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2018-05-01 Artist's Palette

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THE MAGAZINE FOR ALL ARTISTS
Artist’
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ntents
68
Issue No.159 2018
INSIGHTS
FEATURES
22 In the Galleries
Discover inovative online auctions
- a great way to market your
masterpieces.
42 Product Feature
A look at some wonderful drawing
tools from a range of art supliers.
60
6 Family Influence
Penny Lyras is a Greek lady whose
father inspired her to a life long
intertest in art.
14 Landscape My Way
South Australian mouth painter
Glenn Barnett creates soulfull
outdoor scenes.
.
26 Art History of cats
Rosslyn Barrett is a clever Sydney
artist who likes to paint "what she
knows"
34 Thw fruits of labours
Nature is the unfailing source of
Helen Wild's special inspiration.
.
48 Endless Passion
Pastellist Jane Greenland has enjoyed
a life-longlove affair with art.
60 Panting Humanity
Remia Montayre Homuk is a portrait
speciaist who captures feelings and
emotions.
68 Perceptions
Maryika Welter is inspirted by life
experiences which have chnaged her
perceptions.
Cover image: Penny Lyras
\
14
26
DEMONSTRATIONS
10 View from Observatory Park
Inovativer brush techniques are
often used by Penny Lyras in her oil
paintings.
18 Back Road to the Mountains A This
demonstration by Glenn Barrett speaks
volumes for his work.
30 Trees and Houses
This pretty watercolour painting is
charming and bright.
38 Pears from my Garden
Helene Wild creates a beautiful
watercolour featuring luscious fruit.
52 Oranges and Apples
Jane Greenland regards her vibrant
pastel work as a form of a drawing.
6
64 Just a girl
This portrait of an enchanting child
glows with warmth and realsim.
72 Spring
Maryika Welters mixed media
demonstration is accessible even for
beginners..
I N S I G H T
Penny Lyras
Family Influence
Edited by Trevor Lang
Formerly from Athens,
this clever oil painter
embarked on her
artistic career thanks to
the example set by her
father when she was a
young girl.
P
enny Lyras has been painting for
over 40 years. She has painted
professionally since 1974. Her
most preferred medium is oils, and she
specialises in traditional landscapes –
although she has been commissioned
for portraits and dabbled in abstracts.
For 30 years, Penny has exhibited
in countless exhibitions throughout
New South Wales and Australia-wide,
including her own major successful
art exhibition containing a wide
variety of subjects.
This artist brings the attributes of
light, colour and texture to her work.
She uses them in a way that transforms
a picture into a three-dimensional
masterpiece, and oil paints allow her
freedom, flexibility and fluidity while
painting.
“Make a mistake with oils, and you
have ample time to correct it or change
the movement,” she says.
I N S I G H T
Traditional landscapes are Penny’s
forté. The Australian Outback, English
cottages and Greek island scenes have
been her popular subjects.
She was inspired to paint from a
very young age. As a young girl in
Greece, Penny watched her father (an
artist himself) painting away at his
easel in his study. Penny fondly
remembers his expression as he gazed
upon the canvas, a brush in one hand,
and tongue between his lips … as one
does when focusing.
At the tender age of nine in 1954,
Penny immigrated to Australia with
her family from Athens, Greece. With
the frustrations brought on by being in
a new country with English as her
second language, Penny was
motivated to express herself more
than ever through art. Eager to start
her first project in oils at 12 years of
age, Penny set about to create her own
oil paints. This was a concoction of
water colours and olive oil, and a
linen towel as the canvas. Alas, it was
not a great success; but it showed her
father her passion to become an artist.
Her father set one rule: To be a good
artist, she would first need to learn to
draw in perspective.
For the next three years, Penny
frequented the local park in Elizabeth
Bay and practiced perfecting her threedimensional sketches. Buildings
surrounding the park provided her
backdrop. For her fifteenth birthday,
she received the gift she most desired –
a good set of oil paints from her father.
Immediately, Penny went to work
and painted her first ‘real’ painting –
a reflection of the harbour view from
her home in Elizabeth Bay. She won
art prizes throughout her time at high
school; then she studied Commercial
Art at East Sydney Technical College
until 1965.
From 1965 to 1974, Penny was
commissioned to paint works ‘here
and there’ via word of mouth through
family and friends. In 1966, she met
Nick – a fellow Greek who had also
migrated to Australia with his family.
They were married in 1969 and began
to raise a young family of their own.
Life changed in 1974, when Penny
was introduced to local artist Sheila La
Forest, who helped her to launch her
career professionally. She encouraged
Penny to exhibit her works of art,
marking the beginning of a beautiful
and ongoing career. Many exhibitions
were to follow, marked by important
successes in selling her work and
gaining artistic recognition and awards.
Penny has also used her artistic skills
extensively to help others, by
supporting various charities and
community groups over the years.
In the ’90s, Penny became famous
for her depictions of English thatched
cottages – so much so that in 1993
Bradford Exchange commissioned her
to create the artworks for their
‘Colonial Cottage’ series of collectable
porcelain plates.
Her career has continued to flourish
since that time.
Recently, Penny achieved another
goal when she completed a mural on a
I N S I G H T
I
wall in her home. It features her favourite Greek
depictions. The mural allows her to step into a
memorable time and place.
Penny has also been the recipient of myriads of
awards. Some which really stood out for her
included the Warringah People’s Choice Award in
2006 for her painting ‘Sunrise’, and the People's
Choice Award at the Norvill Art Prize in 2002. In
2003, she won the Warringah Art Prize Exhibition
with her painting ‘Here Comes the Drought’.
Penny Lyras seeks out art critics in her own
special way.
“Sometimes I will stand back and observe as
people comment on my works.” she explains. “It’s
the most honest feedback you can get … the public
are the best critics.”
She gleans particular satisfaction from knowing
that people truly appreciate her work.
“The most satisfying part of producing a work is
not just the journey in creating it, but the heartfelt
‘thank you’ letters from buyers and recipients of
my work,” she explains. “There is nothing more
fulfilling than knowing that my work has brought a
smile to another’s face.”
Penny continues to display her work in major
exhibitions around Australia. Her website can be
found at www.pennystudio.id.au ■
D E M O N S T R A T I O N
Oils
View from
Observatory Park
By Penny Lyras
Here is an oil painter who does not limit herself to using only the
bristles of paint brushes. She also uses the pointed ends of the
handles to scrape along wet paint, to create specific effects.
FINAL STEP
D E M O N S T R A T I O N
STEP ONE
M AT E R I A L S
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Oleopasto Medium (drying gel).
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as a wide thick bristle brush used for dabbing.
STEP ONE
The first step is to select my subject: In this case,
the view from Sydney’s Observatory Park (I had
taken a photograph earlier). On a timber framed
stretched canvas, I pencil sketch what I find
interesting from the photograph. I select a focal
point to attract the eye, in order to make an inviting
subject. When satisfied with the balance, I proceed
to prepare my oil paints.
STEP TWO
I paint the sky by mixing Ultramarine Blue with
Titanium White (I always mix in Liquin Oleopasto
Medium to accelerate the drying process). When I
have painted the entire sky area, I put only
Ultramarine Blue on my brush and, from the top of
the painting, I proceed to blend in the blue in order
to make the colour of the sky realistic (the deep
darker shade of the atmospheric blue sky overhead).
Then I paint the harbour water a darker shade of
blue than the sky; and when that is done, I brush in
different shades of dark blue to emphasise the water
movement and reflections. I then paint the faraway
city buildings and the city parks and trees in misty
tones in order to emphasise distance – before
roughly painting the foreground grass area.
STEP TWO
STEP THREE
STEP FOUR
Artist’s Palette
11
D E M O N S T R A T I O N
MASTER HINTS
AND TIPS
STEP FIVE
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a mistake, you have plenty of time to alter it. If
you find a mistake when the paint is already
dry, you can scrape the paint off with a razor
blade. This will provide a smooth surface to repaint over.
‡,I\RXZDQWWKHSDLQWLQJWRGU\TXLFNO\IRU
instance, if you need to exhibit the painting
soon after completing it), use Liquin
Oleopasto Medium (drying gel) mixed in
with your paints. This dries the paint faster,
and also provides an even sheen to the
painting.
‡8VHDVPDOOEUXVK6L]HIRUGHWDLOVVXFKDV
fine branches on trees; and use a wide flat
brush (one inch wide) for adding threedimensional bunches of leaves on trees; grass;
and many other details that would usually
require multiple strokes. Don’t be limited to
only using the bristles of a paint brush. You
can also use the pointed end of the handle to
scrape along wet paint, creating an effect (for
instance) of long blades of grass.
‡(QYHORSH\RXUVHOILQ\RXUSDLQWLQJ«\RX·OO
be surprised at how amazing your piece will
become when you allow yourself to mentally
escape into your creation.
STEP SIX
STEP THREE
I mix some brown paints, and start to
roughly paint the tree trunks and
branches; simultaneously dabbing
green patches to represent the distant
leaves on the tree. I also paint in the
bench seat with my mixture of
browns, as well as the bark at the base
of the trees, and mix some concrete
colour to paint the base of the bench. I
paint the shades and different tones of
the tree trunks in order to give them
shape and texture.
STEP FOUR
I start to add more detail on the
bench seat, and also paint in more
branches on the tree (including the
tiny ones) with a small brush. I play
around with light and shade on the
tree trunks and ground until the
desired effects are achieved.
12
Artist’s Palette
STEP FIVE
I really go to work with lots of detail
in the background of my painting. I
detail the city buildings and trees
and paint in the yachts and boats
anchored in the water. I also paint in
Luna Park (faintly, in order to show
distance and depth). Once I am
satisfied with the background, I
leave it and move on to detail the
foreground trees. First, I detail all
the branches and then dab different
tones of green all over them, where
appropriate, to represent leaves –
darker first and then lightly on top
(with lighter green), thus giving
depth and texture.
