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2018-05-23 The Hollywood Reporter

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May 23, 2018
R EA DING T V ’S
TEA LEAV ES
• Fall’s battlegrounds
• Diversity scorecard
• Advertiser anxiety
at the upfronts
EM M Y SEASON 2018
‘I T ’ S A
R E V O L U T I O N’
The Drama Actress Roundtable
Clockwise from top left:
Elisabeth Moss, Angela Bassett,
Sandra Oh, Maggie Gyllenhaal,
Claire Foy and Thandie Newton
were photographed in Hollywood.
“ THE FUNNIEST AND SMARTEST
SHOW IN A GENERATION”
“THE BEST SHOW ON TV” “GRADE A”
“ATLANTA IS PUTTING BLACK LIVES ONSCREEN
IN A WAY THEY’VE NEVER BEEN BEFORE”
“LESS A TV SERIES THAN A CONCEPTUAL WORK OF ART”
“BRILLIANT”
FYC
“AN EXCELLENT AND DECEPTIVELY PRECISE SHOW ABOUT
THE HUMAN CONDITION”
O U T S TA N D I N G C O M E DY S E R I E S
“ ONE OF THE GREATEST DRAMA SERIES
IN TELEVISION HISTORY ”
“ ONE OF THE
“ONE OF THIS DECADE’S
UNQUESTIONABLE DRAMA
“ ONE OF THE
GREATS
BEST
DRAMAS”
OF ALL TIME”
BEST
DRAMAS
OF THE ERA”
“ADDICTIVE....STELLAR CAST....
THE SHOW’S METICULOUS CONSTRUCTION OF AMBIGUOUS CHOICES IS ONE OF THE
FINEST ACHIEVEMENTS
IN RECENT TELEVISION HISTORY”
“ ONE OF THE
BEST
DRAMAS
OF THE DECADE”
FYC
“ ONE OF THE
BESTOFTV
SHOWS
THE DECADE”
O U T S TA N D I N G D R A M A S E R I E S
“JAW-DROPPING TV”
“ONE OF TV’S MOST UNFORGETTABLY INVENTIVE SHOWS”
“EYE-POPPING TV”
“ VISUALLY BOLD
AND STUNNING
“GET READY TO HAVE YOUR
AND INNOVATIVE”
MIND BLOWN”
CLEVELAND PLAIN DEALER
“BRAZENLY INVENTIVE”
“ UNLIKE
ANYTHING ELSE
ON TELEVISION”
FYC
“A
MARVELOUS PIECE
OF TELEVISION”
O U T S TA N D I N G D R A M A S E R I E S
“MASTERPIECE”
“ABSORBING,
CINEMATIC VENTURE”
“COMPELLING AND THRILLING”
“STELLAR CAST”
FYC
O U T S TA N D I N G D R A M A S E R I E S
Development managed by Elad Group. Sponsor: Civic Center Community Group Broadway LLC (C3GB). The complete ofering terms are in an ofering plan available from Sponsor File # CD16-0364.Sponsor: Civic
Center Community Group Broadway LLC, having an address c/o El Ad US Holding, Inc., 575 Madison Avenue, 22nd Floor, New York, New York 10022. Image is an artist rendering. Equal housing opportunity. DBOX
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e xc lusi v e s a l e s & m a r k e t i ng
d ougl a s e l l i m a n de v e l op m e n t m a r k e t i ng
“Chapter Nine: The Gate”
“Chapter Nine: The Gate”
“Chapter Four: Will the Wise”
Issue No. 18, May 23, 2018
FEATURES
54 The Drama
Actress Roundtable
TV’s top female stars unload
on the power of producing,
onscreen nudity (male and
female), learning to say no
and Hollywood’s better-latethan-never push for gender
pay parity: “There was so
much talk, and where was
the action?”
70 ‘It Would Be a Blander
Show If Hillary Had Won’
64 Reading TV’s Tea Leaves
As the upfronts call it a
wrap, THR delves into fall’s
complete schedule and
major battlegrounds, tracks
the diversity scorecard,
examines advertiser anxiety
and tries to make sense of
all the disruption.
Donald Trump looms
large on a slew of Emmy
contenders in which showrunners choose to face the
political climate head-on,
from hypothetical impeachment campaigns to radical
conservative governments.
ON THE COVER
Clockwise from top left:
Elisabeth Moss, Angela
Bassett, Sandra Oh,
Maggie Gyllenhaal, Claire
Foy and Thandie Newton
were photographed by
Miller Mobley on April 29
at Line 204 Studios in
Hollywood. Watch
the actresses discuss
their dramatic roles at
THR.com/video.
54
Angela Bassett
was photographed
April 29 at
Line 204 Studios
in Hollywood.
Photographed by Emily Berl
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
4
M AY 23, 2018
FOR YOUR EMMY® CONSIDERATION
OUTSTANDING DOCUMENTARY SERIES AND ALL OTHER CATEGORIES
©2018 Home Box Office, Inc. All rights reserved. HBO® and related service marks are the property of Home Box Office, Inc.
FOR YOUR EMMY ® CONSIDERATION
OUTSTANDING COMEDY SERIES AND ALL OTHER CATEGORIES
©2018 Home Box Office, Inc. All rights reserved. HBO® and related service marks are the property of Home Box Office, Inc.
FOR YOUR EMMY® CONSIDERATION
OUTSTANDING TELEVISION MOVIE AND ALL OTHER CATEGORIES
©2018 Home Box Office, Inc. All rights reserved. HBO® and related service marks are the property of Home Box Office, Inc.
Issue No. 18, May 23, 2018
“She was a brand before people branded
themselves,” Goldsmith-Thomas (left) says of
producing partner Lopez. The pair was photographed
May 1 at their ofice on the Universal Studios lot.
42
31
Markle’s demure
gown was designed
by a British woman,
Clare Waight Keller,
but for a French
house, Givenchy.
Hollywood and a lot of herself into the royal wedding.
STYLE
19 What Les Does Now
The latest on the CBS-Viacom
showdown between Redstone
and Moonves, as an audacious lawsuit and a dramatic
shareholder meeting sway the
balance of power.
26 The Race: How Not to
Jump the Shark
Longevity means being
unafraid to audition in your
70s, writes Happy Days and
Barry star Henry Winkler:
“Young executives need to
know you can walk without
a walker.”
ABOUT TOWN
31 The Meaning of Meghan
How the star brought a little
49 Bloom Bijoux
Take a cue from Cannes’ red
carpet, where a floral fixation
ruled, with a pair of spring’s
showstopping earrings.
THE BUSINESS
42 Creative Space:
Jennifer Lopez and
Elaine Goldsmith-Thomas
52 Watch ‘Modding’ Has
Gone Mainstream
As World of Dance returns,
the collaborators open up
on plans to direct, the delay
on NBC’s Bye Bye Birdie Live!
and why you won’t see J.Lo on
another network drama.
For the first time, disrupter
timepiece companies are
being acknowledged by luxury brands and teaming
up with the likes of Spike
Lee and Lenny Kravitz.
44 Cannes vs. Netflix:
A Lose-Lose Proposition
It was quiet on the Croisette
this year thanks to a silly war
that kept streaming movies
(and the stars who generate buzz) out and hurt indie
producers as much as the
festival itself.
Huckleberry
LTD stainless steel
Rolex Daytona
with plant motif and
custom aqua dial;
$45,000, available
at Trois Pommes.
REVIEWS
72 Critic’s Notebook
THR chief film critic Todd
McCarthy rounds up
the best of a stronger than
expected Cannes festival.
Photographed by Christopher Patey
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
52
8
M AY 23, 2018
THIS WEEK ON THR VIDEO
Watch some of the year’s top
actresses discuss the power behind
their performances.
WATCH: COURTESY OF HUCKLEBERRY. MARKLE: BRIAN LAWLESS - WPA POOL/GETTY IMAGES.
THE REPORT
F O R
Y O U R
E M M Y
®
®
C O N S I D E R A T I O N
“SO MANY HARD KNOCKS AMID THE HILARITY OVER 100 EPISODES OF MOM,
ONE OF NETWORK TV’S MORE
MEMORABLY GRITTY SITCOMS...”
–TVINSIDER
“...IT’S LARGELY DRIVEN BY THE
CHEMISTRY
AND CAMARADERIE
BETWEEN...JANNEY AND...FARIS.”
–THE NEW YORK TIMES
“...BALANCING DEEP EMOTIONAL MOMENTS ABOUT PEOPLE IN CRISIS WITH
SHARP HUMOR.”
–USA TODAY
“Refreshingly, Young Sheldon has enough
“...UNCOMMONLY
WELL-ACTED AND
CLEVERLY CONCEIVED...
HEART, CREATIVE
INDEPENDENCE,
AND INTEGRITY
with the casting coup of the year:
Iain Armitage’s performance
as a nine-year-old
Sheldon Cooper is exceptional.”
to stand alone.”
– THE DAILY BEAST
“The emotional complexity of this
Big Bang Theory prequel will
– YAHOO TV
STUN HATERS
AND FANS ALIKE.”
“...Young Sheldon has
PERFECT PITCH.”
– NEW YORK POST
KNOCK
KNOCK
KNOCK
– INDIEWIRE
KNOCK
KNOCK
KNOCK
KNOCK
KNOCK
KNOCK
“HEADING INTO ITS SECOND DECADE, BIG BANG IS STILL DELIVERING
BIG LAUGHS WITH GREAT CHARACTER COMEDY.”
—TV Guide Magazine
F
O
R
Y
OUTSTANDING
DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING DIRECTING
FOR A DRAMA SERIES
JASON BATEMAN
“The Toll”
OUTSTANDING WRITING
FOR A DRAMA SERIES
CHRIS MUNDY
“The Toll”
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTOR
IN A DRAMA SERIES
JASON BATEMAN
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTRESS
IN A DRAMA SERIES
LAURA LINNEY
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTRESS
IN A DRAMA SERIES
JULIA GARNER
O
U
R
E
M
M
Y®
C
O
N
S
I
D
E
R
A
T
I
O
N
Matthew Belloni
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR
Alison Brower
Shanti Marlar
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TELEVISION & MEDIA
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HUMAN RESOURCES
NETFLIX PROUDLY CONGRATULATES
WINNER
BAFTA TV AWARD 2018
SUPPORTING ACTRESS
VANESSA KIRBY
F O R Y O U R E M M Y®
CONSIDER ATION
OUTSTANDING
SUPPORTING ACTRESS
IN A DRAMA SERIES
Editor’s Letter
Contributors
As awards editor, Rebecca
Ford oversees THR’s
Emmy coverage, kicking
of this week. The Bay
Area native spent six years
as a film reporter. In her
first year covering TV, she
notes “there is so much
more content — hundreds
of shows.” This week’s
Emmy Playbook (page 70),
by Michael O’Connell,
looks at the Trump efect
on episodic TV.
P
eople (mostly New Yorkers)
say there are only two seasons in Los Angeles: Oscar
and Emmy. I’d argue that like
the L.A. weather, the Hollywood
awards seasons are all blurring
together. The Oscar campaign for
Get Out began not in the traditional fall window but last spring
when Universal staged a “DVD
release party” and invited a bunch
of guild and film Academy members. And in the “Peak TV” era, the
jockeying for the prestige (and
viewers) that come with industry
awards has turned into a yearround endeavor.
For me — and for many of
the busy awards voters who are
just trying to keep up with all
the good stuff — the Oscar and
Emmy seasons begin when The
Hollywood Reporter’s Roundtables
do. In addition to assembling
interesting groups for one-of-akind conversations, THR has
↑ Clockwise from left: Thandie Newton,
Maggie Gyllenhaal, Elisabeth Moss, Angela
Bassett, THR’s Lacey Rose, Claire Foy
and Sandra Oh were photographed April 29
at Line 204 Studios in Hollywood.
SET YOUR DVR!
SUNDANCETV AIRS
THR ROUNDTABLES
On June 24, the fourth
season of Close Up With
The Hollywood Reporter
premieres on SundanceTV,
featuring a lively conversation with TV’s top
comedy actors (this issue’s
Roundtable airs July 15).
The series is produced by
THR’s Jennifer Laski
and a team that includes
Stephanie Fischette, Victor
Klaus, Victoria McKillop,
Laela Zadeh and Natalie
Heltzel. Extended versions
are available on THR.com
following each broadcast,
and previous seasons are
available on Hulu.
a great track record of inviting
future nominees and winners.
Case in point: Last year, 22 of
our TV Roundtable participants
became Emmy nominees.
This year’s groupings, coordinated by awards editor Rebecca
Ford (pitch her, not me!), moderated by TV editor Lacey Rose and
produced by photo/video director Jennifer Laski and her team,
kick off with this issue — and the
drama actresses came ready
to rumble. It’s an incendiary conversation with beautiful photos
shot by Roundtable veteran Miller
Mobley and styled by fashion &
beauty director Carol McColgin.
Yes, it’s officially Emmy season.
Matthew Belloni, editorial director
Photographed by Emily Berl
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
14
M AY 23, 2018
Illustrator Lucy Engelman
created “a wall of foliage”
for a feature on earrings
in this week’s Style section
(page 49). Engelman says
she loves the soft, playful
tone of florals and making
up “imaginary nature.”
Originally from Chicago,
she lives in Pittsburgh
surrounded by her houseplants and snoring dog.
She also has worked with
Time and Bon Appetit.
FORD: AUSTIN HARGRAVE. ENGELMAN: COURTESY OF SUBJECT. WINKLER: SLAVEN VLASIC/GETTY IMAGES.
THR ROUNDTABLES RETURN WITH A
GATHERING OF POWERHOUSE ACTRESSES
The man best known as
“The Fonz” — Henry
Winkler — contributes
“How Not to Jump the
Shark” (page 26), about
auditioning for the HBO
series Barry. Winkler says
making a TV show hasn’t
changed from the era of
Happy Days: “I’m still
knocking on wood. Every
time I show up on set in the
morning, I am as excited
as I was the very first time.”
CONSIDER IT #MARVELOUS
I N A L L C AT E G O R I E S I N C L U D I N G O U T S TA N D I N G C O M E DY S E R I E S
OU TSTA NDI NG LEA D ACT R ES S I N A C O M EDY S ER I ES
RACHEL BROSNAHAN
OU TSTAN D IN G S U PPO RT I NG ACT R ES S
IN A C OM E DY S ER I ES
OU TSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR
I N A C O M EDY S E RIES
ALEX BORSTEIN
MA RIN HI NK L E
TONY SHALHOUB
MICHAEL ZEGEN
↑ Digital
YouTube Pivot
A tech giant moves into
Spotify territory. p. 20
Television
Fox TV’s Rival
Sinclair plans to challenge
Murdoch’s empire. p. 22
WOJCICKI: FILMMAGIC/FILMMAGIC FOR YOUTUBE. BAKISH: JOHN LAMPARSKI/GETTY IMAGES. REYNOLDS: DAVE J HOGAN/GETTY IMAGES FOR TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX. GORDON: ALBERTO E. RODRIGUEZ/GETTY IMAGES. SANDERS: VINCENT SANDOVAL/GETTY IMAGES. KERN: L. COHEN/WIREIMAGE.
Heat Index
Ryan Reynolds
His Deadpool 2 opens to
$300.4 million worldwide, a
R-rated record (though the
U.S. number, $125.5 million, is
behind the first film’s
$132.4 million), and he’s set
to star in Michael Bay’s
Six Underground for Netflix.
Mark Gordon
The TV producer sufers two
cancellations of bubble shows
(Designated Survivor and
Quantico, though the former
could be revived by Netflix).
Vernon Sanders
The NBC alum joins Amazon
Studios as co-head of TV
(with Albert Cheng) as new
boss Jennifer Salke begins
assembling her team.
Why Moonves Is
Desperately Trying to
Fend Off a Merger
The CBS chief says it’s all about shareholder value, but he
privately considers the Viacom channels an albatross, thinks
there are better deals and considers Bob Bakish a threat
BY PAUL BOND
I
Brad Kern
The NCIS: New Orleans
showrunner steps down amid
claims that he sexually
harassed female subordinates
and created a hostile work
environment on set.
Showbiz Stocks
$57.86 (+33%)
WORLD WRESTLING
ENTERTAINMENT (WWE)
THR reported the wrestling
firm is negotiating a 5-year TV
deal with Fox for $205 million
annually, three times more than
NBCUniversal pays.
$35.34 (-3%)
CINEMARK HLD. (CNK)
Rising salaries and slower
growth in the price of tickets
cause the movie theater
chain to post softer quarterly
financials than expected.
n an era when Disney is aiming to acquire most of 21st
Century Fox for $52.4 billion and AT&T is attempting to
merge with Time Warner in an
$85 billion deal, scale has become
the priority for media titans. Yet,
presented with the opportunity
to lead a combined CBS-Viacom,
Leslie Moonves didn’t simply
rally the CBS board of directors
to support his “no merger” view
— he went “nuclear” on National
Amusements Inc., the entity run
by Sumner and Shari Redstone that
holds an 80 percent voting stake
in both companies. On May 17,
the CBS board voted 11-3 to issue
a dividend of shares that would
dilute NAI’s control to 17 percent
— the three “no” votes coming
from Shari Redstone and Robert
Klieger and David Andelman,
two board members who are
Redstone family lawyers.
If a judge approves Moonves’
Hail Mary dilution plan — which
one person close to the situation
likens to “swatting a fly with
a sledgehammer” — the executive
will have killed a roughly $12.3 billion merger that few on Wall Street
seem to be advocating to begin
with. Indeed, each time it appears
CBS might purchase
Viacom, shares of
the former drop, and
when it seems the
acquisition is a long
Bakish
shot, CBS shares rise.
But short-term stock movements
often are dismissed when negotiating multibillion-dollar mergers,
raising the question: What’s
Moonves really after — or trying
to prevent?
Illustration by Victor Kerlow
May 14-21
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
19
M AY 23, 2018
Viacom, CBS and NAI declined
to comment, but numerous
sources close to the situation say
the answer is fourfold: First,
Moonves has grown weary of playing second fiddle to the Redstones
and sees anti-Viacom sentiment
as a rare opportunity to wrest a
good chunk of control away from
them. National Amusements,
in fact, addressed just that when
it said May 17 that CBS management “cannot wish away the
reality that CBS has a controlling
shareholder.” Moonves, 68,
who had been friendly with Shari,
64, until suing NAI on May 14
to block the Viacom merger, has
never been comfortable with her
as overlord. In private, Moonves
points out that even Shari’s
father, now a fragile 94, said in a
letter made public a decade ago
that he gifted to his daughter her
interest in NAI — and therefore in CBS and Viacom — but
that he “built these great media
companies” with “little or no
contribution” from his children,
including Shari.
Second, Moonves wants nothing
to do with Viacom’s rebounding
but still struggling TV channels.
Sources say the CBS CEO considers those networks an albatross,
fearing he’d be pressured into
bundling MTV, Nick, Comedy
Central, VH1 and others into CBS
carriage deals. But while some
on Wall Street say Viacom’s best
option is to sell itself off piece
by piece, the odds of Moonves being
allowed to cherry-pick the assets
that interest him — Nickelodeon
and possibly the Paramount
film and TV studio (worth $3.5 billion, says Bernstein analyst Todd
Juenger) — are long.
“Moonves believes that the
value of CBS’ assets will not be
maximized by combining with
Viacom, which would increase
CBS’ exposure to the declining
U.S. pay-television market, as
well as cable advertising,” says
Ben Weiss, chief investment
officer at 8th & Jackson Capital
The Report
Where Wall Street Sees Value
Behind the Headlines
Revenue for Viacom’s cable channels grew 2 percent to $10.1 billion in 2017. CBS, which was free for carriers
before striking its first consent agreement in 2006, has seen rapid growth in that arena BY PAUL BOND
The net
boasts nearly
100M subs.*
$1.13
2B
CBS’ Rising
Retrans/
Reverse Comp
Revenue
$1.2
$150M
$250M
.8
2010
2012
2013
$.56
.6
2016
2017
$.27
$.25
VH1
Comedy
Central
$.2
.4
CBS has set a goal
of $2.5B by 2020.
500M
$.77
1
$500M
1B
revenue per
subscriber,
per month
$1.25B
$1B
1.5B
CBS vs.
Viacom
.2
CBS
2020
Nick
MTV
TV
Land
Source: S&P Global Market Intelligence, SEC filings, THR research. *Not including CBS All Access.
Management, adding that
“CBS wants to reduce its reliance
on advertising.”
Third is that, while he craves
content for OTT services CBS
All Access and Showtime
Anytime, there are potentially
cheaper acquisitions that
make more sense than Viacom,
which sports an $11 billion
market cap (Northlake Capital
Management founder Steven
Birenberg suggests MGM,
Lionsgate or Sony Pictures).
And the fourth Moonves concern boils down to Viacom CEO
Bob Bakish. Indeed, after Shari
insisted that CBS explore an
acquisition of Viacom, Moonves
“reluctantly,” says an insider,
offered 0.55 shares of CBS for each
Viacom share. Viacom countered
at 0.68 shares, and the two met
near the middle at 0.6135. The
deal-breaker was that Bakish, 54,
would have a major role in the
merged company. When Moonves
balked, Shari sweetened the offer
by simply asking that Bakish be a
board member, but that was also
unpalatable to Moonves, even
though there was never a question
that he would be CEO of a merged
CBS-Viacom.
Two decades ago, when Viacom
and CBS were a single company
run largely by co-presidents
Moonves and Tom Freston, the
latter’s unofficial chief strategist
was Bakish. Hardworking and
ambitious, he was by all accounts
a popular executive — even with
YouTube’s ‘Trojan Horse’ to Boost Service
An overhaul to the company’s subscription business bets that music
habits of its 1.8 billion users are the key to competing with major rivals
BY NATALIE JARVEY
ouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki confused attendY
ees at the Code Media Conference in February
when she said that she considered YouTube
Red, the subscription video service behind originals like Cobra Kai and Step Up: High Water, “really
a music service.”
Her comment took on new meaning when, on
May 16, Google-owned YouTube said that it was
overhauling its subscription business, doing away
with YouTube Red and in its place
introducing two new oferings: the
$10-per-month YouTube Music
Premium for ad-free music streaming and the $12-per-month YouTube
Cohen
Premium, which combines the
music subscription with ad-free video viewing
and access to original programming.
