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The Searcher - July 2018

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THE SEARCHER
NO 395 JULY 2018 £3.99
Exclusive:
Anglo Saxon
gold from
Berkshire
Stunning aesica brooch
BUMPER
ISSUE
The ‘Bucket List’
Hoard
Nations’ Greatest Finds
Competition 2017
nominations
JULY 2018 ISSUE 395
Performance
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Discrimination - Sensitivity - 4 frequencies (4, 8, 12, 18kHz) Ground Balance - From 2 to 5 tones - Pitch , Full Tones 10 factory programs - 8 empty slots for you to save Indicates the target’s ID - Volume - Choice of coil Battery condition displayed
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ON THE COVER
14
The ‘Bucket List’ Hoard Darcy Fear
Special report from the field Daniel Spencer
20
VOLUME 33 No. 11 ISSUE No. 395
Dedicated to: Karolyn Hatt founding Publisher and Editor
Publisher, Editor, Design and Layout: Harry Bain
Numismatic Consultant: Peter D Spencer BA (Hons)
Typesetting, Production and Repro: Jim Judd,
Tradeset Ltd
Printed and Distributed by: Warners Group plc,
For Editorial and Advertising: Harry Bain
Call: 01483 830133
Email: info@thesearcher.co.uk
Write to: 17 Down Road, Guildford,
Surrey GU1 2PX
Assistant Editor: John Winter
Call: 01296 580244
Email: john@thesearcher.co.uk
Field Reporter: Daniel Spencer
Email: daniel@thesearcher.co.uk
Videographer/Reporter: Sid Perry
Email: sid@thesearcher.co.uk
For Identification and Valuation Desk
Email: coinidman@yahoo.co.uk
Write to: Searcher Publications Ltd, PO Box 197,
Leeds, LS18 5WQ
For Subscriptions, Current and Back Issues
www.thesearcher.co.uk or call: 01778 392036
Email: subscriptions@warnersgroup.co.uk
Subscriber enquiries: subsmgmt@warnersgroup.co.uk
Write to: The Searcher Subscription Dept, Warners,
West Street, Bourne, Lincs. PE10 9PH
For Queries on Availability & Distribution
Call Nikki Munton on: 01778 391171
E-mail: nikkim@warnersgroup.co.uk
Front Cover Photo: Civil War hoard coins
© the Trustees of the British Museum
22
24
42
FEATURES
REGULARS
20
22
24
28
06
36
42
46
50
54
58
60
64
illefiore brooch M
Searcher Report
Incredible aesica Paul Hamilton
Part 1: Turn of the plough Nick Burston
66
75
ations’ Greatest Finds
N
Competition nominations
2017 The Searcher
Rally round-up Sid Perry,
Gary Cook and Jim Beckerleg
reat hobby – I’m always
G
learning Les Graydon
After a fashion Andrew Caley
Identification and
Valuation Desk Your monthly
guide for the detectorist,
numismatist and archaeologist
Club Activities Your club news
and images of finds. Email:
info@thesearcher.co.uk
94
ubscription, gift card
S
and Searcher merchandise
information
How you can subscribe
to this magazine
95
97
Persian antiquity Roy Aldington
Widescan
News and views from in and
around the hobby
Read’s Miscellany Brian Read
Saleroom Scene Recent
coin auction results
lassified Advertising
C
Including items For Sale,Wanted,
Exchange, Miscellaneous and the
Classified Advert Order Form
Groundhog Day … Stuart Stevens
y 2017 outings and finds M
Peter D. Spencer
nglo Saxon rarety! A
Gordon Johns
August issue on sale: 29 June
Get in touch with us at thesearcher.co.uk
twitter.com/thesearchermag
facebook.com/pages/The-Searcher-magazine/
thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2018 5
widescan
Harry Bain
Editor/Publisher
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Call 01778 392036
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Digital subscriptions:
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Next issue
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29 June
the searcher.co.uk
Buy ANY single
OR back
issueS
Hot hot hot!
H
ello and welcome to your July issue …
Our cover features the exciting Civil War hoard discovered by Darcy
Fear on a Midweek Searchers dig. Darcy exclusively shares his story and
the subsequent excavation at the British Museum and Daniel Spencer
reports from field as it happened!
The Searcher’s Nations’ Greatest Finds Competition is now in its twelfth year
and I can proudly announce that I’ve opened it to our friends and counterparts in the
Netherlands! Next year we expect Denmark and Flanders to join us!
There’s a great Fathers’ Day Gift subscription offer on page 94 in which you
receive a FREE Searcher binder worth £10 and a gift card to present on the day!
And also adding to our popular range of Searcher control box covers for the DEUS
and EQUINOX we now offer covers for the Makro Kruzer series. Available in red or
black and are competitively priced at £14.95 each. See the complete Searcher
merchandise range on page 94.
If you have a find you’d like to share please send it in. We prefer exclusives,
as we like to offer our readership value for money and something they can’t
read elsewhere. You can contact any one of us: john@thesearcher.co.uk
daniel@thesearcher.co.uk sid@thesearcher.co.uk and myself harry@thesearcher.co.uk
or contact us through our Facebook page.
Harry Bain, Editor
PRODUCT NEWS
NEW: WEATHERPROOF COVER SETS
There’s a growing army of followers using the Minelab
GPX series (4500, 4800 & 5000) for its serious depth
capabilities over a variety of terrains.
These new waterproof cover sets made from 100%
unique silicon are designed to offer protection like
nothing else. They are rain and dust resistant, protects
the screen against scratches, knocks and dings and
keeps the machine looking like new!
Although designed in Australia, they are perfect for
British weather conditions. Available in black or grey
from Crawford Metal Detectors priced at £24.99 +
£3.50 p&p.
To order call 01724 845608 or www.crawfordsmd.com
6 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
PRODUCT NEWS
NEW FROM CRAWFORDS!
Let’s be honest; detectors are not cheap and as travelling to
events, and taking it on holiday is much more common place
these days, it makes sense to protect your asset. With this in
mind Crawfords have recently introduced two extra heavy
duty carry cases. They are designed to be universal for any
machine in that they feature a unique foam grid system that
is easily plucked or trimmed to any shape!
The cases are both lightweight and tough enough to be
safely stowed in your vehicle or the hold of an aircraft
without fear of damage and even features a cabin pressure
release valve.
The cases are available in two sizes, L & XL and in four
colours: Black, tan, green, and grey. ONLY L Case –
£84.99 + £8.50 p&p. XL Case £99.99 + £8.50 p&p.
www.crawfordsmd.com or 01724 845608.
Features include:
IP67 Dust & Water Protection 2 Padlock holes on front edge
Side handle to carry by hand
Inner padding on top & bottom
Easy closing latches
Pluck Foam grid system
Wheels on the bottom
with handle
FINDERS NEWS
PRESTON’S GOLD
COIN
On a Saturday in May on a dry warn
sunny day Preston Davies aged seven
from Herefordshire was tuning his Whites
Prizm IV detector on his granddad’s field
when he came across this William III
gold guinea.
After finding a couple of nails this was
his next target and it was approximately
six inches deep. Because the ground was
so hard his Dad, Christopher Davies had
to dig the hole and both were astounded
to find gold glinting back at them.
Preston was so happy he couldn’t
hardly contain himself.
Preston has recently joined the Let’s
get Hammered Club in Hereford and
is enjoying every moment!
Congratulations Preston – what an
amazing start to you detecting career!
Sid Perry
thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2018 7
EVENT NEWS
NEW PRODUCTS
TO LAUNCH
AT DETECTIVAL
Time is drawing closer to Detectival 2018 and tickets are selling fast,
with only a limited number of allocated tickets left.
This means this year’s event will be as good as 2017 where many
of you made some fantastic memories, friends and some great finds.
2018 will see all of the stalls and traders from 2017 returning and
with new ones coming along to demonstrate and sell their products!
Our title sponsor are the amazing Nokta/Makro Metal
Detectors, who will be providing a great selection of prizes
and giveaways from their latest product range as well as
demonstrating some seriously new and exciting game
changing technology and new products will be launched!
Last year PAS recorded around 600 + finds, some of which are
of real interest and significance such as a wonderful Anglo Saxon
brooch, Roman cornucopia and a stunning and unique Anglo Saxon
work box which we will be featuring within these pages once more
research has been done. Work boxes are associated with female
graves which could mean we have a undiscovered Anglo Saxon grave
in the fields for Detectival 2018.
READERS FINDS
A PENNY AND OTHER
GROAT EXPECTATIONS
Henry VIII is one of our best-known English monarchs and his
coins are always a pleasure to find. Whilst on a Coil to the Soil dig
in April, Detectorist Kelvin Sach found not one, but two
examples. Here’s how it happened.
We all know the feeling. After two hours of finding washers
and ‘eight thousand’ four-hole buttons – I think that’s
an exaggeration – all sounding like hammered coins, he had
a break.
Kelvin swings a Teknetics G2 and, when he started again,
a solid number of 52 on the display meant he just had to dig!
At about five inches and shining in the glorious sunshine was
a Henry VIII penny! After a very long and dry spell on the
hammered front he was very surprised, and as well as informing
good friends, he managed to compose himself and snapped
a few pictures.
After a while he continued detecting, but thought it a waste
of time thinking he’d used up all his luck for the day. He was
wrong. This time a ‘belting’ signal of 58 proved to be a beautiful
Henry VIII groat.
He searched for another couple of hours, but was so excited
and couldn’t concentrate, so called it a day. At home he supped
a well-earned beer. John Winter
8 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
This field saw many Anglo Saxon items
unearthed last year, including a possible
scattered hoard of sceats as well. Other fields we’ll
be returning to have seen scattered hoards of
medieval hammered coins and Roman silver denarii.
Last year saw over 10 Treasure finds reported by our
wonderful FLO team and 2018 should be no different. With all our
new fields and the best and most productive fields from 2017
we are expecting another bumper year for finds!
Depending the weather we will have around 1,000 acres
of arable land in various states, with much of the ground being
cultivated, rolled and seeded and a few stubble fields (approx.
50 acres).
Don’t miss out on this amazing event and get your tickets today
from www.detectival.com (via our secure online booking system).
Mark Becher
COMPETITION
TICKET
COMPETITION!
We have two weekender tickets worth
£120.00 to giveaway for the
‘Straight into Compton’ 2018 rally
near Chichester on 24-26 August over
the Bank Holiday weekend!
Two years ago this rally was highly
productive (see December 2016 rally
report) and this year there are 600
acres of arable land on a high status
Iron Age and Roman site.
As well as the best fields from the
2016 rally there are new fields that
haven’t been detected on in years
which will have been deep ploughed.
Subscribe to our Searcher
YouTube channel for free to see
how you enter!
Just Google thesearchermag
YouTube
READERS FINDS
PATIENCE
& PERSISTENCE
PAYS OFF
Our recently formed club the SaxonShore MDC was kindly invited to join up
for the day with Pete O’Brien’s Garden
of England MDC.
On a lovely farm in Kent, during a
mini heat wave, a hard day was had. We
didn’t have much to show for our efforts
except the normal bits and bobs.
I made my way to a corner in the field
I had a good signal and my ID was
showing 74 on my Deus in Sifter mode
(great program!)
I dug down about 4” to find what
I thought was a spear tip. Feeling happy
I pulled it out to have a proper look and
BOOM! The other side was silver! It had
engraving on it with a slot and rivets at
one end – a beautifully decorated Saxon
silver strap end!
It just goes to show patience and
persistence pays off! Graham Bull
NEWS FROM AUSTRALIA
GOLD, GOLD AND YES MORE GOLD!
I am the Vice President of The Bendigo Prospectors’
Club in Australia and would like to show Searcher
readers what gold looks like before it
is made into the rings and sovereigns
that are found in England.
Shown here is the gold found
by one guy near a little town called
Wedderburn in Victoria, part
of an area known as ‘The Golden
Triangle’. Australia was still in the
Stone Age until ships from England
started arriving here in the 1790’s.
A 1797 Cartwheel penny is an old coin by
our standards. Most of the detecting clubs
here concentrate on searching for gold.
These nuggets weigh around a kilogram
and at the time of writing would be worth around £31,200 GBP. Sometimes a gold
buyer will pay a little more if the nugget has an unusual shape or is suitable
for a pendant.
Most of these are sold, melted down and may end up in India and changed
into gold bracelets or necklaces. Ray Swinnerton
READERS FINDS
GREAT START!
I’ve been detecting 14 months and
have made some good finds already.
The two Roman brooches and the tip
of a Bronze Age spearhead were found
on my first ever permission, on rough
ploughed land in Nottinghamshire
with my new cracking machine
a Quest 40!
The horse harness pendant and
hammered coin were unearthed on a
club dig on new pasture in Derbyshire.
I’ve not managed to trace the family
yet. I found these with my old Minelab
Safari at a depth of about 5-7”.
Mark Dalton
thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2018 9
Twenty years on
John Winter looks back
Cover story
This month’s cover shows two
finds selected from a number
of items found on a former
United States Air Force Base
in Suffolk … perhaps
spanning from 1943 the
1960s, maybe even the 70s.
The Silver Firestone
medallion, which is about the
size of an American silver
dollar is typical of how some
companies and businesses
showed their patriotism by
honouring their staff who
joined up, and on this
occasion the man so
distinguished by the Akron
rubber tyre firm was one Alvin
Howaniec who joined,
presumably in 1942.
The Searcher says that they
Love tokens and
wrote to the Firestone people
holed coins
but alas no reply. Considering
The Searcher Research column
how many years have passed,
reports that they have had an
this is understandable for
excellent response from
any employees there in
readers giving details of
1942 would have long
individual finds. Most
JULY
gone, and if there
of the tokens were of
1998
were no company
silver, and mostly
archives nothing can be
sixpences of William III
done …
and George III, but the
occasional Anne came
through and, even more
surprisingly, several sixpences
of Elizabeth I.
“As we collect more data we
will be able to draw a
conclusion as to the main
period these quaint souvenirs
of the past were popular. They
have come from all parts of
the country and from Wales,
so it is plain there was a
certain universality to the
The second item is a silver
identity bracelet, which invites custom of giving these
tokens.”
much enquiry. Where for
example is the Polaris Flight
Academy? Seems to have been Spencer’s Law
a basic flying school from
In an entertaining article,
which JF Meacham graduated. Peter Spencer talks about
The presumption is that
‘laws’ that relate to things and
Meacham was somehow
happenings etcetera. Some
attached to the Suffolk air
are rather frivolous, like
base as was Howaniec but
Murphy’s or Sod’s.
perhaps about 25 years or so
apart. …
READERS FINDS
PASTURE PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT
In late April I decided to go detecting to some
pasture where I have permission, as all my
arable fields are all in crop. It has about 1500
acres and multiple fields but I chose two fields
that had previously produced some decent
finds and used my XP Deus on Fast program
on 18kHz, 3 tones and Sensitivity set at 85.
After two and a half hours I had next to
nothing other than a Roman grot and bits of
lead and shotties. With only a couple of hours
to go I decided to go to another field and about
half an hour I had a really good signal.
I dug about 10” down and saw the beautiful
sight of lovely green patina and knew it was
something nice so I carefully dug round it.
To my amazement it was the bottom half
of a Bronze Age spear and I was absolutely
over the moon and so excited as it’s my first!
I then went back into the hole with the
pinpointer and located the spear tip
so now I had a whole Bronze
Age spearhead.
That was a great moment I will
always remember. Joseph Edwards
10 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
He says, “The other day, while
pondering over my last
detecting trip, I realised that
there is a fundamental ‘law’
relating to detecting and that
is as yet unnamed. My heart
left at the thought of gaining
an everlasting place in the
annals of our great hobby.
Therefore, from the date of
publication of this article
Spencer’s Law will officially
come into being. It is very
important that detectorists
make note of this otherwise
when they come up against
the ‘law’ in action they won’t
know what to call it.
And what is it?
“Spencer’s law states that
when a detectorist unearths a
flat faced button (which
invariably looks like a worn
hammered coin) it always
comes out of the ground flat
side upwards. Every
detectorist will agree that the
law is always operative but I
was the first to publish it,
therefore my name goes on it.
All I ask now that the word
should be spread so as to
avoid confusion, i.e. it is
Spencer’s Law of flat faced
button finds.”
READERS FINDS
RARE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION TOKEN
Detectorist Andrew Pegg only started
searching with his Garrett Ace 250 in the
September of last year. In that time he
has realised that the surrounding area of
East Suffolk in which he lives was a
popular Roman trading site – judging by
the number of coins he has discovered.
The humble token he wants to share
with us is, in so many ways, much more
interesting. He said, “Every find gives us
a further insight into what went on in our
local area all those years ago and they
teach us so much! I absolutely love it!”
And he sent me a short video that he’d
made for East Coast Suffolk Metal
Detecting, of which he is a member.
Unfortunately, technology hasn’t reached
the stage where the reader of a magazine
can activate a link to share the artefact
when found, so I’ll tell you about
Andrew’s special find.
The Coalbrookdale Token
The token celebrates the first Iron Bridge
and Inclined Plane in Shropshire. The
latter allowed for easy placement into the
river of barges full of ore (for example)
from the local mines.
The obverse of the Industrial Revolution
copper token, issued in Coalbrookdale,
Shropshire in 1792, shows a detailed view
of the iron bridge with a sailing ship
passing underneath. The inscription
reads: IRON BRIDGE AT COALBROOK
DALE. 1792, ERECTED ANNO 1779.
SPAN 100 FEET.
The reverse depicts a man working at a
barge-lifting machine and carries the
legend INCLINED PLANE AT KETLEY.
1789. There is an inscription on the edge
PAYABLE AT COALBROOK-DALE AND
KETLEY. The token is 30mm in diameter.
It must be remembered that at this
time the government was not issuing
sufficient small coinage and employers
were quick to exploit government inertia
by issuing their own money in the form of
trade tokens.
Employees were paid using these
tokens, which could only be spent at the
company shop or exchanged for coins of
the realm at some designated location.
Andrew initially used The Searcher
INBOX on our Facebook page to alert
us to his special find. Just another
method of communication that you might
like to consider! facebook.com/
thesearchermagazine John Winter
READERS FINDS
BEAUTIFUL BUCKLE
Kevin Dean was out with his Minelab
Equinox 800 using The Searcher
Power Program adjusted to Iron Bias 3
and Reactivity 3, when he found this
stunning silver shoe buckle.
The buckle was approximately 8”
deep and displayed a solid 19 on the VDI!
Well done Kevin what a lovely find!
Daniel Spencer
READERS FINDS
RACER WINS!
Whilst out on my permission in the
Yorkshire Dales with my Makro Racer, after
having found my usual Georgian coppers
and buckles, I noticed a raised and flat area
along the back of the field and thought it
looked quite interesting.
After walking over there I got a great
signal which sounded very promising. At a
depth of about 8” I saw the glint of silver
and out popped my first ever hammered
coin! A lovely Charles I half crown!
After I had cleaned it in a nearby
stream, I filled the hole in and carried on …
three steps and another great signal,
exactly the same as before! I dug and at
the same depth as the first out popped
another Charles I half crown!
I’ve only been detecting three months
but this was a fantastic day that I will not
forget anytime soon. Neil Hutchinson
READERS FINDS
SILVER RARITY
Phil Harvey was finder of this very rare Celtic coin.
He was on a Metal Detectives group dig in Oxfordshire
in May. The dig was on a favourite site that was
recently well turned and has started to produce a large
number of recordable finds. The silver unit will be recorded
with his local FLO in Norfolk.
Liz Cottam at Chris Rudd commented: ‘This silver
coin appears to be a ‘Facing Horses, Right Type’ silver
unit struck by an East Wiltshire tribe c.50-40 BC.
The first known example of this type we sold in
January 2018 – Celtic coins really are like buses –
you don’t see any and then two come along
in a relatively short space of time!’. Harry, Editor
thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2018 11
READERS FINDS
DETECTING MILESTONE
For many, a milestone in your detecting lifespan is finding your first gold
coin and that’s exactly what Hobie Lamb has just done.
Using his XP Goldmaxx Power on pasture that has been ploughed
just once before, he unearthed this beautiful 1849 gold Victoria half
sovereign which was just an inch beneath the surface!
Congratulations Hobie, and thanks for sharing! Daniel Spencer
READERS FINDS
SUPER SHILLING
It’s come to the end of my detecting
season and this is the biggest hammered
coin I’ve found, which marks the end
of a productive period for me.
The coin was about five inches down
on a site that is iron-scattered plough
soil on the borders of Hertfordshire and
gave a perfectly clean signal from my
DeepTech Vista Gold Gain.
Aaron Cooper
READERS FINDS
CLASPED HANDS
BROOCH
I found this clasped hand brooch in
Suffolk near Newmarket. It was found
with my CTX 3030 on Tadpole 4 with
combined tones.
I have had the CTX for around two
months after moving from a Deus. It’s a
steep learning curve so I am digging any
two-way nice tones until I can get to grips
with it.
Luckily this brooch didn’t need digging
as it was on the surface. At first
I thought it was a buckle and didn’t
realise it was a brooch until it was
properly identified on Facebook.
David Lind
DEALER NEWS
SOME BIG-NAME CELTS COME OUT IN NORFOLK
This July sees many rare Ancient British coins
coming out of hiding, some from the soil,
others from well known collections. A couple
are named after famous collectors: a Mossop
Helmet silver unit of the Hampshire Belgae
named after the war hero Henry Mossop
DFC (see ‘The Flying Farmer, Coin News,
November 1991) and a Montagu’s Minim
named after Hyman Moses Montagu, author
of The Copper, Tin and Bronze Coinage and
Patterns for Coins of England (1885), whose
1,291 Roman gold coins were sold in Paris in
1896 by Rollin & Feuardent and other coins
in eight sales held by Sotheby’s in London,
1895-1897.
Other Celtic rarities include a unique
Fowlmere Lyres silver half unit found near
Cambridge in 2016, a Dorchester Y-Type
gold quarter stater found in Dorset in 2015,
and an Eyelash Crescents gold stater from
the famous Celtic collection of Geoff
Cottam. “A great Celtic numismatist, but
sadly no relation of mine,” says Elizabeth
Cottam of Chris Rudd who will be selling
these coins by auction in Aylsham, Norfolk
on 15 July. For more information contact
Chris Rudd, tel: (44) 1263 735 007.
Or email: liz@celticcoins.com Chris Rudd
Fowlmere Lyres, ABC
Dorchester Y-Type, ABC 2145v.
Montagu’s Minim, ABC 728
Henry Mossop DFC
(1919-1988)
Eyelash Crescents, ABC 1456
Mossop Helmet, ABC 854
12 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
EXCLUSIVE
was raised in rural Alberta, Canada
and always enjoyed wide open
spaces and outdoor pursuits.
Although I wasn’t interested in much of
the high school curriculum, I was always
fascinated with history. I enjoyed hearing
tales from old trappers, hunters and miners
of our community. These colorful characters
had stories of hardship and survival, and they
had stories of joy, freedom and pursuing
their dreams.
I made two trips to the UK with our
high school and my love for history was
cemented. When I was introduced to metal
detecting, it was a match made in heaven.
My enthusiasm inspired my Dad and my
brother and soon the three of us had what
we needed to head off on weekends “looking
for treasure.” We joined a detecting club
in Calgary, Alberta and began attending
meetings and organised outings.
It didn’t take long for local community
members to know we had the equipment,
and we received many requests to help
people find their lost ‘treasure’. Sometimes
it was jewellery and other times it was a
tractor part. Often we were successful but
sometimes, not. It’s all part of the mystery;
how something that’s lost can be right in
front of you, and yet years later it may be
rediscovered.
THE
‘BUCKET LIST’
HOARD
MY DETECTING DREAMS
COME TRUE
DARCY FEAR
At 20 years old, I left Alberta to spend the
summer looking for gold in British Columbia
with an Englishman. He was pursuing his
lifelong dream of prospecting and us meeting
was completely by chance. Just like the
characters from my childhood, we had some
tales of hardship by the summers’ end,
but we had many more tales of adventure
and friendship. No, we didn’t strike it rich
in the hills of British Columbia but we sure
enjoyed trying, and the Englishman had the
satisfaction of seeing his dream through.
14 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
All of these things and more, have brought
me to the UK. It has been my dream to
detect in England. Life has a way of keeping
us busy and hobbies and dreams can be
shelved for decades. Recently my wife and
I started taking stock of how fast the years
have gone and how we had better get
moving on those things that we want to
do. Starting a bucket list was easy for me
because I always knew what I dreamed of
and this trip was right at the top.
In November of last year, the two of
us came to England for a short visit. Upon
arrival, our 85 year old cousin put the thumb
screws to me right away to find a way to get
out detecting. We went online that evening,
made some phone calls and the next morning
we were off to rent a machine. The day
after that, we met up with the club I had
connected with and from there on I was
out with them three times a week. I can’t
say enough about my good fortune to have
fallen in with the Midweek Searchers group.
These people are true ambassadors for
your country as I was shown nothing but
friendship and the warmest of welcomes.
Before my wife and I had even finished that
trip, we were planning our next one; only
it would need to be much longer.
