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2018-07-01 Artists & Illustrators

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&
Win over �0 of luxury art products
S T R A T O R S
IDEAS
INS IR ATIO
0
SUMMER
PROJECTS
Top tips, tools and
techniques for
outdoor painting
paint
your
?What galleries want
?Oil myths busted
?Draw beautiful birds
?Augustus John?s art
Capture character, texture and colour
IMPROVE YOUR PRECISION
MES YEUX SONT UN PAYS DE SECRET ? NITRAM CHARCOAL
NITRAM STYLUS
"Whenever I start a drawing, I am always looking for new ways to balance expression and
technique. The Nitram Stylus charcoal holder is an essential tool for any artist looking for
control and subtlety. I like to sharpen my charcoal frequently and the Stylus helps to keep the
charcoal usable for a longer time. Not only does it avoid wasting pieces of charcoal that
have become too small, but also improves the precision of the drawing gesture.
The Nitram Stylus offers a greater variety of pressure, more possibilities to alternate angles
and provides a better grip of your charcoal.?
The Nitram Stylus is designed to hold Nitram H, HB, B or 6mm Round Charcoal.
The package includes a Nitram Charcoal Assortment and a set of
4 color coded end caps to identify which charcoal is in the holder.
Watch as Florent Farges creates this stunning drawing using many
different formats of Nitram Charcoal. To see this fantastic video go to:
youtu.be/KKVFW1l-5l0 or scan the QR code
NITRAM
TM
MC
www.nitramstylus.com
FINE ART CHARCOAL
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Post: Artists & Illustrators,
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� MARK RAGGETT
Artists & Illustrators,
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EDITORIAL
Editor Sally Hales
Digital Editor Natalie Milner
Art Editor Alicia Fernandes
Contributors Laura Boswell,
Jake Spicer, David Boyd Haycock,
Tom Dunkley, Adele Wagstaff, 羒ne
Divine, Adebanji Alade, Sophie
Ploeg, Hashim Akib
Welcome
IT?S TIME TO STEP
INTO THE LIGHT
I was taken aback when a sunglasses-wearing stranger looked at me
on the platform at London Blackfriars and blurted, ?It?s spectacular,
isn?t it?? Not because it wasn?t true. The glass-encased station spans
the Thames and boasts dramatic views of St Paul?s, the Houses of
Parliament and beyond. But for most of the year, harassed city
workers simply shuf?e through, their minds and eyes elsewhere.
Not today. The sun has ?nally come out and the change is
palpable. Light dapples the river and warms parliament?s limestone; even the
twinkling re?ections on some of London?s less attractive buildings look divine.
Stepping off sti?ing trains, travellers are transformed into sociable folk who
stop to marvel at the skyline and ? shockingly ? to speak.
Light changes everything; even more so for painters. It means starker
contrasts, shimmering colours and re?ections to capture, as well as the chance
to grab the kit and go outdoors. To help you make the most of the long, sunny
days ahead, this issue is packed with tips for working en plein air, from
mastering vibrant urban scenes (page 58) to top events and exciting products
(page 57). And if you?re wondering where to paint this summer, check out our
guide to beautiful Pembrokeshire (page 28) to discover why artists have long
adored the region and its lovely light.
Sally Hales, Editor
Write to us!
Are you painting outdoors this summer? Share your art using one of the contacts below...
info@artistsandillustrators.co.uk
AandImagazine
@AandImagazine
ArtistsAndIllustrators
AandImagazine
Artists & Illustrators 3
Contents
69
PAI N T
PE R F E CT
FUR
LAURA QUINN HARRIS
JAMIL AKIB
12
Nine exciting ways to get
creative this month
10 Exhibitions
Explore the best art shows
12 Fresh Paint
Three inspiring new artworks
24 In The Studio
Children?s book illustrator
Laura Carlin shows us round
26 The Working Artist
Consistency is key ? Laura Boswell
helps you manage your portfolio
36 10 Minutes With...
We speak to painter and
printmaker Angie Lewin
45 Prize Draw
Win one of ?ve luxury da Vinci
paint brushes worth �8 each
featureS
18 The Art Of
Augustus John
51
28 Picture Perfect
Pembrokeshire
54 Paint A Swan
The region?s artists tell us what
makes the area so special
57 Go Outdoors
Tackle re?ections in watercolour
Your kit essentials, plus exciting
plein-air events and competitions
38 Paint The Season
Sally Hales gets a taste of Wendy
Jelbert?s watercolour workshops
58 Paint Cit y Life
51 About The House
62 Talking Techniques
Winner of Artists & Illustrators?
Pastel Society award, Felicity
House, shares her techniques
Andrew Roberts on outdoor oils
practical
41 Sketchbook
Top tips and techniques
46 Masterclass
Botanical artist Fiona Strickland
shares her painting tips
Learn how to mix acrylic and oil in
a still life study with 羒ne Divine
& Illustrators
L AUR A QUINN
HARRIS ? PAGE 69
David Boyd Haycock describes the
rise of the much-loved painter
82 What I?ve Learned
4 Artists
FELICITY HOUSE
regulars
7 The Diar y
Fur is thick,
so you need
to create the
illusion of
volume by
adding layers,
but don?t
overwork it
Capture a busy street scene
66 Challenging Oil
Painting My ths
Pl ei n-ai r
pa in ti ng
ti ps ?
pa ge 62
Sophie Ploeg explores supports
69 Your Questions
Master a realistic pet portrait
72 Coloured Pencils
Jake Spicer?s ?rst instalment
76 Essential Acr ylics
Hashim Akib?s advice on retarders
Letters
write to us
LETTER OF THE MONTH
The magic of a splodge of paint
When I saw the name ?Sir Kyf?n Williams? on the contents page of the
June 2018 magazine (issue 391), I turned right away to Nicholas
Sinclair?s heartwarming article on his godfather. It?s a small world. I?m a
journalist, and when Sir Kyf?n died in 2006, The Scotsman newspaper
commissioned me to compile his obituary. I started with: ?Sir Kyf?n
Williams was the Welsh painter who captured majestic images of his
native land. People queued for days to buy his work, at prices reaching
�,000, and Wales regarded him as a national treasure.?
My great good fortune while on holiday in Anglesey some 20 years
ago was a chance meeting with Sir Kyf?n. I found him warm, engaging
and humorous. As for his work: I loved it. There was one mountain
scene where in the foreground was a wee splodge of white. I stepped
back, and there with Sir Kyf?n?s magic, suddenly appeared a
hardworking collie. My thanks to Nicholas Sinclair for his writing.
Gordon Casely, Crathes, Kincardineshire, via email
THE JEWEL IN THE CROWN
Just to say a very huge thank you
for choosing my artwork Jewel
Border (below) as the artwork of the
month for April [in the Portfolio
Plus, Editor?s Pick email]. It was
such an amazing surprise and made
my weekend. It was timely too, as
earlier that day I had sent off some
digital artwork to see it made into
a scarf and cushions (and
wondering what I was doing taking
this step) so I am taking your
wonderful news as a good omen.
Andrea Hook, Dorset, via email
We loved seeing this winning artwork
looking resplendent in its new forms.
See more of Andrea?s art on her
Portfolio Plus page www.artistsand
illustrators.co.uk/andreahook. For the
chance to be in June?s Editor?s Pick, sign
up to Portfolio Plus and submit your
works on the theme of ?still life? at
www.artistsandillustrators.co.uk/
competitions before noon on 3 June.
Send your letter or email
to the addresses below:
POST:
Your Letters
Artists & Illustrators
The Chelsea Magazine
Company Ltd.
Jubilee House
2 Jubilee Place
London SW3 3TQ
EMAIL: info@artists
andillustrators.co.uk
The writer of our ?letter
of the month? will receive
a � gift voucher from
our partner GreatArt,
who offers the UK?s
largest range of art
materials with more
than 50,000 art supplies
and regular discounts
and promotions.
www.greatart.co.uk
SOCIAL SCENE
Keep up-to-date with
what?s happening
on our busy social
media channels
Let us know what you think of
Artists & Illustrators magazine
and share your painting projects
with us at the contacts below...
@AandImagazine
ArtistsAndIllustrators
AandImagazine
AandImagazine
Artists & Illustrators 5
ISTOCK
Talking
point: would
you ask a
non-painter
what they
think of your
picture?
Casey Floyd: Yes? I
feel like it?s a little elitist
to suggest a non-painter couldn?t
elucidate what it is they like or
don?t like about a picture. When
I paint, it is primarily to please
myself; after that, I paint for
everyone, not just fellow artists.
Linda Davies Gage: I don?t ever
ask anyone, ?What do you think
of my painting?? If my painting
does not elicit a response from
someone, so be it.
Ann Green: We?ve been
brainwashed with too many
myths and false rules over the
years. You don?t need to follow
things like the Golden Rule of
Proportion or the Horizon theory.
These may assist you when
starting out, but as you progress,
test theories... That?s all they are.
Pay attention only to people who
give you a technically accurate
crit, not likes and dislikes.
Join our regular Talking Points
at www.facebook.com/
ArtistsAndIllustrators
PAUL FEILER:
ONE HUNDRED YEARS
21 April ? 8 July 2018
jerwoodgallery.org
01424 728377
#FeilerOneHundredYears
Janicon XLII (2001), oil, silver and gold lead on canvas laid on wood. Courtesy Redfern Gallery. � The Artist?s Estate by kind permission
the diary
9 ARTISTIC THINGS TO DO IN
July
CAMBRIDGE OPEN
STUDIOS 2018
NAOMI DAVIES
Starting on 7 July and continuing over four
more weekends, 350 artists are set to
open their doors in 221 locations across
Cambridgeshire. Plan your days out by
downloading the Cambridge Open Studios
app from mid-June and searching for
artists. Or look out for the yellow COS
flags outside participating studios.
www.camopenstudios.co.uk
the diary
d o n? t
mis s!
VISIT
4
compete
2
create
3
Introduction to Print
Head to Leicester Print Workshop
from 7 June to 12 July to ?nd your
niche during its six-week evening
course. Explore a different technique each session,
including drypoint, linocut, hard-ground etching,
monoprint and collagraph.
www.leicester-print-workshop.myshopify.com
DEBORAH ANN, LANDSCAPE WITH 3 TREES
enter
5
Wells Art Contemporary
Awards 2018
Send your creative efforts to this open
competition before 2 July. All shortlisted
artworks go on show at Bishop?s Palace and
Gardens in Somerset from 8 to 22 October.
wac.artopps.co.uk
9
read
6
exhibit
ING Discerning Eye
Exhibition 2018
Get your small works of
art seen alongside
internationally recognised
names. A lucrative �000
top prize is also up for grabs.
Entries open 1 June.
thediscerningeye.artopps.co.uk
8 Artists
& Illustrators
7
Explore
Patchings Festival
The festival of creativity is
back for another year from
12 to 15 July. Artists David
Howell, Roger Dellar, Soraya
French and more will be on
hand to inspire.
www.patchingsartcentre.co.uk/
patchings-festival
8
paint
Drawing and Painting
Summer School
Master sight-size, and learn
draughtsmanship and paint
handling, at LARA?s summer
school. Join a course at its
Bristol base from 2 to 6 July,
2 to 13 July or 9 to 13 July.
www.drawpaintsculpt.com
500 Self-Portraits
Explore the fascinating ways that
artists from antiquity to the present
day have chosen to paint themselves
with this beautiful selection of
self-portraits (Phaidon, �.95).
The revised and expanded version
includes powerful works from artists
as wide-ranging as Rembrandt and
David Hockney.
www.phaidon.com
RUTH DE MONCHAUX PRINTS � H躄YA CORTY
PAMELA RAITH PHOTOGRAPHY
Royal Institute of Oil
Painters Annual
Exhibition 2018
With new president, portraitist Tim
Benson (above), settling into the
role, the ROI is calling for entries to
its open exhibition. Polish off your
oil paintings and enter up to four
works online before 17 August.
www.mallgalleries.org.uk
Brockley
Open
Studios 2018
Get in the neighbourly
spirit and visit artists
in their studios in
London?s Brockley
from 30 June to 2 July.
As well as paintings,
prints, ?re etchings
and ceramics, you can
enjoy workshops by
Caravan Arts and
Aurora Options.
www.brockleyopen
studios.co.uk
Exhibitions
JULY?S BEST ART SHOWS
LONDON
Aftermath: Art in the Wake
of World War One
5 June to 23 Septemebr
How artists responded to
the scars left by war.
Tate Britain. www.tate.org.uk
Bomberg
21 June to 16 September
An extensive private collection.
Ben Uri Gallery and Museum.
www.benuri.org.uk
Edward Bawden
23 May to 9 September
160 works that emphasise
the artist?s versatility.
Dulwich Picture Gallery. www.
dulwichpicturegallery.org.uk
Jonathan Cooper: 30 Years
12 to 21 July
Celebrates the best in
contemporary ?gurative
painting and drawing.
Jonathan Cooper.
www.jonathancooper.co.uk
RECOMMENDED
BP Portrait Award 2018
14 June to 23 September
International exhibition of
contemporary portrait painting.
National Portrait Gallery.
www.npg.org.uk
Chris Orr RA: The Miserable
Lives of Fabulous Artists
Until 9 August
Humorous works on paper.
Royal Academy of Arts.
www.royalacademy.org.uk
Quentin Blake: Voyages
to the Moon and the Sun
Until 30 September
The much-loved artist?s
illustrations of Cyrano de
Bergerac?s 17th-century novel.
House of Illustration.
www.houseo?llustration.org.uk
Brantwood, Coniston.
www.brantwood.org.uk
Our Kisses Are Petals ?
Lubaina Himid
Until 28 October
New ?ag-like works from
the Turner Prize-winning artist.
BALTIC, Newcastle.
www.baltic.art
Op Art in Focus
16 July 2018 to 16 June 2019
Pioneering artists from
the 1960s to today.
Tate Liverpool. www.tate.org.uk
Personal Feeling is the Main
Thing ? Chantal Joffe
19 May to 2 September
Fearless paintings confront the
physicality of the human body.
The Lowry, Salford.
www.thelowry.com
ENGLAND ? NORTH
A World of? Work
Until 2 September
Artists react to human labour.
The Bevin Boys ? War?s
Forgotten Workforce
Until 30 September
Marking the 75th anniversary
of mining conscription.
Mining Art Gallery,
Bishop Auckland.
www.aucklandcastle.org
The Making of an Englishman
30 June to 11 August
Paintings and drawings by
artist Fred Uhlman made
between 1928 and 1971.
Hatton Gallery, Newcastle.
www.hattongallery.org.uk
ENGLAND ? MIDLANDS
Andrew Tift: Immortalise
25 May to 2 September
Paintings, drawings and
sketchbooks.
The New Gallery Walsall. www.
thenewartgallerywalsall.org.uk
Harmonising Landscapes:
Paul Sandby RA
16 June 2018 to 6 January 2019
Drawings, paintings and prints.
Newstead Abbey, Nottingham.
www.newsteadabbey.org.uk
Lest We Forget?
JOHN NASH, 1918, OIL ON CANVAS, 182.8X213.3CM. � IWM ART 2243
27 July 2018 to
24 February 2019
Iconic paintings by Paul Nash,
Stanley Spencer, Wyndham
Lewis and John Singer
Sargent, intended for a First
World War memorial that was
never built, will be united in
this free exhibition. Sitting
alongside more than 180
objects, the show will
challenge perceptions of the
First World War as part of
IWM North?s Making a New
World, a season of innovative
exhibitions and installations.
Imperial War Museum North,
Manchester. www.iwm.org.uk
ENGLAND ? SOUTH
LAST CHANCE
Suzanne Perlman:
Catching the
Ephemeral
America?s Cool Modernism:
O?Keeffe to Hopper
Until 22 July
A fascinating insight into
American interwar art.
Ashmolean, Oxford.
www.ashmolean.org
Artists Rooms:
Gilbert & George
Until 2 September
The Turner Prize-winning
partnership present themes
of sex, faith and identity.
Brighton Museum.
brightonmuseums.org.uk
Augustus John:
Drawn from Life
26 May to 30 September
A reappraisal exhibition of
one of the towering ?gures of
20th-century British art.
Poole Museum.
www.poolemuseum.co.uk
Dance: Movement
and Modernism
Until 2 September
Artists? responses to passion
and movement in early
20th-century dance.
Pallant House Gallery,
Chichester. www.pallant.org.uk
Discover
more ab out
the ar tist on
page 18
Elisabeth Frink:
Fragility and Power
22 June to 29 September
Sculptures and works on paper.
Abbot Hall Art Gallery, Kendal.
www.abbothall.org.uk
Entranced by a Special
Place: The Art of SJ Lamorna
Birch RA
16 June to 8 September
Works by the Academician
in celebration of the Royal
Academy?s 250th year.
Penlee House Gallery,
Penzance.
www.penleehouse.org.uk
Henry Lamb:
Out of the Shadows
26 May to 30 September
A retrospective from the
leading 20th-century
British ?gurative painter.
The Salisbury Museum.
www.salisburymuseum.org.uk
Making and Breaking the
Rules: Royal Academy 250
at the Russell-Cotes
Until 14 October
A look at the tension between
the establishment and art that
breaks the rules.
Russell-Cotes Art Gallery,
Bournemouth.
www.russellcotes.com
Prized Possessions:
Dutch Masterpieces
from National Trust Houses
25 May to 16 September
Dutch 17th-century paintings
by some of the masters of
the Golden Age.
The Holburne Museum, Bath.
www.holburne.org
SCOTLAND
Ages of Wonder: Etchings
7 July to 29 September
Touring show telling the story
of printmaking in Scotland.
Biggar and Upper Cyldesdale
Museum. www.
biggarmuseumtrust.co.uk
Canaletto and the
Art of Venice
Until 21 October
A spectacular selection of
18th-century Venetian art.
Palace of Holyroodhouse,
Edinburgh.
www.royalcollection.org.uk
Emil Nolde: Colour of Life
14 July to 21 October
More than 100 paintings,
drawings, watercolours and
prints by the German
Expressionist.
Scottish National Gallery
of Modern Art, Edinburgh.
www.nationalgalleries.org
Rembrandt: Britain?s
Discovery of the Master
7 July to 14 October
Discover the profound
impact this artist had on
the British imagination.
Scottish National Gallery,
Edinburgh.
www.nationalgalleries.org
WALES
Journeys and Visions:
Twentieth Century Artist
Series 2
Until 15 October
SUZANNE PERLMAN, AFTER THE BATH (1978), OIL ON CANVAS, 106X106CM � IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST
Until 31 August
Spanning seven decades
and three continents, the
Hungarian-born artist?s
career is in the spotlight
in a major retrospective.
Around 25 key paintings
and works on paper
cover the three main
periods of her life:
pictures made in Cura鏰o
between 1941 and 1971;
those created in the
United States between
1970 and 1978; and
works painted in London
between 2002 and 2018.
Dutch Centre, London.
www.dutchcentre.com
See how European and British
surrealist artists in?uenced
one another in the 1930s.
Glynn Vivian, Swansea.
www.swansea.gov.uk
Who Decides?
Until 2 September
Curated in collaboration with
homeless charity The Wallich,
this show features paintings,
prints, drawings and sculptures
from the collection.
National Museum Cardiff.
www.museum.wales/cardiff
IRELAND
Artist as Thief
Until 19 August
This exhibition explores
Belfast-born painter Sir John
Lavery and his debt to the
Old Masters.
Ulster Museum, Belfast.
www.nmni.com
Hennessy Art Fund for
IMMA Collection 2018
Until 16 September
A showcase of innovative
contemporary art made by
Irish and Ireland-based artists
in the last ?ve years.
IMMA, Dublin. www.imma.ie
Artists & Illustrators
11
Fresh
Paint
Inspiring new artworks, straight off the easel
Jamel Akib
Capturing the energy of movement on a canvas is a skill,
but it?s one this oil painter, tutor and illustrator has honed
to perfection. Whether depicting a dancer, bird, animal,
musician or yachtsman, a feeling of animated exuberance
?lls his work. Pulsating with colour and energetic lines,
this hummingbird looks as if it might ?y off the canvas.