The rebrand puts music at the center of
YouTube’s push to sign up subscribers, a move that
YouTube global head of music Lyor Cohen says
was driven by the “enormous consumption of music
happening globally” on YouTube. It also places
YouTube squarely in the race for music streaming
dominance already led by Spotify (75 million subscribers) and Apple Music (50 million paid and free
members). “Music subscription streaming is still
relatively new,” explains Cohen, who joined YouTube
at the end of 2016 to smooth over its relationship
with the music industry and pave the way for the
introduction of a subscription streaming service.
“There’s so much opportunity in front of us.”
The move also appears to be a tacit admission
by YouTube that there is more of that opportunity in music subscriptions than there is in video,
a landscape overrun with competition from
Moonves. Now, though, Moonves
considers him a threat because
he doesn’t want another Redstone
ally on the board, nor does he
want Bakish to be coronated his
heir apparent. “Les doesn’t like
to be questioned, especially by
someone who backs Shari,” says
one insider.
If the Redstones really want
to fire Moonves, they’d have
to replace much of the CBS board,
risking accusations they were not
acting in the best interest of stockholders in doing so. And Moonves
would depart with a golden
parachute likely worth north of
$180 million.
Given the legal back-and-forth,
many on Wall Street, though,
figure the NAI-Viacom-CBS
drama will not come to a close
for another six months or so.
“For him to claim he’s only trying
to protect shareholders is ridiculous,” says a high-ranking Viacom
loyalist. “The CBS board is captive to its CEO.”
deep-pocketed players including Netflix, Amazon,
Hulu and Apple. At YouTube, meanwhile, sources
say the budget for originals remains in the highnine figures and has not expanded meaningfully
despite the recent success of Cobra Kai. “The
premium subscription service has been a tepid
success at best,” notes GBH Insights analyst
Daniel Ives. But YouTube only needs to convert a
small percentage of its 1.8 billion users into paying
subscribers to become a music streaming threat,
one that Morgan Stanley — which values YouTube
at $160 billion (more than Disney) — estimates
could have 25 million subs by 2022. Ives believes
music streaming is the “low-hanging fruit” that
could help YouTube quickly build up a subscriber
base before it invests further in resource-intensive
video: “It’s their Trojan horse.”
Where YouTube Stands Among Giants
The Google streamer has a higher valuation than both Netflix and Spotify yet trails Apple and Amazon
The iPhone maker’s Apple Music
service now has 50 million
members either paying for a
subscription or using a free trial.
$1T
800B
$920B
$768B
600B
400B
$160B*
The newly public
company has 75 million
paid subscribers and
170 million total users.
$143B
$27B
200B
Amazon
Apple
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
YouTube
Netflix
Spotify
Source: Morgan Stanley; THR research * YouTube’s valuation is based on Morgan Stanley estimates
20
M AY 23, 2018
COHEN: SEAN MATHIS/GETTY IMAGES FOR SXSW.
$2.5B
$2.5B
F
O
R
Y
O
U
R
E
M
M
Y
®
C
O
N
S
I
D
E
R
A T
I
O
N
O U T S TA N D I N G C O M E DY S E R I E S
“
THE BEST SHOW
”
OF THE YEAR.
The Report
Behind the Headlines
But before Baltimore-based
Sinclair declined comment, and
Sinclair can take on Fox News, it
Sinclair executive chairman
must wait for federal regulators
David Smith did not respond to
to approve the company’s purchase an emailed request for comment.
of Tribune Media, which would
Some conservative media
give Sinclair a cable channel, WGN
insiders, however, don’t think
America, that could be converted
Sinclair will go through with a
to right-leaning news and opinplan to compete against Fox
ion. “They don’t want to cause any
News, and these include one of
waves, but they are preparing
the television anchors who has
for the network as soon as they
spoken with Smith and Sinclair.
can,” says one source.
This person points
Former FCC
out that Sinclair
TV Markets
commissioner
“can’t even begin to
Stations owned
sort of half-make
Michael Copps, who
or operated
plans” until after the
has loudly opposed
Tribune deal closes.
Sinclair’s $3.9 billion
SINCLAIR
Another source
takeover of Tribune,
close to Sinclair plays
says the company is
down the signifi“trying to look
cance of meetings
as nonthreatenFOX
with Fox News taling as possible and
ent, saying that “a lot
make this deal
of meetings come
look as innocuous
and go.”
as possible.”
One of the most high-profile
In early May, 21st Century
skeptics is Charles Herring, who,
Fox agreed to snap up seven TV
stations from Sinclair in a
as an executive for conservative
$910 million deal that could help
news channel One America News
Sinclair get regulatory approval
Network, has plenty of skin in
for its Tribune bid.
the game. He says, “Sinclair,
Publicly, Sinclair leadership
even with all its resources, will
has denied rumors of a Fox News
have an uphill battle in buildchallenge. But Copps is unmoved:
ing a national cable news brand
“Watch what they do and not
that will resonate with its target
what they say.” A spokesman for
audience.”
Sinclair Moves Closer
to Fox News Challenge
191
28
Company execs are taking meetings with conservative stars as a
prelude to launching a competitor to the Murdoch-led juggernaut
BY JEREMY BARR
I
t may be just a matter of
time before Fox News gets
a real challenger from the
right. Conservative media giant
Sinclair Broadcast Group, which
has long quieted speculation
about plans to create a rival to
Rupert Murdoch’s cable news
empire, is making new moves to
lay the groundwork for the plan.
Sinclair is speaking with both
current and former Fox News
personalities about joining the
would-be network, which a knowledgeable source says could be
led by Tribune Media executive
Sean Compton. The company also
recently made an overture to conservative radio host
Michael Savage, THR
has learned. Savage
did not respond to a
request for comment.
Savage
(One name not in
the mix: Ousted Fox News host Bill
O’Reilly, whom Sinclair CEO Chris
Ripley has said the company isn’t
looking to hire. Newsmax, a digital conservative news outlet, has
courted O’Reilly.)
Gays and Lesbians Disappeared From the Big Screen in 2017
all Me by Your Name may have been celeC
brated at this year’s Oscars, but studio movies
actually turned away from depicting LGBTQ
characters last year. Surveying 109 films released
in 2017 by the major studios for
lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender
and queer characters, only 14 films
(12.8 percent) were found to be
Ellis
inclusive, down from the 23 out of 125
films (18.4 percent) in 2016 and the
lowest percentage since GLAAD began tracking
LGBTQ characters in 2012.
Adding in judgments about how those characters were treated, the study found no studio
deserved an “excellent” or even a “good” ranking.
Fox, with a gay couple amid the crew in Alien:
Covenant, and Universal — although the lesbian
Missing the Grade
LGBTQ-INCLUSIVE FILMS
UNIVERSAL
4
2017 TOTAL FILMS
14
LIONSGATE
2
19
WARNER BROS.
2
20TH CENTURY FOX
2
18
Among mainstream
films in 2017,
GLAAD found only 28
LGBTQ characters.
14
PARAMOUNT
2
11
SONY
1
25
WALT DISNEY
1
8
5
10
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
15
22
20
25
M AY 23, 2018
character Cynthia Rose (Ester Dean) is relegated
to the sidelines in Pitch Perfect 3 — ranked highest with an “insuficient,” but Disney, Paramount
and Sony were deemed “poor,” and Warner Bros.
and Lionsgate got “failing” grades. The report
pointed to Warners’ CHiPs as a movie that treats
gays as punch lines. “It’s not cool to be homophobic,” Dax Shepard’s Jon tells Michael Pena’s
Ponch, who cringes at the sight of shirtless men,
“but I respect your right to be.”
With GLAAD claiming that 20 percent of 18- to
34-year-old Americans identify as LGBTQ, president and CEO Sarah Kate Ellis notes, “If Hollywood
wants to remain relevant with these audiences and
keep them buying tickets, they must create stories
that are reflective of the world LGBTQ people and
our friends and family know.”
ELLIS: ANDREW TOTH/GETTY IMAGES. SAVAGE: AP PHOTO/JOHN STOREY.
GLAAD claims double-digit declines in representation year-over-year, with no trans characters in major films at all BY GREGG KILDAY
F O R YO U R EM M Y C O N SI D ER AT I O N
®
OUTSTANDING LIMITED SERIES
The Report
Behind the Headlines
Broadcast TV
Cable TV
Domestic
International
Gross Cume % Chg Gross Cume
18-49
Live+3
Viewership
Live+3
1.
Deadpool 2 FOX
125.5 125.5(1) -
Total
1.
174.9*82 174.9 300.4
Thanks largely to the one-two punch
of the Deadpool sequel and rival Avengers pic,
domestic revenue was up a staggering
67 percent over the same weekend a year ago.
2.
3.
Avengers: Infinity War DISNEY
29.5 595.8(4) -53 84.4*55 1.2B
Book Club PARAMOUNT
N/A
13.6 13.6(1)
N/A
Young Sheldon CBS
3.0
15.6M
The Good Witch HALLMARK
2.5M
3.
Westworld HBO
2.4M
4.
The Haves and Have Nots OWN
2.3M
5.
Into the Badlands AMC
1.8M
6.
The Last OG TBS
1.7M
7.
Billions SHOWTIME
1.5M
8.
The Terror AMC
1.5M
18.0M
6.
Empire FOX
2.2
6.7M
7.
Mom CBS
2.0
10.9M
36.7
8.
American Idol ABC
2.0
9.8M
9.
30.8
9.
Survivor CBS
2.0
10. Krypton SYFY
Show Dogs GLOBAL ROAD
6
6(1)
N/A
840K
6.8
Overboard LIONSGATE
4.6 36.9(3) -53 4.1*17
21.4
58.3
A Quiet Place PARAMOUNT
3.9 176.1(7) -39 18.8*51 120.3 296.4
John Krasinski’s thriller has passed Get Out
($176 million) domestically while at the same
time bowing to a stellar $18 million in China,
hardly a bastion for American horror fare.
10. Modern
2.0
9.3M
Chicago P.D. NBC
1.9
9.2M
12.
The Middle ABC
1.9
7.2M
13.
Law & Order: SVU NBC
1.8
7.7M
14.
Mom (9:30 p.m. Special) CBS
1.7
9.7M
15.
Chicago Fire NBC
1.7
8.9M
Closer
Look
407
The Americans FX
1.45M
One to Watch
11.
The Royals E!
All of the excitement for royal nuptials,
something hammered on by the cable
net, did little for its on-theme original
drama — down 10 percent from 2017.
L.A.’s Creative Job Growth
The county has steadily added industry pros
Feel Pretty STX ENTERTAINMENT
1.27 46.6(5) -67 1.8*14 19.1
65.7
2016
RBG MAGNOLIA
1.25 3.8(3) +5
N/A
N/A
3.8
2014
Super Troopers 2 FOX
1.21 29(5) +24 N/A
N/A
29
2011
Black Panther DISNEY
860K 697.8(14) -59 N/A
647.2 1.3B
399.5K
367.4K
12.
353.8K
13.
Tully FOCUS
560K 8.4(3)
50
100
150
200
250
300
350
400
14.
-75
100K*1 700K
9.1
Disobedience BLEECKER STREET
522K 1.9(4) +24 N/A N/A
1.9
Spike Lee’s BlacKkKlansman
earned a rousing welcome,
but few major awards hopefuls
emerged at this year’s fest
hile the Palme d’Or
W
eluded Spike Lee at this
year’s Cannes Film Festival, his
1.3M
Family ABC
6.8M
Cannes Fails to
Field Many
Oscar Hopefuls
BY GREGG KILDAY
A steady burn, the period drama has
done wonders for AMC’s Monday
night — helping it lead cable’s scripted
oferings at the top of the week with
an average 1.8 million viewers.
NCIS CBS
2.2
6.
11.
3.
2.
5.
Breaking In UNIVERSAL
6.8 29.1(2) -61 300K*6 1.7
10. I
Roseanne ABC
4.0
14.4M
Fear the Walking Dead AMC
3.6M
Grey’s Anatomy ABC
10.0M
3.0
5.
Rampage WARNER BROS.
1.6 92.5(6) -54 4.4*61 314.5
2.
1.
4.
Life of the Party WARNER BROS.
7.6 30.9(2) -58 1.3*9 5.8
9.
A wedding helps the CBS hit top its
year-ago finale and best Roseanne for
the first time since ABC put it back on
the air — leading the week’s runner-up
by 13 percent in the key demo.
13.6
4.
8.
The Big Bang Theory CBS
4.5
20.4M
1.8B
Older femmes fueled the movie to a betterthan-expected showing. Those over 50 made
up 60 percent of all tickets sold, the majority
of them female (80 percent).
7.
Audience
Live+3
Otis Report on the Creative Economy; Bureau of Labor Statistics.
BlacKkKlansman, which both satirizes and protests racism, nabbed the
next best thing, the Grand Prix, for
what jury president Cate Blanchett
called “a film about a quintessentially
American crisis.” And that suggests
the Focus release also should find a
receptive audience among Oscar
voters — and maybe even an eventual
best picture nom. If so, it may be
the only major awards contender
to emerge from this year’s fest, since
Netflix held back eagerly awaited
films like Alfonso Cuaron’s Roma —
and the major studios, save for a Solo:
A Star Wars Story red carpet stroll,
avoided the costs and press scrutiny
of the Croisette. Wildlife, Paul
Dano’s period family drama starring
Carey Mulligan, which kicked of
the Critics’ Week sidebar, does boast
a 100 percent Rotten Tomatoes
ranking, but the IFC Films release ultimately could prove more of a player
at the Spirit Awards.
The other Cannes debuts likely to
get Oscar noms mostly will be in the
foreign-language category. Nadine
Labaki’s Lebanese tearjerker
Capernaum, to be released by Sony
Classics, scored the third-place
Jury Prize, while Poland’s Pawel
Pawlikowski earned director honors
for his 1950s-set love story Cold
War, coming from Amazon. As for
the Palme d’Or winner, Hirokazu
Kore-eda’s Shoplifters, about a family of petty thieves, it doesn’t have
a U.S. distributor and will need to be
Japan’s Oscar submission if it’s to
have any awards traction at all.
15.
Box-ofice source: comScore; estimates in $ millions; ( )Weekends in release; *Territories. Broadcast source: Nielsen, live-plus-3, week of May 7. Cable TV source: Nielsen, live-plus-3 scripted series, week of May 7.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
24
M AY 23, 2018
OSCAR: COURTESY OF ©A.M.P.A.S. ROYALS: JAMES DIMMOCK/E! ENTERTAINMENT. TERROR: AMY MONAGHAN/AMC. BIG: MICHAEL YARISH/CBS. QUIET: JONNY COURNOYER/PARAMOUNT PICTURES. BOOK: MELINDA SUE GORDON/PARAMOUNT PICTURES. DEADPOOL: COURTESY OF TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX.
Box Office
F O R Y O U R E M M Y C O N S I D E R AT I O N
O U T S TA N D I N G D R A M A S E R I E S
®
A NETFLIX ORIGINAL SERIES
The Report
Awards Analysis
E M MYS TH E RACE
How Not to
Jump the Shark
Longevity means being unafraid to audition in your 70s,
says the Happy Days and Barry star: ‘Young executives need
to know you can walk without a walker’ BY HENRY WINKLER
A
— and I was amazed by how
funny and strange it was. My audition’s set, and I think, “I can do
this character, an acting teacher. I
had 12 or 13 acting teachers at Yale.
I know acting teachers.”
The honest truth is that when
you’re in your 70s, young executives need to know that you can
talk without assistance and
walk without a walker. They need
to see you. And if they need to
see you, you need to show up. So I
ran lines with my son Max, who
is a director (and brother of Zoe
and Jed). He’s very strict. “Dad,
that’s an exclamation point. Dad,
revere the writer.”
When I went in, I waited
in those metal chairs like at the
very beginning of my career.
Eventually, they called me in. I
made Hader laugh. And I thought,
“No matter what happens, I
have made this man — a man who
I have watched all these years
speak in nonsensical Italian and
play Stefon on Saturday Night
Live — laugh.” I got in my car and
I drove home. And waited, as you
always do.
It is an awfully long wait.
Bill called. He wrote two scenes
the night before and asked me
if I wanted to come in and “play.”
Left: (From left) Anson Williams, Don Most, Ron Howard and Winkler on Happy Days in 1974.
Right: Sarah Goldberg plays a student and Winkler an acting teacher on HBO’s Barry.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
Happy Days continued for six seasons after the 1977 episode in which The Fonz jumps over a
shark on water skis — launching the idiom for any show, brand or trend that outstays its welcome.
Bill said it was not an audition.
He just wanted to hear the scenes.
This time executive producer
Alec Berg was there. I’ve heard a
lot about Alec Berg. He doesn’t
give a lot away. (He is Norwegian.
Subsequently, he told me he
is Swedish.) This time I did the
scenes with Bill, and out of the
corner of my eye, I saw that I made
Alec Berg smile. After another
wait — a really chunky, bonecrushing wait — Bill asked me if I
would like to play the character.
These two guys created something from the ground up. They
were very judicious and took their
time in making the important
decisions. Everything starts with
the people at the top. A showrunner needs to be a psychologist,
parent, banker, mediator, creator
and great at ordering lunch. That
has not changed.
Barry’s first season was only
eight episodes. Happy Days ran for
255! We probably had six showrunners over that time. And, yes,
I was the first actor to literally
jump the shark. But we stayed
No. 1 for years after that episode,
while the phrase that came out
of it swung around the world like
26
M AY 23, 2018
one of those Argentine bolas.
Besides, when the newspapers —
we had newspapers back then —
would mention that shark jump,
they’d run the same picture
of me waterskiing. I thought I
had good legs at that time, so I
didn’t care.
There may be fewer episodes of
shows now, the technology is different and some of the outlets
are new, but the process of making
television is exactly the same.
Those human beings have to sit in
front of a computer or a yellow pad
and they have to write the script —
because if it’s not on the page, it’s
not on the stage. Nothing has
replaced imagination. Depending
on the amount of the creativity that goes into a project, I think
you’re always either getting closer
to jumping or further away from
jumping that shark.
If you complain about doing
these jobs, you’re an idiot and a
liar. I’m still knocking on wood.
Every time I show up on set in the
morning, I am as excited as I
was the very first time — unless
the doughnuts are bad. You cannot create comedy with a bad
doughnut. — AS TOLD TO MICHAEL O’CONNELL
HAPPY: PHOTOFEST/ABC (2). BARRY: COURTESY OF HBO.
fter “The Fonz,” I
didn’t act for about
eight years. People
said, “Oh, my God, we
love him! He is such
a good actor … but, you know, he’s
The Fonz.”
When I did a small role in
Scream, in 1996, they wouldn’t give
me a credit. The production company felt that I would knock the
balance of the movie off. Then my
character got applause during test
screenings, so they asked me to
come back and do press. That is a
Hollywood story. They don’t need
you until they need you. But the
fact of the matter is that I just love
this work. I love going in every
day. And while there are a lot of
people who at my age don’t audition, they also don’t get the job. So
I’m happy to.
In 2016, leaving my manager’s
office and driving eastbound down
Ventura Boulevard, I got a call from
my agent. She said that there’s a
new series with Bill Hader, and I’m
on a shortlist for a role. Now, wait
a minute: Is Dustin Hoffman on this
shortlist to be brought in to play
the acting teacher? He wasn’t, so
that was good.
I read the script — about a hitman who joins an acting class
The Report
7 Days of DEALS
Who’s inking on the dotted line this week
LIONSGATE’S FILM EXECU TI V E SHU FFLE:
W H AT’S OLD IS NEW AGAIN (SORT OF)
With its May 12 farewell party for Lionsgate Motion
Picture Group co-chair Patrick Wachsberger in
Cannes, a changing of the guard at the film studio is
more or less complete, and the second Joe Drake era
has begun.
That leaves industry observers wondering what
Drake’s vision for the studio will be. The only project
greenlighted in the past six months, say sources,
is the third installment in Keanu Reeves’ John Wick
series, announced May 21 with the cast additions
of Halle Berry, Anjelica Huston and Asia Kate Dillon.
Drake had served as Lionsgate COO and Motion
Picture Group president before the company acquired
Summit Pictures in 2012. At that point, Drake
departed to co-found financing, production and sales
company Good Universe. He returned to his executive
role at Lionsgate in October, and the Summit team
has gradually moved on. (Rob Friedman departed as
co-chair of the film studio in 2016 and now runs
Donald Tang’s Global Road.)
Lionsgate stock jumped in January to a 52-week
high of $36.48 after the studio telegraphed it was up
for sale and may be the next takeover target amid
more industry consolidation. But shares in the studio
plunged a month later on a lower growth forecast
for 2019, as Wall Street seems to be getting impatient.
With the industry undergoing a wave of mergers
— including Disney’s (and Comcast’s) bid for Fox
assets and AT&T’s potential acquisition of Time Warner — pressure is
on Lionsgate CEO Jon Feltheimer to
find a path forward.
With Lionsgate having acquired
Good Universe — the finance and proDrake
duction company behind Neighbors and
Blockers — in October, Drake has his team in place.
Former Good Universe co-founder Nathan Kahane
was named president of the Motion Picture Group on
May 17, and Good Universe veteran Helen Lee-Kim is
expected to once again take on her old Lionsgate job
as head of international.
THR first reported the exit of Wachsberger and
Motion Picture Group co-president Erik Feig in
February. Feig now is nailing down capital with the
Raine Group for a new, youth-oriented production
company called Picturestart. At Lionsgate, he had
championed such successes as La La Land, which
grossed $446 million worldwide on a $30 million
budget, and the Julia Roberts drama Wonder,
which pulled in $265 million on a $20 million budget.
Wachsberger also is expected to launch a new
company focusing on international sales. No specifics have been provided so far, but Wachsberger
told guests at his farewell party, “There is much
I intend to do between Lionsgate and the Pearly
Gates.” — KIM MASTERS
Theron
FILM
Charlize Theron (WME,
Hansen Jacobson) will
play Megyn Kelly in
an upcoming Roger Ailes
drama from Annapurna.
Jake Gyllenhaal (WME,
Bloom Hergott) is in
talks to play Marvel villain
Mysterio in the SpiderMan: Homecoming sequel.
Bradley Cooper (CAA)
will star opposite Clint
Eastwood in Warner Bros.’
crime drama The Mule.
Streaming Switcheroo: Cable TV’s Series Saviors
In the latest examples
of TV’s changing economic
Big
models, two basic cable
Deal
shows are near deals to
move from their original
homes to their streaming partners.
