close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

The Washington Post – May 16, 2018

код для вставкиСкачать
Flat at home: Capitals drop Game 3 to Tampa Bay, 4-2. Sports, D1
ABCDE
Prices may vary in areas outside metropolitan Washington.
Democracy Dies in Darkness
Thunderstorms 78/67 • Tomorrow: Thunderstorms 73/64 B8
M2 V1 V2 V3 V4
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
. $2
N. Korea says U.S.
must halt push on
nuclear weapons
NATION THREATENS TO WALK FROM SUMMIT
Kim also cancels Wednesday meeting with South
BY
A NNA F IFIELD
seoul — North Korea is rapidly
WISSAM NASSAR FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
moving the goal posts for next
month’s summit between leader
Kim Jong Un and President
Trump, saying the United States
must stop insisting it “unilaterally” abandon its nuclear program
and stop talking about a Libyastyle solution to the standoff.
The latest warning, delivered
by former North Korean nuclear
negotiator Kim Gye Gwan on
Wednesday, fits Pyongyang’s wellestablished pattern of raising the
stakes in negotiations by threatening to walk out if it doesn’t get its
way.
This comes just hours after the
North Korean regime cast doubt
on the planned summit by protest-
ing joint air force drills taking
place in South Korea, saying they
were ruining the diplomatic
mood.
If the Trump administration approaches the summit “with sincerity” for improved relations, “it will
receive a deserved response from
us,” Kim Gye Gwan, now vice foreign minister, said in a statement
carried by the North’s official Korean Central News Agency on
Wednesday.
“However, if the U.S. is trying to
drive us into a corner to force our
unilateral nuclear abandonment,
we will no longer be interested in
such dialogue and cannot but reconsider our proceeding to the
DPRK-U.S. summit,” he said, using
the abbreviation for North Korea’s
N. KOREA CONTINUED ON A11
Palestinian medics, trying to evacuate injured protesters in the Gaza Strip, raise their hands Tuesday while walking toward the border
and, on the other side of its fence, a group of Israeli soldiers. The death toll from Monday’s shootings has risen to at least 60.
Assailed at the U.N., Israel and U.S. defend shootings U.S. identifies suspect in
leak of CIA hacking tools
Haley says Israelis used
restraint in Gaza, but
lethal force widely decried
C AROL M ORELLO,
L OVEDAY M ORRIS
AND K AREN D E Y OUNG
BY
Israel and the United States
came under harsh, global criticism Tuesday as both countries
defended Israel’s use of live ammunition against Palestinians
protesting at the Gaza border.
The Palestinian death toll from
the Monday shootings rose to at
least 60, while the United Nations
put the overall tally in six weeks
of escalating tension at 112.
“Lethal force may only be used
as a measure of last, not first,
resort and only when there is an
immediate threat to life or serious injury,” U.N. human rights
spokesman Rupert Colville told
reporters in Geneva. An attempt
to approach or cross a border
fence was “not sufficient
grounds,” he said.
Thousands have been wounded, Colville said. “Enough is
enough.”
Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, told an
emergency meeting of the Security Council that Israel had acted
with restraint. She dismissed suggestions that the violence was
A surprise, data-driven
return of the repo man
As auto loan delinquency
rates soar, agents turn to
technology to find targets
BY
T ODD C . F RANKEL
cleveland — The computer in
the spotter car shouted “Hide!”
and repo agent Derek Lewis
knew that meant to keep driving
like nothing happened. He’d just
found another wanted vehicle.
He was about to ruin someone’s
day. Best not to draw attention.
It helped that he wasn’t in a
tow truck, the stereotypical image of a repo man. Lewis drove a
beat-up Ford Crown Victoria sedan. It had four small cameras
mounted on the trunk and a
laptop bolted to the dash. The
high-speed cameras captured every passing license plate. The
computer contained a growing
list of hundreds of thousands of
vehicles with seriously late loans.
The system could spot a repossession in an instant. Even better, it
could keep tabs on a car long
before the loan went bad.
Now, Lewis had a live hit in a
parking lot. He glanced at his
laptop. The plate matched a blue
2006 BMW 325xi. He twisted in
his seat. “It’s right there,” he said.
Technology has made the repo
man ruthlessly efficient, allowing
this familiar angel of financial
calamity to capitalize on a dark
corner of the United States’
strong economy: the soaring
related to the opening of the U.S.
Embassy in Jerusalem, and said
that Hamas, backed by Iran, had
urged protesters to burst through
the fence separating Israel from
the Gaza enclave.
“I ask my colleagues here in the
Security Council: Who among us
would accept this type of activity
on your border?” Haley said. “No
one would. No country in this
chamber would act with more
restraint than Israel has.”
But the actions of Israeli troops
and the refusal by the United
States to even express regret for
the loss of life have left both
countries isolated amid growing
condemnations that Israel used
excessive force against the protesters, most of whom were un-
armed.
Crowds at the border were thin
Tuesday. Gunfire rang out over
Gaza City as rounds were fired
during funeral processions for
Monday’s
dead.
Residents
planned further protests as they
prepared to mark the anniversary
of Israel’s founding, known to
Palestinians as the Nakba, or
Catastrophe. More than twothirds of Gaza’s population of
nearly 2 million is descended
from refugees who were displaced at the time of Israel’s
creation 70 years ago.
Israel has blockaded Gaza
ISRAEL CONTINUED ON A12
Gaza mourns: The death toll from
demonstrations rises to 60. A13
BY
And about
that white suit
Wolfe understood
that odd was far
more intriguing
than cool. C1
FRANK MICELOTTA/GETTY IMAGES
REPO CONTINUED ON A6
ALLISON SHELLEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Going with God A longtime tour organizer
seeks to portray the nation’s capital through
his group’s conservative Christian lens. B1
Primary elections Voters in Pennsylvania,
Nebraska, Idaho and Oregon chose candidates
to set up important November races. A4
A study of veterans
suggested more men
with low-risk prostate
cancer are opting for tumor surveillance. A2
Judges offered few
clues on whether they
would allow President
Trump to end the
Deferred Action for
Childhood Arrivals
program. A3
The Trump administration dissolved a federal advisory panel on
climate change over
concerns it did not have
enough industry representatives. A3
Gina Haspel appears
to have secured enough
Senate votes to be confirmed as the country’s
next CIA director. A6
The Defense Department is evaluating military installations for
suitability to hold immigrant children. A7
A federal judge refused
to toss charges against
Paul Manafort, rejecting
claims that Robert S.
Mueller III exceeded his
authority. A14
billion fake accounts
and millions of pieces of
violent or obscene content in the first three
months of 2018. A16
Top Democrats
slammed President
Trump’s decision to
rescue the Chinese firm
ZTE, saying it lied about
breaking U.S. law. A17
THE WORLD
The chief diplomat of
the European Union
took a defiant stance to
try to salvage the Iran
nuclear deal. A11
THE ECONOMY
After an outcry, drugmakers abandoned an
effort to triple the price
of a cancer pill. A15
Facebook said it removed more than half a
The U.S. government has identified a suspect in the leak last
year of a large portion of the CIA’s
computer hacking arsenal, the
cyber-tools the agency had used
to conduct espionage operations
overseas, according to interviews
and public documents.
But despite months of investigation, prosecutors have been
unable to bring charges against
the man, who is a former CIA
employee being held in a Manhattan jail on unrelated charges.
Joshua Adam Schulte, who
worked for a CIA group that
designs computer code to spy on
foreign adversaries, is believed to
have provided the agency’s topsecret information to WikiLeaks,
federal prosecutors acknowledged in a hearing in January.
The anti-secrecy group published
the code under the label “Vault 7”
in March 2017.
It was one of the most significant leaks in the CIA’s history,
exposing secret cyberweapons
and spying techniques that might
be used against the United States,
according to current and former
intelligence officials. Some argued that the Vault 7 disclosures
could cause more damage to
American intelligence efforts
CIA CONTINUED ON A2
A writer who captured the
extravagance of his times
An appreciation
How Tom Wolfe
saved American
fiction by getting
writers out from
behind desks. C1
THE NATION
S HANE H ARRIS
TOM WOLFE 1930-2018
Tom Wolfe in
Manhattan at
the 2005 Tribeca
Film Festival.
The champion
of “New
Journalism”
died Monday at
88. His career
included a stint
reporting for
The Washington
Post.
In THE NEWS
BY
METRO
A former Obama administration official has
launched a Democratic
challenge to Washington’s nonvoting repre-
M ATT S CHUDEL
The birth of the literary
movement known as “New
Journalism” can be traced to
one coffee-fueled episode in
1963: Tom Wolfe’s all-nighter.
He had been sent to California
by Esquire magazine to report
on a gathering of custom-car
designers and casually cool
teenagers.
Photos of lacquer-painted
cars were laid out on the pages
and the magazine was about to
go to press, but Mr. Wolfe wasn’t
able to complete his first assignment for Esquire. Finally, managing editor Byron Dobell told
him to write up his notes as a
memo, which the editors would
shape into a story.
sentative in Congress. B1
Legal sports betting
may come to the Washington area after a
Supreme Court ruling,
but local lawmakers
weren’t sure when. B1
The D.C. Council
introduced a proposal to
tax ride-hailing trips at
a higher rate than that
sought by Mayor Muriel
E. Bowser (D). B1
Baltimore Police
Commissioner Darryl
De Sousa, who faces
tax charges, resigned. B5
SPORTS
The Phoenix Suns
posted the worst record
in the NBA during the
regular season and
earned the No. 1 pick in
the draft lottery. D6
Mr. Wolfe began typing at
8 p.m.
“I wrapped up the memorandum about 6:15 a.m.,” he later
wrote, “and by this time it was
49 pages long. I took it over to
Esquire as soon as they opened
up, about 9:30 a.m. About 4 p.m.
I got a call from Byron Dobell.
He told me they were striking
out the ‘Dear Byron’ at the top of
the memorandum and running
the rest of it in the magazine.”
The story, “There Goes (Varoom! Varoom!) That Kandy
Kolored (Thphhhhhh!) Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby,” was
more than a dutiful report on
the car convention. Mr. Wolfe
had discovered an underground
culture among the West Coast
WOLFE CONTINUED ON A8
Inside
FOOD
Easy-peasy pasta
It’s a great dinner option
when you don’t want to
put in a lot of work. E1
SPORTS
Celtics up 2-0
LeBron James scores 42,
but it’s not enough for
Cavs in 107-94 loss. D1
BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A15
COMICS........................................C7
OPINION PAGES..........................A19
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B6
TELEVISION..................................C5
WORLD NEWS ............................ A10
CONTENT © 2018
The Washington Post / Year 141, No. 162
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
4 1 9 2
A2
EZ
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
President Trump welcomes Uzbekistan’s President
Shavkat Mirziyoyev to the White House. For developments,
visit washingtonpost.com/politics.
8:10 a.m.
A scheduled spacewalk by NASA astronauts Ricky Arnold
and Drew Feustel takes place to perform maintenance on
the International Space Station. For developments, visit
washingtonpost.com/national.
8:30 a.m.
The Commerce Department issues housing starts for
April, which are expected to come in with a 1.325 million
annualized rate, slightly up from March’s 1.319 million.
Visit washingtonpost.com/business for details.
7:05 p.m.
The Washington Nationals host the New York Yankees at
Nationals Park. Follow the game at postsports.com.
KLMNO
NEWSPAPER DELIVERY
For home delivery comments
or concerns contact us at
washingtonpost.com/subscriberservices or
send us an email at
homedelivery@washpost.com or call
202-334-6100 or 800-477-4679
TO SUBSCRIBE
800-753-POST (7678)
TO ADVERTISE
washingtonpost.com/mediakit
Classified: 202-334-6200
Display: 202-334-7642
MAIN PHONE NUMBER
202-334-6000
TO REACH THE NEWSROOM
Metro: 202-334-7300;
metro@washpost.com
National: 202-334-7410;
national@washpost.com
Business: 202-334-7320;
business@washpost.com
Sports: 202-334-7350;
sports@washpost.com
Reader Advocate: 202-334-7582;
readers@washpost.com
TO REACH THE OPINION PAGES
Letters to the editor:
letters@washpost.com or call
202-334-6215
Opinion:
oped@washpost.com
Published daily (ISSN 0190-8286).
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
The Washington Post, 1301 K St. NW, Washington,
D.C. 20071.
Periodicals postage paid in Washington, D.C., and
additional mailing office.
Washington Post
iPad app
We bring you a
richly designed
reading
experience — a
replica of the
printed
newspaper,
along with a 14day archive, more than 40 comic
strips, all Post blogs and real-time
social media. The app gives you
video, photo galleries, new search
functionality and offline reading.
Find it in the App Store.
ADVERTISEMENT
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks at New
York University’s 186th commencement at Yankee
Stadium. Visit washingtonpost.com/national for updates.
Tonight @ 6:30pm
CO R R ECTI O N S
A May 15 correction about a
House of the Week feature in the
Real Estate section misstated the
article’s publication date. It was
May 12, not April 12.
A May 15 A-section article about
a former Chipotle manager
awarded nearly $8 million by a
jury in her lawsuit over an alleged
wrongful termination misstated
the amount she was accused of
stealing. According to court
documents in her suit against the
restaurant chain, the amount was
$636, not $626.
The Five Myths feature in the
May 13 Outlook section, about
Britain’s royal family, incorrectly
said that the crown updated the
rules of succession. The crown
supported the update, but the
rules were changed by the
legislatures of several nations of
the Commonwealth.
A May 12 A-section article about
a Hawaiian geothermal plant that
is threatened by volcanic activity
incorrectly said the chemical
pentane is used to power wind
turbines. It is used to help drive
steam turbines.
A headline on a May 12
A-section article about the
disproportionate impact on
blacks of Michigan Republicans’
plan to impose work
requirements on some
government health insurance
recipients misidentified the
federal program involved. It is
Medicaid, not Medicare.
The Washington Post is committed to
correcting errors that appear in the
newspaper. Those interested in
contacting the paper for that purpose
can:
Email: corrections@washpost.com.
Call: 202-334-6000, and ask to be
connected to the desk involved —
National, Foreign, Metro, Style, Sports,
Business or any of the weekly sections.
Comments can be directed to The
Post’s reader advocate, who can be
reached at 202-334-7582 or
readers@washpost.com.
Call today to connect with a
SENIOR LIVING ADVISOR
INDEPENDENT LIVING • ASSISTED LIVING • MEMORY CARE
LOCAL KNOWLEDGE — Our Advisors have the local knowledge
to hand-pick communities in your area
SIMPLIFY — Your dedicated Advisor will simplify your
search & help schedule tours
UNDERSTAND YOUR OPTIONS — Learn the different types
of senior care available
MORE THAN HALF of our Advisors have helped a loved one
transition into senior care
SUPPORT — Our team is happy to provide additional
support from movers to attorneys and much more
A Place for Mom has helped over a million families find senior living solutions
that meet their unique needs. Our Advisors are trusted, local experts who
can help you understand your options.
There’s no cost to you!
DC (202) 798-7723
MD (301) 264-8376
VA (703) 570-5963
! We’re paid by our partner communities
Joan Lunden, former host of Good Morning America
and senior living advocate.
MAY 16 , 2018
CIA FROM A1
All day
VS
. WEDNESDAY,
CIA suspect held on unrelated charges
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
All day
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
than those by former National
Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden. He revealed extraordinary details about the capabilities of the United States to
spy on computers and phones
around the world, but the Vault 7
leaks showed how such spying is
actually done, the current and
former officials argued.
Schulte’s connection to the
leak investigation has not been
previously reported.
Federal authorities searched
Schulte’s apartment in New York
last year and obtained personal
computer equipment, notebooks
and handwritten notes, according to a copy of the search warrant reviewed by The Washington
Post. But that failed to provide
the evidence that prosecutors
needed to indict Schulte with
illegally giving the information to
WikiLeaks.
A government prosecutor disagreed with what he called the
“characterization” by Schulte’s attorney that “those search warrants haven’t yielded anything
that is consistent with [Schulte’s]
involvement in that disclosure.”
But the prosecutor, Matthew Laroche, an assistant U.S. attorney
in the Southern District of New
York, said that the government
has not brought an indictment,
that the investigation “is ongoing” and that Schulte “remains
a target of that investigation,”
according to a court transcript of
the Jan. 8 hearing that escaped
public notice at the time.
Part of that investigation, Laroche said, was analyzing whether a technology known as Tor,
which allows Internet users to
hide their location, “was used in
transmitting classified information.”
In other hearings in Schulte’s
case, prosecutors have alleged
that he used Tor at his New York
apartment, but they have provided no evidence that he did so to
disclose classified information.
Schulte’s attorneys have said that
Tor is used for all kinds of communications and have maintained that he played no role in
the Vault 7 leaks.
Schulte is in a Manhattan jail
on charges of possessing, receiving and transporting child pornography, according to an indictment filed in September. He has
pleaded not guilty.
A former federal prosecutor
who is not connected to the case
said that it is not unusual to hold
a suspect in one crime on unrelated charges and that the months
Schulte has spent in jail do not
necessarily mean the government’s case has hit a wall. The
LUKE SHARRETT/BLOOMBERG NEWS
A CIA recruiting table at the Special Operations Forces Industry Conference in Tampa in 2016.
former prosecutor, who spoke on
the condition of anonymity to
discuss an open investigation,
also said that if government lawyers acknowledged in a public
hearing that Schulte was a target,
they probably suspect he acted
alone.
In documents, prosecutors allege that they found a large cache
of child pornography on a server
that was maintained by Schulte.
But he has argued that anywhere
from 50 to 100 people had access
to that server, which Schulte, now
29, designed several years ago to
share movies and other digital
files.
Schulte worked in the CIA’s
Engineering
Development
Group, which produced the computer code, according to people
with knowledge of his employment history as well as the
group’s role in developing cyberweapons.
At the time of the leak, people
who had worked with that group
said that suspicion had mainly
focused on contractors, not fulltime CIA employees such as
Schulte. It is not clear whether
the government is pursuing contractors as part of the leak investigation, but prosecutors have
not mentioned anyone other
than Schulte in court proceedings.
Schulte, who also worked for
the NSA before joining the CIA,
left the intelligence community
in 2016 and took a job in the
private sector, according to a
lengthy statement he wrote that
was reviewed by The Post.
Some intelligence
officials argue that the
Vault 7 disclosures
could cause more
damage to American
intelligence efforts than
those by former
National Security
Agency contractor
Edward Snowden.
The CIA declined to comment.
Schulte said in the statement
that he joined the intelligence
community to fulfill what he saw
as a patriotic duty to respond to
the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.
Schulte also claimed that he
reported “incompetent management and bureaucracy” at the
CIA to that agency’s inspector
general as well as a congressional
oversight committee. That painted him as a disgruntled employee, he said, and when he left
the CIA in 2016, suspicion fell
upon him as “the only one to have
recently departed [the CIA engineering group] on poor terms,”
Schulte wrote.
Schulte said he had also been
planning a vacation with his
brother to Cancun, Mexico,
which may have given the appearance that he was trying to
flee the country.
“Due to these unfortunate coincidences the FBI ultimately
made the snap judgment that I
was guilty of the leaks and targeted me,” Schulte said.
Schulte, who has launched a
Web page to raise money for his
defense and post articles critical
of the criminal-justice system,
claims that he initially provided
assistance to the FBI’s investigation. Following the search of his
apartment in March 2017, prosecutors waited six months to
bring the child pornography
charges.
shane.harris@washpost.com
Ellen Nakashima contributed to this
report.
More men wait to treat low-risk prostate cancer
BY
L AURIE M C G INLEY
American doctors are successfully persuading increasing numbers of men with low-risk prostate cancer to reject immediate
surgery and radiation in favor of
surveillance, a trend that is sparing men’s sexual health without
increasing their risk of death.
The latest evidence that more
men are postponing aggressive
therapy unless their symptoms
worsen came in a large study
published Tuesday that involved
more than 125,000 veterans diagnosed with nonaggressive prostate cancer between 2005 and
2015. Researchers reviewed the
former servicemen’s medical records and found that in 2005, only
27 percent of men under 65 chose
to forgo immediate therapy and
instead signed up for “watchful
waiting” or “active surveillance” to keep track of their tumors. By 2015, the situation had
flipped — 72 percent rejected
immediate surgery or radiation
in favor of such monitoring. The
data for men older than 65 was
similar.
The study, which appeared in
JAMA, was conducted by researchers at the New York University School of Medicine and the
Manhattan campus of the De-
partment of Veterans Affairs New
York Harbor Healthcare System.
The data came from throughout
the country.
“I think it’s hugely important,”
said Otis Brawley, chief medical
officer of the American Cancer
Society, who was not involved in
the study. “Remember that until
2010, a man diagnosed with prostate cancer was told to get your
prostate out, next week at the
latest.”
The movement away from aggressive early action has gained
momentum as doctors, researchers and patients have increasingly recognized the potential harms
that can occur in overtreating
malignancies that may never
pose a threat.
“As we got better at early detection, we found more cancers,”
including ones that grew slowly
or not at all, said William Nelson,
director of the Sidney Kimmel
Comprehensive Cancer Center at
Johns Hopkins. “Then the greatest threat to the poor man was our
attempt to help him with radiation and surgery.” Those treatments can cause incontinence
and sexual dysfunction, he said.
In addition, studies from the
United States and Europe in recent years have shown that holding off on treatment for nonag-
gressive prostate cancer does not
result in higher death rates. Similar research is underway in very
early-stage breast cancer — sometimes called Stage 0 — to see
whether active surveillance is a
safe alternative to immediate surgery and radiation.
Brawley, who has long warned
about the dangers of overtreatment of prostate and breast cancer, said the study shows efforts
are paying off to convince patients that not all cancers pose the
same level of danger. And he said
the study is a leading indicator of
where the rest of the country is
going; he estimated that about
half of non-VA patients with the
same type of malignancies are
now rejecting immediate treatment and the number is growing
quickly.
“The VA is the tip of the spear,”
he added. “Five years from now,
the whole country will be at
70 percent.”
Stacy Loeb, an assistant professor of urology at NYU School of
Medicine and Manhattan VA who
led the study of veterans, said the
shift to surveillance represents “a
historic reversal, at least at the
VA, in the decades-long overtreatment of men with prostate cancers least likely to cause harm,
and brings their care more in line
with the latest best-practice
guidelines.” Those guidelines include recommendations by
the American Urological Association and the American Society of
Clinical Oncology.
Most of the increase in the
monitoring-only arm, Loeb said,
occurred in a category called “active surveillance,” in which men
are subjected to more rigorous
monitoring and testing than
those engaged in “watchful waiting.” While 4 percent of men
chose active surveillance in 2005,
39 percent selected it in 2015, the
researchers found.
Loeb said as many as twothirds of men with low-risk malignancies treated in private medical practices are undergoing aggressive early treatment. She sug-
gested that one reason VA may be
adhering to national guidelines at
a higher rate is its lack of financial
incentives for salaried physicians
to recommend expensive feefor-service procedures. In addition, VA facilities often are affiliated with academic medical centers, which are faster to adopt
new approaches.
Jonathan Simons, president
and chief executive of the Prostate Cancer Foundation, which
helped fund the study, said that
while the VA medical system has
some problems, when it comes to
the “No. 1 cancer of veterans,
prostate cancer, the outcomes are
better in VA hospitals than in the
rest of American medicine.”
Active surveillance is not for all
prostate-cancer patients. It isn’t
recommended for men with higher-risk prostate cancer or those
with genetic defects such as a
BRCA mutation, which can increase the chance of having more
aggressive cancer.
Clark Howard, an Atlanta resident who writes and does a radio
show on consumer issues, was
one of the earliest patients to opt
for active surveillance rather
than aggressive treatment. He
was diagnosed with low-risk
prostate cancer at age 53 in 2009,
and his doctors pressed him to
immediately schedule an operation. He refused.
“My wife thought I was crazy
and burst into tears,” he said. “I
have never seen her scream and
weep like that. She was so mad.”
As part of the monitoring of his
cancer, Howard gets PSA (prostate-specific antigen) tests twice a
year and biopsies every other
year. He also has had two MRIbased tests. His cancer hasn’t
worsened; if it does, he says, he’ll
get treatment then. “So many
people are conditioned that cancer must be treated aggressively
and immediately and if you don’t,
you are going to die,” he said.
laurie.mcginley@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/to-your-health
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
RE
Politics & the Nation
Appeals
court hears
arguments
on DACA
BY
M ATT Z APOTOSKY
A federal appeals court panel
on Tuesday questioned the government’s rationale for terminating a program that offered a reprieve from deportation to immigrants who came to the United
States illegally as children, with
one judge inquiring whether officials had yet considered re-justifying the decision to make it more
legally sound.
The three-judge panel with the
U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th
Circuit is the first appellate court
to hear oral arguments on whether the Trump administration’s decision to end the Deferred Action
for Childhood Arrivals program,
commonly known as DACA, can
pass legal muster.
The judges — two appointed by
President Barack Obama and one
by President Bill Clinton — asked
skeptical questions of both sides,
and it was difficult to determine
how they might rule.
The judges inquired about
whether the judiciary could rightly second-guess what the government characterizes as an exercise
of prosecutorial discretion, and
whether the government might —
as one lower court judge suggested — consider providing more solid legal reasoning for coming to
the decision it did. They also asked
about whether the government
might have violated the dueprocess rights of DACA recipients
whose lives could be upended.
REED SAXON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Supporters of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.
A federal judge in San Francisco
— weighing bids to save DACA
from the states of California,
Maine, Maryland and Minnesota;
California’s university system;
and individual DACA recipients —
had blocked the administration
from ending the program, at least
temporarily. The ruling was largely based on the judge’s conclusion
that the decision to end it was
arbitrary and based on flawed legal reasoning.
Justice Department attorney
Hashim M. Mooppan argued that
it was not and that federal judges
should not be able to review what
was essentially a “discretionary
enforcement decision” of the
Homeland Security secretary.
Michael Mongan, an attorney
for the state of California, countered that the Justice and Homeland Security departments “told
the courts and they told the country that our hands are tied by the
law” — reversing course after
years of defending DACA — and
that “they can’t turn around and
say the courts are barred from
reviewing that legal conclusion.”
“They’ve got to explain what
they’re doing,” Mongan said.
The 9th Circuit panel’s eventual
ruling is unlikely to have any immediate, practical effect on the
DACA program and its hundreds
of thousands of recipients. That is
because two other federal district
court judges in the District and
New York have also blocked the
administration from winding
down the program. Those cases
run through different appellate
circuits and would not be directly
affected by the 9th Circuit’s decision.
To change the status quo, the
administration would have to run
the table or win at the Supreme
Court, where — short of legislation
or other government action — the
case is likely to be decided.
The Justice Department is
hopeful that the nation’s highest
court might be friendlier. Last
year, the court, which then had
only eight justices, deadlocked in
deciding the fate of a similar program. That program expanded
DACA and implemented a new
initiative commonly referred to as
DAPA, shielding those with family
ties to U.S. citizens or others lawfully in the country from deportation.
A federal judge in Texas had
blocked the DAPA program after a
lawsuit by that and other states.
Texas and six other states in recent
weeks sued to end the original
program, and the case is before the
same federal judge. His ruling
could hasten the Supreme Court’s
taking up the case if it conflicts
with others around the country.
Judge Kim McLane Wardlaw
pressed on that point, asking what
the Justice Department would do
if the Texas judge declared DACA
unlawful — which might force the
administration to either violate
his order or those of the judges
who say the program should be
maintained.
“This is one of many reasons
why nationwide injunctions are
not appropriate for courts to issue,” Mooppan responded. “What
we would do in that circumstance
is something we’re still figuring
out.”
Judge Jacqueline H. Nguyen
noted that the federal judge in the
District had given the government
an out of sorts by providing the
government time to offer more
solid reasoning for the decision to
wind down DACA, and asked
whether it might take him up on it.
Mooppan said officials had not yet
made a decision but believed the
legal reasoning for winding down
DACA was sufficient.
Lawyer Mark Rosenbaum, who
represents six DACA recipients suing to save the program, urged the
judges to consider that his clients’
due-process rights could have
been violated by the government’s
“cruel bait-and-switch method” of
convincing them to sign up for a
program, only to suddenly withdraw it.
Judge John B. Owens hinted
that he might be amenable to the
argument, asking what the panel
might do if it were to consider the
states’ other argument a “loser”
but agree that winding down
DACA violated recipients’ dueprocess rights.
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
Emails shed light on dissolution of climate panel
BY
J ULIET E ILPERIN
The Trump administration disbanded a federal advisory committee on climate change last
year because of concerns that it
did not have enough industry
representatives, according to
documents obtained under the
Freedom of Information Act.
An exchange among Commerce Department officials,
which was released in response to
a lawsuit by the advocacy group
Center for Biological Diversity,
sheds light on the demise of a
panel aimed at helping policymakers and the private sector
incorporate the government’s climate science into long-term planning.
Commerce Secretary Wilbur
Ross allowed the 15-person Advisory Committee for the Sustained
National Climate Assessment —
which included scientists and
representatives from companies
and local governments — to expire in August. The newly released emails and memos chart
an intense debate between career
and political officials last summer
over whether the group’s twoyear charter should be renewed.
George Kelly, then the deputy
chief of staff at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, questioned the panel’s
ideological makeup.
“It only has one member from
industry, and the process to gain
more balance would take a couple
of years to accomplish,” Kelly
SPENCER PLATT/GETTY IMAGES
New York Gov. Andrew M.
Cuomo helped reconvene the
dissolved climate change panel.
wrote in a June 13 email.
But some of NOAA’s senior
career employees, who worked
with members of the committee,
said it helped inform a sweeping
federal assessment of climate science, which is supposed to be
issued every four years. The government is finalizing its fourth
such assessment; the underlying
climate science report for it was
issued in November.
In a June 16 email, Craig
McLean, NOAA’s assistant administrator for oceanic and atmospheric research, warned Kelly
that failing to renew the committee’s charter “would stop their
work mid-stream, and likely have
backlash.”
McLean suggested that Trump
officials would be able to shift the
group’s ideological leanings over
time.
“The members on the Committee can achieve a greater balance
towards the interest you described and we are compiling a
list of likely nominees,” McLean
wrote in the email, adding that
the next group of members would
rotate off in April 2018 and “could
be replaced by more industry
focused members at that time.”
While federal researchers from
more than a dozen agencies collaborate on the National Climate
Assessment — a massive document that includes scientific findings and captures climate
change’s impact across the United States — the outside advisory
panel worked to translate those
findings so they would useful for
everyone from a water manager
out West to a business owner on
the Atlantic seaboard.
“It’s disturbing that the Trump
administration dumped a scientific advisory committee for having too many scientists,” said Center for Biological Diversity senior
attorney Howard Crystal, who
filed the lawsuit to obtain the
Commerce records. “These experts provided critical guidance
on protecting the American people from monster hurricanes and
climate chaos. But if lifesaving
expertise is inconvenient for the
fossil fuel industry, the Trump
administration won’t hesitate to
throw it out the window.”
The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy endorsed the idea of letting the
panel expire, according to the
records. In statements Tuesday,
both OSTP and the Commerce
secretary noted that the federal
assessment remains on track for
release later this year.
“The Advisory Committee on
Sustained National Climate Assessment simply was not necessary for the completion of the
report,” Ross said, signaling that
the panel also became a target as
his department looked “for methods to cut duplicative spending.”
After the panel was dissolved,
officials from New York state,
Columbia University and the
American Meteorological Society
reconstituted the group in January. Members held their first
meeting this month in New York
City.
“We are fully supporting the
advisory committee on its vital
work to protect our environment,” said New York Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo in a statement
Tuesday. “The task remains as
urgent as ever.”
Richard Moss, the panel’s chair
and a visiting senior research
scientist at Columbia, said in a
phone interview that while the
group has lost “its close relationship” with federal officials, the
administration’s
move
also
served as a galvanizing force.
“What’s gained is a greater
sense of purpose and energy on
the part of those outside the
federal government to apply climate science, share best practices
and highlight information gaps
for which more research is needed,” Moss said.
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
D I GE S T
TERRAY SYLVESTER/REUTERS
Lava erupts from a fissure on the outskirts of Pahoa during ongoing
eruptions of the Kilauea volcano in Hawaii on Monday. Officials
ordered evacuations for about 2,000 people since the volcano began
shooting lava this month. Several structures, including two dozen
homes, have been destroyed.
OKLAHOMA
3 girls tied up, gagged
as house is set on fire
Tulsa police on Tuesday
arrested a woman who they say
bound and gagged her three
daughters, stabbed the eldest
repeatedly and set their house on
fire.
Police said a patrol officer
found Taheerah Ahmad, 39, about
midday in a vehicle in downtown
Tulsa. Ahmad was taken into
custody, and her 7-year-old
daughter, who had been reported
missing, was found safe, police
said.
Tulsa Police Officer Jeanne
MacKenzie said the 7-year-old girl
helped her 9-year-old sister
escape Monday night, and the 9year-old ran to a nearby house for
help. MacKenzie told the Tulsa
World that when authorities
arrived, they found an 11-year-old
girl with so many stab wounds
that emergency responders
“couldn’t even count them.” The
house was on fire, and Ahmad
and the youngest girl were
missing.
The middle child told police
that their mother placed socks in
their mouths, bound their hands
with duct tape and began
stabbing the eldest child,
MacKenzie said.
The 11-year-old remained
hospitalized Tuesday and police
said her condition was “very
severe.”
— Associated Press
CALIFORNIA
Psychologist at military
base faces rape charges
A clinical psychologist hired by
a U.S. Air Force base in California
to treat military veterans with
post-traumatic stress disorder
has been charged with raping
female service members who
were in therapy for the crime he is
now accused of committing —
sexual assault, officials said
Tuesday.
Heath J. Sommer was ordered
Monday to stand trial on three
felony sexual assault charges after
authorities said he targeted
female service members in 2014
and 2015 while working at Travis
Air Force Base’s David Grant
Medical Center, about 45 miles
northeast of Sacramento.
Sommer was arrested this
month and pleaded not guilty to
the charges.
His attorney, Thomas Maas,
did not return telephone
messages seeking comment.
Maas told the judge at a hearing
Monday in Fairfield, Calif., that
the sex was consensual, according
to the Daily Republic newspaper.
Maas said his client had not
committed a crime and the
actions were part of his therapy
work.
Prosecutors allege the 41-yearold psychologist used a technique
called exposure therapy and
would ask the women to have sex
with him, leaving them “even
more traumatized.”
The base hired Sommer
through a contracting company
in 2014, and he treated more than
100 people before being
suspended on July 12, 2016, said
Staff Sgt. Amber Carter, a base
spokeswoman.
He was vetted by the
contracting company, Aloha
Health Joint Venture, and the Air
Force also did a background
check, Air Force officials said.
— Associated Press
KANSAS
Wrongfully convicted
to get compensation
People wrongfully convicted in
Kansas will qualify to collect
$65,000 for each year they were
incarcerated under a bill the
governor signed into law Tuesday.
At a signing ceremony at the
Mount Zion Church of God in
Christ in Kansas City, Gov. Jeff
Colyer (R) named three men who
were recently released after being
wrongfully convicted of killings
and apologized to them.
Under the law, those who are
wrongfully convicted and whose
convictions are overturned will
be eligible for $65,000 per year
they spent behind bars. They also
would qualify for nearly a year of
free health insurance, financial
assistance for higher education,
and various social services,
including counseling.
Previously, Kansas’s wrongfully
convicted had to fight for
compensation, either by suing the
state or by filing a claim with the
legislature that would be voted on
as if it were a bill. The wrongfully
convicted will still be able to sue
the state, but any compensation
they have received under the new
system would be deducted from
what they were awarded in the
lawsuit.
Michele Feldman, a legislative
strategist with the Innocence
Project, called Kansas’s new
compensation system a “gold
standard.”
Nebraska has a $500,000 cap
on compensation, and Missouri
awards compensation only if a
guilty verdict is overturned by
DNA evidence.
— Associated Press
Enjoy the Outdoors All Year!
SunSuites Sunrooms
SunSuites Sunroom
End of the Year Special
$
2,500 OFF
Wiith thhis co
oupo
on. No
N t valid withh othher offerss or prior salees.
Couupon good
o upon initiaal preesent
n atio
on onnly.
Lim
mited timee off
ffer. Pricee incluudess exper
p t installlatio
on.
ents
Paymw as
as lo 99
$1
Winter Screen Room
Special
BUY NOW AND
$
SAVE
1,250
Some restrictions apply
202-869-1044 DC
703-468-4418 VA
301-841-8308 MD
Lifetime Warranty
ƫņāĂĆąĆĀƫđƫƫņĂĈĀĆƫāĀĉĉăĆ
Locally Owned & Operated
A4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. WEDNESDAY,
MAY 16 , 2018
No mention of
McCain smear at
Senate GOP lunch
BY
S EUNG M IN K IM
For six days straight, Republican senators had publicly rallied
to the defense of their longtime
colleague battling cancer, Sen.
John McCain, who was the target
of a crass joke by a White House
aide calling him irrelevant because “he's dying anyway.”
But in a long luncheon Tuesday
with President Trump himself,
none of the Senate Republicans in
attendance brought up the
McCain smear — or the steadfast
refusal by Trump and the White
House to apologize for it.
“I’ve said how I feel about the
comment about Senator McCain.
It was unconscionable. I think
everybody involved should apologize,” said Sen. John Neely Kennedy (R-La.) as he exited the
lunch held at the U.S. Capitol. “But this was a policy meeting, right? It was policy-driven.”
Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.), who
has had his own personal spats
with Trump, added: “That’s not
what we do in those meetings.”
The episode illustrated how
reluctant most Republicans have
become about directly challenging Trump, whose approval numbers have ticked up recently amid
encouraging economic signs and
a scheduled summit with North
Korea. Trump is also viewed as a
critical asset as the GOP seeks to
retain House and Senate majorities in November.
The remark about McCain last
week by communications aide
Kelly Sadler have been condemned by numerous Senate Republicans. “It doesn’t matter; he’s
dying anyway,” Sadler said of McCain’s opposition to the administration’s CIA director nominee,
according to participants in a
White House staff meeting.
But many senators have also
said that McCain, who has been
absent from Washington since
December as he undergoes treatment for brain cancer, would be
unlikely to get an apology from
the notably unapologetic White
House.
“I know it’s probably not their
style to make apologies,” Sen.
Mike Rounds (R-S.D.) said Tuesday. “But I can tell you that I think
the vast majority of Americans
would say John McCain deserves
our respect, and that’s from the
top to the bottom.”
Senate Republicans were also
reluctant to raise other issues
with Trump, even on policies
where they’ve diverged from the
president.
GOP lawmakers have been particularly critical when it comes to
Trump’s protectionist tendencies
on trade, decrying the administration’s moves to impose tariffs
on steel and aluminum imports
as well as warning Trump against
withdrawing from the North
American Free Trade Agreement.
But no one challenged Trump
on his trade policies on Tuesday.
Instead, Trump assured Republican senators that he was dedicated to securing better trade deals,
including regarding NAFTA, according to Sen. Ron Johnson (RWis.).
Senior GOP officials have also
raised concerns about Trump’s
surprise disclosure Sunday that
he has ordered his administration to rescue ZTE, a Chinese
telecommunications company
that the U.S. government had
punished for violating sanctions
involving North Korea and Iran.
Top Senate Republicans signaled in advance of the lunch that
they would raise that issue with
Trump, but the topic never came
up, according to multiple senators in attendance. Trump spoke
for about 45 minutes, senators
said, leaving little time for a question-and-answer session at the
end.
Just two senators spoke following Trump, according to senators:
Sen. Dean Heller (R-Nev.) raised
the topic of immigration and also
discussed his trip to Jerusalem to
attend the opening of the U.S.
Embassy there, while Sen. Lamar
Alexander (R-Tenn.) talked up the
party’s accomplishments.
Indeed, Trump’s visit with Senate Republicans comes during a
relatively calm time in the relationship between the two ends of
Pennsylvania Avenue. In private,
Senate Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell (R-Ky.) has urged the
president to work with him to
support electable Republicans
this fall, and Trump has eagerly
seized the chance to go on the
attack against vulnerable Democratic senators up for reelection,
much to the GOP’s delight.
Inside the lunch, Trump expressed confidence in the prospects of flipping the Senate seat
in West Virginia held by Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin III while
proclaiming that he loves the
state so much he may want to
move there someday, Kennedy
said. Trump appeared eager to
take digs at Manchin, telling senators how much the Democratic
senator loves the president and
hugs him when he sees him,
PHOTOS BY BILL O'LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST
End of watch
ABOVE: Law enforcement
officers face the color guard
before the 37th annual National
Peace Officers’ Memorial Service
outside the Capitol on Tuesday
morning. The service honors
those who died in the line of
duty. President Trump, left,
spoke at the event, calling for
greater protections for law
enforcement officials.
according to a person briefed on
the lunch.
GOP Senate candidate Mike
Braun, who will face off against
Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) this
fall, was also in attendance, with
Trump talking up his prospects in
November. As he had during a
rally in Elkhart, Ind., last week,
Trump derided Donnelly as “Sleepin’ Joe,” according to two people
familiar with the lunch meeting.
His remarks were wide-ranging, senators said, veering among
the economy, North Korea, Iran
and his midterms outlook. Trump
also pressed senators to provide
him money for a border wall and
said he will have more to say on
his plans for health care in the
coming weeks.
The president also thanked
Senate Republicans for their wellwishes for his wife, Melania, who
was hospitalized Monday for
a “benign kidney condition” at
Walter Reed National Military
Medical Center. Trump then noted her high poll numbers and
quipped that he has asked the
first lady not to run against him,
one person briefed on the lunch
said.
The president was “in a cele-
bratory mood,” McConnell told
reporters following the lunch.
He “seemed to be in an upbeat
mood heading into the fall.”
Trump’s confab Tuesday inside
the ornate Mansfield Room at the
Capitol is the third time he has
addressed Senate Republicans as
president in their weekly Tuesday
luncheon. And it’s not the first
time that an intensely personal
fight between the administration
and a Republican senator has
overshadowed a show of unity
that Republicans preferred to
project.
Before his meeting with Senate
Republicans in October, Trump
and Corker, the Foreign Relations
Committee chairman, had been
locked in a weeks-long feud, with
Corker accusing Trump of “debasing” the country just hours before
Trump arrived at the Capitol for
lunch.
But as with the Trump-McCain
rift this week, the Trump-Corker
feud never came up during the
October gathering.
seung-min.kim@washpost.com
Erica Werner, Sean Sullivan, Paul
Kane and Mike DeBonis contributed
to this report.
Democrats nominate slate of women in Pa.; Trump ally gets Senate nod
S EAN S ULLIVAN,
E LISE V IEBECK
AND D AVID W EIGEL
BY
Pennsylvania Democrats took a
major step toward upending the
state’s all-male, Republican-dominated congressional delegation
Tuesday, nominating competitive
candidates, including women intent on breaking barriers two years
after the state rejected Hillary
Clinton.
In a state crucial to their shot at
House and Senate majorities,
Democrats turned out in high
numbers to settle crowded primaries. They put themselves in
position to gain as many as half a
dozen House seats in November
and are all but assured of sending
at least three women to Congress.
But President Trump’s presence
could still be felt in the state, as a
close ally, Rep. Lou Barletta, won
the GOP Senate primary. His victory sets up a showdown with twoterm Democratic Sen. Robert P.
Casey Jr., who has stockpiled nearly $10 million for the race. Trump
had recorded an automated telephone message praising Barletta
that was sent to voters just before
the election.
“The media said that Donald
Trump could not win in Pennsylvania, and Pennsylvania put Donald
Trump in the White House,” Barletta told his supporters in Hazleton.
“They say I can’t beat Bob Casey,
and I’m going to beat Bob Casey.”
Democratic turnout was running far ahead of Republican turnout in Pennsylvania late Tuesday,
even though the Democrats had
just one competitive statewide
race — the usually sleepy lieutenant governor’s contest. With nearly
90 percent of precincts reporting,
Democrats had cast nearly
100,000 more votes than Republicans. In Erie County, where Republicans saw one of their most dramatic surges in 2016, Democrats
cast 5,000 more votes than the
GOP.
The general election in Pennsyl-
MARK MAKELA/GETTY IMAGES
Rep. Lou Barletta, an early supporter of President Trump, won the GOP Senate primary in
Pennsylvania. He will face Sen. Robert P. Casey Jr. (D), who is expected to hold on to his seat this fall.
vania will serve in part as a test of
Trump’s appeal two years after he
became the first Republican presidential nominee to win the state in
28 years — a victory he still talks
about.
Trump met with Senate Republicans at the Capitol on Tuesday
and spoke optimistically about the
party’s Senate prospects in November. The GOP holds a
razor-thin 51-to-49 advantage, but
leaders are increasingly bullish
about adding to their majority as
Trump’s approval ratings have
ticked up.
Pennsylvania is one of 10 states
Trump won where a Democratic
senator faces a reelection race this
year. But strategists in both parties
think Casey has the advantage.
The state has shown signs of
trending
Democratic
since
Trump’s historic defeat of Clinton.
In March, Democrat Conor Lamb
won a special election in a
Pittsburgh-area district where
Trump had defeated Clinton by
20 percentage points.
A redrawn congressional map
and a string of House Republican
retirements have given Democrats
more reasons to be optimistic
about Pennsylvania. There, they
are hoping to pick up a chunk of
the 23 seats they need to win the
House majority.
Ballots were cast Tuesday in
four states where primary outcomes provided fresh signs about
voters’ mood less than six months
before Election Day. In addition to
Pennsylvania, there were nominating contests in Nebraska, Idaho
and Oregon.
The president used Twitter to
urge Nebraska Republicans to
“make sure you get out to the polls
and VOTE” for Sen. Deb Fischer,
who defeated four little-known
challengers. Fischer is favored to
hold her seat in November. She will
face Democrat Jane Raybould,
who attracted widespread atten-
tion when she repeatedly refused
to say in a television interview
whether she would have voted for
the sweeping GOP tax law.
In Nebraska’s 2nd Congressional District, a pickup opportunity for Democrats, former congressman Brad Ashford (D) was
trying to make a comeback. But he
was in a tight race with nonprofit
executive Kara Eastman. The winner will face Rep. Don Bacon (R).
Nebraska Republican Gov. Pete
Ricketts easily defeated his primary challenger. He is favored to
win a second term in November.
In Pennsylvania, the retirement
of Rep. Ryan Costello (R), the resignation of Rep. Patrick Meehan (R)
and a revised map ordered by the
state Supreme Court have led the
GOP to effectively cede two House
districts in the Philadelphia area.
Democrats Chrissy Houlahan,
Mary Gay Scanlon and Madeleine
Dean were nominated in districts
that Democrats are favored to win
in November. In another district
Democrats are aggressively contesting, they nominated Susan
Wild.
All told, Democrats nominated
seven women for the House in
Pennsylvania. Republicans nominated one.
“We’re beyond thrilled at what is
going on tonight,” said EMILY’s
List President Stephanie Schriock.
Scanlon and Wild defeated male
candidates backed by Sen. Bernie
Sanders (I-Vt.), who involved himself in several of Tuesday’s contests.
Elsewhere, Democrats were trying to unseat Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick (R) in a swing district. Wealthy
philanthropist Scott Wallace won
the Democratic nomination
against him.
Republican Rick Saccone, who
lost to Lamb, was denied a chance
for redemption in a primary for a
Pittsburgh-area district that favors
the GOP. He lost to state Sen. Guy
Reschenthaler. Lamb opted to run
in a different district near Pittsburgh that is less conservative. He
will face Rep. Keith Rothfus (R) in
November.
Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf will
face Republican state Sen. Scott
Wagner in the general election.
Voters also decided the outcomes
in contested primaries for lieutenant governor in both parties.
In the Democratic race, John
Fetterman, the longtime mayor of
a struggling industrial town who
was backed by Sanders and who
ran on universal health care and
legalizing marijuana, defeated Lt.
Gov. Mike Stack by an unexpectedly large margin. Stack had been
dogged by reports that he and his
wife mistreated state employees.
Republicans nominated businessman Jeff Bartos for lieutenant
governor.
While strategists in both parties
are monitoring the Senate race in
Pennsylvania, most are not counting on the seat flipping Republican.
In the phone message he record-
ed, Trump called Casey the “handpicked guy” of Senate Minority
Leader Charles E. Schumer
(D-N.Y.), using a strategy Republicans have deployed in other states
to tie candidates to party leaders.
But Democrats were not as worried about those attacks resonating in Pennsylvania, compared
with some other states Trump
won. And Casey has built a much
bigger campaign account than
Barletta, giving them another reason to be confident he will prevail
in November. As of late April, Barletta had about $1.3 million in his
campaign account. Casey had
more than $9.9 million.
In Idaho, a competitive Republican primary for governor featured
three leading candidates: Rep.
Raúl R. Labrador, a founding
member of the hard-right House
Freedom Caucus; Lt. Gov. Brad Little, who had the support of outgoing Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter; and
Tommy Ahlquist, a businessman
and physician who ran with the
backing of 2012 presidential nominee Mitt Romney.
With most of the vote yet to be
tallied, Little led the pack late Tuesday.
The leading Democratic candidates were Paulette Jordan, a former state lawmaker who would be
the country’s first Native American
governor; and A.J. Balukoff, the
party’s 2014 nominee. Jordan led
with nearly a fifth of the vote tallied.
“People are ready for something
new,” Jordan said in an interview.
“I’m not about the party; I’m not
about the system.”
Farther west in Oregon, incumbent Democratic Gov. Kate Brown
defeated a pair of primary challengers. She will face state legislator Knute Buehler, who won the
Republican nomination.
Oregon is a heavily Democratic
state, and Brown is favored to retain the governorship this fall.
sean.sullivan@washpost.com
elise.viebeck@washpost.com
david.weigel@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
Iman Jillani
EZ
Adekunle Onadipe
A5
RE
Guoyun Bai
Ricky Fernandes
Sonal Bhatia
Herbert Medina
Everything that makes us unique
makes us uniquely good at the work
we do together.
