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The Washington Post August 31 2017

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Partly sunny 84/62 • Tomorrow: Rain 66/57 B8
Pentagon
chief
shows a
deft touch
SU V1 V2 V3 V4
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31 , 2017
. $2
Second landfall brings more flooding
HARVEY THREAT TO
LOUISIANA LESSENS
A devastated Houston
wonders: What now?
T ODD C . F RANKEL,
A VI S ELK
AND D AVID A . F AHRENTHOLD
BY
Mattis maintains air of
independence without
provoking his boss
orange, tex. — The storm once
“We expect a many-year recovery in Texas, and the federal
government is in this for the
long haul,” Elaine Duke, acting
secretary of the Department of
Homeland
Security,
said
Wednesday.
The federal agencies in
charge of recovery face a task
that is complex and massive in
scale.
“The life-sustainment mission is huge. It’s going to
grow,” said Federal Emergency
known as Hurricane Harvey
made its second landfall Wednesday, dumping record rains and
spurring additional flooding in
small Texas cities that lie east of
now-devastated Houston.
Harvey, which had swung out
into the Gulf of Mexico again,
came ashore at dawn near the
Texas-Louisiana border. Its rain
bands preceded it, pounding Texas towns including Orange, Port
Arthur and Beaumont with more
than two feet.
City officials said much of Port
Arthur — a city of 55,000 — was
underwater. A shelter for flood
victims flooded. One official estimated that water had entered
one-third of the city’s buildings.
“We need boats. We need large
trucks, and we need generators,”
said Tiffany Hamilton, a former
city council member in Port Arthur who was helping to coordinate relief efforts in a city that
also is without electricity. “The
entire city has been flooded.”
About 80 miles to the west, the
Houston area was just beginning
to recover from the biggest rainstorm in the recorded history of
the continental United States.
Nearly 35,000 people were in
shelters. Thousands of homes
were still submerged. At least
37 people were dead, and that
number was climbing as water
receded, revealing the storm’s awful toll.
In Harris County, which includes Houston, authorities finally located a van, containing six
members of a family, that had
been washed off the road days
earlier. All six were dead.
A few miles away, authorities
discovered the bodies of two
friends who had gone out in a
RESPONSE CONTINUED ON A10
HARVEY CONTINUED ON A8
BY G REG J AFFE
AND D AN L AMOTHE
Away from the cameras and
apart from the nonstop drama of
the White House, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis has come to play a
role unlike any other Cabinet
member.
The retired Marine general has
become a force for calm, order
and, in the eyes of the president’s
critics, quiet resistance to some of
President Trump’s most combative and divisive instincts.
In perhaps his greatest political feat, Mattis has maintained
this air of independence without
directly provoking a president
who demands absolute loyalty.
The latest example came
Wednesday
morning
when
Trump vented his frustrations
with North Korea after its latest
missile launch.
“Talking is not the answer!”
Trump tweeted only a few hours
before Mattis met at the Pentagon
with Song Young-moo, South Korea’s defense minister, and delivered a very different message to
reporters.
“We’re never out of diplomatic
solutions,” Mattis said.
On Tuesday night, Mattis
seemed again to be in mitigation
mode when he announced that he
would be pulling together a “panel
MATTIS CONTINUED ON A5
As Trump
embraces
Egypt’s Sissi,
abuses rise
BY
JOE RAEDLE/GETTY IMAGES
Evacuees sit on a boat after being rescued from Harvey’s floodwater on Wednesday in Port Arthur, Tex.
For police, a grim turn on
Houston’s graveyard shift
BY
C HICO H ARLAN
houston — For five days,
they’d been pulling people
from rooftops and vehicles, patrolling the eastern part of this
flooded city on the night shift,
when the next call came in on
the scanner.
“We’ve got a male floating in
the water,” the Harris County
Sheriff’s Office dispatcher said.
“Oh, no,” said Bob Goerlitz,
the deputy behind the wheel.
“A DOA,” said Andrew King,
Busy shelters: As thousands
seek refuge, the wait begins. A6
his partner in the passenger
seat. Dead on arrival.
Goerlitz flicked on the wipers and hit the gas of their
Hummer.
What they knew was an address. What they didn’t know
was a name, or whether the
location was reachable, or
whether the person had been
dead for hours or days. And
what they feared was that this
type of dispatch, their first
since Hurricane Harvey hit the
SEARCH CONTINUED ON A6
A hurdle for helpers: Agencies
are ready but blocked by water. A7
Next are insurance battles
and the search for housing
BY
J OEL A CHENBACH
On the flooded Gulf Coast,
hundreds of thousands of people are facing a housing crisis
that will drag on long after the
floodwater recedes.
Many have little information about the homes they fled.
Now they must navigate the
complex process of filing insurance claims, seeking government assistance and deciding whether to rebuild or pick
up stakes.
Strong medicine: Most hospitals
withstand Harvey’s challenge. A11
Kindness of strangers: Texas
hospitality shines through. A12
Skyrocketing prices: Some
retailers accused of gouging. A18
S UDARSAN R AGHAVAN
Now walking the same
ground as her ancestors
cairo — Two months after Sabry
Mohammed Said vanished, his
body turned up at the morgue. He
had been shot three times and
severely beaten, his family said.
The 46-year-old accountant
and father of five was a rank-andfile member of the Islamist Muslim Brotherhood movement.
Egyptian authorities claimed he
was also a terrorist who was
killed in a June gun battle with
police.
But Said’s daughter Sara Sabry
said he hadn’t been politically
active in three years and had
never been arrested. When relatives went to get a police report,
the precinct had no record of the
incident.
Now, Sabry is convinced that
her father died in the custody of
Egypt’s notorious state security
forces.
“They killed him because he
opposed the government,” said
Sabry, her face somber and
framed by a lime-green headscarf. “Anyone in the opposition
EGYPT CONTINUED ON A17
At 63, Georgetown freshman felt piece was missing
BY
MARVIN JOSEPH/THE WASHINGTON POST
Mélisande Short-Colomb’s ancestors were among the 272 slaves Georgetown’s priests sold in 1838.
IN THE NEWS
LOUAI BESHARA/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
A trip interrupted The U.S. coalition blocked
a convoy of Islamic State fighters from
reaching the Syria-Iraq border. A15
‘Sanctuary’ law on hold A federal judge in
Texas temporarily blocked a state immigration
law that was set to take effect Friday. A3
THE ECONOMY
THE NATION
THE WORLD
The Food and Drug
Administration
cleared a groundbreaking treatment for childhood leukemia. A3
A federal judge excoriated the president’s voter commission for not
sharing documents with
the public. A3
The Trump administration ended a rule that
would have required
large firms to report pay
by race and gender. A16
A GOP congressman
from Florida introduced
an amendment that
would end the Russia investigation of President
Trump. A19
The head of a hospital
in northern India said at
least 217 children have
died there this month
from a variety of causes,
including an encephalitis outbreak. A13
A Putin spokesman
said the Kremlin got an
email about a Moscow
Trump Tower project
during the 2016 presidential campaign but
didn’t respond. A14
President Trump
tweeted that “talking is
not the answer” with
North Korea, hours after
the Pentagon’s latest
missile-defense test. A15
After President Trump
praised Finland for ordering “large amounts”
of Boeing jets, the country’s president denied it
had ordered planes from
the U.S. company. A18
THE REGION
Ruth Odom Bonner,
the daughter of a man
born into slavery and
who helped officially
open the Smithsonian’s
African American Museum, died at 100. B1
Part of President
Trump’s donated salary
will be used to restore a
historic Civil War-era
home in Maryland. B1
A woman trapped after
a car crash was reunited
with the Maryland fire-
T ERRENCE M C C OY
On the first day of class at
Georgetown University, the 63year-old freshman left her dorm
room in Copley Hall, carrying
highlighters and a legal pad.
Walking down the hallway, her
gray-blond dreadlocks swinging,
her heavy bracelets chiming, Mélisande Short-Colomb gave her
schedule a quick look. Today she’d
attend the “Problem of God,” a
course on the existence and nature of God. And tomorrow would
bring the class she’d been waiting
for: African American Studies.
It was a subject with which
Short-Colomb had recently become more acquainted. The his-
fighter who stopped and
saved her life. B1
tory of her own family was the
history of African Americans,
and, she has learned, proof of how
deeply the roots of slavery go in
America’s most prominent institutions and universities.
At a time when the nation is
undergoing a tumultuous reckoning with the darkest chapter of its
past, when protests have turned
deadly in Charlottesville and college students across the country
are demanding the renaming of
buildings linked to slavery, ShortColomb was quietly coming to
terms with her own place in that
sweep of history.
Her ancestors were among the
272 slaves Georgetown priests
LEGACY CONTINUED ON A5
Inside
OBITUARIES
Rollie Massimino,
82, led Villanova over
Georgetown for the 1985
NCAA men’s basketball
title in one of the sport’s
greatest upsets. B5
LOCAL LIVING
STYLE
Twenty years after
Princess Diana’s death,
many think her boys grew
up just fine. A13
Squabblers
How to help your kids
find domestic harmony.
THE WORLD
Two fine lads
The National Book
Festival is further proof
that while some say
books are dying, such
bookish gatherings are
as popular as ever. C1
SPORTS
Navy football players
face a unique situation
in the college ranks:
10 hours a day in dress
shoes. And this has
caused problems. D1
BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A16
COMICS........................................C6
OPINION PAGES ......................... A20
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B5
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS ............................ A13
CONTENT © 2017
The Washington Post / Year 140, No. 269
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
3 8 3 4
A2
EZ
H A P P EN I N G TO D A Y
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
8:30 a.m.
New jobless claims are expected to rise this week to
237,000, compared with 234,000 the previous week. Visit
washingtonpost.com/business for details.
10:30 a.m.
Randy Johnson, senior vice president of labor,
immigration and employee benefits at the U.S.
Chamber of Commerce and the chamber’s chief
economist, J.D. Foster, discuss overtime regulations, joint
employer issues, immigration, economic and labor market
trends, and how pro-growth tax reform could accelerate
economic growth at the chamber’s annual Labor Day
briefing in Washington. For details, visit washingtonpost.
com/business.
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CO R R ECTI O N S
An Aug. 29 Page One article
about how the North American
Free Trade Agreement has
altered the retail culture in
Mexico incorrectly said that
Target has stores there.
An Aug. 29 Metro article about
five medical marijuana
businesses receiving approval
from Maryland regulators
incorrectly described an
investigation into whether a
Minnesota company affiliated
with the Maryland company
MaryMed illegally transported
marijuana across state lines. The
probe was by state regulators
and county prosecutors in
Minnesota, not federal
authorities.
The Washington Post is committed to
correcting errors that appear in the
newspaper. Those interested in
contacting the paper for that purpose
can:
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
AUGUST 31 , 2017
Financial clouds swirling over Capitol
Hurricane
Harvey has
devastated Texas.
Now board your
windows,
evacuate the low
Dana
ground and
Milbank
watch the
WASHINGTON damage it is
poised to unleash
SKETCH
on the nation’s
finances.
Harvey makes landfall in
Washington as soon as next
week, when President Trump is
expected to ask for what could
be tens of billions of dollars in
storm relief. And paying for
storm recovery — probably with
few offsetting spending cuts —
will be but the first blow to
fiscal discipline in what looks to
be a particularly active, and
calamitous, spending season.
After Harvey comes the debt
ceiling, and there are rumblings
that the vote to raise the limit
could actually be used to
increase spending. (In the past,
such votes were used by fiscal
hawks to cut spending.) At the
same time come negotiations to
fund the government for fiscal
year 2018, and indications are
that lawmakers will try to avoid
a shutdown with a short-term
spending deal that will include
a Pentagon slush fund worth
tens of billions of dollars.
Then, still forming over the
Treasury Department is a fiscal
Category 4: Trump and
Republicans have given clear
signs they are moving away
from tax reform (a
simplification of the tax code
that doesn’t necessarily reduce
revenue) toward all-out tax
cuts, financed by deficit
spending.
Trump, who came to power
promising to eliminate the $20
trillion debt, or at least to cut it
in half, is poised to oversee an
exponential increase in that
ERIC GAY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Workers on Wednesday tend to damage from Hurricane Harvey in
Rockport, Tex. Pretty soon, the storm’s effects will be felt in D.C.
debt. Republicans, who came to
power with demands that
Washington tackle the debt
problem, could wind up doing
at least as much damage to the
nation’s finances as the
Democrats did.
Rising are the floodwaters of
hypocrisy. Surging is the tide of
amnesia. Blowing are the gales
of profligacy.
If the red ink rises according
to worst-case forecasts, “we’re
talking additions to the debt in
the trillions,” Maya
MacGuineas, president of the
Committee for a Responsible
Federal Budget, tells me. All
from actions to be taken in the
next few months. “It turns out
the Republican-run Congress is
not willing to make the hard
choices,” she says. “It is a fiscal
free-lunch mentality on all
sides.”
Trump, announcing his taxreform plan in a speech
Wednesday afternoon in
Missouri, left little doubt that
he’d ditch tax reform for tax
cuts. He dutifully read out his
principles from the
teleprompter — which he uses
when giving a speech somebody
else wants him to give — but
made clear that he isn’t
expecting Democratic
cooperation. “We must lower
our taxes, and your senator,
[Democrat] Claire McCaskill,
she must do this for you,”
Trump said. “And if she doesn’t
do it for you, you have to vote
her out of office.” Democrats,
Trump said, “are looking to
obstruct tax cuts and tax
reform, just like they
obstructed so many other
things.”
There is no way to pass a
comprehensive tax-reform plan
of the sort Ronald Reagan
secured — a simplified code,
lower rates and closed
loopholes — without bipartisan
support. And Democrats want
tax reform that doesn’t add to
the deficit and doesn’t benefit
the wealthiest 1 percent of
households. But Republicans
could pass a simple, deficitmushrooming tax cut without
Democratic support.
Trump’s partisan speech
confirms other indications that
his administration has
essentially abandoned tax
reform in favor of cuts.
Treasury Secretary Steven
Mnuchin and chief economic
adviser Gary Cohn have not
been reaching out to
Democrats, party leaders
complain. And Senate Majority
Leader Mitch McConnell has
indicated he plans to use the
same “reconciliation” resolution
he used on the failed attempt to
repeal Obamacare to allow for a
party-line vote on a tax cut.
That process would nominally
prevent Republicans from
ballooning the deficit — but
they could avoid such concerns
by using the well-worn gimmick
of having the tax cut expire
before 10 years.
MacGuineas calls this “the
predictable spiral from tax
reform to tax cuts.”
Of course, if Trump and
Republican leaders were to
come right out with a pure tax
cut that would add trillions to
the debt, the blatant hypocrisy
might swamp the effort. But
what if that were to come after
months in which other, smaller
storms had already saturated
the ground and weakened the
roots of fiscal responsibility?
First, a Harvey recovery bill
without the spending “offsets”
so many Republicans
demanded of previous bills.
Then, a debt-limit increase,
possibly secured with promises
to spend more money on
defense (which would buy GOP
votes) and domestic priorities
(for Democratic votes). Next, a
spending deal that busts
previously agreed budget caps
by allowing an extra $70 billion
or so for an “Overseas
Contingency Operations” slush
fund. Eventually, a reckless tax
cut doesn’t seem so crazy —
particularly with midterm
elections looming and no
accomplishments to show.
When it rains, it pours.
Twitter: @Milbank
DIGEST
‘Sanctuary city’ sues
U.S. attorney general
Philadelphia on Wednesday
became the latest “sanctuary city”
to sue Attorney General Jeff
Sessions over what officials say
are unconstitutional immigration
restrictions placed on a major
federal grant.
The city is asking the court to
stop Sessions from adding these
conditions to its Edward Byrne
Memorial Justice Assistance
grant, which it uses to pay police
overtime, upgrade equipment
and courtroom technology and
train officers.
Philadelphia’s “sanctuary”
status has made it a frequent
target of the attorney general.
Sessions in July said cities and
states can receive the grants only
if they allow federal immigration
officials to access detention
facilities, and that they must
provide advance notice when
someone who is in the country
illegally is about to be released.
Sessions called out nine
jurisdictions, including
Philadelphia, as not complying
with federal law regarding
immigration policy. Chicago, Los
Angeles and San Francisco also
have sued over the grant
conditions.
Philadelphia Mayor Jim
Kenney has frequently defended
the city’s law enforcement
approach to illegal immigration,
and the municipality has
maintained it is in compliance
with federal requirements.
The lawsuit notes that as a rule,
Philadelphia officers do not ask
residents about their
immigration status.
— Associated Press
INSULATION SALE
CALIFORNIA
Sheriff’s deputy killed
in gunfire at hotel
A sheriff’s deputy was killed
and two California Highway
Patrol officers were wounded in
Sacramento on Wednesday when
at least one person opened fire on
officers from a hotel room,
officials said.
Officers searching for a suspect
in a car theft case were knocking
at the door of a room in a Ramada
Inn when someone inside fired
through the door and walls,
wounding two California
Highway Patrol officers,
Sacramento County Sheriff’s
Department spokesman Tony
Turnbull told reporters.
As law enforcement officers
swarmed the area, a man
exchanged gunfire with police
from a rear balcony of the room,
fatally wounding Sheriff’s Deputy
Robert French, 52, Sacramento
County Sheriff Scott Jones said.
The Highway Patrol officers are
DAVE KETTERING/IOWA TELEGRAPH HERALD/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A fisherman tests the waters of the Mississippi River on Chaplain Schmitt Island on Wednesday in
Dubuque, Iowa. Officials are planning renovations to the city-owned island.
Beat The Heat and
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expected to survive.
The man then drove off,
crashed the car a few miles away
and again exchanged fire with
police before he was struck by
gunfire and arrested, Turnbull
said. Two women who were
suspected to be involved in car
theft were arrested before the
gunfire broke out, Turnbull said.
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WEST VIRGINIA
Lesbian couple settles
with clerk’s office
A lesbian couple is receiving a
public apology and $10,000 in
damages from a county clerk’s
office in West Virginia where they
were disparaged when applying
for a marriage license last year,
the couple’s attorneys said
Wednesday.
Amanda Abramovich and
Samantha Brookover sued Gilmer
County Deputy Clerk Debbie
Allen and Clerk Jean Butcher,
saying Allen told the couple while
processing their application that
they were an “abomination,” what
they were doing was wrong and
that God would “deal” with them.
As part of the settlement, the
clerk’s office has agreed to issue a
public apology in a news release
that also will announce the
monetary settlement and include
a promise to refrain from such
treatment in the future,
according to a statement from the
Americans United for Separation
of Church and State and the
Mayer Brown law firm, the two
groups that filed the suit.
Judge Irene Keeley dismissed
the case Wednesday after both
sides reached a settlement.
— Associated Press
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THURSDAY, AUGUST 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
M2
Politics & the Nation
FDA clears first gene-altering therapy for child leukemia
Landmark action
opens new chapter
in cancer treatment
BY L AURIE M C G INLEY
AND C AROLYN Y . J OHNSON
The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved a
groundbreaking cancer treatment for childhood leukemia
that uses patients’ genetically altered immune cells to fight the
disease. It is the first gene therapy to be cleared in the United
States — a “historic” action, the
agency said — and one with
major ramifications for patients
with cancer as well as other
diseases.
The decision gave the green
light to the Novartis drug Kymriah for children and young adults
whose leukemia doesn’t respond
to traditional approaches. That
group numbers only 600 or so
patients a year in the United
States. But the one-time, customized treatment also is being tested for a range of diseases including non-Hodgkin lymphoma,
multiple myeloma and solid tumors.
The therapy’s approval signals
a new chapter in treating cancer
by mobilizing the body’s immune
system and by using modified
genes to fight disease.
“We’re entering a new frontier
in medical innovation with the
ability to reprogram a patient’s
own cells to attack a deadly cancer,” FDA Commissioner Scott
Gottlieb said. “New technologies
such as gene and cell therapies
hold out the potential to transform medicine” and cure intractable illnesses. He said companies are pursuing hundreds of
experimental treatments involving gene therapy products.
Unlike some experimental
gene approaches, the Novartis
treatment, called CAR T-cell therapy, doesn’t replace disease-causing genes with healthy ones. Instead, in a complicated and personalized process, white blood
cells called T cells are extracted
from the patient and sent to a
manufacturing center to be altered to include a new gene that
directs the T cells to target and
kill leukemia cells. Those T cells,
an important part of the immune
system, then are infused back
into the patient.
Carl June, a professor at the
University of Pennsylvania who
led the treatment’s development,
said he thinks it will be a gamechanger not just for children with
leukemia but potentially for all
cancer patients. Experiments on
mice indicate that an array of
cancers respond to the therapy,
he said, although the big question
is “how long this will take to
come about for humans.”
The Novartis therapy is ap-
BRENT STIRTON/NOVARTIS PHARMACEUTICALS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Human T cells belonging to cancer patients arrive at a Novartis
Pharmaceuticals facility in Morris Plains, N.J., in 2015.
proved for patients who are up to
25 years old and have B-cell acute
lymphoblastic leukemia that
doesn’t respond to treatment or
that returns after initial therapy
— as happens in as many as
20 percent of patients, according
to the FDA.
Novartis told reporters that
the treatment would cost
$475,000; that makes it one of the
most expensive of the new highpriced oncology therapies. Critics
of high drug prices immediately
expressed displeasure, noting
that the federal government has
spent millions of dollars on basic
research paving the way for the
approach. A group called Patients
for Affordable Drugs called the
cost “excessive.”
The FDA action was expected
after a panel of outside advisers
this summer recommended approval in enthusiastic terms. In a
pivotal study of more than five
dozen patients, researchers reported, more than 80 percent of
those who received the therapy
went into remission. A small per-
centage relapsed, and doctors are
following the rest to see how long
the drug’s effect will last.
Kevin Curran, a pediatric oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New
York, called the new treatment
“exciting for pediatric oncology”
and said he hopes it will make
bone-marrow transplants obsolete. Elizabeth Jaffee, an oncologist at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore and president-elect of the
American Association for Cancer
Research, called the medication a
“major advance that is going to
help kids,” who often are the last
to benefit from cancer breakthroughs.
The treatment can cause serious side effects, including high
fevers, plummeting blood pressure and neurological problems.
Often, those complications can
be successfully treated with a
drug called tocilizumab.
Because of the risks involved in
using the cancer drug, the FDA is
limiting its distribution to specially trained hospitals and medical staff.
In their call with reporters on
Wednesday, Novartis executives
said they expect to have 20 certified medical centers ready within
a month and 32 by the end of the
year. They said the company is
collaborating with the federal
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to develop a pricing
model based on how well the
drug works; a patient will not be
charged for the therapy if it
doesn’t show signs of working
within a month.
Of the patients in the United
States who are eligible for Kymriah, most are children who have
insurance coverage through their
parents, Medicaid or the federal
Children’s Health Insurance Program. Novartis has set up a patient-assistance program that
can be used to help families that
lack insurance or have coverage
that falls short for this treatment.
It also has a program to assist
with travel expenses.
Moving forward, Novartis
chief executive Joe Jimenez said,
the company plans to price the
drug differently, depending on
which disease it is treating. If
Kymriah is later approved for
another type of cancer in which it
is less effective, for example, the
price could theoretically be lower.
Novartis plans to file for FDA
approval later this year of Kymriah for a type of non-Hodgkin
lymphoma that affects adults.
California-based Kite Pharma,
which is being acquired by Gilead
Sciences, also is seeking FDA
approval for its CAR T-cell therapy for lymphoma patients. That
approval is expected later this
fall.
laurie.mcginley@washpost.com
carolyn.johnson@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/to-your-health
Federal judge blocks Texas’s state immigration law outlawing sanctuary cities
Statute would have
punished officials for not
aiding deportation efforts
BY
M ARIA S ACCHETTI
A federal judge in Texas has
temporarily blocked parts of a
severe state immigration law that
was supposed to take effect Friday
and would have outlawed sanctuary cities and penalized local officials who do not cooperate with
federal deportation efforts.
The decision Wednesday by
U.S. District Judge Orlando Garcia
in San Antonio delivers a temporary blow to the state’s campaign
— backed by the Trump administration — to compel localities to
detain immigrants so federal
agents can take them into custody.
In a 94-page decision, Garcia
wrote that parts of the Texas law
are likely to be found unconstitutional. He enjoined the state from
punishing local officials, infringing on their right to free speech
and forcing them to detain immi-
grants for federal immigration officials, an act that is currently
voluntary. And he wrote that cities
and towns had provided “overwhelming” and “ample” evidence
that cooperating with immigration officials will “erode public
trust and make many communities and neighborhoods less safe”
as well as harm the state economically.
“Indeed, at the end of the day,
the Legislature is free to ignore
the pleas of city and county officials, along with local police departments, who are in the trenches,” Garcia wrote. “The Court cannot and does not second guess the
Legislature. However, the State
may not exercise its authority in a
manner that violates the United
States Constitution.”
Gov. Greg Abbott (R) and Texas
Attorney General Ken Paxton (R)
vowed to appeal. “Today’s decision
makes Texas’ communities less
safe,” Abbott said in a statement.
The law would fine local officials who refused to assist federal
agencies in working to deport illegal immigrants up to $25,500 a
day. Elected and appointed officials could lose their jobs, and
police and sheriffs could go to jail
for up to a year on misdemeanor
charges.
Garcia’s decision comes as Texas, home to an estimated 1.6 million undocumented immigrants,
is grappling with historic flooding
and dozens of deaths following
Hurricane Harvey. It also lands
amid growing fears that the
Trump administration will end an
Obama-era program that has
granted nearly 800,000 immigrants brought to the United
States as children reprieves
from deportation.
Texas is one of 10 states that
have threatened to sue the Trump
administration if it does not begin
to phase out the deportation-relief
program by next week.
Abbott said the Texas statute
would increase public safety by
preventing local law enforcement
from releasing foreign-born residents from jails or prisons before
immigration agents can take them
into custody.
The small border city of El Cenizo sued to stop the law, and was
soon joined by Houston, San Antonio, Dallas, Austin and other
cities. They said the law could lead
to racial profiling, make immigrants afraid to report crime and
ignite a backlash that could devastate the state economically.
The U.S. Justice Department
sided with Texas in defending the
law in federal court.
President Trump signed an executive order in January that
threatened to withhold federal
funds from sanctuary cities. A federal judge later halted that order,
saying it was overly broad. The
administration has continued to
try to steer funding away from
cities and towns that refuse to
help enforce immigration law.
El Cenizo Mayor Raul Reyes
said Wednesday’s ruling left him
in tears, thinking about the hatefilled messages he’s received for
filing the lawsuit, and the immigrants who will rest more easily
come Friday — at least temporari-
ly. “This is great news for thousands of families here in Texas,”
he said.
Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner, who is touring flooded areas
of the city, tweeted: “Happy to
learn a federal judge blocked the
Texas law aimed at making local
police immigration enforcers.
Need them for fighting local
crime.”
maria.sacchetti@washpost.com
Judge decries Trump’s voter-fraud panel
BY
S PENCER S . H SU
A federal judge on Wednesday
tore into President Trump’s voter
commission for reneging on a
promise to fully disclose public
documents before a July 19 meeting, ordering the government to
meet new transparency requirements and eliciting an apology
from administration lawyers.
U.S. District Judge Colleen
Kollar-Kotelly of Washington said
the Election Integrity Commission released only an agenda and
proposed bylaws before its first
meeting at the White House complex last month.
But once gathered, commissioners had thick binders that
included documents the public
had not seen, including a specially prepared report and a 381-page
“database” purporting to show
1,100 cases of voter fraud, both
from the think tank Heritage
Foundation. The group also received a typed list of possible
topics to address from the panel
vice chairman, Kansas Secretary
of State Kris W. Kobach.
Kollar-Kotelly said the panel’s
after-the-fact argument was “incredible” when it said it did not
believe documents prepared by
individual commissioners for the
July meeting had to have been
posted in advance.
“You didn’t completely live up
to the government’s representations,” Kollar-Kotelly told Justice
Department lawyers at Wednesday’s hearing. “I want to know
what things are not going to be
covered” by the government’s
pledges, she said.
The exchange was the latest
controversy surrounding the
commission, which has roiled
states with a sweeping request for
the voting information of more
than 150 million registered voters. Trump created the commission in May after repeatedly suggesting that millions of illegal
voters cost him the popular vote
against Democratic presidential
nominee Hillary Clinton. Studies
and state officials of both parties
have found no evidence of widespread voting fraud.
Kollar-Kotelly directed the
commission to detail what documents it believes are subject to
disclosure ahead of its next meeting, set for Sept. 12 in New Hampshire, and how it is identifying
and handling them.
Justice Department civil division attorney Elizabeth J. Shapiro
apologized for what she called a
good-faith error by staffers, saying the panel wrote members
Tuesday informing them of disclosure obligations, “mak[ing]
clear there should be no surprises.”
“It was truly an honest misunderstanding on the part of the
commission with respect to its
obligations to share information,”
Shapiro said, based on what she
said was guidance from the Office
of Legal Counsel. “It was not an
attempt to hide anything. It fully
intends to be as transparent as
possible. . . . I wanted to convey
our apologies and our sincere
regret for that.”
Administration officials have
said 30 states have agreed to
share at least some voter data,
adding that the commission requested only publicly available
data and would anonymize any
information it released.
Many state leaders from both
parties have objected to what they
regard as the potential to reveal
personal information, suppress
voter participation and encroach
on states’ oversight of voting laws.
Critics say Kobach has compared the commission’s work to
efforts to pool state data and
called for collecting “whatever
data there is” on individuals’ potential voting eligibility within
the federal government, including information kept by the departments of Justice and Homeland Security and the U.S. Census
Bureau.
Shapiro said the commission
has gotten off to a “chaotic start,”
saying the panel had not known
Trump planned to appear at its
first meeting and learned of his
intention only the night before or
on the day of the session, “so
arrangements had to be made.”
“There was a little bit of unknown and a little bit of disorganization in terms of how the
meeting would happen,” Shapiro
said, while also acknowledging
staffers were aware ahead of time
that one commissioner planned
to make a presentation.
In an evening statement, Kobach said the court denied most
of the plaintiffs’ demands for
what he called “an unreasonable
amount of discovery from the
commission . . . including their
most burdensome ones.”
The federal court hearing came
in a lawsuit filed by the Lawyers’
Committee for Civil Rights Under
Law that is challenging the commission’s compliance with federal open government laws. It is one
of seven pending suits, Shapiro
said, including five that have
sought to block some aspect of the
commission’s activity.
spencer.hsu@washpost.com
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A4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
AUGUST 31 , 2017
From some Democrats in Trump states, little resistance
Indiana’s Donnelly casts
himself as centrist who
will work with president
BY
M IKE D E B ONIS
winchester, ind. — The worker’s message for Sen. Joe Donnelly was blunt: “President Trump, I
think, has got a long road ahead
of him,” he said, “and I hope you
can back him on some things,
because I think he has the country’s best interest at heart.”
Donnelly assured the man that
he is working with Trump on
creating jobs and combating
opioid abuse. Looking out on the
construction of a railroad underpass in this rural town, he said,
“Anywhere we’ve got some
common-sense stuff, count me
in.”
“I hope so,” said the worker,
who declined to give his name to
a reporter. “Because if not, then
I’m going to be voting for someone else.”
It’s a message Donnelly, a burly
Indiana Democrat, is hearing a
lot. It’s one he and other Democrats seeking reelection next year
in states Trump won are responding to in a way that puts them at
odds with the leadership and
base of their own party: by promising to work with this president.
Donnelly is one of 10 such
Democratic senators — and one
of five in states where Trump’s
margin entered the double digits.
(In Indiana, Trump won by 19
percent of the vote.) They face a
seemingly impossible challenge:
to appeal to Trump voters while
retaining the support of antiTrump Democrats. They must do
so not only for their own political
futures but for their party to win
back control of the Senate and
compete in states rich with the
white working-class voters who
drifted to Trump in 2016.
Key congressional forecasters
consider Donnelly’s race a tossup, even without a clear Republican opponent. The same goes for
the races of Democratic senators
in Missouri, Montana, North Dakota, West Virginia and other
states — all caught between their
constituents’ support for Trump
and a national Democratic brand
increasingly centered on resistance to the president.
It’s a delicate dance for many
of them. Sen. Claire McCaskill
(Mo.) described her approach at a
recent town hall: “My job isn’t to
fight the president. My job is to
DON KNIGHT/ANDERSON HERALD BULLETIN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sen. Joe Donnelly greets Rebecca Crumes at a United Auto Workers hall in Anderson, Ind., at the start
of his reelection campaign. Promising to work with Trump puts him at odds with his party’s leadership.
fight for you.” It was on full
display last week as Donnelly
kicked off his reelection campaign, touring the state in an
Indiana-built RV.
At the highway project, Donnelly basked in the praise of the
local mayor, who said that if the
senator hadn’t made a phone call
to the railroad, the project might
still be entangled in red tape.
That’s the kind of prudent,
results-oriented governing Donnelly ran on when he pulled off
his unlikely 2012 victory, and it’s
the image he hopes voters will
have in mind when they cast their
ballots next year. But he is frequently reminded that his reelection isn’t going to be about just
roads and bridges.
A few hours before inspecting
the underpass, Donnelly rose in a
union hall in the factory suburb
of Anderson and denounced the
violent white-nationalist rally in
Charlottesville — and, by implication, the president’s tepid response to it.
“There is no place for white
supremacy, for neo-Nazis, for
KKK in the United States of
America,” Donnelly declared to a
standing ovation. He later told
reporters that Trump’s remarks
were “way off the mark” and that
he hoped the president “might
choose his words more wisely on
those types of issues.”
That’s as far as Donnelly went
— and he otherwise steered clear
of open conflict with Trump,
touting instead his own bipartisan initiatives to crack down on
corporate outsourcing, address
the opioid epidemic and beef up
military readiness and services
for veterans.
In an interview, Donnelly relayed what he’s heard from Indiana voters over the past eight
months: “ ‘Be with him, and don’t
try to give him a hard time just
because he’s the president.’ That’s
pretty universal.”
As much as any congressional
Democrat, Donnelly has complied with those wishes. He has
voted for more Trump Cabinet
nominees than all but four other
Democratic senators and was one
of three Democrats to vote to
confirm Neil M. Gorsuch as a
Supreme Court justice. He also
has sided with Republicans on
some efforts to overturn environmental regulations.
Donnelly has kept his Washington profile low, ignoring reporters in the Capitol hallways
and eschewing the cable news
circuit, preferring instead a robust schedule of local TV and
radio appearances back in Indiana.
But he also has been a team
player for Democrats on most key
issues — including preserving the
Affordable Care Act. That gives
GOP leaders in both Washington
and Indiana what they say is a
clear path to reclaiming his seat
in 2018 by tying him to the
national party.
“We know the Trump voters,
and they are not Donnelly voters,” said Kyle Hupfer, chairman
of the Indiana Republican Party.
“The reality is, he’s not supportive of the president, and voters in
Indiana are going to know that.”
Reps. Luke Messer and Todd
Rokita are giving up their safe
House seats to take on Donnelly,
and five other Republicans have
also declared their candidacies.
Donnelly’s air of vulnerability
is partly rooted in the circumstances of his 2012 victory.
He won comfortably against
Republican Richard Mourdock,
then the state treasurer, whose
campaign imploded after he suggested in a debate that a pregnancy resulting from a rape was
“something that God intended to
happen.”
But political observers in Indiana say it would be a mistake to
dismiss Donnelly’s victory. They
credited a skillful campaign that
positioned the Democrat as a
bipartisan problem-solver — including TV spots where he literally stood in the middle of a road to
play up his centrist outlook. Current public polling is scarce, but
strategists cite past surveys and
anecdotal evidence indicating
that Donnelly has built a genuine
bipartisan following.
“Donnelly won by six points
because of the rape comment, but
he didn’t win because of the rape
comment,” said Christine Matthews, who polled the 2012 race
and has worked for numerous
Republican candidates in Indiana.
Donnelly’s message is well calibrated to a state that is 85 percent
white and has seen a decline in
low-skill manufacturing jobs,
and where three-quarters of the
population has no more than a
high school degree. It involves a
major focus on the effects of
foreign trade, highlighting his
work on the Armed Services and
Agriculture committees, and a
hefty dose of reverence for service members and veterans.
In Winchester, he visited a
facility for homeless veterans,
where he pressed administrators
and local officials on how the
federal government could do
more to help them and quizzed
the residents on the challenges
they faced.
Greg Beumer, a Republican
state lawmaker, attended the
event and had little ill to say
about Donnelly.
Many
Republicans
were
“scratching their heads,” he said,
at why Messer and Rokita would
risk safe seats to take on Donnelly, “who by and large has done a
very good job of being that moderate voice in the Senate.”
Beumer wouldn’t say whether
he would vote for the Democrat,
but he said moderate Republican
voters will be “up for grabs” next
year. “I would say if I were in his
shoes, he’s done exactly what I
would have done,” Beumer said.
Donnelly has been most outspoken on economic issues, introducing an End Outsourcing
Act and waging war against Carrier Corp.’s decision to move hundreds of jobs from an Indianapolis furnace factory to Mexico — a
crusade Trump later joined, culminating in a dramatic announcement in November that
the then-president-elect had brokered a deal to keep most of the
jobs intact.
Those bombastic promises did
not completely pan out — Carrier
began laying off more than 600
workers last month — but while
other Democrats have lambasted
Trump for a bait-and-switch,
Donnelly doesn’t. “There’s more
jobs that stayed after he got
involved than there was before he
got involved,” he said.
Donnelly has taken a recent
bruising on the outsourcing issue, thanks to an Associated
Press report in July that revealed
that an arts-and-crafts company
owned by the Donnelly family
uses Mexican labor for some of its
products. The senator owns a
minority stake in the company.
The AP reported this week that
Donnelly is finalizing the sale of
his share of the company, Stewart
Superior Corp., and donating the
proceeds to charity, but the political toll has come swiftly: The
National Republican Senatorial
Committee has already started
trying to brand Donnelly as
“Mexico Joe.”
It hired a mariachi band to
play outside his campaign kickoff
in Anderson last week.
In an interview, Donnelly said
he has had no active role in the
company in two decades and he
learned of the outsourcing only
when he was contacted for the AP
report. “The subject never came
up” in conversations with family,
he said, adding, “I was disappointed when I found out.”
Donnelly noted that a company facility in Indiana has added
jobs in recent years and said his
record on trade speaks for itself:
“I’m more than happy to have
this discussion any place, any
time.”
For now, it is Trump — not
outsourcing — that appears to
weigh more heavily on many
Hoosiers’ minds. Kaye Whitehead, a farmer and former Republican county party chairman,
attended a Donnelly campaign
event on a Hartford City farm to
hear his thoughts on the upcoming farm bill — and on Trump.
“We need to support the president of the United States no
matter who it is,” Whitehead said.
“I really think he’s got some good
ideas, but nobody gets on board.”
As the sun beat down on the
cornfield outside, Donnelly stood
inside a pole barn and rattled
through his efforts to maintain
crop insurance programs and his
opposition to an Obama administration regulation that applied
Clean Water Act protections to
small streams.
Whitehead listened closely
and said afterward that she was
willing to give Donnelly a chance.
But she said she would be watching closely, with a particular eye
on health care and taxes.
“There’s a lot of issues on the
table that the senator will have to
vote for or against, and I’m
interested in seeing how he proceeds.”
mike.debonis@washpost.com
Trump calls on Congress to push broad tax cuts — without giving specifics
Speech signals a shift
in strategy to advance
his legislative priorities
BY D AMIAN P ALETTA
AND J OHN W AGNER
springfield, mo. — President
Trump on Wednesday called on
Congress to pass sweeping tax
cuts he said would unleash the
economy and lead to higher wages for all Americans, leaning hard
into conservative economic theories as he tries to revive his domestic agenda.
Trump, speaking at a manufacturing company here, provided
few details of what the tax plan
should look like, saying simply
that he wants to cut taxes for
companies and families and to
encourage firms to move operations to the United States from
places such as China.
Unlike his boisterous rallies,
Trump rarely strayed from carefully worded remarks. White
House officials hope the speech
will energize GOP lawmakers to
push a tax cut plan into law.
Within minutes of its conclusion,
numerous Cabinet agencies, including the departments of State
and Interior, issued statements
claiming Trump’s tax outline
would benefit virtually every corner of the economy. Trump plans
to meet with GOP leaders on
Tuesday to press them to move
quickly.
While Trump’s event was short
on specifics and largely overshadowed by continuing coverage of
Hurricane Harvey, it signaled a
shift in his strategy for advancing
his priorities on Capitol Hill.
During the failed push to repeal and replace the Affordable
Care Act, Trump seemed disinterested in fully utilizing the bully
pulpit provided by his office. He
frequently spoke about what he
saw as the “disaster” of Obamacare but did little to make an
affirmative case for why it should
be replaced with unpopular Republican-drafted legislation.
On tax reform, the White
House is planning a series of
pitches by Trump, building on his
remarks Wednesday.
One senior Republican congressional aide said Trump’s
speech was exactly the kind of
message lawmakers want to see
the president deliver and wished
he had started sooner.
“I think we need presidential
leadership on this issue,” said the
aide, who requested anonymity to
speak more candidly. “He needs
to engage his base of support and
create some urgency.”
But while the White House
seems to be working more closely
with congressional GOP leaders
on tax legislation than during the
health-care debate, signs of potential tensions were evident
Wednesday with Trump leaving
little doubt where he would place
blame if this effort also fails.
“I am fully committed to working with Congress to get this job
done. And I don’t want to be
disappointed by Congress, do you
understand me?” he said. “Do you
understand? Understand? Congress. I think Congress is going to
make a comeback. I hope so.”
The White House is also looking to win the support of moderate Democratic senators facing
tough reelection fights next year,
believing it will be more difficult
for them to vote against tax legislation than it was for them to
reject Republican attempts to
scrap the ACA.
To further that effort, Trump
brought a hammer rather than an
olive branch to Wednesday’s
event, saying there could be political consequences for Democratic
Sen. Claire McCaskill (Mo.), who
is up for reelection next November, if she doesn’t support the bill.
“She must do this for you, and
if she doesn’t do it for you, you
have to vote her out of office,”
Trump said.
The speech Wednesday outlined broad principles but did
little to advance the debate over
the specifics of what the tax plan
should look like. Trump even
seemed to waver on one of the few
specific tax ideas he has advanced, saying that “ideally” the
corporate tax rate would be lowered from 35 percent to 15 per-
JIM WATSON/AGENCE FRANCE PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
In his speech in Springfield, Mo., on Wednesday, President Trump said: “I am fully committed to
working with Congress to get this job done. And I don’t want to be disappointed by Congress.”
cent as he has previously proposed. Many GOP aides on Capitol Hill believe it will be difficult
to get the rate below 20 percent.
The speech had Trump’s trademark lofty promises — he said
numerous times the tax-cut plan
he envisioned would reshape the
U.S. economy and the morale of
workers who “will love getting up
in the morning. They will love
going to work.”
Trump closely followed the
economic vision many Republicans have tried to advance for
years — namely that cutting corporate taxes will grow the economy, lead companies to pay workers higher wages, spur those
workers to spend more money
and help grow the economy.
But budget analysts have
found a large portion of the benefits from what Trump has outlined would be enjoyed by the
wealthiest Americans. The Tax
Policy Center estimates that
40 percent of the tax cuts would
go toward the top 1 percent of U.S.
“This is going to be one
of the biggest fights of
the next three, four
months, and Democrats
are ready for it.”
Senate Minority Leader
Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.)
earners, or those who make more
than $732,000 a year.
On the corporate tax cuts,
Trump echoed an argument that
members of both political parties
have made for years, saying that
the 35 percent rate must be
brought down. President Barack
Obama proposed lowering it to
28 percent, and House Republi-
cans have proposed bringing it
down to 20 percent.
Lawmakers have often split
when debating lowering the tax
rate because they can’t agree on
what tax breaks to jettison to
make up for the lost revenue that
would come from lowering rates.
The Obama administration
found that the “effective” tax rate
paid by corporations, when factoring in all the deductions and
credits they claim, averaged
20 percent in 2011 and 2012.
The big tax-rate disparity between the United States and other
countries has lured American
firms to relocate overseas, to places like Ireland, so they could
benefit from a lower rate on their
earnings. Trump has said he
wants to stop this, in part, by
lowering the U.S. corporate rate
and removing the financial benefit from such a relocation.
Alan Auerbach, director of the
Center for Tax Policy and Public
Finance at the University of California at Berkeley, said some of
the ideas Trump floated during
the speech could boost economic
growth and potentially grow wages, but it would depend on how
the tax changes were designed
and structured. He also said it
would depend greatly on whether
the tax plan would add to the
government debt. Trump didn’t
mention his plan’s impact on the
debt or the deficit during the
speech.
“It’s hard to have a consensus
about a policy about which you
know very little,” Auerbach said.
Trump on Wednesday also said
that lowering the corporate tax
rate would help lure trillions of
dollars in overseas earnings back
to the United States, further helping the economy grow. Many
Democrats have expressed skepticism about this proposal, saying
companies would use the money
to pay senior executives and
shareholders and not hire workers or make new investments.
Senate
Minority
Leader
Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) said
Wednesday that Democrats were
open to discussing changes to the
tax code but they would oppose
any plan that is not squarely
focused on the middle class and
that would add to government
debt, saying it would lead to
Republicans later targeting programs such as Social Security or
Medicare for savings.
“This is going to be one of the
biggest fights of the next three,
four months, and Democrats are
ready for it,” Schumer said.
Republicans are hoping to pass
a bill through the House Ways
and Means Committee in October
and then possibly through the full
House of Representatives in November. The focus would then
move to the Senate, where Republicans are divided on how to
proceed.
“It all comes down to one thing
— and that’s the same thing
health care came down to,” said
Steve Moore, who was one of
Trump’s top economic advisers
during the campaign. “How do
you get to 50 votes in the Senate?”
damian.paletta@washpost.com
john.wagner@washpost.com
Paletta reported from Washington.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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Mattis avoids the spotlight — and the ire of a president who demands loyalty
MATTIS FROM A1
of experts” to provide advice on
how to implement Trump’s ordered ban on transgender troops.
Trump announced the ban last
month in a series of tweets that
caught the military’s top brass
largely by surprise. By contrast,
Mattis’s statement promised an
exhaustive study and also seemed
to leave the door open to allowing
some transgender troops who are
serving to stay in uniform.
Perhaps the most striking example of Mattis’s inclination to
tamp down deep political divisions came in the wake of the
recent violence in Charlottesville.
Mattis was recorded in a video
uploaded to Facebook speaking
off the cuff to a small group of
American troops in Jordan. “Our
country, right now, it’s got problems that we don’t have in the
military,” Mattis told them. “You
just hold the line until our country gets back to understanding
and respecting each other and
showing it.”
The comments were interpreted by some as a critique of
Trump’s leadership.
Mattis and his top advisers
blanch at suggestions that he is
resisting the wishes of his commander in chief. As defense secretary, Mattis has steered away
from the public spotlight, avoiding Pentagon news conferences
and on-camera interviews. And
he has expressed frustration with
those who scrutinize his remarks
for signs of disagreement with
Trump.
In his often terse public statements, the defense secretary has
repeatedly noted that he is not
the ultimate decision-maker on
matters of military or foreign
policy.
“The American people elected
the commander in chief,” Mattis
said after Trump’s tweets last
month on the new transgender
policy. “They didn’t elect me. . . .
He has that authority and responsibility. So that was fully within
his responsibility.”
Mattis is far from the only
senior Trump administration official who has seemed to be at
odds with the president of late.
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson
and National Economic Council
Director Gary Cohn both distanced themselves from Trump’s
remarks following the Charlottesville violence for their failure to
unequivocally condemn hate
groups.
“The president speaks for himself,” Tillerson said coolly of
Trump’s public statements. Tillerson and Cohn’s comments both
fueled new tensions with the
White House and fed speculation
that they could soon be gone from
the administration.
But Mattis’s deft political touch
has surprised many who watched
him fall out of favor with the
Obama White House. As a fourstar general, Mattis pushed for
the Obama administration to
take a harder line against Iran’s
destabilizing behavior in places
such as Yemen, Iraq and Syria.
Ultimately, his aggressive style
alienated the White House and
the president he was serving.
In the Trump administration
he has managed to press his
differences without provoking a
backlash.
In many instances his oppos-
ing view seems shaped by his
more than four decades of military service in the Marine Corps
than any overt political disagreement with the president.
Some analysts speculated, for
example, that Mattis’s slow-rolling resistance to Trump’s order on
transgender troops may be motivated by a deeply held military
bias for consistency and continuity over sudden shifts in policy.
“He’s clearly saying he’s not
going to be a political agent of
change inside the military,” said
retired Lt. Gen. David Barno, who
led U.S. troops in Afghanistan
and is now a professor at American University.
Others interpreted Mattis’s response as an expression of respect for the oath that transgender troops took to serve.
During his confirmation hearings in January, Mattis offered
unflinching support for the service of gay and transgender troops.
“Frankly, I’ve never cared much
about two consenting adults and
who they go to bed with,” he said
in response to a question from
Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.).
Even his unscripted remarks to
troops in Jordan, which were
interpreted by many as a direct
rebuke of Trump’s response to the
violence
in
Charlottesville,
echoed an alarm Mattis has previously sounded.
This spring, Mattis was asked
in a rare interview with New
Yorker magazine about his biggest worries in his new job. “The
lack of political unity in America,”
Mattis replied. “The lack of fundamental friendliness.”
He sounded a similar theme in
a commencement speech at the
U.S. Military Academy at West
Point, N.Y. “For those privileged
to wear the cloth of our nation, to
serve in the United States Army,
you stand the ramparts, unapologetic, apolitical, defending our
experiment in self-governance —
and you hold the line,” he told the
graduates.
Mattis’s public worries about
the state of political debate in the
United States and the climate of
divisiveness reflect a long-standing concern of the military. Political infighting has stymied efforts
to produce a long-term budget
plan for the Pentagon that Democrats and Republicans have described as essential.
“It’s incredibly frustrating to
the military that we can’t put
aside our political differences for
the greater good of the country,”
said Kathleen H. Hicks, a top
Pentagon official in the Obama
administration. “They don’t understand it.”
In Mattis’s recent call for the
military to “hold the line” until
the country comes to its senses,
Hicks heard a common refrain.
“It’s what they all say to each
other to pep themselves up,” she
said of the military brass.
Other analysts heard in the
statement something darker — a
fundamental disconnect between
the tight-lipped Pentagon chief
and his president.
“I think Mattis is a profoundly
decent guy working for a profoundly indecent guy,” said Eliot
Cohen, a top official in the George
W. Bush administration. “That
sets up a conflict. . . . The psychic
tension has to be acute.”
greg.jaffe@washpost.com
dan.lamothe@washpost.com
Trying to come to
terms with history
LEGACY FROM A1
had sold in 1838 to help pay off the
university’s debts during a financially turbulent time. Now it was
nearly two centuries later, the
truth of what happened was finally out in the open and here she
was, a member of her family, again
in Washington but under very different circumstances.
The university has granted legacy status to the slaves’ descendants as part of an effort to atone
for the sale of their ancestors. But
only two have come so far. One is
20. The other, the oldest degreeseeking undergraduate at Georgetown, is Short-Colomb.
She had completed so much of
life — she had become a mother,
grandmother, professional chef —
but increasingly she was feeling
like a piece was missing. Did she
owe something to the slaves who
were sold and the children who
followed, and would joining with
the university that began it all
bring some sense of resolution?
Hoping her experience at
Georgetown would help answer
this question, she walked into the
Walsh Building. The elevators
weren’t working, so she climbed
the steps beside scores of younger
students — “kids,” Short-Colomb
described them — before stopping
to catch her breath. “I’m not 18
anymore,” she said.
She arrived at Room 496. Most
of the students were already inside. She found a seat near the
front, took out her legal pad and
quietly waited for class to begin.
Oral history, then the truth
Short-Colomb had heard the
story her whole life, and in the
summer of 1980, as she sat beside
her grandmother in the family
house in New Orleans, she listened once more. A local newspaper reporter was doing a story on
the volunteer work of her maternal grandmother, Geneva Smith,
who was saying their family
wasn’t from Louisiana but Baltimore. And they had been free.
“My great-grandmother was
named Mary Ellen Queen,” Smith
told the reporter, according to the
article. “She was beautiful, too.
Even when she was old, she was a
tall, beautiful, dark-skinned
proud lady. Before the Civil War
ended, the Queen family gave my
great-grandparents their freedom, and they came down here to
Terrebonne Parish because they
heard that there was farmland.
She told me how she came on a
flatboat with a baby in her arms,
and she remembered how the alligators would follow the boat all
the way.”
“I heard all the stories,” is how
Smith explained it.
But the stories never made
much sense to Short-Colomb.
Why had her family been freed?
And why would they, a recently
emancipated black family, ever
travel to Louisiana to work land
that was dominated by slaveholders? For Short-Colomb, there had
never been any way to answer
those questions. It’s unusually difficult for black families to trace
their roots. African Americans
weren’t listed in census records
until 1870. So Short-Colomb, who
had recently dropped out of college and become a chef, reconciled herself to never knowing.
She told her children the same
story she had been told, always
wondering which details were
missing.
Decades would pass before the
details started filling in last year.
Her grandmother was dead now.
So was her mother. It was just
Short-Colomb that day last summer, reading a Facebook message,
asking a simple question that
would turn out to have a very
complicated answer: Was she related to a woman named Mary
Ellen Queen?
The woman writing the message was Judy Riffel, a genealogist
who had been hired by something
called the Georgetown Memory
Project. Short-Colomb had read
about it in an article in the New
York Times, which told of the story of the Jesuit priests’ sale of 272
slaves. She recalled feeling sad for
the slaves. Now she was being told
that her own family had been a
part of that history, too.
She couldn’t sleep that night.
She felt nauseated, thinking
about all of the stories her grandmother had told her that hadn’t
been true. Mary Ellen Queen
hadn’t been freed. She had been
sold. And the people who did it
were the same priests who helped
make Georgetown one of the nation’s most prestigious universities. She arose the next morning
feeling better, with a purpose: She
provided a DNA sample to the
Georgetown Memory Project and
connected with the rest of the
descendants.
“I felt okay with the history of
my family as I had it,” she wrote
last September to Richard Cellini,
an alumnus of Georgetown University and the founder of the
memory project, with whom she
developed a quick rapport. “I had
heard the story of . . . [ancestor]
Abraham Mahoney and Mary Ellen Queen being sent south as
young adults. . . . So, that’s my
pedigree line as I know from familial oral histories.”
There was now so much more
to know. She wanted to know
Washington and Georgetown and
how her family had come to be-
The truth of what
happened was finally
out in the open and here
she was, a member of
her family, again in
Washington but under
very different
circumstances.
owned by Catholic priests. But
how could she find that out? She
was all the way down in New
Orleans, “extremely underemployed,” as she put it, earning her
keep at a friend’s house by caring
for the friend’s elderly mother.
In January, Cellini sent her an
opinion piece in the New York
Times, describing Georgetown’s
decision to provide legacy status
to descendants as “making reparations.” The article angered
Short-Colomb. Was that gesture
meant to compensate for all that
had happened?
“I don’t like those people, and
we have unfinished business,” she
said. “I might [be] ready to . . .
exercise that ‘preferential legacy
status.’ ”
“Actually, I think you SHOULD
go to Georgetown,” Cellini said.
“I would,” she said.
“Someone has to be the first,” he
said.
“I’m a million years out of
school,” she said. “We should have
PHOTOS BY MARVIN JOSEPH/THE WASHINGTON POST
Mélisande Short-Colomb, 63, seen on the campus of Georgetown University, is a descendant of slaves sold by the Jesuits to fund the
struggling school. The university granted legacy status to the slaves’ descendants as part of an effort to atone for the sale of their ancestors.
a test case from the descendant
group. Perhaps it should be a brilliant 17-year-old!”
Suddenly unsure, she talked to
her roommate, Marcia Dunmore,
who encouraged Short-Colomb
but was apprehensive nonetheless. “You’re talking about a 60plus-year-old person becoming a
freshman, and just the idea of that
is daunting, the social aspect of it,”
Dunmore recalled thinking at the
time.
Cellini soon responded to
Short-Colomb’s note.
“It needs to be someone with
wisdom, strength, imagination,
intellect, vision and courage. Does
that sound like a 17-year-old to
you?”
“It feels right,” she said, finally
agreeing. “I want to go back to the
source of my family in America.”
So she sat down and, feeling
anxious and unsure, began an application to enroll as a freshman
at Georgetown University.
“My story begins simply,” she
typed, and for the first time, began
writing the real one. “My family
was sold by the Society of Jesus of
Maryland in 1838.”
The purpose of an education
Nearly 200 years later, ShortColomb was sitting in the “Problem of God,” looking around the
classroom. There were young
women with long black hair.
There were young men in polos
and leather shoes. There was the
professor, a middle-aged white
woman, who said, “Let me see
here, who is here?” and started
going through the roll call.
Short-Colomb wanted to be a
resource to students like these,
educate them on how slavery had
shaped Georgetown, but she already knew there would be many
with whom she would never completely bond. In her week on campus, there had already been times
when she felt she didn’t quite fit
in. Like when a young white student disparaged Black Lives Matter in one of her orientation sessions, and she wondered what
sort of household he had come
from. Or when a young woman in
her dorm had asked her, “And who
are you?” and she had felt out of
place, alone in her dorm room. Or
when an English professor had
given a tour of campus and mentioned the sale of the 272 slaves,
but in her mind didn’t probe its
moral
implications
deeply
Short-Colomb hangs a poster of Muhammad Ali in her dorm at Georgetown University. The oldest
degree-seeking undergraduate there says she had heard family stories but that they never made sense.
Short-Colomb has wondered whether she owes something to the
slaves who were sold and the children who followed and wondered
whether being at Georgetown might bring a sense of resolution.
enough.
A university spokesman said,
“Slavery was discussed in depth.”
But that was then, this was
class and she wanted to do well, so
she focused on what the professor
was saying. She asked students to
read a recent article in the Atlantic magazine titled, “Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?”
which explored the ramifications
technology has had on millenni-
als.
“They’re talking about you, and
the answer is ‘Yes,’ ” the professor
joked, and the younger students
laughed.
Other students started asking
questions, but not Short-Colomb.
She stayed quiet, trying to absorb
an experience she didn’t yet know
how she would apply. She knew
she wanted to study African
American history, but would that
be her major? And if so, what
would she do with it? She would
be 67 — past retirement age —
when she finally graduated, and
what would come next?
Maybe, she thought, she would
stick around. Maybe she would go
on to get a PhD. Maybe she would
be one of those “career students”
she sometimes heard of. Maybe
this was it. Her family had finally
returned to Georgetown, and she
was home.
Class was ending, and ShortColomb glanced at tomorrow’s
reading assignment, “The Death
of Reading.” She gathered her
things and walked outside, seeing
what the sale of her family had
ultimately helped accomplish:
the gothic buildings, the coiffed
gardens, students walking in every direction.
“Look how beautiful this view
is,” she said quietly.
She reached her room on the
fourth floor of the dormitory and
noticed the time. It was already
afternoon. The first day of class
was over, but it wouldn’t be long
before tomorrow. She had so
much reading to get through before then, and it was time to get to
it.
terrence.mccoy@washpost.com
A6
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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. THURSDAY,
AUGUST 31 , 2017
harvey swamps texas
BY
D YLAN B ADDOUR
AND A VI S ELK
houston — Harvey has driven
nearly 35,000 people to emergency shelters across Texas, including
10,000 who were holed up in a
downtown convention center on
Wednesday waiting out the extensive flooding that has paralyzed
this city.
Six days after the storm made
landfall south of here, people continued to stream into the George
R. Brown Convention Center and
spilled over into other shelters as
residents were forced from their
homes because of record-setting
rain and the resulting floods. The
displaced milled in large halls and
corridors, a somber and impatient
crowd that officials said could be
out of homes for a month or more
as the low-lying city empties trillions of gallons of rainfall.
John Boyce, a 49-year-old cabdriver, fled his home over the weekend. He went from a rescue boat to
a truck to a hospital, where he
traded his soaked clothes for paper
scrubs, and then by bus to the
convention center Monday morning. There, he received fresh donated clothes, a blanket and a cot.
His life now is a lot of waiting.
“Wake up, stand in line to get
breakfast, stand in line to brush
your teeth, stand in line to use the
bathroom, stand in line to do
something with FEMA, stand in
line for lunch,” he said as he stood
in line for a lunch plate of spaghetti with meat sauce, salad and
steamed carrots. He applied for
Federal Emergency Management
Agency aid and figured he’ll leave
town to live with family in Dallas
or Alaska. As soon as he can.
A huge population has been
sheltered, clothed and fed in
scores of shelters across the coastal region of Texas and Louisiana,
and that population has been
growing precipitously as reservoirs have overflowed, rivers have
swelled to record crests and towns
have been overwhelmed with water — some to the rooftops.
“This is so big we can only
compare it with Katrina, and it’s
heads and tails above Katrina,”
said Holly Brundage, 64, a disaster mental health worker with the
Red Cross who also aided with
Katrina evacuation in Mississippi, referring to the large number
of displaced from Harvey and
what she considers to be a far
more organized response.
Inside the convention center,
throngs of volunteers register
evacuees, administer light first
aid, serve food, sort clothing, distribute supplies, and usher
crowds amid a heavy presence of
Houston police and state troopers. There is a children’s playroom
full of toys and sleeping areas for
families, men and women.
“This is a very solemn experience,” said Debbie Jared, 67, who
works in the Aldine, Tex., school
system, as she waited in line to volunteer. “You see the depth of humanity.”
A mega-shelter sprang up overnight Tuesday into Wednesday at
the NRG Center, south of downtown Houston, after local officials
became frustrated with overcrowding and delivery delays at
Houston’s other shelters. By
Wednesday afternoon, 900 people
had arrived, and nearly twice as
many were expected by day’s end.
At a glance, it seemed to have
everything that someone with
nothing might want: a pharmacy
At a Houston convention center,
all the displaced can do is wait
JOHN TAGGART FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
MICHAEL CIAGLO/ASSOCIATED PRESS
TOP: Volunteers sort clothing donations Wednesday at the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston, where people gathered for
food, clothing and shelter in Harvey’s wake. ABOVE: Tammy Dominguez, left, and her husband, Christopher Dominguez, sleep on cots at
the convention center, where they had been since evacuating Houston’s Northside district Sunday.
counter built out of plastic crates,
a doctor, kennels for pets, a hot
kitchen. And most of all, space —
thousands of empty chairs at empty tables, and cavernous halls
around the clusters of beds.
At one end of the center, from a
small corner piled with toys, Angel McGee had procured a stuffed
unicorn and walked with it down
a great hall, back to her family’s
collection of cots.
“It’s a little bit fun, but a little bit
not,” the 11-year-old said.
The not-fun part, explained Angel’s mother, Lonetta Woodley,
had been getting kicked out of a
house where she, her mother and
four children had sheltered from
the hurricane. They then walked
in the rain until they found refuge
in a crowded high school in northeast Houston. They were bused to
NRG the next day.
“I’m safe in here,” Woodley said
through tears. “But, you know,
after we gotta leave, where am I
gonna go?”
Michelle McGowen, 35, walked
around the shelter at a San Antonio middle school in her socks
because none of the shoes that
had been donated fit her.
On Friday night, as the storm
moved through her home town of
Aransas Pass on the coast, an uncle who stayed behind provided
regular updates about McGowen’s
mobile home, where she lives with
her boyfriend and two young sons.
“He said the doors were falling
off, windows were shattering in, and
it was rocking back and forth,”
McGowen said. “We’ve started from
scratch before; we can do it again.”
On Saturday morning, she sat
on a bench outside of the shelter
with her sons before breakfast was
served. As she watched them play,
someone stole her phone from behind her on the bench. McGowen
and her boyfriend kept both of
their debit cards in her phone case,
so they were gone as well.
The couple hasn’t heard from
their family since Friday. McGowen said she borrowed someone’s
phone to leave a Facebook message for her aunt, telling her the
family was safe. Her sons, ages 9
and 11, ran around in the grass
outside carrying fans they made
out of green and black construction paper. They hope to be able to
go to the movies, museums and
zoo later this week after a disability check arrives on Friday.
Others had been through so
many makeshift homes in the past
week that they had no emotion
left to show.
Ramon Meza, 50, said he slept
in his truck outside an abandoned
gas station for three days after
water took his home in northeast
Houston.
He made his way to a Walmart
after he ran out of food, he said. But
the store had no food, so by Tuesday
he had found a school shelter.
There, he had to sleep outside on
the concrete with his dog, which
was not allowed to come in.
Now at the NRG shelter, with
his dog safe in a kennel, Meza had
a bed indoors and was sitting in a
half-empty dining room about to
have his first hot meal in days. He
has no long-term plans other than
finding his truck.
How did he feel about all that?
Meza just shrugged and bit into
his burger.
avi.selk@washpost.com
Brittney Martin in San Antonio and
Leslie Fain in Lake Charles, La.,
contributed to this report.
Police expect weeks of calls to recover bodies as floodwaters begin to recede
SEARCH FROM A1
coast, was about to become more
and more frequent. The floodwaters were only now beginning to
recede, and perhaps for weeks
and months ahead, the nighttime
scanner calls like this would slowly unearth the true extent of the
hurricane’s toll.
The body, the dispatcher said,
was somewhere on the farthest
end of their district, where the
concrete of Houston gave way to
mobile homes, some farmland, a
few fast-food joints and discount
stores. The area was ringed by
overloaded rivers and lakes, so
flooded that it was off limits to all
but the heaviest-duty vehicles.
On previous nights, this had
meant Goerlitz and other officers
could churn through feet of water in their Hummers and other
trucks, rescuing people from
half-submerged apartment complexes or neighborhoods otherwise cut off. But now, it meant a
different mission: The death
count from Harvey had been
steadily rising, and now the officers drove east to look for the
next body.
They headed out just after sunset, past a grocery store where
scattered red shopping carts
poked up from the water, past a
flooded onramp, past a carwash
where Goerlitz said, “I can’t tell
you how many shootings I’ve
worked at that place.” They
turned down a small commercial
street, where there was still a gas
station with the lights on, and
then made one more turn down a
straightaway that took them into
a landscape of darkness and silhouettes.
Whoever had lived here was
gone. The road was elevated just
enough to be dry, while a few
street signs and mailboxes rose
from the water alongside it. But
south.”
The address they’d been given
seemed like a vague target, nothing more.
“Okay,” Goerlitz said.
“It was called in by somebody in
a boat,” Lyons said. “So look for the
boat.”
“But do we know where the
boat is?” Goerlitz asked.
“No.”
Goerlitz nodded, and he and
King got back into the vehicle,
where three other officers crowd-
“I don’t know how much deeper we can go. Look
at that water. It’s gonna suck me out. I’m sorry.”
Bob Goerlitz, Harris County Sheriff’s Office deputy
there were no other cars. Goerlitz
drove for a mile.
Then King spotted a flashing
light ahead.
“Slow down,” he said.
They arrived to find two Harris
County Sheriff’s Office sedans,
which were stopped just before
the water became too deep to
drive.
“What we’ve got here — this is
the search area,” Sgt. Keith Lyons
told Goerlitz and King, who’d
stepped out of their vehicle. “I
would go this way, then head
ed in the back seats. There was no
music or radio, just the occasional
beep of the scanner and the throb
of the engine, as the Hummer
plowed its way into deepening
water.
“I’m gonna turn on the high
beams,” Goerlitz said.
The water level kept rising —
up to the tires, and then up to
the front grille. It was hard to
tell where the road turned into
the median. It was hard to tell
where the median turned into a
yard. It was hard to tell where a
yard might give way to a house
or a car or a boat. Georlitz, part
of the Harris County Sheriff ’s
Office for 27 years, hadn’t gotten
more than three hours of sleep a
night since the hurricane first
hit. Since then, he’d been starting his shifts at 6 p.m., often
working well into the next
morning. He hadn’t been home
since Saturday. In his career
he’d dealt with hundreds of bodies — homicides and suicides
and industrial accidents — and
maybe the next one was somewhere just ahead, an arm or a
head above the water, if he could
focus enough to spot it.
“A body or a boat,” Goerlitz said,
quietly, and then King, looking
out the passenger’s window, said,
“Look, there’s a car.”
They pulled up and shined a
flashlight at a hatchback, nose
just above the water, windshield
fogged. “Shine the flashlight,” Goerlitz said, because three days earlier, they’d come upon a similar
car, and when they looked inside,
a hand of a person begging for
rescue suddenly appeared. But
this time, King aimed and saw
nothing. “Ain’t nobody in there,”
he said.
They kept driving. The high
beams angled off the water, which
was all around them — not like a
placid lake but, instead, a powerful river, ripping across the road,
headed somewhere.
Goerlitz looked ahead.
“Is that a boat?” he asked.
“I think it’s a reflection of the
light,” King said.
The vehicle steered through the
water for 10 minutes, then 20. The
officers searched through the water for barely visible street markers to follow, turning north. They
saw reeds and high grass and
darkened, flooded homes. No
boat.
“The water is getting deeper,”
Goerlitz said. “It’s a little hairy.”
Some water lapped into the
rear of the Hummer.
“Can you see the yellow
stripes?” King asked.
Now, Goerlitz couldn’t.
“I don’t know how much deeper
we can go,” he said. “Look at that
water. It’s gonna suck me out. I’m
sorry.”
There were a few more roads
to search, but they couldn’t go
farther. Not without wrecking
the car. Maybe, just around the
bend, in the water that was too
deep, there was a boat and body.
But maybe the current had already dragged it miles away.
Maybe the information they
were chasing was old. Maybe
they were acting on a bad tip.
They didn’t know, and Goerlitz
pulled a U-turn and began to
backtrack, heading out of the
water, past the mobile homes
and the gas station, past the
carwash, then back toward the
district station.
“I’m thinking, just wait until
daylight,” Goerlitz said.
At the station, the air conditioner was blasting. Paper plates
and aluminum trays were set out
with tacos and beef. Small televisions played the nightly news, and
a computer monitor showed all
the calls coming in.
Then Goerlitz’s phone buzzed.
A text message. An hour had
passed since they’d left the water.
“Body was found,” Lyons, the
sergeant, had written.
Goerlitz showed his phone to
King.
For now, there were no other
details. All that would have to
wait. By morning, maybe, they’d
know the age, or the identity, or
they’d be able to guess what had
happened, and they’d be able to
hear more about where, exactly,
the body had been discovered.
Maybe they’d just missed it.
“Well, it won’t be the last,” King
said. “When the water starts going
down, we’ll find more bodies.”
“For now, we’re just finding the
floaters,” Goerlitz said.
“We’re still in the starting
phase,” King said.
“Yup,” Goerlitz said. “Guaranteed, for the next few months,
bodies will be popping up all over.”
chico.harlan@washpost.com
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A7
SU
harvey swamps texas
Aid teams ready
to begin working
but cannot get in
BY
K ATIE Z EZIMA
Mobile kitchen units, truckloads of tools and massive quantities of supplies are ready to help
people affected by Hurricane
Harvey, but there is one problem:
Much of the material is hundreds
of miles away from Houston.
The extent of the disaster
caused by Hurricane Harvey and
its remnants has made it impossible for relief agencies to help in
some of the hardest-hit areas. The
storm lashed hundreds of miles of
coastline from Corpus Christi,
Tex., to Lake Charles, La., flooded
more than one-quarter of Harris
County, Tex., home to the city of
Houston and more than 4.5 million people, and inundated the
Beaumont-Port Arthur area with
more than two feet of rain in
24 hours. Trucks now sit hundreds of miles away, waiting for
roads to become passable and for
search-and-rescue teams to finish
their jobs.
“The scope and size of the
storm is unlike anything the [Salvation Army] has ever experienced,” said Lt. Col. Ronnie
Raymer.
Trying to navigate flooded
roads and an ever-changing situation as levees fail, rivers overflow
and tides change makes it too
difficult, even dangerous to try
getting supplies in. The biggest
issue is that the storm just won’t
let up: Tuesday and Wednesday,
the Beaumont-Port Arthur area
was heavily flooded and rains
drenched western Louisiana.
“We’ve got units set up as close
as we can,” said Mike Ebert, a
spokesman for the North American Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention. Many of
the emergency units are in Mississippi. The mission board has
deployed kitchens traveling to
smaller towns, including Rockport on the Texas coast, to feed
first responders. The units also
contain showers and laundry facilities.
Some relief organizations cannot get supplies into Houston,
where highways are flooded and
authorities are still searching for
and rescuing people from homes.
Organizations that do not help
with basic shelter needs will wait
until the situation changes from
search and rescue to a recovery
mission to help people whose
homes are flooded.
“What we don’t want to do
right now is get our volunteers in
there and have them get stranded
and need to get rescued and
create more problems for first
responders,” Ebert said.
Tim Haas, manager of disaster
relief at Samaritan’s Purse, said
the organization has more than
60 volunteers in Victoria and
another base of operations in the
Portland-Rockport area. Three
other disaster relief units — 53foot trailers filled with tools —
will be stationed in Baton Rouge
and ready to deploy when it is
possible to safely access hard-hit
areas. Samaritan’s Purse also has
generators and mobile kitchens
in Baton Rouge, where it has been
active since massive floods there
last year. It is hoping to get a unit
to a church in Santa Fe, Tex.,
between Houston and Galveston.
But the flooding makes meeting even immediate needs difficult to fill. A mobile kitchen capable of feeding 40,000 people a day
was expected to arrive at the
George R. Brown Convention
Center in Houston on Tuesday
but could not get there until
Wednesday, according to the Red
Cross.
“It can be frustrating as people
are wondering: When can we get
deployed?” said Bill Bumpas, a
spokesman for the Southern Baptists of Texas Convention Disaster
Relief. Some, however, do not
have to go far: One man waiting
to be deployed has rescued people
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
The sun sets Wednesday on downtown Houston as floodwaters still surround some neighborhoods. Hurricane Harvey and its downgraded
variant, Tropical Storm Harvey, have caused catastrophic flooding that forced thousands of people from their homes and into shelters.
from rising water in his own
neighborhood, Bumpas said.
The magnitude of Harvey has
shocked even the most seasoned
disaster workers. Because the
storm devastated so many places
highways and roads, organizations are realizing that setting up
one centralized command center
will not be effective.
“We also quickly realized this is
going to stretch us more than
“What we don’t want to do right now is get our
volunteers in there and have them get stranded
and need to get rescued.”
Mike Ebert, a spokesman for the North American Mission Board
of the Southern Baptist Convention
in different ways, with varying
combinations of high winds and
flooding, the response will be
different in each area. And because of the storm’s massive geographic reach and impact on the
Katrina did and that we’re going
to have to begin thinking outside
the box in how we move forward,
especially in long-term recovery,”
Raymer said.
Raymer said the Salvation
Army is starting to think about
opening centers in different
neighborhoods because Houston’s sprawl was difficult to navigate even before the storm. The
Salvation Army has opened shelters in the city and a command
center in northwest Houston. On
Wednesday, Raymer was in Rockport, which took a direct hit from
Harvey when it was at hurricane
strength. Raymer said that Rockport is “devastated” and that he
did not see one undamaged building.
“There are multiple levels of
challenges just dealing with how
you navigate Houston, how you
get around town,” said Haas, of
Samaritan’s Purse. But conditions
are improving ever so slightly.
“The island is expanding” as
some floodwaters recede, said
Charles Maltbie, a Red Cross
spokesman. The organization has
not been able to move resources
assembled in Austin to Houston
because of flooded roads.
But some on the ground in
Houston would prefer to understand the scope of the disaster
before assistance starts arriving
in large volumes.
Anna M. Babin, president and
chief executive of the United Way
of Greater Houston, said the organization’s 211 help line has had
a backlog of 9,000 calls. Because
the storm is still unfolding nearly
a week after its initial landfall,
she is urging organizations to
hold off on sending materials.
“People keep wanting to send
us stuff and bring in trucks, and
we have to say, ‘Wait. Where are
we going to put these?’ ” she said.
“We’re still in the disaster.”
katie.zezima@washpost.com
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EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
AUGUST 31 , 2017
harvey swamps texas
In Houston, millions now facing a new post-Harvey reality
HARVEY FROM A1
boat Monday, trying to rescue
neighbors. They lost control in
the current and drifted toward
the sparks of a downed power
line.They jumped in to avoid the
current. The electricity was in the
water, too.
Three other men, including
two journalists from a British
newspaper, suffered electrical
burns but survived by clinging to
a tree above the water.
On Wednesday afternoon,
Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo
said 20 people remained missing
in the city. At one point, that
figure was as high as 47, but
Acevedo said 27 people have been
found alive and removed from the
list.
By Wednesday afternoon, the
remnants of Harvey had moved
into Louisiana, traveling at 8 mph
to the northeast. Its peak winds
decreased to about 40 mph and
the storm was downgraded to a
tropical depression Wednesday
night.
Louisiana officials, who had
worried that Harvey might devastate their state as well, said the
threat of flooding seemed to be
lessening.
“Somewhere between being
complacent and being panicked
is the right place” to be, said Gov.
John Bel Edwards (D). “That’s
where we’re going to ask the
people of Louisiana to settle.”
More than 50 inches of rain fell
onto Houston over four days, turning the country’s fourth-largest
city into a sea of muddy brown
water, boats skimming along
what had been neighborhood
streets in search of survivors.
At the height of the flooding,
between 25 and 30 percent of
Harris County — home to 4.5 million people in Houston and its
near suburbs — was flooded as of
Tuesday afternoon, said Jeff Lindner, a meteorologist with the Harris County Flood Control District.
That is an area as large as New
York City and Chicago combined.
More than 210,000 people have
registered for federal assistance,
a number that is expected to
increase, said Texas Gov. Greg
Abbott (R). William B. “Brock”
Long, administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), said it will take “many,
many years” before the full scope
of Harvey’s effect is clear, he said.
Elaine Duke, the acting homeland security secretary, said at the
same briefing Wednesday: “We
expect a many-year recovery in
Texas, and the federal government is in this for the long haul.”
President Trump has pledged
swift federal aid in response to
Harvey’s
devastation.
On
Wednesday, Abbott said that given the sheer number of people
and the geographic area affected,
he expects the government’s aid
package “should be far in excess”
of the roughly $120 billion allotted for Gulf Coast recovery after
Katrina.
Trump could request emergency funding as soon as next week, a
senior administration official
said, reshuffling the political
agenda as the White House
scrambles to deal with the storm’s
aftermath.
The funding package is expected to be only a partial down
payment and serve in part to
backstop depleted reserves that
FEMA had on hand to respond to
disasters.
No final decision about the
funding has been made, and the
amount could fluctuate based on
conversations with lawmakers.
Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Tex.)
said the aid package request
could be as much as $200 billion.
Tens of thousands of Houstonarea residents were living in shelters as they waited out the storm.
After the George R. Brown Convention Center took on nearly
10,000 evacuees, a county official
asked to use the NRG Center
south of downtown.
“They called up our CEO yesterday, and said: ‘Hey, we need
you to do the shelter,’ ” said Frederick Goodall, director of marketing for the nonprofit BakerRipley Neighborhood Center.
That call was Tuesday morning. By the same time Wednesday,
the NRG Center was lined with
cots and thousands of volunteers.
By the afternoon, 900 people had
been bused in from other shelters, and nearly twice that many
were expected to arrive by the end
of the day. Six days after the storm
first made landfall, residents
were still unsure how long they
would be out of their homes or
what they would find when the
waters receded.
Some of Houston’s bayous began to retreat inside their banks
— although Buffalo Bayou, Houston’s main river, was still rising in
some sections because of the release of water from upstream
reservoirs.
PETTY OFFICER 3RD CLASS BRANDON GILES/U.S. COAST GUARD/REUTERS
An evacuee is rescued Wednesday by a Coast Guard helicopter in Beaumont, Tex., which received more than two feet of rain.
JOHN TAGGART FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Flor Portilla surveys the damage wrought by Harvey outside her house in East
Houston on Tuesday. More than 50 inches of rain fell on Houston over four days.
“The watersheds are falling,
and while most of them remain
well over their levels, and some
remain at record levels, the water
levels are going down,” Lindner
said. But he cautioned that some
homes already underwater may
“degrade.”
Across Texas, the storm shut
down 11 oil refineries and curtailed production at nine others,
while causing damage that led to
at least 45 releases of harmful
chemicals. In Crosby, Tex., a
chemical plant was in critical
condition after flooding disabled
its refrigeration system and two
backup power generators, raising
the likelihood that the volatile
chemicals usually kept at cool
temperatures on the site would
warm up and catch fire or explode.
Arkema, a French-based maker
of organic peroxides used in plastics, pharmaceuticals and construction materials, removed all
employees from the plant. Harris
County police were scrambling to
keep people at a distance; local
media outlets said the evacuation
zone had a 11/2-mile radius.
“We have lost critical refrigeration of the materials on site that
could now explode and cause a
subsequent intense fire,” said
Richard Rowe, the chief executive
of Arkema’s North American division. “The high water and lack of
power leave us with no way to
prevent it.”
Elsewhere, it was the first day
of the rest of Houston’s history,
where millions of lives had been
reshaped and burdened by the
flood’s destruction.
Cleanup doesn’t begin to describe what’s next.
Electricity was out. Debris littered the city. When a house
caught fire in West Houston, firefighters couldn’t get water pressure to fill their hoses. Instead,
they turned to the water around
them and used a jet boat engine.
They pointed the back of the boat
toward the house, fired up the
engine, and sprayed a massive
GERALD HERBERT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rescuers from organizations in Louisiana and Florida remove residents from the
Golden Years Assisted Living home in Orange, Tex., on Wednesday.
water stream toward the blaze.
On highways that allowed for
some traffic, large pickup trucks
— some outfitted with monstertruck-style tires — hauling boats
made up the majority of those
who dared to travel. Grocery
stores, doughnut shops and Mexican-food restaurants reopened.
For those lucky enough not to
be in a shelter, it was a day to take
stock of what Harvey left behind.
“I feel like I’m dreaming,” said
Julie Steptoe, who ventured
Wednesday morning to an intersection in Kingwood, north of
Houston. Never taking her eyes
off the water that engulfed the
area, she continued: “I don’t
know what to think. I’m hoping it
turns out okay for everyone.”
In Katy, people offered gifts to
the “Cajun Navy” volunteers from
Louisiana, who had been conducting rescues in the area west
of the city. What gifts does one
give after a flood? Chewing tobacco. Bottles of water. Packs of dry
socks.
Neighbors then turned to start
the enormous task of removing
water and waterlogged debris.
At the Ehlert house, China
chests filled with Christmas village ornaments, computers,
sweaters and silverware were
stacked in the center of the living
room. A grandfather clock was
flooded. Floral wallpaper was
peeling. Neighbors were lugging
out trash and soggy drywall and
insulation.
“Our neighborhood army is
here — pizza and tools,” said Don
Ehlert, 69, who lives in the house
with his wife, Cheri, and two
grandchildren, who are 5 and 12.
After a call for help on a social
media app, 50 people had shown
up. Ehlert had never met most of
them.
“This is what America is all
about,” Cheri said.
Farther east, in Port Arthur
and Beaumont, the rain was so
bad that it sounded like hail on
windows. Hamilton, the former
council member in Port Arthur,
Harvey dropped record levels of rainfall on Houston
TEX
T
EX
XA
X
A
AS
S
LLO
LOU
OUIS
SIAN
ANA
AN
A
Austin
Beaumont
Lake
Charles
With four months left in 2017, Houston already has received nearly
as much rainfall as it did in 1900, its rainiest year on record.
80 inches
Orange
Port
Arthur
Houston
Cumulative precipitation
since Jan. 1, 2017
70.82”
Record cumulative
precipitation (1900)
72.86”
70
todd.frankel@washpost.com
avi.selk@washpost.com
david.fahrenthold@washpost.com
60
50
Galveston
40
Total rainfall
midnight Friday to
5 p.m. Wednesday
0
30
50 inches
or more
Rockport
Normal
cumulative
precipitation
20
10
(1981-2010
average)
Gul f o f M e x i c o
Corpus
Christi
25 MILES
Source: National Weather Service
said that in the rain, emergency
lines were overwhelmed, and
friends called friends for help.
Hamilton said one of her
friends received a call about
2 a.m. from an elderly woman.
“She and her husband were
both in the water and he was in a
wheelchair, and she said she was
struggling to hold his head above
water,” said Hamilton, who was
finally able to relay the information to emergency workers about
10 a.m. Hamilton does not know if
anyone was able to reach the
couple.
In nearby Orange, the water
began rising at 3 a.m. Wednesday,
covering first the streets, then the
small residential lawns. And by
morning, it was rising faster,
pushing into homes and submerging to the rooflines of cars,
trapping hundreds of people in
their homes.
“It was unbelievable,” said Robin Clark, who was ferried, along
with her mom — who uses a
wheelchair — and three dogs, out
of her home on a volunteer’s john
boat.
Dozens of rescued residents
stood in a pelting rain outside a
Market Basket supermarket.
They were saved. But being
saved was just the start.
“We don’t know what’s going to
happen,” said Keeleigh Amodeo,
15, who was waiting with her
sister and mother.
0
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JULY AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
As of 8:30 a.m. local time on Aug. 30, George Bush Intercontinental Airport
Source: National Weather Service
THE WASHINGTON POST
Selk reported from Houston and
Fahrenthold reported from
Washington. Dalton Bennett, Tim
Craig and Kevin Sullivan in Houston;
Emily Wax in Katy, Tex.; Alex Horton in
Crosby, Tex.; Ashley Cusick in New
Orleans; Leslie Fain in Lake Charles,
La.; and Steven Mufson, Ed O’Keefe,
Damian Paletta, Mike DeBonis,
Wesley Lowery, Katie Zezima, Dave
Clarke, Mark Berman and Jason
Samenow in Washington contributed
to this report.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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RE
. THURSDAY,
AUGUST 31 , 2017
harvey swamps texas
Flood survivors face
housing, financial trials
RESPONSE FROM A1
Management Agency Administrator William B. “Brock” Long,
who hours earlier had returned
from a trip to Texas, where he
had seen the storm damage and
flooding firsthand.
He reissued a call for volunteers and said their help is needed
beyond the immediate rescue effort.
“The need to volunteer is going
to take place over the next couple
of years, okay. And the need to
volunteer, let me remind you, is in
50 counties now, not just in Houston but everywhere,” he said.
Retired Coast Guard Adm.
Thad Allen, who helped lead the
federal government’s response to
Hurricane Katrina in 2005, said,
“We don’t have complete knowledge of what everybody’s situation is. We know some people
went to shelters. Some people
went to relatives. It was like a
diaspora. What we don’t know is
how many housing units were
lost.”
“It is insurance claim adjustment on a scale we have never
seen before in the history of this
country,” he added.
Linda Thompson, a resident of
the Robindell neighborhood in
southwest Houston, said this
week that she had endured smaller floods in 2015 and 2016. This
time, the water would have
reached over her head had she
not evacuated. She managed to
salvage one cardboard box containing soggy photographs that
she was trying to pat dry with a
towel in a hotel lobby. She said
Harvey’s floodwater has destroyed at least $50,000 in belongings, including custom-made
furniture and original artwork.
She plans this time to move rather than rebuild.
“I’m just bracing myself to see
if I can do this, because I know:
Get the elevation certificates, get
your documents for the insurance, and start fighting with the
insurance company,” Thompson
said. “You’ve got to write all, like,
seeing what receipts you have and
write every single itemized list.”
According to the Texas Department of Public Safety, nearly
35,000 people had taken refuge in
231 shelters as of Wednesday
morning. Officials said 294,000
people remained without power
from Corpus Christi to Port Arthur.
More than 10,000 rescues have
been conducted by state and
county agencies, the report said,
though that total did not take into
account rescues conducted by civilians. FEMA, which has coordinated the federal response, said
12,400 employees from 17 agencies are working to help the disaster survivors in Texas and Louisiana. The agency said its urban
search-and-rescue teams had rescued 2,500 people, with another
4,200 people and 1,000 pets rescued by the U.S. Coast Guard.
Houston officials have opened
three major shelters: the George
R. Brown Convention Center,
which quickly filled with 10,000
people; the Toyota Center, where
the Houston Rockets basketball
team plays; and the NRG Center,
a convention center near the old
Astrodome, which was a major
refuge 12 years ago for survivors
of Katrina who were transported
to the city. Dallas is ready to take
on another 6,000 storm survivors.
Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R) said
the federal aid package necessary
to respond to Harvey “should be
far in excess” of the roughly
$120 billion spent on the Katrina
recovery. U.S. Rep. Sheila Jackson
Lee (D-Tex.), who represents central Houston, said the federal
response will likely reach about
$150 billion.
By
Wednesday
morning,
195,000 people had already filed
for assistance from FEMA, said
Alex Amparo, who leads the agency’s recovery directorate. The
agency has given out more than
$35 million in disaster assistance
so far, he said.
He urged people to start the
process of recovery by filing an
insurance claim if possible. Then
they should register for FEMA aid
at www.DisasterAssistance.gov.
“Our assistance is not designed
CHRIS MACHIAN/OMAHA WORLD-HERALD/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Staff Sgt. Lawrence Lind, left, hoists a child into a Black Hawk helicopter while Sgt. Ray Smith, right, assists in Port Arthur, Tex. By
Wednesday morning, 195,000 people had already filed for assistance from FEMA, an agency leader said.
to make you whole, which is why
it is important to register with
your
insurance
company,”
Amparo said.
In the counties declared a federal disaster area, only 16 percent
of homes — about 400,000 homeowners — have flood insurance
through the federal flood insurance program, said Laura Lightbody, director of the Pew Charitable Trusts’ Flood-Prepared Communities initiative.
“This is an event unlike we’ve
ever seen before that no one could
have predicted. It forces a national discussion about flood preparedness, the way that we plan
and develop and think about living in areas that are prone to
flooding,”
Lightbody
said
Wednesday. “Does it make sense
to rebuild or build in an area that
we know is prone to flooding?”
Long acknowledged that the
shelters “are obviously not ideal”
but that people will have to be
there for a while. So far, he said,
1,800 people have been placed in
hotels and motels under FEMA’s
Transitional Shelter Assistance
program, in which the government seeks to alleviate crowding
in emergency shelters by directly
paying hotels and motels to put
up disaster survivors.
“The next goal is to save houses,” Long said. “This is where the
volunteers have to be organized
— helping people muck out their
houses.”
FEMA is hiring temporary
workers to supplement the disaster response. Volunteers can also
sign up with the National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disasters.
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development is
also charged with assisting in a
disaster. Like FEMA, HUD drew
criticism for how it handled the
aftermath of Katrina.
Before Harvey slammed into
Texas late Friday night, Houston
had an 11 percent vacancy rate in
its rental housing market, according to HUD. But many of those
rental units, which could be used
to house those displaced by the
storm, are likely underwater.
“It’s still early yet, but we’re
working to determine if the rental
market can absorb the significant
number of families forced from
their own homes,” HUD spokesman Brian Sullivan said Wednesday.
HUD Secretary Ben Carson
said President Trump’s declaration of a disaster in 18 Texas
counties will allow the department to offer mortgage and foreclosure relief, among other types
of assistance.
“As FEMA begins to assess the
damage and respond to the immediate needs of residents, HUD
will be there to offer assistance
and support the longer-term
housing recovery efforts,” Carson
said.
In the meantime, there is a lot
of uncertainty in the communities where people have not had a
chance to return to their homes.
“I don’t think I ever will recover financially from this,” said Linda Oliver in Katy, Tex., as she
stood on a soggy golf course near
her submerged subdivision. As
she spoke, helicopters buzzed
overhead, helping with rescues.
Her son-in-law had managed to
rescue her in his truck.
“I’m certainly just happy to be
safe,” she said, clearly shaken.
joel.achenbach@washpost.com
Eva Ruth Moravec in Austin, Emily
Wax-Thibodeaux in Katy, Tex., Avi
Selk in Houston, and Wesley Lowery
and Peter Whoriskey in Washington
contributed to this report.
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harvey swamps texas
Houston’s medical system mostly withstands Harvey
BY A MY G OLDSTEIN
AND L AURIE M C G INLEY
The first ambulances finally
arrived at Ben Taub Hospital, in
the heart of Houston’s vast Texas
Medical Center, to remove five
patients clinging to life on ventilators.
The county hospital had initially planned to transfer all of its
350 patients. As the remnants of
Hurricane Harvey continued to
unleash epic rains, a foot of water
was rising in the hospital’s basement from a burst pipe and wet
seeping in from the city’s inundated streets. The kitchen was
knocked out, as well as the pharmacy and the area where supplies
such as linens and needles
are stored.
But with knee- to waist-high
water immediately outside, and
flooding across the city, the hospital-wide evacuation became a
new plan to move fewer than
80 of the sickest patients. And
then, when only five ambulances
could reach the bay outside the
emergency department, it was
significantly reduced again. In
the end, only three vehicles made
their destinations of hospitals up
to 150 miles away; the two others
had to turn back.
Ben Taub was among some
20 of about 110 hospitals in Houston and nearby counties that
removed a portion or all of their
patients — 1,500 people, including those in nursing homes and
other facilities — as floods from
Harvey continued Wednesday to
ravage Southeast Texas.
Many of the other facilities
canceled elective surgeries and
any other appointments that
could wait.
The storm “challenged every
plan we’ve written, every resource, every piece of inventory. I
mean, we’ve run out of wheelchairs,” said Darrell Pile, chief
executive of the Southeast Texas
Regional Advisory Council, who
oversees preparations for and
management of medical crises for
the 25-county region. “I mean it
just was unimaginable.”
At Memorial Hermann Sugar
Land Hospital just southwest of
ANDREW KRAGIE/HOUSTON CHRONICLE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Water on Sunday approached Houston’s Ben Taub Hospital, where several patients were removed
because of flooding. The city’s medical facilities were more prepared than in the past.
Houston, chief executive Greg
Haralson said administrators
watched as the Brazos River less
than a mile away quickly rose.
With the river forecast to crest
Thursday at 59 feet — just an inch
shy of a nearby levee’s capacity —
officials turned to their disaster
plan and called for evacuation.
“We felt in our guts this was the
right thing to do. It was a very
tough decision,” Haralson said.
Between 2 p.m. and 9 p.m. Tuesday, in driving rains, about two
dozen ambulances carried 75 patients to another Memorial Hermann hospital a dozen miles
away.
MD Anderson Cancer Center,
one of the nation’s premier cancer hospitals and a major presence in the Texas Medical Center,
shut down its massive outpatient
operation on Sunday to focus its
diminished resources on patients
already in the hospital with the
most time-sensitive need for
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treatment.
Doctors, nurses and other staff
members there spent the next
few days calling patients and
medical facilities nationwide to
reschedule appointments and arrange for people whose cancers
have been, doctors, health-care
administrators, and the leaders
of the regional network say Houston’s vaunted web of hospitals
has generally come through the
storm in far better condition than
during the last massive rains to
“We saw the water flowing and the streets looking
like rivers when the bayou crested,
but the lights were all on.”
William McKeon, president of Texas Medical Center
require immediate treatment to
receive it at hospitals closer to
home. Officials say the hospital’s
outpatient clinics, which draw 1.4
million patients each year from
across the nation and overseas,
will not reopen until at least
Friday.
Disruptive as such changes
deliver a direct hit.
Sixteen years ago, during Tropical Storm Allison, “virtually every hospital was broken in one
way or another,” recalled Kenneth Mattox, chief of staff and
chief of trauma at Ben Taub
Hospital. Memorial Hermann, for
one, had no power because its
basement-level generator had
been flooded, and staff members
were working by flashlight and
ventilating patients by hand.
The pills in hospital pharmacies were wet and ruined. Medical equipment shorted out. The
medical center’s research laboratories suffered $2 million in losses.
Mattox and another Houston
trauma surgeon went on local
televisions stations a few weeks
after the June storm and said:
“Drink milk, not booze, on this
Fourth of July weekend, because
if you get into a wreck or get in a
fight, we have no way to take care
of you.”
In the aftermath, a coalition of
hospitals, emergency medical
services, fire departments and
community leaders undertook intensive efforts to fortify the city’s
medical system. This led to such
physical changes in the sprawling
medical center as submarine
doors that can be closed to wall
off parts of a tunnel system that
runs beneath the blocks-long
area. Outside berms were built
for protection should a gully off
Brays Bayou overflow its banks,
and strategically located flood
gates that can rise three feet were
installed. Hospitals that had
emergency electricity generators
in the basement moved them
higher.
Such fortifications were tested
as never before in recent days.
Based on protocols written
over the intervening years, hospitals stationed extra staff members in their facilities so stranded
workers could rotate in shifts.
Other systems lessened the risk of
running out of crucial supplies.
And unlike after Hurricane
Katrina, in which no one knew
where some New Orleans patients had been moved and some
arrived at distant hospitals without medical records, a regional
Catastrophic Medical Operations
Center coordinated transfers and
kept track of which hospitals had
beds available for specific types of
care.
Since Allison, Houston has
been inundated by brushes from
hurricanes Rita in 2005 and Ike
three years later. But nothing
like Harvey.
Yet when William McKeon, the
Texas Medical Center’s president,
looked outside during the height
of the storm, “We saw the water
flowing and the streets looking
like rivers when the bayou crested, but the lights were all on,” he
said. “The people were inside,
were caring for patients as they
do every day.”
Doctors at MD Anderson said
because of special doors that now
exist, the lobby had some flooding but areas for patient care
weren’t affected.
Inside the hospital, much of
the attention focused on patients
with blood cancers, whose treatments are urgent, said Christopher Logothetis, chairman of
genitourinary medical oncology.
Leukemia patients who have undergone a bone-marrow transplant, for instance, are temporarily dependent on blood transfusions for blood cells and platelets.
In those cases, “cancer doesn’t
wait,” said lymphoma expert Jason Westin.
By Wednesday morning, with
the storm lifted, ambulances
drove once again over clear roads,
workers in medical scrubs bicycled on dry sidewalks, and the
gates of some parking garages
stood open as cars filled them.
“Free!” a man shouted.
As waters recede in some places, medical emergencies from the
storm and its cleanup will multiply, doctors and hospital officials
know.
And following its protocol, Pile
said, the Catastrophic Medical
Operations Center will conduct
an after-study to compile evidence of how hospitals weathered the storm. On the agenda, he
said, will be Ben Taub’s shifting
decisions about evacuating —
from the all-hospital plan to calling off the whole idea after just
three critically ill patients
were moved.
amy.goldstein@washpost.com
laurie.mcginley@washpost.com
Carolyn Y. Johnson in Washington
and Avi Selk in Houston contributed
to this report.
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A12
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
AUGUST 31 , 2017
harvey swamps texas
In Houston, the hospitality of strangers shines through
BY M ARIA S ACCHETTI
AND R ACHEL S IEGEL
The family from Pasadena,
Tex., shuddered as roiling floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey
poured into their apartment complex’s parking lot, bobbing the
cars like fish in a pond.
Fearing for their two small
children, they lent their secondfloor unit to their downstairs
neighbors and fled with a garbage
bag full of clothes to a shelter at
the George R. Brown Convention
Center in Houston.
They huddled in a corner,
dazed and scared, until two perfect strangers offered to take
them in.
Anne Whitlock and Michael
Skelly had been ferrying hurricane victims to the shelter from a
nearby hospital. They knew the
convention center was filling rapidly, and they were certain their
own home, a 110-year-old converted firehouse in Houston’s
East End, would be safe from the
rising waters.
So they brought home the family — a woman who had immigrated from Mexico, her two
daughters, her brother and a
family friend — and Skelly posted
a message on Facebook urging
others to take people in. And so
began a chain of help, one Houston family assisting another, as
the nation’s fourth-largest city
grapples with the impact of an
epic and devastating storm.
“There’s no way that the city
can come up with shelter for all
those people,” said Skelly, a 55year-old wind energy executive.
“All across the city, people are
offering up their homes . . . bringing their friends, or friends of
friends of friends, or new friends,
or whoever.”
One of Skelly’s work colleagues
saw his post and promptly decided to take in a father from Iraq
and his four children. Then Skelly
and Whitlock’s son Oliver, 23,
called. He had been making another run from the hospital and
discovered that a disabled woman and her elderly mother were
going to have to wait in the rain as
the line at the convention center
shelter curled out the door.
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Miriam Bain, 82, is overcome as she learns that her home is relatively unscathed. She and daughter
Becky are staying at a rental property owned by Michael Skelly and Anne Whitlock.
Whitlock told her son to bring
the two women to the firehouse,
where they could eat and relax. She
arranged for them to sleep in a
nearby home that she and her
husband own and rent to a tenant,
Tom McCasland, who happens to
be Houston’s director of housing
and community development.
“I tagged him on Facebook
saying, ‘Hey, you don’t even know
about this, Tom, but you’ve got
two visitors,’ ” said Whitlock, 56,
who runs a nonprofit that seeks
to reinvigorate neighborhoods
without pushing out longtime
residents. “He has not slept in
four days, he’s so overwhelmed.”
Becky Bain, 58, and her mother
Miriam, 82, said they were grateful for a quiet place to stay after
fleeing the rising floodwaters in a
dump truck.
“We’ve already folded the laundry that was in his dryer and
cleaned up a little around for
him,” Bain said. “He’s got a beautiful home, and I’m just so incredibly grateful. . . . It’s a very emotional time.”
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Skelly and Whitlock have opened their home and rental homes to
evacuees. “Everybody is pressed into service in some way,” he says.
Whitlock and Skelly are known
in Houston as a risk-taking power
couple devoted to public service,
including his failed bid for Congress in 2008. They met in Washington, D.C., in 1988 after both
served in the Peace Corps. They
married, had three children and
bounced around to different
countries and states before settling in Houston, where he made
a small fortune at a wind energy
company he co-founded.
Skelly now runs Clean Line
Energy Partners, which builds
long-haul transmission lines for
renewable energy. The couple
moved in 2015 from a wealthy
neighborhood to the old firehouse, located in a poorer part of
the city heavily populated by immigrants. They have purchased
six abandoned Victorian houses,
moved them to their street and
preserved them.
And, since epic rains and
winds began pummeling their
city, they have taken in strangers.
“We opened our doors . . . and
they opened their doors to us,”
said Rafael, 33, a factory worker
who is part of the family that
Skelly and Whitlock brought
home from the shelter. He asked
that his last name not be used,
because he is in the United States
illegally. His two nieces, a 6month-old and a dimpled 3-yearold, were born in the United
States.
Air mattresses were pulled
from the attic so everyone would
have a place to sleep. The evacuated adults pitched in to cook
meals, help with cleanup and
walk Whitlock and Skelly’s dog.
The owner of a nearby restaurant,
which had closed because of the
storm, got wind of the couple’s
efforts and donated tortillas,
chorizo and other foods.
Skelly and Whitlock said they
were inspired by former Houston
Mayor Bill White, who was in
charge of the city when Hurricane Katrina slammed into Louisiana 12 years ago. Thousands of
people were homeless, and many
cities did not want them. But
Houston did — and now thousands of Katrina survivors call
the city their home.
“Everybody is pressed into
service in some way,” Whitlock
said. “That’s pretty much the
story across the city.”
Stories of goodwill were easy to
find across the region, as about
10,000 people filled the convention center shelter and city, and
county officials opened additional enormous structures to house
more evacuees.
Abbey Kaler, her husband and
their newborn left their home in
West Houston before the storm to
stay with her parents in the suburb of Kingwood. When that area
flooded Tuesday morning, she
sent out a plea on Facebook,
asking whether anyone could
take in her family, her parents
and their four dogs.
A friend rescued them in an
inflatable raft, after Kaler
wrapped 3-week-old Emily in a
bedsheet and duct-taped her to
her body for safety. They ended
up in the home of longtime family
friends, who were out of town but
invited them to stay.
Neighbors “brought diapers
and wipes for Emily . . . formula,
bottles,” Kahler said. “I’ve never
“All across the city,
people are offering up
their homes . . .
bringing their friends, or
friends of friends of
friends, or new friends,
or whoever.”
Michael Skelly
even met these people.”
In the Heights neighborhood,
north of Rice University, John
Hoye learned that friends who
had just brought their baby home
from the neonatal intensive care
unit were without power because
of the hurricane. He invited them
to stay at his home, along with his
wife, their 2-year-old and his
in-laws, who had evacuated, as
well.
Hoye, 41, then turned his attention to a new effort he was calling
Heights Heroes, in which he is
trying to organize squads of volunteers to salvage belongings and
make repairs at flooded homes.
“It’s a chain reaction where
people are like, ‘Let’s get it done!’
” he said. “It’s about having some
good memories. You’re never going to forget rebuilding your life.”
maria.sacchetti@washpost.com
rachel.siegel@washpost.com
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THURSDAY, AUGUST 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
RE
The World
The grown princes as living tributes to Diana
On the 20th anniversary of her death, many say the Princess of Wales was a successful mother in extraordinary circumstances
BY K ARLA A DAM
AND W ILLIAM B OOTH
london — Princes William and
Harry are good lads — and either
would make a proper 21st-century king. Given all that has happened, that is amazing.
On the 20th anniversary of the
death of the People’s Princess, the
British people have reached a
consensus: Diana raised two relatively normal, capable, flawed but
decent, and maybe even exceptional sons, under extraordinary
circumstances.
That one of them, Harry, once
dressed up as a Nazi is mostly
forgotten. That the other, William, is a little dull is okay.
On Wednesday, the eve of the
anniversary of Diana’s death, the
princes paid tribute to their
mother by visiting a memorial
garden planted in her honor at
Kensington Palace, her former
home. Afterward, they stopped to
look at the flowers and messages
fans started leaving outside the
palace gates this week.
The princes also talked to some
of the onlookers who had braved
the soggy London weather to pay
their respects.
“Harry is really nice — I’m
shaking!” said Gracie Oxby, an
8-year-old who had a brief chat
with Harry before handing him a
bouquet of flowers that the prince
laid next to other floral tributes.
All eyes are now on the next
generation of royals as the world
remembers the strange and unsettling tabloid days surrounding
the death of Diana, killed in a
horrific car crash in a Paris tunnel
on Aug. 31, 1997.
William was 15 then; Harry was
12. That they were young and that
it was heartbreaking escaped no
one. Billions watched the televised
reports that day, one of the largest
global audiences ever assembled.
Since then, the pair has done
well. To recap, the princes got
through their teens and survived
their roaring 20s without fatal
embarrassments.
There was plenty of partying —
and some jousting with paparazzi outside nightclubs. But both
served honorably in the military,
which the British public applauded.
William was a pilot for the East
Anglian Air Ambulance until last
month. He had a day job. His crew
saved lives.
Harry served as an Apache attack helicopter pilot in Afghanistan. Two tours. He got high
marks for trying hard not to draw
too much attention to himself. Or
as the Sun put it in a tabloid
headline, “From wild nights to
fire fights: How Prince Harry became a man.”
Once dubbed the Party Prince,
the ginger-haired bachelor Harry
has settled down, a bit. He is dating
American actress Meghan Markle.
He understands your interest but
issued a statement through his
Kensington Palace spokesman
asking people to back off.
These days, William and Harry
are busy promoting charities that
seek to help disabled veterans
and those with AIDS. And, most
remarkable, they are speaking
out on the stigma surrounding
mental-health challenges — by
discussing their own, and by extension, very delicately, their
mother’s struggles. She suffered
JOHNNY EGGITT/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
ARTHUR EDWARDS/WPA POOL/GETTY IMAGES
TOP: Princess Diana and sons Harry, center, and William at the commemorations of V-J Day
in London in 1995. ABOVE: Prince William and Prince Harry arrive for the May wedding of
Pippa Middleton to James Matthews in Englefield Green outside London.
from depression and bulimia.
None of this was guaranteed.
That neither prince became a
punchline, an afterthought or
train wreck — growing up in the
selfie age under the all-seeing eye
of the most unforgiving tabloid
culture on earth — is remarkable.
Their parents, Charles and Diana, had a deeply unhappy public
marriage with the most lurid details splashed on the front pages
of the world’s newspapers for
years. The fascination continues.
A documentary that aired on
Britain’s Channel 4 two weeks ago
generated news about how much
sex — or not so much — Charles
and Diana were having as their
marriage cratered, mostly because Charles could not get
over his one true love, Camilla
Parker Bowles, whom he later
married and who is now the
Duchess of Cornwall.
Although many might wish
otherwise,
the
68-year-old
Charles will almost certainly be
king when his mother, the 91-
year-old Queen Elizabeth II, dies.
In Britain, at least now, Charles
appears a kind of afterthought, a
vintage image. The enduring moment from Diana’s funeral 20
years ago is not of Charles but of
sons William and Harry, walking
behind their mother’s flagdraped casket, their heads bowed
as they shuffled forward between
immense ranks of mourners,
most silent, but some wailing,
others nearly hysterical.
It was a “long and lonely walk,”
William says in a new BBC documentary, “Diana, 7 Days,” one of
several marking the 20th anniversary of Diana’s death. William
said he tried to hide behind his
floppy blond bangs, which were
like a “safety blanket.”
Reflecting on the experience
today, William says he had many
roles to play that day: He was a
grieving teenage son, yes, but he
was also Prince William, the nation’s future king.
