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2018-06-01 Bon Appetit

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SUMMER GRILLING
A
Fresh
New
Take
Reignite your backyard - barbecue routine
w i t h d e e p l y c ha r red c a bbag e , f l a s h - f i red br i s ke t ,
turmeric-glazed pork chops and more
ADVERTISEMENT
An Ode
To Mayo
If not for you, mayo,
I am only a patty between two buns
I dream of your smooth embrace,
With which not even cheese can compete.
From my rings of red onion
To the frills of my lettuce,
I crave your perfectly crafted creaminess,
Lovingly made with cage-free eggs.
So simple, yet so perfect,
With one swift swipe of your silky goodness,
You are the finishing touch on my burger,
My flawlessly crafted mayo.
Inspired by chefs.
Created for you.
Michelin Three Star Chef Christopher Kostow
for Samsung Chef Collection appliances.
© 2018 Samsung Electronics America, Inc.
BON APPÉ TIT ‒ VOLUME 63 NUMBER 5
june/july
THE GRILLING ISSUE
F E AT U R E S
68
A NEW FLAME
82
GIMME SOME
Throwing braising
cuts like pork
shoulder on the
grill can be your
quick and easy
way out of a rut.
Attention Big Green
Egg obsessives: This
sticky-sweet glazed
pork from Aaron
Franklin & Co. needs
to be your next
weekend project.
RECIPES BY THE BON
APPÉTIT TEST KITCHEN
74
‘CUE IT UP
We’re firing
up lemon-pepper
chicken, tossing
corn with hot honey,
and spiking some
lemonade with
Bryan Furman of
B’s Cracklin’ BBQ.
BY NIKITA RICHARDSON
78
SIDE HUSTLE
Traditional sides
get a bad rap, but
these fresh takes
(hello, charred bean
salad!) are out
to change all that.
BY CLAIRE SAFFITZ
84
EVEN COOLER
What the craft beer
boom can mean for
your next cookout.
BY ALEX DELANY
88
GLOSSY
& GLAZY
Savory caramel,
garlicky yogurt
sauce, and two more
glazes you’ll want
to lacquer on every
protein between
now and Labor Day.
BY CHRIS MOROCCO
92
FRESH TAKES
Embrace the lighter
side with spiced
snapper and mango,
charred cabbage
with goat cheese
raita, and more.
BY ANDY BARAGHANI
CRAFT BREWS
ARE MAKING
A SPLASH.
PHOTOGRAPH BY ALEX LAU
P. 8 4
ON THE COVER
Grilled ChileLemongrass Short Ribs
with Pickled Daikon
(for recipe, see p.99).
Photograph by Alex
Lau. Food styling by
Rebecca Jurkevich.
Prop styling
by Amy Wilson.
4  J U N E / J U L Y 2 018
Welcome Life In
BONAPPETIT.COM
june/july
THE GRILLING ISSUE
S TA RT E R S
BA K I T C H E N
C O LU M N S
13
SUMMER DAZE
25
COOK
THIS NOW
50
THE FEED
Four ways to dress
up summer’s most
versatile berry
(you’re gonna want
to start with the
matcha strawberries).
BY CLAIRE SAFFITZ
28
DINNER
TONIGHT
The BA Test Kitchen’s
Molly Baz spins
farmers’ market finds
into hanger steak
with charred scallion
sauce and marinated
summer squash.
38
BASICALLY
A no-bake icebox
cake that’s crowdpleasing, effortless,
and anything
but square.
BY CLAIRE SAFFITZ
44
KITCHEN IN
A BOX
Before you hit that
vacation rental cabin,
read our guide to
making the most of
that rental kitchen.
GET OUTSIDE
I T ’S T I M E
TO GRILL.
P. 6 8
BY CARLA LALLI MUSIC
One weekend
griller’s unlikely
introduction to
the barbecuecompetition circuit.
BY PETER MEEHAN
60
CITY GUIDES:
COPENHAGEN
From beer-tasting
menus to ramen
worth crossing
oceans for, the city
that gave birth to
Noma (twice) has so
much more to offer.
BY CHRISTINE MUHLKE
107
PREP SCHOOL
The citrus rounds that
will make your dishes
shine, the cherry
pitter we can’t help
but love, and more.
114
THE LAST BITE
Argentinian chef
Francis Mallmann
goes low and
sloooooow with
a 12-hour grilled
pineapple.
BY CHRISTINA CHAEY
IN EVERY ISSUE
10 editor’s letter
112 recipe index
112 sourcebook
HAVE A QUESTION ABOUT A RECIPE, OR A COMMENT? Email us at askba@bonappetit.com, or contact the editorial offices: Bon Appétit, 1 World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007.
FOR SUBSCRIPTIONS AND CHANGES OF ADDRESS, call 800-765-9419 (515-243-3273 from outside the U.S.A.) or email subscriptions@bonappetit.com. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A.
PHOTOGRAPH BY ALEX LAU
The grill that chefs
are swooning over
• Austin’s culinary
dream team • The
reason you should
mail-order your meat
• What we’re
drinking this summer:
nonalcoholic edition!
• Jeff Goldblum’s
favorite fro-yo
• The MexicanAmerican pitmasters
changing barbecue
©2018
©2
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2018 Ne
Nest
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Waters
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North Ame
Amer
Am
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a Inc.
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ENHANCE
NEW YO
NE
YORK
RK
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• NEW
VISIT SANPELLEGRINO.COM
MOMENTS
Tastefully Italian
Editor in Chief
ADAM RAPOPORT
Creative Director MICHELE OUTLAND
Deputy Editor JULIA KRAMER
Food Director CARLA LALLI MUSIC
Director of Editorial Operations JENNY HAIGHT Digital Director CAREY POLIS
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Design
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Features Editor MERYL ROTHSTEIN
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Associate Editors HILARY CADIGAN, CHRISTINA CHAEY,
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Editorial Assistants ALIZA ABARBANEL, JESSE SPARKS,
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BECAUSE YOU’RE WORTH IT.™
THE FINEST HOUR
My parents bought their place in upstate New York in 1987,
and I wasn’t happy about it.
As an 18-year-old, the last thing I wanted to do was come
home from college to D.C. and immediately head to a country
house hundreds of miles away (with my parents no less!).
Funny how times change.
Over the next 25 years, the house became a quick escape
from New York City, where I moved after graduating; a permanent home for my parents when they relocated to East Chatham
in 2007; and the place where I learned to love to grill.
While up there on weekends, we’d spend our days doing this
and that—tooling around nearby Hudson, running errands,
maybe some yard work. But basically it was all just killing time
until I could ask, “When should I start the grill?” Which, in the
Rapoport house, was interpreted by those not ripping open a
bag of charcoal as, “When’s cocktail hour?”
At the agreed-upon time, my mom would pull a little orange
wooden table from the porch to the patio. I’d fill a metal cooler
with ice and a 12-pack. Snacks would be brought out: guacamole when we had time, those little sesame sticks when we
didn’t. My brother and mom would pour themselves a Dewar’s
10  J U N E / J U L Y 2 018
on the rocks; my dad, never a big drinker,
would often ask, “Maxine, what’s that drink
I like again?” “Campari and soda, Dan.”
When my wife, Simone, came on the scene,
she’d reach for the citrus reamer and mix
margaritas for herself and my sister.
The backdrop was a mellowing sun over
the Berkshires and that intoxicating smell of
a charcoal grill just getting going, when it’s
all smoke and no fire.
I realize it’s at about this point in my letter
that I’m supposed to talk about food. And
sure, there were skirt steaks charred over a
raging fire until dark and crispy; butterflied
leg of lamb laced with garlic and rosemary;
and racks of dry-rubbed ribs, brought to fallapart tenderness in a low oven, then shellacked and crisped up on the Weber.
But it was always that window before I
threw anything on the grate that made me
happiest. That moment when we’d gather
by the grill like it was some grown-up campfire and just kick back and talk and drink
and snack. If we played it right, we’d get
about 45 choice minutes just as the sun was
turning the sky into what looked like one
big Italian ice.
Eventually, the sun set.
In 2011 my father fell ill, and he fought the
good fight. As is often the case with cancer,
there were days and months when things
looked good, like he might turn the corner.
But I still remember one evening, sky
aglow, plumes of smoke rising from the
grill, cocktails poured, when my dad never came down to join
us. I tried to pass it off as, well, maybe he’s just resting up for
dinner. But in the back of my head, I knew better. You didn’t
miss cocktail hour at the Rapoport house. That was our time.
My dad passed away in April 2012, and a year or so later, my
mom sold the house. A few years ago Simone and I got a little
cabin out on the North Fork of Long Island. The view’s different, though no less mesmerizing—the cascading sun electrifies
the sky as it sinks into the Long Island Sound. While I keep
telling myself that one day I’m going to build one of those
dream outdoor kitchens with the smoker and the beverage
fridge and all that, for now we’re making do with a simple kettle grill, just like we had upstate. And I still time my day toward
nailing that 45-minute window—when I’ve got my drink in
hand, the charcoal going, the skirt steak marinating, and some
sort of crudités set out on a wobbly little side table.
I guess you could say that things haven’t changed, but that
doesn’t mean they’re the same.
A DA M R A P O P O R T
e ditor in c hief
PHOTOGRAPH BY PEDEN + MUNK
editor’s letter
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starters
What to
Eat, Drink,
and Grill
This Month
1
The Grill
Chefs Love
Do we need bells and
whistles on a grill? No. Do
we want them? After hearing
chefs talk up the Kudu—yes.
It has a grill grate and castiron pan on arms that swing
to the side and move up or
down for mega heat control.
(Think ten-zone fire, not
two.) Katie Button of Cúrate
in Asheville, NC, loves it for
paella, which needs precise
temps hard to achieve on
other grills. “If it’s too hot,
I just move the pan up,” she
says. The setup also offers
extra real estate. “Cook a
rib eye, swing it over to
rest, start the corn, maybe
sear some peaches,” says
Cheetie Kumar of Garland
in Raleigh, NC. “Hopefully
someone inside made a
salad, and you’ve got a full
meal.”JULIA BAINBRIDGE
PHOTOGRAPH BY ALEX L AU
Multitasking
on the Kudu
Grill ($499;
kudugrills.com)
J U N E / J U L Y 2 0 1 8  13
SMOKED BEEF
BRISKET
Loro’s flagship
dish is also its most
collaborative,
starting with the
brisket Austinites
famously line
up for at 6 a.m.
G R E E N PA PAYA
SALAD
Cole and Franklin
both call this
crisp Thai utility
player a
“no-brainer” to
sub for coleslaw.
The rub is
the same as at
Franklin, but this gets
hit with fish sauce and
chili oil. “We wanted
a lightness to meter
the smoke and fat,”
Dumapit says.
KALE AND ASIAN
PEAR SALAD
If the brisket
establishes Loro’s
Texas cred, this
bright, textural toss
of kale, pears,
and dashi is Cole’s
ode to Japan.
The Year’s
Biggest
Barbecue
Opening
Superheroes have the Avengers. Austin has Loro. Two of the city’s most celebrated chefs—Aaron Franklin
of Franklin Barbecue and Tyson Cole of Japanese-inspired Uchi (both James Beard Award winners)—have
joined forces for a new smokehouse where Texas barbecue meets Asian flavors and techniques. Franklin
smokes his signature brisket using a wood-burning Oyler rotisserie smoker made in Texas and stocked with
post oak, which gets balanced by a pan-Asian arsenal from chef de cuisine (and Uchi alum) James Dumapit.
The result is food that finds common ground but wears its influences like badges of honor, from oak-grilled
marinated pork shoulder (for its close-up, see page 102) to Texas sweet corn with miso butter to this 12-hour
smoked brisket dressed with fish sauce, herbs, and Thai chiles. MIKE SUT TER
PHOTOGRAPH BY ALEX LAU
S
T
A
R
T
E
R
S
NEW
F L AV O R S
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PREMIUM ORGANIC TEA. EXQUISITE INGREDIENTS. EXTRAORDINARY TASTE.
Also available in these flavors:
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©2018 PURE LEAF, the PURE LEAF logo and the TEA HOUSE COLLECTION logo are registered trademarks of the Unilever Group of Companies used under license.
S
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A
R
T
E
R
S
3
Your
Meat’s in
the Mail
1
Don’t live near one of
those four-star sustainable
butchers? Not a problem.
Some of the best meat in the
country is available online
BY A S H L E Y M A S O N
1
KUROBUTA
FRENCHED PORK
CHOP
Kurobuta heritage
pigs are grown
for flavor, and the
breed’s high quantity
of fat promises
a juicy finish. ($17,
approx. 5 oz.;
snakeriverfarms.com)
2
LAMB LOIN CHOPS
Heritage Foods is
an online butcher
known for heirloom
breeds: Think Red
Wattle prosciutto or
these mildly gamey
Dorset Horn chops.
($120 for eight chops,
approx. 8 oz. each;
heritagefoodsusa.com)
3
AKAUSHI BEEF
RIBEYE
This deeply marbled
beef is a breed of
Japanese Wagyu
cattle by way of Texas.
($50, approx. 14 oz.;
heartbrandbeef.com)
4
SKIRT STEAK
Belcampo provides
in-depth info about
how its grass-fed
animals are raised
and processed.
($25, approx.
2.3 lb.; belcampo
.goldbely.com)
2
5
WAGYU
MERLOT STEAK
Cook this tender
grass-fed, grainfinished cut from
the calf muscle like
a flank steak.
($16, approx. 20 oz.;
farmfieldtable.com)
6
W I L D B OA R
S T . LOU I S R I B S
Boar ribs have a
richer, nuttier flavor
than regular pork
ribs. ($15 per small
rack, approx. 1 lb.;
fossilfarms.com)
3
4
5
PHOTOGRAPH BY CHELSIE CRAIG
6
16  J U N E / J U L Y 2 018
© 2017 Tyson Foods, Inc.
4
If You
Need Us,
We’ll Be
at Basic
Kitchen
A Dry
Summer
As much as we love
a backyard beer or a
sunset G&T, right now
we’re digging these
booze-free beverages
Send our mail to
Charleston, SC, where
this cheery all-day
café is providing
compelling reasons to
stay, well, all day. That
obligatory avocado
toast just tastes better
with a Jittery Monkey
smoothie (cold brew,
bananas, coconut
milk, and cacao nibs),
and conversation flows
as freely as the house
kombucha. And after
a Fiery Carrot
nightcap (a vibrant mix
of grapefruit, orange,
and ginger), driving
home is no problem.
ALIZA ABARBANEL
We couldn’t help but roll our eyes when we first heard about Seedlip,
a new “nonalcoholic spirit.” But all its bartender fans, including
Gaby Mlynarczyk of Accomplice in L.A., have made us reconsider:
“If you’re not drinking, you used to be stuck with iced tea or soda.
How boring is that? Seedlip brings a lot of complexity to the table.
I like the Spice variety—its delicate, aromatic flavor lends itself to
the fruity tiki-style drinks we do.”
Très Chic
Soda
A
rosemary-berry
French soda
comes together
at Bellecour.
French sodas, where
have you been all
our lives? (Oh,
France.) And what,
exactly, are you?
ASHLEY MASON
What
A creamy, fizzy
drink made with
sparkling water,
flavored simple
syrup, and a splash
of half-and-half.
Where
At French bakery
Bellecour in
Wayzata, MN,
where flavors
include cocoa nib–
coriander and
lavender-vanilla.
ICED COFFEE:
THE NEXT
G E N E R AT I O N
While there are plenty
of innovative coffee
drinks on the market, few
are good. Keepers
Coffee Soda (available
at keepers.co and
some Whole Foods) is
both. This Brooklyn-made
sparkling beverage
combines the juice of
tangerines, lemons, and
limes with flash-brewed
house-roasted coffee. It’s
a lively, citrusy, roast-y
slap in the face—a
perfect wake-up call.
ALEX DELANY
Why
“It’s like drinking an
iced coffee without
the caffeine,” says
Bellecour GM
Jeanie Janas. “Halfand-half gives it a
nice mouthfeel while
keeping it refreshing.”
Coconut water + pineapple juice + lime wedge
Kombucha + pomegranate juice + grated ginger
Seltzer + lemonade + muddled basil
Iced tea + apple cider vinegar +
smashed raspberries
Ginger beer + lime juice + muddled mint
Pamplemousse LaCroix + grapefruit juice + bruised rosemary
6 COMBOS THAT ARE (ALMOST) BET TER THAN COCKTAILS
18  J U N E / J U L Y 2 018
PHOTOGRAPHS: NICOLE FRANZEN (BASIC KITCHEN); COURTESY SEEDLIP; ASHLEY SULLIVAN (BELLECOUR); ALEX LAU (KEEPERS)
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S
T
A
R
T
E
R
S
What did you have for
breakfast today? “We traveled
to Toronto and Berlin recently, so
there was a time change. I
stabilized myself with very austere
oatmeal, which I love to make.
And I liked it today even more.”
For more from
Goldblum,
download
episode 165
of the BA
Foodcast
wherever
you get your
podcasts.
How do you take it? “I add a
little goat’s milk. My wife, who is
French, has found the best butter
in Los Angeles, actually through
my friend Jonathan Gold.
So I like to put a little of that in.”
Is it in a gold wrapper?
Bigger than a hockey puck?
“Yeah, you know the exact one.”
[Editor’s note: It’s Rodolphe
le Meunier Beurre de Baratte.]
Coffee or tea? “I gave
[them both] up. And I’m so very,
very happy right now.”
How do you like your eggs?
“You crack them in the pan and
drag them around with a spoon.
They become a little white and a
little yellow—not all whipped up.”
That’s how I make my eggs.
“I like a bit of the yolk experience
without the runny experience.”
You don’t want to describe
your eggs as mucilaginous.
“I wouldn’t want to describe
anything as mucilaginous.”
It’s grilling season. Do you
fire up the grill? “I don’t know if
I want to wear that apron or put
on the big hat, but I really should
grill more because I like to eat
it. When we were kids, we’d do
shuffleboard, swim in the pool,
and fire up the grill. I loved that.”
5
The Jurassic World:
Fallen Kingdom star
and Hollywood
mensch on what’s for
breakfast, sushi,
and frozen yogurt
You go in for fro-yo dates?
“Yes, we do.”
B
A
Q
&
A
What do you get? “I go down
the line and get anything that
appeals—it’s different every time.
Six or seven [flavors] usually.”
What are some favorites?
“I like to be surprised. It’s usually
something I’ve never tasted,
like pistachio something or
cookie dough something. I just hit
the handle for a second. I come
to pay with a bunch of little dabs.
It looks like a Van Gogh of some
kind. Then I spoon it and go, ‘You
know, they all taste the same.’”
INTERVIEW BY ADAM RAPOPORT
2 0  J U N E / J U L Y 2 018
PHOTOGRAPH BY PHIL KNOTT/CAMERA PRESS/REDUX
Jeff
Goldblum
Is the
Van Gogh
of Fro-Yo
Best sushi in L.A.? “Sugarfish
is the populist—and delicious—
version of [Sushi] Nozawa. I
enjoy going [for sushi] with my
friend Gary, who’s on the Paleo
diet, except when he’s with me.
Then we go have frozen yogurt.”