Syfy canceled The Expanse on May 11
after three seasons when it no longer could
justify what sources say was a sizable
price tag. The NBCU-owned cable network
had sold SVOD rights to Amazon, with
Netflix distributing the series internationally. That left Syfy with only the rights to
the space drama’s small yet loyal linear audience, which wasn’t enough to keep the show
going. Now, Amazon is reviving the series
— a personal favorite of CEO Jeff Bezos
— for a fourth season (and it likely will take
international rights back from Netflix).
UnREAL, meanwhile, will see SVOD partner Hulu have first-run rights to its fourth
and likely final season before it airs on
Lifetime. The move is designed to further
monetize the little-watched drama from
A+E Studios, which will retain 100 percent
ownership, with Lifetime possibly airing season four at a later date. Sources say Hulu,
which has yet to stream the recently concluded third season, paid a premium to get
first-window rights for the Bachelor-inspired
drama. Helping matters is that UnREAL
filmed seasons three and four practically
back-to-back, with those familiar with the
deal noting that more viewers stream it on
Hulu than tune in on Lifetime.
Meanwhile, Netflix is eyeing a third season of ABC’s since-canceled Designated
Survivor after serving as its original SVOD
home. — LESLEY GOLDBERG
Vin Diesel (CAA, Brillstein,
Felker Toczek) will star
in and produce STX’s action
comedy Muscle.
UnREAL’s
fourth
season will hit
Hulu first,
then Lifetime.
Rights Available! Hot new books with Hollywood appeal
Naomi Watts (CAA,
Australia’s Linsten, the
U.K.’s Markham Froggatt,
Untitled, Hansen
Jacobson), Frank Grillo
(WME, Management
360, Loeb & Loeb) and
Bobby Cannavale (WME,
Framework, Schreck
BY ANDY LEWIS
Confessions of the Fox (ONE WORLD, JUNE 26)
Home Baked (HOUGHTON MIFFLIN HARCOURT, 2020)
BY Jordy Rosenberg AGENCY UTA
BY Alia Volz AGENCY Paradigm
Touted as a big summer debut, the UMass trans professor offers
a gender-bending spin on 18th century thief Jack Sheppard and
his prostitute girlfriend, told through the story of a trans scholar
investigating if Sheppard’s just-discovered memoir is real or fake.
Multiple publishers bid on the book subtitled “My Mom, Marijuana
and the Stoning of San Francisco.” Volz’s mother ran the city’s
famed Sticky Fingers underground pot bakery in the ’70s and
returned in the ’80s to offer the brownies to help AIDS patients.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
28
M AY 23, 2018
DRAKE: LESTER COHEN/WIREIMAGE. UNREAL: BETTINA STRAUSS/LIFETIME. ANDERSON, THERON: VENTURELLI/WIREIMAGE. BOOK: COURTESY OF PENGUIN RANDOM HOUSE. HENSON: MARC ANGELES/SPLASH NEWS. MARTIN: JON KOPALOFF/FILMMAGIC. FIRPO: COURTESY OF SUBJECT (2).
Deal
of the
Week
Channel Zero screenwriter Nick Antosca (WME,
Writ Large, Ginsburg
Daniels) and reporter
Michelle Dean will coshowrun anthology series
The Act for Hulu.
Anderson
Henson’s four-bedroom sat on the market for more than two years.
Rose) will star in Once
Upon a Time in Staten
Island for Blumhouse.
Sloane Offer) will star in
Channel 4 drama Brexit.
Warner Bros. has picked
up film rights to LinManuel Miranda’s In the
Heights.
Wrath of the Titans
helmer Dan Mazeau (CAA,
Circle of Confusion,
Katz Golden) and Rampage
scripter Ryan Engle (CAA,
Mosaic) will pen Universal’s
Cowboy Ninja Viking.
TELEVISION
STX Entertainment, Dick
Clark Productions and
Tencent are partnering to
bring the Billboard Music
Awards to China.
Benedict Cumberbatch
(UTA, the U.K.’s Conway
van Gelder Grant,
New Girl alum Max
Greenfield (WME, Untitled,
Ziffren Brittenham) will
replace Josh Lawson in CBS
series The Neighborhood.
Gotham showrunner Bruno
Heller (WME, Hansen
Jacobson) has set Batman
prequel series Pennyworth
at Epix in a 10-episode,
straight-to-series order.
Freeform has ordered to
series The Perfectionists
and Kenya Barris multicam
comedy Besties and
has renewed drama Siren.
DIGITAL
Gillian Anderson (WME,
the U.K.’s Independent,
Untitled, Ziffren
Brittenham) and Asa
Butterfield (CAA, the
U.K.’s Independent, Felker
Toczek) will star in Netflix
dramedy Sex Education.
Netflix has signed a
multiyear deal with Barack
and Michelle Obama.
Jennifer Aniston (CAA,
Lighthouse, Hansen
Jacobson) and Tig Notaro
(ICM, Integral, Ziffren
Brittenham) will star
as POTUS and FLOTUS in
Netflix’s First Ladies.
Viceland has inked an
exclusive licensing deal
with Hulu for 15 of its
shows, including Ellen
Page’s Gaycation.
ESPN Films and Netflix
are teaming for The Last
Dance, a longform doc
about Michael Jordan.
$
12M
C Round funding raised by popular
female-fronted startup theSkimm
Big
Number from investors including Shonda
iZombie star Rose McIver
(UTA, Artists First, Hirsch
Wallerstein) will return for
Netflix’s wedding-themed
A Christmas Prince sequel.
Amy Ryan (Gersh,
Bloom Hergott)
will replace Sarah Paulson
as star of Liz Garbus’
true-crime feature Lost
Girls on Netflix.
Amazon has picked up
Jordan Peele’s Nazi drama
to series. … YouTube
has ordered an untitled
eight-episode artificial
intelligence docuseries
from Team Downey.
MUSIC
Sony Corp. has acquired
an additional 60 percent share in EMI Music
Publishing for $4.75 billion.
REAL ESTATE
Taraji P. Henson has
sold her Hollywood Hills
home for $2.35 million.
— COMPILED BY MIA GALUPPO
Rhimes and Tyra Banks.
Rep
Sheet
Black-ish’s Marsai
Martin, who will exec
produce and star in
Universal’s Little, has
signed with WME.
Randy Jackson has left
CAA for UTA .
BuzzFeed Studios has
signed with WME.
Mayim Bialik has signed
with Icon PR.
GLOW’s Jackie Tohn
has signed with Artists
First.
Unsolved’s Wavyy Jonez
has signed with Abrams.
Next
Big
Thing
Matthew & Ryan Firpo
REPS UTA, LBI
WHY THEY MATTER
The brother screenwriting team has been
tapped to pen the Jack
Kirby–created title
The Eternals for Marvel
Studios. The Firpos
are best known for
co-writing the World
War II drama Ruin,
which was picked up by
Marc Butan’s MadRiver
Pictures before being
voted to the top of 2017’s
Black List of unproduced screenplays. The
Eternals marks the writers’ first studio gig.
Our Pronto Buffet Lunch is a hit, now showing daily at Culina.
$
35 per person
11:30 am to 2:00 pm | Monday to Saturday
Call 310.860.4000 for reservations
About Town
People, Places, Preoccupations
3
4
1
6
5
7
2
8
WILLIAMS, RAGLAND: GARETH FULLER - WPA POOL/GETTY IMAGES. WINFREY, ELBA: IAN WEST - WPA POOL/GETTY IMAGES. CLOONEY: MAX MUMBY/INDIGO/GETTY
IMAGES. MARKLE: COURTESY OF ALEXI LUBOMIRSKI. COLLINS: COURTESY OF SUBJECT. HAMMER: COURTESY OF NBC. WINDSOR: CHRIS JACKSON/GETTY IMAGES.
T H E R O Y A L W E D DI N G
The Meaning of Meghan, the Black Duchess
By celebrating her nuptials with reverent nods to African-American beauty, faith and culture, writes an Empire
alum, Markle ‘raised the roof on St. George’s Chapel, obliterating hundreds of years of tradition’ By Attica Locke
am a black woman raising
a biracial girl in California.
I work in entertainment.
Immaculate Heart is on our
list of prospective high schools.
I went to Northwestern. In Meghan
Markle’s life story, I see glimpses
of my own. And even I was like,
“There’s no way I’m getting up at
4:30 in the morning to watch that
wedding.” I had to do that for Diana
and Charles. We all did. There
was no such thing as a DVR when
I watched that wedding from
my grandmother’s living room in
I
Lufkin, Texas, at age 7. I thought
the Harry and Meghan nuptials
would be the same royal schtick,
just, you know, caramel-dipped.
So I recorded it, planning to watch
it at a sensible hour.
Still, I could feel the excitement
of the event — a crackling energy
in the air and online, a sense of
national pride (that one of us was
marrying into British royalty)
and global connection that is all
too rare in our on-demand lifestyle; it’s easy to forget the power
of the spectacle of live TV, how it
can bring millions together.
I tried to keep the experience
authentic — even on tape delay. I
ignored social media, had seen not
even a glimpse of the gown when
1 Williams 2 The Duke and Duchess of Sussex 3 Bonnie Hammer, chair of NBCUniversal cable
entertainment (Markle starred on USA’s Suits), arrived with husband Dale Heussner. “It was simply
spectacular,” says Hammer. “Grand yet intimate, historic yet contemporary, regal yet accessible
and warm. It felt like we were all being swept away in a modern-day fairy tale.” 4 Winfrey 5 From left:
Markle’s business manager Andrew Meyer, attorney Rick Genow and agent, Gersh’s Nick Collins
6 Markle’s mother, Ragland 7 Amal and George Clooney 8 Elba and fiancee Sabrina Dhowre
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
31
M AY 23, 2018
I laid out artisanal doughnuts and
waited for folks to arrive for my
viewing party, which consisted
of 11- and 13-year-old girls, all
biracial, and their moms. As we
oohed and aahed over gravitydefying hats and colorful plumes,
it initially felt like a replay of
Charles and Diana’s wedding —
only now with my sour, grown-up
understanding of history and the
colonialism that made all that
pomp and circumstance possible.
Still, I was game to bite through
my political distaste to see a black
About Town
People, Places,
Preoccupations
1
2
3
1 The London-based Kingdom Choir took a
group portrait after the ceremony. 2 “When love
is the way, poverty will become history,” said
Curry in his 13-minute homily. 3 Suits’ Torres.
OK, let’s tick off the obvious:
Gown, gorgeous. Bride, stunning.
Harry, hot ginge as always. Their
furtive glances, so romantic.
But then let’s get into off-thewall fabulous: Bishop Michael
Curry’s sermon. By the time he
was mentioning slaves to the O.G.
colonialists, I was damn near
prostrate. Then he quoted Dr. King.
He spoke of love as a political act
— basically subtweeting every
day of Donald Trump’s presidency
and the violent nationalism it
has spawned. And all the while
Meghan sat, ankles crossed (per
her royal training) but unbowed in
her quiet power, knowing she had
just raised the roof on St. George’s
Chapel, obliterating hundreds of
years of tradition. With stoic grace,
she was telling the world (and her
new in-laws): “This ain’t a tan,
y’all. I’m black.” Then there was the
Kingdom Choir singing “Stand by
Me.” By the time they brought out
the black cellist, my soul was so
lifted that I said to my sister, “This
is the most joy I’ve felt in 2018.”
A year when I wake up most days,
read the news and think, with fear
and sadness, “Jesus Christ, this
country can’t stand black people.”
In the history of television,
there have been many instances
when the spectacle of a live
event offered a balm to a world
in the throes of turmoil, when
the medium itself has acted as a
healer. I am thinking of President
Kennedy ’s funeral. I am thinking of the fall of the Berlin Wall.
The images of 9/11 first responders racing into burning buildings,
lifting strangers out of rubble.
For black folks, images of ourselves in these uplifting scenarios
have been few and far between.
Our relationship with TV spectacle
is more complicated. We are as
likely to see one of us in a perp
walk on TV as we are to see one of
us give away cars to a studio
audience. We are as likely to see
ourselves murdered by police
as we are to see ourselves being
inaugurated to the highest office
in the land. So when a display
of the beauty of black people and
black culture — our faith, our fortitude — finds its way onto my TV
screen, it is, for me, a moment
of healing. And to my personal list
of moments in live television that
made me feel seen and understood
and respected and hopeful — the
March on Washington; Michael
Jackson moonwalking onstage at
the Motown 25th anniversary
special; Halle Berry winning the
Oscar; Denzel Washington winning
the Oscar; Moonlight winning the
Oscar; Kanye telling George Bush
about himself; the night Obama
won — I now add the wedding of
Meghan and Harry, who walked
out of St. George’s Chapel as Duke
and Duchess of Sussex to the
ululating of African chants in the
crowd. It doesn’t get any blacker
than that.
Locke is a former writer for Fox’s
Empire and the author of the novel
Bluebird, Bluebird.
With a Gown Draped in Hollywood History, an Actress Says Goodbye to Hollywood
eghan Markle afirmed her status as an
icon of modern minimalist style with
her gown on May 19. Defying all fashion
detectives, she chose a look by British designer
Clare Waight Keller of the French fashion house
Givenchy, which has deep roots in Hollywood.
Her gown looked deceptively simple, sculpted
waist and relatively straight skirt that released
into a train with soft folds. But its strength and gorgeousness were revealed as Markle, 36, gracefully
walked — on her own at first — down the
aisle. The bateau, or boat neck, recalled such 1950s
Hollywood gamines as Audrey Hepburn, Hubert
de Givenchy’s muse. At the same time, the silhouette was a vision of no-nonsense ease and about
as far away from Princess Diana’s 1981 frou-frou as
you could get.
Surely, Markle also had Hubert de Givenchy in
mind when making her choice. The brand’s namesake designer, who died this year at 91, has a long
Hollywood association, having dressed Hepburn
on- and ofscreen, including for Sabrina (1954) and
Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961). Now, his name also
will be forever associated with a fresh superstar
leading the British monarchy into a brave new
future. — BOOTH MOORE
M
↑ Hepburn’s Givenchy-designed wedding dress in 1957’s Funny Face (left) shares a neckline with Markle’s.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
32
M AY 23, 2018
CURRY: OWEN HUMPHREYS/WPA POOL/GETTY IMAGES. CHOIR: STEVE PARSONS/PA
IMAGES VIA GETTY IMAGES. TORRES: IAN WEST/WPA POOL/GETTY IMAGES. FUNNY:
COURTESY EVERETT COLLECTION. MARKLE: BRIAN LAWLESS/WPA POOL/GETTY IMAGES.
girl marry into the royal family. As I told my very leftist, very
white husband when he tried
some “down with the monarchy”
BS: “What you’re not going to
do is have your whole existence
propped up by white imperialism
and then try to change the channel when we get a black face up
in Windsor. We are watching this
wedding. Period.”
As the coverage began, it all
seemed as British and foreign to
me as that clotted mess they
put on scones. And as white too,
frankly. But then guests began
to arrive, and our multiracial
party started to get the sense that
this wasn’t going to be like any
other royal wedding: The blackening of Windsor was upon us.
I spotted Idris Elba and screamed.
Then I saw Serena Williams.
Oprah. By the time Afro-Latina
goddess Gina Torres arrived at
Windsor Castle, I almost fainted.
Then Meghan’s mama showed
up. Doria Ragland. Dreads beneath
a tasteful hat, nose ring, walking in with the regal beauty of
every auntie and sister-cousin in
my family — and I was done,
y’all. In love. In awe. And suddenly at home — in England,
in Windsor, in the world. I had
never seen anything like this
on TV. At one point, my husband
wondered aloud if the bride and
groom would jump the broom.
That’s how black it was getting
in that church.
T V GUIDE
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About Town
Yes, I Did Say That!
Quotes
A look at who’s saying what in entertainment
Compiled by Brian Porreca
“We know
who you are.”
ASIA ARGENTO
The actress, speaking about her alleged 1997
rape by Harvey Weinstein at the Cannes Film Festival,
which she called his “hunting ground.” She added,
“Even tonight, sitting among you, there are those
that need to be held accountable.”
TOM ARNOLD
The comedian and ex-husband of
Roseanne Barr, tweeting his reaction
to the Roseanne co-showrunner not
returning. He added: “Well the jokes
on you girlfriend because my
podcast was cancelled a year ago!!”
“I’ve never killed
anyone myself.
… If I do, it
will probably be
a journalist.”
“About
$2 million.”
STEVEN TYLER
The Aerosmith frontman,
revealing to James Corden
the amount of money
he’s spent on drugs over
the years, adding that
he “snorted half of Peru.”
LARS VON TRIER
The director, responding to a
question from Cineuropa
about Cannes media walking
out of The House That Jack
Built over the film’s gruesome
violence and misogyny.
“I look across the
room and he’s
got his paddle up.”
“I’m Batman.”
EMILIA CLARKE
MICHAEL KEATON
The Game of Thrones star,
revealing on The Graham Norton
Show that Brad Pitt once
bid $120,000 at a charity auction
in which a date with her
was the grand prize. Pitt lost.
The actor, ending his
commencement address at
Kent State University.
POTUS
GETS
SPELLCHECKED
After Donald Trump misspelled Melania’s name
— “Melanie is feeling and doing great” — in a
tweet about her status after a kidney procedure,
Michael Rapaport replied, “No wonder you gotta
pay chicks to be quiet,” while Matthew Modine
pondered if Melanie was a “secret” pet name.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
RASHIDA JONES
The actress, explaining to
Net-A-Porter what led to
her walking away from the writing
team for Pixar’s Toy Story 4.
34
M AY 23, 2018
“How can you
not be pansexual in
space? There are
so many things to
have sex with.”
DONALD GLOVER
The Solo: A Star Wars Story
star, responding at a media
junket to screenwriter Jonathan
Kasdan’s comment about
Lando Calrissian’s sexual “fluidity.”
ARGENTO: DOMINIQUE CHARRIAU/WIREIMAGE. VON TRIER: STEPHANE CARDINALE - CORBIS/CORBIS VIA GETTY IMAGES. CLARKE, GLOVER: CINDY ORD/GETTY IMAGES FOR SIRIUSXM. TRUMP: J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE - POOL/GETTY IMAGES.
“So now I bet
Whitney Cummings
will finally show
up for my podcast.”
“You look at
their track record
and it was one
woman directing one
film in 25 years,
and she was fired.”
Move to what
moves you
Make bold moves. Meet your
Agents of Change at halstead.com
Philip O’Connell, Managing Director – Hamptons | 631.771.5333 | poconnell@halstead.com
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Hamptons
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Connecticut
New Jersey
Hudson Valley
About Town
The Red Carpet
Television Upfronts
New York, May 14-17
2
3
Stephen Colbert
(left) and Jon Batiste
Anthony Andersen
(left) and Jef Garlin
7
Jared
Leto
1
From left:
Jessica Szohr,
Penny Johnson
Jerald, Seth
MacFarlane,
Adrianne Palicki,
Scott Grimes
and J. Lee
8
From left: Chris
Horsman, Oliver
Hudson and
Chris Silbermann
5
Taraji P.
Henson
6
9
The CW’s Mark
Pedowitz and
Nicollette Sheridan
Bob Greenblatt
(left) and
Lorne Michaels
Billboard Music Awards
18
Las Vegas, May 20
Janet
Jackson
19
17
16
15
Taylor
Swift
John
Legend
Pharrell Williams
and Camila Cabello
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
36
M AY 23, 2018
From left: Normani,
Bebe Rexha and Khalid
Party
Crawler
TV Fun Time
NYC’s upfronts extravaganza wasn’t washed out
by the city’s unrelenting
rainfall. Party highlights
included CBS’ annual
gathering in the food hall
below The Plaza Hotel,
where the shadow cast by
Leslie Moonves’ brief and
funny appearance amid a
courtroom showdown with
the network’s vice chairwoman Shari Redstone still
lingered. “CBS has some
of the most exciting legal
dramas,” cracked Stephen
Colbert (2) earlier in the
day. “And some great TV
shows.” Many wondered
en route to Wollman Rink,
where Lethal Weapon’s
new lead Seann William
Scott (10) hobnobbed
with buyers, if this would be
the last hurrah for “Old
Fox.” — MICHAEL O’CONNELL
12
Lin-Manuel
Miranda
(left) and Dick
Van Dyke
Backstage at
the Geffen
4
Los Angeles, May 19
10
Seann
William
Scott
11
Shaquille O’Neal
and Kristen Ledlow
SZOHR, HENSON: ROY ROCHLIN/GETTY IMAGES. COLBERT: MATTHEW EISMAN/GETTY IMAGES. GARLIN, HADDISH, O’NEAL: DIMITRIOS KAMBOURIS/GETTY IMAGES. LETO: KEVIN MAZURE/GETTY IMAGES. LEGEND, JACKSON,
LOVATO, LOPEZ, MALONE: KEVIN MAZUR/WIREIMAGE. HUDSON: SEAN ZANNI/GETTY IMAGES. GREENBLATT: HEIDI GUTMAN/NBC/GETTY IMAGES. SCOTT: DIA DIPASUPIL/GETTY IMAGES. MIRANDA, BELL, CAREY: JORDAN
STRAUSS/COURTESY OF THE GEFFEN. SWIFT, FONSI: STEVE GRANITZ/WIREIMAGE. WILLIAMS: KEVIN WINTER/GETTY IMAGES. KHALID: MATT WINKELMEYER/GETTY IMAGES. PEDOWITZ: COURTESY OF THE CW NETWORK.
Tifany
Haddish
Geffen Gala
13
Kristen
Bell
14
Jim
Carrey
Mary Poppins Returns
co-stars Lin-Manuel
Miranda (12) and Dick
Van Dyke (12) were
honored at the Gefen
Playhouse’s 16th annual
fundraiser, hosted by
Aisha Tyler. Kristen Bell
(13), Mia Michaels, Jim
Carrey (14) — who presented to Van Dyke — and
Billy Crystal took to the
Westwood stage to perform
for guests including Jim
Gianopulos, Alan Horn and
Ted Sarandos, as well as
Rita Moreno, who was on
hand to present to Miranda.