But, as all artists know, such lightness of touch doesn?t
come without consideration and revision. Oil paint offers
Jamel the chance to re?ne as he goes. ?If I don?t like a
stroke, I can wipe it away and reapply,? he says. The artist
works out from the focal point ? in this case the eye ?
before establishing a rhythm using ?broad, long strokes far
from the focal point, getting shorter and smaller as you get
closer.? He keeps up the painting?s momentum by creating
a variety of strokes with everything from tiny riggers to
three-inch brushes. The painter particularly loves Rosemary
& Co?s Ivory angled brushes, which are ideal for large
sweeps of colour. ?The bristles are cut to an angle, this
gives a variety of brush marks to your painting,? he says.
?I try to encourage a more generous use of paint, so the
stroke is clear and con?dent.?
As a rule of thumb, he ensures the maximum tonal
values are only present at the focal point, as seen in the
bright blue of the hummingbird?s eye, which was painted in
short strokes using a size 4 long rigger brush. Loose,
energetic pencil marks add drama. ?I?ve always enjoyed the
drawing process. Over time, the initial work has gradually
become more prevalent in the ?nished painting,? he adds.
?I start with a size 4 or 6 long rigger, and large arcs of line
gradually become more re?ned.? On top of this, Jamel
deploys credit cards, print rollers and palette knives,
hoping to lay down marks that surprise both himself and
the viewer. He also paints over his old artworks to help
more of these happy accidents ? an unexpected stroke or
burst of colour peeking through ? to emerge.
See more of Jamel?s work at www.jamelakib.com
>
12 Artists
& Illustrators
RIGHT Hummingbird
2, oil on canvas,
50x50cm
to p t
ip
Use Ma
dder R
ose
to mix
dark s .
It will
mag ic a
lly tr an
sf
withou
t mudd orm
y
ing
eve n w
ith b lac ?
k
THE
ESsENTIAL
SCHOoL OF PAINTING
BOOKING OPEN FOR SPRING AND SUMMER COURSES
ARTIST-TUTORS:
Sandy Moffat OBE RSA, Alison Harper, Adrian Wiszniewski RSA, Dan Coombs, Guy Allott, Jessica Voorsanger,
Liane Lang, Johanna Melvin, Rosemary Beaton, Lesley Burr, John Myers, Allan Ramsay, Adam Dix,
Bob and Roberta Smith OBE RA
End of Year shows 22nd June to 3rd July 2018
The Essential School of Painting London
theesop.com @theesop Instagram.com/theesop
facebook.com/theesop #londonartschool
Fresh Paint
to p tip
Us e a complementary
colour for a ground to
animate and me sh top
colours. For examp le,
orange under
blu e
Kate Montgomery
ABOVE Artist?s
House, casein
on birch panel,
30x27cm
Partially based on an old photograph
of Henri Matisse?s studio with a view
of a northern European town, Artist?s
House explores the interior space
associated with female responsibility
and creativity. ?It is about the people
who support others? creativity ? often
women, and often at the expense of
their own work,? says Kate. ?Although
not a self-portrait, it does recall a
period when I had to spend more time
cleaning than painting.?
Redressing traditional imbalances
is at the heart of her practice, and
also ties in with her love of pattern.
?Pattern and domesticity are primary
motivations,? she says. ?Both are
marginalised within western painting
traditions. Their deliberate
employment within ?ne art still
demands explanation and defence.?
The artist studied Islamic pattern
during her MA at the Royal College of
Art, and was brought up in a house
covered in old wallpaper. Today, she
enjoys working the scale, tone and
colour of ?oral and geometric patterns
into her compositions ? a passion that
can be seen here in curtains, tiles and
even the buildings outside the window.
The paintings within the painting
presented another compositional
challenge to allow them to sit together
on the wall. The largest is based on
Dante Gabriel Rossetti?s drawing of
Lizzie Siddal. Kate wanted to recall
these sources to prompt, but not
dictate, alternative narratives.
This delicate, otherworldly feel is
also enhanced by the medium. Kate
uses Casein ? an old, milk-based
medium found on Egyptian mummy
cases ? as she can make it herself. It
is also solvent-free, which is ideal as
she creates these dream-like visions
of domesticity in her own home.
Kate?s exhibition, Dreamed House, is
at Long & Ryle, London SW1P, from 24
May to 22 June. www.longandryle.com;
>
www.katemontgomery.co.uk
Artists & Illustrators 15
Fresh Paint
David Cooper
His ?rst sighting of a puf?n prompted
Portfolio Plus artist David Cooper to capture
it in watercolour. The seabirds caught his eye
as he was walking with friends along
Flamborough Head in North Yorkshire. The
motion of the puf?ns would be frustrating
working en plein air, but David mainly works
from photographs. His mass of snaps from
the day helped him in his home studio. ?I
generally use a combination of photos to
build a composition,? says David. ?Then I use
them for colour and texture reference, as well
as detail when it comes to the important
areas, such as the beak of the puf?n.?
As an illustrator and graphic designer, it?s
easy to see why the York-based artist would
hone in on detail. ?I often think that I don?t
use watercolours as others do,? he says. ?I
tend to work in small areas and build these
across the painting, revisiting again and
again to increase the value.? This can be
seen in his dry brush work, which uses a
hatching technique to create grass texture.
The earthy foreground contrasts with the
lively swell of the sea. David starts with clear
washes, wet-in-wet, building colour in the
darker areas as the paper dries, masking out
the space for the bird. ?I toyed with the idea
of introducing more puf?ns but, in the end,
decided one bird was enough to convey what
I wanted,? he says of the painting, which
directs the viewer to look past the cliff edge
and catch their ?rst glimpse of the puf?n, too.
www.artistsandillustrators.co.uk/david-cooper
LEFT Above the swell ? Puffin, watercolour
and gouache on paper, 52x30cm
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憪杻厲? 噹? ????? ?????? ? ?弮嫀? 嫄垜?唶攺憱厓槂悆墛?厬� ? 噭晪枃? 櫃�唶攺憱厓槂悆墛?厬�
Drawn
from
Life
AUGUSTUS JOHN was the most famous painter
of his day. DAVID BOYD HAYCOCK reveals
how perseverance helped his star to rise
RIGHT An Hour at
Ower, 1914,
oil on panel,
31.8x40cm
18 Artists
& Illustrators
COLLECTION OF THE LATE MRS THELMA CAZALET-KEIR CBE, THENCE BY DESCENT/� THE ESTATE OF AUGUSTUS JOHN/BRIDGEMAN IMAGES
f
or almost 40 years from 1892 until his retirement
in 1930 Henry Tonks taught drawing at the Slade
in London. One of his ?rst and most talented
students was Augustus John. When the young man
arrived from Tenby in 1894, aged only 16, he was a shy boy
and an undistinguished draughtsman. Tonks, however, was
an exacting, severe, sarcastic tutor who used these
techniques to wring the very best from his pupils ? as the
example of John illustrates. Yet a study of the artist also
reveals that to be a successful artist it?s not always enough
to be able to draw well ? or even very well.
On top of the numerous hours spent in the Slade?s Life
Class, Tonks directed his students to closely study the work
of the Old Masters. ?I cannot teach you something new,? he
told them. ?You must ?nd that out for yourselves. But I can
teach you something of the methods of the Old Masters ? if
that will be of any use to you.? He advised them to go every
day to the National Gallery, the Prints and Drawings Room
at the British Museum or Sir John Soane?s Museum. There,
for 10 or 15 minutes, they should ?study one picture, make
a sketch of its pattern and rhythm, and buy a postcard
reproduction and pin it up at home.?
Tonks?s teaching method, a former student explained in
1907, was not intended to develop an attitude ?of
ceremonious and conventional admiration; it suggests no
attempt to bandage the eyes of the student and blind him
to what is not to be found in their works. It is rather a love
of, and familiarity with, the old work, a habit of living easily
with it and constantly referring to it for help in dif?culties.
Such an attitude produces a stimulating sense of nearness
rather than an overwhelming one of distance.?
Young John welcomed Tonks?s guidance. He was pointed
in the direction of Michelangelo, Holbein, Rubens,
Rembrandt, Ingres and Watteau, spending his spare time
studying and copying original works wherever he could.
>
AU G U S T U S J O H N
Artists & Illustrators 19
AU G U S T U S J O H N
Through a mix of hard work and talent, John
emerged as the school?s leading draughtsman
� THE ESTATE OF AUGUSTUS JOHN/BRIDGEMAN IMAGES/IMAGE � POOLE MUSEUM
ABOVE Self-portrait, 1911, etching,
8.2x7.8cm LEFT Port de Bouc, 1910,
oil on panel, 31.7x23.5cm
� SOUTHAMPTON CITY ART GALLERY
Though at times overwhelmed by the anxiety of in?uence,
through a mixture of hard work and natural talent by 1898
John had emerged as the school?s leading draughtsman.
He left the Slade having won the annual summer
composition competition with his epic oil painting Moses
and the Brazen Serpent, but it still took many years for him
to convert his drawing skill into an ability to paint well. And
it was paintings, not drawings, which the British art market
(as well as critics) valued. As his friend and admirer William
Rothenstein watched John?s drawings getting ?better and
better,? he saw too that his painting ?was still uncertain; he
found it dif?cult to control his palette?. But Rothenstein
(who was himself an artist) admitted that John did ?now
and again? show promise ?of astonishing genius?.
Yet it took a long time to appear. The most successful of
John?s peers from the Slade focused their studies on
perfecting oil painting: his sister Gwen went to Paris where
she studied under James Abbott McNeill Whistler; his
friends Ambrose McEvoy and William Orpen dedicated
themselves to the study of this aspect of their art beyond
anything else. But for John there were too many other
distractions. For a start he drank too much and he married
young (in 1901, aged 23), which obliged him to take a
teaching job in Liverpool. Children soon followed (he would
eventually sire 14, with six different women). There were
also rowdy drinking partners, such as the talented, doomed
painter Charles Conder or the gypsies and travellers he met
on his journeys through England, Wales and France.
?I have worked strenuously,? he told his friend William
Orpen in around 1905, ?when I should have worked calmly
>
? I have fought when I should have lain down ? I have
Artists & Illustrators 21
AU G U S T U S J O H N
relied on my individuality instead of my reason ? I have
shouted and raged when I should have been listening
attentively ? I have made awful efforts to be ?natural?,
?human?, ?masterly?, all to the neglect of that secret subtle
thing ? beauty ? all these absurdities I know have been the
logical result of trying to paint without knowing how to paint
? they are all the apologies of innocence. Failing to paint
beautifully we ?nd something else and insist that it is just
as good ? and what
unhappiness follows that lie!?
But John?s great strength
was perseverance. He never
stopped searching; never
stopped experimenting. In
1907 these travels took him
back to Paris where he met
Picasso. At the young
Spaniard?s studio, he saw Les
Demoiselles d?Avignon and
was impressed (though he
would never become a Cubist).
And in 1910 he made a brief
visit to Italy, before setting up home in the south of France.
There he produced a series of scintillating Proven鏰l
studies. When exhibited later that year in London the Times
would record how they ?at once transport the beholder into
a country of sunlight. Their power is so compelling that the
dreary greyness of a wet winter day yields before memories
of winters passed in ?summer worlds?.?
It was the peak of John?s career. The great draughtsman
had ?nally arrived as a painter and, for a while, it appeared
that he might prove himself to be the Welsh equivalent of
Gauguin or Matisse. At the famous Armory Show in New
York in 1913, which ?rst brought modern European art en
masse to America, only Odilon Redon had more works
displayed. And yet it was still never quite to be. Though by
the early 1920s he was the most famous living artist in
Britain, it was his extravagant lifestyle as much as his art
that made him so renowned. ?I am just a legend,? he would
observe in later life, ?I?m not a real person at all.? Today,
almost 60 years after his death, Augustus John is certainly
not forgotten, but he is no longer the canonical ?gure he
was once. Yet to see his youthful drawings, or to linger over
his vivid paintings from just before the First World War, it is
to see a genius at work.
Drawn from Life: The Art of Augustus John is at Poole Museum,
Dorset, from 26 May to 30 September. Augustus John: Drawn
from Life by David Boyd Haycock is published by Paul Holberton
Publishing. www.poolemuseum.co.uk; www.paulholberton.com
RIGHT WB Yeats, c.1910,
pencil on paper, 35.3x25.3cm
22 Artists
& Illustrators
� NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY
John?s great
strength was
perseverance.
He never
stopped
searching
Call for
Entries
2019
Seeking artists working in oil, portrait,
marine, wildlife, watercolour or pastel,
Mall Galleries? open exhibitions offer the
opportunity to exhibit in Central London,
as well as many valuable prizes, awards
and bursaries.
The Pastel Society
Contemporary works in
dry media
The Royal Society
of British Artists
Contemporary painting,
printmaking and
sculpture
Royal Institute
of Painters in
Water Colours
Contemporary works
in water-soluble media
Royal Society of
Portrait Painters
Works of contemporary
portraiture
New English Art
Club
Find out more:
www.mallgalleries.org.uk
@mallgalleries
Painting based on
observation and
draughtsmanship
Royal Society
of Marine Artists
Painting, printmaking
and sculpture inspired
by tidal waters
Society of
Wildlife Artists
Painting, printmaking
and sculpture inspired
by the natural world
Royal Institute
of Oil Painters
Contemporary works
in oils
We also offer
many workshops
and professional
development
opportunities to artists
at all stages of their
career.
HOME STYLE
Having a
home studio
means Laura
can leave
works out
to analyse
IN THE STUDIO
Laura
Carlin
SALLY HALES meets the children?s illustrator
at her London studio. Photos: TOM DUNKLEY
How long have you been working
in this studio?
It?s in our house and we?ve
only been here a few months. The
idea is to do up the shed in the
garden. I also have a ceramics
studio in Camberwell. Since having
my son Jessie, I work more from
home because I don?t have the
freedom to go to the ceramics
studio. I?m more reliant on evenings.
I do all my illustration work here.
What would be your criteria
for a good studio?
I know the answer to this because
I?ve been sharing this studio with my
partner Luke, who is also an
illustrator. My ideal studio would be
one of my own. I think a lot of people
relish a communal space, and I envy
and respect that, but I ?nd it too
annoying. I?m much more private
than I would like to admit.
24 Artists
& Illustrators
Do you not like showing people
work-in-progress?
No. I don?t even like showing
them when they are ?nished.
What?s your working day like
if you?re illustrating a book?
It has changed massively since
Jessie has been born. I have to get
my head into it, so the night before
I?ll look at things, gaining con?dence
about what I?m going to draw or
paint, and start to visualise. On the
day, I?ll start by working on a few
images at the same time to try to
get rid of that one-perfect-piece
pressure, and keep energy and
pace. And I go on for as long as I
can. Again, because of Jessie, I?m
much less luxurious with time.
How does a project start?
I read the text and start stepping
inside that world. You hear great
writers saying unless they believe
the characters, they don?t exist. And
so you have to collect supporting
imagery, come up with ideas. I
feel like I make a pig?s dinner of it,
though. I drag it out. I come out with
pop-ups and glitter ? everything.
Do you have any studio rituals?
I listen to Radio 4. Although I?ve
started listening to podcasts
because I go Radio 4 crazy. And I
drink about 80 cups of tea or coffee.
Does your studio in?uence how
you make your artwork?
De?nitely. When I look at work the
evening before, I also clear the
BE PREPARED
The illustrator
works hard
to get inside
the imaginary
world of books
yourself and mix it up so you never
get too stale. I used to be unfussy
about quality, but I am getting
fussier. Now, with paper and paint
brushes, I ?nd it makes a difference.
I?ve started investing in paper but
it?s worth it. I use Bockingford. It?s a
lovely hot pressed paper that is
really smooth.
PENCIL POWER
The illustrator
has a passion
for working in
coloured pencil
I start by
working on
a few pieces
at once to try
to keep up
the energy
workspace. I don?t like pictures on
the wall in front me. I have my own
pictures up, but I wouldn?t have
images from in?uences. I want
those in books so I can choose
when to look at them.
What materials are essential?
I use ink, acrylic, watercolour and
colour pencil. Normally, it?s a
combination of all of them.
Sometimes wax resist and other
things, too. You?re trying to surprise
Your most recent children?s book,
King of the Sky, features beautiful
coloured pencil work. What
appeals to you about the medium?
I started using them as a child, and
have never stopped. I love them. You
can push and pull them, and they
have movement ? you could argue
all media has movement ? but they
have more obvious movement.
Do you work digitally?
No. I?m old-fashioned. I?m not
anti-digital, but it just doesn?t
feature in what I want to do.
Do you sketch outdoors, too?
Yes, but just with pencils. Gone are
the days when I would take paints
out because I?ve found a shorthand.
I think you have to draw from life.
There isn?t any getting around that,
but I?m not so precious that it has
to be full colour. If I?m short of time,
I will write the scenario rather than
draw it or take a photo. I used to
think that was cheating. But now
I think if you?re honest about your
work you can see when it?s become
stale and you need to redeem it.
What are you working on now?
I?ve just handed in a children?s book
to publisher Frances Lincoln.
I?m doing tile murals, too, one for
a hotel and a private commission.
Then I want to concentrate on a set
of books with my brother. He is a
historian and teaches in schools.
We?ve talked about what we think
is lacking because of the obsession
with the curriculum.
King of the Sky, written by Nicola
Davies and illustrated by Laura Carlin,
is shortlisted for the 2018 CILIP Kate
Greenaway Medal, the UK?s most
prestigious children?s book award.
It is available from Walker Books,
�.99. www.walker.co.uk;
www.lauracarlin.com; www.
carnegiegreenaway.org.uk
Artists & Illustrators 25
LAURA BOSWELL helps you understand what galleries
are hoping to find in your body of artwork
i
was discussing my early days as an artist with a
gallerist and mentioned a rejection I?d received from
a gallery, which said my work was inconsistent.
Consistency can be a confusing word when applied to an
artist?s work, so I asked her to help me explain galleries?
take on the subject, and why it is so important.
When a gallery owner refers to consistency, they are not
talking about subject matter or medium but referring to
your voice as an artist. The priority for any artist that a
gallery shows is that they have a distinct visual language,
which makes work clearly and consistently their own ? and
for that voice to develop in a recognisable way. A buyer
should be able to recognise an artist?s new work, but also
see how they have moved forward.
That said, if you work across several themes and media,
make sure that the gallery owner is aware of this when you
apply, or are invited, to exhibit. If they are expecting small
watercolours and you arrive with large sculptures they will
be dismayed, however consistent your approach. From a
practical point of view, a gallery may also ask for work to
26 Artists
& Illustrators
be tailored by subject matter or medium to ?t its location
or specialisation. But to reach that stage you will need to
show a strong personal voice.
The good news is that your voice is
built in. The tricky part is ?nding it and
developing your own visual language.
This takes time, practice and constant,
honest and respectful self-analysis.
Keep asking why you are making art,
why you choose a speci?c subject,
theme or medium, what is and isn?t
working about the art you are making
and what you can do to improve. You
should also study the work of other
artists, but concentrate on why you are
drawn or repelled by their visual language and how your
reaction may re?ect on your work, rather than seeking to
mimic a style. It is by knowing yourself that you will develop
the visual language and consistency prized by galleries.
www.lauraboswell.co.uk
A priority for
any artist is
that they have
a distinct visual
language
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Artists & Illustrators 27
Picture
perfect
Pembrokeshire
Artis ts have long been draw n to t h is co u nt y? s co ast al
beauty, quality of light and Celtic myster y. We ask
thre e p ainte rs wh at makes wo r king t h er e so special
MARK R AG G ET T
The senior vice president of the Royal
Watercolour Society tells SALLY HALES why
the land of his birth remains his inspiration
Born in 1953 in the harbour town of Solva, near St Davids,
Mark Raggett was drawn to sketching the landscape at an
early age. He was lucky to ?nd support for his endeavours
from some of the best painters working in the county at the
time. ?Graham Sutherland, who visited often, encouraged
me enormously ? and it is to him that I owe the discipline of
my approach,? he says. ?Ray Howard-Jones and John
Knapp-Fisher were also a great in?uence.?