STARTERS
2
1
6
Texas pitmasters are
bringing the MexicanAmerican flavors they
grew up on to some of
the country’s tastiest,
most exciting barbecue
BY J E S S I C A E L I Z A R R A R A S
VA L E N T I N A’S
1—Brisket and
beef fajita tacos,
smoked corn, and
tomato-serrano salsa.
For the salsa recipe,
see page 105.
2—Miguel Vidal
seasons the brisket
with a rub that
includes cayenne
and garlic powder.
2M
SMOKEHOUSE
3—Joe Melig and
Esaul Ramos,
business partners and
high school BFFs
4—A very meaty
spread, featuring
brisket, ribs, housemade sausage, turkey
breast, and pulled
pork. The sides include
our favorite, borracho
beans. For the recipe,
see page 105.
2 2  J U N E / J U L Y 2 018
4
N O O N E AT E T H E W H I T E B R E A D at
Miguel Vidal’s family barbecues. In his family’s
backyard on San Antonio’s south side, Vidal
and his tios and tias ate their brisket with tortillas,
not the sliced bread served at so many barbecue
joints around Texas.
As the pitmaster and chef at Valentina’s Tex
Mex BBQ in Austin, Vidal re-creates elements
of those backyard cookouts of his childhood,
sharing the meals and flavors he grew up eating
with his family. It makes him one of several pros
bringing Mexican-American traditions to the
forefront of barbecue today. That means the
guacamole with sea salt and lime at Valentina’s
is the same delicate bare-bones version his
mother would make. Brisket and sausage share
a menu with charro beans, Mexican rice, and
barbacoa (Sundays only), and the pulled
chicken comes with salsa and, yes, flour tortillas,
made to order. “It’s not fusion,” Vidal says.
“We’re sharing what Mexican-Americans are
doing across Texas.”
Seventy miles south on I-35 at 2M
Smokehouse in San Antonio, pitmaster Esaul
Ramos, his high school best friend, Joe Melig,
his wife, Grecia Ramos, and sister Giselle Ramos
pickle garlic and nopales, top creamy mac
and cheese with crushed chicharrones, and stuff
sausage links with Oaxacan cheese and hot
serrano peppers, all paired with the cumin-laced
brisket that’s gaining fans the state over. “I grew
up eating American food outside of my house,
and I’d come home and my mother would
predominantly make Mexican dishes with these
spices and bold flavors,” Ramos says. “As a
Texan who loves barbecue, why not take that
passion and what I grew up eating and marry
them to get something great out of it?”
PHOTOGRAPHS BY ALEX LAU. FOR RESTAURANT DETAILS, SEE SOURCEBOOK.
Tex +
Mex +
’Cue
3
WH O WOR E I T B E ST ?
TORT E L LI N I
with pesto
R AV I O L I
with pesto
F R E S H I S ALWAYS I N S T Y L E
Buitoni freshly made pasta and sauce available
in your grocer’s refrigerated aisle.
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Alex White,
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Pure Leaf.
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kitchen
RECIPES
TIPS
MENU IDEAS
Cook
This Now
I ’V E B E E N
known to buy
strawberries by the
flat (that would be
eight quarts). These
little red orbs are
so sweet and juicy
that I’ll easily burn
through a pint still
warm from the sun
on my way home
from the farmers’
market. When I can’t
possibly eat another
handful, I’ll bake
them into pies, blend
up a cool agua
fresca, or add them
to savory salads.
And there’s no better
way to eat slightly
overripe berries
than macerated and
spooned over
vanilla ice cream.
CLAIRE SAFFITZ
P H OTO G R A P H S BY A L E X L AU
J U N E / J U L Y 2 018  2 5
k
COOK
THIS NOW
strawberries
“Strawberries are like tomatoes for me;
I’ll wait till they’re in season, then gorge myself
like a brown bear before hibernation.”
 B R A D L E O N E , T E S T K I TC H E N M A N AG E R
B E R R I E S 101
Shop
Strawberry and Watercress Salad
Very thinly slice ½ medium rhubarb stalk on a diagonal,
then hull and slice 6 oz. strawberries. Toss in a medium
bowl with 2 Tbsp. lemon juice and 2 tsp. honey.
Remove tough stems from 1 bunch watercress and
arrange on a platter with ½ cup basil leaves and ½ cup
cilantro leaves with tender stems; scatter 2 thinly sliced
scallions over. Season with salt and crushed red pepper
flakes. Spoon berry mixture and juices over; drizzle with
2 Tbsp. olive oil. Sprinkle with poppy seeds. 4 servings
The best
thing about
farmers’ market
strawberries
is getting to
sample as you
shop (just ask
first!). Look for
fragrant berries
that are red
all the way
through with
perky green
tops. Check the
bottom of the
container to
make sure none
are crushed.
Store
Truthfully, the
ripe ones never
last around
us for long. If
you want to
hold them a few
days, arrange
berries in a
single layer on
a baking sheet
or plate, loosely
cover with
plastic wrap,
and chill.
Strawberry-Rose Agua Fresca
Hull 1 lb. strawberries and purée in a blender with
¼ cup mint leaves, 2 Tbsp. fresh lime juice, 2 Tbsp.
light agave nectar, 1 tsp. rose water (optional),
and 2 cups cold water until smooth. Transfer purée to
an airtight container and chill until cold, about 1 hour.
Skim off any foam from surface; pour purée into four
12-oz. glasses filled with ice, filling two-thirds of the
way. Top off with club soda and garnish with mint sprigs,
lime wheels, and whole strawberries. 4 servings
Clean
Strawberries
keep longer if
unwashed.
Before eating,
swish them
around in a
large bowl of
cold water to
release any dirt
or loose leaves.
Hull 1 lb. strawberries; slice into thirds. Toss half of
berries with ⅓ cup sugar in a medium heatproof bowl.
Cover tightly with plastic wrap and set over a medium
saucepan filled with 1" of barely simmering water. Let sit
until berries are soft and juices have accumulated in bowl,
25–30 minutes. Let cool, then toss in remaining berries.
Whisk 1½ cups heavy cream in a medium bowl to soft
peaks. Layer cream, 2.5-oz. store-bought meringues,
then strawberry mixture in four 8-oz. glasses, dividing
evenly. Chill 20 minutes. Top with more sliced and whole
fresh strawberries to serve. 4 servings
2 6  J U N E / J U L Y 2 018
Hull
To cut out the
bitter white
center, insert a
paring knife
into the top of
the berry at
a slight angle,
then rotate the
berry and
knife in opposite
directions to
release the hull.
Matcha-Dipped Strawberries
Stir 2 oz. chopped white chocolate, ¼ cup melted virgin
coconut oil, 1 tsp. matcha, and a pinch of salt in a
medium heatproof bowl set over a saucepan of simmering
water (do not let bowl touch water) until nearly smooth.
Remove from heat; stir until chocolate is melted. Chill in a
bowl of ice water, stirring until thickened and just starting to
lose its sheen, about 2 minutes. Pat dry 15–20 chilled large
stem-on strawberries. Working one at a time, hold berries
by stems, dip into mixture to coat; let excess drip off. Place
on a parchment-lined baking sheet; sprinkle with sesame
seeds. Chill until set, about 20 minutes. Makes 15–20
FOOD STYLING BY REBECCA JURKEVICH
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L U X U R Y
P E R F O R M A N C E
P A S S I O N
The Hybrid Fire Grill by Kalamazoo
888 992 1230
Gas, wood & charcoal in one incredible grill
kalamazoogourmet.com
kk
DINNER
TONIGHT
Getting
Warmer
On lazy summer nights, senior
associate food editor Molly
Baz turns her weekend farmers’
market haul into vibrant vegheavy meals in under an hour
Niçoise Toast
Bring a medium
saucepan of water to
a boil. Gently lower
in 4 large eggs with
a slotted spoon; cook
8 minutes. Transfer
to a bowl of ice water;
let cool. Peel eggs.
Toss 1 lb.
tomatoes, cut into
1" pieces, 1 thinly
sliced medium
shallot, juice from
1 lemon, a pinch
of sugar, and a
pinch of kosher salt
in a medium bowl.
Whisk 1 finely
grated garlic clove,
½ cup mayonnaise,
1½ tsp. red wine
vinegar, and
½ tsp. hot smoked
Spanish paprika in
a small bowl; season
with kosher salt.
2 8  J U N E / J U L Y 2 018
Heat 2 Tbsp.
olive oil in a large
skillet over medium.
Cook 2 slices
sourdough bread
until deeply browned
on bottom side,
about 3 minutes.
Transfer to a platter;
sprinkle fried side
with kosher salt.
Repeat with another
2 Tbsp. olive oil
and 2 slices bread.
Spread mayonnaise
over fried side of
bread. Top with
drained oil-packed
tuna from two
6–7-oz. jars; spoon
tomato mixture and
some of the juices
over. Cut eggs into
quarters and set on
top; season with
flaky sea salt and
pepper. Scatter
½ cup torn mixed
tender herbs and
¼ cup torn pitted
oil-cured black
olives over; drizzle
with oil. 4 servings
C O N T I N U E S O N PAG E 3 3
PHOTOGRAPHS BY CHELSIE CRAIG
Our
contribution
to the classic
niçoise:
fried bread
eatbasically.com
A BON APPÉTIT BRAND
can’t cook. no problem.
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DINNER
TONIGHT
W H Y W E .. . C U R E S Q U AS H
Summer squash contains a lot of water, which can cause it to get mushy when cooked.
We turned to a trick we use with moisture-rich vegetables like cucumbers and eggplant:
Toss raw halved squash with salt and let it sit for at least ten minutes (and up to 30)
to draw out some liquid. This also seasons it from the inside out, concentrating the flavor.
This would
also be great
with pattypan
squash.
Strike Gold
Healthy summer squash is
anything but boring when
bathed in a kicky vinaigrette
Marinated Summer Squash
with Hazelnuts and Ricotta
4 S E RV I N G S
3 medium summer squash or
zucchini, cut in half lengthwise
1½ tsp. kosher salt, plus more
¼ cup blanched hazelnuts
6 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil,
divided, plus more for drizzling
1 small bunch mint, divided
1 small garlic clove, finely grated
2 Tbsp. white wine vinegar
¾ tsp. sugar
½ tsp. crushed red pepper flakes
Freshly ground black pepper
½ lemon
½ cup fresh ricotta
Flaky sea salt
Toasted country-style bread
(for serving)
Preheat oven to 300°. Toss squash
and 1½ tsp. kosher salt in a colander;
set over a bowl. Let sit 10 minutes,
then pat dry with paper towels.
Toss hazelnuts and 1 Tbsp. oil on
a rimmed baking sheet and roast,
shaking occasionally, until golden brown,
15–20 minutes. Let cool; crush into large
pieces with a measuring cup or glass.
Smack 3 mint sprigs against your
cutting board a few times to release their
flavor; mix in a large bowl with garlic,
vinegar, sugar, red pepper flakes, and
2 Tbsp. oil; set dressing aside.
Heat 2 Tbsp. oil in a large skillet,
preferably cast iron, over medium-high
until shimmering. Arrange squash cut
side down in skillet, breaking into smaller
pieces if needed in order to fit in a single
layer, and cook, moving around in pan
to ensure even browning, until golden
brown on cut side, about 5 minutes.
Reduce heat to medium-low, cover (if
you don’t have a lid use a baking sheet),
and continue to cook until very tender,
about 15 minutes. Transfer to a cutting
board and let cool slightly.
Cut squash into 2" pieces and toss
in reserved dressing to coat; season with
kosher salt and black pepper. Let sit at
room temperature, tossing occasionally,
15 minutes. Pluck out mint sprigs; discard.
Meanwhile, zest lemon half into a
small bowl, mix in ricotta and remaining
1 Tbsp. oil; season with kosher salt.
Hang on to that lemon.
Spread lemon ricotta over platter.
Top with squash and their juices. Squeeze
reserved lemon over. Pull leaves from
remaining mint sprigs (you want about
¼ cup). Scatter mint and hazelnuts over
squash. Drizzle generously with oil and
sprinkle with sea salt. Serve with toast.
J U N E / J U L Y 2 018  3 3
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DINNER
TONIGHT
BEHIND THE DISH
At Rolf and Daughters in Nashville, chef Philip Krajeck makes a fermented
pasta cloaked in a tangy whey and butter sauce. It inspired this springy
dish, in which we use store-bought buttermilk to mimic whey’s acidic flavor.
It’s a perfect foil for the rich butter and cheese in this glossy sauce.
Butter & Parm 2.0
We’re throwing this pantry pasta
all-star a “Welcome to Summer”
party with peas and mint
Orecchiette with Buttermilk,
Peas, and Pistachios
4 S E RV I N G S
¼ cup pistachios
12 oz. orecchiette
Kosher salt
12 oz. peas (such as shelled fresh
or frozen English and/
or halved sugar snap)
3 Tbsp. unsalted butter
2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil,
plus more for drizzling
2 medium leeks, white and
pale green parts only,
cut in half lengthwise, thinly sliced
3 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
½ tsp. crushed red pepper flakes
1 small bunch mint, divided
¾ cup buttermilk
3 oz. Parmesan, finely grated,
plus more for serving
Freshly ground black pepper
2 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice
Preheat oven to 350°. Toast pistachios
on a rimmed baking sheet, tossing
once, until golden brown, 5–8 minutes.
Let cool, then coarsely crush with a
measuring cup or glass.
Cook pasta in a large pot of boiling
salted water 6 minutes, then add peas
and cook until pasta is al dente, about
2 minutes more.
3 4  J U N E / J U L Y 2 018
Meanwhile, heat butter and 2 Tbsp.
oil in a medium heavy pot over medium.
Cook leeks, garlic, red pepper flakes,
and 3 mint sprigs, stirring occasionally,
until leeks are soft but not browned, 6–8
minutes; season with salt. Add buttermilk;
bring to a simmer. Pluck out mint; discard.
Using a slotted spoon, transfer pasta
and peas to leek mixture. Add 3 oz.
Parmesan; cook, stirring vigorously
and adding a little pasta water if needed,
until sauce is creamy and coats pasta,
about 1 minute. Season with salt and
pepper. Remove from heat; add lemon
juice. Pull leaves from remaining mint
sprigs, tear into pasta, and toss. Divide
pasta among bowls. Top with pistachios
and Parmesan; drizzle with oil.
DINNER
TONIGHT
THESE
S P E E DY
S T E A KS
MAKE
THE CUT
HANGER
SKIRT
FLANK
This flavorful and
tender cut comes
from the cow’s
diaphragm.
Slice this fibrous
cut as thinly
as possible for the
most tender results.
The leanest of the
three—cook it on
the rarer side so
it doesn’t dry out.
Steak, Sauce
This bright, addictive condiment
is also destined for your next
roast chicken or pork chop or…
Hanger Steak with
Charred Scallion Sauce
4 S E RV I N G S
½ cup crushed or
coarsely chopped walnuts
1 small garlic clove
9 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 1½-lb. hanger steak, cut into 4
pieces, center membrane removed
Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
¾ tsp. Aleppo-style pepper,
plus more for serving
12 scallions
5 tsp. sherry vinegar or
red wine vinegar
1 Tbsp. chopped cornichons
1 Tbsp. chopped drained capers
1 Tbsp. whole grain mustard
¾ tsp. chopped thyme
Pinch of sugar
Flaky sea salt
3 6  J U N E / J U L Y 2 018
Preheat oven to 350°. Toast walnuts on
a rimmed baking sheet, tossing once, until
golden brown, 8–10 minutes. Transfer to
a medium bowl. Finely grate garlic over
warm walnuts and toss with 6 Tbsp. oil.
Heat a large cast-iron skillet over
medium-high. Season steaks with
kosher salt and black pepper; sprinkle
all over with Aleppo-style pepper.
Rub with 2 Tbsp. oil and cook, turning
occasionally, until deeply browned
and an instant-read thermometer
inserted into the thickest part registers
130° for medium-rare, 10–12 minutes.
Transfer steaks to a cutting board.
Wipe out skillet and reduce heat to
medium. Place scallions and 1 Tbsp. oil
in skillet, season with kosher salt, and
cook, turning occasionally, until softened
and deeply charred, about 4 minutes.
Transfer to cutting board; trim and cut
into 1" pieces. Add to bowl with walnut
mixture along with vinegar, cornichons,
capers, mustard, thyme, and sugar
and toss to combine; season with kosher
salt and black pepper.
Slice steak against the grain and
sprinkle with sea salt. Serve with scallion
sauce and more Aleppo-style pepper.
FOOD STYLING BY MOLLY BAZ. PROP STYLING BY EMILY EISEN. ILLUSTRATIONS BY JOE WILSON. FOR RESTAURANT DETAILS, SEE SOURCEBOOK.
k
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When you season with GOYA® Adobo, you don’t have to guess which herbs and spices
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GOYA® Adobo, the perfect seasoning for Real-Life Chefs
Grilled Shrimp Tostadas with Black Bean Salsa
Serves: 12 | Prep time: 20 min. | Total time: 40 min.
Tostada Ingredients:
Salsa Ingredients:
2 GOYA® Ancho Chiles, stemmed and seeded
3 tbsp. GOYA® Lemon Juice
2 tbsp. GOYA® Vegetable Oil
1 tsp. GOYA® Adobo with Pepper
½ tsp. GOYA® Ground Cumin
1 tsp. GOYA® Minced Garlic
½ tsp. GOYA® Oregano Leaves
1 ½ lbs. medium shrimp, peeled and deveined
GOYA® Corn Oil, for frying
12 GOYA® Corn Tortillas
1 can (16 oz.) GOYA® Traditional Refried Beans
Lime wedges, for garnish
1 can (15.5 oz.) GOYA® Black Beans,
drained and rinsed
1 medium tomato, seeded and diced
1 small red onion, finely chopped
1 tbsp. chopped cilantro
1 tsp. GOYA® Adobo with Pepper
1 tsp. GOYA® Lemon Juice
1 tbsp. GOYA® Extra Virgin Olive Oil
For step-by-step instructions, visit goya.com/shrimptostadas
k
BASICALLY
Out of
the Box
b y C L A I R E SA F F I T Z
1―B E R RY N I C E
2―CRACK THE WHIP
Measure out 2 cups blackberries from
2 pints; slice in half lengthwise. Toss in a bowl
with 2 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice and ½ cup
blackberry jam; let sit 10 minutes. (Save
the rest of the berries for decorating later.)
Using an electric mixer, beat 2 cups chilled
heavy cream in a large bowl, starting on
low speed and increasing to high, until soft
peaks form. Beat in ¼ cup powdered sugar
and a pinch of salt just to combine.
3 ― L AY T H E F O U N DA T I O N
4―COOKIES AND CREAM
5―S TAC KS O N S TAC KS
Line a medium bowl (6-cup capacity) with
plastic wrap, pressing into bottom and
up sides and leaving plenty of overhang.
Line the bottom of bowl with a layer of
vanilla wafers (you’ll need 8 oz. total).
Spoon about ¼ cup berry mixture over
wafers. Scoop 1½ cups whipped cream into
a small bowl; cover and save in fridge for
later. Spread ½ cup of remaining whipped
cream evenly over wafer and berry layers.