During that November trip, I had also
learned of a machine many were using,
the XP Deus.
ABOVE An early-medieval silver penny of Cuthred,
King of Kent (dating to 798-807), portrait type
(BMC 4-10), struck by Sigeberht at Canterbury
and dating to 805-7. Reference: North 211 BELOW
Silver hairpin. Photo © PAS
Martin Allen comments, “This is a coin of King
Cuthred of Kent (798-807), from the last
phase of his coinage, 805-807. The mint
is Canterbury, as with all of Cuthred’s coins,
and the moneyer is Sigeberht, named as
+SIGEBERHTI MONETA on the reverse. Rory
Naismith’s book The Coinage of Southern
England 796-865 lists nine coins of Sigeberht
in tbis type (C33.1, part of North no. 211),
but the drapery of the king’s bust on your coin
is unlike any other coin of Cuthred in this book’
(pers. comm. to the finder, April 2018).”
Photo © PAS
thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2018 15
EXCLUSIVE
It seemed to offer technology that
couldn’t compare to my machine
at home and the weight of it made
detecting for a full day actually
reasonable. Of course, I had to acquire
one before my next trip. But then again,
living in a country completely blanketed
in snow, I did not have any opportunity
to use it before arriving back here for all
of March and April.
The first couple of days presented
a learning curve that was manageable
and very rewarding. I did a fair bit of
digging to ensure I was interpreting
the signals correctly and had help from
my friends in the group to tweak the
settings. My friend Chris Moss set it
up to the HOT program, designed by
Gary Blackwell. It didn’t take long to feel
to get to grips with it and I was ready.
Like a lot of people in the group, I found
something on every outing.
Most often, I had little idea of what
I’d found and would ask the opinion
of those around me. I was always
impressed with my fellow detectorists
who could not only identify something
at a glance but also tell me the complete
history of its use, timeline, ruler of the
era and any assorted trivia. Detecting
had often been a solitary pastime and
I was really enjoying the camaraderie
of sharing this passion with others.
One of my finds was an Anglo Saxon
coin dating from 802 AD of Cuthred.
It was a chilly start to the day and we
had two fields to choose from. I watched
the others in my group fan out across
the field ahead of me, leaving the centre
unoccupied. This is where I walked, just
slowly down the middle. Only a couple
of hours in, a third field became available
to us and I found myself the lone
occupant in our original starting place.
The day turned warm and at lunchtime
I had to head back to have some lunch
and lose some layers. At this point, I had
found four hammered coins. I returned
to where I had left off and in less than
an hour I had found the Saxon coin.
I continued detecting, unaware of what
the coin was or its significance.
A few people were back in this field
and my friend Em and I chatted in
passing. I showed her the Saxon coin,
asking her what she thought it was.
She looked at me with eyes the size
of dinner plates and simply got out her
phone to call Mikey, our group leader.
I was asking, “What? What? What is it?”
and she couldn’t even answer me. Clearly
it was something special but I was going
to have to wait for her to calm down
before being advised.
EXCLUSIVE
I took it to FLO Katie Hinds to have it
recorded and learned that it is the only
one of its kind on the database. There are
two others that match on one side to the
one I found, but the opposite side of this
coin is unique. I sent it to be cleaned and
straightened and it looks incredible.
The other interesting item I found was
a silver hairpin. I took it along to Katie just
in case they had enough time to look
at a second item and they were intrigued
with it as well. They have sent it to the
British Museum for evaluation and at some
point I will hear what they have determined
to be the age of this piece and what
its future will be.
My entire trip thus far had been a dream
come true and I was into my last three
weeks of time when I made the discovery
of my lifetime. We had arrived at a farm
offering us four fields totaling about 200
acres. It was a beautiful clear day and I think
all of us were relieved at the possibility that
the muddy days were behind us. My brother
video called me just as we were starting out
and I turned my camera around to show him
the surrounding area. After a few minutes
of chatting I said I had to go. Three of us
decided that we would walk down to the
smallest field where lots of hammered coins
had been found in the past. It was about
a 20 minute walk, when we arrived there
were a few people already detecting. I was
onto my fourth signal at about 9:15. It was
a very deep signal but very clean, I knew
it wasn’t iron.
16 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
I started to dig and unearthed a broken piece
of what looked like a lid for a clay pot. I went
over the spot again and the signal was still
strong. I dug some more and found other
pieces of the lid. At this point, my mind went
into imagining all kinds of possibilities of
what could be below. In order to go deeper
I had to dig a bigger hole. Once I had made
it bigger at 34cm down, I turned over the
dirt and could see multiple coins. This is
when everything stopped; everything except
the excitement. I don’t know if it was our
collective excitement or if news travelled
across the field, but it didn’t take long for a
crowd to gather and there was much hugging
and cheering. Mikey needed to be called over
and he began the lengthy process of trying
to arrange an archaeologist to come to the
site. He also set up a hoard perimeter.
The farmer and his family were called
and they stopped by with a bucket for the
‘treasure’ to be put into. It was a long, hot
day of many hours spent observing my find,
waiting for direction on how to proceed.
My friend Chris stopped detecting and
spent the entire day there with me. Another
friend slathered us in sunscreen to stop
us from burning any further. Many people
were so excited that they could no longer
concentrate on their detecting and chose
to spend their afternoon watching the
events unfold. In the end, there wasn’t an
archaeologist available but there happened
to be one in our group and he was given the
authority to oversee the digging out of the
pot in situ.
EXCLUSIVE
ABOVE Dr Duygu Camurcuoglu, who excavated the
soil block, in the presence of Darcy Fear, the finder,
and a crew gathering material for the next series
of Digging For Britain.
The pot was block lifted with a large
amount of soil still around it and wrapped
in clingfilm to slow down the process of the
soil drying out and to help keep the pot and
coins intact. So we didn’t even know the
actual size of the pot but it didn’t matter.
It wouldn’t have mattered if the rest of the
pot was filled with dirt, the thrill of the day
had been enough.
Of course, the story doesn’t end there
as I was in charge of transporting it to the
British Museum. Due to the time zone,
I hadn’t been able to talk to any of my family
in Canada but I had called our UK cousin
and our friends across the street from her.
As soon as I arrived, the neighbour’s were
over with a celebratory bottle of champagne
and I replayed the events of the day for
them. I think it was surreal for all of us.
I know I didn’t sleep that night, which
allowed me the time to talk to all of my
family at home.
The following morning; three of us
delivered the bucket with its prized contents
to the British Museum. This was another
thrilling part of the adventure as we were
given access through a secured entry. It was
a privilege to take the bucket right into the
room where it would be examined and
to meet the conservation team that
would be assigned to my discovery. I was
allowed to return two days later when they
excavated it.
It contained 344 silver coins dating from
1532–1642. It turns out, it is only the
second Civil War hoard of silver found buried
in a pot.
There were four different rulers during the
time these coins were minted and they were
Edward VI, Elizabeth I, Charles I and James
I. The pot itself is in poor condition as the
top of it had been cut off by the plough,
but it had been quite beautiful and they
may attempt to restore it. It will be with the
museum staff for approximately one year
while they work on it.
I still can’t really believe the events
of that day but I know it is a day I’ll never
forget. I shake my head at my good fortune
to have been in the right place at the right
time. I only know how grateful I am to have
fulfilled my dream and beyond.
I thank all of my family and co-workers
at home who enabled this time away and
I am eternally grateful to my family here
and to all of the new friends I have made
who have made this time so special. It really
feels like home away from home.
Lastly, I encourage everyone to think
about what is on their bucket list and
to begin putting the wheels into motion.
You really can make it happen.
Pippa Pearce Senior Conservator
at the British Museum commented:
“There were 344 silver coins in the base
of the broken bellarmine pot. We have
found no neck and rim fragments so far
(we are still to sieve the soil from the
block excavated round the pot) but
it is likely that the pot had lost the top
before the coins were put in, as getting
those halfcrowns down a narrow neck
would not have been easy.
Most of the coins are Elizabeth I,
James I & VI and Charles I, with just
one sixpence of Edward VI as the earliest
coin in the hoard. Three of the coins
had pierced holes (which may technically
make them jewellery) and in several
cases the head on the obverse had
been defaced in some way, which
is, apparently, usual for this period,
according to Dr Barrie Cook from the
Coins & Medals Department. Also, he
has told us that the final coins of Charles
are likely to have a triangle in a circle
mintmark, again usual for hoards
of this period.”
thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2018 17
EXCLUSIVE
SPECIAL REP RT
FROM THE FINDSPOT …
For most of us, it’s something of a given
that we have a top five list of finds
we would so dearly love to unearth!
But how many of us have bigger plans?
A bucket list? Well, One such person
who has such a list is Darcy Fear from
Nelson, British Columbia, Canada!
Darcy has longed to detect in the UK
and what better way to do so than
give up work for eight weeks and head
over to pond with plans to detect
with friends made via Facebook and
with the well-established group
Midweek Searchers.
Using his XP Deus, Darcy hit the ground
running and had the extended detecting
session of his life! Roman coins, a Saxon
Cuthred silver penny, Medieval hammered
silver coins and plenty of copper, bronze
and lead to top up his finds pouches before
heading back to Canada.
With just days left of his ‘Bucket List’
holiday, Darcy was booked onto the
Midweek Searchers Hook dig where the
group had been going on and off for 20
years. The farm was in perfect detecting
condition and the weather was going to be
hot … Very hot!
Many had preconceived ideas as to where
to head and others like Darcy were given
pointers as to where and when previous finds
were made. With the knowledge in mind
that a large field next to a small church had
previously produced hammered coins,
a small group of detectorists, including
Darcy, headed down to the area via a very
long walk.
Once on the field Darcy had selected
a bespoke version of Gary Blackwell’s HOT
program put into his machine by his friend
Chris Moss. What happened next happened
quickly and would change Darcy’s
life forever.
Less than 30 minutes in and Darcy had
a positive signal. It was more than a few
scoops of soil until he hit what seemed to
be the target which appeared to be pottery.
So he stood up, swung over the target again
and sure enough his trusty Deus gave of the
same positive signal it did prior to removing
the soil.
Back on his knees, Darcy started to
investigate further. This time he started
to remove the shards of pottery that lay
at the bottom of the hole and by doing so,
and for the first time in around 400 years
a layer of tarnished silver coins came face
to face with human eyes and bright sunlight!
He looked down in absolute astonishment
at what was being uncovered before him.
With a few more gentle brushes of earth
with his fingertips to remove the excess soil,
he began to reveal the extent of what
he’d found.
Darcy stopped immediately. Called over
other detectorists and in turn a call was
put in to Michael Barker to get down to the
field and set up a ‘hoard’ perimeter around
the find. Not long after that call, posts and
orange tape had made a substantial cordon
and the dig was momentarily halted whilst
they gauged the extent of the find.
What became apparent quickly was the
shards coming out of the ground were from
a bellarmine jug and could potentially be
the size of a small pineapple but potentially
longer. The coins also appeared to be Charles
I full crowns and other hammered coins for
around the late 1500’s and early 1600’s,
the excitement was overwhelming.
Due to this excitement, it had almost
gone unnoticed that the temperature was
approaching the late 20’s! That was until
looking around we noticed each others
arms and necks going a funny shade of pink
as we were serious exposed without any
cover. It was at that moment Tony Hunt
(Detectorbits) and I went off to get his van
which conveniently has a canopy on the
side. It wasn’t long before the hoard and
detectorists were under the shade of said
canopy and could concentrate on what was
still sat 14” under the surface.
Over the next five hours many calls back
and forward to FLO’s, archaeologists and
Museum curators, Michael Barker was in
no doubt how to, and not to, proceed with
the hoard excavation. However, without
exception every detectorist around the
hoard was putting pressure on him, eagerly
anticipating the pot to be excavated and
examined before their very eyes. This was
putting enormous pressure on Michael
but this is where the good clubs get their
reputation and Michael was doing everything
by the book!
LEFT Saxon Cuthred silver penny © PAS
18 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
EXCLUSIVE BROUGHT TO YOU BY
DANIEL SPENCER
Following what was to be the final call
of the day, it was agreed with the local
archaeologist that with help from detectorist
and trained archaeologist David Lange,
the hoard would be removed in a block
to allow full and professional recording
and conservation.
There were no lack of volunteers to
help prepare the area for David prior to him
making the final recovery. An initial 131cm
square was dug out around the hoard to a
depth of 19cm. This protected the hoard and
allowed two people into the area to start the
recovery. David was now starting his report
by taking all the measurements down and
investigating the best way to get the pot out
of the ground intact. He estimated the pot
was 16cm wide so marked out a clod size of
24cm across and then dug down 36cm to
leave a clod big enough to protect the pot
but small enough to get in the bucket which
would transport the hoard out of the field.
It was at this point, the landowners wife
turned up, probably more intrigued at the
use of her roll of cling film that Michael had
asked for following his previous discussions
with the archaeologist.
David was by now wrapping the block
to keep everything together and limit
movement of the pot within. Doing it this
way also slows down the soil drying out
so that it all kept together.
Once this was done, David and Bruce
Hearn, started to put a little pressure on the
block to loosen it.
This took a little more digging and
persuasion but eventually the soil gave the
centuries old foundations up.
Some more wrapping and the block was
ready to go into the bucket which was easier
said than done! It appeared to weigh around
30kgs and was a two man lift! A few of us
offered our services and started to slowly
backfill the hole whilst Darcy was going over
the spoil to check for any further signals but
apart from a small piece of iron and a piece
of lead, the hoard was proven to have been
intact and nothing was left behind.
Michael put a call into Katie Hinds the
Hampshire FLO to confirm everything had
gone well.
Due to the weight and fragility of the
hoard in the bucket, it as decided that if he
was willing, Darcy would be best to take
it directly to the British Museum himself
where Ian Jenkins the senior Curator at the
BM would meet him at the service entrance.
This was something he agreed to without
hesitation and appreciated that by doing
so it would be the icing on the cake to the
experience. All he had to do now was take
the hoard home and wait till the next day
to take it to London. How Darcy slept that
night is anyone’s guess.
A few days later Darcy was invited back to
the British Museum to watch as the pot was
uncovered and the coins extracted. This turn
around is pretty exceptional but Darcy was
due to go back to Canada a week later so it
was fast tracked.
The day was a positive experience for
all involved and the total coin tally stood
at 350 silver hammered coins, many of
which were Charles I full crowns. The hoard
has been classed as treasure and is now
in conservation for the duration.
Daniel Spencer
thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2018 19
A
M
ZI N
A
RE
SEARCHER REPORT
O
G
L
L
I
M E FI
RESEARCHER
his superb early medieval
hanging bowl mount was found
by Mark George on a Midweek
Searchers dig in late April.
Mark was using his Deus bought from
Leisure Promotions with an HF coil set
up with the Deep program. He’s been
detecting for about four and a half years
and this is his best find so far, previous
to this is a quarter gold noble about three
months ago, again with the same set up.
Mark has been advised by Emma Golding
the following about his mount: ‘A 7th-8th
Century Early Medieval hanging bowl
mount. An incomplete round copperalloy disk with a copper alloy bezel. Sunk
in to the centre of the disk lies nine cells
in the form of a four petalled flower. Red
enamel fills each cell and are detailed as
follows: Four cells bear a millefiori slab
of about nineteen alternating black-andwhite rays, possibly a floral design, with
a red dot in the centre of each.
Another four of the cells (alternating)
hold eight alternate yellow and black
squares almost chequerboard-like flowers,
again with a red square dot in the middle
of each. The centre diamond part is filled
with red enamel and another millefiori
slab of four white isosceles triangles,
black infills with a red square dot in the
centre depicting what may be four small
blossoms. Missing is the hook plate that
the mount would have sat in. The back
is plain though with a pale green outer
edge which could be the remnants of
brazing, probably suggesting solder.’
Brian Read has since checked Bruce
Mitford’s standard reference for hanging
bowls and advises that this may be an
escutcheon, the small ones seem more
uncommon than the larger hanging bowl
mount types.
Thank you for sharing such an
amazing find Mark, and we hope your
success continues!
MAIN IMAGE courtesy of LP Metal Detecting LEFT
courtesy and copyright Emma Golding BELOW All images
copyright PAS
Other examples
GLO-549164 A copper-alloy mount
inlaid with enamel and millefiori
glass dating to the Roman period,
c. 50-300. The item is a circular disc
with two cells on the face consisting
of a recessed circular central cell
surrounded by an outer recessed ring,
both of which are held within raised
copper alloy borders.
KENT-36E4E6 A copper-alloy
escutcheon from an Early Medieval
hanging bowl. The mount is circular
in plan; the edges are slightly
damaged, but the majority of the
mount survives. The mount is convex
in profile, suggesting it is a mount
from the side of the bowl rather than
the base. Early Medieval, 6th-7th
Century. Diameter: 22.5mm,
Thickness: 1.8mm, Weight: 5.65g
20 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
NLM-AAFD2A Copper alloy hanging
bowl fragment. Cast circular mount
or escutcheon with a wider (1.7mm)
part of an otherwise unvaried border
(of width 1.2mm) on one side where
the hook has been lost.
DEV-7AE0B6 Circular copper-alloy
disc inlaid with opaque champlevé
enamel holding panels of fine millefiori
glass, a component of a larger item;
it dates somewhere in the period
from 670 to 900 AD (and possibly
beyond) but may well be 9th century.
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EXCLUSIVE
Incredible aesica!
Paul Hamilton
It was a windy midweek day in early March,
and a quiet week in terms of work, so I decided
to take a trip over to a farm in Worcestershire
that I had searched regularly in past years.
My detecting buddy couldn’t make it that day,
so I headed off on a solo search.
There are two adjacent fields that have given up
finds from Neolithic to medieval, and just about
everything in between, but the vast majority
of finds are small Roman bronzes.
One of these large fields was ploughed and
set to rape back in the autumn, which is where
we had concentrated our efforts throughout
the winter. Fortunately for us, the farmer is very
accommodating and happy for us to detect
on seeded land until the arrival of spring.
Unfortunately, as I pulled into the field and
parked the van I could see that the rape had
sprung back to life after its winter ‘retreat’ and
was no longer detectable.
The other field which had been left as stubble
since the harvest had been planted with beans and
rolled. Although it hadn’t been ploughed this time
around, it was still nice to be able to get the coil
to the soil once again. I wasn’t expecting too much
as we have put many hours into this field since
it was last ploughed, and finds had been thin
on the ground for a long time.
Starting in one corner I worked my way around
the field, spending a little more time in all the
usual hot spots, only to confirm that we had
covered them pretty thoroughly. I was using
a Deus in 18kHz and 4 tones, just listening for
that slight lift in tone that tends to either turn up
a small Roman at depth, or possibly a hob nail but
apart from a few shottie ends and more than a few
hob nails, it was very quiet.
After about five hours detecting, I decided
to head up the roadside and back to the van.
I know, I hear you, ‘not that old cliché again!’
Apart from not producing much Roman, being
next to the road, the field has a lot of junk,
including foil, cans. and deep iron. Roughly
half way back, I heard that slight lift in tone that
deserves a ‘second look,’ the first shovel of loose
soil produced a small Roman grot.
Spurred on by the first real find of the day,
I tightened up my swing and began a careful
search of the area. On the second pass, I found
what I believe to be a Roman bracelet that had
been broken and turned into a small ring.
Just beyond that I had a loud signal that screamed
‘can’ just under the surface, giving an 88 on the
ID and a rather forced sound. Turning over the
first shovel full onto the side revealed nothing,
so I scanned the hole again, only to realise that
the target was out.
On closer inspection I could make out a lump
of bronze amongst the loose soil, but I had no
idea that it was of any significance until I picked
it up and saw the huge spring and pin, still intact
on the axis bar. As as I turned it over, and saw the
silver/tinned finish to the fantail, I realised what
it was that I had found ... the holy grail of Roman
artefacts, an Aesica type brooch!
My gob remains well and truly smacked!
ABOVE Paul holding the Aesica Brooch ABOVE © PAS
22 THE SEARCHER JULY 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
What Paul had found was a
Roman (c. AD 60 to 80) Aesica
type brooch: The wings
are semi-cylindrical with a
perforated wing cap at each
terminal. The wing caps support
a copper alloy axis bar with a
spring coiled around it 15 times.
The pin is complete, tapering to a
sharp point and is now obliquely
angled and bent towards the
tip. At the centre of the upper
edge of the wings there is a
hook, which holds the chord
in place. The bow head is an
elongated trapezoidal shape in
plan with concave sides and the
lower corners terminating with
a bulbous knop. In the centre of
the bow head there is a vertical
ridge, which continues beyond
the lower edge. The ridge is
decorated with a central angular
block zig-zag with a ridge either
side. There is another ridge in
the field on either side with a
low-relief ring-and-dot. At the
lower edge there are two more
ring-and-dot motifs. This portion
of the brooch also has two very
small knops on the lower edge.
On the reverse of this portion
there is a central vertical solid
catchplate, which has an abraded
edge. The surface of the brooch
has a dark green patina and
on the outer face there is an
incomplete white alloy coating.
The brooch measures 53.83mm
long, 39.83mm wide across the
wings, 26.34mm thick from the
spring to the apex of the
bow head and weighs 51.62g.
Adapted from the PAS record
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EXCLUSIVE
Turn of the
plough
PART
1
Nick Burston
BELOW Nick Burston RIGHT silver boar; Merovingian
tremissis, Filigree; votive axe head
24 THE SEARCHER JULY
JULY2018
2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
ometimes the turn of the
plough is kind. Very kind.
SAXON gold kind. Here’s the
story of Maidenhead Search Society’s
most recent digs on a great new site.
But first, a little bit of background
about our club. We are a small and
enthusiastic detecting club that has
been successfully run since the 1970’s.
Unlike some groups, we are not just
about organised digs, the club enjoys
monthly meetings where members have
the opportunity to meet and display their
finds, and learn more about this fantastic
hobby. As with most clubs, obtaining new
land to detect on is always a key priority.
Many of our existing permissions have
been detected on continually for years
and good finds can sometimes
be difficult to come across.
In an effort to drum up interest from new
farms we recently attended a ploughing
competition, complete with stall, banners,
display cases and a taped off and coin
seeded area for children and adults to
have a go at detecting.
The day went extremely well, with lots
of children having a go and telling their
parents that they knew what they wanted
for Christmas(!) as well as a few rather
sheepish fathers, who looked like they
had caught the bug but really didn’t want
to let on …
It was interesting to see the general
public keen to come over and engage
with us, looking at all the finds and
asking the usual questions of what’s the
oldest thing you have found or what’s
the most valuable. The farmers were a
little more reserved, however many were
amazed at some the local treasures our
members had uncovered, including the
Watlington Hoard.
A hot lead
Looking good
A couple of months passed and the club
obtained a list of potential farms to
contact from a contractor that worked
on an existing permission. One of our
site liaison officers followed these leads
up and a farmer responded and said
that they had seen us at the ploughing
competition and his son had had a go
at detecting on our stand and really
enjoyed himself. Whilst other individuals
and clubs had detected there he was
happy if we wanted to visit. No second
invitation was required, and within a
couple of weeks a dig had been arranged.
Unusually, the field we had was under
crop, but the farmer was relaxed and
happy for us to detect it, as long as all
divots were replaced carefully.
The day arrived and 21 of the club’s 40
members were eager to get going. We
had the usual pre-dig talk and advised
members that the land had been detected
on for many years and that we would
probably have to work hard for any
decent finds. But you know what it’s like
with new land, there is always that buzz
of anticipation.
As we set off over the brow of the hill
we were greeted with a fantastic view
out over the valley below a beautiful
patchwork of green fields welcoming the
low winter sun. I thought to myself, even
if I find nothing at all, that view will have
been worth it.
Surprise, surprise! The first items to
be found were shotgun caps, ring pulls
and ointment tubes, bits of lead and the
odd button.
ABOVE Gold pendant; gold cloissone
complete with inset garnets
BELOW Plough stand;
kids corner
Although not what we wanted to find,
the sheer number of good signals, if not
good finds, was promising. Bearing in
mind that this land had been detected
on for a number of years the number of
signals we were finding was encouraging.
A lucky turn of the plough perhaps?
As I worked my way along the edge
of a path, I had a good signal and
out popped a section of a silver pin
approximately 25mm long and with a
round head. My first thought was that
it was probably Roman and definitely
treasure, a very good start to the
morning. I checked the area immediately
round the find spot, had a chat with
a couple of club members and then
headed off at a 90 degrees angle.
Twenty minutes later, and with
another couple of shotgun caps and
a large lump of iron in my pouch, I
had another strong signal. I carefully
dug the hole to limit crop disturbance
and checked again. It was still there,
I pulled out my pinpoint probe and
located the target. Using my small trowel
I finally exposed it. Damn, I thought,
the smooth gold top of a bottle, BUT
as I wiped more mud off it was obvious
that it was a bit bigger than a bottle top.
Then, as I turned the item over I could
see some markings and a loop. WOW!
I realised I had a beautiful and unusual
gold pendant in my hand, most likely
Roman or Saxon.