Although he now lives in London, the call of home means
it?s never too long between visits. Solva is a popular rest
stop for walkers tackling the Pembrokeshire Coast Path,
and the easy access it affords means the whole coastline
is up for grabs. ?St David?s Head ? the walk from Carn
Rhosson over Trefeiddan Moor via Treginnis and down to
Porthlysgi ? is a particular favourite,? he says. Mark?s
bright, energetic watercolours convey the excitement the
landscape still instills. ?I sketch quickly and freely on the
spot,? he adds, ?trying to capture the energy of the moment
? the wind, rain, sea, cliffs ? a sense of place.?
www.royalwatercoloursociety.co.uk
>
TENBY MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY
28 Artists
& Illustrators
LEFT Tenby
(Plantagenet),
pen, watercolour,
and ink on paper,
36x26cm
RIGHT CLOCKWISE
FROM TOP LEFT
Green Scar Beyond,
mixed media on
paper, 36x26cm;
Ogof Cadno, mixed
media on paper,
56x36cm; Trefeiddan, mixed media
on paper, 26x36cm
Graham Sutherland encouraged me. It is to
him that I owe the discipline of my approach
Artists & Illustrators 29
DAVID TRES S
Renowned for his personal visions of the landscape around
his home, the artist reveals how he makes his paintings and
drawings of Pembrokeshire. Interview: ANDREW LAMBIRTH
?I like to keep homing in on being in
the landscape because I want to make
the drawing or painting about that
experience. I re-state things, taking
information from the drawings ? the
structure of ?elds, the skyline ? but it?s
also as much about me, about what I
feel about it, as the topography of the
place. The challenge is to make the
image about the place but also about
my memories of the time spent doing
the sketchbook drawings, and of other
occasions in that landscape. St Non?s
is on the coast, and I?m there all the
time, sometimes drawing but quite
often for Sunday walks, to visit the
well and the chapel.
?The drawing Fields St Non?s is
made with thick sticks of graphite.
They?re 9B, which I liken to working
with molten road tar. It?s easy to get
on but, as you can see, there?s a lot of
rubbing out. It can take a morning to
rub off the graphite, particularly if you
want that certain steel grey which is a
lovely half-tone. That?s partly how the
paper gets worn away, but I attack it
with screwdrivers or a Stanley knife.
Sometimes scored lines reinforce
topography or run counter.
?I go out into the landscape and
draw in a sketchbook, with a pencil or
a biro. I don?t use watercolour but
make written colour notes. I write as
much as I can on the drawing: tonal
contrasts, colour contrasts, details,
what?s happening with the wind and
temperature. I make two or three
drawings when I?m out, then I have the
sketchbook propped up in front of me
while I?m working in the studio on a
painting or drawing. The important
thing about drawing is the experience
of being there and absorbing stuff
about the landscape.
?I can get carried away in the studio
and work through a sheet of paper ? I
stick another sheet behind and carry
on. There are also odd bits of collage
stuck on. It?s a balance. I?m not using
it like tomato sauce on chips ? it?s got
to be an integral part. There?s
botanical material (leaves and
grasses, for instance) covered over
and invisible under layers of collage.
There are different things going on:
topographical accuracy, the balance of
composition, the quality of the
different parts of the drawing or
painting which want to gel together,
but also run counter to each other in a
sense. The ?ght is to bring all these
elements into balance.?
www.davidtress.co.uk
>
LEFT Fields St
Non?s, graphite on
paper, 32x39cm
30 Artists
& Illustrators
ABOVE Landfall (St
Non), mixed media
on paper, 64x81cm
It?s as much about me ? and what I feel about
the landscape ? as it is about the topography
NAOMI T YDEMAN
A member of the Royal Institute of Painters
in Water Colours, the artist lives and works
in Tenby. She talks to SALLY HALES
ABOVE Tenby
Harbour in Blue,
watercolour on
watercolour board,
30x38cm
?I always say Pembrokeshire made me an artist,? says the
watercolour painter. ?I wasn?t a painter when I came. I?ve
travelled and seen some of the most beautiful places on
earth, but there is something about the quality of the
beauty here, the insubstantiality of the atmosphere, and
the way it alters and reveals the landscape.?
The artist started teaching herself to paint in
watercolours about 30 years ago and her love affair with
the medium has never abated. And, although she has been
working as a full-time artist for 25 years, her surroundings
have never ceased to inspire. ?I think we become familiar
with our immediate environment and learn to explore it,
?nding new ways to see it,? she says. ?My gallery is close to
Tenby Harbour, the most-photographed, most-painted view
in Wales. Consequently, there is always the challenge of
?nding a new angle or a different atmosphere in order to
take something so recognisable and see it with fresh eyes.?
Surrounded on three sides by the sea, washed by rain
and mists, and indented by estuaries and rivers, water is
everywhere in the town. ?The ?uidity and subtleness of
watercolour captures the atmospheric qualities of the
weather, the light ?ltering through clouds and the re?ective
nature of water in a way that no other medium can,? says
Naomi. ?It is water painting itself.?
www.naomitydeman.co.uk
There is something about the quality of the
beauty, the insubstantiality of the atmosphere
32 Artists
& Illustrators
AN ARTIS T?S AREA GU IDE
WHERE TO LEARN
SEE ART IN... TENBY
ART CLASSES WALES AT
PICTON CASTLE STUDIOS
Catering for all abilities, classes
are based in the Batchelor Wing,
but there is also the opportunity
to paint in the beautiful 45-acre
gardens. Head there on 22 to 23
August for a two-day painting
course with Nicky Philipps.
www.artclasseswales.com;
www.nickyphilipps.com
TENBY MUSEUM AND ART
GALLERY, CASTLE HILL
As well as a permanent
collection featuring Welsh artists
such as Gwen and Augustus
John, Kyf?n Williams, John Piper
and David Jones, the New Art
Gallery hosts changing shows ?
many of which are of works by
important contemporary artists
with a connection to the region.
See Wendy Yeo: Paintings, from
3 August to 9 September.
www.tenbymuseum.org.uk;
www.wendyyeo.com
WHERE TO STAY
INDIGO BROWN, SWMBARCH
HOUSE, LETTERSTON
Now rented as self-catering
accommodation, the property
previously hosted Indigo Brown?s
residential painting courses,
which means it is perfectly
geared towards artists? needs.
It has three luxury bedrooms,
countryside views and bags of
wildlife, plus artist Maggie
Brown is on hand with advice.
To book a stay in the cottage at
Indigo Brown, call 01348 840177.
www.indigobrown.co.uk
WHERE
TO PAINT
Artist and Indigo Brown co-owner
MAGGIE BROWN shares her top
sketching and painting spots
PARROG BEACH AND NEWPORT SANDS
Either side of an estuary, these two spots
have different charms. Parrog is a ?shing inlet
with a small beach and stunning view of the
estuary which has public toilets, a car park
and shops and cafes to make a sketching visit
a comfortable one. Newport Sands is a broad,
long and beautiful beach. From there you can
head back into Newport town for a full range
of amenities, including shops and galleries.
SEE ART IN... ST DAVIDS
FISHGUARD
Paint the pretty Lower Town?s multicoloured
cottages or head to the harbour for some
sketching. If you want to paint the town?s
harbour, split your time between both sides,
as there?s only a loo on one side.
STRUMBLE HEAD
The northwest tip of Pembrokeshire, west of
Fishguard, juts far out into the Irish Sea, so
views don?t come much more stunning on the
British coast. It?s also a haven for seabirds
and wildlife, but be prepared for a taxing walk
and an absence of amenities.
PORTHGAIN
This small coastal hamlet is a popular spot for
tourists, walkers and painters. It boasts a
great pub, cafe and an excellent art gallery.
It?s quaint in its own right, but is also a good
spot to join the coast path in search of views.
TENBY ARTS FESTIVAL,
22 TO 29 SEPTEMBER
Heading into its 27th year,
the exciting festival will feature
talks on a range of subjects,
from classic and jazz music to
drama and art workshops.
www.tenbyartsfest.co.uk
ABOVE Maggie
Brown, Aber
Draw (Trefin),
Fresh Turquoise
April, acrylic and
mixed media on
paper, 57x75cm
RIGHT Wendy
Yeo, Broad
Haven,
watercolour,
ink and painted
collage,
56x56cm
ORIEL Y PARC, HIGH STREET
Pembrokeshire Coast National
Park?s visitor centre houses a
small ? but important ? art
gallery with a rotating display of
treasures from the National
Museum Wales collection, as
well as touring exhibitions.
These include an unmissable
collection of work by Graham
Sutherland, who described
Pembrokeshire as a ?land of
exultant strangeness?. He
returned there every year from
1967 until his death in 1980.
www.pembrokeshirecoast.wales
GOAT STREET GALLERY,
GOAT STREET
This gallery in the centre of St
Davids is home to work by local
artists and craftspeople. Make
time to chat to owners Daniel
and Amanda Wright, and you
might get a peek at the glorious
garden view, which overlooks
St Davids Cathedral.
www.goatstreetgallery.co.uk
NAOMI TYDEMAN GALLERY,
COBB LANE
The gallery is a showcase for the
artist?s wonderful watercolour
paintings and limited edition
prints. Visit from 26 to 31 July
to see an exhibition of small
paintings by RI members.
www.naomitydeman.co.uk.
For more information on things
to see and do in Pembrokeshire,
visit www.visitpembrokeshire.com
Artists & Illustrators 33
A DV E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E
A SUMMER
SPECTACLE
To mark its milestone 250th year, the ROYAL
ACADEMY OF ARTS is getting set to celebrate
with an extravaganza of unmissable creativity
ABOVE Frederic Leighton, Clytie, c.1895-6, oil on
canvas, 156x136cm � Leighton House Museum,
The Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea
E
ach summer, the galleries at the Royal Academy of
Arts are jam-packed with contemporary art made by
artists from all walks of life. A world-famous show,
the Summer Exhibition is unlike any other, drawing together
works by internationally renowned artists, exciting new
talent and ?rst-time exhibitors. This summer, Grayson Perry
RA is coordinating the biggest, brightest and most colourful
exhibition yet for the 250th Summer Exhibition.
In this milestone year, the show is set to be the cultural
highlight of the season, spilling out of the RA and onto the
streets of London?s West End. As part of the celebrations,
there will be a monumental sculpture in the RA courtyard
and artworks in an array of mediums throughout the
galleries, all handpicked by a committee led by Perry. With
more than 1,200 works on display, you?ll see art you love,
art you hate, art that leaves you thinking and art that simply
puts a smile on your face.
There are plenty of ways to take part in this joyous
celebration of art. Visit with a sketchbook on a Monday
morning, have a drink with your friends in the galleries on a
Friday night or bring the family to a free weekend festival.
Coinciding with Summer Exhibition 2018 is The Great
Spectacle: 250 Years of the Summer Exhibition, which tells
the story of the world?s longest running annual display of
contemporary art. Dominated by what has become a
famously crowded and collage-like arrangement, over the
years the exhibition has provided thousands of artists with
crucial competition, inspiration and publicity, and captured
the interest of millions of visitors.
Recreating important moments in the history of the
Academy and its summer shows, The Great Spectacle
brings to life the excitement, variety and richness of past
Summer Exhibitions, offering a fascinating journey through
art from Joshua Reynolds to Wolfgang Tillmans. Visit the RA
this June to celebrate 250 years of art and creativity.
Both exhibitions are on from 12 June to 19 August.
Book tickets at www.royalacademy.org.uk
Summer Exhibition 2018 is sponsored by Insight Investment.
LEFT Visitors enjoy the 2017 Summer Exhibition
Photo: � James Harris
Painting In Italy
Painting Holiday in Umbria
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All round a special week?. Florence 2017
www.paintinginitaly.com ? Freephone: 08081185729 ? Email: info@paintinginitaly.com
Artists & Illustrators 35
10 MINUTES WITH?
Angie Lewin
The painter, printmaker and co-founder of St Jude?s prints reveals to
NATALIE MILNER how nature?s understated beauty inspires her art
How did you develop your style?
I have always had a graphic way of drawing and working
with line. I like to create a hard-edged, linear quality. Being
able to draw is a two-way thing in that it helps you to
become a printmaker ? certainly with relief printmaking
and making stencils for screen ? but then, in turn, it
in?uences the way you interpret the world around you.
What draws you to linocut and wood engraving?
There?s something about relief printing that I love. It is a
satisfying process. The tools and the Japanese papers I
print on feel so beautiful to use. You draw the image on the
block, cut it, ink it and print. It?s this transformation I enjoy.
When I?m doing lots of watercolour, I look forward to
printmaking. I like to move between the processes.
Your work focuses on native British plants, often weeds.
What attracts you to this subject?
I?ve always been interested in landscape, walking, drawing
and sketching. Once I moved out of London I was often
doing the same walk each day, and I?d see the plants grow
through the seasons. They?d be on a Norfolk clifftop or by a
Scottish river, so they were quite understated. I ?nd that
intriguing. I might see a dandelion growing in a crack in the
pavement struggling against adversity. I ?nd it poignant.
Did your move from the Norfolk coast to Scotland?s
Speyside and Edinburgh have an impact on your artwork?
For about 10 years we lived between Norfolk and Speyside,
so I became familiar with the plants that de?ned those
landscapes. Often I?d start something in Scotland then
continue it in Norfolk and vice versa. I?m not rigorous about
it. They merge. The studio has lots of reference material,
which becomes jumbled. It?s about the recognition of
plants and how they?ve adapted to each environment.
Are sketchbooks important in your practice?
They are the starting point for everything. I have a large
sketchbook and a really small one which I take out all the
time. I record information. They?re almost like scrapbooks.
I might stick in an old proof that I think relates to what I?m
doing now, or I?ll go back to old sketchbooks and develop
something. Some pages are made up of the ways I could
lay out a wood engraving block: the shapes vary quite a lot.
36 Artists
& Illustrators
Do you have tips for capturing a plant?s characteristics?
They have amazing sculptural structures. I studied garden
design for a while. Looking at structure and form from a
design point of view, you come to see them in a graphic
way. Each plant has its differences and asymmetry: a
damaged petal, a hole in a leaf or a bent stem. It?s not
about creating a shorthand. Just look at a plant and ask:
what is it that de?nes it?
Are there any techniques or tools you rely on?
There?s something so pleasing about using tools you?ve had
for years. I use Schmincke watercolours and I have
beautiful, soft Isabey brushes, which hold lots of paint. I
sometimes sponge on paint. With wood engraving, I use
the end grain, like when you cut through a tree horizontally
and see all the rings. I engrave in any direction round the
ends of plant ?bres and can get incredibly ?ne detail.
Do you always print with a press?
For a long time I hand burnished all my prints. I?ve had a
press for about 15 years. I have a hydraulic printing press
for lino and a little tabletop Albion printing press for wood
engraving. Up north, I also have a slightly bigger Albion on
which I can print linocuts and wood engraving.
Why did you decide to turn work into fabric and wallpaper?
Although I did ?ne art, I?d always liked commercial work.
So rather than selling my designs to a textile agent, I set up
St Jude?s in 2005, in?uenced by companies such as David
Whitehead and Edinburgh Weavers which, in the 1950s,
started working with artists such as Graham Sutherland
and Henry Moore. I liked that idea of artist-as-designer, so
approached a few artists whose work I liked and started
working with Mark Hearld, Jonny Hannah, Emily Sutton and
Ed Kluz. It has been a really nice collaboration.
What can we look forward to from your latest show?
I create still life compositions using found and gathered
objects ? shards of pottery from the beach mingle with
feathers and seaweed. I treat watercolour still lifes the
same as a linocut. They develop and change as I?m painting
them. With the found ceramics, the patterns are more
important than the form. They become part of the elements
in and around the pots. There?s a contrast between exotic
cut ?owers and the natural, understated ?nds. That?s the
direction it?s going in.
Angie?s watercolour exhibition Spey Path and Strandline
runs until 2 June at The Scottish Gallery, Edinburgh.
www.scottish-gallery.co.uk; www.angielewin.co.uk;
www.stjudes.co.uk
ALUN CALLENDER
What made you ?rst want to be a painter and printmaker?
I took sculpture at Central School of Art and Design, but
when I went into the print studios I decided that was what
I was more suited to. The print rooms at central?s old
Southampton Row building were beautiful.
Sketchbooks
are the
starting point
for everything
I do. They are
almost like
scrapbooks
PAINT
THE
season
Ever wondered if a painting class is right
for you? SALLY HALES visits WENDY
JELBERT?s watercolour workshop at ART
COURSES BATH to explore their benefits
38 Artists
& Illustrators
e
ager painters gather around watercolourist Wendy
Jelbert and watch her conjure a bluebell wood from
a ?urry of washes. She dabs on some Opera Rose,
a bit of Burnt Sienna and squiggles with a biro to suggest
branches. It looks effortless. But Wendy knows it?s not
? and that?s why these watercolour painters are here for a
poolside painting demonstration in the sumptuous
surroundings of Bathwick Hill House, the home of Art
Courses Bath. This afternoon session of her two-day
Painting the Seasons workshop is a chance for the
attendees to witness how an experienced, professional
painter plans ? and then feels ? their way through a work.
Wendy, who has been teaching for more than 45 years,
has already spent the morning tackling winter scenes with
her students ? an amusing seasonal anomaly given the
sunshine illuminating the mature gardens and views of the
city of Bath all around. Yet with her calm and inclusive
manner, her class responds enthusiastically as they
experiment with speci?c techniques, such as creating
freezing mist with gouache, reserving white with masking
?uid, adding detail with oil and wax pastel, as well as pen
and ink (biro is great for bare winter trees, says Wendy).
WO R KS H O P
WENDY?S TIPS
FOR SUMMER
GARDENS
?An underpainting of
bright colours ? green
and yellow ? will add
seasonal vibrancy.
Linden Green is ideal.
?Sun means shade,
so you?ll need strong
shadows. Darken with
Cobalt Blue, Violet, and
Burnt Sienna.
?Salt effects aren?t just
for winter scenes. A
sprinkle can add
interest to foliage.
CLOCKWISE
FROM FAR LEFT
A work from
Wendy?s new
book; Bathwick
Hill House;
workshops are
held poolside;
Wendy?s demo
Although the course covering painting the four
seasons is pitched at an advanced level, her class
includes painters with a range of experience. But
Wendy?s open manner and background in
supporting artists, in addition to the small group
numbers, ensures everyone gets the practical help
and feedback they need. Soon any array of
techniques are being put to use on a
series of winter scenes. At Wendy?s
behest, salt of all shapes and sizes
Use a Ruling Pen to lay
is sprinkled to create snowy ?elds
down masking ?uid. It
and frosty gates, before paintings are left
can render the thinnest
to ?develop? overnight.
lines to create ?ne detail.
The surroundings help to foster a spirit of
Bofa Small Ruling
co-operative learning. Lunch brings a visit
Pen, �90.
to the main home, where a gourmet
three-course
meal is served in the elegant
www.jacksonsart.
dining
room,
and
ambitions and anecdotes are
com
shared. Throughout the day, organisers are on
hand to help with queries and supply materials,
which are available to borrow or buy if inspiration strikes.
Top tip
One of the pleasures of painting is that it is a solitary
pastime, but there comes a time for help, support and
feedback. Workshops with professional artists such as
Wendy provide a great way to get all three in one go. Her
students ?nish day one of the course already better
informed and more experienced, praising the
?very helpful? tutoring and ?exquisite? surroundings.
Wendy?s latest book, From Sketch to Watercolour Painting,
is available now from Search Press. www.searchpress.com;
www.wendyjelbert.co.uk
MORE WORKSHOPS AT ART COURSES BATH
Liz Dotesio, Landscape in Oils with
Special Attention to Colour Mixing,
Monday 16 July
Bathwick Hill House?s glorious gardens are
the backdrop to this course featuring a
demonstration exploring ?all those greens?.
