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2018-05-21 Adweek

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FEATURE
WHY
DOES THE
INTERNET
SUCK?
PAGE 18
Family
Reunion
ROSEANNE BARR AND SARA GILBERT GOT THE
CONNER CLAN BACK TOGETHER, GIVING ABC AND ITS
ADVERTISERS A REASON TO CHEER. BY JASON LYNCH
I G IDEA vs. LONG IDEA
CREATING EFFECTIVE CONCEPTS THAT ENDURE
Advertisers are obsessed with the big idea. But what
is a big idea in today’s marketing world? Something
novel that breaks through the noise and has a
cultural impact? Or something with staying power
that reveals its value over time?
DEVIKA BULCHANDANI
COLLEEN DECOURCY
SAMANTHA DEEVY
CORINNA FALUSI
President, McCann New York
Chief Creative Officer, Wieden + Kennedy
Group Communications Strategy Director
Droga5
Partner and Chief Creative Officer
Mother New York
JASON HARRIS
FERNANDO MACHADO
EDDIE OPARA
President and CEO, Mekanism
Global CMO, Burger King
Partner-in-Charge, Creative Director
Pentagram
AND MORE!
PRESENTED BY
JOIN THE CONVERSATION THAT WILL ELEVATE THE INDUSTRY
GET TICKETS TODAY AT ADWEEK.COM/ELEVATE // TICKET SALES END MAY 28
IN THIS ISSUE
Upfr
t
THE W EEK IN MEDIA A ND M A RK ETING
MAY 21, 2018 | VOL. LIX NO. 14
12
TOP STORY
NEW CEO FOR NEW FOX
TV PROGRAMMING CHIEF SUZANNE SCOTT
MAKES HISTORY. BY CHRIS ARIENS
FEATURE
Roseanne’s triumphant
return upends the upfronts,
while a resurgent ABC
parties like it’s 1989.
Suzanne Scott has been named CEO of Fox News
and Fox Business Network. Lachlan Murdoch,
chairman of 21st Century Fox and the
chairman, CEO of the proposed New Fox,
made the announcement on Thursday. Scott
will report jointly to Lachlan Murdoch and
Rupert Murdoch, 21st Century Fox executive
chairman, executive chairman of Fox News
and co-chairman of the proposed New Fox.
“Suzanne has been instrumental in the success
of Fox News and she has now made history as its first
6
female CEO,” said Lachlan Murdoch in a statement. “Her
vision and innovation have helped create some
of the most popular and lucrative prime-time
programs on cable.” Scott has been president
of programming since last May, following the
departure of longtime programming chief
Bill Shine. At that time, Rupert Murdoch also
promoted Jack Abernethy to co-president
of Fox News and Jay Wallace was named
president of news. Both men also are taking on
new roles with today’s announcement.
TRENDING
The anti-hero becomes
the anti-marketer.
AD OF
THE DAY
MEDIA
UPFRONT
WEEK
R
11
J-B Weld
Why the “transformists”
are the demo to target.
26
PERSPECTIVE
The lean, mean, fatreducing grilling machine.
29
PORTRAIT
This agency finds the
perfect musical match.
C O V E R : P H O T O G R A P H E D BY S C O T T W I T T E R FO R A D W E E K ; T H I S PAG E : K I M M E L : G E T T Y I M AG E S
DATA POINTS
BIG NUMBER
Nick Offerman barely speaks in J-B Weld’s first
national campaign, created by TBWA\Chiat\Day
New York. Luckily, silence is golden. Relying mainly
on physical comedy and some stellar facial acting,
Offerman amusingly communicates that J-B Weld
helps you fix broken stuff real good. Each of three
videos has the same setup: The big guy comes across
items discarded as trash and patches them up, then
returns to rub it in the face of their previous owners.
It’s basically a one-joke campaign, but the gags work
every time, because they’re extremely well-staged
and intrinsic to the brand story. —David Gianatasio
MOOD BOARD
11m
UNDOCUMENTED
IMMIGRANTS
BLOCKED FROM
BUYING POLITICAL
ADS UNDER
FACEBOOK’S
NEW U.S. AD
BUYING RULES.
The Week in Emojis
SPOTIFY
SCHWEPPES BRAZIL
AIRBNB
PUSHES ITS FREE TIER
W I T H FA K E M O V I E T R A I L E R S
AND A WITTY OUTDOOR AD.
M A D E A D R E S S T H AT
MEASURES HOW OFTEN
WOMEN GET GROPED.
D E S I G N E D I T S O W N “ P L A Y F U L”
FONT TO UNIFY ITS LOOK
A C R O S S A L L P L AT F O R M S .
Buyers descended on New York
for the annual upfront week,
during which all the broadcasters
unveiled their new schedules
for the 2018-19 TV season.
NBCUniversal and Fox Networks
Group made ad load reductions
a big part of their respective
pitches, ABC welcomed back
Jimmy Kimmel for his annual
upfront roast and The CW
expanded its programming
to Sunday nights. But none of
the trailers for next season’s
new shows generated half as
much enthusiasm from buyers
as the appearance of CBS
Corp. chairman and CEO Leslie
Moonves, who received a standing
ovation at CBS’ Carnegie Hall
upfront as Madison Avenue made
it clear which side it is on in
Moonves’ legal battle with parent
company National Amusements
over CBS’ (and his) future.
—Jason Lynch
THIS WEEK’S INSIGHTS
Twentieth Century Fox started
conversations with brand partners
like Trolli, 7-Eleven, Espolòn tequila
and Mike’s Harder 18 months ago.
BRANDS
nary Marketer Saves the Day
WHY DEADPOOL IS THE
PERFECT PITCHMAN.
BY KRISTINA MONLLOS
Candy, liquor, a convenience store
chain, even frozen food, Deadpool
has hawked it all with his usual grim
self-awareness ahead of the May 18
release of the anti-hero’s sequel film.
Twentieth Century Fox, the studio
behind Deadpool 2, developed an
elaborate anti-marketing marketing
campaign for the witty supermercenary, played by Ryan Reynolds,
that winks at traditional tactics while
aiming to turn them on their head.
Putting Deadpool front and center is
“very in keeping with this character, that
he’s going to get down and dirty and
market this stuff,” said Nancy Hansell,
strategy director at global brand
strategy shop Siegel+Gale. “Normally
a lot of the superhero characters it’s
beneath them—and beneath the actors
playing them—to market stuff.”
Not so, for Deadpool and Reynolds.
Case in point: Espolòn tequila, one
of the film’s many brand partners,
tapped Deadpool to serve as the
liquor’s creative director—well, to be
clear, th r n “cr
r tor
of cultur
that ma
celebrit
have De
what yo
6
lazy, subpar creative work.
But that’s exactly what Espolòn
wanted. “Partnering up with Deadpool
2 gave us the opportunity to lean on the
very popular trend to hire celebrities as
a creative director, but we gave it a fun,
satirical twist we could only achieve
with a character such as Deadpool,”
explained Christine Moll, marketing
director of tequilas and rums for
Campari America, who added that being
part of the pop culture conversation
allows the brand to attract new fans—
especially millennials.
Espolòn is one of a number of
sponsors, which include 7-Eleven, Mike’s
Harder, Devour and Trolli, to partner
with Twentieth Century Fox on cobranded campaigns that use Deadpool’s
irreverent and calculating personality to
tweak the traditional film partnership to
devise something original.
“The consumer landscape is
saturated with traditional blockbuster
campaigns,” said Zac Eller, evp of
marketing partnerships for Twentieth
Century Fox, explaining that Deadpool 2
is one of the first R-rated films to have
a larger roster of brand partners. “We
wanted to take an anti-approach to that
and work with brands who were willing
to have a lot of f n—not your
s.”
ue
the
s
them the flexibility needed to execute
an effective co-branded campaign.
Twentieth Century Fox kicked off
conversations with brand partners
roughly 18 months ago. The studio
used a war room approach—inviting
marketers and their various agency
partners—to ensure that not only
did each brand have its own unique
campaign, but also that those
campaigns would accurately reflect
Deadpool’s tone and voice.
The result was an array of
campaigns. Deadpool broke the fourth
wall for Devour as he explained why he
became a sellout spokesman for the
frozen food brand. Trolli created a new
candy based on Deadpool’s tiny hands.
The anti-hero took over 8,000 7-Eleven
locations with store signage and Slurpee
straws that feature a pole-dancing
Deadpool. And Mike’s Harder replicated
Deadpool’s favorite bar, Sister Margaret,
in New York and Los Angeles.
“We had such a great result from
the first film that [partnering again]
was easy,” said Sanjiv Gajiwala, svp,
marketing for Mike’s Hard Lemonade.
The company’s limited-edition
Deadpool cans for the first film gave
the brand a 10 percent increase in
sales in some stores.
This time around, Mike’s Harder is
focusing on its Deadpool partnership
this summer, spending millions of
dollars in media (Gajiwala declined to
be specific on the spend). One element
of the campaign, the Sister Margaret
pop-up, has already driven massive
engagement for the company, with
800 fans swarming the bar for the
first night in New York alone.
“We love the opportunity to get
people to try our product and we think
that experiential, particularly with the
millennial 21-year-old to 29-year-old
consumer, is really important,” Gajiwala
said, explaining that patrons explored
the bar and shared images on social
media instead of getting a drink first.
“Creating experiences that are positive
and shareable are important to brand
equity and to grow the Harder brand.”
Siegel+Gale’s Hansell believes
the partnerships break through the
traditional film sponsorship noise
because they are speaking to adults,
whereas superhero work is typically
family-friendly. She also believes that
it helps that the focal point of the
creative isn’t the film—or even the
brands—but the Deadpool character,
making fans more likely to care about
the film and the brands. “In a way, this
feels like the launch of a bigger brand
than just a film,” Hansell said. “This
feels like it could be more of a portable
template for other brands to emulate.”