I sat back on my heels, kneeling on
the ground and started to laugh, one
of the other club members looked over
at me and with a bit of a puzzled look
he said “hammered?” no I said, “a bit
better than that, a gold pendant. He
came over and looked at the find along
with a couple of others. Within a couple
of minutes there was another shout of
“GOLD!”. Another of our members,
Paul Berry, had just found a stunning
piece of gold cloissoné complete with
inset garnets. This is the stuff that
dreams, and the Staffordshire Hoard,
are made of …
thesearcher.co.uk JULY
thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2018 25
EXCLUSIVE
Sowing the seeds
EXCLUSIVE
Needless to say the area was scoured very carefully for
the rest of the day, but alas nothing more
was forthcoming.
Elsewhere in the field a votive axe head was found
as well as a lovely silver boar with a broken loop. Several
hammered coins turned up along with a selection
of buckles.
Unsurprisingly, the farmer was amazed and very
pleased with the finds and impressed by our Club’s
performance. When asked if we could return the
following week for another session on the field, he was
more than happy to say yes. These likely treasure finds
were duly reported to the FLO and a discussion was held
as to whether they might belong to a scattered hoard.
Given that these items had been found a considerable
distance apart it was agreed we should continue, record
find spots and advise if them anything else was found.
Even more gold
The following weekend arrived and there was much
expectation and even more members in attendance,
all keen to see if more treasure could be found.
Having been extremely lucky the first time out (two
treasure items) and only being able to detect for the
morning this time, I was not expecting to find much.
This view was shared by others, given the care with
which we’d already combed this area.
How wrong could we be! By late morning nothing
much had come up on the field I was on, so I worked my
way over to the find spot from the previous week. Within
minutes of my arrival Steve Hunt showed me a lovely
Roman denarius of Pertinax, he’d just unearthed, this
being a particularly rare coin as the emperor had only
ruled for 86 days.
I hardly had time to get my breath when another
member, Tony Firbank, found a stunning pierced gold
coin, that looked very much like a Byzantine solidus.
Surely nothing more could be found … wrong again!
In the afternoon a lovely piece of Saxon gold filigree
was found, by Jim Mather, the dig organiser, along with
a further tiny and extremely rare gold Merovingian
tremissis for Paul Berry.
What an extraordinary couple of weeks. No less
than four gold and one silver Treasure items declared.
Beautiful and archaeologically significant items that
have been responsibly detected and saved for the future.
The turn of the plough has certainly had its part
to play, from the ploughing competition that helped
gain us the permission, to the turn of the plough
that brought such exceptional finds within
detecting range.
ABOVE Valley view; filigree in ground;
Jim with filigree; Tremisses clod
ABOVE RIGHT Roman denarius
of Pertinax RIGHT Byzantine solidus;
Merovingian tremissis BELOW John
Firbank
What next…
With the cold snap and snow, the crops were not growing and as a result the farmer
allowed the club one last opportunity to this field. The club had now been over this land
on two separate occasions and signals were now very few and far between. That said,
I just had a feeling in my bones that this field was about to give up something special …
TO BE CONTINUED!
26 THE SEARCHER JULY
JULY2018
2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
The Detectorists’ Auctioneers
Entries invited for our forthcoming Jewellery sales
to be held at our Mayfair Salerooms
A medieval inscribed ring sold recently for £2800
and a 17th century fede ring sold for £1400
If you have jewellery you are thinking of selling, we offer
Professional Catalogues
ComPetitive selling rates
no Hidden CHarges
www.dnw.co.uk
For a free valuation, without obligation, please contact Laura Smith
on 020 7 016 1700 or email jewellery@dnw.co.uk
www.dnw.co.uk
16 Bolton Street Mayfair London W1J 8BQ England UK
Telephone +44 020 7016 1700 Fax +44 020 7016 1799 Email coins@dnw.co.uk
Dix Noonan Webb 16 Bolton Street Mayfair London W1J 8BQ UK
Find: Bronze Age spearhead
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Region: North Yorkshire
Ref: SWYOR-BF7F41
And the nominations are...
This competition sets itself apart from others held in
the hobby by two major differentiators; one being that
Treasure items are not included as I wanted to stress
the significance of the finds over value. The other is
of course that all them have to have been recorded
with the Portable Antiquities Scheme or a Museum
Curator in order for them to be nominated.
This year, like last, PAS Finds Advisors from England
and PAS Co-ordinator Mark Lodwick from Wales have
nominated your finds for the three categories. Allison
Fox from Isle of Man and Robert Waterhouse from
Jersey have also submitted nominations.
Find: Bronze Age sword
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Region: Isle of Man
Ref: 2017-91
As well as our nations’ within the British Isles I have
opened the competition to our neighbours in Europe
who have similar recording schemes to the Portable
Antiquities Scheme. So this year we welcome Stijn
Heeran head of Portable Antiquities of the Netherlands
(PAN). I hope that Denmark and Flanders will nominate
next year!
2017 Entries
There were some amazing artefacts this year including
some items I’ve not seen before and some that have already
appeared within our pages. As ever with the coins there were
some specimens in great condition and some new varieties.
This year we have three hoards – one from Jersey!
All are significant in one way or another, each contributing
hugely to our knowledge and understanding of the past.
We have omitted the finder’s names at this stage as is our
usual policy.
Here are just some of the entries made this year of
The Searcher’s competition: The Nations’ Greatest
Detecting Finds.
28 THE SEARCHER JULY
JULY2017
2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Find: Bronze Age razor
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Region: Berkshire
Ref: CORN-D78C78
Find: Iron Age pin
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Find: Iron Age fob or dangler
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Find: Roman brooch
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Region: Cambridgeshire
Ref: SF-F4BD24
Region: Cheshire
Ref: WMID-924C13
Region: Conway
Ref: WREX-C2ADAA
Find: Roman brooch
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Find: Roman figurine
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Region: North Yorkshire
Ref: DUR-B70444
Region: Hertfordshire
Ref: BH-FBEE8C
Find: Iron Age pin
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Region: Lancashire
Ref: LANCUM-1BEF5B
Find: Roman buckle
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Region: Suffolk
Ref: ESS-8A5F43
Find: Roman phalera
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Region: Oxfordshire
Ref: BERK-41C728
Find: Roman cosmetic set
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Find: Iron Age mount
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Region: Hampshire
Ref: BERK-1CEE21
Region: Oxfordshire
Ref: YORYM-F23346
Find: Post-Medieval tag
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Region: Cheshire
Ref: LVPL-963F4D
thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2018 29
Find: Roman figurine
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Find: Early Medieval brooch
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Find: Medieval harness pendant
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Region: Worcestershire
Ref: GLO-082F26
Region: South Yorkshire
Ref: FAKL-A05256
Region: Devon
Ref: DEV-C6D8F7
Find: Roman brooch
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Region: Oxfordshire
Ref: SUR-78ACA0
Find: Early Medieval mount
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Region: Staffordshire
Ref: WMID-448800
Find: Medieval purse bar
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Region: Kent
Ref: KENT-BB3F94
Find: Roman timepiece
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Region: Hampshire
Ref: SUSS-BA3CBE
Find: Medieval candle holder
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Region: Norfolk
Ref: SF-74624E
Find: Medieval pilgrim’s badge
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Region: Somerset
Ref: SOM-315A8C
Find: Early Medieval strapend
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Region: Dorset
Ref: DEV-264F62
Find: Medieval crossbow hook
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Region: Berkshire
Ref: SUR-FB55E5
30 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Find: Roman hoard
Category: Most Significant Hoard
Region: Gloucestershire
Ref: GLO-BE1187
Find: Early Medieval Merovingian
Pseudo-Imperial solidus,
copy of Justinian I
Category: Most Significant Coin
Find: Sestertius, contemporary
copy of Trajan
Category: Most Significant Coin
Find: Roman sestertius of
Agrippina Senior
Category: Most Significant Coin
Region: Denbeighshire
Ref: WMID-2F41FB
Region: Oxfordshire
Ref: BERK-6C41FC
Find: Iron Age gold Armorican stater
Category: Most Significant Coin
Find: Nummus of Theodosius I
Category: Most Significant Coin
Find: Greek silver obol from Massalia
Category: Most Significant Coin
Region: Isle of Wight
Ref: IOW-E01586
Region: Wiltshire
Ref: WILT-CE9258
Region: Devon
Ref: LVPL-93DF5E
Find: Iron Age silver quarter stater
Category: Most Significant Coin
Find: Aureus of Gallienus
Category: Most Significant Coin
Region: Wiltshire
Ref: WILT-E00F41
Region: North Yorkshire
Ref: LVPL-BCE783
Find: Early Medieval pre-primary
phase/transitionary phase
sceat of Vanimundus type.
Category: Most Significant Coin
Region: Lincolnshire
Ref: BM-EE0045
Region: Essex
Ref: ESS-7860C7
thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2018 31
Find: Early Medieval penny of
Aethelstan I of East Anglia (827-45).
Category: Most Significant Coin
Find: Middle Iron Age Osterburger
brooch with spring support
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Find: Early Medieval enamelled
Saints brooch
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Region: Vale of Glamorgan
Ref: NMGW-DAB2C6
Region: Vries municipality, Drenthe
province, The Netherlands
Ref: PAN-21362
Region: Dongeradeel municipality,
Friesland province, The Netherlands
Ref: PAN-10672
Find: Early Medieval coin of Sihtric,
King of Dublin (989-1036).
Category: Most Significant Coin
Region: Hampshire
Ref: HAMP-7622E9
Find: Medieval gold noble of Henry VI
Category: Most Significant Coin
Region: Dorset
Ref: SOM-654171
Find: Post Medieval Charles I shilling
Category: Most Significant Coin
Find: Merovingian sword and axe 6th-7th century
Category: Most Significant Hoard
Region: Linne municipality, Limburg province, The Netherlands
Ref: PAN-18933-4-5
Find: Early Medieval Frankish cruciform
disc brooch (Carolingian)
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Find: Iron Age or Roman copper
alloy ring
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Region: Jersey, Channel Islands
Region: Jersey, Channel Islands
Region: Hampshire
Ref: HAMP-EB0B1B
32 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Find: Early Medieval 23 gaming piecesor tokens
Category: Most Significant Hoard
Region: Jersey, Channel Islands
Find: Aethelraed II penny of
‘CRVX’ type
Category: Most Significant Coin
Region: Wales
Ref: NMGW-B1A80D
Find: Iron Age vessel mount
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Region: Wales
Ref: NMGW-B1513C
Find: Middle Bronze Age valve from
a decorated mould for casting
palstaves date
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Region: Wales
Ref: NMGW-9883F6
Find: Roman gold Aureus of Augustus
Category: Most Significant Coin
Region: Wales
Ref: NMGW-981BC4
Find: Late Bronze Age – Iron Age
chape or mount
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Region: Wales
Ref: NMGW-AF1FCC
Find: Bronze Age razor or knife
Category: Most Significant Artefact
Region: Wales
Ref: NMGW-B18276
Judging The competition will be judged by a panel that will include Michael Lewis on behalf of the PAS, Stijn Heeran
too if possible and Peter D. Spencer for The Searcher. We hope that Tim Loughton MP for East Worthing and Shoreham will
also join the panel like last year. Tim has been a long time supporter of the PAS and is also the Treasurer of the Parliamentary
Archaeology Group, Member of Friends of British Museum and Member Royal Archaeological Institute.
thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2018 33
Rally
Roundup
Midweek Searchers at Stockbridge
I was lucky enough to join the Midweek Searchers
down in Stockbridge, Hampshire. Organiser Mikey
Barker welcomed me and we discussed their previous
visit when on the adjacent fields. Roman coins, Saxon
sceats, Celtic staters and plenty of hammered coins
were discovered on that ocassion.
Available to us were about 100 acres of ploughed
and rolled land and also some areas of maize stubble.
It was only a matter of minutes before I saw a nice
small hammered coin, possibly a Edward III farthing.
The next detectorist I bumped into had a lovely
zoomorphic Saxon strapend, an early jetton and
a nice medieval buckle.
I saw hammered and Roman coins and
everyone was in high spirits and the sun
was shining, a perfect day so far. All that
was needed was a few finds for myself
so I got my head down and it wasn’t long
before I pulled out a nice Elizabeth I three
farthings.
At lunch everyone gathered around
the parking area taking the opportunity
to re-fuel ready for the afternoon
session and enjoying hot dogs and drinks
served by Paula.
North Norfolk Charity Rally
After much weather interruptions with arctic
temperatures, then snow and ice, and then monsoons,
we at last got uninterrupted rally runs over our
carefully selected three co-joined fields. Each weekend
approximately 25 members turned out to support the
causes and expectations were high.
Luckily it was well worth the wait, and produced
large quantities of cracking good finds, some of
which impact considerably in advancing our local
understanding of settlement and trade.
A decent sum of £750.00 was raised for charity
too by way of raffle donations such as a Searcher
subscription which will go to local charities such as Blind
Veterans and the Gherka Welfare Trust. Jim Beckerleg
36 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018
twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
LEFT Medieval Horse Harness Pendant, with
surviving Blue enamelling, Earls of Surrey; Henry
VI noble. Limoges Mount of a Saint, enamelled,
from a Reliquary Casket; found in field opposite
significant Medieval parish church. An arm of an AD
11th/12th C Processional Cross (Saxo-Norman).
Only 2 or 3 pieces survive nationally via detecting.
All others from parish churches destroyed by Puritan
Revolution 1640’s. BELOW FROM LEFT Henry
VI noble 1422-1430; James I Sixpence, 1603;
Denarius; Elizabeth I shilling.
After lunch I headed to an area where Roman
coins had been discovered and straightaway
I got to see a few for myself. Shortly after,
I bumped into Paula and Em who had a lovely
silver artefact that had gold initials inside.
Paula was in high spirits and commented how
she would love a nice Saxon sceat. Literally
one minute after she shouts out “SAXON
SCEAT!” The coin is in really great condition
and it was a pleasure to see it fresh out
of the ground and to see an elated Paula
with her find!
Throughout the day there were plenty more
super finds such as a lovely Anglo Saxon
penny, more Saxon sceats, a lovely Celtic
silver stater, Roman fibulae … the list goes
on and on.
It really was a great day’s detecting for
all with a fantastic, friendly group of people.
Thanks again to Mikey and the Midweek
Searchers Group who can be found
on Facebook.
See footage of this dig on the Searcher
YouTube channel, it’s free to watch
and subscribe! Sid Perry
A selection of finds from the rally
The Pascal Lebrrun Rally – Belgium
“Gaz how do you fancy a road trip to Belgium” that was the
start of the call I received from Gary Blackwell a few months
back. XP were supporting the Pascal Lebrrun Detecting Rally
and Gary was wondering if I fancied joining him.
The Rally itself has been held annully since 1999 to
remember the late Pascal Lebrrun who was an avid and wellrespected detectorist from Belgium who’d worked hard to
break down the boundaries that existed between detectorists
and archaeologists. Detecting is very restricted in Belgium and
you can only legally detect if you are on an organised event
approved and attended by archaeologists.
Pascal tragically died when he discovered, whilst detecting,
an unexploded WW2 bomb which exploded and damaged
buildings in the nearby vicinity. His family were held responsible
for the repairs. To help, his friends organised the first rally in his
memory and raised money for the family. Since then they’ve
held it every year and the debts have now been paid and the
money raised now goes to charity.
The Rally is one huge token hunt spread over two fields four
miles away from the main site. Buses take the particpicants
there, are collected for lunch and returned back to the fields
in the afternoon.
My highlight had to be the token hunt using only their
pinpointers! It was hilarious to watch but everyone had good
fun! Some of the tokens found are exchanged for raffle tickets
and the prize this year was a XP Deus full set up.
By now the heat (25 degrees) and the drink
had started to take effect on many of them
as you can see by the picture one had passed
out lent against Gary’s car (remind you of
anyone!) many had been drinking since 8am.
Around 5pm back came the buses to take
them all back to the site for apple pie and
cream. The drinking continued and people
were having a great time, the raffle was
drawn and the tokens found were exchanged
for prizes by the lucky finders. An evening
BBQ saw the close of a successful event. I
take my hat off to the organisers as the day
ran to perfection.
Remember, they cannot go out and detect
like we can. This is the only way they can
detect out in a field an organised event with
the consent of the archaeologists who insist
on being there. It was a real eye opener and it
made us realise how lucky we actually are in
the UK to be able to enjoy our hobby so freely.
Be thankful you can enjoy your hobby and
for the NCMD who work hard to give us that
freedom. Gary Cook
thesearcher.co.uk JUNE
thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2016
2018 37
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• Ergonomic rubber
• LED flashlight
• 2 audio modes PITCH/PULSE
• 6 Programs
• Rechargeable Li-on Battery
• 3 Levels of sensitivity
• Fast re-tune
• Single-button operation
• Lanyard with stainless ring
• Rotating holster
• Parts totally replaceable
to Garrett Z-Lynk wireless receivers.
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0
• Wireless Convenience:
£6
49
Hear both detector and pinpointer
alarms in your headphones, even
in noisy environments (beach, high
winds, congested urban areas, organized hunts).
NE
£5
59
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NE
49
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• Fast re-tune
• Single-button operation
• LED flashlight
• Lost Pinpointer Alarm
• Automatic Power-Off feature
• Patented proportional audio and
scraping blade to sift through soil.
NEW
W
Garrett MS3
Wireless Z-Lynk Kit
£129.95
Fits to every detector
with 1/4” socket
• New Stereo MS-3
Wireless Headphones
• Z-Lynk WT-1
transmitter module
• 2-pin (AT) headphone
to USB cable
• 1/4” headphone jack
• Mounting band
• USB charging cable
£149.95
• New 8.5”x11” PROformanceTM DD serchcoil
• New Pulse-Width Modulation Audio
• Higher 10kHz frequency
• Adjustable Frequency
• Digital Target ID
• Iron AudioTM
• Camlocks
Garrett MS3
Wireless Z-Lynk Kit
£449.9
5
*valid from 1st January 2018 to 31st July 2018, Accessories items are subject to change.
• New Pulse-Width Modulation Audio
• New 7”x10” elliptical serchcoil
• Enhanced Iron Resolution
• Higher 8 kHz frequency
• Adjustable Frequency
• Digital Target ID
New Stereo MS-3 Wireless Headphones
Z-Lynk WT-1 transmitter module
2-pin (AT) headphone to USB cable
1/4” headphone cable jack
Mounting band
Garrett MS3
Wireless Z-Lynk Kit
fo
B O TrH
£369.9
*valid from 1st January 2018 to 31st July 2018,
Accessories items are subject to change.
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Order & Enquiry
Hotline
£116.95
New Stereo MS-3 Wireless Headphones
Z-Lynk WT-1 transmitter module
2-pin (AT) headphone to USB cable
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Mounting band
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Fully submersible up to 5 meters (16.4ft.)
Excellent Discrimination and Unmasking Ability
High Performance & Unmatched Depth
Advanced Beach Mode
NEW E.U.D. Function & Fast Recovery Speed
3 Selectable Target ID Depth Levels
4 (Gold) and 6 (Multi) Search Modes
Built-in Lipo Battery
2.4 GHz Wireless Headphones
Online Firmware Updates
Vibration & Lightweight (1.3kg / 2.9Ibs)
NEW
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• Lanyard with stainless ring
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0121 359 2379
*All prices and offers are subject to change without prior notice
April2018-m.indd 1
04/05/2018 10:30:59
Order & Enquiry Hotline 0121
359 2379
www.regton.com
metal detectors
XP MI-6 Pinpointer
DEUS with
9 inch coil
• Rechargeable Lithium
Polymer battery.
• Submersible up to 20 feet.
XPD3428
XP
13’’ x 11’’
Deus coil
XP
XP
XP DEUS with 9’’ coil, WS4 headphones,
mains charger and coil cover
Ref: XPD22WS4
£769.00
£373.00
£116.95
XP
XP DEUS with 9’’ coil, WS5 headphones,
mains charger and coil cover
Ref: XPD22WS5
£827.00
XP DEUS with 9’’ coil remote control and
WS4 headphones, mains charger, coil
cover, hip mount pouch
Ref: XPD22RCWS4
£1378.00
XPD28
XP
XP
11’’ Deus coil
£349.00
XP
XP DEUS with 9’’ coil remote control and
WS5 headphones, mains charger, coil
cover, hip mount pouch
Ref: XPD22RCWS5
£1436.00
XP DEUS with 9’’ coil, remote control,
mains charger, coil cover, hip mount
pouch
£1118.00
Ref: XPD22RC
XPD01
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£319.95
DEUS with
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XPD01HF
9’’ XP Deus
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£349.95
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£799.00
XP DEUS with 11’’ coil and WS5
headphones, mains charger, coil cover
Ref: XPD28WS5
£857.00
XP
XPDELLHF
XP
• Rechargeable Lithium
Polymer battery.
• Submersible up to 20 feet.
• Connection via radio link to
the DEUS.
£139.95
XP
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mains charger, coil cover, hip mount
pouch
£1148.00
Ref: XPD28RC
Order & Enquiry Hotline
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9.5’’x5’’
Elliptical
XP Deus high
frequency coil
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OUR CUSTOMERS LOVE US!
*All prices and offers are subject to change without prior notice
April2018-m.indd 2
04/05/2018 10:31:20
REGTON
METAL DETECTION SPECIALISTS
Garrett Pro-Pointer AT
The Garrett ATX is ultra-sensitive to very small
targets, such as subgram-size gold nuggets, that
other pulse machines will not find. Larger size
gold, jewellery, and even relic targets can be
detected at great depths.
£126.95
Garrett ACE 250
Garrett ACE 250 with
batteries, DVD, Coil Cover
and Headphones
£849.95
Garrett ACE 150
£314.95
Garrett
Garrett
£214.95
Garrett
Garrett
• Lost pinpointer alarm
•Auto-offfeature
• Lanyard attachment clip
• Faster retuning capability
• Increased durability and
sensitivity
£109.95
£2299.95
Garrett ATX Extreme
batteries, charger,
car charger, bag,
headphones, sling
Garrett ACE 250 Accurate
Locator Package including
batteries, DVD, Coil Cover,
Headphones and Garrett
Pro-Pointer
Garrett
Garrett Ace 300i with:
Garrett
£394.95
Garrett Euro Ace with DVD,
headphones, backpack, meter
cover, coil cover. begginers
guide
Euro Ace Accurate Locator
Package with DVD, headphones,
backpack, coil cover, meter
cover and Garrett Pro-Pointer II
Garrett Ace 200i
Garrett
Garrett
Ideal for
Inland detecting
and beach
detecting,
including wet
sand.
£299.95
Garrett
AT Pro International
£634.95
£169.95
•
•
•
•
•
headphones
coil cover
control box cover
batteries
instructions
Garrett Ace 400i with:
•
•
•
•
•
£149.95
Garrett ACE 150 with 2 year
UK warranty, Coil Cover,
Headphones
headphones
coil cover
control box cover
batteries
instructions
Garrett
Garrett Pro-Pointer
Garrett
Garrett
• New 2017
Garrett
metal
detector
• Maximum
Detection
Depth
• 13,6 kHz
operating frequency
• Ideal for silver coins,
gold jewellery and
brass relics
• 8.5 x 11 in. DD
PROformance™
Searchcoil
• New Garrett MS-3
wireless headphones
with volume control
• All terrain
performance
• Built-in Z-Link™
wireless technology
Garrett
Garrett ATX Extreme
Pulse Induction
• Waterproof to 10 feet
• Fast retune
• Single button operation
•LEDflashlight
• Lost pinpointer alarm
• Lanyard attachment loop, belt
holster, and 9V battery
• Patented proportional audio
and scraping blade to sift
through soil
£259.95
Garrett
Garrett AT MAX
£339.95
£715.95
Garrett
AT PRO International
Accurate Locator Package
including land phones,
Camo Digger’s Pouch,
Baseball Cap, Coil Cover
and Garrett Pro-Pointer II
£699.95
Z-Lynk Package including
Z-Lynk wireless system,
Z-Lynk headphone cable
with 2 pin connector, Z-Lynk
2-pin AT connector cable,
2MS Headphones and coil
cover.
Garrett Sea Hunter Mk II
Garrett Sea Hunter Mark II metal detector
can be used for under full beach conditions.
It is waterproof up to 200 feet (60 meters).
