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The Washington Post September 7 2017

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Partly sunny 75/58 • Tomorrow: Partly sunny 76/58 B8
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
Monstrous Irma slams Caribbean, takes aim at Fla.
Evacuees stream north
in preparation for
potential Sunday landfall
BY J OEL A CHENBACH,
F RANCISCO A LVARADO,
S ANDHYA S OMASHEKHAR
AND M ARK B ERMAN
miami — This could be The Big
One, again, and everyone knows
it, and if people here are getting a
bit frantic, that might not be an
irrational response. Hurricane
Irma is about as big as a tropical
cyclone can possibly get, and the
latest computer models show it
aimed at South Florida as if following directions by GPS.
There are more than 6 million
people in Miami-Dade, Broward
and Palm Beach counties, all concentrated between the beach and
the swamps. Many have been
streaming north on Interstate 95
or Florida’s Turnpike, and gas
stations have plastic bags on the
pumps. The region’s airports were
slammed, and it had become difficult to score a seat on any airplane, going anywhere.
“I’m nervous, and I never get
nervous in storms,” said Jane
Llewellyn, a rental car sales agent
at the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport and a
resident of Miami Beach. She said
Irma seemed more “aggressive”
than Andrew in 1992: “It’s just so
massive and it’s just so fast, and
it’s just so hot here. It’s going to
get worse.”
Irma is an extremely dangerous
Category 5 hurricane that had
sustained winds of 185 mph as it
ripped through the Caribbean on
Wednesday, battering the northern Lesser Antilles and Virgin
Islands, in some cases leaving behind massive destruction, such as
on the small island of Barbuda.
The storm next headed toward
Puerto Rico, where some residents are preparing to be without
electricity for as long as six
months. Although the storm’s
center passed north of Puerto
IRMA CONTINUED ON A11
Sporting events upended in Fla.
Postponements and cancellations
are widespread as Irma nears. D5
Representatives of Facebook
told congressional investigators
Wednesday that the social network has discovered that it sold
ads during the U.S. presidential
campaign to a shadowy Russian
company seeking to target voters,
according to several people familiar with the company’s findings.
Facebook officials reported that
they traced the ad sales, totaling
$100,000, to a Russian “troll farm”
with a history of pushing proKremlin propaganda, these people said.
A small portion of the ads,
which began in the summer of
2015, directly named Republican
nominee Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton, the people
said, although they declined to say
which candidate the ads favored.
Most of the ads, according to a
blog post published late Wednes-
. $2
Trump
reaches
across
aisle
CUTS FISCAL DEAL
WITH DEMOCRATS
Debt-limit agreement
upends GOP’s battle plan
M IKE D E B ONIS,
K ELSEY S NELL,
P HILIP R UCKER
AND E LISE V IEBECK
BY
ALVIN BAEZ/REUTERS
Police patrol San Juan, Puerto Rico, in heavy rain and winds. Some island residents are girding to be without power for up to six months.
Worry, hope and boredom
mingle in a Houston shelter
BY
M ONICA H ESSE
houston — Lanny Dumbaulb
RICKY CARIOTI/THE WASHINGTON POST
Hurricane Harvey evacuees Stephanie and Nash Ubale sleep for
the night at Calvary Community Church in Houston. The couple
lost their home to flooding the same week they had a funeral for
their newborn twins. “We lost everything and more,” they said.
The couple are now thinking about moving out of the city.
Facebook sold $100,000 in
political ads to Russian firm
BY C AROL D . L EONNIG,
T OM H AMBURGER AND
R OSALIND S . H ELDERMAN
M2 V1 V2 V3 V4
and Elvira Wolf were the first
Harvey evacuees to wake in the
worship hall of Calvary Community Church, before the volunteers had even made coffee, before it was even dawn.
It had become their routine:
the new friends, a classical composer and a German grandmother, sat at a table and whispered to
each other amid a sea of inflatable
mattresses and tote bags filled
with what people had frantically
grabbed before water seeped into
their houses. Wolf told Dumbaulb
she was yearning for a tomato. He
told her the volunteers would
bring her one; they were nice like
that.
Juan “J.P.” Perez woke next,
wandering to the table, saying
that an acquaintance had promised to lend him a car so that he
and his wife could drive to their
subdivision and see whether their
own car was still submerged up to
the door handles.
At 6:32 a.m., one of the kenneled dogs started barking, which
woke his owner. That woke the
Hindi-speaking family next to
her, which woke all the kids who
SHELTERS CONTINUED ON A10
Amid economic collapse, one woman had grown used to going without. Then her HIV drugs ran out.
BY
AND
FACEBOOK CONTINUED ON A7
MANU QUINTERO FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Carmen Hernández, diagnosed with HIV in 2013, lives in Catia, a Caracas slum. Experts fear
Venezuela’s surging HIV/AIDS crisis could become the worst in Latin America in years.
IN THE NEWS
THE NATION
EVELYN HOCKSTEIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
A window on the future Leaders at
Washington National Cathedral have decided
to remove stained glass honoring Robert E.
Lee and Stonewall Jackson. B1
TRUMP CONTINUED ON A8
A seat at the table
But, Paul Kane asks, can the
Democrats pass legislation? A4
In Venezuela, life-threatening shortages
day by Facebook’s chief security
officer, Alex Stamos, “appeared to
focus on amplifying divisive social
and political messages across the
ideological spectrum — touching
on topics from LGBT matters to
race issues to immigration to gun
rights.”
The acknowledgment by Facebook comes as congressional investigators and special counsel
Robert S. Mueller III are probing
Russian interference in the U.S.
election, including allegations
that the Kremlin may have coordinated with the Trump campaign.
The U.S. intelligence community concluded in January that Russia had interfered in the U.S. election to help elect Trump, including
by using paid social media trolls to
spread fake news intended to influence public opinion.
Two sides of Chairman Grassley
In the Russia probe, can a GOP
loyalist also be an investigator? A4
President Trump, a man of few
allegiances who seized control of
the Republican Party in a hostile
takeover, suddenly aligned himself with Democrats on Wednesday on a series of key fiscal issues
— and even gave a lift to North
Dakota’s embattled Democratic
U.S. senator.
Trump confounded his party’s
leaders when he cut a deal with
Democratic congressional leaders — “Chuck and Nancy,” as the
president informally referred to
them — on a short-term plan to
fund the government and raise its
borrowing limit this month.
The president’s surprise stance
upended sensitive negotiations
over the debt ceiling and other
crucial policy issues this fall and
further imperiled his already tenuous relationships with Senate
Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and House Speaker
Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.).
The episode is the latest turn in
Trump’s separation from his party
as he distances himself to deflect
blame for what has been a year of
gridlock and missed opportunities
for Republicans on Capitol Hill. It
follows a summer of presidential
A federal prosecutor
said during opening arguments of a bribery trial that Sen. Robert Menendez (D-N.J.) had acted as a “personal United
States senator” for a rich
Florida doctor. A3
Planned Parenthood
and two National Cancer Institute researchers
received Lasker Awards
for their work to protect
and enhance women’s
health. A3
Attorneys general
from 15 states and the
District of Columbia
filed a lawsuit to try to
save the DACA program. A6
Prominent Republicans are urging the Supreme Court to find that
extreme partisan gerrymandering is unconstitutional. A6
THE WORLD
In Germany, some
churches are actively defending migrants, even
housing displaced people so police cannot deport them. A12
President Trump’s
zigzagging response to
North Korea probably
renders negotiations impossible for now, security experts said. A14
Rohingya Muslims
numbering more than
140,000 have fled violence in Burma in the
past 10 days, risking
danger and death on the
way to Bangladesh. A15
A U.N. panel formally
accused the Syrian government of using the
banned nerve agent
sarin in an April chemical attack that killed
dozens of civilians. A16
THE ECONOMY
Personal information
that the government collected on DACA beneficiaries could now be
used to track down those
people for deportation. A17
THE REGION
GOP gubernatorial
nominee Ed Gillespie
wants to raise Virginia’s
felony threshold and
soften marijuana enforcement. B1
New test scores show
large achievement gaps
between students who
face disadvantages and
those who don’t. B1
A former Federal Protective Services officer
was sentenced in Prince
George’s County Circuit
Court to two more life
terms. B1
A NTHONY F AIOLA
R ACHELLE K RYGIER
caracas, venezuela — The wheezing bus
pulled in late from the slums, so Carmen
Hernández was practically jogging toward the
clinic now. It had opened 20 minutes ago, and
she needed to be early. Late meant lines, and
the 49-year-old mother of five couldn’t wait.
She was wasting away.
Her high cheekbones were protruding
more, and the headaches were getting worse.
A fearless tough talker, she didn’t flinch at the
crackle of gunfire on her street. But this was
different. She’d dropped eight pounds in four
weeks. She was scared.
“I should be at the clinic already,” she said,
her voice on edge.
That would be the state infectious disease
clinic, where a doctor in July had said the
words that meant Venezuela’s chronic shortages had finally ensnared her. With the economy collapsing, many things were hard to find.
But this was her Viraday, the HIV drug
keeping her alive.
“We have none left,” the doctor had told her.
“Try again in August.”
VENEZUELA CONTINUED ON A13
Inside
LOCAL LIVING
How to roll on
Our paint issue explores
tricky colors and whether
to go DIY or hire a pro.
ST YLE
More like us
The fashion industry is
getting a clue on diversity,
Robin Givhan writes. C1
SPORTS
The NFL is retaining its
fan base, despite such issues as brain injuries to
players, according to a
poll by The Washington
Post and the University
of Massachusetts at
Lowell. D1
BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A17
COMICS........................................C6
OPINION PAGES ......................... A20
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B5
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS.............................A12
CONTENT © 2017
The Washington Post / Year 140, No. 276
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
6 3 0 6
A2
EZ
President Trump meets with Emir Sabah Ahmed al-Sabah
of Kuwait at the White House. Visit washingtonpost.com/
politics for developments.
9:30 a.m.
The Senate Banking Committee votes on the
nominations of Joseph Otting to be comptroller of the
currency and Randal Quarles to be a member of the
Federal Reserve Board of Governors. Visit
washingtonpost.com/business for details.
10 a.m.
The Pentagon holds a swearing-in ceremony for Navy
Secretary Richard V. Spencer in Arlington. For details, visit
washingtonpost.com/checkpoint.
10:40 a.m.
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson meets with Moroccan
Foreign Minister Nasser Bourita in Washington. For
developments, visit washingtonpost.com/politics.
7:05 p.m.
The Washington Nationals host the Philadelphia Phillies
at Nationals Park. Follow the game at postsports.com.
KLMNO
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CO R R ECTI O N S
An Aug. 27 Metro article about
the Smithsonian Institution
refurbishing dollhouse death
scenes incorrectly said that the
70-year-old dollhouses used to
train police detectives had been
housed at the medical examiner’s
office in Baltimore since 1966
after Harvard University sought
to discard them. The dollhouses
were brought to Baltimore after
Harvard’s Department of Legal
Medicine closed; they remain on
loan from Harvard Medical
School.
An Aug. 27 Washington Post
Magazine article about the lives
of ice cream truck drivers
incorrectly identified Mitch
Berliner as a co-owner of
Berliner Specialty Distributors;
he is a former co-owner. The
story also incorrectly said that a
dispute between a driver and
Berliner Specialty Distributors
about buying ice cream at Costco
centered on price; company
owner Guy Berliner says the
issue was legality. The article
also suggested that a provision in
Berliner’s contract with drivers,
which says the company is not
responsible for ice cream
melting, was introduced this
year. It has been in the contract
for years.
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The enigma that is President Trump
H A P P EN I N G TO D A Y
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
All day
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
off
Reg.
prices
House Speaker
Paul Ryan could
not have been
more clear.
After meeting
with his
Dana
Republican
caucus
Milbank
Wednesday
WASHINGTON morning on the
SKETCH
first day back
from their long
summer break, he declared at a
news conference that Democrats’
call for a three-month extension
of the government’s borrowing
limit was “ridiculous.”
“That’s ridiculous and
disgraceful, that they want to
play politics with the debt ceiling
at this moment,” he repeated. He
called it “unworkable,” said it
would jeopardize hurricane
response and called out
Democratic leaders by name for
promoting what “I don’t think is
a good idea.”
About an hour later, Ryan and
other GOP leaders sat in the
White House with President
Trump, who told them he wants
. . . a three-month increase of the
debt ceiling, just as Democrats
proposed.
Such chaos and confusion at
the highest level of American
government hadn’t been seen
since, well, the day before.
On Tuesday, even as the
administration announced that
it was ending protection from
deportation for the 800,000
“dreamers” — mostly young
people who know no country but
America — there were signs that
Trump had no idea what he was
doing. “As late as one hour before
the decision was to be
announced, administration
What does the
president support?
“We love the dreamers.
. . . We think the
dreamers are terrific,”
Trump said last week,
four days before putting
them in jeopardy of
deportation.
his position. He called on
Congress to “legalize” the
dreamers program and vowed to
“revisit the issue” if Congress
can’t.
Even Trump’s close advisers
seem to have little knowledge of,
much less control over, what he
says and does.
Trump has signaled that he
wants to end a free-trade deal
with South Korea, even though
his national security adviser, his
defense secretary and the
director of the National
Economic Council all object. He
and Defense Secretary James
Mattis have contradicted each
other about whether to talk with
North Korea. Chief of Staff John
Kelly’s attempts to tone down
Trump’s antics have reportedly
led Trump to escalate his attacks
— on Kelly. Trump has publicly
criticized Attorney General Jeff
Sessions and repeatedly
contradicted Secretary of State
Rex Tillerson. Ivanka Trump and
husband Jared Kushner have let
it leak that Trump ignored their
advice on Charlottesville and
other matters.
One imagines a future scene in
the Situation Room:
The president: Why don’t we
bomb Guam so the North
Koreans can’t?
The secretary of state: That’s
part of our country, sir.
The secretary of defense: We
have thousands of troops there.
The national security
adviser: And 150,000 innocent
civilians.
The chief of staff: It would be
a humanitarian and strategic
catastrophe.
Ivanka Trump: Please don’t
do this, Dad.
Jared Kushner: [Silence.]
The president: It’s settled. We
begin bombing in five minutes.
Let’s hit Hawaii, too. But not my
hotel in Waikiki.
The unreliability of Trump has
put an unusual burden on
Congress, which is ill equipped
to bear it.
Outside the House caucus
gathering the morning after
Trump’s immigration
announcement, Rep. Steve King
(R-Iowa), an immigration hardliner, angrily opposed legislative
action for the dreamers, saying
they can “live in the shadows”
and demanding GOP leaders not
“divide our conference over an
amnesty act.”
Minutes later, Rep. Mike
Coffman (R-Colo.), took the
opposite view, threatening to use
a “discharge petition” with
Democrats to force a vote on
protecting the dreamers if the
House doesn’t act.
Ryan put the responsibility
right back on Trump for the
DACA (Deferred Action for
Childhood Arrivals) legislation.
“We will not be advancing
legislation that does not have the
support of President Trump,
because we’re going to work with
the president on how to do this
legislation,” he said. Sens. Marco
Rubio (R-Fla.) and Lindsey
Graham (R-S.C.) urged Trump to
lead.
But what does Trump
support?
“We love the dreamers. . . . We
think the dreamers are terrific,”
Trump said last week, four days
before putting them in jeopardy
of deportation.
“I have a great heart for the
folks we are talking about, a
great love for them,” Trump said
on the same day his
administration announced the
end of protection for the
dreamers.
What does the president
want? Nobody knows — not his
advisers, not his fellow
Republicans in Congress, and
probably not Trump himself.
Twitter: @Milbank
D I G ES T
MICHIGAN
Court: Officials did not
violate religious rights
Christian prayers publicly
offered by elected officials in a
Michigan county don’t run afoul
of the U.S. Constitution, a federal
appeals court said Wednesday,
rejecting a challenge by a local
man who contends that the
practice violates the rights of
people with different beliefs.
Jackson County
commissioners are Christian and
aren’t illegally promoting one
faith over another, the U.S. Court
of Appeals for the 6th Circuit
said.
“The solemn and respectful-intone prayers demonstrate the
commissioners permissibly seek
guidance to make good decisions
that will be best for generations
to come and express well-wishes
to military and community
members,” wrote Judge Richard
Griffin in a 9-6 opinion.
The dispute could reach the
U.S. Supreme Court.
In July, the U.S. Court of
Appeals for the 4th Circuit said
the prayer custom at meetings in
Rowan County, N.C., was
“unconstitutionally coercive.”
Jackson County was sued by
Peter Bormuth, a pagan, who said
he’s being forced to worship Jesus
to participate in government. He
doesn’t stand during prayers. He
believes his criticism probably
cost him appointments on a
county solid waste committee
and a public works board.
One commissioner called
Bormuth a “nitwit,” and two
turned their backs when he spoke
during public comments.
— Associated Press
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officials privately expressed
concern that Mr. Trump might
not fully grasp the details of the
steps he was about to take, and
when he discovered their full
impact, would change his mind,”
Michael Shear and Julie
Hirschfeld Davis of the New York
Times reported, citing an
anonymous source.
Sure enough, Trump fired off a
tweet Tuesday night that revised
KENNETH MORRIS/WORLD SURF LEAGUE/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/EFE
Australia’s Keely Andrew competes Wednesday during the Swatch Women’s Pro Trestles surfing event
as part of the World Surf League in Trestles, Calif.
UTAH
Former teenage bride
wins $16 million case
A woman who was married to
her cousin at age 14 in a
ceremony overseen by
polygamous sect leader Warren
Jeffs has won a $16 million
lawsuit against the group.
Elissa Wall’s lawyer said
Wednesday the decision lets
attorneys investigate the
secretive group’s bank accounts
and property held in states all
over the United States.
The Fundamentalist Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints
is based along the Utah-Arizona
border and has a compound in
South Dakota.
The state of Utah is also
entitled to half the punitive
damages in the case, up to $6
million, under state law, Wall’s
attorney Alan Mortensen said.
Last year, Wall agreed to a
$2.75 million settlement with the
group’s communal property trust,
but her case against Jeffs and the
group continued until Tuesday.
Her testimony about the 2001
marriage helped convict Jeffs in
Utah of being an accomplice to
rape, though the verdict was
overturned on a technicality. He’s
now serving a life prison sentence
in Texas for sexually assaulting
girls he considered wives.
— Associated Press
LOUISIANA
Court to end jailing
those who can’t pay
A final settlement has been
reached in a federal lawsuit filed
over a Louisiana city’s jailing of
poor people who fail to pay fines.
The settlement requires the
Bogalusa City Court and Judge
Robert Black to determine
whether failure to pay a penalty is
intentional. It says a defendant
cannot be jailed for being unable
to pay. The Southern Poverty Law
Center’s 2016 lawsuit was
officially dismissed Tuesday by a
federal judge in New Orleans.
The lawsuit said criminal
defendants were routinely jailed
when they were unable to pay
fines for minor traffic or
misdemeanor offenses. Bogalusa
is 75 miles north of New Orleans.
In June, the city court agreed to
refund some fees paid by indigent
defendants to avoid jail.
— Associated Press
Reporter broke no law, official
says: A West Virginia journalist
who was arrested after
repeatedly questioning U.S.
Health and Human Services
Secretary Tom Price broke no law
and isn’t being charged, a
prosecutor said Wednesday. A
joint news release from the
independent Public News Service
and the Kanawha County
prosecutor’s office said a review
cleared Daniel Ralph Heyman of
any lawbreaking. The
Charleston-based reporter for
Public News Service was initially
charged with willful disruption of
governmental processes at the
state Capitol in Charleston when
he asked Price on May 9 whether
domestic violence is a preexisting
condition under the Republican
health-care proposal.
— Associated Press
The Washington Post
is printed using recycled fiber.
NF407 2x1.75
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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
RE
Politics & the Nation
At trial, Menendez portrayed as doctor’s ‘personal’ senator
Prosecutors allege bribes;
defense says lawmaker
acted out of friendship
BY
D EVLIN B ARRETT
newark — The bribery trial of
Sen. Robert Menendez began
Wednesday with a federal prosecutor charging that the lawmaker sold his office in exchange
for luxury getaways, private jet
flights and hundreds of thousands of dollars in campaign
cash.
“This is what bribery looks
like,’’ said Assistant U.S. Attorney
Peter Koski in opening arguments at U.S. District Court in
Newark. “These two defendants
corrupted one of the most powerful offices in our country. The
defendants didn’t just trade
money for power, they also tried
to cover it up.’’
Menendez (D-N.J.) is accused
of receiving gifts from Salomon
Melgen, a doctor in West Palm
Beach, in exchange for a range of
government favors involving the
doctor’s professional and personal life.
The two men have spent years
fighting the charges, saying their
trips together were evidence
only of their public friendship,
not secret crimes.
Supporters of the senator applauded as he walked into the
courthouse to face trial on
12 separate charges.
“Not once have I dishonored
my public office,” Menendez
said.
He became emotional and
choked back tears as he thanked
his children and supporters who
“have stood by me as I try to clear
my name.’’
The courtroom of Judge William Walls was filled for opening
arguments, as was a second,
overflow courtroom.
Menendez’s lawyer, Abbe D.
Lowell, accused the Justice Department of trying to paint a
decades-long friendship as
something sinister and criminal.
“It is wrong for a public official to violate the public trust,
but it’s equally wrong for an
innocent man to be charged,’’ he
said. “The evidence will be that
Bob Menendez and Sal Melgen
have a real friendship.’’
Lowell said the prosecutors
are focused on seven years of
alleged corruption, but the relationship between the two men
goes back to the early 1990s —
JOE PENNEY/REUTERS
Sen. Robert Menendez’s daughter Alicia Menendez looks on as the
New Jersey Democrat heads to U.S. District Court in Newark.
proving their friendship is genuine. “Acting out of friendship is
not improper, it is not corrupt,
and it is certainly not a crime,’’
Lowell said.
Koski, the prosecutor, derided
that claim.
“There’s no friendship exception to bribery,’’ Koski said.
Prosecutors allege Menendez
repeatedly pulled strings to help
Melgen in a variety of areas: in
getting his girlfriends U.S. visas,
in trying to resolve the doctor’s
$8.9 million billing dispute with
Medicare, and in an effort to help
Melgen’s efforts to make money
from a port security contract in
the Dominican Republic.
“Senator Menendez went to
bat for Doctor Melgen at the
highest levels of our federal government over the course of many
years . . . because Melgen gave
Menendez access to a lifestyle
that reads like a travel brochure
for the rich and famous,’’ Koski
said.
“Make no mistake about it —
Robert Menendez was Salomon
Melgen’s personal United States
senator.’’
Prosecutors say they can tie
$750,000 worth of campaign
cash from Melgen to Menendez’s
favors.
Since his indictment two years
ago, Menendez has seen his political star dim, but he still has
plenty of allies in the Democratic
Party. Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.)
attended the opening argument,
and the two senators laughed
and chatted during a court
break.
Menendez has said he plans to
attend the trial every day, but if a
critical vote came to the Senate
floor during the trial, he would
consider leaving if his vote was
needed.
Melgen’s lawyer, Kirk Ogrosky,
attacked prosecutors for what he
called their “filthy, dirty view of
the world’’ and urged jurors not
to be so jaded.
The defendants are “not guilty
and they stand falsely accused,’’
said Ogrosky. “What you’re going
to hear from every single witness
who knows these two men is that
they are friends. Real friends.’’
He also said prosecutors
would try to make his married
client look bad by calling his
former girlfriends to the witness
stand — but urged the panel to
focus on the facts. “These people
want to trot these girlfriends
here in front of you,’’ he said.
“You’re not here to judge his
personal life. I’m here to tell you
right now that he’s not always
the best husband.’’
The trial is expected to last
nearly two months, but tempers
were running high even before
the jury entered the courtroom,
during a couple of tense exchanges between Menendez’s
lawyers and the judge.
When defense lawyer Raymond Brown argued that the
judge had disparaged their case,
the judge grew exasperated.
“Shut up for a moment,’’ the
judge said.
“Excuse me, sir?” the lawyer
replied.
Walls told the lawyer he felt
“quasi-insulted’’ by the lawyer’s
suggestion that a judge’s response was too critical of the
defense.
The judge got testy again
when Lowell defended another
filing that the defense had made
before opening arguments.
Lowell insisted they’d only
made the filing to adhere to a
previous instruction from the
judge. “Fine. Bill me,’’ the judge
shot back.
devlin.barrett@washpost.com
HPV researchers, Planned Parenthood win prestigious medical awards
This year’s Lasker prizes
reflect contributions
to women’s health
BY
L AURIE M C G INLEY
The Lasker Awards, among the
most prestigious in medicine, will
go to two National Cancer Institute researchers whose work led
to the development of vaccines
that prevent cervical cancer, and
to Planned Parenthood for providing “essential health services
and reproductive care” to millions
of women, the Albert and Mary
Lasker Foundation said Wednesday.
In announcing the awards,
sometimes referred to as “America’s Nobels,” the foundation lauded the recipients’ efforts to protect
and enhance women’s health. Its
praise of Planned Parenthood
seemed designed to counter attacks on the nonprofit group by
President Trump and top congressional Republicans, who want to
end all federal funding to the
organization. Planned Parenthood, the nation’s biggest abortion provider, is barred from using federal dollars for abortions.
The foundation also honored
Michael N. Hall, a molecular biologist at the Biozentrum University of Basel, Switzerland, for discoveries involving the role of proteins called TOR in controlling
cell growth. It said his discoveries
“have broadened our understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that underlie growth, development and aging.”
The prizes, which come with
$250,000, are awarded to researchers, clinicians and others
who have made major advances in
the prevention and treatment of
disease. They are sometimes seen
as a harbinger of the Nobel Prize;
87 Lasker laureates have also
won Nobels.
The target of the two NCI scientists honored — Douglas Lowy,
the institute’s acting director, and
John Schiller, a longtime researcher there — was the disease
that kills 250,000 women around
the world every year. “They devised a blueprint for several safe
and effective vaccines that promise to slash the incidence of cervical cancer and mortality,” the
foundation said.
That work by the longtime collaborators, who will share the
Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical
Research Award, enabled the development of vaccines for the human papillomavirus. HPV infection also causes cancers of the
vulva, penis, anus and throat.
People have known since the
19th century that cervical cancer
behaved like a sexually transmitted disease, Lowy said. But it
wasn’t until the early 1980s that
German virologist Harald zur
Hausen linked malignancies to
particular HPV strains. “That
made crystal clear that HPV was
incredibly important,” he added.
In the early 1990s, he and Schiller set out to create a vaccine to
block persistent infections from
dangerous HPV strains. They
couldn’t use the entire virus for
the vaccine because of the risk
that it could trigger malignancies.
Instead, they focused on using
parts that wouldn’t cause cancer.
Experimenting first with the
bovine papillomavirus, which
causes cow warts, they found proteins that could arrange themselves into virus-like particles and
provoke a strong antibody response that prevented infection.
Translating those and other
findings to humans brought new
technical hurdles, which Lowy
and Schiller eventually surmounted. They then approached
pharmaceutical companies about
manufacturing the vaccine, but
only Merck and a company that
was later bought by GlaxoSmith-
Kline were interested. After successful clinical trials in humans,
the companies’ vaccines won approval by the Food and Drug Administration in 2006 and 2009,
respectively.
Three doses of the vaccine for
girls and boys were recommended
initially, but last year the Centers
for Disease Control and Prevention said two doses were adequate
for 11- and 12-year-olds. If started
later, three doses are still recommended for ages 15 through 26.
The uptake rate for the vaccination has been slower than that for
many other vaccinations, but
Lowy remains confident the pace
will increase. In a conference call
with reporters, he and Schiller
emphasized that boys as well as
girls need to be vaccinated — in
part because throat cancer, which
can be caused by HPV infection,
occurs more often in men than in
women.
In the meantime, the two researchers are overseeing a new
clinical trial in Costa Rica to see
whether a single dose can provide
sufficient protection — a finding
that could have huge ramifications for women in poor countries.
“A single dose would be much
less expensive and logistically far
easier,” Lowy said.
The pair acknowledge they
have had an unusually productive
collaboration. “He’s understated
and not self-aggrandizing,” Schiller says. Lowy responds, “I like the
way he thinks.”
Planned Parenthood will receive the Lasker-Bloomberg Public Service Award, in recognition
of its role as a critical provider of
women’s medical services from
breast-cancer screenings to tests
for sexually transmitted diseases,
the foundation said. It noted that
Planned Parenthood helped
2.4 million women in 2015, including many who had no other
source of care.
Those services, the president of
Planned
Parenthood
said
Wednesday, could be at risk given
the “major public efforts to roll
back access to reproductive
health care and reproductive
rights,” including birth control.
The Trump administration is considering overturning a requirement that many employer-based
plans provide birth control at
no cost.
Such a move would be counterproductive, President Cecile Richards suggested on a call with reporters. Because of sex education
and family planning, unintended
pregnancies and abortions in the
United States have declined
sharply, she noted.
The foundation’s creators —
public relations pioneer Albert
Lasker and his wife Mary, who
became one of the nation’s leading
advocates of fighting cancer —
had a long relationship with
Planned Parenthood. In 1937,
Mary Lasker read about Margaret
Sanger, who two decades before
had opened the first birth control
clinic in the United States and
later founded the American Birth
Control League. She made a donation and subsequently joined the
group’s board. Her husband pro-
posed a new name to better describe the group’s mission:
Planned Parenthood Federation
of America.
Previous recipients of the public service prize included Doctors
Without Borders for its work during the Ebola outbreak and to Bill
and Melinda Gates for their global
health efforts.
This year’s awards will be presented in New York City on
Sept. 15.
laurie.mcginley@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/to-your-health
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EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
Democrats score a seat at the table, but can that lead to a legislative win?
Senate Minority
@PKCapitol Leader Charles E.
Schumer could
not hide his glee
as he approached the
microphones Wednesday
afternoon.
“Ye of little faith,” the New
York Democrat chirped to The
Washington Post before
launching into one of the
strangest news briefings of the
year. He praised President
Trump for siding with him on
how to handle the year-end
crush of must-pass legislation,
including funding the massive
recovery effort from hurricane
season, and averting a
government shutdown and a
default on the national debt.
“So it was a really good
moment of some bipartisanship
and getting things done,”
Schumer said.
Now that the president has
upended Republican plans,
Schumer and House Minority
Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.)
think they have positioned
themselves for a negotiation
that will wrap most of the mustpass items into a big Christmas
gift in December — the sort of
year-end battles that
Republicans have routinely lost
for more than a decade.
Democrats still must prove,
however, that they can land
those victories. For now, they
have secured a seat at the
negotiating table.
The big issues include
funding for federal agencies and
the debt limit, and Democrats
will use their votes on those
issues as chips to be exchanged
for their highest priorities,
particularly legislation to codify
an Obama-era order granting
legal status to more than
800,000 undocumented
immigrants brought to the
United States by their parents.
Democrats will also demand
more money to shore up private
health insurance markets, which
have been cratering under the
uncertainty of the Affordable
Care Act’s future. In turn, Trump
is sure to continue demanding
funding for a border wall to
back up his 2016 campaign
pledge, but key Republicans
have signaled that they would
instead prefer funds for more
border agents and a surge of
PAUL KANE
BILL O'LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), center right, hoped to put off a debt-limit vote until after the midterms. But President
Trump upended his plans by agreeing with Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.), center left, on the timing of must-pass bills.
technology to deter illegal
immigration.
For the first time this year,
Democrats can envision playing
offense, possibly securing
victories on immigration and
health issues that eluded them
in the last years of President
Barack Obama’s tenure.
These year-end negotiations
will take energy away from what
is supposed to be the
Republican effort to forge a
massive tax cut for businesses
and families, which many
conservatives view as their
political absolution for their
failure in the health-care debate.
If they’re not careful,
Republicans could end the year
with no major conservative
accomplishments to show for
their complete control of
Washington. This scenario
would not only leave Obamacare
as the law of the land, but also
in better financial standing, and
would grant long-term legal
status to the “dreamers.”
That would have been
considered a good first year in
office for President Hillary
Clinton.
And there are only so many
times that Senate Majority
Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.)
will be able to shout “Supreme
Court Justice Neil M. Gorsuch”
to calm the nerves of rattled
conservatives, who expected
much more out of the first GOP
president and Republicancontrolled Congress since 2006.
“The bottom line is we have a
lot of issues to come together
on. It almost always works out
best in a bipartisan way when
we can do those issues together,”
Schumer told reporters.
Republicans staunchly
disagree with that view, having
repeatedly seen massive yearend negotiations turn into
bigger spending deals and few
victories for conservatives.
That’s why they entered
Wednesday’s Oval Office
meeting with Trump and the
bipartisan congressional
leadership with a plan of their
own: Kick the debt limit until
after the November 2018
midterm elections.
That would have decoupled
the most volatile issue — a
default on the debt threatens
global markets — from other
issues. It also would provide
relief on the issue for Wall Street
traders growing jittery over any
nuclear standoff with North
Korea.
Treasury Secretary Steven
Mnuchin, who is supposed to be
Trump’s point person on the
emerging tax proposal, pushed
for an 18-month extension of the
debt limit, well into 2019.
“The markets dictated it,”
Mnuchin said, according to a
Democrat briefed on the
meeting.
Schumer called his bluff. “The
markets picked right after the
2018 election? I doubt it,” he
responded.
McConnell and House
Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.)
agreed with Mnuchin. A little
after 10 a.m., less than an hour
before the Oval Office meeting,
Ryan told reporters the proposal
for a short-term boost to debt
limit was “ridiculous and
disgraceful.” He warned that it
was “playing politics” with
Grassley: Partisan or
fearless investigator?
BY
K AROUN D EMIRJIAN
When Sen. Charles E. Grassley
announced that the Judiciary
Committee wouldn’t make time
to consider a replacement attorney general this year, he seemed
to establish himself as a firewall
between President Trump and
the Russia probes the president
has long sought to dismantle.
But the Iowa Republican’s continuing efforts to focus attention
on Hillary Clinton’s emails, her
family’s foundation and allegations that Democrats colluded
with foreign governments suggest something else: that Grassley is also playing the part of
partisan Republican, protecting
the president he is also investigating.
As Congress’s Russia probes
enter an intense new phase this
month, one uncertainty is which
Grassley will prevail at the helm
of the Judiciary Committee: fearless investigator ready to take on
his own party, or loyal member of
the GOP.
On Thursday, those competing
tendencies will face a fresh test as
the Judiciary Committee meets
with Donald Trump Jr., the first
of the president’s inner-circle
campaign surrogates the panel
hopes to interview as part of its
investigation into Russian interference in the election — including allegations of coordination
between the president’s team and
the Kremlin.
Grassley’s investigation is one
of three ongoing efforts on Capitol Hill to examine such allegations. For several months, witnesses treated his probe as an
also-ran to the House and Senate
intelligence committees — a
symptom of the limited clearance
that Grassley’s panel enjoys to
dig into intelligence files critical
to the investigation.
Yet the Judiciary Committee’s
profile has risen as the president
makes increasingly controversial
moves to respond to the Russia
probes. Firing FBI director James
B. Comey, hinting that he might
try to do the same with special
counsel Robert S. Mueller III and
demanding that members of
Congress protect him from the
Russia inquiries have inspired
accusations that Trump may be
attempting to obstruct justice —
and pulled the Russia investiga-
tion straight into the purview of
Grassley’s panel.
Despite appearances, Grassley,
83, may be the man for this
moment. From his perch on the
dais, the seven-term senator’s
slow Midwestern drawl and oldtimey exclamations can lure the
unacquainted into mistaking
him for a simple Iowa farmer in
the big city rather than one of
Congress’s most powerful and
dogged investigators. But Grassley can be punishing with anyone
who tries to circumvent his committee’s authority — even the
president, whom Grassley recently lectured in a letter to be
more responsive to congressional
oversight requests from Democrats and Republicans.
Trump’s surrogates have been
less than responsive to Grassley’s
requests for information. Trump
Jr. and former Trump campaign
manager Paul Manafort received
such requests this summer, and
at one point Grassley threatened
to issue subpoenas but later rescinded them in favor of negotiating with their lawyers.
The scope of Grassley’s probe
is unique: While the intelligence
committees are focused on
whether the president’s team colluded with Russian officials,
Grassley’s is looking at abuse of
power involving the Justice Department and matters such as
foreign lobbying. That range
could expose some witnesses to a
different level of risk.
Yet Grassley’s refusal to be
constrained, and his reputation
for putting the integrity of his
probes above all, including party,
is why many Democrats trust him
with the reins of an investigation
into Trump.
“Chuck Grassley has demonstrated across several administrations an independent spirit
and a dedication to the jurisdiction of the committee and the
appropriate role of the Senate,”
said panel Democratic Sen.
Christopher A. Coons (Del.) “He’s
pretty determined to make sure
the Judiciary Committee gets its
due.”
Privately, Democrats also express concerns about Grassley’s
apparent affinity for Trump, and
how he is steering the committee’s investigative attention
toward other targets, including
allegations about Hillary Clinton.
DREW ANGERER/GETTY IMAGES
Sen. Charles E. Grassley is chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, which hopes to interview
Donald Trump Jr. Thursday as part of its investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.
Grassley rarely criticizes the
president, even when much of
the GOP is doing so. He did not
directly censure the president for
pardoning former Maricopa
County sheriff Joe Arpaio or for
his reaction to neo-Nazi marches
in Charlottesville. When reports
emerged that Trump would end
an Obama program that has allowed 800,000 undocumented
immigrants brought to the United States as children avoid deportation, Grassley released data alleging that some recipients were
unfairly exploiting loopholes in
the program to become citizens.
In the past few months, Grassley has also echoed or excused
several of Trump’s actions that
have given the appearance of
distracting from the Russia
probe. He has supported the
president’s fixation on “leaks” —
a surprising turn from a senator
who has made defending whistleblowers a key part of his career.
After Trump fired Comey, Grassley encouraged the news media
to “suck it up and move on”
during an appearance on Fox
News. And in late August, his
committee released redacted
documents alleging that Comey
planned to exonerate Clinton for
her email scandal before even
interviewing her.
Grassley has also exhibited
more passion attacking officials
over Clinton’s email investigation
than he has going after Trump’s
team. That tendency was on dis-
play during a May hearing when
he excoriated Comey for not being more transparent about the
FBI’s email probe.
“How do you justify that? . . .
How do you justify it?” Grassley
yelled to Comey, who did not try
to defend his decisions.
“Egads,” Grassley concluded.
Former Democratic aides say
Grassley’s continued focus on
Clinton is consistent with the
Grassley they know, who often
displays his partisanship by fixating on certain targets.
But an aide to Grassley argued
that the pattern proves his nonpartisan commitment to oversight.
“If he asks questions about a
political figure who is running
for office, but then drops them
the minute that person is no
longer a candidate, then
wouldn’t that mean his interest
was based on politics?” said Taylor Foy, Grassley’s Judiciary Committee press secretary. “It’s as
simple as this: Chairman Grassley is interested in getting the
facts to the American people, and
he’s going to continue to push for
answers, regardless of where
people are.”
Part of what fuels the uncertainty about Grassley’s motivation now is the way he has
structured his investigation. To
Grassley’s team, referring to their
investigation as a “Russia probe”
is a misnomer. They prefer to
describe it as a “web” of intersect-
ing investigations into the reasons behind Trump’s decision to
fire Comey, the FBI’s handling of
Clinton’s email scandal, and how
lax enforcement is allowing foreign interference in U.S. matters
to proceed unchecked in Washington.
To date, and to Democrats’
continued confusion, Grassley
has treated the Trump surrogates
largely as witnesses to that foreign lobbying probe, which he
started in 2015. At the center of
the probe is Fusion GPS, the firm
behind a salacious but unverified
dossier of Trump’s personal and
financial activities in Russia.
“We’re trying to find out if
Russia paid ’em,” Grassley explained in a recent interview.
Manafort and Trump Jr. came
into Grassley’s Fusion orbit as a
result of the June 2016 Trump
Tower meeting they attended
with a Russian lawyer claiming to
have damaging information
about Clinton.
Committee Democrats accept
Grassley’s unorthodox approach
because it still puts them within
striking distance of Trump’s top
advisers.
“Anything that enables us to
hear from witnesses who know
about Russian meddling and
Trump campaign conspiracies to
aid it is welcome,” said Sen.
Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.).
Despite their political differences, Democrats have maintained a good working relation-
much-needed relief funds for
Texas in Harvey’s wake and
other Southern states bracing
for Hurricane Irma to make
landfall in a few days.
The two leaders know how
difficult it is to get Republican
votes for raising the debt
ceiling, an issue that
conservative activists have
turned into a purity test and one
that primary challengers often
use against GOP incumbents.
Remove the debt-ceiling issue
until 2019, and the Democrats
would have less leverage in the
immigration and health-care
negotiations.
Instead, Trump undercut his
own treasury secretary and his
nominal allies on Capitol Hill,
siding with the Democratic
proposal — perhaps in the belief
that it would be an important
show of bipartisanship during
the hurricane-driven crises.
“We essentially came to a
deal, and I think the deal will be
very good. We had a very, very
cordial and professional
meeting,” Trump told reporters
aboard Air Force One en route
to an event in North Dakota.
It followed a brutal August
for the relationship between
Trump and McConnell, whom
the president repeatedly blamed
for falling one vote short in the
effort to revamp health-care
laws. Trump also took to Twitter
last month to blame McConnell
and Ryan for not settling the
debt-limit issue before Congress
adjourned for the regular
August recess.
Trump also ridiculed
Arizona’s Republican senators,
John McCain and Jeff Flake,
during a trip to their state. At
his weekly media briefing,
McConnell received a question
about the intraparty feuding last
month and simply ducked the
question. “We’re in September
now,” he said.
But McConnell did not hide
his irritation with the outcome
Wednesday.
“The president agreed with
Senator Schumer and
Congresswoman Pelosi,” he said,
setting up the sort of showdown
he had been trying to avoid.
“That’s what I will be offering
based on the president’s
decision.”
paul.kane@washpost.com
ship with Grassley. He rarely
takes a public step without at
least attempting to coordinate
his efforts with ranking Democrat Dianne Feinstein (Calif.), often whispering with her as he
runs committee meetings, and
co-signing with her the bulk of
the formal letters he sends to
witnesses and agencies demanding information.
In fact, it is often Republicans
who can’t seem to agree on what
they think about Grassley’s
broad-based, multifaceted approach.
“Senator Grassley, who has
been a master of oversight — and
he’s very aggressive — I think he’s
a little frustrated that the Judiciary Committee hasn’t had a more
expansive role,” said Sen. John
Cornyn (R-Tex.), the Senate’s
No. 2 Republican and a member
of both the Judiciary and Intelligence committees. He didn’t outright blame Grassley for taking
the Judiciary Committee’s probe
out of its “unique lane” of DOJ
oversight — but he did warn that
Grassley’s approach increased
the potential for “confusion and
delay.”
Grassley is notoriously unperturbed by jurisdictional limitations — and aides say he has
never received so much as a
phone call from leaders asking
him to back off aspects of his
probe. It isn’t clear if the current
president has been as hands-off:
Last week, Trump placed a phone
call to Grassley to talk about
ethanol, one of the most important parochial issues to the Iowa
senator, just hours after cable
news outlets carried chyrons
about the Judiciary Committee’s
upcoming interview with Trump
Jr.
Grassley has often spoken of
his respect for special counsel
Mueller’s integrity and professionalism. But in a recent interview, the chairman also expressed disdain for the way Mueller is running his investigation
into Trump’s alleged Russia ties,
complaining that “this whole
Russia thing is going to go on for
five years” before it is over.
“When you’ve got a special
counsel and they don’t even have
a budget, they just draw on the
Treasury, and they’re going to
keep going until they can at least
find one person who lied under
oath, so they can charge one
person,” Grassley said. “They’re
not going to get their work done
until they charge at least one
person with something so they
can claim victory.”
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
15 states and D.C. file suit to try to save DACA
BY
M ATT Z APOTOSKY
A group of attorneys general
from 15 states and the District of
Columbia filed a lawsuit Wednesday to stop the administration
from winding down the DACA
program, which granted a reprieve from deportation to undocumented immigrants who came
to the United States as children.
The suit, filed in federal court
in the Eastern District of New
York, alleges that rescinding the
Deferred Action for Childhood
Arrivals (DACA) program was a
“culmination”
of
President
Trump’s “oft-stated commitments
— whether personally held, stated
to appease some portion of his
constituency, or some combination thereof — to punish and disparage people with Mexican
roots.”
The suit says that unwinding
the program would damage states
because DACA beneficiaries pay
taxes, go to state universities and
contribute in other ways, and that
phasing out the program would
jeopardize their ability to do those
things.
“Rescinding DACA will cause
harm to hundreds of thousands of
the States’ residents, injure Staterun colleges and universities, upset the States’ workplaces, damage the States’ economies, hurt
State-based companies, and disrupt the States’ statutory and regulatory interests,” the attorneys
general wrote in the suit.
Justice Department spokesman Devin M. O’Malley said in a
statement: “As the Attorney General said yesterday: ‘No greater
good can be done for the overall
health and well-being of our Re-
public, than preserving and
strengthening the impartial rule
of law.’ While the plaintiffs in
today’s lawsuits may believe that
an arbitrary circumvention of
Congress is lawful, the Department of Justice looks forward to
defending this Administration’s
position.”
The states listed as plaintiffs in
the lawsuit are New York, Massachusetts, Washington, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois,
Iowa, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania,
the previous administration.
The program, which has allowed nearly 800,000 immigrants
who came to the United States as
children to obtain temporary
work permits and other benefits,
will be unwound gradually. Immigrants already enrolled can stay
until their two-year work permits
expire, and those whose permits
expire through March 5, 2018, are
allowed to seek renewals if they
apply by Oct. 5. Advocacy groups
are scrambling to meet that deadline to help about 150,000 DACA
“Rescinding DACA will cause harm to hundreds of
thousands of the States’ residents. . . hurt
State-based companies, and disrupt the States’
statutory and regulatory interests.”
Lawsuit filed by the attorneys general
Rhode Island, Vermont and Virginia, along with the District of
Columbia.
In Maryland, Attorney General
Brian E. Frosh (D) is “considering
all options” on how to protect the
roughly 800,000 undocumented
immigrants who were brought to
the United States as children, a
spokeswoman said Wednesday.
U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced Tuesday that the
administration was ending the
DACA program, saying that officials had reviewed it because of
threatened litigation from the
state of Texas and others and
determined it to be unconstitutional. That is a reversal of the
Justice Department’s position in
recipients renew their status.
Trump and Sessions cast the
decision to end the program as
one made out of respect for the
constitutionally mandated separation of powers. President Barack Obama, they said, essentially
overstepped in ordering the initiative when Congress wouldn’t
pass legislation. The president,
though, suggested on Twitter he
would “revisit this issue” if Congress failed to take action to revive
the program.
Legal analysts have said lawsuits to save DACA were likely to
face an uphill battle to be successful. That is because the same authority that gave Obama’s Department of Homeland Security the
ability to implement the program
would give the Trump administration the ability to undo it.
In 2014, the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel
said the program was constitutional but noted that the benefits
conferred “could be terminated at
any time at DHS’s discretion.”
D.C. Attorney General Karl A.
Racine (D), a naturalized U.S. citizen whose family emigrated from
Haiti when he was a child, acknowledged that challenges lay
ahead for the plaintiff states. But,
Racine said, the claim that racism
spurred the revocation of DACA
benefits could be particularly
compelling.
He noted that courts, in their
rulings on the president’s proposed bans on travel from majority-Muslim countries, have shown
a willingness to consider Trump’s
comments on the campaign trail
as evidence of bias against a specific minority group.
“Look, it’s a tough case,” Racine
said. “We think there are enough
references to his comments —
both before he was president and
while he was president — that
illustrate a bias against Mexicans.”
Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey said those suing believed the “arbitrary and
capricious way” that DACA was
rescinded made the action unlawful.
“You still need a valid, a lawful
justification to end the program,”
she said. “Animus cannot provide
such a justification.”
The lawsuit from the state attorneys general traces how DACA
recipients have become a part of
the fabric in the states where they
live — attending prestigious
schools such as Harvard University and working at state jobs. It
alleges that removing their ability
to live in the United States without fear of deportation could have
severe financial consequences.
The lawsuit says that one expert estimated that rescinding the
DACA program would cost New
York state $38.6 billion over the
next 10 years.
“We know that when bullies
step up, you have to step to them
and step to them quickly, and
that’s what we’re here to do today,”
New York Attorney General Eric
Schneiderman (D), a frequent
critic of Trump, said at a news
conference to announce the lawsuit.
The lawsuit notes that Trump,
in the past, made positive statements about DACA recipients but
also alleges he has “a long history
of disparaging Mexicans, who
comprise the vast majority of
DACA grantees,” citing as evidence his public statements.
The suit says revoking DACA
would violate components of the
Fifth Amendment, along with the
Administrative Procedure Act,
which “prohibits federal agency
action that is arbitrary, unconstitutional, and contrary to statute.”
It asks a judge to stop the administration from rescinding DACA as
well as bar the government from
using DACA recipients’ information, which they submitted to the
government voluntarily, to deport
them if the program is revoked.
activists thought the Sessions
effigy would be a good way to
capitalize on that theme.
A representative for the Justice Department had no immediate comment.
Wednesday’s march took a
brief pause en route, when the
top of the cardboard structure
got stuck in a tree branch.
“Off with his head,” a woman
shouted. The effigy was freed,
and the march continued.
Outside the Justice Department, one of the protesters chosen to help yank down the statue
was Genoveva Ramirez, 67, of
Chicago. She was ably assisted by
her 7-year-old grandson.
Ramirez, who came to the
United States illegally from Mexico 17 years ago, has been issued
her final orders of deportation
after being stopped on a traffic
violation. “I felt courage and
power when the statue came
R OBERT B ARNES
rachel.chason@washpost.com
robert.barnes@washpost.com
BONNIE JO MOUNT/WASHINGTON POST
Tomas Martinez, with the Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights, protests near a cardboard statue of Attorney General Jeff Sessions.
About 200 people marched to the Justice Department with the effigy, which called Sessions a “living monument of white supremacy.”
Latino advocacy group Mijente
and who has a work permit and
deportation protection, courtesy
of Deferred Action for Childhood
Arrivals, the Obama-era program
that is being abolished.
Since the Charlottesville rally
on Aug. 12, dozens of Confederate
statues have been removed in
cities from Austin to Baltimore,
some in rowdy public displays,
and others with little fanfare in
the middle of the night. The
BY
down,” she said in Spanish, her
daughter translating.
Activists preserved the head
from the effigy, covering it with a
plastic bag. The statue, Unzueta
said, will remain in the District.
The artist who created it doesn’t
want to be identified.
“It doesn’t have a scheduled
agenda yet,” Unzueta said. “But I
imagine there will be more protests.”
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
Ovetta Wiggins, Maria Sacchetti and
Peter Jamison contributed to this
report.
R ACHEL C HASON
Men in business suits, a woman in blue scrubs and teenagers
wearing “Resist” T-shirts gathered around a cardboard effigy of
Attorney General Jeff Sessions on
Wednesday as they booed and
chanted.
“The people, united, will never
be defeated,” they chanted in
Spanish and English in the rain.
“Undocumented, unafraid.”
Then they marched, about 200
strong, a few blocks up Pennsylvania Avenue to the U.S. Justice
Department. They carried with
them the replica of Sessions,
dressed as a Confederate soldier,
with frowning eyebrows and
bulging eyes.
“Jefferson Beauregard Sessions, living monument of white
supremacy,” read the inscription
at the base.
Nearly four weeks after a
white supremacist rally to defend
Confederate monuments in
Charlottesville turned violent,
and a day after Sessions announced that the Trump administration would wind down a
deportation-relief program for
young undocumented immigrants, liberal activists staged an
unusual bit of street theater to
express their opposition to both
events.
Participants — who came from
as far as Atlanta, Chicago and
Philadelphia — said Sessions represented “a living, breathing
symbol of the Confederacy.”
When they reached the federal
building that houses the attorney
general’s office, they sent the
cardboard statue tumbling. It
careened into a flowerpot before
landing on the wet sidewalk. The
head broke off from the impact.
“He represents a larger antiimmigrant agenda within the
government that criminalizes
immigrants and targets sanctuary cities,” said Tania Unzueta,
who is policy director at the
Case over
redrawn
districts
splits GOP
A long list of prominent Republicans is urging the Supreme
Court to find that extreme partisan gerrymandering is unconstitutional, saying the practice of
drawing electoral lines to benefit
one party or another is detrimental to democracy.
It puts those Republicans on
opposing sides from groups such
as the Republican National Committee and the party’s congressional campaign committee,
which are supporting Wisconsin’s GOP-led legislature in a major high court case to be heard
next month.
A lower court found lawmakers drew maps that so favored
Republican candidates that they
violated the constitutional right
of equal protection.
Now, Republicans such as former California governor Arnold
Schwarzenegger and the party’s
former presidential nominee
Robert Dole have signed onto
friend-of-the-court briefs that say
the Supreme Court should find —
for the first time — that a redistricting plan is so politically biased that it must be thrown out.
“Partisan gerrymanders frustrate majority rule by entrenching political parties in ways they
do not earn on the merits,” says
the brief signed by Schwarzenegger and other former elected
Republican officials. “They turn
republican government upside
down, with politicians choosing
their voters instead of voters
electing their politicians.”
In a conference call with reporters, Schwarzenegger said
that in the case at the Supreme
Court, it is Republicans who have
drawn maps to their benefit. “But
when Democrats have the power,
they gerrymander, like in Illinois
and Maryland.”
Indeed, challengers of the
Democrat-drawn congressional
maps in Maryland filed an unusual motion with the Supreme
Court last week, asking that their
case be heard as well as the
Wisconsin case, Gill v. Whitford.
A three-judge panel last month
split 2 to 1 to allow Maryland to
use its voting boundaries for the
2018 election and put the lawsuit
on hold until after the Supreme
Court rules in the Wisconsin
case.
The challenge in Maryland
centers on redrawing a congressional district anchored in Western Maryland in such a way that
transferred Republican voters
out and Democratic voters in,
resulting in a victory by a Democrat over the incumbent Republican congressman.
The challengers’ petition to the
Supreme Court says that considering their case along with the
one from Wisconsin would provide a “broader spectrum of legal
arguments and evidence with
which to address the problem of
partisan gerrymandering.”
Such last-minute petitions are
rarely granted by the court.
The outpouring of amicus
briefs in the Wisconsin case — on
both sides — underscores its importance. A host of Republicanled states have urged the Supreme Court not to get involved
with what they say are essentially
political decisions made by elected representatives.
“There is nothing invidious, or
irrational, under the Equal Protection Clause, about legislatures
having partisan purposes when
reapportioning legislative seats,”
said a brief filed by Texas and
other states.
Protesters topple Sessions e∞gy in front of Justice Department
BY
SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
240-year-old maps suggest Florida Keys coral loss is worse than was thought
BY
B EN G UARINO
Between 1773 and 1775, a surveyor with the British Admiralty
immortalized the coast of the
Florida Keys in ink. Though
George Gauld’s most pressing
goal was to record the depth of
the sea — to prevent future
shipwrecks — he embraced his
naturalist side, too. He sprinkled
his maps with miscellany that
later charts would omit: the
locations of sea turtles’ nests and
the colors and consistency of
sand.
Gauld also took note of the
corals he saw. And in doing so he
created the oldest known records
of Florida reefs.
“With the early charts you can
actually see the reef itself being
drawn,” said Loren McClenachan, a marine ecologist at Colby
College in Maine. “It matches
almost exactly with the satellite
data.”
In a study published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances, McClenachan and her
colleagues compared those 240year-old observations with present-day satellite images. The results were stark: Half of the reefs
recorded in the 1770s are missing
from the satellite data.
The coral nearest to shore
fared the worst, with 88 percent
of the coral that Gauld recorded
now gone. But at the most seaward edge of the reef, there
appeared to be no loss between
historical coral observations and
modern habitat maps.
“I was surprised that there was
such a strong spatial gradient,”
McClenachan said.
Sam Purkis, a marine geoscientist and conservationist at the
University of Miami who was not
involved with this research,
called the findings “very important” because they offer a far
longer perspective of the coral
habitat.
He noted that the maps were
“generated with very primitive
techniques.” According to the
study authors, surveyors such as
Gauld dredged up seafloor samples using rope tipped with tallow or wax pockets. Or they
simply looked.
Katie Cramer, a researcher at
the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego, pointed
out a few possible limitations
with the maps: It's impossible to
tell whether the surveyors distinguished between living and dead
coral, for example, or how long
the reefs had persisted.
Despite such limitations, Purkis said that dismissing these
charts would be “overlooking a
very rich data source.”
The causes of modern coral
deaths are widespread, including
more acidic oceans and higher
water temperatures. But the
sharp losses the authors discovered were local. The maps and
satellite images don’t reveal exact reasons for the disappearance of the Florida corals. “We
can't get at that,” McClenachan
said. “All we have is then and
now.”
But the marine ecologist offered a few possible explanations, most of them involving
humans. Humans built a causeway through the Keys and
dredged the Key West harbor.
They changed the way fresh water flows through the Everglades.
And agriculture may have played
a part. In Panama, where studies
of fossilized coral show similar
near-shore population drops,
ecologists suspect that the appearance of banana plantations
degraded water quality.
“There are many factors, some
natural, some anthropogenic,”
Purkis said. He did not rule out
human involvement, though he
also noted that the local sea level
has been rising since the 1930s.
The rising seawater sweeps out
mangrove and saw-grass debris
as well as sediment, which can
choke coral.
Looking at older ecological
records helps redefine what scientists think of as a natural
baseline — particularly in marine
environments where there’s less
historical information, McClenachan said. She doesn't consider
the Florida losses to be isolated.
“If something's not there, you
don't know to look for it,” she
said.
“Even the oldest surviving
generations probably cannot remember seeing spectacular reefs
close to shore in Florida,” Cramer
agreed. “So we have lost our
collective memory of the majesty
of these reefs and a sense of the
magnitude of what has been
lost.”
Purkis said the time scale
captured by the new study offers
a look into the future as well as
the past. If deeper corals are the
most historically resilient, for
instance, perhaps they deserve
special attention. “If we think
about protecting reefs in the
future, with no-take zones and
marine protected areas, we
might learn about where our
more sensible conservation efforts can be,” he said.
ben.guarino@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/speaking-of-science
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
More than 3,000 ads linked to Russian company
FACEBOOK FROM A1
Even though the ad spending
from Russia is tiny relative to overall campaign costs, the report from
Facebook that a Russian firm was
able to target political messages is
likely to fuel pointed questions
from investigators about whether
the Russians received guidance
from people in the United States —
a question some Democrats have
been asking for months.
Facebook reported in its blog
post Wednesday that about onequarter of the ads in question were
“geographically targeted,” although company officials declined to provide specifics about
what areas or demographic
groups were the recipients. Of
those targeted ads, the company
said, more ran in 2015 than 2016.
Rep. Adam B. Schiff (Calif.), the
senior Democrat on the House
Intelligence Committee, said
Wednesday that the disclosure by
Facebook confirmed one of the
ways Russia sought to interfere in
U.S. politics and serves as a “profound warning to us and others
about future elections.”
“This is a very significant set of
data points produced by Facebook,” Schiff said, adding: “Left
unanswered in what we received
from Facebook — because it is
beyond the scope of what they are
able to determine — is whether
there was any coordination between these social media trolls
and the campaign. We have to get
to the bottom of that.”
The House panel, whose staff
investigators heard briefly from
Facebook representatives behind
closed doors Wednesday, will follow up with Facebook and other
social media companies and platforms to see “to what degree they
are able to confirm similar metrics,” Sciff said.
An official familiar with Facebook’s
internal investigation said the company does not have the ability to determine whether the ads it sold represented any sort of coordination.
The acknowledgment by Facebook follows months of criticism
that the social media company
served as a platform for the spread
of false information before the November election. In a statement
posted days after the election,
Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg promised to explore the issue
but said that 99 percent of information found on Facebook is au-
PETER DASILVA/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/EFE
Facebook representatives met behind closed doors Wednesday with
House Intelligence Committee staff investigators.
thentic and only “a very small
amount” is fake or hoaxes. In December, however, the company announced that it would begin flagging articles that had been deemed
false or fake, with the assistance of
fact-checking organizations.
Facebook discovered the Russian
connection as part of an investigation that began this spring looking at
purchasers of politically motivated
ads, according to people familiar
with the inquiry. It found that 3,300
ads had digital footprints that led to
the Russian company.
Facebook teams then discovered 470 suspicious and likely
fraudulent Facebook accounts
and pages that it believes operated
out of Russia, had links to the
company and were involved in
promoting the ads.
A Facebook official said “there
is evidence that some of the accounts are linked to a troll farm in
St. Petersburg, referred to as the
Internet Research Agency, though
we have no way to independently
confirm.” The official declined to
release any of the ads it traced to
Russian companies or entities.
“Our data policy and federal law
limit our ability to share user data
and content, so we won’t be releasing any ads,” the official said. The
official added that the ads “were
directed at people on Facebook
who had expressed interest in subjects explored on those pages,
such as LGBT community, black
social issues, the Second Amendment and immigration.”
Clint Watts, a former FBI agent
who has studied Russian online
influence
campaigns,
said
Wednesday that Facebook’s report
served as “validation” for findings
by him and his researchers, who
he said had spotted what they
believed to be Russians posing as
Americans to press political messages on Facebook as early as 2015.
He said his analysis showed that
Facebook ads in 2015 were largely
concerned with divisive social messages and were used to identify other Facebook users most susceptible
to messaging. Those users were then
targeted with election-oriented ads
in 2016, he said.
“We had these suspicions, but we
could never see who was purchasing the accounts,” said Watts, a senior fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute. “Facebook’s being
brave. They probably could have
buried this, and they did the right
thing by coming forward.”
Stamos, the Facebook security
chief, said the company is committed to continuing to protect the
integrity of its site and improve its
ability to track fraudulent accounts. He said Facebook has shut
down the accounts that remained
active.
“We know we have to stay vigilant to keep ahead of people who
try to misuse our platform,” he said.
This year, Facebook announced
technology improvements to detect fake accounts and more recently announced that it would no
longer allow Facebook pages to advertise if they have a pattern of
sharing false news stories. Over the
past few months, Stamos said, the
company has also taken action to
block fake accounts tied to election
meddling in France and Germany.
The Internet Research Agency
has received attention in the past
for its activity.
In 2013, hackers released internal company documents showing
it employed 600 people across
A7
SU
Russia. Ex-employees who have
gone public with their experiences
at the company in Internet postings and in media interviews have
said their work entailed creating
fake Twitter and Facebook accounts and using them to circulate
pro-Kremlin propaganda. They
said Internet Research Agency
employees, for instance, spread
derogatory information about Putin critic Boris Nemtsov in the
days after his 2015 murder.
In 2015, the New York Times
Magazine reported that social media accounts linked to the Internet
Research Agency had launched
social media campaigns in the
United States, including a sophisticated hoax that spread false
news of a chemical leak in Louisiana in 2014, apparently to sow
chaos and fear.
In its unclassified report in January, the U.S. intelligence community concluded that the Internet
Research Agency’s “likely financier” is a “close Putin ally with ties
to Russian intelligence.”
In May, Time magazine reported that U.S. intelligence officials
had discovered evidence that Russian agents had purchased ads on
Facebook to target specific populations with propaganda. A Facebook spokesman told the magazine that the company had no
evidence of such buys.
Under federal law and Federal
Election Commission regulations,
both foreign nationals and foreign
governments are prohibited from
making contributions or spending
money to influence a federal, state
or local election in the United
States. The ban includes independent expenditures made in
connection with an election.
Those banned from such
spending include foreign citizens,
foreign governments, foreign political parties, foreign corporations, foreign associations and foreign partnerships, according to
the FEC. (Permanent residents
who hold green cards, however,
are not considered foreign nationals.) Violators face civil penalties,
as well as criminal prosecution, if
they are found to have knowingly
broken the law.
Irma threatens Trump
compound in Caribbean
BY
M ATEA G OLD
A ferocious Hurricane Irma
barreled early Wednesday across
the Caribbean island of St. Martin,
where President Trump owns a
lavish waterfront estate, wrecking
buildings, overturning cars and
uprooting trees with punishing
winds.
The status of the president’s
11-bedroom gated compound,
which is on the market, was not
immediately known. But officials
with the French government,
which controls the side of the island where the beachfront property is located, said the territory
suffered serious damage.
A cluster of government buildings was partially destroyed, and
two dozen government officials
took shelter inside a concrete
structure. “We know that the four
most solid buildings on the island
have been destroyed, which
means that more rustic structures
have probably been completely or
partially destroyed,” French Interior Minister Gerard Collomb
told Agence France-Presse.
Trump Organization spokeswoman Amanda Miller said company officials are monitoring the
situation very closely. “All of the
proper precautions and protections have been implemented and
right now we are just praying for
all those in the path of Hurricane
Irma in the Caribbean and beyond,” she said in a statement.
Photos and videos from St. Martin posted on social media show
flattened buildings, cars on their
sides and water crashing into hotel balconies.
Trump’s Chateau des Palmiers
estate covers nearly five acres and
comes with a pool at the beach’s
edge, a tennis court and fitness
center. The trust that oversees the
president’s holdings recently
slashed the asking price from
$28 million to $16.9 million.
Trump and his family visited
the Plum Bay property frequently
after purchasing it in 2013. But in
recent years, the estate has largely
served as a rental, generating between $100,000 and $1 million
from January 2016 to April 15 of
this year, according to the president’s financial disclosure.
After barreling across the Caribbean, Hurricane Irma is headed for South Florida, potentially
threatening Trump’s signature
Mar-a-Lago resort and three golf
courses he owns in Doral, West
Palm Beach and Jupiter. Forecasters said that while it was too soon
to know whether they would be in
the direct path of the hurricane, all
are likely to face tropical storm
conditions, at a minimum.
“The safety and security of our
guests, members and colleagues is
our top priority and we are closely
monitoring Hurricane Irma,” Miller said. “Our teams at the Trump
properties in Florida are taking all
of the proper precautions and following local and Florida state advisories very closely to ensure that
everyone is kept safe and secure.
We continue to send our thoughts
and prayers to victims of Hurricane Harvey and are praying for
those that are in the path of Hurricane Irma.”
matea.gold@washpost.com
Jason Samenow contributed to this
report.
carol.leonnig@washpost.com
tom.hamburger@washpost.com
rosalind.helderman@washpost.com
Andrew Roth, Alice Crites, Matea Gold
and Ashley Parker contributed to this
report.
GEMMA HANDY/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Hurricane Irma left roads flooded on the twin-island nation of
Antigua and Barbuda before it swept on to St. Barts and St. Martin.
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A8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
NASA’s Cassini spacecraft will crash into Saturn, marking its final triumph
Since 2004, mission has
revolutionized our grasp
of sixth planet from sun
BY
S ARAH K APLAN
On Sept. 15, NASA’s Cassini
spacecraft will nose-dive into Saturn and burn up in the planet’s
atmosphere. It’s the final step of a
months-long dance through Saturn’s rings that has given scientists an unprecedented view of
the sixth planet from the sun. It’s
also the end of a mission that has
revolutionized our understanding of Saturn and opened our eyes
to two worlds that could be home
to alien life — the moons Titan
and Enceladus.
Cassini fans are devastated. To
understand why, you have to understand Cassini — a plucky,
school-bus-size spacecraft that
has been orbiting Saturn since
2004.
Cassini launched on its billionmile journey from Earth to Sat-
urn on Oct. 15, 1997. It was named
for the astronomer Giovanni
Cassini, who discovered four of
the planet’s moons and a gap in
its rings. Cassini also carried a
single passenger: the Huygens
lander, built by the European
Space Agency and named for the
Dutch scientist who first spotted
the moon Titan.
Cassini and Huygens arrived in
Saturn’s orbit seven years after
launch, in July 2004. Several
months later, Huygens split off
and touched down on the shore of
one of Titan’s lakes of liquid
methane. It was humankind’s
first-ever landing on a moon other than our own, and the first
landing of any kind in the outer
solar system. Cassini, meanwhile,
was the first probe to orbit Saturn. (Pioneer and Voyager had
simply flown by, in 1979 and 1980,
respectively.)
Cassini is indisputably one of
the most successful planetary
missions ever. Its flight was
smooth, its instruments worked,
its software rarely acted up. In
addition to Huygens’s perfectly
stuck landing, Cassini probed the
formation and behavior of Saturn’s ring system, discovered a
5,000-mile-wide hurricane at Saturn’s south pole and got the first
close-up view of the planet’s hexagonal North Pole storm. Cassini
revealed that Saturn’s rings have
a lot of three-dimensional texture
and contain bumps as big as the
Rocky Mountains. Roughly 4,000
papers have been written using
the data collected by Cassini in
nearly 300 orbits of Saturn.
Best of all were the revelations
about Saturn’s moons. In the haze
around Titan, Cassini discovered
molecules that could be precursors to — or even indicators of —
biological activity on that
methane-rich planet. Zooming
past the icy moon Enceladus, it
found evidence of an underground ocean of water and spotted geysers spewing out ingredients for life.
The spacecraft is not equipped
with life-detecting instruments —
no one could have imagined it
might make such discoveries
when it launched 20 years ago.
But these moons are now considered two of the best places in the
solar system to look for alien
organisms, and they are the focus
of several proposals for new
NASA missions.
“There’s this tremendous legacy,” said project scientist Linda
Spilker, who has worked on the
mission since 1988. “Cassini has
certainly rewritten the textbooks.”
It’s precisely because of Cassini’s revelations about Titan and
Enceladus that the spacecraft has
been sentenced to die. Back in
2009, when it became apparent
the spacecraft was running out of
fuel, scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory got together
to assess their options. The craft
couldn’t be left to float around in
space, on the off chance it might
be knocked out of orbit and crash
into one of the potentially habitable moons. If that happened,
Cassini might contaminate those
worlds with Earthling microbes.
The mission team considered
moving Cassini to a more distant
orbit, or sending it off to another
planet. But then it came up with a
proposal that would launch
Cassini into one last flyby past
Titan and use the moon’s pull to
sling the craft into 22 close-in
orbits of Saturn that would explore the gaps between the planet’s rings, then end by crashing
into Saturn itself.
It was the obvious choice,
Spilker said. She compared these
ring-grazing orbits to a “brand
new mission.” During the orbits,
Cassini has mapped Saturn’s
gravity and magnetic fields to
reveal the internal structure of
the planet. It got close-up views of
the rings and even sampled some
of the icy particles that constitute
them. It’s expected to finally figure out the length of a Saturn day
— a measurement that has eluded
scientists for decades.
Cassini’s “Grand Finale” began
in April and will end on Sept. 15.
On that day, scientists who have
worked on the mission during the
past 30 years will converge at the
Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Just after midnight,
the spacecraft will point its instruments in the direction of Saturn’s atmosphere and start transmitting real-time data about what
it sees. It will hit Saturn’s atmos-
phere three hours later. A minute
after that, it will start tumbling
through the increasingly dense
clouds of gas and will lose the
ability to send a signal back to
Earth. Because of the time delay
in communication between Saturn and Earth, that final message
won’t arrive at JPL until 83 minutes later, just before 5 a.m. local
time.
At that point, Cassini will already have burned up in Saturn’s
atmosphere, a tiny, bright meteorite streaking across an alien
sky.
For the scientists who have
devoted their lives to this mission, it’s a tough loss.
“Cassini is our eyes and ears
allowing us to be there, allowing
us to reach out and touch the
world and the rings,” Spilker said.
“As long as Cassini is there we’re
there at Saturn, and when Cassini
is gone that close personal connection to the Saturn system will
be gone too.”
sarah.kaplan@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/speaking-of-science
Trump, at odds with his party, gives nod to the other one
TRUMP FROM A1
stewing over McConnell and Ryan,
both of whom Trump views as
insufficiently loyal and weak in
executing his agenda, according to
his advisers.
Trump made his position clear
at a White House meeting with
both parties’ congressional leaders, agreeing with Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer
(D-N.Y.) and House Minority
Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) on
plans for a bill to fund the government and raise the debt ceiling for
three months.
That effectively postpones until December a divisive fight over
fiscal matters, including whether
to fund construction of Trump’s
long-promised wall at the
U.S.-Mexico border.
“We had a very good meeting
with Nancy Pelosi and Chuck
Schumer,” Trump told reporters
Wednesday aboard Air Force One
as he traveled to North Dakota.
“We agreed to a three-month extension on debt ceiling, which
they consider to be sacred — very
important — always we’ll agree
on debt ceiling automatically because of the importance of it.”
In siding with Democrats,
Trump overruled his own treasury secretary, Steven Mnuchin,
who was in the middle of an
explanation backing a longerterm increase when the president
interrupted him and disagreed,
according to a person briefed on
the meeting who was not authorized to comment publicly and
spoke on the condition of anonymity. Trump was “in deal-cutting mode,” the person said.
After the gathering, McConnell
said he would add provisions extending government funding and
the debt limit through midDecember to legislation passed by
the House on Wednesday providing $7.85 billion in Hurricane
Harvey relief. McConnell introduced the legislation late
Wednesday night, setting up a
Senate vote as early as Friday.
“The president agreed with
Senator Schumer and Congresswoman Pelosi to do a threemonth [funding extension] and a
debt ceiling into December, and
that’s what I will be offering,
based on the president’s decision,
to the bill,” McConnell told reporters. “The president can speak
for himself, but his feeling was
that we needed to come together
to not create a picture of divisiveness at a time of genuine national
crisis.”
Trump also threw tacit support
behind the Democrats’ push for a
“dreamers” bill that would effectively formalize an Obama-era
program shielding undocumented immigrants brought to the
United States as children from
deportation.
Trump on Tuesday began phasing out the Deferred Action for
Childhood Arrivals program,
which GOP hard-liners regard as
illegal amnesty, but suggested
Wednesday that if Congress
passed a dreamers bill he might
sign it.
“Chuck and Nancy want to see
something happen — and so do I,”
Trump said.
Later Wednesday, Trump
brought a special guest with him
to an oil refinery in Mandan, N.D.,
to pitch his tax-cut plan: Sen.
Heidi Heitkamp, a Democrat facing a tough reelection effort in a
solidly Republican state that
Trump carried in 2016 by 36 percentage points. He welcomed
Heitkamp into his traveling delegation, affording her the chance
to appear bipartisan by standing
alongside a president popular
with North Dakotans.
BILL O’LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Meeting in the Oval Office on Wednesday are, clockwise from front left, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.), Vice President Pence, President Trump, Senate
Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.).
As Heitkamp stepped onto an
outdoor catwalk at the Mandan
refinery to join him on stage,
Trump delivered play-by-play
commentary: “Everybody’s saying, ‘What’s she doing up here?’
But I’ll tell you what: Good woman.”
Trump opened his speech by
recounting his “great bipartisan
meeting” at the White House. “I’m
committed to working with both
parties to deliver for our wonderful, wonderful citizens,” Trump
said, citing Schumer and Pelosi by
name before mentioning the Republicans who were in attendance.
“Everybody was happy,” Trump
said of the meeting. “Not too happy, because you can never be too
happy, but they were happy
enough.”
By setting up another debt-ceiling vote in December — a vote in
which Republicans will almost
certainly need Democratic help to
avoid default — Democrats keep
their seat at the table in this fall’s
key policy debates.
Had Trump sided with GOP
leaders, Democrats would have
been stuck trying to extract concessions ahead of debt-ceiling
votes this week using an empty
threat — voting against a legislative package that includes the
politically sensitive Harvey aid.
Democrats believe pushing the
debt-limit debate into December
will increase their leverage on
several issues, including the protection of dreamers and securing
funds to help stabilize health-care
markets.
Schumer and Pelosi also gained
an edge by giving Democrats an
aura of strategic command they
have lacked since Trump’s election. Instead of McConnell claiming victory, it was Schumer who
told reporters, “The nation can
JOSHUA ROBERTS/REUTERS
House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) had called it “disgraceful”
that Democrats wanted to “play politics with the debt ceiling.”
breathe a sigh of relief.”
The deal may also benefit
Trump by allowing him to revive
his threat to shut down the government over wall funding.
At the White House, Republican leaders pushed for an 18month debt-limit hike, then floated doing a six-month extension,
according to two aides briefed on
the meeting. But Pelosi and Schumer dismissed the six-month proposal, and Trump then agreed to
the three-month hike that Democrats put on the table.
McConnell and Ryan came out
of the White House meeting in the
weakest position — losing an opportunity to neutralize the debtceiling issue before the 2018 midterm elections and to exclude
Democrats from major policy debates this fall.
The president’s decision came
barely an hour after Ryan panned
the idea of a short-term debt hike,
accusing Democrats of “playing
politics” with much-needed aid
for Hurricane Harvey victims.
“I think that’s ridiculous and
disgraceful that they want to play
politics with the debt ceiling at
this moment when we have fellow
citizens in need,” Ryan told reporters.
Trump apparently disagreed.
“We essentially came to a deal,
and I think the deal will be very
good,” Trump said. “We had a very,
very cordial and professional
meeting.”
Not all Democrats were so
thrilled with the deal. Some were
upset it did not include protections for the estimated 800,000
dreamers.
“So Trump attacks our dreamers, and the next day the Democrats walk in there and say, ‘Oh,
let’s just have a nice timeout,’
while they’re all suffering?” said
Rep. Luis V. Gutiérrez (D-Ill.).
“That is what is wrong with Democrats. They don’t stand up.”
Schumer said he was not finished advocating for dreamers.
“This is not a trade-off for us,” he
said. “This is a very important
issue that we’re going to fight
hard for until we get it done.”
The plan for now is to suspend
the debt ceiling until Dec. 15 and
then revisit it with a vote by
Congress before then, but the
Treasury Department would retain flexibility to take emergency
steps, two congressional aides
said.
The short-term extensions for
the debt ceiling and government
funding are also expected to further cloud the prospects for enacting major tax cuts, Trump’s top
domestic priority. They effectively mean spending and budget
fights will continue for months,
just as the GOP was hoping to
coalesce around a plan to cut
taxes.
Trump tried to rally support for
his tax plan in North Dakota.
“Anybody that’s going to vote
against tax cuts and tax reforms —
whether it’s in North Dakota or
anybody else or any place else —
you’ve got to vote against them
and get them out of office, because it’s so, it is so bad,” Trump
said, pausing so that the crowd
could cheer. “This is not a close
one.”
The White House meeting took
place just as the House approved
the Harvey aid package, its first
major order of business after the
August recess.
The measure — providing
$7.4 billion for the Federal Emergency Management Agency and
$450 million for a disaster loan
program for small businesses —
passed 419 to 3, with 12 members
not voting. Reps. Thomas Massie
(R-Ky.), Justin Amash (R-Mich.)
and Andy Biggs (R-Ariz.) voted
no. It now moves to the Senate,
where leaders plan to hold a vote
by the end of the week.
Top House Republicans barely
veiled their frustration with
Trump’s decision to side with
Democrats on the debt ceiling.
House Rules Committee Chairman Pete Sessions (R-Tex.) said he
“would have not tied the knot so
tight” for December, saying an
extension till at least February
would have been better, but he
carefully avoided criticizing
Trump.
“We all do it differently,” Sessions said. “I think it was an
overly generous answer that he
gave our friends the Democrats.
But I’m not going to be critical of
my president. I support my president.”
Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.),
the chairman of the conservative
House Freedom Caucus, was
among those who warned that
Democrats’ short-term debt-limit
request could threaten GOP efforts to cut spending.
“Obviously getting a [continuing resolution] and the debt ceiling to not come due at the same
time would be the most prudent
fiscal decision we could make,”
Meadows told reporters.
mike.debonis@washpost.com
kelsey.snell@washpost.com
philip.rucker@washpost.com
elise.viebeck@washpost.com
Rucker reported from Mandan.
Damian Paletta, Abby Phillip, Paul
Kane and Jenna Johnson in
Washington contributed to this
report.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
PHOTOS BY RICKY CARIOTI/THE WASHINGTON POST
Harvey evacuee Jordan Vital, 26, and his girlfriend, Andrea Aragon, 20, pass the time around their living area Tuesday at Calvary Community Church in Houston.
A community forms at a Houston church turned shelter
SHELTERS FROM A1
spent their days kicking rubber
balls to one another between the
portable beds. The church’s pastor
said a prayer.
Along the back wall, Andrea
Aragon and Jordan Vital, under
their donated blankets and wearing their donated clothes, tried to
ignore the noise and sleep as long
as they could, knowing that Aragon, two months pregnant, needed rest. And knowing that flooding and looting had taken everything they had. And knowing that
when they eventually woke up
that day — nine days after Harvey
had first touched ground — they
would still be in a shelter.
‘God doesn’t like ugly’
Every day, the Texas Department of Public Safety publishes a
situation report listing the shelters still holding evacuees. There
were 32,202 people on the list that
Tuesday morning — 1,462 in rows
of military cots at Houston’s convention center downtown, 696 at a
suburban high school.
At Calvary Community, the
shelter had been operating for seven days, ever since Jeff McGee, the
church’s senior pastor, had done
the math, realized that the official
Red Cross facilities might not have
capacity in northwest Houston,
and put out a call for supplies and
volunteers. Now there were 72
evacuees in his worship hall, hundreds of travel-size shampoos in
his prayer room, and a pile of
pillows and quilts so high they’d
reached the top “S” on a massive
vertical “Jesus” banner.
Aragon and Vital had walked 17
miles across town to get here, and
Vital, 26, who had never stopped
marveling that he met his girlfriend on Instagram when he messaged her that she was the most
beautiful woman he’d ever seen,
made sure they stayed hydrated
and took breaks.
“God doesn’t like ugly,” Aragon’s
mother often said, so Aragon, 20,
had reminded herself to stay positive while they walked and while
the water filled the apartment they
had just moved into three weeks
before. And when, a few days later,
looters had taken the television,
PlayStation and vanity for which
they had spent two years saving.
“My mother says, if you could
get it once, you can get it again.
And that we need to be grateful for
what we have,” she reminded Vital
once they had woken up at Calvary
Community.
Car: flooded. Jobs: gone. The
shop where Aragon had done eyelash extensions told her they needed to reopen, but she couldn’t get
to work. The couple tried to be
grateful for the blue office chairs
they had arranged in a square
around their inflatable mattress,
creating the semblance of walls in
the shelter. They tried to be grateful for an outlet to charge their
iPhones.
“I’m going to look for a vacuum,” Vital said. He returned with
one a few minutes later and carefully cleaned under the chairs
while Aragon folded the used
clothing they had been given.
“How far are you along?” asked
a fellow evacuee, a motherlylooking woman who had heard
Aragon was pregnant. “Taking
your prenatal vitamins?”
“I don’t have them,” Aragon
said. Lost in the flood. “But there’s
some Ensures by the food table.
I’ve been drinking those.”
She took a shower in the single
available stall. Vital went out for
KFC because Aragon had been
craving chicken.
On the other side of the chair
barrier, a stranger was crying over
news about her house. Aragon and
Vital bowed their heads. Aragon
had been pregnant before, twice.
Two miscarriages. She knew miscarriages could be caused by stress.
“Bless us, oh Lord,” she said.
“For the gifts we are about to receive.”
‘A pretty prison’
The shelter was shelter, but the
time in it was loose. It slipped by,
divided not into hours but into
distractions: Teenagers stayed in
their beds, watching Hulu on their
laptops. A few people went to the
Spanish-language service in the
upstairs chapel even though they
didn’t speak Spanish. Juan Perez’s
wife, Joan Potter, had taken to
freshening up her air mattress
with a new throw every day and
posting the results on Facebook: “I
redecorated my boudoir.” There
was never anything new to look at.
“I’m so bored,” Wolf, 83, sighed
to Dumbaulb.
“You could take a nap, Omi,”
said Dumbaulb, 67, using the German word for “grandmother.” He
looked at his iPad, hoping to hear
from his daughter who was trying
to help him find a place.
There was nothing to do here
but try to get out.
A woman named Ginger Hol-
BELOW: Nash and Stephanie Ubale check in with the help desk at Houston’s Calvary Community
Church before heading to their flood-damaged home. Calvary had been operating as a shelter ever
since Jeff McGee, the church’s senior pastor, realized that the official Red Cross facilities in northwest
Houston might not have enough room. BOTTOM: The Ubales embrace after meeting with contractors.
comb found housing in San Antonio, where she had never been but
where she could bring her dogs. A
couple named Stephanie and
Nash Ubale were thinking of selling their house and moving out of
the city, too. Their home had been
flooded in the same week they had
held a funeral for their newborn
twins. “Did you lose everything?”
people had been asking. “We lost
everything and more,” they had
been responding.
The Calvary shelter was scheduled to close in three days’ time,
though the pastor was trying to
make sure everyone had a place to
go. The national news that they
saw seemed to have already
turned its attention to Hurricane
Irma and to be talking less about
the people still stuck in the Texas
shelters. Vital recharged his
phone again and again, depleting
his batteries with call after call to
apartments, hotels and friends.
Wolf had grown up in Nazi Berlin — Jewish but passing as Christian. When she was 6 or 7 years old,
the German chancellor had come
to visit her school and Wolf, as the
prettiest student, had been chosen
to greet him. That is how she
found herself presenting flowers
to Adolf Hitler.
“This is nothing,” she told people when they asked how she was
managing shelter life. “This is a
pretty prison,” she said. It was
nobody’s fault they were there but
the rain. Nobody could let them
out but the weather.
‘That must be the secret’
Midafternoon, Potter decided
she couldn’t stand being idle anymore. The ESL teacher wanted to
get her nails done at the closest
open Walmart. She wanted to drive
up and down the highway nearest
the shelter and stop at every available hotel looking for a room. McGee, the pastor, was doubtful she
would have success; people had
been calling hotels all day.
“I know, but I want them to see
me in person,” she had insisted, so
she and Perez got in their borrowed car and went to the Comfort Inn two miles down the road.
“Just checking — do you have
any space?” she asked the clerk,
who told her no but that she could
check back in an hour in case
something opened up.
“Are you all sold out?” she asked
at the Best Western, whose clerk
looked pained and apologetic.
“Do y’all —” she started at La
Quinta, but the woman behind the
desk was shaking her head before
Potter could finish the sentence.
“They said they’re booked until
September 20th,” Potter told Perez
as she came out of the Hampton
Inn.
He stepped out of the car for a
cigarette to calm his nerves. “Let’s
just get back,” he said. “I’m getting
hungry and irritated.”
The night before, Potter had
woken to hear her husband talking in his sleep for the first time in
their 23-year marriage. He was
screaming “Help me! Help me!”
into the darkness of the shelter.
When he woke up, he said he
didn’t remember. “Let’s go to one
more,” she said. “One more hotel.”
At the Country Inn, when Potter
came out of the lobby, she made a
double-V victory sign. “Excellent
news. We can 100 percent for sure
get a room on Monday. Maybe
even Saturday.”
Monday was six days away, Perez pointed out, and they had to be
out of the shelter by Friday.
“They have a breakfast area,”
she told him. “The rooms are
clean.”
They went back to the shelter.
They told the other evacuees sitting around a table about their
room at the Country Inn.
“You have to drive, to do it in
person,” she said, explaining how
they had lucked out.
Dumbaulb’s car was underwater somewhere. “I guess that must
be the secret,” he said. “I’m
amazed, and I’m jealous, and I’m
happy.” The table was quiet.
‘I will fear no evil’
“I wish I could listen to German
music,” Wolf said to Dumbaulb.
The worship hall, filled with air
mattresses this morning, was now
only half full. Teams of volunteers
deflated the mattresses left behind by the people who had been
lucky enough to leave.
Dumbaulb took out his iPad and
showed Wolf how a person could
search for almost anything on YouTube. Wolf leaned her chin on her
fists and listened to Marlene
Dietrich sing something slow and
haunting in her native tongue.
“There’s nothing worse than
not knowing where you’re going to
be in three days’ time,” he said.
“This feels right. Doesn’t it? For
this space right now — this sad
Marlene Dietrich song?”
Over along the far wall, Aragon
had changed for bed into a borrowed orange T-shirt with palm
trees on the front. She climbed
onto her air mattress and put in
her ear buds to watch an old episode of “Grey’s Anatomy” on her
iPhone. After a couple of minutes,
McGee took his position in the
middle of the raised platform to
offer the evening prayer.
“We as Christians often take
great comfort in the 23rd Psalm,” he
said and began to recite it: “Yea,
though I walk through the valley of
the shadow of death, I will fear no
evil: for thou art with me; thy rod
and thy staff, they comfort me.”
Aragon watched her phone as
the lights dimmed around her,
and someone coughed and another dog barked, and it was one
more night in the shelter again.
monica.hesse@washpost.com
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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Massive
hurricane
hurtles
toward Fla.
IRMA FROM A1
Rico itself, the hurricane still delivered lashing rain bands, damaging winds and warnings of flash
flooding.
On Wednesday, Irma hit Barbuda in the Leeward Islands, territories and commonwealths stretching southeast from Puerto Rico. A
weather station recorded sustained winds of 118 mph and a
wind gust to 155 mph before the
instrument failed, according to
the National Hurricane Center,
which called the storm’s conditions “life-threatening.”
This hurricane’s 185-mph maximum sustained winds are the
strongest recorded for a landfalling hurricane in the Atlantic
Ocean, tied with the 1935 Florida
Keys hurricane.
The National Hurricane Center
said on Wednesday evening that
Irma remains powerful and that
Puerto Rico should expect hurricane conditions through Wednesday night and could see as much
as 20 inches of rain in some places. The storm is projected to pass
by the Dominican Republic, Haiti
and Cuba in the next two days
before it could make landfall
somewhere in South Florida on
Sunday, though intense winds
could begin long before that.
In San Juan, Puerto Rico, people in the Hato Rey neighborhood
prepared for the storm under unusually calm, cool weather
Wednesday that gave way to a
light drizzle. People expect to lose
power, which is nothing unusual
for the neighborhood, where power often goes out for a few hours
after a heavy rainstorm.
The power went out at about
10:15 a.m. on Wednesday. Even
though her house was boarded
up, Rita Hernandez could hear
the singsong calls of “Yucca! Platanos!” from a pregonero — a
roaming fruit and vegetable vendor — making what was probably
his last run before the storm truly
arrived.
With the storm still days away,
it was relatively unusual for the
people of South Florida to go into
full-on storm preparation mode.
But this is a scary hurricane at a
moment when anyone paying attention to the news understands
what a big storm can do.
On Virginia Key, at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School
of Marine and Atmospheric Science, professor David Nolan was
putting heavy plastic over computer terminals, in case the roof
leaks during the storm. He said
his family plans to drive to Atlanta, while he’ll ride it out behind
storm shutters at his home in
JOE BURBANK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Shoppers await the arrival of a shipment of water in Altamonte Springs in central Florida in preparation for Hurricane Irma, which could
strike the state on Sunday. The Category 5 hurricane roared into the Caribbean on Wednesday and delivered heavy rain to Puerto Rico.
“That’s extremely bad. That’s basically every East Coast Florida city.
This could easily be the most expensive U.S. storm if this happens.”
Brian McNoldy, senior research associate at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, on the storm’s potential path
Coral Gables. But that plan could
change, he said. Lots of people are
still thinking this through.
The mood in South Florida, he
said, “is frantic.”
“Anxious, frantic,” chimed in
his colleague, senior research associate Brian McNoldy.
“I saw a gas-station-induced
car accident happen right in front
of me yesterday,” Nolan said.
McNoldy, who contributes to
The Washington Post’s Capital
Weather Gang, called up the model forecasts and showed how Irma
is expected to move in more or less
a straight line toward Florida,
west by northwest, but then hang
a sharp right to the north. That
track could send it right to McNoldy’s cubicle and on up the
Gold Coast, as if the storm were
trying to grind away a century of
urbanization.
“That’s extremely bad,” he said.
“That’s basically every East Coast
Florida city. This could easily be
the most expensive U.S. storm if
this happens.”
He hastened to add, as all forecasters do, that a forecast four or
five days in advance is typically off
by something like 185 miles, and
Irma could still veer west toward
the Gulf or stay east and never
make landfall.
But it could also go right up the
center of the peninsula.
“We’re surrounded by hot water,” McNoldy said. “The state itself is not good at doing damage to
hurricanes. It’s flat. It’s pretty wet,
so you’re not going to drag in dry
air. They don’t weaken much.”
The Florida Keys are particularly vulnerable. Monroe County,
home to the Keys, began mandatory evacuations of tourists and
visitors Wednesday morning. The
county’s 80,000 residents were
ordered to evacuate beginning
Wednesday evening.
The main drag in Key West,
Duval Street, was largely empty
Wednesday. Many storefronts already had been sandbagged and
boarded up. But some people will
ride out the storm — as Floridians
often do even when told they’re
supposed to leave.
At the Ernest Hemingway
Home and Museum, general manager Jacqui Sands said she’s not
going anywhere. She is charged
with securing the legendary author’s 19th-century estate as well
as ensuring the safety of the 55
cats that roam the lush grounds
here, many of them with six and
seven toes on each paw.
“If I didn’t have to, I wouldn’t
stay,” Sands said. “My kids told me
to get the hell out. But I have an
obligation to take care of the
building and the cats.”
The petite 72-year-old will be
joined by nine employees, four of
whom she has sent off to retrieve
storm shutters and plywood from
a nearby storage facility to board
up windows and doors. “They
couldn’t leave because either they
don’t have a car or couldn’t find a
flight out of here,” she said. “I
think we are going to be fine.”
At the Key West Port, the cruise
ships had long departed for safer
docks, and the inlet was devoid of
pleasure craft. Only four small
vessels remained in the marina,
including a 50-foot boat that ferries residents and hotel guests to
and from Sunset Key, a private,
27-acre resort located in waters
nearby.
The ship’s captain, William
“Harry” Privette, 80, said he’s never been caught in a hurricane.
“Every time, it either veered off
or never arrived,” he said. He
hopes to keep his track record
intact. “I know what happens
when they show up. I don’t want
to be here when this one does. It’s
nasty.”
Late Tuesday evening, some
mainstays, including Sloppy Joe’s,
kept the doors open for dozens of
straggling tourists. R.E.M.’s “It’s
the End of the World as We Know
It” blared through the speaker
system.
Broward County Mayor Barbara Sharief said mandatory evacuations would begin Thursday at
noon for people in the eastern
portion of the county that runs
alongside the Atlantic Ocean.
“This storm is bigger, faster
and stronger than Hurricane Andrew,” Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R)
said Wednesday, emphasizing
that even with Irma’s uncertain
trajectory, officials were preparing for a direct impact. “Do not sit
and wait for the storm to come. It
is extremely dangerous and deadly and will cause devastation. Get
prepared right now.”
Scott, who earlier this week
declared a statewide emergency,
has warned that Irma could re-
quire large-scale evacuations and
severely impact areas battered
last year by Hurricane Matthew,
which sent punishing flooding
into parts of the state. A state of
emergency was also declared in
North Carolina and South Carolina on Wednesday.
Officials across Florida responded to the dire forecasts by
slowly shutting down the contours of daily life. Schools closed;
the NFL postponed the Miami
Dolphins’ season opener scheduled for Sunday; the University of
Central Florida in Orlando, which
could face punishing weather if
Irma crawls up the coastline,
moved a football game to Friday
night; and the University of Miami — the Hurricanes — announced the cancellations of its
football game set for this Saturday
in Arkansas so the team doesn’t
have to travel.
Storm preparations also were
underway at two nuclear sites in
Florida — 45-year-old Turkey
Point 25 miles south of Miami and
41-year-old St. Lucie further north
along the coast. They belong to
NextEra, a utility with about 5
million electricity customers in
Florida. NextEra said that it will
shut down its four nuclear reactors before Irma makes landfall.
That will reduce the heat in the
reactors and the need for electricity.
NextEra also said that its reactors could weather a loss of electricity of the sort that caused a
meltdown at Japan’s Fukushima
Daiichi reactors after the tsunami
there in 2011. NextEra spokesman
Peter Robbins said that the nuclear plants have diesel generators located 20 feet above sea level
inside reinforced concrete structures.
People across Florida who
planned to ride out the storm
were clearing store shelves of water, food and supplies, and people
trying to drive north had to search
for gas — and hotel rooms. Many
streamed to South Florida’s airports.
At the Fort Lauderdale airport,
Sandy Lukaszewicz of Deerfield
Beach, Fla., showed the text she’d
sent Tuesday morning to her
brother-in-law in Indiana: “I’m
scared but I don’t want boog to
know it. She’s gonna witness
mother nature’s most powerful
ocean churn.”
“Boog” is her sister Karen Romanski, who had been visiting.
They saw Hurricane Irma reach
Category 5 intensity and early
Tuesday decided to evacuate, going online to nab four tickets to
Chicago on Southwest Airlines.
They were evacuating their mother, Virginia Gay, 87, and her friend
Thelma Leonard, 91, who sat patiently in wheelchairs Wednesday
near the Southwest ticket counter.
“I’ve been through Wilma. I’ve
been through Andrew. I saw
what’s coming,” said Lukaszewicz,
56. She said she noticed the storm
forming off the coast of Africa a
week or so ago and thought to
herself, “That looks like Andrew.”
“I wish I could stay home,” said
Gay, her mother. But her daughters had been emphatic, telling
her, according to Lukaszewicz:
“You have no choice. We made a
family decision. We’re going.”
The airport had been jammed
since before dawn with people
trying to get out of the state.
Florida’s peninsular geography
makes flight the best way to flee
an oncoming hurricane, but there
are only so many planes to catch.
By early Wednesday morning,
it was hard to get a seat on a plane
going anywhere. Seats that were
available still for purchase at Florida airports were often exorbitantly expensive, in the range of
$2,000.
Some of those who were leaving said modern technology, and
modern communications, helped
inform their decisions — and
made them easier.
“Back in the 1800s, people
wouldn’t have had a warning,”
said Renee Gray, flying with her
husband, Mitch, to their home in
Nashville after evacuating from
Islamorada, in the Florida Keys, at
4 a.m. “Today we’ve got warnings,
and we have to take advantage of
that.”
joel.achenbach@washpost.com
sandhya.somashekhar@washpost.com
mark.berman@washpost.com
Alvarado reported from Key West,
Fla.; Somashekhar and Berman
reported from Washington. Daniel
Cassaday in San Juan, Puerto Rico,
and Angela Fritz, Jason Samenow and
Steven Mufson in Washington
contributed to this report.
Airlines scramble and roads fill as hundreds of thousands rush to leave Fla.
Hurricane Irma could hit
South Florida between
Friday night and Monday
BY L UZ LAZO
AND L ORI A RATANI
Whether by plane, car or train,
hundreds of thousands of people
scrambled to get out of South
Florida on Wednesday ahead of
Hurricane Irma, a massive system forecasters say is the most
powerful storm to hit the Atlantic
Coast in more than a decade.
The storm, with maximum sustained winds near 185 mph,
moved over the Leeward Islands
Wednesday morning before moving to the northern Virgin Islands
and Puerto Rico.
Forecasters say it will reach
South Florida sometime between
Friday night and Monday.
To accommodate surging demand of people trying to flee,
airlines including American and
Delta added flights or brought in
larger planes and waived change
fees for passengers who need to
cancel or rebook their flights.
Even so, hundreds of flights
were canceled Wednesday, and
airlines strongly advised passengers to check before leaving for
the airport.
Late Wednesday, American
Airlines announced it would begin winding down its operations
in Florida and had canceled
flights at its Miami hub as well as
to airports in Fort Lauderdale,
Fort Myers, Sarasota and West
Palm Beach. In addition, it canceled a handful of international
flights from Europe and South
American that were scheduled to
land in Miami on Friday.
Many of those leaving Wednesday said they didn’t want to
gamble on getting stranded.
Janet and Tom Wrabel of Fairfield, Conn., had been visiting
their daughter in Fort Lauderdale
when they saw the storm brewing
and decided to cut their vacation
a couple of days short. Neither
was crushed, though this clearly
was suboptimal.
“We would rather be here reclining by a pool right now instead of getting on a plane,” said
Tom, 62, as the couple prepared
to leave.
Officials at Key West International Airport said they would
suspend commercial operations
at the end of the day Thursday,
and Miami International Airport
advised travelers it will halt operations at the airport when winds
reach 55 mph. Generally, airlines
do not operate in sustained crosswinds that exceed 35 mph, and
the Federal Aviation Administration tower ceases operations after
winds of 55 mph, the airport
noted.
On the state’s roadways, long
lines of cars and trucks could be
seen traveling north on the Florida Turnpike as tourists and residents fled the Florida Keys —
among the first areas to be under
a mandatory evacuation order.
Gas stations were also jammed as
Floridians rushed to fill their
tanks before Irma’s arrival. Grocery stores reported running out
of bottled water.
Airlines, still reeling from Harvey, which swept through Texas
last month, were preparing for
another hit.
Both American and Southwest
airlines have a significant presence in Florida and the Caribbean. American has a hub at Miami
International, and Southwest has
a large operation at Fort Lauderdale’s airport.
The travel picture is expected
to worsen as Irma moves closer to
Florida.
CHRIS URSO/TAMPA BAY TIMES/ASSOCIATED PRESS
On Wednesday at Tampa International Airport, Ron Fogle, 61, tells his mother, Marian, that he was
unable to get a seat on a flight and would need to rent a car and drive them to Tennessee. Fogle traveled
to Tampa to pick up his mother ahead of Hurricane Irma.
There were anecdotal reports
from travelers that airlines were
charging exorbitant fares for
flights out of areas in the path of
the storm, but airlines denied
that was the case.
Even so, Paul Hudson, president of the consumer rights advocate Flyers Rights, said the group
was checking into reports of fares
of up to $1,000 to get out of the
Miami area, where depending on
the destination, a one-way ticket
can typically go for as little as
$99.
Leigh Dow, a public relations
executive from Arizona, used her
twitter account to chide Delta Air
Lines for raising the price of a
ticket from Miami to Phoenix’s
Sky Harbor Airport from $547 to
$3,200.
Dow’s tweet was retweeted
more than 23,000 times.
She later tweeted Delta officials contacted her and the situation had been resolved.
Trebor Banstetter, a spokesman for Delta, said Dow was
apparently reacting to information from the travel website Expedia, but when she contacted the
airline directly, he said, “She got a
price she was happy with.”
“We have not increased prices
in response to the hurricane,”
Banstetter said.
Similarly, JetBlue was offering
travelers trying to get out of
Irma’s path remaining seats at
reduced fares ranging from
$99 to $159.
The main worry remained the
storm’s impact on South Florida,
home to 6 million people. President Trump on Tuesday declared
an emergency in the state as well
as the U.S. Virgin Islands and
Puerto Rico. Florida Gov. Rick
Scott (R) has ordered all 7,000
members of the Florida National
Guard to report for duty Friday.
Evacuations began Wednesday
morning in the Florida Keys, and
state transportation officials
were “aggressively clearing evacuation routes,” officials said.
The main routes out of South
Florida are Interstate 95 and the
Florida Turnpike, which can be
prone to gridlock on the best of
days. In an effort to ease congestion, the governor ordered that
no tolls be collected.
State officials say more mandatory evacuations would be ordered as the storm nears, and
some urged residents to evacuate
the area early and expect clogged
roadways.
“Do not sit and wait for this
storm to come,” Scott said in a
tweet. “Remember, we can rebuild your home — not your life.”
Airport officials also urged
caution, telling people to check
with their airlines before venturing out and urging people not to
use the airport as a shelter.
Meantime, residents who were
leaving were keeping those staying behind in their thoughts.
Betsy Weidenmuller, 71, had
booked a flight on Southwest out
of Fort Lauderdale on Sunday at
the urging of her son in New
Orleans, who had told her, “I
think this looks bad.”
Weidenmuller said most of her
neighbors are going to ride out
the storm with friends or relatives who have generators. As she
was heading to the airport, she
got a text from a neighbor offering to hurricane-proof her home.
Weidenmuller was struck by
the generosity. “It looks like keeping my neighbors supplied with
scones has really paid off,” she
said with a smile.
lori.aratani@washpost.com
luz.lazo@washpost.com
Joel Achenbach contributed to this
report from Florida.
A12
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
The World
Finding refuge in ‘church asylums’
In Germany, Christian pastors are housing Afghans, Iranians and others to defend them from deportation
BY
A LICE S U
berlin — Two guitar players
strummed and sang in Farsi as a
stream of Afghans and Iranians
knelt at the front of Trinity Lutheran Church, sipping wine from a
shared Communion cup. Most of
the congregants had arrived in
Germany within the last two years,
part of the refugee influx that’s
brought more than a million asylum seekers to the country since
2015.
At the peak of the crisis two
years ago, this Lutheran church
was holding mass baptisms of
more than 200 people at a time,
said the pastor, Gottfried Martens.