STEP SIX
I detail the front two tree trunks as much
as possible, to make them look alive.
The bench seat gets light and shade
touches only after I play around with
detailing the grass and bark areas of my
painting. The way I achieve this is by
using a thick brush; and, after picking up
large blobs of different colours of oil
paint, I dab and dab on the paint, layer
by layer, creating a three-dimensional
look. After each layer of paint is dry, I
repeat the same method again.
FINAL STEP
After a few days, I have a quiet time
when I sit back at a distance and
have a good look at my painting –
even looking at it through a mirror to
get a different perspective. I also let
my family take a close look and tell
me if they find fault with anything,
as I appreciate their differing
opinions. Then I touch up anything I
believe needs amending. And then I
call it a day! ■
I N S I G H T
Glenn Barnett
Landscapes My Way
Edited by Trevor Lang
Art created by people with disabilities has a distinctive edge and
speaks of triumph over adversity. This talented South Australian
landscape specialist is a mouth painter.
I N S I G H T
G
lenn Barnett of Port Lincoln in
South Australia is a Member
of Mouth & Foot Painting
Artists Pty Ltd. He delights in painting
beautiful landscapes with brushes held
in his mouth.
Like many artists, Glenn has
developed his skills over the years and
experimented with a whole range of
mediums.
“After a few years of painting with
watercolours, I turned to oil paints. I
enjoyed their flexibility; the way they
worked into each various colour, and
the ability to wipe off a mistake,”
Glenn explains. “Then, in the mid
1970s, I tried acrylics. At this time I
was talking to schools and community
groups and demonstrating how I
painted. It did not take long before I
found it very difficult to actually
achieve much of a result painting
quickly with oils – so I turned to
acrylics.”
Glenn has found that each medium
has its different techniques. As he
‘played around’ with acrylics it soon
became obvious that they dried very
rapidly.
“In using this medium, I had to do it
‘my way’,” he says. “I continued to
use painting boards with canvas drawn
over them, and occasionally an actual
canvas. However, when I first
attempted to paint on canvas pads, I
found a base that was much better (for
me) to work with.”
Normally, Glenn works in his studio
drawing subjects from his imagination
(those that come out of his head) and
photographic images shot by his wife
when the pair visits areas of interest.
At times he also works on location.
Another method he employs is to
gather a series of images from various
places and ‘make up’ a compilation
work. Then, there are pictures he
creates by simply ‘playing around’ …
these paintings are compilations with a
lot of imagination.
“Over the years, I found it simpler
to work from the sky to the
foreground – sometimes laying down
a base colour and at other times just
‘going for it’,” Glenn relates. “I never
I N S I G H T
really sketch in first. Instead, I attempt
to complete either a base or a complete
section in one sitting. Acrylics dry fast
… which is very beneficial at times
and a real problem at other times. So I
am never happy with a finished
painting; just small sections.”
“My palette is very limited,” he
continues. “I use only about ten to
twelve colours to make all of my hues.
I nearly always use the same colours,
with just a few different ones if I paint
a non-landscape work. As my painting
begins, I usually never want to paint
over a sky – but because I work
forward through the work, it becomes
essential. Thus I may simply paint over
a completed finished section and paint
it out.”
As a teenager, after three years of
painting by himself, Glenn Barnett had
three lessons (his only ones) with the
Art Master of one of Adelaide’s
colleges. The Art Master led him to do
three different exercises: Colour
mixing, perspective, and a shaded
building across the other side of a
paddock.
At the conclusion of the three
lessons, the Art Master said to Glenn:
“I cannot teach you anything. You
have the basics. Go and find your
technique.”
16
Artist’s Palette
I N S I G H T
Glenn has followed that advice,
albeit within his own particular
limitations.
“I changed a few times with
techniques and with mediums, and I
am still learning,” he claims. “There
are times when I really want to paint
large works – but it is physically
impossible. Also, I would love to be
really free-flowing and very loose.
Occasionally I can be.”
In closing, Glenn Barnett shares his
philosophical approach to his
creativity, and hints at the frustration
felt by many artists when criticising
their own work.
“I do it my way,” he says.
“Who knows … maybe one day I
will be happy with a painting that I
think I’ve finished.”
Despite his personal doubts, this
artist is capable of bringing happiness
to countless other people who view
his clever and engaging pictures. ■
Artist’s Palette
17
D E M O N S T R A T I O N
Acrylics
Back Road to the
Mountains
By Glenn Barnett
Very few words accompany this demonstration. Sometimes it is preferable to
let the pictures do most of the talking … and these pictures speak volumes
about the skill of the artist.
FINAL STEP
18
Artist’s Palette
D E M O N S T R A T I O N
STEP 1
STEP 2
P
ainting with a brush held in the mouth, I work in
sections. I begin with the sky, as I prefer to work
from the sky to the foreground. I usually do not do
preliminary sketches. My normal method is to complete a
base and/or a complete section in one sitting.
Fast drying acrylics can sometimes be an asset in my
style of painting; while occasionally presenting problems.
Working ‘forward’ from the sky means that I sometimes
need to paint over completed sections to progress the work.
Steps 6 to 11 continues on page 28. ■
M AT E R I A L S
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STEP 4
STEP 3
STEP 5
Artist’s Palette
19
D E M O N S T R A T I O N
20
Artist’s Palette
STEP 6
STEP 7
STEP 8
STEP 9
STEP 10
S T E P 11
F E A T U R E
In the Galleries
Art galleries are scattered all over our wonderful country, hosting and
promoting the works of Australia’s diverse exponents of art. On the pages of
Artist’s Palette magazine we will showcase a range of these important venues.
Dorothy Rae, ‘Hot and Dry’.
ONLINE AUCTIONS
MOVE QUALITY
A RT W O R K S
GraysOnline attracts 500,000 visitors
to its retail website each month. The
breadth of high quality new products on
offer along with the excitement of the
auction process keeps people coming
back. GraysOnline is one of Australia’s
top ten online retailers – offering
customers everything from furniture
and forklifts, to jewellery and cars.
GraysOnline has developed a specialist
Fine Arts department, achieving very
successful corporate, private, gallery
and artists’ own sales. These include the
Ernst & Young, Westpac and Mirvac
collections, which all exceeded owners’
expectations; Mendo Vasilevski,
Norman Lindsay, original etching.
Dorothy Rae, ‘Pilbara Ravens’.
22
Artist’s Palette
F E A T U R E
Kooroora, Alice Sundown and many
other big name artists.
Works handled recently by
GraysOnline include paintings by
Minnie Pwerle, Dorothy Rae Sullivan,
Norman Lindsay and Jackie Abbott.
Some of these pieces are shown here.
The types of artworks sold by
GraysOnline are varied as the
company caters to emerging, midcareer and established artists. All of
these artists target different markets.
Because the GraysOnline database is
truly national, it accesses relevant
buyers all over the country in both
remote and populous areas.
With the days of abundant ‘chequebook art buyers’ and collectors behind
us, few of the traditional art auctioneers
seem to have embraced the Internet as
a channel through which to sell art. At
the same time, Australians are now
taking to buying art online in record
numbers, perhaps even more than at
the traditional physical auctions or at
static art galleries. Many high earning
Australians are now buying art in large
numbers, and fashions have changed
significantly. Artists can reach this
important market through GraysOnline.
The company sells international,
Australian and indigenous art pieces.
A significant number of pieces have
a low starting price with no reserve
(unlike many of the other traditional
auction houses). Auctions are run
regularly, as GraysOnline embraces
the future of art auctioneering online.
GraysOnline sold the celebrated art
collection seized from jailed celebrity
bankrupt, John Barrie Loiterton, for
just under $360,000 in May 2006. The
sale broke Australian art auction
records for the number of paintings
sold online from one individual’s
private collection; and also for the
value achieved for them.
Large oils such as ‘Abstract Trees’
by John Coburn have achieved almost
$49,000, while ‘Islanders’ by
Queensland artist Ray Crooke was
sold for over $46,000.
When Ernst & Young instructed
GraysOnline to sell over 400 works
of art from its offices, via a totally
Norman Lindsay, ‘Visitors to Hell’.
‘Pilbara Plains’.
Artist’s Palette
23
F E A T U R E
Norman Lindsay.
Dorothy Rae, ‘Sculptures’.
Minnie.
‘In the Rain’.
unreserved online auction in
December 2005, it was Australia’s
largest online art sale ever.
A Ray Crooke oil on linen landscape
from 1922 achieved $12,200 while an
abstract landscape by Geoff Dyer was
sold for $15,075.
Results like this demonstrate that
there has been a change in the way
people are buying art in Australia and
a significant change in the profile of
the typical art buyer.
To contact GraysOnline,
telephone Catherine Brown on
0448 484 022 – or email her at
catherine.brown@grays.com.au ■
24
Artist’s Palette
IDRIS MURPHY. Weipa Harbour, Storm Clouds. Atelier Interactive on board, 120x120cm, 2005.
Image courtesy of King Street Gallery on William http://www.kingstreetgallery.com.au
Professionals Choose
Atelier Interactive
To see more artwork by Idris Murphy and other leading artists from
around the world visit the gallery section of the Chroma website at:
www.chromaonline.com/gallery
FREES!
BONU
DVD*
USING INTERACTIVE DVD
This DVD shows just how easy and helpf
Interactive techniques really are!
CHROMA AUSTRALIA PTY.
LTD. MT KURING-GAI NSW 2080
Free Call: 1800 023 935
www.chromaonline.com
telier
Professional Artist Mitch Waite demonstrates Atelier
Interactive and gives lessons on composition, drawing, tonal
values, portraiture and colour mixing.