There was a balance, he said,
“between me being Prince Wil-
liam and having to do my bit,
versus the private William who
just wanted to go into a room and
cry, who’d lost his mother.”
Until recently, William and
Harry have not spoken publicly
like this about their mother and
what it was like to cope with her
loss when they were so young.
It is hard to overstate just how
unusual it is, even in 2017, for the
queen’s subjects to see the princes
on the television talking so openly
about Diana.
The queen has ruled for more
than 65 years, and she has given
exactly zero interviews during
her long reign.
But William says he felt now
was an appropriate time to honor
his mother’s memory. In the two
documentaries, the princes paint
a portrait of a fun-loving, cool
mum who is dearly missed.
The princes light up when they
talk about Diana playing pranks
— from hiding candies in socks to
sending rude cards to her sons at
school to arranging supermodels
to surprise William at their
home.
“Our mother was a total kid,
through and through,” Harry says
in the HBO documentary “Diana,
Our Mother: Her Life and Legacy.”
In 2012, Harry was photographed naked in Las Vegas during a game of strip poker. He
didn’t really lose that hand.
Today, Harry, 32, lives in a cottage on the grounds of Kensington Palace.
In his post-army career, Harry
founded the Invictus Games, a
sporting event for disabled veterans. To help publicize it, he roped
in the queen for a promotional
video with the Obamas that went
viral on Twitter.
Proving that the royals have a
sense of humor.
His older brother, William, second in line for succession after his
father, Charles, is the less interesting one, with the thinning hair
and the glamorous wife. He
doesn’t have the same bad-boy
allure as his brother, but he hasn’t
fully escaped criticism from the
news media.
“Work-shy William” is his nickname in some tabloids, upset that
he hasn’t clocked up enough royal
duty hours. “Throne idle” said one
front-page headline in the Sun.
William defended himself
against the gibes, saying that he
was concentrating on being a
good father, pilot and a royal. But
he will soon be clocking up more
duties in service of the realm.
William and Kate, both 35, recently packed up the fam —
George, 4 and Charlotte, 2 — and
moved their main residence from
Anmer Hall in Norfolk, a relatively secluded area in eastern England, to Kensington Palace in the
bustling British capital. Prince
George starts school this fall in
Battersea, south London, a few
miles from the family home.
Both William and Harry are
now full-time royals, and as such
carry out “engagements” — as
they are called — on behalf of the
queen, and draw attention to various charities.
The queen — “the boss” as William has called her — is still very
much at the helm, but as she
gradually scales back her duties,
the younger generation is taking
on a greater role.
Despite their recent openness,
it’s widely reported that the princes loathe the media, and William
in particular comes across as
guarded.
In the BBC documentary, William said that when he saw his
mother crying, it was usually to
do with something connected to
the media. He said that this took a
toll on him and that he found it
difficult as a young boy who wanted to protect his mother from the
paparazzi.
“And I mean a pack, like a pack
of dogs, followed her, chased her,
harassed her, called her names,
spat at her, tried to get a reaction
to get that photograph of her lashing out, get her upset,” William
said.
The princes have signaled they
won’t be talking about Diana as
much in the future, but don’t expect them to stop talking about
the importance of expressing
feelings.
karla.adam@washpost.com
william.booth@washpost.com
Hospital in
India says
217 children
have died
A SSOCIATED P RESS
lucknow, india — Death continues to haunt a government
hospital in northern India that
came under fire earlier this
month after dozens of babies died
within two days.
P.K. Singh, head of the BRD
Medical College in Gorakhpur
city, said Wednesday that at least
217 children have died there this
month for a variety of reasons,
including an annual encephalitis
outbreak. Singh added that 42
children had died in the past 48
hours. Seven of the deaths were
from encephalitis, while the others were attributed to other medical complications.
The hospital found itself in the
middle of a media storm this
month when 33 children died
there Aug. 10 and 11 around the
same time as a disruption in the
facility’s oxygen supply. A team of
experts from New Delhi later said
the oxygen-supply interruption
was not responsible for the
deaths, but there was fury in
India over how the hospital let
the supply run out.
“Increase in fatality is because
of seasonal infection,” Singh said,
explaining the deaths. “There is
no shortage of oxygen or medicine in the hospital. Children died
only because of medical complication, not because of medical
negligence.”
It is well known that encephalitis wreaks havoc in the area
every year during the monsoon
season.
Experts say that this year, fatalities from encephalitis are expected to be high because of excessive
rains and flooding across eastern
Uttar Pradesh state, particularly
the area in and around Gorakhpur.
The city is about 150 miles east
of Lucknow, the capital of Uttar
Pradesh.
Medical experts say the government continues to be taken by
surprise and remains unprepared
for what is now an annual cycle of
disease and death.
“Any layman can tell you that
in view of flooding, the cases of
vector-borne diseases are likely to
go up. But what shocks me is that
the administration has taken no
preventive step,” said R.N. Singh,
a local expert who has worked
with encephalitis patients for
years. “There is no attempt to
prevent spread of communicative
diseases.”
Indian hospitals have been
routinely criticized for poor management, widespread corruption
and outright negligence.
Encephalitis has killed more
than 4,000 children and sickened
nearly 25,000 since 2010 in Uttar
Pradesh.
Acute encephalitis syndrome
causes patients to suffer from
fever, vomiting, headaches and
brain function problems such as
confusion, trouble speaking and
coma, along with seizures. The
condition can leave surviving
children paralyzed and mentally
impaired.
Outbreaks can be timed every
year to the monsoon season,
which runs from June through
September.
DIGEST
SAUDI ARABIA
JAPAN
1.7 million Muslims
gather for start of hajj
Official retracts remark
on Hitler’s intentions
More than 1.7 million pilgrims
marked the start of the hajj
pilgrimage on Wednesday by
circling the cube-shaped Kaaba in
Mecca, Saudi Arabia — Islam’s
holiest site — and performing
rites that trace the footsteps of the
prophet Muhammad.
The Kaaba represents the
metaphorical house of God and
the oneness of God in Islam.
Observant Muslims worldwide
face in the direction of the Kaaba
during their five daily prayers.
Over the years, the Saudi
government has spent billions of
dollars to improve the safety of
the pilgrimage, required of all
Muslims once in a lifetime. A
stampede in 2015 during the hajj
killed more than 2,400 people.
An Interior Ministry
spokesman said at a news
conference that 100,000-plus
security personnel are on the
ground in and around Mecca to
secure the hajj and assist pilgrims.
Japan’s deputy prime minister
on Wednesday retracted a
comment made a day earlier that
seemed to suggest that Nazi
leader Adolf Hitler had good
intentions.
Taro Aso was speaking at a
seminar for his faction in the
ruling Liberal Democratic Party
on Tuesday when he said: “I don’t
question a politician’s motives; it
is delivering results that matter.
Hitler, who killed millions of
people, was no good, even if his
intentions had been good.”
Aso said Wednesday that the
remark was “inappropriate” and
that he would like to retract it. He
said he meant that Hitler was a
bad leader with bad intentions.
Aso is also the finance minister
in Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s
cabinet and served as prime
minister in 2008-2009.
Aso in 2008 was criticized for
comparing the tactics of the
Democratic Party of Japan to
those of Nazis in 1930s Germany.
— Associated Press
MURAD SEZER/REUTERS
Turkish soldiers march during a ceremony in Istanbul marking
Victory Day, a national holiday commemorating the 1922 Battle of
Dumlupinar, one of the last and most decisive victories in the War of
Independence that led to the Turkish republic. Observances were also
And in 2013, he withdrew a
comment that seemed to suggest
that Japanese leaders should
follow Nazi Germany’s example in
changing the constitution.
— Associated Press
BURMA
18,000 Rohingya flee to
Bangladesh in a week
At least 18,000 Rohingya
Muslims have fled fresh violence
in Burma and crossed into
Bangladesh in less than a week,
with hundreds stranded in a
no man’s land at the border, the
International Organization for
Migration said Wednesday.
Human rights groups and
advocates for the Rohingya say
the Burmese army was burning
down villages and shooting
civilians in retaliation for attacks
last week by Rohingya militants.
The Burmese government
blames Rohingya insurgents for
the violence. Government figures
put the death toll since last week
at a minimum of 103.
Most of Buddhist-majority
Burma’s estimated 1 million
Rohingya live in northern
Rakhine state, where they face
persecution. Burma refuses to
recognize the Rohingya as a
legitimate native ethnic minority.
The U.N. refugee organization
on Tuesday urged Bangladesh to
continue to allow Rohingya
fleeing violence to seek safety.
Bangladeshi Prime Minister
Sheikh Hasina on Wednesday
urged the United States to put
pressure on Burma so that its
government stops pushing the
Rohingya toward Bangladesh, her
spokesman said.
— Associated Press
Brazilian judge suspends decree
allowing Amazon mining: A
Brazilian judge has suspended a
presidential decree that stripped
protections from a reserve in the
Amazon and would have allowed
mining. The order, issued last
week and later revised, lifted the
reserve designation from a goldrich area in two northern
Brazilian states. Environmental
groups said such a move could
cause environmental damage and
create conflicts between miners
and indigenous groups.
Hungary extends state of
emergency: The Hungarian
government has decided to
extend by six months, until March
2018, the state of emergency
declared early last year because of
the migrant crisis. A government
spokesman said strict border
controls were still needed
because the “threat of terrorism
in Europe has increased” recently.
— From news services
A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
Why do so many Indians support ‘godmen’?
The jailing of a popular
guru on a rape conviction
leaves a town reeling
BY S WATI G UPTA
AND V IDHI D OSHI
BY
MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Gurmeet Ram Rahim Singh, head of Dera Sacha Sauda, visits a village after a deadly earthquake in May 2015 in Nepal’s Nuwakot District.
styled “godmen” have amassed
fortunes selling branded products.
People buy into religious rhetoric, Ram said, because godmen are
often charismatic speakers and
make their followers feel part of a
fraternity.
“People from all walks of life go
and attend,” he said. Establishment religions such as Hinduism,
he said, trap lower castes at the
bottom of the social pyramid, offering them no way to rise. To
them, being part of the “alternative” religious clubs offers “equality, dignity and social justice,” he
said. “A poor man goes and finds
himself in a room with a minister,
and suddenly he feels, ‘Oh, God,
I’m not alone!’ ”
Inside the compound now
sealed off to the public, Singh lived
a life of luxury, surrounded by
doting followers who attended to
his every need. Luxury cars and
lavish furniture surrounded him.
The complex includes a hotel, an
auditorium for sermons and a
large meditation hall. His largerthan-life personality attracted
rich business executives and politicians who came to seek blessings
ahead of new ventures or elections.
To cater to the pious, grocery
shelves in the city are stacked high
with the guru’s branded products.
Movie theaters show films starring Singh, sometimes as a motorcycle-riding superhero. Shops are
plastered with photos of the rhinestone-garbed “rock star baba.”
“It has been profitable here,”
said Prabhu Ram, who sat under a
tree playing cards with friends.
“There has been employment for
the men in the factories, schools
for our children. Even the value of
land has appreciated.”
“We think of this place as heaven,” said his friend Parhlad Singh,
who works in one of the factories
run by the sect, cleaning and packing pulses, the grains common in
Indian cooking. “The work is
good, their product is good and I
am able to run my house on what I
earn.”
But now all of that seems in
jeopardy.
“Everyone fell silent, and it felt
like we had gone numb,” a resident
named Satbir Singh said of the
moment when the verdict was announced on television. “Our fa-
His joke political party
wants to lure nonvoters
to fend off the far-right
I SAAC S TANLEY- B ECKER
berlin — On posters blanketing
the German capital, a warning is
emblazoned: “We give a face to
the crisis.”
The visage is Nico Semsrott’s,
ghost white save the shadow cast
on his right cheek by the upturned hood of his black sweatshirt. He glowers. This is the face
of a hoodlum — gazing out from
placards advertising his campaign for the German Parliament. The election is next
month.
But crisis? What crisis?
Semsrott is not campaigning
in the United States, where emotions are red hot. This is Germany, where politics is seemingly untroubled. The chancellor,
Angela Merkel, is poised to claim
a fourth term, polls show. One
poster for her center-right party,
the Christian Democratic Union,
features a young woman lying in
the grass, sleeping. “Enjoy the
summer now and make the right
choice in the autumn,” the flyer
counsels, suggesting that voters
sleepwalk through the race.
But Semsrott would rather
voters snicker than snooze. He is
the leading candidate in Berlin
for Die PARTEI — the Party for
Labor, Rule of Law, Animal Protection, Promotion of Elites and
Grassroots Democratic Initiative. More aptly, “The Party.”
Founded in 2004 by the editors
of the satire magazine Titanic,
one of its members, Martin Sonneborn, sits in the European
Parliament.
The motto of the satirical
faction is “yes to politics, no to
politics” — a contradiction that
gets to the heart of Semsrott’s
mission. He is a professional
jokester with an earnest political
objective. By luring non-voters to
his joke party, he is trying to
diminish the share of support
Kremlin
says it got
email on
Trump deal
A NDREW R OTH
moscow — A spokesman for
ther has gone to jail, but we hope
someone keeps the organization
running.”
In a village less than a mile away
from the Dera sect’s headquarters,
a group of farmers sat in a muddy
field smoking a hookah pipe. “He
provided so much employment.
So much development,” said Mahaveer, who uses only his first
name. “We all think that the accusation was false.”
Shaking his head, Mahaveer
said, “The Sirsa district will fall
back now. I feel they should release him. Earlier, this was such a
desolate area. Now look at the
difference. We have public transport here, two fire engines and a
hospital. We have nothing else
that we need or want right now.
The Dera has given us every facility. We have schools to educate our
children. Colleges for them to
study as much as they want.”
A number of godmen like Singh
have held on to vast numbers of
followers despite allegations of
criminality. Baba Ramdev, a stomach-flexing yogi who led an anticorruption campaign, was investigated for tax evasion. Asaram
Bapu has been jailed on charges of
rape and criminal intimidation.
But supporters are willing to overlook crimes, Ram says, because
they see their own lives tangibly
improving after joining sects.
“It is a social protest for a new
identity,” Ram said, noting that
holy men are often praised for
their vast and wide-reaching social programs. Singh particularly
was known for huge blood-donation drives, anti-drug messages
and performing mass marriages
of sex workers.
“I have been a follower since the
beginning,” said Prabhu Ram. The
sentence was wrong, and harsh,
he said. “They have given hospitals; there are eye camps,” he said.
The state government, he added,
“would not have made all this
progress.”
A woman of 18 named Pinky
refuses to doubt Singh’s moral
character. “He did so much good.
He never did anything bad,” she
said as she washed cooking utensils in a drain alongside the road.
“I believe the rape charges are
false,” she whispered.
vidhi.doshi@washpost.com
Doshi reported from New Delhi.
A satirical comedian aims to shake up a sleepy German election
BY
AUGUST 31 , 2017
But Russians did not
send response in regard
to stalled Moscow project
sirsa, india — The guru sits in
jail now, and his town is already
showing the bleak signs of departing abundance. New factories
have their shutters rolled down,
men are complaining of unemployment, military guns are everywhere.
Sirsa, a town in northern India,
headquarters of the Dera Sacha
Sauda sect, is reeling without its
spiritual leader, Gurmeet Ram Rahim Singh, who was sentenced
Monday to 20 years’ imprisonment for raping two female followers.
The conviction came after a decade-long legal battle, during
which victims detailed their allegations of being invited into
Singh’s underground residence,
where they said he watched pornographic films and forced himself on them.
Minutes after the judge pronounced Singh guilty, violence
erupted in Sirsa and outside
Panchkula court, where Singh’s
devotees thronged the streets. A
total of 38 people lost their lives, as
rioters threw stones and torched
vehicles.
Ravinder Saini watched from
his roof as a government-run milk
factory burned. “For two days the
factory was burning. No one
came,” Saini said.
The riots have ended, but the
townspeople are fearful about
their future.
Singh claimed to have more
than 60 million followers. Garbed
in sequined costumes and gold
jewelry, which earned him the
nickname “guru of bling,” he produced outlandish music videos.
Over the years, Singh’s popularity
made Sirsa prosperous.
“From a purely business perspective, his organization was
good for me,” said Pradeep Saini, a
25-year-old shopkeeper.
Singh’s is hardly the only outsider sect to have found a foothold
in India. In this rapidly industrializing country, “alternative spirituality” persists alongside increasing levels of education and increased economic prosperity, said
Ronki Ram, a professor of political
science at Panjab University. Sermons from religious teachers are
beamed into homes on religious
channels, and a number of self-
. THURSDAY,
ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER/THE WASHINGTON POST
Nico Semsrott, a prank candidate running in the German election,
holds a campaign poster that says, “We give a face to the crisis.”
captured by Alternative for Germany (AfD), a nationalist, antiimmigrant party that needs 5
percent of the vote to enter
Parliament. AfD’s strategy is convincing voters, two years after
a massive influx of refugees, that
Germany is facing a crisis.
Semsrott uses humor to undermine this claim. He often
works through comparison: “If
you look at the numbers, it’s like
you have 82 German baboons
and then two other baboons
come in. Those two would have
to work really hard to Islamize
German society.” Another contrast he likes is between “enlightenment” and “fanaticism.” A human being, he says, is defined
by “experience, religion, political
views, mental health.” But a “fanatic,” he argues, “looks at the
same human being and says, ‘No,
he’s a Muslim.’ ”
Drawing on the example of
late-night American comedians
such as Stephen Colbert and
John Oliver, whose sets are also
news sources and coping mechanisms for liberals in the era of
President Trump, Semsrott’s approach suggests how comedy
might be directed toward more
specific and immediate political
aims. It also challenges long-held
assumptions about the severity
of German culture.
His work is gaining attention
but remains less firmly established than top late-night programming in the United States,
where Semsrott spent a year in
high school, in Mississippi, getting his first taste of American
show business: halftime shows
at high school football games.
His party isn’t polling above 5
percent, so it doesn’t register in
published surveys. But it got
about 80,000 votes — .2 percent
— in 2013, when it was on the
ballot in five of 16 states. This
year it’s on the ballot in all 16.
Semsrott
attracts
large
crowds; he is performing in January in front of 2,000 people in
the northern port city of Hamburg. But he began with an
audience of one: his therapist.
The same dark humor he uses
to lampoon the far-right party,
and its dire predictions of Islamic takeover, he employs to ward
off personal demons. The 31year-old has long struggled with
depression, an experience he
said sharpened his sense of tragedy, which is the main motif of
his routine.
“I do stand-up tragedy, not
comedy,” said Semsrott, who
grew up in Hamburg, where his
parents worked as teach-
ers. “Laughing distances you and
gets you closer at the same time.”
Semsrott was born on March
11, 1986 — a curse, he explained
in a performance this spring, as
1986 was the year of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in Soviet
Ukraine and March 11 the day of
the 2011 disaster in Fukushima,
Japan.
“I’m really eager to find out
what else my life will bring,” he
said, deadpan.
His training as a comedian
began at Catholic school, he
said. “I got my satirical education
from professionals. Catholic
ideas — that’s satire. Making
something up and selling it is
satire.”
He chafed at authority and
struggled to connect with other
people. He considered suicide,
completing more than 100 hours
of therapy between the age of 16
and 25, he said. “I’ve always just
felt lonely — whether in my
family or at school.”
He began college in Hamburg
but dropped out after six weeks.
“The stage was my last option,” he said.
About a decade ago, he started
going to poetry slams and simply
describing his depression, finding that audiences were drawn to
his blunt accounts of his own
feelings. He now visits schools
and mental clinics to prompt
frank discussion of taboo topics,
which he said is not customary
for Germans.
“I think the Second World War
is certainly one reason everything is so serious,” Semsrott
said. “Every society has its dark
spots, but maybe Germany more
than others. There’s not much
irony or play.”
Most commercially successful
comedy, he lamented, is slapstick. A hub of this sort of
entertainment, Theater am
Kurfürstendamm, is one of the
oldest and most popular private
theaters in Berlin. Still, its communications director, Brigitta
Valentin, said the theater struggles to be taken seriously — “not
to get an audience but to be
respected, because it’s not high
culture. It’s entertainment. In
Germany, there’s a split.”
The tradition in which Semsrott is rooted dates to the Weimar Republic of the early 20th
century, when satirical cabaret
wiggled loose from imperial censorship and took on political
themes, said Peter Jelavich, a
cultural and intellectual historian of Germany at Johns Hopkins University. After brutal suppression under the Nazis, political satire returned in the 1960s
and 1970s.
Present debates reflect this
anguished history, Jelavich said.
A signal example is a provocative
poem about Turkey’s president,
Recep Tayyip Erdogan, that last
year placed Jan Böhmermann, a
television comedian, at the center of a debate over humor and
free expression.
Some of Semsrott’s peers try to
meld modern stand-up with
more classic cabaret — but they
have less bite than their American counterparts.
“There’s nothing in Germany
that compares to the American
late-night industry,” Jelavich
said. “There’s also no reason to
have it. The politicians are not as
egregious, and, right now, the
stakes are not as high.”
That depends on one’s moral
standards, Semsrott said, pointing to problems lurking below
the surface, including short-term
labor contracts and slapdash efforts to stem the refugee flow.
But he isn’t spending much time
addressing these problems. Campaigning, he said, might involve
being shuttled around Berlin on
a rickshaw.
Semsrott’s is a strange, partial
faith in politics — in a way,
illustrative of uncertain political
currents, globally if not in Germany.
“Maybe it’s better Germany
doesn’t have someone like [former White House press secretary] Sean Spicer from a political
point of view, but wouldn’t it be
funny if we did?” he said.
Russian President Vladimir Putin
confirmed on Wednesday that he
had received a request for assistance on a stalled Trump Tower
real estate project in Moscow
from a close aide to President
Trump during the 2016 presidential campaign, but added that the
Kremlin did not respond to the
letter.
“I confirm that among a number of emails one from Mr. Michael Cohen came to us. This
indeed happened,” said Dmitry
Peskov, a personal spokesman for
Putin, during a telephone briefing with Russian and foreign
journalists. “But as far as we don’t
respond to business topics, this is
not our job, we did not send a
response.”
The stalled deal as described to
congressional investigators by
Cohen, a close aide to Trump
since 2007 who now serves as one
of his personal lawyers, was for a
licensing project between Trump
and a Moscow-based developer
called I.C. Expert Investment. According to Cohen, Trump signed a
letter of intent with the company
in October 2015, but added that
the project was later abandoned
for “business reasons.”
Peskov said that the email described a “Russian company together with certain people [who]
had the goal of creating a new
skyscraper in Moscow city, but
the deal is not moving forward,
and they were asking for some
recommendations and help advancing this deal.”
Peskov said that he had seen
the email but that it was not given
to Putin.
The email was sent in mid-January 2016 shortly before the first
Republican Party primaries, as
Trump stood out on the campaign
trail for his warm rhetoric about
the Russian president. It is one of
a number of contacts between
Trump associates and Russian
officials that have become the
subject of congressional inquiries
and an investigation led by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III
exploring Russian interference in
the 2016 election
Cohen has served as a personal
lawyer for Trump since January.
He did not have a formal role in
the campaign,
“Over the past few months I
have been working with a company based in Russia regarding the
development of a Trump TowerMoscow project in Moscow City,”
Cohen wrote to Peskov, according
to a person familiar with the
email. “Without getting into
lengthy specifics, the communication between our two sides has
stalled.
“As this project is too important, I am hereby requesting your
assistance. I respectfully request
someone, preferably you, contact
me so that I might discuss the
specifics as well as arranging
meetings with the appropriate
individuals. I thank you in advance for your assistance and
look forward to hearing from you
soon,” Cohen wrote.
The email was sent to a general
inbox used by the Kremlin press
service, which Peskov said receives thousands of emails pertaining to courts, law enforcement and business topics that the
Kremlin regularly passes on. In a
statement to Congress, Cohen
said he was encouraged to write
to Peskov by Felix Sater, a Russian
American businessman who was
serving as a broker on the deal.
Peskov, a former diplomat who
speaks fluent English and Turkish, is seen as one of several
gatekeepers to Putin and regularly travels with him on official
trips. He was appointed head of
the presidential press service during Putin’s first term in 2000, and
has served as a spokesman for
Putin in various roles since.
andrew.roth@washpost.com
isaac.stanley-becker
@washpost.com
©STEPHANIE KEITH /REUTERS
Luisa Beck and Alexandra Rojkov
contributed to this report.
Lawyer Michael Cohen worked
on the Moscow proposal.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
RE
Priest worries he can’t
return to North Korea
Travel limits may complicate humanitarian aid
BY
A NNA F IFIELD
seoul — The Rev. Gerard Hammond has been to North Korea
52 times. Or maybe it’s 53. It’s so
many times that he’s lost count.
But now, the 84-year-old Catholic priest from Philadelphia
fears he may not be able to go
again, because of new restrictions on U.S. travel to North
Korea that will go into effect
Friday.
“I can’t conceive that our
country would prohibit humanitarian aid,” said Hammond, the
superior of the Korean mission of
Maryknoll, the American Catholic Church’s overseas missionary
organization. “No country in the
world does that.”
The new travel restrictions
technically won’t ban U.S. humanitarian workers from traveling to North Korea. They will bar
Americans from traveling as
tourists and will require others,
such as aid workers and journalists, to get a special one-time
passport authorizing each trip.
But in practice, Americans like
Hammond are concerned that
the additional layer of bureaucracy — on top of international
sanctions that have made it hard
to send medicine and equipment
into North Korea, as well as the
idiosyncrasies of the North Korean system — will make an
effort that is already difficult
close to impossible.
Although the regulations will
go into effect this week, the State
Department was not able to give
even a ballpark time frame for
how long it will take to consider
and issue the special permits.
“Applications will be handled
on an individual basis, so we are
not able to speculate on how long
the process will take,” said Ashley Garrigus, a spokeswoman for
the department’s Bureau of Consular Affairs.
That is creating headaches for
aid organizations, academics
and sports people alike.
The Pyongyang University of
Hammond cannot
spread the word
of God while he is
in North Korea.
Science and Technology (PUST),
an American-run private institution, has 10 U.S. passport holders
on its campus who are trying to
figure out how to teach during
the fall term, which starts Monday.
“The U.S. citizens working at
PUST are eagerly praying and
waiting approval of the State
Department to return to PUST,”
said Park Chan-mo, the university’s chancellor.
George Vitale, a retired New
York City police officer who introduced taekwondo, the South
Korean martial art, to North
Korea, is waiting to find out if he
will be permitted to attend the
International Taekwondo Federation world championships, set
to be held in Pyongyang in
mid-September. Vitale, who has
promoted taekwondo as a form
of “ping-pong diplomacy,” helped
North Koreans participate in a
competition in the South in June
for the first time in a decade.
The restrictions are being imposed after the death of Otto
Warmbier, an American tourist,
in June after 17 months in North
Korean custody. Two Korean
Americans affiliated with PUST,
as well as a businessman, are
being detained in North Korea.
For Hammond and Maryknoll,
the new rules could spell the end
of an era, at least temporarily.
Maryknoll has had a mission
in Korea since 1922. Back then, it
was based in Pyongyang, the
northern city that was such a
center for religious activity that
it was dubbed “the Jerusalem of
the East.”
But after the civil war between
the Koreas broke out in 1950 —
during which several Catholic
priests were killed by communists in the North — the mission
moved its base to the South.
It was shortly afterward, in
1960, that the newly ordained
Hammond arrived at the southern port of Busan on his mission.
Fifty-seven years later, he’s still
here.
During these decades, the
Catholic Church has flourished
in South Korea, which has become the most Catholic country
in Asia after the Philippines.
North Korea, meanwhile, has
been run by a family of dictators
that bans outside religions, viewing them as an existential threat
to its personality cult.
But when a devastating famine arrived in the mid-1990s,
COURTESY OF THE REV. GERARD HAMMOND
The Rev. Gerard Hammond, 84,
has been ministering to TB
patients in North Korea.
North Korea allowed outside organizations, including religious
ones, in to help with the humanitarian crisis.
Hammond first went to North
Korea in 1995 to assist with the
famine relief. “I never felt that
going there was extraordinary
because Maryknoll had worked
in the North before the war,” he
said at the Fathers and Brothers
mission in Seoul.
He then became involved with
the Eugene Bell Foundation, an
American-run organization that
has treated more than a quartermillion tuberculosis patients in
North Korea. It is run by Stephen
Linton, also Philadelphia-born,
who comes from a line of Southern Presbyterian missionaries
who first arrived in Korea in
1895.
A decade ago, the foundation
began focusing on multi-drugresistant tuberculosis, a particularly pernicious form of infection
that does not respond to standard TB medication. This requires an 18-month course of
treatment; about three-quarters
of treated North Koreans recover.
Hammond’s role with the
foundation, he said prosaically, is
“sputum security.”
The priest accustomed to giving cups of wine for Communion
instead gives empty cups to patients, into which they provide
samples. Those are analyzed to
determine the six months’ worth
of medicine and dietary supplements each patient receives.
Hammond cannot spread the
word of God while he is in North
Korea. Nor can Linton, nor the
Christians associated with PUST,
which is run by Korean American missionaries. Doing so
would jeopardize their humanitarian efforts there.
But Hammond said he hopes
his actions speak for themselves.
“In the early church, they
didn’t have crucifixes or Roman
collars or Bibles, but people
knew they were Christian because they treated people with
kindness,” Hammond said.
The North Koreans he helps
don’t call him “Father” in the
Catholic sense. Instead, they call
him “Grandfather,” the Korean
term of address for elderly men
regardless of relation.
When Pope Francis visited
South Korea in 2014, he praised
Hammond for his “wonderful
work” in North Korea, the priest
recalled.
Earlier this month, Hammond
received the Gaudium et Spes
[Joy and Hope] Award from the
Knights of Columbus, the largest
lay group in the Catholic
Church.
The award — first given in
1992, to Mother Teresa — was
presented to Hammond for his
“heroic” work in North Korea. At
the ceremony, Archbishop William Lori of Baltimore said Hammond’s mission was the manifestation of mercy: “Visiting the
sick, comforting the afflicted,
and feeding the hungry in body
and soul.”
Hammond hopes to use the
$100,000 award money to build
new facilities in North Korea to
house terminal patients.
“I want to build some patient
rooms for the 20 percent of
people who are not cured so they
are able to die with dignity,” he
said. “Also, we don’t want them
to go back to their families and
spread the disease.”
But international sanctions
make it very difficult to export
any goods into North Korea,
whether or not they’re prohibited. The Eugene Bell Foundation
had difficulties getting its medicines out of South Korea last year
for this reason.
Now, Hammond is waiting to
hear whether he will be allowed
to go back to North Korea and
continue his work.
“Pope Francis wants us to go to
the periphery,” he said, characterizing North Korea as the definition of peripheral and his work
as the essence of Catholic — and
American — values. “If you have
any belief about anything, you
know that if people are suffering,
we should be helping them.”
anna.fifield@washpost.com
LOUAI BESHARA/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
The deal that allowed Islamic State fighters to travel to the Iraqi border — as seen on Aug. 28 — triggered anger among Hezbollah’s allies.
Coalition airstrike throws a wrench
into a Hezbollah-Islamic State deal
TURKEY
Bombed-out bridge stops
ISIS fighters on trip to
Syrian-Iraqi border
Qamishli
Aleppo
Tal Afar
Idlib
BY L IZ S LY
AND T AMER E L- G HOBASHY
Raqqa
Hama
beirut — U.S. warplanes on
Wednesday blocked a convoy of
hundreds of Islamic State fighters who were heading to eastern
Syria under the terms of a widely
criticized deal brokered by Lebanon’s Hezbollah movement.
The 310 fighters were traveling
to the Iraqi-Syrian border in a
convoy of buses after Hezbollah
and the Syrian government permitted them to withdraw from a
besieged enclave on the Lebanese-Syrian border.
The deal triggered a rare outburst of public anger against
Hezbollah even among some of
its closest allies, notably in Iraq,
which is gearing up for an offensive to reclaim Iraqi territory
adjoining the area to which the
fighters were relocating.
Negotiated withdrawals have
been a common tactic in Syria’s
six-year-old war and have enabled the Syrian government to
reassert its authority over many
of the areas that fell to opposition
control.
But this was the first publicly
announced instance of a deal
involving the Islamic State on any
battle front in Syria or Iraq since
the war against the group geared
up three years ago.
The criticisms laid bare a widening rift between the U.S.-led
coalition battling the Islamic
State and the rival coalition fighting the extremists that includes
the Shiite Hezbollah movement,
Syria and the Iranian-backed Shiite militias in Iraq.
On Wednesday morning, the
U.S.-led coalition moved to prevent the convoy from reaching its
destination, cratering the road
and blowing up a bridge leading
to the Islamic State-controlled
town of Bukamal on the Syrian
border with Iraq, according to a
U.S. military spokesman, Col.
Ryan Dillon.
Mt. Sinjar
Homs
SYRIA
Deir al-Zour DEIR AL-ZOUR
PROVINCE
Mayadeen
Palmyra
Bukamal
IRAQ
es
Euphrat River
Qaim
50 MILES
THE WASHINGTON POST
The strikes took place in the
vicinity of a desert town called
Hamaymah, and although front
lines are fluid in that part of
Syria, it is the U.S. military’s
understanding that the convoy is
stuck in Syrian government-held
territory, Dillon said.
“ISIS is a global threat, and to
relocate terrorists from one place
to another for someone else to
deal with is not acceptable to the
coalition,” he said, using an alternative acronym for the Islamic
State. “Our goal is to prevent this
deal a “great victory” in a televised speech on Monday.
“The number of those transferred was not big: 310 tired,
broken, militants who had surrendered and lost the willpower
to fight will not change the course
of the battle in Deir al-Zour,
where there are tens of thousands
of fighters,” Nasrallah said in a
statement on Wednesday, referring to the province where the
Islamic State fighters were headed. He pointed out that the fighters were being transferred from
“Our goal is to prevent this convoy from
moving to ISIS-held territory to reinforce
ISIS elements there.”
Col. Ryan Dillon, U.S. military spokesman
convoy from moving to ISIS-held
territory to reinforce ISIS elements there.”
The airstrikes did not target
the convoy itself because about
300 relatives are also traveling
with the Islamic State fighters, he
added. A U.S. military statement
subsequently said airstrikes targeted a number of individual
vehicles and fighters that were
“clearly identified as ISIS.”
The strikes and the criticisms
triggered a defensive response
from Hezbollah leader Hassan
Nasrallah, who had called the
one border region of Syria to
another, not to Iraq.
But the planned relocation of
the fighters to a town right on the
Iraqi border, where they would
have easily been able to reinforce
militants in Iraq, infuriated many
Iraqis. In addition to sending
thousands of fighters to help
Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, Hezbollah has provided
training and advice to some of the
Iranian-backed Shiite militias
fighting the Islamic State in Iraq,
and it is regarded by many as an
Iraqi ally.
The anger erupted after photographs showing the armed Islamic State fighters traveling across
Syria in air-conditioned buses —
one of them marked with the
words “Happy Journey” — began
circulating on social media. One
commentator called the deal
“selfish.” Another described it as a
“betrayal” of Iraq’s alliance with
Hezbollah, Syria and Lebanon.
Addressing a news conference
on Tuesday night, Iraqi Prime
Minister Haider al-Abadi called
for a public inquiry into how the
deal came about.
“We are fighting terrorists in
Iraq, not kicking them out to
Syria,” he said at a news conference on Tuesday. “They are terrorists: Why would one negotiate
with them in the first place?”
The leader of one of the Hezbollah-allied Iraqi militias refuted the criticisms. Hadi al-Amiri,
who heads the Badr Organization, said that negotiating with
the Islamic State could save lives
and that he wished there had
been a similar deal to avert the
high death toll in the battle for
the Iraqi city of Mosul.
“Personally, if I could have
negotiated with them in western
Mosul, I would have,” he said in
an interview in Mosul. “It’s better
than putting our soldiers and
civilians in harm’s way and destroying the city.”
Under the arrangement negotiated over the weekend, the
fighters and their relatives were
allowed to leave a remote mountainous area spanning the SyrianLebanese border for the desert
town of Bukamal on the Iraqi
border. In return, Hezbollah secured the bodies of nine captured
Lebanese soldiers who had been
kidnapped by the Islamic State in
2014, the bodies of three Hezbollah fighters and the body of an
Iranian military adviser who had
been decapitated by the Islamic
State during a battle on the Iraqi-Syrian border earlier this
month.
liz.sly@washpost.com
tamer.el-ghobashy@washpost.com
El-Ghobashy reported from Mosul.
Mustafa Salim, also in Mosul, and
Suzan Haidamous in Washington
contributed to this report.
U.S. executes successful missile-defense test
Hours afterward, Trump
tweets his opposition to
talks with North Korea
BY
D AN L AMOTHE
President Trump on Wednesday questioned why the United
States should keep open the
possibility of talks with North
Korea, hours after the U.S. military conducted a missile-defense test off the coast of Hawaii
that it said was successful.
The test came after North
Korea launched a ballistic missile over northern Japan early
Tuesday and warned it was the
first step in having a “Pacific
operation.” Late in the day in
Hawaii, the Navy and the Missile Defense Agency combined
to carry out what they termed a
“complex missile defense flight
test,” intercepting a mock medium-range ballistic missile using
guided missiles launched from
the destroyer USS John Paul
Jones.
The military used what it calls
“Standard Missile-6 weapons
to take out the ballistic missile
target, tracking it on radar
aboard the ship first. Lt. Gen.
Sam Greaves, director of the
Missile Defense Agency, said in
a statement afterward it was
working with the Navy “to develop this important new capability” and considered the test a
key milestone in building the
Navy’s Aegis missile-defense capability.
“We will continue developing
ballistic missile defense technologies to stay ahead of the
threat as it evolves,” Greaves
said.
In a tweet several hours later,
Trump accused North Korea of
taking “extortion money” from
the United States for the past
25 years, adding “Talking is not
the answer!”
The president posted the message as Defense Secretary Jim
Mattis was preparing to meet
Wednesday morning with Song
Young-moo, South Korea’s defense minister.
Mattis, asked Wednesday
morning at the Pentagon whether there are no diplomatic solutions when it comes to North
Korea, indicated there still are.
“No, we’re never out of diplomatic solutions,” he said. “We
continue to work together, and
the minister and I share a
responsibility to provide for the
protection of our nations, our
populations and our interests,
which is what we are here to
discuss today.”
The U.S. test, carried out off
the coast of Hawaii, marks the
second time the military has
successfully intercepted a medium-range ballistic missile target, military officials said. The
first one occurred in December.
Following closed-door deliberations Tuesday, the U.N. Security Council unanimously condemned the North Korean
launch but stopped short of
calling for additional sanctions.
Envoys from Japan and Britain backed additional penalties
on Wednesday, despite likely
opposition from veto-holding
powers China and Russia. In the
past, the United States has
worked with China to draft
economic penalties that China,
which is responsible for about
90 percent of North Korean
international commerce, can
support.
The latest, and strictest, penalties were imposed with a
unanimous vote on Aug. 5, but
China has not signaled it is
prepared to go further now.
dan.lamothe@washpost.com
Anne Gearan contributed to this
report.
A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
AUGUST 31 , 2017
Economy & Business
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Trump administration halts Obama-era rule to shrink gender wage gap
Ivanka Trump worried
the regulation wouldn’t
work as intended
BY
D ANIELLE P AQUETTE
The Trump administration has
halted a rule that would have
required large companies to report to the government what they
pay employees by race and gender
— an Obama-era policy that
aimed to close what economists
call the wage gap.
The decision Tuesday evening
prompted outrage from groups
that noted that women and minorities still aren’t receiving
equal pay for equal work. Some of
the furor was directed at President Trump’s daughter Ivanka
Trump, who has previously spoken out against wage disparities
and workplace discrimination.
Fatima Goss Graves, president
and chief executive of the National Women’s Law Center, said the
move contradicts President
Trump’s claim that he wants prosperity for every American.
“It’s not enough to say ‘equal
pay,’ ” Graves said. “It matters
what policies you stand behind.”
In a letter sent Tuesday to Victoria Lipnic, acting chairman of
the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), Neomi
Rao, administrator of the Office of
Information and Regulatory Affairs, said the Office of Management and Budget had paused the
government’s pay data collection
process to review it.
“OMB is concerned that some
aspects of the revised collection of
information lack practical utility,
are unnecessarily burdensome,
and do not adequately address
privacy and confidentiality issues,” Rao wrote, according to
documents obtained by The
Washington Post.
Ivanka Trump released a statement hours later.
“Ultimately, while I believe the
intention was good and agree that
pay transparency is important,
the proposed policy would not
yield the intended results,” she
said. “We look forward to continuing to work with EEOC, OMB,
Congress and all relevant stakeholders on robust policies aimed
at eliminating the gender wage
gap.”
A source close to Ivanka
Trump, who works as an unpaid
adviser to her father, said she
initially wanted to support the
measure. Then she consulted experts and worried that it wouldn’t
work as intended.
Graves said that Ivanka
Trump’s platform to fight discrimination at work now seems flimsy.
“We have seen her say the
words ‘equal pay’ and that she
supports equal pay,” Graves said,
“but halting an equal pay policy,
which would have brought transparency and improved enforcement and made employers more
accountable — that shows her
rhetoric doesn’t match reality.”
The Obama-era rule, which did
not require congressional approval, would have given the
EEOC more reach in its efforts to
investigate firms with glaring pay
disparities.
Starting next year, companies
with more than 100 employees
and federal contractors with at
least 50 would have had to report
more detailed salary data to the
EEOC on a form they already
annually submit to the agency.
As of today, only large federal
contractors provide such data to
the government. Earlier this year,
the Labor Department took the
technology giant Google to court
for what the government called
“extreme” pay disparities between men and women at the
company. (The case is ongoing.)
When
President
Barack
Obama’s rule was proposed in
January 2016, Jenny Yang, former
EEOC chairman, said that officials would not have shared how
much money individual employ-
ees make or how much firms pay,
but that they would have released
an annual report showing how
much workers in different kinds
of jobs earn by race and gender.
The updated form would have
grouped workers into 10 categories, from service employees to
managers to executives. It also
would have lumped them into 12
annual wage bands, from about
$19,000 to $208,000 and higher.
“Pay discrimination goes undetected because of a lack of accurate information about what people are paid,” Yang said at a White
House news conference last year.
“Collecting this pay data would
help fill a critical void we need to
ensure American workers receive
fair pay for their work.”
Some in the business community said the measure added an
unfair burden to a company’s
workload. Others said the data
would not have offered a clear
enough picture to right any economic wrongs.
Nancy Hammer, senior govern-
ment affairs policy counsel at the
Society for Human Resource
Management, a global business
group with 270,000 members,
said the expanded data-collection
process still lacked specificity to
find evidence of discrimination.
“We didn’t think it would help
them solve the issue they were
trying to solve, which is rooting
out pay discrimination,” Hammer
said. “Pay has a lot of variables,
and the way they collected the
data was in pretty big categories.”
Federal law has banned pay
discrimination since 1963. Women, though, still earn an average of
79 cents for every dollar paid to
men. The gap is larger for black
women, who take home 60 cents
for every white man’s dollar, and
Hispanic women, who average
55 cents.
Francine Blau, an economist at
Cornell University, found in a recent study that a woman’s career
decisions account for about
60 percent of the gap.
danielle.paquette@washpost.com
The raging legal battle over
what makes a food ‘natural’
In absence of guidance
by the FDA, baffled
consumers turn to suits
BY
C AITLIN D EWEY
More than a year after the Food
and Drug Administration signaled that it would soon nail
down exactly what the word “natural” means, the agency has yet to
provide any guidance — and baffled consumers are suing.
They’ve sued Sargento, the
dairy giant, because the cows behind its “natural” cheeses are given genetically modified feed.
They’ve sued Walmart over its
“all-natural” pita chips, which
contain thiamine mononitrate
and folic acid — both B vitamins
that are made synthetically.
They’ve even sued HINT, which
makes “all-natural” fruit-flavored
waters, for using a common solvent to boost the drink’s taste.
Since January, court filings
show that there’s been an uptick
in lawsuits against food companies regarding “all-natural” and
“natural” claims — and some lawyers say the FDA’s continued silence is to blame.
Nineteen all-natural class actions have been filed this year, as
of July. There were 27 such suits
for the entire year of 2016.
The suits, brought by individual consumers or small groups of
consumers, allege that “natural”
labels tricked shoppers into buying a more expensive item by
deceiving them about how the
product was made.
“It’s really striking that we’re
seeing this return to the types of
claims we were seeing two years
ago,” said Charles Sipos, a partner
at the law firm Perkins Coie who
defends food manufacturers.
“Plaintiffs are arguing that the
FDA hasn’t acted yet, and that’s
tantamount to an admission
they’re not going to act.”
Judges, consumer groups and
even manufacturers have long
called on government to intervene in the fraught debate over
what the word “natural” means on
a food label — much like the
words “wholesome” and “pure,”
which have also been the subject
of lawsuits.
According to a 2016 survey by
Consumer Reports, 73 percent of
consumers seek out products with
the “natural” label. But many erroneously believe it indicates a
food does not contain synthetic,
highly processed or genetically
modified ingredients, when in
fact there are no clear rules for
what “natural” is and isn’t.
Unofficially, the FDA says it
expects natural foods to have
“nothing artificial or synthetic
(including all color additives, regardless of source)” added.
In 2015, after more than 100
lawsuits and several requests
from judges, the FDA agreed to
take up the question and began
soliciting comments from the
public. The deadline, initially set
for February 2016, was delayed
until May of that year. The agency
has been mum since then on what
action it plans to take.
Deborah Kotz, an FDA spokeswoman, said the agency is “currently reviewing comments submitted . . . on use of the term
“natural” on food labels to help
determine next steps.” She did not
specify when those next steps
could be expected. (The rulemaking process is typically a time-consuming one and does not appear
to have any direct link to the
change in federal administrations.)
Until then, food manufacturers
are contending with a new wave
of “all-natural” lawsuits, including those aimed at Sargento, Walmart and HINT. In addition to the
looming FDA question, a January
ruling by a federal appeals court
in California that makes it easier
to register class-action suits has
made these companies vulnerable
to litigation.
The Sargento case is especially
interesting, as it does not allege
that the company’s “natural”
cheeses contain ingredients that
are artificial or genetically modified, themselves. Instead, the case
claims that the cows that produce
Sargento’s milk have eaten genetically modified feed or have been
treated with hormones or antibiotics.
“Reasonable consumers believe that if a cow consumes GMO
grass, corn, or soy, or is given rbST,
and then produces cream, the casein is not ‘Natural’ and products
derived from the casein, such as
cheese, are likewise not ‘Natural,’ ”
the complaint reads.
The plaintiff, Brittany Stanton,
is a Seattle woman who used to
buy Sargento cheese. She is represented by Michael Reese, an attorney who has filed numerous classaction suits over all-natural products on behalf of a range of consumers, and against a number of
companies.
Lawyers for Sargento have
pushed back, arguing that the
claims are “without legal basis.”
The company has also said that it’s
inappropriate for these decisions
to be made by anyone beside the
FDA, a common refrain among
critics of food-related class-action
suits.
LUCAS JACKSON/REUTERS
A shopper inspects the fresh produce at a Walmart in Secaucus, N.J., in 2015. Consumers have sued
Walmart over its “all-natural” pita chips, which contain synthetic B vitamins, and have filed 18 other
class-action suits related to “all-natural” labels this year as of July.
The Institute for Legal Reform
— an affiliate of the U.S. Chamber
of Commerce, which has pushed
for sweeping changes to the classaction system — maintains that
these suits are little more than
lawyerly tricks, intended to earn
big fees for attorneys and next to
nothing for plaintiffs.
The institute points to the recent proposed settlement in the
Subway foot-long case, which
claimed the chain’s sandwiches
aren’t always 12 inches long. It
would have awarded more than
$500,000 to plaintiffs’ attorneys,
and $500 each to a handful of
plaintiffs. A judge in Milwaukee
threw the settlement out this
week, calling the whole case a
“racket.”
That’s true of most “all-natural”
suits as well, the institute says. It
claims that most consumers are
hurt by food class-actions because
companies may raise their prices
to cover the cost of fighting litigation.
“The consumers are really getting nothing,” said Lisa Rickard,
the president of the Institute for
Legal Reform. “But the lawyers
are walking away with huge settlements. It's ridiculous.”
That said, even Rickard acknowledges that food-related
class-action suits can serve a legitimate purpose. Some of these
suits — originally a tactic of public-health groups, concerned
about lax FDA enforcement — can
identify gaps in existing regula-
tion and force the FDA to close
them.
That is certainly what began to
happen in the case of “natural,”
said Sipos, the Perkins Coie attorney. Now he and other lawyers
who defend food makers are hoping to see the agency finish what it
started.
Until then, Sipos and others
aren't expecting the trend to
change.
“This seems to be where the
cases are for the time being,” he
said. “The only difference right
now is that we’re seeing more of
them.”
New America, a liberal think tank
funded by the company, about
Barry Lynn, the head of its
antitrust program, after he
publicly congratulated the
European Commission on the
record $2.7 billion fine and urged
U.S. regulators to follow suit.
Lynn said New America
president Anne-Marie Slaughter
gave in to pressure from
Alphabet chair Eric Schmidt.
Slaughter said in a statement
the claim “is absolutely false.” The
group decided to terminate Lynn
after “repeated refusal to adhere
to New America’s standards of
openness and institutional
collegiality,” she said, adding they
were spinning off Lynn’s group as
an independent program.
The leisure and hospitality sector
added 51,000 workers. The
figures indicate employers still
expect the economy to expand, so
they’re bolstering their staffs.
caitlin.dewey@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/wonkblog
DIGEST
ECONOMY
U.S. reports 3 percent
growth in 2nd quarter
The U.S. economy grew at a
brisk 3 percent pace in the April
to June quarter, the Commerce
Department said Wednesday — a
report welcomed by President
Trump, who has repeatedly
vowed he can propel the country
to faster growth.
“We just announced that we
hit 3 percent in GDP. It just came
out,” Trump said at a rally in
Springfield, Mo. “I think we can
go much higher than 3 percent.”
The rate, revised up from the
initial estimate of 2.6 percent,
was the strongest quarterly
growth for the United States in
more than two years. Americans
spent more money at stores and
restaurants and on other
services, and businesses invested
more in equipment and research.
While the private sector surged
ahead, however, government
spending shrank, especially at
the state and local level.
The White House has
promised Trump can achieve
3 percent growth for the year, far
higher than the 2 percent average
under President Barack Obama.
For Trump to achieve his goal
in 2017, he will need the
economy to accelerate at an even
faster rate the rest of the year to
make up for the sluggish 1.2
percent growth in the JanuaryMarch quarter. But few
economists are optimistic that
will happen.
— Heather Long
TECHNOLOGY
Alexa, Cortana to start
talking to each other
Alexa, meet Cortana.
Microsoft and Amazon are
pairing their voice assistants
together in a collaboration
announced Wednesday.
The companies said that this
fall users will be able to access
Alexa using Cortana on Windows
10 computers and Android and
Apple devices. They’ll be able to
access Cortana on Alexa-enabled
devices such as Amazon Echo.
Microsoft said the link will
allow Alexa customers to get
access to Cortana features such
as those for booking meetings
or accessing work calendars.
Cortana users, in turn, can
ask Alexa to switch on smart
home devices or shop on
Amazon.com.
— Associated Press
REGIS DUVIGNAU/REUTERS
A mechanic examines secondhand bicycles in Ecocycle, which sells
new and used models, in Bordeaux, France, on Wednesday.
— Bloomberg News
ALSO IN BUSINESS
INTERNET
Google denies helping
oust nonprofit scholar
Google rejected the claims of a
think tank scholar Wednesday
who said the company had played
a role in ousting him from the
nonprofit after he praised the
European Commission’s decision
to fine the tech giant in June.
“We don’t agree with every
group 100 percent of the time,
and while we sometimes
respectfully disagree, we respect
each group’s independence,
personnel decisions, and policy
perspectives,” said Alphabet
spokeswoman Riva Sciuto.
The statement came in
response to a report in the New
York Times that the Alphabet
unit of Google had complained to
U.S. businesses added a healthy
237,000 jobs in August with
broad gains across several
industries, according to a private
survey. Payroll processor ADP
said Wednesday the hiring was
spread among large companies
with more than 1,000 employees
and medium and small firms
with fewer than 500 workers.
Manufacturers added 16,000
jobs, and builders hired 18,000.
A test version of a spacecraft
resembling a mini space shuttle
has been carried aloft over the
Mojave Desert by a helicopter
ahead of a free flight in which it
will be released to autonomously
land on a runway. Sierra Nevada’s
Dream Chaser was lifted off the
ground Wednesday morning on
Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. A
control team sent commands to
the wingless vehicle and collected
data before the helicopter brought
it down less than two hours later.
The spacecraft is being developed
for missions to and from the
International Space Station.
— From news reports
COMING TODAY
8:30 a.m.: Commerce
Department releases personal
income and spending for July.
10 a.m.: Freddie Mac releases
weekly mortgage rates.
10 a.m.: National Association of
Realtors releases pending home
sales index for July.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A17
SU
After Trump’s Mideast visit, crackdown in Egypt intensified
EGYPT FROM A1
is at risk of having this happen to
him these days.”
Said’s death is part of a spike in
extrajudicial killings and other
forms of state abuses that have
been committed in recent
months under President Abdel
Fatah al-Sissi, according to activists, victims and their families.
They date the dramatic rise to
President Trump’s visit to the
Middle East in May, in which he
urged Arab leaders to take a
tougher stance against Islamist
extremists and made clear that
human rights would not be a high
priority for his administration in
its dealings with regional allies.
State security forces have arrested dozens of opposition party
members. More than 100 websites deemed critical of Sissi’s
government have been blocked.
Human rights lawyers and activists have been jailed for staging
protests, and their assets have
been frozen. The judiciary is being stacked with pro-Sissi appointees, lawyers and judges say.
In July alone, there were 61
reported extrajudicial killings,
more than double the total over
the previous six months, according to the Egyptian Commission
for Rights and Freedom.
“The arrest campaigns have
become fiercer, and the numbers
of people and groups being targeted are scary,” said Asmaa
Naem, 27, a human rights lawyer
in the northern city of Alexandria. “This is reaching even apolitical people, not just those who
are politically active.”
The Egyptian government did
not respond to repeated requests
for comment.
Previous U.S. administrations
denounced Egypt’s rulers for
abuses and pressed for democratic reforms, often using the
$1.3 billion in U.S. military aid
Egypt receives annually — second
only to Israel — as leverage.
President Barack Obama froze
part of that aid for two years after
Egypt’s military, then led by Sissi,
overthrew the elected Muslim
Brotherhood government of Mohamed Morsi.
But Trump has embraced Sissi,
even inviting him to the White
House, something Obama never
did. Trump’s trip to Saudi Arabia
was widely seen as solidifying a
new relationship focused on combating terrorism.
“The visit has emboldened the
Arab rulers that whatever violations they commit against their
people are going to be accepted
by the Trump administration,”
said Gamal Eid, executive director of the Arabic Network for
Human Rights Information.
“This gave Sissi the green light to
increase the repression. He’s been
empowered.”
Early last week, the United
States notified Egypt that it
would slash or delay more than
$290 million in military and economic aid, partly in response to a
law that undermines nongovernmental organizations. “We remain concerned about Egypt’s
lack of progress in key areas,
including human rights and the
new NGO law,” said a State Department official, speaking on the
condition of anonymity as per
diplomatic protocol.
The cuts surprised many observers and angered the Sissi
government. But last Thursday,
Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, met with Sissi in Cairo. Sissi’s
office said that Trump phoned to
stress “the strength of the friendship between both countries” and
that their conversation “showed
Trump’s keenness to step over
any obstacles facing this friendship.” A U.S. official confirmed
the call.
The State Department official
said the administration “will continue to support Egypt in defeating extremists and terrorism.”
Egypt should eventually get
$195 million of the restricted aid
slated to fight internal security
threats and terrorism, U.S. officials said.
In speeches, Sissi has declared
war against Islamist extremist
groups, including an Islamic
State affiliate based in the northern Sinai and its counterparts in
neighboring war-divided Libya.
But under the guise of fighting
terrorism, security forces are also
cracking down on moderate Islamists and secular opponents, as
well as independent media. Since
taking office in 2014, Sissi has
jailed thousands of members of
the now-outlawed Muslim Brotherhood.
With a presidential election
scheduled for next year, Sissi is
facing mounting criticism over
rising prices and reduced government subsidies. Critics say he’s
clamping down on dissent to
prevent a repeat of the revolts
that ousted President Hosni
Mubarak during the Arab Spring
uprising six years ago.
Two days later, the ministry
issued another statement: Said’s
friend had also been killed in a
gun battle with police, it said.
Four days after Trump’s visit to
Saudi Arabia, the website of an
independent Egyptian newspaper, Mada Masr, was shut down.
Lina Attalah, the paper’s top editor, initially thought it was a
problem with the Internet provider. “Egypt was never a country
that used to block websites,” Attalah said. “It was never like China
or Syria.”
That was the start of a government campaign to censor the
Internet. By early August, 133
websites had been blocked, including privately owned media,
NGOs and human rights groups,
activists say.
Egypt has also blocked several
websites based in Qatar, including the Al Jazeera news network,
as part of a Saudi-led alliance that
has severed ties with the tiny
nation. The countries accuse
Qatar of backing terrorism,
which it has denied.
Mada Masr is now publishing
articles via Facebook and Twitter.
But even that is under threat: A
proposed law, also in the name of
fighting terrorism, seeks to restrict the public’s access to social
media.
“Before the revolution, there
was little margin in which we
could operate as independent
journalists or human rights defenders or women’s rights activists,” Attalah said. “Right now,
this margin is becoming tighter
like no other time.”
Egypt’s parliament passed the
NGO law last year, but it was
shelved following international
condemnation. Eight days after
Trump’s visit to the region, the
government ratified a similar law
that makes it more difficult for
the groups to raise money and
prohibits them from engaging in
‘They killed him’
Said was visiting Alexandria
when he vanished. A friend traveled there to find him, and he,
too, disappeared. Sabry said her
family’s Cairo apartment was
raided by state security agents.
The family filed a case with the
government and found a human
rights lawyer.
For the next month, she and
her family searched police stations and prisons for her father.
Then, in late June, the Interior
Ministry said in a statement on
its Facebook page that Said had
been killed in a clash with police.
“I dropped my phone and
screamed: ‘They killed him. They
killed him,’ ” Sabry said.
political activities that “harm national security.” Violators could
face prison sentences of up to five
years.
“It means the death of civil
society,” said Nour Khalil, an
Egyptian human rights activist.
Under Sissi, thousands of people have vanished into the state’s
security apparatus, but until recently, most were eventually
found at police stations, often
after being tortured and facing
charges. “But now our biggest
hope is to find that person alive,”
said Khalil, a slim, thin-bearded
24-year-old who has been detained and imprisoned, and who
tracks “forced disappearances.”
“Sissi is using terrorism as an
excuse to do whatever he wants,”
he said. “Now, he’s trying to
control the political scene in the
name of fighting terrorism.”
The members are being held
on what Amnesty International
described as “a series of vaguely
worded counterterrorism-related
charges.” If convicted, they could
be sent to prison for five to 25
years.
“There used to be harassment
against us,” said Naem, the lawyer
in Alexandria, who is also a Bread
and Freedom Party member.
“Now, it’s much more violent and
apparent.”
In mid-June, Naem and five
other lawyers were arrested for
protesting parliament’s decision
to hand over the two islands to
Saudi Arabia despite the court’s
ruling against the transfer. They
were charged with demonstrating without permission and fined
$2,700 each. One lawyer was
jailed.
A law passed in March allows
Sissi to appoint judges, and he
recently replaced two senior justices with pro-government ones,
activists said. One of the ousted
judges, Yehya al-Dakroury, issued
the first ruling last year that
nullified the island handover.
“I no longer have trust in the
judicial system,” said Eid, the
human rights lawyer.
Nor does he have any faith that
Washington’s sanctions will pressure Sissi to respect basic freedoms or improve human rights,
he said.
Increasingly, Eid’s world is
closing in on him. He has been
banned from traveling outside
the country, and his assets have
been frozen. And this month, his
NGO’s website was shut down.
‘Sending a message’
Khaled Ali, a human rights
lawyer and opposition politician,
was detained for “violating public
morals” the day after Trump left
Saudi Arabia.
The charges stemmed from a
January photo showing Ali celebrating outside a court after a
government decision to hand
over two Red Sea islands to Saudi
Arabia was reversed.
In the photo, government prosecutors allege Ali was flashing the
middle finger.
But pro-democracy activists
saw a different motive for the
charges, which came four months
after the incident. Ali is the
founder of the Bread and Freedom Party and recently announced his intention to run for
president. If convicted, he faces a
year in prison and a fine.
And he will be legally barred
from running for president.
“They are sending a message to
intimidate society,” Ali said.
Dozens from several political
parties were arrested in May and
June in late-night sweeps, including 30 members of the Bread and
Freedom Party. Five are still in
jail, he said.
sudarsan.raghavan@washpost.com
Heba Farouk Mahfouz contributed to
this report.
THE MARKETS
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Daily Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
22,300
Close
YTD
% Chg
21,892.43
+0.1
+10.8
21,400
20,500
19,600
18,700
17,800
Nasdaq Composite Index
6500
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
6368.31
+1.1
+18.3
Daily
% Chg
Industry Group
Construction Materials
Biotechnology
Trading Co's & Distr
Internet & Catalog Retail
Communications Equipment
Power Prodct & Enrgy Trdr
Multi-Utilities
Water Utilities
Metals & Mining
Diversified Consumer Svcs
0
–9.0%
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
+9.0%
4.97
2.46
2.26
1.46
1.42
–0.68
–0.74
–0.78
–1.06
–8.28
5500
5000
S&P 500 Index
2457.59
+0.5
+9.8
2500
2350
2200
2050
S
O
N
D
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DuPont
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
203.69
85.69
163.35
240.46
117.55
107.73
31.99
45.39
83.19
76.10
24.28
222.42
150.00
142.56
34.89
0.4
0.3
0.3
0.0
1.3
–0.1
1.6
–0.1
1.2
–0.5
–0.7
1.1
0.1
–0.4
0.5
14.1
15.7
41.0
54.5
26.8
–8.5
5.9
9.5
13.3
–15.7
–23.2
–7.1
11.9
–14.1
–3.8
Company
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
Wal-Mart
Walt Disney
131.07
91.31
159.53
63.12
74.01
52.56
91.87
33.45
121.81
119.60
195.88
48.12
103.73
78.54
102.87
–0.9
0.2
0.1
0.0
1.3
–0.3
–0.5
–0.1
–1.0
0.8
–0.4
–0.8
0.0
–0.3
0.3
13.8
5.8
31.1
7.2
19.1
3.4
9.3
3.0
–0.5
9.1
22.4
–9.9
33.0
13.6
–1.3
Close
Daily
% Chg
70,886.26
15,133.13
51,175.96
–0.6
0.3
–0.3
371.01
5056.34
12,002.47
7365.26
0.7
0.5
0.5
0.4
5669.72
3834.30
28,094.61
19,506.54
0.0
0.0
1.2
0.7
YTD % Chg
–30%
0%
+30%
US $
EU € per
0.8416
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.1882
0.0090
1.2919
0.3166
0.7918
0.0564
0.0076
1.0873
0.2663
0.6663
0.0475
142.5570
34.9357
87.3700
6.2236
0.2450
0.6129
0.0437
2.5004
0.1782
Japan ¥ per
110.3500
131.1100
Britain £ per
0.7741
0.9197
0.0070
Brazil R$ per
3.1589
3.7535
0.0286
4.0806
Canada $ per
1.2630
1.5006
0.0114
1.6316
0.3998
Mexico $ per
17.7305
21.0671
0.1610
22.9064
5.6130
Mexico $
0.0712
14.0384
Gainers
Aerovironment Inc
Orion Group
Incyte Corp
US Concrete Inc
Kopin Corp
Brown Shoe
American Axle & Mfg
Gilead Sciences
Eagle Materials Inc
AR Best
Bob Evans Farms
Cohu Inc
Vitamin Shoppe Inc
QuinStreet Inc
Martin Marietta
Analog Devices
Echo Global Log
AK Steel Holding
Group 1 Automotive
Avis Budget Group
Consumer Rates
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 25,395.32
Russell 2000
1391.32
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 493.22
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
11.22
Daily % Chg
0.5
0.6
0.5
–4.1
YTD % Chg
9.1
2.5
10.3
–20.1
0.26
0.43
0.73
1.45
2.57
5.28
Money market funds
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FLOORING
FALL KICK-OFF SALE!
AUG 23 - SEPT 5
4.25%
Bank Prime
1.25%
Federal Funds
1.32%
LIBOR 3-Month
3.69%
Daily
% Chg
$1.3005
$17.50
$9.3325
$0.1391
$4.2975
–0.8
–0.1
–0.4
+0.7
0.0
day
month
$1200
$1000
$800
–2.5
–0.4
–0.5
0.3
1.3
1.8
–0.8
–0.3
–1.1
Daily
Close % Chg
$46.52
$6.28
$138.27
$81.40
$4.11
$26.71
$14.59
$81.23
$97.62
$29.80
$68.44
$18.90
$5.30
$5.33
$213.80
$83.72
$15.15
$5.77
$57.59
$35.06
18.2
12.3
10.6
9.9
8.2
7.7
7.4
7.2
6.6
6.6
6.4
6.3
6.0
5.8
5.4
5.2
5.2
4.9
4.8
4.8
Losers
Barnes & Noble Edu
Vera Bradley Inc
H&R Block Inc
Dycom Industries
Bristow Group Inc
Black Box Corp
Medicines Co
Ensco PLC
Barnes & Noble
Atwood Oceanics
Vista Outdoor Inc
Super Micro Comp
Enanta Pharma
Era Group Inc
Lumber Liquidators
Impax Laboratories
Freeport-McMoRan
Movado Group Inc
Chico's FAS Inc
Fossil Group Inc
30-Year fixed mortgage
2.96%
10-year note
Yield: 2.14
2-year note
Yield: 1.33
5-year note
Yield: 1.72
6-month bill
Yield: 1.10
Daily
Close % Chg
$5.61
$9.14
$26.81
$76.07
$8.21
$3.00
$36.43
$4.35
$7.25
$6.80
$20.89
$25.85
$42.37
$8.96
$37.11
$17.95
$14.56
$27.30
$7.52
$8.55
–17.7
–9.2
–8.3
–7.3
–7.2
–6.3
–6.0
–5.4
–5.2
–5.2
–5.1
–5.0
–4.9
–4.7
–4.7
–4.5
–4.3
–4.2
–4.0
–3.8
15-Year fixed mortgage
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A18
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
AUGUST 31 , 2017
Nearly 22 million comments sent to FCC on net neutrality
Deadline for public
to weigh in on GOP plan
to roll back rules passes
BY
B RIAN F UNG
nications
Commission.
By
Wednesday — the last day of the
public-comment period — nearly
22 million comments had been
filed in the net neutrality docket,
with more than 8.5 million in the
past month alone.
Here’s why technology experts
see this as such a big deal.
What is net neutrality?
The push to undo the government’s net neutrality rules for Internet providers has intensified a
debate that could have sweeping
implications for the future of the
Web. Industry officials argue that
deregulation will spark renewed
investment in America’s Internet
networks, but consumer groups
slam the proposal as a handout to
big businesses and a threat to consumer choice.
For the past several weeks, the
public has had a chance to weigh
in on the issue by submitting their
comments to the Federal Commu-
Net neutrality is the idea that
your Internet service provider, be
it Comcast, Verizon, AT&T or
Charter, shouldn’t be allowed to
arbitrarily manipulate Internet
content you’ve requested as it
travels across their networks. It’s a
concept that says all websites, applications and services should be
equally accessible to the consumer
and not slowed down, blocked or
subjected to extra fees before it
reaches your screen.
In 2015, the FCC approved a set
of rules that sought to codify that
principle into practice. Led by
Democrats, the FCC rammed the
proposal through over the objections of Republicans — some of the
same officials who now control the
FCC in the Trump era.
The Republicans are the ones
who want to undo the rules?
Yes. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai has
made no secret of his opposition to
the regulations his predecessor
put in place. When the rules first
passed, he called them “intrusive
government regulations that
won’t work to solve a problem that
doesn’t exist using legal authority
the FCC doesn’t have.”
Pai argued that Internet providers weren’t interested in blocking
websites or throttling content, so
there is no need for the FCC’s
“Open Internet Order” prohibiting the practice.
Is that really true?
Some Internet providers have
pledged to uphold the ideals of net
neutrality. Comcast has said it
supports strong and legally enforceable net neutrality rules.
Other industry groups, such as
the cable trade association NCTA,
have made similar pledges.
Companies that make misleading or deceptive statements in
their marketing are at risk of a
lawsuit or other enforcement by
the Federal Trade Commission.
You can probably rely on the specifics of these pledges, so far as
they go. But it means how words
are defined, and what isn’t being
said, is just as important as what is
being said.
What about the idea that Internet providers support net
neutrality?
Internet providers have said
while they back “net neutrality,”
they don’t support the FCC’s rules,
which sought to regulate providers in the same way as legacy
telephone companies. Proponents, however, said this “reclassi-
fication” approach was the only
way the principle of net neutrality
could properly be preserved. Industry supporters say there are
other ways you could do it, such as
with an act of Congress or by using
a different part of the FCC’s powers. Critics of the latter option say
it’s fraught with loopholes and opportunities for Internet providers
to game the system.
And that brings us back to
what isn’t being said?
Right. Even though many Internet providers are willing to say
they won’t block content, that’s
not the only tactic the industry has
considered as it tries to adapt to a
rapidly changing business environment. Providers have considered giving discounts if you allow
them to sell your browsing history; giving you “free” access to
Netflix and Spotify if you agree to a
lower-quality stream; getting users to watch proprietary TV con-
tent over cellular data. Each of
these models has ostensible benefits as well as drawbacks to the
consumer. The question is: How
far can carriers go to find new
ways to profit off everyone who
uses the Internet, including websites and app developers?
That’s ultimately what the net
neutrality fight is all about. And
even as Internet providers claim
to support strong rules, or oppose
blocking and throttling, rest assured that those same companies
are constantly on the lookout for
revenue schemes that challenge
conventional assumptions about
what it means to be an Internet
provider. They’ll be seeking to
shape any net neutrality regulation in ways that permit them to
keep experimenting.
brian.fung@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/the-switch
Trump’s speech on tax
reform rekindles debate
President wants to cut
corporate rate to 15%,
but will that create jobs?
BY
BILL O’LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST
At a joint news conference Monday with Finnish President Sauli Niinisto, President Trump said Finland is buying “large amounts of our
great F-18 aircraft from Boeing.” Later, Niinisto said that Finland is still determining which company’s planes to order.
Finland denies it agreed to buy Boeing fighter jets
BY
A ARON G REGG
A competition to replace Finland’s aging fleet of fighter jets
became an unexpected point of
contention this week when American and Finnish leaders offered
conflicting statements about
whether the new planes would be
purchased from an American company.
The Finnish military is looking
to replace its fleet of 62 Boeing
F/A-18 Super Hornet jets, which
are to be decommissioned in 2025.
The country’s Defense Ministry
has identified five planes that
could fit its requirements, including Boeing’s F-18 Super Hornet
and Lockheed Martin’s F-35 Joint
Strike Fighter and offerings from
European competitors. But a procurement decision on what plane
would replace them is not expected until 2021, a media counselor
for the Finnish Embassy in Washington said Wednesday.
That didn’t stop President
Trump from saying in a Monday
news conference that Finland
would be buying F-18 fighter
planes from Boeing.
“One of the things that is happening is you’re purchasing large
amounts of our great F-18 aircraft
from Boeing, and it’s one of the
great planes, one of the great fighter jets, and you’re purchasing lots
of other military equipment, and, I
think, purchasing very wisely,”
Trump said.
Finnish President Sauli Niinisto
appeared startled and immediately looked in Trump’s direction
upon hearing the comments. Niinisto later pushed back against
the comments in a tweet Monday
that translates to “the news of the
purchase of the F-18 fighter planes
is a duck.” He used a Finnish word
“ankka” commonly used to describe a falsehood, similar to “canard” in English, or maybe “fake
news” in the U.S. vernacular.
“The cultural interpretation: a
‘news duck’ in Finnish means the
news is totally not true,” said Sanna Kangasharju, a media counselor with the Finnish Embassy in
Washington.
Niinisto later clarified his comments in a Washington news conference, saying the Finnish military is still in the early stages of
determining which plane it would
buy.
“The purchase is just starting,
and that is very clear here,” Niinisto told reporters.
Industry analysts said both
presidents’ public statements on
the competition represent a worrying departure from how military
agencies have traditionally set
procurement priorities.
The outcomes of such competitions are often closely tied into the
geopolitical priorities of whatever
government is buying the planes,
and it is not uncommon for officials to lobby in favor of domestic
manufacturers. But final decisions on what plane to purchase
are meant to be determined
through analysis on the part of
seasoned bureaucrats, with pricing and requirements negotiated
privately with the companies involved.
Taking sides in a competition is
seen as a departure from the norm.
“This kind of thing should be
left to professionals. . . . That’s why
countries like the U.S. and Finland
have qualified procurement professionals who look at strategic
needs, economics and other factors,” said Richard Aboulafia, an
analyst with aerospace consultancy Teal Group.
“Or you can just tweet about it,”
he added.
For Trump, elevating weapons
procurement decisions through
highly trafficked tweets and offthe-cuff statements is hardly new.
Before he assumed office, he took
Boeing to task for what he said was
the “out of control” costs of the Air
Force One program, tweeting that
the order should be canceled. (The
contract wasn’t canceled.)
He later seemed to warm to
Boeing when he said in a Dec. 22
tweet that Lockheed’s F-35 Joint
Strike Fighter should be replaced
with Boeing’s cheaper F-18 Super
Hornet. The Pentagon ultimately
awarded a contract that departed
little from what had been planned
before Trump took office.
Now, the president appears to
be promoting Boeing’s proposal as
it competes with foreign manufacturers for the Finnish military’s
business.
The apparent plug is seen as
part of an “America-first” marketing campaign where Boeing happens to be the primary beneficiary.
Still, the president’s decision to
mention Boeing’s plane is probably seen as an annoyance to another American corporation involved in the competition. Bethesda, Md.-based Lockheed Martin is
hoping the Finnish military will
purchase its F-35 Joint Strike
Fighter to replace the aging Super
Hornets.
“We will continue to work closely with the United States Government to offer the best possible
solution to meet Finland’s next
generation fighter aircraft requirements,” Lockheed Martin
spokesman Mike Friedman said in
an emailed statement Wednesday.
Both companies are likely to
face fierce competition from European rivals: A 2015 assessment by
the Finnish government also identified planes made by French,
Swedish and German companies
as candidates.
aaron.gregg@washpost.com
D ANIELLE P AQUETTE
President Trump’s muchanticipated speech Wednesday
about his plans for tax reform has
fired up the debate about who
really wins when taxes are
slashed.
The president in his speech proposed cutting the corporate tax
rate from 35 percent to 15 percent
— a move budget experts project
would cost $2.4 trillion over a
decade. The reduction, he has argued, would encourage companies to stay in the United States.
“We need a competitive tax
code that creates more jobs and
higher wages for Americans. It’s
time to give American workers the
pay raise that they’ve been looking
for many, many years,” Trump said
Wednesday.
Economists have long clashed
over whether tax cuts lead to jobs
growth. Businesses tend to be
chiefly motivated by profit, and
there’s no guarantee the cash they
keep from Uncle Sam would go
toward hiring people on American
soil. But some argue that lowering
the corporate tax rate would encourage companies to come to the
United States and generate employment.
A report from the Institute for
Policy Studies, a progressive think
tank, comes down solidly against
that argument, asserting that
companies that reap more tax savings are not more likely to expand
their workforce.
Since the tax code is full of
loopholes, most firms already pay
less than 35 percent — the average
effective rate for profitable businesses was 22 percent between
2007 and 2011, according to the
Treasury Department.
IPS used data from company
filings — analyzed by the research
organization Institute on Taxation
and Economic Policy — to make a
list of publicly held firms that
made a profit every year from
2008 to 2015 and that also paid
less than 20 percent of their earnings in federal corporate income
tax. Ninety-two companies fit that
description, according to the report. The group’s median job
growth over the seven-year period
was negative 1 percent, the au-
thors determined, compared with
6 percent among all private firms.
Forty-eight of the 92 companies
got rid of jobs between 2008 and
2016, a period that includes the
recession, shrinking by a combined 483,000 positions.
These firms gave their top brass
bigger raises, too, the data show.
The average chief executive pay
among the 92 companies increased 18 percent from 2008 to
2016, while S&P 500 chief executives saw a 13 percent boost. (IPS
looked at employment data from
2016, the latest numbers available,
with 2015 ITEP analysis.)
In contrast, workers across the
private sector saw a 4 percent
bump over that period, the authors calculated.
Sarah Anderson, the global
economy project director at IPS,
said she wants Trump to focus on
closing tax loopholes, rather than
reducing the corporate rate.
“How can they claim that
they’re going to turn tax savings
into job creation when they’ve already been getting hugely reduced
tax bills and they’ve been cutting
jobs?” she said.
One company Anderson highlighted in the report was GE,
which, according to the ITEP
numbers, paid no federal income
taxes between 2008 and 2015 and
also reduced its workforce over
that time by about 14,700.
GE spokeswoman Tara DiJulio
said the report “recycles misinformation” and overlooks $6.2 billion
the company paid in 2015. The
smaller workforce, she added,
reflected GE’s decision to sell
NBCUniversal to Comcast, among
other deals.
“The tax code is complex and
outdated, which is exactly why tax
reform must happen this year,” she
said. “GE has long been advocating to simplify and modernize the
tax system — even if it means we
pay more in taxes.”
Eric Toder, co-director of the
nonpartisan Tax Policy Center,
said giving companies a break
shouldn’t be framed as a jobs initiative. Unemployment is already
at a 16-year low (4.3 percent). The
more plausible win, Todor said,
would be a raise for the workforce.
“If a corporate tax cut attracts
investment, it’s going to help
workers in the sense that wage
growth will be somewhat bigger,”
he said.
The drawback, he added, is that
Trump has yet to propose a specific way to pay for the tax relief.
danielle.paquette@washpost.com
As prices skyrocket in storm-hit Texas, some retailers accused of gouging
State attorney general
opens probe into possible
disaster profiteering
BY K RISTINE P HILLIPS
AND H AMZA S HABAN
One station sold gas for a
whopping $20 a gallon. A hotel
reportedly charged guests more
than twice the normal rate. One
business sold bottles of water for
a staggering $99 per case — more
than 10 times some of the prices
seen online.
As people in Southeastern Texas face the devastating flooding
left in the wake of Hurricane
Harvey, they are also grappling
with predatory businesses that
are selling basic necessities at
astronomical prices. By Wednesday, the state attorney general’s
office had received 684 consumer
complaints, a majority of which
involved price-gouging of bottled
water, fuel, groceries and other
necessities.
“Anytime catastrophic storms
hit Texas, we witness the courage
of our first responders and the
generosity of neighbors coming
together to help their fellow Texans,” Attorney General Ken Paxton (R) said in a statement. “Unfortunately, in the wake of the
damage from storms and flooding, we also see bad actors taking
advantage of victims and their
circumstances.”
In a few cases, people reported
having to pay $3.50 a gallon for
gas in Houston, about $1.30 more
than the average gas price in the
area, said Kayleigh Lovvorn, a
spokeswoman for Paxton’s office.
A Houston convenience store
charged $20 a gallon, she said. It’s
unclear whether the jacked-up
rates were the result of price gouging or if the shutdown of refinery
operations in the wake of Harvey
was a factor, but the attorney
general’s office is investigating.
Meanwhile, some businesses
sold bottles of water for $8.50
each and cases for $99, Lovvorn
said.
“These are things you can’t do
in Texas,” Paxton told CNBC on
Tuesday. “There are significant
penalties if you price-gouge in a
crisis like this.”
The death toll from the hurricane has climbed to the double
digits, with the devastating storm
times as high — up to $250,000.
Lovvorn said she cannot give
the names of the businesses cited
in the complaints.
Twitter users have shared a
picture of bottled water being
sold Friday at a Houston-area
Best Buy for more than $42 for a
case containing 24 bottles. Online
prices from other retailers range
“These are things you can’t do in Texas.
There are significant penalties if you
price-gouge in a crisis like this.”
Attorney General Ken Paxton (R), speaking Tuesday on CNBC
making landfall again Wednesday morning in Louisiana.
State law prohibits businesses
from charging exorbitant prices
for necessities during times of
disasters. Violators could face
penalties of $20,000 per incident,
Paxton said. If victims are 65 and
older, the penalty is more than 10
from $16 to about $30 per case.
The company said that a few store
employees decided to sell cases of
bottled water even though Best
Buy does not sell them by case.
“This was clearly a mistake in a
single store,” Best Buy spokesman
Shane Kitzman said in a statement. “We feel terrible about this
because, as a company, we are
focused on helping, not hurting
people affected by this terrible
event. We are deeply sorry that we
gave anyone even the momentary
impression that we were trying to
take advantage of the situation.”
Kitzman said the company
does not have pricing in its computer system for cases of water.
The employees priced the cases
by multiplying the cost of one
bottle by the number of bottles in
a case, “arriving at a number that
is far, far higher than normal,”
Kitzman said.
At a Best Western hotel in
Robstown, about 20 miles west of
Corpus Christi, 40 guests were
reportedly charged far above the
normal rate. The overcharging
was uncovered by NBC affiliate
KXAN. A crew from the station
booked a room and was charged
$289.99 a night, according to
KXAN. The total, $321.89 including taxes, is nearly three times the
normal rate of $119 a night.
Best Western spokeswoman
Kelly Dalton said in a statement
that guests at that hotel have been
reimbursed. She said the company is severing ties with the Robstown location, describing the actions as “egregious and unethical.”
In Corpus Christi, a RaceWay
gas station drew ire after a woman
said she was charged more than
$60 for two cases of beer, ABC
News reported. RaceWay told the
station that the overpricing was
caused by a clerical error, not
price gouging. Ashleigh Womack,
spokeswoman for RaceTrac Petroleum, which owns RaceWay, said
the store in question is operated
by an independent contractor
who has control over pricing of
store merchandise.
“Nevertheless, we take these
allegations seriously and are investigating them with the operator,” Womack said.
The Texas attorney general’s
office is urging people to report
possible scamming and price
gouging by calling 800-621-0508
or emailing consumeremergency@oag.texas.gov.
kristine.phillips@washpost.com
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A19
RE
PowerPost
INTELLIGENCE FOR LEADERS WASHINGTONPOST.COM/POWERPOST
Government workers at all levels help in Harvey response
Like an
atmospheric
bully, Hurricane
Harvey settled its
big butt over the
Texas Gulf Coast,
Federal
causing epic
Insider
rains, floods and
misery — before
JOE
inflicting more
DAVIDSON
grief on
Louisiana.
But a welcome counterpoint
to Mother Nature’s destruction
is the human response, the
legion of selfless volunteers,
charitable organizations and
regular folks helping residents
survive. Government workers at
all levels, including more than
12,400 federal employees as of
Wednesday morning, are
directly involved with the
disaster.
About two dozen federal
offices have responded,
including the Federal
Emergency Management
Agency, which is taking the lead
with more than 3,200 staffers
on Harvey’s case, including
1,100 search-and-rescue
personnel, and AmeriCorps. It
sent over 250 people to the area
for food and shelter operations
and debris removal.
By boat and aircraft, the U.S.
Coast Guard had rescued more
than 4,200 people and 1,000
pets through early Wednesday.
President Trump has not
faced the criticism that George
W. Bush earned for his
administration’s response to
Hurricane Katrina. A statement
from the office of Rep. Sheila
Jackson Lee (D), whose district
includes parts of metropolitan
Houston, said that “she’s
encouraged by the Federal
response so far but there’s still
so much that needs to be done.
She was pleased by the
President’s remarks promising
that Texas will have everything
it needs. Moving forward, she
remains hopeful that the
President will deliver on his
words.”
Federal employees also are
among those who might need
assistance. Almost 60,000 feds,
working in 45 agencies,
regularly work in the Houston
area, according to the Office of
Personnel Management.
FEMA said the federal
response to Harvey includes:
• The Department of Health
and Human Services declared a
public health emergency for
Texas. HHS has more than 500
staffers in Texas and Louisiana,
with an additional 1,000 on
alert. “They deployed
approximately 53,000 pounds of
medical equipment and supplies
to support medical and public
health needs in the affected
areas. HHS helped arrange for
evacuation of three Texas
hospitals Saturday,” according to
FEMA, while assessing “damage
and needs of mental health
centers, dialysis centers,
pharmacies, and other critical
health infrastructure.” More
than 340 HHS employees
began “rapid strike” training
Monday before being sent to the
field.
• The National Guard Bureau
said it “would provide an
additional 20,000 to 30,000
Soldiers and Airmen in support
of the ongoing Hurricane
U.S. ARMY NATIONAL GUARD/SGT. GARRETT DIPUMA/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/EFE
The Louisiana National Guard helps residents in Lake Charles.
The National Guard readied thousands of troops for relief efforts.
Harvey response efforts.” The
entire Texas National Guard has
been activated.
• National Emergency
Medical Services’ has a contract
for 100 ambulances and 15 air
ambulances.
• Mobile Emergency
Response Support personnel
provided voice, video and
information services.
• FEMA’s Incident
Management Assistance Teams
provided on-the-ground support
in Austin and Baton Rouge to
help with requests for federal
help.
• The National Business
Emergency Operations Center
facilitated information to
private companies for
communicating with their
employees.
• National Flood Insurance
Program adjusters in Texas and
Louisiana helped assess
damage.
• The Army Corps of
Engineers provided sandbags,
power restoration and floodfighting projects.
• The Bureau of Safety and
Environmental Enforcement
worked on “the evacuation of
offshore oil and gas platforms
and rigs due to the storm.
Personnel have been evacuated
from 89 production platforms
and four drilling rigs.”
• The Defense Department
supplied search-and-rescue
aircraft, as well as generators,
50,000 gallons of gasoline and
450,000 gallons of diesel fuel. It
is sending 100 tactical vehicles
to Houston for personnel and
patient transportation from
flooded areas
• The Energy Department
monitored Harvey’s hit on oil
and natural gas supplies.
• The Environmental
Protection Agency worked with
Energy to ensure fuel
availability in the storm zone.
• The Federal
Communications Commission
monitored communications
networks and efforts to restore
communications in disaster
zones.
• The Interior Department’s
storm-tide sensors provided
daily reports on water heights,
and Interior’s U.S. Geological
Survey updated storm surge
forecasts.
• The National Park Service
and Office of Aviation Services
supplied drones “for search and
rescue operations and to
provide imagery for identifying
high priority search areas.”
• The U.S. Postal Service
reviewed “conditions for
restoration of service on a case
by case basis.”
• The Department of
Transportation made
“emergency declarations to
remove restrictions in order to
hasten the delivery of
emergency equipment and
supplies to the region.”
• The USA.gov and Spanishlanguage GobiernoUSA.gov
websites compiled federal
agency updates on Harvey.
• The Bureau of Indian
Affairs offered assistance to
tribes needing emergency aid.
Even the HHS Office of
Inspector General is involved in
assisting with the Harvey
response. Inspectors general
usually audit and investigate
agency operations after the fact.
In this case, members of the
HHS inspector general’s staff,
including law enforcement
officers, are assisting with teams
on medical assistance, mortuary
operations, security, and search
and rescue.
FEMA said it set up incident
support bases in Texas and
Louisiana “to ensure supplies
including water, meals, blankets
and other resources are closer to
affected areas.” As of Wednesday
morning, FEMA provided
Texans more than 306,000
meals and 687,000 liters of
water.
“More than 4.6 million meals,
5.1 million liters of water, and
thousands of cots and blankets
remain available . . . for transfer
to the states of Texas and
Louisiana should they be
needed and requested,” FEMA
reported.
FEMA’s list can’t be complete
because it doesn’t include the
National Weather Service. As
the rain subsided in some areas,
residents were cautioned
against complacency.
“Catastrophic and lifethreatening flooding continues
in southeastern Texas and
portions of southwestern
Louisiana,” the Weather Service
warned. “This is a lifethreatening situation.”
joe.davidson@washpost.com
We asked Texas Republicans about Harvey and climate change. One answered.
When members
of Congress from
Texas return to
work next week,
DINO
the fallout from
GRANDONI
Harvey, likely the
worst disaster to
ever hit the state, will follow
them back to Washington.
Unless reauthorized by the
end of September, the National
Flood Insurance Program, which
is nearly $25 billion in debt, will
lose most of its borrowing power
at a time when it will begin
making payouts on claims on
the Texas Gulf Coast. And
President Trump has promised
to work with Congress on a
federal aid package for affected
communities in Texas.
But that aid request puts
many Texas Republicans in
Congress in a bind four years in
the making. In 2013, all but one
Texas Republican who was
serving in Congress then and is
still in office now voted against
an aid package for New York and
New Jersey after Hurricane
The
Energy 202
Sandy.
“The congressional members
in Texas are hypocrites,” New
Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R), a
Trump ally, said this week. “I
said back in 2012 they’d be
proven to be hypocrites. It was
just a matter of time.”
The Energy 202 reached out
to all 38 members of the Texas
delegation to ask about that and
other issues related to Harvey as
they prepare to return to
Washington.
Only one Republican, Rep.
Lamar Smith (R), responded to
defend his 2013 vote.
“It is my hope that our
funding package for aiding
those affected by Harvey doesn’t
include funding unrelated to
damage caused by the storm,”
said Smith, chairman of the
House Science Committee and a
frequent critic of federal climate
scientists. “The Sandy bill was
used as an opportunity for
fiscally irresponsible politicians
to exploit natural-disaster
spending in order to fund pet
GOP lawmaker seeks to
end Russia investigation
BY
E LISE V IEBECK
A Republican congressman
from Florida made a special demonstration of his loyalty to President Trump last week by introducing an amendment to protect him
from the Russia investigation led
by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III.
Rep. Ron DeSantis, a potential
candidate for Florida governor in
2018, hopes to attach language to a
government spending package
that would end the inquiry, which
began six months ago, and stop
Mueller from looking into activities that took place before June
2015. Democrats, on the other
hand, have introduced at least
four measures designed to protect
the inquiry.
It is unlikely that these provisions will receive a vote, let alone
become part of the final bill. But at
a time when few Republicans are
actively defending Trump, especially regarding Russian meddling
in the 2016 election, DeSantis’s
amendment is a conspicuous effort to support the president and
possibly curry favor with him and
his political base ahead of a potential gubernatorial bid.
DeSantis said the order from
Deputy Attorney General Rod J.
Rosenstein appointing Mueller
“practically invites a fishing expedition” because it did not name a
possible crime.
“Congress should use its spending power to clarify the scope and
limit the duration of this investigation. Rosenstein has said that
the DOJ doesn’t conduct fishing
expeditions; the corollary to this
admonition should be that Congress will not fund a fishing expedition,” DeSantis said in a statement.
A spokeswoman for DeSantis
did not respond to a question
about the possible political motivation behind the amendment.
The Mueller proposals are just
one example of Trump-related
measures winding their way into
the debate over House appropriations. At a time of congressional
inaction, when members of Congress are judged not by what they
pass but by what they propose,
several lawmakers have seized the
opportunity to position themselves for and against Trump in
the eyes of voters before a spending debate that will dominate the
legislative schedule this fall.
In one example, Democrats
have become increasingly concerned about Secret Service payments to the Trump Organization
since last week, when Secret Service Director Randolph “Tex” Alles
told USA Today that more than
1,000 agents have reached their
federally mandated salary and
overtime limits while protecting
the Trump family.
Rep. Adam B. Schiff (Calif.), the
ranking Democrat on the House
Intelligence Committee, joined
the chorus Wednesday with a proposal to block Secret Service mon-
projects with taxpayer money.”
In 2013, many Republicans
derided the Sandy aid bill as
being laden with spending
provisions unrelated to the
hurricane, such as repairs to the
Smithsonian Institution in
Washington, D.C., and the
Kennedy Space Center in
Florida.
On MSNBC this week, Sen.
Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) said that “twothirds of that bill had nothing to
do with Sandy.” (Cruz’s office did
not reply to The Washington
Post’s request for comment.)
However, fact-checkers have
pointed out that a Congressional
Research Service report on the
bill concluded that it “largely
focused on responding to
Hurricane Sandy.”
Texas’s other senator and the
No. 2 Senate Republican, John
Cornyn, also defended his Sandy
vote, noting that he did
approve a smaller, $9.7 billion
increase in the Federal
Emergency Management
Agency’s borrowing power
before rejecting the larger
$50.5 billion aid package.
(Cornyn’s office also didn’t
reply.)
Texas Democrats, however,
criticized their Republican
colleagues for voting against the
Sandy package and said they
agreed with scientists who say
climate change increases the
severity of disasters like Harvey.
“Natural disasters know no
party, and it was regrettable that
Texas Republicans played
politics with the Hurricane
Sandy aid package in their time
of need,” Rep. Marc Veasey (DTex.) said.
Calling from a school in his
Houston-area district that has
been converted into a shelter,
Rep. Al Green (D-Tex.) added
that Congress should pass an aid
package not only to help the
people of Texas but also
“because we want every
American to know that your
government is going to be there
for you in a time of crisis.”
The lone Republican “yes”
vote from the Lone Star State for
that Sandy bill came from Rep.
John Abney Culberson, whose
district encompasses parts of
Houston and its suburbs.
On the question of climate
change, Republicans from Texas
were also mute.
Meanwhile, the seven Texas
Democrats who responded to
The Post’s request for comment
— Reps. Joaquin Castro, Henry
Cuellar, Lloyd Doggett, Gene
Green and Eddie Bernice
Johnson, along with Al Green
and Veasey — agreed with
scientists who say climate
change increases the severity of
disasters like Harvey.
“The flooding in Houston
caused by Harvey marks the
third ‘500-year’ flood to hit the
city in the past three years,” said
Johnson, who serves with Smith
on the House Science
Committee as its top Democrat.
“It is hard to believe these
catastrophic events can be
occurring so frequently by
chance.”
However, Smith pointed to an
interview that Bill Read, the
former director of the National
Hurricane Center, gave on CNN
in which Read declined to
attribute Harvey’s intensity to
climate change.
“This is not an uncommon
occurrence to see storms grow
and intensify rapidly in the
western Gulf of Mexico,” Read
said. “As long as we’ve been
tracking them, that has
occurred.”
Indeed, climate scientists say
singling out this one hurricane
as a global-warming-driven
anomaly would be a mistake.
But they also argue that climate
change can worsen the
hurricanes that do occur.
“The storm is a bit more
intense, bigger and longerlasting than it otherwise would
be,” Kevin Trenberth, a climate
researcher with the National
Center for Atmospheric
Research in Boulder, Colo., told
The Post over the weekend.
ey from going to Trump-owned
entities. The amendment seeks to
stop Trump properties from making money off the security demands imposed by the president’s
frequent visits through golf cart
rentals and other charges.
“The immense honor and responsibility of serving as President of the United States should
never be exploited for profit or
personal gain,” Schiff said in a
statement. “That the Trump Organization is profiting off the Secret Service is an abuse of taxpayer
money and an improper method
of enrichment.”
Another Schiff amendment
would block funding for Trump’s
Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, which is
investigating voter fraud in the
2016 election. There is no evidence
that widespread voter fraud took
place, experts say.
Other Democratic amendments focus on Mueller’s inquiry:
Reps. Nita M. Lowey (N.Y.), Ruben
Gallego (Ariz.), Ted Lieu (Calif.)
and Sheila Jackson Lee (Tex.) introduced language that would
deny federal funding for efforts to
remove Mueller, hamper his work
or destroy documents he obtains.
Democrats also have introduced provisions that would bar
the federal government from contracting with Trump-related enterprises (Rep. Steve Cohen of Tennessee), stop public money from
flowing to Trump properties in the
form of reimbursements (Lieu)
and even end salary payments to
Trump senior adviser Stephen
Miller (Rep. Barbara Lee of California).
All of these Democratic lawmakers represent districts that
solidly backed Clinton, allowing
them to introduce anti-Trump
amendments without political
backlash. The provisions are unlikely to become part of the final
spending bill, but serve as a tacit
acknowledgment of Democratic
voters’ anger with Trump.
A senior adviser to Lieu pointed
to a Washington Post report that
the State Department spent more
than $15,000 on rooms at the
Trump hotel in Vancouver in late
February.
“This is just a recent, disturbing
example of the Trump family and
President Trump forcing the
American taxpayer to stuff money
directly in their pockets,” Jack
D’Annibale wrote in an email.
“The bottom line is that the
Office of the President should never be used for personal gain or
enrichment,” he wrote. “In these
matters, Congress must act to protect the American people from
fraud and abuse.”
dino.grandoni@washpost.com
elise.viebeck@washpost.com
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Read some history
EDITORIALS
What comes after the flood
The National Flood Insurance Program needs funds to cover losses — but also reform.
C
appropriate land-use and other measures to prevent
development in risky low-lying areas; and that
homeowners would pay actuarially sound premiums.
Elegant in theory, the plan gradually succumbed
to real estate interests, with the result that flood
insurance enabled rather than managed development along coasts and in other flood-prone areas —
ultimately putting more people and property at risk
than might otherwise have been the case. As it
happens, well-to-do people benefit disproportionately from this program; they’re the ones who tend
to build big houses on the beach. The NFIP has spent
many millions of dollars to repair properties that
have been repeatedly flooded.
Prior to Katrina, the NFIP was nevertheless
generally able to pay for coverage through the
premiums it collected. Massive losses from that
storm and Sandy, however, have driven it into
de facto bankruptcy; the program has been forced to
borrow more than $24 billion from the treasury to
pay claims, a debt that was nearly unpayable even
before Harvey hit. At the moment, the program has
$1.7 billion on hand, plus $5.8 billion left on its line
of credit with the Treasury — and some 373,000
policyholders in the Harvey flood zone who will
expect to get paid.
Coincidentally, the program is due for reauthorization on Sept. 30. Ideally, this deadline would
galvanize Congress to ensure enough money is
available to pay current commitments, while reforming NFIP for the future. What’s needed are
tougher flood-risk mitigation requirements, more
realistic premiums and encouragement for privatesector involvement in the business, based on modern technology that may enable insurance companies to underwrite risks they could not have underwritten in the 1960s.
Recent history, alas, doesn’t make us optimistic:
Congress did reform the program on a bipartisan
basis in 2012, only to see much of that undone under
pressure from coastal-state lawmakers in 2014, after
Sandy. “There is a tide in the affairs of men, which
taken at the flood, leads on to fortune,” Shakespeare
wrote. Congress, though, tends to go with the
political flow.
Will the
divider in chief
strike again?
Rescinding the deportation shield for
‘dreamers’ would be a cruel blow.
P
RESIDENT TRUMP has outdone himself in
dividing America — over banning Muslims,
pardoning a racial profiler and spotting
“very fine people” among the neo-Nazis and
Ku Klux Klansmen in Charlottesville. Now he is
reported to be on the brink of dividing families by
rescinding deportation protections enjoyed by nearly 800,000 young undocumented immigrants
brought to this country as children and raised here
to believe in the American Dream.
The president once described the so-called
dreamers as “incredible kids” and, saying he’d
handle their predicament “with heart,” urged them
to “rest easy.” It will be instructive to see if he sticks
to that stance in the face of pressure from his nativist
attorney general, Jeff Sessions, who has counseled
Mr. Trump that he regards the program shielding
dreamers from deportation as unconstitutional and
indefensible in court.
For Mr. Trump to heed that advice would be in
keeping with his own record of pandering to
hard-liners in his base by beating up on foreigners.
But it would go beyond his usual rhetorical toxicity
by upending lives en masse, immiserating huge
numbers of people striving to make good.
Dreamers registered with the government starting in 2012 under a program, launched by President
Barack Obama, that enabled many of them to attend
college, get jobs and driver’s licenses, start businesses, open bank accounts, pay taxes, buy homes and
cars, and live ordinary and open lives. All had lived
in the United States since at least 2007; none had
committed a serious crime. Each signed up for the
program, known as Deferred Action for Childhood
Arrivals, by trusting the government with their
names, addresses and other information marking
their emergence from the shadows.
Since Mr. Trump’s inauguration, they have continued registering for two-year permits and renewing
ROBIN RUDD/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Demonstrators participate in a rally in support of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program
in Chattanooga, Tenn., on Aug. 19.
them. By doing so, they have hurt no one; to the
contrary, they have contributed their energy, ambition and labor to the country and communities
where they have spent most of their lives.
That status quo is now challenged by Texas
Attorney General Ken Paxton and a group of
like-minded conservative state attorneys general
who have threatened to challenge the DACA program in federal court unless it is phased out by the
administration starting next Tuesday. Like Mr. Sessions, they say it is unconstitutional. In fact, it is a
long-standing matter of policy that presidents of
both parties have exercised broad discretion in
determining whom to deport, given government’s
finite resources.
In their letter, the attorneys general insisted that
ending DACA wouldn’t require the president to
deport dreamers or even rescind the permits already
issued. In reality, for every individual who holds a
permit, its expiration would mean lost jobs, lost
educational opportunities and a lost sense of security. An end to DACA would entail a one-way trip
back into the shadows, where immigration agents
would be free to track them using addresses and
other data they freely submitted when applying for
their deferrals.
There is no clamor for ending DACA, which polls
suggest enjoys broad public support. Ending the
program would be a cruel betrayal and a gratuitous
blow against the very people Mr. Trump just months
ago described as “incredible.”
Tom Toles
is away.
between them, far behind the citywide average of
more than six supermarkets per ward. While much
of the city has swelled in numbers and affluence of
stores, Wards 7 and 8 actually saw a decrease in
offerings. A report by D.C. Hunger Solutions contrasted how the 149,750 residents of Wards 7 and 8
were served by three supermarkets while the 82,000
residents of Ward 6 had 10 full-service grocery
stores.
More than convenience is involved. Lack of access
to fresh produce and other foods can lead to poor
nutrition and bad health outcomes, and those
affected are some of the city’s most vulnerable
people. “It’s a health issue,” said Beverly Wheeler of
D.C. Hunger Solutions. “We can no longer pretend
we don’t see what we see.”
Attempts by the city over successive administrations to attract and retain grocery stores have failed.
An organic market that opened in Ward 8 closed
after two years, and the much-heralded effort to
attract two Walmart stores fizzled when the company pulled out of the deal. Retailers and developers
look at the bottom line, and Wards 7 and 8 have
neither the median income nor high-density daytime populations that are attractive to doing business. There are also higher costs for security and
staff turnover for stores that operate in poorer areas.
Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) has set aside $3 million to try to help attract developers to underserved
areas, and Mr. Gray has proposed legislation that
would require the District to pay for the construction of supermarkets for chains that agree to locate
in underserved areas. While that might not be the
right formula, officials are right to recognize the
need for the city to play a more active role in this
critical area.
ABCDE
TA K I N G EX CEP TI O N
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
Yes, we owe the debt, but we also own the debt
Robert J. Samuelson’s Aug. 28 op-ed, “The truth
about tax ‘reform,’ ” expressed concerns that the
costs of today’s deficit spending by the government
“would be transferred to future generations” and
that increased government borrowing would lead to
“crowding out of private investment.”
The public debt passed on to future generations
will be offset by their holdings of Treasury securities
issued to finance the debt. So the net burden will be
zero. Future generations will owe the debt, but they
also will own the debt. As Republican President
Abraham Lincoln said in his 1864 message to Congress, “Men can readily perceive that they cannot be
much oppressed by a debt which they owe to
themselves.”
While about one-third of our public debt is owned
Poverty is the explanation
I was dismayed to see Kathleen Parker claim in her
Aug. 27 op-ed, “The removal of Robert (no E.) Lee,”
that the fact that the “majority of those killed and
maimed held no slaves suggests that there was more
to the Southern soldiers’ fervor than a burning desire
to secure human bondage.” To the contrary, the only
thing that suggests is that most white Southerners
were too poor to own slaves — not that they opposed
the institution. Indeed, that is precisely why they
were so resentful of the few former slaves who
received their promised “40 acres and a mule” during
Reconstruction. Not only were blacks suddenly their
equals (theoretically, at least) but, in many cases,
they also were better off than their former oppressors. Ms. Parker herself noted it: “In the end, it was a
matter of pride — and, later, injured pride.”
More than 150 years after Appomattox, it is high
time for them to get over it and for all those
memorials to go into museums (or theme parks, if
that would ease hurt feelings).
Steven Alan Honley, Washington
by foreigners, that is a net benefit to the United States
because such increased demand for Treasury securities raises their price and thus lowers the interest
costs to the government and to the American taxpayer. If foreigners were to reduce their investment in
Treasury securities, U.S. investors would increase
their holdings, which we would owe to ourselves.
“Crowding out” of private investment happens
when government spending or taxing increases,
regardless of whether the increases are financed by
taxes or borrowing.
Francis X. Cavanaugh, Washington
The writer was chief executive of the Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board from 1986 to 1993
and an economist and federal debt manager at the
Treasury Department from 1954 to 1986.
In her Aug. 27 Business essay, “Why you tip as
much as you do . . . Actually, why do you tip at all?,”
Katherine L. Milkman summarized some of the
surprising influences on tipping behavior that have
been identified through research, experiments and
several large studies. While this made for interesting
reading, I could not shake the way she teed up the
subject, embracing the “standard” economic view
that tipping in most cases is nothing more than a
“behavioral quirk” in any service encounter. Is that
how Ms. Milkman’s economist explains the bedrock
human impulse to acknowledge a good turn or
compliment for a job well done? What about the
implicit social contract that most recognize in
receiving service from waitresses and waiters, bellhops, hotel maids and such? We all know that tips
form a critical portion of their income, and we
typically make that payment as part of what we feel
we owe. Same with those dollars we voluntarily slip
into the contributions box upon entering a free
museum.
Does paying what you feel you owe when the
payment is voluntary constitute a transaction for
which “there’s technically no economic reason . . .
beyond a social expectation”? Does economics,
“technically” speaking, have no explanation beyond
quirks and social convention for the couple of bucks
we hand over to an emaciated panhandler or the
idea of paying it forward or for any number of other
acts done out of honor, kindness or other altruistic
impulse?
Thoughtful economists do not find such behavior
“peculiar” but rather use basic economic theory to
explain it in terms a little less simplistic than those
Ms. Milkman put into the mouths of her gardenvariety economist.
David E. Horowitz, Silver Spring
Stay on this track, Mr. President
The city’s failure to improve grocery options in Wards 7 and 8 calls for new strategies.
B
After reading the Aug. 27 Metro article “After
neo-Nazi march, synagogue starts to heal,” describing
people who are embracing Nazi emblems and slogans
and gestures, it is apparent to me as a historian that
our schools have failed to teach about what the Nazis
did.
Anyone who has studied the Nazis could not
possibly carry a Nazi flag, wear a swastika armband,
wear a Nazi uniform or deliver the Hitler salute unless
he or she has a depraved mind. Nazi evil is unequaled
in the history of humankind, yet too many of our
citizens seem not to know about their heinous crimes.
The young man who allegedly killed the woman in
Charlottesville seems to have studied the World
War II German military without understanding Nazi
crimes, including the “Final Solution” for Jews, horrible “medical” experiments on prisoners and killing
their own disabled German World War I veterans.
Our schools need to do a better job of teaching such
history. Anyone wanting to know about this era
should read either William L. Shirer’s classic “The
Rise and Fall of the Third Reich” or Robert E. Conot’s
“Justice at Nuremberg.” Either would be a real eyeopener.
James T. Currie, Alexandria
Add human decency to the equation
D.C.’s rotten food access
AD PUBLICITY about the state of Safeway
stores in the District east of the river prompted a recent cleaning blitz by the company.
Workers scrubbed shelves and refrigerator
cases, removing moldy produce and spoiled meat.
Good that D.C. Council member Vincent C. Gray (D)
focused attention on conditions at the stores serving
his Ward 7 constituents, and good that Safeway took
needed action. But it will take more than sudsy water
and promises of better service to address the lack of
grocery options for Ward 7 and Ward 8 residents. The
failure of successive administrations on this issue
underscores the need for new strategies.
Mr. Gray made unannounced visits to the Safeway
stores in Ward 7 that not only called attention to his
demand for improved services but also highlighted
the long-standing grocery gap that exists in the
District. Wards 7 and 8 have just three supermarkets
AUGUST 31 , 2017
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
ONGRESS MUST be generous in helping to
repair the damage, to lives and to property,
from Hurricane Harvey. The full extent of the
destruction may not be known for a long
time but is evidently catastrophic, just as the
damage wrought by Katrina and Sandy was. Even as
they demonstrate that they have a heart, lawmakers
must also show that they have some brains. Specifically, the United States is long overdue for smart
reforms to one of the major government institutions
designed to help people cope with the risk of natural
disaster: the National Flood Insurance Program
(NFIP), which has underwritten a total of 5 million
policies providing homeowners and some businesses $1.2 trillion in coverage.