“This church went from just a few
hundred members to more than
1,300 Iranians and Afghans,” Martens said. “All converts.”
When Germany opened its
doors to refugees in 2015, churches
and church-affiliated organizations played a critical role in the
response. Most of them took care
to separate religion from humanitarian aid, especially those implementing state-funded relief projects. More than two years later,
however, some churches are more
actively defending refugees, even
housing rejected asylum seekers
in churches so German police cannot deport them, while submitting
legal appeals for their cases. Many
of these “church asylum” beneficiaries have also converted, a controversial act that’s drawn criticism from Islamic groups and
skepticism from German authorities.
Downstairs at the Lutheran
church, 12 rejected asylum seekers
were living in the basement. Iranian Ali Karimi, 44, said he’d been in
the church building for almost six
months. Karimi had fled to Germany after being imprisoned
twice in Iran for political activism,
he said, and had become a Christian while taking refuge in this
building. “I’m looking for a religion that doesn’t force, push or
kill,” Karimi said.
Refugees in the European
Union are subject to a law called
the Dublin Regulation, which requires that asylum seekers process
their papers in the country where
they entered the E.U. Karimi came
in through Italy, so Germany could
send him back there under the
Dublin Regulation, as it tried to do
with 29,507 asylum seekers in the
first half of 2017. Yet, only 3,085 of
those people were actually deported. One way to avoid deportation is
through church asylum, in which
people like Karimi live in churches
for six months, after which German law allows asylum seekers to
process their requests in Germany
instead.
There are 351 church asylum
locations in Germany, according
to Asyl in der Kirche, a network of
German parishes offering safe
houses. They host 551 people, including 127 children and 301 Dublin cases. Legally, German police
can deport both Dublin cases and
rejected asylum seekers, a phenomenon that has increased for
Afghans in particular. Germany
started deporting hundreds of Afghans in 2016, sending them on
charter flights back to Afghanistan, despite the country’s growing instability. If refugees are living on church grounds, however,
Catalonia
lawmakers
set vote on
secession
BY
main churches’ aversion to conversion, but also rejected Alboga’s
accusation of active missions
work. “We are not doing mission
work among Muslims,” Martens
said. “But people who come here
are fed up with Iran and Afghanistan, and looking for an alternative. I don’t think we should patronize them and say, ‘You should
know there is a better Islam than
this.’ This is religious freedom.”
Though some of the converts
may be pretending for the sake of
bettering their chances at asylum,
others point out that changing religion has made their lives harder.
“I can’t believe when people ask,
‘Didn’t you just come here for a
better life?’ ” said 32-year-old
Saeed Hassan, who was jailed
twice in Iran, for political dissent
and for getting caught with alcohol and his girlfriend. Resentment
toward religious government
made him first an atheist and then
a Christian.
He fled Tehran in 2015 when
Iranian police caught him with a
Bible in his car, eventually arriving
in Berlin, where he has yet to receive refugee status. His parents
have since divorced, he said, fighting over whether their son should
risk return to Iran instead of struggling to survive in Europe. He
hasn’t seen his wife in two years,
and he’s been drinking more and
more recently to fight off loneliness.
“I had everything in Iran,” Hassan said. “My wife, my car, my
house in the north — you think I
want this ‘better life’ in camps and
hiding, alone for two years now? I
choose to believe in Jesus. But for
everything else — to run, to be a
refugee, to come to Germany — I
did not have a choice.”
madrid — Catalan lawmakers
voted Wednesday to allow regional authorities to officially call an
Oct. 1 referendum on a split from
Spain, making concrete a yearslong defiance of central authorities, who insist the referendum is
illegal.
The cabinet that makes up the
executive branch of Catalonia’s
government later unanimously
endorsed the vote calling for the
“binding self-determination referendum,” and regional President
Carles Puigdemont signed the
document late Wednesday.
In an effort to rein in one of the
country’s deepest political crises
in recent years, Spain’s conservative government threatened to
challenge in the country’s top
court the Catalan parliament’s decision to allow the vote.
Tensions flared at the plenary
session in Barcelona when the
regional parliament’s top speaker,
Carme Forcadell, announced that
the vote on the bill would go
ahead without the customary vetting of a legal committee.
The “referendum bill” was included at the last minute in
Wednesday’s agenda.
The pro-independence coalition governing Catalonia, where a
strong Catalan identity is built
around the region’s language and
traditions, says the bill will legitimize a binding vote on breaking
away from Spain on the basis of a
right to self-determination.
The national government,
however, maintains that the referendum violates the country’s constitution because only the central
authorities can make such a call.
Spain’s constitutional court has
previously ruled that any step taken toward a referendum on secession would be illegal. Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy on Wednesday urged the court to take punitive measures against the Catalan
legislative body’s committee of
speakers, including Forcadell.
Wednesday’s parliamentary
session was an “embarrassing
show” and “a kick to democracy,
to Catalans and to political decency,” said Deputy Prime Minister
Soraya Sáenz de Santamaría.
Rajoy has vowed to use all legal
measures to ensure that a referendum does not take place and has
ordered his cabinet to be ready to
challenge the constitutionality of
the bill if it ends up being passed.
The Spanish government is trying to strike a delicate balance
between offsetting the secessionist defiance and staying away
from more dramatic measures
that would further inflame antiSpanish sentiment, such as suspending Catalonia’s autonomous
powers or declaring a state of
emergency that would involve the
military.
A secession vote is also not
recognized by most of the national political opposition. The leaders of the Socialists and the business-friendly Ciudadanos party
declared support for the government in fighting the vote.
foreign@washpost.com
— Associated Press
ALICE SU FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
police won’t enter.
Germany’s church asylum
movement dates to 1983, when a
parish in Berlin protected three
Palestinian families from deportation to Lebanon amid its civil war.
Hundreds of refugees have sought
German church asylum since
then, with a success rate of more
than 75 percent.
“The law doesn’t say that police
can’t enter the church. But they
don’t do it. It’s something sacred,”
said Martina Domke, head of migration at the Cologne office of
Diakonie, the social welfare organization of Germany’s Protestant churches. “The churches said:
Sometimes from a humanitarian
or a Christian point of view, the law
is not correct,” Domke said.
Conversion is both a side effect
of church relief and a potential
advantage for rejected asylum
seekers, who can claim deeper
need for asylum if they are at risk
of religious persecution in their
home country. What’s tricky for
both authorities and church leaders is determining whether a convert’s faith is real. Many of Martens’s church members have been
rejected and told they are not really Christian, which Martens said is
a cause of contention between authorities and the church.
“Pastors say, ‘I know this man.
He is a Christian,’ and they say,
‘He’s just cheating,’ ” Martens said.
One of his congregation members
was asked what illness Martin Luther died of, he said, and when he
ASSOCIATED PRESS
TOP: Members of a church in southern Berlin serve Iranian
stew after Sunday service to a congregation of mostly Iranian
and Afghan converts. ABOVE: Pastor Gottfried Martens,
pastor of Trinity Lutheran Church in Berlin, prays with
Iranians during a baptism service. Many “church asylum”
beneficiaries have converted to Christianity, drawing criticism
from Islamic groups and skepticism from German authorities.
couldn’t answer, he was told he
wasn’t a Christian.
“We as churches don’t want to
support cheating via religion.
That’s why we check so carefully —
if someone can’t explain to me why
he wants to be a Christian, I won’t
baptize him,” Martens said.
Bekir Alboga, general secretary
of the Turkish-Islamic Union for
Religious Affairs, Germany’s largest Islamic organization, said converting refugees is a form of abuse.
“You want to give bread in one
hand and a Bible in the other,”
Alboga said, adding that the main
reason Islamic groups don’t do as
much for refugees as Christian
groups is because of their legal
status. Germany’s two main
churches are highly structured
and close to the state, with long-established status as public “corporations” that can own land, collect
taxes and receive government
money to implement social welfare projects. Germany’s mosques
and Islamic associations have not
attained that status.
“Almost all support and work
for refugees are paid from the government to church organizations,”
Alboga said.
Church leaders say government
money is exactly why conversion is
not a goal of the mainstream German church. “We’re paid by the
government, so our work must be
open to everyone. We have to follow humanitarian principles and
Christian principles,” Domke said,
adding that those latter principles
influence Diakonie’s worldview
but don’t compel it to recruit others into its religion.
“The Protestant church says: Jesus was a refugee, so love the other
person. But we’re not trying to
make them part of a group.”
Martens disagreed with the
A RITZ P ARRA
DIGEST
SOMALIA
U.S. drone strike kills
3 al-Shabab militants
A U.S. military drone strike has
killed three members of the alShabab extremist group in
Somalia, the U.S. Africa
Command said Wednesday.
The airstrike was carried out
Tuesday morning in the Bay
region, about 45 miles west of the
capital, Mogadishu, the U.S.
statement said.
“We assess no civilians were
anywhere near the site,” said a
spokesman for the U.S. Africa
Command, Lt. Cmdr. Anthony
Falvo. He said he did not have
identities for the extremists
killed.
The al-Shabab members were
operating “in close proximity to”
Somali army forces and African
Union forces in the area “and
were deemed as a credible threat,”
Falvo said.
The U.S. military has carried
out several airstrikes against
fighters with the al-Qaeda-linked
al-Shabab in the Horn of Africa
nation since President Trump
approved expanded military
operations against the group.
The shift includes more
Mubarak but has been the target
of a sweeping crackdown since
2013, when the military
overthrew Brotherhood-aligned
President Mohamed Morsi and
Sissi attained power.
aggressive airstrikes and
considering parts of southern
Somalia areas of active hostilities.
A 22,000-strong multinational
African Union force known as
AMISOM has been helping to
support Somalia’s fragile central
government after more than two
decades as a failed state. Both it
and the U.S. military are trying to
prepare Somalia’s military to take
over the country’s security before
AMISOM’s planned departure by
the end of 2020.
— Associated Press
GERMANY
Merkel seeks support
in ‘turbulent times’
— Associated Press
EGYPT
Sissi backs torture,
rights group says
An international rights group
says Egyptian President Abdel
Fatah al-Sissi has given a “green
light” to systematic torture inside
detention facilities, allowing
officers to act with “almost total
impunity.”
In a 63-page report released
Wednesday, Human Rights Watch
says Sissi, a U.S. ally who was
warmly received at the White
House this year, is pursuing
stability “at any cost” and has
allowed the widespread torture of
detainees despite its being
RITCHIE B. TONGO/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/EFE
People take photos of an approaching C-130 military plane in Taipei,
Taiwan. Plane spotting is a hobby of aircraft enthusiasts who track
the movement of planes, recording details and taking photographs.
outlawed by the Egyptian
constitution.
“Impunity for the systematic
use of torture has left citizens
with no hope for justice,” said Joe
Stork, deputy Middle East
director at the New York-based
group.
Egypt’s Foreign Ministry
slammed the report in a
statement Wednesday, saying it
is full of inaccuracies and
undermines the sovereignty of
the state and the role of its
national institutions.”
Most of the detainees are
alleged supporters of the Muslim
Brotherhood group, which rose
to power after the 2011 uprising
that toppled President Hosni
Chancellor Angela Merkel
warned German voters on
Wednesday not to risk allowing
an untested left-wing alliance to
take power after this month’s
national election, urging them to
stick with her in “turbulent
times.”
Less than three weeks before
the Sept. 24 vote, politicians and
media in Germany are turning
their attention to the possible
coalitions that could form after
the election, from which no single
party is expected to emerge with a
clear majority.
Merkel, 63, leads a “grand
coalition” of her conservatives
and the left-leaning Social
Democrats (SPD) — a tie-up
neither wants to repeat.
Merkel wants to avoid being
outflanked by a coalition of the
SPD, the far-left Linke and the
environmentalist Greens, who
have held exploratory talks about
the possibility of joining forces in
a “Red-Red-Green,” or “R2G,”
coalition.
— Reuters
Pope begins Colombia visit: Pope
Francis headed to Colombia to try
to help heal the wounds of Latin
America’s longest-running armed
conflict. During a deeply symbolic
five-day visit starting Wednesday,
Francis is expected to press
Colombian leaders to address the
social and economic disparities
that fueled five decades of armed
rebellion, while urging ordinary
Colombians to balance their need
for justice with forgiveness.
Woman is not Dali’s daughter,
DNA said to show: DNA tests on
the exhumed body of Salvador
Dali showed that a Spanish
woman who brought a paternity
suit was not his daughter, the
surrealist painter’s foundation
said. The court supervising the
tests had informed its lawyers
that Maria Pilar Abel was not
Dali’s daughter, the foundation
said. A court spokesman declined
to confirm the results.
— From news services
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
SU
Outcry follows killing of Indian journalist who criticized Modi
Gauri Lankesh, an
activist against Hindu
nationalism, was shot
BY
V IDHI D OSHI
new delhi — The killing of a
prominent journalist and government critic outside her home in
Bangalore prompted protests in
major Indian cities Wednesday
and a national uproar about the
shrinking space for free speech in
the world’s most populous democracy.
Gauri Lankesh, 55, was shot in
the head and chest Tuesday on her
doorstep by motorcycle-riding
gunmen.
Although police have not yet
identified suspects or possible
motives, Lankesh’s death is widely
being attributed to her work as a
journalist and activist.
“They want us to be intimidated,” said Paranjoy Guha Thakurta,
former editor of the academic
journal Economic and Political
Weekly, speaking at the Press Club
here. “I hope that a thousand
Gauri Lankeshes will be born and
MANJUNATH KIRAN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Indian protesters take part in a rally condemning the killing of
journalist Gauri Lankesh, 55, in Bangalore. Her publication, Gauri
Lankesh Patrike, was known for its irreverence toward politicians
and coverage of issues that affect marginalized people.
will rise among us.”
Lankesh was a vocal critic of
Indian Prime Minister Narendra
Modi and the rising far-right Hindu nationalism associated with
his party. Her death follows a
string of recent killings that targeted leftist academics and scholars, activists said.
The activist was given a state
funeral in Bangalore, where her
body was displayed in a glass case
adorned with marigolds.
Activists gathered at the Press
Club and in cities across India
holding signs that read, “#IamGauri” and “Who is next?” They
shouted, “May Gauri Lankesh remain immortal.”
The killing was condemned by
organizations such as Amnesty
International. The U.S. Embassy
in India said in a statement: “The
U.S. Mission in India joins advocates of press freedom in India
and worldwide in condemning
the murder of respected journalist Gauri Lankesh in Bangalore.
We offer our sincere condolences
to the family, friends, and colleagues of Ms. Lankesh.”
Her death has been compared
to the killings of other writers and
scholars in recent years. “I think
there should be no doubt in our
mind that she has been killed
because of her work as a journalist,” said Siddharth Varadarajan,
editor of online news outlet the
Wire. He said that police officers
did not properly investigate the
other deaths and that the failure
encouraged those who killed
Lankesh.
According to the Committee to
Protect Journalists, at least 27
journalists have been killed in
India since 1992. According to the
World Press Freedom Index, India fell three points in 2017, ranking 136 out of 180 countries.
Lankesh’s killing is the most
high profile in recent years. She
edited a popular regional tabloid
called Gauri Lankesh Patrike,
known for its irreverence toward
politicians and its coverage of issues that affected the most marginalized sections of society.
“She was very respected and
well-known,” said Ramesh Aroli,
who teaches journalism at Kamala Nehru College at the University
of Delhi and who is writing a
doctoral thesis about Lankesh Patrike. “People used to call her
office to complain about corrupt
politicians.”
Lankesh Patrike was started by
Lankesh’s father, P. Lankesh, a
poet and literary giant in Karnataka. When it first came out in the
1980s, the publication significantly altered the regional media
scene, poking fun at politicians
and spotlighting issues that mattered to the rural and semi-urban
populations of the state, rather
than catering to city dwellers.
Gauri Lankesh inherited the
paper in 2000 when her father
died. But differences with her
brother resulted in a split, and in
2005, Lankesh started her own
publication. This week’s issue carried a cover story about a former
chief minister of Karnataka who
had previously been arrested for a
corruption scandal, with a headline that read, “Once again, the
Chronic
shortages
worsen
HIV crisis
VENEZUELA FROM A1
So an hour after first light one
August morning, she was doing
just that. Her eyebrows furrowed as she approached the clinic’s black gates.
Doctors inside were struggling
to cope with a surging HIV/AIDS
crisis that experts fear could become the worst in Latin America
in years. In a country where a
six-pack of condoms — which can
prevent transmission — costs almost a full day’s minimum wage,
the number of newly infected
patients was jumping. Surging
prices and shortages of medicines
and food, meanwhile, were hitting those already infected, with
increasingly devastating consequences.
“Hola, mi amor,” a grinning
guard at the gate said, sizing up
Hernández. She couldn’t afford
breakfast, but she had managed
blue eye shadow and a dash of
fuchsia on her lips that matched
her skintight leggings. His smirk
said he knew she was not from
around here — a middle-class
district. This woman was pure
Catia, one of the capital’s toughest slums.
“What are you looking for today, my love?” he said.
She took a second, hugging
herself in a knockoff Adidas jacket that hid the loose skin from her
rapid weight loss.
“Viraday,” she said.
“I need Viraday.”
Sickness and shortage
Already living with the
world’s highest inflation rate and
an increasingly repressive government, Venezuelans are facing
an imploding health system.
During the 14-year rule
of President Hugo Chávez, a charismatic socialist who died in 2013,
oil-rich Venezuela was praised by
health experts for its HIV prevention programs and free treatment. But the national health
system is now buckling as years
of government mismanagement
and corruption, coupled with
lower oil prices, have plunged the
economy into chaos. Authorities
import many drugs, including
antiretrovirals, at discounted
rates via the Pan American
Health Organization. But the local currency is in free fall, putting
those cut-rate drugs, as well as
basic imported medical supplies
such as needles and saline, increasingly out of reach.
Amid the cascading medical
crises is the spike in complications from HIV/AIDS. Free HIV
tests have been mostly unavailable since November. Pinched by
costs, prevention programs offering free condoms ceased last
year. Amid pill shortages, otherwise healthy carriers like Hernández are going weeks, sometimes
months, without antiretroviral
drugs.
As a result, Caracas’s largest
hospitals are now scrambling to
cope with an influx of both newly
infected and deteriorating HIV
patients, their emaciated bodies
evoking the distressing images
that defined the virus in the
1980s.
MANU QUINTERO FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
“We used to have about one or
two HIV patients a day; now we
have four and five, up to 25 a
week,” said María Eugenia Landaeta, head of infectious diseases
at Caracas University Hospital,
one of the capital’s largest medical centers. “We’ve had too many
patients die because we can’t offer treatment.”
“It is,” she said, “a nightmare.”
According to statistics from
the United Nations’ AIDS agency,
based on information from Venezuela’s Health Ministry, the
number of AIDS-related deaths in
the country surged 25 percent to
2,500 between 2010 and 2016,
even as they fell 12 percent on
average across Latin America.
Many Venezuelan medical experts believe the numbers could
be even higher.
The number of newly diagnosed infections in Venezuela fell
slightly during the same period,
easing to 6,500 from 7,000 annually, according to the figures. But
shortages of medication, the lack
of tests and the disintegrating
economy, experts say, appear to
be sharply worsening the HIV
crisis now, making the country an
outlier in a region that is generally making gains against the virus.
Severe shortages of HIV drugs
go back to at least April, doctors
say. But before July, the state
clinic Hernández counts on had
regularly supplied her with the
combination
drug
Viraday,
known as Atripla in the United
States. Its powerful compounds
act against the enzymes that
cause the HIV infection to
spread.
“When they told me they ran
out, I left, sat down on the street
and cried,” Hernández said. “I
couldn’t stop. People passed by
and stared.”
Venezuela’s Health Ministry
did not respond to repeated calls
and written requests for comment.
The government of Nicolás
Maduro, Chávez’s anointed successor, has routinely rejected of-
fers of international humanitarian aid. Nonprofit groups say Venezuelan authorities have refused
even small-scale help.
Jesús Aguais, founder of AID
for AIDS International, said his
nonprofit used to have a permit to
bring up to $2 million worth of
HIV drugs into Venezuela annually. Without citing a reason, the
government abruptly refused to
renew its license in 2014, he said.
“We send drugs to 42 countries,” said Aguais. “What is happening in Venezuela hasn’t happened anywhere else.”
Out of options
The AIDS patients at Caracas
University Hospital are a vision
that haunts Hernández. Last year,
she went to the facility for lab
work.
“I remember an extremely
skinny one in a wheelchair,” she
said. “It affected me.”
Today, some of the hospital’s
hallways are darkened by burnedout bulbs; one hallway has a
MANU QUINTERO FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
TOP: Jesús Morales, an HIV patient, lies on a bed in Caracas University Hospital.
Retroviral drugs have grown scarce, leaving doctors with few options for treatment.
ABOVE: Laura López eats her dinner — pasta and a single chicken wing — at the hospital.
Skyrocketing food prices have hit all Venezuelans. For HIV carriers, who require a good
calorie intake for their weakened immune systems, they are a crippling blow.
caved-in floor. On a recent
day, the 14 beds reserved for HIV
patients in the infectious-disease
ward were filled. So the spillover
went to internal medicine, a 150bed unit that was 40 percent
occupied with patients suffering
from HIV/AIDS complications.
In one large ward, AIDS patients, some wasting and shriveled, languished in their
beds. The stench of diarrhea
floated in the halls; there was
little medication to treat it. If
patients need IV dips or many
antibiotics, they have to buy
them.
Many can’t afford it. A destitute 31-year-old AIDS patient, a
hairdresser who had been splitting his antiretroviral pills in half
to make them last, lay in a fetal
position in his bed. Skipping doses or taking insufficient amounts
of the medication for weeks, doctors say, can increase the virus’s
tolerance of HIV drugs, allowing
it to spread.
The young man’s feet were
scaly and white, a sign of dehydration. His mouth hung open,
his eyes wide in their jutting
sockets.
Lacking the right antibiotic to
treat him or IVs to rehydrate his
rail-thin body, his doctor prescribed an antacid and a plastic
bottle for drinking tap water. The
complication: The hospital’s water supply, doctors said, had been
contaminated by bacteria.
“We can discharge them, which
is often safer for them,” said David Flora, a medical resident in
the ward.
“Or we can watch them die.
Those are really our choices.”
‘Scared of decaying’
Parrots squawked in distant
palms as Carmen Hernández
strode through Catia, the western
Caracas slum where she
was raised. This was her market
day, four days before she would go
back to the clinic in search of
meds, and she felt weak.
Her irregular jobs as a hairdresser and errand runner
earned her about 60,000 bolívares, or $4, a week — a sum that
didn’t go very far, even in Catia.
Skyrocketing food prices have hit
all Venezuelans. For HIV carriers,
who require a good calorie intake
fear of jail.”
Lankesh’s articles had prompted death threats and abuse on
social media and on the phone,
friends said. In November
2016, she was convicted of defamation, a criminal charge in India, after she published an article
alleging that local leaders of the
Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party were involved in a scam
to cheat a jeweler.
“She was not an intellectual
like her father, per se,” said Umapathy, a journalist and friend of
Lankesh who goes by only one
name. “But she was a firebrand
activist, much more so than her
father was.”
At the Press Club here, people
paid tributes to Lankesh’s work on
behalf of people historically underrepresented in India: women,
those in low castes and the poor. A
student activist recalled how
Lankesh had donated her own
money to help a struggling fellow
student pay for his studies abroad.
Close friends of Lankesh expressed disbelief at the news of
her death. “I wish it was a dream,”
said Bharathi Gowda, who knew
Lankesh for three decades. “Her
family is in shock.”
vidhi.doshi@washpost.com
for their weakened immune systems, they are a crippling blow.
But Hernández didn’t let the
street vendors smell blood.
“How much?” she demanded of
a butcher, asking the price of
carapacho, or chicken carcasses
with the meat removed. It’s
a popular dish for a growing
number of Venezuelans. They
make soups, suck out marrow.
“Five thousand,” he replied,
meaning 5,000 bolívares — about
30 cents.
“What? For bones!” she exclaimed. She puffed air out of her
cheeks, moving on.
“They used to give it away for
free,” she said.
Thirty minutes later, she’d
spent 70 percent of her weekly
salary on three days of food.
Hernández is down to just tea
for breakfast, and usually eats
one or two meals later in the day.
But prices for some foods — tomatoes, corn flour — have doubled in
recent weeks. So she’s cut back
even more. She couldn’t tell if it
was that, or four weeks without
Viraday, causing the pounds to
fall off.
Last year, her cousin died of
HIV complications. She gave in,
Hernández said, by not taking her
meds. Hernández can understand. Life is hard in Venezuela,
but it’s a lot harder with HIV.
“I’m scared of decaying,” she
said.
Her walk home takes her past a
trash heap and up a hill. On the
way, there’s graffiti from the progovernment thugs that now run
Catia, controlling distribution of
subsidized food and instilling
fear through violence. Painted on
another wall, the eyes of Chávez
loom large.
She liked Chávez, even loved
him. He fought, she said, for the
poor. But under Maduro, she said,
people in Catia were casting votes
for the government out of fear.
“Everything is a disaster, and
they rob so much,” she said.
In her aluminum-walled tworoom hut, she occupied herself
making tea. These days, her adult
children come by sometimes, but
none of them are helping her with
food. They have families, their
own mouths to feed.
She was diagnosed with HIV in
2013. Her husband had recently
left her, she said, plunging her
into a depression eased by men
and liquor. She had no idea who
gave her the virus. “It doesn’t
matter,” she said. “I have it.”
Lottery of life
After being waved in by the
clinic guard on the morning in
early August, Hernández rushed
toward a pharmacy window in a
small courtyard. She took a clipboard and signed in.
She sat down on a bench, chewing her lip and watching as patients were called to the window.
One man asked for a different
HIV drug. “No, we don’t have it,
sorry,” a doctor said. The patient
closed his eyes and sighed.
The next man — an older patient — was looking for the same
drug.
“Nothing, sir. Hasn’t arrived,”
the doctor said.
“Hernández, Carmen,” a doctor
finally called out from the window.
She rushed forward.
“Viraday,” Hernández said.
No, they didn’t have it.
But they did have the generic.
The doctor told Hernández she
was lucky. Only 500 monthly doses had arrived for 2,900 patients.
“What happens to the patients
who come next week?” Hernández asked.
The doctor looked down, shaking her head.
anthony.faiola@washpost.com
A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
U.S. places sanctions on 3 South Sudanese o∞cials
BY
C AROL M ORELLO
The United States on Wednesday placed sanctions on three
close associates of South Sudan’s
president, saying they had personally profited from a climate of
corruption in a government that
has been called a kleptocracy.
The Treasury Department imposed sanctions on Gen. Malek
Reuben Riak Rengu, the army’s
deputy chief of staff in charge of
military procurement; and Michael Makuei Lueth, South Sudan’s information minister. In addition, sanctions were placed on
Paul Malong Awan, who was chief
of staff of the South Sudan People’s
Liberation Army until President
Salva Kiir fired him in May. Three
companies owned or controlled
by Riak also were sanctioned.
The Treasury Department said
the sanctions were in response to
the deteriorating humanitarian
situation in South Sudan and the
role of officials in undermining
stability and peace.
“These actions send a clear
message to those enriching themselves at the expense of the South
Sudanese people that we will not
let them exploit the U.S. financial
system to move and hide the proceeds of their corruption,” said
Sigal Mandelker, undersecretary
for terrorism and financial intelligence. “Treasury will forcefully respond to the atrocities ongoing in
South Sudan by targeting those
who abuse human rights, seek to
derail the peace process and obstruct reconciliation in South Sudan.”
State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said in a statement that the Trump administration will increasingly scrutinize
South Sudanese officials.
“This is a man-made crisis, and
one the Government of South Su-
dan can stop,” she said.
The sanctions come days after
Kiir met in the capital of Juba with
a senior U.S. official who raised
concerns about the violence
sweeping South Sudan and the
dangers posed to humanitarian
workers trying to reach starving
people amid a civil war.
Mark Green, administrator of
the U.S. Agency for International
Development, said he warned Kiir
that the administration is reviewing U.S. policy toward South Sudan, but Kiir dismissed all his
concerns. The following day, after
he visited U.N. and church compounds where tens of thousands
of ethnic minorities have sought
protection from government
forces who have looted their
homes and killed people, Green
told reporters that he thought Kiir
should visit the same sites and
observe the truth firsthand.
The timing of the sanctions so
soon after Green’s visit suggests
that while the measures were already in the works, they could
have been averted if Kiir had acknowledged the lawlessness and
government corruption and
agreed to improve the situation.
The United States has spent
about $730 million this year on
humanitarian aid to people uprooted by almost four years of
conflict.
South Sudan is the newest and
one of the poorest countries in the
world. It declared independence
from Sudan in 2011, and war
erupted two years later over a
falling-out between Kiir and his
vice president, a political rival.
Since then, 2 million civilians
have been displaced inside South
Sudan, and another 2 million have
fled as refugees to neighboring
countries. In the chaos engulfing
the country, 83 humanitarian aid
workers have been killed, making
. THURSDAY,
it the most dangerous place in the
world for them to work.
In 2014, President Barack
Obama placed sanctions on six
military officers in South Sudan,
including one who commands opposition troops. None ranked as
high or was as closely linked to
Kiir as those sanctioned Wednesday.
Officials from the United Nations and donor countries have
visited South Sudan recently to
urge Kiir to participate in peace
negotiations. Almost all have said
the government is as much to
blame for the violence and resulting famine as the opposition
troops fighting it.
A report last year in the Sentry,
an investigative group funded by
actor George Clooney, said top
officials in South Sudan have accumulated fortunes while war
and atrocities have pushed the
country to the edge of collapse.
The State Department’s latest human rights report cited the Sentry’s conclusion that South Sudan’s government is a kleptocracy.
SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
The Treasury Department said
Riak was responsible for planning
offensives in which civilians were
targeted and human rights abuses
occurred. It said he had entered
into contracts with inflated
prices, for which he received kickbacks.
According to the Treasury Department, Malong ordered army
units to block the movement of
humanitarian supplies for hungry
civilians, claiming that food
would be diverted to militias instead. Treasury said that after Malong was fired and fled Juba, he
was reportedly stopped carrying
millions of U.S. dollars allegedly
stolen from the army.
Makuei, as information minister, was accused of advocating actions that obstructed the delivery
of humanitarian aid. Last week,
Makuei said in a news conference
that the government will review
the mandate for U.N. peacekeepers to operate in South Sudan
when it is scheduled for renewal
in December.
carol.morello@washpost.com
U.S. o∞cials mix messages
on threat of North Korea
Military action, sanctions
and offers of diplomacy
have all been on the table
BY
A NNE G EARAN
President Trump’s approach to
the rapidly rising threat from
North Korea has veered from empathy for the country’s bellicose
leader to finger-pointing at China
to quick-tempered threats of possible military action.
The administration’s goals and
tactics have also shifted, from isolating North Korea to reassuring
leader Kim Jong Un that the United States won’t overthrow him to
threats of, as Defense Secretary
Jim Mattis put it, “annihilation.”
Before Pyongyang’s sixth and
largest nuclear test Sunday,
Trump had said U.S. military options were “locked and loaded”
should North Korea behave rashly.
On Wednesday, Trump sounded subdued and statesmanlike.
“We’re going to see what happens,” Trump said when asked
whether he is considering military
action against North Korea. “We’ll
see what happens. Certainly, that’s
not our first choice, but we will see
what happens.”
While Trump has accused his
predecessors of not being tough
on North Korea, the zigzagging
U.S. response and the president’s
willingness to talk openly about a
military attack could be creating
its own set of problems by raising
the price of an eventual deal and
probably making negotiations impossible for now, Asia security
analysts said.
“Kim Jong Un is not begging for
war,” said Daniel Russel, who was
the State Department’s top diplomat for Asia until earlier this year.
“What he wants is not conflict but
some kind of major concession”
from the United States and its
allies South Korea and Japan.
Kim, in contrast to Trump, has
been relentlessly consistent.
During Trump’s nearly eight
months in office, North Korea’s
leader has, as promised, accelerated development of a more powerful nuclear weapon and longrange missiles that could deliver a
warhead to U.S. shores. The goal,
Asia security specialists said, is to
cut off U.S. military options and
force the United States and the
rest of the world to make concessions.
“Kim Jong Un has a very scrutable game plan,” said Russel, now a
fellow at the Asia Society Policy
Institute. “Leverage his nuclear
threat and monetize it.”
That strategy predates Trump,
and U.S. officials have complained
about a shakedown for years.
But Trump’s response has been
far different from recent adminis-
trations’ and, at times, has seemed
more off the cuff than the result of
deliberative planning.
He recently mused about cutting off all trade with nations that
do business with North Korea, a
practical impossibility and a proposal at odds with the U.S. strategy
of engaging China and other nations in international economic
sanctions against North Korea.
Trump spoke to Chinese President Xi Jinping on Wednesday
and told reporters that the 45minute conversation about North
Korea was productive.
“President Xi would like to do
something. We’ll see whether or
not he can do it,” Trump said. “But
we will not be putting up with
what’s happening in North Korea.
I believe that President Xi agrees
with me 100 percent. He doesn’t
want to see what’s happening
there, either.”
On Wednesday, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said that if
the United Nations does not put
additional sanctions on North Korea, he has an executive order
ready for Trump to sign that
would impose sanctions on any
country that trades with Pyongyang, Reuters reported.
The muddled U.S. message includes offers of diplomacy from
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson
and threats of additional economic sanctions from U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley and of a
“massive military response” from
Mattis.
Haley told the U.N. Security
Council at an emergency session
Monday that Kim is “begging for
war.”
Trump had appeared to endorse diplomatic outreach before
writing it off as pointless in a
Twitter message on Aug. 30.
“Talking is not the answer!” he
wrote then.
Democrats have criticized
Trump’s handling of the rising tensions on the Korean Peninsula,
arguing a more measured approach is needed.
“The president of the United
States needs to be on the phone
conducting diplomacy, not these
hot and cold tweets,” Sen. Chris
Van Hollen (D-Md.) said Tuesday
in an interview with MSNBC. “We
want to work with China, and we
want to get them to put pressure
on North Korea. On one hand, he
tweets that his best buddy is President Xi, and the next day he tweets
something very different.”
China is the most important
partner in making any economic
penalties stick. Beijing worked
with the United States to approve
tough new export bans on North
Korea last month, a strong signal
of Chinese irritation with a regime
it protects but cannot fully control. Beijing has signaled opposition to new penalties, potentially
including an oil embargo, that the
United States is now seeking
DON’T BE
LEFT IN THE
COLD!
through the United Nations.
“The time has come to exhaust
all diplomatic means to end this
crisis, and that means quickly enacting the strongest possible measures here in the U.N. Security
Council,” Haley said Monday.
On Tuesday, White House press
secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders emphasized pressure and military options.
“Look, we’ve been clear about
what our priorities are: that now is
not the time for us to spend a lot of
time focused on talking with
North Korea, but putting all measures of pressure that we can,” she
said. “All options are on the table,
and we’re going to continue to
keep them on the table until we
get the results that we’re looking
for.”
It is not clear where Tillerson’s
diplomatic overture stands. A
week before North Korea’s latest
nuclear test, of a hydrogen bomb,
Tillerson told “Fox News Sunday”
that the United States hoped Kim
would take the “different path”
that negotiations could offer.
“We’re going to continue our
peaceful pressure campaign as I
have described it, working with
allies, working with China as well
to see if we can bring the regime in
Pyongyang to the negotiating table,” Tillerson said in the Aug. 27
interview.
He has gone so far as to directly
address North Korea, and offer
assurances that the United States
does not plan to invade.
“We are not your enemy,” he
said on Aug. 1.
Since then, North Korea has
twice test-fired missiles and conducted its most powerful nuclear
test yet. And at least until Wednesday, Trump had increasingly emphasized military responses.
He referred only to military advisers and White House Chief of
Staff John F. Kelly, a retired Marine general, when tweeting about
a White House emergency session
on North Korea on Sunday.
“I will be meeting General Kelly,
General Mattis and other military
leaders at the White House to discuss North Korea,” Trump wrote.
Mattis later told reporters the
session was a “small-group national security meeting” with
Trump and Vice President Pence.
Any threat to the United States
or its allies “will be met with a
massive military response — a response both effective and overwhelming,” Mattis said Sunday.
He advised Kim to heed international warnings to stand down,
but he did not call for talks or
repeat earlier warnings that he
sees no military solution to the
North Korean problem.
“We are not looking to the total
annihilation of a country — namely, North Korea,” Mattis said. “But,
as I said, we have many options to
do so.”
anne.gearan@washpost.com
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WONG MAYE-E/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Adm. Scott Swift, commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, arrives for a news conference Aug. 22 in
Singapore after the collision involving the USS John S. McCain, shown in the background at left.
Proof sanctions on N. Korea work?
‘We are not at war,’ U.S. admiral says.
AND
BY A NNA F IFIELD
M ICHELLE Y E H EE L EE
tokyo — The international,
sanctions-focused approach to
dealing with North Korea has
been a success, according to the
commander of the U.S. Navy’s
Pacific Fleet, because it has
staved off a war in Asia.
Speaking just three days after
North Korea detonated a huge
nuclear device that was or was
close to being a hydrogen bomb,
Adm. Scott Swift said that the
only alternative to diplomacy
and pressure was military action.
“I think that the strategy has
worked,” Swift said in an interview Wednesday in Tokyo, describing the use of sanctions to
try to stop North Korea from
pursuing nuclear weapons. “I say
it has worked because we are not
at war.”
Swift reiterated recent pronouncements from the secretaries of defense and state that “all
options are on the table” but that
diplomacy and pressure were
preferred to military action
against North Korea.
The international community
is in a “much better place” to deal
with Pyongyang “than if we had
foreclosed on the diplomatic options,” Swift said.
“China, South Korea, Japan,
Russia, the United States — all of
those with direct equities have
been working hard,” Swift said
after two days of meetings here
and in Seoul with political and
military leaders.
Since North Korea conducted
its first nuclear test in 2006, it
has been subject to increasingly
harsh unilateral and multilateral
sanctions, designed to cut off its
ability to obtain the parts and the
money needed for its weapons
program but also to inflict so
much economic pain that the
current leader, Kim Jong Un,
decides it’s not worth it.
But some analysts say the
sanctions have clearly not
worked, neither changing Kim’s
calculus nor isolating the regime.
The nuclear test conducted
Sunday had an explosive yield of
160 kilotons, the Japanese government said Wednesday, making it more than 10 times the size
of the bomb that destroyed Hiroshima and putting it into thermonuclear territory.
Since Sunday’s test, the United
States has been pushing at the
United Nations for “the strongest possible” sanctions against
North Korea, raising the pros-
pect of an oil embargo.
South Korea and Japan are
backing the United States’ calls
for more tough sanctions on
North Korea, but China and
Russia, both veto-wielding members of the U.N. Security Council,
favor negotiations.
Russian President Vladimir
Putin on Wednesday condemned
the North’s latest nuclear test but
dismissed the idea of cutting off
oil exports to the communist
country, which was once a Soviet
client state and continues to
have close ties with Moscow.
“It is clear that it is impossible
to solve the problems of the
Korean Peninsula by sanctions
alone and pressure,” Putin said
after talks with his South Korean
counterpart, Moon Jae-in, at an
economic forum in the Far Eastern Russian city of Vladivostok.
“One shouldn’t give in to emotions and drive North Korea into
a corner,” Putin said, according
to local reports. He added that
the countries involved need to
stop tensions from escalating.
“Without political and diplomatic tools, it is very difficult to
change the situation” on the
Korean Peninsula, Putin said.
Moon had asked the Russian
president to support a drive to
cut off crude oil supplies to
North Korea, said Yoon Youngchan, Moon’s spokesman.
But Putin said that might hurt
ordinary North Korean citizens,
Yoon told reporters.
Elected president of South
Korea in May on a pledge to
engage with North Korea, Moon
has taken a notably harder line
in recent weeks, partly driven by
Pyongyang’s increasing provocations and partly, it seems, in
response to President Trump’s
criticism Sunday of Moon’s “talk
of appeasement.”
During a phone call Monday,
Trump and Moon “agreed to
maximize pressure on North Korea using all means at their
disposal,” according to the White
House.
Moon’s government said
Wednesday it would go ahead
with plans to install four more
rocket launchers to complete the
U.S. Terminal High Altitude Area
Defense (THAAD) antimissile
system at a base in the south of
the country.
China’s primary objection to
an oil embargo stems from concern over stability on its borders.
For all its anger with Kim over
his nuclear and missile tests,
Beijing does not want to cause
the collapse of his regime and the
uncertainty that would follow.
For Russia, which has been under U.S. economic sanctions, resisting an oil embargo is more a
matter of principle.
Still, Swift said that the focus
on sanctions and diplomacy was
a “glass half full” situation. “As
long as we are not reaching into
the military tool kit as the only
option, then that’s a success,” he
said.
Separately, Swift said he was
taking steps to change the culture within the 7th Fleet after
two fatal collisions at sea since
June. A guided-missile destroyer,
the USS Fitzgerald, collided with
a container ship south of Japan
in June, killing seven sailors, and
another, the USS John S. McCain,
collided with an oil tanker in
August, leaving 10 sailors dead.
This came on the heels of two
other incidents in the region
involving 3rd Fleet guided-missile cruisers: a May incident in
which the USS Champlain collided with a South Korean fishing
vessel, and the USS Antietam’s
running aground in Tokyo Bay in
January.
After the fourth incident,
Adm. John Richardson, chief of
naval operations, ordered an operational pause so that the Navy
could review procedures, and a
separate investigation into how
the Navy prepares its forces to
operate in the Pacific.
Asked whether the collisions
reflected a deeper problem with
the culture inside the 7th Fleet,
Swift said: “It does say something about it. That’s reflective of
the reviews and the inspections
that are ongoing.”
Swift fired Vice Adm. Joseph
Aucoin as commander of the 7th
Fleet after the USS McCain incident, although he had been due
to retire in a few weeks.
“We’ve taken immediate steps
to address the errors, but we also
have to look at the culture,” Swift
said. “You don’t change culture
overnight, and you don’t change
culture just by removing people.
We have to change the approach
people take to the challenges
they face.”
The Fitzgerald, which is still in
its home port of Yokosuka in
Japan, will be moved to Mississippi next month for repairs,
while the McCain, which is still
in Singapore, will be brought
back to Yokosuka while the Navy
decides where it will be fixed.
anna.fifield@washpost.com
michelle.lee@washpost.com
Lee reported from Seoul. Yoonjung
Seo in Seoul contributed to this
report.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
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Rohingya confront death as they flee violence in Burma
More than 140,000 have
left the country, with
hundreds killed en route
BY
J OE F REEMAN
rangoon, burma — More than
140,000 Rohingya Muslims have
fled violence in Burma over the
past 10 days, carrying with them
whatever they can on the perilous
journey to Bangladesh and arriving hungry, injured and afraid, if
they arrive at all.
The mass exodus of Rohingya
began on Aug. 25, when members
of the Arakan Rohingya Salvation
Army (ARSA), a militant group,
attacked dozens of police posts.
The number of displaced is
expected to rise, and possibly
double, in the coming days.
More than 400 people have
been killed in the clashes, some of
the worst fighting in decades in a
state prone to religious and ethnic conflict. Burma’s government
says 371 of the dead are Rohingya
fighters, 15 are from the security
forces and civil service, and 22 are
civilians.
Much is in dispute in Rakhine
state, where an estimated 1.1 million Rohingya Muslims live in an
uneasy relationship with their
Buddhist neighbors.
Rohingya activists and monitors say that many of the dead are
noncombatants and that massacres — including decapitations —
have taken place. They also argue
the death toll is much higher.
The government says Rohingya militants and supporters are
burning their own homes,
spreading false news and killing
their own people, including informants.
“It is the terrorists who are
cutting off heads, and this needs
to be known by you and the rest of
the world,” Burma’s national security adviser, Thaung Tun, said
Wednesday at a news conference.
What is not in dispute is the
epic migration unfolding.
“I’ve worked in many war
zones. I’ve worked with refugees
before. But the scale of this particular flow of refugees is highly
distressing,” said Tejshree Thapa,
senior South Asia researcher at
DANISH SIDDIQUI/REUTERS
A Rohingya refugee carries a child through a paddy field after crossing the Bangladesh-Burma border, in Teknaf, Bangladesh, on
Wednesday. The mass exodus of the Rohingya, the world’s largest stateless group, began last month after militants attacked police posts.
Human Rights Watch.
Thapa witnessed the exodus in
Cox’s Bazar in Bangladesh on the
border with Burma.
“I’ve spoken to people who
have walked four or five days
through mountains, across rivers,” she said. “It’s wave after
wave. I mean, you stand at the
border and it’s just family after
family. It’s endless. You drive
down one patch of road, you see
thousands of people. You turn
down another patch of road and
see thousands.”
The story of the Rohingya, the
world’s largest stateless group, is
a story of movement.
In the decades after World War
II, tens of thousands fled an
increasingly unwelcoming Burma, with waves occurring in the
1970s, 1980s and 1990s.
There are Rohingya diaspora
communities in Malaysia, India,
Nepal, Saudi Arabia and Pakistan. But the biggest is in Bangladesh, where hundreds of thousands of Rohingya live, many
undocumented.
In 2012, intercommunal violence in Rakhine state sent more
than 140,000 Rohingya into internal displacement camps,
where many remain today. In
2014, tens of thousands fled the
country by sea.
Last year, nearly 90,000 escaped to Bangladesh after ARSA
first emerged with deadly assaults on border guard posts,
triggering a crackdown by the
military that has resulted in allegations of possible crimes against
humanity.
Organized armed resistance is
nothing new, but it has taken
different forms and names over
the years. ARSA was formed in
the aftermath of the violence in
2012, with ties to the diaspora.
Burma’s government insists on
calling the Rohingya “Bengali,”
implying that they are illegal
immigrants.
The length of the trip from
Burma to Bangladesh can depend
on a variety of factors, not least
geography.
Those closer to Maungdaw, a
town near the top of northern
Rakhine, are positioned closer to
the Naf River separating the two
countries and may be able to
cross that way.
But at least 57 people have died
after their boats capsized trying
to make the trip.
Those living further south have
to navigate security patrols, some
of which have reportedly involved civilians. Making the trip
on foot further north involves a
longer, hilly journey that can take
almost two weeks.
There are other problems. The
monitoring group Fortify Rights,
for example, has documented instances of ARSA fighters preventing men from fleeing.
Health officials and rights
monitors in Bangladesh say hospitals are filled with patients
needing serious medical care.
There are food, water and medical scarcities, and hospitals are
overwhelmed.
Some arrive long after getting
hurt.
“The patients came here many
days after they received bullet
injuries inside Myanmar,” Sumon
Barua, the chief of a medical
facility in Teknaf, near the border,
said, using another name for the
country.
Rakhine state has been declared a military operations zone,
and government officials have
implied that ARSA members
could be mixing in with civilians
to elude capture.
But many Rohingya describe
fleeing an aggressive army campaign that does not distinguish
between militants and civilians.
Mohamed Ayat, 22, said he was
shot twice in the leg on Friday
when he tried to flee his house
after the army tried to burn it
down.
“I couldn’t leave my house before September 1 as there was
heavy firing [in the area],” he
said.
He left without any food.
A man who identified himself
only as Arafat said he fled along
with six family members, including his wife, son, sister and two
nephews.
He says the Burmese military
set fire to their homes in northern
Rakhine on Aug. 31, forcing them
to leave the area and that a
member of the security forces
killed his 14-year-old cousin.
They walked for two days to
reach the border and then
crossed on a tiny boat on Saturday, he said.
Stories of experiences inside
northern Rakhine, which is largely closed off to the media, could
not be independently verified.
Videos circulating online depict groups of refugees massed in
a no man’s land along the border,
and one appeared to show a trail
of people gingerly stepping over a
small strip of tarp that had been
placed over barbed wire.
Burma’s de facto leader, Aung
San Suu Kyi, whose new administration is less than two years old,
has come under increased pressure for not doing more to speak
up for the Rohingya.
Though she rarely weighs in on
developments in Rakhine, she
told Turkish President Recep
Tayyip Erdogan on Tuesday that
the government is defending all
the people of the state, according
to a readout of the call.
ARSA on Wednesday called on
the international community to
put “maximum pressure” on the
Burmese government to stop
committing what it called “war
crime, genocide, and crimes
against humanity.”
foreign@washpost.com
Muktadir Rashid contributed to this
report from Dhaka.
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A16
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
U.S. commander in Afghanistan apologizes for ‘highly o≠ensive’ leaflets
American forces gave out
fliers showing Islamic
text over image of dog
BY S AYED S ALAHUDDIN
AND P AMELA C ONSTABLE
kabul — A senior U.S. commander in Afghanistan apologized Wednesday for propaganda leaflets that superimposed a key Islamic text on the
image of a dog.
The leaflets distributed by U.S.
forces in Parwan province, north
of Kabul, on Tuesday depicted a
lion, representing the U.S.-led
coalition, chasing a dog with a
section of the Taliban’s banner,
containing a passage from the
Koran in Arabic, superimposed
on its side.
Linking Islamic texts and religious beliefs with animals is a
sensitive matter in the Islamic
world, including Afghanistan, a
country where the United States
is fighting its longest antiIslamist war and that has been
the scene of bloody protests over
religious issues.
Dogs are particularly offensive.
In Afghan society, many people are culturally and religiously
sensitive to the issue of dogs. The
animals generally are considered
unclean, diseased and dangerous, and a common Afghan proverb says that if a dog is in your
home, angels will not cross the
doorstep. Dogs are a common
sight in Afghanistan and are
traditionally used for fighting,
guarding and herding. The Afghan hound is considered a national treasure, although few can
be found in the country anymore.
Many wealthy Afghans now
import expensive breeds as a
status symbol, especially German shepherds, but local or stray
dogs are still widely shunned,
and children often throw stones
at them. Even though the American pamphlet showed a dog in
connection with Taliban militants, who are officially the enemy of the Afghan government
and people, the symbol and slogan were still considered offensive, creating a public uproar on
social media and leading to the
U.S. military’s hasty apology.
The Taliban in a statement
SHAH MARAI/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE VIA GETTY IMAGES
A U.S. soldier sits in a Chinook helicopter as it flies over Kabul.
The United States has been fighting in Afghanistan for 16 years.
Wednesday slammed the leaflets,
saying they were deliberately
distributed to show the United
States’ “utter animosity with Islam.” Qari Mohammad Yousuf, a
spokesman for the group, urged
Afghans to support the militants
in their war against U.S. troops to
save the country and Islam.
Zabiullah Mujahid, another
spokesman for the group, later
said that as a move to partly
avenge the leaflets, a suicide
bomber conducted an attack on
U.S. troops at an entrance of
Bagram air base Wednesday afternoon. The coalition confirmed
a blast outside the base. Without
giving details, it said that the
blast had caused a small number
of casualties and that the injured
were treated inside the base.
The base was secure, it said in
a statement.
The propaganda leaflets drew
stern criticism and anger among
the residents of Parwan — home
to Bagram, the largest U.S. military base in Afghanistan — and
prompted the coalition to issue
an apology Wednesday.
“The design of the leaflets
mistakenly contained an image
highly offensive to both Muslims
and the religion of Islam. I
sincerely apologize,” Maj. Gen.
James Linder said in a statement.
“We have the deepest respect
for Islam and our Muslim partners worldwide,” he said, promising an investigation to find out
why the incident happened and
to hold those responsible accountable. “Furthermore, I will
make appropriate changes so
this never happens again.”
Parwan’s authorities have
managed to calm anger by talking to the public, officials said.
“It is a very serious violation.
The people are very angry. It is a
major abuse against Islam,” Mohammad Zaman Mamozai, the
police chief of Parwan, said by
phone.
“Why they do not understand
or know our culture, our religion
and history? We lost several
million, became refugees, lost
our country and government just
because of our religion,” he said
referring to the occupation of
Afghanistan by the former Soviet
Union in the 1980s.
Images of the leaflets also have
been published on some social
media sites.
“Regain your freedom from
these terrorist dogs and aid the
coalition forces so that they annihilate these enemies,” said the
writing on the top of the leaflet.
President Ashraf Ghani’s government, which some consider a
puppet of the United States, has
not reacted to the distribution of
the leaflets.
Parwan was the scene of days
of anti-U.S. demonstrations in
2012 when copies of the Koran
along with other Islamic texts
were burned at the Bagram base
by U.S. troops. The U.S. military
apologized at the time, saying it
was a mistake and not a deliberate act.
The demonstrations turned
violent and spread to other parts
of the country.
pamela.constable@washpost.com
Constable reported from Islamabad,
Pakistan.
United Nations o∞cially accuses Syrian government of April sarin attack
BY
L OUISA L OVELUCK
beirut — U.N. investigators formally accused the Syrian government Wednesday of using the
banned nerve agent sarin in a
deadly chemical-weapons attack
in April that left dozens of civilians dead and hundreds wounded.
The daybreak attack, the investigators said in a report, was one
of more than 20 government assaults involving chemical weapons since March 2013, most of
them targeting families with no
part in the conflict.
The U.N. Commission of Inquiry on Syria is tasked with investigating alleged war crimes that
have taken place during the sixyear conflict. But it has no capacity to prosecute any party, underscoring the geopolitical constraints that hamstring the
world’s response to the war.
The commission’s report
marked first time that a U.N. body
has explicitly accused the Syrian
government of using sarin, a
chemical that pushes the nervous
system into overdrive and can kill
in minutes.
Video footage from the scene of
the attack on the northern village
of Khan Sheikhoun showed men,
women and infants convulsing
uncontrollably. In many cases,
they had no idea what had hit
them — sarin is colorless, odorless and tasteless.
The attack killed at least 83
people, dozens of them women
and children. According to investigators, some died in their beds.
A single mother who had left her
house early for work said she
returned to find all of her four
children dead.
Images of the youngest casual-
ties are believed to have figured
in President Trump’s decision to
order missile strikes on a Syrian
government airstrip days later,
marking the first direct American
military intervention against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.
The Syrian government and its
Russian backers had insisted that
the Khan Sheikhoun attack was
the fault of opposition forces in
the area or that it was entirely
fabricated. The inquiry found no
supporting evidence for either
claim.
Diplomacy over the Assad government’s use of chemical weapons has been thorny, resulting in
a deadlock at the U.N. Security
Council as the Syrian president’s
key backers have blocked resolutions to punish his armed forces.
Despite an internationally
backed effort to remove the Syrian government’s chemical weap-
ons stockpiles, U.S. intelligence
officials believe the nation retains
a significant quantity that could
still be used for attacks on civilians.
The U.N. commission also criticized a U.S.-led coalition and
militant groups it is battling,
accusing them of possible war
crimes in Syria. The condemnation highlighted the breadth of
atrocities in a war that has killed
nearly half a million people and
driven millions more to flee as
refugees.
As U.S.-backed forces fight
their way through the Islamic
State stronghold of Raqqa, the
coalition faces mounting allegations of civilian casualties from
its airstrikes on heavily armed
extremist groups in Syria and
Iraq. In a detailed timeline of a
March attack on a mosque in the
northern Syrian town of Jinah,
the commission said the coalition
had neither taken appropriate
measures to protect civilians nor
provided evidence to back up its
claim that the mosque was being
used as a meeting place for senior
al-Qaeda leaders.
“Information gathered by the
Commission does not support the
claim that any such meeting was
being held at that time,” the U.N.
report said. “Interviewees described the gathering as strictly
religious, and explained that
most attendees were Al-Jinah
residents, and that many of them
were internally displaced persons, with the exception of some
residents from neighbouring
towns.”
At least 38 people were killed
in the attack, including a woman
and three boys ranging from 6 to
13 years old.
The coalition has repeatedly
emphasized that it takes extensive precautions before launching any strike that may affect
civilians. On Wednesday, the
commission concluded that
these procedures were not followed adequately in Jinah.
Although the targeting team
had information on the target
three days before the strike, the
inquiry said that the expected
additional verification processes
were not completed.
The commission also accused
Islamic State and al-Qaedalinked rebels of targeting religious minorities with car bombs,
snipers and kidnapping.
Violence, it said, continues to
be carried out “in blatant violation of basic international humanitarian and human rights law
principles, primarily affecting civilians countrywide.”
louisa.loveluck@washpost.com
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.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A17
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Economy & Business
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Critics slam claim that ‘dreamers’ take jobs from black, Hispanic Americans
White House’s DACA
arguments don’t add up,
groups and experts say
BY
T RACY J AN
It’s a long-running talking
point spouted by Trump administration members and the president himself: Undocumented
immigrants are taking jobs away
from black and Hispanic Americans.
Hours after President Trump
dismantled an Obama-era program that had granted 800,000
young undocumented immigrants — who are also called
“dreamers” — permission to live
and work in the United States,
White House press secretary Sar-
ah Huckabee Sanders again
made the claim.
“It’s a known fact that there
are over 4 million unemployed
Americans in the same age group
as those that are DACA recipients; that over 950,000 of those
are African Americans in the
same age group; over 870,000
unemployed Hispanics in the
same age group,” Sanders said
during Tuesday’s press briefing.
“Those are large groups of people
that are unemployed that could
possibly have those jobs.”
Here’s the problem: Immigrant and native-born workers
are
imperfect
substitutes.
There is no evidence that the
unemployed Americans, be
they black, white or Hispanic,
have the skills necessary to
hold the same jobs occupied by
the young beneficiaries of the
five-year-old Deferred Action
for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)
program.
“It is one thing to say that
there are hundreds of thousands
of minorities the same age that
are unemployed, and a very
different thing for them to have
the same education, skills and
experience as the employed
DACA workers,” said Douglas
Holtz-Eakin, president of the
American Action Forum and
former chief economic policy
adviser in the presidential campaign of Sen. John McCain (RAriz.).
“And if they do,” he added, “it
begs the question as to why they
don’t have those jobs in the first
place.”
Contrary to Sanders’s assertion, he said, DACA improves the
economic outlook for lowskilled, American-born workers.
Without work permits, undocu-
mented immigrants are more
likely to take any job they can,
even work that falls far below
their skill or education level.
DACA, on the other hand, allows
those workers to move to jobs
that better match their background, freeing up low-skilled
positions.
There is just no compelling
proof that immigration — legal
or illegal — “squeezes out nativeborn workers in any systematic
way,” Holtz-Eakin said. “We’ve
experienced waves of immigration and still, on average,
reached full employment.”
The number of jobs in the
United States is not fixed. An
influx of immigrant workers generates economic growth and employment opportunities by increasing productivity, said Jackie
Varas, director of immigration
and trade policy at American
Action Forum.
“Many DACA recipients are
also more skilled than other
immigrants because they possess
a college education, so they don’t
compete with low-skilled Americans,” Varas said.
Furthermore, said Darrick
Hamilton, an economics and urban policy professor at the New
School, black and Latino Americans want access to high-quality
jobs, not just jobs at the bottom
of the labor market.
“Why do we reserve and presume the bottom of the labor
market for blacks and Latinos?”
Hamilton said. “Many DACA
recipients are full-time students
not engaged in taking away
jobs.”
Of the DACA-eligible immigrants older than 21, 12 percent
have bachelor’s degrees, 3 percent have advanced degrees, 84
percent have completed high
school and some college, and 2
percent did not graduate from
high school, according to an
analysis by New American Economy.
A Moody’s Analytics analysis
of Trump’s proposed economic
policies last year showed that
removing all undocumented immigrants from the labor force
would trigger an economic recession within one year.
Another American Action Forum study found that if all
undocumented immigrants were
deported, there would not be
enough American workers to fill
all of the jobs that would be left
open.
And even if all available native
workers filled the open slots, the
country would still be short
4 million workers.
tracy.jan@washpost.com
‘Dreamers’ fearful
of their own data
Information submitted
under DACA could be
used against them
BY C RAIG T IMBERG
AND T RACY J AN
The message from the U.S. government to hundreds of thousands of young, undocumented
immigrants in 2012 was clear:
Come out of the shadows. Tell us
your home addresses, where you
study and work, and when you
crossed the border. In exchange,
you can stay in a country you
already call home.
On Tuesday, President Trump
revoked that offer. Yet personal
information about the nearly
800,000 immigrants who arrived
as children in the United States
survives in a federal database that
could help law enforcement officials deport any one of them.
The shift in federal policy —
created by an executive order by
one president and rescinded by
the next — has created what immigration advocates say is a highstakes data-privacy nightmare.
Trump administration officials
say they will use the information
judiciously, only to pursue cases
against immigrants who have otherwise become threats to public
safety or national security — as
already was permitted during the
Obama administration.
But immigrants and advocates
fear the database under Trump
could be turned against the
“dreamers,” who generally have
been studying or working here for
years, and in some cases serving in
the U.S. military.
Much that is necessary to find
and deport those who applied for
the Deferred Action for Childhood
Arrivals program is contained in
the database: home addresses,
phone numbers, financial information, and education and employment history, as detailed
across several federal forms and
backed by supporting documenta-
tion.
Even entries and exits from the
country and visa expiry dates were
required to complete the DACA
application, giving government
officials what amount to signed,
dated admissions about violations
of federal immigration law. All this
information is now just a few
clicks away on federal government
computer systems.
“That is highly problematic and
the opposite of the intent of this
program,” said Alvaro Bedoya, executive director of Georgetown
Law’s Center on Privacy and Technology. “It would be a historic
betrayal of a very vulnerable people by their government. They’re
Americans by all intents and purposes.”
Immigration advocates have
been on edge since Trump removed Privacy Act restrictions on
the DACA database and other immigration databases as part of an
executive action in January. That
lessened the already scant legal
limits on how federal law enforcement agencies, such as Immigration and Customs Enforcement or
Customs and Border Protection,
could use this information.
Trump administration officials
say the database has not been used
to identify people who have overstayed their DACA waivers, and
there are no plans to change that
policy, said David Lapan, press
secretary for the Department of
Homeland Security.
“I don’t want to leave the impression that somebody who was
in DACA will never be potentially
arrested, but they’re not being targeted for arrest,” Lapan said.
“Even when the policy was created, [government officials] made
clear it’s not a path to citizenship.
It’s not a legal status. . . .If they had
a sense of security previously, it
was a bit false.”
Unless Congress acts to restore
the program in some form, more
than 1,000 people a day are expected to lose their DACA waivers as
the program is phased out beginning next year, according to the
Center for American Progress.
“The government asked you to
SARAH L. VOISIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Missael Garcia, 27, leads chants Tuesday at the White House against the ending of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.
come out of the shadows and register for this program,” said Ernestor De La Rosa, 28, a DACA
recipient from Mexico who came
to the United States as a teenager
and now is the assistant finance
director for Dodge City, Kan. “Now
it has turned the tables and can
use your information against you.”
Few expected the political shift
that arrived with the election of
Trump, who campaigned on
pledges to crack down on illegal
immigration. Increasingly aggressive enforcement actions and
sharp rhetoric from Trump have
alarmed civil liberties groups and
immigration advocates, making
them skeptical that promises to
respect traditional limits on using
data will be respected.
“The signals this administration has sent to immigration
agents in the field is that the gloves
are off,” said Michael Tan, a staff
attorney for the ACLU’s Immigrants’ Rights Project. “The firewalls or constraints are subject to
being undermined.”
Karina Macias Sandoval, 22,
was taken to Northern California
from Mexico at age 3 and completed her schooling in the United
States. DACA allowed her to get a
work permit and to obtain internships with nonprofit groups and
Hewlett-Packard. Now she has a
job with a San Francisco Bay-area
biotech firm but worries about the
future.
“They say we’re not a priority
for deportation, but let’s say if
there were more pressure on
Trump to do something, we are
that easy target for him to prove a
point,” Sandoval said.
The rules regarding the DACA
database could ultimately be resolved through litigation, as several immigration rights groups
have threatened to challenge
Trump’s executive order in court.
Attorneys general from 15 states
filed suit on Wednesday to oppose
Trump’s move to end the program
and sought to bar the government
from using personal information
submitted for DACA for other purposes such as law enforcement.
In any court case, a key factor
will be the representations made
under the Obama administration
regarding how information submitted by dreamers could be used.
A federal government FAQ
about the program issued in 2012
assured applicants that information they submitted about themselves or family members would
not be referred to law enforcement for purposes of deportation,
but there were stated exceptions
for “national security purposes” or
“the investigation or prosecution
of a criminal offense.”
The document also noted that
the rules of the program could “be
modified, superseded, or rescinded at any time without notice.”
But the longevity of DACA may
have given applicants reasonable
expectations that the rules would
continue in their current form,
said Seth Grossman, former depu-
ty general counsel for the Department of Homeland Security.
“These arguments are strong,”
said Grossman, who is the chief of
staff to Janet Napolitano, a former
secretary of homeland security
under Obama and now president
of the University of California system, in which several thousand
dreamers are students.
A legal battle could raise broader issues about how the federal
government sometimes uses data
collected for one purpose to pursue other purposes when priorities change.
“This really highlights the fact
that, in the U.S., the privacy and
data protections we have are not
strong enough to prevent some
kinds of large-scale abuses,” said
Sarah St. Vincent, an advocate on
U.S. national security, surveillance
and domestic law at Human
Rights Watch. “Congress really
needs to stand up.”
inhalation, but the extent of the
injury was not listed.
In December, the agency began
investigating nearly 43,000
Smart cars from the 2008 and
2009 model years made by
Mercedes. Investigators found
the cars had significantly more
fire claims than comparable
vehicles. The agency said
Mercedes has investigated two
fires but could not find a cause.
Mercedes says it’s cooperating
with the investigation but
declined further comment.
did delay some deliveries over the
summer. “The railroad is now
returning to a normal operating
rhythm, and our performance
metrics are improving,” the new
CEO said. Several groups of rail
customers have spoken out about
CSX.
craig.timberg@washpost.com
tracy.jan@washpost.com
DIGEST
growth “slowed some,” even as
worker shortages worsened.
The report showed mixed
results for auto production and
sales. “Contacts in many districts
expressed concerns about a
prolonged slowdown in the auto
industry,” the report said.
The report only deepened the
mystery over why a tightening
labor market is not triggering
higher wages and lifting prices.
Prices “rose modestly” across
the country, the report said.
RETAIL
200 Banana Republic,
Gap stores to close
Gap plans to shift its focus to
its growing Old Navy and Athleta
stores and away from the Gap and
Banana Republic brands.
The company said Wednesday
it will close about 200 Gap and
Banana Republic stores in the
next three years and open about
270 Old Navy and Athleta
locations in the same period.
Lower-priced Old Navy has
been a bright spot for the clothing
retailer, posting rising sales even
as they fell at the Gap and Banana
Republic.
The company said Old Navy is
on track to surpass $10 billion in
sales in the next few years.
Athleta is expected to exceed
$1 billion in sales.
— Bloomberg News
— Associated Press
AUTO SAFETY
ALFREDO ESTRELLA/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
A Shell gas station serves customers in the Tlanepantla
municipality in suburban Mexico City. Royal Dutch Shell opened the
first of many gas stations in Mexico on Tuesday and announced it will
invest $1 billion in the country. Shell adds to the list of foreignbranded pumps in a market dominated by the state-owned Pemex.
— Associated Press
FEDERAL RESERVE
Survey shows modest
growth in July, August
Economic growth was modest
to moderate across the country in
the past two months as labor
markets stayed tight without
much wage pressure, according to
a Federal Reserve survey released
Wednesday.
The central bank’s Beige Book
report, based on anecdotal
information collected by the 12
regional Fed banks from early
July through August, said
consumer spending, capital
expenditures and manufacturing
all were increasing. Employment
Reports of fires in some
Smart Fortwo cars
An investigation by U.S. auto
safety regulators has found 27
reports of engine fires in tiny
Smart Fortwo cars.
The National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration has
upgraded its probe to an
engineering analysis, a step closer
to a recall.
In documents posted
Wednesday, the agency said one
person reported smoke
ALSO IN BUSINESS
CSX railroad said Wednesday its
service is improving after a
summer marked by delays as it
overhauled its operations. But the
railroad trimmed its profit
outlook. It now expects profit to
improve between 20 and 25
percent over last year’s earnings
per share of $1.81. CSX had
predicted 25 percent profit
growth. Chief executive Hunter
Harrison said in a statement the
railroad has made good progress
implementing his operating
model, but the extensive changes
Health insurer Anthem will offer
Obamacare plans in about half of
the counties in Kentucky next
year, after covering the whole
state in 2017, it said Wednesday.
Anthem said it will offer the
health-care plans in 59 Kentucky
counties in 2018. It said the other
61 counties in the state will still
have a carrier offering plans next
year.
— From news reports
COMING TODAY
8:30 a.m.: Labor Department
releases weekly jobless claims.
8:30 a.m.: Labor Department
releases second-quarter
productivity data.
10 a.m.: Freddie Mac, the
mortgage company, releases
weekly mortgage rates.
A18
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
THE MARKETS
6 Monitor your investments at washingtonpost.com/markets
Data and graphics by
Daily Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
22,300
Close
YTD
% Chg
21,807.64
+0.2
+10.3
21,400
20,500
19,600
18,700
17,800
Nasdaq Composite Index
6500
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
6393.31
+0.3
+18.8
Daily
% Chg
Industry Group
Specialty Retail
Oil, Gas, Consumable Fuel
Multiline Retail
Airlines
Trading Co's & Distr
Power Prodct & Enrgy Trdr
Aerospace & Defense
Diversified Telecomm
Diversified Consumer Svcs
Leisure Equipment & Prod
0
–2.5%
+2.5%
1.74
1.70
1.60
1.34
1.32
–0.88
–0.96
–1.23
–1.48
–2.37
5500
5000
2465.54
S&P 500 Index
+0.3
+10.1
2500
2350
2200
2050
S
O
N
D
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
Close
Daily
% Chg
73,412.41
15,059.83
50,510.70
1.7
–0.2
0.4
373.95
5101.41
12,214.54
7354.13
0.1
0.3
0.7
–0.3
5689.73
3849.45
27,613.76
19,357.97
–0.3
–0.2
–0.5
–0.1
YTD % Chg
–30%
0%
+30%
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
3M Co
202.05
AmExp
85.23
Apple Inc
161.91
Boeing
234.62
Caterpillar
116.98
Chevron Corp 111.79
Cisco Systems 31.87
Coca-Cola
45.96
DowDuPont Inc 64.87
Exxon Mobil
78.78
GE
24.92
GoldmnSchs
218.83
Home Depot
156.56
IBM
143.82
Intel Corp
35.76
0.5
–0.1
–0.1
–1.0
–1.1
2.1
0.8
0.1
–0.2
2.1
0.6
0.5
2.4
0.5
2.1
13.1
15.1
39.8
50.7
26.1
–5.0
5.5
10.9
13.4
–12.7
–21.1
–8.6
16.8
–13.4
–1.4
Company
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
Wal-Mart
Walt Disney
130.67
90.11
158.22
64.00
73.40
52.76
92.72
33.99
117.73
109.61
198.38
46.91
103.18
80.08
101.50
0.6
0.7
–0.6
0.6
–0.3
–0.5
0.0
0.6
2.0
–1.4
–0.5
–1.0
0.2
0.4
–0.1
13.4
4.4
30.0
8.7
18.1
3.8
10.3
4.6
–3.8
0.0
24.0
–12.1
32.2
15.9
–2.6
Cross Currency Rates
US $
US $ per
EU € per
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
Mexico $
1.1919
0.0091
1.3045
0.3223
0.8181
0.0562
0.0077
1.0944
0.2703
0.6864
0.0472
142.5910
35.2390
89.4280
6.1496
0.2471
0.6271
0.0431
2.5379
0.1745
0.8390
Japan ¥ per 109.3100
130.2900
Britain £ per
0.7666
0.9137
0.0070
Brazil R$ per
3.1021
3.6975
0.0283
4.0466
Canada $ per
1.2223
1.4569
0.0111
1.5945
0.3940
Mexico $ per
17.7747
21.1865
0.1630
23.2135
5.7300
0.0688
14.5398
Consumer Rates
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 25,489.83
Russell 2000
1402.20
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 488.54
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
11.63
Daily % Chg
0.3
0.2
–0.3
–4.9
YTD % Chg
9.5
3.3
9.2
–17.2
$3.1515
$3.6100
$49.16
$1,339.00
$3.00
+0.8
+0.7
+1.0
–0.4
+0.9
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Exchange-Traded (Ticker)
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Daily
% Chg
Close
Dail
% Ch
$1.4080
$17.91
$9.7100
$0.1429
$4.4575
–2.
–0.
+0.
+1.
+0.
day
month
$1200
$1000
$800
–0.2
–0.2
0.6
0.4
0.8
0.1
0.3
1.3
0.0
Gainers
Fred's Inc
Griffon Corp
Electr for Imaging
Pioneer Energy Svcs
Landauer Inc
G-III Apparel
HealthEquity Inc
Bill Barrett Corp
Gap
Myriad Genetics Inc
CF Industries
Veritiv Corp
Teleflex Inc
Avon Products
SM Energy Co
JC Penney
Helmerich & Payne
HCI Group Inc
Macy's Inc
Barnes & Noble
Daily
Close % Chg
$6.74
$21.05
$40.02
$2.00
$67.70
$30.29
$45.22
$3.30
$25.82
$32.57
$31.20
$29.65
$225.41
$2.64
$14.25
$4.10
$46.35
$32.73
$22.17
$7.85
17.0
15.3
13.5
11.1
10.4
10.0
7.8
7.5
7.4
7.4
7.3
7.0
6.9
6.5
6.0
5.9
5.9
5.8
5.5
5.4
Losers
Dave & Buster's Ent
Independence Realty
MarketAxess
INC Research
USA Mobility Inc
Atla Tele-Network
Iridium Comm
Comty Health Sys
Cytokinetics Inc
Quorum Health Corp
Envision Healthcare
Impax Laboratories
ILG Inc
Teleph & Data Sys
Lantheus Holdings
Synaptics Inc
Darden Restaurants
Newell Brands Inc
Aaron's Inc
Wabtec
Daily
Close % Chg
$51.41
$9.46
$176.58
$55.25
$15.80
$58.21
$10.25
$7.30
$14.10
$4.16
$48.77
$20.85
$25.12
$28.08
$16.40
$39.70
$78.36
$47.03
$42.00
$69.70
–11.6
–9.0
–5.8
–5.4
–5.4
–5.3
–5.1
–4.9
–4.7
–4.6
–4.2
–4.1
–3.9
–3.8
–3.8
–3.7
–3.5
–3.5
–3.4
–3.4
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
Daily
% Chg
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Close
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
6000
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
0.27
0.41
0.74
1.45
2.73
5.37
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
3.73%
4.25%
Bank Prime
30-Year fixed mortgage
2.95%
1.25%
Federal Funds
10-year note
Yield: 2.10
2-year note
Yield: 1.30
5-year note
Yield: 1.68
6-month bill
Yield: 1.15
15-Year fixed mortgage
1.32%
LIBOR 3-Month
3.10%
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
New iPhone may get updated screen
Sharper images, longer
battery life are possible,
but at a steeper price
The Daily 202 Live
On Friday, September 8, The Washington Post’s
James Hohmann will talk one-on-one with
U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross. They
will discuss the Trump administration’s efforts to
reshape the playing field for international trade,
the future of NAFTA, the tax reform push and
other pressing domestic and international
economic issues.
BY
James Hohmann
Wilbur Ross
National Political Correspondent,
The Washington Post
U.S. Secretary of Commerce
H AYLEY T SUKAYAMA
Apple is poised to unveil a new
generation of iPhones next week,
but the highest expectations are
for the 10th-anniversary edition
of the iconic smartphone. With
that model, Apple is expected to
change the type of screen the
iPhone uses to what is thought to
be a nearly all-screen front.
Here’s a quick look at what that
could mean for the average
iPhone owner.
How is this screen different
from the current one?
Right now, Apple has a liquid
crystal display (LCD) screen on
the iPhone. The tech giant is said
to be switching to a type of OLED
(organic light-emitting diode)
screen called an AMOLED. (The
AM stands for “active matrix.”)
The big difference between an
LCD screen and an AMOLED display is the presence of a backlight.
The LCD screens on Apple phones
have a backlight that is always
shining behind the screen.
AMOLED screens don’t. Instead,
pixels light up when electricity
passes through them.
What does that mean?
Potentially, two things: Images
may be more vivid, and you may
get better battery life.
AMOLED screens can be thinner, and they naturally provide
more vivid colors rather than the
more realistic (and sometimes
muddier) hues on an LCD screen.
AMOLED screens can also im-
Friday, September 8, 2017
Streamed live from 9:00 - 9:30 a.m.
Presenting Sponsor
PATRICK T. FALLON/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Apple’s most expensive version of its next-generation iPhone is
expected to include a screen that displays more vivid images.
prove battery life or be more energy efficient without the backlight, particularly with dark colors, because an AMOLED screen
can cut power to any pixel that
should be black.
It's hard to say how much battery life improvement you’ll get
with the new phone. Because an
edge-to-edge screen takes up
more real estate, Apple may be
able to use energy savings from an
OLED screen to offer a larger
screen with the same battery life.
Or it may be able to improve performance elsewhere in the phone.
Apple declined to comment.
Is Apple the first to use this
kind of screen?
Nope. In fact, competitors such
as Samsung and LG — both of
which manufacture screens —
have put some kind of OLED
screen on their smartphones. So if
you want to see what the difference is, you can look at a phone
such as the Galaxy S8 or the new
LG V30, which has its own plastic
variant of an OLED screen called
POLED. (The p is for plastic.)
How could this affect my relationship with the iPhone?
For one, it could make a dent in
your wallet if you want the toptier phone. Apple’s current
screens are cheaper to produce,
which helps explain why analysts
are expecting a big price bump for
the most expensive iPhone.
There are some differences between the LCD and AMOLED
screens on the market. LCD
screens tend to show more muted
colors, but they’re also generally
truer to life. They can also be
easier to see in direct sunlight and
brighter than AMOLED screens.
But with a sharper screen,
those social-media posts and
streaming videos we all peruse on
our phones will look better, as will
newer technologies such as augmented reality — another emerging Apple interest.
hayley.tsukayama@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/the-switch
Former FTC chief is tapped to lead antitrust at law firm
BY
Watch the live stream: wapo.st/daily202live
17-1071-02
The green pages.
Did you know? The Washington Post is printed using recycled fiber.
NF407 3x1.25
B RIAN F UNG
The nation’s former top
consumer-protection official is
headed to Hogan Lovells, a leading international law firm, to specialize in an increasingly visible
area of policy: antitrust and competition law.
Edith Ramirez, the chairwoman of the Federal Trade Commission during President Barack
Obama’s tenure, will help lead the
firm’s practice on economic regulation and antitrust, Hogan
Lovells announced Tuesday. She
will also take on some of its work
in cybersecurity and privacy, two
issues that were a core part of
Ramirez’s portfolio at the FTC.
The move highlights the growing relevance of corporate power
to consumers, as companies such
as Google have been penalized and
accused of monopolistic behavior
in Europe and U.S. lawmakers
question whether platforms such
as Facebook and Amazon.com
have become too dominant. (Amazon chief executive Jeffrey P. Bezos
owns The Washington Post.)
“Issues that relate to the role of
competition when it comes to economic growth, issues of income
inequality, those are important
conversations to be having,”
Ramirez said, “and it’s a good
thing that the public’s attention
has been turning to the role of
competition policy.”
In recent months, Democrats
have rolled out an economic agenda calling for a more expansive
U.S. policy on competition, argu-
ing that FTC guidelines focus too
narrowly on consumer prices and
fail to acknowledge the effects of
behavior and customer data on
today’s Internet-driven economy.
But Ramirez, whose time at the
FTC included the publication of a
landmark agency report on commercial data vendors, said Washington’s current antitrust tools are
sufficient for the moment.
“There are a number of questions that are new, and issues we
do need to keep an eye on,” she
said, “but it doesn’t necessarily
mean that we need to be looking at
these in a dramatically different
way than in the past.”
brian.fung@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/the-switch
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A19
RE
PowerPost
INTELLIGENCE FOR LEADERS WASHINGTONPOST.COM/POWERPOST
Immigration becomes a litmus test for Democrats
MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
Sen. Jon Tester (D-Mont.) opposed the Dream Act in 2010. Tuesday, he spoke of aiding “innocent kids.”
solution. Congress must work
together, Democrats and
Republicans, to secure our
borders, crack down on folks
illegally entering our country,
and provide a way forward for
innocent kids.”
Yes, this is a cautious
statement. But it is also a clear
change in his position that
reflects Tester’s desire to avoid
the backlash he faced from his
left flank in 2010 after opposing
the Dream Act.
Understandably, most of the
news media’s coverage of the
Trump administration’s DACA
announcement focused on
cleavages in the Republican
ranks.
The untold story, though, is the
degree to which Democrats are in
lockstep on what not long ago
was an issue that divided them.
Not a single Democrat in either
chamber of Congress has
expressed support for getting rid
of DACA.
This is part of a larger lurch to
the left in the Democratic Party
on a host of hot-button issues. No
matter where you’re from, it is
harder than ever to be a
Democratic candidate who is
against gun control, abortion
rights or single-payer health
insurance.
Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.),
who voted against the Dream Act
as a House member in 2010 and,
like Tester, faces a tough race in a
red state next year, also reversed
Leading CEOs may blast Trump on
DACA, but they still want a tax rewrite
Business leaders
The
of every industry
Finance
stripe made clear
Tuesday that they
202
object to
TORY
President Trump’s
NEWMYER
decision on the
Deferred Action
for Childhood Arrivals policy.
They registered their displeasure
in Facebook posts, tweets,
statements and joint letters —
and urged members of Congress
to step into the breach with a
legislative fix that assures the
futures of about 800,000
undocumented workers who
came to the United States as
children.
“Immigration is a complex
issue but I wouldn’t deport a kid
who was brought here and only
knows America. Congress must
address #DACA,” Goldman Sachs
chief executive Lloyd Blankfein
tweeted.
“Rescinding DACA is cruel and
misguided. Dreamers contribute
to our economy and our nation.
Congress must act fast to protect
them!” Disney CEO Robert Iger
tweeted.
“#Dreamers contribute to our
companies and our communities
just as much as you and I. Apple
will fight for them to be treated
as equals,” Apple CEO Tim Cook
tweeted.
But will the latest galvanizing
move from an increasingly
isolated president spell doom for
what remains of Trump’s
business-friendly agenda? Don’t
bet on it. The promise of
corporate tax cuts, although
facing steep odds, remains
enticing enough to keep business
interests engaged with the
administration.
Indeed, the DACA backlash
presents a potentially revealing
test for corporate chiefs.
Although it carries an economic
impact — one estimate places the
10-year tab at $60 billion — it is
orders of magnitude smaller
than the potential stakes for
business in rewiring the tax code.
Chief executives publicly burnish
their moral bona fides by
defending “dreamers.” They
benefit shareholders by securing
a lower tax rate.
The two goals make competing
demands on diminishing
congressional bandwidth. A
DACA fix and a tax package share
a shelf life: The administration
announced it won’t enforce the
immigration crackdown until
March, which tax-watchers have
pegged as a rough deadline for
action on taxes before midterm
election concerns swamp the
legislative agenda.
At least one business leader
said Tuesday that lawmakers
must prioritize one over the
other, arguing that an
immigration fix should come
first. Brad Smith, Microsoft’s
president and chief legal
officer, wrote in a blog post that
Congress needs to “reprioritize”
the legislative calendar. “This
means that Congress should
adopt legislation on
DACA before it tries to adopt a
tax reform bill,” he wrote. “This is
the only way, given the number of
legislative days Congress has
scheduled over the next six
months, we realistically can
expect Congress to complete
DACA legislation in time.” In
a follow-up interview with NPR,
Smith called on other business
leaders to follow suit.
There was no indication
Tuesday that any of Smith’s peers
were inclined to second his
call. And Trump may have
alleviated some of the pressure
on them by tweeting Tuesday
night that he’ll revisit his
decision if Congress fails to act.
Meanwhile, lobbyists point out
that corporate heavyweights
juggle sprawling Washington
wish lists. And Congress likewise
should be able to take on both
initiatives, especially considering
that tax and immigration bills
move through different
committees. “Both issues are
critical to manufacturers’ success
and to keeping America
exceptional,” Jay Timmons,
president and CEO of the
National Association of
Manufacturers, said in a
statement. “Manufacturers are
confident that Congress can walk
and chew gum at the same time.”
Jeremy Robbins — executive
director of the New American
Economy, a group founded by
Michael Bloomberg to organize
business leaders and others
behind an immigration overhaul
— called it fair to question
whether business leaders would
push for both tax and
immigration changes.
But he doubted whether
business leaders will need to
answer it. “Tax reform is a huge
issue for them, but they are
invested in immigration, and
you’re seeing that in the way
they’re reacting to the decision,”
he said.
U.S. Chamber of Commerce
and Business Roundtable
officials — whose leadership
denounced the DACA decision —
didn’t respond to questions
Tuesday about whether their
groups would shuffle their
congressional asks.
Those groups are also
sponsoring campaigns to drum
up public support for a tax
revamp. Neil Bradley, the U.S.
Chamber of Commerce’s chief
policy officer, put a finer point on
his group’s investment in the
outcome of the tax debate last
week, suggesting the group
would work to oust lawmakers
who get in the way. In a Tuesday
statement on DACA, he called
Trump’s decision “contrary to
fundamental American
principles and the best interests
of our country.”
The corporate rebuke of the
administration’s DACA
move continues a trend.
Tensions have been mounting
all year between the
administration and business
leaders the Trump team tried to
draw into its orbit.
To the extent the DACA
decision folds into the larger
immigration debate, it more
directly intersects with corporate
bottom lines than those episodes.
In 2013, the last time the issue
was front-and-center in
Washington, the chamber
alone spent more than
$50 million lobbying for a
comprehensive immigration
overhaul.
But a tax code rewrite remains
too rich a prize for big business
interests still hoping to tilt the
process in their favor.
So, in all likelihood,
Microsoft’s Smith will keep
cutting a lonely figure on his
ramparts.
tory.newmyer@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/powerpost
course.
Others “evolved” sooner. Sen.
Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) voted
against a 2007 version of the
Dream Act but decided to
support the 2010 version.
McCaskill unabashedly
decried Trump’s announcement
Tuesday. “Taking young people
who were brought here through
no fault of their own, and have
never known another country,
and kicking them out of America
is as dumb as it is
counterproductive,” McCaskill
said. “Over 90 percent of them
are in school or working and
many have proudly served our
country in uniform.”
Fifteen Senate Democrats, plus
a democratic socialist named
Bernie Sanders, voted against a
carefully crafted immigration bill
in 2007 that would have created a
pathway to citizenship for
12 million illegal immigrants.
Sanders (I-Vt.), who joined
with Jeff Sessions, then a
Republican senator from
Alabama, to kill what turned out
to be the last, best hope in a
generation for true reform, paid a
political price in the 2016
Democratic primaries for siding
with organized labor over the
Latino community.
“Sanctions against employers
who employ illegal immigrants
[are] virtually nonexistent,”
Sanders complained at a
news conference 10 summers ago,
as he stood alongside union
leader Richard Trumka, now the
AFL-CIO’s president.
Fast forward to this Labor Day.
Speaking Monday at a breakfast
sponsored by the New
Hampshire AFL-CIO, Sanders
called Trump’s decision to end
DACA “one of the most cruel and
ugly decisions ever made in the
modern history of this country by
a president.”
That 2007 vote was only a
decade ago, but it feels like an
eternity. In the intervening years,
there really has been a sea change
in Democratic politics. Not a
single Senate Democrat, or
Sanders, opposed the bipartisan
immigration bill that passed the
Senate in 2013 but never got a
vote in the GOP-controlled
House.
Don’t forget the origins of the
DACA order. Obama signed it
during the heat of the 2012
campaign in response to intense
pressure from Latino leaders,
who were angry that he had
prioritized health care over
immigration when he took office
and that he was overseeing largescale deportations.
He dragged his feet for years
on taking executive action. In
2006, afraid of looking weak, the
then-freshman senator from
Illinois voted for the Secure Fence
Act, which authorized a barrier
along the southern border. This is
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now the legal mechanism that
Trump is using to push forward
with his plans for a border wall.
Frank Sharry, executive
director of America’s Voice, a
nonprofit organization that
advocates for immigrants, said
that outside groups such as his
were not as organized or
powerful 10 years ago.
“There really has been a shift,”
he said in an interview. “Obama is
a good example of how the
electoral and movement politics
underneath him shifted, and they
finally adjusted to it. . . .
Progressives generally have
become much more supportive of
immigration reform, and the
public has become more
supportive of immigrants.”
The complexion of the party
has also changed. Three in four
Democrats were white 25 years
ago. Now, it’s just 57 percent. A
breed of Blue Dogs has become
endangered, if not extinct.
Conservative Democrats a
generation ago, especially whites
in the South, are now
Republicans.
Jim Manley, who was a top aide
to former Senate majority leader
Harry M. Reid (D-Nev.), said
Democrats in the past might have
looked seriously at a proposal
tying protecting the “dreamers”
to funding for a border wall.
“Those kinds of deals are DOA to
Democrats in both the House and
Senate,” said Manley, now a
Washington lobbyist.
“Two things have changed,” he
said by email. “Politically, they
watched the Hispanic
community put Sen. Reid over
the goal line in his close 2010
election. And since then, there
have been others that have won
because of their support. Now
every smart Democrat is working
hard to build alliances with
Hispanic voters. But even more
importantly, as they have gotten
to know the community better
they realize what is at stake and
that something needs to be done
to protect those that are here in
this country.”
james.hohmann@washpost.com
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S1034 3x10.5
The House passed
a Dream Act in
2010 that would
have allowed
JAMES
illegal immigrants
HOHMANN
to apply for
citizenship if they
entered the United States as
children, graduated from high
school or got an equivalent
degree, and had been in the
United States for at least five
years.
Five moderate Democrats in
the Senate voted no. If each of
them had supported it, the bill
would have become law,
President Barack Obama’s
establishment of the Deferred
Action for Childhood Arrivals
problem would have been
unnecessary, and the
manufactured political crisis now
facing Congress would have been
averted.
Sen. Jon Tester (D-Mont.) is the
only one of those five Democrats
still in Congress. Two lost
reelection bids in 2014 (Kay
Hagan in North Carolina and
Mark Pryor in Arkansas), and two
retired (Ben Nelson of Nebraska
and Max Baucus of Montana).
Sen. Joe Manchin III (W.Va.) said
he would have opposed the bill,
but he skipped the vote.
Despite being up for reelection
next year in a state that Donald
Trump carried by 21 points,
Tester spoke out against the
president’s decision to end DACA.
Compare the news release he sent
out after his “no” vote seven years
ago with what he said Tuesday
night:
“Illegal immigration is a
critical problem facing our
country, but amnesty is not the
solution,” Tester said in
December 2010. “I do not support
legislation that provides a path to
citizenship for anyone in this
country illegally.”
Discussing the same group of
people, Tester said Tuesday:
“America’s immigration system is
badly broken and needs fixing,
but breaking a promise to these
children — who are here through
no fault of their own — is not the
The
Daily 202
A20
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ABCDE
letters@washpost.com
Saving the ‘dreamers’
EDITORIALS
The unjustified DACA decision
Mr. Trump and his attorney general offer muddled reasoning for unraveling the ‘dreamers’ program.
I
lives rely.
Mr. Sessions argued Tuesday that the Trump
administration was forced to end DACA after the
Justice Department found the program unconstitutional. Yet what did the attorney general mean by
that? His public statements provide few details
beyond pointing to general concerns about presidential overreach into an area of congressional authority
and citing a court ruling against President Barack
Obama’s would-be extension of DACA to parents of
U.S. citizens. Which actions does the Justice Department now believe Mr. Trump is constitutionally
prohibited from taking?
Likewise, if Mr. Sessions considers DACA to be
unlawful, why is the administration allowing six
months for the policy to wind down instead of
halting it immediately? There may well be serious,
prudential reasons behind this choice: An immediate rescission would have cast 800,000 dreamers
suddenly adrift. Yet after finding the policy unconstitutional, Mr. Sessions should explain why the sixmonth delay is more than an effort by Mr. Trump to
Cambodia’s
civic shutdown
seek political cover for an unpopular decision.
Hours after Mr. Sessions’s announcement,
Mr. Trump tweeted that he would “revisit” DACA if
Congress were unable to “legalize” the policy by
March. It is unclear just what the president intends
with this pledge. If he plans to reinstate or extend
DACA, on what basis will he do so, given his own
attorney general’s determination that he lacks the
necessary legal authority?
These questions may seem abstract when compared with the nuts and bolts of immigration
legislation or the sickening uncertainty now faced by
the dreamers. Yet the answers go to the heart of why
these young people face uncertainty and what
remedies Mr. Trump would have the power to offer
should Congress fail to find a solution. Of course, it
would be a mistake to hang too much on the words of
this most mercurial of presidents. But having offered
young immigrants a possible lifeline, the president
has a responsibility to explain to them whether he is
legally capable of following through with it — and
why he snatched it away from them in the first place.
TOM TOLES
The opposition and independent
media are being suffocated.
C
AMBODIA’S NORMALLY repressive leader,
Hun Sen, is on a tear even by his standards. In
recent weeks he has outdone himself in
destroying what remains of independent
news media, civil society and political opposition. His
apparent motive is to wipe out any contrary voices
before a July 2018 election, transforming a malfunctioning democracy into a fully authoritarian state.
The latest turn of the screw came Sunday, with the
arrest of opposition leader Kem Sokha and the
announcement two days later that he had been
charged with treason for “a secret plan and the
activities of conspiracy.” His “red-handed crime” was
his appearance in a 2013 video telling supporters he
received U.S. support and advice in planning political
strategy. His lawyer, Pheng Heng, denied this was a
crime, telling Reuters: “What he talked about was
elections in a multi-party democratic way.” Kem
Sokha’s arrest is a severe setback for his Cambodia
National Rescue Party, previously headed by Sam
Rainsy, who resigned earlier this year and is in exile.
The party, established in 2012, posed the first real
challenge in years to Hun Sen’s rule. No wonder it is
now in his crosshairs.
Another target is the Cambodia Daily, a newspaper known for its critical investigative reporting and
fierce independence. Faced with a one-month deadline from the government to pay $6.3 million for
years of back taxes, which the paper disputed, the
Daily closed its doors Monday with a huge front-page
headline in the last edition: “Descent Into Outright
Dictatorship.” The paper, founded by American
journalist Bernard Krisher in 1993, was already in a
perilous financial condition, and officials said the tax
threat effectively forced its closure. At the same time,
the government has been actively attempting to
silence radio broadcasts, forcing dozens off the air; it
is also pressuring radio station owners to stop
relaying broadcasts of Radio Free Asia and Voice of
America.
On Aug. 23, Cambodia ordered the National
Democratic Institute, a nongovernmental organization loosely affiliated with the Democratic Party in
the United States, to cease operations and its foreign
workers to leave the country. The NDI had worked in
Cambodia for 25 years, with both the ruling party and
opposition, attempting to help strengthen democratic processes and institutions. Its expulsion was based
on a 2015 law on associations and nongovernmental
organizations that has been widely criticized as
designed to serve as a weapon against such groups.
Cambodia’s real patron is authoritarian China,
concerned, Metro can continue to wither and die.
In a three-way summit, Mr. Hogan told his counterparts that he would oppose any further funding
from Maryland for the nation’s second-busiest transit system. Stunned by his adamance — he is reported
to have said the system consumes 11 percent of the
state’s capital spending on transit though just 2 percent of Marylanders ride it — other officials at the
meeting leaked his comments to The Post.
Mr. Hogan’s analysis is tissue-thin and upsidedown. Montgomery County, the state’s leading engine of economic vitality, depends heavily on Metro;
the subway’s demise would decimate the county’s
businesses and tax base, along with Maryland’s.
Think Mr. Hogan has trouble balancing the state’s
budget now? Wait till he tries it with the county’s
economy stalled, which would be the inevitable
consequence of the subway’s continuing deterioration.
Decades of neglect and can-kicking by the region’s
elected officials have left the transit system badly
underfunded — hence the maintenance and safety
meltdowns for which it has become notorious. The
which has been generous with aid and praised the
Hun Sen regime this week for its efforts to “uphold
national security and stability.” This is Chinese code
for imprisoning critics. The State Department expressed “grave concern” about the arrest of Kem
Sokha, but at the same time President Trump has
declared that the United States will not try to build
democracy in other nations. “We are not asking
others to change their way of life,” Mr. Trump said
recently. Hun Sen must think now is a good time to
shutter what’s left of Cambodia’s democracy.
buck-passing finally stopped with Metro’s current
general manager, Paul J. Wiedefeld, who launched a
track safety program and slashed staffing, spending
and service. He then warned that without additional
earmarked annual revenue of at least $500 million,
Metro’s long-term decline could no longer be forestalled. He also suggested that without those funds —
a bailout for a failing system — he would be moving
on to another job. And who could blame him for
wanting to get off a sinking ship?
Mr. Hogan seems unfazed by those warnings.
Perhaps concerned with his GOP base, mainly rural
and exurban voters far from the Washington suburbs, he delivered his verdict: not another dime from
Annapolis for Metro.
That’s not just penny-wise and pound-foolish. It’s
an inexcusable abdication of leadership. Facing
reelection next year, Mr. Hogan is broadly popular
and at no risk of a primary challenge. Any Democrat
who runs against him would be foolish to oppose
Metro funding. What is Mr. Hogan so scared of? The
stakes are clear. It’s not just his governorship that’s at
risk; it’s the region itself.
ABCDE
L O CA L O P I N I O N S
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
The economic impact of a later school start date is beside the point
I was disappointed to see the Sept. 2 front-page
article “In Maryland, late school start is a boon for
tourist industry” espousing the benefits for businesses in Ocean City of the longer summer vacation
for Maryland schools. Gov. Larry Hogan’s (R)
decision to force schools in Maryland to finish the
school year by June 15 and start after Labor Day
ignored overwhelming evidence that longer breaks
widen the educational gap between struggling
students and their peers. School districts across
Maryland have fought the implementation resulting from the governor’s executive order to no avail.
The article painted a rosy picture of the bliss of
the last hoorah of summer. I believe the phenomenon would be the same in any week just before the
start of school. Putting this article on the front page
Leon E. Panetta’s defense of the Deferred
Action for Childhood Arrivals program in his Sept.
5 op-ed, “What about the ‘dreamers’ who serve us?,”
started powerfully as he recalled his sadness when
his Italian grandfather was forced to leave the
family home in Monterey, Calif., during World War
II. But there is something disturbing about Mr. Panetta’s argument that dreamers should be protected because of their aptitude for serving in the
armed forces. Surely, continued hospitality should
be extended to dreamers who came to the United
States as children, have been educated here, work
here and have committed to a future here for
reasons beyond their utility as cannon fodder. They
are part of the fabric of American society, and the
idea of tearing them out of it and deporting them to
a country they do not know should be rejected on
the most fundamental moral grounds for its cruelty
and stupidity.
Harry Eyres, Washington
The economics of health insurance
Md.’s governor opposes what every other U.S. transit system has — dedicated funding.
W
House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) said
President Trump should not cancel the Deferred
Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program: “I
believe that this is something that Congress has to
fix. . . . I really do believe that there needs to be a
legislative solution” [“Republicans press Trump to
save DACA,” front page, Sept. 3].
If Mr. Ryan thinks there needs to be a legislative
solution, who better than he to offer it? Let him
propose legislative language to put DACA into law.
He should command substantial Republican backing for his position, and such a bill would assuredly
get full-throated Democratic support and pass the
House by a substantial majority.
But the perverse Republican insistence (known
as the Hastert Rule) that a bill be allowed a vote
only if it has a Republican majority behind it has
stood in the way. Indeed, had then-House Speaker
John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) dared to use a Republican minority together with substantial Democratic
support, he would long ago have saved us this
trauma by passing bipartisan immigration reform
in 2013, which cleared the Senate with nearly
two-thirds support and could have passed overwhelmingly in the House with bipartisan support.
What about governing for the good of the country?
What about strength of convictions? What is the
point of the speakership for if not this?
Avram Israel Reisner, Baltimore
House members opposed to continuing the
Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program
would do well to reflect on an early group of
dreamers: the children of the Mayflower, many of
whom were so young when brought to this land as
to have no memory of any home other than the one
made for them here by parents seeking a better life.
Living in a community where survival was a
struggle often lost, 18 of those minors managed to
reach adulthood and to contribute to the growth of
that community. Imagine instead their being
deported to England by the people of the dominant
culture, the Wampanoag. It seems House Republicans see the Wampanoag’s failure to do so as a
cautionary tale.
Gregory Adams, Washington
Mr. Hogan to Metro: Drop dead
hatever else Larry Hogan accomplishes
as Maryland’s governor — and so far,
despite deft political instincts, his substantive achievements are modest — his
time in office will be a failure if he causes or allows
Metro’s financial collapse. Yet this is the likely effect
of the stance Mr. Hogan took in recent negotiations
among the transit system’s three regional stakeholders on its financial future. Let’s hope it was merely an
opening gambit.
For Metro to pull out of its tailspin of inadequate
maintenance, pitiable reliability and deteriorating
safety, it needs what every other major subway in the
United States has: a dedicated, reliable source of
annual local funding. For that to happen, the top
elected officials of Maryland, Virginia and the District must agree on a plan.
That would have been difficult enough even if all
three — D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D), Virginia
Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) and Mr. Hogan (R) — were
on board with the basic and undeniable fact that
Metro’s death spiral portends disaster. Unfortunately, Mr. Hogan made clear last week that as far as he is
SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
N ANNOUNCING an end to the program providing temporary relief from deportation to young
immigrants brought into the country illegally as
children, both President Trump and Attorney
General Jeff Sessions have been clear: The responsibility of saving the “dreamers” is now on Congress’s
shoulders. House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) has
sent encouraging signals so far, promising to push
forward with legislation and telling dreamers to “rest
easy.” That’s a praiseworthy response, though the
devil will undoubtedly lie in the details of whatever
compromise Mr. Ryan works to hammer out.
In the meantime, Mr. Trump and Mr. Sessions owe
the public a better explanation as to why the
president rescinded the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which allowed
young undocumented immigrants to work and live
freely in the United States through renewable
two-year deferrals of deportation. The administration’s vague and haphazard account of the legal
reasoning behind DACA’s termination is far from a
sufficient rationale for a decision on which so many
. THURSDAY,
was like pouring salt in a wound for those of us who
opposed this change. The economic strength of
Ocean City businesses should not take priority over
the educational needs of our students. I find the
focus on a potential positive economic impact
irritating.
The article mentioned two school systems that
were granted waivers for snow days, but Prince
George’s County Public Schools’ waiver request for
academic reasons was denied. Maryland prides
itself on having some of the best schools in the
country. But that might not be true if our
educational leaders must balance higher graduation rates and test scores with shorter school
years.
Nancy Grigsby, Davidsonville
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Regarding the Sept. 3 editorial “One small step for
Obamacare”:
If members of Congress from either party agree
with the position that taxpayers should fund
guaranteed subsidies to insurance companies to
stabilize Obamacare, those lawmakers better not
express their predictable shock, bewilderment and
outrage when insurance companies continue to
raise premiums and deductibles exorbitantly. What
possible incentive is there for insurance companies
to be competitive among themselves and hold down
costs when they can go to Congress and have it
“craft a bill that would guarantee these payments
are made”?
Taxpayers would be dealt a double whammy —
paying via taxes and higher rates — if such economic
nonsense were applied.
Chris J. Krisinger, Burke
In reading the Sept. 3 news article “ACA battle
putting pressure on state insurance commissioners,” I was reminded that Sen. Susan Collins
(R-Maine) had been such a commissioner. Her
absence from the Republicans’ “repeal/replace”
working group was not only an inappropriate
rejection of women’s input but also a clear sign of
Republicans’ refusal to be evidence-based when
developing health-care policy to address real human
needs. I thank Ms. Collins for her integrity and her
strength in pushing back against those in her own
party.
Janet Goldberg, Riverdale
Don’t rush to judge
The Sept. 2 Religion commentary on Houston
megachurch minister Joel Osteen, “Here’s why people hate Joel Osteen” [Metro], had more than its
share of contradictions. On the one hand, writer Kate
Bowler asserted that “everyone hates” this “grinning
preacher.” On the other hand, Ms. Bowler noted that
Mr. Osteen is a best-selling author with a huge
congregation. Clearly, quite a few Americans value
him and his message, because his books alone have
made him wealthy. But is it fair to pillory someone,
even a Christian minister, for his wealth if it has been
gained honestly? Many have found his messages to be
hopeful and practical beyond the attainment of
material riches. Is there something wrong about
preaching that God is an active, healing power in
human affairs?
As for the charge that his nondenominational
Lakewood Church is only for the fortunate top
“1 percent” of the population, it is interesting that his
congregation is so ethnically diverse.