* When you purchase the Mitch Waite DVD it comes with a FREE 90
minute painting demonstration by Keith
Norris.Palette 25
Artist’s
Call Chroma on 1800 023 935 to Order
I N S I G H T
Roslyn Barrett
Art History and Cats
By Trevor Lang
Working with a limited palette, this Sydney artist likes to paint what
she knows … not necessarily what she sees. She knows quite a lot
about cats and art history.
26
Artist’s Palette
I N S I G H T
R
oslyn Barrett believes that her
ideal occupation would be
writing and illustrating
children’s books. Her background as
a primary school teacher is doubtless
a great asset, together with her talent
for dealing with children.
She currently works with ‘special
needs’ children and helps them to
integrate into everyday classroom
situations.
After studying art while completing
her Higher School Certificate, Roslyn
allowed some years to pass before
taking watercolour classes at Eastwood
Community College and also at WEA
in Sydney where she was tutored by
Helen Hall. She describes Helen as an
excellent teacher.
Although family and career
commitments have dominated much of
Roslyn Barrett’s life, art has found
its way into her existence in a really
positive way.
“I have been interested in art and
history since I was at school,” she
explains. “This led to a life-long
interest in art history and the lives
of artists. I see my paintings as a
touchstone with them. I love to look
at paintings as such, but also I like
to think about the lives of the artists;
the times they lived in; and the ways
people looked at art and thought
about life at other times and in
other places.”
When she has observed the work of
another artist, Roslyn has sometimes
enjoyed recreating a version of their
studio – or an interior associated
with a style they may have used:
For example, Picasso and Cubism.
“Picasso said an artist should paint
what they know, not what they see,”
she relates. “So I sometimes take his
advice and paint about art history,
including a cat in a studio or a
townscape, because I know about
art history and cats!”
“When I first started painting,” she
continues, “I thought I would most
like to paint country landscapes – but
as time passed I found it was urban
landscapes and interiors that I enjoyed
painting most. I often include an
animal – which sometimes, I hope,
adds a touch of humour.”
Humour is certainly evident in the
work of this talented painter. Also
present is abundant rich colour.
“The colour in a painting is probably
the first thing that attracts me,” Roslyn
says. “When I paint, I find the way the
Artist’s Palette
27
I N S I G H T
colours interact to be one of the most
interesting parts of the process, although
I like drawing as well. I have done some
oil painting, but I found it static
compared to watercolours. Using
watercolours in differing conditions, you
can sometimes get an unexpected and
pleasing result – I like the way the
paints take over and do their own thing
at times. Most of my paintings have an
area like this in them (such as the sky).
28
Artist’s Palette
I like to keep other parts of the painting
very much under control, and I generally
use a reasonably limited palette.”
Art is a source of satisfaction and
enjoyment for Roslyn Barrett, and it
has also brought success to her life in
the form of several awards when her
work has been exhibited at various
shows around Sydney.
“For me, painting is one of the most
satisfying things that I have ever done,”
she claims. “I enjoy the process of
creating a painting. I am gratified when
someone likes one of my paintings
enough to part with money for it and to
include it in their life by, presumably,
hanging it on one of their walls.”
But Roslyn is not preoccupied
with the importance of selling her art.
“It is difficult to know to what
extent sales of one’s paintings should
influence what one paints, although
I N S I G H T
I find that pictures of artists’ studios
and cats sell very well,” she says.
In displaying a true creative spirit
however, this artist will not limit
herself to familiar topics.
“I have just begun a series based on
the women in Patrick White’s novels,”
she reveals. “At some times, he has
them walk through various rose
gardens – for one reason or another …
“I don’t think these pictures will sell,
but I am excited about doing them!” ■
Artist’s Palette
29
D E M O N S T R A T I O N
Watercolours
Trees and Houses
By Roslyn Barrett
This experienced watercolourist has learned that good quality rough paper is
reasonably forgiving – allowing for minor corrections and adjustments during
the creation of a picture.
30
Artist’s Palette
D E M O N S T R A T I O N
M AT E R I A L S
‡3DSHU$TXDUHOOH$UFKHV
watercolour block, 185gsm,
rough.
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watercolours – Burnt Sienna,
Payne’s Grey, Cadmium Orange,
Cadmium Red, and Chinese
White.
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‡:LQVRU1HZWRQ0DVNLQJ
Fluid.
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STEP ONE
I draw up the house-scape by using
my own stencil. The important thing
at this stage is to get a balanced
overall composition. I loosely put the
trees in position. When I am happy
with this, I use Winsor & Newton
watercolour art masking fluid to
outline the edges of the houses that
will be in contact with the loose areas
of the sky and background. This
allows me the freedom to let the paint
move around and mix in the next
step. After this, I wait 24 hours to
make sure the gum is dry.
STEP TWO
Before I begin to paint, I have a colour
scheme already in my mind. Now, I
wet the entire area of the sky with
clear water. In this sky, I introduce
each colour that I intend to use in the
rest of the painting – this helps to
unify and balance the picture.
I introduce the first colour onto the
wet paper. This is a mix of Burnt
Sienna and Payne’s Grey. I usually
make the top line of the sky the
darkest colour. I bring it down to the
horizon line, lightening it as I go. If I
want to leave white areas for clouds,
I don’t put paint in those places and
allow the water and paint to leave
natural soft outlines to form them.
I quickly introduce interest and
highlights into the sky by lightly
touching in other colours.
Artist’s Palette
31
D E M O N S T R A T I O N
It is necessary to work while the
paper is still wet. It’s not a time to
answer the telephone!
STEP THREE
I do the background, in the same
way, introducing lighter and darker
areas. I include all the colours here
too, to a greater or lesser extent.
Towards the bottom of the painting I
include some of the darkest colour –
this gives the painting a little depth.
When the sky and the background
have dried, I rub away the gum from
the edges of the houses. They should
have sharp, clean edges.
STEP FOUR
I look at the painting to try to get some
idea of what colours should go where
in the rooftops and walls of the houses.
I use the main colours mostly here. In
this painting, I use combinations of
Burnt Sienna, Payne’s Grey and
Cadmium Orange in these areas.
Cadmium Red will be added to
provide contrast and interest.
STEP FIVE
After all the main areas are coloured, it
is time to add the details. On the
rooftops, I add brighter and darker
colours to the chimneys. After putting
on the main colour, I add a thin strip of
darker or contrasting paint down the
side of the shape while it is still wet to
create a nice effect. I put in the tree
trunks as well, using this same
technique. I put in the windows by
outlining them and then painting in a
criss-cross pattern.
MASTER HINTS AND TIPS
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paint, are: Use of masking fluid to protect areas and to create sharp edges;
and ‘wet in wet’ where coloured paint is introduced into an already wet
surface – this allows for a soft fusion of the colours and can be used to
create a dramatic sky.
‡,XVHWKH¶ZHWLQZHW· WHFKQLTXHRQWKHHGJHVRIVRPHVKDSHVWRJLYH
the effect of shadow or to introduce some colour interest to an area.
‡8VLQJDWRRWKEUXVKORDGHGZLWKSDLQWWRVSUD\RYHUDVXUIDFHFDQJLYH
the effect of soft foliage, spray on water, or the surface of a road.
32
Artist’s Palette
STEP SIX
Finally, the foliage. I cut a hole in a
piece of paper and place the hole in the
position of the tree’s foliage. With a
toothbrush dipped in watery Cadmium
Orange, I spray the exposed areas to
create the soft foliage of the trees. At
this point, I might lighten or darken
some areas; or brighten some of the
colours, if they need it. I may go back
and lighten some of the treetops using
Chinese White. ■
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Australian
I N S I G H T
Helene Wild
The Fruits of
Our Labours
Edited by Trevor Lang
This Melbourne artist loves to draw and paint directly from Nature. She is
fascinated by the delicate and beautiful forms of fruits, vegetables, leaves
and flowers, and many other textural objects found in her surroundings.
D
uring her primary school years,
art was Helene Wild’s favourite
subject. In those days, State
schools had no designated ‘art rooms’,
but thankfully one of her teachers took
art seriously. Art classes were a highlight
for Helene. She also enjoyed health,
nature study, geography and history
studies – especially because the students
were encouraged to illustrate their
lessons. This talented lady has been
drawing and painting ever since she
could hold a pencil. She claims that her
career as a natural history artist began in
grade four at primary school when she
was inspired by her nature study classes
– and she could hardly wait to get home
Apple ‘Wild Delight Pippin’
(approximately 22 x 20 cm)
My husband is a great propagator of plants,
and enjoys growing things from seeds.
Many years ago, he planted an apple pip
and we watched with delight as it grew into
a strong, healthy tree. The specimen for
this watercolour was chosen for its
simplicity and the elegant arrangement of
the leaves. When selecting the model for
my painting, I didn’t grab the first apple I
saw … I walked around and around the
tree until I found the perfect piece.
60
34
Artist
’s Palette
Palette
Artist’s
I N S I G H T
Bok Choy and
Miniature Aubergine
The result of yet
another trip to the
greengrocer. A study
in voluptuousness!
The leafy green bok
choy is embracing a
pregnant purple
aubergine.
Laura’s Pomegranates (20 x 17.5 cm)
The models for this watercolour were a gift from my niece who was
about to be married. They were growing in Laura’s new garden.
Maria’s Cherries (15 x 9.5 cm)
My mother-in-law was proud of her
backyard orchard and her cherry trees
in particular. During a visit, we were
presented with a large bag of ripe
Morello cherries for bottling. But art
came first! I’m so glad I did this
painting, because Maria was delighted
to see this likeness of her cherries.
and illustrate her work book with images
of whatever had been taught that day.
Helene often took specimens to show
her teacher – a few berries, a colourful
fungi, a bird’s feather or an autumn leaf.
“Somehow, Mr Marshall always
found time to talk about my finds, and
he encouraged me to marry my
newfound love of Nature with what he
saw as an artistic talent,” she says.