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Garrett
Garrett
AT PRO International
with Land phones, Camo
Digger’s Pouch, Baseball
Cap, Coil Cover
£704.95
All metal Deep seeking mode
Adjustable Audio Threshold
Full range discrimination
Submersible headphone jack
Hip mountable control box
Salt elimination mode
Sensitivity / depth adjustment
Surface mount PC board technology
www.regton.com
*All prices and offers are subject to change without prior notice
April2018-m.indd 3
04/05/2018 10:31:34
www.regton.com
REGTON
Regton Ltd. 82 Cliveland Street
Birmingham, B19 3SN
METAL DETECTION SPECIALISTS
•
•
17’’ by 15’’
use on a very clean
ground such as a
pasture land, where
maximum detection
range is important
•
•
•
12” x13”
use on fairly clean ground,
such us pasture land
it gives more ground
coverage than a standard
manufacture coil
Garrett, Teknetics, Tesoro, Laser, Whites
, Minelab, Fisher, XP, Discovery, Makro
Detectors
Call us or visit
Regton.com website
for more details
Hunter
Attack
•
•
REGTON STOCK QUALITY
NEL COILS MADE FOR MOST
MAKES
Tornado
Big
15’’ by 15’’
use on a very clean
ground such as a pasture
land, where maximum
detection range is
important
•
•
•
•
12.5’’ x 8.5’’
use on ploughed land, where you
need a good ground coverage
excellent recovery speed
good separation
Garrett ACE
Sharpshooter
•
•
Snake
9.5’’ x 5.5’’
for use on roughly ploughed
land or stubble, where you
need a small coil to get in
between stubble
•
•
•
13.5”
2D coil for Garrett ACE
range
Sharp
Thunder
•
•
•
•
6.5” by 3.5”
use inland and especially beach on
heavily contaminated sites where
recovery speed is paramount, however
ground coverage is still required to an
extent
Excellent separation
•
•
14.5” x 10.5”
use on a very clean
ground such as a
pasture land, where
maximum detection
range is important
•
•
5’’ round coil,
for use on junky ground where there
is so much iron and you need to get in between
iron very slowly and carefully
on thick maize stubble which is very difficult to
detect due to the thickness of stalks
gives excellent separation
Storm
•
•
13’’ x 14’’
use on clean ground
2ENT
2EEB
Viking V1 non motion metal
detector suitable for 8-10
years old children.
2EPCT
Pro Cut T Spade
£63.90
£69.95
2ELHT
Long Handled Trowel with teeth
£36.90
2ELH
Long Handled Trowel
£36.90
2ESHT
Short Handled Trowel with teeth
£26.90
2ESH
Short Handled Trowel
£26.90
2EEB
Extreme Blade Trowel
£26.90
2ENT
NT Digging Trowel
£26.90
£129.00
£85.00
Garrett
Ace 150
The Scanmaster
1st is our
budget choice
children’s toy
detector for
youngsters
up to 5 feet 2
inches tall.
The Garrett
Ace 150 is
lightweight but
durable, very
comfortable
to hold, which
is great for
beginners or
childrens.
Scanmaster 1st Children
Metal Detector
GA150
£69.95
V1
Pro Cut D Spade
WXVEN
£69.95
2EPCD
2EPCPD Spade with plastic D handle
Viking V1 Kids
Metal Detector
White’s XVenture Kids Metal
Detector is a “real” sized metal
detector adjustable
to fit most kids 7
years old and older.
SM1
2EPCSE Pro Cut SE Spade
2ESH
White’s XVenture Kids
Metal Detector
2ESHT
2ELH
2ELHT
2EPCPD
2EPCT
2EPCD
2EPCSE
Kid’s Metal Detectors
£21.95
£149.95
Visit our website
www.regton.com
*All prices and offers are subject to change without prior notice
April2018-m.indd 4
04/05/2018 10:32:15
EXCLUSIVE
EXCLUSIVE
Great hobby –
I’m always learning
LES
GRAYDON
About three years ago I decided to quit smoking, and took
up another pastime to which I have become addicted …
metal detecting. I did some research, and eventually purchased
a Garrett Ace 250, the reasoning being that if the hobby
didn’t suit, then I hadn’t wasted a fortune.
I am lucky enough to live in a small
farming community in County
Fermanagh less than a mile from the
Irish border; so getting permissions has
never been a problem. Many of the locals
think I’m crazy wandering back and forth
on the fields in rain, hail and snow. Good
call – I probably am, anyway!
On one of my first outings I found a
badly worn George III Hibernian half
penny and a musket ball, objects that
might as well have been gold for I was so
excited. Within a couple of years I would
have a large number of both.
Since then I have recovered some
interesting pieces and polished up on my
local history, spent lots of time visiting
the library, poring over old maps and
doing simple research.
Going to Historical Society meetings
has made me see my local area in
a new light. For example I never knew
about the Battle of Clones in 1643,
which happened only a mile from
my house.
Then there was the Battle of
Newtownbutler in 1689 between the
armies of William III and James II.
This was only three miles away, with
over 2,000 killed. And there was more.
In the early days I was only going
out searching occasionally, but that all
changed in December 2016 when I found
a stunning bronze penannular brooch
which was featured in this magazine
at the time and created a lot of interest.
The brooch is now on display
in the Ulster Museum.
Since then my addiction has taken
over and there has been many ‘highs’.
I have acquired a lot of permissions,
most of them in locations around Lough
Erne, the second-biggest lake system in
Northern Ireland. What other excuse
would I have to go to these places and
absorb the scenery well away from the
tourist trail?
At the start of 2017 I upgraded my
machine and bought a Makro Racer,
with which I have racked up hundreds
of hours.
42 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
TOP Les Graydon; military buttons; Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers
lapel badge ABOVE bronze penannular brooch
There were lots of ‘firsts’, including a
badly worn hammered coin and a clipped
Edward III half groat. Since then I have
found more hammered and lots of other
silver coins.
From a field near Enniskillen I have
started building a large collection of late
18th and early 19th century military
buttons and badges. From a small
area I have found about 50 buttons,
ranging from the Argyleshire Regiment,
the Huntingdonshire Regiment and
Connaught Rangers, and many others.
The George III Irish bank tokens were
found within a few feet of each other.
I haven’t been able to find why all of
the above were found in the same field,
but know that after the 1798 rebellion
there was a large military presence in
Fermanagh. That’s what I love about this
hobby; I’m always learning. My collection
of military buttons and cap badges, bits of
muskets, musket balls and powder flasks
is getting quite impressive – so much so
that my Chief of Staff (aka the wife) keeps
threating to throw out all my ‘detecting
crap’ … as she calls it.
On my most recent permission, the
site of a castle destroyed in the 1641
rebellion, I have found a few interesting
bits including a silver Victorian puzzle
brooch. I understand that these brooches
were given from one lover to another
and only they knew what it said. I wonder
did she lose it or throw it away after a
breakup or row? If you can work it out
please let me know.
I also wonder how the Canadian
Edmonton Guards cap badge ended
up in a field between Fermanagh in
Northern Ireland and Monaghan in
the Republic.
I must admit that this hobby has taken
over my life, but in a good way. It has
increased my knowledge of history, and
I do lots of walking now. By attending
rallies and going on forums, I have also
increased my circle of friends.
When I don those phones all life’s
problems seem to disappear for a while;
that’s what it’s all about. For the year
going forward my plan is to upgrade the
Racer to a Makro Kruzer, and then find
that piece of gold, which is eluding me!
Maybe I just have to walk over it …
LEFT TO RIGHT Bank tokens; Ulster Defence Regiment cap badge; puzzle brooch TOP TO BOTTOM two coins; Canadian 66 Batallion Edmonton Goards
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thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2018 43
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•
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Persian Antiquity
– Provenance
ROY ALDINGTON
Small metallic artefact
During the early 1970’s an elderly
retired gentleman, William Carswell,
was my friend. He’d once worked
for Allen and Hanbury (A&H who
are now SmithKline Beecham).
A&H were a long established
pharmaceutical manufacturing
company famous for their pastille
lozenges, but specialising in the
development of drugs, medical
equipment and later, healthcare
provision.
For many years William was
an executive and company
representative in the Middle East,
including Persia (now Iran).
The Shah and the Persian
Government were grateful for
the contribution of A & H in the
development of the country’s
medical services and became
particularly disposed towards my
friend. On several occasions they
showered him with gifts. William was
an avid and knowledgeable collector
of fine arts and antiquities from
Bronze Age to Roman to Georgian
and everything between.
During one of our frequent
reminiscences over a glass or two
of single-malt, Bill (as I called him)
produced a small metallic artefact of
simple but pleasing design. He told
46 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
me that it had been given to him during the early
sixties by a member of a visiting archaeological
team. He did not divulge his exact source but
hinted it was Sir Mortimer Wheeler himself.
He now wished me to have it as a keepsake and
memento of our friendship. I have kept it through
the years, occasionally producing it as a ‘talkingpoint’ and conundrum.
Bill had been assured that it was a bell, probably
for attachment to a goat’s neck, had once held a
flint pellet or clapper inside to resonate sound and
was, in fact, a device made to assist a shepherd
keep track of his flock at night.
He was insistent that the object had its origin
in the early Bronze Age, and was certain that the
‘bell’ had been excavated from a site in the area
of what later became the ancient Persian capital,
Persepolis.
Thing of antiquity
That evaluation and provenance seemed
eminently plausible at the time and I accepted the
explanation without question. William Carswell
passed away peacefully in the mid-1980’s,
surrounded by his amazing lifetime collection
of artefacts.
Without doubt, this particular artefact is a
thing of antiquity and simple beauty. It had been
skilfully crafted for a specific, practical purpose
and has over time developed a rich, dark-green
patina. The base is of globular-shaped openwork
construction; hollow, with the casing panels
separated by six, irregular, vertical slits (widest at
the median line). The globe is discretely decorated
with twin, parallel, vertical indented lines on each
of the panels at the upper and lower poles of the
globe. Emerging from the top of the sphere is a
short, stout, barley-twist linear extension, formed
of two twisted wires, terminating in a small loop
clearly intended for attachment purposes. The
object is just 48mm in length; 20mm diameter
(nominally) and weighs 18.03g. The metal is
copper-alloy. Traces of soil remain.
The object appears impractical in size and
intricate in design for use as a bell. It is doubtful
that sound emanating from it, even in the still
night air of the desert, would be audible over
distance. Tests have been carried-out to produce
a sound from the ‘bell-chamber’ by introducing
clappers of various materials such as flint spheres,
bronze and iron pellets. None were effective
in producing anything better than a dull rattle
sound, so rendering it ineffective as a night-time
livestock locator.
Use as a horse adornment cannot be ruledout as the embellishment of tack by means of
‘trappings’, especially small bells, was practised
widely in this region for millennia; developing
in later eras as crotal bells or cowbells.
There are also several examples of Bronze Age
‘rattle-bells’ with origins in Western Persia dating
from 1,000 BCE that have a curious resemblance,
albeit they are invariably significantly larger
in proportion.
Several years ago the British Museum’s Persian
Antiquities section examined photographic images
of the object, studied the dimension detail and
considered a possible use. The Museum curators
were unable to make a positive and definitive
identification or offer advice as regard to its
origins or specific uses.
A convincing parallel?
After considerable research I have been unable
to find images or written description that
identify exactly with the style, shape, design or
construction of this intriguing little object. The
British Museum do have records, catalogued as
horse trappings, similar in appearance, albeit
slightly larger.
Perhaps it is significant that I have been unable
to find a convincing parallel for this particular
object under the general guise of an animal bell,
horse adornment or rattle-bell. It may have been
intended for other purposes.
Could this be an early type of pomander? I
have seen illustrations of a similar design and
it is known that such devices, intended to mask
offensive body odours and/or ward-off disease
were already in use at least circa 1,000 BCE and
very likely, much earlier.
The hollow cavity would be
charged with concentrated pungent
fragrances. Fragrant plants like
cardamom, cassia, cinnamon,
lemongrass, lily, myrrh and rose were
favoured ingredients of the time.
The early Egyptians are known
to have developed jewellery that
incorporated scented materials, a
tradition still practised in cultures
throughout northern Africa and
the Middle East. In this particular
case the pomander (perhaps one
of several worn) would have been
suspended on a cord or thong
around the waist, either beneath,
or as in later times, above the outer
layer of clothing.
I think that thin strips of cloth
were soaked in the concentrated
liquid fragrance and threaded
into the chamber through the
slits. Another method of charging
the globe cavity, found widely in
pomander type jewellery, is to
blend and suspend the fragrance
in ambergris or soft wax, allowing
body heat to gradually dispense the
agreeable fragrance.
Help
I would very much like to discover
the true origins of this modest and
interesting, ancient artefact. But, in
any case, I think that it should now
reside with an interested scholarcollector or institution concerned
with the study of ancient Persian
artefacts, in order that further
academic research can be undertaken
to establish conclusively its true
‘raison d’être’.
Wanted – Gold Finger Rings, Jewels and Artefacts
An early 17th century yellow gold signet ring, the bezel engraved with a hawk
Highest prices given and paid immediately
14 Grafton Street, London, W1S 4DE
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After a fashion
Andrew Caley
What to wear
The question of what to wear when detecting does
not seem like a fashion topic that would be of
interest. But it is. When you are out in all weathers
on muddy fields, what to wear becomes a central
concern.
My initial choice of clothing was
determined by chance. On my first dig I
scrabbled about early in the morning and
dug out a pair of crappy trousers with a
broken zip, a grubby and stained T-shirt
and an old sweatshirt. I also had a freebie
Pac-a-Mac with a rainbow on the back of
it and a bandana-type hat to protect my
balding head from the sun. I am always
careful about that.
The upshot was I looked like a twit.
When you are a member of a club
there tend to be conventions associated
with that. There may be a club jumper
or hat. Although clubs most certainly do
produce branded wear, sporting slogans
like ‘Digging For Victory’ or ‘Detectorists
Go Deeper’. No one seems to wear them;
certainly not outside.
Nevertheless there is a uniform, of
sorts. A good number of detectorists, it
seems, like to go about in camouflage
army gear. And that prompts a number
of questions.
First, although detecting is a form
of hunting there doesn’t seem to be any
obvious reason why you need to hide
yourself in plain view. It’s not as if a
hoard of Viking coins or a Roman brooch
is going to be any more easier to sneak
up on if you are decked out like Rambo.
In fact, in terms of finding stuff, it would
make no difference if you went out dolled
up like the cross-dressing artist Grayson
Perry … although your frock would be
at risk of getting a bit cacked up.
That leaves the possibility that
detectorists camouflage themselves to
prevent other people from spotting them
easily. But why would you be anxious to
make sure no one could see you? It can’t
be because of embarrassment.
There is not much shame attached
to the hobby these days, in fact quite the
opposite. When people hear that I am a
detectorist they show quite a bit of
interest, asking questions about the
treasures I have found. It tends to be
quite a short conversation.
Why?
I put the question of why detectorists
go for camouflage to Bellend as
we munch on our lunchtime
sandwiches on a dig.
“Two things,” he says.
“First off, I don’t want
‘randoms’ seeing me.”
“Why not?”
“Cos some people
think if they see
detectorists on a field
they can grab a detector
and just turn up on the
land. They don’t know about
getting permission.”
“… But.”
“… But when there’s loads of us on
the fields, like today, then it don’t make
much difference. When we are all
together like this we stick out like turds
in a fruit bowl.”
“Right. Yes, I mean, there’s 40 odd
of us here, so I suppose we do …”
“... But when you are detecting on
your own permissions with a mate, it
makes sense to keep your head down.
Besides, you don’t want them bloody
nighthawkers spotting you then turning
up later to have a go themselves.”
I wonder what Bellend makes of my
bright yellow cagoule with a rainbow on
the back. Without prompting, he tells
me.
50 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
“There’s no way I’d take you along
on one of my permissions wearing that
hideous thing. No offence, Captain,
but you look a right knob.”
None taken.
Lunch back at the cars is a ritual.
Detectorists take the opportunity to
drink some warming tea and look at
each other’s finds from the morning’s
search. Identifications of coins and other
bits and bobs are made.
Bellend is the go-to guy for coin ID,
it seems. Streams of folk in army get-up
file by, popping the odd coin into his
palm. Out comes his eyepiece. He
examines the finds like a jeweller
checking the quality of diamonds.
Well-thumbed reference books on coins
and artefacts lie around in his open boot.
“Eddy penny, York mint, very fine
condition. Nice little one, that.”
“Nuremburg jetton.
Should be able to tell
which old sod made it
once it’s cleaned up a
bit more.”
“Scottish Charles I
hammered silver forty
pence. Worth about a
hundred quid, that.”
“George III sixpence.
Bit crappy so maybe twenty
quid on a good day.”
From my natty pouch
I wonder what on earth I can offer him
to look at from my natty pouch. After a
morning’s tramping about I have some
blank coins, blank buttons, a musket ball,
a large buckle and an assortment of crap.
I have one thing that looks old, possibly
something Roman. But I haven’t a clue
what it is.
“Any idea what this is?”
He looks at the small circular object
that looks a bit like the symbol for the
London Underground.
“Boat,” he says.
“Boat?”
TOP Andrew Caley in character
ABOVE Cagoule RIGHT British Army Issue Camo
“Bit off a tractor. B.O.A.T.”
“Oh, I thought it might be Roman.”
“You daft git. This is a bit of diecast
metal. It’s about as Roman as my arse.”
I have so much to learn.
Lunch over, the detectorist army fan
out across the fields again. Looking at
them I wonder whether as well as
needing to acquaint myself with the
difference between a bit off a Massey
Ferguson and a Roman brooch, I might
need to rethink my wardrobe. But I am
still not sure about this military fatigues
thing.
The afternoon brings no more joy,
just a lot more scrap metal, a few more
buttons and a couple of totally blank
coins, probably Victorian half pennies
judging by their size.
As I prise off my mud-caked old
walking boots Bentspoon wanders past
looking like an extra from Apocalypse
Now.
“Anything?” I ask.
“No. Knob all. It happens.”
“Yup.”
I decide to instigate another question
and answer session about the detectorists’
choice of attire.
Why dress up like soldiers?
“I see you go for the camouflage gear,
like Bellend,” I say.
“Yep. Better than that day-glo hippy
crap you have on. Looks like you got it
at Glastonbury.”
“Er …”
It seems these guys cannot only
identify coins, buttons and brooches,
but also the provenance of clothing.
“Bellend told me he didn’t like
being spotted, so that’s why he
wears it.”
“Yeah. If I looked like
Bellend I wouldn’t want
to be seen either.”
Bentspoon laughs so
hard at his own joke
he starts coughing
like a 60-a-day
consumptive.
I continue to press
him.
“Seriously, why do so
many detectorists dress up like
soldiers?”
“Simple really,” he says. “If the gear
is good enough for the British Army to
go on manoeuvres or wade through crap,
then it is good enough for us. They have
loads of pockets so you can easily carry
around a trowel, your pinpointer and
what have you. And you can sort the stuff
you find on the move. Put buttons in one
pocket, buckles in another, crap in
another.”
“But you can buy gear like that doesn’t
make you look like a hero from Where
Eagles Dare.”
“True, but it costs a bomb. You can
pick up this stuff for next to nowt from
army surplus places and on eBay. It’s
hardwearing, waterproof, warm and it
doesn’t matter if you shit it up. That
thing you are wearing wouldn’t keep
you dry if a frog spat at you. And you
look like a tosspot.”
I can’t argue with this. I know that I
look like a tosspot. I cannot say I have
ever been spat on by a frog, and it is not
an expression I am familiar with, but I
get Bentspoon’s drift.
Maybe I should investigate military
garb. I pack my stuff into the boot and
head home.
The Quiz … and waterproof
socks
After a Sunday spent detecting I like
to reward myself for the hard work by
popping down to my local in the evening
to take part in the weekly pub quiz. My
team members know about my hobby
and always ask me how I got on. One
Sunday I was asked the usual question.
“Found that hoard yet?”
“Er, no.”
“You went out all day in this weather?
You must be mad!”
“Yeah, I might be. It did piss down
on and off. I need some better outdoor
clothing. It was horrible today.”
I mention to them that while my fellow
detectorists are kitted out like
Vietnam veterans, I go about
like a kiddie at a slightly
rainy outdoor birthday
party.
“I can get you any
military gear you want,”
says Tim.
“Sorry?”
“Well, not guns and
grenades, but any clothes
you want.”
I had forgotten that Tim is a
veteran of Bosnia, Kosovo and
Northern Ireland and now works
part-time as an army quartermaster as he
heads towards retirement.
“We have loads of stuff lying about.
Just let me know what you want.”
“Cheers!”
The following week at the quiz, Tim
arrives at the pub with a bin bag stuffed
like Santa’s sack.
“Found that hoard yet?”
“Er, no.”
“Well, here you go,” he says, handing
over the bulging bin bag. “Here’s a load
of gear. There’s even a pair of waterproof
socks in there.”
Waterproof socks! I didn’t know such
a thing existed. I would bet that even
Bentspoon and Bellend don’t have a pair
of those!
After the quiz is done – and a
respectable third place achieved – I
wander home with my bin bag. The
missus has fallen asleep in front of
Downton Abbey. Not wanting to disturb
her just yet I head to the kitchen and pull
out the various bits and bobs from Tim’s
bin bag and try them on.
There are camouflage waterproof
trousers, a tight fitting thermal top and a
camouflage jacket that would easily cope
with frog spit. There is also one of those
warm hats with ear flaps that make you
look like Deputy Dawg.
I stand there looking at my reflection
in the kitchen window. I am not sure
about this.
Encouragement from
the Missus
There is a shriek of alarm.
The missus is standing in the kitchen
doorway clutching her heart.
“Jesus wept,” she says, huffing and
puffing. “What the hell are you doing?
You nearly gave me a heart attack then.
Jesus!”
Lily, our dog, runs into the kitchen
in full protection mode, alarmed by the
shriek of her mistress. She starts barking
at me, hackles up. She plainly does not
like the sight of a portly soldier standing
in her house late at night.
Collecting herself, the missus asks me
what the hell I am doing standing in the
kitchen at 10.30pm dressed like Ross
Kemp in one of his Afghanistan
documentaries.
“Erm … Tim from the quiz team gave
me this gear to go detecting in.”
The missus eyes me.
“Do you know what you are?”
“Nope.”
“You are a daft twit and you look like
a tosspot.” Lily barks in agreement.
If Bellend and Bentspoon were
standing in my kitchen they would
no doubt concur.
thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2018 51
Read’s Miscellany
Brian Read
his month’s 20 artefacts, mainly buttons, are from more widespread
locations: Dorset one, Wiltshire five, Somerset five, Devon three; Wales
one, Lancashire one, Suffolk one, Leicestershire one, Yorkshire one and
Buckinghamshire one. One object is late medieval while the others are postmedieval. Photos are not to scale. Abbreviations: East Devon Metal-Detecting Club
– EDMDC, Norwich Detectors – ND, Weymouth & Portland Metal-Detecting Club –
WPMDC, Yeovil Metal Detecting Club – YMDC, Portable Antiquities Scheme – PAS.
Enamel colours are as now seen which may be not as they were originally.
T
Post-medieval cast copper-alloy artefacts
applied with enamel seemingly were once
uncommon detecting finds, however,
in recent years more specimens have
turned up, many of which are in the
known record. Previously, ascribed as
‘Surrey’ enamels, manufactured in an
Esher factory, the late Claude Blair, and
Angus Patterson et al, writing in the
Journal of the Antique Metalware Society,
Vols 14 & 15, June 2005, argue that such
decorative metalwork is English, actually
produced between c.1645 – c.1690 ‘in
the London [Middlesex] workshop
of Stephen Pilcherd and Anthony
Hatch’, and named ‘Stuart Enamels’.
The writers also indicate that the cast
objects were moulded, leaving fields
to receive enamel, which, confusingly,
they differentiate from the champlevé
technique: though to me, it’s the same.
Four good examples of this enamelwork
are included here: No. 1, a South West
Wiltshire find for a YMDC member, is a
double trapezoidal possible spur buckle,
minus its pin, retaining much darkblue and white enamel (I have recorded
another buckle of this type though the
enamel colours are transposed); No. 2,
which came out of South Somerset for a
YMDC member, is a one-piece circular
hollow-domed button decorated with an
alternate light-blue and white six-petalled
flower within a border of dark-blue
2
1
5
3
6
54 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
pellets; No. 3, the same kind of button
but depicting a horse and rider – perhaps
representing the Royalist cause – on a
light-blue and white field, turned up in
East Devon for an EDMDC member;
a different member of EDMDC found
No. 4 in East Devon, another one-piece
button, but sexfoil with a conical boss
decorated peripherally with alternate
dark-blue and light-blue and white fivepetalled flowers, and a central light-blue
and white five-petalled flower.
Cast copper-alloy one-piece buttons
of the same type as the aforesaid
examples all have similarly deep fields
that formerly may have held enamel:
Val found No. 5 in South West Wiltshire,
it is emblazoned with the arms of the
Commonwealth under the Lord Protector
1653-60 (variations of these arms exist,
for example on finger-rings, bridle-bosses
and blunt-hooked clasps); I discovered
No. 6 from the same South West Wiltshire
site and it depicts a six-petalled flower
bordered by alternate oblique ridges and
pellets and crescents; No. 7, which turned
4
7
up in South Devon for an independent
detectorist, is slightly distorted and has a
small section of rim broken off, and shows
a Cavalier’s mask, also perhaps indicating
a Royalist supporter. The Commonwealth
Arms buttons are now well-represented in
the known record, recovered from River
Thames, London and inland depositions,
however, I have yet to see one retaining
enamel; this is paradoxical considering
the quantity of other designs with enamel
surviving.
With regard to No. 8, recovered from
South Somerset by an EDMDC member,
a one-piece cast copper-alloy hollowdomed button displaying the profile
mask of reputedly Catherine of Braganza.