Paul Robinson, Buildings in the
Landscape Using Pen, Line and Wash,
Friday 20 July
Master perspective and how to place
architecture in its surroundings, as well
as tackle details such as roofs and doors.
Wendy Jelbert, Keeping a Sketchbook
Journal using the Garden as Inspiration,
Saturday 21 July
Study how to keep things simple, using
sketching and watercolour projects.
www.artcoursesbath.com
Artists & Illustrators 39
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40 Artists
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sketchbook
July
TIPS ? ADVICE ? IDEAS
To p t i p
To store
an ac r y
lic skin
painting
, roll it w
ith
p arc hm
ent or fr
e
e
z
er
p ap e r s
o it doe
s
n
?t
stick to
ge t h e r
TRY AN ACRYLIC
SKIN PAINTING
Artist RH蒒I TAUCHID on
how she makes these delicate,
exciting artworks
Among the tools I use most often in my studio are my
large (122x122cm) non-stick palettes. These provide
the base on which I begin many of my paintings. I
apply numerous layers of acrylic, primarily of tinted
gloss gel and self-levelling gel, over several weeks.
Sometimes, as in my painting The Conversation, I use
other materials, such as graphite and charcoal, for
accents and details. When I am sure it is dry enough,
the entire painting is peeled from the palette and
stretched onto a frame or suspended from a dowel.
THIN-SKINNED
I lightly rolled this acrylic skin painting to show the
thinness of the paint and the contrast between the
glossy underside and the matte surface. Be warned,
though: doing this for longer than a few minutes
would result in a fused skin. You can, however, store
an acrylic skin by rolling it with freezer paper or
parchment to prevent it from sticking to itself.
This is an excerpt from Acrylic Painting Mediums and
Methods: A Contemporary Guide to Materials, Techniques
and Applications by Rh閚i Tauchid, published by Monacelli
Studio. www.monacellipress.com; www.rhenitauchid.com
MAIN IMAGE The
Conversation, acrylic
skin with charcoal
and graphite, 107x91cm.
The skin painting lying
in folds
ABOVE A detail from
the the same painting
showing a charcoal
drawing of swallows
on a line over a matte
medium layer
sketchbook
PRODUCT OF THE MONTH
Sennelier egg tempera
Used since the Renaissance, egg tempera is
a fast-drying medium made from pigment mixed
with egg yolk as binder. It creates delicate
effects but can be difficult ? and messy ? to
make. Sennelier egg tempera has an authentic
finish and can be used directly from the tube.
Sennelier egg tempera is available in 21ml
tubes from Jackson?s Art. www.jacksonsart.com
TRAVELS WITH
MY SKETCHBOOK
G R AHAM E B O OTH tackles some
sizzling Spanish cit y architec ture
MASTER TIP: CAMILLE PISSARRO
This view of the Parisian Tuileries was painted in 1899 from
Pissarro?s apartment in the Rue de Rivoli. It overlooked the
gardens, providing a high viewpoint, giving depth and space.
It is one of a series where Pissarro explored light at different
times of the day. Rapid strokes of paint suggest the clouds
scurrying across the sky, while more broken brush work ?
dabs of white ? gives the scene its luminosity. A palette of
cool blues and yellows is used to mix vivid, bright greens for
the year?s new foliage.
42 Artists
& Illustrators
CAMILLE PISSARRO, THE GARDENS OF THE TUILERIES ON A SPRING MORNING,
OIL ON CANVAS, 73.7X92.1CM 〢RT COLLECTION 2/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO
Discover the techniques of the
world?s greatest ar tist s
Pen and wash is a wonderful sketching medium. Unlike pure
watercolour, structure is all down to the drawing, so applying
the paint is more relaxed. While disposable waterproof pens
are convenient, nothing beats the variety of line and ?ow of
ink that can be achieved with a traditional pen. A dip pen isn?t
suitable for travelling but a fountain pen can be ?lled with
inks that dry waterproof. I use Noodlers Bulletproof Ink which,
although not as dense as Indian ink, provides a strong black.
A pen and wash needs the right balance of ink to paint so
the drawing is the work?s strongest feature. This is why it
suits busy architectural subjects, such as this one in
Cartagena, Spain. The contrast between the ornate city hall
and modern buildings creates an obvious subject. It was
almost unbearably hot and humid, which encouraged a rapid
approach. After half an hour, air conditioning seemed more
important than painting. The less interesting modern
buildings were indicated simply, allowing me to concentrate
the pen work on the city hall. Even here I didn?t want to be
fussy, preferring to hint at architectural details. A few palm
fronds, along with a suggestion of ?owering shrubs, provided
a simple foreground. In this area only, I added ink after the
paint because I ?nd it easier ? and better ? to
create simple lines around loose, splashy
?owers and leaves. Drawing ?rst and
then painting produces a stilted result.
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Try not
to carefu
lly
paint up
t
o your li
ABOVE City Hall, Cartagena, waterproof ink
nes.
Work fr
eely to
and watercolour, A5 cartridge paper
avoid
a colou
red-in a
nd
stiff loo
k
To p t i p
ART COURSES BATH
Workshops on Techniques in all forms of Painting Media with Professional Instructors
Watercolour ? Mixed Media ? Oil Painting ? Acrylics ? Pastels
Call us on 07531 925287
ali@artcoursesbath.com
www.artcoursesbath.com
Artists & Illustrators 43
sketchbook
TIPS FOR ENTERING
ART COMPETITIONS
K ATH RYN MAPLE won the Sunday
Times Watercolour Comp etition in
2016 . Here she of f er s her advice
No tip will guarantee you a place in a competition because
there are many things beyond your control. After many
failed attempts, I?ve learned you should never see being
unsuccessful as a re?ection of the quality of your work.
?NEVER BE SATISFIED
Keep trying to reinvent or push your ideas and mediums
so the work feels fresh.
?SELF-BELIEF IS ESSENTIAL
Working alone in the studio can feel isolating at times but
your self-belief will allow you to recognise if a work has the
potential to be shortlisted.
?TALK IT OVER
I ?nd it refreshing to have chats about my work with friends
who aren?t artists because they can see something obvious
that doesn?t work. Fresh eyes with no bias can be useful.
?GET YOUR ART SEEN
Creating opportunities for work to be seen and working to
deadlines keeps your work energised. This translates into
your voice and forms the heart of your practice.
The Sunday Times Watercolour Competition 2018 is now open
for submissions. Enter at sundaytimeswatercolour.artopps.co.uk
by 5pm on Monday 25 June.
COMPETITION
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since 2005, offering a
comprehensive online shop,
as well as art classes and
exciting workshops.
www.pegasusart.co.uk
HOW TO ENTER
Winners will be selected at
random. Enter online at www.
artistsandillustrators.co.uk/
competitions by noon on 13
July 2018. For full terms and
conditions, visit www.
chelseamagazines.com/terms
MASTERCL ASS
ENERGETIC
STILL LIFE
羒ne Divine mixes her media to create a beautiful floral
painting with dramatic contrast between light and dark
羒ne?s materials
?Acrylic and oil
t
Ultramarine Blue, Cerulean Blue, Alizarin
Crimson, Cadmium Red, Yellow Ochre, Burnt
Sienna, Hooker?s Green, Viridian Green (oil
only), Titanium White, Cadmium Orange,
Vandyke Brown, Payne?s Grey
here are a few things that I
recommend before painting a ?ower
still life. The ?rst relates to the way
you set it up. I raise the level of the table so
that it is almost at eye level to get a good,
side-on view. I like to see the leaves, stems
and ?owers clearly against the background,
and for a sliver of tabletop to be visible to
help convey the depth of the picture plane.
I love the effect of natural light, so I set up
the ?owers on the window in my studio. It isn?t
north facing, but the sun shines from 11am to
2pm creating a dramatic contrast between the
light and dark. The second thing that I
recommend considering is your position.
I work standing at an easel with a daylight
lamp casting light on my board. I am
right-handed and prefer to look out the
left side of the canvas so that I can see from
the ?owers to the painting surface by only
moving my eyes.
You could complete the painting in acrylic
rather than change to oil, and then paint it
with a glaze to give a richer surface.
www.ainedivinepaintings.co.uk;
www.facebook.com/AineDivinePaintings
1 Make sweeping marks
2 Scumble shapes
3 Observe closely
I use a two-inch ?at brush to cover the board?s
surface with broad sweeping marks in a
mixture of Cerulean Blue, and a little Alizarin
Crimson and Ultramarine Blue. I splash on
some water and, before it dries fully, wipe
away the droplets with a dry rag. This creates
the spatter pattern.
I scumble on the main colours with the rag:
general ?ower shapes in Cadmium Red and
Alizarin Crimson, and the darks of the leaves in
Hooker?s Green, Ultramarine Blue and Vandyke
Brown. The tabletop is a runny mixture of
Alizarin Crimson, Burnt Sienna and Ultramarine
Blue. I wipe it away to show the table?s height.
I use Ultramarine Blue with some Vandyke
Brown to establish the shape of the jug and
handle. Cadmium Orange is applied loosely to
describe the fruit. I explain the negative spaces
between the leaves on the right using a damp
rag to lift off wet acrylic. I use masking tape so
I can freely paint the cover of the table.
>
46 Artists
& Illustrators
?Brushes
Flat brushes from Royal & Langnickel Burgundy
Taklon set, old household ?at brushes, 1in, 2in.
?Mount board
?White gesso
?Palette knife
?Rags
To p t i p
E xplain
t he neg
ative
space s
b e t we e
n
the leav
e s usin
ga
damp ra
g to lift
off
we t a c r
ylic
Artists & Illustrators 47
5 Explain the pattern
I use Payne?s Grey and white to generate the
pattern down the middle section of the jug.
Using ?at brushes and rags to apply the paint
keeps the marks lively and helps me avoid
unnecessary detail. I use a one-inch ?at
brush to paint the grey pattern. The blue wall
?inside? the handle is applied with a dry rag.
I print the stems with the edge of the brush.
6 Add in the darks
4 Mix true colours
I paint the tabletop in thick acrylic ? a blend
of Cadmium Red, Alizarin Crimson and
Titanium White. I then lift the masking tape to
reveal a clean horizon line. To get a true
colour, I hold up the palette so I can see what
I?m aiming for while I mix.
7 Introduce oil paint
I stand back every third or fourth stroke to
ensure I?m scanning the whole painting.
Now I introduce oil paint. A mix of Vandyke
Brown and Ultramarine Blue adds richness
and heightens tonal contrast. I sharpen the
shadows in the leaves, then clearly capture
the shapes in a �-inch ?at brush.
It?s important to keep an eye on the darks.
I half-close my eyes and ?nd the darkest
darks in the whole subject. I use Ultramarine
Blue and Vandyke Brown to make the dark
pattern on the jug. I also make a ?esh colour
with white, Cadmium Red and Yellow Ochre
to describe the lighter stems.
MASTERCL ASS
8 Darken shadows
I capture the jug handle with Ultramarine Blue
and Vandyke Brown and darken the shadows
to the left of the oranges with Vandyke Brown
and a little Ultramarine Blue. Adding Cadmium
Red to this makes a good colour for the jug?s
shadow. These moves help to anchor the still
life. I aim to apply the light colours with thicker
paint while using thin paint for the dark areas.
10 Create the background
9 Paint light tones
I subdue the front of the tablecloth with a
dark red, made from Alizarin Crimson, Viridian
Green and Cadmium Red, and scumble it on
with a rag. Mixing Cadmium Red and white I
introduce the lightest tones on the tabletop.
The colour of the background wall is a mix of
Cerulean Blue and white. The oil is thick and
vibrant, working well over the thinner acrylic
to clearly de?ne edges. Ultramarine Blue and
white make a lovely light blue for the pattern
on the light side of the jug.
11 Find the highlights
I describe the brightest stems with
a ?chipping in? effect, where a mix
of Cadmium Orange and white is
laid on and left as a ridge. Lights
read more convincingly when the
paint is in relief. The brightest
sections of the red ?owers are laid
on in thick oil paint too. Highlights
are enhanced by the dark accents
? a blue-brown oil mix ? at the
base of some ?owers.
To p t i p
To achie
ve a
in? effec ?chipping
t
paint on , pile the
t he top
e d ge
of t he b
rush an
d
lay
it on as
a ridge
12 Finishing touches
I decide the oranges are a distraction, so
I paint over them in oil paint. It helps to have
a mount cut to see the painting through, so
that I can decide more easily when it?s
complete. It also helps me to ?nd where
I want the edge to be.
Artists & Illustrators 49
甆ational Trust Images / Angelo Hornak
25 May to
16 September
PRIZED
POSSESSIONS
In partnership with:
Dutch Masterpieces from
National Trust Houses
Supported by:
ART IN THE ALGARVE
:DWHUFRORXU��OSDLQWLQJ��O$FU\OLF�6SHFLDOLVWFRXUVHV
info@artinthealgarve.com
Call us on: 0203 287 7140
www.artinthealgarve.com
50 Artists
& Illustrators
I N T E RV I E W
ABOUT
THE
HOUSE
Winner of the Artists & Illustrators award
at this year?s Pastel Society exhibition,
FELICITY HOUSE, chats to NATALIE
MILNER about her glorious garden scenes
a
n unassuming subject can make a fascinating
painting. ?You can look at an impressive scene,
but, instead, you can turn around and ?nd one that
needs noticing,? says the Dorset-based artist. And with the
rustic garden scene in Espalier Tomatoes, the pastel
painter has taken her own advice. Its juicy tomatoes,
intricate composition and fascinating textural qualities
prove that the familiar doesn?t have to mean dull. The
delightful work was awarded the Artists & Illustrators prize
at this year?s Pastel Society Annual Exhibition at London?s
Mall Galleries earlier this year.
Felicity saw the fruit in the walled garden of West Dean
College, near Chichester, where she taught art and was on
good terms with the head gardener. ?I went back the next
week hoping that all those shades of red, green and orange
would still be there, and they were,? she says. ?So I homed
in and set up my easel.?
52 Artists
& Illustrators
She rests Art Spectrum Colour?x card on a lightweight
Herring easel and works quickly, applying a watercolour
underpainting with rough brushes. A mix of Winsor Blue
and Permanent Rose is used to block in shapes and tones
without losing the tooth of the surface. ?If you apply lots of
layers of pastel it can ?ll up quickly and get slidey,? says
Felicity. ?This way helps to save the texture and gives you a
lovely, tonal composition. Perhaps it spills over from
painting in oils.? Once she has grabbed some pastels, her
process is an ebb and ?ow of broad strokes and detailed
pastel pencil marks, each complementing the other.
?Espalier Tomatoes is a beautiful example of how careful
observation of complex arrangements can create bold,
expressive paintings,? says Artists & Illustrators editor Sally
Hales, who selected it as her winner. This balancing of
expression and representation comes from a close
connection with her materials. ?With pastels you?re holding
ABOVE Autumn,
West Dean
Glasshouse,
watercolour
underpainting, soft
chalk pastels and
pastel pencils
on Colour?x card,
46x54cm
PREVIOUS Espalier
Tomatoes, soft
chalk pastels,
pastel pencils
on Colour?x card,
40x32cm
Pastel is attractive
in terms of freedom
of mark-making; it is
personal to you ?
like your handwriting
RIGHT Tomato and
Chilli Chutney,
neutral watercolour
underpainting,
soft pastel chalks
and pastel pencils
on Colour?x card,
48x48cm
BELOW Felicity?s
pastel kit
the colour. There?s no brush
or tool between you and the
colour, so it is very gestural,?
adds Felicity. ?That?s what I
like about the medium. It?s
attractive in terms of freedom
of mark-making; the marks are
very personal to you. They?re
like your own handwriting.?
Her ability to surrender to
this and react in the moment is
essential to her ?nished work.
?It is more spontaneous when
you?re outside ? there?s a liveliness you just don?t get in the
studio,? she says. ?You?re lingering, noticing more than
what?s in front of you ? the smells, sounds and fresh air.?
But, for Felicity, drawn elements are also crucial. ?When
you?re working onsite, it is important to be accurate,? she
says. ?Every now and then I check I?ve got things in the
right place, or the right shape. I return to drawing through
the painting.? This fastidiousness comes from a history of
painting from life. For more than 25 years she worked in
primary school education but, by 2000, it was time to give
her art more attention and she moved on to teach life
drawing at Arts University Bournemouth. ?I?m not art-school
trained. I wrote to artists who I admired and asked them
where they were teaching. It was always drawing from life;
it kept me challenged. That?s why I can draw fast.? Felicity?s
art is grounded in the domestic, as seen in Tomato and
Chilli Chutney, another painting shown in the Pastel Society
Annual Exhibition. It was inspired by a recipe. Attracted by
the ingredients, she built a kitchen scene, bringing to life
the busyness of the everyday and joyful colours with her
energetic marks. An appreciation of the ordinary is at the
core of her painting. ?I think the world is full of so many
lovely things,? she says. ?There?s enough for us to look
at and respond to in a personal way.?
See Felicity?s winning artwork and more paintings at her
open studio event during Dorset Art Weeks, 26 to 28 May,
1 to 3 June and 8 to 10 June. www.dorsetartweeks.co.uk;
www.felicityhouse.eu; www.thepastelsociety.org.uk
FELICITY?S PASTEL TIPS
?UNWRAP AND BREAK
Arrange pastels so you can
see them in shallow pots.
Learn to identify colours
visually, so you don?t need
names and numbers.
?LET THE PAPER WORK
Choose a colour paper that
will be useful to the image.
If you?re painting in a warm
country, try sand colours or
the Australian Grey in Art
Spectrum Colour?x. Allow
colour to peep through
and unify.
?KEEP PASTELS IN RICE
This avoids colours rubbing
off on one another. Divide
pastels in pots of lights,
darks, warms and cools.
?DRAW BETTER
Fifteen minutes a day will
improve your observational
skills immensely. Put in the
time to get better.
?STORE WORK WELL
So it doesn?t slide or
smudge, tape your work
inside a sugar-paper folder
with paper between each
piece to blot the dust. If
you?re travelling, cut two
pieces of foam board the
size of your suitcase, tape
them together with a hinge,
and store work inside.
Artists & Illustrators 53
D E M O N S T R AT I O N
REFLECTION
& MOVEMENT
With this serene watercolour
of a swan, ROB DUDLEY
explains how you can
capture the beauty and
energy of the natural world
D E M O N S T R AT I O N
Rob?s materials
2
?Watercolour
Artist-quality Ultramarine Blue, Winsor
Blue (green shade), Raw Sienna,
Permanent Rose, Cadmium Red,
Cadmium Orange, neutral tint
To p t i p
?Paper
If masking
fluid ends
up in the w
rong place
on your pap
er, let
it dry before
removing
Bockingford 300gsm (140lb) NOT,
28x17cm
?Brushes
Nylon masking brush and sable
brushes, size 10, 8, 4 and 2
?Tracing paper
?2B pencil
?Masking fluid
?Palette
?Kitchen paper
?Maskaway eraser
?Painting board
3
1
A
lthough one might think that since this painting
is a simple study of a single swan, little, if any,
thought would have gone into the design, but that
would be wrong. The painting?s format, the placement of
the swan within the picture, tone and colour ? all the
considerations that an artist would give to a more ?nished
work apply equally to smaller-scale paintings. The study is
not merely about the swan, it?s also about the re?ection
and the movement within the water. Therefore I chose a
rather narrow portrait format that would amplify the swan,
particularly its neck and its re?ection, but would also allow
room to include the wake.
www.moortoseaarts.co.uk
1
DRAW AND MASK
After transferring the drawing
from the tracing to the stretched
watercolour paper, reserve the swan
and its re?ection with masking ?uid
using the nylon masking brush. Let it
dry naturally. It is worth noting that if
masking ?uid ends up in the wrong
place within the painting, avoid
rubbing at it straight away with a ?nger
or kitchen paper, as this can damage
the paper?s surface, making it almost
impossible to paint. Let it dry and then
carefully remove by gently rubbing
with a ?nger or Maskaway eraser.