Regina McDonald
WE ARE THE
MANY DARING,
DIFFERENT PEOPLE
OF PFIZER
Charles Cain
ALL DRIVEN TO
DISCOVER THE CURE.
Karen Walters
Farhan Hameed
Come and discover what we are all about at
pfizer.com/diversity
Elaine Ravasco
Adekole Alagbe
Kelly Voight
Patrick McCann
A6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
MAY 16 , 2018
Repo industry turns to big data to more easily find targets
TOP: Derek Lewis backs up a car equipped with license-platerecognition cameras at Relentless Recovery in Cleveland last
month before heading out to scan for vehicles to be repossessed.
MIDDLE: Relentless Recovery is Ohio’s largest such business.
BOTTOM: Travis Wolford, 24, cleans personal belongings out of a
newly repossessed car at Relentless Recovery’s lot in April.
REPO FROM A1
number of people falling behind
on their car payments.
No longer tethered to a tow
truck and able to use big data to
find targets, the repossession industry is booming at an unexpected time. Although the U.S.
economy recently entered its
second-longest-ever period of expansion, the auto loan delinquency rate last year reached its
highest point since 2012, driven
by souring subprime auto loans.
It’s evidence of how the economic
recovery has not been evenly felt,
with some of Americans’ biggest
purchases — automobiles — being fueled by unsustainable borrowing rather than rising wages.
And the repo man has noticed
the change.
“So much of America is just a
heartbeat away from a repossession — even good people, decent
people who aren’t deadbeats,”
said Patrick Altes, a veteran agent
in Daytona Beach, Fla. “It seems
like a different environment than
it’s ever been.”
Repo agents are the unpopular
foot soldiers in the nation’s
$1.2 trillion auto loan market.
They don’t make the loans or
issue the repossession orders
that, for some high-risk customers, can come as soon as a single
payment is days late. But they are
the closest most people come to a
faceless, sophisticated financial
system that can upend their lives.
‘Sitting on a live hit’
Lewis rolled to a far corner of
the parking lot, next to an apartment building overlooking Lake
Erie, and called the BMW’s lender.
“I’m sitting on a live hit for
you,” he said.
He texted for a company tow
truck. It was seven minutes away.
This was the hard part. He had to
just hope the vehicle’s driver
didn’t come out and drive away. It
would be like watching a fish
wiggle free of the hook.
He sat in silence, one of the few
times his spotter car wasn’t logging new plates, each one trumpeted by a video-game-like bing.
The system picked up passing
cars. Parked cars. Cars stashed in
driveways. As many as 10,000
every eight-hour shift.
Lewis compared each scan to
planting a seed.
“Is it going to grow into a
repo?” he said. “Or are they going
to pay their bills?”
Lewis works for Relentless Recovery, the largest repo company
in Ohio and its busiest collector
of license plate scans. Last
year, the company repossessed
more than 25,500 vehicles —
including tractor trailers and riding lawn mowers.
Business has more than doubled since 2014, the company
said. Even with the rising deployment of remote engine cutoffs
and GPS locators in cars, repo
agencies remain dominant.
Relentless scanned 28 million
license plates last year, a demonstration of its recent, heavy push
into technology. It now has more
than 40 camera-equipped vehicles, mostly spotter cars. Agents
are finding repos they never
would have a few years ago.
The company’s goal is to capture every plate in Ohio and use
that information to reveal patterns. A plate shot outside an
apartment at 5 a.m. tells you
that’s probably where the driver
spends the night, no matter their
listed home address. So when a
repo order comes in for a car, the
agent already knows where to
look.
“It’s kind of scary, but it’s
amazing,” said Alana Ferrante,
chief executive of Relentless.
Lewis, 33, got his start repossessing cars when he was 14,
helping his dad tow vehicles in
the dead of night. His dad moved
on to construction. But Lewis
kept at it, eventually getting
burned out on chasing cars. He
went to work as a firefighter and
paramedic — which provoked
very different reactions from people — before returning a few
up. Lewis slipped on a pair of
work gloves.
“You ready?” he shouted at the
tow truck driver.
The best repo is a quick “hook
and roll.” This wasn’t one of them.
The BMW had all-wheel drive. All
four wheels needed to be off the
ground. The tow truck swung its
lift under the rear tires of the
backed-in BMW. Lewis and the
tow driver jumped out to assemble a metal dolly to raise the front
tires. Time crawled. Lewis
scanned the lot. A woman walked
toward them. He watched with
relief as she climbed into a different car.
“See you, guys,” the tow truck
driver shouted, pulling away with
the bounty — worth about $400
to Relentless.
First repo of the day. Thousands of seeds planted.
PHOTOS BY DUSTIN FRANZ FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
years ago to the job he knew best.
And for a while, the job remained
mostly the same. He’d prowl
around in a tow truck, armed
with paper orders and a map, just
praying the target vehicle was
parked where it was supposed to
be.
rector still regularly does repos,
tries to follow one main rule:
“Don’t make someone’s bad situation worse.” So he avoided hospital parking lots. But he loved
shopping malls, especially the
last row of lots, where the employees park. Discount stores
“So much of America is just a heartbeat away from
a repossession — even good people, decent people
who aren’t deadbeats. It seems like a different
environment than it’s ever been.”
Patrick Altes, veteran repo agent in Daytona Beach, Fla.
That all changed in recent
years.
Repos remain risky. Lewis has
had a gun pointed at him three
times and a cigarette stubbed out
on his forehead once. He’s had
people come out screaming at
him. He’s seen them break down
in tears.
Lewis, who as operations di-
were another target.
“For getting a live hit, this is
the place to be,” he said earlier,
weaving his way past rows of cars
outside a Dollar General.
It could feel like he was preying on the poor. Lewis said he just
went where the repos were. Even
then, repos clustered in unexpected ways. Lewis pointed to
one apartment complex so
stocked with repos it became his
honey hole. Yet similar buildings
nearby were repo deserts.
Nationwide, repo agents described a broadening base of
people struggling to stay current
on their auto loans. In the old
days, agents picked up mostly
entry-level cars — Chevy Chevettes and Dodge Neons.
“Now it’s all over the place,”
said Altes, the Daytona Beach
agent, who is also the former
head of the repo trade group
Time Finance Adjusters.
Agents today get assignments
for high-end brands such as Mercedes-Benz. They take the new
cars of Uber drivers. Relentless
picked up its first 2018 model last
year, just weeks after it debuted.
The only cars still rarely seen are
Subarus and Volvos — the unflashy favorites of the urbane
upper middle class.
Now, Lewis kept his eye on the
blue BMW, a vehicle that might
cost $37,000 new but after more
than a decade was worth less
than $8,000. The tow truck rolled
Key Democrat says he’ll back Haspel to lead CIA
BY K AROUN D EMIRJIAN
AND S HANE H ARRIS
Gina Haspel appears to have
secured enough votes to be confirmed as the country’s next CIA
director after stating in a letter to
a top Democrat that the agency
never should have detained terrorist suspects and employed
brutal interrogation techniques
against them.
In announcing his support for
Haspel, Senate Intelligence Committee Vice Chairman Mark R.
Warner (D-Va.) said Tuesday he
had asked her to write down her
views because he believed that in
one-on-one meetings she had expressed greater regret and more
resolute moral opposition to the
agency’s interrogation program
than she had communicated during her confirmation hearing last
week.
“I believe she is someone who
can and will stand up to the
President if ordered to do something illegal or immoral — like a
return to torture,” Warner said in
a statement.
Warner’s support for Haspel
provides more opportunity for
her to gain the backing of other
lawmakers who were conflicted
about her nomination. Several
Democrats facing tough reelection battles this year, as well as
Republican Sen. Jeff Flake
(Ariz.), have been caught between the pressures of an administration and agency forcefully
lobbying for Haspel’s confirmation and the admonitions of senior senators such as John McCain
(R-Ariz.) and Dianne Feinstein
(D-Calif.), who have said a vote
for Haspel is effectively telling
the world the United States condones torture.
Minutes after Warner’s an-
nouncement, Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.) — one of the
GOP’s prime targets in 2018 —
announced she, too, would be
supporting Haspel.
Sen. Bill Nelson (D-Fla.), who
is also up for reelection this year,
announced he too would vote for
Haspel.
Haspel, who played an integral
role in the CIA’s interrogation
program, pledged during her
confirmation hearing that she
would not restart it if approved
to lead the agency. She refused to
say, however, the program had
been immoral, defending the
A growing problem
Although there are no national
auto repossession statistics, other measures point to a growing
problem. More than 4 percent of
auto loans were at least 90 days
late at the end of 2017 — the
highest rate in five years. That
number jumps to almost 10 percent for subprime auto loans
alone, according to a report by
the Federal Reserve Bank of New
York.
Affordability is one factor. The
average new car price has soared
20 percent over a decade, to
$35,500, while wages have been
sluggish. Auto loans now carry
higher balances and longer
terms, stretching out the timeline
for trouble to appear.
Analysts point to a period from
2014 to 2016, when auto lenders
got too loose with credit. That
helped the United States sell a
record number of automobiles in
2016. But it also pushed the
delinquency rate higher.
“As a result, the markets pulled
back a little bit,” said Amy Crews
Cutts, chief economist at Equifax.
The rate of auto loan write-offs
— which includes repos — is
trending higher but remains below its 2009 peak, according to
Equifax numbers.
Repo agents have their own
theories about what’s going on —
including fading attachment to
vehicles and an increased willingness to walk away, a lesson
learned from the housing crisis.
One national list of active automobile repossession orders
reached 360,000 this year, more
than double what it was at the
same time last year.
Lewis believed the industry
followed a pulse. April was always slow because people made
car payments with tax refunds.
But repos soared on bad news,
such as with the loss of 1,500
autoworker jobs in Lordstown,
Ohio, announced this year. Lewis
recently heard that a nuclear
power plant near Cleveland
might shutter.
“I expect we’ll see some from
that,” he said.
His own industry has seen
changes, too. Regulators, led by
the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, have cracked down
on the job’s outlaw attitude.
Lenders have pushed agents to
take certification courses. Last
year, Relentless switched its 120
workers from contractors to employees in an effort to change the
culture and its incentives.
The camera systems have
made agents more productive
but also opened them up to new
challenges.
Repo agents are responsible
for the majority of the billions of
license plate scans produced nationwide. But they don’t control
the information. Most of that
data is owned by Digital Recognition Network (DRN), a Fort
Worth company that is the largest provider of license-platerecognition systems. And DRN
agency’s actions as legal.
“With the benefit of hindsight
and my experience as a senior
agency leader, the enhanced interrogation program is not one
the CIA should have undertaken,”
Haspel wrote in her letter
to Warner.
She stopped short of condemning the people “that made
these hard calls” and again cited
“valuable intelligence collected”
through the program — despite
the findings of the Senate Intelligence Committee’s report on torture, released in 2014, which
concluded the CIA’s interrogation methods were not a viable
means of gaining information.
Those omissions — plus the fact
that almost all records related to
sells the information to insurance companies, private investigators — even other repo agents.
DRN is a sister company
to Vigilant Solutions, which provides the plate scans to law enforcement, including police and
U.S. Immigration and Customs
Enforcement. Both companies
declined to respond to questions
about their operations. The potential misuse of the plate data
has drawn criticism from privacy
groups. A federal court in Nevada
ruled in January that the scans do
not amount to unwarranted surveillance because they are essentially snapshots taken in public.
Still, officials in Alameda,
Calif., this year put on hold a
contract to buy Vigilant’s technology over worries the scans
could be used for federal immigration enforcement.
For repo companies, one worry
is whether they are producing
information that others are monetizing.
A real hook and roll
Now it was after midnight and
Lewis was back at work, trying to
rouse himself with Red Bull. This
time he drove a tow truck. And he
had his eye on a potential repo: a
2016 Chevy Cruze.
The order was only a few hours
old. Half of Relentless’s repos are
found within the first two days.
After 10 days, most vehicles disappear.
But Lewis had a plate scan for
the Chevy taken five days earlier,
at 8:39 a.m. outside an apartment
complex. He bet that was the car
owner’s home.
Lewis loved being back in a
hulking Ford F-450. Moving to a
spotter car had been “like getting
neutered,” he said. But he realized the change was better for
business.
“I had to ask myself, ‘Do I want
to make money, or do I want to
look like a tough guy in a tow
truck?’ ” he said.
He pulled up to a quiet gardenstyle apartment complex. The
plate scan’s GPS coordinates
pointed to exactly where the car
should be. And it was.
The tow truck’s rumble seemed
impossibly loud. Darkened apartment windows lined the parking
lot. Lewis backed up the truck
and guided the lift. He jumped
out with a flashlight and verified
it was the right car. He got back
in, lifted the vehicle higher and
pulled away. A real hook and roll.
Safely out of sight, he pulled
over to inspect the vehicle. He
could see a woman’s sunglasses
in the front console. A “black ice”
air freshener and knickknacks
dangled from the rearview mirror. In the back was a child’s car
seat.
Lewis didn’t flinch. He knew a
mother was probably going to
walk outside in the morning and
realize her car was gone. She
might call the police to report it
stolen. But she had to have
known this moment was coming
after a flurry of lender late notices and phone calls. Lewis understood. What do you do against the
inevitable? He has four children
of his own. He had paid to get
strangers’ cars out of repo before.
But this was his job. He’d been
doing it most of his life. And
technology hadn’t yet figured out
how to soften the blow.
After her car was towed to
Relentless, the woman’s personal
items would be stored in a cardboard box, amid the stacks of
boxes from other repos. The car
might be gone, the missed payments and repo fee too much to
make up, but she could get her
items back for $50.
The repo man had a policy,
part of that aim to not make a bad
situation worse.
The child’s car seat was always
returned for free.
todd.frankel@washpost.com
her career remain classified —
will probably keep dozens of
Democrats from voting for her.
But she is putting distance
between herself and other senior
intelligence officials, many of
whom acknowledge the CIA
made mistakes but defend the
interrogation program as a legitimate response to the immediate
threat of attacks by al-Qaeda.
In written answers the committee released Tuesday, Haspel
also said she would disobey a
direct order from Trump to
waterboard a detainee and alert
Congress if she ever came under
political pressure to change an
intelligence assessment.
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
shane.harris@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
Military bases eyed to house
detained immigrant children
BY N ICK M IROFF
AND P AUL S ONNE
The Trump administration is
making preparations to hold immigrant children on military bases, according to Defense Department communications, the latest
sign the government is moving
forward with plans to split up
families who cross the border illegally.
According to an email notification sent to Pentagon staffers, the
Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) will make
site visits at four military installations in Texas and Arkansas during the next two weeks to evaluate
their suitability to shelter children.
The bases would be used for
minors under 18 who arrive at the
border without an adult relative
or after the government has separated them from their parents.
HHS is the government agency
responsible for providing minors
with foster care until another
adult relative can assume custody.
The email characterized the
site visits as a preliminary assessment. “No decisions have been
made at this time,” it states.
An official at HHS confirmed
the military site visits, speaking
on the condition of anonymity
because the plans are not yet
public. The official said that HHS
currently has the bed space to
hold 10,571 children.
In a statement, the agency’s
Administration for Children and
Families said its programs require “routinely evaluating the
needs and capacity of an existing
network of approximately 100
shelters in 14 states.”
“Additional properties with existing infrastructure are routinely
being identified and evaluated by
federal agencies as potential locations for temporary sheltering,”
the statement said.
Those facilities are at 91 percent capacity, the HHS official
said, and the Trump administration’s crackdown plans could
push thousands more children
into government care. The official
said that DHS has not provided
projections for how many additional children to expect.
Trump officials say they are
moving forcefully to halt a sharp
increase in the number of families
crossing the border illegally this
spring, many of whom are Central
Americans seeking asylum. U.S.
border agents in March and April
arrested more than 100,000 people who crossed the border illegally, the highest monthly totals
since President Trump took office.
Trump has seethed at the increase, singling out Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen
for blame.
He has ordered her to “close”
the border and cut off the migration flows, which typically increase in spring with seasonal
LOREN ELLIOTT/REUTERS
Immigrants who had illegally crossed into the United States turn
themselves in to Border Patrol agents May 9 near McAllen, Tex.
demand for rural labor.
Nielsen and Attorney General
Jeff Sessions say the government
will take the extraordinary measure of filing criminal charges
against anyone who crosses the
border illegally, including parents traveling with their children.
In most cases, that means adults
will be held at immigration jails to
await court dates while their children are sent into foster care.
“If you’re smuggling a child,
then we’re going to prosecute you,
and that child will be separated
from you, probably, as required by
law,” Sessions said in a speech last
week.
“If you’re smuggling a
child, then we’re going
to prosecute you. . . .
If you don’t want your
child separated, then
don’t bring them across
the border illegally. It’s
not our fault that
somebody does that.”
Attorney General Jeff Sessions,
in a speech last week
“If you don’t want your child
separated, then don’t bring them
across the border illegally,” he
added. “It’s not our fault that
somebody does that.”
Children held in HHS custody
spend an average of 45 days in the
government’s care, the HHS official said, and they are provided
with educational and recreational opportunities. The agency conducts background checks on potential sponsors for the minors,
and in 85 percent of cases the
children are released to a parent
or other adult relative already
present in the United States, the
official said.
Homeland Security officials
have struggled for years to manage the demographic shift in the
population of immigrants arrested at the border, where single
men from Mexico were once the
overwhelming majority of those
taken into custody.
Families with children and unaccompanied minors made up
10 percent of illegal border crossers five years ago, Nielsen told
senators in testimony Tuesday.
Today, they account for 40 percent of those detained by U.S.
border agents, she said.
At the peak of the 2014 childimmigration crisis, the Obama
administration used bases in
Oklahoma, Texas and California
to house more than 7,000 children
over a period of several months.
Critics of the family-separation
practices denounce the practice
as heartless, saying it inflicts additional trauma on families fleeing from Central America’s
bloody gang wars.
Trump last month ordered the
Pentagon to help Homeland Security officials cope with the surge in
illegal crossings, including the
mobilization of up to 4,000 National Guard troops. Military personnel have been deployed in a
supporting role and are not allowed to arrest immigrants.
It is not clear whether the
troops could be assigned to the
bases where children will be held.
Three of the bases are in Texas —
the Army’s Fort Bliss, Goodfellow
Air Force Base and Dyess Air
Force Base. Little Rock Air Force
Base in Arkansas also will be
evaluated, according to the Pentagon communications and HHS.
A Pentagon spokesman, Lt. Col.
Jamie Davis, said the Defense
Department had not yet received
a formal request from HHS.
When the military has loaned
space at its facilities in the past,
HHS has reimbursed the Defense
Department and the military has
had little to do with the operation.
nick.miroff@washpost.com
paul.sonne@washpost.com
Abortion rights advocates’ lawsuit
seeks to block Iowa’s ‘heartbeat bill’
BY
E MILY W AX- T HIBODEAUX
Abortion rights advocates filed
a lawsuit in an Iowa district court
Tuesday seeking to block Iowa’s
newest abortion law — known as
“the heartbeat bill” — which bans
most abortions at about the sixth
week of pregnancy, before many
women know they are pregnant.
The law is among the most restrictive abortion bans in the
country.
The Iowa law is part of a flurry
of legislation that aims to test the
legality of abortion restrictions,
as some Republicans want legal
challenges to the laws to reach the
U.S. Supreme Court in an effort to
overturn its landmark 1973 Roe v.
Wade ruling. In Mississippi this
year, GOP lawmakers passed a
15-week abortion ban that was
signed by Mississippi’s Republican governor, but the law was
quickly put on hold after a court
challenge.
Iowa’s “heartbeat bill” was
passed by the Iowa House, 51 to
46, and the state Senate passed the bill, 29 to 17, in
early May, sending it to Gov. Kim
Reynolds (R), who has said abortion is “equivalent to murder.”
The law would ban abortions as
soon as embryonic cardiac activity is detected, which is usually
about six weeks, the same
time women typically begin to
feel the first signs of pregnancy.
State Rep. Shannon Lundgren
(R), while speaking on the House
floor, called the bill “a courageous
step” that sends the message that
Iowa “will defend its most vulnerable, those without a voice — our
unborn children.”
The American Civil Liberties
Union of Iowa, the Planned Parenthood Federation of America
and the Emma Goldman Clinic of
Iowa City are plaintiffs in the
lawsuit challenging Iowa’s ban;
the case was filed in Polk County
District Court.
Almost immediately after the
lawsuit was filed, the state’s attorney general said he would not
defend the new law. Democrat
Tom Miller said he based his
decision on a belief that the measure “would undermine rights and
protections for women,” the Associated Press reported.
Unless blocked, the Iowa law
would go into effect July 1.
The lawsuit names Reynolds
and the Iowa Board of Medicine
as defendants. Reynolds signed
Iowa’s ban this month and said at
a public event in Davenport that
she felt “very confident in moving
forward with it.”
If the ban takes effect, Iowa
women would have to travel out
of state to obtain an abortion
after a fetal heartbeat is detected.
Abortion rights advocates say
those who don’t have the resources to leave Iowa will be forced to
carry an unwanted pregnancy to
term, or in some cases will attempt to self-induce, a sometimes
dangerous act.
“This abortion ban is beyond
extreme,” said Rita Bettis, legal
director of the ACLU of Iowa.
“With it, Iowa politicians have
tried to ban virtually all abortions
for women in our state. In the 45
years since Roe, no federal or
state court has upheld such a
dangerous law.”
Jill Meadows, medical director
of Planned Parenthood of the
Heartland and a co-plaintiff in
the lawsuit, said it is important
that the law not go into effect:
“Abortion care must remain safe
and legal as an important part of
basic reproductive health care.”
The law allows for some exceptions, including in the case of a
“medical emergency” such as conditions that are life-threatening
or pose “a serious risk of substantial and irreversible impairment
of a major bodily function.” There
is an exception for rape and incest, which requires women to
report the crime to law enforcement or certain medical professionals within 45 days.
Doctors who violate the law
would lose their licenses. The law
does not allow a woman to access
an abortion due to “psychological
conditions, emotional conditions, familial conditions, or the
woman’s age.”
Francine Thompson, co-director of the Emma Goldman Clinic
in Iowa City, said the law would
have a devastating impact on the
women her clinic sees every day.
“The cutoff period of this bill at
around six weeks simply does not
work for women. The timing essentially makes it an almost-complete ban on abortions in our
state,” Thompson said in a written statement. “It’s also important to note that the exceptions in
the law are essentially non-exceptions. The requirement of reporting rape within 45 days, for example, is completely out of touch
with the reality that survivors of
those horrendous crimes live
with.”
emily.wax@washpost.com
RE
K
A7
A8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
MAY 16 , 2018
TOM WOLFE 1930-2018
‘Right Stu≠’
author’s
work, style
stood out
WOLFE FROM A1
car designers, hailing them as the
vanguard of a new form of modern art, not unlike Picasso.
“I don’t have to dwell on the
point that cars mean more to
these kids than architecture did
in Europe’s great formal century,
say, 1750 to 1850,” he wrote. “They
are freedom, style, sex, power,
motion, color — everything is
right there.”
Seldom had journalism seen
such an audacious display of observation, wry humor and go-forbaroque verbal dexterity. Mr.
Wolfe invented words, wrote in
the point of view of his characters
and peppered his pages with ellipses, italics and exclamation
marks.
Just like that, the legend of
Tom Wolfe was born.
“It was like he discovered it in
the middle of the night,” Dobell
told Vanity Fair in 2015. “Wherever it came from, it seemed to me
to tap a strain of pure American
humor that wasn’t being tapped.”
Mr. Wolfe, who had a transformative effect on journalism and
later became a best-selling novelist, died May 14 at a Manhattan
hospital. He was 88. His niece
Hughes Evans confirmed the
death, but no other information
was immediately available.
In 1963, Mr. Wolfe was a littleknown reporter at the New York
Herald Tribune.
Less than two years later, when
his first collection, “The KandyKolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby,” was published, he was
one of the most famous and influential writers of his generation.
His books became bestsellers,
and his explosive, fast-moving
prose was seen as the perfect
vehicle for the times. He invented
or popularized phrases such as
“good old boy,” “radical chic,” the
“Me Decade” (sometimes altered
to “Me Generation”) and “pushing the envelope.”
Perhaps his most memorable
coinage was the title of what is
often considered his greatest
achievement: “The Right Stuff.”
Published in 1979, the book was
an epic account of the idea of
American
heroism,
viewed
through the exploits of military
test pilots and astronauts.
Mr. Wolfe chronicled the rise of
the hippie generation in “The
Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test”
(1968) and mocked the pretensions of Manhattan liberals in
“Radical Chic & Mau-Mauing the
Flak Catchers” (1970) and of the
art world in “The Painted Word”
(1975). He gleefully violated the
city editor’s dictum to trim each
sentence to a sleek, understated
nugget of news: For Mr. Wolfe, no
verbal extravagance was too
much.
“American journalism has never had a practitioner who combined the attributes of talent,
audacity, learning, legwork, and
pure observation as well as Tom
Wolfe,” author and scholar Ben
Yagoda wrote in “The Art of Fact,”
a 1997 anthology of narrative
nonfiction.
Mr. Wolfe was considered the
leader of an ink-stained avantgarde that included Jimmy Breslin, Joan Didion, George Plimpton, Gay Talese and Hunter S.
Thompson. Their personal, immersive style was imitated, with
varying degrees of success, in
practically every newspaper feature section in the country.
“The most important literature
being written in America today is
in nonfiction,” Mr. Wolfe asserted
in his 1973 anthology, “The New
Journalism,” which became the
standard of prosaic rubric for his
style of writing.
He borrowed certain techniques from fiction, including
characterization and dialogue,
but knew that journalism had
something else going for it — “the
simple fact that the reader knows
all this actually happened.”
In almost everything he wrote,
Mr. Wolfe examined what he
called “status details” — the finer
points of behavior, trends, fashion and the pursuit of prestige
that, in his view, shaped the
American social order. Sullen
teenagers, Southern good old
boys, arty urbanites, elite test
pilots — all measured themselves
by what their peers thought of
them. (Perhaps as a marker of his
own status, Mr. Wolfe pronounced the word “stay-tus.”)
Despite frequent appearances
on television and on college campuses, Mr. Wolfe remained curiously opaque. He wasn’t a pillpopping, pistol-waving renegade
like Thompson; he didn’t dabble
in Hollywood, like Didion; he
wasn’t a party host, like Plimp-
JIM COOPER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
“Wherever it came from, it seemed to me to tap a strain of pure American humor that wasn’t being tapped.”
Byron Dobell, former managing editor of Esquire magazine
ton; and he wasn’t a serial husband with a violent streak, like
novelist-turned-New Journalist
Norman Mailer.
Instead, he cultivated an image
as an eccentric, well-mannered
Southerner who — never mind
the Yale PhD and flamboyant
white suits — gaped in wonder at
the sheer spectacle of America in
the 1960s and beyond. He resisted
any attempts to be portrayed, as
the title of his second novel put it,
as “A Man in Full.”
Being a reporter
The biggest question surrounding Mr. Wolfe’s methods
was the simplest: How did he
manage to win the trust of such
disparate groups as Southern
moonshiners, car fanatics, socialites, hippies and astronauts?
By his account, it was simply by
hanging out, watching and listening — in other words, being a
reporter.
Custom-car designer George
Barris said Mr. Wolfe was around
so much that he “even came to the
house and cooked dinner with my
wife.”
He entered the world of stockcar driver Junior Johnson — the
title figure of a 20,000-word Esquire article, “The Last American
Hero” — so completely that he
described the chickens walking
across Johnson’s yard in Ingle
Hollow, N.C.
At the Park Avenue apartment
of conductor Leonard Bernstein,
Mr. Wolfe captured the awkward
social dance between uptown liberals and street-toughened Black
Panther militants in the enduring
phrase “radical chic.”
In 1966, Mr. Wolfe climbed
aboard a bus with an LSD-dropping coterie of hippies led by Ken
Kesey, author of “One Flew Over
the Cuckoo’s Nest.” The Merry
Pranksters, as they called themselves, traipsed across the country in search of enlightenment
but often stumbled into misfortune and unintended humor.
In “The Electric Kool-Aid Acid
Test,” Mr. Wolfe described a surreal scene as a police officer
pulled the bus over while a forest
fire was in full blaze.
“By this time,” Mr. Wolfe wrote,
“everybody is off the bus rolling in
the brown grass by the shoulder,
laughing, giggling, yahooing,
zonked to the skies on acid, because, mon, the woods are burning, the whole world is on fire. . . .
And the cop, all he can see is a
bunch of crazies in screaming
orange and green costumes,
masks, boys and girls, men and
women, twelve or fourteen of
them, lying in the grass and making hideously crazy sounds. . . . So
he wheels around and says, ‘What
THE WASHINGTON POST
TOP: Tom Wolfe in his New
York apartment in November
1998. Video at wapo.st/
tomwolfe: Post critic Ron
Charles explains how Wolfe
revolutionized fiction writing.
ABOVE: Wolfe as a Washington
Post staff writer in 1961.
LEFT: President George W.
Bush presents Wolfe with the
National Humanities Medal in
2002.
LARRY DOWNING/REUTERS
are you, uh — show people?’ ”
Mr. Wolfe was praised by novelist Kurt Vonnegut Jr. — “a genius
who will do anything to get attention” — and poet Karl Shapiro,
who exclaimed in a Washington
Post review that the author “is
more than brilliant . . . . He is
more than urbane, suave, trenchant . . . . Tom Wolfe is a goddam
joy.”
Mr. Wolfe spent much of the
1970s working on “The Right
Stuff,” a gripping chronicle of the
inner world of test pilots and the
more rarefied group that grew
out of them — the country’s first
astronauts. He scaled back his
customary satire and mockery,
adopting a relatively sober style
befitting his larger subject —
what it takes to be a hero.
“This quality, this it, was never
named, however, nor was it talked
about in any way,” he wrote. “The
idea was to prove at every foot of
the way up that pyramid that you
were one of the elected and
anointed ones who had the right
stuff and could move higher and
higher and even — ultimately,
God willing, one day — that you
might be able to join that special
few at the very top, that elite who
had the capacity to bring tears to
men’s eyes, the very Brotherhood
of the Right Stuff itself.”
The book won the American
Book Award, became a bestseller
and was made into a 1983 film
with Sam Shepard and Ed Harris.
“Never mind journalism, new
or old,” author Michael Lewis
wrote in Vanity Fair in 2015.
“ ‘The Right Stuff,’ in my view, is a
great work of American literature.”
‘Who in the name
of God is that?’
Thomas Kennerly Wolfe Jr. was
born March 2, 1930, in Richmond.
His father was an agronomist and
edited the Southern Planter, a
magazine for farmers. His mother
was a homemaker with varied
artistic interests.
At Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Va., from which
he graduated in 1951, Mr. Wolfe
wrote for school publications. He
also pitched for the baseball team
and once had a tryout with the
New York Giants.
In graduate school at Yale University, his dissertation about
communist influences on American writers was initially rejected
in part because of its attentiongetting style. He rewrote it in dry
academic prose — including a
reference to “an American writer
E. Hemingway” — and received a
doctorate in American studies in
1957.
Rejecting academia, Mr. Wolfe
toyed with the idea of becoming a
cartoonist before becoming a
newspaper reporter, first in
Springfield, Mass., and from 1959
to 1962 at The Washington Post.
At The Post, he had no interest
in the high-profile national desk,
preferring to cover quirky local
stories with a hint of the insouciant style about to come. He then
joined the Herald Tribune, a
struggling paper with a tradition
of stylish writing. The editor of
the paper’s Sunday magazine,
Clay Felker, encouraged Mr.
Wolfe to pursue the stories — and
the style — that he wanted.
Determined to stand out in
other ways, the trim, 6-foot-tall
Mr. Wolfe became a conspicuous
dandy, wearing custom-made
suits, often in white or pastel
colors.
“I just want to make sure,” he
later said, “that when I walk into a
room, everybody there turns
around and says, ‘Who in the
name of God is that?’ ”
A four-month newspaper
strike allowed Mr. Wolfe time to
write his first pieces for Esquire.
When the strike was settled in
May 1963, Mr. Wolfe flourished,
writing freewheeling stories for
his newspaper and traveling on
weekends for Esquire. After the
Herald Tribune folded in 1967,
Felker relaunched the paper’s
Sunday magazine — New York —
as an independently weekly and
made it a showcase for Mr. Wolfe.
His style was so overwhelming
that it masked what wasn’t there:
Throughout the turbulent 1960s
and ’70s, he largely avoided writing about the war in Vietnam,
civil rights, the women’s move-
ment, foreign policy or politics.
He seldom wrote about celebrities.
“I was afraid that readers
would like the pieces for their
subjects,” he told The Post in 1979,
“not for my writing.”
Above all, Mr. Wolfe never
wrote about himself.
When he married for the first
and only time at 48, it took many
by surprise, if only because he was
so guarded about his personal
life.
Survivors include his wife,
Sheila Berger, a former art director at Harper’s magazine, of New
York, and two children, journalist
Alexandra Wolfe of New York and
furniture designer Tommy Wolfe
of Brooklyn.
For years, Mr. Wolfe disparaged the modern novel as a lifeless relic that could be revived
only with a muscular framework
of reporting and social realism.
Deciding to do the job himself, he
published “The Bonfire of the
Vanities” in Rolling Stone magazine, then, after considerable revision, in book form in 1987.
The novel describes the comeuppance of a wealthy bond trader
and self-crowned “master of the
universe” amid the racial and
cultural turmoil of New York.
“Bonfire” sold millions of copies
and was made into a 1990 film
with Tom Hanks, Melanie Griffith
and Bruce Willis.
In many ways “Bonfire” was his
last literary triumph. His books
on art and architecture, including
“From Bauhaus to Our House”
(1981), received biting reviews,
including this one from Michael
Sorkin in the Nation: “What Tom
Wolfe doesn’t know about modern architecture could fill a book.
And so indeed it has.”
Mr. Wolfe received a 2001 National Humanities Medal from
President George W. Bush and
sold his archives to the New York
Public Library in 2013 for $2 million.
His later novels — “A Man in
Full” (1998), “I Am Charlotte Simmons” (2004) and “Back to Blood”
(2012) — received tepid reviews.
He feuded with novelists John
Updike and John Irving over dismissive comments they made
about his fiction. He continued to
publish nonfiction books well
into his 80s, with critics noting
that he often skewered the absurdities of the left but never the
buffoonery of the right.
What he didn’t lack was confidence in the power of his prose.
“I regard myself in the first
flight of writers, but I don’t dwell
on this,” Mr. Wolfe said in 1981. “If
anything, I think I tend to be a
little modest.”
matt.schudel@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
RE
An enemies list is printed in Hungary. Many want to join it.
GRIFF WITTE
across two pages,
white type on a
black
But that was not true of
everyone. An administrative
assistant reported that her
parents were getting abuse from
their neighbors, who wondered
why they had a Soros mercenary
in the family.
“It’s an extreme example of
harassment, and it does impact
people,” Pardavi said.
It also comes in the context of
a very real crackdown on civil
society, with the government
using legislation to make it
uncomfortable — if not
impossible — for many
independent organizations to
operate.
And even if the government
has not gone nearly as far as its
counterparts in Turkey or Russia
in suppressing dissent, some fear
that’s where it’s headed.
“Let us not underestimate
such petty and shameful projects
like this list,” wrote one
signatory to Koren’s petition.
“Who knows where hate speech
ends and political terror starts?”
The magazine that published
the list — Figyelo, which means
Observer in Hungarian — has
dismissed such talk as “hysteria.”
It has said that anyone who
wants to be removed from the
list should simply email the
magazine and ask.
It is not clear whether anyone
has done so. But Koren recently
emailed the magazine with the
names of thousands of people
who want to be added.
“Could you please print these
names in a 20-page special
edition?” Koren said he asked.
There has been no reply.
griff.witte@washpost.com
Gergo Saling and Andras Petho,
editors of the Hungarian investigative
news website Direkt36, contributed
to this report. Both were on the list.
w
o
d
n
i
W
y
a
D
Memorial
e
l
a
S
r
o
o
D
o
i
t
and Pa
+ + + + + + +
+ + + + + + + + +
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+ + + + + + + +
+ + + + + + + + +
Hurry – limited time offer!
• Renewal by Andersen is the full-service replacement window division of
Andersen, a family-owned American company that builds affordable windows
for those with a deep sense of pride in their home
• Our window helps make homes more comfortable because its strong seals
help prevent drafts and leaks, and our Fibrex® composite window material is
2X stronger than vinyl
• To lock in this Memorial Day Sale, call on or before Thursday, May 31st, and
schedule your free Window and Patio Door Diagnosis
Memorial Day Sale ENDS Thursday, May 31st
SAVE 20%
on windows and patio doors1
WITH
NO NO NO
MONEY DOWN PAYMENTS
INTEREST
FOR 1
YEAR1
When you set your appointment by May 31st and purchase by June 9th. Interest accrues from
the purchase date but is waived if paid in full within 12 months. Minimum purchase of four.
PLUS
+
Minimum purchase of four.
++
take an
additional $200 off
your ENTIRE project1
+
background.
There, plain for all to see in a
prominent pro-government
magazine, were the names of 200
academics, journalists, human
rights advocates and others.
They were the “mercenaries”
of Hungarian American
financier George Soros, the
accompanying article explained.
And this was an enemies list.
At once it was a relic from a
darker time in Hungary’s history
and a modern-day symbol of just
how far the country has veered
toward a rebirth of autocracy
under Prime Minister Viktor
Orban.
The prime minister has spared
little effort in vilifying Soros.
Orban has made the Jewish
philanthropist the heart of
numerous government smear
campaigns, countless
xenophobic speeches and several
pieces of punitive legislation.
Before Hungary voted last
month, he vowed “revenge”
against Soros and his allies for
their role in a supposed plot to
flood the country with Muslim
refugees.
On Tuesday, Soros announced
that he is moving the
headquarters of his Open Society
Foundations from Budapest to
Berlin because of an
“increasingly repressive”
environment in Hungary.
Publication of the list, just
days after Orban won a sweeping
electoral victory, seemed to be
confirmation that the prime
minister intended to make good
on his pledge. The magazine’s
owner, after all, is an Orban ally
and would have been unlikely to
publish it without
encouragement from top levels
of the government.
The list was met with a tide of
condemnation, including from
Michael Ignatieff, president of
the Budapest-based Central
European University, who called
it “a flagrant attempt at
intimidation.”
But if that was the goal,
evidence soon grew from
Ignatieff’s own faculty at the
Soros-funded university that it
hadn’t entirely succeeded.
Miklos Koren, a mildmannered CEU economist, was
outraged when he saw the list.
First, because it existed. Then,
because he wasn’t on it.
Not that he had done much to
deserve inclusion. He said he
generally avoids politics. But
others on the list didn’t seem to
merit their spots, either. Some
were even dead.
“The only common theme
among the 200 names was that,
at some point, they had all
received money from an
organization that was Sorosfunded,” Koren said. “I could
imagine this kind of document
in the dark corners of the
Internet. But it was shocking to
see it in print.”
So Koren took to the Internet
and launched a petition to have
his name included among the
enemies. He encouraged anyone
else who wanted to be added to
sign as well.
Weeks later, nearly 8,000
people have added their names.
Many have left comments:
“My husband is on the list.
They excluded me. I demand
equal credit.”
“Liberal democracy should
be defended.”
“Wherever there’s a list, I
want to be on it.”
Some signatories pointed out
that Orban himself qualifies as a
Soros “mercenary,” having
received a scholarship from the
billionaire to study at Oxford
University as a young man.
The reaction, Koren said, “was
heartwarming.”
It was also revealing about the
state of modern Hungary, where
Orban exercises near-total
control and bullying tactics are
common. But there’s also free
expression, with opponents
speaking out on television, in
newspapers and on the streets.
On May 8, the day the new
parliament was sworn into
office, thousands of opponents
rallied against Orban just
outside.
“It’s not Turkey. It’s not
Russia,” said Gabor Klaniczay.
“It’s a new form of autocracy.”
Klaniczay, a medieval-studies
professor at CEU, was on the list.
But he’s used to it. He was on
enemies’ lists during communist
times, as well.
Back then, he said, it was
because he would occasionally
sign petitions circulated among
dissidents who sought changes
to the regime.
This time, there appears to
have been a more prosaic reason:
He was included in a Wikipedia
entry of notable CEU faculty
from the past and present, which
had been copied name for name.
Hence the names of the dead.
“It was very lazy,” he said.
Other organizations had their
entire staff lists copied and
included, right down to the
administrative assistants.
At the Hungarian Helsinki
Committee, a human rights
group, most of the staff members
rolled their eyes at the list, said
co-chair Marta Pardavi. They’ve
grown accustomed to being
targeted.
+ + ++
budapest — The
WorldViews list was spread
Call to schedule your appointment.
Limited appointments are available.
1-800-934-5860
The Beer Way to a Beer Window
™
1
renewalbyandersen.com
DETAILS OF OFFER: Offer expires 6/9/2018. Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. 20% off your project, no money down and 12 months nothing down, no payments, no interest when you purchase four (4) or more windows or patio doors between 5/14/2018 &
6/9/2018. Subject to credit approval. Additional $200 off your project when you set your appointment by 5/31/2018 and purchase by 6/9/2018, taken after initial discount(s), minimum purchase of four (4) windows or patio doors. Interest is billed during the promotional period
but all interest is waived if the purchase amount is paid before the expiration of the promotional period. Financing for GreenSky® consumer loan programs is provided by federally insured, federal and state chartered financial institutions without regard to age, race, color,
religion, national origin, gender or familial status. Military discount applies to all active duty, veterans and retired military personnel. Military discount equals 3% off your entire purchase and applies after all other discounts, no minimum purchase required. Savings comparison
based on purchase of a single unit at list price. Available only at participating locations. See your local Renewal by Andersen location for details. MHIC #121441. VA Lic. #2705155684. DC Lic. #420215000125. Some Renewal by Andersen locations are independently owned
and operated. “Renewal by Andersen” and all other marks where denoted are trademarks of Andersen Corporation. ©2018 Andersen Corporation. All rights reserved. ©2018 Lead Surge LLC. All rights reserved.
A10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
MAY 16 , 2018
The World
Cambodian leader fuels anti-Americanism
As elections approach, Hun Sen is casting the United States as the boogeyman during a crackdown on democratic institutions
BY
A NNA F IFIELD
phnom penh — The United
States has been busy in Cambodia these past few months, if Hun
Sen’s government is to be believed. Between trying to overthrow the government and secretly backing the now-dissolved
opposition party, it has been
supporting journalists who report “fake news” and spy for
Washington.
Oh, and the CIA has assassinated a prominent political analyst. (Never mind that the analyst
was actually a critic of the government and should therefore
have been on the CIA’s side, if the
conspiracy theories are to be
consistent.)
As Hun Sen, who has been
Cambodia’s prime minister for
the past 33 years, takes steps to
ensure he’s returned to office in
the July 29 election, he has been
looking for an external threat to
rally support against. And he
found the perfect bad guy in the
United States.
“The U.S. has become the
boogeyman here,” says Naly Pilorge, head of the Phnom Penhbased human rights organization
Licadho.
A former Khmer Rouge leader
who later helped overthrow Pol
Pot, Hun Sen got a shock in
national elections in 2013, when
the main opposition Cambodia
National Rescue Party did surprisingly well. It was buoyed by
support from young voters who
had not experienced the brutal
genocide of the Khmer Rouge era
and therefore did not feel a
special gratitude to Hun Sen for
leading them out of that awful
period.
During local elections in June
last year, opposition parties won
44 percent of the vote despite
concerted efforts to suppress
them. That was too close for the
government’s comfort, Western
diplomats in Phnom Penh say.
Since then, Hun Sen’s efforts to
suppress opposition and criticism have intensified — and
much of it has a strong antiAmerican streak.
The CNRP’s leader, Kem
Sokha, was arrested on charges
of treason last September, accused of conspiring with the
United States to overthrow Hun
Sen’s government. He has been
held in a remote prison on the
border with Vietnam and will
remain there until after the vote.
Shortly after he was arrested,
the party was formally dissolved
for plotting a “coup,” essentially
wiping out the prime minister’s
competition.
“That body is dead and was
taken to be cremated and buried.
We don’t know where the bones
are, so there will be no resurrection,” Hun Sen said during a
speech to students May 1.
The outside criticism has been
pointed.
Rhona Smith, the United Nations’ special rapporteur for
Cambodia, said last week that the
election could not be “genuine” if
the main opposition party was
barred from taking part.
There is no sign, though, that
the authorities will have a change
of heart.
The United States and the
Taliban
overruns
parts of
Afghan city
BY
President Trump’s White House
— and in return he has been
attacking the United States while
demonstrating his allegiance to
China.
The prime minister has told
immigration authorities to root
out American spies, suggested
the Peace Corps pull out and
forced the nongovernmental National Democratic Institute to
shut down.
He called William Heidt, the
Khmer-speaking U.S. ambassador, a “liar” and accused the
United States of being behind the
2016 assassination of prominent
political analyst Kem Ley.
But this anti-American sentiment is not a reaction to Trump,
Western observers in Phnom
Penh say, as it dates back to
before the U.S. election.
China has in the meantime
been stepping up its role here.
The
Chinese
military
held joint exercises in central
Cambodia, with Beijing reportedly donating the tanks and armored personnel carriers that it
brought here.
Beijing also helped establish Fresh News, a media outlet
that publishes articles favorable
to Hun Sen’s government and
that recently put out a 700-page
book of anti-American sentiment.
Hun Sen has stated that he
plans to be in power for another
decade, and that, according to
Pilorge of Licadho, means that
the repression will only intensify
in the months ahead.
“Right now, the international
community still has leverage
over the country,” she said. But
“it’s only going to get worse
because after the election, there
will be no constraints on them at
all.”
kabul — Taliban fighters overran
parts of western Farah city early
Tuesday but were reportedly repelled by late evening as Afghan
ground troops and reinforcements, backed by U.S. and Afghan
airstrikes, fought for hours to prevent the insurgents from capturing a second city since they were
driven from power in 2001.
Residents hid from explosions
and gunfire, some government
buildings were seized, and the
provincial governor fled the city
during the day, Afghan media and
local officials reported. A spokesman for the Taliban said that the
insurgents had taken most of the
provincial capital. The group also
posted images on social media
that seemed to show them inside
the city.
But as the hours passed, residents and officials told news agencies by phone that local security
forces were still in control of police
headquarters and the national intelligence agency facility.
By late evening, Afghan officials
said the insurgents were confined
to isolated pockets. Some were
said to be hiding in local homes,
making it harder to flush them
out. Officials reported a small
number of casualties during the
day, and there was no official update by evening.
Farah has only about 50,000
residents, and the surrounding
province, also called Farah, is a
remote and poor rural region
known mostly for growing opium
poppies. But if the city were to fall
to the Taliban, even briefly, it
would give the insurgents a major
psychological victory.
The Taliban recently announced that it was launching a
new spring offensive, shortly after
Afghan officials offered to restart
peace talks, and the attack on
Farah was its most ambitious assault since then in rural areas of
the country. Both the Taliban and
Islamic State forces have staged
shooting and suicide bombing attacks in Kabul and other cities.
Only one city, Kunduz in the
north, has previously fallen to the
Taliban. The insurgents captured
it in 2015 and 2016, but in both
cases, it was retaken by government forces after a few days amid
heavy fighting and airstrikes.
The insurgents have been
pounding at Farah for months,
taking over villages and sparsely
populated areas. During 2017, they
failed three times to seize the city.
This time, they appear to have
been pushed back by a joint military effort that included American
A-10 Thunderbolt attack aircraft
and elite security units from the
western border city of Herat and
southern Kandahar province.
American troops have been
working intensively for the past
several months to bolster the
fighting capacity of Afghan defense forces. They also have
worked to expand the Afghan special operations forces and air
force, both of which participated
in the fight for Farah.
anna.fifield@washpost.com
pamela.constable@washpost.com
PHOTOS BY TANG CHHIN SOTHY/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen and his wife Bun Rany, both in blue, at a ceremony last month marking the Khmer New Year.
Cambodian opposition party leader Kem Sokha is in jail, accused of
conspiring with the U.S. to overthrow Hun Sen’s government.
European Union this year cut off
funding to the National Election
Committee, which is supposed to
be an independent election supervisor but is widely considered
to be doing Hun Sen’s bidding.
Both China and Russia, by
contrast, have offered to send
election monitors instead, as well
as ballot boxes and voting
booths.
The United States in March
joined 44 other countries in a
joint call through the U.N. Human Rights Council for the Cambodian authorities to ensure that
the election will be free and fair,
starting by reinstating the CNRP
and releasing Kem Sokha.
“The international community
has not exhausted all the options
yet,” said Monovithya Kem, a
CNRP spokeswoman and the
daughter of the party’s jailed
leader. She is in exile in Washington, and the Hun Sen government has accused her and her
sister of being CIA agents.
“We have not seen democratic
countries working together having a unified message and a
unified response to this Cambodian crisis,” she said.
More international pressure
could have a big impact, said Lao
Mong Hay, one of Cambodia’s
leading public intellectuals, especially if sanctions were imposed
on Cambodia’s leaders.
“Without any pressure from
the outside or within the country,
Cambodia is becoming a dictatorship,” he said. “There is no
democracy or human rights or
rule of law.”
While banning his rivals, Hun
Sen’s government has been cracking down on independent media.
The local branches of Radio
Free Asia and Voice of America —
both independent broadcasters
that receive funds from the U.S.
government — were shut down
last year. Two RFA reporters were
arrested on suspicion of continuing to contribute stories to the
Washington-based media outlet,
accused of espionage.