KRISTINA MONLLOS IS A SENIOR
EDITOR FOR ADWEEK, WHERE
SHE SPECIALIZES IN COVERING
B R A N D S , M A R K E T I N G I N N O VAT I O N ,
CONSUMER TRENDS AND POP
C U LT U R E . @ K R I S T I N A M O N L L O S
MAY 21, 2018 | ADWEEK
TRENDING
AGENCY LIFE
BACK IN
BUSINESS
LIZZIE ROBERTS/GETTY IMAGES
THANKS TO SHOPS THAT
‘GET IT,’ MOMS ARE FINDING
THE SUPPORT THEY NEED
TO RETURN TO WORK.
BY LINDSAY RITTENHOUSE
uring stops at renowned
shops like Lowe and
Partners, McCann and Grey,
longtime creative director
Erica Fite said she never
received the kind of support
that working parents really need in order to
flourish in the industry. Twenty years ago,
she brought her then-5-month-old son on a
commercial shoot in Los Angeles so she could
breast-feed him. But as she recalled, Fite
“didn’t dare” tell her employer or client.
“I made my own plan, with my mom
meeting me and acting as my on-site
babysitter,” Fite admitted. “It was a
parenting disaster. I had no creativedirector-mom mentors to guide me.” Fite
said her client never caught on to her baby
debacle, but amid the chaos of trying to work
around the clock, she had her computer
stolen and lost the ability to nurse her child.
Since then, many agencies have begun to
enact better policies for a healthy work/life
balance, including improved maternity (and
paternity) leave, but those eforts have little
impact on American women who take a break
from their careers to raise their children (43
percent, according to the Harvard Business
Review). For women in advertising, however,
a host of obstacles have made it next to
impossible to return to the office.
No longer. Shops including 72andSunny,
Odysseus Arms and Venables Bell & Partners
are working to change this paradigm,
creating internship-type programs called
returnships to get them back.
Meanwhile, since 2011 Fite has been
committed to helping mothers, too, founding
Fancy, a creative boutique, alongside fellow
working mom Katie Keating, who held stints
at agencies like Publicis and Grey. According
to Fite, Fancy focuses on employing women
over 40, most of whom are mothers who
are encouraged to work on schedules that
are best suited for their families. “We trust
ADWEEK | MAY 21, 2018
everyone to be a grown-up,” Keating said.
“The fact is, moms are super-efficient. We
have no choice. We get shit done.”
Libby Brockhof, co-founder, CEO of
Odysseus Arms, never thought she could
return to an agency as a working mom of
two children despite having an impressive
work history that included founding Mother
London. Her husband Franklin Tipton, an
accomplished creative director himself,
convinced her to come back in 2011—after five
years of—to open the San Francisco shop.
“I’m really fortunate in that I had a lot
of support to come back; it wasn’t my idea
to just start another ad agency,” Brockhof
said. “It was the idea of the people around
me, who showed me there was space for me
to come back.”
‘Parenting offers
a diversity of
perspective that
is great to have,
especially in the
creative room.’
Keesha Jean-Baptiste, svp of talent,
engagement and inclusion, 4A’s
But not all working moms are as fortunate
as Brockhof. A year after launching
Odysseus Arms, she met another mother
at her child’s school, a “brilliant, former
big-league exec” for Gillette, she recalled.
But Brockhof was shocked to learn that no
company would hire her simply because she
couldn’t work standard 9-to-5 office hours.
So Brockhof ofered her a job at
Odysseus Arms with flexible hours. And
that’s how Army of Moms was born—which
was her version of a returnship before she
even had heard the term. To date, Brockhof
said the Army of Moms program has
employed 40 to 50 women.
“They’re working across many diferent
verticals; we have moms in creative, strategy,
account management,” Brockhof said. “Most
of them work from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and
then from 9 p.m. onward. That’s not our
choice; we let them work on their own time …
whenever they feel creative.”
Now more agencies are ofering their own
returnships (a term first coined by Goldman
Sachs in 2008).
Mary Johnstone, associate partner and
head of talent at Venables Bell & Partners,
said the firm recently hired a dedicated
recruiter to find women who have been
absent from the industry for some time.
“The main thing we hear from them is
they feel really insecure coming back; things
have changed; we’ve transitioned into this
digital age,” Johnstone said. She added, they
usually only need “a few days” of training to
get up to speed.
72andSunny’s Sedef Onar, chief talent
officer and partner, noted that the agency
launched its first returnship last year,
employing one woman under the program
in Los Angeles. This year, 72andSunny will
admit four into returnships, which Onar
stressed is an educational-based program
separate from the internships the agency
ofers. At the end of the program, “if it’s a fit,
we hire; if not, we give them direction.”
“We all know that the more diverse our
teams are, the smarter they are and parenting
ofers a diversity of perspective that is great
to have, especially in the creative room,
where we’re putting together campaigns
that resonate with consumers that are
working parents,” added Keesha JeanBaptiste, the 4A’s svp of talent, engagement
and inclusion. “If we want to hold on to our
brightest talent, we have to make sure we’re
not losing people when they are entering or
exiting diferent stages of life.”
LINDSAY RITTENHOUSE IS A STAFF WRITER AT ADWEEK,
W H ER E S H E S P EC I A L I Z E S IN C O V ER IN G T H E W O R L D O F
AGENCIES AND THEIR CLIENTS. @KITTEN_MOUSE
7
WHITEBOARD > REINVENTING THE BUSINESS MODEL
CHALLENGE
INSIGHTS
Celebrities
are lining up
to be part of
this year’s
Red Nose Day
on May 24.
Clowning Around
For a Cause
HOW RED NOSE DAY RAISED $100 MILLION
FOR CHILDREN IN NEED, IN JUST 3 YEARS.
BY KATIE RICHARDS
Taking on a concept as ambitious
as ending child poverty is a pretty
lofty goal, but when Red Nose Day
launched in the U.S. in 2015—30
years after U.K.-based nonprofit
Comic Relief’s first biannual Red
Nose Day—it landed a few strategic
brand partnerships that would later
ensure the organization’s massive
success in the States. In just three
years, the group has raised $100
million to eradicate poverty among
children—“one nose at a time.”
There are many different
elements to Red Nose Day. Its
partners include Walgreens,
M&M’s, the Bill and
Melinda Gates Foundation,
as well as NBC. On May 24,
the network will broadcast
a three-hour extravaganza,
which will include a celebrity
version of American Ninja Warrior,
featuring Derek Hough, Ne-Yo,
Nikki Bella and others, as well as
Hollywood Game Night, hosted by
comedian Jane Lynch. Separately,
consumers also can enter raffles
or bid on special experiences like a
picnic with Hugh Grant or breakfast
with Benedict Cumberbatch and the
cast of Sherlock.
A key cornerstone of the
campaign, though, has been Red
Nose Day’s partnership with
Walgreens. “Walgreens is very much
fundamental because that iconic red
8
nose is sort of a gateway into the
overall Red Nose Day experience,”
explained Janet Scardino, CEO of
Comic Relief USA and Red Nose Day
U.S. “Red Nose Day [is] considered
a full store takeover that is only
second to Christmas.”
From April 2 to June 2,
Walgreens locations transform
into Red Nose Day hubs, selling
a massive number of noses. Just
last year the retailer pulled in
$7.6 million—or about 10.6 million
noses, and all told has sold 30
million noses over the last
three years. Red Nose
Day uses the money it’s
raised to issue grants to
charities like the Boys &
Girls Clubs of America,
Children’s Health Fund
and Feeding America.
What makes the partnership
with Walgreens such a success
stems perhaps from the retailer’s
long-standing commitment to
philanthropy. “Part of our DNA
since the beginning has been
helping in local communities across
America,” said Adam Holyk, svp and
CMO of Walgreens. “You can look at
what our stores do every single day,
our employees are there to help
people. Red Nose Day fits with our
brand purpose, to help champion
the health and well-being of every
community in America.”
1
FINDING OUTSTANDING
PARTNERS IS KEY
Perhaps the biggest catalyst that
led to Red Nose Day’s success in
the U.S., according to Scardino, was
finding the right partners to work
with. Walgreens, for example, was a
great fit because of the company’s
existing dedication to giving back
through its “Everyone Counts”
platform that helps Walgreens
customers do good in their local
communities and around the world.
2
MAKE CORPORATE SOCIAL
RESPONSIBILITY FUN, BUT
DON’T GO OVER THE TOP
It can be hard to see any kind of
silver linings when talking about
ending childhood poverty. Red
Nose Day and Walgreens strive to
make giving back as lighthearted
as possible, while educating
people about the serious problem
at hand. Walgreens employees
will ring a cowbell “every time a
consumer purchases, makes a
contribution and buys a red nose,”
Holyk said. “There is really strong
engagement,” which he argued
makes the partnership feel even
more fun for everyone.
Not only did the group need to find
the best partners to work with when
first launching in 2015, but Red Nose
Day also needed to find new and
exciting ways to engage consumers
and encourage people to continue
donating to the cause year after
year. “There are so many wonderful
organizations in the U.S. and
globally that are vying for attention,
so to come into the U.S. market,
the biggest challenge is breaking
through the clutter,” Scardino said.
GOAL
Each year, Red Nose Day works
closely with partners like
Walgreens to help support as
many children in need as possible,
both in the U.S. and globally.
EXECUTION
One reason for Red Nose Day’s
success in the U.S. is the wide variety
of ways people can interact with the
group. For Walgreens, it’s as simple
as walking into a retail location
and purchasing a red nose. All
proceeds from those $1 purchases
go to ending child poverty. To keep
consumers who may already have a
nose interested, Walgreens recently
updated the nose for 2018, adding a
silver sparkle to it.
KEY DATA
$100 million
raised for million-plus
kids in first three years.