2
PAINT THE
WATER WASHES
After checking the masking ?uid is
completely dry, prepare two wells of
pure colour, Ultramarine Blue and
Winsor Blue. With the board at a slight
angle, using the large no 10 sable
brush lay a wash of Winsor Blue over
the top three-quarters of the paper.
Paint the remaining quarter with
Ultramarine Blue, working from the
bottom up, allowing colours to mix
where they meet. Keep the board at
the same angle and let colours dry.
3
DEFINE RIPPLES
AND MOVEMENT
With some washes of Winsor Blue
mixed with Ultramarine Blue, and
Winsor Blue with neutral tint, paint
the ripples varying colours. A
>
Artists & Illustrators 55
5
6
4
To p t i p
urs
Lighter colo
darker
t
c
e
fl
usually re
d darker
in water, an
ter, so
colours ligh
ingly
rd
mix acco
should be reinstated, either by using
the master drawing from the tracing
or freehand, using a 2B pencil.
well-pointed no 8 sable brush is ideal.
Not only can it produce ?ne and broad
lines but it has the capacity to carry a
lot of wash, making this type of mark
easier to produce and reducing the
number of times you have to revisit
the palette. Note the ripples caused
by the swan?s wake are narrower and
closer together than the broader
ripples in the foreground. The
difference helps to emphasise the
swan?s forward motion. Leave to dry.
4
REMOVE THE
MASKING FLUID
After checking none of the paint is still
wet, carefully remove the masking
?uid. This is quite a large area to
remove; be careful not to pull at the
dry masking ?uid when removing it or
you are likely to tear the paper. It?s
also likely the removal of the masking
?uid will have removed some of the
pencil details from the swan. These
56 Artists
& Illustrators
ADD STRUCTURE
AND DETAIL
5
Prepare washes of Permanent Rose
with Ultramarine Blue, Raw Sienna
and neutral tint, and, with a no 4
brush, begin to add detail to the swan.
Note the re?ection is slightly darker in
tone than the swan itself. As a rule of
thumb, lighter colours re?ect darker in
water, and darker colours lighter.
Although this is a useful guide when
painting re?ections, nothing beats
?rst-hand observation, so take time to
assess the tonal values of the object
and re?ection. Continue to build detail
with overlaid washes. Care should be
exercised at this stage. The swan?s
white plumage could easily be lost by
overzealous washes. Paint with
con?dence, but also with control.
6
FINISH THE PAINTING
The red of the beak makes a
dramatic statement. With a no 2
brush, paint it with a
mix of Cadmium Red
and Cadmium Orange,
the bottom beak being
slightly stronger in
colour than the top.
Let this dry. If the
darker details are
added before the
beak is dry the colours
will run, ruining sharp
divisions. For the eyes
and dark parts of the
beak, use a strong mix
of neutral tint,
achieved by adding as
little water to pigment
as possible. Add short shadow details
at the water line and pick out ripples
with neutral tint. When painting the
re?ections of the beak and eyes, use
the same mixes, but with slightly more
water in the wash as re?ective colours
are a little paler than the swan itself.
This is an edited extract from Painting
Rivers from Source to Sea by Rob Dudley,
published by The Crowood Press.
www.crowood.com
Wh at to
pack
Working en plein air this
summer? Be inspired by
these kit essentials and
exciting painting events
Head to Wexford,
Ireland, to
compete in one of
Europe?s biggest
plein-air painting
festivals, from
29 July to 6
August. Paint
in spectacular
locations and
join one of 20
workshops. www.
artintheopen.org
From �. www.
carriart.co.uk
Ideal for shaping
and sharpening
drawing media on
the go, Nitram?s
block will make a
handy kit addition.
WINDSOR AND ETON EN PLEIN AIR 2018
ART IN THE OPEN
With painting
outdoors comes the
peril of bad weather.
Slip your in-progress
art into an ArtCase
to protect it from
the elements.
NITRAM
CHARCOAL
SHARPENING
BLOCK
Where to go
Hot on the heels of May?s royal wedding, set
up your easel inside the walls of Windsor
Castle on 21 July, and compete against
amateur and professional artists. The winner
takes home �0 cash, �0 worth of art
materials and a discounted stand at
Contemporary Art Fairs Windsor, plus the
winning painting will be donated to HM The
Queen?s collection. Enrol by noon on 15 July.
www.windsor.gov.uk
PAUL O?KANE
Go
outdoor
CARRIART
ARTCASE
�50. www.
nitramcharcoal.com
PLEIN AIR
HOLIDAY
Learn to paint en
plein air in oil and watercolour in beautiful
Umbria with artist Paul O?Kane from 11 to
18 July. Hosted by Arte Umbria, you will be
able to paint sunrises and sunsets, forest
scenes, cascading streams and more on
this week-long residential holiday. Also
included with the tutoring is full-board
accommodation, wine, free bar, and trips
to wine tastings and castles.
www.arteumbria.com
PAINT OUT NORWICH 2018
There?s a prize pool worth thousands of
pounds at this plein-air painting competition,
from 14 to 17 October. Locations include a
market, medieval cathedral quarter and a
Norman Castle. Apply to take part in day or
night challenges.
www.paintoutnorwich.org
DA VINCI
CASANEO TRAVEL
BRUSH CASE
This pocket
watercolour brush
set includes three
round brushes,
sizes 10, 6 and 4,
made from extra
soft synthetic ?bres.
Each brush includes
a screw-on handle
that doubles as
a handy lid.
From �.50. www.
davinci-defet.com
H OW T O
PAINT CITY
LIFE
Seasoned London plein-air painter
ADEBANJI ALADE explains how he
navigates the urban environment
to capture exciting street scenes
PA I N T T H E C I T Y
Flower stall sketch
ADEBANJI?S PLEIN-AIR KIT
?Tripod
?Plein air or
pochade box, or a
French easel for
larger paintings
?Oil paints
?Mediums
and solvents
?Digital camera
or smartphone
?Rags or
kitchen paper
?Brushes
?TomBow
Markers or Zig Art
Twin Pens
?Small containers
for mediums
and solvents
?Sculpting wax
?Mirror
?Viewfinder
?Ruler
?Palette knives
Outside-In progress
like an artist and move around with a
childlike curiosity. Once you have an idea of
where you want to paint, make sure you also
work out what direction you?ll be painting
from. This will save you time on the day.
WHAT TO TAKE
i
t is the season to dust down your plein-air
gear and get ready to paint outdoors.
And you don?t need to travel to the
countryside to paint, either. A busy urban
environment ? with its people, cars, street
lamps and buildings ? will also make
a fantastic painting.
I move around with a 26-inch Dunlop
suitcase in which I pack my kit. It is easier
because I do a lot of walking about. When
setting up, I?ll make sure I?m in a position that
is safe. I try not to be against a wall because
people can?t see my painting ? sometimes
these are the people who might buy the work.
MY TECHNIQUES
WHAT TO WEAR
Painting on a cold day can be off-putting.
If you do, be sure to really wrap up. I have to
wear up to ?ve layers of jumpers as well as
the essential thermal wear. I cover my
painting hand in a sock and poke a hole
through, so that I can hold my brush. I also
wear big, Eskimo-type boots, which
completely cover my feet, because I will be
standing in one position for a long period.
It is much easier to plan what to wear
during the warmer periods. The only thing
to take note of is not to wear bright colours
because they may re?ect in your painting.
A nice hat to block your eyes from the sun
can also be handy.
WHAT TO PAINT
It?s best to make the important decision
about what you are going to paint before you
set out. As I pass through any location, I am
always looking for things that interest me and
then make notes. The key is to keep thinking
I have two major techniques or approaches.
The ?rst I call ?Inside-Out?. I start from one
spot on the surface of the painting and
bring each area to completion as I move
along. This approach works best on days
when the light is grey and the conditions are
not going to change very much.
The second approach is called ?Outside-In?.
When working this way, I block in all of the
major shapes very quickly, and ?nish by
adding the details inside the major shapes.
This is a fast technique that is
suitable when the light is
changing all the time, and
I need to get a quick,
abstract feel for the
whole scene down on
the canvas.
Adebanji teaches at
the Art Academy and
Heatherley?s School
of Fine Art. www.
adebanjialade.co.uk >
LEFT The
Flower Stall
Sloane
Square, oil
on board,
20x25cm
Sketch stage
ADEBANJI?S TOP
TIPS FOR URBAN
PLEIN-AIR PAINTING
?Get to grips with your
sketching and drawing skills.
Being strong in this area will
make painting easier.
?Always bear in mind why you
were interested in painting the
scene in the ?rst place, and
BELOW
Grey Sloane
Square, oil
on canvas,
50x56cm
follow this through in the piece.
?It?s not a crime to ?nish the
piece at home or in the studio
? which is why it?s good to have
a camera to take a picture of
the scene at the start.
?Never despair about your
progress. You get better by
deliberately practising on
areas that you ?nd dif?cult.
?Inside-Out? progress
Finished painting
cover competition
�0 worth of Winsor
& Newton art materials
to be won
Winning entry will
feature on the cover
of our new catalogue
NOW OPEN FOR ENTRIES
Entry deadline Sunday 8th July
Sponsored by
Full Terms & Conditons available online - artsupplies.co.uk/covercomp
?Fascinating?
The Guardian
?A revelation?
The Observer
?Impressive?
Will Gompertz, BBC
BOOK NOW Until 22 Jul
www.ashmolean.org
Artists & Illustrators 61
TA L K I N G T E C H N I Q U E S
THE OUTSIDE
WORLD
Artist ANDREW ROBERTS
tells NATALIE MILNER
about his love of paint and
showing art with his heroes
62 Artists
& Illustrators
ANDREW ROBERTS
YARI BENO
Chasing fun is a good
thing. They don?t teach
you that in art school.
But it is still hard work
i
LEFT Untitled
? Blossom,
oil on canvas,
30x30cm
ABOVE,
CLOCKWISE
FROM TOP
LEFT Andrew?s
plein-air
painting set
up; Welcomed
(detail), oil
on canvas,
30x30cm;
Andrew
at work
t?s not every day you exhibit alongside your
heroes, but landscape painter Andrew
Roberts has managed just that as he joins
a stellar cast of artists ? Tom Coates, Fred
Cuming RA, Julie Jackson and Mary Jackson
? in The Alchemy of Paint exhibition at
London?s Gallery 8 this May. ?I don?t agree
that you should never meet your heroes,?
says the Sussex-based artist. ?I think you
absolutely should, to see that they?re human
like you, have foibles and make mistakes ?
and still create great paintings.?
But it?s more than admiration that brings
these artists together ? it?s the sheer love of
the materiality of paint. When Andrew had
the chance to watch Royal Academician Fred
Cuming at work in his studio, it reaf?rmed his
appreciation of the artist. ?He?d use a brush
by turning it on its edge. It?s uncomfortable,
like he?s stroking a cat the wrong way,? says
Andrew. ?It made me think about my own
habits. I thought, ?It?s OK to do that.? All my
brushes are ruined, but I like them that way.?
This disregard for his tools injects energy
into Andrew?s oil paintings, whether he is
making sweeping strokes with a decorator?s
brush or smearing with a palette knife. But it
hasn?t always been this way. ?I used to paint
from photographs and the style was
different,? he says. ?The oil paint was
watercolour-like, still and ?at. I needed to
connect with something. I wanted the
plasticity of paint; to see the brush mark.
I wanted it to be more passionate.?
He attended art courses with Tom Coates
and found his calling in plein air, and his style
loosened into expressive marks you want to
reach out and touch. A ?urry of blossom in a
recent piece takes this tangibility to the
extreme. ?It is a very twee subject,? he says.
?But there?s a gloopy, marshmallowness
about it that is delicate and voluptuous.? And
it?s clear he ?nds working outdoors more
enjoyable. ?Chasing fun is a big thing,? he
says. ?They don?t teach that at art school.
But it doesn?t mean it?s not hard work.?
To get a feeling for texture it?s essential for
Andrew to start his artworks outdoors. He >
Artists & Illustrators 63
LEFT Between The Two
? Lower Beeding, oil
on canvas, 30x30cm
It is all about your
approach. I paint en
plein air because it is
about reaction. It?s
about that intensity
compares the experience to the tradition of
life drawing. ?It?s about your approach; your
relationship to it. The nude is just the coat
hanger of the subject matter that you can
then put yourself on,? he says. ?I paint
en plein air because it is about reaction.
Through doing, something interesting
happens. It?s about that intensity.?
He scours the countryside in his van
looking for a good location. The vehicle gives
him shelter from the wind ? or he settles into
a seat in the back of the van which he?s
angled to get a perfect view through the
sliding door, light streaming in through the
sun roof. He takes paintings home to ?nish.
Although happy with the colour balance
in his painting Between the Two ? Lower
Beeding, the triangles of yellow wheat got
their punch from a glaze in his workspace.
?When you paint plein air, you?re limited to
about a two-hour period of standing and
concentrating,? he says. ?You can build
your painting in layers in that time but,
sometimes, they?ll need a glaze to create that
intensity of colour.? For an artist who, in jest,
64 Artists
& Illustrators
compares his restricted colour
palette to ?shades of mud?, it?s
surprising that hot highlights bring
his landscapes alive. Calling them
his ?little interlopers?, he dashes one
luminous colour per painting onto the canvas
to complement the subtle shades.
This playful attitude is seen in the
undulating surface of his oils. Swearing by
the buttery Lukas Medium 5, the artist can
be generous with his paints ? especially with
the pigment-rich Michael Harding oils ? using
runnier Roberson?s glaze medium mixed with
turps or white spirit for the ?nal kick of a
semi-opaque glaze.
Andrew?s attraction to the ?squishiness of
paint? stems from an early obsession with
technique. ?Growing up, I was amazed with
the magazines my dad collected as a child,
showing illustrations from the period ?
charcoal drawings, war paintings ? and I was
fascinated,? he says. Remembering icing a
cake with his mum, he describes how he
lifted it into lumps and peaks, mimicking
snow. ?I was enjoying it,? he smiles. ?It?s all
about playfulness.? If it?s the ability to
unleash your inner child that allows you to sit
alongside your heroes, let the fun begin.
See Andrew?s work in The Alchemy of Paint,
from 21 to 26 May at Gallery 8, London,
SW1Y. www.8dukestreet.co.uk;
www.andrewrobertsart.co.uk
BELOW Painting the
Dimple at Devil?s
Dyke, West Sussex
ANDREW?S PLEIN-AIR KIT
?Open Box M
palette/panel
holder for storing
paints and to use
as an easel
?Tripod for palette
/panel holder
?Lightweight
aluminium easel
for large paintings
?Small 30x30cm
and 40x40cm
canvases, and a
large 100x100cm
canvas
?A variety of
brushes and
palette knives
?Bulldog clips
attached to the
palette/panel to
hold brushes
?Scraper card to
run a brush along
to paint verticals
?Paints: a
combination of
Lukas, Winsor &
Newton and
Michael Harding.
?Lukas Medium 5
Painting Butter
?Viewfinder to
help compose
the scene
?A good hat
?Extra surfaces
or bottle
attachments
to hold brushes
and knives
?Backpack that
fits all equipment
?Lightweight rack
for protecting a
wet painting or
pochade box
?B&Q strong
kitchen roll for
wiping brushes
CASA BEZZIA
Painting Holidays in Italy
+39 0525 71370 ? info@casabezzia.com
www.casabezzia.com
SIR JOHN HURT ART PRIZE 2018
The winning artist will receive �750
and the work will be exhibited at the
Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts
Entry is open to all artists to submit up
to three wall-based works
Deadline Midnight Sunday 17th June 2018
An exhibition of 25-30 shortlisted works
will be held at the
Auden Theatre, Holt, North Norfolk
from
Saturday 21st until Sunday 29th July
as part of Holt Festival 2018
For further details and an application form visit
www.holtfestival.org
Our course?s for 2018
?Journey?s Into Colour? June 2-8 and June 11-17
With Jessica Watson-Thorp
?Towers, Tortelli & Time To Paint? June 23-29 and July 1-7
With Norinka Ford
?Watercolour and beyond capturing a sense of place?
With Seana Mercedes Mallen
Aug 31 Sep 6 and Sept 8-14
?Parmesan & Paint !? Sep 16-22
With Karen Pearson
Also
included is a
Cooking Demo
and a visit to an
Artisan Cheese
Maker
ARTISTS?
VALUE
BRUSHES
(]HPSHISL[OYV\NOHZLSLJ[NYV\WVMZ[VJRPZ[Z
^^^HY[PZ[ZIY\ZOLZJV\R
MVYM\SSPUMVYTH[PVUVUYHUNLZZL[ZWYPJLZ
.YLH[]HS\LIPNZH]PUNZ
Artists & Illustrators 65
O I L PA I NTI N G MY TH S B U S TE D
1. SUPPORTS
In the first part of her new series,
SOPHIE PLOEG explodes some commonly
held misconceptions about the medium
Wood is rigid, easy to work
on and less fragile than
canvas but can split if kept
in the wrong conditions
1
LINEN AND CANVAS
ARE MUCH THE SAME
Not necessarily. Woven material such
as cotton or linen is the most widely used
support for oil painting, but there is also jute,
as well as polyester. Cotton has a different
weave to linen. The texture of cotton is very
regular. When painting, it looks and feels
different to linen. Cotton canvas is also a
little more elastic, so it is easier to stretch.
Linen?s weave is more irregular and naturallooking. You can see threads running over the
surface creating ?ne lines, instead of the
regular bob of cotton. Linen is ?rmer than
cotton, so it is harder to stretch. Cotton is
cheaper but it is not necessarily of inferior
quality. Canvas comes in a variety of
textures, ranging from coarse to super-?ne
but brands interpret this in their own way.
Canvas can also come glued to a rigid
support offering the best of both worlds.
2
WOOD WILL WARP
Panels have been used as a support
for a long time. Wood is rigid, easy to
work on and less fragile than stretched
canvas, but can split and warp if kept in the
wrong conditions. However, there are good,
stable wood products available. Think about
trying plywood or MDF.
3
YOU CAN?T USE OIL
PAINT ON PAPER
Yes, you can. Some manufacturers
sell oil-painting paper that has been coated
to make it suitable for working in oil. There
are also papers that have a mock-canvas
texture, while brands such as Arches have
watercolour paper-like quality.
4
OIL PAINTINGS
WILL CRACK
Common sense tells us that an oil
painting on stretched canvas will move,
either by the slight bounce a stretched fabric
gives or by the expanding and shrinking of
the materials in certain circumstances. But,
if we paint on a rigid surface, we remove the
risk of cracking. Copper is a beautiful
material to work on but needs preparation. It
is non-absorbent, so paint glides beautifully
over the surface. Other metals often used as
oil painting supports are aluminium and an
aluminium product often referred to as
Dibond, which is a brand name. Dibond is
a sandwiched aluminium product, which is
normally used for road signs. It needs
preparation but it is wonderfully lightweight,
rigid and easy to work on.
5
YOU HAVE TO PRIME
A CANVAS YOURSELF
Oil painting supports generally come
either primed or unprimed. For ease of use,
a primed support is handy because you can
dive in straightaway and start painting. To get
more control over your materials, you can
also buy unprimed supports and apply your
own primer in your preferred way.
www.sophieploeg.com
MAKE THE RIGHT CHOICE
What you choose to paint on is personal
preference. But some choices make more
sense in certain circumstances. For
detailed work you will need a fine canvas,
and the other way round for bolder styles.
For large paintings, you will have to keep
an eye on the weight of your support. A
wooden panel might be too heavy.
Whether you paint indoors or outside will
also influence what you paint on. If you
need to travel with your materials you will
want something light, sturdy and practical,
such as a small panel. Another
consideration is whether you are painting
a quick study or a paid commission. But,
of course, in the end it all comes down to
whatever you like best, what feels right
and what helps you create your best art.