Now almost half a century old, the NFIP grew out
of what was, at the time, a basic reality of the
insurance business: Flooding risks were actuarially
imponderable, so insuring against them was uneconomic for the private sector, especially in places such
as the hurricane-prone Gulf of Mexico. To fill the
gap, the federal government offered coverage on two
conditions: that local communities would take
. THURSDAY,
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Regarding Dan Balz’s Aug. 27 The Sunday Take
column, “Trump’s pardon fits a pattern: Dividing, not
uniting”:
Those of us who share President Trump’s vision of
ending Mexican border insecurity and stopping the
exportation of American factories and jobs, both of
which are destroying our once-great nation, are
pleased that Mr. Trump’s presidency is on an “unambiguous course” and that “there could be no reversal.”
Reuben Hamasian, North Bethesda
More context on national monuments
I appreciated the Aug. 28 editorial “Fragile national monuments in danger,” but it included a common
misconception regarding national monuments. The
overwhelming majority of these recent monuments,
including the Grand Staircase-Escalante, are not
closed to grazing. To suggest that there is an effort to
“reopen” them to grazing is a misnomer.
Also, Congress essentially ratified the 1.9-millionacre Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument
in two laws passed in the late 1990s. One added and
deleted land from the national monument and
redrew the boundary. The second traded tens of
thousands of acres of land owned by Utah inside the
monument to federal ownership in return for
federal lands elsewhere in Utah. It would seem to
require congressional action to now reduce the size
of this monument.
Robert Hellie, Gaithersburg
We need the arts
Philip Kennicott wrote movingly and with such
strength in his Aug. 27 Critic’s Notebook, “Why we
need the arts: Trump” [Arts & Style]. We human
beings are all the richer when we have access to the
arts. The idea that the beauty and skills of the
performers and their hours of preparation and
determination can be thrown aside because of the
politics of one person with no sense of beauty is
abhorrent. The curtain will not and must not come
down on the arts.
Mary Ann Carmody, Washington
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A21
RE
GEORGE F. WILL
E.J. DIONNE JR.
At Yale,
silliness
in stone
A hurricane of hypocrisy
O
S
ummer brings no respite for academics committed to campus purifications, particularly at the institution that is the leader in the
silliness sweepstakes, Yale. Its Committee on Art in Public Spaces has discovered that a stone carving that has
adorned an entrance to Sterling Memorial Library since it opened 86 years ago
has become “not appropriate.”
The carving, according to Yale Alumni
Magazine, depicts “a hostile encounter:
a Puritan pointing a musket at a Native
American.” Actually, the Native American and the Puritan are looking not
hostilely at each other but into the
distance. Still, one can’t be too careful, so
the musket has been covered with stone.
This is unilateral disarmament: The
Native American’s weapon, a bow, has
not been covered up. Perhaps Yale thinks
that armed white men are more “triggering” (this academic-speak means “upsetting to the emotionally brittle”) than
armed people of color. National Review
Online’s Kyle Smith drolly worries that
Yale University might be perpetuating
harmful stereotypes.
If such campus folderols merely added to what Samuel Johnson called “the
public stock of harmless pleasure,”
Americans could welcome a new academic year the way they once welcomed
new burlesque acts. Unfortunately, the
descent of institutions of learning into
ludicrousness is symptomatic of larger
social distempers that Frank Furedi has
diagnosed abroad as well as in America.
Furedi is a professor emeritus in England and author of “What’s Happened to
the University?: A Sociological Exploration of Its Infantilization.” Writing in the
American Interest, he cites a warning
issued to Oxford University postgraduate students about the danger of “vicarious trauma,” which supposedly results
from “hearing about and engaging with
the traumatic experiences of others.”
This, Furedi says, is symptomatic of the
“medicalization” of almost everything in
universities that strive to be “therapeutic.” Universities are “promoting theories and practices that encourage people
to interpret their anxieties, distress and
disappointment through the language
of psychological deficits.” This generates
self-fulfilling diagnoses of emotionally
fragile students. They demand mentalhealth services on campuses that are
replete with “trigger warnings” and
“safe spaces” to insulate students from
discomforts, such as the depiction of a
musket. What academics perceive as “an
expanded set of problems tracks right
along with the exponential growth of the
‘Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of
Mental Disorders.’ ”
The socialization of children, which
prepares them to enter the wider world,
has been shifted from parents to primary and secondary schools, and now to
higher education, which has embraced
the task that Furedi calls “resocialization through altering the norms
that undergraduates grew up with.” This
is done by using speech codes and indoctrination to raise “awareness” about
defects students acquired before coming
to campuses that are determined to
purify undergraduates.
Often, however, students arrive with
little moral ballast bequeathed by parents who thought their role was, Furedi
says, less to transmit values than to
validate their children’s feelings and
attitudes: “This emphasis on validation
runs in tandem with a risk-averse regime of child-rearing, the (unintended)
consequence of which has been to limit
opportunities for the cultivation of independence and to extend the phase of
dependence of young people on adult
society.”
The therapeutic university’s language
— students are “vulnerable” to routine
stresses and difficulties that are defined
as “traumas” — also becomes selffulfilling. As a result, students experience a diminished sense of capacity for
moral agency — for self-determination.
This can make them simultaneously
passive, immersing themselves into
groupthink, and volatile, like the mobs
at Middlebury College, Claremont McKenna College, the University of California at Berkeley and other schools that
disrupt uncongenial speakers. Hence
universities provide “trigger warnings”
that facilitate flights into “safe spaces.”
Furedi quotes an Oberlin College student who says: “There’s something to be
said about exposing yourself to ideas
other than your own,” but “I’ve had
enough of that.”
Times do, however, change, as the Yale
Alumni Magazine delicately intimated
when it said the stone now obscuring the
Puritan’s musket “can be removed in the
future without damaging the original
carving.” And the future has come with
strange speed to New Haven.
In a peculiar letter in Tuesday’s Wall
Street Journal, a Yale official says the
university is removing the stone “that a
construction project team had placed on
the stonework.” By clearly suggesting,
implausibly, that this “team” acted on its
own, the letter contradicts the magazine’s report that the covering up was
done because the Committee on Art in
Public Spaces deemed the carving “not
appropriate.” The letter, which says the
uncovered carving will be moved to
where it can be studied and “contextualized,” speaks volumes about Yale’s context.
georgewill@washpost.com
SHAWN THEW/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin at the White House on Aug. 25.
CHARLES LANE
America’s most
important exports
T
he trade numbers say that
America’s largest exports are
industrial products such as
refined petroleum and air-
craft.
In a real sense, though, our most
important exports are intangible
ones: political stability and the rule of
law.
Combined with our sophisticated
and liquid financial markets, these
characteristics make the United States
uniquely suited to serve as a haven for
the accumulated savings of individuals, companies and central banks from
around the world.
As University of Wisconsin economist Menzie Chinn puts it, we enjoy “a
quasi-monopoly on the production of
safe assets, in the form of sovereign
debt.” America exploits this monopoly
power by selling government bonds at
more advantageous interest rates than
would be possible otherwise.
Congress must act soon after it
returns next month to preserve that
monopoly — to avert the impending
exhaustion of the federal government’s legal borrowing authority, lest
the United States default on any of its
obligations.
This situation once again reminds
us that investors all over the world rely
on the full faith and credit of the
United States — which is the hardearned product of our long history as a
civilized democracy whose courts can
be relied upon to enforce contracts
impartially.
If we couldn’t import financing so
cheaply, then we would have to save
more and consume less. We might
have to sell other countries more
aircraft, or wheat, or some other good
or service that’s harder to make than a
federal promise to repay.
To be sure, this is a mixed blessing.
Our quasi-monopoly on safe assets
tempts, and enables, the United States
to live beyond its means, which can be
as much of a luxury as it sounds; over
time, though, it can also distort the
economy.
A prudent safe-asset-monopolist
nation would hedge by reducing its
long-term structural budget deficits
and, hence, its need to borrow. Congress has not taken such steps for
decades, however, which is part of the
reason that we face another debt
ceiling drama just two years after the
last one. Of course, foreigners’ willingness to finance the U.S. debt on easy
terms reduces Congress’s sense of
urgency about deficits, so it’s a bit of a
Catch-22.
What’s more, as Chinn says in a new
paper he presented to the Federal
Reserve’s annual conference in Jackson Hole, Wyo., this month, there may
be limits to the United States’ ability to
curb international demand for Treasury debt, even if it does reduce its
budget deficit.
As addicted as the Treasury is to
bringing foreign money in, countries
such as China and other emerging
Asian markets are also hooked on
sending it out — due to the lack of
alternative havens.
Even accounting for demographics,
fiscal policy and other factors, there
remains a certain amount of international demand for U.S. Treasurys that
can be explained only by this country’s
status as a nearly unparalleled producer of safe assets, Chinn writes.
Years ago, a French finance minister
labeled the dominance of dollardenominated assets in global finance
as America’s “exorbitant privilege.”
He might have characterized it
more objectively as a huge international compliment — the world’s way
of recognizing that, whatever else one
can say about the United States, or its
policies, foreign and domestic, it’s still
the most reliable place to invest money you absolutely can’t afford to lose.
For all the tensions between the
United States and China, for all the
latter’s sometimes harsh denunciations of American trade policy, or the
U.S. Navy’s maneuvers in Asia, Beijing
continues to hold more than $1 trillion
in Treasury securities and has been
accumulating more in recent months.
Frequent predictions that the Communist government would act on its
periodic ire with the United States by
dumping our debt have never materialized.
The United States has to keep
earning this compliment every day.
And while extending the debt ceiling,
as Congress will probably manage to
do, is necessary for that, it is hardly
sufficient.
The full faith and credit of the
United States rest not on this or that
grudgingly passed statute, but on a
much deeper structure of consensus
and cooperation, both political and
social. That is to say, it rests on the
very attributes of our society that seem
to be under siege in the contemporary
political situation.
If America ever does stop exporting
political stability and the rule of law, it
will probably not be due to a lack of
demand, but a disruption in supply.
lanec@washpost.com
GLOBAL OPINIONS
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/global-opinions
What I learned in North Korea
On a recent trip to North Korea, my North
Korean minder, a lively woman educated in
Beijing, shared with me her dreams for a
better life. “I want to be a businesswoman,”
she said in fluent Chinese. “My time in
China had a huge influence on me. Making
money is good.” Wow, I thought. Here I am,
on my first trip to North Korea, and already
I’m witnessing capitalist cells infecting the
body politic of the Hermit Kingdom. I
congratulated myself on my reportorial
chops.
Then I eavesdropped as the same woman
sidled up to the rest of my group — Chinese
friends from Beijing — and said the exact
same thing, in the exact same conspiratorial
tone.
“Ha,” one of these friends said to me.
“Don’t start thinking you’re getting a scoop.
Whatever they say has been approved beforehand. They’re robots.”
In the end, our three-day trip to North
Korea taught me more about how Chinese
view North Korea than about North Korea
itself. Bowing at twin statues of Kim Il Sung
and his son Kim Jong Il, one of my companions smirked: “It’s like the Cultural Revolution.” “Only worse,” someone else piped in.
At a museum celebrating North Korea’s
current leader, Kim Jong Un, another remarked, “He’s the only fat person in North
Korea.” My friends referred to Kim as Jin
Sanpang, or No. 3 Fatty Kim.
I reflected on this recently as the situation on the Korean Peninsula has become
more dire. Kim has redoubled the efforts,
begun by his grandfather, to turn his nation
into a global nuclear threat. On Tuesday,
after North Korea shot a missile through
Japan’s airspace, China’s Foreign Ministry
warned that the region was “now at a
tipping point, approaching a crisis.” As this
approaching crisis unspools, it is China that
will be saddled with an evil ally that more
and more Chinese detest.
While my friends look down on North
Korea, viewing it as a kind of Communist
Disneyland to be mocked but not feared,
China’s government worries that its collapse would spell not just a refugee crisis
but, with the possible unification of the
Korean Peninsula under a pro-American
South Korea, a perilous security situation
for Beijing.
Until now, China has taken a passive
approach, arguing that the problem is
North Korea and America’s to solve. But
among my Chinese friends and even among
some officials, I get a sense of an emerging
realization. North Korea is China’s problem,
too. Communist Party insiders no longer
view it as a convenient way to sap U.S.
strength. As one of my companions observed, “No. 3 Fatty Kim’s missiles can be
pointed in any direction. Even at us.”
— John Pomfret
ne of the barriers to sensible
politics is the opportunism
that so often infects our debates about what government
is there for, where we want it to be
energetic and how we can keep it from
violating the basic rights of citizens.
The muddled nature of our discussions of these matters has been
brought home by two unfortunate
events: the mass suffering unleashed
by Hurricane Harvey and President
Trump’s pardon of former sheriff Joe
Arpaio.
In the case of the vicious storm, we
are reminded that some politicians
think government is great when it
helps their own constituents and
wasteful if it helps anyone else.
We also regularly assert that government is better when it prevents
problems than when it focuses primarily on cleaning up after the fact.
But when environmentalists suggest
that development can be carried out in
more sustainable ways or that climate
change is worth dealing with, they are
mocked as “anti-business” or “crisismongers.” Then a crisis comes, and we
wonder why the politicians were so
shortsighted.
As for the Arpaio pardon, it is seen
as technically legal because presidential authority in this area is almost
unlimited. But it may be the most
dangerous act of Trump’s presidency.
The occupant of the White House has
claimed the power to permit government agents to violate the constitutional rights of Americans and to
override the courts if he doesn’t like
what they’re doing. This is the largest
single step toward autocracy Trump
has taken.
What we hear all the time is that
conservatives are for “small government” and liberals are for “big government.” But this is very misleading
shorthand.
Yes, liberals typically favor more
social insurance programs, including
expanded guarantees of health care,
and more government regulation of
business in what they insist is the
public interest. Conservatives are often critical of some or all of these
initiatives.
But liberals (often joined by libertarians) are among the first to stand
up against government violations of
the civil rights of individuals. Many
conservatives — most certainly including Trump — use the “law and order”
battle cry to accuse liberals concerned
about civil liberties of being “soft on
crime.” (In the case of the Arpaio
pardon, Trump seems to be for his
version of “order” but indifferent to
the “law” part.)
So who is really for big government
and who is against it? Which is more
threatening to our liberties: higher
taxes to pay for new benefits, or an
expansive view of police powers and
presidential prerogatives?
The conversation about disaster relief helps clarify another issue. The
conservative critique of government
aid is that it is on some level unjust
because it takes money from one
group of people and gives it to another.
Applying this logic to natural disasters, why should parts of the country
that will almost never experience hurricanes help the hurricane-prone areas? After all, people don’t have to live
in places subject to hurricanes.
Well, it’s also true that some places
get tornadoes and others don’t. Some
experience earthquakes and others
don’t. Some people live near rivers
that overflow their banks and others
don’t.
Disaster relief is premised on an
old-fashioned “there but for the grace
of God go I” solidarity. We are happy to
see government give a hand to our
fellow citizens facing sudden catastrophe today and assume that they will
help us if we face comparable challenges tomorrow.
This is why it is entirely appropriate
to call out the hypocrisy of Texas
conservatives who voted against assistance for the victims of Superstorm
Sandy in New York and New Jersey but
are now asking for federal help on
behalf of their folks. They broke this
basic rule of solidarity in the name of
an ideology that, when the chips are
down, they don’t really believe in. Of
course we should help all the areas
devastated by Harvey. I’d just appreciate hearing our Texas conservative
friends, beginning with Sen. Ted Cruz,
admit they were wrong.
Call me a liberal (I won’t mind), but
I do believe in using government’s
taxing powers reasonably to direct
help toward people who really need it,
and in regulations to protect the
environment and prevent catastrophe.
But I also believe it is vital to stand
firm when government officials violate constitutional rights, which is
what Arpaio was found to have done
with Latinos in Arizona and why
pardoning him is so dangerous.
We can certainly debate where government compassion becomes overreach. Unfortunately, we’re not anywhere close to such a measured and
civilized dialogue.
ejdionne@washpost.com
Discrimination almost cost
my autistic son his life
BY
F
S UNSHINE B ODEY
ive years ago, when my son
Lief was 9, he fell ill with a
virus. The virus attacked his
heart and flooded it with fluid.
The pressure from the growing pool
inside his heart tore the muscle fibers.
In a matter of weeks, he was transformed from a healthy kid to a
critically ill hospital patient with only
one hope for survival: a heart transplant.
Needing a lifesaving transplant is
truly awful for any child and family.
For children with a disability, the
challenges are even more immense.
Lief has autism and is a non-speaking
person who types to communicate. He
struggles with sensory disturbance,
profound motor planning difficulties
and perseverance behaviors.
Because of our son’s disability, the
doctors at our local children’s hospital
told us that no facility would perform
the transplant, and we should prepare
for him to die. A second hospital also
refused to consider him. As Lief ’s
condition swiftly deteriorated, one
young physician pleaded Lief ’s case to
a third transplant hospital, and Lucile
Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford University opened its doors to us.
We were warned that Lief would
not survive the flight from Portland,
Ore., to California. As we flew through
the night, Lief ’s heart stopped again
and again. When we arrived, he was
outfitted with a standard “bridge
therapy.” This cumbersome computer
and heavy batteries that hang from
outside the body had the power to
extend his life by years. The device is
used by 7,000 children and adults. Our
local hospital had failed to make us
aware that this therapy existed and
could extend his life.
Discrimination is a common barrier faced by people with disabilities
in need of lifesaving care. Only a
handful of states have banned bias in
transplants. Until more states act, this
discrimination will persist.
Lief ’s medical odyssey spanned a
year of continuous hospitalization,
nearly half a dozen open-heart surgeries and countless grueling procedures. No one knows what someone
is capable of until they are fighting for
their life. Throughout, Lief defied
everyone’s expectations and acquired
abilities such as improving his communication so that he was fully able to
participate intellectually in his care.
He was 100 percent compliant with
his treatments. His remarkable en-
durance and patience exceeded those
of most neurotypical adults. The culmination of his medical journey was
receiving a precious gift of life: a
human heart. He was likely the first
person with severe autism to undergo
a heart transplant. Sadly, he’s likely
not the first person who has needed
one.
Transplant programs are given
wide latitude in deciding whether to
take a patient’s disability into account. According to a Post article
published in March, the 815 transplant programs in the United States
may take into account neurocognitive
disabilities when making decisions
about lifesaving organ transplants.
Whether programs do so varies. A
2008 study by the Stanford Center for
Biomedical Ethics found that 43 percent of the 50 pediatric heart, liver
and kidney transplant programs surveyed always or usually considered
neurodevelopmental delays, while
39 percent rarely or never did.
This discretion creates an opening
for ingrained stereotypes and false
assumptions to influence decisions.
Some transplant teams might assume
that people with disabilities are incapable of making it through the rigors
of a grueling marathon of medical
procedures involved in a transplant,
or that they’re unable to care properly
for themselves post-surgery.
While the Americans With Disabilities Act explicitly prevents discrimination in medicine, there is no mechanism for enforcement. This leaves
states on the front line of not just
ensuring the prevention of the discrimination but also giving families
an effective and time-sensitive path of
recourse outside of adjudication. Our
state, Oregon, in June joined California, New Jersey, Maryland, and Massachusetts in the fight. More states
should adopt these policies prohibiting discrimination.
Today, Lief is 14 years old and doing
well. His experience has helped reshape the conversation in transplant
medicine from “Should we transplant
kids with autism?” to “How do we
transplant kids with autism?”
Though we’ve made enormous
strides in changing the conversation,
there is so much more we need to do
to stop discrimination. Adults and
children with disabilities in need of
organ transplants should be afforded
greater legal protections. Their lives
are inherently worth saving.
The writer is a disability rights advocate.
A22
EZ
Uber CEO:
IPO may
come soon
BY
E LIZABETH D WOSKIN
Uber could go public as soon
as 18 months from now.
That was the news delivered to
Uber’s 16,000-person workforce
Wednesday by the embattled
transportation company’s new
chief executive, outgoing Expedia CEO Dara Khosrowshahi,
according to an employee who
attended the meeting.
Khosrowshahi was not definitive, the person said. In a meeting that was broadcast from San
Francisco across the world,
Khosrowshahi said the eightyear-old company could go public in a timeline of 18 to
36 months. But he added that he
would have to see.
In addressing the issue at his
first all-hands meeting, Khosrowshahi appeared to be trying
to allay one of the biggest concerns not only for investors but
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
also for employees.
With a $68 billion valuation
by private investors, Uber is the
most valuable start-up Silicon
Valley has produced over the
past decade, but financiers have
grown frustrated by the lack of a
timeline for getting their payouts.
Employees have also felt pent
up, as many are compensated
with options in the company.
The loose timeline also gives
Uber’s incoming leader an opportunity to resolve many of the
controversies facing the company.
That includes litigation with
Google in a major case in which
Uber is accused of stealing trade
secrets from Google’s self-driving
car program, as well as two
pending federal investigations.
On Tuesday, the company confirmed that the Justice Department is probing whether executives broke U.S. laws prohibiting
bribery of officials in foreign
countries.
Uber is cooperating with the
investigation, spokesman Matt
Kallman said.
Under Uber’s previous hardcharging CEO, Travis Kalanick,
Uber expanded to 77 countries in
just eight years and built up a
reputation for rule-breaking and
for a “bro” culture that has been
hostile to bothwomen and minorities.
Federal officials are also probing whether the company used
special software to evade authorities in places where ride-sharing
services were banned or restricted.
It is not known how much it
cost to have Khosrowshahi take
the job, but he likely did not
come cheap.
As the chief executive of Expedia, he was named the highestpaid CEO in the United States by
Equilar for his 2015 compensa-
. THURSDAY,
AUGUST 31 , 2017
tion, thanks largely to a longterm stock option package valued at $90.8 million that he
would gain access to over several
years.
He also had additional options
that would be worth $82.5 million if aggressive stock-price performance targets were met,
bringing his take-home pay to at
least $180 million.
Because Uber is a private company, it will not be required to
immediately release specifics on
Khosrowshahi’s pay, though it
would become public if the company launches an IPO.
elizabeth.dwoskin@washpost.com
KLMNO
METRO
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31 , 2017
High today at
approx. 4 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
84°
8 p.m.
70 79 84 78°
°
°
°
Precip: 10%
Wind: WNW
6-12 mph
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
B
RE
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
MARYLAND
OBITUARIES
Forty years before Capital
Bikeshare, a GSA worker in
D.C. had the same idea —
but was twice rejected. B3
A Hogan lawyer threatens
the attorney general with a
misconduct probe over a
proposed minor fine. B3
Coach Rollie Massimino
led Villanova to the 1985
NCAA basketball title in
“the perfect game.” B5
Man who
fired in rail
station still
not located
GUN WAS FOUND IN
COLUMBIA HEIGHTS
Metro officials didn’t
publicize incident
BY
RICKY CARIOTI/THE WASHINGTON POST
Trump’s cash will boost Antietam site
President’s donated salary will help restore
a historic home near a Confederate statue
BY
J USTIN W M. M OYER
sharpsburg, md. — During the
presidential campaign last year,
Donald Trump said he wouldn’t
accept a salary if elected. In April,
the White House said he would
donate his first-quarter salary to
the National Park Service. And in
July, the agency announced some
of those funds would be used to
restore a historic home at Antietam National Battlefield in
Maryland.
Work is scheduled to begin
next summer on property that
includes a 24-foot statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee
astride his horse, Traveller. The
statue, built in 2003 by a Confederate enthusiast, sits on a bluff
about 250 feet from the Newcom-
er House that will benefit from
Trump’s donation.
The $78,333 donation was
made before President Trump
called for the preservation of Confederate memorials following
deadly violence in Charlottesville,
where white supremacists protested the planned removal of a
statue depicting Lee from a
downtown park.
Heather Swift, a spokeswoman
for the Interior Department, said
the National Park Service, not
Trump, selected the property, and
that his donation will not be used
to restore the statue. She said
funds used to benefit the historic
home adjacent to the statue
F AIZ S IDDIQUI
Five days after a man fired a
gunshot down an escalator at a
bustling Northwest Washington
Metro station in broad daylight,
police continue to search for a
suspect, and little information has
been made public on the circumstances of the shooting.
Police first acknowledged the
shooting Monday, three days after
the incident, when D.C. police
posted harrowing surveillance
footage of a man firing a gun at the
top of the escalator at Columbia
Heights station. Police asked for
help identifying either of the two
people of interest in the incident,
labeled an “assault with a dangerous weapon.”
In the video, which drew comparisons to a movie scene, two
men chase another man onto the
plaza in front of the station. One
man wields a gun in his hand
while the other repeatedly places
his hand in his waistband.
At the top of the escalator, as the
victim rushes down, a man wearing a jacket and blue jeans fires a
gun, and a burst of smoke pours
from the barrel. The shooter flees,
and the man on the escalator disappears into the station. At that
point, according to Metro spokeswoman Sherri Ly, the victim told a
station manager that someone
outside the station had been chasSHOOTING CONTINUED ON B4
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
In April, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, left, and Harpers Ferry National
Historic Park Superintendent Tyrone Brandyburg hold up a check signed by
President Trump. The president gave his first-quarter salary to the National
Park Service.
ANTIETAM CONTINUED ON B2
Md. mom
must allow
breast-fed
son formula
Magistrate issues order
to accommodate infant’s
overnight visits with dad
Reagan once comforted a
black family hurt by KKK
President Ronald
Retropolis Reagan read the
story about the
DENEEN L.
cross burning in
BROWN
his morning
Washington Post.
A black family in College Park,
Md., had just won a civil suit
against a young Ku Klux Klan
leader who had been convicted
of terrorizing the family five
years earlier.
Reagan’s deputy press
secretary, Larry Speakes, said the
president was jarred by what had
happened to Phillip and Barbara
Butler. “That was the first thing
on his mind this morning,”
Speakes told The Post on May 3,
1982. White House Chief of Staff
James Baker and Deputy Chief of
Staff Michael Deaver walked into
the Oval Office, and the first
thing he said to them was, “ ‘I’ve
read this story. I’d like to go see
these people.’ ”
Deaver found the Butlers at
their jobs at the Government
Printing Office, where they both
worked as printers, and told
them the president wanted to
visit them at their home.
The Butlers had been
newlyweds when they bought the
house in 1976. They were the fifth
black family to move into the
neighborhood. They had lived
there for five months when, on
Jan. 30, 1977, the Klan burned the
cross on their front lawn.
William Aitcheson, then a
University of Maryland student
and “exalted cyclops” of a Ku Klux
Klan lodge, was charged with
burning crosses at the Butlers
and five other properties,
including a synagogue, and
sending a death threat to Coretta
Scott King, the widow of the Rev.
Martin Luther King Jr.
But by the time a federal judge
ordered Aitcheson, who had been
convicted and sentenced to
90 days in jail, to pay the Butlers
$23,000 in civil damages, his
whereabouts were unknown,
according to the 1982 Post story
that Reagan read.
This week, Aitcheson
reemerged in an astonishing way.
Now a Catholic priest, he
published a personal essay about
his involvement with the Klan
and the cross burnings, calling
his own actions “despicable.”
Reagan would have agreed
with that description. Although
his relationship with African
Americans was strained by his
repeated references to “welfare
queens” and efforts to cut
government programs for the
poor, the Republican president
REAGAN CONTINUED ON B4
A wrong turn saves a woman’s life
BY
L YNH B UI
It was a wrong turn on the way
to work that took firefighter William Gressen past the beam of
light piercing the dark woods
along Crain Highway. At first, he
thought it was illumination from
a construction site, but something about it still didn’t feel
quite right.
He turned around, pulled over
and hiked down to an embankment through brush and downed
trees. About 125 feet down, he
discovered the light source.
Md. firefighter on his
way to work first sees a
light, then a wrecked car
A gold Hyundai Elantra had
rolled down from the road, trapping a woman inside. Blood was
running down her face. Her head
was wedged between the headrest and the door. And a seat belt
was wrapped around her neck.
The Prince George’s County
Wednesday. She had turned 100
on March 16.
She and the four generations of
her family reflected “the arc of
our progress,” Obama told them
that Saturday as they assembled
on the stage for the grand opening of the museum.
“And the sound of this bell will
be echoed by others . . . all across
this country — an echo of the
ringing bells that signaled emancipation more than a century and
a half ago,” he said. “The sound,
BONNER CONTINUED ON B2
FORMULA CONTINUED ON B4
RESCUE CONTINUED ON B5
Slave’s daughter who helped open African American Museum dies at 100
M ICHAEL E . R UANE
Ruth Odom Bonner was 99
when she grasped the rope of the
old Baptist church bell and
started it tolling across the Mall
last fall before a gathering of
thousands.
It was a sublime moment.
“Mother Bonner,” as the staff at
her assisted-living community
called her, was the daughter of
a man born into slavery and
had lived through almost a
century of racial oppression
and segregation.
Now here she was, ringing the
hallowed bell to officially open
the Smithsonian Institution’s
National Museum of African
American History and Culture
in Washington.
The graying man who stood
behind her steadying her arm was
the country’s first black president, Barack Obama.
Bonner, who cherished that day,
died peacefully in her sleep Friday
in the Silver Spring assisted-living
facility, her son, Michael, said
J USTIN W M. M OYER
A breast-feeding mother is
embroiled in a court battle in
Maryland after an official said
she must let her estranged partner give the 6-month-old boy
formula while the child is visiting him.
Amber Brown, 27, of Upper
Marlboro, gave birth in February
to the boy. Brown and the boy’s
father, Corey Donta Lewis, separated shortly after their child’s
birth.
At a July custody hearing,
Monise A. Brown, a family magistrate in Charles County, addressed a disagreement between
the couple: Amber Brown wanted to exclusively breast-feed her
child, but Lewis insisted the
child be able to consume formula
to facilitate overnight visits with
him, according to court documents.
After Amber Brown explained
she couldn’t pump enough milk
for an overnight visit, the magistrate sided with the child’s father.
“The magistrate stated pointedly that breast-feeding is not a
reason to prevent [Lewis’s] visitation, and that insisting on
breast-feeding would be considered deliberate alienation of
[Lewis],” according to an affidavit from Jay R. Halleck, an attorney who represented Amber
Brown at the hearing.
At a follow-up hearing, Magis-
firefighter plunged his hand
through a broken window and
freed the choking woman, who
officials say probably would have
died had he not investigated the
mystery light.
On Wednesday, Briana Morrissette for the first time met the
man who rescued her. In a tearful
reunion, she embraced Gressen
and thanked him for saving her.
“I was unconscious during the
entire accident,” said Morrissette, 22. “I only know from
stories what has happened. I
‘She was proud to be part of history’
BY
BY
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
Park Service: No plans to remove battlefield statues
ANTIETAM FROM B1
should not be interpreted as a
provocation of those who criticize
Confederate imagery, calling any
attempt to connect them “absolutely ridiculous.”
The president has framed his
support for Confederate statues
in historical terms, delighting his
supporters and signaling his embrace of a racially charged cause.
“Sad to see the history and
culture of our great country being
ripped apart with the removal of
our beautiful statues and monuments,” he tweeted Aug. 17. “You
. . . can’t change history, but you
can learn from it. Robert E Lee,
Stonewall Jackson — who’s next,
Washington, Jefferson?”
In the days after the Charlottesville attack, Rep. John Delaney (D-Md.) called for the Antietam statue to be removed. Other
Maryland lawmakers have made
statements critical of Confederate monuments without singling
out the Antietam statue.
“I don’t believe that statues
and monuments meant to glorify
the Confederate cause and Confederate leadership belong on
federal land and they should be
taken down unless they serve the
clear purpose of educating people
about American history and are
placed by historians in the proper
context,” Delaney, who’s running
for president in 2020, said in a
statement.
When Trump’s donation to the
Antietam National Battlefield
was announced in April, thenWhite House press secretary Sean
Spicer said the president would
give his first-quarter salary to “a
government entity.” After lawyers
gave the president options, he
chose the National Park Service,
Spicer said at the time.
“It’s a decision he made,” Spicer
said. “He believed . . . some great
work is being done there, especially work being done to restore
RICKY CARIOTI/THE WASHINGTON POST
our great battlegrounds.”
Swift said Trump and Interior
Secretary Ryan Zinke thought a
donation to the Park Service
“would be a good way to show
support for the military and veterans throughout our history.”
Trump has donated his quarterly
salary since his inauguration and
gave $100,000 in July to the
Education Department for a science camp.
The Interior Department and
the Park Service worked with two
nonprofit groups, the Civil War
Trust and the National Park Foundation, “to identify historic battlefields that had deferred maintenance projects that would benefit from the president’s donation
and matching funds,” Swift said.
The Park Service identified the
Newcomer House, a mill used by
the Union Army to care for sol-
The statue of Confederate
Gen. Robert E. Lee astride
his horse, Traveller, was
built in 2003 by a
Confederate enthusiast. It
sits on a bluff about
250 feet from the
Newcomer House, which
was used by the Union
Army to care for soldiers
wounded during the Battle
of Antietam in 1862.
diers wounded during the Battle
of Antietam in 1862, as one of
those projects. The National Park
Service purchased that property
in 2005 with the Lee statue on it.
Work on the house is expected
to begin next summer, while another part of the donation will be
spent on repairing a fence at the
battleground.
“The project selection was
based solely on need and historic
importance,” Antietam National
Battlefield Superintendent Susan
Trail said in a statement.
The Lee statue was built on the
property two years before it was
sold to the Park Service by William F. Chaney, an investor and
the heir to a concrete fortune who
claimed Lee as an ancestor. It sits
directly across from a sign marking the entrance to Antietam on
Route 34. A small Confederate
flag was recently left at the statue’s base.
Noting that Union memorials
outnumbered Confederate memorials at Antietam before the
statue was built, Chaney said he
sought to “even that up a little
bit,” according to the Hagerstown, Md.-based Herald-Mail. A
dedication on the statue defends
Lee’s legacy.
“Although hoping for a decisive
victory Lee had to settle for a
military draw,” the text of the Lee
statue reads. “Robert E. Lee was
personally against secession and
slavery, but decided his duty was
to fight for his home and the
universal right of every people to
self-determination.”
Chaney could not be reached
for comment.
Confederate memorials are
few and far between at Antietam.
There are 96 monuments at the
battlefield, according to its website. Five represent Confederate
companies, but besides Lee, just
one other Confederate leader has
his own memorial.
Antietam marked a turning
point in the Civil War. Lee retreated to Virginia after the battle, but
both sides combined lost about
23,000 men. Weeks later, President Abraham Lincoln fired Gen.
George McClellan for his failure to
pursue the Confederate general.
In the wake of Charlottesville,
which has prompted the removal
of several Confederate statues
across the country, the Park Service has been questioned about
such monuments on federal land
as well. At the Antietam, Gettysburg and Manassas national battlefields, the Park Service has said
no statues will come down, short
of legislation.
John Howard, who was superintendent of Antietam for 17 years
before he retired in 2010, said the
battlefield has hundreds of projects that require maintenance at
any time. Antietam would be
quick to accommodate a White
House willing to fund a project,
Howard said.
“I think they were giving money to something that made him
look good,” Howard said of
Trump’s donation to the Park
Service. “It could have just as well
have been Acadia.”
justin.moyer@washpost.com
VIRGINIA
Charlottesville mayor apologizes to fellow council members
BY
J OE H EIM
Charlottesville Mayor Michael
Signer apologized Wednesday to
the City Council and the people of
the city for some of his actions and
words over the recent “deeply troubling and traumatizing” weeks.
Those actions and communications he said were “inconsistent
with the collaboration required by
our system of government” and
“overstepped the bounds as my
role as Mayor.”
Signer (D) and others in Charlottesville leadership have come
under fire as the city reeled from
its handling of the white supremacist Unite the Right rally on
Aug. 12 and a smaller July 8 rally
by the Ku Klux Klan. A woman
died amid the Aug. 12 rally when a
car drove into a crowd. Later that
day, two Virginia State Police officers who were monitoring the rally died when their helicopter
crashed. Both demonstrations
were organized in response to the
City Council’s decision earlier this
year to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from a
downtown park.
Following widespread criticism
of Charlottesville’s response, Signer had sought to distance himself
from the handling of the event.
Charlottesville is typical of many
Virginia municipalities in that the
mayor does not have strong executive powers. The police chief re-
ports to the city manager, not the
mayor, and Signer had been unhappy that he did not know details
about the city’s security plans for
the rally. He also was upset that he
had not been allowed in the city’s
command center during the rally.
He was publicly critical of City
Manager Maurice Jones and Police Chief Al Thomas.
Some in the city felt he had
overreached. Signer acknowledged as much in his statement
saying his actions “included an
ill-advised Facebook post that impugned the reputations of our City
Manager Maurice Jones and our
Chief of Police Al Thomas, for
which I sincerely apologize.”
The mayor’s apology followed a
closed-door session of the council
Wednesday to “discuss the performance and discipline of an
elected official.”
In his statement Signer said he
would commit to four protocols
for the rest of this year. Most of
those had to do with his interaction with the city’s professional
staff and collaborating with council members. He also said he
“would not make public pronouncements or announcements
as Mayor without working with
my Colleagues and the City Manager beforehand and ensuring
their consent.”
Though the council had authority to impose a fine on the mayor or
vote to remove him, it chose to do
neither. Instead council members
accepted the mayor’s apology and
affirmed their support for him.
In its statement, the council
said it “reiterates shared responsibility for good governance and
conveys Council’s commitments
to working effectively together for
the best interests of the City and its
people.”
The council, including Signer,
also released a separate statement
that said, in part: “Collectively as
leaders, and on behalf of everyone
in our great community, we stand
up for our City and stand against
hate and racism. We pledge to
work together as the City continues to heal.”
joe.heim@washpost.com
Woman descended from slave stood beside first black president
BONNER FROM B1
and the anthem, of American
freedom.”
The 500-pound bell had been
lent by the First Baptist Church in
Williamsburg, Va., which was
founded by slaves and free blacks
in 1776. The bell was acquired in
Cincinnati in 1886.
Bonner, clad in a magenta
pantsuit, stood and got a kiss on
the cheek from the president.
Then both, along with first lady
Michelle Obama and Bonner’s
great-granddaughter, Christine,
7, hauled on the rope and got the
bell ringing.
Bonner “was beaming all day,”
her granddaughter, Rukiya Bonner, said Wednesday. “She was the
belle of the ball.”
“She was proud to be part of
history,” Bonner said. “She was
thankful that such an institution
existed. . . . She felt honored to
meet Obama, because she would
never think that in her lifetime
she would see such a wonderful
president who happened to be
black.”
“The whole family was talking
about it all day long,” she said of
the museum’s opening Sept. 25.
“That extended into Christmas.
. . . It was a surreal moment . . . a
wonderful way to sum up a lot of
her life experiences.”
A former political precinct
leader in Cleveland, where she
spent much of her life, Ruth Bonner was determined to walk up
the steps of her polling place in
Northeast Washington and cast
her vote for Obama when he was
first elected in 2008, her son said.
But meeting the president was
not her only thrill last year.
She and her family were taken
to the museum well before the
ceremony began, her son said.
“She was the belle
of the ball.”
Rukiya Bonner, about her grandma
“We were among the first at the
museum” in the celebrity waiting
room, he said.
So “she was able to interact
with all of the dignitaries and
stars that came through the . . .
room,” he said. “It was just unimaginable. President Clinton to
Oprah to Will Smith. . . . She
really was elated with that.”
And the stars were eager to
meet her, he said.
Bonner was born in 1917 in tiny
Biscoe, Ark., one of the eight
children of Elijah and Ada Odom.
Her father had been born into
slavery in 1859 but had gone on to
become a physician after the Civil
War.
He had a practice in Biscoe that
THE DAILY QUIZ
According to this week’s Local Living
story on bedbugs, what percentage
of pest-control professionals
encountered bedbugs in hotels
and motels in the previous year?
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, and then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Quizzes to enter the
correct response.
he ran out of the back of his
general store.
There were few doctors in the
area, and the local white residents would allow him to care for
them but not deliver white babies, Michael Bonner said.
In the 1930s, Ruth Odom was
sent north to Cleveland to get a
better high school education.
There, she met her husband,
William H. Bonner Sr., a bus
driver. After high school, she
worked as a bookkeeper and later
as a teaching assistant in the
Cleveland school system.
She also took college courses to
help her work in the classroom,
her son said. William Bonner died
in 1990 after over 50 years of
marriage, he said. They had two
children, Michael and William H.
Bonner Jr.
She “will be remembered . . .
for her warmth, sacrifice, and
love,” the museum’s founding director, Lonnie G. Bunch III, said
in a statement Wednesday.
“She will also be remembered
for representing generations of
African Americans with honor
and dignity,” he said. “This nation
owes Mrs. Ruth Bonner a debt of
gratitude.”
A memorial service is set for
Sept. 9 at Washington’s Nineteenth Street Baptist Church. Donations to the museum can be
made in lieu of flowers.
michael.ruane@washpost.com
MEMBER EXCLUSIVES
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama join four
generations of the Bonner family, including then-99-year-old Ruth
Odom Bonner, center, and her great-granddaughter, Christine.
. THURSDAY,
AUGUST 31 , 2017
THE DISTRICT
GU, Nike
reach pact
on worker
conditions
BY
S ARAH L ARIMER
In December, students at
Georgetown University staged a
sit-in, protesting the school’s licensing agreement with Nike
over concerns regarding labor
practices. Months later, Georgetown and Nike have reached a
new agreement that includes
guidelines for investigations into
the working conditions of factories.
The new protocol ensures that
the Worker Rights Consortium, a
labor rights monitoring organization, will have access to Nike’s
supplier factories. It also bolsters
coordination between the consortium and the sportswear company when a violation is identified
and change is needed.
The protocol was approved last
week and incorporated into a new
retail licensing agreement between Nike and the school, which
was signed last Friday, according
to a Georgetown spokesman.
“We now have a road map
together for how we coordinate,
which we didn’t have before,” said
Hannah Jones, Nike’s chief sustainability officer. “This protocol
helps us to establish how we will
work together in a much clearer
way.”
The licensing agreement is related to Georgetown apparel,
such as Nike-produced T-shirts,
and other items that would normally be for sale in the university
bookstore. It is not the same as a
sponsorship deal, though Georgetown also has a sponsorship
agreement with Nike.
Students who participated in
the December sit-in were pushing
for the private university to end
its Nike licensing agreement,
which was set to expire Dec. 31.
The students noted a report by
the Worker Rights Consortium,
which found that factory workers
in Vietnam endured poor treatment, including not being allowed bathroom breaks and being padlocked in the factory.
“Our job, on behalf of the university, is to determine whether
or not violations have occurred,”
said Scott Nova, executive director of the Worker Rights Consortium. “In the case of that facility,
we identified a number of significant labor rights violations and
have been working since then to
try to get them corrected.”
Georgetown let the licensing
agreement with Nike expire, and
it was not the only school to do so.
Instead of abandoning the matter, though, Georgetown then was
involved in creating the new
guidelines.
“As a university, we are able to
realize our commitment to the
safety, welfare and rights of workers through principled and practical engagement,” Georgetown
University President John J.
DeGioia said in a statement.
“This protocol is animated by our
shared commitment to workers’
rights and a belief in the dignity
and worth of every individual.”
Nike’s Jones said there was a
breakdown in trust and communication between the parties but
that Georgetown ultimately
played a pivotal role by recommending mediation on the basis
of “a shared vision of good.”
“We were pretty easily, very
quickly, able to establish that we
did indeed have a shared vision of
good, which is ultimately to impact system change across the
apparel and footwear industry for
workers; that was something that
was really — we were all passionate about,” Jones said. “What we
weren’t agreeing on, per se, was
the ways to get there.”
Nova said it was important to
understand the special nature of
the university labor standards.
“Every brand and retailer in
the garment industry has its own
labor code and monitoring program, but those are voluntary
programs, created by each brand
and retailer itself,” Nova said.
“What is special about the university codes is that they’re binding,
they’re part of the contract between the university and the
brand.”
sarah.larimer@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/grade-point
DID YOU KNOW?
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September 22 at The Birchmere
Usnavi, the proprietor of the corner bodega, guides us through his neighborhood of
striving immigrants and young lovers, where hip-hop meets salsa and soul. Meanwhile
Nina returns to the barrio after flunking out of Stanford, ashamed to tell her immigrant
parents that she lost the American Dream sweepstakes. But with patience and faith,
fortunes can shift and romance can bloom. “A groundbreaking 21st-century musical.”
(New York magazine) See details at washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Coupons &
Discounts.
The songwriter’s eclectic catalog of ballads, historical songs, children’s songs,
love songs, topical satire, fiddle and hammer dulcimer instruments and
even symphonic works are among the broadest in American folk music. His
36 albums have earned six Grammy nominations. “What sets McCutcheon’s
songs apart is that he’s actually writing about something!” (Folk music DJ
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Not a PostPoints member yet?
It’s free. Sign up and get rewarded.
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THURSDAY, AUGUST 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
A 1970s energy-saving
idea: Fleet of loaner bikes
Peter Durant was
a man ahead of his
time, although, I
guess he really
was a man ahead
of our time. On
John
Sept. 26, 1973,
Kelly's
Peter invented
Washington Capital Bikeshare.
Sure, it would
take nearly
40 years for a vast fleet of rental
bicycles to actually appear on the
streets of Washington, but Peter
spelled out its essential premise
when he was a recent college
graduate starting his first
government job.
Peter was reminded of those
days when he was cleaning his
attic recently. He came across
some papers from his time at the
General Services Administration:
two sets of GSA Form 405, one
from September 1973, the other
from March 1974. That’s the form
employees could fill out and drop
in the agency’s suggestion box.
“I believe,” Peter wrote in his
first submission, “that GSA
should provide bicycles to be
used for official travel purposes
by federal employees. On short
(2- to 3-mile) trips a bicycle can
be quick, pollution-free and
enjoyable.”
Peter estimated that a bike
could pay for itself if it replaced
40 trips that a government
employee would normally take by
taxi. “Of course, not everyone will
even ever want to use the ‘bicycle
pool,’ but I feel that there are
potentially enough bike riders to
merit the investment,” wrote
Peter, who was 22 at the time and
rode a three-speed around town.
A month later, Peter received a
reply: “The suggestion to use
bicycles for official travel by
Federal employees is rejected.”
The reasons were spelled out
in three short paragraphs: It
would be too much trouble to
control storage and
disbursement of the bicycles.
Bikes would be stolen. The union
was consulted, and its reaction
was negative — too dangerous
and no place to carry tools on a
bike. Then there was the issue of
inclement weather.
Peter was nothing if not
persistent. Six months later he
wrote again, addressing GSA’s
objections and reminding them
that President Nixon was urging
Americans to save energy.
Peter volunteered to oversee
bike disbursement in the
building where he worked. He
said that he had never intended
the bicycles to be only for toolcarrying blue-collar workers, but
also for white-collar workers
such as himself. (“I’ve ridden as
far as Alexandria in a suit for a
business meeting,” he wrote.)
Thieves could be deterred by
locks and also by placing a visible
tag on each bike identifying it as
federal property and outlining
the penalties for its theft or
misuse.
Boy and man are shot
in Northeast D.C.
A boy and a man were shot
Wednesday in Northeast
Washington, according to D.C.
police.
The shootings occurred around
1:45 p.m. in the 3500 block of
South Dakota Avenue NE. Police
said both were conscious.
Police did not reveal the age of
the boy, who was taken to a
hospital, or the man, who went on
his own to a hospital.
Authorities were looking for a
green Lexus with Maryland
license plates.
The woman, Opal L. Brown, 38,
of Southeast D.C., was arrested at
L’Enfant Plaza station shortly
after noon Wednesday.
Police believe she assaulted a
bus driver around 6:15 p.m.
Saturday on the X2 bus near the
intersection of Benning Road and
Minnesota Avenue.
According to Metro
spokeswoman Sherri Ly, the
passenger was getting off the bus
when the operator told her, “Have
a nice day.”
“Are you talking to me?” the
passenger said, according to
Metro. “Yes,” the bus driver said.
That, Metro says, is when the
rider lashed out.
— Martine Powers
— Peter Hermann
MARYLAND
Police: Man touched
teen on Metro train
Man dies in collision
with garbage truck
He started flirting with her on
a Metro train. But then it quickly
escalated to inappropriate, police
said.
Metro Transit Police have
arrested and charged Wayne
Anthony Dammons, 26, of
Southeast Washington, with a
second-degree sexual offense.
They said the incident unfolded
Monday afternoon on the Red
Line.
A teenage girl told police she
was approached by a man, later
identified as Dammons. He sat by
her and asked for money.
Dammons touched her in a
“sexual manner,” according to
Metro Transit Police.
He then exposed himself to the
teen and left the train at
Glenmont, police said.
The girl reported the incident
to an adult, who notified
authorities, police said. A warrant
was issued for Dammons’s arrest.
He was arrested Wednesday at a
Metro station in Prince George’s
County.
A man was killed Tuesday
when his SUV collided with a
garbage truck in Prince George’s
County, police said.
Around 9:30 a.m., officers
responded to the 15700 block of
Livingston Road in Accokeek for
the report of a collision, county
police said in a statement. They
found Grover Glass, 64, of
Accokeek had tried to turn onto
Livingston Road from a parking
lot when his SUV collided with a
garbage truck traveling west on
Livingston, the statement said.
Glass was pronounced dead at
the scene, police said.
— Dana Hedgpeth
Bus driver’s greeting
set off rider, police say
The woman who allegedly
threw a cup of urine on a
Metrobus driver who told her to
“have a nice day” has been
arrested, police said Wednesday.
— Justin Wm. Moyer
New lane coming for
Severn River bridge
Maryland will add a fourth
eastbound lane over the Severn
River Bridge, near Annapolis on
Route 50, to relieve traffic
congestion for vehicles heading
toward the Eastern Shore.
Transportation officials said
construction will begin on the
$22.8 million project on Sept. 5
and be completed by May 2018.
More than 126,000 vehicles cross
the bridge every day during nonsummer weekdays, and the
number swells to more than
145,000 on Fridays during
summer travel months.
— Josh Hicks
L O TTER I ES
GSA employees found few who
said they would cycle. Bike
storage and shower facilities at
the GSA and HEW buildings
were rarely used. But the real
issue was this: “Bicycles are
extremely dangerous in city
traffic.”
I read Peter’s suggestions to
Colin Browne, communications
coordinator at the Washington
Area Bicyclist Association. Colin
noted that the 1970s saw the
flowering of a nascent bike
movement, spurred by the energy
crisis and environmental
DISTRICT
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Tue.):
Lucky Numbers (Wed.):
DC-4 (Tue.):
DC-4 (Wed.):
DC-5 (Tue.):
DC-5 (Wed.):
6-8-3
8-8-4-1
0-3-9-9-3
0-3-5
7-3-9
2-8-8-7
4-6-9-0
4-4-4-3-4
4-2-8-5-8
Day/Pick-3:
6-7-1
Pick-4:
6-8-7-9
Cash-5:
10-18-20-29-31
Night/Pick-3 (Tue.):
7-5-2
Pick-3 (Wed.):
0-3-8
Pick-4 (Tue.):
3-6-7-0
Pick-4 (Wed.):
2-9-1-8
Cash-5 (Tue.):
7-15-17-20-29
Cash-5 (Wed.):
4-6-8-27-34
Bank a Million:
5-10-14-27-28-40 *33
MULTI-STATE GAMES
MARYLAND
3-3-1
6-1-8-9
3-0-3
4-0-9
7-7-4-0
0-6-5-6
8-11-14-26-30 *28
3-22-32-34-37 *35
5H-8D-KC-6C-2S
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/johnkelly.
Hogan campaign threatens probe on proposed fine
BY
F ENIT N IRAPPIL
Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan’s
reelection campaign could be
slapped with a $250 fine for a
minor violation of state election
law, an inconvenience that has
erupted into a messy partisan
brawl.
Hogan’s campaign attorney
Dirk Haire, who also chairs the
Maryland Republican Party, says
he’ll ask the state prosecutor’s
office to launch an official misconduct investigation if Attorney
General Brian E. Frosh (D)
doesn’t act to block the fine,
which was proposed by staffers at
the state Board of Elections in
response to a complaint from
Maryland Democratic Party
Chair Kathleen Matthews.
Haire is also threatening to file
a complaint alleging that Frosh’s
campaign illegally charged children for ice cream at a fundraiser.
The Republican chairman of
the elections board, which normally defers to staff to handle
alleged election-law violations,
says he and board members from
both parties will offer their own
concerns and input on the proposed fine at an upcoming meeting.
The proposed fine is in response to an April 2 email sent by
Alfred W. Redmer, a former state
delegate who serves as insurance
commissioner to Hogan, that
sought hosts for a summer fundraiser for Hogan’s reelection bid
next year.
The Democratic Party cried
foul because Maryland law prohibits state officeholders, and
those acting on their behalf, from
soliciting campaign donations or
advertising upcoming fundraisers during the annual 90-day legislative session, which this year
ran from Jan. 11 to April 10.
Elections officials were weighing whether Redmer was acting
on behalf of Hogan’s reelection
campaign, and whether his request for hosts who would raise a
minimum amount of money for
the event was an illegal overture
or a legitimate “save-the-date” notice.
They learned that Redmer
asked Hogan campaign officials
for guidance on organizing the
fundraiser, according to records
provided under the Public Information Act. The campaign
warned Redmer not to distribute
the invitations during the legislative session, and he did so anyway.
Nevertheless, Jared DeMarinis, who heads the election board’s
campaign finance division, concluded that the Hogan campaign
was responsible for Redmer’s actions. In a letter sent to the Hogan
campaign, DeMarinis proposed a
$250 fine, half of the maximum
penalty.
Haire, acting as Hogan’s campaign attorney, retorted in an
email that the election agency
was misinterpreting the law. He
accused Frosh, whose office had
provided advice on how to interpret Maryland’s campaign finance law, of taking a “nakedly
political and legally unjustified
position.”
“If . . . this issue either is not
rapidly concluded without a violation and/or it ends up in the
press, it is my intention to make a
request to empanel a grand jury
to consider if an indictment is
warranted against the Attorney
General for misconduct in office,”
Haire wrote in an Aug. 10 email.
After hearing the content of
Haire’s email, House Majority
Leader C. William Frick (D-Montgomery) called it “bizarre and
inappropriate.”
“At best, he is trying to bully a
nonpartisan state employee who
is doing his job,” Frick said. “At
worst, he is threatening criminal
actions against a fellow statewide
elected official on Hogan’s behalf.”
But Haire maintained that
Frosh, a Democratic political rival
of Hogan’s, could not have been
neutral when his staff advised
election officials on how the law
should be interpreted.
“This is a politically contrived,
nonserious effort to take illegal
action against the governor,”
Haire said.
Elections board Chairman David J. McManus Jr. said the board
wants to have a public discussion
of the probe into Redmer’s email
because it raises new questions
about election law, especially the
notion that a campaign may be
fined if a staffer or volunteer does
something they were explicitly
told not to do.
“Something that is not typical
and novel is something we should
still have a say in,” McManus said.
If the fine against Hogan goes
through, Haire says he will retaliate with a complaint about an
OLIVER CONTRERAS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Mega Millions:
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Megaplier:
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Hot Lotto:
6-14-23-31-37 †9
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ALEX BRANDON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The reelection campaign of Gov. Larry Hogan (R), left, faces a $250
fine for a minor election law violation. Hogan’s campaign attorney
wants Attorney General E. Brian Frosh (D), right, to block the fine.
Aug. 26 ice cream social in Baltimore organized by Frosh’s campaign, where children were
charged $10 for half-pints. Children cannot legally give campaign contributions, Haire said,
and their parents are prohibited
from making contributions on
behalf of another person.
“My point here is, this is a
waste of time for everyone,” Haire
said. “Why are we bothering with
such trivial matters?”
On that point, Frosh spokeswoman Raquel Coombs seemed
to agree. She called Haire’s allegations “ridiculous.”
fenit.nirappil@washpost.com
MARYLAND DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
STATE HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION
MD 4/SUITLAND PARKWAY INTERCHANGE
The Maryland Department of Transportation State Highway Administration
(MDOT SHA) is starting construction on the $78 million interchange project
at MD 4 (Pennsylvania Avenue) and Suitland Parkway in Prince George’s
County. The new diamond interchange will reduce congestion at the busy
intersection. The project also includes realigning the Pennsylvania Avenue
Service Road and Armstrong Lane, reconstruction of on- and off-ramps to
Joint Base Andrews, construction of a new signalized intersection at
Presidential Parkway and Central Park Drive, and widening of the existing
bridge on Suitland Parkway. The work is expected to be complete by the
end of the summer of 2021. MDOT SHA is hosting a public meeting on
September 14, 2017 to discuss project details.
WORKSHOP PURPOSE: The public meeting will present maps and other
exhibits of the current design. The meeting will provide an opportunity for
project team members to answer project-related questions.
WORKSHOP FORMAT: The meeting will be conducted in an open house
format. No formal presentation will be given.
WHEN: Thursday, September 14, 2017 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
You may arrive at any time during meeting hours and walk through at your
own pace.
WHERE: Forestville High School (Forestville Military Academy) –
Cafeteria, 7001 Beltz Drive, District Heights, MD 20747
CONTACT: Mr. Sean Johnson, Project Manager
MDOT State Highway Administration
Office of Highway Development
707 N. Calvert Street, Mail Stop C-102
Baltimore, MD 21202
Phone: 410-545-8813; Toll-free: 1-888-228-5003
Email: sjohnson@sha.state.md.us
Mr. Michael Brown, MDOT SHA
District 3 Area Engineer-Construction
MDOT State Highway Administration District 3 Office
9300 Kenilworth Avenue
Greenbelt, MD 20770
Phone:301-513-7367; Toll-free:1-800-749-0737;
Email: mbrown6@sha.state.md.us
VIRGINIA
Results from Aug. 30
Mid-Day Pick 3:
Mid-Day Pick 4:
Night/Pick 3 (Tue.):
Pick 3 (Wed.):
Pick 4 (Tue.):
Pick 4 (Wed.):
Match 5 (Tue.):
Match 5 (Wed.):
5 Card Cash:
FAMILY PHOTO
As for inclement weather,
Peter conceded: “Bicycles are for
sunny days.”
GSA rejected Peter’s idea again
but in a much nicer, more
detailed letter.
“It is gratifying to know that
our employees are constantly
striving for ideas which may
improve GSA operations or effect
a savings to the Federal
Government,” wrote James F.
Steele Jr., regional
commissioner for the Public
Buildings Service.
Steele wrote that a survey of
MARYLAND
L O CA L D I G ES T
THE DISTRICT
SARAH L. VOISIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
In the 1970s, Peter Durant, below, suggested that the federal government create a system similar to
Capital Bikeshare. Unfortunately, his proposal was rejected — twice.
awareness.
But cycling in cities then could
be terrifying. Said Colin: “The
fact that we now have bike lanes
and trails in place for people to
help them feel less stressful
makes it seem like more of a
realistic option.”
Peter, 67, agreed. “Isn’t it great
what Washington, D.C., has
done?” he said. “There are lanes
for the bikes. It really has
changed to a different place.”
Today 4.1 percent of
commuters bike to work in the
District, making it the thirdmost-biked city in the country,
after Portland, Ore., and
Minneapolis.
GSA may not provide bikes
today, but there’s bike storage at
its building at 18th and F NW,
along with showers and lockers
in the fitness center.
And GSA incorporates bicycles
into at least some of its planning.
I looked at reports prepared for
the since-tabled proposal to
move the FBI’s headquarters.
Each one included information
on cycling routes to proposed
new sites and the number of
bicycle parking spaces at nearby
Metro stations.
Peter spent his working life in
the federal government, first at
GSA, then at such agencies as the
Federal Aviation Administration,
Office of Personnel Management
and Environmental Protection
Agency,
“It was just too soon for this
new idea,” he said.
But thanks for trying!
REQUEST FOR ASSISTANCE: The MD Relay Service can assist teletype
users at 7-1-1. Persons requiring assistance to participate, such as an
interpreter for hearing/speech disabilities or assistance with the English
language, should contact Mr. Johnson by September 7, 2017.
For project details, visit our project website at www.roads.maryland.gov
and click on Projects, and then on MDOT SHA Projects Page. Type
MD 4 in the search box, and click on the MD 4, Pennsylvania Avenue
RI - AT SUITLAND PARKWAY INTERCHANGE project and then choose
the Additional Project Information link in the callout box.
Please mark your calendars and plan to attend!
Aug 2017
A-0854
Gregory I. Slater
State Highway Administrator
B4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
RETROPOLIS
. THURSDAY,
AUGUST 31 , 2017
VIRGINIA
Long before priest’s confession, a show of compassion Keys-Gamarra elected
to Fairfax school board
REAGAN FROM B1
had a visceral reaction to what
the Butlers had endured.
Before he went to see the
Butlers, Reagan met with the
National Security Council, was
briefed by top aides over lunch,
and discussed voting rights with
the attorney general and the
federal budget with members of
Congress, according to The Post
account of that day by staff
writers Sara Rimer and Kenneth
Bredemeier.
He finished his last meetings at
the White House at 4:15 p.m.
Fifteen minutes later, he and first
lady Nancy Reagan climbed
aboard a helicopter on the White
House lawn.
A few minutes later, the
helicopter landed in Beltsville,
Md., and the president and first
lady rode in a motorcade to the
Butlers’ beige brick rambler in
College Park Woods. The Butlers,
their 4-year-old daughter,
Natasha, and Barbara Butler’s
mother, Dorothea Tolson, were
waiting outside to greet them.
The Reagans arrived with a jar
of gourmet jelly beans, the
president’s favorite candy. The
Butlers invited them inside,
where they sat on the sofa in the
living room.
Rimer, who then was a Post
Metro reporter, remembers how
dignified the Butlers were. “My
one memory is of how great the
family was,” said Rimer, who now
works in communications at
Boston University. “My thought
was, ‘How could someone do that
to them?’ ”
Inside the house, Reagan told
the family: “I came out to let you
know that this [cross burning]
isn’t something that should
happen in America.”
Barbara Butler, then 39, was
touched. “It makes a difference
when the president of the United
States will take time to come
BY
BARRY THUMMA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Barbara and Phillip Butler and daughter Natasha, 4, walk with President Ronald Reagan and Nancy
Reagan (behind Mrs. Butler) in 1982 outside the family’s home in College Park, Md. At left is Dorothea
Tolson, Barbara Butler’s mother. The president had a visceral reaction to what the family had endured.
from the White House to a little
community like this,” she told
Reagan. “It’s been a long hard
battle out here. We know by your
coming that everything has
changed.”
Reagan chatted with Barbara
Butler about growing up in
California, where he had been a
movie star and later governor.
And he recalled how he had
befriended William Franklin
Burghardt, who was black and
was the center on the 1931 Eureka
College football team on which
Reagan was a starting guard.
“In an incident celebrated by
Reagan in his autobiography and
confirmed by his football coach,
Ralph McKinzie, Reagan took
Burghardt and the team’s other
black player into his own home
when a hotel in a small Illinois
town refused them admittance
on a road trip in 1931,” Post
political reporter Lou Cannon
wrote in 1986. “Many public
places in the Middle West in
those days were as rigidly
segregated as they were in the
South.”
In College Park, the Reagans
posed for a photo with the Butlers
in front of the fireplace. The
White House photographer
snapped photos. After
20 minutes, the visit ended.
“The Reagans shook hands
with the Butlers,” The Post
reported. “Mrs. Reagan kissed
Mrs. Butler on the cheek. The
president hugged Mrs. Butler.”
The president’s limousine
pulled out of the Butlers’ driveway
at 5:15 p.m. By 5:40, the Reagans
were back at the White House.
The Butlers held a news
conference, and Phillip Butler,
then 40, told reporters that he
thought the president was
sincere. “I really think he came
here on his personal feeling,”
Phillip Butler said. “I don’t feel it
was political.”
After the news conference
ended, The Post reported, “the
Butlers went inside to watch
themselves on the evening news.”
deneen.brown@washpost.com
Excerpted from at
washingtonpost.com/news/
retropolis
O∞cials didn’t acknowledge gun incident for 3 days
SHOOTING FROM B1
ing him. D.C. police said it did not
appear anyone was struck in the
incident, which occurred about
12:15 p.m.
“The suspect did not enter Metro and fled on the street,” Ly added. The victim left the scene, she
said.
Neighborhood officials say a
gun has been recovered, but the
apparent shooter fled, information police have yet to publicly
confirm. In emails to Advisory
Neighborhood Commission members, police Cmdr. Stuart Emerman said officers had recovered a
weapon discarded in the area after
a Friday afternoon pursuit in Columbia Heights. Emerman said
police chased a suspect on foot
“but he managed to make good his
escape.”
In response to the incident,
Emerman told an ANC commissioner that police had increased
their visibility in the area and
alerted officers to the description
of the suspect in an attempt to find
him. The commander also said
police believe that the individual
involved in the incident was targeted and that the apparent suspect knew the victim.
“We do not believe that this was
a random incident,” he wrote.
In the aftermath of the shooting, authorities were still piecing
together the sequence of events.
Metro said it was not immediately
MD:
VA:
301-637-2870
703-382-8505
D.C. POLICE
A man can be seen firing a handgun down the escalator at the
Columbia Heights Metro station in this video still, released by D.C.
police. The incident took place Aug. 25.
“We do not believe
that this was a
random incident.”
Stuart Emerman,
D.C. police commander
evident that a shot had been fired.
The surveillance footage, however, shed light on the events.
“In this case, whether and
where a firearm had been discharged was not immediately
known, as initially there was no
obvious crime scene, victim or witnesses who remained on scene for
responding officers,” Ly said.
“Subsequent investigation yielded
useful camera footage from private surveillance cameras, which
provided detectives with a clearer
understanding of what had occurred, including the fact that the
suspect fled on the street and did
not enter Metro.”
Ly said Metro did not release
information on the shooting because D.C. police, as the lead agency, determine which details to reveal — and when — to maintain
the integrity of the investigation.
But the lunchtime shooting, adjacent to a shopping complex with a
Target, Best Buy and other stores,
shocked neighborhood residents
and officials.
“I was very disturbed to see
someone shooting a gun down an
escalator at Metro,” Metro Board
Chairman Jack Evans said.
ANC commissioners were similarly dismayed.
“When I looked at the video, it’s
disturbing. It’s a kick to the gut
every time I see something like
that,” said ANC Commissioner
Christine Miller, whose district is
in Columbia Heights. “It’s just the
feeling that, ‘What if?’ ”
ANC Commissioner Zach Rybarczyk, who lives in the adjacent
residential and commercial building where the footage appeared to
have originated, said the consequences could have been tragic.
“I’m very thankful that it didn’t
happen maybe three hours later,
four hours later, when schools
were letting out,” he said. “I can
only imagine how bad that situation would have been.”
Metro defended its decision not
to publicize the incident and said
the case was taken on by D.C.
police because the chase began off
Metro property and the perpetrator never entered Metro.
On social media, however, messages of outrage were plentiful.
Metro critics piled on the agency
for its only public acknowledgment of the incident, a Friday afternoon tweet that said the station’s west entrance was closed
due to an investigation “off Metro
property.”
“Heard shooting was on WMATA
escalator. If true, WMATA deceptive in saying Investigation is off
WMATA property,” tweeted one
user.
Evans, who also is a D.C. Council member, said the crime wasn’t
necessarily specific to the Metro
system, as the incident appeared
to have started in the adjacent
blocks. “The best we can hope for
is things like that don’t happen,
and when they do,” authorities
swiftly make an arrest to send a
message, he said.
Still, Evans said Metro could
have communicated the incident
to riders, even if it was a D.C. police
investigation.
“Personally, if it were me at Metro, I would have said something,”
Evans said. “I have always had a
problem with Metro being too
close to the vest when things happen. That’s the mind-set of Metro
— is to generally not be open as
they should be.”
Others suggested that an officer
should be permanently stationed
outside the Columbia Heights station.
D.C. police have not responded
to an inquiry on whether they are
considering such a move.
faiz.siddiqui@washpost.com
M ORIAH B ALINGIT
Fairfax County voters elected a
candidate backed by the Democratic Party to the school board
Tuesday in a special election that
was cast as a test of the party’s
strength in the Northern Virginia
county.
Karen Keys-Gamarra, an attorney and child advocate, won the
at-large seat with 41,519 votes.
Chris Grisafe, a federal contractor endorsed by the Fairfax
County Republican Committee,
received 21,389 votes. A little
more than 70,000 people cast
ballots, putting turnout at about
10 percent.
Keys-Gamarra will fill the seat
of Jeanette Hough, who left the
board in June after her husband’s
job took the family overseas.
Hough, who held the at-large seat
on the 12-member board, was
elected in 2015 with an endorsement from the Fairfax County
Republican Committee and was
one of three GOP-backed members.
The board is officially nonpartisan, but candidates are often elected with endorsements and money
from the local Democratic and
Republican party committees. In
recent years, the Democratic- and
Republican-backed factions of
the board have been fiercely divided over many issues, including
how to accommodate transgender students, sexual education
curriculum and whether to strip
the names of Confederate figures
from schools.
The board in 2015 voted to
teach students about transgender
issues in sex ed and to include
transgender students and staff in
its nondiscrimination policy.
Both moves were opposed by
conservative parents and the
GOP-endorsed board members.
In July, the board voted to rename
J.E.B. Stuart High following a
contentious, two-year process
that led to heated community
forums. The board’s two GOPbacked members dissented. Stu-
art was a Confederate Army
general.
Those issues played an outsize
role in this election, with KeysGamarra and her opponent staking out opposite positions. KeysGamarra said she backed the
board’s decision to rename J.E.B.
Stuart High, while Grisafe assailed the board for not seeking
enough community input. KeysGamarra also said transgender
students should be able to use
bathrooms matching their gender identity. Grisafe said transgender students should use unisex restrooms to avoid making
their classmates feel uncomfortable.
Keys-Gamarra said she hopes
she can bring more harmony to
the board and to school politics.
“I’d like to bring healthy community discussions because I
think the tenor of some of those
discussions in the past has been
far too divisive,” she said. “They
have marginalized students, they
have marginalized members of
our community.”
Keys-Gamarra, the mother of
three Fairfax County schools
graduates, received substantial financial backing from the Democratic Party, which donated more
than $60,000 to her effort. Grisafe raised about $25,000.
State party leaders celebrated
the news, drawing parallels between Keys-Gamarra’s win and
that of Jackie Smith, a Democrat
who defeated a powerful Republican this year to become clerk of
courts in Prince William County,
a populous swing county. Democratic strategists pointed out she
prevailed even in districts represented by Republican state lawmakers.
“Karen Keys-Gamarra’s victory
tonight reinforces what Jackie
Smith’s win proved in April: Democrats are energized and organized, and we’re coming out in
droves,” Susan Swecker, chairwoman of the Virginia Democratic Party, said in a statement.
moriah.balingit@washpost.com
KEYS-GAMARRA CAMPAIGN
Fairfax County school board candidate Karen Keys-Gamarra easily
won election to an at-large seat with 41,519 votes.
Magistrate orders infant
be given formula to see dad
FORMULA FROM B1
trate Mistey L. Metzgar appeared
to agree with her fellow family
magistrate, recommending overnight visits begin Aug. 4, according to court filings. But Amber
Brown filed a request for an
exception on Aug. 10, saying the
child’s pediatrician said the boy
couldn’t tolerate formula — and
that, during one visit, Lewis had
fed him formula anyway.
“It was simply more convenient for [Lewis] to feed the baby
formula than to ensure the baby
remained healthy,” the request
for exception reads.
Amber Brown’s request for the
exception alleged a “clear and
improper policy” in Charles
County courts “creating a presumption that breast-feeding is
used to alienate fathers and that
babies should be switched from
breast milk to formula in order to
accommodate overnight visitation.”
Lewis declined to comment,
citing the need to contact legal
counsel. The magistrates in the
case didn’t return a request for
comment on Wednesday.
In a telephone interview, Amber Brown said she tried home
remedies in an attempt to produce more breast milk, including
lactation cookies and herbal tea,
but was unable to pump enough
for an overnight visit.
Citing the American Academy
of Pediatrics and other heath
officials, a Maryland Senate bill
that became law in 2003 indicated “the state is interested in the
promotion of family values and
to that end encourages public
acceptance of this basic act of
nurture.”
Jeanette Rice, Amber Brown’s
attorney, said she was outraged
by the magistrates’ recommendations. “I’ve been practicing for
20-plus years,” she said. “I’ve
never had a magistrate tell someone not to breast-feed.”
Custody disputes related to
breast-feeding are not unheard
of. A mother in Pennsylvania said
a judge in 2013 ordered her to
stop breast-feeding to accommodate visits with the father of her
child. Bristol Palin, daughter of
former Alaska governor Sarah
Palin, said in court last year her
former fiance’s custody demands
would disrupt her breast-feeding
schedule.
George Washington University
law professor Catherine J. Ross
said courts are generally tasked
with defending the best interests
of children, for whom breastfeeding is often considered
healthiest.
“Even as the legislatures and
courts have tried to put parents
of both genders on an equal
footing, things like breast-feeding are still biologically determined,” she said. “And in general,
we tend to think that a breastfeeding mother would be accommodated.”
Amber Brown said her child
remains on breast milk ahead of
an October custody hearing before a judge.
“We latched right away since
birth,” she said. “It’s been that
way ever since.”
justin.moyer@washpost.com
Alice Crites and Terence McArdle
contributed to this report.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B5
RE
Woman is reunited with the man who saved her after crash
RESCUE FROM B1
never had the opportunity to see
his face, to touch his hand, to give
him a hug, to thank him.”
Gressen said he was not sure
what he would encounter when
he headed down the ravine
toward the light, but he was
grateful his gut told him to stop.
“I don’t know what made me
go that way,” said Gressen, a
12-year veteran of the department.
He had just finished seeing his
family in Calvert County on
July 9 when he headed back to
the fire services building in
Landover, where he planned to
bunk before starting his next
shift. But for some reason, about
1 a.m., he accidentally took a
right turn instead of a left not far
from the office, sending him
along Route 301 behind a slow
tractor-trailer.
That’s when he noticed the
light and did a U-turn to check it
out.
“When I first looked, I couldn’t
see the vehicle at first,” Gressen
said. “I went down in the meantime just far enough for me to
see, and I could see the silhouette
of the vehicle.”
He saw the car had rolled to
one side with the right headlight
buried in the mud.
He ran down, circled the car
and checked a few windows before discovering Morrissette.
“I looked up, you were laying
like flat,” Gressen told Morrissette during their reunion. “Your
feet were up by the dashboard,
your head was by the headrest,
“Your feet were up by
the dashboard, your
head was by the
headrest, but you were
wrapped in the seat
belt, and it had your
head hyperextended.”
William Gressen, to Briana Morrissette
but you were wrapped in the seat
belt, and it had your head hyperextended all the way to the back.”
Gressen watched for a few
seconds to see whether she was
breathing, but her chest didn’t
rise, and she wasn’t moving.
Typically in car crashes, firefighters try not to move victims
until there is a way to stabilize
them, but Gressen had to make a
split-second decision.
He moved her head forward
just far enough to unwrap the
seat belt from around her neck.
Seconds later, after falling over
limp and lifeless, a gasp of air
heaved in her chest, and she
started to breathe. Gressen called
911, and Morrissette was flown to
a hospital.
She said she was on her way
home to Upper Marlboro after
having dinner with friends in the
District. She said the last thing
she remembered before the crash
was speaking with her boyfriend
on the phone via headset. When
she awoke, she was in a hospital,
where nurses were trying to calm
her.
“I’m eternally grateful for what
you’ve done,” Morrissette told
Gressen at their reunion. “It was
very courageous of you. Every
day, I aspire to be that way
myself.”
Morrissette’s mother was also
on hand to thank the man who
saved her only child, whom she
raised alone after her husband
died about 20 years ago.
“It’s every mother’s worst
nightmare to think that a child
will not make it home,” Aundrea
Wheeler Morrissette said. “But
when we heard the story of how
Briana was rescued, I burst into
tears.”
At their reunion, Briana Morrissette and Gressen discovered
they share a birthday, Oct. 21. But
“it’s almost like Briana has a new
birthday,” her mother said,
thanks to Gressen’s lifesaving
work. “I can’t image what my life
would be like today without my
only child. She’s my only family.”
Briana Morrissette, a domestic-violence coordinator for the
Charles County state’s attorney’s
office, suffered a broken clavicle
and scratches in the crash, injuries from which she is still recovering.
It is unclear what caused her to
crash, but she is glad Gressen was
there when seconds made the
difference between life and
death.
“I wish I could remember,”
Morrissette said. “Thank God he
took a wrong turn.”
lynh.bui@washpost.com
obituaries
ROLLIE MASSIMINO, 82
Coached Villanova
to an upset NCAA
championship win
BY
M ATT S CHUDEL
Rollie Massimino, a roly-poly,
energetic college basketball coach
who engineered one of his sport’s
greatest upsets, when his Villanova Wildcats played “the perfect
game” to defeat Georgetown for
the 1985 men’s NCAA championship, died Aug. 30 at his home in
Jupiter, Fla. He was 82.
His death was announced by
Keiser University of West Palm
Beach, Fla., where Mr. Massimino
was head men’s basketball coach.
He had lung cancer and had been
treated in recent years for a brain
tumor and other ailments.
Mr. Massimino, who won more
than 800 games during his 41
seasons as a college coach, is best
known for the 19 years he spent at
Villanova, outside Philadelphia.
Beginning in 1980, Villanova was
a rival of Georgetown, St. John’s,
Connecticut, Syracuse and other
schools in the rugged Big East
Conference.
Throughout his career, Mr.
Massimino cultivated a familystyle approach to coaching, often
inviting his players to his home
for pasta dinners. After their
6 a.m. preseason practices, his
players returned to the locker
room for doughnuts and milk,
fostering a camaraderie that
made for exceptionally close-knit
teams.
“His family atmosphere was absolutely key,” Harold Pressley, who
played on the 1985 championship
team, told Sports Illustrated, describing how he was recruited by
Mr. Massimino. “He came in,
lounged around with my mother,
seemed real comfortable. It
worked. It was believable. And it
was real.”
Mr. Massimino led Villanova to
the NCAA tournament nine times
during an 11-year period and often
said his best teams were the ones
he coached in 1982 and 1983,
when Villanova won the Big East
regular-season title.
Those teams, however, were
ousted in the NCAA tourney. The
only time he reached the Final
Four came with the 1984-1985
team that defied all odds.
That season, Villanova finished
the season with an unremarkable
19-10 record and entered the
NCAA tournament as a mid-level
No. 8 seed in the Southeast region.
It was the last NCAA tournament
to be played without a shot clock,
and it came before college basketball used the long-range threepoint shot.
Mr. Massimino used a deliberately paced offense and a baffling
array of zone defenses designed to
throw more physically imposing
teams off stride.
In the opening game of the 1985
tournament, Villanova faced the
University of Dayton on Dayton’s
home court. Backup shooting star
Harold Jensen drove to the basket
late in the game to win the game
for the Wildcats, 51-49.
Next, Villanova dispatched
No. 1 seed Michigan, 59-55, then
topped Maryland, 49-46. To reach
the Final Four, the Wildcats had to
beat perennial power North Carolina. At halftime, Villanova trailed
UNC, 22-17.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Villanova players carry coach Rollie Massimino on the court after the team defeated the University of
North Carolina to advance to the NCAA tournament’s Final Four in March 1985.
“I don’t need this,” Mr. Massimino shouted to his players in
the locker room. “You know what
I’d like right now? A big bowl of
spags, with clam sauce.”
With the tension broken, he
then told his team, “Hey, guys.
Just go out and play.”
Villanova won easily, 56-44, to
advance to the Final Four in Lexington, Ky. Three of the teams in
the Final Four that year were from
the Big East: Villanova, Georgetown and St. John’s.
The fourth was Villanova’s opponent, Memphis State. The Wildcats’ slow-paced style wore down
Memphis State, 52-45, and set up a
final matchup between the Wildcats and Georgetown.
The intimidating Hoyas, led by
7-foot all-American Patrick Ewing
(now Georgetown’s head coach)
were the defending national
champions and entered the game
with a record of 35-2. They were
overwhelming favorites.
Georgetown’s coach, the im-
posing 6-foot-10 John Thompson,
was more than a foot taller than
his pudgy, animated counterpart.
Villanova had lost twice to
Georgetown earlier in the season,
but for the final game Mr. Massimino sought to inspire his underdog team through psychology.
“Go back to your rooms,” he told
his players hours before the tipoff.
“Close your eyes and picture yourself playing this game to win.
Don’t play this game not to lose.
Play it to win. Believe you can
win.”
Villanova committed 17 turnovers in the game but otherwise
played what Sports Illustrated
writer Tim Layden called “the perfect game on the biggest stage
against an unbeatable opponent.”
Mr. Massimino and his assistant coaches adopted a shifting
defensive scheme that confused
the Hoyas. Late in the first half,
Villanova held the ball for almost
two minutes, before taking a
29-28 halftime lead. In the second
half, Villanova could do almost
nothing wrong.
With 2:47 remaining in the
game, Georgetown held a 54-53
lead when Jensen sank an 18-foot
jump shot to give Villanova the
lead. The Wildcats later intercepted a Georgetown pass and held on
to win, 66-64.
The Wildcats attempted 10
shots in the second half and made
nine of them. Their shooting percentage for the game was an astonishing 78.6 percent.
It was Mr. Massimino’s greatest
moment as a coach. Villanova,
with its No. 8 seeding, remains the
lowest-seeded team to win the
NCAA tournament.
“We played as hard as we
could,” Thompson told The Washington Post after the game. “We’re
disappointed, sure. We feel bad
about losing. If I had to lose to
somebody, I take some consolation that it’s Rollie Massimino.”
Roland Vincent Massimino
was born Nov. 13, 1934, and grew
ALAN ROOT, 80
Acclaimed, scar-ridden
wildlife filmmaker
BY
H ARRISON S MITH
Alan Root, a wildlife filmmaker
who splashed through crocodileinfested rivers, piloted hot-air
balloons over stampeding wildebeests and lost a “Coke
bottle”-size chunk of his calf to an
angry hippopotamus, all while
producing nearly two dozen acclaimed nature documentaries,
died Aug. 26. He was 80.
Mr. Root had just returned
from a safari in Alaska when he
was hospitalized near his home in
central Kenya, just outside the
Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, said
Delta Willis, a friend and U.S.
publicist for several of Mr. Root’s
television specials. He had been
diagnosed with the brain cancer
glioblastoma in April, she said.
Mr. Root, an Englishman,
spent nearly all his life in Kenya,
where he and his first wife, Joan,
acquired a reputation as two of
Africa’s finest — and most scarridden — documentarians.
“The Man Who Was Eaten
Alive,” as a New Yorker profile by
George Plimpton once described
him, was working on a wateringhole scene when he was mauled
by a hippo. He nearly died after
going into anaphylactic shock
following a bite from a puff adder,
but lost only the index finger of
his right hand, forcing him to
reconfigure the hand controls of
his helicopter — an aircraft that
he began flying in his 60s and
crashed at least twice.
A leopard once bit into his
bottom, and a mountain gorilla —
what Mr. Root described as “a
Doberman on steroids” — ripped
into his thigh while he was helping to shoot a scene for “Gorillas
in the Mist,” the 1988 film about
Dian Fossey, whom Mr. Root reportedly introduced to gorillas
decades earlier.
Mr. Root was considered one of
the first filmmakers to capture
animals in their natural habitat
without human interference, and
he was credited with paving the
way for migration movies such as
“March of the Penguins.” He received two Emmy Awards and
was named an Officer of the
Order of the British Empire in
2008.
While he wrote, filmed and
produced most of his documentaries, including television specials
for National Geographic, the BBC
and the “Survival” series on Britain’s Anglia network, Joan Root
often played a central role behind
the scenes, allowing a cobra to
spit on her sunglass-clad face for
one shot and piloting a balloon
over the 19,000-foot peak of
Mount Kilimanjaro for another.
“In a world where natural history films have become increasingly formulaic, made by big
teams with big budgets, backed
by an army of researchers, scientific advisers, and camera-people,
Alan was the original auteur,” the
ITV/REX FEATURES/ASSOCIATED PRESS
JOHN HEMINWAY
LEFT: Joan and Alan Root filming for the British nature program, “Survival.” The documentarian was
considered one of the first to capture animals in their natural habitat without human interference,
paving the way for migration movies such as “March of the Penguins.” RIGHT: Root in Nairobi.
filmmaker Mark Deeble, a protege of Mr. Root, wrote in a
tribute.
The Roots, he continued, “combined natural history integrity
with irreverence [and] conveyed
a knowledge of natural history
and wildlife behavior that few
could equal.”
Alan Root was born in London
on May 12, 1937. His father was a
manager at a fish-paste factory,
and moved the family to Kenya
for a job at a corned-beef plant
when Mr. Root was 9.
For Mr. Root, it was an opportunity to surround himself with
more exotic pets than he had
owned in England, including a
baby bongo (he later gave it to the
Cleveland Zoo), a baboon named
Bimbo and a back yard full of
snakes. He dropped out of school
at 16 and taught himself to trap,
guide and fly planes while developing what Deeble described as a
“repertoire of baboon alarm calls,
elephant farts and wildebeest
contact calls.”
He also began shooting movies
with a 16-millimeter Bolex camera. In a well-received 2012 memoir, “Ivory, Apes & Peacocks,” Mr.
Root said he was drawn to make
films that corrected the excesses
of early nature programs — television shows that, as he put it,
made it seem as though animals
“were something you picked up,
basically molested and used to
augment your ego.”
He was a cameraman for
“Serengeti Shall Not Die,” a 1959
documentary by the father-son
team of Bernhard and Michael
Grzimek, when the younger
Grzimek died in a plane crash.
Mr. Root finished the film, which
won an Academy Award for best
documentary.
“It was all downhill after that,”
he quipped.
He married Joan Thorpe, the
daughter of a safari guide, in 1961.
They embarked on a series of
journeys across Africa and the
rest of the world, visiting the
Galápagos Islands for “Voyage to
the Enchanted Isles” (1967). To
capture the ground-level thunder
of a roaming herd in “The Year of
the Wildebeest” (1974), they hid
their camera inside a tortoise
shell.
Their crossing of Kilimanjaro,
for “Balloon Safari” (1975), reportedly marked the first instance that a hot-air balloon was
used to photograph African wild-
up in Hillside, N.J. His father, an
Italian immigrant, was a shoemaker.
Mr. Massimino played basketball at the University of Vermont,
from which he graduated in 1956.
He received a master’s degree in
physical education from New Jersey’s Rutgers University in 1959.
After coaching in high schools,
Mr. Massimino became the head
coach at the State University of
New York at Stony Brook in 1969.
He was an assistant under Hall of
Fame coach Chuck Daly at the
University of Pennsylvania before
going to Villanova in 1973.
Mr. Massimino left Villanova in
1992 to take over the troubled
basketball program at the University of Nevada at Las Vegas, after
the dismissal of coach Jerry Tarkanian. But after two seasons, it was
revealed that Mr. Massimino was
collecting $375,000 in off-thebooks payments, on top of his
$511,000 salary. He took a settlement of $1.8 million to leave Las
Vegas and later moved on to
Cleveland State University, where
his teams compiled mediocre records before he stepped away from
coaching in 2003.
Mr. Massimino was seemingly
retired in Florida when he was
asked to start a basketball program at Northwood University, a
school of fewer than 1,000 students, in West Palm Beach. In 11
seasons at Northwood (later renamed Keiser University), Mr.
Massimino built a small-college
powerhouse.
With a career record of 816-462,
Mr. Massimino is one of 22 men’s
basketball coaches with at least
800 wins at four-year colleges.
Survivors include his wife of
59 years, Mary Jane Massimino of
Jupiter; five children; and 17
grandchildren.
Asked last year by Sports Illustrated why he continued to coach
in his 80s, Mr. Massimino said, “I
wouldn’t be coaching if I didn’t
enjoy it. It keeps me young. I can
yell, I can scream. I can still punch
a little bit, you know what I
mean?”
matt.schudel@washpost.com
life — an innovation based on Mr.
Root’s concern that helicopters
were too noisy and airplanes too
fast. (He later started a hot-air
balloon safari company and reportedly crashed while piloting
former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.)
Among the couple’s most acclaimed works was the termitefocused “Mysterious Castles of
Clay” (1978), which featured narration from Orson Welles and a
memorably destructive appearance from an aardvark — an
animal that was, as Mr. Root
observed in his narration, “first
word in the dictionary, last word
in anteater design.”
Mr. Root and his wife’s relationship fractured in the years
after the movie, and they divorced in 1990. She was fatally
shot at her home in Kenya in
2006 by intruders. The case is
unsolved but has been linked to
her conservation efforts.
Mr. Root married Jennie Hammond in 1991; she died in 2000.
Survivors include his wife, Fran
Michelmore, and their two sons,
Myles and Rory.
He seemed to be fully aware of
the danger of his work, telling
journalist John Heminway that
“when he dies he intends his body
to be left on an African savannah.”
“He will be repaying old debts
to vultures, hyenas and porcupines,” Heminway wrote in his
1983 book “No Man’s Land,” recounting their conversation.
Those creatures, he continued,
will in turn “be scratching off
obligations to the smaller creatures — the beetles, bot flies and
termites. His end, in short, will be
many beginnings.”
harrison.smith@washpost.com
B6
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
IN MEMORIAM
obituaries
HAMID
. THURSDAY,
AUGUST 31 , 2017
DEATH NOTICE
BROWN
Sister JESSIE M. BROWN
The Officers and Members of
Martha Chapter No. 11 are hereby
notified of the passing of our
beloved sister Jessie M. Brown.
Wake 10 a.m. to 12 Noon, No OES
service, funeral services to follow
at 12 Noon, Friday, September 1, 2017, at
St. Martin of Tours Catholic Church. Interment
Saturday, September 2, 2017 Maryland National Memorial Park Cemetery.
WM, Jeanette Steward
WP, Melvin Williams
Secy, Norma J. Brooks, PM
EBRAHIM YAZDI, 85
Political dissident sought a democracy
BY
D ARA E LASFAR
Ebrahim Yazdi, an Iranian political activist and Americantrained cancer researcher who became one of Ayatollah Ruhollah
Khomeini’s top confidants, only to
emerge as a prominent dissident
against an Islamic revolutionary
regime he found increasingly using “Stalinist and un-Islamic
methods,” died Aug. 27 in Izmir,
Turkey. He was 85.
The cause was pancreatic cancer, said his niece Roya Yazdi.
Dr. Yazdi, who once described
himself to the New York Times as a
“modernist intellectual Muslim,”
spent decades as one of the few
outspoken dissidents largely allowed to go about his business
under the repressive revolutionary government. His seemingly
protected status stemmed from
his closeness to the revered
Khomeini, although his clout
dwindled significantly over the
past two decades, and he was
frequently jailed and harassed.
He was a microbiology student
at the University of Tehran when
he became swept up in the nationalist fervor that elected Mohammad Mosaddegh as prime minister. He was radicalized by the 1953
U.S.-backed coup that deposed
Mosaddegh and restored to power
the pro-Western Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, who ran the
country with an increasingly
autocratic hand over the next
26 years.
Dr. Yazdi joined the fledgling
opposition party known as the
Freedom Movement of Iran and
belonged to underground groups
that aimed to overthrow the shah,
which led to his arrest and beatings by the Savak secret police.
Persona non grata under the shah,
he moved to the United States in
the early 1960s, taught pharmacy
at Fairleigh Dickinson University
in New Jersey and became a U.S.
citizen.
He settled in Houston at Baylor
University’s medical school,
where he worked as a researcher
and a professor, and received a
doctorate in biochemistry. Colleagues described him to reporters as pleasant and hard-working,
and they were surprised when he
suddenly emerged as a figure of
international significance after
the Islamic revolution toppled the
shah and his corrupt government
in 1979.
Over the previous few years, Dr.
Yazdi had become a close adviser
to the exiled cleric Khomeini, a
guiding force behind the revolution. After the cleric had been
expelled from Iraq, Dr. Yazdi
helped establish a new headquarters for Khomeini near Paris in
1978 in the run-up to his triumphant return to Tehran, where he
promised a religious form of governance that was harmonious
with republican ideals.
Dr. Yazdi, now a leader in the
FMI, helped sell that view of moderation to the Western world. Al-
SAFIYA A. HAMID
You never said I'm leaving
You never said Goodbye.
You were gone before we knew it
And only God knows why.
In life I loved you dearly
In death I love you still.
In my heart I hold a place
That only you can fill.
It broke my heart to lose you,
But you didn't go alone
A part of me went with you,
the day God took you home.
Missing You Always
IN MEMORIAM
WILLIAMS
DEATH NOTICE
CLARK
MARGARET ANNE CLARK (Age 74)
VAHID SALEMI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Iranian political dissident Ebrahim Yazdi, center, is flanked by his allies, Hashem Sabbaghian, left,
and Mohammad Tavasoli, during a news conference in Tehran on March 8, 2005. Yazdi was the leader
of the Iranian Freedom Movement at the time and was disqualified from running for president.
though ardently anti-Zionist, he
said he wanted an Iran that had a
free market, constitutional elections and stable relations with the
West while also holding true to
Islamic values. He was convinced
that the ayatollah had a place for
moderates in his government, including FMI founder Mehdi
Bazargan.
Dr. Yazdi served as foreign minister and deputy prime minister
“I don’t have a date,
but this will be a
democratic society
sooner or later.”
Ebrahim Yazdi,
on revolution in Iran
for revolutionary affairs for the
interim
government
under
Khomeini’s Islamic Republic. In
the bloody chaos of those first few
months, he reportedly tried to
halt summary executions by firing
squad of dozens of imprisoned
sympathizers of the shah. He explained that the former regime
fell too fast and revolutionaries
were ill-equipped to run the penal
system, so executions commenced
to prevent a coup by the Savak.
The situation on the streets remained explosive, with a raging
anti-Americanism after the United States gave safe passage to the
ailing shah. Threatening crowds
massed at the U.S. Embassy in
Tehran, and Dr. Yazdi, whose
American citizenship was revoked, gave public reassurances
that the occupants would be safe.
Then, on Nov. 4, 1979, militants
seized the compound and took
more than 50 people hostage, triggering an international crisis that
lasted 14 months. Khomeini’s explicit approval of the kidnapping
disabused Dr. Yazdi of the ayatollah’s intentions. The clergy soon
sidelined moderate revolutionaries such as Bazargan on the road
to forming an Islamic theocracy
under the rule of a supreme
leader.
“They thought they were using
the clergy, but the clergy was using them,” Mehdi Khalaji, a senior
fellow at the Washington Institute
for Near East Policy, said of moderates such as Dr. Yazdi. “He was
one of the most controversial figures in Iran. Hard-liners and antiregime elements say he paved the
way for the Islamic Republic. You
would hear very extreme statements on both sides, which shows
his legacy would remain mixed.”
After resigning from Khomeini’s cabinet, Dr. Yazdi remained in
parliament for a few years. Bazargan died in 1995, and Dr. Yazdi
succeeded him at the helm of the
FMI, which was officially illegal
and had little political clout to
champion its goals of democratic
reform. When Dr. Yazdi made a
bid for the presidency in 2005, he
was disqualified by the official
election watchdog council, along
with other pro-reform candidates.
Dr. Yazdi was outspoken
against hard-line President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s reelection
in 2009 amid street protests over
accusations of widespread voter
fraud. Dr. Yazdi was detained that
year and released from prison in
2011, soon after he reputedly
agreed to step down as FMI leader. Months later, the country’s
Revolutionary Court sentenced
him to eight years in prison for
allegedly acting against national
security interests.
Dr. Yazdi served less than a year
in prison but remained under
house arrest in Tehran, his niece
said. He was allowed to seek treatment in Turkey as his health
deteriorated.
The son of a prosperous merchant, Dr. Yazdi was born in
Qazvin in northwest Iran, on Sept.
26, 1931.
Survivors include his wife, the
former Sourour Talieh of Tehran;
six children, Khalil Yazdi of Fredericksburg, Va., Sarah Yazdi of
Harrisburg, Pa., Lily Yazdi of
Izmir, Youseph Yazdi of Ellicott
City, Md., Mary Yazdi of Ann Arbor, Mich., and Iman Yazdi of
Seattle; 16 grandchildren; and a
great-grandchild.
Khomeini died in 1989, and
Ayatollah Ali Khamenei was
named supreme religious leader.
When Dr. Yazdi was arrested in
1997 on specious charges, it was
widely seen as a test of powers
between deeply conservative and
reformist players in government.
“This chapter of our history, the
revolutionary chapter, is not concluded,” he told the Times that
year. “Nobody can say for sure
what will be the conclusion of the
1979 revolution. I don’t have a
date, but this will be a democratic
society sooner or later.”
He was asked if he thought he
was safe expressing such views.
“Not very much, but we feel this is
our country,” he said, “and no one
can claim to be more revolutionary or Islamic than I am. I stay
inside the country in order to say
these things.”
CATHERINE BETTY WILLIAMS
12/25/11 ~ 8/31/01
It’s been 16 years since God called you home.
We miss your love, wisdom, and courage. God
continues to bless and take care of us.
The Family
Died Sunday, August 27, 2017 in Charlotte,
NC. Mrs. Clark was born in Metropolis, IL and
moved to Northern Virginia after attending
business school in Paducah, KY. She moved to
Charlotte, NC in September 2015. Mrs. Clark
worked an administrative assistant for the U.S.
Navy, Sterling Park Baptist Church, and the
U.S. Department of Interior until she retired
in August 2006. She was preceded in death
by her husband of 38 years, Harold T Clark,
her parents, Burlie and Modena Wilcox, and
her brother, Billy Joe Wilcox. She is survived
by four children, Vickie Johnson of Leesburg,
VA, Anita (David) Siecker of Chesterfield, VA,
Sandra (Rob) Rush and Doyle (Michele) Clark,
both of Charlotte, NC; one stepson, Brian Clark
of Martinsburg, WV; five grandchildren; Kyle,
Lauren and Evan Siecker; Aaden and Allie Clark;
one sister, Betty (Carl) Staats of Blacksburg, VA;
and several nieces and nephews.
Arrangements are being handled by National
Funeral Home, 7482 Lee Highway, Falls Church,
VA 22042, where the family will receive family
and friends from Noon to 1 p.m. on Saturday, September 2, 2017, Pastor Mike Jones,
Officiating. Funeral services will at 1 p.m. Interment to follow.
COWGILL
WINIFRED M. COWGILL (Age 95)
DEATH NOTICE
Of Silver Spring, MD, on Sunday, August 13,
2017. Mother of Carol Cowgill, Kenneth Cowgill
(Carmela A.) and Katharine C. Minker (Michael).
She is also survived by four grandchildren,
Scott Sampley (Annamarie), Peter Cowgill
(Stephanie Langan), Katharine R. Minker and
Beverly Minker; and three great granddaughters, Charlotte, Olivia and Naomi Minker. Winnie’s daughters, Mary C. Balduc and Martha
Sampley predeceased her. A memorial service
to celebrate Winnie’s life will be held at the
Westmoreland Congregational United Church
of Christ, One Westmoreland Circle, Bethesda,
MD 20816 on Saturday, September 9, 2017 at
2 p.m. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests
contributions be made to this church or to a
favorite charity. The family invites guests to a
reception following the service in the church
social hall.
AMOS
DERRICK
Sister EDITH AMOS
JOAN T. DERRICK (Age 83)
The Officers and Members of
Martha Chapter No. 11 are hereby
notified of the passing of our
beloved sister Edith Amos. Wake
10 to 11 a.m., OES service at 10:30
a.m., funeral services to follow at
11 a.m., Saturday, September 2, 2017, at John
Wesley AME Zion Church. Interment Washington National Cemetery.
WM, Jeanette Steward
WP, Melvin Williams
Secy, Norma J. Brooks, PM
BROWN
Of Ashton, MD passed away on August 28,
2017. Daughter of Beatrice Clingan Toms and
the late Clark Toms. Wife of the late Willard
H. Derrick. Survived by her two daughters,
Deborah Derrick Bissell of Olney, MD and Diane
Derrick Kimble of Ashton, MD. Also survived
by nine grandchildren and her sister, Patricia T.
Ferrell of Bethesda, MD. Relatives and friends
may visit on Saturday, September 2, 2017
from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Oakdale Church,
3425 Emory Church Rd., Olney, MD 20832,
where funeral services will be held at 11 a.m.
Interment will follow at Parklawn Cemetery
in Rockville, MD. Donations may be made
to Oakdale Church, 3425 Emory Church Rd.,
Olney, MD 20832 or Ashton United Methodist
Church, 17314 New Hampshire Ave., Ashton,
MD 20861. Online condolences may expressed
at:
www.barberfhlaytonsville.com
DIVITA
dara.elasfar@washpost.com
JESSIE M. BROWN
RAFAEL RAMIREZ, 94
Hall of Fame Spanish-language baseball broadcaster
BY F REIDA F RISARO
AND A DRIAN S AINZ
Rafael “Felo” Ramirez, a Hall
of Fame baseball radio broadcaster who was the signature
voice for millions of Spanishspeaking fans over three decades,
died Aug. 21 in Miami. He was 94.
The Miami Marlins announced his death in a statement
on Tuesday morning. The organization says he died Monday
night. Mr. Ramirez fell and struck
his head while getting off the
Marlins team bus April 26, during a series in Philadelphia. He
spent two months in a Delaware
hospital before he was brought to
Miami.
Mr. Ramirez began his broadcasting career in Cuba in 1945
before calling 31 major league All
Star games and World Series in
Spanish. He had been the Florida
Marlins’ Spanish-language announcer since 1993 and received
the National Baseball Hall of
Fame’s Ford C. Frick Award for
broadcasters in 2001.
“Calling baseball games was
my passion since I was a child,”
Ramirez said in 2001 when he
accepted the prestigious Ford C.
Frick Award and became the
second Spanish-language broadcaster inducted into the National
Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y.
Cookie Rojas, a former player
and manager in Cuba and the
major leagues, once said Mr.
Ramirez was admired by sports
fans who listened to Spanish-lan-
WILFREDO LEE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rafael Ramirez and his wife, Luisa, before a game in 2001. Mr.
Ramirez was known for his signature strike call of “Essstrike.”
guage broadcasts.
“When you hear Felo Ramirez
announce a game, you instantly
know its Felo Ramirez,” said Rojas, a former Spanish-language
television announcer for the
Marlins. “His voice is one of the
most acceptable and distinguishable around. Felo’s influence on
Latin Americans in the United
States is undoubtable.”
Mr. Ramirez was known for an
expressive yet low-key style and
his signature strike call of “Essstrike.”
Several
Spanish-language
broadcasters, including Amury
Pi-Gonzalez of the Seattle Mariners and San Francisco Giants,
have admitted to emulating his
style.
Mr. Ramirez’s big break came
when he landed a job in 1950 with
the Gillette Cavalcade of Sports,
which introduced him to major
league baseball. The Cavalcade
broadcast a baseball game of the
week and boxing matches in English and Spanish. While Americans were listening to Mel Allen
and Red Barber, more than 200
Latin American radio stations
carried Mr. Ramirez and his partner, future Hall of Famer Buck
Canel.
Mr. Ramirez left Cuba in the
early 1960s, after Fidel Castro’s
revolution.
When the Yankees’ Don Larsen
pitched his perfect game in the
1956 World Series, Mr. Ramirez
called the emotional last four
innings, describing in Spanish
how catcher Yogi Berra jumped
into his pitcher’s arms.
Mr. Ramirez was also there the
day Roberto Clemente got his
3,000th and final hit.
When Hank Aaron hit his
715th home run in 1974, Ramirez
and Canel were broadcasting
from the roof of Atlanta Fulton
County Stadium. That call is enshrined in Cooperstown.
Mr. Ramirez was born in Bayamo, Cuba, on June 22, 1923. He
played second base on a local
team during his teens and, one
day during a game, spontaneously began calling plays using a
friend’s amplifier and microphone.
He began his radio broadcasting career in Havana in 1945
before moving on to call games
for teams in Puerto Rico and
Venezuela. He also announced
many boxing matches.
When the Florida Marlins began play in 1993, Mr. Ramirez
quickly landed the job. Four
years later, Mr. Ramirez called
the Marlins’ first World Series
win.
Tony Perez, a Cuban-born Hall
of Fame infielder who is now a
special assistant with the Marlins, said he remembers listening
with his father as Mr. Ramirez
called games in Cuba.
“He never wanted to quit,”
Perez said. “He wanted to keep
doing games and traveling.”
— Associated Press
Peacefully on Monday, August 21, 2017 in
Silver Spring, MD. Wife of the late Gwynn
Brown; loving mother of Anthony (Victoria
Oden) and Roslyn; grandmother of Margaret
and Cortland Styles-Brown; sister-in-law of
Vinie Miller, Rosetta Miller and Doris Brown.
Also surviving are a host of nieces, nephews
and friends. On Friday, September 1, 2017,
visitation will be held from 10 a.m. until Noon,
when Mass of Christian Burial will offered
at St. Martin's Catholic Church, 1908 North
Capitol St., NW. Interment, 11:30 a.m. on
Saturday, September 2, 2017 at Maryland
National Cemetery, Laurel, MD. Arrangements
by McGuire.
www.mcguire-services.com
FRANCES CARMELLA DIVITA (Age 84)
On Saturday, August 26, 2017 of Potomac, MD.
Beloved wife of 58 years to the late Salvatore
Frank Divita; loving mother of Grace Lawson,
Mark, Guy, and Dean Divita; grandmother of
11; step-grandmother of five; step great-grandmother of nine. She was always unconditionally loving, accepting, and welcoming. A mother
and grandmother to all.
The family will receive friends at PUMPHREY’S
COLONIAL FUNERAL HOME, 300 W. Montgomery Ave. (Route 28 just off I-270 exit 6A) Rockville, MD on Friday, September 1, 2017
from 7 to 9 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will
be offered at St. Elizabeth’s Catholic Church,
917 Montrose Rd., Rockville, MD 20852 on
Saturday, September 2, 2017 at 12:30 p.m.
Interment Gate of Heaven Cemetery on Saturday, September 9, 2017 at 2 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may
be made to Family and Nursing care foundation; Grants and Scholarships, 962 Wayne
Ave., #500, Silver Spring, MD 20910 or Special
Olympics of Montgomery County (on behalf
of Christopher Divita). Please view and sign
online family guestbook at
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
When the need arises,
let families find you in the
Funeral Services Directory.
To be seen in the Funeral Services Directory,
please call paid Death Notices at 202-334-4122.
POST YOUR
CONDOLENCES
Now death notices on
washingtonpost.com/obituaries allow you
to express your sympathy with greater ease.
Visit today.
GHI
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B7
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DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
FIELDS
HUNT
LOMBARDY
WILLIAMS
EMANUEL
QUEEN
LANNAH L. LOMBARDY
LISA ANN WILLIAMS
On Monday, August 28, 2017, in Arlington,
VA; dear sister of Patricia A. Lombardy Butler
and best friend to Terri L. McDaniel, Vivian
Thompson and the late Benjamin Thompson;
devoted aunt of Robert C. (Melissa) Butler;
daughter of the late Charles E. and Gertrude
V. Payne Lombardy; granddaughter of the late
Charles L. and Agnes G. Payne; cousin of
Christine (Michael) Marshall, Thomas M.
(Karen) Kneeland, Jr., Michael (Barbara) Lombardy and Diane (Stephen) Beckam. Relatives
and friends are invited to Lannah's Celebration
of Life on Saturday, September 2, 2017 from
9 a.m. until time of service at 10 a.m. at
the KALAS FUNERAL HOME, 6160 Oxon Hill
Rd., Oxon Hill, MD. Interment Resurrection
Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may
be made to Capital Caring, Halquist Memorial
Inpatient Center, 4715 15th St. N., Arlington,
VA 22205.
KalasFuneralHomes.com
Entered into eternal rest on Sunday, August 20, 2017. Beloved
mother of Leeann Williams and
Leroy Allen Jr.; loving daughter of
the late Clay Williams and Shirley
Wiley (Walter). Also survived by
brother, Ricky Williams and sisterin-law, Cynthia; sister, April Ford; grandfather,
John P. Austin; aunts, Caroline Robinson and
Debra Harrison; uncles, Michael and Keith
Austin; step-brother, Harry Ford, Jr.; step-sister,
Kristal Ford; and a host of other relatives
and friends. Friends may visit with the family
on Saturday, September 2, at Hodges and
Edwards Funeral Home, 3910 Silver Hill Rd.,
Suitland, MD from 10 a.m. until time of service
11 a.m. Interment Private.
GERTRUD BURNER FIELDS
Passed away peacefully and surrounded by
love on August 27, 2017. The daughter of Willie
and Elsa Schulz, she was born on January 4,
1927 and spent her early years in Walldürn,
Germany. As a teenager, she moved with the
family to Heidelberg.
It was there she met and married Joseph
Burner, an American soldier, shortly after the
war ended. She arrived in the U.S. on July 4,
1950 and they eventually settled in Roanoke,
Virginia, where they raised their daughters.
Unfortunately, Joe died at a young age of
Leukemia in 1971. Gerdi continued to raise her
daughters while also obtaining an associate’s
degree in bookkeeping.