Should Mr. Osteen’s church be faulted for not
moving more quickly to house the victims of Hurricane Harvey? Church officials said they moved as
quickly as they could, given the unexpected severity of
the storm. TV coverage shows that the church is now
sheltering storm refugees and handing out needed
supplies. Probably nothing will satisfy the critics, but
one hopes that people who hate are not representative
of Americans in general. That would be sad indeed.
Julia Malone, Washington
Letters and Local Opinions: letters@washpost.com
Op-eds: oped@washpost.com
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A21
RE
E.J. DIONNE JR.
GEORGE F. WILL
A president
who believes
nothing
Will Trump
lower the
nuclear bar?
O
T
ne of the most cynical quotations in history is also one of the
most widely attributed. Let’s
ponder the version associated
with Groucho Marx: “Sincerity is the key
to success. Once you can fake that,
you’ve got it made.”
From the moment Donald Trump
opened his quest for the presidency, this
idea has defined him and served as an
organizing principle of his politics.
He presented himself as the guy who
said whatever was on his mind, who
didn’t talk like a politician, who didn’t
care what others thought and who railed
against “political correctness.”
In fact, just about everything that
comes out of his mouth or appears on
his Twitter feed is calculated for its
political and dramatic effect. Trump is
the exact opposite of what he tries to
project: The thing he cares about is what
others think of him. So he’ll adjust his
views again and again to serve his ends
as circumstances change. He’s not
Mr. Fearless. He’s Mr. Insecure.
Putting aside the catastrophe of his
presidency, this approach has worked
remarkably well for Trump. But when
the input on which he bases his calculations is garbled or contradictory, he
doesn’t know which way to go. Lacking
any deep instincts or convictions, he
tries to move in several directions at
once, an awkward maneuver even for an
especially gifted politician. In these
situations, Trump offers us a glimpse
behind the curtain, and we see there is
nothing there.
This is the most straightforward explanation for the fiasco created by the
president’s mean-spirited decision to
end the Deferred Action for Childhood
Arrivals program, known as DACA.
Trump was trying to square incompatible desires: to look super tough on
immigrants to his dwindling band of
loyal supporters, and to live up to his
expressions of “love” (you have to wonder why Trump throws this word around
so much) for the 800,000 residents who
were brought to the United States
illegally as children, conduct productive
lives and are as “American” as any of the
rest of us.
Just about everything that
comes out of Trump’s mouth
is calculated for its political
and dramatic effect.
His solution is a non-solution. First,
Trump showed how little he believes in
his policy — of ending DACA but
delaying its death sentence by six
months — by having Attorney General
Jeff Sessions, the administration’s ad
hoc director of nativist initiatives, make
the announcement.
Trump shifted responsibility for his
impossible political dilemma to Congress. It’s true that Congress should have
acted on this long ago, but Trump
undercut his claim by not telling his
allies what he wanted done. He was
simply tossing the choices down Pennsylvania Avenue in the way a lousy
neighbor might hurl unwanted debris
into the yard next door.
And then, when the bad reviews
poured in, Trump backed away from
even his muddle of a policy. He tweeted
that if Congress didn’t act, “I will revisit
this issue!” So a six-month delay might
not really be a six-month delay. It might
be extended. Or maybe not. Who knows?
Adding an exclamation point to your
waffling doesn’t help.
The improvised character of the
Trump presidency owes to his inclination to see politics as entirely about
public performance. He cares above all
about the reactions he arouses day to
day and even hour to hour.
There is no strategic vision of what a
Trump administration should look like
because he doesn’t have any clear objectives of his own. On some days, he buys
into the Sessions-Steve Bannon-Stephen
Miller nationalist worldview. On others,
he goes with his practical generals or his
business-friendly Wall Street advisers.
He doesn’t resolve the philosophical
tensions because they don’t matter to
him.
All this underscores what a waste this
presidency is. Trump’s campaign was
irresponsible in many ways, but it did
highlight problems our country needs to
grapple with, particularly the vast gap in
opportunity and hope between the
country’s prosperous metropolitan areas and its economically ailing smaller
towns and cities. We are doing nothing
to ease this divide, and the policies
Trump does embrace by default (he goes
with conservatives in Congress on many
issues as the path of least resistance)
may worsen it. Stasis also rules on
health care and infrastructure.
Those who condemn the fundamental
cruelty of using “dreamers” to make a
political point are right to do so. The
mobilization for decency in reaction to
Trump has already altered the direction
of his weather vane. But there is a larger
lesson here: It is a genuinely bad idea to
elect a president who worries far more
about how his actions look than what
they actually are.
ejdionne@washpost.com
CHRISTOPHER MILLETTE/ERIE TIMES-NEWS VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS
People protest President Trump’s decision to rescind the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy at the
Intermodal Transportation Center in Erie, Pa., on Wednesday.
The ‘dreamers’ I know
BY
E RIC H . H OLDER J R.
O
ur nation’s sense of morality —
and of itself — is once again
being tested.
President
Trump
has
scrapped the Deferred Action for
Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program,
threatening to deport nearly 800,000
young, undocumented immigrants —
the “dreamers” — and crassly justifying the decision by hiding behind a
false interpretation of immigration
law and our constitutional separation
of powers.
DACA, which gave undocumented
young people brought to the United
States as children a chance to work
and study here without fear of deportation, has been a dramatic success.
The program provided a two-year
grant of protection and a permit to
work legally in the United States, after
which enrollees were required to go
through a renewal process. To qualify,
immigrant youths had to meet a set of
stringent criteria: When applying,
they were required to have been enrolled in high school, have a high
school diploma or equivalent, or have
been an honorably discharged military veteran. In addition, they had to
have lived in the United States continuously at least since June 15, 2007, and
not have a criminal record suggesting
they posed a threat to national security or public safety.
In other words, DACA was far from,
as Attorney General Jeff Sessions suggested Tuesday, an “open-borders policy” that admitted “everyone.” To the
contrary, it was a beacon of hope for a
narrowly defined group who crossed
our borders before they could have
fully understood what a “border” was.
Of course, as Sessions emphasized,
we are a nation of laws, and the
immigration system is no different.
We must ensure that our laws are
enforced to maintain the vitality, pros-
perity and security of our polity. But in
painting DACA as a flagrant disregard
for our constitutional separation of
powers, Sessions exhibited a fundamental misunderstanding of what
DACA did. The program was based on
the well-established executive-branch
authority to exercise prosecutorial
discretion in setting enforcement priorities. Rather than grant legal status,
DACA simply deferred enforcement
action against immigrants who met
certain qualifications and permitted
them to work lawfully in the meantime. And despite Sessions’s suggestion that President Barack Obama
departed from established precedent
in creating DACA, the practice of
granting deferred action has been
formally recognized as within the
executive branch’s authority since the
Reagan administration.
But the Trump administration’s revocation of DACA more than rests on
legal misconceptions; it also is based
on a misleading characterization of
the dreamers. Sessions has justified
the end of the program by suggesting
that dreamers took jobs away from
Americans and that “failure to enforce” immigration laws puts our nation “at risk of crime, violence and
even terrorism.” This portrait stands
in stark contrast with the dreamers
whom I, and many others, know,
admire and love.
The dreamers I know are husbands
and wives, children and parents, cousins and friends. They are business
owners, neighbors and soldiers who
fight for our nation. Their work in
sectors from technology to law to
finance continually betters our nation.
They are not and should not be defined by their immigration status.
They must be defined by their character and contributions to this country,
their devotion to our communities,
and the dreams they espouse. Their
America is our America. As Obama
has said, they are Americans “in their
hearts, in their minds, in every single
way but one: on paper.”
We must look to the truth etched in
our past and avoid a tendency to focus
on short-term political impulses when
it comes to immigration. Immigrants
created the United States. Tenacity,
entrepreneurship and fearlessness
have defined immigrants throughout
the centuries and serve as a common
bond between my immigrant father
and Trump’s immigrant mother.
After immigrating to America from
Barbados, my father served in the
Army in World War II only to be
refused service — while in uniform —
at a lunch counter in the very nation
he defended. Nevertheless, his persistence and unshaken belief in this
country and the unique American
opportunities made available to him
enabled his son to become attorney
general of the United States. That’s the
possibility that comes with immigrating to this country, the dream that this
country fosters and has made real.
Remembering these truths can help us
avoid the self-inflicted wound that
will be caused by turning away from
the principles that indeed made
America great — again and again and
again.
I’m calling on all Americans to see
and treat dreamers as our own, because they are our own. Congress
must urgently enact legislation to
restore their ability to build lives in
this country. States must resist
Trump’s inevitable deportation efforts. The private sector must come
together to defend its employees.
Americans must raise their voices —
and use their ballots. If we are to
remain true to our heritage and who
we claim to be, we must stand with the
dreamers.
The writer was U.S. attorney general from
2009 to 2015.
How Virginia can reconcile its history
BY
V
T OM P ERRIELLO
irginia is the birthplace of American democracy, but it is also the
birthplace of American slavery.
We often hear our history described as a steady progress toward equality, but in reality, each generation that has
pushed for progress has faced violence
from those who seek to preserve a system
of racial hierarchy.
In the 19th century, emancipation and
Reconstruction sparked lynchings and the
Ku Klux Klan. In the early 20th, the
emergence of a black middle class and an
influx of immigration sparked Lost Cause
Confederate revisionism, eugenics-based
immigration quotas and the firing of African Americans from the federal workforce. In our own time, the election of our
first black president unleashed a wave of
white supremacism, including in my
home town of Charlottesville, where
armed protesters whom I interviewed last
month described former president Barack
Obama as a “national embarrassment”
that they needed to “cleanse.”
It is time we break this cycle. Virginia
should establish a statewide Truth and
Reconciliation Commission on race that
could bend this endless loop of progress
and backlash into an arc of justice.
Such commissions are not just conversations. They are systematic, nonpartisan
public processes for establishing a common understanding of our history, evaluating how we publicly memorialize that
history and tackling policy reforms that
address the painful legacies of our past.
Successful commissions spend a few years
convening leading historians, community
and moral leaders, former elected officials, and artists. They work across deep
fault lines of conflicting narratives to
establish common ground and common
facts.
Many great nations — including Germany, Argentina, South Africa and Canada — have used similar strategies to forge a
path forward after periods of violence,
division and repression. Initiatives here in
the United States have proved promising
as well, including the Greensboro process
in 2000 to review a 1979 attack in which
members of the KKK killed five people in
broad daylight and walked free.
Civil rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson has
been building the South’s first memorial
to lynching as a teachable, interactive
engagement with our past, and several
localities in Virginia have launched Hope
in the Cities initiatives. This year, after
neo-Nazis held their first tiki-torch rally at
the Robert E. Lee monument in Charlottesville, I issued a call for a comprehensive Virginia commission on race as part of
my campaign for the Democratic nomination for governor, understanding from my
past work on transitional justice abroad
that hate left unchecked tends to escalate.
Much attention has been paid to the
question of monuments, and these are
often a component of such commissions.
How we decide to commemorate and
celebrate our history — and who gets a
voice in the decision — speaks volumes
about our present and our future. While I
support the removal of most Confederate
monuments, the process by which these
decisions are made is as important as the
outcome. The highly charged debate cannot be avoided; the question is whether
this discussion should be done through a
shared, historically grounded process or
as isolated (and often reactionary) proxy
battles in the public parks and streets of
our cities.
But successful reconciliation looks well
beyond monuments to the inequalities
and cultural divides produced by history,
including statutes on housing, education
and criminal codes. It must not just be
top-down but also provide a space for
painful memories to be aired.
We saw a glimpse of how this process
can help — and what its absence risks — in
the first City Council meeting in Charlottesville after the violence. The meeting
was messy and chaotic, but far less so than
when we provide no such forum. Those
who suffered at the hands of the forces of
hate and breakdowns in protections from
state authorities needed a forum to have
their stories heard and to demand accountability. Reconciliation is not easy or
pain-free, but it does provide an outlet for
healing.
Virginia’s history is full of contradictions. We hosted the capital of the Confederacy, but we were also the first state to
elect an African American governor. We
produced the Declaration of Independence but also shuttered public schools
before allowing integration. The modern
Klan rallied in Charlottesville with local
support, but I was proud to the point of
tears to see them massively outnumbered
by Virginians of all races, faiths, generations and orientations standing up for
racial justice and an inclusive commonwealth.
From tragedy, Virginia can lead again.
We can heal through a statewide process
that brings gravitas, methodology and
inclusion to some of the most difficult
questions our society must answer. These
are the questions about who we are as
Americans, how we got here and where we
go from here. And they are about whether
every American has a voice in crafting the
answer.
The writer, a Democrat from Virgina, was a
member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from 2009 to 2011 and served as a special U.S.
envoy to the African Great Lakes from 2015 to
2016. He is head of a Democratic political
action committee in Virginia.
he U.S. Air Force “sniffer plane”
was collecting air samples off
Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula
on Sept. 3, 1949, when it gathered evidence of radioactivity, confirming that the war-shattered Soviet
Union had tested a nuclear device. The
Soviets’ Aug. 29, 1949, test had come
faster than expected.
Dating from the detonation at the
Trinity Site in New Mexico on July 16,
1945, the basic science of nuclear
explosions is more than 72 years old —
three years older than the North Korean nation. Ballistic missile technology is more than 60 years old. The
problems of miniaturizing warheads
for mounting on missiles, and of ensuring the warheads’ survival en route to
targets, are not sufficient to stymie a
nation — consider Pakistan, whose
annual per capita income is less than
$2,000 — that is determined to have a
nuclear arsenal.
North Korea has one and is developing intercontinental ballistic missiles
faster than expected and with ostentatious indifference to U.S. proclamations. On Jan. 2, President-elect Donald Trump scampered up the rhetorical
escalation ladder, unlimbering his
heavy artillery — an exclamation point
— to tweet about North Korea’s promised ICBM test: “It won’t happen!” It
did. North Korea’s most audacious act,
firing a missile over Japan, came seven
days after Secretary of State Rex Tillerson praised North Korea’s “restraint.”
Pyongyang’s “signaling” does not
involve abstruse semiotics: It wants a
global nuclear reach, and as the Economist magazine says, the world’s unpalatable options are the improbable (productive negotiations), the feeble (more
sanctions) and the terrifying (military
preemption). Concerning the latter,
there is no bright line, but there is a
distinction to be drawn, however imprecisely, between preemptive war and
preventive war. The former constitutes
self-defense in response to a clear and
present danger — repelling an act of
aggression presumed with reasonable
certainty to be imminent. The latter is
an act of anticipation — and, to be
candid, of aggression — to forestall the
emergence of a clear and present
danger.
When Trump threatened North Korea with “fire and fury like the world
has never seen,” was he threatening to
cross the nuclear weapons threshold?
This has been contemplated before
regarding North Korea. Former
Gen. Douglas MacArthur, who had
been fired by President Harry S. Truman for insubordination, handed President-elect Dwight D. Eisenhower a
memorandum on how “to clear North
Korea of enemy forces”: “This could be
accomplished through the atomic
bombing of enemy military concentrations and installations in North Korea
and the sowing of fields of suitable
radio-active materials, the by-product
of atomic manufacture, to close major
lines of enemy supply and communication. . . .”
MacArthur badly misjudged Eisenhower, whose biographer Jean Edward
Smith says that during the Potsdam
Conference (July 17 to Aug. 2, 1945),
when Eisenhower was told of the New
Mexico test — his first knowledge of
the new weapon — “he was appalled”
and “was the only one at Potsdam who
opposed using the bomb.” Smith says:
“As president, Eisenhower would
twice be presented with recommendations from his National Security Council and the Joint Chiefs of Staff that the
bomb be used; first, in Vietnam to
protect the French at Dien Bien Phu,
then against China at the time of the
Formosa Strait crisis. Both times
Eisenhower rejected the recommendations. As a former supreme commander, Eisenhower had the confidence to
do so, where other presidents might
not have. And by rejecting the use of
the bomb, there is no question that
Eisenhower raised the threshold at
which atomic weaponry could be employed — a legacy we continue to
enjoy.”
But for how long? The nonproliferation regime has been remarkably successful. During the 1960 presidential
campaign, John Kennedy cited “indications” that by 1964 there would be
“10, 15 or 20” nuclear powers. As president, he said that by 1975 there might
be 20. Now, however, North Korea, the
ninth, might be joined by Japan, South
Korea and Taiwan, among others, unless U.S. leadership produces, regarding North Korea, conspicuously credible deterrence. The reservoir of presidential credibility is not brimful.
On Aug. 1, Sen. Lindsey O. Graham
(R-S.C.) said Trump had told him that
“there will be a war with North Korea”
if it continues to develop ICBMs capable of reaching the United States.
“We’ll see,” said Trump on Sunday,
responding to this shouted question:
“Will you attack North Korea?” You?
Are Congress’s constitutional powers regarding war so atrophied that it
supinely hopes for mere post facto
notification? Ten months after Nov. 8,
that day’s costs, until now largely
aesthetic, are suddenly, although not
altogether unpredictably, more serious
than were perhaps contemplated by
his 62,984,825 voters.
georgewill@washpost.com
A22
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
House approves bipartisan bill on driverless vehicles
Lawmakers steer clear
of crafting rules for
commercial trucks
BY
M ICHAEL L ARIS
The House passed a major
self-driving-vehicle bill Wednesday. But a big question remains:
what to do about commercial
trucks.
Driverless trucks are seen as
one of the most promising — and
fraught — elements of the coming autonomous future on U.S.
roads. Convoys of robo-trucks
guided across the country by a
single human driver — or none at
all — could become a major
economic force. They could be a
boon to safety or, opposing advocates say, a particularly potent
hazard.
They could also gobble up
plenty of good-paying jobs.
So lawmakers seeking biparti-
san backing for the Self Drive Act
made clear that their definition
of a “highly automated vehicle
. . . does not include a commercial motor vehicle,” as the legislation puts it.
That means it doesn’t cover
trucks that weigh more than
10,000 pounds or vehicles meant
to carry more than 10 passengers
or hazardous materials.
The bill blocks states from
regulating “the design, construction, or performance” of automated vehicles, clarifying that
such power is in federal hands.
Many technology and car companies have warned that state legislators are leaving behind a
“patchwork” of regulations that
could dampen innovation and
thwart travelers crossing state
lines.
Some state officials, meanwhile, argue that federal guidelines on autonomous vehicles,
which are voluntary, do too little
to guarantee safety.
The U.S. Transportation Department has been working on
changes to the Obama-era policies, and Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao will travel to
Michigan next week to describe
updated guidelines.
The House legislation passed
Wednesday also allows automakers and tech companies to
seek exemptions, totaling in
the tens of thousands per company, from federal vehicle safety standards, as long as the
companies can ensure that a
car’s safety won’t be downgraded. That would allow, for example, an automaker to ditch the
steering wheel to allow more
creative driverless designs. The
bill also instructs Chao, within
two years, to require “safety
assessment certifications” that
demonstrate driverless vehicles “are likely to . . . function
as intended and contain fail
safe features.”
The legislation calls for the
creation of an advisory council to
wrestle with a long list of outstanding questions on autonomy,
including cybersecurity con-
cerns, environmental impacts,
and access for people with disabilities and those living in “rural, remote, mountainous, insular, or unmapped” areas.
“While the National Highway
Traffic Safety Administration
can’t write a safety standard to
make us all perfect drivers, it
can work to advance lifesaving
technologies to avoid collisions,
and that’s part of what this
bipartisan legislation will put in
place,” Rep. Greg Walden (ROre.), chairman of the House
Energy and Commerce Committee, said before Wednesday’s
vote.
The Self Drive Act came out of
the commerce committee with
unanimous support this summer, offering a rare bipartisan
win on a high-profile issue on
which members are eager to
show results.
A separate House committee,
Transportation and Infrastructure, has jurisdiction over trucking, which meant that backers of
the Self Drive Act could avoid the
touchy and potentially perilous
driverless truck issue. But the
Senate committee on Commerce,
Science, and Transportation,
which is crafting its own bill, has
wrestled with trucking, and it’s
not clear how the House and
Senate approaches will eventually mesh.
The Senate committee’s chairman, John Thune (R-S.D.), on
Wednesday said trucking “has
emerged as a pivotal issue” for
Congress and announced a hearing on the matter next week. The
issue has gummed up efforts to
write legislation in the Senate.
The International Brotherhood of Teamsters was among
the groups pushing Congress to
stay clear of trucks.
James P. Hoffa, president of
the Teamsters, said many issues
remain with the House bill. But
the labor union, which represents 600,000 drivers, commended members of Congress
“for recognizing that a starting
point for any discussion on this
subject was that no legislation
should impact commercial motor vehicles or traditional commercial drivers,” Hoffa said in a
statement.
Hoffa said the Teamsters must
be at the center of any separate
discussion on autonomy and
trucking to make sure that technology is “not used to put workers at risk on the job or destroy
livelihoods and chip away at the
middle class.”
But Michael Cammisa, vice
president of safety and connectivity at the American Trucking
Associations, said the industry
doesn’t think that “it makes
sense to write legislation without it applying to all vehicles,
and that includes commercial
trucks, which account for 33.8
million registered vehicles and
450 billion miles traveled annually.”
Cammisa added that “it continues to be our belief that the
technologies being developed today will assist, rather than supplant, drivers on the road.”
michael.laris@washpost.com
Vice chair to leave Fed
board before term ends
Unexpected departure
adds to central bank’s
leadership vacuum
BY C HISTOPHER R UGABER
AND M ARTIN C RUTSINGER
MANUEL BALCE CENETA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Oklahoma insurance regulator John Doak, right, testifies during a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on
the Affordable Care Act insurance market. The committee is trying to improve and stabilize the ACA’s shaky exchanges.
State regulators want more funds for ACA insurers
Lawmakers seek to
bolster exchanges, but
consensus is uncertain
BY A MY G OLDSTEIN
AND J ULIET E ILPERIN
A bipartisan group of state insurance
commissioners
on
Wednesday sketched out possible
common ground where Congress
could strengthen the Affordable
Care Act’s insurance marketplaces, but the chance of lawmakers coalescing around even a modest consensus remained unclear.
At the first of four hearings
before the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, which is trying to forge a small
set of improvements to the ACA’s
shaky exchanges, the commissioners urged senators to guarantee at
least two more years of funding for
subsidies to insurers, which President Trump has repeatedly threatened to abolish.
They also said the government
should give states more flexibility
to bypass certain ACA insurance
requirements and should re-create a pool of money the law provided during its first years to help
buffer health plans from the expense of covering customers with
unusually high medical costs.
The ideas advocated by the
commissioners amount to a strategy to slow recent spikes in premium rates by some health plans
sold on ACA marketplaces and to
expand consumers’ choices now
that major insurers have defected
from some marketplaces. The
ideas track the basic contours of
changes being touted by committee Republicans or Democrats —
though not necessarily by both.
The hearings this week and
next are part of a compressed
timeline the committee has set for
itself to negotiate a narrow, bipartisan plan that might help the
marketplaces. It is a modest goal
but a sharp strategic reversal following events in late July when
GOP senators’ plans to tear apart
much of the ACA imploded spectacularly.
Committee Chairman Lamar
Alexander (R-Tenn.) opened
Wednesday morning’s session by
saying he wanted to reach an
agreement by the end of next
week. He pointed out that 31 GOP
and Democratic senators had
turned out for a private coffee
before the hearing to talk about
how they might arrive at a consensus — “a remarkable level of interest,” he said.
Alexander called on the Trump
administration to promise funding for the ACA’s “cost-sharing”
subsidies through 2018. He also
said the government should allow
states greater freedom to deviate
from a variety of ACA rules, including the benefits that health
plans sold through marketplaces
must include. Each party “may be
reluctant” to support certain elements, he acknowledged, then
added, “This is a compromise we
ought to be able to accept. . . . If we
don’t, millions of Americans will
be hurt.”
The committee’s top Democrat,
Sen. Patty Murray of Washington
state, said senators “need to seize
this opportunity.” But she noted
that they have little time for doing
so if they hope to influence insurers’ rates or participation before
Sept. 27, the deadline for companies participating in the marketplaces to sign government contracts for the coming year.
Murray took a less conciliatory
tone than the chairman, accusing
the Trump administration of sabotage of the sprawling health-care
law — such as last week, when
officials slashed federal funding of
outreach activities and consumer
assistance for the ACA’s fifth annual enrollment season. Sign-ups
start on Nov. 1.
She also quickly reflected the
Democrats’ differences with their
Republican counterparts. For one,
the government should promise
insurers cost-sharing payments
for multiple years, she said.
Other committee Democrats
made clear that they expect any
compromise to include language
or funding aimed at bolstering the
enrollment-related activities cut
last week. Given Trump’s repeated
attacks on the law, “if we’re going
to boost enrollment in 2018, we’re
going to have to do things to overcome it,” Sen. Tammy Baldwin
(Wis.) said in an interview.
Republican senators have privately appealed to the White
House to consider accepting a limited package to avert further premium spikes for the coming year.
One senator, who asked for anonymity to speak frankly, said Vice
President Pence seemed open to
the idea this week.
The hearings, which continue
Thursday with testimony from a
bipartisan group of governors, fol-
low Senate Republicans’ dramatic
failure in late July to overturn
central parts of the ACA. Regardless of the new negotiations’ fate,
the hearings mark the closest collaboration between Republicans
and Democrats in years on an
issue that has defined their ideological differences perhaps more
than any other.
Julie McPeak, who heads the
Tennessee insurance department
and is the incoming president of
the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, said 78 of
Tennessee’s 95 counties will have
only one insurer selling ACA
health plans for 2018. She urged
Congress to guarantee payments
of the cost-sharing subsidies and
re-create the federal pool of reinsurance money.
Lori Wing-Heier, director of
Alaska’s insurance division, said
that paying through 2019 would
be a minimum, while Washington
state’s insurance commissioner,
Mike Kreidler, would make the
payments permanent. The marketplaces are in serious peril because of “the growing uncertainties and actions of the administration,” he said.
No matter the result of the panel’s efforts, Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.) said its bipartisan
approach should become a model
for broader attempts by the chamber to improve health care. Ticking off goals — from reducing geographic variations in medical
practice to improving care at the
end of life — Whitehouse said
“there is nothing Democratic or
Republican” about them.
amy.goldstein@washpost.com
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
Federal Reserve Vice Chairman Stanley Fischer is to resign
next month for personal reasons,
leaving a fourth vacancy on the
seven-member Fed governing
board.
Fischer is a widely respected
economist who taught at MIT
and was head of the Bank of
Israel for eight years.
His unexpected departure
adds to a leadership vacuum at
the top of the Fed as it navigates a
difficult path. Fischer, 73, was a
confidant of Fed Chair Janet L.
Yellen, whose term ends in February
The U.S. central bank is slowly
raising interest rates as the economy grows and unemployment
falls. Yet inflation remains below
the Fed’s target, complicating its
course.
Fischer has been a member of
the Fed’s Board of Governors
since May 2014. His term as vice
chairman was set to expire next
June. In a letter to the Fed, he
said his resignation would occur
on or around Oct. 13.
His resignation will provide
President Trump with another
opportunity to reshape the Fed.
Trump has nominated Randal
Quarles for one of the four vacancies, as vice chairman for bank
supervision.
Quarles’s nomination is scheduled for a vote by the Senate
Banking Committee on Thursday. All nominations to the Board
of Governors require Senate confirmation.
Diane Swonk, chief economist
at DS Economics and a longtime
Fed watcher, said Fischer’s resignation could make it more likely
that the Trump administration
will renominate Yellen rather
than naming a new Fed chair.
Congress already faces a
crowded agenda this fall: It
needs to raise the country’s borrowing limit, reach a budget
agreement to keep the government operating and take up complicated tax overhaul.
“It would be easier to keep her
around,” Swonk said of Yellen.
“You’re talking about a lot of
turnover when uncertainty about
Fed policy is already high.”
Trump criticized Yellen’s lowinterest rate policies during the
presidential campaign but has
tempered his comments since
the election.
Last month in an interview,
JIM WATSON/
AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Stanley Fischer’s term at the
Fed was to last until June 2018.
Trump said he was considering
either renominating Yellen for a
second term as Fed chair or
replacing her. One potential candidate was Gary Cohn, a former
top executive at Goldman Sachs
who now leads Trump’s National
Economic Council.
Cohn would be the first Fed
chair over the past four decades
who is not an economist.
In the interview with the Wall
Street Journal, Trump said he
had a “lot of respect” for Yellen
and would consider asking her to
serve another term.
But he also said he was considering other candidates.
Yellen has said that she intends to serve out her term but
has declined to say whether she
would consider serving another
term.
Reports earlier this year suggested that a leading candidate
for one of the other vacant slots is
Marvin Goodfriend, an economics professor at Carnegie
Mellon University in Pittsburgh.
Goodfriend, 66, worked for
more than 20 years at the Richmond Fed and is seen as a
leading hawkish voice on monetary policy. In congressional
testimony in March, Goodfriend
endorsed a move being pushed
by Republican lawmakers to require the Fed to follow a rulesbased approach to setting interest rate policy.
That could make it harder for
the Fed in the future to slice
interest rates to ultralow levels,
as it did in 2008 and 2009, amid
the financial crisis and Great
Recession.
Another potential nominee for
a board seat is Robert G. Jones,
the chairman and chief executive
of Old National Bancorp.
The bank is headquartered in
Indiana, Vice President Pence’s
home state.
— Associated Press
Under Trump, sta∞ng at EPA shrinks to levels near those in Reagan era
2018 budget proposal
would cut 3,200 workers,
trim funding 31 percent
BY
B RADY D ENNIS
The workforce of the Environmental Protection Agency could
soon shrink to the lowest level
since Ronald Reagan occupied
the White House — part of a push
to curtail the size and scope of an
agency that President Trump
once promised to eliminate “in
almost every form.”
The EPA employs about 14,880
people, but administration officials made clear this spring that
they intended to reduce those
numbers in several ways. The
agency also has been under a
hiring freeze. And in June, the
EPA said it planned to offer buyouts and early retirement packages to more than 1,200 people by
early September.
Last week, 362 employees accepted a voluntary buyout, according to one agency official,
who spoke on the condition of
anonymity because the figures
have not been publicly an-
nounced. On Aug. 31, a dozen
employees retired. An additional
33 employees are retiring at the
end of September, and 45 more
employees are considering retirement offers.
If all those individuals depart,
EPA staffing levels would drop to
14,428. The last time the agency’s
workforce fell so low was in the
final year of the Reagan administration.
“We’re giving long-serving,
hard-working employees the opportunity to retire early,” EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt said in a
statement. “We’re reducing the
size of government, protecting
taxpayer dollars and staying true
to our core mission of protecting
the environment and American
jobs.”
Nearly 25 percent of EPA employees are eligible to retire with
full benefits. An additional 25 percent could retire in the next five
years.
The EPA has been a main target
of the Trump administration. The
president’s proposed fiscal 2018
budget would slash the agency’s
funding by 31 percent, cutting
about 3,200 workers, obliterating
funding for climate change research and Superfund cleanups
and scrapping more than 50 pro-
grams. Among those are efforts
aimed at improving energy efficiency, funds for infrastructure
projects in Native American communities and cleanup plans for
the Great Lakes.
During his second term in office, President Barack Obama initiated a round of buyouts at the
agency, paying more than $11 million to 436 employees to voluntarily leave their jobs. But John
O’Grady, a career EPA employee
who heads a national council of
EPA unions, said this spring that if
the Trump administration tries to
get rid of thousands of employees,
as officials have proposed, it
would amount to “the utter destruction of the U.S. EPA.”
“If the administration were interested in realigning the U.S.
EPA, it would first conduct a thorough workforce and workload
analysis,” O’Grady said when
word of the looming buyouts
came this spring. “However, they
will not do this because it would
tell them that the agency is woefully underfunded and understaffed today. Any further cuts will
absolutely cripple the agency.”
brady.dennis@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/energy-environment
KLMNO
METRO
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
High today at
approx. 4 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
60 70 75 68°
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75°
Precip: 5%
Wind: WNW
7-14 mph
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WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
B
RE
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
THE DISTRICT
OBITUARIES
A Maryland telescope that
helped track the Earth’s
wobble for nearly a century
is placed in a museum. B3
A credit-card fraud probe
has exposed an alleged
D.C. dogfighting ring called
the “DMV Board.” B3
Simeon Wright witnessed
the 1955 abduction of his
cousin Emmett Till before
Till’s torture and murder. B5
Ex-o∞cer
is given 2
additional
life terms
TEEN’S STEPFATHER
KILLED MD. MOTHER
Estranged husband
also killed 2 others
BY
EVELYN HOCKSTEIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Shuttered windows
Washington National Cathedral votes to remove stained glass honoring Robert E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson
BY
M ICHELLE B OORSTEIN
ination that historically has counted many of
America’s elite as members, including presidents George Washington, James Madison
and George H.W. Bush. It is the second-largest
church building in the country and is typically host to national events such as presidential
funerals and official interfaith ceremonies on
presidential swearing-in days, including
President Trump’s.
The removal of the windows, which will
take a couple of days, reflects a flurry of
national debate over whether to take down
monuments, statues or art that honor Confederates in public and private spaces across
the country. The issue gained prominence
after a mass killing at a black church in
Charleston, S.C., in 2015 by a white supremacist, and then again last month after a deadly
white supremacist march in Charlottesville.
Several dozen monuments have been removed, or a debate to remove them is on the
table, in places including New Orleans;
Baltimore; Helena, Mont.; and Los Angeles.
Budde and cathedral dean Randy Hollerith
said the governing board voted “overwhelmingly” Tuesday to remove the windows but
acknowledged there were opponents who felt
the windows are part of the cathedral and
Leaders at Washington National Cathedral, the closest thing in the country’s
capital to an official church, have decided
after two years of study and debate to remove
two stained-glass windows honoring Confederate figures Robert E. Lee and Stonewall
Jackson.
Saying the stories told in the two 4-by-6foot windows were painful, distracting and
one-sided, a majority of the cathedral’s governing body voted Tuesday night to remove
the windows. On Wednesday morning, stonemasons were at work putting up scaffolding
to begin taking out the art that was installed
64 years ago.
“This isn’t simply a conversation about the
history of the windows, but a very real
conversation in the wider culture about how
the Confederate flag and the Old South
narrative have been lively symbols today for
white supremacists. We’d be made of stone
ourselves if we weren’t paying attention to
that,” said Bishop Mariann Edgar Budde,
leader of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington, which includes the cathedral.
The cathedral is the official seat of the
Episcopal Church, a small Protestant denom-
BY
G REGORY S . S CHNEIDER
richmond — Republican gu-
bernatorial nominee Ed Gillespie
on Wednesday called for criminal
justice reform that goes beyond
what the GOP-controlled state
legislature has so far been willing
to embrace, including raising the
state’s felony threshold to $500
from $200 and softening marijuana enforcement.
Speaking at a black-owned
barbershop and surrounded by a
number of local pastors and social workers who deal with people returning to the community
from prison, Gillespie said he
wants a system that is “just, fair
and redeeming. I believe in redemption.”
Gillespie also cast his proposals in economic terms, pointing
out that the state spends more
than $1 billion a year on incarceration.
While he said he opposes decriminalizing marijuana because
it “sends the wrong signal” to
young people, Gillespie said he
would favor a three-strikes approach for simple possession:
The first two arrests would not
carry criminal charges, but a
third would.
By then, he said, “you really
should know better.”
The
Republican-controlled
legislature commissioned a study
of decriminalization earlier this
year, and Gillespie said he would
be interested to see its findings.
Gillespie also said he supports
GILLESPIE CONTINUED ON B4
STEVE HELBER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ed Gillespie (R) is running
for governor of Virginia.
STEVE HELBER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam
(D) is Gillespie’s opponent.
BY
F ENIT N IRAPPIL
Americans for Prosperity, the
group financed by the billionaire industrialists Charles and
David Koch, is going on air to
attack Virginia Democratic gubernatorial nominee Ralph
Northam as part of a multimillion-dollar campaign.
A commercial set to air Thursday on networks statewide blasts
Northam, the sitting lieutenant
governor, for missing board
meetings of the Virginia Economic Development Partnership.
The partnership, created by
the state legislature in 1995 to
ACT scores
show stark
gaps in
race, class
Students in D.C. area
beat national average,
but fewer take the test
BY
N ICK A NDERSON
KOCHS CONTINUED ON B4
SCORES CONTINUED ON B2
Kochs plan to shell out
millions to beat Northam
TV ad accuses Democrat
of lax control of
economic board, grant
TORDIL CONTINUED ON B4
boost economic development,
has long been criticized for waste
and dysfunction. In 2014, while
Northam served on its board of
directors, the agency approved a
$1.4 million state grant to a Chinese firm that promised to open a
factory in Appomattox County
but never did. The money was
never returned to the state.
Levi Russell, a spokesman for
Americans for Prosperity, said
the ad buy ranges from $1 million to $2 million and will run
for three weeks. He added that
the commercial is the first
round of paid television advertising but declined to say how
much the organization plans to
spend through Election Day in
November.
Northam faces Republican Ed
Gillespie, a longtime Republican
Party operative who was the keynote speaker at Americans for
CATHEDRAL CONTINUED ON B2
TOP: Masons at Washington National Cathedral erect scaffolding before taking out stained-glass windows honoring Robert E. Lee and Stonewall
Jackson. One of Lee’s panels is seen above. The windows were put up in 1953 after fundraising, including by the United Daughters of the Confederacy.
GOP nominee favors
a looser approach to
marijuana enforcement
The teen was walking out of
ROTC after school when she saw
the lights flashing and heard the
horn blaring from her mother’s
black SUV.
The girl’s stepfather was beside
the driver’s side window, confronting his estranged wife.
The teen dropped her backpack
and ran to help her mother, but
abruptly stopped.
“Grace! Run! Run!” Gladys
Tordil yelled to her daughter.
Those were the last words the
mother uttered before the man at
the SUV — Gladys Tordil’s estranged husband — shot his wife
and walked away.
More than a year later, a judge
on Wednesday sentenced Eulalio
Tordil, 65, to two life terms for the
killing of Gladys Tordil and the
attempted murder of a good Samaritan who tried to intervene in
the school lot.
The sentence in Prince George’s
County Circuit Court closes a case
that set the Washington suburbs
New results from the nation’s
most widely used college admission test highlight in detailed
fashion the persistent achievement gaps between students who
face disadvantages and those
who don’t.
Scores from the ACT show that
just 9 percent of students in the
Class of 2017 who came from
low-income families, whose parents did not go to college, and who
identify as black, Hispanic, American Indian or Pacific Islander are
strongly ready for college.
But the readiness rate for students with none of those demographic characteristics was six
times as high, 54 percent, according to data released Thursday.
“That kind of shocked us,” ACT
chief executive Marten Roorda
said. “We knew it was bad, but we
didn’t know it was this bad.”
The analysis of “underserved
learners” was a first for the ACT,
which is one of two major tests
students can take to apply to
college. The other is the College
Board’s SAT.
In recent years, both tests have
found major disparities in college
readiness among students in the
Washington region and around
the country. Roorda lamented
that these gaps have persisted
despite efforts to improve schools
under the banners of No Child
Left Behind, Race to the Top and
other national initiatives.
“You could argue that those
investments should have made a
clearer difference,” he said, “and
that’s not what we’re seeing.”
More than 2 million of this
year’s high school graduates took
the ACT, accounting for an estimated 60 percent of the class.
JAMES M. THRESHER/THE WASHINGTON POST
Gillespie pitches wider
criminal justice reform
L YNH B UI
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
Windows were meant to ‘foster reconciliation’
CATHEDRAL FROM B1
U.S. history and could be contextualized rather than removed.
A call to the United Daughters
of the Confederacy, which raised
money for the windows along
with a private donor, was not
returned.
On Wednesday, as the scaffolding was put up, some visitors
began gathering, including a few
who seemed concerned that the
windows were being taken out.
The windows are among some
200 in the soaring Gothic building, in addition to hundreds of
carvings and fabric and other art.
They are in a bay in the middle of
the nave and each have four
panels, one honoring the life of
Jackson and the other of Lee.
They show the men at points
in their academic, military and
spiritual lives. Kevin Eckstrom, a
cathedral spokesman, noted that
they are praised in wording
alongside the windows as pious
Christians. “The problem is that
they are shown as saints,” he said
Wednesday.
The cathedral plans to keep
the removed windows and find a
way to display them in historical
context, he said.
“People ask, ‘Are we whitewashing history and trying to
forget reality?’ But the truth is
that slavery is as old as the Bible.
But we believe in a God that
liberates slaves,” he said.
The windows were not controversial when they were installed
in 1953, after years of fundraising. Eckstrom said there was
discussion at the time about
featuring other U.S. figures, including former president Ulysses
S. Grant, who commanded the
Union armies at the end of the
Civil War, but donors insisted
that the windows honor Southerners. The engraved stone under the Jackson window notes his
admirers “from South to North.”
Both stones praise the men’s
religious character. Jackson’s
says he “walked humbly before
his creator.” Lee’s says he was “a
Christian soldier without fear
and without reproach.”
After the Charleston killings,
the national conversation about
Confederate symbols and white
supremacy grew louder. Gary
Hall, then dean of the cathedral,
said at the time that the windows
had no place in a place of worship
meant for all Americans.
The windows were intended to
“foster reconciliation between
parts of the nation that had been
divided by the Civil War,” Hall
said in 2015. “While the impetus
behind the windows’ installation
was a good and noble one at the
time, the cathedral has changed,
and so has the America it seeks to
represent. There is no place for
the Confederate battle flag in the
iconography of the nation’s most
visible faith community. We cannot in good conscience justify the
presence of the Confederate flag
in this house of prayer for all
people, nor can we honor the
systematic oppression of African
EVELYN HOCKSTEIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
A window at Washington National Cathedral depicts the life of Stonewall Jackson. Underneath, a
stone says he “walked humbly before his creator.”
“The problem is that they are shown as saints.”
Cathedral spokesman Kevin Eckstrom about Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson
Americans for which these two
men fought.”
The cathedral then created a
task force to discuss the windows
and how to best foster a conversation around racial reconciliation. Last year, it removed from
the windows two small pieces of
glass depicting Confederate
flags. One was replaced with
plain red and the other with
plain blue.
Public lectures were held
about white supremacy, reconciliation and African American
spirituals. Standing beside the
windows for months has been a
poster about the window discussion, and Eckstrom said the cathedral has received emails and
visitors every day for two years
with different views about how to
deal with controversial history in
a sacred, public space.
Hall left the cathedral in 2015,
and a couple of days after the
Charlottesville violence, he
shared on Facebook his earlier
push for the windows to come
out, with the comment “Just
sayin’.”
Asked whether the cathedral
was told its audience or donations could be affected by the
windows coming out — or staying in — Hollerith said it didn’t
come up as a major part of the
decision process.
“If I honor Jesus’ command to
love thy neighbor as thyself, and
take seriously the experience of
African Americans in this country, the question is: What is the
right thing to do? Not to look at it
in terms of funding or participation,” he said.
The
cathedral’s
decision
comes as the country is divided
by debate about its history and
the place of race and religion in
American identity. Also Wednesday, a huge poll by the Public
Religion Research Institute was
released, showing white Christians continuing to shrink as a
percentage of the country.
In 2017, the Episcopal Church
is perhaps the most prominent
face of progressive Christianity
— with its leaders on the forefront of liberal changes on race,
gender and sexuality. However,
its cathedral is also perhaps the
most prominent example of a
blending of patriotism and religion. Art all around the cathedral
weaves the story of the Bible with
America’s story — including that
of the Civil War.
One massive window juxtaposes George Washington with
King David on one side, with Paul
Revere and D-Day paratroopers
nearby. The highest window panels soaring over the sanctuary
show the Supreme Court, the
White House and the U.S. Capitol.
Near the entrance is a huge,
vivid window called “the Agony
of War,” which Eckstrom said is
about the Civil War. It shows
flames mixed with glass fragments of blue and gray. Engraved
beneath are the words “with
malice toward none.”
A Virginia women’s prison that
settled complaints last year regarding substandard health care
is continuing to fail inmates, according to a Wednesday filing in
federal court that cited the recent
deaths of two prisoners and the
amputation of another’s leg.
The Fluvanna Correctional
Center for Women (FCCW) settled with several female inmates
in February 2016, signing an
agreement to improve care. But
the plaintiffs argue that the prison should be held in contempt for
failing to live up to those promises.
Two inmates died at Fluvanna
in July — 70-year-old Carolyn
Liberto, who was serving time in
a murder case, and 38-year-old
Deanna Niece, who online court
records show had convictions for
forgery and probation violations.
The plaintiffs allege that both
women’s complaints of serious
pain were ignored and that emergency equipment that could have
helped them was unavailable.
Liberto suffered from hypertension and had a history of congestive heart failure, according to
the court filing. Before she died of
THE DAILY QUIZ
According to this week’s Paint Issue
in Local Living, what was the name
of the orange paint that Jamie Drake
used in an 1840 Greek Revival home
on Long Island?
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints and click on
“Quizzes” to enter the correct response.
cardiopulmonary failure on
July 21, the plaintiffs say, her
medication repeatedly ran out
and she was never referred to a
specialist for her extremely high
blood pressure.
“She died on the floor,
only a couple of weeks
before she would have
been free.”
Rachel McCracken, on the death of
fellow inmate Deanna Niece
The day before her death, Liberto complained of chest pain and
was told by a medical staffer that
her vitals were fine and she
should return to her cell, another
prisoner wrote in an affidavit.
That night, Liberto began complaining that she could not
breathe, and emergency oxygen
was not available, according to
the plaintiffs; she died overnight.
Niece, who had multiple sclerosis, complained of shortness of
breath and chest pain throughout
the day July 25 and had trouble
walking, according to the court
filing. That night, she began to
convulse, vomit and cough up
blood. There was no suction
equipment readily available, and
oxygen had to be brought from
another building, according to
the motion.
“There was something wrong
with her all day, and none of the
nurses she talked to bothered to
follow up with her or send her to
medical,” inmate Rachel McCracken wrote in an affidavit.
“Then she died on the floor, only a
couple of weeks before she would
have been free.”
Former inmate Sherry Richburg, 63, who was convicted of
heroin distribution, wrote in an
affidavit that inconsistent access
to antibiotics during her two-year
incarceration at Fluvanna caused
her severe pain and forced her to
have a femur transplant in her leg
replaced with cement.
She lost 40 pounds, she wrote,
and the cement shattered when
she fell trying to go to the bathroom. After her release this year,
the plaintiffs say, Richburg’s leg
was amputated to her hip.
“I was punished for my crime
and did my time,” Richburg said
in an affidavit. “But Fluvanna
LEGAL AID JUSTICE CENTER
Sherry Richburg, 63, says she
had to have her leg amputated
because of substandard care at
the Fluvanna women’s prison.
punished me a second time when
the medical staff did not take care
of me.”
The state attorney general’s office, which declined to comment
on the plaintiffs’ filing, wrote in
an April court document that the
Troy, Va., prison and medical contractor Armor are in compliance
rachel.weiner@washpost.com
nick.anderson@washpost.com
2017 PostPoints Scavenger Hunt
Catch Arthur Miller’s poignant, The Price
About personal sacrifice
At Arena Stage starting October 6.
Like actor Hal Linden? Come get your fix!
Emmy and Tony winner Hal Linden will star in Arthur Miller’s The Price
at Arena Stage. On what day is the last performance?
(Hint: See ArenaStage.org for the answer.)
SCORES FROM B1
with the settlement and working
on outstanding issues.
“FCCW and Armor have made
tremendous progress in implementing the terms of the settlement agreement and, more important, changing the culture of
the provision of medical services
to approximate much more a hospital culture,” wrote Senior Assistant Attorney General Richard
Vorhis.
The Virginia Department of
Corrections did not immediately
respond to a request for comment.
In a June report, the doctor
monitoring compliance with the
settlement wrote that care and
staffing have improved significantly but that problems remain,
in particular with the response by
nurses to sick calls and by the
prison to medical grievances.
“It’s outrageous that we continue to hear about VDOC’s neglect
and mismanagement from the
women at FCCW,” Brenda Castañeda of the Legal Aid Justice
Center said in a statement.
The group is representing the
plaintiffs, along with the firm
Wiley Rein and the Washington
Lawyers’ Committee.
michelle.boorstein@washpost.com
Inmates blame prison for deaths, say care has not improved
R ACHEL W EINER
ACT chief:
‘We didn’t
know it was
this bad’
Their average composite score
was 21 out of a maximum 36 on
the multiple-choice test of English, math, reading and science
learning. That was up from 20.8 a
year before.
Scores this year in Maryland
(23.6), Virginia (23.8) and the
District (24.2) exceeded the national average. But that was largely a function of participation
rates. In each of those jurisdictions, slightly fewer than a third
of graduates took the ACT, well
below the national rate. With
standardized testing, average
scores often decline when participation rises because the results
reflect a cross-section of students
with a broader range of academic
experiences and abilities.
The SAT is more prevalent in
the District, Maryland and Virginia, although the ACT has expanded in recent years in the
region.
SAT scores for 2017 are expected to be released in late September. Last year, the College Board
reported that about 1.7 million
students in the Class of 2016 took
that admission test.
Natasha Ushomirsky, a policy
development director for the
Education Trust, a nonprofit that
advocates for disadvantaged students, said achievement gaps reflect long-standing disparities in
the quality of teachers, rigor of
curriculum and degree of academic support available to poor
and minority children.
She called the ACT’s data understandable but “incredibly discouraging.” States and schools,
she said, must redouble efforts to
narrow and eliminate achievement gaps. “There’s a lot of power
in communicating the expectation that all students can achieve
at high levels,” Ushomirsky said.
Disadvantaged students face
complex challenges connected to
their families, neighborhoods
and schools. The ACT analyzed
how those students performed
relative to benchmark scores for
readiness on the test’s four sections. It found:
About 560,000 students had
one of the three “underserved”
characteristics. Some came from
a low-income family. Some had
parents who didn’t go to college.
Others were from an underrepresented racial or ethnic minority.
The share of this group that met
at least three benchmarks — a
level ACT says indicates strong
college readiness — was 26 percent.
About 254,000 test-takers
met two of the underserved criteria. Their strong readiness rate
was 15 percent. About 114,000
more met all three of the criteria.
They had the lowest rate of strong
readiness: 9 percent.
More than half of the test-takers — 1.1 million — were not
underserved. Fifty-four percent
showed strong readiness, 14 percent some readiness, and 32 percent little or no readiness.
Among the bright spots in the
report, the ACT said Hispanic
participation rose with the 2017
class, and Hispanic scores improved slightly: Twenty-four percent showed strong college readiness, up from 23 percent a year
before. That is notable because
Hispanic students are a fastgrowing bloc nationally.
The ACT overtook the SAT as
the most widely used admission
test with the Class of 2012. Younger than the SAT, the ACT has
grown in part through contracts
with states that require students
to take the exam before they graduate from public high schools.
The ACT said 16 states paid for all
students to take the test as part of
a statewide testing program, with
others funding testing on an optional basis.
The College Board has made
inroads recently, winning contracts for the SAT in Michigan
and elsewhere. The District pays
for SAT testing in its public high
schools. About 32 percent of D.C.
graduates in 2017 took the ACT,
down from 38 percent in 2013.
The share of Maryland graduates who took the test rose from
21 percent in 2013 to 28 percent
this year. The share for Virginia
rose in that time from 26 percent
to 29 percent.
VIRGINIA
BY
SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
In search of a stylish table and chairs
Or a hutch, sofa or chest for your lair?
Head to Belfort for high-end décor
Your local furniture superstore!
Belfort Furniture Park in Sterling boasts more than how
many square feet of showroom space?
(Hint: See BelfortFurniture.com for the answer.)
EARN 5 POINTS AND A CHANCE TO WIN GREAT PRIZES. Answer our Scavenger Hunt questions, then go to washingtonpost.com/postpoints and click “Quizzes” to enter your responses.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
L O C A L D IG ES T
VIRGINIA
$3 million lottery win
remains unclaimed
The Giant grocery store on
Southbank Street in Sterling,
Va., sold a winning $3 million
lottery ticket, but so far no one
has claimed the prize.
The ticket matched the first
five numbers in a $61 million
Mega Millions lottery drawing
Tuesday night. Usually a match
of five numbers would mean a
$1 million win. But the buyer
spent an extra buck and did the
Megaplier, an added feature of
the lottery games.
In Tuesday night’s drawing,
lottery officials said, the
Megaplier was “3x,” so that
means the winner’s ticket is now
worth three times what it would
have been.
The winning numbers were
11-17-59-70-72, and the Mega Ball
number was 1. The winning
ticket did not have the Mega
Ball number.
The Sterling ticket was the
only one to match the first five
numbers in the drawing,
according to Virginia Lottery
officials.
It takes a lot of luck to match
the first five numbers. Officials
with Virginia Lottery said the
odds of doing that — without
the Mega Ball — are 1 in
18,492,204.
Because there was no ticket
that matched all six numbers,
the jackpot jumps to $70 million
for the next drawing, lottery
officials said. The next drawing
is Friday at 11 p.m.
But the clock is ticking to
claim the Tuesday drawing’s
prize money. The winner has
180 days from the date of the
lottery draw to claim the prize.
— Dana Hedgpeth
Charlottesville council
backs removing statue
Officials in Charlottesville
have backed removing a statue
of Confederate Gen. Thomas
“Stonewall” Jackson — marking
another push to take down a
Confederate landmark in the
college town rocked by deadly
clashes last month between
white nationalists and
counterprotesters.
But the unanimous vote late
Tuesday by the Charlottesville
City Council faces an uncertain
path, according to the Daily
Progress newspaper. The
removal depends on the
outcome of a lawsuit
challenging the council’s power
to remove another statue
depicting Confederate Gen.
Robert E. Lee — a focal point of
the march and its opposition
last month.
The council meeting was
reported to be relatively mild
and is the latest move in dealing
with controversy over
Confederate statues around the
country.
The lawsuit over the Lee
statue in Charlottesville
includes the Virginia division of
the Sons of Confederate
Veterans as plaintiffs. A judge
recently heard arguments in
that case.
At Tuesday’s Charlottesville
City Council meeting, some of
those in attendance criticized
leaders over the August rally
that left three people dead,
including a protester opposing
neo-Nazis and white
nationalists. Two Virginia state
troopers also died in a
helicopter crash.
— Dana Hedgpeth
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
Unique telescope is back
home in Gaithersburg
It was a
homecoming of
sorts when the
telescope arrived
at the
Gaithersburg
John
Community
Kelly's
Museum last
Washington week. The
telescope — a
brass cylinder
about five feet tall and painted
black — had spent its entire
working life a half-mile away,
pointed at the heavens. Its
ultimate mission wasn’t to glean
information from the stars, but
to discover something about the
Earth.
And also about Earthlings.
Such as: There are humans for
whom the perfect job is sitting up
all night, every night, looking at
the stars. For nearly 100 years, a
succession of men did that in a
little wooden shed in
Montgomery County, Md., at a
place called the Gaithersburg
Latitude Observatory.
“I very much had wanted that
job,” Dave Doyle told me when I
rang him up recently at his house
in Silver Spring, Md.
Dave retired in 2013 from the
National Geodetic Survey, the
part of the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration
charged with figuring out exactly
where everything is in this great
land of ours, from mountains to
coastlines. He started there in
1972, fresh out of the Army. One
day, Dave was dispatched to run
some material from the office in
Rockville, Md., to a place he
hadn’t known existed: an
observatory.
“I drive up to Gaithersburg, I
pull in and I’m in love,” he said.
There, Dave found a squat,
flat-topped, white wooden
building, with louvered outer
walls and a nifty roof that could
be slid open by pulling on a rope
on a pulley. Inside — set onto a
concrete pier — was the
telescope. Next door was the
house where the observer lived
with his family, a lighthousekeeper far from the sea.
“The guy lives right there,”
Dave said. “There’s nobody to
bother him. He gets to do his
thing.”
The observer’s thing was to
note the exact positions of 12 to
18 pairs of stars as they passed
overhead. The same thing
happened every cloudless night
at four other observatories
arranged along the 39th parallel:
in Ukiah, Calif.; Mizusawa,
Japan; Kitab in Uzbekistan; and
Carloforte, Italy.
Why? Because of something
called the Chandler wobble,
which sounds like a jazz-era
dance craze but is actually a
variation in the Earth’s latitude
discovered in 1891 by U.S.
astronomer Seth Carlo
Chandler. Our planet does not
spin perfectly on its axis. It
wobbles, like a top spinning
down.
The Gaithersburg observatory
was built in 1899 to track that
wobble. Funding issues left it
inactive between 1915 and 1932,
when it was started up again.
U.S. COAST AND GEODETIC ARCHIVES
An observer in the 1940s looks through the telescope in
Gaithersburg, Md., that helped scientists study the Earth’s wobble.
Throughout World War II, all five
stations — three in Allied
nations, two in Axis countries —
sent their readings in.
By 1982, more sophisticated
wobble-measuring methods had
arisen and the very last observer
— Mac Curran — made his very
last observation.
“Real nice guy,” Dave said. “He
taught me the ins and outs, as
much as I could absorb. But once
GPS came along, I knew we were
not going to do this optically
anymore.”
In 1989, the observatory
became a National Historic
Landmark. It’s owned now by the
city of Gaithersburg, and the
park it sits in — right next to
Gaithersburg High School — is
the setting for regular
skywatching programs,
including an eclipse-viewing
party last month that drew 3,500
people.
Last week, Dave went out to
Corbin, Va., to help haul the
heavy telescope back from a
National Geodetic Survey storage
facility. It wouldn’t be prudent to
put the precision instrument
back in the observatory now that
it’s not staffed, so it’s the newest
exhibit in the Gaithersburg
Community Museum, which is
open 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Tuesdays
through Sundays.
Even without its telescope, the
observatory kept making history.
The grounds are studded with
survey markers, including one
called “Observatory Reference
Marker 1,” or RM-1. When GPS
was being developed, companies
would head to Gaithersburg with
representatives of the Geodetic
Survey and the National Institute
of Standards and Technology to
test their latest receivers.
Standing on RM-1, how accurate
would their equipment be?
You can test your GPS, too.
Enter “100 Desellum Ave.,
Gaithersburg, MD 20877” if you
want to see Observatory Park and
“9 S. Summit Ave., Gaithersburg,
MD 20877” if you want to see the
telescope that once resided there.
Finally, you may be
wondering: Why does the Earth
wobble? Scientists aren’t sure,
but it seems to have something to
do with the water on our planet,
either the amount in the oceans,
the ice caps or the Eurasian land
mass.
Elementary, my dear Susan
In my column Wednesday about
the World War I exhibit at the
American Red Cross, I
misidentified the organization’s
archivist. She is Susan Watson,
not Susan Wilson.
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/johnkelly.
THE REGION
Probe into credit-card fraud scheme reveals a dogfighting ring
BY
R ACHEL W EINER
An investigation into a longrunning
credit-card
fraud
scheme in the D.C. area led to the
exposure of a D.C.-area dogfighting ring last week called the
“DMV Board,” according to federal prosecutors in the Eastern District of Virginia.
The government seized seven
pit bulls from a home in Southeast Washington and six from a
home in Temple Hills, Md. The
homes had been searched as part
of the credit-card probe.
The dogs were being used in
fights in the District, Maryland
and Virginia, according to a court
filing by Assistant U.S. Attorney
Gordon Kromberg. At the home
in Temple Hills, FBI agents found
a fighting ring stained with blood,
along with training equipment,
dog trophies and performanceenhancing drugs. More pharmaceuticals, chains, collars, whips
and other items associated with
dogfighting were found in the
D.C. house.
Court filings suggest that Rodriguez Rodney Lomax Norman,
some of whose phone conversations were recorded as part of the
credit-card fraud probe, was also
organizing dogfights in the D.C.
area as part of the “DMV Board.”
Three others named only by initials are accused of involvement
in the dogfighting ring.
Norman had written down a
goal for the year 2017 — to raise a
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clined to say where the facility is
located. In the past — including
the 2007 case against former NFL
star Michael Vick in the same
district — dogs seized in such
cases have been kept in shelters
whose locations are shielded
from the public for fear that fight
organizers would try to steal
them.
rachel.weiner@washpost.com
Fall Transportation Meeting
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without bond Friday in the fraud
case, in which he and 11 others are
accused of producing hundreds
of fake credit cards and using
them to buy thousands of dollars
worth of cartons of cigarettes that
they then resold for cash.
The seized dogs are being kept
at a facility contracted by the U.S.
Marshals Service, according to
court filings. Prosecutors de-
VIRGINIA
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“champion” dog, meaning a dog
that has won three fights, according to prosecutors. One of the
seized dogs, “Pyrex,” suffered several bites during a fight in New
Jersey in July, according to court
documents.
Most of the dogs that were
taken were adults, but three were
puppies just a few weeks old.
Norman was ordered held
You are invited to participate in public meetings held by the Commonwealth Transportation Board. The
meetings will begin with an open house followed by a town hall style meeting. The open house will
provide information on various transportation initiatives including proposed changes to Virginia’s project
prioritization process (SMART SCALE), recently funded projects in the Six-Year Improvement Program,
Virginia’s Statewide Transportation Improvement Program, VTrans Multimodal Transportation Plan, and
Scenario Planning and Freight plans. Representatives from the Office of Intermodal Planning and
Investment, Departments of Transportation and Rail and Public Transportation, along with Metropolitan
Planning Organizations, Planning District Commissions, and Transit organizations will be in attendance to
highlight their transportation programs and to discuss your ideas and concerns on Virginia’s
transportation network The open house will be followed by a town hall session, where you can engage in
discussion and ask questions about the various initiatives. Comments will be accepted informally at the
meeting and may also be submitted via email, or online.
Meeting Dates and Locations
Open House begins at 4:00 pm in each of the locations:
Tuesday August 29, 2017
Gerrmanna Community College
Center for Workforce & Community
Education
10000 Germanna Point Drive
Fredericksburg, VA 22408
Thursday, August 31, 2017
The Prior Center at UVA-Wise
437 Stadium Drive
Wise, VA 24293
Monday, September 11, 2017
Culpeper District Office
Auditorium
1601 Orange Road
Culpeper, VA 22701
Thursday, September 14, 2017
Chesapeake Conference Center
700 Conference Center Drive
Chesapeake, VA 23320
Monday, September 18, 2017*
NOVA District Office
The Potomac Room
4975 Alliance Drive
Fairfax, VA 22030
Monday, October 2, 2017
Hilton Garden Inn Richmond
South/Southpark
800 Southpark Boulevard
Colonial Heights, VA 23834
Wednesday, October 4, 2017
Holiday Inn Lynchburg
601 Main Street
Lynchburg, VA 24504
Tuesday, October 10, 2017
Blue Ridge Community College,
Plecker Center for Continuing
Education
One College Lane
Weyers Cave, VA 24486
Thursday, October 12, 2017
Holiday Inn Valley View
3315 Ordway Drive
Roanoke, VA 24017
Meeting materials will be available at http://www.ctb.virginia.gov/planning/fallmeetings/ beginning August
29, 2017.
If you cannot attend a meeting, you may also send your comments on highway projects to Infrastructure
Investment Director, VDOT, 1401 E. Broad St., Richmond, Virginia 23219, or SixYearProgram@VDOT.Virginia.gov and on rail, public transportation and transportation demand
management to Public Information Officer, DRPT, 600 E. Main St., Suite 2102, Richmond, Virginia 23219,
or DRPTPR@drpt.Virginia.gov. Comments will be accepted until October 20, 2017.
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The Commonwealth is committed to ensuring that no person is excluded from participation in, or denied
the benefits of its services on the basis of race, color or national origin, as protected by Title VI of the
Civil Rights Act of 1964. If you need further information on these policies or special assistance for
persons with disabilities or limited English proficiency, please contact the Virginia Department of
Transportation’s Title VI Compliance Officer at 804-786-2730 or the Virginia Department of Rail and
Public Transportation’s Title VI Compliance Officer at 804-786-4440 (TTY users call 711).
B4
EZ
Slain Md. mother had
filed a protective order
TORDIL FROM B1
on edge as Tordil went on a twoday shooting rampage that left
three dead and three others
wounded.
“You should not see or breathe a
free bit of air for the rest of your
life,” Prince George’s County Judge
Leo Green Jr. said before sentencing Tordil. “It’s overwhelming the
reasons to show no mercy.”
Green ordered the two life sentences to run back-to-back on top
of the four consecutive life sentences Tordil previously received
in Montgomery, where Tordil shot
two strangers during his attempts
to steal cars and elude police.
Surveillance video from the
high school played during
Wednesday’s sentencing hearing
showed Tordil shot his wife
through the window of the SUV.
He ran toward his car to flee but
quickly turned back. He then
stretched his arm through the
window of the SUV once more,
appearing to shoot his wife again
before leaving. “My stepfather
came out of nowhere!” Grace Glimada screamed to an operator
during a 911 call played in court.
When given the opportunity to
speak on Wednesday, Tordil spent
a few minutes telling the judge
about his career in law enforcement and talking about how he
“never got in trouble” in his life.
“I’d like to apologize to my family,” Tordil then said.
Tordil had gone to the parking
lot of High Point High School on
May 5, 2016, two months after his
wife filed a protective order
against him. He rented a car that
morning and packed a bag with a
toothbrush, clothes and $1,800 in
cash. He also had a cache of ammunition and a single gun he kept
hidden from law enforcement, despite court orders to turn in all of
his weapons.
The former Federal Protective
Service officer, who had just lost
his job, went to the parking lot
with a plan to kill, prosecutors
said. In a journal, which prosecutors detailed in court during his
sentencing in Montgomery, Tordil
wrote that his marriage had
“reached a point of no return.” He
asked “God and the potential victims . . . for forgiveness.”
During a massive manhunt the
day after killing his wife, Tordil
shot Malcom “Mike” Winffel, who
was coming to the aid of a woman
whose car Tordil was trying to
steal at a mall in Montgomery
County, and Claudina Molina,
who was fatally shot by Tordil as
he tried to take her SUV outside a
grocery store.
Tordil’s attorney, David Booth,
said his client grew up in a strict
Catholic upbringing and chose a
career in a regimented military
system. When his wife and daughters left him and he lost his job, “he
broke,” Booth said. Tordil became
depressed and sat at home alone
in the dark, Booth said.
“His life was just beginning to
crumble and tumble out of control,” Booth said. “These two days
aren’t really who he is.”
ALEX BRANDON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Eulalio Tordil is taken into
custody on May 6, 2016. He was
later convicted of murdering his
estranged wife and two others.
“His life was just
beginning to crumble
and tumble out of
control.”
. THURSDAY,
SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
Candidates’ views jibe on raising felony threshold
GILLESPIE FROM B1
“limited, tightly regulated” use of
marijuana for treatment of some
medical conditions.
His opponent in the governor’s
race, Democratic Lt. Gov. Ralph
Northam, supports decriminalizing possession of marijuana and
legalizing the medical use of
marijuana.
Gillespie’s plan aligns with
Northam’s proposals in other
ways: Both favor raising the
state’s standard for what constitutes felony larceny. The current
level of $200 is among the lowest
in the nation, making the theft of
an iPhone, for example, a felony
that can deprive someone of the
right to vote.
The state Senate this year
unanimously approved a bill to
raise that threshold to $500,
which is in line with other states,
but the measure died — as it has
before — in a Republicancontrolled House subcommittee.
Gillespie also said he would
support finding ways to “functionally end” the practice of suspending driver’s licenses when
someone fails to pay court costs
“I think Ed’s plan does
a good job of balancing
these issues. The
correctional part
probably could use
some modernization.”
House Speaker William J. Howell
(R-Stafford)
and legal fees. Calling it part of a
“vicious cycle” that keeps drawing people back into the corrections system, Gillespie said it
would make more sense to create
payment plans to make it manageable for people to pay off their
obligations.
Northam has said he wants to
end the practice of seizing a
driver’s license for failure to pay
such costs.
Restoration of voting rights
for convicted felons has been a
contentious issue in Virginia
since Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D)
attempted to automatically restore the rights of hundreds of
thousands of felons last year.
Republicans sued to block that
effort, arguing that the governor
could not restore rights en
masse, and McAuliffe has been
restoring them since on a caseby-case basis.
Gillespie said he would seek to
appoint former governors Robert
F. McDonnell (R) and L. Douglas
Wilder (D) to study the issue and
propose a way to standardize the
process so that it’s no longer
subject to different practices by
different governors.
Northam has made restoring
felon voting rights a centerpiece
of his campaign and said he
would continue McAuliffe’s aggressive approach.
To help get former felons back
into the workforce, Gillespie said
he would propose that the state
pay about $500 so that a business
could perform quarterly drug
tests to ensure that any former
felon it hired stayed clean. He
also proposed banning state government from asking job applicants to check a box indicating
whether they’ve ever been convicted of a felony but would not
move to require the same of
private employers.
House Speaker William J.
Howell (R-Stafford) attended the
news conference and said he was
sure the General Assembly would
be willing to take up those issues
— though Howell is retiring and
will not be serving in the legislature next year.
“I think Ed’s plan does a good
job of balancing these issues,”
Howell said. “The correctional
part probably could use some
modernization.”
gregory.schneider@washpost.com
David Booth, attorney for Eulalio Tordil
Booth argued that Tordil
should have the opportunity for
parole, which the judge denied.
Prince George’s Assistant
State’s Attorney Rebecca Cordero
said that Tordil didn’t deserve any
mercy. “He shattered the lives of so
many people,” Cordero said.
Not only did he kill and wound
several people, but he also stole
the sense of safety people had in a
“sacred” place like a school by
confronting his wife in the parking lot packed with students and
parents.
A man who had arrived at the
high school to watch his son’s
baseball game was shot in the arm
when he ran to help Gladys Tordil,
Cordero said. The man remains
haunted by violence, and his son
has not played baseball since that
“horrific” day, Cordero said.
Gladys Tordil’s children spoke in
court, sobbing as they talked about
how much they miss their mother.
They were seniors who were one
week away from graduating when
their mother was killed.
At a time when they should
have been excited about prom and
preparing for college, Nikki and
Grace Glimada were instead attending a funeral and memorials.
The girls also admonished
Tordil, who they said was abusive
and created a “house that was
toxic.”
Nikki Glimada recalled her
mother as strong, smart and independent, saying she lost “a role
model, a friend, a mom.”
“She was everything I wanted to
be,” Nikki Glimada said.
Grace Glimada called her mother’s killing “the worst day of my
life,” listing the college graduations, grandchildren and other life
milestones Gladys Tordil would
never see.
“She’s only seen one-third of our
lives,” Grace Glimada said.
lynh.bui@washpost.com
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Outside groups flocking to support Northam’s run
KOCHS FROM B1
Prosperity’s summit in Richmond in August.
Gillespie’s campaign has criticized Northam for missing meetings of various boards and commissions on which the lieutenant
governor sits, dubbing him “No
Show Northam.”
The new Americans for Prosperity ad echoes that strategy.
It claims Northam’s absence
from board meetings of the Virginia Economic Development
Partnership amounted to a failure of supervision that “let a fake
Chinese company with a false
address and phony website to
take $1.4 million of our money.”
This grant was cited in a blistering performance review by the
legislature’s audit arm and led to
an overhaul of the agency’s oversight and board.
At the time of the grant award,
Northam was one of 24 board
members overseeing the agency.
Board members were not directly
involved in grant decisions;
grants were recommended by
staff and approved by the governor.
Northam’s campaign aides
said the Democrat had limited
involvement with the grant.
“Relying on misleading facts to
manufacture false attacks is a
sure sign of a flailing campaign
that’s hoping for traction,” said
Ofirah Yheskel, a Northam
spokeswoman. “Ed Gillespie, a
K Street lobbyist and the archi-
“Ed Gillespie, a K Street
lobbyist and the
architect of dark money
in politics, is so
desperate that he needs
to be bailed out by the
Koch brothers.”
Ofirah Yheskel,
a spokeswoman for Ralph Northam
tect of dark money in politics, is
so desperate that he needs to be
bailed out by the Koch brothers.”
Virginia’s gubernatorial contest is the nation’s marquee race
this year and is being widely
watched by both national parties
as a precursor to the 2018 midterms and a test of politics in the
era of President Trump.
The race has drawn intense
interest from outside groups, and
Americans for Prosperity is shaping up to be one of the biggest
players on the Republican side.
Nationally, the political network led by billionaire Charles
Koch plans to spend between
$300 million and $400 million
next year promoting policies and
candidates favoring limited government.
“Our Virginia chapter has a
responsibility, and its role is to
stick up for taxpayers, so we are
not viewing this through a national lens but viewing this more
of as who would be best governor
and who would have the best
ideas,” Russell said.
Americans for Prosperity’s ad
buy comes on top of more than
$300,000 it has already funded in
anti-Northam mailers, door
hangers and digital advertising,
according to data compiled by
the Virginia Public Access Project.
The organization, which has
five field offices in Virginia, says
its staff and volunteers have already reached tens of thousands
of voters by phone and canvass-
Purple Line foes ask judge to prohibit tree cutting
BY
K ATHERINE S HAVER
Purple Line opponents asked a
federal judge Wednesday to prohibit a project contractor from
cutting down trees along a Montgomery County trail while a lawsuit against the line’s construction
is pending.
It was the latest effort by opponents of the light-rail line to block
it from being built.
During a hearing Wednesday,
U.S. District Judge Richard J. Leon
said he would hear more arguments Sept. 19 to decide whether to
block Maryland’s contractor from
clearing trees along the three-mile
Georgetown Branch Trail until the
lawsuit is resolved. Leon said he
also would rule as early as Friday
on the opponents’ request for a
shorter-term restraining order
that would prohibit tree clearing
until he decides whether a longerterm ban for the duration of the
lawsuit is warranted.
Leon indicated that he would
rule on a longer-term ban by
Sept. 25 and asked an attorney for
the state why tree cutting couldn’t
be delayed until then.
“I don’t think that’s asking
much on a project of this magnitude,” Leon said, citing the
$900 million in federal grants
committed to the project’s more
than $2 billion construction costs.
Maryland officials have said
that larger trees between downtown Bethesda and Silver Spring
are scheduled to be cut down beginning the week of Sept. 18. The
state’s contractor closed the popular recreational trail Tuesday, saying it would remain off limits for
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MARYLAND
four to five years while the 16-mile
light-rail line’s western segment is
built in the corridor. Workers began cutting smaller trees — those
less than nine inches in diameter
— this week, an attorney for the
state said.
In a recent court filing, the Purple Line opponents — two Chevy
Chase residents and the advocacy
group Friends of the Capital Cres-
“Their tactic is to delay
. . . in an effort to get us
to abandon a critical
project for the National
Capital Region.”
Erin Henson, Maryland Department of
Transportation spokeswoman
VA #2705029456A | MHIC #46744 | DC #67000878 | NC #77474
ing.
Officials with Americans for
Prosperity say they are opposing
Northam because they believe he
has a bad record on taxes and
reducing regulations.
“We believe Ed Gillespie would
be a much better governor than
Ralph Northam with the policies
he’s put forward . . . the tax-cuts
proposals he’s put forward,” said
Tim Phillips, president of Americans for Prosperity. “This effort,
though, is focused on Ralph
Northam and expressly advocating his defeat.”
One of the organization’s mailers claims that Northam voted for
the “largest tax increase in Virginia history” — an attack line
used by the Gillespie campaign to
describe a vote that Northam
took on a compromise bill about
transportation funding that was
crafted by then-Gov. Robert F.
McDonnell (R) and GOP legislative leaders.
Outside groups have also
flocked to support Northam’s
campaign.
Planned Parenthood’s Virginia
political affiliates, the Virginia
League of Conservation Voters
and billionaire climate change
activist Tom Steyer’s NextGen
America have all committed to
spend millions to elect Northam
and other state Democrats.
According to the most recent
filings, Gillespie had more than
twice as much campaign cash on
hand as Northam.
Wake up to home delivery. 1-800-753-POST
SF
cent Trail — said cutting down
trees before the lawsuit is resolved
would cause “irreparable environmental damage.”
“Once you cut down a tree, it
can’t be put back up,” David
Brown, the attorney for the opponents, told the judge.
Tyler Burgess, a U.S. Justice Department attorney, said the opponents’ legal arguments hadn’t
cleared a “very high bar” for a
temporary restraining order,
which she deemed “very extraordinary relief.”
Albert Ferlo, a lawyer who represents the Maryland Department
of Transportation, told Leon that
every day of construction delays
costs the state up to $433,000 in
potential contract penalties and
other costs.
MDOT spokeswoman Erin
Henson said the opponents were
“abusing the judicial process” to
fight the rail project.
“Their tactic is to delay, delay,
delay in an effort to get us to
abandon a critical project for the
National Capital Region — something that will never happen,”
Henson said.
The state is appealing an unfavorable ruling in a 2014 lawsuit
opposing the Purple Line, but an
appellate court recently permitted
construction to continue while a
three-judge panel considers the
case.
The state is under pressure to
clear the heavily wooded trail before April, when it must abide by
federal restrictions against cutting down trees during the bird
nesting season.
The plaintiffs are renewing their
arguments that the U.S. Transportation Department failed to require Maryland to show it can afford to maintain and operate the
region’s existing transportation
system, particularly Metro, before
using federal aid to expand it.
The plaintiffs also argue that
the Purple Line shouldn’t receive
federal construction funding until
it abides by Leon’s previous order
to redo the project’s ridership
forecasts to reflect Metro’s declining ridership and safety problems.
The state has yet to redo that
environmental analysis — a process that could take months — and
is appealing Leon’s order to a higher court.
The Purple Line will operate
separately from Metro, but 27 percent of its riders are expected to
come from people transferring to
and from Metro.
State and federal officials have
told Leon that they have already
determined that Metro’s declining
ridership would have no significant effect on the Purple Line.
katherine.shaver@washpost.com
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B5
SU
MARYLAND
Public Works board approves $61 million cut in budget
BY
J OSH H ICKS
Maryland’s Board of Public
Works on Wednesday approved a
scaled-back version of a plan that
Gov. Larry Hogan proposed last
week to trim the state’s budget as
part of an effort to prepare for
future shortfalls.
The three-member panel —
consisting of Hogan (R), Comptroller Peter Franchot (D) and
Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp (D) —
voted unanimously in favor of
reducing state spending by
$61 million for the current fiscal
year, but it dropped the administration’s request to eliminate
$6.35 million, mostly in grants for
revenue-hungry
jurisdictions
such as Baltimore City and Prince
George’s County.
The modified proposal, posted
online Wednesday morning,
came after several Democratic
lawmakers and the state Democratic Party said the governor’s
initial proposal bypassed the regular budget process and wrongly
diverted extra money from individual jurisdictions.
Hogan said state budget officials “sat down and discussed it,
made some adjustments, and I
think it’s something that we can
all be proud of.”
The original plan called for
trimming about $6 million in
“disparity grants” for low-wealth
jurisdictions that struggle to raise
revenue through local taxes. It
included a reduction of $4 million
in the state’s $31 million in assistance for Prince George’s County,
and a $1 million reduction in the
$79 million in aid slated for Baltimore. Both jurisdictions were
counting on the money to supplement their schools budgets.
The new plan eliminates the
proposed reductions to disparity
grants, along with cuts of
$200,000 for historic preservation and $150,000 for the Maryland Humanities Council.
Sean Johnson, legislative director for the state teachers union,
applauded the revisions but
called on Hogan to “stop playing
games with school funding and
start making real progress in getting our students what they need
The original plan called
for a cut of $4 million in
the state’s $31 million in
aid for Prince George’s
County and $1 million
off Baltimore’s
$79 million.
to be successful.”
The governor frequently answers such criticism by noting
that all of Hogan’s budgets have
fulfilled the state’s K-12 funding
formulas and increased overall
spending on schools.
State Budget and Management
Secretary David R. Brinkley described the approved reductions
as a “down payment” on addressing
Maryland’s
projected
$750 million shortfall for the next
fiscal year, which begins in July
2018.
The cuts, which amount to less
than 0.2 percent of the state’s
$43.5 billion budget, range from
0.06 percent to 2.53 percent of
budgeted spending for each department.
Examples include lowering
state health department expenditures by $22 million, nearly half
of which is supposed to come
from a decline in the average
length of hospital stays; eliminating 30 vacant positions at public
higher-education institutions to
save $8 million; and trimming
$8 million from the Department
of Public Safety and Correctional
Services by not filling open jobs.
House Appropriations Committee Chair Maggie McIntosh
(D-Baltimore) criticized Hogan
last week for proposing the cuts
early in the fiscal year, when the
legislature is not in session and
cannot weigh in. Previous administrations have not proposed such
cuts unless the state is running a
deficit in the current fiscal year.
A day after Hogan unveiled the
cuts, the comptroller’s office reported that state general-fund
revenue for fiscal 2017, which
ended June 30, was $90.3 million
above previous projections, or
0.5 percent more than analysts
had forecast.
On Wednesday, Brinkley said
the midyear cuts are necessary
despite that modest surplus, because of the shortfall projected
for next fiscal year.
Any notions to the contrary
“betray a fundamental misunderstanding not only of sound budgeting principles but also the serious challenges this state faces in
the next few years based on its
current spending patterns,” Brinkley said.
While the state averages
3.4 percent revenue growth each
year, he said, spending has increased 5.6 percent annually on
average, and expenditures for the
next fiscal year are set to grow by
8 percent.
Brinkley and Hogan blame
mandated spending increases for
the imbalance. Hogan has pushed
to reduce such automatic upticks
in funding since taking office, but
the majority-Democratic General
Assembly has blocked his efforts.
During the Board of Public
Works meeting, Kopp said spending mandates largely cover education and public health. She noted
that the governor and General
Assembly regularly balance the
budget by the end of the state’s
annual legislative session despite
facing projected shortfalls.
Franchot, in explaining his
support for the administration’s
final proposal, said that “having a
conservative, cautious approach
to fiscal matters in the state is a
line of defense for our taxpayers.”
josh.hicks@washpost.com
THE DISTRICT
Arrest made in fatal shooting of man whose son was profiled in Post series
BY P ETER H ERMANN
AND J OHN W OODROW C OX
D.C. police on Wednesday arrested a suspect in the fatal shooting in March of a 28-year-old man
who was gunned down near his
residence in Congress Heights,
where violence has been a part of
life.
Derek Brian Turner, 26, of
Southeast Washington, was
charged with first-degree murder
while armed in the killing of Andrew McPhatter, who was shot
March 1 and died at a hospital
March 5. The shooting occurred
in the 3500 block of Wheeler Road
SE.
The Washington Post in April
profiled McPhatter’s now-8-yearold son, Tyshaun McPhatter, as
part of a series on how children
cope amid gunfire that is routine
in many neighborhoods in the
District and in other cities.
Andrew McPhatter’s mother,
Jessica Jackson, was elated when
she learned of the arrest on
Wednesday.
“I don’t even know where to
start,” she said. “Happy, happy.
Extremely happy.”
Jackson, who didn’t know Tur-
“I don’t even know
where to start.
Happy, happy.
Extremely happy.”
Jessica Jackson after hearing of the
arrest of a suspect in the fatal
shooting of her son, 28-year-old
Andrew McPhatter
ner but had heard of him, was
thankful to the investigators who
hadn’t given up their search for
her son’s killer. Police did not
discuss a motive; additional information about the case is expected
to be made public Thursday.
Tyshaun, in the second grade at
the time, lived part-time with his
father and was keenly aware of
the danger in the neighborhood.
A bullet pierced his front door and
struck the back of a television set
within days of the killing. One of
his father’s friends had been
killed, and another man was
killed a few hundred feet from
the apartment.
McPhatter was shot about the
same time that five other people
were wounded by gunfire, all
within seven days and all along a
short stretch of Wheeler Road.
Police have not said whether any
of the shootings are related.
Police said Turner was arrested
in the murder case as he was
being detained on a federal felony
gun charge stemming from a
shooting incident March 8 in the
4400 block of South Capitol Street
SW. Police said two masked gunmen shot at Turner’s white Lexus
after two friends had gotten
inside.
Turner was standing outside
the vehicle and ran when the
gunfire erupted, police said in
court documents. Police said they
recovered more than 20 ammunition casings from the scene.
Police said they searched the
damaged Lexus and found a loaded Glock 29 semiautomatic pistol
locked in the glove box, along with
seven targets used for target practice. Federal authorities charged
Turner with unlawful transport of
a firearm; he is awaiting trial.
peter.hermann@washpost.com
john.cox@washpost.com
obituaries
SIMEON WRIGHT, 74
Witnessed the 1955 abduction of his cousin Emmett Till
BY
E MILY L ANGER
“Certain sounds bring it back,”
Simeon Wright once told an interviewer, recalling the August night
in 1955 when his 14-year-old cousin Emmett Till was kidnapped
from the bed they shared and
tortured, shot and submerged in
the Tallahatchie River of Mississippi. “Certain smells. Honeysuckle smell. Because honeysuckle was blooming that summer.”
Mr. Wright, who died Sept. 4 at
74, was — besides his cousin’s
assailants — one of the last people
to see Till alive. In the years that
followed, Mr. Wright became a
key witness in the lynching — an
incident that helped spark the
civil rights movement after Till’s
mother, Mamie Till-Mobley, insisted that her son’s mutilated
remains be displayed before the
public in an open casket.
Mr. Wright’s death was confirmed by Marvel Parker, the wife
of his nephew Wheeler Parker Jr.,
who also was sleeping in the
home the night of Till’s abduction. Marvel Parker said Mr.
Wright died at his home in Countryside, Ill., and that the cause
was cancer.
Mr. Wright had been with Till
days before his kidnapping, during a visit to Bryant’s Grocery and
Meat Market in Money, Miss.,
where Till stopped to buy bubble
gum. In accounts of the lynching,
Till is widely said to have wolfwhistled at the proprietress, Carolyn Bryant, on his way out.
Till, who lived in Chicago and
was visiting relatives in Mississippi, was unschooled in the racial mores of the Jim Crow South
— and the violence that any perceived violation might provoke.
Mr. Wright, a local sharecropper’s
son who was two years younger,
said he knew immediately upon
hearing Till’s whistle that his
cousin was in danger.
“It scared us half to death,” Mr.
Wright told Chicago magazine in
2009. “We were almost in shock.
We couldn’t get out of there fast
enough, because we had never
heard of anything like that before.
A black boy whistling at a white
woman? In Mississippi? No.”
According to Mr. Wright, Till
begged his cousin and their companions not to tell Moses Wright,
Simeon’s father, what had happened at the store. They acquiesced to Till’s request, certain
that Moses Wright would send
Till home to Chicago for his safety
if he learned of the encounter.
Bryant.
Mr. Wright’s survivors include
his wife of 46 years, Annie Cole of
Countryside; a sister; and three
brothers.
Interviewed by the Chicago
Citizen in 2014, Mr. Wright said
that “there was of course tremendous sadness and grief” after Till
died. “When tragedy strikes, life
goes on but not like before,” he
said. “I had never witnessed anything like this. My eyes had been
opened to a new world.”
He was particularly disturbed,
he wrote in his memoir, by the
agonizing questions of what
might have been if their group
hadn’t gone shopping, or if they
had told an adult of Emmett’s
encounter at the store and asked
for help.
“I couldn’t shake the many
thoughts of him,” Mr. Wright
wrote. “What if we had stayed
home that night? What if we had
told Dad?”
emily.langer@washpost.com
NAM Y. HUH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Simeon Wright, a cousin of Emmett Till’s, attends a news conference on June 6, 2005. Mr.
Wright had been with Till days before Till’s kidnapping. Till entered a market in Mississippi and
is said to have whistled at a white woman, for which he was later tortured and murdered.
The boys did not wish to lose their
summer together.
The men charged in Till’s ultimate murder were Bryant’s husband, Roy Bryant, and his half
brother, J.W. Milam. Moses
Wright risked his life by identifying the defendants in the courtroom as the intruders who had
entered his home by dark and
kidnapped Till.
“When I opened my eyes, I saw
two white men at the foot of my
bed. One had a flashlight and a
gun,” Simeon Wright told the Chicago Tribune in 2014. “They ordered me back down. Emmett
was still sleeping. They had to
shake him to wake him up.”
Despite the eyewitness testimony, the defendants were acquitted by an all-white jury, only
to then confess to the murder in a
paid interview with Look magazine.
Carolyn Bryant, for her part,
was in her 70s when she agreed to
be interviewed by a Duke University professor, Timothy B. Tyson,
“When I opened my
eyes, I saw two white
men at the foot of my
bed. One had a
flashlight and a gun.”
Simeon Wright, talking to
the Chicago Tribune in 2014
after years of silence. She told
Tyson that Till had never physically menaced her, as she claimed
at the time of the trial.
“Nothing that boy did could
ever justify what happened to
him,” she told Tyson for his 2017
book “The Blood of Emmett Till.”
Simeon Brown Wright was
born in Doddsville, Miss., on Oct.
15, 1942. But he would spend most
of his life in the Chicago area,
where his father moved the family after the trial and where Mr.
Wright made a livelihood as a
pipe-fitter.
He said that he harbored profound anger over the brutality
and injustice of his cousin’s death
and that, as he grew up, he at
times looked for fights with
whites.
“Even my bedroom was not a
safe haven, because killers had
walked into it and snatched Bobo
from us,” he recalled, using Till’s
nickname.
Mr. Wright, who became a deacon, said he found peace in his
Christian faith. With co-author
Herb Boyd, he wrote a memoir,
“Simeon’s Story: An Eyewitness
Account of the Kidnapping of
Emmett Till” (2010).
In that book and in interviews
over the years, Mr. Wright sought
to dispute what he said were
falsehoods in the telling and retelling of Till’s murder. He denied
that Till carried in his wallet a
photograph of a white girl and
that the other boys had dared him
to flirt with or whistle at Carolyn
202-849-5996 DC | 301-683-7144 MD
571-429-5488 VA
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IN MEMORIAM
DANFORTH
ROBERT EUGENE DANFORTH, JR.
Happy Birthday!
We love you. We miss you.
You are in our hearts always.
Love always, Mom, Dad, Kim and Jackie
NORRIS
LUCILLE HELEN NORRIS
September 7, 1935 ~ March 15, 2007
Happy Birthday
Your loving husband, Paul
DEATH NOTICE
ANDERSON
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
BROWN
JACKSON
PENNIFILL
TIGERT
MARJORIE A. BROWN
SANDY JACKSON (Age 53)
of Temple Hills, MD
CHARLES R. PENNIFILL (Age 77)
Marjorie Ann Brown, 84, of Gainesville, Virginia graduated from this life on August 29,
2017 at her home with her family at her
side.
Viewing and Memorial Service will be held
from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Friday, September
8, 2017 at Mount Olive Baptist Church, 6600
Old Centreville Road, Centreville, VA 20121.
Celebration of Life Services will be at 11
a.m. on Saturday, September 11, 2017 at
the Church with viewing from 9 a.m. to
11 a.m. Interment will be at 10 a.m. on
Monday, September 11, 2017, at Stonewall
Memory Gardens, Manassas, VA. Everyone
participating in the procession, please meet
at The Church of the Blessed Trinity, 15011
Sacred Lane, Centreville, VA by 8:30 a.m.
Services of comfort entrusted to: C.W.
Edwards Funeral Home, Inc., Bowling
Green, VA under the direction Malcom O.
Ames, Jr. and Anthony S. Adams, Funeral
Directors. For full obituary and online condolences please visit www.cwedwardsfuneralhome.com or www.tcbtholiness.org.
On Thursday, August 24, 2017 at Medstar
Southern Maryland Hospital Center, Clinton,
Maryland, Sandy Jackson, peacefully transitioned to eternal rest. Viewing, 10 a.m. until
time of Service 11 a.m., Saturday, September 9,
2017 in the Chapel of Thornton Funeral Home,
P.A., 3439 Livingston Road, Indian Head, Maryland 20640. Interment 9:30 a.m., Monday, September 11, 2017, Maryland Veterans Cemetery, Cheltenham, MD. He joins in glory, his
mother, Lena and sister, Nadine. He leaves
to cherish his memory daughters JaLena and
Kiyanna Jackson, father Howard Jackson,
nephews James and Stephen Moultrie, and
other nephews, family and friends.
BUSH
Lloyd was born January 21, 1927 in
Aliceville, IN to Frank Charles Jordan and
Charlotte Holman Jordan. He graduated
from Bruceville High School, May 1945 and
was inducted the following day into the US
Army.
MARY VIRGINIA BUSH
On Monday, September 4, 2017, of Oxon Hill,
MD, formerly of Chaptico, MD. Beloved wife
of the late Arthur E. Bush, Jr., Mother of
Annette Hebb (Quintin), Flora Gantt, the late
Julia Bush Farris, Alice Baruwa (Larry) and
Tony Bush, Sr. Also surviving are a host
of grandchildren, great grandchildren, siblings,
Mary Agnes Anderson, Shirley Ann Young,
Catherine Ann Mims, James Ford, Roderick
Young, Horace Carter and the late James
Young, Jr., other relatives and friends. Viewing,
9 a.m. until Mass of Christian Burial, 11 a.m.,
Saturday, September 16, 2017, St. Thomas
More Catholic Church, 4275 4th St., S.E., Washington, D.C., 20032. Interment Resurrection
Cemetery, Clinton, MD. Online guest book
@thorntonfuneralhomepa.com
CLEIMAN
DAVID CLEIMAN "Tevy"
RAYMOND E. ANDERSON, JR.
Raymond "Ray" E. Anderson Jr., aged 75,
died Sunday, September 3, 2017, after a
short illness.
Mr. Anderson was born to Helen and Raymond Anderson in Fairfax, Virginia, on
October 13, 1941, living his entire life in
Fairfax County. Ray was a veteran of the US
Navy and worked with Broderick Bonding
Agency in Fairfax for many years. He was
also a salesman for King Wholesale, retiring
after 25 years.
Ray was a proud, long term member of
Chantilly National Golf and CC, winning the
1983 club championship. He was also a
member of the Centreville Moose Lodge
(44-years), Elks Club (51-years) and the
Fairfax American Legion (44-years).
He is predeceased by his parents and sister,
Mary Jane Hart. He is survived by two
children, Dottie Ward and Doug Anderson, a
brother, Marty Windham, six grandchildren
and two great grandchildren.
As per his wishes, his children will host a
casual celebration of his life to be held from
2 to 4 p.m. on Saturday, September 9 at
the Centreville Moose Lodge, 3529 Chain
Bridge Rd., Fairfax, VA. 22030.
BONNER
On Tuesday, September 5,
2017 of Silver Spring, MD.
Beloved husband of the
late, Sylvia Cleiman; devoted father of Jay (Cathy)
Cleiman, Eileen (Arnie)
Kaplan and Rona (Neil) Morton; and brother of Sylvia
Milstein and the late Mike
Kleiman. He is survived by adoring grandchildren, David (Dena), Sarah and Adam
(Lindsay) Kaplan and Rebecca and Steven
Cleiman; and cherished great-grandchildren, Lauren and Allison Kaplan. Funeral services will be held on Thursday, September 7, 2017 at 12 noon at Judean
Chapel, 16225 Batchellors Forest Road,
Olney, MD, with interment to follow at
Judean Memorial Gardens. Shiva will be
held at the Kaplan family residence on
Thursday, Saturday and Sunday evenings.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions
may be made to Honor Flight Network
(www.honorflight.org) or Casey House Hospice.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
DONALD D. FORRER (Age 83)
A loving and devoted matriarch, Ruth
Odom Bonner departed this life on Friday,
August 25, 2017 at the age of 100. Leaving
her birthplace of Biscoe, Arkansas, she
moved to Cleveland, Ohio where she married the late William H. Bonner. She spent
the majority of her life there and was
involved in local politics and public education. For the last two decades, Ruth
resided in Washington, DC and was active
in her senior center. One of the most
notable highlights of her life was being
honored to help open the National Museum of African American History and Culture last fall.
She leaves to honor her legacy a host of
relatives and friends including her sons,
William (Yvonne) and Michael (Wilma);
grandchildren, Rhonda Bonner, Jason Bonner (Kathy), Rukiya Bonner, Michael Bonner (Kerri), Rickey Young (Daniza), Toya
Smith (Pedro), Tia Young and Ebony
Thomas (Jonathan); 20 great-grandchildren; and two-great-greatgrandchildren.
Her memorial service will be held Saturday, September 9, at the Nineteenth
Street Baptist Church, 4606 16th Street,
N.W., family visitation, 1 p.m., followed
by service at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers,
contributions can be made in her honor
to the Smithsonian National Museum of
African American History and Culture,
1400 Constitution Avenue, N.W. or online
(https://support.si.edu/site/Donation2;jsessionid=00000000.app30102a?)
BOYLE
THERESA LETITIA BOYLE
(Age 92)
Formerly of the Washington, DC area, Pittsburgh, PA and Wildwood Crest, NJ, Theresa Letitia Boyle passed
away peacefully surrounded by family on Tuesday, August
29, 2017. She was born May 1, 1925, in
Manoa, PA the daughter of James Joseph
and Margaret Sweeney.
Theresa graduated from Notre Dame High
School, Moylan, PA, Class of 1942.
Following graduation, she worked for Bell
Telephone leaving the work force to marry
the love of her life, Charles Walter Boyle
and provide a warm and loving home to
their nine children.
In addition to her parents, she was predeceased by her husband, Charles; sisters,
Marie, Marguerite and Francis; daughter,
Peggy; son, Danny and two great-granddaughters. She is survived by her daughters, Kathy (Ken) Roden, Monica (Rich)
Bassham, Tracey (Peter) DeLonga, Regina
(Nick) Peranteau, Megan (Gary) Doyle and
sons, Tim (Judie) and Kevin (Carolyn);
daughter-in-law, Margaret Rowan Boyle;
39 grandchildren and 71 great-grandchildren; her best friend, favorite shopping
partner and sister, Joan McPeak, as well as
many nieces and nephews.
Theresa was a loving wife, a cheerful
companion, a supportive mother, and a
grandmother who was practically perfect
in every way. A regular attendee of daily
Mass and an avid petitioner of the Blessed
Mother, Theresa anonymously ensured
success, joy, and comfort for the hundreds
of people for whom she prayed daily. She
loved to organize, dance, and drive her
blue convertible, where she listened to
Frank Sinatra. She was an expert listener,
trustworthy confidante, and connoisseur
of stilettos, shopping malls, and patterned
socks.
Her cheerful attitude, her impeccable fashion sense, and her propensity to eat candy
[for three meals a day] endeared her to
everyone she met, ages one to ninety one.
Touching lives across generations, ideologies, and state boundaries, Theresa left
everyone she encountered a little happier
and lighter of heart.
Visitation will be at St. John the Evangelist
Catholic Church, 10103 Georgia Avenue,
Silver Spring, MD, 20902 on Thursday, September 7, at 10 a.m., immediately followed
by a Mass of Christian Burial at 11 a.m.
Interment Gate of Heaven Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers or gifts of condolence,
Theresa’s family requests donations be
made to The Catholic Hospice of Pittsburgh, 2605 Nicholson Road, Suite 3240,
Sewickley, PA, 15143.
On September 4, 2017 in Annapolis, Maryland. Husband of Rita Ann (Gallagher) Forrer. Born June 10, 1934 in Bridgeport, CT
to Donald E. Domian of Wayne County, OH,
and Helena Domian Forrer of Bridgeport.
Survived by his wife Rita, and their five
children and 11 grandchildren: Donald, his
wife Sheilia O’Brien, and their children
Genevieve, Declan, Therese, Marcella, and
Colman; Kathleen, her husband Marc Massoglia and their children Gabriella and Graham; Karen; Michael, his wife Katherine
Kelleher, and their children Ian and Helen;
Maureen, and her daughters Morgan and
Madison.
A Funeral Mass will be held at Sacred
Heart Catholic Chapel, 16501 Annapolis
Rd., Bowie, MD at 11 a.m., on Saturday,
September 9, 2017. Burial directly following. In lieu of flowers, donations can be
made to Covenant House, www.covenanthouse.org. Please view and sign the family’s
guestbook at:
www.beallfuneral.com
HALL
FRANCIS EDWARD HALL "Eddie"
(Age 84)
Of South Hill and formerly of Alexandria
VA, died Sunday, September 3, 2017. He is
survived by his wife of 61 years, Frances
Hall of South Hill, and children, David Boaz
(Diane) of Kenbridge and Tracy Studds of
Woodbridge. Also surviving are five grandchildren, four great grandchildren, and
three siblings, Janice Pickering of Alexandria, Joyce Hall of Alexandria and John Hall
of King George, VA. Mr. Hall was preceded
in death by his son, Francis Edward “Chip”
Hall, Jr. and seven brothers and sisters.
POE
DENNIS C. POE (Age 69)
It is with regret that we notify
the members of Steamfitters
Local #602 of the death of Brother.
Dennis C. Poe. Services held by
family. Notice #1627.
Daniel W. Loveless, FST
After serving in the Occupation Forces in
Japan, Lloyd enrolled at Indiana University,
Bloomington, where he earned a Bachelor
of Science Degree, Master of Science
Degree and a PhD in Slavic Studies. Recruited by the Central Intelligence Agency, Dr.
Jordan worked 30 years as a Soviet Union
analyst during the Cold War. Upon retirement, Lloyd was awarded the Medallion
of Honorable Service and the Career Intelligence Medal for Exceptional Achievement.
During his retirement, he authored two
historical fiction novels and conducted
genealogical research which culminated
in the 2003 establishment of the Jordan
Society in Vincennes, IN for descendants of
Thomas Jordan, who served as First Officer
to Colonel George Rogers Clark during the
American Revolution.
Lloyd was a member of the Masonic Lodge,
No. 585 in Bicknell, IN.
CLARETTE JONES HARRISON
On Wednesday, August 23,
2017 Beloved mother of
McKinley Jones, Jr., Crystal
Jones-Reynolds, Collette
Jones Ricks and Derrick
Harrison. dear daughter of
Ella B. King, loving sister of Wanda Thompson,
Danita Albert and the late Vannoy Thompson.
She is also survived by seven grandchildren,
five great-grandchildren, a host of other relatives and friends. On Friday, September 8,
visitation will be held from 9 a.m. until hour of
service 10:15 a.m. at the Macedonia Community Church, 1026 - 46th St., NE, Washington,
DC 20019. Interment private. Condolences to
www.pridgenfuneralservices.com
HASTINGS
RICHARD SCOTT HASTINGS
Of Alexandria, VA, on September 6, 2017,
passed away at the age of 56 after a brief
illness. Richard is survived by his loving
parents Ronald and Janice; his brother
Doug Hastings; and grandmother Aldene
Wright. He was preceded in death by his
sister Lori Hastings Burgin. Richard was a
life-long resident of Northern Virginia. He
retired in 2016 after a 36-year career with
the FBI. Services will be private and are
under the care of Demaine Funeral Home,
Springfield. Please direct condolences to
the family through the funeral home (703941-9428) or via Richard’s page at
www.demainefunerals.com
MARION A. TIGERT (Age 91)
Captain USN (Ret.)
Passed into eternal peace at his Bethesda
home on Saturday, August 26, 2017. He
was predeceased by his wife of 70 years,
Lois, in March, 2017. Barbara T. Julian of
Bowie, Merle A. Tigert of Gaithersburg and
Mike Payne, and Mark A. and Carol Tigert of
Edgewater, with their children, grandchildren, and friends will celebrate his life on
Saturday, September 16, 2017, at 1 p.m. at
North Bethesda United Methodist Church,
10100 Old Georgetown Rd., Bethesda, MD
20814. Burial will be held at Arlington
National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, gifts
may be made to the Board of Child Care,
3300 Gaither Rd., Baltimore, MD 21444 or
online (www.boardofchildcare.org/donate).
KIDWELL
SAMUELS
JEROME SAMUELS
Cemetery.
Edwards.
Entered into eternal rest on Saturday, September 2, 2017. Visitation
on Saturday, September 9 at 9
a.m., service 11 a.m. at New
Grove Missionary Baptist Church,
4242 Benning Rd. NE, Washington, DC. Interment Ft. Lincoln
Services entrusted to Hodges &
SCHOOLFIELD
MAURIETTA JO SCHOOLFIELD
SERODY
Lyndon A. Kidwell 90, of Alexandria VA died
on August 29, 2017 at INOVA Mount Vernon
Hospital. Family and friends will be received
at Mountcastle Turch Funeral Home, 13318
Occoquan Road, Woodbridge VA 22191 on
Sunday, September 10, 2017 from 2 to 4 p.m.
and 7 to 9 p.m. A life celebration service
will be held at the funeral home on Monday,
September 11, 2017 at 11 a.m. Interment will
follow at Chestnut Grove Cemetery, Herndon,
VA.
McCASKILL
JACQUELINE H. McCASKILL
Jacqueline H. McCaskill passed away on
September 3, 2017; Beloved wife of the late
Charles W. McCaskill; devoted mother of
Stephen H. McCaskill and his wife Holly, and
of C.W. McCaskill Jr and his wife Norma.