“At the end of that year my workbook
was lavishly illustrated with swarms
of little creatures, and my teacher
asked if he could keep it as an example
for future classes. I admit I was
pleased and flattered, but it would be
interesting now to look back and see
the work I had been doing then.”
Even at that early age, Helene liked
to paint detailed studies on a plain
white background … although it wasn’t
until she was in high school that she
discovered this was the traditional way
to paint natural history subjects.
Helene Wild was delighted on
commencing high school to discover
that art was taken seriously. She
relished many hours of drawing,
painting and studying art history each
week. Early in her career she became
a secretary, but continued to draw and
paint whenever she could find time.
Later in life she embarked on a new
career as a professional artist.
Inspiration for her botanical paintings
comes from many sources. Sometimes
the flowers are from her garden. At other
times they are borrowed from specialist
plant enthusiasts. She loves to paint
Australian wildflowers as well as exotic
plants. Lichens and fungi fascinate her,
too; and she is not afraid to take on
challenging and unusual tasks.
“As a joint project, most members
of my art group accepted the challenge
to paint, over a 12 month period, the
annual cycle of an oak tree,” Helene
relates. “Each artist selected a tree
growing in the Royal Botanic Gardens
in Melbourne and, as our finished
works would be donated to the gardens,
we painted to a predetermined size.
We had to show the plant’s leaves; the
male catkins and female flowers; a
mature acorn; and the growth habit of
the tree … then we staged an exhibition
to show off our finished works.”
“I also love to paint fruits and
vegetables from our home gardens
or from the greengrocer’s shop,” she
Artist’s Palette
35
I N S I G H T
Aubergine, Onion and Capsicums (25 x 17.5 cm)
A client, delighted with her recently completed country kitchen renovation, was
keen to purchase a pair of watercolours with a fruit or vegetable theme. Her kitchen
walls were the colour of clotted cream. Honey-coloured timber cupboards
abounded, and the soft furnishings were in creams and browns with touches of
orange and lime. Keeping this colour scheme in mind, I dropped in at the
greengrocer’s in search of inspiration. I found a glossy, deep purple aubergine; a
red-skinned onion; and three lime-green capsicums faintly flushed with purple.
Tamarillos (25 x 12 cm)
During the month of May, my husband exchanged home-grown produce
with his friend, Branko. When I saw what Branko had given us, I grabbed a
few perfect specimens to paint; and I set up a still life where the light
would fall on their fetching sealing-wax-red skins.
Plums
A few purple plums from a tree in our back garden. The birds
and possums love them!
36
Artist’s Palette
continues. “I like the simple, uncomplicated
shapes of apples, oranges, cherries and
pumpkins (round); tamarillos and aubergines
(oval); and pears and figs (raindrop); and I find
them very satisfying to paint. While a botanical
work must depict the subject accurately, the
challenge in painting simple shapes is in
achieving a pleasing composition, and also
in the application of colour.”
Helene’s grandfather and great grandmother
were artists and she has an aunt who
specialises in portraiture.
“They were all impressionist painters, so
by becoming a botanical artist, I have broken
with family tradition,” she explains.
“For a while, I did dabble with landscapes
and seascapes; I enjoyed painting historic
buildings and still life subjects; I even did t
he odd abstract … and I experimented with
pencils, pastels, oils and watercolours. But the
subjects I always found most appealing were
the flowers, insects and other small creatures
that lived in my family’s garden, and I preferred
working in pencil, watercolour, or pen and ink.”
It was not until Helene and her husband
joined the Australasian Native Orchid Society
in 1982 that she really began to take her flower
painting seriously. Not long after she joined
this society, a friend gave her a pot of
greenhood orchids, and one plant flowered
between meetings.
“At that stage, I knew very little about our
terrestrial orchids, and I was anxious to have
the plant identified,” she says. “I doubted the
flower would last until our next meeting, so I
decided to paint it, and in doing so I learned a
valuable lesson about botanical art. This little
orchid had a deformed labellum. Should I paint
what I saw, or should I straighten it out?
Contrary to my husband’s advice, I decided to
depict the plant exactly as it was.”
When Helene showed her painting to the
president of the society, he said “Oh, that’s
Pterostylis nutans – you can tell by its twisted
labellum!” Incidentally, Helene has edited the
A.N.O.S. Victorian Group’s monthly newsletter
for the past 18 years.
After a string of shared exhibitions, Helene
staged her first solo exhibition ‘Orchids and
Butterflies of the Castlemaine District’ in
1989. It was an outstanding success and other
solo exhibitions and displays have followed.
Helene has accepted numerous commissions
to paint Australian native flora andindigenous
species of various regions, as well as popular
I N S I G H T
Tangello and Kiwi Fruit
A contrast of textures – dimpled orange
tangellos and furry brown kiwi fruits.
Black Genoa Figs
(approximately 25 x 16 cm)
This watercolour is of a few figs I picked before the
birds discovered them. I fell in love with the rich
array of colours in their skins.
Golden Nugget Pumpkin, Mushrooms and Onion
(25 x 17.5 cm)
I again visited my greengrocer as he was
unloading a crate of small golden nugget
pumpkins that exactly matched the splashes of
orange in my client’s curtains. A softly glowing
Spanish onion and a handful of button mushrooms
duplicated other colours in her decor.
garden flowers, fruits and vegetables.
Her work is represented in private,
public and corporate collections
worldwide, including the permanent
collections of the Castlemaine Art
Gallery in regional Victoria and the
State Botanical Art Collection that
is held at the Royal Botanic Gardens
Melbourne. Several companies are
featuring her work on a range of
products including cards, stationery,
placemats, decals, ceramics and
cross-stitch kits.
Helene is Resident Artist for the
Habitat Trust and has been allocated
space to showcase her work in their
offices at the CRT Resource Centre
in Altona North.
She is always looking for fresh
specimens to paint or draw, but doesn’t
like to have half a dozen works in
progress at any one time.
“I like to really concentrate on a
subject and complete one work before
moving on to the next one,” she reveals.
“This can sometimes become frustrating,
as I have often spotted a flower that I
would love to draw, and then found it
has died or is well past its prime by the
time I am ready to start my next work.
Fortunately, flowers have an annual
cycle … so there is always next year!”
Although there have been times
when Helene has completed a drawing
outdoors, she does prefer to work
indoors with her specimen in a vase
or a pot. A lot of people think painting
flowers is simple because they sit
still. Well, sometimes they do; but
mostly they don’t!
Her studies of dried plant material
pose no problems at all. But Helene
recalls the time when a friend was coordinating a heritage rose exhibition.
“My friend asked me if I would paint
a particular rose if she could locate a
suitable specimen. A single flower stem
was delivered early one morning, and I
set to work immediately. I barely took
a break all day, but I did finish painting
the flower just as the light was
beginning to fade (the leaves could
wait until the next day … or even the
day after). I got up to empty my jar of
water; and when I turned around, the
flower had collapsed and the petals
were on the floor!”
Helene has found that, most times,
the flowers are the first part of a plant
to flop – so she usually completes
them before moving on to the leaves.
“I have only been caught out once,
when the leaves of a plant I was
working on drooped almost immediately
and the flowers stayed in pristine
condition for a week!” she says. ■
Artist’s Palette
37
D E M O N S T R A T I O N
Watercolours
Pears from
My Garden
By Helene Wild
This botanical artist loves to paint fruits and vegetables from her home garden
or from the greengrocer’s shop. She admires the simple, uncomplicated
shapes and enjoys the challenge of achieving pleasing compositions.
FINAL STEP
38
Artist’s Palette
D E M O N S T R A T I O N
STEP ONE
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Artist’s Palette
39
D E M O N S T R A T I O N
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40
Artist’s Palette
STEP FOUR
STEP FIVE
P R O D U C T
F E A T U R E
Pencils and Other
Drawing Materials
Contributed
An abundance of different styles of pencils and other drawing implements
is available to artists – catering for almost every conceivable drawing
technique. Here are some examples from your favourite art suppliers.
R E VO L U T I O N A RY D E R I VA N L I Q U I D P E N C I L F R O M M AT I S S E
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a different rheology, artists now have
a wider scope for creating sketches.
Due to a precisely balanced formulation,
another great benefit of the Permanent
Liquid Pencil is that it will ‘burnish up’
in a similar manner to traditional
graphite – but it will not smudge.
The re-wettable formula will also
allow you to remove areas using water
– in a similar manner to watercolour
techniques; or it is possible to use with
a traditional eraser. Another advantage
to using Derivan Liquid Pencil is that
large areas can be built up and covered
quickly and easily.
Colour Mixing
Derivan Liquid Pencil is available
in six graphite shades, each with a
permanent or re-wettable formula. Each
of the shades has a definite graphite
colour; however, there are distinct
undertones such as blue, yellow, red,
sepia and neutral in two different
strengths to allow a great range of
options for artists.
ASTM Lightfastness
The American Society for Testing and
Materials (or ASTM for short) is the
authority which has set standards for
testing the lightfastness of pigments (in
other words, the ability for a pigment
not to fade) in America. This standard
has been adopted almost universally
42
Artist’s Palette
around the world to rate the
lightfastness of pigments on a scale of
1 to 4. Paints with an ASTM rating of
1 have an excellent lightfastness and
the pigments will remain unchanged for
more than 100 years. Pigments with an
ASTM rating of 2 have a very good
lightfastness and will remain
unchanged, in full sunlight, for about
100 years. Pigments rated ASTM 3 or 4
are said to be fugitive and are not
deemed to have the necessary
lightfastness for artist’s use. Derivan
Liquid Pencil pigments are all rated
either ASTM 1 or 2.
Clean up
Derivan Liquid Pencil is washable in
water, making clean up quick and easy.
Contact Matisse Derivan by
telephone on 02 9736 2022.
Matisse Derivan – Pure Brilliance,
Pure Quality.
