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2018-05-21 The Big Issue

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PLUS
ESCAPING AL-QAEDA IN YEMEN
THE TRUTH ABOUT YOUR VOICE
�50
EVERY MONDAY
NO. 1308 MAY 21-27 2018
A HAND UP NOT A HANDOUT
THE HEARTBREAKING, LIFE-AFFIRMING STORY
OF THE STREET KIDS? WORLD CUP
WIN!
CONTENTS
THE
COMMUTER
ON BLU RAY?
MAY 21-27 2018 / NO. 1308
TURN TO PAGE 44
Hello, my name is Sarah.
LET?S TALK ABOUT LOSS
How a grieving daughter set up a support
network to help cope with her mum?s death
PAUSE
Like the sound of your own voice? Turns out
it?s important that others do too
LETTER TO MY YOUNGER SELF
Dan Snow on following in the famously
lengthy strides of his dad
Vendor photo: Mike Berry
We?re looking at the Street Child World Cup in Russia this week. I
hate football but I find it upsetting to see kids living on the streets. It
makes me really angry because no child should have to put up with
it. You can see how football is being used to change that on page
24. I love walking, I walk absolutely everywhere
because it keeps my mind occupied and it
makes me feel better. Two other ladies are
also discussing walking this week, Raynor
Winn and Sheila Hancock. Read more on
pages 20 and 22. My story is on page 46.
INSIDE...
THE BIG ISSUE MANIFESTO
Cover Pic: Paul Fontanelli
WE BELIEVE in a hand up, not a handout...
Which is why our sellers BUY every copy of the
magazine for �25 and sell it for �50.
WE BELIEVE in trade, not aid?
Which is why we ask you to ALWAYS take
your copy of the magazine. Our sellers are
working and need your custom.
WE BELIEVE poverty is indiscriminate?
Which is why we provide ANYONE whose life is
blighted by poverty with the opportunity to
earn a LEGITIMATE income.
WE BELIEVE in the right to citizenship?
Which is why The Big Issue Foundation, our
charitable arm, helps sellers tackle social and
?nancial exclusion.
THE BIG ISSUE / p3 / May 21-27 2018
WE BELIEVE in prevention?
Which is why Big Issue Invest ofers
backing and investments to social enterprises,
charities and businesses which deliver social
value to communities.
CORRESPONDENCE
Write to: The Big Issue, Second Floor, 43 Bath St, Glasgow, G2 1HW
Email: letters@bigissue.com
@bigissueuk
facebook.com/bigissueUK
bigissue.com
COMMENT OF THE WEEK
David?s making his mark
My beautiful friend David John
Tovey covering this week?s The
Big Issue with his amazing artwork.
He rebuilt his life through art
after some difficult challenges. We
A healthy fix
It has taken me several years
of buying The Big Issue before
l now accept the fact that l am
addicted to this magazine!
The sheer diversity of its
contents and interesting
articles make its purchase an
absolute necessity, and
without this weekly ?fix? I am
far from happy.
So why on earth are the
vast majority of people
passing by my local vendors
without trying a copy
themselves? Perhaps they
have ideas and prejudices
against those vendors needing
a hand up in their lives. I
would like to suggest to those
that buy the magazine already
that they do as l do after
reading it, pass it on to a friend
or relative who they know
does not buy the magazine
and are unaware of the help
the sale of the magazine
provides to the vendor.
If more of us Big Issue
addicts pass on our magazine
to others they will get hooked
themselves and more copies
will be sold, because they also
will need a weekly fix like me!
John Sparkes, Ipswich
Online ambush
I have just read the editor?s
article, Big beats and
billionaires [May 7-13]. I was
nodding my head the whole
way through. You are right, we
are seriously losing our shops
and factories to the internet.
There will be nothing left if
we don?t change our habits. I
worked together many moons ago
and I cannot be prouder of the
achievements and marks he is making
within the homeless community.
Suzie Mac, Facebook
have my own business and I
would love to have a premises
where I could sell and also
train someone up and give
them a job. But rent and rates
are so high that working from
home is my only option.
Something needs to change
and quick before it?s too late
and we can only buy things
from an airbrushed picture!!!
Danielle Meiners, email
politicians living high on the
hog with huge European
pensions, all denying a
European Brexit. Democracy
loathes snouts in unelected
European troughs.
Nigel Coombes, Portishead
@LondonMetUni
A brilliant front cover
of @BigIssue designed by
former London Met student,
@DavidTovey1975.
We?re extremely proud.
#LoveLondonMet
@LindaCHoward
One of my friend
@JoSunshineArt?s colourful
and unique creations graces
the cover of the latest
@BigIssue and it looks
amazing. So proud Jo
#visuallyimpaired
Bird?s eye view
I always enjoy reading John
Bird?s view on life, even if I
don?t always agree with him.
But he was spot on the money
this week when he wrote
about ?plenty and empty?
rotting our democracy.
Furthermore: ?What was
Brexit all about if not this
combination of indulgence
and ugly need??
His own House of Lords,
crammed with failed
@matildasmusings
What an honour
@JoSunshineArt - well done
and many congratulations.
Image looks fab!
@Naburn2
Great to see the
amazing @JoSunshineArt
having her picture as the
cover is the Scottish
@BigIssue An amazing artist
who occasionally turns my
photos into works of art.
THE BIG ISSUE / p4 / May 21-27 2018
@bigissue
@muIderitsme
[Re: End-of-life care
for homeless, May 14-20]
Still thinking about this; the
hostel manager was right,
the facility was not a hospice.
But people are by & large, if
they want to & it?s a medical
possibility, supported to die
at home so why not people
living in hostels or temporary
accommodation. The correct
support & education for the
people who manage these
facilities is paramount & that
boils down to funding & only
when as a society we stop
viewing people as ?other?
or less worthy of dignity
& help because they have
additional/complex needs
will we properly address this
@JoSunshineArt
@BigIssue please buy
a Big Issue this week as it will
make a vendor?s
ay and help
elebrate the royal
edding and in
Scotland my pic
of it is on the
cover ? proud
@GuiheneufJohan
@BigIssue
delighted to see my
vendor at Moorgate
yesterday and to learn
he found a flat and a job!
#heartWarmingEndOfDay
@thatbohomama
One of the happiest,
friendliest and helpful people
in my town ... meet Harvey
who sells the @BigIssue on
The Pride Hill in Shrewsbury
... he has been on hand for
many mummy meltdowns
over the last few months and
mummy & cub just think
he?s wonderful
#lovelylocalfolk
THE EDITOR
Not one for a cool-headed approach to
international policy or climate change, polarising
US president Donald Trump will make the
Arctic great again thanks to Project Trumpmore
? a Mount Rushmore-inspired 115ft tall
sculpture of his face carved into a glacier.
The Finnish NGO behind the stunt wants
to show global warming is an inconvenient
truth, not fake news. But they need a tiny hand
to help them do it ? they must covfefe up
�0,000.
?Global warming is one of the most
important issues of today. There are still people
who ponder whether it?s a real issue,? said
Nicolas Prieto, chair of the Melting
Ice Association.
?We want to build the monument
so we can see how long it lasts. Often
people only believe something when
they see it with their own eyes.?
It will probably melt fast. Sad!
We?ve all
got to carry
that weight
I
like Jamie Oliver. This sets me at odds with the prevailing mood.
There is a groundswell, groupthink push that is laying into him.
Oliver is the anti-obesity tsar (unoicially). Since he took on
Turkey Twizzlers he has been in the vanguard of a move to make
Britain?s kids healthier and less obese.
He drew ire last week with his call to ban two-for-one pizza deals.
He was meeting the Scottish first minister Nicola Sturgeon and asked
her to back the plan as part of her mission to halve childhood obesity
rates in Scotland by 2030.
As ideas go (the ban of two-for-one deals, not the halving of obesity)
it?s not great. It feels like a nippy measure that punishes small pleasure.
I?m sure that many of us have used this offer at one time or another.
However, the opprobrium directed towards Oliver was
ridiculous. It involved, mostly, columnists desperate to overstate their
working class roots fuming at how a multi-millionaire had any right to
attack the poorest in society when this was frequently the only food
available. He should butt out with his nanny state elitist
interventionism. And wasn?t this a real double standard anyway as he
owns a chain of pizza restaurants. That said, the call of ?fuck off you
salad shagger? was amusing.
There is a central issue here that the Oliver attacks don?t deal
with. He didn?t create the problem. He did not build a growing
obesity epidemic in Britain. He was not the one who racked up an
annual bill of over �n for the NHS in England and Wales to deal
with obesity related ill-health. Or a further �bn in costs to wider
society. Or a spiralling Type 2 diabetes problem.
He?s trying to do something about it. And if he?s clumsy
sometimes, so what. At least he?s trying something.
Like St Augustine, we frequently call for redemption, but not
just yet. We feel the need to stop health dangers growing, but woe
betide anybody who grabs our kebab.
A huge part of the problem is the lack of availability of cheap,
fresh food in the poorest areas of Britain. Several years ago we
conducted an investigation we called The Big Issue Mile. We went
to ?ve of the most deprived areas in the UK, those that experts had
singled out in reports looking at the correlation between bad health
and poverty, and we walked for a mile calling into the local shops
(which are non-chain) to see what fresh food and vegetables we
could ?nd. The results may not shock you. In most shops, there was
the odd bruised banana, maybe an apple, overpriced bags of
potatoes and onions or a carrot on the turn.
Given this range, and a lack of money/opportunity to get to lower
priced out-of-town supermarkets, it?s hardly surprising that people
turned to lower cost fast food.
I?m not a big fan of big government interventions. We all need
to take personal responsibility. But in this crisis, there needs
to be the hand of state. We can?t demand people eat more healthily
by banning things ? we need to make the alternative affordable
and available.
If that involves a governmental investment of millions to
provide fresh fruit and vegetables nationwide at certain collection
points, at a hugely subsidised rate ? supporting providers AND
consumers ? then let?s have it. Why not? Why not prevent the
problem growing? And still make the solution tasty.
And let?s thank Jamie Oliver. Saying what you really think,
regardless of the herd?s prevailing line, is increasingly rare. It?s not
something to be afraid of.
Paul McNamee is editor of The Big Issue
@pauldmcnamee paul.mcnamee@bigissue.com
Trump?s big
Clean up with our
royal tea-towels
There?s been some pretty weird royal wedding
merch popping up, from condoms to cereal and a plate
replacing Harry with Ed Sheeran. But now that the
party is over it?s time to mop up the spilled prosecco and
tears ? and The Big Issue can help! We?re giving one
lucky reader the chance to grab all four of our limited
edition royal wedding commemorative tea-towels,
created by our Street Art contributors. Go to
bigissue.com to enter and read more about our
unique wedding range.
THE BIG ISSUE / p6 / May 21-27 2018
THE BIG
ISSUE IS
POINTLESS
Last week The Big Issue passed into
daytime telly legend after popping up on
BBC One?s Pointless.
Contestants were tasked with naming
seven things with ?Big? in the title and top
of the board sat ?magazine launched in 1991
that ofers employment opportunities to
homeless people?.
A tricky one, but Jenni from north-east
London (who works for a big multinational
company analysing stability data and enjoys
amateur dramatics along with partner Phil)
correctly answered The Big Issue.
And we even received glowing praise from
Pointless stats man Richard Osman, who called
us: ?A wonderful set-up, a wonderful thing to
buy and a great read as well.? Aw shucks.
Fellow host Alexander Armstrong is a fan
too ? he previously called us ?wonderful?, and
said: ?I used to live in Islington and there was a
lovely Spanish guy who used to wear little
round dark glasses who sold The Big Issue for
years to me. He was adored by everyone.
?He stopped selling The Big Issue after he
was approved for a house and went on to get
another job. It was the making of him.?
gest meltdown
Opening doors
for creative teens
Creative Works (pictured) is within
a refurbished 100-year old building
that built engines for ?ghter planes
during WW1. It will open the doors of
creative professionals and employers to
young students aged
from 16 to 24 from
some of London?s
most disadvantaged
areas, offering
apprenticeships,
training, mentoring and
practical support. Since
2010 more than 300
young people have
landed jobs thanks to Big Creative.
James Salmon, investment manager
at Big Issue Invest, said: ?The team
will provide young people who would
ordinarily ?nd it near-impossible to enter
the creative industries a vibrant space
to learn and gather valuable on-the-job
experience.? creativeworks.space
THE BIG ISSUE / p7 / May 21-27 2018
ON BIGISSUE.COM
THIS WEEK
? Frightened Rabbit?s Scott Hutchison is gone too
soon after his suicide ? we remember his cathartic,
sweary sadness
? Running 401 marathons in
401 days teaches you a thing or two.
Thankfully Ben Smith has
10 takeaways so you don?t
have to do it
Photo: Alamy
Big Issue Invest (BII) ? the social
investment arm of The Big Issue ? is
to invest �0,000 in a new workspace
which will help guide marginalised
youngsters into the creative industries.
The cash
boost, from BII?s
Social Enterprise
Investment Fund
SEIF II, forms
part of a �6m
total investment
in conjunction
with the Greater
London Authority
and Charity Bank, to build a vibrant
and inspirational workspace ? named
Creative Works ? in Waltham Forest.
It is part of a new Big Creative
Village masterminded by Big Creative
Education, which has worked with
over 10,000 young people since it was
established in 1999.
? Ronnie O?Sullivan says
ditching snooker would
be like ?putting an injured
animal out of its misery?
HOME SWEET HOME
The 11 purpose-built two-bedroom homes
were built on brownfield land leased gratis from
Edinburgh City Council. Around �0,000
was spent on the village, with more than
100 companies ranging from builders and
timber merchants to landscapers and glaziers
contributing pro-bono. Josh Littlejohn estimates
its overall value to be around �5m.