Also survived by three grandsons, Miko,
Gabby, and Jared and three great-grandsons, Braeden, Cullen, and Luca. Friends
may visit the Fairfax Memorial Funeral
Home, 9902 Braddock Road, Fairfax, VA on
Friday, September 8, 2017 from 6 to 8 p.m.
Private funeral services and internment will
be held on Saturday, September 9, 2017 at
1 p.m. at the funeral home.
MERCILLIOTT
ROBERT L. MERCILLIOTT
The brothers and sisters of SMART
Local 100 are herby notified of
the death of Brother Robert L.
Mercilliott who passed away on
August 26, 2017.
Fraternally,
Richard D. LaBille, III
Business Mgr/President
NIGHTENGALE
GERSON THEODORE SERODY
"Gerry"
June 13, 1935-September 6, 2017
Gerry Serody, beloved husband, father, and
grandfather passed away on September 6,
2017 after a brief illness. Gerry was born in
Philadelphia, PA and was the youngest child
of Jacob and Bessie Serody. A graduate
of Temple University School of Pharmacy,
Gerry spent two years as a Corporal in the
Army as a bugler. He was then stationed
in the Washington DC area and spent all of
his professional career as a pharmacist in
metropolitan Washington, DC. For 29 years
he owned and operated Landmark Professional Pharmacy in Alexandria, Va. In 2002,
Gerry became the CEO of Care Pharmacies,
a cooperative of independent community
and specialty pharmacies, and served in
that role until he retired to Chapel Hill in
2006.
Gerry was pre-deceased in 2013 by his wife
of 55 years, Richel, and is survived by his
three children: Jonathan (Chapel Hill, NC),
Arthur (Pittsburgh, PA), and Robin (North
Bergen, NJ) ; his daughters-in-law Anne and
Shannon Serody; and his five grandchildren
whom he adored, Christopher, David, Katie,
Megan, and Jessie Serody.
Services will be held at 1 p.m., Friday,
September 8 in Chapel Hill, NC.
The family would like to greatly thank the
many healthcare professionals at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill for
their wonderful care of Gerry, particularly
over the last few months, as well as the
staff at the SECU Jim and Betsy Bryan
Hospice Home of UNC Health Care. The
family requests that in lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions be made to the
American Diabetes Association, P.O. Box
15829, Arlington, VA 22215 or at diabetes.org.
SEWELL
DONALD R. SEWELL
February 21, 1958 - August 15, 2017
Service will be held on Saturday, September
9 at 12:30 p.m. at J.B. Jenkins Funeral Home,
7474 Landover Road, Hyattsville, MD 20785.
SHINN
RICHARD KENNETH NIGHTENGALE
"Night"
Born on May 7, 1946, and passed away
on Thursday, August 24, 2017, after a brief
illness. A native Washingtonian and McKinley Tech graduate (1965), Richard is survived by his devoted wife of 26 years,
Gina Brown Nightengale; mother, Haddasah
Nightingale; daughter, Jasmine Yvonne
Nightengale; sons: Eric Nightengale (Leatesha), Corey Nightengale, Sr. (Chrysta), and
Jared Richard Nightengale; seven grandchildren: Erika, Tiffany, Corey, Jr., Hayden,
Eunik, Olivia, and Lauryn; his mother-inlaw, Emily Everhart; other In-laws: Tanya
and Rafael DeLeon, Roderick and Teresa
Brown, Lawrence and April Brown, and
Eric and Hillary Flowers; nephews: Rafael,
Roderick (Selicia), Lawrence, Jr., Jalen,
Nicholas, Zachariah, and Ezekiel; nieces:
Cherie, Cherelle, and Azura; and, his former
wife, Brenda Nightengale. Friends will be
received beginning at 10:00 am on Friday,
September 8, 2017, at the Bishop’s Chapel
at Evangel Cathedral, 13901 Central
Avenue; Upper Marlboro, MD 20774, where
service will be held at Noon. Interment,
with military honors, at Ft. Lincoln Cemetery, Brentwood, MD 20722.
In lieu of flowers, the family has requested
that Memorial contributions be made to:
Mentoring To Manhood, 2342 Vermont
Avenue, Unit 1, Hyattsville, MD 20785, or
online at https://www.razoo.com/organization/mentoringtomanhood Online guestbook available at: www.johntrhines.com.
NORRIS
CHARLES F. NORRIS (Age 72)
It is with regret that we notify
the members of Steamfitters
Local #602 of the death of Brother
Charles F. Norris. A Celebration of
Life service will be held in the near
future. Please check www.steamfitter-602.org for more details. Notice #1625.
Daniel W. Loveless, FST
On Friday, August 25, 2017 at his home in
Alexandria, VA. He is survived by his parents
Bishop "Troy" Young, III and Denise Young; a
brother, Joshua and a host of other relatives
and friends. The family will receive friends on
Saturday, September 9, 2017 at Bethlehem
Baptist Church, 7836 Fordson Rd, Alexandria
VA 22306 from 10 a.m. until time of service
at 11 a.m. Rev. Dr. Darrell K. White, Pastor
officiating. Interment in Mt. Comfort Cemetery.
Arrangements by Greene Funeral Home,
Alexandria, VA.
ZAJAC
On Sunday, September 3, 2017, of
Washington, DC. Beloved wife of
the late Wladyslaw Zajac; mother
of Paul (Lisa A. Wright) W. and
Mickel (Debra A.) W. Zajac; grandmother of Michael W., Alexandra
L., Adam R., Ashley T., Matthew
M., and Brian A. Zajac; mother-in-law of Catherine W. Zajac; cousin of Antonio Prieto. Relatives
and friends may call at Collins Funeral Home,
500 University Boulevard West, Silver Spring,
MD, (Valet Parking), on Sunday, September 10
from 2 to 4 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial
will be celebrated at St. Peter's Church, 2900
Sandy Spring Road, Olney, MD, on Monday,
September 11 at 10:30 a.m. Interment Gate
of Heaven Cemetery. Memorial contributions
may be made to Alzheimer's Association, P.O.
Box 96011, Washington, D.C. 20090.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
CAROLYN J. QUALLS
Carolyn J. Qualls, 88, of Woodbridge, Virginia
entered into eternal rest on Friday, September
1, 2017. She is survived by her devoted
children Theresa Joyner, Carol, Phillip, Andrew
Jr., Tyrone and a host of other relatives and
friends. Visitation is Monday, September 11,
from 6 to 8 p.m. at Mountcastle Funeral
Home, 13318 Occoquan Rd, Woodbridge, VA
22191. Service is held 11 a.m. at Dale City
Baptist Church, 3501 Dale Blvd., Woodbridge,
VA 22193. In lieu of flowers, please donate in
Mrs. Qualls' name to the Red Cross in care of
the Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund.
On August 25, 2017 Maurietta Jo Schoolfield
(nee Maurer), beloved wife of the late Samuel
A. Schoolfield, devoted mother of Linda W.
Kessler (Michael), David P. Schoolfield (Gail),
and Peter W. Schoolfield (Diane). She is also
survived by nine grandchildren and eight greatgrandchildren. A memorial service will be held
on Saturday, September 30, 2017 at 10:30
a.m. at the National Presbyterian Church, 4101
Nebraska Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C.
20016. The family will receive friends from 10
to 10:30 a.m. prior to the service on Saturday
at the church. Interment will be private. Those
desiring may make memorial contributions to
the National Presbyterian Church.
LYNDON A. KIDWELL
MICHAEL A. YOUNG
AURORA SAINZ ZAJAC (Age 88)
WEINGART
Mr. Hall was a retired surveyor having
worked for Holland Engineers in Alexandria,
and later with B & B Consultants in South
Hill. He was a veteran of the U S Army, a
member of American Legion Post 79 and
the Eagles in Alexandria.
HARRISON
YOUNG
QUALLS
Dr. Jordan is survived by nieces, Nancy
Messel Boberg, Chicago, IL, Pamela Messel
Kirchoff, Franklin, TN, and Heather Kahn of
Milwaukee, WI; one grandniece, two great
grandnephews and several cousins.
Lloyd was preceded in death by his parents,
his wife of 49 years, Joan McMahon Jordan,
formerly of Indianapolis and his sister,
Kathryn Jordan Messel of Bicknell, Indiana.
Graveside service and Masonic Burial will
be October 5, 2017 at 2 p.m. at St. Mary's
Cemetery, Lafayette, IN.
SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
DEATH NOTICE
Dr. LLOYD FRANK JORDAN
For his entire life, Eddie maintained a deep
appreciation for the many happy hours
he spent and many lifelong friendships he
made at the Alexandria Boy’s Club and
Alexandria Eagles.
A graveside funeral will be conducted at
1:30pm at Mt Comfort Cemetery in Alexandria. The family will receive friends Friday,
September 8 from 12 Noon to 1 p.m. at
Everly-Wheatley Funeral Home in Alexandria. The family request memorial considerations be directed to Alzheimer's Association. Online condolences may be placed at
www.Everlywheatley.com
. THURSDAY,
Dr. Lloyd Frank Jordan, 90, formerly of
Woodley Rd., NW, Washington, DC, passed
away September 2, 2017 at The Cottage at
Curry Manor, Bethesda, MD.
CROWELL
The Ladies First Aid Union of
Churches, Inc. are notified of the
passing of Nurse Annie Crowell.
Wake Friday, September 8, 2017 at
Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church, 215
Rhode Island Ave. NW., Washington, DC, from 10 a.m. until time of
service at 11 a.m.
Yoshia Johnson, President
Bobbie Best and Emma Salter,
Chairpersons of Condolences
It is with regret that we notify
the members of Steamfitters
Local #602 of the death of Brother
Charles R. Pennifill. Services held
by family. Notice #1626.
Daniel W. Loveless, FST
JORDAN
ANNIE M. CROWELL
FORRER
RUTH ODOM BONNER
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
PAID DEATH NOTICES
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
PETER JOHN WEINGART (Age 82)
On Monday, September 4, 2017, of
Silver Spring, MD and San Diego,
CA. Beloved husband of Patricia
B. Weingart; step-father of Margaret O'Neill (Thomas Kane), Molly
O'Leary (Jerry) and Kathleen
O'Neill (Kathrin Schwerdtfeger);
grandfather of Clare and Maeve Kane, and
Daniel O'Leary. Also survived by numerous
cousins and friends. The family wishes to thank
the staff at The Village at Rockville for their
loving care. Peter spent his 35 year career
with the Boy Scouts of America retiring as
an Executive. Visitation will be held at Our
Lady of Grace Church, 15661 Norbeck Blvd,
Silver Spring, MD, Saturday, September 9, from
10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m, followed by a Mass
of Christian Burial at 11 a.m. Interment San
Diego, CA at a later date. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be made to the
Lourdes Foundation Inc., 1710 Industrial Dr.
NW, Rochester, MN 55901 or to St. Mary's
University, 700 Terrace Heights, Winona, MN
55987.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
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DEATH NOTICE
All Paid Death Notices
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Included in all death notices
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CHARLES STEWART WHITSON, SR.
Charles Stewart Whitson, Sr. was born March
4, 1938 in Washington, DC to the late John and
Anna Whitson. On Sunday, August 27, 2017,
God came and took his hand, and said, “It’s
times to come home, my son.” Charles leaves
to cherish his memory three loving sons:
Michael (Renee) Whitson, Charles Whitson Jr.,
and Anthony (Felicia) Whitson, three grandchildren, one god-grandson, and five greatgrandchildren.
Visitation will be held on Friday September 8,
2017 at Calvary Gospel Church, 11150 Berry
Road, Waldorf, Maryland from 10 a.m. until
Homegoing Celebration 11 a.m. Interment Resurrection Cemetery Clinton, Maryland.
PLEASE NOTE:
Notices must be placed via phone, fax or
email. Photos must be emailed. You can
no longer place notices, drop off photos
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Payment must be made via phone with
debit/credit card.
DEATH NOTICE
CRADOCK
JAMES C. CRADOCK "Jim"
James "Jim" C. Cradock of Frederick, MD,
passed away on Sunday, September 3, 2017,
due to complications of a cardiac event. He
was the loving husband of Joan Cradock for
49 years. Born on March 10, 1942, in St.
Louis, MO, he was the son of the late Hubert
and Charlotte Cradock.
Jim graduated from the St. Louis University
High School, St. Louis College of Pharmacy,
and Purdue University. He joined the U.S.
Public Health Service, where he achieved
the rank of Captain. Jim worked in drug
development and research for many years
at the National Cancer Institute and National
Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
After he retired from the U.S. Public Health
Service, he worked at Ben Venue Laboratories in Bedford, OH. Upon retiring from
Ben Venue, Jim returned to the National
Institutes of Health, where he worked until
his death. Jim loved being on the forefront of
developing cancer drugs and generic equivalents. He valued scientific rigor and enjoyed
collaborating with his trusted colleagues,
toward the goal of creating safe and effective
medications to help people live longer, more
full lives.
Jim and Joan raised their three daughters
in Kensington, MD, where they were active
members of Holy Cross Catholic Church.
Jim was a devoted Catholic, and member
of St. Katharine Drexel Catholic Church in
Frederick and St. Andrew Catholic Church
in Newtown, PA. He was a great supporter
of Catholic education. One of Jim’s greatest
joys was spending time with his five grandchildren, particularly watching them “in their
element,” be it scouts, band, karate, or Irish
dance.
Jim was preceded in death by his beloved
wife, Joan, and brother, Bill. He is survived by
daughters Jeanne Mulcahy and her husband
Aaron of Frederick, Julie O'Leary and her
husband Kevin of Anchorage, AK, and Janet
Stankus and her husband Brian of Ewing,
NJ; sister Carroll Cradock of Chicago, IL;
grandchildren, Daniel and Christopher Mulcahy, Lauren O'Leary, Elise and Nathan
Stankus; and several cousins, nieces,
nephews, and in-laws.
The family will receive friends from 2 to 4
p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday, September
8, 2017, at Keeney and Basford Funeral
Home, 106 East Church St., Frederick. A
Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 10:30
a.m. on Saturday, September 9, 2017, at
St. Katharine Drexel Catholic Church, 8428
Opossumtown Pike, Frederick. There will
also be a viewing at the church one hour
prior to the funeral Mass. Interment will be
in the Mount Olivet Cemetery, Frederick. In
lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may
be made to St. Katharine Drexel Catholic
Church, 8428 Opossumtown Pike, Frederick,
MD 21702 or The Academy of the Holy Cross,
4920 Strathmore Avenue, Kensington, MD
20895. Online condolences can be made at:
www.KeeneyBasford.com
KORTUM
In Vietnam, Zane commanded a MP Battalion, MP Group, and served as the Deputy
Provost Marshal. Subsequently, Zane served
as Deputy, The Provost Marshal General at
the Pentagon, and then as Commandant
of the US Army MP School, Fort Gordon,
Georgia. Prior to his retirement, Zane
returned to the Pentagon to serve as Acting
Provost Marshal of the US Army.
HARRIET R. SHINN "Heidi"
Heidi Shinn, 79 passed away on August 23,
2017 at Riderwood Retirement Community in
Silver Spring, MD.
Ms. Shinn was born Harriet Rensch in Omaha,
Nebraska and grew up mostly in Minneapolis.
She graduated from Wells College in New York
and married Bill Shinn. As a Foreign Service
wife, she lived in Poland, Germany, France and
the Soviet Union during the Cold War. She also
worked as Director of Marketing at the Center
for Strategic and International Studies.
She was an avid birder, venturing up the East
Coast trying to add bird sighting to her life list.
She wrote poetry later in life and her works
were compiled into a book in 2016. She had
a recipe published in Gourmet Magazine, was
an elder at her church, sang three years with
the Masterworks Chorus and studied three
languages.
Ms. Shinn enjoyed traveling, especially to
Europe. She also loved annual family beach
trips, where she built many sand castles and
collected numerous sea shells with her grandchildren.
Heidi is survived by her sister, Helen, two
children, Liz and Rob, their spouses Steve and
Laurie, and four grandchildren: Tyler, Kaylin,
Emily and Connor.
A celebration of life will be held at St. Mark
Presbyterian Church, 10701 Old Georgetown
Road, Rockville, MD, on September 18, 2017 at
1:30 p.m.
The family asked that any expressions of
sympathy take the form of donations to the
Lewy Body Dementia Association or the
Audubon Naturalist Society.
Among Zane’s numerous military awards and
decorations are the Legion of Merit, Bronze
Star, Meritorious Service Medal, Air Medal,
Joint Services Commendation Medal, and
Army Commendation Medal. The University
of Maryland, the USA Command and Staff
College, Armed Forces Staff College, Defense
Language Institute, and the USA War College
are among the many schools from which he
graduated.
ZANE VINCENT KORTUM
Colonel Zane Vincent Kortum (US Army Ret.),
who rose from Private to Acting Provost
Marshal of the US Army, died peacefully in
Washington, DC, on August 11, 2017, just
short of his 92nd birthday.
Zane was born on September 15, 1925 in
Presho, South Dakota, to a farming family.
At age 19, he joined the US Army, driving
a tank in General Patton’s invasion of Italy.
In 1946, in Rome, Zane received a field
promotion as Military Police Corp Lieutenant,
thus beginning a distinguished career of 31
years in the US Army Military Police.
Following combat duty in Korea, in 1950,
Zane served in Army command and staff
positions in the US and overseas, including
the Pentagon, Orleans, France, and with
NATO in Verona, Italy.
After retiring from the Army in 1975, Zane
served as an executive with the Equitable Life
Assurance Company for 18 years.
While Zane traveled the world, he never
forgot his rural roots, staying in close touch
with family and friends in South Dakota.
Throughout his life he loved sports, from
baseball to basketball, and was an avid golfer,
playing courses around the globe.
Zane is survived by his wife, Emma Ruberti
Kortum, whom he married in Rome in 1946;
daughters, Renée Kortum Gardner of Washington, DC, and Countess Simonetta Kortum
Brandolini d’Adda of Florence, Italy; three
grandchildren, Emilio and Polissena Brandolini d’Adda, and Kevin Kortum Gardner;
three great-grandchildren; his sister, Betty
Fernandez, and companion, Patricia Windsor.
Zane will be buried at Arlington National
Cemetery with military honors at a future
date.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B7
RE
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
HAMMOND
COLEMAN
HAND
SCHROTE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
BIRCHARD
at Yale University and for the Hartford Jazz
Society.
Leaving WELI to become a freelance broadcaster-writer in 1978, he wrote articles for
AutoWeek, the Hartford Courant Sunday
Magazine, Connecticut Magazine and others.
In 1981, he was auto racing reporter for
Enterprise Radio, history’s first all-sports
radio network. He later wrote a book about
his Enterprise experience. During 1984-85,
he was play-by-play announcer for sports car
races on ESPN and public-address announcer for Indy car races at the Meadowlands
Complex in New Jersey.
HOPE "MISSY" HAMMOND
God has you in His hands,
But you are always in our
hearts. Happy Birthday!
DEATH NOTICE
AARON
ANDRE JOSE COLEMAN
On Thursday, August 24, 2017. Loving father
of Deon A. Coleman (Glenda); beloved son of
Uvaghn Coleman and the late Chief Theodore
R. Coleman, Jr. He is also survived by two
sisters, Sandra Coleman Perkins and Yvette
Coleman; two brothers, Theodore R. Coleman,
III and Michael Coleman; three grandchildren,
Andre Coleman (Desiree), Deon Coleman, II
and Dorian Coleman; a host of other relatives
and friends. Mr. Coleman will lie in state at
the Carolina Missionary Baptist Church, 9901
Allentown Rd., Fort Washington, MD on Thursday, September 7 from 10 a.m. until funeral
services at 11 a.m. Interment Fort Lincoln
Cemetery. Services by STEWART.
CONROY
JOAN GALE HAND
Age 78
Of Round Hill, VA died Wednesday, August
23, 2017, in Leesburg, VA. Joan was born in
Hopewell, Virginia. She met her future husband
Fred Hand, who was in the Army and stationed
at Fort Lee, VA, during the summer before
starting her freshman year at Madison College.
They married on September 12, 1959. Joan
was one of four children. Her older sister
Betty died as an eight-year-old child. Her older
brother, Ellsworth Bryant, a lifelong resident of
Hopewell, also predeceased her. Her younger
sister, Janet Coleman lives in Hopewell. Her
parents were Clinton Bryant and Helen Williams Bryant. She is survived by her husband,
Fred Hand of Round Hill; her daughter, Susan
Manning of Round Hill; her sons, Scott Hand of
Cerritos, CA and Mark Hand of Arlington, VA;
her granddaughter, Morgan Hand; her grandson, Marshall Hand, both of Cerritos; her sister,
Janet Coleman of Hopewell and her daughtersin-law, Danica Ridgway Hand and Nancy Ryan.
A memorial service for Joan was held on
Sunday, August 27, 2017, in the chapel at Hall
Funeral Home in Purcellville, VA. Donations
in Joan's memory should be directed to the
League of Women Voters of Loudoun County's
nonprofit Education Fund at LWV LC Education
Fund, P.O. Box 822, Leesburg, VA 20178.
HENDERSON
ALICE V. AARON
On Tuesday, August 29, 2017 of Hyattsville,
MD. Devoted mother of Lloyd Everett Thomas,
III, Zachary Aaron, and Rhonda Aaron; sister
of Charles Dunnington, Deloris Dunnington,
James Dunnington, and Regina Johnson (Alonzo). Also survived by 11 grandchildren, four
great-grandchildren, a host of nieces,
nephews, cousins, and friends. Visitation will
be held on Friday, September 8, 2017 at
St. Joseph Catholic Church, Largo, 2020 St.
Josephs Dr., Upper Marlboro, MD from 10 a.m.
until the Funeral Mass at 11 a.m. Interment
Arlington National Cemetery.
Janet Wray Balson Andrews, daughter of
the late William M. Balson and Shirley C.
Swain, died suddenly at home of heart
failure on August 31, 2017. She grew up
in Upper Arlington OH and Hampton VA
and had been a resident of Montgomery
County MD since 1978. She graduated with
a BS in Medical Technology from George
Washington University, Washington DC and
worked primarily at the National Institutes
of Health as a medical technologist and
microbiologist. She enjoyed sewing, quilting, and fabric art. She was a member
of Gaithersburg Presbyterian Church and
was serving as president of the local Alpha
Gamma Delta alumnae fraternity chapter.
She is survived by her husband of 43
years, Bruce S. Andrews, and their daughter
Sydney M. Andrews of Washington DC;
brothers William Mark Balson (and his wife
Jan) of Columbus OH and Stacy L. Balson
of Suffolk VA; sister Stephanie B. Stover
(and husband Tim) of Gurnee IL; as well as
numerous cousins, nieces and nephews. A
memorial service will be conducted at 11
a.m., Saturday, September 16 at Gaithersburg Presbyterian Church at 610 S. Frederick Avenue, Gaithersburg MD. In lieu of
flowers, the family has requested that
memorial donations be made to Planned
Parenthood.
Vincent served his country as a United
States Naval Academy 1971 graduate, a
USMC officer until 1983, and a representative of the defense industry until his
retirement.
He will be remembered for his intellect,
enthusiasm, tenaciousness, his big smile,
his ability to talk forever and his wonderful
bushy eyebrows.
A memorial service will be held on September 9 at 1 p.m. at Grayson United Methodist
Church, Grayson, Georgia, with visitation
from noon to 1 p.m. and luncheon following
the service.
ROBERT A. JACKSON
Entered into eternal rest on Friday, September
1, 2017. He is survived by his devoted wife,
Jane M. Jackson; one son, Wendell (Patricia)
Jackson; mother, Grace Jackson; grandchildren, Sherita Ashmon (Antonio) and Darius
Jackson; and great-granddaughter, Aniyah
Jackson. Robert is also survived by three
sisters, Nancy Spencer, Elaine Jackson and
Eloise Furbush (Robert); one brother, James
Jackson; a host of nieces, nephews, other
relatives and friends. Preceded in death by
daughter, Renee, Jackson Family will receive
friends at St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church,
2800 Pennsylvania Avenue, SE, Washington,
DC on Saturday, September 9 from 9 a.m., until
service at 10:30 a.m. Interment Mount Olivet
Cemetery. Online condolences may be made
to:
www.stewartfuneralhome.com
MELVIN EDMONDS, JR
"Mel"
Suddenly transitioned peacefully on Thursday,
August 24, 2017. He is survived by a loving
sister, Andrea Edmonds; and a host of nieces;
nephews; other relatives and friends.
On Saturday, September 9, 2017 from 9 a.m.
until service time at 11 a.m. friends may visit
with the family at Antioch Baptist Church of
Deanwood, 1105 50th St. NE, Washington, DC
20019. Interment Ft. Lincoln Cemetery, Brentwood MD.
DITMEYER
Internet. While working for the MIT Alumni
Association, she started dating Steve Ditmeyer, an MIT graduate and a railroad man.
When they married in 1979 at the MIT
Chapel, they embarked on a life that resulted
in them living in Anchorage AK, Washington
DC, St. Paul MN, Fairway KS, Boise ID, and
Alexandria VA, where they finally settled for
the last 22 years.
Upon returning east with her children grown,
Marty worked for the National Academy of
Public Administration where she oversaw
the final production of all the academy’s
reports during her 13 years there. She retired
from NAPA in 2010.
Upon returning to the US in 1969, Marty
joined the staff of MIT where she worked on
several programs including the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program and
Project MAC, where her office had a terminal
to access the ARPANET, a predecessor of the
JACKSON
NATASHA SMITH
They moved to Wheaton, MD, where they
purchased their first home upon the birth
of their only child, Catherine. Ann was an
enthusiastic and creative mother, wife and
homebuilder. The family moved to Santa
Monica, California, where they spent several
In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may
be made in Marty’s name to the Ovarian
Cancer Research Fund (ocrfa.org), Girls on
the Run (www.girlsontherun.org), and the
Christ Church Foundation (www.historicchristchurch.org/give/christ-church-foundation).
A memorial service will be at National City
Christian on Sunday September 10, 2017
at 1 p.m. followed by a reception. In lieu
of flowers, donations may be made to
www.nationalcitycc.org
The son of Hooks K. Johnston, Jr. and Susan Y. Johnston of North Andover, Massachusetts, and brother to Amy Desel and
Laura Simpson, he was born in Manchester, Connecticut, on July 6, 1962. Raised in
Glastonbury, Connecticut, he graduated from
Glastonbury High School, Brown University
and Harvard Business School. He married
Elizabeth (Betsy) Randolph Edmunds of Richmond Virginia in 1988, and together they
had four children: Marietta Yates Johnston,
Allison Wight Johnston, Hooks Kelley Johnston, IV and David Spencer Johnston. He
resided in McLean, Virginia for the past 29
years as a venture capitalist, corporate executive and philanthropist. He was a man of
strong faith who lived his life in God's service,
giving all who knew him an example of grace,
humility, and kindness. He was an active
member of Vienna Presbyterian Church and
the High Tech Prayer Breakfast. Remembered for his wisdom, patience and integrity
he was a counselor to many, from CEOs to
friends and family.
His substantial business success and venture capital record were second only to
a rich legacy of nonprofit work that has
impacted communities across the globe. In
1988 he started his post-business school
career at VM Software then was an executive
at many companies including VP of Marketing at Systems Center, COO at ALG and CEO
of Roadshow International and Descarte
Hooks’s family was central to his life. He
was extraordinarily proud of his children and
fostered a deep and special bond with each
of them. He would certainly say they were
his greatest achievements second only to
his 29 year marriage to Betsy. He loved
summers spent at Bruce Beach, his favorite
spot on Lake Huron in Canada. Having spent
summers there growing up as an active
tennis and baseball player, in more recent
years he would be found court side at family
tennis matches sharing a love of the game.
He was the person all went to for his sage
and thoughtful advice and counsel on all
matters. His intelligence, insight, patience
and gentleness were inspiring to all. Though
he faced physical challenges and limitations
he was full of joy and lived his life always
prioritizing how to help those around him.
His wit and humor followed him everywhere,
he was always quick with a joke, a smile,
and an unmistakable laugh. He shared a love
of the Red Sox and Patriots with his boys,
spending many hours spectating and many
family dinners sharing in their enthusiasm for
those teams. His marriage to Betsy created,
with her, a deep bond and partnership. His
love and pride for his family was always
prioritized over all his business demands and
accomplishments.
His life work focused on making the world
a better place, whether through his work
with the Global Good Fund, Five Talents or
in personal conversations where his always
made you feel heard and important. He
empowered those around him to persevere,
find their strength and be better people, all
through his quiet and calm example.
There will be a funeral service at Vienna
Presbyterian Church, 124 Park St, NE, Vienna, VA 22180, at 10 a.m., Saturday September 9. In lieu of flowers, donations can
be made to Five Talents (www.fivetalents.org/hooks) or the Global Good Fund
(http://globalgoodfund.org).
NEVERS
RUSSELL
followed Christ. He had a gentle, strong
spirit and was devoted and dedicated to
Christ. Wise beyond his years, Javier was
always willing to talk through anything and
he always had the right words for every
situation. He was confident and fashion forward. He was very business minded and
became an entrepreneur, starting his first
successful company at an early age and
having honed his purpose, his last business
was Kingdom Living. A thinker and mediator,
Javier was the calming force that looked for
the greater good in every situation. He had a
great sense of humor and enjoyed making his
family and everyone else laugh. Javier was
the rock of the family and a loving husband,
father, brother, son and best friend.
DEATH NOTICE
WILLIAMS
JAVIER ESTÉBAN RUSSELL (Age 39)
Marty was a dear friend to many, a voracious
reader, and an avid gardener. She was a true
force of nature who will be greatly missed.
The funeral service for Marty will be held at
Christ Church (Episcopal), Alexandria VA at
11 a.m. on Saturday, September 9, 2017. Her
ashes will be buried in the church garden,
and a reception will follow in the church’s
Meade Room.
Survivors include her daughter, Catherine
Cappiello Nowicki; son-in-law Steven Nowicki; grandchildren Tristan and Samantha Nowicki and a host of nieces and nephews. She
was preceded in death by three siblings.
LARRY WALTER NEAL
Departed this life on Saturday, September 2,
2017. Loving husband of Lynda; father of Shelly
and Andrea Neal; stepfather of Marlene Anderson and Michelle Coles; grandfather of five and
great-grandfather of one. Also survived by one
sister, Bette Neal; two aunts; five cousins and a
host of other relatives and friends. Friends may
visit with the family on Saturday, September
9 from 9:30 a.m. until funeral service at 11
a.m. at Mt. Ephraim Baptist Church, 610 Largo
Rd., Upper Marlboro, MD. Interment Harmony
Memorial Park. Services provided by JOHN T.
RHINES FUNERAL HOME.
In recent years, Marty served as president
of the Zonta Club of the Arlington Area,
was active with several groups at the Hollin
Hall Senior Center, did water aerobics with
the Water Ducks at the Mount Vernon Recreation Center, and was active with Christ
Church’s Stewards of the Dirt (SOD) gardening group.
Marty is survived by her husband Steve,
daughter Anne Stark Ditmeyer of Paris, son
David Stark Ditmeyer of Alexandria, brother
James Stark Draper of Newton MA, cousins,
three sisters-in-law, and numerous nieces,
nephews, grandnieces, and grandnephews.
Her parents and her brothers John and
Michael predeceased her.
After 59 years of marriage and the passing of
her husband, she began to spend more time
in Laurel, MS to be near family, and eventually
moved there. Her hobbies included travel,
reading and friendship, in which her circle of
friends included both young and old. She was
known for her kind heart, listening ear and
sweet smile.
Systems group. In 1998 he was recruited to
FBR Technology Venture Partners and then
later as a General Partner and Co-founder
of Valhalla Partners of Vienna, Virginia. Most
recently, Hooks was a Managing Partner with
INOVA Strategic Investments, after having
been on the board of the INOVA Healthcare
Services. He served on twenty corporate
and many non-profit boards. He was most
proud of his charitable work and in 2014, he
received the Outstanding Corporate Director
Award given by the Washington Business
Journal and National Association of Corporate Directors for his work with the Global
Good Fund.
HOOKS K. JOHNSTON, III
BRIAN D. WHITE
In the 1980s Ann obtained her real estate
license and worked for Shannon and Luchs
for 10 years. She adored her grandchildren
and she and Cappy made time to babysit
often. Ann always felt there was no job more
important than raising a child, and she loved
all babies and children.
JOHNSTON
Hooks K. Johnston, III of McLean, Virginia,
beloved husband of Betsy and father to
Mary, Allison, Hooks and David, passed away
on September 4, 2017. He died following
a courageous almost 30 year battle with
an auto immune condition that affected his
joints and ultimately his heart.
Of Germantown, MD, on Sunday, September
3, 2017. Loving father of Megan (and John)
McHale and Connor White; beloved son of
Tricia and Walter White; brother of David,
Gregory and Christopher White. The family
will receive friends at PUMPHREY’S COLONIAL
FUNERAL HOME, 300 W. Montgomery Ave.
(Route 28 just off I-270, exit 6-A) Rockville, MD
on Saturday from 3 to 5 p.m. A graveside
service and inurnment will be held at Gate of
Heaven Cemetery on Monday, September 11,
2017 at 10 a.m. In lieu of flowers memorial
contributions may be made to the Foundation
of Alcoholism Research at http://alcoholismresearch.org/support-volunteer-donate/. Please
view and sign the family’s online guestbook at:
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
Mr. Birchard is survived by his wife Donna, his
younger brother Roy Birchard of Davenport,
IA, as well as several cousins. His remains
will be cremated and his ashes buried in
East Shoreham Cemetery in his hometown
of Shoreham, VT. Memorial gifts in lieu of
flowers may be made to; Southern Poverty
Law Center, or Doctors without Borders of
Neighborhood Music School, New haven,
CT. Funeral arrangements are under the
direction of the Miller & Ketcham Funeral
Home in Brandon, Vermont.
Ann enjoyed decorating and raising flowers
and vegetables in their new home as well
as joining Welcome to Washington, an international club, where she studied watercolor.
She served as deaconess, president of the
women's circle, elder and trustee at her
church. She worked part-time for Woodward
and Lothrup in the silver department.
Anna Louise Hettel was born December 15,
1922, in Corning, Arkansas and graduated
from high school, excelling in writing and
art. She moved to St. Louis to work in
a relative's restaurant for one year before
moving to Washington, DC. She worked for
the Statler Hotel and found lodging in a
boarding house where she later met her
husband, Silvio Cappiello. Ann began to work
at the Department of the Interior's library,
and she and "Cappy" married in 1949 at
National City Christian Church, where they
remained lifelong active members.
On August 28, 2017, Tasha departed this life
at Holy Cross Hospital. She was proceeded in
death by her loving mother the late Deborah
Ann Williams and father Jerome Boyd. She was
the beloved wife of Neville Smith, Sr.; mother
of Johnathan King, Neville, Jr. and Nathaniel
Smith; step-mother of Maya and Isaiah Smith.
She is also, survived by her great-grandmother
Minnie White; sisters Ikesiha Boyd and Wendy
Wallace; grandson Keenan Hunt, Jr.; goddaughter Bella Jones and a host of other
relatives and friends. On Friday, September 8,
family will receive friends at Southern Friendship Missionary Baptist Church, 4444 Branch
Ave., Temple Hills, MD. at 10 a.m., funeral
service will follow at 11 a.m. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. Send condolences to:
www.marshallmarchfh.com
Mr. Birchard married Donna Kelley of New
Haven, CT. A previous marriage to Karen
Litton of Hartford, CT ended in divorce. Neither marriage produced children.
years, and Ann enjoyed taking college classes in writing, drawing, and millinery. After
four years, the family returned to Maryland,
settling in Kensington. Ann was an excellent
cook and seamstress and enjoyed sharing
her talents with family and friends, creating
clothes, doing alterations and making costumes for Einstein High School's drama and
music departments.
Of Kensington MD, passed away peacefully
in Laurel, MS, with her family around her on
August 19, 2017.
VIVIAN W. HENDERSON
On Tuesday, August 29, 2017, Vivian passed
away peacefully at the home of her daughter
and son-in-law, Paula and Jesse. She was
the loving mother of Paula and Paul (Omar)
Henderson, as well as a loving grandmother
and great-grandmother. She was preceded
in death by her husband, Paul R. Henderson
"Ray", after 66 years of marriage. In addition
to her children, Vivian leaves behind her sister,
Marie Williams; daughter-in-law, Peg; along
with a host of relatives and friends. Vivian was
born in Philadelphia and a long-time resident
of Crestwood Community in Washington, DC.
She was a devoted member Sixth Presbyterian
Church and recently resided at Riderwood
Retirement Community in Silver Spring, MD.
Relatives and friends are invited to celebrate
her Homegoing at Sixth Presbyterian Church,
5413 16th Street, on Saturday, September 9,
from 10 a.m., until time of funeral service at 11
a.m. Interment Cedar Hill Cemetery in Suitland,
MD. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations
may be made to the church. Arrangments by
McGuire.
www.mcguire-services.com
In 2010, he published the book “Jock Around
the Clock” on his days with Enterprise Radio.
In 2012, he launched the internet jazz program CyberJazzToday.
CAPPIELLO
ANNA H. CAPPIELLO (Age 94)
NEAL
REGINALD L. BUNTING "Reggie"
Marty graduated from Newton High School
and received a BA in history in 1964 from the
University of the Pacific, Stockton CA, and an
MA in history in 1966 from Boston University.
She then worked as a paralegal on space
law issues with the law firm of Haley, Bader
& Potts in Washington DC before joining
the Communications Satellite Corporation
(Comsat) as manager of its office in Geneva,
Switzerland.
He then moved to WELI in New Haven, Ct
where he led a popular talk show from
1970 to 1978. Mr. Birchard also served as
Master of Ceremonies for the Quinnipiac
Intercollegiate Jazz Festival, for jazz concerts
WHITE
EDMONDS
Marty Ditmeyer of Alexandria passed away
peacefully at home on September 2, 2017,
following a nearly four-year fight with ovarian cancer. She was born on October 16,
1942, in Boston to Dr. Charles Stark Draper
and Ivy Willard Draper of Newton MA. Doc
Draper was known for leading the MIT Instrumentation Lab team that developed the
inertial guidance system that took the Apollo
astronauts to the moon and back.
After his discharge in 1958, he attended the
University of Alabama, where he earned a
Bachelor’s Degree in Radio & TV. He returned
to New England, where he worked for radio
stations WCCC and WTIC in Hartford, CT.
He hosted jazz programs at both Hartford
stations and was honored by the jazz community for his efforts.
SMITH
Donations may be made to Make-A-Wish
Foundation or Children’s Defense Fund.
DEATH NOTICE
MARTHA STARK DRAPER DITMEYER
“Marty”
1942~ 2017
A Vermont native Mr. Birchard enlisted in the
U-S Air Force following graduation from high
school in Shoreham, VT.
VINCENT PAUL CONROY
BUNTING
On Sunday, August 27, 2017.
Beloved husband of the late
Vernice Kyler Bunting. Loving
father of Reginald L. Bunting
(Kiesha), Benjamin Kyler
(Patricia), and Latonya Kyler
(Henry). He also leaves nine
grandchildren,
four
great-grandchildren;
nephew Lemuel Bunting; niece, LeMuria
Bunting-Kent; three sisters-in-law; four brothers-in-law; a special friend, Joyce Brown and
a host of family and friends. The family will
receive friends on Friday, September 8, 2017
from 10 a.m. until service time 11 a.m. at
Allen Chapel A.M.E. Church, 2498 Alabama
Ave, SE. Interment Lincoln Memorial Cemetery.
Arrangements entrusted to Ralph Williams, II
Funeral Service, P.A., (301) 262-2387.
She is predeceased by her husband, John
of 50 years. She is survived by her sister
Julie Morris of Nags Head NC, her son,
Jim, daughter in law Carolyn of Kinsale,
daughter Gretchen Rhedmon of Alexandria
VA, and four grandchildren; Julia, Jessica,
Frank and Ted and two great-grandchildren.
Veteran broadcaster-writer John Birchard
died August 22, 2017 at home in Silver Spring
MD at the age of 81.
In lieu of flowers, make donations to Sarah
Cannon Cancer Institute at Henrico Doctors
Hospital, Richmond, VA.
Above all he loved his family in Georgia - his
precious sons, Cecil Vincent, Evan Edward,
Collin Ross, USMC 2002-2006 and Collin’s
wife Caitlin and their son and Vincent’s
first grandchild Theodore Ronald; their dear
mother and Vincent’s former wife Vicky
Howard, and his siblings, Helen Conroy
Del Guercio and her husband Nicholas Sr.,
Harry Conroy, and Frances Conroy and her
husband Jan Munroe, his nephew Nicholas
Jr., and Nick’s wife Mary Jo and daughters
Freja and Sophia, and his two nieces Carroll
Drake, and Kathy Termotto and her husband
Tom. He was the son of Vincent Paul
Conroy, Sr. and Ossie Ray Conroy.
JANET W.B. ANDREWS
She was extremely intelligent, an avid reader who always read the last chapter in a
book first, world traveler, active in Bridge
club, book club and Mahjong player. She
loved animals, the Ohio State Buckeyes,
college basketball, (especially the Tarheels),
playing Mexican Train, and her family. She
enjoyed living on the water and life in
the Northern Neck. A loving mother and
friend that will be missed by her family and
friends, especially by me.
JOHN BIRCHARD
Voice of America Broadcaster and
Author
Her service will be at St Paul’s Catholic
Church in Hague VA, on Saturday, September 9 at 11 a.m.
Vincent Conroy, 68, passed in his sleep
on August 22, 2017 in Woodville, Florida,
surrounded by the beauty of the St. Marks
River and its wildlife that he held dear.
ANDREWS
RACHEL DALY SCHROTE
Rachel Daly Schrote of Kinsale, VA, surrounded by her family, quietly passed away
on September 1, 2017. She was born in
Sapulpa OK on October 9, 1937 the daughter of Charles and Juanita Daly. Mom grew
up in Mount Vernon Ohio and attended
The Ohio State University where she met
and married my dad, John Ellis Schrote
(predeceased 2007) of Middletown, Ohio.
She lived her adult life in Alexandria Va
working in various congressional offices on
Capitol Hill, before retiring to Corolla NC
to enjoy the beach and new friends. She
moved to Kinsale, VA in 2012 to be close to
her family.
He returned to radio as news director of
WAVZ and WKCI in New Haven, CT in 1986
and then in 1993 Mr. Birchard joined the
Voice of America in Washington, DC as an
international radio news broadcaster and
automotive reporter where he remained until
his retirement in 2008.
STEWART G. NEVERS
Of Washington, DC born in St. Ann, Jamaica
departed this life on Saturday, August 19,
2017. He leaves to morn his children, Noel,
Kevin, Sherol and Charles; grandchildren, Marcus, Kevin, Kayden, Carley, Noel, Kaiya, Koran,
Jeremiah, Charles and Kalia; sisters, Edith and
Alette; and a host of nieces; nephews; other
relatives and friends. Preceded in death by his
wife, Noris and siblings, Inez and Cecil.
Family will receive friends on Friday, September 9 from 9 a.m. until time of Funeral service
10 a.m. at the Michigan Park Christian Church,
1600 Taylor St. NE. Interment Rock Creek
Cemetery.
www.johnsonandjenkinsfh.com
GLORIA B. WILLIAMS
Born on February 17, 1955 and
passed away suddeny at home,
on Friday, August 25, 2017. She
was affectionately as known as
"Dimples". Dimples leaves to
cherish her memory, her siblings,
Janice, Keith, Darlene, Dennis and Gary; a host
of other relatives and friends. Services will be
held on Friday, September 8, viewing, 9:30
a.m.; service, 11 a.m., at Corithian Baptist
Church, 6705 Good Luck Road, Lanham, MD
20706. Services entrusted to R. N. Horton Co.
Mortician, Inc.
Of Garland, TX, went home to be with the
Lord September 4, 2017. He was born
December 7, 1977, in Washington DC, to
Lionel James and Conchita Consuelo Russell.
Javier was educated in the DC Public School
System and graduated from H.D. Woodson
Sr. High School in 1995. He continued his
education at Florida A&M, earning a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration.
While in college, Javier was baptized at
Rising Sun First Baptist Church in Woodlawn,
Maryland under the spiritual leadership of Dr.
Emmett Burns. He later accepted the calling
to serve the Lord as a minister of God’s
gospel and became an ordained minister
under the spiritual direction of Pastor Dr.
Joseph T. Wright at Jerusalem Missionary
Baptist Church in Tallahassee, FL. While being
a dedicated servant and worker in the
church, God directed Javier to move his
family to Dallas to earn a master’s degree
at Dallas Theological Seminary. He was currently working on that degree when he
became lead pastor at the Richland Campus
of Lake Pointe Church under the spiritual
leadership of Pastor Steve Stroope. Javier
was a God fearing man who dynamically
Javier is survived by his high school sweetheart and loving wife: Atiyyah Russell; adoring children: Javier II, Ezra and Naomi; parents: Lionel and Conchita; siblings: Beverly
Rice and husband Kevin, Damien Russell
and wife Lisa, Vegia Jackson and husband
Prentis; Eboni Russell, Renaldo Russell, Conchita Schéz Russell and Lonnie Russell, III
and wife Misty; aunts: Dolores Addo, Nellie
Taylor and Rosalind Blackwell; uncle: Gerald
Russell; parents-in-law: Winona and Rahmann Rasheed; sisters-in-law: Rafiqah
Palmer and Aneesah Hanke; and brother-inlaw: Rahmann Rasheed; and sisters-in-law:
Raushanah Rasheed and Shareefah Rasheed;
along with a host of nieces, nephews and
cousins. He was preceded in death by his
beloved brother: Lionel Russell, II.
Services will be held 11 a.m. Friday, September 8, 2017, at Lake Pointe Church –
White Rock Campus, 9150 Garland Road,
Dallas, 75218 with Pastor Steve Stroope
officiating. Pallbearers will be Frank Davila,
Charles Mulisa, Brandon Richardson, Brandon Jordan, Austin Patton, Mark Moore, Jerry
Perry and Ron Galloway. The family will
receive friends Thursday evening at Lake
Pointe Church – Richland Campus, 1601 East
Buckingham Road, Richardson, 75081 from 5
to 8 p.m.
B8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Clear skies with a pleasant breeze
Skies are trending clear or are
already there in the morning. If
clouds hang on, they’ll be scooting
away with time. A northwest wind is
delivering some fall-like air, with
very low humidity and pleasant temperatures.
Highs should largely make the mid-70s. Tonight
should be mostly clear and on the cool side. Lows
should get down into the 50s with light winds.
Today
Partly sunny
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Friday
Partly sunny
75° 58
Saturday
Mostly sunny
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Sunday
Mostly sunny
Monday
Partly sunny
OFFICIAL RECORD
Tuesday
Rain
Temperatures
76° 58
72° 56
73° 59
74° 65
80° 62
FEELS: 77°
FEELS: 73°
FEELS: 74°
FEELS: 72°
FEELS: 76°
CHNCE PRECIP: 5%
WIND: WNW 7–14 mph
P: 10%
W: WNW 7–14 mph
P: 5%
W: NNE 7–14 mph
P: 5%
W: NNE 8–16 mph
P: 20%
W: ENE 8–16 mph
P: 60%
W: ENE 8–16 mph
HUMIDITY: Moderate
H: Low
H: Low
H: Low
H: Moderate
H: High
°
°
FEELS*: 75°
°
°
°
NATION
Harrisburg
72/53
Hagerstown
72/52
Su
Normal
Philadelphia
74/57
Record high
Record low
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Norfolk
78/61
Virginia Beach
76/60
Sa
72° 12:10 a.m.
64° 5:00 p.m.
83°/66°
98° 1954
47° 1909
68° 2:48 a.m.
61° 12:00 p.m.
83°/60°
98° 1983
45° 1972
68° 1:00 a.m.
61° 4:00 p.m.
81°/61°
98° 1983
46° 1962
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 73°
Total this month
Air Quality: Good
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Moderate
Moderate
Very High
Normal
Total this year
Normal
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.47"
1.24"
0.65"
30.89"
27.05"
0.90"
1.56"
0.70"
34.56"
28.70"
1.03"
1.73"
0.72"
31.97"
28.57"
Moon Phases
UV: High
Solar system
7 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, mostly sunny. High 56–60. Wind west–
northwest 4–8 mph. Tonight, clear, cool. Low 40–44. Wind
west–northwest 3–6 mph. Friday, partly sunny. High 58–62.
Wind northwest 4–8 mph. Saturday, mostly sunny. High
54–60.
Atlantic beaches: Today, partly sunny, cooler, less humid,
shower northeast. High 72–78. Wind west 7–14 mph.
Tonight, mostly clear. Low 56–62. Wind west 4–8 mph.
Friday, mostly sunny. High 72–78. Wind northwest 4–8 mph.
Saturday, mostly sunny. High 70–76.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, partly sunny. Wind
northwest 8–15 knots. Waves near 1 foot. Visibility unrestricted.
• Lower Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, partly sunny. Wind
northwest 10–15 knots. Waves 1 foot on the Potomac and 1–3 feet
on the Chesapeake.• River Stages: Today, the Little Falls stage will be
around 3.2 feet. Friday, holding near 3.2 feet. Flood stage at Little
Falls is 10 feet.
(High tides in Bold)
4:09 a.m.
9:22 a.m.
4:29 p.m.
9:43 p.m.
12:19 a.m.
6:30 a.m.
12:57 p.m.
7:02 p.m.
Ocean City
2:47 a.m.
8:52 a.m.
3:02 p.m.
9:15 p.m.
Norfolk
4:44 a.m.
10:53 a.m.
5:05 p.m.
11:15 p.m.
Point Lookout
2:28 a.m.
9:01 a.m.
3:00 p.m.
9:11 p.m.
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Palm Springs, CA 109°
Low: West Yellowstone, MT 27°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
70/50/pc
87/62/s
56/48/c
76/56/s
86/59/s
73/53/pc
87/54/s
76/55/s
83/50/s
93/66/pc
76/58/r
64/51/sh
69/52/sh
82/62/pc
69/51/s
76/54/s
81/52/s
68/52/pc
69/52/pc
67/53/sh
86/64/s
86/57/s
Tomorrow
66/48/sh
88/63/pc
58/48/s
79/60/s
86/60/s
74/52/s
89/62/s
79/59/s
82/57/s
90/63/pc
74/56/pc
62/47/sh
66/50/sh
83/64/s
72/50/pc
77/56/s
82/56/t
67/50/pc
73/51/pc
66/52/sh
87/65/s
88/58/pc
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
76/54/s
65/50/sh
92/68/s
62/41/pc
80/49/s
75/52/pc
88/75/pc
85/62/s
71/52/pc
79/56/s
84/70/pc
76/58/s
100/78/s
78/56/s
85/67/pc
72/54/s
76/57/s
93/81/t
66/51/pc
72/51/pc
74/53/s
83/67/s
74/58/pc
78/61/pc
83/60/pc
65/47/c
93/67/s
63/41/c
74/54/s
72/49/pc
87/75/sh
86/63/s
76/50/pc
81/59/s
85/71/s
81/59/s
92/72/pc
81/59/s
82/65/pc
77/54/pc
80/61/s
93/81/pc
64/52/pc
69/53/s
78/55/s
84/68/s
72/55/pc
77/63/s
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
83/59/s
78/56/s
90/75/t
74/57/pc
106/83/s
65/52/pc
74/53/r
81/63/pc
76/55/r
76/54/s
85/56/s
75/53/s
79/59/s
76/56/s
86/80/r
94/70/s
79/69/pc
75/62/pc
87/80/r
79/63/pc
92/63/pc
67/51/sh
91/77/t
86/61/s
83/61/s
84/62/pc
87/76/pc
74/55/pc
99/80/pc
65/47/pc
72/51/pc
77/56/pc
75/53/pc
78/56/s
84/56/pc
76/55/s
86/60/pc
83/58/s
89/79/t
91/68/t
76/68/pc
73/61/pc
88/79/t
74/55/c
85/59/pc
63/46/sh
91/77/pc
86/61/s
Searing Summer Heat
Causing Your Shingles to
World
High: Nasiriya, Iraq 119°
Low: Summit Station, Greenland 1°
Sep 13
Last
Quarter
Sep 20
New
Sep 27
First
Quarter
Oct 5
Full
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Rise
6:42 a.m.
8:32 p.m.
4:11 a.m.
5:33 a.m.
9:51 a.m.
2:35 p.m.
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
80/65/s
106/82/s
78/65/t
84/69/pc
66/41/pc
76/51/t
80/65/pc
80/72/r
86/79/c
58/43/pc
68/51/s
94/80/sh
98/76/s
83/71/sh
64/50/sh
71/50/pc
59/51/r
Today
Addis Ababa
69/53/pc
Amsterdam
64/58/pc
Athens
85/71/s
Auckland
61/53/sh
Baghdad
111/78/s
Bangkok
92/80/t
Beijing
90/64/s
Berlin
62/52/pc
Bogota
68/47/r
Brussels
65/57/pc
Buenos Aires
69/51/pc
Cairo
92/72/s
Caracas
78/69/pc
Copenhagen
59/55/c
Dakar
86/78/pc
Dublin
61/50/r
Edinburgh
59/49/r
Frankfurt
67/54/pc
Geneva
67/48/pc
Ham., Bermuda 87/80/pc
Helsinki
54/43/r
Ho Chi Minh City 93/77/t
Tomorrow
72/51/t
62/53/r
86/72/s
61/54/pc
107/73/s
93/80/t
89/68/s
65/56/c
66/47/r
62/52/r
68/58/c
93/74/s
77/69/pc
62/55/r
86/79/c
60/49/sh
59/48/t
67/55/c
72/52/s
87/79/s
57/45/r
93/79/t
I’ve
cra got
m
c
plu ks tha ore
m
con be n a
ven r ’s
tio
n!
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
89/81/sh
92/74/pc
80/67/s
82/65/s
82/54/s
88/56/s
92/80/pc
93/80/t
81/75/c
67/59/s
91/62/s
67/58/pc
88/60/s
92/79/pc
67/57/pc
65/52/sh
62/50/sh
89/81/c
76/56/pc
92/77/t
58/47/c
66/47/sh
67/55/pc
65/50/pc
89/80/c
94/74/s
84/68/s
89/69/s
83/55/s
91/56/s
90/80/t
93/80/t
82/74/c
67/59/pc
79/62/s
63/51/r
89/63/s
92/78/t
67/57/pc
63/50/sh
59/48/sh
89/80/pc
74/58/pc
94/78/pc
55/51/sh
61/43/sh
66/53/c
69/52/pc
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83/67/s
106/80/s
78/62/pc
84/69/pc
58/42/pc
71/51/t
82/66/pc
85/74/pc
87/78/t
58/50/c
67/48/pc
91/79/pc
97/72/s
80/69/sh
63/43/pc
74/55/pc
66/55/pc
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
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Set
7:29 p.m.
7:55 a.m.
6:10 p.m.
6:59 p.m.
9:04 p.m.
12:09 a.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
SCALLOPED
EDGE
g
F
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
OCEAN: 75°
Pollen: Moderate
g
Th
BWI
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: –5.3° yr. to date: +2.9°
OCEAN: 76°
g
W
Dulles
Precipitation
Kitty Hawk
76/63
g
Tu
Reagan
OCEAN: 73°
Richmond
75/53
Annapolis
FORECAST
Ocean City
75/59
Lexington
71/47
Washington
ACTUAL
Cape May
73/59
Annapolis
74/58
Charlottesville
75/52
Today’s tides
M
High
Low
Weather map features for noon today.
Baltimore
73/53
Dover
74/54
Washington
75/58
RECORD
°
Sa
REGION
AVERAGE
LUXURY
SHINGLES
KLMNO
Style
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
RE
C
THE RELIABLE SOURCE
BOOK WORLD
CAROLYN HAX
THEATER REVIEW
Sarah Huckabee
Sanders holds her
own with the five
hosts of “The View.” C2
Michael Dirda reviews
John McPhee’s “Draft
No. 4: The Writing
Process.” C2
Dad’s leaving Mom for
another woman. Here’s
why it’s unfair (to Mom) to
expect him to stay. C2
At the Atlas Performing
Arts Center: A thin “Julius
Caesar” and a bloated
“Neverwhere.” C8
TV REVIEW
‘The Deuce’
has heart
in spades
BY
H ANK S TUEVER
After all those come-ons that
aired before and after “Game of
Thrones,” HBO viewers are doubtless aware that “The Deuce,” a
serious and provocative new drama from co-creators David Simon
and George Pelecanos, is about a
seedier era in the history of Times
Square, circa 1971, when it was full
of prostitutes, pimps and peepshows.
For your money and their effort, the show promises a sensual
yet sufficiently gritty, occasionally
violent and nostalgically illicit act
of time travel, kicked off with Curtis Mayfield’s “(Don’t Worry) If
There’s a Hell Below, We’re All
Going to Go” as its theme song.
Along the way you’ll meet dishonest cops, ruthless mob hands, corrupt union reps, tenderhearted
pornographers and, of course, a
whole lot of fascinating, streetwise women whom you’ll frequently see naked, while feeling a
mixture of sympathy and admiration for them. (For what it’s worth,
there are also fleeting glimpses of
naked men, but you won’t feel
much for them.)
So how about it, baby — wanna
date?
Easily the most ambitious drama among this fall’s first wave of
new shows, “The Deuce” (premiering Sunday) focuses mainly
on establishing its milieu rather
than hammering home its theme.
The initial task is to resurrect the
sights and sounds of a dirty, John
Lindsay-era New York while keeping everyone who still remembers
the half-disaster that was 2016’s
“Vinyl” from saying “Ugh, New
York in the early ’70s? Again?”
The show uses CGI magic to
CHRIS PIZZELLO/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Former first lady Michelle
Obama participated in a photo
collage for Beyoncé’s birthday.
ESSAY
ROG WALKER
Designer Fe Noel’s runway show at Harlem’s Fashion Row, which Brandice Henderson founded to promote multicultural designers.
The fashion industry
finally recognizes
the diversity trend
After years of missteps, there’s a whole new look on runways
TV CONTINUED ON C4
BY
U.S. POSTAL SERVICE
BOOK WORLD
‘Snowy Day’ — on
stamp — can help
us rethink race
BY
R OBIN G IVHAN
The fashion industry has become more
diverse, more inclusive. More open. It is less
them-vs.-you. It is us.
Yes, fashion still has its flaws. Designers
often still have tunnel vision. The industry still
makes head-smacking gaffes. There are far too
many cases of profound insensitivity and
cavalier cultural appropriation. (Will those
Kardashians ever learn?) But in the past
decade, it has opened its doors to more people
of color, plus-size women, transgender women
and those who simply don’t fit the industry’s
classic definition of beauty. Most importantly,
fashion is talking about diversity in more
nuanced ways — and learning from its mistakes.
Two years ago, Brandice Henderson, who
describes herself as a “fashion coach,” was
having dinner with five designers at Harlem’s Red Rooster. They were all up-andcomers, lauded by major fashion magazines,
who had dressed an assortment of famous
women. The scene was typical for New York
with one significant exception: All five of the
designers were black.
This is no small thing.
Four years ago, five women walked into
IMG Models and immediately impressed the
company’s president, Ivan Bart. One of them
especially stood out. Her name was Ashley
Graham and she was plus-size. But as Bart put
it: “A star is a star is a star.” Graham has gone
on to become the rare model who is known by
name well outside the insulated world of
fashion. She is not a plus-size success story;
she is, quite simply, a success.
This is no small thing, either.
In 2017, Vogue ran countless photo stories
celebrating Hollywood stars and cultural figures, but it also published visual essays on
Latinas in Los Angeles, Alpha Kappa Alpha
sorority sisters, lesbian models and black
servicewomen.
This is significant, too.
During the past decade, the New York
fashion industry has been in upheaval over the
subject of diversity, or the lack of it. The most
egregious examples were on the runways.
They are fashion’s billboards and its proving
STAMP CONTINUED ON C5
THEO WARGO/GETTY IMAGES FOR US WEEKLY
K RISSAH T HOMPSON AND
H ELENA A NDREWS- D YER
BY
Is this the woman that Michelle Obama sees when she
looks in the mirror now, free of
the White House and the media
scrutiny of presidential politics?
After more than a decade in
public life, can she freely shed the
sheath dress and pearls for a wide
brim black hat and dookie
braids?
She just did.
By allowing herself to be photographed alongside 15 other
members of Beyoncé’s inner circle, Obama reclaimed her image
from the annals of stodgy first
lady portraits. And, she did it by
embodying Beyoncé’s.
The image, in case you haven’t
seen it, is part of a birthday
tribute to the singer who posted
In this latest visual
love letter to Beyoncé,
former first lady
Michelle Obama is not
only admitting to her
“inner Beyoncé,”
she’s reveling in it.
FASHION CONTINUED ON C3
R ON C HARLES
Ibram X. Kendi was in Washington this weekend for the National Book Festival talking about
his monumental history of American racism, “Stamped From the
Beginning.” Winner of a National
Book Award, “Stamped” is an
extraordinary work of scholarship that traces the depth of racial
hatred in this country and our
intricate methods of perpetuating it.
“Consumers of these racist
ideas,” Kendi writes, “have been
led to believe there is something
wrong with Black people, and not
the policies that have enslaved,
oppressed, and confined so many
Black people.”
I don’t think it’s an exaggeration to say that the books we read,
especially at a young age, help
create our conception of the
world and other people. Growing
up in the blindingly white suburbs of St. Louis, I didn’t know
any African Americans. There
weren’t any black children on my
street or in my class at a Christian
kindergarten. It was the sort of
Michelle
Obama
lets her
hair down
EVAN AGOSTINI/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Plus-size models such as Ashley Graham and transgender models such as Hari Nef are more common on runways.
portraits of black women — some
famous, others not — dressed in
one of her iconic looks from the
“Formation” video.
The portraits alone were striking, but Obama’s participation
was jaw-dropping. Eight months
after leaving the White House,
she has quietly returned to private life. She posts rarely to social
media — a sweet Valentine’s message here, a birthday wish there.
She has made trips to visit high
schools, some low-key and others
covered by the media, to emphasize her initiative to encourage
higher education. She has given a
few paid speeches, but those are
generally closed to the public.
Both the former first lady and
Queen Bey are two women who
don’t put images out into the
world without carefully considering their meaning. So what’s the
former first lady telling us with
this one?
First, that she loves Beyoncé.
Well, duh: Their track record of
public support dates back to the
first inauguration, when the singer serenaded the Obamas with
Etta James’s “At Last.”
Second, that she loved “Formation,”
undeniably
one
of
Beyoncé’s most overtly political
tracks. The video featured stark
images of the aftermath of HurriOBAMA CONTINUED ON C2
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
Melania’s stylist,
but no Trump, on
‘best-dressed’ list
Melania Trump’s go-to stylist
— the man responsible for her
gowns at her husband’s
inaugural ball and other highprofile events — is among the
gorgeously plumed company on
Vanity Fair’s new “best dressed”
list. Don’t recognize Hervé
Pierre? He’s not exactly a
household name — or even a
frequently photographed figure,
unlike his famous client.
The designer and former
creative director at American
fashion line Carolina Herrera
offers the magazine a quote that
the stiletto-favoring first lady
might agree with: “Casual
clothes are not always the
answer!”
The annual list includes no
Trumps — neither the alwayspolished Melania nor Ivanka —
nor even a particularly stylish
Trump Cabinet member or
spouse.
The Obamas are on the list, as
Here’s the crazy thing: I’m supposed to be on a boat for my
60th birthday, so my wife says, ‘Steve, just take off [and skip
the meeting]. You’ll meet with him some other time.’ God, I
should’ve listened.”
Comedian Steve Harvey, acknowledging to the Hollywood Reporter that he regrets not
listening to his wife when she told him not to meet with President-elect Donald Trump in
January. Harvey told the publication that he hasn’t spoken to the president since.
STEVE MARCUS/REUTERS
Steve Harvey
CHIP SOMODEVILLA/GETTY IMAGES
The Trumps at the inaugural
Freedom Ball in January.
in previous years. (Though their
“memorable look” from this year
is decidedly more casual than in
their state-dinner days: It’s the
breezy tourist togs they donned
while visiting Tuscany.)
Other pols include Canadian
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau
as well as French President
Emmanuel Macron and his wife,
Brigitte (the woman President
Trump declared to be in “good
shape”). And there’s a requisite
Kennedy: law student Jack
Schlossberg, the son of Caroline
Kennedy and grandson of JFK.
A belly roll for the Cheney role?
Bale’s ready for his close-up.
Looks like actor Christian
Bale is boning up for his
“Big Time.” Another giveaway
that the English actor is
upcoming role as former
slipping into character?
vice president Dick
Bale’s eyebrows were
Cheney by doing the
dyed blond.
opposite of hitting the
Written and
gym. The normally
directed by Adam
McKay (“The Big
svelte 43-year-old was
spotted last weekend at
Short”), “Backseat,”
the Telluride Film
Christian Bale which also stars Steve
Carell and Amy
Festival sporting a
noticeably fuller physique,
Adams, will track Cheney’s rise
presumably to look more like
to power and is slated to debut
the man former president
in 2018.
George W. Bush nicknamed
Sarah Huckabee Sanders enters the lions’ den
“Who approved you coming here? The
Mooch?” asked Joy Behar at the top of
White House press secretary Sarah
Huckabee Sanders’s time in “The View’s”
notorious hot seat Wednesday. “I’m
shocked that you’re here,” Behar
continued, not so jokingly.
But Sanders spent the hour almost
completely unfazed. Appearing alongside
her dad, former Arkansas governor and
GOP presidential candidate Mike
Huckabee (he has a new TV show called
“Huckabee” to promote), Sanders didn’t
need a wingman.
“We want to talk to Sarah first,” co-host
Whoopi Goldberg said. And for the next
30 minutes, the talk show’s five co-hosts
round-robined the press secretary.
How does Sanders handle those 2 a.m.
phone calls (or tweets)? She has three
children younger than 5, so she’s up
already. Does dear old Dad offer any
career advice? “Always be honest and
always be myself.” Mmm-hmm, went the
co-hosts.
But come on, isn’t it hard to defend
President Trump sometimes?
Sanders said that she has spent a lot of
time with the president and that she has
“always felt respected and empowered” to
do her job.
Chiming in, Huckabee said that he
would never have encouraged his
daughter to join the White House if he
“didn’t have confidence in [Trump’s]
integrity.”
Sanders pointed out that she’s the first
HEIDI GUTMAN/ABC
White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders and her father, former
Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee, were guests on the talk show “The View.”
working mother to take over the podium
in the briefing room. “Instead of liberals
celebrating it, they have attacked me,” she
said, probably referring to the “Saturday
Night Live” parody that some deemed
sexist.
What about the press? Why does the
president hate the media so much?
“There is always a little bit of friction
between the press corps and the White
House,” said Sanders “We have to be
forthcoming, and it’s journalists’
obligation to present facts, not opinions.”
“Is the media not supposed to report
on the fact that 95 percent of what he says
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
is a lie?” That’s Behar again.
Sanders disagreed with that assertion.
Obviously. And she countered that “false
narratives” inhibit “his ability to succeed.”
Goldberg asked whether former
president Barack Obama is a U.S. citizen.
“I think that’s been addressed,” said
Sanders, who then doubled down on the
White House’s stance that immigration
reform is in Congress’s court.
Okay, fine, but what about the
president looking directly at the sun
during the solar eclipse?
“Maybe,” suggested Sanders, “he has
super powers that we don’t know about.”
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
BOOK WORLD
A master class in creative nonfiction
BY
M ICHAEL D IRDA
In “Frames of Reference,” one
of the chapters in John McPhee’s
“Draft No. 4: On the Writing
Process,” this longtime staff writer for the New Yorker visits his
granddaughter’s 12th-grade English class. He brings with him a
list of approximately 60 items
mentioned in an article he has
just written. “I would like to try
that list on you,” McPhee tells the
young people. “Raise your hand if
you recognize these names and
places: Woody Allen.”
All 19 students are aware of
Woody Allen, so he starts going
down his list. Only five hands go
up for Norman Rockwell, Truman
Capote and Joan Baez. Laurence
Olivier gets one. In 2014 none of
these high school seniors can
identify Samuel Johnson. Or Sophia Loren. Or Bob Woodward.
McPhee doesn’t intend this to
be shocking. He certainly knows
the voting results if you were to
ask other students about John
McPhee.
No, what he means to emphasize is the brief shelf life of cultural references. Prose that overindulges in the hip can quickly
grow incomprehensible or dated.
Today’s “woke” and Adele are
yesterday’s “keen” and Dinah
Shore. So little abides and the
present inexorably overwrites the
past.
Which is why rediscovery remains an important function for
critics, scholars and serious readers. Even if you’ve never heard of
Bill Bradley, you can pick up “A
Sense of Where You Are” and read
with pleasure this profile of a
young basketball player. That
book, McPhee’s first, appeared in
1965 and has since been succeeded by 31 others, the most admired
being “Oranges,” “The Pine Barrens,” “Coming into the Country”— about Alaska — and the
Pulitzer Prize-winning study of
North American geology, “Annals
of the Former World.” Never as
flashy as Hunter Thompson or
Tom Wolfe, nor as lyrically moving as Joan Didion, McPhee has
always relied on prose that is
fact-rich, leisurely, requiring a
certain readerly patience with
scientific and geographical description, and nearly always enthralling. Years ago, when I
taught literary journalism, I had
my classes buy “The John McPhee
Reader.”
As it happens, McPhee himself
teaches creative nonfiction at
Princeton, and two of his former
students — the New Yorker’s editor David Remnick and The Post’s
Joel Achenbach — warmly praise
their mentor on the jacket of
“Draft No. 4.” Apparently derived
from that college course, this
insider’s guide to long-form journalism, though somewhat meandering, is a book that any writer,
aspiring or accomplished, could
profitably read, study and argue
with.
However, its opening two
chapters, in which McPhee presents his various systems for
structuring articles, do require a
bit of perseverance. There are
graph-like illustrations, circles,
arrows, number lines, maps and
even an irrelevant excursus about
an outmoded text editor called
Kedit. The upshot of it all is
simply: Take time to plan your
piece so that it does what you
want.
From here McPhee proceeds to
offer more specific advice. For
example, he warns against comic
lead sentences, such as “Insomnia is the triumph of mind over
mattress.” If you are serious about
the subject, he explains, “you
might seem to be indicating at the
outset that you don’t have confidence in your material so you are
trying to make up for it by waxing
cute.” Successful writing, above
all, starts with knowing what to
include and what to leave out. In
his classes, McPhee regularly asks
students to trim a dozen lines
from Joseph Conrad or tighten up
the already concise Gettysburg
Address. His aim could be
summed up by the classic tonsorial mantra: Cut it but don’t change
it.
In another chapter, McPhee
addresses the uneasy relationship between editors and writers,
illustrating his points with anecdotes from life at the New Yorker.
Once he asked the then-editor,
William Shawn, how he could
DRAFT NO. 4
On the Writing
Process
By John McPhee
Farrar Straus
Giroux. 192 pp.
$25
justify devoting vast amounts of
time and money to making sure
the magazine’s stories were accurate. After all, besides underwriting its contributors’ research and
travel, the New Yorker employed
copy editors, fact-checkers and
an in-house grammarian. Was all
this labor-intensive attention to
detail really worth it? Shawn only
murmured, “It takes as long as it
takes.”
“As a writing teacher,” McPhee
adds, “I have repeated that statement to two generations of students. If they are writers, they will
never forget it.” Without disputing the importance of getting
things right, may I nonetheless
gently demur from this implied
goal of artistic perfection? While
McPhee proffers tested insights
into efficient reporting and notetaking, on the deft use of quotations and indirect discourse, on
both writer’s block and the pleasure of revision, he’s nonetheless
living in a privileged world,
where expenses scarcely seem to
matter and he and the New Yorker can expend months, even years
on a single project. Yet most of us
in the writing trade face inexorable deadlines and weekly bills. We
can’t afford to carry on like perennial graduate students, endlessly
researching, endlessly polishing.
We simply do the best we can in
the time available, then move on
to the next assignment.
Enough of such carping. For
over half a century, John McPhee
— now 86 — has been writing
profiles of scientists, eccentrics
and specialists of every stripe. All
are exceptional at what they do.
So, too, is their discerning chronicler:
“Creativity lies in what you
choose to write about, how you go
about doing it, the arrangement
through which you present
things, the skill and the touch
with which you describe people
and succeed in developing them
as characters, the rhythms of your
prose, the integrity of the composition, the anatomy of the piece
(does it get up and walk around
on its own?), the extent to which
you see and tell the story that
exists in your material, and so
forth. Creative nonfiction is not
making something up but making the most of what you have.”
mdirda@gmail.com
Michael Dirda reviews books for
The Washington Post every Thursday.
CATI CLADERA/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY-EFE
Michelle Obama leaves a restaurant in Llucalcari, Spain, last week. The former first lady has kept a
relatively low profile since leaving the White House in January.
Michelle Obama’s braided message
OBAMA FROM C1
cane Katrina in New Orleans,
along with graffiti supporting the
movement for Black Lives Matter,
a police cruiser sinking into a
body of water and a young black
boy dancing in front of a line of
officers outfitted in riot gear.
That’s all before Beyoncé throws
up her middle fingers.
Last, Obama is signaling that
she embraces the song as an
anthem for black womanhood —
and is, clearly, not afraid to cause
her own conversation.
Once, an interviewer asked
Mrs. Obama who she would be if
she could be anyone other than
herself. She answered: “Beyoncé.”
As an artist, Beyoncé has been
exploring the inner lives of black
women. At the same time Mrs.
Obama is quite literally exploring
her inner Beyoncé.
In “The Meaning of Michelle,”
Brittney Cooper, an associate professor at Rutgers University, dissects Obama and Beyoncé's “mutual girl crush.”
“The curiosity is not that Michelle Obama has an inner Beyoncé,” writes Cooper, “it is rather
that this quintessence of
twenty-first-century Black ladyhood admits to it.”
In this latest visual love letter
to Beyoncé, Obama is not only
admitting to her “inner Beyoncé,”
she’s reveling in it. Playing dressup with an image that evokes
badassery and “slaying.”
It is a full-on deviation from
the former first lady playbook.
She is ripping that up in one
potent image.
In one of her final interviews as
first lady, Obama told Oprah Winfrey that she longed for a “normal” life after living in the nation’s fish bowl. So it seems
Her predecessors have
generally maintained
the traditional
first lady veneer
post-White House.
counterintuitive for her to participate in this such a public display
of adulation for one of the world’s
most famous women.
Add to that the controversial
nature of the look — which hearkens to Beyoncé in one of her
more militant moments. Remember that satirical New Yorker cover, which cast Michelle Obama as
a fist-bumping, combat bootwearing, afro’d commando? That
image, Obama has said, “knocked
[her] back.”
“That was one of those things
that you just sort of think, ‘Dang,
you don’t even know me,’ you
know?” Obama told Winfrey.
“And then I thought, okay, well,
let me live my life out loud so that
people can then see and then
judge for themselves.”
Her predecessors have generally maintained the traditional first
lady veneer post-White House. At
age 53, Obama is taking a different approach, embracing a pop
icon that her two teenage daughters also love (though maybe not
as much).
Mrs. Obama’s portrait exists
alongside those of the nation’s
demurely smiling first ladies, but
she makes clear that it also belongs amid the retinue of black
women celebrating Beyoncé.
She’s there with Serena Williams,
with Beyoncé’s 5-year-old daughter, Blue Ivy, with the other members of Destiny’s Child, and with
90-something Hattie White,
grandmother of Beyoncé’s husband, Jay-Z.
If there are people who are still
wondering whether Michelle
Obama is done carrying the mantle of first lady, wonder no more.
She is done.
krissah.thompson@washpost.com
helena.andrews@washpost.com
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C3
RE
Dad has found a new love, but daughter doesn’t want him to give up on Mom
Adapted from a recent online discussion.
woman, although none of us kids
want to hear about it.
— Anonymous
Dear Carolyn: My
Anonymous: He says he should
have left earlier, so I’m not sure
what I can add with my opinion.
Here’s how I suggest looking at
this whole situation: There were
no good answers.
What everyone wanted,
presumably, was for your parents
to keep loving each other to the
end. That didn’t happen, and it’s
not surprising because — all
things being equal — lasting
affection is always a combination
of effort and luck.
The effort part, of course, is
what you put into it, including
your self-knowledge throughout
your time together, the wisdom of
dad fell in love
with someone else
and left my mom,
who thought their
30-year marriage
was great, as did we. They had
lived apart for a few years due to
work, and my father said they had
grown apart for years and he
wasn’t in love.
Obviously leaving for another
person was wrong, but should he
have left my mom when he knew
there was no love left? He
acknowledges that he should
have tried years earlier. And he
says he is deeply in love with this
Carolyn
Hax
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
your choice of mate, and the
energy you devote to each other
and to your shared lives.
The luck part includes the
things you can’t control, which
are mainly the obstacles you run
across — be they boredom or
tragedy or anything in between —
and your mate’s responses and
reactions to these.
So, maybe they chose wrong
upfront, or your dad’s effort
flagged, or your mom’s did, or
both, and the few-year absence
came into play, and the new
woman presented herself . . .
And there you are. Your dad
either remains in his marriage
with his heart elsewhere; or he
remains and makes an effort to
love your mom again as he once
did (or in some new and
improved way); or leaves the
marriage.
While it looks as if the two
“stay” options are the better ones
than leaving, I advise anyone
processing news like this to put
themselves not in the position of
the person who left, but of the
person left behind: Would you
want a spouse who doesn’t love
you anymore to return to you
solely out of duty? In some
circumstances I suppose I might,
but in general I think, “Don’t do
me any favors.”
It’s normal to have all these
questions going through your
mind, normal to be angry at your
dad, normal not to want to hear of
his new love — but for your longterm well-being, do try on the
“there were no good answers” idea.
Even if you decide it doesn’t
apply here, I think it’ll come in
handy another time. We humans
tend to create so many uses for it.
Re: Anonymous: You’re gonna
fall out of love, or stop loving
someone, and people are going to
stop loving you, maybe many
times. It’ll happen to you; it
happens to others; it happened to
your parents.
And you don’t know the whole
story.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
The skinny on diversity?
Fashion’s figuring it out.
FASHION FROM C1
ground — the place where designers spin out their wildest fantasies, and where the public receives its notions of fashion at its
most glamorous and rarefied.
And the message, in the mid2000s, was that high-end fashion
was for emaciated white teenagers.
The ranks of editors and designers were lacking in diversity,
too. There were no editors-inchief of major fashion publications who were black. The rising
generation of designers who had
captured the industry’s attention
were mostly white — sometimes
Asian, but rarely black, Latino or
even female. Plus-size women
were not part of the fashion conversation. And gender fluidity
had yet to become an aesthetic
interest.
In 2007, activist Bethann
Hardison organized a “town hall”
meeting to start a conversation
about fashion’s worsening diversity problem. In 2013, she meticulously tracked designers’ hiring
practices and publicized the results. The lack of inclusiveness
was striking. And Hardison unflinchingly called such practices
“racist.”
Now, the industry looks significantly different from the days of
clone-like waifs, golden-haired
muses and magazine mastheads
that read like the Social Register.
There is greater recognition that
fashion needs to change.
Last year, after designer Marc
Jacobs featured models — many
of them white — wearing fanciful
dreadlocks in his spring 2017 runway show, social media lit up in
anger because of his failure to
acknowledge the hairstyle’s history within black communities. Six
months later, his fall 2017 show
was an ode to hip-hop; he cast
mostly models of color and included show notes lauding the
influence of black youth.
Fashion has also had several
landmark moments: A black man
has been appointed editor in chief
of British Vogue and a black woman is at the helm of Teen Vogue.
Joan Smalls, who was born in
Puerto Rico, became Estee Lauder’s first Latina spokesmodel.
French Vogue featured a transgender model on its cover.
There are more models of color
on major runways. A range of
designers have included plus-size
models and older women in
shows and advertising. A more
diverse group of designers, including four black men, make up
the 10 finalists vying for the
CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund
award.
Women
are
also
well-represented.
“I think fashion is becoming
more democratized,” says Henderson — for consumers as well as
those hoping to build a career in
the industry.
As fashion designers unveil
their spring 2018 collections over
the next few weeks, it will be an
opportunity to see whether fashion’s forward trajectory continues or stalls. “There’s a consensus
about having an inclusive runway,” says Bart. “I’m hopeful at
this stage.”
Bart has been working in fashion for 30 years, and the first
model he represented, back in
1986, was a young black woman
who was part Russian. When a
jewelry company was looking to
hire someone “tall, pretty and
effervescent,” Bart suggested her.
The company hemmed and
hawed and “finally said, ‘We’re
not looking for black people.’ I
dropped the phone.” He ultimately got her the job after traveling to
personally show them her portfolio.
After Hardison’s 2007 town
hall, Bart considered his place in
the fashion business. As the head
of one of the industry’s larger
agencies, with a roster including
Smalls, Kate Moss and a host of
celebrities, he decided to help
lead the way.
“I think the industry got lazy,”
Bart says. “We’ve got to start
telling [clients] what they need.
When people say no, we have to
tell them why they’re wrong.”
That’s why he decided not to
simply target Graham for the
plus-size market, but for womenswear in general. On the company’s website, she and fellow
plus-size models Candice Huffine
and Marquita Pring are not segregated in a separate category or
called “plus-size.” They are simply
models. Graham has appeared on
the cover of American Vogue and
in runway shows alongside whippet-thin models. She has her own
line of lingerie.
What the fashion industry does
is important to the broader culture, Bart says, recalling actress
Lupita Nyong’o’s heartfelt speech
about finding validation of her
own dark-skinned beauty in the
images of Sudanese-born model
Alek Wek, whom IMG signed
some 20 years ago.
“It’s okay if people are resistant,” he says. “They will change if
you stay the course.”
The website the Fashion Spot,
which tracks diversity on the runway, has tallied about 30 percent
nonwhite models in recent seasons. There are models in hijabs,
models with vitiligo, models with
physical disabilities. The question is no longer who isn’t represented but how to make that
inclusiveness feel organic rather
than self-consciously trendy.
The need to change is not simply moral, Bart says, but also
financially smart. “The Internet
changed everything. Anyone can
pull up anything online. If you
want that consumer, you need to
reflect who they are.” If consumers don’t like what they see, they
are likely to make their displeasure heard.
The Vogue website has become
a more diverse, global experience
than the print magazine, speaking to “more people and different
people,” says Sally Singer, creative
digital director. It even reads as if
it is written by a variety of voices
that share a common interest,
rather than the single, dominant
voice of print.
“I don’t think it’s a conscious
decision,” says Chioma Nnadi, the
website’s fashion news director.
“Our staff is just very diverse and
very young.”
Vogue’s digital natives roam
freely and report on everything
from the baati, a classic Somali
cotton dress favored by hijabwearing model Halima Aden to
the personal aesthetics of people
who identify as “they.” While
Vogue might have written about
these subjects in the past, Singer
says, it’s doubtful that those stories would have found a readership within those communities.
“Now, they’re sharing it on Facebook.”
The Internet is also broadening the ranks of designers. Ten
years ago, Henderson founded
Harlem’s Fashion Row, a production company aimed at supporting multicultural designers who
were absent from the top fashion
weeks, the store racks at influential retail outlets and the pages of
mainstream glossies.
Back then, “I could barely
count three designers of color. . .
making a mark and getting the
attention of the fashion industry,”
Henderson says. Today, she can
rattle off nearly a dozen. Social
media and e-commerce have lowered the barriers to success, making it easier for designers to connect directly with customers.
Designers can market themselves around the globe with a
single website and an Instagram
account. If an accepting audience
isn’t in New York or Los Angeles,
perhaps there’s one in Indianapolis or Tupelo, Singapore or Qatar.
One of the Harlem’s Fashion
Row designers, for example,
found his fan base in Japan. Reuben Reuel’s Demestik collection,
JONAS GUSTAVSSON/MCV PHOTO FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Marc Jacobs, who got in hot water for featuring white models in dreadlocks without racial context, had more diverse models this year.
FRAZER HARRISON/GETTY IMAGES
worn by Ava DuVernay as well as
Beyoncé, sells on Etsy.com. It’s
not Bergdorf Goodman, but it
gets the job done.
“For designers 10 years ago, it
was just all about the art. They
didn’t want to hear anything business-wise,” Henderson says. “I
was different, too. Something in
the economy woke us up.”
A recession will do that.
As the spring 2018 shows begin, the conversation about diversity has expanded to include the
role of immigrants in the industry
and the rights of women. Diversity is not just about the imperative
of an inclusive runway. It is also
about identity: both personal and
national.
“Ten years ago, people never
wanted you to refer to them as a
‘black designer.’ Just call me a
‘designer’! Now, with Black Lives
Matter, with the political climate,
people are proud to be a black
designer. They’re proud to say it
to people in the fashion industry,”
Henderson says. “I even have
more stylists who say they have
clients who [specifically] want to
wear a black designer.”
Diversity is political. It’s a form
of protest.
When Vogue posted a story in
March about women in East L.A.,
it happened to coincide with a
conversation about a rise in ICE
raids under the Trump administration. It was the fashion site’s
most-shared story — in the middle of Paris Fashion Week.
“I thought we had lots of momentum after the civil rights
movement and then we have Nazis go marching through Charlottesville,” Bart says. “This is going
to be our resistance: Showing the
totality of humanity.”
robin.givhan@washpost.com
Joan Smalls, who was born in Puerto Rico, is the first Latina to be the face of Estee Lauder.
“Ten years ago, people never wanted you to
refer to them as a ‘black designer.’ Just call me
a ‘designer’! Now, with Black Lives Matter,
with the political climate, people are proud to
be a black designer.”
Brandice Henderson, founder of Harlem’s Fashion Row
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
9/7/17
7:00
7:30
8:00
BROADCAST CHANNELS
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
◆ News
◆ Football Night/America
NFL Football: Kansas City Chiefs at New England Patriots (Live)
4.1 WRC (NBC)
◆ TMZ
◆ Beat Shazam
◆ Love Connection
Mod Fam
Fox 5 News at Ten
5.1 WTTG (Fox)
◆ Wheel
◆ Jeopardy!
◆ Battle of the
◆ Battle of the
◆ The Gong Show
7.1 WJLA (ABC)
◆ ET
◆ Big Bang
◆ Zoo
(8:31) ◆ Mom ◆ Big Brother (Live)
9.1 WUSA (CBS) Off Script
Enamorándome
Mi marido tiene familia
La tierra prometida
14.1 WFDC (UNI) ◆ La Rosa de Guadalupe
Bones
Bones
20.1 WDCA (MNTV) ◆ Family Feud ◆ Family Feud Fox 5 News ◆ Dish Nat.
Money
Collectibles Artworks
Murder Maps
Movie: Inside Peace (2014)
22.1 WMPT (PBS) ◆ Business
The Brokenwood Mysteries
Endeavour on Masterpiece
26.4 WETA (PBS) PBS NewsHour
France 24 Programming
Nestor Burma
30.1 WNVC (MHz) France 24 Programming
POV
Nobody Dies Democracy Now!
32.1 WHUT (PBS) Tavis Smiley Rick Steves
◆ Whose?
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50.1 WDCW (CW) Mike & Molly Mike & Molly ◆ Penn & Teller: Fool Us
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Murder-Laci
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(5:30) Movie: Twister ★★★ Movie: Independence Day ★★★ (1996)
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AMC
Yukon Men: Roughing It
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(5:30) Movie: Blue Streak ★ Movie: Life ★★ (1999)
Martin
Martin
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Million Dollar Watch What Below Deck
Flipping Out
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Watch
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(6:00) Naked and Afraid
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Discovery
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Open
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(Live)
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(Live)
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30 for 30
30 for 30
ESPN2
Chopped
Chopped
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(5:05) Movie: Forrest Gump ★★★★
(8:20) Movie: Crazy, Stupid, Love. ★★★ (2011)
The 700 Club
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(5:00) Movie: Furious 7
Movie: Snow White and the Huntsman ★★ (2012)
Snow White & Huntsman
FX
Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing The Middle
The Middle
The Middle
The Middle
Golden Girls Golden Girls
Hallmark
Movie: Garage Sale Mystery: The Beach Murder (2017)
Murder, She Wrote
Hallmark M&M Movie: Wedding Planner Mystery (2014)
Austin
VICE
Movie: Jackie ★★★ (2016)
Insecure
Under, Lights Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them
HBO
Love It or List It
Flip or Flop
Flip or Flop
Flip or Flop Desert
Hunters
Hunt Intl
Desert Flip
Flip or Flop
HGTV
Mountain Men
Mnt. Men
Mountain Men
Ice Road Truckers
(11:03) Mountain Men
History
Project Runway
Project Runway
Project Runway
Runway
(10:47) Project Runway
Lifetime
MLB Baseball: Philadelphia Phillies at Washington Nationals (Live)
Nats
Football
Bensinger
MLB Baseball
MASN
Hardball Matthews
All In With Chris Hayes
Rachel Maddow Show
The Last Word
The 11th Hour
MSNBC
Wild ’n Out
Wild ’n Out
Wild ’n Out
Wild ’n Out
Wild ’n Out
Wild ’n Out
Wild ’n Out
Wild ’n Out
Wild ’n Out
Wild ’n Out
MTV
Great Migrations
Great Migrations
Fight for Life
Fight for Life
Nat’l Geographic Wild Colombia
Henry Danger Henry Danger Movie: Shrek Forever After ★★ (2010)
Full House
Full House
Friends
Friends
Nickelodeon
Friends
Friends
Stephen King’s It
Spike
(6:30) Movie: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory ★★★
Movie: The Princess Bride ★★★ (1987)
Princess
Syfy
Seinfeld
Seinfeld
Seinfeld
Seinfeld
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Guest
Conan
TBS
A Streetcar Named Desire
Movie: Fitzcarraldo ★★★ (1982)
(10:45) Movie: Stroszek ★★★ (1977)
TCM
My 600-Lb. Life
My 600-Lb. Life
My 600-Lb. Life
(11:02) My 600-Lb. Life
TLC
Bones
Movie: American Sniper ★★★ (2014)
Movie: Miracle ★★★
TNT
Mysteries at the Museum
Mysteries at the Museum
Mysteries-Museum
Mysteries at the Museum
Mysteries at the Museum
Travel
Inside Jokes Inside Jokes Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers The Chris Gethard Show
TruTV
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
(8:12) M*A*S*H
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
King
King
TV Land
Cosby Show Cosby Show Movie: New Jack City ★★★ (1991)
Unsung Hollywood
Unsung
TV One
NCIS
NCIS
NCIS
NCIS
The Sinner
USA Network
Movie: Space Jam ★★ (1996)
Movie: Malibu’s Most Wanted ★★ (2003)
Movie: Space Jam ★★
VH1
GE Washington
Govt. Matters On Your Side SportsTalk
ABC News
News at 10pm
Govt. Matters On Your Side
WNC8
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
WGN
EDDY CHEN/ABC
The Gong Show (ABC at 10) Isla Fisher, left, executive producer Will Arnett
and Courteney Cox judge a talent pool that includes an ’80s cover band
and a man with a pizza-dough-centered acrobatic routine.
(All times Eastern.)
Football Night in America
(NBC at 7:30) The NFL pregame
show returns ahead of the season
opener pitting the Kansas City
Chiefs against the host New
England Patriots.
around her as she copes with a
family tragedy.
Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders:
Making the Team (CMT at 10) The
rookies get media training.
LATE NIGHT
Battle of the Network Stars (ABC
at 8) ABC airs two episodes of this
celeb-studded competition show.
The first features Taye Diggs,
Danny Bonaduce and Beverley
Mitchell. Vivica A. Fox, Julie Benz
and Nicole Eggert appear in the
second.
Daily Show (Comedy Central at 11)
Zac Posen.
Big Brother (CBS at 9) Another
eviction leaves the remaining
players vying to be named Head of
Household.
Kimmel (ABC at 11:35) Christian
Slater, Abbi Jacobson and Ilana
Glazer, Khalid.
Project Runway (Lifetime at 9)
Demi Lovato is this week’s guest
judge as Heidi Klum tasks the
designers with creating sleepwear.
Fallon (NBC at 11:34) Reese
Witherspoon, U2.
Colbert (CBS at 11:35) Sen. Bernie
Sanders (I-Vt.), Caitriona Balfe, the
National.
Corden (CBS at 12:37) Dana
Carvey, Lake Bell, All-American
Rejects.
Meyers (NBC at 12:37) Seth
MacFarlane, Sheryl Crow.
Girlfriends’ Guide to Divorce
(Bravo at 10) Abby’s friends rally
— Bethonie Butler
More at washingtonpost.com/tv
LEGEND: Bold indicates new or live programs
In HBO’s seedy 1970s Times Square,
there’s no shame in paying for . . . TV
TV FROM C1
return Times Square to its slimiest
state. An early panoramic shot in
the first episode features James
Franco (who stars as morally differentiated twin brothers) crossing on foot through the traffic of
Times Square near “the deuce” (an
old nickname for 42nd Street) and
the overall effect is breathtaking
in its attention to detail. The people who made this show are desperately in love with the New York
of a half century ago, which will
delight some viewers just as sure
as it could bore others. (After all,
who among us hasn’t had to sit
through some New Yorker’s recollections of the city in a more authentic period?)
“The Deuce” re-creates this
world so it can study it on a personal and communal level, rather
than ogle it like a perv. Where
“Vinyl” was addicted to atmospherics and its eventually tedious tales of excessive rock-androll living, “The Deuce,” in the
more subtle way we’ve come to
expect from Simon, is an earnest
venture that sets out to retrace the
latter-day history of the sex industry.
An overall theme (amply demonstrated but never directly stated in these eight episodes) could
be about the mutual exchange of
power between men and women,
law and justice, boss and employee — all of it seen at a messy,
intimate and even biological level.
“The Deuce” returns us to the
familiar, “Wire”-esque territory of
the corrupt transaction and its
place in human nature.
Please note that I did not write:
It’s like “The Wire,” only with
hookers! “The Wire” was “The
Wire” (and “Treme” was “Treme”
and “Show Me a Hero” was “Show
Me a Hero”) and a viewer who
keeps expecting Simon and company to replicate “The Wire” could
easily make a “Treme”-type mistake of missing the artfully complicated story that’s being told
here.
Franco plays both Vincent and
Frankie Martino — a role that
requires a little camera magic and
a considerable if not always successful effort by both the actor and
the writers to ensure that we don’t
constantly mix them up.
Hard-working Vincent is a
manager at two bars, one of them
in a failing Korean restaurant in
PAUL SCHIRALDI/HBO
As a prostitute pushing 40 in
HBO’s “The Deuce,” Maggie
Gyllenhaal shows yet again that
she can do justice to any role.
Times Square. The less trustworthy twin, Frankie, is a gambling
addict in hock to bookies and
criminals. Vincent has just left his
philandering wife (and their kids)
and moved into a fleabag hotel;
Frankie is always on the run.
Through mob backing, Vincent
gets a chance to operate his own
bar off Times Square, and Frankie
comes around, wanting a piece of
the action. You can get all the way
through the series and still never
quite understand why it needs the
Martino brothers front and center, if at all. Franco’s performance(s) are fine, but not exactly
standout.
◆
High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
Maggie Gyllenhaal co-stars as
Eileen Merrell, who works Times
Square as a prostitute named Candy. Nearing 40, Candy is something of a curiosity among the
younger women with whom she
shares the sidewalk — she is selfemployed and doesn’t have a
pimp. For what she gains in independence, Candy sacrifices in protection, but her motivations for
keeping 100 percent of her earnings are soon made clear: She’s
giving money to her mother, who
takes care of her son.
Gyllenhaal, who has proved
time and again that she can excel
in just about any part out there, is
sublime in every episode of “The
Deuce,” serving as a strong, constant reminder that this story really belongs to its female characters, despite an oversupply of
male characters and male dominance.
She’s also the surest path to an
overall through-line that hints at
potential future seasons, as Candy
develops an interest in producing
pornographic films just as New
York begins to loosen (or neglect)
the obscenity laws that prevented
dirty movies from showing explicit acts. The 1972 big-screen premiere of “Deep Throat” serves as
an obvious but meaningful — pardon the expression — climax. If
nothing else, “The Deuce” offers a
good opportunity for those of us
living in the age of Pornhub to stop
and consider what got us here.
Other than Gyllenhaal, the
show’s most notable asset is the
ensemble of supporting players
who play the prostitutes and
pimps. It should come as no surprise that they’re the star attractions, given the subject matter, but
it is notable, after so many years of
stereotyping those in the sex
trade, that they are given a sense
of dignity, in a way that makes me
wonder if Simon and Pelecanos
and their co-writers have been
paying special attention to Netflix’s “Orange Is the New Black.”
As soon as you meet someone
like Darlene (Dominique Fishback), Ashley (Jamie Neumann),
Ruby (Pernell Walker) or freshoff-the-bus Lori (Emily Meade),
you’ll want to know everything
about them, including how they
arrived at sex work. Even when it
spends far too much time on cops
and precinct politics and mafia
machinations, “The Deuce” seems
committed to giving these women
more than just an auxiliary presence, which is striking, given how
many Times Square prostitutes
over the years have been sacrificed at TV’s altar of the almighty
crime procedural.
Likewise, “The Deuce” skillfully
lends just enough shape and
depth to a trio of pimps named
Larry, C.C. and Rodney (Gbenga
Akinnagbe, Gary Carr and Method Man), whose garish wardrobes
and abusive behaviors hew to the
very image that turned “ ’70s
pimp” into a distasteful Halloween costume. While “The Deuce”
avoids over-humanizing these misogynistic manipulators, it respects them as something other
than just menacing brutes. They
are carrying along a set of cultural
traditions — twisted, perhaps, but
similar enough to the cultural
roots of the Irish cops and Italian
mobsters who get in their way.
“The Deuce” doesn’t endorse
the world it portrays and, perhaps
underscoring its anthropological
or reportorial tendencies, it introduces a character named Sandra
Washington (Natalie Paul), a
young journalist who works for an
African American newspaper and
starts hanging out at Times
Square, hoping to write an indepth story about prostitutes,
pimps and their cyclical encounters with the law.
She’s interested, you’re interested, I’m interested — at its most
elemental, “The Deuce” is a show
about the mysteries and power
and infinite market potential of
sex. How could we not be interested and still call ourselves human?
hank.stuever@washpost.com
The Deuce (90 minutes) premieres
Sunday at 9 p.m. on HBO.
THEATRE
José Zorilla’s
Don Juan Tenorio
Thru Oct 1
Thurs – Sat at 8 pm
Sun at 2 pm
Be seduced by this sensual look at the legendary lover
as he pursues his vampiric lust and is redeemed by love.
World premiere adaptation by Nando López.
GALA Theatre
3333 14th Street, NW
202-234-7174
www.galatheatre.org
$30-$45
In Spanish with
English surtitles
OPERA
Saturday at 7
Sunday at 2
Giuseppe Verdi /
Antonio Ghislanzoni
“Aida”
Sept 13, 15 & 21 at 7:30
Sept 16 & 18 at 7
Sept 17 at 2
Northern Virginia Chorale
Mon, 9/11/17, 7pm
Mon, 9/18/17, 7pm
Mon, 9/25/17, 7pm
The timeless conflict of duty versus desire rises like a
pyramid in Verdi's towering, impassioned epic. Featuring
striking sets and costumes inspired by visionary artist
RETNA, Aida is a love triangle for the ages, laid bare
against the backdrop of two warring societies spinning out
of control.
Kennedy Center
Opera House
kennedy-center.org/wno
or call (202) 467-4600
Casting available at
kennedy-center.org/wno
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
In Italian with
Projected
English Titles.
OPENINGS & AUDITIONS
Open Auditions
Come join us for a fantastic and engaging 2017-2018
season of music, including Forrest’s “Requiem for the
Living”, Handel’s “Messiah” with orchestra & soloists, and a
variety of other musical genres.
St. Mark’s Lutheran Church
5800 Backlick Rd. Springfield, VA
www.northernvirginiachorale.org
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
NA
16-2898
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C5
RE
‘Snowy Day’ stamps honor book that made an indelible imprint
STAMP FROM C1
cultural vacuum in which kids
could suck up enlightened or toxic ideas about others.
Which is why I’m particularly
grateful for the first books my
parents read to me. Half a century
later, the warm images of “The
Snowy Day,” by Ezra Jack Keats,
are still vivid in my mind. Published in 1962, Keats’s picture
book was the first time I’d seen an
African American in the center of
his own story. And “The Snowy
Day” contributed to my own story
in the most positive way. There
was a child like me, making snow
angels, sliding down a hill, looking at his footprints — crunch,
crunch, crunch.
Looking back, Keats (19161983) said that working on that
book turned his life around. Millions of other lives were touched
— and are still touched — by
Peter’s joyous winter day.
“None of the manuscripts I’d
been illustrating featured any
black kids — except for token
blacks in the background,” Keats
wrote. “My book would have him
there simply because he should
have been there all along.”
This week, the U.S. Postal Service started taking preorders for a
set of four stamps based on
Keats’s illustrations from “The
Snowy Day.” The images, designed by Antonio Alcalá of Alexandria, Va., show little Peter playing outdoors in his red snowsuit.
The stamps will be dedicated at a
free ceremony open to the public
on Oct. 4 at the Brooklyn Public
Library in New York, not too far
from Keats’s birthplace.
At a moment in our history
when America seems torn between moving forward or slipping back into the morass of
state-encouraged racism, these
four postage stamps commemorating an old children’s book
won’t pass any legislation or
change any minds. A 49-cent
MOVIE DIRECTORY
It (R) CC: 7:45-8:30-9:15
Home Again (PG-13) CC:
7:00-9:30
It (R) 7:00-10:15
AMC Loews Uptown 1
3426 Connecticut Avenue N.W.
It (R) CC: 7:00-10:15
Close Encounters of the Third
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
(PG) CC: 3:40
AMC Mazza Gallerie
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC: 1:30
Kidnap (R) CC: 1:50
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 4:10
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
1:00-6:40
Tulip Fever (R) CC: (!) 1:40-4:20
The Big Sick (R) CC: 4:10
It (R) CC: (!) 7:00-8:00-10:00
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
1:50-4:35-7:20-10:00
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC:
1:40-4:00
Home Again (PG-13) CC:
7:00-9:20
Wind River (R) CC: 2:40-5:257:10-9:40
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC:
3:50-9:45
Jean-Michel Cousteau's Secret
Ocean 3D (NR)
National Parks Adventure 3D
(America Wild 3D) (NR) 10:251:10-4:50
Amazon Adventure 3D (NR)
11:20-2:05-3:55
MARYLAND
AFI Silver Theatre Cultural Ctr
8633 Colesville Road
Felony (NR) 1:15
The Absent One (Fasandraeberne) (NR) 7:30
Dunkirk (PG-13) 12:30-2:45-5:007:15-9:30
Step (PG) 1:15-3:05-5:05-7:059:05
The Godfather: Part II (R) 3:30
Scott Pilgrim vs. the World
(PG-13) 9:45
AMC Academy 8
6198 Greenbelt Road
The Dark Tower (PG-13) CC: 4:10
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC:
1:15-3:30
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
(PG) CC: 1:45-4:00-6:20
Kidnap (R) CC: 8:40
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG13) CC: 5:00
Cars 3 (G) CC: 2:15
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
2:40-5:10-10:00
Albert Einstein Planetarium - War for the Planet of the Apes
National Air and Space Museum (PG-13) CC: 6:00
6th Street and Independence Ave SW Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 2:004:40-7:15-9:55
To Space and Back 11:00AM
Dark Universe Space Show (NR) Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30 1:00-6:45
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:00- The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
1:00-3:45-7:30-10:15
1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
The Stars Tonight (NR) 10:30AM Girls Trip (R) CC: 1:30-4:207:10-10:10
Angelika Pop-Up
It (R) CC: (!) 7:00-8:00-9:10-10:00
at Union Market
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 2:00-7:00
Maudie (PG-13) CC: 11:40-4:30
Landline (R) CC: 1:15-5:15
Marjorie Prime 11:30-1:30-3:305:30-7:30
Menashe (PG) 11:15-3:15-7:15
AMC Center Park 8
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC:
1:15-3:45
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
(PG) CC: 12:30
Kidnap (R) CC: 2:45-7:35
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
Avalon Theatre
2:15-4:45
5612 Connecticut Avenue
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 2:00Tulip Fever (R) 12:00-2:304:30-7:05-9:45
5:00-7:30
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
Columbus 1:00-3:20-5:40-8:00
12:30-3:30-6:30-9:30
Landmark
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 12:45Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
3:00-5:15-7:30-10:00
807 V Street, NW
Detroit (R) CC: 6:00-9:10
Baby Driver (R) CC: 1:45
Girls Trip (R) CC: 4:50-9:40
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 12:15Home Again (PG-13) CC: (!)