Artists & Illustrators 67
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THIS IMAGE Hugo,
alkyd on board,
20x15cm
YO U R Q U E S T I O N S
PAINT
REALISTIC
FUR
Artist LAURA QUINN HARRIS specialises in
oil portraits of people and animals. Here she
explains how to master painting dog coats
fur ? curly, short or long ? and use
brushstrokes in correct shape, but still
quite randomly. I?m not trying to paint
individual hairs, just create a suggestion
of fur. For wiry-haired or ?uffy dogs, it?s
good to use a scumbling technique to
add broken colour. I add more layers to
build texture, using more re?ned
brushstrokes as I go. On the ?nal layer,
I add very ?ne hairs and whiskers.
Does painting different colours of
fur need separate techniques?
With any fur, you need to observe closely
and identify its many colours and tones
to make your painting accurate. A white
dog is never just white. Light greatly
in?uences what you see. There will be
cool blue tints from the sky and warm
yellow tints from the sun, as well as
re?ected light from the ?oor or other
objects. It is a good idea to accentuate
highlights you see in the fur of very dark
animals to give your painting contrast,
otherwise it may look ?at. Ensuring your
subject is well lit makes your job easier.
ABOVE
Spyke, alkyd
on board,
30x25cm
RIGHT Holly,
alkyd on
board,
30x30cm
Fur has different textures, too.
How do you study and paint them?
I begin by roughly laying down basic fur
colours using loose brushstrokes. This
underpainting is important to describe
the form of the animal. With the next
layer, I start to think about the type of
What detail should I pay attention to
when painting brushstrokes for fur?
Always paint in the direction of hair
growth, but remember no animal?s fur is
uniform. Vary brushstrokes and try not
to think about them too much so they
don?t look contrived. Fur is thick, so you
need to create the illusion of volume by
adding layers, but don?t overwork. Make
sure your reference photographs are
clear so you can observe the fur and not
resort to guesswork. Begin with larger
brushes and looser strokes, and end
with ?ner brushes for the top layers.
Are there any brushes you would
recommend for painting fur?
I use synthetic brushes because I don?t
want to use animal products. I tend to
prefer brushes meant for acrylic as they
are softer and more malleable than oil
brushes. I mainly use Winsor & Newton?s
Galeria range, which is good quality and
affordable. For most fur, I prefer small to
medium rounds, and medium to large
?lberts for backgrounds and blocking in.
Are there specific brands and types of
paint that work well for rendering fur?
I use Winsor & Newton?s Grif?n Alkyd
and Artists? Oil Colours.
See more of Laura?s artwork at
www.lauraquinnharris.com
PAINT PERFECT PET PORTRAITS
How can I bring character
to my pet portrait?
One of the most important
aspects of portrait painting
is choosing the right
composition. You want to
capture the essence of your
pet?s character, so try to get
reference photographs of
them with an expression
that is typical. Try to catch
70 Artists
& Illustrators
them looking alert and
happy. Take time to ?nd the
right reference images to
work from. I often use the
best aspects from several
shots to compose a portrait.
Is there a part of the animal
I should start with when
painting a portrait?
Start wherever you feel
comfortable. I work from the
top left corner to the bottom
right, purely because this
means that I won?t get my
hand in the paint. I prefer to
have my hand on the board
wherever possible. When
painting the later layers, I
tend to focus on the face,
working outwards from the
nose area.
Always paint in the
direction of hair
growth, but remember
that no fur is uniform
COLOURED PENCIL
1. Birds
Over the next four issues, JAKE SPICER
will reveal how to get the most from this
medium with his subject-specific guides
Jake?s materials
?Derwent lightfast
coloured pencils
?Mechanical pencil
?Sharpener
?Plastic eraser
?300gsm hot pressed
watercolour paper
72 Artists
& Illustrators
A
fter a long hiatus, I have returned with vigour to
the medium of coloured pencil. Often the ?rst
material thrust into our hands as children, the
coloured pencils available to us as adults are a world
apart from the pale, waxy stubs of childhood. For a
mediocre colourist like me, the attraction of the medium
is that it bridges the gap between manageable,
monochromatic graphite and the world of painterly colour
in attainable steps.
You can start with line and build tone gradually before
introducing ?ourishes of colour without feeling as if the
medium is getting away from you. Coloured pencil covers
space more slowly than paint, and many people derive
great pleasure from the meditative process of hours
spent layering colour towards a photorealistic end. I
prefer a looser approach and use them for 10-minute,
two-colour sketches as much as for long studies.
To make a great drawing, you need to get to know your
subject. Before drawing this owl I went to sketch at a
wildlife drawing session, where handlers brought owls to
draw from life. I then went to a natural history museum
and made studies from stuffed owls ? more static
subjects ? before taking a reference photo of one to
inform the three-hour drawing in this tutorial. Don?t
be limited by photographs ? use drawing as a way to
get to know your subject, even when your materials
demand time and control.
www.jakespicerart.co.uk
To p t i p
Plumage ca
n dis trac t
from the bir
d?s form ?
draw skele
tons to
become mo
re familiar
with their sh
ap e s
Artists & Illustrators 73
1
CONSTRUCTION
One minute
It might not look impressive,
but this stage is critical to a
lively and well-proportioned
drawing. You are laying the
foundation, as well as
setting the scale. Hold your
pencil like a paintbrush
rather than a pen, and make
loose, looping shapes from
the elbow to establish the
bird?s rough form.
To p t i p
ard
drawing bo
An angled
. If
n
io
rt
to
is
d
minimise s
m
st
ave a cu o
you don?t h
h
it
w
rovise
board, imp
ainst
a board ag
d ge
e
le
a tab
3
2
SMALL
SHAPES
20 minutes
Focus on smaller shapes. Keep
the drawing linear and marks
light and energetic, throwing a
line around the shapes of
markings and shadows, as well
as drawing key feathers that
suggest the ?ow of the plumage.
4
BIG SHAPES
10 minutes
Rub your drawing back so it sits faintly on
the page. Using the same pencil as in the
construction drawing, shift your pencil
hold to an overhand grip to give more
control. Draw in big masses. The eyes
and beak make a triangle of shapes;
the wing, breast, tail and legs can be
separated into large, simple forms.
MIDTONE
20 minutes
Introduce a second colour to develop
tone. In this case, I used a warm grey to
build with short, hatched marks in the
direction of feathers. Don?t go too dark
too quickly and leave blank space where
you expect to draw very light colours, or
very dense black, later on.
COLOURED PENCIL
5
COLOUR
40 minutes
Now for the real colour. You?ll
notice your line drawing has
become the pattern on which you
are layering tone and colour. A
sound underdrawing gives you
room to build con?dently. Be bold
with colours. To avoid an
exclusively brown palette, I used
a lilac pencil to introduce subtle
contrasts into the shadows.
To p t i p
Don?t be ove
rwhelmed b
y
the numbe
r of colours
in your pen
cil tin.
Pick a limit
ed palette
before you
st art
your drawin
g
6
DARK MIDTONES
7
DARKEST DARKS
40 minutes
Returning to the dark red-brown pencil of the
?rst stages, I spent time building dark tones,
layering brown over earlier colours and
putting particular weight into the shapes of
shadow between the feathers. These sharp
wedges of dark add structure to the bird?s
feathers and can be drawn as a small, simple
abstract shape.
40 minutes
Never underestimate how long it takes to
build layers in a coloured pencil drawing. If
you ?nd yourself getting tired or bored, stop
and take a break. Drawing should be an
engaged act. At this stage, I added black for
the darkest tones, which also serves to cool
down the hot shadows of the earlier browns.
I decided to leave the background white, but
included the shadow on the rock to ground
the owl in space.
In the next issue, Jake will explore drawing skin
tones in coloured pencil.
Artists & Illustrators 75
TRY SPRAYING SLOW-DRYING MEDIUM
A new technique I?ve adopted relies on
rapid, thick applications and dragging
pigments around. It is less to do with
blending and more about paint effects
colliding. Rather than adding retarder to
the mix at the beginning, I use a liquid
version in a diffuser and spray liberally
over layers of paint before they dry.
This allows a little more working time
or additional spreads of paint. More
re?ned brushwork along with the drag
effects creates interesting contrast.
while using generous quantities on your palette will
keep paint workable if it is prodded regularly.
GEL OR LIQUID?
E S S E N T I A L AC RY L I C S
6. RETARDER
In the final part of his series, HASHIM AKIB
reveals his advice on how to slow drying times
Retarder comes in a gel or liquid form. The gel is suitable
for more impasto-style applications, whereas ?uid is great
for producing ?owing colour. Add any slow-drying medium
to acrylic on a mixing tray to extend working times. Be
careful not to use too much with small amounts of
pigment because it will dull colour and cause adherence
issues. I use a slightly unconventional method with
retarder. I use the ?uid form in a diffuser bottle and spray
it over thick acrylic that has already been applied to
canvas. It is fairly passive but allows a small opening to
push paint around for drag effects and to meld colours.
WHAT TO BUY
o
ABOVE Venice, acrylic
on canvas, 76x51cm
76 Artists
& Illustrators
ne of the main concerns about acrylic is the
drying time, which will seem too rapid for the
uninitiated. On average, artist-quality acrylic
paints take half-an-hour to dry completely if used in a thin
layer. Thicker applications take one-to-two hours
depending on the air temperature. Experience will help
you understand these qualities but, in the meantime, you
can use mediums such as retarder and slow-drying gels.
Medium isn?t essential. You can use water to dilute
acrylic but it will affect the pigment?s richness. As well as
retarders, there are moulding pastes to thicken paint,
gloss or satin varnishes to mimic an oil ?nish, and
products to create ?ow with no colour-shift once dry, such
as ?ow-enhancer, glazing gel and matt or gloss medium.
Thicker consistencies of acrylic have longer drying times,
Retarders are readily available from art manufacturers.
Golden produces a 3.78lr bottle for �, while the
cheapest I found was a 60ml tube by Vallejo. My
preference is Liquitex Slow-Dri Fluid Retarder, which is
available in a 118ml bottle at just under � Glazing
medium has slow-drying properties if you prefer thinner
applications. I came across a new Liquitex Palette
Wetting Spray for acrylics that comes in a 237ml bottle.
Spray a ?ne mist over your palette or painting.
I use retarder early as I work on the overall image to
allow more working time. Whether you are using a
slow-drying medium or not, the key is to be decisive and
paint with momentum. Any additional tools or materials
will take your concentration away from your painting.
See more of Hashim?s work and ?nd out about his workshops
at www.hashimakib.co.uk
"TOLKIEN" is a registered trade mark of The Tolkien Estate Limited and used with kind permssion
With the support of The
Tolkien Trust
7RON騂Q
1 June ? 28 October 2018
WESTON LIBRARY
TICKETS to the exhibition are free but booking online
is recommended at tolkien.bodleian.ox.ac.uk
@bodleianlibs #BODtolkien
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Artists & Illustrators 77
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Tel: 0118 931 4155
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Distance: 75 Miles Media:
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Special subjects: Landscapes,
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STOW-ON-THE-WOLD
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Email: info@theoldschoolstudio.co.uk
www.theoldschoolstudio.co.uk
Call Val Pettifer 01223 833064
CORRESPONDENCE COURSES
Pastel Correspondence
and Studio Courses
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Tel: 01834 831633
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THINGS
I?VE
LEARNED:
FIONA
STRICKLAND
NATALIE MILNER asks
the American Society
of Botanical Artists
member the secrets
of her success
1
LIVE WITH IT Discover an aspect
of a plant by surprise, as if seeing it for
the ?rst time, in the same way an artist may
study a life model through close observation.
This plays an integral part in my process.
I use magni?cation, in addition to prescribed
occupational varifocal spectacles, for study
and accurate control of the brush.
4
2
5
LIGHT IT RIGHT Form is much
more easily seen when a plant is lit
from one side only. If the light is behind the
plant it will emphasise its shape or linear
qualities more than form. If it is lit from the
front, it will be ?ooded in light making it
impossible to see the form.
3
PERSISTENCE IS KEY There is
much to learn and it takes persistence.
I?ve learned to work cautiously when
applying paint, and to consider its ?uidity
and whether it is wet or dry. Controlling
moisture and ?ow is key.
TAP INTO EMOTIONS I?ve learned
that while it is of vital importance to me
to record the plant with extreme accuracy,
my paintings are not produced in the service
of science or to capture an endangered
species. I want to engage the viewer in a
dialogue to enrich their emotive experience.
See Fiona?s work in Jonathan Cooper 30 Years
from 12 to 21 July at Jonathan Cooper gallery,
London SW10. www.jonathancooper.co.uk
ABOVE Celebration Papava, watercolour
on Kelmscott vellum, 42.2x42.5cm
LEFT Fiona at work in her studio
THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH
botanical
art is
based on
my emotive
response
STUDY THE TEMPERATURE
Scrutinise the plant for nuances in
colour temperature to convey an accurate
representation of a vital moment in its life
cycle. Colour is my signature approach to
botanical art and is based on my emotive
response. I apply multiple layers of complex
transparent washes to build vibrancy.
ART . CRAFT . DESIGN
18
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[[[GSFVEVS]EPXEPIRWGSQ
e broken brush work ?
dabs of white ? gives the scene its luminosity. A palette of
cool blues and yellows is used to mix vivid, bright greens for
the year?s new foliage.
42 Artists
& Illustrators
CAMILLE PISSARRO, THE GARDENS OF THE TUILERIES ON A SPRING MORNING,
OIL ON CANVAS, 73.7X92.1CM 〢RT COLLECTION 2/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO
Discover the techniques of the
world?s greatest ar tist s
Pen and wash is a wonderful sketching medium. Unlike pure
watercolour, structure is all down to the drawing, so applying
the paint is more relaxed. While disposable waterproof pens
are convenient, nothing beats the variety of line and ?ow of
ink that can be achieved with a traditional pen. A dip pen isn?t
suitable for travelling but a fountain pen can be ?lled with
inks that dry waterproof. I use Noodlers Bulletproof Ink which,
although not as dense as Indian ink, provides a strong black.
A pen and wash needs the right balance of ink to paint so
the drawing is the work?s strongest feature. This is why it
suits busy architectural subjects, such as this one in
Cartagena, Spain. The contrast between the ornate city hall
and modern buildings creates an obvious subject. It was
almost unbearably hot and humid, which encouraged a rapid
approach. After half an hour, air conditioning seemed more
important than painting. The less interesting modern
buildings were indicated simply, allowing me to concentrate
the pen work on the city hall. Even here I didn?t want to be
fussy, preferring to hint at architectural details. A few palm
fronds, along with a suggestion of ?owering shrubs, provided
a simple foreground. In this area only, I added ink after the
paint because I ?nd it easier ? and better ? to
create simple lines around loose, splashy
?owers and leaves. Drawing ?rst and
then painting produces a stilted result.
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Try not
to carefu
lly
paint up
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o your li
ABOVE City Hall, Cartagena, waterproof ink
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Work fr
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Artists & Illustrators 43
sketchbook
TIPS FOR ENTERING
ART COMPETITIONS
K ATH RYN MAPLE won the Sunday
Times Watercolour Comp etition in
2016 . Here she of f er s her advice
No tip will guarantee you a place in a competition because
there are many things beyond your control. After many
failed attempts, I?ve learned you should never see being
unsuccessful as a re?ection of the quality of your work.
?NEVER BE SATISFIED
Keep trying to reinvent or push your ideas and mediums
so the work feels fresh.
?SELF-BELIEF IS ESSENTIAL
Working alone in the studio can feel isolating at times but
your self-belief will allow you to recognise if a work has the
potential to be shortlisted.
?TALK IT OVER
I ?nd it refreshing to have chats about my work with friends
who aren?t artists because they can see something obvious
that doesn?t work. Fresh eyes with no bias can be useful.
?GET YOUR ART SEEN
Creating opportunities for work to be seen and working to
deadlines keeps your work energised. This translates into
your voice and forms the heart of your practice.
The Sunday Times Watercolour Competition 2018 is now open
for submissions. Enter at sundaytimeswatercolour.artopps.co.uk
by 5pm on Monday 25 June.
COMPETITION
1 OF 5 LUXURY
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PAINT BRUSHES
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Our winners, chosen at
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HOW TO ENTER
Winners will be selected at
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competitions by noon on 13
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MASTERCL ASS
ENERGETIC
STILL LIFE
羒ne Divine mixes her media to create a beautiful floral
painting with dramatic contrast between light and dark
羒ne?s materials
?Acrylic and oil
t
Ultramarine Blue, Cerulean Blue, Alizarin
Crimson, Cadmium Red, Yellow Ochre, Burnt
Sienna, Hooker?s Green, Viridian Green (oil
only), Titanium White, Cadmium Orange,
Vandyke Brown, Payne?s Grey
here are a few things that I
recommend before painting a ?ower
still life. The ?rst relates to the way
you set it up. I raise the level of the table so
that it is almost at eye level to get a good,
side-on view. I like to see the leaves, stems
and ?owers clearly against the background,
and for a sliver of tabletop to be visible to
help convey the depth of the picture plane.
I love the effect of natural light, so I set up
the ?owers on the window in my studio. It isn?t
north facing, but the sun shines from 11am to
2pm creating a dramatic contrast between the
light and dark. The second thing that I
recommend considering is your position.
I work standing at an easel with a daylight
lamp casting light on my board. I am
right-handed and prefer to look out the
left side of the canvas so that I can see from
the ?owers to the painting surface by only
moving my eyes.
You could complete the painting in acrylic
rather than change to oil, and then paint it
with a glaze to give a richer surface.
www.ainedivinepaintings.co.uk;
www.facebook.com/AineDivinePaintings
1 Make sweeping marks
2 Scumble shapes
3 Observe closely
I use a two-inch ?at brush to cover the board?s
surface with broad sweeping marks in a
mixture of Cerulean Blue, and a little Alizarin
Crimson and Ultramarine Blue. I splash on
some water and, before it dries fully, wipe
away the droplets with a dry rag. This creates
the spatter pattern.
I scumble on the main colours with the rag:
general ?ower shapes in Cadmium Red and
Alizarin Crimson, and the darks of the leaves in
Hooker?s Green, Ultramarine Blue and Vandyke
Brown. The tabletop is a runny mixture of
Alizarin Crimson, Burnt Sienna and Ultramarine
Blue. I wipe it away to show the table?s height.
I use Ultramarine Blue with some Vandyke
Brown to establish the shape of the jug and
handle. Cadmium Orange is applied loosely to
describe the fruit. I explain the negative spaces
between the leaves on the right using a damp
rag to lift off wet acrylic. I use masking tape so
I can freely paint the cover of the table.
>
46 Artists
& Illustrators
?Brushes
Flat brushes from Royal & Langnickel Burgundy
Taklon set, old household ?at brushes, 1in, 2in.
?Mount board
?White gesso
?Palette knife
?Rags
To p t i p
E xplain
t he neg
ative
space s
b e t we e
n
the leav
e s usin
ga
damp ra
g to lift
off
we t a c r
ylic
Artists & Illustrators 47
5 Explain the pattern
I use Payne?s Grey and white to generate the
pattern down the middle section of the jug.
Using ?at brushes and rags to apply the paint
keeps the marks lively and helps me avoid
unnecessary detail. I use a one-inch ?at
brush to paint the grey pattern. The blue wall
?inside? the handle is applied with a dry rag.
I print the stems with the edge of the brush.
6 Add in the darks
4 Mix true colours
I paint the tabletop in thick acrylic ? a blend
of Cadmium Red, Alizarin Crimson and
Titanium White. I then lift the masking tape to
reveal a clean horizon line. To get a true
colour, I hold up the palette so I can see what
I?m aiming for while I mix.
7 Introduce oil paint
I stand back every third or fourth stroke to
ensure I?m scanning the whole painting.