10.6 million
red noses sold at
Walgreens in 2017.
3
DOING GOOD IS
GOOD FOR BUSINESS
“Being able to deliver good and
do good locally is something
that is really top of mind for
consumers,” Holyk said. It’s
become increasingly clear that
younger consumers favor buying
from brands that have some sort
of corporate social responsibility
aspect to them. Others suggest
that companies that give back
are better able to engage with
employees and retain talent.
$20 million
total funds raised from
Walgreens in 2017.
17,500+
Red Nose Day donations through
Facebook’s giving tools in 2017.
4.6 billion
Facebook impressions
reaching over 60 million users.
K AT IE R I CH A R D S I S A S TA F F
WRITER FOR ADWEEK SPECIALIZING
IN B R A N D S A N D M A R K E T IN G
T R EN D S . @K TJ R I CH A R D S
MAY 21, 2018 | ADWEEK
TRENDING
CREATIVE
Death of
The Global
CCO?
WHY AGENCIES ARE
REEVALUATING SUCH A CRITICAL
ROLE. BY PATRICK COFFEE
n March, JWT CEO Tamara Ingram
wrote an all-staf memo to announce
that she and other leaders were “reimagining the future” of the world’s
oldest ad agency. Its key take-away:
This future would not include global
chief creative officer Matt Eastwood or anyone else holding that title.
Every day brings new reports of brands
building in-house shops, creative account
wins shrinking and top talent following
Apple’s Tor Myhren to the client side. But
there may be no greater symbol of the intense
pressures now facing such “traditional” agencies than a debate over the relevance of the
one job most unique to the ad industry.
In short, agencies—especially those owned by
publicly traded holding groups—are struggling
to justify the salaries of their most visible talent.
One agency exec who spoke to Adweek on
condition of anonymity said, “You’re going
to see pressure points, whether it’s the global
CCO, head of analytics or managing director: senior roles that represent a lot of money
and are largely nonbillable will get called into
question more and more.”
Ingram’s memo told staf that creativity is
still at the core of the business, but eliminating
the position allows JWT to be “more agile” as
creativity is now a “more collaborative process.”
Yet some heard a death knell for the agency
leader who, in the words of Joan co-founder
and CCO Jaime Robinson, “floats around,
shakes hands, kisses babies and judges
awards ceremonies.”
“The truth is that the most creatively
dynamic and interesting brands in the world
right now have strong in-house creative
teams,” said former Airbnb CMO and TBWA
executive Jonathan Mildenhall, who now
serves as CEO of consultancy TwentyFirstCenturyBrand. He cited Adidas, Spotify,
Chobani and others, adding, “I predict the
external CCO will become a relic of the past.”
ADWEEK | MAY 21, 2018
According to some observers, the
halcyon days of creative figureheads
like Bill Bernbach, David Ogilvy and
Leo Burnett are now a thing of the past.
According to former PepsiCo and Ogilvy
executive Brad Jakeman, this shift represents
a new wave of CMOs who don’t fit the “MBA
marketer” stereotype. “They have their
own Rolodexes of producers, writers, directors and art directors,” he said, arguing that
this knowledge renders agencies—and their
CCOs—less relevant.
Recruiters have also witnessed this
change as rising stars who might one day be
agency leads now prefer in-house roles at
companies like Square, Casper, Blue Apron
or even Facebook, said Tim Young of executive consultancy SYPartners.
Many leaders unsurprisingly disagree
with these dire predictions, but the role has
clearly changed.
‘I predict the external
CCO will become
a relic of the past.’
Jonathan Mildenhall, former Airbnb CMO
and TBWA executive
“Thirty years ago, [global CCO] was a way to
give people a job but also give the next generation
of creative leaders some autonomy,” said Susan
Credle, who now holds the title at FCB. “Then it
shifted: It was all about amassing awards.”
In other words, many creatives grow further removed from the act of creating as they
climb the industry ladder. Some are better
known as “thought leaders.”
Ogilvy & Mather worldwide CCO Tham
Khai Meng argued that the job must be redefined if that remains the case. “It is about the
work. Nothing else matters,” he said, stating
that CCOs who bring attention to that work
help attract talent and win new business, ul-
timately benefiting a network’s bottom line.
Most shops, however, are led by executives
with backgrounds in finance. And ex-WPP
chief Martin Sorrell’s lasting legacy may
be splitting creative and media, thereby
“marginalizing creative agencies” even as he
encouraged them to apply for more awards.
“You want to have leaders who are product
people, and in our business the product
is creative,” said newly installed Publicis
Groupe global CCO Nick Law, who questioned
whether a Sorrell-style CEO can be “better at
looking at the whole picture” than someone
like Dan Wieden or David Droga.
This lack of “product people,” Law said,
means many CCOs now spend their time
“polishing craft that could be from any agency” rather than developing and promoting a
vision fit to distinguish their own companies.
“A true global CCO should be the cultural
heroine for the agency worldwide,” said Nils
Leonard, founder of Uncommon London.
The former chief creative at Grey Europe
added this individual would ideally serve as
“the best and most inspirational example of
what that agency is about, what they believe
in and how they work.”
Leonard argued that any decline in
the prominence of CCOs is a side efect of
“bloated and often broken networks.” But
every agency leader who participated in this
story agreed on one point: The industry at
large faces a shortage of individuals fit to both
showcase and defend creativity as a business.
“Creative people will go where creative
people are. That’s why you still need the
global CCO,” Tham said. “In fact, we need
them now more than ever.”
PAT R I C K C O F F E E I S A S E N I O R E D I T O R F O R A D W E E K ,
WHERE HE SPECIALIZES IN COVERING AGENCIES,
BR ANDS AND INDUSTRY TRENDS. HE IS EDITOR OF
A D W E E K ’ S A G E N C Y S P Y B L O G . @ PAT R I C K C O F F E E
9
VOICE
Nail down the happy path. From
launching the experience to signing
off, the happy path is the series of
steps your user will take if everything
goes according to plan. Map out
what happens when a user activates
your app and provides an ideal,
predetermined response at every
prompt. The happy path should be
committed to code immediately, using
the computer-generated voice at
hand. This step is important, because
submitting updates to Google and/or
Amazon early and often will save you
headaches deeper in the process.
Read your script out loud. Just like
a table reading for a movie, eliminate
technology entirely and read your
voice script out loud among the team.
Hearing it read makes it easier to
catch hiccups that would otherwise be
hard to identify.
OPINION
What to Know
Before Building
A Voice Skill
CHECK THESE EIGHT
BOXES WHEN SETTING
OUT TO PRODUCE
AN EFFECTIVE
CONVERSATIONAL
ACTIVATION.
BY 360I’S VOICE TEAM
for them. For the first iteration of your
app, it’s best to assume that things
will be at least twice as challenging
as you expect. Select a user need
that’s feasibly solvable in a one- or
two-minute conversation. Articulate
how solving those user needs will
help you achieve your business
objectives. This rationale will serve
as your experience strategy and
become the project’s north star.
If you’re a producer, designing
a conversational experience for
voice may lead you into uncharted
territory. While we can’t fully protect
you from a few sleepless nights of
quality assurance testing, these eight
pointers may help you get to where
you need to go with this new and
burgeoning marketing tool.
Consult experts and observe this
need in the wild. You need to find
out if there are existing solutions for
the problem you are trying to solve.
If there’s an expert in helping people
handle this need, say a mechanic or a
psychologist, ask them how they do
it. Go into the wild and listen carefully
to conversations in order to learn how
to recommend a cocktail, find a nice
bar and listen to how the bartender
imparts his or her mixologist magic.
It’s also really helpful to start with
existing script material. Do you have
call center scripts? Start there and
Start by identifying the consumer
need your app will solve. Designing
your voice experience strategy is
all about understanding your users.
Identify the need your app will solve
10
If you can, hire a voice actor.
Though the tech is rapidly improving,
it’ll be years before a computergenerated voice feels truly natural.
Deciding on intonation (like which
word to emphasize in a sentence)
requires computers to make
assumptions based on context they
don’t have. Using a voice actor adds
a more human touch to your app, but
also ups the cost and complexity
considerably. Consider how many
Margaret
Barnard
Integrated
Producer
Instagram
@margbarnard
Mike
Mohammed
Senior Content
Strategist
Twitter
@MikeMohammed
Tony Landa
Senior Technical
Director
Twitter
@bigtbigtbigt
Sabreen Jafry
Project
Manager
Twitter
@sabu_91
minutes of dialogue will need to
be recorded. If the app is going to
change in a few weeks or months,
will the talent be able to return and
record? Don’t jump into recording
sessions until you’ve locked down
and extensively stress-tested the
anticipated flow of the app.
Plan for three rounds of audio
recording. Round 1 involves recording
the happy path voiceover. Round 2
will include corrections and the audio
for your alternate user flows. Round
3 is where you’ll record any final
corrections. You should schedule this
as close to the end of production as
possible, since swapping out audio can
be done fairly quickly.
Submit chunks of audio early and
often. Submitting updates to Google
or Amazon early and often will save
you headaches deeper in the process.
When your app is rejected—and your
app will be rejected—you can’t rely
on the app reviewer to tell you why.
Submit for approval with every major
update to limit the scope of what’s
changed and it’ll be easier to figure
it out. As you incorporate alternate
flows, keep submitting your updates
to the virtual assistant platform for
review. This will help ensure that
as much of your app is approved as
possible as you near your live date.
Do not skip quality assurance.
Recruit as many people as possible
for user testing to identify points
of friction. You’ll use this critical
feedback to identify bugs, iterate
skill development and refine your
design. Though you’ll be tempted to
shorten or skip this phase—don’t.
The assistant platform approvals
process routinely misses even the
most glaring problems, and skipping
testing provides the opportunity for
you to ship a product that’s riddled
with them. Align with a QA team to
test ease-of-use assessment and
refinement tests before deployment.