2:45-5:00
7:15-9:45
It (R) CC: 7:15-10:00
Wind River (R) CC: 1:00-3:45Atomic Blonde (R) CC: 2:35-4:30 6:25-9:00
Ingrid Goes West (R) CC: 12:20- Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC:
2:35-4:45-7:40-9:55
1:15-4:15
Gook 12:15-2:25-4:35-7:20-9:30 It (R) CC: 7:00-10:15
Girls Trip (R) CC: 12:00-5:00
AMC Columbia 14
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 12:0010300 Little Patuxent Parkway
2:30-5:00-7:35-10:00
The Dark Tower (PG-13) CC:
Home Again (PG-13) CC:
2:00-10:20
7:30-9:45
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
Landmark E Street Cinema
(PG) CC: 11:40-2:15
555 11th Street NW
Baby Driver (R) CC: 3:10
Polina, danser sa vie (NR) 1:00- Cars 3 (G) 12:20
4:00-7:00-9:30
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13)
Tulip Fever (R) CC: 1:15-4:1511:10-1:40-4:20
7:15-9:40
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC:
Good Time (R) CC: 1:35
11:05-1:30
The Big Sick (R) CC: 1:00-4:00- Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG7:00-9:30
13) CC: 4:00
Wind River (R) CC: 1:05-4:05Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: (!)
7:05-9:35
11:00-1:40-4:25-7:10-10:00
Columbus 1:20-4:20-7:20-9:40
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 4:35-9:40
I Do... Until I Don't (R) 1:25-4:25- Tulip Fever (R) CC: 11:00-1:307:25-9:45
4:05-6:40-9:20
The Trip to Spain CC: 1:30-4:30- The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
7:30-9:40
10:50-1:35-4:25-7:15-10:05
Landmark West End Cinema Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 11:201:50-4:30-7:05
2301 M Street NW
It (R) CC: (!) 7:00-7:40-8:10-9:00Step (PG) CC: 2:45-5:15-7:45
An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to 9:30-10:10
Power (PG) CC: 2:30-5:00-7:30 Wind River (R) CC: (!) 11:00-1:404:15-6:50-9:25
Patti Cake$ (R) CC: 2:15-4:45Girls Trip (R) CC: 11:05-4:35-7:30
7:15
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC:
Medal of Honor Theater - NMMC 12:05-6:00
18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
Home Again (PG-13) CC:
We, the Marines (NR) 10:007:00-9:30
11:00-12:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00 Valley of Bones (R) 11:50-2:40Regal Gallery Place Stadium 14 5:25
Terminator 2: Judgment Day in
701 Seventh Street Northwest
3D (R) (!) 3:25
Kidnap (R) CC: 10:30
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC: EXTRAORDINARY 7:00
Marvel's Inhumans (NR) (!) 4:35
12:15-2:35-5:05
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 5:30-8:05- Close Encounters of the Third
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
10:35
(PG) (!) 12:00-3:20
Cars 3 (G) CC: 12:15-2:55
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 11:20-2:00
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC:
It (R) CC: (!) 7:00-10:15
12:05-2:40-5:20-7:50-10:35
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC: AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18
1:10-4:00-10:15
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
Atomic Blonde (R) CC: 12:45
It (R) CC: (!) 7:00-10:05
It (R) CC: 7:00-10:30
Home Again (PG-13) CC: (!)
Girls Trip (R) CC: 3:45-7:25-9:25 7:00-9:25
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 1:20AMC Loews
3:45-6:00-8:15
St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 12:5011115
Mall Circle
4:00-6:55-9:40
The Dark Tower (PG-13) CC: 4:45
EXTRAORDINARY (!) 7:00
Despicable
Me
3 (PG) CC:
Close Encounters of the Third
Kind 40th Anniversary Release 2:15-4:30
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
(PG) 12:00-3:15-6:45-10:05
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin (PG) CC: 1:30-4:00
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PGIMAX Theater
13) CC: 10:30-6:30
601 Independence Avenue SW
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D
(!) 11:30-2:00-5:15
(NR) 2:40
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC:
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 4:20
11:55-2:30
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the War for the Planet of the Apes
Sea 3D (NR) 11:00-1:15-3:30
(PG-13) CC: 11:00AM
Dream Big: Engineering Our
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC:
World: An IMAX 3D Experience 10:45-1:30-4:15
12:25
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:25- 11:00-1:45-4:30-7:15-10:00
11:50-2:05-5:15
It (R) CC: (!) 7:00-7:15-7:30-9:15Smithsonian - Samuel C.
9:45-10:00-10:15-10:30
Johnson IMAX Theater
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: (!)
10th Street and Constitution Avenue NW 11:30-2:00-4:30-7:00
Girls Trip (R) CC: 11:15-2:15Dinosaurs Alive! 3D (NR)
4:30-7:45-10:45
12:15-3:00
bookworld@washpost.com
Ron Charles is the editor of Book
World.
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
Home Again (PG-13) CC: (!)
7:00-9:30
Wind River (R) CC: (!) 11:45-2:155:00-7:45-10:30
AMC Magic Johnson
Capital Ctr 12
800 Shoppers Way
It (R) CC: 7:00-9:30
ArcLight Bethesda
7101 Democracy Boulevard
Despicable Me 3 (PG) 12:15
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
(PG) 12:25-3:30-4:55-6:50
Cars 3 (G) 11:40AM
Dunkirk (PG-13) 11:05-2:40-5:057:10-10:35
Tulip Fever (R) 11:50-2:25-5:107:20-10:05
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG13) 11:55-2:30-4:50-7:40-9:40
Annabelle: Creation (R) 12:202:35-5:45-8:10
Wonder Woman (PG-13) 12:30
Atomic Blonde (R) 4:25-10:10
Girls Trip (R) 1:30-4:35
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) 2:35-4:456:55-9:05
Home Again (PG-13) 7:15-8:059:30-10:15
The Big Sick (R) 11:15-1:50-4:307:40-10:20
Wind River (R) 12:10-2:45-4:557:50-10:40
Logan Lucky (PG-13) 11:25-2:054:40-7:25-9:35-10:45
Served Like a Girl CC: 11:301:25-5:15
The Glass Castle (PG-13) 12:001:40-4:00-7:35
Cars 3 (G) 3:25
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R)
12:05-2:15-5:25-10:25
It (R) 8:00-11:00
Ingrid Goes West (R) CC: 11:352:55-5:35-7:55
Baby Driver (R) 1:55
Close Encounters of the Third
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
(PG) 11:00-2:00-5:00
It (R) 7:00-7:30-9:00-10:00-10:30
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
(PG) 12:40
Cars 3 (G) 2:55
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13)
11:30-2:10-4:50-7:20-10:00
Dunkirk (PG-13) 11:10-1:40-4:20
Spider-Man: Homecoming
(PG-13) 6:00
Annabelle: Creation (R) 11:202:20-5:00-7:40-10:30
It (R) 7:00-9:00-10:00
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R)
11:00-1:50-4:40-7:30-10:20
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) 11:40-2:004:30-7:00-9:20
It (R) 8:00-11:00
Close Encounters of the Third
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
(PG) 12:00-3:20
Bow Tie Harbour 9
2474 Solomons Island Road
Tulip Fever (R) 10:50-1:50-4:307:20-9:50
Good Time (R) 5:10-10:30
Home Again (PG-13) 7:00-9:40
Wind River (R) 10:40-1:20-4:006:50-9:30
Logan Lucky (PG-13) 11:10-2:004:40-7:20-10:10
All Saints (PG) 11:30-2:10-4:50
The Glass Castle (PG-13) 11:002:20-7:40
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
Annabelle: Creation (R) 11:001:40-4:20
It (R) 7:00-10:10
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R)
1:10-4:00-7:05-9:55
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) 10:55-1:15
Home Again (PG-13) 7:00-9:45
Wind River (R) 12:30-3:30
EXTRAORDINARY 7:00
Close Encounters of the Third
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
(PG) 11:25-2:40
Annabelle: Creation (R) 11:001:40-4:20
It (R) 7:00-8:35-10:10-11:00
Hoyt's West Nursery Cinema 14
1591 West Nursery Road
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
(PG) CC: 12:10
Kidnap (R) CC: 2:45-5:15-7:35
Baby Driver (R) CC: 12:20-2:255:00-7:45-10:20
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
War for the Planet of the Apes
(PG-13) CC: 2:55
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 1:004:10-6:40
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG13) CC: 12:35-3:35-6:35-9:35
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC:
12:00-2:30-5:05-7:40-10:15
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
12:30-3:30-6:30-9:30
It (R) CC: 7:00-8:00-9:00-10:0011:00
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
12:00-1:30-4:30-7:15-10:05
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 12:002:15-4:30-6:05
Home Again (PG-13) CC:
7:00-9:20
Wind River (R) CC: 12:10-2:405:10-7:40-10:10
Girls Trip (R) CC: 1:10-4:157:10-9:55
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 12:304:20-7:05-9:50
All Saints (PG) CC: 1:50-4:25
Landmark
Bethesda Row Cinema
7235 Woodmont Avenue
Step (PG) CC: 1:40-3:40-5:40
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 1:006:50-9:20
The Glass Castle (PG-13) CC:
4:10
Home Again (PG-13) CC:
7:45-9:55
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 12:503:50-7:10-9:50
The Big Sick (R) CC: 1:20-4:207:20-9:30
Wind River (R) CC: 2:00-4:307:05-9:45
Menashe (PG) 1:30-3:30-5:307:40-10:00
The Trip to Spain CC: 1:10-4:407:30-9:40
I Do... Until I Don't (R) 1:45-4:457:00-9:20
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 1:154:15-10:30
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 12:002:30-5:00-8:05
The Big Sick (R) CC: 6:30-9:15
Arjun Reddy (NR) (!) 1:45-5:158:45
Vivegam (NR) (!) 7:00-10:15
EXTRAORDINARY (!) 7:00
Regal Hyattsville Royale
Stadium 14
6505 America Blvd.
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC:
12:30-3:30
Kidnap (R) CC: 1:15-3:30-5:458:00-10:15
Baby Driver (R) CC: 1:00-3:45Step (PG) 7:45
6:45-9:45
Menashe (PG) 5:30
Cars 3 (G) CC: 12:45-3:30-6:30Paragon Kentlands Stadium 10
9:15
629 Center Point Way
War for the Planet of the Apes
Despicable Me 3 (PG) 5:20-7:30 (PG-13) CC: 12:45-4:00-7:15Cars 3 (G) 4:35
10:30
Dunkirk (PG-13) 5:15-7:35-9:55 Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG- 2:00-5:00
13) 5:35-8:30
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC: 1:30Annabelle: Creation (R) 9:40
4:00-7:00
Wonder Woman (PG-13)
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 1:45-4:305:40-8:35
7:15-10:00
It (R) 7:00-9:50
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PGThe Hitman's Bodyguard (R)
13) CC: 12:30-3:45-7:00-10:15
5:10-7:45-10:20
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 1:15Home Again (PG-13) 7:00-9:10 4:15-7:30-10:15
The Big Sick (R) 5:10-7:40-10:15 Atomic Blonde (R) CC: 6:15-9:15
Wind River (R) 4:50-7:15-9:40
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
Logan Lucky (PG-13) 4:30
1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
The Glass Castle (PG-13)
It (R) CC: (!) 7:00-10:30
5:30-8:15
Girls Trip (R) CC: 1:45-4:457:45-10:45
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 12:303899 Branch Avenue
The Dark Tower (PG-13) 12:45- 3:00-5:30-8:00
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 10:30
3:20-6:10
The Dark Tower (PG-13) 9:45
Kidnap (R) 12:05-5:30
The Emoji Movie (PG) 12:15-2:30- The Big Sick (R) CC: 12:45-4:007:00-10:00
4:45-7:10
Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12
It (R) 7:45-8:35
14716 Baltimore Avenue
Girls Trip (R) 1:30-5:00
Detroit (R) 2:30-7:50
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R)
(PG) CC: 1:15-4:05-6:45
1:15-5:10-8:00
Kidnap (R) CC: 9:15
Annabelle: Creation (R) 12:30Baby Driver (R) CC: 10:30
3:00-5:30-8:15
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC:
12:40-3:30
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
Cars 3 (G) CC: 12:05-2:35
15200 Major Lansdale Boulevard
of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature Birth
12:30-3:00
(PG) CC: 2:55-5:15
Spider-Man:
Homecoming (PGBaby Driver (R) CC: 7:35-10:15 13) CC: 12:00-3:10-6:25-10:05
Cars 3 (G) CC: 1:35-4:40
Annabelle:
Creation
(R) CC: 1:00Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC: 3:50-6:30-9:30
3:10-5:55-8:25
Dunkirk
(PG-13)
CC: 5:15-7:50The Emoji Movie (PG) CC: 3:05- 10:20
5:35-8:00
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG- 1:25-4:30-7:15-10:15
13) CC: 3:20-6:25-9:30
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 1:00- 6:00-9:45
3:40-6:50-9:50
Girls Trip (R) CC: 12:45-3:45It (R) CC: (!) 7:00-9:30
7:30-10:25
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC: It (R) CC: 7:00-10:15
1:10-4:15-7:05-10:10
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 12:25Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 1:00- 3:15-6:15-9:25
3:25-5:50
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 12:00Ingrid Goes West (R) CC:
2:25-5:00-8:00
7:40-10:20
All Saints (PG) CC: 1:30-4:10Girls Trip (R) CC: 1:00-3:457:10-10:00
6:45-9:45
Close Encounters of the Third
The Big Sick (R) CC: 3:15-6:10- Kind 40th Anniversary Release
9:05
(PG) 12:00-3:30-5:30-9:45
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 1:00Regal Rockville Ctr Stadium 13
4:00-7:00-10:00
199 East Montgomery Avenue
Detroit (R) CC: 3:20-6:30-9:45
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
The Dark Tower (PG-13) 10:30
(PG)
CC: 1:00-4:00
All Saints (PG) CC: 1:30-4:20Baby Driver (R) CC: 1:15-7:00
7:25-10:05
Cars 3 (G) CC: 12:55-3:25
The Glass Castle (PG-13) CC:
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
1:25-4:25-10:25
1:30-3:55-7:15-9:45
Regal Cinemas Majestic
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 1:00Stadium 20 & IMAX
3:45-6:30
900 Ellsworth Drive
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PGCars 3 (G) CC: 12:45-3:25
13) CC: 12:50-3:35-9:20
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC: Annabelle: Creation (R) CC:
12:25-3:05-5:40-8:15-10:50
1:00-3:50-6:45
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 6:15-9:15 Tulip Fever (R) CC: 1:15-4:00Tulip Fever (R) CC: 1:20-4:506:45-10:15
7:45-10:30
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 1:55- 1:30-4:15-7:00-9:15
5:10-8:00-10:45
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC: 9:45
It (R) CC: 7:00-10:00
Wind River (R) CC: 12:45-3:30The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC: 6:00-8:45
1:45-4:35-7:30-10:20
It (R) CC: (!) 7:00-9:00-9:45-10:15
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC:
Girls Trip (R) CC: 4:05
1:00-1:05-3:20-3:25-6:00-6:05Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 12:458:30-8:35
3:00-5:45-8:00
Good Time (R) CC: 12:50-6:30
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 1:45Ingrid Goes West (R) CC:
4:30-6:00-10:00
3:35-9:25
Good Time (R) CC: 10:15
Patti Cake$ (R) CC: 10:50-10:55 Ingrid Goes West (R) CC:
Wind River (R) CC: 12:00-3:10- 7:45-9:00
6:00-9:00
The Big Sick (R) CC: 1:25-4:30All Saints (PG) CC: 1:10; 3:55
7:30
It (R) CC: (!) 7:00-10:00
Regal Waugh Chapel
Do It Like An Hombre (Hazlo
Stadium 12 & IMAX
como hombre) (R) 1:30-4:051419 South Main Chapel Way
6:45-9:45
The
Nut
Job 2: Nutty By Nature
Marvel's Inhumans (NR) (!)
(PG) CC: 1:00-3:30
12:00-2:25-4:50
Birth
of
the
Dragon (PG-13) CC:
Close Encounters of the Third
Kind 40th Anniversary Release 12:40-3:05-5:30
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC: 12:00(PG) 12:15-3:45-7:00-10:15
2:15-4:30
Regal Germantown Stadium 14 Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 6:00
20000 Century Boulevard
Tulip Fever (R) CC: 1:10-4:00Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC: 1:00- 6:45-10:30
3:30-6:00-8:30
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PGThe Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature 13) CC: 9:30
(PG) CC: 2:00-4:30
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC:
Kidnap (R) CC: 10:35
12:00-2:40-5:15-8:00-10:40
Baby Driver (R) CC: 5:45-8:30
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
Cars 3 (G) CC: 12:45-3:30
6:45
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC: The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
12:30-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
1:20-4:05-7:30-10:20
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 2:15-5:00- It (R) CC: (!) 7:00-8:00-9:007:30-10:30
9:45-10:15
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC:
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 12:2512:30-2:45
3:00-5:30-8:15
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG- Girls Trip (R) CC: 12:50-3:4013) CC: 12:15-3:15
6:30-10:15
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC:
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 1:3012:45-3:45-6:45-9:45
5:00-7:45-10:30
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC: All Saints (PG) CC: 12:50-3:30
1:00-4:00-7:15-10:15
Marvel's Inhumans (NR) (!)
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
12:15-2:30-4:45
12:00-3:15-6:45-10:15
Close Encounters of the Third
Girls Trip (R) CC: 12:15-3:00Kind 40th Anniversary Release
6:30-9:45
(PG) 12:30-3:45-7:00-9:15
It (R) CC: 7:00-10:15
It (R) CC: (!) 7:30-10:45
Old Greenbelt Theatre
129 Centerway
Regal Westview
Stadium 16 & IMAX
5243 Buckeystown Pike
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC: 1:304:00-6:30
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
(PG) CC: 1:00-3:45
Cars 3 (G) CC: 12:30-3:30
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
12:45-3:15-6:00-8:30-11:00
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC:
1:45-4:30
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 1:15-4:307:45-10:00
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13)
CC: 12:15-3:30-6:45
Tulip Fever (R) CC: 2:00-5:308:15-10:55
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 12:303:15-6:45-9:30
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
6:15-9:45
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
1:00-4:00-7:30-10:30
It (R) CC: 7:00-8:00-10:15
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 12:002:45-5:15-8:00
Good Time (R) CC: 10:35
Ingrid Goes West (R) CC: 9:00
Wind River (R) CC: 1:45-4:45-10:50
Girls Trip (R) CC: 10:45
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 1:004:00-7:15
All Saints (PG) CC: 12:45-4:157:00-9:45
The Glass Castle (PG-13) CC:
6:30-9:30
It (R) CC: (!) 7:30-10:45
Marvel's Inhumans (NR) (!) 12:002:15-4:30
Close Encounters of the Third
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
(PG) 12:15-3:45-7:00-10:30
Tulip Fever (R) CC: 1:30-4:00
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
1:30-4:15-7:00-9:45
Atomic Blonde (R) CC: 4:15-10:00
Girls Trip (R) CC: 6:30-9:15
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 2:154:30-6:45-9:15
Home Again (PG-13) CC:
7:00-9:20
AMC Hoffman Center 22
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
It (R) CC: 8:30-9:15
Home Again (PG-13) CC:
7:00-9:30
EXTRAORDINARY (!) 7:00
Marvel's Inhumans (NR) 11:001:15-3:30-5:35
It (R) 7:00-10:00
Wind River (R) CC: 9:45-12:102:25-4:45-7:20-9:35
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 9:50-9:45
The Glass Castle (PG-13) CC:
1:00-7:00
Tulip Fever (R) 9:55-12:15-2:354:50-7:10-9:20
Menashe (PG) 10:00-2:00-6:00-8:00
The Trip to Spain 9:40-12:00-2:305:00-7:30-9:40
I Do... Until I Don't (R) 9:45-12:052:35-5:05-7:40-9:50
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
1600 Village Market Boulevard
The Dark Tower (PG-13)
4:40-7:10
Despicable Me 3 (PG) 12:052:20-4:45
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
AMC Potomac Mills 18
(PG)
CC: 12:10-2:25
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
Cars 3 (G) 12:15-2:45
It (R) CC: 7:30-10:30
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
Home Again (PG-13) CC:
12:20-2:40-5:00
7:00-9:20
Dunkirk (PG-13) 12:25-2:55-7:15
Marvel's Inhumans (NR) 12:15- Tulip Fever (R) 12:15-2:452:30-4:45-7:00-9:10
5:10-7:40
It (R) 7:00-10:00
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG13) 1:00-4:00-7:05
AMC Shirlington 7
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) 12:05-2:152772 South Randolph St.
4:30-6:50
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC: 11:45The Glass Castle (PG-13) 7:00
2:15-4:30
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 11:30-4:45 Annabelle: Creation (R) 5:15-7:45
Tulip Fever (R) CC: (!) 11:30-2:30- It (R) 7:00
Home Again (PG-13) 7:45
5:00-7:45-10:15
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 1:30It (R) CC: (!) 7:00-7:30-10:00
4:15-7:25
Home Again (PG-13) CC:
Wind River (R) 12:00-2:307:00-9:30
5:00-7:30
Ingrid Goes West (R) (!) 2:00
Wind River (R) CC: 11:40-2:10- All Saints (PG) 12:00-2:35-5:05
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R)
4:45-7:15-9:45
The Big Sick (R) CC: (!) 1:00-7:00 12:30-3:15-7:35
It (R) 7:00
The Glass Castle (PG-13) CC:
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R)
4:00-9:50
UA Snowden Square
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 1:15- 12:30-3:15
Stadium 14
Manassas 4 Cinemas
4:15-7:20-10:05
9161 Commerce Center Drive
I Do... Until I Don't (R) (!) 11:358890 Mathis Ave.
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC: 1:15- 2:05-4:35
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R)
3:30-5:45
1:45-4:00-6:15
AMC Tysons Corner 16
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
Wonder Woman (PG-13)
7850e Tysons Corner Center
(PG) CC: 1:00-3:15
2:30-5:15
It (R) CC: (!) 7:00-10:00
Cars 3 (G) CC: 1:00-3:40-6:20
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) 2:00Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC: Home Again (PG-13) CC: (!)
4:00-6:00
7:00-9:30
2:10-4:30-6:45-9:10
The BIG SICK with Bonus
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 1:20-4:10- EXTRAORDINARY (!) 7:00
Content THE BIG(GER) SICK (R)
It
(R)
(!)
7:30-10:30
7:00-9:40
1:35-4:00-6:20
Tulip Fever (R) CC: 1:10-3:35AMC Worldgate 9
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12
6:15-8:45
13025 Worldgate Drive
6201 Multiplex Drive
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG- It (R) CC: (!) 7:00-10:00
13) CC: 12:50-3:50-6:50-9:50
The
Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
Home Again (PG-13) CC: (!)
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 2:00- 7:00-9:25
(PG) 10:15-12:35-2:45
4:50-7:35-10:25
Baadshaho (NR) 3:35-6:35
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema - Birth of the Dragon (PG-13)
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
One Loudoun
12:50-4:00-7:10-10:20
11:50-2:35-4:55-7:15-9:35
20575 East Hampton Plaza
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
Dunkirk (PG-13) 10:25-1:00
Mean Girls Quote-Along (NR)
12:50-3:50-6:00-9:15
Tulip Fever (R) 11:25-2:00-4:35It (R) CC: (!) 7:00-8:00-9:00-9:45- 7:40
7:30-10:05
Close Encounters of the Third
10:15-10:45
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PGLeap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 1:20- Kind 40th Anniversary Release 13) 12:50-6:40
3:45-6:00-8:15
(PG) 12:10-4:20-6:30-8:30
Annabelle: Creation (R) 12:00Girls Trip (R) CC: 1:50-4:402:40-5:25-8:05-10:45
Dunkirk (PG-13) 10:05-12:507:30-10:30
It (R) 7:00-8:00-10:10-11:05
3:35-6:20-10:30
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 1:30- Annabelle: Creation (R) 11:40The Hitman's Bodyguard (R)
4:20-7:15-10:00
11:20-2:05-4:50-7:45-10:35
4:30
The Big Sick (R) CC: 12:55Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) 10:00The Hitman's Bodyguard (R)
3:45-6:40
12:15-2:30-4:45-7:05-9:20
12:00-3:00-5:30-9:05
Home
Again (PG-13) 7:25-9:50
Logan
Lucky
(PG-13)
10:30-1:30Xscape Theatres Brandywine 14
Arjun Reddy (NR) 12:25-4:10
4:40-8:30
7710 Matapeake Business Drive
Wind River (R) 11:45-2:20-5:20Cars
3
(G)
10:20-1:15-2:30
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC:
7:55-10:30
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13)
12:50-3:10
A Gentleman (Hindi) (NR) 1:10
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature 10:05-12:40-3:15
Shubh Mangal Savdhan (Shubh
It
(R)
8:50
(PG) CC: 10:40-1:40-4:00
Again (PG-13) 8:00-10:40 Mangal Saavdhan) (NR) 9:05
Kidnap (R) CC: 11:40-2:10-4:50- Home
Ingrid Goes West (R) 10:35-1:15- Vivegam (NR) 1:05
7:10-9:50
Logan Lucky (PG-13) 10:054:00-5:50-10:05
Cars 3 (G) CC: 10:20-1:10-3:50- Wind
River (R) 10:50-1:40-3:40- 3:55-9:45
6:30
Paisa Vasool (NR) 10:00-4:20
6:00-10:00
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC: It (R) 7:00-10:40
Yuddham Sharanam (NR)
12:40-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:40
6:00-9:35
Back
to
the
Future:
Part
III
War for the Planet of the Apes (PG) 7:20
Rave Cinemas
(PG-13) CC: 11:00-2:30-6:10-9:40
Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme
Angelika Film Center Mosaic
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC:
11900 Palace Way
2911 District Ave
12:30-2:50
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: (!)
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 11:50-2:20- Despicable Me 3 (PG) 11:55-2:155:00-7:20-9:55
11:30-2:20-5:00-5:40-8:20-11:00 4:45-7:35-10:10
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13)
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
11:10-1:35-4:15-7:35-10:40
12:20-3:40
11:45AM
It (R) CC: (!) 7:00-8:30-10:00
The Big Sick (R) CC: 11:10-1:50- War for the Planet of the Apes
(PG-13) 3:05-6:20
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC: 4:30-7:10-9:50
(!) 11:50-2:40
I Do... Until I Don't (R) (!) 11:45- The Emoji Movie (PG) 11:054:50-7:10
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 10:50- 2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
1:50-4:20-6:40-9:00
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC: Dunkirk (PG-13) 11:20-2:00-4:557:30-10:20
Girls Trip (R) CC: 10:30-1:20(!) 11:00-1:15-3:30-5:45
4:10-6:20-7:30-9:20-10:30
Tulip Fever (R) CC: (!) 11:30-2:00- Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG13) 12:10-3:15-6:15-10:50
9/11 (R) CC: (!) 7:45-10:15
4:30-7:00-9:30
True to the Game (R) CC:
Wind River (R) CC: 11:20-2:10- It (R) 8:00-11:15
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R)
7:15-9:45
4:40-8:00-10:30
Close Encounters of the Third
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 11:15- 12:05-10:45
Atomic Blonde (R) 12:15
Kind 40th Anniversary Release 1:55-4:35-7:15-9:55
Home Again (PG-13) 7:00-9:45
(PG) CC: (!) 11:20-3:30
It (R) 7:20-10:15
It (R) CC: (!) 7:50-10:30
Home Again (PG-13) 7:45-10:05 Arjun Reddy (NR) 10:55-2:556:45-9:25
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R)
Ingrid Goes West (R) CC: (!)
Wind River (R) 11:15-1:50-4:20CC: (!) 11:10-2:00-4:40-7:202:45-5:15
6:55-10:00
9:10-10:00
Bow Tie
Puriyaatha Puthir (NR) 11:30AM
iPic Pike & Rose
Reston Town Ctr 11 & BTX
Girls Trip (R) 12:25-10:20
11830 Grand Park Avenue
11940 Market Street
Vivegam (NR) 1:25-9:35
Clueless (PG-13) 12:45-3:45
Cars 3 (G) 1:00-4:00
The Glass Castle (PG-13)
Cars 3 (G) 12:00
Dunkirk (PG-13) 2:10-5:10-8:003:25-7:00
Tulip Fever (R) (!) 12:00-3:3010:35
Do It Like An Hombre (Hazlo
6:45-10:00
Tulip Fever (R) 1:20-4:40-7:20-10:20 como hombre) (R) 11:25-2:05Annabelle: Creation (R) 1:00-4:00 Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13) 4:30
Wonder Woman (PG-13) 3:00
3:20
Paisa Vasool (NR) 3:40
It (R) (!) 7:00-7:30-8:00-10:30Wonder Woman (PG-13) 12:10
Close Encounters of the Third
11:00-11:30
It (R) 8:00-11:00
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R)
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) 12:30- (PG) XD: 12:20-3:35
12:15-4:15-7:45-11:15
3:40-6:40-9:40
Yuddham Sharanam (NR)
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) 12:45-3:30- Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) 12:20-2:30- 6:05-9:30
6:15-9:00
4:55-7:15
Punjab Nahi Jaungi 3:00
Home Again (PG-13) (!) 7:15-10:15 Good Time (R) 10:00
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) XD:
Girls Trip (R) 12:00-3:15-6:30-10:00 Home Again (PG-13) 7:00-9:50
11:00-1:45-4:35-7:25-10:35
Close Encounters of the Third
The Big Sick (R) 1:30-4:30-7:40It (R) XD: 7:00-10:15
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
10:30
Regal Ballston Common
(PG) 12:30-4:00
Wind River (R) 1:40-4:10-7:10-10:10
Stadium 12
Logan Lucky (PG-13) 12:50-3:45671 N. Glebe Road
6:50-9:55
Despicable
Me 3 (PG) CC: 1:10The Glass Castle (PG-13) 3:10-9:30
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
Close Encounters of the Third Kind 4:30-7:55
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
The
Nut
Job
2: Nutty By Nature
40th Anniversary Release (PG)
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC:
(PG) CC: 1:20-3:35
12:00-6:30
2:00-4:15
Baby Driver (R) CC: 7:30-10:15
It (R) 7:00-10:00
Baby Driver (R) CC: 1:45-7:15
Close Encounters of the Third Kind Cars 3 (G) CC: 1:00-3:45
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 2:15-4:45- 40th Anniversary Release (PG)
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13)
7:15-9:45
CC: 1:25
12:40-3:50
Cars 3 (G) CC: 2:00-4:30
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 2:25-5:10Cinema Arts Theatre
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 2:307:40-10:10
9650 Main St
5:00-7:30-10:00
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PGMaudie (PG-13) CC: 4:30-9:30
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
13) CC: 6:15-9:15
Step (PG) CC: 12:00-4:00
7:00-10:00
It (R) CC: (!) 7:00-10:15
VIRGINIA
U.S. POSTAL SERVICE
Thursday, September 7, 2017
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
1:05-3:50-6:50-9:35
The Big Sick (R) CC: 1:40-3:306:20-9:20
Good Time (R) CC: 5:15-10:15
Ingrid Goes West (R) CC:
2:30-7:45
Patti Cake$ (R) CC: 10:10
Wind River (R) CC: 1:15-4:157:15-9:55
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 1:103:55-6:45-9:30
Baadshaho (NR) (!) 1:00-4:007:00-10:00
Close Encounters of the Third
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
(PG) 1:30-4:45-6:30-9:45
Regal Countryside Stadium 20
45980 Regal Plaza
It (R) 7:00-10:00
Regal Dulles Town Center 10
21100 Dulles Town Circle
It (R) 7:00-10:15
Regal Fairfax Towne Center 10
4110 West Ox Road
Cars 3 (G) CC: 1:10-4:10
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
12:15-2:50-5:20
Tulip Fever (R) CC: 12:00-2:355:10-7:45-10:20
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 1:304:10-7:55-10:40
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 12:352:55-5:25-8:00
Good Time (R) CC: 10:30
Ingrid Goes West (R) CC: 12:002:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
Home Again (PG-13) CC:
7:00-9:50
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 12:403:50-6:50-9:45
All Saints (PG) CC: 1:00-3:406:30-9:20
The Battleship Island 9:45
EXTRAORDINARY (!) 7:00
A Taxi Driver 12:10-3:25-6:409:55
Midnight Runners
(cheong-nyeon-gyeongchal)1:20-4:20-7:20-10:15
Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX
22875 Brambleton Plaza
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC: 12:152:45-5:00-7:15-9:45
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
(PG) CC: 12:30-3:00
Baby Driver (R) CC: 6:30-9:30
Cars 3 (G) CC: 1:00-3:45-6:459:45
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
12:30-2:45-5:15-7:45-10:15
War for the Planet of the Apes
(PG-13) CC: 12:00-3:00
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC:
2:00-4:15
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 12:30-3:156:00-8:45
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG13) CC: 12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
12:15-3:30-6:45-10:00
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 1:454:30-7:15-10:15
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
It (R) CC: (!) 7:00-8:15-9:15-10:15
The Big Sick (R) CC: 12:45-3:456:30-9:15
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 1:153:30-5:45
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 1:004:00-7:00-10:00
Wind River (R) CC: 12:00-2:305:15-8:00-10:30
Marvel's Inhumans (NR) (!)
12:00-2:30-5:00
It (R) CC: (!) 7:30-10:45
Regal Kingstowne
Stadium 16 & RPX
5910 Kingstowne Towne Ctr
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC:
1:20-3:40
Cars 3 (G) CC: 12:15-2:55-5:35
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
1:30-4:00-6:30-9:10
War for the Planet of the Apes
(PG-13) CC: 6:00-9:15
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC:
1:15-4:15
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 12:45-3:306:15-9:00
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG13) CC: 12:25-3:35-6:45-9:55
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 1:454:50-7:45-10:30
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC: 3:25
It (R) CC: 7:00-10:15
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
1:00-4:05-7:00-10:00
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 12:503:15-5:45-8:05
Good Time (R) CC: 10:30
Girls Trip (R) CC: 7:15-10:15
The Big Sick (R) CC: 12:30
Wind River (R) CC: 1:40-4:307:30-10:10
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 1:554:50-7:40-10:30
All Saints (PG) CC: 1:50-4:457:35-10:25
Baadshaho (NR) (!) 12:35-3:406:40-9:45
A Gentleman (Hindi) (NR) (!) 8:45
Close Encounters of the Third
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
(PG) 12:20-3:45-7:05-10:20
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC: 12:504:20-7:20-10:20
It (R) CC: (!) 8:00-9:00
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
2:10-5:00-7:45-10:45
Atomic Blonde (R) CC: 10:50
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 2:505:30-8:15
The Dark Tower (PG-13) 7:40-10:30
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 12:453:30-6:30-9:20
Marvel's Inhumans (NR) (!)
1:15-3:20
It (R) CC: (!) 7:00-10:10
Regal Potomac Yard Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Avenue
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC: 1:304:05-6:30-9:00
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
(PG) CC: 1:20-3:50
Kidnap (R) CC: 6:45-10:25
Baby Driver (R) CC: 3:55-9:25
Cars 3 (G) CC: 1:05-3:45
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
1:05-3:30-5:50-8:10-10:30
War for the Planet of the Apes
(PG-13) CC: 2:20-9:10
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC:
1:45-4:10
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 1:00-3:356:15-9:05
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG13) CC: 1:10-4:15-7:15-10:15
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 2:255:05-7:50-10:30
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
1:15-4:00-6:50-9:40
It (R) CC: (!) 7:00-8:00-9:35-10:15
Girls Trip (R) CC: 1:35-4:307:20-10:10
Detroit (R) CC: 2:30-6:10-9:30
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 1:003:20-5:40-8:00
The Big Sick (R) CC: 1:00-6:35
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 1:404:40-7:35-10:25
EXTRAORDINARY (!) 7:00
Close Encounters of the Third
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
(PG) 2:40-6:20-9:45
Regal Springfield Town Ct 12
6500 Springfield Town Center
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
(PG) CC: 1:30-4:20
Cars 3 (G) CC: 1:40-5:10
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
12:05-2:30-5:00-7:50-10:50
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC: 12:202:50-5:20-7:55
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 12:303:20-6:10
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG13) CC: 12:00-3:10-6:30-9:40
Tulip Fever (R) CC: 1:20-4:407:20-10:00
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 2:004:50-7:40-10:40
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
7:05-10:20
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
1:10-4:10-7:10-10:10
Atomic Blonde (R) CC: 8:00-10:45
It (R) CC: (!) 7:00-9:00-10:30
Girls Trip (R) CC: 1:00-4:007:30-10:30
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC:
12:50-3:40
Good Time (R) CC: 10:15
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 12:403:50-6:40-9:30
Regal Virginia Gateway
Stadium 14 & RPX
8001 Gateway Promenade Place
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC: 1:404:50-7:45-10:00
The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature
(PG) CC: 2:10-4:25
Kidnap (R) CC: 9:00
Cars 3 (G) CC: 1:10-3:40
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
1:20-4:30
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC: 1:15
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 2:20-5:158:10-10:40
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG13) CC: 3:30-6:30
Tulip Fever (R) CC: 1:45-4:15-9:45
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 2:305:45-8:15-10:45
Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
6:50-9:55
The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
2:00-4:45-7:15-10:15
It (R) CC: (!) 7:00-10:00
Wind River (R) CC: 1:55-4:307:00-9:40
The Glass Castle (PG-13) CC:
6:15
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 1:303:45-8:00
Logan Lucky (PG-13) CC: 2:155:00-6:00-10:50
All Saints (PG) CC: 2:05-5:057:45-10:20
Close Encounters of the Third
Kind 40th Anniversary Release
(PG) (!) 1:00
It (R) CC: (!) 7:45-8:30-9:30-10:45
Smithsonian - Airbus
IMAX Theater
14390 Air and Space Museum Parkway
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
11:10-4:00
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 12:35
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Sea 3D (NR) 10:20-1:30-3:10
Dunkirk: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
Regal Manassas
Dream Big: Engineering Our
Stadium 14 & IMAX
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
11380 Bulloch Drive
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC: 2:40-5:20 2:20
Journey to Space 3D (NR)
Kidnap (R) CC: 1:45-3:50-6:0012:00-4:50
8:30-10:40
Marvel's Inhumans (NR) 5:30Baby Driver (R) CC: 1:40-4:157:10-8:55
6:50-9:40
University Mall Theatre
Cars 3 (G) CC: 1:50-4:40-7:15-9:50
10659 Braddock Road
Birth of the Dragon (PG-13) CC:
1:20-3:40
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC: 12:20The Emoji Movie (PG) CC: 1:30-3:45 2:35-4:35
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 1:10-4:10Baby Driver (R) CC: 7:30-9:45
6:45-9:15
Cars 3 (G) CC: 12:10-2:25-4:50
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13) War for the Planet of the Apes
CC: 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
(PG-13) CC: 7:00-9:40
Annabelle: Creation (R) CC: 2:00- Wonder Woman (PG-13) CC:
4:50-7:30-10:15
1:00-4:00-7:15-10:00
HAVE YOU ACCOMPLISHED ANYTHING LATELY?
YES
WE HEAR YOU
GOT RID OF
NO
WHAT IF YOU
GOT RID OF
12 MONTHS
12 YEARS
WORTH OF STUFF AND SELL
IT FOR DECENT CASH
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
2.1 million readers, bargain hunters included • 202.334.6200 • washingtonpost.com/classified • Open 24/7
Or place your ad in Express, our daily commuter read, and reach 536,000 readers.
Source: Scarborough 2012, Release 2. Washington Post newspaper 7-day cumulative reach; Express 5-day reach.
C054C 6x2.5
DISTRICT
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
stamp for one-ounce envelopes is
no counterweight in the scale of
American history. But these
stamps are a sweet reminder of a
child we met when we were all as
pure as driven snow.
And needless to say, these are
“forever” stamps, which, if nothing else, is the happiest metaphor
you’ll read all day.
C6
EZ
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
PICKLES
. THURSDAY,
SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
N-S VULNERABLE
NORTH
A 10 3 2
Q94
K4
J 10 6 4
EAST
KQ874
A7
853
853
WEST
96
853
Q J 10 9 6
K92
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH (D)
J5
K J 10 6 2
A72
AQ7
The bidding:
SOUTH
WEST
NORTH
1 NT
Pass
2
2
Pass
3 NT
Opening lead — Q
EAST
Pass
All Pass
“T
his deal caused a fuss
in a team match,” a
fan writes. “At my table, South
opened one heart and played
four hearts. I led my queen of
diamonds, and he took the
K-A and ruffed a diamond in
dummy. He lost a trump, a
club and a spade.
“That result seemed
normal, but in the replay my
teammate as South opened
1NT and played 3NT. West
led the queen of diamonds,
and declarer took the ace
and forced out the ace of
hearts.
“South won East’s
diamond return and had
eight tricks. When he
finessed in clubs, West won
and took three diamonds.
“I think opening 1NT was
wrong. North-South missed
the heart fit. What say you?”
I don’t know, nor does
anyone. Sometimes it pays
to suppress a five-card major
to open 1NT, sometimes not.
The only error was South’s
play. He must win the first
diamond in dummy and
finesse in clubs, dislodging
West’s entry before the
diamonds are good. South
ducks the diamond return,
wins the third diamond and
leads a heart. He is safe
when East has the ace.
CLASSIC PEANUTS
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
LIO
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
CHARLES SCHULZ
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
A 10 3 2 Q 9 4
K 4 J 10 6 4
Your partner opens one
heart, you respond one
spade and he bids 1NT. What
do you say?
ANSWER: Bid two hearts.
Partner should expect about
10 points and game interest.
With six to nine points and
heart support, you would
raise directly to two hearts.
If his second bid had been
two of a minor, you would bid
three hearts to invite game.
A return to two hearts would
suggest only a doubleton in
support.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2017, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MUTTS
EZ
PATRICK McDONNELL
C7
RE
ZITS
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | SEPTEMBER 7
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
This year you often
feel as if you are
forging a new path,
destination unknown.
You will take a risk in at least
one area of your life. If you are
single, note when you become
possessive of someone
you are dating. You might
want to stop and see what
is happening. You obviously
value the person in question.
If you are attached, the two of
you could decide to separate
your finances in order to have
a more peaceful bond. Aries
can push you to act, but only
you can act.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
Opportunities seem to pop up.
Extremes mark your plans,
decisions and day. You are far
more direct than you normally
are. Be willing to express your
thoughts directly. Someone is
clearly interested.
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
You obviously have something
or someone on your mind.
Share your thoughts, and you’ll
get positive feedback. You
have more supportive people
around you than you originally
thought.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
Reach out for someone you
care about. A meeting or
get-together could draw some
of your friends together. You
might feel far more confident
with this group. You trust that
WEINGARTENS & CLARK their comments are authentic.
Be as direct as possible.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
Reach out for someone at a
distance or an expert who
openly shares his or her
thoughts with you. Question
which way to go. Do you want
to blaze a new path? What
would you prefer to do?
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
Stretch and do whatever
you must to get past an
immediate problem. How you
see a personal matter could
change as a result. Perhaps
you got stuck in a perspective.
Recognize what is happening
with a child or loved one.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
A key person in your life knows
what he or she wants. This
person could become pushy
without intending to. Do you
know exactly what you desire
in the same vein? You cannot
proceed if you don’t know or
are willing to defer. Be aware
there is no lack of caring
between you and this person.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
Defer to others. They
appreciate being able to make
the choices. In some way, they
will reveal more of themselves,
and you will see their caring
toward you. You have the ability
to charm nearly anyone into
agreeing with your choices.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
A creative person or associate
spouts ideas left and right.
You might not be able to
absorb these ideas with ease
at the moment. Express your
appreciation. Meanwhile, clear
out what you must do.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
Listen to your inner voice
when dealing with a child
or loved one. Your fiery side
encourages more openness.
As a result, you’ll gain a great
deal of insight into the other
party.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
You have the capability to
handle whatever comes up.
You could be in a position
where you need to have
a conversation without
triggering. You might want
to see another perspective,
because when you do, you will
naturally find a solution.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
Don’t stand on ceremony. You
will get past a situation if you
stay open. Listen, and you
will learn a lot more about the
person and his or her needs.
Keep communication flowing.
You could hear from a close
family member.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
You can communicate your
bottom line and others will
remain responsive. You
also must extend the same
courtesy. A partner or close
friend clearly enjoys getting
together with you. Make plans
as soon as possible.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2017, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
C8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
KIDSPOST.COM
The National Football League season kicks off
tonight, with the New England Patriots taking on
the Kansas City Chiefs. Washington hosts the
Philadelphia Eagles on Sunday at 1 p.m.
Not exactly football weather, but
sunny skies, low humidity and mild
breezes are a winning combination.
Would you like your class
featured as a Class of
KidsPost? Check online for
our new questionnaire.
ILLUSTRATION BY CAMILLE HARRIS, 10, BURKE
TOD AY ’ S NE WS
CARLOS GIUSTI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Wooden panels are installed over a
window in Puerto Rico on Tuesday
in preparation for Hurricane Irma.
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Kirk Cousins passed for 25 touchdowns last year. A
good running game would take pressure off him, but
the Redskins don’t have a first-rate running back.
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Tight end Jordan Reed is super-talented pass
catcher, but he missed several games last year, and
he can’t help the team when he’s hurt.
Rookie Jonathan Allen (95) should help Ryan
Kerrigan (91) and the rest of the Washington
defense, which was terrible last year.
Redskins need more than a terrific quarterback
The Washington
Redskins’ season begins
against the
FRED BOWEN
Philadelphia Eagles on
Sunday afternoon at
FedEx Field. Redskins fans are hoping
the team can take a step forward and
make the National Football League
(NFL) playoffs.
Sorry, I don’t see that happening.
Let’s take a look at the team’s chances.
Offense: Quarterback Kirk Cousins
has been terrific the past two seasons.
Last year, he passed for 4,917 yards — a
team record — and 25 touchdowns.
But Cousins needs help, and I’m not
sure his supporting cast will be as good
this season. The Redskins have two new
wide receivers: Terrelle Pryor and Josh
Doctson, but Pryor has had only one
good season as a wideout (he used to be
The Score
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1 Drains
5 Takes from page
to screen, say
11 One of
Beethoven’s
nine: abbr.
14 Party with tiki
torches
15 Flashy Chevy
16 With 36-Down,
Dr. Seuss classic
with the subtitle
“The Simplest
Seuss for
Youngest Use”
17 Cowardly
Snoopy
nemesis?
19 Seagoing “I see”
20 French film icon
Brigitte
21 “The Racer’s
Edge”
22 Urban air
concern
23 Much
25 Curriculum __
27 Gloomy
route to Oz?
32 Actress Vardalos
33 Butte relative
34 RadioShack
predecessor
35 Automaker
Ferrari
37 Watched
closely
40 Fictional
London alter
ego
41 United
43 Halt
45 Belonging to us
46 Embarrassed
three-person
Vegas act?
50 Kentucky
pioneer
51 Divided sea
52 Applaud
54 Old PC monitor
56 “Altogether
ooky” family
name
60 Rocker Ocasek
61 Primary mixes
that affect
17-, 27- and
46-Across
63 Query
64 Fire up
65 Attract
pigeons
for, say
a quarterback) and Doctson has trouble
staying healthy.
Speaking of health, everyone should
hope tight end Jordan Reed doesn’t get
injured. Reed is a super-talented pass
catcher, but he can’t help the team when
he’s hurt. (Reed missed several games in
2016.)
A good running game would take
pressure off Cousins’s passing. The
offensive line, led by all-pro tackle Trent
Williams, should be solid. But the
Redskins don’t have a first-rate running
back. Starter Rob Kelley had a few good
games last season but tailed off with
just 280 rushing yards in the final six
games.
Defense: The Redskins defense was
terrible in 2016, ranking 28th out of 32
NFL teams for total yards given up.
Maybe that’s why Washington went out
and got some new players on the
defensive side of the ball.
Rookie defensive tackle Jonathan
Allen from the University of Alabama
should help shore up the middle of the
line. But most of the new faces on the
Redskins defense are just castoffs from
other teams, not real game-changers.
Maybe the new defensive coordinator,
Greg Manusky, can mold the group into
a crack unit, but I have my doubts —
especially after second-year safety Su’a
Cravens’s sudden departure to consider
retirement.
Schedule: This may be the Redskins’
biggest problem. They have a supertough schedule.
Seven of their 16 games are against
teams that made the playoffs last
season. And four of those seven games
will be played at the other team’s
stadium. Chances are, Washington will
lose those games.
The key to the season may be games
against middle-of-the-pack teams such
as the Eagles, Arizona Cardinals, New
Orleans Saints, Minnesota Vikings and
Los Angeles Chargers. The Redskins will
have to win most of those matchups to
have a shot at the playoffs.
Prediction: Sorry, but I think the
Redskins will take a step backward from
last year, when they won eight games,
lost seven and tied one (7-8-1). In 2017, I
predict they’ll finish 7-9.
kidspost@washpost.com
Bowen writes the sports opinion column for
KidsPost. He is the author of 22 sports books
for kids, including three football books:
“Touchdown Trouble,” “Quarterback Season”
and “Double Reverse.”
Hurricane slams
Caribbean islands,
heads for Florida
Hurricane Irma roared into the
Caribbean with record force early
Wednesday, its 185-miles-per-hour
winds shaking homes and flooding
buildings on a chain of small islands
along a path toward Puerto Rico, the
Dominican Republic, Haiti, Cuba and
a possible direct hit on South Florida.
The strongest Atlantic Ocean
hurricane ever recorded passed
almost directly over the island of
Barbuda, causing widespread
flooding and downed trees. The
National Office of Disaster Services
for Antigua and Barbuda confirmed
that there was damage to several
homes but gave no details.
The U.S. National Weather Service
said Puerto Rico had not seen a storm
of Irma’s magnitude since 1928’s
Hurricane San Felipe, which killed
2,748 people in Guadeloupe, Puerto
Rico and Florida.
Irma seemed almost certain to hit
the United States by Friday.
“You’d be hard-pressed to find any
model that doesn’t have some impact on
Florida,” said University of Miami senior
hurricane researcher Brian McNoldy.
— Associated Press
THEATER REVIEW
By Kurt Mengel and Jan-Michele Gianette
‘Julius Caesar’ too thin, ‘Neverwhere’ too much at Atlas
BY
© 2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
66 Bluster
67 Colorful fish
68 2016 NL East
champs
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
18
22
24
26
DOWN
Untidy type
Certain
something
Early late-night
host
Ice cream
treat
Polish removers
Apply carefully
Latin I verb
“Friday the 13th:
Jason Lives,”
sequentially
Torrid Zone
parallel
Junior
Words of
reproach
Up-and-down
toy
Downloaded
video format
Jewish folklore
figure
Mother of Isaac
Recipe amt.
B’way buy
9/7/17
27 Many of its knives
have a limited
lifetime warranty
28 Arkansas team
29 Mrs. Gorbachev
30 Compute
31 Salon worker
32 Twice-monthly
tide
36 See 16-Across
38 Sicilian high
point
39 Track events with
mechanical lures
42 “Strange Magic”
gp.
44 Museum with
Goyas and El
Grecos
47 Recital bonus
48 Red wine option
49 Gary who played
Beethoven in
“Immortal
52
53
55
57
58
59
61
62
WEDNESDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
Beloved”
Outcropping
Songwriter Loeb
__ de force
“Dancing
Queen” quartet
Bubbly maker
Old fast fliers
Player in an
indoor tree
Soweto’s
country: abbr.
N ELSON P RESSLEY
“Julius Caesar” won’t be generating shock waves at the Atlas
Performing Arts Center — not
that you want cheap topical
shots or controversy for their
own sake. But the lickety-split
version of Shakespeare’s drama
now being executed in under two
hours by Scena Theatre is more
drive-by than in-depth.
Neil Gaiman’s “Neverwhere”
across the hall at Atlas, on the
other hand, is a three-hour
sprawl. Rorschach Theatre is reviving its immersive 2013 production, but the sluggish adventure feels as if it’s getting the
kind of sustained attention “Caesar” should have had.
The pocket-size “Caesar” is the
bigger bafflement. Director Robert McNamara uses three video
screens over the stage to set the
action in modern locales (not
strictly Washington), and the
contemporary costumes include
power suits and, for the preening
Caesar, aviator shades and a
sinister leather overcoat. McNamara plays Caesar as a rote
autocrat, lounging and barking,
but the richest character in the
show is the mob.
And what about the mob? Not
much more than comes hardwired into any “Caesar”: The
crowd is fickle, emotional, easily
manipulated. As Mark Antony
orates over Caesar’s casket, Barry
McEvoy slyly lathers them up,
but even this famed sequence is a
thin-skinned blitz.
The show takes its stabs at
style: McNamara and the politicos rhythmically march like robotic brutes in the menacing
mode of British bad-boy actor-director Steven Berkoff. But there’s
not much room to move on the
small Lab II platform stage, and
the show defaults to rapid connivance and declamation. For
one of Shakespeare’s most political dramas, it’s a pretty uncontemplative staging.
The “Neverwhere” is everywhere in the flexible Sprenger
Theatre, piling on the narrative
froth. Gaiman’s tale, adapted by
Robert Kauzlaric, sucks an ordinary Londoner (played with a
casual air by Daniel Corey) into
the flamboyant world of London
Below, which is full of mystics
and pirates, angels and assassins. Jenny McConnell Frederick’s keep-it-moving staging
chases the actors up platforms,
C. STANLEY PHOTOGRAPHY
Sarah Taurchini as Door and Daniel Corey as Richard Mayhew in
Rorschach Theatre’s “Neverwhere” at the Atlas Center.
behind the audience (seated on
four sides) and across the wide
central stage.
Projections on the outer walls,
plus the dark hollows of Cory
Ryan Frank’s lighting, accentuate the sense of tunnels and
warrens from designers David C.
Ghatan, Robbie Hayes and Ryan
Smith.
This performance seemed
bracing in 2013, but a second
look reveals how repetitive and
cliched the script is. There may
be a ripping two-hour show submerged here, one that doesn’t
seem to put so much emphasis
on scampering through the
space and hoping the cast can
sustain the “Pirates of the Caribbean”-style drollery from London Below’s cutthroats and heroes.
Much of the 2013 cast is back,
including Sarah Taurchini as the
avenging heroine Door and Grady Weatherford as the Johnny
Depp-y Marquis de Carabas.
Newcomer Megan Reichelt
brings noble focus to her turn as
the formidable bodyguard Hunter. At times, Reichelt even brings
a sense of gravity, something you
wouldn’t think a heavily visualized, verbally ornate under-
ground saga would lack.
nelson.pressley@washpost.com
Julius Caesar by William
Shakespeare. Directed by Robert
McNamara. Set, video and
projections, Jonathan Dahm
Robertson; sound design, Denise
Rose; costumes, Heather Jackson;
lights, Jonathan Alexander. With
Kevin Boudreau, Kim Curtis,
Amanda Forstrom, David Bryan
Jackson, David Johnson, Louis
Lavoie, Ron Litman, Daniel Noake,
Anne Nottage, Danielle Scott, Robert
Sheire, Greg Ongao and Ian
Blackwell Rogers. About 110
minutes. Tickets $30-$45. Through
Sept. 24. At the Atlas Performing
Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. Call 202399-7993 or visit atlasarts.org.
Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman,
adapted by Robert Kauzlaric.
Directed by Jenny McConnell
Frederick. Costumes, Debra Kim
Sevigny and Sydney Moore; sound,
Veronica J. Lancaster. With Lee
Liebeskind, Cam Magee, Scott
McCormick, Christian Sullivan,
McCaul Baggett, Thais Menendez,
Robert Pike, Robert Bowen Smith
and Dina Soltan. About three hours.
Tickets $20-$45. Through Oct. 1 at
the Atlas.
KLMNO
SPORTS
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
D
M2
PERSPECTIVE
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
HURRICANE IRMA
YOUTH SPORTS
One big reason this U.S. Open is mustwatch TV: Black women are crushing. D2
Jerry Brewer on Howard’s historic upset
of UNLV — fuel for pride and belief. D3
The massive storm in the South Atlantic
causes a flurry of schedule changes. D5
New data: Participation in sports for kids
ages 6 to 12 is down almost 8 percent. D5
Doctson still a mystery,
and he could be the key
BY
M IKE J ONES
Philadelphia Eagles Coach
Doug Pederson gave a long pause
when asked for a scouting report
on Washington Redskins wide
receiver Josh Doctson.
“He’s going to have a role,”
Pederson said, doing his best to
finesse the answer on Wednesday’s conference call with Redskins media. “There’s going to be
an opportunity for him to be an
impact on that team, and that’s
something where the staff will
have plays specifically for him.”
Pederson admitted that it’s
“tough” to prepare for a player
such as Doctson, who has next to
no NFL game tape after missing
all but two contests last season
because of a pair of Achilles’
tendon injuries. In those two
games, Doctson — the 22nd overall pick of the 2016 draft — logged
a total of 31 plays and had two
catches on six targets.
So when the Redskins host the
Eagles on Sunday to open the
season, Doctson very much will
be a mystery man to Philadelphia’s defensive coaches.
The Redskins are counting on
Doctson to help fill the void
created when 1,000-yard wide
receivers Pierre Garcon and
DeSean Jackson departed via free
agency. But in truth, the 6-foot-2,
206-pound Doctson remains
rather mysterious to the Redskins as well.
Coaches and officials know his
body of work from his days at
Texas Christian, where he racked
up a combined 143 catches for
2,344 yards and 25 touchdowns
in his final two seasons. That
production and his physical attributes caused the Redskins to
view Doctson as the best receiver
REDSKINS CONTINUED ON D10
Eagles at Redskins
Sunday, 1 p.m., Fox
AVA WALLACE
MYSTICS CONTINUED ON D7
Mystics at Liberty
Sunday, 5 p.m., ESPN2
More people are fans of professional football than
any other sport
Q: Do you consider yourself to be a fan of [each sport], or not?
(Percent of adults who say "yes")
60%
Pro football
BY ADAM KILGORE
AND SCOTT CLEMENT
As the NFL opens its season
Thursday night, the league faces
myriad challenges. A growing
body of science connects playing
football to dire brain-related
health risks. Ratings sagged last
season. Quality of play has been
scrutinized. Another high-profile player finds himself enmeshed in a domestic-abuse
scandal. Some fans are upset
about players protesting during
the national anthem, and others
are angry Colin Kaepernick does
not have a job.
Despite those issues and other
apparent threats to the league’s
health, Americans’ zeal for foot-
Pro baseball
45%
College football
45%
39%
Pro basketball
35%
College basketball
28%
Pro boxing
Mixed martial arts
25%
Pro soccer
24%
Pro auto racing
24%
22%
Pro ice hockey
Wrestling, such as
the WWE
Source: Washington
Post-UMass Lowell poll
conducted Aug. 14-21, 2017
14%
An all-inclusive,
all-American dream
MYSTICS 86,
WINGS 76
The Washington Mystics sacrificed for their win Wednesday
night against the Dallas Wings.
Star forward Elena Delle
Donne wore it on her chin, bandaged postgame after receiving
three stitches after getting hit in
the fourth quarter. Center Krystal
Thomas wore it on her legs, each
plastered with three ice bags each
instead of the usual one as she sat
in the locker room. Point guard
Kristi Toliver told of it with her
voice,
uncharacteristically
hoarse for the typically quiet
leader.
The aches and pains were
worth it as Washington defeated
the Dallas Wings, 86-76, in a
single-elimination playoff game
in front of 6,482 at Capital One
Arena to advance past the first
round of the playoffs for the first
time since 2002. Washington will
play at New York on Sunday at 5
p.m. in the second round in
another single-elimination game.
A physical bout that finally
revealed glimpses of the Mystics’
full potential after struggling
through a regular season
wrought with injuries, Washington also notched its first home
playoff win since 2004.
“When you are trying to build
something, there are steps you
have to take,” Coach and General
Manager Mike Thibault said. “A
game like this is another major
step because, No. 1, we had to win
a game in the playoffs to get to the
next round. No. 2 is your team
needs to figure out — we didn’t
shoot the ball great, but we
played great defense. I mean, we
held them to [33.8] percent from
the floor. And in general, playoff
games are more physical, more
things are allowed to happen,
and if you can fight through that
and still keep your defensive
presence about you, it’s great.”
Thibault had delivered strict
instructions to his team ahead of
Wednesday’s game — no one was
to overextend themselves. The
Mystics (19-16) entered the postseason healthier than they had
been since the end of July, when
star forward and 2015 league
MVP Delle Donne injured her left
thumb, and with 11 of 12 players
available.
Only Tayler Hill, who tore her
right anterior cruciate ligament
and was lost for the season in
July, remained on the bench.
The Mystics looked more like
the team those around the WNBA
expected them to be at the beginning of the season. Their defense
Despite challenges
such as brain injuries,
league retains fan base
ball has shown no sign of abating. Professional football remains the most followed sport in
America by a wide margin, and
its massive popularity has not
waned in recent years, according
to a nationwide poll conducted
in August by The Washington
Post and the University of Massachusetts Lowell.
Six in 10 Americans say they
are fans of professional football,
roughly similar to polls in 2012
and up from 50 percent in a 2008
Post poll. Fandom for professional football far outpaces professional baseball at 45 percent
of Americans and professional
basketball at 39 percent. Asked
which sport is their favorite to
watch, 37 percent say football,
little changed from 35 percent in
a 2012 Post poll and more than
triple the percentage who pick
baseball or basketball.
Football’s dangers and drawbacks have not turned away
younger fans poised to become
NFL CONTINUED ON D9
Old-school
sign stealing,
new-school
technology
Mystics
clip Wings
to move on
in playo≠s
BY
Poll: NFL’s popularity reigns supreme
In year of heady tennis anniversaries, U.S. Open women’s semifinals
are packed with four American players, poised for the history books
JEWEL SAMAD/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE VIA GETTY IMAGES
Sloane Stephens, shown serving to Anastasija Sevastova in the U.S. Open quarterfinals, faces Venus Williams next.
BY
CHUCK CULPEPPER
new york — She finished sixth in the
country in the backstroke and swam to
all-American honors at Boston University in
the same time frame when, in April 1987, Los
Angeles Dodgers executive Al Campanis
went on Ted Koppel’s “Nightline” to state,
among other lunacies, that black people
were “not good swimmers” because “they
don’t have the buoyancy.”
She cringed when teammates made offhand, opposite comments such as, “You’re a
natural athlete. Of course you’re going to be a
good swimmer,” and, “You’re so lucky you
don’t have to work that hard.”
To the Boston Herald in 1988, she said,
“I’ve been the only black female at the U.S.
nationals for the last five years. I was the
only black female in the NCAA championships my whole career. It seems I’ve always
been the only black swimmer. I’m grown up
to accept it, deal with it.”
Few among the 23,000 Thursday night in
Arthur Ashe Stadium would be able to
A couple of weeks
ago, I was having a
conversation with
a baseball scout
who had been
watching the Los
Barry
Angeles Dodgers
Svrluga
quite a bit
recently. This was
before the Dodgers dropped 10 of
11 entering Wednesday, back
when they were on pace to win 115
games. The scout was blown
away. The Dodgers, he said, do so
many things right each and every
night to win games, and he
started ticking off traits,
including . . .
“They’re the best I’ve seen at
stealing signs and relaying them
to the hitter,” he said. “They’ve got
it down.”
That same day, I was asking
Sean Doolittle, the Nationals’
closer, about his preparations for
entering games: what inning he
begins stretching out, how he
predicts when he might be used,
what sort of mental and physical
checklist he goes through.
Another long list came forth. And
then . . .
“I like to see who’s coming up,”
Doolittle said, “and I may go back
to the iPad and go over the
scouting reports one more time as
a refresher.”
One day in a baseball season.
Two separate, unrelated
conversations. And a potentially
toxic mix: the time-tested art of
pushing the envelope combined
with most modern technology.
On Tuesday, the New York
Times reported what, on the face
of it, is an explosive story: Major
League Baseball is investigating
the Boston Red Sox for stealing
signs from the New York Yankees
and relaying them to players
using an Apple Watch affixed to
the wrist of one of their athletic
trainers. The Yankees, the Times
said, responded by training one of
the cameras from their YES
SVRLUGA CONTINUED ON D5
U.S. OPEN CONTINUED ON D4
U.S. Open | Today: Women’s semifinals, 7 p.m., ESPN
Spoiler alert: del Potro ousts Federer in quarters
BY
CHUCK CULPEPPER
new york — As if it’s etched in
some old stone buried in Flushing Meadows Park that Roger
Federer and Rafael Nadal shall
never meet at a U.S. Open,
Federer and Nadal will not meet
at this U.S. Open. The semifinal
that loomed in the air through
Argentine ends hopes of clash with Nadal
the two weeks here fizzled one
match from fruition, and it did
so via a familiar, beloved “villain.”
Juan Martin del Potro, the
Argentine 2009 U.S. Open cham-
pion who prevented a FedererNadal meeting when he ousted
Nadal in a 2009 semifinal, spent
Wednesday night in Arthur Ashe
Stadium reminding a stirred-up
crowd of his sublime quality. As
his stemwinder of a fourthround win Monday somehow
had failed to sap his energy, del
Potro deployed his power and
grit to remove Federer, 7-5, 3-6,
7-6 (10-8), 6-4, and to treat
Federer to a second crushing U.S.
Open loss, eight years after the
first in a five-set final. If the
FEDERER CONTINUED ON D4
MIKE EHRMANN/GETTY IMAGES
Gonzalez, Nationals roll
Gio Gonzalez throws five
scoreless innings and Ryan
Zimmerman homers as the
Nationals top Marlins, 8-1. D7
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
washingtonpost.com/sports
EARLY LEAD
EARLY LEAD
FBI arrests
radio host
on charges
of fraud
BY
Bennett
describes
encounter
with police
PERSPECTIVE
C INDY B OREN
Craig Carton, the co-host of
the “Boomer and Carton” morning sports talk show on New
York’s WFAN radio station, was
arrested by the FBI on investment-fraud-related counts in
connection with an alleged ticket
scam, authorities announced
Wednesday.
Carton, who has hosted the
show with former NFL player
Boomer Esiason since 2007, was
picked up at his home in Manhattan’s Tribeca neighborhood in
the early morning, New York’s
NBC affiliate reported. Carton
and his co-defendant, Michael
Wright, were charged with securities fraud, wire fraud and conspiracy and face up to 45 years in
prison and fines of millions of
dollars.
“Behind all the talk, the Carton
and Wright show was just a
sham, designed to fleece investors out of millions ultimately to
be spent on payments to casinos
and . . . other personal debt,” U.S.
Attorney Joon Kim said according to the New York Daily News.
Carton is accused of enticing
investors into a fake ticket resale
business by promising to deliver
face-value tickets to concerts that
would be resold for profit.
Why would Carton, who earns
$250,000 a year, risk doing this?
Court papers allege that he ran
up millions of dollars in losses at
two casinos and owed $825,000
to an unidentified individual.
Carton is accused of lying to
investors, even sending fake documents and emails.
Esiason addressed Carton’s absence on the air, saying, “I am
aware now why Craig is not here
this morning,” he told listeners.
“Unfortunately, he was arrested
this morning. . . . I’m taken aback
and surprised by it, just like
everybody else is. I thought my
partner called in sick this morning, but unfortunately my partner was arrested.”
“We are aware of the situation
and are cooperating with authorities,” said a spokesperson for
CBS Radio, which owns WFAN.
cindy.boren@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
QUOTABLE
“I do believe that the
Lord — at least in my
life — He likes to use
one-year contracts . . .
if you will.”
KIRK COUSINS,
explaining how his faith has helped
him find peace in playing under the
franchise tag (Via D.C. Sports Bog)
BY
KATHY WILLENS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
JOHN G. MABANGLO/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY
Venus Williams, left, will face Sloane Stephens on Thursday in a U.S. Open semifinal with deeper meaning than tennis.
Why I am a tennis fan this week
Success of black women makes this year’s U.S. Open an inspiration to watch
BY
C ANDACE B UCKNER
On Thursday night, a tennis icon will
face a younger star: Venus Williams, one
of the greatest to play the game and
upholding her legendary status at
37 years old, and Sloane Stephens,
13 years younger but with established
credentials as a Grand Slam contender
and on the cusp of making a storybook
comeback, will meet in Arthur Ashe
Stadium.
This is prime-time material, good
enough to entice any sports fan to tune
into the U.S. Open women’s semifinals to
witness the renaissance of American
tennis. I’ll be watching, too, but not for
that reason.
I’m watching because the players are
black women, and I like watching black
women do cool stuff on my TV.
I like seeing Venus, her hair natural,
like mine, thick and bundled under her
brightly colored visor.
And Sloane, her forearms defined,
unfortunately way more chiseled than
mine, and covered by an endless canvas
of beautiful mocha.
I understand how this sounds,
describing the physical appearance of
women before mentioning their stellar
achievements, such as Venus’s seven
Grand Slam titles or Sloane’s three
semifinal appearances this summer
after returning to the game from an 11month injury hiatus. Also, I can already
hear the All Tennis Players Matter crowd
complaining that I shouldn’t be so
caught up on race.
But I unabashedly root for
representation and role models,
knowing there are many girls with
Venus’s hair type and Sloane’s dark
complexion who don’t always see
positive images of themselves on
television. But on Thursday, they will.
Let’s be clear: This semifinal match
between Venus and Sloane won’t
magically end racism. Two sistas inside
Arthur Ashe Stadium can’t undo years of
damage done by ratchet reality TV shows
that have portrayed black women as
loud, quarreling and materialistic.
However, this unicorn moment — with
another black American, Madison Keys,
joining this final four — will matter. Not
just to me but also to the millions who
look like me, think like me, move in this
world like me.
I’m a product of the in between — old
enough to remember seeing only a few
black Cabbage Patch dolls on the shelves
yet entrenched enough in today’s culture
in which suburbanites and sistas alike
agree: Beyoncé is boss, and Idris Elba is
bae. Though this progression of
scattered mainstream acceptance is a
great step, I still would like to see more.
Because before a kid can visualize herself
doing dope stuff, she first has to see it
done. See how it’s even possible. So
watching the Williams sisters in action
or Sloane ripping winners down the
baseline isn’t just about great tennis. It’s
about being inspired and seeing
someone like you succeed.
Certainly there must have been times
when Venus and her sister Serena
wanted to be simply known as
tremendous tennis players and not
“black tennis players.” And fair or not,
people of color who may have some
influence in the cultural conversation
are often viewed as the avatar for their
entire group. This can be arduous and
misleading — no one person can
represent a complex and diverse people
— and sometimes even the ones pushed
to be spokeswomen push back. For
someone like Keys — she’s bi-racial, calls
Taylor Swift her favorite musician, lists
“The Notebook” as her favorite movie
and politely will check you that she
doesn’t want to be defined as black — the
role doesn’t fit.
That’s fine, but I would hope that
other people with a precious platform,
who are okay with the responsibility,
understand their significance and
represent accordingly.
And the sport of tennis, for so long not
a bastion of blackness, offers several role
models.
Twenty years ago, Venus made her U.S.
Open debut, the same year the new
center court was named after Arthur
Ashe, the first and only African
American man to win this tournament
as well as Wimbledon. That’s significant.
Katrina Adams, a black woman,
became the first person elected two
times in a row as U.S. Tennis Association
president and chief executive. That’s
motivating.
So yes, I’m a casual tennis fan who only
pays attention to the championships, but
I’ll be watching and rooting and
obsessing over Thursday’s match. It will
be the best thing on television.
candace.buckner@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
sports
FIFA on Wednesday ordered
that a World Cup qualifier
between South Africa and
Senegal be replayed after the
referee was found guilty of match
manipulation and banned for life.
South Africa beat Senegal, 2-1,
in the qualifier in November,
helped by a penalty awarded by
Ghanaian referee Joseph
Lamptey for a nonexistent
handball.
That result will be annulled,
and the game will be replayed
this November, FIFA said, after
the Court of Arbitration for Sport
upheld the life ban for Lamptey.
FIFA found Lamptey guilty of
breaching the rule relating to
“unlawfully influencing match
results” and banned him for life
in March. The referee failed with
appeals to FIFA’s appeal
committee and now to CAS.
Lamptey awarded a penalty
against Senegal defender
Kalidou Koulibaly in the game
in Polokwane, South Africa,
when replays clearly showed the
ball struck Koulibaly’s knee and
then dropped to the ground.
South Africa scored the 42nd-
cindy.boren@washpost.com
TELEVISION AND RADIO
NFL
8:30 p.m.
Ref’s action will result
in Cup qualifier replay
Seattle Seahawks defensive end
Michael Bennett plans to file a
civil rights lawsuit over what he
said was a violation of his constitutional rights when he was stopped
by Las Vegas police as he left the
Floyd
Mayweather-Conor
McGregor fight Aug. 26.
Bennett, in a letter addressed
“Dear World” and posted on Twitter on Wednesday morning, explained that he was the victim of
racial profiling that occurred as he
was heading back to his hotel.
When “several hundred people
heard what sounded like gun
shots,” they fled and Bennett
writes that “Las Vegas police officers singled me out and pointed
their guns at me for doing nothing
more than simply being a black
man in the wrong place at the
wrong time.”
“A police officer ordered me to
get on the ground,” Bennett wrote.
“As I laid on the ground, complying with his commands not to
move, he placed his gun near my
head and warned me that if I
moved he would ‘blow my [expletive] head off.’ Terrified and confused by what was taking place, a
second officer came over and
forcefully jammed his knee into
my back, making it difficult for me
to breathe. They then cinched the
handcuffs on my wrists so tight
that my fingers went numb.”
The use of what Bennett says
was excessive force “was unbearable. I felt helpless as I lay there on
the ground handcuffed facing the
real-life threat of being killed. All I
could think of was ‘I’m going to die
for no other reason than I am
black and my skin color is somehow a threat.’ ”
Bennett said he was placed in a
police car “until they apparently
realized I was not a thug, common
criminal or ordinary black man
but Michael Bennett, a famous
professional football player. After
confirming my identity, I was ultimately released without any legitimate justification for the officers’
abusive conduct.”
At a news conference later
Wednesday, a Las Vegas Police Department spokesman said the department has launched an internal investigation. TMZ shared video of the incident, showing Bennett lying on the ground as he was
being handcuffed by an officer. He
can be heard saying, “I wasn’t doing nothing, man! I was here with
my friends! They told us to get out.
Everybody ran.”
Bennett wrote that he has hired
Oakland civil rights attorney John
Burris to investigate and explore
his legal options. In the interim, he
intends to continue to protest inequality and police brutality by
not standing during the national
anthem, a gesture started by Colin
Kaepernick. The Seahawks will
play their season opener Sunday
at Green Bay.
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
DIGEST
SOCCER
C INDY B OREN
minute penalty and went on to
win — its only victory so far in
the final round of qualifying in
Africa. . . .
The World Cup qualifying
second-leg playoff between
Australia and Syria on Oct. 10
will be played at Sydney’s
Olympic Stadium. The first leg of
the Asia Confederation decider
will take place Oct. 5, probably in
Malaysia, where Syria plays
home games, which can’t be held
in its war-torn homeland.
The winner of the two-leg
playoff will meet the fourthplace CONCACAF team in homeand-away matches in November
for a spot at the World Cup in
Russia in 2018. . . .
Jack Harrison scored his
ninth goal of the season in the
84th minute, helping New York
City FC beat Sporting Kansas
City, 1-0, in an MLS match.
NYCFC (15-7-5) is 8-0-2 in its
past 10 home games. Kansas City
(10-6-10) has won only once in its
past 10 regular season road
games.
GOLF
Phil Mickelson was selected
as a captain’s pick for the
Presidents Cup and will be on a
U.S. team for the
23rd consecutive time.
Anirban Lahiri of India was
picked to play for the
International team for a second
time, and it might be just as
meaningful.
U.S. captain Steve Stricker
used his two picks on Mickelson
and Charley Hoffman, who was
narrowly bumped out of the
top 10 automatic qualifiers in the
final week. Mickelson tied for
sixth at the Dell Technologies
Championship outside Boston
on Monday to finish at No. 15 in
the Presidents Cup standings.
Mickelson was No. 30 when he
was picked for the 2015 team.
The surprise was International
captain Nick Price taking Lahiri,
who missed a short putt on the
18th hole in 2015 that proved
pivotal in the Americans winning.
Price also selected Emiliano
Grillo of Argentina. . . .
Michelle Wie withdrew from
next week’s Evian Championship,
the final major on the LPGA Tour,
as she recovers from surgery to
remove her appendix. Wie, 27,
withdrew from the Canadian
Pacific Women’s Open in Ottawa
before the final round Aug. 27 and
had the surgery that night at
Ottawa Hospital.
PRO BASKETBALL
Indiana Pacers owner Herb
Simon denied a report that the
team might sue the Los Angeles
Lakers for tampering with Paul
George.
The NBA fined the Lakers
$500,000 last week for violating
league rules, and there was a
report that the Pacers were
considering legal action, too.
In a statement, Simon said the
Pacers agreed with the league’s
decision and that the team
simply wanted to move on.
Indiana traded George to
Oklahoma City for Victor
Oladipo and Domantas
Sabonis after George’s camp let
it be known that the four-time
all-star intended to sign as a free
agent with the Lakers in July
2018.
Simon acknowledged those
sentiments put Indiana “in a
tough position” but the Pacers
acquired two good players. . . .
Minnesota Lynx star Lindsay
Whalen returned to practice
after missing the final 12 games
of the regular season with a
broken left hand.
Whalen plans to be ready
when the Lynx play in the second
round of the WNBA playoffs next
week. The top-seeded Lynx have
a bye in the first round, so
Whalen has a week to practice
and get back into the flow.
Kansas City at New England » WRC (Ch. 4), WBAL (Ch. 11)
MLB
1:30 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
10 p.m.
New York Yankees at Baltimore » MASN, WSPZ (570 AM)
Philadelphia at Washington » MASN, WJFK (106.7 FM)
Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh » MLB Network
Colorado at Los Angeles Dodgers » MLB Network
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
7:30 p.m.
Sam Houston State at Prairie View A&M » ESPNU
TENNIS
7 p.m.
U.S. Open, women’s semifinals » ESPN
GOLF
5:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m.
3 p.m.
10 p.m.
European Tour: European Masters, first round » Golf Channel
European Tour: European Masters, first round » Golf Channel
LPGA Tour: Indy Women in Tech Championship, first round » Golf Channel
Champions Tour: Japan Airlines Championship, first round » Golf Channel
WOMEN’S COLLEGE SOCCER
7 p.m.
North Carolina at Penn State » Big Ten Network
MISC.
NASCAR handed out
punishments to several of its top
teams for violations that
included Denny Hamlin’s
winning cars in his weekend
sweep at Darlington and the
No. 88 of Dale Earnhardt Jr.
NASCAR said Hamlin’s cars in
both the Cup and Xfinity races
violated rear suspension rules.
Cup crew chief Mike Wheeler
was suspended two races and
fined $50,000, and Hamlin was
stripped of five playoff points,
though the Joe Gibbs Racing
driver still will make NASCAR’s
postseason.
Earnhardt crew chief Greg
Ives was suspended one race and
fined $20,000 for two loose lug
nuts found after the Cup race. . . .
Chris Froome lost some of his
Spanish Vuelta lead in a brutal
climb that challenged riders in a
17th stage won by Stefan Denifl
of Austria in Los Machucos,
Spain. Froome, coming off a
comfortable time-trial victory
Tuesday, was struggling as he
rode up the steep Los Machucos
hill at the end of the 180.5kilometer (112.1-mile) stage.
— From news services
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
SU
college football
After breakthrough win, Howard can start believing
Late Sunday
morning, about
11 hours after its
historic victory,
the Howard
football team
Jerry
returned to
Brewer
campus, exited a
bus and walked to
church. There was no hero’s
welcome, just worship. At a
chapel a touchdown pass from
Greene Stadium, the Bison
slipped back into holy anonymity.
Soon enough, the players,
coaches and staff would roam
through the community and
encounter frequent outbursts of
affection. But in this moment,
cloaked in solemn praise, they
were where they belonged. An
impromptu parade would have
been nice, but for a program that
had won three of its previous
22 games, it was most
appropriate to return not to
overflowing fanfare but to a
building made for believers.
On Saturday, the players awoke
in Las Vegas as 45-point
underdogs to UNLV. By early
Sunday morning, they were
dancing in the visiting locker
room after a 43-40 triumph, with
Coach Mike London bouncing in
the middle and making
movements that seemed to
intertwine the dab and an old
Madonna-style vogue.
“Oh, no you didn’t,” London
said Tuesday, laughing at being
reminded of a performance that
has become viral video fodder.
“No you didn’t. You know, I got
caught up in the moment of
celebration with the players. It’s
just so great to see the elation, the
smiles on their faces. I didn’t do
any Michael Jackson moves or
anything like that, but I got
caught up with the players. That
was a great moment, minus the
dance moves.”
So what now? The music has
stopped. London will not
entertain any requests for a
groove reenactment. Howard has
10 games left, starting with a trip
to Kent State, another member of
the sport’s upper-crust Football
Bowl Subdivision. The Bison have
inspired more than a season’s
worth of enthusiasm and
appreciation in one game, but
this was only the first stroke of
the new coach’s paintbrush. At
least now more people will care to
know what he is trying to create.
In January, Howard Athletic
Director Kery Davis pulled off a
stunning coup by hiring London,
the former Maryland associate
head coach who was previously
the head coach at Virginia and
Richmond, where he won a
Football Championship
Subdivision national title. He
arrived asking “Why not?” of the
possibilities for a downcast
program. Once he learned of the
many difficulties, he adopted a
slogan for the season: “Mission
Possible.”
It’s not all that original. Google
the phrase, and 521,000 results
are produced. It’s rather corny,
without belief and substance
behind it. London possesses
oodles of both. Now that he is
away from supposed big-time
football — where fame and
pressure and the pursuit of
money complicate all intentions
— it’s easier to tone down
skepticism, hear his message and
trust his faith-infused leadership
style.
Howard went 2-9 last season
and lost five games by at least
27 points. It opened the year
playing guarantee games against
big-conference foes Maryland
and Rutgers and was outscored
104-27. It hadn’t won a season
opener since 2012. Before
Saturday, it had been outscored
176-37 in its four previous
openers.
Those weren’t just 0-1 starts.
Those were oh-no-and-1. As in,
“Will this season be glorious? Oh,
no. Did you see that score in the
first game?” Now, after the
biggest point-spread upset in
modern college football history,
Howard isn’t just a doormat with
a great band.
“That was just the surface on
Saturday, seeing how that
happened, how that went down,”
said linebacker Devin Rollins,
who returned a fumble 75 yards
for a touchdown against UNLV.
“It was a big moment, but it’s
going to get bigger.”
After practice Tuesday, the
players walked through campus
wearing blue team attire and
responded to greetings with shy
acknowledgment.
“Mission Impossible!” one
woman declared before
correcting herself. “I mean,
Mission Possible! Every time I see
you guys, I’m going to scream
that.”
“Congrats on that dub!” a
student yelled.
“Y’all was lit!” another
exclaimed.
Rollins went to a grocery store
in Columbia Heights. A woman
noticed him and asked whether
he played football. He nodded.
She smiled and replied, “The
alumni all over are so proud.”
The program that developed
Jay Walker, Leonard Stephens
and Antoine Bethea is still alive.
The UNLV triumph restored
some pride. This week, as the
players look forward, they find
inspiration in making a
connection to a past that includes
three conference championships,
five black college national titles
and a 1993 Division I-AA playoff
appearance.
“We wanted to do it for the
school,” Rollins said. “We wanted
to give Howard a good name.”
Running back Anthony
Philyaw, a Los Angeles native
who rushed for 1,230 yards last
season, tried to hold his tongue
when talking about low
expectations and the
embarrassment of past losing. It
has been an emotional struggle,
he conceded, working so hard for
so little and hearing insults.
Asked how he has stayed
committed, he pointed to a tattoo
across his chest. It referenced
Philippians 4:13: “I can do all
things through Christ who
strengthens me.”
“Coming from Howard,
everybody expects us to lose
because that’s, you know, the way
it’s been,” Philyaw said. “We work
too hard just for people to be
saying we’re going to lose every
game. That’s kind of disrespectful
in a way. Everybody here has been
here three, four years, putting in
blood, sweat and tears. But it’s all
good. Our doubters are our
doubters, but we’re steady
working it. It doesn’t discourage
us. It encourages us.”
Before London united the
team, he spent time learning
about his players individually, so
much time that many of them
bring it up on their own during
interviews. They were impressed.
Although London brought a new
level of preparation to the
program and demanded a
stronger commitment, he
avoided creating a new sheriff
vibe.
“It truly felt like family from
Day 1,” Philyaw said.
Since London’s arrival, there
have been some profound teambonding moments. He has
counseled players who lost loved
ones. Some have revealed
hardships that they were once
reluctant to discuss. Hurricane
Harvey affected several native
Texans on the team, and London
was amazed at how this squad
supported those players.
“When you talk about football
being just an element of their
lives — it’s not who they are —
you have to get to know them as
individuals, and you have to
really value a relationship,”
London said. “I love these guys.
I’m dedicated to doing whatever I
can to make them a better son,
student, husband, father. And last
on that list is a football player. I
believe it shows. The reciprocal of
it is giving a great effort, trying to
hold true to the values and the
mission of the program.”
When you have lived as
London has, it’s impossible not to
have perspective. The most
dramatic parts of his story are
told without shock now. There
was the time when, as a
Richmond police detective, a
robbery suspect aimed a gun at
his forehead and pulled the
trigger, and it did not fire. There
was the time he defied medical
odds by being a bone marrow
match for his daughter, Ticynn,
and helped to save her life.
London carries those
experiences and many others
into coaching.
After all he has been through,
what’s impossible about
rebuilding Howard?
“My perspectives, I believe, are
just a little different about
things,” London said. “The status
jobs — BCS, FBS, NFL — I’ve done
all that. And I’m here. The plan
for me is here.”
Like Philyaw, London has a
favorite Bible verse. It is Jeremiah
29:11. It reads: “For I know the
plans I have for you,” declares the
Lord, “plans to prosper you and
not to harm you, plans to give you
hope and a future.”
Howard football, for so long
the grass beneath an opponent’s
cleats, has hope and a future
now? Believe it.
jerry.brewer@washpost.com
For more by Jerry Brewer, visit
washingtonpost.com/brewer.
Terps’ winning plan overcame injuries, adversity
BY
R OMAN S TUBBS
As Maryland offensive coordinator Walt Bell designed his
game plan for the season opener
at Texas during the offseason, he
was haunted by Longhorns firstyear defensive coordinator Todd
Orlando and what had happened
when the two men last met on a
field three years earlier.
Bell was in his first year calling
plays at Arkansas State, and Orlando was serving as Utah State’s
defensive coordinator; both were
on the cusp of becoming bright
young stars in college football
when the two teams played in
late September 2014.
What mattered less was that
Arkansas State overcame four
turnovers and won, 21-14, in overtime; Orlando had out-coached
Bell and forced him to make a
slew of schematic changes in his
offensive philosophy. When the
two men met again last weekend
in Austin, Bell was reminded of
that pivotal moment in his coaching career — and he was more
than prepared.
His offense amassed 482 yards
on just 58 plays in the 51-41 win,
which marked the most points
Maryland has scored against a
ranked opponent and announced
Bell’s up-tempo, perimeter-attacking scheme as one fully capable of dominating at the line of
scrimmage and generating big
plays.
“I really thought that [Arkansas State-Utah State] game in
2014 helped craft and prepare
this plan, just as much as anything else,” Bell said, tracing the
origins of an offensive game plan
that helped bring Maryland its
first win over a ranked team since
2010 and its first such victory on
the road since 2008.
The offensive statistics were
staggering: Maryland gained
263 yards rushing on 43 carries
and 219 yards passing on just
15 attempts, manufactured seven
plays of 20 yards or more —
including on four of the team’s six
offensive touchdowns — and
gained 281 yards on first downs
alone.
Maybe more impressive was
that efficiency never wavered despite
quarterback
Tyrrell
Pigrome’s first pass getting inter-
RALPH BARRERA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tyrrell Pigrome, above, thrived Saturday at Texas before he suffered
a torn ACL. Kasim Hill filled in at QB and closed out the victory.
cepted and returned for a touchdown and his departure on the
last play of the third quarter with
a season-ending torn anterior
cruciate ligament. Before leaving, Pigrome accounted for 241
total yards and three touchdowns. He was replaced by true
freshman Kasim Hill, and the
offense didn’t miss a beat as Hill,
who will assume the starting
duties for the rest of the season,
made a string of plays in the
fourth quarter to help seal the
win.
“That was a big day for us, I
would think even at our own
expectation level, especially at
the quarterback position. I
thought those guys played a really solid game. We did not ask a
ton of those guys. You can kind of
look at the run-pass stuff and
know that,” Bell said.
As impressive as Maryland’s
stars were offensively — aside
from Hill and Pigrome, junior
running back Ty Johnson ran for
132 yards and junior wide receiver DJ Moore caught seven passes
for 133 yards — the anatomy of
this upset began in the trenches.
Maryland’s offensive line — with
four returning starters who have
added considerable bulk after
giving up 49 sacks a year ago and
struggling to get push against top
competition in the Big Ten —
allowed just one sack against the
Longhorns and showed their athleticism in running Bell’s complex zone-read scheme on the
perimeter.
“We know the type of offense
we run. We know defensive coordinators. They’re going to try to
throw types of blitzes, zone blitzes. They’re going to try to stem
our fronts,” Maryland junior
tackle Damian Prince said. “You
really just have to really hone in.”
Maryland Coach DJ Durkin
could point to so many factors in
his team’s breakthrough win as
he held his weekly news conference Tuesday — including the
resilience through the injuries of
Pigrome and senior defensive
end Jesse Aniebonam, who will
miss several months after frac-
turing his ankle in the third
quarter — but a centerpiece of
this win was also how Maryland
performed in the trenches on
defense and special teams.
That included a blocked field
goal in the second quarter by
starting offensive tackle Derwin
Gray — who was just moved to
special teams a month ago — that
set up a 71-yard touchdown return for sophomore Antoine
Brooks.
“We are a better-looking team
up front than we were a year ago.
And I’m talking about with the
same guys. They’ve developed
better, transformed their bodies,”
said Durkin, who hired former
Fordham offensive coordinator
Tyler Bowen to coach the offensive line and former Kentucky
assistant Jimmy Brumbaugh to
oversee the defensive line during
the offseason. “They understand
the scheme better, so they have a
better understanding for what
they’re doing.”
The defense not only endured
84 plays, but it also held Texas to
just 98 yards rushing on 31 attempts and recorded five sacks
and eight tackles for loss. That
production came on the heels of
what Maryland defensive coordinator Andy Buh called “simulated pressure” — Maryland disguised blitzes and rushed four on
90 percent of its calls, rotating as
many as eight players along the
defensive line.
“We’re always going to attack
the offense. It’s always going to be
something we do but doing it in a
smart way,” Buh said.
Buh’s defense only allowed two
touchdowns, and while Texas exposed Maryland with a defensive
touchdown and another two
scores off special teams blunders,
the Longhorns’ 41 points simply
weren’t enough to keep up with
Bell’s game plan.
The most rewarding drive netted minus-seven yards in the
waning seconds, when Bell told
Hill to get the offense into the
victory formation and take two
knees to seal the program’s biggest win in seven years.
“The best formation in football,” Prince said. “It just felt
great, just to know that we have a
fresh start.”
roman.stubbs@washpost.com
BRIAN ROTHMULLER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jake Olson, right, snapped for an extra point during USC’s victory
over Western Michigan, the culmination of an emotional journey.
USC’s blind long snapper
brightens season opener
When Jake Olson
heard his coach,
Clay Helton,
calling his name
late in Southern
California’s game
John
Saturday
Feinstein
afternoon against
Western
Michigan, he was caught a little
bit by surprise.
“Jake,” Helton said, “are you
ready?”
Olson had been ready all week,
ever since Helton had called him
into his office and told him the
plan was in place for the redshirt
sophomore to snap the ball on an
extra point in the season’s
opening game. Olson had thought
about it, been anxious about it,
lost sleep worrying about it. He
had been nervous in pregame
warmups thinking this was the
time — finally.
Olson, as much of the collegefootball-watching world now
knows, is different from other
football players, uniquely
different. He has been blind since
age 12, having lost both of his eyes
to retinal cancer.
Pete Carroll was then the coach
at USC. The Olsons had a
neighbor who taught at USC, and
they knew a number of players on
the team. When word reached
Carroll that there was a 12-yearold boy who had grown up loving
the Trojans who was about to lose
his sight, he got in touch with
Jake’s parents, Brian and Cindy
Olson.
“At first, I thought, ‘Wow, how
cool, I’m going to get to watch a
practice,’ ” Olson said Monday on
the phone. “I never dreamed that
I would meet the players, be in
the middle of their pre- and postpractice huddles and then travel
with them to a game. Never.”
Carroll also arranged for the
boy to hold the traditional band
leader’s sword and lead the USC
band after a game.
Olson went to Notre Dame
with the team, then to one last
practice the night before the
surgery. When he returned to
practice following the surgery, he
received a hero’s welcome from
the coaches and players. “I really
felt I was part of Trojans nation at
that point,” he said. “That feeling
has never left me.”
After Carroll left USC to coach
the Seattle Seahawks, he and
Olson kept in touch. In 2011,
Olson traveled to a game in
Seattle and was on the sideline
before the game while the teams
warmed up. Seahawks long
snapper Clint Gresham asked
whether he had any interest in
learning how to play the position.
“He showed me how to grip the
ball and gave me a sense of how to
release the ball,” Olson said. “It
was amazing. I realized this was a
way for me to keep playing
football.”
After learning how to longsnap, he played in high school.
When he got to USC, his dream
was to be part of the team and
someday snap the ball in a game.
Last week, with the Trojans
hosting Western Michigan,
Helton decided this was the time
to try to get it done. He contacted
Broncos Coach Tim Lester and
explained the situation. Clearly,
Helton couldn’t risk sending
Olson into the game as if he were
any other player and having a
huge defensive lineman slam into
him trying to block a kick.
Helton and Lester agreed that
USC wouldn’t rush on the
Broncos’ first extra point attempt,
assuming there was one. After
that, all Helton had to do was let
Lester know when he was
sending Olson into the game. The
school then contacted the NCAA
and the Pacific-12 Conference to
let them know they had taken
steps to ensure that Olson
wouldn’t be in danger if he got
into the game.
After that, Olson believed all
the work he had done with holder
Wyatt Schmidt was finally going
to pay off.
“It felt like it was pretty much
set in stone that I was going to do
it in the second quarter,” he said.
“Then the game turned out to be
closer, I guess, than we’d thought.
Halftime came, and even though I
warmed up for the second half to
be ready, the thought in my mind
was that it wasn’t going to happen
today.”
Western Michigan was willing
to stand down on an extra point
attempt but not in the game. It
was 14-14 at halftime, 21-21 after
three quarters and 28-28 midway
through the fourth quarter.
Then USC scored two
lightning-fast touchdowns, with
the Broncos answering only with
a field goal, and it was 42-31.
When the Trojans scored again on
a pick-six with 3:13 to go, Olson
heard his coach calling him.
“Are you good to go?” Schmidt
asked.
Olson wasn’t sure. “I mean, I’ve
done it thousands of times,” he
said. “I was trying to tell myself it
was just another day of work, only
in a different office. But suddenly
it was happening so fast.”
The spotlight is nothing new
for Olson. His story was
chronicled at length by ESPN in
2009, and he has done some
motivational speaking and even
co-wrote a book a few years ago
called “Open Your Eyes: Ten
Uncommon Lessons to Discover a
Happy Life.”
This, though, was completely
different. “I think the one thing
that made me nervous about the
whole thing was understanding
no matter how many times I told
myself it was just another snap,
that I knew it wasn’t,” Olson said.
“It was about more than football.
It was about showing people you
can overcome something bad,
something really awful, if you just
don’t give up on yourself.
“It was about showing other
parents who have kids who have
gone through truly tough times
that they can find joy, real joy,
again in their lives. It wasn’t
important to the outcome of the
game. It was, I knew, more
important than that.”
While Olson and Schmidt
warmed up, Helton signaled
Lester, who let his players know
what was going on. The official
spotted the ball, put his hand on
Olson’s back for a moment, and
stepped back. Olson heard
Schmidt calling the cadence. “It
felt faster than in practice,” he
said. “By then I was reasonably
okay. I just tried to do what I’ve
always done.”
Schmidt called for the ball.
Olson snapped it. “I knew it was a
good snap,” he said. “I could feel
it. Then I heard it hit Wyatt’s
hands, and after that, it was
pandemonium.”
The snap was perfect, and
Chase McGrath converted
arguably the most beautiful extra
point in football history.
When the game ended, Olson
was again handed the sword so he
could lead the band in
“Conquest,” the traditional USC
march. “Sword felt a lot lighter
than when I was 12,” he said,
laughing.
That night, Carroll called
Olson. “He told me he tried to
make a video to send me but he
kept breaking down, so he called
instead,” Olson said. “Then he
started crying all over again.”
Helton said Saturday that he
hoped to get Olson in to snap
again. “I hope I get to do it against
UCLA,” Olson said, talking about
the Trojans’ crosstown archrival.
Maybe that will happen. Maybe
it won’t. One thing is certain, Jake
Olson brightened the college
football world Saturday even if he
didn’t see it. Certainly, he felt it.
As did we all.
sports@washpost.com
For more by John Feinstein, visit
washingtonpost.com/feinstein.
D4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
tennis
The hair salon might be the busiest place at the U.S. Open
BY
A VA W ALLACE
new york — In the maze of
hallways underneath Arthur
Ashe Stadium, there is a path
that winds around drab rooms
reserved for news conferences,
skirts the peaceful lawn known
as the players’ garden, shoots up
two flights of stairs and ends at a
place where players of all ranking
and level of celebrity get treated
like Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic and Maria Sharapova.
They could even get the same
haircut as those stars should they
choose.
The salon at the U.S. Open is
just one of the perks offered to
players and their entourages during the tournament. Starting the
week before the main draw begins, when players competing in
the qualifying tournament start
flooding Flushing Meadows, salon owner Julien Farel offers
world-class haircuts, blowouts,
manicures, pedicures and facials
in a tiny room tucked in the far
corner of Billie Jean King National Tennis Center.
All services, the likes of which
a customer visiting Farel’s
10,000-square-foot spa on Park
Avenue in Manhattan could pay
hundreds of dollars for, are free
of charge.
“The most common thing is
haircuts,” Farel said Tuesday after he rushed from appointments
in Manhattan to attend to players
in Queens. “It’s a lot of braids
before a game because when you
do a braid for somebody like
DARREN CARROLL/U.S. TENNIS ASSOCIATION
Max Mirnyi gets a haircut from a member of Julien Farel’s staff. U.S. Open players receive free service.
Sharapova or Victoria Azarenka
— Sharapova no, but Azarenka
has a lot of layers, so you need to
lock her hair into the braid to
make sure they don’t move. Of
course, when you’re doing a
braid, the important thing is
she’s not bothered at any time on
court so she can focus on the
tennis.
“Then there’s the beauty of it.
Athletes, they’re just like you and
I. They enjoy looking good, too.
The haircut is just a very big part
of that.”
Farel has run the pop-up salon
at the U.S. Open since 2007. He
and his staff of seven, which
includes hair stylists and aestheticians, see between 50 and
70 clients on their busiest days of
the tournament. The room has
just three chairs for hair services,
a large table for nail services and
a stand with lipstick for those
who prefer a little color on court
or are dashing out for the night
after a match.
The walls are stocked with hair
products Farel designed with
tennis players in mind — they all
have sunscreen protection and
hydration for athletes battling
humidity. Small canisters of Evian spray are available for those
who have dropped by the salon
just to cool off after practice.
“It’s amazing how much we do
every day,” Farel said. “The first
week is the really crazy one, then
after people lose there are fewer
people. Then I start to become a
human again.”
Farel, who counts Ivanka
Trump as one of his clients,
worked at the salon at Roland
Garros in Paris before he moved
to New York and eventually drew
up a contract with the U.S. Tennis
Association. (USTA executives
also receive free services from
Farel throughout the tournament.)
All four Grand Slams include a
salon among their player amenities.
The Frenchman sees just as
many men as women in his work
at the U.S. Open, and he counts
Nadal and Djokovic as among his
most loyal customers. It was
Farel who lopped off Nadal’s long
hair for the first time in 2010, the
first year Nadal won a title in
New York, and the Spaniard now
makes routine visits to Farel’s
Manhattan salon for a cut.
For the men on tour, the salons
at Grand Slams are useful stops
for players who might not be able
to get to their regular barber
because of travel.
Jamie Murray, the sixthranked doubles player on the
ATP Tour, feels too squeamish
about accepting a free haircut to
use the salons at tournaments.
But he knows plenty of men who
stop in just to look presentable
on court.
Federer
is foiled
again by
del Potro
FEDERER FROM D1
illness del Potro carried through
Monday night had persisted,
then it appeared everyone
should want such illness.
It meant that while Federer
and Nadal have played four
times at the Australian Open,
five times at the French Open
and three times at Wimbledon,
they remain peculiarly on zero
here. That’s true even though the
top-ranked Nadal briskly went to
the semifinals on Wednesday
afternoon, tearing through 53rdranked 19-year-old Andrey Rublev of Russia, 6-1, 6-2, 6-2, in 96
minutes, after which Rublev
said, “I’m really happy” just for
the experience, understandable
for the age.
Del Potro, who spent a threeyear chunk of this decade wondering whether his fractious
wrists would allow him back to
the upper crust, wanted no such
happiness and held his resolve
particularly in a third-set tiebreaker on which the match
turned. In that 18-point ruckus,
Federer held four set points: at
6-4, 6-5, 7-6 and 8-7. Del Potro
contributed some blunders but
GEOFF BURKE/USA TODAY SPORTS
No. 3 seed Roger Federer came up short against 2009 U.S. Open champion and 24th-seeded Juan Martin del Potro, 7-5, 3-6, 7-6 (10-8), 6-4.
then contributed the commendable forgetfulness necessary to
negate those blunders. In his
four predicaments he produced a
fine low forehand return, a 124-
mph service winner, a low shot
that confounded Federer at the
net (so that he lifted it long) and
a commanding service point
when he whacked away a meek
return.
When he sent another low ball
to Federer at the net while returning up 9-8 and Federer directed it upward and long, both
Federer and Federer-Nadal
looked imperiled.
In five service games in the
fourth set, del Potro lost three of
23 points. That kind of domi-
“Hey, everyone loves a freebie,”
Murray said, “and mainly, it’s
convenient.”
The women have been known
to go for more drastic styles at
Grand Slam events. American
Bethanie Mattek-Sands, known
for her ever-changing hair color,
was a client of Farel’s. Semifinalist Sloane Stephens notices when
players such as 20th-ranked Daria Gavrilova show up in the
locker room after a visit with
Farel.
“First of all, Gavrilova got her
hair cut today, super short. I
don’t know if anyone saw that,
but she looks good,” Stephens
said at a news conference last
week. “It’s always, like, random.
Someone will get their hair colored. You’re like, ‘Okay, more
highlights, all right.’ ”
The list of high-profile tennis
players who seek out Farel’s salon
for a trim and a reprieve from a
busy tournament is long, and
Farel cherishes his relationship
with the USTA.
Still, Farel feels like he has
unfinished business at the U.S.
Open. There is one player he
hasn’t been able to get in his
chair.
“We have won the trust of
basically every player, and the
only one we don’t have is [Roger]
Federer,” Farel said with a laugh.
“He’s a hard one. Last year, we
talked about cutting his hair. We
talked and talked, and then the
next day he lost. He was gone. It
happens.”
ava.wallace@washpost.com
nance made it glaring and decisive at 2-2 when Federer
slammed an overhead into the
net on deuce and suffered del
Potro’s masterful, cross-court,
winning, backhand return on
break point. Then, at 30-30 in
the final game, Federer took an
open volley and, with shocking
unease for the 19-time Grand
Slam champion, directed it so
long and wide it might have
caromed through the stadium
hallways.
Within
moments,
Nadal
would have a match with del
Potro, even after a Wednesday
when he answered batches of
understandable questions about
playing Federer. One last destroyed tennis ball from a del
Potro forehand, his most renowned shot, into an open court
after a ringing serve, and the
motley U.S. Open had a final four
of No. 1 Nadal, No. 28 del Potro
and two first-time Grand Slam
semifinalists, No. 19 Pablo Carreno Busta and No. 32 Kevin
Anderson. Del Potro had found
his first Grand Slam semifinal
since Wimbledon in 2013. He had
played “my best match of the
tournament,” he said to ESPN on
the court afterward.