On January 18, 1975, she married Bill Fields,
who for the next forty-two years was a dedicated and loving spouse, and remains an
adoring father and grandfather to her three
daughters and three granddaughters. Gertrud
and Bill traveled the world together and lived
alternately in Virginia and Florida.
During her life, she touched many people with
her affection and humor. She made life-long
friends, including fellow war brides and quite a
few “adopted” daughters.
She was preceded in death by first husband,
Joseph Burner, a granddaughter, Alexis, and a
great-granddaughter, Miraculous Faith.
Gertrud is survived by Bill and various relatives
in Germany including her two younger brothers, Willibald and Freddie. Carrying on her
legacy is daughter, Susan and husband, Al
and granddaughter, Nicole and her husband,
Randy; daughter, Deborah and granddaughter,
Zandra and daughter, Theresa and her fiancé,
Danny, granddaughter, Alyssa and her husband, Laurie.
A Funeral Mass will be held on November
4 at 11 a.m. at Holy Trinity Catholic Church
in Gainesville, VA, where a new stained-glass
window she commissioned will be dedicated.
A reception will follow at Heritage Hunt Golf
and Country Club Mountain View Room, 6901
Arthur Hills Drive, Gainesville.
In lieu of flowers, please make donations to
Capital Caring, www.capitalcaring.org, 24419
Millstream Drive, Aldie, VA 20105.
GEORGE A. HUNT, JR.
On Tuesday, August 22, 2017 of District
Heights, MD. Beloved husband of Margaret
Mary Hunt of 34 years; loving father of Anthony Jaz Hunt, Mia Alison Hunt and Veronica
Rose Bundy; dear brother of Norman Christopher Hunt and Rose Marie Miller. Visitation
will be held at Mount Calvary Catholic Church,
6700 Marlboro Pike, Forestville, MD 20747 on
Saturday, September 2 from 10 a.m. until the
time of Mass of Christian Burial at 12 p.m.
Interment Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of
flowers, donations may be made to Dante
Ross Scholarship Fund, c/o St. Philip the Apostle Catholic Church, 5416 Henderson Way,
Camp Springs, MD 20746. Please make checks
payable to St. Philip the Apostle Catholic
Church.
www.KalasFuneralHomes.com
GOODALL
MARILYN SUE GOODALL
On August 26, 2017 of Greenbelt, MD. Loving
wife of William Goodall for 30 years. Survived
by sisters, Joan and Audrey; brother, Larry
and mother-in-law, Delores. Also survived by
several nephews, sisters-in-law and many
friends. Preceded in death by sister, Arlene.
Friends and family may call Gasch's Funeral
Home, P.A., 4739 Baltimore Avenue, Hyattsville,
MD 20781, viewing on Thursday, August 31,
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Service at 1 p.m. Burial
at Fort Lincoln Cemetery. Memorial Contributions to Lombardi Cancer Center at Georgetown University Hospital, P.O. Box 0734, Washington, DC 20073.
HAMM
GREGORY GLENN HAMM (Age 55)
Of San Diego, California, passed away unexpectedly on July 25, 2017. Greg was born
in Norfolk, Virginia, graduated from Oakton
High School, Oakton, Virginia and received a
Bachelor of Science Degree in Microbiology
from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State
University (Virginia Tech). Greg’s first 10 years
as a staff scientist in Virginia started at Artech
Corporation followed by GT-Devices, Inc. In
1988, after an extended project sent him
to San Diego for a year and a half, Greg
knew California was home. From 1994 to
the remainder of his career he worked as a
scientist for Science Applications International
Corporation (SAIC) participating in Long Range
Land Attack Projectile programs and on-site
live fire prototype testing as well as developing
precision techniques in the fields of mechanical and electronic guidance, navigation and
control, and telemetry data transmission for
the Precision Munitions Division. Greg was a
proud member of the San Diego Parrot Head
Club and had a passion for working on cars,
flying drones and building model rockets to
shoot off in the desert. Like his father, he
too loved gardening a wide variety of flowers,
fruits and vegetables. He is survived by his
sister, Christine Erika (Hamm) Hill; brother-inlaw, William R. Hill, Jr. and a niece, Meredith
Anne Hill, all of Fairfax, Virginia; an aunt,
Loy Hamm of Wall, South Dakota, numerous
cousins throughout South Dakota, Colorado
and Denmark and a lifetime of friends. A
celebration of Greg’s life will be held in the
Summer of 2018 in San Diego at which time
Greg will fly high in that rocket to the sky.
HENSLEY
ALVIN D. HENSLEY
Entered into eternal rest on
Wednesday, August 23, 2017.
Beloved father of Curtis, Alan
(Cassandra), Glenn Hensley and
Crystal Hensley Johnson (Donnie).
Also survived by nine grandchildren, four great-grandchildren,
three great-great-grandchildren, a cousin and
a host of other relatives and friends. Preceded
in death by wife, Priscilla Hensley; daughter,
Karen Hensley; son, Darryl Hensley and grandson, Michael Smith. Friends may visit with the
family on Friday, September 1 from 10 a.m.
until time of service, 11 a.m. at New Macedonia
Baptist Church, 4115 Alabama Ave., SE, Washington, DC. Interment private. Services by
HODGES & EDWARDS.
LEE C. NEAL
ROGERS
Of Conyers, GA passed away suddenly, August
21, 2017, at 47 years of age. He was preceded
in death by his father, Australia Arthur Hoover,
Jr. and niece, Olivia Hoover.
MARY JOSEPHINE LAVELLE
Mary Josephine "Jo" Lavelle, died on August
23, 2017 at Edgeworth Farm in Marshall, VA.
She was 98. The beloved wife of the late
General John D. "Jack" Lavelle (USAF). Mrs.
Lavelle was born to her Irish immigrant parents
Daniel and Bridgette McEllin on December 3,
1918 in Cleveland, OH. She grew up on the
Corning estate on the shore of Lake Erie where
her father was a chauffeur and her mother
a maid. Jo loved sports and exploring the
lake especially when it iced over during the
winter. She and Jack met through the Catholic
Youth Organization with a little help from Fr.
Murphy of St. Aloysius Church in Cleveland.
Mrs. Lavelle later recalled, "He made a bet with
Jack that if he beat him at golf, Jack would
have to take out the girl he chose for him on
a date". Well, Fr. Murphy beat Jack and told
him, "You have to take out Jo McEllin." He was
the only boyfriend I ever had. They married
on June 22, 1940, upon his graduation from
flight school at Randolph Field, Texas. When
Jack went to Europe during the war flying P47's Jo moved back to Ohio, where he returned
to Wright-Patterson Field to be part of the
team that created from the Army Air Forces,
the United States Air Force. Their devotion to
their faith was only equaled by their love for
each other, their children and the Air Force
they grew with. Jo and her beloved Jack raised
their family as they moved across the U.S. and
around the world with the Air Force. From
World War II to the Korean War, and during
the Cold War to the war in Vietnam, they
worked hard together to serve their country,
family and faith. It was as Jo said, "Quite a
ride." In 1972, when her husband was wrongly
accused of ordering unauthorized air strikes
in North Vietnam and false reports, Jo Lavelle
recalled her anger and frustration. "I just knew
it wasn't true. It made me boiling mad. It was
heart-piercing, but I couldn't do anything about
it." After leaving the Air Force in 1972, she
and her husband worked to rejuvenate the
then-struggling resort at Bryce Mountain in
Virginia and built a home there. They were also
instrumental in building the nearby area's first
Catholic church, Our Lady of the Shenandoah,
which sits on the side of the mountain. The
general died of a heart attack at age 62 in 1979.
But Jo Lavelle found comfort when visiting his
gravesite at Arlington Cemetery and used to
recall, "When it rains, you can only read the
first two letters of his name, John, so instead
you see my name, Jo. I like to think it's his
way of saying he's waiting for me." She will
be buried at a yet to be determined date
at Arlington National Cemetery. She leaves
behind a sister, Catherine McEllin' seven children, 16 grandchildren and 30 great-grandchildren. The family thanks Laurie Camp and
Capital Caring Hospice of Fauquier for their
wonderful care and comfort. Donations in Mrs.
Lavelle's memory may be made to the US Air
Force Aid Society (www.afas.org).
LEONHARDT
FREDERICK HUDSON LEONHARDT
(Age 80)
On Thursday, August 24, 2017, Frederick
Hudson Leonhardt died peacefully at his
Gaithersburg, MD home, with his loving
wife Barbara (Bierl) Leonhardt by his side.
The family will receive friends on Thursday
August 31, 2017 at Thibadeau Mortuary,
124 E. Diamond Avenue, Gaithersburg MD,
20877 from 10 a.m., until the Memorial
Service, at 11 a.m. Memories and Directions:
www.InterFaithFunerals.com
LESHER
When the
need arises,
let families
find you in the
Funeral Services
Directory.
To be seen in the
Funeral Services
Directory, please call
paid Death Notices
at 202-334-4122.
James W. "Jim" Rogers, 91, a 28-year resident
of Davidsonville, MD and previously of University Park, MD, passed away on August 29,
2017 at his home. Born on July 4, 1926 in
Washington, DC, Jim was the oldest of five
children born to the late James and Anna
Rogers. He grew up in Hyattsville and attended
the University of Maryland. A successful real
estate builder and developer, Jim was the
proprietor of James W. Rogers Associates in
Bladensburg, MD. He was an avid horseman
and long-time member of the Marlboro Hunt
Club. Jim was also a member of St. Mary's
of the Assumption in Upper Marlboro, MD
and a previous member of Holy Family in
Davidsonville where he actively supported the
construction of the new church in the late
1980s. Before moving to Davidsonville, he had
been a member of St. Mark's in Hyattsville,
MD. Jim was preceded in death by his wives,
Ellen S. Rogers and Mary Catherine Rogers,
and two of his brothers, Phillips C. and William
H. Rogers. He is survived by two sons, Jay
(Terri) Rogers and Clayton (Christi) Rogers, both
of Davidsonville; one daughter, Melissa (Kevin)
Morelli of Virginia Beach, VA; two brothers, J.
Whitson Rogers of Baltimore, MD and Joseph S.
Rogers of Landover, MD; three grandsons, Ryan
Hughes, Andrew Rogers Campbell and Eric
Morelli; three granddaughters, Emily Morelli
Reuter, Jessica Conard and Loren Smith; seven
great-grandchildren, and his companion and
love of his life, Betty Peters.
A visitation will be held from 4 to 7 p.m.
on Thursday, August 31 at the George P.
Kalas Funeral Home, 2973 Solomons Island
Road, Edgewater, MD. Burial will be private.
Online condolences and tributes may be
offered at:
KalasFuneralHomes.com
SHAW
Friends may call at the Hines-Rinaldi Funeral
Home, 11800 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver
Spring, MD on Friday, September 1 from 4 to 8
p.m., where an Alpha Kappa Alpha Ceremony
will be held at 6:30 p.m. They may also call
Saturday, September 2 at 11:30 a.m. at Shepherd Park Christian Church, 7900 Eastern Ave,
NW, Washington, DC 20012 where services will
be held at 12 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to Shepherd Park Christian
Church or Montgomery Hospice, www.montgomeryhospice.org. Please sign and view the
family guestbook at
www.hinesrinaldifuneralhome.com
GORE
STEWART
DEATH NOTICE
DECKER
Deacon FREDERICK A. GORE, SR.
Passed peacefully on August 27, 2017 at his
residence. Survived by his devoted wife of 50
years Juanita Gore; son, Frederick A. Gore Jr.
(Jackie); daughter, Sheereen Brown (Maurice);
four grandsons; one sister Terry Davis and a
host of other relatives and friends. Family will
receive friends on Friday, September 1 from 10
a.m. until time of service at 11 a.m. at Vermont
Avenue Baptist Church, 1630 Vermont Ave NW.
Interment Mt. Olivet Cemetery.
GRAY
EDWARDS
ALFONZA E. SHAW
Peacefully passed on August 28, 2017. Beloved
husband of Shirley Holley Shaw. He was preceded in death by one son, Steven Shaw and
is survived by his children, Vincent (Paula),
Michael (Naomi), Gary (Joann), Felecia Howard
(Clarence) and Angela Shaw; his grandchildren,
Takisha (Omar), Jasmine (Mark), Brittney
(Brian), Kimberly, Hannah and Krystal; a brother, Johnnie Shaw (Etlena); other relatives and
friends. Friends may visit with the family on
Friday, September 1, 2017 from 10 a.m. until
funeral time, 11 a.m. at the Springfield Baptist Church, 508 P St., NW, Washington, DC.
Interment, 11 a.m., Tuesday, September 5,
2017 at the Quantico National Cemetery.
SLOAN
MICHELLE LYNETTE SLOAN
On Saturday, August 12, 2017, Michelle Lynette
Sloan of Laurel, Maryland, born January 16,
1973, daughter of Jerovine (Sloan) Ramon,
passed away suddenly at the age of 44 years.
Michelle was a remarkably generous woman
whose beautiful personality and warm smile
will be forever remembered by her family,
friends and extended family. A memorial service will be held on September 7, 2017, 11
a.m., at the Quiet Waters Park, 600 Quiet
Waters Road, Annapolis, MD 21403. In lieu
of flowers, memorial donations in memory
of Michelle may be made to National Kidney
Foundation, Finance Department, 30 East 33rd
St. New York, NY 10016.
PAID DEATH NOTICES
On Friday, August 25, 2017.
The beloved stepdaughter of
Louis and daughter of the
late Beatrice Beander; loving
mother of Adrienne Gray
(Rob), Delvin, Shanta' and Tia
Gray. She also leaves two
grandsons; five granddaughters; two sisters;
two brothers; two aunts; one uncle and a host
of other relatives and friends. The family will
receive friends on Friday, September 1, 2017
from 10 a.m. until time of service, 11 a.m. at
Antioch Baptist Church, 9107 Pine View Lane,
Clinton, MD. Interment Resurrection Cemetery.
Arrangements entrusted to Ralph Williams II
Funeral Service (301) 262-2387.
LINDSAY
He was a US Army veteran, and after discharge
received a PhD in Agricultural Economics from
Cornell University. He then began a long public
policy career, including positions as Chief Economist of the U.S. Senate Committee for Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry, Assistant U.S.
Secretary of Agriculture, and Partner of the
agriculture policy consulting firm Lesher &
Russell Inc., where he was instrumental in
shaping US agriculture policy.
Bill never forgot his roots on the family farm in
rural Indiana, his father Raymond’s strong work
ethic or his mother Marjorie’s penchant for
no fuss, tidiness and being properly dressed.
Bill loved his grandchildren immensely and
enjoyed sports, reading and politics; he also
had a big sweet tooth. He touched the lives of
many, and he will be sorely missed.
He was predeceased by his wife, Joyce (Dixon)
Lesher. He is survived by his son, Sean Lesher
and his wife, Michele; daughter, Molly Lesher
and her husband, Patrick Armstrong; sister,
Darlene Weaver and her husband, Nelson;
grandchildren, Zachary and Nathan Lesher,
Aidan, Gavin and Madeleine Armstrong; stepdaughter, Lisa Clements; step-son, Gene Miller
and his wife, Kathy.
Funeral Services will be held on Wednesday
September 6, 2017 at 10 a.m. at Colonial
Funeral Home, 201 Edwards Ferry Road NE,
Leesburg, VA. Send condolences to
www.colonialfuneralhome.com
In lieu of flowers, please consider a contribution to the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation in Bill’s name.
CASSIDY KARAKORN
"Cat"
Family and friends mourn the loss of Cassidy
“Cat” Karakorn, a leading civil rights advocate, artist, and style icon in the nation's
capital, who was killed in a traffic accident
on the evening of Saturday, August 26, 2017
in Northeast DC.
Cassidy described herself as an 'activist,
believer, achiever, optimist, dreamer, and
dream catcher.' Those who loved her would
add: 'loyal friend and confidant, family
woman, world traveler, walking piece of
art, lover of love, savvy businesswoman,
caretaker, muse, giver, art appreciator,
trendsetter, mentor, connector of people,'
and so much more. Cassidy had a flair
for recognizing the potential in others and
inspiring them to be the best version of
themselves. Her tastes were very particular;
she liked her food spicy, her music loud, and
her lips red.
Born in Arlington, Virginia in 1978, Cassidy
attended Lake Braddock Secondary School
and George Mason University. She later
moved to Washington, DC in her early 20's.
There, she built a community of friends
from all walks of life, began her career
at the Human Rights Campaign (HRC), and
became a DJ and local fashion icon. Her
award-winning work and keen sense of
style earned her recognition and profiles
from publications such as Refinery29 and
Monday, Sept. 4, 2017
11 a.m. ~ 3 p.m.
Photo Deadline:
12 noon
NO EXCEPTIONS
To place a notice, call:
202-334-4122
800-627-1150
Ext. 4-4122
DORIS M. CRAWFOLK EDWARDS
"Tippy"
On Sunday, August 27, 2017, Doris M. Edwards
was called home. Daughter of the late Albert
and Sadie Norwood. Beloved wife of the late
Charles A. Edwards; devoted mother of
Antoinette Jones, Charles L. (deceased) and
Hermonia Edwards, Dr. John and Jana Grymes,
Darrell and Helen Grymes, Renee and Frank
(deceased) Silva, Paula and Melvin Brown; sister of the late Clarence and Frederick Norwood, Aline Corbin, Katherine Roane. She is
also survived by two sisters-in-law, Isabella
Edwards and Carena Amerson; devoted granddaughter, Capri McClenndon, 12 grandchildren; 17 great-grandchildren; two great-greatgrandchildren; 11 nieces and nephews; and
a host of great-nieces; nephews; family and
friends. Family will receive relatives and friends
at JOHN T. RHINES FUNERAL HOME, 3005 12th
St., NE, Washington, DC 20007 for visitation
and funeral services. Visitation is from 6 to 8
p.m. on Friday, September 1 and 9 to 10 a.m. on
Saturday, September 2. Funeral Services will
commence at 10 a.m. on Saturday. Arrangements by JOHN T. RHINES FUNERAL HOME.
PAID DEATH NOTICES
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
JOYCE ANN LINDSAY
Of Springdale, MD. Departed this life on Sunday,
August 27 2017. Beloved wife of the late
James E. Lindsay; devoted mother of Marilyn
Scales, Kristy Lindsay-Ray, Deanna and the late
Edward Lindsay. She is also survived by sister,
Odell Perry; grandchildren, Stephen, Katrina,
Edward, Vincent , Sharia, Jermel, Rodney and
Kristopher; great-grandson, Tristan; and a host
of other relatives and friends. Friends may visit
with the family Friday, September 1, from 10
a.m. until time of service 11 a.m. at Shiloh
Baptist Church, 8801 Ardwick Ardmore Rd.,
Hyattsville, MD. Internet Harmony Memorial
Park.
www.marshallmarchfh.com
NIEBELL
Washington Life.
WILLIAM GENE LESHER "Bill" (Age 71)
Labor Day
Holiday Hours
deathnotices@washpost.com
KARAKORN
Died on August 25, 2017 from complications
related to multiple myeloma. He was born
March 21, 1946 in Logansport, Indiana, the
beloved son of Raymond and Marjorie (Logan)
Lesher.
JESSIE B. STEWART (Age 92)
On Thursday, August 24, 2017, of Washington,
DC died at Ingleside Nursing home after a
long battle with Alzheimer’s disease. Dear wife
to Robert L. Stewart for over 70 years and
mother to one daughter; Elsie E. Williams,
both whom preceded her in death. Jessie is
survived by one brother; Oliver Wendell Epps,
eight grandchildren, 26 great-grandchildren;
two whom preceded her in death: Clarence
Williams and Emmanuel Williams, and 17 great
great-grandchildren.
A celebration of her life will be held at Marshall
March Funeral Home, 4217 Ninth Street, NW
Washington, DC 20011 at 11 a.m. on Friday,
September 1, 2017. Interment will be at Maryland National Memorial Park, Laurel, MD.
www.marshallmarchfh.com
PATRICK J. DECKER
Patrick J. Decker, 79, of Alexandria, VA died
August 30, 2017 at INOVA Fairfax Hospital
due to complications of heart surgery. He
was born to the late Stanley and Zoe Decker
September 30, 1937 in Richmond, Texas. He
graduated from Texas A&M University, and
obtained his Master's degree from Purdue
University. He was a member of the Franconia
Volunteer Fire Department as Volunteer EMT
winning several Volunteer of the year awards.
He is survived by his loving wife of 37 years,
Ann Malloy; and his devoted best friend,
"Tully". He was preceded in death by his
brother, Murray Decker.
An Inurnment will take place on his ranch in
Menard, TX at a later date.
www.cunninghamfuneralhome.net
CYNTHIA A. GRAY
DEATH NOTICE
Survivors include his son, Mason William Koi
Hoover of Decatur, GA; mother, Aileen H.
Hoover and sister, Kenya Hoover, both of
Loganville; brothers and sisters-in-law, Australia A. Hoover, III and his wife, Germaine,
Michael Hoover and his wife, Breeanne, all
of Conyers; nieces and nephews; Tanzania
Hoover, Iyona Hoover, Reyna Hoover, Jamya
Hoover, India Hoover, Jaimie Hoover, Jacob
Hoover, Juliana Hoover; as well as a host of
aunts and uncles.
A Funeral Service for Mr. Hoover will be held
Saturday, September 2, 2017, 1 p.m. at Caldwell & Cowan Funeral Home, 1215 Access
Road, Covington, GA, with Dr. Adam Cooper
officiating. Friends may visit with his family, at
the funeral home, Friday, September 1 from 5
to 8 p.m.
On August 28, 2017, David
E. Zarin of Silver Spring, MD.
Loving husband of the late
Thelma Zarin; devoted and
loving father of Neal (Ecaterina) Zarin, Harold (Starr) Zarin,
Annette (Jeffrey) Smith; wonderful and loving grandfather of Scott (Jennifer) Zarin, Stacy (Adam) Goldberg, Jordan
(Mike) Lanczycki and Bradley Smith; loving
great-grandfather of Madison and Dylan
Goldberg and Abby Lanczycki; and loving
brother of the late Lillian (Robert) Block.
Graveside services will be held on Wednesday, August 30 at 12 noon at Mt. Lebanon
Cemetery, 9304 Adelphi Rd, Adelphi, MD.
Family will be receiving guests following
service at the home of Harold and Starr
Zarin with Shiva and Minyan services at 7
p.m. Memorial donations may be made
in his memory to Jewish Social Service
Agency (JSSA), 200 Wood Hill Road,
Rockville, MD 20850.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
ELBERT BICKLEY QUEEN, JR.
"Pete"
On Tuesday, August 29, 2017 of Potomac, MD.
Beloved husband of Rebecca “Becky” Queen;
loving father of Jeffry M. Queen (wife, Gail)
and Kimberly Queen Brugnerotto (husband,
Stefano); devoted grandfather of Courtney,
Jonathan, Stefano and Silvano. Brother of the
late Robert A. Queen. Also survived by many
loving family members and friends. A memorial service will be held at the Potomac United
Methodist Church, 9908 S. Glen Road,
Potomac, MD on Saturday, September 2 at
1 p.m. Inurnment to follow at the church
cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to assist those affected
by Hurricane Harvey. Please donate online at:
http://faithbridge.org/news/news-feed/
hurricane-harvey-updates//
or to:
http://www.jhwellnessfoundation.org/
home.aspx
Please view and sign the family guestbook at:
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
JAMES ROGERS
HOOVER
DANIEL HEDGEBETH HOOVER
ZARIN
DAVID E. ZARIN
On Friday, August 25, 2017. The Homegoing
Service for Lee Neal will be held at Mount
Calvary Baptist Church, 2221 Emmett Rd.,
Alexandria, VA 22307, September 2, 2017,
Viewing, 10:30 a.m.; Service,11:30 a.m.
FISHER
On Tuesday, August 22, 2017 of Washington,
DC. Devoted mother of two daughters,
Francine Fisher and Alexandria Fisher-Massenberg; grandmother of Kimberly Gray, Lareese
Gray, William Goodine and Charles Massenberg; sister of Georgia Green and Joe Dowling.
Also survived by other relatives and friends.
Family will receive friends on Friday, Septmber 1 from 12:30 p.m. until tine of service, 1
p.m. at FORT LINCOLN FUNERAL HOME, 3401
Bladensburg Rd., Brentwood, MD. Interment
Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
www.fort-lincoln.com
NEAL
LAVELLE
JENNIE D. FISHER
BERNICE KELLY EMANUEL
On August 27, 2017 Bernice Emanuel beloved
wife to the late Lawrence Emanuel; loving
mother of David Emanuel and Dorothy Emanuel
Gardner; sister of Dorothy Jordan; adored
grandmother of Jordan Emanuel, Douglas
Gardner and Miles Gardner; cherished motherin-law of George Gardner and the late Paula
Emanuel. Also survived by loving relatives and
a host of friends.
Cassidy’s colleagues at HRC remember her
as a vibrant and energetic force for positive
change in the world. Over a seventeen-year
career at HRC, Cassidy championed civil
rights for the LGBTQ community. As Director
of Consumer Marketing, Cassidy’s eye for
fashion and art was credited for making a
transformative impact on the organization’s
mission and helping to reach more people
than ever before. Her work was often deeply
and profoundly moving; this past June, she
worked with renowned artist Meghan Geckler to bring to life an eight story public art
installation remembering the 49 lives lost
in the Pulse Nightclub shooting and other
victims of hate violence. When out exploring
the beauty in the world, she often said that
she needed to "return home and fight the
good fight". This was her purpose in life and
will be her legacy.
A passionate environmental activist, Cassidy
worked with her brother John's company,
Energy and Environment LLC, in environmental cleanup and sustainability. She also
led by example; in her home and in her life,
she sought to leave behind a minimal carbon
footprint.
Cassidy is survived by her loving mother,
Phukhanh; two brothers, John and Tom;
sister, Kim; nephews, Nathan, JJ and Jonah;
nieces, Jaz and Kyla; sisters-in-law, Jerralyn
and Rachel; numerous aunts, uncles,
cousins and close friends. She was preceded
in death by her beloved father, Sonny.
Her departure has left a gaping hole in the
community and broken hearts across the
globe. In every future effort, we will seek
to make Cassidy proud, and will carry her
memory and legacy with us always.
There will be a reception for colleagues
and friends at the HRC Equality Forum this
Saturday from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Following,
there will be a Celebration of Life at the
Rock and Roll Hotel from 4:30 p.m. to 8:00
p.m. A visitation for dear friends and family
will be held Sunday, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
at Fairfax Memorial Funeral Home, 9902
Braddock Road, Fairfax, Virginia. The service
will begin at 1 p.m. with a cremation to
follow.
www.fmfh.com
ELEANOR BEASLEY NIEBELL
(Age 95)
On Saturday, August 26, 2017, “Ellie”
passed away peacefully at her home in
Annapolis, MD. Loving mother to Barbara
(Bill) Sweeney, Dottie Burkholder, Paula
(Steve) Tidwell and Nancy (Bert) Ashton.
She was a loving grandmother and greatgrandmother. She was preceded in death
by her first husband, William Beasley; second husband, Paul M. Niebell Sr.; and son,
Paul M. Niebell Jr. She was born in Washington, DC on September 28, 1921. Eleanor
was a longtime resident of Potomac, MD
and an active member of many societies
and organizations.
Relatives and friends are invited to call at
Joseph Gawler’s Sons, LLC, 5130 Wisconsin Avenue, NW (corner of Harrison Street)
Washington, DC on Thursday, August 31,
2017 from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m. A Celebration of Life Service will be held at Joseph
Gawler’s on Friday, September 1, 2017 at
11:30 a.m. Interment at Cedar Hill Cemetery will follow. In lieu of flowers, contributions are requested for Saint George’s
Episcopal Church; PO Box 188, Glenn Dale
MD 20769. For more information, please
visit:
www.josephgawlers.com
To place a notice, call:
202-334-4122
800-627-1150 ext 4-4122
FAX:
202-334-7188
EMAIL:
deathnotices@washpost.com
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name, home address & home phone #
of the responsible billing party.
Fax & email deadline - 3 p.m. daily
Phone-In deadline
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CURRENT 2017 RATES:
( PER DAY)
MONDAY-SATURDAY
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1" - $135 (text only)
2" - $306 (text only)
3" - $441
4" - $482
5" - $611
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3" - $489
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5" - $665
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5" - $770
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Additional plaques start at $26 each
and may be ordered.
All Paid Death Notices
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B8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
AUGUST 31 , 2017
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Cloudy skies but largely dry
Clouds try to obscure the sky much
of the day, but we should see periods
of sunnier conditions. Let’s call it
partly to mostly cloudy. It should be
largely dry, but a few quick-hitting
showers are possible late. Highs are mainly in the
low to mid-80s. Winds are out of the west and
northwest around 10 mph, with higher gusts.
Tonight, breezes pick up from the northwest, the
humidity plummets, and lows cool off to the
upper 50s to low 60s.
Today
Partly sunny
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Friday
Rain
84° 62
Saturday
Rain
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Sunday
Partly sunny
Monday
Partly sunny
OFFICIAL RECORD
Tuesday
Sunny
Temperatures
66° 57
70° 64
80° 67
84° 70
83° 63
FEELS: 62°
FEELS: 71°
FEELS: 83°
FEELS: 88°
FEELS: 87°
CHNCE PRECIP: 10%
WIND: WNW 6–12 mph
P: 60%
W: NE 10–20 mph
P: 75%
W: E 7–14 mph
P: 20%
W: WNW 6–12 mph
P: 10%
W: SSW 7–14 mph
P: 15%
W: S 7–14 mph
HUMIDITY: Moderate
H: Low
H: High
H: High
H: High
H: High
°
°
FEELS*: 88°
°
°
°
NATION
Harrisburg
82/54
Hagerstown
83/54
Su
Normal
Philadelphia
84/57
Record high
Record low
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Norfolk
83/69
Th
F
Sa
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
BWI
79° 3:51 p.m.
62° 6:00 a.m.
85°/68°
99° 1953
50° 1986
78° 3:48 p.m.
59° 7:00 a.m.
85°/62°
99° 1991
41° 1986
78° 3:27 p.m.
57° 6:00 a.m.
83°/63°
101° 1953
45° 1986
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: –0.7° yr. to date: +3.1°
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
OCEAN: 75°
Virginia Beach
81/70
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 72°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
OCEAN: 77°
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Good
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Ozone
Low
Low
Low
Low
Normal
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.04"
4.58"
2.84"
29.65"
26.31"
0.06"
3.83"
3.43"
33.00"
27.90"
0.09"
4.59"
3.19"
30.23"
27.75"
Moon Phases
UV: High
Solar system
7 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, partly sunny, warm. High 67–71. Wind
northwest 4–8 mph. Tonight, mostly cloudy, cool. Low
51–55. Wind light and variable. Friday, rain from Harvey,
chilly. High 54–58. Wind southeast 5–10 mph.
Atlantic beaches: Today, partly sunny, warmer, more
humid. High 79–83. Wind southwest 6–12 mph. Tonight,
mostly cloudy, a shower. Low 59–69. Wind northwest 6–12
mph. Friday, mostly cloudy, breezy, cooler; a shower. High
67–73. Wind northeast 10–20 mph.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, partly sunny, warm, humid.
Wind northwest 5–10 knots. Waves a foot or less. • Lower Potomac
and Chesapeake Bay: Today, partly sunny, warm. Wind west 5–10
knots. Waves a foot or less on the Potomac, 2 feet or less on the
Chesapeake.• River Stages: Today, the Little Falls stage will be
around 3.0 feet, falling slightly to 2.9 feet Friday. Flood stage at Little
Falls is 10 feet.
(High tides in Bold)
Washington
4:06 a.m.
11:18 a.m.
4:46 p.m.
11:02 p.m.
Annapolis
1:41 a.m.
7:57 a.m.
1:04 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
Ocean City
3:23 a.m.
9:28 a.m.
4:02 p.m.
10:28 p.m.
Norfolk
5:27 a.m.
11:32 a.m.
6:07 p.m.
none
Point Lookout
4:42 a.m.
9:19 a.m.
3:06 p.m.
10:22 p.m.
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Needles, CA 113°
Low: Leadville, CO 34°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
72/45/sh
88/64/s
57/48/r
82/72/t
91/68/s
84/59/pc
90/60/pc
84/69/t
87/65/pc
91/59/s
81/54/pc
66/47/pc
67/46/sh
88/76/t
82/63/c
80/70/t
81/57/t
72/56/pc
80/58/c
73/53/pc
89/69/pc
88/59/t
Tomorrow
65/44/s
89/62/pc
56/46/sh
82/63/t
92/67/pc
65/55/sh
89/60/s
81/62/t
86/56/s
93/63/s
69/52/s
63/47/s
64/44/c
91/75/t
70/59/r
86/64/t
82/53/s
71/52/s
59/55/r
68/54/pc
91/71/pc
85/59/pc
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
80/56/pc
71/51/pc
90/66/s
66/43/pc
78/60/s
80/48/pc
87/74/pc
90/70/pc
81/59/c
76/67/t
93/76/t
82/61/pc
102/82/pc
77/66/r
98/76/s
82/62/c
77/67/r
93/80/pc
69/56/pc
74/52/pc
80/68/r
86/73/t
82/55/pc
83/69/pc
78/55/s
66/52/pc
91/66/s
60/41/sh
77/56/t
68/46/s
85/73/pc
91/71/pc
67/52/c
84/66/pc
91/73/t
78/58/s
104/82/pc
84/65/pc
100/76/s
62/55/r
80/62/c
90/79/t
67/53/s
72/61/pc
69/55/r
87/73/t
69/58/pc
73/70/c
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
85/61/s
84/62/s
94/76/pc
84/57/pc
109/85/pc
76/52/c
77/47/c
82/58/pc
83/52/pc
79/69/t
94/62/s
84/61/pc
102/68/s
82/62/pc
91/79/pc
88/65/t
86/71/s
80/62/s
89/80/pc
77/56/pc
83/57/s
65/45/sh
93/80/t
86/62/s
87/64/pc
81/64/s
92/75/t
69/57/pc
109/84/pc
64/52/c
68/44/pc
91/61/s
70/49/s
79/67/t
96/64/s
65/59/c
109/70/s
77/53/pc
89/79/pc
91/66/s
83/72/s
90/66/s
89/79/pc
80/60/s
88/59/s
62/43/s
91/77/t
86/65/pc
Searing Summer Heat
Causing Your Shingles to
World
High: Abadan, Iran 120°
Low: Summit Station, Greenland –2°
Sep 6
Full
Sep 13
Last
Quarter
Sep 20
New
Sep 27
First
Quarter
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Today
Addis Ababa
70/53/pc
Amsterdam
65/50/c
Athens
85/69/s
Auckland
63/51/r
Baghdad
119/85/s
Bangkok
93/79/t
Beijing
83/66/pc
Berlin
78/55/t
Bogota
67/47/pc
Brussels
68/49/c
Buenos Aires
62/53/s
Cairo
94/74/s
Caracas
74/68/pc
Copenhagen
67/53/r
Dakar
87/81/pc
Dublin
61/48/sh
Edinburgh
62/45/pc
Frankfurt
68/52/c
Geneva
67/54/r
Ham., Bermuda 84/74/s
Helsinki
66/59/r
Ho Chi Minh City 92/78/t
Tomorrow
69/55/sh
65/52/sh
88/72/s
62/52/sh
119/86/s
94/79/t
84/65/pc
65/51/pc
68/45/pc
67/51/pc
70/61/c
92/74/s
75/68/pc
66/53/pc
86/80/pc
62/47/pc
62/44/pc
69/51/pc
63/49/r
83/75/s
64/48/sh
90/77/sh
I’ve
cra got
m
c
plu ks tha ore
m
con be n a
ven r ’s
tio
n!
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
93/81/t
91/73/t
79/66/pc
82/63/s
76/52/s
90/58/s
89/81/pc
91/78/t
82/75/t
68/59/pc
81/63/pc
65/49/pc
83/62/pc
86/79/t
69/56/c
65/44/pc
65/45/s
86/77/sh
75/56/sh
89/79/t
62/47/r
60/42/c
69/51/pc
82/53/t
91/81/t
91/74/pc
81/65/s
82/65/s
73/40/s
92/55/s
90/80/pc
90/79/t
83/74/t
69/59/pc
85/65/s
67/51/pc
83/57/pc
88/79/t
70/59/pc
62/43/pc
69/50/s
84/78/sh
76/55/c
89/79/t
66/48/pc
62/41/pc
67/52/t
57/49/r
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
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75/67/c
107/81/s
85/70/s
82/70/pc
69/43/pc
87/53/s
80/60/s
82/74/c
87/78/t
63/49/r
60/47/pc
91/80/sh
98/73/s
75/65/r
65/43/s
87/64/pc
83/59/s
ARCHITECTURAL
SHINGLES
FINANCING AVAILABLE
A TRUSTED NAME SIN
NCE 1945
Set
7:40 p.m.
1:18 a.m.
6:10 p.m.
7:15 p.m.
9:29 p.m.
12:37 a.m.
72/63/c
109/78/s
82/66/t
83/70/pc
65/42/pc
87/56/s
82/62/s
87/73/pc
86/79/pc
65/46/sh
63/45/s
90/81/pc
97/71/s
74/67/r
63/48/pc
76/55/t
76/55/pc
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
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6:36 a.m.
3:58 p.m.
3:57 a.m.
5:38 a.m.
10:12 a.m.
3:02 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
SCALLOPED
EDGE
g
W
Dulles
Precipitation
Kitty Hawk
79/71
g
Tu
Reagan
OCEAN: 71°
Richmond
84/61
g
FORECAST
Ocean City
80/63
Lexington
82/60
g
ACTUAL
Cape May
80/60
Annapolis
82/61
Charlottesville
85/62
Today’s tides
M
High
Low
Weather map features for noon today.
Baltimore
84/59
Dover
82/56
Washington
84/62
RECORD
°
Sa
REGION
AVERAGE
LUXURY
SHINGLES
KLMNO
Style
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
RE
C
ESSAY
Faces, microphones and A love letter to Houston and its hidden treasures
disaster reporting’s risks
BY
BY
P AUL F ARHI
CNN reporter Rosa Flores may
have inadvertently discovered
the most passionate media critic
to emerge from Hurricane Harvey on Tuesday.
Flores approached the woman,
identified only as Danielle, and
her young daughter in a Houston
shelter and began asking her
about the hazards and discomfort
they had encountered when the
woman unloaded on Flores on
live TV:
“She walked through four feet
of water to go get them food on
the first day,” the woman said,
referencing her daughter. “Yeah,
that’s a lot of s---. But y’all sitting
here, y’all trying to interview people during their worst times. Like,
that’s not the smartest thing to
do.” (“Sorry,” began Flores.) “Like,
people are really breaking down,
and y’all sitting here with cameras and microphones trying to ask
us, ‘What the f--- is wrong with
us?’ (“I’m so sorry. . . . ”) And
you’re really trying to understand
with the microphone still in my
face. When she’s shivering cold
and my kid’s wet and you still
MEDIA CONTINUED ON C3
2013 PHOTO BY SCOTT HALLERAN/GETTY IMAGES
Houston may not be a city people fall in love with like New Orleans,
but you can find greatness there where you might not expect it.
K RISSAH T HOMPSON
When you’re from Houston,
you find yourself explaining it to
people who’ve never really been
there.
They have some flip opinion
from the one time they visited for
a conference: Too hot. Too ugly.
Too slow. Ohhhh, the humidity.
Not so when you’re from New
Orleans, home of jazz, Mardi Gras
and the second line. N’awlins is a
place that people brag about
knowing and loving, and when
the waters rose during Hurricane
Katrina — along with images of
the souls stranded in the storm —
there was an immediate outpour-
ing of odes to the sacred culture
that must be preserved.
Houston deserves its odes.
My home town is not the kind
of place that strangers immediately fall in love with. But I know
its secret treasures. I know what
is being lost under the rushing
waters.
The people who don’t love it
just don’t know how to read it.
The maze of highways confuses
because they haven’t learned to
follow it to Mama Ninfa’s, where
the soft flour tortillas and margaritas taste as they should.
Its loveliness is not in the landscape. Houston’s famous resisESSAY CONTINUED ON C2
CRITIC’S NOTEBOOK
WASHINGTON POST ILLUSTRATION; HBO, SHOWTIME, ISTOCK IMAGES
Bigger vs. better
GoT was the talk of the summer, but ‘Twin Peaks’ is the show of the summer
BY
H ANK S TUEVER
A curious thing happened on the way to
television greatness this summer: The highly
anticipated return of a critically revered show
that some viewers might avoid because of its
reputation as a melodramatic, even lugubriously indulgent mess of complicated story lines
instead turned out to be a stunning rumination
on heroic good and innate evil, told through a
refreshingly coherent, expertly paced plot that
managed to keep its loyal fans and curious
newcomers guessing the entire way.
At the same time, another show, also feverishly awaited and already occupying its right-
ful spot on the list of TV’s most provocative and
original series, sacrificed nearly all of its slowly
divulged, carefully constructed mythology in
the name of predictable plot and implausible
incident — so much plot and so much incident
that its biggest fans groaned in mutual misery
every week, wondering whether their favorite
show had, after so long, turned itself into a
cheap and even pretentious facsimile of the
original material.
So, which show is “Game of Thrones” and
which show is “Twin Peaks: The Return”?
In terms of pure satisfaction and elevation
of the form, it’s no contest: Showtime’s “Twin
Peaks,” David Lynch and Mark Frost’s 18-part
sequel to their long-shelved ABC series, has
been a quiet yet profound triumph, splendidly
fulfilling a promise made 27 years ago.
A two-episode conclusion will air this Sunday with Lynch’s daffiest ducks lined up in neat
precision and ready for their swan song, perhaps at the possibly interdimensional roadhouse called the Bang Bang Bar on the outskirts of fictional Twin Peaks, Wash. I find
myself truly sorry to see “Twin Peaks” go and
even apologetic for the doubts I’d cast upon its
revival during the hype that preceded its May
premiere. (My only excuse? Reboot fatigue.)
And I note that for all its greatness, “Twin
NOTEBOOK CONTINUED ON C2
HBO’s “Game of Thrones” zoomed through its seventh season. Showtime’s “Twin Peaks: The Return,” meanwhile, was quietly excellent.
BOOK WORLD
Long live the book festival — proof that though we read alone, we are not alone
BY
R ON C HARLES
While the publishing industry
frets about the state of literature,
readers keep surging to book
festivals in Los Angeles, Miami,
New York and dozens of other
cities. These people have no time
for despair — the poetry slam
starts in 20 minutes, and it’s
already standing room only in the
Civil War pavilion. Clutching
their book-themed totes, they sit
in dank conference rooms listening to fantasy writers in sequined
capes. They wait in winding lines
to tell a doctor that her cancer
memoir got them through a dark
year.
Don’t tell these folks that
books are dead.
Even in battle-fatigued Washington, far more than 100,000
people are expected to attend the
Library of Congress National
Book Festival on Saturday.
Under the leadership of first
lady Laura Bush, the National
Book Festival was born just three
days before the terrorist attacks
of Sept. 11, 2001. It returned the
next fall and then again and
again, growing larger and more
popular each time.
But the awesome success of the
National Book Festival and book
festivals in general isn’t as surprising as the fact that they exist
at all. These clamoring crowds of
bookworms seem incongruous
with the objects of their affection.
After all, we enjoy plays, movies,
concerts and dances — even
paintings — in the close company
Michael Dirda reviews the sequel to “The War of the Worlds.” C3
of others, but books insist upon
solitude. No other art demands so
much time apart, alone, in silence. Coming upon someone
with a book unawares, we know
instinctively that something intimate is transpiring: Do Not Disturb.
What a wonder, then, that
these book lovers should rise
from their comfy chairs, abandon
their nooks and swarm together
in celebration — like cicadas
emerging from the ground to
meet their literary mates.
In fact, though, our modern
craze for book festivals descends
from much older gatherings. An
illuminating new work of history
called “The Social Life of Books,”
by Abigail Williams, describes
the public’s obsession with reading aloud — and together — in
BOOK WORLD CONTINUED ON C3
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
AUGUST 31 , 2017
MICHAEL CIAGLO/HOUSTON CHRONICLE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Armando Bustsamante walks along Buffalo Bayou in Houston on Tuesday. The city’s rich, complex culture isn’t always immediately evident, but natives cherish it.
Houston isn’t a natural beauty, but look beneath its surface
ESSAY FROM C1
tance to the zoning laws that give
other cities a neat municipal grid
leave Texas’s biggest metropolis
looking like a gangly series of
misshapen trapezoids. There are
no scenic mountains or breathtaking cityscapes.
But find your way to Rice Village, South Park, Third Ward —
historic neighborhoods that each
have their own story to tell. Or
newer communities, such as
Pearland, where my sister threw
me the perfect bridal shower in a
tea shop with the daintiest little
cookies and lovely sweet tea.
On the television screen, more
and more street signs I recognize
flash past. Braeswood Boulevard,
where the helicopters are filming
a rescue, is where my mom used
to take us to get our hair done.
I moved away 20 years ago, but
I had already been shaped by the
spirit of the place. Watching the
waters rise these past few days
has gripped me with the kind of
helplessness that had only ever
filled my chest while waiting for a
loved one to come out of surgery. I
pray. I hope. I wait.
Some people run from their
home towns with an intentionality, but it was not that way for me.
Life took me elsewhere, but I hold
the city close the way I’ve held on
to my best girlfriend from high
school. We don’t talk every day,
but we share the kind of understanding built only by growing up
together. We may tease each other, but don’t come for her.
Houston is the sort of place
where you run into greatness on
the cheap, while you’re just going
on about your business, living
your life.
Listen, I’m so Houston that
when my little sister competed in
the Miss Black Teen Houston
pageant, the entertainment was
an unknown local group that
hadn’t debuted its first single.
Beyoncé and the rest of Destiny’s
Child sang their hearts out that
day.
We grew up going to the rodeo
one year and the circus the next.
I’ve never ridden a horse anywhere, but I have cousins who go
on trail rides honoring the legacy
of the legendary black cowboy
Bill Pickett.
The big hair, cowboy boots and
other displays of Go Texan flair
are there, but so are the magnificent quinceañeras and epic Punjabi weddings I attended over the
course of my childhood. My
friends and I listened to both
Selena and the Geto Boys.
Houston is the nation’s fourthlargest city and, by some measures, is its most diverse. Bigness
and diversity have their challenges, and Houston has scraped with
those. Some of the families most
in need as the waters rise are poor
people of color. Yet the water has
not swept over just one swath of
the city. The need is as wide and
vast as the floodwaters that have
turned streets into rivers.
“I’ve NEVER had to evacuate
but when they opened the dams
and the water began to rise . . . we
chose to survive,” wrote one of my
Facebook friends Tuesday after
she and her family had to leave
her home in Northeast Houston.
They waded through 31/2 feet of
water with her daughter in a
floaty, then caught a speedboat
and two trucks to a school bus to a
church in Humble. “Shout out to
the mutha lovin country people
[with boats] . . . salute to the good
Samaritans that came to Houston
JUST to help,” she wrote in a post
filled with praise-hands emoji
and hearts.
I call my parents in Alief, a
suburb straddling the city limits,
one more time. I’m relieved to
hear that the water in their back
yard has begun to recede. I text
my sister in Katy, and she is busy
helping a friend of a friend contact a man with a boat. My best
friend, who lives in Cypress,
sends a photo. Now that the tornadoes have subsided, she has
pulled out her flour, sugar and
baking powder to turn them into
cakes and pies that she will deliver to a nearby shelter.
I call my cousin Tish, who tells
me that she and our Big Mama
have made it safely from Bay City,
where the Colorado River is cresting, to a Best Western suite on the
outskirts of San Antonio.
Big Mama is 91 and lives in a
house that my late grandfather
built. It is mauve with a matching
fence. The three bedrooms are
tight but have been home over the
years to a host of relatives in need
of shelter. The pecan tree in the
back yard and crepe myrtle in the
side yard have always been tended with care.
Does her house still stand? It is
built on higher ground, up from
the road with a gently sloping
driveway. I remind Big Mama of
this.
I am once again stunned by the
size of the storm, which is flooding places that never flood. The
many lives lost and the many
others touched. What will be left
when the rain lets up and the
mean waters slowly return to the
sea?
You can’t wrap your arms easily around Houston. We must remember that in the months to
come.
When the rebuilding starts, it
will be impossible to manufacture the spirit of the place. It came
together organically, a city without a master plan.
I pray that the slow and steady
rebuilding that will follow this
disaster can honor this. May
those of us who know this place
still find our way to its treasures.
krissah.thompson@washpost.com
SUZANNE TENNER/SHOWTIME
Laura Dern as Diane Evans in “Twin Peaks,” which nearly three decades after its run on network
television retained its epic strangeness and challenged its viewers.
MACALL B. POLAY/HBO
Kit Harington as Jon Snow and Emilia Clarke as Daenerys Targaryen in “Game of Thrones,” which
seemed in its seventh season to transform from a richly textured drama into just another TV show.
As ‘Twin Peaks’ played to its strengths, ‘Thrones’ showed its weaknesses
NOTEBOOK FROM C1
Peaks” struggles now to get more
than a few hundred thousand
viewers to watch each week. Ratings-wise, it looks like an expensive disaster, but Showtime says
it’s getting an average of 2 million
viewers when you include the
streaming audience.
“Game of Thrones,” meanwhile: Yeesh, right? After Sunday’s Season 7 finale on HBO,
there’s little need to list the gripes
of its 16 million viewers, except to
boil down the biggest criticism,
which have to do with pace. Although it has one season left,
“Game of Thrones” this time acted
like a show in a terrific hurry to be
done with us.
Characters who’ve never met —
or who haven’t seen each other in
years — were suddenly visiting
one another all the time. Journeys
and story lines that used to take
months to complete (whether
The
Reliable
Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
are away. Their column will resume
when they return.
during entire seasons of the show
or within hundreds of pages of
George R.R. Martin’s thick novels)
now seem to take a few minutes,
as if the imaginary medieval continent of Westeros had acquired a
system of bullet trains, or perhaps
a wooden version of Elon Musk’s
people tubes. That, or Westeros
was suddenly reduced to the size
of Rhode Island.
In its rush, “Game of Thrones”
laid bare its most obvious weakness, in that it is now two seasons
ahead of where Martin stopped
writing his most recent book. Although the show aptly avails itself
of the richness and backstories
that exist in the “Game of
Thrones” blueprint, it has unfortunately given in to the temptation to be just another hit TV show
— specifically, a soap opera. This
happens, then this happens, and
then you’re not going to believe it
when this happens! It all happens
faster than even superfan Leslie
Jones can tweet about it.
Don’t waste your last bit of ice
flame in defense. “Game of
Thrones” is still one hell of a soap
opera — and perhaps that’s all it
ever was beneath all the texture
and time, even back in its more
glorious stretch of the slow build.
Many of us, having bent the knee
years ago, will remain loyal to the
show until it ends, no matter who
gets killed off or who sleeps with
their aunt or nephew or brother or
sister. And the point of a slowly
built drama is that it must eventually reach a frantic, breathless
climax, no? Isn’t that the point of
good sex? (I mean, good television?)
Watching the show devolve, it’s
funny to think back to 2013 or so,
when “Game of Thrones” was on
its third season and a converted
critic had to counsel (i.e., beg) the
doubters to only give it a shot, to
not worry about its layers and
characters, the many locations,
the impossibly huge scope. The
promise was that once you
watched enough of it, “Game of
Thrones” would take you and
transport you; once you gave in to
it, it would magically cohere, and,
in addition to feeling entertained,
you would feel the adrenaline
breakthrough that marathon runners tend to go on about just
before they pass out from delirium. The journey supplants the
suffering; the miles become transcendent.
T
hat’s what good TV is all
about — and it’s the very
experience that we happy
few get by sitting still and letting
“Twin Peaks” patiently insert its
epic strangeness into our minds.
By the time Part 8 aired in July,
Lynch took viewers on a hypervisual (and hyper-aural), hour-long
trip back to 1945 and the first
detonation of an atomic bomb, in
New Mexico. As the camera delves
into the split atom, the viewer
senses, through sound and image,
an unleashing of evil that personifies itself in the elusive “Bob,” who
now occupies the corporeal form
of one of two Dale Coopers; followed by the suggestion that other forces can temper such occurrences by creating virtuous creatures (Laura Palmer, perhaps?).
Confounding, marvelous, unforgettable: That episode alone
would be a hit as a video installation in a contemporary art museum, played on a constant loop.
I realize that doesn’t sound like
everyone’s idea of a swell time
(Are there dragons? Battle scenes?
Rapey incest?), but “Twin Peaks”
actually did what “Game of
Thrones” used to do: It took us
somewhere entirely new, on its
own creative terms and using its
own visual language. Like “Game
of Thrones,” it required that we
pay attention and even do our
homework. (“Siri, who is Tycho
Nestoris?” “Never mind, Siri —
who is Phillip Jeffries?”) It rewarded expertise while reward-
ing a more casual viewer with a
thrill ride.
This season, “Game of
Thrones” abandoned those traits
and became a set of color-coded
index cards arranged on a bulletin
board in a writers room, each card
representing its own holy-crap
moment in a season overburdened with holy-crap moments,
rather than honoring the whole of
the work.
And yet, despite this muddying
of the brand, this summer was the
one when we showed up in droves
for “Game of Thrones” — stood in
lines to get into “Game of
Thrones” pop-up bars, spoke in
“Game of Thrones” shorthand,
tweeted up a storm and aggravated uninterested colleagues to the
point where they started penning
backlash essays with such titles as
“No, I don’t watch ‘Game of
Thrones,’ so please stop asking.”
This is the summer we GoT’d
ourselves to death. And who could
blame us? Poke out of your bunker
for a moment, have a look around
at the world, and crawl back down
and close the lid.
And so it happens that while
America spent its summer watching TV’s biggest show, it unfortunately missed TV’s best show.
While “Game of Thrones” chose
simple paths and explosive set
pieces, “Twin Peaks” promoted
and celebrated every quality we
TV purists say we most want from
the medium: It challenged us,
surprised us and rewarded the
minds that were the least inert
and the most open.
Here, the art of the slow build
was very much in force, making
viewers wait nearly forever for
one of its most satisfying and
stirring scenes, when — and if
you’re not caught up, stop reading
now — at last, in the most recent
episode, the real FBI Agent Dale
Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan, who
has given an above-and-beyond
performance this time) snapped
out of his Dougie Jones fugue
state in Las Vegas and started
giving orders and plotting his return to Twin Peaks, ostensibly to
face down his evil doppelganger.
(“Finally,” said the poor OneArmed Man from his vantage
point in the Black Lodge.)
The goose bumps? The thrills?
The astounding visuals? The thematic crescendo? The supernatural uses of magic? The epic payoff?
Yep, it was all there — same
night, different channel.
hank.stuever@washpost.com
Twin Peaks: The Return (two hours)
concludes Sunday at 8 p.m. on
Showtime.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C3
RE
BOOK WORLD
Mars attacks (again) in an enjoyable follow-up to ‘The War of the Worlds’
THE MASSACRE OF MANKIND
A Sequel to ‘The War of the
Worlds’ by H.G. Wells
By Stephen Baxter
Crown. 453 pp. $27
BY
M ICHAEL D IRDA
At the close of H.G. Wells’s
1898 novel “The War of the
Worlds,” the Martian invaders are
all dead, having succumbed to
the bacteria that infest our planet
and against which they had never
built up resistance. While something of a surprise ending, Wells
had nonetheless prepared the
reader for it with various clues,
starting with his opening sentence:
“No one would have believed
in the last years of the nineteenth century that this world
was being watched keenly and
closely by intelligences greater
than man’s and yet as mortal as
his own; that as men busied
themselves about their various
concerns they were scrutinized
and studied, perhaps almost as
narrowly as a man with a microscope might scrutinize the transient creatures that swarm and
multiply in a drop of water.”
Despite the unexpected failure
of what was probably just a
scouting party, would Mars, a
dying and depleted planet, simply abandon its plans for conquest? Wouldn’t those “intellects
vast and cool and unsympathetic” continue to regard our Earth
with the same envious eyes and,
slowly and surely, draw up new
plans against us?
Such is the premise of Stephen
Baxter’s “The Massacre of Mankind” — the phrase appears in
Wells’s original novel — and,
though a bit too long and looselimbed, it is a highly enjoyable
work of homage and extrapolation. The action, which begins in
1920, moves right along. Baxter’s
chapters are short, sharp shocks,
and he cleverly reuses many of
Wells’s original characters.
For example, the unnamed
narrator of Wells’s book is
revealed to be Walter Jenkins,
now the best-selling author of
the “Narrative of the Martian Wars” and a sufferer of
post-traumatic stress syndrome.
That shrewd Cockney survivalist
— a.k.a. “The Man on Putney Hill”
— now bears the name Bert Cook,
and his adventures among the
aliens have been sensationalized
in “Memoirs of an Artilleryman.”
Miss Elphinstone — the revolverwielding heroine of the flight
from London — turns out to have
married and then divorced the
narrator’s brother Frank, and she
now works as a freelance journalist. Though Baxter’s global perspective shows us the effects of
the Second Martian War on dozens of combatants and civilians,
Julie Elphinstone will be his
main viewpoint character.
The 1920 of “The Massacre of
Mankind” isn’t the one we know
from history. General Marvin —
who managed to knock out one of
the Martians’ fighting machines
in the original novel — has built
on his popularity to become the
right-wing leader of England. Arthur Conan Doyle has even written a jingoist book praising him.
Most
significant,
Germany
roundly defeated France in the
“Schlieffen War” and is now engaged in a prolonged conflict
with Russia.
In the seven years since the
original 1913 invasion, Walter
Jenkins has been obsessed with
the possibility of a second Mar-
tian attack, much to the despair
of his psychiatrist, Sigmund
Freud. As befits a strong militarist, Prime Minister Marvin has
duly organized a massive, welltrained army eager to blast to
smithereens any of those bugeyed monsters, long before they
can set up their tripodlike fighting machines and deadly heat
rays. This time, however, Mars
launches not 10 but 100 cylinders,
and the first 50 are essentially
atomic bombs meant to clear the
landing area of enemy forces.
I won’t say more about the
course of the invasion itself, but
the end result is, as Baxter titles
his book’s second section, “England Under the Martians.” After
relentless mass destruction, the
conquering aliens consolidate
their forces within a 20-milewide circular perimeter in Buckinghamshire. People trapped inside this cordon must survive by
their wits, many living like characters in a “Road Warrior” movie.
Bert Cook, once again, comes into
his own.
Meanwhile, Julie Elphinstone
— intrepid reporter, unwilling
emissary of Walter Jenkins, secret weapon of the military —
travels from England to France to
Germany, through the sewers of
London, and, finally, into the very
heart of the Martian redoubt.
There, Julie learns that these
vampiric, bloodsucking aliens
are altering Earth’s climate and
ecosystem to resemble those of
their own planet; they are even
starting to manipulate human
evolution, planning to turn humans into docile, Eloi-like cattle.
Can things possibly get any worse
for Earth? Of course they can:
More Martian cylinders begin to
rain down on all parts of the
globe.
Throughout “The Massacre of
Mankind,” Baxter regularly offers
intertextual winks to readers who
know their Wells. Referring to his
unheeded warnings, Walter Jenkins grumbles: “I told you so. You
damned fools” — these are the
very words that Wells proposed
as his own epitaph. Various episodes echo elements of “The
Time Machine,” “The Land Ironclads” — Wells’s visionary short
story about tank warfare — and
“The Island of Dr. Moreau.” The
great writer himself is referred to,
with mock disdain, as “The Year
Million Man,” an allusion to
Wells’s youthful article about future humans as eggheads with
attenuated bodies and limbs.
Baxter even obliquely nods to
Garrett P. Serviss’s “Edison’s Conquest of Mars,” an actual 1898
pulp serial written in response to
“The War of the Worlds,” and
then goes on to mention Grovers
Mill, N.J., made famous as the
landing site in the 1938 radio
dramatization — the panic broadcast — of Wells’s novel.
In 1995, Baxter published “The
Time Ships,” an award-winning
sequel to “The Time Machine.” As
a science-fiction writer, he obviously likes to work on a grand
scale. Still, his new Wellsian pastiche contains too many battle
scenes and too many characters,
most of whom make only a fleeting appearance, while the big
reveals don’t always surprise as
much as they might. Despite
these flaws, at least 90 percent of
“The Massacre of Mankind” remains a lot of fun — and I haven’t
even said anything about the
humanoids from Venus!
mdirda@gmail.com
Michael Dirda reviews books for
The Washington Post every Thursday.
Books are supposedly dead, but the National Book Festival is alive and kicking
BOOK WORLD FROM C1
18th-century England. Before the
Civil War, millions of Americans
came to hear authors traveling on
the lyceum circuit. And in the
1870s, the Chautauqua movement of western New York began
spreading across the country,
bringing readings and lectures to
people who had little access to
formal education.
Now, those of us who live for
books worry about the decline of
literacy, the ascension of emoji,
the supremacy of video. Even the
most discouraged cultural observer, though, would be heartened by the National Book Festival. The size of the crowd is
exceeded only by the volume of
its enthusiasm. From children
clamoring to hug Captain Underpants to Capitol Hill Brahmins
swooning over David McCullough, this is that rare moment when a literary event
trounces the Super Bowl.
But what a remarkable moment for these authors to be
thrust into the modern-day spectator sport of book celebration.
Some of them, like former
secretary of state Condoleezza
Rice, are familiar faces, well
known for accomplishments
aside from their books. A few, like
Diana Gabaldon, author of the
best-selling Outlander series,
have been propelled to celebrity
status by television adaptations
of their work. Many of them
understand that their public persona is part of their books’ appeal. Descendants of that brilliant marketer Charles Dickens,
they relish the attention, the
selfies, the chance to meet their
fans and sign copies of their
books.
But some authors, even a few
very popular ones, can breathe
only in front of their desks. Solitude is not a drawback of their
craft; it’s what appeals to them
about writing. They find book
tours exhausting, distracting,
vaguely humiliating. They think
plugging their work on Twitter
and Facebook is a modern abomination. They engage in promotion erratically and only after a
firm talking to by their publicists.
Spotting these bashful authors at
a book festival, you can see the
strain in their smiles, a mixture of
humble gratitude and recoiling
embarrassment.
make Elizabeth Strout understand that we appreciate her
novels more than anyone else in
this crowd of 2,000 fans?
It’s not just that we want our
favorite authors to know we
heard them. We want them to
realize that they heard us, that
their books explained us to ourselves in ways that feel revelatory.
And so we gather, by the thousands, rushing for seats at their
readings, staring up adoringly at
the jumbotrons, waiting patiently for our 60 seconds at the
signing table.
“Your book inspired me to
become a teacher.”
“Your book saved my marriage.”
“Your book changed my life.”
bookworld@washpost.com
ASTRID RIECKEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Hundreds of book enthusiasts stand in line for a book signing at the Walter E. Washington Convention
Center in the District during the 15th annual Library of Congress National Book Festival in 2015.
“Leave me alone,” their eyes
say. “I want to write.”
That makes seeing them at an
event such as Saturday’s all the
more thrilling — that they’re
willing to come, to greet us, to see
who’s reading their books despite
their shyness. Because we can’t
leave our most beloved writers
alone. We crave the contact, the
chance to commune with these
magicians who spin whole lives
from mere words. “I love your
book!” we gush, instantly frustrated by how pat that sounds,
how inadequate to convey the
depth of our ardor, the complexity of our feelings. How can we
Ron Charles is the editor of
Book World and host of
TotallyHipVideoBookReview.com.
The Washington Post is a charter
sponsor of the National Book
Festival. This year’s festival will be
held at the Walter E. Washington
Convention Center on Saturday from
8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. The event is
free and open to the public.
A CNN interviewee’s frustration shows the pitfalls of reporting on disasters
MEDIA FROM C1
putting a microphone in my
face!”
“Sorry,” said Flores, backing
away as the woman appeared
ready to burst into tears of rage.
Anchor Jim Acosta broke into
the tirade. “Rosa Flores, it sounds
like you’ve got a very upset family
there,” he said. “We’re going to
take a break from that.”
Media coverage of disasters
can be like that — wild, uncertain,
erratic. Stuff happens that
wouldn’t happen if the story
didn’t sprawl over hundreds of
square miles and involve the lives
of millions of people. When
there’s chaos near and far, it’s
hard to know when an ordinary
interview will turn into an act of
fury.
CNN found out the hard way
that disaster reporting requires a
different approach. People are
vulnerable and hurting; they’ve
lost property, perhaps family, and
certainly a sense of safety and
privacy, says Bruce Shapiro, director of the Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma, a Columbia
University project that focuses on
disaster and violence reporting.
“A disaster of this scale challenges all of our reporting practices,” he said. “Our day-to-day tool
kit isn’t always equal to this.”
It wasn’t clear how Flores approached the woman before their
interview or what their pre-interview conversation had been. But
Shapiro says reporters need to
seek “small gestures of permission” from people in such circumstances. Asking for consent and
explaining the purpose of an interview can restore a small measure of control to those who’ve lost
much of theirs, he says.
(A CNN spokeswoman, Barbara Levin, responded to a question about the encounter with a
statement reading: “The people
of Houston are going through a
very difficult time. Our hearts go
out to this woman and her family.
Our reporter handled the situation graciously.”)
While it wasn’t hard to relate to
the Houston woman’s pain and
JOE RAEDLE/GETTY IMAGES
Evacuees wait to board a bus Monday in Houston. CNN found out
this week that disaster reporting requires a different approach.
distress, sustained news coverage
of disasters such as Hurricane
Harvey largely has a positive effect. News reporting stimulates
government relief efforts and private donations. It also inspires
heroic volunteers. Some of the
most heartening images of the
past few days, in fact, have been
those of ordinary citizens employing kayaks and other recreational vessels to rescue people
from flooded homes.
News coverage also plays a
vital social role in a crisis by
providing information that can
bind a community together. The
ways and means are many: stories
about heroism or human interest,
warnings about ongoing hazards,
weather forecasts, details about
relief operations, the location of
missing people. Shapiro says
some New Orleanians wept when
the local paper, the Times-Picayune, distributed its first copies
to the battered evacuees at the
city’s convention center and the
Superdome after Hurricane Katrina in 2005.
Nonetheless, misreporting is a
constant feature of natural disasters, too. One of the great mediafed myths of Katrina was that
criminality, violence and looting
swept New Orleans after the
breach of the city’s levees. There
were apocalyptic stories about
snipers shooting at rescue helicopters, roving gangs indiscriminately killing and raping
throughout the flooded city, and
the Superdome overflowing with
dead bodies.
Almost none of it was true.
Much of the defective reporting stemmed from exaggerated or
wholly inaccurate comments
from official sources, including
the mayor and police chief, said
W. Joseph Campbell, the author
of “Getting It Wrong: Debunking
the Greatest Myths in American
Journalism.”
Because official sources are often themselves shaky amid catastrophe, disaster coverage requires extra restraint and circumspection, said Campbell, a communication
professor
at
American University. “It’s an occasion to be more cautious than
ever,” he said. “A good rule of
thumb might be to restrict yourself only to what you can see.”
Campbell said he hasn’t seen
any “outright phony reporting”
from Hurricane Harvey — yet.
But there might be some of the
inadvisable kind. On Tuesday,
ABC News reporter Tom Llamas
caught some social media pushback after he tweeted: “#Breaking: We’re witnessing looting
right now at a supermarket in the
NE part of Houston & police has
just discovered a body nearby.”
Some pointed out that it might
not exactly be “looting” for desperate people to take the only
available food in sight. But Llamas went on, tweeting that he
had “informed police of the looting” and that the Coast Guard and
police had responded.
More criticism followed. One
website called Llamas’s second
comment “the worst tweet in history.” It questioned Llamas’s deci-
sion to involve police and then
tweet about it. Eventually, Llamas
deleted his original tweet and
tried to clarify his intent by saying
that he was already with police at
the time and “mentioned we saw
ppl w/faces covered going into a
supermarket nearby.”
ABC News had no comment;
Llamas had no further tweets on
the matter.
paul.farhi@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
AUGUST 31 , 2017
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
8/31/17
7:00
7:30
8:00
BROADCAST CHANNELS
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
◆ News
◆ Tonight Show
NFL Football: Washington Redskins at Tampa Bay Buccaneers (Live)
Postgame
News
4.1 WRC (NBC)
◆ TMZ
◆ Beat Shazam
◆ Love Connection
Mod Fam
Fox 5 News at Ten
Fox 5 News
The Final 5
5.1 WTTG (Fox)
◆ Wheel
Pregame
NFL Football: Baltimore Ravens at New Orleans Saints (Live)
Postgame
News
7.1 WJLA (ABC)
◆ ET
◆ Kevin Can
◆ Kevin Can
◆ Big Brother (Live)
◆ Zoo
◆ Late-Colbert
News
9.1 WUSA (CBS) Off Script
◆ Noticiero
Enamorándome
Mi marido tiene familia
La tierra prometida
Noticias
14.1 WFDC (UNI) ◆ La Rosa de Guadalupe
Bones
Bones
Big Bang
Big Bang
20.1 WDCA (MNTV) ◆ Family Feud ◆ Family Feud Fox 5 News ◆ Dish Nat.
Money
Collectibles Artworks
Murder Maps
Murder
Secrets of the Six Wives
Farm-Harvest
22.1 WMPT (PBS) ◆ Business
The Brokenwood Mysteries
Endeavour on Masterpiece
Charlie Rose
26.4 WETA (PBS) PBS NewsHour
France 24 Programming
Anti Drug Squad
Codename Hunter
30.1 WNVC (MHz) France 24 Programming
◆ Charlie Rose
POV
The Jewels
Democracy Now!
32.1 WHUT (PBS) Tavis Smiley Rick Steves
◆ Whose Line ◆ Whose Line News
Seinfeld
Two Men
Two Men
50.1 WDCW (CW) Mike & Molly Mike & Molly ◆ Penn & Teller: Fool Us
Blue Bloods
Blue Bloods
Blue Bloods
Blue Bloods
66.1 WPXW (ION) Blue Bloods
CABLE CHANNELS
FELICIA GRAHAM/USA NETWORK
Queen of the South (USA at 10 p.m.) Season 2 of this drama, based on
the telenovela “La Reina del Sur,” ends with the inevitable showdown
between Camila (Veronica Falcón, left) and Teresa (Alice Braga).
Big Brother (CBS at 9 p.m.)
Another houseguest is evicted.
Project Runway (Lifetime at 9)
Maddie Ziegler (the Sia
collaborator and “Dance Moms”
alum) is this week’s guest judge.
FINALE
The Night Shift (NBC at 10) In the
Season 4 finale, a shooting at a
college throws the crew into a
dangerous situation.
LATE NIGHT
Girlfriends’ Guide to Divorce
(Bravo at 10) Barbara is left to
make some difficult decisions
when a family emergency forces
Abby to hurry out of town.
Daily Show (Comedy Central at 11)
Reid Hoffman.
SPECIAL
Fallon (NBC at 11:35) Repeat: Billy
Crystal, Derek Hough, Jessie
Reyez.
Mysteries of the Abandoned:
Chernobyl’s Deadly Secrets
(Science Channel at 9) Engineer
Philip Grossman tries to determine
the cause behind the largest
nuclear accident in history.
DOCUMENTARY
Rancher, Farmer, Fisherman
(Discovery at 9) This two-hour film,
narrated by Tom Brokaw, follows
four American conservationists as
they work to preserve the natural
resources essential to their
livelihoods.
Conan (TBS at 11) Repeat: Marisa
Tomei, Gabrielle Union, Jackie
Kashian.
Colbert (CBS at 11:35) Repeat:
Jason Bateman, Muse.
Corden (CBS at 12:37) Repeat:
John Boyega, Jeffrey Tambor,
Rag’n’Bone Man.
Meyers (NBC at 12:37) Repeat:
Tracy Morgan, Michael McKean,
Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.).
— Bethonie Butler
More at washingtonpost.com/tv
The First 48
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(4:30) Movie: Armageddon Movie: Tombstone ★★★ (1993)
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Yukon Men: Roughing It
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(10:01) The Last Alaskans
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Movie: Coach Carter ★★★ (2005)
Martin
BET
Flipping Out
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We Bare
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Burgers
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Redskins Extra (Live)
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Daily
President
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Movie: Rancher, Farmer, Fisherman (2017)
(11:02) Deadliest Catch
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K.C. Under.
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Raven
Stuck/Middle Bizaardvark Bizaardvark Liv-Mad.
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Botched
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E!
(6:00) College GameDay
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2017 U.S. Open Tennis: Second Round (Live)
Sports Shorts
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Chopped
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Beat Bobby Beat Bobby Beat Bobby
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The Story With Martha
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Fox News
(5:40)
Movie:
Just
Go
With
It
★★
(2011)
(8:20)
Movie:
Life
as
We
Know
It
★★
(2010)
The 700 Club
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Transformers-Extinction
Movie: Star Trek Into Darkness ★★★ (2013)
Star Trek Into Darkness
FX
Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing The Middle
The Middle
The Middle
The Middle
Golden Girls Golden Girls
Hallmark
Movie: Real Murders: An Aurora Teagarden Mystery
Murder, She Wrote
Hallmark M&M Movie: A Bone to Pick: An Aurora Teagarden Mystery
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Movie: Suicide Squad ★★ (2016)
24/7: Canelo REAL Sports Bryant Gumbel Ballers
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Flip or Flop
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Hunters
Hunt Intl
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Flip or Flop
HGTV
Mountain Men
Mnt. Men
Mountain Men
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(11:03) Mountain Men
History
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Help a son who is trying to stay sober, but be careful not to support his habit
Ask Amy
Dear Amy: My
husband and I
recently found out
AMY
that our 28-yearDICKINSON
old son has been
using OxyContin.
He is a college graduate, lives
on his own and has a home and a
good job. We suspected
something when, in January, he
was in a lot of debt, but although
he told us he was doing
“something recreationally,” he
convinced us that he was
stopping. We bailed him out, and
he paid most of it back.
By Easter, though, it was clear
that he had a problem. We
confronted him, and he admitted
to using OxyContin.
We insisted that he get help
and stop using. We started
testing him, and he started
halfheartedly going to AA with a
friend.
The first two times we tested
him, he did not test clean. My
husband was ready to cut him off
completely, and since we don’t
support him financially or in any
other way, that means that we
would cut him off emotionally.
I’ve struggled with this
tremendously.
My husband has come around,
as our son seems to be working
hard to make changes. He tested
clean on the last test, and so far
he is being honest with us. Today
he will be 13 days clean.
He’s managed to detox. I guess
what I want to know is, is it
possible for him to do this
himself, and to stay sober
through going to meetings?
He is again behind in his bills.
Would it be wrong for us to
help him?
The first time, we just gave
him the money. I was thinking
that this time maybe we should
pay the bill holders directly and
then have him pay us back, but
would that be enabling him?
Will we ever stop worrying?
A Lot to Handle
A Lot to Handle: It is somewhat
surprising that your adult son
would submit to drug testing
from you. I appreciate your effort
to try to sustain and support his
sobriety, but you are in denial
about some important details.
Your denial is the crack he will
fall through.
For instance, you state that
you “don’t support him
financially or in any other way,”
and then in the next sentence
you state that you DO support
him financially and in every
other way.
Do not give him money. Do
not pay his bills (this only frees
up money to fund his habit). Use
whatever money you might have
spent supporting him for
professional drug counseling for
him.
Do not give up on your son. Be
extremely skeptical about
anything he tells you regarding
his drug use. Tell him that you
love him and that you will
support his sobriety, but not his
habit.
You and your husband should
attend “friends and family”
support meetings and also
receive counseling.
Dear Amy: A couple of days ago, I
met a friend for a late breakfast at
a nearby cafe. We were there for
50 minutes, from the time we sat
down, ordered, were served, ate
and were getting a last cup of
coffee.
A manager approached us and
asked us to leave, saying that
there was a large party needing
two tables.
I was shocked — insulted, even.
This has never happened to me. In
all fairness, I had my back to the
door and could not see the waiting
crowd, and I try to be considerate.
My friend says she was asked
to leave another restaurant in
our area. I went to school in
Mexico City, and people there
have a table for as long as they
wish — doing homework or
whatever.
I am wondering what you
think of this, and maybe what
your readers think, or even
restaurateurs think. Was I wrong
to be upset?
Kathy in Colorado
daughter’s relationship with a
same-age boy.
I’m the mother of a 13-year-old
boy. I liked your response, but I
would add that she should butt
out! Her daughter needs to learn
how to define what she wants
from a relationship, and stand
up for herself.
Please consider that the
biggest threat to the daughter’s
well-being might be her
helicoptering.
A Loving Mom
Kathy in Colorado: I agree that
this is unusual, and rude. Wait
staff have many ways of trying to
urge a party along (presenting
the check, etc.) before actually
asking diners to leave. I assume
you won’t be returning to this
establishment.
I’ll run responses in future
columns.
Loving Mom: Your take is
certainly valid. Thank you.
Dear Amy: “Heartbroken Mom”
Amy’s column appears seven days a
week at washingtonpost.com/advice.
Write to askamy@amydickinson.com
or Amy Dickinson, Tribune Content
Agency, 16650 Westgrove Dr., Suite
175, Addison, TX 75001. You can
also follow her @askingamy.
© 2017 by Amy Dickinson distributed by
was upset about her 13-year-old
Tribune Content Agency
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C5
RE
You should feel free to make your dinner party a no-dogs-allowed affair
Miss
Manners
Dear Miss
Manners: I have
friends (a couple)
who bring their
dog with them
everywhere,
including to my
house for dinner.
On a few
occasions, one half
of the couple has
“shared’’ some of the appetizers
with their “best friend’’; the
second time around, I
commented.
The remark was met with a
JUDITH
MARTIN,
NICHOLAS
MARTIN AND
JACOBINA
MARTIN
chilly response. I feel that they can
do as they please in their own
house with their own food, but at
my house, it’s out of line and rude.
They also let the dog out for potty
breaks, which I’m left to clean up
the following day.
Am I being defensive? It is, after
all, my home, and I am paying outof-pocket to entertain. We do have
fun, but the hound wasn’t invited
to dinner; they were.
we are not equipped to
accommodate dogs.’’
Note that Miss Manners says
nothing about the particulars of
the dog’s behavior, the modifying
of which is a losing battle. Much
like the rule with children, better
to make a blanket statement about
their attendance and leave the
specifics of how they are reared to
their minders.
Invoke the children-at-weddings
Dear Miss Manners: I have
wonderful in-laws who visit from
out of state several times a year.
Each time they stay at least a week
rule: “Yours are so well-behaved,
but then everyone would want to
bring theirs, and I am afraid that
and insist on doing all the cooking
and cleaning. They insist that I
stay out of the kitchen so that I
can rest and enjoy time with the
kids. (Both my husband and I
work full time.)
While this is greatly
appreciated, the problem arises
when they leave. For weeks
afterward, I struggle to locate
dishes, silverware and other
cookware. Sometimes I discover a
particular piece has been put in
the wrong place only when I am in
immediate need of it (for example,
needing to quickly drain a pot of
MOVIE DIRECTORY
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
DISTRICT
MARYLAND
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
AFI Silver Theatre
Cultural Center
8633 Colesville Road
The Dark Tower (PG-13) 8:2010:40
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
(PG) 10:20-12:50-3:20-6:00
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) 11:002:00-5:00-8:00-10:30
Dunkirk (PG-13) 10:00-1:10-3:506:50-9:30
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13)
12:20-3:30-6:40-9:40
Annabelle: Creation (R) 10:501:40-4:40-7:40-10:20
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R)
10:10-1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) 10:30-1:304:30-7:30-9:50
Marvel's Inhumans (NR) 7:00-9:20
The Keeper of Lost Causes
Close Encounters of the Third
(Kvinden i buret) (NR) 7:00
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
Dunkirk (PG-13) 12:30-2:45
(PG) 7:00-10:20
Step (PG) 11:15-1:15-3:05-5:05AMC Loews Uptown 1
7:15-9:05
3426 Connecticut Avenue N.W.
Dode Hoek 1:00
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 4:20
Dunkirk 70mm (PG-13) 5:00Close Encounters of the Third
7:15-9:30
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
The Godfather (R) 3:30
(PG) CC: 7:00
The Memory of a Killer (De Zaak
AMC Mazza Gallerie
Alzheimer) (R) 9:05
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 1:50-4:30
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC: 7:10
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
(!) 2:05-4:50-7:40
The Big Sick (R) CC: 4:40-7:30
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: (!) 1:003:20-5:40-8:00
Wind River (R) CC: (!) 1:40-4:107:00
Girls Trip (R) CC: 1:30-7:20
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: (!)
2:10-5:00-7:50
The Glass Castle (PG-13) CC:
1:40-4:20
AMC Academy 8
6198 Greenbelt Road
The Dark Tower (PG-13) CC:
4:45-10:10
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC: 12:152:35-4:55
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
(PG) CC: 1:15-3:35-6:00-8:20
Kidnap (R) CC: 7:20-9:30
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13)
CC: 1:00-6:45
Baby Driver (R) CC: 4:00-9:45
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC: (!)
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 1:30Albert Einstein Planetarium - 4:15-7:00-10:00
National Air & Space Museum Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
6th Street and Independence Ave SW 1:30-7:00
To Space and Back 11:00AM
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
Dark Universe Space Show (NR) 1:45-4:30-7:15-9:35
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30- Girls Trip (R) CC: 12:30-3:205:30-6:30
6:15-9:00
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:00AMC Center Park 8
1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00-6:00-7:00
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
The Stars Tonight (NR) 10:30AM
The Dark Tower (PG-13) CC: 9:35
Angelika
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
Pop-Up at Union Market
(PG) CC: 1:15-3:40
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC: (!)
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 12:00-2:30- 2:00-4:35-7:15-9:50
5:00-7:30
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13)
The Only Living Boy in New York CC: 3:40-6:35
(R) CC: 4:00
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 1:45Landline (R) CC: 2:00-7:00
4:30-7:00-9:45
Detroit (R) CC: 11:15AM
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
Menashe (PG) 11:20-1:15-3:15(!) 1:00-3:45-6:45-9:30
5:15-7:15
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:004:00-7:00-9:45
Avalon Theatre
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: (!) 1:455612 Connecticut Avenue
4:00-6:30-9:00
Dunkirk (PG-13) 12:15-2:45Spider-Man: Homecoming 3D
5:15-8:00
(PG-13) CC: 12:45
Maudie (PG-13) 12:00-5:00
Detroit (R) CC: 6:00-9:15
Landline (R) 2:35-7:45
Girls Trip (R) CC: 12:45-3:30Landmark
6:15-9:00
Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
807 V Street, NW
Baby Driver (R) CC: 1:45-4:307:00-9:30
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 12:15-2:455:00-7:15-9:50
Atomic Blonde (R) CC: 12:00-2:255:00-7:30
Girls Trip (R) CC: 12:30-3:006:45-9:40
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 12:002:30-5:00-7:35-10:00
Detroit (R) CC: 10:00
Ingrid Goes West (R) CC: 12:102:35-4:45-7:40-9:55
Landmark E Street Cinema
555 11th Street NW
Good Time (R) CC: 1:25-4:257:25-9:45
Patti Cake$ (R) CC: 1:15-4:157:15-9:35
Rumble: The Indians Who Rocked
The World 1:35-4:35-7:35-9:45
An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth
to Power (PG) CC: 1:05-4:057:05-9:25
The Big Sick (R) CC: 1:00-4:007:00-9:30
Wind River (R) CC: 1:00-4:007:00-9:30
Columbus 1:20-4:20-7:20-9:40
The Trip to Spain CC: 1:30-4:307:30-9:40
Landmark West End Cinema
2301 M Street NW
The Jesus Freak (NR) 2:30-7:30
Step (PG) CC: 2:10-4:40-7:10
The Little Hours (R) 2:20-4:50-7:20
Medal of Honor Theater NMMC
18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
We, the Marines (NR) 10:00-11:0012:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00
Regal Gallery Place
Stadium 14
701 Seventh Street NW
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
11:45-2:10-4:35-7:00-9:30
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 11:45-2:104:45-7:20-10:15
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 12:002:35-5:20-7:55-10:30
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
11:45-2:30-5:15-8:00
Atomic Blonde (R) CC: 1:40-4:45
Girls Trip (R) CC: 1:25-4:15-7:2010:00
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 11:552:10-4:20-6:35-9:00
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 1:254:05-7:50-10:40
Close Encounters of the Third
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
(PG) 7:00-10:15
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin
IMAX Theater
601 Independence Avenue SW
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
2:40
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 4:20
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Sea 3D (NR) 11:00-1:15-3:30
Dunkirk: The IMAX 2D Experience
(PG-13) 6:00
Dream Big: Engineering Our
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
12:25
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:2511:50-2:05-5:15
Smithsonian - Samuel C.
Johnson IMAX Theater
10th Street and Constitution Avenue NW
Dinosaurs Alive! 3D (NR)
12:15-3:00
Jean-Michel Cousteau's Secret
Ocean 3D (NR)
National Parks Adventure 3D
(America Wild 3D) (NR) 10:251:10-4:50
Amazon Adventure 3D (NR) 11:202:05-3:55
Bow Tie Harbour 9
2474 Solomons Island Road
Good Time (R) 10:00-12:30-3:005:30-8:00-10:30
The Big Sick (R) 1:20-9:50
Wind River (R) 10:50-1:40-4:207:10-10:00
Logan Lucky (PG-13) 11:10-2:004:40-7:40-10:20
All Saints (PG) 11:30-2:10-4:507:30-10:10
The Glass Castle (PG-13) 10:304:10-7:00
Cinemark Egyptian
24 and XD
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
The Dark Tower (PG-13) 4:40-9:50
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
(PG) 11:50-2:20
Kidnap (R) 11:55-2:25-5:00
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) 11:201:50-4:20-6:50-9:15
War for the Planet of the Apes
(PG-13) 5:30-8:45
The Emoji Movie (PG) 12:50-3:105:30-7:50
Dunkirk (PG-13) 12:20-5:40
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13)
11:45-2:50-5:55-9:00
Annabelle: Creation (R) 10:551:35-3:00-4:15-7:05-9:45
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R)
11:00-1:55-5:05-7:55
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) 10:55-1:203:45-6:10-8:35
Wind River (R) 12:40-3:30-6:30-9:10
Girls Trip (R) 11:05-1:55-4:45-7:40
Vivegam (NR) 11:00-6:00
Arjun Reddy (NR) 8:00
Logan Lucky (PG-13) 11:102:00-4:50
Step (PG) 11:25-1:45-4:00
Vivegam (NR) 2:30-9:30
AMC Columbia 14
War for the Planet of the Apes 3D
10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
(PG-13) 10:55AM
The Dark Tower (PG-13) CC:
All Saints (PG) 11:30-2:10-4:556:55-9:35
7:45
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
A Taxi Driver 11:15-6:00
(PG) CC: (!) 11:35-2:05-4:25
Do It Like An Hombre (Hazlo como
Baby Driver (R) 1:00-4:05
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) 11:35- hombre) (R) 7:05-9:30
Midnight Runners (cheong2:05-4:45-7:25-10:05
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC: 10:55- nyeon-gyeong-chal) 2:45
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R)
1:20-3:45
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13) 11:00-12:30-1:55-3:25-5:05-6:207:55-9:25
CC: 6:25-9:40
Detroit (R) 2:05-10:15
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: (!)
Paisa Vasool (NR) 7:30-8:30
11:25-2:10-4:55-7:30-10:15
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC: Close Encounters of the Third
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
10:50-1:30-4:20-7:10-10:00
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 11:20- (PG) 7:00-10:15
1:40-4:10-6:40-9:15
Hoyt's West Nursery
Cinema 14
Dunkirk: The IMAX 2D Experience
1591 West Nursery Road
(PG-13) 1:10-4:10
Wind River (R) CC: (!) 11:00-1:40- The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
4:15-6:50-9:25
(PG) CC: 12:10-2:25-4:45
Girls Trip (R) CC: 11:10-2:00-4:50- Kidnap (R) CC: 2:45-5:15-7:357:40-10:30
10:05
Ingrid Goes West (R) 11:15-1:40- Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
4:20-7:00-9:30
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 11:00- War for the Planet of the Apes
1:45-4:30-7:15-10:00
(PG-13) CC: 7:00-9:45
The Glass Castle (PG-13) CC: (!) Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 1:00-4:1011:45-6:00
6:40-9:15
Terminator 2: Judgment Day in 3D Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13)
(R) (!) 11:30-3:00-6:30-9:40
CC: 12:35-3:35-6:35-9:35
Detroit (R) CC: (!) 2:40
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 2:30Marvel's Inhumans (NR) (!)
5:05-7:40-10:15
7:00-9:30
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
Close Encounters of the Third
12:00-1:30-4:30-7:15-10:00
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 12:00(PG) (!) 7:00-10:10
2:15-4:30-6:45-9:00
Detroit (R) (!) 9:05
Good Time (R) CC: 12:25-2:55AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18 5:20-7:45-10:20
Wind River (R) CC: 12:10-2:409811 Washingtonian Ctr.
5:10-7:40-10:10
Marvel's Inhumans (NR) (!)
Girls Trip (R) CC: 1:10-4:157:00-9:15
7:10-9:55
Close Encounters of the Third
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 12:30Kind 40th Anniversary Release
4:20-7:05-9:50
(PG) CC: (!) 7:00-10:15
All Saints (PG) CC: 12:00-1:50AMC Magic Johnson
4:25-6:55-9:25
Capital Center 12
The Glass Castle (PG-13) CC:
800 Shoppers Way
12:50-4:00-6:50-9:40
Marvel's Inhumans (NR) 7:00
ArcLight Bethesda
7101 Democracy Boulevard
Despicable Me 3 (PG) 12:45-3:45
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
(PG) 10:35-2:50-5:00-7:05-9:15
Dunkirk (PG-13) 11:30-2:10-4:307:10-9:25
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13)
10:40-1:30-4:15-7:30-9:45
Annabelle: Creation (R) 10:0512:30-5:20-8:15-10:40
Atomic Blonde (R) 7:45-10:20
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) 10:45-12:552:00-3:05-5:05-7:00-9:05
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R)
10:00-12:25-2:55-5:30-8:05-10:35
The Only Living Boy in New York
(R) 4:00-10:20
The Big Sick (R) 11:20-1:55-3:004:40-7:20-10:25
Girls Trip (R) 11:45-2:25-5:157:55-10:30
The Glass Castle (PG-13) 11:152:05-4:55-7:35-9:50
Wind River (R) 10:20-11:35-12:403:00-5:25-7:50-10:15
Served Like a Girl CC: 10:10-12:202:25-5:45-8:00-10:05
Baby Driver (R) 2:45-5:50
Wonder Woman (PG-13) 12:004:35
Ingrid Goes West (R) CC: 11:101:25-3:40-5:55-8:10-10:35
Good Time (R) CC: 11:25-1:355:35-7:40
Logan Lucky (PG-13) 11:40-2:154:50-7:25-9:50
Close Encounters of the Third
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
(PG) 7:00-9:55
pasta only to discover my colander
is not where it is supposed to be).
And all goodwill I have from their
visit disappears when I am elbowdeep in hot, soggy pasta. When
they are here, I do slip into the
kitchen as often as I can, but they
insist on doing the dishes and
putting everything away. How can
I let them know politely that while
I truly appreciate their efforts, I do
not want them to put anything
away?
How about striking a deal? They
cook, you clean. Or vice versa, and
you can sneak in some cleaning as
you go. You could even involve —
or invoke — the children, saying:
“At least let the children help out.
The Big Sick (R) 12:05-2:35-5:107:40-10:15
Wind River (R) 12:00-2:25-4:507:15-9:40
Logan Lucky (PG-13) 11:55-2:305:05-7:40-10:15
The Glass Castle (PG-13) 12:002:45-5:30-8:15
Detroit (R) 9:40
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
3899 Branch Avenue
The Dark Tower (PG-13) 12:303:20-5:50-8:20
Kidnap (R) 11:00-1:20-6:50
The Emoji Movie (PG) 12:00-2:304:45-7:10-9:40
Annabelle: Creation (R) 11:202:00-4:40-7:20-10:00
Girls Trip (R) 12:30-3:20-6:10-9:45
Detroit (R) 3:40-9:30
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R)
11:30-2:15-5:10-8:40
Regal Bowie
Stadium 14
15200 Major Lansdale Boulevard
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
(PG) CC: 1:00-3:25-5:50
Kidnap (R) CC: 1:00-3:35-6:20-9:20
Baby Driver (R) CC: 1:30-4:45-8:00
War for the Planet of the Apes
(PG-13) CC: 3:20-10:05
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
2:35-5:00-7:30-10:10
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC: 1:103:50-6:40
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13)
CC: 1:00-3:55-7:05-10:15
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 2:305:10-7:50-10:30
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC: 6:50
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
1:25-4:20-7:15-10:30
Atomic Blonde (R) CC: 9:30
Girls Trip (R) CC: 1:20-4:15-7:2010:20
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 1:003:30-6:10-8:30
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 1:154:05-7:00-9:50
Detroit (R) CC: 3:15-6:30-9:55
The Dark Tower (PG-13) 8:15
All Saints (PG) CC: 1:00-4:207:45-10:30
Girls Trip (R) CC: 1:15-4:30-7:3010:30
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 12:454:00-7:00-10:15
Detroit (R) CC: 10:00
The Dark Tower (PG-13) 6:30-9:00
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 1:454:15-7:00-9:30
Regal
Laurel Towne Centre 12
14716 Baltimore Avenue
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
(PG) CC: 1:15-4:00-6:45
Kidnap (R) CC: 1:30-7:10
Baby Driver (R) CC: 2:35
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC: 12:05
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
12:10-2:45-5:20-8:00-10:30
War for the Planet of the Apes
(PG-13) CC: 3:30-10:20
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13)
CC: 12:00-3:10-6:25-10:05
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 1:003:30-6:30-9:15
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
1:30-4:15-7:15-10:15
Atomic Blonde (R) CC: 10:00
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
12:15-6:50
Girls Trip (R) CC: 12:45-3:457:00-10:30
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 12:303:15-6:15-9:30
The Dark Tower (PG-13) 4:00-9:50
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 12:002:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
All Saints (PG) CC: 1:05-3:556:45-9:45
Close Encounters of the Third
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
(PG) 7:00-10:30
Regal Rockville Center
Stadium 13
199 East Montgomery Avenue
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
(PG) CC: 2:15-5:00
Baby Driver (R) CC: 3:45-6:45-9:45
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
2:00-5:00-7:45-10:20
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 12:45-4:157:15-10:15
War for the Planet of the Apes
(PG-13) CC: 3:45-10:00
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13)
Regal Cinemas Majestic
CC: 3:45-7:00-10:00
Stadium 20 & IMAX
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 1:15900 Ellsworth Drive
4:30-7:35-10:15
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
12:00-2:35-5:10-7:45-10:20
1:00-4:30-7:25-10:20
War for the Planet of the Apes
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
(PG-13) CC: 12:00
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC: 12:10 12:45-6:55
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13) Wind River (R) CC: 1:15-4:006:45-9:30
CC: 3:35-7:20
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 2:30- Girls Trip (R) CC: 10:00
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 1:305:15-8:00-10:50
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC: 4:00-6:30-7:15-9:00
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 1:001:25-4:20-7:15-10:10
4:00-7:00-9:45
Atomic Blonde (R) CC: 12:45
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 12:05- The Glass Castle (PG-13) CC:
12:45
1:15-3:45-6:15-8:45
Good Time (R) CC: 1:45-4:45Good Time (R) CC: 12:00-2:407:30-10:10
8:15-10:55
Dunkirk: The IMAX 2D Experience Ingrid Goes West (R) CC: 1:304:30-7:30-10:00
(PG-13) CC: (!) 12:50-3:55
In This Corner of the World (Kono
Ingrid Goes West (R) CC: 1:30sekai no katasumi ni) (PG-13) 12:45
4:20-7:00-9:45
Patti Cake$ (R) CC: 12:25-3:00Regal Waugh Chapel
5:45-8:25-11:00
Stadium 12 & IMAX
1419 South Main Chapel Way
Wind River (R) CC: 2:25-5:108:00-10:50
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
Girls Trip (R) CC: 5:10-10:35
(PG) CC: 12:30-2:50-5:20-7:35
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 3:45
Baby Driver (R) CC: 4:25-10:25
All Saints (PG) CC: 12:20-6:00Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
8:50; 3:10
12:20-2:45-5:15-7:40-10:15
Gook 12:10-2:35-5:00-7:30-10:05 The Emoji Movie (PG) CC: 12:00Marvel's Inhumans (NR) (!)
2:20-4:35
7:00-9:30
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 9:15
Close Encounters of the Third
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13)
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
CC: 12:15-3:10-6:15
(PG) 7:25-10:50
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 12:102:55-5:35-8:15-10:50
Regal Germantown
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
Stadium 14
1:15-7:10
20000 Century Boulevard
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC: 12:30- The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
1:20-4:20-7:15-10:10
3:00-8:15
Atomic Blonde (R) CC: 10:05
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
Dunkirk: The IMAX 2D Experience
(PG) CC: 12:45-6:30
(PG-13) CC: (!) 12:05-2:35
Kidnap (R) CC: 5:45-10:30
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 12:00Baby Driver (R) CC: 1:45-4:302:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
7:45-10:30
Girls Trip (R) CC: 1:10-4:10War for the Planet of the Apes
7:00-9:50
(PG-13) CC: 3:15-10:00
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC: Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 1:304:30-7:20-10:20
1:45-4:15-6:45-9:15
All Saints (PG) CC: 1:00-3:40Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 2:00-4:456:30-9:10
7:30-10:15
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC: 12:30- Marvel's Inhumans (NR) (!)
7:00-9:20
3:00-8:15
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13) Close Encounters of the Third
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
CC: 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 1:45- (PG) 7:00-10:15
Landmark
4:30-7:15-10:00
Regal Westview
Bethesda Row Cinema
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
Stadium 16 & IMAX
7235 Woodmont Avenue
1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
5243 Buckeystown Pike
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 1:00-4:10Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC:
6:50-9:20
2:45-6:00-9:30
1:45-4:30
The Trip to Spain CC: 1:10-4:40Girls Trip (R) CC: 12:45-3:30The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
7:30-9:40
6:30-9:30
An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 12:45- (PG) CC: 12:30-3:00-5:45
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
Power (PG) CC: 1:35-10:00
3:45-6:45-9:45
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 12:50- Atomic Blonde (R) CC: 5:30-10:30 11:45-2:30-5:00-7:45-10:15
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC:
3:50-7:10-9:50
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 12:30- 1:30-4:00
Step (PG) CC: 1:40-3:40-5:402:15-4:45-7:15-9:45
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 12:45-3:457:50-9:55
Vivegam (NR) (!) 12:30-3:456:45-9:30
The Glass Castle (PG-13) CC:
7:00-10:15
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13)
4:00-6:55
CC: 12:00-3:15-10:40
Regal Hyattsville Royale
Wind River (R) CC: 2:00-4:30Stadium 14
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 1:007:00-9:45
6505 America Blvd.
4:15-7:30-10:30
The Big Sick (R) CC: 1:20-4:20Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC: 12:45- Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
7:20-9:30
6:50-10:05
3:30-6:15
Menashe (PG) 1:30-3:30-5:30The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
7:40-10:00
1:15-4:45-8:00-11:00
(PG) CC: 1:15-3:45
Old Greenbelt Theatre
Kidnap (R) CC: 1:30-3:45-6:15-9:00 Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 11:45129 Centerway
Baby Driver (R) CC: 12:30-3:30- 2:15-4:45-7:15-9:45
Menashe (PG) 5:30-7:45
Good Time (R) CC: 12:45-3:456:45-9:45
Rio (G) 1:00
7:00-10:00
War for the Planet of the Apes
(PG-13) CC: 12:45-4:00-7:15-10:30 Dunkirk: The IMAX 2D Experience
Paragon Kentlands
Stadium 10
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC: (PG-13) CC: (!) 12:00-3:00
629 Center Point Way
2:00-5:00-7:30-10:00
Ingrid Goes West (R) CC: 12:30Despicable Me 3 (PG) 1:00-3:10- The Emoji Movie (PG) CC: 12:30- 3:30-6:15-9:00
3:00-5:30-8:00
Wind River (R) CC: 12:15-3:005:20-7:30
6:00-9:15
Dunkirk (PG-13) 12:35-2:55-5:15- Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 1:45-4:307:15
Girls Trip (R) CC: 6:30-9:30
7:35-9:55
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13) Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13) Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 1:15CC: 12:45-4:00-7:15-10:20
4:15-7:15-10:30
11:55-2:45-5:35-8:30
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 2:00- All Saints (PG) CC: 1:00-4:00Annabelle: Creation (R) 12:154:45-7:30-10:15
7:00-10:00
2:40-5:05-7:30-9:55
Atomic Blonde (R) CC: 9:15
The Glass Castle (PG-13) CC:
Wonder Woman (PG-13) 11:50The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC: 1:30-4:30-7:45-10:45
2:45-5:40-8:35
1:00-4:00-7:15-10:15
The Dark Tower (PG-13) 8:30The Hitman's Bodyguard (R)
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC: 10:30 11:15
12:00-2:35-5:10-7:45-10:20
Marvel's Inhumans (NR) (!)
7:00-9:30
Close Encounters of the Third Kind
40th Anniversary Release (PG) 7:15
Ingrid Goes West (R) CC: 11:301:50-4:20-6:45-9:15
Wind River (R) CC: 11:45-2:204:55-7:35-10:10
Patti Cake$ (R) CC: 11:30-2:05UA Snowden Square
4:40-7:15-9:50
Stadium 14
Girls Trip (R) CC: 12:00-2:55-5:459161 Commerce Center Drive
8:35-9:30
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC:
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 12:451:30-3:45
3:35-6:20-9:10
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
All Saints (PG) CC: 11:30-2:05(PG) CC: 12:45-3:05-5:25
4:45-7:20-10:00
Baby Driver (R) CC: 3:50-9:45
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC: Terminator 2: Judgment Day in 3D
(R) 12:15-3:20-6:30-9:35
12:30-2:50-5:15-7:45-10:15
Do It Like An Hombre (Hazlo como
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 1:15-4:15hombre)
(R) 7:00-9:30
7:00-9:45
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13) Marvel's Inhumans (NR) 7:00-9:10
Close
Encounters
of the Third
CC: 12:35-3:40-6:45-10:00
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 1:45- Kind 40th Anniversary Release
(PG)
7:00-10:10
4:30-7:20-10:00
AMC Tysons Corner 16
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
7850e Tysons Corner Center
12:40-6:30
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC: Marvel's Inhumans (NR) (!)
1:00-4:15-7:30-10:20
7:00-9:15
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 1:15- Close Encounters of the Third
3:40-6:00-8:30
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
Ingrid Goes West (R) CC: 1:50(PG) (!) 7:00-10:20
4:30-7:10-9:40
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema Girls Trip (R) CC: 1:30-4:45-7:30One Loudoun
10:20
20575 East Hampton Plaza
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 12:45- Blade Runner: The Final Cut (R)
4:00-7:15-10:05
8:00-9:00
The Glass Castle (PG-13) CC:
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG12:30-3:30-6:30-9:30
13) 4:00
The Dark Tower (PG-13) 7:45Dunkirk (PG-13) 10:25-1:10-3:55
10:10
Annabelle: Creation (R) 11:20A Gentleman (Hindi) (NR) (!) 2:00- 12:30-4:40-8:40-11:35
5:15-8:30
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R)
Toilet: Ek Prem Katha (NR)
10:20-2:10-5:15-8:20-11:20
6:00-9:30
Atomic Blonde (R) 1:20
Xscape Theatres
Logan Lucky (PG-13) 11:55-3:00Brandywine 14
6:00-9:30
7710 Matapeake Business Drive
Close Encounters of the Third
The Dark Tower (PG-13) CC: 5:30- Kind 40th Anniversary Release
8:20-10:45
(PG) 7:00-11:00
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC:
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) 10:151:10-3:50
12:50-3:25-6:00-10:00
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
Good Time (R) 10:45-1:30-4:15(PG) CC: 11:00-1:40-4:05
6:20-10:00
Kidnap (R) CC: 10:20-12:10-2:30- Ingrid Goes West (R) 11:00-2:004:50-7:10-9:30
5:00-9:00-11:40
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC: Wind River (R) 10:20-1:10-3:2511:40-2:10-4:30-7:50-10:10
6:40-10:35
War for the Planet of the Apes
Bottle Rocket (R) 7:20
(PG-13) CC: 11:45-3:20-6:30-9:50 Death Warrior (Olum savascisi)
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC: 10:10- (NR) 7:40
12:30-2:50
Angelika
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: (!)
Film Center Mosaic
11:30-2:20-5:00-7:40-10:20
2911 District Ave
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC: (!)
12:20-3:40-6:50-10:05
10:00-12:15-2:30-4:50-7:20-9:40
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
Menashe (PG) (!) 1:00-6:00
(!) 11:50-2:40-5:20-8:10-10:50
Atomic Blonde (R) CC: 6:10-9:10 Kiki's Delivery Service - Studio
Ghibli Fest 2017 11:00AM
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 11:20Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:101:50-4:20-6:40-9:00
12:40-3:10-5:40-8:10-10:40
Girls Trip (R) CC: 10:30-1:20-4:10Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:30
7:30-10:30
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 10:40- In This Corner of the World (Kono
sekai no katasumi ni) (PG-13) (!)
1:30-5:10-8:00-11:00
Detroit (R) CC: 10:50-3:00-6:20-9:40 10:50-4:20
Patti Cake$ (R) CC: (!) 10:45-3:35The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC: 8:05-10:35
(!) 11:10-2:00-4:40-7:20-10:00
The Big Sick (R) CC: (!) 1:30-4:15Close Encounters of the Third
7:10-9:55
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
Wind River (R) CC: (!) 10:00-12:30(PG) CC: (!) 7:00-10:15
3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
iPic Pike & Rose
Ingrid Goes West (R) CC: (!) 10:1511830 Grand Park Avenue
12:40-3:05-5:30-7:55-10:25
Despicable Me 3 (PG) 1:15
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:00Baby Driver (R) 4:00
1:40-4:20-7:00-9:40
Wonder Woman (PG-13) 12:30I Do... Until I Don't 7:15-9:45
4:00-7:15-11:00
Bow Tie
Annabelle: Creation (R) (!) 12:45Reston Town Center 11 & BTX
3:30-6:45-10:00
11940 Market Street
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) (!) 1:00-3:45- Despicable Me 3 (PG) 9:506:30-9:30
12:50-3:50
Good Time (R) (!) 2:15-5:15-8:00- Baby Driver (R) 6:50-10:10
11:00
Dunkirk (PG-13) 11:20-2:20-5:20The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) (!)
8:20-10:50
1:15-4:30-7:45-11:15
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13)
Logan Lucky (PG-13) 1:30-4:30- 11:00-5:00-8:00
7:30-10:30
Annabelle: Creation (R) 2:00-11:00
Girls Trip (R) (!) 1:45-5:00-8:15-11:30
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R)
Close Encounters of the Third
11:30-2:30-5:30-8:30-11:10
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) 10:10-1:00(PG) (!) 7:00-10:45
4:00-7:10-9:30
The Big Sick (R) 10:30-1:20-4:107:00-9:50
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
The Glass Castle (PG-13) 10:402150 Clarendon Blvd.
1:40-4:40-7:40-10:30
Wonder Woman (PG-13) 10:00The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
1:10-4:20-7:30-10:40
(PG) CC: 2:00
Good Time (R) 10:20-1:30-4:30Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 2:00-4:307:20-10:00
7:15-9:45
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 1:45- Wind River (R) 10:50-1:50-4:507:50-10:20
4:45-7:30-10:00
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC: 1:30- Logan Lucky (PG-13) 11:10-2:105:10-8:10-11:05
4:15-7:00-10:00
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
Cinema Arts Theatre
1:45-4:30-7:15-10:00
9650 Main St
Atomic Blonde (R) CC: 4:45Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 12:05-2:357:20-10:00
7:40-9:55
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) 1:45-4:30- Maudie (PG-13) CC: 10:00-2:45-5:10
6:45-9:15
Step (PG) CC: 9:50-1:15-5:05-9:40
Girls Trip (R) CC: 4:15-7:10-9:55 The Big Sick (R) CC: 12:15-7:50Detroit (R) CC: 1:30
10:05
Terminator 2: Judgment Day in 3D Wind River (R) CC: 9:45-12:10(R) 1:40-4:00-7:00-10:00
2:25-4:45-7:20-9:35
AMC Hoffman Center 22
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 9:40206 Swamp Fox Rd.