WELCOME TO
THE UK?S FIRST
HOMELESS
VILLAGE
It could be a weekend haven, a retreat from the stresses
of city living. But the people coming here are no
holidaymakers. They?re some of the most vulnerable
members of society.
This is the Social Bite Village in Granton, Edinburgh, the
result of a sustained fundraising and awareness drive with the
lofty aim of bringing an end to homelessness. Next month, the
first residents will take their places in the enclave of cosy twin
cabins in the country?s first homeless village.
Celebrities like Leonardo DiCaprio and George Clooney have
thrown their weight behind Social Bite, and 8,000 people bedded
down in temperatures of -6C to raise � at their sleep-out in
Edinburgh?s Princes Street Gardens last December.
Social Bite?s Josh Littlejohn is working towards more highprofile events, and are driving through their Housing First
programme, which, if successful, should see 800 permanent
tenancies open up to the homeless community in five cities.
Social Bite has not been immune from criticism. ?When we
announced this, the homelessness sector was cynical,? Littlejohn
says. ?It felt like daggers from all corners. It felt like there was no
appetite for innovation.
?We?re not pretending this is a one-stop solution. But in
Edinburgh alone there are 600 homeless people in B&Bs costing
� a year, and yet there are pockets of vacant council-owned
land. This is cheaper than the status quo, and has merit in being
part of the jigsaw of solutions required.?
Words: Paul English @PaulEnglishhack
THE BIG ISSUE / p8 / May 21-27 2018
STEPPING STONE
Applicants are interviewed, and must meet a set criteria
measured against mental health and addiction before securing
a berth for 12-18 months, or longer, acting as a stepping
stone to permanent accommodation. The Village project ?
combined with the Housing First programme ? is aimed at
helping 800 homeless people from the streets and temporary
accommodation into housing over the next 18 months.
BUILDING A COMMUNITY
More than just providing shelter, a team from charity
Cyrenians will help establish a community. Their chief Ewan
Aitken said: ?Often the assumption is that if someone is in
poverty or vulnerable, they won?t mind where they are, they?ll
be happy for a bed. What this place is saying is that people
really matter and deserve as much quality as anybody else.
The environment becomes part of their journey of change.
Poverty and destitution grind the soul, and that?s affected by
what you see every day.?
THE BIG ISSUE / p9 / May 21-27 2018
STREET ART
You can buy
prints of some
artworks featured in
Street Art through
bigissueshop.com
At least half of the profit
from each sale goes
to the artist.
THE VOYEUR
BY CHRISTIE CASSISA
?With the abuse that I suffered as
a child I retreated inside myself
to protect my feelings,? explains
frequent Street Art contributor
Christie of the story behind this
self-portrait. ?Because of this, I
have always felt separated and odd.
When I am depressed, I feel very
lonely, but at the same time, I can?t
relate to people and want to be left
alone. The self-portrait of me in a
mask is how I feel, separate, and
watching, hidden, hoping to learn
how to ??t in?.?
ELEPHANT
DRAWING
BY DON POLLARD
Don is 64 years old. He is a
regular guest and service user at
a London homeless charity called
Restart (restartlives.org), where he
did this drawing which he sees as
?an abstract pattern ?tted into the
shape of an elephant?. Don started
drawing when he was 35. He is
self-taught. ?Apart from some help
from Leonardo,? he says.
Street Art is created by people who are marginalised by issues like homelessness, disability and mental health conditions.
Contact streetlights@bigissue.com to see your art here.
THE BIG ISSUE / p10 / May 21-27 2018
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S T R AT F O R D - U P O N - AV O N
THE TIMES
DAILY TELEGRAPH
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WEBSTER
TICKETS FROM �
BP �ti
t ckets for
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Supported by BP
Image by H el
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a nks
GUARDIAN
JOHN BIRD
The time is right
for a new ?-ism?
Photo: Oxford Picture Library / Alamy Stock Photo
A
s a one-time follower of the two occasions. That it was all rather mad. That months later, were in a small pro?t and
major ?-isms? that critiqued the we got through by the skin of our teeth. And have kept our heads above water ever since.
big -ism, capitalism, you?d think that I was like a bear with a sore head, We have expanded into other countries (the
I would have had enough of combined with a rabbit caught between the International Network of Street Papers
-ismism. That I would never embrace headlights! How one can be both beggars now supports over 100 titles worldwide)
another -ism for the rest of my life. And yet belief, but I managed this strange combo and we created a very large investment
here I write, sitting in the early morning quite skilfully (and only let the rabbit out business, Big Issue Invest, out of something
in an Oxford hotel, having the night before when I was alone).
that once looked remarkably crazy. And
There is no shortage in the world of me, the maddest player in the pile.
entertained and informed its students;
an essential duality if you?re going to students who wish to topple ignorance,
I woke the next morning thinking about
be useful ? and coming up
my new -ism. Going by coach
with a new -ism.
from Cambridge to Oxford, I
I could be bold, rude and
had sent an email to a history
self-seeking and call my new
student who I?d talked to
-ism ?Birdism?, but I?m aware
f leetingly a few months
that too many might rename
before. The student wrote to
it ?Turdism?. And, whereas
me. And I replied, saying that
Marxism was named after
I wanted history in The Big
Marx (just 200 years old a few
Issue because we all need to
weeks back), what a presumpknow where we came from
tuous little turd I would be for
and where we are going. I said,
appending a movement to my
?We need history. But not as
name. No, my new -ism is
things in themselves. Not just
grander and more graspable
as dead dates. We need history
as a descriptive -ism that, as
as ingredients in our
soon as you hear it, you might
understanding of why we
just ?nd yourself saying ?by
have the problems of today.?
the wand of Harry Potter, this
My view is that unless we
makes supreme sense!?
know the ingredients of the
I was in Oxford visiting its
cake, we have no reference
university with John Gilligan,
points for understanding the
who runs the ?nance lab at
current political problems we
Sa飀 Business School. We gave
face; including the big one,
a lecture on the founding of
Brexit. And so my new -ism is
The Big Issue and how (at a
?Ingredientism?. What is it that
Inspiring: Oxford?s dreaming spires are breathing life into a new -ism
year old), it was both
makes up our weird world; a
extremely popular and
world that seems to be the
extremely costly to Gordon Roddick, the short-termism and small-mindedness. The result of the laws of unintended
co-founder of The Body Shop. For it was problem they often run into is that they don?t consequences? We need to understand that
Gordon who put the money up for me to get to embrace contradiction. They get though poverty, climate change and war may
start our global street paper empire, which cleaned-up examples of businesses, social seem unintended, they?ve grown out of the
started life on the double yellow lines of businesses and charities that are made to ingredients with which we made the cake.
London?s West End. Faced with his appear pristine. And so I spend my time
I shall return to this new -ism with
ultimatum ? ?sort it out and break even describing my rescue plan, emphasising the thoughtfulness, and an awareness that we
within three months, or it?s goodbye, (at times) silliness, waste and deeply marred may well have put the wrong ingredients
Big Issue?? I then appeared from a dark situation we were in.
into our current lumpy cake. And in future,
We got out through a simple ?ve-point make sure that the right ingredients are
corner of the lecture theatre and told them
exercise plan that I drew up in the car on used for tomorrow?s much more appetising,
what I did.
John and I have given this lecture three the way back from Gordon?s decisive and much better cake.
times now, and will do it many more times meeting. Clarity in the face of madness, you
for students who want to listen to a might call it. For The Big Issue was madly
vigorous social enterprise story. Students popular and madly expensive, and was John Bird is the founder and Editor in Chief of
listen, and ? hopefully ? learn that the absolutely haemorrhaging money in those The Big Issue. @johnbirdswords
smelly stuf nearly hit the fan on too many early days. But we got it right and, three john.bird@bigissue.com
THE BIG ISSUE / p13 / May 21-27 2018
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OPINION
NO ONE SHOULD BE
ALONE IN GRIEF
Beth Rowland lost her mother at the age of 20. Compounding the
loss was the isolation of that ?conversation ender? ? so she set up a
network to talk through one of life?s biggest taboos
H
ave you ever wondered what it
would be like to be pulled into a
black hole? The inevitability of
the darkness, the struggle against the
force, the crushing pain, the emptiness of
everything? On July 2 2015 I sat on the side
of a bed and watched as my mum took her
final breath. In that moment, I joined the
group of people who have lost someone
close to them far too early, and felt a new
level of emptiness, grief.
I was 20 years old when my mum died.
I?m now 23 and I still tense when people
talk about their mothers, panic when
someone asks me about my parents and
dread meeting new people because I?ll have
to tell them ?the conversation ender? as I
like to call it: my mum is dead. Luckily, I
am surrounded by amazing family and
friends and have experienced love, joy and
hope since mum died. I love talking about
mum and share stories of her so that such
a wonderful person is not forgotten. The
problem is that for many of us loss is hard
to talk about.
If you?ve lost someone close to you ?
whatever your age ? you?ll know that
sometimes it is impossible to put feelings
into words, and talking about it may not
always be helpful. There have been many
times when I have screamed, thrown
things or sat and sobbed, simply because
there are not always words. If you?ve tried
to support a friend or family member who
has been bereaved, you may have had no
idea what to say. Wanting to make it better
but unable to.
Talking is really important, and that?s
something that I?ve been learning in the
three years since I lost mum. I have
depression and anxiety, and started having
scary panic attacks about a year ago, simply
because I was bottling up my grief and not
allowing my brain to actively process it. I
went to see a fantastic counsellor who
taught me the importance of saying ?I?m
not OK? so that others could help me.
Despite having two siblings and friends
who had lost parents, when I lost mum I
thought I was completely alone in my
grief. I set up a support network in 2016,
called Let?s Talk About Loss. It started
as a website where anyone can share
their stories of loss, grief and healing,
anonymously if they want to. If you?ve lost
someone close to you, you might like to
read the stories that others have shared. I
hope they will help you and show you
that you?re not the only one who is
finding bereavement hard. We have also
started holding meet-ups so connections
can be made in person, and not just
THE BIG ISSUE / p15 / May 21-27 2018
online. I?ve already made amazing friends
who completely understand my grief
through these.
Although anyone can write for the
website and share their experiences, the
support network exists primarily for those
aged 16 to 30. At 20, I was an adult, but I
certainly didn?t feel like one. I still had so
much to learn about life, death and being
a woman. The loss of my mother was a huge
blow at that age. I thought ahead to my
wedding day, the birth of my first child,
even my graduation day ? how on earth
would I cope without my mum by my side?
There are currently no national charities
reaching out to that age group, and Let?s
Talk About Loss aims to change that.
Our slogan is ?Together, we?re talking
through the taboo? and I am thrilled that
there is a movement in the UK to talk
openly and honestly about mental health
and break down some of the barriers in
society. With brave voices like those of
Prince Harry and TV presenter Simon
Thomas, both of whom have written to me
to support Let?s Talk About Loss,
we can make bereavement ?normal? and
less terrifying.
letstalkaboutloss.co.uk
Illustration: Mitch Blunt
PAUSE
TREVOR COX
How to sound your best
W
hat does your voice
s ou nd l i k e on a
recording? Do you
like it? Hearing a recording
reveals how your voice sounds
to others. It?s disconcerting
because the recording doesn?t
match what you hear inside
your head. When talking, the
internal voice sounds diferent
because it reaches the ear by
two paths. Not only does sound
pass out of the mouth around
the side of the head and into the
ear, the vibrations of the vocal
anatomy also pass through your
skeleton allowing the speech to
reach the ear via an internal
path. This second route adds
more bass to the sound; I sound
more manly in my head than I
really am!
Most of us have put a lot of
ef for t i nto preen i ng a nd
choosing clothes to look good.
But how many of us have put
similar effort into the image
we project through the voice?
How we sound matters as much
as our visual appearance,
because when we talk, we
don?t just pass on words. Our
voice unwittingly reveals very
Misconceptions a re a n
personal information about
who we are, how we are feeling inevitable side effect of our
cognition. The brain searches
and where we come from.
Listeners are constantly for patterns to simplify what it
picking up and responding to hears and to help it make sense
of the world. It?s
these vocal cues.
easy to see why
We subconsciously
this would have
tweak our voice
been usef u l for
to oil the
su r v iva l i n ou r
conversation. We
evolutionary past.
are oral chameIf you encounter
leons, turning our
someone at night,
accent up in our
you try and
hometow n or
estimate how big
down elsewhere to
the person is from
?t in. Surprisingly,
the voice, to help
some of the deducdecide whether to
t ion s l i s t ener s
fight or run away.
ma ke f rom t he
Now You?re Talking S m a l l a n i m a l s
voice are wrong.
by Trevor Cox is
have higherTake the associaout now (Bodley
pitched voices and
tion bet ween
l a r g er a n i m a l s
heig ht a nd t he
Head, �)
have deeper ones ?
pitch of someone?s
mice squeak while
voice. If you hear a
man talking with a booming lions roar ? this helps explain
voice, you?ll naturally assume why we ex pect men w ith
that he must be ta ll. But booming voices to be bigger
contrary examples are easy to people. But scientific experifind. David Beckham is above ments ?nd no such association
average height and yet his old because the vocal anatomy is
post-match interviews were very flexible. We can readily
change our voice ? just think of
given in a high-pitched voice.
THE BIG ISSUE / p17 / May 21-27 2018
what a skilled impressionist like
Rory Bremner can achieve.
We?re increasingly talking to
our gadgets, because it is easier
to do this than ty pe on a
keyboard. Virtual assistants
like Amazon Echo turn our
speech into text, and use this
information to respond to
commands. Soon gadgets will
also start making deductions
about the person behind the
voice issuing the commands.
This will help devices to work
out what we really want and
respond better. But our vocal
identity is very personal and
can reveal intimate details. Are
y ou c om f or t a ble w it h a
computer knowing your sexual
orientation? Or whether you?re
feeling depressed? Or knowing
your relationship is on the
rocks? Even more concerning,
the devices are going to get it
wrong some of the time. This
isn?t just because artificial
intelligence is imper fect,
problems will arise because the
vocal cues we give out are
naturally ambiguous. After all,
even humans make mistakes
when decoding the voice.