He had done this one round
after he came from the crypt,
mulling retirement with labored
breathing during a second set in
the fourth round against Dominic Thiem, before winning stunningly, 1-6, 2-6, 6-1, 7-6 (7-1), 6-4.
Somehow, two nights after narrow escape and just after playing the player considered the
best ever, del Potro found himself saying, “I cannot believe to
play another semifinal after all
my injuries, after all my surgeries.”
chuck.culpepper@washpost.com
V. Williams and Stephens march into all-American semifinals in New York
U.S. OPEN FROM D1
behold the evening so keenly as
the woman who figures to take
her seat in the Friends Box. Not
only does Sybil Smith figure to
watch her daughter, 24-year-old
Sloane Stephens, oppose Venus
Williams in an all-American,
all-African American U.S. Open
women’s semifinal, but the other
semifinal will feature Madison
Keys, the 22-year-old, onrushing
daughter of a white mother and
African American father.
Keys, who blew through Kaia
Kanepi of Estonia on Wednesday
night, 6-3, 6-3, will play Coco
Vandeweghe, yet another American, who always looked the more
forceful player on Wednesday
afternoon while upending topranked Karolina Pliskova, 7-6
(7-4), 6-3. Here come the first
four-American women’s semifinals since 1981 and Martina
Navratilova, Chris Evert, Tracy
Austin and Barbara Potter, and
here comes another milestone of
diversification.
“Oh,” host Koppel replied to
Campanis on-air that night back
in 1987. “I don’t — I don’t — it
may just be that they don’t have
access to all the country clubs
and the pools.”
The tennis testament to Koppel’s point — these U.S. Open
women’s semifinals — will come
on some heady anniversaries.
The 2017 U.S. Open marks 20
years since Williams debuted at
17 in those famous hair beads
and toiled all the way to the final
against Martina Hingis. It marks
60 since Althea Gibson won
Wimbledon. And it marks almost 30 since two early pioneers, Lori McNeil and Zina
Garrison, reached the semifinals
here, McNeil in 1988 to tussle for
three sets with Steffi Graf and
Garrison in 1989 by ending the
career of Evert in the quarterfinals, after which Garrison wept
for Evert as they embraced and
Evert said, “Congratulations.
You played well.”
In a sport similar to her
mother’s in its 20th-century legacy of exclusion toward people
of color, Stephens said, “It’s
great for American tennis. It’s
great for African American
women. I hope that we keep it
going. Yeah, there is not really
much to say other than it’s
amazing.”
Furthering the keen, knowledgeable eyes, there will be Ge-
neen McCauley, a database manager for the City University of
New York, an African American
and a tennis fan of uncommon
knowledge and devotion. (Yes,
she sits up through wee hours
watching the Australian Open in
January.) McCauley reached the
grounds Wednesday, as she does
chronically every U.S. Open,
with her mother, Joan McCauley.
Joan McCauley told of how her
daughter was an epitome of how
things can and do change.
“One day,” decades ago at their
home in the Bronx, “she’s sitting
there, and I’m like, ‘What are you
watching?’ ” Joan McCauley
said.
“Tennis,” Geneen McCauley
said.
And then . . .
“And then one day she calls me
up,” Joan McCauley said, “and
she says, ‘You know, Mom, I’m at
the U.S. Open.’ I’m like, ’Where
are you?’ She just came alone.
Didn’t wait for her friends to tag
along with her. To get a phone
call, and now I’m going to date
myself because when she mentioned that, I realized exactly
where she was. I mean, I knew
where this place was.
“But see, that world sphere
over there was for the World’s
Fair [in 1964] that I ended up
sneaking away from my high
school and my Mom didn’t know
I was here, so I had to go home
and I didn’t get home on time for
curfew because of where I was.
So when she called and said the
same thing, ‘Mom, I’m here,’
kind of a flashback. So I did
something that my Mom didn’t
want me to do, the World’s Fair,
and I would not have suggested
she come out here by herself,
and we both did something separately, independently, not worrying about other kids, just go for
it. And that’s what kids have to
do: Go for your passion. Go for
what you like.”
That rang with the words of
Stephens, who told of growing
up across the street from Sierra
Sport and Racquet Club in Fresno, Calif., playing in summer
camps and, “I thought it was fun.
My stepdad used to take me.
That’s how I started playing.”
As Geneen McCauley watches
such moments — Stephens
played Serena Williams in the
2013 Australian Open quarterfinals, and Keys did likewise in the
2015 Australian Open semifinals
— she reports a two-pronged
thought process. Yes, she spots
the significance. She hates that
“the history books often bypass”
McNeil and Garrison, the 1990
Wimbledon finalist, and MaliVai
Washington, the 1996 Wimbledon finalist. She loves the Williams sisters but credits them
with furthering what had come
before and of changing the
“physicality” of the sport.
At the same time, she started
watching Boris Becker and Ivan
Lendl, and her first undiluted
tennis love was Roger Federer.
“I do feel something,” she said,
“but I think what I feel is
different from what the masses
would feel. I’m able to look at
them as individual, exceptional
players, without the asterisk of
saying ‘African American,’ because that’s really what they
want to be known as — as
athletes, not ‘African American
athletes.’ And so I think any win
they have should be a win because of their merit. So culturally I’m looking at it two different
ways.”
At the same time, she said, “I
want people to take a moment
and see that each one got here in
a different path. Each path is
dramatically different from the
other. And I think people should
take note, and I’ll say this however controversial it may sound:
When an athlete is different
than the masses, it’s all ‘Sisboom-bah, U-S-A, U-S-A,’ but
when the cameras are turned off,
perfect example, Indian Wells
[and the controversy with the
crowd’s treatment of the Williamses there in 2001]. So it’s
like, okay, so now you see those
three [in the 2017 semifinals].
Are you with those three because
they’re ‘U-S-A?’ Or are you with
those three because they’re the
best and fought the hardest to
get there?”
That question could have
gone to thousands Tuesday
when the crowds boomed for
Stephens and Williams in their
stirring quarterfinals. After the
former match, the elegant Smith
headed haltingly up the stairs
toward the concourse. Groups of
fans kept asking her for selfies.
She kept stopping to oblige. Her
smile radiated. Her daughter
was healthy after foot surgery
last winter, grateful for that and
into the semifinal.
“It’s a beautiful thing,” Smith
said.
chuck.culpepper@washpost.com
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
SU
Youth sports declining in participation amid rising costs
BY
J ACOB B OGAGE
With skyrocketing costs, sport
specialization and coaches needing training, youth sports are in
the midst of a crisis, according to
new data published Wednesday by
the Sports & Fitness Industry Association and the Aspen Institute.
Athletic participation for kids
ages 6 through 12 is down almost
8 percent over the past decade,
according to SFIA and Aspen data,
and children from low-income
households are half as likely to
play one day’s worth of team
sports than children from households earning at least $100,000.
“Sports in America have separated into sport-haves and havenots,” said Tom Farrey, executive
director of Aspen’s Sports & Society program. The group released
its research at its annual Project
Play Summit on Wednesday in
Washington. “All that matters is if
kids come from a family that has
resources. If you don’t have money, it’s hard to play.”
Almost 45 percent of children
ages 6 to 12 played a team sport
regularly in 2008, according to
Aspen data. Now only about
37 percent do.
Experts blame that trend on
what they call an “up or out” mentality in youth sports. Travel
leagues, ones that sometimes can
cost thousands of dollars to join,
have crept into increasingly
younger age groups, and they take
the most talented young athletes
for their teams.
The children left behind either
grow unsatisfied on regular recreational teams or get the message
that the sport isn’t for them, Farrey said.
One of the summit’s main goals
is to enable informal play and
encourage kids to play more than
one sport. Aspen, a nonprofit
think tank, introduced a partnership with Major League Baseball,
the NBA, Nike and a dozen other
industry groups to pursue those
strategies.
MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred, the keynote speaker, said he
had spoken with the NBA, NFL
and NHL commissioners and they
agreed that “the best athlete is a
kid who played multiple sports.”
But pursuit of a college athletic
scholarship has “reshaped” the
youth sports landscape, Farrey
said, and placed an earlier emphasis on winning and elite skill development that often forces children to select one sport at an early
age.
That has pushed hypercompetitive selection processes into
younger age groups — some basketball analysts rank the nation’s
best kindergartners — and ravaged traditional recreational
leagues whose purpose is to get
kids playing rather than winning
games.
That has caused major losses
for the “big four” American youth
sports: baseball, basketball, soccer and football (both tackle and
flag). Those four sports have suffered the most severe losses of any
of the 15 team sports SFIA and
Aspen surveyed.
The only sports that saw growth
over the past eight years were golf,
gymnastics, ice hockey and track
and field.
Those declines have sent
leagues and the nonprofits that
support them scrambling to attract kids’ attention — often away
from video games — and sweeten
the deal for parents who sign their
kids up for sports.
“We go out and we have to sell
our program whether we charge
or not,” said Lawrence Cann,
founder of Street Soccer USA, a
nonprofit that develops local soccer clubs.
“You can’t stick a kid in right
field and he touches the ball once
or twice a game,” Farrey said.
“That’s not the same level of excitement as you can get on a video
game.”
But money, measured in average household income, is the largest indicator of whether a child is
going to be physically active or
play sports, the data shows.
And whether children are physically active, Farrey said, is another of the largest indicators as to
what kind of adult that child will
become.
“There’s reams and reams of
research on this,” he said. “Kids
who are physically active are less
likely to be obese. They’re better in
the classroom. They go to college.
They’re more likely to be active
parents. And because of that, their
kids are more active.”
Youth sports make up a $15 billion industry, according to a recent Time magazine cover story,
with costs for equipment, uniforms, travel, lodging, registration
fees and so much more. And as
elite travel teams reach into
younger age groups, coaching often becomes privatized, too.
“There’s been this presumption
that youth sports are exploding in
this country and private clubs and
trainers will pick up the slack,”
Farrey said. “For kids with resources, they have. But families
without resources are getting left
behind.”
And those travel teams and private skills coaches also can drive
up costs for traditional rec
leagues, experts say.
Teams are in a constant fight for
practice space, especially in urban
areas, and affluent leagues often
outbid rec leagues for use of the
best fields in the most convenient
locations, said former San Antonio mayor Ed Garza, now the president of the Urban Soccer Leadership Academy.
Another of the largest challenges facing youth sports: finding
qualified coaches. According to
SFIA and Aspen data, seven in 10
youth sports coaches are not
trained in six core competencies
required to be a qualified coach.
Those competencies are general
safety and injury prevention, effective motivational techniques,
CPR and basic first aid, physical
conditioning, concussion management, and sport-specific skills
and tactics.
At the summit, Aspen described the issue as a public health
concern.
There is also barely any diversity in the youth coaching ranks.
More than 70 percent of youth
coaches for both boys’ and girls’
sports are male. Half of all coaches’ households make at least
$100,000 per year.
Farrey said those kinds of
trends make sports look like they
are for some kids, those with
enough money and superior skill,
and not everyone. He hopes Aspen’s new coalition of sport organizations will help more kids
gain access to fun athletic experiences.
“Success looks like every kid in
this country having the opportunity to play sports,” he said, “and
develop habits of physical activity
for their lifetime.”
jacob.bogage@washpost.com
BARRY SVRLUGA
For it’s one, two, three G’s
you’re out at new ballgame
SVRLUGA FROM D1
MIKE EHRMANN/GETTY IMAGES
There were many seats available for the Nationals’ 8-1 win over the Marlins on Wednesday night in Miami as Hurricane Irma drew closer.
Irma causes schedule changes in Fla.
Postponements,
cancellations widespread
as storm approaches
BY
RICK MAESE
As Hurricane Irma thundered
through the Caribbean on
Wednesday,
sports
teams
throughout South Florida canceled games, evacuated families
and began prepping for the most
powerful storm the area has seen
in years.
Days before the Category 5
hurricane was expected to make
landfall, every sport, every team
and every level had been affected. The NFL postponed Sunday’s
regular season opener between
the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and
host Miami Dolphins, colleges
across the state shifted kickoff
times and postponed games, and
high schools throughout the area
canceled several days’ worth of
practices and games.
At the University of Miami,
classes were canceled for the
remainder of the week, and the
athletic department scratched
the entire weekend’s athletic
schedule, including the Hurricanes’ football game Saturday at
Arkansas State.
“The decision to cancel these
athletic contests is difficult, especially as some are scheduled to
take place away from Miami,”
Blake James, the school’s athletic
director, said in a statement.
“However, we made the collective decision that we simply
cannot put our student-athletes,
coaches and staff in danger traveling to and from contests. As we
have seen from the tragic impact
of Hurricane Harvey — and from
South Florida’s own experiences
— the impacts of hurricanes can
be devastating and long-lasting,
and can make travel extremely
difficult and dangerous.”
WILFREDO LEE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Marlins owner Jeffrey Loria said he would allow families of players
and staff to travel with the team as it embarked on a seven-game trip.
Tropical storm-force winds
could begin hitting South Florida on Saturday, with conditions
worsening overnight and Sunday. With plenty of warning,
teams, athletes and their families were wasting no time in
taking precautions.
The Miami Marlins were set to
wrap up their homestand
Wednesday night against the
Nationals before heading to Atlanta. Marlins owner Jeffrey Loria said he would be allowing
families of players and staff to
travel with the team Wednesday
night when it was set to embark
on a seven-game trip.
“Jeffrey ultimately made the
decision that all the families are
going to get to go with us, travel
the whole trip, kids and the
whole thing and really provide a
service for our families, which is
really very nice of the organization,” Manager Don Mattingly
told reporters.
While the Marlins’ games
would not have been directly
impacted by Irma, the team’s
decision means players won’t
have to worry about how their
loved ones are dealing with the
storm.
“We all feel the same way,”
Mattingly said. “You all feel the
same way, too. If you had your
kids here and you’re leaving on a
trip, it’s not the best feeling to
leave your family somewhere.”
While most of the NFL gets
underway Sunday, the Bucs and
Dolphins will have an unexpected bye week to start the season.
League officials considered playing the game at a neutral site,
such as Philadelphia or Pittsburgh, but ultimately decided to
push the matchup back to Week
11, when both teams had been
scheduled for a bye. The move
means both teams will have to
play 16 straight weeks this season.
The Orlando Pride was scheduled to host the Seattle Reign on
Saturday, but the National Women’s Soccer League moved the
game to Thursday night. Some
players felt that was still cutting
it close with Irma’s anticipated
arrival and were urging the
league Wednesday to consider
rescheduling the game for a later
date.
“It’s difficult for us players to
understand why the priority is to
play this game rather than get
out of this area?” Seattle midfielder Megan Rapinoe tweeted.
“Being in Orlando isn’t safe,
it’s scary & I cant help but feel
that the number 1 priority
should be us getting out of here
now,” Seattle co-captain Jess
Fishlock tweeted.
A four-team NHL tournament
for rookies also was canceled
Wednesday. The tournament
was scheduled to take place in
Estero, Fla., near the state’s
southwestern coast, beginning
Saturday and was to include the
Washington Capitals, Florida
Panthers, Tampa Bay Lightning
and Nashville Predators.
Florida is in a state of emergency, and classes in MiamiDade and Broward counties
have been canceled for the rest
of the week, in addition to all
high school athletic events being
postponed. College teams were
mulling their options Wednesday and juggling start times.
While the Hurricanes’ football game at Arkansas State will
not be made up because the
teams don’t have a mutual open
date, most other schools managed to adjust their start times
to account for the incoming
storm.
Florida International was
scheduled to host Alcorn State
on Saturday for its home opener,
but that game instead will be
played Friday in Birmingham,
Ala., a neutral site.
Florida State moved up its
7 p.m. kickoff against Louisiana
Monroe to noon. The Florida
Gators did the same for their
home game against Northern
Colorado on Saturday.
The University of Central Florida moved its contest with Memphis from Saturday to Friday.
South Florida will still host Connecticut on Saturday, but the
game time was changed from
noon to 10:30 a.m.
rick.maese@washpost.com
Network on the Boston dugout,
trying to swipe signs back.
The story has everything you
would want: the sport’s most
bitter rivals, embroiled in a
pennant race, engaging in
espionage and counterespionage
in hopes of getting an edge.
But really, these two forces —
the competitive urge to gain an
advantage and modern sports’
inevitable embrace of technology
— have long been intertwined. It’s
an awkward marriage.
Those two conversations in one
day show how ingrained each is
in the day-to-day life of a major
league team: Players and coaches
spend hours studying tendencies
not just from the dugout but on
video as well — because MLB’s
use of video replay to challenge
umpiring calls means each club
has a monitor not far from its
dugout. And tablets are a regular
part of preparation and analysis,
a part of baseball life just as
they’re . . . well, a part of nearly
everyone’s life.
So at one level, it’s not
surprising that technology and
sign stealing merged. It’s actually
kind of surprising we haven’t seen
more similar situations. If sign
stealing — standing on second
base, figuring out what pitch the
catcher is calling for and relaying
that to the batter — is an accepted
part of the game (and it is) and
baseball teams are incorporating
new technologies in their
preparation and scouting more
and more every day (and they are),
they were on a collision course.
“Electronics makes things
easier, more accessible — and
more dangerous,” Yankees
Manager Joe Girardi told
reporters Tuesday in Baltimore.
Any “dangers,” though, would
be minimized if MLB could
articulate and implement strong
policies about what’s permitted
and what’s not. Right now — and
the Red Sox-Yankees imbroglio
highlights this — there’s too much
gray area. That in-between
territory isn’t terribly different
from other forms of envelope
pushing in baseball. The use of
pine tar or other sticky
substances by pitchers — to gain a
better grip on the ball — is both
illegal and generally accepted.
How much more gray can you
get?
The use of advanced analytics
and other modern means of
evaluation and preparation are
accepted and even celebrated in
baseball. Implementing the
conclusions baseball research
departments come to, however,
can be clunky. Early in the 2016
season, the cutting-edge Dodgers
took defensive placement to a
previously unseen level by
painting dots in the outfield so
their defenders would have a
baseline idea of where to stand —
and would shift based on the dots,
which were positioned by a laser
system not unlike a GPS. When
the Dodgers wanted to do this for
games at Citi Field, the host New
York Mets balked.
So what’s cheating? Teams
have altered defensive
positioning based on who’s up
and who’s pitching for
generations, long before modern
over-shifts came into vogue. The
line that was crossed then — both
by the Dodgers with outfield
alignment and by the Red Sox
with sign stealing — was
electronic.
“It’s the electronic equipment
that creates the violation,”
Commissioner Rob Manfred told
reporters Tuesday in Boston.
So the question becomes: What
kind of punishment do the Red
Sox deserve for mixing these two
elements together?
They deserve to be punished,
sure. But in a sport in which
stealing signs is a part of history
— indeed, a part of history that
can be romanticized in folklore
and even admired as a craft —
and in which technology is
playing an increasing role, is it
clear that the punishment must
be harsh?
Taking away a draft pick would
be harsh because it impedes the
development of a franchise.
Suspending a player would be
harsh. The Times reported that
Dustin Pedroia and Brock Holt
were two Red Sox players seen on
video submitted by the Yankees
taking interest in information
supplied by the trainer. Take one
or both out of September games,
and the playoff picture could be
altered.
Such punishments seem like a
stretch. What’s more appropriate
is a fine. Fine the franchise. Fine
President of Baseball Operations
Dave Dombrowski for allowing
this to happen on his watch. Fine
the individuals involved.
But let’s be honest: If sign
stealing is part of baseball’s
culture and technology is in
bullpens and dugouts every single
night, this was bound to happen.
The result we want here isn’t one
that alters Boston’s path to the
playoffs. What we want is another
wrinkle should the two franchises
meet again in October. We want
tension. We want animosity. If it
took an Apple Watch to create it,
that’s great.
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
For more by Barry Svrluga, visit
washingtonpost.com/svrluga.
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Nationals closer Sean Doolittle said he makes use of technology by
going over scouting reports on an iPad before entering games.
D6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
Baseball
National League
EAST
W
American League
L PCT GB L10 STR
— 7-3 W-3
CENTRAL
W
Chicago
76 63 .547
72 68 .514 41/2 5-5 L-3
Washington
85 54 .612
Miami
67 72 .482 18 1-9 L-4
Milwaukee
L PCT GB L10 STR
WEST
— 7-3 W-1
W
L PCT GB L10 STR
x-Los Angeles 92 46 .667
x-Arizona
— 1-9 L-5
81 58 .583 111/2 10-0 W-12
EAST
W
Boston
79 61 .564
L PCT GB L10 STR
— 6-4 W-2
Cleveland
83 56 .597
— 10-0 W-14
x-Houston
85 53 .616
New York
74 64 .536
4 5-5 L-1
Minnesota
72 67 .518
11 6-4 W-1
Los Angeles
72 68 .514 14 6-4 L-1
CENTRAL
W
L PCT GB L10 STR
WEST
W
L PCT GB L10 STR
— 7-3 W-6
Atlanta
61 77 .442 23
4-6 W-1
x-St. Louis
71 67 .514 41/2 7-3 W-3
Colorado
74 65 .532 181/2 4-6 L-1
Baltimore
71 68 .511 71/2 7-3 W-1
Kansas City
69 69 .500 131/2 5-5 W-1
Texas
70 69 .504 151/2 6-4 L-1
New York
60 79 .432 25 3-7 W-1
Pittsburgh
67 73 .479 91/2 5-5 L-1
x-San Diego
62 77 .446 301/2 5-5 L-2
Tampa Bay
70 71 .496 91/2 6-4 L-1
Detroit
59 80 .424 24 3-7 L-1
x-Seattle
69 70 .496 161/2 3-7 L-2
Philadelphia
53 86 .381 32 5-5 L-1
Cincinnati
61 79 .436 151/2 6-4 W-3
San Francisco 55 87 .387 39 3-7 W-1
Toronto
64 76 .457 15 3-7 L-2
Chicago
54 84 .391 281/2 3-7 L-3
Oakland
59 80 .424 261/2 2-8 W-1
1/
2
x-Late game
x-Late game
NO T E S
TOD AY
O’S-YANKEES, PPD.
NL games
Baltimore’s game against
New York at Camden
Yards was postponed by
rain until Thursday
afternoon, when the
teams again will attempt
to conclude their threegame series.
PHILLIES AT NATIONALS, 7:05
W-L
ERA TEAM
Nola (R)
10-10
3.72 11-12
Roark (R)
11-9
4.48 14-12
CUBS AT PIRATES, 7:05
Lester (L)
9-7
4.46 15-12
Taillon (R)
7-5
4.50 11-10
REDS AT METS, 7:10
Mahle (R)
0-1
2.45
0-2
PERSONNEL DEPT.
Harvey (R)
4-4
5.97
5-9
Cardinals: St. Louis
acquired RHP Juan
Nicasio from Philadelphia
in exchange for minor
league IF Eliezer Alvarez.
MARLINS AT BRAVES, 7:35
Reds: OF Billy Hamilton,
who leads the majors with
58 stolen bases, suffered
a fractured left thumb
attempting to bunt
against the Brewers and
was placed on the 10-day
disabled list.
ROCKIES AT DODGERS, 10:10
STAR OF THE DAY
Eduardo Escobar,
Twins
Third baseman went 3 for
5 with two runs and three
RBI as Minnesota topped
Tampa Bay, 10-6.
TODAY’S GAME
TO WATCH
Indians at White Sox,
8:10 p.m.
AL Cy Young candidate
Corey Kluber (14-4,
2.56 ERA) takes the hill
for red-hot Cleveland.
AL leaders
Entering Wednesday’s games
ERA
Kluber, Cle ....................................... 2.56
Sale, Bos .......................................... 2.85
Severino, NY .................................... 3.03
Stroman, Tor ................................... 3.08
Cashner, Tex .................................... 3.29
Santana, Min ................................... 3.35
Pomeranz, Bos ................................. 3.36
Cobb, TB ........................................... 3.64
Carrasco, Cle .................................... 3.67
Verlander, Hou ................................ 3.74
WINS
Sale, Bos ......................................... 15-7
Bauer, Cle ........................................ 15-8
Kluber, Cle ....................................... 14-4
Pomeranz, Bos ................................ 14-5
Santana, Min ................................... 14-7
Vargas, KC ..................................... 14-10
Carrasco, Cle ................................... 13-6
Bundy, Bal ....................................... 13-9
Keuchel, Hou ................................... 12-3
Paxton, Sea ..................................... 12-3
Severino, NY ................................... 12-6
Berrios, Min .................................... 12-7
GAMES PITCHED
Jennings, TB ....................................... 67
Shaw, Cle ............................................ 67
Moylan, KC .......................................... 66
Parker, LA ........................................... 65
SAVES
Colome, TB ......................................... 42
Osuna, Tor .......................................... 35
Kimbrel, Bos ....................................... 32
Diaz, Sea ............................................. 31
Giles, Hou ........................................... 29
Herrera, KC ......................................... 26
Allen, Cle ............................................ 24
INNINGS PITCHED
Sale, Bos ........................................ 189.2
Santana, Min ................................. 182.2
Porcello, Bos .................................. 181.1
Archer, TB ...................................... 179.1
STRIKEOUTS
Sale, Bos ........................................... 270
Archer, TB ......................................... 225
Kluber, Cle ........................................ 222
Severino, NY ..................................... 201
Carrasco, Cle ..................................... 183
Verlander, Hou ................................. 183
Bauer, Cle ......................................... 170
Porcello, Bos ..................................... 163
Estrada, Tor ...................................... 159
Tanaka, NY ....................................... 158
4.31
4-11
Lynn (R)
10-6
2.99 13-15
Richard (L)
6-13
4.94 11-17
Kershaw (L)
6-4
4.26
9-6
16-2
1.95
20-2
NL scores
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
at Washington 2, Miami 1
at Pittsburgh 4, Chicago Cubs 3
at Cincinnati 9, Milwaukee 3
Philadelphia 9, at N.Y. Mets 1
at Colorado 9, San Francisco 6
Arizona 3, at L.A. Dodgers 1 (10)
St. Louis 8, at San Diego 4
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
CHRIS O'MEARA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Washington 8, at Miami 1
at Cincinnati 7, Milwaukee 1
Chicago Cubs 1, at Pittsburgh 0
at N.Y. Mets 6, Philadelphia 3
San Francisco 11, at Colorado 3
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, Late
St. Louis at San Diego, Late
Minnesota homecoming
Twins OF Ehire Adrianza slides safely into home as Minnesota upends Tampa Bay, 10-6, to slip ahead of the Angels in the race for the second AL wild-card spot.
QUOTABLE
— Elvis Andrus, Rangers
shortstop, after belting his
20th home run in a 12-8
win over the Braves to join
the Astros’ Jose Altuve and
the Angels’ Mike Trout as
the only players with at
least 20 home runs and
20 steals this season.
3.91 14-14
2-8
Gray (R)
14
“It’s great
company, the
two best players
in the league
right now. I’m
really proud of
the season I’m
having right now,
but it’s not about
me.”
9-8
Newcomb (L)
CARDINALS AT PADRES, 9:10
BY THE NUMBERS
Consecutive wins for the
AL Central-leading Indians
— equaling the franchise
record set last season —
after Wednesday’s 5-1
victory over the White Sox.
Straily (R)
AL games
YANKEES AT ORIOLES, 1:35
W-L
ERA TEAM
8-9
3.36 10-12
10-9
4.79 15-14
Gray (R)
Mets 6, Phillies 3 (6)
Twins 10, Rays 6
Reds 7, Brewers 1
Athletics 3, Angels 1
Red Sox 6, Blue Jays 1
Cubs 1, Pirates 0
Gausman (R)
Robert Gsellman
pitched well in a winning
return from the minors
and Travis d’Arnaud homered to help New York
beat Philadelphia in a
game shortened to six innings because of rain.
Asdrubal Cabrera went
3 for 3 with an RBI single
and scored twice as the
Mets took two of three
and improved to 37-17
against Philadelphia over
the past three years.
Eduardo Escobar had
three hits and three RBI,
and Minnesota beat Tampa Bay to end a threegame skid.
Rookie Luis Castillo
struck out 10 in his final
start of a fine season, Zack
Cozart and Jose Peraza
homered, and last-place
Cincinnati completed a
three-game sweep of playoff-contending Milwaukee.
Sean Manaea pitched
six-plus innings of scoreless ball and Khris Davis
homered as Oakland ended a season-high eightgame losing streak with a
victory over Los Angeles,
which is locked in a tight
wild-card race.
Doug Fister gave up one
run over seven innings,
Jackie Bradley Jr. hit a tworun homer and drove in
three runs, and Boston
beat Toronto a day after the
teams played a 19-inning
marathon.
The AL East-leading Red
Sox are four games ahead
of the second-place Yankees, who were rained out.
Alex Avila delivered an
RBI triple in the ninth inning, capping a duel between Jose Quintana and
Gerrit Cole to lift Chicago.
After Cole limited Chicago to two hits over eight innings, Avila scored pinchrunner Leonys Martin from
second base with a drive to
the right field corner off reliever Daniel Hudson.
INDIANS AT WHITE SOX, 8:10
TORONTO
AB
Carrera rf.............4
Hernandez cf.......4
Smoak 1b ............4
Morales dh ..........4
Saunders lf..........3
Montero c............2
Barney 3b ............4
Goins 2b ..............4
Urena ss ..............3
TOTALS
32
R
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 2 .293
0 0 0 2 .154
1 0 0 1 .283
0 0 0 1 .244
1 0 1 1 .214
0 1 2 0 .224
0 0 0 2 .221
1 0 0 1 .228
0 0 0 0 .154
4 1 3 10 —
BOSTON
AB
Nunez 2b .............3
Holt 2b.................0
Pedroia dh ...........2
Young ph-dh........1
Benintendi lf .......4
Betts rf................3
Moreland 1b ........3
Bogaerts ss .........4
Devers 3b ............4
Leon c ..................4
Bradley Jr. cf .......4
TOTALS
32
R
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
6
H BI BB SO AVG
2 0 1 0 .309
0 0 1 0 .181
0 0 1 0 .300
0 0 0 1 .233
0 1 0 2 .270
1 0 1 0 .262
1 0 1 0 .248
1 1 0 1 .268
2 1 0 0 .290
1 0 0 0 .228
1 3 0 1 .257
9 6 5 5 —
CHICAGO
AB
Jay lf ...................4
La Stella 2b.........3
Bryant 3b............3
Rizzo 1b ..............3
Martin pr ............0
Caratini 1b ..........0
Happ cf................3
Almora cf............0
Avila c .................4
Heyward rf..........3
Baez ss ...............3
Quintana p..........2
Schwarber ph .....1
Freeman 2b.........0
TOTALS
29
R
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 1 .288
0 0 1 0 .284
0 0 1 1 .289
0 0 1 0 .277
0 0 0 0 .174
0 0 0 0 .261
0 0 1 2 .253
0 0 0 0 .286
1 1 0 2 .268
0 0 1 0 .257
1 0 0 1 .271
0 0 0 2 .100
0 0 0 1 .201
0 0 0 0 .077
3 1 5 10 —
PITTSBURGH AB
Marte lf ..............4
Luplow rf ............3
McCutchen cf......4
Freese 3b ............3
Osuna 1b.............3
Bell ph.................1
Rodriguez 2b.......3
Jaso ph................1
Mercer ss............3
Stewart c............3
Cole p ..................3
TOTALS
31
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 1 .260
0 0 1 1 .200
1 0 0 2 .275
1 0 1 2 .268
1 0 0 0 .248
0 0 0 0 .262
1 0 0 1 .179
0 0 0 1 .222
0 0 0 0 .253
1 0 0 0 .189
1 0 0 1 .163
6 0 2 9 —
PHILA.
AB
Hernandez 2b .....3
Galvis ss.............3
Williams cf.........3
Hoskins lf-1b......3
Kim rf .................2
Joseph 1b ...........3
Crawford 3b .......2
Rupp c ................2
Pivetta p ............1
Kelly ph-lf ..........1
TOTALS
23
R
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
3
H BI BB SO AVG
3 1 0 0 .289
1 0 0 0 .257
1 2 0 0 .274
0 0 0 1 .309
0 0 1 0 .231
0 0 0 2 .238
0 0 0 1 .143
0 0 0 0 .220
0 0 0 0 .079
0 0 0 0 .188
5 3 1 4 —
NEW YORK
AB
Reyes ss .............3
Aoki rf ................3
Cabrera 3b..........3
d'Arnaud c ..........3
Nimmo lf ............1
Lagares cf ..........3
Smith 1b ............3
Reynolds 2b........2
Gsellman p .........2
Taijeron ph .........1
TOTALS
24
R
1
1
2
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
6
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 0 .236
1 0 0 0 .280
3 1 0 0 .264
2 2 0 0 .237
0 2 0 0 .263
1 0 0 1 .266
1 0 0 1 .187
0 0 1 2 .212
1 1 0 1 .172
0 0 0 1 .056
10 6 1 6 —
PHILA. ................000 003 — 3 5 0
NEW YORK .........311 010 — 6 10 1
One out when winning run scored.
E: Cabrera (15). LOB: Philadelphia 3,
New York 5. 2B: Hernandez (23), Cabrera (25), Lagares (12), Smith (4).
HR: Williams (9), off Gsellman; d’Arnaud (11), off Pivetta.
PHILA.
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Pivetta ................ 5 10 6 6 0 5 6.49
Ramos .............. 0.1 0 0 0 1 1 4.82
MINNESOTA AB
Dozier 2b.............4
Polanco ss...........4
Buxton cf ............5
Escobar 3b ..........5
Grossman dh ......4
Vargas 1b............3
Mauer ph-1b .......1
Goodrum rf .........3
Kepler ph-rf ........1
Gimenez c ...........3
Adrianza lf..........4
TOTALS
37
R
2
1
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
2
2
10
H BI BB SO AVG
1 1 1 1 .262
2 0 0 1 .259
0 0 0 2 .253
3 3 0 1 .253
2 1 0 2 .247
0 0 0 2 .242
0 0 1 0 .302
0 0 0 2 .000
0 1 0 0 .246
2 0 1 0 .206
2 3 0 0 .262
12 9 3 11 —
TAMPA BAY AB
Kiermaier cf........5
Dickerson dh.......3
Longoria 3b.........3
Duda 1b...............3
Souza Jr. rf .........4
Miller 2b .............4
Hechavarria ss....3
Smith lf...............4
Sucre c ................3
Morrison ph ........1
TOTALS
33
R
1
1
2
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
6
H BI BB SO AVG
1 2 0 1 .282
0 0 1 3 .284
2 1 1 0 .266
1 3 1 1 .231
1 0 0 2 .247
0 0 0 0 .186
1 0 1 0 .252
1 0 0 1 .274
1 0 0 1 .253
0 0 0 0 .252
8 6 4 9 —
MINNESOTA... 130 020 301 — 10 12 0
TAMPA BAY ... 103 020 000 — 6 8 1
E: Cishek (3). LOB: Minnesota 5, Tampa
Bay 4. 2B: Polanco (27), Grossman (18),
Longoria (34). 3B: Escobar (4). HR: Dozier (29), off Snell; Adrianza (2), off Snell;
Longoria (18), off Slegers; Duda (28),
off Slegers; Kiermaier (11), off Boshers.
MINNESOTA IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Slegers ................ 4 5 5 5 2 3 6.10
Boshers ............ 0.1 1 1 1 0 1 4.96
Pressly.............. 1.1 1 0 0 2 2 4.72
Rogers .............. 1.1 0 0 0 0 2 3.31
Hildenberger ....... 1 0 0 0 0 1 2.51
Belisle.................. 1 1 0 0 0 0 4.53
TAMPA BAY IP
Snell .................... 4
Romo ................ 1.2
Alvarado........... 0.1
Cishek............... 0.1
Pruitt................ 0.2
Roe ...................... 1
Boxberger............ 1
H
7
1
0
2
1
0
1
R ER BB SO ERA
6 6 0 7 4.36
0 0 1 3 4.15
0 0 0 0 4.70
3 3 1 1 2.43
0 0 1 0 5.09
0 0 0 0 6.00
1 1 0 0 4.43
MILWAUKEE AB
Perez 2b..............4
Walker 1b ...........3
Thames ph ..........1
Braun lf...............4
Shaw 3b..............4
Santana rf...........3
Vogt c .................3
Broxton cf...........3
Arcia ss...............3
Garza p................1
Bandy ph.............1
Sogard ph-2b ......1
TOTALS
31
R
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 1 .262
1 1 0 1 .270
0 0 0 1 .235
0 0 0 2 .275
1 0 0 2 .276
0 0 0 2 .275
0 0 0 0 .240
1 0 0 1 .222
1 0 0 1 .268
0 0 0 0 .086
0 0 0 1 .213
0 0 0 0 .278
4 1 0 12 —
CINCINNATI AB
Hamilton cf.........1
Ervin ph-cf ..........4
Cozart ss.............4
Votto 1b..............3
Duvall lf ..............4
Suarez 3b............4
Schebler rf ..........3
Peraza 2b............4
Barnhart c...........2
Castillo p.............3
Gennett ph..........1
TOTALS
33
R
0
0
2
1
1
1
0
2
0
0
0
7
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 0 .248
1 0 0 1 .391
2 1 0 0 .303
1 0 1 1 .313
2 1 0 2 .253
2 0 0 0 .273
0 1 1 1 .235
1 2 0 2 .260
1 1 2 0 .266
0 0 0 1 .069
0 0 0 0 .298
10 6 4 8 —
MILWAUKEE .. 100 000 000 — 1 4 1
CINCINNATI .... 005 000 11X — 7 10 0
E: Walker (7). LOB: Milwaukee 3, Cincinnati 6. 2B: Shaw (30), Suarez (25).
HR: Walker (13), off Castillo; Cozart
(18), off Jeffress; Peraza (5), off Knebel.
MILWAUKEE IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Garza ................ 2.2 6 5 5 2 2 5.06
Suter ................... 1 2 0 0 1 0 3.55
Hughes ............. 0.1 0 0 0 0 1 3.53
Jeffress ............... 2 1 1 1 0 3 4.69
Hader................... 1 0 0 0 0 2 2.10
Knebel .............. 0.1 1 1 1 1 0 1.38
Williams ........... 0.2 0 0 0 0 0 0.00
CINCINNATI
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Castillo ................ 8 4 1 1 0 10 3.12
Shackelford ......... 1 0 0 0 0 2 6.10
WP: Rogers (6-3); LP: Cishek (3-2).
Snell pitched to 2 batters in the 5th.
Slegers pitched to 1 batter in the 5th.
Inherited runners-scored: Boshers 1-1,
Rogers 1-0, Romo 2-2, Alvarado 1-0,
Pruitt 1-1. HBP: Romo (Polanco). T:
3:17. A: 7,185 (31,042).
WP: Castillo (3-7); LP: Garza (6-9). Jeffress pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Hughes 2-0,
Williams 1-0. T: 2:44. A: 12,626
(42,319).
Rangers 12, Braves 8
Braves 5, Rangers 4
Game 1
Elvis Andrus had four
hits, including a homer, and
three RBI to lift Texas.
Game 2
Freddie Freeman hit a
two-run double during Atlanta’s five-run second inning against Cole Hamels,
and the Braves held off a
rally to beat Texas.
NEW YORK
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Gsellman............. 6 5 3 2 1 4 5.44
WP: Gsellman (6-6); LP: Pivetta (5-10).
T: 1:53. A: 19,617 (41,922).
L.A.
AB
Phillips 2b ...........5
Trout dh ..............2
Upton lf...............4
Cron 1b................4
Simmons ss ........4
Calhoun rf ...........4
Pennington 3b ....2
Revere cf.............1
Graterol c ............3
Cowart ph ...........1
Young Jr. cf .........2
Valbuena ph-3b...2
TOTALS
34
R
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 1 .285
0 0 2 0 .324
0 0 0 3 .280
2 0 0 1 .266
0 0 0 0 .284
2 1 0 1 .249
1 0 1 0 .270
0 0 0 1 .261
1 0 0 0 .224
0 0 0 0 .231
1 0 0 1 .263
0 0 0 1 .199
7 1 3 9 —
OAKLAND
AB
Semien ss ...........4
Pinder rf..............3
Healy dh..............4
Davis lf................3
Joyce lf................0
Olson 1b ..............4
Chapman 3b ........0
Nunez ph-3b .......2
Lowrie 3b ............1
Canha cf ..............3
Powell cf .............1
Barreto 2b...........3
Garneau c............3
TOTALS
31
R
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 1 .257
1 1 0 2 .246
1 0 0 2 .265
2 1 1 0 .239
0 0 0 0 .240
1 0 0 1 .259
0 0 1 0 .232
0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 0 .274
0 0 0 1 .202
0 0 0 1 .255
0 0 0 2 .163
0 0 0 2 .186
6 2 2 13 —
L.A. .................. 000 000 010 — 1 7 2
OAKLAND ....... 000 120 00X — 3 6 0
TORONTO........ 100 000 000 — 1 4 2
BOSTON .......... 100 401 00X — 6 9 1
E: Upton (9), Revere (3). LOB: Los Angeles 9, Oakland 7. 2B: Calhoun (19),
Semien (15). 3B: Calhoun (2). HR: Davis
(39), off Skaggs.
L.A.
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Skaggs ................. 6 5 3 2 1 9 4.71
Norris................... 1 0 0 0 0 2 4.33
Middleton ............ 1 1 0 0 1 2 4.59
E: Montero (6), Urena (1), Holt (4). LOB:
Toronto 7, Boston 8. 2B: Smoak (23),
Leon (13). 3B: Bogaerts (6). HR: Bradley
Jr. (15), off Biagini.
TORONTO
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Biagini............... 3.1 6 5 5 3 2 5.29
Mayza ............... 1.2 3 1 1 0 1 9.00
Ramirez ............... 2 0 0 0 1 1 0.00
Loup ..................... 1 0 0 0 1 1 4.13
OAKLAND
IP
Manaea................ 6
Dull ................... 1.2
Moll................... 0.1
Hatcher................ 1
H
5
1
1
0
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 3 6 4.33
1 1 0 2 5.23
0 0 0 1 6.75
0 0 0 0 4.53
BOSTON
IP
Fister ................... 7
Kelly..................... 1
Barnes.................. 1
H
4
0
0
R ER BB SO ERA
1 1 3 9 3.91
0 0 0 0 2.59
0 0 0 1 3.92
CHICAGO......... 000 000 001 — 1 3 1
PITTSBURGH .. 000 000 000 — 0 6 0
E: Bryant (17). LOB: Chicago 6, Pittsburgh 6. 3B: Avila (1).
CHICAGO
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Quintana ............. 6 6 0 0 1 6 4.32
Rondon ................ 1 0 0 0 0 0 4.58
Strop.................... 1 0 0 0 1 1 3.27
Davis ................... 1 0 0 0 0 2 2.23
PITTSBURGH IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Cole...................... 8 2 0 0 4 8 3.93
Hudson ................ 1 1 1 1 1 2 4.61
WP: Manaea (10-9); LP: Skaggs (1-5); S:
Hatcher (1). Manaea pitched to 2 batters
in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Dull
2-0, Moll 1-1. HBP: Skaggs (Pinder). WP:
Skaggs. T: 3:10. A: 10,544 (37,090).
WP: Fister (5-7); LP: Biagini (3-10). Mayza pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Mayza 1-0, Ramirez
2-0. HBP: Ramirez (Young). WP: Fister.
T: 2:57. A: 33,190 (37,499).
Royals 13, Tigers 2
Indians 5, White Sox 1
Giants 11, Rockies 3
Orioles 7, Yankees 6
Salvador Perez homered
twice as Kansas City broke
open a close game to rout
Detroit.
Carlos Carrasco allowed
three hits in a complete
game, and Cleveland
equaled its longest winning streak in franchise
history with its
14th straight victory.
Carrasco lost his shutout with two outs in the
ninth inning when Adam
Engel homered.
Joe Panik completed a
torrid series with five more
hits and Johnny Cueto
threw five effective innings,
helping San Francisco beat
Colorado.
Late Tuesday
WP: Strop (4-4); LP: Hudson (2-6); S:
Davis (29). T: 3:05. A: 17,067 (38,362).
Kluber (R)
14-4
2.56
16-8
Rodon (L)
2-5
4.15
5-7
TWINS AT ROYALS, 8:15
Gibson (R)
9-10
Gaviglio (R)
3-5
5.33 13-11
4.62
6-5
AL scores
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
at Baltimore 7, N.Y. Yankees 6
at Boston 3, Toronto 2, 19 innings
at Detroit 13, Kansas City 2
Tampa Bay 2, at Minnesota 1
Cleveland 9, at Chicago White Sox 4
L.A. Angels 8, at Oakland 7, 10 innings
Houston 3, at Seattle 1
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
at Minnesota 10, Tampa Bay 6
at Oakland 3, L.A. Angels 1
Kansas City 13, at Detroit 2
at Boston 6, Toronto 1
Cleveland 5, at Chicago White Sox, 1
Houston at Seattle, Late
Interleague scores
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Texas 12, Atlanta 8 (1st game)
at Atlanta 5, Texas 4 (2nd game)
NL leaders
Entering Wedesday’s game
ERA
Kershaw, LA .................................... 1.95
Scherzer, Was ................................. 2.19
Gonzalez, Was ................................. 2.58
Strasburg, Was ............................... 2.78
Lynn, StL ......................................... 2.99
Greinke, Ari ..................................... 3.01
Martinez, StL .................................. 3.34
Arrieta, Chi ...................................... 3.48
Nelson, Mil ...................................... 3.59
deGrom, NY ..................................... 3.65
WINS
Kershaw, LA .................................... 16-2
Greinke, Ari ..................................... 16-6
Davies, Mil ...................................... 16-8
Wood, LA ......................................... 14-2
Arrieta, Chi ...................................... 14-9
deGrom, NY ..................................... 14-9
Scherzer, Was ................................. 13-5
Gonzalez, Was ................................ 13-6
GAMES PITCHED
TEXAS
AB
DeShields lf.........3
Choo rf.................5
Andrus ss ............5
Gomez cf .............4
Gallo 3b ...............4
Napoli 1b .............3
Odor 2b................4
Nicholas c............5
Gonzalez p...........0
Middlebrooks
...1
ph .....................
Bibens-Dirkx p ....1
Jimenez ph..........1
Hoying rf .............0
TOTALS
36
ATLANTA
AB
Inciarte cf............5
Albies 2b .............5
Freeman 1b .........3
Peterson lf ..........1
Kemp lf................4
L.Adams rf ..........1
Markakis rf..........3
Garcia ph .............1
Swanson ss.........3
M.Adams ph- ......2
Ruiz 3b ................5
Freitas c ..............5
Gohara p..............1
Johnson ph..........1
Camargo ss .........2
TOTALS
42
R
2
1
1
0
2
2
1
1
1
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 1 1 .285
1 1 0 2 .263
4 3 0 0 .305
0 1 0 4 .249
1 0 1 1 .212
1 2 2 0 .194
1 0 0 2 .214
2 2 0 1 .286
0 0 1 0 .000
1 1
0
0
0
12
R
1
1
2
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
8
2 0 0 .400
0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 .210
12 11 5 12 —
H BI BB SO AVG
3 2 0 0 .307
1 0 0 1 .281
2 1 1 0 .320
0 0 0 0 .188
1 2 0 0 .287
0 0 0 1 .268
1 1 1 0 .284
1 0 0 0 .250
0 0 0 1 .237
1 1 0 1 .272
1 1 0 1 .212
2 0 0 2 .250
0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 0 .000
2 0 0 0 .299
15 8 2 8 —
TEXAS ............. 101 432 010 — 12 12 0
ATLANTA ........ 202 000 112 — 8 15 0
2B: DeShields (14), Choo (16), Andrus
(38), Gallo (16), Odor (19), Nicholas (3),
Freeman (29), Camargo (18), M.Adams
(20). 3B: Middlebrooks (1), Albies (5).
HR: Andrus (20), off Gohara; Napoli (29),
off Wisler; Kemp (17), off Gonzalez; Inciarte (11), off Gonzalez.
TEXAS
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Gonzalez .............. 3 4 4 4 2 2 4.48
Bibens-Dirkx........ 3 5 0 0 0 2 4.67
Gardewine ........... 1 1 1 1 0 1 2.45
Grilli ..................... 1 2 1 1 0 2 6.46
Ross .................. 0.2 3 2 2 0 1 7.33
Claudio .............. 0.1 0 0 0 0 0 2.58
ATLANTA
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Gohara ................. 4 4 6 6 4 6 13.5
Wisler ............... 1.1 7 5 5 0 2 7.76
Krol ................... 1.2 0 0 0 0 2 5.89
Winkler ................ 2 1 1 1 1 2 3.00
WP: Bibens-Dirkx (5-2); LP: Gohara
(0-1). Inherited runners-scored: Claudio
1-0, Krol 1-0. HBP: Krol (Odor). WP: Gohara. T: 3:30. A: 19,971 (41,500).
TEXAS
AB
DeShields lf ........5
Andrus ss............4
Mazara rf ............2
Hoying rf.............1
Napoli ph ............1
Gomez cf.............4
Gallo 1b...............3
Odor 2b ...............3
Chirinos c ............4
Robinson 3b........2
Middlebrooks
...2
ph-3b................
Hamels p.............3
Choo ph...............1
TOTALS
35
R
0
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
ATLANTA
AB
Inciarte cf ...........3
Albies 2b.............4
F.Freeman 1b......4
Kemp lf ...............4
Adams lf .............0
Markakis rf .........3
Suzuki c ..............3
Swanson ss ........3
Camargo 3b.........4
Teheran p............2
Garcia ph.............1
TOTALS
31
R
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
1
0
5
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 1 .280
1 0 1 1 .304
2 2 1 0 .259
0 0 0 1 .206
1 0 0 0 .196
2 1 0 0 .251
0 0 2 1 .211
0 0 1 1 .213
2 0 0 0 .259
0 0 0 1 .219
1 1
0 0 0 .429
0 0
0 0
4 9
1 0 1 .000
0 0 0 .263
4 5 7 —
H BI BB SO AVG
2 1 1 0 .309
1 0 0 1 .280
1 2 0 0 .319
1 0 0 3 .286
0 0 0 0 .268
0 0 1 0 .283
1 0 0 0 .253
1 1 1 1 .237
0 0 0 1 .293
0 0 0 0 .149
0 0 0 1 .248
7 4 3 7 —
TEXAS............. 002 011 000 — 4 9 1
ATLANTA........ 050 000 00X — 5 7 0
E: Hamels (3). LOB: Texas 10, Atlanta 6.
2B: Gomez (20), Chirinos 2 (11), F.Freeman (30), Suzuki (10). 3B: Middlebrooks
(2). HR: Mazara (18), off Teheran.
TEXAS
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Hamels ................ 6 6 5 4 2 5 4.03
Diekman .............. 1 0 0 0 1 2 0.00
Barnette ........... 0.2 1 0 0 0 0 4.91
Claudio.............. 0.1 0 0 0 0 0 2.57
ATLANTA
IP
Teheran ............... 5
Minter ................. 1
S.Freeman ........ 1.1
Ramirez ............ 0.2
Vizcaino............... 1
H
5
1
0
1
2
R ER BB SO ERA
3 3 5 3 4.77
1 1 0 2 4.50
0 0 0 2 2.81
0 0 0 0 2.25
0 0 0 0 2.68
WP: Teheran (10-11); LP: Hamels (9-3);
S: Vizcaino (10). Inherited runnersscored: Claudio 1-0. HBP: Hamels (Suzuki), Teheran (Gomez). T: 3:03. A: 20,364
(41,500).
KANSAS CITY AB
Merrifield 2b.......6
Cain cf.................3
Orlando ph-cf......2
Cabrera rf............5
Soler rf................0
Hosmer 1b ..........5
Moss 1b ..............0
Perez c ................4
Butera c ..............0
Moustakas 3b.....3
Torres 3b ............1
Bonifacio dh........5
Escobar ss...........5
Gordon lf.............4
Gore ph-lf ...........1
TOTALS
44
R
2
1
1
1
0
1
0
2
0
1
0
1
2
1
0
13
H BI BB SO AVG
3 3 0 1 .284
1 1 1 1 .297
1 1 0 0 .175
2 0 0 1 .297
0 0 0 0 .154
1 2 0 1 .315
0 0 0 0 .199
2 3 1 1 .266
0 0 0 0 .252
2 0 1 0 .280
0 0 0 0 .250
1 0 0 0 .253
4 1 0 0 .243
1 1 0 0 .196
0 0 0 0 .000
18 12 3 5 —
DETROIT
AB
Kinsler 2b ...........3
Romine ph-2b .....1
Presley rf ............5
Castellanos dh....4
Navarro ph-dh ....1
Hicks 1b ..............4
Holaday ph..........1
Candelario 3b......2
Mahtook lf ..........4
McCann c ............4
Jones cf ..............4
Machado ss.........4
TOTALS
37
R
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
H BI BB SO AVG
1 1 1 0 .236
0 0 0 0 .242
1 0 0 1 .309
2 0 0 0 .255
0 0 0 1 .133
1 0 0 0 .313
0 0 0 0 .429
1 0 2 0 .245
1 0 0 2 .276
1 1 0 2 .260
0 0 0 1 .174
2 0 0 2 .291
10 2 3 9 —
KANSAS CITY . 020 000 470 — 13 18 1
DETROIT ......... 000 110 000 — 2 10 0
E: Moustakas (9). LOB: Kansas City 7,
Detroit 11. 2B: Merrifield 3 (27), Cabrera (26), Hosmer (25), Escobar (27), Gordon (16), Castellanos (26). 3B: Escobar
(4). HR: Perez (23), off Boyd; Perez (24),
off Reininger; Kinsler (15), off Hammel.
KANSAS CITY IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Hammel............... 6 9 2 2 2 6 4.73
Moylan ................ 1 0 0 0 1 0 3.86
McCarthy............. 2 1 0 0 0 3 2.62
DETROIT
IP
Boyd .................... 6
Saupold ............... 0
Labourt................ 1
Jimenez ............ 0.1
Reininger.......... 0.2
Greene ................. 1
H
7
3
0
5
2
1
R ER BB SO ERA
4 4 2 4 5.93
2 1 0 0 3.98
0 0 1 1 3.00
5 5 0 0 12.8
2 2 0 0 14.5
0 0 0 0 2.67
WP: Hammel (8-10); LP: Boyd (5-9).
Boyd pitched to 2 in the 7th. Saupold
pitched to 3 in the 7th. Inherited runnersscored: Saupold 1-1, Labourt 2-1, Reininger 2-2. PB: McCann (7). T: 3:27. A:
23,755 (41,681).
CLEVELAND AB
Lindor ss .............5
Chisenhall rf .......5
Ramirez 2b .........4
Gonzalez 2b ........0
Encarnacion dh ...4
Santana 1b .........4
Diaz 3b................2
Allen pr-lf ...........1
Almonte lf ..........3
Zimmer pr-cf ......1
Naquin cf ............2
Urshela 3b ..........0
Perez c ................4
TOTALS
35
R
0
0
1
0
1
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
5
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 0 .268
1 0 0 1 .298
0 0 1 0 .309
0 0 0 0 .272
1 0 1 1 .253
3 2 1 0 .262
1 0 2 0 .260
0 1 0 0 .214
1 0 1 0 .228
0 0 0 0 .247
1 1 1 0 .222
0 0 0 0 .226
0 1 0 2 .219
8 5 7 4 —
CHICAGO
AB
Hanson 2b...........4
Sanchez 3b .........3
Abreu dh .............3
Garcia rf..............3
Delmonico lf .......3
Liriano lf .............0
Davidson 1b ........3
Smith c ...............3
Saladino ss .........3
Engel cf...............3
TOTALS
28
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 2 .222
0 0 0 2 .262
0 0 0 2 .296
1 0 0 0 .324
0 0 0 1 .295
0 0 0 0 .154
0 0 0 1 .226
1 0 0 0 .281
0 0 0 1 .195
1 1 0 0 .170
3 1 0 9 —
CLEVELAND.... 000 100 031 — 5 8 0
CHICAGO......... 000 000 001 — 1 3 2
E: Davidson 2 (5). LOB: Cleveland 11.
2B: Naquin (2). HR: Santana (23), off
Farquhar; Engel (5), off Carrasco.
CLEVELAND
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Carrasco .............. 9 3 1 1 0 9 3.53
CHICAGO
IP
Lopez ................... 6
Infante................. 1
Farquhar.............. 0
Covey................... 2
H
6
0
2
0
R ER BB SO ERA
1 1 2 2 4.84
1 1 1 0 3.55
2 2 2 0 4.35
1 1 2 2 8.25
WP: Carrasco (14-6); LP: Lopez (0-3).
Infante pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Farquhar pitched to 5 batters in the 8th.
Inherited runners-scored: Farquhar 1-1,
Covey 3-0. WP: Lopez. T: 2:48. A: 13,403
(40,615).
SAN FRAN.
AB
Hernandez cf.......6
Panik 2b...............6
Pence rf ...............4
Hundley c ............5
Crawford ss.........5
Slater lf ...............5
Tomlinson 3b ......5
Jones 1b ..............4
Cueto p ................1
Sandoval ph ........1
Williamson ph.....1
Calixte ph ............1
TOTALS
44
R
2
3
1
1
0
0
2
1
0
0
1
0
11
H BI BB SO AVG
2 3 0 0 .258
5 2 0 1 .285
1 0 2 1 .252
2 2 0 0 .258
2 1 0 2 .247
1 2 0 2 .286
2 0 0 0 .263
1 0 1 2 .198
0 0 0 0 .079
0 0 0 1 .199
1 1 0 0 .238
0 0 0 1 .171
17 11 3 10 —
COLORADO
AB
Blackmon cf ........4
McMahon ph .......1
LeMahieu 2b .......4
Gonzalez rf..........2
Arenado 3b..........4
Parra lf ................3
Desmond 1b ........4
Story ss ...............4
Wolters c.............2
Valaika ph ...........1
Tauchman ph.......1
Freeland p ...........1
Amarista ph ........1
Murphy ph-c........2
TOTALS
34
R
2
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
H BI BB SO AVG
2 1 0 1 .340
0 0 0 0 .143
1 0 0 1 .316
2 1 1 0 .247
0 0 0 2 .303
0 1 0 0 .331
2 0 0 1 .282
1 0 0 2 .225
0 0 0 1 .237
0 0 0 1 .247
0 0 0 1 .214
0 0 0 0 .160
0 0 0 1 .235
0 0 0 0 .043
8 3 1 11 —
SAN FRAN....... 200 302 121 — 11 17 1
COLORADO ..... 000 010 110 — 3 8 1
E: Jones (4), Arenado (7). LOB: San Francisco 10, Colorado 7. 2B: Panik 2 (25),
Jones (5), Blackmon (30), Gonzalez (27),
Story (24). HR: Williamson (2), off Hoffman; Hundley (7), off Carle; Blackmon
(34), off Okert.
SAN FRAN.
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Cueto.................... 5 5 1 1 1 7 4.43
Crick ..................... 1 0 0 0 0 0 3.38
Okert................. 0.2 1 1 1 0 1 7.04
Gearrin.............. 1.1 2 1 1 0 2 2.24
Dyson................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 6.08
COLORADO
IP
Freeland............ 3.1
Estevez ............. 1.2
Hoffman .............. 2
Carle..................... 2
H
7
1
4
5
R ER BB SO ERA
5 3 2 4 3.99
0 0 0 1 6.12
3 3 1 2 5.48
3 3 0 3 9.00
WP: Cueto (7-7); LP: Freeland (11-10).
Inherited runners-scored: Estevez 1-0.
HBP: Cueto (Gonzalez). WP: Cueto. PB:
Wolters (7). T: 3:32. A: 26,674 (50,398).
Manny Machado hammered a two-out, walk-off
home run early Wednesday
morning to complete a
comeback in a 7-6 Baltimore victory over AL East
rival New York.
NEW YORK
AB
Gardner lf ...........5
Judge rf ..............4
Castro 2b ............4
Gregorius ss .......4
Holliday dh..........3
Bird 1b ................4
Frazier 3b............4
Ellsbury cf...........3
Romine c.............4
TOTALS
35
R
0
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
6
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 1 .255
1 0 1 1 .277
2 0 0 1 .315
1 2 1 1 .288
0 0 2 1 .229
1 1 0 1 .149
0 1 0 1 .209
2 2 1 0 .259
1 0 0 0 .214
9 6 5 7 —
BALTIMORE AB
Beckham ss ........4
Machado 3b ........5
Schoop 2b ...........3
Jones cf ..............4
Mancini lf............4
Trumbo dh ..........4
Davis 1b ..............4
Castillo c .............4
Rickard rf ............2
Alvarez ph ..........1
TOTALS
35
R
1
2
2
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
7
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 1 0 .289
2 3 0 1 .273
1 1 1 0 .306
1 0 0 0 .279
2 1 0 0 .292
1 2 0 0 .246
0 0 0 3 .222
1 0 0 1 .299
1 0 1 1 .248
0 0 0 1 .000
9 7 3 7 —
NEW YORK ..... 006 000 000 — 6 9 0
BALTIMORE.... 101 012 002 — 7 9 1
Two outs when winning run scored.
E: Jones (3). LOB: New York 9, Baltimore 5. HR: Machado (31), off Sabathia;
Schoop (31), off Sabathia; Trumbo (22),
off Sabathia; Machado (32), off Betances. RBI: Gregorius 2 (66), Bird (13), Frazier (62), Ellsbury 2 (36), Machado 3
(91), Schoop (102), Mancini (73), Trumbo 2 (63). SF: Bird.
NEW YORK
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Sabathia ........... 5.1 8 5 5 1 3 3.91
Kahnle .............. 0.2 0 0 0 1 1 2.82
Robertson............ 1 0 0 0 0 1 2.24
Chapman ............. 1 0 0 0 0 1 4.02
Betances L 3-6 . 0.2 1 2 2 1 1 2.73
BALTIMORE IP
Hellickson......... 2.1
Bleier ................... 1
Yacabonis ......... 1.2
Jimenez ............... 1
O'Day................... 1
Brach ................... 1
Britton................. 1
H
2
1
3
1
0
2
0
R ER BB SO ERA
5 3 4 1 5.26
1 0 0 0 1.99
0 0 1 0 3.97
0 0 0 1 6.80
0 0 0 2 3.76
0 0 0 1 2.73
0 0 0 2 2.78
WP: Britton (2-0); LP: . Inherited runners-scored: Bleier 3-3. HBP: Hellickson
(Castro). WP: Sabathia, Bleier. T: 3:34.
A: 14,377 (45,971).
Bowman, StL ...................................... 66
Knebel, Mil .......................................... 66
Rivero, Pit ........................................... 66
Blevins, NY ......................................... 65
Cecil, StL ............................................. 65
Barnes, Mil ......................................... 64
SAVES
Holland, Col ........................................ 37
Jansen, LA .......................................... 36
Rodney, Ari ......................................... 35
Knebel, Mil .......................................... 32
Davis, Chi ............................................ 28
Ramos, NY .......................................... 26
Iglesias, Cin ........................................ 25
Johnson, Atl ....................................... 22
Oh, StL ................................................ 20
Neris, Phi ............................................ 19
INNINGS PITCHED
Samardzija, SF .............................. 183.2
Martinez, StL ................................ 183.0
deGrom, NY ................................... 182.1
Greinke, Ari ................................... 179.1
Gonzalez, Was ............................... 174.2
Cole, Pit ......................................... 173.0
Richard, SD .................................... 173.0
Scherzer, Was ............................... 172.1
Nelson, Mil .................................... 170.1
Davies, Mil ..................................... 169.1
STRIKEOUTS
Scherzer, Was .................................. 232
deGrom, NY ...................................... 211
Greinke, Ari ...................................... 194
Martinez, StL ................................... 192
Nelson, Mil ....................................... 192
Ray, Ari ............................................. 184
Samardzija, SF ................................. 184
Kershaw, LA ..................................... 175
Strasburg, Was ................................ 172
Cole, Pit ............................................ 160
NL wild-card standings
Team
x-Arizona
Colorado
Milwaukee
x-St. Louis
Miami
Pittsburgh
W
81
74
72
71
67
67
L
58
65
68
67
72
73
WCGB
—
—
2 1/2
2 1/2
7
71/2
x-Late game
AL wild-card standings
Team
New York
Minnesota
Los Angeles
Baltimore
Texas
Kansas City
Tampa Bay
x-Seattle
Toronto
x-Late game
W
74
72
72
71
70
69
70
69
64
L
64
67
68
68
69
69
71
70
76
WCGB
—
—
1/
2
1
2
2 1/2
3
3
8 1/2
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
M2
Nats roll again, but their minds seem elsewhere
NATIONALS 8,
MARLINS 1
CHELSEA JANES
miami — As most of the city of
Miami rushed to gas stations or
packed northbound freeways in
preparation for Hurricane Irma,
the Washington Nationals and
Miami Marlins stayed put to play
a baseball game that the Nationals won, 8-1.
If baseball ever truly fades
from the top of a major leaguer’s
list of priorities, you could understand how it might slide to
the back of many Nationals’
minds Wednesday.
Many of them make their
full-time homes in Florida. A
handful of others have family in
the Dominican Republic. They
have loved ones and property
within the storm’s expected path.
For what is probably the first
time in major league history,
something called “Irma” was the
most talked about thing in the
visitors’ clubhouse in the hours
before a game.
“There was a lot on our minds.
Not only myself but a lot of
players had some family here,”
said Gio Gonzalez, who threw
five scoreless innings in the win.
“I was talking to [Marlins catcher] J.T. Realmuto, and I was
asking, ‘You guys have your family set? You guys ready to go?’
That was the main concern was
basically everybody’s safety, and
then we can get back to work.”
But while Gonzalez, Trea Turner, Michael A. Taylor, Adam
Lind, Daniel Murphy, Jose Lobaton and others who live in Florida likely would be torn as they
climbed onto the plane that was
set to leave late Wednesday night
for home, they would do so
having all but finished the Marlins’ playoff hopes with six wins
in six games against them since
the beginning of last week.
After Wednesday’s victory, the
Nationals’ magic number to win
the National League East is six —
the smallest magic number in
baseball. In those two series
sweeps, the Nationals outscored
their closest division foe 40-9.
Nothing like that seemed to
matter to Gonzalez as he sat in
the corner before the game,
chatting with teammates about
the storm, glancing up at the
clubhouse television showing local coverage of the storm and
rubbing his hands through his
hair distractedly now and then.
Gonzalez, a Miami native who
nearly pitched an emotional nohitter in his previous outing
here, has family and friends
certain to be affected by the
storm.
“It’s weird to see a night game
and get going in Miami knowing
what’s coming,” Gonzalez said.
“It was just trying to take emotion out of the game again. But
it’s tough. Too much going on.”
Gonzalez seemed to fight off
distraction into the fourth when
he suddenly found himself with
the bases loaded and no one out.
But Gonzalez and battled around
the base runners and what he
felt was an unfavorable strike
zone to escape unscathed. By
that time, opposing hitters were
hitting .138 against him with
runners in scoring position.
Unlike most of his starts this
season, however, Gonzalez’s
pitch count climbed as he struggled to stay ahead of hitters. He
crossed the 100-pitch threshold
in the fifth and did so while
facing Giancarlo Stanton with
one out and two on. Gonzalez got
him to ground into an inningending double play. As they
swept the Marlins in back-toback series, the Nationals held
Stanton to two hits in 20 at-bats.
Those two hits were both home
runs.
Gonzalez’s ERA fell to 2.50,
JASEN VINLOVE/USA TODAY SPORTS
“There was a lot on our minds,” said Nationals starter and Miami native Gio Gonzalez, who pitched five scoreless innings in earning the win.
Nationals 8, Marlins 1
GASTON DE CARDENAS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Washington’s Trea Turner, who is from South Florida, had two hits and reached base three times.
NATIONALS ON DECK
vs. Philadelphia Phillies
Today
7:05 MASN
Tomorrow
7:05 MASN2
Saturday
7:05 MASN2
Sunday
1:35 MASN
vs. Atlanta Braves
Tuesday
7:05 MASN
Wednesday
7:05 MASN
Sept. 14
7:05 MASN2
vs. Los Angeles Dodgers
Sept. 15
7:05 MASN2
Sept. 16
1:05 Fox
Sept. 17
8:08 ESPN
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
third lowest in the majors behind Clayton Kershaw and Max
Scherzer. Interestingly, the 2018
option in the lefty’s contract
vests when he reaches 180 in-
nings. He finished the evening at
1792/3.
Meanwhile, distracted or not,
the other Nationals pummeled
Marlins rookie Dillon Peters for
two runs on five hits and a walk
the first time through the order,
and despite a few egregious base
running errors early, the offense
continued to add.
Ryan Zimmerman was 3 for 5
with a home run, his 31st, which
landed in the second deck in
right-center field. South Floridian Turner, whose family lives in
Lake Worth near West Palm
Beach, went 2 for 4 and reached
base three times. Fort Lauderdale native Taylor, whose mother
will weather the storm at their
home about 30 miles inland, hit
his 14th homer and reached base
three times.
“It’s been a little hectic, trying
to get everything situated for my
place and my family,” Taylor said.
“But I’m kind of glad I’m here
right now. I’m close to home, and
it gives me a chance to help out a
little bit before I leave.”
His baseball efforts helped to
give the Nationals plenty of
breathing room from start to
finish, enough breathing room
that Manager Dusty Baker could
avoid using any of the big three
in the back of his bullpen. The
Nationals are in a stretch of
21 games in 20 days that does not
end until Monday. Any break
yields dividends.
So under normal circumstances, a series sweep like this
likely would send the Nationals
home in jubilation. But now,
when the whole push for a
playoff spot has felt like a foregone conclusion for weeks, and
the safety of the Nationals’
friends and family is anything
but, many would fly home uneasy. Fortunate as they were to
be leaving Miami with the division title closer than ever, they
were far more fortunate to be
headed home before the storm,
though many likely would find
their minds wandering to those
they had to leave behind.
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
WASHINGTON
AB
Turner ss........................4
Difo 2b............................5
Rendon 3b ......................4
Zimmerman 1b ..............5
Kendrick lf......................4
Werth rf .........................2
De Aza rf ........................1
Taylor cf .........................3
Lobaton c .......................3
Gonzalez p .....................2
Lind ph ...........................1
Blanton p .......................0
Kelley p ..........................0
Read ph ..........................1
Romero p........................0
Grace p ...........................0
TOTALS
35
R H
2 2
0 1
1 2
3 3
1 1
0 0
0 0
1 2
0 1
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
8 12
BI BB SO AVG
0 1 0 .275
0 0 2 .281
1 1 0 .303
2 0 0 .305
1 0 1 .324
1 0 1 .240
0 0 0 .158
1 1 1 .262
1 1 0 .153
0 0 1 .100
1 0 0 .299
0 0 0
--0 0 0
--0 0 1 .333
0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 .000
8 4 7
—
MIAMI
AB
Gordon 2b.......................5
Stanton rf ......................3
Yelich cf .........................3
Ozuna lf..........................3
Realmuto c.....................4
Moore 1b........................3
Tazawa p........................0
Nicolino p .......................0
Aviles ph ........................1
Anderson 3b...................4
Rojas ss..........................4
Peters p..........................1
Suzuki ph .......................1
Worley p.........................0
Telis 1b ..........................1
TOTALS
33
R
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 .301
0 1 0 .282
0 1 0 .287
0 1 0 .306
0 0 0 .274
0 0 1 .211
0 0 0
--0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 .259
0 0 3 .227
1 0 0 .258
0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 .255
0 0 0 .211
0 0 0 .216
1 3 5
—
H
1
0
1
0
2
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
6
WASHINGTON.............. 200
103
011
—
1
8 12
MIAMI........................... 000
000
001
—
1
60
E: Turner (7). LOB: Washington 6, Miami 9. 2B: Turner
(18), Kendrick (14). HR: Zimmerman (31), off Peters;
Taylor (14), off Tazawa. RBI: Rendon (91), Zimmerman
2 (93), Kendrick (38), Werth (23), Taylor (40), Lobaton
(10), Lind (48), Rojas (12). CS: Taylor (5). SF: Werth.
DP: Washington 1 (Turner, Difo, Zimmerman).
WASHINGTON
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Gonzalez, .....................5 3 0 0 3 4 101 2.50
Blanton ........................1 1 0 0 0 1 21 6.28
Kelley ...........................1 0 0 0 0 0 10 6.85
Romero ........................1 0 0 0 0 0 14 3.81
Grace............................1 2 1 1 0 0 19 4.70
MIAMI
IP
Peters, .........................5
Worley .........................1
Tazawa ........................2
Nicolino........................1
H
6
2
2
2
R ER BB SO NP ERA
3 3 2 6 77 2.25
3 3 2 0 32 6.34
1 1 0 1 27 5.80
1 1 0 0 16 5.79
WP: Gonzalez, (14-6); LP: Peters, (0-1).
HBP: Worley (Kendrick), Grace (Telis).
T: 3:02. A: 14,390 (36,742).
HOW THEY SCORED
NATIONALS FIRST
Turner singles. Difo strikes out. Rendon walks, Turner to
second. Zimmerman singles, Turner scores, Rendon out
at third. Kendrick doubles, Zimmerman scores. Jayson
Werth strikes out.
Nationals 2, Marlins 0
NATIONALS FOURTH
Zimmerman homers. Kendrick strikes out swinging.
Werth lines out. Taylor strikes out swinging.
Nationals 3, Marlins 0
NATIONALS SIXTH
Rendon singles. Zimmerman singles, Rendon to second.
Kendrick hit by pitch, Zimmerman to second, Rendon to
third. Werth out on a sacrifice fly, Rendon scores, Kendrick to second, Zimmerman to third. Taylor is intentionally walked. Lobaton walks, Zimmerman scores, Taylor
to second, Kendrick to third. Lind reaches on a fielder’s
choice, Kendrick scores, Lobaton out at second, Taylor to
third. Turner reaches on a fielder’s choice, Lind out at
second.
Nationals 6, Marlins 0
NATIONALS EIGHTH
De Aza flies out. Taylor homers. Lobaton flies out. Read
strikes out swinging.
Nationals 7, Marlins 0
NATIONALS NINTH
Turner doubles to left field. Difo lines out, Turner to
third. Rendon singles, Turner scores. Zimmerman
grounds out, Rendon to second. Kendrick grounds out.
Nationals 8, Marlins 0
MARLINS NINTH
Realmuto singles.Aviles grounds out, Realmuto to second. Anderson singles, Realmuto to third. Rojas grounds
out, Realmuto scores, Anderson to second. Telis hit by
pitch. Gordon grounds out.
Nationals 8, Marlins 1
Mystics are single-minded in advancing to playo≠s’ second round
MYSTICS FROM D1
was sharp, and their three driving forces on offense played in
harmony.
Delle Donne was outstanding
in her Mystics playoff debut. She
scored 25 points on 8-for-18
shooting, collected 11 rebounds
and added three assists.
Emma Meesseman added
16 points, 10 rebounds and five
assists and Toliver added
16 points. On the defensive end,
center Krystal Thomas grabbed a
team-high 17 rebounds and
played a huge role in the Mystics’
25 second-chance points compared with the Wings’ 15.
“Twenty offensive rebounds
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/nationals
Glover (shoulder)
seeks second opinion
Gonzalez, others think
of Fla. ties as Irma looms
BY
NATI ONALS NOTE S
tells the story right there,” Dallas
guard Skylar Diggins-Smith said.
“They just hustled. I think Krystal ended up with, how many?
Fifteen, 16, 17? That was the
x-factor for them.”
The Mystics used lockdown
defense and a 17-5 run to start the
third quarter to push past Dallas,
who they lost to twice in the
regular season.
Washington lost a 13-point
lead in the second quarter thanks
in large part to a nine-point surge
from Wings guard Aerial Powers,
playing just her 13th game of 2017
after recovering from a hip injury
that required surgery in the offseason, in the final three minutes
of the first half.
The second-year pro led Dallas
with 21 points on 6-for-15 scoring.
Washington held DigginsSmith, the Wings’ leading scorer,
to just 15 points, by far her lowest
points total against Washington
this season, and held secondleading scorer Glory Johnson to
15 points and 14 rebounds.
“We just know that we had to
be aggressive against this team,”
Meesseman said.
The Mystics not only weathered a chippy game — Delle
Donne’s chin injury left blood on
the court with less than three
minutes left in the game, and
Powers was ejected with 1:11 remaining — they also muscled
through the bad habits that had
haunted them all season.
Washington avoided stumbling late when the Wings cut the
margin to four in the closing
minutes. They committed 10
turnovers but outrebounded Dallas 52-42.
Toliver, who won the WNBA
title with Los Angeles last year,
called it a foundational victory.
“It was very important to me
because I know what it feels like
to make a deep run in the playoffs, and I want to have that
feeling
again,”
she
said.
“. . . Those are the environments
that you want to be in, and it’s
fun. I want this team to have fun
and to know what it feels like to
make a run and play as hard as
you can and see what happens.
“I don’t think very many people chose us to win, but I think
we’re coming along. We’re believing in the system, and we’re
believing in one another, and
when you do that, anything’s
possible.”
Dusty Baker hoped to catch up
with Koda Glover when the
Washington Nationals were in
Miami this week. The righthander had been rehabbing in
West Palm Beach, about an hour
and a half away.
The manager figured he would
see Glover at some point in the
series and could get the latest
news about his injured throwing
shoulder then. But by the time the
Nationals got to Miami, Glover
was gone. He headed to Texas to
get a second opinion on the
injury, the results of which Baker
did not know Wednesday. Glover
will spend a few days at home in
Oklahoma, then rejoin the
Nationals at Baker’s request —
though not to pitch.
“There’s discouragement [in
his voice] because he wants to
pitch,” Baker said. “This is a guy,
he’s young and this is his life right
now. He’s been a long time away
from us.”
Glover went on the disabled list
with lower back stiffness June 11,
then a bigger problem surfaced —
“severe rotator cuff
inflammation.” Glover headed to
West Palm Beach to rehabilitate
the injury. On Aug. 16, he tweeted,
“Great report from the doc!
Gonna ramp up to get BACK!!”
Apparently, the encouraging
signs were short-lived as Glover
went back to a doctor this week
and is at home instead of ramping
up. Baker did not know the
specifics of the second opinion.
The shoulder trouble might
cause Glover to lose the end of a
second straight season to injury.
A torn labrum in his hip forced
Glover out last September, then
forced him to choose between
surgically repairing that hip and
missing part of the season or just
rehabbing the injury to workable
levels. Glover chose the latter but
was back on the disabled list with
hip trouble by April. He returned
to earn eight saves when the
Nationals’ bullpen lacked a closer.
He posted a 5.12 ERA in
191/3 innings.
Given that Glover is a reliever,
he would not need much work to
rebuild enough stamina to
contribute down the stretch. But
the playoffs start a month from
Wednesday, and he is, it seems,
inactive. A return feels unlikely,
though no one has ruled it out,
and Baker wants him around this
month no matter what.
“If he pitches anymore this
year or not, just to get that playoff,
down-the-stretch feeling that
there’s no substitute and you can’t
really describe unless you’ve been
there,” Baker said. “This is what I
told, I remember, Corey Patterson
when I was with the Cubs. He just
showed up at the end for the
playoffs and never did get that
feeling. You’ve got to get that
feeling in, the electricity, the
positive vibes, so I invited him to
come join us.”
In more promising injury
news, right-hander Max Scherzer
threw a bullpen session
Wednesday and is listed as the
Nationals’ starter for Friday
night’s home game against the
Philadelphia Phillies.
Scherzer said he would be fine
after taking a line drive to the calf
in his previous outing.
Harper’s new hairdo
Nationals outfielder Bryce
Harper, who has been sidelined
since suffering a bone bruise in
his knee Aug. 12, played catch and
walked up and down a few rows
of stairs at Marlins Park before
the Nationals’ 2-1 victory Tuesday
night. Then he went and got his
hair done.
Never afraid to try something
new when it comes to his
hairstyle, Harper posted a photo
of himself with cornrows on his
Instagram story. If he keeps it,
Harper’s new look could make his
post-home run hair flips a little
more difficult.
Harper appeared to get his hair
done at Headz Up, the only pro
barbershop in a major league
stadium, located down the hall
from the Marlins’ clubhouse.
Harper hasn’t offered an update
on when he might return to the
field, but it’s possible his hair will
look a lot different when he does.
— Chelsea Janes and Scott Allen
ava.wallace@washpost.com
79, STORM 69:
MERCURY
Center Brittney Griner scored
23 points to go along with 11 rebounds, three assists and three
blocks as Phoenix moved on to
the second round of the playoffs
with a victory in Tempe, Ariz. The
Mercury advanced to face the
fourth-seeded Connecticut Sun
on the road Sunday at 3 p.m.
— Associated Press
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Reliever Koda Glover went to
Texas for another opinion on
his injured throwing shoulder.
D8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
scoreboard
T E NNIS
FOOTBALL
BASKETBALL
AU TO R AC I NG
HI GH S C HOOLS
U.S. Open
College football
NFL
WNBA playoffs
NASCAR Cup series
Results
At USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center
In New York
Purse: $50.4 million
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
TOP 25 SCHEDULE
NFC
FIRST ROUND
POINTS LEADERS
VOLLEYBALL
Friday’s game
No. 11 Oklahoma State at South Alabama, 8
EAST
W
Dallas ............................ 0
N.Y. Giants .................... 0
Philadelphia .................. 0
Washington .................. 0
L
0
0
0
0
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.000
.000
.000
.000
PF
0
0
0
0
PA
0
0
0
0
Wednesday’s results
at Washington 86, Dallas 76
Seattle vs. Phoenix, Late
VIRGINIA
Stone Bridge def. Langley (26-24, 26-24, 25-18)
Stuart def. Lee (25-9, 25-11, 25-15)
PRIVATE
Bishop Ireton def. Potomac School (25-14, 25-12, 25-15)
SOUTH
W
Atlanta .......................... 0
Carolina ......................... 0
New Orleans ................. 0
Tampa Bay .................... 0
L
0
0
0
0
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.000
.000
.000
.000
PF
0
0
0
0
PA
0
0
0
0
NORTH
W
Chicago ......................... 0
Detroit .......................... 0
Green Bay ..................... 0
Minnesota ..................... 0
L
0
0
0
0
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.000
.000
.000
.000
PF
0
0
0
0
PA
0
0
0
0
WEST
W
Arizona ......................... 0
L.A. Rams ...................... 0
San Francisco ................ 0
Seattle .......................... 0
L
0
0
0
0
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.000
.000
.000
.000
PF
0
0
0
0
PA
0
0
0
0
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
EAST
W
Buffalo .......................... 0
Miami ............................ 0
New England ................. 0
N.Y. Jets ....................... 0
L
0
0
0
0
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.000
.000
.000
.000
PF
0
0
0
0
PA
0
0
0
0
SOUTH
W
Houston ........................ 0
Indianapolis .................. 0
Jacksonville .................. 0
Tennessee ..................... 0
L
0
0
0
0
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.000
.000
.000
.000
PF
0
0
0
0
PA
0
0
0
0
NORTH
W
Baltimore ...................... 0
Cincinnati ...................... 0
Cleveland ...................... 0
Pittsburgh ..................... 0
L
0
0
0
0
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.000
.000
.000
.000
PF
0
0
0
0
PA
0
0
0
0
WEST
W
Denver ........................... 0
Kansas City ................... 0
L.A. Chargers ................ 0
Oakland ......................... 0
L
0
0
0
0
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.000
.000
.000
.000
PF
0
0
0
0
PA
0
0
0
0
MEN’S SINGLES
Wednesday’s Quarterfinals
Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Andrey Rublev, Russia, 6-1,
6-2, 6-2. Juan Martin del Potro (24), Argentina, def.
Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, 7-5, 3-6, 7-6 (10-8), 6-4
WOMEN’S SINGLES
Wednesday’s Quarterfinals
CoCo Vandeweghe (20), United States, def. Karolina
Pliskova (1), Czech Republic, 7-6 (7-4), 6-3. Madison
Keys (15), United States, def. Kaia Kanepi, Estonia, 6-3,
6-3.
Thursday’s Semifinals
In Arthur Ashe Stadium; at 7 p.m.
Venus William (9), United States, vs. Sloane Stephens,
United States
CoCo Vanderweghe (20, United States vs. Madison Keys
(15), United States
WOMEN’S DOUBLES
Wednesday’s Quarterfinal
Barbora Strycova, Czech Republic and Lucie Safarova
(3), Czech Republic, def. Yi-Fan Xu, China and Gabriela
Dabrowski (9), Canada, 6-3, 2-6, 6-4.
SOCCER
SOUTH
West Alabama (1-0) at Samford (1-0), 7
FAR WEST
Idaho St. (1-0) at Utah St. (0-1), 8
WORLD CUP QUALIFYING
Top three teams qualify. Fourth-place team advances to
playoff against Asia fifth-place team.
GP W D L GF GA Pts
q-Mexico .......................... 8 5 3 0 11 3 18
Costa Rica........................ 8 4 3 1 12 5 15
Panama............................ 8 2 4 2 7 5 10
United States .................. 8 2 3 3 12 11 9
Honduras ......................... 8 2 3 3 9 16 9
Trinidad............................ 8 1 0 7 4 15 3
q-qualified
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
Costa Rica 2, at United States 0
Honduras 2, at Trinidad and Tobago 1
at Mexico 1, Panama 0
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
at Honduras 1, United States 1, tie
at Panama 3, Trinidad and Tobago 0
at Costa Rica 1, Mexico 1, tie
MATCHES ON FRIDAY, OCT. 6
Panama at United States, 7:35
Honduras at Costa Rica, 10
Trinidad and Tobago at Mexico, TBA
MATCHES ON TUESDAY, OCT. 10
United States at Trinidad and Tobago
Mexico at Honduras
Costa Rica at Panama
MLS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
L
3
7
9
12
10
8
10
12
12
12
15
T PTS
8
56
5
50
5
44
3
42
4
40
6
36
6
36
5
32
7
31
7
31
4
28
GF
55
49
48
42
40
44
42
43
36
27
22
GA
26
35
36
42
35
32
42
41
38
43
44
L
7
9
6
8
9
7
11
13
14
14
16
T PTS
9
42
8
41
10
40
8
38
5
38
10
37
6
36
5
35
5
26
4
25
4
22
GF
41
48
31
46
37
39
31
40
35
32
24
GA
34
45
20
37
35
35
44
48
47
52
41
WESTERN CONFERENCE
TEAM
W
Seattle ...........................11
Portland .........................11
Sporting KC ....................10
Houston .........................10
Vancouver ......................11
Dallas ...............................9
San Jose .........................10
Real Salt Lake ................10
Los Angeles .....................7
Minnesota United ............7
Colorado ...........................6
AFC
NCAA SCHEDULE
THURSDAY’S GAMES
SOUTHWEST
Sam Houston St. (1-0) at Prairie View (0-0), 7:30
Houston Baptist (0-1) at Texas Southern (0-1), 8:30
CONCACAF
TEAM
W
Toronto FC .....................16
New York City FC ...........15
Chicago ..........................13
Columbus .......................13
New York .......................12
Atlanta United FC ..........10
Montreal ........................10
New England ....................9
Philadelphia .....................8
Orlando City .....................8
D.C. United .......................8
Saturday’s games
No. 1 Alabama vs. Fresno State, 3:30
No. 2 Ohio State vs. No. 5 Oklahoma, 7:30
No. 3 Clemson vs. No. 13 Auburn, 7
No. 4 Penn State vs. Pittsburgh, 3:30
No. 6 Southern Cal vs. No. 14 Stanford, 8:30
No. 7 Washington vs. Montana, 8
No. 8 Michigan vs. Cincinnati, Noon
No. 9 Wisconsin vs. FAU, Noon
No. 10 Florida State vs. Louisiana-Monroe, Noon
No. 12 LSU vs. Chattanooga, 7:30
No. 15 Georgia at No. 24 Notre Dame, 7:30
No. 16 Miami at Arkansas State, ccd., hurricane
No. 17 Louisville at North Carolina, Noon
No. 18 Virginia Tech vs. Delaware, 3:30
No. 19 Kansas State vs. Charlotte, Noon
No. 20 Washington State vs. Boise State, 10:30
No. 21 South Florida at U-Conn., Noon
No. 22 Florida vs. Northern Colorado, Noon
No. 23 TCU at Arkansas, 3:30
No. 25 Tennessee vs. Indiana State, 4
WEDNESDAY’S RESULT
at New York City FC 1, Sporting KC 0
SATURDAY’S MATCHES
Orlando City at D.C. United, 7
New York at Chicago, 4
San Jose at Toronto FC, 5
Portland at New York City FC, 5:30
Montreal at New England, 7:30
Philadelphia at Minnesota United, 8
Colorado at Houston, 8:30
Real Salt Lake at Vancouver, 10
SUNDAY’S MATCHES
Sporting KC at Columbus, 1
Dallas at Atlanta United FC, 3:30
Los Angeles at Seattle, 9
New York City 1, Sporting KC 0
SPORTING KC
0
0
0
NEW YORK CITY
0
1
1
First half: None.
Second half: 1, New York City, Harrison, 9 (Allen), 85th
minute.
Goalies: Sporting KC, Tim Melia, Adrian Zendejas; New
York City, Sean Johnson, Andre Rawls, Eirik Johansen.
Yellow Cards: Espinoza, Sporting KC, 24th; Moralez,
New York City, 28th; Allen, New York City, 89th; Rubio,
Sporting KC, 92nd.
A: 19,353 (30,321)
Sporting KC, Tim Melia; Saad Abdul-Salaam, Ike Opara,
Erik Palmer-Brown, Seth Sinovic (Jimmy Medranda,
68th); Lobato (Gerso Fernandes, 83rd), Latif Blessing
(Diego Rubio, 66th), Roger Espinoza, Benny Feilhaber,
Ilie Sanchez; Daniel Salloi.
New York City, Sean Johnson; Robert James Allen,
Frederic Brillant, Alexander Callens, Ben Sweat; Jack
Harrison, Thomas McNamara, Maxi Moralez, Andrea
Pirlo; Jonathan Lewis (Khiry Shelton, 55th), Sean Okoli
(John Stertzer, 83rd).
NWSL
W
L
T Pts GF
North Carolina .................14 6
0
42 30
Portland ...........................12 5
4
40 33
Orlando ............................10 6
5
35 41
Chicago ............................10 6
5
35 29
Seattle ...............................8 7
6
30 39
Sky Blue FC........................9 10
2
29 36
Kansas City........................7 9
5
26 27
Houston .............................7 11
2
23 20
Boston ...............................3 11
7
16 18
Washington .......................4 13
4
16 26
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
GA
18
19
28
25
33
45
30
30
30
41
SATURDAY'S MATCHES
Chicago at FC Kansas City, 3:30
Seattle at Orlando, 7:30
Houston at North Carolina, 7:30
FRIDAY‘S GAMES
SOUTH
Memphis (1-0) at UCF (1-0), 6:30
Delaware St. (0-1) vs. Hampton (0-1) at Washington, 7
Oklahoma St. (1-0) at South Alabama (0-1), 8
MIDWEST
Ohio (1-0) at Purdue (0-1), 8
SATURDAY‘S GAMES
EAST
Buffalo (0-1) at Army (1-0), Noon
Holy Cross (0-1) at Bucknell (1-0), Noon
Fordham (0-1) at CCSU (0-1), Noon
Wagner (1-0) at St. Francis (Pa.) (1-0), Noon
South Florida (2-0) at U-Conn. (1-0), Noon
East Carolina (0-1) at West Virginia (0-1), Noon
Wake Forest (1-0) at Boston College (1-0), 1
Richmond (0-1) at Colgate (1-0), 1
Stetson (0-1) at Marist (0-1), 1
Lehigh (0-1) at Monmouth (N.J.) (1-0), 1
Stony Brook (0-1) at Rhode Island (1-0), 1
Bryant (1-0) at Maine (0-1), 3:30
Tulane (1-0) at Navy (1-0), 3:30
Pittsburgh (1-0) at Penn St. (1-0), 3:30
E. Michigan (1-0) at Rutgers (0-1), 3:30
Middle Tennessee (0-1) at Syracuse (1-0), 3:30
Villanova (1-0) at Temple (0-1), 3:30
Old Dominion (1-0) at U-Mass. (0-2), 3:30
Sacred Heart (1-0) at Lafayette (0-1), 6
SOUTH
N. Colorado (1-0) at Florida (0-1), Noon
Northwestern (1-0) at Duke (1-0), Noon
E. Kentucky (0-1) at Kentucky (1-0), Noon
Towson (1-0) at Maryland (1-0), Noon
UT Martin (1-0) at Mississippi (1-0), Noon
Louisiana-Monroe (0-1) at Florida St. (0-1), Noon
Louisville (1-0) at North Carolina (0-1), Noon
Jacksonville St. (1-0) at Georgia Tech (0-1), 12:30
Elon (0-1) at Furman (0-1), 1
Albany (N.Y.) (0-1) at Morgan St. (0-1), 1
Catawba (1-0) at VMI (0-1), 1:30
Fresno St. (1-0) at Alabama (1-0), 3:30
Savannah St. (0-0) at Appalachian St. (0-1), 3:30
Indiana (0-1) at Virginia (1-0), 3:30
Delaware (1-0) at Virginia Tech (1-0), 3:30
Wofford (1-0) at Mercer (1-0), 4
Indiana St. (0-1) at Tennessee (1-0), 4
Alabama A&M (0-1) at Vanderbilt (1-0), 4
Georgetown (0-0) at Campbell (1-0), 6
New Hampshire (1-0) at Georgia Southern (0-1), 6
ETSU (1-0) at James Madison (1-0), 6
Morehead St. (1-0) at Liberty (1-0), 6
Mars Hill (1-0) at N.C. A&T (1-0), 6
Shaw (0-1) at N.C. Central (0-1), 6
Marshall (1-0) at N.C. State (0-1), 6
William & Mary (0-1) at Norfolk St. (0-1), 6
Charleston Southern (0-1) at S.C. State (0-1), 6
Presbyterian (0-1) at The Citadel (1-0), 6
Alabama St. (0-1) at Troy (0-1), 6
Davidson (1-0) at W. Carolina (0-1), 6
Auburn (1-0) at Clemson (1-0), 7
Northwestern St. (0-1) at Grambling St. (0-1), 7
Tennessee Tech (0-1) at Kennesaw St. (0-1), 7
Florida Tech (1-0) at McNeese St. (0-1), 7
Cent. Arkansas (0-1) at Murray St. (1-0), 7
Southern U. (1-0) at Southern Miss. (0-1), 7
Jackson St. (0-1) vs. Tennessee St. (1-0) at Memphis, 7
Alcorn St. (1-0) vs. FIU (0-1) at Birmingham, Ala., 7:30
Chattanooga (0-1) at LSU (1-0), 7:30
Mississippi St. (1-0) at Louisiana Tech (1-0), 7:30
Bethune-Cookman (0-1) at SE Louisiana (0-1), 8
MIDWEST
Iowa (1-0) at Iowa St. (1-0), Noon
Charlotte (0-1) at Kansas St. (1-0), Noon
Cincinnati (1-0) at Michigan (1-0), Noon
FAU (0-1) at Wisconsin (1-0), Noon
SE Missouri (0-1) at Dayton (0-1), 1
Duquesne (0-1) at Valparaiso (0-1), 2
Robert Morris (1-0) at Youngstown St. (0-1), 2
UAB (1-0) at Ball St. (0-1), 3
Howard (1-0) at Kent St. (0-1), 3:30
Austin Peay (0-1) at Miami (Ohio) (0-1), 3:30
W. Michigan (0-1) at Michigan St. (1-0), 3:30
E. Illinois (1-0) at N. Illinois (0-1), 3:30
Cent. Michigan (0-1) at Kansas (1-0), 4
Cal Poly (0-2) at N. Iowa (0-1), 5
Missouri St. (0-1) at North Dakota (0-1), 5
South Dakota (1-0) at Bowling Green (0-1), 6
Butler (0-1) at Franklin (0-1), 6
Ark.-Pine Bluff (1-0) at Akron (0-1), 6:30
Southwestern (Kan.) (0-1) at Drake (0-1), 7
South Carolina (1-0) at Missouri (1-0), 7
MVSU (0-1) at S. Illinois (0-0), 7
Georgia (1-0) at Notre Dame (1-0), 7:30
Oklahoma (1-0) at Ohio St. (1-0), 7:30
W. Kentucky (1-0) at Illinois (1-0), 8
NCAA LEADERS
Washington at Sky Blue FC, 6
Portland at Boston, 6
Rushing
G Car RuYD Tds
Marshall,GaTech ............1 44 249
5
Abey,Navy ......................1 32 235
2
Williams,TexA&M..........1 22 203
2
Crockett,Mo. ..................1 18 202
2
Penny,SDSt ....................1 21 197
2
Bryant,Neb. ....................1 31 192
1
Dobbins,OhioSt ..............1 29 181
0
Love,Stan. ......................1 13 180
1
Bradshaw,Army .............1 9
177
2
Wilson,N.Tex..................1 12 176
3
Barkley,PennSt ..............1 14 172
2
Henderson,Memphs.......1 12 169
2
Adams,NDame ...............1 19 161
2
Jones,So.Cal...................1 18 159
3
Thomas,UNLV ................1 21 151
2
Freeman,Oregon ............1 23 150
4
Walton,MiaFla ...............1 16 148
2
Ward,CMich....................1 19 147
1
Duckworth,Idaho............1 19 144
1
Lindsay,Colo ...................1 19 140
1
Saint Jus,Hawaii ............2 48 280
1
Johnson,Auburn.............1 16 136
1
Martin,Auburn ...............1 14 136
1
Hill,OklaSt......................1 15 132
1
Johnson,Md....................1 12 132
1
Taylor,Memphs ..............1 15 131
1
Hopkins,UConn...............1 20 130
3
Kelly,Tenn. .....................1 19 128
4
Moss,Utah......................1 22 128
1
Benson,GaTech ..............1 26 124
1
Williams,NDame............1 6
124
1
Guice,LSU .......................1 27 122
2
Brown,Duke....................1 10 120
1
Hayden,Ark ....................1 14 120
1
Wadley,Iowa ..................1 24 116
0
Ford,TexA&M .................1 18 114
3
Isaac,Mich. .....................1 11 114
0
Taylor II,Tulsa ................1 20 111
2
Jackson,NW'ern .............1 30 109
0
Benoit,Oregon ................1 7
107
3
Jackson,L'vill..................1 21 107
0
Crawford,W.Va. .............1 13 106
0
Wimbush,NDame...........1 12 106
1
Homer,MiaFla ................1 11 103
0
Bellamy,W.Mich.............1 9
102
0
Seymour,Toledo .............1 11 102
1
Jackson,VaTech .............1 11 101
1
Klugh,Chrlot ...................1 14 101
0
Smith,N.Tex ...................1 18 101
1
Boone,Cincy....................1 19 100
1
Graham,NIU....................1 12
99
0
Thompkins,Toledo..........1 15
99
0
Johnson,N.Tex ...............1 13
98
0
T RA NS A C T I O N S
MLB
Chicago White Sox: Activated INF-OF Nicky Delmonico
from the 10-day DL.
Houston Astros: Announced Fresno (PCL) manager Tony
DeFrancesco will not return for the 2018 season.
Los Angeles Angels: Activated RHP Bud Norris from the
10-day DL.
Seattle Mariners: Assigned INF Shawn O’Malley outright to Tacoma (PCL).
Chicago Cubs: Named Will Venable special assistant to
the president/general manager.
Cincinnati Reds: Recalled RHP Luke Farrell from Louisville (IL).
Philadelphia Phillies: Traded RHP Juan Nicasio to St.
Louis for INF Eliezer Alvarez.
NFL
Atlanta Falcons: Signed QB Trevor Knight to the practice
squad. Waived DL Taniela Tupou.
Cleveland Browns: Signed DB Channing Stribling to the
practice squad.
Detroit Lions: Signed TE Hakeem Valles and WR Noel
Thomas to the practice squad. Released TE Cole Wick
from the practice squad. Placed WR Dontez Ford on
practice squad/injured list.
Houston Texans: Signed CB Marcus Burley. Waived CB
Dee Virgin. Waived WR Wendall Williams from the
reserve/injured list.
New York Jets: Signed TE Neal Sterling. Waived WR
Damore’ea Stringfellow.
Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Signed T Justin Murray to the
practice squad. Placed T Marquis Lucas on the practice
squad/injured reserve list.
MOTOR SPORTS
NASCAR: Suspended Denny Hamlin’s Cup crew chief,
Mike Wheeler, two races and fined him $50,000 and
stripped Hamlin of five playoff points and suspended
Hamlin’s Xfinity Series crew chief, Eric Phillips, two
races and fined him $25,000 for violating rear suspension rules in both the Cup and Xfinity races last weekend.
Suspended Dale Earnhardt Jr. crew chief, Greg Ives, one
race and fined him $20,000 for two loose lug nuts found
after the Cup race. Suspended Greg Erwin, crew chief for
Team Penske’s second-place car driven by Joey Logano,
two races and fined him $25,000 for violating suspension
rules.
WASHINGTON
Meesseman
Thomas
Delle Donne
Ruffin-Pratt
Toliver
Cloud
Hawkins
Latta
TOTALS
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS.
37:06 7-17 1-2 5-10 5 2 16
0:00
2-4 1-4 5-17 3 5
5
0:00 8-18 8-8 4-11 3 2 25
0:00
3-7 1-4 1-3 1 4
7
0:00 4-17 7-7 2-5 0 2 16
0:00
0-4 0-0 1-3 0 0
0
0:00
4-5 0-0 1-2 0 6
9
0:00
2-3 0-0 0-0 1 0
6
200 31-78 18-25 20-52 14 22 86
Percentages: FG .397, FT .720. 3-Point Goals: 6-18, .333
(Latta 2-2, Hawkins 1-1, Meesseman 1-2, Delle Donne
1-3, Toliver 1-9, Cloud 0-1). Blocked Shots: 8 (Delle
Donne 2, Meesseman 2, Thomas 2, Cloud, Ruffin-Pratt).
Turnovers: 10 (Toliver 5, Delle Donne 3, Meesseman,
Ruffin-Pratt). Steals: 3 (Meesseman 2, Toliver). Technical Fouls: Ruffin-Pratt, 1:33 fourth.
Dallas .................................. 12 22 16 26 — 76
Washington ........................ 18 16 25 27 — 86
A: 6,483 (20,356). T: 2:19.
FT
155
163
123
142
136
134
195
124
132
109
96
50
158
124
135
67
98
114
81
60
57
94
106
61
36
72
52
38
135
31
61
33
89
80
24
44
54
126
94
64
FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE
FG
Fowles, MIN ...........................254
Langhorne, SEA ......................180
Griner, PHO.............................207
Ogwumike, LAS......................244
Dolson, CHI .............................194
Jones, CON .............................181
Clark, SEA...............................106
Vandersloot, CHI ....................127
Thomas, CON..........................188
Gray, LAS................................184
Quigley, CHI............................191
Augustus, MIN .......................148
Harrison, SAN.........................163
Dupree, IND ............................214
Delle Donne, WAS ..................159
FGA
388
278
359
435
346
339
202
246
369
363
378
295
326
433
322
PCT
.655
.647
.577
.561
.561
.534
.525
.516
.509
.507
.505
.502
.500
.494
.494
THREE-POINT FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE
3FG
3FGA
Gray, LAS..................................53
110
Jones, CON ...............................25
56
Dolson, CHI ...............................31
71
Quigley, CHI..............................77
179
Moore, MIN...............................65
158
Stricklen, CON ..........................71
173
Thomas, CON............................54
134
Currie, PHO ...............................39
98
Bird, SEA ..................................59
150
Delle Donne, WAS ....................33
85
Hooper, CHI...............................29
75
Loyd, SEA .................................54
140
Taurasi, PHO.............................96
250
Vandersloot, CHI ......................26
68
Hayes, ATL ...............................48
129
Stewart, SEA............................49
132
Plum, SAN ................................35
96
Mitchell, PHO ...........................36
100
PCT
.482
.446
.437
.430
.411
.410
.403
.398
.393
.388
.387
.386
.384
.382
.372
.371
.365
.360
Cardinals: DNP: LB Deone Bucannon (ankle), WR Larry
Fitzgerald (not injury related), DT Robert Nkemdiche
(calf), QB Carson Palmer (not injury related). LIMITED: G
Mike Iupati (tricep). Lions: LIMITED: DE Ezekiel Ansah
(knee), WR Kenny Golladay (ankle), T Corey Robinson
(foot), RB Zach Zenner (back).