P R O D U C T
F E A T U R E
COLOURSOFT PENCILS FROM S&S WHOLESALE
SHINE IN ‘WHITE ON BLACK’ TECHNIQUE
This demonstration piece by Fiona
Peart first appeared in the UK
magazine ‘Leisure Painter’ under the
title ‘Black Paper and Soft Pencils
Create Dramatic Results’. It is
reproduced here with permission.
I was introduced to Coloursoft
pencils last year and, since then, I have
experimented with them on various
coloured papers, textured surfaces and
with other media. Coloursoft are the
first pencils I have found that work
well on black paper.
I hope this demonstration will inspire
you to use pencils on dark surfaces.
The results are quite dramatic.
Deep Red; 170 Soft Pink; 200 Bright
Pink; 390 Grey Green; 400 Mid Green;
and 490 Pale Mint.
You will also need: Smooth black
paper; 2B pencil; pencil sharpener;
masking tape; and a soft putty eraser
(optional).
If you wish to trace my drawing, you
will need: Tracing or greaseproof paper;
and a wooden pop stick or similar.
Tracing Technique
If you want to trace my drawing, place
a sheet of tracing paper over my
drawing and draw over the lines with a
lead pencil.
Turn the tracing paper over and
redraw over the lead lines in the back
of the sheet using a white pencil.
Position the tracing paper, white lines
down, onto a sheet of black paper and
secure with masking tape.
Using a wooden rounded pop stick,
the rounded handle of a teaspoon or a
10-cent coin, firmly rub down on the
image, checking as you go that the
lines are transferring onto the black
paper. A wooden pop stick is softer
for this method and there is less
chance of damaging the tracing if you
press too hard.
You will need: Derwent Coloursoft
Pencils – 720 White; 100 Rose; 130
Step Two
Apply the lightest colour first, in this
case where the light catches the petals.
Use a combination of white and soft
pink and blend from the outer edge
of the petal in towards the centre.
Gently shade with the side of the
pale mint pencil to give the impression
of foliage. If you want to imply leaf
veins or stalks, lift the pencil slightly
and increase the pressure.
Step One
Draw (or trace) the outline directly
onto the black paper using white. Any
unwanted lines can be gently erased
using an eraser.
Step Three
Blend bright pink from the dark
sections between the petals towards the
light, merging it with the soft pink.
Using rose towards the centre of the
flower gives a deeper red than that on
the outer petals, which appear more
pink. Blend rose with the bright pink
and the soft pink, pressing the pencil in
the direction of the petal.
Step Four
Use deep red in the centre, pressing
very lightly to the underside of
the shadows. Continue to build up
the darks very gradually, pressing
more firmly if you want to lighten
areas.
Use grey green and mid green, using
the flat of the pencil rather than the
point to apply texture.
Imply the buds in the background
(without losing the focal point of
the flower head) by applying bright
pink and rose, again using the flat
of the pencil but pressing a little
more firmly.
Use mid green to suggest the bud
case, then adjust the background.
Check that the highlights are all
bright enough and that the darks
contrast well.
Helpful Tips
Press firmly where you want bright
white and release the pressure where
the tone darkens slightly.
Lighten or lift by using a soft
putty eraser.
Working on black paper means that
that the darker the tone you want, the
less you press on the paper.
Keep the focal point crisp and in
focus, and the rest more slightly
suggestive.
Please contact S&S Wholesale
Customer Service on
1300 731 529 for further product
information and stockists.
Artist’s Palette
43
P R O D U C T
F E A T U R E
GET INSPIRED WITH ECKERSLEY’S EXTENSIVE RANGE OF PENCILS
At Eckersley’s, you’ll find all the tools
for your drawing needs including
graphite and sketching pencils,
charcoal, coloured pencils in various
grades, pastel pencils and watercolour
pencils. They stock a wide range of
brands including Derwent, FaberCastell, Staedtler, Jasart, Prismacolour,
Roymac, and many more!
If you like using charcoal, this is
available from Eckersley’s in natural
sticks of willow, or as compressed
charcoal of various grades in stick or
pencil form. Compressed charcoal and
pencils vary in texture according to the
blend of charcoal, clay and fillers used
in their manufacture.
Eckersley’s also stocks a range of
standard drawing (lead) pencils in a
range of grades. These are made from
a mixture of graphite and clay. The
harder grades (H grades) have more
clay and less graphite, while the softer
grades (B grades) have little or no clay.
Graphite pencils and sticks offer
great value as you receive all graphite
and no wood casing. Some are lacquer
coated to keep the fingers clean!
Coloured pencils are also available
in a variety of grades – from student
quality to artists’ quality. Some, like
the Derwent Watercolour and Inktense
pencils, are water-soluble – enabling
you to create a variety of watercolour
painting or ink-like effects. The
Roymac Life Pencils are great for life
drawing with 12 different skin tones.
Finally, the new Coloursoft range from
Derwent is a range of smooth, vibrant
pencils that blend extremely well and
allow you to apply layer upon layer of
rich colour.
Whatever your preference, you’ll be
sure to get inspired with the wide range
of drawing tools at Eckersley’s.
For further information,
call 1300 657 766; email
art@eckersleys.com.au or
visit www.eckersleys.com.au
44
Artist’s Palette
P R O D U C T
F E A T U R E
A N E X C E L L E N T R A N G E O F S TA B I L O P E N C I L S
Stabilo produces a well-known
range of quality pencils favoured by
many drawing enthusiasts.
Coloured Pencils
Stabilo coloured pencils are available
in hangsell cardboard boxes and hard
wearing metal tins. Ideal for students
and professional artists.
Graphite Pencil 306
The Stabilo Graphite Pencil 306 is a
good quality graphite pencil available
in five degrees of hardness: 2B, B, HB,
H and 2H. Ideal for drafting, art and
graphics.
Graphite Pencil 4906
The Stabilo Graphite Pencil 4906 is a
quality HB graphite pencil with an
eraser tip. Ideal for drafting, art and
graphics.
Othello Graphite Pencil
The Othello Graphite Pencil is a
good quality smooth graphite pencil
with a striped wooden casing. It
has a rounded and sealed end cap,
and is available in ten degrees of
hardness. Ideal for drafting, art and
graphics.
Grafito Graphite Pencil
The Stabilo Grafito Graphite
Pencil boasts a brightly coloured
fluorescent wooden casing. It is
HB grade, complete with a
fluorescent eraser tip.
Triangular Graphite Pencil
The Stabilo Maxi Size Triangular
Graphite Pencil has a distinctive
triangular design for comfortable grip.
It comes in four degrees of hardness:
HB, 2B, 4B and 6B. The large 9mm
pencil diameter accommodates a
4.5mm lead diameter in an attractive
natural wood casing. Ideal for a variety
of art applications.
Further information about quality
drawing products can be
obtained from JASCO –
telephone 1800 676 155.
Artist’s Palette
45
P R O D U C T
F E A T U R E
Q U A L I T Y D R AW I N G O P T I O N S F R O M O X F O R D A RT S U P P L I E S
Derivan Liquid Pencil
At Oxford Art Supplies, Derivan Liquid
Pencil is available at a price of only
$7.95 as a special introductory offer.
Buy four, and get one free!
Derivan Liquid Pencil is an
innovative new product that allows
artists to create authentic graphite
pencil sketches using a liquid. It has
been formulated to be used straight
from the jar to give a bold pencil effect
using brushes, nibs or other art tools.
Derivan Liquid Pencil has the
advantage of being able to cover large
areas quickly and easily. Derivan
Liquid Pencil is available in six
graphite shades – each with a
permanent or re-wettable formula.
Each of the shades has a definite
graphite colour; however there are
distinct undertones of blue, yellow,
red, sepia and neutral in two different
shades to allow a great range of
options for artists.
The re-wettable formula will allow
artists to remove areas using water
in a similar manner to watercolour
techniques; or it is possible to use
the medium with a traditional eraser
(depending on substrate type).
The permanent formula will
allow artists to layer colours without
‘moving’ or ‘re-wetting’ the previous
layers. Although the Permanent
Derivan Liquid Pencil will not re-wet,
it can be burnished (additions of more
than 50 per cent water will render the
Permanent Liquid Pencil watersensitive – to avoid this, add equal
parts of Derivan Polymer Gloss Varnish
or Matisse MM9 Acrylic Painting
Medium to the water before use).
A full range of colours are available
46
Artist’s Palette
from Oxford Art Supplies and Books
in Chatswood.
Derwent Drawing Pencils
Derwent Drawing Pencils provide for
drawing at its most natural – both in
the exquisite colour range and the
creative potential of these unique and
rewarding pencils. The Derwent
Drawing Pencil is the perfect medium
for wildlife and nature studies, natural
portraiture and dreamy, evocative
landscapes. Drawing is available in
24 subtle shades, including a wide
selection of traditional sepia tones
together with soft neutral greys, greens,
blues and creams.
A full range of colours and sets are
available from Oxford Art Supplies and
Books in Chatswood. Individual pencils
are available for $2.50, with sets of 12
or 24 pencils priced at $27.95 and
$55.90. Sets of 12 contain one each of
the following colours: Solway Blue,
Ink Blue, Green Shadow, Olive Earth,
Brown Ochre, Yellow Ochre, Sepia
(red), Sanguine, Ruby Earth,
Chocolate, Ivory Black, Chinese White.
Sets of 24 contain one each of the
following colours: Solway Blue, Ink
Blue, Green Shadow, Olive Earth,
Brown Ochre, Yellow Ochre, Sepia
(red), Sanguine, Ruby Earth,
Chocolate, Ivory Black, Chinese White,
Light Sienna, Smoke Blue, Pale Cedar,
Crag Green, Warm Earth, Wheat, Mars
Orange, Venetian Red, Terracotta, Mars
Violet, Warm Grey, Cool Grey.