Matching buttons bearing the profile
mask of (?)Charles II, were produced,
assumedly to commemorate their
marriage in 1662. The fields on these
particular buttons examined by me, seem
too shallow to support enamel and I have
yet to see an enamelled example. Other
high-relief buttons in this series, but
with different frontal designs, are fairly
ubiquitous though enamelled specimens
appear unrecorded.
The same series of buttons continues
with a more often seen frontal decoration,
variations of floral and foliate like No. 9,
an independent detectorist’s discovery in
Buckinghamshire. Any of the aforesaid
form of button could be linked to a
similar button, thereby possibly acting
as a neck fastener on a cloak. However,
8
costume retaining such a fastener hasn’t
survived therefore remains conjectural.
Ascribed as 17th century, No. 10 is
a white-metal coated cast copper-alloy
hollow-domed two-piece button with
openwork on both the polygonal front
and polygonal flat reverse. The front is
embossed with S-spirals and curvilinear
which form a ten petalled flower; also
perhaps a cloak fastener. Found by me in
South Somerset.
Button No. 11 is cast lead or lead/
tin, solid-domed with a flat reverse,
integral short shank and loop. Depicting
a profile crowned mask left, with I [J] left
and R right, thereby indicating James
VI of Scotland or James I of England.
Whoever, it’s an extremely rare button, I
know of no other example in the known
record. Discovered in Lancashire. PAS
LANCUM-E363F2.
A member of Norwich Detectors
MDC uncovered in West Suffolk No.
12, another rarity, a circular, flat leaden
button frontally embossed with a crowned
profile, bearded bust left, a C between
two pellets left, and R between two pellets
right; representing either Charles I or
Charles II. Surviving on the reverse is a
mould line and an integral circular crosssection stem with a lost loop.
A South Somerset discovery for me, a
fairly ubiquitous type of cast copper-alloy
one-piece circular, flat button ascribed
as 17th century No. 13. The front
has engraved decoration, a clockwise,
hatched four-bladed impeller with a
central punched ring-and-dot motif; a
similar motif is punched between each
blade; all within a linear border. On the
reverse is an integral drilled shank.
Back in 2005, on a South West
Wiltshire site, I found a one-piece lead/tin
circular flat button embossed on the front
with a ridged circle enclosing 56, No. 14.
My research attributed this button to the
(?) 56th (West Essex) Regiment of Foot
1790–1810. As military buttons weren’t
included in my book Metal Buttons c.900
BC – c. AD 1700, this button lay in my
collection until now, when I decided to
include it in this article. Before writing
the blurb, I decided seek an opinion
from Dixon Pickup, a foremost authority
on military buttons; he replied: ‘Thank
you for the images of the 56th Regiment
of Foot pewter button – a remarkable
find. It pertains to the 56th Regiment
of Foot c.1770-c.1781, the regiment
THEN received the additional territorial
title ‘West Essex’, so its usage could
continue into this period but up to
c.1790 at the latest. It was then replaced
by one showing the crown over ‘56’
with attendant laurel sprays. This is an
addition to our knowledge of the early
rank & file buttons’. What a surprise for
me! It just goes to prove, ‘knowledge
unshared is knowledge lost’. The button
shall, I hope, wing its way to Dixon
thereby filling a gap in his collection.
9
13
10
11
12
14
thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2018 55
The final button in this article, No. 15,
is an 18th-century circular example found
by me in South Somerset. We all find
buttons of this period, they are so prolific
it seems fields were actually drilled with
them. So what’s so special about this one?
To some eyes possibly nothing. However,
by being large and made from five pieces
of metal it seems a little different. The
reverse plate is copper-alloy on which
is soldered the usual copper-alloy wire
simple loop (in this case, distorted), while
soldered on the front is a sheet silver
disc, an annulet of white-metal, probably
tombac, and a peripheral sheet silver
annulet; the outer annulet has punched
foliate and small flowers and the disc,
peripheral dashes.
Val discovered this early post-medieval
Read Class N single sharp-hooked clasp,
No. 16, in South Somerset (after Read
2008). Cast from silver in two pieces
soldered together, therefore composite,
it’s gilded, and in the form of a spray
emerging from a three-lobed leaf,
(?) a strawberry; the spray supports a
large circular cross-section ring; three
attachment loops, one on the strawberry
leaf point and one each side of the spray,
were probably for stitching the clasp
to dress. A separate flat cross-section
forward-facing sharp hook with two
15
longitudinal grooves is soldered to the
reverse of the ring. PAS 2003 T109.
Objects like No. 17 occasionally turn
up anywhere; Val found this example
in South West Wiltshire. For years they
have confusingly been described as ‘lace
tags’ or knife ‘scabbard chapes’, however,
research with Richard J Ince at Ince
Umbrellas, London has revealed their
true identity. All are sheet copper-alloy,
varying sizes but quite small, c.10mm
wide and 20mm tall, forming an openended cone with a hollow globular knop
terminal and a small circular hole close
to the open end; this hole may be on
one side only or both sides. A similar
version, instead of a globular knop, has a
flattened terminal pierced with a circular
hole. Both forms are actually umbrella rib
ends or tips ascribed as late 18th - 19th
century. The ones at an umbrella’s rib
ends are ‘tips’ while the others at the top
of an umbrella are ‘top tips’, which are
obviously much larger. The hole/s are
for inserting a metal securing pin. An
umbrella’s ribs were/are organic, either
whalebone or cane and inside No. 17 a
remnant of organic material survives.
Umbrellas fitted with such traditional
components are still made by this firm
and continue in use today, especially in
equestrian events like carriage driving.
A member of YMDC found No. 18 in
South Somerset, an incomplete threedimensional cast copper-alloy pipe
tamper depicting the figure of St George
standing on and lancing the dragon. The
small size of the tamper suggests perhaps
an early date of 17th century though 18th
is possible.
Somewhere in South Wales a Welsh
detectorist discovered No. 19, an early
20th-century die-stamped sheet copperalloy male section of a two-piece clasp.
The front depicts the standing figure of
an oarsman clutching an oar and with
one foot on his skiff. Soldered on the
reverse are a sheet copper-alloy hook and
a copper-alloy wire transverse belt loop.
From near Ripon in North Yorkshire
an independent detectorist found No. 20,
a c.14th- – c.15th-century pilgrim’s
lead ampulla complete with its two
angular stitching-loops. A scallop-shell is
embossed on the front, signifying generic
pilgrimage and not the shrine of St John
of Compostella in Northern Spain; the
reverse is embossed with a heater-shaped
shield emblazoned with a crowned cross,
possibly a purely decorative design – the
cross is not necessarily St George’s whose
shrine lay at Windsor.
16
17
17
18
20
56 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
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Ground hog day…
Stuart Stevens
his an article about one of my best finds
and also one of my dad’s best finds
almost a year later, but at a different site.
I’ve been a detectorist for over 20 years, but
took a break a few years ago and returned at the
beginning of 2017.
I bought a Minelab E-Trac, and my father – who
has the same machine – joined a local club. Many
of the members we knew from years ago.
One sunny Sunday in April 2017 we were on
a local club rally on a permission I’d never been
on before on which I’d been told there had been
hammered and Roman coins found previously.
The three fields had been ploughed and rolled.
In the morning a couple of nice Edward
hammereds and Roman grots were found by
some of the members. I hadn’t found much, just
a few buttons, bits of lead and the usual shotgun
cartridges. The second field again was much
the same.
After lunch, we decided by to try the third field
but about an hour in I’d found little and decided
to head towards the hedge line and make my way
back down the field. Then, all of a sudden, I got
a good signal and expected another bit of lead.
But then I spotted a brown disc in the soil.
Thinking it was probably an old halfpenny
I rubbed the soil away and saw a horse. I’d found
a gold stater! I called to the other members
and told them what I’d found – there were a few
choice words exchanged.
Naturally, we all spent time going
over the area but nothing else
revealed itself.
I took the coin to our local FLO
for it to be identified and recorded
and it turned out to be a continental
Iron Age Gaul American Veneti stater
dating from the 2nd
Century BC.
A year later…
A year later on a grey, wet Sunday
my father and I were again detecting,
but on a different farm, also with
three fields to search. We’d done this
farm a few times before and usually
the odd hammered
or Roman bronze coin turns up.
In the morning I was lucky
enough to find a Henry III penny
in good condition. After lunch
we headed for the field that a few
hammered coins had been found
on previously, but not much was
found apart from the usual bits
of lead and junk.
58 THE SEARCHER JULY 2017 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Then … a call came over the
radio from my dad ... ‘Anglo Saxon
hammered coin!’ Apart from a small
bend in one corner it looked as good
as the day it was made.
Later it was identified as an
Edward the Martyr Saxon penny
dated 975-978 – a very rare coin.
It just goes to show you’ll never
know what you’ll find even on a field
that’s been detected on many times
and it more than makes up for all the
junk you find most of the time!
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thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2018 59
MY 2017 OUTINGS
AND FINDS
Peter D. Spencer
January to June
My first outing on 7 January was on a very
muddy field in East Yorkshire. Digging was
difficult and great lumps of mud sticking
to boots made it hard even to walk. After
a search lasting about four hours all I had
to show for my efforts was a very small
Roman grot.
The next day I attended a meeting of the
Yorkshire Region of the NCMD, after which
a detecting session had been arranged.
It was on a field that had already been
searched by several individuals and there
were many, many filled-in holes. Anything
is better than nothing, so I turned on my
machine and started to crisscross the field.
On three or four occasions I thought I had
unearthed a coin but each find, though round
in shape, turned out to be something else.
After a couple of hours I received a signal
and pushed my spade into the soil with the
intention of digging out a scoop. Just as
I was about to do so I noticed something
on the surface; I thought I recognised it as
a cut halfpenny but decided it couldn’t be.
However, when I bent down and picked it
up I was delighted to discover it actually was
a voided long cross cut halfpenny of Henry III
(Figure 1). How this had been missed
by all the other detectorists I will never
know but it was a welcome and totally
unexpected find.
On 22 January I was out with a colleague
in North Yorkshire. We had visited the site
before and had unearthed some decent finds.
There were two fields, one fairly ‘clean’ but
the other was littered with all manner of
junk. Both fields were hard work but there
were good things in both, provided that you
were patient and spent enough time
on them.
I was eventually rewarded on the worst field
by the discovery of a nice Charles I halfgroat,
which was accompanied later on by a lead
spindle whorl (Figure 2).
The first club outing of 2017 was on 29
January. We were on a field of well-rotted
stubble, which had not been searched before
so hopes were high. During the morning
session I found three Georgian coppers and
a 1944 sixpence but I heard that a few
Roman grots had been unearthed. Shortly
after lunch I was passing Arthur when he
said he had just located two small Roman
coins so I should check the area. Whilst
I was detecting close to Arthur he found
three more bronzes, whilst I unearthed four
cartridge caps! We both laughed when I said
this was typical of my luck. Half an hour later,
well away from Arthur, I unearthed a very
nice denarius of Sabina (Figure 3). Later
on I found a couple of small Roman bronzes,
so this was a really good day out.
It’s always nice to visit a site that has
previously been productive and this was the
case with the club outing on 5 February.
It was a very large field, flat at the bottom
then sloping upwards to another flat area at
the top. Hopes were soon dashed, when it
became apparent that since the last visit the
field had been contaminated by green waste.
Detectorists have spent decades removing
all sorts of metallic rubbish, only for farmers
themselves to contaminate their own fields.
Quite frankly, this baffles me. The bottom
area and the slope were full of rubbish but
reports filtered back that the top was fairly
clean. Therefore, those club members who
had not already left made their way up to the
top. I ended up with a USA dime (pierced)
a better than average Roman bronze and
a cut farthing (Figure 4). The last, being
very small, took some time to locate. I also
found my fourth piece of gold in 20 years of
detecting; it’s a finger ring, which is twisted
out-of-shape and has one setting missing
(Figure 5).
60 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Two things stop a
detectorist getting out:
a lack of land and/or bad
weather. There was plenty
of land available and the
weather was decent at the
start of 2017, so I was out
and about quite regularly.
I’ve seen much better gold finger rings but
this one rounded off an outing that had
started off badly but ended up much better
than I thought it would.
On 19 February my club revisited the
field on which a scattered hoard of Roman
denarii had been found late in 2016
(for more details see the January issue
of The Searcher). I didn’t find a denarius but
I did unearth a decent Elizabeth I sixpence
(Figure 6). This was another unexpected
find and the date, 1563, is one of the rarest
for Elizabeth I. So, in the first four months of
2017 I found four hammered coins, which
set a new record for me. Would the next ten
months be as good? Only time would tell.
March, April and May came and went will
no additions to my hammered silver score.
There were plenty of other odds and ends
but nothing worth reporting.
After a spell of rain I visited a site with a
colleague on 22 June. From my second hole
I took out an Edward VII shilling dated 1907,
which was in nice condition. Even though
shillings of this reign aren’t particularly scarce
this was a first for me. Later on I unearthed
a William and Mary tin farthing (Figure 7).
The condition is very poor but this was
important in two ways: firstly, it is a very
rare coin and secondly it is the oldest coin
ever found on the site. The landowner is
building up a collection of finds to represent
the history of the area, so this farthing will
be a very interesting addition.
Figure 1
Figure 2
Game keepers
July and August
Detectorists who search large estates can’t
help to occasionally (or regularly) come into
contact with gamekeepers. Estates often
hold shoots, during which paying guests
fire their shotguns and hope to bring down
game birds. The cost of a stake (a place to
stand and shoot) can be very expensive; the
money raised can go towards the upkeep of
the estate and anything left over will go to
the landowner. Gamekeepers are responsible
for the rearing of birds and the organisation
of shoots. Shoots are profitable, allowing
detecting clubs onto land usually isn’t.
Therefore, gamekeepers sometimes come
into conflict with detectorists. The former
have been known to say that the latter
frighten birds and in doing so the birds can fly
off the estate, which will be bad for shoots.
After all, if there are no birds to fire at then
the paying guests would want a refund and
won’t come back. One estate I know of used
to have a single shoot each week of the
season but it now holds three. Therefore, the
gamekeeper has informed our site officer
that we are not welcome on the estate until
the season ends in February. It is pointless to
complain, as shoots are a valuable source of
income to estates. All we can do is to accept
the situation and stay as friendly as possible
with gamekeepers.
After the meeting on 2 July of the Yorkshire
Region of the NCMD about 15 detectorists
spent a few hours searching a pasture field.
Someone unearthed a George III sixpence
but my best finds were a George I halfpenny
and a Victorian silver threepence in poor
condition (Figure 8).
Other outings in July and early August
produced nothing of note. However, I faired
better during a club outing on 20 August.
My best coin amongst the eight that
surfaced was a 1936 silver threepence; it
has little wear but there is some damage to
the edge. This was joined by a Russian lead
bag seal, which dates from the late 18th
to early 19th century. I used to find lots of
these (they were presented to a museum)
but this was the first for quite some time
(Figure 9). Another item unearthed that
day was a silver spoon, which is illustrated as
Figure 10. It’s still in poor condition but was
much worse when it came out of the soil. Its
design (the tip of the stem curving upwards
towards the bowl) told me it is pre-George
III. Two sets of initials are cut into the back of
the stem and there are faint hallmarks lower
down. It is George II at the latest and might
be even older.
Figure 3
Someone I hadn’t heard from for quite some
time invited me onto one of his sites on
28 August. Conditions could have been
better (the soil had been roughly dragged)
but I did quite well. My first find of note was
a Wigmund styca, followed by a siliqua of
Julian II (Figure 11). The latter hasn’t much
wear but is oxidised and has two edge chips.
Other finds included a very small thimble
and an Anglo-Saxon pin with a broken shaft
(Figure 12).
September
The Yorkshire Region of the NCMD held
a special outing on 3 September. The
organisers were Barry Williams and Syd
and Beryl Hallam. Amongst the raffle prizes
was an XP Deus Lite, kindly donated by Sue
Austin and the NCMD. 50% of the cash
raised was donated to a blind girl, who is
six years old and in need of an operation
in the USA to improve her sight. The other
50% went to Martin House Hospice. A
very large number of detectorists turned
up for this event, including some I had not
seen for ages. Seven fields were available,
which varied from quite rough to fairly
soft stubble. My first two coins were
Elizabeth I decimals, with which I was a bit
disappointed. However, half way through the
morning I ended up on a field with stubble
that was easy to push through. I soon found
a fragment of silver, which looked Tudor
in date.
Figure 6
Figure 11
Figure 7
Figure 4
Figure 8
Figure 5
Figure 12
Figure 9
Figure 10
thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2018 61
This was a sign that other hammered coins
be lurking in the same field. Half an hour
later I unearthed a cut halfpenny of John; it
has hardly any circulation wear but one edge
has been damaged. During the lunch break
I saw and heard of several other hammered
silver coins. I should have gone back onto
the same field after lunch but tried some
of the others, with no success until it was
almost time to leave. I hadn’t had a signal
for some time so decided to dig one that
sounded dodgy. The target turned out to be
an Elizabeth I halfgroat, which surprised me
(Figure 13). This proves that even dodgy
signals can sometimes lead to something
good. A detectorist found a Victorian half
sovereign and another located a gold brooch.
This doesn’t sound much for an attendance
of well over 100 but I’d guess that at least
60 hammered silver coins were found, so
many of those who attended went home
happy. And, the cash raised went to two very
worthy causes.
The following weekend the Yorkshire
Region had another outing, on an estate
that Barry Williams had gained permission
to search. The field we were on had proved
to be productive in the past, especially near
an old church. As might be expected, most
of those present concentrated on the area
around the church; I did the same but when
nothing turned up I started to move down
the field.
After walking for about 100 metres
I unearthed a Canterbury penny of John.
There is some damage to the edge but the
coin is otherwise in nice condition. Half an
hour later I located another hammered silver
coin, this time a London penny of Edward II
(Figure 14). Most of the hammered coins
I find are not in good condition, so I was very
pleased with these two. Later on I unearthed
a silver finger ring, which has been made
to look like a buckle (Figure 15). Inside the
rather wide hoop are Birmingham hallmarks
for 1913.
On 23 September I was in North
Yorkshire with a colleague. The landowner
came to see us and we handed over a few
items discovered during our previous visit.
My colleague managed to find four Roman
grots; I found only one but I did unearth an
Anglo-Saxon strap end, circa 9th century
in date (Figure 16). The next day I was
detecting near York, on a field on which
the stubble was long and tough in several
places. However, I unearthed a few buttons
and other odds and ends. Shortly before
we knocked off the target of an ‘iffy’ signal
turned out to be an Edward I farthing
(Figure 17); it’s in very good condition and
it was hammered number ten for 2017. And,
the total for September (six) was a record
for a single month.
Confusion
A collector I know used to ring me up quite
often when he wanted advice. On one
occasion he had bought a William I penny,
which had an old paper disc with it. Most
numismatists store their collections in
custom-made cabinets, which have felt
lined recesses to hold coins. Descriptions
are written on paper discs and placed
underneath the coins. When a coin has
previously been in a collection it often
comes with a paper disc. The chap who
had bought the William I penny asked me
if I knew of a collector named Kings. When
I asked why he said besides a description
of the penny, the accompanying paper disc
mentioned Kings 325; he took this to be a
reference to a lot number in an auction sale.
I knew of a Mr King, whose collection was
sold at auction decades since but no-one
named Kings. “Is there any other clue on
the disc as who this collector might be?”
I asked. “Well, there’s his Christian name if
that helps. It’s Norman.” I laughed when I
heard this, as everything became clear. One
of the standard reference works on Norman
pennies is entitled ‘Catalogue of English
Coins in the British Museum, Norman Kings’,
which is often abbreviated to Norman Kings.
Therefore, the reference on the disc was not
to a person but to a book!
Figure 14
Figure 13
Figure 15
Figure 18
Figure 17
Figure 16
62 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
October to December
An outing on 1 October after a Yorkshire
Region meeting was on two fields, both
of which had never been searched before.
After only ten minutes I unearthed a large
copper-alloy ring brooch dating from the late
medieval period (Figure 18). This was a first
for me and I thought that other good finds
might follow on. Unfortunately, a couple
of dozen detectorists managed to find only
a single hammered coin and what might have
been a Bronze Age spearhead.
A club outing on 15 October was on
a large estate, on which we detect a couple
of times each year. Various events are held
there, so lots of decimal coins are found.
In the past a few hammered coins have
turned up but over the years the number
as dwindled. The estate is very up and down
but there is a very large pasture field at the
top end, where club members tend to spend
the most time. I headed up there and pretty
soon started to unearth the usual decimal
coins. My heart leapt as I sifted through
the soil taken from a hole, as I thought
I had spotted a hammered coin. I pulled
a face when I realised it was actually a very
worn William III sixpence, which had been
converted into a love token by bending over
the edge in two places (Figure 19). Around
midday I saw a couple of club members
sitting on a large log about 50 metres
away, so I decided to join them. Half way
there I received a signal in my headphones,
so I turned over a piece of grass and dug
out some soil; to my amazement I saw a
hammered silver coin resting on the small
heap of soil. At first I thought I was a shilling
of Charles I but then realised it was actually
a clipped halfcrown (Figure 20). It’s in
terrible condition but I was very pleased with
it as it was my first ever Charles I halfcrown.
The following Sunday I attended another
club outing, when four stubble fields were
available. The last time we searched them
they had been clean but this time they
were littered with green waste. The estate
manager has banned its use but the ban
came too late to stop the contamination
of several fields. I ended up on the smallest
field, on which the contamination wasn’t
as bad. A 1937 threepence was joined
by a George III halfpenny, which was an
improvement on the bag of junk I had already
unearthed. My next find was a Scottish
hammered silver 20 pence piece (Figure
21). This is in very poor condition but it
brought my hammered silver score up to 12,
which is my highest total since 2005.
On 10 November I was in North Yorkshire
again, on a site that has given up a few
Anglo-Saxon finds. Amongst the artefacts
I found was a small Anglo-Saxon buckle and
a copper-alloy item that could date from the
Viking period (Figure 22). The latter could
have been worn on a finger or have been
used to hold a bunch of hair. One Roman grot
surfaced and what is probably a very worn
shilling of William III countermarked with
a crowned letter I flanked by O and A
(Figure 23). This must have meant
something to the person who made it but
I’ve no idea what it is supposed to be.
During a club outing on 26 November
a few decent milled silver coins were
found, including a very nice Victorian
Gothic florin. My only find of note was an
enamelled Tottenham Hotspur badge, with
the mounting attachment missing from the
reverse (Figure 24). Being unearthed from
a field in West Yorkshire, this was a long way
from home. If there is a Tottenham Hotspur
supporter who would like to add this to their
collection then let me know and I will donate
it to them. I can be contacted via
The Searcher.
A single search session early in December
produced nothing more than a George VI
penny and that was my last outing of 2017.
Figure 19
Statistics for 2017
As I do every year, I’ve put together a set of
statistics relating to my outings and the finds
unearthed during 2017. See below.
Number of outings: 40
Number of holes dug: 2,465
Number of hours detecting: 180
Number of miles walked: 100
Number of coins found: 97
Number of buttons found: 225
Bullet case and cartridge caps: 120
The number of outings and coins found
are accurate but the other figures are only
approximate but within about 5-10%.
As I’ve said on previous occasions, in most
cases ‘holes’ refer to one or two scoops
of soil. Turf and soil are always replaced
carefully and my colleagues take similar care
to ensure minimal ground disturbance.
My figures work out at one coin per
25 holes, one coin per roughly two hours
of detecting, and one coin for each mile
walked. In comparison to some detectorists
I know my statistics aren’t particularly good.
However, I know of many detectorists who
don’t do as well. Though some might not
agree, I’d suggest my figures are average
for the hobby.
I extend my sincere thanks to Andy, Jack,
Kevern and Tony G, all of whom have given
me lifts during 2017. Were it not for them
then I’d have no finds to write about. And, as
I’ve said before, invitations from detectorists
to join them on productive sites will be
gratefully accepted. I live in hope but won’t
hold my breath!
Figure 23
Figure 24
Figure 21
Figure 22
Figure 20
thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2018 63
A N G L O S A X OSEEKERS
N RARITY
SOUTHERN
64
orking full time,
supporting my
wife who has
Fibromyalgia (a condition
that causes pain all over
the body) and having three
school age kids takes a bit
of doing. Trying to combine
those and detecting takes on
a whole other level of juggling
and at times my hobby has
to take a back seat whilst more
important things take priority.
In August 2017 I heard from a
friend that I had missed out on a great
dig in Fontmell Magna, organised by the
Southern Seekers, and asked him to let
me know if they intended to return. Just
before the end of September I heard
that another dig had been arranged,
but it was midweek and he was unable
to go.
Being of a slightly cheeky nature
I decided to chance my luck and asked
my wife if she minded me trying
a midweek dig, and was given the
go-ahead. Great. The dig was booked
and ticking off the days on the
calendar started.
The day soon arrived and I felt rather
weird going detecting when the rest
of the world was going to work
and school.