“It’s revenge,” one of the reporters, Oun Chinn, said during a
recent court hearing. If convicted, he and Yeang Sothearin could
be imprisoned for up to 15 years.
Local radio stations that carry
RFA and VOA broadcasts have
had their licenses revoked.
“I think they are trying to stifle
criticism and expression by anyone campaigning against them,”
said Nop Vy, executive director of
the Cambodian Center for Independent Media. “The government wants to close the mouths
of these people so they can’t
criticize the government before
the election.”
The independent Cambodia
Daily, an influential English-language newspaper, was shut down
in September, ostensibly for tax
breaches.
“They decided to steal the
election and they needed to take
out the opposition and the independent media,” said Doug
Steele, general manager of the
Cambodia Daily. “We were basically the witnesses to what was
happening.”
Then, the last remaining English-language paper, the Phnom
Penh Post, was sold recently to a
Malaysian investor and executive
at a public relations firm that had
previously done work for Hun
Sen’s government.
Shortly after the paper reported on those links, the editor in
chief, Kay Kimsong, was fired,
multiple journalists wrote on
Twitter. The chief executive and
at least four reporters, all foreigners, resigned in protest.
In contrast to other strongmen
in the region such as Rodrigo
Duterte of the Philippines and
Prayuth Chan-o-cha of Thailand,
Hun Sen has not been invited to
P AMELA C ONSTABLE
DIGEST
SYRIA
Assad’s forces retake
last rebel area in Homs
President Bashar al-Assad’s
forces are in full control of the last
rebel enclave in Syria’s largest
province after “overpowering
terrorism” following the
evacuation of thousands of armed
men and civilians, a Syrian officer
told state-run TV on Tuesday.
The rebels agreed to surrender
the northern countryside of Homs
province to the government under
a deal reached this month.
According to the deal, thousands
of rebels and civilians who refuse
to live under government control
were to be evacuated to other
rebel-held areas in northern Syria.
State media and activists say
more than 27,000 civilians and
gunmen have left Homs’s
northern countryside in recent
days, the latest in a string of
capitulation deals by the rebels.
The deal on northern rural
Homs came days after rebels
cleared their last remaining
strongholds around the capital,
Damascus.
A Syrian security officer told
state-run al-Ikhbariya TV on
Tuesday that police have begun to
under rules applying to Windrush
immigrants. Javid said the
number was provisional as work
on records was still going on.
The immigrants are named
after the Empire Windrush, one of
the first ships to bring Caribbean
migrants to Britain in 1948.
The government has tried to
portray the Windrush fiasco as an
administrative problem.
But critics have said that the
crisis was a consequence of an
anti-immigrant climate at the
Home Office that dated to Prime
Minister Theresa May’s years as
home secretary from 2010 to 2016.
deploy in northern rural Homs,
restoring government control.
“We declare from the area that
we have triumphed over terrorism
and we declare that we have
overpowered terrorism from
Homs province,” said the officer,
who was not identified. “Starting
today, northern rural Homs will
begin to return to normal life.”
— Associated Press
BRITAIN
63 Caribbean migrants
likely deported in error
British authorities may have
wrongly deported up to 63
immigrants from the Caribbean,
Britain’s new interior minister
said Tuesday in the latest
revelation on the Windrush
scandal, which cost his
predecessor her job.
The government is under
intense pressure to come clean on
the mistreatment of descendants
of people from the Windrush
generation, who were invited to
settle in Britain after World War II
to plug labor shortages.
Although fully entitled to live
and work in Britain, an unknown
number of Windrush descendants
have been wrongly identified as
— Reuters
LEON NEAL/GETTY IMAGES
A woman walks on Tuesday past a decorated building in Windsor,
England, as people begin to arrive ahead of the royal wedding of
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, an American actress. The couple
will wed Saturday at Windsor Castle, located about an hour west of
central London. Harry’s brother, Prince William, will be his best man.
illegal immigrants and denied
basic rights. Some have been
detained and may have been
wrongly deported.
Sajid Javid, who took over as
home secretary, or interior
minister, on April 30 after Amber
Rudd was forced to resign over her
handling of the scandal, appeared
Tuesday in front of lawmakers
investigating the scandal.
Javid said Home Office officials
had identified 63 records of
people who were deported to the
Caribbean and may have been
entitled to remain in Britain
Bahrain revokes citizenship of
115 in mass trial: A Bahrain court
revoked the citizenship of 115
people at a mass terrorism trial,
the most to lose their nationality
at any one time, amid a years-long
crackdown on dissent. The Sunni
government increasingly has
wielded denaturalization as a
hammer to beat back dissent on
the Shiite-majority island.
Prosecutors accused the
defendants of building and
detonating bombs, receiving
weapons training and plotting to
kill police. They also alleged that
the defendants received training
and support from Iran.
Indonesian police kill suspected
militant, arrest 13: Indonesian
police killed a suspected militant
and arrested 13 thought to have
links to suicide bombings carried
out by two families in the
country’s second-largest city. A
police spokesman in the city,
Surabaya, said the militant died
in a shootout with police trying to
arrest him in connection with the
attacks, which killed 13. He said
the arrests were made in
Surabaya and other cities. A
family of six carried out suicide
bombings at three churches on
Sunday. A second family bombed
Surabaya’s police headquarters
on Monday.
Mexican radio journalist killed:
A radio news host was killed in
southern Mexico, bringing to at
least 32 the number of journalists
killed during the administration of
President Enrique Peña Nieto,
which began in December 2012.
The governor of Tabasco state said
Juan Carlos Huerta was fatally
shot by assailants traveling in a
vehicle. Gov. Arturo Núñez said
the killing did not seem to be
random or robbery-related.
— From news services
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A11
M2
Top E.U. diplomat adopts defiant stance in attempt to save Iran nuclear deal
BY
M ICHAEL B IRNBAUM
brussels — The European
Union’s chief diplomat took a
defiant stance Tuesday after
meeting with Iran’s foreign minister and other top European
diplomats to try to salvage the
Iran nuclear deal following President Trump’s decision to withdraw the United States.
Federica Mogherini, who negotiated the deal on behalf of the
European Union, listed a string
of proposals that taken together
may not be enough to convince
Iran’s leaders to hold to the deal
but probably will be seen in
Washington as a raised fist
against U.S. policy.
The Trump administration
has announced that it will be
reimposing sanctions on Iran
and is seeking to prevent companies around the world from doing business there.
Comparing the 2015 nuclear
agreement to “a relative in intensive care,” Mogherini said ideas
under consideration include
plans to deepen Europe’s economic relationship with Iran,
shield banking transactions with
Tehran, keep purchasing Iranian
oil and gas, and use E.U. financing for investments there.
“We are operating in a very
difficult context,” Mogherini said
after an intense day of diplomacy
that included meetings with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif and the foreign
ministers of Britain, France and
Germany. All of those countries
were signatories of the deal that
aimed to prevent Iran from
building a nuclear weapon in
exchange for economic incentives. She said European leaders
hoped to have a firm plan within
a few weeks.
Trump’s decision to pull out of
the agreement unilaterally has
created one of the biggest foreign
policy crises of his presidency,
infuriating Washington’s closest
allies in Europe.
This week, European leaders
will consider whether to order
European companies doing business in Iran to ignore U.S. sanctions. That would be the diplomatic equivalent of a slap in the
face.
And it may have limited effectiveness, since many companies
would prefer access to the larger
U.S. market over Iran’s relatively
N. Korea calls joint U.S.
exercises a ‘provocation’
N. KOREA FROM A1
official name. He also questioned
the sequencing of denuclearization first, compensation second.
Analysts said they were not surprised by these latest developments in what has been a year of
diplomatic whiplash.
“The U.S. and South Korea hold
an exercise, which contains some
strategic strike elements to it. U.S.
officials can’t seem to get on the
same page regarding denuclearization and what is required of
North Korea,” said Ken Gause, a
North Korea leadership expert at
CNA, a Virginia-based consulting
firm. “At some point, North Korea
was going to cry foul.”
Trump and Kim Jong Un are
due to meet in Singapore on June
12, which would be the first time a
North Korean leader had met with
a sitting U.S. president.
Trump and his top aides, including Secretary of State Mike
Pompeo and national security adviser John Bolton, have repeatedly
said that the United States wants
the “complete verifiable irreversible denuclearization of North Korea” — a high standard that Pyongyang has previously balked at.
Bolton, known for his sharply
hawkish views, has said that
North Korea must commit to a
disarmament similar to “Libya
2004.” He was undersecretary of
state for arms control in 2004,
when Libyan leader Moammar
Gaddafi agreed to give up its nuclear program in return for sanctions relief.
But this is not a tempting model
for North Korea. Seven years after
surrendering his nuclear program, Gaddafi was overthrown
small one.
British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson warned Tuesday that
Washington’s sanctions may be
able to strike around the world
because of the long reach of the
U.S. financial system.
“We have to be realistic about
the electrified rail, the live wire
of American extraterritoriality,
and how that can serve as a
deterrent to business,” he said.
Despite the E.U. efforts to save
the nuclear agreement, Zarif was
noncommittal on his way out of
Brussels.
“It’s a good start. We’re not
there. We’re beginning the process, and we need to receive those
guarantees,” he said, striking a
gloomier tone than he did at the
outset of the day, when he ap-
peared to be optimistic that the
deal could be buttressed.
Trump’s decision has created a
tricky game of strategy for other
countries that remain committed to the agreement, which was
endorsed by the U.N. Security
Council after years of negotiations.
Iranian President Hassan
Rouhani has staked his political
legacy on delivering prosperity
for Iranians through the deal,
which is now threatened by the
new U.S. sanctions. Iranian hardliners who always felt the agreement made too many concessions may be emboldened to
restart nuclear enrichment, but
they could risk airstrikes from
the United States and Israel if
they did so.
The Iranian split was clear
Tuesday, with some leaders in
Tehran making threats even as
Zarif indicated an openness to
the talks in Brussels.
“We have the capacity and we
are ready to resume our nuclear
activities to a much higher level
if the talks fail with Europeans to
save the nuclear deal after America’s exit,” Iranian Atomic Energy
Organization head Ali Akbar
then brutally killed by opponents
of his regime.
North Korea lashed out at Bolton, whom the regime derided as
“human scum” while he worked in
the George W. Bush administration, and at the suggestions that
North Korea should be dealt with
in the same way that the Bush
administration dealt with Libya
and Iraq.
In negotiations over the years,
North Korea has repeatedly
threatened to walk out over disagreements — and has on occasion actually walked out. In that
respect, Wednesday’s announcement is not surprising and underscores analysts’ warnings that
North Korea will not give up its
nuclear weapons easily.
During the April 27 inter-Korean summit, Kim Jong Un
and South Korean President
Moon Jae-in agreed to work
toward the “complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula,”
phrasing that was seen as code for
mutual arms reduction.
Earlier Wednesday, KCNA had
protested the joint U.S.-South Ko-
rea military exercises taking place
in the southern half of the peninsula, threatening to pull out of the
summit over this “provocation.”
North Korea said barely a word
about the drills during the computer simulation exercises that
took place through April, and the
South Korean and U.S. militaries
had scaled back and played down
the exercises to avoid antagonizing the North.
But the two-week-long Max
Thunder drills between the two
countries’ air forces, an annual
event that began Friday and involve about 100 warplanes, including B-52 bombers and F-15K
jets, have clearly struck a nerve.
“The United States will also
have to undertake careful deliberations about the fate of the
planned North Korea-U.S. summit
in light of this provocative military ruckus jointly conducted with
the South Korean authorities,” the
KCNA report said.
South Korea’s Defense Ministry
said that the Max Thunder drills
would carry on as planned and
that there is no disagreement on
this between South Korea and the
United States.
A Pentagon spokesman, Army
Col. Robert Manning III, said
Tuesday that the exercises are part
of the U.S.-South Korean alliance’s
“routine, annual training program to maintain a foundation of
military readiness.”
Manning said the purpose of
the exercises is to enhance the
alliance’s ability to defend South
Korea. “While we will not discuss
specifics, the defensive nature of
these combined exercises has
been clear for many decades and
has not changed,” he said.
North Korea, as it has in the
past, disagreed. “This exercise targeting us, which is being carried
out across South Korea, is a flagrant challenge to the Panmunjom Declaration and an intentional military provocation running
counter to the positive political
development on the Korean Peninsula,” KCNA said.
By mentioning the Panmunjom
Declaration, North Korea was referring to the agreement signed
last month by Kim and Moon fol-
FRANCOIS LENOIR/REUTERS
Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif in Brussels.
Salehi was quoted as saying by
Iran’s Fars news agency, Reuters
reported.
In Europe, leaders are faced
with a decision about whether to
treat their longtime closest ally,
Washington, as an adversary,
marshaling their economic
might to engage in full-out economic conflict. They remain
deeply dependent on the United
States for security guarantees
against Russia — something
Trump has grumbled about —
and are in the middle of negotiations over an exemption to new
U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminum. Many also share U.S. concerns about Iranian behavior in
the Middle East and its ballistic
missile program, but they are
divided on how to deal with the
issue.
“We have experienced a break
in German-American, in European-American relations,” German
Chancellor Angela Merkel told a
labor union congress in Berlin on
Tuesday. “The agreement against
nuclear weapons in Iran is an
agreement that certainly has
weaknesses, but an agreement
that we should stand for.”
lowing their historic summit.
They agreed to work to turn the
armistice agreement that ended
the Korean War in 1953 into a
peace treaty that would officially
bring the war to a close, and also to
pursue the “complete denuclearization” of the Korean Peninsula.
Trump administration officials
said they were continuing to work
toward the June 12 summit between Trump and Kim.
State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said the United
States had not received notice of
any change or cancellation. She
said the government is continuing
to plan for the summit and is
confident that Kim understands
the need for the exercises.
At the same time as threatening
to scuttle the summit with Trump,
North Korea canceled talks with
South Korean officials that had
been scheduled for Wednesday,
less than 24 hours after agreeing
to them.
michael.birnbaum@washpost.com
anna.fifield@washpost.com
Dan Lamothe and Anne Gearan in
Washington contributed to this article.
Give Your Deck a Makeover!
SPRING SPECIAL
300
60%
$
RESTORE Option
t4BOEBMM%FDLCPBSET
t3FTFU/BJMT&MJNJOBUF4QMJOUFST
t3FQMBDF3PUUFEPS%BNBHFE8PPE
t"QQMZ$PBUT$PMPS&OIBODFE4FBMFS
DECK
REPLACE Option
t3FNPWFPMEEFDLCPBSET
t3FNPWFPMESBJMTBTOFDFTTBSZ
t*OTUBMMOFXLJMOESJFEXPPEEFDLJOH
t"QQMZ$PBUT$PMPS&OIBODFE4FBMFS
WIZARD
RESTORE YOUR DECK LIKE MAGIC
'BTUt&BTZt"GGPSEBCMF
UPGRADE Option
t3FNPWFPMEEFDLCPBSET
t3FNPWFPMESBJMTBTOFDFTTBSZ
t*OTUBMMOFXNBJOUFOBODFGSFFDPNQPTJUFEFDLJOH
t*OTUBMMOFXNBJOUFOBODFGSFFWJOZMSBJMT
Schedule Your FREE ESTIMATE TODAY!
877.926.1283
www.deckwizard.com
Value
FREE Second
Color on Rails
Plus
OFF
Materials!*
* Restoration Only
Expiration date 6/30/18
72 Years of Integrity
Deck Wizard is a division of
Wheaton Door and Window,
one of the oldest remodeling
companies on the East Coast.
Established in 1945.
A12
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
$10
TICKETS
MAY 21–23
SAN DIEGO
PADRES
WASHINGTON
NATIONALS
MAY 16 , 2018
JUSTIN LANE/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
Danny Danon, Israel’s ambassador to the United Nations, accused Iran of helping foment the clashes
between Israelis and Palestinians. “We do have indications of Iranian funding into Hamas,” he said.
At U.N., politicians bicker
over Gaza Strip shootings
ISRAEL FROM A1
VS.
. WEDNESDAY,
since Hamas — considered a terrorist group by Israel, the United
States and most, if not all, Western countries — was elected by
the population there and took
over in 2007.
In Washington, State Department spokeswoman Heather
Nauert said the misery endured
by Gazans, who have the world’s
highest unemployment rate and
are largely cut off from the rest of
the world, is entirely the fault of
Hamas.
“We have seen how Hamas
continues to incite violence,” she
said.
Saudi Arabia and other U.S.
allies in the Middle East criticized
the Gaza violence and the relocation of the U.S. Embassy from Tel
Aviv. Turkey’s government ordered the Israeli ambassador in
Ankara to leave the country, and
recalled its ambassadors in Washington and Tel Aviv for consultations.
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Israeli Prime
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu
traded insults on Twitter. A Turkish government minister and
spokesman, Bekir Bozdag, said
Palestinian outrage had been fueled by the embassy move and
that “the blood of innocent Palestinians is on the hands of the
United States.”
In Dublin, Foreign Minister
Simon Coveney summoned the
Israeli ambassador to express Ireland’s “outrage” over the Gaza
shootings. The European Union’s
foreign policy chief, Federica
Mogherini, called on Israel to
show “utmost restraint to avoid
further loss of life.”
Mogherini was meeting in
Brussels with the foreign ministers of Britain, France and Germany, as well as their Iranian
counterpart, to discuss how they
can keep the Iranian nuclear deal
alive following withdrawal by the
United States. In remarks to re-
porters, she and French Foreign
Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian said
the embassy move was a violation
of international law and Security
Council resolutions.
The Monday violence, in which
no Israelis were injured, contrasted sharply with the festive ceremony at the new embassy in
Jerusalem, just 40 miles away. At
the U.N. meeting, called by Kuwait to discuss the Gaza situation, both U.S. allies and adversaries added their opposition to
the embassy move to their remarks on the violence.
“Who among us would
accept this type of
activity on your border?
No one would.”
Nikki Haley, U.S. ambassador to the
United Nations, asserting that Israel
acted with restraint when using live
ammunition against Palestinians.
“The unilateral decision by the
United States to move its embassy to Jerusalem does nothing but
inflame spirits,” said Sacha
Llorenti, Bolivia’s envoy. “The
United States, which supports the
occupying power, has become an
obstacle to peace. It has become
part of the problem, not part of
the solution.”
Karen Pierce, the British ambassador, expressed support for
an investigation into Monday’s
killings, then stated London’s position on the U.S. Embassy’s opening.
“Our position on the status of
Jerusalem and moving the American embassy is well known,” she
said. “The status of Jerusalem
should be determined in a negotiated settlement between Israel
and Palestinians, and Jerusalem
should ultimately be the shared
capital of the Israeli and Palestin-
ian states.”
The envoys from China, Sweden and the Netherlands also
went out of their way to reiterate
their government’s position that
Jerusalem’s status should be left
to negotiations and their intention to keep their embassies in Tel
Aviv.
Haley, speaking at the beginning of the session, said the location of the U.S. Embassy has no
bearing on whatever Israelis and
Palestinians might negotiate and
described the opening of the facility as “a cause for celebration.”
“It reflects the will of the American people,” she said. “It reflects
our sovereign right to decide the
location of our embassy. Importantly, moving our embassy to
Jerusalem also reflects the reality
that Jerusalem is the capital of
Israel . . . . Recognizing this reality makes real peace more achievable, not less.”
Haley and Danny Danon, Israel’s ambassador to the United
Nations, accused Iran of helping
foment the violent and deadly
clashes.
“We do have indications of
Iranian funding into Hamas,”
said Danon, talking to reporters
before the Security Council meeting.
“We know the riots are well
organized, well funded and well
orchestrated by Hamas,” he added. “Iran is supporting the riots in
Gaza.”
Mansour al-Otaibi, the Kuwaiti
ambassador to the United Nations, said he would circulate
another draft resolution Wednesday calling for the United Nations
to provide protection for civilians
in Gaza. He said it would be short
of a peacekeeping force, however.
carol.morello@washpost.com
loveday.morris@washpost.com
karen.deyoung@washpost.com
Morris reported from Gaza City. Ruth
Eglash in Jerusalem and Kareem
Fahim in Istanbul contributed to this
report.
FOR THIS EXCLUSIVE OFFER VISIT
nationals.com/Post
WISSAM NASSAR FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh joins a crowd of supporters Tuesday during his visit to the Gaza Strip’s
border with Israel. Israel has blockaded Gaza since Hamas took over in 2007 following an election.
Operators standing by. Call for home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
washingtonpost.com/subscribe
Available online only at nationals.com/Post, while supplies last.
Ticket brokers are not eligible for this offer.
Special ticket events are not eligible for this offer.
SF
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
RE
Day of mourning in Gaza as protest’s death toll hits 60
BY L OVEDAY M ORRIS
AND R UTH E GLASH
gaza city — Gaza residents buried their dead Tuesday as the
death toll of Palestinians killed
by Israeli forces at the Gaza
boundary fence climbed to at least
60 after several succumbed to injuries overnight, according to local health officials.
Monday’s
demonstrations,
which coincided with the opening
of the U.S. Embassy in Jerusalem,
were marked by a level of bloodshed not seen in Gaza since the
2014 war with Israel. Israel’s use of
live ammunition has drawn widespread condemnation, notably
from Turkey, which expelled the
Israeli ambassador Tuesday after
recalling its envoys to Israel and
the United States.
Gunfire rang out over Gaza City
on Tuesday as rounds were fired
during funeral processions.
Further protests were planned
as residents attended funerals and
prepared to mark the anniversary
of Israel’s founding, known to Palestinians as the “Nakba,” or “Catastrophe.” More than two-thirds
of Gaza’s population is descended
from refugees who fled or were
expelled at the time of Israel’s
creation 70 years ago.
However, crowds at the border
were thin after the organizing
committee for the demonstrations
called for a day of mourning to
bury the dead. Demonstrators
were asked to go home early as the
death toll climbed.
Monday’s killings more than
doubled the number of Palestinians slain in Gaza during six weeks
of demonstrations, dubbed the
“March of Return.” More than
2,700 people were injured, the Palestinian Health Ministry in Gaza
said, about half of them from live
ammunition. At least six of the
dead were under age 18, the ministry said, including a girl whose
family said she was 14.
The Health Ministry also reported that a baby died after inhaling tear gas at the main protest
area in Gaza. An unidentified doctor told the Associated Press on
Tuesday that the baby, Layla Ghaben, had a preexisting medical
condition and that he did not
think her death was caused by tear
gas.
One more person was killed in
demonstrations Tuesday, the
WISSAM NASSAR FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Palestinians pray at the funeral of an infant in Gaza City. Gaza officials blamed her death on tear gas, though others disputed that claim.
Health Ministry said.
Speculation was rife that
crowds were thinner because
Egypt had pressured Hamas to
order people home. Hamas leader
Ismail Haniyeh was summoned to
Cairo on a last-minute trip Sunday
night, and senior leaders were noticeably absent from Monday’s
demonstrations.
Egypt controls Gaza’s southern
border, which opens only sporadically, while Israel has blockaded
its boundary with the territory for
the past 10 years. Ahmed Yousef, a
former senior adviser to Haniyeh,
said it was likely that Egypt had
warned Hamas to prevent an escalation.
He said Hamas may have secured some short-term concessions from Egypt in return, such as
a sustained opening of the Rafah
crossing point with Egypt, which
has been open in recent days.
“This is the minimum they can
ask,” Yousef said of Hamas.
Israeli officials justified the military’s tactics as necessary to stop
Palestinians
from
breaking
through the border into Israel,
which blockaded Gaza after
Hamas took control of the enclave
in 2007.
Rupert Colville, spokesman for
the Office of the United Nations
High Commissioner for Human
Rights, said Tuesday that while
Israel has a right to defend itself,
lethal force should be a last resort
and was not justified against peo-
ple who were simply approaching
the fence. He condemned Monday’s “appalling deadly violence.”
Palestinian Authority President
Mahmoud Abbas condemned a
continuing “massacre” of the Palestinian people.
South Africa joined Turkey in
announcing that it was recalling
its ambassador from Israel.
Turkish Prime Minister Binali
Yildirim called on Muslim countries to review their ties with Israel
in the wake of the violence.
Israeli Prime Minister Benja-
“There is no doubt that he understands terror and
the massacres well, and I suggest that he not
preach morality to us.”
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, criticizing
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Twitter
min Netanyahu later attacked
Turkish President Recep Tayyip
Erdogan on Twitter, saying that he
“is one of the great supporters of
Hamas, and there is no doubt that
he understands terror and the
massacres well, and I suggest that
he not preach morality to us.”
Israeli newspapers Tuesday
contrasted the upbeat inauguration ceremony for the U.S. Embassy in Jerusalem with pictures of
the violence on the border but
characterized the Israeli response
to the demonstrations in terms of
self-defense.
“Every country must protect its
borders,” Netanyahu wrote in a
tweet. “Hamas is a terrorist organization that states its intention
to destroy Israel and it sends thousands of people to breach the border fence to realize this goal. We
will continue to act firmly to protect our sovereignty and our citizens.”
He was backed by the Trump
administration, which blamed
Hamas for the loss of life.
Yaakov Amidror, Israel’s former
national security adviser and a
senior fellow at the Jerusalem Institute for Strategic Studies, said
people around the world condemning the violence need to understand that the Gaza demonstrations are not like protests in
Europe.
“They do not take into consideration that this is a cover for a
terrorist organization that is attempting to stop Israel from building a system that would stop their
underground terror tunnels,” he
said.
Asked if Israel could have used
less-lethal methods to contain the
protesters, most of whom were
unarmed, Amidror said that such
a question was a good example of
those who “can sit in an air-conditioned office, drinking coffee, and
give advice to the Israeli army that
is facing off against many thousands of Palestinians.”
Tens of thousands of Palestinians had gathered on the edges of
the enclave from mid-morning
Monday. Many came to demonstrate peacefully, but some protesters appeared to be more aggressive than in previous weeks.
Israeli snipers opened fire, ostensibly to prevent any breach of
the border fence, and protesters
began to fall. No Israeli soldiers
were injured.
In Gaza, Hamas backed the
demonstrations, called to protest
the loss of Palestinian homes and
villages when Israel was formed in
1948.
Commenting in the Israeli daily
Yedioth Ahronoth, however, journalist Ben-Dror Yemini said the
situation was “self-inflicted” and
called on Palestinians to get over
the events of 70 years ago.
“There was a Nakba. The Arabs
of Palestine underwent expulsion.
Tens of millions of people
throughout the entire world, including Jews, underwent similar
expulsion. But only the Palestinians adopted an ethos of rejectionism, victimhood, suffering and
death,” he wrote. “They aren’t
looking to improve things for
themselves.”
loveday.morris@washpost.com
ruth.eglash@washpost.com
Eglash reported from Jerusalem.
50% OFF KITCHEN INSTALLATION SALE!
GOODBYE Old Kitchen!
Get Your Dream Kitchen NOW!
Your Kitchen Experts
YOU WILL LOVE YOUR
NEW KITCHEN FROM CAPITAL!
$FREE GRANITE upgrade
from Corian*
$FREE CONCEPTUAL DRAWINGS*
TRUST OUR 25 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE
MHIC #39985
*Conceptual drawing and 50% off installation sale provides 50% off regular labor portion of remodeling project and
must accompany purchase of cabinets and countertops on a full kitchen remodel at regular prices. Free granite upgrade
is difference in price between granite and Corian. Coupon must be presented and used at time of estimate. Expires
6/28/18. Capital is not a lender. Financing rates and payments vary based on approval, credit, terms, contract amounts
and other factors. Minimum monthly payments are based on minimum size job with one third down. Offers on ad cannot
be combined. All offers exclude previous contracts and orders. Call for more details.
FREE THOUSANDS OF REFERENCES
CALL TODAY! 1(888)861-2797
REMODELING, INC.
www.CAPITALREMODELING.com
AD CODE:
AD CODE: RP 0516
A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
MAY 16 , 2018
Judge declines to dismiss charges against Manafort
BY
S PENCER S . H SU
A federal judge in Washington
refused to toss Paul Manafort’s
criminal case Tuesday, saying his
indictment “falls squarely” within special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s authority to investigate
ties between the Russian government and Donald Trump’s 2016
campaign.
“Manafort was an obvious person of interest,” U.S. District
Judge Amy Berman Jackson
wrote in part of her 37-page opinion.
The decision delivered an expected victory to prosecutors and
clears a key hurdle to a September
trial in Washington on at least
some charges.
Manafort has a similar motion
pending to dismiss criminal
charges set for trial in July in
federal court in Alexandria, Va.
Manafort, 69, has pleaded not
guilty in both cases and argued
that Mueller exceeded his authority in charging him with felonies
including conspiracy, bank and
tax fraud, money laundering and
failing to register as a lobbyist in
his work before 2014 on behalf of
Ukraine’s pro-Russian president
at the time, Viktor Yanukovych.
Following the release of Jackson’s opinion, Jason Maloni, a
spokesman for Manafort, said,
“It bears emphasizing
at this stage that
Manafort is presumed
to be innocent of
these charges. But the
indictment will not
be dismissed, and the
matter will proceed
to trial.”
U.S. District Judge
Amy Berman Jackson
CHIP SOMODEVILLA/GETTY IMAGES
Paul Manafort has been charged with conspiracy, bank and tax fraud, money laundering and failing to
register as a lobbyist in his work before 2014 on behalf of Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych.
“Paul Manafort maintains his innocence and looks forward to prevailing in this matter.”
Manafort’s attorneys have argued that Deputy Attorney Gener-
al Rod J. Rosenstein acted improperly when he appointed
Mueller in May 2017 to investigate
not only collusion with Russia but
any other issues that “may arise”
from that investigation.
They objected to Manafort being charged for alleged conduct
that occurred before the 2016
campaign and asserted that the
authorization for Mueller’s probe
was so broad it was a “blank
check” and violates Justice Department regulations they say call
for a “specific factual statement”
of matters under investigation.
In her opinion, Jackson rejected those arguments.
“It bears emphasizing at this
stage that Manafort is presumed
to be innocent of these charges,”
she said. “But the indictment will
not be dismissed, and the matter
will proceed to trial.”
Manafort, she wrote, “was, at
one time, not merely ‘associated
with,’ but the chairman of, the
Presidential campaign, and his
work on behalf of the Russiabacked Ukrainian political party
and connections to other Russian
figures are matters of public record.”
She wrote that “given the combination of his prominence within the campaign and his ties to
Ukrainian officials supported by
and operating out of Russia, as
well as to Russian oligarchs,
Manafort was an obvious person
of interest.”
Manafort joined the Trump
campaign in March 2016 and resigned that August amid news
reports about his activities in
Ukraine.
Manafort’s indictment includes a conspiracy count citing
alleged conduct going into 2016.
Tuesday’s opinion by Jackson
was issued days after both sides
argued a similar set of issues to
dismiss charges before U.S. District Judge T.S. Ellis III. Ellis, who
has yet to issue an order, has
asked to see an unredacted copy
of the memo that lays out the
special counsel’s lines of investigation.
spencer.hsu@washpost.com
Rachel Weiner contributed to this
report.
Lost: Grenade rounds in green box. Owner: U.S. military. Reward: $5,000.
BY
P AUL S ONNE
The Air Force is offering $5,000
for leads on the whereabouts of a
box of explosive grenade rounds
that its personnel accidentally
dropped on a road in North Dakota while traveling between two
intercontinental ballistic missile
sites — the facilities scattered
across the U.S. heartland that
stand ready to launch nuclear
warheads at a moment’s notice.
Airmen from the 91st Missile
Wing Security Forces team were
traveling on gravel roads May 1 in
North Dakota when the back
hatch of their vehicle opened and
a container filled with the explosive ammunition fell out, according to a statement from Minot Air
Force Base.
On May 11, the Air Force sent
more than 100 airmen to walk the
entire six-mile route where the
grenades were probably lost, according to a statement from the
local Mountrail County sheriff.
Two weeks after it was lost, the
box of explosives still hasn’t been
found.
The missing ordnance is a belt
of linked grenades for the MK 19
automatic grenade launcher,
Sheriff Kenneth G. Halvorson said
in the statement shared with The
Washington Post. “This ammunition is specific to that launcher
and will not operate in any other
launching device without catastrophic failure,” he said.
The security forces of the 91st
Missile Wing are responsible for
protecting the intercontinental
ballistic missile silos that Minot
Air Force Base operates across the
Great Plains.
The weapons are manned by
specially trained airmen known
as missileers, who sit in the underground launch centers in the middle of North Dakota fields
24 hours a day and wait in the
event of a presidential order to
launch the weapons of mass destruction. Associated security
forces operate from a building
aboveground at each launch center to protect the missileers and
their equipment down below. The
security forces are armed with
weapons such as the MK 19 to
fend off any attack on the installations and protect the nuclear warheads.
The Air Force said its Office of
$49**
Special Investigations does not
consider the incident a criminal
matter and is seeking public assistance in ensuring the safe return
of the explosives. The office has
offered the number for an anonymous tip line for any information
about the missing grenade rounds
and a $5,000 reward for any information leading to their recovery.
Air Force Lt. Col. Jamie
Humphries, a spokesman at Minot Air Force Base, said in a statement that the ammunition was in
a green metal container weighing
42 pounds and is considered safe
so long as the container remains
intact.
Humphries warned that any
damage to the container, however, could result in an explosion. If
anyone locates the box and finds
the ammunition in a damaged
state, the area should be evacuated immediately, the statement
said.
“We are hoping to get contacted by someone soon with information that leads to the can’s
return,” Humphries said.
He added that the incident remains under investigation and
that he couldn’t speculate on
whether any disciplinary action
would be taken against the airmen who lost the explosives.
According to the statement
from the sheriff, people living in
the area were contacted by law
enforcement authorities immediately and asked to keep an eye out
for any explosives that have
turned up on their property.
The sheriff’s office also contact-
ed many of the oil field vendors
that operate in the area, as well as
farmers, asking them to forward
along any information about the
box of grenade rounds, the sheriff
said, describing the ammunition
as very dangerous.
The sheriff’s office wasn’t notified until three days after the
airmen lost the explosives, according to his statement. Agents
from the Office of Special Investigations met with him a week after
the incident to outline the status
of their investigation and request
assistance, resulting in a warning
to the public.
Anyone with information
should contact the Air Force Office of Special Investigations at
701-723-7909.
paul.sonne@washpost.com
Never Clean Your
Gutters Again®
Protect Your Gutters
Savings Event
18% OFF
+ EXTRA $100 OFF
*
**
Hurry, Call Before May 31st! Expires Soon
America’s #1
††
Gutter Protection Company
One Time Investment • Lifetime of Benefits
Get a permanent maintenance-free solution
Tested to handle up to 22 inches of rain per hour
Installs over new or existing gutters
Installed by mfr. trained & certified technicians
Triple lifetime NO clog performance warranty
FREE Estimates
Senior & Military Discounts Available
888-417-0653
www.HarryHelmet.com
*Min. purchase required, offer expires 5/31/18. Offer applies to Gutter Helmet only and must be presented at time
of estimate, cannot be combined with any other offers and subject to change without notice. Void where prohibited
by law **Subject to credit approval, fixed APR of 9.99% for 96 months. Lednor is neither a broker nor a lender.
Financing is provided by 3rd party lenders, under terms & conditions arranged directly between the customer and
such lenders, satisfactory completion of finance documents is required. Any finance terms advertised are
estimates only. †Based on an independent 2014 national marketing study. DC# 420218000007 MD MHIC #48622
VA #2705036173© 2018 Lednor Corporation
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
RE
Economy & Business
DOW 24,706.41
DOWN 193.00, 0.8%
NASDAQ 7,351.63
DOWN 59.69, 0.8%
S&P 500 2,711.45
DOWN 18.68, 0.7%
GOLD $1,290.30
DOWN $27.90, 2.1%
CRUDE OIL $71.31
UP $0.35, 0.5%
10-YEAR TREASURY
DOWN $6.10 PER $1,000, 3.07% YIELD
Uber says it’s ending
forced arbitration
for harassment victims
The heat is on
BY
CHRIS MCGRATH/GETTY IMAGES
Employees work in a television heat-testing room at a Vestel factory in Manisa, Turkey, on Tuesday. The “Vestel
City” megafactory has nine buildings and employs more than 16,000. The complex produces smartphones, LED
lighting and other consumer electronics. Vestel has been the leading exporter of electronics in Turkey for 20 years.
Drugmakers stop plan to triple price of cancer pill
BY
C AROLYN Y . J OHNSON
Last week, two drug companies
that jointly sell a blood-cancer
drug made a rare decision: to not
move forward with changes that
would have effectively tripled
the cost of the lifesaving medicine for some patients.
Most patients take three capsules of Imbruvica a day, at an
annual price of $148,000 — most
of which is picked up by insurance.
But just as early evidence began to
suggest a lower dose might be
effective, Janssen Biotech and
Pharmacyclics announced they
were discontinuing the old capsule and introducing once-a-day
tablets in four different dosages.
The new pills were all priced at
the same flat rate of $400 — or
triple the cost of the original capsule. Patients who had been taking
one or two pills a day would see
higher costs, and even if future
CURRENCIES
$1=110.33 YEN, EURO=$1.184
evidence supported the use of lower doses of the drug, patients, insurers and health systems would
not save money.
Oncologists were critical of the
changes, and last week, Janssen
and Pharmacyclics announced
they were reversing course. They
will keep the original 140-milligram capsule on the market — at
the original price.
“We have received feedback regarding the availability of Imbruvica capsules, and as a result will
continue to offer 140 mg Imbruvica capsules as an option in addition to our one pill, once-a-day
tablet,” Pharmacyclics, which is
owned by the drug giant AbbVie,
said in a statement.
Physicians, who say they frequently adjust the dose of Imbruvica to avoid interactions with
other drugs or side effects, had
been concerned the dosing change
could delay their ability to rapidly
change patients’ dosages as needed. While the once-a-day tablet
was described as an innovation to
increase patients’ adherence to
the drug for those challenged by
having to take three pills at a time,
physicians said the price of a drug
was more often a deterrent.
Doctors also saw the dosing and
pricing changes as a way to guard
against emerging evidence, in a
small pilot study conducted by
researchers at MD Anderson Cancer Center, that lower doses of the
drug could be effective in patients
with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The Value in Cancer Care
Consortium, a nonprofit focused
on lowering the cost of cancer
treatment, had been planning a
clinical trial to more rigorously
test lower doses.
“If they’re really preserving the
status quo, that’s fantastic,” said
Mark J. Ratain, an oncologist at
the University of Chicago Medi-
cine center who wrote about the
issue in the Cancer Letter, a publication read by oncologists. “I appreciate the fact the company is
receptive to concerns about not
only pricing, but [also] the safety
and efficacy,” he said.
The announcement came as the
Trump administration unveiled
its plan to lower drug prices. In a
speech Monday, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar
warned that in addition to policy
levers the administration plans to
use to keep drug prices down,
President Trump may use the bully pulpit.
“I can imagine he is going to be
very interested in the next company that takes a price increase not
justified by inflation or change in
clinical benefit,” said Azar, a former executive at Eli Lilly. “I can
tell you I wouldn’t have wanted to
be the one to do that.”
carolyn.johnson@washpost.com
D ANIELLE P AQUETTE
Under growing pressure, Uber
announced Tuesday that it will
no longer forbid passengers, drivers and employees to speak publicly about sexual harassment
or assault complaints they bring
against the ride-hailing giant.
The move to end forced arbitration marks a major shift for
the company, which has faced a
stream of misconduct allegations.
Uber is the second technology
powerhouse in the past year to do
away with requiring employers
or customers to settle sexual
misconduct complaints in private. Critics say forced arbitration shields predators and promotes a culture of silence.
As the #MeToo movement
ousted powerful men across industries, Microsoft announced in
December that it would allow
employees to sue the company for sexual harassment, rather
than handle the matter behind
closed doors, and it encouraged
other companies to do the same.
Uber also said it plans to
release a report as early as next
year on the prevalence of sexual
harassment and assault on the
platform — a move that follows
a class-action lawsuit in California that alleges the $72 billion
company failed to protect passengers from sexual predators.
“Once we are able to really
begin to shine a light on these
things, it equips us better to
actually deal with the issue,” Tony
West, Uber’s chief legal officer,
told The Washington Post.
Chief executive Dara Khosrowshahi, who took the helm eight
months ago, has pledged to overhaul Uber’s culture. The company gained a reputation for rampant sexism last year after Susan
Fowler, a former engineer, wrote
a viral blog post about harassment and retaliation she said she
faced on the job.
Uber subsequently launched
an investigation into its corporate environment, which led to
the firing of 20 staffers for sexual
harassment, bullying and other
causes.
The app took another reputation hit in April, when a CNN
analysis of police reports and
court records found that at least
103 Uber drivers in the United
States have been accused of some
form of sexual assault in the past
four years. (The outlet reported
that 31 drivers have been convicted of sexual crimes, including
forcible touching and rape.)
Some lawmakers had urged
Uber to waive binding arbitration for sexual harassment complaints.
Sen. Richard Blumenthal (DConn.) wrote in a letter to Khosrowshahi this month that the
practice allows corporations to
“cover up wrongdoing.”
In April, California state leaders introduced a bill that would
bar companies from requiring
workers to settle complaints in
arbitration.
Uber will continue to require
non-disclosure agreements for financial settlements. And racial
and gender discrimination complaints will be resolved in private.
“But we have learned it’s important to give sexual assault and
harassment survivors control of
how they pursue their claims,”
the company said in a statement.
“So moving forward, survivors
will be free to choose to resolve
their individual claims in the
venue they prefer.”
More than half of American
workers have signed employ-
“We have learned it’s
important to give sexual
assault and harassment
survivors control of
how they pursue
their claims.”
Uber, in a statement
ment contracts that bar them
from suing their employers for
sexual harassment, gender or racial discrimination, according to
a 2017 study from the Economic
Policy Institute in Washington.
Ira Rheingold, executive director of the National Association of
Consumer Advocates, said Uber’s
step reflects a shift in corporate
America. “It’s how a company is
going to need to act if they want
to regain public trust,” he said.
In Uber’s case, the company is
trying to win back riders lost to
Lyft, which doubled its ridership last year after the sexual
harassment complaints.
“They know where the wind is
blowing here,” Rheingold said.
“They understand how their reputation will suffer if consumers
perceive them as using arbitration to hide bad behavior.”
danielle.paquette@washpost.com
DIGEST
PHARMACEUTICALS
Six more states file
suits over opioid crisis
Six more states on Tuesday
announced lawsuits against
OxyContin maker Purdue
Pharma, accusing the company
of fueling a national opioid
epidemic by deceptively
marketing its prescription
painkillers to generate billions of
dollars in sales.
State attorneys general from
Nevada, Texas, Florida, North
Carolina, North Dakota and
Tennessee also said Purdue
Pharma violated state consumer
protection laws by falsely
denying or playing down the
addiction risk while overstating
the benefits of opioids.
“It’s time the defendants pay
for the pain and the destruction
they’ve caused,” Florida Attorney
General Pam Bondi said at a
news conference.
Florida also sued drugmakers
Endo Pharmaceuticals; Allergan,
a unit of Johnson & Johnson;
Teva Pharmaceutical and
Mallinckrodt, as well as drug
distributors AmerisourceBergen,
Cardinal Health and McKesson.
Lawsuits have already been
filed against Purdue by 16 other
U.S. states, Puerto Rico and New
York City.
— Reuters
RETAIL
U.S. retail sales
increased in April
U.S. retail sales rose in broad
fashion last month as bigger
after-tax paychecks helped
compensate for rising fuel costs,
signaling consumer demand was
off to a firm start this quarter.
The value of sales increased
0.3 percent in April, after an 0.8
percent advance in February that
was stronger than initially
reported, Commerce
Department figures showed
Tuesday.
Retail-control group sales,
which are used to calculate gross
domestic product and exclude
food services, auto dealers,
building materials stores and
gasoline stations, improved 0.4
percent after an upwardly
revised 0.5 percent gain.
Retail sales data for February
were also revised up to
unchanged from a previously
estimated 0.1 percent decrease.
Nine of 13 major retail
categories showed advances in
April since March of last year,
led by the biggest jump in sales
at apparel stores. Increased
receipts were also evident at
furniture merchants, buildingmaterials outlets, Internet
retailers and department stores.
Filling-station receipts
increased 0.8 percent since
March 2017, the most since
January and reflecting a jump in
gasoline costs that are now near
the highest level since late 2014.
— Bloomberg News
ENERGY
Oakland coal shipment
ban is struck down
A federal judge in California
on Tuesday struck down the city
of Oakland’s ban on coal
shipments at a proposed cargo
terminal, siding with a developer
who wants to use the site to
transport Utah coal to Asia.
are still in the running. Amazon
chief executive Jeffrey P. Bezos
owns The Washington Post.
U.S. home builders are feeling
more confident about their
sales prospects, reflecting
strong demand for newly built
homes with existing homes in
short supply. The National
Association of Home Builders/
Wells Fargo builder sentiment
index released Tuesday rose two
points to 70 this month. That’s
up from a revised reading of 68
in April and snaps a four-month
slide in builder confidence.
Kellogg will discontinue
OMER MESSINGER/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
A humanoid robot named Bonny, made by the German company Bayer, is on display at the CUBE Tech
Fair 2018 at the Arena venue in Berlin on Tuesday. The exposition is organized by CUBE, a global
matchmaking network for start-ups and investors who aim to shape the future of technology.
U.S. District Judge Vince
Chhabria in San Francisco said
the information the city relied on
to conclude the coal operations
would pose a substantial health
or safety danger to the public
was “riddled with inaccuracies,
major evidentiary gaps,
erroneous assumptions and
faulty analyses, to the point that
no reliable conclusion about
health or safety dangers could be
drawn from it.”
City leaders approved
construction of a rail and marine
terminal in 2013. The
$250 million project in west
Oakland was expected to bring
thousands of construction and
shipping jobs.
Oakland officials said coal had
never been mentioned as a
possibility for the site. Lawyers
for the developers said city
officials always knew there
would be a mix of goods,
including coal.
— Associated Press
ALSO IN BUSINESS
Arlington, Tex., is “no longer
moving forward” in the
competition to become
Amazon’s second headquarters,
the city announced Tuesday,
releasing details of its incentive
package. City spokeswoman
Susan Schrock said Arlington
realized it was “no longer a
focus” in the process. Arlington
offered incentives estimated at
$921 million. Amazon asked for
proposals last year, and 20 areas
operations in Venezuela
immediately, the cereal maker
said Tuesday, blaming the
country’s “economic and social
deterioration.” The food giant is
just the latest international
company to partially or
completely close shop in
Venezuela. Venezuelan
President Nicolás Maduro said:
“The company has been handed
to the workers. It will continue
to operate in the hands of the
working class.” Grinding food
shortages and rampant
inflation have put even cereal
beyond the purchasing power of
most families in the hungry
nation.
— From news services
COMING TODAY
8:30 a.m.: Commerce
Department releases housing
starts for April.
9:15 a.m.: Federal Reserve
releases industrial production
for April.
Earnings: Macy’s.