Derwent Graphitint Pencils
Why not add some colour to your
graphite drawings with Derwent
Graphitint Pencils? These beautiful
pencils from Derwent will help. The
range consists of 24 colours from soft
greys, blues and greens to glowing
russets, plums and browns – all made
from superior quality Cumberland
graphite. Used dry, Graphitint provides
just a hint of colour but adding water
literally transforms the tint into rich,
vibrant colour. Graphitint will appeal to
artists looking for something a little bit
different but with all the familiar
qualities of their favourite graphite
pencils.
A full range of colours and sets are
available from Oxford Art Supplies and
Books in Chatswood. Individual pencils
are priced at $2.10; sets of 12 are
$23.30; and sets of 24 are $45.30. A
set of 12 includes the following colours:
Port, Aubergine, Dark Indigo, Slate
Green, Ivy, Chestnut, Cool Brown,
Cocoa, Storm, Midnight Black, Cloud
Grey, and Cool Grey. A set of 24
includes the following colours: Port,
Aubergine, Dark Indigo, Slate Green,
Ivy, Chestnut, Cool Brown, Cocoa,
Storm, Midnight Black, Cloud Grey,
Cool Grey, Juniper, Shadow, Steel Blue,
Ocean Blue, Green Grey, Meadow,
Sage, Russet, Autumn Brown, Warm
Grey, Mountain Grey, and White.
Derwent Tinted Charcoal Pencils
Derwent Tinted Charcoal Pencils offer
the dramatic beauty of traditional
charcoal with a gentle hint of colour.
Natural charcoal particles have been
mixed with the finest clays, then
encased in wood to produce a
wonderfully expressive drawing tool.
The unique deep and light colour tones
of charcoal in pencil form make the
medium clean and easy to use but
provide all the drama and impact
expected from charcoal. The colours
smudge and blend beautifully to
produce deep, rich and diverse tones,
making Tinted Charcoal Pencils
P R O D U C T
ideal for all types of portraiture and
landscape studies.
A full range of colours and sets are
available from Oxford Art Supplies and
Books in Chatswood. Individual pencils
are priced at $2.65, while sets of 12 and
24 are available for $29.95 and $59.60.
Derwent Inktense Pencils
Pen and ink offers strong, intense
colour combined with a translucent
effect. Now you can enjoy these
distinctive qualities in easy-to-use
Derwent Inktense Pencils. Inktense has
a firm, blendable texture and comes in
a range of 23 brilliant colours, plus a
non-soluble outliner. The colours can
F E A T U R E
be blended together with a slightly
wetted paint brush; while applying an
overall light wash creates a vivid, inklike translucency. Once dry, this wash
is permanent so Inktense is ideal for
silk painting and other craft projects.
A full range of colours and sets are
available from Oxford Art Supplies and
Books in Chatswood. Individual pencils
are priced at $2.00, while sets of 12 and
24 are available for $23.30 and $45.30. A
set of 12 includes: Sun Yellow, Tangerine,
Poppy Red, Fuchsia, Deep Indigo, Sea
Blue, Teal Green, Apple Green, Leaf
Green, Baked Earth, Bark, and Ink Black.
A set of 24 includes: Sherbet Lemon, Sun
Yellow, Tangerine, Poppy Red, Chili Red,
Shiraz, Fuchsia, Violet, Iris Blue, Bright
Blue, Deep Indigo, Sea Blue, Teal Green,
Apple Green, Field Green, Leaf Green,
Mustard, Baked Earth, Willow, Bark,
Charcoal Gray, Ink Black, and Antique
White. A non-soluble Inktense Outliner
pencil is also included.
Oxford Art Supplies and Books
(Chatswood) is located at
143-145 Victoria Avenue,
Chatswood NSW 2067.
Telephone 02 9417 8572;
fax 02 9417 7617; or
mailorder@oxfordart.com.au
Oxford Art Supplies and Books
(Darlinghurst) is located at
221-225 Oxford Street,
Darlinghurst NSW 2010.
Telephone 02 9360 4066;
fax 02 9360 3461; or
orders@oxfordart.com.au
Artist’s Palette
47
I N S I G H T
Jane Greenland
Endless Passion
Edited by Trevor Lang
Born with a love of art, this lady has developed her
skill into a passion that will never end. Art is
something that she ‘just has to do’.
J
ane Greenland lived in the
Queensland country town of
Boonah as a child. She recalls
walking past the local kindergarten and
48
Artist’s Palette
gazing at the easels, the beautiful bright
colours, and paintings that were
hanging to dry. She spent hours as a
youngster drawing in the dirt, making
and decorating mud cakes, and
collecting the craft section from the
old-style Women’s Weekly magazine
to make whatever she could.
I N S I G H T
“I still remember the smell of the
oily Craypas that we used in primary
school, and the odd occasions when
we played with Plasticine,” she
relates. “Childhood memories still
return whenever I smell Craypas!”
Jane’s father, on his return from
service in World War Two, spent some
time dabbling in art. He has a pastel
book with some of his works and
some amazing fretwork depicting
his war experiences.
Jane’s own art career developed
when she continued art as a subject
in high school; then attended Kelvin
Grove Teachers College studying to
become an art teacher.
“Naturally, my passion for art was
put aside when I married and moved
to Goondiwindi,” she says. “My life
became focused on helping my
husband with his business, raising
our four children, working as a relief
teacher, and (later) opening and
working in my swim school. I was
eventually forced to close the swim
school after years of fighting problems
with a skin condition and subsequent
ill health. That was when I went back
to art. I began to teach children’s art
after school, and some adult classes –
and was then asked to teach art at a
local Catholic primary school.
Artist’s Palette
49
Teaching others provided some artistic
satisfaction, but left me with no time to
practice my own work.”
Jane Greenland has experienced
severe post-natal depression and related
illnesses which led her to obtain
professional help … but now she is
focusing on the positives in her life,
including her family and her art.
“As my children grew older, I began
to attend art workshops during school
holidays and weekends,” she says.
“The workshops kept me up-to-date
with new methods and materials. I
would always come home to an
absolute mess in the house, but I was
determined to have just a little time out
on something I loved. Thankfully, my
family members were very supportive.”
“I still love to teach,” she continues.
“I enjoy passing on my knowledge, and
watching others expressing their own
styles. And, as an artist, I have a deep
and never-ending desire to learn and
develop my creativity in an informed
manner. I want to continue producing
my own work based on sound knowledge
and expertise. I need to know how to use
every product and experiment in all
media and methods of producing art.
I want to read, learn and have a sound
knowledge of art; and all the craft and
theory behind it. I will never stop
attending workshops, learning, reading,
visiting galleries and gathering
knowledge to put into practice.”
Moving between many forms of art,
Jane finds it hard to keep her attention
focused on just one method or medium.
She feels a need to shift and change,
and sometimes use many media and
methods together. She loves to depict
topics relevant to the human condition
and human emotions in the modern
world, and believes that it doesn’t
matter what medium, methods or
subject matter you use … your own
style will always come forth.
“Art is something I have to do –
it is in my soul – it is my form of
meditation!” she enthuses. “I have
had the joy of learning from many
wonderful and giving artists, but my
absolute dream is to learn from
Margaret Woodward. I also adore the
work of Carole Katchen – I love her
intense use of pastels and the sense of
humour she expresses in her pictures. Michael John Taylor
(a Master in his own right) has taught me a great deal,
especially about the potential development of ideas. Peter
Griffen has allowed me to use my imagination and Catherine
Hamilton has given me the courage to believe in myself.”
Jane Greenland’s art is an evolving process. She loves to
start, change, adapt, rearrange and re-draw until what she
imagined (in the beginning) is in front of her. She thoroughly
enjoys the process.
She also ponders deep questions on the topic.
“Often, I read about ‘Painting like the Old Masters’,”
she relates. “I question and wonder, why do we have a
need to paint like this? Should we be trying to copy what
has been done in the past? Today, we have many new
materials, mediums and processes – maybe we should be
looking at today and to the future – how do we learn from
that? Should we be searching in other directions?”
Jane would love to travel to further her studies, and she
would like to become a full-time artist. She currently rates
herself as ‘an emerging artist’. She has won many prizes and
participated in several group exhibitions. She has a dream of
exhibiting her work overseas, and believes that would be a
big achievement.
“For now, I am happy and fully content with simply being
in the position to produce more and more of my own artwork,
while continuing to advance my expertise, and exhibit and sell
some of my work. Art is my passion that will never end …
I just have to do it and there is no other way to explain the
feeling. It’s like a burning desire, a candle that nothing can
put out!” she concludes. ■
Artist’s Palette
51
D E M O N S T R A T I O N
Pastels
Oranges and
Apples
By Jane Greenland
This pastellist believes that any subject matter could be selected for her
technique, which (to her) is drawing – but to others may be a form of painting.
STEP SIX AND FINAL STEP
52
Artist’s Palette
D E M O N S T R A T I O N
D
ecide on the size of your finished work.
Because masking tape is overlapped from the
protective cartridge paper onto the working
paper, your finished picture will be slightly smaller
than the cut-out frame.
M AT E R I A L S
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‡:RUNLQJSDSHURUERDUG:DOOLV%RDUG$UW
6SHFWUXP3DVWHO%RDUGRU)DEULDQR$FTXDUHOOR
Cold Pressed Watercolour Paper) 200gsm plus.
‡/RQJPHWDOUXOHU
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are ideal).
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‡0DWLVVH0DWW0HGLXP
‡0DWLVVH*HVVR
‡$VVRUWPHQWRIKDUGDQGVRIWSDVWHOV1XSDVWHO$UW
Spectrum, Unison, Daler-Rowney, and Schmincke.
‡$VVRUWPHQWRIEUXVKHV
STEP ONE
Make your sheet of cartridge paper
the same size as your working
paper/board. Draw up the area you
want to work on, and cut this area
out using a Stanley knife and metal
ruler. Place your working paper or
board down; position your cut-out
frame over the top; and secure with
masking tape (allow three millimetres
overlap onto the working board).