More than $1 million was
raised for the theater’s
artistic and educational
initiatives. — LOU VANHECKE
Music’s Messages
22
Jennifer
Lopez
20
Luis
Fonsi
21
23
Christina
Aguilera (left) and
Demi Lovato
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
Halsey and
Post Malone
37
M AY 23, 2018
Shows of strength held
sway at the Billboard
Music Awards, where Ed
Sheeran was named top
artist. “Let’s have a moment
of change,” pleaded host
Kelly Clarkson, responding to the Santa Fe, Texas,
shooting. In a similar
stride, Shawn Mendes and
Khalid (19) were joined
by the Stoneman Douglas
High School Choir at
the MGM Grand Garden
Arena. In a nod to Time’s
Up, Icon award recipient
Janet Jackson (18)
said that women will “no
longer be controlled, manipulated or abused.” — L.V.
About Town
Stories That Matter
The Red Carpet
Peabody Awards
New York, May 19
2
Hasan Minhaj
and journalist
Fatma Naib
1
From left: Alexis Bledel,
producer Warren
Littlefield, producer Daniel
Wilson and Bruce Miller
5
Issa Rae
Politics grabbed the spotlight at the 77th Peabody
Awards. The filmmakers behind doc winner
Newtown brought schoolshooting survivors to
the event a day after the
Santa Fe, Texas, tragedy.
Onstage at Cipriani Wall
Street, the sister of
Sandy Hook victim Daniel
Barden urged the influential crowd to take action:
“I am asking every single
person in this room to
get up and do something
— we need you,” Natalie
Barden said. The audience
— including honorees
Carol Burnett (4), John
Oliver (6), Issa Rae (5), CBS
News’ Bob Schieffer and
Jeff Fager, and Marvelous
Mrs. Maisel creator Amy
Sherman-Palladino and
star Rachel Brosnahan (4)
— responded with a standing ovation. And host Hasan
Minhaj (2) later joked
sharply that entertainment
winner The Handmaid’s
Tale is, to Vice President
Mike Pence, “the breakout comedy of the year.”
Accepting for the series,
showrunner Bruce Miller (1)
told the journalists who
were being honored for
their harrowing, true stories, “Please don’t stop.
Keep working to make sure
that Handmaid’s Tale
stays fictional. You’re doing
God’s work.” — HILARY LEWIS
3
4
Maria Cuomo Cole (second
from right) and Kim A. Snyder
(far right) of Independent
Lens: Newtown with activists
6
Rachel Brosnahan
(left) and
Carol Burnett
John Oliver
John
McCain:
For Whom
the
Bell Tolls
Washington, D.C.,
May 17
From left: Sens. Chuck Schumer,
Lindsey Graham, Mitch McConnell, HBO’s
Richard Plepler, Sen. Amy Klobuchar and
director/exec producer Peter Kunhardt
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
38
M AY 23, 2018
Fifty senators put party
aside to pay tribute to
Sen. John McCain at the
world premiere screening
of HBO’s John McCain:
For Whom the Bell Tolls.
The new documentary
was feted by HBO chairman
and CEO Richard Plepler
alongside co-hosts Senate
Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell, Senate Minority
Leader Chuck Schumer
and Sens. Lindsey Graham
and Amy Klobuchar.
“Patriotic sacrifice and
principled service are not
outdated notions or cliches,” McConnell said in his
remarks at the Capitol
Visitors Center Auditorium.
“They are the building
blocks of an extraordinary
life.” Present to celebrate
that life were members of
McCain’s family, including
his 106-year-old mother,
Roberta. — RAMONA SAVISS
BLEDEL, NAIB, SNYDER, BURNETT: BRAD BARKET/ GETTY IMAGES FOR PEABODY. RAE: MICHAEL LOCCISANO/GETTY IMAGES. SCHUMER: RALPH ALSWANG/COURTESY OF HBO
Crossing the Aisle
for McCain Doc
Von Trier Screening Causes a
Cannes Juror’s Relative to Bail
Director Lee (right) calmed Grace’s anxieties over playing David Duke in BlacKkKlansman.
Rambling Reporter
By Chris Gardner
Topher Grace’s N-Word Anxiety
As Topher Grace prepared for his first read for BlacKkKlansman last fall,
he realized he was well outside his comfort zone. “I had the weirdest
audition ever,” Grace tells THR of trying to channel Ku Klux Klan grand
wizard David Duke, N-words and all. “I said to [director] Spike [Lee],
‘Look, it’s your project, but I just have to say how uncomfortable it is to
say these words.’ ” But the That ’70s Show alum says Lee instantly put
him at ease, allowing him to “unleash the worst things I’ve ever said in
my life.” Grace recalls that before the Cannes premiere, “Spike [said], ‘Sit
down, I’m playing you this whole reel.’ So we watched the whole final reel
of the film,” he says, adding that the finale, which splices in real footage
of 2017’s deadly Charlottesville protests in which Duke marched, “was
devastating.” This year marked Grace’s first Cannes, where he kept busy
as he also appears in Under the Silver Lake. — TATIANA SIEGEL
When director Lars von Trier
showed up at the Cannes premiere
of The House That Jack Built, his
serial killer film starring Matt
Dillon, it was his first appearance
since 2011, when his sympathetic
remarks about Adolf Hitler led
to a ban. THR had a seat next to
jury member Denis Villeneuve,
who upon seeing von Trier on the
red carpet cried, “It’s the beast,
the beast!” The Blade Runner 2049
director said he’s a “huge” von
Trier fan but admitted that he
“warned” his family, seated
beside him, that the film might be
“very intense.” His fears were justified as graphic scenes of women
being mutilated and children
killed prompted dozens of walkouts — including a Villeneuve
The House That Jack Built caused
a Twitter outcry.
family member, who bailed halfway through. — ALEX RITMAN
Leah Remini’s Next Target
After Scientology
Following a May 17 FYC panel featuring the Emmy-winning team
behind A&E series Leah Remini:
Scientology and the Aftermath,
Remini was tentative about revealing what’s next with her freshly
signed first-look production pact.
THR since has learned that
Remini is keeping her sights set
on religion, where she says she
“finally feel[s] like we are … really
helping people.” According to
a source, Remini will produce a
special for A&E that focuses on
Jehovah’s Witnesses, to air during
a break following season three of
Aftermath, which exec producer
Aaron Saidman said at the panel
will “go right after the heart of the
church’s power and resources and
challenge the foundation upon
which they stand.” Added Remini:
“We’ve had it. … We want to make
sure we’ve done everything we
can to put an end to [abuse]. It’s
an anti-abuse show. People should
have a negative feeling about
people hurting people and taking
away their money and families.”
Hitched, Hatched, Hired
Weddings
the Saint Barnabas
Medical Center in
New Jersey on May 7.
Amy McGee, video
marketing at Apple,
married Fernando
Loureiro, film producer and co-owner
of Exhibit, on May 5
in front of 40 guests
at the Santa Barbara
County Courthouse.
The couple became
engaged in November.
Births
John Legend and
Chrissy Teigen welcomed their second
child, son Miles
Theodore Stephens,
on May 16.
1
Congrats
Nathan Kahane
Max
was named president of the motion
picture group at
Lionsgate on May 17.
April Tombs, a
Lachlan Murdoch will
licensing, branding
and endorsement
agent at UTA, and
her husband, Ian
Weintraub, vp at
Limelight Media, welcomed daughter
Max Weintraub at
be chairman and
CEO and his father,
Rupert Murdoch,
will be co-chairman
of “New Fox” —
the company that will
consist of the 21st
Century Fox assets
1 McGee and Loureiro with nephew Oliver McGee and Magnolia Remington, daughter
of the bride’s friend. 2 Gold’s A Clockwork Orange key art. 3 Campanella
Got tips? Email rambling@thr.com
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
40
M AY 23, 2018
that Disney is not
buying, including the
Fox News Channel
and Fox broadcast
network. John Nallen
will become COO,
the conglomerate
announced May 16.
Scott
Suzanne Scott was
promoted to CEO
of Fox News Channel
and Fox Business
Network on May 17.
REMINI: JASON LAVERIS/FILMMAGIC. HOUSE: COURTESY OF CANNES FILM FESTIVAL. BAVEL: DYLAN+JENI. SHAW: JEFFREY MAYER/WIREIMAGE. DICAPRIO: TIBRINA HOBSON/WIREIMAGE. SUITS:
ISTOCK. GRACE: LAURA CAVANAUGH/FILMMAGIC. LEE: PASCAL LE SEGRETAIN/GETTY IMAGES. POSTER: WARNER BROS/PHOTOFEST. CANNES: ANDREAS RENTZ/GETTY IMAGES. MCGEE: ANNA
JOCKISCH/WWW.ANNAJ-PHOTO.COM. WEINTRAUB: COURTESY OF SUBJECT. CAMPANELLA: PHOTOFEST. CONLEY: COURTESY OF DON AZARS. SCOTT: LARRY BUSACCA/GETTY IMAGES.
Inside the industry’s celebrations and news
About Town
Remini
Cannes Women’s March
Photographed by Men
On May 12 in Cannes, Cate
Blanchett, Ava DuVernay, Kristen
Stewart, Salma Hayek, Patty
Jenkins and Agnes Varda were
HO T
REST
among the 82 women who
climbed the steps of the Palais to
shine a spotlight on the dearth
of female directors who have had
a chance to screen their films in
competition. While it proved to be
a powerful moment, female photographers are now speaking out
about the lack of equality in their
own ranks. Veteran photographer
Stefanie Keenan tells THR that
it is a male-dominated profession,
which could have something to
do with the physical demands.
“Most of the time we have around
20 to 30 pounds of equipment to
carry around,” she explains,
adding that she has hopes that the
number of females behind the red
carpet stanchion will continue
to grow. “I luckily see more and
more females in this industry,
Female protestors on the carpet in Cannes.
Bavel
NEW
AU
and that’s really making me
happy. I see equal support from
the gents as well as the girls, but …
we should make it about how good
a photographer is and not hire
someone based solely on gender.”
It’s too late for Cannes, however.
One female fest photographer
adds, “Its ironic women stood in
solidarity and had a moment
of silence while being shot by 500
male photographers objectifying
the hell out of them.”
The Quick Pitch Ori Menashe and Genevieve
Gergis, the married chef-owners behind Italian
phenomenon Bestia in downtown L.A.’s Arts
District, have replicated its high-energy, flirty
vibe a few blocks away — but switched to flatbreads, spreads (don’t miss the foie gras halva)
and all manner of other updated Middle Eastern
oferings, including a lamb neck shawarma.
The Inside Dish Kanye West was an early arrival.
Now dudes dressed in Yeezy are packing tables.
500 Mateo St. — GARY BAUM
RANT
Superna Kalle was
named executive
vp international
digital networks at
Starz on May 18.
with Casablanca,
died in Old Greenwich,
Connecticut, on
May 20. He was 97.
of the original 1948
musical Kiss Me, Kate,
died May 20 in Los
Angeles. She was 103.
The Right Stuff and
The Bonfire of the
Vanities author Tom
Wolfe died May 14
of an infection in a
New York City hospital. He was 88.
Bill Gold, who revolu-
Arthur Manson, a
tionized the art of the
movie poster starting
veteran marketing
and distribution
executive who helped
to usher in the era
of consumer research
at Hollywood studios, died May 14 in
Riverdale, New York.
He was 90.
Deaths
Patricia Morison, star
2
Chuck Panama, a
journalist turned
publicist who worked
with Elizabeth
Taylor and ran publicity for shows
such as The Simpsons,
M*A*S*H and L.A.
Law, died May 13 at
the Motion Picture
& Television Fund
home in Woodland
Hills, California. He
was 93.
Conley
Michael Allen Conley,
a director, producer
and editor who
worked on the KTLA
News, the Rev. Robert
Schuller’s Hour of
Power and a string of
hit TV shows including Blossom and
The Golden Girls, died
April 12 at Ronald
Reagan UCLA Medical
Center from complications of a kidney
transplant. He was 73.
Joseph Campanella,
the ever-present
Emmy- and Tonynominated character
actor who appeared
on scores of TV
shows, including The
Bold Ones, One Day
at a Time and The
Colbys, died May 16
at his Sherman Oaks
home. He was 93.
Ron Thomas, SAGAFTRA’s senior
manager of national
member education and outreach,
To submit, send email to hhh@thr.com
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
41
M AY 23, 2018
died May 3 at his
West Hollywood
home. He was 46.
Ellen Catherine
Ryan, the executive
vp and general
3
Heard Around Hollywood
Power Dining
Shaw
DiCaprio
Leonardo DiCaprio
lunched at Salt’s Cure. …
Peter Chernin, Irving
Azoff and producer Dan
Mintz shared the room
at The Grill. On a diferent
day, attorney Nina Shaw
sat with producer Jordan
Horowitz and director
Julia Hart. … Jude Law,
Giada De Laurentiis,
Christian Slater and Phil
Rosenthal were at Jafa,
separately. ... Mark
Wahlberg was at Ocean
Prime Beverly Hills. ...
Chris Martin checked out
Belwood Bakery. ... Sandra
Bernhard had lunch at
The Standard Hotel’s Croft
Alley. ... Jamie Foxx
stopped by Casa Vega. ...
Brian Grazer, Ron Howard
and Jeffrey Katzenberg
held court at The Palm.
manager of media
research and analytics firm Screen
Engine/ASI TV
Group, died from
a sudden illness
in L.A. She was 59.
The Business
Creative Space
Lopez’s significant
recording career
has its place in the
ofice. On the 6 sold
3 million copies in
the U.S. alone.
Jennifer
Lopez
and Elaine
GoldsmithThomas
As World of Dance returns,
the collaborators open up on
plans to direct, the delay
on NBC’s Bye Bye Birdie Live!
and why you won’t see
Lopez on another network
drama By Michael O’Connell
J
mother of two crisscrossing the
country, though she insists that
she remains hands-on and passionate about development at the
five-person company.
This latest phase for Lopez
and Goldsmith-Thomas could
easily prove the most lucrative.
Nuyorican makes both Lopez’s
reality breakout World of Dance,
which will return May 29, and
was behind the star’s NBC drama
Shades of Blue, set to end its threeseason run in August.
As the most watched new summer reality series in a decade,
with more than 10 million viewers, Dance earned a pre-emptive
renewal and NBC announced
plans to air two cycles over the
coming year. There’s a return
to big-screen comedy, too, with
STX’s Thanksgiving-timed
Second Act, a Lopez vehicle that
also will be Goldsmith-Thomas’
first writing credit (with Justin
Zackham). During an early
May sit-down, the women talked
Photographed by Christopher Patey
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
42
M AY 23, 2018
↑ “It took a while for Kevin [Huvane] and I to
heal, since he actually introduced me to Jennifer,”
says Goldsmith-Thomas, who in the 1990s
poached Lopez from her once and current CAA
agent. They were photographed May 1 at their
ofice on the Universal Studios lot.
about launching Dance, bolting from broadcast and
the fate of NBC live musical
Bye Bye Birdie.
Jennifer, you founded Nuyorican
back in 2001. What made you and
your longtime manager, Benny
Medina, bring Elaine on?
MAKEUP BY SCOTT BARNES. LOPEZ HAIR BY CHRIS APPLETON, MANICURE
BY TOM BACHIK, STYLING BY ROB ZANGARDI AND MARIEL HAENN.
ennifer Lopez and Elaine
Goldsmith-Thomas
have a comfortable rapport.
Sharing a couch in the stark
white Universal Studios lot office
of their Nuyorican Productions
shingle, the 48-year-old CEO
(more familiar as an international
film, television and music star)
eats a chicken salad, while her
producing partner, 56, rattles
through their colorful two-decade
history and pauses only to steal
a crouton off Lopez’s plate.
It’s an earned intimacy. The
pair first worked together in
1998, when Goldsmith-Thomas,
then an ICM agent, poached
the multihyphenate from CAA.
Goldsmith-Thomas has worn a
variety of hats since: After a
turn at Revolution Studios, where
she shepherded such romantic
comedies as Lopez’s 2002 Maid in
Manhattan, she’s had a run as a
manager and, since 2012, has been
president of Lopez’s company. In
that role, L.A.-based GoldsmithThomas runs the day-to-day
business at Nuyorican, which has
focused on “aspirational” fare
since its conception in 2001. For
Lopez’s part, her packed schedule — which includes a Las Vegas
residency and a Miami-based boyfriend, Alex Rodriguez — has the
Below: Lopez with her twins, Maximilian
and Emme, boyfriend Rodriguez and his
daughters, Ella and Natasha.
GOLDSMITH-THOMAS It’s the
same thing that happened on
Shades of Blue. We came to
[NBC Entertainment chairman]
Bob Greenblatt, having developed it just to produce, and he
said, “I’ll give you 13 on the air
if you agree to star.”
Is it ever a frustration that people
expect you to appear in the projects that you produce?
LOPEZ One of the reasons we
started a production company
was because there is a lack of
roles out there for women like
myself — for women period.
This is a female-run company,
save Medina. Have you noticed
any differences in how business is
being done in the #MeToo era?
Second Act, out
Nov. 21, is described
by Lopez as a
romantic comedy
where “the lead
falls in love with her
own life.”
LOPEZ They’re much more open
to women directors. They’re begging for them. I’ll probably wind
up directing sooner rather than
later. Maybe a movie musical.
JENNIFER LOPEZ I was feeling
World of Dance
was the biggest
reality launch of 2017,
averaging a 2.6 rating
in adults 18-to-49 and
10.1 million viewers.
overwhelmed, and I think Benny
was feeling overwhelmed, too.
Initially, we thought she might
come on just to help us with the
movie side.
ELAINE GOLDSMITH-THOMAS I just
believe in this woman. She
does things without blueprints,
things that nobody has done
before her, except maybe [Barbra]
Streisand. She was a brand
before people branded themselves. They all fucking criticized
her for it. But haters hate, and
then they copy.
Why star in World of Dance so soon
after ending your five-season run
on American Idol?
LOPEZ [NBC Entertainment real-
ity chief] Paul Telegdy had been
developing this other dance
project with me— not to appear
in — when he asked me if I’d
heard of World of Dance [a previously untelevised dance showcase
for up-and-coming performers].
And I go, “Yes, that’s the show.” I
knew everything about it because
I’d watched [the competition]
for years. I had hired choreographers from it. Then someone
says, “Well, you were a great judge
on American Idol. Do you think …”
Speaking of musicals, NBC’s Bye
Bye Birdie Live!, which you’re
attached to produce and star in,
has been delayed twice. Will it
ever happen?
LOPEZ These are all projects we
want to do, it’s just about finding
time. I would have loved to have
done Shades for a few more years,
but I just can’t. The Vegas residency, which I’ve done for three
years, wants another year out
of me, but I need a year off. I have
two beautiful kids, this amazing boyfriend with his own two
kids, and we’re just trying to find
time. I’ve been working nonstop
since Jan. 1. Nonstop! It’s amazing
and I’m grateful, but sometimes
things like Bye Bye Birdie go.
Second Act is a return to a genre
you’ve both had success in. Why
have romantic comedies struggled
at the box office?
GOLDSMITH-THOMAS Things used
to feel special, but now there’s just
so much content out there.
LOPEZ And everything has seasons.
Musicals get hot; superheroes
get hot. Romantic comedies had a
moment. If one hits, then everybody wants them again. Studio
execs go with what they think is
going to make money. You have to
just stick to who you are, do what
you do well.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
43
M AY 23, 2018
RÉSUMÉ
CURRENT TITLE
Lopez is CEO of Nuyorican;
Goldsmith-Thomas is
president of Nuyorican
PREVIOUS JOB
Goldsmith-Thomas
was a producer with
Revolution Studios
BIG HIT
NBC competition World
of Dance, renewed for
a third season before its
sophomore premiere
Broadcast hasn’t had the greatest
success with prestige drama. Are
you happy with the way Shades of
Blue was received?
LOPEZ My measure of success is,
“Did we make a great show?” And
we did. I was more worried about
the amount of time it would take.
A one-hour drama is the hardest
gig in show business.
Would you do it again?
LOPEZ Not for broadcast — maybe
a Netflix limited or something
that was just 10 episodes. It’s hard.
And I know demanding hours, but
it was scary for me. The first week
of shooting, I remember thinking,
“How am I gonna fucking do this
for a year or two years?” (A member
of Lopez’s team enters and places a
bedazzled Starbucks tumbler bearing
her initials before her.) This article is
going to talk about this cup.
It is something to look at …
LOPEZ Elle, my manicurist, gave
it to me for my birthday. I took it
to the Shades set the next day.
Just like that, it went viral. There
was a blog post with the headline, “Jennifer Lopez’s Cup Will
Make You Feel [Poor and Ugly].”
GOLDSMITH-THOMAS This is where
we differ. I don’t love it because
of this idea that she’s “diva-like.”
She is so not that. A few years after
Maid in Manhattan, I was diagnosed with Stage 3 breast cancer.
She found out when I was having
chemo, didn’t tell me and just
showed up at Sloan Kettering. The
girl I know flies across the country to rub your bald head or sit
at home with you to eat popcorn
and watch Jim Brooks movies.
LOPEZ But I’m a showgirl. I love the
sparkle.
The Business
Analysis
FILM | STEPHEN GALLOWAY
Cannes vs. Netflix: A Lose-Lose Proposition
I
’ll never forget the first time
I went to Cannes. It was 1995,
and the electricity was palpable. Stars, critics and directors
intermingled up and down the
Croisette, all waiting in breathless anticipation — as I did — for
whatever movie happened to
screen that night at the Palais. It
was a heady experience for a
reporter who’d grown up loving
film. And if one or two movies
were letdowns, so what? Others
were sure to follow that would
sweep us up even more.
Much of that excitement has
fizzled in recent years. The truth
is, filmmaking is in decline as a
cultural force — at least the kind
of filmmaking Cannes celebrates,
meaning art house and auteurdriven pictures. The rise of
television and rival forms of narrative has taken much of the air
out of the movie balloon, and so
has the dilution of the filmgoing
experience. Often now, we don’t
see movies on the big screen
but on smaller ones, in our homes,
sometimes just on our phones.
This year, Cannes took a stand
against all that. By refusing to
allow any picture to screen in competition that wouldn’t be shown
in French movie theaters before it
streamed, the festival was effectively saying: We believe in the big
screen, we believe in the full
immersive experience, we believe
that movies are meant for theaters
and we have to protect them.
I wish I could say Cannes was
right. Alas, even as I agree with
From left: Catherine Deneuve, John Huston
and Coppola at the 1979 Cannes Film Festival.
its principles, I disagree with its
practice, which prompted Netflix
to withdraw its contenders
from this year’s fest. Cannes was
committing itself to the past;
but film, like all art forms — like
all of society — is in a constant
process of evolution. Failing to
recognize that, the fest did damage not just to the pictures but
also itself.