A16
EZ
. WEDNESDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
MAY 16 , 2018
THE MARKETS
6 Monitor your investments at washingtonpost.com/markets
Data and graphics by
Daily Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
26,750
Close
YTD
% Chg
24,706.41
–0.8
–0.1
25,500
24,250
23,000
21,750
20,500
Nasdaq Composite Index
7600
7351.63
–0.8
+6.5
Daily
% Chg
Industry Group
Leisure Equipment & Prod
Trading Co's & Distr
Textiles & Apparel
Construction & Engineerng
Construction Materials
REITS
Biotechnology
Power Prodct & Enrgy Trdr
Household Durables
Life Sciences
0
–4.0%
+4.0%
2.46
1.07
1.00
0.99
0.98
–1.70
–1.75
–1.84
–3.22
–3.75
6800
6400
6000
2711.45
S&P 500 Index
–0.7
+1.4
2900
2790
2680
2570
2460
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
J
F
M
A M
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
Close
Daily
% Chg
85,130.14
16,097.81
46,290.19
–0.1
0.1
–0.5
392.37
5553.16
12,970.04
7722.98
0.0
0.2
–0.1
0.2
6097.82
3924.10
31,152.03
22,818.02
–0.6
0.4
–1.2
–0.2
YTD % Chg
–15%
0%
+15%
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
202.41
100.74
186.44
342.12
152.59
129.74
45.48
41.72
67.15
81.79
14.71
241.56
187.98
143.74
53.92
–1.6
–0.5
–0.9
–0.7
–1.7
–0.5
–0.5
–0.8
–0.6
0.0
0.0
–1.0
–1.6
–0.4
–1.8
–14.0
1.4
10.2
16.0
–3.2
3.6
18.7
–9.1
–5.7
–2.2
–15.7
–5.2
–0.8
–6.3
16.8
Company
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
WalMart
Walt Disney
125.13
113.03
163.06
59.20
97.32
69.50
72.95
35.69
129.86
124.55
239.50
47.79
131.10
84.52
102.92
–0.7
–0.8
–1.0
–0.8
–0.7
1.0
–0.5
–0.5
–0.1
–0.3
–1.4
–1.4
–0.1
0.2
0.5
–10.4
5.7
–5.3
5.2
13.8
11.1
–20.6
–1.5
–4.3
–2.4
8.6
–9.7
15.0
–14.4
–4.3
Cross Currency Rates
US $
US $ per
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
Mexico $
1.1841
0.0090
1.3509
0.2733
0.7771
0.0508
0.0077
1.1409
0.2308
0.6563
0.0429
149.0510
30.1583
85.7430
5.6047
0.2023
0.5752
0.0376
2.8432
0.1858
EU € per
0.8445
Japan ¥ per
110.3300
130.6500
Britain £ per
0.7402
0.8765
0.0067
Brazil R$ per
3.6585
4.3316
0.0331
4.9416
Canada $ per
1.2868
1.5237
0.0116
1.7383
0.3517
Mexico $ per
19.6859
23.3105
0.1780
26.5963
5.3820
0.0654
15.2996
Consumer Rates
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 28,150.26
Russell 2000
1600.34
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 546.27
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
14.63
Daily % Chg
–0.6
0.0
–0.3
13.1
YTD % Chg
1.7
4.2
0.5
32.5
Daily
% Chg
–1.2
+1.5
+0.5
–2.1
–0.2
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Exchange-Traded
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Daily
(Ticker) % Chg
Close
Daily
% Chg
$1.6990
$16.27
$10.1875
$0.1152
$4.9350
–0.8
–2.3
+0.1
+2.3
+0.5
day
month
$1100
$1000
$900
–0.7
–1.3
0.5
–0.2
0.0
1.0
–1.9
0.5
–2.3
Gainers
Dress Barn Inc
FutureFuel Corp
Mattel Inc
3D Systems Corp
Extreme Networks
Pioneer Energy Svcs
United Stationers
Century Aluminum
Enova International
Medicines Co
Symantec Corp
Ensco PLC
Nutrisystem Inc
DXP Enterprises Inc
CARBO Ceramics
OFG Bancorp
Cato Corp
Exterran Corp
JC Penney
Fluor Corp
Daily
Close % Chg
$2.85
$12.70
$15.06
$12.89
$8.57
$5.35
$10.92
$16.65
$34.00
$32.12
$22.33
$6.87
$32.60
$39.06
$10.95
$14.05
$17.02
$29.21
$2.91
$48.48
10.0
6.7
6.1
5.5
5.4
4.9
4.7
4.7
4.6
4.5
4.3
4.2
4.0
3.9
3.9
3.7
3.7
3.6
3.6
3.5
Losers
AZZ Inc
Agilent Tech
Prestige Brands
Maiden Holdings Ltd
Fred's Inc
Itron Inc
William Lyon Homes
QuinStreet Inc
PDF Solutions Inc
Myers Industries
DR Horton Inc
Aerovironment Inc
Quorum Health Corp
RoadrunnerTrans Sys
TRI Pointe Group
LGI Homes Inc
Lennar Corp
M/I Homes Inc
PulteGroup Inc
MDC Holdings
Daily
Close % Chg
$39.60
$62.50
$34.59
$7.28
$1.70
$62.13
$25.04
$12.40
$10.82
$20.50
$40.58
$54.15
$4.98
$2.12
$15.95
$58.19
$51.21
$27.70
$29.30
$28.98
–12.1
–9.7
–8.9
–8.5
–8.4
–7.5
–7.4
–7.3
–7.0
–7.0
–6.7
–6.6
–6.4
–6.2
–6.1
–5.9
–5.7
–5.6
–5.4
–5.1
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
Close
$3.0560
$4.0225
$71.31
$1,290.30
$2.84
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
7200
2350
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
0.45
0.55
0.80
1.69
4.19
6.09
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
4.75%
Bank Prime
4.43%
1.75%
Federal Funds
3.89%
2.33%
LIBOR 3-Month
3.92%
30-Year fixed mortgage
10-year note
Yield: 3.07
2-year note
Yield: 2.58
5-year note
Yield: 2.92
6-month bill
Yield: 2.08
15-Year fixed mortgage
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
Facebook outlines network cleanup
BY T ONY R OMM
AND D REW H ARWELL
Facebook revealed Tuesday that
it removed more than half a billion
fake accounts and millions of pieces of violent or obscene content
during the first three months of
2018, pledging more transparency
while shielding its chief executive
from new public questioning
about the company’s business
practices.
The findings, its first public
look at internal moderation figures, illustrate the gargantuan
task Facebook faces in cleaning up
the world’s largest social network,
where artificial-intelligence systems and thousands of human
moderators are fighting back a
wave of offensive content and
abuse.
“My top priorities this year are
keeping people safe and developing new ways for our community
to participate in governance and
holding us accountable,” Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg wrote in a post. “We have a lot
more work to do.”
Along with fake accounts, Facebook said in its transparency report that it had removed 21 million
pieces of content featuring sex or
nudity, 2.5 million pieces of hate
speech and almost 2 million items
related to terrorism by al-Qaeda
and the Islamic State.
583 million fake accounts
removed; firm resists U.K.
request for CEO to testify
Though Facebook extolled its
forcefulness in removing content,
the average user may not notice
any change. For every 10,000
views of content on Facebook, the
company said, roughly eight were
removed for featuring sex or nudity in the first quarter, up from seven views at the end of last year.
More than 96 percent of the
posts removed by Facebook for
featuring sex, nudity or terrorismrelated content were flagged by
monitoring software before users
reported them. But users are still
reporting the majority of hatespeech posts, about 62 percent of
them, before Facebook takes them
down.
The site removed 583 million
fake accounts in the first quarter
of the year, roughly 100 million
fewer than in the last quarter of
2017. The company attributed the
decline to the “variability of our
detection technology's ability to
find and flag” fakes.
But Facebook’s progress in policing what users see isn’t likely to
temper fresh criticism from regulators in Europe over privacy pro-
tections for its billions of users
worldwide.
In the United Kingdom, Facebook this week again resisted a
request from British lawmakers to
testify as part of their investigation into Cambridge Analytica, a
political consultancy that improperly accessed personal information of about 87 million of the
social site’s users. Facebook said
that Zuckerberg “has no plans to
travel to the UK,” said Damian
Collins, chairman of the House of
Commons’ Digital, Culture, Media
and Sport Committee, in a statement Tuesday.
Collins said lawmakers would
be open to video testimony.
“If Mark Zuckerberg truly recognizes the ‘seriousness’ of these
issues as they say they do, we
would expect that he would want
to appear,” he said.
A spokesman for Facebook did
not immediately respond to an
email seeking comment.
European Union regulators are
also seeking to question Zuckerberg. On Tuesday, European regulators tweeted that negotiations
with him are continuing. A spokesman did not immediately respond
to an email seeking comment.
tony.romm@washpost.com
drew.harwell@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
technology
Quality
You Can
Complete Kitchen Remodeling
Afford
Superior Service | Years of Experience
Buy Now
and
Save
Financing
As Low As
$2000
limited time offers
other restrictions may apply
FREE Consultation | FREE Design | FREE Estimates
202-897-3095 DC | 703-382-8411 VA | 301-892-6015 MD
MHIC #125450 | DC #67004413 | VA #2705 108835A | WVA #036832
149
$
Per Month
ANDREW HARRER/BLOOMBERG
Billionaire Michael Bloomberg says his New Economy Forum will focus on “how we all work together.”
Bloomberg launches rival to Davos
BY
R ACHEL S IEGEL
For the past four decades,
heads of state, celebrities and
business elite have convened at
the World Economic Forum, the
yearly pilgrimage that merges debates on international problems
with days of fanfare in the snowcapped mountains of Switzerland.
This year, former New York
City mayor and financial media
billionaire Michael Bloomberg
will debut a conference to rival
the Davos conference, one he and
his partners say will focus on the
changing global economy and the
need for greater understanding
between the United States and
China.
Enter the New Economy
Forum.
“Now more than ever, we need
a new convening platform to
bring world leaders across the
public and private sectors together to assess the risks and opportunities created by the emerging
global order,” Bloomberg said in a
statement.
The forum will bring 400 world
and business leaders to Beijing
for two days in November to address topics such as technology,
global governance and urbanization. Bloomberg is partnering with the China Center for
International Economic Exchanges, a Beijing-based “think
tank with Chinese characteristics” led by former state vice premier, Zeng Peiyan, who will cochair the forum’s advisory board.
Bloomberg also tapped former
U.S. secretary of state Henry
Kissinger, as well as former U.S.
treasury secretary Hank Paulson,
to drive the forum’s content and
design. Advisory board members
include former U.N. secretary
general Ban Ki-moon, President
Trump’s former top economic adviser Gary Cohn and Janet L.
Yellen, former chair of the U.S.
Federal Reserve Board. Leaders of
11 other corporations and institutions have signed on as partners.
In an interview with the Financial Times, Bloomberg, who could
not be reached for comment, said
the Beijing forum would emphasize “actionable solutions” with
the help of public- and privatesector leaders from developed
and emerging economies. Unlike
Davos, Bloomberg said his forum
is not meant to be a lavish party
“where you go and have dinner
with everybody and hobnob with
movie stars.”
“Davos has been around for a
long time: It is a very big conference, and it is focused on lots of
world problems,” he said. “This
conference is focused on the
world and China as an emerging
power and how we all work together.”
Still, the rise of a new forum has
cast further scrutiny on the role of
elite summits in solving international problems.
Gordon Chang, author of “The
Coming Collapse of China,” said
that while the World Economic
Forum could use a competitor,
Bloomberg’s New Economy Forum has “critical deficiencies.”
Chief among them are the forum’s
location and the leadership of
Kissinger and Paulson, he said.
He cast doubt on whether China would allow voices critical of
the government and its policies at
the forum, noting that the state
controls who will be issued visas
to attend. If the forum were held
outside China, Chang said, that
alone would aid transparency and
meaningful conversations.
Moreover, he said, if the forum
is committed to finding new ways
of tackling the U.S.-China relationship, looking to Kissinger and
Paulson — architects of decades of
American diplomacy toward China — is not the way to go about it.
“I can understand there’s a lot
of competing considerations
when one thinks about the relationship between the U.S. and
China,” Chang said, “but you’re
not going to have a full airing of
those in a Paulson-KissingerBloomberg extravaganza in the
heart of Chinese power.”
For Guy Standing, an economics professor at SOAS University of London, the Beijing forum
serves as the latest example of a
closed-door summit among
the world’s elite. Standing, who
has attended Davos twice, said he
would have urged Bloomberg to
direct this money into grass-roots
movements to address inequality
and economic insecurity.
Instead, the November conference will serve as another gathering of elites “carving out policy
and influence and bypassing anything closely resembling democratic processes,” Standing said.
He noted the Bloomberg interview in which he told the Financial Times that his conference
would focus on China as an
emerging power and “how we all
work together.”
“Who is the we?” Standing said.
“Is it going to be you and me? I
somehow doubt it.”
rachel.siegel@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A17
RE
Trump’s support for Chinese firm remains a mystery Democrats pounce on
Trump for ZTE reversal
Just about
everything is odd
regarding
HEATHER
President Trump’s
LONG
recent tweet that
he wants to help
Chinese technology company
ZTE Corp. “get back into
business, fast” because its failure
cost “too many jobs in China.”
It’s odd that Trump, who
campaigned on saving millions
of U.S. jobs, suddenly says he
cares about a few thousand
Chinese jobs.
It’s odd that Trump, who
championed “America First,” is
worried about a single Chinese
firm.
It’s odd that Trump, who has
spent months berating the
Chinese for stealing U.S.
intellectual property, is coming
to the rescue of a Chinese
telecom company that’s trying to
compete with U.S. companies
such as Apple.
It’s odd that Trump, who
wants a strong U.S. military and
business climate, is ignoring
a House Intelligence Committee
report from 2012 that concluded
that ZTE “cannot be trusted to be
free of foreign state influence
and thus [poses] a security threat
to the United States and to our
systems.”
It is odd that Trump, who has
put extensive sanctions on North
Korea and Iran, seems to
be willing to forgive ZTE, a
company that admitted it
illegally shipped telecom
equipment to Iran and North
Korea. Trump’s own Commerce
Department’s punished ZTE in
April for “egregious behavior,”
including repeatedly lying to the
U.S. government. (Commerce
banned U.S. companies
from selling critical microchips
and other products to ZTE for
seven years.)
And it’s especially odd that
Trump, who loves to win, appears
to be caving so easily. Relief for
ZTE is one of China’s top
demands in the ongoing U.S.China trade skirmish.
“In the middle of a trade
dispute, the president is publicly
offering a major concession to
China that could potentially
harm national security,” said
Scott Paul, president of the
Alliance for American
Manufacturing, a coalition of
manufacturers and steelworkers.
Trump says he’s doing this
because ZTE buys a lot of parts
for its various phones from the
United States, and “this is also
reflective of the larger trade deal
we are negotiating with China
and my personal relationship
with President Xi [Jinping].”
But Trump’s tweet supporting
ZTE stunned many of his top
advisers, who were busy
preparing for another round of
Wonkblog
Move could jeopardize
U.S. national security,
senators warn
BY
WANG ZHAO/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Telecom giant ZTE said its major operations ceased after the U.S. ban on sales of critical technology
to the company. President Trump tweeted that he wants to help ZTE “get back into business, fast.”
intense negotiations with China.
Going after China was an issue
that inspired a lot of unity — in
Washington and beyond. While
few wanted a harmful trade war,
there was widespread agreement
that China has been stealing U.S.
intellectual property and not
been playing fairly on trade, and
Trump appeared to be getting
further than past presidents at
changing that.
“I don’t agree with President
Trump on a whole lot, but today I
want to give him a big pat on the
back. He is doing the right thing
when it comes to China,” Senate
Minority Leader Charles E.
Schumer (D-N.Y.) said in March,
when Trump launched an
aggressive campaign against
China, including with tariffs.
Now Trump has given
Democrats an opening to accuse
him of helping Chinese
companies and workers over
Americans.
Trying to make sense of
Trump’s ZTE move is tough.
There are those who point to
North Korea as the motivating
factor. They argue that Trump
wanted to give Xi a gesture of
goodwill as Trump prepares to
meet North Korean leader Kim
Jong Un to try to negotiate a
major foreign policy deal. North
Korea threatened to cancel a key
meeting with South Korea on
Tuesday, a reminder that the
situation is still delicate.
But it’s hard to buy that as the
tipping factor. Trump and Xi are
already friendly, and Trump
already had the meeting
scheduled to meet the North
Korean dictator face-to-face in
Singapore, a move that had
South Korea’s president saying
Trump should win the Nobel
Peace Prize. China is also
heavily incentivized to want a
resolution in North Korea,
regardless of what happens with
U.S.-China trade.
Perhaps another explanation
for Trump’s action on ZTE is that
he wants quick relief for
American farmers. Republican
senators from agricultural states
have been lobbying the president
every chance they get to make
sure farmers don’t end up as the
big losers in the U.S.-China trade
spat.
The mere threat of Chinese
tariffs on soybeans sent the price
per bushel below $10 this spring,
a move that starts to make it
difficult for some farmers to
make money. While prices have
rebounded a bit to climb back
above $10, they are still far below
where they were in 2013 and 2014
when a bushel was regularly
going for over $14.
Trump had told farmers at his
April 28 rally in Michigan, “There
may be a little pain for [a] little
while,” but it would be worth it
because he was going to win big
against China. But that is a tough
message to sell, especially as
Chinese buyers started canceling
orders for American soybeans.
Polling by the trade group
Agri-Pulse found that 67 percent
of farmers said they voted for
Trump, but in early March, only
45 percent said they would vote
for him again (and that was
before much of the rising U.S.China trade tensions).
U.S. officials are pushing
China to back down on
agricultural tariffs in exchange
for Trump rolling back penalties
on ZTE.
The situation looks a lot like Xi
is “using barriers against
American agriculture to
blackmail the Trump
administration into accepting
ZTE’s behavior,” China expert
Derek Scissors of the
conservative American
Enterprise Institute told the
Associated Press.
Trump and his top deputies,
such as economic adviser Larry
Kudlow, attempted Tuesday to
cast the ZTE move as just a small
step, insisting that the president
had not given up on the bigger
prize of going after China on
intellectual property and the
trade deficit.
But in China, Trump’s ZTE
comment was portrayed as a
victory. State-run media outlet
China Daily said Chinese leaders
“praised” the move, saying it was
the result of “close contact”
between the nations. It’s a tactic
Xi could easily try again.
Trump appears to have given
away some leverage on an issue
just about everyone in America
was backing him on.
It remains a mystery why.
heather.long@washpost.com
D AMIAN P ALETTA
Top Senate Democrats on
Tuesday slammed President
Trump’s decision to rescue the
giant Chinese technology firm
ZTE, saying relief for a company
that violated U.S. law and then
lied about its behavior should
not be offered as a concession
during trade talks.
Senate
Minority
Leader
Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.),
along with Sens. Ron Wyden
(D-Ore.) and Sherrod Brown (DOhio), wrote in a letter to Trump
that easing U.S. penalties on ZTE
would “call into grave doubt
whether this Administration will
put American jobs and national
security first.”
The Obama and Trump administrations previously had
sought to punish ZTE, a huge
company that makes phones and
other products, for selling items
to countries in violation of U.S.
sanctions. Lawmakers from both
parties also have warned that
ZTE’s close ties to the Chinese
government could make it a
cybersecurity threat to the United States.
The company was found also
to have lied about selling phones
to Iran and North Korea. Trump’s
Justice and Commerce departments enacted stiff penalties,
which most thought could put
the company out of business
because it would be blocked from
acquiring U.S. parts.
Some senior Chinese officials
were enraged and have urged
Trump to reverse decisions made
by Commerce Secretary Wilbur
Ross and others. Trump on Sunday, in a Twitter post that
shocked many of his advisers,
said he had intervened to help
ZTE and protect Chinese jobs.
U.S. officials are now discussing a package of changes that
would relax penalties on ZTE in
exchange for China easing tariffs
on U.S. agricultural products,
although talks remain very fluid.
Democrats and some Republicans have accused Trump of
grasping for any leverage he
might be able to find in the trade
talks with China.
“America’s national security
must not be used as a bargaining
chip in trade negotiations,” the
Democratic senators wrote. “Offering to trade American sanctions enforcement to promote
jobs in China is plainly a bad deal
for American workers and for the
security of all Americans. Bargaining away law enforcement
power over bad actors such as
ZTE undermines the historically
sharp distinction between sanctions and export control enforcement and routine trade decisions
made by the U.S.”
The U.S. government previously had fined ZTE $1.2 billion,
and the Commerce Department
last month slapped it with a
“denial of export privileges,” a
move that could have effectively
put it out of business because it
meant U.S. companies could not
sell products to ZTE.
Trump is working to force
Beijing to allow more U.S. imports into China, and he has
threatened to impose tariffs on
steel and aluminum if major
concessions aren’t made.
On Monday, one day after
Trump said in a Twitter post that
he had instructed Ross to help
the company, the commerce secretary said that he was evaluating ZTE’s penalties but that his
decision would not be linked to
trade
discussions.
Trump
seemed to overrule that a few
hours later in another Twitter
post.
“ZTE, the large Chinese phone
company, buys a big percentage
of individual parts from U.S.
companies. This is also reflective
of the larger trade deal we are
negotiating with China and my
personal relationship with President Xi,” he wrote.
Trump met with Republican
senators on Tuesday during a
closed-door lunch. ZTE was not
discussed, several senators said.
damian.paletta@washpost.com
Erica Werner contributed to this
report.
When did mining become more than mining?
With no swiping or signing needed,
credit-card use gets perilously easy
In hawking its
iPhone X, Apple
produced a pretty
fly commercial.
Fly as in stylish.
Or, “totally lit,” as
Michelle
teens say.
Singletary
Apple’s “Fly
Market” ad
THE COLOR
highlights how
OF MONEY
easy it is to pay
with your face.
Three seconds. That’s all it
takes for the actor to pay for a hat
that flies off the rack and onto his
head. Another second and he’s
got on some cool sunglasses. The
shopping spree continues with
suits, shirts, stylish shoes, a chair
for mama and jewelry.
The tagline: “Pay with a
glance.”
With your face or fingertip,
you can now literally get into
debt in seconds.
For those of us old enough to
remember, paying with a credit
card used to take some time. The
cashier had to reach under the
counter to retrieve the creditcard-swiping machine. You had
to place your card in the device,
then the cashier needed to press
down hard to move a gizmo back
and forth to make an imprint of
your card with carbon copies.
Then you signed with other
customers looking on and
wondering what in the world was
taking so long. Go further back,
and you might recall a time when
merchants had to make a phone
call to the bank to make sure the
customer was approved.
The credit-card-imprint
machine has long been a
dinosaur in the digital age. But at
least you still had to sign your
name for credit purchases.
But soon, we will no longer
even need to do that.
MasterCard, Visa, Discover and
American Express have made
signatures optional for
merchants. You may have already
noticed that you’re not asked to
sign your name as often.
MasterCard announced in
April that merchants in the U.S.
and Canada no longer have to
make cardholders sign for instore credit or debit purchases.
Discover no longer requires
“point-of-sale signatures” for
credit and debit transactions on
its network in the U.S., Canada,
Mexico and the Caribbean.
American Express won’t
require any of its merchants
around the globe to collect
signatures.
Citing the migration to chip
technology for credit cards, Visa
also said it was making
signatures optional for its
merchants in North America
with chip readers.
On the heels of yet another
data breach, this time of the
Chili’s restaurant chain, new
security features have cut down
significantly on fraud, making it
easier to authenticate a
purchase.
But not for an Apple Pay
second do I believe security
concerns are the primary reason
for the retiring of our signatures.
“The goal is to speed
customers through checkout
lines,” MasterCard said.
Trevor Noah, the host of “The
Daily Show” on Comedy Central,
recently commented on the
absurdity of the notion that
signing your name is
inconvenient.
“It’s not like children are
saying, ‘Daddy, can you spend
more time with us’ and the dad is
forced to say, ‘I would, but I’ve
got to sign all these receipts.
Damn you, American Express,’”
Noah joked.
Sure, credit-card security is a
big concern for merchants and
consumers. But it’s also true that
the faster the credit transactions,
the less time you have to
consider your purchases. Speed
is not your friend when
spending.
When you use cash, there’s
often a prick of pain at handing
over real money. For some, that
sting may give them pause. But
as we create faster ways to pay,
we’ll be getting too numb to the
cost of credit.
“Our lack of awareness of
spending may be the scariest
thing about the more and more
sophisticated ways with which
companies are seducing us into
avoiding the pain of paying,”
write Dan Ariely and Jeff Kreisler
in “Dollars and Sense: How We
Misthink Money and How to
Spend Smarter.”
They continue: “So many
recent technological advances
have made payment so easy that
we’re barely aware of our
spending. … Painless.
Thoughtless. If we don’t even
know something’s happening,
how can we feel it?”
Two-thirds of cardholders
have carried a balance within the
past six months, according to a
recently released survey by
CreditCards.com. Only 39
percent of these credit users even
know how much interest they are
paying for the balances they are
carrying forward.
Our scribbled signatures have
become perfunctory. Most of us
sign our names so illegibly that
it’s useless in proving our
identity.
Still, it’s not a good thing that
“sign here” may soon become a
distant memory. The act of
signing for credit means
something. It’s an opportunity to
realize that you’re going into
debt, even if temporarily. So, no,
we shouldn’t be cheering a
speedier checkout process
online, on our phones or in
person. Because it’s in our pauses
that we make better financial
decisions.
michelle.singletary@washpost.com
BHP’s integrated remote operations centre in Perth, Australia, 743 miles from the closest mine, utilises
advanced technology to deliver the resources the world needs, efficiently and safely.
Australia’s global resources company
A18
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
MAY 16 , 2018
PowerPost
INTELLIGENCE FOR LEADERS WASHINGTONPOST.COM/POWERPOST
Some Trump supporters are feeling pain from his policies
President Trump
sometimes seems
impervious to
the second- and
JAMES
third-order
HOHMANN
consequences of
his decisions.
Several recent developments
have highlighted the unintended
— though often foreseeable —
effects the president’s policies
are having on his own
supporters.
In many cases, he’s following
through on campaign promises
— such as cutting the flow of
immigrants, renegotiating trade
deals and rolling back
regulations put in place by
President Barack Obama. But in
the deeply interconnected global
economy, the devil is always in
the details, and the
implementation of some policies
may do more to hurt than help
the people who put their faith in
Trump to fix their problems.
As one example, smallbusiness owners who voted for
him might be forced to shut
down because the president is
making it harder for them to
hire guest workers. Here’s a story
that appeared over the weekend
in the Herald Leader of
Lexington, Ky.:
“Eddie Devine voted for
[Trump] because he thought he
would be good for American
business. Now, he says, the
Trump administration’s
restrictions on seasonal foreign
labor may put him out of
business. ‘I feel like I’ve been
tricked by the devil,’ said Devine,
owner of . . . Devine Creations
Landscaping. ‘I feel so stupid.’
Devine says it has been years
since he could find enough
dependable, drug-free American
workers for his $12-an-hour jobs
mowing and tending landscapes
for cemeteries, shopping centers
and apartment complexes across
Central Kentucky. So for years he
has hired 20 seasonal workers,
mostly from Guatemala, through
the U.S. Labor Department’s H2B ‘guest worker’ program.
Importing these workers for a
The
Daily 202
DANIEL ACKER/BLOOMBERG NEWS
If President Trump’s trade dispute with China leads to punishing retaliatory tariffs, some farmers may be forced to go out of business.
few months cost him an
additional $18,000 in fees and
expenses beyond their wages,
which must be the same as he
pays American workers. But
that’s the only way he could
serve his customers.
“Restrictions on guest-worker
visas, which began during
[Obama’s] second term as
immigration became a hot issue
for conservatives, have gotten
worse under Trump. And it’s
even more of a problem now that
the unemployment rate is the
lowest it has been in years.
Devine says he lost a $100,000
account because he didn’t have
enough men to do the job. . . .
“He isn’t alone. Cuts in H-2B
visas are hurting small
businesses across the country
that can’t find Americans willing
to do hard, manual labor:
Maryland crab processors, Texas
shrimp fishermen, and Kentucky
landscapers and construction
companies. . . . Devine said he
believed Trump’s America-first
promises. But cutting off a good
supply of seasonal foreign labor
when Americans won’t take
those jobs is only hurting
American business owners and
the U.S. workers they employ, he
said. These workers aren’t
immigrants, and there is no path
to U.S. citizenship. When their
seasonal work is done, they
return home. That’s why Devine
thinks the Trump
administration’s stifling of guestworker programs has more to do
with racism than economics. ‘I
MANNERS
DICTATE YOU
SLURP UP
EVERY LAST
BITE
think there’s a war on brown
people,’ he said.
“But what makes him most
angry is that Trump’s properties
in Florida and New York have
used 144 H-2B workers since
2016. ‘I want to know why it’s OK
for him to get his workers, but
supporters like me don’t get
theirs,’ Devine said.”
As another example, General
Motors is cutting its second shift
at the Lordstown Assembly plant
outside Youngtown, Ohio, next
month. The move could cost
1,500 jobs at the 3,000-employee
plant that builds the Chevrolet
Cruze. This is in the heart of the
Mahoning Valley, long a
Democratic stronghold that
broke toward Trump in 2016
because of his popularity with
the kinds of blue-collar workers
who are about to lose their jobs
or reluctantly take buyouts.
GM says it is downsizing
because there is “lower customer
demand for compact cars.” The
plant already downsized last
year, moving from three shifts to
two, partly because consumers
are buying more crossovers,
SUVs and trucks at the expense
of smaller vehicles.
Rep. Tim Ryan (D-Ohio), who
represents the plant, blames
reduced demand and the
pending layoffs on Trump’s
decision to scrap fuel efficiency
standards — which the auto
companies did not want. “While
low gas prices paved the way for
the decline of compact cars . . .
Trump’s April announcement to
weaken fuel economy standards
put his thumb on the scale in
favor of the larger cars and SUV’s
made elsewhere, hurting our
community specifically,” the
congressman said in a statement
Friday. “The truth is, the fuel
economy standards help sell
more Chevy Cruzes.”
Separately, gas prices might
go up because Trump pulled out
of the Iranian nuclear agreement
last week. (Iran is the world’s
fifth-biggest oil producer.)
And the president’s decision
to pull out of the Iran deal and
reimpose sanctions will cost
Boeing contracts worth as much
as $20 billion to replenish Iran’s
aging fleet of commercial planes.
The Chicago-based aerospace
giant played down the impact
last week, noting that there’s
already a backlog of orders for
737 aircraft, so production won’t
slow. But $20 billion in planes
represents quite a lot of
manufacturing work.
Those jobs will go to other
countries — specifically Russia.
“Russian aircraft makers, who
can skirt the U.S. sanctions, are
already working on deals,” the
Puget Sound Business Journal
reports. “A Russian aircraft
maker is exploring plans to
make a modified version of its
Sukhoi Superjet 100 regional
airliner so Iranian airlines can
buy the jet.”
Last, the trade dispute with
China is increasing uncertainty
for farmers and may still lead to
punishing retaliatory tariffs.
China buys 60 percent of all
U.S. soybean exports, and
growers of the crop could be
hard-pressed if the
administration cannot cut a deal
with Beijing. Soybean-producing
counties went for Trump by a
margin of more than
12 percentage points in 2016.
Dave Walton, who voted for
Trump and tends soybeans, corn
and livestock in eastern Iowa, is
not sure his farm could take the
added stress. “If this turns into a
longer-term thing, we’re going to
see friends and neighbors go out
of business,” he told The
Washington Post’s Caitlin Dewey
last month. “If this stretches into
years, we ourselves won’t be able
to sustain it.”
Walton’s 800-acre farm, in his
family for 118 years, has already
been struggling to stay above
water with falling crop prices,
and tariffs could make
profitability difficult. “Right
now, soybean growers in Iowa
and across the nation are
encouraging the administration
to engage positively with China,”
he said. And if that doesn’t
happen, he added: “Iowa
leads the nation in many things.
The presidential election is one
of them.”
james.hohmann@washpost.com
Older and younger GOP voters don’t
agree on climate change, survey finds
Democrats and
Republicans are
deeply divided on
what to do about
human-caused
DINO
climate change —
GRANDONI
and whether it
even exists.
But a lesser-known yet
probably more important
division exists when it comes to
defining the climate positions of
future elected GOP officials. It is
the gap between older and
younger GOP voters.
According to a new survey
released by the Pew Research
Center on Monday, millennial
GOP voters — those born
between 1981 and 1996
— disagree with their older
partisan counterparts across
a range of energy and
environmental issues. The
younger Republicans also
disagree with older GOP
members on the extent to which
climate change is already
affecting the world.
This new survey, and others,
suggest that tomorrow’s
Republican Party, writ large, will
think and talk about climate
change in a starkly different way
from today’s GOP — whose
leader, President Trump, along
with many Republican members
of Congress, have repeatedly
dismissed the findings of climate
science as a hoax.
But the shift will probably fall
short of bringing the GOP into
perfect alignment with
Democrats on climate change, if
the Pew study is any indication.
Republicans, both young and old,
distrust the government to solve
the problem.
According to the survey, about
45 percent of younger
Republican voters say they see
some of the results of global
climate change in their
communities, whereas only a
third of older GOP voters feel the
same way. A majority of GOP
millennials — 59 percent — said
they see at least some effect of
climate change somewhere in the
United States.
The
Energy
202
DINING ETIQUETTE TIP#12
Sloth Bear
ZOOFARI
DINE FOR WILDLIFE sponsored by GEICO®
May 17, 2018 • 6:30-9:30 • Smithsonian’s National Zoo
It’s feeding time! Satisfy your appetite with the gourmet fare that has
made ZooFari a local tradition for 34 years. Sample tastings from nearly
100 of Washington’s finest restaurants and savor wines from around the
world. This is DC’s longest-running gourmet food tasting event and, with
a silent auction and live entertainment, tickets sell fast! FONZ members
enjoy special pricing. fonz.org/zoofari
LEAD SPONSOR: GEICO. Sponsors: Big Bus Tours, Cisco Brewers, Comcast, 94.7 Fresh FM, Giant Food, Groupon, La Prima Catering/
Catering by Seasons, NBC4, PepsiCo, Washingtonian Magazine, The Washington Post, WTOP and WTOP.com
E0362 3 x10.5
Similarly, 36 percent of GOP
voters say the planet is warming
because of human activity — a
position supported by a vast
majority of the scientific
community. Only half that
percentage of baby boomers in
the GOP, born between 1946 and
1964, said the same to surveyors.
On energy issues, Republican
millennials are vastly less
supportive than the older
generation of GOP voters of
expanding coal mining
(43 percent vs. 71 percent),
hydraulic fracturing or
“fracking” (47 percent vs.
68 percent) and offshore oil and
natural gas drilling (44 percent
vs. 75 percent).
While many political pundits
think young voters are more
motivated by climate change,
that extra enthusiasm is really
seen only among Republicans,
according to Anthony
Leiserowitz, director of the Yale
Program on Climate Change
Communication, who has
conducted his own surveys on
U.S. opinion on climate change.
“There is a common wisdom
out there that younger people
care more about climate change
than older people,” Leiserowitz
said. “We have looked and looked
and looked and looked, and we’ve
never found the evidence for that
in our survey data.
“But one exception to that,” he
said, “is among Republicans, and
that young Republicans tend to
have more engaged views of
climate change.”
That gap between younger and
older GOP voters exists when it
comes to the causes and
consequences of climate
change. But the rift narrows
when GOP voters are asked what
to do about global warming, Pew
found.
Across generations,
Republicans are skeptical of
government policies aimed at
mitigating the causes and effects
of climate change. Millennials
and baby boomers in the GOP
generally agree, for example, that
policies aiming at reducing the
effects of climate change make
no difference for the
environment (44 percent vs.
45 percent).
On this and other questions
about policy solutions, “you’re
not seeing significant differences
by generation among
Republicans,” said Cary Funk,
Pew’s director of science and
society research and lead author
of the report.
At the moment, many
Republicans are hesitant to make
a proactive move to stem climate
change in an aggressive
way. “Climate change occurs no
matter what,” Rep. Paul D. Ryan
(R-Wis.), now House speaker,
said in 2014. “The question is,
can and should the federal
government do something about
it? And I would argue the federal
government, with all its tax and
regulatory schemes, can’t.”
That distrust of government
intervention means climate
policies from future Republican
leaders will probably be quite
different from Democratic ones.
They may look like a recent
proposal from a group of senior
GOP statesmen — including
former treasury secretaries
James A. Baker, Henry Paulson
and George P. Shultz — to impose
a national carbon tax in exchange
for getting the government out of
the way elsewhere by rolling
back other emissions
regulations. That trade-off is
popular with some economists,
including Democrats such as
former National Economic
Council director Lawrence H.
Summers, while irking some
environmental groups, such
as the Natural Resources Defense
Council.
One of the areas of agreement
between survey respondents of
both parties was on the
expansion of wind and solar
power. Large majorities among
both Democrats and Republicans
favor building more wind turbine
farms (91 percent and 79 percent)
and solar-panel farms
(93 percent and 84 percent).
dino.grandoni@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A19
RE
WEDNESDAY Opinion
DANA MILBANK
WASHINGTON SKETCH
MEGAN MCARDLE
A reckoning
is coming
for blue states
For Democrats,
plenty of cooks
in the kitchen
B
H
ey! What’s the big idea? No, really.
What’s the big idea?
A dozen possible Democratic
presidential candidates assembled at a downtown Washington hotel
Tuesday for one of the first cattle calls of
the 2020 campaign. The good news: There
were, on that stage, all of the personal qualities and policy ideas needed to defeat President Trump. The bad news: These qualities and ideas were not in any one person.
The perfect candidate to dethrone
Trump would have Sen. Sherrod Brown’s
(Ohio) blue-collar appeal, the youth of Sen.
Chris Murphy (Conn.), the looks of Rep. Joe
Kennedy (Mass.) and the moral clarity of
Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.). She would have
the sensibility of Sen. Amy Klobuchar
(Minn.), the feminist firepower of Sen.
Kirsten Gillibrand (N.Y.) and the populist
fervor of Sen. Elizabeth Warren (Mass.). He
would have Julián Castro’s oratory, Sen.
Cory Booker’s (N.J.) facility with data, the
earnest wonkery of New York City Mayor
Bill de Blasio and Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, and the wealth of Tom Steyer.
That ideal candidate would also be able
to harmonize the cacophony of agenda
items I heard over several hours: higher
minimum wage, huge infrastructure
spending, more broadband access, two
years of free college, free public universities, universal pre-K, universal health
care, fair housing, police reforms, national
paid leave, equal pay for equal work, clean
air, clean water, climate action, LGBT
rights, cracking down on predatory lenders, tax incentives for poor areas, a federal
job guarantee, election protections, as well
as criminal-justice, campaign finance and
immigration reforms, and higher taxes on
the wealthy and corporations, gun control
and more.
In fairness, the Center for American
Progress’s annual Ideas Conference was
structured to cover the full range of progressive ideas. But it also served to highlight the difficulty Democrats will have in
developing a coherent alternative to
Trump. Many of the ideas advanced have
widespread support, and many are big
ideas. But the best way to put them all together still bedevils Democrats, just as it
did Hillary Clinton, who in 2016 had a proposal for everything but seemed to say
nothing.
For November’s midterm elections, it
may be enough for Democrats to say they
are against Trump. Congressional Democratic leaders took a stab at a unified agenda for 2018 — “A Better Deal” — and were
roundly mocked by progressives.
But to beat Trump, they’ll need more.
Trump convinced tens of millions of Americans that they are losing ground because of
immigrants, racial and religious minorities, and foreigners. What will Democrats
advance to counter that grim message?
Booker, using a roving microphone to
deliver his keynote, auditioned as “one of
those senators who, when I shop at my local bodega, I see people using food stamps.”
Brown offered his crossover appeal:
“Trump won my state by almost nine
points.” Klobuchar went for regional appeal: “The Midwest cannot be left behind
at the gas station in 2020.” De Blasio let
them know New York crime is down four
years in a row.
“I’m writing a children’s book on the history of suffrage,” Gillibrand announced.
“I co-authored a book on clean energy a
few years ago,” said Inslee.
They also tried out some prospective
campaign lines.
“If it wasn’t Lehman Brothers, but Lehman Sisters, we might not have had the financial collapse,” ventured Gillibrand.
“Which side are you on?” asked Brown.
“Are you on the side of Wall Street or the
side of the little guy?”
Contributed Klobuchar: “We resist, but
we also insist, on a better way forward.”
Yes, but which way? The would-be candidates pointed in all directions.
Brown spoke of worker rights, the minimum wage and infrastructure. Castro had a
“new blueprint” that ranged from universal
pre-K to two years of free college. Gillibrand
wants national paid leave. Booker wants
guaranteed jobs. Kennedy spoke of universal coverage and mental-health parity.
Warren spoke of automatic voter registration. “Democrats are the party of ideas
— lots of ideas,” she said, listing a dozen.
“Most of these ideas won’t go anywhere until we deal with the defining crisis of this
moment in our history. . . . Democracy is
crumbling around us.”
Sanders, with one presidential run under his belt, was better than most at articulating a unified theory. He spoke of tuitionfree public universities, ending institutional racism and the war on drugs, reforming
criminal justice and immigration, and
fighting climate change — “but there is one
issue out there which is so significant and
so pervasive that, unless we successfully
confront it, it will be impossible for us to
succeed on any other of these important issues.”
And that is inequality. “The oligarchy in
this country, whose greed is insatiable, is
destroying Lincoln’s view of America, our
vision of America, and is leading us to a
government of the few, by the few and for
the few.”
This is a big idea. Maybe the big idea.
Whoever can best make that case should
lead the Democrats in 2020.
Twitter: @Milbank
ADEL HANA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A woman waves the Palestinian flag during a protest at the Gaza Strip’s border with Israel on Tuesday.
KATHLEEN PARKER
Truth vs. reality in Israel
T
he past few days have provided a head-swiveling
study in cognitive dissonance and dueling realities.
Monday started the week with a
jolt in Jerusalem, where the United
States and Israel celebrated the
U.S. Embassy’s move from Tel Aviv.
Television spectators around the
world watched as the two nations’
officials gathered inside a large,
white tent — a metaphorical bubble
that seemed to protect them from
the tragedy unfolding 50 miles away
in Gaza.
There, Israeli soldiers opened fire
on Palestinian protesters, killing at
least five dozen and wounding thousands more.
In stark contrast to the carnage,
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was almost giddy as he
cited historical justifications for the
embassy’s relocation — from Abraham and King Solomon to Zechariah, who 2,500 years ago declared
Jerusalem “the City of Truth.” Netanyahu was effusive in his praise of
President Trump for “having the
courage to keep [his] promises,”
which just happened to be the
opening line in the White House’s
talking points afterward.
Even as one might have enjoyed
Netanyahu’s understandable elation and Jared Kushner’s touching
speech about truth, Western
idealism and the pursuit of peace,
there was something oddly
Baghdad Bob-ish about the whole
production.
You remember him. He was the
so-nicknamed Iraqi government
spokesperson during the U.S.-led
invasion who insisted to television
cameras that everything was just
fine in Baghdad, as American tanks
rolled into the city. One wonders if
future Trump press secretary
Sarah Huckabee Sanders, then a
student at Ouachita Baptist University in Arkadelphia, Ark., caught
Bob on TV and thought to herself:
Why, yes, he’s right. It all looks good
to me.
Kushner, whose task as adviser is
to secure Middle East peace, noted
in his remarks that the Palestinian
protesters were “part of the problem,” an analysis seconded by
U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley the next day.
During a Security Council meeting,
Haley dismissed the protests as
having been caused by Hamas and
said they had nothing to do with the
relocation of the embassy.
One could say that.
One could say that the moon is
cheesy and good with grits. Or that
the person who invited Dallas pastor and Fox News contributor Robert Jeffress to Jerusalem to lead a
prayer was a genius. (Jeffress has
said that Islam, Hinduism, Judaism
and the Catholic Church are all
essentially satanic cults.)
One could further say that there
was no one better to lead a second
prayer than Pastor John Hagee, who,
you’ll recall, blamed gays for Hurricane Katrina. He also has said that
Hitler was a “hunter” for God and
that Jews will be saved during the
Second Coming of Christ, which is
expected to occur in, guess where . . .
Jerusalem.
The surprise isn’t that Palestinians protested but that Israelis
didn’t.
Given that Trump and cohorts are
so suddenly enamored of the truth,
let’s stick to it. The relocation of the
U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv has
everything to do with the Palestinian protests. Blaming Hamas for
organizing the protests is like blaming Republicans for electing Trump.
Did anyone really think there would
be no protests against a move that
essentially ends the bilateral peace
process?
Moving the embassy may have
been the right thing to do — and
maybe no time would be right — but
we shouldn’t delude ourselves. The
embassy was moved because it
served Trump. How do we know
this? Because everything Trump
does is for Trump.
It burnished his tough-guy brand
by demonstrating that he keeps his
word and by putting Iran on further
notice that he means business. He
consolidated the support of conservative U.S. Jews and evangelical
Christians, stabilizing his base and
increasing the likelihood of his
reelection. Most important, perhaps, it distinguished him from his
predecessor, Barack Obama, who
continues to get under this president’s skin.
If Trump had hoped to also further enhance his chances for a
Nobel Peace Prize, which Obama
received for merely talking eloquently about peace, then the Israeli
clampdown in Gaza was surely unhelpful. Then again, the “collateral
damages” weren’t Trump’s doing,
he’d likely tell himself. Why, he
wasn’t even there.
It would be no surprise if Trump,
in a bout of cognitive dissonance,
were to believe that the Palestinians
will quiet down in a few days and
peace will settle over the valley,
which sounds a lot like the flowers
and candy American forces were
told to expect from liberated Iraqis
in the aftermath of “shock and awe.”
Remind me how that worked out.
kathleenparker@washpost.com
A lawsuit the DNC might regret
BY
N ATHANIEL A . G . Z ELINSKY
M
any Americans might be
sympathetic to the Democratic National Committee’s
lawsuit against the Russian
government, WikiLeaks and the
Trump campaign, alleging that they
conspired to hack the DNC’s servers
and disseminate stolen emails during
the 2016 election. After all, Moscow
assaulted our democracy and should
pay for it.
But Americans — and the courts —
should think hard before embracing all
of the DNC’s legal theories. As it applies
to the Trump campaign, the case presents implications for the First Amendment and, if successful, could transform free-speech law in the United
States in worrisome ways. Down the
road, the DNC itself might regret prevailing on the legal claims that it
advances today.
The DNC lawsuit boils down to a
simple question: When may the law
penalize someone who disseminates
truthful but illegally acquired information about a matter of public concern?
Under current First Amendment caselaw, most recently addressed in the
2001 Supreme Court decision in Bartnicki v. Vopper, the answer is almost
never — unless the person who published stolen information also participated in the initial theft. This means,
for example, that the First Amendment
should protect the right of a journalist
to publish leaked classified material.
But if the journalist stole the classified
material, the law can penalize the theft
and subsequent publication.
The DNC claims that the Trump
campaign conspired with Russia and
WikiLeaks to hack the DNC and publicize embarrassing, stolen information
to swing the presidential election. We
know that then-Republican-candidate
Donald Trump and others hyped the
hacked emails to stoke controversy. We
also know that members of the Trump
campaign
communicated
with
Kremlin-linked
Russians
and
WikiLeaks. But there is no real evidence yet that anyone associated with
the Trump campaign helped Moscow
hack the DNC’s servers or orchestrated
the cyberattack in advance. Nor is
there publicly known evidence that the
Trump campaign communicated with
Russia before the hacks or agreed to
Russia’s information theft.
As a result, under Bartnicki, the
First Amendment may well protect the
Trump campaign’s actions. Just as the
Constitution guarantees a reporter’s
right to publish the DNC hacks, so too
can a political campaign take advantage of emails stolen by a third party.
However, the Supreme Court has not
had the chance to definitively weigh in
on the issue. As is common in First
Amendment cases, the justices decided
Bartnicki narrowly — limiting their
ruling to the specific circumstances of
the case. The journalists in Bartnicki
acted passively, receiving stolen information from an anonymous source.
But this may not be the case in the
DNC’s lawsuit, so it is plausible that a
decision might push First Amendment
law toward a different result if a publisher actively cooperates after the fact
with an information thief.
Consider the unintended consequences that might arise if the DNC’s
lawsuit succeeds in holding the Trump
campaign legally responsible for Moscow’s hacks. In the future, a journalist
who closely cooperates with a leaker
might also be labeled a conspirator and
held liable for the leaker’s actions. Put
more sharply: Under the DNC’s legal
thinking, the Trump administration
today could prosecute those many reporters who rely on sources leaking
classified material to uncover accounts
of governmental incompetence (or
worse).
To be sure, as with any complex legal
situation, we might be able to distinguish between journalists cooperating
with leakers and candidates who collude with foreign hackers. For instance, in Bartnicki, the Supreme
Court noted that the government’s
ability to prosecute domestic information thieves justifies the media’s First
Amendment right to print stolen information. When it comes to statesponsored hacking, however, that
equation breaks down. The government possesses far fewer means to
deter or punish the hackers, thus opening the door to placing liability on
downstream publishers — or so that
particular theory might go. In practice,
however, it would be extremely hard to
draw such a fine factual and legal
distinction — and the broader freedoms of the press would suffer.
The First Amendment calculus is
quite different for Russia and possibly
WikiLeaks, depending on the latter’s
involvement from the beginning. As
the information thief, Moscow and its
spies forfeited any constitutional right
to publish the emails they stole. But
individuals with the Trump campaign,
like other Americans, deserve the freedom to speak.
As more facts come to light, the
Trump campaign’s legal exposure might
increase, especially if the Trump campaign planned in advance for the Russians to breach the DNC’s servers. But
until then, we should not confuse the
Trump campaign’s constitutional rights
with its civic responsibility. When
Trump and his associates willingly took
advantage of a foreign power’s intervention in our election, they betrayed the
nation’s basic values and, in my view,
rendered Trump unfit for office. To
combat that problem, however, the
DNC and all Americans should look to
the political process, not the courts.
The writer will graduate from Yale Law
School this month.
efore the ink was dry on our new tax
bill, outraged blue states were
screaming about the cap on the
deductibility of state and local taxes.
Their governments were also frantically
seeking ways around it, and small wonder.
For decades, high-tax states with a lot of
wealthy residents enjoyed a hefty subsidy
from the rest of America. Legislators were
understandably panicked over what voters
might do when handed the rest of the bill.
That panic generated some desperate
ideas. The most popular, currently, is allowing people to convert tax payments above
the $10,000 cap into a “charitable donation.”
New York, New Jersey and Connecticut have
already passed laws to allow this.
While charmingly innovative, this approach is likely to fall afoul of tax courts, as
will the other proposed tactics. Blue-state
taxpayers may finally have to confront the
full cost of the government they want. And
Democrats will finally have to confront the
tension between what those voters want
government to do and what they’re willing
to pay for.
That reckoning is long overdue.
Remember the Bush tax cuts? A heartless
giveaway to the rich that did nothing for the
middle class, Democrats said. But when
their expiration date approached, President
Barack Obama called for raising taxes only
on families making more than $250,000
annually — that being, apparently, what it
now takes to call yourself “rich.”
This absurdity is no accident. It’s a
function of the ideological beliefs of the
Democratic activist base clashing with the
geographic and demographic distribution
of their voters.
Over the past few decades, the United
States has undergone “the Big Sort,” the
clumping of the electorate into demographically, professionally and politically homogenous neighborhoods. Clinton voters have
their Zip codes, and Trump voters theirs,
and ever more rarely do the twain meet.
This fact has been often remarked, but the
implications for tax politics are rarely
noted.
Democratic voters have crammed themselves into a handful of the most economically successful counties, heavily concentrated in narrow strips along the coasts.
There they’ve formed a coalition of affluent,
educated professionals and lower-income
minorities. That coalition used its prosperity to fund expensive, intensive state and
local governments.
This fact has been often remarked, but
the implications for tax politics are rarely
noted. Already, just two states, New York
and California, together account for more
than 20 percent of federal revenue. Making
the government bigger, and the tax code
more progressive, necessarily means making that skew even worse.
But most of the party’s energy comes from
those coastal clusters, where left-wing activists are most numerous and powerful. They
want to supersize the federal government
just as they’ve done in their home states. But
so far, they’ve been unwilling to ask their
neighbors to foot the bill.