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-9:55
Marvel's Inhumans (NR) 7:00-9:30 The Glass Castle (PG-13) CC:
10:10-4:15-7:10
Close Encounters of the Third
Menashe (PG) 9:55-12:00-2:00Kind 40th Anniversary Release
4:00-6:00-8:00-9:45
(PG) 7:00-10:15
VIRGINIA
Manassas 4 Cinemas
8890 Mathis Ave.
Annabelle: Creation (R) 1:454:00-6:15
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R)
1:45-4:00-6:15
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) 2:004:00-6:00
Logan Lucky (PG-13) 1:40-4:05-6:30
Rave Cinemas
Centreville 12
6201 Multiplex Drive
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
(PG) 10:45-1:20-3:40
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) 10:3012:50-3:10-5:30-7:50-10:10
Dunkirk (PG-13) 10:10-12:453:20-5:55
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13)
10:05-1:10-4:20-7:30-10:35
Annabelle: Creation (R) 11:402:35-5:20-8:00-10:40
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R)
11:05-1:50-4:35-7:20-10:05
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) 10:55-1:053:05-5:10-7:10-9:10
Wind River (R) 11:50-2:25-5:007:35-10:10
Arjun Reddy (NR) 6:00-9:45
A Gentleman (Hindi) (NR) 12:153:30-6:50-9:55
Logan Lucky (PG-13) 10:35-1:254:10-7:00-9:50
Vivegam (NR) 1:15
Paisa Vasool (NR) 7:45-8:30-10:50
Vivegam (NR) 10:00-4:30
Rave Cinemas
Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme
11900 Palace Way
Guardians of the Galaxy (PG-13)
XD: 1:00
Despicable Me 3 (PG) 11:30-2:104:35-6:55-9:35
Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2
(PG-13) XD: 4:00
Kidnap (R) 2:05
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) 11:201:45-4:30-7:20-10:00
War for the Planet of the Apes
(PG-13) 11:45-3:20
The Emoji Movie (PG) 12:40-3:15
Dunkirk (PG-13) 11:10-1:50-4:207:40-10:20
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13)
12:35-4:05-7:10-10:15
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R)
12:20-6:40
Atomic Blonde (R) 11:15-2:00-4:45
Arjun Reddy (NR) 8:00
Wind River (R) 11:40-2:15-4:507:15-9:50
Puriyaatha Puthir (NR) 8:00
Girls Trip (R) 12:45-4:10-7:35-10:25
Vivegam (NR) 11:25-2:45
The Glass Castle (PG-13)
10:55-4:25
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) XD:
11:05-1:55-4:40-7:45-10:30
Do It Like An Hombre (Hazlo como
hombre) (R) 7:00-9:40
Paisa Vasool (NR) 7:30-8:30
Close Encounters of the Third
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
(PG) XD: 7:00-10:10
Regal Ballston Common
Stadium 12
671 N. Glebe Road
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC: 11:302:00-4:20
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
(PG) CC: 3:00
Baby Driver (R) CC: 11:30-2:104:50-7:30-10:10
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
12:15-2:45-5:15-7:45-10:15
War for the Planet of the Apes
(PG-13) CC: 12:25-6:45
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 11:555:30-8:00
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13)
CC: 10:05
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
12:40-4:15-7:20-10:15
The Big Sick (R) CC: 12:106:15-9:30
Atomic Blonde (R) CC: 3:30
Good Time (R) CC: 11:45-2:154:45-7:15-9:45
Ingrid Goes West (R) CC: 12:453:15-5:45-8:15
The Glass Castle (PG-13) CC: 3:10
Patti Cake$ (R) CC: 12:30-3:456:30-9:15
Wind River (R) CC: 11:40-2:305:15-8:30
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 1:004:00-7:00-10:00
Close Encounters of the Third
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
(PG) 7:00-10:15
Regal Countryside
Stadium 20
45980 Regal Plaza
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC:
1:20-4:15
Baby Driver (R) CC: 1:45-4:45-7:35
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC: 1:153:55-6:15
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13)
CC: 3:00-6:00-9:05
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
12:35-3:45-6:50-9:50
Atomic Blonde (R) CC: 8:45
The Only Living Boy in New York
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
AMC Potomac Mills 18
(R) CC: 12:45-3:15-5:25-7:50
1600 Village Market Boulevard
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
Good Time (R) CC: 2:45-5:05-7:45
The Dark Tower (PG-13) 5:30-8:00 The Big Sick (R) CC: 7:05-9:45
The Dark Tower (PG-13) CC:
4:35-7:05
Despicable Me 3 (PG) 11:55Ingrid Goes West (R) CC: 2:30Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC: 11:50- 3:00-5:20
5:00-7:30-9:55
2:10-4:30
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth
(PG) CC: 11:40-2:00-4:20-6:50
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
to Power (PG) CC: 12:25-2:50(PG) CC: 12:00-2:20
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC: 5:30-8:00
12:20-2:40-5:15-7:45
Baby Driver (R) 4:15
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 12:55Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC: The Emoji Movie (PG) 12:15-2:30 3:40-6:35-9:15
12:10-2:30-4:55-7:20-9:45
Dunkirk (PG-13) 11:45-2:15Fidaa (NR) 12:50-3:50-6:45-9:35
4:50-7:20
War for the Planet of the Apes
(PG-13) CC: 11:35-2:45
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13) The Glass Castle (PG-13) CC:
12:40-3:20-6:05-9:00
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC: 11:40- 12:25-3:30-7:00
2:00-4:20-6:40-9:05
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) 12:30-2:45- Bareilly Ki Barfi (NR) (!) 1:30-4:307:20-10:05
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13) 5:00-7:15
Arjun Reddy (NR) (!) 1:05-4:35-8:15
CC: 12:30-3:30-6:35-9:45
The Glass Castle (PG-13) 7:35
A Gentleman (Hindi) (NR) (!) 1:10Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 11:35- Annabelle: Creation (R) 11:504:05-7:15
2:10-4:50-7:30-10:10
2:25-5:05-7:40
Vivegam (NR) (!) 12:30-1:00The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC: The Hitman's Bodyguard (R)
3:30-4:00
5:50-8:35; 1:30
12:00-1:40-2:50-4:30-5:40-7:10
Atomic Blonde (R) CC: 6:50-9:30 Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 12:10- Jab Harry Met Sejal (NR) 1:15-4:30
Toilet: Ek Prem Katha (NR) 3:10Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 11:45- 2:10-5:10-7:50
6:20-9:40
2:00-4:20-6:45-9:20
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R)
Anando Brahma (NR) (!) 3:051:40-4:30-7:10
Good Time (R) 11:35-2:00-4:30
5:45-8:30
Dunkirk: The IMAX 2D Experience All Saints (PG) 11:45-2:20-4:55Punjab Nahi Jaungi (!) 8:00
7:30
(PG-13) 1:45-4:20
We are trying to teach them
responsibility, just as you have
done so beautifully with your son.
If we all do it together, then we will
have more time to enjoy the visit
with you as well.’’
But if this method fails, Miss
Manners recommends you give in
to the soggy pasta. Surely its
inconvenience is far better than a
riff with your in-laws.
New Miss Manners columns are
posted Sundays, Tuesdays and
Thursdays at washingtonpost.com/
advice. You can send questions to Miss
Manners at her website,
missmanners.com.
©2017, by Judith Martin
Thursday, August 31, 2017
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Regal
Dulles Town Center 10
21100 Dulles Town Circle
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 2:004:50-7:30-10:10
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
12:45-3:50-7:10-10:15
(PG) CC: 12:45
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC: 2:10-5:00-7:45-10:45
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
Dunkirk: The IMAX 2D Experience
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 2:15-5:15(PG-13) CC: (!) 1:40-4:15
8:00-10:40
Atomic Blonde (R) CC: 1:50-7:40
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13) Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 2:15CC: 3:30
4:40-7:15-9:40
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 12:30- The Dark Tower (PG-13) 6:30-9:00
3:15-6:15-9:00
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 12:40The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC: 3:30-6:15-9:10
1:30-4:45-7:45-10:45
Marvel's Inhumans (NR) (!)
Atomic Blonde (R) CC: 12:00-5:45 7:00-9:10
Wind River (R) CC: 1:00-3:45Regal Potomac Yard
6:30-9:15
Stadium 16
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 12:003575 Potomac Avenue
2:00-4:15-7:00-9:30
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC: 1:30Girls Trip (R) CC: 2:45-8:30
3:55-6:30-9:10
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 12:15- The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
3:00-6:00-8:45
(PG) CC: 1:45-4:10
All Saints (PG) CC: 1:45-4:30Kidnap (R) CC: 7:20-10:00
7:15-10:10
Baby Driver (R) CC: 1:10-3:50
Close Encounters of the Third
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
2:00-4:30-7:30-10:10
(PG) 7:00-10:15
War for the Planet of the Apes
Regal
(PG-13) CC: 2:15-6:25-9:45
Fairfax Towne Center 10
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC:
4110 West Ox Road
2:00-4:35
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 3:40-9:50
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 1:25-4:20Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13) 6:55-9:50
CC: 12:20-6:40
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13)
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 11:50- CC: 1:00-4:00-7:05-10:05
2:30-5:15-8:00-10:40
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 1:55Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 11:40- 4:40-7:35-10:15
2:00-4:25-6:50-9:30
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
Good Time (R) CC: 12:10-2:502:25-6:00-9:25
5:20-8:10-10:45
Atomic Blonde (R) CC: 7:45-10:30
Ingrid Goes West (R) CC: 11:35- The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
2:05-4:45-7:20-9:55
1:05-4:05-7:00-10:00
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 12:40- Girls Trip (R) CC: 1:20-4:30-7:253:50-7:00-10:00
10:20
All Saints (PG) CC: 11:30-2:10Detroit (R) CC: 2:20-6:05-9:30
4:50-7:30-10:15
The Dark Tower (PG-13) 2:05The Battleship Island 12:30-3:55- 4:55-7:50-10:30
7:10-10:15
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 2:10A Taxi Driver 12:00-3:15-6:30-9:45 4:45-7:10-9:40
Midnight Runners (cheongLogan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 1:35nyeon-gyeong-chal) 11:30-2:15- 4:25-7:15-10:25
4:55-7:40-10:20
Close Encounters of the Third
Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX Kind 40th Anniversary Release
(PG) 7:00-10:15
22875 Brambleton Plaza
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC: 12:15Regal
2:45-5:00-7:15-9:45
Springfield Town Center 12
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
6500 Springfield Town Center
(PG) CC: 12:30-3:00
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
Valerian and the City of a
(PG) CC: 12:45
Thousand Planets (PG-13) CC:
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
12:45-3:45-6:45-9:45
11:15-1:45-4:45-7:30-10:30
Baby Driver (R) CC: 6:30-9:30
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC: 12:35Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC: 3:45-6:15
12:30-2:45-5:15-7:45-10:15
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 11:40-2:20War for the Planet of the Apes
5:00-7:45-10:25
(PG-13) CC: 12:00-3:00-6:15-9:30 Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13)
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC:
CC: 3:30-6:45-10:00
2:00-4:15
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 12:05Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 12:30-3:15- 2:45-5:25-8:05-10:45
6:00-8:45
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC: 9:15
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13) The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
CC: 12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15
12:40-4:15-7:50-10:40
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
Atomic Blonde (R) CC: 3:15-6:30
12:15-3:30-6:45-10:00
Girls Trip (R) CC: 1:00-4:10-7:05Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 1:45- 10:15
4:45-7:30-10:15
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 11:30Atomic Blonde (R) CC: 5:45-8:30 2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC: Good Time (R) CC: 11:45-2:151:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
5:15-8:00-10:45
Dunkirk: The IMAX 2D Experience The Glass Castle (PG-13) CC:
(PG-13) CC: (!) 1:45-4:30
12:30
The Big Sick (R) CC: 12:45Ingrid Goes West (R) CC: 1:153:45-6:30
4:00-7:15-9:45
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 1:15- The Dark Tower (PG-13) 9:25
3:30-5:45-8:15-10:30
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 12:00The Glass Castle (PG-13) CC: 9:15 3:00-6:00-9:00
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 1:00Regal Virginia Gateway
4:00-7:00-10:00
Stadium 14 & RPX
Wind River (R) CC: 12:00-2:308001 Gateway Promenade Place
5:15-8:00-10:30
Despicable
Me 3 (PG) CC: 2:00Marvel's Inhumans (NR) (!) 7:00-9:30
4:15-6:30-8:45
Regal Kingstowne
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
Stadium 16 & RPX
(PG) CC: 2:15-5:20
5910 Kingstowne Towne Center
Baby Driver (R) CC: 4:30-10:30
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC: 1:15- Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
4:20-6:45
1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC:
(PG) CC: 12:50
2:30-4:50
Kidnap (R) CC: 1:20
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 1:20-4:20Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC: 7:00-10:20
12:45-3:05-5:30-8:05-10:20
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13)
War for the Planet of the Apes
CC: 1:40-4:40-7:40-10:40
(PG-13) CC: 3:20-6:30-9:45
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 1:05The Emoji Movie (PG) CC:
3:35-6:20-8:45
12:00-2:20
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 12:05-3:00- 1:30-7:30
5:45-9:00
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13) 1:45-4:45-7:45-10:45
CC: 1:00-4:15-7:20-10:30
Atomic Blonde (R) CC: 10:15
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 12:00- Girls Trip (R) CC: 8:00-10:50
2:35-5:15-7:50-10:25
Wind River (R) CC: 12:55-3:50The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC: 6:50-9:50
12:30-3:30-6:30-9:30
The Glass Castle (PG-13) CC: 7:15
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 12:10- Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 1:102:45-5:05-7:40-10:15
3:20-6:00-8:15
The Only Living Boy in New York Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 12:50(R) CC: 4:45-7:10-9:40
3:45-6:45-9:45
Girls Trip (R) CC: 3:50-7:00-10:00 The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
Good Time (R) CC: 1:30-4:00(!) 3:15
6:50-9:50
All Saints (PG) CC: 1:15-4:10The Dark Tower (PG-13) 9:15
7:10-10:10
Wind River (R) CC: 12:25-3:45Close Encounters of the Third
7:05-10:25
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 12:15- (PG) (!) 7:00-10:15
3:15-6:15-9:15
Smithsonian - Airbus
All Saints (PG) CC: 1:45-4:30IMAX Theater
7:15-10:05
14390
Air and Space Museum Parkway
A Gentleman (Hindi) (NR) (!) 1:40D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
4:40-7:35-10:30
11:10AM
Regal Manassas
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 12:35
Stadium 14 & IMAX
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
11380 Bulloch Drive
Sea 3D (NR) 10:20-1:30-3:10
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC:
Dunkirk: The IMAX 2D Experience
1:30-4:10
(PG-13) 4:40-7:00-9:10
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
Dream Big: Engineering Our World:
(PG) CC: 3:10-5:40
An IMAX 3D Experience 2:20
Kidnap (R) CC: 1:15-3:20-6:00Journey to Space 3D (NR)
8:30-10:40
12:00-4:00
Valerian and the City of a
University Mall Theatre
Thousand Planets (PG-13) CC:
10659 Braddock Road
4:30-10:20
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC: 10:00Baby Driver (R) CC: 1:10-3:4512:20-2:35-4:35-7:00
6:40-9:30
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC: Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2
(PG-13) CC: 9:00
12:50-3:10-5:30-8:15-10:50
Baby Driver (R) CC: 7:30-9:45
War for the Planet of the Apes
(PG-13) CC: 8:45
Cars 3 (G) CC: 10:00-12:10The Emoji Movie (PG) CC: 1:20- 2:25-4:50
3:40-6:20
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC: 1:00Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 8:00-10:30 4:00-7:15-10:05
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13) How to Train Your Dragon 2 (PG)
CC: 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
10:00AM
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SF
C6
EZ
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
PICKLES
. THURSDAY,
AUGUST 31 , 2017
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
N-S VULNERABLE
NORTH
A743
AQ
A7652
Q4
EAST
J982
98
J 10 9
A982
WEST
Q 10 5
753
KQ
K7653
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH (D)
K6
K J 10 6 4 2
843
J 10
The bidding:
SOUTH
WEST
NORTH
2
Pass
4
Opening lead — 3
EAST
All Pass
E
xperienced declarers
know the benefits of running a long suit and forcing
the defenders to discard.
Even if the defenders aren’t
legitimately squeezed,
they may have unpleasant
guesses.
The effect of running a
long suit can be unexpected,
something of which I have
become more aware in my
years of writing up deals. In
today’s deal, South’s four
hearts looks hopeless: He
has two clubs and two diamonds to lose.
But West leads a trump
(not best, as it happens),
and South, with little choice,
peels off six rounds of
trumps, pitching two clubs
and two diamonds from
dummy.
West can comfortably
throw clubs. East can also
throw three clubs, but the
last trump skewers him.
If East discards the ace of
clubs, South can win a club
trick. If East throws a diamond, South gets a second
diamond trick. If East throws
a spade, South can take the
K-A of spades and concede a
spade. The defense can take
only one club, and dummy’s
fourth spade is good for
South’s 10th trick.
CLASSIC PEANUTS
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
LIO
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
CHARLES SCHULZ
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
A743AQ
A7652Q4
You open one diamond,
your partner responds one
heart, you bid one spade and
he rebids two hearts. What
do you say?
ANSWER: Partner suggests
a six-card suit with at most
10 high-card points. Your
aces, good heart support
and possible ruffing value in
clubs make the hand worth
a try for game. Raise to three
hearts. Incidentally, it pains
me to say that some players
would have opened 1NT with
your hand.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2017, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MUTTS
EZ
PATRICK McDONNELL
C7
RE
ZITS
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | AUGUST 31
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
This year you walk
through many
different situations
yet gain in nearly
all of them. If single, your
love life will be significant,
allowing many different people
into your life. You could also
discover that you make a new
circle of friends. Your innate
traits and characteristics
appeal to someone who loves
to chat and share. If attached,
the two of you love to spend
isolated time together,
whether to share some
imaginative musings or to
work on a mutual project and
tighten it up. Go to a Capricorn
to get good financial advice.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
You will see a difference in
how you proceed. Listen to
someone who demonstrates
caring yet is very concerned
with what is appropriate.
Communication flourishes,
and you could have difficulty
keeping up with a sudden
flurry of activity.
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
You could be in a situation
that is uncomfortable at best
yet allows you to see a matter
differently. You see a totally
new point of view once you
get past your discomfort. As
a result, your actions and
attitude will change.
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
Recognize the impact of an
WEINGARTENS & CLARK unexpected jolt within your
immediate circle or with a
friend. You will be able to
regroup and communicate on
a new level as you have not
been able to before.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
One-on-one relating takes you
down a new path, and you
feel more connected to a key
person. You reveal a greater
ability to stand on your own
and not be affected by others.
Listen to news with a grain of
salt.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
You could be on the verge of
a major change. Though you
might feel as if it is inevitable
with certain events and
pressure occurring, others
might not totally understand
where you are coming from.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
Your depth and understanding
come out when dealing with
a project or a child who can
be extremely challenging. You
might not want to weigh in
about what others need to do.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
You might not realize how
far you need to go in order
to make the impression you
want and gain the results you
desire. You could be on top
of a problem and ready to
make the next move yet still
wavering at times.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
You could be in a situation
where you need to try to
advance a core belief. Others
could be receptive to your
sharing. The unexpected
occurs when you least
anticipate it, impacting an
element of your daily life.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
You are all smiles despite
an unexpected choice from
a child or loved one. Some
of you could be taken aback
by someone and his or her
reactions.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
You could be in a situation
where you cannot figure out
which path is more suitable.
Refuse to worry about the
issue. The Moon in your sign
draws attention to you, and
what seems impossible could
become possible.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
Slow down and enjoy the
luxury of some time off
from your usual routine.
No matter which way you
choose to go or what you
decide to do, you seem to be
able to relax and think more
clearly.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
Allow greater give-and-take
among your circle of friends as
well as co-workers. Whether
you are discussing a personal
matter or looking to add
flourish to a certain project,
your resources remain the
same. Laughter opens up
many doors and possibilities.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2017, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
C8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
AUGUST 31 , 2017
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
KIDSPOST.COM
The U.S. Open tennis tournament has been
played in Queens, a borough of New York City,
since 1915, but it was first held in 1881 in Newport,
Rhode Island.
A little warmer and a little more
humid, but the weather should be
fairly pleasant.
Sue, the world-famous T. rex,
will get a makeover before
moving to a new spot at
Chicago’s Field Museum.
ILLUSTRATION BY JASON STEINERT, 10, LAUREL
TOD AY ’ S NE WS
CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL OF PHILADELPHIA/
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Five years ago, Emily Whitehead
began receiving a therapy that has
put her leukemia into remission.
A new way to fight
a childhood cancer
ISTOCK
Wimps do it. Dorks do it. You can do it, too.
It’s almost September,
and kids are going back
to school and starting
FRED BOWEN
their fall sports seasons.
I have a suggestion that
might make your sports more fun.
Keep a sports journal. Write about
your soccer, baseball or lacrosse team.
I know it sounds a bit like a homework
assignment, but you don’t have to write
every day. If you get stuck on what to
write about, just pretend you’re writing a
letter to a friend telling her about your
team. Have fun with it. Don’t worry, no
one is going to give you a grade for your
journal.
There are plenty of popular diaries and
journals. Lots of kids love to read “Diary
of a Wimpy Kid” and the “Dork Diaries.”
The Score
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1 Draft day
announcements
6 In-tents
experience?
10 Like some
dental floss
14 End of __
15 Jai __
16 Wrapped up
17 Artifact
18 Board member?
19 Unites
20 Volleyball
players in
Dublin?
23 New York’s
__ Island
24 Sturgeon
delicacy
25 Engineering sch.
on the Hudson
River
28 Euros in Rome?
32 Deadly snake
35 White House
signing ceremony memento
36 __ Trinket, “The
Hunger Games”
chaperone
played by
Elizabeth Banks
37 Airport inspectors in Beijing?
42 Cosmonaut
Vladimir
43 Partner of abet
44 Most of Ariz.
doesn’t observe it
45 Dance lessons in
Madrid?
50 CIA
predecessor
51 Drivers’ org.
52 Phillies’ div.
56 Number cruncher in New Delhi?
59 SALT subject
62 Crab Key villain
63 Mazda MX-5,
familiarly
64 Witty tweet, e.g.
65 Novelist O’Brien
66 Bunsen
burner kin
67 Small ticks?
68 Travel aimlessly
69 One of Franklin’s
two certainties
DOWN
1 Musée d’Orsay
city
2 Still
There are famous sports diaries, too.
Jerry Kramer, an all-pro guard for the
Green Bay Packers, kept a journal of his
football team’s 1967 season. Kramer’s
book — “Instant Replay” — was on the
New York Times bestseller list for 37
weeks.
How do you get started? Buy a
notebook. Or open up a file on your
computer. It doesn’t have to be anything
special. Then start to write down your
thoughts or collect stuff about your team.
What kind of stuff? You can start by
putting the team roster in your journal.
Or the team schedule along with the
scores of the games.
Like to draw? Draw pictures of your
team uniforms or certain plays and
players. Don’t worry if you’re not a great
artist. Jeff Kinney, the author and artist
of the “Wimpy Kid” series, isn’t Picasso.
If your team keeps statistics, you can
include them. Or keep track of your own
stats.
Of course, the journal shouldn’t be just
scores and statistics. Write about the fun
things that happen. One fun thing I
remember is a day that it started raining
during practice of a soccer team I
coached. The boys didn’t stop playing.
They had a blast slipping and sliding all
over the pitch. The kids talked about that
practice for years. It was a favorite team
memory.
Write about your favorite parts of
being on your team. Or your leastfavorite parts. Write about how your
team is coming together — or not coming
By David Poole
together — during the season.
Every team, whether in the pros or in
your neighborhood, is a story. A sports
journal is just a way to write down the
team stories so you won’t forget them.
Keeping a journal may also help you
become a better player because you will
notice things about your sport. Tennis
legend Serena Williams and Olympic
swimmer Michael Phelps both keep
sports journals to help them with their
performance.
So this season don’t just play sports,
write about them.
kidspost@washpost.com
Bowen writes the sports opinion column for
KidsPost. He is the author of 22 kids sports
books.
Opening a new era in cancer care,
the Food and Drug Administration on
Wednesday approved the first
treatment that genetically engineers
patients’ own blood cells into an army
of assassins to seek and destroy
childhood leukemia (loo-KEE-me-uh).
The CAR-T cell treatment
developed by Novartis and the
University of Pennsylvania is the first
type of gene therapy to hit the U.S.
market — part of a wave of custommade “living drugs” being tested
against blood cancers and some other
tumors, too.
“We’re entering a new frontier in
medical innovation with the ability to
reprogram a patient’s own cells to
attack a deadly cancer,” said FDA
Commissioner Scott Gottlieb.
CAR-T treatment uses gene
therapy techniques to turbocharge
T cells, immune system soldiers that
cancer can often evade. Researchers
filter those cells from a patient’s
blood, reprogram them to target
cancer and grow hundreds of millions
of copies. Returned to the patient, the
revved-up cells can continue
multiplying to fight disease for
months or years.
— Associated Press
A flashy display isn’t
the only way to say ‘I love you’
Carolyn Hax is
away. The following is from
Aug. 6, 2003.
Carolyn
Hax
Dear Carolyn: I
am a die-hard
romantic. I tried
to fight it and say
I wasn’t, but it’s
true. My ex-boyfriend told me
that what I wanted didn’t exist,
but I still believe that out there
somewhere are people who love
somebody so much they show it
in big or caring ways. Am I
holding out for something that
doesn’t exist? I have never
broken up with someone
because the romance wasn’t
there, but I am afraid I can’t be
happy without it.
— Romantic at Heart
© 2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
3 Salsa singer
Cruz
4 Spring 2008
“Dancing with
the Stars”
champion
Yamaguchi
5 Potpourri pouch
6 Wedding
reception sight
7 Hit the ground
8 Hindu
incantation
9 Word with
carrier or
passenger
10 Floors
11 Abbr. in many
addresses
12 Crossed (out)
13 Jr. and sr.
21 Loses it
22 Lutelike
instrument
25 Served
seconds, say
26 Figure skating
event
27 In other
words, in
other words
29 Novelist Harper
30 Quechua
speakers
8/31/17
31 He served as
A.G. under his
brother
32 “Don’t __
innocent”
33 Port arrivals
34 Pockets for
falafel
38 Start to skid?
39 French spa
40 Strike
41 Utopias
46 More
melancholy
47 Bob, for one
48 Like peacocks
49 Many a
Mideast
native
53 Appliance
maker since
1934
54 Attack
55 Vandalize
56 Rascals
57 Kendrick of
“Pitch Perfect”
58 “Syntactic
Structures”
author Chomsky
59 Nos. averaging 100
60 What a
shark strikes
with
61 Wite-Out
maker
WEDNESDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
Romantic at Heart: So wait. If
people don’t show their love in
big or caring ways, they don’t
love you “so much”?
Grab the Harlequin off your
nightstand and slap yourself
with it.
You’re being rigid, not
romantic. There are as many
ways to show profound love as
there are profound loves.
You want someone who both
loves you deeply and loves you
flashy; that’s fine, but don’t
make the mistake of assuming
one means the other. If the size
of the display were a true
measure of depth, then “If you
really loved me, you’d put me on
the side of a bus” would be a
cliche. Which would actually be
an improvement. So never mind.
The bigger mistake would be
to believe the greatest love is the
one that fits your preconceived
notions. Sure, on some level,
you’re going to want what you
want — someone who
remembers your birthday and
listens to you and doesn’t say
too many obnoxious things —
and you shouldn’t want
anything less.
But no one wants to follow a
script, yours or anyone else’s,
for what romance “should” be.
And even if you found someone
who did, please tell me you
wouldn’t want him; you’d never
be sure it wasn’t an act. Real
people showing real love in
their own real ways can hurt
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
you (never maliciously),
frustrate you and spill wine on
your favorite shoes — and
surprise the hell out of you
every single day with the
number of ways they show love.
That is, if you get your head out
of your rose petals.
Dear Carolyn: I have been with
my fiancee 41/2 years. We met
our freshman year in college
and got engaged five months
ago. My fiancee recently
expressed feelings of doubt
because she doesn’t know “what
else is out there.” I am crushed
and don’t know what to do. I
never thought she would be the
one to go through something
like this.
— Hurting in Ga.
Hurting in Ga.: Rule No. 1:
Never think something can’t
happen. Loss is always possible.
The strongest hearts are the
flexible ones.
Rule No. 2: Never take it
personally when fiancees you
met in freshman year say they
don’t know what else is out
there.
Instead of seeing that as
proof she isn’t in love, and
therefore proof you’re a bad
person, see it as proof her
synapses work. She has
experienced adulthood, all 20
minutes of it, only with you.
If you marry now, you, too,
will never have lived a conscious
day without a certainty in your
future — first school, then
fiancee. So grieve, of course, but
also let your synapses take the
hint: Go find out who you are
without anything else to define
you.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
KLMNO
SPORTS
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
M2
D
OBITUARIES
PRO BASKETBALL
TENNIS
Former Villanova coach Rollie
Massimino, on the sideline for the
Wildcats’ legendary 1985 upset of
Georgetown, is dead at 82. B5
The Cavaliers and Celtics finally
complete the Irving-Thomas trade,
with Boston reportedly adding a
second-round pick to the deal. D2
Venus Williams’s resurgent 2017
continues with a straight-sets win
over Oceane Dodin to advance to
the third round of the U.S. Open. D3
Dominant Strasburg is simply
‘a big, hairy, scary, furry animal’
It’s gotta be the shoes:
At Navy, a unique situation
BY
GENE WANG
It took three straight losses —
including, most painfully, to
Army — for Navy’s football
coaches to start talking about
their players’ shoes.
Their team had fallen to its
archrival in December for the
first time in 15 years. A litany of
players missed the game because
of foot injuries, most notably
quarterback Will Worth, slotback Toneo Gulley, linebacker
Daniel Gonzales and wide receiver Tyler Carmona. Slotback Josh
Brown sat out with a sprained
ankle.
Redskins’
fringe guys
battling for
final spots
BY
Several weeks later, after a 9-2
start to the season dissolved into
a 9-5 finish, Coach Ken Niumatalolo and his staff began the
unpleasant task of evaluating
what had gone wrong.
Their conclusion: a potential
injury risk that almost no other
team in major college football
has to consider.
Unless the Midshipmen are
participating in athletic activities or in their dorm rooms, they
are forbidden by U.S. Naval
MIDSHIPMEN CONTINUED ON D6
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Matinee idol
Stephen Strasburg throws his second career complete game,
allowing six hits and homering in a 4-0 win over Miami. Story, D5
Navy at Florida Atlantic
Friday, 8 p.m., ESPNU
Often disparaged
but monstrously
good, Stephen
Strasburg gave up
a leadoff triple to
J.T. Realmuto in
Thomas
the fifth inning of
Boswell
a scoreless game
against Miami on
Wednesday afternoon. Instant
crisis.
Immediately, as if clicking off
the cruise control on a Ferrari
and stomping the accelerator,
Strasburg overpowered the next
two Marlins for swinging
strikeouts, then got a weak flyball
from the pitcher to strand the
runner. To lead off the bottom
half of the inning, Strasburg hit
the first pitch into the rightcenter bleachers for a home run.
“Sometimes it’s just your day,”
Nationals Manager Dusty Baker
said after Strasburg’s six-hit
shutout in a 4-0 win to sweep
three games from the Marlins.
That’s wrong. Sometimes it’s
your 26 months. That’s how long
Strasburg has pitched — and
especially won — at an incredible
level. Since June 2015, when he
BOSWELL CONTINUED ON D5
Nationals at Brewers
Today, 8 p.m., MASN2
At 5-8, 140 pounds, Christian Pulisic, 18, is a rising star in Germany and on cusp of becoming . . .
M IKE J ONES
The Washington Redskins’
starters and a number of key
backups will not play in the preseason finale at Tampa Bay on
Thursday night. But don’t tell the
other 45 to 60 remaining roster
hopefuls the preseason doesn’t
matter.
As their players take on the
Buccaneers at 7:30 p.m., Washington’s coaches and officials still
have a number of decisions to
make with reserve roles and roster spots remaining up for grabs
ahead of Saturday’s cut deadline
(from 90 to 53 players). As such,
Thursday represents a final showcase for those young prospects.
Second-year quarterback Nate
Sudfeld is among the players who
will receive a substantial opportunity. Coach Jay Gruden said he
plans to play the 2016 sixth-round
pick the entire game while resting
veterans Kirk Cousins and Colt
McCoy.
At this point, Sudfeld has
played sparingly in the preseason, and a strong performance
could go a long way toward convincing team officials he is worthy of a roster spot rather than a
practice squad designation.
These final roster calls aren’t
likely to feature recognizable
names. They will, however, determine the quality of depth on
offense, defense and special
teams. Here’s a look at the most
intriguing position battles entering Thursday night’s game.
Defensive line: A.J. Francis
vs. Joey Mbu — This spot
seemed nearly set at this time last
week. Veterans Ziggy Hood, Phil
Taylor and Stacy McGee, rookie
Jonathan Allen and second-year
players Matt Ioannidis and Anthony Lanier looked like virtual
locks. (A seventh, Terrell McClain,
hasn’t exactly had an impact this
preseason. But his $7.5 million
dead cap hit makes him hard to
cut). But then Taylor, who seemed
like the favorite to start at nose
tackle, tore his left quadriceps
and will have season-ending surREDSKINS CONTINUED ON D7
MATTHEW STOCKMAN/GETTY IMAGES
Teenager Christian Pulisic has scored four goals in his past five appearances with the U.S. team. “Everything happened a little bit too fast,” he said.
BY
S TEVEN G OFF
whippany, n.j. — Christian Pulisic’s status is blooming to such a degree with both
his German Bundesliga club and the U.S.
national team that global speculators are
placing his market transfer value in the
tens of millions — incomprehensible figures for an American soccer player. Next
summer, if all goes as planned over the
coming six weeks, he will take center stage
at the World Cup in Russia.
He is, without question, on the cusp of
the type of stardom that U.S. soccer has
dreamed about for decades.
Given his place, though, it’s easy to
forget how quickly he has risen and how
young he is. Wednesday offered a reminder.
At the end of a U.S. workout, while
teammates dipped into outdoor ice baths
The boy
king of
U.S. soccer
World Cup qualifying | Costa Rica vs. United States
Friday, 7 p.m., ESPN; Red Bull Arena, Harrison, N.J.
or trotted to the bus, Pulisic stepped aside
and greeted his father. He is, after all, still a
teenager who, had he not been so very
good at this game, would have spent this
day getting lost looking for a sophomore
econ class.
“He’s my son, you know, and soccer is
secondary,” said Mark Pulisic, a former
George Mason University and pro indoor
player. He had driven more than four
hours from his assistant coaching job in
Rochester, N.Y., for a short visit ahead of
the U.S. team’s World Cup qualifier against
Costa Rica on Friday at Red Bull Arena in
nearby Harrison.
A few years ago, under the supervision
of his dad, the younger Pulisic was developing skills at home in Hershey, Pa. (His
mom also played at GMU.) Now he’s
starting for Borussia Dortmund and the
PULISIC CONTINUED ON D8
Redskins at Buccaneers
Today, 7:30 p.m., WRC-4, CSN
Several varsity letters spell out a dilemma
Eleanor Roosevelt football and basketball standout tries to find a college in age of year-round specialization
BY
J ESSE D OUGHERTY
Jaden Faulkner sat against the
back wall of the gym, laughing at
nothing in particular, as his teammates tugged accessories onto
their bodies.
It looked as if they were dressing for an athletic apparel commercial, not a high school basketball summer league game. They
slipped into leggings shaded
black, gray and off-white. They
situated their socks at very particular lengths. They wore shoes
that matched undershirts that
matched wristbands and spent
the minutes leading up to the
game making sure it all looked
just right.
But Faulkner did not join the
impromptu fashion show. He
walked onto the court wearing
black ankle socks, a baggy gray
T-shirt and soccer shorts hovering well above his knees. He
looked out of place, and maybe he
was. On this June evening,
Faulkner was Eleanor Roosevelt’s
6-foot-4 star point guard who also
plays football. On other days, he is
the Greenbelt school’s star dual-
threat quarterback who also plays
basketball.
From there, the duality of his
athletic career thickens: He is
being recruited by Division I programs in both sports and has one
more season of each before he has
to choose. That choice will, in
many ways, be shaped by the
generation in which he is playing
— the age of both AAU basketball
and football head-injury concerns. And with more collegebound athletes specializing in
one sport from a young age, precedent for how to navigate it has
dwindled.
“It’s really confusing, with the
recruiting and the pressure to
choose from both sides,” Faulkner
said. “But I really do love both
sports, and I’ve been playing both
since I was a little kid. I’m only
choosing because I have to.”
His mother, Natasha Marshall,
reads the latest concussion studies and sometimes worries about
her son’s long-term health should
he continue playing football. That
is a pull toward hoops. But the
year-round demand of AAU basFAULKNER CONTINUED ON D3
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Jaden Faulkner is a top point guard and quarterback, but his only
college offer so far is from Central Connecticut State for basketball.
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
AUGUST 31 , 2017
washingtonpost.com/sports
EARLY LEAD
EARLY LEAD
Cavaliers,
Celtics deal
settled with
extra pick
BY
Suh adds
to list of
duties, just
for kicks
D.C. SPORTS BOG
D ES B IELER
The Cavaliers and Celtics completed a trade Wednesday that
swaps two of the Eastern Conference’s biggest stars. As first reported by ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski, Boston agreed to add a
2020 second-round pick to an already agreed-upon package that
sends point guard Isaiah Thomas
to Cleveland in exchange for point
guard Kyrie Irving.
The Cavaliers, who also will
receive forward Jae Crowder, center Ante Zizic and the Nets’ 2018
first-round pick, had been balking
at finalizing the trade after conducting a physical examination of
Thomas. The guard suffered a hip
injury last season that ultimately
forced him out of the Eastern Conference finals, in which his Celtics
fell to the Cavaliers, and his recovery could linger into this season.
“I am not damaged,” Thomas
told Wojnarowski on Tuesday. “I’ll
be back, and I’ll be the same player.”
Cleveland reportedly had been
seeking further compensation in
the deal, in the form of one of
Boston’s talented young players or
one of the several first-round
picks the team holds for the next
few years, but it apparently settled
for a lesser addition. A deadline of
10 a.m. Thursday was looming for
the teams to complete their trade,
and Wojnarowski reported that
“Boston would budge no more.”
Assuming the deal does go
through, the Cavaliers will have
done as well as could have been
reasonably expected in the wake of
Irving’s trade demand. The fourtime all-star, who helped Cleveland reach three straight NBA Finals and win its first title, was said
to have grown weary of playing in
LeBron James’s shadow.
The Cavaliers could lose Thomas after this season, but the same
possibility exists for James, who
has his own opt-out-clause, and
the draft picks, plus Zizic, help
bolster the team’s future. For this
season, Thomas, as well as
Crowder, should help James keep
Cleveland in strong contention for
another NBA Finals appearance.
des.bieler@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
QUOTABLE
“As usual, we always
take care of our fans
and will fix this.”
DANA WHITE,
UFC president, on refunding $100 to
customers who ordered the PPV fight
between Floyd Mayweather and
Conor McGregor on Saturday but
were unable to get the broadcast
because of network outages.
(per Early Lead)
BY
MITCHELL LAYTON/GETTY IMAGES
Wearing a Montreal Expos jersey, Hall of Famer Tim Raines throws out the first pitch at Nationals Park on Monday.
Expos fans don’t answer this ‘Ring’
BY
D AN S TEINBERG
Tim Raines wore a Montreal Expos
jersey on the field as the Washington
Nationals honored him this week, and
while it was nice and sweet and
harmless, it also was an incredibly weird
sight: a big league team honoring a guy
who never wore its uniform as he stood
there in a different set of threads. Ditto
for seeing another Expos logo added to
the right field facade at Nationals Park,
next to Raines’s name, as he entered the
franchise’s Ring of Honor. The further
we are from 2005, the wackier those
logos start to look.
But in Montreal — the city where
Raines starred for the first 12 years of his
Hall of Fame career — the Monday
evening ceremony was wonderf . . . well,
it was gloriou . . . well, it was magica . . .
well, let’s just ask an Expos fan.
“I’ll put it to you as simple as I can,”
said Perry Giannias, who estimated his
Expos fandom at about a 15 or 25 on a
scale of 1 to 10. “It’s like you being friends
with a guy who’s now sleeping with your
ex. And now they invite you to the
wedding, and your kids are ushers or
bridesmaids or flower girls. It doesn’t
work like that. It’s very difficult to
digest.”
Washington’s tangled dance with its
past is old news, as is the weirdness of
these ceremonies.
As you probably know, there is a fierce
segment of Washingtonians put off by
any nod to Montreal. They cared about
Ryan Zimmerman’s chase of Frank
Howard’s D.C. home run record but
disdained Zimmerman’s chase of
Vladimir Guerrero’s franchise mark.
They hate those graphics comparing
these Nats to successful Expos teams of
yore. And they sure don’t want more
Expos logos splashed on Washington’s
Ring of Honor.
But what I didn’t realize is that a
fierce segment of Montreal fans feels
exactly the same way!
“It sort of rubs me the wrong way; I’m
not going to lie,” said Annakin Slayd, a
Not everyone is pleased
that the Nationals honored
Montreal’s Raines
39-year-old musician who has recorded
songs about the Expos, including one in
honor of Raines’s Cooperstown
moment. “From our point of view, we
feel like our history is being stolen from
us. And I get how in Washington they’re
like, ‘What’s the big deal? We’ll just
honor Tim. It’ll be nice; his family will
enjoy it.’ But for us there’s a little more
depth to it.”
“Why are they pushing a history that
didn’t belong to them? It makes no
sense,” added Giannias, who organizes
an annual Expos Fest to benefit the
Montreal Children’s Hospital. “I don’t
blame the fans of the Nationals; I don’t
blame Tim Raines, for sure. If someone
wants to honor you, who are you to say
no? It’s just the whole notion. The team
hasn’t been around for a long time, and
they need to find a history? Create your
own history. You have Ryan
Zimmerman. You have Bryce Harper.
The Expos are certainly not a part of
that, no matter what MLB says.
Everybody knows that’s not the case,
and the best part is the fans of
Washington know that’s not the case.”
Now to defend the Nats: They don’t go
out of their way to claim the Expos. They
don’t wear Montreal throwbacks or
push Expos merchandise. It isn’t the
front office’s fault that baseball didn’t
treat the club as an expansion franchise.
Once Dawson was in that Ring, it
would be hard to keep Raines out. The
ex-players themselves seem thrilled by
the honor. There’s not a shred of
malicious intent. Some Nats fans
actually get a kick out of nods to this
binational history. So only a true
heartless crank would write hundreds of
words about a nice and sweet and
harmless ceremony. (Guilty!)
Further, it isn’t like all Expos fans are
riled up.
“There’s a diversity of opinion on this
stuff. I think a lot of people might feel
like me: that it’s fine,” said author Jonah
Keri, who has literally written the book
on the Expos. “I think that these two
franchises should be considered
separate in general . . . but put yourself
in the players’ perspective. It’s a nice
thing to be honored. Maybe it’s not more
complicated than that.”
This is all pointless, of course, like so
much of . . . well, of my professional
career, anyhow. The three Expos already
are in the Nationals Park Ring; they
aren’t coming down. You can just tune
out the talk of Expos records if you
choose. Raines and his family got to
have a nice time during his first actual
trip to Washington in his entire life. Why
even pick at this scab two days later,
unless you’re actively trying to make
Nats officials mad at you, dummy?
Here’s why, I guess: because it turns
out that the one group of people that
best understands the unique torments
of D.C. baseball fanatics might be
Montreal baseball fanatics. They’re all
trapped in the same confounding
construct, linked with another city they
like just fine but have no interest in
being linked with. Nats fans mostly
weren’t Expos fans. Expos fans mostly
aren’t Nats fans. But they sure do get
each other.
“What connection does Washington
have to Montreal? Absolutely nothing,”
said Giannias, who couldn’t stop himself
from watching Monday’s ceremony and
marveling at the small crowd. “The
proof is in the pudding. The fans of
Washington don’t care. If your own fans
don’t care about Tim Raines, Andre
Dawson and Gary Carter, why should we
care about you honoring them?”
“God, I get so revved up over this
subject,” he finally said.
dan.steinberg@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
dcsportsbog
CFL team says thanks,
no thanks to Manziel
The Hamilton Tiger-Cats,
struggling with an 0-8 start to
their Canadian Football League
season, took a look at Johnny
Manziel last week and reportedly
decided he wasn’t the
quarterback for them.
“Too many red flags,” an
unnamed source told The Sports
Network, a Canadian media
outlet.
The workout for Tiger-Cats
coaches and player personnel
took place in Buffalo and
included Coach June Jones. The
group decided, TSN reported,
that he is not ready to play
football, but the team plans to
keep him on its negotiation list.
The Tiger-Cats would have 10
days in which to sign him or trade
his rights to another CFL team if
his agent says that Manziel is
ready to sign.
Manziel, the 2012 Heisman
Trophy winner and 22nd overall
pick in the 2014 NFL draft, was
released by the Cleveland Browns
in 2016 after a second tumultuous
season marred by partying and
drinking. The Tiger-Cats,
according to TSN, had “wondered
Nobody, but noooobody, is going to rough this kicker.
Perhaps best known for using
his feet for stomping and kicking
opponents, Ndamukong Suh has
another talent: kicking a football.
The 305-pound defensive tackle is
so good at it, in fact, that he is the
Miami Dolphins’ backup place
kicker, an unofficial position but
one that nonetheless continues
the NFL’s long, glorious tradition
of, shall we say, portly kickers.
Suh showed his kicking prowess by making 33- and 39-yard
extra points Tuesday in practice;
he also missed a 39-yarder.
Should the Dolphins’ Andrew
Franks be rendered unable to perform his duties, it looks as if Suh
would be the next man up. “Yeah, I
mean, I don’t think we have another choice,” came the endorsement from Coach Adam Gase.
Pity the poor football.
Suh has even kicked in a game.
In 2010, when he was with the
Detroit Lions, he missed a critical
extra-point attempt in an overtime loss to the New York Jets
when he was called upon to replace the team’s injured kicker.
“Ndamukong is our backup field
goal kicker; he’s done it in practice,” Jim Schwartz, then the Lions coach, told reporters. “You
guys have been to practice before
and seen him do it. . . . I probably
should have called a timeout and
given him time to get ready.”
“Everybody knew he could
kick,” Dolphins defensive tackle
Jordan Phillips said (via the Miami Herald).
Defensive lineman William
Hayes added (via the Sun-Sentinel): “I think he told me he used to
play soccer when he was younger,
so nothing will surprise me what
you can do when you’re that big of
a freak.”
NFL history offers some compelling evidence for “freak” kickers; here’s a look at a few of the
most famous.
There was Lou “The Toe” Groza, the Cleveland Browns’ Hall of
Fame kicker and offensive lineman who had 1,608 career points
over a 21-year career and was
named to the NFL’s 75th anniversary all-time team. But he was a
mere wisp of a man at
240 pounds.
Tom Dempsey of the New Orleans Saints weighed in at 255 and
set the NFL record for the longest
field goal (63 yards) in 1970.
And let us not forget Sebastian
Janikowski, the Oakland Raiders’
265-pound, left-footed kicker. A
first-round draft pick (17th overall) by the Raiders in 2000, he has
amassed 1,574 points, including a
63-yard field goal that tied
Dempsey’s record in 2011. (Matt
Prater, then the Denver Broncos’
kicker, set the NFL record of
64 yards in 2013, but he is a mere
200-pounder.)
cindy.boren@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
TELEVISION AND RADIO
NFL PRESEASON
DIGEST
FOOTBALL
C INDY B OREN
if Manziel could manage
becoming the face of a franchise
and the attention that would come
with a return to the spotlight” and
determined that the answer “was a
resounding no.”
The Tiger-Cats are a team in
need, with quarterback Zach
Collaros, the league’s highest-paid
player and lowest-rated passer,
recently benched. However, they
also have stumbled this week
when Jones hired Art Briles, who
was fired by Baylor in the wake of a
sexual-assault scandal at the
school, as an assistant. That
decision was reversed shortly
afterward, with the CFL and the
Hamilton team saying he would
not be joining the staff.
The Tiger-Cats did not deny
that hiring of Briles was geared
toward luring Manziel, who
played at Texas A&M, or Robert
Griffin III, who played at Baylor
and also is a free agent, to
Canada. “Certainly everything
was considered, yes,” Jones said.
— Cindy Boren
No. 17 Florida named Feleipe
Franks its starting quarterback
for the season opener.
Franks will start against 11thranked Michigan in Arlington,
Tex., on Saturday — a huge stage
for a redshirt freshman making
his first career start.
Franks beat out incumbent
starter Luke Del Rio, the son of
Oakland Raiders Coach Jack Del
Rio, and Notre Dame transfer
Malik Zaire.
Florida, meanwhile, suspended
two more players for the opener,
including starting running back
Jordan Scarlett.
Scarlett and wide receiver Rick
Wells were suspended
indefinitely from all team
activities for misusing school
funds, bringing to 10 the total
number of Florida players
suspended for the game against
the Wolverines.
HOCKEY
Arizona Coyotes captain Shane
Doan is retiring after 21 seasons
with the same franchise.
The 40-year-old Doan is the
franchise’s all-time leader in
nearly every category, finishing
his career with 402 goals and
570 assists in 1,540 games.
The Coyotes announced in June
that Doan would not be re-signed,
making the longtime captain a
free agent. After deliberating with
his family, Doan decided to hang
up his skates rather than play for
another team.
Doan was selected by the
Winnipeg Jets with the seventh
overall pick of the 1995 NHL draft
and followed the franchise to the
desert the next year.
7 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
10 p.m.
Philadelphia at New York Jets » NFL Network
Washington at Tampa Bay » WRC (Ch. 4), CSN, WTEM (980 AM)
Seattle at Oakland » NFL Network
MLB
SOCCER
The league-leading North
Carolina Courage (14-5-0)
completed a season sweep of the
host Washington Spirit in a
National Women’s Soccer League
match at Maryland SoccerPlex,
winning, 3-2, thanks to two goals
from Jess McDonald and
another from Samantha Mewis.
The Courage became the first
team in the NWSL to clinch a
playoff berth.
Estefania Banini and Cheyna
Williams scored for the Spirit (412-4). . . .
England left back Kieran
Gibbs joined West Bromwich
Albion after falling out of favor at
Arsenal.
Gibbs moved for an
undisclosed fee and on a fouryear deal to end a 13-year stay at
his boyhood club, for whom he
played more than 200 games.
MISC.
Skylar Diggins-Smith had
28 points and eight assists, Glory
Johnson added 25 points, and the
Dallas Wings secured a WNBA
playoff spot with a 99-96 victory
over the Chicago Sky in
Rosemont, Ill. . . .
1 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
8 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Minnesota » MLB Network
Toronto at Baltimore » MASN, WSPZ (570 AM)
Boston at New York Yankees » MLB Network
Washington at Milwaukee » MASN2, WJFK (106.7 FM)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
6 p.m.
7 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
8 p.m.
8 p.m.
9:15 p.m.
Florida International at UCF » CBS Sports Network
Buffalo at Minnesota » Big Ten Network
Tulsa at Oklahoma State » Fox Sports 1
Ohio State at Indiana » ESPN, ESPNU
Florida A&M vs. Arkansas » SEC Network
Louisiana Monroe at Memphis » CBS Sports Network
TENNIS
1 p.m.
U.S. Open, second round » ESPN2
GOLF
5 a.m.
3 p.m.
7 p.m.
European Tour: Czech Masters, first round » Golf Channel
Web.com Tour: Nationwide Children’s Hospital Championship, first round
» Golf Channel
LPGA Tour: Portland Classic, first round » Golf Channel
SOCCER
2:45 p.m.
6:15 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
10:45 p.m.
UEFA World Cup qualifier: Faroe Islands at Portugal » Fox Sports 1
CONMEBOL World Cup qualifier: Paraguay at Chile » beIN Sports
CONMEBOL World Cup qualifier: Ecuador at Brazil » beIN Sports
CONMEBOL World Cup qualifier: Bolivia at Peru » beIN Sports
Maya Moore scored 18 points,
Sylvia Fowles had 12 points and
13 rebounds for her 19th doubledouble, and the Minnesota Lynx
beat the Indiana Fever, 80-69, in
Indianapolis. . . .
Chris Froome increased his
lead of the Spanish Vuelta in
Calar Alto, Spain, finishing
second in the mountainous
11th stage behind Astana rider
Miguel Angel Lopez.
Froome is a four-time
champion of the Tour de France.
— From news services
and staff reports
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
V. Williams eases into the third round
Resurgence continues
for 37-year-old in win
against Dodin, 20
BY
Kyrgios left demoralized
after another early exit
BY
A VA W ALLACE
new york — After losing his
A VA W ALLACE
new york — Amid all the talk of
injured men’s players and the
hullabaloo over Maria Sharapova
reappearing in a Grand Slam, you
could be forgiven for having
overlooked ninth-seeded Venus
Williams in the U.S. Open draw.
But in a prime-time slot in
Arthur Ashe Stadium on
Wednesday night, Williams reminded everyone of her presence. She beat French 20-yearold Oceane Dodin, 7-5, 6-4, to
advance to the third round, in
which she will meet Maria Sakkari of Greece.
Performing in front of a soldout crowd of 23,771, Williams was
more businesslike in her second
match of the tournament than
the first.
After fighting to earn a threeset victory Monday, Williams
marched through the big-hitting
Dodin, closing the match with a
service break at love. She sealed
the win by ripping a forehand
return down the line, just out of
the Frenchwoman’s reach, then
gave the crowd her signature
twirl at the net.
She hit 32 winners to 14 unforced errors, served six aces and
had no reason to raise her grunts
of effort anywhere near her top
decibel.
It was the second main draw
appearance in New York for Dodin, ranked 48th in the world,
and just the ninth of her career.
She has never been past the third
round in a major.
“I played two big servers in
both rounds,” Williams said.
“When you get your opportunities, you do have to close on
them, then sometimes they don’t
come back. Today, by the stats,
D3
M2
GEOFF BURKE/USA TODAY SPORTS
Venus Williams has an outside chance of claiming the No. 1 ranking at the end of the U.S. Open.
the match was super clean. . . . I
feel like each round is a time to
improve.”
Her performance Wednesday
was a reminder that Williams is
capable of making a deep run in a
wide-open women’s draw and
extend her resurgent 2017 into
the final major of the year.
Williams, 37, reached the final
at Wimbledon and the Australian
Open, which was her first appearance in a Grand Slam final
since 2009. She lost to her sister,
Serena, but the championship
marked the beginning of a year in
which tennis rewound the clock
in terms of who occupied the top
spots.
She arrived in New York after a
fine hard-court swing leading up
to the U.S. Open in which she
made the fourth round in Toronto and exited in the second round
in Cincinnati.
An eighth career Grand Slam
title here would be another testament to her longevity.
Williams is seeking her third
U.S. Open trophy — her first since
she won back-to-back in 2000
and 2001 — and her 50th career
title overall. This is her 19th
appearance in the major, the
most of all active players on tour,
and her 76th appearance in the
main draw of a Grand Slam, the
record in the Open Era.
Still she remains somewhat
under the radar in these early
rounds, even with her small
chance of taking the No. 1 ranking from Karolina Pliskova at the
end of the tournament.
A little less off-court spotlight
suits the near-unflappable Williams just as much as when
attention from the media is its
most intense, though it does
provide a stark contrast to Wimbledon. There, Williams spent an
emotional two weeks navigating
questions about her involvement
in a fatal South Florida car accident in early June (she would
later be cleared of wrongdoing).
The controversy lasted nearly all
the way until the final, which she
lost to Garbine Muguruza.
(The Spanish champion, another title-contender in New
York, had to wait to play her
second-round
match
until
around 10 p.m. Wednesday when
a court was finally free. Tuesday’s
rainout put 87 matches on the
schedule in a single day.)
In New York, Williams resumed not knowing — or caring
about — what was said about her
in the media.
“For me, I’m just going on the
court, practicing, preparing and
recovering and playing the
match,” Williams said. “I’m not
out there reading press, watching
TV or trying to see who said I was
going to win. At the end of the
day, there’s people who are talking about the winning, and there
are people who are actually playing the matches. I need to play
the match.”
ava.wallace@washpost.com
opening-round match at Louis
Armstrong Stadium on Wednesday and smashing his racket in
frustration, it took Nick Kyrgios a
few moments to stuff the busted
racket into his tennis bag.
Kyrgios, ranked 17th and the
No. 14 seed at the U.S. Open, fell to
fellow Australian John Millman,
6-3, 1-6, 6-4, 6-1. The world
No. 235, Millman advances to face
Malek Jaziri in the second round.
The fact that all Kyrgios was left
with was a bent racket to carry
awkwardly neatly summarized his
afternoon.
The 22-year-old struggled with
his right shoulder during the
match — the same injury he cited
when he retired from his openinground match at Washington’s Citi
Open at the beginning of this
month — and received a warning
for swearing on court and a point
penalty for the racket-smash after
dropping the third set.
He ends his Grand Slam season
after a turbulent 2017 in which he
never made it past the second
round of a major and dealt with
various injuries — a hip issue
caused him to retire from his
opening-round match at Wimbledon. Although Kyrgios did have
some success at bigger ATP events
throughout the season, reaching
the quarterfinals at the tournament in Indian Wells, the semifinals in Miami and the final at a
tournament this month in Cincinnati, he was despondent when he
reflected on his season after the
loss in New York.
“I mean, obviously I’m not having a shocking year,” Kyrgios said.
“Obviously in this scheme of
things I’m not having the greatest
year for what maybe people, like, I
should have done, but, I mean, the
last three months has been a
nightmare, really. I have said it
before. I had such a good Indian
Wells, Miami and then Davis Cup,
we had a good win over America,
and then, you know, things just
went downhill from there, really.
Obviously I’m disappointed I lost
today. It’s not the end of the world.
I will get over it in probably half an
hour. I will get food and watch the
matches. It is what it is.”
Asked after the match whether
he would continue working with
his coach, Sebastien Grosjean,
Kygrios spoke of his lack of commitment.
“I don’t know, honestly. I’m not
good enough for him,” he said.
“You know, he’s very dedicated.
He’s an unbelievable coach. You
know, he probably deserves a player that is probably more dedicated
to the game than I am. . . . I’m not
dedicated to the game at all.
“. . . I keep letting people down.
So I don’t know.”
Sharapova wins, Zverev loses
Maria Sharapova used 12 aces
to help overcome a shaky start and
reach the U.S. Open’s third round.
The five-time major champion
got better and better as the match
wore on and came back to beat
59th-ranked Timea Babos of Hungary, 6-7 (7-4), 6-4, 6-1, in 2 hours
19 minutes.
Sharapova made 19 unforced
errors in the opening set against
Babos but cleaned up her play,
cutting the mistakes to 12 in the
second set and five in the third.
Her victory was the highlight of
a busy day that featured 87 singles
matches on the schedule after rain
washed out most play a day earlier.
With so many matches going on,
there were plenty of names to keep
tabs on, although few truly remarkable results.
The most noteworthy secondround loss was by No. 4 Alexander
Zverev, a 20-year-old German who
despite his lofty seeding and considerable potential has been as far
as the fourth round at a major only
once. He was beaten by Borna
Coric, 3-6, 7-5, 7-6 (7-1), 7-6 (7-4).
— Associated Press
College decision is not
slam dunk for Faulkner
FAULKNER FROM D1
ketball — and Faulkner’s inability
to fully submerge himself in it —
could set him back in recruiting.
That is a pull toward football.
College football coaches are
unsure whether they want him as
a quarterback or safety. Lowerprofile programs such as James
Madison and Massachusetts like
him under center. Power-conference schools such as Ohio State,
Syracuse, Kentucky and Pittsburgh like him as a defensive
back. He doesn’t have a football
offer, not yet at least, and his lone
basketball offer is from Central
Connecticut State.
None of that pulls him one way
or the other, and Faulkner is left
competing on both sides of an
unsolved equation.
“You’ll see a lot of kids play
both sports. That’s not uncommon,” said Tom Green, Eleanor
Roosevelt’s football coach. “But
for a kid to be the best in the
school at football and basketball,
that just doesn’t happen much
anymore. And no matter what,
Jaden will have a tough choice to
make.”
‘Just part of a game’
Just after Faulkner peeled himself off the field and slowly walked
to the sideline, Marshall pushed
herself off the bleachers and
walked briskly toward the Eleanor Roosevelt bench.
For three quarters last November, she had watched her son get
driven into the ground by Wise’s
defenders. The Raiders run an
option offense that requires
Faulkner to make snap decisions
in the pocket and often scramble
into the open field. But Wise’s
defense was plugging all the holes
in what ended up a lopsided,
season-ending loss for Eleanor
Roosevelt.
Marshall
winced
when
Faulkner’s
helmet
cracked
against a defender’s. She silently
pleaded with him to slide and
held her breath when he didn’t,
instead choosing to go headfirst
into another collision. Then she
had enough.
“He’s not going back into the
game, is he?” Marshall remembers asking the Raiders’ athletic
trainer on the sideline, suspecting
her son was concussed.
“Mom, I’m going back . . .”
Faulkner started before he was
cut off.
“Jaden, you’re not going back
into that game,” Marshall said,
and Faulkner didn’t play another
snap.
“My mom likes basketball because I don’t get hurt as much,”
Faulkner said in August. “She
doesn’t like when I get hit in
football and will remind me that
concussions can stay with you for
a long time.”
Faulkner was not diagnosed
with a concussion, but Marshall
maintains
that
“something
wasn’t right” when he came off
the field. Her relationship with
football is complicated. She loves
the sport but doesn’t always love
it for her son. She sees head injuries as a workplace hazard her son
willingly signs up for but is also
worried that they could seep into
his future as the hits pile up.
She does not actively sell her
son on basketball or football. Neither does Faulkner’s father, Derwin Faulkner, who played football
at Virginia State and coaches
girls’ varsity basketball at Douglass High. Derwin knows the risks
of playing football but said his son
“could also get hurt walking down
the street.” Jaden Faulkner sees
concussions as “just part of a
game” he has played since he was
5 years old.
But Marshall follows the latest
concussion news, including a revealing study on chronic traumatic encephalopathy and the brains
of former NFL players from July,
and sometimes views basketball
as the safer choice.
“I do think about it a lot actually,” Marshall said. “It’s hard to be a
football parent now and not worry about your kid’s future with all
that is out there. I worry a bit. I
don’t think anybody likes seeing
their son get hit, and now he has a
chance to go play basketball in
college. I love football, and if he
wants to play it, I’ll support him.
But I also know they don’t hit in
basketball.”
Hesitation on both sides
The question comes two different ways, and it comes often.
Do you love football?
Do you love basketball?
College coaches want to make
sure Faulkner is fully committed
to the sport they are recruiting
him for, and all he can do is tell
them that he is. Or would be. It’s
complicated.
His height, coupled with deceptive speed, makes him a quarterback who sees well over the
line and a defensive back who
bullies smaller receivers. It also
makes him an unusually long
point guard who finishes above
the rim and guards multiple positions on defense.
But skepticism lingers from
both sides.
“Unless you’re LeBron James
or Allen Iverson or an athlete of
that caliber, I think it’s really
hard to be a lower-level D-I guy
and get exposure while splitting
your time between two sports,”
said a high-major college basketball assistant, who spoke under
the condition of anonymity because of NCAA rules against discussing potential recruits.
“There has to be some kind of
investment from both sides because they could be offering you
a scholarship worth $40,000 or
more,” the assistant continued.
“So for there to be any doubt that
a kid is totally in it, that could
really hurt a kid’s recruitment in
either sport.”
AAU basketball is a constant
grind, and a different college
assistant called it a “necessary
evil that Division I hopefuls cannot avoid.” Football prospects
follow strict year-round weight
training regiments, all geared
toward readying their bodies for
the college game.
Faulkner’s two-sided recruiting process has been difficult at
times, and he thinks he could
have more offers if he specialized. He ultimately plans to make
his college decision at the end of
the basketball season and choose
a sport and school all at once. But
he still has to turn all this promise into concrete opportunity,
and even getting to this point has
been dizzying.
This past summer, Faulkner
finished a seven-on-seven event
at Surrattsville High, and Derwin
paid for a 30-minute ride to a
basketball camp at the University of Maryland. Another time,
PHOTOS BY JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
“I really do love both sports, and I’ve been playing both since I was
a little kid. I’m only choosing because I have to,” Eleanor Roosevelt
football and basketball standout Jaden Faulkner said.
he flew back from an AAU event
in Atlanta, went to a football
workout the same day and then
flew to Las Vegas for another
AAU event two days later.
“College coaches tell me they
are hesitant to offer scholarships
because if they do and he changes his mind, that’s a problem,”
said Derwin, who manages
his son’s recruitment for both
sports.
“He has put in a lot to both. I
mean, football takes a lot of time,
and AAU basketball is all the
time. But he hasn’t made the full
pledge to one sport, and I think
that has held him back a bit.”
‘No real regrets’
It all happened in two quick
motions while most of Faulkner’s
teammates were huddled around
the water station.
It was a sunless mid-August
evening, and the Raiders were
wrapping up another day of training camp. For the moment and
the months ahead, Faulkner was
Eleanor Roosevelt’s star dualthreat quarterback who also plays
basketball. In the winter that will
shift again. And then, who knows.
“Throw me the ball! Throw me
the ball!” Faulkner yelled through
a grin, and then he stabbed it out
of the air with one hand, wound it
behind his head in a smooth circular motion and chucked a whistling spiral into the hands of an
unsuspecting teammate. His left
hand never touched the ball. A
teammate watching from behind
Faulkner muttered, “Holy God.”
It is moments like these —
when Faulkner makes a perfect
read out of the option or slips
through the tiny cracks of a defense in basketball — that bottle
all of his potential and intrigue
into single athletic feats. That
make this pending choice feel less
like a burden and more like a
springboard. That take all the
thoughts in his head, about recruiting and concussions and expectations, and bury them in the
joy of playing games.
“Sometimes I think about it,
like, ‘Damn, I could be better than
what I am,” Faulkner said. “Like
I’ll be having long thoughts about
it, but in the end there are no real
regrets.”
After practice wound down,
Faulkner made his way toward
the school with a few of his teammates. To his left was Eleanor
Roosevelt’s football field, with
new stadium lights that will turn
Friday nights into his stage. To his
right was a worn pickup basketball court, the concrete cracked
but two netless hoops still standing on either end.
And Faulkner, without hesitating, walked directly between the
two.
jesse.dougherty@washpost.com
D4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
AUGUST 31 , 2017
Baseball
National League
EAST
W
Washington
81 51 .614
Miami
American League
L PCT GB L10 STR
CENTRAL
W
Chicago
72 60 .545
66 66 .500 15 6-4 L-3
Milwaukee
69 64 .519 31/2 6-4 W-1
— 7-3 W-4
L PCT GB L10 STR
— 7-3 W-3
EAST
W
Boston
76 57 .571
74 58 .561 18 7-3 W-5
New York
WEST
W
L PCT GB L10 STR
x-Los Angeles
91 39 .700
x-Arizona
— 5-5 L-3
L PCT GB L10 STR
CENTRAL
W
WEST
W
Cleveland
76 56 .576
— 8-2 W-7
Houston
79 53 .598
70 62 .530 51/2 4-6 L-3
Minnesota
69 63 .523
7 6-4 W-3
x-Los Angeles 68 65 .511 111/2 5-5 W-2
11 4-6 L-1
— 5-5 W-3
L PCT GB L10 STR
— 4-6 L-2
Atlanta
59 72 .450 211/2 5-5 W-2
St. Louis
66 66 .500
Colorado
72 61 .541 201/2 4-6 L-1
Baltimore
68 65 .511
Kansas City
65 67 .492
New York
58 74 .439 23 4-6 W-1
Pittsburgh
63 71 .470 10 3-7 L-3
x-San Diego
58 74 .439 34 4-6 W-1
Tampa Bay
67 68 .496 10 7-3 W-1
Detroit
58 74 .439 18 5-5 W-1
Seattle
66 68 .493 14 3-7 L-5
Philadelphia
49 83 .371 32 4-6 L-2
Cincinnati
56 77 .421 161/2 4-6 L-1
x-San Fran.
53 81 .396 40 3-7 L-1
Toronto
61 72 .459 15 2-8 L-4
Chicago
52 79 .397 231/2 5-5 L-2
x-Oakland
58 74 .439 21 5-5 L-2
6 3-7 L-1
8 8-2 W-7
L PCT GB L10 STR
Texas
66 66 .500 13 5-5 W-2
x-Late game
NO T E S
ASTROS WILL RETURN
HOME THIS WEEKEND
The Houston Astros are
heading home and will
open a three-game series
against the New York
Mets on Saturday.
The Astros had to relocate
their series against the
Texas Rangers this week
to Tropicana Field in
St. Petersburg, Fla.,
because of catastrophic
flooding in the nation’s
fourth-largest city in the
wake of Hurricane Harvey.
PERSONNEL DEPT.
Cubs: SS Addison Russell
was scratched from a
rehab game with
Class AAA Iowa after
experiencing a setback in
his recovery from a right
foot injury.
Mariners: Acquired RHP
Mike Leake from the
Cardinals for minor league
IF Rayder Ascanio.
BY THE NUMBERS
.179
Orioles 8, Mariners 7
Indians 2, Yankees 1
SEATTLE
AB
Gamel lf ..............4
Segura ph ...........1
Alonso 1b............2
Valencia ph-1b....2
Cruz dh................4
Cano 2b ...............4
Seager 3b............4
Haniger rf ...........4
Zunino c ..............4
Heredia cf ...........3
Motter ss............4
TOTALS
36
R
1
0
1
0
1
1
0
2
0
0
1
7
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 0 .285
1 0 0 0 .299
1 0 1 0 .267
0 0 0 2 .262
1 2 0 2 .287
1 0 0 0 .272
0 0 0 1 .254
3 3 0 0 .248
1 2 0 2 .231
0 0 1 0 .272
1 0 0 0 .205
10 7 2 7 —
BALTIMORE AB
Beckham ss ........5
Machado 3b ........3
Schoop 2b ...........4
Jones cf ..............4
Mancini lf............4
Davis 1b ..............4
Trumbo dh ..........4
Castillo c .............4
Joseph pr-c .........0
Gentry rf .............2
TOTALS
34
R
0
0
1
0
1
1
1
2
1
1
8
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 1 .294
0 1 1 1 .267
2 2 1 2 .306
1 0 0 0 .280
1 1 0 0 .294
1 0 0 3 .226
1 0 0 2 .239
4 3 0 0 .300
0 0 0 0 .274
1 1 1 0 .260
12 8 3 9 —
Game 1
Trevor Bauer won his
seventh straight decision,
Jose Ramirez had four hits
to match a career high,
and Cleveland took advantage of Gary Sanchez’s
passed ball in a two-run
first inning, beating New
York in the opener of a doubleheader at Yankee Stadium.
SEATTLE ......... 006 000 010 — 7 10 1
BALTIMORE.... 020 311 01X — 8 12 0
E: Seager (11). LOB: Seattle 4, Baltimore 7. 2B: Alonso (21), Haniger 2 (17),
Castillo (10). HR: Haniger (9), off Brach;
Mancini (23), off Miranda; Castillo (16),
off Miranda; Gentry (2), off Miranda;
Schoop (30), off Miranda. RBI: Cruz 2
(103), Haniger 3 (33), Zunino 2 (51),
Machado (88), Schoop 2 (99), Mancini
(71), Castillo 3 (46), Gentry (11). SF:
Machado. S: Gentry.
SEATTLE
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Miranda ............ 4.1 8 6 6 0 6 4.85
Pagan................... 1 1 1 1 1 1 2.92
Phelps............... 0.1 1 0 0 1 0 3.40
Vincent ............. 1.1 0 0 0 0 2 1.93
Bergman........... 0.2 1 1 1 1 0 5.00
Rzepczynski ..... 0.1 1 0 0 0 0 3.14
BALTIMORE IP
Jimenez ............ 2.2
Castro............... 3.1
Bleier ................ 0.1
O'Day................ 0.2
Brach W 4-4......... 1
Britton................. 1
H
6
2
0
0
1
1
WP: ; LP: Bergman (4-5); S: Britton
(13). Inherited runners-scored: Pagan
1-0, Phelps 2-1, Vincent 3-0, Rzepczynski 2-1, Castro 2-2. T: 3:07. A: 16,983
(45,971).
“I’m the player,
and he’s the
coach. He tells
me when I’m
playing and
when I’m not
playing. He said
he’s giving me a
couple days off,
and that was it.”
— Aaron Judge,
discussing Manager Joe
Girardi’s decision to bench
him for a second
consecutive game.
STAR OF THE DAY
Ender Inciarte, Braves
Went 8 for 10 with five RBI
to lead Atlanta to two wins
over Philadelphia.
TODAY’S GAME
TO WATCH
DAVID ZALUBOWSKI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Doing it all
Tigers starter Justin Verlander fouls off a pitch on this swing but later collected his first career RBI with a
fourth-inning single off Chad Bettis. Verlander also pitched a gem, allowing just three hits and striking
out nine over six innings to propel the Tigers to a 6-2 victory over the Rockies at Coors Field.
Sale, Bos ........................................... 264
Archer, TB ......................................... 225
Kluber, Cle ........................................ 215
Severino, NY ..................................... 192
Carrasco, Cle ..................................... 175
Verlander, Det .................................. 167
Bauer, Cle ......................................... 157
COMPLETE GAMES
Santana, Min ........................................ 5
Kluber, Cle ............................................ 4
Porcello, Bos ......................................... 2
Stroman, Tor ........................................ 2
14 tied ................................................... 1
3.39 16-10
5.81
Maeda (R)
12-5
3.76
15-6
Greinke (R)
15-6
3.14
18-8
PHILLIES AT MARLINS, 7:10
Lively (R)
1-5
4.36
2-7
Despaigne (R)
0-1
3.70
1-1
BRAVES AT CUBS, 8:05
Newcomb (L)
2-7
4.36
4-10
Hendricks (R)
5-4
3.45
9-9
CARDINALS AT GIANTS, 10:15
Wacha (R)
9-7
4.33 11-13
Bumgarner (L)
3-6
2.85
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
at Washington 8, Miami 3
Atlanta at Philadelphia, ppd.
at Cincinnati 14, N.Y. Mets 4
St. Louis 10, at Milwaukee 2
at Chicago Cubs 4, Pittsburgh 1
at Arizona 7, L.A. Dodgers 6
at San Diego 6, San Francisco 3
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
at Washington 4, Miami 0
Atlanta 9, at Philadelphia 1, 1st game
at Milwaukee 6, St. Louis 5
Atlanta 5, at Philadelphia 2, 2nd game
N.Y. Mets 2, at Cincinnati 0
at Chicago Cubs 17, Pittsburgh 3
San Francisco at San Diego, Late
L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, Late
AL games
BLUE JAYS AT ORIOLES, 7:05
ERA TEAM
Estrada (R)
6-8
5.04 12-15
8-7
4.88 13-12
RANGERS AT ASTROS, 1:10
BOSTON
AB
Davis lf ...............4
Nunez 2b.............5
Benintendi cf ......3
Betts rf ...............5
Bogaerts ss ........4
Devers 3b............3
Ramirez 1b .........4
Young dh.............1
Moreland ph...2
dh.....................
Vazquez c............4
TOTALS
35
R
0
0
1
1
1
1
2
0
AL scores
TORONTO
AB
Carrera lf ............4
Pearce 1b ............4
Bautista rf ..........4
Morales dh..........4
Pillar cf ...............4
Goins ss ..............3
Barney 3b ...........4
Lopez c................2
Refsnyder 2b ......3
TOTALS
32
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
ST. LOUIS
AB
Carpenter 3b.......2
Pham lf ...............4
DeJong ss ...........4
Fowler cf.............4
Molina c ..............3
Wong 2b .............4
Voit 1b ................4
Grichuk rf............4
Martinez p ..........2
Martinez ph ........1
TOTALS
32
R
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
5
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 2 0 .243
2 4 0 0 .307
0 0 0 1 .295
0 0 0 2 .261
1 0 1 0 .281
0 0 0 2 .305
0 0 0 3 .247
1 1 0 2 .237
0 0 0 1 .188
1 0 0 0 .288
5 5 3 11 —
MILWAUKEE AB
Sogard ss............4
Broxton cf...........0
Thames 1b ..........4
Braun lf...............4
Walker 3b ...........4
Santana rf...........4
Vogt c .................4
Villar 2b ..............4
Perez cf-3b .........4
Anderson p .........2
Arcia ph-ss .........1
TOTALS
35
R
0
0
0
0
0
2
2
2
0
0
0
6
H BI BB SO AVG
2 1 0 0 .291
0 0 0 0 .225
0 0 0 3 .235
1 0 0 0 .271
0 0 0 3 .271
2 1 0 0 .276
1 0 0 0 .232
2 3 0 0 .233
2 1 0 0 .261
0 0 0 2 .135
0 0 0 0 .273
10 6 0 8 —
ST. LOUIS........ 200 010 020 — 5 5 3
MILWAUKEE .. 030 003 00X — 6 10 0
E: Carpenter (12), DeJong (8), Martinez
(4). LOB: St. Louis 3, Milwaukee 5. 2B:
Braun (21). HR: Pham (18), off Anderson; Grichuk (17), off Anderson; Pham
(19), off Swarzak; Santana (22), off
Martinez; Villar (10), off Martinez.
ST. LOUIS
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Martinez........... 5.2 10 6 3 0 7 3.52
Sherriff............. 0.1 0 0 0 0 0 0.00
Tuivailala............. 1 0 0 0 0 1 2.78
Bowman .............. 1 0 0 0 0 0 4.26
ATLANTA
AB
Inciarte cf ...........5
Phillips 3b ...........6
Freeman 1b.........5
Markakis rf .........5
Suzuki c ..............4
M.Adams lf.........4
Albies 2b.............5
Swanson ss ........3
Dickey p ..............3
L.Adams ph-lf.....0
TOTALS
40
PHILA.
AB
Hernandez 2b .....4
Galvis ss .............2
Rios p..................1
Blanco ph ............1
Williams rf-cf .....4
Hoskins lf ...........4
Joseph 1b............4
Franco 3b ............3
Florimon cf-ss ....4
Alfaro c ...............3
Therrien p ...........1
Kim ph-rf ............2
TOTALS
33
R
1
1
2
1
0
1
2
1
0
0
9
R
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
H BI BB SO AVG
5 4 1 0 .307
1 1 0 1 .291
2 2 0 0 .319
1 1 0 2 .277
0 0 0 0 .264
2 0 1 1 .274
2 1 0 0 .269
1 0 2 1 .229
1 0 0 0 .135
0 0 1 0 .275
15 9 5 5 —
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 1 .287
0 0 0 0 .255
0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 0 .169
1 0 0 1 .285
1 0 0 1 .306
1 0 0 1 .239
0 0 1 1 .223
1 0 0 0 .353
2 1 0 1 .356
0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 1 .217
7 1 1 9 —
ATLANTA........ 314 010 000 — 9 15 0
PHILA.............. 000 000 100 — 1 7 0
LOB: Atlanta 11, Philadelphia 6. 2B:
Freeman (25), Markakis (31), M.Adams
(19). 3B: Inciarte (3). HR: Freeman (23),
off Eickhoff.
ATLANTA
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Dickey.................. 8 7 1 1 1 9 3.91
Minter ................. 1 0 0 0 0 0 5.40
DETROIT
AB
Mahtook rf .........4
Machado 2b........4
Upton lf ..............5
Castellanos 3b ...5
Romine 3b ..........0
McCann c............4
Hicks 1b..............4
Jones cf ..............3
Iglesias ss ..........3
Verlander p ........3
Cabrera ph..........1
TOTALS
36
R
0
1
0
2
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
6
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 1 0 .276
1 0 0 1 .297
1 0 0 3 .279
3 1 0 0 .252
0 0 0 0 .238
1 3 1 1 .252
1 0 0 2 .317
0 0 1 0 .162
3 0 1 0 .258
1 1 0 1 .167
0 0 0 0 .252
11 5 4 8 —
COLORADO
AB
Blackmon cf .......3
LeMahieu 2b ......4
Arenado 3b.........4
Parra lf ...............4
Desmond 1b .......4
Gonzalez rf.........3
Story ss..............4
Wolters c............3
Lucroy ph............1
Bettis p ..............1
Amarista ph .......1
Valaika ph ..........1
TOTALS
33
R
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
H BI BB SO AVG
1 1 1 1 .339
2 0 0 1 .316
0 0 0 3 .305
0 0 0 2 .337
0 0 0 1 .285
1 0 1 0 .239
1 1 0 2 .230
1 0 0 0 .241
0 0 0 0 .253
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 1 .238
0 0 0 1 .258
6 2 2 12 —
DETROIT ......... 011 030 010 — 6 11 0
COLORADO..... 000 001 001 — 2 6 0
LOB: Detroit 8, Colorado 6. 2B: Castellanos (25), Story (22). HR: Castellanos
(19), off Bettis; McCann (13), off Bettis; Blackmon (32), off Verlander.
DETROIT
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Verlander ............ 6 3 1 1 1 9 3.82
VerHagen ............ 1 0 0 0 0 1 6.23
Wilson................. 1 2 0 0 0 2 3.69
Greene ................ 1 1 1 1 1 0 2.61
R
2
0
1
0
2
1
1
0
0
1
1
9
H BI BB SO AVG
2 1 0 1 .271
0 0 0 0 .198
2 1 1 1 .317
0 0 0 2 .303
2 2 1 1 .246
3 1 0 0 .253
1 2 2 0 .250
1 0 0 0 .236
0 0 0 0 .247
1 2 0 3 .221
1 0 1 1 .256
13 9 5 9 —
NEW YORK
AB
Gardner lf ...........3
Ellsbury cf...........1
Castro 2b ............3
Sanchez dh .........4
Judge rf ..............3
Gregorius ss .......3
Frazier 3b............0
Hicks cf-lf ...........4
Bird 1b ................4
Torreyes 3b-ss....4
Romine c.............4
TOTALS
33
R
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
1
0
0
4
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 0 .259
0 0 0 0 .241
0 0 1 0 .307
0 0 0 0 .271
1 0 1 1 .280
0 0 0 0 .299
0 0 1 0 .210
4 0 0 0 .266
2 4 0 0 .135
0 0 0 1 .298
0 0 0 0 .216
8 4 3 2 —
CLEVELAND.... 400 011 210 — 9 13 1
NEW YORK ..... 010 000 003 — 4 8 0
E: Ramirez (11). LOB: Cleveland 9, New
York 5. 2B: Jackson (14), Santana (30),
Gonzalez (6). HR: Encarnacion (31), off
Shreve; Gomes (10), off C.Smith; Lindor
(25), off C.Smith; Bird (2), off McAllister.
CLEVELAND
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Merritt.............. 5.1 5 1 1 2 1 1.74
Breslow ............... 1 1 0 0 0 0 4.91
J.Smith............. 1.2 0 0 0 0 1 3.13
McAllister ........... 1 2 3 3 1 0 2.96
H
2
1
1
1
R ER BB SO ERA
3 3 2 6 2.96
1 1 1 2 1.44
1 1 0 1 2.37
0 0 0 2 1.29
TEXAS
AB
Choo dh...............5
Andrus ss ...........5
Mazara rf............5
Beltre 3b.............2
Gallo lf................4
Gomez cf ............5
Napoli 1b ............5
Odor 2b...............3
Chirinos c............3
TOTALS
37
R
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
8
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 2 .264
3 1 0 0 .306
1 0 0 0 .256
1 0 3 0 .317
1 2 1 2 .206
2 2 0 2 .246
1 3 0 2 .195
0 0 1 1 .214
1 0 1 1 .254
11 8 6 10 —
HOUSTON
AB
Springer cf..........4
Bregman 3b-ss ...4
Altuve 2b............4
Reddick rf ...........4
Gurriel 1b ...........2
Davis 3b..............2
McCann c ............3
Beltran dh ..........2
Gonzalez ss-1b...3
Fisher lf ..............3
TOTALS
31
R
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 1 .290
0 0 0 0 .285
1 0 0 2 .354
0 0 0 1 .303
1 0 0 0 .293
0 0 0 0 .200
2 0 0 0 .241
0 1 0 0 .235
0 0 0 0 .294
0 0 0 2 .218
4 1 0 6 —
TEXAS............. 000 600 002 — 8 11 2
HOUSTON....... 010 000 000 — 1 4 0
E: Andrus (16), Gomez (3). LOB: Texas
8, Houston 4. 2B: Choo (14), Andrus
(37), Mazara (25), Gomez (16), Gurriel
(36). HR: Napoli (28), off Keuchel.
TEXAS
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Cashner ............... 8 3 1 1 0 6 3.30
Rodriguez ............ 1 1 0 0 0 0 2.70
HOUSTON
IP
Keuchel ............... 6
Musgrove ............ 1
Gregerson ........... 1
Liriano ................. 1
H
5
1
2
3
R ER BB SO ERA
6 6 3 7 2.91
0 0 1 0 5.13
0 0 1 1 4.01
2 2 1 2 5.91
WP: Cashner (8-9); LP: Keuchel (11-3).
T: 2:52. A: 6,123 (31,042).
PHILA.
IP
Eickhoff ............... 2
Therrien............... 3
Rios ..................... 3
Ramos ................. 1
H
6
6
2
1
R ER BB SO ERA
6 6 1 1 4.71
3 3 2 0 9.00
0 0 0 2 5.40
0 0 2 2 5.08
ATLANTA
AB
Inciarte cf ...........5
Albies 2b.............5
F.Freeman 1b......4
Kemp lf ...............5
L.Adams lf ..........0
Markakis rf .........3
Swanson ss ........4
Peterson 3b ........4
Freitas c..............3
M.Adams ph .......1
Teheran p............3
Suzuki ph-c .........1
TOTALS
38
R
1
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
5
H BI BB SO AVG
3 1 0 1 .310
1 0 0 2 .265
1 1 0 0 .318
2 1 0 1 .294
0 0 0 0 .275
2 0 2 0 .280
2 1 1 1 .232
0 0 0 0 .189
1 1 0 1 .333
0 0 0 1 .273
1 0 0 0 .156
0 0 0 0 .262
13 5 3 7 —
PHILA.
AB
Hernandez 2b .....3
Galvis cf..............4
Williams rf .........3
Hoskins 1b..........4
Franco 3b ............3
Nava ph...............0
Rupp c .................4
Florimon ss.........4
Kim lf ..................4
Leiter Jr. p ..........2
Blanco 3b ............1
TOTALS
32
R
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
2
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 2 2 .285
0 0 0 1 .252
0 0 1 1 .281
1 0 0 0 .303
1 0 0 1 .224
0 0 1 0 .298
0 0 0 3 .225
1 1 0 3 .342
2 0 0 0 .223
1 0 0 0 .118
0 1 0 1 .168
6 2 4 12 —
ATLANTA........ 100 200 002 — 5 13 0
PHILA.............. 010 000 001 — 2 6 1
E: Hoskins (3). LOB: Atlanta 11, Philadelphia 8. 2B: F.Freeman (26), Kemp
(23), Markakis (32), Freitas (1), Franco
(25), Florimon (4), Kim (6). 3B: Kim (1).
ATLANTA
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Teheran ............ 6.2 5 1 1 1 8 4.75
S.Freeman ........ 0.1 0 0 0 0 1 2.96
Ramirez ............ 0.2 0 0 0 3 0 2.33
Vizcaino............ 1.1 1 1 1 0 3 2.79
PHILA.
IP
Leiter Jr............ 6.2
Milner............... 0.2
Garcia ............... 0.2
Pinto.................... 1
H
9
1
0
3
R ER BB SO ERA
3 3 1 6 3.88
0 0 1 0 2.18
0 0 0 1 2.81
2 2 1 0 8.22
WP: Teheran (9-11); LP: Leiter Jr. (2-4);
S: Vizcaino (9). Inherited runnersscored: S.Freeman 1-0, Vizcaino 3-0,
Milner 1-0, Garcia 2-0. HBP: Milner
(F.Freeman). WP: Garcia. T: 3:17. A:
15,706 (43,651).
COLORADO
IP
Bettis .................. 5
Chatwood............ 3
Oberg .................. 1
H
7
3
1
R ER BB SO ERA
5 5 2 4 4.88
1 1 2 3 5.03
0 0 0 1 5.80
TAMPA BAY AB
Kiermaier cf........4
Souza Jr. dh ........4
Longoria 3b.........3
Morrison 1b ........4
Ramos c ..............4
Puello lf ..............3
Dickerson ph-lf ...1
Miller 2b .............4
Hechavarria ss....4
Bourjos rf............2
TOTALS
33
R
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
5
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 0 .272
2 2 0 0 .252
0 1 0 0 .264
1 1 0 1 .247
1 0 0 2 .236
0 0 0 0 .200
0 0 0 0 .290
1 0 0 1 .196
1 1 0 0 .248
1 0 1 0 .230
8 5 1 4 —
KANSAS CITY AB
Merrifield 2b.......4
Cain cf.................3
Cabrera lf............4
Hosmer 1b ..........3
Perez c ................4
Moustakas dh.....4
Bonifacio rf.........4
Cuthbert 3b ........2
Escobar ss...........3
TOTALS
31
R
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
3
H BI BB SO AVG
2 3 0 1 .283
0 0 1 0 .290
1 0 0 0 .292
0 0 1 2 .318
1 0 0 1 .270
0 0 0 2 .275
0 0 0 2 .254
0 0 1 0 .217
1 0 0 0 .234
5 3 3 8 —
TAMPA BAY ... 003 020 000 — 5 8 0
KANSAS CITY . 003 000 000 — 3 5 0
LOB: Tampa Bay 3, Kansas City 4. HR:
Hechavarria (5), off Vargas; Souza Jr.
(29), off Vargas; Morrison (33), off Vargas; Merrifield (17), off Odorizzi.
TAMPA BAY IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Odorizzi ............... 5 4 3 3 3 3 4.85
Cishek.................. 2 0 0 0 0 2 1.80
Hunter ................. 1 0 0 0 0 0 2.57
Colome ................ 1 1 0 0 0 3 3.02
KANSAS CITY IP
Vargas ................. 6
Alexander ......... 0.2
Moylan ............. 0.2
Minor................ 0.2
Maurer................. 1
H
7
1
0
0
0
R ER BB SO ERA
5 5 1 1 3.87
0 0 0 0 2.25
0 0 0 0 4.12
0 0 0 2 2.95
0 0 0 1 5.91
WP: Odorizzi (7-7); LP: Vargas (14-9); S:
Colome (40). Odorizzi pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored:
Cishek 1-0. T: 2:39. A: 25,916 (37,903).
NEW YORK
AB
Reyes ss .............4
Nimmo rf ............3
Cabrera 2b ..........4
Flores 3b .............4
Plawecki c...........4
Smith 1b .............4
Lagares cf ...........3
Reynolds lf..........2
Montero p ...........3
TOTALS
31
R
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 0 .232
1 0 1 0 .260
1 0 0 1 .258
1 1 0 0 .271
1 1 0 0 .239
0 0 0 0 .172
0 0 0 0 .250
0 0 0 1 .221
0 0 0 1 .100
5 2 1 3 —
CINCINNATI AB
Ervin cf ...............4
Cozart ss.............3
Votto 1b..............3
Duvall lf ..............3
Gennett 2b..........4
Suarez 3b............2
Schebler rf ..........3
Barnhart c...........3
Bailey p...............1
Peraza ph............1
Hamilton ph........1
TOTALS
28
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 2 .400
1 0 1 1 .309
1 0 1 0 .311
0 0 1 1 .252
0 0 0 2 .285
0 0 1 0 .273
0 0 0 2 .239
0 0 0 1 .265
0 0 0 1 .235
0 0 0 0 .259
0 0 0 0 .247
3 0 4 10 —
NEW YORK ..... 200 000 000 — 2 5 0
CINCINNATI .... 000 000 000 — 0 3 1
E: Ervin (1). LOB: New York 4, Cincinnati
5. 2B: Reyes (21), Flores (17), Plawecki
(3), Cozart (21), Votto (26).
NEW YORK
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Montero ........... 8.1 3 0 0 4 8 5.12
Ramos .............. 0.2 0 0 0 0 2 3.61
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 1 3 .234
1 0 0 2 .312
0 0 2 0 .275
1 1 0 0 .263
1 1 1 0 .273
2 0 1 0 .294
2 1 0 1 .249
0 0 1 0 .236
1 2
4 0 0 .257
0 1
7 10
0 0 0 .294
7 6 6 —
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 2 .295
1 0 0 0 .260
0 0 0 3 .205
1 0 0 2 .247
1 0 0 1 .253
1 0 1 0 .228
0 0 0 0 .220
1 1 1 1 .194
1 0 0 0 .178
6 1 2 9 —
BOSTON.......... 000 010 240 — 7 10 0
TORONTO ....... 001 000 000 — 1 6 0
LOB: Boston 7, Toronto 6. 2B: Nunez
(31), Betts (38), Bogaerts (28), Ramirez
(19), Pearce (15). HR: Ramirez (21), off
Happ; Moreland (18), off Koehler; Lopez
(2), off Porcello.
BOSTON
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Porcello ............ 6.2 6 1 1 2 7 4.45
Scott................. 0.1 0 0 0 0 0 3.45
Kelly .................... 2 0 0 0 0 2 2.56
CINCINNATI
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Bailey .................. 6 4 2 2 1 1 7.51
Adleman .............. 3 1 0 0 0 2 5.28
TORONTO
IP
Happ .................... 6
Koehler ................ 1
Mayza.................. 0
Loup..................... 1
Dermody.............. 1
WP: Montero (3-9); LP: Bailey (4-7); S:
Ramos (26). Inherited runners-scored:
Ramos 3-0. HBP: Bailey (Reynolds). T:
2:27. A: 12,491 (42,319).
WP: Porcello (9-15); LP: Koehler (1-7).
Mayza pitched to 4 batters in the 8th.
Inherited runners-scored: Scott 2-0,
Loup 2-2. T: 2:58. A: 37,693 (49,282).
Cubs 17, Pirates 3
Twins 11, White Sox 1
Angels 8, Athletics 2
Kyle Schwarber hit two
home runs for Chicago in a
rout of Pittsburgh.
Jose Berrios pitched
seven scoreless innings,
Brian Dozier had four hits
and Eddie Rosario homered twice as Minnesota
defeated Chicago.
The Twins improved to
19-10 in August, the most
wins in the major leagues
this month.
Late Tuesday
C.J. Cron homered twice
to lift Los Angeles over
Oakland.
It was the eighth multihomer game for Cron, who
has settled into an everyday role with Yunel Escobar on the disabled list
with a strained oblique.
CHICAGO
AB
L.Garcia lf ...........4
Sanchez 3b .........4
Abreu 1b .............3
Saladino 1b.........0
A.Garcia rf ..........4
Davidson dh........3
Narvaez c............2
Anderson ss........4
Hanson 2b...........4
Engel cf...............4
TOTALS
32
R
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 2 .272
0 0 0 2 .258
0 0 0 1 .301
0 0 0 0 .191
3 0 0 0 .324
0 1 0 3 .237
1 0 1 0 .269
1 0 0 2 .241
1 0 0 2 .214
0 0 0 1 .172
6 1 1 13 —
OAKLAND
AB
Powell cf.............2
Pinder ph-cf ........2
Semien ss ...........4
Lowrie 2b............4
Davis lf ...............4
Joyce rf ...............3
Healy dh..............4
Olson 1b..............4
Chapman 3b........4
Maxwell c ...........2
TOTALS
33
R
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
2
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 0 .273
0 0 0 1 .242
0 0 0 1 .255
2 0 0 0 .270
1 0 0 2 .234
1 1 1 0 .233
0 0 0 1 .262
1 1 0 1 .255
1 0 0 1 .239
1 0 2 1 .233
7 2 3 8 —
MINNESOTA AB
Dozier 2b ............5
Mauer 1b ............3
Gimenez ph-1b ...0
Buxton cf ............4
Granite ph-cf ......2
Polanco ss...........5
Escobar 3b ..........3
Rosario rf............5
Garver c ..............4
Vargas dh ...........4
Adrianza lf..........5
TOTALS
40
R
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
2
3
1
2
11
H BI BB SO AVG
4 2 1 0 .263
1 1 1 0 .296
0 0 1 0 .208
1 0 0 2 .249
0 0 0 1 .246
1 0 0 0 .255
0 0 2 1 .251
2 3 0 0 .292
3 0 1 1 .286
1 1 1 1 .246
3 4 0 0 .265
16 11 7 6 —
L.A.
AB
Maybin cf............5
Revere lf .............4
Pujols dh .............3
Calhoun rf ...........3
Simmons ss ........3
Valbuena 3b........2
Cron 1b................3
Maldonado c .......4
Cowart 2b ...........4
TOTALS
31
R
2
1
0
1
0
1
2
1
0
8
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 2 .235
2 2 0 0 .262
0 0 1 0 .230
0 0 1 1 .244
1 1 0 0 .288
0 0 2 1 .203
2 4 1 0 .258
1 1 0 0 .231
1 0 0 1 .244
8 8 5 5 —
NEW YORK
IP
Montgomery ....... 4
Shreve .............. 1.1
C.Smith ............ 3.2
H
6
4
3
R ER BB SO ERA
4 4 3 5 4.15
2 2 0 1 3.58
3 3 2 3 6.11
PITTSBURGH AB
Harrison 2b-3b ...4
Rodriguez rf-cf ...4
McCutchen cf......3
Luplow rf ............1
Bell 1b.................4
Freese 3b ............3
Jaso ph................1
Marte lf...............3
Mercer ss............3
Stewart c............2
Diaz ph-c.............2
Nova p.................1
Brault p...............1
Moroff 2b............1
TOTALS
33
R
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 2 .273
1 0 0 3 .183
1 0 0 1 .277
0 0 0 1 .000
1 1 0 1 .262
1 1 0 1 .256
0 0 0 0 .223
0 0 0 0 .256
1 1 0 0 .259
0 0 0 1 .180
0 0 0 1 .252
0 0 0 1 .021
0 0 0 0 .200
1 0 0 0 .157
6 3 0 12 —
CHICAGO
AB
Jay cf-rf ..............6
Schwarber lf .......6
Bryant 3b............4
Zobrist ss ...........0
Rizzo 1b ..............3
Avila ph-1b .........1
Happ 2b...............5
Heyward rf..........4
Almora cf ............1
Baez ss ...............5
Rivera c...............5
Quintana p..........3
La Stella ph-3b ...2
TOTALS
45
R
1
2
2
0
3
0
2
1
1
3
1
1
0
17
H BI BB SO AVG
2 1 0 2 .282
2 4 0 3 .199
3 0 1 0 .292
0 0 0 0 .233
2 2 0 0 .282
0 0 0 0 .272
3 4 0 0 .252
1 1 0 0 .258
1 0 0 0 .289
2 2 0 0 .271
3 0 0 1 .235
1 1 0 2 .111
0 1 0 1 .305
20 16 1 9 —
PITTSBURGH .. 200 001 000 — 3 6 2
CHICAGO......... 113 071 22X — 17 20 0
E: Freese (12), Stewart (5). LOB: Pittsburgh 5, Chicago 6. 2B: Mercer (22), Rizzo (29), Happ (14), Baez (19), Rivera
(5). HR: Bell (23), off Quintana; Happ
(20), off Nova; Schwarber (23), off
Schugel; Rizzo (31), off Sanchez;
Schwarber (24), off Sanchez.
PITTSBURGH IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Nova .................... 3 5 5 4 1 5 4.11
Brault .................. 1 4 4 4 0 1 5.93
Schugel................ 1 3 3 3 0 1 2.28
Sanchez ............... 2 4 3 3 0 1 10.8
Rivero ............... 0.2 4 2 2 0 0 1.52
Neverauskas .... 0.1 0 0 0 0 1 2.77
CHICAGO
IP
Quintana ............. 6
Rondon ................ 1
Wilson ................. 1
Pena..................... 1
H
4
1
0
1
R ER BB SO ERA
3 3 0 9 4.49
0 0 0 0 4.86
0 0 0 2 2.86
0 0 0 1 4.91
WP: Quintana (9-11); LP: Nova (11-12).
Brault pitched to 4 batters in the 5th.
Inherited runners-scored: Schugel 2-2,
Neverauskas 2-0. HBP: Quintana 2
(Marte, Mercer), Brault (Rizzo). WP:
Nova. T: 3:12. A: 36,628 (41,072).
CHICAGO......... 000 000 001 — 1 6 1
MINNESOTA... 102 020 33X — 11 16 0
E: Anderson (26). LOB: Chicago 8, Minnesota 13. 2B: Narvaez (8), Dozier (24),
Mauer (26), Garver (1), Vargas (10). 3B:
A.Garcia (4), Garver (2), Adrianza 2 (2).
HR: Rosario (19), off Holland; Rosario
(20), off Pelfrey.
CHICAGO
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Holland ................ 5 8 5 5 4 4 6.16
Pelfrey.............. 1.1 5 3 3 0 1 5.26
Beck.................. 1.1 3 3 3 3 0 6.24
Petricka ............ 0.1 0 0 0 0 1 7.50
MINNESOTA IP
Berrios................. 7
Pressly................. 1
Perkins ................ 1
H
4
0
2
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 1 11 3.80
0 0 0 1 4.89
1 1 0 1 12.0
WP: Berrios (12-6); LP: Holland (7-14).
Inherited runners-scored: Beck 1-0,
Petricka 2-0. HBP: Berrios (Abreu), Holland (Mauer), Perkins (Narvaez). T:
3:17. A: 21,172 (39,021).
H
4
2
2
2
0
R ER BB SO ERA
1 1 4 2 3.96
2 2 0 1 7.47
4 4 2 0 11.0
0 0 0 3 4.14
0 0 0 0 7.15
OAKLAND ....... 020 000 000 — 2 7 1
L.A................... 500 200 01X — 8 8 0
E: Chapman (9). LOB: Oakland 7, Los
Angeles 5. 2B: Maybin (19), Simmons
(32). HR: Joyce (20), off Scribner; Olson
(10), off Scribner; Cron (11), off Smith;
Maldonado (12), off Smith; Cron (12),
off Brady.
OAKLAND
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Smith................ 3.2 5 7 6 2 1 6.27
Castro............... 2.1 1 0 0 3 2 3.09
Hendriks .............. 1 1 0 0 0 1 4.89
Brady ................... 1 1 1 1 0 1 4.74
L.A.
IP
Scribner ............ 2.2
Alvarez ................ 1
Chavez ................. 4
Bedrosian ......... 0.1
Wood ................... 1
H
4
2
1
0
0
R ER BB SO ERA
2 2 1 2 4.35
0 0 0 0 3.95
0 0 2 5 4.87
0 0 0 0 3.78
0 0 0 1 5.46
WP: Chavez (7-10); LP: Smith (0-4). Inherited runners-scored: Castro 1-1, Alvarez 3-0, Chavez 2-0, Bedrosian 2-0. T:
2:53. A: 36,229 (43,250).
3-10
NL scores
Mitch Moreland had a
pinch-hit homer and drove
in four runs, Hanley Ramirez added a solo blast, and
Boston completed a threegame sweep of Toronto.
Rick Porcello allowed
one run in 62/3 innings as
the AL East-leading Red
Sox moved 51/2 games
ahead of the Yankees.
CLEVELAND AB
Lindor ss .............5
Urshela 3b ..........0
Jackson cf-lf .......4
Ramirez 2b .........5
Encarnacion 1b ...4
Santana rf...........5
Diaz dh................3
Guyer lf...............2
Zimmer cf ...........3
Gomes c ..............5
Gonzalez 3b-ss ...4
TOTALS
40
3-2
DODGERS AT DIAMONDBACKS, 3:40
Rafael Montero took a
one-hitter into the ninth inning, and New York extended its dominance over Cincinnati.
Montero allowed only
Joey Votto’s single through
the first eight innings. The
Reds loaded the bases
with one out in the ninth
on two hits and an intentional walk to Votto. A.J. Ramos fanned Adam Duvall
and Scooter Gennett for
his 26th save.
Logan Morrison, Steven
Souza Jr. and Adeiny
Hechavarria each went
deep for Tampa Bay.
Morrison has four home
runs in the past six games.
The Rays took two out of
three and have won three
consecutive series. The
Royals lost 18 of 28 games
in August, including six of
seven to end the month.
STRIKEOUTS
2-4
Game 2
Cleveland completed a
sweep by sending 10 batters to the plate in a 43pitch first inning by New
York’s Jordan Montgomery.
Edwin Encarnacion, Yan
Gomes and Francisco Lindor all homered in the win.
Rays 5, Royals 3
Sale, Bos ......................................... 15-6
Pomeranz, Bos ................................ 14-4
Santana, Min ................................... 14-7
Vargas, KC ....................................... 14-8
14-7
Justin Verlander struck
out nine over six commanding innings and aided his own cause by driving in his first career run
as Detroit beat Colorado.
Verlander allowed one
run and three hits in earning his 10th win and ignited the offense with an RBI
single in the second.
Game 2
David Freitas lined a goahead RBI double for his
first career hit and Ender
Inciarte had three hits to
help Atlanta complete a
doubleheader sweep. Inciarte had eight combined
hits in the two games.
WINS
WP: Bauer (14-8); LP: Garcia (5-9); S:
Allen (22). Garcia pitched to 1 batter in
the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Shaw
1-0, Kahnle 1-0. HBP: Bauer (Gardner).
WP: Bauer 2. PB: Sanchez (13). T: 3:12.
Stephenson (R)
Game 1
Ender Inciarte went 5
for 5 with four RBI to lead
Atlanta past Philadelphia
in the first game of a doubleheader.
R.A. Dickey struck out
nine and the Braves won for
the first time this season in
nine games at Citizens
Bank Park. The Phillies lead
the season series 12-3.
Braves 5, Phillies 2
Kluber, Cle ....................................... 2.63
Sale, Bos .......................................... 2.77
Stroman, Tor ................................... 3.11
Severino, NY .................................... 3.14
Pomeranz, Bos ................................. 3.23
Santana, Min ................................... 3.27
Archer, TB ........................................ 3.66
R ER BB SO ERA
2 1 3 5 4.43
0 0 0 7 2.05
0 0 1 1 2.91
deGrom (R)
Domingo Santana and
Jonathan Villar homered in
the sixth inning, and center fielder Keon Broxton
made a leaping catch over
the wall for the final out.
St. Louis fell 21/2 games
behind the second-place
Brewers despite two home
runs from Tommy Pham.
Andrew Cashner
pitched eight strong innings, Mike Napoli hit a
three-run homer, and Texas beat Houston in a game
relocated to Florida because of Hurricane Harvey.
Cashner limited the AL
West leaders to three hits,
one after the second inning. Napoli’s homer off
Astros starter Dallas
Keuchel capped a six-run
fourth inning for the Rangers.
ERA
H
6
1
1
3.91 17-10
METS AT REDS, 12:35
Hellickson (R)
Rangers 8, Astros 1
Cruz, Sea ........................................... 101
Schoop, Bal ......................................... 97
Upton, Det .......................................... 94
Davis, Oak ........................................... 91
Machado, Bal ...................................... 87
Mazara, Tex ........................................ 84
Smoak, Tor ......................................... 84
NEW YORK
IP
Garcia .................. 5
Green................ 2.2
Kahnle .............. 1.1
15-7
Red Sox 7, Blue Jays 1
WP: Verlander (10-8); LP: Bettis (0-2).
HBP: Bettis (Machado). WP: Chatwood. T: 3:03. A: 29,281 (50,398).
RBI
LOB: Cleveland 9, New York 8. 2B:
Ramirez 2 (43), Gregorius (23).
CLEVELAND
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Bauer ................... 6 4 1 1 4 4 4.46
Olson ................ 0.1 1 0 0 0 0 0.00
Shaw ................ 1.1 0 0 0 0 2 3.18
Allen ................. 1.1 0 0 0 0 3 2.82
2.40 16-10
Davies (R)
Mets 2, Reds 0
WP: Dickey (9-8); LP: Eickhoff (4-8).
Eickhoff pitched to 2 batters in the 3rd.
Inherited runners-scored: Therrien 1-1.
HBP: Therrien (Suzuki). T: 2:49.
Judge, NY ............................................ 37
Davis, Oak ........................................... 36
Gallo, Tex ............................................ 36
Smoak, Tor ......................................... 36
Moustakas, KC ................................... 35
Morrison, TB ....................................... 32
Cruz, Sea ............................................. 31
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 1 .258
0 0 2 2 .255
1 0 0 0 .273
1 1 0 0 .301
0 0 2 2 .271
0 0 0 2 .114
1 0 0 0 .210
0 0 0 1 .309
0 0 0 0 .242
1 0 0 0 .302
0 0 0 1 .280
5 1 4 9 —
ERA TEAM
13-5
Indians 9, Yankees 4
WP: Anderson (8-3); LP: Martinez (1010); S: Knebel (30). Inherited runnersscored: Sherriff 1-0, Swarzak 1-1. T:
2:40. A: 28,964 (41,900).
HOME RUNS
R
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
W-L
Gonzalez (L)
Tigers 6, Rockies 2
Cole Hamels (9-2, 3.78)
takes the hill for Texas as
the Rangers conclude
their series with Houston
at Tropicana Field against
Collin McHugh (2-2, 3.63).