Dan
Snow
History buff
IN 1994
THE YEAR
DAN SNOW
TURNS 16?
Ayrton Senna is killed
during the San Marino
Grand Prix / Nelson
Mandela becomes
president of South
Africa / Michael
Jackson marries
Lisa Marie Presley
LETTER TO MY YOUNGER SELF
A
s a 16-year-old I probably came across as me. I was in a dark place. I thought I was a complete loser.
arrogant. I was tall and very athletic, What I know now is that those are just practice years, real
good-looking. But I wasn?t con?dent. I couldn?t lifebeginsmuchlater.Ihadmuchmorefunandadventure
look people in the eye and I was very nervous in social and more experiences in my twenties and thirties.
situations. So that probably came across as ?look at that
I think I developed gradually into someone who
tallblokeoverthere,hethinkshe?sbetterthaneverybody?. could speak to an audience. This is one of the things
I feltveryinsecureinLondon,embarrassedaboutmyposh about having a wonderful dad [fellow TV presenter and
accent. I didn?t know how to dress. I was still wearing the historianPeterSnow],he?slikeawiseolderyougivinggood
Gap T-shirt I?d got at 14. I went to a single-sex private advice. And he once said to me, when I was starting my
school,whichalsomademeetinggirlsdiicult.Myfriends career, say yes to every speaking event you get asked to do.
knew lots of girls and I didn?t know any. I hadn?t kissed a You?llbeabsolutelyrubbishforthe?rst?veyears,terrible,
girl yet. My friends were telling me lots of stories about you?ll make a balls-up of the whole thing. But then you?ll
kissing girls and la la la. I wish my 16-year-old self had be able to do it. And that?s exactly what happened. I was
known his friends were all lying to him.
fucking useless at ?rst. But now it?s no bother to me.
My parents never addressed the issue of me
The 16-year-old me would be very surprised I?m
becoming a teenager. They quite liked the fact that I married to a very conventional English woman with
was hanging out with them on a Friday night in my old a life like mine, very boring. He?d be like, oh come on
Gap T-shirt. As a dad myself I?d be quite mindful that your Dan! I?m half-Canadian and always assumed I?d marry
kids need to be with their friends, to start to move into someone exotic from a completely diferent part of the
world. And I did have a lot of foreign
adulthood. I think I?ll try to help them do
girlfriends. But the moment I met my
that. My mum never said, look, here?s your
wife, I felt very comfortable with her. I
pocket money, go to Camden Market, buy
somedecentgoddamnclothes.Mydadnever
immediately thought, I wonder if this is the
taught me how to shave. He just said, ?Oh
one. And now three kids later... It?s the best
yeah, you need to start shaving now?, and
thing I?ve ever done. I never thought I?d be
wandered of. And I was like, I?m fucking
as lucky as I am.
terrified, what do you do?! I was
The 16-year-old me would be
embarrassed, I had these hairs coming out
disappointed that I haven?t lived in lots
of my chin and I didn?t know what to do
of different, exciting places around the
about them. They probably thought I was
world. I?d say to him now, don?t
on it, but I wasn?t on it, I was dying.
underestimatetheimportanceofhome.I?ve
I was very competitive when I was
travelled all over the world and the older I
16. I wanted to get into a top
getthemoreIfeelwe?relikesalmon.
university, I wanted to be good at
We come back to where we?re from.
rowing and rugby. So I was working
When I land at Heathrow Airport,
hard. Looking back, that?s what I?m
ithasthatfeeling,there?ssomething
mostgratefulabout.IwenttoOxford
in the air. The smell of the streets of
right? I can tell you this, the people
south-west London, the mixture of
at Oxford were no cleverer than
dog poo, and fox piss, and rubbish
and concrete, that?s the smell of my
anyoneelseIevermet.Buttheywere
home. I look at the street signs, the
people who made the decision at 14
hedgerows, the birds, the trees, the
yearsoldtoworkreallyhard.Oxford
wildflowers, and I know I could
was like anywhere else, a bunch of
never move away. I used to think
muppets who wanted to do well and
From top: With his dad, Swingometer supremo
happiness would be drinking
madealotofmistakes.Butweallhad Peter Snow; and with wife Edwina and two of
expensive cocktails on fantastic
been weird teenagers who made a their children, Wolf and Zia
beaches chasing beautiful foreign
decision at 14 to work for two years
and see what happened. And I?m glad I did that, because women around. I know now what makes you happy is a
it opened up a world of opportunities for me. I absolutely deep and abiding sense of comfort and con?dence and
loveduniversity.Afterhatingbeing16,Ibloodylovedbeing proximity to people you love.
If I could go back and re-experience any moment
17 and 18. I grew into myself. I felt I?d made it.
I?m quite a conservative person. I did try to be in my life, it would be a very special day when I was
rebellious when I was a teenager. I remember a friend 19 and working as a prep chef in the Rocky Mountains.
ofered to sell me weed and I said, hey, cool, of course. So I?d spent the summer there, living in a lodge in the
I bought some weed from him and literally, the moment mountains, letting my hair grow long and go blonde in the
I was round the corner I started panicking that a SWAT sun. I?d made amazing friends. And in three days? time I
teamwasgoingtoswoopdownonme.Iimmediatelythrew was leaving to start at Oxford. I came out of the lodge and
it in a dumpster. That was the fucking scariest 30 seconds ran 20 miles through the mountains and the ?owers, by
these beautiful cerulean blue lakes. I had my Walkman
of my life.
If I could speak to that teenager now I?d say, you on, blasting the soundtrack of The Last of the Mohicans. I
have so much more time than you think.At16Ithought felt at the prime of my life. I was ending an amazing chapter
time was running out. I thought life was over by the time of my life and about to begin a big new one. Nothing could
you got to 23, that?s when you were washed up. So I only stop me. I?ve never been so happy.
had ?ve years to really live. And here I was, on a Friday
night in one of those years, just sitting at home with my Dan Snow ? An Evening With The History Guy is touring
mumanddad.Ithoughteveryonewasbetteratsocialising the UK from June 2. For full details, visit ticketline.co.uk
than me, was much cooler than me, more successful than Interview: Jane Graham @janeannie
THE BIG ISSUE / p19 / May 21-27 2018
Last year Raynor Winn wrote in
The Big Issue about how she dealt with
homelessness and her partner?s terminal
illness by putting on a pair of boots and
moving forward, one step at a time.
Her story has been published as bestselling
book The Salt Path, and she now lives
alongside the route that led to her
redemption. But, she says, the reality of rural
poverty still passes her door every day
ate summer on a damp, misty had to carry on. As he walked away
day, I was walking on the with a real sense of purpose, striding
coast path, as I do most days con?dently over the headland, I could
now that I live where the still hear his voice: ?I?ve changed, I
South West Coast Path know I won?t go back to my old life.?
passes my front door. Through the fog I
I hadn?t told him that I?d written the
spotted a man with a full rucksack walking article that was published by The Big Issue
towards me. Not your average backpacker, in July 2017. Or that I walked the 630
miles of the SWCP
he had a face full of
homeless, with very little
piercings and a yellow
money, sleeping wild on
road worker?s waterheadlands and beaches.
proof. We met at a gate
That didn?t matter, what
and I started the usual
conversation ? ?Hi, it?s
was important to the man
wet, where are you
that day was his focus. He
heading?? ? and he
wasn?t just walking, he
went on to tell a great
was moving his life
tale. He was sleeping on
forward, his self-belief
growing as he did so.
the streets in Exeter
When my husband Moth
when he read an article Sea change: Raynor?s story first appeared
[pictured right with
in The Big Issue about inThe Big Issue last July
Raynor] and I began
a woman who was
homeless, but walked the SWCP. So he walkingwewereinastateofdespairfollowthought he?d do the same. When we met ing the loss of our home and Moth?s diagnohe?d been walking for a week and said: ?It?s siswithaterminalillness.Butaswewalked,
the hardest thing I?ve ever done, but the each step taken encouraged us to take the
best, I feel diferent already.? He wouldn?t next, each hill climbed was a success and
come back with me for a meal, he said he the wild landscape of sea and sky became
THE BIG ISSUE / p20 / May 21-27 2018
all the reason we needed to go on. With the
passage of time our journey became a walking
meditation, allowing us to leave the past
behind and look to the future with hope.
Every day I see people walking on the
SWCP, our longest national trail. Many of
them are out for the day, but others are
walking further over a number of days, and
very occasionally in ones or twos people are
following the whole path. The UK is
crisscrossed by a myriad of over 140,000
miles of national trails and public footpaths,
endless space for us all to enjoy. But few ?ll
a rucksack and set out on an epic trek to spend
weeks walking in nature. So as I?ve watched
walkers pass the gate it?s been enlightening
to explore what drives those who do, and
surprising to ?nd that the answers weren?t
as obvious as I might once have thought.
Before I left the tarmac in Minehead to
begin the SWCP, I thought most longdistance walkers were all rough tough types
who walked as a form of sport, as a way of
testing and pushing their endurance
boundaries. I?ve discovered many of those,
many who walk with their heads down,
clocking up the miles and ticking the boxes.
I spent much of our walk feeling ecstatic if
Main photo: ㏕he Sunday Times / News Licensing
we walked seven miles a day, so I have every
respect for those who can perform amazing
feats of athleticism. Then there are others
who say they?re walking hundreds of miles
for a long holiday and for the adventure, but
when you dig a little deeper they are often
looking for some form of solace in nature.
Many are escaping stressful jobs and
pressured modern lives, driven to the natural
environment to disconnect. Then there are
those who are trying to come to terms with
events in their lives that have caused them
anguish, looking for a space which might
allow them to let go of trauma.
But there are others, and the longer I
watch the more of them I see. Those who are
walking rather than standing still, because
those are the only two options they have. We
walked when we had no home and no hope
of getting one. When we
put our rucksacks on our
backs and walked on a
national trail, we were
backpackers. If we had
donethesamethinginan
urban environment we
would have appeared to
be what we really were
? homeless. Chat to a
to go, and he might not
backpacker who isn?t
get there, but the more
wearing the newest kit
steps he takes away from
from the outdoors
his old life the closer
suppliers, or who seems
he?ll come to finding a
to be carrying the
new one.
When I wrote about
equipment for life rather
Raynor looked like a walker but in fact was
than walking and often
our experiences of being
homeless. Below: She and Moth now live
the reply will be the
homeless on the SWCP,
alongside the SWCT
same ? they are the rural
I didn?t consider that
homeless on the move. In a rural society otherswouldtakeourstoryasan inspiration
where the homeless are bad for tourism and to help them overcome their own issues. But
the streets are regularly cleared, they find it day after day I?ve received messages from
easier to either hide away or keep moving.
people who are walking with The Salt Path
Anotherwalkerpassedbyafewweeksago. in their hand, moving their own lives
He said he was heading north to John forward, which surprises me every time I
O?Groats,he?dbeenhomelessformonthsbut open a message. But when I think of our
now he was no longer on the streets, he was pierced friend heading east, I know that if
moving.Notjustphysically,butmentallytoo. the hard-won miles of our walk helped just
Andtheattitudeofothers that one person to find his way, control the
towards him had direction of his feet and to
changed. Rather than follow his own path, then I?d
being looked on with stand in Minehead again
either pity or worse, tomorrow.
aggression, people were
helpful, encouraging, The Salt Path by Raynor Winn
even showing him is out now (Michael Joseph,
respect.Hehasalongway �.99)
THE BIG ISSUE / p21 / May 21-27 2018
INTERVIEW
The only thing standing between Sheila Hancock and a script she?d fallen in love
with was the summit of a rocky 2,000ft mountain. She explains to Adrian Lobb how
she faced it down to tell a story about loneliness, ageing and peak adrenalin
?Well, of course all the actual mountain climbing scenes
will be done on green screen or whatever, won?t they??
Sheila Hancock was already sold on the title role in Edie.
The story of a recently widowed woman breaking away from
the expectation that she would settle intoalifeofquietsolitude,
and instead embarking on a once-in-a-lifetime adventure had
touched the 85-year-old actor?s heart.
So when she was told by the ?lm?s producers that, no, there
was to be no camera fakery in Edie, and instead she would
have to climb Suilven, one of the most challenging peaks in
the Highlands, Hancock had a big decision to make.
?There was a terrible silence,? she recalls. ?They showed
me a picture of this mountain and said theywereratherhoping
I would climb it. I didn?t know whether I could at my age. I
looked it up and it was obvious this was not a thing you should
take lightly. But the script had got to me.
I loved what it was saying. Whereupon
I did a huge, intensive training regime.
I was in the gym every day.?
Over the next months, Hancock
could be found running up hills with
an RAF trainer in Richmond Park,
trudging across diicult terrain, and
pounding the machines at her local
gym. ?I enjoyed getting ?t and strong,?
she says when we meet in central
London.
Once the cast and crew of Edie had
assembled, it was time for Hancock to
put her new ?tness to the test. Then
there was the small matter of conquering her fear of heights.
?There were bits that were totally
terrifying,? says Hancock, describing
a narrow section of path with a sheer
drop either side in vivid detail.
And not only did Hancock have to
tackle this tricky section of Suilven en
route to the summit, she had to do it
repeatedly ? ?lmed ?rst in close-up,
then from various angles, before a ?nal
sweeping overhead shot in which she is the only person visible
in the vast landscape. Then, at last, the pay-of ? achievement
unlocked, fear conquered. Or ?the incredible feeling of having
overcome sheer fucking terror,? as Hancock puts it. She talks
of feeling empowered, of reminding herself of her capabilities.