Eventually, they’ll have to, because in
deference to the moderate-income portion
of their coalition, they want to finance all
their plans by taxing the rich. Many on the
left now call for a Danish-style welfare state,
but few are calling for Denmark’s 25 percent
value-added tax on all purchases, or their
heavy income tax on all wages above about
$55,000 a year.
No, the money for American-style social
democracy is all supposed to come from the
rich. “I’ve been frustrated with liberals,”
says Len Burman of the Tax Policy Center.
“They really do just want to raise all the
revenue from rich people, and they don’t
understand that that really constrains what
they can do in terms of financing the safety
net.”
Especially if you also try to defer to the
affluent, educated portion of your base by
continually redefining “rich” to just north of
what moderately successful blue-state professional couples earn. Yet politics require
this ratchet. Thanks to the Big Sort, those
folks are now concentrated in coastal cities
where competition from others like themselves, and blue-state taxes, raise the cost of
living sky-high. Compared with their neighbors, they don’t feel especially rich; they feel
as though they’re struggling just to pay for
the basics.
Eventually, however, Democrats are going
to have to either give up their big dreams or
hand those voters the bill, because they’re
the ones with most of the money. This
creates a certain cognitive dissonance for
progressives. “There’s a bitterness that all
the tax cuts went to the rich,” says Marc
Goldwein of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, “and not enough of
them went to the rich in New York and
California and Connecticut.” Until that dissonance is resolved, Sen. Bernie Sanders
(I-Vt.) will keep promising big new programs with laughably inadequate financing
mechanisms — and blue-state legislators
will denounce inequality while cooking up
tax-evasion schemes to perpetuate it.
Blue-state professionals have enjoyed a
disproportionate share of the prosperity
gains over the past few decades; if they want
a bigger government, they’ll have to give up
those gains to fund it. But thus far, Democrats haven’t managed to convince these
voters that providing lavish government to
every state means that they need to be taxed
like a Rockefeller — or even like a Dane.
Twitter: @asymmetricinfo
A20
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ABCDE
letters@washpost.com
A millennial oasis sounds great
EDITORIALS
Death in Gaza
Hamas has launched another war. Israel urgently needs a better response.
I
of Hamas or the Islamic Jihad.
On cue, condemnations of the government of
Benjamin Netanyahu poured in. Israel was accused of
carrying out a “bloodbath” by Human Rights Watch,
while Amnesty International said its soldiers may
have committed war crimes. European governments
summoned Israeli ambassadors and called for an
investigation; at Poland’s urging, the U.N. Security
Council observed a moment of silence for the victims.
Only opposition from the Trump administration likely prevented a Security Council condemnation of the
Jewish state.
With the White House’s strong support, Mr. Netanyahu will likely shrug off the international onslaught.
He shouldn’t. As the Palestinians well understand,
Israel can ill afford further damage to its standing.
Sympathy for it is dangerously eroding on U.S. campuses and among Democratic voters — not to speak of
in other Western countries. President Trump’s embrace of controversial pro-Israel initiatives, such as
the move of the U.S. Embassy to Jerusalem, may in
time produce its own backlash.
Blurring a
critical line
The question for Israelis is why their government,
with weeks of warning about what Hamas would
attempt, did not develop a strategy to defeat the
operation by minimizing the loss of life. Clearly the
government must defend its borders; if it had allowed
thousands of Palestinians to pour across toward nearby Israeli communities, the bloodshed could have
been much greater. But it seems likely such a breach
could have been stopped without such extensive use of
lethal force. That impression is only strengthened by
the stridency with which senior Israeli officials defended the killings and even called for more. Public
Security Minister Gilad Erdan on Tuesday proposed
the assassination of Hamas’s leaders.
In fact, Israel can ill afford to escalate, given the
low-grade war it is already fighting with Iran in Syria.
Most likely it will watch as Hamas reaps the gains of
its strategy: Egypt already has responded by relaxing
its own closure of the Gaza border. Unbothered by the
death toll, Hamas leaders say the marches will continue — which means Israel needs to find a way to stop
them without being defeated by them.
TOM TOLES
On trade and national security,
Mr. Trump twice gets it wrong.
I
NVOKING NATIONAL SECURITY as a rationale
for restricting trade can be a tricky business. In
general, there are two ways to get it wrong: You
can invoke national security when it does not
really apply. Or you can remove economic strictures
on countries or corporations that actually do threaten U.S. security.
We’ve seen both recently from President Trump.
His threat to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum
from allies such as Canada and Japan spuriously
invoked national security as a pretext. More recently,
he overlooked genuine national security concerns
with his sudden announcement that he’s reconsidering newly imposed sanctions on ZTE, the partially
state-owned Chinese telecommunications company
guilty of a systematic, years-long effort to sell its
services and equipment to Iran, using U.S.-made
inputs, and to North Korea.
The president’s about-face came in the form of an
improvised tweet just a month after the Commerce
Department barred U.S. firms from selling components to ZTE for seven years, tantamount to a death
sentence for this pillar of Chinese state capitalism.
Given the Commerce Department security bureau’s
findings, based on an extensive U.S. investigation
going back to the Obama administration, the punishment fit the crime; indeed, the Trump administration had let ZTE off with a fine and probation in
March 2017, only to discover that it continued to lie
and cover up its lack of compliance. The company is,
a top Commerce official found, “incapable of being,
or unwilling to be, a reliable and trustworthy recipient of U.S.-origin goods, software, and technology.”
Mr. Trump, however, said he was moved by the loss
of jobs at ZTE plants in China and ordered his
secretary of commerce, Wilbur Ross, to come up with
an alternative, undoubtedly lighter, punishment for
the firm. China reciprocated by relaxing its previous
opposition to U.S.-based Qualcomm’s proposed acquisition of semiconductor maker NXP, and by
offering to lift its threat of tariffs on U.S. agricultural
goods (which were provoked by Mr. Trump’s tariff
threats against China to begin with).
This seems rather paltry compensation for a huge
“T
The recurring ‘mobocratic spirit’
In 2008, Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama had his head handed to him for seeking
to explain a pervasive anger in parts of the American
populace by saying that “they cling to guns or religion
or antipathy to people who aren’t like them or
anti-immigrant sentiment or anti-trade sentiment as
a way to explain their frustrations.”
In 2016, Democratic presidential nominee Hillary
Clinton was lambasted for calling those self-same
people a “basket of deplorables.”
But I expect that no one will object, nor even notice,
that George F. Will, a conservative icon, referred to
those same people as “the vicious portion of [the]
population” who represent a “mobocratic spirit”
[“The fine art of governing by groveling,” op-ed, May
10].
Oh, and these were not his own words. They were
the words of Abraham Lincoln in 1838, in response to
the lynching of an abolitionist newspaperman.
Hmm . . .
Is that a depressing sign of our failure to elevate the
“vicious portion of [the] population,” or perhaps is it
somewhat reassuring in that as we have overcome
this in the past, we will likely overcome it again today?
Avram Israel Reisner, Baltimore
It’s up to the FDA to act on Juuls
U.S. concession, which Mr. Trump made before his
trade talks with President Xi Jinping’s government
pick up steam. Maybe it was motivated by a higher
diplomatic purpose: Mr. Trump’s need to keep Beijing mollified in the run-up to his summit meeting
with Beijing ally Kim Jong Un of North Korea — but
that’s not what the president said. “This is also
reflective of the larger trade deal we are negotiating
with China and my personal relationship with President Xi,” he tweeted Monday. That contradicted
Mr. Ross’s statement, just three hours earlier, that
the U.S. “position has been that [the ZTE ban is] an
enforcement action separate from trade.”
This confusion has to end, and not only because it’s
sowing uncertainty for business. If the words “national security” mean anything, they define a policy
concern that takes precedence over everything else,
even jobs or farm exports. U.S. efforts to secure trade
objectives or security objectives suffer when policymakers invoke, or disavow, national security goals in
an unprincipled or inconsistent manner, cherrypicking provisions of U.S. law to suit their agenda of
the moment. So far, unfortunately, that is exactly how
the Trump administration has operated.
used for decades in nonstick coatings and firefighting foam. Though they are being phased out, these
chemicals linger in the environment and in human
tissue, and in sufficient amounts they can do serious
damage. PFAS water contamination has been detected in communities near military bases, where firefighting foam was used, adjacent to industrial plants
and in other areas.
The EPA found in 2016 that PFAS drinking-water
concentrations above 70 parts per trillion are dangerous. Health and Human Services experts were poised
to conclude that the threshold for concern should be
much, much lower. A lower threshold would spur
communities concerned about the risks of living near
major installations to do more to protect their
residents. It would also cost money, raising cleanup
costs for the Defense Department and at toxic
civilian sites, and cause public concern. Since the
White House staffer’s email warning of PR blowback
circulated around the Trump administration, the
HHS report has sat unpublished for months, according to a Politico report this week.
The White House Office of Management and
Budget, where the email appears to have originated,
did not respond to a request for an explanation. For
his part, EPA Chief of Staff Ryan Jackson argued that
his agency is trying to “ensure that the federal
government is responding in a uniform way to our
local, state, and Congressional constituents and partners.” Getting government scientists on the same
page about the dangers of PFAS would be good, but it
is not worth holding back alarming conclusions about
a serious public-health issue. Mr. Jackson’s reasoning
also does not explain the White House’s apparent
preoccupation with optics rather than science.
The EPA stressed that it is holding a conference on
PFAS next week, at which the chemicals’ risk profile
will be addressed. That’s good. Before that happens,
HHS should finally release its report so the participants will have as informed a discussion as possible.
ABCDE
L O CA L O P I N I O N S
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
Join the debate at washingtonpost.com/local-opinions
The worst offenders on the road
the rules of vehicular traffic, came to a red light at a
four-way intersection and decided to cross on the
pedestrian crosswalk, thereby following the rules of
pedestrian traffic. We were making a right turn on
red after stopping but nearly hit the bicyclist. Both
times, my husband’s quick reaction saved the day.
Both times, we were within a half mile of our home.
I’m just amazed the fatality rate is not higher.
We respect all the rules of the road. We respect all
the pedestrian traffic rules. We watch with horror
when people violate these simple rules. Bicyclists are
the worst offenders because no one can anticipate
what they’re going to do, and if there’s an accident,
guess who’s going to be held responsible?
Carole E. Hunt, Arlington
The skyrocketing use of Juuls among teenagers is
creating major concerns for parents and schools
[“Teen ‘Juuling’ a drag for schools,” Metro, May 11].
Juuls are nicotine products that have cracked the
code in appealing to kids: cool names and flavors,
devices that are easily concealed from adults and, of
course, newly forged nicotine addictions.
Schools are responding by removing bathroom
stall doors and installing vapor detectors in bathrooms. Parents are responding by demanding school
administrators do more to protect their kids from
the dangers of nicotine addiction.
And the Food and Drug Administration is responding by sending a letter to Juul.
The FDA has the authority to regulate these
products — but the Trump administration’s FDA has
delayed by years taking any action on Juuls and
other e-cigarettes. No matter how hard they try,
schools and parents can’t regulate this multibilliondollar industry. The FDA can, but it has only delayed.
Michelle N. Eakin, Ellicott City
The writer is a member of the American Thoracic
Society Tobacco Action Committee.
Mr. Kelly ought to know better
An HHS study on water contaminated by chemicals was suppressed and remains unpublished.
I was incensed by Guy Edwards’s May 13 Local
Opinions essay, “Drivers, please help bicyclists get
home alive.” I admit the automobile driver
Mr. Edwards described was in the wrong, and there
are a lot of crazy automobile drivers out there. I live
in South Arlington, the bicycle-crazy capital of the
free world. Before anyone cautions automobile
drivers about bicycle safety, they should examine the
habits of bicycle riders. (Granted, Mr. Edwards said
bicyclists also need to abide by the rules.)
Twice recently, my husband and I have come close
to hitting a bicycle rider. One came out from between
two buses to cross the street in the middle of four
lanes of traffic as we approached from the opposite
direction. The other, who was in the road, following
The Rev. H. Lionel Edmonds’s warning, as
reported in the May 13 front-page article “D.C.-area
Amazon could be boon, bane,” about Amazon
coming to the area and possibly creating “a
millennials’ oasis, a little Amazon island of these
folks making $100,000 a year, surrounded by
people making less than half of that, or even a third
of that,” is typical when referencing millennials. We
are somehow constantly talked about negatively.
Yet some of the “people making less than half of
that, or even a third,” are millennials.
Let us not forget that millennials graduated from
college during the Great Recession and couldn’t
find jobs. We are not all making $100,000 a year.
And those of us who are had to work jobs out of
college that most definitely did not require that
college degree we had just earned. We deserve those
$100,000-a-year jobs now. But what do I know? I’m
just another opinionated millennial.
Katie Myers, Springfield
Thanks to George F. Will for condemning the
over-the-top obsequious adulation of Vice President
Pence toward the president and Mr. Pence’s public
praise of former sheriff Joe Arpaio, who was convicted of criminal contempt. All that is indeed horrifying.
But it goes beyond that: Where is the outrage, especially among the evangelical Christians close to the
vice president, about our president’s lapses in truth,
morality and civility, and his disrespect of the norms
of social discourse? Unfortunately, Mr. Pence’s silence
on these matters indicates a lack of moral leadership
at a time when we need it the most. That failure may
be the most horrifying of all horrors regarding our
vice president, perhaps more than all that fawning.
John Glaser, Alexandria
Toxic stalling tactics
HE PUBLIC, media, and Congressional
reaction to these numbers is going to be
huge,” a White House staffer wrote in a
newly revealed email, calling the release
of a new Department of Health and Human Services
study a “potential public relations nightmare.” After
the White House forwarded the staffer’s email to the
Environmental Protection Agency, which also oversees the chemical industry and consulted with HHS,
the study was suppressed and remains unpublished.
Meanwhile, communities across the country may be
exposed to unhealthful levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, chemicals linked to thyroid conditions, weakened immune systems, developmental
defects and other health problems.
Now the email is out, even as the HHS report
remains under wraps, and the administration looks
both secretive and uncaring about Americans’
health.
At issue are chemicals known as PFAS, which were
MAY 16 , 2018
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
SRAEL AND Hamas have fought three wars in
the Gaza Strip over the past decade, and though it
may not look like the others, a fourth one is now
underway. Having tried and failed to defeat Israel
with rockets and armed cross-border attacks, Hamas
this spring deployed a new strategy: assembling
thousands of nominal civilians to march on and
attempt to breach the border fence, in the calculation
that many would be killed. The result would be a
moral and political defeat for Israel — and perhaps
some relief for a regime that is literally besieged from
all sides.
On Monday, this cruel and cynical tactic paid off,
albeit at enormous human cost. By the Israeli account, Hamas assembled some 40,000 people at
13 points along the border, then sent groups of them
toward the fence, armed with wire cutters, slingshots,
knives and, in a couple of cases, firearms. They were
met with clouds of tear gas, but when that failed to
disperse them, Israeli snipers opened fire. At least
60 Palestinians were killed. On Tuesday, Israeli officials said two dozen had been identified as militants
. WEDNESDAY,
News pages:
MARTIN BARON
Executive Editor
CAMERON BARR
Managing Editor
EMILIO GARCIA-RUIZ
Managing Editor
TRACY GRANT
Managing Editor
SCOTT VANCE
Deputy Managing Editor
BARBARA VOBEJDA
Deputy Managing Editor
Editorial and opinion pages:
FRED HIATT
Editorial Page Editor
JACKSON DIEHL
Deputy Editorial Page Editor
RUTH MARCUS
Deputy Editorial Page Editor
JO-ANN ARMAO
Associate Editorial Page Editor
Vice Presidents:
JAMES W. COLEY JR......................................................................................Production
L. WAYNE CONNELL..........................................................................Human Resources
KATE M. DAVEY..................................................................................Revenue Strategy
ELIZABETH H. DIAZ ................................................. Audience Development & Insights
GREGG J. FERNANDES........................................................Customer Care & Logistics
STEPHEN P. GIBSON...................................................................Finance & Operations
SCOT GILLESPIE .......................................................................................... Engineering
JED HARTMAN.......................................................................................Client Solutions
KRISTINE CORATTI KELLY...................................................Communications & Events
JOHN B. KENNEDY.................................................................General Counsel & Labor
MIKI TOLIVER KING........................................................................................Marketing
SHAILESH PRAKASH...............................Digital Product Development & Engineering
The Washington Post
1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20071 (202) 334-6000
White House Chief of Staff John F. Kelly’s comments about new immigrants not being able to
quickly assimilate into our country is something he
might rethink [“John Kelly’s know-nothingism,”
PostPartisan excerpt, op-ed, May 13]. Certainly, he
must remember that when he was a young Marine
officer, his recruits joined the service for different
reasons. They came from small towns and large cities
and were of different religions and economic backgrounds. He did not expect them to immediately
assimilate into the Marine Corps. He had to have
patience, compassion and understanding. So should
it be with immigrants.
Arthur Sturm, Gaithersburg
It seems that White House Chief of Staff John
F. Kelly is grossly uninformed about the nature of
many Americans whom he would deem as being
unable to become assimilated. My progenitors fled
Germany in search of religious freedom. My father
was a farmer all of his life with only an eighth-grade
education. He invented a milking machine that was
patented and manufactured and now stands in a
museum in Kansas. He and my mother also volunteered their farm for what is now Heifer International from 1944 to 1948. My mother was also raised on a
farm, and she completed one year of college. This
came to a halt because of a lack of finances during the
Great Depression. My parents encouraged their
daughters to pursue further education, and all three
of them did.
Being raised on a farm was an education in and of
itself. We knew where our food came from because
we planted it, reaped it and canned it. I learned how
to drive a tractor at 14. Raising livestock and the
harvests of the fields requires a great deal of knowledge regarding the weather and what nutrients are
needed for that same harvest. So, Mr. Kelly would be
wise to become informed about what farming entails
before he makes the assumption that farmers are
dumb and unable to be assimilated into our culture.
Patricia Roop Hollinger, Westminster, Md.
Letters to the editor: letters@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A21
RE
DAVID VON DREHLE
DAVID IGNATIUS
Going to school no longer
means going to school
Contain Iran?
Trump should
copy Reagan.
humboldt, kan.
F
or months I have been reading
and writing about the poisoning
of social media, the perils of unregulated drones and assorted
other dangers posed by rampant technology. So I was delighted to see the pro side
of progress during a visit to Southeast
Kansas.
It was Mother’s Day afternoon. An
unusually persistent winter in the Midwest had turned to summer with hardly a
mention of spring. In the fields around
town — birthplace of Walter Johnson, the
greatest pitcher in Washington baseball
history (sorry, Mr. Scherzer) — soybean
plants by the thousands had peeped warily from the warming earth to begin climbing toward the glare of the sun. Near the
town square, inside Humboldt Community Fieldhouse, 60 students in black
gowns and mortarboards waited patiently through speeches for the chance to
collect their high school diplomas.
The bleachers were filled with proud
family and friends. But this wasn’t a
group that grew up together through
ballgames and choir concerts. Alienated
from traditional high schools, seeking an
alternative, they found the Humboldt
Virtual Education Program, one of the
largest and best-regarded online high
schools in the Sunflower State. After
months, even years, of solitary study in
Internet classrooms, they gathered as a
physical community for the first, and
probably the last, time.
Across the United States, online education is booming. Sixth-through-12thgraders enrolled in Florida’s largest fulltime virtual high school completed more
than 44,000 semesters of classwork last
year. In Kansas, virtual school enrollment
grew 100-fold between 1999 and 2014,
from about 60 students to more than
6,000.
Perhaps inevitably, controversy has
followed the growth. Some educators
worry that online schools are inherently
inferior to traditional classrooms with
their flesh-and-blood teachers and peergroup teamwork. I agree that the trend
requires close monitoring; at this point,
quality research is still sparse. But one
widely cited study for Harvard’s Kennedy
School of Government found that a wellrun virtual school can match outcomes of
brick-and-mortar institutions.
To Jody Siebenmorgen, director of the
Humboldt virtual high school, comparing her program with traditional schools
misses the crucial fact. Her students have
tried the old model, and it didn’t work for
them. “A lot of my students were expelled
from their local schools, and neighboring
schools won’t take them,” she told me. “I
work with 14 different probation officers.
I also work with some gifted students
who are bored stiff in their schools and
just want to finish quickly and move on to
greater challenges. I work with students
in foster care. I work with a lot of teen
moms juggling school and child care. I
work with students who are battling illnesses that prevent them from going to
school. I once had a student who received
a double lung transplant, and she attended high school on a laptop in bed at
Children’s Mercy Hospital.”
And Siebenmorgen’s program enrolls
some 200 adults who left school without
graduating only to discover that a diploma is essential in today’s world. When the
Kansas legislature weighed whether to
eliminate funding for adult virtual education, Siebenmorgen traveled to Topeka to
share the story of a Walmart worker in
Iola whose GED certificate was preventing him from moving up in management.
As I scanned the gymnasium floor, I
couldn’t help thinking of my own high
school graduation some 40 years earlier.
In those days, few alternatives existed for
students turned off by bell schedules,
crowded lunchrooms and teen drama.
The 20th-century school was designed in
a time when the majority of Americans
did not finish 12th grade. Yet we took for
granted that it could work for everyone, in
an age of the indispensable diploma. It
was not just the best model but the only
model.
Thankfully, we’ve begun to appreciate
that students aren’t stamped from a single mold. Some do their best learning at
their own pace and rhythm. This awakening is surely one reason more Americans
are finishing high school: The dropout
rate fell from 11 percent to 6 percent
between 2000 and 2015, according to the
National Center for Education Statistics.
Well-run virtual education programs
are part of that success. Educators with
up-close experience of at-risk students
understand this — which is why Humboldt’s virtual school includes the daughter of a traditional school principal. And
the daughter of a newspaper columnist.
When the nontraditional learner in my
family gripped her diploma proudly and
gave Siebenmorgen a tearful hug, she
became one of more than 400 alumni of a
little Kansas town’s very big idea, with
hundreds more in the pipeline.
These aren’t students normally celebrated with trophies and scholarships.
But I would not bet against them. In an
age of constant change, they’ve seized
tools offered by technology and put them
to good use. Instead of dropping out, they
stepped up, toward a future that will favor
those who see and grab new possibilities.
An hour after they marched in, they sailed
forth on the stream of lifelong learning,
which promises to take them far.
david.vondrehle@washpost.com
Sleazy, swampy — but legal?
BY
T
RANDALL D. ELIASON
o understand the sorry state of
federal public corruption law
and its present inability to punish even the most egregious influence peddling, consider a hypothetical scenario involving President Trump’s
personal attorney Michael Cohen.
Cohen was reportedly paid several
million dollars over the past year by
companies seeking an in with the Trump
administration. For an administration
that promised to “drain the swamp,”
Cohen’s brazen behavior sounds decidedly swampy — Washington business as
usual, only more so. But based on the
publicly available evidence, Cohen’s behavior is slimy but likely not criminal.
In fact, it would take a great deal for
Cohen’s activities to cross the line into
criminal corruption. And that is the
remarkable, and disturbing, aspect of
the Cohen story: just how freely access to
government power may be bought and
sold these days without running afoul of
criminal law.
Thus, a disturbing hypothetical: Even
if Cohen explicitly sold access in the
form of meetings with Trump administration officials — indeed, even if those
officials themselves received a portion of
Cohen’s fees in exchange for attending
the meetings — it would be difficult, if
not impossible, to mount a successful
public-corruption prosecution.
For that, influence peddlers and politicians can thank former Virginia governor Robert F. McDonnell — or, more
precisely, the Supreme Court justices
who unanimously overturned McDonnell’s convictions.
McDonnell was found guilty of corruption after accepting more than
$170,000 in secret gifts. But in June 2016,
the court found that McDonnell’s favors
for his benefactor — including sending
emails, making phone calls and arranging introductions to other government
officials — did not amount to “official
acts” under federal corruption law. The
court ruled that bribery requires a more
substantial exercise of government power as part of a corrupt deal. Merely
providing introductions or access to public officials is not enough.
The court in McDonnell v. United
States endorsed an extremely cramped
view of public corruption. A public official’s time and attention are finite resources, and access is valuable. For proof,
we need look no further than the fact that
major corporations were willing to shell
out hundreds of thousands of dollars to
Cohen, who offered little apparent rel-
evant experience but was “promising
access” to the new administration.
McDonnell allows such access to be
sold to the highest bidder — not just by
lobbyists but also by government officials themselves. After McDonnell, public officials are free to enrich themselves
by offering access only to those willing to
pay, because taking a meeting or a phone
call is not an “official act.” And, of course,
the everyday citizen or “little guy” who
can’t pay gets left out in the cold.
White House budget director Mick
Mulvaney displayed this mind-set recently when he said that while he was a
congressman, “if you were a lobbyist who
never gave us money, I didn’t talk to you.
If you were a lobbyist who gave us money,
I might talk to you.” Although Mulvaney’s
comments provoked widespread outrage, McDonnell makes it clear that the
practice he described is perfectly legal.
In Cohen’s case, a bribery prosecution
would require proof that, in exchange for
the payments, he secured agreements
from Trump or other administration officials to perform specific official acts,
such as lifting sanctions against Russia
or pursuing a particular health-care or
telecommunications policy. But proving
such a clear quid pro quo is not easy.
Personal connections may result in influence and tacit understandings that are
simultaneously very real and nearly impossible to prove beyond a reasonable
doubt. And that again explains why access itself can be such a valuable commodity.
Investigators for special counsel Robert S. Mueller III reportedly spoke
months ago with companies that paid
Cohen hundreds of thousands of dollars
for “consulting services.” Prosecutors
will no doubt follow the money in search
of potential criminal violations. But
those may be hard to find. In the current
legal environment, politicians and those
close to them are generally free to buy
and sell access to government power
with little fear of prosecution.
McDonnell was simply the latest in a
series of Supreme Court decisions over
the past two decades narrowing federal
corruption laws. Cumulatively, those decisions have created multiple safe harbors for behavior that most would consider clearly corrupt. Congress could
step in and reform those laws but has
shown little interest in doing so.
Swamp, drain thyself ? I don’t plan to
hold my breath.
Randall D. Eliason teaches white-collar
criminal law at George Washington University
Law School and blogs at Sidebarsblog.com.
abu dhabi, united arab emirates
A
BEBETO MATTHEWS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tom Wolfe in his living room in New York on July 26, 2016.
MAX BOOT
Master of the
American universe
I
was not, alas, close to Tom Wolfe. I
knew him only slightly: I saw him
at occasional parties and dinners
at his Upper East Side haunts, including the Lotos Club, where a glorious full-length portrait of him hangs in
the lobby. I went to a few shindigs at his
beautifully appointed apartment decorated with German Expressionist posters. But I am nevertheless devastated
by his passing. It seems inconceivable
that the gaudy spectacle of America can
continue to unfold without the man in
white chronicling its highs and lows.
Wolfe was often described as a master of verbal pyrotechnics, and so he
was. His style — all that onomatopoeia,
all those punctuation marks — was
easy to imitate but hard to master. He
coined so many terms that are now part
of the language: social X-rays, masters
of the universe, radical chic, the right
stuff, the Me Decade. But it wasn’t just
about impressing the reader with his
command of English. He used his rococo language to get inside the heads of
his characters and reveal what motivated them — which in his telling was,
above all, the quest for status.
A passage taken at random from his
1970 essay “Radical Chic” is emblematic of his method:
Mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm. These are nice. Little Roquefort
cheese morsels rolled in crushed nuts.
Very tasty. Very subtle. It’s the way the
dry sackiness of the nuts tiptoes up
against the dour savor of the cheese that
is so nice, so subtle. Wonder what the
Black Panthers eat here on the hors
d’oeuvre trail?
I’m not sure if I transcribed the right
number of m’s, but I am certain that no
one else could have described so vividly
the incongruity of African American
radicals being feted by the great and
good of Gotham.
And speaking of Gotham: A few
years ago, I reread “The Bonfire of the
Vanities” and was even more impressed by it than when it originally
came out in 1987. Back then, I was still
a kid in California. Now, having lived
in the New York area for nearly a
quarter-century, I can attest to the
verisimilitude of his descriptions. If
there is a greater novel of New York, I
don’t know what it is.
His characters — the bond trader
Sherman McCoy, going broke on
$1 million a year, the louche tabloid
hack Peter Fallow, the racial agitator
Reverend Bacon, the publicity-besotted D.A. Abe Weiss — were based, for
the most part, on real people. Wolfe
captured their speech and thought and
dress and everything else about them
perfectly, as I can attest from having
gotten to know a few of his inspirations.
I even rented an apartment for a while
from Ed Hayes, a friend of Wolfe’s who
was the model for Tommy Killian, the
streetwise defense lawyer who explains
the idea of the Favor Bank: “ ‘Everything in the criminal justice system in
New York’ — New Yawk — ‘operates on
favors. Everybody does favors for everybody else. Every chance they get,
they make deposits in the Favor Bank.’ ”
Wolfe painted an indelible portrait
of “the Rome, the Paris, the London of
the twentieth century, the city of ambition, the dense magnetic rock, the irresistible destination of all those who
insist on being where things are happening.” I have never lived in Atlanta
but am told by those who have that
Wolfe was equally accurate in portraying that metropolis in “A Man in Full”
— a feat that was, if anything, even
more impressive given that Wolfe was
not a resident of that city.
Like many people, I regard “The
Bonfire of the Vanities,” the definitive
portrait of New York in the 1980s, as
one of Wolfe’s two masterpieces. The
other was “The Right Stuff,” which was
made into a much better movie than
“Bonfire.” Wolfe got inside the minds of
test pilots and astronauts in a way that
no other writer has done before or
since. The opening chapter, focused on
the anxiety of the pilots’ wives who
don’t know if their husbands will come
home from work, instantly transported
the reader to a psychological reality far
removed from the glossy news coverage of the space program. The narrative
was utterly seamless — as befits the
New Journalism that Wolfe helped create, it read like a novel — and yet no one
ever claimed that he made it up. There
was a sturdy skeleton of reporting,
invisible to the reader, upon which
Wolfe hung his peerless prose.
Having gotten to know Wolfe a bit, I
saw something of his method. He hid in
plain sight — his three-piece white
suits served as a shield that made the
man within nearly invisible. To the
extent that anyone so flamboyantly
attired can recede into the background,
he did. Wolfe did not talk much; he
preferred to listen and to soak in the
atmosphere. A quiet man, he did his
talking in print. And now he has gone
silent forever. American literature —
and American life — will be the poorer
without him.
writetoboot@gmail.com
JAMES DOWNIE
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-partisan
Jerusalem and the
‘no consequences’ presidency
Last week, Post White House correspondent Anne Gearan wrote about how President Trump “has become increasingly confident in his gut-driven, out-of-the-box approach to international relations and dismissive
of
the
warnings
from
establishment critics.” The president has
reportedly cited the moving of the U.S. Embassy to Jerusalem as a case where “dire
warnings against something Trump wants
to do seem like hollow threats after the
fact.”
On Monday, Israeli soldiers killed at least
60 Palestinian protesters and wounded thousands more. It was the bloodiest day
in six weeks of demonstrations triggered in
part by that decision Trump believed would
have no consequences.
That dozens have been killed and thousands wounded in what Human Rights
Watch described as a “bloodbath” is tragedy
enough. That the move of the embassy to
Jerusalem will prolong the Palestine-Israel
conflict, including the brutal occupation of
Gaza and the West Bank, is a tragedy further. And there’s a third failure that compounds the previous two: This president
will not recognize that his mistakes have
repercussions.
The broader administration is ludicrously claiming that Israel acted with “restraint.” But Trump’s myopia goes deeper:
Where other White Houses might privately
reckon with their foul-ups and reconsider,
this president actively hides — with his
staff’s help — from the fallout. New York
magazine reports that Trump regularly
speaks to Fox News host Sean Hannity, as
the latter’s show has become a “daily stream
of assertions serving to prop up Trump,”
and that his top advisers have actively
encouraged him to watch Fox “with the
hope of calming him down.” Instead of
hearing genuine criticisms, Trump has
swaddled himself in the comforting narrative that he’s being unjustly persecuted.
One of the most notable aspects of the
Trump White House is the administration’s
refusal to apologize for anything. In rationalizing why “not apologizing is a core
operating principle for Trump,” a senior
White House official told Axios that “the
basic belief is that you never actually get
‘credit’ — from the Left, the media, political
opponents, etc. — for apologizing, so why
do it?” But this “credit” explanation ignores
that Trump had refused to apologize long
before entering politics, and that other
administrations of both parties have apologized despite not getting “credit” (without
hurting their standing with their bases). So
why not do it? Because Trump sees no consequences; therefore, he has done nothing
wrong and there is nothing to apologize for.
As with any president well over a year
into office, we no longer have to only speculate about the real-world effects of Trump’s
policies. While he may not feel the consequences, they are coming into view — and
this week in particularly bloody fashion.
rab leaders love the idea that
President Trump is ready to
give Iran a punch in the nose.
But is this White House truly
serious about challenging Iranian
power in the Middle East? The evidence is mixed, at best.
I heard passionate enthusiasm for
Trump’s decision to withdraw from the
Iran nuclear deal from prominent
Arabs gathered here last weekend for a
conference sponsored by the Beirut
Institute. They know that scuttling the
nuclear deal could be dangerous and
that the region is already a powder
keg. But many Arab leaders don’t seem
to care.
To put it bluntly, they like the idea
that Trump is willing to stick it to
Tehran. Though they expect an Iranian
counterpunch, they’re not as worried
about it as you might expect. Several
prominent Arabs predicted that Tehran will eventually bend to pressure, if
there’s a united front.
Prince Turki al-Faisal, a former Saudi intelligence chief and hardly a
shoot-from-the-hip hothead, argued
that maybe the Iranians will react like
North Korea’s Kim Jong Un, “who
seems to have accepted Trump’s ‘bigger’ button.” Facing Trump’s demand
for concessions on the duration of the
nuclear agreement, Iranian missile
programs and regional meddling,
“Iran might change its mind,” he told
the conference.
But Arab leaders should consider
the possibility that Trump has it backward: The right strategy would be
reversing Iran’s power grab in the
Middle East while preserving the nuclear deal as an element of regional
stability. Trump’s instincts, in contrast, seem to be the opposite, as
Karim Sadjadpour of the Carnegie
Endowment for International Peace
told me recently — that is, Trump
wants to get out of both the nuclear
agreement and the region.
A serious strategy to roll back Iran
would begin with Syria. The United
States would maintain the strong military position it has established east of
the Euphrates River and enhance its
garrison at Tanf and other points in
southern Syria. Trump’s public comments suggest, however, that he wants
to pull these troops out, the sooner the
better. This would all but assure continued Iranian power in Syria.
Iraq is another key pressure point.
The victory of militant Iraqi nationalist Moqtada al-Sadr in Saturday’s elections should worry Tehran as much as
Washington. Sadr has quietly developed good relations with Saudi Arabia,
and his movement may offer the best
chance of maintaining an Arab Iraq, as
opposed to a Persian-dominated one.
But again, that’s assuming Washington is serious about backing the Saudis
in checking Iran’s regional ambitions.
Getting both Iran and Saudi Arabia
out of Yemen would help, too. That
would require a mix of subtle pressure
and diplomacy from a Trump administration that has shown little skill at
either so far in the Middle East. But it’s
a worthy goal for Mike Pompeo, the
new secretary of state.
Rolling back an aggressive rival
seems impossible, until someone dares
to try it. Think back to the Ronald
Reagan presidency, when policymakers considered the once-unthinkable
possibility that America and its allies
could dislodge the Soviets from the
Third World and, eventually, from
Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union
itself. After a decade of challenge,
Soviet power was gone.
To be sure, past attempts to contain
an expansionist, revolutionary Iran
haven’t had much success. Saddam
Hussein’s invasion of Iran in 1980
produced an eight-year quagmire.
Saudi Arabia’s invasion of Yemen in
2015 also created a bloody slog and has
brought Iranian missile attacks on
Saudi territory. The proxy war in Syria
has been catastrophic.
The Arabs want the United States
(or Israel) to do the fighting this time.
That’s a bad idea for America, for many
reasons, but the biggest is that there’s
no U.S. political support for a war
against Iran.
So what’s the pathway to containing
Iranian meddling? It probably passes
through Moscow. Russian interests in
the region are complicated. Moscow
may be fighting alongside Iran in
Syria, but it also has growing economic and diplomatic links with Israel, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab
Emirates.
“Iran is a tactical ally. Russia needs a
constellation of partners,” Russian foreign policy analyst Andrei Bystritsky
told the conference here. And unlike
the Iranians, who want to stay in Syria,
“the question for us is how to leave,”
argued Russian former deputy foreign
minister Andrei Fedorov.
Trump has embarked on an Iran
mission that lacks a clearly defined
objective. Here’s a suggestion that
draws on the lessons of the Reagan
years: The right combination is combating regional meddling, plus maintaining arms control. Thinking rollback isn’t crazy, but it requires a
sustained effort, not a grandstand
play.
Twitter: @IgnatiusPost
A22
EZ
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST
. WEDNESDAY,
Can’t find your phone?
We’ll call it for you.
Your time is valuable. Why spend it searching for a
lost phone? That’s why Xfinity Mobile customers can
simply say, “Xfinity Mobile, find my phone,” into their
X1 Voice Remote, and we will make their phone ring.
Just one more way Comcast is working to fit into
your life. Not the other way around.
xfinity.com/service
© 2018 Comcast. All rights reserved.
MAY 16 , 2018
KLMNO
METRO
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
High today at
approx. 2 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
72 76 75 72°
°
°
°
78°
Precip: 60%
Wind: ENE
4-8 mph
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
B
SU
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
VIRGINIA
OBITUARIES
The family of a Maryland
woman whose ancestor
solved an 1835 murder
will finally get a reward. B3
The Senate minority
leader weighs a “nuclear”
tactic to bring Medicaid
expansion to the floor. B3
U.K. politician Tessa Jowell
helped secure the 2012
Olympics and fought for
better cancer treatment. B6
Blur of Democrats struggles for visibility in quest to oust Hogan D.C. floats
6% tax on
Candidates hampered by largest field in decades, governor’s strong popularity
ride-hail
fares
BY
P AUL S CHWARTZMAN
The gaggle of Democrats seeking to topple Maryland Gov.
Larry Hogan (R) occupied every
inch of a Baltimore stage on a
recent Tuesday, a shoulder-toshoulder phalanx that included
one woman in a red jacket and a
blur of men in blue suits, one of
them inexplicably wearing sunglasses.
A full 20 minutes passed before the candidates finished introducing themselves to the au-
dience, which included Nancy
Steichen, a social worker who sat
in the back and took notes as she
tried to master who was who.
“Don’t even ask me their
names,” Steichen said. “In one
ear and out the other.”
Six weeks before the June 26
primary, the major Democratic
candidates — a cast including
one county executive, one state
lawmaker and four political novices — are struggling to capture
voters’ attention and emerge as
the clear alternative to Hogan.
Regaining control of Maryland’s top seat may seem like a
simple task in a state in which
registered Democrats outnumber Republicans 2 to 1 and at a
time when President Trump has
newly energized legions of pro-
gressive voters.
Yet the governor has managed
to attract broad support, in part
by distancing himself from
Trump and Republicans in Congress. Hogan has a 69 percent
approval rating and $9 million in
his campaign account — more
than the entire Democratic field.
The dynamics of the Democratic race grew murkier last
week with the death of Kevin
Kamenetz, the Baltimore County
executive who was among the
leaders in the polls. Valerie Ervin, Kamenetz’s ticket-mate and
a former Montgomery County
Council member, has until
Thursday to decide whether to
replace him on the ballot.
Whatever Ervin chooses, the
field’s size already has complicated the candidates’ efforts to raise
money and distinguish themselves given that they “violently
MARYLAND CONTINUED ON B4
LARGER HIKE THAN
BOWSER PROPOSED
Firms also would have
to disclose user data
BY
F AIZ S IDDIQUI
The D.C. Council on Tuesday
introduced a proposal that would
tax ride-hailing trips at a higher
rate than Mayor Muriel E. Bowser
(D) had sought and would require the companies to disclose
extensive data about the scale of
their operations in the District.
The proposal, which had first
been floated in budget documents released this week, would
raise the “gross receipts tax” on
Uber, Lyft and Via ride-hailing
services to 6 percent from 1 percent, rather than the 4.75 percent
Bowser had proposed. The mayor
sought the tax increase as a way
to help raise money for the District’s $178 million share of dedicated funding for the Metro rail
system.
The council says its tax on the
companies would raise about
$23 million for the transit agency,
compared with about $18 million
under Bowser’s plan. And they
argued that their departure from
Bowser’s recommendations is
justified because research shows
Uber and Lyft “contribute to traffic congestion, add wear and tear
to the District’s roads, and there
is evidence that they draw people
TAX CONTINUED ON B2
PHOTOS BY ALLISON SHELLEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
In God we tour
A conservative Christian guide aims to portray the nation’s capital in a different light
BY
S ARAH P ULLIAM B AILEY
T
he girls in red, white and
blue plaid skirts and boys in
khaki pants climbed aboard
the bus with their parents
before it pulled away from
the Red Lion Inn in Arlington.
The 46 Mississippi sixth-graders
from Tupelo Christian Preparatory
School were headed to the Mall for a
conservative “Christian history” tour
— a theme that stands out in largely
liberal, diverse Washington, even given the city’s role as host to tours for
practically every interest.
“We are a nation founded by people
who put their trust in God,” said
Stephen McDowell, co-founder of the
Providence Foundation, the rightleaning Christian educational nonprofit group in Charlottesville that
A group, top, from Tupelo Christian Preparatory School in
Tupelo, Miss., visits the grave of Robert Kennedy at Arlington
National Cemetery. Guide Stephen McDowell, above, has led a
“Christian history” tour for about 30 years.
sponsors the tours.
“What’s our motto?” McDowell
called out to the students.
“In God We Trust!” they yelled back
in unison.
“America is exceptional,” McDowell
continued. “This nation was unlike
any in history.”
The tours attempt to explain the
buildings, monuments and symbols
in the nation’s capital through a
Christian lens, as visible proof of religious foundations upon which the
country was built.
McDowell, who has been organizing the trips for about 30 years, describes them as a kind of calling. God,
he says, has been ignored in the
schools, in the government, in the
media, and in official tours of our
nation’s historic sites. But if tourists
TOUR CONTINUED ON B2
We’re going backward on D.C. delegate faces Democratic rival
what blacks cannot do
Former Obama official
When racial
incidents make
news, my friends
and neighbors
cannot avoid
bringing it up. We
Courtland may start out
Milloy
trying to have a
normal
conversation. How’s the family?
Will it be the Warriors vs. Cavs?
You planting anything this
spring?
Then, without so much as a
pause, we are back there.
Reliving every incendiary
incident through gritted teeth:
aims to edge out Norton,
seeking her 15th term
napping while black, Airbnb
while black, Starbucks while
black. The list of what black
people cannot do before
someone calls the police seems
to go on and on.
Going back, way backward.
“It’s like the postReconstruction era,” said a
neighbor, recalling the violent
backlash to black progress
following the Civil War.
It is an eerie comparison.
“The KKK is recruiting,” a
friend said recently, sounding as
if it were just another company
Eleanor Holmes Norton has
been in Congress so long she can’t
immediately recall how many
terms she has served. But she
knows one thing: She will win
another one this year.
And that’s part of the problem,
according to Kim R. Ford, 37, a
former Obama administration official running an underdog cam-
MILLOY CONTINUED ON B5
NORTON CONTINUED ON B8
BY
J ENNA P ORTNOY
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Kim R. Ford, a D.C. native and former Obama administration
official, will challenge Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-D.C.).
Sports
gambling
no sure bet
— for now
Some local lawmakers
embrace idea, but details
and timing are unclear
BY
S TEVE T HOMPSON
Legalized sports betting could
come to the nation’s capital or its
surroundings after a Supreme
Court ruling this week opened the
way for states to allow it. But
where, and how fast, remain very
much up in the air.
Nearly 20 states have introduced bills to legalize sports betting or allow voters to decide. The
District and Virginia aren’t
among them.
In Maryland, a bill calling for a
voter referendum on the issue
passed the House of Delegates
this year, but not the Senate. Any
betting proposal now must wait
until next year, barring a special
legislative session, which the office of Gov. Larry Hogan (R) said
he has no plans to initiate. That
pushes the soonest potential legalization to 2020.
“The governor has previously
expressed support for the rights
of states to make this determination,” Hogan spokeswoman Shareese Churchill said in an email.
“We anticipate this issue will be
debated in the next legislative
session.”
Del. Jason C. Buckel (R-Allegany), who has sponsored past
sports betting legislation, said the
bill’s failure could put Maryland
at a competitive disadvantage.
“It’s a shame that all our neighboring states and competing casinos are going to be up and running with this new amenity for
their customers,” he said.
Indeed, in the District, one
council member said he’d like to
BETTING CONTINUED ON B5
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
MAY 16 , 2018
Tour guide sees God in the foundations of D.C. monuments
TOUR FROM B1
can peel back the secular layers of
government and media, they will
behold a nation birthed by God, he
maintains, and thus be compelled
to conclude that without Christianity, there would be no United
States.
“Watch for things the tour
guides aren’t going to tell you,”
McDowell told the students, by
now in Washington and preparing
to tour the Capitol, the first of
many stops over three days that
would include Arlington National
Cemetery and George Washington’s Mount Vernon home.
“What happened in 1492?” McDowell asked the students on the
bus.
“Columbus sailed the ocean
blue!” they shouted back.
Most people know that part, he
said, but they don’t know that
Christopher Columbus toward
the end of his life wrote something
called “The Book of Prophecies,”
which contained hundreds of biblical scriptures and promoted the
spread of Christianity throughout
the world.
After Columbus opened up the
“New World” for exploration,
what would become the United
States was colonized in the midst
of the Protestant Reformation
with a focus on getting the Bible
into the hands of ordinary people,
McDowell noted.
“Latin America was founded by
the Catholic Church, which neglected the Bible,” he said. “America was founded by Protestants
who focused on the Bible.”
Inside the Capitol Rotunda, the
group paused to look at a large oil
painting by John Vanderlyn that
depicts Columbus on a beach in
the West Indies.
Another of the paintings by various artists depicted the baptism
of Pocahontas.
“She was the most famous convert. Her baptism is a reflection of
why the colonies were established,” McDowell had prepped
his charges before the official tour,
during which the guide noted that
Pocahontas was baptized so she
could marry English settler John
Rolfe.
Another painting showed the
Pilgrims praying before embarking on their journey to New England. The rest of the eight paintings, one of which shows the signing of the Declaration of Independence, illustrate “providential
events,” McDowell had declared —
meaning there was divine oversight.
Many historians takes issue
with the idea of a tour that focuses
at looking at national history solely via a conservative Christian perspective.
“People like McDowell get some
facts wrong, but my real issue with
them is the way they try to spin the
past to promote their present-day
political agenda,” said John Fea, a
professor of American history at
Messiah College, a Christian
school in Mechanicsburg, Pa.
“They cherry-pick. . . . This is not
how historians work.”
The political leanings of the
Christian history tour group were
apparent.
For example, the students and
parents watched Senate Minority
Leader Charles E. Schumer
PHOTOS BY ALLISON SHELLEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
TOP: In front of the statue
of Junipero Serra, a
Franciscan priest who
founded Spanish missions in
California, students from
Tupelo Christian
Preparatory School in
Tupelo, Miss., listen to
guide Stephen McDowell’s
narration as they tour the
National Statuary Hall
inside the Capitol.
LEFT: Donna Parker, left,
takes a photo in front of a
quote by President Thomas
Jefferson, on the subject of
God, at the Jefferson
Memorial.
(D-N.Y.) give an address in the
Senate chambers about labor
rights for Native Americans and
his opposition to President
Trump’s stance toward Russia and
the recent tax reform law.
“He sounded like he was from
somewhere in the North,” Julia
Jane Averette, 12, said over lunch.
“I wish a Republican had been
talking when we went through.”
Averette said she is inspired to
become president some day. “I
would lower taxes and spend
money on things that are useful,
like protecting the country, not
what Obama did,” she said.
The girl’s mother, Jennifer Averette, said it was her first trip to
Washington and that she had
heard the monuments were strategically placed to form a cross.
(Historians say Pierre L’Enfant
did not employ this concept when
he planned the city in the early
1790s.)
“The Bible should shape policy,
because that’s how America was
founded,” she said.
The group visited the Library of
Congress, where some students
tapped out notes on their smartphones. “The first book printed on
the Gutenberg press was what?”
McDowell asked the students.
“The Bible,” they yelled back.
“It’s important we have it on
display because the Bible is the
bedrock upon which our nation
rests,” McDowell said, noting the
15th-century Gutenberg Bible
that sits on display in the library.
The students and parents then
flocked to view the book, which is
encased in glass under a spotlight.
The group made its way to the
Supreme Court Building, where
McDowell pointed out a statue of
John Jay, the first chief justice of
the United States. Jay once wrote
that “it is the duty, as well as the
privilege and interest, of our
Christian nation to select and prefer Christians for their rulers.”
“Today, that would bring an
apoplectic rage among liberals,”
McDowell said.
The tour ended its first day at
the National World War II Memorial. McDowell described the war
as a struggle against evil Nazism,
drawing parallels between Christian faith and liberty. Jesus’ message that the “truth will set you
free” is at odds with constraints
imposed under repressive forms
of government, he said.
“Unfortunately,
academia
stopped seeing traditional Christianity as a source of liberty,” McDowell said. “It’s hard to combat
evil if you don’t recognize God.”
On the second day of the tour,
the group paused in front of the
Marine Corps War Memorial,
which depicts six Marines raising
a flag on the Pacific island of Iwo
Jima during World War II. McDowell focused instead on an earlier war called the First Barbary
War, from 1801 to 1805. He said
Americans fought what would be
called “Muslim terrorists” today
who were capturing merchant
ships and enslaving their crews.
(Although the pirates came from
Muslim states, many historians do
not think that religion was a motivating factor.)