Creating a voice app can be a pretty
rad—and challenging—experience
for a producer, because you’ll likely
encounter problems you can’t turn
to Google to answer. Don’t count on
everything going smoothly— it won’t
and it’s going to be rejected a bunch of
times before it’s ready for the big show.
It’s going to take weeks and weeks
of stress testing and rerecording, and
hours and hours of QA. And if your
experience goes anything like ours,
there might even be some heightened
emotions stirred by the intense work.
But fear not, in the end you may
end up creating something no one’s
ever seen, or heard, before.
MAY 21, 2018 | ADWEEK
I L L U S T R AT I O N : L E I G H W E L L S / G E T T Y I M A G E S
build tactics with which your voice
experience will help the consumer
solve their problem.
D ATA P O I N T S
The Transformists
INTRODUCING THE HOTTEST DEMOGRAPHIC FOR
BRAND MARKETERS SINCE MILLENNIALS. BY SAMMY NICKALLS
While millennials may be the hottest demographic for marketers to target, research by Insider Inc. and Digitas says they’re not the most powerful influencers—
and that we shouldn’t be focusing so much on generations in the first place. A recent study identifies a new group of people cutting across age groups and
backgrounds that brands should be chasing: the “transformists.” And they’re united in mindset rather than birth. “Transformists” are tech-savvy individuals who
don’t just use technology for fun, but to better their own lives and supplement the values and causes they believe in, from social issues to work goals. Driven,
curious and connected, transformists are exactly the group that brands should be striving to reach, according to a survey by Insider Inc. and Digitas. There are 38
million transformists in the United States, and they make engaging with brands a staple in their lives—77 percent “like” something a brand posts on social media
once a week or more, while 51 percent purchase something they see in their social feeds. “Marketers today place a lot of importance on reaching millennials,”
said Jenifer Berman, svp of marketing, Insider Inc. “But there are more than 80 million of them, and any group that large defies definition. We believe it’s far more
valuable to look at audiences through the filter of mindset and worldview—which is also the best way to identify the truly influential.”
A profile of
transformists
52% Male
Age
48% Female
18 – 24
29%
25 – 35
45%
36 – 45
17%
46 – 54
How transformists use
social media
Social media presence
(Top 3)
10%
Overall %
Percentage who
seek out information
on the source at
least once a week
Percentage
who have
heard of the
sources
Overall
Transformists
Facebook
84
91
94
Instagram
Transformists %
(% who agree)
Making the world
a better place
is a priority.
Overall %
Transformists %
How transformists
get information
Motivations
of transformists
99
52
Television
84
CNN
60
69
59
USA Today
55
New York Times
51
50
Washington Post
50
43
The New Yorker
48
40
42
Vice
32
Mashable
Radio
INFOGRAPHIC: CARLOS MONTEIRO
28
Refinery 29
26
The Verge
25
21
Now This
16
Quartz
Attn:
11
News & Guts
12
Axios
8
Brands need to
focus on causes
and quality
Keeping up to date on
the local and federal
government is important.
78
89
Like something
a brand posts
Quality of a product
matters more than price.
50
55
67%
47
Comment
on something
a brand posts
44
56
68
53
93
51%
85
58
83
If a product is made by a
trusted company, it’s worth
it, even if it’s slightly
more expensive.
56
S O U R C E : I N S I D E R I N C . A N D D I G I TA S
ADWEEK | MAY 21, 2018
Fill up
spare time
77%
14
The Skimm
Print newspapers
16
25
96
56
30
Vox
19
89%
49
45
45
47
Business Insider
26
72
50
49
NPR
Apps
58
62
41
The Economist
64
Print magazines
16
30
71
MSNBC
Social media
Q: How often do you
do the following things
on social media?
(Once a week or more)
73
70
55
Forbes
67
91
74
62
50
67
78
Buzzfeed
Huffington Post
Finding happiness
is a priority.
46
80
60
WSJ
72
Twitter
83
Fox News
Websites
83
Purchase
something
seen on feed
80
90
11
ra Gilbert
Roseanne Barr and Saweek by
photographed for Ad y, Calif.
Cit
Scott Witter in Culver
THE RO
REVIVA SEANNE
THE T V L UPENDS
IND
AND GI USTRY—
VE
ITS FIR S ABC
S T NO
SHOW
IN 24 Y . 1
EA
BY JAS
ON LYN RS.
CH
C O V E R F E AT U R E
It only took a few moments
for Disney-ABC’s upfront
presentation last Tuesday
to morph into a full-blown
Roseanne Barr lovefest.
With the surprise breakout success of ABC’s Roseanne revival less than two
months earlier, the network felt as if it had won the lottery—ending up with the
season’s No. 1 entertainment show among adults 18-49 for the first time in 24
years—and took great pleasure in reveling in its unexpected good fortune in front
of the assembled buyers at New York’s Lincoln Center. “If anyone came to play a
drinking game based on how many times we mention Roseanne, you’re welcome,”
said Ben Sherwood, co-chairman of Disney Media Networks and president of Disney-ABC Television Group.
From opening the event with a surprisingly strong taped performance of Frank
Sinatra’s “My Way” in front of American Idol’s judges (“I was glad to be able to sing
well in public. That’s taken me about 30 years to get over what happened before,”
Barr told Adweek, referring to her infamously horrific rendition of the national
anthem at a 1990 San Diego Padres game) to joking onstage that Sherwood is “the
guy that really writes most of my tweets,” Barr could do no wrong in front of buyers and network execs. The adoration she and the cast have received since the premiere, says Barr, is “very gratifying.”
What a diference a year makes. During last year’s upfront presentation, buyers
weren’t sure what to make of the Roseanne cast’s awkward appearance, and wondered whether ABC had made a mistake in bringing back the sitcom—about the bluecollar Conner family, struggling to
make ends meet in fictional Lanford,
Ill.—after a two-decade hiatus.
Network execs said they knew
they had the goods, but not even they
predicted the eye-popping ratings
for the sitcom’s March 27 return.
That night it pulled in 18.2 million
viewers and a 5.2 rating in the 18-49
demo, making it the most-watched
comedy telecast since an episode
of The Big Bang Theory in September 2014, and out-rating the 16.6
million who turned into the show’s
then-series finale in 1997. “I had no
idea it would do the number that it
did,” says Carrie Drinkwater, svp,
group director of investment activation, MullenLowe Mediahub. “It’s
amazing to see, because there was
doubt it could ever happen again.”
Those gargantuan numbers kept
growing as multiplatform delayed
viewing numbers came in, with the
premiere’s demo rating rocketing to
an 11.7 in live-plus-35 (see graph).
Then, as the season moved beyond its endlessly dissected political-themed premiere episode,
much of the audience stayed around.
ALL IN THE FAMILY Roseanne ran for nine
Roseanne is the season’s No. 1 show
seasons on ABC before signing off in 1997. The
in Nielsen’s most current ratings,
revival includes a new generation of Conners.
averaging 19.0 million viewers an
14
episode, and No. 2 in the 18-49 demo with a 5.4
rating, behind only Sunday Night Football. Its C7
rating among all entertainment programs on TV
is a hefty 5.3, well ahead of second-place This Is
Us, with a 3.7. More importantly, the show helped
move ABC out of fourth place this season in the
18-49 demo, where it has languished for five of
the past six seasons, and into a three-way tie for
second place alongside CBS and Fox. After two
consecutive upfront appearances in which ABC
Entertainment president Channing Dungey
promised buyers that change was coming as she
tried “to put the broad back in broadcast television, it does feel good,” she says. “It’s nice to be
going into May with some momentum.”
Unsurprisingly, she’ll be bringing Roseanne
back in the fall instead of waiting again for midseason. “We wanted to keep the momentum going and bring strength to our fall launch,” says
‘I’m just excited to
think that people
are going to see
shows they enjoy
on TV again.’
Roseanne Barr
Dungey—which was a move that Disney-ABC ad
sales chief Rita Ferro also lobbied for as brands
clamor for space on the Roseanne bandwagon.
(However, someone might have forgotten to inform Barr of next season’s scheduling plan: “I’m
going to air in the fall?” she responded, when
Adweek asked her about the scheduling switch
one day after ABC’s upfront. “I’m glad somebody fucking knows what’s going on!”)
The show’s sensational debut, along with Will
& Grace’s solid return earlier in the season, sent
rivals scrambling to line up revivals of their own
(see sidebar). CBS has picked up Murphy Brown
and Fox opted to bring back the Tim Allen sitcom
Last Man Standing, which ABC canceled last
May, with that network’s execs saying they were
“emboldened” by Roseanne’s robust ratings.
“I’m just excited to think that people are going to
see shows they enjoy on TV again, that you can
watch with your family and with your grandkids,
like I do,” says Barr of the revivals. “I’m happy for
that, because that’s been missing for awhile.”
For ABC, these past two euphoric months are
a validation of the company soul-searching that
began among Sherwood and his top execs the
morning after Donald Trump’s surprise victory
in the 2016 presidential election. If Trump’s win
showed that Hollywood was out of touch with
“mainstream America,” recalls Sherwood, “as
ABC—America’s Broadcasting Company—what
is our responsibility to reflect what’s just happened on our airwaves?”
MAY 21, 2018 | ADWEEK
The iconic afghan
from the Conner
family’s couch has
returned—and was
a key element of the
marketing campaign.
Those discussions led to several research projects, through which ABC “began
to develop some ideas about how perhaps inclusion doesn’t just mean Fresh Of
the Boat and Black-ish. Maybe inclusion also means reflecting the working poor in
America, and the middle of America where there is daily struggle,” says Sherwood.