I’d never been with this group before
and was a little nervous but I needn’t
have worried. Detectorists are, by
and large, a friendly bunch and I was
warmly greeted.
After the dig briefing I started my
Deus, selected my favourite custom
program and off we went. The
morning started slowly and
whilst I saw a few finds coming
up there wasn’t a lot of
activity to indicate
a return to the
‘fantastic field’.
A few artefacts
later and close to
lunchtime I had my
first memorable find,
a non-hallmarked silver
cufflink with one end missing.
After recording the find spot another
target presented itself. I located the
other part of the cufflink.
About 20 minutes later a piece of
Victorian silver jewellery was retrieved
and I was beginning to feel a bit better.
Have you ever noticed how a find can
give energy back to your legs after
a few hours of finding nothing?
The afternoon proceeded as the
morning, but after digging a button
I heard a loud sweet sound in my
headphones. I lifted the soil to find my
first Roman sestertius. A Minelab user
had just passed that way and I don’t
know how he missed it.
The afternoon continued and
I was thinking of heading back to my
car when I heard a quiet, but diggable
signal. The pinpointer indicated a target
square in the middle.
THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
After removing more soil
I found a lovely Saxon diamond
shaped artefact, which made
my day.
I submitted my find to Richard
Henry, the Wiltshire FLO who was
most disappointed that it was found
in Dorset! What I’d unearthed was a
8th to 9th Century Saxon strip brooch
class 31C (WILT-FB2312). My first bit
of Saxon is now pride of place on my
display shelf.
After its return from the FLO I dug
into the history of Saxon strip brooches.
There’s a great online resource from the
British Library. I understand that these
brooches are not common, but over
in the east of the country they turn up
fairly regularly. In Wiltshire and Dorset
where I usually detect, they are as rare
as hen’s teeth.
In conclusion, I’d like to say that,
whilst I found Southern Seekers
to be well run and encourage
recording, some of the online
groups have a bad reputation. Some
of them lend themselves towards
finding the bright shiny objects that
can be worth a little money and can
be advertised that way.
The attendees’ turn up, Hoover
a field clean and leave without
recording finds with the PAS. It’s
a damn shame as not only do
the PAS provide a wonderful
and free identification
service, recording your finds
with them provides a lasting
legacy and over time a vast
amount of information on
our ancient landscape and
the uses that our ancestors
put it to.
FROM TOP LEFT Gordon Johns with his wife;
Gordon’s Anglo Saxon strip brooch; other finds
LEFT Strip brooch example from PAS Database
(HAMP-CEBED) ©PAS
A monthly identification
and valuation guide
for the detectorist,
numismatist
and archaeologist
Address: The postal address for the
Identification and Valuation Desk
is given below. This address is only
for this section of The Searcher.
Please do not send in the finds
themselves, email:
coinidman@yahoo.co.uk
Finder’s address: Please include
a contact address (preferably postal)
when sending in inquiries. We may need
more information about a find
so it is important to include an address
where we can contact you. Names and
addresses are never passed on to any
third party.
Illustrations: In order to provide
accurate identifications and valuations
we need good quality photographs,
scans or drawings to work from. Images
of finds should be posted to us,
as we do not undertake the task
of printing out images from
computer screens.
Dimensions/metal: When sending
in images of finds please provide details
of size and whatever metal things are
made of (if known). Some Roman coins
utilise the same legends and design
for different denominations, so size can
be important.
Speed of inclusion: Much depends
on how many other finds are waiting
to be featured in the Identification
and Valuation Desk. Sometimes items
appear very quickly but if there
is a backlog it may take a little longer.
If you require a speedy response then
say so and we’ll get back to you
as quickly as possible (sometimes
by return of post).
Treasure Act: For those not familiar
with the Act we will give help and
advice about what needs reporting
and how it needs to be reported.
Finds classed as treasure will only
be published if they have been through
or are going through the necessary
procedure.
Identification & Valuation Desk, PO Box
197, Leeds LS18 5WQ
or email: coinidman@yahoo.co.uk
66 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
O
n 15 June
1972 Sotheby
& Co. sold the
Bridgewater
House
collection of
coins, which had been started by
the second Earl of Bridgewater
(1622-86) and added to by later
earls. The collection was made
up of English, Scottish, Irish and
Anglo-American coins and only five
pieces were dated later than 1740.
Amongst the great rarities were two
Cromwell halfcrowns struck in gold,
a Scarborough siege halfcrown, two
Scottish £20 pieces of James VI,
and two Irish Inchiquin money gold
double pistoles (lots 548 and 549),
the latter being the only known
specimens.
One of the double pistoles
realised £13,000 and the other
£13,500, which in 1972 were very
high prices. The following two
lots were gold pistoles, one being
sold for £9,000 and the other for
£9,500. In 1972 only ten pistoles
were known to exist: seven in the
National Museum of Ireland in
Dublin, one in the collection of the
American Numismatic Society and
the two in the Bridgewater House
collection.
In 2000 one of the Bridgewater
House pistoles was sold at auction
by Whyte’s of Dublin and the
hammer price was £100,000. A note
in the sale catalogue mentioned
that there was a specimen in Ulster
Museum, which would be the other
one from the Bridgewater House
collection.
On 25 September 2005 Dix
Noonan Webb sold another gold
pistole (illustrated on this page),
which was reputed to have been
found in a box of brass coin weights;
this raised the total number known
to eleven. The coin achieved a
hammer price of £45,000.
In February of 2006 Spink Coin
Auctions offered up the pistole sold
by Whyte’s of Dublin in 2000. On
this occasion the coin sold
for £67,500.
The pistole sold by Dix
Noonan Webb in 2005
was offered for sale again
by the same auctioneer in
September of 2015. Ten
years after the first sale this
coin achieved a hammer
price of £65,000.
Starting in the 1960s
most series of coins, year
on year, went up in price.
It seemed that this would
continue forever but in
the 1990s the unthinkable
happened: prices dropped,
some quite considerably.
However, after 2000 many
prices started to pick up
again. Hammered gold
coins in particular are far
more expensive today than
they were back in 2000.
Inchiquin gold pistoles
would seem to be an
exception, as the hammer
price achieved in the year
2000 proved to be the
highest ever. The lesson to
be learned from this is just
because a coin has sold for
a high price in the past it
does not necessarily mean it
will sell for the same figure
in the future.
What are the chances of
you finding a gold pistole?
Well, a number of different
dies were used, so thousands
may have been struck.
Detectorists have unearthed
many great rarities in the
past, so it could be just a
matter of time before one
of them discovers a gold
pistole. Therefore, keep
searching and you might
strike it lucky.
Next month: Amongst the
coins will be a penny of
Stephen, two hammered
gold coins, a portrait
type penny of Mary and
a very rare halfpenny of
Robert Bruce of Scotland.
The artefacts will include
a Roman statuette, an
Anglo-Saxon brooch and
a mount and a gold posy
ring. Miss the next issue of
The Searcher and you won’t
see these and many other
interesting detecting finds.
MEDIEVAL. The hammered gold coin pictured
here was unearthed by a detectorist who asked to
be placed on record as Edward of Lincolnshire. He
believed that his find could be a half noble of Henry
V (unearthed from sandy soil) and said this is his first
hammered gold in four years of detecting. When it
surfaced it was very bent and twisted but it has been
straightened out by someone used to doing this type
of work. On the obverse there is a broken annulet on
the side of the ship and a cinquefoil over the shield
being held by the king. In the first quarter of the
reverse there is a broken annulet by the lion’s head.
These characteristics mark out the coin as a series C
STUART. Clive Rasdall of Staffordshire sent in the
coin pictured here. Mr Rasdall said it was unearthed
from Shropshire soil and he would appreciate it if we
could let him have more information about his find.
The coin is a halfcrown of Charles I, which is very
worn, has a V scratched into the obverse and looks
to be slightly clipped. It was struck at the mint in the
Tower of London and had it been a standard type
then in its present condition it would have been worth
£20 at best. However, it isn’t a standard type. There is
an oval shield of arms on the reverse with C R above;
the most important element is the plume between the
C and the R. This halfcrown is an example of Tower
type 2b, which is much more difficult to find than
most others of Charles I. Additionally, the mint mark
on both sides is a plume. There are two mint marks
for the type, plume and rose but plume is the rarer
of the two. The coin will have been struck during
1630 or 1631. The wear, scratch and clipping are all
minus points but this halfcrown is a significant rarity.
Therefore, even though its condition leaves much
to be desired, the coin should still be worth around
£100 to a keen collector of coins of Charles I.
LATE ANGLO-SAXON. This find was unearthed
by Mr P. J. Lewis of Dorset. The photographic
enlargement is very dark but just clear enough
to make out the detail. Mr Lewis said it measures
45mm high and 33mm at it widest point and he
thought it could be a stirrup mount. However, he
asked for more information, including a value. It
is cast in copper-alloy in the shape of a fearsome
face with a suspension loop in the hair. This is a
late Anglo-Saxon stirrup-strap mount and is one of
the best we have ever seen. The standard reference
work on these things is by the late David Williams
and includes all the types known to him at the
publication date (1997). The mount found by Mr
Lewis is catalogued as type A, class 9. Williams
illustrates 14 of the 17 examples known to him (in
1997). Whilst this one is very similar, the face appears
to have a downward-curving moustache with a curl
on each end. The finest two (numbers 159 and 160)
illustrated by Williams do not have this feature,
nor do any of the others. This mount looks to be
intact and in very good condition, so our minimum
valuation figure would be £250 and a keen collector
might be willing to pay even more for it.
London half noble of Henry V. Edward told us that
he reported the coin to his local Finds Liaison Officer
and it was photographed in its ‘as found’ condition.
As he has a 50-50 agreement with the landowner
Edward also requested a valuation. He said he would
never sell the coin but hoped to share its value with
the landowner. The coin looks as if it would grade
good Fine in terms of general wear but it is flat in
places. In its present state of preservation a likely presale auction estimate would be £900-1,000.
A series C London half
noble of Henry V
17th CENTURY + ROMAN. Carol Noakes of Wiltshire
is the detectorist who unearthed these two finds. The
first is a gold posy ring, which was reported under
the Treasure Act but was disclaimed and returned to
the finder. Carol said that the landowner wished to
sell the ring, so a valuation was needed. The images
show the ring in its ‘as found’ condition but it has
now been restored to its original shape by a jeweller.
It has been dated to 1650-1700 and the exterior has
roped decoration all round the hoop. Engraved on
the inside is a posy reading ‘A true friends gift’. It has
an internal diameter slightly larger than 18m and is
1.44 grams in weight. We gave Carol an estimate of
the price it would be likely to achieve were it offered
for sale at auction in good saleroom.
The coin will have been struck
during 1630 or 1631
It has been dated to 16501700 and the exterior has
roped decoration
This mount looks to be intact
and in very good condition
Find number two is a denarius of Vespasian. Were
the full legend visible on the obverse then it would
read IMP CAES VESPASIANVS TR P around the
laureate head of the emperor. On the reverse the
legend reads IVDAEA DEVICTA either side of the
personification of Judaea, represented as a bound
captive beside a palm tree. This and some other
coins celebrate the crushing by Vespasian and his son
Titus of the First Jewish Revolt. In volume I of David
Sear’s Roman Coins and Their Values this denarius type
is listed as number 2262 and is said to have been
struck at Lugdunum during AD 70-71. Sear prices
the type at £550 in VF condition, which suggests it is
very rare. Unfortunately, when Carol reported it with
the Portable Antiquities Scheme she was told it was
a fouree, which is the name given to contemporary
plated copies. On the plus side it is a rarity, so to a
keen collector it should still be worth at least £100.
Sear prices the type at
£550 in VF condition
thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2018 67
TUDOR. These two coins are halfgroats of Henry
VIII and both of them were sent in on the same day.
However, the first was found by Russel Ward and the
second by Richard Higham. Coin number one was
struck at York during the second coinage. The mint
mark is a cross and the initials beside the shield on
the reverse (TW) stand for Thomas Wolsey, who was
Archbishop of York when this coin was struck (152630). In the Standard Catalogue the reference number is
2346. This halfgroat would grade good Fine in terms
of wear but is dark in colour and the flan is bent, so
our price range would be no higher than £60-80.
Our price range would be no
higher than £60-80
Halfgroat number two was also struck during the
second coinage but at Canterbury rather than York. It
has a letter T as the mint mark on both sides, which
dates it to 1526-32. This coin is listed in the Standard
Catalogue as number 2343. The letters W and A
beside the shield on the reverse stand for Archbishop
Warham of Canterbury. The coin is centrally struck
on an almost perfectly round flan and is a really nice
example of this type of halfgroat of Henry VIII.
SCOTTISH. This rather attractive Scottish hammered
silver coin was found in Morayshire by Lewis Stag
on 31 December 2017. Lewis is only 17 years old
but he said he has now been detecting for four years
and absolutely loves the hobby. He initially used a
very cheap machine, which was bought for him as
a Christmas present but after getting a strong dose
of the detecting bug he upgraded to a Garrett Euro
Ace. Lewis used to detect in Hampshire but recently
moved to Scotland and soon managed to gain a few
permissions. The coin featured here is his very first
hammered coin, which he will be reporting to Elgin
Museum. He said he is delighted to hold a coin that
no-one else has held for hundreds of years and looks
forward to more good finds in the future. The coin
is a silver thirty pence piece of James VI of Scotland,
who became James I of England in 1603 on the
death of Elizabeth I. On the obverse, facing right,
is a striking bust of James VI. This is a little unusual
in depicting the king without a crown but gold
SCANDINAVIAN. In the October 2017 issue of The
Searcher we published an extremely rare quarter
pfennig (or quarter penny) of Haakon V Magnusson,
who was Duke of Norway from 1273 to 1299 and
King of Norway from 1299 to 1309. The coin was
found on one of the Shetland Isles by John Wishart,
who works closely with his local museum and the
National Museums of Scotland. This seemed like
a once in a lifetime find but a few weeks after the
quarter pfennig turned up Mr Wishart contacted us
again, to say he had unearthed another incredible
coin. His first find was a coin of Haakon as Duke of
Norway and the latest one is a full penny (shown
enlarged) but it was struck when Haakon had
ascended the throne of Norway. On the obverse is
a crowned head, fairly similar to those found on
English coins of the same period; the legend on this
side reads +hAQVInVS REX nOVE. On the reverse
is a large letter h within the inner circle and a legend
reading +MOnETA BERGEnSIS. The coin is dark in
The coin is
centrally
struck on
an almost
perfectly
round flan
ROMAN. The images of this coin were sent in by
Fred Bason, who said he had not been able to trace
a specimen with the same reverse. Mr Bason’s find
is a denarius of Trajan and has on the obverse a
legend reading IMP CAES NER TRAIAN OPTIM
AVG GERM DAC around the laureate and draped
bust of the emperor. On the reverse is the standing
figure of Virtus (the personification of valour and
bravery) facing right, together with a legend reading
PARTHICO P M TR COS VI P P SPQR. In volume
II of David Sear’s Roman Coins and Their Values
the obverse is listed as number 3140 but with a
different reverse. However, the reverse type is listed
as 353-55 in Roman Imperial Coinage. This, though,
is not particularly unusual as there is a very wide
range of reverse types for Trajan. There are a few
small striking cracks in the edge but this denarius is
otherwise a reasonably good specimen.
On the reverse is
the standing figure
of Virtus
ducats of the third coinage also depicted James with
a bare head. Within the inner circle on the reverse
is a thistle with three heads (the centre one with a
crown above) and the date, 1594. The coin was struck
during the 7th coinage, which commenced in 1594
and ended in 1601; during this coinage Scottish coins
were very close to the sterling standard of England.
Most of the thirty pence pieces of James VI we have
seen have been clipped or have not been in good
condition. The edge is a bit ragged on the lower part
of IACOBVS on the obverse but this coin is otherwise
an exceptionally nice specimen. This being Lewis’s
very first hammered coin he has made a brilliant start
in the Scottish series. Let’s hope that it is joined by
many others over years to come.
n A couple of weeks after finding the Scottish coin
Lewis let us know that he had unearthed a class Xc-f
London penny of Edward I. So, after waiting four
years to locate his first hammered silver coin, number
two turned up only a fortnight later.
This Haakon V penny
from the Bergen mint is a
significant rarity
68 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
This rather attractive
Scottish hammered
silver coin was found in
Morayshire
colour but has minimal signs of circulation. Tragically,
quite a large piece has been lost from the edge. In
June of 2016 a coin catalogued as a Haakon penny, of
a similar type to Mr Wishart’s find but struck at Oslo,
was sold at auction in London. This coin was said to
be in Fine condition but with flan cracks; the presale estimate was £300-500 but on the day the final
hammer price was £1,600. After a prolonged search
we traced a couple of Bergen mint coins of the same
type but with slightly different legends. This Haakon
V penny from the Bergen mint is a significant rarity
and it is great pity that its eye appeal is reduced by
the edge chip. It is made all the more interesting as
it was found on one of the Shetland Isles, just a few
weeks after a quarter penny struck for the same man.
Further research into the period might uncover trade
links between the Shetlands and mainland Norway.
Or, could both coins have been lost by the same
Norwegian, whilst he was visiting distant relatives
living on the Shetland Isles?
MEDIEVAL + EUROPEAN. On page 53 in the
December 2016 issue of The Searcher we featured
a large and heavy Bronze Age gold bracelet, which
had been found by a detectorist nicknamed ‘Jammy
Geoff ’ by his colleagues. The reason for this is
because he seems to be really good at unearthing
outstanding finds; when sold the proceeds are
donated to charity. This month we feature a couple
of his recent finds, both of which are gold coins. The
first is an Edward III quarter noble of London. On
the obverse the legend reads +EDWAR DEI GRAC
REX ANGL D and on the reverse +EXALTABITVR
IN GLORIA. There are pellets around the tressure on
both sides and the reverse has a pellet in the centre
surrounded by four annulets. The characteristics
mentioned point towards this being a coin of the
transitional treaty period, which will have been struck
during 1361. Even though this type was issued over
only a short period it is not particularly rare and
there are many varieties. The coin looks to be in near
VF condition and in this state of preservation similar
quarter nobles usually sell at auction for at least
£500.
Coin number two is a Portuguese 1000 reis of John
V, whose dates are 1706 to 1750. On the obverse is a
crowned shield of arms with 1000 to the left, together
with a legend reading IOANNES V DG P ET ALG
REX. There is a voided Jerusalem cross with roses in
the angles on the reverse and the date (1739) divides
a legend reading IN HOC SIGNO VINCES. The
coin is in VF condition but the flan looks to be a bit
wavy. The catalogue price in VF is $250 and until
fairly recently this worked out at £167. However, the
£ sterling has dropped in value and if the exchange
rate stays the same then the coin would be worth over
£200. This price, though, is for a truly VF specimen
but with the wavy flan this Portuguese 1000 reis would
be likely to sell for a lower figure.
There are pellets
around the tressure on
both sides
GEORGIAN + TUDOR. These two coins were
unearthed by Mr D. M. Barnes, who asked for
valuations and a date for the second one to pass on to
the landowner. The first is a George III half guinea,
which is dated 1785. The reverse has a crown over the
rather complicated coat of arms of the Hanoverian
kings. The reverse is in VF condition but a number
of nicks and scratches show up on the obverse, which
will reduce its value. The date isn’t scarce but this
type turns up less often than the later, spade type half
guineas. In its present state of preservation we’d say
that the coin shouldn’t be worth any less than £300.
The reverse is in
VF condition
Coin number two is a shilling of Elizabeth I. It
belongs to the sixth issue, which was struck between
1582 and 1600. The mint mark at the start of the
obverse and reverse legend is a letter A and this dates
the coin to 1582-84. Most of the Elizabethan shillings
we see are quite worn and it is not unusual for them
to be scratched on the obverse. This one is well above
average. On the obverse the queen’s face is slightly
weak and the mint mark is almost flat but the coin is
otherwise about VF for the issue. The term ‘for issue’
is used when a coin is not necessarily in a certain
grade of preservation but is better than average for
a coin of its type. If offered up at auction in a well
filled saleroom this coin should sell for a figure in
the region of £180.
a Portuguese 1000
reis of John V
The mint mark at the start of the obverse and reverse
legend is a letter A
ROMAN. The denarius pictured here was found by
Alan Carey, who is a member of the Weymouth and
Portland Metal Detecting Club. On the obverse is
a laureate head facing right and a legend reading
CAESAR AVGVSTVS. The reverse has DIVVS IVLIVS
across the centre; above and below is what are meant
to represent the rays of a comet. A coin of a similar
type but with the head facing left is listed as number
1607 in volume I of David Sear’s Roman Coins and Their
Values. On page 319 Sear comments: “The ‘Julian star’
was the comet which appeared in the heavens shortly
after Caesar’s assassination in 44 BC. It was taken as a
sign of the late dictator’s divinity. A restoration of this
type was made during the revolt of Vindex in Gaul.”
Denarii of this type were struck during 19-18 BC and
many sets of dies were used – some of the highest
standard, others of lesser workmanship. The die used
for the obverse of Mr Carey’s find is of a reasonable
standard but the reverse is significantly different
from all the other coins we traced of this type. Firstly,
there should be a pellet in the centre and a space
The denarius
pictured here was
found by Alan Carey
between DIVVS and IVLIVS. Secondly, the comet has
a tail at the top but on this coin it is at the bottom.
We initially thought the coin could be an example of
the revived type struck at the start of the Civil War in
AD 68; however, we traced a specimen and it did not
match Mr Carey’s coin. We checked with the British
Museum, which has several specimens of the type
(including four contemporary plated forgeries), but
none of then were from the same dies. After weighing
up the pros and cons, it would seem that the die used
for the reverse is likely to be unofficial; this being so,
then the same could be said of the obverse die. On the
greatly enlarged images we received there are hints
on the obverse of a base metal core showing through
in a few places, so the coin might not even be solid
silver. However, we can’t be absolutely certain with
just images to work from. Therefore, we advised Mr
Carey to report his find to his local FLO, who can then
arrange for it to be seen and handled by someone who
will then be in a much better position to come up with
a more definite opinion.
thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2018 69
ANGLO-SAXON + ANCIENT BRITISH. These two finds
were sent in by Roger Paul of Hertfordshire. The first
is an Anglo-Saxon silver sceatta, which was struck
during the primary phase and is an example of the
Saroaldo type. On the obverse is a very stylised bust,
and on the reverse is a carefully produced standard
containing a thin cross pommee with three pellets in
each angle. In the Standard Catalogue the type is listed
as number 784. A better Saroaldo sceatta was sold at
auction during 2016 and realised £650, which is a
very high price for this type. However, this specimen
is well struck and attractive, so to a collector it
shouldn’t be worth any less than £300.
Find number two is a base metal contemporary
copy of a quarter stater of the Catuvellauni. On the
obverse are back to back crescents with three lines
topped by a pellet in each of the inner faces. There
is a horse facing right on the reverse, with a box
positioned over -ED below. In Ancient British Coins this
is listed under Addedomaros as the Addedomaros
X Box type (number 2520) and in the Standard
Catalogue it is number 205. Only the top half of two
letters show up but it is not usual for coins of this type
to have all the letters missing. This is a bronze core,
rather than a solid gold example of a very rare type.
Therefore, as a contemporary copy it would be worth
far less than a genuine coin. However, it looks to be
in VF condition and we’ve never heard of a bronze
core of this type, so we wouldn’t expect it to sell for a
figure lower than £150.
This specimen is well struck
and attractive
As a contemporary copy
it would be worth far less
than a genuine coin
ANGO-SAXON. The images of this Anglo-Saxon
penny were sent in by Nathan Storer. It’s an example
of the small flan type, which was struck for Edward
the Confessor between 1048 and 1050. Even though
it is much smaller than the previous and succeeding
types, it is of exactly the same weight. To highlight
the detail and lettering we are showing it enlarged.
On the obverse is a diademed bust facing left and
a legend that reads EDPERD REX. There is a
short voided cross on the reverse but some of the
letters are rather crude, which makes the legend
difficult to read. However, we eventually translated
it as +ALCSIG ON LEI (the letter S is made up of
crescents and wedges and the G is square in form).
With the mint signature reading in this way it could
be assumed to be Leicester; this is not the case,
as the mint is actually Chester. The Anglo-Saxons
name for Chester was Legaceaster, which derives
from the Roman name of ‘Camp of the Legions’.
The moneyer’s name is listed as Alcsige but there
wasn’t enough room on the coin for the final letter
E. The reign, type, mint and moneyer combination
is very rare. We traced only one other specimen but
it was struck from a different set of dies to those used
for this coin. We can’t see any defects and overall
this Edward the Confessor penny looks to be in VF
condition.
The Anglo-Saxons name for Chester was Legaceaster
MEDIEVAL. Found by Kev Johnstone, this gold finger
ring will probably date from the 15th century but
could be as early as the late 14th century. It is very
small in size and Mr Johnstone said it hardly fits
his little finger. The exterior of the hoop has foliate
decoration, which breaks up an engraved inscription.
Five illustrations show different sections of the ring.