“You stand up and use force —
people respect that,” McDowell
said. “It’s pertinent for struggles
we’re facing today.”
The parents on the trip had only
good things to say about what the
students were learning.
“We went to church, but in
school we were never taught anything like this,” said Dana Parker,
whose 12-year-old son, Brayden,
one of two African American students on the trip, had braces with
red, white and blue bands on
them.
Parker’s oldest son was in public school but started hanging
around the “wrong crowd,” she
said, so she decided to put him in
the private school three years ago.
The focus on faith during the trip
was important to her, enough to
justify the tour’s $999-per-person
fee, plus airfare.
“They’ll always have [these
ideas] instilled in them, even if
they drift away,” she said.
Many of the parents said they
appreciated McDowell’s telling of
history because they felt it covered
aspects that have been ignored.
“A lot of people are trying to
rewrite history,” said Brent
Crumpton, a dentist who joined
his 13-year-old son, Tucker, on the
trip.
Christianity, Crumpton said, is
being “slammed” on a daily basis,
citing the “war on Christmas” and
“The View” host Joy Behar’s recent mockery of Vice President
Pence’s faith. “Middle America
feels like there’s more tolerance
for other religions apart from
Christianity,” he said.
As the bus made its way
through the city, McDowell noted
that the historic Post Office Pavilion is now the Trump International Hotel, but the president was
never named in his talks. Later,
McDowell described Trump as
“better than the alternative,”
though “certainly not the biblical
model.”
The bus made a quick stop for
photos in front of the White
House, where McDowell told the
group a state dining room fireplace includes the inscription, “I
pray Heaven to Bestow the Best of
Blessings on THIS HOUSE and on
All that shall hereafter Inhabit it.
May none but Honest and Wise
Men ever rule under this Roof.”
At the Lincoln Memorial, McDowell said he thinks that President Abraham Lincoln was a
Christian, though his “theology
wasn’t developed.” (Lincoln biographer Allen Guelzo says Lincoln
appeared to believe in God, although there is no evidence to
suggest he accepted Christian
teaching about Jesus. Nonetheless, he famously quoted Jesus’
Sermon on the Mount in his second inaugural address and suggested that God was punishing the
nation for slavery.)
The group finished the tour in
Washington by visiting the Korean War Veterans Memorial and
Vietnam Veterans Memorial.
McDowell described a satellite
image showing South Korea
(where Christianity has thrived)
as lit up at night, in contrast to
North Korea’s darkness. “Liberty
produces prosperity,” he said.
The point of his tours, McDowell said, is not about the facts and
figures.
“Churches have become less influential. Schools have become influenced by secular humanism,”
he said. “The bigger purpose is to
show people that biblical ideas are
necessary for us to live free.”
sarah.bailey@washpost.com
D.C. proposal would require ride-hailing companies to surrender troves of data
TAX FROM B1
away from public transit.”
Researchers in a range of studies arrived at figures showing
anywhere between 15 and 30 percent of ride-hailing trips would
have otherwise been taken by
transit. Metro is studying the
impact of Uber and Lyft’s operations on its declining ridership.
The reaction was swift from
the ride-hailing firms and advocates who had bristled at the tax
increase in Bowser’s initial request and had pushed for a tiered
system that would exempt pooled
rides from the tax increase. The
council’s proposal would add
about 60 cents to a $10 ride — if
the services decide to pass on the
cost to customers.
“This disappointing proposal,
devised behind closed doors
without public input, stands in
stark contrast to the good-faith
example set by Mayor Bowser
and Councilmember [Jack] Evans, who found a way to sustainably fund transit while helping
reduce congestion,” Uber spokes-
man Colin Tooze said in a statement. “Punishing District residents who choose to share their
rides and help take cars off the
road is not the right approach.”
Lyft officials said they were
similarly dismayed with the plan,
arguing that a steep tax would
affect the affordability of the
company’s fares for passengers.
“For the City Council to attempt to raise taxes on all rides —
across the board — to a staggering 6% is highly disappointing,
and unfair to DC’s ride-share
passengers,” Lyft spokeswoman
Campbell Matthews said. “We are
hopeful that lawmakers realize
the importance of keeping transportation affordable and accessible for those who need these rides
most.”
The measures are outlined in
the fiscal 2019 budget to which
the council gave an initial vote of
approval Tuesday.
Bowser’s office criticized the
budget tweaks in a statement late
Tuesday, citing their likely impact
on residents and commerce rather than tourists.
“While we’re still in the process
of reviewing the council’s proposal, our concern is that the new tax
increases shift the burden away
from visitors and onto District
residents and businesses,” Bowser spokeswoman LaToya Foster
said. “We will continue to work
with the council and other partners to ensure that the final
budget works in the best interest
of our residents.”
D.C. Council Chairman Phil
Mendelson (D) said in a statement
said that the mayor had sent a
request
for
approximately
$77 million in new taxes, and that
the council had honored that commitment “although with some revisions to the incidence of the tax.”
The council also proposed that
ride-hailing services operating in
the District provide more data on
where, when and how many trips
the companies are conducting, a
move that transit officials, city
planners and open-data advocates have backed as vital to their
congestion-relief and sustainability efforts.
Ride-hailing companies ex-
pressed skepticism about that
proposal as well, saying that the
requirements are aggressive and
overly broad and pose concerns
about the privacy of their passenger data.
Under the proposal, companies would be required to submit
troves of data to the D.C. departments of transportation and forhire vehicles, including how
many drivers they have, the total
number of vehicle miles driven in
the District and an extensive log
of each trip. The logs were a point
of contention because they would
include information such as the
origin and destination, and pickup and drop-off times for each
ride. Companies would also be
required to specify how much
idle time there was at pickup and
drop-off points, the total fare of
each trip, whether it was private
or pooled, and how many passengers were in each vehicle.
The information gathered
would include trips that take
place in the District, or begin or
end within it. The proposal would
also retroactively require data for
THE POSTPOINTS HUNT
2018, which would be due in
January.
“This would put D.C. right up
beside New York in providing
transparency about how the
fastest-growing form of transportation in American cities is affecting those cities,” said Bruce
Schaller, consultant and former
deputy commissioner for traffic
and planning in New York City,
who led study on the growth of
ride-hailing
services
there.
“These companies are remaking
the transportation landscape in
big American cities, and we need
to understand what’s happening.”
Lyft officials said they worried
about the potential impact of
those data requirements on customers.
“We share anonymized data
with a number of regulators to
help cities understand the transportation environment; however,
we have serious concerns about
the impact of the city council’s
requests on user privacy and proprietary information,” Matthews
said.
The council’s proposal goes on
to specify that ride-hailing companies would be required to submit “any additional information
that the DFHV or DDOT deems
necessary,” provided the government states the purpose of its use
under D.C. law. Uber, Lyft and Via
raised objections to those proposals in a letter Monday to Mendelson, which was obtained by The
Washington Post. The letter highlights the companies’ myriad concerns with how the council’s datasharing agreement could leave
users’ personal information at
risk.
“It is critical that any data
sharing agreement ensure the
privacy and security of D.C. residents and visitors,” the companies wrote. “We are confident
that these risks can be mitigated
through careful collaboration
with DDOT to identify that data
which will best help the District
plan for the future while also
ensuring the protection of highly
sensitive personal data from exposure.”
faiz.siddiqui@washpost.com
WHAT WILL YOU FIND?
Head to Folger Theatre for Shakespeare’s Macbeth.
In Love’s Labor’s Lost men are put to the test.
Also on the docket: The Bard’s King John –
Secure tickets now before they are gone!
Who will direct Shakespeare’s King John, an epic struggle of power,
from October 23 – December 2 at Folger Theatre?
A Bruce Springsteen tribute band
Is D.C.-bound; come if you can
To The Hamilton Live for “Blinded by the Light”
“Dancing in the Dark” and “Prove It All Night.”
When will the doors open for the Bruce in the USA tribute band
on June 22 at The Hamilton Live?
Coming to Ford’s: Born Yesterday
A sharp-edged satire; justice wins the day
And A Christmas Carol and Into the Woods –
A dark comical tale with Red Riding Hood
Who will direct Into the Woods, a musical fairy tale with a twist,
March 8 - May 22 at Ford’s Theatre?
(Hint: See Folger.edu for the answer.)
(Hint: See Live.TheHamiltonDC.com for the answer.)
(Hint: See Fords.org for the answer.)
E A R N 5 P O I N T S F O R E V E RY C O R R E C T R E S P O N S E : F i n d t h e a n s w e r s , t h e n g o t o w a s h i n g t o n p o s t . c o m / p o s t p o i n t s a n d c l i c k o n “ Q u i z z e s ” t o e n t e r t h e c o r re c t re s p o n s e s .
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
Reward in 1835 murder goes to Md. descendants of German tipster
L O C A L D IG ES T
The letter
THE DISTRICT
Barbara
Schaefer of
Nearly 150 arrested
outside Capitol
Nearly 150 people were
arrested Monday outside the
Capitol during the inaugural
demonstration of a month-long
protest of poverty, war and
inequality that attempts to
revive a civil rights campaign
from 50 years ago.
The Rev. William Barber and
the Rev. Liz Theoharis, the lead
organizers for the new Poor
People’s Campaign — named
after the original 1968 coalition
organized by the Rev. Martin
Luther King Jr. — were among
146 protesters who refused to get
out of First Street SE and were
arrested by Capitol Police.
Barber, a minister from North
Carolina, said the group decided
to block traffic outside the
Capitol to send a message to
lawmakers.
“We took those streets to say
that we’re headed in the wrong
direction as a nation,” Barber
said after he was released from
custody. “We believe something
worse is being done than our
blocking traffic for an hour. Our
Constitution says we’re to
promote the general welfare.”
— Marissa J. Lang
MARYLAND
Three die in Charles
County highway crash
Three people were killed
Tuesday afternoon in a twovehicle collision in Charles
County, Md., state police said.
Four others were injured.
The three who were killed and
two of the injured were in an
SUV that collided around 3 p.m.
with a dump truck at Route 234
and Penns Hill Road, state police
said. The crash happened about
five miles south of La Plata.
None of those killed or injured
was identified. No conditions
were given for those who were
injured.
Gaithersburg,
Md., received
three years ago
John
sounded
Kelly's
suspicious. It
Washington came from
Germany and
informed Barbara
she was entitled to a share of
1,000 euros, roughly $1,200. All
she had to do was travel to a
town outside of Stuttgart to
receive it. The letter-writer
would even pay for plane tickets
for her and a guest.
Barbara said it sounded
pretty good to her, especially the
reason for the windfall: An
ancestor of Barbara’s had
helped solve a murder, and she
was entitled to some of the
reward.
“My sister, myself and our
brother, we’re all saying to her,
‘You’re crazy. Do not reply to
this person. It’s a scam,’” said
Patti Beisner, one of
Barbara’s daughters.
Said Patti’s sister, Jennifer
Manion, “My mom always said,
‘If it’s too good to be true, it is.’
We couldn’t figure out why she
was believing it.”
Convinced by her family it
was a scam, Barbara never
responded to the letter. She died
in 2016.
Last year, it turned out she
had been right. The murder
occurred in 1835 in the German
town of Bönnigheim. Barbara’s
great-great-grandfather, August
Frederick Rupp, had helped
identify the killer.
How this all came to light is
the subject of “Death of an
Assassin: The True Story of the
A former Fairfax County
middle school teacher who has
received educator of the year
honors has been charged with
committing an indecent act with
a minor, according to a search
warrant and court records.
Timothy Threlkeld, who
taught at Langston Hughes
Middle School in Reston, Va., is
facing four counts of the charge.
Authorities began investigating
him in 2014, according to a
search warrant filed in Fairfax
County Circuit Court.
In August 2014, Fairfax
County Public Schools put
Threlkeld on leave, officials said,
and he resigned from his
position in June 2015.
Subsequently, the school system
petitioned the Virginia
Department of Education to
have his teaching license
revoked.
Threlkeld was arrested in
November 2017, but it does not
appear that police, prosecutors
or the school district ever put
out a news release about the
case.
Threlkeld is scheduled to
stand trial at the end of August.
His attorney did not respond to a
request for comment.
— Justin Jouvenal
KENT STATE UNIVERSITY PRESS
Ann Marie Ackermann,
author of “Death of an
Assassin: The True Story
of the German Murderer
Who Died Defending
Robert E. Lee,” will speak
about her book Saturday
in Gaithersburg.
Bönnigheim in 1996 after
marrying a German man. She
stumbled across the murder
while researching an article for
the local historical society on
bird life. She was flipping
through the diary of a 19thcentury forester — who would
be more familiar with the birds
of the forest? — when she saw a
mention of the killing.
The murderer turned out to
be a disgruntled government
employee, though that would
not be known for sure until 1872
when Rupp — a Bönnigheim
resident who had emigrated to
Washington, where he sold an
ointment called Rupp’s Salve —
notified town officials he had
heard a conversation that might
prove pertinent.
I will spare you the details in
case you want to read the book,
but you may be curious about
the Robert E. Lee connection in
the subtitle. After fleeing to the
United States, the murderer
Reunited
Here is another local reunion:
Surrattsville High Class of
1968 — Two reunion activities:
Aug. 18 (visit surrattsville68.
classquest.com/main/default.
aspx) and a cruise Dec. 30-Jan. 6
(email Jeannie Lipphard at
jeannie@cruiseplanneronline
.com or call 410-987-7245 or
443-871-5914).
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/people/johnkelly.
LOTTE R I E S
‘Nuclear option’ threatened on Medicaid expansion
BY
L AURA V OZZELLA
richmond — Sen. Minority
Ex-Fairfax teacher
accused of indecency
DENNIS ACKERMANN
joined the U.S. Army. He ended
up under Lee’s command at the
Siege of Veracruz during the
Mexican American War.
Ackermann could find no
mention of the reward ever
being paid. Gail McCormick, a
Washington researcher, found
Rupp’s descendant, Barbara
Schaefer, living in Gaithersburg.
“When I brought it to our
mayor in 2015 and said we have
this unpaid reward, he could
have backed out and said we
have no legal obligation to
honor it,” Ackermann said. “But
he felt this was the murder of
his predecessor, and the town
has a moral and diplomatic
obligation to make this
good again.”
When Ackermann’s book was
finally published last year, she
sent copies to Rupp’s
descendants in America. This
time, they believed her.
“It was totally from a movie,”
Patti Beisner said. “We were
thinking this is ridiculous, so
crazy. I just wish my mom was
here. She believed in it
wholeheartedly.”
VIRGINIA
— Martin Weil
VIRGINIA
German Murderer Who Died
Defending Robert E. Lee,” by
Ann Marie Ackermann,
published last year by Kent
State University Press.
Ackermann will be at Saturday’s
Gaithersburg Book Festival
talking about her book. (Visit
gaithersburgbookfestival.org
for details.)
Also at the festival: Kornelius
Bamberger, mayor of
Bönnigheim. He will be
presenting the reward to
Manion, Beisner and other
family members.
Bamberger has a special
interest in the case: The victim
was a 19th-century mayor of the
town, Johann Heinrich Rieber.
On the evening of Oct. 21, 1835,
Rieber was hit by a shotgun
blast as he walked home from a
restaurant. He lingered in pain
for a few days, then died.
The act so horrified the town
that Mayor Rieber’s bloodencrusted clothes were
displayed in the city hall for the
next 36 years, a reminder the
murderer was still at large.
A magistrate named Eduard
Hammer investigated the crime.
A highlight of Ackermann’s
book is the description of how
he set about trying to solve it,
interviewing witnesses, poring
over clues, examining ballistic
evidence.
“When it’s a public official
who’s murdered, I think they
put a little more effort into the
investigation,” Ackermann said.
The case files grew to nearly
800 pages, all written in a
Gothic German script
Ackermann had to master.
Ackermann is an American
lawyer whose father was
German. She moved to
Leader Richard L. Saslaw said he
will resort to a “nuclear” procedural move — one that would
wrest the state budget bill from
the Senate Finance Committee —
if the panel does not send a
spending plan to the full Senate
before it reconvenes next week.
Saslaw (D-Fairfax) said he will
make a motion to “discharge” the
committee, which he says has
been dragging its feet on the
budget since a second Republican senator declared his willingness to approve Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care
Act.
Although both chambers of
the legislature are controlled by
the GOP, they have been split on
the question of whether to extend Medicaid coverage to an
additional 400,000 low-income
Virginians, with the House in
favor and the Senate opposed.
But in recent weeks, two Republican senators have indicated
they would back expansion under certain conditions — enough
to pass the budget.
The General Assembly needs
to approve a budget by July 1 or
face a government shutdown.
The legislature reconvened last
month, ostensibly to negotiate a
budget agreement between the
House and the Senate, but the
Senate has not put forth a plan.
Saslaw’s suggestion that he
would discharge a committee for
this purpose — to get a bill to the
floor against the panel’s wishes
— is a rare move that has not
been tried since the mid-1970s.
The tactic could be seen as a
humiliating end-run around Sen.
Thomas K. Norment Jr. (R-James
City), who is both Senate majority leader and co-chairman of the
Finance Committee — or as a way
for Norment to keep his hands
clean of Medicaid expansion
even if passes out of the closely
divided Senate.
“That is the nuclear option,”
Saslaw said in an interview Tuesday. “But we don’t have any
“We’re going to get
Medicaid expansion
one way or another.”
Senate Minority Leader
Richard L. Saslaw (D-Fairfax)
choice. We can’t shut the government down. . . . We’re going to
get Medicaid expansion one way
or another.”
Norment reacted furiously.
“That Senator Saslaw and
some outlying Republicans are
openly using the term ‘nuclear
option’ indicates the devastating
effect such an action will have on
the Senate,” Norment said. “It
would be unprecedented to use
this tactic, especially with a
budget bill. Doing so will irrevocably change the Senate of Virginia. This is the bastardization
of Senate tradition to score a
political win.”
Under the Affordable Care Act
Large Selections to choose from
Best Price Guarantee
ROLL
IN
IN TO
TO
championed by President Barack
Obama, Washington allowed
states to open their Medicaid
rolls to people making up to
138 percent of the federal poverty
level, which is $16,643 for an
individual. The federal government has pledged to pay at least
90 percent of the cost, which in
Virginia would amount to about
$2 billion a year.
Thirty-two states, including
Maryland and the District of
Columbia, accepted the offer. But
Virginia, which has one of the
nation’s most frugal Medicaid
programs, refused. Republicans
said they feared the federal government would withdraw its
support and leave the state picking up the cost.
Opposition in the House softened this year, after Republicans
nearly lost control of the House
in last November’s elections. But
the Senate, which did not face
voters last year, remained opposed during the regular legislative session.
The Senate convened Monday
to send the House’s two-year,
$115 billion spending plan to the
Finance Committee. The committee has met twice since but
adjourned Tuesday without voting or scheduling another meeting.
If the panel doesn’t pass a
budget before the full Senate
returns May 22, Saslaw said he
would make the discharge motion, which would need a simple
majority to pass.
The Senate customarily discharges committees to speed
along procedural matters. But
using that tactic to muscle a bill
to the floor against a committee’s
wishes is almost unheard of in
Virginia.
If the budget bill comes to the
floor that way, it would be the
House’s budget plan, unamended. The Senate could amend it on
the floor, but if the House did not
agree to the changes, the bill
would wind up in a conference
committee.
Saslaw said he was wary of
sending the budget to a conference committee because of the
delay and the potential for political “shenanigans.” To avoid that,
the Senate would have to either
accept the House budget as is —
or work with the House ahead of
time to ensure it would accept
any Senate amendments.
“I would prefer no conference.
And that’s what we’re going to try
to work out this week,” Saslaw
said. “If you bypass that conference, which is best way to go,
guess what? It goes directly to
the governor. . . . I want Medicaid
expansion plopped on the governor’s desk, period, no ifs, no
ands, no buts.”
Gov. Ralph Northam (D), a
pediatric neurologist, has been
a steadfast supporter of Medicaid expansion. His spokeswoman Ofirah Yheskel sidestepped
a question about Saslaw’s intended strategy, saying only,
“Governor Northam will continue to work with leaders in
the House and Senate to make
sure a budget is adopted by the
General Assembly as quickly as
possible.”
Results from May 15
DISTRICT
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Mon.):
Lucky Numbers (Tue.):
DC-4 (Mon.):
DC-4 (Tue.):
DC-5 (Mon.):
DC-5 (Tue.):
1-6-8
9-9-0-9
2-3-5-4-1
6-1-9
6-1-4
2-5-2-0
3-5-9-4
4-2-3-3-8
0-2-8-9-7
MARYLAND
Day/Pick 3:
6-1-7
Pick 4:
2-3-9-3
Night/Pick 3 (Mon.):
7-1-0
Pick 3 (Tue.):
3-1-0
Pick 4 (Mon.):
3-3-5-8
Pick 4 (Tue.):
8-9-0-4
Multi-Match (Mon.):
1-5-7-15-22-33
Match 5 (Mon.):
6-19-23-33-39 *18
Match 5 (Tue.):
17-19-22-25-26 *18
5 Card Cash:
9S-AH-8S-2S-QS
VIRGINIA
Day/Pick-3:
Pick-4:
Cash-5 (Tue.):
Night/Pick-3 (Mon.):
Pick-3 (Tue.):
Pick-4 (Mon.):
Pick-4 (Tue.):
Cash-5 (Mon.):
Cash-5 (Tue.):
7-8-7
9-8-2-2
1-11-23-27-34
6-6-8
3-1-5
2-5-1-0
4-6-9-2
2-12-23-27-31
7-17-26-27-32
MULTI-STATE GAMES
Cash 4 Life:
1-4-6-13-32 ¶2
Mega Millions:
21-34-44-49-61 **21
Megaplier:
2x
Lucky for Life:
11-26-33-36-42 ‡14
*Bonus Ball
**Mega Ball
‡Lucky Ball
¶Cash Ball
For late drawings and other results, check
washingtonpost.com/local/lottery
laura.vozzella@washpost.com
Relax in your new SUNROOM
FREE
SUNROOM
INSTALLATION
SPRING
(up to $5,600 Value)*
PLUS
CALL TODAY!!!
9-8 EST Monday thru Friday
10-4 EST Saturday
Family Owned and Operated Since 1994
™
#&4513*$&(6"3"/5&&r'*/"/$*/("7"*-"#-&
2 YEARS
ASK THE
EXPERTS
703-634-6704 VA
202-750-2740 DC
301-264-8395 MD
www.patriotscooters.com
TRUSTED FAMILY BUSINESS
Save up to $250 when you mention this ad
NO INTEREST†
HURRY! Offer ends June 5
YOUR SUNROOM EXPERTS
The One and Only
FOR A FREE DESIGN CONSULTATION, CALL
202-897-3255 - DC
571-775-2450 - VA
301-637-4412 - MD
PROMO CODE: WP *Discount applies to std. rm. installation only & varies by market. Foundation, electrical & vperipheral items not incl. Some restrictions apply. See store for details. Not valid on prior
sales or previous quotes. May not be used in conjunction w/other offers or discounts. Franchise/dealer participation varies. †Min. purchase of $15,000 required. Subject to credit approval. Fixed APR
of 0.00% for 29 mos. Based on ea. $1,000 financed, 5 mos. of $0.00 pymts. followed by 24 amortized pymts. of $41.67. Financing for GreenSky® consumer credit programs is provided by federally
insured, federal and state chartered financial institutions without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, sex or familial status. See store for details. Franchise/dealer participation varies.
©Copyright 2018 Patio Enclosures.
DC 420214000016; VA 2705157137; MHIC #132308
SUNROOMS
|
SCREEN ROOMS
|
PORCH ENCLOSURES
|
AWNINGS
|
WINDOWS & DOORS
B4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
MAY 16 , 2018
MARYLAND
Bowie educator is county Teacher of the Year
BY
D ONNA S T. G EORGE
An educator in Prince George’s
County lauded for her engaging
instruction and efforts to develop
the next generation of classroom
leaders has been tapped as the
county’s 2018 Teacher of the Year.
Daleisha Myers, who teaches
fifth grade at Tulip Grove Elementary in Bowie, has worked
more than 13 years at her Maryland school and served on its
management team. She is a volunteer, helping out at the school’s
fundraisers, reading night, health
fair and fall festival.
She was nominated by her
peers.
“I truly believe Mrs. Myers is an
ideal Teacher of the Year,” principal Jaime Coffen said. “Her involvement in education provides
a solid platform and the insight
needed to speak eloquently about
the state of public school education.”
Outside the Tulip Grove classroom, Myers is an adjunct professor at Bowie State University,
Daleisha Myers, who teaches at
Tulip Grove Elementary in
Bowie, is Prince George’s
County’s Teacher of the Year.
where she was honored with the
university’s Teacher Leader
Award. She also was selected for
the City of Bowie Excellence in
Education Award.
Other finalists for the Prince
George’s Teacher of the Year
award included Charina Pacheco
of J. Frank Dent Elementary; Luis
Javier Pentón Herrera of Laurel
High; Jason Venezia-Walerstein
of Buck Lodge Middle; and Arnice
Williams of Largo High.
Myers will compete against
winners in other county school
systems for state honors as Maryland Teacher of the Year.
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS
donna.stgeorge@washpost.com
No clear choice to take on Hogan
MARYLAND FROM B1
agree” on most issues, as one put
it recently.
The muddle also has tested
voters’ ability to accomplish that
most basic of tasks — matching
the candidates’ names with their
faces.
“The Italian one, Mad—,
Mad—, Mad— . . .,” said Ed
Downey, a Silver Spring retiree,
squinting as he tried to recall the
name of state Sen. Richard S.
Madaleno Jr. (Montgomery).
Donald F. Norris, emeritus
professor of public policy at the
University of Maryland Baltimore County, said none of the
Democrats are standing out “in a
way that challenges Hogan.”
“It’s like a bowl of oatmeal —
it’s all the same,” Norris said of
the field. “He can ignore them
just like everyone else is doing.”
Democratic leaders counter
that the field’s size — and the
seemingly endless litany of candidate forums — is evidence of
the party’s muscle and the energy
behind its opposition to Hogan
and Trump. They note that Maryland’s last Republican governor,
Robert Ehrlich, had a 55 percent
approval rating two weeks before
Martin O’Malley defeated him in
2006.
“They are an army of voices
showcasing the shortcomings of
Larry Hogan,” said state party
chair Kathleen Matthews. “It’s
going to drive record turnout and
boost Democrats’ chances in November.”
Name games
On any given night, the candidates can be found at a church or
a school competing to make an
impression, sometimes in the
most rudimentary ways.
“Let me remind you, I’m Jim
Shea,” the candidate who is a
prominent Baltimore attorney
told a recent audience — an hour
after he had already introduced
himself.
Prince George’s County Executive Rushern L. Baker III —
leading most polls, albeit with
less than 20 percent of the vote —
likes to remind audiences that
he’s “the only candidate” who has
managed a large county and also
served as a state lawmaker.
“I specialize in getting things
STAFF AND CAMPAIGN PHOTOS
Maryland’s Democratic gubernatorial candidates, clockwise from top left: Prince George’s County
Executive Rushern L. Baker III; former NAACP chief Ben Jealous; state Sen. Richard S. Madaleno Jr.
(D-Montgomery); James Shea, former head of the Board of Regents for the University System of
Maryland; former Obama administration appointee Krishanti Vignarajah; and tech entrepreneur Alec
Ross. Four of the six — Jealous, Vignarajah, Ross and Shea — have never held elected office. Baltimore
County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, another contender, died last week. His ticket-mate, Valerie Ervin,
must decide by Thursday whether to replace him on the ballot. The primary is June 26.
done” is his mantra, which he
repeats in various ways wherever
he goes.
Madaleno, the campaign’s only
openly gay candidate, casts himself as Hogan’s chief tormentor in
Annapolis and makes no apologies for being what some rivals,
in tones befitting a horror movie,
refer to as a “career politician.”
“We’re paying such a price for
the ultimate outsider,” he told
one audience, referring to
Trump. “Do we really want to
double down on that?”
Former NAACP chief Ben Jealous touts endorsements from
progressives such as Sen. Bernie
Sanders (I-Vt.), with whom he
appeared at a rally recently in
Prince George’s.
“Ber-nie! Ber-nie!” the crowd
chanted as the pair mounted the
stage. Sanders leaned into the
mic and instructed the supporters, “You’ve got to change that to
‘Ben! Ben!’ ”
Jealous starts his appearances
WE
GET IT
DONE:
COUNTERTOPS
VANITIES
FLOORING
TILE
SIDING
TRIM
WINDOWS
DOORS
& MORE
Visit ScheduleFRED.com today
for a complimentary consultation.
THOUSANDS OF HOMEOWNERS
SERVED IN THE DMV
Voted Best Handyman
WASHINGTON CIT YPAPER
Voted Best Handyman
BETHESDA MAGAZINE
Great Reviews Awardee
GUILD QUALIT Y
MD 301.388.5959 VA 571.341.6202 DC 202.770.3131
ScheduleFRED.com
A DIVISION OF
by telling voters that his election
is a sure way to “make Donald
Trump’s blood pressure go up.”
His rivals make similar vows of
impending anguish if they’re
elected.
“I am Larry Hogan’s worst
nightmare,” declares Shea, the
former head of the Board of
Regents for the University System of Maryland, who often cites
his business acumen and command of regional issues.
“I’ve been called Donald
Trump’s worst nightmare,” insists Krishanti Vignarajah, a former Obama administration appointee. “I’m Larry Hogan’s
worst nightmare, as well.”
Vignarajah, who lived in
Washington during much of her
time with the Obama administration, is the only candidate in
the field who has faced questions
about her residency status.
But she prefers highlighting
her standing as the field’s only
woman, releasing a campaign
commercial that showed her
breast-feeding her daughter.
“Conventional wisdom says
that no man can defeat Larry
Hogan,” Vignarajah tells every
audience. “Well, I’m no man.”
But it is tech entrepreneur
Alec Ross who promises to be the
“feminist governor.” Like Vignarajah, he frequently mentions
his time with the Obama administration, although he likes to
add that he’s not part of the
“carousel” that produces traditional politicians.
Ross also has found morenovel ways to stand out.
After Madaleno told an audience in Silver Spring that he
would be Maryland’s first Italian
American governor, Ross took
the microphone and, in his best
Italian, said, “Okay, bene, sono
anche Italo-Americano” (Okay,
well, I’m also Italian American).
As the audience laughed, he
then offered to speak Italian with
his rival.
Madaleno’s expression suggested that he was not interested.
A diluted field
Not since 1994 have Maryland
Democrats had so many candidates competing in a gubernatorial primary. Prince George’s
County executive Parris N. Glendening won that race and went
on to become governor.
Twenty-four years later, party
chair Matthews said Democratic
leaders are conscious of not
showing favoritism toward any
candidate, hoping to avoid the
kind of division that emerged
during the 2016 presidential
race, when progressives accused
the party of rigging the nomination for Hillary Clinton.
“I set a goal of being judiciously fair and evenhanded and making sure there was no appearance
of putting the finger on the
scale,” Matthews said. “That was
the way to rebuild trust in the
party.”
The rise of Trump, the embodiment of an outsider, also inspired
a more heated political environment and a sense of opportunity
for political neophytes in Maryland and beyond. Four of the six
well-financed Democratic candidates — Jealous, Vignarajah,
Ross and Shea — have never held
elected office.
“As a consequence, it’s a very
diluted field, and no one has
enough money to take over the
race,” said former state attorney
general Douglas F. Gansler, who
lost to Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown
in the 2014 Democratic primary
and is backing Madaleno. “At the
same time, you have a popular
governor, so there’s no urgency to
get behind a Democrat.”
Party leaders contend that the
race will crystallize after voters
choose a nominee and turn their
attention to the general election.
But even the Democratic candidates complain that Hogan has
commandeered their issues, including most recently making
community college tuition-free
for low- and middle-income residents.
“Why is he a popular governor?” Madaleno asked one audience. “Because he’s running on
my record not his record.”
As they mull their choices,
Democratic voters are not expressing a pressing need for
change in Maryland, at least not
yet.
“It’s hard for me to like a
Republican, but we’re cool with
Hogan — he hasn’t made any
serious mistakes,” Jerry Coopey, a
retired federal administrator,
said as he showed up for a forum
in Prince George’s.
He said he would vote for a
Democrat, if only to express his
leanings. But he wasn’t sure who,
since he knew only one candidate’s name.
“The Jealous guy — didn’t he
do
something
nationally?”
Coopey said. “I don’t know the
rest.”
At the Baltimore forum, Gail
Sunderman, 67, a research scientist, looked at a stage that was
even more crowded than usual,
thanks to the participation of a
Green Party candidate and two
lesser-known Democrats, including Ralph Jaffe, a retired teacher,
who distinguished himself by
being the one in sunglasses.
As she departed two hours
later, Sunderman was still trying
to figure out who has the best
shot.
“I’ve got it down to five,” she
said of her choices, smiling at the
prospect that she has time to
decide.
paul.schwartzman@washpost.com
THE DISTRICT
Council gives first nod
to $14.5 billion budget
BY
F ENIT N IRAPPIL
The D.C. Council on Tuesday
approved a $14.5 billion budget
for the next fiscal year that contains more money for subsidized
housing and higher taxes than
Mayor Muriel E. Bowser’s
proposal.
The unanimous votes came
after a group of clergy crashed
the council chambers to protest
what they considered insufficient
relief for rising water bills.
Church leaders say the new water
fees related to a federal mandate
to clean up the Potomac and
Anacostia rivers could force them
to close their doors.
While the council’s budget included $12 million to help residents and nonprofits cope with
increased fees to D.C. Water,
church leaders said it was not
enough. They interrupted the
meeting to shout at legislators
and sing the civil-rights-era song
“Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn
Me Around.”
“This is classic racism and
classism,” Willie Wilson, pastor of
the Union Temple Baptist Church
in Southeast, told lawmakers, according to video of the disruption. “Residents, poor residents,
cannot afford these bills and will
be pushed out the city. You cannot separate that from gentrification.”
Council Chairman Phil Mendelson (D) and several lawmakers
huddled privately with Wilson,
Graylan Hagler, senior pastor of
Plymouth Congregational United
Church of Christ, and other clergy. The lawmakers emerged with
a promise to revisit the issue
before a final budget vote in two
weeks.
“We will attempt yet again to
see if we can’t find some additional funds to soften the blow to
those people who are especially
seriously affected by these increased fees,” said council member Mary M. Cheh (D-Ward 3).
Lawmakers also approved an
increase on the cigarette tax by
$2 a pack, as proposed by council
member Vincent C. Gray
(D-Ward 7). That would be a hike
of 68 percent on the current tax of
$2.94 a pack, aimed at curbing
smoking, particularly among
youth. The plan would also raise
the legal age to buy tobacco from
18 to 21. It passed on a 10-to-2
vote, with council members Jack
Evans (D-Ward 2) and Mendelson
opposed. Council member Trayon White Sr. (D-Ward 8) was
absent.
The council’s budget also creates a $30 million dedicated
funding stream for the city’s arts
commission, which provides
grants for projects, by redirecting
a portion of the sales tax and
imposing a 1-cent increase in the
commercial property tax rate.
Lawmakers also increased
funding for various housing programs by $15.6 million, enough
for 752 units. They shifted funding from temporary one-year rapid rehousing vouchers to permanent housing programs.
The budget included tax increases to fund the $178.5 million
share of a regional funding agreement for Metro.
Bowser (D) proposed increasing the fee on ride-hailing trips
from 1 percent to 4.75 percent, as
well as hikes in sales and commercial property taxes.
The council rejected Bowser’s
proposal to increase restaurant
and hotel sales taxes and instead
raised the ride-hailing fee to
6 percent. The tax on commercial
real estate over $5 million would
rise 3 cents from $1.85 per $100 of
assessed value, a penny more
than Bowser proposed.
Bowser and the council agreed
on increasing the general sales
tax from 5.75 percent to 6 percent
and boosting sales tax on liquor,
beer and wine sold at stores from
9 percent to 10.25 percent.
The revised budget also decoupled the District’s estate tax from
the federal tax code, reversing an
impending revenue loss for the
city when the Republican-backed
federal tax overhaul eliminated
tax liabilities for people with
estates under $11 million.
The budget also offered a new
tax break: a $5,000 credit to help
small retail businesses with rising rents and property taxes.
Legislators also appeased residents who worried they would
lose a dog park in Columbia
Heights:
They
earmarked
$1.5 million to purchase and preserve the land.
fenit.nirappil@washpost.com
THE DISTRICT
Police chief: O∞cer and
gunman fired all at once
BY
P ETER H ERMANN
A man armed with a gun and
an off-duty D.C. police officer
fired “almost simultaneously”
during a brief confrontation that
ended with the man dead, police
said Tuesday, offering the most
detailed account yet of the encounter last week.
D.C. Police Chief Peter Newsham said the May 9 incident
began as the officer, dressed in
plainclothes, was headed to a
cookout in a neighborhood he did
not know well around the Brentwood Recreation Center in
Northeast Washington.
Newsham said D’Quan Young,
24, crossed the street and approached the officer as he talked
on his cellphone. The chief said
Young “confronted the officer
about why he was in the neighborhood” and moments later
there was “an exchange of gunfire.” Young was struck and died
at a hospital. The officer was not
injured.
Newsham said he believes the
officer saw Young with a gun in
his hand and perceived a threat
but said it was unclear who fired
first. He said it also is unclear
whether Young knew the other
man was a police officer. The
chief said he did not think the
officer had time to identify himself.
The new information comes
after the officer provided a statement to detectives investigating
the shooting, which occurred
about 6:50 p.m. in the 2300 block
of 15th Street NE, in the Montana
Terrace apartment complex.
Newsham also said investigators
had obtained surveillance video,
though it shows only part of the
confrontation and was taken a
long distance away. Police also
said they have found a gun at the
scene and have forensic evidence
showing Young and the officer
both fired weapons. The officer’s
lawyer did not respond to an
interview request.
The shooting raised questions
last week as police discussed a
chaotic aftermath in which many
officers rushed to the sound of
gunshots. A sergeant pulled the
officer who fired away from the
scene, apparently fearing for his
safety amid an angry crowd, and
failed to immediately notify superiors that a police officer had fired
his weapon, police said. That sergeant has been suspended pending an internal investigation.
Young’s family has been critical
of the police response and the
shooting and questioned whether
Young had fired a gun. On Tuesday, Young’s grandmother Phyliss
Young, 53, said she has not heard
the latest details given by police.
She said she doesn’t believe what
they say. “I think they’re covering
up,” Young said. She declined to
comment further.
Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D),
interviewed on Monday before
the new details were revealed,
said she is focused on “finding out
what happened” but cautioned
that not all the facts are known.
The mayor declined to make
public the name of the officer who
fired, as she did after an officer
fatally shot a motorcyclist in 2016
and had failed to turn on his
body-worn camera. That case, she
said then, warranted an exception to the department’s policy
about withholding the identities
of officers involved in shootings
because of the serious questions
raised about the incident.
In this case, Bowser said, “Like
we’ve done in other difficult circumstances, we have been open
and transparent with the community. When it’s appropriate, we
show what we know.”
Newsham’s comments this
week are more forceful than those
provided during a Friday update
on the incident. At that time, the
officer had not yet spoken with
investigators and Newsham had
few new details to discuss.
On Monday, the chief for the
first time discussed Young’s criminal record, noting two previous
arrests involving guns. One resulted in a conviction. “One of the
things that is most disturbing to
me,” Newsham said, “is why we
had a man that close to one of our
rec centers . . . carrying a gun and
confronting people. What would
have happened if he had confronted one of our unarmed
kids?”
peter.hermann@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B5
SU
THE DISTRICT
COURTLAND MILLOY
Police department brings back ‘O∞cer Friendly’
History repeats itself with
the rise of racial incidents
BY
P ETER H ERMANN
The warning “stranger danger”
is making a comeback.
So are lessons in “good touch,
bad touch.”
Police departments in the District and elsewhere are dusting
off old curriculums and reviving
the “Officer Friendly” program,
an effort to promote a gentler and
more approachable image of a
cop.
D.C. police launched its version Tuesday to youngsters at
Miner Elementary School in
Northeast Washington. There
were familiar slogans coupled
with new, sometimes more complicated ideas.
A warning about drugs was
front and center, and the “good
touch, bad touch” session referenced sexual assault. McGruff the
Crime Dog was there, of course,
but so was a new addition to help
teach the do’s and dont’s of 911 —
Sally the Cell Phone.
D.C. Officer Tracy D. Taylor, a
28-year veteran, who had no Officer Friendly when he grew up in
Maryland, led students at Miner
in the Officer Friendly pledge, in
which they promised to “make
the right choices” and “make a
difference in my world.” Demonstrating an example from one
lesson plan, Taylor had a boy
stand next to Codi Prather, 8. The
officer asked the young audience,
“If he pushed her, is that a good
touch or a bad touch?” The crowd
shouted, “Bad touch.”
Police Chief Peter Newsham
said bringing back Officer
Friendly was the No. 1 request
made at community crime meetings.
The program, which began in
the late 1960s and was introduced in the District in the 1970s,
seemed to fizzle out more than a
decade ago, replaced by other
community policing models,
such as the Metropolitan Police
Boys and Girls Clubs.
In some ways, the program
harks back to a nostalgic era of
old-time beat cops pounding the
pavement as they walked, nightstick in hand, knowing every kid
on the block by nickname and
reputation. Officer Friendly visited schools and gave lessons on
how kids should be careful talk-
PHOTOS BY MARVIN JOSEPH/THE WASHINGTON POST
D.C. Officer Tracy D. Taylor, top, as Officer Friendly, speaks to
students at Miner Elementary School. McGruff the Crime Dog,
above, also made an appearance for the children.
“We want [people] to know that when they
see the uniform, it’s supposed to represent hope
and safety, not fear and oppression.”
D.C. Police Chief Peter Newsham
ing to strangers and resolve conflict without hitting.
There are new challenges now,
such as an increased awareness
of sexual assault and the fear of
gunmen storming schools. Students in some city schools go
home to violent neighborhoods,
where police are not well regard-
ed. Even the terms have gotten
more complicated. The National
Center for Missing & Exploited
Children advises against using
the term “stranger danger,” saying it is too simplistic to cover
present-day threats and is misleading because the group says
the risks to children are greatest
from people they know.
Law enforcement nationwide
also is trying to find new ways to
improve its image amid instances
of police brutality, questionable
shootings by officers, and violent
arrests that have led in some
instances to protests and riots
and left lingering questions
about conduct and fairness.
Many departments have returned to various community policing plans to work to rebuild
trust in their communities. Baltimore and Chicago are among the
other departments bringing back
Officer Friendly.
The challenge, Newsham said,
is to get people to understand
that Officer Friendly is not one
person, but rather every officer
on the force. “We want them to
know that when they see the
uniform,” he said, “it’s supposed
to represent hope and safety, not
fear and oppression.”
To Newsham, Officer Friendly
is every officer who stops to kick a
ball with a kid, changes a flat tire,
helps find a missing person and
gives someone directions. Mayor
Muriel E. Bowser (D) said that
“every officer has been painted
with one kind of picture showing
what policing is by negative
events. We need to remind people
of all the thousands of positive
interactions there are.”
Crystal Davis, who attended
Miner Elementary and had a
child who also attended, said it
will be difficult for police to
change the perception of children
who see negative interactions
with police in their communities.
“I think they need to be more
sensitive to their neighborhood,”
Davis said. “A lot of these children
are scared of the police or scared
of saying something to the police.”
Uniyah Campbell, 10, a fifthgrader, said she had never heard
of Officer Friendly before Tuesday. “He’s really inspiring,” she
said. “He teaches kids what to do
when something is bad.”
And Uniyah knew exactly what
do with her new lesson when she
got home. “Today, I’m going to tell
my little brother what’s a good
touch and what’s bad touch,” she
said, “because I think he should
learn that.”
peter.hermann@washpost.com
Local o∞cials react to court ruling on sports betting
BETTING FROM B1
get betting in place before Maryland and Virginia do, so gamblers
from across the region can spend
their dollars in Washington.
“This is a source of enormous
revenue, and we need to move
forward as quickly as possible,”
said council member Jack Evans
(D-Ward 2), who’s planning to
introduce a bill.
But first, Evans — who was a
driving force behind bringing
Major League Baseball back to
Washington and building the
publicly financed Nats Park —
said he’s trying to sort out questions, such as where revenue from
sports bets should go.
“Gambling has always been a
mixed bag in the District. When
we looked at casino gambling,
there was a lot of opposition to it,
particularly from churches,”
Evans said. “I personally want to
make this happen, but it’s a long
road.”
Virginia, unlike Maryland, has
so far resisted any form of casino
gambling. Its conservative legislature turned away riverboat
gambling in the 1990s, outlawed
Internet gambling cafes in the
2000s and has kept a casino bill
bottled up in a Senate committee
for the past five years.
But momentum for gambling
in the commonwealth is getting a
push from the popularity of the
MGM National Harbor casino
just across the Potomac River in
Maryland, which estimates that
at least 40 percent of its business
comes from Virginia.
During the first four months of
this year, Maryland’s six casinos
hauled in more than $414 million,
with nearly $150 million of that
“We need to move
forward as quickly as
possible.”
D.C. Council Member Jack Evans
(D-Ward 2), who is planning to
introduce a bill to authorize
sports gambling
going to state and local coffers.
Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam
(D) has taken note and said it may
be time for something similar in
his state. On sports betting, his
office was noncommittal this
week. “We are still reviewing the
ruling and should the General
Assembly take up legislation on
this issue, we’d review that as
well,” Northam spokeswoman
Ofirah Yheskel said in an email.
The Supreme Court struck
down a federal law that kept most
states from authorizing sports
betting, ruling in favor of New
Jersey, which had challenged the
statute.
That state has been preparing
for legalized sports wagering
since 2012, and many locations
are ready to move quickly. Monmouth Park, a racetrack on the
Jersey Shore, says it could open
betting windows within the next
two weeks. Delaware could also
have betting windows open soon,
and other states are poised to
follow. A 2017 report from Eilers &
Krejcik Gaming estimated that as
many as 32 states could offer legal
sports betting within five years.
Experts suggest that illegal
sports betting in the United
States is a $50 billion to $150 billion business, though it’s probably impossible to accurately estimate. According to research by
UNLV’s Center for Gaming Research, legal sports betting in
Nevada totaled nearly $5 billion
last year, led by wagers on football
— both college and professional
— which accounted for $1.76 billion.
Many in the gambling and
sports industries in the D.C. region have greeted the Supreme
Court’s ruling enthusiastically.
“The Court’s decision is both a
victory for state’s rights and for
the millions of Americans who
want to legally bet on sports in a
safe, regulated environment,” Joe
Weinberg, managing partner of
Maryland casino developer
Cordish Companies, said in a
statement. “Sports betting should
be made available exclusively
through the regulated casinos in
Maryland, where it is best positioned to protect consumers and
maximize tax revenues to the
state.”
Washington Wizards, Capitals
and Mystics owner Ted Leonsis
also said he’s eager to embrace
legalized betting, though he said
there are “a huge number of questions” about how the court’s decision will play out.
“Many ask if this decision will
impact the integrity of sports
themselves,” Leonsis said in a
statement. “I think it’s just the
opposite. I think that the increased transparency that will
accompany more legalized betting around the country will only
further protect against potential
corruption.”
MILLOY FROM B1
seeking employees. He lives in
Colonial Beach, Va., where the
Klan had spent a day last month
passing out fliers.
I saw the flier that the
Westmoreland News, the weekly
paper published near his home,
decided to run on its front page
— racist language and all. One of
my neighbors took a glance.
“I guess we’re not in Wakanda
anymore,” he said.
The movie “Black Panther,”
with its supernatural black
wonderland called Wakanda,
had come out in February. The
feeling of empowerment the
film left us with was all but over
now. We were back to racial
reality.
I told two other neighbors
about the Klan drive.
“They’re at it again, huh?” one
These days, it does not
even look like progress
on racial disparity
is being made.
said.
The other said, “Again? They
never stopped.”
For the people in my
suburban Maryland world, even
those who tend to mind their
own business, who seem to pay
more attention to their lawn
mowers than current events, the
constant bombardment of racist
incidents have broken through
the grind of daily life. That
“pursuit of happiness” thing can
become one joyless trudge.
So, we talk about it — at the
tennis courts, the supermarket,
on the telephone, during visits
to one another’s homes. Venting.
Reassessing the racial climate.
Recalibrating our social radar.
Last May, a young black Army
officer from Bowie State
University was stabbed to death
while walking past a white
student at the University of
Maryland at College Park. The
white student was arrested and
charged with murder and a hate
crime. He turned out to be a
member of some white
supremacist Facebook group
called the “Alt-Reich Nation.”
Since then, the assault on
black bodies and black psyches
have multiplied.
“You see where that white girl
called the cops on the black girl
for sleeping in the common
room at Yale?” one of my friends
asked. A black Yale graduate
student — how much work went
into getting her ready for an Ivy
League humiliation?
On Friday, another black Yale
student, this time a young man,
said the same white woman had
Baltimore Police Commissioner Darryl De Sousa has resigned
and a national search has been
launched to find his replacement,
Mayor Catherine Pugh announced Tuesday.
“I want to reassure all Baltimoreans that this development in no
way alters our strategic efforts to
reduce crime by addressing its
root causes in our most neglected
neighborhoods,” Pugh (D) said in a
statement.
The announcement of De Sousa’s resignation comes after he
was charged with three misdemeanor counts of failing to file
federal income tax returns by federal prosecutors last week.
His resignation was from the
department entirely, ending a 30-
cluded in 2016.
The federal charges against De
Sousa, unsealed Thursday, allege
that he willfully failed to file federal income tax returns in 2013, 2014
and 2015. De Sousa admitted in a
statement on Twitter the same day
that he did not file state or federal
tax returns in those years but did
have taxes withheld from his police salary.