Repeat layers with wafers (breaking to fit
as needed—no one will know), blackberry
mixture, and whipped cream, using more
for each layer as the bowl gets wider, until
you run out of all the components.
6―THE BIG CHILL
7―FULL COVERAGE
8―SLICE OF LIFE
Bring up plastic overhang to cover and
chill at least 24 hours. Unwrap plastic from
top of cake and place a large cake stand
or platter firmly over it. Flip over and lift bowl
away; peel away plastic wrap. (Ta-da!)
Use a whisk to beat reserved whipped
cream back to soft peaks, then use a spoon
to dollop cream all over cake and spread
around evenly. Cut reserved berries in
half lengthwise and arrange them on top.
Slice cake into 8 pieces to serve. Pro tip:
This cake can be assembled 2 days ahead
of time and can also be unmolded and
covered in cream 1 hour ahead; either way,
keep in the fridge until the last minute.
3 8  J U N E / J U L Y 2 018
P H OTO G R A P H S BY C H E L S I E C R A I G
FOOD STYLING BY CLAIRE SAFFITZ AND MOLLY BAZ
Our creamy, dreamy
Blackberry Icebox Cake—
built in a bowl for maximum
ease—is the no-bake dessert
you’ll be making all summer
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A BA
KITCHEN
PRIMER
Kitchen in
a Box
Give that vacation rental (and
all those lazy-day meals) a
serious upgrade with BYO knives,
spices, and yes, even a blender
by CARL A L ALLI MUSIC
YO U AND YO U R
F A M I LY A N D F R I E N D S
A R E PA C K I N G up the car
and going away for a week
to your little rental at the
beach, the lake, the woods,
the country spot with a
swimming hole. There’s a
general store, a weekly
farmers’ market, and maybe
a decent butcher and
fishmonger, but there’s no
Whole Foods, no Trader Joe’s,
and definitely no Instacart.
You’ll eat out a couple of
times, but mostly you came
to sleep in, hang out, cook
meals together, swim/hike/
bike, and take at least one
nap a day. Here’s the gear
to bring from home, how to
shop like a local upon
arrival, and the recipes that
let you get the most out
of summer. Consider it your
guide to culinary survival
in the not-quite-wilderness.
4 2  J U N E / J U L Y 2 018
P H OTO G R A P H S BY A L E X L AU
SHINE
BRIGHTER
Blue Moon is a wheat beer brewed
with Valencia orange peel for a
taste that rises above the ordinary.
k
A BA
KITCHEN
PRIMER
kitchen
in a box
1
N O, R E A L LY
BRING THE
BLENDER
When you’re trying
to make the most
of your mornings, keep
breakfast quick but
filling with frothy fruitand-nut-filled smoothies
for everyone. Leave
the blender out for pesto,
hummus, gazpacho,
and milkshakes later.
Pack the
Essentials
4 4  J U N E / J U L Y 2 018
THE CHECKLIST
E Q U I PM E N T
CASTIRON
SKILLET
NONSTICK
SKILLET
2 RIMMED
BAKING
SHEE TS
BLENDER
CUTTING
BOARD
AIRTIGHT
CONTAINERS
T O O LS
KNIVES
WOODEN
SPOONS
THIN ME TAL
S PAT U L A
FINEMESH
SIEVE
MICROPLANE
ZESTER
DIGITAL
T H E R M OM E T E R
PA I R O F
TONGS
WINE KEY
CAN OPENER
DISH TOWELS
Purée 2 pitted
Medjool dates,
2 cups coconut water,
1 cup raw cashews,
1 cup fresh or
frozen blueberries,
⅓ cup plain wholemilk Greek yogurt,
1 Tbsp. fresh lime
juice, a large pinch
of kosher salt, and
2 cups ice in a blender
until smooth. Pour
smoothie into glasses,
dividing evenly.
4 servings
PA N T RY
YOUR TOP
FIVE JARRED
SPICES
OLIVE OIL
FROM YOUR
COUNTERTOP
WHISK
ANY NUTS,
G R A I N S A N D/
O R PAS TA ,
AND OATS
YOU’VE GOT
PEPPER MILL
COFFEE
CITRUS
JUICER
FLAKY SEA
SALT
SLOT TED
SPOON
Blueberry,
Lime,
and Cashew
Smoothie
PROP STYLING BY AMY WILSON (TOTE)
Dull rentalkitchen knives,
cheap cookware,
and musty spices
can derail the
best-laid vacation
meal plans. Think
of this checklist
as your insurance
policy, and bring
the key equipment,
tools, and pantry
staples from home
that will make
cooking enjoyable
when you’re away.
Pack up everything
between a big
plastic storage bin
and a tote that
can double as a
market bag.
Typical
Tacos?
Not in this
house.
Take your family’s taco night to zesty new heights with
new Kraft Expertly Paired Cheddar and Asadero made for tacos.
© 2018 Kraft Foods
k
A BA
KITCHEN
PRIMER
kitchen
in a box
2
T H E P L AT T E R
Shop Like
a Local
Hit the farmers’ market
for lettuces, fresh beans
and greens, herbs, melons,
berries, and a few good
eggs. Round out things
with bread and cheese
and you’ll be freed up
to throw together casual
dishes, such as a giant
salad or on-the-fly frittata,
with little to no planning
required. Come midday,
when it’s hot and no
one feels like cooking,
opt for the lazy lunch:
Whip up a garlicky aioli
and serve it with a
produce -heavy platter
starring your market haul.
Graze all afternoon.
Nap. Repeat.
Plan on serving
about half a pound of
veg and two to three
ounces of protein per
person. Try:
BLANCHED
LONG BEANS,
WAX BEANS,
OR SUGAR
SNAP PEAS
BOILED
FINGERLING
POTATOES
RADISHES
Grand Aioli
Whisk 2 large egg
yolks, 1 tsp. Dijon
mustard, 1 finely
grated garlic
clove, and a pinch
of kosher salt in
a medium bowl to
combine. Set bowl
on top of a kitchen
towel laid across a
small heavy pot
(this setup will anchor
the bowl while you
whisk so you have
a free hand for
pouring). Whisking
constantly, add
¾ cup extra-virgin
olive oil to egg
mixture, starting with
just a few drops and
gradually increasing
amount to a fine
steady stream. Stop
adding and just
whisk if there is any
unincorporated oil
in the bowl, then
resume. Whisk until
aioli is completely
emulsified and
smooth, then whisk in
2 Tbsp. fresh lemon
juice. Season aioli
generously with salt.
Makes about 1 cup
CHERRY
TOMATOES
B A BY L E T T U C E S
COOKED,
PEELED SHRIMP
T H I N LY
SLICED HAM
HARDBOILED
EGGS
Paring, serrated, and chef’s knives are all you need.
And no, don’t wrap them in a dish towel secured
by a rubber band. There’s a safer way: Pick up
a few inexpensive blade covers (Messermeister,
$10 for set of three; surlatable.com), slide them
onto your knives, and pack everything in a sturdy
canvas pouch (Klein Tools, $16; homedepot.com).
4 6  J U N E / J U L Y 2 018
GUTTER
Yes, You Want Your Own Knives
eat like a local. even if you’re not.
bonappetit.com/city-guides
A BON APPÉTIT BRAND
k
A BA
KITCHEN
PRIMER
kitchen
in a box
No fish sandwich
is complete
wi t ho ut t a r t a r
s a uc e . F i n d o ur
v e rs i o n i n P re p
S c ho o l , p . 10 8 .
Fried Fish Sandwiches with
Cucumbers and Tartar Sauce
For the best results, use
hake, pollock, or cod for this sandwich.
4 S E RV I N G S
2
1
1
¾
¾
5–6
⅓
2
8
1
¾
8
½
Tbsp. Old Bay seasoning
tsp. baking powder
tsp. cayenne pepper
cup all-purpose flour, divided
cup cornstarch, divided
Vegetable oil (for frying; about
6 cups)
mini seedless or Persian cucumbers,
thinly sliced lengthwise
cup seasoned rice vinegar
Tbsp. unsalted butter, melted
potato rolls, split
large egg, beaten to blend
cup light beer
4-oz. pieces skinless, boneless
firm whitefish fillets (¾"–1" thick)
Kosher salt
cup very coarsely chopped dill
Lettuce leaves and Tartar Sauce
(see recipe, p. 108; for serving)
S P E C I A L E Q U I PM E N T :
A deep-fry
3
Use the Grill
(but Not
for Grilling)
When the sun goes down
and the evening breezes
kick up, take the kitchen
outside for a full-on fish
fry. Set up your cutting
board on the deck table,
enlist housemates to pitch
in with prep and stocking
the cooler with drinks,
and treat the (probably
propane) grill as the heat
source for these insanely
4 8  J U N E / J U L Y 2 018
satisfying fish sandwiches
(or fritto misto or fried
chicken). The open air
comes with advantages:
Gas grills can be dialed
into a steady temperature
for frying, there won’t
be oil splatters on the
cabinets or lingering fish
aromas, and you’ll fall
even more in love with
your cast-iron skillet.
F I S H A N D ASS E M B LY Prepare a grill for
medium-high heat. Whisk Old Bay,
baking powder, cayenne, ½ cup flour,
and ½ cup cornstarch in a medium bowl.
Whisk remaining ¼ cup flour and ¼ cup
cornstarch in another medium bowl.
Set a large deep cast-iron skillet or
large Dutch oven fitted with thermometer
on grill; pour in oil to come 1" up sides.
Heat oil until thermometer registers 375°.
Meanwhile, toss cucumbers in a third
medium bowl with vinegar, massaging
gently to soften slightly. Let sit, tossing
occasionally, until ready to serve.
Lightly butter insides of rolls; grill,
butter side down, just until toasted, about
30 seconds. Transfer to a plate.
Gently whisk egg and beer in a large
bowl, then whisk in Old Bay mixture in
3 additions. Working in 2 batches, season
fish lightly with salt. Dredge in flour
mixture, shaking off excess, then dip into
batter and lift up with a fork, letting excess
drain off (you want batter to coat fish
without looking clumpy.) Fry, turning once,
until deeply browned and an instant-read
thermometer inserted into the thickest
part registers 125°–130°, 7–9 minutes.
Transfer to a wire rack set inside a rimmed
baking sheet with a slotted spoon.
Drain most of vinegar from cucumbers;
toss in dill. Build sandwiches with
cucumbers, fish, lettuce, and Tartar Sauce.
FOOD STYLING BY CHRIS MOROCCO
thermometer
Grandma was Italian.
Mom fell in love in Greece.
You married a grill master.
©2018 Reynolds Consumer Products LLC.
Inspired by culture. Prepared by you.
Grilled
Greek PIZZA
For this recipe, visit
ReynoldsKitchens.com
The Feed
the barbecue pit
It’s one thing to grill for my family. It’s another to
enter a competition. How did I get here?
By P E T E R M E E H A N
IF THE CANOPY OF STARS wasn’t so captivating, wasn’t
like silver glitter spilled on velvet the color of midnight, I might have just given up. It was the kind of
damp cold that turns your bones to glass—a spell of
40-degree weather rolled in on what should have been
a swampy summer night—and we’d been outside since
the previous afternoon, on a patch of grass ringed by
mountains, huddled around the smoker for warmth.
I was cooking in my first barbecue competition, in
a small town in the Catskill Mountains, and seeking
shelter would have meant letting my buddies down.
Other, properly prepared, teams were asleep in their
trailers and trucks, shelters festooned with Old Glory
5 0  J U N E / J U L Y 2 018
or Infowars stickers. So onward toward dawn we
shivered, checking the schedule and our prep list and
debating when to switch from beer to coffee.
It could have been anything, I guess: old cars, ceramics, maybe an interest in flying small planes. Entering
middle age, perhaps looking to distract myself from
my feelings about how my business partner had shut
down the mildly artsy food magazine I edited, I fell
into cooking over live fire as a life-filler-upper.
I became a guy who was “into barbecue,” which, for
as true as it is, is still somewhat painful to type. Talking Heads had told us that day was coming, when you
wake up and ask yourself, Well, how did I get here?
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THE FEED
For the past few years, my family and I have been
getting out of New York City on weekends and during the summer to go to an old bungalow encampment in a hollow pinned between a swamp and a
graveyard. It’s our little slice of heaven with trees and
a big lawn and other kids for our kids to play with.
There are six other families there, and we—whoever’s
up from the city on a given night—routinely eat dinner
communally, a dozen or twice as many people sitting
down. A whole pork shoulder or all the ribs they had
at the supermarket can disappear without anyone
even contemplating seconds.
The big annual party, which predates me, is a
Labor Day pig roast, when everybody’s friends and
friends of friends cover the lawn in a patchwork of
picnic blankets, bring side dishes or desserts, and
make sure their kids don’t drown in the pond. Over
the course of a few summers, I went from being a
willing helper to spearheading off-season discussions about how we’d do next year’s pig. Now I initiate get-togethers that necessitate the cooking of
whole animals whenever possible.
Because, like anything I’ve ever been into, I need
to up the ante every once in a while to get the same
kick. It’s one thing to cook competently for your family, and it leads, often, to cooking for friends in
grander quantities. It was another thing when all of
this led me to enter a barbecue competition.
Actually, I would have vaguely committed to it,
forgotten about it, missed registration, and gotten
on with my life if it were not for Jonathan Hooper.
Jonathan is a fellow dad at the upstate place and the
property’s founding pitmaster, a guy who is active on
Reddit barbecue boards but who has a real job and
life. Over the years, as we’ve gotten to know each
other, we’ve undertaken a consistent and escalating
program of barbecuing bigger animals, or more of
the little ones, and the competition felt, in some
ways, like a natural next step. We’d been inching
toward the cliff’s edge; it was time to jump.
wasn’t unafraid. I am insecure about my
cooking in a performative sense: I am a
writer, not a cook. I have no investment in
the value of trophies, diplomas, and their
ilk. My interests lie more in regional barbecue—the
ribs or shoulder or brisket cooked over wood you get
at the place down the road—than in the style practiced at competitions, which is a thing apart.
While there are many governing bodies that put
on barbecue competitions, the Kansas City Barbeque
Society is the big dog. KCBS says it sanctions 500
meets a year, from “backyard only” competitions,
where pros are excluded, to “invitationals,” which
require you to have won a trophy to qualify. Four
types of meat go before the judges: pork butt or
shoulder, pork ribs, beef brisket, and chicken. The
scoring rubric that judges are educated in via a oneday seminar is intended to be region-agnostic—as
i
5 2  J U N E / J U L Y 2 018
I found myself
wanting to be
out there, by
the collection
of pits that
had grown
like the lawn
furniture of
a nightmare
neighbor.
welcoming of vinegary eastern North Carolina pork
as of salt-and-pepper Texas beef—but it is not.
Rather, it rewards what’s often called “competition
style”: a groupthink simulacrum of many styles.
Competition barbecue is sweet and saucy. It is
pretty in a manicured, post–World War II foodstyling fashion—uniform and tidy in a way that most
real barbecue isn’t. The aesthetic prescriptions about
how the meat should be presented are campy enough
that I think John Waters would dig them. (From the
rules: “PROHIBITED GARNISHES are lettuce cores,
kale stems, and other vegetation, INCLUDING BUT
NOT LIMITED TO endive, red tipped lettuce.”)
To summarize the difference between regular
regional barbecue styles and KCBS BBQ, I’d draw this
comparison: In one you are hosing your mutt off in
the driveway; in the other you’re scissoring perfect
pom-poms on your purebred’s haunches before trotting him around Westminster.
The kind of chicken that wins competition is fashioned from skin-on but boneless thighs, tucked into
taut little bundles, the final product lacquered in
sauce. Jonathan and I apprenticed ourselves to a
bearded YouTube guru named Tom Jackson (a.k.a.
Chef Tom) to dial in our chicken and ribs game. And
it was following him that we finally assented to some
of the more arcane practices of winning barbecue:
We removed the skin from the thighs, scraped the
subcutaneous fat from its underside, then redraped
it on the meat after it had brined for 90 minutes.
The quantity of honey Mr. Jackson drizzled over
and around his ribs was gratuitous if not something
more unseemly. We ignored our own moral compasses and played along. This was what the competition gods wanted, and so we spent a few weeks of the
summer gearing up for that kind of cooking.
he cynical carpetbagging Yankee egghead reason I cooked at the dog show was
so that I could call it a dog show without
feeling like someone could snipe at me
saying I’d never shown a dog. But just like you don’t
stumble into owning a show poodle, I wasn’t cooking
in the competition by accident.
I found myself wanting to be out there, by the
woodpile, by the collection of pits that had grown
like the lawn furniture of a nightmare neighbor: the
one who starts with one car up on blocks and soon
enough is hoarding mounds of unclassifiable trash in
his yard. Now my neighbor Jonathan and I are that
guy, but for meat cookers.
I acknowledge that humanity has collectively been
trying to improve on cooking over fire since the first
monkeyman’s synapses fired in frustration, asking,
Jeez, couldn’t we speed this up a little bit? I know the
Instant Pot is the dream that humans dispersed
themselves around the globe seeking, not the chance
to spend another night tending a fire with a whole
dead animal on top of it.
t
But I grew up in the suburbs and have lived in cities ever since, the kind of cities where having space
for a grill is unlikely. So now I can watch a fire forever, in a pit, in the woodstove that heats our cabin.
My kids roll their eyes when I tell them about the
colors in the fire—the whites and the blues and what
they mean—but then I see them coloring the fire
in their drawings with those pencils, hues I never
reached for in my Duraflame youth.
I’d buy albums of the fire’s hisses and pops to
listen to in my city apartment. The roar of a bonfire?
The way its heat pushes you away before you realize
the warmth of the day has retreated and there are
bats overhead and suddenly you want that sear on
your shins, that orange glow turning your cheeks
red? Yes, please.
I liked that cooking over fire was uncertain. Writing cookbooks, I’d spent years developing a facility
with other kinds of cooking that I could be assured
would turn out. I know most of what a wok does on a
home stove, how a 12-inch nonstick pan heats up,
how long it takes to melt onions. But for a few years,
I didn’t know how the meat would turn out, how the
fire would behave, if we’d be conquering heroes or
idiots who’d burned or undercooked dinner. It was
fun, which is a dumb and easy word, but an elusive
feeling at certain times in your life.
he competition was held on a field Honus
Wagner is rumored to have played some
baseball on in a Catskills mountain town
called Fleischmanns. The townsfolk, now
mostly Hasidic Jews, eyed us as we drove in, and
I noticed we didn’t have the matching T-shirts or
gleaming five-figure rigs that many of the other competitors had. We had a rented U-Haul pickup and a
rickety but beautiful Texas-style smoker I’d bought
off of Austin barbecue godhead Tom Micklethwait.
And maybe it was all those weekends full of meatplay, those 3 a.m. wake-ups, all the YouTube video
watching and looking at cookbooks, but I found
myself caring a little about winning something.
Maybe it was not wanting to return home looking like
schmucks—or wanting to at least be schmucks who
had some hardware to show for it. Maybe it was the
fact that I’d never won an award for anything despite
being in a business that gives out a lot of medals.
When judgment was ready to be meted out—all
the deliberations and score calculations happen in
private—the competitors gathered in a semicircle in
front of a tiny stage as the organizers went through
the categories, doling out trophies and cash prizes.