?I think that is the best feeling in the world. To take on
something you are frightened of and actually do it ? and it
doesn?t have to be climbing a mountain,? she continues. ?It
can be telling your boss you are not happy. Or standing on the
street and selling The Big Issue ? that must be a hell of a task
for some people who are frightened or who have had a tough
time. When you ?nd the courage to do that, and then you have
done it, I imagine that you get the same feeling I got. Which
is that you have climbed your own particular mountain.?
?Choose life? might be a key phrase from a diferent Scottish
?lm, but the Trainspotting tagline also speaks to the themes
of Edie. After years of ful?lling what she sees as her obligations
to her ailing husband ? despite years of unhappiness ? Edie
seizes the day.
?The key themes of the ?lm are, don?t waste your life,? says
Hancock. ?Because it is never too late. That is what the ?lm
says and I am so thrilled it might have that efect on some
people. Now I can aford to be a bit more choosy ? I do not have
to work for the money, which I have had to do all my life ? so I
am into doing work that says something to people. I am very
happy to be in something that seems to be making people feel
better or that they want to change their lives.?
Hancockstillgetshundreds of letters from people who have
been touched by the wit and wisdom of her two bestselling
books, The Two Of Us and Just Me, charting her life with actor
husband John Thaw and exploring her grief after his
death in 2002.
Assheworksonathird volume ? ?a summing-up book, about
life and what is going on in the world? ? she ofers insight into
loneliness and social isolation afecting more and more older
people, the ?lm ofers an important message.
?You can get into a habit of feeling lonely, or that everyone
has died and left me on my own, but if you look around you,
you will ?nd ways of breaking it as Edie
does. She is lonely when she is with her
husband. She is lonely caring for somebody.
?There are an awful lot of lonely
people and I do my damnedest to make
them join clubs, go to classes. It is in
your hands to turn loneliness into
solitude. Sometimes solitude can be
lovely. I love being on my own a lot. It
is a real efort, even for me, to pick up
the phone sometimes. But if I am feeling
a bit lonely, it is in my power to phone
somebody up.?
The depiction of the developing
friendship between Edie and her guide
Jonny (Dunkirk?s Kevin Guthrie) ? with
both learning from the other after
initial mistrust ? is another aspect of
the ?lm that interested Hancock.
?I think it is very sad that at the
moment within society, for whatever
reason young and old seem to be drifting apart a bit,? she says. ?There seems
almost to be an anger between the
never-had-it-so-good generation and
the youngsters who are feeling really hard done by. That is
such a sad gulf to have.?
Talk turns to the big political issue of the day, the one on
which the generation gap was so clear in voting patterns.
?I am heartbroken about Brexit, as heartbroken as any
youngster was. And my grandchildren were distraught about
it. Anything that breaks links with anyone in the rest of the
world to me is suicidal and stupid ? I am not talking
?nancially now, just in terms of life. We need to join hands ?
bridges not walls,? she says.
?But the good thing is that the old people are dying of, you
know? Those youngsters will get older and things will change
again, I am convinced of it.?
There may be a few more mountains to climb ?rst. But after
conquering Suilven, it?s no surprise that Hancock feels the sky
is the limit.
?I must say my children?s first question when I get a
new part is ?Does she go senile, or die?? So it was so
refreshing to be able to say, ?No, she climbs a mountain!? That
was a joy.?
?I do my damnedest
to make lonely people
join clubs. You turn
loneliness into
solitude ? solitude
can be lovely?
Edie is in cinemas from May 25
@adey70
THE BIG ISSUE / p23 / May 21-27 2018
Stand up and be counted:
The Tanzanian girls team fly the
flag at Lokomotiv Stadium
For three of the nine teenagers in the team from
Kenya, playing football in the Street Child World
Cup has been liberating in a literal sense; to take
part in the event in Moscow the trio were released
from a juvenile detention centre in Mombasa,
where they are being held after being rounded up
on the streets. They will go back into custody on
their return.
?These boys exchanged their prison uniforms for
football kits,? says Frederick Achola, a former Kenyan
Olympic boxer who leads the team. He hopes their
participation in the event for more than 200 at-risk
children from 20 countries could help pave the way
for changes to the law that address the criminalisation
of street-connected youth in Kenya.
Achola had to get permission from the courts for
NGO Glad?s House to bring the boys ? who have a short
time left to serve on their two to three-year sentences
? and the team has been accompanied by Philip Nzenge
from Mombasa children?s services. In Kenya, youths
on the streets are regularly detained, sometimes at
centres thousands of miles away from where they have
been living if the local juvenile facility is full.
But the criminalisation of street-connected youth
is just one of the social issues organisers hope to
highlight at the Street Child World Cup, a football
tournament and congress on children?s rights that
piggybacks the Fifa World Cup to draw attention to
at-risk children so participating countries can leverage
the publicity to efect change in their countries.
All the teams have been organised by frontline
organisations working with homeless and socially
excluded children. This time, 12 boys? and 12 girls?
teams come from Belarus, Bolivia, Brazil, Burundi,
Egypt, England, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Kenya,
Mauritius, Mexico, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines,
Russia, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Uzbekistan and the US.
Many of the participating organisations use football
as a tool to engage hard-to-reach youth and provide a
safe space for them to play, whether in the Penha favela
in Rio de Janeiro, where gun violence is endemic, or
in central Cairo, where the Nafas charity runs a
football league for 400 at-risk youth, or in Payatas in
Manila, where the Fairplay for All Foundation helps
children who scavenge on the local rubbish dump for
a living to return to school.
The tournament was a festival of football, with
some young players showing a multitude of skills, tricks
and dribbles, and amazing goals on show.
Unsurprisingly, the stars of the tournament came from
two of the four ?nalists, with Asteria Robert from the
Tanzanian team and Mohammed Abdullah, the
Pakistan captain, impressing the judges to win the
female and male awards. Honourable mentions go to
Brazil?s striker, Thyssa, who scored 14 goals throughout
Photo: ㎝egaFon
The Street Child World Cup is
a remarkable tournament.
Jo Griffin details the incredible and
heartbreaking stories that light it up
;
THE BIG ISSUE / p25 / May 21-27 2018
the tournament to lead her team to victory. In the
?nals, Brazil?s girls won 1-0 against Tanzania and
Uzbekistan boys beat Pakistan on penalties. Team
England had given a performance to make everyone
involved proud, losing to Tanzania in the semi-?nal,
but then beating the Philippines to ?nish third.
This year?s event is the third incarnation of the
Street Child World Cup, which was held in Durban,
South Africa, in 2010, and in Rio de Janeiro in Brazil
in 2014. A mini Olympics for street-connected youth
was held in Rio in 2016. It is the ?rst time that there
has been an equal number of girls? and boys? teams,
a fact that has pleased many of the girls taking part.
?To come here to an international tournament with
a women?s team is really powerful,? said Kalkidan
Haile, 16, from the US team. ?I like to see women
prosper through football.?
For some, even travelling to Moscow has meant
overcoming huge obstacles; many of the young people
lack any identity documents. The girls? team from
Mexico City had to attend two court hearings to get
permission to travel because no one could locate their
parents. The Indian team, from Chennai, includes
several girls who are ?pavement-dwellers?.
?Imagine what it is like trying to get an identity
Coach Frederick
document when you don?t even have a front door,?
Achola, centre,
said Dr MB Pavritha of NGO Karunalaya, which
with the
Kenyan team
brought the team and campaigns for birth certi?cates
for street children. ?One challenge for us is that
informal homes can be cleared away at any moment
so a girl may say, ?my family live in the hut under the
bridge?, and we say: ?what hut under what bridge??
Such high visibility is important for children who
because the hut is no longer there.?
often hide from sight or whose presence in public is
The gathering of young people spans those who still unwelcome, say event organisers UK charity Street
live on the streets with their families to others who have Child United. As well as challenging stereotypes of
faced ?hidden homelessness? ? on the streets, sofa- street-connected youth ? and giving them a chance
sur?ng or staying at friends? houses. Teams of girls who to demonstrate their talents ? a high profile for
at-risk children can serve a
have faced social exclusion in
political purpose.
London and Washington are
?It is crucial to increase the
among those taking part. The
visibility of children/youth in
girls from London came with
street situations. If we don?t
Centrepoint as part of the sixmake them visible by
month Street Football team
England personal development
accounting for them in national
programme.
and global statistics and
For some of the American
protecting them in policies and
girls, the highlight of the event
laws, we won?t be able to hold
is the opportunity for cultural
governments accountable to
exchange. ?Living in the US is
international and national child
a privilege and sometimes it?s
rights commitments,? says
Team USA will address Congress to share their experiences
hard to understand other
Caroline Ford, chief executive
of the Consortium for Street
people?s situations. Every
person I have seen here is just so beautiful? I have never Children, a global network.
This high visibility culminated in a general
been around a global community. It?s a culture shock
but in a good way,? says Kalkidan from the team assembly in the centre of the city where young people
organised by DC Scores, part of a US-wide programme presenteda?MoscowManifesto?callingongovernments
that ofers after-school football and other activities in to uphold their rights around the three issues of
low-income areas. ?One of my biggest takeaways from protection from violence, the right to education and
here will becommunicating with other people whose the right to an identity. To prepare the manifesto, the
young people took part in a congress alongside
?rst language is not English.?
Teammate Jessica Amayo, also 16, says: ?This event the football where they?ve shared experiences of life
in their countries.
proves the universal language really is football.?
The mood has been celebratory as young people have
?It?s unique to have more than 200 young people who
taken over the stands at Lokomotiv, home of the new have been or are street-connected in one place to talk
Russian Premier League champions, to watch each to each other and show each other they are not alone
other?s matches. They?ve seen the Kremlin and Red and to share in an environment without
Square, and were guests at a reception in the garden of judgment and hopefully to come together and bring a
louder voice to what is important,? says Duncan Ross,
British ambassador Laurie Bristow.
THE BIG ISSUE / p26 / May 21-27 2018
IN
NUMBERS
There are at least
150 MILLION
STREET
CHILDREN
around the world
Over
200
CHILDREN
from
20
COUNTRIES
took part in the
Street Child
World Cup
12 BOYS? AND
12 GIRLS?
TEAMS
This is the
THIRD TIME
the tournament
has been held,
after Durban
in 2010 and Rio
in 2014
MOVING THE
GOALPOSTS
of StreetInvest, which works with 15 organisations in
15 countries and has facilitated the congress. The charity
has also pioneered a methodology for counting youth
connected to the streets.
?We hope that their participation changes the
perception of these young people so their rights are
recognised and that something very speci?c changes
for the children in their countries soon,? says Ross. ?It?s
really time that something happened.?
He says youth homelessness is believed to be rising
around the world because of factors like con?ict and
migration, but exact numbers are hard to come by. The
?gure of 150 million street children is widely cited, but
many experts believe it is now much higher.
The Street Child World Cup comes almost a year after
the publication of the United Nations General Comment
on children in street situations, which ofers guidance
to governments on applying the Convention on the
Rights of the Child to street children.
The general comment is seen as a significant
breakthrough in an area that many believe is underreported, but on an individual level many of the teams
will continue their advocacy.
Later this year the American team will go to the US
Congress and share their insights from Moscow,
supported by the National Network for Youth.
Kalkidan says: ?I will say to Congress that
homelessness and poverty should be visible. The other
day a girl from the Philippines said: ?The adults need to
take care of the kids so the kids will take care of them.??
For Nzenge, the official from Mombasa who
accompanied the Kenyan team, spending a week with
the teenagers has been a profoundly affecting
experience. He says: ?When I go back to Kenya, I will
make it my mission to help these children.?
streetchildunited.org
Photo: Adam Davy/PA Archive/PA Images
Photo: Polina Bykonya
THE TOURNAMENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW
More than 3.2 billion people will tune into the
World Cup this summer, but away from the
Russian extravaganza, the world?s
most popular sport is doing good
for others in tournaments around
the world.
Don?t worry, England will
probably lose in them too.
Or maybe not ? because the
Three Lions do have a win to their
name in the INAS World Football
Championships, taking the title in
Japan in 2002.
The tournament gives a chance
to para-athletes with an intellectual disability to
take to the pitch in a battle for global supremacy.
At least eight teams will head to Karlstad in
Sweden between August 5 and 18 with the task of
stopping Saudi Arabia?s all-conquering side, which
has won on the last three occasions.
?Athletes still face barriers in all areas of their
life and for many people sport is an opportunity
to develop life skills like friendship and health,?
INAS executive director Nick Parr says. ?But each
player goes back home after the tournament with
an inspirational story to share with other people in
their position.?
Brazil remain the dominant force in the
mainstream tournament and it?s a similar story in
the IBSA Blind Football World
Championships, which will
take place next month when
16 teams descend on Madrid.
The sele玢o have taken
four titles in the sport, which
sees four outfield players
sporting eye patches and
blindfolds playing with a ball
bearing-filled football while a
sighted goalkeeper acts as a guide from the goal.
The IFCPF European Championships
for athletes with cerebral palsy or an acquired
brain injury will be held in Zeist, Netherlands, from
July 22 to August 22. The profile of the sport has
grown recently, with former Birmingham
City star Jack Rutter leading the charge.
He will be heading to
the tournament as England
coach after a change in
classifications made him
ineligible to play.
And for 2022, Fifa are
making the controversial
switch to a winter World
Cup in Qatar ? but the 16th
Homeless World Cup is ahead of the game with
more than 500 players from 47 countries heading
to Mexico City from November 8-15.
Liam Geraghty @Lazergun_Nun
THE BIG ISSUE / p27 / May 21-27 2018
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THE ENLIGHTENMENT
Books
Escaping death in Yemen page 30
Film
South American gold ? Zama page 33
Radio
An epic in one sentence page 35
BRIGHTON FESTIVAL
TAKE A STAND
?I have an obsession with bandstands,? says artist Morag
Myerscough. Her latest work, Belonging, is a bright bandstand
crowned with placards made by local groups. As the bandstand
tours the country, the placards will change and so will its meaning.