Meanwhile, the idea of a Roseanne revival suddenly ignited in March 2017
when costar John Goodman guested on The Talk, and told co-host Sara Gilbert,
who had portrayed the Conner’s younger daughter, Darlene, that he’d be open to a
reunion. “I had started thinking about it a few weeks before he was on, but I didn’t
anticipate that everyone would want to do it,” says Gilbert, who did double duty as
an executive producer on the revival. “So I was thinking, what version can we do if
just some people want to do it? And when he said he would do it, it occurred to me
that everybody would.”
Barr was interested, too, but
worried “whether I could do it at
my age, if I had the energy for it,”
she says. To that end, she enlisted
Gilbert, who had set the wheels
When the series ended in 1997, the only way to
in motion by wrangling all their
watch was via live TV. But its return has become
castmates, to run interference
a multiplatform sensation in the 18-49
with the network and studio
demo. Here’s how the premiere’s
and fight the battles on behalf
live-plus-35 ratings stack up:
of the show that Barr famously
waged during Roseanne’s origiSEASON 10
PREMIERE
nal run. “I wanted just to be free
(MARCH 2018)
to do what I do best,” says Barr.
11.7 RATING
Explains Gilbert, “She gets to
SEASON 9
0.3
focus on the creative parts more
FINALE
COMPUTER
and not have to worry about the
(MAY 1997)
AND MOBILE
other parts.”
8.1 LIVE TV
1.8
As the revival quickly gained
TOTAL
CONNECTED
RATING
steam last spring, with Netflix
TV VOD
a likely destination, Sherwood
2.4
pleaded directly to Roseanne
SET-TOP
executive producer Tom WerBOX VOD
ner, whose company CarseyWerner owns the show. “Every
fiber of my being wanted to resist Roseanne going to Netflix,”
4.1
he says. “I said, ‘Roseanne beDVR
longs at eight o’clock on Tuesday night on ABC, with the full
force of the ABC television network behind it. While all kinds
3.1
of changes are taking place
LIVE TV
throughout our industry, one
thing remains true: Broadcast
is still the only way into 125 million homes.” His pitch, along with a lucrative ofer (“we stretched to get it,” says
Sherwood) won over Werner and the other producers. “We wanted to have a place
that all viewers could watch us, because our show is supposed to appeal to everyone, and not everyone has the means to have a streaming service,” says Gilbert.
One of the only early bumps in the road came during the cast’s awkward appearance at last May’s ABC upfront. “The chemistry on the stage was nonexistent,” says Betty Pat McCoy, svp, managing director and director of investment,
GSD&M. Between that and concerns about what the revival would look like, “I do
think people were a little skittish. … Boy, did I call that wrong!”
Despite what marketers thought at the time, “we knew we were going to have a hit
on our hands,” says Ferro. But even so, she admits, “there wasn’t any rush to buy it” in
last year’s upfront, as buyers focused more on the network’s fall slate and the Oscars.
ABC marketing chief Rebecca Daugherty built anticipation ahead of the March
premiere with a nostalgia-themed campaign that played up two iconic elements
from the original series—the family’s afghan-draped couch and Barr’s infectious
laugh—which were featured on everything from New York subways to SXSW pedicabs to rigged-for-audio L.A. bus benches. After its market research showed that
Roseanne resonated with Nascar fans, ABC secured naming rights to the Nascar
Inside Roseanne’s
Massive Debut
16
Xfinity Series race on March 17, which it called
the Roseanne 300, and featured co-star Michael
Fishman (who plays son D.J.) as the honorary
grand marshal. “What I loved most about that
is they broadcast it on our competitor. So when
you’re watching Fox Sports 1, you’re seeing banners for Roseanne,” says Daugherty.
As the show’s writers got down to work, they
focused on “what’s going on now in the world
that would afect a working-class family in the
Midwest,” says executive producer and coshowrunner Bruce Helford. They also decided
that the first episode would tackle how the 2016
election had divided the country, and many of
its families, between Donald Trump and Hillary
Clinton supporters. “It would have been the elephant in the room if we hadn’t dealt with it, because it was such a big part of what was going on
with working-class America,” says Helford. “We
thought, let’s see what happens when a family
has that divide within it, because it’s happening
to families all over America.”
That election-fallout premiere launched hundreds of think pieces (“regardless of the position that anybody took about anything, it was
great to see a really intelligent discussion about
the efect of media on American life,” says Helford), and Trump even called Barr—a longtime,
vocal Trump supporter—to congratulate her on
the show’s big debut. “It was very trippy to get a
phone call that said, ‘Hold please for the president of the United States,’” says Barr. “He was
very impressed with the ratings. He’s very into
ratings.” Jokes Gilbert, who is on the other side of
the political spectrum, “He won’t be calling me.”
None of the season’s other episodes—which
tackled topics like opioid abuse, healthcare and
single parenting—was as overtly political as the
premiere, though Barr insists that “our show is
always political, even if people don’t see it that
way.” Elaborates Gilbert, “We don’t need to be
talking about candidates to be political. If we’re
talking about a working-class family that can’t
pay for their pills or that is dealing with a little
boy who likes to wear a dress, we’re talking
about it in another way.”
ABC execs reject the notion that Roseanne
is successful only because it appealed to Trump
voters. “The show is definitely holding up a mirror to a segment of the audience that has not felt
well represented on television. But we wouldn’t
have such robust members if we didn’t have a
lot of people watching,” says Dungey, noting
that “the struggles between parents and kids is
endless and constant and always relatable, no
matter what family you find yourself in.” Ferro
concurs: “You can’t do that number just by going
after one segment of the market. You have to do
that by being broad.”
J A S O N LY N C H I S A D W E E K ’ S S E N I O R E D I T O R F O R
T E L E V I S I O N , C O V E R I N G T R E N D S , T E C H N O L O G Y,
P E R S O N A L I T I E S A N D P R O G R A M M I N G A C R O S S B R O A D C A S T,
C A B L E A N D S T R E A M I N G V I D E O . @ J A S O N LY N C H
MAY 21, 2018 | ADWEEK
C O V E R F E AT U R E
M U R P H Y B R O W N , L A S T M A N S TA N D I N G A N D
WILL & GRACE ARE ALL BACK IN PRIME TIME.
MURPHY BROWN: CBS PHOTO ARCHIVE; WILL & GRACE: ANDREW ECCLES/NBC
REVIVAL OF THE FITTEST
The strong ratings for this season’s returns of
Roseanne and Will & Grace have prompted several
rivals to revive other past-hit shows. “Right now,
a lot of people are rushing to say, ‘Let’s dust this
off, let’s remake that,’” says ABC Entertainment
president Channing Dungey. Already set for next
season are Murphy Brown, which will return to
CBS on Thursdays at 9:30 p.m., and Tim Allen’s
Last Man Standing, which Fox resuscitated one
year after ABC canceled it. Those will likely be
followed by Mad About You; Helen Hunt and Paul
Reiser recently closed deals with Sony Pictures
Television to star in new episodes of the sitcom,
though it hasn’t yet landed at an outlet.
However, the execs involved in many of
these successful revivals said that networks
should use caution when considering bringing
back other classic shows. Nostalgia is “really
helpful in terms of bringing people into the tent,”
says Dungey. “But they don’t stay if they’re not
feeling engaged and entertained, and that’s the
most important lesson to take from this. It’s not
just about putting a fan favorite back on the air;
you need to be doing that with the right kind of
creative talent behind it.”
For NBC Entertainment chairman Robert
Greenblatt, working with the show’s original
creative team is essential for a revival, as he
did with Will & Grace creators Max Mutchnick
and David Kohan. “Only if they feel creatively
energized to bring the show back in some form
does it make any sense, as much as I might want
it,” Greenblatt says.
At Sony, which recently launched the Karate Kid
revival Cobra Kai on YouTube Red and is shopping
around Mad About You, “it’s always creative first.
We would not reboot a series if the creative wasn’t
there,” says Sony Pictures Television president Jeff
Frost. When it came to reviving Mad About You,
“the creative take we heard was just incredible.”
Another potential stumbling block for revivals
is wooing back the series’ original stars. A series
like Will & Grace or Roseanne, in which the entire
cast returned, “is an anomaly,” says Greenblatt.
“So you have to look at the approach, castingwise, and decide whether it’s worth doing with
new people, or with some new people and some
returning people,” which is a tactic that didn’t work
out for NBC when it aired Heroes Reborn in 2015.
“Everything is its own specific case,” says
Greenblatt, “and I don’t think we’re going to be
doing a lot of this in the grand scheme of things.”
ADWEEK | MAY 21, 2018
Any remaining buyer hesitancy about the show, or Barr’s personal politics and
her occasionally volatile Twitter feed, evaporated once those huge premiere numbers came in. “As soon as we started seeing those numbers, I think the broadness
of the reach killed any worries that they have,” says McCoy of her clients.
That led to a “significant uptick” in pricing and demand for Roseanne during
the scatter market, particularly in the theatrical category, says Ferro. As a result,
30-second spots in Roseanne, which could have been had for $200,000 in last year’s
upfront, doubled in the scatter market frenzy, going for as much as $420,000.
Now, Ferro is planning on making Roseanne a central part of this year’s upfront
talks, where she’ll seek brand integration opportunities for both that show and
ABC’s other midseason hit, American Idol. With brands like Uber and Walmart
already woven into the show, “that will be a tremendous opportunity for us,” says
Ferro, who was also inspired by seeing John Goodman’s new TV ad campaign for
McDonald’s. “I said, ‘This is perfect,’ because we have a huge partnership with
McDonald’s around our theatrical.”
Those buyers who were lukewarm on Roseanne a year ago are already planning on shelling out for the show during this year’s upfront buys. “It’s a great way
to reach millions of people in an environment where they are engaged. So yes, it
would be a welcome addition to all of my clients’ media plans,” says Drinkwater.
“Well, unless something drastic happens.”