We had undercooked our ribs—we pulled them
too early, and they weren’t as tender as they should
have been—and our decision to dress our pork shoulder in the vinegary eastern North Carolina style was
a recipe for losing against the ketchup-y confectionery style more proven to win. (We got buried.) So all
was riding on chicken and brisket.
t
5 4  J U N E / J U L Y 2 018
I didn’t know
how the meat
would turn out,
how the fire
would behave,
if we’d be
conquering
heroes or
idiots who’d
burned or
undercooked
dinner.
I was confronted with pride in creation while sitting there, something I feel congenitally averse to.
But our chicken was good. My teammate Mark Ibold
deserved to win something. He’s not a barbecue idiot
like I am, but he had dutifully and beautifully scraped
the underside of the chicken skin clean in the early
morning and had done an exceptional job as our lettuce fluffer, creating gorgeous and rules-compliant
carpets of greenery to present the meat on.
We had been educated in the style of Texas barbecue by Micklethwait, one of the finest practitioners
of the form, so we imitated his brisket as well as we
could, but shellacked the burnt ends with sweet
sauce in a way that I could imagine our other Chef
Tom, the one from YouTube, revving his Harley for.
Teammate Seth Prouty, also a civilian, had meticulously stoked the fire and split wood quietly in the
dark as he shepherded the meat toward doneness for
more than 12 hours.
Royal Hooper, Jonathan’s then 11-year-old son,
rounded out the team. He was there for some sort
of father-son bonding opportunity, but rather than
be pressed into indentured servitude as I’d hoped,
Royal succeeded mainly in showing how much better
at sleeping he was than the rest of us. When, early
in the morning, the event organizers apologetically
parked the generator for a mechanical bull right next
to our tent—there’s a carnival aspect to some of these
competitions, but that all gets under way after the
serious cooking has happened—he goosed free rides
for himself on it for the rest of the day.
We sent Royal up to collect our trophies: third
place in chicken, second place in brisket. In a field of
17 competitors, these were victories, and the couple
who ran the competition couldn’t have been kinder
or more complimentary about our finish when we
visited the tent to claim our prize money. They said
that placing as we did in our first pro competition
was a guarantee we’d be back for more.
It wasn’t, which isn’t to say we won’t. There wasn’t
a gregarious community of like-minded cooks or
the chance to expand our minds tasting other barbecue that is part of the promise of most food gettogethers. The hours sucked and the pay was bad.
But we didn’t abjectly fail. We didn’t lose any toes
to frostbite. There was a moment of cow-scratchingherself-against-a-fence -post satisfaction in the
molten yolk of an egg-and-cheese sandwich that
warmed us as dawn broke and another of revelation
when a pan of pork scraps, water, and salt transmuted itself, as teammate Mark said it would, into a
pan of carnitas, meat snacks to fish out with dirty
fingers as the competition drew to a close.
It was this: an excuse to gather around the fire,
to cook with friends, and to do funny things to meat,
possibly for praise. If it wasn’t the best of times, it
wasn’t the worst, either.
Peter Meehan cofounded Lucky Peach. He is working
on a book about grilling to be published spring 2020.
ILLUSTRATIONS BY HISASHI OKAWA
THE FEED
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city guides
COPENHAGEN
Living the
all-day-café
life at
Admiralgade
26.
See p. 67.
Life
Beyond
Noma
Perhaps you’ve
heard people
talking about
a particular
restaurant in
Copenhagen?
Well, its alums
have opened a
slew of their own
exciting spots
b y C hr i st i n e Muhlke
6 0  J U N E / J U L Y 2 018
P H OTO G R A P H S BY D I T T E I SAG E R
ADVERTISEMENT
LET’S
FACE IT
“ S TJ E R N E S KU D ” F R I E D
FISH, REMOULADE,
S M A L L S H R I M P, C AV I A R ,
L E M O N , AS PA R AG U S & D I L L
When in Copenhagen, you have to
try smørrebrød—Denmark’s famous
open-faced sandwich piled high with a
cornucopia of tasty toppings. From fried
fish to cured salmon or roast beef, the
options are almost endless. The next time
you sail with Princess Cruises, don’t
miss a traditional smörgåsbord lunch
on the new Bon Appétit Recommended
excursion, Classic Copenhagen.
CREAM CHEESE,
CUCUMBER, EGG,
BEET CURED SALMON,
DILL & CAPERS
R OAS T B E E F, M U S TA R D ,
C O R N I C H O N S , R OAS T E D
& C R I S PY O N I O N S
WHILE IN
COPENHAGEN
©2018, PRINCESS CRUISE LINES, LTD. SHIPS OF BERMUDAN AND BRITISH REGISTRY.
Stop by and try
smørrebrød at these
local restaurants.
1  C H R I S T I A N S H AV N S
FÆ R G E C A F É
FA E R G E CA F E E N . D K
2  Ø L & B R Ø D BY
MIKKELLER
O LO G B R O D . D K
3  A A M A N N S 1921
AAMANNS.DK
The Stjerneskud and Roast
Beef smørrebrød are
available on the Princess
Cruises Excursion at
Christianshavns Færgecafé.
SMØRREBRØD
PROTIPS
Make your smørrebrød
with Rugbrød—a
dense, dark, and
sour Danish rye
For the perfect
accompaniment
try a Danish-style
pilsner or chilled
aquavit
A true local never eats
smørrebrød with their
hands—always use a
knife and fork
Explore Copenhagen with Princess Cruises ’ new “Classic Copenhagen ” Tour (CPH-30 0) at PRINCESS.COM/BONAPPE TIT
CITY GUIDES
copenhagen
Clockwise from
left: Welcome
to the new Noma;
impeccable
noodles at Slurp
Ramen Joint;
fresh-baked
cardamom buns
at Juno the Bakery
EVEN IF YOU HAVEN’T
SCO RED A RESERVATI ON AT
Noma 2.0, Copenhagen is
still one of the world’s most
exciting places to eat, as
chefs from René Redzepi’s
stable continue to spin
off into their own orbits.
Though the food at these
places often seems too
simple—why would you
travel to Scandinavia for
pizza and tacos?—so much
thought goes into making it
that you’ll be spoiled for the
basics back home. And if
the city’s food and design
quotient weren’t enough,
then there’s the summer vibe.
You can bike everywhere,
sip wine canal-side, and
be surrounded by friendly
people who speak better
English than you. Factor
in the 10 p.m. sunsets,
and the fantasy practically
never ends.
6 2  J U N E / J U L Y 2 018
THE TASTINGMENU
BEER BAR
R A M E N T H E J A PA N E S E
T R AV E L F O R
For those who dined at the
original Noma, it may be hard
to accept that the legendary
space is now a beer-lovers’
restaurant. But guys, Barr is still
owned by the Noma family, so
that means the “European beer
belt” food is legit. (That freerange pork schnitzel? It’s packing
anchovies.) Strap in for the
four-course tasting with beer
pairings, or sit out by the water
and order from the extensive
and ever-changing tap selection.
If you’ve never considered the
overlap between how the
Japanese and Danish fixate on
details, you will after a bowl of
the spectacular noodles at Slurp
Ramen Joint. Listing everything
that goes into former Noma chef
Philipp Inreiter’s shio ramen
would take up this entire page,
so trust. Even the house-milled
grains for the noodles are
carefully sourced. You’ll be done
in less than 30 minutes—and
getting right back in line for more.
But if You
R eally Want t o
Go to N oma…
Whe re t o
D ri n k …C o f fe e
The light-roast
coffee movement
was instigated
in part by Klaus
Thomsen of
Coffee Collective,
which now has
four Pinterest-ing
locations, the
Jægersborggade
one being our
favorite. Want
something really
different? Try
the kombucha,
fermented
from leftover
filter coffee.
HOTTEST BUNS
I N T O W N ( S O R R Y,
B U T I T ’S T R U E )
Ex-Noma chef Emil Glaser
rewards those lined up outside
his lo-fi Juno the Bakery in
Østerbro with lovely traditional
buns flecked with black
cardamom or saffron, often hot
from the oven, among other
treats like croissants. If you get
there early enough, be sure to
grab a loaf of sourdough bread—
or a roll served with aged Comté
and butter to stay; the bread
might be among the city’s best.
The recently opened lakeside location of one of the world’s
best restaurants is bigger and more elaborate, for sure. But the
most breathtaking upgrade here is the amount of sunlit kitchen
and lab space created for René Redzepi’s staff. As a result, the
already-exceptional crew is firing on even more cylinders.
Reservations open on a rolling basis for the seasonal menus
(seafood until midsummer, vegetables next, then game come fall).
Try your luck, and be sure to get on the wait list for cancellations.
C O N T I N U E S O N PAG E 67
THE GLOWING SUNSET,
INVITING YOU TO GET STARTED.
AROUND EVERY TURN.
I’M THE SERENIT Y YOU'LL WISH YOU COULD STAY IN FORE VER.
I’M COLOR ADO. AND I’LL SHOW YOU
WHAT IT’S LIKE TO BE TRULY ALIVE.
Get the guide at COLORADO.COM
good food. good health. good vibes.
behealthyish.com
A BON APPÉTIT BRAND
CITY GUIDES
copenhagen
And Don ’t
Miss...
Wher e to Drink …Wine
The waterside seating at importer
Sune Rosforth’s wine bar, Den Vandrette,
is excellent. Ved Stranden 10 has
to be Scandinavia’s most stylish
wine bar. And people swim almost
year-round at the waterfront café
La Banchina. Gotta love Copenhagen.
MORNING TO NIGHT
The first Noma satellite, 108
presented itself as dressed-down
and more approachable while
still intensely thoughtful and
technically flawless. In summer,
sit outside and sample from the
eight or so dishes available—
perhaps that day’s veg showered
with smoked egg yolk sauce.
The Corner at 108 next door
could be the most pedigreed
coffee shop and wine bar in town,
brewing beans from fabled Oslo
roaster Tim Wendelboe and
serving next-level pastries of the
internet-breaking variety.
SCANDIMEXICAN
LO W  I M PA C T D I N I N G
P E R F E C T I O N I S T ’S
PIZZA
Clockwise from top
left: Legendar y pies
at Bæst; not-your average coffee and
pastr y at The Corner
at 108; the old Noma
space is now the
beer -focused Barr
In a former warehouse on a
neglected waterfront strip is
former Noma head chef Matt
Orlando’s grand experiment
Amass. Here he serves Michelinaspirational tastings of pushall-the-envelopes food, with
a mission to generate minimal
waste. Kale-stem oil flavors a
hollandaise; leftover potato peels
become a dipping sauce. Best in
summer, when nightly bonfires are
lit near the raised garden beds.
AFTERHOURS
NAT T Y WINE CLUB
108’s former sommelier Riccardo
Marcon opened Barabba
to underscore his favorite (mostly
natural) wines with Italian food.
The menu reads rustic but skews
modern: Think binchotan-grilled
octopus with heirloom potatoes
and olives tucked beneath
young sorrel leaves. It’s open till
2 a.m. and good for groups—
two rarities in CPH.
A super-stylish
all-day café from
the Café Atelier
September crew.
Hit the courtyard
come summer.
KAP TA JN
A lakeside
restaurant with
hygge to spare.
A DM I R A LGA D E
26
The meticulously
designed restaurant
spin-off of
cult wine bar Ved
Stranden 10.
GAS O L I N E
GRILL
The pedigreed
gas-station
burger joint.
P U N K R O YA L E
A Stockholm
transplant
that can only be
described as
20-course dinner
theater meets
anarchic vodka
blackout. Think of it
as the anti-Noma.
FOR DETAILS, SEE SOURCEBOOK.
Christian F. Puglisi was one of
the first Noma chefs to make
good outside the fold with Relæ
and Manfreds—both still musts—
then Mirabelle bakery and
Bæst. Calling Bæst a pizzeria is
underselling it: Puglisi’s team
makes the exquisite fresh cheeses
from its own cows daily, cures
the charcuterie upstairs, and
grows the vegetables on its own
farm. It all comes together in
the small and big tasting menus.
Chicago-born Rosio Sánchez
is a Copenhagen success story.
After heading the pastry
department at Noma, she opened
two outposts of the taco stand
Hija de Sanchez: one for partiers
in the meatpacking district, another
in the always-busy Torvehallerne
food hall. Her new sit-down
restaurant, Sanchez, serves food
that transcends the beachy vibe,
with impeccably sourced Mexican
and Danish ingredients that get
along brilliantly, like the tart
gooseberry in the avocado dip
or the oysters with habanero
and sea buckthorn. Not to mention
that churro parfait sandwich….
AP O L LO BAR
& KANTINE
J U N E / J U L Y 2 018  6 7
68
A New
Flame
Did you know that you can
quick-grill braising cuts
(you can—look to your right!),
or char cabbage (p. 93),
or transform your sides into
s o m e t h i n g l i g h t e r ( p . 78 ) ?
I t ’s t i m e t o c h a n g e t h e w a y
you grill. Let us show you how
Recipes by
THE BON APPÉTIT TEST KITCHEN
―
Photographs by
ALEX LAU
Pork
Shoulder
Steaks with
Grilled
Mustard
Greens
p. 98
Grilled
Brisket
with
ScallionPeanut
Salsa
p. 98
70
Rosemar y
Lamb
with Juicy
Tomatoes
p. 98
YOU SHOULD
EAT SHORT RIBS
IN SUMMER
There’s a decent chance that
the last time you bought pork
shoulder there was a chill in
the air, snow on the ground,
and you were looking for an
excuse to stay inside and nap
while your dinner spent hours
in the oven. But there’s no
law that says the cuts many of
us associate with braising—
like brisket, lamb shoulder,
and short ribs—have to go
low and slow. In fact, a quick
trip to the grill is a surprisingly
great way to let them shine.
They’re rich in intramuscular
fat, which means they’re rich
in flavor. It also means they’re
forgiving—they don’t dry out
easily, letting you get a deep
char without worrying that
you’re missing your narrow
window of perfect mediumrare (for more on that, see
Prep School, page 108).
And because we typically
slice the meat thin (so you
won’t gnaw on that fat),
there’s a ton of surface area
to let bold marinades and
rubs announce themselves.
As a bonus, these cuts are
often less expensive than
standard grilling fare, so
you get that extra flavor
without paying for it.
MERYL ROTHSTEIN
FOOD STYLING BY REBECCA JURKEVICH. PROP STYLING BY AMY WILSON. ILLUSTRATION BY TIM LAHAN. FOR DETAILS, SEE SOURCEBOOK.
Grilled
Chile Lemongrass
Shor t Ribs
with Pickled
Daikon
p. 99
73
DIG IN TO
T H E U LT I M AT E
SPREAD FROM
B RYA N F U R M A N ,
G E O R G I A ’S
NEW KING OF
BARBECUE
’C u e
74
It Up
Tex t b y N I K I T A R I C H A R D S O N ― R e c i p e s b y B RYA N F U R M A N ― P ho t o g r a p hs b y P E D E N + M U N K
Fu r m a n t a kes a b rea k ; ice crea m d oesn’ t st an d a chan ce ag ai n st thi s Ci n n amon -Oat Peach Cri sp , p . 101
ou could say that Bryan
Furman is good at waiting.
He waited ten years
before opening B’s Cracklin’ BBQ in Savannah in
2014, bringing in homemade barbecue for his
coworkers and catering
events in the humid,
sleepy town. He waits months for one of the hogs
on his farm in Statesboro, Georgia, to put on
pounds. He waits hours while those pigs slowly
smoke over oak, pecan, and cherrywood before
transforming into slabs of dry-rubbed ribs and
chopped pork. So what if it takes awhile? Bryan
Furman is a natural at taking his time.
And if you really enjoy his low-and-slow food—
as do the dozen or so family and friends who drove
to gather marshside for this all-day cookout—then
you won’t mind waiting either.
“I believe in doing everything the old-fashioned
way,” Furman says, as smoke from the grill floats
upward and the cicadas buzz rhythmically. “Anything you do that way is always going to be better.
And I want to stay true to that.”
Y
76
THE
MENU
( for reci pes, see
pp . 99–101)
SPIKED
GINGERMINT
LEMONADE
LEMONPEPPER
CHICKEN
PORK
TENDERLOIN
WITH PEACH
MUSTARD SAUCE
GRILLED
CORN SALAD
SWEETAND
SPICY SL AW
P OTATO AND
EGG SALAD
CINNAMONOAT
PEACH CRISP
Furman also believes in surrounding himself with
a tight-knit community of people who support one
another. This group, which includes family and
restaurant-industry friends, is grilling out at the home
of Bob Cawley, a Savannah local. Cawley took an
interest in Furman’s restaurant shortly after it reopened, following a devastating fire in 2015, in a
new location down the street from Cawley’s home.
That community support led Furman to open a
second location of B’s Cracklin’ BBQ, in Atlanta
in 2016. But even when it comes to expansion,
Furman is mindful of timing: “I want to slow it down
and make sure that the quality is right,” he says.
And along the way, he wants to impart his knowledge to anyone who’s curious to learn. “Barbecue
has so many secrets,” Furman says. “And me, I
don’t have secrets. Like, how am I going to pass it
on if I’m holding back secrets?”
In that spirit, Furman didn’t hesitate to share his
recipes from the cookout: spicy cabbage slaw,
juicy lemon-pepper chicken, a killer potato salad
with bacon and eggs, a can’t-have-just-onehelping peach crisp, and more. It’s not complicated food, but it takes time. And if you can wait,
it’s well worth it.
FOOD STYLING BY SUE LI. PROP STYLING BY REBECCA BARTOSHESKY. FOR RESTAURANT DETAILS, SEE SOURCEBOOK.
T O P R O W : Lem on- P ep p er Ch icken, p . 100; Fu rman ’s son , N asi r Smi th Bey ; Spi ked Gi n g er -Mi n t L emon ade, p . 99
M I D D L E R O W : Furm a n’s nep hew Keifa B enj ami n ; spi ci n g thi n g s u p; F u rman wi th hi s dad, T i mothy Ben j ami n
B O T T O M R O W : A b a la nced d iet ; t he lit t lest gu est, Charl i e, wi th mom Kate Foster; g atheri n g u n der the Span i sh moss
Side Hustle
Romesco
Pasta
Salad with
Basil and
Parmesan
p. 101
T H E S E L I G H T E R , B R I G H T E R TA K E S O N S TA LWA RT B A R B E C U E
SIDE DISHES JUST MIGHT OVERSHADOW THE MAIN COURSE
Recipes by C L A I R E S A F F I T Z ― Photographs by A L E X L A U
Charred
Bean and
Pea Salad
p. 101
MAKE IT SNAPPY
Beautifully crisp with just the right amount of char, this loose riff on a three -bean salad covers your
textural bases. Like all of these sides, this bean and pea salad can be served room temp.
79
Spicy
Kimchi
Slaw
p. 102
SHRED IT
The secret to this vibrant slaw lies in a funky whipped dressing made with kimchi.
Because it skips the mayonnaise base, this is kickier and fresher -tasting than your typical coleslaw.
FOOD STYLING BY REBECCA JURKEVICH. PROP STYLING BY AMY WILSON.