The reality of the film business
is that, until recently, financing for independent projects was
in a long decline. The business
model that made indie releases
viable (packing a project with
stars in order to generate presales
to foreign territories, with much
of the revenue driven by home
entertainment) had been eroding
for years. Everyone was praying
for a miracle — and then it came
thanks to streaming services
like Netflix, Amazon and Hulu.
These services are putting
millions — make that hundreds
of millions — into films that
otherwise would never see the
light of day. Like it or not, more
and more pictures (especially the
provocative, nontentpole kind)
will depend on streamers as
the years go by. Cannes should
be embracing these newcomers as saviors of the very type of
filmmaking it aims to promote.
Instead, it’s putting up walls,
keeping the barbarians at the gate,
as if somehow they’re foes of the
filmmaking it cherishes.
Once upon a time, Cannes’ strategy may have made sense. In
the first decades of the television
era, film and TV were radically
different media. That’s when your
average television set was a dull,
boxlike affair, maybe 24 inches
wide, with a terrible image and
dreadful sound. But almost anyone who can pay for an expensive
movie ticket can now purchase
Illustration by Leon Edler
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
44
M AY 23, 2018
a widescreen delivery system
with terrific sound. Audiences, in
other words, can largely choose
how they want to see a film, and
should be free to do so.
Some films, admittedly, are
simply made for the big screen.
They’re utterly visual works that
would suffer without the cinematic experience. Francis Ford
Coppola’s Apocalypse Now, which
shared the Palme d’Or with
The Tin Drum in 1979, is one such
movie; Stanley Kubrick’s 2001:
A Space Odyssey, recently unveiled
at Cannes in a restored version
overseen by Christopher Nolan, is
another. But it’s better for most
movies to be seen on a variety of
screens than not to be seen at all.
In choosing to keep good movies out rather than letting more
movies in, Cannes is blinkering itself to the modern age. We’ve
seen how much sparkle has left
Cannes — where the Croisette
used to be packed with A-list stars,
now only a few big names can
be found hanging in its bars: Cate
Blanchett, Penelope Cruz and
Javier Bardem this year, but few
others; that could only improve
with a better choice of movies.
Netflix is making some incredible films — among them,
if advance word is right, its new
Alfonso Cuaron picture, Roma;
Paul Greengrass’ Norway; and
the Orson Welles documentary
They’ll Love Me When I’m Dead.
These need to be seen, and should
have been seen in Cannes. Rather
than eliminate a subsection of
movies, the world’s greatest film
festival should welcome them
with open arms. Without them,
Cannes will matter less; and
without Cannes, so will the films.
STEPHEN GALLOWAY is
executive editor, features, at
The Hollywood Reporter.
BENOIT GYSEMBERGH/PARIS MATCH VIA GETTY IMAGES
It was quiet on the Croisette this year thanks to a silly war that kept streaming movies (and the A-list stars who generate buzz)
out of the industry’s biggest promotional event, hurting indie producers as much as the festival itself
Miami has no stand-in. And now there are even more reasons to film in
Miami, including several new local film incentives. To learn more about
getting some green back, visit: MiamiandBeaches.com/FilmInMiami
FILM IN
T h e G r e a t e r M i a m i C o n v e n t i o n & V i s i t o r s B u r e a u i s p r o u d t o b e t h e h o s t o f t h e A m e r i c a n B l a c k F i l m Fe s t i va l .
©Greater Miami Convention & Visitors Bureau – The Official Destination Sales & Marketing Organization for Greater Miami and the Beaches.
The Business
Analysis
they can offer that Netflix can’t — or won’t.
Included in that mix: a hefty marketing push
and the confidence to sell projects anywhere.
“They’re really pushing the fact that you can
sell to outside distributors like streamers and
cable networks,” says CAA’s Andrew Miller. It’s
that flexibility that could allow Warner Bros.
to keep ahold of uber-producer Greg Berlanti,
who’s leaned heavily on the studio’s DC library.
Netflix is said to have already wooed him even
though his contract doesn’t expire until 2020,
but multiple sources say he’s likely to stay
put at Warners, suggesting the studio is ponying up a hefty nine figures (a few say as much
as $300 million). Notes one rep: “You’re seeing
TELEV ISION | BRY N ELISE SANDBERG
a legacy studio that believed they could get a
discount on talent suddenly stepping up and
going batshit crazy with the rest of them.”
Though Netflix executives have stated their
desire to keep their roster small — “There’s
a rare class of creator who has a sensibility and
a brand,” chief content officer Ted Sarandos
With deep-pocketed Netflix poaching hitmakers Shonda Rhimes and Ryan Murphy
told THR earlier this year — it’s by no means
for nine-figure paydays, studios are ‘going batshit crazy with the rest of them’
done. In recent months, the streamer is said to
and leveraging their wider scope to secure talent amid ‘insane’ bidding wars
have courted Kenya Barris (also pursued by
Warner Bros., allegedly for high-eight figures,
but stuck in his ABC deal) as well as 20th TV’s
arms of their business for deals across the
he Shonda deal was a shot across the
Seth MacFarlane and Steve Levitan. Meanwhile,
corporation. It’s a marked break from the past,
bow, and the Ryan Murphy deal was a
Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg are rumored
where media companies were heavily siloed
punch in the face.”
to be mulling a multimillion-dollar Netflix
and broadcast was the keystone of any pact.
That’s one business affairs executive’s
offer. With lesser fanfare, Amazon has locked
Viacom, in an effort led by CEO Bob Bakish,
assessment of the way Netflix dramatically
up Robert Kirkman (The Walking Dead), Amy
has inked multiyear deals with both Tyler Perry
disrupted the overall deals market with
Sherman-Palladino (The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel)
and Trevor Noah that encompass TV, film
back-to-back nine-figure pacts for two of TV’s
and Jill Soloway (Transparent), while Hulu is
and shortform video. So rather than turn to
top creators. Now traditional studios are left
dipping its toe with a pact for Handmaid’s Tale
another studio to adapt his nonfiction book
scrambling — looking at their tentpole players
showrunner Bruce Miller. Even Apple, yet to
Born a Crime for film, the Daily Show host
and asking, “How do we keep them?” The
launch its first scripted series, has inked a deal
now will do so at Paramount. Similarly,
mad rush for talent has not only forced
in April, Lorne Michaels left Paramount that sources say is in the $10 million range for
studios to abandon the one-size-fits-all
Bates Motel alum Kerry Ehrin to take the reins
after nearly 30 years for a film deal
broadcast-focused pacts that defined the
on its Reese Witherspoon-Jennifer Aniston
with
Universal,
the
longtime
home
of
his
business (“Now they come in all shapes
Noah
morning-news drama.
television business. “One of our initiaand sizes,” says CBS TV Studios’ David
It’s not just those in the upper echelon who
tives is to forge a more synergistic feature-TV
Stapf), but it also has driven up prices, particuare benefiting. “If studios want a drama showrelationship, so we’ve been offering up as
larly for showrunners with multiple series on
runner, they’ll offer a straight overall deal
many aspects of the NBCUniversal family as
the air. “It’s the most competitive overall deal
for a big number,” says one agent, notpossible,” says NBCUniversal TV head
market I’ve ever seen,” says UTA’s Dan Erlij.
ing that there’s a dearth of experienced
Pearlena Igbokwe, whose studio is also
Traditional outfits must figure out how
drama showrunners available because
signing longer deals (more than three
to remain competitive: “They’re going to have
of the volume of scripted series. With
years) to lock in talent.
to start placing bets,” says one top rep who
egos as well as bottom lines at stake, the
In recent months, there’s been growestimates that studios accustomed to paying
Berlanti
climate is growing increasingly cuting speculation that J.J. Abrams, who has
a high-end drama showrunner about $3 milthroat. Following Rhimes’ move to Netflix, a
had a long-standing relationship with Warner
lion a year will now have to spend closer to
heated battle emerged for her writers. “The
Bros. for TV, may sign a companywide deal
$5 million. “They’ve tried to keep costs down.
bidding wars became really insane,” says one
at Time Warner, moving his film dealings
But the people that don’t get back into the specsource, who suggests that scribes who had
from Paramount when his contract comes up
ulative business will be dead.”
never even developed a property were offered
this summer. According to an insider, Warner
Without the seemingly bottomless pockets
seven-figure guarantees. Admits one rep who
Bros. CEO Kevin Tsujihara, TV boss Peter Roth
of their streaming counterparts, studios are
just landed a multimillion-dollar development
and film head Toby Emmerich regularly meet to
getting creative, banding together the various
pact for a lesser-known client, “It’s a stupid
strategize ways to better position talent across
deal for the studio to have made, but that’s the
TV, film, digital and even gaming.
BRYN ELISE SANDBERG is television writer at
market.”
Traditional studios are busy pitching what
The Hollywood Reporter.
Why the One-Size-Fits-All
Talent Deal No Longer Fits
Illustration by Tim Peacock
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
46
M AY 23, 2018
NOAH: JASON KEMPIN/GETTY IMAGES. BERLANTI: GARY GERSHOFF/GETTY IMAGES.
T
UJA-Federation of New York | Entertainment, Media & Communications Division
2018 MUSIC VISIONARY OF THE YEAR AWARD RECIPIENTS
TROY CARTER
DANIEL EK
SPOTIFY
TUESDAY, JUNE 12, 2018 | 11:30 AM
NEW YORK CITY
For more information, please contact Steven Singer at
212.836.1452 or singers@ujafedny.org.
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Style
Jewelry
↑
Jennifer Behr
Hand-painted Aviva chandeliers
with Swarovski crystals;
$875, jenniferbehr.com
Bloom Bijoux
Take a cue from the Cannes red carpet,
where a floral fixation ruled, with a pair of
spring’s showstopping earrings
By Carol McColgin • Illustration by Lucy Engelman
↑
Dior Fine Jewelry
Dior a Versailles Cote Jardins earrings
with diamonds, sapphires, tourmalines,
garnets and emeralds; price
upon request, 800-929-3467
EARRINGS: COURTESY OF BRAND (7). BLANCHETT: TONY BARSON/GETTY IMAGES. SEYDOUX: EMMA MCINTYRE/GETTY IMAGES.
←
Irene
Neuwirth
One-of-a-kind
pink opal, Akoya
pearl and
diamond pavé
earrings in
18-karat rose
gold; price upon
request, at Irene
Neuwirth, West
Hollywood
Cate Blanchett wore Chopard’s
orchid earrings with 4,800
tsavorites from the Red Carpet
Collection in Cannes.
Style
Jewelry
↑
Dolce &
Gabbana
↑
Bounkit
Rosetto gold-tone
brass and crystal
clip earrings; $1,195,
modaoperandi.com
Pink mother-of-pearl
flower drops with blue
quartz and onyx in
14-karat gold-plated brass;
$395, modaoperandi.com
Lea Seydoux dazzled in
Boucheron diamonds from the
new Nature Triomphante High
Jewelry collection in Cannes.
Emerald mini impatiens faceted
glass crystal clip earrings;
$350, oscardelarenta.com
↑
Bea Bongiasca
Kawaii Currency clusters with cherry
blossom-shaped amethyst, rose quartz and
topaz; $3,000, beabongiasca.com
50
SEYDOUX: EMMA MCINTYRE/GETTY IMAGES.
↑
Oscar de la Renta
Style
The strap is handmade natural
vegetable-tanned
leather with
colorful handpainted stripes.
The company
hand-paints its dials,
such as this hot
pink shade on the
41mm steel piece
(with gold bezel), at
its downtown
Los Angeles studio.
Reboots, but for Watches:
‘Modding’ Has Gone Mainstream
Rolex and other top timepiece companies are embracing customization and teaming with
Spike Lee and Lenny Kravitz: ‘There’s an extra, extra exclusivity because it’s personalized’
By Degen Pener
he trend of outsider
companies customizing
luxury-brand watches
has come a long way from the days
when messing with an iconic
timepiece felt almost like sacrilege. In the past two years alone,
aftermarket modification — or
watch modding — has gained
A-list steam, with director Spike
Lee and musician Lenny Kravitz
each collaborating with Swiss
customization company Artisans
de Geneve on limited-edition
Rolexes. Lee’s co-design, dubbed
Cool Hand Brooklyn ($39,800, in
a limited edition of 40), debuted in
November, featuring orange and
blue details on a Rolex Daytona.
While stars have had jewelers
remake watches for decades —
Elvis Presley added diamonds to
his in the ’60s, and hip-hop artists long have worn iced-out
timepieces — a new look kicked
off in the mid-2000s when George
Bamford of Bamford Watch
Department and such companies
as Pro Hunter, Project X, Mad
T
Paris and Titan Black started
promoting a specific style: a blackon-black look, mostly on new
Rolexes, that was created by coating
them with DLC (diamond-like carbon)
or PVD (physical
Aniston
vapor deposition). The
blacked-out watches
were discreet enough
to be worn in an
office and exuded
Downey
stealth cool: Jennifer
Aniston, Mark Wahlberg, Robert
Downey Jr., Daniel Craig and
Snap chairman Michael Lynton
rocked them.
But purists loathed these
Frankenwatches, with no brands
sanctioning the practice. “For a
long time, these companies were
the black sheep,” says James
Lamdin, founder of vintage watch
sales site Analog/Shift. Still,
customization was very attractive for high-end buyers,
especially creative types. “We
cater to whims,” says Ben Waite,
director of Titan Black, who notes
that hand-painted camo patterns are popular right now. The
Chainsmokers’ Alex Pall has been
spotted in one of 2-year-old
brand La Californienne’s “restored
and remastered” Rolexes and
Cartiers, with hand-painted dials
and striped leather straps in
West Coast pinks and tangerines,
says co-owner Leszek Garwacki.
Most surprisingly, Bamford, the
best known among this group of
disrupter watch companies,
formed an official partnership
with LVMH as the approved
personalization partner for such
brands as Bulgari, Zenith and
TAG Heuer. “People want more
individualization. For a big
1
Watches
company like us, we are more
organized for standardization. So
working with Bamford, we have
the best of both,” says LVMH head
of watchmaking Jean-Claude
Biver. In March at the Baselworld
watch fair in Switzerland, TAG
Heuer and Bamford debuted
their first official collaboration,
a Monaco (famously worn by
Steve McQueen in 1971’s Le Mans)
with a carbon case and pale blue
dial ($8,100, in a limited edition of 500). The Bamford deal
means that lovers of, say, a Bulgari
Serpenti watch can have their
choice of coatings, dial, baton,
hand and logo colors and even add
their initials to the face. “With
us, you can have your identity on a
product,” says Bamford, as watch
companies like Ulysse Nardin and
Armin Strom join in expanding
consumers’ choices. Adds Lamdin,
“There’s an extra, extra exclusivity
because it’s personalized.”
Most of these businesses are
spurred by their respect and love
of Rolex. “If you customize one of
Rolex’s products, you have to be
at the same high level,” says John
Isaac, CEO of Artisans de Geneve.
Some modders will tweak a
watch you already own, while
others only work on factory-fresh
pieces. Wait times run two to three
months. A good sign that a customization company is reputable
— “There are things done in somebody’s garage,” warns Lamdin — is
that it offers its own warranty that
matches the length of the original,
which is invalidated when a new
watch is modified. “Traditionally,
modifying a watch is a sure way
to reduce or destroy resale value,”
says Lamdin. “However, I have
seen preowned Bamfords sell for
good money. It’s a relatively
young sort of industry within the
watch world.”
1 Huckleberry’s modified
18-karat rose gold Rolex Daytona
($90,000) with custom red dial
is hand-engraved with a plant motif.
2 U.K.-based Bamford’s
collaboration with TAG Heuer,
a 39mm x 39mm Monaco
with a carbon case and sporting
Monaco’s signature crown.
2
WATCHES: COURTESY OF BRAND (6). LEE: MIKE MARSLAND/WIREIMAGE. ANISTON: B LACROIX/WIREIMAGE. DOWNEY JR: JESSE GRANT/GETTY IMAGES FOR DISNEY.
La Californienne
restores vintage
Rolexes, including
sourcing original
hands, such as
on its reimagined
Yachtmaster
($13,500).
Lee, who co-designed the Cool
Hand Brooklyn (below), was
approached about collaborating by the
CEO of Artisans de Geneve while in
line at the NYC Apple store in SoHo.
March 3, 2017
TRUMP’S OSCAR
OBSESSION
MAKING A SPEECH
T H AT M AT T E R S
by john irving
W H O W I L L ( A N D S H O U L D) W I N
‘ G E T O N A TA B L E A N D D A N C E ’
E LT O N J O H N ’ S B A S H T U R N S 2 5
‘ I W A S P R I N C E S S L E I A’ S
O S C A R D AT E ’
S PA R K L E A N D S U B S TA N C E
ON THE NEW RED CARPET
plus ...
H O W T O AV O I D
‘ LO S E R FAC E ’
WHY
THE
OSCARS
STILL
M AT T E R
By Lin-Manuel Miranda,
Mark Cuban, Liza Minnelli,
Matt Damon, Dakota Johnson,
Olivia de Havilland, Michael Ovitz
Neil deGrasse Tyson and more
Oscar nominee Miranda was
photographed Feb. 6 in L.A.
42
NOMINATIONS
I N C LU D I N G
Best Website
PRINT Journalist of the Year
Gary Baum
ENTERTAINMENT JOURNALIST OF THE YEAR
LACEY ROSE
Los Angeles Press Club
60th Southern California
Journalism Awards
MORE nominations THAN ANY
OTHER entertainment outlet
DR AMA ACTRESS
ROUNDTABLE
‘I T TA K ES T IM E
TO GET TO A POINT
IN YOUR CAREER WHERE
YOU C A N M A K E
A CHOICE’
From left: Claire Foy, Thandie Newton, Elisabeth Moss, Sandra Oh, Angela Bassett
and Maggie Gyllenhaal were photographed April 29 at Line 204 Studios in Hollywood.
Styling by Carol McColgin. On Foy: Versace dress and boots; Jennifer Meyer earring.
On Newton: Balmain dress; Jennifer Meyer earring and rings; Tamara Mellon shoes.
On Moss: Cushnie et Ochs dress; Jennifer Meyer earrings; Christian Louboutin shoes.
On Oh: Laura Basci corset and pants; Jennifer Fisher earring and ring; Jimmy Choo shoes.
On Bassett: Stella McCartney jumpsuit; Jennifer Fisher jewelry; Casadei shoes.
On Gyllenhaal: Michael Kors dress; Jennifer Fisher jewelry; Christian Louboutin shoes.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
54
M AY 23, 2018
T V ’s top female stars un load on the power of
producing, onscreen nudity (male and female), learning
to say no and Hol ly wood’s bet ter-late-than-never
push for gender pay parit y: ‘ T here w a s so much t a l k,
and where w a s the act ion? ’
BY LACEY ROSE
PHOTOGRAPHED BY
MILLER MOBLEY
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
55
M AY 23, 2018
CLAIRE FOY JOK ES, AS
The Hollywood Reporter’s annual Drama Actress Roundtable
conversation veers into the subject of pay parity. It is a hot-button issue
that the Crown star has been
unable to avoid since March, when
a producer on her acclaimed
Netflix drama disclosed that Foy,
who has played Queen Elizabeth
for two seasons, was paid less
than her male co-star Matt Smith.
Going forward, however, the
producer noted, “No one gets paid
more than the queen.” The admission ignited fury and was quickly
followed by an apology for dragging Foy and Smith to “the center
of a media storm.” But the saga was
not without a silver lining: HBO
stars Thandie Newton (Westworld)
and Maggie Gyllenhaal (The Deuce)
quickly saw their own salaries
boosted to match their male counterparts’, as they reveal to their
compatriots at the Hollywood
gathering. Over the course of an
hour at Line 204 Studios on
April 29, Foy, 34, Newton, 45, and
Gyllenhaal, 40, were joined by
Elisabeth Moss, 35 (Hulu’s The
Handmaid’s Tale and SundanceTV’s
Top of the Lake: China Girl); Sandra
Oh, 46 (BBC America’s Killing
Eve); and Angela Bassett, 59 (Fox’s
9-1-1) for a wide-ranging discussion that also hit on the politics of
MAGGIE GYLLENHAAL
T H E D E U C E (H BO)
sex scenes, the power in producing
and the parts that have warranted
an easy and immediate “no.” But
first and foremost — as is increasingly the case in today’s Hollywood
— they talked money.
Claire, one of the conversations
that you got unwittingly pulled
into was one about pay parity.
C L A I R E F OY
Here we go …
(Laughs.)
How much did you know about
the pay disparity between you
and your co-star before the world
F OY I [could have] kept my mouth
shut and said, “I have nothing
to say, I’m a robot.” I was part of
a really incredible show that I’m
really proud of and grateful for,
but that shouldn’t stop me from
having an opinion about something that I have been brought
into the center of. It would be very
different if it was something
that I didn’t have an opinion on,
but it’s something that I feel
really strongly about and that I
had a suspicion of …
T H A N D I E N E W T O N Is that why
it got talked about? Because you
had a suspicion?
F OY No, no, no. It came about
purely because the producers
brought it up [at a conference] as
a way of saying, “This is a good
thing because in the first two
[seasons] this is what happened,
but we’ll never do that again.”
S A N D R A O H Oh, whoops!
SET DESIGN BY LIZZIE LANG AT WALTER SCHUPFER. ON-SITE TAILOR: LAURA BASCI. GYLLENHAAL HAIR BY KARA YOSHIMOTO BUA AT STARWORKS ARTISTS, MAKEUP BY KYLEE
HEATH AT STARWORKS ARTISTS. BASSETT HAIR BY RANDY STODGHILL AT OPUS BEAUTY, MAKEUP BY D’ANDRE MICHAEL. DEUCE: PAUL SCHIRALDI/HBO. 911: MICHAEL BECKER/FOX.
“ O H , G R E A T,”
knew, and what did it feel like to
be at the center of that?
ANGELA BASSETT
9 -1-1 (Fox)
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
57
M AY 23, 2018
But will you now?
F OY No. (Laughter.) But the point
is I don’t have to now.
N E W T O N It’s going to set a
precedent.
F OY Yeah. And the thing is, at
the beginning of the deal when
they’re saying, “This is gonna
happen and you’re gonna get paid
this and blah, blah, blah,” I have
never felt that I would ever be in a
position where I could ask [for
more] and I would know what was
happening and I would know
what decisions were being made.