She’s referring to perhaps the only thing that could derail the show’s continued
success: Barr’s sometimes-controversial statements in public appearances and on
social media. Her children banned her from Twitter during the months leading up
to Roseanne’s debut (“her kids, and her TV kids, try to keep her of of social media,” says Gilbert), but in the past two months she has returned with a vengeance:
erroneously accusing a Parkland shooting survivor of performing a Nazi salute,
promoting a right-wing conspiracy theory about child sex trafficking and igniting a Twitter feud with Stormy Daniels (some of her more incendiary tweets were
later deleted). “I can’t back of from what’s really going on in the world, because
I’m very fascinated by it and I have to stick my nose in everyone’s business,” says
Barr, who claims that she’s attempting a new social media approach: “I’m going to
just try to talk about what I’m for, rather than what I’m against.”
‘You can’t do that number just by going
after one segment of the market.
You have to do that by being broad.’
Rita Ferro, ad sales chief, Disney-ABC
ABC hopes she’ll stick to that plan. “Roseanne has said herself that she does
not want what she says publicly to overshadow the show in any way, and I do hope
that she will continue to be thoughtful about what she shares on social moving
forward,” says Dungey.
As the season finale airs Tuesday night, Roseanne’s creative team is already
making plans for the next season, which will be 13 episodes, four more than this
year’s run. (ABC would love a full season of the show, but “we like doing the quality
control of a shorter order,” which also gives the cast freedom for other projects, says
Gilbert.) “Like a good Avengers movie, we’ve planted a lot of seeds in the show about
things to come,” says Helford, mentioning D.J.’s wife returning from fighting in Afghanistan, and kids Darlene and Becky—both currently single—moving forward
romantically. Plus, there will be a Halloween episode, which was always an annual
highlight during the original run. “That’s what I’m most excited about!” says Barr.
Dungey is eager to see the show continue along the same path that it followed during its first revival season. “They clearly have a winning formula, and
I’m really excited to watch it continue to flourish,” says the network chief, who
had completed this year’s pilot order prior to Roseanne’s debut, but plans on
searching for more multicamera sitcoms during the next development season
to build on Roseanne’s success.
Until production starts up again, Barr is content to bask in the glow of these last
two months. “I’ve just very grateful for ABC’s support for my show. It is a dream
come true to have lightning strike twice,” she says. “You can go home again; it’s a
wonderful lesson and a wonderful thing.”
17
WHY DOES THE INTER
ONES AND ZEROES DON’T LIE LIKE HUMANS DO.
The internet is a prime example of
how an infallible technology butts up
against the fallibility of humankind.
So it is perhaps unsurprising that the
internet, as it stands, is broken.
There’s a perverse logic here:
The web fulfills the promise of a
democratized media where anyone
with a keyboard and a connection
can change the world, but it also
created a digital axiom underscoring
the very worst of humanity: Godwin’s
Law, which states, “As an online
discussion grows longer, the
probability of a comparison involving
Hitler approaches 1.”
How did we reach this point where
otherwise good people call other
otherwise good people the worst
human being ever; where a teen
survivor of a school mass shooting
is called out as a “crisis actor”;
where “don’t read the comments” is
yet another awkward conversation
parents have with their teens;
where a foreign nation believed that
Americans would be susceptible
to “fake news” and thus able to
infl uence a presidential election;
where a technocratic elite of a
handful of companies exert power
and infl uence at grand scales?
This is a story of hubris and
greed; of capitalism taken to
an extreme; of representing
humanity writ large.
What started as a small
community of government and
academic researchers trying to
create separate passageways for
information to travel has blossomed
into a community of 3 billion people,
often yelling at each other about
things both trivial and consequential,
but also an economic boon for the
companies that control the access
to logging on and tuning out.
The new titans of tech have
revenue that surpasses some nations.
For example, Apple’s 2017 revenue
of $229 billion is equivalent to the
combined GDP of Cambodia ($20
billion) and Vietnam ($205 billion).
18
Google ($109 billion), Facebook ($40
billion) and Amazon ($177 billion) are
also not doing too shabby.
And then there’s the digital ad
revenue side of the equation: $88
billion in the U.S. alone. The original
sin of the internet, the click, has led
to a race-to-the-bottom philosophy
where the commoditization of
information, evidenced in our neverending thirst for pageviews, has
helped create an environment that
rewards the untruthful, the harmful
and the sensationalist over facts and
reason and rational thought.
The incentive for those
gatekeepers to clean up their web
is not an economic one, clearly.
Facebook and Twitter, for
example, last week spiked the
football for their recent efforts in
transparency. This was not dictated
by the invisible hand of Adam Smith,
but instead of watchful senators and
congressmen looking to fl ex their
regulatory muscles.
Of course, one of the ironies of the
internet is that Tim Berners-Lee, the
creator of the World Wide Web, had
different intentions; he didn’t patent his
invention, and made it free to use. But
sometimes, the argument goes,
you pay for what you get.
But there’s hope. Tech
companies carry the word
optimism around like a
talisman, and there is a
growing number of players
who want to take the tech of
the internet to a happier place.
For example, instead of www
protocol (the good old HTTP), which
is the underlying language of the
web, they’ve developed peer-topeer networks, in which blockchain
may hold the key to creating a more
secure, more transparent, more
dare we say, anything better than
the internet as it currently exists.
Adweek spoke with several
pioneers of the early web, researchers,
thinkers and practitioners about their
thoughts on the broken internet.
STEVE BELLOVIN
Computer science
professor, Columbia
University, one of the
founders of the early
online community Usenet
My take is that in very
many different ways the
internet is an amplifier.
It was very clear even
in 1980 that people could
be very intemperate online.
One of the neo-Nazis
behind the Daily Stormer
was on Usenet and was
very clearly a Nazi then.
But the phrase flaming
online and trolling, these
are Usenet terms and
this was long before the
commercialization of the
internet. You should talk to
a psychologist about why
people behave differently
online—to me it’s the
distancing. It’s easy to say
something nasty about
someone you don’t see in
front of you … you don’t
perceive them as human
… you have intemperate
behavior going way, way
back online—close to the
dawn of the medium you
started seeing this.
ELISA
CAMAHORT PAGE
Consultant, author and former
BlogHer co-founder and COO
Ten years ago, we were realizing
there was a problem with
harassment and troll behavior
on the internet and there was
a lot of discussion around
2007-2008 about a code of
conduct for the internet. We had
guidelines for the community
that were accessible and
enforced rigorously, but we
didn’t believe in having one code
of conduct for the internet—
different sites have different
purposes and audiences, but
we believed every site needs
to have its own. From the very
beginning, platform companies
and media companies were not
willing to invest in moderation
and enforcement and I think
some of these platform
companies don’t want to be
media companies that are
responsible for the content
they publish. Those are the
two primary problems: lack
of moderation enforcement/
intervention and basic denial
of responsibility on the part of
people who lead some of these
platform companies.
MAY 21, 2018 | ADWEEK
NET SUCK?
TED NELSON
IT pioneer, coined the
term “hypertext” to
refer to text with links
to other texts
In the early days of
computer networking
… almost everyone
was so idealistic that
they’d bring truth
and knowledge and
accuracy in reporting
and now we’re horrified
with the opposite … in
the same way no one
knew the American
republic would have
a Civil War and crime
in the streets. These
are consequences
of complications
that arose once the
infrastructure was
in place.
To me, [peer-to-peer
networks are] a little
like a couple of hippies
dancing in front of a
German tank. Maybe
it will take off, but
Facebook and Google
are very well entrenched
and very, very, very big.
ADWEEK | MAY 21, 2018
DEWAYNE
HENDRICKS
CEO, Tetherless Access
(and former member of
the FCC’s Technological
Advisory Council), also
known as the Broadband
Cowboy thanks to
his efforts to expand
broadband access
The heart of the problem
is we have met the enemy
and he is us.
People make up the
internet. We developed a
technology that enables
communication in ways that
humanity never dreamed
of, but we’re screwing it up
because we can’t learn to
trust each other.
You have to have failure
to learn and the commodity
internet has turned into a
failure, but the roots were
sound and so those roots
will be used to build the
future. I’m not trying to say
we’re doomed or anything—
I’m saying the commodity
internet is doomed. We
can’t fix it, but there are
new internet instances that
are out there thriving.
THE QUICK ANSWER MAY BE
THE PEOPLE WHO USE THE
WEB: US. BY LISA LACY
LIZ LEE
PAUL MARTINO
Founder and
executive director
of Online SOS
General partner, Bullpen
Capital and founder of early
social network Tribe
In my experience at
Morgan Stanley as
an investor providing
support around
harassment, it’s clear to
me why we’re here: It’s
money. I would assert
ad-focused business
models and incentives
being misaligned.
The way investors
make money from
social media platforms
has primarily been ad
based. People often
point to everyone
who is designing the
platforms—we need
people to be diverse,
true—and it’s the C-suite
… [which is] incentivized
to prioritize clicks for ad
metrics for valuations
over experiences and, as
a result, trust, privacy,
the well-being of users …
The monetization of the
internet and social media
is why we’re here.
I don’t think [the internet is] broken
at all. It’s an example of what
happens when no one reads the
damn [user license agreements
(ULAs)]. We could have been on
the phone a decade ago and the
conversation would have been
identical. We need to have a
#MeToo moment around privacy.
Congress might do something,
heaven help us. This actually
scares me the most.
If you watched [Facebook
founder Mark Zuckerberg’s]
testimony, how out of touch
were those congressmen asking
questions? These people will
write legislation? Do any of
them even know what those
words mean? That’s the thing
that scares me the most—go
back to 1998—they wanted to
bring [Microsoft co-founder Bill]
Gates on antitrust charges and
they broke the company. Gates
was never the same—he became
a philanthropist. They might
be trying to make an example
with Zuckerberg … God help us
if Congress does something. I
guarantee they will make it worse.