He wrote there was “no excuse”
for his failure to “fulfill my obligations as a citizen and public official”
and that his “only explanation” was
that he had “failed to sufficiently
prioritize my personal affairs.”
His attorneys have pushed back
against prosecutors, saying De
Sousa was not given the opportunity other taxpayers receive to explain or file missing returns before
being charged criminally. Attorney
Steven Silverman wrote in a state-
0
Fenit Nirappil, Greg Schneider and
Luz Lazo contributed to this report.
ment, “Had the government made
an inquiry prior to charging, the
government would have learned
that Commissioner De Sousa was
in the process of seeking assistance
from a professional tax consultant
to file all past due returns.”
De Sousa was appointed the
city’s top police officer on Jan. 19,
the same day Pugh fired his predecessor, Kevin Davis, citing stubbornly high levels of violence.
De Sousa’s tenure in the top job
is among the shortest in modern
history but not the shortest.
The police union that represents rank-and-file officers in the
city issued a statement Tuesday
saying members “are anxious to
put these events behind us and
hope that Mayor Pugh can quickly
find a suitable replacement” for
De Sousa.
— Baltimore Sun
To read previous columns, go to
washingtonpost.com/milloy.
$
steve.thompson@washpost.com
Baltimore police chief resigns amid tax charges
year career.
He could not immediately be
reached for comment. One of his
attorneys in the ongoing federal
case declined to comment on his
resignation.
Deputy Commissioner Gary
Tuggle will be the interim commissioner, Pugh’s office said.
Tuggle could not immediately
be reached for comment but said
in a department-wide email that
his “focus is on crime, the Consent
Decree, and moving this agency
forward.”
De Sousa’s resignation comes as
the department continues to implement mandated changes under
its consent decree with the U.S.
Justice Department. The federal
agency found widespread unconstitutional and discriminatory policing practices in the department
after an investigation that con-
courtland.milloy@washpost.com
This Year Fix
your Foundation,
Damp Crawl Space or
Wet Basement and pay
MARYLAND
BY K EVIN R ECTOR
AND I AN D UNCAN
reported him to police just for
being in the same building.
In the middle of a chat about
pollen, another neighbor asked:
“You see how police wrestled
that black woman to the floor at
the Waffle House, exposing her
breasts? Like they were trying to
rape her?”
I had, unfortunately.
Someone just assumes you do
not belong in a certain space or
just does not want you in the
space — and the police are at
their beck and call. You can be
questioned, intimidated,
arrested. Or worse. Police shot
and killed 20 unarmed black
people last year; seven so far
this year, according to The
Washington Post.
Racism = death. In a lot of
ways.
“Scientists and doctors have
spent decades trying to
understand what makes African
American women so vulnerable
to losing their babies,” read a
story on the NPR website last
December. “Now, there is
growing consensus that racial
discrimination experienced by
black mothers during their
lifetime makes them less likely
to carry their babies to full
term.”
For black women, racism and
the stress it causes may be a
greater predictor of having a
low-weight baby than smoking
cigarettes, according to a study
in the Journal of American
Public Health.
Black people of a certain age,
with a firm grasp of history,
know exactly what is going on:
Inequality and racial disparity
are the byproduct of an
economic system built on
slavery and white supremacist
ideology.
My older neighbors and I talk
a lot about coping with
madness, keeping the blood
from boiling. Some are
committed to improving the
system, knowing it will not
happen in their lifetime. But
these days, it does not even look
like progress is being made.
Some of the younger guys in
our circle are part of the Obama
generation, having attended
integrated schools, having as
many white friends as black
ones. They seem more
optimistic, interested in finding
solutions to the problem of
racism. Some seek to build
coalitions among the races,
which is reasonable.
I suspect there is something
deeper going on for both the
young and the old. Having a
white woman call the police on
two guys for sitting in a
Starbucks, or on a young woman
for taking a nap, is not
something any of us thought
would be the theme of 2018.
*
New Year Special
NO Payments & NO Interest
For 18 Months!*
*Financingtooffer
good at time
Free Inspection
before
.BSDI.
Subject
to qualifying
credit
Interest
accrues
*Subject
qualifying
creditof approval.
Interest
accrues
during the
promotional
period
butapproval.
all interest
is waived
the promotional
period
butbefore
all interest
waived if the
amount isperiod.
paid before
the expiration
of the promotional
ifduring
the purchase
amount
is paid
the isexpiration
of purchase
the promotional
Financing
for GreenSky
consumer
period.programs
Financing for
GreenSky by
consumer
credit
programs
is provided
by federally
insured,
federalinstitutions
and state chartered
credit
is provided
federally
insured,
federal
and state
chartered
financial
withoutfinancial
regard
institutions
without
regardnational
to race, color,
religion,
sexNot
or familial
status. Not with
to be combined
any other offer.
to
race, color,
religion,
origin,
sex ornational
familialorigin,
status.
to be combined
any otherwith
offer.
Owned & Operated
by Professional Engineers
F
VA:
703-413-3443
VA 2705068655
DC:
202-813-9955
MD:
301-760-4385
www.jeswork.com
MHIC 50637
B6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
MAY 16 , 2018
obituaries
TESSA JOWELL, 70
OF NOTE
Battling cancer, politician
worked to improve care
Obituaries of residents from the
District, Maryland and Northern
Virginia.
Bertram Snyder,
physician
Bertram Snyder, 90, an internist who had a private practice in
Arlington, Va., from 1953 to 1999,
died Feb. 21 at a hospital in
Arlington. The cause was acute
respiratory failure, said a daughter, Cynthia Snyder.
Dr. Snyder, a resident of Falls
Church, Va., was born in New
York and graduated from medical
school at 21. He was a past chief of
the medical department at
Northern Virginia Doctors Hospital in Arlington and past medical director of the Powhatan
Nursing Home in Falls Church.
He was a volunteer physician at
the Arlington Free Clinic.
F ROM
STAFF REPORTS
AND NEWS SERVICES
Tessa Jowell, a former British
culture secretary who played a
key role in securing the 2012
London Olympics and used her
own cancer diagnosis to campaign for better treatment, died
May 12 at her home in the British
county of Warwickshire. She was
70.
Her family announced the
death in a statement. Ms. Jowell
was diagnosed with a brain tumor last year.
A member of the House of
Lords, she used her platform to
deliver a memorable speech calling for improved informationsharing and better access to care
that moved her colleagues to
tears.
“In the end, what gives a life
meaning is not only how it is
lived, but how it draws to a close,”
she said in January, with a shawl
around her shoulders and her
head covered by a skullcap. “I
hope that this debate will give
hope to other cancer patients,
like me, so we can live well
together with cancer — not just
dying of it. All of us — for longer.”
As a government minister and
member of the House of Commons with the Labour Party, Ms.
Jowell championed programs
such as Sure Start, an initiative to
improve child care. But it was her
work on the Olympics that made
her known to the general public.
Having pushed the British government to bid for the Olympics,
her joy on securing the Games
was short-lived. The following
day — July 7, 2005 — four suicide
bombers targeted the London
transport network, killing 52 people and injuring hundreds more.
On the 10th anniversary of the
attacks, Ms. Jowell told those
attending a memorial service that
her memories of the day were
vivid.
“I will certainly never forget it
— neither the day itself nor the
days afterwards. I was in Singapore. We were celebrating having
won the Olympic bid when my
private secretary received a call
from London to be told that there
might have been a terrorist attack
on the Tube network.
“As the full scale of the atrocity
became clear, those of us representing the U.K. in Singapore
could think about just one thing.
We had to get home.”
Then-Prime Minister Tony
Blair asked Ms. Jowell to coordinate the government’s support
MARTIN HAYHOW/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Tessa Jowell, then Britain’s secretary of state for media, culture and sport, announces in 2003 a
British bid to host the Olympics.
SANG TAN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tessa Jowell, then the British Olympics minister, poses for a photo
with Sebastian Coe, chairman of the London 2012 organizing
committee, at the Olympic Park site in London on Nov. 13, 2008.
for survivors and the bereaved.
She later said she often thought
about July 7, but particularly
during the two-minute silence at
the London Games’ Opening Ceremonies.
“I saw the forward-looking,
expansive, optimistic vision of
Britain that the opening ceremony represented and I thought
again that this was something the
bombers and their supporters
would have hated — all those
nations, with their different
views, their different cultures,
their different traditions, coming
together in a spirit of peace and
play,” she said.
“So it was a deeply civilized
thing that we did in those marvelous two weeks in the summer of
2012.”
Tessa Jane Helen Douglas
Palmer was born in London on
Sept. 17, 1947, and raised in Aberdeen, Scotland. Her father was
a physician, and her mother was a
radiologist.
Ms. Jowell, whose first marriage to Roger Jowell ended in
divorce, worked initially as a
social worker. She was elected to
the House of Commons in 1992,
representing the Dulwich area of
London, and held office until
2015. She became a staunch ally
of Blair and was secretary of state
for culture, media and sport from
2001 to 2007.
Ms. Jowell was sometimes enmeshed in controversy over the
business dealings of her husband,
tax lawyer David Mills. In 2009,
he was sentenced to 41/2 years in
prison by an Italian court for
taking a bribe from former Italian prime minister Silvio Berlusconi in exchange for false testimony at corruption trials. The
conviction was eventually overturned because of what an Italian
appeals court described as a technicality.
She was appointed dame commander of the Order of the British Empire in 2012, and entered
the House of Lords in 2015.
In addition to her husband,
survivors include two children.
newsobits@washpost.com
CROSBIE ‘BUTCH’ SAINT, 81
Served as commanding general of U.S. Army Europe
BY
E LLIE S ILVERMAN
Crosbie “Butch” Saint, a fourstar Army general who retired in
1992 as the commanding general
of the U.S. Army Europe, a post he
held for four years at the end of
the Cold War, died May 7 at a
medical center in Bethesda. He
was 81.
The cause was congestive heart
failure, said his wife, Merrilyn
Saint.
During his more than 30-year
military career, Gen. Saint commanded armor units and served
two combat tours in Vietnam. He
also served five tours in Europe,
including as a lieutenant on border duty while the Berlin Wall
was built and as commander
when it fell. He also was the
commanding general of the 1st
Armored Division and the III
Corps in Fort Hood, Tex.
Crosbie Edgerton Saint was
born on Sept. 29, 1936, at the U.S.
Military Academy at West Point,
N.Y., where his father was an
instructor. His father died as a
Japanese prisoner of war during
World War II.
After graduating from an episcopal high school in Asheville,
N.C., Gen. Saint graduated from
West Point in 1958.
His honors included the Defense Distinguished Service Medal, the Silver Star, the Distinguished Flying Cross and the multiple awards of the Legion of
Merit.
Gen. Saint, a resident of Philomont, Va., was vice president for
international operations at Military Professional Resources, a
military contractor organization,
from 1993 to 2005. He was also a
past president of the West Point
Society of D.C. and spent his
retirement raising and boarding
horses at his farm in Philomont.
Sue Rowell,
office manager
Sue Rowell, 75, an office manager for the Syska Hennessy
Group, an engineering consultation firm, from 2001 to 2013, died
Feb. 28 at a hospital in Fairfax
County, Va. The cause was lung
cancer, said a daughter, Debbie
Frank.
Mrs. Rowell, a resident of
Gainesville, Va., was born Sue
Pierce in Abingdon, Va. She settled in the Washington area in the
early 1960s and was a clerk and
executive secretary at government agencies for the next several
decades, including Department
of Health and Human Services,
the Army Audit Agency and the
Defense Threat Reduction Agency. She volunteered at the Northern Virginia Training Center in
Fairfax County, a state-run institution for people with disabilities.
Benjamin Martin,
labor specialist
Benjamin Martin, 100, a longtime union official who later
served as a labor specialist at the
State Department for about
10 years until retiring in 1977,
died Feb. 19 at his home in Washington. The cause was complications from prostate surgery, said
a son, Serge Martin.
Mr. Martin was born in Chicago. Early in his career, he was on
the national field staff of the
United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America and an
international representative of
the United Steelworkers. He
joined the U.S. Information Agency in the early 1960s and was a
labor attache at the U.S. embassy
in Chile. He moved to Washington in 1966.
In retirement, Mr. Martin
wrote a book, “The Agony of
Modernization: Labor and Industrialization in Spain” (1990), was
a lecturer at American University
and Cornell University and a senior associate with the Carnegie
Endowment for International
Peace.
Veronica Mason,
day-care provider
Veronica Mason, 74, who ran
her own day-care service at her
home in Potomac, Md., for more
than 30 years, died March 13 at a
hospital in Rockville, Md. The
cause was complications from
pancreatic cancer, said a son,
Christopher Mason.
Mrs. Mason was born Maria
Veronica Gandarillas in Santiago,
Chile. She moved from the Palo
Alto area in California to Alexandria, Va., before settling in Potomac in the early 1980s. She was
the director of Copenhaver Park
in Potomac and a member of St.
Raphael Catholic Church in
Rockville.
Perry ‘Pete’ Peterson,
Foreign Service officer
Perry “Pete” Peterson, 94, a
Foreign Service officer and World
War II Army Air Forces bombardier who was taken prisoner by
the German army after having
been shot down over France, died
March 6 at a care center in Medford, Ore. The cause was pneumonia, said a son, Steven Peterson.
Mr. Peterson was born in Omaha. He joined the Foreign Service
in 1950, was soon assigned to the
newly created U.S. Information
Agency and worked in Europe,
Africa and Asia specializing in
public affairs. He retired in 1980
and later moved to Oregon from
Fairfax County, Va.
During the war, he was awarded the Silver Star for helping to
guide his aircraft back to its base
in England after having suffered a
wound in his throat from a piece
of shrapnel that pierced the bombardier bubble of his aircraft. In
October 1944, he was shot down
over France and held as a POW
until the war in Europe ended in
the spring of 1945.
Virginia Rosick,
business manager
Virginia Rosick, 90, a business
manager who became vice president of McLean, Va.-based EPM
Publications for about 25 years
before retiring in 1999, died
Feb. 9 at an assisted-living center
in Scottsdale, Ariz. The cause was
respiratory failure, said a daughter, Patricia Roderick.
Mrs. Rosick, a Scottsdale resident, was born Virginia Sands in
Brooklyn and grew up in Washington. In the 1940s, she was a
typist for the federal government
and then for an insurance agency.
She was also an accountant for
her husband’s bookstores in
Washington and Alexandria from
1962 to 1983. Mrs. Rosick was a
member of Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church in Silver Spring,
Md., and moved to Scottsdale
from Silver Spring in 2012.
— From staff reports
IN MEMORIAM
TRUESDALE
SHARMON BEALE TRUESDALE
Always remembered
Always loved
Your Loving Family
DEATH NOTICE
AMICO
FREDERICK F. AMICO
The Washington Post
is printed using
recycled fiber.
Passed away on Monday, May 14, 2018.
Fred is survived by his wife of over 55
years, Dolores; his children, Frederick, Jr.
(Mary Amico), Thomas (Michael Brennan)
and Marie Amico; and his grandchildren
Alexander Amico, Nicole Amico and Zackery Jackson. Visitation will be on Thursday,
May 17 from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m.
at Demaine Funeral Home, 5308 Backlick
Road, Springfield, Virginia with funeral mass
at 12 Noon on Friday, May 18, 2018 at
St. Bernadette Catholic Church, 7600 Old
Keene Mill Road, Springfield, Virginia.
BURNEY
MARGIE BURNEY
On Sunday, May 6, 2018 went home to be
with the Lord. Mother of Deloris Singletary
Cox; sister of Erma Mervin; cousin, like
a sister, Irma Whitaker; grandmother of
M. Sharee Singletary; great-grandmother
of Kelli, Ki'Yale, Shaun and Roman. Also
survived by nieces; nephews; cousins, and
friends. On Thursday, May 17, 2018 viewing
at 10 a.m., Funeral 11 a.m. at Mt. Zion
Bapitst Church, 5101 14th Street NW, Washington, DC 20011. Interment Fort Lincoln
Cemetery., Brentwood, MD. Arrangements
by McGuire.
www.mcguire-services.com
U.S. ARMY EUROPE
ABOVE: Gen. Crosbie “Butch”
Saint, left, talks with an
officer while touring the scene
of a simulated chemical
accident. Saint held his post as
the commanding general of U.S.
Army Europe for four years.
RIGHT: Gen. Saint in an
undated photo.
CHRONIGER
ROBERT T. CHRONIGER
"Bobby"
His first marriage, to Virginia
Carnahan, ended in divorce. In
addition to his wife of five years,
the former Merrilyn Crosgrove,
survivors include two children
from his first marriage, Mary
Saint Dumlao of The Woodlands,
Tex., and Fred Saint of Atlanta; a
half sister; a half brother; and five
grandchildren.
ellie.silverman@washpost.com
FAMILY PHOTO
NF407 1x6
On Thursday, May 3, 2018 of Bowie and
Hyattsville, MD, beloved husband of Jane A.
"Ant Jane" "Plain Jane" Chroniger passed
away. Loving father of Kevin P. and John
B. Bichy, Grandfather of Boden and Lydia
Bichy. Brother of Alfred G., John B., James
R., William C., Michael G., Richard P., Joseph
F., Patrick C., and Margaret W. A Celebration
of Life for Bobby will be held on Saturday,
May 19, 2018 at 1 p.m. at the Christian
Community Presbyterian Church, 3120
Belair Drive, Bowie, MD 20715. In lieu of
flowers, memorial contributions may be
made in Bobby's name to the Muscular
Dystrophy Softball Tournament presented
by the Professional Fire Fighters, 1750 New
York Avenue, NW, Suite #300, Washington,
DC., 20006 or to the Lupus Foundation of
America, Inc., 2121 K Street, NW, Suite 200,
Washington, DC 20034-1830.
www.gaschs.com
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B7
RE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
CORNELL
HUTCHINSON
JENNINGS
STANLEY
JOSEPH CORNELL
"WES" (Age 58)
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
WAESCHE
MADISON
KATHRYN F. WAESCHE (Age 99)
On Friday, May 11, 2018. Beloved
wife of the late George Ernest
Waesche; loving mother of Glen
(Rene) Waesche, and Kay (Sid)
Colen; grandmother of Lori Davenport, Sabrina (Mack) Strickler,
Lindsay (John) Pedersen, and Kimberly (Adam)
Harris; great-grandmother of nine. Relatives
and friends may call at BORGWARDT FUNERAL
HOME, 4400 Powder Mill Road, Beltsville, MD
on Tuesday from 6 to 9 p.m. A funeral service
will be at the Chapel of Riderwood Village,
3110 Gracefield Road, Silver Spring. MD on
Wednesday, May 16, 2018 at 12:30 p.m. with
viewing a half hour prior. Interment Monacacy
Cemetery, Beallsville, MD.
www.borgwardtfuneralhome.com
It is with regret that we notify the
members of Steamfitters Local
#602 of the death of Brother Wes
Cornell. Services held by family
Notice #1662
Daniel W. Loveless, FST
DIXON
RONALD GILBERT DIXON (Age 72)
Peacefully passed away on Monday, May 7,
2018. Family will welcome friends on Thursday,
May 7, at Johnson and Jenkins Funeral Home,
716 Kennedy St. NW., visitation 10 a.m. until
time of service 11 a.m.
www.johnsonandjenkins.com
LOUIS ANTHONY HUTCHINSON
1949 - 2018
GULLEN
Louis Anthony Hutchinson departed this life
on April 24, 2018 at Providence Hospital in
Washington, DC. He was born June 7, 1949 to
John and Lois (Brown) Hutchinson in Washington, DC.
Louis is survived by his brother Dawoud Assad;
sister; Donna Gardner; former spouse Judith
Steele Hutchinson; sons and spouses, Anthony
Douglas Hutchinson (Rhona) of Falls Church,
VA, and David Louis Hutchinson (Ashia) of
Stockbridge, GA; along with four grandchildren.
He was preceded in death by his brother
Charles Hutchinson.
A funeral service will be held at St. Columba's
Episcopal Church, 4201 Albemarle St. NW,
Washington, DC 20016 on Wednesday, May 16,
at 11 a.m. Relatives and friends are welcome to
attend the service and reception immediately
following.
JOHN P. GULLEN, JR.
Colonel, U.S. Army (Ret.)
Of Newport News, VA died after a brief illness
on May 12, 2018 at The Chesapeake. Born
in 1934 to John P. and Mary (Gutt) Gullen in
Wilmington, DE. He is survived by his wife of
61 years, Anne E. (Gainty) Gullen; daughters,
Elizabeth Gullen of New Haven, CT, Mary McGonigle (Kevin) of Yorktown, VA and Margaret
Gullen of Alexandria, VA; and two grandchildren.
As a youth, John enjoyed working on the family
tobacco farm in Glastonbury, CT where he
learned to drive a tractor long before he could
legally drive a car. He also developed a love
of music, lending his strong baritone voice to
choirs throughout his life.
In 1956, John graduated from the University of
Connecticut with a Commission in the Regular
U.S. Army. A year later, he and his new wife
drove to his first duty station in California.
The family moved 18 times in 23 years. John
served in the European Theater, Vietnam and
throughout the U.S. He also earned an MBA
from Syracuse University.
After 30 years in the U.S. Army, John retired and
he and Anne settled in northern Virginia. He
spent the next 12 years consulting for various
organizations. He and Anne were active in the
Catholic church wherever they lived, singing
together and supporting church-based charities. Once completely retired, they spent many
years traveling to Europe and Canada. In 2017,
John and Anne move to The Chesapeake,
a retirement community in Newport News,
VA. John's beautiful voice once again paved
the way to making new friends, both in the
community choir and in the dining room where
he would break into song, much to the enjoyment of his fellow residents.
A viewing will be held on Friday, May 18 at
10 a.m., followed by a Mass of Christian Burial
at 11 a.m. at Our Lady of Mount Carmel in
Newport News. John will be buried with full
military honors at Arlington National Cemetery
at a later date. In lieu of flowers, memorials
may be made to the American Heart Association.
Arrangements by Berceuse Funeral and Cremation Traditions.
HUTNYAN
JOSEPH D. HUTNYAN
On Friday, May 4, 2018, Joseph D. Hutnyan
of Bethesda, MD. Beloved husband of the
late Mary A. Hutnyan; loving father of Cynthia
Hutnyan and Mark Hutnyan and caring grandfather of Krystina Hutnyan. A Funeral Mass will
be held on Monday, May 21, 2018, 11 a.m.
at St, Jane Frances de Chantal Church, 9701
Old Georgetown Road, Bethesda, MD 20814.
Interment will be at Parklawn Memorial Park.
In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may
be made to St. Jane Frances de Chantal Church
or Alzheimer's Foundation of America. Friends
may sign the family guest book at:
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
HYATER
LEONARD CALVIN HYATER
Of Largo MD, passed on Wednesday, May
9, 2018. He was born on November 7,
1941 in Portsmouth VA. to John Hyater Sr.
and Roxanna Boyd Hyater, both deceased.
Leonard is survived by his children Leonard
C. Hyater Jr, Yolanda A Hyater-Davis, Lionel
Hyater, and Keith Hyater; brothers John
Hyater Jr (Carolyn) and Dennis M. Hyater
(Alise). He also leaves behind grandchildren
and great grandchildren. Memorial service
is at the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's Witnesses, 15311 Nice St., Bowie, MD on Friday,
May 18, at 11 a.m.
Of Woodbridge VIrginia, left us on Tuesday
morning the of May 8, 2018 after a long illness.
Tom grew up in Falls Church and attended
Timber Lane Elementary School and Falls
Church High School where he was active
in the band. He went on to graduate from
Purdue University with a degree in Industrial
Education. Tom taught Industrial Arts and Professional Photography at Jefferson and Chantilly High Schools until he retired in 2000.
In retirement he continued to enjoy photography, working with the aeromodlers club, fixing
computers for Fairfax County Schools, trips
to New York with Bettie and cheering for his
beloved Washington Nationals.
He is survived by three brothers and their
families.
Friends will by notified of a memorial celebration later this summer.
On Sunday, May 13, 2018, of Washington,
DC. Loving father of Lori Callahan (William),
Paul Luebkert, Jr. (Lorena), Susan O’Connor
and Mary Truman (Matthew). Dear brother
of Joan Kent, Robert Luebkert and Malcolm
Luebkert, Jr., Devoted grandfather of nine
grandchildren. Also survived by his former
wife, Sandra Luebkert. Family will receive
friends at the family-owned Beall Funeral
Home, 6512 NW Crain Hwy. (Rte. 3 South),
Bowie, MD on Thursday, May 17, 2018 from
5 to 8 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be held at
St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church, 1800
Seton Dr., Crofton, MD on Friday, May 18, 2018
at 10 a.m. Interment private at Crownsville
Veterans Cemetery. Please view and sign the
family’s guestbook at:
www.beallfuneral.com
William A. Mambert, of Alexandria, passed
away on May 12, 2018 after a courageous
battle with ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), also called Lou Gehrig’s disease. He
was 62 years old.
He was a 1973 graduate of TC Williams High
School and attended the George Washington University. Bill was a journalist, editor
and publishing consultant and ran his own
publication advertising firm for over 30
years.
HARPER
He is survived by two daughters, Jordan
Mambert and Regan Mambert, his mother,
Constance Mambert and sister, Rebecca
Thomas, her husband, Mark Thomas and
their son and his nephew, Colton Thomas.
All are long-time residents of Alexandria,
Virginia.
MARY-ANGELA HARPER
(Age 91)
JEANETTE Z. JENNINGS
On May 13, 2018 of Rockville, MD. Beloved
wife of the late Earshell Herman Jennings;
loving sister of Norma Fredlund, Louise Curtin,
Yvonne Bean and S. John Haddad (Patricia);
cherished aunt of many.
Funeral Service at PUMPHREY’S COLONIAL
FUNERAL HOME, 300 W. Montgomery Ave., (Rt.
28 just off I-270), Rockville, MD on Saturday,
May 19, 2018 at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be made to
Rockville Senior Center, Chevy Chase Presbyterian Church or Loyal Order of Moose. Please
view and sign the family online guestbook at
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
EDWARDS
coups and the everyday challenges of living
as a foreigner in a developing country with
limited resources. To say she was resourceful, flexible, resilient and persevering is an
understatement.
A memorial service is planned. The time
and place will be announced.
MEAD
The Rev. LOREN BENJAMIN MEAD
Episcopal priest, educator, consultant and
author, died in Falls Church, VA on May 5, 2018.
He was 88. A memorial service will be held at
St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 3001 Wisconsin
Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20016 at 11 a.m. May
21, 2018. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that
memorials be sent either to St. Alban’s Church
or to Alban at Duke Divinity School, 1121 W.
Chapel Hill St., Suite 200, Durham, NC 27701.
Milli’s life is a challenge to encapsulate—her
93 years spanned so many historic and
personal events and she was a complex,
multifaceted person. Growing up through
the Great Depression, World War II, the
Berlin airlift shaped her; among other things,
she was conservation-minded, passionately
patriotic, and had already developed a taste
for world travel by her twenties.
Living near the ocean in a temperate rainforest environment, she loved daily light rains
and longed for time at the beach. Clamming
was a treasured childhood memory. Musically gifted and an accomplished thespian
as a young adult, she sang in operettas and
performed in both comedies and dramatic
plays, often alongside her sister and lifelong
friend, Georgie. She was a bona fide “Rosie
the Riveter” in Seattle, to support the war
effort.
Milli was one of the earliest commercial
airline stewardesses on United Airlines and
her love of airplanes and flying remained
her entire life, always excited to see another
contrail in the sky. One of the older college
students when she attended the University
of Washington to obtain a BS in Psychology,
she met her husband-to-be, Bill Edwards, in
Russian class.
Bill and Milli were united in marriage on
December 22, 1950 and this marriage kicked
off a demanding and exciting life for her—the
life of a Foreign Service officer’s wife. They
moved to Washington, DC soon after their
wedding and from there lived in many overseas posts--Bangkok, Honolulu, Jakarta;
Seoul, and Okinawa (while Bill was assigned
o Saigon). She juggled her two, more than
full-time jobs with finesse—that of mother
of three rambunctious children and of diplomat’s wife—even while living through a myriad of tropical illnesses, threats of political
Clarence, “Bill” Edwards preceded her in
death on December 29, 2008. Then, unexpectedly and mysteriously, her son, Kevin
T. Edwards died around August 31, 2009.
Needless to say, she was heartbroken.
She courageously moved from McLean, Virginia to Bridgewater in April of 2016, where
she lived for her last two years.
She is survived by two daughters, Stephanie
L. Detwiler and husband Kenneth “Rodney”,
of Lakeridge, VA and Melanie B. Gray and
husband Bart Balint, of Weyers Cave, VA ; two
sisters, Mary Agnes Heath, of Linwood, WA;
Georgiana “Georgie” Lentsch, of Marysville,
WA. She is also survived by five grandchildren, Bryce “Cody”, Danielle, Casey, Lindsey,
and Niklas, three great grandchildren, Grace,
Bryce, and Samantha and numerous nieces
and nephews as well as her son-in-law, Jeremy Small.
Of all the roles Milli filled in her lifetime, she
would probably want to be seen as a devoted
daughter, wife, mother, grandmother, and
great grandmother. Family was everything to
her. She was a very loving mother who cared
wholeheartedly for her children, always
there for them. She will be deeply missed.
A Celebration of Life service will be held on
Saturday, May 19, 2018 at 2 p.m. at the at
Johnson Funeral Service in Bridgewater, VA.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions
may be made to the Salvation Army or The
Carpenter’s Shelter in Alexandria, VA, or a
charity of your choice.
When the need arises, let families find you in
the Funeral Services Directory.
To be seen in the Funeral Services Directory,
please call paid Death Notices at 202-334-4122.
TAYLOR
CECILIA ASHBROOK “Sassy”
April 1, 1923 – April 4, 2018
VAN DYKE
LYNNE L. VAN DYKE
May 5, 1943 – May 2, 2018
Lynne died three days before her 75th birthday.
She was born in Evanston, Illinois and was
the only child of only child parents, Frank and
Virginia Lammers. Lynne married her husband,
Gary, in 1966 and resided in Bethesda, Maryland for 49 years. Together they raised the
family Lynne always wanted; three children,
Alison (Alie), Jeremy (Jed), Matthew (Matt) and
seven grandchildren aged 15 to 9 , all of whom
she loved dearly. She had legions of friends
captured by her bright smile and the warm love
she gave each without condition.
Lynne graduated with honors from Smith College in 1965 and spent her junior year studying
at the Sorbonne in Paris. That same year she
earned a Phi Beta Kappa award. She went on
to Columbia for her Masters work in French
Literature, and after marriage earned her MBA.
Together, in 1978, Lynne and Gary founded
a company focused on software for securely
connecting global networks of computers (in
the very early days of the Internet). With Gary
as CEO and Lynne CFO they partnered to build
a company of 300 consultants. After 21 years
Lynne and Gary sold the company, Gary to
start another, and Lynne to get her art/painting
certification at the Washington Studio School in
Washington, DC. Painting in oils was one more
thing at which Lynne became accomplished.
Lynne also sang with the Choral Arts choir
under the direction of Norman Schribner, at
the time.
A memorial service will be held at St. Columba’s Episcopal Church, 4201 Albemarle Street,
NW, Washington, DC 20016, Saturday, May 19,
at 11 a.m. All who loved Lynne are welcome. A
reception will follow with details to be provided
at the service.
VOYIAZIAKIS
BARBARA VOYIAZIAKIS
Life overseas was also thrilling because she
traveled the world, visited places like Ankor
Wat, Bali, Prambanan, Borobudur, Krakatoa
volcano, Australia’s eastern coast, Hong
Kong, Fiji, Japan and more.
When Bill retired from the Foreign Service,
once again Milli supported him as he
launched a real estate career in the metropolitan DC area. She served as the company
accountant, managing all the books for their
various investment properties. During this
time, she and Bill took many cross-country
trips and fishing excursions together and she
fell in love with this marvelous, beautiful
country known as the United States.
ASHBROOK
ALLENE PEAL THOMAS (Age 90)
On Wednesday May 10, 2018 of Silver Spring,
Maryland. Loving mother of Dr. Staley Jackson,
Tina Burke, Rosemary Westry, James Thomas,
Ellery Thomas and the late Carolyn Lewis,
Jerome Thomas and Cleo Newell; devoted
grandmother of 15. Also survived by one brother and three sisters. She also leaves behind
a devoted friend Maceo Miles and a host of
other relatives and friends. Family will receive
friends from 10 a.m. until time of service
11 a.m. on Friday May 18, 2018 at Pilgrim
Baptist Church, 8901 Pennsylvania Avenue
Silver Spring, Maryland 20910. Arrangements
entrusted to SNOWDEN FUNERAL HOME.
www.snowdencares.com
PICKETT
An accomplished cook and impeccable
seamstress, possessing an expansive vocabulary and an ear for grammatical precision,
she provided her children with wholesome
nourishment, beautiful clothing and an
appreciation of their native tongue. A gracious hostess and tireless worker, she supported her husband’s role in each embassy.
She often compared her home to Grand
Central, frequently bustling with activity as
it was used for so much entertaining of the
diplomatic corps.
Of Bridgewater, VA, passed away peacefully
at her home on Monday, April 23, 2018. She
was born in Seattle, Washington on January
20, 1925, and was the middle daughter of
the late George and Mildred (Miller) Mayer.
DEATH NOTICE
DR. JOHN PAUL MADISON
Of Frederick, MD, passed away peacefully on
May 8, 2018 at Kline Hospice House in Mt. Airy,
MD following a two year battle with cancer.
Born in Warsaw, NY on March 30, 1941, he was
the son of the late Margaret (Fitzgibbons) and
Clayton Madison. He is survived by his wife of
55 years, Helena Emanatian Madison, brothers
Bob and David, his children, Maureen Madison
and husband, Tim Brockett, Melissa Madison
and husband, Alexander Cruickshank, Mark
Madison and Michael Madison, and grandchildren, Colin (Saralyn), Caroline and Helena
Cruickshank, Kambria, Noah, Alexis, and Jackson Madison, Jessica and Dylan Madison. He
will be missed by his Tennessee Walker, Harley.
He was predeceased by his parents and brothers, Paul Skinner and Jim, Leo and Tom Madison. He had a passion for learning and dedicated his life to education. He would have
appreciated the coincidence of passing away
on Teacher Appreciation Day.
In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation
to the 4-H Therapeutic Riding Program, 11515
Angleberger Road, Thurmont, MD 21788
(fc4htrp.org). All services will be private.
Online condolences may be shared at:
www.keeneybasford.com
LUEBKERT
Bill was born September 21, 1955 in Washington, DC to Constance Mambert and the
late William Mambert.
Peacefully on May 6, 2018. Services on Friday,
May 18, 2018, Visitation 10 a.m., Celebration
of Life 11 a.m. at Bibleway Baptist Church,
1100 New Jersey Ave, NW., Washington, DC.
Interment Quantico. Services by FREEMAN.
GWENDOLYN MARIE WRENCH
(Age 87)
Of Upper Marlboro, MD transitioned Saturday, May 12, 2018. She is survived by one
child, six grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren, two great-great-grandchildren,
two sisters and a host of nieces and
nephews. Viewing and services are Friday,
May 18 at J.B. Jenkins Funeral Home, 7474
Landover Road, Landover, MD. Viewing is
3:30 to 4:30 p m. and service is 4:30 to
5:30 p.m.
THOMAS
WILLIAM A. MAMBERT
Deacon CHARLIE JAMES HANCOCK
(Age 94)
WRENCH
KELLEHER
THOMAS ARTHUR KELLEHER
MAMBERT
JENNINGS
MILLICENT EVELYN MAYER EDWARDS
"Milli" (Age 93)
DENISE STANLEY
Entered eternal rest on Monday, May 7, 2018.
Left to cherish her memory are her two sons
Anthony (Brenda) and Wesley (Chimere) Stanley; sisters Cornelia, Cynthia, Carla, Tia and
Rose; and a host of loving family and friends.
Funeral Services will be held on Friday, May 18,
2018 at Smyrna Baptist Church, 4417 Douglas
St., NE, Washington, DC 20019, Viewing at 10
a.m., Service at 11 a.m. Services entrusted to
Dunn & Sons.
PAUL LUEBKERT, SR.
HANCOCK
On Friday, May 11, 2018, of
Bethesda, MD. Beloved wife of
the late John Harper, Jr.; mother
of Angel Harper, John Harper III,
Michael Harper, Denis Harper,
Mary Pat Murphy and Therese
Taylor. Also survived by 19 grandchildren
and 26 great-grandchildren. Relatives and
friends may call at the Shrine of the Most
Blessed Sacrament, 5949 Western Avenue
NW, Washington, DC, Thursday, May 17,
from 6 to 8 p.m., where a Mass of Christian
Burial will be celebrated on Friday, May
18, at 11 a.m. Interment Gate of Heaven
Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be
made to John and Mary-Angela Harper
Scholarship Fund c/o St. John’s College
High School, 2607 Military Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
ROBERT JENNINGS, JR. (Age 64)
"Rob"
On Monday, May 7, 2018; resident of Washington, DC. Survived by three children,
Robert Jennings, III, Ricardo Jennings and
Kaylin Jennings-Knight; parents Barbara
and Robert Jennings, Sr., sisters, Rhonda
(Arthur Lee) Adams and Robin Renteria;
eight grandchildren; one great-grandchild;
and a host of other relatives and friends.
Homegoing Service on Friday, May 18, at
J. B. Jenkins Funeral Home Chapel, 7474
Landover Rd., Hyattsville, MD. 20785 Visitation 12:30 p.m. Service 1:30 p.m.
FREDERIC WILLIAM PICKETT
Born in Oberlin, KS on June 1, 1924 and
peacefully passed in his home on May 8, 2018.
Son of Louise and Vaughn Pickett, he served
in the U.S. Navy during WWII. He married
Shirley Crockett in 1945 and they had three
children, Janet, Douglas and Robert. He was
proud of being an Eagle Scout, of being an
air traffic controller in the early years of the
F.A.A., leading the family band, “The Mellow
Notes,” winning local golf tournaments, and
travelling the world with Shirley. He enjoyed
fishing, boating and spending summers in Kill
Devil Hills, NC with family and friends. His
kindness, endless energy and generosity will
be missed by his children, grandchildren and
great-grandchildren. No services are planned
at this time.
Passed on February 13, 2018. A daughter of
Greek immigrants, she was born on July 26,
1935 in Massillon, OH
She is survived by husband Father Stanley
Voyiaziakis of Alexandria, VA; children Angela
and Thomas McNamara of Arlington, VA,
Emanuel Voyiaziakis and Sandy Abramowicz
of Long Beach, NY, Krisan and Eric Heinbach
of Virginia Beach, VA; her greatest joy, her
grandchildren: Leigh and Tucker McNamara,
Derek, Sophia and Thannos Heinbach.
The funeral service will be held at St Katherine’s Greek Orthodox Church, 3149 Glen Carlyn
Rd Falls Church, Virginia, on Thursday, May
17 at 12 Noon followed by burial at Arlington
National Cemetery.
DEATH NOTICE
A memorial service will be held on Thursday, May 17, 2018 12 Noon at HINESRINALDI FUNERAL HOME, INC., 11800 New
Hampshire Ave, Silver Spring, MD. The
family will be observing Shiva immediately
following the memorial service at the
Rosenberg residence. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions can be made to
St. Ignatius Fund, Inc. (5013C) C/O Barb
Conetta, 36 Janes Lane Stamford, Connecticut 06903 or a charity of their choosing.
HYUN-WOO KIM
Born November 12, 1952 in South Korea to
YungJo Kim and Sikyung Pi, Hyun-Woo came
to the United States to study and become
a violinist. He received his bachelor’s and
master’s degrees from the Juilliard School
of Music and joined the National Symphony
Orchestra (NSO) in 1978. He has been an
active performer as a member of the NSO for
nearly 40 years, and the Manchester String
Quartet for 37 years. His recital at the Phillips
Collection received critical acclaim, and he had
been a guest artist with various ensembles in
the Washington area.
Hyun-Woo was a devout Catholic and devoted
parishioner at the Our Lady of Good Counsel
Catholic Church in Vienna, VA where he played
the violin at the 11:15 a.m. mass on Sundays.
He also volunteered for the Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind.
The viewing and the funeral mass will be
held on Wednesday, May 16, 2018, at 10 a.m.
and 11 a.m. respectively at the Our Lady of
Good Counsel (OLGC) Catholic Church, located
at 8601 Wolftrap Rd. SE, Vienna, VA 22182.
The burial is scheduled for 1:00 pm at Fairfax
Memorial Park at 9900 Braddock Road, Fairfax,
VA 22032-1903.
He was an Amateur Radio hobbyist (K3SZN),
active in several clubs and often first out
to support communications during disasters,
usually hurricanes. His other hobbies included shooting, gardening, ranting at current
politics, and refusing to acknowledge his
own mortality by taking up post-retirement
activities such as riding motorcycles and
flying experimental aircraft, both of which
ended when he crashed his bike and his
plane.
LARRY FLETCHER
Passed away on May 13, 2018. Larry left this
life exactly as he lived it, decisively and ready
for his next adventure. He was 80 years old
and gave the best hugs in the world.
Born in Nebraska to Hoye and Gwen Fletcher
he later moved to the Washington DC area
where he spent more than 50 years. Itching
for one more adventure, he and his wife
moved to Potter County PA in 2014, where
he remained until his death, happily spending
time with his gun club, hanging out at Potter
County Outfitters, eating at “Mama’s” and
other local establishments, and chatting up
the cashiers at the local Rite Aid.
A graduate of Colorado State (BS), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MS), and
George Washington University (PhD AbD) he
was an Electrical Engineer who spent his
professional life in service for his country,
designing communications systems used in
support of military operations world-wide.
He was considered by many to be the world’s
leading expert on Very Low Frequency, which
he would willingly discuss with anyone who
expressed a passing interest and he could
do it in English, Norwegian, German, and
Russian.
VALARIE J. TAYLOR
On May 4, 2018 Valarie J Taylor went
to be with the Lord. After a long illness.
Survived by her companion Wayne Dorsey;
sisters, Pamela Taylor, Juanita Taylor,
Victoria Taylor; nephews, nieces, aunts and
uncles whom she all loved. Memorial services will be held at First Baptist Church,
712 Randolph Street, NW on Thursday May
17 at 11 a.m. Followed by a repast.
When the
need arises,
let families
find you in the
Funeral Services
Directory.
To be seen in the
Funeral Services
Directory, please call
paid Death Notices
at 202-334-4122.
Passed away unexpectedly on May 11, 2018
surrounded by his loving family. He is survived
by his wife SooJung, his son, Euijin, his daughters, Eunhie and Eunyoung, his sister, Yeongin
Lee, his brother-in-law, Dong Myung Lee, his
nephew, Samuel Suckjae Lee, his nephew’s
wife, Jung-Yoon Lee, his niece, Sohaye Lee, his
great-niece and great nephew, Annabel Suhjoo
and Christopher Sunwoo Lee, and his motherin-law, Bokhi Kim.
Passionate about his field of expertise, he
also spent many years as an Adjunct Professor of Engineering at George Washington
University where he delighted in encouraging
future engineers to look for the possible in
their craft. Despite his exacting standards
he was voted Professor of the Year several
years running.
IRWIN ROSENBERG
"doc / irv"
Irv was a corpsman in the Navy during
the Korean War. He was owner and cofounder of the Apothecary Pharmacy in
Bethesda MD. Beloved by most that knew
him for the generous services he offered
to anyone interested in benefitting from
his knowledge as a Pharmacist. He will be
sorely missed.
KIM
FLETCHER
ROSENBERG
On Monday, May 14, 2018
- Irwin J. Rosenberg of Derwood, MD. Cherished husband of 54 years to Barbara
Rosenberg
(deceased),
adored father of Andrea (Salvador) Martinez, Christina
Rosenberg, and Julie (Leonard) Leo; dear
grandfather of Anaelise, Daniel, Benjamin,
and Reuben; brother of Audrey (Eddie)
Eisenstein. Also survived by many nieces,
nephews and friends.
Cecilia Garcia Ashbrook died peacefully on
April 4, 2018, of natural causes surrounded
by her two adoring daughters. Born in Bucaramanga, Colombia, she lived and studied in
Bogotá, Brussels, and Canada until she moved
to Washington, DC. in the 1930s where she
resided until her death. Known as “Sassy”
for her vibrant personality, she worked for
the United States Information Agency until her
marriage to Arthur G. Ashbrook, Jr. in 1964. A
devoted mother and volunteer, she dedicated
herself to helping others—be it providing a
loving environment for her family or caring
for the sick and dying as a volunteer at
local hospitals, mental health facilities, and
hospices. A talented artist, singer, and compassionate friend, Sassy brought endless joy to
others. She is survived by her two daughters
and their spouses, Yolie Westerstrom Diego
(from her marriage to Leonard Westerstrom,
deceased) and Dennis Diego and Alexandra
Ashbrook and Jim Ehrenhaft and three grandsons, Alex Diego, Ethan Ehrenhaft, and Caleb
Ehrenhaft. She also leaves behind her beloved
Colombian nieces, Sandra, Patty, and Monica
Velez and their families. A celebration of her
life will be held on Saturday, June 16 at 4
p.m. at the Little Sanctuary at Saint Albans
School in Washington, DC. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to Mary’s Center,
drico@maryscenter.org and the Food Research
and Action Center (FRAC), http://frac.org/.
He is survived by his loving, faithful, and
amazingly patient wife of almost 55 years
Fredericka, as well as the five children they
produced and sent into the world with
instruction to be useful. They are three
daughters: Debra Yamanaka and former husband Bill, who never successfully escaped
the family, and their four children Reggie,
Cheryl, Ken, and Gwendolyn and Cheryl’s
husband Billy and daughter Aliana, Tamra
and Tony Herring, and their children Nathan,
Savannah, and AJ, and Amy and Andy Dove
and their sons Andy, Josh, and Jacob. He is
also survived by his two sons, Jon and David
Fletcher and David’s wife Jennifer and their
children Melissa, Kevin, and Mark.
He is also survived by his only brother, Doug
Fletcher and wife Jan along with their three
children Julie, Kip, and Jill and many grand
nieces and nephews.
He greets on the next step of this journey
his parents, many friends, and a selection of
dogs who loved him as much he loved them.
Services will be held on May 17, 2018,
Viewing from 6 to 8 p.m. Funeral service will
be held on Friday, May 18, 2018 at 11 a.m. at
Olney Funeral Home & Cremation, Ulysses,
PA.
PAID DEATH NOTICES
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
To place a notice, call:
202-334-4122
800-627-1150 ext 4-4122
FAX:
202-334-7188
EMAIL:
deathnotices@washpost.com
Email and faxes MUST include
name, home address & home phone #
of the responsible billing party.
Fax & email deadline - 3 p.m. daily
Phone-In deadline
4 p.m. M-F
3 p.m. Sa-Su
CURRENT 2018 RATES:
( PER DAY)
MONDAY-SATURDAY
Black & White
1" - $135 (text only)
2" - $306 (text only)
3" - $441
4" - $482
5" - $611
-----SUNDAY
Black & White
1"- $161 (text only)
2" - $339 (text only)
3" - $489
4" - $515
5" - $665
6"+ for ALL Black & White notices
$135 each additional inch wkday
$161 each additional inch Sunday
-------------------MONDAY-SATURDAY
Color
3" - $566
4" - $609
5" - $744
-----SUNDAY
Color
3" - $599
4" - $685
5" - $834
6"+ for ALL color notices
$224 each additional inch wkday
$250 each additional inch Sunday
Notices with photos begin at 3"
(All photos add 2" to your notice.)
ALL NOTICES MUST BE PREPAID
MEMORIAL PLAQUES:
All notices over 2" include
complimentary memorial plaque
Additional plaques start at $26 each
and may be ordered.
All Paid Death Notices
appear on our website through
www.legacy.com
LEGACY.COM
Included in all death notices
Optional for In Memoriams
PLEASE NOTE:
Notices must be placed via phone, fax or
email. Photos must be emailed. You can
no longer place notices, drop off photos
and make payment in person.
Payment must be made via phone with
debit/credit card.
B8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
MAY 16 , 2018
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Rain and thunder
We’re back into a marine air mass
behind a front. It doesn’t go too far
to our south, so we’re probably still
in the near 70 to mid-70s range for
highs. The front keeps our weather
messy, as well, with more rain likely to fall. Some
thunder is a good bet, too. Rain could be
moderate to heavy at times during the afternoon
and into the evening, although it shouldn’t rain
nonstop.
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Monday
Afternoon
t-storm
Friday
Heavy rain,
t-storm
Saturday
T-storms
73° 64
70° 60
74° 69
84° 70
84° 68
FEELS: 74°
FEELS: 69°
FEELS: 73°
FEELS: 86°
FEELS: 84°
CHNCE PRECIP: 60%
WIND: ENE 4–8 mph
P: 60%
W: NE 6–12 mph
P: 75%
W: ENE 8–16 mph
P: 65%
W: NW 7–14 mph
P: 40%
W: WSW 8–16 mph
P: 40%
W: NNW 6–12 mph
HUMIDITY: Very High
H: High
H: High
H: High
H: Very High
H: Very High
Today
T-storms
Thursday
T-storms
78° 67
°
°
FEELS*: 83°
°
Sunday
T-storm
possible
°
°
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Harrisburg
69/60
Hagerstown
73/61
Davis
71/57
Sa
Su
High
Low
Weather map features for noon today.
Normal
Philadelphia
66/56
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
74/62
Dover
70/61
Washington
78/67
Norfolk
82/70
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Dulles
BWI
89° 4:00 p.m.
66° 2:00 a.m.
75°/56°
94° 1962
40° 1939
89° 2:56 p.m.
63° 1:00 a.m.
75°/51°
89° 2018
37° 2016
89° 4:00 p.m.