But they used that to their favor,
[the fact] that you can’t, and they’d
all say, “But you’re not worth
that.” And you go, “You’re right,
I’m not.” Because that’s what you
say to yourself when someone
tells you that, and you absorb it.
A L L Yeah.
For those of you who are producers, do you feel compelled or
empowered to start having those
conversations and speaking
up about pay on your shows now?
I’m probably
feeling a little bit more empowered to do so, but for so long
it’s just been about wanting to
work. And wanting to be paid
A NGEL A BASSETT
fairly, sure, and not having a
frame of reference of what someone else is getting or the fear of,
if you over-reach you’re going to
lose the job.
N E W T O N And that’s used against
us all the time.
B A S S E T T You hear, “We’re gonna
move on if you say no.”
N E W T O N But then you say no, and
suddenly they say, “Oh, actually
would you reconsider?” That’s a
tactic I’ve used.
B A S S E T T Good for you. (Clapping.)
E L I S A B E T H M O S S When you’re
leading the show and you’re
the face of the show and a lot of
people are making a lot of money
off of that face and your work,
it does put you in an empowered
position. It’s not just financial, it’s
about other ways of having control and a say, which frankly no
one is used to. You start asking for
something, and they’re like, “Oh
right, I guess you could have that.
No one has ever asked.”
F OY I can’t imagine being
an executive producer on a show
and me saying something and
them not just going, “But you’re
just an actor.”
lots of fake orgasms. They’re not
called fake orgasms, but you cut
in on the end of a sex act between
a sex worker and a John and you
hear this loud orgasm, and I said
to David Simon, the man running our show, “I think you need
to see a real feminine orgasm
in order to show the contrast and
to show that these are performative. It will illuminate the
misogyny and the performance
and all that stuff.” When I first
said it to him, he pretended to spit
his water back in his cup. But
then he wrote a scene where my
character is sleeping with somebody whom she actually wants to
sleep with. He doesn’t make her
come, and so she turns over and
makes herself come.
N E W T O N That’s amazing.
G Y L L E N H A A L And I was like, “This
orgasm needs to be the realest
orgasm ever. This needs to be one
that takes 30 seconds, that’s very
quiet, that’s just about her.” I
thought about it, and then I went
in and did that on TV. And that’s
way more vulnerable than the
orgasm that’s the performance.
You’ve heard that?
F OY That’s what’s understood.
And that you’re difficult when
you say, “Could we just push my
pickup time by 25 minutes?”
M O S S Oh yeah.
G Y L L E N H A A L I asked to be
a producer on my show because
I’d never done this thing before
where you get three scripts and
the season is 10 scripts and
then you might go on for three
years. And I’m playing a sex
worker, and of course I have to
take my clothes off all the time,
and I’m like, “Wait, I have to
be able to know that I will be
included in the conversation.”
But, actually, I wouldn’t feel
comfortable saying, “Could you
please push my call time 25 minutes?” (Laughs.)
M O S S Really? I do that all the
time.
F OY All the time. I’m like, “I need
to sleep.”
THANDIE NEWTON
W E S T WO R L D (H BO)
What are you asking for with that
producer hat on, Maggie?
G Y L L E N H A A L Well, for example,
in our show there is lots of prostitution, lots of transactional sex,
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
How empowering to be able
to have an artistic say in what your
character is doing.
G Y L L E N H A A L But then I see
the cut, and they cut the orgasm.
A L L No! (Laughter.)
G Y L L E N H A A L I wrote a dissertation by email, and then I woke
up at 6 o’clock in the morning to
see if they [read] it. And the second I got to set, I was like, “Where
is the orgasm?” I explained to
them again why they needed it in.
And they put it in.
B A S S E T T You fought for it.
O H That’s fantastic. Such a
great win.
OH
58
M AY 23, 2018
NEWTON HAIR BY CAROLA GONZALEZ, MAKEUP BY SHERIDAN WARD. WESTWORLD: JOHN P. JOHNSON/HBO.
N E W T O N That’s what’s happened
with HBO now because of what
[happened on your] show. They’re
now having all the men and
women [making] equal pay. It’s a
revolution.
M A G G I E G Y L L E N H A A L It’s true.
That’s a place where honestly
there was so much talk, and where
was the action? And then I just
get a call going over the bridge to
Brooklyn saying my salary now
is way higher than I ever considered it would be, and it’s because
of these conversations. At first, I
was like, “Wait, this is not fair.
Why do I get to win the lottery?”
And then I went, “No, it’s been
unfair to the point where I’ve
digested it and accepted it without
ever considering that it could or
should be equal.”
F OY Looking back now at the
conversations you have at the
beginning of doing a deal and all
that, and this may be a cultural
thing, but in the United Kingdom
we don’t talk about money.
G Y L L E N H A A L We don’t talk about
it here either.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
59
M AY 23, 2018
M O S S I know that dissertation
email so well. (Laughs.)
When you’re considering roles,
you’re all at a point in your
careers where you can afford to be
picky. How do you decide what’s a
yes versus a no?
It takes a while to get to a
point in your career where you can
actually make a choice. And after a
decade of my life on a show [Grey’s
Anatomy], I had enough economic
power to be able to say no. Those
four years were like active waiting. I was not not working really in
here (motions to her gut) to be able
to figure out what the right thing
is and what it is to say no and what
it is to say yes. It’s like falling in
love. Now, what I realize is I have a
little bit more awareness, a little
more consciousness, I want this out
of a relationship and I’m just
going to wait until they show up
because I feel like they’ll show up.
OH
You’ve talked about reading the
initial pilot script for Killing Eve
and scrolling through quite a bit
to me in that moment where I
couldn’t even see myself [as the
central character].
N E W T O N You hadn’t given yourself permission.
O H Right. Why didn’t I?
F OY That makes me want to cry.
O H So the fact that [creator]
Phoebe Waller-Bridge, BBC
America and Sally Woodward
Gentle, our producer, said, “Yes,
why not this [for me]?” I felt
slightly ashamed — and if I can’t
see myself in that moment, then
other people have that weight
as well. And so we need to hold
these things up for other people
to see.
N E W T O N Oh my God, yes.
O H And that’s one of the reasons
why I said, “I’m going to take
this. I’m gonna leave my life here
— I’m going to do everything to
make this.”
So that was your big yes. For the
rest of you, are there types of
roles that you just say, “Mmm, not
gonna do that”?
N E W T O N Oh my God, yeah.
Ninety-five percent [of them].
What’s an easy no?
SANDRA OH
KILLING EVE
(BBC A mer ica)
of it before you realized you were
being asked to play the central
storyteller. Why do you think that
is, and what did you learn from
that realization?
That moment was a real
punch in the gut for me because
the internalization [that I couldn’t
be seen as the lead] was really
deep. I get the script, I’m on the
phone with my agent, I remember exactly where I was, right by
BAM in Brooklyn, and I’m going,
“Scrolling, scrolling” (scans her
phone). I’m just like, “I don’t know,
who am I playing? What’s the
part?” [My agent] goes, “Eve! You’re
playing Eve.” Something happened
OH HAIR BY TED GIBSON AT THE VISIONARIES AGENCY, MAKEUP BY DANIELLE
VINCENT FOR KIMIKO BEAUTY. KILLING: COURTESY OF BBC AMERICA.
OH
N E W T O N Well, for a start, it’s how
a character is described in a script.
For years, I’d be called up and
they’d say, “Thandie, they want to
go exotic with the role, so get
excited.” (Laughter.) Or they want
to go “ethnic” with the role. And
I would just have to brace myself
because it was so deeply offensive,
but I wanted to work. And then I’d
read the script and I’d transform it
out of this bizarre objectification.
I’d think, like, “How can I help
make this more progressive?” I’d
spend a lot of time trying to give
more dimension to these women’s
roles. And oftentimes — well,
always — they would be written
by men, and I’d find myself
desperately trying to stop these
characters from being demonized,
and that happens [because] you
don’t have enough lines or screen
time to actually try and humanize
these characters. So, I’ve found
I’ve had to rise above the initial
hurt that I feel that a man has
written a role that is objectifying
this person, whether it’s their ethnicity or [a description like], “She
turns up, she’s beautiful, she’s sexy
without giving too much away …”
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
F OY Oh God, that’s an awful
description. (Laughter.)
N E W T O N Or you turn up at a photo
shoot, and it’ll say, “The idea
behind this shoot is strong, powerful, sexy.” And as soon as
I read sexy, I’m like, “Really? Do
we have to be sexy in order to
be powerful?” Let’s start looking
at the way things are described
because they have ramifications.
I have daughters. I don’t want
her thinking you have to be sexy
to be powerful.
B A S S E T T Well, at least you stay in
the conversation. If I look at something and I feel that way about
it, or offended, then it’s like, “Well,
it’s not for me, but it’s for someone else, perhaps.”
N E W T O N But we have influence and we can help them
because very often people have
no idea that they’ve done it. I’ve
heard unbelievable statistics
about how many men are writing
our roles, and of course they’re
going to get it wrong. How can
they be in our shoes? How can
they really understand how we
feel? We have to correct that. And
we have the opportunity.
G Y L L E N H A A L I’ve worked with
a lot of men who are actually
interested in and curious about
women. Even if, of course, it’s
impossible for a man to entirely
understand a feminine experience, there are men who are
interested in exploring it with you
and in correcting it if you’re like,
“Mmm, no, it’s actually more
like this.”
N E W T O N Sure. It’s scary, though,
to be the one to say, “Hang on a
sec, guys, can we try this?”
G Y L L E N H A A L My show is actually about this: sex as a way
into having an actual interesting conversation. And when I
look back with a little objectivity
on the work I’ve done in my life,
I don’t think I was conscious
of this but I do think sex and sex
scenes and sexuality has been
a way to get people’s attention and
then go, “OK, are you listening
now? Here’s what I actually really
want to talk about.” That’s what
was available to me, so that’s what
I used.
N E W T O N Yep.
G Y L L E N H A A L I’m really interested in sex, like everybody else,
and I’m interested in sex scenes.
61
M AY 23, 2018
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But in my show, my character
has access to filmmaking but only
in porn and only with her body.
That’s how she can get in and start
having the conversation where
she’s like, “What does that light
do?” — while she’s got her clothes
off. But I kind of relate to that
as an actress. I don’t know if you
all feel this way, but it has felt
like a prerequisite that, yes, you
can be smart and powerful and all
these things, but you also have
to throw a little sexiness in there.
And I don’t know if it’s going
to stay that way, but it certainly
has been that way for most of
my career.
N E W T O N [It’s one thing] when
you’re in control and empowered
to be able to dial up and down
however much sexiness you want
to use, but what worries me is
when you’re a young person coming into this industry and you’re
encouraged to use your sexuality
and you haven’t made decisions
about that.
G Y L L E N H A A L But haven’t we all
been …?
B A S S E T T Mmmm, no, not really.
(Laughter.) I’ve not been asked
to use my sexuality in my career.
G Y L L E N H A A L Really?
B A S S E T T Not as a black woman,
no.
G Y L L E N H A A L Hmm.
N E W T O N I wonder why?
O H I’ll echo Angela’s experience.
For me, I don’t think I’ve ever
gotten any job based on bum bum
bum … (motions to her body). As
fabulous as it is. (Laughter.)
F OY That’s really interesting and
alarming.
O H But it’s also complicated in
lots of ways if you are the person
CLAIRE FOY
[for whom] that’s not at the
forefront of your toolbox. And
there’s a lot of different feelings that we have when people are
not interested in your [sexuality].
I have realized in a lot of this
awakening that there are a lot of
times where I have felt left out,
ignored, not seen, but now I see
I’ve been protected.
N E W T O N How?
F OY If people didn’t see you
that way, you don’t get sent
those parts?
O H It’s not so much that, it’s the
compromises. I have not
necessarily been in the situations where I have had to
compromise in those ways. Other
ways I have — but my ability to
continue the integrity of my work
has not, I don’t think, been as
weighted as it has for a lot of other
actresses I know.
F OY What really pisses me off is
that there is one idea of what is
sexy. And now because I’m doing
more and more photo shoots
and things like that that are
required of me and I’m expected
to be a certain way …
What way is that?
(Gives mock sexy poses.)
Yeah, yeah, yeah, the
sexy thing. (Laughter.)
F OY I just don’t have it. I don’t
have it in me to be sexy as someone else. I don’t know why I would
F OY
N EW TON
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
be sexy or in what way I’m sexy,
and I don’t know whether I can
play up my sexiness.
G Y L L E N H A A L But I’m not talking
about that kind of sexy. I’ve been
told I’m not sexy enough or beautiful enough so many more times
than I can even remember from
the time I was 22 years old. I’m
talking about what you’re saying
(looks to Oh), which is: I figured
out at some point that one of the
things in my toolbox was the way
I feel that I’m sexy. And for us as
women, we have to use whatever’s
in our toolbox. I’m not interested
in the pretend sexy thing and I’m
not interested in seeing it in other
people, either.
F OY That’s the fallacy of it. I don’t
think anybody really is.
N E W T O N Well …
G Y L L E N H A A L I know. (Laughter.)
62
M AY 23, 2018
How do the conversation and
tone on set change as you start to
see more male nudity?
Oh, I’ve had like
three prosthetic penises put
in front of a group of people to
figure out which one went best
with which man.
O H Wow.
GY LLENHA AL
And what does that feel like,
having always been the one who’s
had to strip down?
I don’t know how
to compare that to anything!
(Laughs.)
N E W T O N I do. With the season
premiere, [my co-star] Simon
Quarterman was completely
naked and he was terrified. There
was no prosthetic penis there.
He decided to go for it. And just
being aware of his vulnerability …
GY LLENHA AL
FOY HAIR BY JILLIAN HALOUSKA AT STARWORKS ARTISTS, MAKEUP BY QUINN MURPHY AT THE WALL GROUP. MOSS HAIR BY SUNNIE
BROOK AT THE TOMLINSON GROUP, MAKEUP BY KAYLEEN MCADAMS AT STARWORKS ARTISTS. CROWN: ALEX BAILEY/NETFLIX.
THE CROW N
(Netf lix)
What I love about Westworld is
that it’s showing the vulnerability and the objectification of
a person, and if you see a person
naked and not in a sexual context,
suddenly you don’t want to look.
Well, maybe some people do want
to jerk off to what I was doing
in season one, but that’s really
weird and they should check into
a hospital.
A L L Mm, hmm. (Laughter.)
N E W T O N But that’s why I took the
show. I’ve been objectified, I’ve
had directors lie to me when I’m
in a naked situation on a movie
and been told that they’re cutting
here (motions to her bust line and
up) when in fact they’re shooting
from here (motions to whole body),
so you see everything. I’ve had
terrible things happen, so to be
able to say to the showrunners of
Westworld, “I am willing to stand
for 75 percent of this season
totally naked” because it wasn’t a
sexual context [is powerful]. And
then to see this man terrified
of being naked when Evan Rachel
Wood and I have grown accustomed to it, sitting there, having
a chat, a glass of water, totally
naked, it was very touching. And
he’s learned that it’s really tough,
and the more men that do it. …
And men are also really worried
about how their bodies look.
So much more worried than us.
Like these guys on Westworld
are all, “How does my bum look?
I’m really scared, can you do some
shading here and there?” And
we’re like, “Really?’ (Laughter.)
100 percent approval without
me asking.
N E W T O N Oh, that’s incredible.
M O S S I was like, “I don’t know,
I don’t know,” and she was like,
“Listen …”
G Y L L E N H A A L I have that, too.
M O S S Everyone should have it.
[ahead of time] — which I think is
really strange — “You can show
a right nipple but not this (motions
to her rear) ...”
M O S S Instead it’s [seeing
the footage and saying], “Oh, I’m
comfortable with this but I’m not
comfortable with that.”
G Y L L E N H A A L I’ve been doing a
lot of nudity all my career and I’ve
had it for 15 years, and I’ve actually
never taken anything out.
M O S S You’ve got to get it. I have it
on everything now. They can’t
send out a cut that has something
in it without me approving it.
N E W T O N I wish I’d known that.
That’s why we all need to talk.
What does 100 percent approval
over nude scenes entail?
M O S S It means I have 100 percent
approval over all the footage and
I can literally say, “You cannot use
that scene.”
G Y L L E N H A A L And it means
instead of having to negotiate
ELISABETH MOSS
THE HANDM AID’S TALE
(Hu lu) and T OP OF T H E L A K E:
C H I N A G I R L (Su nda nceT V )
For those of you who are
producers, when have you decided
to weigh in as a female voice?
M O S S Luckily, I work in a really
incredibly collaborative atmosphere on my show that I’ve never
experienced before — and I’ve
been around for a while. As
one of the only female executive
producers, obviously there’s a
weight there. I have a perspective
that nobody else will have, and
that’s so respected and appreciated. That shouldn’t be crazy
that it’s appreciated, it should
be appreciated. As far as the
nudity and the sex, I was lucky in
the sense that five years ago
I worked with Jane Campion [on
Top of the Lake] and it was my
first nude scene, and she gave me
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
63
M AY 23, 2018
1
2
3
4
TV UPFRONTS
IGBOKWE New Amsterdam being one of the earliest pickups
that NBC made was rewarding; they knew very early on
that that was a show that they absolutely wanted.
STAPF The CW’s Charmed. Not only did we get it ordered,
but we got it right.
ROTH Lethal Weapon and Gotham at Fox, Splitting Up
Together at ABC and Blindspot at NBC. We got four of our
five bubble shows picked up.
‘IT’S PAINFUL
AND UNFAIR’
Nine studio
chiefs open
up about
tough passes,
worsening
economics
and the
canceled
show ‘that
deserves
to continue’
By Lesley Goldberg
s Madison Avenue buyers head into a $9 billion
battle over 30-second spots on the 2018-19 schedule, Hollywood’s studios are just now coming
up for air. After another dizzying broadcast pilot season,
they landed 37 series on the air (down from 39 in 2017), a
mix heavy on multicams and procedurals. But before any
of those new series go back into production, THR spoke
exclusively with nine studio chiefs for a candid if still raw
assessment of the 2018 upfronts — the good, the bad and
the truly shocking.
A
The buzzword of upfront week was …
PEARLENA IGBOKWE “Brand safety.”
DAVID STAPF “New data.”
PETER ROTH “Change.”
JEFF FROST “Reboots.”
JONNIE DAVIS “Roseanne.” We’re thrilled it’s still possible
to gather 27 million viewers, but lightning in a bottle
is still lightning in a bottle. It’s not a formula for us all
to follow.
My most rewarding pickup was …
PATRICK MORAN Tim Doyle’s The Kids Are Alright at
ABC. It’s so personal and delivers such a specific point
of view.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
64
And the most disappointing or surprising pass was …
MORAN Kayla Alpert’s pilot, ABC’s False Profits. The network has ordered additional scripts, so they are going to
keep working on this one.
IGBOKWE The Brooklyn Nine-Nine pass at Fox. I wait and
hope for that [renewal] call, and it’d always come in previous years, and I thought it would come again.
ROTH Lucifer was a very painful pass. It’s a show that
deserves to continue.
DAVIS The Mick was hard.
HOWARD KURTZMAN L.A. to Vegas.
CHRIS PARNELL L.A.’s Finest was a shock.
FROST Guess Who Died was a big surprise given the auspices
of Norman Lear and its amazing cast [Holland Taylor,
Hector Elizondo and Christopher Lloyd]. Bob Greenblatt
told us that there was no room on the schedule.
The new show I wish was ours is …
DAVIS ABC’s A Million Little Things. It’s clearly trying to
live in the emotional, character-driven space of our This Is
Us, which is very tricky to pull off.
KURTZMAN Dick Wolf’s FBI at CBS.
MORAN I still wish This Is Us was ours. Dan Fogelman is a
rare talent.
IGBOKWE ABC’s The Rookie. Nathan Fillion is accessible and
M AY 23, 2018
I only go to New York to see [him at the ABC upfront].
IGBOKWE The Friday before upfronts when Brooklyn Nine-
Jason Clodfelter
Sony Pictures TV
Nine moved to NBC. It was 12 hours of negotiating. By
the time it actually happened, I was almost in stunned
disbelief. To be able to call them all to say, “Hey guys,
you’re uncanceled,” there’s nothing like it. I felt like Ed
McMahon saying you just won the Publishers Clearing
House Sweepstakes.
PARNELL Brooklyn Nine-Nine and Last Man Standing. There
isn’t a better example of vertical integration.
The hardest call I made or received was …
Jonnie Davis
20th Century Fox TV
IGBOKWE No Way Back didn’t find a place on the NBC sched-
ule. That was a tough one.
DAVIS Calling the Chernins about The Mick.
PARNELL Calling Norman Lear. He’s an icon, and we wanted
so much to deliver for him and get that show on the air.
The show we intend to shop elsewhere is …
5
Jef Frost
Sony Pictures TV
MAN: COURTESY OF FOX. KIDS: ABC/TONY RIVETTI. AMSTERDAM: FRANCISCO ROMAN/NBC. CHARMED: COURTESY OF THE CW. GOD: JONATHAN WENK/CBS. STAPF: MATT WINKELMEYER/GETTY IMAGES. KURTZMAN:
ALBERTO E. RODRIGUEZ/GETTY IMAGES. PARNELL: RICH POLK/GETTY IMAGES FOR SONY PICTURES TELEVISION. IGBOKWE: DAVID LIVINGSTON/GETTY IMAGES. DAVIS: ALBERTO E. RODRIGUEZ/GETTY IMAGES FOR JONSSON
CANCER CENTER FOUNDATION. MORAN: PHILLIP CHIN/WIREIMAGE. ROTH: MATTHEW SIMMONS/GETTY IMAGES. FROST: CRAIG BARRITT/GETTY IMAGES FOR YOUTUBE. KURTZMAN: ALBERTO E. RODRIGUEZ/GETTY IMAGES.
1 Fox’s Last Man Standing 2 ABC’s The Kids Are Alright
3 NBC’s New Amsterdam 4 CBS’ God Friended Me 5 The CW’s Charmed
one of those actors who people love. That’s a show that
could go on for a long time.
STAPF CBS’ God Friended Me. It feels like a fresher version
of Joan of Arcadia. I would love to be creatively involved
in that. [CBS co-produces the series with Warner Bros.,
which is the lead studio.]
PARNELL CBS’ God Friended Me. It’s proof that you can do a
hopeful, affirming show on broadcast.