Wilted
Greens in
TomatoBacon
Broth
p. 102
MIX AND MATCH
Sweet, sour, and simple, these wilted greens are a faster version of braised collards. Use an array of soft
and hardy greens, such as escarole and Swiss chard, to get something silky and with a bit of chew in every bite.
81
Gimme
IF YO U GAVE
BARBECUE
GOD AARON
FRANKLIN
AND HIS TEAM
A BIG GREEN
EGG, WHAT
WOULD THEY
COOK? THE
STICKYSWEE T
PORK SHOULDER
YOU’LL WANT
TO MAKE
ALL SUMMER
Recipe by JAMES DUMAPIT
Photograph by A L E X L A U
FOOD STYLING BY REBECCA JURKEVICH. PROP STYLING BY AMY WILSON. ILLUSTRATION BY TIM LAHAN. FOR DETAILS, SEE SOURCEBOOK.
HOG WILD
Hoisin–
Mari nated
Pork with
Molasses
Glaze
p. 102
If you’re a Big Green
Egg obsessive, you
know that these
grills can seamlessly
transition from low
and slow to blazing
hot, thanks to their
thick ceramic walls
and vents that let you
control airflow. But
you might not know
that this gloriously
shellacked pork
shoulder from James
Dumapit, chef de
cuisine at Aaron
Franklin and Tyson
Cole’s new Austin
barbecue spot, Loro
(see page 14), is
practically begging
to be cooked in
one. Inspired by the
classic Cantonese
barbecued pork dish
known as char siu,
this marinated pork
shoulder is cooked
in a closed Egg until
tender, then glazed
over a blast of heat
that creates addictive
crispy bits. Just call
it pork candy.
Some
83
84
Even
Cooler
Bring the best of the
thriving craf t beer scene home
w i t h u t t e r l y d r i n ka b l e s t y l e s ,
high-design tall boys,
and f lawless glassware
By
ALEX DELANY
― Photographs by
ALEX LAU
YES,
WE CAN
Prime examples
of the thirstquenching beer
styles you’ll
be drinking this
summer (see p. 86):
Creature Comforts
Brewing Co.
Athena, Lost
Nation Brewing
Gose, Suarez
Family Brewery
Palatine Pils,
and Mikkeller
Brewing San Diego
Windy Hill
85
2
THE
2 018
BEERS
OF
SUMMER
Perfect for picnic
tables and porch
swings alike, these
are the five styles
you’ll find all over
brewery tap
lists this season.
Gol d Star Beer Cou n ter i n Brookl yn l ooks l ike a bar — bu t al s o s e l l s bot t l e s t o g o.
Beer and a backyard
barbecue: a duo you’re
probably familiar with. But
if you’ve moved past burgers
and dogs to healthyish
seafood and new-school
sides, shouldn’t you be
reaching for a beer to match?
Maybe it’s time to embrace
some unfamiliar styles and
pack your cooler with tart,
fruity, refreshing brews. But
remember: Drinking beer is
still supposed to be fun. So
if by chance someone at your
cookout takes your cooler of
craft brews as a cue to lecture
you about hop varieties,
well, that person might just
get pushed into the pool.
1 ― F i n d Yo u r L o c a l B o t t l e S h o p
The beer we’re talking about isn’t the kind you buy at the gas station. You need to
head to a bottle shop. Yes, a store dedicated to stocking bottles (and cans) of local
and sought-after craft beers. Just roll up and ask whoever’s behind the counter
what’s new, what they drank last night, or what people are buying. The more you
talk to the folks at the shop, the more they’ll know what to recommend to you.
The Beer That
Tastes Like Beer
The LemonadeStand Beer
AMERICAN
PILSNER
BERLINER
WEISSE
The Champagne
of Beers? Yeah, that’s
a pilsner. It’s a
common style—a
lager brewed with
pilsner malt—but
brewers are pushing
it away from the
watery suds of frat
parties past and
toward the flavors of
zingy hops and
soft, toasty malt. The
stepping stone for the
craft beer newcomer.
This German wheat
ale welcomes the
addition of sweet
fruit—like mango,
passion fruit, or
lychee—in the
brewing process to
balance out its
inherent tang. This
summer, brewers are
going to be slinging
fruity Berliner Weisse
like it’s the official
sponsor of patios
nationwide.
The
Beach in
a Bottle
The Drink-onRepeat Hoppy Ale
The Country
Beer
GOSE
NEW
E N G L A N D I PA
FA R M H O U S E
ALE
Brewed with sea salt
and coriander, this
low-ABV German
style is summer’s
ultimate food beer.
It’s light and
refreshing in that getthis-barbecuesauce-off-my-face
kind of way. Think of
it like standing on the
edge of a cliff as a
wave sprays mist up
into your face—
minus the beach hair.
Gone are the days of
hangover-inducing
hop bombs. We live
in a new era, one
filled with aromatic,
fruit-forward IPAs
you’ll actually want
to drink all afternoon.
And they look
different too: New
England–style IPAs
are unfiltered, which
means they’re
cloudy—almost like
orange juice.
Sometimes they’re
called saisons; other
times, wild ales. The
common thread
among these yeastdriven ales is the
Belgian farmhouse
vibe (think hay with
barnyard-funk
undertones) they
evoke. Where the
pilsner is a testament
to simplicity, the
farmhouse ale is a
think piece.
3
GET IT
FROM THE
SOURCE
4 ― G r a b a Ta l l B o y
Craft breweries love cans these days—16-ounce cans. What’s so great about
those extra four ounces? Like a magnum of wine, a bigger vessel means less
oxygen per ounce of beer, giving you fresher, tastier brews. And as with a can
of any size, the fact that sunlight can’t get through aluminum keeps the beer
from getting skunked. Plus, there’s the aesthetic factor: Pint cans (like Other
Half Brewing’s Dream in Green, pictured left) are trophies, ready to be
displayed on book shelves, kitchen counters, and desks. You drink, or at least
shop, with your eyes, and breweries are adorning the extra space on pint
cans with quirky illustrations and bold typography that has something to say.
Finding a can to match your bathing suit shouldn’t be a problem at all.
Three ways to
transport the brewery
to your yard:
Growler
Usually a 32- or
64-ounce bottle with
a screw-on or fliptop cap, a growler
keeps draught
beer fresh for up to
four days and
should be consumed
all in one sitting,
before the beer
loses carbonation.
Crowler
If you’re thinking
this just looks like
a giant can, you’re
100 percent right.
These 32-ounce
aluminum cans are
filled from a tap and
capped by a special
machine, keeping
beer fresh for up
to a few weeks.
ILLUSTRATIONS BY TIM LAHAN
Pressurized
Growler
Insulated and fitted
with a CO₂ canister,
a pressurized
growler stores and
pours beer like a
mini keg, keeping it
fresh for as long as
you can make it last.
Equal parts effective
and impressive.
5
THE
GLASS
THAT
MAKES
BEER
BETTER
We’ll never argue
with drinking straight
from the bottle or can
(See point No. 4!),
but if you have a
minute, pouring your
beer into a glass
is well worth it. It’ll
taste a heck of a
lot better once you
let it breathe:
Fruity, bready, grassy
aromas open up,
showing you what the
beer is all about. And
there’s one glass we
hold above all others:
the Rastal Teku
($13; tekuglass.com).
The Lip
Beer rolls right
off the curved
lip of the Teku.
It’s less like
drinking and
more like letting
the beer go
where it was
meant to go:
your mouth.
The Curve
The conical
shape of the
glass traps
aromas near
the top, giving
you a hit of fruit
or yeast as
you tilt the glass
toward you.
The Stem
Stemmed
glasses keep
beer cooler
for longer,
which we can
all agree is
a good thing.
87
Glossy
& Glazy
S K I P T H E M A R I N A D E A N D H I T YO U R FAVO R I T E P R O T E I N W I T H
A G L A Z E T O B U I L D L AY E R S O F F L AV O R I N R E C O R D T I M E
Recipes by C H R I S M O R O C C O ― Photographs by A L E X L A U
Salmon
Steaks with
Cilantroand-Garlic
Yogur t Sauce
p. 103
Chicken
Drumsticks
with
Savor y
Caramel
p. 103
89
FOOD STYLING BY REBECCA JURKEVICH. PROP STYLING BY AMY WILSON. ILLUSTRATION BY TIM LAHAN.
Grilled
Pork
Chops with
Pineapple Turmeric
Glaze
p. 103
90
ALL ABOUT
THAT BASTE
Grilling a marinated
steak sounds like a
great idea in theory
until you find out
the meat won’t be
ready to cook for
another 12 hours,
and good luck if you
thought dinner was
at seven. That’s why
this summer we’re hot
for glazes that deliver
all the punch of a
marinade in minutes,
not hours. The sugar
in glazes can easily
burn, which is why
we apply them in
the final moments of
cooking to quickly
build layers of
serious flavor. And
when you’re ready
to dig in, they also
pull double duty as
finger-licking-good
dipping sauces.
Grilled
Pork
Spareribs
with
Gochujang
Barbecue
Sauce
p. 103
92
Fresh
Ta k e s
Ye s , g r i l l i n g c a n s t i l l
b e h e a l t h y i s h . W e ’r e
throwing ever ything from
deep-purple wedges
of cabbage to spice -rubbed
fish on the barbecue
Recipes by
ANDY BARAGHANI
―
Photographs by
ALEX LAU
Charred
Cabbage
with Goat
Cheese
Raita and
Cucumbers
p. 10 4
93
A LIGHTER
TOUCH
No shade thrown at hot
dogs, but putting in
a little extra effort can
yield some impressive
results. These are our
tricks to beautiful meals
that taste as good as
they make you feel.
Grilled
Swordf ish
with
Charred
Leeks
and Citrus
p. 10 4
Play with the Ratio
Grill Your Salad
Texture Is Everything
The easiest way to make
your grilling a smidge
healthier? Up the
vegetable quotient and
downsize the animal
protein. The steak on
page 97, for instance,
becomes an accent
to a plate of charred
beans and tomatoes.
It’s tempting to make
a meal seem more
nutritious by just “adding
a salad.” But then
you’re grilling one thing
and prepping another
inside. Why not just
throw hearty vegetables
alongside the meat
on the grill?
Especially for
vegetarian dishes. Use
our cabbage recipe
as a model: You need
something creamy,
some crunch (try corn
nuts!), and a fresh
or herby element to
counter the charred veg.
 A N DY B A R AG H A N I
Spicy
Grilled
Chicken
with
Crunchy
Fennel
Salad
p. 10 4
95
Spiced
Snapper
with Mango
and Red
O nion
Salad
p. 105
FOOD STYLING BY REBECCA JURKEVICH. PROP STYLING BY AMY WILSON. ILLUSTRATION BY TIM LAHAN.
Strip
Steak with
Blis tered
Beans and
Tomatoes
p. 105
97
D O A H E A D : Pork can be seasoned
1 day ahead. Cover and chill. Let sit at
room temperature 1 hour before grilling.
A New
Flame
P. 6 8
Pork Shoulder Steaks
with Grilled Mustard Greens
4 S E RV I N G S Like a rib eye, pork
shoulder has lots of intramuscular fat,
and like strip steak, it has satisfying
chew. Slicing it thickly and grilling it
swiftly maximizes the enjoyment of both.
PORK
2
1
1½
1
1
4
Tbsp. fennel seeds
Tbsp. yellow mustard seeds
tsp. black peppercorns
tsp. crushed red pepper flakes
tsp. ground cinnamon
¾"-thick boneless pork shoulder
(Boston butt) steaks (about
2 lb.) or pork blade chops
Kosher salt
G R E E N S A N D ASS E M B LY Prepare a grill
for medium heat; oil grate. Grill steaks,
turning occasionally, until an instant-read
thermometer inserted into the thickest part
registers 145° for medium, 5–7 minutes.
Transfer steaks to a cutting board,
squeeze a lemon half over, and drizzle
with olive oil. Let rest 10 minutes.
Meanwhile, grate garlic into a large
bowl and whisk with 2 Tbsp. olive oil. Add
mustard greens and toss to coat; season
with kosher salt and pepper. Spread out
greens over grate (save bowl) and grill
until lightly charred and just wilted, about
45 seconds per side. Transfer back to bowl
and squeeze remaining lemon half over.
Add red pepper flakes and toss to coat.
Transfer greens to a platter. Thinly
slice pork against the grain and place on
top of greens. Drizzle any accumulated
juices left on your cutting board over and
sprinkle with sea salt.
Grilled Brisket with
Scallion-Peanut Salsa
4 S E RV I N G S Freezing the brisket
makes it easier to slice it against the
grain, which nullifies its naturally
ropy texture and exposes more surface
area to the flavorful marinade.
Remove brisket from freezer. Using
a long sharp knife, slice brisket against the
grain ⅛" thick. (As the piece gets smaller,
you can cut it in half crosswise to make
it easier to cut.) Place inside a resealable
plastic bag. Whisk garlic, lime juice,
oyster sauce, soy sauce, brown sugar,
and oil in a small bowl until sugar
dissolves. Pour marinade over meat,
seal bag, and rub vigorously to separate
any meat slices that might want to stick
together so the marinade can get to them.
Chill at least 1 hour and up to 1 day.
S A LS A A N D ASS E M B LY Prepare a grill for
medium heat; oil grate. Cook olive oil and
peanuts in a small saucepan over medium
heat, swirling occasionally, until peanuts
are very faintly sizzling and turn golden,
6–8 minutes. Remove from heat and stir
in garlic, sesame seeds, and red pepper
flakes. Let cool. Stir in lime juice and
honey. Season salsa with salt; set aside.
Rinse scallions under cold water; drain
well. Toss in a medium bowl with cilantro.
Transfer brisket slices to a large rimmed
baking sheet with tongs, leaving any
excess marinade behind. Lightly season
with salt. Grill meat in batches until
charred underneath and nearly cooked
through, 1–2 minutes, then turn and grill
just long enough to cook through, about
30 seconds. Transfer to a platter. Toss
scallion mixture into peanut mixture and
mound over brisket.
G R E E N S A N D ASS E M B LY
1
2
2
2
½
Vegetable oil (for grill)
lemon, halved
Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil,
plus more for drizzling
garlic cloves
bunches mustard greens,
leaves torn into large pieces
Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
tsp. crushed red pepper flakes
Flaky sea salt
M E AT A N D M A R I N A D E
1½ lb. flat-cut beef brisket,
fat trimmed to ¼" thick
4 garlic cloves, finely grated
¼ cup fresh lime juice
¼ cup oyster sauce
2 Tbsp. soy sauce
2 Tbsp. dark brown sugar
2 tsp. toasted sesame oil
S P E C I A L E Q U I PM E N T :
A spice mill or
P O R K Toast fennel and mustard seeds
in a small saucepan over medium heat,
stirring occasionally, until fragrant and
mustard seeds are just beginning to pop,
about 4 minutes. Transfer to spice mill
or mortar and pestle and let cool. Add
peppercorns and red pepper flakes and
finely grind. Transfer to a small bowl
and mix in cinnamon.
Season pork steaks generously with
salt and rub all over with spice mixture.
Cover and let sit at room temperature
1 hour.
98
8 S E RV I N G S Separating the shoulder
into a few smaller-size pieces before
marinating makes it less unwieldy on
the grill and allows you to monitor
the internal temperature more easily.
LAMB AND SAUCE
S A LS A A N D ASS E M B LY
a mortar and pestle
Rosemary Lamb
with Juicy Tomatoes
Vegetable oil (for grill)
cup extra-virgin olive oil
cup chopped raw peanuts
garlic clove, finely grated
tsp. toasted sesame seeds
tsp. crushed red pepper flakes
Tbsp. fresh lime juice
tsp. honey
Kosher salt
1 bunch scallions (about 6),
thinly sliced into matchsticks
½ bunch cilantro, torn into sprigs
⅓
⅓
1
2
1
2
2
1 3–4-lb. boneless lamb shoulder
Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
2 red onions, coarsely chopped
1 bunch rosemary, leaves stripped
from half of sprigs (about 1 cup)
1 bunch oregano, leaves stripped
from sprigs (about 1 cup)
¾ cup red wine vinegar
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup plain whole-milk Greek yogurt
¼ cup fresh lemon juice
1 garlic clove, finely grated
T OM AT O E S A N D ASS E M B LY
Freeze brisket on
a small baking sheet until very firm around
the edges, 45–60 minutes.
M E AT A N D M A R I N A D E
5 beefsteak or large heirloom
tomatoes (about 4 lb.)
Flaky sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper
3 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice, divided
1 red onion, halved, thinly sliced
Extra-virgin olive oil (for drizzling)
Lay lamb shoulder,
cut side up, on a work surface. You will
notice it’s made up of a few muscle groups,
separated by thin strips of fat and gaps
where the bones have been removed.
Use a sharp knife to separate the shoulder
into smaller pieces along these natural
seams—you should end up with 5 or 6
pieces of various sizes. Transfer lamb to a
glass baking dish and season generously
on all sides with salt and pepper.
Pulse onions, rosemary leaves, and
oregano leaves in a food processor until
finely chopped; set remaining rosemary
sprigs aside. Add vinegar and oil and
pulse until a coarse purée forms. Season
marinade with salt and pepper, then
pour over lamb, turning to coat. Cover and
let sit at room temperature 2–3 hours.
Mix yogurt, lemon juice, and garlic in a
medium bowl. Season sauce with salt and
pepper; cover and chill until ready to use.
D O A H E A D : Lamb can be seasoned
1 day ahead; cover and chill. Sauce can
be made 8 hours ahead; keep chilled.
LAMB AND SAUCE
T OM AT O E S A N D ASS E M B LY About half
an hour before you plan to start grilling,
slice tomatoes into ½"-thick rounds and
arrange on a large platter. Season with
salt and pepper and drizzle with half of
lemon juice. Top with onion, season with
salt and pepper, and drizzle remaining
lemon juice over. Arrange reserved
rosemary sprigs on top; set aside.
Prepare a grill for medium heat.
Without scraping off marinade, transfer
larger pieces of lamb to grate and grill
until underside is very well browned,
about 5 minutes. Spoon some remaining
marinade over lamb, turn, and continue
to grill, turning every 5 minutes or any time
you see a flare-up, until lamb is charred in
spots and very well browned everywhere.
After large pieces have been cooking
about 15 minutes, add smaller pieces to
grill and follow same instructions; they
take less time to cook, and by staggering
the start times, all the lamb will come off
the grill within a few minutes of each other.
An instant-read thermometer inserted
into the center of each piece should
register 140° for medium, which is ideal.
Start checking smaller pieces after 7–10
minutes. The largest piece will take closer
to 30 minutes. As each piece finishes,
transfer to reserved platter, setting on top
of rosemary. Let rest 20–30 minutes.
Transfer lamb to a cutting board and
tuck rosemary sprigs off to sides of platter.
Tip platter so that accumulated tomato
and lamb juices pool at one end and
spoon over tomatoes. Using a long sharp
knife, slice lamb into very thin pieces and
arrange on top of onion and tomatoes.
Season with salt and drizzle with oil.
Drizzle yogurt sauce with oil and serve
alongside lamb.
’C u e
it up
P. 74
COOK THE COVER
Grilled Chile-Lemongrass
Short Ribs with Pickled Daikon
4 S E RV I N G S If you’ve ever had kalbi
at a Korean barbecue restaurant, you’ve
had grilled flanken-style short ribs. Look
for them prepackaged in the meat case,
or ask your butcher. This concentrated,
aromatic, spicy-sweet chile paste seasons
the ribs robustly in as little as 15 minutes.