?We are in very turbulent times and so many traditional forms
of connection are breaking down and we are having to ?nd new
ways of connecting,? Myerscough explains. ?There are many
forms of belonging ? it does not have to just be about family
and friends, it can be about the landscape, space, music, shared
experiences and many other things.
?I wanted to discover how you can make work that people
directly connect to, that can bring people together. I love how
bandstands just stand in a place dormant for long lengths of time
and then can be transformed by performance. They are beautiful
empty and when a performance takes place people just gravitate
towards it. I love that they are free for everybody to experience.?
After its seafront stint in Brighton, Belonging will travel to
Ardingly, Crawley, Newhaven, Ditchling and Hastings, hosting
different performances and events.
?When people are involved in the creating and the making
they connect so much more with the piece and ultimately the
piece is their piece,? Myerscough adds. ?I want it to belong to
them and for everybody to own it.?
Belonging by Morag Myerscough has been
co-commissioned by Ditchling Museum of Art + Craft
and Brighton Dome & Brighton Festival.
Brighton Festival runs until May 27. brightonfestival.org
THE BIG ISSUE / p29 / May 21-27 2018
BOOKS
THE FOX HUNT
Faith in friendship
Mohammed Al Samawi was forced to flee for his life after civil war broke out in
Yemen. But friends from different religions and cultures helped him escape
My family and friends were unable to
offer me protection, and I panicked. In
desperation, I turned to social media and
messaged people I had met from around the
world asking for help, including Daniel,
Justin, Megan, and Natasha. Amazingly, not
only did they respond, but they reached out
to all their contacts, looking for anyone who
might have ideas.
Over the next few days my situation
deteriorated. I was stopped
by al-Qaeda fighters who
Mohammed found himself trapped
marched me back to my
in the war-torn port of Aden
apartment to find papers
proving I was an enemy. I
was sure that they would
kill me. Luckily, a skirmish
outside distracted them,
and I escaped.
Meanwhile, my friends
in the US and Israel were
still trying to save me. It
was no easy task, as the
airport and all other routes
had been shut down. They
investigated some crazy
options, including paying
someone $80,000 to pick
me up in a helicopter, or
having a Greek cargo ship
smuggle me to Uganda.
The situation was too
dangerous for any of these options to have
worked, even if we had found the money.
Finally, they discovered that an Indian
warship was scheduled to arrive in the port
to evacuate Indian nationals. Incredibly,
they managed to persuade the Indians to let
me on to the ship.
I rushed to the port, with bullets flying
around me. The boat took me to Djibouti,
and from there I travelled to the US as a
refugee. Today I work as a peace activist and
speaker, trying to build bridges between
In early 2015, Sana?a, the capital where I communities with my own story. And I still
lived, was taken over by Houthis, insurgents speak to Daniel, Justin, Megan and Natasha
from northern Yemen. Their slogan was almost every day ? it?s thanks to them that
?Death to America, death to Israel, death to I am here at all.
the Jews?; I knew that I would be in serious
trouble if they found me. I moved to Aden
Mohammed Al Samawi?s
The Fox Hunt: Four
in the south, thinking the situation would
Strangers, Thirteen Days,
be calmer. I couldn?t have been more wrong.
and One Man?s Amazing
Days after I arrived the fighting spread
Journey to Safety
to Aden, and I was stranded. Even worse,
is out now
with my northern features and name, I was
(Scribe, �.99)
now an obvious target for al-Qaeda fighters.
bonded while talking about everything from
international development to football. I had
no idea that they would end up saving
my life.
Back home in Yemen, my activities had
beennoticed,andnotinagoodway.Rumours
had spread that I was a spy, and I began
receiving death threats. Just as this situation
was coming to a head, things got even worse;
civil war broke out.
?I turned to
social media and
messaged people
from around the
world for help?
THE BIG ISSUE / p30 / May 21-27 2018
Photo : Fawaz Salman/Reuters/PA Images
G
rowingupinYemen,Iwasapretty
serious kid. I came from a
respected family, was committed
to Islam, and absorbed the
messages that surrounded me. At school
I heard that Hitler was a hero for killing
many Jews, whilst on the news I heard about
how Israelis were murdering our brothers,
the Palestinians.
At the end of school I decided to start
taking night classes in
English, not suspecting
how this would change my
worldview. My teacher was
a young British guy named
Luke, and we soon became
friendly. I liked him a lot,
but it worried me knowing
that he wasn?t a Muslim. So
we agreed to do a swap ? he
said he would read the
Koran as long as I read
the Bible.
I picked up the Bible
anticipating that reading it
would confirm that the
Koran was far superior. But
instead I was entranced,
and curious to know more.
How did God create the sky
and the earth? If we are
made in the image of God,
does that mean we look like God? Plus,
so many of the stories were similar to what
was in the Koran: Moses, Abraham, and
many others.
I told Luke how interesting I had found
his book, but he explained he had actually
meant for me to read the Gospels. Instead I
had been reading the Old Testament, the
holy text of the Jews!
Learning this blew my mind. I had a lot
of questions, but I couldn?t imagine how I?d
be able to meet a Jew to get them answered.
Instead, I turned to Facebook, trying to
befriend Israelis by spamming them with
questions about their views of Islam and
Yemen? Unsurprisingly, no one replied.
Gradually I made progress. I joined
Facebook groups created for Jews and
Muslims to talk, and from these I learnt
about international interfaith meetings. At
conferences in Bosnia and Jordan I met
Megan Hallahan, who was Christian, and
Daniel Pincus, Justin Hefter and Natasha
Westheimer, who were all Jewish. We
READ MORE FROM...
DOUG JOHNSTONE
REVIEWS
VISIT BIGISSUE.COM
POPS / ON MICHAEL JACKSON
TOP 5 BOOKS ON
THE IRISH DIET
MARGARET HICKEY
Growing pains
Doug Johnstone is absorbed by two very
different takes on the pros and cons of growing up
NEVER NO MORE
Maura Laverty
Laverty?s cookbook is Full
and Plenty, but her novels
are stuffed with seductive
descriptions of food, such as how her
grandmother made little cakes of yellow
meal, rolled in cabbage leaves and
cooked in the hot ashes of a turf ?re.
Illustration: Dom McKenzie
I
sometimes think the essay as a form
is undervalued and overlooked these
days in the rush to ?nd the next big
thing in ?ction or memoir. But in the
right hands a collection of essays can give
invaluable insight into all sorts of subject
matters, or indeed just one, and this week
we have two writers who brilliantly employ
the form to focus on speci?c areas with
powerful results.
Both our authors this week are Pulitzer
Prize-winners, one for ?ction the other
for criticism, and it?s to the writer better
known as a novelist that we turn ?rst.
Michael Chabon?s eight novels include
the hugely lauded The Amazing
Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, but he?s also
written short stories, YA books, children?s
fiction and two terrific collections of
essays already.
Pops is a third collection and deals
primarily with the writer?s attitudes to
parenthood, both his own relationship with
his four kids and his father?s relationship
with him as a child and an adult. The book,
subtitled Fatherhood in Pieces, is a slim
volume, the seven essays here amounting
to a total of 127 pages, but it packs a big
emotional punch.
Chabon?s last book of essays, Manhood
for Amateurs in 2009, was a brilliant look
at all facets of modern masculinity, and this
book dovetails with that more than a little,
as he tries to negotiate the shark-infested
waters of being a dad in the 21st century.
The centrepiece here is My Son, The Prince
Of Fashion, which was originally published
in GQ and went viral, in which he
accompanies his teenage son to Paris
Fashion Week. It?s a brilliantly evocative
piece of reportage, funny and engaging,
and it also looks deeply at the gap in
understanding between himself and his son.
Similarly, this book ends with the
eponymous essay Pops, in which the author
reminisces about his own childhood and
comes to terms with his sometimesfractious relationship with his own dad, now
that his father is elderly and in failing
health. In between there are insightful
exa minations of racism, spor t,
snobbishness, relationships and more, all
of it delivered with plenty of self-awareness
of the writer?s own privilege ? he?s a
well-known and well-off author with a
comfortable life, but that doesn?t shield any
parent from the pain of their kids growing up
and away from them into their own lives.
Speaking of growing up, that idea is at the
core of our second book, but in a very diferent
way. Margo Jeferson?s On Michael Jackson
is another slim volume, this time from a critic
and the author of the award-winning memoir
Negroland. On Michael Jackson was
originally published in the US in 2006, three
years before Jackson?s death, but appears
for the ?rst time here in the UK now, with
an updated introduction taking into account
the pop singer?s dubious legacy in the
intervening years.
Jeferson confesses to always having loved
Jackson as an entertainer, something that
maybe colours this book a little, the writer
looking more favourably on some of his
exploits than might otherwise have been the
case. But she doesn?t shirk from the allegations
of sexual abuse, his all-round weirdness or his
in?uence in terms of race, gender, popular
culture or the entertainment business, shining
a perceptive and eloquent light on the darker
recesses of the star?s life and work.
Words: Doug Johnstone @doug_johnstone
Pops
by Michael Chabon
(4th Estate, �)
On Michael Jackson
by Margo Jefferson
(Granta, �99)
THE BIG ISSUE / p31 / May 21-27 2018
NURSERY
COOKING
Molly Keane
Born into an Edwardian
Anglo-Irish household,
Keane, author of Good Behaviour, writes
lyrically of simple but elegant dishes,
including poached eggs: ?The eggs were
perfect, swelling primly on ... toast, the
lightened dust of cayenne blown over
their well-matched pearls.?
A MODEST PROPOSAL
FOR PREVENTING
THE CHILDREN OF
IRELAND FROM BEING
A BURDEN TO THEIR
PARENTS OR COUNTRY
Jonathan Swift
From 1729, when people were starving,
comes the great Jonathan Swift?s savage
satire. He puts forward the notion that
a super?uous child could be a helpful
addition to the larder, as a plump infant
would serve well, boiled, stewed or fried!
IRISH TRADITIONAL
COOKING
Darina Allen
In Allen?s Ballymaloe
Cookery School, she insists
on the best of ingredients and then
shows how to cook them. Here she gives
her own take on recipes submitted by
people all over Ireland.
ULYSSES
James Joyce
From Leopold Bloom?s liking
for ?grilled mutton kidneys? to
his lunch in Davy Byrne?s pub:
a cheese sandwich with yellow blobs of
mustard, Joyce?s novel is as stuffed with
references to food as a plum pudding is
with raisins.
Margaret Hickey?s
Ireland?s Green
Larder is out now
(Unbound, �)
In association with
presents...
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FILM
READ MORE FROM...
EDWARD LAWRENSON
VISIT BIGISSUE.COM
New World without end
Lucrecia Martel?s first film in a decade is a dazzling and
hallucinatory look at Spanish colonialism, with added llama
L
ucrecia Martel?s last ?lm The
Headless Woman was a haunting
puzzle-piece drama that left an
impression of lingering unease
? and con?rmed the Argentine writerdirector as one of our leading ?lmmakers.
That ?lm was released 10 years ago, and
after much delay she has a new movie out,
Zama, a period drama set in a Spanish
colony in 18th-century South America.
The long wait seems oddly appropriate.
For one, Martel?s style of ?lmmaking is
slow-cooked, compacted, dense, and
deliberate ? Zama isn?t a ?lm made with
any sense of haste, and its impact stays with
you and builds long after ?rst viewing.
But also Zama is itself a film about
waiting, about the anguish of anticipation.
A middle-ranking functionary in a
colonial backwater, Don Diego de Zama
longs to sail to Spain where his wife and
son live. But for this he needs a letter
requesting a transfer from the local
governor, and this letter remains
unwritten. Without the letter, Zama (a
performance of careworn charisma from
Daniel Gim閚ez Cacho) remains in his post
? unhappy, bored, desperate.
Zama?s agonised, constantly frustrated
attempts to leave form the thread that
holds together Martel?s seemingly
disparate collection of scenes from this
remote coastal location. The years seem
to pass ? Martel doesn?t give an exact tally,
but colleagues come and go; and Zama
himself grows increasingly haggard ?
and yet still no letter.
Through a fastidious attention to the
Martel withholds much more than she
workings of the Spanish crown, what
emerges is a droll, acerbic portrait of a vast reveals, and her movie stirs in us a sense
unwieldy state bureaucracy, of which Zama of jumpy anxiety that is an echo of Zama?s
own predicament. By the end Zama?s
is both a functionary and victim.
The overseas setting gives the satire a physical and psychological state of atrophy
sharper edge: this is the absurdity of worsens ? he develops a fever that seems
colonial life, seen as a grim Kafkaesque to infect the logic of the movie.
comedy. (And the ?lm is funny: at one
In scenes of mounting hallucinatory
intensity Zama joins a
point Zama is attending a
group of Spanish soldiers
solemn meeting with his
on a mission to the
gover nor a nd into
FINAL REEL
swampy interior to arrest
the oice walks a llama.
May 1968 was a month of
The interruption goes
a notorious bandit (despite
protest and near revolution,
unremarked on by the two
long-held claims that he
and to mark the anniversary
has been executed by the
men, but it earned a laugh
the British Film Institute has
state). And here Zama
from the audience I was
launched a series of events and
and his comrades have a
with ? I?m not sure why
screenings
iolent encounthe scene prompted that
under the
er with indigereaction other than it?s
banner
ou s t r ibesfurther evidence of
Spirit of
eople. In scenes
Martel?s peculiar genius).
?68 across
f
v ibra nt,
But while Zama is
the UK
about one man trapped in
most
dreamlike
revolving
a single place, the tone of
e ugly logic of
around ?lms that re?ect the
the film is restless and
colonialism plays out.
historic tumult: spiritof68.org.uk
sprawli ng. Ma r tel?s
Zama confounds easy
offers a complete lowdown.
approach to storytelling
interpretation and on my
is boldly askew; the
second viewing I feel
structure is exhilaratingly elliptic. Zama?s there?s still much to discover about this
attempt to woo a capricious noblewoman sumptuous, emotionally reverberant
is a major part of the ?rst section, only for drama. It?s a thrillingly layered ?lm, and
Martel to abruptly cut this storyline, never is perhaps best experienced by
to return to it. In a throwaway line we learn surrendering to its intoxicating
that Zama has fathered a child with an strangeness. Let?s hope we don?t have to
indigenous woman ? but little more is said. wait too long until Martel?s next ?lm.