The most surprising or frustrating trend is …
Pearlena Igbokwe
Universal TV
IGBOKWE No Way Back. It has amazing stars in Derek Luke
and Raul Esparza, and it’s highly bingeable. We’re talking
to some outlets.
STAPF Both our CW shows that didn’t get ordered, Skinny
Dip and Playing Dead. And with Lionsgate TV, we’re exploring another home for L.A. Confidential.
KURTZMAN We’re putting together game plans to see where
else Last Man on Earth and Mixtape can go.
DAVIS If we can get a home for The Mick, nothing would be
more gratifying.
PARNELL L.A.’s Finest and Guess Who Died.
If I had this development season to do all over again, I would …
Howard Kurtzman
20th Century Fox TV
IGBOKWE Given the interest in multicams at multiple networks, we would have developed more.
DAVIS Make more procedurals, and that’s what we’re going
to be doing.
MORAN Reboots continue to flourish. In this crowded envi-
ronment, it certainly helps to have some built-in awareness
in a pre-existing title, and I suspect we’ll see studios look
to mine their catalogs again next season.
IGBOKWE Networks emphasizing their home studios.
JASON CLODFELTER It seems to be dealmaking ahead of creative every step of the way, and that part is frustrating.
The biggest threat to the traditional studio business is …
Patrick Moran
ABC Studios
The most challenging part of this season’s negotiations was …
KURTZMAN Every year, networks look to renegotiate license
fees downward as a condition of a series pickup. At no time
was this trend more prevalent than this past pilot season. No
doubt network economics are challenged, but studio costs
continue to rise and production deficits continue to increase,
so the burden of reduced license fees is borne entirely by
the producing studio. At best, network license fees cover a
smaller and smaller percentage of the production costs.
Reducing license fees further is beyond frustrating, it’s painful and unfair.
FROST The lack of consistency in dealmaking, meaning it
changes year to year. Just when you think you’ve reached a
template or a common ground with a network, it changes
the next year. Digital rights change year to year. The nature
of a co-production agreement changes year to year.
Chris Parnell
Sony Pictures TV
THE STUDIO SCORECARD
For production houses to get shows on nonafiliated networks,
many are being forced to share ownership
2018 orders
CBS Television Studios
BIG BET
CBS’ Magnum P.I.
Peter Roth
Warner Bros. TV
The thing you still can’t believe happened this upfront
week was …
KURTZMAN Last Man Standing revived at Fox. And Jimmy
Kimmel being so irreverent. It’s almost to the point where
MORAN Volume. With so many shows in production, we are
all fighting for stage space, production facilities, etc. It’s a
very crowded environment at the moment.
IGBOKWE Rising costs. If someone wants to offer a writerproducer $300 million, I can’t fight that.
ROTH Vertical integration and disrupters in the business.
KURTZMAN Competitors with deep pockets.
CLODFELTER We have a business that’s putting all dealmaking
ahead of creative, and I think that will catch up to everybody.
12
10
2017 orders
Universal Television
BIG BET
CBS’ FBI
11
9
Warner Bros. Television
BIG BET
CBS’ Murphy Brown
8
9
Up two from 2017
Up two from 2017
Up one from 2017
ABC Studios
BIG BET
ABC’s The Rookie
20th Century Fox
Television
BIG BET
Fox’s Last Man Standing
Sony Pictures
Television
BIG BET
ABC’s Schooled
David Stapf
CBS TV Studios
9
8
Up one from 2017
6
6
Even with 2017
1 3
Down two from 2017
Source: THR research
65
TV UPFRONTS
MOST SKEPTICISM
“We want to welcome you to New Fox. This is
an exciting opportunity for our network.”
FROM THE
STAGE …
Fox’s Dana Walden, pitching a dialed-back, sports-heavy schedule
ahead of Disney’s planned acquisition of Fox’s TV studio
“Let’s be honest, this is
all nonsense. Our ratings
are going down and our
price is going up. … So, here’s
what I think we should do.
Just let these stupid shows
wash over us, clap politely
and then let’s just
get blackout
drunk together.
Our president is
a lunatic and
we’re all going
to die. And if
we keep this up,
with these
buzzwords, you
know what it’s
going to say on our
headstones? It’s going
to say ‘KPI’ [Key
Performance Indicator].
You want that? I know
I don’t. Let’s not do
this again next year.”
The best, silliest and most
groan-inducing quotes from
TV’s most famous mouths
MOST APPLAUSE
“So, how’s your
week been?”
CBS’ Leslie Moonves, upon
arriving onstage amid his
legal war with controlling
shareholder Shari Redstone
MOST CRINGEWORTHY
“ We are home to the No. 1
drama on television, a show
that gives us twists and
turns, heartbreaking
reveals and, this season,
the departure of a oncebeloved character. I’m
talking about This … is
the Today show.”
ABC’s Jimmy Kimmel,
skewering TV, his own
network and the annual
upfront tradition
NBC’s Seth Meyers on
Matt Lauer’s dismissal
Madison Avenue: ‘It’s Tough Math to Swallow’
Before they pony up billions, buyers weigh in with reboot skepticism, data fatigue and lesser ad load caution By Marisa Guthrie
oseanne may be a runaway hit, but Madison Avenue
ad buyers still are skeptical of the reboot craze that’s
gripping broadcast television.
So say the collection surveyed by THR following a
frenzied upfront week full of pitches and spin. As one puts
it: “The networks need hits, but I’m a viewer too, and it’s
disheartening that they can’t come up with new concepts.”
Those buyers — speaking anonymously so as not to
influence coming negotiations when they and their peers
are expected to commit more than $9 billion across the
broadcast networks (potentially down ever so slightly from
2017’s $9.7 billion haul) — also ofered muted praise for
CBS’ inclusive new lineup, which follows a 2016 crop featuring all white leads, and bemoaned the seemingly terminal
NFL pitch from Fox, which in January unveiled a five-year,
$3 billion deal for Thursday Night Football.
But with an infinitesimal spread among CBS, ABC and
Fox in 18-49 demo ratings and an overall downward trend
in linear viewership, buyers concede that the new shows
don’t have much bearing on where they put their money
R
anymore. “You’re buying the network instead of [the
shows], which didn’t used to be the case,” explains David
Campanelli, director of national TV at Horizon Media. The
reason: With few exceptions, it’s harder for a single show
to become a game-changer at a network today. So, in
addition to ratings, a key for buyers is brand consistency
— and most of those who spoke to THR praise the clear
brand propositions at both NBC and ABC, with several touting This Is Us-esque oferings like NBC’s Manifest and
ABC’s A Million Little Things.
To buyers’ delight, the networks spent far less time at
this year’s pitchfests focused on analytics. In years prior,
several presentations were festooned with pie charts and
data graphs promising ever more sophisticated data that
the industry (read: the Nielsen sample on which the vast
majority of advertising is sold and guaranteed) does not
support. “A company like CBS has 30 [million] or 40 million
viewers a day; they have scale, what they don’t have is
data,” says Colin Petrie-Norris, CEO of VOD service
Xumo. “They can’t compete with digital in terms of
66
two-way activation on advertising. If they try, they’re going
to be outclassed.”
Where at least a few didn’t fare as well, however, was
with solutions. Indeed, the trend toward reduced ad loads
— “JAZ pods” at Fox, “prime pods” at NBC — was greeted
with a decidedly mixed reaction from buyers. While many
welcome the promise of greater resonance for their messages in a less cluttered environment, they also question
the markup, which can be as much as 50 percent more
than the standard CPM (cost per thousand viewers). Says
one: “It’s tough math to swallow.”
A Million
Little Things
MEYERS: VIRGINIA SHERWOOD/NBCUNIVERSAL. MOONVES: RAY TAMARRA/WIREIMAGE. WALDEN: AMANDA EDWARDS/WIREIMAGE. KIMMEL: ABC/PAWEL KAMINSKI. MILLION: ABC/
JACK ROWAND. PASSAGE: STEVE DIETL/FOX. STANDING: COURTESY OF FOX. GOD: JONATHAN WENK/CBS. LEGACIES: ANNETTE BROWN/THE CW. GRAND: ABC/ED HERRERA.
MOST LAUGHS
Broadcast’s New Inclusivity Scorecard
SOCIAL MEDIA
HEAT INDEX
KEY
erhaps the biggest sign of broadcast’s improved race and gender inclusivity
is the changing face of CBS, which took the upfront stage with a ready
response to long-standing complaints about its lack of diversity. “We said
that we were going to [improve representation],” said entertainment president
Kelly Kahl. “If you look at the schedule, we did what we said we were going to do.”
Indeed, CBS made the biggest gains to reach more than 50 percent actors of
color in new orders — second only to The CW. Growth behind the camera, among
showrunners and pilot directors, remains slow. — REBECCA SUN
P
WHITE MEN
What’s driving early buzz?
Fox’s Mark-Paul Gosselaar
drama The Passage has
the most viewed trailer and
CBS’ God Friended Me
needs more friends as THR
reads the fall TV tea leaves
WHITE WOMEN
MEN OF COLOR
WOMEN OF COLOR
LEAD ROLE
By Natalie Jarvey
Hot!
SERIES REGULARS
THE PASSAGE (Fox)
Justin Cronin’s novel reached
No. 3 on The New York Times
best-seller list in 2010, interest
that helped drive online chatter
and 10.2 million YouTube views for
the trailer of the Fox adaptation.
CREATORS AND SHOWRUNNERS
ABC
26
25
25
23
NEW AMSTERDAM (NBC)
The trailer’s 6.5 million views on
YouTube shed light on why NBC
is giving this medical drama the
slot following This Is Us — even if
Twitter buzz is more muted with
3,100 hashtag engagements.
16
16
14
14
10
8
6
9
6
4
1
11
2018-19
6
4
4
5
0
0
0
2018-19
2017-18
0
2017-18
LAST MAN STANDING (Fox)
The big-league ratings for
ABC’s Roseanne aren’t the only
reason Fox is reviving the Tim
Allen comedy after its ABC cancellation. It is also the second most
engaging “new” show on Twitter.
CBS
25
16
16
13
13
11
11
10
9
7
LEGACIES (The CW)
Though not as popular as the
network’s Charmed reboot, the
spinof of The Originals pops
with fans on Twitter, where it
has 10,000 hashtag engagements.
4
3
6
7
3
10
2018-19
1
2
2
1
0
1
0
2017-18
0
2018-19
2017-18
Fox
13
11
4
10
6
6
2
3
11
7
2018-19
6
3
THE ROOKIE (ABC)
With 5,400 Twitter hashtag engagements, the Nathan Fillion drama
is ABC’s most in-demand new show
— though the star will be first to
admit that it’s moms and aunts
who’ll be watching.
6
6
5
1
10
1
1
2
2
1
0
0
2018-19
2017-18
2017-18
NBC
19
18
11
11
12
12
10
9
4
4
3
4
7
2018-19
6
GRAND HOTEL (ABC)
The Eva Longoria-produced
Miami Beach drama has one of the
less buzzy new trailers with a limp
69,000 YouTube views.
12
2
8
1
4
2017-18
1
1
1
0
0
2018-19
2017-18
GOD FRIENDED ME (CBS)
Lacking established stars, the
religious drama has just 55,000
views for its trailer on YouTube.
The CW
11
9
11
10
8
7
2
2
2
2018-19
4
1
2
6
6
5
4
1
3
Sources: 4C Insights, measured May 12-18;
YouTube as of May 21
3
1
2
0
2017-18
1
0
2018-19
2017-18
Source: Data provided by the networks.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
67
M AY 23, 2018
Cool
TV UPFRONTS
THE BIG BETS
With ratings down, cancellations up
and a mix of revived and recycled
series dominating lineups, THR breaks
down broadcast’s new fall schedule
Nathan
Fillion
The Rookie
TIME
SLOT
ABC’S BIG BET
8:00
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
T
FOX
Dancing With
the Stars
The Resident
911
The Good Doctor
TUES
Roseanne
ABC has lofty hopes that its
highest-testing pilot, A Million
Little Things, will tug This Is
Us-style on viewers’ heartstrings,
but nailing Roseanne’s second
season is a bigger priority. Channing
Dungey said storylines would
steer clear of Trump, and her
net signaled its commitment to its
controversial star by having her
open the shoutout-heavy upfront.
FOX’S BIG BET
8:00
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
Roseanne
The Kids Are Alright
Black-ish
Splitting Up Together
The Gifted
Lethal Weapon
The Rookie
WED
8:00
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
The Goldbergs
American Housewife
Modern Family
Single Parents
Empire
Star
A Million Little Things
THURS
8:00
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
Grey’s Anatomy
Thursday Night Football
Station 19
How to Get Away With Murder
FRI
Lethal Weapon
Recasting the lead of the Fox hit
is not without risk (hence a
reduced order: 13 episodes). Of the
costly but necessary — given
Clayne Crawford’s on-set behavior
— move, Warner Bros. TV chief
Peter Roth says, “We are letting our
actions speak for themselves.”
HOW THE 2017-18
CLASS FARED
Only 18* of last year’s 39
ordered shows are coming back
ABC
CBS
CW
5-for-13
4-for-8
2-for-4
FOX
NBC
4-for-6
3-for-8
*At press time.
68
ABC
MON
By Lacey Rose and Lesley Goldberg
oday is a day for celebrating new
shows,” Seth Meyers began, “but let’s
also spare a thought for the shows
that weren’t renewed, the pilots that weren’t
picked up and the shows from the ’90s that
weren’t revived.” From Radio City’s main
stage, where NBC kicked off another dizzying upfront week May 14, the Late Night host
continued: “If you had a show in the ’90s
and your phone didn’t ring this week, you
must have been heartbroken.” The quip
played well among the media buyer crowd,
which is set to shell out more than
$9 billion on commercial time on a schedule that is, indeed, heavy on ’90s fare (see
Murphy Brown).
But it was the series that jumped networks — NBC’s Brooklyn Nine-Nine
(formerly at Fox), Fox’s Last Man Standing
(formerly at ABC) — that sucked up the
most airtime as those buyers hopscotched
Manhattan’s most famous stages. “We’re
recycling shows that other networks throw
away,” ABC’s resident roastmaster, Jimmy
Kimmel, explained at Lincoln Center the
following day. “This is what’s known in the
industry as a failure orgy.”
Rather than focus on declining ratings
— the five nets collectively slid another
9 percent in the key 18-49 demographic this
season — they played up their respective
digital footprints and diversity pushes. The
CW’s presentation was the most compelling, with chief Mark Pedowitz noting that
30 of his 37 series regulars are women or
people of color, and all five of his new series
were developed by women. As for the others,
NBC’s presentation proved the lengthiest (clocking in at two hours, 11 minutes),
Fox’s the most perplexing (the pre-New
Fox New Fox?) and CBS’ the most exciting.
Of course, it was chairman and CEO Leslie
Moonves’ entrance — amid a ferocious legal
battle with his controlling shareholder, Shari
Redstone — and not CBS’ new batch of shows
that made it so. After Moonves’ opening
remarks, which were met with thunderous
applause and a partial standing ovation
(which some say was started by Warner Bros.
CEO Kevin Tsujihara), buyers were in the
mood to cheer on trailers.
Tim Allen
Last Man
Standing
8:00
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
Fresh Off the Boat
Speechless
Child Support
Last Man Standing
The Cool Kids
Hell’s Kitchen
20/20
SAT
7:00
7:30
8:00
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
Fox Sports Saturday:
College Football
Saturday Night Football
SUN
7:00
7:30
8:00
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
America’s Funniest
Home Videos
Dancing With
the Stars: Juniors
Shark Tank
The Alec Baldwin Show
NFL on Fox
The OT/encores
The Simpsons
Bob’s Burgers
Family Guy
Rel
BY THE NUMBERS
Sarayu Blue
I Feel Bad
Candice Bergen
Murphy Brown
Taye Diggs
All American
Cancellations are up,
volume is down*
GUIDE TO THE GRID
Red
2018 numbers
New show
New time slot
2017 numbers
Total series renewed
CBS
The CW
71
70
The Voice
Manifest
The Neighborhood
Happy Together
Legends of Tomorrow
Magnum P.I.
Arrow
–1
Scripted series ordered
Bull
Brooklyn Nine-Nine
The Voice
NCIS
This Is Us
FBI
New Amsterdam
Chicago Med
Chicago Fire
The Flash
Black Lightning
NCIS: New Orleans
Survivor
SEAL Team
The critical favorite, pricey
and low-rated on Fox, was canceled
May 10 and revived (for midseason)
May 11. “It became about Hulu and
NBC,” says Universal TV’s Pearlena
Igbokwe, noting that NBC execs
had more history with the show and
made “a really strong play.”
37
–2
Canceled series
Riverdale
All American
39
36
33
CBS’ BIG BET
+3
Chicago P.D.
Criminal Minds
Superstore
The Good Place
Will & Grace
I Feel Bad
Big Bang Theory
Young Sheldon
Mom
Murphy Brown
Law & Order: SVU
MacGyver
Midnight, Texas
Hawaii Five-0
Dateline
Supernatural
Legacies
SWAT
Blindspot
Dramas picked up to series
across the five networks
26
24
Magnum P.I.
Dynasty
Crazy Ex-Girlfriend
Blue Bloods
–2
None of CBS’ swings seem as big
or dramatic as that of its CEO, but
its reboots (Murphy Brown and
Magnum P.I.) will have extra eyes
on them. By contrast, Dick Wolf’s
FBI is a slam dunk. “Look for it
to be the most watched new drama
of next season,” crows Kelly Kahl.
Series renewed by CBS alone,
the most of any network
20
18
+2
THE CW’S BIG BET
Dateline Mysteries
Series canceled by ABC alone,
the most of any network
Crimetime Saturday
13 10
No original series
Saturday Night Live (encores)
+3
48 Hours
Series ordered by ABC
Saturday Night Live
9 12
Charmed
Football Night in America
60 Minutes
God Friended Me
NCIS: Los Angeles
Sunday Night Football
Madam Secretary
Supergirl
Charmed
–3
The CW is leaning heavily on its
reboot to draw viewers not
only to the network but also to
an entirely new night of original
programming. Paired with
Supergirl, it will air on Sundays, and
already the net is prepping local
station promos featuring its stars.
Series ordered by both
CBS and NBC
9 8
+1
*At press time. Source: THR research
69
FILLION: DIMITRIOS KAMBOURIS/GETTY IMAGES. ALLEN: GREG DOHERTY/GETTY IMAGES. BLUE: MATT WINKELMEYER/GETTY IMAGES. BERGEN: GABRIEL OLSEN/FILMMAGIC. DIGGS: JIM SPELLMAN/WIREIMAGE. ROSEANNE: ABC/ADAM ROSE. WEAPON: RAY MICKSHAW/FOX. BROOKLYN: JOHN P. FLEENOR/FOX/UNIVERSAL TELEVISION. MAGNUM: KAREN NEAL/CBS. CHARMED: KATIE YU/THE CW.
NBC
NBC’S BIG BET
E M MYS TH E CONTE N DE RS
2
1
3
It Would Be a Blander Show
If Hillary Had Won’
Donald Trump looms large on a slew of Emmy contenders in which showrunners choose to face the political climate
head-on, from hypothetical impeachment campaigns to radical conservative governments BY MICHAEL O’CONNELL
uring the April 29 episode of
The Good Fight, CBS All Access’
operatic legal drama, Emmy- and
Tony-winning lead Christine
Baranski spends the better part of
the 52-minute runtime debating the legitimacy
of “the pee-pee tape” — the alleged video of
Donald Trump watching Russian prostitutes
urinate on each other, as detailed in the Steele
dossier. When two characters finally watch
the presidential pornography, all viewers see
are their beaming faces illuminated by a
glowing computer screen.
“Writers have to write what they live, and the
time we’re living in is stranger than fiction,”
says Baranski, who’s amused by her new material after seven seasons on The Good Wife.
“Our capacity for outrage and shock has gone
to where we’re almost maxed out.”
Directly or obliquely, dozens of scripted
series are dealing with the Trump presidency
and the climate it was born out of on a nowweekly basis. Increasing evidence of politics’
influence on TV can be found in prestige
dramas — from Showtime’s Homeland to USA’s
Mr. Robot — and on revived Big Four sitcoms
Roseanne and Will & Grace. Skating alongside
D
headlines often comes with critical acclaim,
ire from the right or left and, in the case of
ABC’s runaway hit Roseanne, more than 20 million viewers tuning in to each episode. What’s
not clear, one year after the timeliness of The
Handmaid’s Tale helped put Hulu on the path to
Emmy victory, is whether TV Academy voters
still have an appetite for shows marinating in
the same cultural upheaval that’s
so frantically covered on cable
news and late night.
“It’s a temptation and a danger,”
Handmaid’s Tale showrunner
Levine
Bruce Miller says of leaning too far
into current events. His breakout, a dystopian drama seemingly
tailored for the #MeToo era, relies
heavily on flashbacks that show
Cummings
an America on the brink of collapse
at the hands of conservative radicals. “We’re
seeing things on the news that are an accurate
and perfect analog to the show,” says Miller. “It
seems silly not to use all of them, but you don’t
want to get sucked into wagging the dog.”
Showtime programming president
Gary Levine agrees. “Resonating in the culture
doesn’t have to mean chasing any particular
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
70
M AY 23, 2018
headline,” notes the exec, whose network is
making a hard Emmy push for Frankie Shaw
breakout comedy SMILF and Lena Waithe
drama The Chi — shows that navigate issues
of gender and race in Trump’s America. “But
when Homeland shows up in the op-ed pages
or [New York Times columnist] Maureen Dowd
references Billions in a piece about [ex-New
York Attorney General] Eric Schneiderman,
that’s pretty thrilling.”
Talking about Trumpism without uttering his name is the most popular move.
Roseanne, the biggest hit of the TV season and
recent memory, spent its first season back on
ABC after a two-decade hiatus going all-in on
class issues and a poor, Trump-voting family.
None of the comedy’s nine episodes this season
ever directly mention the president’s name
— not that anyone would know that after his
much-publicized congratulatory call to star
and noted Trump supporter Roseanne Barr.
Will & Grace, which beat Roseanne to the air
with its September return to NBC, went the
opposite route — peppering the first few episodes with multiple mentions of Trump. The
unabashedly liberal comedy, which returned
to the network’s schedule after filming a
Shows to Wash
the Partisan
Blues Away
If you’d rather your TV time be
spent ignoring today’s realities,
tune in to these politics-free
shows BY REBECCA FORD
American
Vandal
4
6
(Netflix)
7
A mockumentary about a high
school student
(Jimmy Tatro) accused of defacing cars in his school’s faculty parking
lot with giant pink phallic symbols
is pretty much as far away from the
political turmoil of today as it gets.