Press the tape down firmly to create
a good seal around all edges. It is
important to see the working board,
tape and cartridge frame as one
working surface. I prefer to work flat
with this method (rather than on an
easel) to avoid any potential running
of media under the tape. Work from
life or a photograph; but make sure
you have thought about what you
really want to express.
Using a pencil, dark hard pastel such
as Nupastel, or willow charcoal, begin
to plot your drawing. Just start putting
marks down to map out your subject.
Use a cloth to rub off excess drawing
medium, being careful not to lift the
masking tape.
STEP TWO
Introduce gesso, which is like your
rubber. Using an old brush, cover
up lines and adjust your drawing –
correcting the composition and
proportions. Consider the placement
of your subject matter and put in the
lightest lights. Your gesso will
probably pick up some of your
drawing colour, but I actually like this
and use it to my advantage. This is
where I draw, use gesso, draw and use
gesso again until I am happy with the
initial construction.
STEP ONE
STEP TWO
STEP THREE
Begin to consider and put down the
base colour, the mid-tonal range of your
subject matter. Using pastel, spread and
seal this coat with matte medium. Take
care to fully clean your brush between
colours and values to keep them fresh.
Look for the pattern and colour of the
shadows and begin to plan and draw
them in. Use your background colour
(which I prefer to keep quite dark at
this stage) to cut in and redraw your
objects. Sometimes, I continue working
while the matte medium is still wet – as
I can make marks and draw into it.
Usually, I walk away for a short time;
let the work dry; stand back; evaluate;
and continue working.
STEP FOUR
Begin to create some drama. Look
for the lightest lights and the darkest
Artist’s Palette
53
STEP THREE
darks – see them as shapes and put
them in. Use gesso, pastel and matte
medium. Continue to look at darks
and lights; shadow colours;
highlights; your drawing and
composition. At this stage, I am
constantly shifting between the
gesso, matte medium, pastel, pencil
and/or charcoal. I am working
quickly as I like to put down my
immediate reactions to the subject.
During the application of the matte
medium in the later stages, I tend
to use a loaded brush and create
texture that represents the surface
of my subject matter, painting
around the forms.
STEP FIVE
Consider the composition and middle
values once again. Take time to recall
and focus on the initial reasons for
doing the painting. Look for the
shapes of colours and (particularly)
STEP FOUR
the wonderful play of colours in the
shadow areas. Consider the desired
background tonal values and look for
those important ‘lost and found’ edges.
feel is necessary to achieve what I
originally set out to represent. Once I
see it, I know the work is finished
and I can move on.
STEP SIX
Add subtle tones, shapes of colour
and textural marks. Even at this stage
you can do some dramatic changes
with gesso and dark pastel and then
pull the painting back together as you
want. Sometimes I prefer to leave
details rather loose and suggestive;
however, depending on the subject
and my initial motivation, I love to
pick up a strong dark medium and
make heavy, definite line details that
express what I see or that carry the
eye through the picture. A beautiful
soft creamy Schmincke pastel can be
used to accentuate the textures that
have been left by the brush and matte
medium. At this stage I regularly,
assess, question and change what I
FINAL STEP
Carefully dust off any excess media
from the cartridge border. Wash your
hands thoroughly, and then carefully
and slowly peel away the mount –
along with the masking tape. A good
quality eraser can be used to remove
any unwanted marks around your
picture. Sometimes my build-up of
media is so thick, I may have to
carefully use a Stanley knife to help
lift the masking tape.
Why bother with the mount and
tape in the first place? It leaves an
element of surprise at the end. No
matter how many times I use this
method, the removal of the mount
is always an exciting and delightful
part of the process. ■
MASTER HINTS
AND TIPS
STEP FIVE
54
Artist’s Palette
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someone else wants.
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satisfied if you paint only to sell.
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grow as an artist and take chances.
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D R A W I N G
I N S P I R A T I O N
Cliffs at
Wentworth Falls
This drawing demonstration is an expansion on a five minute sketch by the
artist. The sketch was done during a painting trip in the Blue Mountains
west of Sydney early in 2007.
Contributed by Brett ‘Mon’ Garling
FINAL STEP
STEP ONE
I
n my hasty sketch (although it was
done very quickly), I attempted to
capture as much visual information
as possible with a few strokes of the
pencil. My intention was to use the
study at a later date for a painting.
Instead, I have used the sketch as a
study for a charcoal and conte sketch
on coloured paper.
I used a blue medium-weight paper.
I chose blue because of the striking
blues the mountains are named for,
and knowing that some of the paper
colour would show through on the
finished work.
Charcoal, like graphite, comes in
similar grades (HB, 2B etc). So if you
are used to using graphite you might
find charcoal an easy medium to try
… although charcoal can be a little
messy, which is why I prefer to use
graphite when travelling.
STEP ONE
Firstly, I established lightly where the
major shapes would go, using a HB or
hard charcoal pencil. Charcoal comes
in both pencil and stick.
Once established, I began as I
would if painting – from top to
bottom. Using a hard stick, I lightly
worked forward to the middle ground
– adding softness by working white
conte over the charcoal. Remember to
work with your paper upright, keeping
your arm well away from the work to
avoid mess.
STEP TWO
Because of the nature of the cliff faces
protruding out as they recede, each
cliff becomes a slightly darker shade
as they come forward. I upgraded to
a medium charcoal pencil and stick,
working on the cliff face, being careful
to leave the lightest parts clean so I
could highlight with white conte.
I also jumped ahead – and with a 6B
(extra-soft) pencil I established the
tree on the left, thus giving a complete
tonal range from the foreground to the
distant cliffs.
STEP TWO
D R A W I N G
I N S P I R A T I O N
soft charcoal, working conte into
the highlights. I allowed the blues
of the paper to work their way
through, helping to give the piece
the ‘mountain atmosphere’ I was
striving to achieve.
STEP THREE
I continued along the same line,
alternating between medium and
STEP FOUR
While completing the piece, I
worked quickly and freely with
an extra-soft stick on the foliage
and brush. Although it may look
complicated, I let the soft edges of
the charcoal give the impression
of detail. I finished with some
conte highlights throughout the
foreground.
The aim of the piece was to give
the impression of the drop-off
between foreground and cliffs.
Creating air between the two. ■
STEP THREE
58
Artist’s Palette
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I N S I G H T
Remia Montayre Homuk
Painting Humanity
Edited by Trevor Lang
This portrait specialist uses her own eyes as her ‘window to the soul’ –
capturing the feelings and emotions of her subjects on canvas.
60
Artist’s Palette
I N S I G H T
R
emia Montayre Homuk is
originally from the
Philippines town of
Sindangan, Zamboanga del Norte.
After moving to Sydney in 1984,
she married and continued to
follow her clear artistic destiny.
This lady is a natural artist. She
was born with the artistic gifts
that she has nurtured and
developed. She began to draw
human faces and forms at the age
of three, and her talent grew with
her through childhood.
At the tender age of 15, Remia
was commissioned to sculpt the
Holy Family for a private collection.
With an artistic family
background, Remia Homuk
enjoyed a fertile environment in
which to grow her talents. Her
father (a sculptor) encouraged her
to study architecture. Her mother
was a school teacher. Remia is
also a guitarist – with significant
skills in the performing arts. She
Artist’s Palette
61
was a guitar playing member of the
first all female band in Cebu; and
spent two years performing in the
Philippines and Japan.
A new life in Australia opened this
artist’s eyes to more vital influences.
Here she became interested to learn
different artistic techniques. Delving
into numerous books and other
resources, she developed her love for
the works of renowned artists such as
Caravaggio (from Italy) and Elya
Repin (from Russia).
In 1989, Remia began to accept
serious commissions. This was also
the year in which she decided to
specialise in portrait painting.
She loves to capture the feelings
and emotions of her subjects with
paint on canvas.
In May 1997, she completed a
commissioned portrait of the Mayor
and Councillors of her native home
town – a work which was hung in the
Municipal Town Hall in Sindangan.
In August 1997, she joined ‘Arts
Alive’. This was promptly followed
by her winning first prize in the
‘Traditional’ section of the 1998 Arts
Alive Trophy Exhibition.
Remia Montayre Homuk continues
to fine-tune her skills in the visual arts
while she dreams of achieving her
own unique style. With discipline and
humility, she believes that success
is possible.
If success can be measured in a rich
proliferation of masterful pictures, she
has already achieved it. ■
Artist’s Palette
63
D E M O N S T R A T I O N
Acrylics and Oils
Just a Girl
By Remia Homuk
FINAL STEP
This portrait specialist
enjoys listening to
music while painting,
because it helps her to
relax and concentrate.
She also believes that
good natural lighting is
very important.
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STEP ONE
STEP ONE
With acrylics, I undercoat the canvas roughly with a light blue
mixture of White, Cobalt Blue and a touch of Yellow Ochre. I
sketch my subject with pencil on tracing paper and transfer the
drawing onto the dried canvas before outlining with Burnt Sienna.
STEP TWO
I begin painting the background using a mixture of White,
Yellow Ochre, a touch of Burnt Sienna and a little Cobalt Blue
(all acrylics). I also paint the shoes with Burnt Sienna; and dilute
Raw Umber with water for the hair.
STEP THREE
Still using acrylics, I start to paint the singlet top with Cobalt
Blue, Light Blue and White; then the skirt with Cobalt Blue and
Light Blue.
STEP FOUR
I use acrylics in Yellow Ochre, White and a touch of Cadmium
Red for the skin tones. I paint the face, neck, arms and legs. Then
I add a touch of Viridian and Burnt Sienna for the light shadows.
I paint the shoes with Burnt Sienna for the second coat and
Yellow Ochre for the design; and I add Raw Umber to the hair. I
also start to paint the low stone fence using Burnt Sienna, Cobalt
Blue and White. I then allow the work to dry.