Altuve, Hou ..................................... .355
Garcia, Chi ........................................ .320
Hosmer, KC ...................................... .320
Reddick, Hou .................................... .306
Schoop, Bal ...................................... .304
Abreu, Chi ........................................ .303
Andrus, Tex ..................................... .303
NEW YORK
AB
Gardner lf ...........2
Hicks rf ...............2
Sanchez c............4
Gregorius ss .......4
Headley 1b..........2
Bird dh ................4
Frazier 3b............3
Castro ph ............1
Ellsbury cf...........4
Torreyes 2b.........3
Judge ph .............1
TOTALS
30
NATIONALS AT BREWERS, 8:10
Braves 9, Phillies 1
WP: Merritt (2-0); LP: Montgomery
(7-7). Inherited runners-scored:
Breslow 1-0, J.Smith 1-0, C.Smith 1-0.
WP: Montgomery. T: 3:04. A: 39,598
(49,642).
BATTING
H BI BB SO AVG
2 0 0 1 .269
0 0 0 2 .233
4 0 0 0 .306
1 1 2 1 .247
0 0 0 2 .259
0 0 1 1 .249
1 0 0 1 .205
0 0 0 3 .250
0 0 1 2 .198
8 1 4 13 —
NL games
Brewers 6, Cardinals 5
Rangers vs. Astros
in St. Petersburg, Fla.,
1:10 p.m.
Entering Wednesday’s games
R
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
TOD AY
W-L
MILWAUKEE IP
Anderson............. 6
Hader................ 1.1
Swarzak ........... 0.2
Knebel ................. 1
AL leaders
CLEVELAND AB
Lindor ss .............5
Guyer lf...............5
Ramirez 2b .........4
Diaz dh................2
Bruce rf...............4
Santana 1b .........3
Perez c ................4
Zimmer cf ...........4
Urshela 3b ..........3
TOTALS
34
CLEVELAND.... 200 000 000 — 2 8 0
NEW YORK ..... 001 000 000 — 1 5 0
R ER BB SO ERA
6 6 1 3 6.85
0 0 1 1 2.47
0 0 0 0 1.76
0 0 0 1 3.93
1 1 0 1 2.93
0 0 0 1 3.29
Batting average since the
all-star break for Yankees
rookie Aaron Judge
entering Wednesday.
QUOTABLE
x-Late game
Martinez (R)
3-5
5.26
7-7
McHugh (R)
2-2
3.63
3-4
WHITE SOX AT TWINS, 1:10
Gonzalez (R)
7-10
4.30
9-12
Colon (R)
6-10
6.35
9-12
RED SOX AT YANKEES, 7:05
Rodriguez (L)
4-4
4.19
10-8
Sabathia (L)
10-5
3.82
14-7
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
at Baltimore 4, Seattle 0
Cleveland at N.Y. Yankees, ppd.
Boston 3, at Toronto 0
Texas 12, Houston 2, at St. Petersburg,
Fla.
at Minnesota 6, Chicago White Sox 4
at Kansas City 6, Tampa Bay 2
at L.A. Angels 8, Oakland 2
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Seattle at Baltimore, Late
Cleveland 2, at N.Y. Yankees 1, 1st game
Cleveland 9, at N.Y. Yankees 4, 2nd game
Boston 7, at Toronto 1
Texas 8, Houston 1, at St. Petersburg,
Fla.
at Minnesota 11, Chicago White Sox 1
Tampa Bay 5, at Kansas City 3
Oakland at L.A. Angels, Late
Interleague scores
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
at Colorado 7, Detroit 3
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Detroit 6, at Colorado 2
NL leaders
Entering Wednesday’s games
BATTING
Blackmon, Col .................................. .339
Turner, LA ........................................ .329
Harper, Was .................................... .326
Murphy, Was ................................... .320
Goldschmidt, Ari ............................. .318
LeMahieu, Col .................................. .314
Seager, LA ....................................... .311
Posey, SF ......................................... .311
Votto, Cin ........................................ .311
Ozuna, Mia ...................................... .310
HOME RUNS
Stanton, Mia ....................................... 51
Bellinger, LA ....................................... 34
Votto, Cin ........................................... 33
Goldschmidt, Ari ................................ 32
Blackmon, Col ..................................... 31
Duvall, Cin ........................................... 31
Ozuna, Mia ......................................... 31
Arenado, Col ....................................... 30
Rizzo, Chi ............................................ 30
Harper, Was ....................................... 29
Zimmerman, Was ............................... 29
RBI
Arenado, Col ..................................... 111
Stanton, Mia ..................................... 110
Goldschmidt, Ari .............................. 105
Ozuna, Mia ....................................... 103
Lamb, Ari ............................................ 96
Rizzo, Chi ............................................ 94
Votto, Cin ........................................... 90
Duvall, Cin ........................................... 89
Zimmerman, Was ............................... 88
Harper, Was ....................................... 87
Reynolds, Col ...................................... 87
ERA
Kershaw, LA .................................... 2.04
Scherzer, Was ................................. 2.21
Gonzalez, Was ................................. 2.40
Strasburg, Was ............................... 3.10
Greinke, Ari ..................................... 3.14
Lynn, StL ......................................... 3.14
Arrieta, Chi ...................................... 3.36
deGrom, NY ..................................... 3.39
Nola, Phi .......................................... 3.46
Martinez, StL .................................. 3.48
WINS
Kershaw, LA .................................... 15-2
Greinke, Ari ..................................... 15-6
Davies, Mil ...................................... 15-7
Wood, LA ......................................... 14-1
deGrom, NY ..................................... 14-7
Arrieta, Chi ...................................... 14-8
Gonzalez, Was ................................ 13-5
Scherzer, Was ................................. 13-5
Maeda, LA ....................................... 12-5
Wainwright, StL ............................. 12-5
Urena, Mia ....................................... 12-6
Corbin, Ari ..................................... 12-11
STRIKEOUTS
Scherzer, Was .................................. 230
deGrom, NY ...................................... 201
Greinke, Ari ...................................... 182
Nelson, Mil ....................................... 181
Martinez, StL ................................... 175
Samardzija, SF ................................. 175
Kershaw, LA ..................................... 168
Ray, Ari ............................................. 160
Strasburg, Was ................................ 156
Lester, Chi ........................................ 155
COMPLETE GAMES
Nova, Pit ............................................... 2
Richard, SD ........................................... 2
Scherzer, Was ...................................... 2
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
SU
baseball
Matinee idol: Strasburg steals the spotlight with a shutout
Nationals 4, Marlins 0
NATIONALS 4,
MARLINS 0
BY
NATIONALS ON DECK
at Milwaukee Brewers
Today
Tomorrow
Saturday
C HELSEA J ANES
Perception always seems to
consume reality when it comes to
Stephen Strasburg. Injuries and
the horde of stars around him
sometimes combine to mask his
ability, poke holes in his résumé
and otherwise diminish what is
and always has been a once-in-ageneration talent.
Wednesday’s 4-0 win over the
Miami Marlins provided a reminder of exactly what the Washington Nationals have in their
enigmatic right-hander, of what
they missed when he was injured
last October and of his evolution.
Strasburg did to the Marlins
what the Nationals did to Miami’s push for a wild-card spot
this week: He all but shut it
down, throwing the second complete game of his career (both
have been shutouts; the first
came in August 2013). Strasburg
(11-4) had recorded an out in the
ninth inning only twice in his
career before Wednesday. His
ERA dropped to 2.90.
The Marlins came to the District with a chance to cut the
Nationals’ division lead to single
digits and stir doubt in the process. Instead, the Nationals outscored them 23-5 and sent them
home 15 games back. The Nationals’ magic number to clinch the
division title is 16, and these
teams meet again Monday in
Miami. That number could
shrink fast.
On Wednesday, it shrunk because Strasburg delivered one of
the best all-around games of his
professional career. He allowed
six hits and struck out eight while
intentionally walking one. He
also homered to right center and
singled, results that came as a
surprise to him given that he had
not picked up a bat in more than
a week, since two starts ago in
San Diego.
“Oppo? Wow,” his catcher, Jose
Lobaton, said after the game.
Sunday
at Miami Marlins
Monday
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
He can hit, too: Stephen Strasburg homered, then got some love from Nats hitting coach Rick Schu.
“That was impressive. That was
something special. As soon as I
saw that, I was like, ‘This is going
to be pretty good today.’ ”
Sometimes Strasburg accumulates strikeouts with the best of
them. Entering Thursday, his
10.50 strikeouts-per-nine ranked
third in the National League
behind only Max Scherzer and
Clayton Kershaw.
Other times, he pitches to
contact. He added his cutter to
help him do that last year but
threw the pitch so often he believed it contributed to the torn
pronator tendon in his throwing
arm.
This year, Strasburg seems to
have found a healthier balance.
He has thrown less than half the
sliders he threw last year. He has
thrown more curveballs and
change-ups than his career average and a lower percentage of
fastballs.
“[I try to] throw a couple
pitches early that produce quick
outs instead of just being too
heavy on the fastball,” Strasburg
said. “I think across the league
that’s what’s happening. “
On Wednesday, against a deep
and powerful Miami lineup,
Strasburg relied heavily on that
change-up and his curveball to
slice through the Marlins’ order.
Through four innings, he threw
just 42 pitches. Most pitchers
target 15 per inning.
Strasburg ran into more serious trouble in the fifth when J.T.
Realmuto grounded a ball up the
third base line, just out of reach
of Anthony Rendon. Realmuto
appeared to slow down rounding
second, which seemed to lull left
fielder Howie Kendrick into
thinking he had time to send the
ball back in, but Realmuto broke
for third and ended up with a
leadoff triple.
Needing strikeouts to keep the
Marlins from scoring, Strasburg
turned to his fastball to get two of
them. Derek Dietrich swung
through a 96-mph fastball. So did
A.J. Ellis, leaving Strasburg to get
opposing starter Adam Conley to
hit a weak flyball to end the
inning.
The problem by that time,
however, was that Conley had
held the Nationals down, too —
until Strasburg led off that fifth
inning with a home run, his
second of the season. He has hit
more home runs this season
(two) than Marlins leadoff man
Dee Gordon (one).
So Strasburg took the mound
with a lead in the sixth, when he,
Lobaton and Manager Dusty
Baker became more convinced
that Wednesday was just his day.
With one out in the sixth, Strasburg left a fastball up and over
the middle of the plate to Giancarlo Stanton, who normally redirects mistakes like those over
one fence or another. He hit this
one 114 mph toward shortstop,
where Trea Turner picked it,
twirled and threw him out.
By almost any measurement,
right-hander among MLB’s best
returned from the disabled list,
the Nats’ record in his 60 starts is
47-13. That’s a .783 winning
percentage.
A little perspective: In the final
five great years of Sandy Koufax’s
career, the Dodgers’ winning
percentage in his starts was .746.
Strasburg isn’t Koufax. But
except for the Nats themselves,
few seem to grasp what he
actually is, what he has become: a
fierce competitor, a pitcher who
rises to the game situation and a
winner. In fact, his improvement,
from remarkable to truly elite —
becoming just who he was
predicted to be — has happened
before our eyes but in seasons
with slight imperfections or DL
trips that kept him from Cy
Young Award contention and the
appreciation he has worked eight
years to earn.
“Can’t see him very well as an
outfielder. But I got a chance to
face him in a [simulated game]
when we were both on the DL,”
Jayson Werth said. “He was
rested, healthy, throwing hard. I
realized one thing that maybe he
doesn’t know.
“He’s scary.
“He’s big. He hides the ball. It’s
explosive in the zone. Especially
to a right-handed hitter — he ran
one in on me, and I said, ‘Oh,
[expletive].’ I don’t know if I can
even pick that up every time,”
Werth said. “He’s just a big, hairy,
7:10 MASN,
WUSA-9
Tuesday
7:10 MASN2
Wednesday
7:10 MASN2
scary, furry animal out there.”
That 47-13 understates what
Strasburg has done when he’s in
working order. Late in 2016,
before a torn pronator tendon
was diagnosed, Strasburg lost
three straight starts, allowing
19 runs in 112/3 innings. Except for
those, his record in his past
57 healthy starts would be 34-7
with a 2.55 ERA — and the Nats
are 47-10.
Even the Nats find this record
hard to fathom.
“He’s spit the hook on some
losses — three or four,” Baker said
of games when the Nats scored
after he left.
Perhaps the bitterest irony of
Strasburg’s career is his injuries.
“Just stay healthy. Back off. Just
be smart,” Werth said, aware that
pundits often have intimated
that Strasburg is soft or even a
hothouse plant. “For years he was
trying to prove he wasn’t what
[people] said he was. He pushed
too hard.
“He was grinding when he
should have stopped grinding.
He’s gotten schooled up. His
confidence is slowly. . . ” Werth
said, raising his hand gradually,
“coming along.”
What happens if he ever gets
as confident as he probably
should be already?
“He’s really [expletive] good,”
General Manager Mike Rizzo
snapped when shown the
numbers over those past 60
starts. Rizzo gets exasperated on
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
The Nationals have won 47 of Stephen Strasburg’s past 60 starts,
including his shutout of the Marlins on Wednesday afternoon.
a regular basis since Strasburg’s
personality, toughness or
performance has been impugned
for his entire eight-year career.
“If you just took the name off
his numbers and asked, ‘Who is
this?’ people would probably say
‘Bob Gibson or Don Drysdale,’ ”
Rizzo said, citing two
intimidating right-handed
strikeout pitchers in the Hall of
Fame.
In fact, Strasburg’s career
winning percentage (80-45, .640)
edges into the top 25 in the past
100 years. Nolan Ryan was only
32 games over .500 for his career.
Also, Strasburg’s ERA+ of 127
(27 percent better than league
average) nudges into the top 30
in the past century for starters.
Gibson’s figures are .591 and 127,
Drysdale’s .557 and 121, so the
comparisons, so far, are apt.
What Strasburg lacks is a
defining season or postseason.
He has never won more than
15 games, although he owns a
strikeout title. He has missed two
of the Nats’ three postseasons. He
is exceptional when he pitches
(sixth-best ERA in MLB of 2.90
this year) but he has seldom
pitched enough innings, piled up
enough accolades, to satisfy those
who nag about his potential or
hype when he was first drafted.
In a way, the attacks on him —
or the Nats for his 2012 shutdown
— may have made him even more
inward, private and focused.
“Stras doesn’t chirp about
anything — good or bad” in the
dugout, Baker said. When Baker
arrived, he said that “making
Strasburg happier” was a goal.
“I haven’t accomplished it yet,”
said Baker, whose team is 36-11 in
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
H
2
0
1
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 .297
0 0 0 .292
0 0 1 .285
0 0 2 .308
0 0 0 .280
0 0 1 .243
0 0 1 .211
0 1 1 .263
0 0 1 .158
0 0 0
--0 0 1 .253
0 0 0 .000
0 1 8
—
WASHINGTON
AB
Turner ss........................3
Difo 2b............................4
Rendon 3b ......................4
Zimmerman 1b ..............3
Kendrick lf......................4
Werth rf .........................4
De Aza pr-rf ...................0
Taylor cf .........................3
Lobaton c .......................3
Strasburg p ....................4
TOTALS
32
R H
1 0
1 2
0 2
0 1
0 1
0 1
1 0
0 1
0 0
1 2
4 10
BI BB SO AVG
0 1 0 .276
1 0 0 .291
1 0 1 .305
0 1 0 .300
0 0 1 .340
0 0 0 .267
0 0 0 .125
0 1 2 .262
0 1 0 .156
1 0 0 .156
3 4 4
—
vs. Philadelphia Phillies
MIAMI........................... 000
WASHINGTON.............. 000
Sept. 7
7:05 MASN
Sept. 8
7:05 MASN2
Sept. 9
7:05 MASN2
LOB: Miami 6, Washington 8. 2B: Realmuto (23), Rendon (34), Werth (6). 3B: Realmuto (4). HR: Strasburg
(2), off Conley; Difo (5), off Conley. RBI: Difo (20), Rendon (86), Strasburg (3). SB: Turner (36). CS: Gordon
(11).
DP: Miami 2 (Rojas, Gordon, Realmuto), (Rojas, Gordon).
MIAMI
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Conley, .........................6 7 2 2 2 3 111 5.02
Steckenrider ................1 2 1 1 1 0 27 2.78
McGowan.....................1 1 1 0 1 1 12 4.10
Sept. 10
1:35 MASN
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
THOMAS BOSWELL
BOSWELL FROM D1
8:10 MASN2
8:10 MASN2
7:10 MASN2,
WUSA-9
2:10 MASN,
WUSA-9
MIAMI
AB
Gordon 2b.......................4
Stanton rf ......................4
Yelich cf .........................4
Ozuna lf..........................4
Realmuto 1b ..................4
Dietrich 3b .....................4
Ellis c..............................3
Rojas ss..........................2
Conley p .........................2
Steckenrider p ...............0
Suzuki ph .......................1
McGowan p ....................0
TOTALS
32
“That was a mistake. Not supposed to throw the ball right
there,” Lobaton said after, with a
smile. “. . . He should’ve hit that
one far, but sometimes that happens.”
Many little things like that
had to go right for Strasburg to
do what he did Wednesday.
Thanks to lots of early swings
and plenty of weak contact,
Strasburg finished the eighth
inning at 87 pitches. He finished
the ninth at 110, throwing more
pitches in that inning than he
had in any other. He bent but did
not break.
Those who see Strasburg regularly know that he was not much
of a pitch conservationist early in
his career, which cost him
chances to finish games. Even
last season, Baker took him out of
a no-hit bid because he had
thrown too many pitches.
But this smarter Strasburg, the
one who pitches exclusively from
the stretch to save energy and
minimize injury risk, is mastering the art of quick outs. On
Wednesday, he provided a clinic
on the subject to the announced
WASHINGTON
IP
Strasburg,....................9
H
6
000
020
000 — 0
11X — 4
6 0
10 0
R ER BB SO NP ERA
0 0 1 8 110 2.90
WP: Strasburg, (11-4); LP: Conley, (6-6).
WP: McGowan. PB: Ellis (1).
T: 2:36. A: 25,019 (41,418).
HOW THEY SCORED
NATIONALS FIFTH
Stephen Strasburg homers. Trea Turner grounds out.
Wilmer Difo homers. Anthony Rendon strikes out
swinging. Ryan Zimmerman singles. Howie Kendrick
grounds out.
Nationals 2, Marlins 0
NATIONALS SEVENTH
Stephen Strasburg singles. Trea Turner walks. Stephen
Strasburg to second. Wilmer Difo lines out. Stephen
Strasburg doubled off second. With Anthony Rendon
batting, Trea Turner steals second. Anthony Rendon
doubles. Trea Turner scores. Ryan Zimmerman grounds
out.
Nationals 3, Marlins 0
NATIONALS EIGHTH
Howie Kendrick grounds out. Jayson Werth doubles.
Alejandro De Aza pinch-running for Jayson Werth. On
Dustin McGowan’s wild pitch, Alejandro De Aza to
third. Michael Taylor strikes out swinging. Jose Lobaton is intentionally walked. On A.J. Ellis’s passed ball,
Jose Lobaton to second. Alejandro De Aza scores. Stephen Strasburg grounds out.
Nationals 4, Marlins 0
crowd of 25,019.
His stated goal this season has
been he wants to be healthy in
October. If he is, the Nationals
will have another starter able to
take over a game, a rare talent on
a roster that has so many of them
that it sometimes obscures just
how good Strasburg can be.
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
Strasburg’s starts, making Baker
the happy one.
“Strasburg never shows any
emotion. He didn’t even smile
after he hit the home run. So you
never know what he’s thinking
on the mound either or what he’s
going to throw,” Tanner Roark
said. “He’s got four five-star
pitches that he can throw any
time in any count. But it’s that
laserlike focus that’s amazing.
“I asked him, ‘Do you even
enjoy your own walk-up song?’ ”
Roark said.
“Don’t know what it is,”
Strasburg told Roark. “But I
wouldn’t hear it anyway.”
Almost everything the public
thinks it knows about Strasburg
was either wrong from the
beginning or has become
incorrect with time. Strasburg
does not have a durability
problem. Since his teammandated shutdown in 2012, he
has made 134 starts over the past
five seasons, only one less than
Clayton Kershaw, the same
number as Felix Hernandez and
more than Jake Arrieta (130),
Johnny Cueto (128) or Adam
Wainwright (126) and not far
behind David Price (139). He’s
tied for 30th in starts over that
time. So an average team has one
pitcher this durable.
Strasburg does not lack
competitiveness. In games in
which he gets little run support
(zero to two runs) or large
support (six or more runs), he
has a career ERA around 3.60.
But in the kind of games that
demand gutting out a close win,
when he gets medium runsupport of three, four or five
runs, he’s 32-10 with a 2.40 ERA.
Strasburg does not fade as
games get deeper. In fact, he gets
better. With every 25 pitches he
throws, his on-base-plusslugging percentage versus
trends down: .705, .629, .590,
.600 and .590 from his 101st pitch
onward. It’s the same pattern
with batting average. Strasburg
just gets tougher deeper: .243,
.224, .216, .220 and .190 after
pitch 100.
On Wednesday, Strasburg
threw 110 pitches in the second
shutout of his career. No, he
doesn’t have many complete
games. Few do these days. But
he’s as likely to snap your neck
for seven innings, the modern
complete game, as just about
anybody. Giancarlo Stanton went
0 for 4 against Strasburg, though
with a 114-mph groundout that
Trea Turner may remember for a
while.
In his way, Strasburg
symbolizes this entire team. The
Nats lead the NL in runs. They
are the only NL team since World
War II to have three of the top
four ERA starters in the league —
Max Scherzer (2.21), Gio
Gonzalez (2.40) and Strasburg.
And they have gotten a 1.88 ERA
from the top five men in a
revamped bullpen, with 16 of
17 save conversions, since the AllStar Game.
All of that is lovely — the Nats’
excellence in the face of
hardship, all the fancy stats and
Strasburg’s dazzling 60-start run.
It’s real and of value but
unfinished art.
Can they do it in October?
Especially the big, hairy, scary,
furry animal who needs to take
’em home?
recovery time, Harper pointed
out, “We don’t have much.”
Nationals minor league affiliates’
seasons end next week, so
Harper’s options for rehab at-bats
likely will be limited to simulated
games in West Palm Beach, Fla.
“That’s one reason I’m playing
Jayson [Werth] in right, too. You
don’t know if [Harper] has hit a
plateau of healing. You’re asking
me questions I really don’t know.
Nobody knows. Only the Lord
knows, really,” Baker said.
Werth played right field
Wednesday night with Howie
Kendrick in left and Michael A.
Taylor in center. That trio would
likely compose the postseason
outfield if Harper is not
immediately available. At this
point, Harper’s future consists of
flying with the team to
Milwaukee and Miami, where he
can continue to receive daily
treatment from the Nationals’
training staff and stay around the
team.
“I’m just going to take what’s
best for this organization and
what’s best for myself. I don’t
want to come back and I pop
something and have to have
surgery and something goes bad,”
Harper said.
“. . . Just trying to take it day by
day and worry about doing what I
can each day that I can come in
here.”
thomas.boswell@washpost.com
For more by Thomas Boswell, visit
washingtonpost.com/boswell.
NATIONALS NOTES
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/nationals
Harper frustrated
by his slow progress
Bryce Harper has spent much of
this week sitting at his locker or
in one of the big leather chairs in
the back of the clubhouse, Players
Weekend hat pulled low and not
smiling much. Harper isn’t
usually a particularly vocal
clubhouse presence, and he isn’t
known for a perpetual smile. But
something about Harper has
been sullen this week — subdued
somehow. Even the return of his
good friend Jayson Werth didn’t
seem to perk him up.
“I can sense a little frustration
in his voice when I ask him, ‘How
you doing?’ or say, ‘You’re walking
good,’ ” Manager Dusty Baker
said. “Usually he’s not a smart
aleck, but lately he’s been a little
short in temperament, and I can
tell that’s because he wants to
play.”
But Harper is not close to
playing. He is not even close to
running. Asked what he has been
able to do in the two-plus weeks
since suffering a severe bone
bruise, Harper shrugged and
said, “Calf raises?”
“If I wasn’t an athlete and was
just an average person, I probably
wouldn’t even be on it and doing
anything,” Harper said. “I’m
thankful enough to be able to
have a strong unit in there in the
training staff to come in there
every day and work hard and be
able to do the things I need to do
around my body that take a little
stress off the knee area and calf
area and certain things that can
speed up recovery and speed up
those places around it that I can
be stronger again. When I come
back I don’t have to rely on one
muscle or one thing in my body to
keep me going, I can rely on
everything. That’s what we’re
doing right now.”
Harper also revealed that he
suffered a calf strain in that
seemingly gruesome injury two
weeks ago and is wearing a sleeve
on the area. He said the strain is
particularly trying because he
has never had such a muscle
injury.
Most of his injuries — such as
the thumb injury he suffered
sliding or the knee injury from
running into a wall or this injury
— have been impact, freak
occurrences.
Muscle injuries such as this
calf issue can be hard to predict
and difficult to rehab.
If he wants to play in the first
game of the National League
Division Series, Harper has five
weeks and two days to get going.
As Baker said Wednesday, “He’s a
long ways from running.” Of his
— Chelsea Janes
D6
EZ
O’s extend
win streak
to seven
with sweep
ORIOLES 8,
MARINERS 7
BY
EDUARDO A. ENCINA
baltimore — The Baltimore
Orioles’ seven-game winning
streak — the longest active streak
in the major leagues — suddenly
has put them within reach of the
second American League wildcard spot, a place that seemed
like a pipe dream the last time the
Orioles played a series with the
Mariners.
Two weeks ago, the Orioles
boarded a plane back to Baltimore after dropping two of three
in Seattle to conclude a losing
West Coast trip. At that point, six
teams — including the Mariners
— were ahead of the Orioles in the
chase for the final playoff spot.
The teams have gone in opposite directions since, and after
their 8-7 win over the Mariners
on Wednesday afternoon, the
Orioles finished the night
11/2 games out of the second AL
wild-card spot.
“To be honest, I don’t follow
[the standings] much, but today I
see the standings, and, you know,
we’re right there,” said second
baseman Jonathan Schoop, who
drove in the winning run with a
two-out single in the eighth inning and hit his 30th home run.
“So we just got to keep winning
and we just got to go out there
and compete and don’t worry
about the stats too much. Just try
to go out there and win and win,
and we’re going to be there.”
Catcher Welington Castillo
had a career-high four hits, including an RBI double in the
second and a two-run homer in
the fourth. Over his past
19 games, he is hitting .400 (28 for
70) with seven homers and
20 RBI.
The Orioles (68-65) have won
nine of 12 since the end of that
trip, including their past seven
with back-to-back three-game
sweeps — first against the Boston
Red Sox at Fenway Park, then
against the Mariners at Camden
Yards. In the process, they have
jumped the Mariners (66-68) in
the wild-card standings, handing
them their fifth straight loss.
Seattle ended its 12-game road
trip wearily with a 5-7 record.
“What’s really tough, you come
through the emotion of winning
three games at Fenway and then
come back home and there’s another challenge of a team that
you’re trying to catch ahead of
you,” Orioles Manager Buck
Showalter said. “But it’s that time
of year. You can see the finish line
a little bit now.”
The Orioles are starting to
come together as the final full
month of the season looms. With
one game remaining in August,
they have 17 wins, their most of
any month this season (they were
15-7 in April).
“That’s the team that I’ve seen
before when I wasn’t here,” said
Castillo, who anchored the offense. “Everything is working out
now. The pitchers are pitching
better, we’re hitting better, playing defense better — everything
is definitely going better for us.
That’s the kind of team that I’ve
seen playing before.”
The Orioles had moved within
a game of the second wild-card
position before the Minnesota
Twins routed the Chicago White
Sox on Wednesday night.
“I don’t know about me,” Showalter said when asked whether he
has been waiting for his team to
put together a winning streak
after spending most of the past
three months in mediocrity. “I
think we have. I think the players
have.”
— Baltimore Sun
EVAN HABEEB/USA TODAY SPORTS
Jonathan Schoop’s RBI single
in the eighth put the O’s ahead
to stay in a sweep of Seattle.
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
AUGUST 31 , 2017
Hokies’ Jackson is ready for his first major test
Virginia Tech again
opens season with
an untested quarterback
BY
GENE WANG
blacksburg, va. — Virginia
Tech quarterback Josh Jackson
heads into this season having not
played a down of major college
football. The glaring omission on
his résumé is hardly cause for
anguish though, Hokies Coach
Justin Fuente and offensive coordinator Brad Cornelsen have said
repeatedly since announcing the
redshirt freshman as the starter
two weeks into training camp.
Jackson is set to make his
debut in the Hokies’ season
opener Sunday night against No.
22 West Virginia at FedEx Field.
He will be the third starting
quarterback in as many seasons
for Virginia Tech, which opened
at No. 21 in the Associated Press
preseason rankings.
“I have seen a guy that has
grown in confidence and mastery of what we’re trying to accomplish,” Fuente, in his second
year at Virginia Tech, said of
Jackson. “But we saw some of
that before we named him the
starter, which is obviously what
led us to that conclusion.”
Given their recent history of
transforming unproven quarterbacks into record-setters, Fuente
and Cornelsen have every reason
to be at peace with the decision.
Last season, redshirt junior
Jerod Evans won the starting job
shortly before the opener without having taken a snap in a
major college game. He went on
to set eight single-season Virginia Tech records, most notably
for total offense (4,392 yards),
passing yards (3,546), touchdown passes (29) and rushing
yards by a quarterback (846)
before declaring for the NFL
draft.
One year earlier, when Fuente
was coach at Memphis and Cornelsen was his offensive coordinator, Paxton Lynch set Tigers
single-season records for passing
yards (3,776), touchdown passes
(28) and completion percentage
(66.8). Lynch was selected
26th overall by the Denver Broncos in the 2016 NFL draft.
Fuente and Cornelsen, then
the quarterbacks coach, had elevated Lynch to starter when he
was a redshirt freshman in 2013.
“Josh, he kind of goes about his
business the same way since he
showed up a year and a half ago, I
guess,” Cornelsen said. “Being
named the starter hasn’t
changed him. He’s going to continue to become a bigger leader
for our offense as the season goes
along. That’s something that
comes pretty natural to him. He’s
not a kid that feels like he’s going
MATT GENTRY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Josh Jackson will make his debut against West Virginia. “Being named the starter hasn’t changed him,” coordinator Brad Cornelsen said.
to have to manufacture some
leadership. I think it’s in there.”
Jackson climbed to first string
following a three-way competition with AJ Bush and Hendon
Hooker, both of whom also are
untested at this level. Bush, the
Hokies’ No. 2 quarterback, transferred from Iowa Western Community College and was at Nebraska for two seasons but did
not play.
At this time last year, Hooker
was preparing for his senior season in high school.
Jackson had another advantage coming into camp: He traveled with the Hokies last season.
He studied Evans’s habits while
learning the finer points of the
offensive scheme that helped
Virginia Tech win the ACC’s
Coastal Division on the way to a
10-4 record.
Among other deciding factors
in promoting Jackson included
his attention to ball security and
quick decision-making.
“Last year I got to prepare and
get ready like I was going to play,”
Jackson said. “Being able to take
that into this season I think will
be very helpful. Obviously I’ve
had since January to prepare and
look at West Virginia. It kind of
gives you a lot more of an edge, I
guess you could say, but when it
gets to the week to week, I think
that will definitely help me a lot.”
Jackson’s youth underscores a
VIRGINIA TECH FOOTBALL SCHEDULE
Date
Opponent
Time
Sun.
vs. West Virginia*
7:30
Sept. 9
Delaware
3:30
Sept. 16
at East Carolina
3:30
Sept. 23
Old Dominion
TBA
Sept. 30
Clemson
TBA
Oct. 7
at Boston College
TBA
Oct. 21
North Carolina
TBA
Oct. 28
Duke
TBA
Nov. 4
at Miami
TBA
Nov. 11
at Georgia Tech
TBA
Nov. 18
Pittsburgh
TBA
Nov. 24
at Virginia
TBA
Dec. 2
ACC championship**
TBA
* at FedEx Field; ** if applicable, in Charlotte
prevailing trend within the offense, which in addition to Evans
lost starting wide receivers Isaiah Ford and Bucky Hodges and
starting running back Sam Rogers.
Ford completed his career as
Virginia Tech’s all-time leader in
receiving yards (2,967) and
touchdowns (24). The seventhround draft pick of the Miami
Dolphins is the only player in
school history with 1,000 yards
receiving in a season after doing
so in 2015 and 2016.
The Hokies’ only returning
player with at least 19 catches
and 300 yards receiving last season is Cam Phillips (DeMatha
High), who operated in the slot.
This season, the senior becomes
the primary wide receiver on the
outside, with redshirt junior C.J.
Carroll (Good Counsel) and
sophomore Eric Kumah (Forest
Park) in the mix to contribute.
Among Virginia Tech’s top
four leading rushers last season,
only Travon McMillian (Hylton),
a redshirt junior, is back. Evans
led the Hokies in rushing, Rogers
was third, and Marshawn Williams was fourth. Williams retired from football in January
after undergoing knee surgery
for the third time since 2014.
The dearth of experience in
the backfield leaves redshirt
sophomore Deshawn McClease
and junior Steven Peoples in line
to share carries with McMillian,
who amassed 1,043 yards and
seven touchdowns on 200 attempts two years ago.
Fuente’s offense doesn’t necessarily rely on a featured runner,
instead
spreading
touches
around to keep defenses guessing and players fresh. Virginia
Tech just happened to lean on
Evans last season, according to
Fuente, because of his size
(240 pounds), speed and elusiveness.
“I think the leadership we
have in me, Travon McMillian
and [redshirt senior guard] Wyatt Teller, I think that can help us
greatly to bring along some of
these young guys,” Phillips said.
College Football Week 1
Some of this weekend’s notable area
and national games
Tonight
Tulsa at No. 10 Oklahoma State,
7:30
No. 2 Ohio State at Indiana, 8
Tomorrow
Navy at Florida Atlantic, 8
No. 8 Washington at Rutgers, 8
Utah State at No. 9 Wisconsin, 9
Saturday
Maryland at No. 23 Texas, noon
Kent State at No. 5 Clemson, noon
Akron at No. 6 Penn State, noon
William & Mary at Virginia, 3:30
UTEP at No. 7 Oklahoma, 3:30
No. 11 Michigan vs. No. 17 Florida
in Arlington, Tex., 3:30
Western Michigan
at No. 4 Southern Cal, 5:15
No. 1 Alabama
vs. No. 3 Florida State in Atlanta, 8
Sunday
No. 21 Virginia Tech vs. No. 22
West Virginia at FedEx Field, 7:30
“I think they’ve done a great job
thus far. I’ve tried to lead them as
best I can, and I’m going to
continue to do that hopefully to
bring success to our team.”
gene.wang@washpost.com
Emphasis on footwear might be a step in right direction for Navy
MIDSHIPMEN FROM D1
Academy rules from wearing
sneakers or flip-flops. For them
and the rest of their classmates,
hard-soled Oxfords shined to
Navy specifications, paired with
a uniform of service whites or
dress blues, are required.
And they get one pair of shoes,
issued when they’re plebes, that
they typically wear for four years.
“We had a huge summit
among the training staff, the
weight room staff, equipment
people,” Niumatalolo said. “What
could it be? Somebody brought
that up, and I thought it was a
pretty valid point. Guys are walking around in hard-soled shoes
all day.
“I have a hard enough time
wearing tennis shoes.”
The stress on a pair of shoes
used for roughly 10 hours each
day for the length of a college
career frequently leads to considerable wear on the heel, sole or
both. That deterioration in turn
can lead to supination in the
foot, according to Jim Berry,
Navy’s assistant athletic director
for sports medicine.
“We recognized that a lot of
these kids, their foot injuries
could be caused by their uniform
shoes,” Berry said. “We noticed
some of the kids, their heels were
starting to wear, kind of like
dress shoes you might have had
for a few years. Your back heel is
kind of worn out.”
Before the start of his 10th full
season at Navy, which begins
Friday night with a game at
Florida Atlantic, Niumatalolo
mandated his players have their
shoes cobbled if they discovered
noticeable wear. Midshipmen
have access to a cobbler shop in
Bancroft Hall, the largest dormitory in the world, and many
players had their uniform shoes
repaired during the offseason.
Precautionary
measures
didn’t end there. A team of specialists from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in
Bethesda went to campus to
analyze players’ feet. Included in
the procedure was assessing how
players stood up and whether
they rolled their feet in or out
during that process.
Players deemed at a higher
risk for foot or ankle injuries
were fitted for orthotics to be
used in their uniform dress shoes
and, in some cases, for their
cleats as well. Carmona, a senior
wide receiver who started 11
games last season before suffering a Lisfranc sprain in his right
foot, is among those wearing
customized orthotics in both his
uniform shoes and cleats this
year.
“It seems to make a difference,” Carmona said after practice earlier this month. “Me personally, I have a high arch, so the
orthotics just kind of takes away
the gap. I mean, I’ve felt the
difference. I feel more secure.”
While Niumatalolo and his
staff have not uncovered a definitive link between well-worn
dress shoes to elevated instances
of foot injuries, some data suggests a correlation, according
Thomas Sanders, a Falls Churchbased sports orthopedist who
specializes in foot and ankle
injuries.
“Certain types of injuries I
would say it certainly increases
the risk for,” said Sanders, a
former all-American rugby player at Virginia. “I would think
stress fractures would absolutely
be created in that setting because
dress shoes tend to be tighter.
They tend to not have as much
support, especially if you’re doing a lot of standing.
“Stress fractures are known to
be more common in marchers
and in military recruits.”
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Like the rest of the Midshipmen at the U.S. Naval Academy, the
football players must wear dress shoes for roughly 10 hours a day.
“Guys are walking
around in hardsoled shoes all day.
I have a hard
enough time
wearing tennis
shoes.”
Ken Niumatalolo,
Navy football coach, on a new
emphasis on footwear after
several Navy players suffered
season-ending foot injuries last
year. Navy is one of the few
programs in Division I in which
players have to wear a school
uniform during the day — and
the uniform includes mandatory
dress shoes.
Sanders added that Lisfranc
injuries, which involve bones or
ligaments in the middle of the
foot, also could be associated
with compromised dress shoes,
assuming an individual has been
standing a great deal, although
that connection is a bit more
blurred.
Navy’s triple-option offense
might be a factor as well, Sanders
indicated, because of the constant and often sudden change of
direction required in such formations. The Midshipmen have
employed the triple option since
former coach Paul Johnson arrived in 2002 and hired Niumatalolo as his top assistant.
“The guys are so big and
strong and fast now,” said Niumatalolo, who took over fulltime in 2008 after Johnson departed for Georgia Tech. “All the
stops, starting, planting, it’s a lot
of torque on your feet.”
In addition to remodeled
guidelines
regarding
dress
shoes, Niumatalolo, his assistants and medical staff have
updated practice and game-day
preparations to curtail foot injuries.
It starts with new “foot activation stations” in the locker room.
There, players must undergo rigorous foot warmups before getting taped. Trainers have been
instructed to ask players when
they are on the training table
whether they have complied.
“If we haven’t done it, we have
to go back and do it,” said Brown,
who missed six games last year
with a sprained ankle. “There’s
just a lot more preventive stuff in
the training room nowadays.”
Players also are set to receive
fresh cleats far more frequently
from Under Armour, Navy’s athletic apparel sponsor since 2014.
The goal is to have new footwear
available every couple of games.
During the offseason, Baltimore-headquartered Under Armour sent representatives from
its design team to the academy to
educate the coaching staff and
players about its cleats, informing them of various options depending on a particular need.
If, for instance, a player has
turf toe, Under Armour can provide a partially or fully stiffened
shoe at the request of Berry in
consultation with Greg Morgenthaler, the football team’s director of equipment operations. The
same applies for players in need
of wider cleats and those who
require more stiffness in the
front of the shoe or the back.
“It’s been a whole process,”
Niumatalolo said. “All of us, myself, all of us have to learn better
because people get hurt, but it
can’t be because of our negligence. We’ve got to do the best we
can and make sure that we look
at everything, look under every
stone.”
gene.wang@washpost.com
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
M2
professional football
NFL NOTES
REDSKINS NOTES
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/insider
Final preseason game
crucial for RB Brown
Mack Brown is facing a familiar
situation in Thursday’s
preseason finale. The Redskins
running back has one final
chance to make an impression
against the Tampa Bay
Buccaneers at Raymond James
Stadium, just as he did last year.
While it didn’t result in a spot
on the 53-man roster, Brown’s
149-yard rushing performance
sealed a spot on the team’s 10man practice squad. Brown was
promoted to the active roster in
Week 8, serving as the team’s
third running back. In Week 16,
Brown scored his first career
touchdown, a 61-yard run
against the Chicago Bears.
So, yes, this game does matter
to players such as Brown.
“That last game, I said I got to
put all my marbles in, give
myself the best chance to be on
somebody’s roster,” Brown said.
“Looking back on it again, we’ve
got the same team, last game.
Same thing, I’m putting all my
marbles in and just be patient.
Whatever I see, hit full speed.”
Brown wants to get his best
efforts in the final preseason
game on film so that either the
Redskins or one of the other
31 teams can take a chance on
him. An undrafted rookie out of
Florida in 2015, Brown was cut
by Washington after the
preseason that fall and went two
months without a team before
signing with the Redskins’
practice squad.
A year ago, Brown hoped to
avoid a repeat of his rookie
season, and despite a heavy
downpour from a tropical storm
in Tampa, he ran well.
“My mind-set is just that I’ve
got to play,” Brown said. “I don’t
care if it’s raining or snowing,
I’ve just got to play. You’ve got to
give your best film for the last
game and your best film for
every game, but that’s your last
chance to really show teams that
this guy can play in the league.
Same thing this year. If it rains,
it don’t matter. We’ve got to
come in full speed and play with
your brothers for the last time. A
lot of guys that are going to be
on the field with us Thursday, we
all ain’t going to be here
together. So it’s going to be fun
playing the last game with a lot
of these guys.”
Top players honored
Quarterback Kirk Cousins,
linebacker Ryan Kerrigan and
multifaceted Jamison Crowder
were honored as the Redskins’
offensive, defensive and special
teams players of the 2016 season.
Tight end Vernon Davis, who
took part in a USO tour to visit
troops in Afghanistan, also was
recognized for his work on
behalf of U.S. servicemen and
servicewomen. In presenting
Davis, Justin Constantine, a
Marine and Purple Heart
recipient who survived a bullet
wound to the head during his
2006 tour in Iraq, spoke about
what it means to service
members when Redskins players
and team officials paid attention
to their service and their
sacrifice.
“Everyone here can follow
Vernon’s example,” said
Constantine, who received a
standing ovation from the crowd
of Redskins coaches, players and
fans at the Hilton McLean
Tysons Corner ballroom.
Cousins, 29, set a secondconsecutive single-season
franchise record for passing
yards 4,917 in 2016 while
throwing for 25 touchdowns and
12 interceptions.
Kerrigan, 29, started all
16 games for the sixth
consecutive season, finishing
with 11 sacks and Pro Bowl
honors.
And Crowder, 24, was among
the NFL’s best punt returners
last season, averaging 12.1 yards
on his 27 returns while playing a
major role in the passing game.
Neither Redskins owner
Daniel Snyder nor team
president Bruce Allen addressed
the audience. But Snyder
introduced Virginia Gov. Terry
McAuliffe, who made what has
become an annual over-the-top
case for the team to build its next
stadium in the Commonwealth,
extolling the virtues of the state’s
wineries, craft breweries and
varieties of oysters and dolphins.
last season. Ratings suffered, particularly early in the season. That’s
not reason enough, he said, for his
crews to ignore the protests entirely.
“Just because it might not be
popular with the viewer at home
doesn’t mean we’re not going to
cover it,” he said. “There’s a lot of
things that you do on television
that may not be popular, but
they’re important to do from a
journalistic standpoint. If we
think it’s important journalistically and we think it’s part of the
story, I don’t want to tell them to
do it or not to do it.”
Network executives say that
even if there’s a plan in place for
Week 1, it could change by Week 2.
If the protests continue, the news
value could diminish, and the
broadcast crews will adjust accordingly.
“I question — just being fully
transparent — when is there viewer fatigue and for how many
causes?” Rothman said
Said McManus: “Week 1, I think
it’s certainly going to be a story. If
it’s still being done the same way
in Week 4, 5 or 6, I’m not sure it
still is a story. So we’ll make that
decision as the season progresses.”
rick.maese@washpost.com
— Baltimore Sun
— Master Tesfatsion
and Liz Clarke
REDSKINS FROM D1
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Brian Quick, left, has the biggest résumé of the wide receivers on the Redskins’ roster bubble. He caught 41 passes for the Rams last year.
has seven virtual locks: tackles
Trent Williams, Morgan Moses
and Ty Nsekhe, guards Shawn
Lauvao and Brandon Scherff and
centers Spencer Long and Chase
Roullier. But an eighth and possibly ninth could make the initial
roster. Coaches still need to settle
on their swing guard. Entering
offseason practices, it was expected that 2015 fourth-round pick
Kouandjio might have a chance to
challenge Lauvao for the starting
left guard job. But he hasn’t
shown the progress coaches had
wanted. Kouandjio appeared in
five games last year, starting two
in Lauvao’s spot. But midway
through camp, Kalis — an undrafted rookie out of Michigan —
replaced him as the second-team
left guard. And Catalina, an undrafted rookie out of Georgia,
overtook Isaiah Williams as the
backup right guard. Only one
guard likely will make the roster
out of this bunch. Who delivers
Thursday night? Outside chance
of another tackle? Possibly. Vin-
ston Painter appeared in five
games last season and has
worked primarily as the backup
right tackle. But needs elsewhere
will determine whether the Redskins keep eight or nine linemen.
Cornerback: Quinton Dunbar vs. Fabian Moreau and
Joshua Holsey — Entering his
third season, Dunbar seemed to
have a good chance to make this
roster as a backup to Josh Norman and Bashaud Breeland. He
boasts impressive size, length
(6-2, 197) and speed. In 25 games,
he has 39 tackles and two interceptions to go with 10 pass breakups. But Moreau, the team’s thirdround pick, wasted no time making a strong impression after
missing offseason practices and
the start of training camp while
recovering from a torn pectoral
muscle. Moreau has shined on
special teams, where he routinely
is the first man downfield on punt
coverage, and as a cornerback,
displaying good instincts, coverage and tackling skills. He could
start in 2018. A group of Norman,
Breeland, top nickelback Kendall
Fuller and Dunbar and Moreau
would represent an improvement. However, Holsey, the seventh-round pick out of Auburn,
has created a good problem for
the Redskins. He has played well
behind Fuller — so good that the
team traded Fuller’s backup,
Dashaun Phillips, to Pittsburgh
last week. It’s hard to imagine the
team carrying six cornerbacks,
especially because of the likelihood that they go with five safeties. But Holsey might be too good
for the team to cut in hopes of
passing him through waivers to
sign to the practice squad. Does
that upside Moreau and Holsey
offer make Dunbar the odd man
out?
Special teams: Lynden Trail
vs. Zach Vigil, Chris Carter,
Robert Davis and Fish Smithson — The Redskins are crowded
at outside linebacker, inside linebacker, wide receiver (as mentioned) and safety. However,
there’s always a guy who forces
his way onto the roster because of
strong special teams play or a
good showing in the final preseason outing. The Redskins are
looking for one or two core special teamers. Carter, an outside
linebacker, was signed for that
reason this offseason, and he has
played better than expected on
defense. But fellow outside linebacker Trail boasts potential on
defense as well while embracing
the chance to prove himself on
special teams. Vigil joined the
team late last season for insurance at inside linebacker and on
special teams. He has lined up on
nearly every special teams unit, as
has Davis. And Smithson, an undrafted safety out of Kansas, last
week held down a spot on the
starting kick return unit while
also recording an interception on
defense. These and others will try
to earn a spot by showing they’re
willing to do the dirty work
Thursday night.
mike.jones@washpost.com
As NFL season nears, networks make plans to cover protests
BY
R ICK M AESE
new york — The NFL’s regular
season opens next week, and television network executives and
broadcast crews all face the same
quandary: When the national anthem plays, some players on the
sidelines likely will kneel or perhaps raise fists in the air, and
networks must decide whether to
include these protests as part of
their game broadcasts.
For most, at least in the league’s
opening week, the plan is to make
mention of any potential protests
as part of their coverage, either
from the commentators in the
broadcast booth or the reporters
working the sidelines.
Sean McManus, the chairman
of CBS Sports, says he’s not giving
any directives or orders to his
broadcast teams and they’re free
to discuss sideline protests as they
see fit.
If “they’ve got an opinion or a
thought on it, they’re free to express it,” he said Wednesday. “I
have said, however, that we’re
there to broadcast the football
game and not get involved in political or social issues. So I don’t
think you’ll see a lot of commentary on the part of our commen-
tary teams.”
Tony Romo, the recently retired
quarterback who is embarking on
his first season in the CBS booth, is
prepared to address the matter —
and then move on and focus on the
action.
“I don’t think it’s something
we’ll go into great detail on,” he
said. “I think people have talked
about it long enough. I think that
people don’t want to hear a lot
about politics or religion on air.
They want football, so we’ll stick
more with that.”
The networks dealt with the
same issue last season. Saying he
was protesting police brutality
and racial inequality, quarterback
Colin Kaepernick was the first to
protest the national anthem at the
start of the 2016 season. Even
though he faced significant blowback and is out of a job, other
players have continued the protests this year, especially following an incendiary white nationalist rally in Charlottesville earlier
this month.
If anything, the preseason has
shown the movement might have
some momentum entering the
regular season as anthem protests
have increased from week to
week.
While players such as Oakland
running back Marshawn Lynch
and Seattle defensive end Michael
Bennett have sat during the anthem this preseason, others, such
as San Francisco safety Eric Reid
and Philadelphia cornerback Ron
Brooks, have opted to take a knee.
Still others, such as Philadelphia
safety Malcolm Jenkins and Los
Angeles Rams linebacker Robert
Quinn, have raised their fists in
the air. A handful of white players
— such as Philadelphia defensive
lineman Chris Long and Seattle
center Justin Britt — have shown
their support by resting a hand on
the shoulder of a protesting teammate.
A dozen members of the Cleveland Browns took a knee together
during their second preseason
game, with five players resting a
hand on a teammate’s shoulder.
Five days later, in their next game,
30 members of the Browns locked
arms during the anthem, by far
the largest pregame demonstration to date.
So network bosses know the
protests likely will carry over into
the regular season and have been
discussing how to treat it on air.
Jay Rothman, ESPN’s vice president of production and a veteran
“Monday Night Football” producer, says TV crews have a responsibility to show the protests
and to present them in the proper
context. “Monday Night Football”
opens its season in Minnesota on
the 16th anniversary of the Sept. 11
attacks. His crew has been working with the Vikings to include any
pregame commemorative events
the team has planned but also will
keep an eye out for player protests.
“If you go back to 9/11 and think
about it: 3,000 people died,
6,000 injured, hundreds of rescue
workers lost. It was the greatest
terrorist attack on our country. We
feel good about showing it,” he
said. “Should there be protests
during that, I do think we have a
responsibility to show it.”
But rather than simply show
the protests, Rothman wants his
crews to talk to players and coaches so they can explain to viewers
the feelings behind the protests —
“the why,” as Rothman says.
That is sure to rankle fans who
have been turned off by the anthem protests and the attention
they have received. McManus is
plenty familiar with the backlash
the protests have provoked and
says it’s one of the reasons fans
cited for tuning out football games
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
Joe Haden needed a job, a
change of scenery and a chance at
a Super Bowl.
The Pittsburgh Steelers were
more than happy to give the longtime Cleveland Browns cornerback a shot at all three.
The Steelers signed Haden to a
three-year contract Wednesday
night just hours after the Browns
granted Haden his release.
Haden, a two-time Pro Bowl
selection, gives the defending AFC
North champions an upgrade in
the secondary in their bid to chase
down Super Bowl champion New
England.
Haden’s deal has a total value of
$27 million, said a person who
spoke to the Associated Press on
condition of anonymity because
financial details were not released. Initial talks between Pittsburgh and Haden were first reported by ESPN.
The Browns cut Haden earlier
Wednesday, breaking ties with one
of the few fixtures for a franchise
that has spent the entirety of Haden’s seven-year career rebuilding
and then rebuilding some more.
They don’t do that in Pittsburgh. The Steelers reached the
AFC title game in January only to
get blown out by the Patriots, with
Tom Brady throwing for 383 yards
and three touchdowns.
TEXANS: The team headed
home to flood-ravaged Houston
after its final preseason game
against the Dallas Cowboys was
canceled.
“We’ve got several members of
our travel party — our coaches, our
players, our staff members —
whose families have been evacuated,” General Manager Rick Smith
said. “There is so much devastation in the city and the region, and
we want to be part of the recovery
process.”
The game scheduled for Thursday night had been moved from
Houston to the home of the Cowboys because of widespread flooding in the Houston area in the
wake of Hurricane Harvey. The
decision to cancel the game altogether was announced when the
Texans said local authorities had
found a safe route for the team to
drive the 250 miles home.
Meanwhile, Jaguars owner
Shad Khan said he would be willing to swap home dates with the
Texans in the regular season. The
Jaguars are scheduled to open the
season in Houston on Sept. 10. The
Texans play in Jacksonville on
Dec. 17.
BENGALS: Linebacker Vontaze Burfict had his NFL suspension reduced from five to three
games for his egregious hit on a
Chiefs running back during a preseason game.
During the second preseason
game, Burfict leveled running
back Anthony Sherman on a pass
play when he wasn’t the intended
target.
Burfict appealed and had two
games shaved off the punishment.
He will miss home games against
the Ravens and Texans and a road
game with the Packers. He will be
eligible to return for a game in
Cleveland on Oct. 1.
BROWNS: Cleveland made
its final move with offensive lineman Cam Erving, another of the
team’s first-round busts.
Erving, who was shifted from
guard to center to tackle during
two seasons with Cleveland, was
traded to Kansas City for a 2018
fifth-round draft pick.
It ends a disappointing stay in
Cleveland for the No. 19 overall
pick in 2015.
Erving’s versatility had attracted him to the Browns, who were
convinced the former Florida
State standout could be a building
block in their turnaround.
RAVENS: Eleven days after
Coach John Harbaugh expressed
that he would like to bring Zachary Orr on board, Baltimore hired
its former inside linebacker to
work with the coaching and personnel staffs this season.
Orr will work alongside linebackers coach Don Martindale
and observe special teams meetings during the season before
transitioning to evaluating players for the personnel department
in the offseason.
An undrafted rookie in 2014,
Orr led the defense with 132 tackles last season. But on Jan. 20, he
announced his retirement after he
learned he had a congenital spine
condition that would have put him
at an increase risk of paralysis or
worse if he continued to play.
Position
battles
abound
in finale
gery. Now the Redskins have a
need for another nose tackle. Enter 2016 practice squad members
Francis and Mbu. The 6-foot-5,
337-pound Francis and the 6-3,
323-pound Mbu both saw time at
nose last week after Taylor’s injury. Now they will try one last time
to force their way onto this roster.
Mbu impressed coaches with his
work ethic and strong fundamentals. Francis has good size,
strength and quickness. Versatility also will be key: Defensive line
coach Jim Tomsula wants his
linemen to play multiple positions.
Wide receiver: Brian Quick
vs. Maurice Harris and Robert Davis — Four wide receivers
seem set (Terrelle Pryor Sr., Jamison Crowder, Josh Doctson and
Ryan Grant), but the Redskins
will put five and possibly six on
the 53-man roster. Quick’s addition excited fans this offseason
because of his size (6-3, 218) and
production (41 catches, 564 yards,
three touchdowns for the Rams
last year). But he didn’t move the
needle much in spring practices
or training camp. He has produced in the preseason (five
catches for 39 yards) but also has
had some crucial drops. He’s a
willing special teams contributor,
which is key. But the Redskins
also like younger, comparable receivers. Harris, who showed
flashes in spot duty last season,
has good size (6-3, 200) and versatility as a receiver and return man
but missed much of camp and two
preseason games with a knee injury. Davis, a rookie sixth-round
pick out of Georgia State, has
great size (6-3, 217) and speed and
plays with a toughness that helps
him on special teams. Davis needs
polish. But coaches like him.
Offensive line: Arie Kouandjio vs. Kyle Kalis and Tyler
Catalina — The offensive line
Steelers
sign Haden
soon after
his release
D8
EZ
. THURSDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
AUGUST 31 , 2017
S C O R E B OAR D
FOOTBALL
NFL preseason
NCAA
NFC
THURSDAY’S GAMES
EASTERN CONFERENCE
EAST
St. Anselm at Wagner, 6
Delaware St. at Delaware, 7
Maine at New Hampshire, 7
Holy Cross at UConn, 7:30
SOUTH
FIU at UCF, 6
Kentucky Christian at Morehead St., 6
Presbyterian at Wake Forest, 6:30
Clarion at UT-Martin, 7
Jacksonville at Mercer, 7
Kennesaw St. at Samford, 7
Kentucky Wesleyan at Murray St., 7
Methodist at Campbell, 7
Tennessee St. at Georgia St., 7
W. Illinois at Tennessee Tech, 7
McNeese St. at Nicholls, 8
Louisiana-Monroe at Memphis, 9
MIDWEST
Austin Peay at Cincinnati, 7
Buffalo at Minnesota, 7
E. Illinois at Indiana St., 7
Elon at Toledo, 7
Rhode Island at Cent. Michigan, 7
Duquesne at S. Dakota St., 8
Ohio St. at Indiana, 8
SOUTHWEST
Tulsa at Oklahoma St., 7:30
Florida A&M vs. Arkansas at Little Rock, Ark., 8
FAR WEST
North Dakota at Utah, 7:30
W. Oregon at Idaho St., 8:30
Sacramento St. at Idaho, 9
New Mexico St. at Arizona St., 10:30
TEAM
W
Toronto FC .....................16
New York City FC ...........14
Columbus .......................13
Chicago ..........................12
New York .......................12
Atlanta United FC ..........10
Montreal ........................10
Philadelphia .....................8
Orlando City .....................8
New England ....................8
D.C. United .......................8
EAST
W
Dallas ....................... 3
Philadelphia ............. 2
N.Y. Giants ............... 1
Washington ............. 1
L
1
1
2
2
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.750
.667
.333
.333
PF
78
67
50
43
PA
70
71
61
61
SOUTH
W
New Orleans ............ 2
Carolina .................... 2
Tampa Bay ............... 1
Atlanta ..................... 0
L
1
1
2
3
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.667
.667
.333
.000
PF
40
78
33
47
PA
27
74
44
64
NORTH
W
Green Bay ................ 2
Chicago .................... 2
Minnesota ................ 2
Detroit ..................... 2
L
1
1
1
1
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.667
.667
.667
.667
PF
62
60
62
68
PA
46
54
61
46
WEST
W
Seattle ..................... 3
L.A. Rams ................ 2
Arizona .................... 2
San Francisco ........... 1
L
0
1
2
2
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
1.000
.667
.500
.333
PF
94
56
85
72
PA
43
52
68
82
EAST
W
N.Y. Jets .................. 1
New England ............ 1
Miami ....................... 1
Buffalo ..................... 0
L
2
2
2
3
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.333
.333
.333
.000
PF
44
77
61
35
PA
51
86
89
50
SOUTH
W
Jacksonville ............. 1
Indianapolis ............. 1
Houston ................... 1
Tennessee ................ 1
L
2
2
2
2
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.333
.333
.333
.333
PF
62
48
44
44
PA
60
63
63
53
NORTH
W
Baltimore ................. 3
Cleveland ................. 3
Pittsburgh ................ 2
Cincinnati ................. 1
L
0
0
1
2
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
1.000
1.000
.667
.333
PF
67
43
52
52
PA
19
29
44
65
WEST
W
Denver ..................... 3
Kansas City .............. 1
L.A. Chargers ........... 1
Oakland .................... 0
L
0
2
2
3
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
1.000
.333
.333
.000
PF
77
60
45
51
PA
48
65
80
68
AFC
JAN KUPPERT/DEUTSCHE PRESSE-AGENTUR
Christian Pulisic, 18, will play for Borussia Dortmund in the
Champions League against Real Madrid and Tottenham Hotspur.
Teenager Pulisic drives
U.S. national soccer team
PULISIC FROM D1
national team.
“It’s all surreal,” Mark said. “I
never planned to push him in any
direction to be so accomplished
at such a young age. It just happens.”
It’s happening quickly. In his
second full season with Dortmund’s first team, the 5-foot-8,
140-pound midfielder scored
against Bayern Munich in the
German Super Cup early this
month and scored and assisted
two weeks later in the league
opener at Wolfsburg. This all has
come on the heels of making
history in spring 2016 as the
youngest player to score twice in
the fabled Bundesliga and a fivegoal portfolio in all competitions
last season.
For the national team, he has
recorded four goals in his past
five appearances and played a
direct role through scoring or
assisting in seven of the past 11
U.S. goals.
“Everything happened a little
bit too fast,” said Pulisic, who will
turn 19 on Sept. 18. “The past year
has been a roller coaster. Being
able to play at the club level at a
high level and then getting called
into the national team, it’s amazing. But I’m just trying to stay as
well grounded as I can, finding
the balance.”
U.S. Coach Bruce Arena also
has tried to strike a balance,
careful not to rush Pulisic but also
granting him the opportunity to
flourish. Last winter, when he
was hired, Arena spoke in cautionary tones about Pulisic’s place
in the U.S. team.
After watching him soar with
club and country, Arena has
grown more comfortable with a
young player carrying grown-up
responsibilities.
“Good players are good players,” Arena said. “At this level, no
one checks your birth certificate.
They don’t care how old you are.
If you’re a player, you’re a player,
and he’s proving it every day.”
Arena appreciates Pulisic’s
age: In the 1980s, at the University of Virginia, he coached
against Mark Pulisic, then a mullet-haired sniper at GMU.
Arena has found the younger
Pulisic to be “surprisingly mature
for his age, surprisingly reserved
yet confident.”
In recent months, that confidence has carried over into a
second stage of his career. After
deferring to older Dortmund and
U.S. teammates, he is demonstrating greater assertiveness
and, when appropriate, selfishness, a necessary quality for menacing attackers.
“My biggest quality is just going out there and being creative,
being dangerous,” he said. “Just
always keeping the defenders on
their toes with that attacking
style.”
Pulisic has been thrust into a
larger role at Dortmund this season following the transfer of
French winger Ousmane Dembele to Barcelona for at least $125
million. Dembele’s sale price has
raised questions about Pulisic’s
value. Dortmund, which has him
under contract through the 201920 season, said he’s not on the
market. Nonetheless, clubs have
come knocking.
On Saturday, in the second
match of the season, Pulisic didn’t
score despite several opportunities. His body language, though,
looked different from last season:
He seemed more comfortable taking on defenders, worked combinations and displayed an insatiable appetite to score.
Last season, he started 15 of 34
league matches and entered as a
sub in 14 others. This campaign,
which also will include Champions League group-stage matches
against Real Madrid and Tottenham Hotspur, it’s his job to lose.
“The credit goes to him, but
also he’s been given a lot of good
breaks and been lucky to have
coaches both here and in Germany who believe in him and
trust him,” his father said. “You
have to be given chances, but you
have to take them.”
The next chances will come in a
U.S. uniform, as the playmaker or
right wing, against Costa Rica on
Friday and at Honduras on Tuesday. Two victories or a victory and
draw would leave the Americans
in good standing ahead of the last
two qualifiers in early October —
and a step closer to a World Cup
berth with a teenager in the global spotlight.
“From the first camp that he’s
come in with our team, he has
found a really good way to fit into
the group,” captain Michael Bradley said. “You can see what a good
kid he is. How much he loves to
play. How much he enjoys the
time with our group. We want to
put him in the best possible condition so that he can play, enjoy
himself and ultimately make the
biggest difference for our team.”
steven.goff@washpost.com
S OC C E R
MLS
FRIDAY’S GAMES
TE NNI S
U.S. Open
L
3
7
12
9
10
8
9
12
11
12
15
T PTS
8
56
5
47
3
42
5
41
3
39
6
36
6
36
7
31
7
31
5
29
4
28
GF
55
48
42
47
38
44
42
36
27
39
22
GA
26
35
42
36
33
32
41
38
39
41
44
L
7
9
5
8
9
7
11
13
14
14
15
T PTS
9
42
8
41
10
40
8
38
5
38
9
36
6
36
5
35
4
25
5
23
4
22
GF
41
48
31
46
37
37
31
40
32
32
24
GA
34
45
19
37
35
33
44
48
52
47
38
At USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center
In New York
MEN’S SINGLES — FIRST ROUND
Taro Daniel, Japan, def. Tommy Paul, United States, 6-1,
4-6, 4-6, 6-2, 6-2; Stefano Travaglia, Italy, def. Fabio
Fognini (22), Italy, 6-4, 7-6 (10-8), 3-6, 6-0; Viktor
Troicki, Serbia, def. Norbert Gombos, Slovakia, 3-6, 6-3,
3-6, 6-4, 6-3; Aleksandr Dolgopolov, Ukraine, def. JanLennard Struff, Germany, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2, 1-6, 6-3; Tomas
Berdych (15), Czech Republic, def. Ryan Harrison, United
States, 6-4, 6-2, 7-6 (7-4); David Goffin (9), Belgium, def.
Julien Benneteau, France, 6-4, 2-6, 6-4, 6-2; Guido Pella,
Argentina, def. Steve Darcis, Belgium, 6-1, 6-2, 6-0; Gael
Monfils (18), France, def. Jeremy Chardy, France, 7-6
(8-6), 6-3, 6-4; Damir Dzumhur, Bosnia-Herzegovina,
def. Pablo Cuevas (27), Uruguay, 7-5, 7-6 (7-3), 6-1;
Cedrik-Marcel Stebe, Germany, def. Nicolas Kicker,
Argentina, 5-7, 6-3, 6-1, 6-1; Andrey Rublev, Russia, def.
Aljaz Bedene, Britain, 6-1, 6-4, 6-4; Grigor Dimitrov (7),
Bulgaria, def. Vaclav Safranek, Czech Republic, 6-1, 6-4,
6-2; Mikhail Youzhny, Russia, def. Blaz Kavcic, Slovenia,
6-3, 5-7, 6-4, 6-3; Fernando Verdasco, Spain, def. Vasek
Pospisil, Canada, 6-2, 0-0; Feliciano Lopez (31), Spain,
def. Andrey Kuznetsov, Russia, 6-4, 7-6 (7-4), 6-7 (7-5),
6-2; Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany, def. Tim Smyczek,
United States, 6-1, 6-4, 6-4; Santiago Giraldo, Colombia,
def. Vincent Millot, France, 6-1, 6-0, 4-6, 4-6, 6-4; Malek
Jaziri, Tunisia, def. Thiago Moura Monteiro, Brazil, 7-6
(7-5), 4-6, 6-3, 5-7, 6-4; John Millman, Australia, def.
Nick Kyrgios (14), Australia, 6-3, 1-6, 6-4, 6-1; Roberto
Bautista-Agut (11), Spain, def. Andreas Seppi, Italy, 6-2,
4-6, 6-2, 7-6 (7-1); Dustin Brown, Germany, def. Thomaz
Bellucci, Brazil, 6-4, 6-3, 6-2; Juan Martin Del Potro (24),
Argentina, def. Henri Laaksonen, Switzerland, 6-4, 7-6
(7-3), 7-6 (7-5); Adrian Mannarino (30), France, def.
Richard Berankis, Lithuania, 6-2, 6-4, 6-2; Taylor Fritz,
United States, def. Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus, 6-4, 6-4,
6-3.
WESTERN CONFERENCE
TEAM
W
Seattle ...........................11
Portland .........................11
Sporting KC ....................10
Houston .........................10
Vancouver ......................11
Dallas ...............................9
San Jose .........................10
Real Salt Lake ................10
Minnesota United ............7
Los Angeles .....................6
Colorado ...........................6
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
Atlanta United FC 2, Philadelphia 2
D.C. United 1, New England 0
Columbus 2, Dallas 1
Vancouver 2, Orlando City 1
Minnesota United 2, Chicago 1
Sporting KC at Houston, ppd.
Real Salt Lake 4, Colorado 1
EAST
Fordham at Army, 6
CCSU at Syracuse, 7
Washington at Rutgers, 8
SOUTH
Navy at FAU, 8
MIDWEST
Charlotte at E. Michigan, 6:30
Utah St. at Wisconsin, 9
Boston College at N. Illinois, 9:30
SOUTHWEST
Richmond vs. Sam Houston St. at Waco, Texas, 7
FAR WEST
Colorado vs. Colorado St. at Denver, 8
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
THURSDAY’S GAMES
SATURDAY‘S GAMES
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 9
Washington at Tampa Bay, 7:30
Cincinnati at Indianapolis, 7
L.A. Rams at Green Bay, 7
Detroit at Buffalo, 7
Jacksonville at Atlanta, 7
Philadelphia at N.Y. Jets, 7
N.Y. Giants at New England, 7:30
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7:30
Miami at Minnesota, 8
Cleveland at Chicago, 8
Baltimore at New Orleans, 8
Dallas vs Houston at Arlington, Texas, 8
Tennessee at Kansas City, 8:30
Arizona at Denver, 9
L.A. Chargers at San Francisco, 10
Seattle at Oakland, 10
EAST
Akron at Penn St., Noon
Dayton at Robert Morris, Noon
Lock Haven at St. Francis (Pa.), Noon
Villanova at Lehigh, 12:30
Youngstown St. at Pittsburgh, 1
Merrimack at Bryant, 3
Lafayette at Monmouth (NJ), 3
Marist at Bucknell, 6
Stetson at Sacred Heart, 6
Morgan St. at Towson, 6
SOUTH
Kent St. at Clemson, Noon
California at North Carolina, 12:20
Bethune-Cookman at Miami, 12:30
NC State vs. South Carolina at Charlotte, N.C., 3
William & Mary at Virginia, 3:30
Alabama A&M at UAB, 3:30
Stony Brook at South Florida, 4
Charleston Southern at Mississippi St., 4
Kentucky at Southern Miss., 4
Newberry at Citadel, 6
James Madison at East Carolina, 6
Virginia St. at Norfolk St., 6
Albany (NY) at Old Dominion, 6
N.C. Central at Duke, 6
Furman at Wofford, 6
NC A&T at Gardner-Webb, 6
Appalachian St. at Georgia,, 6:15
Miami (Ohio) at Marshall, 6:30
UMass at Coastal Carolina, 7
Northwestern St. at Louisiana Tech, 7
SE Louisnaia at Louisiana-Lafayette, 7
Brevard at Davidson, 7
Limestone at ETSU, 7
Miles at Alcorn St., 7
E. Kentucky at W. Kentcuky, 7
Georgia Southern at Auburn, 7:30
South Alabama at Mississippi, 7:30
Tuskegee at Alabama St., 8
Vanderbilt at Middle Tennessee, 8
Grambling St. at Tulane, 8
Florida St. vs. Alabama at Atlanta, 8
BYU vs. LSU at New Orleans, 9:30
MIDWEST
Ball St. at Illinois, Noon
Bowling Green at Michigan St., Noon
Missouri St. at Missouri, Noon
Wyoming at Iowa, Noon
Temple at Notre Dame, 3:30
Nevada at Northwestern, 3:30
MVSU at North Dakota St., 3:30
Hampton at Ohio, 7
South Dakota at Drake, 7
SE Missouri at Kansas, 7
Cent. Arkansas at Kansas St., 7
Louisville vs. Purdue at Indianapolis, 7:30
Butler at Illinois St., 7:30
Arkansas St. at Nebraska, 8
N. Iowa at Iowa St., 8
SOUTHWEST
Maryland at Texas, Noon
UTEP at Oklahoma, 3:30
Michigan vs. Florida at Arlington, Texas, 3:30
E. Washington at Texas Tech, 4
Houston at UTSA, ppd., hurricane
Stephen F. Austin at SMU, 7
Houston Baptist at Texas St., 7
Lamar at North Texas, 7
Morehouse at Ark.-Pine Bluff, 7
Liberty at Baylor, 7
Jackson St. at TCU, 8
Prairie View at Texas Southern, 9
FAR WEST
VMI at Air Force, Noon
Portland St. at Oregon St., 2
Valparaiso at Montana, 3
Troy at Boise St., 3:45
Coll. of Idaho at N. Colorado, 4
W. New Mexico at San Diego, 5
W. Michigan at Southern Cal, 5:15
Cal Poly at San Jose St., 7:30
Abilene Christian at New Mexico, 8
Montana-Western at Weber St., 8
S. Utah at Oregon, 8:15
UC Davis at San Diego St., 8:30
Howard at UNLV, 9
Incarnate Word at Fresno St., 10
Montana St. at Washington St., 10:30
N. Arizona at Arizona, 11
W. Carolina at Hawaii, 12 mid.
New York at Chicago, 3:55
San Jose at Toronto FC, 5
Portland at New York City FC, 5:30
Orlando City at D.C. United, 7
Montreal at New England, 7:30
Philadelphia at Minnesota United, 8
Colorado at Houston, 8:30
Real Salt Lake at Vancouver, 10
Sam Querrey (17), United States, def. Dudi Sela, Israel,
6-4, 6-1, 6-4; Radu Albot, Moldova, def. Yen-Hsun Lu,
Taiwan, 6-2, 7-6 (9-7), 5-7, 0-6, 7-6 (7-2); Mischa Zverev
(23), Germany, def. Benoit Paire, France, 6-3, 6-2, 3-6,
6-7 (7-3), 7-5; John Isner (10), United States, def. Hyeon
Chung, South Korea, 6-3, 6-4, 7-5; Thomas Fabbiano,
Italy, def. Jordan Thompson, Australia, 2-6, 6-2, 3-6, 6-4,
6-2; Paolo Lorenzi, Italy, def. Gilles Muller (19), Luxembourg, 6-7 (7-4), 6-3, 7-6 (7-4), 6-3; Kevin Anderson (28),
South Africa, def. Ernests Gulbis, Latvia, 6-3, 7-5, 6-4;
Borna Coric, Croatia, def. Alexander Zverev (4), Germany, 3-6, 7-5, 7-6 (7-1), 7-6 (7-4); Denis Shapovalov,
Canada, def. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (8), France, 6-4, 6-4, 7-6
(7-3); Kyle Edmund, Britain, def. Steve Johnson, United
States, 7-5, 6-2, 7-6 (7-4); Nicolas Mahut, France, def.
Albert Ramos-Vinolas (20), Spain, 4-6, 6-4, 4-6, 6-3, 6-0;
Pablo Carreno-Busta (12), Spain, def. Cameron Norrie,
Britain, 6-2, 6-4, 6-3; Lucas Pouille (16), France, def.
Jared Donaldson, United States, 7-5, 6-4, 4-6, 3-6, 6-4;
Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, def. Evgeny Donskoy,
Russia, 6-4, 6-4, 7-5; Diego Sebastian Schwartzman
(29), Argentina, def. Janko Tipsarevic, Serbia, 6-2, 6-4,
7-5; Marin Cilic (5), Croatia, def. Florian Mayer, Germany, 6-3, 6-3, 6-3.
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 10
WOMEN’S SINGLES — FIRST ROUND
Sporting KC at Columbus, 1
Dallas at Atlanta United FC, 3:30
Los Angeles at Seattle, 9
Risa Ozaki, Japan, def. Danielle Lao, United States, 6-3,
6-7 (7-5), 7-6 (7-5); Shuai Zhang (27), China, def. Sabine
Lisicki, Germany, 6-7 (7-4), 6-3, 6-0; Ana Bogdan,
Romania, def. Taylor Townsend, United States, 6-4, 4-6,
6-3; Agnieszka Radwanska (10), Poland, def. Petra
Martic, Croatia, 6-4, 7-6 (7-3); Yulia Putintseva, Kazakhstan, def. Sofya Zhuk, Russia, 7-6 (7-3), 6-3; Ons Jabeur,
Tunisia, def. Brienne Minor, United States, 6-1, 7-5; Coco
Vandeweghe (20), United States, def. Alison Riske,
United States, 2-6, 6-3, 6-4; Lucie Safarova, Czech
Republic, def. Anett Kontaveit (26), Estonia, 6-7 (7-5),
6-1, 6-4; Nao Hibino, Japan, def. Catherine Cartan Bellis,
United States, 6-3, 4-6, 7-5; Kurumi Nara, Japan, def.
Sara Sorribes Tormo, Spain, 6-1, 6-2; Svetlana Kuznetsova (8), Russia, def. Marketa Vondrousova, Czech
Republic, 4-6, 6-4, 7-6 (7-2); Evgeniya Rodina, Russia,
def. Eugenie Bouchard, Canada, 7-6 (7-2), 6-1; Shelby
Rogers, United States, def. Kayla Day, United States,
6-2, 4-6, 6-4; Daria Gavrilova (25), Australia, def. Allie
Kiick, United States, 6-2, 6-1; Elena Vesnina (17),
Russia, def. Anna Blinkova, Russia, 6-1, 6-3; Kirsten
Flipkens, Belgium, def. Madison Brengle, United States,
6-2, 6-3; Tatjana Maria, Germany, def. Ashley Kratzer,
United States, 6-1, 6-1; Daria Kasatkina, Russia, def.
Qiang Wang, China, 6-7 (9-7), 6-2, 6-3; Christina McHale,
United States, def. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (19),
Russia, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2; Denisa Allertova, Czech Republic,
def. Rebecca Peterson, Sweden, 6-2, 7-6 (7-5).
BASKETBALL
WNBA
EAST
W
yConnecticut .............................. 21
yNew York .................................. 20
yWashington.............................. 17
Atlanta ....................................... 12
Chicago ....................................... 12
Indiana.......................................... 9
L
11
12
15
20
20
24
PCT GB
.656
—
.625
1
.531
4
.375
9
.375
9
.273 121/2
WEST
W
yMinnesota ................................ 25
yLos Angeles .............................. 24
yPhoenix..................................... 16
Dallas.......................................... 16
Seattle........................................ 14
San Antonio.................................. 7
L
7
8
16
17
18
25
PCT GB
.781
—
.750
1
.500
9
.485
91/2
.438
11
.219
18
x-Late game; y-Clinched playoff berth
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Connecticut 86, Washington 76
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Minnesota 80, Indiana 69
Dallas at Chicago, late
THURSDAY’S GAMES
No games scheduled
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Seattle at Washington, 7
San Antonio at New York, 7:30
Chicago at Minnesota, 8
Connecticut at Phoenix, 10
Atlanta at Los Angeles, 10:30
Lynx 80, Fever 69
MINNESOTA ...................... 26
INDIANA ............................. 27
16
11
18
20
20 — 80
11 — 69
MINNESOTA: Augustus 6-12 2-2 14, Brunson 1-3 0-0 2,
Fowles 5-9 2-3 12, Montgomery 0-2 0-0 0, Moore 6-11
4-5 18, Fagbenle 0-0 0-0 0, Howard 2-4 2-2 6, Jones 4-8
1-2 11, Perkins 3-7 3-3 10, Pierson 3-4 0-0 7, Zandalasini
0-1 0-0 0. Totals 30-61 14-17 80.
INDIANA: Achonwa 3-6 0-0 6, Coleman 3-7 0-0 7, Dupree
7-16 1-1 15, Gwathmey 2-4 0-0 4, Wheeler 7-19 1-2 17,
Hamson 0-0 0-0 0, Larkins 1-2 0-0 2, McCall 1-2 0-0 2,
Pohlen 3-6 0-1 7, Simms 3-6 1-2 9. Totals 30-68 3-6 69.
Three-point Goals: Minnesota 6-13 (Moore 2-3, Jones
2-3, Pierson 1-1, Perkins 1-2, Brunson 0-1, Augustus 0-1,
Montgomery 0-2), Indiana 6-17 (Simms 2-3, Wheeler
2-7, Pohlen 1-3, Coleman 1-4). Fouled Out: None.
Rebounds: Minnesota 31 (Fowles 13), Indiana 30 (Dupree 10). Assists: Minnesota 16 (Howard, Moore,
Augustus 3), Indiana 16 (Wheeler 7). Total Fouls:
Minnesota 11, Indiana 12. Technicals: Wheeler. A: 7,625
(18,165).
Wings 99, Sky 96
DALLAS .............................. 19
CHICAGO ............................ 27
29
25
31
21
DALLAS: Christmas-Kelly 1-5 2-2 4, Diggins-Smith 8-19
10-11 28, Gray 4-14 2-2 11, Johnson 11-16 2-4 25,
Plaisance 3-10 0-0 8, Chong 0-0 0-0 0, Davis 1-2 0-0 3,
Paris 3-6 0-0 6, Powers 2-7 4-5 8, Thornton 2-4 0-0 6.
Totals 35-83 20-24 99.
CHICAGO: Breland 10-15 2-2 22, Copper 2-5 0-0 5, Dolson
9-12 2-2 21, Quigley 10-15 3-3 25, Vandersloot 6-11 2-2
15, Bulgak 0-0 0-0 0, Graves 0-1 0-0 0, Harris 0-0 0-0 0,
Hooper 0-4 0-0 0, Pondexter 3-5 2-3 8. Totals 40-68 11-12
96.
Three-point Goals: Dallas 9-27 (Thornton 2-3, DigginsSmith 2-6, Plaisance 2-7, Davis 1-1, Johnson 1-2, Gray
1-3, Christmas-Kelly 0-2, Powers 0-3), Chicago 5-11
(Quigley 2-4, Dolson 1-1, Copper 1-2, Vandersloot 1-2,
Hooper 0-2). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Dallas 40
(Johnson, Christmas-Kelly 9), Chicago 28 (Breland 8).
Assists: Dallas 19 (Diggins-Smith 8), Chicago 33
(Vandersloot 12). Total Fouls: Dallas 11, Chicago 19.
Technicals: Johnson.
WNBA leaders
Entering Wednesday’s game
POINTS
G
Griner, PHO....................... 24
Charles, NYL ..................... 32
Stewart, SEA.................... 31
FG
187
248
209
FT
134
118
150
HIGH SCHOOLS
20 — 99
23 — 96
PTS AVG
508 21.2
637 19.9
615 19.8
VOLLEYBALL
VIRGINIA
Oakton def. Langley (25-19, 25-16, 25-20)
PRIVATE
Paul VI def. King Abdullah (25-8, 25-19, 25-130)
GIRLS' SOCCER
PRIVATE
Oakcrest 3, Sandy Spring 0
BOYS' SOCCER
PRIVATE
Good Counsel 3, Spalding 0
TRANSACTIONS
SATURDAY’S MATCHES
Chicago at Montreal, 7
Orlando City at New England, 7
New York at Dallas, 9
Colorado at Los Angeles, 11
WEDNESDAY’S MATCH
Sporting KC at New York City FC, 7:30
NWSL
W
North Carolina .................13
Portland ...........................11
Chicago ..............................9
Orlando ..............................9
Sky Blue FC........................9
Seattle ...............................7
Kansas City........................6
Houston .............................7
Boston ...............................3
Washington .......................4
x-late match
L
5
5
6
6
9
7
9
10
10
11
T
0
4
5
5
2
6
5
2
7
4
Pts
39
37
32
32
29
27
23
23
16
16
GF
26
29
27
37
35
38
23
20
16
24
GA
14
19
24
26
41
33
29
29
26
34
SATURDAY'S RESULTS
Chicago 2, Washington 1
Orlando 2, Kansas City 1
Portland 2, Seattle 1
Sky Blue FC 1, Boston 0
SUNDAY'S RESULT
North Carolina at Houston, ppd., hurricane
SECOND ROUND
WEDNESDAY'S MATCH
Carla Suarez-Navarro, Spain, def. Mirjana Lucic-Baroni
(29), Croatia, 4-6, 7-6 (7-4), 6-2; Maria Sakkari, Greece,
def. Arina Rodionova, Australia, 7-5, 6-3; Venus Williams (9), United States, def. Oceane Dodin, France, 7-5,
6-4; Petra Kvitova (13), Czech Republic, def. Alize
Cornet, France, 6-1, 6-2; Caroline Garcia (18), France,
def. Ekaterina Alexandrova, Russia, 4-6, 6-3, 6-0;
Magdalena Rybarikova (31), Slovakia, def. Kristyna
Pliskova, Czech Republic, 7-6 (7-4), 7-6 (7-3); Garbine
Muguruza (3), Spain, def. Ying-Ying Duan, China, 6-4,
6-0; Aleksandra Krunic, Serbia, def. Ajla Tomljanovic,
Australia, 6-3, 6-2; Julia Goerges (30), Germany, def.
Saisai Zheng, China, 6-2, 6-1; Ashleigh Barty, Australia,
def. Aliaksandra Sasnovich, Belarus, 6-1, 7-6 (9-7);
Sloane Stephens, United States, def. Dominika Cibulkova (11), Slovakia, 6-2, 5-7, 6-3; Anastasija Sevastova
(16), Latvia, def. Kateryna Kozlova, Ukraine, 6-4, 6-4;
Donna Vekic, Croatia, def. Shuai Peng (22), China, 6-0,
6-2; Sofia Kenin, United States, def. Sachia Vickery,
United States, 6-3, 4-6, 7-6 (7-0); Maria Sharapova,
Russia, def. Timea Babos, Hungary, 6-7 (7-4), 6-4, 6-1.
North Carolina at Washington, late
SATURDAY’S MATCHES
Washington at Portland, 3:30
Boston at Orlando, 7:30
SUNDAY’S MATCHES
Sky Blue FC at FC Kansas City, 6
North Carolina at Chicago, 6
Seattle at Houston, 8
CONCACAF
WORLD CUP QUALIFYING
Top three teams qualify. Fourth-place team advances to
playoff against Asia fifth-place team.
GP
Mexico ............................. 6
Costa Rica........................ 6
United States .................. 6
Panama............................ 6
Honduras ......................... 6
Trinidad............................ 6
W
4
3
2
1
1
1
D
2
2
2
4
2
0
L
0
1
2
1
3
5
GF GA Pts
9 2 14
9 4 11
11 8 8
4 4 7
6 14 5
3 10 3
U.S. OPEN SHOW COURT SCHEDULES
PLAY BEGINS ON ALL COURTS AT 11 A.M. EDT
FRIDAY’S MATCHES
ARTHUR ASHE STADIUM
AT HARRISON, N.J.
United States vs. Costa Rica, 6:55
AT COUVA, TRINIDAD
Trinidad and Tobago vs. Honduras, 8
AT MEXICO CITY
Mexico vs. Panama, 9:30
Elina Svitolina (4), Ukraine, vs. Evgeniya Rodina, Russia
NOT BEFORE 1 P.M.
Karolina Pliskova (1), Czech Republic, vs. Nicole Gibbs,
United States
Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, vs. Mikhail Youzhny,
Russia
NIGHT SESSION (7 P.M. EDT)
Ons Jabeur, Tunisia, vs. CoCo Vandeweghe (20), United
States
Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, vs. Taro Daniel, Japan
TUESDAY, SEPT. 5
AT SAN PEDRO SULA, HONDURAS
Honduras vs. United States, 5:36
AT PANAMA CITY
Panama vs. Trinidad and Tobago, 9:30
AT SAN JOSE, COSTA RICA
Costa Rica vs. Mexico, 10:05
LOUIS ARMSTRONG STADIUM
Jelena Ostapenko (12), Latvia, vs. Sorana Cirstea,
Romania
Andrey Rublev, Russia, vs. Grigor Dimitrov (7), Bulgaria
Taylor Fritz, United States, vs. Dominic Thiem (6),
Austria
NOT BEFORE 5:30 P.M.
Tatjana Maria, Germany, vs. Madison Keys (15), United
States
U.S. soccer schedule
WON 9, LOST 0, TIED 5
Sunday, Jan. 29: United States 0, Serbia 0
Friday, Feb. 3: United States 1, Jamaica 0
q-Friday, March 24: United States 6, Honduras 0
q-Tuesday, March 28: Panama 1, United States 1
Saturday, June 3: United States 1, Venezuela 1
q-Thursday, June 8: United States 2, Trinidad and
Tobago 0
q-Sunday, June 11: United States 1, Mexico 1
Saturday, July 1: United States 2, Ghana 1
a-Saturday, July 8: United States 1, Panama 1
a-Wednesday, July 12: United States 3, Martinique 2
a-Saturday, July 15: United States 3, Nicaragua 0
a-Wednesday, July 19: United States 2, El Salvador 0
a-Saturday, July 22: United States 2, Costa Rica 0
a-Wednesday, July 26: United States 2, Jamaica 1
q-Friday, Sept. 1: vs. Costa Rica at Harrison, N.J., 6:55
q-Tuesday, Sept. 5: vs. Honduras at San Pedro Sula,
Honduras, 5:36
q-Friday, Oct. 6: vs. Panama at Orlando, Fla.
q-Tuesday, Oct. 10: vs. Trinidad and Tobago at Port-ofSpain, Trinidad
a-CONCACAF Gold Cup
q-World Cup qualifier
NFL
Atlanta Falcons: Waived WR Reginald Davis III, OT Will
Freeman and Ss Jordan Moore and Deron Washington.
Waived/injured OT Kevin Graf.
Cincinnati Bengals: Announced LB Vontaze Burfict had
his NFL suspension reduced from five to three games for
his egregious hit on a Chiefs running back.
Cleveland Browns: Terminated the contract of DB Joe
Haden. Traded OL Cam Erving to Kansas City for a 2018
fifth-round draft pick.
Oakland Raiders: Signed WR Seth Roberts to a two-year
contract extension.
SECOND ROUND
Toronto FC 3, Montreal 1
San Jose 3, Los Angeles 0
Portland 1, Seattle 1
GRANDSTAND
Barbora Strycova (23), Czech Republic, vs. Jennifer
Brady, United States
NOT BEFORE 1 P.M.
Adrian Menendez, Spain, vs. Juan Martin del Potro (24),
Argentina
Donald Young, United States, vs. Gael Monfils (18),
France
Kurumi Nara, Japan, vs. Svetlana Kuznetsova (8),
Russia
C Y C LI NG
Vuelta a Espana
11TH STAGE
116.5 miles from Lorca to Calar Alto, with two late
Category 1 climbs, including a summit finish at the
Observatorio Astronomico de Calar Alto
RESULTS
LOC AL GOLF
1. Miguel Angel Lopez, Colombia, Astana, 5:05:09.
2. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky, :14 behind.
3. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Bahrain-Merida, same time.
4. Wilco Kelderman, Netherlands, Sunweb, same time.
5. Romain Bardet, France, AG2R La Mondiale, :31.
6. Alberto Contador, Spain, Trek-Segafredo, same time.
7. Ilnur Zakarin, Russia, Katusha Alpecin, same time.
8. Mikel Nieve, Spain, Sky, same time.
9. Darwin Atapuma, Colombia, UAE Team Emirates,
1:02.
10. David de la Cruz, Spain, Quick-Step Floors, 1:14.
MOUNT VERNON
In the LGA-9 Ladies day, Clare Kelly won first flight with
a 34, Ann Barletta won second flight with a 35 and
Marcia Smith won third flight with a 44.
SENIOR GOLF LEAGUE OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA
Loudoun Golf and Country Club defeated Piedmont Golf
Club, 7 to 2.
EFGHI
AUTOMOTIVE
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CARS • TRUCKS • SUVS & MORE
1405
Aviation, Boats, RVs
Motorcycles Directory
69
69
Motorcycles
HARLEY-DAVIDSON 2003 LOWRIDER 100 YR ANNIVERSARY EDITIONPics avail upon req. Blk/silv. 1st
$5000 takes it. Call 202-390-6121
Motorcycles
HARLEY DAVIDSON 2012 ELECTRA
GLIDE- black w/ chrome detailing.
14k mi. chrome headers bonus.
Asking $17,000 202-577-3360
HARLEY DAVIDSON 1972 SPORTSTER
IRONHEAD XLH 1000CC.
Dark burgundy. 2,743 miles.
$10,000. Call 202-726-0830
Cars
2006 Cadillac CTS v6 with “Sport"
package - Fully loaded with all
avail luxury options. Bose sound
system, satellite radio,
power/heated leather seats,
power sun roof, 'Vogue" all metal
grille, etc. Carfax retail value of
$8,140; Carfax report avail. Asking $7,850. Call (703) 789-0742.
BMW
BMW 2008 Z4 3.0i SOFT TOP CONVERTIBLE- excellent condition. blue.
55,000 miles automatic/standard.
$14,500.
Call
703-534-4172
1405
1405
Cars
Cars
BUICK
NISSAN
BUICK 2006 LACROSSE- auto., 92k
mi., all pwr, MD insp., AM/FM/CD,
good ac, exc. cond. asking $3700
OBO
Call 301-219-5551
NISSAN 2014 ALTIMA, beige int,
sandstone, ext., exc cond, leather &
heated seat, 3.5SL, V6 engine, alloy
wheels, sun/moon roof, navigation,
weather tech rain guard, blind spot
& land departure senor 82,500 miles,
$13,900. 240-449-5907
FORD
FORD 2007 500 SES- Auto., 80k mi., all
pwr, MD insp., good ac, AM/FM/CD, 1437
very cln in/out. asking $4500 OBO.
Call 240-347-5362
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Parts, Services and
Repairs
WE PAY UP TO $100-$300
FOR JUNK CARS!
Call or text 571-376-0419
1447
Autos Wanted
1447
DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, RV'S.
LUTHERAN MISSION SOCIETY. Your
donation helps local families with
food, clothing, shelter, counseling.
Tax deductible. MVA License
#W1044. 410-636-0123 or
www.LutheranMissionSociety.org
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
Autos Wanted
1447
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1-800-753-POST SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
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(And your subscription up-to-date.)
ENROLL TODAY
Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy
or call 202-334-6100.
SF
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THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
Autos Wanted
Home delivery
is convenient.
Home delivery
is convenient.
EZ
Democracy Dies in Darkness
Dem
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I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!— I drive
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Non-commercial advertisers can now place ads 24/7
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815
Dogs for Sale
SHIH TZU PUPPIES - Ready to go,
Shots, wormed,mother & father on
premises, Unionville.
Call 540-406-0740
SHIHTZU/ YORKIE
8 weeks, S&W, M/F, health guar., parents on premises. $550-$600.
Call 301-676-5550
Yorkies,Yorkie-Poos,Shihtzu&more—
Puppies for Sale. 304-904-6289,
Cash, Credit Card, Or Buy With EASY
FINANCING on: www.wvpuppy.com
Yorkshire Terrier—$1500, Female, 6
months old, 301-467-1921 - UTD
on all vaccines, microchipped, tails
docked, and dewclaws removed.
They come with vet records,
microchip registration, and UABR
registration. To ensure a smooth
transition into their new homes, they
come with a crate, collar, leash,
harness, toy, starter food, bowl, pee
pads, and instructions on how to
care for them. Request pics via text.
For Sale: Antique Chinese jade,furniture,Jewelry,— painting, porcelain, 612
202-316-2528
Adopt Dogs
Watercolor Cards, Books, Journals,
Chapter Books, —$2.50+, Lake
Ridge, VA, 703-583-5010
Labor Day Adoptorama! Sept 3 & 4,
12-3 pm. Adoptable Dogs & Puppies.
7 Corners PetSmart,
6100 Arlington Blvd.
208
622
Appliances
Bathroom Sink-35" across—$80
White
cultured
marble
Nvr
used.Orig. store price $189.99
WASHER Apartment Size—$75 Gibson Heavy Duty, Energy Saver,
g/cond. , white extr 301-345-1693
Books, Music & Movies
Adopt Cats
Labor Day Adoptorama! Sept 3 & 4,
12-3. Adoptable Kittens & Cats
7 Corners PetSmart,
6100 Arlington Blvd.
Legal Notices
BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE
COMMISSION OF
MARYLAND
"President Trump, May I ask you
a question"—This first ever book
of questions is now available on
Lulu.com and Amazon.com
Collectibles
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!— I drive
to you, pay CASH, and haul them
away. Call 571-830-5871
245
Electronics
Bose CineMate Home Theater Speaker System—$125.00
Capitol
Heights, MD, 301-996-7981
Bose Wave Music System w/Multi CD
Changer—249.00 Capitol Heights,
MD, 301-996-7981
Therapy Lamp—45
NatureBright
Light and Ion Therapy Lamp $45,
Alexandria, VA, 571-431-1501
260
Furniture
7 PC CHERRY BR SET - Queen poster
bed, 2 night stands, dresser w/ mirror & 6 drawer chest. Very good
condition. Smoke & pet free home.
$1,250/obo.
Call 240-764-5425
BUNKBED—$185 Solid Dark Wood,
W/mattress, vgood cond. deliv for
$20 in DC area 301-345-1693
MOVING- Selling many
computer parts, books,small
exercise equipment.
301-392-5464
Solid Wood Dining Table & Chairs
Excellent condition. Includes leaf &
8 chairs. Cash only & buyer responsible for pickup. $800/OBO.
240 338 2385
265
Home & Garden
BRICK—$249 550 New 10 Hole Bldg
Size, less or more if need (apprx
1500) .45 each 301-345-1693
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
Two Car Seats—45 Graco child car
seat,infant
car
seat,$45
each,Alexandria, VA, 571-431-1501
White Bathrm Sink 35" across—$80.
Exc. Cond. Never used. Orig. store
price $189. (HomeDepot)
275
Merchandise Wanted
Antique Chinese jade,furniture,Jewelry, painting, — c: 7039669935,
sharonantique@gmail.com,
IN THE MATTER OF THE
APPLICATION OF
SOL PHOENIX SOLAR, LLC
FOR A CERTIFICATE OF PUBLIC
CONVENIENCE AND NECESSITY
TO CONSTRUCT A 2.5 MW SOLAR
PHOTOVOLTAIC
GENERATING FACILITY IN PRINCE
GEORGE’S COUNTY, MARYLAND
CASE NO. 9446
NOTICE OF HEARING AND
OPPORTUNITY FOR PUBLIC
COMMENT
A public comment hearing in the
above-entitled matter is scheduled for Thursday, September 28,
2017, beginning at 6:30 p.m., at
the meeting room of the Holiday
Inn located at 9101 Basil Court,
Largo, Maryland 20774 concerning Sol Phoenix Solar, LLC’s application for a Certificate of Public
Convenience and Necessity
(CPCN) from the Maryland Public
Service Commission. Sol Phoenix
Solar, LLC has proposed to construct an 2.5 MW solar photovoltaic generating facility in
Prince George’s County, Maryland. An electronic copy of Sol
Phoenix Solar, LLC’s application
is available on the Maryland
Public Service Commission’s
website under Case No. 9446.
Persons who wish to file written
comments are directed to
address such comments to David
J. Collins, Executive Secretary,
Maryland Public Service Commission, 6 St. Paul Street, 16th
Floor,
Baltimore,
Maryland
21202, referencing Case No.
9446, and file such comments
by October 2, 2017.
Estate of
Gregory M. Baltrun
(Deceased February 11, 2017)
Circuit Court of Fairfax, Virginia
To all persons who may have some
interest in the above-captioned
estate, notice is hereby given that
Paul A. Baltrun, Jr. has been
appointed Administrator of the
estate in the Fairfax County Probate
Office on May 1, 2017. All unknown
heirs and heirs whose whereabouts
are unknown should contact the
Administrator at 141 Seagrape
Drive, Apt. 104, Jupiter, FL 33458.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
GOVT SURPLUS TUBES WANTED—
JOINT ARMY NAVY JAN PREMIUM
PAID MOST CASH 410-740-5222
IN THE MATTER OF
UKPEME N. OKON
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
UKPEME AKPAN OKON
FAMILY LAW: 146763FL
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!— I drive
to you, pay CASH, and haul them
away. Call 571-830-5871
PUBLICATION NOTICE
Radio tubes—WANTED ham radios
huge speakers tube hif amps 202
527 9501, vcvdc@msn.com
RECORDS - I pay cash for
50s, 60s, & 70s .
Categories: Jazz, Soul, R&R, R&B.
Call 703-865-6050.
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
Will Come to you!
355
Garage Sales, VA
McLean—BIG Multifamily Sale 7716 Bridle Path Ln, 9/2, 8am-1pm,
Furniture, baby/kids' essentials,
clothing: baby, adult & kids' sizes
408
Tickets, Sports
TWO REDSKINS 2017 SEASON
TICKETS - Includes parking pass,
2 jerseys. Section 404.
Call 843-359-0505
416
Tickets, Wanted
REDSKINS, WIZARDS, CAPS
Season Tickets Wanted.
Buying all locations. Top $ paid.
Please call 1-800-786-8425
610
Dogs for Sale
Cavachon—Cavachon Puppy- We
have 5 adorable pups. Virginia Cavachon breeder Local & loved. $950up
9 wks 703-577-1069
www.DCDogfinders.com
CHIHUAHUA AKC PUPS - 2 males
chocolate tri-color & black-tri,
1 female fawn, wormed, shots.
Ready now. $450. 540-636-0084
Dachshund—AKC Black.
$850.00, female,
DOB 5/19/17, 240-575-1718
noelTtennant@gmail.com
English Bullgos—2 Males, 12 weeks
old, first shot and dewormed.
717-830-5880
German Shepard—Mix Pups,
$300, M & F, 6 WKS old
W/shots, 540-810-2380.
Very Kid Friendly.
Golden Retriever Pups—AKC
Vet checked, family raised
$850, 434-724-7217
Labrador Retriever, Yellow—$600,
Male, 10 weeks old, 202-631-7308
We bought him from a breeder and
realized after having him for 2
weeks that the kids are allergic. He's
a GREAT puppy and we hate to see
him go. He's already crate trained,
sits and goes in his box when told.
We have all the papers, along with
his lineage. HAPPY PUPPY.
Maltese Shihtzu Yorkie & more—Puppies so Cute 304-904-6289, Cash,
Credit Card, Or Buy With EASY
FINANCING on: www.wvpuppy.com
ROTTWEILER PUPS -8 weeks. AKC
CKC OFA. Giant, German parents,
4mo M&F & 8mo M. 5 YR hip
guarantee. 804-829-5512
Shih Tzu/Bichon—Cutest ShiChon
TeddyBear Puppy's! Raised in home
w/TLC. Local NOVA puppy breeder.
750up
9wks
703-577-1069
www.DCDogfinders.com
Shih-Tzu—Champion Line Red/White
Pups. CKC Registrable/ $700. MaleFemale Avail/ 12 Weeks Old. Falls
Church.VA (787)486-1232
815
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
TRUNG MINH NGUYEN
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
BO MINH NGUYEN
FAMILY LAW: 146929FL
Thang Ba Nguyen
Petitioner
IN THE MATTER OF
IMAN ABDUR RAHMAN
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
EMAN ABDUR - RAHMAN
FAMILY LAW: 146961FL
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Iman Abdur Rahman to Eman Abdur-Rahman. The
petitioner is seeking a name change
because: Misspell on birth certificate.
Any person may file an objection
to the Petition on or before the
15th day of September, 2017. The
objection must be supported by
an affidavit and served upon the
Petitioner in accordance with Maryland Rule 1-321. failure to file an
objection or affidavit within the time
allowed my result in a judgement
by default or the grant of the relief
sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 31st day of
August, 2017.
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name of a
Minor in which he/she seeks to
change his/her name from Trung
Minh Nguyen to Bo Minh Nguyen.
The petitioner is seeking a name
change because: Go to school. Call
my name easy.
Any person may file an objection
to the Petition on or before the
15th day of September, 2017. The
objection must be supported by
an affidavit and served upon the
Petitioner in accordance with Maryland Rule 1-321. failure to file an
objection or affidavit within the time
allowed my result in a judgement
by default or the grant of the relief
sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 31st day of
August, 2017.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
TAM MINH NGUYEN
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
BE MINH NGUYEN
FAMILY LAW: 146929FL
Thang Ba Nguyen
Petitioner
PUBLICATION NOTICE
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
Home delivery starts
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PUBLICATION NOTICE
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Phoenix Kal-El
Soma to Brandon Somalika Tea. The
petitioner is seeking a name change
because: Family reason.
Any person may file an objection
to the Petition on or before the
15th day of September, 2017. The
objection must be supported by
an affidavit and served upon the
Petitioner in accordance with Maryland Rule 1-321. failure to file an
objection or affidavit within the time
allowed my result in a judgement
by default or the grant of the relief
sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 31st day of
August, 2017.
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name of a
Minor in which he/she seeks to
change his/her name from Thong
Minh Nguyen to Ben Minh Nguyen.
The petitioner is seeking a name
change because: Go to school. Call
my name easy.
Any person may file an objection
to the Petition on or before the
15th day of September, 2017. The
objection must be supported by
an affidavit and served upon the
Petitioner in accordance with Maryland Rule 1-321. failure to file an
objection or affidavit within the time
allowed my result in a judgement
by default or the grant of the relief
sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 31st day of
August, 2017.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
ANGELYNA MICHELLE ROJAS
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
ANGELYNA ARYA ROJAS
FAMILY LAW: 147238FL
Cesar Rojas
Petitioner
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name of a
Minor in which he/she seeks to
change his/her name from Angelyna Michelle Rojas to Angelyna Arya
Rojas. The petitioner is seeking a
name change because: Parents &
child agree they love the name
Arya.
Any person may file an objection
to the Petition on or before the
15th day of September, 2017. The
objection must be supported by
an affidavit and served upon the
Petitioner in accordance with Maryland Rule 1-321. failure to file an
objection or affidavit within the time
allowed my result in a judgement
by default or the grant of the relief
sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 31st day of
August, 2017.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
ONASSIS BANSON AMPOFO
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
ONASSIS BANSON
FAMILY LAW: 146901FL
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Onassis Banson
Ampofo to Onassis Banson. The
petitioner is seeking a name change
because: of name change on immigration status. Per immigration/citizenship my last name is Banson.
Any person may file an objection
to the Petition on or before the
15th day of September, 2017. The
objection must be supported by
an affidavit and served upon the
Petitioner in accordance with Maryland Rule 1-321. failure to file an
objection or affidavit within the time
allowed my result in a judgement
by default or the grant of the relief
sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 31st day of
August, 2017.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
GWYN ELIZABETH DAVIES
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
CHARLES TOWNSEND DAVIES
FAMILY LAW: 146767FL
Stephen Davies
Petitioner
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name of a
Minor in which he/she seeks to
change his/her name from Gwyn
Elizabeth Davies to Charles
Townsend Davies. The petitioner is
seeking a name change because:
He identifies as male and uses the
name "Charlie"
Any person may file an objection
to the Petition on or before the
15th day of September, 2017. The
objection must be supported by
an affidavit and served upon the
Petitioner in accordance with Maryland Rule 1-321. failure to file an
objection or affidavit within the time
allowed my result in a judgement
by default or the grant of the relief
sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 31st day of
August, 2017.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
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815
Legal Notices
820
Legal Notices
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 889
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 946
WILLIAM C. SHERMAN
James L. Boring, Esquire
10511 Judicial Drive
Fairfax, Virginia 22030
NICHOLAS A. ADDAMS
PRO SE
Roger Woodson Sherman, whose
address is 1767 Honeysuckle Lane,
Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 was
appointed personal representative
of the estate of William C. Sherman,
who died on July 3, 2017 with a will
and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are unknown
shall enter their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections to such
appointment (or to the probate of
decedent's Will) shall be filed with
the Register of Wills, D.C., Building
A, 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor,
Washington, D.C. 20001, on or
before February 17, 2018. Claims
against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a
copy to the Register of Wills or
filed with the Register of Wills with
a copy to the undersigned, on or
before February 17, 2018, or be
forever barred. Persons believed to
be heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
Roger Woodson Sherman
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
Christopher Addams aka C.P.
Addams, whose address is 9815
Laurel Street Fairfax, VA 22032 was
appointed personal representative
of the estate of Nicholas A. Addams,
who died on 06-28-2017 without a
will and will serve without Court
supervision. All unknown heirs and
heirs whose whereabouts are
unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections
to such appointment shall be filed
with the Register of Wills, D.C.,
Building A, 515 5th Street, N.W.,
3rd Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001,
on or before February 28, 2018.
Claims against the decedent shall
be presented to the undersigned
with a copy to the Register of Wills
or filed with the Register of Wills
with a copy to the undersigned, on
or before February 28, 2018, or be
forever barred. Persons believed to
be heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
Christopher Addams
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 000935
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 896
GORHAM H. GILES
William R. Voltz
2120 L Street, NW, Suite 700
Washington DC 20037
NINA BODRICK
PRO SE
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Jack Bodrick, Jr., whose address is
1725 Minnesota Avenue, SE, #1,
Washington DC 20020 was appointed personal representative of the
estate of Nina Bodrick, who died on
July 7, 2017 without a will and will
serve without Court supervision. All
unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment shall be filed with the
Register of Wills, D.C., Building A,
515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor,
Washington, D.C. 20001, on or
before February 17, 2018. Claims
against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a
copy to the Register of Wills or
filed with the Register of Wills with
a copy to the undersigned, on or
before February 17, 2018, or be
forever barred. Persons believed to
be heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
Alanda Marshall, whose address is
2738 Heron Drive, Wolverine Lake,
Michigan 48390 was appointed personal representative of the estate
of Gorham H. Giles, who died on
May 6, 2017 without a will and will
serve without Court supervision. All
unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment (or to the probate of
decedent's Will) shall be filed with
the Register of Wills, D.C., Building
A, 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor,
Washington, D.C. 20001, on or
before February 28, 2018. Claims
against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a
copy to the Register of Wills or
filed with the Register of Wills with
a copy to the undersigned, on or
before February 28, 2018, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be
heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
Jack Bodrick, Jr.