19
ENGAGE FOR GOOD SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION
Halo Award
WINNERS
Each year, the Engage for Good Halo Awards honor corporate social initiatives and cause
marketing, showcasing outstanding work. At this year’s ceremony in Chicago on May 23 and 24,
Salesforce and Save the Children will receive Golden Halo Awards for overall excellence with other campaigns
honored with category-specific awards. For detailed write-ups, go to: www.engageforgood.com/halo-awards.
GOLDEN
HALO
AWARDS
SALESFORCE
SAVE THE CHILDREN
Since its founding in 1999, Salesforce has made giving back a core tenet
of its existence, believing that everyone who wants to change the world
should have the technology to do so. To back this up, it has pioneered
the 1-1-1 model of integrated philanthropy, dedicating 1 percent of
equity, 1 percent of employee time and 1 percent of product back into
its communities.
Today, much of that work takes place through its social enterprise,
Salesforce.org, which gets tools and technology into the hands of
nonprofits and education institutions so they can connect with others
and do more good. And its impact has been significant. Its employees
have volunteered more than 3 million hours. And more than, 36,000
nonprofits/educational institutions use Salesforce for free or at a
discount.
Explains Rob Acker, CEO of Salesforce.org: “Salesforce.org was built
on the idea that the business of business is to improve the state of the
world, and we’re committed to creating change in the communities in
which we live and work. Our hope is that more organizations will come
together and partner to make a difference in our world.”
For nearly 100 years, Save the Children has led global action to improve
the lives of children through better education, health care and economic
opportunities. That means doing whatever it takes to ensure no child dies
before age 5 from preventable causes, all children get a quality, basic
education, and violence against children is no longer tolerated.
What has set Save the Children apart has been its innovative,
transformational approach to working with corporate sector partners
such as Accenture, GSK, Johnson & Johnson, Mondelez International
and IKEA.
Some examples of innovation: through its work with Accenture, Save
the Children’s youth employment programs are embracing humancentered design approaches and leveraging leading edge technology to
deepen its impact and broaden its scale. With publisher Penguin Random
House, it has leveraged skills-based volunteers to improve literacy
outcomes in Rwanda. Save the Children also partnered in the launch of the
MasterCard Aid Network, an end-to-end, nonfinancial service designed to
streamline aid distribution. To solve big problems, these kinds of disruptive
approaches generate impact.
E1
MAY 21, 2018 | ADWEEK
The Need is Great. The Time is Now.
Be All In To End ALZ.
Alzheimer’s is a national crisis. More than 5 million Americans are living with the disease, and
there is no cure. Whether or not you realize it, your brand is being impacted by Alzheimer’s —
economically and through the people you touch. But by working together, we can make
a difference. That’s why we launched All In To End ALZ.
Edward Jones, recipient of the Gold Halo Award in the health category, is our inaugural
partner in this effort. With their generous support of the research initiatives, education
programs and events of the Alzheimer’s Association, they are All In To End ALZ.
But we need your help. Are you in?
Join us at alz.org/AllInToEndALZ.
© 2018 Alzheimer’s Association®. All rights reserved.
ENGAGE FOR GOOD SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION
SOCIAL MEDIA
#ISTANDWITHPP
OKCupid & Planned
Parenthood
OKCupid users showed
they supported Planned
Parenthood with a unique
badge, raising money for
the charity, increasing user
matches and sharing sex
ed tips.
Silver: Be a Community
Hero with Spider-Man:
Sony Pictures & Goodwill
CONSUMER DONATION/
CROWDFUNDING
RED NOSE DAY
Walgreens,
NBCUniversal, Mars
Wrigley Confectionery
U.S. & Comic Relief USA
Noses on! From store aisles
to TV, the combined efforts
of the sponsors raised
more than $40 million for
children living in poverty.
Silver: Evite Donations:
Evite & Pledgeling
EDUCATION
TEAM UP TO
SUPPORT
TEACHERS
Burlington Stores &
AdoptAClassroom.org
Burlington asked
customers to donate at
checkout, raising $1.5
million for 75k students
and increasing sales and
brand awareness.
Silver: Grow Up Great:
PNC & DonorsChoose.org
HEALTH
INVESTING IN A
CURE
Edward Jones &
Alzheimer’s Association
Edward Jones partnered
with the Alzheimer’s
Association to provide
services and education
on brain health to clients
and associates and raised
over $4.8 million for its
signature cause.
Silver: Healthy for Life
20 by 20: Aramark
& American Heart
Association
E3
ENVIRONMENTAL
EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT:
SKILLED VOLUNTEERING
PLANTING SEEDS
FOR HAITI’S FUTURE
SUMMER INTERN
DATA PROGRAM
Timberland & Smallholder
Farmers Alliance
PwC &
DonorsChoose.org
Inspiring real change in Haiti,
Timberland supported a
sustainable agroforestry
model that boosted farmer
yields and income.
PwC interns used data
to investigate classroom
trends and saw how their
work helped students
and teachers across the
country.
Silver: Rinse, Recycle,
Repeat: Garnier,
DoSomething.org &
TerraCycle
EXPERIENTIAL
#HANGRY
Arby’s, Habit Burger &
Share Our Strength
To reach millennials, the
program co-opted “hangry”
to get people angry about
childhood hunger, with the
partners raising over $4.5
million.
Silver: Walls Are Meant
for Climbing: The North
Face & The Trust for
Public Land
Silver: MySkills4Africa:
Microsoft & various
nonprofit organizations
SOCIAL SERVICE
HONORING
VETERANS THEN
AND NOW
Activision Blizzard &
CODE
The multi-month campaign—
around the launch of the
latest Call of Duty game—
not only raised $1 million to
put vets in high-quality jobs,
but also raised awareness of
the importance of supporting
vets.
Silver: Second Chance
Employment: Dave’s Killer
Bread
EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT:
GROUP VOLUNTEERING
XTEAM
Berkshire Bank
Berkshire Bank’s volunteer
program had 100 percent
employee participation in
321 projects with 227 nonprofits for some 40K hours
of service.
Silver: WestJet Live
Different Builds: WestJet
& Live Different
CONSUMER-ACTIVATED
CORPORATE DONATION
#DREAMBIG
PRINCESS
The Walt Disney
Company & Girl Up
Disney enlisted female
photographers from 15
countries to capture
empowering images of realworld girls. For every like/
share of the photos, Disney
donated $1 to Girl Up,
raising $1 million in 5 days.
Silver: Shopathon to Fight
AIDS: Bank of America &
(RED)
MAY 21, 2018 | ADWEEK
ENGAGE FOR GOOD SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION
VIDEO
SMALL BUSINESS
ANIMAL
COACH DAD: FATHER’S
DAY SURPRISE
PROJECT C.A.T.
Discovery & World Wildlife Fund
WestJet & RMHC Canada
By conserving nearly a million acres
of protected land on the border of
India and Bhutan, the collaboration
invited consumers to donate via
text and emoji to help create a
healthy habitat for tigers.
Using authentic storytelling and
the element of surprise, the video
brings to life the story of one
Ronald McDonald House family,
getting nearly 11 million views.
Silver: AIG’s Houston Heroes: AIG
Silver: Forever Against Animal
Testing: The Body Shop Canada
& Cruelty Free International
SCHOOL GARDEN GRANT
PROGRAM
Alaska Fertilizer & Cornell Lab
of Ornithology
Funding for school gardens brought
brand visibility and created birdfriendly environments, engaging
students in hands-on, project-based
learning.
Silver: Dine Out: Grimaldi’s &
Share Our Strength
NUDGING FOR GOOD
UNICEF KID POWER
Ammunition & UNICEF
This wearable-for-good and
app has inspired hundreds of
thousands of kids, educators and
parents to get active and unlock
8.2 million packets of therapeutic
food for malnourished kids around
the globe.
Silver: Rinse, Recycle, Repeat:
Garnier, DoSomething.org &
TerraCycle
eet
Spreadsh
adsheet,
Dear Spre
ings have .
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n
e’ve bee
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r
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togeth
time
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it’s 2018.
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It’s not y
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, A Trailb
Sincerely
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Nonprofi
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P.S.
it’s you.
Salesforce.org is honored to win the 2018
Golden Halo Award, and we want to thank all
of the Trailblazers that made it happen.
We’ll never break up with you!
Connect to
Better
Think you know the definition of “hangry”? Think again. In America today,
there are 13 million kids who know what skipping a meal really means.
No Kid Hungry has a solution. We connect children in need to effective
programs like school breakfast and summer meals, and teach low-income
families to cook healthy, affordable meals.
JOIN THE MOVEMENT AT NOKIDHUNGRY.ORG
NO KID HUNGRY IS HONORED TO BE NAMED THE
2018 GOLD HALO AWARD WINNER
ALONG WITH OUR DINE OUT FOR NO KID HUNGRY PARTNERS
ARBY’S FOUNDATION AND THE HABIT BURGER GRILL
FOR OUR #HANGRY CAMPAIGN
THE FOOD
George Foreman
used to make
cheeseburgers
on his grill, but
the company site
encourages healthier
options like chicken
and vegetables.
The George
Foreman Grill
HOW AN INEXPENSIVE PRODUCT PITCHED
BY AN EX-BOXER TURNED INTO A MARKET
KNOCKOUT. BY ROBERT KLARA
«
THE GROOVES
Ridges on the cooking
plates (featuring
the “George Tough”
nonstick coating)
leave seriously legit
grill marks on
the food.
THE TRAY
The grill’s angled
cooking surface
allows 42 percent of
the fat to drain away
(that’s the company
estimate) and
collect in this handy
removable tray.