Now I introduce oil paint. A mix of Vandyke
Brown and Ultramarine Blue adds richness
and heightens tonal contrast. I sharpen the
shadows in the leaves, then clearly capture
the shapes in a �-inch ?at brush.
It?s important to keep an eye on the darks.
I half-close my eyes and ?nd the darkest
darks in the whole subject. I use Ultramarine
Blue and Vandyke Brown to make the dark
pattern on the jug. I also make a ?esh colour
with white, Cadmium Red and Yellow Ochre
to describe the lighter stems.
MASTERCL ASS
8 Darken shadows
I capture the jug handle with Ultramarine Blue
and Vandyke Brown and darken the shadows
to the left of the oranges with Vandyke Brown
and a little Ultramarine Blue. Adding Cadmium
Red to this makes a good colour for the jug?s
shadow. These moves help to anchor the still
life. I aim to apply the light colours with thicker
paint while using thin paint for the dark areas.
10 Create the background
9 Paint light tones
I subdue the front of the tablecloth with a
dark red, made from Alizarin Crimson, Viridian
Green and Cadmium Red, and scumble it on
with a rag. Mixing Cadmium Red and white I
introduce the lightest tones on the tabletop.
The colour of the background wall is a mix of
Cerulean Blue and white. The oil is thick and
vibrant, working well over the thinner acrylic
to clearly de?ne edges. Ultramarine Blue and
white make a lovely light blue for the pattern
on the light side of the jug.
11 Find the highlights
I describe the brightest stems with
a ?chipping in? effect, where a mix
of Cadmium Orange and white is
laid on and left as a ridge. Lights
read more convincingly when the
paint is in relief. The brightest
sections of the red ?owers are laid
on in thick oil paint too. Highlights
are enhanced by the dark accents
? a blue-brown oil mix ? at the
base of some ?owers.
To p t i p
To achie
ve a
in? effec ?chipping
t
paint on , pile the
t he top
e d ge
of t he b
rush an
d
lay
it on as
a ridge
12 Finishing touches
I decide the oranges are a distraction, so
I paint over them in oil paint. It helps to have
a mount cut to see the painting through, so
that I can decide more easily when it?s
complete. It also helps me to ?nd where
I want the edge to be.
Artists & Illustrators 49
甆ational Trust Images / Angelo Hornak
25 May to
16 September
PRIZED
POSSESSIONS
In partnership with:
Dutch Masterpieces from
National Trust Houses
Supported by:
ART IN THE ALGARVE
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Call us on: 0203 287 7140
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50 Artists
& Illustrators
I N T E RV I E W
ABOUT
THE
HOUSE
Winner of the Artists & Illustrators award
at this year?s Pastel Society exhibition,
FELICITY HOUSE, chats to NATALIE
MILNER about her glorious garden scenes
a
n unassuming subject can make a fascinating
painting. ?You can look at an impressive scene,
but, instead, you can turn around and ?nd one that
needs noticing,? says the Dorset-based artist. And with the
rustic garden scene in Espalier Tomatoes, the pastel
painter has taken her own advice. Its juicy tomatoes,
intricate composition and fascinating textural qualities
prove that the familiar doesn?t have to mean dull. The
delightful work was awarded the Artists & Illustrators prize
at this year?s Pastel Society Annual Exhibition at London?s
Mall Galleries earlier this year.
Felicity saw the fruit in the walled garden of West Dean
College, near Chichester, where she taught art and was on
good terms with the head gardener. ?I went back the next
week hoping that all those shades of red, green and orange
would still be there, and they were,? she says. ?So I homed
in and set up my easel.?
52 Artists
& Illustrators
She rests Art Spectrum Colour?x card on a lightweight
Herring easel and works quickly, applying a watercolour
underpainting with rough brushes. A mix of Winsor Blue
and Permanent Rose is used to block in shapes and tones
without losing the tooth of the surface. ?If you apply lots of
layers of pastel it can ?ll up quickly and get slidey,? says
Felicity. ?This way helps to save the texture and gives you a
lovely, tonal composition. Perhaps it spills over from
painting in oils.? Once she has grabbed some pastels, her
process is an ebb and ?ow of broad strokes and detailed
pastel pencil marks, each complementing the other.
?Espalier Tomatoes is a beautiful example of how careful
observation of complex arrangements can create bold,
expressive paintings,? says Artists & Illustrators editor Sally
Hales, who selected it as her winner. This balancing of
expression and representation comes from a close
connection with her materials. ?With pastels you?re holding
ABOVE Autumn,
West Dean
Glasshouse,
watercolour
underpainting, soft
chalk pastels and
pastel pencils
on Colour?x card,
46x54cm
PREVIOUS Espalier
Tomatoes, soft
chalk pastels,
pastel pencils
on Colour?x card,
40x32cm
Pastel is attractive
in terms of freedom
of mark-making; it is
personal to you ?
like your handwriting
RIGHT Tomato and
Chilli Chutney,
neutral watercolour
underpainting,
soft pastel chalks
and pastel pencils
on Colour?x card,
48x48cm
BELOW Felicity?s
pastel kit
the colour. There?s no brush
or tool between you and the
colour, so it is very gestural,?
adds Felicity. ?That?s what I
like about the medium. It?s
attractive in terms of freedom
of mark-making; the marks are
very personal to you. They?re
like your own handwriting.?
Her ability to surrender to
this and react in the moment is
essential to her ?nished work.
?It is more spontaneous when
you?re outside ? there?s a liveliness you just don?t get in the
studio,? she says. ?You?re lingering, noticing more than
what?s in front of you ? the smells, sounds and fresh air.?
But, for Felicity, drawn elements are also crucial. ?When
you?re working onsite, it is important to be accurate,? she
says. ?Every now and then I check I?ve got things in the
right place, or the right shape. I return to drawing through
the painting.? This fastidiousness comes from a history of
painting from life. For more than 25 years she worked in
primary school education but, by 2000, it was time to give
her art more attention and she moved on to teach life
drawing at Arts University Bournemouth. ?I?m not art-school
trained. I wrote to artists who I admired and asked them
where they were teaching. It was always drawing from life;
it kept me challenged. That?s why I can draw fast.? Felicity?s
art is grounded in the domestic, as seen in Tomato and
Chilli Chutney, another painting shown in the Pastel Society
Annual Exhibition. It was inspired by a recipe. Attracted by
the ingredients, she built a kitchen scene, bringing to life
the busyness of the everyday and joyful colours with her
energetic marks. An appreciation of the ordinary is at the
core of her painting. ?I think the world is full of so many
lovely things,? she says. ?There?s enough for us to look
at and respond to in a personal way.?
See Felicity?s winning artwork and more paintings at her
open studio event during Dorset Art Weeks, 26 to 28 May,
1 to 3 June and 8 to 10 June. www.dorsetartweeks.co.uk;
www.felicityhouse.eu; www.thepastelsociety.org.uk
FELICITY?S PASTEL TIPS
?UNWRAP AND BREAK
Arrange pastels so you can
see them in shallow pots.
Learn to identify colours
visually, so you don?t need
names and numbers.
?LET THE PAPER WORK
Choose a colour paper that
will be useful to the image.
If you?re painting in a warm
country, try sand colours or
the Australian Grey in Art
Spectrum Colour?x. Allow
colour to peep through
and unify.
?KEEP PASTELS IN RICE
This avoids colours rubbing
off on one another. Divide
pastels in pots of lights,
darks, warms and cools.
?DRAW BETTER
Fifteen minutes a day will
improve your observational
skills immensely. Put in the
time to get better.
?STORE WORK WELL
So it doesn?t slide or
smudge, tape your work
inside a sugar-paper folder
with paper between each
piece to blot the dust. If
you?re travelling, cut two
pieces of foam board the
size of your suitcase, tape
them together with a hinge,
and store work inside.
Artists & Illustrators 53
D E M O N S T R AT I O N
REFLECTION
& MOVEMENT
With this serene watercolour
of a swan, ROB DUDLEY
explains how you can
capture the beauty and
energy of the natural world
D E M O N S T R AT I O N
Rob?s materials
2
?Watercolour
Artist-quality Ultramarine Blue, Winsor
Blue (green shade), Raw Sienna,
Permanent Rose, Cadmium Red,
Cadmium Orange, neutral tint
To p t i p
?Paper
If masking
fluid ends
up in the w
rong place
on your pap
er, let
it dry before
removing
Bockingford 300gsm (140lb) NOT,
28x17cm
?Brushes
Nylon masking brush and sable
brushes, size 10, 8, 4 and 2
?Tracing paper
?2B pencil
?Masking fluid
?Palette
?Kitchen paper
?Maskaway eraser
?Painting board
3
1
A
lthough one might think that since this painting
is a simple study of a single swan, little, if any,
thought would have gone into the design, but that
would be wrong. The painting?s format, the placement of
the swan within the picture, tone and colour ? all the
considerations that an artist would give to a more ?nished
work apply equally to smaller-scale paintings. The study is
not merely about the swan, it?s also about the re?ection
and the movement within the water. Therefore I chose a
rather narrow portrait format that would amplify the swan,
particularly its neck and its re?ection, but would also allow
room to include the wake.
www.moortoseaarts.co.uk
1
DRAW AND MASK
After transferring the drawing
from the tracing to the stretched
watercolour paper, reserve the swan
and its re?ection with masking ?uid
using the nylon masking brush. Let it
dry naturally. It is worth noting that if
masking ?uid ends up in the wrong
place within the painting, avoid
rubbing at it straight away with a ?nger
or kitchen paper, as this can damage
the paper?s surface, making it almost
impossible to paint. Let it dry and then
carefully remove by gently rubbing
with a ?nger or Maskaway eraser.
2
PAINT THE
WATER WASHES
After checking the masking ?uid is
completely dry, prepare two wells of
pure colour, Ultramarine Blue and
Winsor Blue. With the board at a slight
angle, using the large no 10 sable
brush lay a wash of Winsor Blue over
the top three-quarters of the paper.
Paint the remaining quarter with
Ultramarine Blue, working from the
bottom up, allowing colours to mix
where they meet. Keep the board at
the same angle and let colours dry.
3
DEFINE RIPPLES
AND MOVEMENT
With some washes of Winsor Blue
mixed with Ultramarine Blue, and
Winsor Blue with neutral tint, paint
the ripples varying colours. A
>
Artists & Illustrators 55
5
6
4
To p t i p
urs
Lighter colo
darker
t
c
e
fl
usually re
d darker
in water, an
ter, so
colours ligh
ingly
rd
mix acco
should be reinstated, either by using
the master drawing from the tracing
or freehand, using a 2B pencil.
well-pointed no 8 sable brush is ideal.
Not only can it produce ?ne and broad
lines but it has the capacity to carry a
lot of wash, making this type of mark
easier to produce and reducing the
number of times you have to revisit
the palette. Note the ripples caused
by the swan?s wake are narrower and
closer together than the broader
ripples in the foreground. The
difference helps to emphasise the
swan?s forward motion. Leave to dry.
4
REMOVE THE
MASKING FLUID
After checking none of the paint is still
wet, carefully remove the masking
?uid. This is quite a large area to
remove; be careful not to pull at the
dry masking ?uid when removing it or
you are likely to tear the paper. It?s
also likely the removal of the masking
?uid will have removed some of the
pencil details from the swan. These
56 Artists
& Illustrators
ADD STRUCTURE
AND DETAIL
5
Prepare washes of Permanent Rose
with Ultramarine Blue, Raw Sienna
and neutral tint, and, with a no 4
brush, begin to add detail to the swan.
Note the re?ection is slightly darker in
tone than the swan itself. As a rule of
thumb, lighter colours re?ect darker in
water, and darker colours lighter.
Although this is a useful guide when
painting re?ections, nothing beats
?rst-hand observation, so take time to
assess the tonal values of the object
and re?ection. Continue to build detail
with overlaid washes. Care should be
exercised at this stage. The swan?s
white plumage could easily be lost by
overzealous washes. Paint with
con?dence, but also with control.
6
FINISH THE PAINTING
The red of the beak makes a
dramatic statement. With a no 2
brush, paint it with a
mix of Cadmium Red
and Cadmium Orange,
the bottom beak being
slightly stronger in
colour than the top.
Let this dry. If the
darker details are
added before the
beak is dry the colours
will run, ruining sharp
divisions. For the eyes
and dark parts of the
beak, use a strong mix
of neutral tint,
achieved by adding as
little water to pigment
as possible. Add short shadow details
at the water line and pick out ripples
with neutral tint. When painting the
re?ections of the beak and eyes, use
the same mixes, but with slightly more
water in the wash as re?ective colours
are a little paler than the swan itself.
This is an edited extract from Painting
Rivers from Source to Sea by Rob Dudley,
published by The Crowood Press.
www.crowood.com
Wh at to
pack
Working en plein air this
summer? Be inspired by
these kit essentials and
exciting painting events
Head to Wexford,
Ireland, to
compete in one of
Europe?s biggest
plein-air painting
festivals, from
29 July to 6
August. Paint
in spectacular
locations and
join one of 20
workshops. www.
artintheopen.org
From �. www.
carriart.co.uk
Ideal for shaping
and sharpening
drawing media on
the go, Nitram?s
block will make a
handy kit addition.
WINDSOR AND ETON EN PLEIN AIR 2018
ART IN THE OPEN
With painting
outdoors comes the
peril of bad weather.
Slip your in-progress
art into an ArtCase
to protect it from
the elements.
NITRAM
CHARCOAL
SHARPENING
BLOCK
Where to go
Hot on the heels of May?s royal wedding, set
up your easel inside the walls of Windsor
Castle on 21 July, and compete against
amateur and professional artists. The winner
takes home �0 cash, �0 worth of art
materials and a discounted stand at
Contemporary Art Fairs Windsor, plus the
winning painting will be donated to HM The
Queen?s collection. Enrol by noon on 15 July.
www.windsor.gov.uk
PAUL O?KANE
Go
outdoor
CARRIART
ARTCASE
�50. www.
nitramcharcoal.com
PLEIN AIR
HOLIDAY
Learn to paint en
plein air in oil and watercolour in beautiful
Umbria with artist Paul O?Kane from 11 to
18 July. Hosted by Arte Umbria, you will be
able to paint sunrises and sunsets, forest
scenes, cascading streams and more on
this week-long residential holiday. Also
included with the tutoring is full-board
accommodation, wine, free bar, and trips
to wine tastings and castles.
www.arteumbria.com
PAINT OUT NORWICH 2018
There?s a prize pool worth thousands of
pounds at this plein-air painting competition,
from 14 to 17 October. Locations include a
market, medieval cathedral quarter and a
Norman Castle. Apply to take part in day or
night challenges.
www.paintoutnorwich.org
DA VINCI
CASANEO TRAVEL
BRUSH CASE
This pocket
watercolour brush
set includes three
round brushes,
sizes 10, 6 and 4,
made from extra
soft synthetic ?bres.
Each brush includes
a screw-on handle
that doubles as
a handy lid.
From �.50. www.
davinci-defet.com
H OW T O
PAINT CITY
LIFE
Seasoned London plein-air painter
ADEBANJI ALADE explains how he
navigates the urban environment
to capture exciting street scenes
PA I N T T H E C I T Y
Flower stall sketch
ADEBANJI?S PLEIN-AIR KIT
?Tripod
?Plein air or
pochade box, or a
French easel for
larger paintings
?Oil paints
?Mediums
and solvents
?Digital camera
or smartphone
?Rags or
kitchen paper
?Brushes
?TomBow
Markers or Zig Art
Twin Pens
?Small containers
for mediums
and solvents
?Sculpting wax
?Mirror
?Viewfinder
?Ruler
?Palette knives
Outside-In progress
like an artist and move around with a
childlike curiosity. Once you have an idea of
where you want to paint, make sure you also
work out what direction you?ll be painting
from. This will save you time on the day.
WHAT TO TAKE
i
t is the season to dust down your plein-air
gear and get ready to paint outdoors.
And you don?t need to travel to the
countryside to paint, either. A busy urban
environment ? with its people, cars, street
lamps and buildings ? will also make
a fantastic painting.
I move around with a 26-inch Dunlop
suitcase in which I pack my kit. It is easier
because I do a lot of walking about. When
setting up, I?ll make sure I?m in a position that
is safe. I try not to be against a wall because
people can?t see my painting ? sometimes
these are the people who might buy the work.
MY TECHNIQUES
WHAT TO WEAR
Painting on a cold day can be off-putting.
If you do, be sure to really wrap up. I have to
wear up to ?ve layers of jumpers as well as
the essential thermal wear. I cover my
painting hand in a sock and poke a hole
through, so that I can hold my brush. I also
wear big, Eskimo-type boots, which
completely cover my feet, because I will be
standing in one position for a long period.
It is much easier to plan what to wear
during the warmer periods. The only thing
to take note of is not to wear bright colours
because they may re?ect in your painting.
A nice hat to block your eyes from the sun
can also be handy.
WHAT TO PAINT
It?s best to make the important decision
about what you are going to paint before you
set out. As I pass through any location, I am
always looking for things that interest me and
then make notes. The key is to keep thinking
I have two major techniques or approaches.
The ?rst I call ?Inside-Out?. I start from one
spot on the surface of the painting and
bring each area to completion as I move
along. This approach works best on days
when the light is grey and the conditions are
not going to change very much.
The second approach is called ?Outside-In?.
When working this way, I block in all of the
major shapes very quickly, and ?nish by
adding the details inside the major shapes.
This is a fast technique that is
suitable when the light is
changing all the time, and
I need to get a quick,
abstract feel for the
whole scene down on
the canvas.
Adebanji teaches at
the Art Academy and
Heatherley?s School
of Fine Art. www.
adebanjialade.co.uk >
LEFT The
Flower Stall
Sloane
Square, oil
on board,
20x25cm
Sketch stage
ADEBANJI?S TOP
TIPS FOR URBAN
PLEIN-AIR PAINTING
?Get to grips with your
sketching and drawing skills.
Being strong in this area will
make painting easier.
?Always bear in mind why you
were interested in painting the
scene in the ?rst place, and
BELOW
Grey Sloane
Square, oil
on canvas,
50x56cm
follow this through in the piece.
?It?s not a crime to ?nish the
piece at home or in the studio
? which is why it?s good to have
a camera to take a picture of
the scene at the start.
?Never despair about your
progress. You get better by
deliberately practising on
areas that you ?nd dif?cult.
?Inside-Out? progress
Finished painting
cover competition
�0 worth of Winsor
& Newton art materials
to be won
Winning entry will
feature on the cover
of our new catalogue
NOW OPEN FOR ENTRIES
Entry deadline Sunday 8th July
Sponsored by
Full Terms & Conditons available online - artsupplies.co.uk/covercomp
?Fascinating?
The Guardian
?A revelation?
The Observer
?Impressive?
Will Gompertz, BBC
BOOK NOW Until 22 Jul
www.ashmolean.org
Artists & Illustrators 61
TA L K I N G T E C H N I Q U E S
THE OUTSIDE
WORLD
Artist ANDREW ROBERTS
tells NATALIE MILNER
about his love of paint and
showing art with his heroes
62 Artists
& Illustrators
ANDREW ROBERTS
YARI BENO
Chasing fun is a good
thing. They don?t teach
you that in art school.
But it is still hard work
i
LEFT Untitled
? Blossom,
oil on canvas,
30x30cm
ABOVE,
CLOCKWISE
FROM TOP
LEFT Andrew?s
plein-air
painting set
up; Welcomed
(detail), oil
on canvas,
30x30cm;
Andrew
at work
t?s not every day you exhibit alongside your
heroes, but landscape painter Andrew
Roberts has managed just that as he joins
a stellar cast of artists ? Tom Coates, Fred
Cuming RA, Julie Jackson and Mary Jackson
? in The Alchemy of Paint exhibition at
London?s Gallery 8 this May. ?I don?t agree
that you should never meet your heroes,?
says the Sussex-based artist. ?I think you
absolutely should, to see that they?re human
like you, have foibles and make mistakes ?
and still create great paintings.?