FREE THROW PERCENTAGE
FT
Delle Donne, WAS ..................142
Hill, WAS ..................................75
McBride, SAN .........................124
Mitchell, IND ............................94
Taurasi, PHO...........................124
Diggins-Smith, DAL ...............195
Sims, LAS .................................62
Dupree, IND ..............................67
Clarendon, ATL .........................80
Prince, NYL ...............................72
Latta, WAS...............................54
Ogwumike, LAS......................134
Dolson, CHI ...............................60
Plum, SAN ................................60
Toliver, WAS ............................52
Loyd, SEA ...............................132
Moore, MIN.............................109
PCT
.953
.938
.925
.922
.912
.894
.886
.882
.879
.878
.871
.870
.870
.870
.867
.863
.858
ATLANTA AT CHICAGO
REBOUNDS PER GAME
Philadelphia at Washington, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Miami, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Arizona at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Atlanta at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Houston, 1 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Indianapolis at Los Angeles, 4:05 p.m.
Seattle at Green Bay, 4:25 p.m.
Carolina at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
MONDAY’S GAMES
New Orleans at Minnesota, 7:10 p.m.
Los Angeles at Denver, 10:20 p.m.
REDSKINS’ DEPTH CHART
OFFENSE
WR
Terrelle Pryor Sr.
LT
Trent Williams
LG
Shawn Lauvao
C
Spencer Long
RG
Brandon Scherff
RT
Morgan Moses
TE
Jordan Reed
WR
Jamison Crowder
WR
Josh Doctson
QB
Kirk Cousins
RB
Rob Kelley
DEFENSE
DE
Jonathan Allen
NT
Ziggy Hood
DE
Stacy McGee
SLB
Preston Smith
MLB Mason Foster
MLB Zach Brown
WLB Ryan Kerrigan
CB
Bashaud Breeland
CB
Josh Norman
SS
Deshazor Everett
FS
D.J. Swearinger
Josh Doctson
Ty Nsekhe
Tyler Catalina
Chase Roullier
Tyler Catalina
Ty Nsekhe
Vernon Davis
Ryan Grant
Brian Quick
Colt McCoy
Chris Thompson
Terrell McClain
Stacy McGee
Matt Ioannidis
Ryan Anderson
Will Compton
Martrell Spaight
Junior Galette
Quinton Dunbar
Kendall Fuller
Stefan McClure
Montae Nicholson
INJURY REPORT
PHILADELPHIA AT WASHINGTON
Eagles: FULL: QB Nick Foles (right elbow), LB Najee
Goode (forearm), DE Brandon Graham (triceps), S Corey
Graham (hamstring), LB Jordan Hicks (quadricep), CB
Jalen Mills (thumb), DT Destiny Vaeao (calf). Redskins:
LIMITED: LB Ryan Anderson (stinger, neck), C Spencer
Long (knee). FULL: WR Josh Doctson (hamstring), LB
Junior Galette (hamstring), S Montae Nicholson (shoulder).
KANSAS CITY AT NEW ENGLAND
Yds Pg
249.0
235.0
203.0
202.0
197.0
192.0
181.0
180.0
177.0
176.0
172.0
169.0
161.0
159.0
151.0
150.0
148.0
147.0
144.0
140.0
140.0
136.0
136.0
132.0
132.0
131.0
130.0
128.0
128.0
124.0
124.0
122.0
120.0
120.0
116.0
114.0
114.0
111.0
109.0
107.0
107.0
106.0
106.0
103.0
102.0
102.0
101.0
101.0
101.0
100.0
99.0
99.0
98.0
Percentages: FG .338, FT .870. 3-Point Goals: 2-21, .095
(Powers 1-3, Diggins-Smith 1-5, Chong 0-1, Johnson 0-1,
Thornton 0-1, Gray 0-3, Plaisance 0-3, Christmas-Kelly
0-4). Blocked Shots: 6 (Paris 2, Chong, Christmas-Kelly,
Johnson, Plaisance). Turnovers: 6 (Diggins-Smith 2,
Chong, Gray, Johnson, Plaisance). Steals: 6 (Powers 2,
Christmas-Kelly, Gray, Johnson, Plaisance). Technical
Fouls: Powers, 1:33 fourth
FG
207
222
262
159
254
244
192
168
208
207
208
191
166
144
181
214
187
188
184
194
171
170
150
180
185
116
138
156
123
127
163
148
131
137
117
120
150
100
83
109
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Chiefs: DOUBTFUL: G Parker Ehinger (knee), LB Reggie
Ragland (knee). QUESTIONABLE: S Ron Parker (ankle).
LIMITED: G Parker Ehinger (knee), TE Travis Kelce (calf),
S Ron Parker (ankle), LB Reggie Ragland (knee). FULL: G
Parker Ehinger (knee), TE Travis Kelce (calf), DT Bennie
Logan (knee), CB Terrance Mitchell (hamstring), S Ron
Parker (ankle), LB Reggie Ragland (knee), K Cairo Santos
(right groin). Patriots: DOUBTFUL: DT Vincent Valentine
(knee). QUESTIONABLE: DT Adam Butler (knee), S Nate
Ebner (shoulder), T Cameron Fleming (ankle), LB Harvey
Langi (concussion), WR Malcolm Mitchell (knee), WR
Matt Slater (hamstring). DNP: DT Vincent Valentine
(knee). LIMITED: DT Adam Butler (knee), S Nate Ebner
(shoulder), T Cameron Fleming (ankle), LB Harvey Langi
(concussion), WR Malcolm Mitchell (knee), WR Matt
Slater (hamstring).
ARIZONA AT DETROIT
Falcons: DNP: RB Brian Hill (ankle). LIMITED: T Austin
Pasztor (chest), RB Terron Ward (hamstring). FULL: S
Damontae Kazee (ankle). Bears: DNP: CB Prince Amukamara (ankle), G Kyle Long (ankle), WR Markus Wheaton
(finger). LIMITED: LB Sam Acho (ankle), DE Jonathan
Bullard (glute), S Eddie Jackson (groin), CB Sherrick
McManis (hamstring), LB Pernell McPhee (knee).
PANTHERS AT 49ERS
Panthers: DNP: CB Cole Luke (ankle), LB Jared Norris
(groin). LIMITED: DT Vernon Butler (knee), DT Kyle Love
(ankle). FULL: DE Daeshon Hall (knee), QB Cam Newton
(right shoulder), WR Curtis Samuel (ankle). 49ers:
Practice Not Complete.
INDIANAPOLIS AT LOS ANGELES
SUNDAY’S MATCHES
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS.
36:49 6-16 3-4 4-14 0 2 15
24:03
3-7 1-1 0-5 3 4
7
34:03
2-9 2-2 3-5 3 4
6
34:33 6-18 2-2 0-2 3 3 15
16:06
0-8 3-4 1-3 0 2
3
23:53 6-15 8-9 2-6 3 2 21
15:57
4-5 1-1 3-6 1 3
9
5:58
0-1 0-0 0-1 1 1
0
5:27
0-1 0-0 0-0 1 0
0
3:11
0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0
0
200 27-80 20-23 13-42 15 21 76
SCORING AVERAGE
Kansas City at New England, 8:30 p.m.
Ravens: DNP: CB Jaylen Hill (thigh). LIMITED: CB
Sheldon Price (concussion). FULL: QB Joe Flacco (back),
WR Jeremy Maclin (hand), WR Breshad Perriman
(thigh), T Ronnie Stanley (knee), RB Danny Woodhead
(thigh). Bengals: DNP: WR John Ross (knee), TE C.J.
Uzomah (ankle), S Shawn Williams (elbow). FULL: WR
Tyler Boyd (hamstring), TE Tyler Eifert (knee), RB
Jeremy Hill (ankle), S George Iloka (knee).
FAR WEST
Texas St. (1-0) at Colorado (1-0), 2
Abilene Christian (0-1) at Colorado St. (1-1), 3:30
Gardner-Webb (0-1) at Wyoming (0-1), 4
N. Dakota St. (1-0) at E. Washington (0-1), 4:05
Nebraska (1-0) at Oregon (1-0), 4:30
Weber St. (1-0) at California (1-0), 5
Hawaii (2-0) at UCLA (1-0), 5
UNLV (0-1) at Idaho (1-0), 7
W. Illinois (1-0) at N. Arizona (0-1), 7
Toledo (1-0) at Nevada (0-1), 7
S. Dakota St. (1-0) at Montana St. (0-1), 8
New Mexico St. (0-1) at New Mexico (1-0), 8
Montana (1-0) at Washington (1-0), 8
Stanford (1-0) at Southern Cal (1-0), 8:30
Incarnate Word (0-1) at Sacramento St. (0-1), 9
San Diego (1-0) at UC Davis (0-1), 9
Minnesota (1-0) at Oregon St. (1-1), 10
Utah (1-0) at BYU (1-1), 10:15
Houston (0-0) at Arizona (1-0), 10:30
Boise St. (1-0) at Washington St. (1-0), 10:30
San Diego St. (1-0) at Arizona St. (1-0), 11
DALLAS
Johnson
Plaisance
Christmas-Kelly
Diggins-Smith
Gray
Powers
Paris
Thornton
Chong
Davis
TOTALS
REGULAR SEASON LEADERS
THURSDAY’S GAME
BALTIMORE AT CINCINNATI
SOUTHWEST
TCU (1-0) at Arkansas (1-0), 3:30
Miami (1-0) at Arkansas St. (0-1), ccd., hurricane
San Jose St. (1-1) at Texas (0-1), 3:30
Louisiana-Lafayette (1-0) at Tulsa (0-1), 4
North Texas (1-0) at SMU (1-0), 7
S. Utah (0-1) at Stephen F. Austin (0-1), 7
Nicholls (1-0) at Texas A&M (0-1), 7
UTSA (0-0) at Baylor (0-1), 8
Texas-Permian Basin (0-1) at Lamar (0-1), 8
Rice (0-1) at UTEP (0-1), 8
Mystics 86, Wings 76
Colts: DNP: CB Vontae Davis (groin), C Ryan Kelly (foot),
QB Andrew Luck (right shoulder), WR Chester Rogers
(hamstring), G Ian Silberman (lumbar). Rams: Practice
Not Complete.
JACKSONVILLE AT HOUSTON
Jaguars: DNP: RB T.J. Yeldon (hamstring). LIMITED: DE
Dante Fowler (knee), S Tashaun Gipson (ankle), CB Jalen
Ramsey (hip), WR Dede Westbrook (core muscle injury).
FULL: DT Michael Bennett (groin), QB Blake Bortles
(right wrist), T Josh Wells (ribs). Texans: DNP: RB
Alfred Blue (ankle), WR Will Fuller (shoulder). FULL: TE
C.J. Fiedorowicz (concussion), RB D’Onta Foreman
(groin), WR DeAndre Hopkins (thumb), WR Braxton
Miller (ankle).
NEW YORK JETS AT BUFFALO
Jets: DNP: TE Jordan Leggett (knee), S Rontez Miles
(eye). FULL: T Kelvin Beachum (knee), G James Carpenter (shoulder), CB Morris Claiborne (shoulder), RB Matt
Forte (knee), WR Chad Hansen (shoulder), T Ben Ijalana
(knee), LB Jordan Jenkins (calf), DE Claude Pelon (eye),
QB Bryce Petty (knee), RB Bilal Powell (ribs), TE Eric
Tomlinson (concussion), DE Leonard Williams (wrist).
Bills: DNP: LB Tanner Vallejo (knee), DT Jerel Worthy
(concussion). LIMITED: S Colt Anderson (foot), DT
Marcell Dareus (hip). FULL: T Cordy Glenn (foot), WR
Jordan Matthews (chest), QB Tyrod Taylor (concussion).
OAKLAND AT TENNESSEE
Raiders: Practice Not Complete. Titans: DNP: CB LeShaun Sims (groin). LIMITED: T Taylor Lewan (ankle).
PITTSBURGH AT CLEVELAND
Steelers: LIMITED: T Jerald Hawkins (knee). Browns:
DNP: T Joe Thomas (knee). LIMITED: G Joel Bitonio
(knee), DE Myles Garrett (ankle), DE Nate Orchard
(groin), DT Danny Shelton (knee), RB Dan Vitale (ankle).
FULL: DT Caleb Brantley (finger), WR Kenny Britt
(knee), C Marcus Martin (toe), TE Randall Telfer (knee).
SEATTLE AT GREEN BAY
Seahawks: Practice Not Complete. Packers: Practice Not
Complete.
NEW YORK GIANTS AT DALLAS
Giants: DNP: WR Odell Beckham (ankle), LB Keenan
Robinson (concussion). FULL: CB Eli Apple (ankle), DT
Jay Bromley (knee), CB Michael Hunter (concussion),
WR Tavarres King (ankle), TE Shane Smith (quadricep).
Cowboys: DNP: LB Anthony Hitchens (ankle). LIMITED:
CB Jourdan Lewis (hamstring). FULL: CB Chidobe Awuzie (hamstring), DE Taco Charlton (shoulder), DT Tyrone
Crawford (ankle), T Chaz Green (ankle), TE James Hanna
(hamstring), RB Keith Smith (knee), S Xavier Woods
(hamstring).
G
Griner, PHO....................... 26
Stewart, SEA.................... 33
Charles, NYL ..................... 34
Delle Donne, WAS ............ 25
Fowles, MIN ..................... 34
Ogwumike, LAS................ 34
Diggins-Smith, DAL ......... 34
Taurasi, PHO..................... 31
Loyd, SEA ......................... 34
Moore, MIN....................... 34
Parker, LAS....................... 33
Quigley, CHI...................... 31
Hayes, ATL ....................... 33
McBride, SAN ................... 30
Jones, CON ....................... 34
Dupree, IND ...................... 33
Johnson, DAL.................... 33
Thomas, CON.................... 33
Gray, LAS.......................... 34
Dolson, CHI ....................... 33
Thomas, CON.................... 32
Sykes, ATL........................ 34
Gray, DAL.......................... 34
Langhorne, SEA ................ 34
Williams, CON .................. 34
Prince, NYL ....................... 28
Toliver, WAS .................... 34
Wheeler, IND .................... 34
Zellous, NYL ..................... 34
Vandersloot, CHI .............. 27
Harrison, SAN................... 34
Augustus, MIN ................. 32
Currie, PHO ....................... 36
Clarendon, ATL ................. 34
Bird, SEA .......................... 30
Rodgers, NYL.................... 33
Williams, ATL................... 34
Christmas-Kelly, DAL....... 34
Mitchell, IND .................... 27
Brunson, MIN ................... 30
G
Jones, CON ....................... 34
Fowles, MIN ..................... 34
Thomas, WAS................... 34
Charles, NYL ..................... 34
Johnson, DAL.................... 33
Stewart, SEA.................... 33
Parker, LAS....................... 33
Ogwumike, LAS................ 34
Griner, PHO....................... 26
Williams, ATL................... 34
Lyttle, ATL........................ 29
Thomas, CON.................... 33
Delle Donne, WAS ............ 25
Brunson, MIN ................... 30
Harrison, SAN................... 34
Breland, CHI...................... 34
Stokes, NYL ...................... 34
Langhorne, SEA ................ 34
Dolson, CHI ....................... 33
Dupree, IND ...................... 33
Montgomery, SAN............ 34
Ruffin-Pratt, WAS ........... 34
Moore, MIN....................... 34
Vaughn, NYL..................... 28
Plaisance, DAL.................. 34
OFF
123
123
111
69
79
49
40
61
45
107
49
47
39
51
72
54
77
43
42
35
39
52
51
54
43
ASSISTS PER GAME
G
Vandersloot, CHI ......................27
Clarendon, ATL .........................34
Bird, SEA ..................................30
Diggins-Smith, DAL .................34
Thomas, CON............................33
Gray, LAS..................................34
Thomas, CON............................32
Pondexter, CHI .........................29
Parker, LAS...............................33
Wheeler, IND ............................34
Augustus, MIN .........................32
January, IND .............................25
Quigley, CHI..............................31
Mitchell, PHO ...........................34
Moore, MIN...............................34
Sims, LAS .................................31
STEALS PER GAME
G
Beard, LAS................................34
Moore, MIN...............................34
Ogwumike, LAS........................34
Thomas, CON............................32
Thomas, CON............................33
Lyttle, ATL................................29
Gray, DAL..................................34
Parker, LAS...............................33
Sims, LAS .................................31
Wheeler, IND ............................34
Diggins-Smith, DAL .................34
Fowles, MIN .............................34
Loyd, SEA .................................34
BLOCKS PER GAME
G
Griner, PHO...............................26
Fowles, MIN .............................34
Williams, ATL...........................34
Breland, CHI..............................34
Parker, LAS...............................33
Stewart, SEA............................33
Jones, CON ...............................34
Delle Donne, WAS ....................25
Dolson, CHI ...............................33
Stokes, NYL ..............................34
Thomas, WAS...........................34
FTA
149
80
134
102
136
218
70
76
91
82
62
154
69
69
60
153
127
DEF
280
231
217
249
221
238
237
202
153
139
158
178
130
150
144
161
137
163
151
156
155
128
120
83
104
PTS AVG
569 21.9
656 19.9
671 19.7
493 19.7
644 18.9
640 18.8
628 18.5
556 17.9
602 17.7
588 17.3
557 16.9
509 16.4
538 16.3
461 15.4
522 15.4
495 15.0
493 14.9
490 14.8
502 14.8
479 14.5
453 14.2
471 13.9
441 13.0
422 12.4
418 12.3
337 12.0
404 11.9
400 11.8
397 11.7
311 11.5
388 11.4
348 10.9
390 10.8
365 10.7
317 10.6
347 10.5
354 10.4
352 10.4
277 10.3
305 10.2
TOT AVG
403 11.9
354 10.4
328 9.6
318 9.4
300 9.1
287 8.7
277 8.4
263 7.7
198 7.6
246 7.2
207 7.1
225 6.8
169 6.8
201 6.7
216 6.4
215 6.3
214 6.3
206 6.1
193 5.8
191 5.8
194 5.7
180 5.3
171 5.0
137 4.9
147 4.3
AST
218
226
199
198
147
151
139
124
141
138
127
98
113
121
119
108
AVG
8.1
6.6
6.6
5.8
4.5
4.4
4.3
4.3
4.3
4.1
4.0
3.9
3.6
3.6
3.5
3.5
STL
71
64
63
51
52
45
52
48
45
47
45
44
43
AVG
2.09
1.88
1.85
1.59
1.58
1.55
1.53
1.45
1.45
1.38
1.32
1.29
1.26
BLK
65
67
67
59
55
53
50
36
43
39
38
AVG
2.50
1.97
1.97
1.74
1.67
1.61
1.47
1.44
1.30
1.15
1.12
Martin Truex Jr. ................................................ 1000
Kyle Busch .......................................................... 893
Kyle Larson ......................................................... 884
Kevin Harvick ...................................................... 867
Denny Hamlin ..................................................... 810
Brad Keselowski ................................................. 761
Chase Elliott ....................................................... 737
Matt Kenseth ..................................................... 735
Jamie McMurray ................................................. 734
Jimmie Johnson .................................................. 653
Clint Bowyer ....................................................... 643
Ryan Blaney ........................................................ 629
Kurt Busch .......................................................... 624
Erik Jones ........................................................... 611
Joey Logano ........................................................ 605
Ryan Newman ..................................................... 604
Daniel Suarez ...................................................... 538
Ricky Stenhouse Jr. ............................................ 536
Austin Dillon ....................................................... 473
Trevor Bayne ...................................................... 472
FIELD HOCKEY
VIRGINIA
Broad Run 3, Loudoun Valley 0
Centreville 6, Patriot 1
Westfield 7, Madison 1
PRIVATE
Good Counsel 3, Stone Ridge 2
Holy Cross 6, O’Connell 0
GIRLS’ FALL SOCCER
PRIVATE
Flint Hill 6, O’Connell 5
McNamara 7, Baltimore Friends 1
GOLF
SCHEDULE
Winners in parentheses
Feb. 19: x-Advance Auto Parts Clash (Joey Logano)
Feb. 23: x-Can-Am Duel at Daytona 1 (Chase Elliott)
Feb. 23: x-Can-Am Duel at Daytona 2 (Denny Hamlin)
Feb. 26: Daytona 500 (Kurt Busch)
March 5: Folds of Honor QuikTrip 500 (Brad Keselowski)
March 12: Kobalt 400 (Martin Truex Jr.)
March 19: Camping World 500 (Ryan Newman)
March 26: Auto Club 400 (Kyle Larson)
April 2: STP 500 (Brad Keselowski)
April 9: O’Reilly Auto Parts 500 (Jimmie Johnson)
April 24: Food City 500 (Jimmie Johnson)
April 30: Toyota Owners 400 (Joey Logano)
May 7: GEICO 500 (Ricky Stenhouse Jr.)
May 13: Go Bowling 400 (Martin Truex Jr.)
May 20: x-Monster Energy Open (Daniel Suarez)
May 20: x-Monster Energy All-Star Race (Kyle Busch)
May 28: Coca-Cola 600 (Austin Dillon)
June 4: AAA 400 Drive for Autism (Jimmie Johnson)
June 11: Pocono 400 (Ryan Blaney)
June 18: FireKeepers Casino 400 (Kyle Larson)
June 25: Toyota/Save Mart 350 (Kevin Harvick)
July 1: Coke Zero 400 (Ricky Stenhouse Jr.)
July 8: Quaker State 400 (Martin Truex Jr.)
July 16: New Hampshire 301 (Denny Hamlin)
July 23: Brickyard 400 (Kasey Kahne)
July 30: Overton’s 400 (Kyle Busch)
Aug. 6: I Love New York 355 (Martin Truex Jr.)
Aug. 13: Pure Michigan 400 (Kyle Larson)
Aug. 19: Bass Pro Shops NRA Night Race (Kyle Busch)
Sept. 3: Bojangles’ Southern 500 (Denny Hamlin)
Sept. 9: Federated Auto Parts 400, Richmond
Sept. 17: Tales of the Turtles 400, Joliet, Ill.
Sept. 24: ISM Connect 300, Loudon, N.H.
Oct. 1: Delaware 400, Dover, Del.
Oct. 8: Bank of America 500, Concord, N.C.
Oct. 15: Alabama 500, Talladega, Ala.
Oct. 22: Hollywood Casino 400, Kansas City, Kan.
Oct. 29: Old Dominion 500, Martinsville, Va.
Nov. 5: AAA Texas 500, Fort Worth
Nov. 12: Can-Am 500, Avondale, Ariz.
Nov. 19: Ford Ecoboost 400, Homestead, Fla.
x-non-points race
Presidents Cup
At Liberty National Golf Club
In Jersey City, N.J.
To be played Sept. 28-Oct. 1
c-captain's pick
ROSTERS
INTERNATIONAL
Captain: Nick Price
Jason Day, Australia
Branden Grace, South Africa
c-Emiliano Grillo, Argentina
Adam Hadwin, Canada
Si Woo Kim, South Korea
c-Anirban Lahiri, India
Marc Leishman, Australia
Hideki Matsuyama, Japan
Louis Oosthuizen, South Africa
Charl Schwartzel, South Africa
Adam Scott, Australia
Jhonattan Vegas, Venezuela
UNITED STATES
Captain: Steve Stricker
Daniel Berger
Kevin Chappell
Rickie Fowler
c-Charley Hoffman
Dustin Johnson
Kevin Kisner
Brooks Koepka
Matt Kuchar
c-Phil Mickelson
Patrick Reed
Jordan Spieth
Justin Thomas
IndyCar
POINTS LEADERS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
Josef Newgarden ................................................ 560
Scott Dixon ......................................................... 557
Helio Castroneves .............................................. 538
Simon Pagenaud ................................................. 526
Will Power .......................................................... 492
Alexander Rossi .................................................. 476
Graham Rahal ..................................................... 466
Takuma Sato ....................................................... 421
Tony Kanaan ....................................................... 375
Ryan Hunter-Reay .............................................. 373
James Hinchcliffe ............................................... 360
Max Chilton ......................................................... 360
Marco Andretti ................................................... 336
Ed Jones .............................................................. 332
JR Hildebrand ..................................................... 315
Carlos Munoz ...................................................... 298
Charlie Kimball ................................................... 289
Conor Daly ........................................................... 264
Mikhail Aleshin ................................................... 237
Spencer Pigot ...................................................... 184
SCHEDULE
Winners in parentheses
March 12: Firestone Grand Prix of St. Petersburg
(Sebastien Bourdais)
April 9: Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach (James
Hinchcliffe)
April 23: Grand Prix of Alabama (Josef Newgarden)
April 29: Phoenix Grand Prix (Simon Pagenaud)
May 13: Grand Prix of Indianapolis (Will Power)
May 28: Indianapolis 500 (Takuma Sato)
June 3: Chevrolet Detroit Grand Prix (Race 1) (Graham
Rahal)
June 4: Chevrolet Detroit Grand Prix (Race 2) (Graham
Rahal)
June 10: Rainguard Water Sealers 600 (Will Power)
June 25: Kohler Grand Prix (Scott Dixon)
July 9: Iowa Corn 300 (Helio Castroneves)
July 16: Honda Indy Toronto (Josef Newgarden)
July 30: Honda Indy 200 at Mid-Ohio (Josef Newgarden)
Aug. 20: ABC Supply 500 (Will Power)
Aug. 26: Bommarito Automotive Group 500 (Josef
Newgarden)
Sept. 3: Grand Prix at The Glen (Alexander Rossi)
Sept. 17: GoPro Grand Prix of Sonoma, Calif.
Formula One
The
green
pages.
Did you know?
POINTS LEADERS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
Lewis Hamilton .................................................. 238
Sebastian Vettel ................................................. 235
Valtteri Bottas ................................................... 197
Daniel Ricciardo .................................................. 144
Kimi Raikkonen ................................................... 138
Max Verstappen ................................................... 68
Sergio Perez .......................................................... 58
Esteban Ocon ........................................................ 55
Carlos Sainz .......................................................... 36
Nico Hulkenberg ................................................... 34
Felipe Massa ......................................................... 31
Lance Stroll ........................................................... 24
Romain Grosjean .................................................. 24
Kevin Magnussen ................................................. 11
Fernando Alonso ................................................... 10
Pascal Wehrlein ...................................................... 5
Daniil Kvyat ............................................................ 4
Stoffel Vandoorne .................................................. 1
The Washington Post
is printed using
recycled fiber.
SCHEDULE
Winners in parentheses
March 26: Australian Grand Prix (Sebastian Vettel)
April 9: Chinese Grand Prix (Lewis Hamilton)
April 16: Bahrain Grand Prix (Sebastian Vettel)
April 30: Russian Grand Prix (Valtterri Bottas)
May 14: Spanish Grand Prix (Lewis Hamilton)
May 28: Monaco Grand Prix (Sebastian Vettel)
June 11: Canadian Grand Prix (Lewis Hamilton)
June 25: Azerbaijan Grand Prix (Daniel Ricciardo)
July 9: Austrian Grand Prix (Valtterri Bottas)
July 16: British Grand Prix (Lewis Hamilton)
July 30: Hungarian Grand Prix (Sebastian Vettel)
Aug. 27: Belgian Grand Prix (Lewis Hamilton)
Sept. 3: Italian Grand Prix (Lewis Hamilton)
Sept. 17: Singapore Grand Prix
Oct. 1: Malaysia Grand Prix, Sepang
Oct. 8: Japanese Grand Prix, Suzuka
Oct. 22: United States Grand Prix, Austin
Oct. 29: Mexican Grand Prix, Mexico City
Nov. 12: Brazilian Grand Prix, Sao Paolo
Nov. 26: Abu Dhabi Grand Prix, Yas Marina, United Arab
Emirates
C Y C LI NG
Vuelta a Espana
17TH STAGE
At Los Machucos, Spain
A 112.1-mile leg from Villadiego to Los Machucos
RESULTS
1. Stefan Denifl, Austria, Aqua Blue Sport, 4 hours, 48
minutes, 52 seconds.
2. Alberto Contador Velasco, Spain, Trek-Segafredo, 28
seconds behind.
3. Miguel Angel Lopez, Colombia, Astana Pro Team, 1
minute, 4 seconds behind.
4. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Bahrain-Merida, same time.
5. Ilnur Zakarin, Russia, Katusha-Alpecin, same time.
6. Rafal Majka, Poland, Bora-Hansgrohe, same time.
7. Michael Woods, Canada, Cannondale-Drapac, 1:13
behind.
8. Daniel Moreno Fernandez, Spain, Movistar Team,
1:17.
9. Wilco Kelderman, Netherlands, Team Sunweb, 1:19.
10. David de la Cruz, Spain, Quick-Step Floors, 1:42.
Also
24. Tejay Van Garderen, United States, BMC Racing,
2:55.
36. Peter Stetina, United States, Trek-Segafredo, 5:01.
62. Chad Haga, United States, Sunweb, 11:37.
88. Joe Dombrowski, United States, Cannondale Drapac,
16:26.
Overall Standings
1. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky, 67:44:03.
2. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Bahrain-Merida, 1:16.
3. Wilco Kelderman, Netherlands, Sunweb, 2:13.
4. Ilnur Zakarin, Russia, Katusha Alpecin, 2:25.
5. Alberto Contador, Spain, Trek-Segafredo, 3:34.
6. Miguel Angel Lopez, Colombia, Astana, 4:39.
7. Michael Woods, Canada, Cannondale-Drapac, 6:33.
8. Wout Poels, Netherlands, Sky, 6:40.
9. Fabio Aru, Italy, Astana, 6:45.
10. David de la Cruz, Spain, Quick-Step Floors, 10:10.
Also
13. Tejay Van Garderen, United States, BMC Racing,
11:20.
34. Peter Stetina, United States, Trek-Segafredo,
1:22:50.
101. Joe Dombrowski, United States, Cannondale
Drapac, 3:05:56.
109. Chad Haga, United States, Sunweb, 3:16:36.
NF407 1x15
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D9
SU
professional football
Political issues are cited by some who are losing interest
BY ADAM KILGORE
AND SCOTT CLEMENT
The NFL knows that last season’s national anthem protests by
quarterback Colin Kaepernick
and other players turned some
fans away from the sport. While
the number may be a small percentage of overall fans, the league
has grappled with how to approach the issue and the effect
anthem demonstrations have had
on its fan base.
A nationwide poll conducted
by The Washington Post and the
University of Massachusetts Lowell found 19 percent of professional football fans say their interest
has decreased in recent years.
Among that pool of fans, 24 percent stated, in response to an
open-ended question, that political issues had made them less
interested in the sport, including
17 percent specifically citing the
anthem protests or Kaepernick.
That compares with 7 percent
who mentioned injuries or violence in the sport as the reason
they lost interest.
“If you look at some of the
reasons NFL viewership was
down last year, that is a reason
that’s mentioned by a fair amount
of viewers that is something they
don’t find attractive or they don’t
find compelling in coverage of the
football game,” CBS Sports Chairman Sean McManus said. “How
big a factor it was, I don’t really
know. But it was one of the factors
that I think perhaps led to the
slight decrease in ratings last
year.”
In the new poll, conducted the
week of Aug. 14 among a random
sample of 1,000 adults, those who
said the insertion of politics made
them less interested in pro football make up just 4 percent of
football fans. And in the general
question about football interest,
about as many fans say they have
become more interested in the
sport, 23 percent, as say their
interest has waned, with a 58
percent majority saying their interest is unchanged.
Still, many powerful figures
within the NFL have reacted with
alarm over the effects of the anthem demonstrations, which
Kaepernick began last fall to call
attention to police mistreatment
of blacks and other minorities.
While Kaepernick has not been
signed by an NFL team, some
players have staged anthem protests in support this preseason.
Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry
Jones said he does not want his
players protesting. Baltimore Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti solicited fans’ opinions before declining
to pursue Kaepernick when his
team needed a backup quarterback.
Among sports fans, the PostUMass Lowell poll finds 64 percent say players speaking out on
political issues such as Kaepernick’s protest is a problem, with
36 percent labeling it a “major
problem” and 28 percent viewing
it as a “minor problem.” Of nine
potential NFL problems tested in
the poll, political speech by players ranked sixth. By comparison,
player health problems caused by
head injuries were deemed a
problem by 90 percent and a “major problem” by 76 percent.
There are also fans on the opposite side of the debate. In late
August, a dozen activist groups
gathered outside the NFL’s offices
in New York to protest Kaepernick’s continued unemployment,
and some fans have stated they
will boycott NFL games because
of their belief Kaepernick has
been denied a job over his actions.
The league office has provided
teams with no explicit mandates
or official guidance on how to
approach players protesting, according to league officials.
“And I might make the case that
it’s the smartest thing they’ve
done,” said one high-ranking NFL
team executive, who requested
anonymity to speak freely about a
controversial topic. “If they did try
to offer guidance, it would get
leaked in about five seconds, so I
give them credit for not having
done that. . . . You do worry about
it, but when it gets right down to
it, I don’t think it’s going to — I
think you just let it fade away on
its own.”
NFL Commissioner Roger
Goodell, often heavy-handed in
matters of player conduct, has
been open publicly to letting players express their political views.
“The national anthem is a special moment to me,” Goodell said
last month in a meeting with Arizona Cardinals season ticket holders. “It’s a point of pride. That is a
really important moment. But we
also have to understand the other
side that people do have rights,
and we want to respect those.”
Many players have felt inherent
pressure not to protest because
they have non-guaranteed contracts. Even those who oppose
protests believe they will not undermine the league’s popularity in
the long run.
“Ultimately it might [tick]
some people off, but does it get to
the core of affecting the league? I
don’t think so,” the executive said.
“But maybe I’m seeing it through
glasses that are too rose-colored, I
don’t know. . . . I think it’s just
going to fade away, and if they do
go out and do that, and then I
think it’s probably a positive for a
league because it’s our players
working to make the country a
better place.”
Lenny Miller, a 42-year-old
from Brunswick, Ga., said he used
to watch as many NFL games as he
could. Now he watches only college football, refusing to partake
in the professional game after
Kaepernick and others demonstrated during the national anthem.
Miller said he believes players
should protest if they choose and
agrees that some Americans are
oppressed and criminal justice
needs reform. But he will not
watch the NFL as long as the
protests happen on the sidelines
in front of the flag.
“We got soldiers dying, and we
got millionaires protesting our
flag before they play a game,”
Miller said. “I have a major problem with that.”
If the protests cease, Miller
happily would revert to being an
NFL fan.
“Absolutely,” Miller said. “I love
football.”
This Post-UMass Lowell poll
was conducted Aug. 14-21 among
a random national sample of
1,000 adults reached on cellular
and landline phones. The margin
of sampling error for overall results is plus or minus 3.7 percentage points; the error margin is
4.7 points among the sample of
598 football fans.
adam.kilgore@washpost.com
scott.clement@washpost.com
Emily Guskin contributed to this
report.
Nine in 10 sports fans call brain injuries a problem, but the NFL is still popular
NFL FROM D1
the NFL’s core fan base. Among
Americans between ages 18 and
29, 61 percent say they are
football fans, roughly the same
as the public overall. Furthermore, adults under age 30 are
the most likely demographic to
say their interest in football has
increased, at 41 percent.
Poll results indicated professional football fans recognize
the danger the sport poses to its
players but have chosen to watch
anyway. In July, neuropathologist Anne McKee published a
study in the Journal of the
American Medical Association
in which 110 of 111 brains of
former football players had
chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, a degenerative brain
disease associated with hits to
the head. While the study was
limited to brains donated by
players’ family members, the
results built on an already large
body of science connecting football to long-term brain damage.
Americans believe the science
by overwhelming majority:
83 percent believe it is either
certainly true (45 percent) or
probably true that playing football causes brain injuries.
Among sports fans, 90 percent
say head injuries causing longterm health problems for players
is a problem for professional
football. Fully 76 percent say it is
a major problem, the highest
level of concern among nine
problems
tested
in
the
Post-UMass Lowell poll.
But the acknowledgment of
problems has not prevented
Americans from watching.
Among those who say head injuries are a major problem, 74 percent identify themselves as football fans, 40 percent called
themselves “big football fans,”
and 44 percent say football is
their favorite sport to watch.
Toni Hendershot, a 70-yearold from Montana, said she and
her family prohibited her grandson from playing football after
watching the movie “Concussion,” a film based on the true
story of a doctor’s struggle to get
the NFL to recognize the threat
of CTE. Hendershot still watches
two or three NFL games a week,
reconciling the health risks players accept because of the financial incentive.
“What I struggle with is the
fact that they are adult men and
they should be making good
choices for their long-term
health,” Hendershot said. “But
since it is their long-term health,
I shouldn’t be expected to pay for
it. I don’t have a problem watching it if they are dumb enough to
make those choices for the big
bucks.”
While football has retained its
popularity, at least some Americans are turning away. More
than 1 in 5, 23 percent, say their
interest in professional football
has decreased in recent years, up
from 13 percent in 2012. When
asked an open-ended question
about why their interest had
decreased, 24 percent cite politics, including 17 percent naming the national anthem protests
that Kaepernick initiated last
preseason. Some 10 percent of
those with decreased interest
say there are too many penalties
or delays. Just 7 percent cite
injuries.
The poll finds 45 percent of
Americans say the NFL is doing
“too little” to prevent concus-
MATT LUDTKE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Green Bay fans love their Packers, and NFL fans remain hooked on the sport despite negative headlines on such issues as brain injuries.
POLL
POLL
Washington Post-UMass Lowell Poll
Sports fans say injuries, player violence
biggest problems for pro football
Q: How big of a problem, if at all, is each of the following in the
NFL? (Among sports fans)
Washington Post-UMass Lowell Poll
Football fans say rooting for favorite
team, action of game are major reasons
to watch
Football fans who say each is a "major reason" they watch professional
football
Head injuries causing long-term health problems for players
All football fans
Major
problem
Minor
Not a
problem problem
76%
14%
Domestic violence committed by players
23%
Rooting for your
favorite team
71%
The action of
the game
68%
82%
6%
No opinion 4%
61%
Big football fans
9%
7%
77%
Enjoying time
with friends
53%
59%
Rooting for your
favorite players
51%
59%
Violent crime committed by players
60%
23%
9%
8%
Taking a break
from everyday life
Injuries caused by hits and tackling
59%
24%
12%
Hard hits and
tackles
25%
31%
4%
Players speaking out on political issues such as Colin Kaepernick's protest
36%
28%
27%
9%
32%
40%
31%
33%
To keep up with
fantasy football
26%
12%
32%
16%
Note: “Big football fans” are self-reported.
Source: Washington Post-UMass Lowell poll conducted Aug. 14-21, 2017, among random
national sample of 1,000 adults. The margin of sampling error is plus or minus 4.7 points
among the sample of 598 football fans, and plus or minus 6.6 points among the sample of
304 big football fans.
Number of TV commercials
31%
53%
43%
5%
Players being paid too much
40%
The tradition
4%
Low quality of play
22%
36%
30%
11%
Number of penalties referees call
20%
37%
33%
9%
Source: Washington Post-UMass Lowell poll conducted Aug. 14-21, 2017, among random
national sample of adults. Head injury results among 813 sports fans with an error margin of
plus or minus four percentage points and other results based on half samples of 403-410
sports fans, with an error margin of plus or minus 5.7-5.8 percentage points.
sions and head injuries among
players while 40 percent say
they are doing the right amount.
That marks a shift from 2011,
when an Associated Press survey
found 57 percent saying the NFL
is doing the right amount.
Concerns about head injuries
rank as the biggest problem
tested in the survey, but the
Post-UMass Lowell poll also
finds roughly 6 in 10 sports fans
say violent crime and domestic
violence committed by players
are major problems for the
sport. Among lesser concerns,
40 percent say players being
paid too much is a major problem, followed by 36 percent who
say the same about players
speaking out about politics and
about 2 in 10 who say low quality
of play or the number of penalties during games are major
problems.
Television ratings dipped last
season, dropping 9 percent in
the regular season and 6 percent
in the playoffs. CBS Sports
Chairman Sean McManus pointed to several factors that suggest
the decrease was temporary.
The biggest reason NFL ratings dropped, McManus said,
was the attention viewers paid to
the presidential election instead. He also cited the absence
of Peyton Manning (retirement),
Tom Brady (four-game suspension) and J.J. Watt (injury); the
appeal of the Chicago Cubs’
World Series run; and a string of
non-competitive
prime-time
games.
“I think those are all factors
that contribute to it,” McManus
said. “Listen, I think the ratings
will come back. You’ve got to
look at this relatively speaking:
The NFL ratings are still, far and
away, the most attractive programming in all of television by
a huge margin. So the fact that
ratings were down marginally
are still of concern. We’d rather
be up than down, but nobody is
panicking and saying the NFL is
slipping in terms of its popularity or in terms of its dominance,
relatively speaking to what else
is on in television.”
The Post-UMass Lowell poll
was conducted Aug. 14-21 among
a random national sample of
1,000 adults reached on cellular
and landline phones. The margin of sampling error for overall
results is plus or minus 3.7 percentage points and is 4.7 points
among the sample of 598 football fans.
Demographic breakdowns of
Americans’ responses revealed
several striking results. While
14 percent of football fans from
the South say their interest in
professional football has decreased in recent years, this rises
to 26 percent in the West.
Nearly a quarter of suburban
football fans (24 percent) say
their interest in pro football
decreased,
compared
with
12 percent of urban fans.
Among non-white pro football
fans, 29 percent say their interest has increased, while 11 percent say it has decreased. Conversely, 17 percent of white football fans say their interest has
increased, while a similar
22 percent say it has decreased.
Overall, Americans cited rooting for their favorite team, socializing with friends and “the
action of the game” as their
biggest reasons for watching.
Far fewer cite hard hits and
tackling or keeping up with their
fantasy football team.
“Look, you got mothers worrying about kids,” said former NFL
linebacker Ray Lewis, now an
analyst for Showtime’s “Inside
the NFL.” “You worry about that.
You got to think about it like
this: I guarantee across the
[country], in every state, there’s
these babies waking up every
day. You know what their dream
is? ‘Man, I get to play football
this Saturday. I get to go to
football practice.’ That passion
they display is something we will
never get by.”
adam.kilgore@washpost.com
scott.clement@washpost.com
Emily Guskin contributed to this
report.
D10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
SEPTEMBER 7 , 2017
professional football
An elite NFL star may sit out indefinitely, and hardly anyone is paying attention
The best defensive
player in football
might not play on
the NFL’s opening
ADAM
weekend, and
KILGORE
hardly anyone has
noticed. The
smallest developments in the
NFL are discussed and analyzed
to a granular level, and yet the
holdout of Aaron Donald has
been overlooked, somehow
buried in the storm of preseason
predictions and Ezekiel Elliott’s
suspension and ensuing legal
saga. The lack of attention
proves, again, that Donald is the
NFL superstar who deserves to
be treated more like a superstar.
The Los Angeles Rams should
be the first ones to take heed.
Donald has sat out all training
camp, exposing himself to
potential fines of up to $40,000
per day, should the Rams choose
to impose them. The sides
remain at an impasse as the team
prepares to open the regular
season Sunday against the
Indianapolis Colts. Star players
holding out and sitting for games
once happened a few times
On
the NFL
JEFF HAYNES/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rams defensive tackle Aaron Donald recorded 19 sacks over the
past two seasons, but Los Angeles has been reluctant to pay him.
annually, but it has become
nearly nonexistent. Donald is
days away from breaking the
trend. It’s mystifying that any
team would let it happen, and it’s
preposterous for the Rams in
particular.
Donald is scheduled to make
$1.8 million this season and
$6.9 million next year on the
rookie contract he signed as the
13th pick of the 2014 draft. He
has outperformed the deal to a
laughable extent, and he has
reached the stage of his career
when elite-among-elite players
often get their deals torn up for a
rich extension. He wants — and
should get — a new contract. The
Rams have not agreed on terms,
and so Donald is not playing.
“I’m optimistic that we’re
going to continue to work to find
a solution,” Rams Coach Sean
McVay said at his news
conference Monday. “If we’re not
able to, the game goes on Sunday
at 1 o’clock. There’s going to be a
kickoff.”
The Rams are uniquely
unqualified to argue against
giving Donald a lucrative new
deal. Last year, they handed
disappointing wide receiver
Tavon Austin, the eighth overall
pick in 2013, a four-year,
$42 million contract with
$28.5 million in guarantees.
Entering last year, Austin was a
tantalizing but unproductive
wide receiver who had never
reached even 500 yards in a
season. He didn’t do much to
prove the Rams prescient,
gaining 668 yards from
scrimmage in 2016.
Not all NFL teams are willing
to tear up rookie deals after their
NFL NOTES
third year, but the Rams proved
they are. And if they think Austin
is worth $10.5 million a year,
they should value Donald
somewhere around the GDP.
Few players are in Donald’s
class. Pro Football Focus called
Donald the best player in the
NFL — not best interior lineman
or defensive player, the best
player — in 2015 and the secondbest player last year. He recorded
the third-most quarterback
pressures in the league last year,
a remarkable feat for a player
who lines up exclusively on the
interior.
At the draft combine in 2014,
he ran the 40-yard dash faster
than any defensive tackle had
before. His quickness and low
center of gravity make him
unblockable. In a league of
freakish physical attributes,
Donald stands out. And he turns
those tools into production like
few, if any, of his peers. He has
19 sacks over the past two years,
an enviable total for an edge
rusher and a ridiculous total for
a tackle who sees constant
double-teams and also defends
the run at an elite level.
It’s fair to wonder whether
Donald is the closest thing in the
NFL to J.J. Watt or vice versa.
Either way, Watt provides a fair
template for how the Rams
should view Donald. Donald’s
low salary affords the Rams
negotiating leverage. But the
Houston Texans held the same
advantage over Watt entering his
fourth season, and they chose to
make Watt the highest-paid
defensive player in the league.
The Rams have no excuse not to
do the same for Donald, based on
their own precedent and moves
made across the league.
McVay offered the typical
boilerplate about how the Rams
could take on the Colts without
Donald, that they have had all
training camp to evaluate and
indoctrinate other defensive
tackles. But they are not Aaron
Donald, because nobody is. The
Rams should pay him. It would
help them win, and it would get
one of the very best football
players in the world back on the
field.
adam.kilgore@washpost.com
R E D S K I N S NOTE S
Beckham is day-to-day
ahead of Cowboys game
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Three-time Pro Bowl wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr. is itching
to play in the New York Giants’
season opener Sunday night at Dallas but is uncertain whether his
injured left ankle will allow him to
face the rival Cowboys.
While the star was back on the
field stretching with his teammates for the first time since he
was hurt more than two weeks
ago, the 24-year-old was not able
to practice Wednesday in East Rutherford, N.J. He spent most of the
time on the sideline working with
trainers.
Coach Ben McAdoo said Beckham needs to be cleared by medical personnel before he can play.
He left open the option that the
team’s leading receiver the past
three seasons might not need to
practice to play, provided he gets
the clearance.
Beckham described his status
as day-to-day, which is what McAdoo has said for weeks. He refused to say whether he has been
dealing with a high ankle sprain,
which usually takes more time to
heal than a low ankle sprain.
“I feel better than I did yesterday and better than I did the day
before,” Beckham said. “It’s progress.”
COWBOYS: Ezekiel Elliott
practiced in Frisco, Tex., fully for
the first time since leaving the
team for a lengthy and ultimately
unsuccessful appeal of his sixgame suspension over a domestic
violence case.
The star running back will play
in the opener against the Giants on
Sunday night essentially because
of the timing of arbitrator Harold
Henderson’s decision. Henderson
backed the NFL process that concluded Elliott used physical force
last summer against his girlfriend
at the time in Ohio.
So the Cowboys move forward
knowing they will have the 2016
NFL rushing leader in Week 1 but
prepared that Elliott won’t be back
until Week 9 after that.
“We’re excited for it,” quarterback Dak Prescott said. “He had a
great practice.”
Elliott missed both practices
last week to attend an appeal hearing that stretched over three days
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/insider
in New York. He was with the team
during meetings Tuesday but
missed a walk-through later in the
day for a hearing in federal court
over a temporary restraining order the NFL Players Association is
seeking on his behalf.
A federal judge is expected to
rule Friday on Elliott’s request,
and more legal action is likely if
Elliott loses.
BROWNS: Rookie defensive
end Myles Garrett, who through
the preseason has lived up to big
expectations as the No. 1 overall
pick in the NFL draft, suffered a
right ankle injury at practice, leaving his status for Sunday’s opener
against Pittsburgh in doubt.
Coach Hue Jackson did not provide any specifics about the injury
other than to say he did not finish
practice. Garrett was scheduled to
undergo further medical tests, including an MRI exam.
JAGUARS:
Quarterback
Blake Bortles showed up on the
injury report with a right wrist
injury but said after practice that
his wrist “feels good, good to go,
100 percent.”
Bortles has started 45 consecutive games for Jacksonville, playing though several nagging injuries.
RAIDERS: Coach Jack Del
Rio brushed aside a question regarding rumors that Oakland had
given Sebastian Janikowski an ultimatum to take a pay cut and said
concerns over the kicker’s health
are what prompted the team to
hold tryouts this week.
Del Rio would not say specifically what is ailing the 39-year-old
Janikowski, although the kicker
was on the team’s injury report
with a back injury. Del Rio said he
is hopeful Janikowski will play
Sunday when the Raiders open the
regular season at Tennessee.
BEARS: Chicago released oftinjured linebacker Lamarr Houston.
Houston was put on injured
reserve after hurting his knee in
the final preseason game and was
let go Wednesday. He was limited
to 26 games in three years with the
Bears because of knee injuries.
PACKERS: Wide receiver
James Jones, 33, retired following
a nine-year NFL career spent
mostly with Green Bay.
Redskins stress need
to have a better start
After the Washington Redskins
stumbled out of the gate in each
of their three season openers
under Coach Jay Gruden, there’s a
big emphasis on getting off to a
better start Sunday against the
Philadelphia Eagles.
Gruden and his players know
they have to do better, and so the
coach and his assistants stressed
attention to detail in Wednesday’s
practice. They will aim to ramp
up the tempo as the week
progresses. Of course, the
Redskins attempt to do so every
week, but everyone understands
the importance of producing
better results Sunday.
“We’re very hungry,” Gruden
said. “Wednesday doesn’t really
give you an indication of what
they’re going to be like on game
day. It’s more teaching them and
installing the game plan.
Thursday’s [practice] will be very
similar. We’re going to do more
third down, really focus on that
part of the game.”
In 2016, the Redskins scored on
their opening possession just four
times. But those showings were
decent tone-setters. Washington
went 3-0-1 when opening games
with a score.
Injury updates
Rookie linebacker Ryan
Anderson was limited in practice
as he continues to recover from
the stinger in his neck. The
second-round pick said he was
feeling good as he exited the
locker room. Asked about his
excitement level for Sunday,
Anderson just shrugged and said
he’s “always even-keel” because
that produces the best results.
Meanwhile, center Spencer
Long, recovering from preseason
arthroscopic knee surgery, was
limited in practice, but he
appears to be moving well. There
is no word yet on whether Long
will start. He seems to have a good
chance.
Practicing fully despite
receiving treatment for injuries
were linebacker Junior Galette
(hamstring), wide receiver Josh
Doctson (hamstring) and safety
Montae Nicholson (shoulder).
Plan for Galette
Count Gruden as one of the many
who eagerly await Galette’s
official Redskins debut.
The coach described himself as
“excited” and said he sees a very
“hungry” Galette preparing for
Sunday’s game.
Galette suffered season-ending
Achilles’ injuries in 2015 and
2016, and Sunday’s game would
be his first in the regular season
for Washington.
Look for Ryan Kerrigan and
Preston Smith to start at left and
right outside linebacker,
respectively. But Galette will
likely rotate with those two, and
for now, the plan is for Galette to
see most of his action on third
downs.
— Mike Jones
Doctson is more than ready just to get in the game
REDSKINS FROM D1
in the 2016 draft, and so they
used their first-round pick on
him despite needs on defense.
Teammates have seen flashes
in practices. Doctson looked like
the most complete wide receiver
on the team during the spring
sessions and preseason. Jamison
Crowder is an excellent route
runner, but he is limited by his
5-9 frame. Terrelle Pryor Sr. has
fantastic athleticism to go with a
6-4, 228-pound frame. But coaches describe him as a developing
receiver, going into just his second year at the position after
playing quarterback most of his
career.
Redskins defensive backs say
Doctson has displayed a blend of
athleticism, polish and savvy that
lead them to believe he can be
special.
“He can do stuff other guys
can’t do,” safety DeAngelo Hall
said one day after a training
camp practice in which Doctson
seemed to win a series of one-onone matchups effortlessly.
But no one really knows how
Doctson’s game will translate
from college to the NFL or from
practice speed to game speed.
Plenty of wide receivers thrived
in college but couldn’t hack it in
the league. And plenty shine in
practice but disappear in games.
Coach Jay Gruden and his staff
don’t believe Doctson will fall
under either category.
“He’s a very natural route runner. Very friendly quarterback
target,” Gruden said. “He gets in
and out of breaks smooth, he gets
his head around, gets the right
depths, understands the route
tree very well. He knows how to
run everything. There’s not a
route that he can’t run. We’ll see
how it goes, but I feel very good
about where he is mentally and
his approach to running routes as
a receiver.”
The inclusion of Doctson’s
mental state was not by accident.
Last year, the young wide receiver admittedly struggled with discouragement over his Achilles’
injuries, which doctors could
never find a cause for because
tests never revealed any structural damage.
Doctson earlier this offseason
discussed the process of regaining trust in his body and rebuilding his confidence. That reconstruction took place during the
spring and training camp. Doctson appeared poised to make a
push for a starting position but
then strained a hamstring leading up to the preseason opener.
He made a cameo in the second
preseason game — making one
catch for 12 yards — but then
missed the third with more hamstring soreness and tightness in
his groin. Coaches then made the
decision to hold Doctson out of
the fourth preseason game as a
precaution. Gruden insists he
sees a very confident player in
Doctson.
The wide receiver will enter
Sunday’s game with less than
ideal prep time. But he’s not
alone. Crowder and tight end
Jordan Reed also have missed
chunks of game and practice
time. Quarterback Kirk Cousins
has struggled without them regularly on the field.
During three preseason appearances, Cousins completed
just 56.8 percent of his passes and
had only one touchdown to go
with an interception. The quarterback has talked about embracing the challenge of proving he
can run an efficient offense regardless of the cast of receivers.
But despite the limited reps
with Cousins, Gruden believes
Doctson’s style and experience
will lead to more rapid progress.
“They’re still in the process,
but I think they’re in good shape,”
he said. “Josh is such a smooth
route runner and natural wide
receiver that he makes it easy for
quarterbacks. So not a concern
there.”
Cousins echoed his coach, saying, “I feel pretty good because
Josh is a natural receiver and has
done it a long time. He was able to
watch last year and sit in on
meetings and learn the offense.
He knows what it’s supposed to
look like. He watched some really
good, veteran players last year, so
it doesn’t take a lot of time to get
him going. We just need him out
there to show what he can do.
He’ll really make a difference for
our offense. I’m excited just as the
fan base is to see what he has in
the tank. We’ve had a good week
of practice here and we’ve just got
to continue to give him opportunities.”
Garcon’s and Jackson’s departures translate into a loss of
2,046 yards, seven touchdowns
and 87 first downs on 137 receptions. No one has made bold
predictions that Doctson will
post a 1,000-yard season. But
they do see him as a fixture in this
offense as long as he’s healthy.
Don’t look to Doctson for any
bold predictions of greatness,
however.
He has tried to temper expectations, declining many interview requests as of late, hoping to
let his play do the talking instead.
This week, he relented and
fielded a handful of questions
before leaving Redskins Park for
the day. But he went into Marshawn Lynch mode and in a low
voice answered nearly every
question with, “Yeah, I’m excited
to play football and the Eagles
this weekend. It’s going to be
fun.”
mike.jones@washpost.com
EFGHI
AUTOMOTIVE
In partnership with
washingtonpost.com/cars
1405
Aviation, Boats, RVs
Motorcycles Directory
Cars
1437
MERCEDES-BENZ
MERCEDES-BENZ 2010 S550- 31k
miles, sports model, fully
loaded,1 owner, silver color,
4WD, $35,000 Call 703-354-7588
62
Recreational Vehicles
Fleetwood 2007 Jamboree- 31M
E450 Ford V10, 4.0 KW Generator, 2
slides, new Michelin tires, new blue
ops towing system, new bed,
42,500 mi, excellent condition
inside and out $35,000,
571-284-6391 or 540-894-1948
69
Motorcycles
HARLEY-DAVIDSON 2006 VROD3800 mi., many upgrades, custom
bike, well main., gar. kept, $7499
neg., Call 540-582-6818 after 6pm
HARLEY DAVIDSON 2008 ROCKER
C(FXCWC)- rare soft tail, 3,755 mi,
showroom, prestine condition,
$13,000 910-261-8102
EZ
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Tax deductible. MVA License
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Antiques
DC BIG FLEA &
ANTIQUE MARKET
SEPT 16-17
416
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Tickets, Wanted
REDSKINS, WIZARDS, CAPS
Season Tickets Wanted.
Buying all locations. Top $ paid.
Please call 1-800-786-8425
610
Over 600 Booths!
Dogs for Sale
An AMAZING Treasure Hunt!
SHOP FOR BARGAINS!
Dulles Expo, Chantilly,Va
4320 Chantilly Shop Ctr 20151
Sat 9-6…Sun 11-5
Park free…Adm $10
703-378-0910
www.thebigfleamarket.com
Belgian Malinois Puppies- AKC
registration avail, 8 wks. M & F,
sports blood lines, guaranteed
HIPs and health. Parents on site.
shots wormed, vet checked.
$1000 540-850-8133
Bichon Poo Pups—9 wks Shots
wormed vet-checked White & apriFor Sale: Antique Chinese jade,furni- cot Hypoallergenic Raised at home
ture,Jewelry,— painting, porcelain, with loving care $650, 540-222-6555
c: 202-316-2528
Appliances
Maytag Washer & Dryer—125.00
$125, woodbridge, VA, 703-4926925
WASHER Apartment Size—$75 Gibson Heavy Duty, Energy Saver,
g/cond. , white extr. 301-345-1693
Books, Music & Movies
INFINITY
TSS-450
SURROUND
SOUND— $75, + subwoofer. LAUREL, MD, 301-498-8019
245
Electronics
Therapy Lamp—40
NatureBright
Light and Ion Therapy Lamp $40,
Alexandria, VA, 571-431-1501
260
Furniture
BUNKBED—$185 Solid Dark Wood,
W/mattress, vgood cond. deliv for
$20 in DC area 301-345-1693
265
BOSTON TERRIER PUPPIES- AKC
reg., 3 Males, 3 Females, S&W,
10 weeks, parents on prem.
Call 240-346-7818
Chussies Pups- tiny, adorable, blue
merle female, tan/white male, blue
eyes, parents under 20 lbs, 8 weeks.
$495 CASH. Leave msg 301-797-5645
English Springer—Sweet Loving pup
for sale to a wonderful home.
Female, AKC reg. litter, Champ
sire&dam liver/white 214-662-2530.
Web: www.littlebearspringers.com
French Mastiff—Dogue de Bordeaux
AKC reg. puppies, Female. Shots,
De-wormed. Avail 9/29. 301-8023660, www.windlanvilleddb.com
German Shepherd pups, German
blood line, 2F, 4M, all black $600,
shots, wormed, par. on prem. AKC
reg. rdy 9/1 240-606-3815
Home & Garden
2010 Kubota B2920 Tractor
LA364 Loader—2010 Kubota
B2920 Tractor LA364 Loader.
Price-$5000,Call or txt : 206472-7358
Non-commercial advertisers can now place ads 24/7
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815
Legal Notices
allowed my result in a judgement
by default or the grant of the relief
sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 7th day of
September, 2017.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
SAMUEL SWANZY
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
SAMUEL SWANZY YAMSON
FAMILY LAW: 146952FL
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for Change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Samuel Swanzy
to Samuel Swanzy Yamson. The
petitioner is seeking a name change
because: I want my name to reflect
the full family name just as my
parents.
Any person may file an objection
to the Petition on or before the
22nd day of September, 2017. The
objection must be supported by
an affidavit and served upon the
Petitioner in accordance with Maryland Rule 1-321. failure to file an
objection or affidavit within the time
allowed my result in a judgement
by default or the grant of the relief
sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 7th day of
September, 2017.
20 ft.Extension Ladder—$65.00
$65.00, Burke, VA, 703-978-2723
Bathrm Sink White cultured marble—$80. 35" across store price
$189.99 Never used. Excel. Cond.
BRICK—$249 550 New 10 Hole Bldg
Size, less or more if need (apprx
1500) .45 each 301-345-1693
FIREWOOD—$240, fairfax, VA, 703297-6936 1 cord of seasoned firewood. Free delivery
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
Two Car Seats—45 Graco child car
seat,infant car seat,$45 each/$80
both,Alexandria, VA, 571-431-1501
Merchandise Wanted
Antique Chinese jade,furniture,Jewelry, painting, — c: 7039669935,
sharonantique@gmail.com,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
GERMAN SHEPARD PUPPIES -Ready
now, European bloodlines, shots
and wormed, delivery options
available. $2800 each. 618-426-1878
GOLDENDOODLES-Health guranteed,
dewormed, 1st shots, $800.
Ready to go. Hour and a half away
from DC Beltway. Call 717-328-9549
Goldens Huskys & more—Puppies for
Sale 304-904-6289, Cash, Credit
Card, Or Buy With EASY FINANCING
on: www.wvpuppy.com
MALTESE PUPS - AKC, adorable,
shots, vetted, health guarantee,
champ lines, home raised. Ready
now. Reduced. Call 434-384-7032
Miniature Schnauzers —Purebred
Puppies - Please visit us at
taylorstoyschnauzers.com
Or call: 540-937-4332
POM-A-POO'S - 8 weeks, 3/4 toy
poodle, adorable balls of fluff,
shots/dewormed, health guarantee
$600-800 540-538-7029
Radio tubes—WANTED ham radios
huge speakers tube hif amps 202
527 9501, vcvdc@msn.com
SHIH TZU PUPPIES - Ready to go,
Shots, wormed,mother & father on
premises, Unionville.
Call 540-406-0740
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
Will Come to you!
SIBERIAN HUSKY PUPPIES- AKC,
1 F black&white, blue eyes
14 wks old, all shots.
540-877-1567 timreissig@yahoo.com
280
Musical Instruments
1980 Kawai KG-2 Grand Piano—One
owner, exc. condition, walnut finish. Appraisal $7,215. Asking price
$5000, price negotiable. Buyer will
move. Bowie, MD, 240-447-0247.
291
Standard Poodle Puppies - AKC reg,
males & females , partis & chocolate,
vet cheked, parents on prem, family
raised. $1,000 & up. 703-408-6027
620
Cats
Sporting Goods
& Services
MENS BIKE—45
NEXT POWER
CLIMBER, 18 SPEED, GC, $45, Laurel, MD, 301-498-8019
Adopt Cats
4Paws — Adopt fr 20+ cats/
kittens Sun 1-4 $v Sterling
Petco www.fourpaws.org
SCUBAGEAR Large—$249
Wet571-434-6562 CFC#345
suit,Fins,Gloves,Boots,Mask/Snrkl,
Wght belt/wghts, 301-345-1693
815
350
Garage Sales, MD
SILVER SPRING - Inside Yard Sale.
Saturday September 9th 7am - 3pm.
1135 University Blvd. W.
355
Garage Sales, VA
Alexandria - Fairfax County—Multi Family 2006 Belle View
Blvd, Alexandria, VA, Fri 9 -3 and Sat
8-1. Indoor. Huge. 703-765-1100
City of Alexandria—Multi-Family
2604 Cameron Mills Rd 09/09 8-1p
collectibles, FURN,vinyl albums, etc.
City of Alexandria—216 Gretna
Green Ct, Alexandria, VA, Sept. 7-9,
from 10-4pm, 202-486-7885
Fairfax - 4172 Governor Yeardley Ln.
Sat 9/9, 7:30am. Clothes, toys, tools,
nick-knacks, collectibles & more!
Fairfax City—4313 Still Meadow
Rd, Fairfax, VA, 09/09/2017, 8-12,
703-764-0730. Community Yard
Sale, many families. Braddock to
Burke Station to Cotton Farm.
Maps at entrance
Fairfax—Downsizing. High quality
household items. 5361 Anvil Ct,
22030, 09/09, 8:00am-1:00pm.
Herndon—Middleton Farm Lane,
Community Yard Sale, Herndon VA,
09/09/2017, 8:00am - 2:00pm
358
Moving Sale
NEW KENT—MOVING SALE
*All manner of odd and unique
items! Many items not allowed to be
listed here! Large surplus of military
items and other unique items from
various expeditions. Items include,
but
not
limited
to:
Historic prints / Framed artwork/
Bicycles / building supplies / electric
motors / air cylinders / light fixtures/
household items / food slicer /ball/
3 point hitch backhoe attachment
Ford tractor parts / Airplane parts/
gearboxes / machine tool components & related items / stainless
steel valves / linear guides/bearings
industrial/electrical components/ jet
powered heater unit with exchangers ALSO: ** Navy Seal underwater
displays / David Clark headsets /
heads-up display monocular / Ghillie
suits / camo shirts, jackets, & pants
/ USGI Alice packs / USGI tent stakes
for ice / USGI coffins / US Army cots
/ military generators / tent heaters /
Dutch prison jackets / paratrooper
accessories / carriers / FMJ/MREs
Ghillie suits and much, much,
more!!!!
(Only 2 miles from
New Kent Winery!)
**Saturday, September 9th at 7am
10475 Talleysville Rd, New Kent**
360
Estate Sales
Upper Marlboro -4718 colonel darnell
place. vintage, doll collection, christmas deco, housewares 443-618-2340
Woodbridge, VA
Fri & Sat 10-3.
3944 Triad Ct.
Immaculate house w/pristine furn.
for every rm, incl. 2 wall units,
much china, jewelry, incl. costume
& semi-precious & Nat. Amer.,
clothes, Men's 42R, women's 4-6,
camping gear, 2 sewing machines,
lawn equipment, 3 bikes, 1989
Volvo 740 runs great & a metal
machine shop loaded w/equip &
supplies, incl. 4 ft lathe, drill press,
& much more.
See estatesales.net
Encore Estate Sales 703-922-6260
408
Tickets, Sports
REDSKIN TICKETS AVAILABLE
includes parking
Call 301-460-7292
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
IN THE MATTER OF
JOY LEANNE GUEST
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
JOY GUEST MESSICK
FAMILY LAW: 147023FL
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Joy LeAnne
Guest to Joy Guest Messick. The
petitioner is seeking a name change
because: marriage- take spouse's
last name.
Any person may file an objection
to the Petition on or before the
22nd day of September, 2017. The
objection must be supported by
an affidavit and served upon the
Petitioner in accordance with Maryland Rule 1-321. failure to file an
objection or affidavit within the time
allowed my result in a judgement
by default or the grant of the relief
sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 7th day of
September, 2017.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
NLANDU GERMAINE HUNUKUNU
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
GERMAINE NLANDU HUNUKUNU
FAMILY LAW: 147063FL
PUBLICATION NOTICE
Bobtail / Manx Kittens - Ready now,
$350. multiple colors. very playful.
raised inside. will meet or more info
GOLF CLUB SET—$45 Set of clubs 540-552-6255 or 540-392-9707.
with Spalding Bag, wood drivers,
also have golf shoes 301-345-1693 622
Legal Notices
BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE
COMMISSION OF
MARYLAND
IN THE MATTER OF THE
APPLICATION OF
SOL PHOENIX SOLAR, LLC
FOR A CERTIFICATE OF PUBLIC
CONVENIENCE AND NECESSITY
TO CONSTRUCT A 2.5 MW SOLAR
PHOTOVOLTAIC
GENERATING FACILITY IN PRINCE
GEORGE’S COUNTY, MARYLAND
CASE NO. 9446
NOTICE OF HEARING AND
OPPORTUNITY FOR PUBLIC
COMMENT
A public comment hearing in the
above-entitled matter is scheduled for Thursday, September 28,
2017, beginning at 6:30 p.m., at
the meeting room of the Holiday
Inn located at 9101 Basil Court,
Largo, Maryland 20774 concerning Sol Phoenix Solar, LLC’s application for a Certificate of Public
Convenience and Necessity
(CPCN) from the Maryland Public
Service Commission. Sol Phoenix
Solar, LLC has proposed to construct an 2.5 MW solar photovoltaic generating facility in
Prince George’s County, Maryland. An electronic copy of Sol
Phoenix Solar, LLC’s application
is available on the Maryland
Public Service Commission’s
website under Case No. 9446.
Persons who wish to file written
comments are directed to
address such comments to David
J. Collins, Executive Secretary,
Maryland Public Service Commission, 6 St. Paul Street, 16th
Floor,
Baltimore,
Maryland
21202, referencing Case No.
9446, and file such comments
by October 2, 2017.
Estate of
Gregory M. Baltrun
(Deceased February 11, 2017)
Circuit Court of Fairfax, Virginia
To all persons who may have some
interest in the above-captioned
estate, notice is hereby given that
Paul A. Baltrun, Jr. has been
appointed Administrator of the
estate in the Fairfax County Probate
Office on May 1, 2017. All unknown
heirs and heirs whose whereabouts
are unknown should contact the
Administrator at 141 Seagrape
Drive, Apt. 104, Jupiter, FL 33458.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
Madisen Rae Garcia
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
Madisen Rae Carpen
FAMILY LAW: 147109
Amber Marie Carmen (Mother)
Petitioner
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Madisen Rae
Garcia to Madisen Rae Carpen. The
petitioner is seeking a name change
because: Amber Carpen has sole
custody and having the same surname will be less confusing for
school officials, daycare, physicians, travel documents and daily
interactions. It will remove the need
to explain name difference from
mother, to others.
Any person may file an objection
to the Petition on or before the
22nd day of September, 2017. The
objection must be supported by
an affidavit and served upon the
Petitioner in accordance with Maryland Rule 1-321. failure to file an
objection or affidavit within the time
ll
d
l i
j d
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Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
or call 202-334-6200
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
275
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208
CLASSIFIED
D11
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Nlandu Germaine Hunukunu to Germaine Nlandu Hunukunu. The petitioner is
seeking a name change because:
the order of name it was revised.
Any person may file an objection
to the Petition on or before the
22nd day of September, 2017. The
objection must be supported by
an affidavit and served upon the
Petitioner in accordance with Maryland Rule 1-321. failure to file an
objection or affidavit within the time
allowed my result in a judgement
by default or the grant of the relief
sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 7th day of
September, 2017.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
ASEEL HUSSIEN HAKIM
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
AMEL MOHAMED ABDELGADIR
FAMILY LAW: 147075FL
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Aseel Hussien
Hakim to Amel Mohamed Abdelgadir. The petitioner is seeking a
name change because: of his marriage.
Any person may file an objection
to the Petition on or before the
22nd day of September, 2017. The
objection must be supported by
an affidavit and served upon the
Petitioner in accordance with Maryland Rule 1-321. failure to file an
objection or affidavit within the time
allowed my result in a judgement
by default or the grant of the relief
sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 7th day of
September, 2017.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
“Notice is hereby given that the
following named company at the
address listed herewith has made
application to engage in the business of loaning money for the
license year ending December 31,
2017 as provided by the Act of
Congress, approved February 14,
1913. Anyone desiring to protest
against the issuance of this license
should do so in writing to the Commissioner of the Department of
Insurance, Securities and Banking,
810 First Street, NE, Suite 701,
Washington, DC 20002, in the manner prescribed by said Act: See DC
Code Title 26, Chapter 9 and 16
DCMR 2.”
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 945
QUENTIN E. GRANT
PRO SE
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Michael W. Grant, whose address
is 45 Hailey Ln #A3 Strasburg VA
22657 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Quentin
E. Grant, who died on May 26,
2017 with a will and will serve
without Court supervision. All
unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment (or to the probate of
decedent's Will) shall be filed with
the Register of Wills, D.C., Building
A, 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor,
hi
815
Legal Notices
Washington, D.C. 20001, on or
before February 24, 2018. Claims
against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a
copy to the Register of Wills or
filed with the Register of Wills with
a copy to the undersigned, on or
before February 24, 2018, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be
heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
Michael W. Grant
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 000935
GORHAM H. GILES
William R. Voltz
2120 L Street, NW, Suite 700
Washington DC 20037
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Alanda Marshall, whose address is
2738 Heron Drive, Wolverine Lake,
Michigan 48390 was appointed personal representative of the estate
of Gorham H. Giles, who died on
May 6, 2017 without a will and will
serve without Court supervision. All
unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment (or to the probate of
decedent's Will) shall be filed with
the Register of Wills, D.C., Building
A, 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor,
Washington, D.C. 20001, on or
before February 28, 2018. Claims
against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a
copy to the Register of Wills or
filed with the Register of Wills with
a copy to the undersigned, on or
before February 28, 2018, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be
heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
Alanda Marshall
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 946
NICHOLAS A. ADDAMS
PRO SE
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Christopher Addams aka C.P.
Addams, whose address is 9815
Laurel Street Fairfax, VA 22032 was
appointed personal representative
of the estate of Nicholas A. Addams,
who died on 06-28-2017 without a
will and will serve without Court
supervision. All unknown heirs and
heirs whose whereabouts are
unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections
to such appointment shall be filed
with the Register of Wills, D.C.,
Building A, 515 5th Street, N.W.,
3rd Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001,
on or before February 28, 2018.
Claims against the decedent shall
be presented to the undersigned
with a copy to the Register of Wills
or filed with the Register of Wills
with a copy to the undersigned, on
or before February 28, 2018, or be
forever barred. Persons believed to
be heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
Christopher Addams
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 947
ROY THOMAS PEARSON
Magin Puig, Lavin & Puig PLLC
1629 K Street NW, Suite 300
Washington, DC 20006
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Everett Pearson, whose address is
5505 16th Street NW, Washington,
DC 20011 was appointed personal
representative of the estate of Roy
Thomas Pearson, who died on July
17, 2016 without a will and will
serve without Court supervision. All
unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment shall be filed with the
Register of Wills, D.C., Building A,
515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor,
Washington, D.C. 20001, on or
before February 28, 2018. Claims
against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a
copy to the Register of Wills or
filed with the Register of Wills with
a copy to the undersigned, on or
before February 28, 2018, or be
forever barred. Persons believed to
be heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
Everett Pearson
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 931
VALERIE DENISE SCOTT
Nancy Spearman
121 12th SE Unit 309
Washington DC 20003
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Laurence Karl Scott, whose address
is 132 Root Avenue, Central Islip,
New York 11722 was appointed personal representative of the estate
of Valerie Denise Scott, who died on
July 03, 2017 with a will and will
serve without Court supervision. All
unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment (or to the probate of
decedent's Will) shall be filed with
the Register of Wills, D.C., Building
A, 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor,
Washington, D.C. 20001, on or
before February 28, 2018. Claims
against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a
copy to the Register of Wills or
filed with the Register of Wills with
a copy to the undersigned, on or
before February 28, 2018, or be
forever barred. Persons believed to
be heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
820
Official Notices
820
820
Official Notices
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
KING FARM IRVINGTON CENTRE – SITES F7 AND F8
Notice is hereby given that the Mayor and Council of Rockville,
Maryland will conduct a public hearing on Monday September 18,
2017, at 7:00 p.m. or as soon thereafter as it may be heard, in
the Mayor and Council Chambers, Rockville City Hall, 111 Maryland
Avenue, Rockville, Maryland, in connection with a request for Mayor
and Council consent to allow residential use on Parcels F-7 and F8 within Irvington Centre at King Farm, rather than office use. The
applicant is requesting the development of up to 120 residential
townhouse units on Parcel F-7 instead of approx. 152,000 sq. ft. of
office space and up to 42 residential townhouse units on parcel F-8
instead of approx. 158,000 sq. ft. of office space. The applicant is King
Farm Associates.
The F-7 property is located southeast of the intersection of Piccard
Drive and Choke Cherry Road and the F-8 site is located along King
Farm Boulevard, north of Piccard Drive.
Persons wishing to testify are requested to call the City Clerk’s Office
at 240-314-8280 by September 18, 2017 at 4:00 PM to place
their names on the speakers’ list. Further information can be found
on file in the planning office, by emailing Brian Wilson, Planner at
bwilson@rockvillemd.gov, or by calling at 240-314-8227.
Mayor and Council of Rockville
By: Kathleen Conway, City Clerk/Director of Council Operations
815
Legal Notices
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 NRT 000026
BETSY S. MARTIN
Name of Deceased Settlor
NOTICE OF EXISTENCE
OF REVOCABLE TRUST
Betsy S. Martin, whose address was
3726 Livingston Street NW, Washington, DC 20015 created a revocable trust on April 8, 2008 which
remained in existence on the date
of her death on June 28, 2017,
and John S. Martin, whose address
is 1008 Dale Drive, Silver Spring,
Maryland 20910 is/are the currently acting trustee(s), hereinafter the
Trustee. Communications to the
trust should be mailed or directed
to Gary Altman, Esq. at c/o Altman
& Associates, 11300 Rockville Pike,
Suite 708, Rockville, Maryland
20852.
The Trust is subject to claims of the
deceased settlor's creditors, costs
of administration of the settlor's
estate, the expenses of the
deceased settlor's funeral and disposal of remains, and statutory
allowances to a surviving spouse
and children to the extent the
deceased settlor's residuary probate estate in inadequate to satisfy
those claims, costs, expenses, and
allowances.
Claims of the deceased settlor's
creditors are barred as against the
Trustee and the trust property
unless presented to the Trustee
at the address provided herein or
or before 3/7/18 (6 months after
the date of the first publication of
this notice). An action to contest
the validity of this trust must be
commenced by the earliest of (1)
6/28/18 (one year from the date of
death of the deceased settlor or
(2) 3/7/18 (6 months from the date
of first publication of this notice)
or (3) ninety days after the Trustee
sends the person a copy of the trust
instrument and a notice informing
the person of the trust's existence,
the Trustee's name and address,
and the time allowed for commencing a proceeding.
The Trustee may proceed to distribute the trust property in accordance with the terms of the trust
before the expiration of the time
within which an action must be
commenced unless the Trustee
knows of a pending judicial proceeding contesting the validity of
the trust or the Trustee has received
notice from a potential contestant
who thereafter commences a judicial proceeding within sixty days
after notification.
This notice must be mailed postmarked within 15 days of its first
publication to each heir and qualified beneficiary of the trust and
any other person who would be an
interested person within the meaning of D.C. Code, sec. 20-101(d).
John S. Martin
TRUSTEE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF
THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 FEP 000100
May 28, 2017 - Date of Death
THOMAS ELRY DUNN
Name of Decedent
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT OF
FOREIGN PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE AND
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Mary R. Wilson, whose address is
7922 Grimsley Street Alexandria VA
22309 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Thomas
Elry Dunn, deceased, by the Circuit
Court for Fairfax County, State of
Virginia on July 20, 2017. Service of
process may be made upon Prilla
L. Stroman 1405 Orrin Street, NE
Washington, DC 20002 whose designation as District of Columbia
agent has been filed with the Register of Wills, D.C.
The decedent owned the following
District of Columbia real property.
4127 A/B Hunt Place, NE Washington DC 20019.
The decedent owned District of
Columbia personal property. Claims
against the decedent may be presented to the undersigned and filed
with the Register of Wills for the
District of Columbia, Building A,
515 5th, NW, 3rd Floor, Washington
DC 20001 within 6 months from
the date of first publication of this
notice.
Mary R. Wilson
Personal Representative
Anne Meister
Register of Wills
820
Official Notices
ABC LICENSE: BL Restaurant Operations, LLC trading as Bar Louie
Potomac Town Center, 15001
Potomac Town Place, Suite 100,
Woodbridge, Prince William, Virginia 22191. The above establishment is applying to the VIRGINIA
DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL (ABC) for a Mixed
Beverage Restaurant; Wine & Beer
On-Premises license to sell or manufacture
alcoholic
beverages.
Tamara Bebb, Chief Financial Officer. NOTE: Objections to the
issuance of this license must be
submitted to ABC no later than 30
days from the publishing date of the
first of two required newspaper
legal notices. Objections should be
registered at www.abc.virginia.gov
or 800-552-3200.
ABC LICENSE: Pentagon City Wine
Merchant, LLC trading as Pentagon
City Wine Merchant, 1330 South
Fair Street, Arlington, (Arlington
County) Virginia 22202. The above
establishment is applying to the
VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL (ABC)
for a Wine and Beer Off Premises
and Keg license to sell or manufacture alcoholic beverages. Opal
Vichitlakakran, Managing Member.
NOTE: Objections to the issuance of
this license must be submitted to
ABC no later than 30 days from the
publishing date of the first of two
required newspaper legal notices.
Objections should be registered at
www.abc.virginia.gov or 800-5523200
825
835
Public Sale Notices
NOTICE
ABANDONED WATERCRAFT
Notice is hereby given that the
following watercraft has been abandoned for more than 60 DAYS on the
property of: Gateway Storage Ctr,
10100 Richmond Hwy, Lorton, VA
22079, 703-339-0009. Description:
21’ 1995 Marada, white; Hull ID:
EFJ00348I495 Title # VA 4220 BC.
Application for Watercraft Registration/Title will be made in accordance with Section 29.1-733.25 of
the Code of Virginia if this watercraft is not claimed & removed
within 30 days of 1st publication of
this notice.
NOTICE
ABANDONED WATERCRAFT
Notice is hereby given that the
following watercraft has been abandoned for more than 60 DAYS on
the property of: Gateway Storage
Ctr, 10100 Richmond Hwy, Lorton,
VA 22079, 703-339-0009. Description:21’3” 1989 Renken, white; Hull
ID: RBMLG119A989; Title # VA 9169
BP; Application for Watercraft Registration/Title will be made in accordance with Section 29.1-733.25 of
the Code of Virginia if this watercraft is not claimed & removed
within 30 days of 1st publication of
this notice
NOTICE
ABANDONED WATERCRAFT
Notice is hereby given that the
following watercraft has been abandoned for more than 60 DAYS on
the property of: Gateway Storage
Ctr, 10100 Richmond Hwy, Lorton,
VA 22079, 703-339-0009. Description:15’ 1981 Cobia, white; Hull ID:
CBA52018M81C; Title: #VA 670 BN.
Application for Watercraft Registration/Title will be made in accordance with Section 29.1-733.25 of
the Code of Virginia if this watercraft is not claimed & removed
within 30 days of 1st publication of
this notice.
850
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
ESTATE OF MARILYN F. JONES
RIKKI DRYKERMAN,
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. 424457V
FREE UNDER $250
820
Official Notices
Official Notices
MARYLAND DEPARTMENT OF THE
ENVIRONMENT
WATER AND SCIENCE ADMINISTRATION
NOTICE OF TENTATIVE DETERMINATION
Montgomery County
Application for State Discharge Permit 17DP3845,
NPDES Permit MD0071951:
The Purple Line Transit Constructors (PLTC), 6811 Kenilworth
Avenue, Suite 300, Riverdale, MD 20737, submitted an
application for a new permit to discharge an average
of 172,800 gallons per day of groundwater from a wellpoint system and the combination of groundwater and
stormwater from within construction excavation during
construction of the Bethesda Shaft, part of the Purple Line
project, located off Elm St. between Wisconsin Ave. and
East Ln., to Little Falls Branch (Use I-P). Note that this
application was originally submitted and had its application
received publication processed as a modification request
(State Permit 14-DP-3818A), but was later requested to
be separated into a different individual NPDES permit, as
reflected above.
The Department proposes to issue the permit with the
following limits on Outfall 001: total suspended solids
(30 mg/L monthly average, 60 mg/L daily maximum); oil
and grease (15 mg/L daily maximum); and pH (range of
6.5 to 8.5). Additionally, the permit proposes monitoring
without limitations for several volatile organic compounds, a
narrative condition regarding turbidity, an elevated sampling
frequency at startup to ensure protection of the receiving
stream, submission of a wastewater treatment plan, and
best management practices to prevent erosion and promote
sediment control.
If a written request is received by September 27, 2017,
a public hearing on the tentative determination for this
application can be scheduled. The request should be sent
to the Maryland Department of the Environment, Water
and Science Administration, 1800 Washington Blvd.,
Baltimore, Maryland 21230-1708, Attn.: Michael
Richardson, Chief, Industrial and General Permits Division and must include the name, address and telephone
number (home and work) of the person making the request,
the name of any other party whom the person making the
request may represent, and the name of the facility and
permit number. Failure to request a hearing by September
27, 2017 will constitute a waiver of the right to a public
hearing on the tentative determination for this permit.
Written comments concerning the tentative determination
will be considered in the preparation of a final determination
if submitted to the Department, to the attention of Michael
Richardson at the above address, on or before October 10,
2017. Any hearing-impaired person who requests a hearing
may request an interpreter at the hearing by contacting
Mr. Richardson at (410) 537-3654 or 1-800-633-6101, or by
written request to the above address at least ten working
days prior to the scheduled hearing date.
Information supporting the tentative determination, including the draft permit and fact sheet, may be reviewed by
contacting Mr. Richardson at the above telephone number
to make an appointment or by written request to Mr.
Richardson at the above address. Copies of documents may
be obtained at a cost of $0.36 per page.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$115,732.35.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Montgomery County, Maryland
Aug 24, 31, Sept 7, 2017 12124985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
DIANE S. ROSENBERG
MARK D. MEYER
JOHN A. ANSELL, III
KENNETH SAVITZ
JENNIFER ROCHINO
SYDNEY ROBERSON
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway
Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiff(s)
v.
Notice is hereby given that the Mayor and Council of Rockville,
Maryland, will conduct a public hearing on Monday, September 18,
2017, at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as it may be heard, in the
Council Chamber, Rockville City Hall, 111 Maryland Avenue, Rockville,
Maryland, in connection with Text Amendment Application TXT201800245, Mayor and Council of Rockville, Applicant.
More detailed information on the above application can be found
on file in the City Clerk/Director of Council Operations Office at
Rockville City Hall and on the City’s web site at:
http://www.rockvillemd.gov/DocumentCenter/View/20135.
Persons wishing to testify at the hearing are asked to call (240)
314-8280, before 4:00 p.m. on the day of the hearing to place their
names on the speakers' list.
Mayor and Council of Rockville
By: Kathleen Conway, City Clerk/Director of Council Operations
NOTICE OF HEARING
Notice is hereby given that the Mayor and Council of Rockville,
Maryland, will conduct a public hearing on Monday, September 18,
at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as it may be heard, in the
Council Chamber, Rockville City Hall, 111 Maryland Avenue, Rockville,
Maryland, in connection with proposed amendments and revisions to
the Adequate Public Facilities Standards (APFS).
The purpose of the proposed amendments is to revise the school
capacity test; delete the fire and emergency services standards; and
make other technical revisions and clarifications.
More detailed information on the above application can be found on
file in the City Clerk's Office at Rockville City Hall and on the
City’s web site: http://md-rockville.civicplus.com/DocumentCenter/View/19887. Persons wishing to testify at the hearing are asked
to call (240) 314-8280, before 4:00 p.m. on the day of the hearing to
place their names on the speakers' list.
Mayor and Council of Rockville
By: Kathleen Conway, City Clerk/Director of Council Operations
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to home delivery.
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Wake up
to home delivery.
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Bids & Proposals
Laurence Karl Scott
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY
GOVERNMENT
Request for Proposal #RFP7008094
Human Services Solution Study
RFP is available https://eservice2.pwcgov.org/eservices/procurement/Solicitations
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Official Notices
V I R G I N I A:
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY
PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY
Plaintiff,
v.
HEATHER L. POINDEXTER, et al.,
Respondents.
CL17-6498
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
THE OBJECT OF THIS SUIT is to sell certain land located in the
Gainesville Magisterial District of Prince William County and further
described as follows:
All that certain lot or parcel of land lying and being situate near
Thorofare Gainesville District Prince William County, Virginia and
adjoining the lands of Mitchell, Fletcher and others and bounded as
follows. Beginning at a corner to Blanch Mitchell’s lot and running
with said line 307 feet to Fletcher’s line, thence south with Fletcher’s
line 153 feet to an iron peg, thence westward 311 feet to an iron
peg beside Wilson’s road, thence with said road 129 feet to the
beginning and containing one acre be the same more or less, and
being apart of the same land conveyed to the said Anna C. Wilson
by H. Thornton Davies Trustee, and recorded in Deed Book 92 Folio
35 in the land records in the Clerk’s Office of Prince William County,
Virginia.
to enforce certain liens for real estate taxes assessed by Prince
William County, Virginia against the above-described real property.
This proceeding is instituted pursuant to Section 58.1-3965 et seq., of
the 1950 Code of Virginia, as amended, and is authorized by the Board
of County Supervisors of Prince William County, Virginia; and
IT APPEARING that Plaintiff has made a careful and diligent inquiry as
to the identity and whereabouts of the heirs of James Henry Scott,
deceased, and that after exercising due diligence, has been unable
to determine whether it has included all heirs at law of James Henry
Scott, deceased, or whether there are also other persons who may
have an interest in the subject real property who should properly be
named parties respondent in the pending action; and
IT FURTHER APPEARING that James Henry Scott, the owner of the
property, died intestate in 1970; and
IT FURTHER APPEARING that an affidavit having been made and filed
that diligence has been used to ascertain the identities and locations
of all heirs at law of James Henry Scott to name them as parties
respondent in the pending action, but some such persons may not
have been identified despite Plaintiff’s best efforts. It is therefore
ORDERED that persons claiming title to or interest in the subject
property situated in Prince William County appear on or before the
___________day of ____________, 2017, and do whatever is necessary
to protect their interests in said land. It is
FURTHER ORDERED, that pursuant to Section 8.01-321 of the Code
of Virginia (1950), as amended, this Order of Publication be published
once a week for two (2) successive weeks in Prince William Today,
a newspaper of general circulation in Prince William County, and
shall also be posted at the front door of the Prince William County
Courthouse.
_______________________________
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT,
Prince William County
_____________________________
BERNADETTE S. PEELE
Senior Assistant County Attorney
VA State Bar No. 29126
CAROLYN PRUITT DESAI
Assistant County Attorney
VA State Bar No. 71377
1 County Complex Court
Prince William, Virginia 22192-9201
Counsel for Plaintiff
825
Bids & Proposals
825
Bids & Proposals
FAIRFAX COUNTY
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY PUBLIC
PUBLIC NOTICE OF INVITATION FOR BID
September 7, 2017
The Fairfax County Economic Development Authority (“FCEDA”), an
agency of the Commonwealth of Virginia, is initiating a process to
obtain the services of a commercial interior design services firm
to provide cosmetic upgrade (painting, ceiling tiles, flooring and
minor add-ons) throughout the FCEDA’s office space at 8300 Boone
Boulevard, Suite 450, Tysons Corner, Virginia in accordance with
specifications set forth in Invitation for Bid (“IFB”) No. 2018-02.
Bidders and their authorized representatives are expected to fully
inform themselves as to the conditions, requirements and specifications of this IFB before submitting bids.
Responses must be submitted in individual binders via first-class
mail or hand/courier delivery. Responses submitted via e-mail or fax
will not be accepted. Responses received after the date and time
stated herein will not be considered for contract award. Applicants,
if a corporate entity, must comply with all applicable governmental
regulatory requirements.
A pre-bid conference will be held at the FCEDA office on Wednesday,
September 13, 2017 from 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Attendance at the
conference is urged for all prospective bidders.
RESPONSES DUE
Friday, September 29, 2017 - no later than 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time
SUBMIT RESPONSES TO
Flor Morrobel
Procurement Manager
Fairfax County Economic Development Authority
8300 Boone Boulevard, Suite 450
Tysons Corner, Virginia 22182
Please visit the FCEDA website to download the below documents
and for additional information at http://www.fairfaxcountyeda.org/about-fceda/contracting-opportunities.
Notice is hereby given that the Mayor and Council of Rockville, Maryland, will conduct a public hearing on Monday, September 18,
at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as it may be heard, in the
Council Chamber, Rockville City Hall, 111 Maryland Avenue, Rockville,
Maryland, in connection with proposed amendments and revisions to
the Adequate Public Facilities Standards (APFS).
•
•
•
•
•
The purpose of the proposed amendments is to revise the school
capacity test; delete the fire and emergency services standards; and
make other technical revisions and clarifications.
All questions regarding the IFB must be submitted by Friday, September 15, 2017 by 2:00 p.m. to Ms. Flor Morrobel at fmorrobel@fceda.org. Responses to questions will be posted on the FCEDA
web site by close of business on Wednesday, September 20, 2017.
More detailed information on the above application can be found on
file in the City Clerk's Office at Rockville City Hall and on the
City’s web site: http://md-rockville.civicplus.com/DocumentCenter/View/19887. Persons wishing to testify at the hearing are asked
to call (240) 314-8280, before 4:00 p.m. on the day of the hearing to
place their names on the speakers' list.
IFB 2018-02 Cover Sheet
IFB 2018-02 Special Provisions
Who We Are, and What We Do
The Next Steps
General Conditions & Instructions
Please visit the FCEDA Web site periodically for updates to this
Invitation for Bid.
850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
Mayor and Council of Rockville
By: Kathleen Conway, City Clerk/Director of Council Operations
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 15th
day of August, 2017, by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland, that the sale of 3544
Gentry Ridge Court, Silver Spring,
MD 20904, made and reported,
will be ratified and confirmed,
unless cause to the contrary
thereof be shown on or before
the 14th day of September, 2017,
provided a copy of this notice
be inserted in a daily newspaper
printed in said County, once in
each of three successive weeks
before the 14th day of September,
2017. The Report of Sale states
the amount of the foreclosure
sale price to be $254,000.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Montgomery County, MD
AUG 24, 31, Sept 7, 2017 12124989
820
Official Notices
MICHELLE R. ROBL
County Attorney
NOTICE OF HEARING
NOTICE OF HEARING
Eddy F. Jocktane
A/K/A E. Franck Jocktane
Katina Jocktane
a/k/a Katina O. Jocktane
3544 Gentry Ridge Court
Silver Spring, MD 20904
Defendant(s)
Case No. 432002V
820
WE ASK FOR THIS
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 16th
day of AUGUST, 2017, by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 15311
Pine Orchard Drive, Apartment 2D,
Silver Spring, MD 20906 will be ratified and confirmed unless cause
to the contrary thereof be shown
on or before the 15th day of SEPTEMBER, 2017, provided a copy
of this NOTICE be published at
least once a week in each of
three successive weeks in some
newspaper of general circulation
published in said County before
the 15th day of SEPTEMBER, 2017.
mypublicnotices.com/
washingtonpost/PublicNotice.asp
If the merchandise you’re selling is priced under $250, your 3-line, 3-day ad is FREE!
Go to washingtonpostads.com for complete details and to order your free ad.
The purpose and intent of this application is to amend Chapter 25
of the Rockville City Code entitled “Zoning” by amending Section
25.20.02.b to delete the reference to fire and emergency services
protection as a required adequate public facilities determination for
development approval.
Montgomery County
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
PUBLIC NOTICE
DRAFT ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT
The City of Gaithersburg has completed its draft Consolidated
Annual Performance Evaluation Report (CAPER) for the period July 1,
2016 to June 30, 2017, as required of all Community Development
Block Grant (CDBG) grantees. During the period covered by the report,
Gaithersburg received a CDBG award of $353,710 to address the
following national objectives and goals set by the U.S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development (HUD): to provide decent housing,
a suitable living environment, and expanded economic opportunities,
principally for low-to-moderate-income persons.
Beginning September 8, 2017, this report will be available at the
following locations:
City of Gaithersburg
City Hall
31 South Summit Avenue
Gaithersburg, MD 20877
City of Gaithersburg
Community Services Division
1 Wells Avenue
Gaithersburg, MD 20877
Benjamin Gaither Center
80A Bureau Drive
Gaithersburg, MD 20878
Gaithersburg Library
18330 Montgomery Village Avenue
Gaithersburg, MD 20878
Activity Center at Bohrer Park
506 S Frederick Avenue
Gaithersburg, MD 20877
Casey Community Center
810 S Frederick Avenue
Gaithersburg, MD 20877
Upon request, copies can be mailed or emailed at no charge
by contacting Louise Kauffmann at (240) 805-1022 or lkauffmann@gaithersburgmd.gov. Comments provided in person or in
writing (by mail, fax, or email) and received by 5:00 pm on September
25, 2017 will be considered. All comments will be summarized and
submitted to HUD with the CAPER.
IS YOUR CAR
HOLDING UP?
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054E 2x2
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, Maryland 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
9233 HUMMINGBIRD TERR.
GAITHERSBURG, MD 20879
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Kenneth
Hawkins dated December 10, 2002 and recorded in Liber 22734, folio
410 among the Land Records of Montgomery County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, at the Court House
Door, 50 Maryland Ave., Rockville, MD 20850, on
SEPTEMBER 13, 2017 AT 11:15 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Montgomery County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #09-01473764.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $13,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, to be adjusted
to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 64388.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Aug 24, Aug 31 & Sep 7
12123588
D12
850
Montgomery County
OPQRS
850
850
Montgomery County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, Maryland 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
25 PINE RIDGE CT., UNIT #12-3
GERMANTOWN, MD 20874
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from
Bernadette Saunders and Courtney Sims dated June 1, 2005 and recorded
in Liber 30073, folio 501 among the Land Records of Montgomery County,
MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Montgomery County,
at the Court House Door, 50 Maryland Ave., Rockville, MD 20850, on
SEPTEMBER 20, 2017 AT 11:12 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Montgomery County, MD and
described as Unit 12-3 of the North Creek Condominium and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #09-01850423.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $20,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, to be adjusted
to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 58730.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Aug 31, Sep 7 & Sep 14
12124695
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, Maryland 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
11300 COLEBROOK TERR.
POTOMAC, MD 20854
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Howard
Kaplan and Jill Kaplan dated April 21, 2006 and recorded in Liber 32260,
folio 137 among the Land Records of Montgomery County, MD, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, at the Court
House Door, 50 Maryland Ave., Rockville, MD 20850, on
SEPTEMBER 20, 2017 AT 11:13 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Montgomery County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #10-01485396.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $68,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, to be adjusted
to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 65933.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Aug 31, Sep 7 & Sep 14
12124276
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, Maryland 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
501 STONINGTON RD.
SILVER SPRING, MD 20902
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Barry J.
Cohen and Liza Porat Cohen dated April 19, 2007 and recorded in Liber
34327, folio 744 among the Land Records of Montgomery County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, at the
Court House Door, 50 Maryland Ave., Rockville, MD 20850, on
SEPTEMBER 27, 2017 AT 11:15 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Montgomery County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #13-03520377.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $313,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, to be adjusted
to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 51944.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Sep 7, Sep 14 & Sep 21
12126533
1. Coffee
2. Paper
3. Bills
ENROLL IN EASY PAY TODAY
850
Montgomery County
Montgomery County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
3501 FOREST EDGE DRIVE, APT. 1F
SILVER SPRING, MD 20906
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to CARRIE WARD, Trustee(s), dated April 25,
2014, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 48588, folio 229, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of
the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction at THE MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
SEPTEMBER 18, 2017 at 1:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED APRIL 30, 2014 IN LIBER 48588, FOLIO 229.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 3.875% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (45318)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
AUGUST 31, SEPTEMBER 7, 14, 2017
850
Montgomery County
850
EZ
Montgomery County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
8610 WOODBROOK LANE
CHEVY CHASE, MD 20815
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
GEOFFREY BOLEN, dated February 23, 2005 and recorded
in Liber 29480, folio 212 among the Land Records of
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.432025V ; Tax ID
No.07-00602038 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
at the MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
SEPTEMBER 25, 2017 at 11:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 554692)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M.A. DECKER,
KHALID D. WALKER,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
850
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2017
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
4229 EAST WEST HIGHWAY
BETHESDA, MD 20814
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from MARIA
L. VASQUEZ, dated May 1, 2006 and recorded in Liber 32604,
folio 391 among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case
docketed as Case No.433333V ; Tax ID No.07-00566522 ) the
Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
SEPTEMBER 25, 2017 at 11:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 554136)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M.A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
212 CEDAR AVENUE
GAITHERSBURG, MD 20877
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to PRLAP, INC. , Trustee(s), dated May 4,
2006, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 32743, folio 181, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of
the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction at THE MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
SEPTEMBER 18, 2017 at 1:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED FOUR (4), IN BLOCK NUMBERED THREE
(3), IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS 'BROWN'S ADDITION
TO GAITHERSBURG", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 31, AT PLAT 1992
THE PROPERTY IS SUBJECT TO A PRIOR MORTGAGE, THE
AMOUNT WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT THE TIME OF THE SALE
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 4.99% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (37432)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
12125626
SEPTEMBER 7, 14, 21, 2017
12127592 AUGUST 31, SEPTEMBER 7, 14, 2017
12121351
www.hwestauctions.com
SEPTEMBER 7, 14, 21, 2017
12127876
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
8470 MEADOW GREEN WAY
GAITHERSBURG, MD 20877
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
TERESSA BEATTY CRISP AND CHAUNCY LEON CRISP, dated
October 11, 2004 and recorded in Liber 28648, folio 340
RE-RECORDDED IN LIBER 33400 AND FOLIO 384, among
the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default
having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as
Case No.434930V ; Tax ID No.09-02776276 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
SEPTEMBER 25, 2017 at 11:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $19,700.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 576520)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
11204 Woodson Avenue
Kensington, MD 20895
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
YUKSEL KURNAZ AND CAREY KURNAZ, dated June 8, 2009
and recorded in Liber 37581, folio 397 among the Land Records
of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default having occurred
thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.432974V;
Tax ID No.13-01363448 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850,
on
SEPTEMBER 18, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $23,900.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 576602)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
18209 Mehrens Terrace
Olney, MD 20832
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to PRLAP, INC. , Trustee(s), dated March 11,
2005, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 29768, folio 134, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of
the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction at THE MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
SEPTEMBER 18, 2017 at 1:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED EIGHTEEN (18) IN BLOCK LETTERED "F" IN
THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT 4, OLNEY SQUARE" AS
PER PLAT THERE RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK 92
AT PLAT 9982 AND RE-RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 93 AT PLAT
10159
THE PROPERTY IS SUBJECT TO A PRIOR MORTGAGE, THE
AMOUNT WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT THE TIME OF THE SALE
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 2.99% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (43924)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
13025 Brahms Terrace
Silver Spring, MD 20904
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to GREENHEAD INVESTMENTS, INC. A
CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, Trustee(s), dated November 19,
2007, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 35123, folio 373, RE-RECORDED ON JULY 25, 2014 IN LIBER 49512 AND FOLIO 456, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of
the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction at THE MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
SEPTEMBER 18, 2017 at 1:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED ONE HUNDRED SIX (106) IN BLOCK LETTERED "E" IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "TANGLEWOOD" AS
PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 114 AT PLAT
13542
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 2% per annum from the
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (36691)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
Democracy Dies in Darkness
S0833-2 2x3
Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy
or call 202-334-6100.
SEPTEMBER 7, 14, 21, 2017
12127877 AUGUTS 31, SEPTEMBER 7, 14, 2017
12126954 AUGUST 31, SEPTEMBER 7, 14, 2017
12119406 AUGUST 31, SEPTEMBER 7, 14, 2017
12119405
IS YOUR OLD CAR HOLDING UP?
YES
NO
NO
8"/5504&--*5
)&.&"/4
YES
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
NJMMJPOSFBEFSTDBSTIPQQFSTJODMVEFEttXBTIJOHUPOQPTUDPNDMBTTJmFEt0QFO0SQMBDFZPVSBEJO&YQSFTTPVSEBJMZDPNNVUFSSFBEBOESFBDISFBEFST
Source: Scarborough 2012, Release 2. Washington Post newspaper 7-day cumulative reach; Express 5-day reach.
C054E 10x2
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2017
850
850
Montgomery County
OPQRS
EZ
850
Montgomery County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
15113 DONNA DRIVE
SILVER SPRING, MD 20905
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in
a certain Deed of Trust to A. BRUCE CLEVELAND AND
JOHN SCHOEMER, Trustee(s), dated December 27, 2004, and
recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MARYLAND in Liber 29031, folio 352, the holder of the
indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the
undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded
among the aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured
thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at
public auction at THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850
ON,
SEPTEMBER 18, 2017 at 1:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWO (2) IN BLOCK LETTERED, "C" IN THE
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PEACH ORCHARD HEIGHTS", AS
PER PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 63 AT PLAT NO. 5465.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 2% per annum from the
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (37142)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
1925 AUTUMN RIDGE CIRCLE
SILVER SPRING, MD 20906
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to SCOTT B. GOLDSCHEIN, Trustee(s),
dated September 28, 2012, and recorded among the Land
Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
45064, folio 042, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
SEPTEMBER 18, 2017 at 1:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT 19 IN BLOCK E IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "MIDDLEBRIDGE", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
121 AT PLAT NO. 14234
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 3.75% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (45635)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
AUGUST 31, SEPTEMBER 7, 14, 2017
www.hwestauctions.com
AUGUST 31, SEPTEMBER 7, 14, 2017
856
856
Frederick County
850
Montgomery County
Frederick County
You, too, could have
home delivery.