Later on he moves from his official Zama is in cinemas from May 25
residence to a grotty guesthouse ? and stays
there for reasons that remain cloudy.
Edward Lawrenson @EdwardLawrenson
THE BIG ISSUE / p33 / May 21-27 2018
RIDELONDON
FOR THE
BIG ISSUE
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JOIN TEAM TBIF TO
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RADIO
READ MORE FROM...
ROBIN INCE
VISIT BIGISSUE.COM
OUT AND ABOUT
TOP MARX
You probably already know Karl and the
tetrarchy of Chico, Harpo, Groucho and
Zeppo, but there?s another Marx you should
be aware of. Enid Marx: Print, Pattern
& Popular Art (May 25 to September 23,
King?s Cross, London; houseo?llustration.
org.uk) is a retrospective of 150 pieces by
the pioneering textile designer, printmaker
and illustrator. While Marx (pictured) might
be most celebrated for her upholstery
designs on Tube carriages, this exhibition
also showcases her work in book illustration,
stamp design, posters and print.
A different kind of art is at Emily Allchurch
(until August 26, Holborn, London; soane.
org) where the artist recreates historic
paintings using both her own photography
and intricate digital collages. For this
exhibition, she is going to be focusing on
pieces that have been inspired by the John
Soane?s Museum?s own collection.
Meanwhile, Ashby Arts Festival (May
26-28, Ashby-de-la-Zouch; ashbyartsfestival.
co.uk) is much humbler in its approach,
showcasing local artists ? both professional
and amateur.
Up the road in Nottingham, there is plenty
happening this week. Wheee! International
Children?s Theatre & Dance Festival
2018 (May 28 to June 3, Nottingham,
lakesidearts.org.uk), as the name very
much suggests, brings the best children?s
entertainers from around the world to show
off their skills. With the summer holidays
looming, parents desperate to ?nd ways
to keep their kids entertained during those
long months could do worse than go here
for tips.
The Dot To Dot
Festival (May 27, various
locations, Nottingham;
dottodotfestival.co.uk)
is the Midlands edition
of the festival that
in the two days before will have visited
Manchester and Bristol. It focuses on the
most exciting new acts and here is your
chance to catch the potential festival
headliners of 2024 before (barely) anyone
else has seen them.
Eamonn Forde @Eamonn_Forde
Quite a stretch
One sentence, four hours, no punctuation.
It?s brilliant radio
T
he Sentence is a shamanic spell as
much as a story if you ask those who
have been to readings of it about the
experience.Ithasnowbeenrecordedandcan
be found at Resonance FM. The author,
Alistair Fruish, works creating art and radio
projectsinprisons.Hewantedtocreateabook
that had none of the possible hindrances for
those who may have lacked much of an
education in literacy. The whole book is in
monosyllablesandthereisno punctuation, it
isjustonelongsentence,
butwhatasentence.Itis
an adventure and a
meditation.
In its live form,
readers are seated in a
line.Oneisaskedtostart
reading and, every two
to three pages, another
reader takes over. All
participants must concentrate intensively,
followingthelineswhile
looking out from the
nod of director, Daisy
Campbell, and find meaning in the commadevoid and question mark-less landscape.
Listeners at home can?t enjoy some of the
live delights. As the reading is four hours
withoutabreak,audiencemembersmaywish
to get a drink or got to the toilet. But a reader
will follow them and continue the recital,
even as far as the toilet door.
Iwasareaderonceandalmostwalkedinto
the cubicle. This is a work best heard in a
low-lit room and in one fell swoop. Though
four hours is a commitment, it is far more
potentifyoucanmanagethat.Itisintriguing
how each voice finds meaning without the
instructionofafullstoporexclamationmark.
Its rhythm can sound like something between
UnderMilkWoodandAClockworkOrange.It
creates a cacophony of images, a seemingly
insane collage, but with meaning behind it.
It is a game of language with powerful
momentum and many interpretations.
I was invited by Alistair to go to Brixton
prison to partake in Space is the Place, a
collaboration between The National Space
CentreandNationalPrisonRadio.Thisfourpartseriesallowedprisonerstoaskscientists
about the Cassini mission to Saturn, the
Hubble telescope and
find out exactly what
happens when the sun
swells into a red giant
and engulfs our planet
?don?tworry,you?vegot
a good few years yet.
Hopefully, no one
readingthiswillhearthe
series as this requires
being incarcerated, but
the curiosity from
the participants was invigorating as was the
inspiration that was
provided by the astrophysicists whose work
led to prisoners with no previous interest in
space exploration creating stories and art.
That?sthegreatthingabouttellingpeople
about the contents of the universe, there
should be something to inspire anyone,
whetheritistheauroraborealis,asupernova
orthespaghettificationthatmayoccurifyou
are clumsy enough to fall into a black hole.
Space is the place and we live right in the
middle of it, or at least that?s how it seems.
But I?ll wait until I write about Radio Four?s
TheLifeScientificbeforeItrytodissecthuman
perception of where we are in the universe.
?It?s four hours
without a
break ? so a
reader will
follow you to
the toilet?
THE BIG ISSUE / p35 / May 21-27 2018
Robin Ince @robinince
Dimension
FABRICLIVE 98
Forthcoming in the series:
Sasha, DJ Q, Marquis Hawkes
MUSIC
READ MORE FROM...
CLAIRE JACKSON
VISIT BIGISSUE.COM
By royal appointment
2016?s BBC Young Musician winner Sheku Kanneh-Mason
has already topped the classical music charts ? could the recording of his
performance at Harry and Meghan?s wedding be about to do the same?
W
hen the phone rang, cellist
Sheku Kanneh-Mason happily
agreed to perform at the
young couple?s wedding. The winner of
the 2016 BBC Young Musician
competition is currently studying at the
Royal Academy; lots of music students
moonlight as wedding performers, so the
request was not out of the ordinary.
Except this wedding was in Windsor.
?I was bowled over when Ms Markle
called me to ask if I would play during
the ceremony,? Kanneh-Mason
later tweeted.
The groom had seen Kanneh-Mason
play at a charity event in London and was
impressed. The 19-year-old was selected
to perform alongside the Choir of St
George?s Chapel, where the wedding took
place, overseen by the chapel?s director
of music, James Vivian. A special
orchestra was convened for the day,
conducted by Christopher WarrenGreen, who also led proceedings at the
weddings of the Duke and Duchess of
Cambridge and the Prince of Wales and
the Duchess of Cornwall. And in case
that was all a little conservative,
conductor Karen Gibson and the
Kingdom Choir was also booked for
the service.
If one missed out on ballot tickets
(plotline contender for a future series of
The Crown) the whole service will be
recorded and released via Decca. A
digital version became available on the
day of the wedding with physical copies
on sale from May 25. Last year KannehMason?s debut recording made number
one in the classical chart; could the royal
wedding release do the same?
?The groom
had seen
Kanneh-Mason
play at an event
in London
and was
impressed?
For many classical musos, spring is
marked by one thing: the unveiling of the
Proms programme. As we had
decamped to London?s Imperial War
Museum for this year?s press launch,
there was an inevitability that the
centenary of the end of the First World
War would feature in this new season.
Indeed, the opening night (July 13)
features two works completed in 1918
THE BIG ISSUE / p37 / May 21-27 2018
? Toward the Unknown Region (Vaughan
Williams) and The Planets (Holst), paired
with a new work by Anna Meredith. Five
Telegrams, inspired by correspondence
sent by young soldiers from the trenches,
will be performed outside the Royal
Albert Hall, with specially
commissioned digital images
projected on to the building.
This year?s Proms also celebrates
music by Debussy, Hubert Parry (who
wrote Proms staple Jerusalem, a Last
Night favourite), and Lili Boulanger, all
of whom died in 1918, and Leonard
Bernstein, who was born in the same
year. Thrillingly, there is a generous
peppering of contemporary works
throughout this season, with more
female composers featured than usual.
This development is part of the Proms?
recent pledge to have a 50-50 gender
balance in its contemporary
programming by 2022, a decision that
has been both praised and derided.
Roxanna Panufnik has received the
coveted Last Night commission,
meaning that women composers will
both open and close the season ? a clear
two-finger salute to those who protest
?identity politics?. What better way to
artistically commemorate parliament?s
1918 decision to grant the vote to
(some) women.
@claireiswriting
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIEDS
To advertise: Jenny Bryan 020 3890 3744 / jennifer_Bryan@dennis.co.uk
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THE BIG ISSUE / p38 / May 21-27 2018
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIEDS
To advertise: Jenny Bryan 020 3890 3744 / jennifer_Bryan@dennis.co.uk
Mental illness and brain disorders will a?ect everyone?s
life at some ?me. One in four of us as direct su?erers.
Here at The Psychiatry Research Trust our sole aim is to
raise funds for mental health and brain disease research
being carried out at the interna?onally renowned Ins?tute
of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (KCL), Bethlem
and Maudsley hospitals. We aim to support research by
young scien?sts in a wide range of mental health topics,
including Alzheimer's and Motor Neurone Disease, Ea?ng
Disorders, Psycho?c Illness, Addic?ons and Childhood
Problems
Our target is not just to ?nd b???r treatments for su?erers
but also to understand the underlying causes of mental
illness and brain disease with the goal of ?nding means of
preven?ons and cures for these illnesses.
For further informa?on or to make a dona?on contact:
The Psychiatry Research Trust
PO 87, De Crespigny Park, Denmark Hill, London SE5 8AF
Tel: 0207 703 6217 Web: www.psychiatryresearchtrust.co.uk
Email: psychiatry_research_trust@kcl.ac.uk
Donate on line at www.justgiving.com/psychiatryresearchtrust
Registered Charity Number 284286
ENRO
NOW
SUMMEROPENDAY
ENROL NOW FOR SEPTEMBER
Saturday 9th June 10am - 4pm
Visit WAES Lisson Grove to enrol for
September courses in Westminster!
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WAES Lisson Grove, 219 Lisson Grove, London NW8 8LW
Find out more at waes.ac.uk/opendays
Refreshments available
Find out what you need to bring to enrol at waes.ac.uk/enrol
020 7297 7297 | info@waes.ac.uk | www.waes.ac.uk |
THE BIG ISSUE / p39 / May 21-27 2018
|
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIEDS
To advertise: Jenny Bryan 020 3890 3744 / jennifer_Bryan@dennis.co.uk
FLOR?S STORY
This poor cat was found at the
side of the road having been run
over and left for dead. She had a
broken jaw, damaged eye and a
hernia ? she would have died in
great pain if it had not been for
a young lady who contacted C4C
and took her to a vet. She had a
very complex operation to save
her life ? she has been named
?Flor?.
Please help us to keep on doing
this work! We also trap and neuter
feral, abandoned and stray cats
from the streets ? there are volunteers from the UK and also local
volunteers working 7 days a week
to ensure the good health and
wellbeing of the cats of the island.
Please help us to save lives:
Please donate through our website:
www.care4catsibiza.org
Through our justgive page:
https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/niki-halls1
Send a cheque to:
Care4Cats, Brimar House,
East Street, West Chiltington,
Sussex RH20 2JY
Please support us and see our work on:
ibiza.care4cats
THE BIG ISSUE / p40 / May 21-27 2018
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIEDS
To advertise: Jenny Bryan 020 3890 3744 / jennifer_Bryan@dennis.co.uk
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01392 432951
THE BIG ISSUE / p41 / May 21-27 2018
BG5
HELPING PEOPLE MAKE A DIFFERENCE
Welcome to Big Issue Jobs, the UK?s recruitment service run
by the third sector, for the third sector. Big Issue Jobs will
help you ?nd the perfect job in a third sector organisation.
Working in the third sector offers a number of great
bene?ts, including competitive salaries, job satisfaction, the
opportunity to work with a diverse group of people and the
chance to make a difference to society.
If this sounds interesting then Big Issue Jobs can help
you ?nd your next role, whether that is with a charity, social
enterprise or any other organisation within the third sector.
Our website allows you to search for the perfect
vacancy but you can also set up job alerts. It?s simple ? input
your ideal sector, skill, location and salary requirements and
we will send you jobs that match your criteria.
Take a look at our website for current vacancies across the sector:
jobs.bigissue.com
Big Issue Jobs has been
established to help
charities, social enterprises
and any other organisation
operating in the third sector
to advertise vacancies to a
large, responsive and
relevant audience.
Being a third sector
organisation ourselves, The
Big Issue understands the
importance of this sector
and will offer a cost-effective
method for you to recruit
the best talent for
your vacancy.
We will advertise your
vacancy on The Big Issue
Jobs website, within
The Big Issue magazine
and on our Facebook,
Twitter an LinkedIn
feeds to ensure your
vacancy is seen by the
right audience.
To advertise your current vacancy with Big Issue Jobs please contact:
029 2025 5672
tbijobs@dennis.co.uk
THE BIG ISSUE RECRUITMENT
ADVERTORIAL
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIEDS
To advertise: Jenny Bryan 020 3890 3744 / jennifer_Bryan@dennis.co.uk
We need to raise �0,000 to buy a row of
garages with planning permission for three
3-bed houses.
Invest with us in the people's revolution to
provide low running cost affordable
homes. Interest as usual.