The lettering is ornate and as is sometimes the case
it is difficult to interpret. However, someone has
suggested to Mr Johnstone that it might read as decut
en leale, which translate as ‘Do not be disappointed
in my loyalty’. The ring has been reported under the
Treasure Act through the local Finds Liaison Officer
(Angie Bolton). This type of finger ring used to be
very rare indeed but over the last couple of decades a
number of them have been found and reported. This
one looks to be in good condition but it remains to be
seen if a museum will want to add it to its collection.
ANCIENT BRITISH. Kevin Easton has found several
gold coins through his hobby as a detectorist. He sent
in the images of this Ancient British gold stater but it
was unearthed by Kevin’s dad, who also has a number
of gold coins to his credit. On the obverse is a panel
divided in two by a line, with TASCIO in the top
section and RICON in the lower section; behind is a
vertical wreath. On the reverse is a horse ridden by a
warrior holding a sword and a shield; below the horse
is a ring and there should be another symbol in front
of the horse but nothing shows up. This is a stater
of the Catuvellauni and bears the abbreviated name
of Tasciovanos, who ruled between circa 25 BC and
AD 10. In Ancient British Coins the coin is listed as the
Tasciovanos Tascio Ricon type (number 2580) and in
the Standard Catalogue it is number 219. The obverse
is sharp, clear and well struck. Perhaps because a
worn die was used, some of the detail on the reverse
is not clear. This is a distinctive and rare type and
one that is very popular with collectors.
This type of finger ring
used to be very rare
indeed
This is a distinctive
and rare type
70 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
TUDOR + GEORGIAN. Bob Piercy is the detectorist
who unearthed these two finds. The first is an Edward
VI halfgroat of Canterbury. Most halfgroats of this
king bear the old head of his father, Henry VIII,
but this one has Edward’s profile portrait on the
obverse. It has no mint mark on either side. On the
obverse the king’s name reads EDOARD and on
the reverse the mint signature is CAN TON. In the
Standard Catalogue the coin is listed as number 2459.
The obverse is slightly double struck but the bust of
Edward stands out well. There are weak areas on both
sides and a short crack in the edge but the coin is
otherwise in good Fine condition. If bought from a
dealer then this coin would cost at least £450.
Find number two is a copper-alloy seal matrix, with
a double-sided face that swivels round to give two
different impressions. On one side is a classical head
and on the other side a ship, which might be meant
to represent a man-of-war. Above the curve holding
the head/ship is what appears to be a griffin holding
a shield, and over the creature’s head is a suspension
loop. This is unusual in being complete. Lots of parts
from Georgian seal matrices are found by detectorists
but not many that are complete. We’d suggest a date
in the second half of the 18th century for this one.
Even though complete matrices are rare as detecting
finds, they are not particularly scarce and it is not
unusual to see gold and silver examples offered for
sale at relatively low prices. This is a very nice find
but our valuation figure would not be any higher
than £25.
We’ve all heard of the saying that some detecting
finds can be like buses, in that you can wait ages for
one then two turn up at once. In around 15 years
we have feature only one other Edward VI profile
type Canterbury halfgroat but only five days after
the specimen found by Bob Piercy came in Tyndall
Jones of West Sussex sent in another. Sadly, there
was a crack in the edge and as soon as it was touched
a piece fell off (see the illustrations). It is the rarer
variety, with the king’s name reading EDWARD.
Despite the damage, this is a rare coin and Mr Jones
is hoping that the landowner will allow him to add it
to his collection.
ROMAN. There is a very wide range of Roman
finger rings but this one, found by a detectorist who
requested anonymity, is rather unusual. It is large
(roughly 25mm in diameter), made of silver and
with a large raised bezel (slightly oblong in shape)
with very unusual decoration. As is very often the
case with Roman rings, it is slightly oval in shape.
The decoration is in the form of a whorl, which is
similar to but longer than those seen on some early
Anglo-Saxon sceattas. The finder had been in contact
with an expert based at Oxford University, who said:
“This is very interesting indeed. It is a Brancaster
type ring, probably 5th rather than 4th century AD.
The distribution is predominantly Eastern England. I
have not seen a coiled figure like this before, possibly
intended for a snake, but there is something of a
menagerie of creatures amongst them.” In a later
An Edward VI halfgroat
of Canterbury
MEDIEVAL + ANCIENT BRITISH. Here are two more
coins from a group sent in by a detectorist named
Graham. The first is a London groat of Edward IV,
which was struck during the light coinage of this
king’s first reign. On the obverse the mint mark is
a cross fitchee and on the reverse it is a radiant sun.
The only punctuation mark on the obverse is between
REX and ANGLE; on the reverse there is a single
mark (a trefoil) after DEVM. There are trefoils on
all the cusps of the tressure on the obverse but no
marks by the king’s neck. The combination of some
marks and a lack of others add up to this groat being
a rare variety. The coin is a bit weak in places but still
decent enough to grade good Fine, so we’d price it
at £120.
The coin is a
bit weak in
places
We’d suggest a date in the
second half of the 18th
century
Despite the damage,
this is a rare coin
The decoration is in the
form of a whorl
Graham’s second find is an Ancient British quarter
stater. It measures only 13mm but is shown enlarged
to highlight the condition and detail. The design
of the obverse is usually referred to as the ‘three
men in a boat’ type. On the reverse is a thunderbolt
and other symbols in the field. Ancient British Coins
states: “The gold type [of this quarter stater] merges
imperceptivity into the silver type.” This specimen
looks to be made of silver rather than gold. In the
Standard Catalogue this is listed under the Durotriges
as number 398 and in ABC it is the Duro Bird Boat
type (number 2208). The coin is slightly discoloured
but is in VF condition and should be worth £75.
This specimen looks to be made of silver rather than gold
communication the expert said that the ring is Henig
type XV.I and added: “I would hope that your ring
comes to a public collection as part of a permanent
display. Its subject is extraordinary and is certainly
in my mind something of a bridge between what
would be regarded as ‘Roman’ and ‘Anglo-Saxon’
ornament.” The ring has been reported under the
Treasure Act and has been shown to the landowner
and the local Finds Liaison Officer. The final
resting place of a Roman finger ring as unusual and
interesting as this one should be a museum. However,
this will depend on whether or nor a museum
expresses an interest in acquiring it. It’s not unusual
for outstanding finds to be disclaimed, so we shall
have to wait and see what happens to this one.
thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2018 71
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28RCWS4 ...... 11” COIL, REMOTE CONTROL, WS4 HEADPHONES ................. £1,267
22RCWS5 ...... 9” COIL, REMOTE CONTROL, WS5 HEADPHONES ................... £1,289
28RCWS5 ...... 11” COIL, REMOTE CONTROL, WS5 HEADPHONES ................. £1,319
Detector
Cost
28RCWS5
28RCWS4
22RCWS5
22RCWS4
28RC
22RC
28WS5
28WS4
22WS5
22WS4
£1,319.00
£1,267.00
£1,289.00
£1,199.00
£1,033.00
£999.00
£800.00
£719.00
£745.00
£689.00
Deposit
min 10%
£131.90
£126.70
£128.90
£119.90
£103.30
£99.90
£80.00
£71.90
£74.50
£68.90
Balance
6 MONTHS
9 Months
12 months
£1,187.10
£1,140.30
£1,160.10
£1,079.10
£929.70
£899.10
£720.00
£647.10
£670.50
£620.10
£197.85
£190.05
£193.35
£179.85
£154.95
£149.85
£120.00
£107.85
£111.75
£103.35
£131.90
£126.70
£128.90
£119.90
£103.30
£99.90
£80.00
£71.90
£74.50
£68.90
£98.93
£95.03
£96.68
£89.93
£77.48
£74.93
£60.00
£53.93
£55.88
£51.68
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clubactivities
Please email your club news and images of finds to:
info@thesearcher.co.uk or send to The Searcher,
17 Down Road, Merrow, Guildford, Surrey GU1 2PX
Identifications made in this section are supplied
by individual clubs.
Brentwood & District MDC John Morton
Gold coin
1st George III half sovereign –
David Hammond
2nd Henry VIII half penny – John Auld
Artefact
1st Iron Age pin – John Auld
Post 1600
Candleholder –
Mark Malyon
Silver coin
1st Richard I penny – Barry Knee
Eyes only find
Fossils – Roy Sifford
2nd Leeds Railway
button –
Barry Knee
Axe
BSEMDG Graham Tredgett
At our March meeting we had some good finds on the table. The best was a lovely little
axe found by Michael Pickering and also a lovely harness pendant by Mike Bunyard.
Best coin was a nice Lizzie sixpence by Robert Stoute. At our April’s meeting there was
a gold guinea 1666 Charles II found by me with the CTX. Also on show was a nice little
Celtic unit and a lovely Roman key ring. The raffles over the two months raised £154.
Lizzie sixpence
Celtic unit
Harness
pendant
Charles II gold guinea 1666
Roman key ring
Medieval French jetton – David Brooker
Herts & DMDS David Roberts
The May coin section winner was Roger Paul with his lovely Henry VIII groat and
David Brooker’s nice medieval bronze French jetton won the Artefact section. Some
of the other finds include: a bronze Saxon ‘ring and dot strapend submitted by John
Pole, an incomplete Roman Colchester type brooch from David Roberts and Russell
Gerrard’s Bronze Age awl.
Incomplete Roman Colchester type
brooch – David Roberts
Saxon ‘Ring & Dot’ strap-end – John Pole
Henry VIII groat – Roger Paul
Bronze-Age awl – Russell Gerrard
thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2018 75
Derby ARC Bridget Whitehouse
Our club was formed over 40 years ago and in all that time there has never been a
cancelled meeting or dig, then we get to 2018 with many meetings cancelled for one
reason or other. However the show must go on and our competition winners are as
follows:
Artefact
1st 1st C. rosette brooch – Jenny Grace
Coin
1st Fausting sestersius – Jenny Grace
2nd Roman pin with a patterned head –
Rod Furness
2nd Elizabeth I 1/2d 1602 – Karl Swain
Metal Detecting Cumbria
Northumbrian Search Society
Justin Bell
Here are our finds of the month:
Gail Bartley
We’ve had another wonderful amazing
year and meet each week at the Gilesgate
Moor Hotel, Dragonville, Durham, on
Wednesday evening.
We had two free weekend rallies last
year and held charity searches too, the
last being for Candlelighters, a Children’s
Cancer Charity in Yorkshire which raised
a sum of £930. We held our legendary
Christmas social and gave the members a
cracking three course Christmas dinner.
We also have had various talks and
lectures last year, including the visits
from our local FLO, Ben Westwood. We
are looking forward to a visit from some
students who are doing their M.A Degree
in Archaeology at Durham University.
Their project is called Shattering
Perceptions, about the role of Women in
Archaeology through the ages, and the
girls hope that we will be involved in the
displays in the Wolfson Rooms of Durham
University Library.
Post 1600 Coin
1st Queen Christina silver coin 1632 –
1654 – Ian Johnston
Post 1600 Artefact
1st Lancaster
medal 1909 –
Paul Woodburn
1st Good
Attendance Medal
– Tom Scott
Pre 1600 Artefact
1st Seal ring –
Paul Woodburn
2nd Medieval
coin weight –
Justin Bell
2nd Scottish
turner –
Justin Bell
2nd Funf
mark 1914 –
Paul Woodburn
For all information & booking forms email: Coiltothesoilmdc@gmail.com
76 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
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Blackpool MDC Andy Harvey
This month there were plenty of great coins and artefacts presented to the finds table.
We saw artefacts from the Roman and Iron Age era as well as coins from as early as
13th and 14th Century reigns of Alexander III and Edward III. There where even two
hammered coins from Charles I that didn’t make the top two places.
The trophies were awarded at this meeting to the winners of last year’s Blackpool club
members’ competitions ‘Finds of the year 2017’ and ‘Detectorist of the year 2017’. Chris
Gardiner took the Finds of the year award and Dan Wrathall won Detectorist of the year.
The Blackpool MDC meetings are held on the first Thursday of every month hosted
at the Conservative Club in Tyldesley Road, Blackpool. We meet at 7.30pm for 8pm.
Results of last months finds competitions:
Coins pre 1662
1st Alexander III
penny – Phil Holt
2nd Edward III
groat –
Dan Wrathall
Artefacts pre 1500
1st Roman headstud brooch –
Pete Summers
West Kirby MDC Chris Andrews
This month we were extremely pleased to be able to donate £200.00 to the Alder Hey
Children’s Hospital, from a collection by the club members.
Artefact of the Month
1st 1866 seated silver half dollar made
into a button – John Titchen
2nd Iron age Celtic terret ring –
Dan Wrathall
Coins post 1662
1st Queen Victoria groat –
Keith Phillipson
2nd George IV shilling – Geoff Graham
Artefacts post 1500
1st William IV trade weight –
Geoff Graham
2nd 18th Century nutcrackers –
Keith Phillipson
Eyes only finds
1st Fossil – Nigel Meakin
2nd George V silver threepence –
Abbie Edgar
3rd Elizabeth I sixpence – Paul Haberla
3rd 1754 sack seal –
Peter Stephenson
Coin of the Month
1st James II half-crown, gun money –
Jackie Smith
2nd Medieval
pilgrims ampulla –
Lol Moulsdale
Other Interesting
Finds Last Month
Ladies powder
compact, George
II farthing and a
Victorian half crown.
Mid Kent MDC Marian Reader
The meeting in April was a very positive evening with a good crowd. There was
information of some possible new fields available to search and speakers had been
booked for some meetings later in the year. We meet on the second Saturday of the
month at 7.30pm in Maidstone.
Stour Valley S&RC Angela Kernan
The Club had a very successful month
with some interesting finds.
The winners for the month were
as follows:
Winners of the Find of the Month were:
Coins:
Porcupine sceat – David Chambers
Victorian groat – Ray Woodger
Coins
1st Iron Age Celtic
Chute gold stater –
John Slade
2nd Edward I farthing – John Earley
3rd Edward III half groat –
John Hinchcliffe
Victorian shilling – Tim Hare
Artefacts:
Double sided seal 14th Century –
Tim Hare
78 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Artefacts
1st Roman zoomorphic
plate brooch
2nd Century –
John Slade
2nd Anglo Saxon strap
end – John Earley
3rd Anglo Saxon long
brooch 6th Century –
John Hinchcliffe
Dunelme MDC Dan Moralee
The meeting started by the Chairman giving an award to a fellow member for
services on the committee and sadly had to step down from her post. The find of the
month table was laced with a range of finds from a Roman statue head to a range of
hammered coins and other fascinating finds.
Artefact
1st Head
of Roman
statuette –
Peter Peers
Coin
1st King John
silver penny –
Chloe Llewellyn
2nd Viking cheek piece – Pam Duncanson
2nd Henry III
farthing –
Kevin Nicholson
3rd Saxon disc
brooch – Kevin
Nicholson
Essex DS Tony Robson
Here are the winners and pics for the Find of the Month Competition for April:
3rd Henry VIII sovereign penny –
Coin
Nigel Pryor
1st Celtic silver unit Cunobelinus
hunting dog – Ray L’Honore
3rd Henry III cut half –
Richard Bowes
2nd Tudor dagger quillon 16-17th c. –
Liam Argent
3rd Buckle with pin – Ian Holmes
2nd Victoria sovereign, London mint –
Peter Minshall
Artefact
1st Silver cufflink –
Melinda Barham
Brighton & District MDC Graham Amy
The April finds competition was won by Ray Wilson on a non club site with a beautiful
Anglo Saxon sceatta. The best club coin was a hammered found by Gordon Browne.
Dave Southwell won the non club artefact with a 14th century buckle and he also entered
a pot weight and a beautiful Georgian brooch. The Wacky prize also went to Dave
Southwell with a Thunderbirds guided missile.
Non club artefact
14th century buckle – Dave Southwell
Other good finds
Georgian brooch – Dave Southwell
80 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Non club coin
Anglo Saxon sceat –
Ray Wilson
Pot weight – Dave Southwell
East Norfolk MDS Andy Carter
At our April meeting we awarded Dave Clarke the Find of the Year Award for his
amazing Iron Age horse cheekpiece, and the Gold Coin of the Year went to Graham
Davies for his George III spade guinea love token. Winners of our monthly competition
were:
Ancient coin (Celtic & Roman)
1st Severus Alexander base silver
denarius – Geoff Argent
Post-mediaeval coin
(Henry VIII to present day)
1st Henry VIII halfpenny – Matt O’Driscoll
2nd House of Constantine irregular
Gloria Exercitus nummus – Andy Carter
2nd Elizabeth I three-halfpence –
Jimmy Shaul
Later mediaeval coin
(short-cross to Henry VII)
1st Edward IV penny – Andy Carter
Metal artefact (pre-Norman Conquest)
1st Carolingian mount fragment –
Gerry Cook
2nd Edward III half groat – Andy Carter
2nd Enamelled Roman mount fragment –
Geoff Argent
Metal artefact (Post-Norman Conquest)
1st 14th century copper alloy seal
matrix – Andy Carter
2nd Intricate 13th century strapend –
Geoff Argent
Non-metallic or Natural find
1st Flint thumbnail scraper –
Geoff Argent
2nd Pottery assemblage – Geoff Argent
Tony Gregory Award for Best Find of
the Month:
Carolingian mount fragment –
Gerry Cook
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thesearcher.co.uk JULY
2018 81
10 Carlton Road, Worksop, Notts, S80 1PH Sat 9am-5pm
Kendal & DMDC Ian Watedge
The club welcomed the new FLO Lydia Prosser who was formerly based in York and
will be available at meetings for any indentifying of objects found. She’ll also judge
our ‘Display Case’ show in May.
New members are always welcome. To join, you must attend a meeting, as postal
applications do not apply. The club meets
at the, Cross Keys Hotel Milnthorpe on
the last Thursday of each month. 7.30pm
for 8pm start.
Find of the month for April 2018:
Artefact pre 1600
1st Bronze Age axe head – Brian Lambert
Artefact post 1600
1st Lead date plaque – Darren Lindsay
Coins and tokens pre 1662
1st Roman silver
denarius – Ryan Morris
2nd Richard III penny –
Duncan Wappet
Coins and tokens
post 1662
1st Victoria sovereign –
Ryan Morris
2nd Early Medieval dagger pommel –
Ryan Morris
2nd Toy cannon – Neil Irwin
2nd George III sixpence – Lee Skinner
Norwich Detectors Steven Carpenter
The April finds table saw many display tray’s of recent finds, including an intriguing
and rarely found item, a silver hawking vervel which would appear to be attributed to
Sir Henry Bedingfield of Oxburgh Hall, Kings Lynn, a knight of the shire, being privy
councillor to Edward VI and Mary I amongst other various posts. Also, a very fine
Anglo-Saxon backward biting beast brooch.
The monthly awards were:
Find of the Month
Roman votive axe – Bob Kalynuk
Coin of the Month – 1066 to 1485
Gold noble of probably Henry VI –
David Soanes
Artefact of the Month
Incomplete Anglo-Saxon prick spur –
Andy Guy
Coin of the Month – 1485 to Modern
Henry VII sovereign penny –
David Soanes
Coin of the Month – Ancient to 1066
Clodius Albinus denarius – Dave Fox
Tony Gregory Award
Silver hawking vervel inscribed
‘* Sr. Hen. Bedingfield’ ‘of Norfolc’ke’ –
Michael Coggles
82 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Token Award
Collection of three 17th Century trade
tokens – David Soanes
Committee Award
Gold posy ring inscribed “NOT THIS BVT
ME” – Keith Travis
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Yeovil MDC Colin Spiller
Coin Pre:
1694 Magnes Maxium siliqua –
Val Macready
Art pre:
Roman ring – Rodney Smith
Coin Post:
Indian coin – Derek Bradshaw
Art Post:
Silver brooch –
Rose Abbott
Collection:
Gary Turner
Eyes only:
Amonite –
Bob Cooke
Wrexham MDC Paul Murphy
Susie White, Wrexham FLO was on hand to return and take receipt of members finds
which we thank her for.
Amongst the many topics discussed was the noticeable ‘difficulty’ in securing new
permissions for regular Club digs. With our usual haunts now in crop it was agreed
a combined effort (excuse the pun!) from everyone would be needed to help the
fantastic job both Dean and Paul are doing.
FOTM competition winners were:
Coin Pre 1700
Henry III cut quarter – Paul Murphy
Swale S&RC Jack le Breton
May finds competition results:
Coins
1st George II farthing – Alan Bradshaw
Artefact Pre 1700
Celtic woad grinder – Dean Field
2nd Cut quarter penny – David Villanueva
3rd George IV farthing – Alan Bradshaw
Artefacts
1st Ring money – Jacq le Breton
Coin Post 1700
William IV groat 1836 – Paul Murphy
Artefact Post 1700
18th C pipe
tamper –
Dean Field
2nd Medieval composite buckle –
Trevor Heyworth
3rd Copper token – Sid Hallybone
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84 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
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Quakers Acres MDC
Weymouth & Portland MDC
Newton Abbot & District MDC
Graeme Thompson
Due to adverse weather in Feb and March
we missed a few outings and our Feb
find of the month was postponed twice!
We are now back out on the fields of
the North East and enjoying the spring
sunshine.
February Competition Winners
Coin Section
1st Cnut penny – Brian Sanderson
Mike Apps
It was a very busy April meeting with
an excellent attendance to hear Mike
Trevarthen, husband of our FLO, give
a very interesting talk on the excavation
of coin hoards from the Archaeologists
point of view. There were many nice finds
in our monthly competitions and the
results were:
Iain Fraser
A very full finds table this month and
much to choose from, but the top picks
were:
Coins
1st King Charles I
6d – Kimberley Dickinson
Coin of the Month
for April
1st Penny of
Edward the
Confessor –
Clive Smith
2nd Commonwealth
half groat –
Chris Hopwood
2nd Magnus
Maximus siliqua –
Val McRae
2nd Cnut penny – John Pottinger
3rd Cnut penny – Bill Smollett
Artefact Section
1st Edward and Alexandra silver
coronation medal – Lance Todd
Artefacts
1st Pilgrims badge –
Jackie Ellis
3rd James I penny –
Dave Cobb
Artefact of the Month for April
1st Viking/Saxon casket key –
Clive Smith
2nd Casket key – Jackson McMillan
3rd Spindle whorl – Andy Walton
March Competition Winners
Coin Section
1st Henry III Irish penny –
Mark Stansfield
2nd Saxon harness fitting – Ron Howse
2nd Bronze Age axe head – Allan Carey
2nd Georgian
silver cufflinks –
Chris Hopwood
Straight into
Compton rally
2018
600 acres of historically
rich arable land/Roman site
on the Sussex/Hampshire
border.
3 days of Metal detecting.
2nd Licinius I follis – Bill Smollett
3rd Elizabeth I penny –
Jackson McMillan
Artefact Section
1st Roman plate brooch – Bill Smollett
Weekend ticket - £60
Day Ticket - £25
Free camping
3rd Dog head spout – Eric Cole
August bank holiday 24th,
25th, 26th
For bookings and
enquiries email:
Hedgefodder@hotmail.com
2nd Button made from Charles II half
groat – John Ward
3rd Liberty to America clog clasp –
Steve Stoddart
86 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
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thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2018 87
SHRADS Keith Arnold
Competition results were:
Club Sites Coin
1st George IV shilling – Jo Strong
2nd Face mount – Allan Ward
Club Sites Artefact:
1st Masonic seal – Dave Whalley
2nd Annular brooch –
Martyn Weaver
2nd Roman coin – Adrian Kiermasz
3rd Medallion – Sue Hurrell
2nd Tauton token – Nick Keeler
3rd Henry half cut fragment
3rd Silver cufflink –
Chris Goodchild
Any Sites Find:
1st Neolithic hand axe – Tony Brown
3rd John cut
half penny –
Keith Arnold
October 13 th - 14 th
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88 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
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Exhibition Stands of Almost All Metal Detector Manufacturers! - Distributors & Dealers Manufacturers of Accessories (coils, digging tools, clothing, outdoor equipment and many more) Second-Hand Market - Books & Magazine Publishers - Detector Clubs, Forums and Communities
- Archeological Institutions - Diving Schools - Finds Identification Teams
POWERED BY
20-23 September 2018
Kimbo’s Norfolk
Social Metal Detecting
Fun Weekender
Return trip to Spooners Row
On behalf of Wymondham Satellite Rotary Club
In Aid of Haemophilia Society & Star Throwers & Break
N.B. No arrivals before midday on Thursday 20 September.
Tickets
Limited to 300 on a first come first served basis. A donation of £50.00 per
detectorists for whole weekend. NO day tickets available.
Payment
Cheques and postal orders to be made payable to: Kimbo’s Detecting Society.
Send payment: Kim Clarke, 20 Leather Lane, Great Yeldham, Halstead,
Essex. CO9 4JB.
Please remember valid NCMD or FID membership card
NO MEMBERSHIP CARD, NO ENTRY.
Camping/Caravans site available
Facilities
Porto-loo’s, and fresh water on camping site.
21-23 September
The Rodney Cook
Memorial Charity Weekender
Nr Cirencester
400 acres of mainly arable land
Camping available.