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
12125631
SF
1-800-753-POST
850
SF
Montgomery County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
6900 CYNTHIA LANE
DERWOOD, MD 20855
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to LAWYERS TITLE REALTY SRVC. A VIRGINIA
CORP., Trustee(s), dated May 28, 2004, and recorded among the
Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
27542, folio 756, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
SEPTEMBER 18, 2017 at 1:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED FOUR (4) IN BLOCK LETTERED 'E' IN THE
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS, "REDLAND ESTATES", AS PER PLAT
THEREOF DULY RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK 79 AT
PLAT 7982.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 7.25% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (40967)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
AUGUST 31, SEPTEMBER 7, 14, 2017
12125635
IS YOUR CAR
HOLDING UP?
856
Frederick County
856
12123465
Frederick County
Frederick County
856
Frederick County
McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC
312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800
Laurel, Maryland 20707
www.mwc-law.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
2510 EMERSON DR.
FREDERICK, MD 21702
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Cheryl
Rosemarie Weir, dated February 24, 2005 and recorded in Liber 5177,
folio 342 among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale
at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
SEPTEMBER 20, 2017 AT 1:01 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in Frederick County, Maryland and more fully described
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of
record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any
kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier's or certified check, or
in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their
sole discretion, for $30,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or
servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived.
Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of
the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County,
Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate
of 5% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received
in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by
an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the
balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will
be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the
defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from
the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes,
ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be
responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost
of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges
shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable
to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser.
Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and
the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk
of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #14-603839).
Laura H. G. O'Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Aug 31, Sep 7 & Sep 14
12125417
McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC
312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800
Laurel, Maryland 20707
www.mwc-law.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
598 CHUKKAR CT.
FREDERICK, MD 21703
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Diana
Win Min and Lwin Min, dated September 14, 2005 and recorded in Liber
5579, folio 43 among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD, default
having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale
at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
SEPTEMBER 27, 2017 AT 1:05 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in Frederick County, Maryland and more fully described
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of
record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any
kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier's or certified check, or
in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their
sole discretion, for $32,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or
servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived.
Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of
the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County,
Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate
of 5.875% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received
in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by
an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the
balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will
be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the
defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from
the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes,
ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be
responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost
of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges
shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable
to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser.
Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and
the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of
loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #2012-28062).
Laura H. G. O'Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Sep 7 & Sep 14 & Sep 21
McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC
312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800
Laurel, Maryland 20707
www.mwc-law.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
12127205
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Shannon Menapace
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Shaun Minick and Stephanie
Minick, aka Stephanie Williams
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF13-28682
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 25th day of August 2017, that
the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust
docketed herein and located at
14919 Nighthawk Lane, Bowie,
Maryland 20716 made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee
Dyson, and Shannon Menapace,
Substitute Trustees, be RATIFIED
and CONFIRMED, unless cause to
the contrary be shown on or
before the 25th day of September,
2017, provided a copy of this Order
be inserted in The Washington Post
once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 25th day of
September, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $177,840.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Aug 31, Sept 7, 14, 2017 12126637
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Brian Thomas
Hugh J. Green
Patrick M. A. Decker
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Francis Donald Hines
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF17-07534
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 25th day of August 2017, that
the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust
docketed herein and located at
6018 Ladd Road, Suitland, Maryland 20746 made and reported by
James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson,
Brian Thomas, Hugh J. Green, and
Patrick M. A. Decker, Substitute
Trustees, be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or before the
25th day of September, 2017, provided a copy of this Order be
inserted in The Washington Post
once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 25th day of
September, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $206,550.00.
Sydney J. Harrison 619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Aug 31, Sept 7, 14, 2017 12126635
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Greg R.
Humphrey, dated December 27, 2013 and recorded in Liber 10007, folio
395 among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale
at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
SEPTEMBER 13, 2017 AT 12:45 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in Frederick County, Maryland and more fully described
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of
record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any
kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier's or certified check, or
in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their
sole discretion, for $23,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or
servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived.
Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of
the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County,
Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate
of 5% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received
in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by
an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the
balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will
be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the
defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from
the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes,
ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be
responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost
of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges
shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable
to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser.
Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and
the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk
of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #16-605387).
12124641
McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC
312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800
Laurel, Maryland 20707
www.mwc-law.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
8049 CHESTNUT GROVE RD.
FREDERICK, MD 21701
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Samuel
P. Summers and Bonnie A. Robertson, dated August 1, 2007 and recorded
in Liber 6727, folio 302 among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the
parties secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer
for sale at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the
Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
SEPTEMBER 27, 2017 AT 1:06 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in Frederick County, Maryland and more fully described
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of
record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any
kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier's or certified check, or
in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their
sole discretion, for $27,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or
servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived.
Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of
the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County,
Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate
of 5% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received
in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by
an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the
balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will
be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the
defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from
the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes,
ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be
responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost
of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges
shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable
to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser.
Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and
the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk
of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #15-617521).
Laura H. G. O'Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Sep 7 & Sep 14 & Sep 21
12127207
McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC
312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800
Laurel, Maryland 20707
www.mwc-law.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC
312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800
Laurel, Maryland 20707
www.mwc-law.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
127 ADAMS CT.
WALKERSVILLE, MD 21793
204 POLARIS DR.
WALKERSVILLE, MD 21793
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Tina Trott
and Jason Trott, dated June 9, 2008 and recorded in Liber 7047, folio 392
among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at
the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W.
Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
SEPTEMBER 13, 2017 AT 12:46 PM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Michael
P. Kelly and Jennifer A. Kelly, dated July 31, 2006 and recorded in Liber
6195, folio 729 among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD, default
having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale
at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
SEPTEMBER 20, 2017 AT 1:00 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in Frederick County, Maryland and more fully described
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of
record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any
kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier's or certified check, or
in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their
sole discretion, for $21,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or
servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived.
Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of
the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County,
Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate
of 5.25% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received
in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by
an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the
balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will
be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the
defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from
the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes,
ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be
responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost
of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges
shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable
to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser.
Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and
the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of
loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #2009-04824).
Laura H. G. O'Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Aug 24, Aug 31 & Sep 7
12124644
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in Frederick County, Maryland and more fully described
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of
record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any
kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier's or certified check, or
in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their
sole discretion, for $44,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or
servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived.
Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of
the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County,
Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate
of 5% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received
in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by
an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the
balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will
be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the
defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from
the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes,
ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be
responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost
of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges
shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable
to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser.
Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and
the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk
of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #16-603725).
Laura H. G. O'Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Aug 31, Sep 7 & Sep 14
12124923
COULD YOU USE
ARE YOUR TENANTS
MOVING OUT?
SOME EXTRA CASH?
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CLASSIFIED
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KLMNO
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054E 2x2
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054B 2x2
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054F 2x2
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
VENNIE R NELSON
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
Civil No. CAEF17-06359
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this
30th day of August, 2017 by the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N.
Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of
the Real Property designated as
4024 27Th Ave, Temple Hills, MD
20748, and reported in the above
entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 2nd day
of October, 2017 next; provided a
copy of this Order be inserted in
The Washington Post, 1150 15th
Street, Washington, DC, MD in
said
COUNTY
OF
PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 2nd
day of October, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $140,600.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Sept 7, 14, 21, 2017
12127523
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
CHARLOTTE M WILLIAMS
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
Civil No. CAEF15-32554
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this
30th day of August, 2017 by the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N.
Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of
the Real Property designated as
2219 OLD FORT HILLS DRIVE, FORT
WASHINGTON, MD 20744, and
reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 2nd day of October,
2017 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in The Washington Post, 1150 15th Street, Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S once a week
for three successive weeks
before the 2nd day of October,
2017.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $159,000.00.
v.
BESSIE L. MONROE
Defendant(s)
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Civil Action No. CAEF17-08927
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 23rd day
of August 2017, by the Circuit Court
for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the property
mentioned in these proceedings
and described as 8407 Lenaskin
Lane, Forestville, MD 20747 a/k/a
8407 Lenaskin Lane, District
Heights, MD 20747 will be ratified
and confirmed unless cause to
the contrary thereof be shown on
or before the 25th day of September, 2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 25th day of September, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$201,400.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
6605 HIGH BEACH EAST CT.
A/R/T/A 6605 HIGH BEACH CT. EAST
NEW MARKET, MD 21774
Laura H. G. O'Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Aug 24, Aug 31 & Sep 7
856
Aug 31, Sept 7, 14, 2017 12126627
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
HASSAN CONTEH
MARIATU KOROMA A/K/A
MARIATA KOROMA
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
Civil No. CAEF16-43723
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this
30th day of August, 2017 by the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N.
Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of
the Real Property designated as
13608 Wood Ember Dr, Upper Marlboro, MD 20774, and reported in
the above entitled cause, will be
finally ratified and confirmed,
unless cause to the contrary
thereof be shown on or before
the 2nd day of October, 2017 next;
provided a copy of this Order
be inserted in The Washington
Post, 1150 15th Street, Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S once a week
for three successive weeks
before the 2nd day of October,
2017.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Sept 7, 14, 21, 2017
12127522
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
MARY LOU DOZIER
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
Civil No. CAEF17-08950
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this
30th day of August, 2017 by the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N.
Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of
the Real Property designated as
5611 FARGO AVE, Oxon Hill, MD
20745, and reported in the above
entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 2nd day
of October, 2017 next; provided a
copy of this Order be inserted in
The Washington Post, 1150 15th
Street, Washington, DC, MD in
said
COUNTY
OF
PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 2nd
day of October, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $168,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Sept 7, 14, 21, 2017
12127521
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
AMINATA WILLIAMS
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF13-33472
NOTICE
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Sept 7, 14, 21, 2017
12127830
Notice is hereby given this 28th
day of August 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 13107 Ogels
Hope Drive, Bowie, MD 20720 will
be ratified and confirmed unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 28th day of
September, 2017, provided a copy
of this NOTICE be published at
least once a week in each of three
successive weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said County before the
28th day of September, 2017.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$585,000.00.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $762,228.56.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
KENNETH A PARKER
KIMBERLY K PARKER
KIMBLEY GREEN
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
Civil No. CAEF13-28691
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this
30th day of August, 2017 by the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N.
Britto, Trustees, of the Real Property designated as 7011 PERENNIAL COURT, Clinton, MD 20735,
and reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 2nd day of October,
2017 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in The Washington Post, 1150 15th Street, Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S once a week
for three successive weeks
before the 2nd day of October,
2017.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Sept 7, 14, 21, 2017
12127518
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
Civil Action No. CAEF16-40163
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 23rd day
of August 2017, by the Circuit Court
for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the property
mentioned in these proceedings
and described as 601 68th Street,
Seat Pleasant, MD 20743 will be ratified and confirmed unless cause
to the contrary thereof be shown
on or before the 25th day of September, 2017, provided a copy of
this NOTICE be published at least
once a week in each of three
successive weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said County before the
25th day of September, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$165,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Sept 7, 14, 21, 2017
12127524
Aug 31, Sept 7, 14, 2017 12126629
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
v.
Joseph Curtis, III and Renee L. Curtis
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF16-40156
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 25th day of August 2017, that
the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust
docketed herein and located at
9609 Allerton Terrace, Clinton,
Maryland 20735 made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee
Dyson, Hugh J. Green, and Patrick
M. A. Decker, Substitute Trustees,
be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 25th day of
September, 2017, provided a copy
of this Order be inserted in The
Washington Post once in each of
three (3) successive weeks before
the 25th day of September, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $348,719.32.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Aug 31, Sept 7, 14, 2017 12126638
856
Frederick County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
SHAWN L. BUTLER
SHERIDA L WILSON
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF16-41491
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 23rd
day of August 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 3909
Bishopmill Dr., Upper Marlboro, MD
20772-3402 will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 25th day of September, 2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 25th day of September, 2017.
www.hwestauctions.com
SEPTEMBER 7,14, 21, 2017
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
DOROTHY A. BROWN
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF16-39155
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 23rd day
of August 2017, by the Circuit Court
for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the property
mentioned in these proceedings
and described as 1723 Allendale
Place, Hyattsville, MD 20785 will
be ratified and confirmed unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 25th day of
September, 2017, provided a copy
of this NOTICE be published at
least once a week in each of three
successive weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said County before the
25th day of September, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$136,629.87.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Aug 31, Sept 7, 14, 2017 12126625
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
KRISTIN GAYMON
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF16-25701
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 23rd day
of August 2017, by the Circuit Court
for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the property
mentioned in these proceedings
and described as 3807 Swann Road
Unit 101, Suitland, MD 20746 will
be ratified and confirmed unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 25th day of
September, 2017, provided a copy
of this NOTICE be published at
least once a week in each of three
successive weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said County before the
25th day of September, 2017.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Aug 31, Sept 7, 14, 2017 12126624
852
Anne Arundel County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
Diane S. Rosenberg, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Estate of Bernard J. Harvey, Sr.
a/k/a Bernard Joseph Harvey, Sr.
Kathleen A. Harvey
a/k/a Kathleen Ann Harvey
Defendants
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this
Wednesday, August 23, 2017 that
the sale of the property in the
proceedings mentioned, made and
reported by Jennifer Rochino, Substitute Trustee.
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 22nd
day of September 2017 next; provided, a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, once in each
of three successive weeks before
the 22nd day of September 2017
next. The report states that the
amount of sale of the property at
7972 TICK NECK ROAD, PASADENA,
MD 21122 to be $148,200.00.
/S/Robert P Duckworth
Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, MD
Aug 31, Sept 7,14, 2017 12126780
1-800-753-POST
SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $322,500.00, with an annual
interest rate of 6.800000% dated
March 4, 2008, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the CITY OF ALEXANDRIA as Deed Instrument Number
080003649, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction all
that property located in the CITY
OF ALEXANDRIA, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the City
of Alexandria located at 520 King
Street, Alexandria, Virginia on
October 4, 2017 at 11:30 AM, the
property with improvements to
wit:
Tax Map No. 50634970
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 14-243684.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Aug 31, Sept 7, 2017
12127225
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
5168 CALIFORNIA LN,
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22304
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $568,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 2.000000% dated
December 18, 2006, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the CITY OF
ALEXANDRIA as Deed Instrument
Number 060033198, the undersigned appointed Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction all that property located
in the CITY OF ALEXANDRIA, on
the courthouse steps at the front
of the Circuit Court building for
the City of Alexandria located at
520 King Street, Alexandria, Virginia on September 27, 2017 at
11:30 AM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 058.04-05-34
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 15-247619.
Fairfax County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
3622 CHAIN BRIDGE RD,
FAIRFAX, VA 22030
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $720,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.442000% dated
February 28, 2007, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 19153,
Page 2174, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on October 11, 2017 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 57 2 02 116 A
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
Wake up
to home delivery.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
1-800-753-POST
City of Alexandria
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
6025 RICKETTS WALK,
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22312
872
No. C-02-CV-17-000464
You, too, could have
home delivery.
You, too, could have
home delivery.
12127881
871
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Aug 31, Sept 7, 2017
12126654
Versus
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$182,400.00.
Aug 31, Sept 7, 14, 2017 12126621
D13
Frederick County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1016 BEXHILL DRIVE
FREDERICK, MD 21702
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
RICHARD A. CIPPERLY AND CARRIE CIPPERLY, dated March
31, 2006 and recorded in Liber 6007, folio 0021 among the
Land Records of FREDERICK COUNTY, MD, default having
occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case
No.10C15002384 ; Tax ID No.02-211947 ) the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the FREDERICK COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 100 W. PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, MD
21701, on
SEPTEMBER 25, 2017 at 3:15 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for FREDERICK
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 562152)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
ERIN M. COHEN,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$32,000.00.
v.
JOHN W. WILSON
JUANITA P. WILSON
Defendant(s)
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $310,080.00.
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Patrick M. A. Decker
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
856
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Sept 7, 14, 2017
12127871
SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 15-251835.
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
OPQRS
856
856
Frederick County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
11313 SANANDREW DRIVE
NEW MARKET, MD 21774
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from PAUL J.
ROACH AKA PAUL ROACH AND SUSAN G. ROACH AKA SUSAN
ROACH, dated April 19, 2004 and recorded in Liber 4604, folio
0265 among the Land Records of FREDERICK COUNTY, MD,
default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed
as Case No.0C17001953 ; Tax ID No.27-544053 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the FREDERICK COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, located at 100 W. PATRICK ST, FREDERICK,
MD 21701, on
SEPTEMBER 25, 2017 at 3:15 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $30,500.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for FREDERICK
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 574614)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
856
Frederick County
856
Frederick County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
3045 Flint Hill Road
Adamstown, MD 21710
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
DEBORAH R. ROBERTS, dated September 2, 2015 and
recorded in Liber 10745, folio 0419 among the Land Records of
FREDERICK COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.10C16002198; Tax ID
No.07-193122 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
at the FREDERICK COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 100 W.
PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, MD 21701, on
SEPTEMBER 18, 2017 at 1:45 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $22,300.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for FREDERICK
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 570686)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
ERIN M. AUGUST,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
872
12127899
872
Fairfax County
Fairfax County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
3823 JANCIE RD,
FAIRFAX, VA 22030
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
7909 DOUBLE CREEK CT,
SPRINGFIELD, VA 22153
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $100,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.500000% dated
May 7, 2003, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 14543, Page 0043,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on September 20,
2017 at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 571935
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $460,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 6.600000% dated
November 9, 2006, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 18916,
Page 0638, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on October 11, 2017 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0982 06 0496
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-268125.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Aug 24, 31, Sept 7, 14, 2017
12125819
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-264948.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Sept 7, 14, 2017
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $531,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 10.500000% dated
June 15, 2005, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 17418, Page 740,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on October 11,
2017 at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0491 09E 0006
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $360,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.875000% dated
March 16, 2006, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 18310, Page 0799,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on October 4,
2017 at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0891160013
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $465,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 2.560000% dated
March 29, 2006, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 18356, Page 1864,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on October 4,
2017 at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 57-3-06-044-A
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 15-253585.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-268221.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
17-267538.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Sept 7, 14, 2017
12127873
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Sept 7, 14, 2017
12128407
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Sept 7, 14, 2017
12128410
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$532,900.00, dated May 9, 2005,
recorded among the land records
of the Circuit Court for Prince William County on May 10, 2005,
as
Instrument
Number
200505100075248, the undersigned
appointed
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction, at the main entrance of
the courthouse for the Circuit
Court of Prince William County,
9311 Lee Ave, Manassas, VA on
October 6, 2017 at 9:30 AM, the
property described in said deed of
trust, located at the above address
and briefly described as: Lot 61,
Phase 4, Section 20, BRAEMAR,
as the same is duly dedicated
in
Instrument
Number
200311060205413, and as shown
on a corresponding plat at Instrument Number 200311060205414,
both recorded among the land
records of Prince William County,
Virginia. Tax ID: 7495-43-4689.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $14,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
Wake up to
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SF
SF
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
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1-800-753-POST
Home delivery starts
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1-800-753-POST
SF
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FROM "NO
1-800-753-POST
SF
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
08/31/2017, 09/07/2017 12123525
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
How about some
home delivery?
Wake up to
home delivery.
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Arlington County
Home delivery is so easy.
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FOOD ALLOWED."
TO "HOW OLD ARE THESE
FRIES?"
SF
870
873
Arlington County
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2017
Prince William County
873
Prince William County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
4500 S Four Mile Run Drive, Unit 105
Arlington, VA 22204
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
8215 Glade Bank Drive,
Manassas, VA 20111
In execution of the Deed of Trust dated February 14, 2006, and recorded
in Book 3950 at Page 1751 as Instrument Number 2006046075, of
the Arlington County land records the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
will offer for sale at public auction on September 8, 2017 at 10:00 AM
immediately in front of the entrance doors to the Circuit Court, Arlington
County Justice Center, 1425 North Courthouse Road, Arlington, Virginia,
the following property:
Unit 105, of the CENTURY SOUTH CONDOMINIUM, together with all
undivided interest in the common elements of such condominium allocated
thereto, as more fully set forth in the Master Deed dated June 12, 1974
and recorded among the land records of Arlington County, Virginia, in Deed
Book 1862 at page 304 and associated plats and plans related thereto as
amended by First Amendment to Century South Condominium Master Deed
dated July 29, 1987 and recorded July 30, 1987 in Deed Book 2288 at page
1255, as further amended by Second Amendment recorded in Deed Book
2572 at page 1358 and amended by Amendment recorded in Deed Book
3911 at page 1826.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
March 28, 2006, and recorded at Instrument Number 200603290050490
and re-recorded at at Instrument Number 201005200043202, in the Clerk’s
Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County, VA, securing a loan
which was originally $319,920.00. The appointed SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE,
Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at public auction at the
front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William County, 9311 Lee Avenue,
Manassas, VA 20110 on:
September 22, 2017 at 1:00 PM
TOGETHER WITH Limited Common Element Garage Space No 55.
Tax No.: 28-035-005
The property and improvements will be sold in "as is" physical condition
without warranty of any kind.
TERMS OF SALE: A non-refundable bidder's deposit in the amount of ten
percent (10%) of the successful bid payable by cashier's/certified check
required at time of sale except for the party secured by the Deed of Trust.
Risk of loss on purchaser from date and time of auction. Balance of the
purchase price must be paid by cashier's check within 14 days from sale
date. Except for Virginia Grantor tax, all settlement costs and expenses
are purchaser's responsibility. Real estate taxes will be pro-rated to the
date of sale. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining possession of the
property. If purchaser defaults, deposit will be forfeited and property
resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser who shall be
liable for any deficiency in the purchase price and all costs, expenses
and attorney’s fees of both sales. If Trustees do not convey title for any
reason, purchaser's sole remedy is return of deposit without interest. This
sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan secured by the
Deed of Trust including, but not limited to, determining whether prior to
sale a bankruptcy was filed; a forbearance, repayment or other agreement
was entered into; or the loan was reinstated or paid off. In any such event
this sale shall be null and void and purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return
of deposit without interest. This communication is from a debt collector.
Old Dominion Trustees, Inc., Substitute Trustees
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
BUONASSISSI, HENNING & LASH, P.C.
1861 Wiehle Avenue, Suite 300
Reston, Virginia 20190
(703) 787-7562
File No. 8207.81533
August 31, September 7, 2017
12126146
873
Prince William County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
3884 WERTZ DR,
WOODBRIDGE, VA 22193
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $374,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.255000% dated
April 23, 2005, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM as Deed Instrument
Number 200504260066115, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM, on the Court House
steps in front of Main Entrance for
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Prince William located
at 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas,
Virginia on October 3, 2017 at 4:00
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 8191706026
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-268338.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Aug 31, Sept 7, 2017
12126690
882
Frederick County
TRUSTEE SALE
357 Crosscreek Lane,
Winchester, VA 22602
Frederick County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$311,200.00, dated July 22, 2005
recorded in the Clerk's Office of
the Circuit Court of the Frederick
County, Virginia, in Document No.
050016221, at Page 0576, default
having occurred in the payment of
the Note thereby secured and at
the request of the holder of said
Note, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Circuit Court of Frederick County, 5
North Kent Street, Winchester, on
September 19, 2017 at 2:15 PM the
property described in said deed,
located at the above address and
briefly described as:
Parcel B, containing 5 acres, more
or less, as shown on plat of survey
recorded in Deed Book 496, Page
837, with improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (38085)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Aug 31,Sept 7, 2017 12126735
Career Training - Emp Svcs
SF
1-800-753-POST
You, too, could have
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SF
Loan Type: Conv/Conv (Trustee #
558978)
Towne #5000.0211
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
SF
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
is convenient.
12126444
Prince William County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
13511 Denside Court
Bristow, VA 20136
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
873
Fairfax County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
10622 ASHBY PLACE,
FAIRFAX, VA 22030
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
872
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
6433 ENGLISH IVY COURT,
SPRINGFIELD, VA 22152
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
www.hwestauctions.com
12126449 AUGUTS 31, SEPTEMBER 7,14, 2017
Fairfax County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
8315 COTTAGE ST,
VIENNA, VA 22180
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
872
Fairfax County
12127872
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
SF
872
EZ
870
Frederick County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1851 Millstream Drive
Frederick, MD 21702
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
FARZAN FANAIYAN, dated March 3, 2005 and recorded in Liber
5207, folio 0292 among the Land Records of FREDERICK
COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure
Case docketed as Case No.10C16000303; Tax ID No.02070464 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at
the FREDERICK COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 100 W.
PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, MD 21701, on
SEPTEMBER 18, 2017 at 1:45 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $36,300.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for FREDERICK
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 566495)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
ERIN M. COHEN,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
AUGUTS 31, SEPTEMBER 7,14, 2017
www.hwestauctions.com
SEPTEMBER 7,14, 21, 2017
856
Frederick County
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improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of Lot 14,
Section 3, BLOOMS MILL, as the same appears duly dedicated, platted
and recorded in Instrument Number 200409090154448, and plat attached
thereto, among the land records of Prince William County, Virginia, and as
more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
August 31, September 7, 2017
12123800
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NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
16867 Toms River Loop,
Dumfries, VA 22026
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
August 31, 2012, and recorded at Instrument Number 201209040084700
in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County,
VA, securing a loan which was originally $211,105.00. The appointed
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at
public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William
County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
September 29, 2017 at 1:00 PM
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of Lot 37,
Section 8, Princeton Woods, as the same appears duly dedicated, platted
and recorded in Deed Book 2161 at page 1268, among the land records
of Prince William County, Virginia, and as more fully described in the
aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
August 31, September 7, 2017
12120250
Newspapers carriers
needed to deliver
The Washington Post
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Great part-time
income opportunity!
Transportation
required.
To apply, go to
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MARYLAND
Roommates
BELTSVILLE- Share unfurn bsmnt. 2
rooms avail. Female pref. N/S, N/P.
$750/$700.
240-542-4567
Membership is rewarding.
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the best shows in town.
HYATTSVILLE- Furn room $180/wk +
security. Includes all utils inc cable.
Near Metro. No pets. 301-675-2016
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Galileo Way, 240-997-3826, new carpet, HSI, pkg, AC, Elec, garbage,
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LANHAM - Lrg furn bdrm, prvt bath
prvt parkg, W/D, light cooking, close
to bus line. $700/mo. Also sm BR
avail for $500/mo., Utils & cable incl.
Dep reqd.
240-938-4614
OXON HILL- In nice house, cable
avail, close to shops, on bus line,
M pref. Call 202-549-0060
ROCKVILLE- Clean, furn. BR. Queen
bed, kit., FR. TV privileges. Util. incl.
$675/mo.
301-424-8377
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including cable, 703-897-5428
SPRINGFIELD / FT. BELVOIR /
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to share 3 bedroom house.
$700 util & cable incl. 703-919-4381
VIENNA - Shr house. Unfurn/furn.
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to Metro. M pref. Fios int & cable.
$560+utils.
Call
703-338-4840
Out-of-Town
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DELAWARE
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THE DISTRICT EDITION
THE WASHINGTON POST
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2017
Local Living
the Paint issue
How designers tackle tricky colors 8
Decorated floors: Would you dare? 10
DIY or hire a pro? 11
Home The perfect armchair can add richness,
color and comfort to any space. Find one that
matches your style — and budget. 4
Gardening Giving the
slighted goldenrod its due
as a late-season star. 14
Wellness Building
healthy bones takes
more than milk. 16
On Parenting Advice
for dealing with a snarky,
eye-rolling 5-year-old. 17
2
DC
INSID E
the washington post . thursday, september 7 , 2017
4 Splurge or Save
6 How To
14 Gardening
16 Wellness
17 On Parenting
18 Animal Doctor
18 Calendar
19 Code violations
23 Crime report
ON THE COVER
Photo by iStock
LOCAL LIVING
STAFF
Editor: Kendra
Nichols • Deputy
Editors: Amy
Joyce, Mari-Jane
Williams • Art
Director: Amanda
Soto • Digital
Editor: Alexa
McMahon
• Designers:
Victoria A. Fogg,
J.C. Reed • Staff
Writers: Jura
Koncius, Megan
McDonough
• Columnists:
Adrian Higgins,
Meghan Leahy
ADVERTISING
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• Email
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Living section,
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• Details:
Announcements
are accepted on a
space-available
basis and must be
received at least
14 days before the
Thursday
publication date.
Include event
name, dates,
times, exact
address, prices
and a publishable
contact phone
number.
Going Out Guide
Sept. 7 - Sept. 13
Thursday
run, a 5K recreational
run/walk and a onemile family fun walk.
A celebration village
offers food, music and
activities for survivors
and kids. 9 a.m.
Freedom Plaza,
14th Street and
Pennsylvania Avenue
NW. info-komen.org.
$25-$40.
DC Shorts Film
Festival and
Screenplay
Competition More
than 170 films from
31 countries are
screened in blocks of
60 and 90 minutes. The
festival also features
filmmaker Q&As,
parties, workshops and
free events throughout
the city. The films can
also be viewed online
until the end of the
festival with an allaccess pass. Opens
Thursday with
screenings at 7 and
9:30 p.m. at E Street
Cinema, 555 11th St.
NW. Through Sept. 17.
dcshorts.com. Free$150; most tickets $12.
Depeche Mode with
Warpaint The English
electronic band stops
by on its Global Spirit
Tour. 7:30 p.m. Capital
One Arena, 601 F St.
NW. 202-628-3200.
capitalonearena.
monumentalsports
network.com. $39.50$235.
“Don Juan Tenorio”
Gala Hispanic Theatre
presents the world
premiere of Nando
López’s adaptation of
José Zorrilla’s play
about the infamous
seducer with vampirelike desires. In Spanish
with English surtitles.
Opens Thursday at
8 p.m. Through Oct. 1.
Gala Hispanic Theatre,
3333 14th St NW.
202-234-7174.
galatheatre.org. $20$55.
Morgan Heritage
The Grammy Awardwinning reggae band
performs. 8 p.m. The
Howard Theatre, 620 T
St. NW. 202-803-2899.
thehowardtheatre.com.
$28-$75.
“Ilya and Emilia
Kabakov: The
Utopian Projects”
The Russian artist
couple’s exhibition
features more than
20 maquettes, or
whimsical models,
including architectural
structures, allegorical
narratives and
commissioned outdoor
works. Opens Thursday.
Through March 4.
The Afghan Whigs
with Har Mar
Superstar The rock
band from Cincinnati
performs songs from its
new album, “In
Spades.” 6 p.m.
9:30 Club, 815 V St.
NW. 202-265-0930.
930.com. $40.
CADE MARTIN
‘The Arsonists’
A small-business owner invites two mysterious
strangers into his house in Woolly Mammoth’s
season opener, Max Frisch’s cautionary
comedy written in response to Nazism and
communism. Begins with a “burn party” at
7 p.m. including one free cocktail, spicy
snacks and spectacles in the lobby; $20
tickets include entry to the 8 p.m. show.
Through Oct. 8. Woolly Mammoth Theatre,
641 D St. NW. 202-393-3939.
woollymammoth.net. $20-$69.
Hirshhorn Museum and
Sculpture Garden,
Seventh Street and
Independence Avenue
SW. 202-633-1000.
hirshhorn.si.edu. Free.
Friday
Lumbee Nation
Festival The Lumbee
Nation of North
Carolina shares
traditional storytelling,
music, social dances,
patchwork quilting and
more. Opens Friday
10:30 a.m.-5 p.m.
Through Saturday.
National Museum of the
American Indian, Fourth
Street and
Independence Avenue
SW. 202-633-1000.
nmai.si.edu. Free.
Awesome
Sommerfest GoetheInstitut hosts a day of
German lessons,
German food and
drinks, art, ’80s
karaoke, banner-sewing
and button-designing
activities, short films, a
scavenger hunt, and
performances by local
punk bands Foul
Swoops and Br’er.
3-9 p.m. GoetheInstitut, 1990 K St NW,
Suite 3. 202-847-4700.
goethe.de. Free.
Saturday
Susan G. Komen
Race for the Cure
The 28th annual race
raises funds for breast
cancer research and
advocacy, celebrates
breast cancer survivors
and honors those who
have lost their battle
with the disease.
Racers can choose
from a 5K competitive
“Aida” This coproduction of Verdi’s
work by the San
Francisco Opera,
Seattle Opera,
Minnesota Opera and
Washington National
Opera features sets and
costumes by Retna. In
Italian with projected
English titles. Opens
Saturday with an
optional lecture at
6 and performance at
7 p.m. Through
Sept. 23. The Kennedy
Center, 2700 F St. NW.
202-467-4600.
kennedy-center.org.
$45-$300.
Apocalyptica The
Finnish cello quartet
plays Metallica songs.
6:30 p.m. Lincoln
Theatre, 1215 U St. NW.
202-888-0050.
thelincolndc.com. $35.
“Big Fish” Keegan
Theatre presents the
D.C. premiere of John
August and Andrew
Lippa’s Broadway
musical based on
Daniel Wallace’s novel
and Tim Burton’s film
about a father’s tall
tales. Closes Sunday at
7:30 p.m. Andrew
Keegan Theatre,
1742 Church St. NW.
202-265-3767.
keegantheatre.com.
$45-$55.
Sunday
Savannah Smith
and Southern Soul
The Asheville, N.C.,
band, helmed by soul
singer and guitarist
Smith, performs as
part of the American
Roots Concert Series.
4:30 p.m. Hill Center at
the Old Naval Hospital,
921 Pennsylvania Ave.
SE. 202-549-4172.
hillcenterdc.org. Free.
Jon Bellion with Dizzy
Wright The rapper
behind the single “All
Time Low” performs.
7 p.m. Echostage, 2135
Queens Chapel Rd. NE.
202-503-2330.
echostage.com. $34.50.
Monday
Duane Evans book
signing The author
discusses and signs
copies of his new book,
“Foxtrot in Kandahar:
A Memoir of a CIA
Officer in Afghanistan at
the Inception of
America’s Longest War.”
Noon. International Spy
Museum, 800 F St. NW.
202-393-7798.
spymuseum.org. Free.
Tuesday
Swervedriver The
English alt-rock band
performs its albums
“Raise” and “Mezcal
Head.” 7:30 p.m.
Black Cat, 1811 14th St.
NW. 202-667-4490.
blackcatdc.com. $23$25.
Wednesday
5777: A Year in
Review The
Washington Jewish Film
Festival begins its fall
season with a series
dedicated to the
cinematic contributions
of major Jewish artists
who passed away in
5777 (the Hebrew
calendar year). Opens
Wednesday with “1945”
at 6:30 p.m. and
“Zuzana: Music Is Life”
at 8:30 p.m., followed
by a Q&A with directors
Peter and Harriet
Gordon Getzels and
producers Frank and
Emily Vogl. Through
Sept. 17. Edlavitch
DCJCC, 1529 16th St.
NW. 202-518-9400.
wjff.org /films. $13.50.
The Last Revel with
Jon Stickley Trio The
Minneapolis Americana
trio performs. 8 p.m.
Gypsy Sally’s, 3401 K
St. NW. 202-333-7700.
gypsysallys.com. $12.
— Compiled by
Carrie Donovan
from staff reports
Home Sales
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
These sales data recorded by the
D.C. Office of Tax and Revenue
were provided by Black Knight
Financial Services. For information
about other residential real estate
transactions, visit
www.washingtonpost.com/
homesales.
Morris Pl., 621-Fenton M.
Stratton to Derek J. Ettinger and
Megan A. Crowley, $853,632.
Orleans Pl., 649-Bart-Bren Inc. to
Jason and Kristin S. Starr,
$750,000.
Perry Pl., 915-915 Perry Place
Corp. to Myrna Colley-Lee,
$675,713.
R St., 225, No. A-Annie D. Moyer
to Shahnila and Brandon Elliott
Dunston, $562,500.
Rosedale St., 1656-Barry G.
Epstein to Vivek Narula,
$293,000.
Tennessee Ave., 145-Rece John
and Karen A. Coates to Zackary
Kevin and Nicole E. Brickhouse,
$725,000.
Webster St., 218-Charels C.
Estelle to Zfzal and Shafin
Hossain, $300,000.
Third St., 2625, No. 302-Amy C.
Dorcy to Christian PlacenciaVelasquez, $225,000.
Fifth St., 14-Jason W. Maroney to
Scott Cooper, $840,000.
Seventh St., 522-Urban
Construction & Renovation Corp.
to Eric A. and Li Y. Beach,
$1.2 million.
Ninth St., 3314, No. 1-Ninth
Kearny Corp. to Katherine D.
Gomez-Ugarte, $236,900.
12th St., 141, No. 18-Patrick T.
Mehlman and Alexia J. Lewnes to
Kevin Michael Behr and Kevin
Marie Louise Libassi-Behr,
$572,500.
13th St., 254-5Design
Development Corp. to Rebecca
Adler Goldberg and John Blakiston
Deck Gross, $850,000.
14th St., 334-Nicholas E. West
and Eleanor M. Brown to
Raymond Alexander and Nancy B.
Pappas, $569,000.
19th St., 422-District of Columbia
Housing Authority to John Buzzi
and Jennifer Murphy-Lubowicz,
$528,800.
24th St., 556-Jack Spicer
Properites Corp. to Duc M. Pham,
$590,000.
31st Pl., 2815-Federal National
Mortgage Association to Yesenia
De La Caridad Acosta, $225,000.
45th St., 567-Patricia Z. FletcherDavis to Bruck Bekele
Woldetsadik, $205,000.
56th St., 330-Eric Billups to
Derrick L. Watson, $152,500.
NORTHWEST
Alton Pl., 4823-John Louis
Conznick 2016 to Marc Stocker
and Celine Legein, $885,000.
Belmont Rd., 1806, No. 3-Eric J.
Conn to Michael E. Harvey,
$484,000.
Blair Rd., 6626-Farrah Darbouze
and Jessica Gray Heard to Natalie
Joan Swabb and Mark Nicholas,
$406,000.
Bryant St., 64-Marco B.
Quaddoura and Meena Batra to
Anthony Lenzi and Noha Sidhom,
$1.1 million.
California St., 1810, No. 105-Will
Robert Oliver to Philippe J. and
Candace N. Rouchon, $469,000.
Chain Bridge Rd., 2303-David
Benton and Dennis Kirk to John
Parlato, $1.19 million.
Church St., 1450, No. 204-John
A. Napoli and Ingrid T. Veray to
Deborah Mara Lipman Fox,
$674,000.
Colorado Ave., 5706-Jeremy T.
Young and Mary Christine to
William Douglas Robinson and
Joelle Christine Johnson,
$680,000.
Columbia Rd., 1126, No. 1Caroline C. Greco to Morgan
Martin, $485,000.
Connecticut Ave., 3100, No.
345-Basil Paravassiliou and
Conamore Alexander to Dawn M.
Ostlund, $456,000.
Connecticut Ave., 5406, No. 601Rea A. Panares to Thomas M.
Scherer, $240,000.
D St., 631, No. 644-Bruce and
Merrie Edelston to Mark Miller
and Julie Brill, $652,000.
E St., 915, No. 303-Louritha
Green to Kristin Koernig,
$442,500.
Fordham Rd., 4107-Sarah H. and
Todd R. Howe to Timothy C. and
Kathryn D. Luwis, $2.15 million.
Garfield St., 2626-Jesse H.
Merrell to Peter F.H. Colarulli and
Kathryn H. Colarulli, $1.34 million.
Harvard St., 1613, No. 513-Mark
D. Minier and Craig T. Pirner to
Joseph Matthew Jones III and
Sahar Allamezade-Jones,
$572,500.
Hurst Terr., 2839-Hanlon Design
Build Inc. to Mark T. and Yekyu C.
Kim, $2.42 million.
Ingleside Terr., 1901, No. 302Zahid Rathore to Grant and
Larissa A. Ovsepyan, $399,999.
Irving St., 1656-Geoffrey Ryan
and Martha Mummey Smit to
Edmund G. and Alice S. Lacour,
$1.13 million.
Jefferson St., 616-Dale B.
Williamson to Kevin Kapel and
Kristen Barden, $700,000.
Jocelyn St., 3638-Janet D.
Shoenfeld to Patrick W. Zanone
and Robert A. Madsen, $959,000.
Kalorama Rd., 2302-Rebecca S.
and Max M. Weinberg to Virginia
Durham Goode, $2.55 million.
Kenyon St., 1390, No. 201Dominic and Laura O’Connor to
Lin Qiu and Sara Wanner,
$543,000.
L St., 1001, No. 407-Thomas P.
Dalton to Sinan Pismisoglu,
$510,000.
Lane Kys W., 3050-Robert
McMillin and Andrea Kelly to Jose
Candido Carbajo Mortinez,
$2.1 million.
M St., 425, No. F-Julia E. Lane to
Yevgenya Zislis and Burak Cesme,
$599,000.
Macarthur Blvd., 4840, No. 604Thomas G. and Lori C. Zorc to
Mark A. Eigenbrode, $250,000.
Macomb St., 5015-Annette
Larocque Fitzsimmons to Michael
M. and Goldie M. Darvishi,
$1.45 million.
Massachusetts Ave., 400, No.
1108-Eric M. and Elaine K. Gold to
Joseph Edward and Erin C.
Nelson, $595,000.
Massachusetts Ave., 4200, No.
710-Anita B. Bobys to Richard F.
Kramer, $470,000.
N St., 216-Ida Louise Moore to
Alexander Lutch, $750,000.
GET IT DONE
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N St., 1440, No. 614-Sonja A.
Mishalanie to Javier J. Nolasco
Brandariz, $220,000.
New Hampshire Ave., 4114, No.
3-Lee Jeremy Richardson and
Andy B. Woo to Alexandra Lowy,
$568,500.
New York Ave., 437, No. 220Kevin C. Roach and Joy M. Pircell
to Christopher Min Jung,
$490,000.
O St., 303-Celine Varkey to Thang
Truong, $775,000.
Ontario Rd., 2448, No. 3-Bryan L.
Mosca to Kyle L. Munoz,
$757,000.
P St., 1718, No. 505-Judson B.
Williams to Karla L. Ingram-Parrish
and Amir Ingram, $304,000.
P St., 3341-Sanjiv Kumar Narsang
to Sean Michael and Annik Louise
Kevelighan, $1.29 million.
Q Pl., 4526-Roxanne Hakim and
Nicholas Pilgrim to Caroline Taco,
$910,000.
R St., 20-Kenneth S. Birnbaum to
Kathryn and Daniel Dall’asta,
$955,000.
R St., 3012, No. 1-2-James B.
Stemple to Olli Heinonen and
Yvonne Yew, $815,000.
Rhode Island Ave., 5, No. 203Iian Black to Patrick Butcher,
$365,000.
Rhode Island Ave., 1441, No.
615-Megan L. Lustig to Yinuo
Geng, $352,500.
Roxboro Pl., 523-Lenoid H.
Coleman to Jacob B. and Kelsey E.
Neilson, $424,000.
S St., 1900, No. 2-Global Telecom
Group Inc. to Liviane Urquiza,
$380,000.
Seaton Pl., 43-Derek N.
Cassadine to William B. Gibbons
and Keri D. Fulton, $850,000.
Sherman Ave., 3211Blackwatercapital Corp. to Brett
Rodgers and Lillian Davidson,
$740,000.
T St., 1319-M. Ishaq and Khalid H.
Nadiri to Guy Henry Cecil III and
Edward Mathias McNulty,
$1.67 million.
Taylor St., 1411-Megan Herbst
HOMES CONTINUED ON 22
MD: 301.388.5959
VA: 571.341.6202
DC: 202.770.3131
ScheduleFRED.com
the washington post . thursday, september 7 , 2017
NORTHEAST
Ames Pl., 1435-Robert P.
Richardson and Nida Katharine
Hurley Parks to Andrew D. Bralver
and Dana C. Hansen, $776,500.
Brooks St., 4630-Mance Family
Trust to Jithesh Prabhakar,
$450,000.
Capitol St. E., 3976-Levi Corp. to
Samuel Schumach, $350,000.
Channing St., 216-Dabren Wills to
Cesar Alfredo Theodoro Cancho
Diez and Berber Nantsje Kramer,
$699,000.
Clay St., 4605-Jack Apicer
Properties Corp. to Andrew H.
Huber and Abray M. Stillson,
$440,000.
D St., 1522-Sed Builder Corp. to
Matthew Frutig, $750,000.
Eastern Ave., 6502-Miriam
Gibson to Pavit and Shraya
Viswalingham, $420,000.
Farragut Pl., 638-Nathaniel Joy
to Keith and Jessica Campbell,
$490,000.
Franklin St., 1404-Lance E.
Williams to Caitlin H. and
Benjamin P. Stewart, $789,000.
Grant St., 4411-Chavuanne C.
Wills to Brendan Halloran and Ana
V. Bolanos Aguirre, $341,000.
I St., 1926-Karen A. Garrett to
Mark Smith, $535,000.
K St., 1624-Adolphus and Annie
M. Brookins to Delores A. Martin,
$425,000.
L St., 1707-Ida L. Reavis and
Lester Hinton to Allison Y. Pan and
Michael T. Johnson, $350,000.
Longfellow St., 36-Albion Gate
Sereis 101 Corp. to Marc Laplante
and Brody Garner, $730,000.
Maryland Ave., 1006-Heston T.
and Laura A. Crandon to Philip E.
Angeli, $990,000.
3
DC
4
DC
Home
$299.99
SPLURGE OR SAVE
$1,198
Basket-weave linen
Rivona chair in
cornflower with
Landon wood legs
(anthropologie.com)
Add flair
with an
armchair
Faith upholstered tufted
club chair in gray
(target.com)
BY MEGAN MCDONOUGH
$2,606
the washington post . thursday, september 7 , 2017
Natalie chair
(mcgeeandco.com)
Whether it’s a cozy reading nook
or a lullaby chair in a nursery,
armchairs are an easy way to add
style, color and a new silhouette to
any space.
They can be a “rich and
comfortable touch to a room,”
says Kate Arends, the St. Paul, Minn.based founder of the media company
and design studio Wit & Delight.
Her preference is for armchairs in
“rich fabrics like velvet and
eye-grabbing warm colors like
cognac.”
They are also a versatile backdrop
for seasonal decorations and can be
easily dressed up or down, depending
on the occasion. “Add cozy throws
and pillows for the colder months,
[and] strip them down a bit for the
warmer ones,” Arends advises.
Here are some of her favorite
armchairs.
$699
Mid-century
show wood chair
in chunky basket
weave, stone
(westelm.com)
$799
Matrix chair in
Cascadia Blue
and walnut
(article.com)
$1,495
Cobble Hill
wingback chair
in Vance indigo
(abchome.com)
Kate Arends
More Splurge
or Save online
$749
Borough
leather chair
(cb2.com)
For more of Arends’s picks,
go to washingtonpost.com/
home.
PRODUCT PHOTOS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT,
BY ANTHROPOLOGIE, TARGET, WEST ELM, ARTICLE,
IKEA, CB2, ABC CARPET & HOME, AND MCGEE & CO.
$159
Ekero armchair in
Kimstad Laglig black
(ikea.com)
DC
5
the washington post . thursday, september 7 , 2017
6
Home
DC
HOW TO
LET YOUR
HOME PAY
FOR ITS
OWN
MAKEOVER.
READER PHOTO
The parts of this rug that were covered by furniture are still in good
shape. A company might be able to use the rug as patch material.
What to do with a worn,
unwanted Oriental rug
BY
FOR THE FIRST 12 MONTHS
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It’s ideal to tackle those big projects, consolidate
other debt or fund education expenses. Apply today.
Stop by one of our community offices, give us a call,
or visit us online. We’re Sandy Spring Bank.
2.49
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APR1
AND THEN AS LOW AS
Q: We have an Oriental rug that
has been in my husband’s family
for more than 100 years. We are
moving and don’t want to take it
with us. It is in bad shape in the
center but not worn in areas that
have been under furniture. I
have read that Oriental rugs can
be repaired by filling holes with
plugs cut from other rugs. Is
there a repair service that would
like our rug?
Arlington
APR1
From here. For here. And always for you.
800.399.5919 • sandyspringbank.com
the washington post . thursday, september 7 , 2017
J EANNE H UBER
PERSONAL | BUSINESS | WEALTH | INSURANCE | MORTGAGE
1
Introductory rate of 2.49% APR applies to accounts signed up for automatic payment from a Sandy Spring Bank checking account.
An initial draw of at least $20,000 is required to activate the introductory rate. After the 12-month introductory period a Standard Rate
applies. Standard Rates may vary and are based on changes in Prime, the highest rate published in The Wall Street Journal’s “Money
Rates” section on the first business day of every month. Currently standard rates range from 4.25% APR to 8.75% APR (Prime plus
4.50%) and are based upon credit qualifications, loan-to-value ratio and approved credit limit. The featured Standard Rate is available
to well qualified borrowers with an approved credit line of $125,000 or more, a loan-to-value ratio of 70% or less, and having monthly
payments automatically deducted from a Sandy Spring Bank checking account. Maximum APR is 24%. Subject to credit
approval. Other rates and terms are available. 2Closing costs are waived, except for Prince George’s County Transfer Tax,
if applicable, as long as the line is open for at least three years. Closing costs range between $540 and $820 for credit lines
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The green pages.
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NF407 3x2
A: Although some companies
that specialize in repairing
Oriental carpets limit their work
to reweaving, others offer
patching as a more affordable
option. Three companies that are
happy to get donations of
partially worn carpets to use as
patch material are Ayoub Carpet
Service, which has showrooms in
Falls Church and Chantilly (703255-6000; rugcare.com); Main
Street Oriental Rugs in Ellicott
City (410-313-9090;
mainstreetorientalrugs.com);
and Mark Gonsenhauser’s Rug &
Carpet Superstore in Virginia
Beach (757-486-6600;
igotyourrug.com).
“It never hurts to have
additional material,” said Alex
Luongo, who oversees the repair
department at the Gonsenhauser
company. “We have many. We
need many.” He suggested
contacting the company first so
that the owner can make sure, by
looking at photographs, that the
rug is suitable.
Patching a rug costs
substantially less than reweaving
because less skill is needed and
the work gets done much faster.
“A couple hundred dollars a
patch,” Luongo estimated,
“versus triple for reweaving.” He
noted that reweaving is done by
people paid American wages, so
the square-inch cost is a lot more
than it is for weaving the original
rug, which is typically made
overseas by people paid far less.
For valuable rugs, however,
repairs are best made by
reweaving. Patches greatly
reduce the value of these rugs;
skillful repairs via reweaving
take less of a toll.
The owner of Main Street
rugs, who gave a single name of
Mojan, suggested that you might
also want to consider donating
your rug to a nonprofit
organization that is recognized
by the Internal Revenue Service
as a 501(c)(3) public charity.
Giving this way entitles you to
claim a tax deduction for the
value of your gift, within certain
limits.
Or you might want to consider
keeping a piece of the rug by
having it refashioned into an
area rug, a pillow, or upholstery
for a footrest or chair. The cost of
this varies with the project, the
type of rug and whether it needs
to be cleaned to make it flexible
enough to work with, Mojan
said. He would charge $75 to
$200 for a 12-inch-square pillow
made from your old rug. For
something that’s been part of
your family history for more
than a century, that might be a
small price to pay.
Have a problem in your home?
Send questions to localliving@
washpost.com. Put “How To” in the
subject line, tell us where you live and
try to include a photo.
DC
7
9/22/17
1.888.821.5708
9/22/17
the washington post . thursday, september 7 , 2017
9/22/17
8
DC
Home
Designers reveal shades
they took a gamble on —
and how to master them
Risky paint colors that paid off
the washington post . thursday, september 7 , 2017
BY
M EGAN B UERGER
Interior designers are masters of light
and color, but even they have blind spots
when it comes to picking paint.
“I can tell you right now that red is my
problem color,” says Grant K. Gibson, who
runs his own firm in San Francisco. Nashville designer Gen Sohr says purple is “always a scary road” because it’s exhausting
over time. Bethesda’s Kelley Proxmire steers
clear of mauve, a dusty pink that she finds
“depressing and unflattering.” And Mimi
McMakin, a vanguard of Palm Beach chic, is
wary of teal: “The wrong blue-green can
really hit you in the face.”
But designers aren’t the type to back
down from a challenge, so we asked them to
reveal the colors they never thought they’d
fall for — and how they finally did. Sometimes, the riskiest options are also the most
rewarding.
Los Angeles designer Chad McPhail has a
knack for updating old homes without compromising their historical integrity, so he
jumped at the chance to work on a quirky
Hollywood estate with an eclectic mix of
architecture styles. But the art deco home
theater became a pressure point when the
homeowner insisted on a color scheme built
around classic, rich red.
“Red is so hard. It changes dramatically
depending on the light source, and there are
so many ways you can go wrong,” he said.
“Too berry, too cherry, too rusty, too fire
engine. I was like, ‘Okay! I’m out of my
comfort zone here.’ But she was adamant,
and of course we wanted to make it work.”
After weeks of negotiations, they settled
on a French Empire palette of scarlet red,
rusty orange and a peculiar Prussian blue.
McPhail, feeling nervous, buried himself in
samples. He tested 15 reds from five brands
on small boards that he hung around the
room in sections. Then, he watched how
each changed in the light from day into
night. It took a week to pick a winner, a
custom mix of two reds by Fine Paints of
Europe. In the end, he said, the client was
right.
“The blue is powdery but not too sweet
and has just a hint of gray, and it works
perfectly against the rich, sultry scarlet. It’s
incredible,” he said. “I don’t know if I’ll ever
feel confident with red, but I certainly feel
more comfortable.”
Not every paint gamble will be a triumph,
but McPhail says your odds are higher with
every shade you sample. “I always, always
do a few tests,” he says. “Even when I’m
really sure, even if I’m playing it safe. People
think neutrals are going to be easier, but I’ve
had to test 40 or 50 whites in a single room
because all you see is light. Colors are complicated, so it’s best to avoid shortcuts.”
JOHN BESSLER
When designer Jamie Drake turned the attic of an 1840 Greek Revival home on Long Island into a study, he used Benjamin Moore’s
Nacho Cheese on the walls and ceiling. “It’s surprising because it’s pretty aggressive, but mostly it feels like sunshine,” he says.
9
DC
washingtonpost.com
Chat Thursday at 11 a.m. Sue Wadden,
Sherwin-Williams’ director of color
marketing, joins staff writer Jura Koncius for
our weekly online Q&A on decorating and
household advice. Submit questions at
live.washingtonpost.com.
At Home newsletter Go to the Home &
Garden page to subscribe to our email
newsletter, delivered every Thursday.
Of course, some designers light up at the
thrill of conquering an “ugly” shade. Jamie
Drake of the New York firm Drake/Anderson is one of them. Known for opulent,
joyful interiors that burst with personality
and a high-profile client list, he’s long been
considered the King of Color.
“I’m drawn to colors that might be considered yucky, intense, low-end even,” says
the New Yorker. He points to Benjamin
Moore’s Nacho Cheese, a velvety yellow-or-
ange that calls to mind plastic-wrapped
cheese slices or sticky notes. “It doesn’t
sound like something you want to run to,
but I’ve grown to love this color.” In fact,
when he renovated an 1840 Greek Revival
home on Long Island and turned the attic
into a study, he used it on the walls and the
ceiling. “It’s happy,” he says. “It’s surprising
because it’s pretty aggressive, but mostly it
feels like sunshine. Intense, intense sunshine bathing this room at all times.”
Drake doesn’t bother with samples; he’s
always had a painterly sense of color and
trusts his gut. While his approach isn’t for
everyone, he maintains that some colors
must be met with a certain fearlessness.
Miles Redd, another daredevil designer
based in New York, agrees. His favorite risky
colors are hot pink and taxicab yellow, both
of which can look extraordinary when done
right but are by no means easy.
“Taxicab looks like dried egg yolk if done
localliving@washpost.com
the washington post . thursday, september 7 , 2017
ZACH DESART
Designer Mimi McMakin stumbled upon one of her all-time favorite colors while testing green paints for a library in Palm Beach,
Fla. It’s a mix of colors that she calls Pond Scum Green. It’s similar to Benjamin Moore’s Home on the Range, she says.
wrong,” he warns. He used it in projects with
Nancy Lancaster and Oscar de la Renta to
great success and says lacquer colors bring
an extra sparkle. “Pink is better in fabric
form, which isn’t exactly cheap,” he says,
“but no one ever said risk was inexpensive.”
On a family trip to Portugal this summer,
Sohr, the Nashville designer, stayed in a
hotel, the Pestana Palácio do Freixo, in a
room that took her breath away. The carpet,
walls and ceiling were a warm goldenbrown that looked, she said, like a “monochromatic masterpiece.” Though never a fan
of rust shades, she was completely inspired.
“I’d never in a billion years have picked this
color, but some designer did, and they went
all the way. That’s why it worked. It was so
sophisticated and confident, you had to
respect it.”
Sohr and her husband started their company Pencil & Paper in 2003. Previously,
they spent a decade in retail development
with Gap in San Francisco. Color in interiors
is like color in fashion, she says. It’s novel,
playful and slyly ironic and requires total
confidence. “Just like an outfit,” she says,
“sometimes you have to go overboard to
turn the corner from plain to chic.”
McMakin stumbled upon one of her alltime favorite colors by mistake. She was
testing green paints for a library in Palm
Beach, Fla., and the mixes kept coming back
wrong. Eventually, she decided to see what
one looked like on the wall. She calls it,
fondly, Pond Scum Green. It’s a murky shade
of yellow-green that’s wonderfully dismal
and surprisingly cozy and feels “like an old
pair of khaki pants,” she says. It’s become
her go-to alternative to classic hunter and
British racing greens, which she’s bored
with anyway.
“It should have been a complete failure,”
she said, “but some of my most dreaded
mistakes have turned out to be home runs.
That’s how it goes.”
If you’re considering a DIY paint project,
you may want to avoid warm colors, at least
to start. Sue Wadden, director of color marketing at Sherwin-Williams, says they’re
indisputably more challenging than cool
colors. “They’re heavily pigmented, aggressive and can be super intense if you get it
wrong,” she says.
Her solution is to go down a few shades.
“If you’re drawn to a fuchsia, try a darker
cranberry. If you’re drawn to fire engine, try
brick red. It will still look exciting, just not
shocking.”
The trick should work for just about any
risky paint project. This summer, Wadden
repainted her dining room from medium
putty brown to black. “It was a huge risk for
me, but I swear, the room came to life.”
Rather than pure black, she used SherwinWilliams’ Sealskin, which has a hint of
warmth to take the edge off.
10
DC
Home
DECORATING
For a room that’s lighter and brighter, let paint take the floor
the washington post . thursday, september 7 , 2017
BY
E LIZABETH M AYHEW
Years ago, my husband and I
bought our first house in Upstate
New York: a 1930s cottage with
small rooms, low ceilings and
mediocre wood floors. I knew
that the best way to lighten up the
rooms and make the whole house
look bigger was to paint the floors
white. Our contractor expressed
nervous doubt — he, like many
traditionalists, thought that
painting the wood — despite its
inferiority — was sacrilege.
What he may not have known
was that there is a long tradition
of
painting
wood
floors.
Throughout the Gustavian period, from about 1780 to 1810,
Swedes painted floors to mimic
ornate parquetry and expensive
Italian marble floors, a practice
that had an added benefit: The
painted floors were lighter in
color, so the rooms appeared
brighter, a welcome change especially during the dark Swedish
winters.
Painted floors were also common in American homes during
the 19th century because the
paint acted as a sealant on soft
pine floors, making them easy to
clean and less prone to staining.
But painting floors had a decorative purpose as well: Common in
American homes throughout the
18th and 19th centuries were
floors stenciled with intricate
patterns meant to resemble expensive European wool and silk
woven carpets.
We sold our cottage about seven years ago, and although my
decorating taste has changed, my
love of painted floors has not. In
our current house, I had a more
ambitious floor-painting plan,
one that required a professional.
My search led me to decorative
painter and artist James Alan
Smith, who began his career as an
apprentice for the legendary muralist, decorative painter and interior designer Richard Lowell
Neas. Smith teaches at the Isabel
O’Neil Studio Workshop in New
York and travels across the country painting floors and murals for
top decorators and designers. He
graciously shared some of his
floor-painting tips.
Know that painting floors is
time-consuming and takes patience. Smith cautions that the
most important step in the process is waiting long enough between coats for curing.
Start by removing everything
from the room. Then sand the
floors. This is very messy, and
although you can rent the necessary equipment, it’s worth having
a professional do it. Once the
floor is sanded and cleaned of
LEFT: The author hired artist
James Alan Smith to paint
this floor in her apartment.
ABOVE: Painting a floor white can
make a room look bigger.
PHOTOS BY ANNIE SCHLECHTER
dust, Smith coats the floor with a
white pigmented oil-based primer and then lets it cure for a day.
He then applies two base coats of
Benjamin Moore’s oil-based Satin
Impervo in whatever color the
client wishes, again allowing the
paint to cure overnight between
applications.
Once the floor is dry, Smith
layers on whatever stencil, pattern or design the client wants
using acrylic paints (his favorites
are by Golden), which dry in an
hour.
The easiest — and most popular — pattern for DIYers, according to Smith, is the classic checkerboard. He says the trick is to
paint the checkerboard squares
on a diagonal because it “hides a
lot of the ins and outs, nooks and
crannies, and imperfections of
the room.” Painting the checkerboard on a diagonal also gives the
illusion that your room is bigger
by optically pushing out the
walls. Smith cautions against
adding a border to the room
because it confines the space. It’s
much better to let pattern run
through the baseboard.
Smith starts the checkerboard
by picking a center point in the
room, which may not be the exact
center. Smith says you want to
play off what you feel is the center
of the room, which is typically
related to the main architectural
element, such as a fireplace.
Smith then marks that point on
the floor with intersecting horizontal and vertical lines. Then,
using a square template made
from mat board, he works from
the center point, marking
squares on the floor in pencil.
Smith uses square templates that
range from 16 to 22 inches, but he
never uses a 12-inch square — he
says that size ends up looking like
linoleum.
Once the checkerboard is outlined, Smith uses low-tack 3M
blue tape to tape off alternating
squares. (Smith suggests taping
off only as much as you can paint
in a day because he says it’s better
to not leave the tape on overnight, as it can still pull up the
paint.) He then paints alternating
squares in whatever color the
client has chosen.
The final step, whether you are
painting a solid floor or a patterned floor, is to apply a water-
based polyurethane. Smith suggests letting the polyurethane
cure 24 hours before light traffic
and seven days before moving
furniture back into the room.
Painted floors are no different
from any finished floor in terms
of durability — they are covered
in poly. Of course, if you drag a
heavy piece of furniture across a
painted floor, it will scratch the
paint, but the same would happen if you had regular woodfinished floors. And many who
choose this look like that they
show some wear — it adds to the
charm.
localliving@washpost.com
Mayhew, a “Today” show style expert
and former magazine editor, is the
author of “Flip! for Decorating.”
11
DC
Details you don’t want to gloss over if you’re thinking of hiring a pro
BY K EVIN B RASLER |
W ASHINGTON C ONSUMERS’
C HECKBOOK
ISTOCK
A roller makes quick work of unobstructed walls. Rooms with
wide baseboards, elaborate window casings and cornice molding
at the ceiling demand more time
and effort. A lot of trim means a lot
of brushwork — even more so if
the job includes cabinets and
shelves — and edges into the
realm of professionals.
• First-rate or second-best?
Take a look at painting projects
you’ve tackled in the past. Is the
trim as smooth as you would like it
to be for the new project? Are the
walls uniform and free of lap
marks? If you want results that
may be difficult and time-consuming to achieve by yourself,
hire a good contractor.
• House built before the 1978
lead paint ban? If so, you’ll probably want a lead-paint-certified
pro to properly seal off rooms and
do required testing and cleanup to
minimize exposure. (These may
sound like expensive tasks, but
they’re usually not.)
If you decide to hire help, have
several contractors inspect the job
and provide proposals. You’ll
probably find huge price differences for the same job. A Checkbook undercover shopper got
quotes from nine Washington-ar-
ea contractors to repaint the
walls, ceiling and trim for a living
room, dining room, family room,
bathroom and kitchen. Including
paint and supplies, prices ranged
from $2,650 or less to more than
$6,500.
Don’t assume that low prices
signify lousy work: Checkbook
finds that companies that perform top-quality work are just as
likely to quote low prices as companies that do shoddy jobs.
Ask companies to include all
details in writing. Although that
sounds simple enough, too many
contractors submit offers such as
“paint house for $5,000.” A friendly contractor may offer a reassuring handshake and promise that
the crew will take care of all the
details — starting on time, working every day, cleaning up, etc.
That’s great, but why not include
each point in the proposal? If it’s a
challenge to get a written description of labor, materials and other
details, things will probably get
worse when the work starts.
Good contracts include descriptions of prep work and repairs; paint specs by brand name,
type, color and product number;
the number of coats; and a full
description of the work, including
frequently omitted items such as
cabinet interiors and shutters.
Minimize delays by specifying
that, weather permitting, work
will be continuous. Get a payment
schedule that minimizes the down
payment — the more payment you
can withhold until the end, the
more leverage you’ll have to get
the job done well and per your
specifications. Insist that contractors provide proof that they carry
both general liability and workers’
compensation coverage.
Specify whether the contractor
or you will supply the paint. Check
Consumer Reports’ paint ratings:
In its tests, some relatively inexpensive paints performed better
than more expensive paints and
cost $10 to $20 less per gallon. But
keep in mind that most paints will
resist cracking, peeling, mold and
mildew. Who does the painting —
and how well they do it — is more
important than what’s in the
bucket.
Before work starts, do your part
by clearing the area. It’s okay to
ask workers for help moving a
large bookcase, but first pack up
all the books — and all your knickknacks in the room. Move cars
from the garage, driveway or in
front of the house so the painter
can park a van full of supplies near
the house.
Once work begins, hold brief
daily meetings to discuss the job
and schedule and quash any misunderstandings. If there are surprises, seek middle ground. No
contract can anticipate every possibility. Materials may be unavailable. Large chunks of rotten siding may crumble along with the
old paint. Exterior jobs may be
stopped cold by a week of steady
rain. But know that you’ll pay
extra if you change your mind
about a color after the trim is
already painted or otherwise add
tasks to the project.
localliving@washpost.com
The nonprofit Washington
Consumers’ Checkbook magazine
and Checkbook.org help consumers
get the best service and lowest prices.
We are supported by consumers and
take no money from the service
providers we evaluate. See ratings of
Washington-area painters free of
charge until
Sept. 30 at checkbook.org/
washingtonpost/painters.
the washington post . thursday, september 7 , 2017
In Mark Twain’s classic “The
Adventures of Tom Sawyer,” Tom
tricks his friends into painting his
aunt’s fence. You probably won’t
get that lucky, but there are good
reasons many homeowners keep
their painting in-house. No building codes apply to interior decoration; if you do something
dumb, you don’t risk life and property as you would if you were, say,
tackling a rewiring job; and because labor typically accounts for
80 to 85 percent of the price of a
paint job, you’ll save a ton by
doing the work yourself.
If you choose to hire a professional instead, use Checkbook’s
ratings of local contractors. For
the next month, Checkbook is offering free access to its ratings of
local painters to Washington Post
readers at checkbook.org/washingtonpost/painters.
Should you go with a pro or no?
Before taking the painting plunge,
consider the following:
• Inside or outside? Inside,
there are solid floors, reachable
ceilings and uniformly bright
working light. Outside, uneven
ground makes it difficult to set
ladders and reach roof overhangs.
Nature isn’t your friend here, either: Dew can cause paint-adhesion problems, and rain can ruin
still-wet paint.
• One room or the whole
house? Applying one coat in one
room is a reasonable DIY Saturday project (especially if you have
help and beer). Multiply the time
spent moving furniture, prepping
walls and sanding old trim by the
number of rooms in the house,
and you might want to hire real
help. It’s the same outside. You can
probably tackle one shady garage
wall that needs a little scraping
and sanding plus a coat of paint,
but covering all surfaces of the
house is usually best left to a pro.
• One or two stories? Painting
one story may be within the scope
of an ambitious homeowner. Two
stories means extension ladders
and scaffolding — probably contractor territory.
• New work or repair? If a
remodeling contractor leaves
smoothly finished drywall, prep
work is eliminated, and the painting can begin. Where walls or
siding need a lot of scraping,
spackling and sanding, the samesize project can take twice as long.
• Same color or stark change?
Repainting with a similar color
rarely requires more than spot
priming and one finish coat. Dramatically changing the color usually requires at least two coats,
doubling the painting work.
• Mostly walls or woodwork?
12
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Home
HOME FRONT
Building a ‘she shed’ that puts his man cave to shame
Erika Kotite,
author of
“She Sheds:
A Room of
Your Own,”
joined staff
writer Jura
Koncius last
Erika Kotite
week on our
Home Front
online chat. Here is an edited excerpt.
Q: Where did the term “she
sheds” come from?
A: No one knows, really. The
term began appearing on social
media about three or four years
ago. It sprang up as a
counterpoint to the ubiquitous
“man cave.” The alliteration
made the term fun and
memorable, and it stuck. My
book was (to my knowledge) the
first one to use the term in the
title. I wish I could take credit
for these magic words, but they
belong to the world.
the washington post . thursday, september 7 , 2017
Q: As wives and mothers, we
often put the needs and wants of
our families before our own. Do
you think a she shed can be
looked at as a good investment
for our homes?
A: You bet it can. I don’t have
hard data to support my claim,
but I do know several Realtors
who have bought my book to
show clients what they can do
with their new back yard or how
to spruce up an existing utility
shed. Building a she shed is just
about the most affordable way to
add space to your home. It’s still
an investment of $4,000 to
$8,000, but it usually costs
much less than a room add-on.
Q: I’m a fan of washable white
slipcovers and am looking for
the fabric that, in your opinion,
wears and looks best. I’m
considering cotton canvas,
cotton denim, linen, hemp and
Sunbrella. Any advice?
A: I really like working with
painters canvas. It isn’t
waterproof, but it is so
inexpensive and natural-looking.
I made a canvas panel that I put
underneath the roof for a soft
she shed ceiling.
Q: I’d like to create a
comfortable space for guests in
my second bedroom while
keeping the option to use it as
additional living space the rest
of the time. None of the rooms
in my 1,200-square-foot
rowhouse are very big, so I
would rather not fill up one of
them with a full- or queen-size
bed that is rarely used. Any
suggestions for smallish sleeper
KIM SNYDER
Jenny Karp’s “she shed,” seen in the book “She Sheds: A Room of Your Own,” by Erika Kotite, features wide French doors and painted
plywood floors. “Building a she shed is just about the most affordable way to add space to your home,” Kotite says.
sofas or other sleeping
accommodations that could
comfortably fit two people?
A: I just put a full-size Murphy
bed in a small room in our
house for my daughter to use
when she comes home from
college. When she’s gone, it
becomes my sewing room. They
aren’t cheap, but they really
work and save tons of space.
Also look at futons; they’ve come
a long way.
Q: Do most of the sheds you
write about have heat? If so, how
is it installed?
A: Many she sheds (at least here
in California) do not have hardwired heat because you need a
permit for that. Women use
their she sheds seasonally, or
they bundle up in blankets
during the winter. Space heaters
are common, but again you will
need to commit to electric
wiring, which requires a permit
in most places. Don’t be put off
by permits, however; the process
is often not as terrible as you
might think. It takes a little
more time and money, but it
could be worth it for a
substantial and beautiful she
shed.
Q: Have you ever come across a
shed converted into a
playhouse? A lot of the
playhouses I’ve seen are either
too expensive or too small for
my tall 4-year-old. Any great
resources or tutorials? I have no
experience with power tools. I
would want the playhouse to be
able to withstand the elements,
but it wouldn’t need to be a fourseason playhouse.
A: Most of the shed conversions
I’ve seen are pretty extensive
and would require at least
rudimentary building skills. Do
you live in a neighborhood with
other families? If you know your
neighbors, maybe you could put
together a building party. Let
the other kids help with the
design, and maybe people can
donate items for the “kids’ club”
in exchange for a fun day and a
nice lunch.
Q: For instant gratification, do
you recommend DIY kits or
manufactured sheds?
A: Here is what I recommend:
Find a design plan that you like
and assemble the materials
yourself. I’m in the early stages
of creating two she shed designs
with plans, but there are many
out there already that are really
nice. Your she shed will be less
expensive and have a really nice
eclectic flair with salvaged
wood, doors and windows. It
takes longer, but the results are
wonderful. For manufactured
sheds, I like Summerwood
Products. For really posh sheds,
look at the company
Gardensheds.
Q: What is a good flooring
option for a shed that doesn’t
have heat?
A: It’s very wise to consider the
right flooring for cold and
moisture. My first choice no
matter what is wood planks —
and it doesn’t have to be fancy
hardwood. In fact, I wouldn’t
advise installing traditional
hardwood in a shed unless you
are planning to finish it and seal
it (like in a house). Salvaged
planks (barn wood, etc.)
protected with a pressuretreated wood subfloor or
concrete pad look great and feel
good. Remember, it’s a shed, and
it’s nice to maintain a rustic,
unpolished feel. I also would
consider laminate flooring. In
my sister-in-law’s shed, we used
interlocking laminate panels
that resembled wood right over
the primed subfloor, which was
easy and quick.
Also at washingtonpost.com
Read the rest of this transcript and
submit questions to the next chat,
Thursday at 11 a.m., at
live.washingtonpost.com.
13
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the washington post . thursday, september 7 , 2017
14
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Home
the washington post . thursday, september 7 , 2017
Late-summer sni±es? Goldenrod isn’t guilty.
Like a lot of
people, I have an
allergy to
ragweed. My
affliction isn’t as
bad as the
Adrian
debilitating
Higgins
reaction I used to
have to spring
GARDENING
tree pollen before
I built up some
immunity to it, but it’s enough
that I can call myself a ragweed
sufferer. The eyes invite rubbing,
the throat feels like a disused
mine shaft, and the sinuses open
and close as they please.
Ragweed starts spewing out
its pollen dust in August, peaks
in September and persists until
the first frosts.
Everyone has heard of
ragweed, but few, I wager, would
recognize it if it were sitting
outside the door. It’s an annual
that expands with almost
shrublike vigor in one season,
each plant growing as high as six
feet, with feathery leaves that
resemble those of the
wormwood.
The male flowers cluster at
the top of the plant. The female
flowers sit in the joints of the
leaves and branches below. The
male flowers generate millions
of microscopic grains of pollen
that ride the air. Some alight on
the female blooms a few inches
away, but most fly many miles so
that they can land in your throat.
For a reason that bears only
passing logic, another plant
entirely has taken the rap for the
ragweed, to wit, the goldenrod.
People look at the common
goldenrod (Solidago canadensis)
and say, “Hey, look at all that
pesky ragweed.” This may be
because the goldenrod is
conspicuous, with its lanky
stems and the way it spreads by
runners to colonize roadside
ditches and open fields. Most of
all, its wands of yellow blooms
wave like banners during
ragweed season. The common
goldenrod species is not suited
to the cultivated garden, but it is
not public enemy No. 1.
Think of it as the innocent
fugitive at the center of an
Alfred Hitchcock film. Can a
menacing crop duster be far
behind?
Like ragweed, most plants
that trigger allergic reactions
generate airborne pollen.
Reproducing this way is a hit-ormiss affair, so the plants overdo
the pollen. Spring is green with
the pollen grains of oaks, elms
and maples, along with grasses.
Goldenrods, by contrast, are
among the flowers that entice
insects to move the pollen from
one plant to another. Pollinator
The advertisements
for allergy medications
are full of blooms that
don’t cause allergies —
a daisy reads better
than a gramineous
inflorescence.
ISTOCK
The lanky, common goldenrod blooms in open fields in late summer and is confused with ragweed.
ADRIAN HIGGINS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Elmleaf goldenrod at the U.S. Botanic Garden’s Regional Garden.
pollen tends to be big and sticky,
not the windblown stuff of stuffy
noses. Nevertheless, the
advertisements for allergy
medications are full of blooms
that don’t cause allergies — a
daisy reads better than a
gramineous inflorescence.
Anyway, the goldenrod’s
September and October
blooming period offers its own
value to the gardener, as one of
those steadfast perennials that
will add floral highlights to the
late-season garden.
Between now and the leaf
drop of early November, the
garden is entering what I think
is the most beautiful phase of
the year. As I’ve said before, it is
a period in which flowers are
just one element and one that
relies on the mature leafy forms
of perennials, grasses and
annuals, along with the
ornament of shrubs and trees
before, during and after leaf
coloration.
But plants that do flower late
are valuable because they add
the fizz to the cocktail. The
common goldenrod may be a bit
rank and invasive for the garden,
but others have been developed
that are smaller, neater, nonspreading and, in sum,
deserving of far more use.
There are more than 60
species of goldenrods native to
the Mid-Atlantic region alone,
and I can’t help thinking that
breeders have merely scratched
the surface in developing
garden-worthy varieties. The
number of pollinators drawn to
goldenrod is amazing. The
DANIJEL MICKA
The culprit, ragweed.
individual flowers of each spray
are tiny daisies. It is worth
pulling up a stool and observing
close up both the blooms and the
creatures drawn to them. They
are favored in particular by tiny
native bees.
The best known garden
goldenrod may be Fireworks, a
variety of the wrinkle-leaf
goldenrod that grows to just four
feet and is smothered in finetextured sprays of golden-yellow
blossoms for most of September
and October. Another tried-andtrue goldenrod is Golden Fleece,
a variety of the dwarf goldenrod.
It grows to about 24 inches, but
its leaves and flower spikes are
bolder than those of Fireworks.
A hybrid from Germany
named Crown of Rays
(Strahlenkrone) is another
compact, floriferous variety that
blooms in early summer, but it
will re-bloom generously in the
fall if cut back after the initial
show. Goldenrods are sun lovers
and are not for wet soils, though
the wreath or bluestem
goldenrod will be happy in a
little shade.
My new favorite goldenrod is
the plumed goldenrod, Solidago
plumosa. It is about 24 inches
high, grasslike, extremely finetextured and about to smother
itself in yellow blooms against
red stems. You can see a drift of
it at the Regional Garden of
native plants at the U.S. Botanic
Garden.
Unfortunately, it’s not readily
available in the nursery trade,
probably because it is rare and
endangered in its native North
Carolina. I’d like to think it could
be propagated without harming
the wild population, much as the
Tennessee coneflower has been
grown and sold. The plumed
goldenrod would be a great front
of the border plant, perhaps as a
filler, much like a grass or sedge
with the bonus of erupting into
bloom in the weeks ahead.
All these goldenrods would
pair nicely with ornamental
grasses such as pink muhly
grass, blue grama grass or switch
grasses, along with half-hardy
and tender ornamental sages.
Asters, cousins to the
goldenrods, provide another
companion plant, including such
superior varieties as Raydon’s
Favorite and Bluebird. The
lower-growing, small-flowered
calico aster deserves more use.
Lady in Black is noted for its
deep purple foliage and tiny
pink blooms in arching sprays.
All these lovely late-season
perennials, and especially the
goldenrods, have a place in most
gardens. Unlike the wretched
ragweed, they are not to be
sneezed at.
@adrian_higgins on Twitter
Also at washingtonpost.com
Read past columns by Higgins at
washingtonpost.com/home.
15
Home
DC
A COOK’S GARDEN
Two indispensable ingredients also make nice kitchen decorations
B ARBARA D AMROSCH
Tip of the Week
Spend some time perking up
annuals by pinching out blooms
that have faded, trimming back
leggy stems and applying a thin top
dressing of potting mix or fine
compost. Tall annuals such as
zinnias, sunflowers, tithonia and
amaranth may need staking or
re-staking to remain upright and
attractive through October.
— Adrian Higgins
thing, after the ponytail and the
“man bun,” might be the French
braid. And you’ll have practiced
on onions.
localliving@washpost.com
Damrosch is the author of “The Four
Season Farm Gardener’s Cookbook.”
Fresh perspectives on
the world around you.
BARBARA DAMROSCH
Hard-neck garlic from the author’s garden is displayed in a tall
container. If you grow soft-neck garlic, you can braid it and hang it
from the kitchen ceiling, a technique that works for onions as well.
This concept appeals
to anyone who likes
rustic kitchen decor,
but even if the theme is
stainless-steel modern,
the sight of onions
and garlic in a kitchen
gives one a feeling
that the cook cares
about flavor.
onions and garlic, which are neatly protected by their skins. So you
can braid their tops to form a tidy
hanging column and snip off one
at a time as needed.
Normally you would cut off
your onions’ dry foliage as soon as
the necks have cured, but if you’re
going to braid them, leave it on.
The simplest way to do this is to
tie three onions tightly together
at the neck with tan-colored jute
or sisal twine, which will last as
long as the onions will. Then
braid the three clumps of leaves
just as you would a pigtail, alternately bringing the left and the
right one to the center.
After each movement, bring a
new onion in, above the center
onion, adding its top to that
strand. So even as you rise above
the tops of the lower onions, the
upper ones carry on the work.
One way to give the column more
strength is to leave a long piece of
twine when you make that bottom tie, and braid it into one of
the continuing strands.
If you’ve ever fiddled with long
hair, you probably know that
braiding in new strands as you go
is called making a French braid.
Heads of garlic can be braided
the same way, but only if you have
grown soft-neck garlic, which has
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the washington post . thursday, september 7 , 2017
Onions are an easy crop, one
that doesn’t require much attention. Water and weed — that’s
about it. But toward the end of
summer, you need to watch them
to see whether they’ve flopped.
When the leaves lie down in the
row, it means the bulbs have
stopped growing and are ready
for harvest.
When this happens, check the
weather. It’s best to pull onions
during a sunny spell. Simply lift
them and lay the whole plants on
the ground in tidy rows to dry out
and cure. The idea is to let the
tops turn brown, all the way down
to the bulbs, so that the necks will
tighten and seal the bulb against
deterioration. A brief shower is
harmless, but if genuine rain is
coming, bring them under cover
to finish the job. Spread them on a
floor, table or screen in a place
that’s well ventilated and dry.
Soft-neck garlic can be harvested like onions. Hard-neck garlic is
pulled when the tops start to
brown but there are still about six
green leaves on top. Bring both
under cover right away to dry and
cure.
New onions and garlic can be
eaten immediately and are outstanding when fresh, but their
main virtue is that they last many
months in storage. An ideal space
is dark, cold and frost-free, but
not moist like a root cellar.
Like many cooks, though, I
don’t feel secure unless I have a
working stash of onions and garlic within easy reach. In the kitchen, there’s always a bucket, bin or
basket — anything that works,
but never the fridge, where too
much moisture might make them
rot.
You can also treat them as a
kitchen display. This concept appeals to anyone who likes rustic
kitchen decor, but even if the
theme is stainless-steel modern,
the sight of onions and garlic in a
kitchen gives one a feeling that
the cook cares about flavor and
that the upcoming meal will not
be bland. (You might have already
sensed that upon entering, from
the pungent aroma of a bubbling
pot.)
Hanging food pantries are picturesque, especially if your kitchen ceiling has exposed beams
from which to suspend them, but
they have limitations. Ristras of
dried red chiles look gorgeous at
first, before they lose color from
too much light. So do bundles of
upside-down herbs, which, if too
close to the action, crumble from
the careless swish of a tea towel.
Both gather dust.
But none of that happens to
pliable foliage like that of an
onion. They’re easier to work
with than onions because they
weigh less. The result is charming.
If you grow hard-neck garlic,
which has long, very stiff stalks,
you’ll see that it doesn’t lend itself
to braiding. Instead, you might
bundle the stalks together at the
top and bottom and hang them
up, keeping hand pruners at the
ready to snip off a head.
But I don’t hang them at all. I
put them in an upright vase with
the heads on top, like a bouquet.
Nothing could be simpler than
that.
If you have always had short
hair, especially if you are male,
the idea of the French braid may
be a little baffling, but you’ll catch
on. Who knows? The next big
M1680-D 2x7
BY
16
DC
Wellness
KIDS & NUTRITION
Got milk?
For bones,
you can
do better.
ISTOCK
the washington post . thursday, september 7 , 2017
BY
F
C ASEY S EIDENBERG
or the first time in his
14 years, my oldest son
brought home the bacon
with two paid summer
jobs. Boy, did he relish the reward of the paycheck. He has
always spent whatever money he
acquired through birthdays or
allowance on the newest baseball
glove, the hottest pair of basketball shoes or, dare I say it, candy.
But this summer, he said there
was something about devoting
long days to work that made him
want to save his pennies.
At the same time, he hit a
growth spurt, and comparable to
how the paycheck changed his
perspective on money, his rapid
growth altered his perspective
on health. He is much more
interested in what will keep him
on this upward trajectory. He
used to eat without thinking, but
now he is making the foodhealth connection when he
chooses what to eat.
As an athlete, he is more
committed to eating a healthy
breakfast. He has five-hour preseason football practices in the
morning, and he wants to have
strength and energy for them.
While experiencing some pretty intense growing pains, he
asked about his bones. I explained that although bones appear to be hard and static, they
are made of living tissue that is
constantly changing. Little pieces of older bone are continually
being replaced by newer, healthier bone. His bones are kind of
like that bank account he has
been building with paycheck deposits; throughout his childhood
and adolescence, he will deposit
healthy tissue into his bones.
Skeletal development peaks in
the 20s, so ideally he should
make as many nutritional deposits as he can now to build a
strong skeleton for adulthood.
In fact, according to the National Institutes of Health, osteoporosis has been called “ ‘a pediatric disease with geriatric consequences,’ because the bone
mass attained in childhood and
adolescence is an important de-
terminant of lifelong skeletal
health. The health habits your
kids are forming now can make,
or literally break, their bones as
they age.”
Bones are made of the minerals calcium, magnesium, zinc,
copper, manganese and potassium, as well as vitamins D and K.
Calcium is your body’s most
abundant mineral, with 99 percent found in your bones and
teeth, and the all-important vitamin D helps your bones and
teeth absorb it. In fact, studies
show that only 10 to 15 percent of
the calcium in food is absorbed
without vitamin D. Zinc regulates a hormone that supports
bone growth, and vitamin K
(found in leafy green vegetables)
activates proteins that deposit
calcium into your bones and
teeth while keeping it out of
places it doesn’t belong.
Although the milk mustache
has led many of us to believe that
milk is the magic bullet of bone
health, there are better ways to
build bones. Cow’s milk is a good
source of calcium and is often
fortified with vitamin D, yet milk
has downsides for some people.
A large portion of the world is
lactose intolerant, which can
cause digestive distress, and others who consume milk experience consequences such as acne.
Instead of dairy, try alternative sources of bone-building nutrients. Leafy greens such as
spinach and kale are good options, as well as broccoli, artichokes and other green vegetables. Nuts and seeds provide
calcium and zinc. Homemade
bone broth, which my daughter
drank from her baby bottle, is a
flawless bone-building food.
Beans such as chickpeas, navy
beans and edamame are a great
source of calcium. Blackstrap
molasses, delicious in oatmeal,
makes a bone-healthy breakfast.
Salmon, sardines and other oily
fish are good foods for bones
because they help reduce inflammation while also providing vitamin D and other nutrients. Inflammation can strip minerals
such as calcium from the bones,
weakening them.
Weight-bearing exercise such
as running, hiking and lifting
weights support bone growth
and strength, so keep those kids
on the move. Children shouldn’t
require a calcium supplement, as
bone health is a balance of
minerals and vitamins, not just
large amounts of calcium. Too
much of one nutrient confuses
the body, causing it to not use
other nutrients beneficially.
Most calcium gummies are full of
sugar, anyway.
My son did not break the bank
with his earnings, but he did
open a fund for the Jeep Wrangler of his dreams. And perhaps
now that he is paying more
attention to his growth, he will
deposit a similar amount of nutrients into his bones. Both seem
like pretty good investments.
localliving@washpost.com
Seidenberg is co-founder of Nourish
Schools, a D.C.-based nutrition
education company, and co-author
of “The Super Food Cards,” a
collection of healthful recipes and
advice.
Family
17
DC
ON PARENTING
Don’t blame DNA for daughter’s sassy demeanor
BY
M EGHAN L EAHY
Q: I’m looking for advice on how to deal with my
almost-6-year-old’s exceedingly snarky attitude. I know
that eye-rolling, talking back, etc., are fairly ageappropriate, but, as our day-care provider put it, she’s the
“sassiest little girl” she’s ever worked with in her decades as
a preschool teacher. I was similar as a child, and my
parents told me repeatedly that my attitude stunk and that
I was unpleasant to be around. It wasn’t until I was older
and realized how many friendships had ended because of
my attitude that I was able to make a change. What can I
do for my daughter? I have no idea whether this “have
attitude, lose friends, learn from mistake” process is
inevitable. On the one hand, I want her to be a little sassy,
unafraid to speak her mind and not polite to a fault. On the
other hand, how do I get her to see that this level of
attitude may alienate her? I don’t want to change her. I just
want her to understand the value of a filter to temper how
she comes across.
being called the “sassiest little
girl” in day care from a provider
who has decades of experience.
What is the day-care provider
doing about this? Is everyone
shrugging their shoulders like,
“Well, she’s just completely
obnoxious, and there’s nothing
we can do about it.” I am
concerned that there are lots of
labels being put on your
daughter but no help being
offered.
Fourth, you are identifying
with your daughter in a way that
is preventing you from helping
her. It seems clear from your
note that you had a tough time
when you were younger and paid
for it. This suffering does not
have to be your daughter’s fate,
and you don’t have to either go
nuclear or just let her sort it out
on her own. She’s almost 6 and
needs some strong guidance, so
let’s get to it.
Regular and chronic sassiness
and disrespect are a sign of deep
discouragement and
defensiveness in a child. Let’s say
you’re married and don’t feel like
your spouse is listening to you
and your opinions. You feel shut
out, dismissed and rejected. Your
impulses could go a couple of
ways, depending on your alarm
instincts. If you’re like me, you
are going to fight. You are going
to confront, get mean and attack.
Others retreat. They shut down,
walk away and seek to avoid this
pain. But the fighters? They will
push, and then they will shut
people out. So if your spouse
ISTOCK
asks you for your opinion and
you have felt down and out for a
long time, your heart will say:
“Oh, heck no. I don’t trust this at
all.” And you very well may give
an eye-roll and a smart
comment. Your heart is saying:
“You have been too hurt by this
dismissal. I am going to protect
you, even if it hurts the
situation.”
Your daughter is defending
herself against listening to
people and taking instruction
because her heart and mind have
decided that is not safe. There is
a little wall around your
daughter’s heart, and every time
she even perceives that she is
being attacked or bullied, the
wall springs up, protects her and
becomes stronger.
She is not necessarily doing
anything wrong. For very
sensitive children, it’s a natural
defense against vulnerability.
They are taking in so much
sensory information and
experiencing so many emotions
that their minds and hearts
become overwhelmed and say,
“That’s enough,” and the
children shut down.
First bit of homework: Stop
calling your daughter sassy.
Rename this emotion
discouragement, and you will
instantly begin to have more
empathy for her. Labeling her as
sassy doesn’t help her mature. It
keeps her boxed in as a pain in
the bottom, and you both don’t
need that. Also, don’t take all this
eye-rolling personally. Does this
mean that you like it or don’t
care? Of course not. Just
remember that she is reacting to
emotions of alarm and
protection. She is not
consciously trying to hurt you.
Second bit of homework: You
cannot demand respect or
kindness from her. It will make
her even more frustrated. The
way into her heart is through
small doses of connection in
non-threatening ways. For
instance, is there a project you
can work on together where she
can find her voice and have
agency over something?
Dedicate only a bit of time to this
every day, because too much oneon-one time will discourage her.
When she is sassy, relabel it as
frustration right then and there.
When she rolls her eyes, say, “I see
how frustrated you are with this
decision.” The more we can put
names to her feelings, the more
we can move her from “sassy,”
“snarky” and “bad” to “frustrated,” “discouraged” and “sad.”
These words will help you communicate with her about her true
feelings.
Place some boundaries on her
behavior. For instance, let her
know that if she has a play date
and acts this way, her friend will
leave immediately. Make good on
this the first time it happens. She
will throw a tantrum of epic
proportions, but as long as you
don’t punish her and put your
relationship on the line, she will
adapt. Don’t draw boundaries
everywhere (you will never stop
fighting), but choose your lines
thoughtfully and stick with your
rule.
Finally, take a listening stance
whenever possible. When she
says something rude, say:
“Sounds like you really don’t like
that idea. I wonder what you are
really thinking.” Then pause. See
what happens.
I will warn you that if your
daughter has been acting this
way for a long time, things won’t
work themselves out overnight.
Children who push boundaries
can be frustrating, so do what
you need to do to keep your
feelings in check as you do this
heavy emotional lifting. But this
can get better! Good luck.
Also at washingtonpost.com
Read the transcript of a recent live
Q&A with Leahy at washingtonpost.
com/advice, where you can also find
past columns. Her next chat is
scheduled for Sept. 13.
Send questions about parenting
to meghan@mlparentcoach.com.
the washington post . thursday, september 7 , 2017
A: There are a number of red
flags in this question, and I want
to address them so that we can
clarify the real issue. I am not
being critical of you; rather, I
want to highlight a few concerns
so that we can identify what you
can change in your parenting
life.
First, eye-rolling, talking back,
etc., are not age-appropriate
behaviors for your daughter.
Although we sometimes see this
in children of many ages,
constant snark and sass are not
appropriate. This is a sign of
deeper frustration. I want to
steer you away from the “little
girls are just sassy” way of
thinking. It is the equivalent of
saying “boys will be boys” when
little boys are violent, and I know
we can look deeper here.
Second, sassiness and snark
are not genetic. I know it is easy
to see yourself in your child, but
sassiness is not passed down
through genes. Am I saying that I
don’t see generations of strongwilled women, one after
another? Of course not. But this
is more nurture than nature. If
you look at temperament scales,
outgoing parents can have
outgoing children, and shy
parents can have shy children.
But sassiness? There is no
sassiness temperament.
Sassiness is a sign of something
else.
Third, it can be fairly normal
for children to be rude at home
while acting like angels at
school, but your daughter is
18
DC
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Calendar
T H URS DAY, S E P T. 7
Garden tour: “Highlights from
the Conservatory Collection” A
one-hour guided tour through a
jungle, a desert and tropical
foliage. Mondays, Thursdays and
Fridays at 10:30 a.m.; Mondays,
Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays
at noon; Wednesdays and
Thursdays at 2 p.m.; and Tuesdays,
Thursdays, Fridays and Sundays at
3 p.m. Through Sept. 29. U.S.
Botanical Garden, 100 Maryland
Ave SW. 202-225-8333. usbg.gov.
Free.
Washington Cathedral Behind
the Scenes Age 11 and older. See
gargoyles and stained-glass
windows, and climb stairs for a
panoramic view of the city. Take a
camera. Most weekdays except
holidays at 10:30 a.m. Washington
National Cathedral, 3101
Wisconsin Ave. NW. 202-537-2228.
cathedral.org. $27, age 11 and 12,
seniors 65 and older, teachers and
students with ID and military $23.
the washington post . thursday, september 7 , 2017
Ask a Curator, Ask a
Conservator As part of the weekly
Textiles at Twelve series, learn
about rugs and textiles from Textile
Museum curators and
conservators, including how to
properly store and display pieces.
Thursdays at noon. The Textile
Museum, George Washington
University Museum, 701 21st St.
NW. 202-994-5200.
museum.gwu.edu. Free.
Organ concerts David Lang
performs a program of mostly
classical works as part of a concert
series with guest organists from
across the country. Fridays 12:151 p.m. Through June 29. National
City Christian Church, 5 Thomas
Cir. NW. 202-797-0103.
nationalcitycc.org. Free; donations
welcome.
Art in the Garden Botanical artist
and gardens director Kellie Cox
teaches art in pencil and pastels or
pen-and-ink to beginning and
advanced artists in the historic
Tudor Place gardens. 12:302:30 p.m. Tudor Place, 1644 31st
St. NW. 202-965-0400.
tudorplace.org/programs/75/artin-the-garden. $50 with online
registration.
Native landscape tour A
horticulturist-led tour showcases
Native American plants and garden
techniques. Thursdays at 1 p.m.
Through Sept. 28. Meet near the
flagpole outside the South
Entrance. National Museum of the
American Indian, Fourth and
Independence streets SW. 202633-1000. nmai.si.edu. Free.
EVENTS CONTINUED ON 20
Preparing an uneasy rider for extended travel
Animal
Doctor
Dear Dr. Fox:
Max is a 91/2year-old female
domestic
MICHAEL W.
shorthair cat I
FOX
adopted from the
Arlington
Animal Welfare League when she
was 6 months old.
She has never liked car travel.
During the five-minute drive to
my vet (while she is in a cat
carrier), she meows loudly, with
anxiety. I once took her to my
beach house 21/2 hours away, and
it was clear by the nonstop loud
meowing and her stress level that
she hated it.
Fortunately, on the trip back
home, she was a bit better and
was fairly quiet, but she kept her
tongue moving in and out,
breathing shallowly, indicating
how stressful it was for her.
I am retiring and moving, first
to a nearby apartment for four
months, and then to Clearwater,
Fla., and taking Max on the flight
in her carrier on my lap. I’m
worried about how loud and
stressed she might become in the
airport and especially on the
flight.
I have asked vets how to keep
her calm during the trip and have
gotten different answers. One
said that “kitty Xanax” would
work well. The next time I asked,
another vet recommended a
Benadryl-type substance.
I would really like your advice
on how best to help keep my Max
as comfortable and relaxed as
possible on the plane.
GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCK
Pet owners planning to travel with cats (or dogs) can help make the
experience less stressful by getting the animal accustomed to
sleeping and eating in the carrier that will be used for the trip. This
teaches pets that there’s nothing to fear.
the medication wears off. Such
medications are especially illadvised for long flights, because
they will wear off and can put
animals at risk if they panic
while feeling drug-disoriented.
Dear readers:
Some animal shelters and
animal-holding facilities still
provide insufficient or no
exercise for dogs. Veterinary
clinical researchers have
documented the benefit of an
exercise regimen for dogs living a
sedentary life and suffering from
chronic diarrhea.
Turn these findings around,
and they indicate that dogs
getting regular exercise are more
likely to enjoy better health than
those that are confined in a home
dog crate, commercial kennels,
animal shelter or research
laboratory cages.
From behavioral observations
of my own dogs, I have found
they will pass a few stools when
let outdoors in the morning to
urinate, but only when they are
setting off for a long, fast walk do
they fully empty their bowels.
Living a sedentary life, rarely
aroused and often being trained
to evacuate inside — especially
when living in high-rise
apartments or confined in a cage
or pen — could well lead to
longer retention times before
evacuation, resulting in
inflammation of the bowels.
Physical activity might also
improve circulation and help
alleviate and prevent
lymphangiectasia, the
accumulation of lymph in the
bowels seen in some forms of
canine inflammatory bowel
disease.
Considering the multiple
stressors to which dogs taken to
animal shelters and rescue
facilities are exposed, this
veterinary report on the health
benefit of exercise for dogs
supports what should be a
standard policy of providing all
dogs with regular, brisk walks,
ideally twice daily for 15 to
20 minutes. Dogs under
quarantine should be taken to
enclosed areas for walks, unless
medically contraindicated. Safety
harnesses are preferable for dogs
not used to wearing a collar and
those that are fearful or likely to
pull and injure their necks and
throats. Walking on a leash also
socializes dogs to their handlers
and is a time to train them to
comply with basic commands,
which will enhance their
adoptability. Walking with a
sociable “buddy dog” used to
FOX CONTINUED ON 19
B.K., Falls Church
AD OPT A PET
DF: Traveling with cats (and
dogs) can be facilitated by having
them get used to sleeping and
eating in the airline-approved
carrier that will be used for
travel.
In your instance, I think it
would be best to let your cat
spend a short time (10 to
15 minutes) in the container she
will be flying in once or twice a
day for a few days. She will soon
learn that there is nothing to fear
in the carrier and that she will
soon be released. Offer her
favorite treats while she is
confined.
I am opposed to giving
animals any medications for
travel other than nausea
remedies (ginger or Dramamine).
A few drops of oil of lavender or a
spritz with a cat pheromone
product such as Feliway on a
blanket or pad the cat will lie on
in transit might help calm her.
Medications such as Xanax
and Benadryl can make animals
fearful in strange places because
they are more vulnerable and
have less control, especially as
Tank, a 4-year-old neutered dog, is available for adoption through the
Humane Rescue Alliance.
HUMANE RESCUE ALLIANCE
The Humane Rescue Alliance’s two adoption centers, at 1201 New York Ave. NE
and 71 Oglethorpe St. NW, offer animals for adoption. Adoption hours are noon
to 7 p.m. daily, except Mondays. Stray animals are accepted 24 hours a day,
seven days a week at the New York Avenue location. Photos of other available
animals can be seen at humanerescuealliance.org. For information, call the
Humane Rescue Alliance, 202-576-6664, or the adoption center,
202-726-2556; email adopt@humanerescuealliance.org; or go to
humanerescuealliance.org/support-us.
A N IMAL WATCH
These cases were handled by the
Humane Rescue Alliance, which
operates its shelters at 71 Oglethorpe
St. NW and 1201 New York Ave. NE.
For information or assistance, call
202-576-6664 or 202-726-2556, or
go to humanerescuealliance.org.
Orphaned squirrels: First St. SW,
3900 block, Aug. 25. Responding to a
report, an officer picked up two
juvenile squirrels in distress and
transported them to City Wildlife for
care.
Close-knit unit: Providence St. NE,
1800 block, Aug. 25. An officer
responding to a call about a stray
family of cats in need of care
captured the mother and her 5-dayold kittens. The family was taken to
the shelter and transferred to foster
care.
Mother waits patiently: Taylor St.
NW, 1800 block, Aug. 21. An officer
responding to a report about a fawn
stuck between two fences freed the
uninjured animal. It was reunited with
its mother.
Adoptable pet: Oglethorpe St. NW,
unit block, July 13. An owner
surrendered a 4-year-old dog to the
shelter because his wife no longer
wanted the dog inside the house.
— Compiled by Ria Manglapus
19
Pets
Don't Replace... REFACE!
ANIMAL DOCTOR
Shelter dogs need exercise
FOX FROM 18
being leashed can help shy dogs
accept and eventually enjoy
walks while leashed.
Dogs out of quarantine also
benefit from being placed in
small, compatible play groups in
recognition of the benefits of
physical activity and social and
emotional stimulation. Running
stimulates the release of “feelgood” and anti-inflammatory
neurochemicals. Many shelters
are also adopting group housing
for dogs, which, along with
regular walks and one-on-one
and group human interaction,
enhance their adaptability and
adoptability.
Private and municipal animal
shelters that do not make such
©2017 United Feature Syndicate
Community News
THE DISTRICT
Greenway Market
3542 E. Capitol St. NE
Closed Aug. 28 for operating
without a manager on duty.
Reopened Aug. 30.
Hana Japanese Market
2000 17th St. NW
Closed Aug. 28 for operating
without a license.
Cabinet
Refacing
Some restrictions
may apply.
Limited time offer.
Available in a variety of panel styles, colors and wood grains
202-897-3009 DC 100% Financing
301-892-3315 MD Available
703-382-6990 VA Get a FREE Customized Quote Today
Penn Grill
825 20th St. NW
Closed Aug. 24 for operating
without a manager on duty and
because of gross unsanitary
conditions, including vermin.
Reopened Aug. 30.
A NEW BATH
In As Little As One Day
20
MARYLAND
El Sambrerito Tex Mex
11510 Baltimore Ave., Beltsville
Closed last Thursday because of
rodents and improper food
temperatures. Reopened Friday.
YEARS OF
SERVICE
EXCELLENCE
One-Day Installation 1
Certified Technicians
Seamless Wall
Lifetime Warranty2
Las Comadres Supermarket
8411 Snouffer School Rd.,
Gaithersburg
Closed Aug. 29 because of vermin.
Reopened that day.
Schedule an appointment by 9/24/17
SAVE $600
WE’LL INSTALL
VIRGINIA
No new closings were reported.
A FREE SOAP DISH**
Applies to a complete bath system
from Bath Fitter.* CODE: 18757
— Compiled by Terence McArdle
Call Now
301-289-7905
301-985-2168
Serving Maryland, D.C., and Virginia
1Tub-to-shower conversions and fiberglass replacements typically require a two-day installation. 2Lifetime warranty valid for as long as you own your home. Subject to limitations. See location for
details. *Offer must be presented and used at time of estimate only. May not be combined with other offers or applied to previous purchases. Valid only at select locations. **Limited to one (1) free
soap dish per installation. Soap dish choices include: Standard, Half Moon, or Twin. Fixtures and features may be differ