AEOBhousepeople.org.uk
3 Windsor Terrace, Clifton, Bristol BS8 4LW
L
TTel: 0117 926 5931
email: tonycrofts1939@gmail.com
THE BIG ISSUE / p43 / May 21-27 2018
COMP
ION
FOUNDERS
John Bird and Gordon Roddick
Group chair
Nigel Kershaw
Managing director
Russell Blackman
EDITORIAL & PRODUCTION
Editor Paul McNamee
Managing editor Vicky Carroll
Features editor Steven MacKenzie
Digital editor Ben Sullivan
Books editor Jane Graham
News & entertainment Adrian Lobb
Film Edward Lawrenson
Radio Robin Ince
Music Malcolm Jack and Claire Jackson
Business support manager Robert White
Art director Ross Lesley-Bayne
Production editor Sarah Reid
Designer Gillian Smith
Junior designer Matthew Costello
Junior sub editor/writers Dionne Kennedy &
Liam Geraghty
ADVERTISING 020 3890 3899
Dennis Publishing, 31-32 Alfred Pl, Bloomsbury,
London WC1E 7DP
Group advertising director Andrea Mason
Group advertising manager Helen Ruane
Account manager Brad Beaver
Classified and recruitment: 020 3890 3744
Account director Jenny Bryan
Senior sales executive Imogen Williams
Vendor Comments
vendorcomments@bigissue.com
The Big Issue Group
020 7526 3200
113-115 Fonthill Road, Finsbury Park, London,
N4 3HH
Group managing director John Montague
Group finance director Clive Ellis
Group marketing & communications
director Lara McCullagh
Group HR director Elizabeth Divver
Distribution director Peter Bird
Big Issue Invest managing director
Ed Siegel
Big Issue Invest head of lending
Daniel Wilson-Dodd
Big Issue Foundation CEO Stephen Robertson
editorial@bigissue.com
0141 352 7260
@bigissue
2nd floor, 43 Bath Street, Glasgow, G2 1HW
Distribution/London 020 7526 3200
Printed at William Gibbons
BSME Cover of the Year 2017, PPA Cover of the Year
2015, PPA Scotland Cover of the Year 2015 & 2017
WIN!
THE COMMUTER
ON BLU-RAY?
The formidable action sensation that is Liam Neeson packs a punch yet again in the exceptionally
entertaining action-thriller The Commuter ? an exhilarating race-against-time thrill ride with
explosive twists around every bend.
The Commuter is an engrossing mystery plot full of intense action sequences, which sees Neeson
(Taken) and director Jaume Collet-Serra (The Shallows) team up once again, having worked
together on Non-Stop. Boasting a stellar supporting cast of Sam Neill (Jurassic Park), Jonathan Banks
(Breaking Bad), Bafta 2018 Rising Star nominee Florence Pugh (Lady Macbeth) and Patrick Wilson
(TV?s Fargo). The Commuter follows insurance salesman Michael (Neeson) on his daily commute
home as he is contacted by a mysterious stranger (Vera Farmiga, The Conjuring, The Departed), and
forced to uncover the identity of a hidden passenger on his train before the last stop.
The Commuter is out now on digital download, DVD, Blu-ray?
and 4K Ultra HD.
To be in with a chance of winning one of five Blu-ray? copies
answer the question below:
For which other film did Liam Neeson and The Commuter
director Jaume Collet-Serra team up?
PPA Scotland
Consumer Magazine of The Year, 2017
Paul McNamee
British editor of the year 2016, BSME
Send your answers with COMMUTER as the subject to:
competitions@bigissue.com or post to The Big Issue, 43 Bath Street,
Glasgow, G2 1HW. Include your name and address. Closing date is June
5. Include OPT OUT if you don?t want to receive updates from The Big
Issue. We will not pass your details to any third party.
For full T&Cs see bigissue.com
THE BIG ISSUE / p44 / May 21-27 2018
GAMES & PUZZLES
SUDOKU
SPOT THE BALL
B
C
D
E
F
ISSUE 1307 SOLUTION
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
To win Solve it like Sherlock by Stewart
(Last week?s
Ross mark where you think the ball is,
Spot the Ball
cut out and send to:
revealed:
Everton v
Spot the Ball (1308), 43 Bath St, Glasgow,
Nottingham
G2 1HW, by May 29. Include name,
Forest (1989)
address, phone no. Enter by email: send grid
position (eg A1) to competitions@bigissue.com.
PRIZE CROSSWORD
1
2
2
3
3
3
5
4
CRYPTIC CLUES
6
7
8
8
9
10
11
11
10
12
13
12
15
14
15
14
16
17
21
17
18
19
20
24
21
22
Across
5. Collision on uneven
road (4)
7. Entirely in the natural
state? (10)
8. Help needed with a
musical work (4)
9. Having had too
much of a spirited
concoction? (5-5)
12. Aphrodite?s lover said
no in error (6)
13. Caressed each other ?
on the mouth (6)
14. Approach made by Bill
next to pool (6)
16. Despite having two
pairs of spectacles,
he?d lost direction ? as
a result of a jinx? (6)
17. Look at the tumblers
using spectacles (10)
20. There is nothing to be
written about this
test (4)
21. Worthless cargo in
Chinese freighter? (4,2,4)
22. Thought it was in
Merseyside area (4)
To win a Chambers Dictionary, send completed crosswords (either cryptic or quick) to:
The Big Issue Crossword (1308), second floor, 43 Bath Street, Glasgow, G2 1HW by
May 29. Include your name, address and phone number.
Issue 1306 winner is Frank Jackson from Harlow
QUICK CLUES
Down
1. Slightly wet old
copper moved map (4)
2. Weapon fastened in
the centre (4)
3. George and Desmond
?nd rock cavities (6)
4. Felt reluctance when it
became smaller (6)
5. Baker?s new garden
implements found on a
car perhaps (5,5)
6. To tamper with part is
interfering (10)
10. Goods not known to
the customs? (10)
11. Left another Icelander
going round in the
pantomime (10)
15. Understand saying
that is found in the
playground (6)
16. Harry, before a game
of cards, will urge on
the pack of hounds (6)
18. Terrible lust of an
immoral woman (4)
19. Reportedly look for a
member of an Indian
religious sect (4)
Across
5. Large bay (4)
7. Seven-sided (10)
8. Belonging to us (4)
9. Reducing volume
(mus.) (10)
12. Ancient Greek city (6)
13. Most timid (6)
14. Priest (6)
16. Room for movement (6)
17. Reproved (10)
20. Amaze (4)
21. Burial ground (10)
22. Point of perfection (4)
Down
1. African country (4)
2. Luncheon meat (4)
3. South American
rodent (6)
4. Pineapple (6)
5. Partial darkness (10)
6. Extensive (5-5)
10. Utopian (10)
11. Great signi?cance (10)
15. University grounds (6)
16. Madness (6)
18. Principal (4)
19. Border on internal
wall (4)
IN ASSOCIATION WITH
Issue 1307 solution
CRYPTIC: Across ? 3 Lubricate; 7 Fungi; 8 Master-key; 9 Estop; 10 Orbited; 13 Satin; 14 Going; 16 Refer; 17 Etesian; 21 Salic; 22 Somnolent; 23 Llano; 24 Eglantine.
Down ? 1 Ofensive; 2 Institute; 3 Limping; 4 Rotor; 5 Corgi; 6 These; 10 Onion; 11 Trafalgar; 12 Detractor; 15 Gristle; 18 Thong; 19 Sonia; 20 Allot.
QUICK: Across ? 3 Profusely; 7 Revue; 8 Resilient; 9 Merit; 10 Atropos; 13 Naa? ; 14 Nabob; 16 Eased; 17 Tannery; 21 Ingot; 22 Instigate; 23 Goner; 24 Expletive.
Down ? 1 Prominent; 2 Overladen; 3 Pertain; 4 Faint; 5 Sligo; 6 Lingo; 10 Abbey; 11 Press-gang; 12 Sandstorm; 15 Besiege; 18 Annex; 19 Natal; 20 Right.
THE BIG ISSUE / p45 / May 21-27 2018
Photos: Action Images
There is just one simple rule
in sudoku: each row, column
and 3 x 3 box must contain
the numbers one to nine.
This is a logic puzzle and you
should not need to guess.
The solution will be revealed
next week.
A
MY PITCH
Sarah Pearce, 34
OUTSIDE SPECSAVERS, PLYMOUTH
?Selling the magazine changed my life.
I?m one of the best sellers in Plymouth now?
ABOUT ME...
MY DOG
My pet Staffy Medusa can?t live
with me at the moment but I?m
hoping to get her on my pitch
soon. I?ve had her since she was
a puppy and she?s beautiful, I
think she?ll be dead popular
with my regulars.
MY FAVOURITE SHOP
I like watching television and my
favourite show is Emmerdale.
I don?t really have a favourite
character but I like to watch the
programme as much as I can.
ON MY
PITCH?
I?m here every day
from 9am until 5pm,
sometimes 6pm.
I
started selling The Big
Issue at the start of 2017
after a year of sleeping
rough. I had a short spell in
prison for shoplifting, going
in in April and coming out in
August, and I immediately
started selling the magazine
again. It?s been going alright
since then and I?ve built up a
good group of regulars ? they
tell me I?m really polite when
I?m on pitch and I always use
my Ps and Qs. I get a lot of help
from people with food and
drinks and the man across the
road is happy to help me change
money ? it?s really nice.
Before I was working with
The Big Issue, I had been
sleeping rough on a park bench
and I had a real problem with
shoplifting. It got so bad that I
was actually banned from every
shop in Plymouth, which was
really diicult. I had a lot of
temptation to steal, particularly
posh candles because they
were expensive and I knew I
could sell them. Selling The
Big Issue has helped me to
focus on something and not to
feel tempted to shoplift. I?m
now allowed back in the shops,
which has been great for me
and made me feel more part of
the community.
It has also allowed me
to get some temporary
accommodation since I came
out of prison. It?s nice to have
my own room, even though
I don?t really like where I?m
staying at the moment. I?m
hoping to ?nd a new place soon.
My pet Stafy Medusa
also can?t stay with me at the
moment so I?m hoping to get
her back soon. I know that?s the
name of a Gorgon but I decided
to call her that because I liked
the name. I?ve had plenty of
dogs before growing up but she
is beautiful. I also spend a lot of
THE BIG ISSUE / p46 / May 21-27 2018
time writing to my kids ? I have
two boys aged two and four ?
and I would love to get back in
touch with them.
I?m so grateful to The Big
Issue ? selling the magazine
really has changed my life.
I?m one of the best sellers in
Plymouth now and I urge
more people to come and buy
the magazine and get involved.
I think it is important to stop
people begging because that
is a really bad thing, I think
it?s wrong.
I tell people I see out and
about who are homeless or
begging that they should sell
the magazine ? sometimes I get
a good reaction and sometimes
I get a not-so-good reaction.
But that won?t stop me telling
people how great The Big Issue
can be.
Interview: Liam Geraghty
Photo: Mike Berry
respect.Hehasalongway �.99)
THE BIG ISSUE / p21 / May 21-27 2018
INTERVIEW
The only thing standing between Sheila Hancock and a script she?d fallen in love
with was the summit of a rocky 2,000ft mountain. She explains to Adrian Lobb how
she faced it down to tell a story about loneliness, ageing and peak adrenalin
?Well, of course all the actual mountain climbing scenes
will be done on green screen or whatever, won?t they??
Sheila Hancock was already sold on the title role in Edie.
The story of a recently widowed woman breaking away from
the expectation that she would settle intoalifeofquietsolitude,
and instead embarking on a once-in-a-lifetime adventure had
touched the 85-year-old actor?s heart.
So when she was told by the ?lm?s producers that, no, there
was to be no camera fakery in Edie, and instead she would
have to climb Suilven, one of the most challenging peaks in
the Highlands, Hancock had a big decision to make.
?There was a terrible silence,? she recalls. ?They showed
me a picture of this mountain and said theywereratherhoping
I would climb it. I didn?t know whether I could at my age. I
looked it up and it was obvious this was not a thing you should
take lightly. But the script had got to me.
I loved what it was saying. Whereupon
I did a huge, intensive training regime.
I was in the gym every day.?
Over the next months, Hancock
could be found running up hills with
an RAF trainer in Richmond Park,
trudging across diicult terrain, and
pounding the machines at her local
gym. ?I enjoyed getting ?t and strong,?
she says when we meet in central
London.
Once the cast and crew of Edie had
assembled, it was time for Hancock to
put her new ?tness to the test. Then
there was the small matter of conquering her fear of heights.
?There were bits that were totally
terrifying,? says Hancock, describing
a narrow section of path with a sheer
drop either side in vivid detail.
And not only did Hancock have to
tackle this tricky section of Suilven en
route to the summit, she had to do it
repeatedly ? ?lmed ?rst in close-up,
then from various angles, before a ?nal
sweeping overhead shot in which she is the only person visible
in the vast landscape. Then, at last, the pay-of ? achievement
unlocked, fear conquered. Or ?the incredible feeling of having
overcome sheer fucking terror,? as Hancock puts it. She talks
of feeling empowered, of reminding herself of her capabilities.
?I think that is the best feeling in the world. To take on
something you are frightened of and actually do it ? and it
doesn?t have to be climbing a mountain,? she continues. ?It
can be telling your boss you are not happy. Or standing on the
street and selling The Big Issue ? that must be a hell of a task
for some people who are frightened or who have had a tough
time. When you ?nd the courage to do that, and then you have
done it, I imagine that you get the same feeling I got. Which
is that you have climbed your own particular mountain.?
?Choose life? might be a key phrase from a diferent Scottish
?lm, but the Trainspotting tagline also speaks to the themes
of Edie. After years of ful?lling what she sees as her obligations
to her ailing husband ? despite years of unhappiness ? Edie
seizes the day.
?The key themes of the ?lm are, don?t waste your life,? says
Hancock. ?Because it is never too late. That is what the ?lm
says and I am so thrilled it might have that efect on some
people. Now I can aford to be a bit more choosy ? I do not have
to work for the money, which I have had to do all my life ? so I
am into doing work that says something to people. I am very
happy to be in something that seems to be making people feel
better or that they want to change their lives.?