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
Alanda Marshall
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 931
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2016 ADM 000742
VALERIE DENISE SCOTT
Nancy Spearman
121 12th SE Unit 309
Washington DC 20003
AGNES V. SMITH-RODGERS
Rachel Evans
4520 East West Highway, Ste 700
Bethesda, MD 20814
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Drew W. Alexander, whose address
is 12800 Hillcrest Road, Suite A216, Dallas, TX 75230 was appointed personal representative of the
estate of Benjamin H. Alexander,
deceased, by the Probate Court
for Hamilton County, State of Ohio
on December 30, 1997. Service of
process may be made upon Dawn
C. Alexander 1300 Pennsylvania
Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20004
whose designation as District of
Columbia agent has been filed with
the Register of Wills, D.C.
The decedent owned the following
District of Columbia real property.
2516 South Dakota Avenue, NE,
Unit 2516 Washington, DC 20018.
Claims against the decedent may
be presented to the undersigned
and filed with the Register of Wills
for the District of Columbia, Building
A, 515 5th, NW, 3rd Floor, Washington DC 20001 within 6 months from
the date of first publication of this
notice.
Laurence Karl Scott, whose address
is 132 Root Avenue, Central Islip,
New York 11722 was appointed personal representative of the estate
of Valerie Denise Scott, who died on
July 03, 2017 with a will and will
serve without Court supervision. All
unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment (or to the probate of
decedent's Will) shall be filed with
the Register of Wills, D.C., Building
A, 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor,
Washington, D.C. 20001, on or
before February 28, 2018. Claims
against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a
copy to the Register of Wills or
filed with the Register of Wills with
a copy to the undersigned, on or
before February 28, 2018, or be
forever barred. Persons believed to
be heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
Drew W. Alexander
Personal Representative
Anne Meister
Register of Wills
Rachel Evans, whose address is
4520 East West Highway, Ste 700,
Bethesda, MD 20814 was appointed
successor personal representative
of the estate of Agnes V. SmithRodgers, who died on March 11,
2015 with a will and will serve
without Court supervision. All
unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment (or to the probate of
decedent's Will) shall be filed with
the Register of Wills, D.C., Building
A, 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor,
Washington, D.C. 20001, on or
before February 17, 2018. Claims
against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a
copy to the Register of Wills or
filed with the Register of Wills with
a copy to the undersigned, on or
before February 17, 2018, or be
forever barred. Persons believed to
be heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
Laurence Karl Scott
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
“Notice is hereby given that the
following named company at the
address listed herewith has made
application to engage in the business of loaning money for the
license year ending December 31,
2017 as provided by the Act of
Congress, approved February 14,
1913. Anyone desiring to protest
against the issuance of this license
should do so in writing to the Commissioner of the Department of
Insurance, Securities and Banking,
810 First Street, NE, Suite 701,
Washington, DC 20002, in the manner prescribed by said Act: See DC
Code Title 26, Chapter 9 and 16
DCMR 2.”
SUPERIOR COURT OF
THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 FEP 93
February 10, 1997 - Date of Death
BENJAMIN H. ALEXANDER
Name of Decedent
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT OF
FOREIGN PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE AND
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 941
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 947
BETTYE B. BELL
PRO SE
Shervonne C. Bell, whose address
is 1250 Farragut Place NE, Washington DC 20017 was appointed personal representative of the estate
of Bettye B. Bell, who died on
8/22/2016 without a will and will
serve without Court supervision. All
unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment shall be filed with the
Register of Wills, D.C., Building A,
515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor,
Washington, D.C. 20001, on or
before February 17, 2018. Claims
against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a
copy to the Register of Wills or
filed with the Register of Wills with
a copy to the undersigned, on or
before February 17, 2018, or be
forever barred. Persons believed to
be heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
Shervonne C. Bell
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
QUENTIN E. GRANT
PRO SE
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Everett Pearson, whose address is
5505 16th Street NW, Washington,
DC 20011 was appointed personal
representative of the estate of Roy
Thomas Pearson, who died on July
17, 2016 without a will and will
serve without Court supervision. All
unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment shall be filed with the
Register of Wills, D.C., Building A,
515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor,
Washington, D.C. 20001, on or
before February 28, 2018. Claims
against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a
copy to the Register of Wills or
filed with the Register of Wills with
a copy to the undersigned, on or
before February 28, 2018, or be
forever barred. Persons believed to
be heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
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Michael W. Grant, whose address
is 45 Hailey Ln #A3 Strasburg VA
22657 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Quentin
E. Grant, who died on May 26,
2017 with a will and will serve
without Court supervision. All
unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment (or to the probate of
decedent's Will) shall be filed with
the Register of Wills, D.C., Building
A, 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor,
Washington, D.C. 20001, on or
before February 24, 2018. Claims
against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a
copy to the Register of Wills or
filed with the Register of Wills with
a copy to the undersigned, on or
before February 24, 2018, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be
heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT OF
FOREIGN PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE AND
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Dawn C. Alexander, whose address
is 5108 Brady Court, Ellicot City,
MD 21043 was appointed personal representative of the estate of
Mary S. Alexander, deceased, by
the Probate Court for Hamilton
County, State of Ohio on September
12, 1994. Service of process may
be made upon Dawn C. Alexander
1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW,
Washington, DC 20004 whose designation as District of Columbia
agent has been filed with the Register of Wills, D.C.
The decedent owned the following
District of Columbia real property.
2516 South Dakota Avenue, NE,
Unit 2516 Washington, DC 20018.
Claims against the decedent may
be presented to the undersigned
and filed with the Register of Wills
for the District of Columbia, Building
A, 515 5th, NW, 3rd Floor, Washington DC 20001 within 6 months from
the date of first publication of this
notice.
Dawn C. Alexander
Personal Representative
Anne Meister
Register of Wills
820
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Legal Notices
MARY S. ALEXANDER
Name of Decedent
Michael W. Grant
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
Everett Pearson
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
Official Notices
SUPERIOR COURT OF
THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 FEP 92
May 26, 1994 - Date of Death
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
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Official Notices
ABC LICENSE: Pentagon City Wine
Merchant, LLC trading as Pentagon
City Wine Merchant, 1330 South
Fair Street, Arlington, (Arlington
County) Virginia 22202. The above
establishment is applying to the
VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL (ABC)
for a Wine and Beer Off Premises
and Keg license to sell or manufacture alcoholic beverages. Opal
Vichitlakakran, Managing Member.
NOTE: Objections to the issuance of
this license must be submitted to
ABC no later than 30 days from the
publishing date of the first of two
required newspaper legal notices.
Objections should be registered at
www.abc.virginia.gov or 800-5523200
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Official Notices
Montgomery County
Application for State Discharge Permit 14DP0048,
NDPES Permit MD0002640:
GenOn Mid-Atlantic, LLC, 8301 Professional Place, Suite 230,
Landover, MD 20785 submitted an application for renewal
of a permit to discharge an average of approximately
285,000,000 gallons of water per day from the Dickerson
Generation Station, a steam electric generating facility,
located at 21200 Martinsburg Rd., Dickerson, MD to the
Potomac River and C&O canal (both Use I-P waters). The
discharge consists of noncontact cooling water, treated
wastewater from flue gas desulfurization, treated sanitary
wastewater, miscellaneous other wastewaters, and
stormwater.
The Department proposes to reissue this permit with the
following effluent limitations for Outfall 001, including monitoring points within: thermal discharge (Outfall 001: 83,000
MBTU/day); temperature increase (Outfall 001: 22°F summer
maximum, 32°F winter maximum); total residual chlorine
(Outfall 001: 0.011 mg/L average, 0.019 mg/L maximum);
total suspended solids (Monitoring Point 101: 30 mg/L
average, 75 mg/L maximum; Monitoring Point 114: 30 mg/L
average, 100 mg/L maximum; Monitoring Point 102: 30 mg/L
average, 45 mg/L maximum); biochemical oxygen demand
(Monitoring Point 102: 30 mg/L average, 45 mg/L maximum);
E. coli (Monitoring Point 102: 126 MPN/100 mL); oil and
grease (Monitoring Points 101 and 114: 15 mg/L average,
20 mg/L maximum); total copper (Monitoring Point 101:
1.0 mg/L maximum), total iron (Monitoring Point 101: 1.0
mg/L maximum) and pH (Outfall 001: range of 6.5 to 8.5).
Additional limitations that have been established at Monitoring Point 801 for the treated flue gas desulphurization
effluent are: suspended solids (5 mg/L average, 100 mg/L
maximum); total nitrogen (annual floating cap based on
a concentration of 6.0 mg/L); total phosphorus (annual
floating cap based on a concentration of 0.3 mg/L); and
narrative limits in the form of operational guidelines. The
monthly average limit for total suspended solids becomes
effective November 1, 2016, the floating cap limit for
phosphorus becomes effective January 1, 2017, and the
floating cap limit for nitrogen becomes effective January
1, 2018. Monitoring without limits shall be required for
arsenic, selenium, mercury, and nitrate-nitrite. The flue gas
desulphurization treatment uses treated industrial wastewater, treated sewage effluent, and raw river water to
comprise its influent stream. The proposal also includes a
site-wide limit for total nitrogen (2,382 lbs/year) and total
phosphorus (108 lbs/year). Numerical limits for nitrogen,
phosphorus, and the monthly average for total suspended
solids, as well as the narrative operational parameters, have
been established using the Department’s best professional
judgment as informed by facility data and the limit of
treatment technology, as determined in light of consultation
and pilot studies. Certain numerical limits for nitrogen,
phosphorus, and total suspended solids, and the narrative
operational parameters, have been agreed to as part of a
consent decree entered by the U.S. District Court for the
District of Maryland on August 26, 2016.
Additionally, the permit proposes a condition for meeting
the terms of the new effluent limitation guidelines for FGD
wastewater and bottom ash transport water, published
November 3, 2015, which were stayed by EPA on April 12,
2017 pending a reexamination of the rule. The condition
allows for the permit to self-implement the new guidelines
if they are unaltered following EPA’s reexamination, even if
effective dates are changed. Should terms of the new rule
change beyond only effective dates, the permit stipulates
automatic reopening as a major modification to be subject to
public participation. Should self-implementation of the new
rule be triggered, the permit terms are as follows:
For FGD wastewater, the proposed permit allows for the
permittee to either elect to comply with the stricter voluntary limits at 40 CFR 423.13(g)(3)(i) by the deadline
established in a finalized rule or propose a timeline for
meeting mandatory limits at 40 CFR 423.13(g)(1)(i) as soon
as possible and apply for major modification to the permit.
If neither is submitted to the Department within twelve
months, new limits for arsenic (8 μg/L average, 11 μg/L
maximum), mercury (0.356 μg/L average, 0.788 μg/L maximum), selenium (12 μg/L average, 23 μg/L maximum), and
nitrate-nitrite (4.4 mg/L average, 17 mg/L maximum) shall
become effective at Monitoring Point 801 on the initial
compliance date specified at 40 CFR 423.13(g)(1)(i) in the
finalized rule. For bottom ash transport water, the proposed
permit allows twelve months for the permittee to propose a
date for cessation of bottom ash transport water discharges
as soon as possible and apply for major modification, else
the cessation date shall be the initial compliance date
specified at 40 CFR 423.13(k) in the finalized rule.
The permit requires biomonitoring, best management practices for fly ash handling, compliance with Clean Water
Act 316(a) for thermal discharges and 316(b) for cooling
water intake structures, and establishes prohibitions and
restrictions on PCBs, biocides and cooling tower additives.
The facility must also obtain stormwater coverage under the
General Discharge Permit for Stormwater Associated with
Industrial Activities (12-SW).
The Department has received a request for a public hearing
on the tentative determination for the above permit and has
scheduled the hearing for 6:00 PM, September 27, 2017 at
the Upper Montgomery Co. Volunteer Fire Dept., 19801
Beallsville Road, 2nd FL., Beallsville, MD 20839.
Persons who wish to present information regarding the
tentative determination may speak at the public hearing,
submit written comments at the public hearing, or submit a
written statement to the Department no later than October
6, 2017. All comments will be considered in making a final
determination.
Written comments should be addressed to the Maryland
Department of the Environment, Water and Science
Administration, 1800 Washington Blvd., Baltimore,
Maryland 21230-1708, Attn.: Mr. Michael Richardson,
Chief, Industrial and General Permits Division. The
supporting information for the tentative determination,
including the draft permit and fact sheet, may be reviewed
by contacting Mr. Richardson at the above address or by
telephone at (410) 537-3654 or 1-800-633-6101 to schedule
an appointment. Copies of documents may be procured at a
cost of $0.36 per page.
Any hearing-impaired person may request an interpreter to
be present at the public hearing by giving ten working days
notice to Mr. Richardson at the address or telephone number
listed above.
815
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 945
ROY THOMAS PEARSON
Magin Puig, Lavin & Puig PLLC
1629 K Street NW, Suite 300
Washington, DC 20006
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
1-800-753-POST
Rachel Evans
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
If the merchandise you’re selling is priced under $250, your 3-line, 3-day ad is FREE!
Go to washingtonpostads.com for complete details and to order your free ad.
MARYLAND DEPARTMENT OF THE
ENVIRONMENT
WATER AND SCIENCE ADMINISTRATION
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
ENROLL TODAY
Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy
or call 202-334-6100.
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
THONG MINH NGUYEN
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
BEN MINH NGUYEN
FAMILY LAW: 146929FL
Thang Ba Nguyen
Petitioner
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name of a
Minor in which he/she seeks to
change his/her name from Tam
Minh Nguyen to Be Minh Nguyen.
The petitioner is seeking a name
change because: Go to school. Call
my name easy.
Any person may file an objection
to the Petition on or before the
15th day of September, 2017. The
objection must be supported by
an affidavit and served upon the
Petitioner in accordance with Maryland Rule 1-321. failure to file an
objection or affidavit within the time
allowed my result in a judgement
by default or the grant of the relief
sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 31st day of
August, 2017.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE MATTER OF
PHOENIX KAL-EL SOMA
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
BRANDON SOMALIKA TEA
FAMILY LAW: 146905FL
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Ukpeme N. Okon
to Ukpeme Akpan Okon. The petitioner is seeking a name change
because: of marriage occurrence.
Any person may file an objection
to the Petition on or before the
15th day of September, 2017. The
objection must be supported by
an affidavit and served upon the
Petitioner in accordance with Maryland Rule 1-321. failure to file an
objection or affidavit within the time
allowed my result in a judgement
by default or the grant of the relief
sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 31st day of
August, 2017.
815
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
K
i
815
Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
or call 202-334-6200
S0833-1 6x2
Antiques
Asian Antiques Auction Sale on
September 17th, 1pm-5pm and
September 18th, 10am-1pm
225
EZ
new and pre-owned
cars, trucks and suvs
Muses Auction Gallery Is delighted
to offer an online, in-person and
telephone bidding sale on September 17 evening and September 18
morning, including all areas ceramics, hardwood furniture, bronze,
jade and paintings with emphasis
on Chinese antiques. Muses
Auction Gallery is a well-established
business dealing with Chinese
antiques and other items of value.
Please join us from September 14
to 16 for an auction preview at
8300 Boone Blvd. Suite 150.
Vienna, Virginia 22182 or contact
us at (703)-343-4900 or for
more
information
email
us
at musesauction@gmail.com
www.musesauction.com
215
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
the local expert
on local jobs
For Jobs advertisements, go to
washingtonpost.com/recruit
or call 202-334-4100
(toll free 1-800-765-3675)
205
CLASSIFIED
D9
820
Official Notices
ABC LICENSE: BL Restaurant Operations, LLC trading as Bar Louie
Potomac Town Center, 15001
Potomac Town Place, Suite 100,
Woodbridge, Prince William, Virginia 22191. The above establishment is applying to the VIRGINIA
DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL (ABC) for a Mixed
Beverage Restaurant; Wine & Beer
On-Premises license to sell or manufacture
alcoholic
beverages.
Tamara Bebb, Chief Financial Officer. NOTE: Objections to the
issuance of this license must be
submitted to ABC no later than 30
days from the publishing date of the
first of two required newspaper
legal notices. Objections should be
registered at www.abc.virginia.gov
or 800-552-3200.
825
Bids & Proposals
Capitol Paving of D.C., Inc.
Capitol Paving is soliciting qualified
MBE/WBE subcontractors to perform DDOT DCKA-2016-B-0043 14th
St NW StreetScape From Thomas
Circle To Florida Avenue email –
bids@capitolpaving.com ; call –
571.277.1022 or fax – 202.832.5126
– Bid Opening 08/21/2017
830
Official Notices
820
Official Notices
CITY OF TAKOMA PARK, MARYLAND
NOTICE OF 2017 NOMINATING CAUCUS
FOR THE CITY ELECTION OF NOVEMBER 7, 2017
The City's Nominating Caucus will convene at 7:30 pm
on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 to accept nominations of
candidates for mayor and councilmember. The Nominating
Caucus will be held in the Takoma Park Community Center
Auditorium, 7500 Maple Avenue, Takoma Park, Maryland.
Only registered voters of the City present at the meeting
may nominate or second the nomination of a candidate. If
not yet registered to vote, residents may register up until the
start of the meeting.
At the Caucus, nominations of candidates for mayor may
be made on motion of any voter of the City, and if such
nomination is seconded, the person nominated will be
considered a candidate. Nomination of each candidate for
councilmember may be made on motion of any voter
of her/his ward, and if such nomination is seconded,
the person so nominated will be considered a candidate.
Ward councilmember nominations will be accepted in the
following order: Wards 4, 2, 1, 3, 5, 6. Nominations for mayor
will follow.
A nominated candidate may decline a nomination during the
Nominating Caucus. A person may only accept a nomination
for one City office. The name of each person nominated
for the office of mayor and councilmember will be placed
upon the official ballot for the November 7, 2017 City
Election unless the person does not meet the qualifications
or files a declination with the City Clerk by 5 p.m. on Friday,
September 15.
Attest: Jessie Carpenter, CMC, City Clerk
www.takomaparkmd.gov | 301-891-7267
LA CIUDAD DE TAKOMA PARK, MARYLAND
AVISO DE LA REUNIÓN ELECTORAL DE NOMINACIÓN
DE CANDIDATOS PARA LA ELECCIÓN
EL 7 DE NOVIEMBRE DEL 2017
La Junta de Nominación de Candidatos se llevará a cabo en
el Auditorio del Centro Comunitario de Takoma Park, 7500
Maple Avenue, el Martes, 12 de Septiembre del 2017 a las
7:30 p.m. Se aceptarán las nominaciones de candidatos
para Alcalde y Miembros del Consejo. Sólo los residentes de
Takoma Park que son votantes registrados podrán nominar
o apoyar una nominación de un candidato. Si no está
registrado para votar, podrán registrarse para votar antes
que comience la reunión a las 7:30 p.m.
Durante la reunión, las nominaciones de candidatos para
Alcalde pueden realizarse por moción de cualquier votante
de la ciudad y, si la misma es secundada, la persona
nominada será considerada como candidato. La nominación
para Miembro del Consejo puede realizarse por moción de
cualquier votante de su distrito y si la misma es secundada,
la persona nominada será considerada como candidato. Las
nominaciones para Miembro del Consejo se aceptaran en la
siguiente orden: Distrito 4, 2, 1, 3, 5, 6. Después seguirá las
nominaciones por Alcalde.
Cualquier candidato nominado puede declinar su nominación durante la reunión. Una persona puede aceptar una
nominación para un solo cargo municipal. El nombre de
cada persona nominada para la Alcaldía o el Consejo será
colocado en la boleta oficial para las elecciones municipales
a menos que él/ella no califique como candidato o se
presente ante la Secretaría Municipal para declinar su
candidatura dentro de tres (3) días de su nominación.
Attest: Jessie Carpenter, CMC, City Clerk
www.takomaparkmd.gov | 301-891-7214
MARYLAND DEPARTMENT OF THE
ENVIRONMENT
WATER AND SCIENCE ADMINISTRATION
NOTICE OF TENTATIVE DETERMINATION
Montgomery County
Application for State Discharge Permit 15DP2529,
NPDES Permit MD0020931:
Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health (NIH), 9000 Rockville Pike, Building 13,
Room 2s11 MSC 5746, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-5746,
applied for renewal of the permit to discharge an average
of 100,000 gallons per day (gpd) of treated domestic and
animal washing wastewater from the NIH, Animal Center
Wastewater Treatment Plant located on 16701 Elmer School
Road, Dickerson, Montgomery County, Maryland 20842 to
an unnamed tributary of Broad Run, which is designated as
Use I - P waters, protected for Water Contact Recreation,
Aquatic Life, and Public Water Supply.
The Department is proposing to reissue the discharge permit
for the facility with the following
effluent limitations for the flow of 100,000 gpd:
BOD5 and total suspended solids, 10.0 mg/l maximum
monthly arithmetic mean and 15 mg/l maximum weekly
arithmetic mean during April 1 through September 30,
and 15 mg/l maximum monthly arithmetic mean and 22.5
mg/l maximum weekly arithmetic mean during October 1
through March 31; ammonia-N, 2.3 mg/l maximum monthly
arithmetic mean and 14 mg/l maximum daily arithmetic
mean during April 1 through September 30, and 4.0 mg/l
maximum monthly arithmetic mean and 17 mg/l maximum
daily arithmetic mean during October 1 through March 31;
E.coli, 126 MPN/100 ml maximum monthly geometric mean
concentration; dissolved oxygen, 5.0 mg/l minimum at any
time; pH maintained between 6.5 and 8.5; and if chlorine
is used in any treatment process, total residual chlorine of
0.011 mg/l maximum at any time.
This permit is in conformance with the load allocation for
segment POTTF-MD (Upper Potomac River Tidal Fresh) in
the “Chesapeake Bay TMDL for Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and
Sediment” established on December 29, 2010.
If a written request is received by September 13, 2017,
a public hearing on the tentative determination for this
application can be scheduled. The request should be sent
to the Maryland Department of the Environment, Water
and Science Administration, 1800 Washington Blvd.,
Baltimore, Maryland 21230-1708, Attn.: Yen-Der Cheng,
Chief, Municipal Permits Division and must include the
name, address and telephone number (home and work) of
the person making the request, the name of any other party
whom the person making the request may represent, and
the name of the facility and permit number. Failure to
request a hearing by September 13, 2017 will constitute
a waiver of the right to a public hearing on the tentative
determination for this permit.
Written comments concerning the tentative determination
will be considered in the preparation of a final determination
if submitted to the Department, to the attention of Yen-Der
Cheng at the above address, on or before September 25,
2017. Any hearing-impaired person who requests a hearing
may request an interpreter at the hearing by contacting Mr.
Cheng at (410) 537-3363 or 1-800-633-6101, or by written
request to the above address at least ten working days prior
to the scheduled hearing date.
Information supporting the tentative determination, including the draft permit and fact sheet, may be reviewed by
contacting Mr. Cheng at the above telephone number to
make an appointment or by written request to Mr. Cheng at
the above address. Copies of documents may be obtained at
a cost of $0.36 per page.
Notice of Hearing
On Housing and Community Development Needs for the Community
Development Block Grant (CDBG)
Notice is hereby given that the Mayor and Council of Rockville, Maryland, will conduct a public hearing on Monday, September 11, 2017
at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as it may be heard, in the
Council Chamber, Rockville City Hall, 111 Maryland Avenue, Rockville,
Maryland for receiving input on community needs for the Community
Development Block Grant for Fiscal Year 2019 (Program Year 44).
Testimony from this hearing will be considered by the Mayor and
Council in funding decisions.
Special Notices
Maria's Bakery BUSINESS CLOSE DOWN
ANNOUNCEMENT
We regret to inform you that we
have decided to close down
our business.
Our last day of business will be on
September 4th, 2017.
If you have any questions or
concerns, please contact us.
Address: 1701-B3 Rockville Pike,
Rockville, MD 20852
Tel: 301-984-2228
Hours: Mon-Sun 9:00am-10:00pm
Home delivery
is convenient.
The Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) is a federal grant
for housing and community development programs. The City of
Rockville has received approximately $230,000 annually over the last
several years.
To be eligible for funding, all CDBG projects must principally benefit
low and moderate-income people or prevent or eliminate slums and
blight and comply with all Federal program requirements. CDBG
funds can be used to acquire property for public uses (recreation,
public facilities, historic preservation, neighborhood conservation);
build public facilities (roads, curbs, sidewalks, parks, neighborhood
facilities, sewerage collection systems, water distribution systems,
flood and drainage systems); remove architectural barriers for people
with disabilities and the elderly (widen doors, install wheelchair
ramps); provide loans and grants to rehabilitate houses and apartments; provide programs to preserve and restore public or private
historic properties; and implement economic development activities
(training programs, energy conservation programs, commercial revitalization).
Any person or organization interested in speaking at the public hearing should contact the City Clerk's Office at (240) 314-8280 by 4:00
p.m. on September 11, 2017. For further information, contact the
Department of Community Planning and Development Services at
(240) 314-8203. Additional information will be available in the Mayor
and Council agenda item, which will be online by September 8, 2017
at: www.rockvillemd.gov/AgendaCenter
1-800-753-POST
SF
MAYOR AND COUNCIL OF ROCKVILLE
By: Kathleen Conway, City Clerk/Director of Council Operations
OPQRS
D10
820
Official Notices
820
850
Official Notices
HEARING EXAMINER NOTICE
BA CASE NO. 17-019V
September 19, 2017; 5:00 p.m.
Bruce and Nancy Menz, Petitioner
Notice is hereby given that a public hearing as scheduled
above will be held by the Hearing Examiner of Howard
County, at the George Howard Building, 3430 Courthouse
Drive, Ellicott City, Maryland, on the petition of said Petitioners, filed under Section 128.0.A.12 of the Howard County
Zoning Regulations for a Residential Variance to increase the
maximum cumulative lot coverage permitted for accessory
structures on a residential lot from 2,200 square feet to
3,128 square feet to accommodate a 950 square foot
addition, located in the RC-DEO (Rural Conservation: Density
Exchange Option) Zoning District on that land belonging
to Bruce and Nancy Menz, situated in the Third Election
District, located on the south side of Underwood Road,
approximately 354 feet south of Pipes Lane, known as 1771
S. Underwood Street, also known as (Tax Map 9, Grid 21
Parcel 328), containing about 6.004 acres, as shown on
file in this case in the Division of Public Service and Zoning
Administration.
Division of Public Service and
Zoning Administration
A sign language interpreter is available for the above hearing
upon request. Call Citizen Services at 313-6400, or TDD at
313 6401.
INVITATION FOR BID
170623/CABW/2017
NOTICE OF SUSPENSION
The Chief of the Brazilian Aeronautical Commission in
Washington D.C. (“BACW”), located at 1701 22nd Street, N.W.
- Washington, D.C. 20008 –USA, hereby notifies, to whom
it may concern, Bidding Process, for LEASE OF 4 (four)
executive transportation jet engine aircraft, to include
aircraft INSURANCE, LOGISTIC SUPPORT and the TRAINING
of pilots and mechanics required for the safe and efficient
operation of the aircraft, published on August 2, 2017 on
newspaper, is suspended due to the interest of the
Administration.
Other relevant information regarding to this solicitation
may be obtained by the BACW’s Bidding and Contract
Division,
or
by
the
website:
http://www.cabwnews.com/index.php/solicitations
Washington, D.C. August 28, 2017
Col POTIGUARA VIEIRA CAMPOS
Chief of BACW
NOTICE OF HEARING
Notice is hereby given that the Mayor and Council of Rockville,
Maryland, will conduct a public hearing on Monday, September 18,
2017, at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as it may be heard, in the
Council Chamber, Rockville City Hall, 111 Maryland Avenue, Rockville,
Maryland, in connection with Text Amendment Application TXT201800245, Mayor and Council of Rockville, Applicant.
The purpose and intent of this application is to amend Chapter 25
of the Rockville City Code entitled “Zoning” by amending Section
25.20.02.b to delete the reference to fire and emergency services
protection as a required adequate public facilities determination for
development approval.
More detailed information on the above application can be found
on file in the City Clerk/Director of Council Operations Office at
Rockville City Hall and on the City’s web site at:
http://www.rockvillemd.gov/DocumentCenter/View/20135.
Persons wishing to testify at the hearing are asked to call (240)
314-8280, before 4:00 p.m. on the day of the hearing to place their
names on the speakers' list.
Mayor and Council of Rockville
By: Kathleen Conway, City Clerk/Director of Council Operations
NOTICE OF HEARING
Notice is hereby given that the Mayor and Council of Rockville,
Maryland, will conduct a public hearing on Monday, September 18,
at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as it may be heard, in the
Council Chamber, Rockville City Hall, 111 Maryland Avenue, Rockville,
Maryland, in connection with proposed amendments and revisions to
the Adequate Public Facilities Standards (APFS).
The purpose of the proposed amendments is to revise the school
capacity test; delete the fire and emergency services standards; and
make other technical revisions and clarifications.
More detailed information on the above application can be found on
file in the City Clerk's Office at Rockville City Hall and on the
City’s web site: http://md-rockville.civicplus.com/DocumentCenter/View/19887. Persons wishing to testify at the hearing are asked
to call (240) 314-8280, before 4:00 p.m. on the day of the hearing to
place their names on the speakers' list.
Mayor and Council of Rockville
By: Kathleen Conway, City Clerk/Director of Council Operations
NOTICE OF HEARING
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
11204 Woodson Avenue
Kensington, MD 20895
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
YUKSEL KURNAZ AND CAREY KURNAZ, dated June 8, 2009
and recorded in Liber 37581, folio 397 among the Land Records
of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default having occurred
thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.432974V;
Tax ID No.13-01363448 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850,
on
SEPTEMBER 18, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $23,900.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 576602)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Notice is hereby given that the Mayor and Council of Rockville, Maryland, will conduct a public hearing on Monday, September 18,
at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as it may be heard, in the
Council Chamber, Rockville City Hall, 111 Maryland Avenue, Rockville,
Maryland, in connection with proposed amendments and revisions to
the Adequate Public Facilities Standards (APFS).
The purpose of the proposed amendments is to revise the school
capacity test; delete the fire and emergency services standards; and
make other technical revisions and clarifications.
More detailed information on the above application can be found on
file in the City Clerk's Office at Rockville City Hall and on the
City’s web site: http://md-rockville.civicplus.com/DocumentCenter/View/19887. Persons wishing to testify at the hearing are asked
to call (240) 314-8280, before 4:00 p.m. on the day of the hearing to
place their names on the speakers' list.
Mayor and Council of Rockville
By: Kathleen Conway, City Clerk/Director of Council Operations
NOTICE OF HEARING
Notice is hereby given that the Mayor and Council of Rockville,
Maryland, will conduct a public hearing on Monday, September 11,
2017, at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as it may be heard, in the
Council Chamber, Rockville City Hall, 111 Maryland Avenue, Rockville,
Maryland, in connection with Text Amendment Application TXT201800246, Mayor and Council of Rockville, Applicant.
The purpose and intent of this application is to amend Chapter 25
of the Rockville City Code entitled “Zoning” by amending Sections
25.03.02, 25.12.03, 25.13.03, and 25.16.03 so as to add definitions
of two new uses, “alcoholic beverage production” and “alcoholic
beverage production, limited;” to identify the zones where the uses
may be permitted; and to establish a parking standard for the uses.
More detailed information on the above application can be found
on file in the City Clerk/Director of Council Operations Office at
Rockville City Hall and on the City’s web site at:
http://www.rockvillemd.gov/DocumentCenter/View/20134.
Persons wishing to testify at the hearing are asked to call (240)
314-8280, before 4:00 p.m. on the day of the hearing to place their
names on the speakers' list.
Mayor and Council of Rockville
By: Kathleen Conway, City Clerk/Director of Council Operations
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
KING FARM IRVINGTON CENTRE – SITES F7 AND F8
Notice is hereby given that the Mayor and Council of Rockville,
Maryland will conduct a public hearing on Monday September 18,
2017, at 7:00 p.m. or as soon thereafter as it may be heard, in
the Mayor and Council Chambers, Rockville City Hall, 111 Maryland
Avenue, Rockville, Maryland, in connection with a request for Mayor
and Council consent to allow residential use on Parcels F-7 and F8 within Irvington Centre at King Farm, rather than office use. The
applicant is requesting the development of up to 120 residential
townhouse units on Parcel F-7 instead of approx. 152,000 sq. ft. of
office space and up to 42 residential townhouse units on parcel F-8
instead of approx. 158,000 sq. ft. of office space. The applicant is King
Farm Associates.
The F-7 property is located southeast of the intersection of Piccard
Drive and Choke Cherry Road and the F-8 site is located along King
Farm Boulevard, north of Piccard Drive.
Persons wishing to testify are requested to call the City Clerk’s Office
at 240-314-8280 by September 18, 2017 at 4:00 PM to place
their names on the speakers’ list. Further information can be found
on file in the planning office, by emailing Brian Wilson, Planner at
bwilson@rockvillemd.gov, or by calling at 240-314-8227.
Mayor and Council of Rockville
By: Kathleen Conway, City Clerk/Director of Council Operations
825
Bids & Proposals
825
Bids & Proposals
PUBLIC BIDDING # 16 YEAR 2017 –
File IN17-0456//5
Contracting organization: ARGENTINE ARMY – US
ATTACHE’S OFFICE
Bid Objective: ACQUISITION OF MODULE OF INDIVIDUAL
EQUIPMENT - MULTICAM UNIFORM
BID OPENING AT: ARGENTINE ARMY- 1810 Connecticut
Ave NW, Washington D.C 20009
Date and Time: September 21st, 2017 at 10:00 AM
Specifications
can
be
downloaded
at
www.amilusa.com/contracts/ and
www.argentinacompra.gov.ar
THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA HOUSING AUTHORITY
REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL (RFP)
SOLICITATION NO.: 0021-2017
FIRE ALARM AND SECURITY SYSTEMS
PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE AND
REPAIR SERVICES
The District of Columbia Housing Authority (DCHA)
requires Fire Alarm and Security Systems Preventive Maintenance and Repair Services.
SOLICITATION DOCUMENTS will be available at the
Issuing Office at 1133 North Capitol Street, NE, Suite
300, Office of Administrative Services/Contracts and Procurement, Washington, DC 20002-7599, between the hours
of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, beginning
Monday, August 28, 2017 and on DCHA’s website at
www.dchousing.org.
850
Montgomery County
850
EZ
Montgomery County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
6900 CYNTHIA LANE
DERWOOD, MD 20855
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to LAWYERS TITLE REALTY SRVC. A VIRGINIA
CORP., Trustee(s), dated May 28, 2004, and recorded among the
Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
27542, folio 756, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
SEPTEMBER 18, 2017 at 1:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED FOUR (4) IN BLOCK LETTERED 'E' IN THE
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS, "REDLAND ESTATES", AS PER PLAT
THEREOF DULY RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK 79 AT
PLAT 7982.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 7.25% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (40967)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1309 Cavendish Drive
Silver Spring, MD 20905
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
BABATUNDE ALAOFIN, dated October 27, 2005 and recorded
in Liber 31198, folio 255 among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.422521V; Tax ID No.0502181607 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
at the MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
SEPTEMBER 18, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 557181)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
ERIN M. COHEN,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
850
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
212 CEDAR AVENUE
GAITHERSBURG, MD 20877
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to PRLAP, INC. , Trustee(s), dated May 4,
2006, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 32743, folio 181, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of
the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction at THE MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
SEPTEMBER 18, 2017 at 1:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED FOUR (4), IN BLOCK NUMBERED THREE
(3), IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS 'BROWN'S ADDITION
TO GAITHERSBURG", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 31, AT PLAT 1992
THE PROPERTY IS SUBJECT TO A PRIOR MORTGAGE, THE
AMOUNT WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT THE TIME OF THE SALE
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 4.99% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (37432)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
AUGUST 31, SEPTEMBER 7, 14, 2017
12125635
www.hwestauctions.com
AUGUST 31, SEPTEMBER 7, 14, 2017
AUGUTS 31, SEPTEMBER 7, 14, 2017
12121351
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
AUGUTS 31, SEPTEMBER 7, 14, 2017
12126954
12126645
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
15113 DONNA DRIVE
SILVER SPRING, MD 20905
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in
a certain Deed of Trust to A. BRUCE CLEVELAND AND
JOHN SCHOEMER, Trustee(s), dated December 27, 2004, and
recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MARYLAND in Liber 29031, folio 352, the holder of the
indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the
undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded
among the aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured
thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at
public auction at THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850
ON,
SEPTEMBER 18, 2017 at 1:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWO (2) IN BLOCK LETTERED, "C" IN THE
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PEACH ORCHARD HEIGHTS", AS
PER PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 63 AT PLAT NO. 5465.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 2% per annum from the
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (37142)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
13025 Brahms Terrace
Silver Spring, MD 20904
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to GREENHEAD INVESTMENTS, INC. A
CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, Trustee(s), dated November 19,
2007, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 35123, folio 373, RE-RECORDED ON JULY 25, 2014 IN LIBER 49512 AND FOLIO 456, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of
the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction at THE MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
SEPTEMBER 18, 2017 at 1:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED ONE HUNDRED SIX (106) IN BLOCK LETTERED "E" IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "TANGLEWOOD" AS
PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 114 AT PLAT
13542
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 2% per annum from the
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (36691)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
1925 AUTUMN RIDGE CIRCLE
SILVER SPRING, MD 20906
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to SCOTT B. GOLDSCHEIN, Trustee(s),
dated September 28, 2012, and recorded among the Land
Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
45064, folio 042, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
SEPTEMBER 18, 2017 at 1:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT 19 IN BLOCK E IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "MIDDLEBRIDGE", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
121 AT PLAT NO. 14234
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 3.75% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (45635)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
18209 Mehrens Terrace
Olney, MD 20832
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to PRLAP, INC. , Trustee(s), dated March 11,
2005, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 29768, folio 134, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of
the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction at THE MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
SEPTEMBER 18, 2017 at 1:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED EIGHTEEN (18) IN BLOCK LETTERED "F" IN
THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT 4, OLNEY SQUARE" AS
PER PLAT THERE RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK 92
AT PLAT 9982 AND RE-RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 93 AT PLAT
10159
THE PROPERTY IS SUBJECT TO A PRIOR MORTGAGE, THE
AMOUNT WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT THE TIME OF THE SALE
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 2.99% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (43924)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
SEALED PROPOSAL RESPONSES ARE DUE ON OR BEFORE
Thursday, October 12, 2017 at 11:00 PM.
Contact Lolita Washington, Contract Specialist at (202) 5351212 or by email at lwashing@dchousing.org with copy to
business@dchousing.org for additional information.
AUGUST 31, SEPTEMBER 7, 14, 2017
12125631 AUGUST 31, SEPTEMBER 7, 14, 2017
12119405 AUGUST 31, SEPTEMBER 7, 14, 2017
12123465 AUGUST 31, SEPTEMBER 7, 14, 2017
12119406
IS YOUR OLD CAR HOLDING UP?
YES
NO
NO
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YES
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
NJMMJPOSFBEFSTDBSTIPQQFSTJODMVEFEttXBTIJOHUPOQPTUDPNDMBTTJmFEt0QFO0SQMBDFZPVSBEJO&YQSFTTPVSEBJMZDPNNVUFSSFBEBOESFBDISFBEFST
Source: Scarborough 2012, Release 2. Washington Post newspaper 7-day cumulative reach; Express 5-day reach.
C054E 10x2
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
850
850
Montgomery County
OPQRS
EZ
850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
856
Montgomery County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, Maryland 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
25 PINE RIDGE CT., UNIT #12-3
GERMANTOWN, MD 20874
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, Maryland 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, Maryland 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
9602 MERWOOD LA.
SILVER SPRING, MD 20901
11300 COLEBROOK TERR.
POTOMAC, MD 20854
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from
Bernadette Saunders and Courtney Sims dated June 1, 2005 and recorded
in Liber 30073, folio 501 among the Land Records of Montgomery County,
MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Montgomery County,
at the Court House Door, 50 Maryland Ave., Rockville, MD 20850, on
SEPTEMBER 20, 2017 AT 11:12 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Taddesse
W. Meshesha dated August 26, 2005 and recorded in Liber 30766, folio
584 among the Land Records of Montgomery County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, at the Court House
Door, 50 Maryland Ave., Rockville, MD 20850, on
SEPTEMBER 6, 2017 AT 11:14 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Howard
Kaplan and Jill Kaplan dated April 21, 2006 and recorded in Liber 32260,
folio 137 among the Land Records of Montgomery County, MD, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, at the Court
House Door, 50 Maryland Ave., Rockville, MD 20850, on
SEPTEMBER 20, 2017 AT 11:13 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Montgomery County, MD and
described as Unit 12-3 of the North Creek Condominium and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #09-01850423.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $20,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, to be adjusted
to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Montgomery County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #13-01355860.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $40,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, to be adjusted
to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Montgomery County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #10-01485396.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $68,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, to be adjusted
to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 65933.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 58730.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Aug 31, Sep 7 & Sep 14
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 27795.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Aug 17, Aug 24 & Aug 31
12124695
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
3501 FOREST EDGE DRIVE, APT. 1F
SILVER SPRING, MD 20906
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to CARRIE WARD, Trustee(s), dated April 25,
2014, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 48588, folio 229, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of
the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction at THE MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
SEPTEMBER 18, 2017 at 1:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED APRIL 30, 2014 IN LIBER 48588, FOLIO 229.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 3.875% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (45318)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12121602
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, Maryland 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
9233 HUMMINGBIRD TERR.
GAITHERSBURG, MD 20879
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Montgomery County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #09-01473764.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $13,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, to be adjusted
to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 64388.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Aug 24, Aug 31 & Sep 7
12123588
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Shannon Menapace
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Shaun Minick and Stephanie
Minick, aka Stephanie Williams
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF13-28682
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 25th day of August 2017, that
the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust
docketed herein and located at
14919 Nighthawk Lane, Bowie,
Maryland 20716 made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee
Dyson, and Shannon Menapace,
Substitute Trustees, be RATIFIED
and CONFIRMED, unless cause to
the contrary be shown on or
before the 25th day of September,
2017, provided a copy of this Order
be inserted in The Washington Post
once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 25th day of
September, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $177,840.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Aug 31, Sept 7, 14, 2017 12126637
www.hwestauctions.com
AUGUST 31, SEPTEMBER 7, 14, 2017
850
850
Montgomery County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
ESTATE OF MARILYN F. JONES
RIKKI DRYKERMAN,
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. 424457V
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 16th
day of AUGUST, 2017, by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 15311
Pine Orchard Drive, Apartment 2D,
Silver Spring, MD 20906 will be ratified and confirmed unless cause
to the contrary thereof be shown
on or before the 15th day of SEPTEMBER, 2017, provided a copy
of this NOTICE be published at
least once a week in each of
three successive weeks in some
newspaper of general circulation
published in said County before
the 15th day of SEPTEMBER, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$115,732.35.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Montgomery County, Maryland
Aug 24, 31, Sept 7, 2017 12124985
Home delivery
is convenient.
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SF
12125626
Montgomery County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
DIANE S. ROSENBERG
MARK D. MEYER
JOHN A. ANSELL, III
KENNETH SAVITZ
JENNIFER ROCHINO
SYDNEY ROBERSON
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway
Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiff(s)
v.
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 15th
day of August, 2017, by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland, that the sale of 3544
Gentry Ridge Court, Silver Spring,
MD 20904, made and reported,
will be ratified and confirmed,
unless cause to the contrary
thereof be shown on or before
the 14th day of September, 2017,
provided a copy of this notice
be inserted in a daily newspaper
printed in said County, once in
each of three successive weeks
before the 14th day of September,
2017. The Report of Sale states
the amount of the foreclosure
sale price to be $254,000.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Montgomery County, MD
AUG 24, 31, Sept 7, 2017 12124989
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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
BESSIE L. MONROE
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-08927
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 23rd day
of August 2017, by the Circuit Court
for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the property
mentioned in these proceedings
and described as 8407 Lenaskin
Lane, Forestville, MD 20747 a/k/a
8407 Lenaskin Lane, District
Heights, MD 20747 will be ratified
and confirmed unless cause to
the contrary thereof be shown on
or before the 25th day of September, 2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 25th day of September, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$201,400.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Aug 31, Sept 7, 14, 2017 12126627
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Patrick M. A. Decker
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
Civil No. CAEF16-40156
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 25th day of August 2017, that
the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust
docketed herein and located at
6018 Ladd Road, Suitland, Maryland 20746 made and reported by
James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson,
Brian Thomas, Hugh J. Green, and
Patrick M. A. Decker, Substitute
Trustees, be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or before the
25th day of September, 2017, provided a copy of this Order be
inserted in The Washington Post
once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 25th day of
September, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $206,550.00.
Sydney J. Harrison 619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Aug 31, Sept 7, 14, 2017 12126635
Home delivery
is convenient.
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 25th day of August 2017, that
the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust
docketed herein and located at
9609 Allerton Terrace, Clinton,
Maryland 20735 made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee
Dyson, Hugh J. Green, and Patrick
M. A. Decker, Substitute Trustees,
be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 25th day of
September, 2017, provided a copy
of this Order be inserted in The
Washington Post once in each of
three (3) successive weeks before
the 25th day of September, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $348,719.32.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
SF
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
JOHN W. WILSON
JUANITA P. WILSON
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF16-40163
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 23rd day
of August 2017, by the Circuit Court
for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the property
mentioned in these proceedings
and described as 601 68th Street,
Seat Pleasant, MD 20743 will be ratified and confirmed unless cause
to the contrary thereof be shown
on or before the 25th day of September, 2017, provided a copy of
this NOTICE be published at least
once a week in each of three
successive weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said County before the
25th day of September, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$165,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Aug 31, Sept 7, 14, 2017 12126629
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
DOROTHY A. BROWN
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF16-39155
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 23rd day
of August 2017, by the Circuit Court
for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the property
mentioned in these proceedings
and described as 1723 Allendale
Place, Hyattsville, MD 20785 will
be ratified and confirmed unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 25th day of
September, 2017, provided a copy
of this NOTICE be published at
least once a week in each of three
successive weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said County before the
25th day of September, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$136,629.87.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Aug 31, Sept 7, 14, 2017 12126625
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
KRISTIN GAYMON
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF16-25701
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 23rd day
of August 2017, by the Circuit Court
for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the property
mentioned in these proceedings
and described as 3807 Swann Road
Unit 101, Suitland, MD 20746 will
be ratified and confirmed unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 25th day of
September, 2017, provided a copy
of this NOTICE be published at
least once a week in each of three
successive weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said County before the
25th day of September, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$32,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Aug 31, Sept 7, 14, 2017 12126624
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
SHAWN L. BUTLER
SHERIDA L WILSON
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF16-41491
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 23rd
day of August 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 3909
Bishopmill Dr., Upper Marlboro, MD
20772-3402 will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 25th day of September, 2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 25th day of September, 2017.
Aug 31, Sept 7, 14, 2017 12126638
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$182,400.00.
Wake up to
home delivery.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Aug 31, Sept 7, 14, 2017 12126621
1-800-753-POST
SF
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is convenient.
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SF
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852
Anne Arundel County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
Versus
Estate of Bernard J. Harvey, Sr.
a/k/a Bernard Joseph Harvey, Sr.
Kathleen A. Harvey
a/k/a Kathleen Ann Harvey
Defendants
No. C-02-CV-17-000464
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this
Wednesday, August 23, 2017 that
the sale of the property in the
proceedings mentioned, made and
reported by Jennifer Rochino, Substitute Trustee.
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 22nd
day of September 2017 next; provided, a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, once in each
of three successive weeks before
the 22nd day of September 2017
next. The report states that the
amount of sale of the property at
7972 TICK NECK ROAD, PASADENA,
MD 21122 to be $148,200.00.
/S/Robert P Duckworth
Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, MD
Aug 31, Sept 7,14, 2017 12126780
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY,
Robert E. Frazier, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Versus
Jeff O. Stratton
Defendant
No . C-02-CV-15-003752
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this
Wednesday, August 9, 2017, that
the sale of the property in the proceedings mentioned, made and
reported by, Thomas W. Hodge,
Substitute Trustee
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 8th day
of September 2017 next, provided
a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, Maryland,
once in each of three (3) successive weeks on or before the
28th day of September 2017 next.
The report states the amount of
sale of the property at 7919 SEA
BREEZE DRIVE, ORCHARD BEACH,
MD 21226, to be $459,086.00
Robert P Duckworth
Clerk of the Circuit Court
for Anne Arundel County, MD
August 17, 24, 31, 2017 12123735
856
Frederick County
Frederick County
ucs299502
CIRCUIT COURT FOR
FREDERICK COUNTY
Sandra K. Dalton
Clerk of the Circuit Court
100 West Patrick Street
Courthouse
Frederick, MD 21701
(301) 600-1976
Case Number: 10-C-17-000662 FC
Lender License Number: N/A
James E Clarke
VS.
Linda M. Henry
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby issued by the
Circuit Court for Frederick County
this 7th day of August 2017, that
the sale made and recorded by
James E. Clarke et al., for the sale
of the property described in these
proceedings
1314 North Market Street
Frederick, MD 21701
be ratified and confirmed thiry (30)
days from the date of this Notice,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown, provided a copy of this
Notice be inserted in some Newspaper published in this County,
once in each of three (3) successive weeks.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $183,000.00.
Sandra K. Dalton
Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Frederick County
Shannon Menapace
P.O. Box 2548
Leesburg, Virginia 20177 (703) 777-7101
Aug 17, 24, 31, 2017
12124410
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856
Frederick County
856
D11
Frederick County
McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC
312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800
Laurel, Maryland 20707
www.mwc-law.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
2510 EMERSON DR.
FREDERICK, MD 21702
127 ADAMS CT.
WALKERSVILLE, MD 21793
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Cheryl
Rosemarie Weir, dated February 24, 2005 and recorded in Liber 5177,
folio 342 among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale
at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
SEPTEMBER 20, 2017 AT 1:01 PM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Tina Trott
and Jason Trott, dated June 9, 2008 and recorded in Liber 7047, folio 392
among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at
the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W.
Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
SEPTEMBER 13, 2017 AT 12:46 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in Frederick County, Maryland and more fully described
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of
record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any
kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier's or certified check, or
in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their
sole discretion, for $30,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or
servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived.
Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of
the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County,
Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate
of 5% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received
in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by
an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the
balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will
be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the
defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from
the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes,
ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be
responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost
of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges
shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable
to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser.
Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and
the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk
of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #14-603839).
Laura H. G. O'Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in Frederick County, Maryland and more fully described
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of
record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any
kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier's or certified check, or
in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their
sole discretion, for $21,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or
servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived.
Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of
the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County,
Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate
of 5.25% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received
in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by
an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the
balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will
be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the
defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from
the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes,
ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be
responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost
of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges
shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable
to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser.
Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and
the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of
loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #2009-04824).
Laura H. G. O'Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Aug 31, Sep 7 & Sep 14
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Aug 24, Aug 31 & Sep 7
12125417
12124644
McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC
312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800
Laurel, Maryland 20707
www.mwc-law.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
6605 HIGH BEACH EAST CT.
A/R/T/A 6605 HIGH BEACH CT. EAST
NEW MARKET, MD 21774
McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC
312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800
Laurel, Maryland 20707
www.mwc-law.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
204 POLARIS DR.
WALKERSVILLE, MD 21793
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Michael
P. Kelly and Jennifer A. Kelly, dated July 31, 2006 and recorded in Liber
6195, folio 729 among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD, default
having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale
at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
SEPTEMBER 20, 2017 AT 1:00 PM
Diane S. Rosenberg, et al.
Substitute Trustees
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
is convenient.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in Frederick County, Maryland and more fully described
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of
record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any
kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier's or certified check, or
in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their
sole discretion, for $44,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or
servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived.
Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of
the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County,
Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate
of 5% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received
in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by
an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the
balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will
be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the
defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from
the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes,
ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be
responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost
of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges
shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable
to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser.
Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and
the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk
of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #16-603725).
Laura H. G. O'Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Aug 31, Sep 7 & Sep 14
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Greg R.
Humphrey, dated December 27, 2013 and recorded in Liber 10007, folio
395 among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale
at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
SEPTEMBER 13, 2017 AT 12:45 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in Frederick County, Maryland and more fully described
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of
record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any
kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier's or certified check, or
in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their
sole discretion, for $23,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or
servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived.
Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of
the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County,
Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate
of 5% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received
in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by
an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the
balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will
be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the
defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from
the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes,
ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be
responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost
of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges
shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable
to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser.
Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and
the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk
of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #16-605387).
Laura H. G. O'Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Aug 24, Aug 31 & Sep 7
12124641
12124923
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
3045 Flint Hill Road
Adamstown, MD 21710
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
DEBORAH R. ROBERTS, dated September 2, 2015 and
recorded in Liber 10745, folio 0419 among the Land Records of
FREDERICK COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.10C16002198; Tax ID
No.07-193122 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
at the FREDERICK COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 100 W.
PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, MD 21701, on
SEPTEMBER 18, 2017 at 1:45 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $22,300.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for FREDERICK
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 570686)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
ERIN M. AUGUST,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1851 Millstream Drive
Frederick, MD 21702
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
FARZAN FANAIYAN, dated March 3, 2005 and recorded in Liber
5207, folio 0292 among the Land Records of FREDERICK
COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure
Case docketed as Case No.10C16000303; Tax ID No.02070464 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at
the FREDERICK COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 100 W.
PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, MD 21701, on
SEPTEMBER 18, 2017 at 1:45 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $36,300.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for FREDERICK
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 566495)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
ERIN M. COHEN,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
Prince Georges County
v.
Joseph Curtis, III and Renee L. Curtis
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF17-07534
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
Eddy F. Jocktane
A/K/A E. Franck Jocktane
Katina Jocktane
a/k/a Katina O. Jocktane
3544 Gentry Ridge Court
Silver Spring, MD 20904
Defendant(s)
Case No. 432002V
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Brian Thomas
Hugh J. Green
Patrick M. A. Decker
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Francis Donald Hines
Defendant(s)
851
12124276
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Kenneth
Hawkins dated December 10, 2002 and recorded in Liber 22734, folio
410 among the Land Records of Montgomery County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, at the Court House
Door, 50 Maryland Ave., Rockville, MD 20850, on
SEPTEMBER 13, 2017 AT 11:15 AM
851
Aug 31, Sep 7 & Sep 14
856
McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC
312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800
Laurel, Maryland 20707
www.mwc-law.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
851
Frederick County
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
AUGUTS 31, SEPTEMBER 7,14, 2017
12126449 AUGUTS 31, SEPTEMBER 7,14, 2017
12126444
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OPQRS
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Khalid D. Walker
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Nkem Amin Khumbah
Defendant(s)
Civil No.13C17110693
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Howard County, Maryland, this
10th day of AUGUST, 2017, that
the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust
docketed herein and located at
10704 Cordage Walk, Columbia,
Maryland 21044 made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee
Dyson, Hugh J. Green, Shannon
Menapace, Khalid D. Walker, Christine M. Drexel and Brian Thomas,
Substitute Trustees, be RATIFIED
and CONFIRMED, unless cause
to the contrary be shown on or
before the 11th day of SEPTEMBER 2017; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in The Washington Post, once in each of three (3)
successive weeks before the 4th
day of SEPEMBER, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $228,500.00.
BY THE COURT:
Wayne A. Robey
Clerk of the Circuit Court
MATL575516
Orlans PC
PO Box 2548
Leesburg, Virginia 20177
12123742
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HOWARD COUNTY,
MARYLAND
Civil No.13C17110852
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Howard County, Maryland, this
10th day of AUGUST, 2017, that
the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust
docketed herein and located at
6309 Old Washington Road,
Elkridge, Maryland 21075 made
and reported by James E. Clarke,
Renee Dyson, Brian Thomas, Erin
M. August, Hugh J. Green and
Patrick M. A. Decker, Substitute
Trustees, be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or before the
11th day of SEPTEMBER 2017; provided a copy of this Order be
inserted in The Washington Post,
once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 4th day of
SEPEMBER, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $255,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Wayne A. Robey
Clerk of the Circuit Court
MATL546122
Orlans PC
PO Box 2548
Leesburg, Virginia 20177
12123744
City of Alexandria
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
2500 N VAN DORN STREET,
UNIT 720,
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22302
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $189,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 6.500000% dated
June 21, 2005, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the CITY OF ALEXANDRIA as Deed Instrument Number
050021050, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction all
that property located in the CITY
OF ALEXANDRIA, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the City
of Alexandria located at 520 King
Street, Alexandria, Virginia on
September 20, 2017 at 11:30 AM,
the property with improvements
to wit:
Tax Map No. 50427550
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-268404.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Aug 24, 31, 2017
Tax No.: 28-035-005
The property and improvements will be sold in "as is" physical condition
without warranty of any kind.
TERMS OF SALE: A non-refundable bidder's deposit in the amount of ten
percent (10%) of the successful bid payable by cashier's/certified check
required at time of sale except for the party secured by the Deed of Trust.
Risk of loss on purchaser from date and time of auction. Balance of the
purchase price must be paid by cashier's check within 14 days from sale
date. Except for Virginia Grantor tax, all settlement costs and expenses
are purchaser's responsibility. Real estate taxes will be pro-rated to the
date of sale. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining possession of the
property. If purchaser defaults, deposit will be forfeited and property
resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser who shall be
liable for any deficiency in the purchase price and all costs, expenses
and attorney’s fees of both sales. If Trustees do not convey title for any
reason, purchaser's sole remedy is return of deposit without interest. This
sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan secured by the
Deed of Trust including, but not limited to, determining whether prior to
sale a bankruptcy was filed; a forbearance, repayment or other agreement
was entered into; or the loan was reinstated or paid off. In any such event
this sale shall be null and void and purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return
of deposit without interest. This communication is from a debt collector.
Old Dominion Trustees, Inc., Substitute Trustees
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
BUONASSISSI, HENNING & LASH, P.C.
1861 Wiehle Avenue, Suite 300
Reston, Virginia 20190
(703) 787-7562
File No. 8207.81533
August 31, September 7, 2017
12126146
872
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
5168 CALIFORNIA LN,
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22304
v.
Jennifer Avery
fka Jennifer Ward and
Michael Ward
Defendant(s)
12125646
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Fairfax County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$532,900.00, dated May 9, 2005,
recorded among the land records
of the Circuit Court for Prince William County on May 10, 2005,
as
Instrument
Number
200505100075248, the undersigned
appointed
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction, at the main entrance of
the courthouse for the Circuit
Court of Prince William County,
9311 Lee Ave, Manassas, VA on
October 6, 2017 at 9:30 AM, the
property described in said deed of
trust, located at the above address
and briefly described as: Lot 61,
Phase 4, Section 20, BRAEMAR,
as the same is duly dedicated
in
Instrument
Number
200311060205413, and as shown
on a corresponding plat at Instrument Number 200311060205414,
both recorded among the land
records of Prince William County,
Virginia. Tax ID: 7495-43-4689.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $14,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
Loan Type: Conv/Conv (Trustee #
558978)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
Towne #5000.0211
08/31/2017, 09/07/2017 12123525
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
3884 WERTZ DR,
WOODBRIDGE, VA 22193
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $568,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 2.000000% dated
December 18, 2006, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the CITY OF
ALEXANDRIA as Deed Instrument
Number 060033198, the undersigned appointed Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction all that property located
in the CITY OF ALEXANDRIA, on
the courthouse steps at the front
of the Circuit Court building for
the City of Alexandria located at
520 King Street, Alexandria, Virginia on September 27, 2017 at
11:30 AM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 058.04-05-34
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $286,400.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.125000% dated
July 31, 2006, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 18653, Page 1821,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on September 27,
2017 at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 047-4-23-0077
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 15-247619.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-266760.
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $374,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.255000% dated
April 23, 2005, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM as Deed Instrument
Number 200504260066115, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM, on the Court House
steps in front of Main Entrance for
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Prince William located
at 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas,
Virginia on October 3, 2017 at 4:00
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 8191706026
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Aug 31, Sept 7, 2017
12126654
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Aug 31, Sept 7, 2017
12126689
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
6025 RICKETTS WALK,
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22312
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
3823 JANCIE RD,
FAIRFAX, VA 22030
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $322,500.00, with an annual
interest rate of 6.800000% dated
March 4, 2008, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the CITY OF ALEXANDRIA as Deed Instrument Number
080003649, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction all
that property located in the CITY
OF ALEXANDRIA, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the City
of Alexandria located at 520 King
Street, Alexandria, Virginia on
October 4, 2017 at 11:30 AM, the
property with improvements to
wit:
Tax Map No. 50634970
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $100,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.500000% dated
May 7, 2003, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 14543, Page 0043,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on September 20,
2017 at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 571935
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-268125.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Aug 24, 31, Sept 7, 14, 2017
12125819
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-268338.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Aug 31, Sept 7, 2017
12126690
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
873
EZ
Prince William County
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
March 28, 2006, and recorded at Instrument Number 200603290050490
and re-recorded at at Instrument Number 201005200043202, in the Clerk’s
Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County, VA, securing a loan
which was originally $319,920.00. The appointed SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE,
Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at public auction at the
front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William County, 9311 Lee Avenue,
Manassas, VA 20110 on:
September 22, 2017 at 1:00 PM
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of Lot 14,
Section 3, BLOOMS MILL, as the same appears duly dedicated, platted
and recorded in Instrument Number 200409090154448, and plat attached
thereto, among the land records of Prince William County, Virginia, and as
more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
August 31, September 7, 2017
12123800
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
11931 Rocky Brooke Court,
Manassas, VA 20112
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust
dated December 17, 2004, and recorded at Instrument Number
200412210215749 in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince
William County, VA, securing a loan which was originally $406,919.00. The
appointed SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer
for sale at public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince
William County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
September 15, 2017 at 1:00 PM
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of Lot 7,
Forest Brooke, as the same is duly dedicated, platted and recorded as
Instrument #200309020161336 (Plat at #200309020161337), as corrected
by Deed of Correction recorded as Instrument #200411230198814 (Plat
at #200411230198815) among the Land Records of Prince William County,
Virginia, and as more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
August 24, 31, 2017
12122481
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
16867 Toms River Loop,
Dumfries, VA 22026
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
August 31, 2012, and recorded at Instrument Number 201209040084700
in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County,
VA, securing a loan which was originally $211,105.00. The appointed
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at
public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William
County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
September 29, 2017 at 1:00 PM
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Prince William County
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of Lot 37,
Section 8, Princeton Woods, as the same appears duly dedicated, platted
and recorded in Deed Book 2161 at page 1268, among the land records
of Prince William County, Virginia, and as more fully described in the
aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
August 31, September 7, 2017
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FOOD ALLOWED."
TO "HOW OLD ARE THESE
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882
Culpeper County
Notice of Substitute Trustee’s and Secured Party’s Sale
The State Theatre
305-311 S. Main Street
Culpeper, Virginia 22701
Tax Parcel No. 41A2-1-C1-2
Terms: ALL CASH except that, subject to the requirements of Section 5559.4 of the Code of Virginia, 1950, as amended, the holder of the note
secured by the Deed of Trust (the “Noteholder”) shall be entitled to apply
any of the debt secured by the Deed of Trust as a credit to the successful
bid for the Property (the “Sales Price”). To participate in the bidding,
a bidder’s deposit in the amount of $250,000.00 (the “Deposit”) will be
required at the Date of Sale in cash or by certified or cashier’s check
payable to the Trustee (or to the bidder and endorsed to the Trustee). To
the extent the deposit exceeds 10% of the final bid, the Trustee will refund
the difference pending closing. The Noteholder shall not be required to
provide a Deposit. The balance of the Sales Price shall be paid in cash,
wired funds or by certified or cashier’s check, at settlement, to be held
no later than twenty-one (21) days after the Date of Sale at the office of
the Trustee (the “Date of Settlement”), TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE. To
those who provide a Deposit to the Trustee but are not the successful
bidder, the Trustee will return the Deposits promptly after completion of
the bidding.
The Trustee reserves the unilateral right, at any time, to: (i) waive or reduce
the Deposit requirement as to any bidder; (ii) withdraw the Property from
sale at any time before the termination of the bidding; (iii) keep the bidding
open for any length of time (which the Trustee intends to do as the Trustee
determines the highest sales price); (iv) reject any and all bids; (v) require
any and all bidders to substantiate their ability to produce the required
Deposit and provide substantial proof of the ability to pay the balance of
the high bid before either allowing them to bid or accepting their bid; (vi)
extend the time to knock down a bid while the successful bidder obtains
the required Deposit; and (vii) extend the Date of Settlement.
If the successful bidder fails to complete settlement on the Date of
Settlement as required, its Deposit shall be delivered to, and retained by,
the Noteholder and applied, in part, to the costs of the foreclosure sale
(including the Trustee’s fees and expenses and fees of the Noteholder’s
counsel), and the Property shall be resold at the risk and expense of the
defaulting bidder. Such retention of the Deposit shall not limit any rights
or remedies of the Trustee or the Noteholder with respect to such default
by the successful bidder. All closing costs, other than preparation of the
deed and the grantor’s tax (which shall be paid out of the proceeds of
sale), shall be borne by the successful bidder. Real estate taxes shall be
prorated to the Date of Sale and the successful bidder will be obligated
to add to its successful bid amount on the Date of Settlement any real
estate taxes paid for the period after the Date of Settlement. Income and
expenses of the Property shall not be prorated.
The Real Estate shall be conveyed by special warranty deed and the
Equipment shall be conveyed by bill of sale, without warranty. All of
the Property shall be sold “as is,” “where is” without representation
or warranty of any kind (except as described in the deed) including,
without limitation, zoning, structural integrity, physical condition, extent
of construction, construction materials, workmanship, habitability, environmental condition, fitness for a particular purpose or merchantability of
all or any part of the Property, and any information a survey or inspection
of the Property would disclose, and subject to, if any, conditions,
restrictions, right-of-ways, easements, reservations, agreements, liens
and other conditions and matters of record taking priority over the lien
of the Deed of Trust. The risk of loss or damage to the Property by
condemnation, fire or other casualty shall be borne by the successful
bidder from the moment the Trustee accepts the successful bidder’s final
bid. Delivery of physical possession of the Property will not be performed
by the Trustee but will be the responsibility of the successful bidder. The
Real Estate will be conveyed expressly subject to that certain Real Estate
Master Lease dated May 30, 2013 between State Theatre Owner, LLC, as
Master Landlord and State Theater Master Tenant, LLC, as Master Tenant.
No representations are made by the Trustee regarding the status of this
Master Lease.
No representation or warranty is made as to the accuracy of the square
footages, the existence or condition of the building or structure on the
Real Estate or any other Real Estate amenities.
The successful bidder will be required to execute a Memorandum of Sale
and Deposit Receipt (the “Memo of Sale”) concerning the purchase of
the Property, a copy of which will be made available upon request to
the information contact person below or immediately before announcing
the sale of the Property on the Date of Sale. The Substitute Trustee
was substituted by Deed of Appointment of Substitute Trustee dated July
31, 2017, and recorded in the Clerk’s Office before the Date of Sale.
Paul S. Bliley, Jr.
Substitute Trustee and
Agent for the Secured Party
Williams Mullen, P.C.
200 South 10th Street
Richmond, Virginia 23218
(804) 420-6448
12125887
Prince William County
1372
Business for
Sale/Lease
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DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Roommates
PETWORTH NEIGHBORHOOD - Room
for rent. Internet & utils incl. $600
monthly. Contact Jim 202-701-5606
MARYLAND
Roommates
ANDREWS AFB Area- Nice furn room,
nice area, kit privs. w/w. $550/mo
+ $50 sec dep. Call 301-395-6738
BELTSVILLE- Share unfurn bsmnt. 2
rooms avail. Female pref. N/S, N/P.
$750/$700.
240-542-4567
FORT WASHINGTON- Large house to
share. Free cable. Close to MGM.
W/D. $150/wk. Call 240-882-8973
GLENDALE- Lg 2BR bsmt in pvt
home w/pvt entr $1300. Pref M.
Inc utils. Sec dep. NS. 240-423-7923
HYATTSVILLE- Furn room $180/wk +
security. Includes all utils inc cable.
Near Metro. No pets. 301-675-2016
LANHAM - 6938 Lamont Drive.
Prvt entrance, prvt BA. $600/mo.
Call 301-728-5622 or 240-533-6176
LARGO- Move in now, nr metro, 2
furn rms avail. Med, $700, lg rm $725
all util. incl. F pref. 240-353-1428
OLNEY- Shr condo. Great location. Nr
shopping & bus line. Clean. Quiet. No
smoking, no pets. Small rm w/ wlk-in
closet, 2 windows, W/D. $550. Leave
voice msg. Dep req. 240-351-5150
OXON HILL- In nice house, cable
avail, close to shops, on bus line,
M pref. Call 202-549-0060
ROCKVILLE- Clean, furn. BR. Queen
bed, kit., FR. TV privileges. Util. incl.
$675/mo.
301-424-8377
SILVER SPRING - Room to rent.
W/D, shrd kit & BA. Nr Holy Cross
Hosp. 240-988-9316/ 301-593-3983
SILVER SPRING - Large room, near
Glen Metro. All utils. Fem pref. WiFi.
N/S. $600 + dep. Call 301-520-6716
TEMPLE HILLS—1 master bdrm w/
pvt bath in SFH, $725 + $200 deposit.
M pref. Avail Sept 9. 301-390-5608
VIRGINIA
Roommates
ANNANDALE - Bedroom in Single
family home, Female preferred, Full
Bathroom. Exc. location. Util. incl.
Fios Internet. $650 703-256-2584
Arlington/Clarendon area2 Sleeping rooms w/ large family
room, private BA & private ent,
W/D, $1,400/mo, month to month
lease, fully furn, includes utilities.
2 blocks to Clarendon metro.
Call 703.525.7192
SPRINGFIELD / FT. BELVOIR /
WOODBRIDGE - Responsible person
to share 3 bedroom house.
$700 util & cable incl. 703-919-4381
Other WV Counties
Spruce Knob
$350,000
2 bedrm, 2 ba, 954-941-7421,
129 Mountain High Lane, Hw Flrs,
Balc, Deck, Fpl, New Appl, EIK,
Rec Room, Wlkout Bsmt,
Form LR, Built in 1994.
Houses Wanted
to Buy
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TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (38085)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Aug 31,Sept 7, 2017 12126735
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers
are needed to
deliver
Paul S. Bliley, Jr.
Substitute Trustee
Williams Mullen, P.C.
200 South 10th Street
Richmond, Virginia 23218
(804) 420-6448
1-800-753-POST
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$311,200.00, dated July 22, 2005
recorded in the Clerk's Office of
the Circuit Court of the Frederick
County, Virginia, in Document No.
050016221, at Page 0576, default
having occurred in the payment of
the Note thereby secured and at
the request of the holder of said
Note, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Circuit Court of Frederick County, 5
North Kent Street, Winchester, on
September 19, 2017 at 2:15 PM the
property described in said deed,
located at the above address and
briefly described as:
Parcel B, containing 5 acres, more
or less, as shown on plat of survey
recorded in Deed Book 496, Page
837, with improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
C
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT THE SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE:
August 31, September 8, 2017
C
TRUSTEE SALE
357 Crosscreek Lane,
Winchester, VA 22602
Frederick County
In execution of a Deed of Trust from State Theatre Owner, LLC, a Virginia
limited liability company (the “Borrower”), dated July 30, 2012, recorded
July 31, 2012, in the Clerk’s Office of the Circuit Court of Culpeper County,
Virginia (the “Clerk’s Office”) as Instrument No. 120004537 (the “Deed of
Trust”), the undersigned Substitute Trustee and agent for the Secured
Party (the “Trustee”), at the direction of the Noteholder , will offer for
sale at public auction at the front entrance of the Culpeper County Circuit
Court located at 135 W. Cameron Street, Culpeper, Virginia 22701, on
September 13, 2017, at 11:00 a.m. (the “Date of Sale”), the property (as
defined in the Deed of Trust) consisting of a theatre and all other rights,
easements and appurtenances benefiting and\or burdening the theatre
property (collectively, the “Real Estate”), and together with all of the
Trustee’s right, title and interest, in and to, all items of tangible and
intangible property described in the Deed of Trust, including, without
limitation, machinery, equipment, furniture, furnishings, goods, building
supplies and materials of the Borrower used on or in connection with
the Real Estate and described as “Collateral” under Financing Statements
perfecting the Noteholder’s interest as the secured party therein filed
with the Virginia State Corporation Commission and the Clerk’s Office
on August 10 and August 14, 2017, as File Number 17081056287 and
as Instrument No. 170017302 respectively (collectively, the “Equipment”).
The Real Estate and the Equipment are hereinafter referred to collectively
as the “Property.”
873
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
Frederick County
SF
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879
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
8215 Glade Bank Drive,
Manassas, VA 20111
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
10077 OAKTON TERRACE RD
#10077(77),
OAKTON, VA 22124
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 14-243684.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Aug 31, Sept 7, 2017 12127225
873
Membership is rewarding.
From dramas and musicals to stand-up and
ballet, discover great ways to save money,
win tickets and have fun at the theater.
washingtonpost.com/postpoints
PostPoints takes you to
the best shows in town.
Not a member? It’s free! JOIN TODAY.
S2930 10x3
871
TOGETHER WITH Limited Common Element Garage Space No 55.
City of Alexandria
Prince William County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
13511 Denside Court
Bristow, VA 20136
In execution of the Deed of Trust dated February 14, 2006, and recorded
in Book 3950 at Page 1751 as Instrument Number 2006046075, of
the Arlington County land records the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
will offer for sale at public auction on September 8, 2017 at 10:00 AM
immediately in front of the entrance doors to the Circuit Court, Arlington
County Justice Center, 1425 North Courthouse Road, Arlington, Virginia,
the following property:
Unit 105, of the CENTURY SOUTH CONDOMINIUM, together with all
undivided interest in the common elements of such condominium allocated
thereto, as more fully set forth in the Master Deed dated June 12, 1974
and recorded among the land records of Arlington County, Virginia, in Deed
Book 1862 at page 304 and associated plats and plans related thereto as
amended by First Amendment to Century South Condominium Master Deed
dated July 29, 1987 and recorded July 30, 1987 in Deed Book 2288 at page
1255, as further amended by Second Amendment recorded in Deed Book
2572 at page 1358 and amended by Amendment recorded in Deed Book
3911 at page 1826.
871
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Brian Thomas
Erin M. August
Hugh J. Green
Patrick M. A. Decker
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
Aug 17, 24, 31, 2017
873
Arlington County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
4500 S Four Mile Run Drive, Unit 105
Arlington, VA 22204
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HOWARD COUNTY,
MARYLAND
Aug 17, 24, 31, 2017
870
Arlington County
WP 2x1
870
S0833-1 6x2
D12
857
Howard County
THE DISTRICT EDITION
THE WASHINGTON POST
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
Local Living
Squabbling siblings?
How to help your kids (and you)
find domestic harmony. PAGE 14
Home Wine experts from across the country
pick their favorite stoppers and other tools
that keep the flavor in and the air out. 6
Gardening The origins of
those pesky invasive
porcelain berry weeds. 11
Wellness Keeping up
with the ever-changing
rules of nutrition. 13
On Parenting How to rein
in the constant chaos
of twin 2-year-olds. 15
2
INSID E
DC
the washington post . thursday, august 31 , 2017
4
10
11
13
15
16
16
17
18
House Calls
Home sales
Gardening
Wellness
On Parenting
Animal Doctor
Calendar
Code violations
Crime report
ON THE COVER
Illustration by
James Yang for The
Washington Post
LOCAL LIVING
STAFF
Editor: Kendra
Nichols • Deputy
Editors: Amy
Joyce, Mari-Jane
Williams • Art
Director: Victoria
Fogg • Digital
Editor: Alexa
McMahon
• Designer: J.C.
Reed • Staff
Writers: Jura
Koncius, Megan
McDonough
• Columnists:
Adrian Higgins,
Meghan Leahy
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Email:
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Details:
Announcements
are accepted on a
space-available
basis and must be
received at least
14 days before the
Thursday
publication date.
Include event
name, dates,
times, exact
address, prices
and a publishable
contact phone
number.
Going Out Guide
Aug. 31 - Sept. 6
Thursday
Monday
Washed Out with Dega
Singer-songwriter and
producer Ernest Greene
blends synth-pop, rock,
hip-hop and jazz. 7 p.m.
9:30 Club, 815 V St. NW.
202-265-0930.
930.com. $35.
Carifesta The
Caribbean music-andarts festival features
bands, cultural dances,
international foods,
craft vendors, a beer
garden and a kids’ zone.
Mainstage performers
include Ras Slick & the
Dutty Bus Crew, the
Unknowns, Lady Flame,
ShaMain & Greg Jamz,
and King Lock. Noon8 p.m. Ronald Reagan
Building and
International Trade
Center, 1300
Pennsylvania Ave. NW.
202-312-1399. wapo.st/
carifesta. Free.
Rod Man with Corey
Marshall The Atlantabased comedian won
Season 8 of “Last Comic
Standing.” 7:30 p.m.
Through Sunday. DC
Improv, 1140
Connecticut Ave. NW.
202-296-7008.
dcimprov.com. Free.
“Julius Caesar”
Director Robert
McNamara stars as
Caesar in Scena
Theatre’s modern
retelling of
Shakespeare’s tragedy,
drawing parallels
between the politics of
ancient Rome and
present-day
Washington. $15
preview Thursday at
8 p.m.; Friday’s opening
night show at 8 will
be followed by a
reception. Through
Sept. 24. Atlas
Performing Arts Center,
1333 H St. NE. 202-3997993. atlasarts.org. $15$45.
“Noah: Apocalypse”
LiveArtDC presents an
interactive play about a
band of survivors a
year after a calamity.
9 p.m. Through Sept. 18.
DC Reynolds, 3628
Georgia Ave. NW. 202506-7178. liveartdc.com.
$20.
Friday
Labor Day Weekend
Music Festival The DC
Commission on the Arts
and Humanities
presents three nights of
free jazz, blues, rock,
pop and more from local
artists. 7 p.m. Through
Sunday. Lincoln Theatre,
1215 U St. NW. 202724-5613. dcarts.dc.gov.
Free.
Saturday
Celebration of Textiles
The 38th annual
festival, held in
conjunction with the
new exhibit “Scraps:
Fashion, Textiles and
Creative Reuse”
(through Jan. 7), offers
BRITTNIE LOVIN
Escape Velocity
The Museum of Science Fiction presents its second annual convention
and science and engineering festival for all ages. Highlights include
drone racing, a stunt workshop, films, activities for kids, cosplay for
adults, panel discussions on artificial intelligence and manipulating
the human genome, a space party, and appearances by “The Expanse”
actor Cas Anvar, “Star Trek: The Next Generation” screenwriter Morgan
Gendel, synth-pop pioneer Thomas Dolby, author Joe Haldeman,
Klingon language creator Marc Okrand and NASA astrophysicist C. Alex
Young. Opens Friday. Through Sept. 3. Marriott Wardman Park Hotel,
2660 Woodley Road NW. 202-328-2000. escapevelocity.events.
$25-$100.
weaving, paper dress
designing, knitting
and jewelry-making;
demonstrations of
weaving, embroidery,
spinning, carpet
repair, tatting (lacemaking), quilting and
felting; and live music,
dance, storytelling and
sheep from Leesburg
Animal Park (Sunday).
11 a.m.-4 p.m. Through
Sunday. George
Washington University
Museum and the
Textile Museum,
701 21st St. NW.
202-994-5200.
museum.gwu.edu. Free.
DC VegFest The East
Coast’s largest vegan
festival, presented by
Compassion Over
Killing, returns with
more than 130 vendors
(many offering free food
samples), a beer
garden, live music,
celebrity speakers, food
demonstrations, a kids’
zone, pet adoptions and
more. The first 1,000
attendees will get a tote
bag stuffed with
samples. 11 a.m.-6 p.m.
Yards Park, 355 Water
St. SE. dcvegfest.com.
Free.
Penn Hill Mini Golf
The Shops at Penn Hill’s
temporary art
installation/nine-hole
course was designed
and built by local artists
and produced by
Building Creative. Play a
game and vote for your
favorite design. Food
trucks will be available.
Noon-8 p.m. Through
Oct. 8. The Shops at
Penn Hill, 3200
Pennsylvania Ave. SE.
shopsatpennhill.com. $3$10.
Bolo (Bridge of
Togetherness)
KanKouran West
African Dance Co.’s
annual conference is
highlighted by this
concert, which takes its
name from a Wolof
word meaning “that
which brings people
together.” 8 p.m. Lisner
Auditorium, 730 21st St.
NW. 202-994-6800.
kankouran.net. $20-$25.
“Neverwhere”
Rorschach Theatre
remounts Robert
Kauzlaric’s adaptation
of Neil Gaiman’s
fantasy adventure set
below the streets of
London. Opens
Saturday with a paywhat-you-can preview at
8 p.m. Through Oct. 1.
Atlas Performing Arts
Center, 1333 H St. NE.
202-399-7993.
rorschachtheatre. com .
$20-$45.
Sunday
National Symphony
Orchestra: Labor Day
Capitol Concert Guest
conductor John Morris
Russell leads the NSO
and singer-songwriter
Aoife O’Donovan in a
program of marches,
folk music and
bluegrass-inspired
songs. Open rehearsal
at 3:30 p.m., concert
8 p.m. West Lawn of the
Capitol, 100
Constitution Ave. NE.
202-416-8114. kennedycenter.org. Free. In case
of inclement weather,
the concert might be
moved to the Kennedy
Center; call after
2:30 p.m.
Tuesday
“The Arsonists” A
small-business owner
invites two mysterious
strangers into his
house in Woolly
Mammoth’s season
opener, Max Frisch’s
cautionary comedy
written in response to
Nazism and
communism. Pay-whatyou-can previews
Tuesday and
Wednesday at 8 p.m.
Through Oct. 8. Woolly
Mammoth Theatre,
641 D St. NW. 202-3933939. woollymammoth.
net. $20-$69.
Wednesday
“Skeleton Crew”
Studio Theatre mounts
Dominique Morisseau’s
drama about displaced
Detroit autoworkers.
Opens at 8 p.m. Through
Oct. 8. Studio Theatre,
1501 14th St. NW.
202-332-3300.
studiotheatre.org. $20$85.
District Improv
Festival The fifth annual
event returns with longform improv teams from
across the United States
and Canada. Chicago’s
3Peat headlines. This
year’s casts include allfemale, all-black, LGBT
and Spanish-speaking
groups. Opens
Wednesday. Through
Sept. 9. Source (1835
14th St. NW) and the
Unified Scene Theater
(80 T St. NW). 202-2047770. districtimprov.org.
Free-$25.
— Compiled by
Carrie Donovan
from staff reports
Home
3
DC
HOW TO
Replace the handles on an antique trunk without ruining its look
BY
J EANNE H UBER
Q: We have an old steamer trunk
that belonged to my greatgrandparents. It is in excellent
condition inside and out except
for the leather handles on each
side, which have rotted away. My
husband has replaced them with
strong climbing rope. Of course,
this ruins the appearance. We
were told that the bolts that held
the leather handles must be cut
off, then new leather can be put
on with new hardware. Is there
someone who could come to our
home and do this?
Silver Spring
This steamer trunk, which was passed down from a reader’s great-grandparents, is in great condition
but needs new handles. Climbing rope was used as a temporary solution, but it didn’t look right.
If you’re handy and want to do
the work yourself, check out the
website of Brettuns Village (207782-7863; brettunsvillage.com), a
company in Maine that offers
dozens of styles of leather
handles and other trunk
replacement parts, the tools
needed to remove clinched nails,
and instructions for doing the
work without damaging the
wood.
Van Dyke’s Restorers
(vandykes.com) also offers
replacement trunk handles.
Q: We have an exhaust fan in the
ceiling of our 1930s brick
Colonial kitchen. The circular
opening measures 91/2 inches in
diameter. The fan, which we
believe is original to the house,
turns on from a switch on the
wall. But it makes a loud
squealing sound. Is it possible to
replace the fan with one that
would still fit the current
opening? It vents to the outside
on the side of the house.
Silver Spring
GET IT DONE
Our consultants and craftsmen bring years of experience, industry
certifications and a genuine passion for what they do to every project,
large and small. You can trust FRED with your home. FRED DONE.
Visit ScheduleFRED.com today to speak with a consultant.
Have a problem in your home?
Send questions to localliving@
washpost.com. Put “How To” in the
subject line, tell us where you live
and try to include a photo.
MD: 301.388.5959
VA: 571.341.6202
DC: 202.770.3131
ScheduleFRED.com
the washington post . thursday, august 31 , 2017
trunks were built to be
lightweight, he said, the wooden
parts are thin. So it’s a challenge
to remove the bent-over nails
without damaging the wood.
Hawksford estimated the cost
at $150 to $190; Burkett said it
might come to about $200.
Steamer trunks typically fit in a
passenger car, but if moving the
trunk yourself isn’t possible,
both companies offer pickup and
delivery, with the price for both
trips in Silver Spring totaling
$75.
A: A Dayton ring exhaust fan
with a nine-inch blade diameter
might work. This model comes
in a circular frame with an
outside diameter of 9 5/8 inches
and an inside diameter of 91/2
inches. Grainger, which owns the
Dayton brand, sells it for
$109.47.
Chris Nakis, who responds to
technical questions related to
heating and air-conditioning
equipment for Grainger,
recommended calling an HVAC
contractor or an electrician to
check before you order
whether this fan is likely to
work. Retrofitting a fan into an
existing opening sometimes
takes some fussing, and an
experienced contractor is likely
to figure out a solution. For
example, the mounting tabs
might need to be bent or even
cut off, he said.
A: Almost certainly, the leather
was not held on with bolts that
need to be cut off. The handles
on steamer trunks are typically
attached with clinched nails —
nails hammered in from the
outside and then bent over
tightly on the inside.
Colonial Restoration Studio in
Gaithersburg (301-948-6652;
colonialrestorationstudio.com)
has replaced handles on
hundreds of these trunks over
the years, said Dave Hawksford,
who runs the shop along with his
son, Jarrod. The shop offers inhome repair of cedar chests in
Silver Spring, as well as in
Bethesda, Chevy Chase, Potomac
and Rockville. But steamer
trunks need to be taken to the
shop to be outfitted with new
handles. “You have to take the
paper off on the inside,”
Hawksford said, and removing
the handles requires special
tools that they keep at the shop.
Raymond Burkett, who runs a
furniture restoration business in
Takoma Park (301-589-2658),
also said that he can replace
handles on steamer trunks but
only in his shop. Because the
READER PHOTOS
This exhaust fan in the ceiling
of a 1930s kitchen makes a
loud squealing sound.
4
DC
Home
SPLURGE . . .
HOUSE CALLS BY MARI-JANE WILLIAMS
A porch fit for the pooch
Woven Malawi
accent chair
($399, cb2.com).
5
Chatham stacking
dining armchair in
dark honey
($312 each,
potterybarn.com).
6
4
. . . OR SAVE
3
1
7
2
Mastholmen
outdoor armchair
($100, ikea.com).
the washington post . thursday, august 31 , 2017
1. Designate
areas for the dog
with a special bed
and feeding station
to make it feel
comfortable and
included in the
family’s activities.
2. An area rug
anchors the
seating area and
helps define the
separate zones of
the space.
3. Layer the space
with soil-repellent
textiles, such as
polypropylene and
Sunbrella, to
withstand the
elements and the
wear and tear from
pets and teens.
4. Inject color and
pattern with blueand-white accent
pillows.
5. Consider
purchasing at least
a 12-inch down
rod for the new
ceiling fan to
circulate air and
keep the porch cool
on hot days.
6. Plants can be
used as tall
design accents to
balance the scale of
the room. Opt for
evergreens that
can tolerate
fluctuating
temperatures.
7. Choose
furniture that is
appropriately
sized and
streamlined to
allow for
comfortable
movement
throughout the
space.
THE CHALLENGE
SHOPPING GUIDE
Susan Noble
had to
rebuild the
30-by-12-foot
screened
porch on her
Arnold home
after a tree crushed it two years
ago. She bought some furniture but
lost her motivation as the weather
turned colder, and she never
finished decorating. She wants a
teen- and dog-friendly space with
room for outdoor meals and
hanging out and needs to work
around the three sets of sliding
glass doors that lead into the home.
She wants to incorporate the
dining table and the large swivel
chair into the new design.
Furniture: Dune sofa with Sunbrella
cushions in taupe ($1,399) and lattice
diamond small side table ($229), both
from crateandbarrel.com.
Accessories: 52-inch Minka Aire roto flat
white ceiling fan with 12-inch fan pole
($197.94, lampsplus.com); Ombre sketch
8-by-11-foot outdoor area rug in blue
($299) and medallion stripe blue outdoor
pillows ($69.50 each), both from
frontgate.com; radius planter in gray
($199 for large, westelm.com); 30-by-40inch outdoor pet bed in blue ($59.99,
petco.com); faux fur sheepskin 2-by-3-foot
throw/rug in off-white ($24.99,
bedbathandbeyond.com); Madison pet
bowl and stand in large ($99,
potterybarn.com); 121/2-foot 10-light white
clear plastic LED globe string lights
($24.98, lowes.com).
THE SOLUTION
Designer Mark Borys creates separate but cohesive areas for outdoor
dining and lounging. He chooses finishes and colors for the lounging
area that are kid- and pet-friendly but that complement the clean
design and warm tones of the dining table. He mixes colors and
textures and uses pieces of various sizes to create an inviting and
visually interesting space.
Rio chair in silver
($99 each,
roomandboard.com).
Mark Borys
Borys, with
Perceptions
Interiors (202-3305619, perceptions
interiors.com), is
based in the District.
INTERIOR RENDERING BY
RODNEY CO/3D STORM
STUDIO FOR THE
WASHINGTON POST;
“BEFORE” AND HOMEOWNER
PHOTOS BY LEAH L. JONES
FOR THE WASHINGTON POST;
PRODUCT PHOTOS, FROM
TOP, COURTESY OF CB2,
POTTERY BARN, IKEA
AND ROOM & BOARD;
DESIGNER PHOTO COURTESY
OF MARK BORYS
See past room makeovers at washingtonpost.com/housecalls. Tell us about your design challenge. Send photos, room dimensions and contact information to makeover@washpost.com.
DC
5
the washington post . thursday, august 31 , 2017
6
DC
Home
Keep your half-drunk wine fresh long after you’re sober
BY
L INDSEY M . R OBERTS
Geoff Kruth, a rising star in the wine world who appeared in the 2012 documentary “Somm,” about the pursuit of the prestigious master sommelier title, is “totally anti-wine gadget.” Kruth, now president of the nonprofit wine professionals organization GuildSomm, explains, “After more than
20 years of drinking wine nightly, I still think the best preservation method is a cork and refrigerator.” That said, a quick perusal of any big-box
home goods store or winery gift shop will turn up wine aerators, pourers, purifiers, automatic and electric openers, foil cutters and more, proving
the demand for wine gear is high. Wine experts from Kruth in California to another master sommelier in New York helped us tackle the wine stoppers and preservers category, because sometimes, even with a good wine, you just need to put a cork in the party and call it a night.
localliving@washpost.com
the washington post . thursday, august 31 , 2017
When she founded the
New York wine studio
Corkbuzz in 2011, Laura
Maniec was one of only
18 female master
sommeliers in the world.
Now Corkbuzz has three
locations, including one in
Charlotte, where visitors
can eat, take wine classes
and attend wine dinners.
At all three, she uses the
Vacu Vin Wine Saver/
Stopper ($9.95-19.95,
crateandbarrel.com). Two
other experts we
interviewed also praised
the Vacu Vin: Madeline
Puckette, founder of
culture website Wine Folly,
and André Hueston Mack,
named a best young
sommelier in the United
States and founder of
Maison Noir Wines.
A favorite of Eric Hastings, E. Guigal
marketing manager at New York’s
Vintus, an importer of family-owned,
estate-based wines, is the Franmara
Nickel-Plated Champagne Stopper
($7.07, amazon.com). Hastings, who
spent 21 years managing wines on the
floor in restaurants before joining
Vintus, says, “It has consistently
provided the best seal to maintain the
freshness of sparkling wine that I’ve
seen for two decades.”
FRANMARA
First funded on Kickstarter,
the Repour ($8.99 for a
pack of four, amazon.com)
is gaining a following. The
product is a one-time-use
stopper filled with a
material that reduces the
oxygen levels of the halfdrunk bottle to below
0.05 percent. “When you
open the bottle after it’s
been under Repour, there’s
a little hiss, and the
dissolved oxygen is gone,”
says Pete Holland, writer of
the Wine in Common
column for the Nashville
Scene. “It needs to open up
like it does a new bottle.”
No surprise it’s designed by
a chemist, Tom Lutz.
MEGAN MLAKAR PHOTOGRAPHY/
VINEYARDFRESH WINE PRESERVER
CRATE &
BARREL
At the San Francisco Wine
School, the largest wine
school in the United States,
a lot of bottles get tapped
for brief tastings. For
preservation of those
vintages, the founder and
chief executive of the
school, David Glancy, likes
VineyardFresh’s pure
argon spray ($29.95,
vineyardfresh.com). “You
spray the gas into the bottle
and reseal it with the
original cork or any cork,”
he says. “Using . . . [it] in
conjunction with keeping
the bottles in the
refrigerator extends the life
of all wines.”
CORAVIN
Another winner was the Coravin. It was noted by Mack, Glancy
and Puckette, author of “Wine Folly: The Essential Guide to
Wine.” More for the enthusiast, it allows you to taste wine
without even popping the cork. “You can actually access a fine
wine, taste it, enjoy a glass of it and put it back in your cellar,”
Puckette says. “I tested one about 10 to 12 months later, and
it’s surprising how well it works.” There are a number of models
and colors, but the Model One System is the Coravin at its
most basic ($199.95, coravin.com).
REPOUR
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ARE YOUR AIR DUCTS CLEAN?
8
DC
Home
Underground and overwhelmed? Brighten up your basement digs.
the washington post . thursday, august 31 , 2017
BY
M AIA S ILBER
It’s no easy feat to find an affordable apartment in Washington. Renters will scour the city
streets for a decent deal, searching
uptown, downtown and increasingly, underground. English basements in neighborhoods such as
Columbia Heights, Adams Morgan and Shaw have become popular options for young people looking for a reasonably priced one- or
two-year lease. But basement
dwellings often have low ceilings,
cramped rooms and little natural
light, making them challenging to
decorate.
We asked designers how renters can optimize these tricky
spaces — and make their basement dwellings feel like homes.
Here are their tips:
Keep it cool: “Lighter, brighter,
cooler colors help the walls recede,” says Jaye Langmaid, the
owner of Hudson & Crane, an urban design studio in Adams Morgan. Light blues and grays can
make a small room feel larger and
enhance limited natural light. But
don’t be afraid to accent a wall in a
darker color, which can lengthen
an oblong room or hall. Stay away
from warm colors, which may
make a small space feel crowded.
Raise the roof: Shannon Claire
Smith, a D.C.-based interior decorator and design blogger, says that
renters have a number of ways to
make low ceilings appear higher.
“I always have clients try to stretch
the walls as high as they can,”
Smith says. “A darker color on the
ceiling makes it look like the night
sky — you don’t know where it
ends.” Renters can also hang floorlength drapery panels or arrange
artwork gallery-style so that it fills
walls from floor to ceiling. If you
don’t have enough artwork to do
that, a few large pieces can have
the same effect.
Add mirrors: Decorative mirrors offer another way to create an
illusion of space and light. “Mirrors can help reflect what little
natural light comes into a basement apartment,” says Sarah
Roussos-Karakaian, who cofounded the artisan contracting
and design team Nestrs with her
husband, Nick Karakaian. “The
light bounces around your space.”
Floor-length mirrors, too, can
make a low ceiling look higher.
Look to the past: There’s nothing new about trying to make the
best of a small, oddly shaped
space. To find furniture that will fit
down narrow stairwells and into
cramped rooms, check out French,
English and Japanese antiques,
suggests Rachel Dougan, the
founder and principal designer of
ViVi Interiors. “In Paris, you had
really tiny alleyways and stairwells,” Dougan says. “These vin-
KRIS ROGERS PHOTOGRAPHY
Designers Sarah Roussos-Karakaian and Nick Karakaian strategically placed this mirror in their basement Airbnb to not only provide
an opportunity for guests to check their appearance one last time but also to reflect natural light from the only window in the space.
KRIS ROGERS PHOTOGRAPHY
NEXT DAY BLINDS
Pussy willows work well in
basement abodes because they
don’t require watering and have
an interesting texture.
tage pieces were made for smaller
spaces to begin with . . . and
they’re made to be disassembled
and put together again.” Dougan
especially recommends “campaign furniture,” originally made
for soldiers on the move. If you
don’t like the old-timey aesthetic,
she says, you can always add a
fresh coat of paint to an antique
piece.
Lighten up: The overhead
lighting in rented apartments
Some types of blinds, such as
Next Day Blinds’ Honeycomb
Shades, allow light to come in
while still providing privacy.
SHANNON CLAIRE SMITH
A darker color on a low
ceiling can make it appear
higher, D.C.-based designer
Shannon Claire Smith says.
tends to be less than flattering,
designer Anna Matthews warns.
She suggests buying lamps that
will warm up the space. For an
affordable option, try Robert Abbey; if you’re willing to invest,
Matthews recommends Bunny
Williams. “I love to put good table
lamps on either side of the sofa,
because it makes it feel more like a
home,” she says. “It personalizes
the space, which is so important.”
Multitask: Get the most out of a
small space by purchasing furniture with more than one function.
“Have all your furniture be multipurpose,”
Roussos-Karakaian
says. Couches can pull out to double as beds for overnight guests,
and coffee tables with built-in
shelves can serve as storage space.
Roussos-Karakaian also recommends wall-mounted shelves: Use
them as bookcases or fill them
with decorative storage baskets.
Privatize: English basements
often have ground-level windows,
which may allow passersby to see
inside. Solar shades or privacy
blinds allow light to come in while
preventing pedestrians from
peeping into your bedroom. Jo
Kerrigan, district manager for
Next Day Blinds, recommends the
brand’s Honeycomb Shades,
which have a soft, delicate look but
offer total privacy. The shades,
made out of a polyester fabric, also
absorb sound, making them ideal
for a basement on a busy street.
Go green: English basements
are often accessed through narrow alleyway entrances, and
plants placed by your front door
can help welcome guests into your
home. They can also improve air
quality in basement apartments,
which may get hot during the day.
Smith recommends the snake
plant, also known as mother-inlaw’s tongue, a leafy indoor plant
that helps purify air. (She also
suggests that basement renters invest in air conditioners and humidifiers.)
maia.silber@washpost.com
9
Home
DC
Don’t pick up hotel room hitchhikers
BY
S ONIA R AO
Look closely at wooden headboards. Although bedbugs are
typically associated with clinging
to fabric, they can use their claws
to grip and climb bed frames as
well. Take a peek behind the
headboard if possible, as the critters often hide in cracks, according to Michael Potter, an entomology professor at the University of
Kentucky.
“The problem is that headboards in many hotels are often
quite heavy,” Potter said.
Be careful while peeking,
though, or you might end up like
Brooke Borel, a science journalist
and the author of “Infested: How
the Bed Bug Infiltrated Our Bedrooms and Took Over the World.”
“In one place, I actually took
Look for your Fall Kick-off Issue
ALEX BRANDON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Hotels are a hot spot for bedbugs in the summer. Be sure to check
your beds, couches and chairs for signs of these bloodsuckers.
the headboard off the wall,” she
said, laughing.
Know what bedbugs look like.
Borel has dealt with three infestations in her time living in New
York. It’s important to be able to
identify the bugs, she said, so you
can notify the hotel immediately
if you spot them.
“This isn’t necessarily fun, but
if you find a bug in your bed, pick
it up and put it in a plastic bag or
“They don’t
discriminate between
a first-class resort
or a low-rate motel.
You could encounter
them anywhere.”
Jim Fredericks, chief entomologist
for the National Pest Management
Association
one of those glasses they have in
your hotel room,” she said. “Keep
it there so you can have proof that
there were bedbugs in the room.”
Adult bedbugs are reddishbrown and about a quarter-inch
in length, Fredericks said, while
the younger ones are smaller and
often have a “creamy coloration.”
“They’re crawling pests,” he
added. “If you see them jumping
or flying, it’s definitely not a
bedbug.”
Keep your suitcase off the
floor. Although either multiple
bedbugs or a mated female would
need to stow away to bring an
infestation home, it’s worth taking precautions, according to
Kenneth Haynes, another entomology professor at the University of Kentucky.
“It’s all a probability matter,”
Haynes said, “and you can bias
that probability toward avoiding
bringing them home by doing
those inspections initially.”
Borel knows people who avoid
picking up the pests by leaving
suitcases in the bathtub instead
of the main hotel room. Potter
said this might be a bit much.
“Traveling is enough of a hassle
without all that,” he said. “Anything is possible in the world of
bedbugs, but everyone has to
make a decision about just how
obsessive they want to be.”
Unpack immediately. Bedbugs don’t typically live on a
person’s body — “They bite people, and then they leave,” Fredericks said — but they can easily
cling to your clothes or the fabric
of a suitcase. If you think you
might have brought back a few
unwanted guests, the best thing
to do is expose the surfaces to
heat. “High heat in the dryer for
30 minutes or so will kill all life
stages,” Fredericks said.
As for the suitcase? There are
luggage heaters invented for this
specific purpose, Borel said,
though it might be silly to spend
big bucks on those. In the summer, there’s a simpler solution.
“When it’s really hot outside,
put that thing in a closed car for a
day or two,” Potter said. “The
[temperature] that a car will heat
up to in the summertime if it’s 80
degrees outside will probably be
enough to kill bedbugs in a suitcase.”
Keep calm and declutter. After
her extensive experience dealing
with infestations, Borel knows
the critters can be “quite taxing
on mental health.” Reduce clutter
to avoid giving them a place to
hide, but if you think they might
have found a way in, remember
that outside help exists.
“We see and hear horror stories
in the news about people that
tried to control bedbugs in their
home and things went horribly
wrong,” Fredericks said. “We encourage people to reach out to a
professional.”
sonia.rao@washpost.com
Wednesday, September 6
We’re delivering the daily Post to
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the washington post . thursday, august 31 , 2017
They creep, they crawl, and
they just might be in your hotel
room.
And worse, they could be coming home with you.
Bedbug infestations can occur
at any time, but experts say it’s
wise to be extra wary of the
critters during peak travel times
— like summer, for instance. Hiding in cracks and crevices, the
bugs are good hitchhikers and
could latch onto luggage and other belongings.
“They’re not discriminating
travelers,” said Jim Fredericks,
chief entomologist for the National Pest Management Association. “They don’t discriminate between a first-class resort or a
low-rate motel. You could encounter them anywhere.”
According to research conducted in 2015 by the NPMA and
the University of Kentucky,
74 percent of surveyed pest-control professionals said they’d encountered bedbugs in hotels and
motels within the past year. Although this number is second to
apartments, condominiums and
single-family homes — 90 percent
of the professionals said they had
found bedbugs in these places —
it’s still pretty high.
“It’s not just hotels, for sure,”
Fredericks added. “It’s hotels, vacation cottages, summer rentals
at the beach, Airbnbs, even a visit
to a relative’s house.”
Luckily, there are a number of
ways to avoid letting the little
bloodsuckers become an unfortunate vacation souvenir.
Inspect your hotel room. Before settling in, it’s worth doing a
quick scan of the bed and any
couches or armchairs. Look at the
folds and seams of the mattress,
Fredericks recommended, as little dark stains could be a sign of
an infestation. If it’s a pretty bad
case, you might even be able to
see the bugs’ castaway shells or
pearly white eggs.
Home
Delivery
Customers!
10
DC
Home Sales
D I S T RIC T OF C OL UMBIA
These sales data recorded by the
D.C. Office of Tax and Revenue
were provided by Black Knight
Financial Services. For information
about other residential real estate
transactions, visit
washingtonpost.com/homesales.
NORTHEAST
Allison St., 1329-Maxine Sutton to
Amy and Blake Henderson,
$559,000.
Brooks St., 4204-Estate of Annie
Ruth Hammond to Andre M.
Lipford Sr., $100,000.
Chancellors Way, 2877-Keith
John and Tara Elizabeth Kowalczyk
to Benjamin Hodapp and Julia Di
Vito, $839,900.
Delafield St., 707-Jimani H.
Mwendo to Lorraine LockettAmaechi, $485,000.
LET YOUR
HOME PAY
FOR ITS
OWN
MAKEOVER.
FOR THE FIRST 12 MONTHS
the washington post . thursday, august 31 , 2017
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Downing St., 1381-Uptown
Development Corp. to Lindsay
Pesacreta, $525,000.
Eads St., 3447-John A. Mitchel to
Farnaz Daryan, $290,000.
Evarts St., 315, No. 210-Janifer
Prince to Thomas G. Litke,
$215,500.
Faraday Pl., 715-Joan Verdier to
Ingrid M. Weiss and Arjun S.
Tasker, $364,000.
Grant St., 4216-Eldridge V. Parks
to William V. and Abenaa A. Jones,
$425,000.
Hunt Pl., 5517-Bank of America to
Subhi Charkatli, $160,100.
Jackson St., 1241-John P. Morris
to Kevin Paul Dolliver and
Lawrence Nathaniel Coig IV,
$899,990.
Levis St., 1606-Estate of Charlotte
E. Sanford to Charbel C. Makhoul
and Youssef Sakr, $370,000.
M St., 611, No. 4-Christopher D.
Weaver Jr. and April L. Fuller to
Joshua Fisher, $699,900.
Montello Ave., 1636-Design Build
Group Corp. to Brandon and
Bethany Funkhouser, $562,500.
Newton St., 3122-SC Holdings
Corp. to Kimberly Webber and
Meghan Ferriter, $500,000.
Quincy St., 2017-Ursula Corp. to
Zahid Rathore and Afsaneh
Kamangar, $690,000.
Rhode Island Ave., 2604Brookland Homes Corp. to Maxine
Thomas-Knuckles and Andre D.
Knuckles, $550,000.
Sheriff Rd., 4818-Daisy Properties
Corp. to Rachael Chevalier,
$420,000.
U St., 164-Daniel C. Gedacht and
Ester Levy-Gedacht to Sara
McGanity, $626,000.
Webster St., 94, No. 8-Federal
National Mortgage Association to
Michael B. Loewenthal Jr.,
$124,900.
Second St., 1831, No. 309Tameka Covert Hall to Saul
Castillo, $177,725.
Third St., 2617-the Merle Burkhart
Living Trust Dated Oc to Jessica G.
Evans, $475,000.
Fourth St., 2701, No. 201-Marjorie
P. Wine to Theodore Sands,
$307,168.
Seventh St., 510-John J. Nielands
to Patricia M. Orfini, $947,000.
11th St., 5043-Millwood
Properites Corp. to Blaire W.
Hamilton and Javier Huillca,
$525,000.
14th St., 219-Alishea E. Bunkley to
Maxwell Blankenhorn and
Alexandra Malis, $525,500.
18th St., 1236-Julia G. Allen to
Shannon M. White, $570,000.
24th St., 547-Alexander and Craig
Ventures Corp. to Thomas M.
Kimmitt and Megan A. Willig,
$665,000.
30th St., 2602-Equitable
Acquisitions Corp. to Ashton T.
Conklin and Bethany A. Jenkins,
$600,000.
45th Pl., 915-DGJ Premier Group
Corp. to Hillary Corinne Johnson
and Kossigan Sika Yawli,
$449,000.
56th Pl., 206-Luwana Corp. to
Byron Edmund Graham,
$340,000.
NORTHWEST
Alaska Ave., 7024-William J. and
Amy R. Denning to Yaa A. Apori,
$832,250.
Blagden Ave., 4825-Kristie M. and
Robert Harscheid to Serena K. and
Seaver J. Sowers, $899,000.
California St., 1807, No. T1-Brent
E. and Jean E. Hippert to Erin Marie
Garratt and Stephen Andrew Floyd,
$483,101.
Cedar St., 343, No. 101-Peter J.
Finnegan and Jocelyne Marie
Dehaas to Ashley D. Fry and Dakin
E. Yeats, $415,000.
Cherry Hill Lane, 3222, No. A3Jeffrey and Krista Harvey to Minh
N. and Chau Bui, $579,000.
Colorado Ave., 5511, No. 302Jose A. Quijada and Susana Carpio
to Charlotte F. Francis, $479,500.
Columbia Rd., 909-Angela
Copeland to Dulles Custom Homes,
$416,000.
Connecticut Ave., 2818, No. 304Mary Ann Hopkins to Aaron
Schoenewolf and Holly Walrath,
$675,000.
Crittenden St., 1410-Aaron L. and
Jose A. Acosta to Daniel and
Brittan West O’Reilley, $657,500.