5
Barry
VANDAL: COURTESY OF NETFLIX. BARRY: COURTESY OG HBO. MINDHUNTER: PATRICK HARBRON/NETFLIX. OZARK: TINA ROWDEN/NETFLIX. TERROR: AIDAN MONAGHAN/AMC. LEVINE: KEVIN WINTER/GETTY IMAGES. CUMMINGS: GABRIEL OLSEN/FILMMAGIC. SMILF:
COLLEEN HAYES/SHOWTIME. ROBOT: MICHAEL PARMELEE/USA NETWORK. GOOD: ELIZABETH FISHER/CBS. TRUMP: JUSTIN SULLIVAN/GETTY IMAGES. WILL: CHRIS HASTON/NBC. HANDMAID’S: GEORGE KRAYCHYK/HULU. ROSEANNE: ABC/GREG GAYNE.
(HBO)
Hillary Clinton promotional spot on the eve
of the 2016 election, has been rewarded with
a Writers Guild Award. (But the conservative-courting Roseanne outperformed it by
230 percent among viewers.)
“It’s too triggering,” says Whitney
Cummings, an executive producer on Roseanne
and a self-professed liberal, of the decision to
not use the T-word on camera. “Roseanne isn’t
about Trump. It’s about the circumstances
that made people think Trump was a good idea.
Really, I secretly hoped he would no longer be
in office by the time it aired.” (On May 18, it was
announced that Cummings would not return
as co-showrunner for the 2018-19 season.)
Roseanne and Will & Grace are in a unique
position this Emmy season. The comedy
field is wide open now that perennial victor
Veep is taking a year off, and both shows
successfully courted the TV Academy during
their original runs. But what matters more
to unquestionably left-leaning Emmy voters
in 2018: making an artistic statement against
the administration or giving the struggling
broadcast industry a desperately needed ratings win?
“I understand why people have a hard time
separating Roseanne Barr from Roseanne
Conner,” adds Cummings, aware that the show
is a tough sell for many in Hollywood. “But I
wanted to work on Roseanne because I couldn’t
make sense of things. I had this martyr
instinct to help give visibility to the people who
gained visibility by voting for Trump.”
Tackling “the pee-pee tape” was not the first
time The Good Fight writers chose to hammer
Trump. One episode saw the cast debating
impeachment strategies with the DNC, and
another — to the outrage of alt-right website
Breitbart News — made a crack about assassination. Indeed, the drama was TV’s first
series to lean hard into the Trump era. Its 2017
freshman run had to be retooled midproduction when Clinton lost the election. There
was a question of abandoning the subject for
its second run, but the opposite route proved
more appealing to the creative team.
“We started this season concerned about
Trump fatigue, anticipating that we were going
to pull back from politics,” says co-creator
and showrunner Michelle King. “The more we
talked with the writers, the more we realized
we had to go all-in.”
Robert King, Michelle’s writing partner and
husband, says he thinks the show found its
voice in tackling Trump. “It would be a blander
show if Hillary had won,” he says. “There’s an
excitement in writing and shooting the show,
wondering if something is going to happen
to make it entirely irrelevant — or if we’re all
going to burn up in a nuclear holocaust before
the episode airs.”
All jokes aside, the Kings’ real-life frustration is the new normal among showrunners
forced to talk about current events in the writers room — even if it helps them stand out in
the crowded TV landscape.
“Personally, I’d be thrilled if The Handmaid’s
Tale was irrelevant,” says Miller, laughing.
“I would gladly take the hit in popularity.”
1 Baranski as attorney Diane Lockhart, who is swept up in several Trump-related cases. 2 Shaw’s SMILF deals with sexual assault.
3 Eric McCormack and Debra Messing star in the Will & Grace reboot. 4 Donald Trump. 5 Mr. Robot had scenes set at Mar-a-Lago.
6 Elisabeth Moss in The Handmaid’s Tale. 7 Barr (far right, with Laurie Metcalf) tweeted her support of Trump in March.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
71
M AY 23, 2018
In need of some
laughs that
aren’t politically tinged?
Barry is a dark and quirky comedy
starring Bill Hader as a hitman who is
also an aspiring actor. Plus, the Fonz
(Henry Winkler) is excellent as his acting coach.
Mindhunter
(Netflix)
David Fincher’s
dark, slow-burn
saga follows
a 1970s-era FBI
agent (Jonathan Groff) chasing
serial killers. Standout performances
from several talents playing real-life
serial killers help make it a bingeworthy escape.
Ozark
(Netflix)
This dramedy
focuses on the
issues facing
Jason Bateman’s
bumbling money launderer, who accidentally gets into trouble with some
Mexican drug lords and then moves his
wife (played by Laura Linney) and kids
to Missouri to pay off his debts.
The Terror
(AMC)
Yes, the word
“terror” is in
the title and it’s
pretty scary, but
this fictionalized account of Captain
Sir John Franklin’s expedition to the
Arctic is set in the 1840s, so it’s guaranteed to be Trump-free.
Reviews
Film
Yes, Cannes
(Still) Can
2
Critic’s
Notebook
After a dubious start, this year’s edition
shone through the cloud of pessimism with
strong and provocative films — suggesting
that those proclaiming the festival was ‘over’
had spoken a bit too soon By Todd McCarthy
Does anyone remember what people were saying during
the first days of the 2018 Cannes Film Festival? That it was
the worst Cannes ever, a festival in decline, antiquated
and outdated by its fixation on tuxedoes and heels, low on
blowout parties and star wattage? Was Cannes even going
to be worth the trip next time? With only two films in competition this year, were Americans shunning the fest? Is
Hollywood too fixated on awards-season timing to bother
anymore with Cannes? Isn’t it all about Venice now?
Spirits were indeed low at the outset. The late-in-thegame yanking of Netflix titles, notably Alfonso Cuaron’s
Roma and Orson Welles’ “finished” The Other Side of the Wind,
seemed another sign of Cannes being stuck in the past. Not
to mention that the fest’s clout with the studios appeared
so diminished that it had to go along with Disney staging the
world premiere of Solo: A Star Wars Story in Los Angeles the
week before screening it on the Croisette.
But it’s amazing what a few good films can do. Like a fog
dissipating to give way to sunny skies, this year’s Cannes
shed its shroud, came to life and delivered what people come
here for: a strong range of films — some from known
auteurs, others from fresh talent.
A few highs brightened the early days. Pawel Pawlikowski,
whose Ida won the best foreign-language film Oscar in
2015, followed with another terrific black-and-white picture,
Cold War, an evocation of a doomed love affair in communist Poland and jazzy France during the 1950s. The film
snagged Pawlikowski a well-deserved best director prize.
Kirill Serebrennikov’s Leto also took a look at fraught times
behind the Iron Curtain in an intermittently beguiling
take (also in gorgeous monochrome) on the nascent early
’80s Soviet rock scene.
1
1 Jun Jong-seo in Changdong’s Burning. 2 Sofia
Boutella in Noe’s Climax.
3 Riley Keough with Dillon
in von Trier’s The House
That Jack Built. 4 Tomasz
Kot and Joanna Kulig
in Pawlikowski’s Cold War.
AND THE PALME D’THR GOES TO …
First
place
PALME D’THR
Second
place GRAND PRIZE
Third
place
JURY PRIZE
And over in Directors’ Fortnight, the standout of the first
week was French bad boy Gaspar Noe’s Climax, an intoxicating experience that takes you from paradise to the inferno
in 90 minutes spent with a sexy, druggy group of dancers. It
is, to use an apt word, a trip.
Relative disappointments in the first half of the competition included Asghar Farhadi’s ho-hum opener, the
Spanish-language kidnap drama Everybody Knows with
Javier Bardem and Penelope Cruz; Ryusuke Hamaguchi’s
uncompelling romance Asako I & II; and A.B. Shawky’s
exceedingly modest Egyptian two-hander Yomeddine. But
the two films vying for the honor of least deserving of
inclusion in the main slate were David Robert Mitchell’s
obnoxiously self-satisfied L.A. mystery Under the Silver
The official winners were unveiled May 19 in Cannes, but THR critics
at the festival held their own vote. Drumroll, please ...
BEST DIRECTOR
BEST ACTOR
BEST ACTRESS
Burning
Shoplifters
Cold War
Pawel Pawlikowski
Vincent Lacoste
Joanna Kulig
Lee Chang-dong’s latest
is a stunning thriller of
obsession in which two very
diferent men pursue
the same magnetic woman.
Hirokazu Kore-eda’s
achingly tender drama
centers on a ragtag family
of petty thieves and the
abused little girl it takes in.
Tracing the afair between
two Polish musicians from
the 1940s to the 1960s, this
is a piercing ode to romantic disappointment.
With astonishing style and
rigor, the Cold War helmer
pares down an epic love
story into an exquisite, melancholy miniature.
As a college student in love
with a man who has AIDS
in Sorry Angel, the young
French actor is goofy, sexy
and, finally, deeply moving.
Playing a Polish singer with
a stormy temperament,
Cold War’s leading lady
delivers an indelibly fierce
and vivid star-making turn.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
72
M AY 23, 2018
THR’S SOCIAL CLIMBERS
A ranking of the week’s top actors, comedians
and personalities based on social media engagement
across Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and more
3
BURNING. CLIMAX, COLD, HOUSE, SHOPLIFTERS: COURTESY OF CANNES. ELLIS: JB LACROIX/ WIREIMAGE. FUMERO:
JON KOPALOFF/FILMMAGIC. ALLEN: DIA DIPASUPIL/GETTY IMAGES. HARVEY: VENTURELLI/WIREIMAGE.
This
Week
Lake (starring Andrew Garfield)
and French director Eva Husson’s
insufferably self-congratulatory
Kurdish-resistance actioner Girls
of the Sun.
At this still-soft point in the festival, attention was grabbed for a
night by former Cannes exile Lars
von Trier. Thanks to Twitter, what
the world knew about The House
That Jack Built right away was that
there were walkouts and boos due
to the brutal murders of women
4
in the film by a serial killer played
by Matt Dillon. But at a screening
the next day, there were no hasty exits or hostilities. Rather,
there was silence and, it seemed, an intent by the audience
to see the film for what it is: an upsetting story of a psychopath’s compulsion to kill. There’s no doubt that von Trier
was digging into his own deeply disturbed psyche when he
wrote this, and the result is both repellent and fascinating. It’s impossible to endorse completely — certain images
are genuinely objectionable — but it’s a serious work to be
grappled with intellectually even if you then reject it.
As the fest passed its midpoint, the films were getting better and better. These included my favorite, Lee Chang-dong’s
dazzling romantic mystery Burning; Matteo Garrone’s fierce
crime tale Dogman (whose star, Marcello Fonte, scooped
up best actor); Spike Lee’s lively and sharp, if occasionally
overdone, KKK comedy BlacKkKlansman (winner of the
second-place Grand Prize); Alice Rohrwacher’s magical-realist allegory Happy as Lazzaro (which shared best screenplay
with Jafar Panahi's 3 Faces); Nadine Labaki’s timely Lebanese
tearjerker, Jury Prize (third-place) winner Caparnaum; and
the eventual Palme d’Or winner, festival vet Hirokazu
Kore-eda’s rapturously received tale of a small-time crime
family, Shoplifters.
This year's edition ultimately had the feel of many Cannes
before it: exhausting, exhilarating and essential as an
exclusive window on the upcoming year in cinema. With
a selection that succeeded in reflecting the tumult of the
age, Cannes proved that it’s still in the game.
BEST SCREENPLAY
PALME DE BORE
Last
Week
Girls of the Sun
Kore-eda’s wise, warm,
quietly devastating script
weaves an intricate web
of relationships within a
family full of secrets.
The road to tedium is paved
with good intentions in
Eva Husson’s bombastic,
manipulative drama about
Kurdish female soldiers.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
Last
Week
Comedians
1
←
→ I
1
I
Donald Glover
1
↑ I
3
I
D.L. Hughley
2
↑ I
3
I
Ryan Reynolds
2
↑ I
6
I
Ricky Gervais
3
↑ I
4
I
Mark Hamill
3
↑ I
4
I
Tommy Chong
4
↑ I
10
I
Will Smith
4
↑ I
-
I
Tim Allen
5
↑ I
15
I
Eugenio Derbez
6
↑ I
-
I
Tom Ellis
The Lucifer star expressed
disappointment that
Fox had canceled his show
after three seasons,
tweeting May 11 that he
was “gutted.” He’s since
contributed his voice to
the efort to save the show,
scoring 724,000 Twitter
likes (up 3,325 percent).
Allen celebrated Fox’s
revival of his former ABC
show Last Man Standing
(canceled in May 2017 after
its sixth season), leaping
165 percent in Facebook
likes (234,000 total). “New
season this fall!” he
announced May 11, thanking
fans for their support.
5
↓ I
1
I
Roseanne Barr
6
↑ I
8
I
Mike Epps
7
↑ I
-
I
Deepika Padukone
7
↑ I
-
I
Marlon Wayans
8
↓ I
2
I
Zendaya
8
↓ I
5
I
Kevin Hart
9
←
→ I
9
I
Lin-Manuel Miranda
9
↑ I
-
I
Kumail Nanjiani
10
↓ I
7
I
Cole Sprouse
10
↑ I
-
I
Chelsea Peretti
11
↑ I
19
I
Ricky Gervais
12
↓ I
8
I
Priyanka Chopra
13
←
→ I
13
I
Tommy Chong
14
↑ I
24
I
Lili Reinhart
15
↑ I
-
I
Terry Crews
16
↓ I
14
I
Dwayne Johnson
17
↓ I
5
I
Robert Downey Jr.
18
↑ I
20
I
Madelaine Petsch
19
↑ I
-
I
Tim Allen
20
↓ I
6
I
Roseanne Barr
21
↑ I
23
I
Jada Pinkett Smith
22
↓ I
16
I
Gal Gadot
23
↑ I
-
I
Melissa Fumero
Ellis (above) hasn’t yet
received good news from
his eforts to #SaveLucifer,
but Brooklyn Nine-Nine’s
Fumero went from canceled
on Fox to saved on NBC.
She leaped 4,929 percent
in Twitter retweets, tweeting, “WE. HAVE. THE. BEST.
FANS” on May 12.
Zzzz ...
← Shoplifters
This
Week
Actors
24
↑ I
-
I
Stephanie Beatriz
25
↑ I
-
I
Hugh Jackman
73
M AY 23, 2018
This
Week
1
↑ I
Last
Week
2
TV Personalities
I
Steve Harvey
Harvey’s 50 percent
boost in new Facebook
followers (67,000) and
12 percent gain in Facebook
likes (407,000) come
thanks to yet another busy
week for the TV host, who
appeared in new episodes
of Family Feud, Steve and
Showtime at the Apollo.
2
↑ I
3
I
Mike Huckabee
3
↑ I
4
I
Jake Tapper
4
↑ I
-
I
Chelsea Handler
5
↓ I
1
I
Jimmy Fallon
6
↓ I
5
I
Chris Hayes
7
↑ I
-
I
Gordon Ramsay
8
↑ I
6
I
Bill Maher
9
↑ I
-
I
Mike Rowe
10
↑ I
-
I
James Corden
Data Compiled By
Source: The week’s most active and talked-about entertainers on
leading social networking sites Facebook, Google Plus, Instagram,
Twitter and YouTube for the week ending May 15. Rankings are based
on a formula blending weekly additions of fans as well as cumulative
weekly reactions and conversations, as tracked by MVP Index.
Reviews
Television
Pose
Ryan Murphy’s FX series
about the 1980s New York
drag ball scene is touching,
fun and lit up by an electric
cast By Daniel J. Fienberg
Mara) and kids after days working
for the Trump empire under the
eye of Matt (James Van Der Beek),
a hustler with fancy suits, a bulky
mobile phone and a standing
reservation at Indochine. Matt’s
excesses are even more performative than anything in the balls.
Still, as good as Van Der Beek is,
the Trump stuff feels less like
an integral part of the story than
an effort to be topical.
Pose is progressive in subject
and casting, but its themes, structure and style are hardly radical;
the series is about people craving a
stable home and parental figures.
We see Damon’s attempt to come
out to his abusive father early
in the pilot and hear other stories
of similar negative experiences,
so it’s no wonder the characters
find comfort in Blanca or Elektra
AIRDATE 9 p.m. Sunday, June 3 (FX)
CAST MJ Rodriguez, Dominique Jackson,
Kate Mara, James Van Der Beek
CREATORS Ryan Murphy, Brad Falchuk,
Steven Canals
sitting them down and lecturing
them on safe sex or the importance of education. Murphy and
subsequent directors also aim
for aesthetic and narrative familiarity rather than outre-ness: The
pilot contains a wacky museum
heist, an audition scene essentially cribbed from Flashdance
and myriad hints of Fame; the
balls are filmed with exuberance
and polish.
Familiarity, however, isn’t
the same as homogenization.
Early episodes prove that Pose is
versatile, capable of both universality and vivid specificity.
Episode three, featuring an emotional family Christmas plotline,
is followed by a very detailed,
somewhat technical episode featuring extensive talk about
AIDS testing, surgical procedures and the factors attracting
straight men to trans women
and drag queens.
The largely unknown actors are
exceptional. No matter the order in
↑ Jackson (center) is a mother figure to a group
of young voguers in a series set amid the LGBT
ball subculture of 1980s New York City.
the credits or on the call sheet,
Rodriguez earns her status
as the show’s star, shining especially in quieter scenes. Jackson
initially dominates with catty
attitude but locates the character’s pain as she goes along. Moore
exudes confidence, plus a fragility and sweetness that the story
needs. And expect Kinky Boots
Tony winner Porter to be in Emmy
conversations a year from now.
There’s an introductory quality to the opening episodes of Pose.
Murphy and his fellow creators
want viewers to be immersed,
but they’re also mindful of those
unfamiliar with the rites and
rules of the ball circuit; the show
anticipates questions certain
viewers might have. Opinions on
that approach may vary, but for
now it looks like a winning strategy: Pose is poignant, funny and
completely accessible.
JOJO WHILDEN/FX
On the surface, FX’s Pose is all
about outrageousness. This
depiction of drag ball culture in
New York City circa 1987, juxtaposed against the acceleration of
Manhattan’s Trump-driven conspicuous consumption, boasts
what FX is calling the largest cast
of transgender actors and LGBT
regulars ever on a scripted series.
Everything about the show is big,
from its costumes to its hit-driven
soundtrack to its episode running times. (The shortest of four
episodes sent to critics ran 58
minutes without commercials;
the longest, 78 minutes.)
Pose may lead with fabulousness — and that’s part of what
makes it entertaining — but the
pleasant surprise is that it also
has a lot of family-drama realness. Created by Ryan Murphy,
Brad Falchuk and Steven Canals,
with Murphy directing the first
two episodes, Pose starts as a
story about the ballroom rivalry
between the House of Abundance
and the House of Evangelista,
both committed to excellence
and run by two very different
den mothers. Elektra Abundance
(Dominique Jackson) is a taskmaster haunted by her own
insecurities — including the fact
that she has not yet had gender
reassignment surgery. Blanca
Evangelista (MJ Rodriguez), who’s
HIV-positive, wants to make
a mark with her remaining time.
She gathers a gang of outsiders,
including aspiring dancer Damon
(Ryan Jamaal Swain) and optimistic Angel (Indya Moore), with
the support of the ball circuit’s
enthusiastic master of ceremonies, Pray Tell (Billy Porter).
Angel is at the start of a
romance with Stan (Evan Peters),
who goes home to his wife (Kate
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
74
M AY 23, 2018
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Memorable moments from a storied history
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An American Girl Once Fell for a Fake Prince Harry
resemblance to the sixth in line
for the crown. (The real Prince
Harry was 29 at the time.) Then a
dozen 20-something American
women were flown to England and
told only that they’d meet “an eligible bachelor.” The details helped
sell the con: The hopefuls were
put up at a Downton Abbey-style
estate decorated with photoshopped pictures of “Harry” and
brother William; Hicks had a
security detail; and his butler
called him “his royal highness.”
Fenton thinks the majority of
the contestants “believed it was
Harry; the rest never let on and
played along with the game.” But
America wasn’t amused. The
Fox show averaged just a 0.4 rating among adults 18-to-49 and
was pulled after only four episodes aired, with the remaining
four airing on Hulu. (The winner
was Kimberly Birch, a Long Island
social worker who, coincidentally,
bears a passing resemblance to
Markle.) “It did well on the coasts
and with people who got the
joke,” says Fenton. “But people
in the middle thought it was
laughing at the Americans.” As
for Hicks, Fenton says the last
he heard he was doing commercials in Israel with a Markle
look-alike. — BILL HIGGINS
↑ Prince Harry look-alike Hicks with Birch, the I Wanna Marry “Harry” winner.
The Hollywood Reporter, Vol. CDXXIV, No. 18 (ISSN 0018-3660; USPS 247-580) is published weekly; 39 issues — two issues in April, July, October and December; three issues in January and June; four issues in February, March, May, August and September; and five issues in November — with 15 special issues:
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T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
76
M AY 23, 2018
CHRIS RAFAEL/FOX/COURTESY EVERETT COLLECTION
Meghan Markle is not the first
American who wanted to marry
Prince Harry. On May 20, 2014,
Fox aired the reality dating competition I Wanna Marry “Harry.”
It was similar to Joe Millionaire’s
premise, but instead of the
bachelor’s supposed wealth being
a ruse, he was a fake royal. “I had
a dream, and when I woke up,
the words ‘I wanna marry Harry’
were in my head,” says British
creator Danny Fenton. “The idea
was it would be a dating show that
would fulfill the dreams of an
American girl to marry a prince.”
He partnered with Ryan Seacrest
to produce the show. The first
challenge was to find a Harry
look-alike. After sifting through
a few hundred hopefuls, they
came upon Matthew Hicks, then
23, who was English and — in the
right light — did bear an amazing
“ TELEVISION’S
VERY BEST SHOW”
“AS GOOD A SEASON OF TV
AS I HAVE EVER SEEN ”
“GRADE A”
“EXTRAORDINARY”
“ONE OF TV’S MOST
EXCEPTIONAL SERIES”
FYC
O U T S TA N D I N G C O M E DY S E R I E S
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