Hancockstillgetshundreds of letters from people who have
been touched by the wit and wisdom of her two bestselling
books, The Two Of Us and Just Me, charting her life with actor
husband John Thaw and exploring her grief after his
death in 2002.
Assheworksonathird volume ? ?a summing-up book, about
life and what is going on in the world? ? she ofers insight into
loneliness and social isolation afecting more and more older
people, the ?lm ofers an important message.
?You can get into a habit of feeling lonely, or that everyone
has died and left me on my own, but if you look around you,
you will ?nd ways of breaking it as Edie
does. She is lonely when she is with her
husband. She is lonely caring for somebody.
?There are an awful lot of lonely
people and I do my damnedest to make
them join clubs, go to classes. It is in
your hands to turn loneliness into
solitude. Sometimes solitude can be
lovely. I love being on my own a lot. It
is a real efort, even for me, to pick up
the phone sometimes. But if I am feeling
a bit lonely, it is in my power to phone
somebody up.?
The depiction of the developing
friendship between Edie and her guide
Jonny (Dunkirk?s Kevin Guthrie) ? with
both learning from the other after
initial mistrust ? is another aspect of
the ?lm that interested Hancock.
?I think it is very sad that at the
moment within society, for whatever
reason young and old seem to be drifting apart a bit,? she says. ?There seems
almost to be an anger between the
never-had-it-so-good generation and
the youngsters who are feeling really hard done by. That is
such a sad gulf to have.?
Talk turns to the big political issue of the day, the one on
which the generation gap was so clear in voting patterns.
?I am heartbroken about Brexit, as heartbroken as any
youngster was. And my grandchildren were distraught about
it. Anything that breaks links with anyone in the rest of the
world to me is suicidal and stupid ? I am not talking
?nancially now, just in terms of life. We need to join hands ?
bridges not walls,? she says.
?But the good thing is that the old people are dying of, you
know? Those youngsters will get older and things will change
again, I am convinced of it.?
There may be a few more mountains to climb ?rst. But after
conquering Suilven, it?s no surprise that Hancock feels the sky
is the limit.
?I must say my children?s first question when I get a
new part is ?Does she go senile, or die?? So it was so
refreshing to be able to say, ?No, she climbs a mountain!? That
was a joy.?
?I do my damnedest
to make lonely people
join clubs. You turn
loneliness into
solitude ? solitude
can be lovely?
Edie is in cinemas from May 25
@adey70
THE BIG ISSUE / p23 / May 21-27 2018
Stand up and be counted:
The Tanzanian girls team fly the
flag at Lokomotiv Stadium
For three of the nine teenagers in the team from
Kenya, playing football in the Street Child World
Cup has been liberating in a literal sense; to take
part in the event in Moscow the trio were released
from a juvenile detention centre in Mombasa,
where they are being held after being rounded up
on the streets. They will go back into custody on
their return.
?These boys exchanged their prison uniforms for
football kits,? says Frederick Achola, a former Kenyan
Olympic boxer who leads the team. He hopes their
participation in the event for more than 200 at-risk
children from 20 countries could help pave the way
for changes to the law that address the criminalisation
of street-connected youth in Kenya.
Achola had to get permission from the courts for
NGO Glad?s House to bring the boys ? who have a short
time left to serve on their two to three-year sentences
? and the team has been accompanied by Philip Nzenge
from Mombasa children?s services. In Kenya, youths
on the streets are regularly detained, sometimes at
centres thousands of miles away from where they have
been living if the local juvenile facility is full.
But the criminalisation of street-connected youth
is just one of the social issues organisers hope to
highlight at the Street Child World Cup, a football
tournament and congress on children?s rights that
piggybacks the Fifa World Cup to draw attention to
at-risk children so participating countries can leverage
the publicity to efect change in their countries.
All the teams have been organised by frontline
organisations working with homeless and socially
excluded children. This time, 12 boys? and 12 girls?
teams come from Belarus, Bolivia, Brazil, Burundi,
Egypt, England, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Kenya,
Mauritius, Mexico, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines,
Russia, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Uzbekistan and the US.
Many of the participating organisations use football
as a tool to engage hard-to-reach youth and provide a
safe space for them to play, whether in the Penha favela
in Rio de Janeiro, where gun violence is endemic, or
in central Cairo, where the Nafas charity runs a
football league for 400 at-risk youth, or in Payatas in
Manila, where the Fairplay for All Foundation helps
children who scavenge on the local rubbish dump for
a living to return to school.
The tournament was a festival of football, with
some young players showing a multitude of skills, tricks
and dribbles, and amazing goals on show.
Unsurprisingly, the stars of the tournament came from
two of the four ?nalists, with Asteria Robert from the
Tanzanian team and Mohammed Abdullah, the
Pakistan captain, impressing the judges to win the
female and male awards. Honourable mentions go to
Brazil?s striker, Thyssa, who scored 14 goals throughout
Photo: ㎝egaFon
The Street Child World Cup is
a remarkable tournament.
Jo Griffin details the incredible and
heartbreaking stories that light it up
;
THE BIG ISSUE / p25 / May 21-27 2018
the tournament to lead her team to victory. In the
?nals, Brazil?s girls won 1-0 against Tanzania and
Uzbekistan boys beat Pakistan on penalties. Team
England had given a performance to make everyone
involved proud, losing to Tanzania in the semi-?nal,
but then beating the Philippines to ?nish third.
This year?s event is the third incarnation of the
Street Child World Cup, which was held in Durban,
South Africa, in 2010, and in Rio de Janeiro in Brazil
in 2014. A mini Olympics for street-connected youth
was held in Rio in 2016. It is the ?rst time that there
has been an equal number of girls? and boys? teams,
a fact that has pleased many of the girls taking part.
?To come here to an international tournament with
a women?s team is really powerful,? said Kalkidan
Haile, 16, from the US team. ?I like to see women
prosper through football.?
For some, even travelling to Moscow has meant
overcoming huge obstacles; many of the young people
lack any identity documents. The girls? team from
Mexico City had to attend two court hearings to get
permission to travel because no one could locate their
parents. The Indian team, from Chennai, includes
several girls who are ?pavement-dwellers?.
?Imagine what it is like trying to get an identity
Coach Frederick
document when you don?t even have a front door,?
Achola, centre,
said Dr MB Pavritha of NGO Karunalaya, which
with the
Kenyan team
brought the team and campaigns for birth certi?cates
for street children. ?One challenge for us is that
informal homes can be cleared away at any moment
so a girl may say, ?my family live in the hut under the
bridge?, and we say: ?what hut under what bridge??
Such high visibility is important for children who
because the hut is no longer there.?
often hide from sight or whose presence in public is
The gathering of young people spans those who still unwelcome, say event organisers UK charity Street
live on the streets with their families to others who have Child United. As well as challenging stereotypes of
faced ?hidden homelessness? ? on the streets, sofa- street-connected youth ? and giving them a chance
sur?ng or staying at friends? houses. Teams of girls who to demonstrate their talents ? a high profile for
at-risk children can serve a
have faced social exclusion in
political purpose.
London and Washington are
?It is crucial to increase the
among those taking part. The
visibility of children/youth in
girls from London came with
street situations. If we don?t
Centrepoint as part of the sixmake them visible by
month Street Football team
England personal development
accounting for them in national
programme.
and global statistics and
For some of the American
protecting them in policies and
girls, the highlight of the event
laws, we won?t be able to hold
is the opportunity for cultural
governments accountable to
exchange. ?Living in the US is
international and national child
a privilege and sometimes it?s
rights commitments,? says
Team USA will address Congress to share their experiences
hard to understand other
Caroline Ford, chief executive
of the Consortium for Street
people?s situations. Every
person I have seen here is just so beautiful? I have never Children, a global network.
This high visibility culminated in a general
been around a global community. It?s a culture shock
but in a good way,? says Kalkidan from the team assembly in the centre of the city where young people
organised by DC Scores, part of a US-wide programme presenteda?MoscowManifesto?callingongovernments
that ofers after-school football and other activities in to uphold their rights around the three issues of
low-income areas. ?One of my biggest takeaways from protection from violence, the right to education and
here will becommunicating with other people whose the right to an identity. To prepare the manifesto, the
young people took part in a congress alongside
?rst language is not English.?
Teammate Jessica Amayo, also 16, says: ?This event the football where they?ve shared experiences of life
in their countries.
proves the universal language really is football.?
The mood has been celebratory as young people have
?It?s unique to have more than 200 young people who
taken over the stands at Lokomotiv, home of the new have been or are street-connected in one place to talk
Russian Premier League champions, to watch each to each other and show each other they are not alone
other?s matches. They?ve seen the Kremlin and Red and to share in an environment without
Square, and were guests at a reception in the garden of judgment and hopefully to come together and bring a
louder voice to what is important,? says Duncan Ross,
British ambassador Laurie Bristow.
THE BIG ISSUE / p26 / May 21-27 2018
IN
NUMBERS
There are at least
150 MILLION
STREET
CHILDREN
around the world
Over
200
CHILDREN
from
20
COUNTRIES
took part in the
Street Child
World Cup
12 BOYS? AND
12 GIRLS?
TEAMS
This is the
THIRD TIME
the tournament
has been held,
after Durban
in 2010 and Rio
in 2014
MOVING THE
GOALPOSTS
of StreetInvest, which works with 15 organisations in
15 countries and has facilitated the congress. The charity
has also pioneered a methodology for counting youth
connected to the streets.
?We hope that their participation changes the
perception of these young people so their rights are
recognised and that something very speci?c changes
for the children in their countries soon,? says Ross. ?It?s
really time that something happened.?
He says youth homelessness is believed to be rising
around the world because of factors like con?ict and
migration, but exact numbers are hard to come by. The
?gure of 150 million street children is widely cited, but
many experts believe it is now much higher.
The Street Child World Cup comes almost a year after
the publication of the United Nations General Comment
on children in street situations, which ofers guidance
to governments on applying the Convention on the
Rights of the Child to street children.
The general comment is seen as a significant
breakthrough in an area that many believe is underreported, but on an individual level many of the teams
will continue their advocacy.
Later this year the American team will go to the US
Congress and share their insights from Moscow,
supported by the National Network for Youth.
Kalkidan says: ?I will say to Congress that
homelessness and poverty should be visible. The other
day a girl from the Philippines said: ?The adults need to
take care of the kids so the kids will take care of them.??
For Nzenge, the official from Mombasa who
accompanied the Kenyan team, spending a week with
the teenagers has been a profoundly affecting
experience. He says: ?When I go back to Kenya, I will
make it my mission to help these children.?
streetchildunited.org
Photo: Adam Davy/PA Archive/PA Images
Photo: Polina Bykonya
THE TOURNAMENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW
More than 3.2 billion people will tune into the
World Cup this summer, but away from the
Russian extravaganza, the world?s
most popular sport is doing good
for others in tournaments around
the world.
Don?t worry, England will
probably lose in them too.
Or maybe not ? because the
Three Lions do have a win to their
name in the INAS World Football
Championships, taking the title in
Japan in 2002.
The tournament gives a chance
to para-athletes with an intellectual disability to
take to the pitch in a battle for global supremacy.
At least eight teams will head to Karlstad in
Sweden between August 5 and 18 with the task of
stopping Saudi Arabia?s all-conquering side, which
has won on the last three occasions.
?Athletes still face barriers in all areas of their
life and for many people sport is an opportunity
to develop life skills like friendship and health,?
INAS executive director Nick Parr says. ?But each
player goes back home after the tournament with
an inspirational story to share with other people in
their position.?
Brazil remain the dominant force in the
mainstream tournament and it?s a similar story in
the IBSA Blind Football World
Championships, which will
take place next month when
16 teams descend on Madrid.
The sele玢o have taken
four titles in the sport, which
sees four outfield players
sporting eye patches and
blindfolds playing with a ball
bearing-filled football while a
sighted goalkeeper acts as a guide from the goal.
The IFCPF European Championships
for athletes with cerebral palsy or an acquired
brain injury will be held in Zeist, Netherlands, from
July 22 to August 22. The profile of the sport has
grown recently, with former Birmingham
City star Jack Rutter leading the charge.
He will be heading to
the tournament as England
coach after a change in
classifications made him
ineligible to play.
And for 2022, Fifa are
making the controversial
switch to a winter World
Cup in Qatar ? but the 16th
Homeless World Cup is ahead of the game with
more than 500 players from 47 countries heading
to Mexico City from November 8-15.
Liam Geraghty @Lazergun_Nun
THE BIG ISSUE / p27 / May 21-27 2018
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THE ENLIGHTENMENT
Books
Escaping death in Yemen page 30
Film
South American gold ? Zama page 33
Radio
An epic in one sentence page 35
BRIGHTON FESTIVAL
TAKE A STAND
?I have an obsession with bandstands,? says artist Morag
Myerscough. Her latest work, Belonging, is a bright bandstand
crowned with placards made by local groups. As the bandstand
tours the country, the placards will change and so will its meaning.
?We are in very turbulent times and so many traditional forms
of connection are breaking down and we are having to ?nd new
ways of connecting,? Myerscough explains. ?There are many
forms of belonging ? it does not have to just be about family
and friends, it can be about the landscape, space, music, shared
experiences and many other things.
?I wanted to discover how you can make work that people
directly connect to, that can bring people together. I love how
bandstands just stand in a place dormant for long lengths of time
and then can be transformed by performance. They are beautiful
empty and when a performance takes place people just gravitate
towards it. I love that they are free for everybody to experience.?
After its seafront stint in Brighton, Belonging will travel to
Ardingly, Crawley, Newhaven, Ditchling and Hastings, hosting
different performances and events.
?When people are involved in the creating and the making
they connect so much more with the piece and ultimately the
piece is their piece,? Myerscough adds. ?I wa
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