4 red Fresno or 3 serrano chiles,
halved, seeds removed
3 lemongrass stalks, bottom third
only, tough outer layers removed,
coarsely chopped
1 3" piece ginger, peeled,
thinly sliced
3 garlic cloves, smashed
1 Tbsp. light brown sugar
1 tsp. toasted sesame oil
¼ cup vegetable oil, plus more for grill
5 Tbsp. seasoned rice vinegar,
divided
3 lb. ¼"–½"-thick crosscut bone-in
beef short ribs (flanken style)
Kosher salt
6 oz. daikon, peeled, halved
lengthwise, thinly sliced crosswise
Purée chiles, lemongrass, ginger,
garlic, brown sugar, sesame oil, ¼ cup
vegetable oil, and 3 Tbsp. vinegar in
a blender or food processor until smooth.
Place ribs in a glass baking dish; season
generously with salt on both sides.
Pour chile paste over and turn ribs to coat.
Let sit at room temperature at least
15 minutes and up to 1 hour.
Prepare a grill for high heat; oil grate.
Remove ribs from dish and grill until lightly
charred and crisp around the edges,
about 2 minutes per side. Transfer to a
platter and let rest 5 minutes.
While the ribs are resting, combine
daikon, a pinch of salt, and remaining
2 Tbsp. vinegar in a medium bowl
and toss, massaging with your hands
until slightly softened.
To serve, scatter daikon over ribs,
leaving any liquid in bowl.
Spiked Ginger-Mint
Lemonade
8 S E RV I N G S Refreshing! And potentially
debilitating, so be careful. Pitmaster
Furman uses Lawn Dart ginger-lemon
liqueur, but Absolut Citron will work.
SY R U P
½ cup chopped mint
½ cup chopped peeled ginger
1 cup sugar
C O C KTA I L A N D ASS E M B LY
1 750-ml bottle lemon-flavored
vodka
2 cups fresh lemon juice
Lemon wheels and mint leaves
(for serving)
SY R U P Bring mint, ginger, sugar, and
2 cups water to a simmer in a small
saucepan over medium heat, whisking
to dissolve sugar. Remove from heat and
let sit 1 hour. Strain through a fine-mesh
sieve into a large measuring glass or
a small bowl; let ginger-mint syrup cool
completely. Cover and chill until cold,
at least 30 minutes.
D O A H E A D : Syrup can be made
1 month ahead. Keep chilled.
C O C KTA I L Combine vodka, lemon juice,
ginger-mint syrup, and 4 cups water
in a punch bowl and stir well.
Ladle spiked lemonade into ice-filled
glasses and garnish with lemon wheels
and mint leaves.
99
Lemon-Pepper Chicken
If you want to go with the
same flavors and basic method but prefer
chicken pieces, go forth! Use skin-on,
bone-in breasts and legs—total cooking
time will be shorter.
8 S E RV I N G S
1 3½–4-lb. chicken, cut in half
4 tsp. kosher salt
2 tsp. freshly ground black pepper,
divided
Vegetable oil (for grill)
1½ lemons, divided
4 Tbsp. unsalted butter
1 Tbsp. honey
Sprinkle chicken all over with salt
and 1½ tsp. pepper. Let sit at room
temperature 1 hour.
Meanwhile, prepare a grill for medium
heat and brush grate with oil. Thinly slice
lemon half into rounds. Heat butter and
honey in a small saucepan until butter is
melted and foaming, then remove from
heat and add lemon slices.
Grill chicken, skin side down, until skin
is lightly charred and releases from grate
without tearing, about 6 minutes. Turn
chicken over and lightly brush with lemon
butter. Cover grill and continue grilling
chicken, brushing with lemon butter every
5 minutes or so, until an instant-read
thermometer inserted into the thickest part
of breast registers 150°, 25–28 minutes.
Just before chicken is ready, cut
remaining lemon into quarters and grill,
cut side down, until charred and softened,
6–8 minutes. Transfer chicken and lemons
to a cutting board; let rest 10 minutes
before carving chicken into pieces.
To serve, squeeze grilled lemons over
chicken and sprinkle with remaining
½ tsp. pepper.
Pork Tenderloin with
Peach-Mustard Sauce
8 S E RV I N G S The key with tenderloin
is making sure it’s not overcooked,
which is when it gets dry.
2 pork tenderloins (about 1 lb. each)
4 tsp. kosher salt
1 tsp. freshly cracked black pepper
Vegetable oil (for grill)
½ cup peach preserves, warmed
Peach-Mustard Sauce
(see recipe; for serving)
Sprinkle pork with salt and pepper and
rub all over. Let sit at room temperature
1 hour. Meanwhile, prepare a grill for
medium heat and brush grate with oil.
10 0
Brush pork with some preserves.
Grill, turning every 4 minutes or so and
brushing with any remaining preserves,
until charred on all sides and an instantread thermometer inserted into the thickest
part registers 130°, 10–12 minutes.
Transfer to a cutting board and let rest
10 minutes. Slice ½" thick.
Serve sliced pork with Peach-Mustard
Sauce alongside.
Peach-Mustard Sauce
MAKES 1 CUP How does that old saying
go—the riper the peaches, the more
delicious and nuanced the sauce?
2 large ripe peaches, peeled,
cut into small pieces
¼ cup ketchup
3 Tbsp. Dijon mustard
1 tsp. light brown sugar
½ tsp. freshly ground black pepper
½ tsp. (or more) kosher salt
Purée peaches, ketchup, mustard,
brown sugar, pepper, and ½ tsp. salt
in a blender until mixture is smooth and
creamy. Taste sauce and season with
more salt if needed.
D O A H E A D : Sauce can be made
1 day ahead. Cover and chill.
Sweet-and-Spicy Slaw
8 S E RV I N G S An oil-and-vinegar
dressing keeps this slaw from feeling
heavy and greasy, and the spiciness
is a good counterpart to sweet notes
in barbecue sauces and glazes.
½
6
¼
2
½
½
½
¼
⅛
1
cup apple cider vinegar
Tbsp. peach nectar or juice
cup extra-virgin olive oil
Tbsp. vinegar-based hot sauce
tsp. crushed red pepper flakes
tsp. garlic powder
tsp. kosher salt
tsp. cayenne pepper
tsp. freshly ground black pepper
large head of cabbage,
thinly sliced
Whisk vinegar, peach nectar, oil, hot
sauce, red pepper flakes, garlic powder,
salt, cayenne, and black pepper in a
large bowl to combine. Add cabbage
and toss until completely coated in
dressing. Cover and chill 30 minutes
to allow cabbage to soften and flavors
to meld together.
D O A H E A D : Dressing can be made
1 day ahead. Cover and chill.
Grilled Corn Salad with
Hot Honey–Lime Dressing
8 S E RV I N G S Bright and light, this salad
makes the most of summer produce.
3 ears of corn, husked
2 Tbsp. unsalted butter, melted
1½ tsp. kosher salt, plus more
Freshly ground black pepper
3 Tbsp. fresh lime juice
2 Tbsp. honey
1½ tsp. Sriracha
1 tsp. granulated garlic
1½ avocados, cut into ¾" pieces
1 serrano chile, thinly sliced
½ cup cilantro leaves with tender
stems
Prepare a grill for medium-high heat.
Brush ears of corn with butter; season
with salt and pepper. Grill, turning
occasionally, until kernels are very tender
and charred in spots, 10–12 minutes.
Let cool slightly, then cut kernels from cobs.
Meanwhile, whisk lime juice, honey,
Sriracha, granulated garlic, and 1½ tsp.
salt in a large bowl to combine.
Add corn, avocados, chile, and cilantro
to vinaigrette and toss to combine; season
with salt and pepper. Cover with plastic
wrap, pressing in direct contact with salad
to prevent avocados from turning brown.
Chill at least 2 hours.
D O A H E A D : Salad can be made
1 day ahead. Keep chilled.
Potato and Egg Salad with
Cherry Tomatoes and Olives
8 S E RV I N G S Can’t decide if you’re
in the mood for egg salad or potato
salad? We’ve got you covered.
6 medium russet potatoes (about
2 lb.), peeled, cut into 1" pieces
2 Tbsp. plus ½ tsp. kosher salt
3 large eggs
4 slices bacon
1 cup mayonnaise
½ cup sour cream
2 Tbsp. dill relish
1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard
1 Tbsp. garlic powder
1 Tbsp. freshly ground black pepper
1 cup halved cherry tomatoes
½ cup halved pitted black olives
from a can
Place potatoes in a large pot and pour
in cold water to cover by 2". Add 2 Tbsp.
salt and bring to a boil. Reduce heat
and simmer until potatoes are just tender,
about 15 minutes. Drain, then let cool
slightly (the potatoes should be warm
when you dress them, which will help
them soak up the dressing).
Meanwhile, cook eggs in a large
saucepan of boiling water 8 minutes
(whites and yolks will be set). Drain;
transfer to a bowl of ice water and let
cool. Drain, peel, and quarter eggs.
Cook bacon in a large skillet over
medium heat, turning halfway through,
until brown and crisp, 8–10 minutes.
Transfer bacon to paper towels to drain
and let cool slightly. Tear into 1" pieces.
Reserve 2 Tbsp. bacon fat in pan.
Whisk mayonnaise, sour cream, relish,
mustard, garlic powder, pepper, and
remaining ½ tsp. salt in a large bowl.
Add potatoes, eggs, tomatoes, olives, half
of bacon, and reserved bacon fat and
fold gently until combined and completely
coated. Transfer salad to a platter and
top with remaining bacon.
Cinnamon-Oat Peach Crisp
8 S E RV I N G S This dead-simple oat
topping can be repurposed for any stone
fruit as it comes into season this summer
or for pears and apples in fall.
5 lb. medium peaches (about 12),
peeled, sliced ½" thick
⅔ cup granulated sugar
2 Tbsp. plus 1 cup all-purpose flour
2 cups old-fashioned oats
⅔ cup (packed) light brown sugar
4 tsp. ground cinnamon
1 tsp. kosher salt
1 cup (2 sticks) chilled unsalted
butter, cut into small pieces
2 pints vanilla ice cream
Toss peaches, granulated sugar, and
2 Tbsp. flour in a large bowl to combine.
Let sit, tossing occasionally, 30 minutes.
Meanwhile, whisk oats, brown sugar,
cinnamon, salt, and remaining 1 cup
flour in a large bowl to combine. Using an
electric mixer on low speed, gradually
add butter. Once it has all been added,
increase speed to medium-high and beat
until dry ingredients are incorporated
(there should be no dry bits left in the
bowl), about 3 minutes.
Scrape peaches and any juices into
a 13x9" baking dish. Evenly scatter oat
topping over peaches and bake crisp until
peaches are soft, fruit juices are bubbling,
and topping is a deep golden brown,
60–70 minutes. Transfer baking dish to
a wire rack and let crisp cool 1 hour.
Divide among bowls and top with
large scoops of ice cream.
Side
Hustle
P. 78
Romesco Pasta Salad
with Basil and Parmesan
8 S E RV I N G S The reason this salad holds
up so well at room temperature is
because you dress it twice. It absorbs the
first round of dressing completely, the
second addition keeps it glossy, and a
fistful of walnuts and breadcrumbs means
there’s always something to bite into.
1 cup raw walnuts
3 oz. country-style bread, crust
removed, cut into 1" pieces
(about 1½ cups)
4 whole roasted red peppers
from a jar
Zest and juice of 1 lemon
2 garlic cloves
1 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes,
divided
½ cup plus 2 Tbsp. extra-virgin
olive oil
Kosher salt
1 lb. fusilli giganti (large spiralshaped pasta) or
medium shell pasta
1 lb. mixed ripe tomatoes, cut into
bite-size pieces (about 3 cups)
4 oz. Parmesan, finely chopped
1 cup basil leaves, torn if large
Preheat oven to 350°. Toast walnuts
on a rimmed baking sheet, tossing
halfway through, until golden brown,
10–12 minutes. Let cool.
Meanwhile, process bread in long
pulses in a food processor until coarse
crumbs form (you should have about
1 cup). Transfer to a small bowl.
Purée roasted red peppers, lemon
juice, garlic, ½ tsp. red pepper flakes, and
about one-quarter of the cooled walnuts
in food processor (no need to clean)
until smooth. With the motor running, very
gradually stream in ½ cup oil. Process
until thick; season romesco dressing
generously with salt.
Cook pasta in a large pot of boiling
salted water, stirring occasionally, until al
dente. Drain and rinse under cold water
(this stops cooking and removes surface
starch so the pasta will be less gummy).
Shake off excess water and transfer to
a large bowl. Toss pasta with half of the
romesco to coat; set aside. Finely chop
remaining walnuts; set aside.
Heat remaining 2 Tbsp. oil in a medium
saucepan over medium and cook
breadcrumbs, lemon zest, and remaining
½ tsp. red pepper flakes, stirring often,
until breadcrumbs are golden, 5–7
minutes. Remove from heat.
Toss reserved pasta with remaining
dressing, then fold in tomatoes, Parmesan,
and reserved walnuts just to distribute.
Sprinkle breadcrumb mixture over pasta
and top with basil.
Charred Bean and Pea Salad
8 S E RV I N G S When the farmers’ market
delivers you fresh, tender, sweet-andnot-starchy beans, don’t bother to blanch
them. A short stint under the broiler
softens them and imparts a light char
while maintaining their snappy texture.
2 dried chiles de árbol
6 garlic cloves, smashed
1 1½" piece ginger, peeled,
thinly sliced
¾ tsp. coarsely ground black pepper
½ tsp. cumin seeds
⅓ cup plus 2 Tbsp. extra-virgin
olive oil
2 Tbsp. fresh lime juice
1 tsp. pure maple syrup
1½ lb. green beans, wax beans,
sugar snap peas, and/or
snow peas, trimmed
Kosher salt
Cook chiles, garlic, ginger, black pepper,
cumin seeds, and ⅓ cup oil in a small
saucepan over low heat, swirling
occasionally, until garlic is golden and oil
is very fragrant, 5–8 minutes. Remove
from heat and stir in lime juice and maple
syrup; set dressing aside.
Meanwhile, heat broiler. Place beans
and/or peas on a wire rack set inside
a rimmed baking sheet and drizzle with
remaining 2 Tbsp. oil. Season generously
with salt, toss to coat, and spread out
beans in a single layer. Broil, undisturbed,
until tender and blistered all over, about
4 minutes. Let cool.
Arrange beans and peas on a platter
and spoon reserved dressing over;
season with more salt.
101
Spicy Kimchi Slaw
We traded the goopy
sweet mayo dressing in your typical
cabbage slaw for a whipped, airy
kimchi dressing. Cabbage two ways!
If you prefer something less spicy,
replace the kimchi juice with water.
8 S E RV I N G S
8 scallions
½ cup kimchi, plus 1 Tbsp.
juice from jar
2 Tbsp. seasoned rice vinegar
1 Tbsp. Sriracha
2 tsp. fish sauce
2 tsp. toasted sesame oil
¼ cup vegetable oil
1 small head of Napa cabbage
1 6" piece daikon, peeled,
cut into matchsticks
2 cups store-bought shredded carrots
Kosher salt
Toasted sesame seeds and cilantro
with tender stems (for serving)
Remove dark green tops from scallions
and thinly slice; set aside. Blend scallion
bulbs, kimchi, kimchi juice, vinegar,
Sriracha, fish sauce, and sesame oil in a
blender until smooth. With motor running,
very slowly stream in vegetable oil; blend
until dressing is thick and airy. Set aside.
Tear off leaves from cabbage until you
get down to the crunchy white part.
Rip outer leaves into 2" pieces. Thinly slice
core crosswise until you have about
6 cups; reserve remaining cabbage for
another use. Toss in a large bowl with
daikon, carrots, and reserved scallion tops.
Season with salt; pour reserved dressing
over. Toss to coat, transfer to a platter,
and top with sesame seeds and cilantro.
Wilted Greens in
Tomato-Bacon Broth
8 S E RV I N G S While you can use any
green you like, a mix of tender and sturdy
ones—some bitter and some hot—gives
the best balance to the final dish.
1 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil,
plus more for drizzling
4 slices bacon, coarsely chopped
1 small onion, chopped
4 garlic cloves, smashed
1 pint Sun Gold or cherry tomatoes
2 Tbsp. sherry vinegar or
red wine vinegar
2 tsp. honey
Kosher salt
10 cups torn greens (such as escarole,
Swiss chard, and/or mustard)
1 Fresno chile, thinly sliced into rings
10 2
Heat 1 Tbsp. oil in a large saucepan over
medium-low. Add bacon and cook,
stirring often, until brown and crisp around
the edges, 5–7 minutes. Add onion and
garlic and cook, stirring often, until onion
is translucent, about 5 minutes. Increase
heat to high and add tomatoes. Cook,
stirring occasionally, until tomatoes have
mostly burst and are lightly charred in
spots, about 5 minutes. Mix in vinegar,
honey, and 1½ cups water. Season lightly
with salt and simmer over low heat to
allow flavors to blend, 8–10 minutes.
Working a handful at a time, add
greens, stirring to wilt before adding more,
and cook until all greens are wilted
and submerged in the broth. Season
with more salt; let cool slightly.
Transfer greens to a serving dish.
Generously drizzle with oil and scatter
chile over.
Gimme
Some
P. 8 2
Hoisin-Marinated Pork
with Molasses Glaze
8 S E RV I N G S Time and temperature
matter here, which is why a Green Egg
is such an awesome cooking tool.
The marinated pork should be fridgecold when you roast it, so take it
straight from the refrigerator to the grill.
PORK
2 heads of garlic, cloves separated,
peeled
1 wide 6" piece ginger, peeled,
chopped
1 cup hoisin sauce
¾ cup fish sauce
⅔ cup honey
⅔ cup Shaoxing (Chinese rice) wine
½ cup chili oil
⅓ cup oyster sauce
⅓ cup toasted sesame oil
1 4–5-lb. skinless boneless pork
shoulder (Boston butt)
Kosher salt
G L A Z E A N D ASS E M B LY
¾ cup (packed) dark brown sugar
1 Tbsp. mild-flavored (light)
molasses
Bread-and-butter pickles, white
bread, cilantro, and rinsed thinly
sliced white onion (for serving)
P O R K Purée garlic, ginger, hoisin sauce,
fish sauce, honey, wine, chili oil, oyster
sauce, and sesame oil in a blender until
very smooth. Place 1½ cups in a small
bowl for glaze; cover and chill until ready
to use. Pour remaining marinade into a
2-gal. resealable plastic bag.
Place pork shoulder, fat side down, on
a cutting board with a short end facing you.
Holding a long sharp knife about 1"–1½"
above cutting board, make a shallow cut
along the entire length of a long side
of shoulder. Continue cutting deeper into
meat, lifting and unfurling with your free
hand, until it lies flat (it’s better to end
up with 2–3 even pieces than 1 uneven
piece). Add to bag with marinade and
seal, pressing out air. Work pork around
inside bag to coat with marinade.
Chill at least 8 hours and up to 1 day.