E St., 915, No. 302-Ana Paula
Sanchez Ramirez and Raul Rangel
Miguel to Miguel and Yvonne
Ortega, $395,000.
Emerson St., 212-Ze Pei Guo and
Qi Ming Tan to Jacob Hafkin,
$579,000.
Fairmont St., 1206-MCH
Partnership to Charles V. and
Deborah D. Mazza, $557,928.
Florida Ave., 1455, No. 1BBrandon MacGillis to Adam Shaffer
and Bradley Mighdoll, $730,000.
Harvard St., 1613, No. 305Charles H. Kooshian and Maria
Trunk to Frederick Schmidt and
Cathy Rosenholtz, $610,000.
Huidekoper Pl., 2025-Andrew
Laughland and Barbara Gage to
Erika Stillabower and Jose
Izenberg, $1.22 million.
Illinois Ave., 5318-Budwell Corp.
to Katherine S. Meck and Rachel
M. Hoff, $690,000.
Jefferson St., 1213-Real
Investment Solutions Enterprises
to Gwendolyn S. Skinner and
Scherie M. Leak, $584,500.
Klingle Rd., 2003-Paul Michael
Goodman and Ilana Saltzbart to
Derek Campbell and Quoc Nguyen,
$1.11 million.
Longfellow St., 33-Shawn K. and
Davida C. Frick to David Teslicko Jr.
and Diana M. Pak Yi, $820,000.
MacArthur Blvd., 4570, No. G7Brendan H. and Maria M. Tracz to
Anissa A. Nabi and Joseph O.
Cascarano, $255,000.
MacArthur Terr., 5201-Benjamin
HOMES CONTINUED ON 22
11
Home
DC
Forgive this 1800s plant collector who brought us a mega-weed
PHOTOS BY ADRIAN HIGGINS/THE WASHINGTON POST
ISTOCK
Japanese plants that reshaped
the American garden,
clockwise from top: Japanese
maple, porcelain berry and
Japanese hydrangea vine.
that, whether for agriculture or
road construction. And the more
recent effects of climate change
may be helping the most
aggressive plants to the
detriment of others.
Before you burn Hogg in
effigy, consider this: He is also
responsible for bringing us
Japanese maples and other
sublime acers, hostas,
hydrangeas, kousa and pagoda
dogwoods, Japanese snowbell,
Asian persimmon, Japanese iris,
stewartia, Japanese hydrangea
vine, Japanese umbrella pine, the
katsura tree and the weeping
cherry.
One assumes that Hogg had
no idea that some of his treasures
would turn into thugs, that the
porcelain berry, say, would be
any different from the beloved
and well-behaved hydrangea
vine (Schizophragma).
“The invasives are only part of
the story,” Del Tredici said. “I
think you have to look at the big
picture, which is the
transformation of the American
landscape.”
The work of Hogg and a
slightly earlier collector named
George Rogers Hall has been
known among garden historians,
but Del Tredici’s paper fleshes
out the details of Hogg’s plant
introductions. Published in June
in a journal named the Botanical
Review, it took him four years to
pull together, he said.
He came to see that the work
of the collectors was only half the
story. The key to the distribution
of the new plants was a nursery
owner in New York City named
Samuel Bowne Parsons.
It took Parsons more than 20
years from the first shipments of
the Japanese plants to have a
well-oiled production line of
plants in place for an eager
public. He employed a Swiss
immigrant named J.R. Trumpy
who by the late 1880s was
grafting 10,000 Japanese maples
annually.
But Parsons was also a great
salesman, filling gardening
magazines with enticing
advertisements that dangled
azaleas, camellias and maples
like paradisiacal carrots before
the gardening public.
“For me, the big takeaway isn’t
so much about Thomas Hogg but
the collaboration between the
collector and the nursery
responsible for increasing it and
marketing it,” Del Tredici said.
“Parsons was way ahead of his
time in recognizing the
importance of marketing his
plants.”
Interestingly, many of the
Japanese plants that came to the
West were available in the United
States before they appeared in
Europe. “This is the birth of
globalization, and people were
super excited about it,” Del
Tredici said.
The arrival of these plants
coincided with a fundamental
shift in the idea of
gardenmaking. Previously,
gardening was “really a form of
agriculture,” Del Tredici said.
But with the advent of
designers such as Frederick
Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux,
the creators of Central Park,
came the idea of designed
landscapes rather than
collections of plants. Parsons’s
son, Samuel Parsons Jr., worked
with Vaux and was a founder of
the American Society of
Landscape Architects.
“There was a shift where
landscape gardening became
landscape architecture, and
Parsons Jr. was the
personification of that,” Del
Tredici said. “All these new plants
coming in from Japan played a
role in that transformation. It
wasn’t just aesthetics.”
The idea of Hogg plucking ripe
seeds of porcelain berry
somewhere in Hokkaido during a
long day of collecting somehow
eases the tedium of ripping the
stems from the tangle of the fruit
bush. If I were to feel any animus
toward him, I would force myself
to think of the living sculpture
that is the Japanese maple and
its place in the garden and the
gardener’s heart.
adrian.higgins@washpost.com
@adrian_higgins on Twitter
Also at washingtonpost.com
Read past columns by Higgins at
washingtonpost.com/home.
the washington post . thursday, august 31 , 2017
Late summer is
the time when I
must deal with
the porcelain
berry. This is a
hardy, woody vine
Adrian
that landed in
Higgins
America as an
exquisite,
GARDENING
bejeweled bower
only to be reviled
later as a beast. Unchecked, it
will grow 15 feet a year and
smother shrubs, trees and in
time whole landscapes in its
quest for world domination.
Now it is entwined with my
gooseberry bush, and once a
week I rip out the wandering
stems before their white
blossoms turn into seedy berries.
I need to grub it out at the roots,
but the gooseberry is full of
thorns, and that’s a job for
winter, when I can get a clearer
view.
Where did this marauder
come from? It came from a guy
named Thomas Hogg Jr.
Actually, it came from Japan, but
Hogg brought it to our shores.
I know this because Peter Del
Tredici, senior research scientist
emeritus at Harvard’s Arnold
Arboretum, has shed new light
on how Japanese plants arrived
to reshape the American garden.
The story is about expanding
markets, consumer lust for the
new and exotic, and the perils
and delights of globalization.
That was 150 years ago and, yes,
not much has changed, except
the scale of it today is much
greater.
Hogg, who lived between 1820
and 1892, made two collecting
sojourns to Japan. The first was a
seven-year stint in the 1860s,
during which he sent back
conifers unseen before, including
the northern Japanese hemlock,
the Japanese false cypress and
the Veitch fir. He returned in the
1870s, when he had access to the
interior of Japan and collected
much from seed, including the
porcelain berry.
You might say he hit the
invasive exotic trifecta, because
he also sent us the all-consuming
oriental bittersweet and the lil’
old kudzu vine. He wasn’t the
only introducer of the vine that
ate the South, but he may have
been the first.
It can take years, decades,
before the propensity of an
introduced species to multiply
and wander is known. Although
some of the reasons for the
spread of bullying vines are fairly
obvious — the attractiveness of
the berries to birds, for example
— other causes are more
complicated. Weeds tend to
invade soil disturbed by humans,
and we’ve proved to be good at
12
DC
Home
A COOK’S GARDEN
For a delicious summer snack, gild the daylily
BY
B ARBARA D AMROSCH
the washington post . thursday, august 31 , 2017
When bright orange daylily
blossoms start to open along
country roads in summer, it’s a
beautiful and welcome sight. It
always seems like a midpoint between the hurry-up planting of
crops in spring and the harvestrich enjoyment of summer and
fall, along with the planting of
cool-weather crops.
The time of those roadside
flowers has passed, but there are
still daylilies in my flower garden.
The various daylily species, with
modern cultivars in various colors, span the season, from late
spring to the end of September.
Those I’ve collected, grown by
Bloomingfields Farm in Sherman, Conn., give me four months
of these gorgeous, minimal-care
treasures.
Before you do the same, you
must understand the difference
between daylilies and true lilies,
which are only distantly related.
The trumpet-shaped flowers of
daylilies (genus Hemerocallis)
and lilies (Lilium) are somewhat
alike, but where lilies grow from
bulbs, daylilies grow from fingerlike rhizomes. Lilies have small,
narrow leaves all along the stem,
but daylilies have a big clump of
long, grasslike leaves at the base
of the plant. Lilies are toxic to
Tip of the Week
Order daffodil and specialty bulbs
soon to get them planted and
growing early for an optimum
display in the spring. Early ordering
from mail-order catalogues will also
allow the widest selection of bulbs.
Some of the choicest tulip and
daffodil varieties quickly sell out —
something to consider if you are
aiming for a specific color scheme.
— Adrian Higgins
BARBARA DAMROSCH
A bouquet of late-summer daylilies plucked from the author’s garden. You can make fritters with the
popular perennial by stuffing the flowers with cheese and frying them to a golden crisp.
humans, daylilies are not, and
most of their parts — rhizomes,
young shoots and flowers — have
long been consumed as food.
That said, it’s best to introduce
yourself to them gradually, as
would be true for any new plant,
just in case you have a sensitivity
to them.
So which parts to eat? I’ve
found the young shoots to be a
good addition to a stir-fry. Some
people eat the tubers, though,
come to think of it, nobody I
know. Mostly I stick with the
flowers.
In addition to topping a salad,
you might find other creative uses
for them. For instance, you could
snip off the long stamens to make
space in the bloom for a spoonful
of cream-cheesy or goat-cheesy
dip, then poke nasturtiums, calendulas and other edible flowers
into it, making an edible bouquet.
Some might find it a bit intimidating to eat, but it would be a
beautiful garnish.
Recently I’ve been wondering
about daylily flower fritters, made
the way I make squash blossom
fritters, for which I stuff the flowers with cheese, swish them in
batter and fry them in oil. They
are wonderful. But those huge,
yellow squash trumpets are soft,
pliable and easy to pinch shut
before swishing. Daylily trumpets
are stiffer and harder to close.
So I made fritters from the
buds. I picked the biggest, fattest
ones I could find — ones that
would have opened the following
day — and made a slit in them
with a small, sharp knife. I left the
stamens and pistil neatly bundled
inside and inserted matchsticklike pieces of sharp cheddar.
They were delicious — crispy,
with the sweetness intact. As I
was gorging on them with my
Climb aboard the home delivery train.
husband, I confessed that he
probably wouldn’t get to eat them
again because they were tiny and
tedious to make.
He picked up a whole flower
and put a dab of butter on the tip
of each petal. Then he pinched
the tips together, gluing the flower shut.
So the next day I stuffed some
flowers with a mixture of ricotta
cheese, rosemary and a little nutmeg. The butter seal made it
possible to douse them in the
batter and fry them to a golden
crisp. Superb!
I fooled around with the idea of
using ricotta with cheddar as a
filling. Cheddar was nicely assertive and oozed less. I tried an eggy
batter, then my usual thin slurry
of whole-wheat flour and water.
The batter absorbed too much oil
and didn’t crisp up as well as the
thin slurry.
Next year, when the wild daylilies start to bloom, try harvesting
them and bringing some to your
table. I’d avoid any growing
alongside the road, where they’ve
been exposed to vehicular fumes,
road de-icer, herbicides and Lord
knows what else. Better to pick
from a field where they have
naturalized or, better yet, from
your own organic, unsprayed garden.
localliving@washpost.com
Damrosch is the author of “The Four
Season Farm Gardener’s Cookbook.”
1-800-753-POST
washingtonpost.com/subscribe
SF
Wellness
13
DC
NUTRITION
ISTOCK
Advice that has reached its expiration date
BY
C ARA R OSENBLOOM
A
Fructose (fruit sugar) is better for diabetics: My nutrition
textbook from 1995 says that
“fructose does not cause problems of high blood sugar for
people with diabetes.” Fructose
naturally occurs in fruit, and it’s
fine in small doses. But in the
1990s, fructose was heavily used
as a sweetener for processed
foods because we thought it was
healthier than white sugar. Remember Frookies, the fructosesweetened cookies for people
with diabetes? Yikes.
It turns out that excessive consumption of fructose — mostly as
high-fructose corn syrup — has
been linked to insulin resistance
and Type 2 diabetes, so it’s not
good for diabetics after all. Too
much fructose is also associated
with metabolic syndrome, obesity and cardiovascular disease.
Fructose from fruit is fine, but
high consumption of fructose in
the form of sweeteners is not
recommended — whether you
have diabetes or not.
All calories are equal: I distinctly remember my nutrition
professor saying, “It doesn’t matter if you eat 300 calories from
apples or from chocolate — a
calorie is a calorie.” In the
mid-’90s, calories were all treated
the same, no matter the source.
That was dietetic tunnel vision. We now recognize that calories from soda, candy and other
treats deliver sugar but offer no
vitamins, minerals, fiber or protein. That’s different than calories
from vegetables, legumes or fish,
which provide nutrients in every
bite. If you still count calories but
don’t consider much else, consider making an appointment with a
dietitian to learn why nutrientdense foods are a better option.
Sugar just causes cavities: My
dorm room was stocked with
Snackwell’s cookies, gummy
bears and Snapple — all of my
fat-free (and guilt-free!) pleasures. These fat-free foods are
loaded with sugar. That didn’t
seem to be a problem, because I
was taught that sugar causes
dental cavities but is benign otherwise. I brushed twice daily, so
no harm done, right?
Fast-forward to 2017, and a
new story emerges. Recent studies link excess sugar consumption — especially from sweetened
beverages — to an increased risk
of obesity, Type 2 diabetes, dementia and heart disease. Sugar
is not as blameless as we once
thought and should be limited.
The American Heart Association
recommends no more than six
teaspoons of added sugar per day
for women and nine teaspoons
for men. One 16-fluid-ounce
Snapple has 10 teaspoons.
Calories
in,
calories
Now we know that obesity is
more complex than that. It involves genetics, physiology, activity level, environment, diet and
socioeconomic status. Plus, researchers are heavily studying
how obesity relates to hormones
such as leptin and ghrelin, which
are not even mentioned in my
1990s textbooks. In 2017, we aim
to treat obesity as a disease and
not lay blame on the people who
have it. And we still don’t have all
the answers to the weight control
riddle.
In fact, we don’t have a lot of
answers about nutrition, which is
considered a relatively new science. The research evolves as
humans evolve, and today’s theory may not carry weight tomorrow. It will be interesting to read
this article in 25 years to see the
progress we’ve made.
localliving@washpost.com
out:
Weight loss was explained very
simply in nutrition school: You’ll
lose weight by cutting calories
from food and increasing calories
burned through exercise. That’s it
— just eat less and move more.
Obesity was blamed on laziness
and overconsumption.
Registered dietitian Cara
Rosenbloom is president of Words to
Eat By, a nutrition communications
company specializing in writing,
nutrition education and recipe
development. She is the co-author of
“Nourish: Whole Food Recipes
Featuring Seeds, Nuts and Beans.”
the washington post . thursday, august 31 , 2017
friend of mine is trying
to lose weight and
wanted
to
check
whether her strategies
were sound. She said
she counts every calorie, avoids
nuts because of the high fat
content and snacks only on sugary (but fat-free!) foods. Was she
on track?
If that conversation took place
in 1993, she’d get kudos for her
nutrition knowledge. But those
bits of wisdom are badly outdated. Nutritional science changes
quickly, and knowledge that was
gleaned from a 25-year-old nutrition textbook needs to be refreshed. Here’s how nutrition information has changed over the
years and why it’s important to
keep up.
All fat is bad: I remember the
on-campus breakfast I ate most
often in 1994: a huge New Yorkstyle bagel with nothing on it. We
all believed that “fat makes you
fat,” so butter, cream cheese and
peanut butter were off-limits. Fatfree foods were deemed better for
health, so nuts, seeds and avocado were frowned upon. A low-fat,
high-carb diet was the recommended approach for weight control and good cardiovascular
health.
Check your menu. If you are
still eating pasta without olive oil
or bread without peanut butter,
you’re doing yourself a disservice.
Fat should not be feared. Certain
fats, especially from nuts, seeds,
olive oil, fish and avocado, are
beneficial for heart health and
weight control, and can help reduce the risk of developing Type 2
diabetes. They should be enjoyed
as part of the daily diet.
14
DC
Family
ILLUSTRATIONS BY JAMES YANG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
BY J ENNIFER W ALLACE
AND L ISA H EFFERNAN
the washington post . thursday, august 31 , 2017
This summer, Amy Wilson bought a
bunch of sporting equipment and left it
casually on the lawn, hoping her children
would create great summer memories
together, long days of whiffle ball and
impromptu games. She pictured sibling
togetherness, where they would create
new bonds.
But instead, said the mother of three
children and co-creator of the podcast
“What Fresh Hell: Laughing in the Face of
Motherhood,” by the second day, the equipment had become weaponry. “I looked
through the window and saw my 13-yearold running for his life while the 14-yearold was chasing after him with the whiffle
ball bat,” she said.
Although there are days when it feels as
if we can do little more than send our
children to separate rooms, experts say
there are steps parents can take to diminish sibling squabbling and foster strong,
lifelong bonds.
It doesn’t always involve whiffle ball
bats strewn on the front lawn.
Remember that not all battles are bad
At its base, sibling rivalry is a battle for
parent resources, be they attention, money
or affection. Even siblings who love and
care for one another can regard one
another as a threat to getting what they
want or need.
Remind yourself that, as painful as
those battles are, they teach important life
skills, such as seeing things from another
person’s perspective, communicating effectively and resolving conflicts, says Laurie Kramer, a professor of applied psychology at Northeastern University. These are
all things that will better equip them to
make friendships and navigate romantic
relationships as they get older. The wonderful thing about siblings, she says, is that
no matter the fight, they’ll still be sitting
next to each other at the breakfast table the
next morning.
Worry less about the bickering
Jeffrey Kluger, author of “The Sibling
Effect: What the Bonds Among Brothers
and Sisters Reveal About Us,” reminds
parents that although sibling rivalry is
unavoidable, our approach to it can make
all the difference in our daily lives.
“A parent’s role is to not to sweat the
day-to-day stuff too much,” he says. In most
cases, the conflict is benign, Kluger says,
and parents needn’t worry that their kids
are irreparably damaging what should be
one of the most important and long-lasting
How to get siblings
to stop bickering
and start bonding
relationships in their lives.
“My wife and I have two daughters, age
16 and 14, and I always worry about that,”
Kluger says. “‘Girls, I want you to be best
friends when you are 88 and 90. I want you
to look at each other and say, ‘This is
someone who has been with me for the
entire ride.’ So parents often worry that
every literal blow or verbal blow or lashing
out will somehow inflict permanent damage to the sibling relationship, and it
typically doesn’t.”
That said, it’s important for parents to
talk to children directly about family
citizenship, polite behavior and in-house
etiquette in a non-pious fashion, says
psychologist Wendy Mogel, author of “The
Blessing of a Skinned Knee.” “Not in one
download and not in the heat of the
moment.”
Model good behavior
As with every other aspect of parenting,
modeling behavior is one of our best tools
to foster strong bonds among siblings.
Watch the tone and words you use when
talking with your spouse, Mogel says.
Parents criticizing each other “is a form of
adult sibling rivalry that does not go
unnoticed by eager young minds,” she
warns.
How you interact with your own siblings
can also have an impact. When kids see the
support, laughter and love we share with
our siblings, they will want that for themselves.
Teach them tools to manage conflicts
“A lot of the literature will say never get
involved, but that’s wrong,” Kramer says.
Research (including Kramer’s) shows that
problem-solving skills must be taught and
don’t always come naturally.
“We are not expecting parents to always
intervene — that would just be exhausting,” she says. Instead of acting as a referee,
think of yourself as a coach. Kramer says
coaching is particularly helpful between
the ages of 4 and 8, but if older children
don’t have the social and emotional skills
to resolve conflicts themselves, then parents should get involved.
Kramer says parents can help children
manage conflicts with three steps: stop,
think and talk. So have them stop what
they’re doing, think about what their goals
are and what their sibling’s goals are, and
then talk about what they need so that
together they can find a solution that
satisfies both parties.
Create positive sibling interaction
Parents haven’t always had to consciously nurture these relationships. Children aren’t sharing bedrooms and doing
chores together as much as they used to,
and they rarely have enough free, unstructured time for shared fun.
Experts agree that it is essential to find
ways for siblings to have positive, noncompetitive interactions so that the fun times
outweigh the negative ones. To do this,
parents need to intentionally create posi-
tive shared experiences.
When siblings are far apart in age,
Kramer suggests trying activities that
“level the playing field, like bike riding,
water sports and games of chance.” She
says that when you see your children
interacting warmly and having fun, acknowledge it by saying, “I love to see you
guys laugh together.”
Look for opportunities that allow older
children and teens to team up and make
decisions together, such as planning dinner or a game night. “Encourage them to
be a resource for each other as well,”
Kramer says, perhaps by asking an older
teen to talk about some of the challenges
he faced when he was his younger brother’s age. It sends the important signal that
siblings can and should learn from one
another.
One way to build warmth among siblings is to reminisce about good times.
Take pictures of them having fun together
and then talk about that memory. “It
validates a moment in time and helps to
build a positive foundation for the relationship,” Kramer says.
Celebrate your kids equally
In the battle for parental attention, it is
important that there are no victors. Kluger
acknowledges that some kids’ accomplishments are far more visible and public and
that it is up to parents to even the balance.
“Parents must remember that there is a
certain type of applause that goes to the
child who is winning football games, and
there has to be a different kind of attention, applause and reward for the child
who may not be doing things so conspicuously,” he says. It is important for parents
to celebrate quieter, more private accomplishments, such as studying hard for a
test.
When it’s good, walk away
When our kids are talking late at night
and should be sleeping, the temptation is
to tell them to be quiet and go to sleep.
Resist that temptation, Kluger says. Those
quiet hours when they trade confidences,
tell stories or just laugh together are the
building blocks of their adult relationship.
Just step out of the way and let it happen.
localliving@washpost.com
Jennifer Breheny Wallace is a freelance writer
and the mother of three preteen children. You
can follow her on Twitter @wallacejennieb.
Lisa Heffernan writes about parenting during
the teen and college years at Grown & Flown
and is the author of three business books.
15
Family
DC
ON PARENTING
My ‘serious’ voice is no match for twin toddlers’ endless energy
BY
M EGHAN L EAHY
Q: We have 21/2-year-old twins, and they have been
wonderfully rambunctious since they started to walk.
They’re fun and loving, but where our eldest daughter
listened to us in public or in potentially dangerous
situations (e.g., crossing the street), our twins delight
in doing their own thing, such as running in
different directions on the sidewalk just out of my
reach or raising a ruckus at public places such as a
carryout restaurant or grocery store. I’ve accepted
that this was par for the course for this age and
family dynamic, but I’ve noticed that their peers
don’t seem to consistently exhibit such
lawlessness with their parents. A trusted friend
at their day care suggested that I be sterner with
them. (When I pick them up, they immediately
sense freedom and start running up the halls to play
or into staff members’ offices, expertly avoiding my
control.) I really don’t know how I would execute
that — it’s not as if I’m permitting them to act like
pinballs or even ignoring their behavior — I’m just at
a loss. They laugh in the face of my “serious” voice,
and I’m not going to resort to shouting or ridicule.
Any advice?
A: First of all, I want to let you
We also have to get into how
difficult it is to raise twin
2-year-olds. I don’t have twins,
but you don’t have to be a rocket
scientist to figure out that one
2-year-old is exhausting, so two?
Wow.
The average 2-year-old is pure
impulse, pure moment-tomoment living, pure emotion.
The past is over, and the future
doesn’t exist as an important
construct. And the 2-year-old
body loves to move. Their fine
and gross motor skills are
exploding, but their language is
still lacking — which means that
frustration and tantrums
abound. Two-year-olds want
what they want when they want
it. Until they don’t. Pleasing a
2-year-old can be an elusive
goal.
This means that although
your “trusted friend” can
simply scoop up her wild
2-year-old, you are left with one
child running south while the
other runs north. I mean, you
have real physical issues.
Lecturing 2-year-olds doesn’t
work (they cannot retain the
information in their immature
brains), threatening them
doesn’t work (their impulses
will override their desire to be
good for you), and although
bribing them may work, you are
creating a slippery slope to
parenting hell that will end
with you offering them full
candy bars every day within the
month.
Am I suggesting that your
twins can run wild because it’s
hard to herd them? No.
Here are some other ideas:
1. Unless it is an emergency,
stop taking them to grocery
stores and other such places.
This will not be forever, but they
are just too little to handle an
hour-long shopping trip without
it turning into a disaster. When
you do have to take them, get the
distractions ready. I used to
bring toys and lollipops when I
dragged all three of my kids to
the store.
2. Get your expectations in
check. Know that going to the
grocery store will be boring and
that your children will run.
Know that the next couple of
years are going to be hard. Your
children will vacillate between
being sick, exhausted and
hungry, and your own
exhaustion will reach its depths.
(Hasn’t it already?) You will
experience wild joy in watching
them play together and mature
and enjoy life. And then one will
smack the other and everything
will go to pot. Wake up and
begin again.
3. Don’t respond to them
laughing in your face with
punishment. Remember, you are
outmanned, and you will only
invite more misbehavior if you
double down on the power
struggles. Yes, you are being
challenged, but you need to
react with action, not more
speech.
4. You need to have routine
rule your life. There are
running places (parks,
playgrounds, back yards, etc.),
and there are walking places
(day-care hallways, church,
parking lots, restaurants, etc.).
Your children won’t care about
these rules; these are for you to
keep and enforce. When you
pick up your children from day
care, don’t make small talk and
don’t stand around and talk to
the kids. Take each child firmly
by the hand, give them string
cheese and leave. If they
squirm, hold them tight. Just
get out the door to a place
where they can run safely. You
know that they have excess
energy that needs to be burned
off, so quickly and kindly get
them to that place. And when
you find yourself in a parking
lot, say, “This is a hand-holding
area.” Don’t talk to them about
cars running them over or
lecture them about safety. Just
keep and enforce the rule. And
if one of them throws himself
on the ground, you all sit on the
ground and wait it out, but
don’t let go. Why? Poof,
goodbye boundary. The child
will run, it is not safe, and the
only way to make sure your rule
stands is by waiting the child
out. You will panic and say, “No,
Meghan, you don’t get it. We
will never go anywhere.” Yes,
you will.
Remember, your goal isn’t
actually getting to the store; it is
upholding a boundary so that
your twins can learn that you
mean business and that they
will follow your rules in the
future. The pain will lead to
ease. I wish I could convince
everyone of this, but you are on
your parenting journey.
Good luck and keep your
boundaries.
Also at washingtonpost.com
Read the transcript of a recent live
Q&A with Leahy at washingtonpost.
com/advice, where you can also find
past columns. Her next chat is
scheduled for Sept. 13.
Send questions about parenting
to meghan@mlparentcoach.com.
the washington post . thursday, august 31 , 2017
know that most parents feel this
sense of “Wait, are my children
the only ones like this?” When
my youngest was in nursery
school, she refused to wear
anything but pajamas. I
struggled and struggled,
sometimes sending her to
school in nothing but a raincoat.
(I soon learned to just let her
wear the darn pajamas.) I would
look around at the other
parents, and no one else seemed
to be having any trouble. No one
else seemed to fight with their
children every morning. I felt
pretty dejected most days.
So my first message to you is
that every other parent seems to
be doing a better job.
You are programmed to look
around and see how you are
measuring up, and you will
almost always come up short.
All the other 2-year-olds are
sweeter and calmer and more
obedient. And the parents of
extremely shy children will look
at your children and think,
“Look at those kids jumping
right in. What is wrong with my
child?” It’s a lose-lose. So stop
comparing yourself. (I laughed
while I typed that because I
know you still will. Just be
aware of it.)
MORDOLFF/GETTY IMAGES
16
DC
Community News
Calendar
THURSDAY, AUG. 31
Garden tour: “Fun With
Trees”Certified arborist Alexandra
Torres leads a walk through the U.S.
Botanical Gardens outdoor garden
and discusses tree selection for the
home and arborist gardening tips.
Take sunscreen and water, and
wear protective clothing. The tour
will be canceled in the event of rain,
extreme heat or a Code Red
weather alert. 10:30-11:30 a.m.
Tour meets by the entrance on the
terrace. U.S. Botanical Garden, 100
Maryland Ave. SW. 202-225-8333.
usbg.gov/programs. Free with
online registration.
Woodrow Wilson Plaza summer
concerts Blues singer Shirleta
Settles performs. Thursday, noon1 p.m. Concerts daily weekdays.
Woodrow Wilson Plaza, 1300
Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202-3121300. itcdc.com. Free.
Native Landscape Tour A
horticulturist leads a tour of the
National Museum of the American
Indian Native Landscape gardens.
Thursdays at 1 p.m. Through
Sept. 28, weather permitting,
except federal holidays. Meet near
the flagpole outside the South
Entrance. National Museum of the
American Indian, Fourth Street and
Independence Avenue SW. 202633-1000. nmai.si.edu. Free.
Kids’ chess club For children of all
ages who want to learn to play,
improve their chess moves or play
in tournaments. Thursdays, 5 p.m.
Through Dec. 28. Chevy Chase
Library, 5625 Connecticut Ave. NW.
202-282-0021. chevychaselibrary@
dc.gov. Free.
the washington post . thursday, august 31 , 2017
FRIDAY, SEP T. 1
Child safety seat inspections DC
Safe Kids in partnership with
Children’s Health Project of DC
offers weekly car seat inspections.
Fridays 10:30-3:30 p.m. THEARC,
1901 Mississippi Ave. SE. 202-4763618. thearcdc.org. Free.
Garden tour: “Highlights from
the Conservatory Collection” A
one-hour guided tour through
jungle, desert and tropical foliage.
Mondays, Thursdays and Fridays at
10:30 a.m.; Mondays, Tuesdays,
Wednesdays and Fridays at noon;
Wednesdays and Thursdays at
2 p.m.; and Tuesdays, Thursdays,
Fridays and Sundays at 3 p.m.
except Sept. 3 and 4. Through
Sept. 29. U.S. Botanical Garden,
100 Maryland Ave. SW. 202-2258333. usbg.gov. Free.
NPS walk: “Secrets of the
EVENTS CONTINUED ON 23
Fresh-air therapy is risky for this ‘tiger in a cage’
Animal
Doctor
together? Are there strategies we
can use to reduce her chances of
contracting the virus?
Any insight you can share
would be most appreciated.
Dear Dr. Fox:
Help! I am at
my wits’ end. I
have an 11-yearMICHAEL W.
old male tabby
FOX
cat. His weight is
in normal range,
his health is good (I take him to
the vet for checkups, plus
anything else not routine), and
his appetite is fine, but he started
spraying in the house about two
years ago, mostly in corners of
stairwells and rooms.
I got him and his littermate
sister when they were 8 weeks
old. They have always been
indoor cats, but when this
started, my vet said, “What you
have here is a tiger in a cage,” and
said I should let him out to roam
the neighborhood. My cat usually
goes out in the evenings and
comes in when called. He’s
brought us a few mice.
He and his sister don’t get
along anymore, although they
used to. The mostly ignore each
other, but sometimes will hiss
and attack.
My husband was diagnosed
with cancer about two years ago,
when this spraying started, and I
can’t help but wonder if this has
contributed to the problem, as
the household was in a lot of
turmoil at the time.
I have tried everything —
drugs from the vet, Feliway,
sprays, etc. — but he continues to
spray. There are three litter boxes
indoors, and one outside, which
he does use. He is very skittish
and afraid, but he has always
been this way.
D.P., the District
DF: Cats are susceptible to a
GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCK
A reader’s veterinarian suggested that letting her male cat roam
outdoors would cure him of spraying indoors. But the outside
environment poses all sorts of risks for cats. A better approach
would be finding out whether the spraying is health-related.
There are other reasons why
cats spray, as well as many
effective treatments for the
behavior, including pheromones,
mood- and anxiety-modifying
drugs and activities other than
letting the cat run free. For your
cat, I would have the veterinarian
rule out stress-related cystitis
and possibly stones or calculi
before consulting with an animal
behavioral therapist.
Dear. Dr. Fox:
Our 8-month-old kitten has
recently been diagnosed with
feline leukemia virus (FeLV),
which has spread to his bone
marrow.
We adopted him at our local
animal shelter when he was
4 months old. We brought him
into our home with our 7-year-old
cat, whom we had adopted two
years ago from the same shelter.
She has tested negative for FeLV
and FIV (feline
immunodeficiency virus) several
times, so we are assuming that
our new guy was born with FeLV.
He now has monthly checkup
appointments at the vet and is on
daily doses of prednisone.
I have two questions for you:
1. As the FeLV has spread to
the bone marrow, what are the
expectations for years of life left?
Is there anything beyond steroid
treatment we should be doing to
improve his chances or extend
his life?
2. Our older cat was never
vaccinated for FeLV. She has
since been tested again and is
negative. She was immediately
vaccinated and subsequently
received her booster, during
which time she was separated
from her brother. We have now
reintroduced them for quality-oflife purposes. Are we putting her
at risk by allowing them to be
variety of virus infections, some
contracted prenatally, others very
early in life.
Those with certain infections,
such as feline herpes, do well
keeping the infection suppressed
so long as their immune systems
function well and they are not
subjected to stress. Your young
cat might cope with the feline
leukemia virus infection as long
as he is not unduly stressed — as
by frequent trips to the vet — so
arrange for in-home visits if
possible.
Avoid boarding and separation
from his family. Also avoid
additional vaccinations and antiflea drugs, which can wreak
havoc with the immune system
and trigger a flare-up of the
infection. Good nutrition is
essential, ideally some raw or
freeze-dried cat foods, or my
home-prepared diet, posted on
my website.
Michael W. Fox, author of a newsletter
and books on animal care, welfare
and rights, is a veterinarian with
doctoral degrees in medicine and
animal behavior. Send letters to Dr.
Michael Fox in care of Andrews
McMeel Syndication, 1130 Walnut
St., Kansas City, Mo. 64106
©2017 United Feature Syndicate
E.D., Potomac, Md.
DF: Certainly a home in turmoil
can upset cats, and spray
marking and house soiling are
not uncommon reactions. What
is important in your case is the
fact that your cat still sprayed
inside the house after you
followed the vet’s advice and let
him out.
I would never have
recommended this, but many
vets do. This probably makes
things worse with outdoor cat
fights and bites, bringing home
fleas and other more serious
potential health problems, as I
document in the article
“Releasing Cats to Live Outdoors”
on my website, drfoxvet.net.
Frankly, I find it ethically
unprofessional for veterinarians
to suggest such “outdoor
therapy” for indoor cats who
start to spray, a suggestion widely
made in Britain and the United
States. Letting the cat out could
mean cat fights, death by
automobile or a cat that comes
home and sprays inside the home
because he is insecure and needs
to mark his territory.
AD OPT A PET
Lady, a 13-year-old spayed dog, is available for adoption through the
Humane Rescue Alliance.
HUMANE RESCUE ALLIANCE
The Humane Rescue Alliance’s two adoption centers, at 1201 New York Ave. NE
and 71 Oglethorpe St. NW, offer animals for adoption. Adoption hours are noon
to 7 p.m. daily, except Mondays. Stray animals are accepted 24 hours a day,
seven days a week at the New York Avenue location. Photos of other available
animals can be seen at humanerescuealliance.org. For information, call the
Humane Rescue Alliance, 202-576-6664, or the adoption center,
202-726-2556; email adopt@humanerescuealliance.org; or go to
humanerescuealliance.org/support-us.
A NIMAL WATCH
These cases were handled by the
Humane Rescue Alliance, which
operates its shelters at 71 Oglethorpe
St. NW and 1201 New York Ave. NE.
For information or assistance, call
202-576-6664 or 202-726-2556, or
go to humanerescuealliance.org.
Trouble passing through:
Gainesville St. SE, 1600 block,
Aug. 13. Responding to a report of a
deer stuck in a fence, officers were
able to free the animal and returned
it to the wild.
Orphaned squirrel: Martin Luther
King Jr. Ave. SW, 3900 block, Aug. 14.
An officer picked up a dehydrated
squirrel from the ground and took it
to City Wildlife for evaluation and
care.
Not sorted: Division Ave. NE,
800 block, Aug. 17. An officer
removed a juvenile opossum from a
recycling bin and returned it to the
wild.
Adoptable pet: Oglethorpe St. NW,
unit block, June 26. A 13-year-old dog
was surrendered to the shelter.
— Compiled by Ria Manglapus
17
Community
News
DC
O
HEALTH CODE VIOLATIONS
These food establishments were
closed because of health code
violations. The list, compiled from
health department reports, reflects
actions taken by the departments.
THE DISTRICT
Appioo African Bar and Grill
1924 Ninth St. NW
Closed Aug. 21 because of a
sewage backup, for operating
without a certified food manager,
and because of gross unsanitary
conditions, including vermin.
Reopened Friday.
Hershey’s Ice Cream
1432 K St. NW
Closed Aug. 9 for operating without
a manager on duty and because of
circumstances that could endanger
public health. Reopened Aug. 16.
La Cafe II
1825 I St. NW
Closed Aug. 18 because of
circumstances that could endanger
public health. Reopened Aug. 23.
Penn Grill
825 20th St. NW
Closed last Thursday for operating
without a manager on duty and
because of gross unsanitary
conditions, including vermin.
MARYLAND
Acapulco Spirit
3100 Hamilton St., Hyattsville
Closed Aug. 21 because of mice
and roaches. Reopened Aug. 23.
Bojangles’ Famous Chicken ’n
Biscuits
3713 Branch Ave., Temple Hills
Closed Aug. 21 for operating
without hot water. Reopened
Aug. 22.
Hunan China
792 Harry S. Truman Dr., Largo
Closed Aug. 22 because of
roaches. Reopened Friday.
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ADDITIONS | BATHS | CONDOS | EXTERIORS | KITCHENS
DESIGN STUDIOS IN VA | DC | MD
VIRGINIA
Ba Le Bakery
3822 Graham Rd., Falls Church
Closed Aug. 22 for operating
without a certified food manager.
Reopened last Thursday.
Sicilian Pizza
923 S. Walter Reed Dr., Arlington
Closed Aug. 17 because of a
refrigerator repair. Reopened the
next day.
What! Still not getting home delivery?
1-800-753-POST
washingtonpost.com/subscribe
— Compiled by Terence McArdle
SF
the washington post . thursday, august 31 , 2017
Glorious Pizza and Sub
7408 Livingston Rd., Oxon Hill
Closed Friday because of roaches.
MORE AREA HOMEOWNERS CHOOSE CASE
THAN ANY OTHER REMODELER.
18
DC
Crime Report
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
These were among incidents
reported by D.C. police. For
information, call 202-727-9099.
NORTHEAST
ASSAULTS
Dix St., 5900 block, 2:14 a.m.
Aug. 21. With gun.
Eastern Ave., 1100 block,
9:33 a.m. Aug. 18.
Nannie Helen Burroughs Ave.,
4600-4700 blocks, 6:35 p.m.
Aug. 22. With knife.
Nash St., 4900 block, 12:52 a.m.
Aug. 16. With knife.
Rhode Island Ave., 18001900 blocks, 3:20 a.m. Aug. 16.
With gun.
West Virginia Ave., 1700 block,
4:42 p.m. Aug. 20.
Fourth St., 2200 block, 7:37 p.m.
Aug. 18. With gun.
24th Pl., 2100 block, 10:27 p.m.
Aug. 20.
46th Pl., Unit-199 blocks, 8:31 p.m.
Aug. 21. With gun.
48th Pl., 1100 block, 5:16 p.m.
Aug. 16. With knife.
49th St., 700 block, 9:28 p.m.
Aug. 21.
ROBBERIES
the washington post . thursday, august 31 , 2017
E St., 600 block, 8:43 p.m. Aug. 22.
Eastern Ave., 1200 block,
4:19 p.m. Aug. 17.
H St., 1300 block, 12:41 a.m.
Aug. 17.
Hayes St., 4200 block, 8:12 p.m.
Aug. 19. With gun.
Irving St., 1700 block, 12:52 a.m.
Aug. 21. With gun.
L St., 1700 block, 8:03 a.m.
Aug. 18. With gun.
Meade St., 4800 block, 7:16 p.m.
Aug. 19. With gun.
Queens Chapel Rd., 2100 block,
10:30 p.m. Aug. 16.
Riggs Rd., 300 block, 7:07 p.m.
Aug. 22.
Sheriff Rd., 4400 block,
10:54 p.m. Aug. 20. With gun.
Eighth St., 500 block, 8:44 p.m.
Aug. 18.
20th St., 800 block, 8:05 a.m.
Aug. 17. With gun.
42nd St., 200 block, 3:36 p.m.
Aug. 19. With gun.
BREAK-INS
Dix St., 6200 block, 9:18 a.m.
Aug. 21.
Evarts St., 1200 block, 6:17 a.m.
Aug. 19.
F St., 1200 block, 5:26 a.m.
Aug. 18.
Grant St., 4200-4300 blocks,
9:01 p.m. Aug. 18.
Just St., 4900-5100 blocks,
1:55 p.m. Aug. 18.
Michigan Ave., 1000 block,
7:41 a.m. Aug. 22.
Minnesota Ave., 3700 block,
9:57 p.m. Aug. 18.
Rhode Island Ave., 28003000 blocks, 6:39 a.m. Aug. 16.
Trinidad Ave., 1600 block,
5:02 p.m. Aug. 18.
Eighth St., 3400 block, 8:05 a.m.
Aug. 20.
55th St., 200 block, 2:07 p.m.
MD (301) 892-5380 DC (202) 897-2986
Aug. 22.
THEFTS
Adams Pl., 2100-2200 blocks,
9:59 a.m. Aug. 16.
Ames St., 3300 block, 6 a.m.
Aug. 21.
Benning Rd., 1500-1600 blocks,
7:05 p.m. Aug. 18.
Benning Rd., 1500-1600 blocks,
10:46 p.m. Aug. 18. From vehicle.
Benning Rd., 1800 block,
9:12 a.m. Aug. 16.
Benning Rd., 1900-2000 blocks,
7:25 p.m. Aug. 21.
Benning Rd., 1900-2000 blocks,
7:47 p.m. Aug. 21.
Benning Rd., 3900 block,
1:39 a.m. Aug. 17.
Benning Rd., 3900 block,
7:53 p.m. Aug. 17.
Benning Rd., 3900 block,
8:56 a.m. Aug. 18.
Benning Rd., 3900 block,
7:46 p.m. Aug. 19.
Benning Rd., 4000 block,
6:45 p.m. Aug. 17.
Benning Rd., 4400 block,
9:54 p.m. Aug. 21.
Benning Rd., 4400 block,
10:25 p.m. Aug. 21.
Bladensburg Rd., 800 block,
6:48 a.m. Aug. 21.
Bladensburg Rd., 900 block,
10:43 a.m. Aug. 21.
Bladensburg Rd., 900 block,
1:06 p.m. Aug. 21.
Bladensburg Rd., 900 block,
8:51 a.m. Aug. 22.
Bladensburg Rd., 1200 block,
VA (571) 775-2525
11:36 a.m. Aug. 20.
Bladensburg Rd., 21002200 blocks, 11:02 p.m. Aug. 20.
From vehicle.
Brentwood Pkwy., 1400 block,
7:07 p.m. Aug. 16.
Brentwood Rd., 10001200 blocks, 4:57 p.m. Aug. 19.
Brentwood Rd., 10001200 blocks, 3:29 p.m. Aug. 20.
Brentwood Rd., 10001200 blocks, 5:04 p.m. Aug. 21.
Bryant St., 2000 block, 9:41 a.m.
Aug. 19. From vehicle.
Commodore Joshua Barney Dr.,
3400-3500 blocks, 7:48 a.m.
Aug. 16. From vehicle.
Commodore Joshua Barney Dr.,
3800 block, 4:41 a.m. Aug. 16.
From vehicle.
Constitution Ave., 17001800 blocks, 7:17 p.m. Aug. 18.
From vehicle.
D St., 1500 block, 4:12 p.m.
Aug. 19.
Delafield Pl., 1200 block,
1:32 p.m. Aug. 22.
Dix St., 5200 block, 7:33 p.m.
Aug. 16. From vehicle.
Dix St., 5300 block, 1:45 p.m.
Aug. 18.
Downing St., 1400 block,
11:09 a.m. Aug. 18.
E St., 300 block, 5:40 p.m. Aug. 21.
E St., 1200 block, 5:41 a.m.
Aug. 18. From vehicle.
Eastern Ave., 900-1000 blocks,
6:12 a.m. Aug. 17.
Eastern Ave., 900-1000 blocks,
9:57 a.m. Aug. 21.
Eastern Ave., 1600 block,
6:32 a.m. Aug. 18. From vehicle.
F St., 500 block, 12:46 p.m.
Aug. 17.
Fenwick St., 1800 block, 4:38 a.m.
Aug. 17. From vehicle.
Florida Ave., 100 block, 9:50 a.m.
Aug. 18.
Florida Ave., 500 block, 5:52 a.m.
Aug. 18.
G St., 600 block, 9:27 a.m. Aug. 18.
G St., 1000 block, 10:17 a.m.
Aug. 20. From vehicle.
Gallaudet St., 1300 block,
2:51 p.m. Aug. 16. From vehicle.
Galloway St., 800-1000 blocks,
9:51 a.m. Aug. 20. From vehicle.
Girard St., 1000-1100 blocks,
5:23 p.m. Aug. 22.
H St., 500 block, 11:38 p.m.
Aug. 11. From vehicle.
I St., 200 block, 9:56 a.m. Aug. 17.
Jackson St., 1200 block, 8:42 a.m.
Aug. 21. From vehicle.
Jackson St., 1500 block, 7:19 a.m.
Aug. 17. From vehicle.
Jay St., 3500-3800 blocks,
2:22 a.m. Aug. 18. From vehicle.
Jay St., 4900-5000 blocks,
2:20 p.m. Aug. 22.
Jefferson St., 600-700 blocks,
10:24 p.m. Aug. 19.
Kendall St., 1800 block, 5:13 p.m.
Aug. 22. From vehicle.
Kendall St., 1900 block, 6:55 a.m.
Aug. 18. From vehicle.
Kenilworth Ave., 11001200 blocks, 7:42 p.m. Aug. 21.
From vehicle.
Kenilworth Terr., 700-800 blocks,
12:16 a.m. Aug. 19.
L St., 700 block, 3:13 p.m. Aug. 19.
Lincoln Rd., 2100-2300 blocks,
6:05 a.m. Aug. 20. From vehicle.
M St., 1800 block, 10:15 a.m.
Aug. 16.
Market St., 2400 block, 8:45 a.m.
Aug. 18.
Market St., 2400 block, 1:54 p.m.
Aug. 19.
Maryland Ave., 1300 block,
2:05 p.m. Aug. 17.
Maryland Ave., 1600 block,
4:47 p.m. Aug. 16.
Maryland Ave., 1600 block,
9:24 a.m. Aug. 18.
Maryland Ave., 1600 block,
4:16 a.m. Aug. 19.
Maryland Ave., 1600 block,
4:07 a.m. Aug. 20.
Michigan Ave., 600 block,
4:26 p.m. Aug. 16.
Michigan Ave., 1900 block,
8:18 p.m. Aug. 20.
Minnesota Ave., 36003700 blocks, 5:26 p.m. Aug. 22.
Minnesota Ave., 3900 block,
4:53 p.m. Aug. 19.
Minnesota Ave., 40004100 blocks, 2:06 p.m. Aug. 16.
Monroe St., 600 block, 6:52 a.m.
Aug. 21.
Monroe St., 800 block, 7:56 p.m.
Aug. 19.
Monroe St., 1700 block, 3:10 p.m.
Aug. 19. From vehicle.
Mount Olivet Rd., 1200 block,
9:12 a.m. Aug. 17.
Nannie Helen Burroughs Ave.,
4200-4300 blocks, 5:08 a.m.
Aug. 19.
New York Ave., 1200-1300 blocks,
12:22 p.m. Aug. 16.
New York Ave., 1400 block,
5:29 a.m. Aug. 16. From vehicle.
Okie St., 1400-1500 blocks,
12:20 p.m. Aug. 18.
Okie St., 1400-1500 blocks,
4:44 p.m. Aug. 18. From vehicle.
Otis St., 1800-1900 blocks,
8:36 a.m. Aug. 20. From vehicle.
Quarles St., 4500 block, 7:40 p.m.
Aug. 19.
Rhode Island Ave., 500700 blocks, 5:29 a.m. Aug. 19.
Rhode Island Ave., 500-700
blocks, 9:52 a.m. Aug. 22. From
vehicle.
Rhode Island Ave., 900 block,
2:57 p.m. Aug. 18.
Rhode Island Ave., 900 block,
3:17 p.m. Aug. 19.
Riggs Rd., 300 block, 8:03 p.m.
Aug. 16.
Rosedale St., 1900 block,
4:34 a.m. Aug. 16. From vehicle.
Sligo Mill Rd., 6200 block,
6:58 p.m. Aug. 19. From vehicle.
Summit St., 1100 block, 7:06 a.m.
Aug. 22.
T St., Unit-100 blocks, 9:37 a.m.
Aug. 18.
Varnum St., 1000-1100 blocks,
12:54 p.m. Aug. 18.
Varnum St., 1000-1100 blocks,
CRIME CONTINUED ON 19
19
Crime Report
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFTS
Ames St., 3500 block, 1:30 a.m.
Aug. 18.
Clay St., 4700-4800 blocks,
8:06 p.m. Aug. 19.
NORTHWEST
ASSAULTS
Connecticut Ave., 1200 block,
9:43 p.m. Aug. 18.
Florida Ave., 600 block,
12:40 a.m. Aug. 20.
Georgia Ave., 4600 block,
10:27 a.m. Aug. 17. With knife.
Girard St., 1400 block, 4:14 p.m.
Aug. 19. With knife.
I St., 1700 block, 11:40 p.m.
Aug. 20. With gun.
Morton St., 700 block, 12:27 p.m.
Aug. 19. With knife.
Pierce St., 100 block, 8:23 a.m.
Aug. 20. With knife.
R St., 1400 block, 9:55 p.m.
Aug. 19.
10th St., 3700 block, 8:26 p.m.
Aug. 19.
15th St., 2600-2700 blocks,
5:23 p.m. Aug. 20. With knife.
17th St., 900 block, 3:24 a.m.
Aug. 16.
1:49 a.m. Aug. 16.
Sixth St., 800 block, 4:53 p.m.
Aug. 21.
Seventh Pl., 5000 block,
11:45 a.m. Aug. 18. With gun.
11th St., 2800 block, 8:38 p.m.
Aug. 17.
14th St., 1800 block, 7:59 p.m.
Aug. 19. With knife.
15th St., 600 block, 11:17 a.m.
Aug. 19.
BREAK-INS
Missouri Ave., 100 block,
5:40 p.m. Aug. 20.
Pennsylvania Ave., 2000 block,
7:43 p.m. Aug. 21.
Wisconsin Ave., 23002400 blocks, 7:51 p.m. Aug. 18.
Eighth St., 4200 block, 3:59 p.m.
Aug. 21.
16th St., 3700-3800 blocks,
3:06 a.m. Aug. 20.
THEFTS
Bates St., Unit block, 3:55 p.m.
Aug. 18.
Belmont Rd., 1800 block,
11:25 p.m. Aug. 20. From vehicle.
Blair Rd., 7000 block, 2:05 p.m.
Aug. 21. From vehicle.
California St., 2200 block,
3:55 a.m. Aug. 17.
Cedar St., 400-500 blocks,
7:41 a.m. Aug. 18. From vehicle.
Colorado Ave., 5500 block,
3:37 a.m. Aug. 21. From vehicle.
Columbia Rd., 700-800 blocks,
5:25 p.m. Aug. 16. From vehicle.
Columbia Rd., 1300 block,
7:48 p.m. Aug. 16.
Columbia Rd., 1700 block,
5:44 a.m. Aug. 19.
Connecticut Ave., 1000 block,
6:05 a.m. Aug. 17.
Connecticut Ave., 1000 block,
7:43 a.m. Aug. 22.
Connecticut Ave., 1200 block,
1:34 a.m. Aug. 18. From vehicle.
Connecticut Ave., 1200 block,
8:47 a.m. Aug. 21.
Connecticut Ave., 13001600 blocks, 1:36 a.m. Aug. 19.
Connecticut Ave., 13001600 blocks, 10:23 a.m. Aug. 20.
Connecticut Ave., 42004300 blocks, 6:17 p.m. Aug. 22.
Connecticut Ave., 43004400 blocks, 2:08 p.m. Aug. 17.
From vehicle.
Connecticut Ave., 5200 block,
10:01 a.m. Aug. 22. From vehicle.
Connecticut Ave., 5500 block,
1:57 p.m. Aug. 17. From vehicle.
Connecticut Ave., 5600 block,
12:27 p.m. Aug. 17. From vehicle.
Corcoran St., 1300 block,
8:36 p.m. Aug. 21.
Delafield Pl., 900 block,
11:04 p.m. Aug. 21. From vehicle.
E St., Unit block, 12:56 a.m.
Aug. 16.
Eastern Ave., 6700-6800 blocks,
1:29 p.m. July 28.
Eastern Ave., 7700 block,
6:29 a.m. Aug. 20. From vehicle.
Euclid St., 700-800 blocks,
1:10 a.m. Aug. 19. From vehicle.
Euclid St., 1100-1200 blocks,
7:41 p.m. Aug. 21.
Euclid St., 1100-1200 blocks,
6:59 a.m. Aug. 22. From vehicle.
F St., 800 block, 2:46 p.m. Aug. 19.
From vehicle.
F St., 1000 block, 3:36 p.m.
Aug. 16.
F St., 1000 block, 5:09 p.m.
Aug. 16.
F St., 1000 block, 10:46 a.m.
Aug. 17.
F St., 1000 block, 3:01 p.m.
Aug. 22.
F St., 1300 block, 9:36 a.m.
Aug. 14.
F St., 1300 block, 6:37 p.m.
Aug. 17.
Fairmont St., 700 block, 8:53 a.m.
Aug. 18. From vehicle.
Florida Ave., 500 block, 8:06 a.m.
Aug. 21.
Florida Ave., 600 block, 7:40 a.m.
Aug. 19.
Florida Ave., 900 block, 9:46 p.m.
Aug. 17.
Florida Ave., 1700 block, 9 a.m.
Aug. 17.
Georgia Ave., 2600-2700 blocks,
8:32 a.m. Aug. 21.
Georgia Ave., 3400 block,
3:46 p.m. Aug. 18.
Georgia Ave., 3600 block,
5:31 a.m. Aug. 16.
Georgia Ave., 3600 block,
2:28 p.m. Aug. 16. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 3800 block, 4 a.m.
Aug. 15. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 3800 block,
8:52 a.m. Aug. 20. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 4800 block,
9:55 p.m. Aug. 19.
Georgia Ave., 5200 block,
7:05 a.m. Aug. 18.
CRIME CONTINUED ON 20
SunSuites Sunrooms
End of
Summer Special
Take an
Additional
ime
Lifet anty
Warr
$
2,500
ROBBERIES
Connecticut Ave., 13001600 blocks, 1 a.m. Aug. 20.
Corcoran St., 1400 block,
10:18 a.m. Aug. 19. With knife.
Georgia Ave., 5400 block,
1:03 a.m. Aug. 21. With gun.
H St., 1300 block, 10:57 p.m.
Aug. 19.
Jefferson Pl., 1800 block,
12:42 a.m. Aug. 16.
N St., 3300 block, 1:39 p.m.
Aug. 17.
North Capitol St., 12001400 blocks, 4:31 p.m. Aug. 20.
Sherman Ave., 2800 block,
2:21 p.m. Aug. 18.
T St., 1100 block, 8:08 p.m.
Aug. 16. With knife.
Fourth St., 2300-2400 blocks,
With this coupon. Not valid with
other offers or prior sales. Coupon
good upon initial presentation only.
Limited time offer.
Price includes expert installation.
• Custom Made Year Round Room
• Exclusive Fiberglass Construction
• Low Maintenance Frame
• Energy Efficient
202-897-3035
202-869-1044 DC
703-382-8840
703-468-4418 VA
301-985-2404
301-841-8308 MD
MHIC #125450 • Virginia License #2705 108835
Complete Financing Available Now
the washington post . thursday, august 31 , 2017
11:26 a.m. Aug. 21. From vehicle.
West Virginia Ave., 1800 block,
8:13 p.m. Aug. 16.
First St., 1000 block, 3:43 a.m.
Aug. 20. From vehicle.
First St., 1200 block, 11:47 a.m.
Aug. 17.
Second St., 1300 block,
12:54 a.m. Aug. 19.
Second St., 1300 block, 1:13 a.m.
Aug. 21.
Third St., 5700 block, 6:26 p.m.
Aug. 20. From vehicle.
Fourth St., 100 block, 6:28 p.m.
Aug. 21. From vehicle.
Fourth St., 1300 block, 5:53 p.m.
Aug. 18.
Fourth St., 2900-3200 blocks,
8:21 a.m. Aug. 22. From vehicle.
Fifth St., 600 block, 3:34 a.m.
Aug. 22. From vehicle.
Fifth St., 1200 block, 7:07 p.m.
Aug. 21. From vehicle.
Fifth St., 1200 block, 6:38 p.m.
Aug. 22. From vehicle.
Fifth St., 1900-2000 blocks,
4:50 a.m. Aug. 20. From vehicle.
Seventh St., 500 block, 5 a.m.
Aug. 19. From vehicle.
Seventh St., 4900 block,
11:32 a.m. Aug. 20. From vehicle.
10th St., 200 block, 12:24 p.m.
Aug. 1. From vehicle.
10th St., 2700 block, 3:11 a.m.
Aug. 22. From vehicle.
11th St., 100 block, 5:32 a.m.
Aug. 18. From vehicle.
11th St., 300 block, 8:02 a.m.
Aug. 16.
11th St., 1000 block, 5:43 a.m.
Aug. 17. From vehicle.
12th St., 3600 block, 1:42 p.m.
Aug. 21.
12th St., 3700 block, 8:57 p.m.
Aug. 19.
12th St., 3700 block, 9:10 p.m.
Aug. 19.
12th St., 3900 block, 5:55 p.m.
Aug. 16.
14th St., 4400 block, 6:06 a.m.
Aug. 19.
15th St., 2200-2300 blocks,
6:33 a.m. Aug. 17.
17th St., 900 block, 10:29 a.m.
Aug. 18. From vehicle.
20th St., 4400-4500 blocks,
11:08 a.m. Aug. 22. From vehicle.
24th St., 500 block, 10:10 a.m.
Aug. 22.
27th St., 2800 block, 4:31 a.m.
Aug. 18.
34th Pl., 300 block, 6:57 a.m.
Aug. 21. From vehicle.
40th St., 300-400 blocks,
2:36 p.m. Aug. 20.
46th St., Unit-100 blocks,
9:28 a.m. Aug. 22. From vehicle.
50th St., 200 block, 7:27 a.m.
Aug. 16. From vehicle.
57th St., 500 block, 11:11 a.m.
Aug. 18.
Clay Terr., 5300 block, 8:10 p.m.
Aug. 16.
F St., 700 block, 5:46 a.m. Aug. 22.
F St., 1500 block, 8:10 a.m.
Aug. 16.
Franklin St., 100-200 blocks,
10:28 a.m. Aug. 17.
Galloway St., 300-400 blocks,
6:27 a.m. Aug. 22.
Hayes St., 3400-3700 blocks,
12:44 p.m. Aug. 17.
Jay St., 3500-3800 blocks, 9 a.m.
Aug. 18.
Kenilworth Ave., 100 block,
6:12 a.m. Aug. 22.
Minnesota Ave., 40004100 blocks, 3:38 p.m. Aug. 19.
New York Ave., 1600-1700 blocks,
6:14 p.m. Aug. 18.
Oneida St., 300-500 blocks,
6:25 a.m. Aug. 22.
Ponds St., 4300-4400 blocks,
8:40 a.m. Aug. 17.
Third St., 1100 block, 4:09 p.m.
Aug. 22.
Seventh St., 4900 block,
11:15 a.m. Aug. 20.
12th St., 4100 block, 10:54 a.m.
Aug. 18.
44th St., 400 block, 8:22 a.m.
Aug. 22.
50th St., 100 block, 6:28 a.m.
Aug. 22.
OFF
CRIME FROM 18
DC
20
DC
Crime Report
CRIME FROM 19
the washington post . thursday, august 31 , 2017
Georgia Ave., 5200 block,
8:23 a.m. Aug. 18.
Georgia Ave., 5900 block,
5:21 p.m. Aug. 19.
Georgia Ave., 5900 block,
8:40 a.m. Aug. 20.
Georgia Ave., 6000 block,
12:31 a.m. Aug. 21. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 6200 block,
2:18 p.m. Aug. 21.
Georgia Ave., 6500 block,
3:12 a.m. Aug. 16.
Georgia Ave., 6500 block,
2:15 p.m. Aug. 22.
Georgia Ave., 6500 block,
2:32 p.m. Aug. 22.
Georgia Ave., 6500 block,
3:11 p.m. Aug. 22.
Georgia Ave., 6600 block,
6:56 a.m. Aug. 19. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 7400-7500 blocks,
3:33 p.m. Aug. 17.
Gresham Pl., 500-600 blocks,
7:16 a.m. Aug. 18. From vehicle.
Gresham Pl., 700-900 blocks,
11:44 a.m. Aug. 20. From vehicle.
H St., 600 block, 11:03 a.m.
Aug. 18.
H St., 800 block, 4:06 p.m. Aug. 16.
H St., Unit block, 9:16 a.m. Aug. 17.
H St., Unit block, 8:53 p.m. Aug. 17.
Hopkins St., 1400 block, 1:45 a.m.
Aug. 19. From vehicle.
I St., 400 block, 5:02 a.m. Aug. 21.
From vehicle.
I St., 1000 block, 2:32 p.m.
Aug. 22.
I St., 2200 block, 8:26 a.m.
Aug. 16.
I St., 2200 block, 6:35 a.m.
Aug. 19.
Illinois Ave., 5400 block,
10:16 p.m. Aug. 17.
Ingraham St., 1400 block,
7:20 a.m. Aug. 22. From vehicle.
Jefferson Pl., 1800 block,
202-897-3051 DC | 301-985-2465 MD
571-775-2455 VA
Corporate Discounts Available
8:11 p.m. Aug. 21. From vehicle.
K St., 400 block, 1:12 a.m. Aug. 19.
From vehicle.
K St., 500 block, 11:22 a.m.
Aug. 18. From vehicle.
K St., 1200 block, 2:50 a.m.
Aug. 19.
K St., 1500 block, 10:08 p.m.
Aug. 18. From vehicle.
K St., 1600 block, 6:48 a.m.
Aug. 20.
K St., 1900 block, 1:38 a.m.
Aug. 21. From vehicle.
K St., 3000 block, 3:20 p.m.
Aug. 16.
K St., 3000 block, 1:15 p.m.
Aug. 18.
K St., Unit block, 5:52 p.m. Aug. 16.
From vehicle.
K St., Unit block, 6:06 a.m. Aug. 17.
From vehicle.
K St., Unit block, 12:35 p.m.
Aug. 18. From vehicle.
K St., Unit block, 6:04 p.m. Aug. 18.
From vehicle.
K St., Unit block, 5:17 p.m. Aug. 22.
From vehicle.
Kalmia Rd., 1300 block, 8:52 a.m.
Aug. 17. From vehicle.
Kennedy St., 800 block, 11:17 a.m.
Aug. 16. From vehicle.
Kennedy St., 1300 block,
5:56 a.m. Aug. 21. From vehicle.
Kingman Pl., 1500 block,
2:07 p.m. Aug. 16. From vehicle.
L St., 1700 block, 4:21 p.m.
Aug. 19.
M St., 1300 block, 2:36 p.m.
Aug. 16. From vehicle.
M St., 1400 block, 1:29 p.m.
Aug. 17. From vehicle.
M St., 2200 block, 6:51 p.m.
Aug. 20.
M St., 3000 block, 8:25 a.m.
Aug. 19.
M St., 3100 block, 11:12 a.m.
Aug. 22.
M St., 3100 block, 1:15 p.m.
Aug. 22.
M St., 3200 block, 2:24 p.m.
Aug. 16.
M St., 3200 block, 7:30 a.m.
Aug. 17.
M St., 3200 block, 3:26 p.m.
Aug. 17.
M St., 3200 block, 8:51 a.m.
Aug. 22.
Massachusetts Ave., 400 block,
10:47 a.m. Aug. 18.
Massachusetts Ave., 400 block,
4:47 p.m. Aug. 18.
Massachusetts Ave., 900 block,
8:47 a.m. Aug. 18.
Massachusetts Ave., 900 block,
12:25 p.m. Aug. 18.
Massachusetts Ave., 1000 block,
7:54 a.m. Aug. 22. From vehicle.
Massachusetts Ave., 1700 block,
4:34 p.m. Aug. 22. From vehicle.
Massachusetts Ave., 4800 block,
5:27 p.m. Aug. 17.
Monroe St., 1300 block, 2:52 p.m.
Aug. 22.
Morrison St., 3700 block,
12:24 p.m. Aug. 18.
Mount Pleasant St., 3000 block,
3:12 p.m. Aug. 21. From vehicle.
N St., 900 block, 1 a.m. Aug. 20.
From vehicle.
N St., 1000 block, 6:01 p.m.
Aug. 20. From vehicle.
N St., 2000 block, 3:09 p.m.
Aug. 21.
Nebraska Ave., 51005200 blocks, 6:24 a.m. Aug. 19.
From vehicle.
Nebraska Ave., 51005200 blocks, 7:27 a.m. Aug. 19.
From vehicle.
New Hampshire Ave., 1100 block,
1:11 a.m. Aug. 21.
New Hampshire Ave., 1200 block,
1:19 p.m. Aug. 22.
New York Ave., 900 block,
11:53 a.m. Aug. 22. From vehicle.
Newark St., 3700 block,
12:50 p.m. Aug. 17. From vehicle.
Newton St., 1800 block, 9:35 p.m.
Aug. 18. From vehicle.
Newton St., 1800 block, 11:17 p.m.
Aug. 18. From vehicle.
Nicholson St., 1300 block,
8:20 a.m. Aug. 16. From vehicle.
Nicholson St., Unit block,
10:02 p.m. Aug. 21. From vehicle.
North Capitol St., 1000 block,
11:37 p.m. Aug. 19. From vehicle.
North Capitol St., 1000 block,
4:37 p.m. Aug. 22. From vehicle.
North Capitol St., 1700 block,
6:02 a.m. Aug. 22.
North Capitol St., 18002100 blocks, 5:42 a.m. Aug. 16.
North Capitol St., 18002100 blocks, 5:55 a.m. Aug. 17.
North Capitol St., 2500 block,
1:45 p.m. Aug. 21.
North Capitol St., 47004900 blocks, 5:51 p.m. Aug. 16.
O St., 100-200 blocks, 5:34 p.m.
Aug. 19. From vehicle.
O St., 1500 block, 6:38 p.m.
Aug. 17. From vehicle.
O St., 3600 block, 8:48 a.m.
Aug. 17.
O St., Unit block, 1:56 p.m. Aug. 16.
O St., Unit block, 8:55 a.m. Aug. 21.
Oak St., 1300 block, 2:58 p.m.
Aug. 17.
Ordway St., 3000-3300 blocks,
6:34 a.m. Aug. 16. From vehicle.
Otis Pl., 700 block, 7:19 a.m.
Aug. 20. From vehicle.
P St., 1600 block, 4:59 p.m.
Aug. 21.
P St., 2200 block, 7:11 p.m.
Aug. 16. From vehicle.
Park Pl., 3500 block, 3:12 p.m.
Aug. 21. From vehicle.
Pennsylvania Ave., 1400 block,
3:29 p.m. Aug. 18.
Pennsylvania Ave., 1900 block,
6:59 p.m. Aug. 18.
Piney Branch Rd., 6500 block,
7:36 a.m. Aug. 21. From vehicle.
Potomac St., 1000 block,
2:30 p.m. Aug. 20.
Prospect St., 3600 block,
4:10 p.m. Aug. 16. From vehicle.
Q St., 100-200 blocks, 9:30 a.m.
Aug. 20. From vehicle.
Quackenbos St., 500-600 blocks,
11:26 a.m. Aug. 19.
R St., 1200 block, 3:05 p.m.
Aug. 16.
R St., 1700 block, 11:46 p.m.
Aug. 18. From vehicle.
R St., Unit block, 1:36 p.m. Aug. 18.
Rhode Island Ave., 1300 block,
9:04 a.m. Aug. 6.
Rhode Island Ave., 1400 block,
4:11 a.m. Aug. 22. From vehicle.
Ridge St., 400 block, 1:31 p.m.
Aug. 22. From vehicle.
Sherman Ave., 3000 block,
8:16 p.m. Aug. 18.
Spring Pl., 7000 block, 2:25 p.m.
Aug. 16.
Sunderland Pl., 1900 block,
6:37 p.m. Aug. 18. From vehicle.
Swann St., 1800 block, 12:10 p.m.
Aug. 18.
T St., 100 block, 3:29 p.m. Aug. 17.
T St., 900 block, 1:27 p.m. Aug. 19.
T St., 1600 block, 9:01 a.m.
Aug. 16.
T St., 1700 block, 9:09 p.m.
Aug. 18. From vehicle.
T St., 1800 block, 5 p.m. Aug. 17.
Taylor St., 1400 block, 10:56 a.m.
Aug. 21. From vehicle.
U St., 1100 block, 7:47 a.m.
Aug. 22.
U St., 1300 block, 7:11 a.m.
Aug. 18.
U St., 1300 block, 3:21 p.m.
Aug. 19.
U St., 1300 block, 12:10 p.m.
Aug. 20.
U St., 1400 block, 10:15 a.m.
Aug. 21.
Underwood Pl., Unit block,
7:05 p.m. Aug. 19. From vehicle.
Upshur St., 1700 block, 6:06 a.m.
Aug. 21. From vehicle.
V St., 800 block, 1:11 a.m. Aug. 20.
Vermont Ave., 1000 block,
2:37 p.m. Aug. 17.
Vermont Ave., 1300 block,
7:47 p.m. Aug. 17.
W St., 4100 block, 5:42 a.m.
Aug. 16.
Wallach Pl., 1300 block,
12:54 p.m. Aug. 17. From vehicle.
Wisconsin Ave., 1000 block,
2:40 p.m. Aug. 17. From vehicle.
Wisconsin Ave., 1200 block,
5:11 p.m. Aug. 17.
Wisconsin Ave., 1200 block,
1:20 p.m. Aug. 21.
Wisconsin Ave., 4500 block,
11:30 a.m. Aug. 22.
Wisconsin Ave., 4500 block,
4:18 p.m. Aug. 22.
Wisconsin Ave., 5300 block,
12:09 p.m. Aug. 17.
Wisconsin Ave., 5300 block,
4:49 p.m. Aug. 17.
Wisconsin Ave., 5300 block,
5:21 p.m. Aug. 17.
Wisconsin Ave., 5300 block,
5:47 p.m. Aug. 18.
Wisconsin Ave., 5300 block,
1:24 p.m. Aug. 20.
Woodley Rd., 3400 block,
9:12 a.m. Aug. 19. From vehicle.
Second Pl., 6400 block, 9:52 a.m.
Aug. 20. From vehicle.
Second St., 2100-2200 blocks,
7:33 p.m. Aug. 16. From vehicle.
Fourth St., 900 block, 3:17 p.m.
Aug. 20. From vehicle.
Fifth St., 900 block, 6:31 a.m.
CRIME CONTINUED ON 21
21
Crime Report
CRIME FROM 20
Aug. 20.
16th St., 6100 block, 7:39 p.m.
Aug. 20.
17th St., 1100 block, 3:10 a.m.
Aug. 21. From vehicle.
17th St., 1100 block, 12:44 p.m.
Aug. 22.
17th St., 1500 block, 9:34 a.m.
Aug. 21. From vehicle.
17th St., 1800 block, 12:19 p.m.
Aug. 15.
17th St., 2500 block, 3:30 p.m.
Aug. 19.
18th St., 2300 block, 12:34 a.m.
Aug. 17.
18th St., 2300 block, 10:37 p.m.
Aug. 18.
19th St., 1200 block, 1:50 p.m.
Aug. 18.
19th St., 1800 block, noon Aug. 16.
From vehicle.
21st St., 1400 block, 6:22 p.m.
Aug. 18. From vehicle.
23rd St., 700 block, 4:55 p.m.
Aug. 22.
24th St., 1900 block, 5:04 p.m.
Aug. 20. From vehicle.
31st St., 1400 block, 9:20 a.m.
Aug. 17. From vehicle.
31st St., 1400 block, 9:23 a.m.
Aug. 17. From vehicle.
32nd Pl., 6100 block, 7:12 a.m.
Aug. 22. From vehicle.
35th St., 1300 block, 2:44 p.m.
Aug. 16. From vehicle.
35th St., 1800 block, 9:23 a.m.
Aug. 17. From vehicle.
36th St., 1400 block, 3:20 a.m.
Aug. 16.
38th St., 3600 block, 8:23 a.m.
Aug. 15.
Aug. 17.
29th St., 1000-1100 blocks,
6:47 a.m. Aug. 22.
39th St., 3800 block, 12:59 a.m.
Aug. 17.
SOUTHEAST
HOMICIDE
Xenia St., 800 block, 8 p.m.
Aug. 19. With knife.
ASSAULTS
B St., 3500 block, 8:33 a.m.
Aug. 19. With knife.
Brandywine St., 400-500 blocks,
3:12 a.m. Aug. 19. With gun.
Bruce Pl., 2700 block, 10:02 p.m.
Aug. 16. With knife.
D St., 1900 block, 6:59 p.m.
Aug. 18.
Good Hope Rd., 18001900 blocks, 9:58 p.m. Aug. 20.
With knife.
Minnesota Ave., 3600 block,
8:58 a.m. Aug. 17. With gun.
Q St., 1800 block, 12:48 a.m.
Aug. 17. With gun.
Savannah St., 2200 block,
9:40 p.m. Aug. 16. With gun.
27th St., 1700-1800 blocks,
3:11 p.m. Aug. 19. With knife.
41st St., 1400 block, 6 p.m.
Aug. 19. With gun.
ROBBERIES
Alabama Ave., 1400-1500 blocks,
6:17 a.m. Aug. 21. With gun.
Alabama Ave., 3600 block,
5:31 p.m. Aug. 22.
Barnaby St., 800 block, 11:53 a.m.
Aug. 10. With gun.
Blakney Lane, 900 block,
1:02 p.m. Aug. 21. With gun.
East Capitol St., 1500 block,
4:08 p.m. Aug. 22.
Elvans Rd., 2400-2500 blocks,
1:06 p.m. Aug. 19.
G St., 4400 block, 7:40 p.m.
Aug. 19.
Good Hope Rd., 1400 block,
6:52 p.m. Aug. 17.
Good Hope Rd., 2300 block,
3:44 a.m. Aug. 19.
Parkland Pl., 300-500 blocks,
8:32 p.m. Aug. 19. With gun.
Pennsylvania Ave., 2500 block,
3:51 p.m. Aug. 19.
R St., 1700 block, 8:37 p.m.
Aug. 15.
Southern Ave., 2500-2900 blocks,
11:19 p.m. Aug. 21. With gun.
Stanton Rd., 3000 block,
9:10 p.m. Aug. 15.
15th Pl., 3200 block, 5:46 p.m.
Aug. 16. With gun.
BREAK-INS
Chicago St., 1100 block, 2:57 p.m.
Aug. 16.
Dubois Pl., 4300 block, 3:54 p.m.
Aug. 22.
G St., 1400 block, 6:01 p.m.
Aug. 22.
Good Hope Rd., 2300 block,
10:22 p.m. Aug. 15.
S St., 1700 block, 6:54 a.m.
Aug. 17.
Southern Ave., 4400 block,
1:49 a.m. Aug. 21.
Sumner Rd., 1100-1200 blocks,
8:17 a.m. Aug. 20.
Fifth St., 3200 block, 1:43 p.m.
Aug. 21.
13th Pl., 3400 block, 8:54 p.m.
Aug. 20.
31st St., 2800 block, 10:35 p.m.
Aug. 18.
THEFTS
A St., 400 block, 11:36 a.m.
Aug. 18. From vehicle.
A St., 700 block, 2:41 p.m. Aug. 20.
Alabama Ave., 1500-1600 blocks,
11:53 a.m. Aug. 18.
Alabama Ave., 1500-1600 blocks,
5:19 p.m. Aug. 20.
Alabama Ave., 2500 block,
5:32 a.m. Aug. 17. From vehicle.
Alabama Ave., 2800-2900 blocks,
10:22 a.m. Aug. 20.
Barnaby St., 800 block, 4:49 p.m.
Aug. 22. From vehicle.
Bay St., 1800 block, 7:29 p.m.
Aug. 18.
Benning Rd., 5000 block,
11:34 a.m. Aug. 20.
Brothers Pl., 3400 block,
8:43 a.m. Aug. 17. From vehicle.
C St., 1400 block, 9:38 a.m.
Aug. 16. From vehicle.
Chesapeake St., 400-500 blocks,
7:28 a.m. Aug. 17.
Congress St., 1300 block,
8:03 p.m. Aug. 18.
D St., 3300 block, 4:27 a.m.
Aug. 18.
E St., 1300 block, 4:45 p.m.
Aug. 17.
East Capitol St., 23003900 blocks, 3:38 p.m. Aug. 22.
East Capitol St., 5200 block,
6:28 a.m. Aug. 16. From vehicle.
East Capitol St., 58006000 blocks, 9:37 p.m. Aug. 18.
CRIME CONTINUED ON 22
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFTS
Broad Branch Rd., 5300 block,
8:48 a.m. Aug. 19.
Everett St., 3600 block, 8:24 a.m.
Aug. 19.
Fairmont St., 700 block, 9:59 p.m.
Aug. 21.
Georgia Ave., 3800 block,
8:31 p.m. Aug. 16.
Harvard St., 500-600 blocks,
7:27 p.m. Aug. 19.
Indiana Ave., 500 block,
11:32 a.m. Aug. 21.
Irving St., 100 block, 5:38 p.m.
Aug. 18.
L St., 400 block, 8:55 p.m. Aug. 21.
Linnean Terr., 5100 block,
6:27 a.m. Aug. 19.
M St., 900 block, 7:04 a.m. Aug. 17.
Madison St., 700 block, 2:04 p.m.
Aug. 22.
Madison St., 800 block, 1:06 p.m.
Aug. 20.
Quincy St., 500-600 blocks,
8:32 a.m. Aug. 22.
Randolph St., 1300 block,
9:14 p.m. Aug. 19.
Seventh St., 700 block, 10:59 a.m.
Aug. 20.
Seventh St., 1800 block, 9:20 a.m.
Aug. 16.
13th St., 5400 block, 5:58 a.m.
July 23.
15th St., 700 block, 7:44 p.m.
Aug. 22.
19th St., 1600 block, 6:13 p.m.
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WINDOWS & DOORS
the washington post . thursday, august 31 , 2017
Aug. 22.
Fifth St., 1500 block, 5:18 a.m.
Aug. 21.
Fifth St., 1800 block, 6:40 a.m.
Aug. 17. From vehicle.
Sixth St., 1000 block, 9:06 a.m.
Aug. 19. From vehicle.
Sixth St., 1800 block, 7:04 p.m.
Aug. 21. From vehicle.
Sixth St., 5700 block, 4:16 p.m.
Aug. 16. From vehicle.
Sixth St., 6600 block, 3:13 p.m.
Aug. 16.
Seventh St., 400 block, 7:06 p.m.
Aug. 17.
Seventh St., 400 block, 5:21 p.m.
Aug. 20.
Eighth St., 1900 block, 12:50 p.m.
Aug. 20.
Eighth St., 2000 block, 9:09 p.m.
Aug. 17. From vehicle.
Eighth St., 5300 block, 7:05 a.m.
Aug. 21. From vehicle.
Ninth St., 500 block, 3:02 a.m.
Aug. 17.
Ninth St., 1300 block, 3:25 p.m.
Aug. 20.
Ninth St., 1700 block, 3:03 p.m.
Aug. 21. From vehicle.
Ninth St., 1800 block, 4:59 p.m.
Aug. 17.
10th St., 900 block, 11:52 p.m.
Aug. 16.
11th St., 500 block, 9:23 p.m.
Aug. 19.
11th St., 1000 block, 6:44 p.m.
Aug. 16.
11th St., 3600 block, 9:55 a.m.
Aug. 19. From vehicle.
13th St., 1200 block, 11:28 p.m.
Aug. 17. From vehicle.
13th St., 2000 block, 2:23 p.m.
Aug. 17. From vehicle.
13th St., 4200-4400 blocks,
4:13 p.m. Aug. 19. From vehicle.
13th St., 5700 block, 3:40 p.m.
Aug. 21. From vehicle.
14th St., 500 block, 11:55 p.m.
Aug. 18.
14th St., 500 block, 6:18 p.m.
Aug. 19.
14th St., 1300 block, 8:13 a.m.
Aug. 21.
14th St., 2100 block, 7:36 a.m.
Aug. 22.
14th St., 2300-2400 blocks,
8:37 p.m. Aug. 19.
14th St., 3100-3200 blocks,
4:32 p.m. Aug. 16.
14th St., 3100-3200 blocks,
11:12 a.m. Aug. 17.
14th St., 3100-3200 blocks,
12:03 p.m. Aug. 17.
14th St., 3100-3200 blocks,
12:44 p.m. Aug. 17.
14th St., 3100-3200 blocks,
6:51 p.m. Aug. 18.
14th St., 3500 block, 3:48 p.m.
Aug. 21. From vehicle.
14th St., 4000 block, 5:30 p.m.
Aug. 22. From vehicle.
15th St., 1600 block, 7:57 p.m.
Aug. 22. From vehicle.
16th St., 1700 block, 10:43 a.m.
Aug. 18.
16th St., 5000 block, 9:28 a.m.
DC
22
DC
Crime Report
the washington post . thursday, august 31 , 2017
CRIME FROM 21
From vehicle.
Elvans Rd., 2400-2500 blocks,
4:02 p.m. Aug. 17.
Elvans Rd., 2400-2500 blocks,
5:58 a.m. Aug. 21.
Erie St., 2900 block, 2:34 p.m.
Aug. 16.
Falls Terr., 4400 block, 12:39 p.m.
Aug. 16.
G St., 4400 block, 7:54 p.m.
Aug. 22.
G St., 4900-5099 blocks, 4:35 a.m.
Aug. 18. From vehicle.
Good Hope Rd., 2300 block,
7:18 a.m. Aug. 22.
Good Hope Rd., 2300 block,
2:15 p.m. Aug. 22.
Good Hope Rd., 25002700 blocks, 7:45 p.m. Aug. 18.
Highwood Dr., 3200 block,
8:58 p.m. Aug. 20. From vehicle.
Independence Ave., 1300 block,
9:19 a.m. Aug. 19. From vehicle.
Independence Ave., 1500 block,
2:49 a.m. Aug. 18.
Independence Ave., 19002000 blocks, 3:40 p.m. Aug. 17.
From vehicle.
Independence Ave., 21002600 blocks, 6:43 a.m. Aug. 22.
K St., 3000 block, 10:28 a.m.
Aug. 22. From vehicle.
L St., 100 block, 5:12 p.m. Aug. 19.
L St., Unit block, 3:44 p.m. Aug. 19.
From vehicle.
M St., 400 block, 4:25 p.m.
Aug. 21.
M St., Unit block, 10:04 a.m.
Aug. 16. From vehicle.
M St., Unit block, 3:49 a.m. Aug. 17.
M St., Unit block, 6:55 a.m. Aug. 21.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.,
2000-2100 blocks, 9:49 a.m.
Aug. 16.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.,
2400 block, 3:57 a.m. Aug. 21.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.,
2600 block, 9:11 p.m. Aug. 17.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.,
2700-2800 blocks, 6:36 p.m.
Aug. 20.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.,
2900 block, 5:42 p.m. Aug. 16.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.,
2900 block, 6:04 p.m. Aug. 16.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.,
2900 block, 1:28 p.m. Aug. 22.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.,
3400 block, 1:14 p.m. Aug. 18. From
vehicle.
Milwaukee Pl., 600 block,
8:32 a.m. Aug. 22.
Pennsylvania Ave., 600 block,
10:43 a.m. Aug. 18.
Pennsylvania Ave., 600 block,
3:33 a.m. Aug. 22.
Pennsylvania Ave., 22002300 blocks, 11:41 p.m. Aug. 15.
Pennsylvania Ave., 22002300 blocks, 1:41 p.m. Aug. 22.
Pennsylvania Ave., 3200 block,
1:37 a.m. Aug. 19.
Pennsylvania Ave., 3200 block,
3:34 p.m. Aug. 20.
Pitts Pl., 2300 block, 11:53 p.m.
Aug. 18. From vehicle.
Home Sales
Potomac Ave., 1600 block,
4:31 p.m. Aug. 18.
S St., 2900 block, 7:21 p.m.
Aug. 16.
Savannah Pl., 1800-2000 blocks,
8:41 a.m. Aug. 20. From vehicle.
Sayles Pl., 2500 block, 3:20 p.m.
Aug. 21.
Seward Sq., 400 block, 7:15 a.m.
Aug. 16.
Southern Ave., 1200 block,
1:03 a.m. Aug. 17.
Southern Ave., 1300-1800 blocks,
7:19 p.m. Aug. 19.
Southern Ave., 3900 block,
12:20 p.m. Aug. 18. From vehicle.
Stanton Rd., 3000 block,
1:40 p.m. Aug. 22. From vehicle.
Stanton Rd., 3300 block,
5:12 a.m. Aug. 16. From vehicle.
Stanton Rd., 3400 block,
5:25 p.m. Aug. 18.
Texas Ave., 4300 block, 9:20 a.m.
Aug. 17.
Tingey St., 300 block, 6:07 p.m.
Aug. 17.
W St., 1300 block, 5:47 a.m.
Aug. 16.
W St., 1300 block, 3:46 p.m.
Aug. 22.
Wilmington Pl., 100 block,
7:37 a.m. Aug. 20.
First St., 1100 block, 1:23 p.m.
Aug. 16.
First St., 4500 block, 5:38 a.m.
Aug. 17.
Second St., 500 block, 10:12 a.m.
Aug. 20. From vehicle.
Fifth St., 500 block, 5:38 a.m.
Aug. 19. From vehicle.
Eighth St., 400 block, 6:57 a.m.
Aug. 16.
Eighth St., 400 block, 5:34 p.m.
Aug. 22.
Eighth St., 700 block, 7:43 p.m.
Aug. 16.
10th Pl., 3200 block, 3:16 a.m.
Aug. 16.
10th St., Unit block, 7:55 p.m.
Aug. 19.
12th St., 500 block, 8:31 a.m.
Aug. 22.
12th St., 700 block, 6:24 a.m.
Aug. 18. From vehicle.
14th St., 400 block, 2:58 p.m.
Aug. 16.
16th St., 1500 block, 12:26 p.m.
Aug. 21.
25th St., 2400-2500 blocks,
12:36 p.m. Aug. 20.
30th St., 2600 block, 5:24 a.m.
Aug. 22. From vehicle.
46th St., 1200 block, 4:16 a.m.
Aug. 16. From vehicle.
50th St., 400-500 blocks,
6:33 a.m. Aug. 21. From vehicle.
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFTS
A St., 3400 block, 7:35 p.m.
Aug. 19.
Alabama Ave., 1200-1400 blocks,
10:07 a.m. Aug. 16.
Alabama Ave., 1800-1900 blocks,
9:01 p.m. Aug. 19.
Bellevue St., 1100 block, 1:59 p.m.
Aug. 16.
C St., 1300 block, 8:29 a.m.
Aug. 22.
Call Pl., 4900 block, 4:26 p.m.
Aug. 21.
Call Pl., 5400-5500 blocks,
7:07 a.m. Aug. 22.
D St., 500 block, 8:17 a.m. Aug. 16.
E St., 1300 block, 3:42 p.m.
Aug. 17.
East Capitol St., 23003900 blocks, 9:51 p.m. Aug. 19.
Ely Pl., 3500-3600 blocks,
1:12 a.m. Aug. 19.
Good Hope Rd., 1600 block,
7:14 a.m. Aug. 20.
Good Hope Rd., 18001900 blocks, 7:05 a.m. Aug. 18.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.,
3000 block, 10:26 p.m. Aug. 19.
Newcomb St., 500 block,
12:36 p.m. Aug. 18.
Stanton Rd., 3300 block,
7:38 a.m. Aug. 19.
Sumner Rd., 1100-1200 blocks,
6:31 a.m. Aug. 15.
Third St., Unit block, 3:55 a.m.
Aug. 17.
51st St., 200 block, 9:17 p.m.
Aug. 19.
SOUTHWEST
ASSAULTS
Delaware Ave., 1200-1300 blocks,
8:20 p.m. Aug. 18.
L'Enfant Plaza, 400-900 blocks,
3:31 p.m. Aug. 20. With gun.
ROBBERIES
Atlantic St., Unit block, 11:47 a.m.
Aug. 17.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.,
3900 block, 12:05 p.m. Aug. 20.
BREAK-IN
N St., 400-500 blocks, 11:26 a.m.
Aug. 16.
THEFTS
Capitol Square Pl., 700800 blocks, 5:57 a.m. Aug. 22.
H St., 600 block, 8:53 p.m. Aug. 18.
Half St., 1300 block, 7:46 p.m.
Aug. 16.
Ivanhoe St., 100 block, 2:04 p.m.
Aug. 20. From vehicle.
K St., 500 block, 6:58 a.m. Aug. 18.
From vehicle.
Maine Ave., 700-800 blocks,
11:13 a.m. Aug. 6. From vehicle.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.,
3900 block, 12:19 a.m. Aug. 18.
Maryland Ave., 400-500 blocks,
7 a.m. Aug. 19. From vehicle.
South Capitol St., 10001200 blocks, 10:21 p.m. Aug. 21.
South Capitol St., 10001200 blocks, 8:25 p.m. Aug. 22.
South Capitol St., 46004700 blocks, 8:28 a.m. Aug. 21.
Fourth St., 900-1100 blocks,
6:20 p.m. Aug. 16.
Fourth St., 900-1100 blocks,
3:43 p.m. Aug. 17.
Fourth St., 900-1100 blocks,
8:09 p.m. Aug. 17.
Fourth St., 900-1100 blocks,
7:22 a.m. Aug. 20.
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFTS
Half St., 1200 block, 6:25 p.m.
Aug. 22.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.,
4200 block, 1:11 p.m. Aug. 20.
HOMES FROM 10
Martin Resnick and Suzanne
Rachael Gould to Eli Weiss and
Lillian Pena Pereira Weiss,
$1.15 million.
Mount Pleasant St., 3314, No.
34-Blanche F. Drummond and
Dwayne Cammock to Cooper M.
Sousa, $444,000.
N St., 1420, No. 915-Audrey Yen
and Jason Engel to Nicholas Lee,
$280,000.
New Mexico Ave., 3101, No. 1001Heloisa Dunshee De Abranches
Sabin to Joseph P. and Michelle O.
Rindone, $625,000.
Nicholson St., 608-Citi Wide
Properties Corp. to Stuart Harding
and Melanie Garcia, $862,000.
O St., 2701-Jeh Charles Johnson
and Susan Dimarco to Mark A.
Borer, $2.1 million.
P St., 1718, No. 420-Stephen P.
Repp to Shelley Marie Cheatham
and Carlos Hinojosa Garcia,
$277,000.
P St., 2724-Brian A. and Margaret
M. Welsh to Mohammed Sohrab
Rafiq, $935,000.
R St., 1800, No. 802-Binali Mehta
to Justin M. Geiger, $552,500.
Randolph Pl., 161, No. 2-Peter M.
Balas to Matthew Steven Daco
Svilar, $565,000.
Rhode Island Ave., 1318-G.
William and Nusrat R. Currier to
Peter and Greta Lichtenbaum,
$2.6 million.
Rodman St., 3871, No. F60Alexandra E. McCarty to Brooke
Danielle Rizzo and Adam Michael
Hoyt, $343,575.
S St., 1829, No. 4-James R. Ray to
Aaron R. Hutman, $525,000.
Scott Cir., 1, No. 317-Vanda A. and
Nicholas D. Petruccelli to China
Dickerson, $260,000.
Sherman Ave., 2801-Consys Inc.
to Conor Klansek and Miles
Michael Gaughan, $945,000.
Swann St., 1423-Estate of Mark
Swann to Jacob Cullen and Jamie
Elizabeth Streit, $1.1 million.
Taylor St., 703-Timothy A. Pilotte
and Marjorie K. Clark to Stephen
Miles, $841,000.
Tunlaw Rd., 3901, No. 703-Gina
Williams to Edward L. Williams and
Travis W. Wussow, $333,000.
V St., 1390, No. 417-Daniel
Salsbury to Nikhil K. Advani,
$535,000.
Volta Pl., 3312-Brendan and
Ashley Burke to Rohan and Bela
Thakkar, $920,000.
W St., 3920-John Channing
Wickham to Keith A. Brengle and
Kevin R. Keller, $1.35 million.
Westhall Dr., 4542-Jean and
Carol Dellamore to David C. and
Rebecca A. Svec, $1.66 million.
Wisconsin Ave., 2320, No. 301Tracy L. Morris to Keegan
Dufresne, $397,500.
First St., 2326-Barry Johnson to
Andrew Salek-Raham and Melissa
Boudreau, $1.05 million.
Third St., 4319-Allison and William
J. Trunk to Lauren Alexis Kalina
and Brendan John Cavanagh,
$765,000.
Fourth St., 5519-Carlton and
Denise Fairley to Matthew T. and
Bethany W. Recctor, $695,000.
Sixth St., 3221-Travis M. Greenlee
to Guillermo and Lynda Peralta,
$529,000.
Eighth St., 3910-Blue Building
Petworth Corp. to Samantha
Crane, $819,900.
Ninth St., 1830-John G. Jessen to
Jason Barlow, $1.3 million.
11th St., 1425, No. 103-Megan
Brinsfield to Leslie A. and Allison C.
Koch, $385,000.
13th St., 1320, No. 43-Dmitry
Erastov and Vera Mironova to
Marian Andrade Gamboa and
Christopher Paul Kyriacou,
$570,000.
13th St., 3614, No. 1-Kipu Corp. to
Anthony De Lannoy and Jordan
Elijah Barth, $849,000.
14th St., 1133, No. 703-Dale
Shane Robbins to Anjelica Ashley
Tan, $387,000.
16th St., 1527, No. 1-Dianna
Tarallo to Paul Pearlman,
$405,000.
17th St., 1401, No. 910-Alan R.
Aronson to Monica K. and Krishna
Dutia, $426,000.
17th St., 4706-Jorge R. Toro to
Henry Thaggert III, $1.5 million.
18th St., 1918, No. 41-Boon S. and
Elizabeth H. Ooi to Theodore and
Steven C. Kahn, $580,000.
22nd St., 1177, No. 8J-Ajnerg Corp.
to Vittorio Gallo, $1.7 million.
30th St., 1077, No. 314-Jeremy F.
Rohen and Lisa M. Debow to Karen
Yianopoulos, $470,000.
34th St., 1671-Frank Babb
Randolph to Jacob and Mirna
Mumm, $3.3 million.
39th St., 2725, No. 108Christopher B. and Sarah Hudgins
to Danielle Douglas, $283,500.
42nd St., 5121-Jeffrey L. Frank and
Arushi Sharma to Dimple Shah and
Roman Jankowski, $1.15 million.
SOUTHEAST
Barnaby Terr., 1383-Jack Spicer
Properties Corp. to Doretha M.
Campbell, $279,000.
Brandywine St., 643-Marquitta T.
Love to Lauren Sims and Kal-El
Waters-Jones, $295,000.
C St., 1228-James M. Gehring and
Matthew T. Brown to Jarrod H.
Stuard and Megan H. Chan,
$1.03 million.
Chaplin St., 4340-Tshombe and
Tonya Pittman to Santos E. Paz
Villatoro, $285,000.
D St., 1733-James Alexander and
Erin McClure Boyd to Charlton
Templeton and Jakub Kakletek,
$925,000.
E St., 105-Donald M. and
Kimberley L. Berlin to Jeff J. and
Amber Burton, $122,000.
Frederick Douglass Pl., 1829-SJL
Corp. to Tanika Washington,
HOMES CONTINUED ON 23
Community Calendar
EVENTS FROM 16
Washington Monument
Grounds” A park ranger traces the
Potomac River’s original shoreline
with stories from more than two
centuries of change. 10 a.m.-noon.
Begins at the Paddle Boat Parking
Lot (near the refreshment stand) on
Maine Avenue. SW. 202-359.2662.
nps.gov/planyourvisit. Free.
Capital Harvest on the Plaza A
farmers market features fresh
fruits, vegetables and artisanal
novelties. Recipes and tips for
maintaining a healthy and socially
responsible life are available at the
information booth. 11 a.m.-3 p.m.
most Fridays through Nov. 10.
Woodrow Wilson Plaza, 13th Street
and Pennsylvania Avenue NW. 703237-9777. capitalharvestdc.com.
Union Market Drive-In movies
“Days of Thunder” (1990), featuring
Tom Cruise as a hot-shot stock car
driver, is the finale of the summer
movie series. Lot opens at 6 p.m.
and closes promptly at 7:20 p.m.
Film begins at 8 p.m. Union Market,
1309 Fifth St. NE. 877-775-3462.
unionmarketdc.com/events/unionmarket-drive-in. Free for walk-ups;
$10 parking fee for cars.
Labor Day Weekend Music
Festival The DC Commission on the
Arts and Humanities presents three
consecutive nights of local music
with three different performers each
night. Friday, Saturday and Sunday,
7 p.m. Historic Lincoln Theatre,
1215 U St. NW. dcarts.dc.gov. Free.
S ATURDAY, SEP T. 2
Adult Zumba The Washington
Ballet leads a dance workout class
featuring radio pop and Latin
rhythms. Saturdays at 8:30 a.m.
THEARC, 1901 Mississippi Ave. SE.
202-889-5901. thearcdc.org. $12;
residents of 20020 or 20032, $6.
Celebration of Textiles A day-long
community festival explores textiles
with demonstrations of weaving,
embroidery, spinning, quilting and
lacemaking. Other activities include
live music and dance, storytellers
and hands-on workshops. SaturdaySunday, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. The Textile
Museum, George Washington
University Museum, 701 21st St.
NW. 202-994-5200.
museum.gwu.edu/celebrate-
National Park Service ranger
talk: “The National Guard in
World War II” Learn about the
contributions and sacrifices of the
Guardsmen who, at the beginning of
World War II, made up two-thirds of
the U.S. Army. 11-11:30 a.m. and 11:30 p.m. Meet at World War II
Memorial contact station, 1964
Independence Ave. SW. 202-3591533. nps.gov/planyourvisit. Free.
“Professore Giuseppe, Master
Concatenator!” An aural tour of
the National Building Museum for
all ages, with percussionist and
museum creative-in-residence
Steve Bloom. Compare the sounds
and vibrations of the different
spaces through synchronized group
drumming and vocals while moving
through the museum’s historic
architecture with Professore
Giuseppe (Bloom). 11 a.m.,
11:40 a.m., 1 p.m. and 1:40 p.m.
National Building Museum, 401 F
St. NW. 202-272-2448. nbm.org.
Free.
Yoga at the library Classes for
beginner adults and teens taught by
Yoga Activist. No experience
necessary; take a mat or borrow
one from the library. Saturdays
11 a.m. Through Sept. 30. Petworth
Library, 4200 Kansas Ave. NW. 202243-1188. petworthlibrary@dc.gov.
Free.
“Pieges (Personal Column)”
Maurice Chevalier, Marie Dea and
Erich Von Stroheim star in director
Robert Siodmak’s 1939 French
proto-film noir. A taxi dancer goes
undercover to investigate the
disappearances of several women
who answered a personal ad. In
French with subtitles. 1:30 p.m.
National Gallery of Art East Building,
150 Fourth St. NW. 202-842-6905.
nga.gov. Free.
NPS ranger walk: “Presidents
and American Indians” A 1.5-mile
walk looks at the historical
interactions of U.S. presidents and
Native Americans. 3:30-4:30 p.m.
Begins at Washington Monument
(base). 202-438-9603. nps.gov/
planyourvisit. Free.
SUNDAY, SEP T. 3
Freshfarm Capitol Riverfront
farmers market Locally sourced
fruits and vegetables, meat,
cheese, bread, beer and coffee,
every Sunday in the fall. 10 a.m.2 p.m. Canal Park, southern block,
200 M St. SE. 202-362-8889.
capitolriverfront.org.
Palisades farmers market Local
produce year-round, with music by
Sherier Mountain. 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
48th Place and MacArthur Blvd.
NW. palisadesfarmersmarket.com.
National Museum of Women in
the Arts community day. The
museum offers free admission to
the special exhibitions “Revival”
and “Fanny Sanin” and the
museum’s collection. First Sundays,
noon-5 p.m. National Museum of
Women in the Arts, 1250 New York
Ave. NW. 202-783-5000. nmwa.org.
Free.
MONDAY, SEP T. 4
Carifesta A day-long festival of
Caribbean music, arts and culture
highlights 28 nations with live
reggae and soca music, food courts
and a beer garden. Noon-8 p.m.
Woodrow Wilson Plaza, 1300
Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202-3121300. eventnation.co/event/
carifestanation2017. Free.
Blue Monday at Westminster
D.C. As part of the weekly blues
series, guitarist Dave Chappell and
his band perform with guest singerkeyboardist Johnny Neel. 6-9 p.m.
Dinner from 5:30-8 p.m.
Westminster Church, 400 I St. SW.
202-484-7700. westminsterdc.org.
$5.
National Symphony Orchestra A
concert of patriotic songs and
American Songbook standards. (In
case of inclement weather, the
concert will be in the Kennedy
Center’s Eisenhower Theater.)
Gates open at 3 p.m., open
rehearsal 3:30 p.m., concert 8 p.m.
U.S. Capitol West Lawn (access at
Third Street and Pennsylvania
Avenue NW or Third Street and
Maryland Avenue SW) 202-4168114. kennedy-center.org. Free.
TUESDAY, SEP T. 5
ImagiNATIONS Activity Center
Kid-friendly activities related to
Native American history and culture
include an interactive
skateboarding video game, a quiz
show and a stilt house adorned with
photos by indigenous youth from
the Amazon. Tuesdays-Sundays,
10 a.m. -5 p.m. National Museum of
the American Indian, third floor,
Fourth Street and Independence
Avenue SW. 202-633-1000.
nmai.si.edu. Free.
Little Builders Storytime Ages
2-6. An interactive read-aloud of
“Riki’s Birdhouse,” by Monica
Wellington, followed by a related
activity. National Building Museum,
401 F St. NW. 202-272-2448.
weta.org. Free with admission: $16
adult, $13 student, seniors and
ages 3-17 with I.D., $5: Blue Star
ages 3 and up with I.D. (limit 6 per
family). Register for the event by
phone or online.
Tuesday classical music
concerts Organist Martin
Schmeding performs. 12:10-1 p.m.
Church of the Epiphany, 1317 G St.
NW. 202-347-2635, Ext. 20.
epiphanydc.org. $10.
WEDNESDAY, SEP T. 6
National Park Service ranger
talk: “Little Rock Girl 1957” A
discussion of the photograph that
changed the fight for integration in
profound and unexpected ways.
Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial
plaza, Independence Avenue and
West Basin Drive SW. 10-10:45 a.m.
and 2-2:45 p.m. 202-740-3441.
nps.gov/planyourvisit. Free.
Tour: “The Art and History of the
U.S. Botanic Garden” A walking
tour explores how historical
currents, architecture, sculpture,
and landscape architecture came
together to create the garden. Meet
at the entrance to the Conservatory
on the Terrace. Repeats Sept. 13
and 20; will be canceled on rainy
days. 2-3 p.m. U.S. Botanical
Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW.
202-225-8333. usbg.gov. Free.
Book talk: “Writer, Sailor,
Soldier, Spy: Ernest
Hemingway’s Secret Adventures,
1935-1961” CIA historian and
author Nicholas Reynolds
discusses his book on Hemingway’s
mid-20th-century spycraft. The talk
will be followed by a book signing.
Noon-2 p.m. William G. McGowan
Theater, National Archives, 700
Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 866-2726272. archives.gov. Free.
Lunder Conservation Center tour
Learn how Smithsonian American
Art Museum conservators use
science, art history and skilled
hands to preserve objects from the
collections in the Lunder
Conservation Center. Wednesdays
at 3 p.m. Smithsonian American Art
Museum, Luce Foundation Center,
third floor, Eighth and F streets NW.
202-633-1000. si.edu/museums/
american-art-museum. Free.
“Conversation Pieces” Senior
curator Joanna Marsh uses a work
from the American Art Museum to
inspire an art discussion. First
Wednesdays at 6 p.m. Smithsonian
American Art Museum, Eighth and F
streets NW. 202-633-1000. si.edu/
museums/american-art-museum.
Free.
— Compiled by Terence McArdle
TO SUBMIT AN EVENT
Email: districtlocalliving@
washpost.com (to the attention of
Terence McArdle)
Mail: Community Calendar, District
Local Living, The Washington Post,
1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C.,
20071.
Details: Announcements are
accepted on a space-available basis
from public and nonprofit
organizations only and must be
received at least 14 days before the
Thursday publication date. Include
event name, dates, times, exact
address, prices and a publishable
contact phone number.
23
DC
HOMES FROM 22
$338,000.
Good Hope Rd., 1910-Levi Corp. to
Kimberly Y. Edwards, $382,500.
Hilltop Terr., 4635-Oliver and
Aerica Lake to Courtney L. Bronson
and Jeremiah Q. Lancaster,
$375,000.
K St., 1420-Robert Draper to
Emerson Siegle and Ariel Xue,
$772,500.
N St., 3427-Estate of Dillard C.
Washington Decea to John Paul
Mudd, $360,000.
North Carolina Ave., 101, No.
307-Thomas H. and Diana B. Allen
to Lloyd K. and Cynthia S.
Smucker, $236,500.
Oakwood St., 433-Creative DC
Properties Corp. to Chloe D.
Louvouezo, $349,900.
Raleigh St., 308-Bank of America
to Angie Michaelman, $178,100.
S St., 2351-Daniel Yohannes to
Andrew Nevins, $359,000.
Texas Ave., 4502-James Michael
Brennan to Tito Antezana,
$150,000.
Yuma St., 128-DC 14 Corp. to
Ramon A. Mercedes and Dulce M.
Peralta, $244,500.
10th St., 111-David W. Sanford to
David Benjamin Brooks, $2 million.
23rd St., 1605-Estate of Leona
Ogunade to Jerome Fisher,
$315,556.
37th St., 2022, No. B-Steven S.
McLaine Jr. to Solomon
Henderson, $125,000.
SOUTHWEST
Darrington St., 130-Jack Spicer
Properties Corp. to Aaron G. Allen,
$310,000.
M St., 468, No. 4-William M. McLin
to Jay E. and Kristine Gazlay,
$995,000.
Third St., 700, No. 123-James A.
Plutino and Betsy J. Brener to
Angela Kordyak, $610,000.
the washington post . thursday, august 31 , 2017
2017 Library of Congress
National Book Festival A day of
presentations, panels, poetry and
family-friendly activities for book
lovers. More than 100 celebrated
authors on 10 different stages,
including David McCullough, Dav
Pilkey, Kate DiCamillo, Roxane Gay
and Alice McDermott. 8:30 a.m.7:30 p.m. Walter E. Washington
Convention Center, 801 Mount
Vernon Pl. NW. 202-707-5000.
loc.gov/bookfest. Free.
textiles. Free.
Home Sales
24
washingtonpost.com/jobs
DC
FEATURED EMPLOYERS SPOTLIGHT
Washington
Post
Featured Employers are DC’s largest and most prominent organizations. They include employers
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Booz Allen Hamilton Number:
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George Mason University
Education–George Mason University is a university
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Hughes Network Systems
Engineering–Hughes is the world's leading provider
of broadband satellite services, products, and network solutions. Hughes Network Systems, LLC
(HUGHES) is the global leader in providing broadband satellite networks and services for large
enterprises, governments, small businesses, and
consumers. HughesNet encompasses all broadband solutions and managed services from Hughes,
bridging the best of satellite and terrestrial technologies. Hughes has shipped more than 1,000,000
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Senior Financial
Commodity
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Specialist–Gaithersburg
EchoStar Corporation is Hughes Network Systransforming the satel- tems, an EchoStar Comlite and telecommuni- pany, (Hughes) is the
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Freddie Mac
Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority
Delivery and Transportation–The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority operates the second
largest rail transit system and the fifth largest bus
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Manager,
Project Manager Maintenance PlanVehicles–
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Washington D.C.
Washington D.C.
Job Description: Job
Job Description: Job Title:
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tenance Planning & ID: 170429 Location:
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170478
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NRP...
Nonprofit–Conservation International (CI) is a nonprofit organization with a mission to conserve the
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Lead Climate Change Development
Campaign–Arlington
Coordinator–Arlington
Lead Climate Change Position Summary: The
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Metropolitan Washing