STEP FIVE
Moving now to oil paints, I mix White, Yellow Ochre and a touch
of Cadmium Red for the skin tones. I add a touch of Viridian and
STEP TWO
STEP THREE
STEP SIX
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determine if any alterations are needed on
your work.
Burnt Sienna for the light shadows and start
blending shadows with a clean brush. I add more
White to the skin tones mixture for highlights, and
blend in … before starting to apply details to the
face, eyes, nose and lips.
STEP SIX
With a mixture of Burnt Sienna, Cadmium Red, a
touch of Viridian, and White, I paint the shadows
of the face, nose, and neck; and blend in. I use the
same technique for the arms and legs. For the lips,
I use Cadmium Red and Yellow Ochre (with White
added for the highlights). I use White, Cobalt Blue,
Cadmium Red and a touch of Burnt Sienna for the
eyes. I finish the hair with Raw Umber, Burnt
Sienna, Cobalt Blue and Yellow Ochre. For the
hairclips and bands, I use Cadmium Red, White and
Yellow Ochre; before adding White to the skin tones
mixture for highlights (and blending in).
FINAL STEP
I complete the background using Cobalt Blue,
Yellow Ochre and a touch of Burnt Sienna; and
adjust the foreground with Cobalt Blue, Cadmium
Red and Burnt Sienna. Then I cover the painting and
let it dry for a few days. I finally add more details,
shadows and highlights to complete the painting. ■
I N S I G H T
Maryika Welter
Perceptions
Edited by Trevor Lang
The underlining factor in most of this artist’s work is the reflection or
expression of past and present experiences which have influenced,
affected or changed her perceptions of life.
F
or Maryika Welter, life’s
experiences and their influences
may not always be instantly
recognisable. Many will take some
time to be made manifest in a series
of art works. She has traveled around
Australia experiencing its vastness and
enormity – but this took some years to
clarify and express in an artistic series.
68
Artist’s Palette
“Getting into the skin of this land
came only when I spent time seeing
massive areas viewed from above in
a plane,” she says. “When standing in
the middle of the land, with limited
views, it is difficult to recognise its
immense significance.”
Maryika has three main areas from
which she works: Landscape, abstract
and figurative. All these areas
are interpreted as contemporary,
representational or expressional.
“I tend to see myself as a creative
visual artist rather than a painter,” she
explains. “I seek to indulge myself in
mixed media, experimenting with a
wide variety of mediums and practices
– printmaking, stencils, screen
printing, and block printing with
works on paper, canvas and board, for
example. I use acrylics, inks, pastels,
oil sticks, oil pastes, watercolours,
charcoal, resin, shellac, powdered
pigments, wax, and collage.”
There is part of her that enquires into
the sense of space, line and design
which may relate to the qualities of
Eastern philosophy where ‘less is
more’; while the contradictory element
of her work speaks of more spontaneous
creativity – congested and unorganised.
“My episodes of practical creativity
(time working in the studio) come in
waves, rather than the consistent nine
to five,” she says. “I find I spend more
time on the ‘business’ of art, than
creating it. I have been participating in
competitive art exhibitions since 1992,
with many successes in awards, prizes
and sales. Most recently my work has
been acknowledged with a Bursary to
attend the 2007 McGregor Winter
School in Toowoomba, Queensland.”
Since 2000, Maryika has been
intermittently attending southern
Artist’s Palette
69
I N S I G H T
Queensland’s Institute of TAFE and studying the
Diploma of Visual Arts. Attending Life Drawing
classes has been very important for her sense of
discipline, needed at times for re-grounding and
collecting scattered energy.
Recently she has taken on the challenge of building
a new studio, where the space is similar to wearing
someone else’s giant baggy pants when compared to her
previous space (which was relative to a dog’s kennel in
size). It has taken her quite some time to feel
comfortable in the enormous new studio which includes
a sheltered outside work area. She has also become
heavily involved in the Rosalie Art Gallery as a member
of the Committee of Management, a Selection Panel
member, and unofficial Curator. She is always busy …
doing, thinking, seeing, being and sharing.
Maryika believes art began for her somewhere in
the early ’70s. She took up appliqué and painting
fleecy tops in the ’80s for a short time, and she feels
that once the taste for painting or creating is there, it
never seems to go away.
“There is a real invisible itch that is indescribable,
perhaps a bit like an addiction,” she explains.
“Satisfaction feeds the addiction for only a short
while, and then it comes back again, usually stronger
each time the fix has passed.”
In 1992, Maryika studied Applied and Visual Arts
at North Adelaide School of Art in Stanley Street.
She toured around Australia in 1993 and arrived in
Goombungee – a very small town west of Brisbane –
where she has settled.
“Since 1999, my main role has been to learn to be a
carer for my partner Ray, while juggling the need to
express a desire to create artworks for others to enjoy,”
she relates. “Tutoring has helped focus what I know,
and how to share it with others, so that they can share
in the experience and express in their own words the
emotions in art. There’s no point in being an artist with
knowledge if I cannot share the information.”
This busy artist also has a hectic social life which
includes being a vocalist for a duo doing local work;
serving as a guest speaker for TAFE and local art
societies; working on concept development and
commissions for residential, corporate, commercial
and private collections; and art work leasing. She was
previously a member of the Rosalie Shires Regional
Art Development Fund, too.
“Finally, believe it or not, I was a one-time band
member and support act for the memorable country
entertainer Chad Morgan!” she reveals.
“Yes, you can laugh … but that was ten years ago.”
Maryika Welter is represented by R.M. Galleries of
Hamilton, Brisbane; Moving Canvas of New Farm,
Brisbane; and Design Works at Noosa on
Queensland’s Sunshine Coast. ■
70
Artist’s Palette
I N S I G H T
Artist’s Palette
71
D E M O N S T R A T I O N
Mixed Media
Spring
By Maryika Welter
The artist uses this demonstration in a group workshop environment. The
exercise gives learners the courage to enjoy and ‘play’ without failure; and for
the practicing artist it provides a challenge go beyond the disciplined and
traditional way of pastel painting.
FINAL STEP
D E M O N S T R A T I O N
T
his is a simple dynamically created landscape. I
call this my ‘rough as guts’ method. Results are
not always predictable, but the end product is
always legible. I love the sense of spontaneous line
dribbles going in various directions; then filling in
areas with blocks of intense colour. This intensity adds
drama, especially when the sense of light comes from
the back giving a morning or evening glow.
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STEP ONE
Applying with brush, loaded with the sepia ink, half
diluted with water, I use the top third of the paper to
make a horizon line and tilt the work away from myself
so that the ink runs in lines to the top of the page.
Before it dries I spray (not squirt) the ink with water
from the bottle and the ink spreads and dilutes. As it
dries, it fades; and lines are purposely lost. I repeat this
process into the bottom two-thirds, starting again from
the horizon line and this time tilting towards myself and
rocking the board from side to side to give horizontal
lines. I spray with water and rock a little more to make
the ink spread. This first process gives grounding for the
hazed, distant background. I allow the piece to dry.
STEP TWO
This is a repeat of Step One. This time I use the black
ink (half diluted with water) and sparingly add the
pigment with the eye dropper straight on top of the
ink. Caution must be used to ensure that the pigment
is not breathed in or blown about the room. A mask
would be advisable.
I again tilt the board away to make the trunks of the
trees and add extra ink at the very top of the paper for
the foliage and branches, spraying for the spreading
effect. I allow the piece to dry, then proceed with the
bottom area – again adding the pigment, tilting and
STEP ONE
STEP ONE
STEP TWO
Artist’s Palette
73
rocking the board for lots of lines that will be
rocks and hills and contours; adding more ink
when needed. I spray again with water before
the piece dries. When all is dry, the final layer
of ink (undiluted black for stronger lines) is
applied, only to the bottom two-thirds of the
paper. Again the piece is allowed to dry.
STEP TWO
STEP FOUR
STEP THREE
Now I choose the colours to give life and
meaning to the seemingly unidentifiable blots
of ink: 205 lime green, 103 ivory, 102 cream,
108 golden yellow, 156 aquamarine, 153 deep
aquamarine, 162 green blue, 154 pale aqua, 104
sky blue, 120 cobalt blue, 125 pink, 170 moss
green, 147 powder blue, and 171 leaf green.
STEP FOUR
Shown here, the final layer of undiluted black
ink on the bottom two-thirds (dried). The first
steps of layering colour start with the tree
trunks and foliage in 120 blue; foliage is a
mixture of deep aquamarine 153 and mauve
139; with highlights in ivory 103. I have
filled in the background with pale aqua and
mauve. Some distant trees are filled in with
pale blue, giving more depth.
STEP FIVE
The idea here is to bounce between blocks of
colour, completely covering areas and the
slight shading of areas so that the underlayer
just peeps through – adding a sense of
textured shading and depth. Cobalt blue has
an intense presence and I try to balance its
distribution throughout the landscape,
searching for triangle shapes. I also colour
test patches of aqua, lime green and green
blue for the larger areas.
STEP FIVE
STEP SIX
I begin working down the paper to ‘highlight
in’ a rocky foreground. My brain switches
from what feels good to what looks good –
balancing out the composition with patterns
and blocks of colour that ask to be balanced
in lots of three. I layer colours that blend
together without rubbing. I introduce golden
yellow to intensify the cobalt blue.
Enhancing with line occasionally will add
shape to the rocky escarpment. The blocks of
colour vary with strength and alternate
between areas so that some of the ink may
show through. Some of the gold pigment
laden in the ink layer is left uncovered; this
adds interest for the viewer.
D E M O N S T R A T I O N
STEP SIX
MASTER HINTS
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IDRIS MURPHY. Weipa Harbour, Storm Clouds. Atelier Interactive on board, 120x120cm, 2005.
Image courtesy of King Street Gallery on William http://www.kingstreetgallery.com.au
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