Prepare a Big Green Egg for medium
heat (with cover closed, thermometer
should register 350°). Remove pork from
marinade, letting excess drip off. Lightly
season all over with salt. Fit grill with
convection plate and set pork on top.
(If you don’t have a convection plate,
bank coals on one side and set pork
over cooler area to avoid flare-ups.)
Cover and roast pork until an instant-read
thermometer inserted into the thickest
part registers 140°–145°. (You can also
do initial cooking in a 350° oven.)
Transfer to a cutting board and let rest
at least 20 minutes.
D O A H E A D : Pork can be roasted 2 days
ahead. Let cool; cover and chill.
G L A Z E A N D ASS E M B LY Bring brown
sugar, molasses, and reserved marinade
to a simmer in a large saucepan; cook until
reduced by one-third, 6–8 minutes (you
should have about 1⅓ cups). Keep warm.
Prepare a Big Green Egg for mediumhigh heat (or use a conventional grill).
Grill pork, basting and turning with 2 pairs
of tongs every minute or so, until thickly
coated with glaze, lightly charred in spots,
and warmed through (an instant-read
thermometer inserted into the thickest part
should register 130°–145°; be careful
not to overcook), 6–8 minutes. Transfer
to a cutting board; slice against the
grain ¼" thick. Serve with pickles, bread,
cilantro, and onion.
Salmon Steaks with Cilantroand-Garlic Yogurt Sauce
Glossy
& Glazy
P. 8 8
Chicken Drumsticks
with Savory Caramel
4 S E RV I N G S Cooking the chicken legs
over indirect heat gives them time to
render fully and start to crisp so they
won’t become gluey when glazed.
Vegetable oil (for grill)
4 garlic cloves, finely grated
1 lemongrass stalk, top third
trimmed, tough outer
layers removed, finely grated
½ cup sugar
¼ cup unseasoned rice vinegar
2 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes
2 tsp. ground cumin
1 tsp. freshly ground black pepper
3 Tbsp. fish sauce
12 large chicken drumsticks
(about 3 lb.)
Kosher salt
T RY G L A Z E O N :
Whole fish, lamb kebabs
Prepare a grill for high indirect heat
(for a gas grill, leave one or two burners
off; for a charcoal grill, bank coals on one
side); oil grate. Bring garlic, lemongrass,
sugar, vinegar, red pepper flakes, cumin,
black pepper, and ½ cup water to a boil
in a small saucepan, stirring occasionally,
and cook until reduced to ½ cup, about
8 minutes. Let cool and stir in fish sauce.
Transfer half of sauce to a small bowl and
set aside for serving.
Season chicken with salt. Place over
indirect heat and cover grill with vent
open (if you have one) and positioned
over chicken. Grill, turning once or twice,
until skin is browned and crisp and meat
is nearly cooked through, 25–30 minutes.
Uncover and move chicken to hotter part
of grill. Continue to grill, turning often
and basting with remaining sauce, until
lacquered and lightly charred in places,
6–8 minutes longer. Serve with reserved
sauce alongside.
4 S E RV I N G S This glaze will work on
virtually any protein you can think of.
Even tofu. Yeah, we went there.
Vegetable oil (for grill)
2 serrano chiles
2 garlic cloves
1 cup cilantro leaves with
tender stems
½ cup plain whole-milk Greek yogurt
1 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
1 tsp. honey
Kosher salt
2 12-oz. bone-in salmon steaks
Shrimp, black bass or
snapper fillets, chicken pieces, lamb chops
T RY G L A Z E O N :
Prepare a grill for medium-high heat; oil
grate. Remove and discard seeds from
1 chile. Purée both chiles, garlic, cilantro,
yogurt, oil, honey, and ¼ cup water in
a blender until smooth; season well with
salt. Transfer half of sauce to a small bowl
and set aside for serving.
Season salmon steaks lightly with salt.
Grill, turning once or twice, until flesh is
starting to turn opaque, about 4 minutes.
Continue to grill, turning often and basting
with remaining sauce, until opaque all
the way through, about 4 minutes longer.
Serve with reserved sauce alongside.
Grilled Pork Spareribs with
Gochujang Barbecue Sauce
4 S E RV I N G S This stir-together situation
has everything you want in a quality
barbecue sauce—heat, sweetness, and
palate-gripping acid—but with extra tang.
⅔ cup apple cider vinegar
½ cup (packed) dark brown sugar
6 Tbsp. gochujang (Korean hot
pepper paste)
¼ cup adobo (from 1 can chipotle
chiles in adobo)
2 racks St. Louis–style pork spareribs
(about 4 lb.)
Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
Vegetable oil (for grill)
T RY G L A Z E O N : Boneless chicken thighs,
pork shoulder steaks, skirt steak
Place a rack in middle of oven and
preheat to 350°. Whisk vinegar, brown
sugar, gochujang, and adobo in a
medium bowl until sugar is dissolved.
Transfer half of sauce to a small bowl
and set aside for serving.
Season ribs all over with salt and
pepper. Place each rack on a double
layer of foil and wrap up. Set on a rimmed
baking sheet; bake until very tender but
not falling apart, 2½–3 hours. Let cool.
Prepare a grill for medium-high heat;
oil grate. Grill ribs, turning several times
and beginning to baste with remaining
sauce as soon as ribs begin to brown,
until charred and coated with a thick
layer of glaze and heated through, 8–10
minutes. Transfer ribs to a cutting board
and cut between bones into individual
ribs. Serve with reserved sauce alongside.
Grilled Pork Chops with
Pineapple-Turmeric Glaze
4 S E RV I N G S Don’t be afraid of getting
a good char here. It just means the sugars
in the glaze are caramelizing (not that
the meat is burning), resulting in deep,
complex flavor.
½
¼
¼
3
1
½
½
4
Vegetable oil (for grill)
cup pineapple juice (from a can)
cup honey
cup unseasoned rice vinegar
Tbsp. Dijon mustard
tsp. crushed red pepper flakes
tsp. toasted sesame oil
tsp. ground turmeric
1"-thick bone-in pork chops
Kosher salt
T RY G L A Z E O N : Shrimp, whole fish,
chicken breasts, slab bacon, beef skewers
Prepare a grill for high indirect heat
(for a gas grill, leave one or two burners
off; for a charcoal grill, bank coals on
one side); oil grate. Bring pineapple juice,
honey, vinegar, mustard, red pepper
flakes, sesame oil, and turmeric to a
simmer in a small saucepan over medium
heat and cook, swirling occasionally,
until reduced to ¾ cup, 10–15 minutes.
Let cool. Transfer half of sauce to a
small bowl and set aside for serving.
Season pork with salt. Grill over direct
heat until browned all over, about 3
minutes per side. Continue to grill, turning
several times and basting with remaining
sauce, until charred and coated with
a thick layer of glaze, about 4 minutes.
Move to cooler part of grill and take
internal temperature of pork. If needed,
continue grilling over indirect heat until
an instant-read thermometer inserted into
chops near bone registers 130°, 1–4
minutes more. Transfer pork chops to a wire
rack and let rest 10 minutes before slicing.
Serve with reserved sauce alongside.
10 3
Fresh
Takes
P. 9 2
Charred Cabbage with Goat
Cheese Raita and Cucumbers
4 S E RV I N G S Go hard when charring
the cabbage wedges—to the point you
might think you did something wrong.
They are dense and resilient and need
a long time on the grill to soften.
1 garlic clove, smashed
4 oz. fresh goat cheese
1½ cups plain whole-milk
Greek yogurt
2 cups mint leaves, divided
2 cups parsley leaves with
tender stems, divided
2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil,
plus more for drizzling
2 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice, divided
Kosher salt
1 medium head of purple cabbage
(about 2½ lb.)
3 Persian cucumbers, thinly sliced
½ cup crushed Corn Nuts
Aleppo-style pepper (for serving)
Pulse garlic, goat cheese, yogurt, 1 cup
mint, 1 cup parsley, 2 Tbsp. oil, and
1 Tbsp. lemon juice in a food processor
until smooth and pale green. Transfer
raita to a medium bowl; season with salt.
Prepare a grill for medium heat. Cut
cabbage in half through core. Cut each
half into 3 wedges, keeping core intact.
Drizzle wedges with oil to coat and
season all over with salt. Grill until deeply
charred on all sides (pretty much
blackened) and a paring knife easily slips
through the center, 8–10 minutes per side.
Transfer to a cutting board and let cool
5 minutes (this also allows the cabbage to
steam and become tender on the inside).
Cut each wedge in half crosswise.
Toss cucumbers, remaining 1 cup mint,
remaining 1 cup parsley, and remaining
1 Tbsp. lemon juice in a medium bowl.
Season salad with a big pinch of salt and
toss again.
10 4
Spread raita over plates; place a
few pieces of cabbage on each. Top with
salad and Corn Nuts. Sprinkle with
Aleppo-style pepper; drizzle with more oil.
D O A H E A D : Raita can be made 1 day
ahead. Cover and chill.
Grilled Swordfish with
Charred Leeks and Citrus
Firm, thick swordfish steaks
can handle being cooked over mediumhigh heat like a steak. An even higher
temp chars the leeks so that they’re smoky
outside and sweet and juicy inside.
4 S E RV I N G S
4
1
¼
3
medium leeks (about 2½ lb.)
cup green olives
cup coarsely chopped dill
Tbsp. white wine vinegar
Kosher salt
5 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil,
divided, plus more
3 oranges
4 1"-thick swordfish steaks
(about 3 lb.)
Freshly ground black pepper
Prepare a grill for high heat. Trim dark
green parts from leeks and remove any
tough outer layers. Rinse off any sand
and dirt and pat dry.
Throw leeks on grill (no oil needed)
and grill, turning every few minutes with
tongs, until outside layer is completely
blackened (they should start to soften and
you might see some juices begin to ooze
out), 10–12 minutes. Transfer to a platter
and let cool (this also allows them to
steam and become tender on the inside).
Reduce grill heat to medium-high.
Meanwhile, smash open olives using
the side of a chef’s knife and remove
pits (try to leave olive flesh in big pieces).
Transfer to a medium bowl.
Cut leeks into ½"-thick rounds (ashy
parts and all) and add to bowl with olives
along with dill, vinegar, a big pinch
of salt, and 3 Tbsp. oil; toss to combine.
Remove peel and white pith from
oranges with a sharp paring knife and
discard. Slice oranges crosswise into
¼"-thick rounds. Set aside for serving.
Clean and oil grate and rub swordfish
steaks with 2 Tbsp. oil; season with salt.
Grill until lightly charred and just cooked
through (fish will feel firm when gently
pressed), 5–7 minutes per side.
Divide swordfish among plates and
arrange reserved sliced oranges around.
Spoon leek mixture and any juices
in bowl over. Drizzle with more oil and
season with pepper.
Spicy Grilled Chicken
with Crunchy Fennel Salad
4 S E RV I N G S This chicken packs some
heat, which is why we paired it with
a superclean and cooling crisp fennel
salad. If fennel is not your thing, any
shaved crunchy veg will do. Try radishes,
carrots, or cucumbers instead.
1½ lb. skinless, boneless chicken
thighs
Kosher salt
2 garlic cloves
3 oil-packed anchovy fillets
(optional)
1 red chile (such as Fresno or
Holland), seeds removed,
coarsely chopped
2 Tbsp. tomato paste
2 tsp. finely chopped oregano
5 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, divided,
plus more for grilling
2 lemons, halved
2 medium fennel bulbs, tough outer
layers removed, halved
lengthwise, thinly sliced crosswise
1 small white onion, very thinly sliced
into rounds
2 Tbsp. unseasoned rice vinegar
1 Tbsp. toasted white and/or
black sesame seeds
Pat chicken dry and season with salt.
Set aside on a plate.
Smash garlic under the flat side of a
chef’s knife on your cutting board. Add
anchovies, if using, chile, and a couple
of pinches of salt and continue smashing
with the side of your knife until a paste
forms. (You can also do this with a mortar
and pestle.) Transfer paste to a large
bowl and stir in tomato paste, oregano,
and 3 Tbsp. oil. Add chicken and toss to
coat. Let sit at room temperature 1 hour.
Meanwhile, prepare a grill for medium
heat. Clean and oil grate. Grill chicken,
turning once, until lightly charred and
cooked through, about 4 minutes per side.
While the chicken is cooking, grill
lemons, cut side down, until lightly charred
and starting to caramelize, about
4 minutes. Transfer to a platter.
Transfer chicken to platter with lemons
and let rest 5 minutes.
While the chicken is resting, toss fennel,
onion, and vinegar in a medium bowl;
drizzle with remaining 2 Tbsp. oil and
season with a big pinch of salt and toss
once more.
Mound fennel salad next to chicken
and sprinkle sesame seeds over both.
Squeeze grilled lemons over chicken and
fennel salad.
Spiced Snapper with Mango
and Red Onion Salad
4 S E RV I N G S Fearless flipping: Slide two
large metal spatulas underneath the fish,
then turn with confidence. See how to
do it in Prep School, page 110.
1 5-lb. or two 2½-lb. head-on whole
fish (such as red snapper
or black sea bass), cleaned
Kosher salt
⅓ cup chaat masala, vadouvan,
or tandoori spice
⅓ cup vegetable oil, plus more
for grill
1 ripe but firm mango, peeled,
cut into irregular 1½" pieces
1 small red onion, thinly sliced,
rinsed
1 bunch cilantro, coarsely chopped
(leaves and stems)
3 Tbsp. fresh lime juice
Extra-virgin olive oil (for drizzling)
Lime wedges (for serving)
Place fish on a cutting board and pat dry
thoroughly with paper towels. With a
sharp knife, make slashes crosswise on
a diagonal along the body every 2"
on both sides, cutting all the way down to
the bones. Season fish generously inside
and out with salt. Coat fish with spice mix,
packing on more if needed (it should
cover the entire fish, head to tail). Let sit
at room temperature 20 minutes.
Meanwhile, prepare a grill for
medium-high heat. Clean and oil grate.
Drizzle both sides of fish with remaining
⅓ cup vegetable oil to coat. Grill fish
undisturbed, 10 minutes. Lift up slightly from
one edge to see if skin is puffed and lightly
charred and easily releases from grate.
If not quite ready, leave alone for another
minute or so and try again. Once it is
ready, gently slide 2 large metal spatulas
underneath and turn over. Grill fish until
the other side is lightly charred and skin
is puffed, 8–12 minutes, depending
on the size of the fish. Transfer to a platter.
Toss mango, onion, cilantro, lime juice,
and a big pinch of salt in a medium bowl.
Drizzle with a bit of olive oil and toss
again to coat. Scatter mango salad over
fish and serve with lime wedges for
squeezing over.
1½ lb. runner beans, green beans,
and/or haricots verts, trimmed
9 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil,
divided, plus more
Kosher salt
3 cups Sun Gold tomatoes, divided
3 1"–1½"-thick strip steaks
(about 2¼ lb.), patted dry
2 Tbsp. smoked paprika
1 Fresno chile, very thinly sliced
1 large shallot, thinly sliced into
rounds, rinsed
1 garlic clove, finely grated
3 Tbsp. red wine vinegar
1½ cups coarsely torn basil
Prepare a grill for medium-high heat.
Toss beans with 2 Tbsp. oil in a large
bowl; season with salt. Place beans on
grill and cook, turning occasionally, until
tender and lightly charred, 6–8 minutes.
Meanwhile, place a small skillet on grill;
pour in 2 Tbsp. oil. Cook half of tomatoes,
shaking skillet occasionally, until beginning
to burst, about 3 minutes.
Oil grate. Season steaks with salt
and coat with paprika, packing on more
if needed. Drizzle with 2 Tbsp. oil. Grill
steaks until lightly charred and an instantread thermometer inserted into the thickest
part registers 120°, about 4 minutes per
side for medium-rare. Transfer to a cutting
board and let rest 10 minutes before
slicing against the grain.
Halve remaining tomatoes and toss
with chile, shallot, garlic, vinegar, grilled
tomatoes, grilled beans, and 3 Tbsp.
oil in a large bowl. Add basil, season with
salt, and toss again. Combine steak and
tomato mixture on a platter; drizzle with oil.
Te x +
M e x + ’C u e
P. 2 2
Strip Steak with Blistered
Beans and Tomatoes
Valentina’s Salsa
Cooking half the tomatoes
in a skillet placed on the grill lets you
capture all their juices and turn them into
a saucy condiment for the steak.
4 S E RV I N G S This puréed charred-tomato
salsa gets a silky texture from the
tomatoes and is as good with chips as
it is splashed over tacos.
4 S E RV I N G S
2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
6 plum tomatoes (about 2 lb.),
cut into 1½" pieces
¼ small onion, chopped
1 garlic clove
1 serrano chile, coarsely chopped
½ cup cilantro leaves with
tender stems
1 Tbsp. fresh lime juice
Kosher salt
Heat oil in a medium skillet over mediumhigh. Cook tomatoes, stirring occasionally,
until slightly charred, 7–10 minutes. Reduce
heat to medium-low and continue to cook,
stirring occasionally, until saucy and juices
are thickened, 6–8 minutes. Let cool slightly.
Transfer tomatoes to a blender and
add onion, garlic, chile, cilantro, and lime
juice. Purée on high until mostly smooth
but still with some texture; season salsa
with salt.
D O A H E A D : Salsa can be made 2 days
ahead. Cover and chill.
2M Smokehouse
Borracho Beans
8 S E RV I N G S Because these “drunken”
(borracho) beans contain no alcohol
at all, they’re fully family-friendly.
1 lb. dried pinto beans,
soaked overnight
12 garlic cloves, lightly smashed
1 Tbsp. beef bouillon paste
4 tsp. kosher salt, plus more
¾ tsp. ground coriander
¾ tsp. ground cumin
¾ tsp. garlic powder
¾ tsp. onion powder
½ tsp. cayenne pepper
1 small white onion, chopped
1 medium tomato, chopped
½ cup chopped cilantro
Drain beans, place in a large pot, and
add 10 cups water to cover. Add garlic,
bouillon paste, and salt and bring to a
simmer. Cook until beans are just tender,
30–35 minutes. Stir in coriander, cumin,
garlic powder, onion powder, and
cayenne and cook, stirring occasionally,
5 minutes. Taste and season with more
salt if needed.
Remove beans from heat and stir
in onion, tomato, and cilantro. Cover
and let sit 5 minutes for flavors to meld.
D O A H E A D : Beans (without onion,
tomato, and cilantro) can be cooked
5 days ahead. Let cool; cover and
chill. Reheat over medium before adding
remaining ingredients.
10 5
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C H I C A G O G O U R M E T 2 018
M I L L E N N I U M PA R K , C H I C AG O
250 CHEFS · 50 SOMMELIERS,
MIXOLOGISTS
EXPERTS · 175
V I N T N E RS ,
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D I S T I L L E RS
· SEMINARS
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TA S T I N GS
S I G N I N GS
MUSICALLY
& SPECIAL
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CULINARY
EVENTS
SEPT 2830
M I L L E N N I U M PA R K
B U Y T I C K E TS N O W AT C H I C AG O G O U R M E T.O R G
TITLE SPONSOR:
Bon Appétit
PRESENTING
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& Spirits of Illinois
FOUNDER:
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Association
SUPP ORTING
SPONSORS:
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Evian
Constellation Brands
Moët Hennessy USA
The Patrón Spirits Co.