But it?s more than admiration that brings
these artists together ? it?s the sheer love of
the materiality of paint. When Andrew had
the chance to watch Royal Academician Fred
Cuming at work in his studio, it reaf?rmed his
appreciation of the artist. ?He?d use a brush
by turning it on its edge. It?s uncomfortable,
like he?s stroking a cat the wrong way,? says
Andrew. ?It made me think about my own
habits. I thought, ?It?s OK to do that.? All my
brushes are ruined, but I like them that way.?
This disregard for his tools injects energy
into Andrew?s oil paintings, whether he is
making sweeping strokes with a decorator?s
brush or smearing with a palette knife. But it
hasn?t always been this way. ?I used to paint
from photographs and the style was
different,? he says. ?The oil paint was
watercolour-like, still and ?at. I needed to
connect with something. I wanted the
plasticity of paint; to see the brush mark.
I wanted it to be more passionate.?
He attended art courses with Tom Coates
and found his calling in plein air, and his style
loosened into expressive marks you want to
reach out and touch. A ?urry of blossom in a
recent piece takes this tangibility to the
extreme. ?It is a very twee subject,? he says.
?But there?s a gloopy, marshmallowness
about it that is delicate and voluptuous.? And
it?s clear he ?nds working outdoors more
enjoyable. ?Chasing fun is a big thing,? he
says. ?They don?t teach that at art school.
But it doesn?t mean it?s not hard work.?
To get a feeling for texture it?s essential for
Andrew to start his artworks outdoors. He >
Artists & Illustrators 63
LEFT Between The Two
? Lower Beeding, oil
on canvas, 30x30cm
It is all about your
approach. I paint en
plein air because it is
about reaction. It?s
about that intensity
compares the experience to the tradition of
life drawing. ?It?s about your approach; your
relationship to it. The nude is just the coat
hanger of the subject matter that you can
then put yourself on,? he says. ?I paint
en plein air because it is about reaction.
Through doing, something interesting
happens. It?s about that intensity.?
He scours the countryside in his van
looking for a good location. The vehicle gives
him shelter from the wind ? or he settles into
a seat in the back of the van which he?s
angled to get a perfect view through the
sliding door, light streaming in through the
sun roof. He takes paintings home to ?nish.
Although happy with the colour balance
in his painting Between the Two ? Lower
Beeding, the triangles of yellow wheat got
their punch from a glaze in his workspace.
?When you paint plein air, you?re limited to
about a two-hour period of standing and
concentrating,? he says. ?You can build
your painting in layers in that time but,
sometimes, they?ll need a glaze to create that
intensity of colour.? For an artist who, in jest,
64 Artists
& Illustrators
compares his restricted colour
palette to ?shades of mud?, it?s
surprising that hot highlights bring
his landscapes alive. Calling them
his ?little interlopers?, he dashes one
luminous colour per painting onto the canvas
to complement the subtle shades.
This playful attitude is seen in the
undulating surface of his oils. Swearing by
the buttery Lukas Medium 5, the artist can
be generous with his paints ? especially with
the pigment-rich Michael Harding oils ? using
runnier Roberson?s glaze medium mixed with
turps or white spirit for the ?nal kick of a
semi-opaque glaze.
Andrew?s attraction to the ?squishiness of
paint? stems from an early obsession with
technique. ?Growing up, I was amazed with
the magazines my dad collected as a child,
showing illustrations from the period ?
charcoal drawings, war paintings ? and I was
fascinated,? he says. Remembering icing a
cake with his mum, he describes how he
lifted it into lumps and peaks, mimicking
snow. ?I was enjoying it,? he smiles. ?It?s all
about playfulness.? If it?s the ability to
unleash your inner child that allows you to sit
alongside your heroes, let the fun begin.
See Andrew?s work in The Alchemy of Paint,
from 21 to 26 May at Gallery 8, London,
SW1Y. www.8dukestreet.co.uk;
www.andrewrobertsart.co.uk
BELOW Painting the
Dimple at Devil?s
Dyke, West Sussex
ANDREW?S PLEIN-AIR KIT
?Open Box M
palette/panel
holder for storing
paints and to use
as an easel
?Tripod for palette
/panel holder
?Lightweight
aluminium easel
for large paintings
?Small 30x30cm
and 40x40cm
canvases, and a
large 100x100cm
canvas
?A variety of
brushes and
palette knives
?Bulldog clips
attached to the
palette/panel to
hold brushes
?Scraper card to
run a brush along
to paint verticals
?Paints: a
combination of
Lukas, Winsor &
Newton and
Michael Harding.
?Lukas Medium 5
Painting Butter
?Viewfinder to
help compose
the scene
?A good hat
?Extra surfaces
or bottle
attachments
to hold brushes
and knives
?Backpack that
fits all equipment
?Lightweight rack
for protecting a
wet painting or
pochade box
?B&Q strong
kitchen roll for
wiping brushes
CASA BEZZIA
Painting Holidays in Italy
+39 0525 71370 ? info@casabezzia.com
www.casabezzia.com
SIR JOHN HURT ART PRIZE 2018
The winning artist will receive �750
and the work will be exhibited at the
Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts
Entry is open to all artists to submit up
to three wall-based works
Deadline Midnight Sunday 17th June 2018
An exhibition of 25-30 shortlisted works
will be held at the
Auden Theatre, Holt, North Norfolk
from
Saturday 21st until Sunday 29th July
as part of Holt Festival 2018
For further details and an application form visit
www.holtfestival.org
Our course?s for 2018
?Journey?s Into Colour? June 2-8 and June 11-17
With Jessica Watson-Thorp
?Towers, Tortelli & Time To Paint? June 23-29 and July 1-7
With Norinka Ford
?Watercolour and beyond capturing a sense of place?
With Seana Mercedes Mallen
Aug 31 Sep 6 and Sept 8-14
?Parmesan & Paint !? Sep 16-22
With Karen Pearson
Also
included is a
Cooking Demo
and a visit to an
Artisan Cheese
Maker
ARTISTS?
VALUE
BRUSHES
(]HPSHISL[OYV\NOHZLSLJ[NYV\WVMZ[VJRPZ[Z
^^^HY[PZ[ZIY\ZOLZJV\R
MVYM\SSPUMVYTH[PVUVUYHUNLZZL[ZWYPJLZ
.YLH[]HS\LIPNZH]PUNZ
Artists & Illustrators 65
O I L PA I NTI N G MY TH S B U S TE D
1. SUPPORTS
In the first part of her new series,
SOPHIE PLOEG explodes some commonly
held misconceptions about the medium
Wood is rigid, easy to work
on and less fragile than
canvas but can split if kept
in the wrong conditions
1
LINEN AND CANVAS
ARE MUCH THE SAME
Not necessarily. Woven material such
as cotton or linen is the most widely used
support for oil painting, but there is also jute,
as well as polyester. Cotton has a different
weave to linen. The texture of cotton is very
regular. When painting, it looks and feels
different to linen. Cotton canvas is also a
little more elastic, so it is easier to stretch.
Linen?s weave is more irregular and naturallooking. You can see threads running over the
surface creating ?ne lines, instead of the
regular bob of cotton. Linen is ?rmer than
cotton, so it is harder to stretch. Cotton is
cheaper but it is not necessarily of inferior
quality. Canvas comes in a variety of
textures, ranging from coarse to super-?ne
but brands interpret this in their own way.
Canvas can also come glued to a rigid
support offering the best of both worlds.
2
WOOD WILL WARP
Panels have been used as a support
for a long time. Wood is rigid, easy to
work on and less fragile than stretched
canvas, but can split and warp if kept in the
wrong conditions. However, there are good,
stable wood products available. Think about
trying plywood or MDF.
3
YOU CAN?T USE OIL
PAINT ON PAPER
Yes, you can. Some manufacturers
sell oil-painting paper that has been coated
to make it suitable for working in oil. There
are also papers that have a mock-canvas
texture, while brands such as Arches have
watercolour paper-like quality.
4
OIL PAINTINGS
WILL CRACK
Common sense tells us that an oil
painting on stretched canvas will move,
either by the slight bounce a stretched fabric
gives or by the expanding and shrinking of
the materials in certain circumstances. But,
if we paint on a rigid surface, we remove the
risk of cracking. Copper is a beautiful
material to work on but needs preparation. It
is non-absorbent, so paint glides beautifully
over the surface. Other metals often used as
oil painting supports are aluminium and an
aluminium product often referred to as
Dibond, which is a brand name. Dibond is
a sandwiched aluminium product, which is
normally used for road signs. It needs
preparation but it is wonderfully lightweight,
rigid and easy to work on.
5
YOU HAVE TO PRIME
A CANVAS YOURSELF
Oil painting supports generally come
either primed or unprimed. For ease of use,
a primed support is handy because you can
dive in straightaway and start painting. To get
more control over your materials, you can
also buy unprimed supports and apply your
own primer in your preferred way.
www.sophieploeg.com
MAKE THE RIGHT CHOICE
What you choose to paint on is personal
preference. But some choices make more
sense in certain circumstances. For
detailed work you will need a fine canvas,
and the other way round for bolder styles.
For large paintings, you will have to keep
an eye on the weight of your support. A
wooden panel might be too heavy.
Whether you paint indoors or outside will
also influence what you paint on. If you
need to travel with your materials you will
want something light, sturdy and practical,
such as a small panel. Another
consideration is whether you are painting
a quick study or a paid commission. But,
of course, in the end it all comes down to
whatever you like best, what feels right
and what helps you create your best art.
Artists & Illustrators 67
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THIS IMAGE Hugo,
alkyd on board,
20x15cm
YO U R Q U E S T I O N S
PAINT
REALISTIC
FUR
Artist LAURA QUINN HARRIS specialises in
oil portraits of people and animals. Here she
explains how to master painting dog coats
fur ? curly, short or long ? and use
brushstrokes in correct shape, but still
quite randomly. I?m not trying to paint
individual hairs, just create a suggestion
of fur. For wiry-haired or ?uffy dogs, it?s
good to use a scumbling technique to
add broken colour. I add more layers to
build texture, using more re?ned
brushstrokes as I go. On the ?nal layer,
I add very ?ne hairs and whiskers.
Does painting different colours of
fur need separate techniques?
With any fur, you need to observe closely
and identify its many colours and tones
to make your painting accurate. A white
dog is never just white. Light greatly
in?uences what you see. There will be
cool blue tints from the sky and warm
yellow tints from the sun, as well as
re?ected light from the ?oor or other
objects. It is a good idea to accentuate
highlights you see in the fur of very dark
animals to give your painting contrast,
otherwise it may look ?at. Ensuring your
subject is well lit makes your job easier.
ABOVE
Spyke, alkyd
on board,
30x25cm
RIGHT Holly,
alkyd on
board,
30x30cm
Fur has different textures, too.
How do you study and paint them?
I begin by roughly laying down basic fur
colours using loose brushstrokes. This
underpainting is important to describe
the form of the animal. With the next
layer, I start to think about the type of
What detail should I pay attention to
when painting brushstrokes for fur?
Always paint in the direction of hair
growth, but remember no animal?s fur is
uniform. Vary brushstrokes and try not
to think about them too much so they
don?t look contrived. Fur is thick, so you
need to create the illusion of volume by
adding layers, but don?t overwork. Make
sure your reference photographs are
clear so you can observe the fur and not
resort to guesswork. Begin with larger
brushes and looser strokes, and end
with ?ner brushes for the top layers.
Are there any brushes you would
recommend for painting fur?
I use synthetic brushes because I don?t
want to use animal products. I tend to
prefer brushes meant for acrylic as they
are softer and more malleable than oil
brushes. I mainly use Winsor & Newton?s
Galeria range, which is good quality and
affordable. For most fur, I prefer small to
medium rounds, and medium to large
?lberts for backgrounds and blocking in.
Are there specific brands and types of
paint that work well for rendering fur?
I use Winsor & Newton?s Grif?n Alkyd
and Artists? Oil Colours.
See more of Laura?s artwork at
www.lauraquinnharris.com
PAINT PERFECT PET PORTRAITS
How can I bring character
to my pet portrait?
One of the most important
aspects of portrait painting
is choosing the right
composition. You want to
capture the essence of your
pet?s character, so try to get
reference photographs of
them with an expression
that is typical. Try to catch
70 Artists
& Illustrators
them looking alert and
happy. Take time to ?nd the
right reference images to
work from. I often use the
best aspects from several
shots to compose a portrait.
Is there a part of the animal
I should start with when
painting a portrait?
Start wherever you feel
comfortable. I work from the
top left corner to the bottom
right, purely because this
means that I won?t get my
hand in the paint. I prefer to
have my hand on the board
wherever possible. When
painting the later layers, I
tend to focus on the face,
working outwards from the
nose area.
Always paint in the
direction of hair
growth, but remember
that no fur is uniform
COLOURED PENCIL
1. Birds
Over the next four issues, JAKE SPICER
will reveal how to get the most from this
medium with his subject-specific guides
Jake?s materials
?Derwent lightfast
coloured pencils
?Mechanical pencil
?Sharpener
?Plastic eraser
?300gsm hot pressed
watercolour paper
72 Artists
& Illustrators
A
fter a long hiatus, I have returned with vigour to
the medium of coloured pencil. Often the ?rst
material thrust into our hands as children, the
coloured pencils available to us as adults are a world
apart from the pale, waxy stubs of childhood. For a
mediocre colourist like me, the attraction of the medium
is that it bridges the gap between manageable,
monochromatic graphite and the world of painterly colour
in attainable steps.
You can start with line and build tone gradually before
introducing ?ourishes of colour without feeling as if the
medium is getting away from you. Coloured pencil covers
space more slowly than paint, and many people derive
great pleasure from the meditative process of hours
spent layering colour towards a photorealistic end. I
prefer a looser approach and use them for 10-minute,
two-colour sketches as much as for long studies.
To make a great drawing, you need to get to know your
subject. Before drawing this owl I went to sketch at a
wildlife drawing session, where handlers brought owls to
draw from life. I then went to a natural history museum
and made studies from stuffed owls ? more static
subjects ? before taking a reference photo of one to
inform the three-hour drawing in this tutorial. Don?t
be limited by photographs ? use drawing as a way to
get to know your subject, even when your materials
demand time and control.
www.jakespicerart.co.uk
To p t i p
Plumage ca
n dis trac t
from the bir
d?s form ?
draw skele
tons to
become mo
re familiar
with their sh
ap e s
Artists & Illustrators 73
1
CONSTRUCTION
One minute
It might not look impressive,
but this stage is critical to a
lively and well-proportioned
drawing. You are laying the
foundation, as well as
setting the scale. Hold your
pencil like a paintbrush
rather than a pen, and make
loose, looping shapes from
the elbow to establish the
bird?s rough form.
To p t i p
ard
drawing bo
An angled
. If
n
io
rt
to
is
d
minimise s
m
st
ave a cu o
you don?t h
h
it
w
rovise
board, imp
ainst
a board ag
d ge
e
le
a tab
3
2
SMALL
SHAPES
20 minutes
Focus on smaller shapes. Keep
the drawing linear and marks
light and energetic, throwing a
line around the shapes of
markings and shadows, as well
as drawing key feathers that
suggest the ?ow of the plumage.
4
BIG SHAPES
10 minutes
Rub your drawing back so it sits faintly on
the page. Using the same pencil as in the
construction drawing, shift your pencil
hold to an overhand grip to give more
control. Draw in big masses. The eyes
and beak make a triangle of shapes;
the wing, breast, tail and legs can be
separated into large, simple forms.
MIDTONE
20 minutes
Introduce a second colour to develop
tone. In this case, I used a warm grey to
build with short, hatched marks in the
direction of feathers. Don?t go too dark
too quickly and leave blank space where
you expect to draw very light colours, or
very dense black, later on.
COLOURED PENCIL
5
COLOUR
40 minutes
Now for the real colour. You?ll
notice your line drawing has
become the pattern on which you
are layering tone and colour. A
sound underdrawing gives you
room to build con?dently. Be bold
with colours. To avoid an
exclusively brown palette, I used
a lilac pencil to introduce subtle
contrasts into the shadows.
To p t i p
Don?t be ove
rwhelmed b
y
the numbe
r of colours
in your pen
cil tin.
Pick a limit
ed palette
before you
st art
your drawin
g
6
DARK MIDTONES
7
DARKEST DARKS
40 minutes
Returning to the dark red-brown pencil of the
?rst stages, I spent time building dark tones,
layering brown over earlier colours and
putting particular weight into the shapes of
shadow between the feathers. These sharp
wedges of dark add structure to the bird?s
feathers and can be drawn as a small, simple
abstract shape.
40 minutes
Never underestimate how long it takes to
build layers in a coloured pencil drawing. If
you ?nd yourself getting tired or bored, stop
and take a break. Drawing should be an
engaged act. At this stage, I added black for
the darkest tones, which also serves to cool
down the hot shadows of the earlier browns.
I decided to leave the background white, but
included the shadow on the rock to ground
the owl in space.
In the next issue, Jake will explore drawing skin
tones in coloured pencil.
Artists & Illustrators 75
TRY SPRAYING SLOW-DRYING MEDIUM
A new technique I?ve adopted relies on
rapid, thick applications and dragging
pigments around. It is less to do with
blending and more about paint effects
colliding. Rather than adding retarder to
the mix at the beginning, I use a liquid
version in a diffuser and spray liberally
over layers of paint before they dry.
This allows a little more working time
or additional spreads of paint. More
re?ned brushwork along with the drag
effects creates interesting contrast.
while using generous quantities on your palette will
keep paint workable if it is prodded regularly.
GEL OR LIQUID?
E S S E N T I A L AC RY L I C S
6. RETARDER
In the final part of his series, HASHIM AKIB
reveals his advice on how to slow drying times
Retarder comes in a gel or liquid form. The gel is suitable
for more impasto-style applications, whereas ?uid is great
for producing ?owing colour. Add any slow-drying medium
to acrylic on a mixing tray to extend working times. Be
careful not to use too much with small amounts of
pigment because it will dull colour and cause adherence
issues. I use a slightly unconventional method with
retarder. I use the ?uid form in a diffuser bottle and spray
it over thick acrylic that has already been applied to
canvas. It is fairly passive but allows a small opening to
push paint around for drag effects and to meld colours.
WHAT TO BUY
o
ABOVE Venice, acrylic
on canvas, 76x51cm
76 Artists
& Illustrators
ne of the main concerns about acrylic is the
drying time, which will seem too rapid for the
uninitiated. On average, artist-quality acrylic
paints take half-an-hour to dry completely if used in a thin
layer. Thicker applications take one-to-two hours
depending on the air temperature. Experience will help
you understand these qualities but, in the meantime, you
can use mediums such as retarder and slow-drying gels.
Medium isn?t essential. You can use water to dilute
acrylic but it will affect the pigment?s richness. As well as
retarders, there are moulding pastes to thicken paint,
gloss or satin varnishes to mimic an oil ?nish, and
products to create ?ow with no colour-shift once dry, such
as ?ow-enhancer, glazing gel and matt or gloss medium.
Thicker consistencies of acrylic have longer drying times,
Retarders are readily available from art manufacturers.
Golden produces a 3.78lr bottle for �, while the
cheapest I found was a 60ml tube by Vallejo. My
preference is Liquitex Slow-Dri Fluid Retarder, which is
available in a 118ml bottle at just under � Glazing
medium has slow-drying properties if you prefer thinner
applications. I came across a new Liquitex Palette
Wetting Spray for acrylics that comes in a 237ml bottle.
Spray a ?ne mist over your palette or painting.
I use retarder early as I work on the overall image to
allow more working time. Whether you are using a
slow-drying medium or not, the key is to be decisive and
paint with momentum. Any additional tools or materials
will take your concentration away from your painting.
See more of Hashim?s work and ?nd out about his workshops
at www.hashimakib.co.uk
"TOLKIEN" is a registered trade mark of The Tolkien Estate Limited and used with kind permssion
With the support of The
Tolkien Trust
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1 June ? 28 October 2018
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Artists & Illustrators 77
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