P R E V I O U S PA G E : R A Q U E L B E A U C H A M P ; P R O P S T Y L I N G : D I A N N A M C D O U G A L L ; T H I S PA G E : 2 . H E R B S C H A R F M A N / S P O R T S I M A G E R Y/ G E T T Y I M A G E S ; 3 . C O U R T E S Y O F G E O R G E F O R E M A N ; 5 . N B C U P H O T O B A N K V I A G E T T Y I M A G E S
One day in 1994, a box arrived at the Texas home
of ex-heavyweight boxing champ George Foreman.
The package was from an inventor named Michael
Boehm, who’d sent his latest handicraft: an
electric appliance he called the Short Order Grill.
Boehm had shipped the grill on a hunch: He
knew the boxer had been known for scarfing down
a couple of burgers before his bouts. He also
knew that, since retiring from the ring, Foreman
had found a new career as a TV pitchman (most
recently for Meineke Mufflers). The grill needed a
celebrity endorsement; was Foreman interested?
Foreman was not. At least, he wasn’t until his
wife Joan began using the thing herself. “I’ve tried
the grill, George, and I like it a lot,” she told him.
“It works great; the meat comes out nice and juicy.
The grease drips right off, and the food tastes
really good.” To make her case, Joan Foreman
cooked her husband a burger. George Foreman
signed the papers.
Most Americans have never heard this story,
though one could argue that it was historymaking. Shortly after finding a manufacturer
and appearing on late-night infomercials, the
humble little appliance—rebranded as the George
Foreman Grill—became a runaway hit. Five years
after the grill’s 1995 debut, over 12 percent of U.S.
homes already had one. By 2009, 55 million of the
grills had sold. Today, that number’s closer to 100
million. And it’s still selling.
So what gives? How did this ordinary-looking
countertop gizmo become one of the most
successful kitchen appliances in U.S. history?
Well, the price—$19.99 for the basic grill—surely
didn’t hurt. And the American mania over fat was
no small factor, either. When a smiling George
Foreman first appeared on camera with his new
product, he called it his “Lean Mean Fat-Reducing
Grilling Machine.” Laugh if you want, but it stuck.
The grill’s innovation was a pair of heating
surfaces that were both grooved and canted at a
slight angle to allow fat to drain off. And according
to parent Spectrum Brands, it’s this feature—and
the healthier eating it implies—that’s kept the
Foreman in demand. “It’s simple,” said product
marketing manager Katie Zagorski. “Our products
continue to make grilling easier and healthier,
making the brand a trusted favorite among
consumers across generations.”
Well, sure. But the magic ingredient was
always George Foreman, who successfully
shook off his bad-boy image from the boxing
ring to become the apron-wearing teddy bear of
a man who wouldn’t steer you wrong. Foreman’s
delivery was so integral to the grill’s success
that his original deal with manufacturer Salton
(which became part of Spectrum in 2010) gave
him a 40 percent stake—and monthly checks
in the neighborhood of $4.5 million. By 1999,
Salton bought the rights to use Foreman’s name
for a reported $127.5 million in cash and $10
million in stock.
In fact, so influential was Foreman’s personality
that his name—featured prominently on the grill’s
plastic cover—continues to sell the machines, even
though Foreman himself stopped pitching them
years ago. But according to his website, Foreman
still uses the grill that bears his name. “My favorite
thing to cook on the grill is salmon steaks,” he said,
even for breakfast.
ADWEEK | MAY 21, 2018
1
2
Fast
Facts
1949 George
Foreman born.
1995 Grill
debuts on TV.
100m
Estimated
number of grills
sold to date.
3
4
5
Heat and serve For help promoting his Short Order Grill, Michael Boehm (1) contacted boxer-turnedpitchman George Foreman (2, shown pummeling Joe Frazier in 1976). Boehm had already secured a
patent for the countertop machine (3), but what he really needed was a compelling endorser. Foreman
proved to be a champion in that role, and he pitched the renamed George Foreman Grill on infomercials
(4). Other major appearances under his belt include the Tonight Show With Jay Leno in 1997 (5).
Watch your step When The Office went off the
air in 2013 after nine seasons, no roundup of the
series’ best episodes failed to include “The Injury,”
in which Michael Scott (played by Steve Carell)
burns his foot on a George Foreman Grill because,
it emerges, he enjoys having breakfast in bed.
When Michael got up that morning, he stepped
on the machine and “it clamped down,” leaving
grill marks on his foot—an injury that Pam (Jenna
Fischer) tries to soothe by putting butter on it.
27
TA L E N T P O O L
Curriculum
Vitae
SEARCH
Vp, director of
analytics and
SEO, Mower
2018-present
Mary
Owusu
Adjunct professor
of marketing,
Canisius College
2012-present
THIS MOWER EXEC
WAS DOING SEO
BEFORE IT WAS COOL.
BY LISA LACY
Director of
analytics, Mower
2015-2017
Manager, digital
marketing and
analytics, PCA
Technology Group
2011-2015
Global ebusiness
manager,
Ivoclar Vivadent
2007-2009
Internet marketing
manager, EarthLink
Business
2004-2007
How She
Got the Gig
28
One Communications, which
required trial and error as
she went along because best
practices had not yet been
established. “I love the SEO
side because ultimately,
the way we think, [it’s] our
desires and the things we
want that we often type into
Google,” she said. “We’re
researching something in our
lives … we bring that desire
to a search engine.”
She joined Mower three
years ago as director of
analytics, but her role also
included SEO, which she
enjoys because, she said,
they are complementary in
nature—where SEO drops
off in client work, analytics
picks up.
Owusu recently joined
the board of directors of the
Digital Analytics Association
(DAA), and while her nearterm goal is, naturally,
to analyze industry data,
she also is committed to
diversity and creating a
program that allows DAA
members to give back
through pro bono analytics
work. Longer term, Owusu
said she’ll continue to do
pro bono work, like teaching
digital marketing and
analytics at her alma mater,
Canisius College, as well as
marketing for the nonprofit
Future in Our Hands – USA,
which supports sustainable
projects in Kenya and
Tanzania.
That drive comes from
having taken care of her
younger siblings when her
parents returned to Ghana,
she said. “We couldn’t be
out there living the life and
partying because to the
courts we had to show we
were guardian material and
could support the younger
ones,” she explained.
Owusu prides herself
on stretching beyond her
comfort zone. “I very often
step into the unknown. I say,
‘Yes, and.’ Very often, I stay
up late learning and reading
about what’s new in my field,”
she added. “It’s the conscious
decision to do—not just think
about doing—that has driven
my professional growth.”
90-Day Plan
Owusu’s best career
advice comes from
motivational speaker
Mel Robbins, who said:
“I’ll never feel like
doing the things that
are hard, painful, new,
uncertain or scary. So,
I need to stop waiting
until I feel like it. Our
lives come down to our
decisions, and if we
change our decisions,
we will change
everything.”
MAY 21, 2018 | ADWEEK
GABRIELLE GOLDSTEIN/MOWER
Mary Owusu got into the
search marketing game right
at its start in the early aughts.
Growing up, Owusu
now the vp and director
of analytics and SEO at
Syracuse, N.Y.-based digital
and PR shop Mower—
enjoyed figuring out how
to fix broken electronics,
leading her to believe she
was destined to become
an engineer. But when her
college introduced a digital
media arts program at the
end of her freshman year,
she changed course and
ultimately earned a degree in
digital media and an MBA in
marketing.
Owusu began as an intern
learning SEO at telecom
After 12 years in
digital marketing and
analytics, Owusu
was looking for more
upward momentum.
She interviewed
at Mower with a
portfolio of work
that demonstrated
her experience with
clients like Radisson
and SweetWorks.
She assumed the
role in 2015 and was
promoted to vp
in 2018.
PORTRAIT
Specs
Who Jesse Kirshbaum (l.),
CEO, and Alex Kirshbaum,
president
What Creative music agency
Where New York
1 The Patch, for Sour Patch
Kids, popped up in Brooklyn,
N.Y., and Austin, Texas, for
on-the-road artists in need of
a crash pad.
2 Nue Agency partnered GE
with artist Gryffin to create an
original song for this ad about
how energy flows.
3 For app LiveMe, 120
musicians performed in five
New York subway stations,
ending with a set by Wyclef in
Grand Central Terminal.
1
2
AGENCY
N U E : G E N E V I E V E K I M ; W Y C L E F : C H A R L E S E C K E R T/A M N Y
Brand Nue
THIS MUSICAL AGENCY LEVERAGES DATA AND TASTE TO
FIND THE PERFECT BANDS FOR BRANDS. BY KATIE RICHARDS
One surefire way to ensure a successful partnership between a brand and a musical artist is by
embedding the latter into the creative process. That’s something Nue Agency learned through
its seven years managing and working closely with musicians. The shop started as a talent
representation house in 2007 before pivoting to a creative music agency in 2014, but the team
never lost its penchant for listening to both the brand and artist’s needs and ideas. “We’re able to
push back” on certain brand approaches, agency president Alex Kirshbaum explained, but in a way
where the artist can feel confident about the campaign and brand. For Sour Patch Kids, Nue in 2015
created The Patch, a crash pad for artists touring in Brooklyn, N.Y., and Austin, Texas. In exchange
for staying in the space, artists need only post about it on social media to bring attention to Sour
Patch Kids. Nue sourced over 200 emerging artists to spend a few nights. To bring top musical
partners to clients like Virgin Mega or LiveMe, the agency developed proprietary technology that
matches artists and brands based on geographic and demographic data. “It’s not taste versus data,”
Kirshbaum said. “We don’t think data is the be-all, end-all. There’s a lot to having your finger on
the pulse, knowing what’s in market and knowing what’s hot and relevant.”
ADWEEK | MAY 21, 2018
3
29
LOOK BACK
1968
Hot Wheels
M AT T E L
Well before kids were obssessed with video games,
they were playing with these candy-colored, shiny
toy cars IRL. Since Hot Wheels’ “Sweet 16” rollout
50 years ago, some 6 billion have been sold.
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30
MAY 21, 2018 | ADWEEK
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