Celebrity Cruises
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Absolut Elyx
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& Seafood Company
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All-Clad
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M E D I A PA RT N E R S :
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93XRT
Edible Chicago
FROM P. 78
B
STARCH
A
ALEX DELANY
A. MANIC O T TI
sauce, and bake until bubbly.
B. PENN O N I
Actual size
This larger-than-life penne
comes either smooth or ridged
and pairs well with meat sauces.
C. LUMAC ONI GIGANTI
This is the XL-size version of
lumaconi, a curved hollow
pasta named after the Italian
word for snail, “lumaca.”
D. FUSILLI GIGANTI
Like drills that dig down
into your plate and come up
covered in cheesy sauce.
D
E. PACCHERI
Serve these large smooth
cylinders on a huge platter
tossed in ragù.
FROM P. 94
HOT WHEELS
The citrus rounds in our
Grilled Swordfish with
Charred Leeks and Citrus
look just as cool as fancy
supremes but are much
simpler to prepare. Grab a
sharp knife, memorize this
simple technique, and add
colorful wheels of oranges,
grapefruit, and more to your
next salad or yogurt bowl.
CHRISTINA CHAEY
1.
2.
3.
Slice off both ends of the fruit,
exposing the flesh beneath the pith,
then stand it upright on a cut side.
Following the natural curve of
the fruit, slice away the peel and
white pith from top to bottom.
Trim off any remaining bits of
pith, then lay the fruit on its side and
cut crosswise into ¼"-thick rounds.
P H OTO G R A P H S BY C H E L S I E C R A I G
J U N E / J U L Y 2 018  10 7
prep school
PITS STOP
Kitchen gadgets designed
to do just one thing rarely
justify the drawer space they
take up (ahem, avocado
slicers and garlic presses).
But when we’re working with
a recipe that calls for more
than, say, three cherries, the
Oxo Good Grips Cherry &
Olive Pitter ($13; oxo.com)
suddenly becomes our
most indispensable tool.
It works like a hole puncher
to quickly and cleanly
extrude the pits from cherries
and olives alike, while
the removable splatter guard
keeps unruly juices from
getting all over the countertop.
Set yourself up with a
bowl to catch the pits for easy
cleanup en route to that
deep-dish cherry pie.  C . C .
FROM P. 48
FROM P. 100
Know Your Garlic
Tartar Sauce
Fresh garlic has little in
common with the jar of garlic
powder in your pantry. Each
has a purpose, but one isn’t a
substitute for the other. Here’s
a mini cheat sheet on how
to use them (and if you can’t
remember when you bought
that jar, it’s time to restock).
Mix ½ cup mayonnaise,
¼ tsp. finely grated lemon
zest, 2 Tbsp. fresh lemon
juice, 2 Tbsp. sweet relish,
1 Tbsp. chopped drained
capers, 1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard,
and 1 finely grated small
garlic clove in a small bowl to
combine; season with salt.
Makes about 1 cup
 C H R I S M O R O C CO
TEST KITCHEN TALK
Chris Morocco,
senior food editor
FRESH GARLIC
GARLIC P O W DER
A nonnegotiable when
you want either a sweet
cooked-garlic flavor
(in soups, sautés, and
tomato sauce) or that
unmistakable raw bite
(like in Caesar dressing).
It lends big flavor to dry
rubs for grilled meats.
We also use it to flavor
dips and dressings;
unlike raw garlic,
powder won’t get more
pungent as it sits.
“We almost always grill meats to medium-rare for the most tender and juicy results.
The one exception is when we’re grilling braising cuts such as brisket and
pork shoulder. These rich, well-marbled cuts can take time to get nice and succulent,
and their high fat content means you can let them hang out on the grill and get
a great char on all sides without worrying about drying them out. So go ahead: Cook
them to medium—or even medium-well. They’ll be all the tastier for it.”
10 8  J U N E / J U L Y 2 018
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THE LIST
by BON APPÉTIT
The Taste Of
Mexico City
Mexico City’s gastronomic offerings
are a fascinating mix of present and past.
Since pre-Hispanic times, the milpa (or
cornfield) has been the agricultural
backbone of Mexico City’s food culture.
Corn has long been considered a
“giver of life,” and today it remains
a fundamental element of Mexican
gastronomic identity, along with the
nopal (cactus).
Together, corn and cactus are the basis
for both everyday dishes like tlacoyos
and huaraches to most complex meals
served in gourmet restaurants like Pujol,
Quintonil, Nicos, and Dulce Patria.
These restaurants strive to tell diners
great stories of Mexico City’s heritage
and culture by incorporating fundamental
ingredients—corn and cactus—into
international fusion dishes based on
original recipes.
Our Thing Is Tea
There are no shortcuts to making
exceptional iced tea. In fact, our tea
masters spend years perfecting it.
It’s why they insist on using only real
tea leaves, rolled and brewed for a
smooth, delicious taste. It’s a difference
that stands the test of time. And it’s a
difference we think you’ll be able to taste
at the very first sip. Discover tea the way
it was meant to be with Pure Leaf®.
pureleaf.com
Visit Mexico City and enjoy its flavors!
¡Visita la CDMX y disfruta de sus sabores!
cdmxtravel.com/en
©2018 PURE LEAF is a registered trademark
of the Unilever Group of Companies.
BITESHAPPENINGSPROMOSBONAPPETIT.COM/THELIST
®
prep school
NEVER
SETTLE FOR
51% REAL
CHEESE.
FROM P. 28
J’APPROVE!
ORTIZ BONITO DEL NORTE TUNA
I grew up eating bland, gray canned tuna packed in water. Now that
I’m a tuna-buying human adult, my heart belongs to Ortiz’s Bonito del Norte
($15 for 250 g; zingermans.com). It’s no 99-cent can, but this meaty,
sustainably caught Spanish tuna packed in buttery olive oil is worth the
splurge. It adds heft and decadence to any salad or sandwich, but I’ll admit
you can often find me snacking on it straight out of the tin.  M O L LY B A Z
FROM P. 38
The Way the Cookie Crumbles
For our Blackberry Icebox Cake, no other cookie will
do but classic Nilla Wafers. They start off crisp and airy,
then as they nestle into a bed of whipped cream or
pudding, they transform into delightful dissolve-in-yourmouth crumbs—not wet mush like other brands.
 C L A I R E SA F F I T Z
FROM P. 105
ON THE FLIP SIDE
Grilling a whole fish doesn’t have to be
daunting, especially if you use this turning
method to minimize the risk of tearing
the skin. To do it: Lay the fish horizontally
across the grill grate with the top fins
toward you and cook. When it’s time
to turn, wedge two metal spatulas
under the fish—one near the tail and
the other at the head—then quickly
and confidently roll it away from you
onto its other side in one fluid motion.
ALIZA ABARBANEL
FOOD STYLING BY ANNA BILLINGSKOG. ILLUSTRATIONS: JOE WILSON; BRUCE HUTCHISON (PORTRAIT).
The best food doesn’t start with
Pasteurized Process Cheese Food.
It’s only required to contain 51% real
cheese. And taste buds definitely
aren’t getting excited for that.
REAL CHEESE PEOPLE
®
KNOW THE DIFFERENCE
100% REAL,
NATURAL CHEESE MAKES.
51% vs. 100%
While Pasteurized Process Cheese Food
is only required to contain 51% real cheese,
Sargento® Slices are always 100% real,
natural cheese. A burger can’t be
its best when it’s made with anything less.
© 2018 Sargento Foods Inc.
recipe index
COOK THE COVER
Grilled ChileLemongrass Short
Ribs with Pickled
Daikon p. 99
BEVERAGES
Blueberry, Lime, and
Cashew Smoothie
p. 44
Spiked Ginger-Mint
Lemonade p. 99
Strawberry-Rose
Agua Fresca p. 26
SALADS
Charred Bean and
Pea Salad p. 101
Grilled Corn Salad
with Hot Honey–
Lime Dressing p. 100
Potato and Egg
Salad with Cherry
Tomatoes and Olives
p. 100
Spicy Kimchi Slaw
p. 102
Strawberry and
Watercress Salad
p. 26
Sweet-and-Spicy
Slaw p. 100
SANDWICHES
Fried Fish
Sandwiches with
Cucumbers and
Tartar Sauce p. 48
Niçoise Toast p.28
MAIN COURSES
SEAFOOD
Grilled Swordfish
with Charred Leeks
and Citrus p. 104
Salmon Steaks with
Cilantro-and-Garlic
Yogurt Sauce p.103
Spiced Snapper with
Mango and Red
Onion Salad p. 105
MEAT
Grilled Brisket with
Scallion-Peanut
Salsa p. 98
Grilled ChileLemongrass Short
Ribs with Pickled
Daikon p. 99
Grilled Pork Chops
with PineappleTurmeric Glaze
p.103
Grilled Pork
Spareribs with
Gochujang
Barbecue Sauce
p.103
Hanger Steak with
Charred Scallion
Sauce p. 36
Hoisin-Marinated
Pork with Molasses
Glaze p. 102
Pork Shoulder
Steaks with Grilled
Mustard Greens
p. 98
Pork Tenderloin
with Peach-Mustard
Sauce p.100
Rosemary Lamb with
Juicy Tomatoes p. 98
Strip Steak with
Blistered Beans and
Tomatoes p. 105
PASTA
Orecchiette with
Buttermilk, Peas,
and Pistachios p. 34
POULTRY
Chicken Drumsticks
with Savory
Caramel p.103
Lemon-Pepper
Chicken p. 100
Spicy Grilled
Chicken with
Crunchy Fennel
Salad p. 104
VEGE TARIAN
Charred Cabbage
with Goat
Cheese Raita and
Cucumbers p. 104
Orecchiette with
Buttermilk, Peas,
and Pistachios p. 34
sourcebook
VEGETABLES,
SIDE DISHES
Charred Bean and
Pea Salad p. 101
Grilled Corn Salad
with Hot–Honey
Lime Dressing p. 100
Marinated Summer
Squash with
Hazelnuts and
Ricotta p. 33
Potato and Egg
Salad with Cherry
Tomatoes and Olives
p. 100
Romesco Pasta
Salad with Basil and
Parmesan p. 101
Spicy Kimchi Slaw
p. 102
Sweet-and-Spicy
Slaw p. 100
2M Smokehouse
Borracho Beans
p. 105
Wilted Greens in
Tomato-Bacon Broth
p. 102
CONDIMENTS
Grand Aioli p. 46
Peach-Mustard
Sauce p. 100
Tartar Sauce p. 108
Valentina’s Salsa
p. 105
DESSERTS
Blackberry Icebox
Cake p. 38
Cinnamon-Oat
Peach Crisp p. 101
Matcha-Dipped
Strawberries p. 26
Mini Eton Mess
p. 26
FOR NUTRITIONAL
INFO FOR THE
RECIPES IN THIS
ISSUE, GO TO
BONAPPETIT.COM
/RECIPES
SHOPPING LIST
A NEW FLAME pp. 68–73
P. 70 DINNER PLATE From
$150–$380; bddw.com
TRAVEL PLANNER
STARTERS pp. 13–22
ACCOMPLICE 3811 Grand View
Blvd., Los Angeles; 310-5747610; accomplicebar.com
BASIC KITCHEN 82 Wentworth
St., Charleston, SC; 843-7894568; basickitchen.com
BELLECOUR 739 Lake Street E.,
Wayzata, MN; 952-444-5200;
bellecourrestaurant.com
CÚRATE 13 Biltmore Ave.,
Asheville, NC;
828-239-2946;
heirloomhg.com/curate
FRANKLIN BARBECUE
900 E. 11th St., Austin;
512-653-1187;
franklinbarbecue.com
GARLAND 14 W. Martin St.,
Raleigh, NC; 919-833-6886;
garlandraleigh.com
LORO 2115 S. Lamar Blvd.,
Austin; 512-916-4858;
haihospitality.com/
restaurants/loro
SUGARFISH For locations,
go to sugarfishsushi.com
2M SMOKEHOUSE 2731 S. WW
White Rd., San Antonio;
210-885-9352;
2msmokehouse.com
UCHI For locations,
go to uchiaustin.com
VALENTINA’S TEX MEX BBQ
11500 Manchaca Rd., Austin;
512-221-4248;
valentinastexmexbbq.com
DINNER TONIGHT pp. 28–36
ROLF AND DAUGHTERS
700 Taylor St., Nashville;
615-866-9897;
rolfanddaughters.com
CITY GUIDES:
COPENHAGEN pp. 60–62
ADMIRALGADE 26
Admiralgade 26; +45-33337973; admiralgade26.dk
AMASS Refshalevej 153;
+45-4358-4330;
amassrestaurant.com
APOLLO BAR & KANTINE
Nyhavn 2; +45-6053-4414;
apollobar.dk
BÆST Guldbergsgade 29;
+45-3535-0463; baest.dk/en
BARABBA
Store Kongensgade 34;
+45-3310-1040; barabba.dk
BARR Strandgade 93;
+45-3296-3293;
restaurantbarr.com/en/home
THE COFFEE COLLECTIVE
For locations, go to
coffeecollective.dk
THE CORNER AT 108
Strandgade 108; +45-32963292; 108.dk/the-corner
DEN VANDRETTE
Havnegade 53A;
+45-7214-8228; denvandrette.dk
GASOLINE GRILL For locations,
go to gasolinegrill.com
JUNO THE BAKERY
Århusgade 48; instagram.com
/juno_the_bakery
KAPTAJN Sortedam
Dossering 45A;
+45-6018-7414;
restaurantkaptajn.dk
LA BANCHINA Refshalevej 141A;
+45-3126-6561;
labanchina.dk/en
NOMA Refshalevej 96; noma.dk
108 Strandgade 108;
+45-3296-3292; 108.dk
PUNK ROYALE Dronningens
Tværgade 10; +45-2757-8500;
punkroyale.dk
SANCHEZ Istedgade 60;
+45-3111-6640;
lovesanchez.com
SLURP RAMEN JOINT
Nansensgade 90;
+45-5370-8083; slurpramen.dk
VED STRANDEN 10 Ved
Stranden 10; +45-3542-4040;
vedstranden10.dk
’CUE IT UP pp. 74–77
B’S CRACKLIN’ BBQ
For locations, go to
bscracklinbbq.com
GIMME SOME pp. 82–83
FRANKLIN BARBECUE 900 E.
11th St., Austin; 512-653-1187;
franklinbarbecue.com
LORO 2115 S. Lamar Blvd.,
Austin; 512-916-4858;
haihospitality.com
/restaurants/loro
THE LAST BITE p. 114
LOS FUEGOS BY FRANCIS
MALLMANN 3201 Collins Ave.,
Miami Beach; 786-655-5610;
faena.com
BON APPÉTIT IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF ADVANCE MAGAZINE PUBLISHERS INC. COPYRIGHT © 2018 CONDÉ NAST. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. VOLUME 63, NO. 5. Bon Appétit (ISSN 00066990) is published ten times a year by Condé Nast, which is a division of Advance Magazine Publishers Inc. PRINCIPAL OFFICE: 1 World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007. Robert A. Sauerberg, Jr., President & Chief Executive
Officer; David E. Geithner, Chief Financial Officer; Pamela Drucker Mann, Chief Revenue & Marketing Officer. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY, and at additional mailing offices. Canada Post Publications
Mail Agreement No. 40644503. Canadian Goods and Services Tax Registration No. 123242885-RT0001. POSTMASTER: SEND ALL UAA TO CFS. (SEE DMM 707.4.12.5); NON-POSTAL AND MILITARY FACILITIES: SEND ADDRESS
CORRECTIONS TO Bon Appétit, P.O. Box 37617, Boone, IA 50037-0617. FOR SUBSCRIPTIONS, ADDRESS CHANGES, ADJUSTMENTS, OR BACK ISSUE INQUIRIES: Please write to Bon Appétit, P.O. Box 37617, Boone, IA 500370617, call 800-765-9419, or email subscriptions@bonappetit.com. Please give both new and old addresses as printed on most recent label. SUBSCRIBERS: If the Post Office alerts us that your magazine is undeliverable, we have
no further obligation unless we receive a corrected address within one year. If during your subscription term or up to one year after the magazine becomes undeliverable, you are ever dissatisfied with your subscription, let us know.
You will receive a full refund on all unmailed issues. First copy of new subscription will be mailed within eight weeks after receipt of order. Address all editorial, business, and production correspondence to Bon Appétit Magazine, 1
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UNLESS SPECIFICALLY REQUESTED TO DO SO BY BON APPÉTIT IN WRITING. MANUSCRIPTS, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND OTHER MATERIALS SUBMITTED MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY A SELF-ADDRESSED STAMPED ENVELOPE.
112  J U N E / J U L Y 2 0 1 8
ADVERTISEMENT
OCEAN’S BOUNTY
The Florida Keys have long been known among savvy travelers as the perfect
destination to escape for a relaxing vacation away from the world.
S I T U AT E D
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and the deep blue waters of the Florida Strait is Islamorada. Made up of
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In addition to relaxation and tranquility, world-class fishing, and a multitude
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fla-keys.com/islamorada 1.800.322.5397
T H E L AS T B I T E
Francis Mallmann
Teach us something
new to grill
And you
thought grilled
peaches
were novel.
“The first ingredient in grilling is patience,”
says Francis Mallmann, the Argentinian chef
whose live -fire cooking st yle is revered by f l a m e obsessed chefs the world over. Whether he’s cooking a whole
side of beef over burning logs on his private island in Patagonia
(yes, really) or simply sizzling a side of mushrooms, the Seven
Fires author has learned that the best results come when you take
your time. One of his specialties: a 12-hour grilled whole pineapple,
which he offers as a seasonal dessert at Los Fuegos in Miami
114  J U N E / J U L Y 2 0 1 8
Beach. “Every hour I’ll dip it into a pineapple
syrup with cinnamon as it cooks so it gets
toasted and caramelized,” he says. The end result is
fruit so meltingly tender you can eat it down to the core,
Mallmann’s favorite part. But what to do for the 11 hours you’re
not tending to the grill? “I’ll take a chair, beautiful books, flowers,”
he says. “I make it very comfortable and plan to spend my whole
day there.” When “there” refers to your very own island, who are
we to disagree? — C H R I S T I N A C H A E Y
P H OTO G R A P H BY A L E X L AU
FOOD STYLING BY CHRIS MOROCCO. ILLUSTRATION BY JOE WILSON. FOR RESTAURANT DETAILS, SEE SOURCEBOOK.
THE VITALS
Hometown
Bariloche,
Argentina
Age
62
Number of
restaurants
9
Once you
You’ve
pop…
seen him on
Netflix’s
Chef’s Table
He also loves
to grill
Baked Alaska
Character isn’t made by machine.
Every bottle of Maker’s Mark®
Bourbon is still hand-dipped
in our signature red wax.
Learn more at makersmark.com.
WE MAKE OUR BOURBON CAREFULLY. PLEASE ENJOY IT THAT WAY.
Maker’s Mark® Bourbon Whisky, 45% Alc./Vol. ©2018 Maker’s Mark Distillery, Inc. Loretto, KY
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