Entertainment. Food. Licensed bar
Raffles. Prizes supplied by The Searcher,
Leisure Promotions, XP and Regtons
Supported by and in attendance
The Searcher, Leisure Promotions
XP Metal Detectors
Tickets: £50 for weekend incl. camping and small area to
detect on Friday pm
OR £25 per day ticket Saturday/Sunday
All money raised will go to the
Bath Hospital Cancer Care Unit
Refreshments & Food
Min 300 acres (200 we detected in 2015).
Charity ordinary raffle & Grand raffle
Entertainment
Thursday evening quiz night.
Friday & Saturday: Live music to dance the night away in the open country air,
Campfire
Fully licence bar: Open 4pm - 12am Thursday - Saturday, incl. our own brew Grumpy Old Twat Cider.
es
For info: email
charitydetectingevent@hotmail.com
Trade Stands
CONTACT: Kim Clarke on e-mail mrstiffler@btopenworld.com
thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2018 89
Maidenhead Search Society Andrew Thompson
Buckle
Club member Barry Knight treated us to an interesting talk on Anglo Saxon coins and
artefacts. The finds table was busy this month with the Washington’s scooping most
of the awards. Well done Mick for his winning Elizabeth I shilling, Sue for her silver
thimble and her Keys and Seals theme. Display went to Andrew Thompson. Other
notable finds included part of a Stone Age axe, horse pendant, coin weight, buckle,
strap end, Edward IV groat, Phillip and Mary penny, Elizabeth I sixpence and penny,
George II penny, denarius, Henry penny and a cut half.
George II penny
Elizabeth I 6d
Elizabeth I penny
Horse
pendant
SA axe head
Denarius
Phillip and Mary penny
Elizabeth I shilling
Edward IV groat
Henry penny
Strap end
Silver thimble
Coin weight
Cut half
WRDG Grenville Shuttleworth
The finds of the month Winners were:
Pre 1066:
Artefact:
Joint winner Bronze Age
axe head –
Liz Andrews
Coin:
Severus-Alexander sestertius –
Peter Kurton
1066-1662:
Artefact:
Joint winner
Medieval lead
seal matrix –
Peter Spencer
Other Winners were
1066-1662:
Coin:
John the Blind (Continental) sterling –
Peter Kurton
1662-Modern: Coin:
Victoria gothic florin 1881 –
Peter Andrews
Eyes Only Find. (non-metallic)
Clay pipe – Liz Andrews
Minehead Area Detectorists (MAD) Richard Tarr
Our monthly meeting took place at the Hobby Horse Inn with the usual stalwarts
attending.
Coin of the Month
Artefact of the
Small hoard of
Month
Roman coins –
Full ringing early
Steve Purchase
17th Century
crotal bell –
Lewis Hayes
New members are welcome, and our club meets at 7pm on the first Thursday of every
month at the Hobby Horse pub in Minehead. The local FLO attends our meetings
every other month.
90 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Trowbridge & District MDC David Rees
There were not so many finds on the table but the winner of coin and artefact of the
month went to Rob Whatley with his King John silver, and a Medieval purse bar. Other
finds included 1st C bronze Hod Hill fibula, and an early Ushers Brewery barrel top.
The winner of find of the month was Gordon Johns with an Edward I penny, closely
followed by an Elizabeth I half groat.
FLO Richard Henry who is leaving to take up the post of curator at NMRN in the
Historic Dockyard in Portsmouth was presented with a plaque to thank him for his
work and help during the past five and a half years.
Edward I penny
King John
Elizabeth I half groat
Medieval
purse bar
Ushers Ltd
Trowbridge
barrel top
1st C bronze –
Hod Hill – fibula
Two Dales MDC Paul Tritt
LHSS Charles Atkinson
We are 25 years old! Way back in April 1993 a group of like-minded individuals with
a shared interest got together and formed the TDMDC. 25 years on, the club is still
flourishing with an active and enthusiastic membership. To mark the occasion, each
member was presented with an embroidered 25th anniversary baseball cap which will be
sure to bring them luck when worn on future searches! Thanks to all our members, past
and present, for making the club what it is today and here’s looking forward to our 50th!
The theme night for April’s meeting was ‘jettons’ with quite a number of different
varieties on display. The winners of the find of the month competitions were:
Coin of the month
Richard I penny – Tom Shuttleworth
Artefact of the month
Roman jewelled umbonate brooch –
Adam Peniket
Find of the Month competition winners
were:
Coin of the Month
1st Alfred the
Great penny –
Neil Atkin
Find under 300 years
William IV groat – Tom Shurlock
2nd Septimus Severus denarius –
Ade Hammond
3rd equal Celtic silver unit – Phil Mundin
(1st ever coin)
Saxon sceat – Sid Deaton
Publius Plausius denarius – Sally Shaw
Edward I penny – Ron Teather
Artefact of the Month
1st equal Celtic woad
grinder – Neil Atkin
Saxon cruciform
brooch –
Rob Jones
2nd equal Large crotal
bell – Ade Hammond
Roman fibula brooch –
Sid Deaton
Metal Detectives Group
Want to join us?
The Metal Detectives Group arrange and organise digs and
rallies for enthusiasts in various locations around the south
of England.
Become a member of the Metal Detectives and receive
regular invites to up to three digs each week at various
locations around the south of the UK.
Counties we have held digs in are: Berkshire, Bedfordshire,
Buckinghamshire, Dorset, Hampshire, Hertfordshire, Essex,
Gloucestershire, Norfolk, Northamptonshire, Oxfordshire,
Sussex, Warwickshire, and Worcestershire.
There are many benefits to becoming a full Member
they are:
Our digs are spread across the south as we feel it is
important to explore our country’s cultural heritage.
We try to visit sites that may hold a vast and interesting
history and good finds potential.
92 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Regular digs are held on Wednesdays / Saturdays / Sundays.
We also hold 4-6 detecting weekender events (2-3
detecting days long) each year
Find us on facebook or twitter or email us on
detect@metaldetectives.co.uk or www.metaldetectives.co.uk
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Choose from a selection of our quality Searcher accessories – rucksack £19.95; hoodie (S/M/L) £29.95;
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Available at www.subscribeme.to/thesearcher/additional-products
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thesearcher.co.uk JUNE 2018 9
On 27 March Spink Coin Auctions
sold the first part of the collection
formed over a period of 30 years by
Alan Williams. This phenomenal
collection is made up of nearly
900 Anglo-Saxon, Viking and
Norman coins, most of which are in
outstanding condition. In the first
sale there were 100 Anglo-Saxon
pennies and round halfpennies
and further sales will be held in
the future. A few of the coins that
changed hands are featured on this
page. All the prices quoted are before
the addition of the 20% buyers’
premium and any VAT that may have
been payable. The reference are all to
the Standard Catalogue.
Lot 3, Eadberht Praen of Kent penny
of Canterbury, moneyer Duda, tribrach
on reverse, S. 875A, EF, extremely rare,
found in Buckinghamshire during 1996,
£12,000.
Lot 4, Cuthred of Kent penny of
Canterbury, portrait/cross and wedges
type, moneyer Werheard, S. 877, about
VF, very rare, £5,800.
Lot 8, Archbishops of Canterbury,
Jaenberht with Offa as overlord, S. 882,
edge weak at top, otherwise good VF,
very rare, found near Rochester during
1989, £3,200.
Lot 11, Archbishops of Canterbury,
Wulfred penny, group VI, Baldred type,
moneyer Swetherd, S. 891, good VF,
very rare, £13,000.
Lot 19, Offa of Mercia penny of
London, light coinage, moneyer Lulla,
S. 905, good VF, extremely rare, found
at Northampton 1987-88, £9,000.
Lot 23, Cynethrith (wife of Offa)
penny of Canterbury, light coinage,
moneyer Eoba, S. 910, VF, slight
porosity, very rare, found in Hampshire
during 1991, £4,000.
Lot 26, Coenwulf of Mercia penny of
Canterbury, portrait/cross and wedges
type, moneyer Werheard, S. 915,
almost EF, rare, £7,500.
Lot 33, Coelwulf of Mercia penny,
portrait type, East Anglian mint,
moneyer Wodel, S. 927, tiny edge split,
otherwise EF, extremely rare, £15,000.
Lot 34, Beornwulf of Mercia penny,
group II, East Anglian mint, moneyer
Eadnoth, S. 929, EF, very rare,
£21,000.
Lot 35, Ludicia of Mercia penny,
East Anglian mint, moneyer Werbald,
S. 931, small edge chip and slightly
buckled, otherwise VF and of great
rarity, found in Norfolk during 1994,
£30,000.
Lot 36, Wiglaf of Mercia penny of
London, second reign, moneyer
Raedmund, S. 934, two small edge
chips, buckled, surface cracks both sides,
otherwise good VF, extremely rare, found
in Oxfordshire during 1996, £5,200.
Lot 38, Berhtwulf of Mercia penny of
London, bust type, moneyer Burnwald,
S. 935, minor surface splits, otherwise
good VF and rare, £13,000.
Lot 42, Aethelstan of East Anglia penny,
portrait type, moneyer Eadgar, S. 949,
EF, very rare, £32,000.
Lot 44, Aethelstan of East Anglia penny,
ship type, moneyer Eadgar, S. 952A, VF
and the only known specimen, £48,000.
Lot 45, Aethelweard of East Anglia
penny, with the king’s name reading
AEÐELVVEAED, moneyer Eadmund,
S. 953, EF, very rare with the error in
the king’s name, £7,500.
Lot 48, Ecgberht of Wessex penny
of Rochester, portrait type, moneyer
Dumun, S. 1039, EF, dark toning, very
rare, £8,500.
Lot 50, Aethelwulf of Wessex penny
of Canterbury, portrait type, moneyer
Daegheah, S. 1047, small perforation
in edge, otherwise good VF, £2,300.
Lot 52, Aethelberht of Wessex penny
of Canterbury, floriated cross type,
moneyer Torthmund, S. 1054, edge
chip, otherwise EF, very rare, £8,000.
Lot 56, Alfred of Wessex penny of
London, portrait/monogram type,
moneyer Tilewine, S. 1062, EF, very
rare £21,000.
Lot 57, Alfred of Wessex halfpenny
of Canterbury, two line type, moneyer
Buee, S. 1068, good VF, very rare,
£7,000.
Lot 58, Alfred of Wessex halfpenny of
London, portrait/monogram type, bust
left on obverse, S. 1063, VF, extremely
rare with bust left, £15,000.
Lot 62, Edward the Elder penny,
church tower type, North Western mint,
moneyer Eadmund, S. 1083, EF, toned,
very rare, £27,000.
Lot 69, Eadred halfpenny, two line
type, moneyer Pigelm, S. 1120, surface
slightly rough, obverse good VF, reverse
good Fine, extremely rare, £1,800.
Lot 71, Eadgar halfpenny, portrait/
monogram, S. 1140B, EF, extremely
rare, £9,500.
Lot 74, Aethelred II penny of York, first
small cross type, moneyer Oda, S. 1143,
struck off centre, otherwise EF and very
rare, £3,500.
Lot 81, Aethelred II penny of Milborne
Port, long cross type, moneyer Aethelric,
S. 1151, good VF, the mint extremely
rare, £7,000.
Lot 3
Lot 19
Lot 33
Lot 35
Lot 44
Lot 56
Lot 58
Lot 62
Lot 81
thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2018 95
Now – onwards
Special exhibition: Hoards
West Berkshire Museum
10am – 4pm (Closed
Mondays/Tuesdays) FREE.
www.westberkshireheritage.
org/whats-on
Now – December 2018
Exhibition: Medieval York:
Capital of the North
10am-5pm
www.yorkshiremuseum.org.uk
2 May - onwards
Special exhibition: Still
digging up the past
West Berkshire Museum/
Berkshire Archaeology
Research Group 10am –
4pm (Closed Mondays/
Tuesdays) FREE. www.
westberkshireheritage.org/
whats-on
11 June
Finds ID Day
Potteries Museum & Art
Gallery, Stoke on Trent
10am-3pm Book your
slot on teresa.gilmore@
birminghammuseums.org.uk
13 June
Antiques and coins
Auction. Hartley’s of Ilkley.
Tel: 01943 816363
13-14 June
British Coins Auction. Dix
Noonan Webb, London. Tel:
020 7016 1700
25 June – 11 November
Exhibition: Viking:
Rediscover the legend
(incl: Vale of York, Cuerdale
& the Bedale Hoards)
aagm.co.uk
3-5 July
Coin Auction. Spink &
Son of Southampton Row,
London. Tel: 020 7563 4000
14-15 July
Coins and other
collectables auction.
Lockdales of Ipswich.
Tel: 01473 218588
10-12 August
GO MINELABBING
Crawfords Metal Detectors/
Coil to the Soil MDC. South
Yorkshire. See page 40 for
more info. Call Craig or Joe
on 01724 845608.
24-26 August
Coil to the Soil Weekender
Nr Sleaford, Lincs
£55 camping. For all
information & booking forms
Email. Coiltothesoilmdc@
gmail.com see page 76.
24-26 August
Straight into Compton
Rally 2018
Organised by Hedgefodder.
Nr Chichester, West Sussex
Sponsored by XP Metal
Detectors. See page p86
24-27 August Bank
Holiday weekend rally
Metal Detectives 500
acres of new undetected
land near Oxford. Detecting
only on the 25th and
26th 9am-8pm www.
metaldetectives.co.uk
1 September 2018
EMDR Great Dunmow
Rotary Rally
Location: Adjacent B1256,
Essex 10am. Rotary All Day
Breakfast & Refreshments,
COST: £18 per detectorist
or £20 on the day.
For Tickets and directions
send cheque, SAE, contact
number and email address
to: Barry Clark EMDR,
93 Brain Valley Avenue,
Black Notley, Essex, CM77
8LT. Cheques Payable to:
Dunmow Rotary Club.
5 July
Antiquities only auction.
Bonhams, London. Tel: 020
7468 8226
96 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
1-2 September
Anton Rotary club
Weekender Near Andover
180 acres ploughed and
rolled land 200 limited per
day. Email Mike Walton on
Walton-m1@sky.com
September 15 & 16
DETECTIVAL 2018
Metal Detectives Group
1000 acres of land to search
in the stunning Cotswolds in
Oxfordshire. Tickets available
soon: www.detectival.com
See page 89.
20-23 September
Kimbo’s Norfolk Social
Detecting Fun Charity
Weekender
Wymondham, Norfolk
Limited tickets, pre-booked
tickets only. See ad on p89.
21-23 September
The Rodney Cook
Memorial Charity
Detecting Weekender
Near Cirencester
Trade, camping, £25
day/£50 for wkd
For info: charitydetecting
event@hotmail.com
See ad on p89.
NOT incl.). All proceeds
to Meningitis Research
Foundation.
Call Mike Charles aka Ski on
07502 371074 for further
details.
13-14 October
DETECTORWORLD
Zuidbroek, Netherlands
www.detectorworld.info
See ad on page 81
If you would like your
event included in this
column please email us on:
info@thesearcher.co.uk
or write to: 17 Down
Road, Merrow, Guildford,
Surrey GU1 2PX
the searcher is in no way
whatsoever involved with
the organisation or running
of any events advertised on
this page and cannot be held
responsible for anything that
may occur at the event. All
enquiries and/or complaints
should be made to the
relevant organiser.
29-30 September
South West MDC Annual
Rally Allowenshay,
Somerset Approx 350
acres, a mix of worked land
and pasture. £35 for both
days or £20 per day. 120
places per day (Camping
Exhibition: Medieval York:
Capital of the North Now until December 2018
10am – 5pm
www.yorkshiremuseum.org.uk
Some of Britain’s finest medieval discoveries will go on display at
the Yorkshire Museum next month to tell the story of how the
North of England was ruled from York for a thousand years.
Star objects including the Middleham Jewel, the Escrick Ring and a
Richard III supporters’ Boar Badge will be complemented by the
latest detector finds and brand new research to reveal more
about life in the Capital of the North.
Photo: The Ryther Hoard, AD 1485-1490, photograph by
Anthony Chappel Ross
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thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2018 97
Classified Advertising
01243 545060
www.detecnicks.co.uk
sales@detecnicks.co.uk
Family run and owned
business
Trading since 1979
Multi Line Dealer
Interest Free Credit
Based in Birmingham
Purpose built showroom
Call for the latest second hand
machines and coils
Find us on Facebook & Twitter
Used Detectors
Wolftrax £375.00
Ace 300i Full Warranty - Unused £230.00
AT Pro Warranty to 16/03/20 £525.00
AT Pro 1 Year Warranty £425.00
Trident II (fitted with 12 x 10” DD coil) £300.00
Rapier fitted with 8” Polo coil £225.00
Trident II Si £325.00
Hawkeye £325.00
Multi Kruzer Warranty to 21/02/20 £550.00
Safari Pro £600.00
Gold Monster (Full Manufacturer
Steve Cox
Prompt repair and service
of detectors
UK’s Independent
Minelab Authorised
Service Centre (ASC)
Warranty/non warranty repairs,
Musketeer & Musketeer Advantage,
Sovereign XS & Elite, Explorer S,
XS & SE Range, CTX3030, Excalibur,
E-Trac, Quattro, Safari, X-Terra Range
Tried and tested worldwide,
quality UK manufactured keypads
for all Explorer range
15 years experience of repairing/
servicing detectors
www.metaldetectorrepair.com
MserviceR@virginmedia.com
Tel: 0208 241 4789
warranty) £700.00
Surfmaster PI £325.00
Goldmaxx Power £350.00
U.K. next working day delivery is included where
machines are purchased @ £100+.
Where purchased at less than £100, a £10.00
delivery charge will be applied.
Unless specified otherwise all our used detectors are
covered by our own 3 month warranty.
Used detectors will be supplied with headphones
if requested at the time of purchase.
3 Orchard Crescent, Arundel Road, Fontwell,
West Sussex BN18 0SD
Over 30 years of experience,
knowledge and advice for both the
beginner and the veteran detectorist.
Part EX deals available.
Accessories and books.
Used Detectors and Coils
Call us for an up-to-date list of
secondhand machines and coils.
Interest free credit available.
LP Metal Detecting
Steve Elden
Coins & Antiquities
Based in Norfolk, But will travel
anywhere to buy collections of
Coins & Artefacts, with best prices
paid, I even buy the junk finds.
Unit 18, Orchard Business Park,
Kingsclere, RG20 4SY
Tel: 01635 597975
email: info@leisure-promotions.co.uk
Open 9.30am – 5pm Mon-Sat
www.lpmetaldetecting.com
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CRAWFORDS METAL DETECTORS
USED DETECTORS, ACCESSORIES & SPECIALS LIST
Garrett Seahunter MK2. Mint – reduced
£419
Garrett AT-PRO. International Superb condition
£389
£599
Minelab Gold Monster. Immaculate
Minelab X-Terra 705. Excellent condition
£380
Makro Racer 2. Superb. Low hours use
£379
Nokta Impact. Excellent with very low hrs use
£549
£225
Nokta FORS Core. Early model. Good Condition
Nokta Golden Sense. Mint. Virtually unused.
Very Deep
£695
Whites MX Sport. Superb
£495
Whites M6 Matrix. Mint. Virtually unused
£329
XP Deus 22RC. Mint – unwanted gift
£839
Coils, Coils, Coils!! We have too many used coils to list.
Call us 01724 845608
Unless specified otherwise, all our used
detectors carry a 90 day warranty.
Please note we only take the best quality
trade-ins so you can be sure all models are as
described. This ensures you get a used detector
you can trust and no hassle!
Note used detectors change daily.
Please call for Latest List.
Coiltek Coils for Minelab in stock now
Crawfords are now the Sole UK importer for
Detech Coils and metal Detectors
01724 845608
or visit
www.crawfordsmd.com
PEPSI PIROS
METAL DETECTORS
USED DETECTOR LIST:
Whites BeachHunter 300 very good £360
Golden Mask 3+ near mint
£259
Deus 9”HF coil mint
£240
C-Scope 3MXi Pro mint
£220
Minelab Quattro very good
£190
Detech 15”DD coil for all
Minelab GPX detectors superb
NEL Sharpshooter 5.5” x 9.5”
for Pre 2012 X-Terras new
£99
NEL Tornado 12” x 13” coil for Minelab
Safari, Explorer, E-Trac mint
£89
NEL Sharp for Pre 2012 X-Terras new£79
Coiltek 9.5” x 5.5” coil for
Minelab Safari, Explorer, E-Trac
very good
Professional & Discreet service
Tel: 07899 036250
Email: stevescoins@hotmail.com
£130
£40
10 Carlton Road, Worksop, Notts, S80 1PH
Tel: 01909 476611
www.detectorregister.com
98 THE SEARCHER JULY 2018 twitter.com/TheSearcherMag
Mon-Fri 8.30am-7.30pm Sat 9am-5pm
Classified Advertising
Midland Detector Centre
STAFFORDSHIRE
METAL DETECTORS
LTD
Now Mike Longfield Detectors
Arado 120B. Very good condition..................... £165
C-Scope CS4Pi. Very little used....................... £220
C-Scope 1220XD. Inc Polo coil......................... £250
C-Scope CS6Pi. Near new, with 10” polo coil.. £250
Fisher 1236X2. Pos unused............................. £240
Fisher 1266X. Little used................................... 200
Fisher F75. Looks unused.................................. 400
Garrett AT PRO. Looks unused......................... £435
Goldenmask 2. Little used............................... £230
Laser Rapier Plus. Used once.......................... £250
Laser B1-HP. Little used.................................. £220
Laser Trident 1. Good condition....................... £260
Laser Hawkeye. Very good condition............... £290
Laser B3 Powermax. Good condition............... £200
Laser Rapier. Good condition........................... £235
Macro Racer. Looks unused............................. £295
p78
Minelab E-Trac. Little used.............................. £690
Minelab Safari. Very little used....................... £500
Minelab Explorer SE. With 11” web coil.......... £450
Minelab Explorer II. Good condition................. £360
Minelab Explorer II. Good condition................. £350
Minelab X-Terra 50. Nice condition................... 200
Sand Shark. Looks unused.............................. £195
Tesoro Trident II supreme. Near new............... £345
Tesoro Cibola. Little used................................. £250
Tesoro Vacuero very little used........................ £250
Tesoro Lobo Supertrac. Little used.................. £330
Vista RG 750 V2. Very little used...................... £150
Whites XLT, little used with new coil................ £295
Whites classic III with new coil........................ £160
Whites Classic IDX. Near new.......................... £225
XP Goldmaxx. Very good condition.................. £300
XP Goldmaxx Power. Nice one......................... £320
Huge Quantity of Coils. All Makes and Sizes
Incorporating
PRO-TECTORS COVERS
Loads of Second-hand/Ex Demo Metal
Detectors in stock
Stock changes daily
All Detectors sold with 3 months warranty
With free next working day delivery
ADs
19/1/15
17:20
Page 1
All detectors, coils, headphones, and other
accessories taken in part ex or swapped
For Sale
The Searcher takes no responsibility
for any of the products or services
advertised within these pages.
BOOK, ‘A Complete Guide To Battlefield
Guide To Battlefields of Britain” from 55BC
to 1918AD with O/S colour maps of battle
sites, and formations, 216 packed pages.
£38 incl. P&P. Tel: 07594 687485 anytime.
WHITES SURF dual field, Pulse Induction.
Instruction manual, box, excellent condition.
Bad back forces sale £375 in P&P. Call
01923 777608/07754 236376.
Wanted
FISHER M-SCOPE 1260-X auto ground
reject discriminator. In very good condition
Tel: 01494 725655.
www.staffsmetaldetectors.co.uk
Loads of Detector covers and accessories
available for most detectors
www.pro-tectors.co.uk
Phone Kevin on
01889 564045 or 07796 024042
Friendly help and advice for beginners
E-mail smdetectors@hotmail.com
Open 9am to 7pm Monday to Friday
Saturday 9am to 12pm
Tel: 01676 533274
All warranted for 2 months
83 Station Road, Balsall Common,
Nr. Coventry CV7 7FN
mikelongfield@hotmail.com
This space could be yours!
Colour box advert (like this) for only
£4.50 per column cm depth.
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Will buy single items to full collections
Fair prices paid and discretion assured
Website: www.HallsHammeredCoins.com
Email: Simon@HallsHammeredCoins.com
Mobile: Simon – 07830 019584
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Email: jjrigby@sky.com
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thesearcher.co.uk JULY 2018 99
GO
Wireless WITH YOUR
GARRETT PRO-POINTER!
Coming Soon!
PN: 1142200
• One-Press Syncing to Garrett Z-Lynk wireless receivers.
• Wireless Convenience: Hear both detector and pinpointer alarms
in your headphones, even in noisy environments (beach, high
winds, congested urban areas, organized hunts).
Visit garrett.com for more details.
Regton Ltd.
metal detection specialists Order & Enquiry Hotline: 0121 359 2379
82 Cliveland Street
Birmingham B19 3SN
Garrett_June_single_2018.indd 1
Tel: 0121 359 2379
Email: sales@regton.com
www.regton.com
4/2/2018 1:36:20 PM
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