64° 1:42 a.m.
74°/52°
96° 1962
41° 1984
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: +8.1° yr. to date: +1.0°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
OCEAN: 64°
Virginia Beach
79/70
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 61°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Kitty Hawk
78/70
OCEAN: 69°
Normal
Pollen: High
Air Quality: Moderate
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Moderate
Moderate
Low
High
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
1.49"
2.16"
1.87"
13.40"
13.84"
2.13"
2.89"
2.11"
14.62"
14.38"
0.22"
0.73"
1.84"
12.48"
14.88"
Moon Phases
UV: Moderate
Solar system
3 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, variably cloudy, showers, thunderstorm.
High 66–71. Wind south 4–8 mph. Tonight, mostly cloudy,
shower, thunderstorm. Low 55–59. Wind southeast 3–6
mph. Thursday, rain, thunderstorm. High 62–68. Wind
southeast 3–6 mph.
Atlantic beaches: Today, variably cloudy, showers,
thunderstorms. High 69–81. Wind south 6–12 mph. Tonight,
mostly cloudy, showers, thunderstorm. Low 59–68. Wind
northeast 4–8 mph. Thursday, mostly cloudy, showers,
thunderstorm. High 64–79.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, variably cloudy, humid,
showers, thunderstorm. Wind northwest 5–10 knots. Waves 1 foot
or less. • Lower Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, mostly cloudy,
showers, thunderstorm. Wind south 7–14 knots. Waves 1 foot on the
Potomac, 1–2 feet on the Bay.• River Stages: Today, the Little Falls
stage will be 6.1 feet, rising to 6.8 feet Thursday. Flood stage at Little
Falls is 10 feet.
Ocean City
M
Reagan
OCEAN: 59°
Richmond
81/68
Annapolis
FORECAST
Ocean City
70/63
Lexington
76/64
Washington
ACTUAL
Cape May
68/61
Annapolis
74/65
Charlottesville
78/66
Today’s tides
RECORD
°
F
REGION
AVERAGE
(High tides in Bold)
3:51 a.m.
9:10 a.m.
4:51 p.m.
9:52 p.m.
6:40 a.m.
1:19 p.m.
6:40 p.m.
none
2:54 a.m.
8:52 a.m.
2:55 p.m.
9:17 p.m.
Norfolk
4:56 a.m.
10:58 a.m.
4:55 p.m.
11:18 p.m.
Point Lookout
2:27 a.m.
9:41 a.m.
2:53 p.m.
8:27 p.m.
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Midland, TX 106°
Low: Bodie State Park, CA 20°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
73/55/pc
86/59/s
50/41/r
76/66/t
94/67/s
74/62/t
81/54/pc
85/67/t
86/56/s
75/52/pc
55/51/c
78/55/pc
74/56/c
84/71/t
80/61/t
79/66/t
75/48/pc
79/56/pc
78/63/t
71/54/pc
89/70/pc
79/54/pc
Tomorrow
80/52/pc
89/57/s
51/43/c
81/67/t
96/69/s
68/60/t
79/48/pc
86/67/t
83/56/t
72/52/sh
72/54/pc
78/51/c
70/43/s
83/71/t
77/61/t
78/67/r
77/46/t
79/56/pc
79/64/t
74/57/t
92/73/s
81/51/c
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
83/60/pc
78/55/s
97/67/s
58/38/c
89/60/s
67/54/pc
84/73/sh
94/67/s
79/60/c
89/66/t
83/70/t
81/60/c
92/65/s
89/67/t
71/56/pc
83/67/t
89/70/t
86/75/t
73/55/pc
86/63/s
86/67/t
94/74/t
65/57/sh
82/70/t
85/61/pc
79/54/pc
98/65/s
61/42/c
81/61/t
80/56/pc
86/74/pc
95/71/s
80/61/t
87/63/pc
85/69/t
85/61/pc
87/66/s
87/67/c
70/56/pc
82/67/t
86/69/c
85/74/t
68/52/pc
83/64/pc
84/64/t
93/74/s
73/57/pc
80/69/t
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
83/61/pc
84/60/pc
82/71/t
66/56/sh
99/73/s
74/60/t
56/47/c
69/54/c
62/53/c
82/67/t
64/46/pc
81/68/t
70/50/pc
82/66/t
86/76/pc
80/56/pc
68/58/pc
66/54/pc
84/75/pc
67/53/pc
75/53/pc
76/55/pc
83/75/t
84/62/t
86/67/pc
87/62/s
85/71/t
68/57/c
98/68/s
76/60/t
73/47/s
70/51/c
74/55/pc
81/68/t
65/49/pc
79/67/t
76/52/pc
85/63/t
85/76/pc
80/53/pc
66/59/pc
64/54/pc
85/75/sh
67/52/c
68/50/sh
75/49/c
84/74/t
87/66/pc
World
High: Nawabshah, Pakistan 118°
Low: Summit Station, Greenland –28°
May 21
First
Quarter
May 29 June 6
Full
Last
Quarter
June 13
New
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Rise
5:55 a.m.
7:06 a.m.
7:44 a.m.
12:56 a.m.
7:24 p.m.
11:23 p.m.
Set
8:14 p.m.
9:42 p.m.
10:47 p.m.
10:30 a.m.
5:44 a.m.
8:56 a.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
80/53/t
Amsterdam
66/47/sh
Athens
84/67/pc
Auckland
68/57/sh
Baghdad
92/68/s
Bangkok
93/78/t
Beijing
85/68/c
Berlin
70/50/t
Bogota
66/50/c
Brussels
70/46/pc
Buenos Aires
59/44/pc
Cairo
90/69/s
Caracas
74/65/pc
Copenhagen
73/54/pc
Dakar
75/66/s
Dublin
55/42/s
Edinburgh
58/39/pc
Frankfurt
70/52/t
Geneva
64/48/t
Ham., Bermuda 78/73/s
Helsinki
78/51/pc
Ho Chi Minh City 94/78/t
Tomorrow
79/54/pc
57/46/s
84/67/s
61/55/pc
95/69/s
91/79/t
76/59/sh
74/51/t
65/50/c
60/45/s
58/45/c
95/70/s
74/65/pc
73/52/pc
74/67/s
55/40/pc
59/39/s
69/49/pc
69/49/t
78/73/s
75/52/t
93/79/t
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
89/81/pc
95/71/s
81/65/s
82/63/s
57/42/pc
71/49/pc
85/77/sh
95/78/t
87/77/t
73/63/pc
81/60/pc
62/44/pc
77/56/s
96/80/t
81/54/pc
72/55/s
73/57/c
92/83/pc
74/57/t
106/81/pc
79/45/pc
73/51/s
72/49/pc
63/51/t
90/80/pc
94/71/t
77/64/pc
90/68/s
64/45/pc
70/50/t
84/76/t
95/78/t
86/76/t
70/62/pc
78/58/pc
62/43/s
78/56/pc
96/80/pc
81/54/pc
66/43/pc
76/59/c
92/86/pc
75/57/t
108/81/pc
63/44/t
65/39/c
66/45/pc
67/50/t
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei City
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
89/70/s
95/73/s
66/57/pc
83/68/pc
71/43/c
65/40/pc
73/65/t
99/80/pc
88/80/c
82/49/pc
64/51/pc
92/77/t
69/53/c
79/68/pc
68/50/pc
67/52/t
72/53/r
83/72/pc
96/77/s
70/55/pc
84/69/pc
66/42/pc
65/44/t
72/64/r
98/78/pc
88/79/c
63/46/c
68/50/s
93/78/pc
72/55/s
78/66/c
70/49/c
69/54/t
66/52/t
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
Ford hopes to re-energize Washington’s bid for statehood
NORTON FROM B1
paign to challenge Norton for the
Democratic nomination in the
June 19 primary.
“Yes, there was a time when we
needed a warrior on the Hill to
start the fight, to elevate the fight,
but now we have to win it,” Ford
said of statehood, pounding her
fist on a table.
Ford is channeling the frustration of some District residents
who have seen zero progress on
statehood in the generation since
Norton, who is 80, took office.
Although largely unknown,
Ford has the backing of D.C. Attorney General Karl A. Racine, has
raised $106,000 — a little more
than half of Norton’s war chest so
far — and is building a network
that could position her for a win —
someday.
Norton, who is seeking a
15th term, and her supporters say
now is not the time to elect someone new. If Democrats win control
of the House in November, seniority would enable Norton to chair a
subcommittee or even a full committee, although the District’s delegate does not have full voting
rights in the chamber.
A leadership post could also
give Norton more clout to bat
down persistent GOP efforts to
limit the District’s power.
“She’s been remarkably effective at defending D.C.’s interests
even without a vote on the House
floor and without partners in the
Senate,” said Rep. Jamie B. Raskin
(D-Md.), a longtime friend. “D.C.
delegate is elected with one hand
tied behind the back, but she has
been a powerful voice for the District.”
Under Republican control,
Norton has played defense against
GOP measures to block city laws
and policies related to legal marijuana, guns, assisted suicide,
abortion for low-income women
and even sewer-clogging disposable wet wipes.
“Boy, you know what, D.C., if
you wanted to get rid of me, this
wasn’t the year to do it!” Norton
said last week, sitting at the National Democratic Club and sipping a cup of green tea with lemon.
Norton is proud of legislation
she carried to reclaim federal land
for the city, including at the Wharf
in Southwest Washington and in
parts of NoMa. She also preserved
the $40 million D.C. Tuition Assis-
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Kim R. Ford, center, talks with Dutch Miller, out of frame, and Ann Miller before a “living room chat” May 8 in Washington. Ford
has the backing of D.C. Attorney General Karl A. Racine in her bid to serve as Washington’s nonvoting representative in Congress.
tance Grant Program, which is
credited with keeping middleclass families in the city. And she
shepherded along the deal that
allowed President Trump to develop the Old Post Office into a luxury
hotel, saying it was worthwhile for
the tax revenue it brings the city,
despite how most residents feel
about Trump.
She was interrupted by Rep.
Mark Takano (D-Calif.), who
thanked her for joining a recent
meeting of Japanese and Korean
legislators who had visited while
Congress was on recess and other
lawmakers had returned to their
home districts. Then Takano
turned to a reporter and gushed
about Norton.
The interaction shows why
Ford is in the uncomfortable position of taking on a veteran of the
civil rights movement and the first
woman to lead the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.
Norton, who is immortalized on
Ben’s Chili Bowl’s mural with for-
mer president Barack Obama and
abolitionist Harriet Tubman, consistently wins more than 80 percent of the vote.
“Privately, there is lots of jumping up and down,” Ford said of
those who tell her behind closed
doors that they are excited by her
campaign. “Publicly, it’s, ‘Well,
she’s a civil rights icon; I can’t
really get out there against that.’ ”
Racine is the exception.
“I’m not going to be an incumbent who tells her I support her in
silence,” Racine said, referring to
Ford. “I’m going to support her by
being shoulder to shoulder with
her — and that’s not to say I don’t
revere the congresswoman. She’s
done an extraordinary job. But I
know our city needs youthful energetic leadership in the future.
Kim Ford is that.”
Norton declined to respond to
Racine’s comments.
Ford grew up in Washington
and attended Shepherd Elementary in Northwest before her
mother sent her to Sidwell
Friends, the elite private school.
She earned a degree in international business from Vanderbilt
University and a master’s degree
in public administration from the
University of Pennsylvania.
She joined the Obama administration to help implement the
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and 18 months
later led neighborhood revitalization efforts around the new headquarters of the Department of
Homeland Security on the
grounds of St. Elizabeths Hospital.
Frustrated by regulations that
she said shut out local residents
from jobs, she went to the University of the District of Columbia
and ran its workforce development program.
After five years, she was recruited by the U.S. Education Department to lead an office in charge of
community colleges and adult, career and technical education.
From her 11th-floor office in
Southwest, Ford watched the development of the Wharf and lamented what she saw as the lack of
local workers and businesses on
the project. She quit on Nov. 3 to
challenge Norton.
On a recent day, Ford stood in a
comfortable Chevy Chase home
and wowed a dozen potential donors with her plan to remake the
District’s reputation in Congress
in 10 years or less.
She wants to limit the federal
government’s role in the city’s
criminal justice system and volunteer the District to pilot programs
such as loan forgiveness. Every
Hill office and federal agency
should have a D.C. resident as an
intern year-round, she said.
If elected, Ford would form a
capital regional caucus and encourage cooperation on projects
to avoid multiple local bids, as has
happened with Amazon’s second
headquarters.
When Ford finished, Herta B.
Feely thrust her hand into the air
and said, “I don’t know about everybody else, but I’m on board!”
Others asked how they could donate.
At first, Ford was vague,
prompting Racine to pipe up.
“With all due respect, I think
you didn’t tell the people what
they really need to know,” he said.
Ford explained the maximum
federal donation is capped at
$2,700 for individuals but that
political action committees can
give $5,000, which is how Norton
raises most of her funds. Ford will
use donations to pay for a staff of
seven, targeted mailers and social
media.
“Better?” she asked Racine.
“Excellent,” he said.
Earlier in the evening, Phyllis
Eisen said she supported Norton
in the past but likes Ford’s energy.
“I just think she should retire
with dignity,” Eisen said, referring
to Norton. “She’s not going to do
that. She’s going to run again, of
course, but Kim is going to get a lot
of name recognition over whatever time it takes because she has got
‘it.’ ”
Mark Plotkin, a longtime political commentator and D.C. statehood advocate, supports Ford as
an alternative to Norton, whom he
has criticized over the years.
“She defines failure as victory,”
he said, referring to the growing
number of Democratic lawmakers
who support statehood while the
legislation goes nowhere. “I’ve
called it a con job, giving us a
feeling that we’re doing well,
when we’re failing miserably.”
Norton said while Republicans
control Congress and the White
House, her strategy is to focus on
Democrats. If they retake the
House in November, she will push
for a statehood vote.
“I did get a vote on D.C. statehood my first term in Congress
because Democrats controlled the
House,” she said. “I got it once; I
can get it again.”
Norton said she has never considered retiring from Congress
and, on the contrary, considers her
work more important than ever in
the Trump era.
In November, Ford got a taste of
that feistiness when she called
Norton to tell her she was running.
Norton said, “Welcome — if
you’re ready for a fight.”
jenna.portnoy@washpost.com
KLMNO
Style
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
RE
K
C
THE RELIABLE SOURCE
BOOK WORLD
THEATER REVIEW
THEATER REVIEWS
It was a dark and stormy night, but that
didn’t stop Bret Baier’s book party. C2
Kevin Powers: More purple badge of
prose than “Red Badge of Courage.” C4
At Olney, Ayad Akhtar’s “The Invisible
Hand” really grabs ahold of you. C5
Baltimore Center Stage and the Keegan
Theater put quarters in the jukebox. C8
Tom Wolfe’s white suits
were not about vanities
APPRECIATION
He electrified Kool-Aid,
then he electrified fiction
BY
R ON C HARLES
No journalist ever moved to
fiction with the panache of Tom
Wolfe. But then, no one ever
moved to anything with quite the
panache of Tom Wolfe. The whitesuited writer, who died Monday at
the age of 88, transformed the
field of nonfiction, but his four
giant novels were equally impossible to ignore.
Wolfe crashed into a literary
scene that had grown timid, selfabsorbed and, yes, dull. Our brilliant young writers, he claimed,
were afraid to capture the dazzling variety and absurd clashes
of real life.
The wild trajectory of his own
career was just the sort of unbelievable reality he craved: Having
spent the first half of his life
dethroning the novel with New
Journalism, he spent his final decWOLFE CONTINUED ON C2
BY
BEBETO MATTHEWS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tom Wolfe, author of “The Bonfire of the Vanities,” implored
writers to get out from behind the desk and venture into the world.
R OBIN G IVHAN
Tom Wolfe would have been
just as brilliant without the white
suit, but he would not have been
nearly as interesting. His fashion
harked to the past while his prose
immersed us in the present. The
suits alluded to civility while his
books slashed away at the uncivil.
In his white minimalism, he was
the ultimate peacock.
Wolfe’s white suits didn’t make
him look cool; they made him
look odd. And what he seemed to
understand was that odd was far
more intriguing than cool. Odd is
full of shadings and contradictions, frustrations and delights.
The odd man fascinates. His personality must be unpacked; he is
worth considering. But he also
must be approached with caution
and care. Who knows what he
might do? Cool is overrated. People recognize cool when they see
it, but once it’s witnessed and
documented, it’s finished. To be
cool is to be part of an era or a
SUITS CONTINUED ON C2
MUSIC REVIEW
Bon Jovi
preaches to
an adoring
choir
Plenty of singalongs at
the rockers’ D.C. concert
BY
KIM RAFF FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Painting the
town #maga
A popular Utah artist depicts Trump
with broad, conservative strokes
“I have no idea where [buyers] are hanging
them,” says Jon McNaughton, whose latest
work, above, shows President Trump
confronting special counsel Robert S. Mueller
III. “I just know I sell a ton.”
BY M ONICA H ESSE
IN AMERICAN FORK, UTAH
Jon McNaughton did not intend to become
the country’s most famous pro-Trump, massmarket painter of the 21st century. But then,
to achieve such an identity does require a
modicum of cultivation; it does not happen
overnight.
In 2008, the Utah artist was selling landscapes out of a gallery in a shopping mall.
Then the presidential election happened and
McNaughton, who didn’t like John McCain or
Barack Obama, was struck with inspiration.
The result, “One Nation Under God,” was a
massive canvas featuring Jesus Christ holding a copy of the Constitution, surrounded by
Davy Crockett, Ronald Reagan and 61 other
historical figures dismayed by the direction of
the country (Satan, also in the painting, was
pleased). It wasn’t particularly subtle, but
something about the work spoke to people
and a new creative doorway was opened.
You might have seen, for example, “The
Forgotten Man,” in which Obama ignores a
weeping citizen on a park bench while the
Founding Fathers implore him to pay attention. Or, “The Demise of America,” in which
he fiddles while the U.S. Capitol burns. Or,
“One Nation Under Socialism,” in which he
has lit the Constitution on fire.
After the 2016 election, McNaughton’s
paintings gained a hero in Donald Trump
instead of just a villain in Obama: a sequel to
“The Forgotten Man,” “You Are Not Forgotten,” features the same weeping citizen, now
planting a tree as Trump looks on benevolently.
Yes. McNaughton is that guy.
It’s pure id art. Which means, in the sense
that art can reveal truths about the undercarMCNAUGHTON CONTINUED ON C3
D AVE M C K ENNA
Turns out Bon Jovi’s music had
a longer shelf life than a can of
Aqua Net. Frontman Jon Bon Jovi
proved as much while leading his
enduring and endeared Jersey
band through a sweet, wholly
unthreatening show Monday at
Capital One Arena in downtown
Washington.
Bon Jovi, 56, told the crowd
that the current tour’s purpose is
to celebrate the 35th anniversary
of the recording of his combo’s
debut LP, also called “Bon Jovi.”
For all the years since its release,
the lead singer sounded and
looked amazingly youthful, and
from first note to last, oozed
genuine happiness with the way
things have turned out. He’s
earned oodles of self-satisfaction,
given career sales of something
like 100 million albums and the
equally flabbergasting ability to
still fill a sports arena with worshipful fans.
Bon Jovi wanted everybody
around him to be as happy, and as
fit, as he is. This was a band whose
members and followers became
associated with hair spray the
way the Pink Floyd realm was
linked to acid tabs, but his oncewild, blond and super-poofy coif
is now conservatively styled and
all gray. Yet, unlike Samson, a
haircut didn’t rob him of his
powers. He moved around the
stage as light on his feet as a
dancer or boxer, and even showcased some surfer/skateboard
poses when so inspired.
After introducing “This House
Is Not for Sale,” the title track to
his band’s 13th and most recent
studio album, he pranced from
one side of the stage to the other
and fist-bumped or backslapped
all his band members before directing the flock in the grandstands through intermittent
BON JOVI CONTINUED ON C6
Big chains gobble up TV stations and merge newsrooms so that outlets provide similar if not identical coverage
In this town, you can flip the channel all you want, but it’s the same old story
BY P AUL F ARHI,
J ACK G ILLUM AND
C HRIS A LCANTARA
IN JOHNSTOWN, PA.
T
he TV news has a familiar
feel to it here in west-central Pennsylvania.
News
stories
broadcast
on WJAC, the NBC affiliate in
town, have appeared on nearby
station WATM, the ABC affiliate.
And many of those stories are
broadcast on WWCP, the Fox
station here, as well.
Not just the same topics
— identical stories, reported by
the same reporter or anchor, and
repeated, almost verbatim at
times, by the other stations.
Recently, for example, both
WATM and WWCP aired during
their morning newscasts the
same report about a Vietnam
Veterans Day ceremony. Anchors
at both stations used virtually
the same language to set up the
story. (“Speakers talked about
how important it is to honor
veterans and take care of them
when they come home.”) The
stories featured the same sound
bite from the same official. Then,
during its noon newscast, WJAC
repeated the whole thing.
Almost all of the look-alike
news emanates from WJAC’s studios, located next to a cemetery
on the southwest side of town.
Inside, reporters and anchors
buzz around two sets equipped
with backdrops representing the
three different stations. The anchors assemble in front of the
appropriate backdrop when that
station has its newscast sched-
PAUL FARHI/THE WASHINGTON POST
The studios of Sinclair Broadcasting’s WJAC-TV in Johnstown, Pa.,
where news reports for all three local channels are produced.
uled.
The media overlap in Johnstown — where all three stations
are either owned or managed by
the Baltimore-based Sinclair
Broadcast Group — is part of a
trend that has spread across the
country, as a small number of
large holding companies are taking over local TV stations, often
more than one in the same
market.
It has allowed companies to
cut costs by consolidating newsrooms that may have once competed against each other — creating a uniformity of news coverage and, critics fear, diminishing
the watchdog power of local
media.
TV news is expensive to produce, and across the country,
the number of viewers has been
plummeting. Many owners argue
that some stations wouldn’t have
news at all if they didn’t share
staffs and programming.
But some Johnstown viewers
have started to notice. Coverage
on weekends is especially spotty,
said Mayor Frank Janakovic (D).
“Unless there’s a disaster, it’s
hard to get someone with a
camera over here.”
Sinclair’s arrangement in
Johnstown — where the first
newsroom mergers started happening even before Sinclair entered the market — has parallels
in many other communities. In
Youngstown, Ohio, two stations
owned by Nexstar Media Group
recently aired identical segments
about a councilman’s outburst.
In Rapid City, S.D., two stations
NEWS CONTINUED ON C9
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
MAY 16 , 2018
The Reliable Source
ARTHUR MOLA/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
It was a defining moment, and [Trump] could have said to the
United States and the world that we’re better than that.”
— Director Spike Lee on President Trump’s failure to condemn the white-nationalist
protests in Charlotteville last August, while speaking at the Cannes Film Festival about his
new movie, “BlacKkKlansman.”
Bret Baier’s book party was a Trump-y affair — but without Trump
PAUL MORIGI/WIREIMAGE FOR BSB
CAUSE CELEB: BARBRA STREISAND
Cause: Gender parity in research on heart
disease.
Celeb: Singer-actress-director Barbra
Streisand knows a thing or two about wrenching
hearts (have you seen “The Way We Were”?), but
her passion for matters of the heart is clinical, too
— in 2014, she founded the Women’s Heart
Alliance to raise awareness and spur research into
cardiovascular diseases. Fun fact: Her interest in
the topic was first piqued by a former NIH
director’s writing about “Yentl syndrome,” a
phenomenon (named after the 1983 Streisand
movie whose titular character poses as a boy to get
an education) in which women’s heart problems
are misdiagnosed far more than men’s.
Scene: At the National Institutes of Health on
Tuesday, Babs delivered the J. Edward Rall
Cultural Lecture, a speaker series whose alums
include Yo-Yo Ma, the Dalai Lama and Maya
Angelou. NIH staffers lined up for the lunch-hour
talk, we’re told, which also featured a bonus
appearance by Streisand’s husband, actor James
Brolin, who sat in the front row. Later, Streisand
was set to meet with senators on Capitol Hill on
the subject.
Sound bite: Streisand joked with the NIH
audience, which was full of folks with lots of
letters after their names, about her role as their
lecturer. “The closest thing I have to a medical
credential is my role in ‘What’s Up, Doc?’ ” she
said, to laughs.
But on a more serious note, she pressed for
greater inclusion of women in heart research,
likening the need for equity in the medical field
to the much-discussed gender disparity in the
entertainment world. “We have accepted barriers
— some institutional, some invisible — to women’s
full participation and recognition, whether we’re
talking about women in Hollywood or women’s
representation in medical research.”
A little rain (okay, a storm
powerful enough to break the car
windshield of veteran reporter
Finlay Lewis and his wife,
Willee, on their drive over)
didn’t stop people from showing
up to Bret Baier’s book
party Monday night — at least
not anyone who mattered.
The shindig for “Three Days in
Moscow: Ronald Reagan and the
Fall of the Soviet Empire,” the Fox
News anchor’s newest
release, felt like stumbling into a
White House staff meeting, but at
the Marriott Marquis.
There’s Attorney General Jeff
Sessions picking at the fruit
spread while talking to Fox News
reporter Peter Doocy about his
latest get. Kellyanne Conway,
counselor to President Trump,
is chatting up Rep. Debbie
Dingell (D-Mich.). Secretary of
Transportation Elaine Chao is
assembling a cheese plate at the
buffet. Commerce
Secretary Wilbur Ross basically
can’t move without someone
coming up to greet him and his
wife, Hilary.
There’s Trump’s top economic
adviser, Larry Kudlow,
and Ambassadors Yousef alOtaiba (United Arab Emirates),
Dina Kawar (Jordan) and Elin
Suleymanov (Azerbaijan).
Marriott Executive Chairman
Bill Marriott and his son David,
and David’s wife, Carrie, are
making their rounds. A slew of
journalists such as Stephen
Hayes, Chris Wallace, Mara
Liasson, Bob Cusack and
TONY POWELL
From left, Bret Baier and wife Amy with Kellyanne Conway and Jeff Sessions at Baier’s book party.
Jennifer Griffin are here. D.C.
social elites such as
Politico owner Robert Allbritton
and his wife, Elena, and power
couple Mae and Ande Grennan,
who hosted the event with the
Marriotts, are mingling. And of
course, Bret’s wife, Amy Baier.
Phew.
While Trump, the man who
might love hobnobbing with his
administration officials and Fox
News top dogs the most, wasn’t
present, he was there in spirit.
Baier spoke on the connections
that 45 shares with Reagan.
While Baier knew Russia
would be a factor in the current
news cycle when he decided to
start writing, he couldn’t predict
just how timely his book would
be. He didn’t make linking
Trump and Reagan the focus of
his book, but he did
note similarities between the two
leaders, including how Reagan
was underappreciated during his
time.
“Their personalities are very
different. . . . I don’t think Reagan
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
would be that fond of Twitter,”
Baier joked. “But here’s what’s
similar: their ability to shift the
paradigm . . . saying bold things
makes people’s heads explode in
Washington but maybe changes
the dynamic to set the table for
something bigger.”
Does that mean Baier thinks
history will treat Trump as
favorably as Reagan? The jury’s
still out on that one.
“I think history is going to
have to judge that.”
— Sarah Polus
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
Tom Wolfe took stories from real life and made them seem so much larger
WOLFE FROM C1
ades plotting to bring the novel
back into power.
Enough with the navel-gazing
of contemporary fiction! If you
want to write a novel, he told
prospective writers, get out of
your room and get out on the
street. The First Law of Wolfe
Fiction was that a great novel is
predicated on great reporting,
which, not coincidentally, was
something Tom Wolfe was preeminently equipped to do. And so
he approached his novel about
New York in the 1980s just as he
had approached his book about
test pilots in the 1970s: He literally submerged himself in his material, riding the subways in the
Bronx. One night he ran into a
nervous broker who had started
dressing in a shabby disguise to
avoid the attention of thugs shaking down well-heeled passengers
for cash. “The Bonfire of the Vanities” was born. The book appeared in October 1987, just days
before the Dow dropped 22 percent.
But as much as Wolfe seemed to
anticipate our era’s melodrama,
he believed that the future of the
novel lay in its Victorian past,
especially the bear-hug embrace
of 19th-century masters such as
Thackeray, Zola and Dickens.
Suits were
apropos for
a Southern
gentleman
SUITS FROM C1
movement. But Wolfe surpassed
his times. He stood apart. He was
singular.
Wolfe, who died Monday at 88,
wore white suits in public and in
the solitary time he spent writing.
The white suits were a constant
visual contradiction. They made
him look courtly at a time when
irony and sarcasm were the rules
of conversational engagement.
He had the appearance of an
awkward outsider as well as that
of a man who was the star of his
Those writers understood the special power of fiction to contain a
city’s vastness, and Wolfe was convinced that their vision could be
awakened again.
In Harper’s magazine in 1989,
he offered up his literary manifesto: “To me the idea of writing a
novel about this astonishing metropolis, a big novel, cramming as
much of New York City between
covers as you could, was the most
tempting, the most challenging,
and the most obvious idea an
American writer could possibly
have.”
As if to drive that point home,
Wolfe began work on another
novel, even bigger, even better,
even more Dickensian in its scope
and ambition. “A Man in Full”
appeared a decade later, in 1998,
and made a strong claim to be a
Great American Novel. Set in Atlanta, “A Man in Full” demonstrated Wolfe’s boundless capacity to
move up and down the class ladder, capturing the lives of the
powerful and the dispossessed
with equal confidence. (It also
contains the most audacious sex
scene in American literature —
albeit between two horses.)
The title may have nominally
referred to Wolfe’s protagonist, an
outlandish real estate developer,
but “A Man in Full” was an equally
apt description of Wolfe himself,
Tom Wolfe got as close as anyone to the Great American Novel with
“A Man in Full,” which described the protagonist and the author.
who could not be contained. Although he was a finalist for a
National Book Award that year, he
graciously declined to attend the
prize ceremony because, he said,
he had a previous engagement in
Atlanta. One of those quiet, introspective novels — Alice McDermott’s “Charming Billy” — beat
out “A Man in Full” in a surprise
upset, but as his publisher Roger
Straus growled at me the next day:
“Tom doesn’t need that prize!”
In the end, Wolfe demonstrated
the limits of his own faith in
reporting as the key to great fiction, though publishers kept
throwing millions of dollars at
him. For his next novel, “I Am
Charlotte Simmons” (2004),
Wolfe visited college campuses
across the country and claimed to
capture the sexual antics of American students. (It won the Bad Sex
in Fiction Award from the Literary Review.) Though written in a
fit of hyperventilating titillation,
this overwrought sexcapade offered only the wholly unsurprising revelations that college kids
drink a lot and make bad romantic choices. It turns out that reporting isn’t sufficient to create a
fully realized female character.
The Wolfean method seemed to
be slipping into shoddy anthropology, complete with an embarrassing use of dialects that sound-
own play. The suits were beautifully tailored but desperately out
of fashion. The white suit was a
Southern affectation that Wolfe
did not succumb to until he called
New York City home. It made him
the center of attention in any
room even though his journalistic
profession was best served by his
ability to be the unnoticed observer.
The suits gave him a rather
old-fashioned appearance even
as his journalism boiled with
news, freshness and the sense
that he was seeing the dawn
before anyone else. He was not
the daring adventurer in black,
the rebel in leather or the man’s
man in tweed and lumberjack
plaids. He was the fop — a man
who appreciated style and iconoclasts. That white suit announced
that he did not plan on rolling in
the muck; there’d be no roughhousing. There would be decorum.
His strike would be witty,
charming and precise. Bloodless
yet deadly.
The wearing of the white suits
began, according to a 2015 profile
in Vanity Fair, when Wolfe moved
to New York in the summer of
1962 after quitting his job at The
Washington Post and taking one
at the New York Herald Tribune.
At the time, wrote Michael Lewis,
Wolfe “owned two sports jackets. Herald Tribune reporters all
wore suits, and so he went out
and bought a suit: a white suit.
The suit wasn’t some kind of
statement; it was what you wore
in the summer in Richmond, Virginia,” where Wolfe grew up. “The
first time he wore it, however, he
realized the suit wasn’t of summer weight. It was thick enough
to wear in cold weather, too.
That’s how strapped for cash he
is: he wears his white suit into the
fall so he doesn’t have to buy
another.”
Like so many aesthetic flourishes, the suit was not simply an
accident; it was serendipity. The
suit reflected his Southern up-
bringing and said something
about the sort of proscribed politeness that goes along with that
geography. It’s the bless-yourheart brand of gentility that is
decorous and polished on the
surface but sharp and piercing
just below that. He was costumed
like the angel of deadly prose. His
innocent wonder was murderous.
Wolfe’s white suit was also a
statement of rigor. A white suit is
not something easily worn. It
suggests control and order. It
doesn’t hide a thousand sins; it
reveals every dropped crumb. It
highlights inattentiveness. Wolfe
is said to have been a disciplined
writer, one who sat daily at his
desk with the goal of producing
10 pages, no matter how long it
took. Writing might be an art, but
producing a steady output of legendary work is a science. He was
the white-coated new journalist:
experimenting and researching.
He was a clean slate heading into
subcultures and reporting back.
The fashion industry owes an
MICHAEL WILLIAMSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
The fashion
industry owes an
enormous debt to
Wolfe. Not because
his white suit
started any trends,
but because he
saw the way
fashion had
infected the
culture, and he
acknowledged its
power.
ed like your grandpa straining to
be hip.
Those flaws were on full display in his final novel, a comedy
called “Back to Blood” (2012), for
which his new publisher, Little,
Brown, paid a staggering $10,000
a page. Set in Miami — another
city vast enough to attract his
prodigious vision — “Back to
Blood” reads like a parody of
Wolfe, the pages filled with ridiculous stereotypes and CAPITALLETTER SOUND EFFECTS.
But it’s not just or helpful to
end on that blaring, discordant
note. At his best, Wolfe wrenched
American novels back into action.
He pumped adrenaline into the
veins of our fiction. He reminded
authors and publishers that readers crave great stories, tales commensurate to the crazy, unbounded chaos they’re living through.
Somewhere, surely, right now
there’s a young author, encouraged by Wolfe’s advice, toiling
away on the next great American
novel about the Trump administration.
Wolfe, already clad in white,
would look down and smile at
that.
ron.charles@washpost.com
Ron Charles is the editor of Book
World and host of
TotallyHipVideoBookReview.com.
enormous debt to Wolfe. Not because his white suit started any
trends, but because he saw the
way fashion had infected the culture, and he acknowledged its
power. He gave us “social X-rays.”
He fleshed out what it meant to
be a “master of the universe.” His
skill was not in characterizing
these archetypes with a laundry
list of expensive designer brands.
He captured their essence, the
mind-set and insecurities of a
particular class of women and
men who fueled the fashion industry during the exalted 1980s
and who continue to exert enormous sway over it today. He was
the white-coated fashion anthropologist.
Wolfe, in contrast, owed fashion nothing. His white suits were
his alone. They were his style, his
creation. They were an establishment uniform — recognizable
and reassuring — but repurposed
to his unsparing specifications.
robin.givhan@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C3
RE
Do: Wash that apple, freeze that fish. Don’t: Stick that fork in the microwave.
Dear Heloise: I
Hints from enjoy reading
Heloise
your column in
the Houston
Chronicle. I eat apples daily, and
I’m aware that pesticides are
necessary to make a beautiful,
delicious apple. So, to clean my
apple, I use a small amount of
dishwashing detergent, scrub the
apple using my hands and rinse
carefully under flowing water
from my faucet. Is this the best
way to clean the apple skin?
E.W.S., Willis, Tex.
E.W.S.: Yes, as long as you wash
the apple thoroughly and rinse
well. Dry with a clean paper
towel.
first, then wrap it very tightly
with two or three layers of wrap.
Dear Heloise: We love fish. Aside
from my husband being a
fisherman, I buy salmon at the
store. I’d like to know how long
fish can be frozen.
Tina D., Lubbock, Tex.
Dear Heloise: My doctor told me
to eat more fish, especially
salmon. What’s so great about
salmon?
Linda Y., Albuquerque
Tina D.: Fish will not maintain
the same flavor, texture or quality
forever. There are, of course, time
limits: Fatty fish, such as salmon
and tuna, should not be frozen
more than two to three months;
lean fish, such as cod or catfish,
should not be frozen longer than
six months. Just make certain
that you run water over the fish
Linda Y.: 1. Salmon is considered
one of the best sources for
Omega-3 fatty acids. You must
get these from food because it’s
impossible for your body to
manufacture them.
2. It’s a terrific source of
protein.
3. Salmon is high in B
vitamins, which repair your DNA
and aid the functioning of your
brain and nervous system.
4. It’s a good source of
potassium, selenium and
astaxanthin and helps fight
inflammation.
Dear Heloise: What would
happen if I put something metal
in my microwave? Is it
dangerous?
Earl K., Twin Falls, Idaho
Earl K.: Your best bet is to never
place metal in a microwave. Thin
pieces of metal, such as
aluminum, pose a serious threat
of fire. It’s best to stay with
materials that won’t cause a fire
and are deemed safe for
microwave use.
Dear Heloise: The best advice
my mother ever gave me:
When cooking with anything
that has a handle, always turn
the handle to the side so that no
one walks by and knocks the pot/
pan off the stove.
Always roll pie dough from
the middle.
Always stir gravy in the same
direction. If you want it to
brown, don’t stir constantly.
A Reader in Virginia
Dear Heloise: Most of the
vegetables I eat are grown in my
Artist
paints
Trump
as hero
T
he other day, we flew to Utah
to watch McNaughton put
the finishing touches on his
latest work, which he planned to
release by the end of the
week. Over the phone, he’d said
only that the painting would be
“Mueller-themed.”
American Fork, a Salt Lake
City suburb, is an interesting
town, a backdrop of ridiculous
beauty and a foreground of bland
chain restaurants. The address
he’d provided led to Altus Fine
Arts, an art consortium specializing in Mormon paintings, where
McNaughton rents warehouse
space. In the backroom of the
nondescript white building, the
painter had already set up his
easel.
The new painting was “Mueller-themed” in the same way a
banana is “fruit-themed”: there
might have been a layer to peel
back, but for the most part, the
thing was just the thing. In the
work, which McNaughton had
tentatively titled “Exposing the
Truth,” Trump grabbed special
counsel Robert S. Mueller III by
the necktie, roughly pulling him
close while Mueller shrank back
in fear. In Trump’s other hand
was a magnifying glass, which he
held inches from Mueller’s face.
“It’s about how it’s all kind of
coming to a head,” McNaughton
explained. “How Trump is turning the tables on Mueller. It does
have a bit of a bully feel — Trump
is saying, ‘I’m not going to be the
victim here.’ ” McNaughton
thinks that the president will end
up firing Mueller, and the painting reflects that.
As McNaughton sat at his
easel, painting the shadows on
Trump’s sleeve, he explained that
this wasn’t his regular studio.
Heloise’s column appears six days a
week at washingtonpost.com/advice.
Send a hint to Heloise, P.O. Box
795000, San Antonio, TX 782795000, or email it to
Heloise@Heloise.com.
©2018, King Features Syndicate
McNaughton’s paintings. Dickerson considers himself moderateto-liberal, at least by Utah standards. “But,” he says, “I do have
one of Jon’s paintings. I really
like it. It’s in my office — should I
go get it?”
He returns a few minutes later
carrying a small square artwork,
maybe 8 by 8 inches, that doesn’t
look like anything else in the
studio. It’s of John F. Kennedy.
It’s a simple black-and-white
sketch, and it’s accompanied by
the JFK quote, “Let us not seek
the Republican answer or the
Democratic answer. Let us not
seek to fix the blame for the past.
Let us accept our own responsibility for the future.”
On McNaughton’s website,
this painting does pop up, but it’s
not featured prominently. The
Kennedy drawing cost only $10,
when it was for sale, but it’s no
longer for sale. A note says that
only 50 copies were made.
MCNAUGHTON FROM C1
riage of the psyche, McNaughton
is one of the most significant
painters of the current era. The
New Yorker’s art critic analyzed
the influence of McNaughton’s
work and dubbed 2016 “The year
of ‘The Forgotten Man.’ ”
“I’m just honestly a little perplexed,” says McNaughton, 50, a
soft-spoken Mormon father. “I
have no idea where [buyers] are
hanging them; I just know I sell a
ton. Sometimes I’m shocked at
how many I sell. That one I told
you about, Obama burning the
Constitution? When I painted it,
I worried, this thing is just hideous — why would anybody hang
that in their living room?”
It’s not, he says, the kind of
“warm, happy” work people typically want in their homes.
But they sell. McNaughton is a
repeat guest on “Fox and
Friends.” Sean Hannity owns several originals, including “The
Forgotten Man.” McNaughton
won’t say how much Hannity
paid (it’s been reported as
$300,000, which the artist says is
too high), but the majority of his
income comes not from originals
but reproductions: $30 for an
11-by-14 lithograph, $700 for
something large, framed and
signed.
Rob Dickerson, the account
manager at the printing outlet
that fills McNaughton’s orders,
says when customers submit orders, they often include personal
notes: Your work has meant so
much to me. You are my favorite
artist. Sometimes orders come in
with a shipping address of Trump
Tower. These aren’t Trump employees, Dickerson thinks: just
regular
citizens
spending
$250-$300 on a painting they’ll
never hold, sent to a man who
has more money than they ever
will, because the art is doing . . .
something . . . for their souls.
back yard. After planting the
garden with seeds, I’d sometimes
forget what exactly I had planted,
or in which row it was planted.
So, I asked my doctor for 12
tongue depressors, wrote the
name of a vegetable on a tongue
depressor and stuck it in the
ground at the head of the row. It
was easy, cheap and tidy-looking.
Carol F., Pukalani, Hawaii
T
KIM RAFF FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Normally, he works from his
basement, which is also where he
stages paintings (a lanky neighbor is the regular stand-in for
Obama; McNaughton’s brother is
the recurring “Forgotten Man”).
But as his fame has grown, his
wife’s tolerance for the circus has
shrunk; no interviews in the
house.
McNaughton talked about his
faith: the Mormon mission he
did in Japan in his youth. He
talked about working as a financial planner for eight years until
he’d saved enough money to
pursue art full time. He talked
about his art training at Brigham
Young University, where a frustrated professor chastised him
for not taking instruction better.
He talked about how he wakes
up every morning and turns on
the news, perpetually seeking out
angles for future projects.
“I have a great idea for an
immigration-themed painting,”
he said. “I have a great idea for a
foreign-policy-themed painting.
I have an idea for a Second
Amendment-themed painting,
and an idea that involves a lot of
past presidents, and a Christmas
painting that’s going to be crazy.”
A good bellwether for if a
painting would sell well was
whether someone like Rachel
Maddow, the liberal MSNBC
host, was offended by it. Her blog
once held a cheeky caption contest for one of his works. “My
sales spiked after,” McNaughton
said cheerfully.
While watching McNaughton
paint, we told him that “Exposing
the Truth” seemed tame compared with his earlier works.
Nobody was burning or tearing
the Constitution. Abraham Lincoln was not weeping in the
background. Jesus Christ wasn’t
presiding over the halls of Congress.
Several hours later we realized
these standards were off. If a
painting of the president of the
United States physically threatening the special prosecutor
didn’t seem downright wacky,
then what did that say about
what passes for normal in this
country?
I
t’s perhaps not surprising to
know that coastal critics don’t
believe in McNaughton’s
work. New York magazine’s Jerry
Saltz has called it “visually dead
as a doornail.” Stephen Colbert
once did a whole segment lampooning the obvious metaphors
in the painting: “Barack Obama
represents President Obama,”
Colbert deadpanned. “The burning Constitution represents a
Constitution that is on fire.”
What isn’t entirely clear is
whether McNaughton believed
in it himself. The Trump world is
populated by disciples — Michael
Cohen, Diamond & Silk — whose
ideology can seem both deeply
felt as well as performative and
JON MCNAUGHTON
opportunistic.
McNaughton’s art shapes perceptions of the president. It
stokes anger in Trump’s supporters. But had McNaughton himself jumped on the Trump Train,
or had he merely set up a lemonade stand at the station?
McNaughton didn’t support
Trump at first; he liked Ted Cruz
in the primaries. Ask what he
thinks about Trump now, and
he’s measured: “He gets away
with stuff nobody else can get
away with,” McNaughton says. “I
laugh when I see it. I cringe and
laugh at just about anything I
see.” He says that his works do
come from an emotional place
but that he doesn’t view himself
as a Trump supporter so much as
a Trump observer.
“Take this painting,” he says at
his makeshift studio, gesturing
to “You Are Not Forgotten,”
which hangs on an easel nearby.
As a regal Trump gestures toward
the Forgotten Man, who is planting a tree, a crowd of mostly
veterans and law enforcement
look on with approval. McNaughton asks, “Based on this painting,
what do you think McNaughton
thinks of Trump?”
The symbolism seems pretty
bonk-you-on-the-head: tree as
hope, Trump as savior, audience
as grateful.
McNaughton says, No, that’s
wrong. No, that’s not what he
intended. “The point of the painting is that here are all the people
who got him elected,” McNaughton says. “It’s, ‘Okay Mr. Trump,
now you’re here, what are you
going to do?’ ” The painting is not
an endorsement of Trump, McNaughton says, so much as it’s a
snapshot of the country in a
moment in time. More than anything, he considers himself a
“historical painter.”
“The way I look at it, these
paintings will either be swept
under the rug, or they’ll represent this era. The same with
Trump, really.”
But if that’s true, it’s not really
what comes across in his work.
When people buy a painting, they
don’t also buy McNaughton to
come to their house and explain
how “You Are Not Forgotten” is
merely an observational statement about the demographics
who elected Trump. The people
who buy the painting are buying
it because the message seems to
be, “#MAGA #MAGA #MAGA,” in
big neon lights.
This prompts a thoughtful interrogation into the meaning and
purpose of art: How much ownership does a painter have over
his messaging? How much
should the artist’s intent inform
the works’ perception?
Perhaps McNaughton is trying
a little bit to have it both ways —
to benefit from the fervor of
Trump’s supporters, while leaving himself some plausible deniability about whether he’s a supporter himself. Perhaps it’s just
about money?
To spend all day, every day,
creating beatific images of Donald Trump would be exhausting,
if you didn’t believe in Donald
Trump at least a little. So McNaughton must believe in him at
least a little.
But it’s complicated. As McNaughton talks, with some
thoughtful sadness, about being
the “whipping boy” of the art
world he spent a lifetime hoping
to join, he’s not the person you
expect him to be.
Dickerson, the account manager, says that he doesn’t share
the political views espoused in
Artist Jon McNaughton
draws much of his
income not from selling
original paintings but
from selling lithographs
of works such as “The
Forgotten Man,” above,
in which President
Barack Obama ignores a
weeping citizen as the
Founding Fathers
implore him to pay
attention. “I have a
great idea for an
immigration-themed
painting,” he said. “I
have a great idea for a
foreign-policy-themed
painting. I have an idea
for a Second
Amendment-themed
painting, and an idea
that involves a lot of past
presidents, and a
Christmas painting
that’s going to be crazy.”
he next day, McNaughton
brings a finished canvas of
the Mueller painting back
into the warehouse. He’d stayed
up until 3 a.m. completing it, he
says, and it’s changed quite a bit.
Now, there are faces watching the
Trump-Mueller
altercation:
James B. Comey, Rod Rosenstein,
Jeff Sessions. McNaughton has
also changed the name: Instead
of “Exposing the Truth,” the
painting is now titled “Expose
the Truth” — a swap that makes
the depiction seem less observational and more directive.
“A little more in-your-face,”
McNaughton allows.
Whether he fully believes in
what he’s doing or not, he’s
chosen to lean into it, without
hesitation. He spends the afternoon composing the text that will
accompany the painting on his
website: “Robert Mueller leads a
special council of at least 17
partisan Democrat attorneys
who have yet to find a single
piece of evidence against the
President, yet they ignore the
mounting verifiable evidence
against Russian collusion with
the DNC and the Clinton Foundation,” the text says. “There comes
a time when you have to take a
stand to Expose the Truth!”
McNaughton puts the painting up for sale on his website, and
almost immediately people respond on Twitter: “GREAT
PAINTING.” “WAKE UP, AMERICA!” “Time to take this country
back from the arrogant minions
of the LEFT.”
Scrolling through the online
response to “Expose the Truth” —
the McNaughton fans who can’t
wait to order their own copies,
and it’s hard not to think back to
one of McNaughton’s earlier
statements, about how his paintings didn’t provide the “warm,
happy” vibe that people typically
want out of their living-room
artwork.
Maybe his work doesn’t make
people feel good in the way we’ve
traditionally defined “feeling
good.” It doesn’t provide a sense
of calmness, peace, and amity
toward our fellow man. But his
art does make people feel good
under the new definitions of
feeling good. It provides a selffulfilling sense of self-righteousness. It assuages people, telling
them that they are upset about
the right things. It feels good
because feeling angry and justified is the new feeling good.
McNaughton used to paint
something new every few
months. He says that’s changed,
recently — now he’s painting
something every few weeks, because it seems like that’s how
often there is appetite for a new
outrage.
Before leaving, we ask McNaughton for a tour of the warehouse, where all of his stock is
kept, and he provides a copy of an
out-of-date calendar: 12 of his
greatest hits, consolidated in one
item. It’s too large to fit in a
carry-on, and at the airport gate,
a few fellow passengers ask to
flip through it.
“Oh, that guy,” one says wearily.
“Oh, that guy!” says another. “I
think he’ll be famous for a long
time. I think he gets America
right.”
monica.hesse@washpost.com
C4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
MAY 16 , 2018
book world
Y OU NG R E AD E R S
In The Funeral (Groundwood, Ages 5
to 8), Matt James offers a lighthearted
— yet not irreverent — look at the
rituals of death, through the eyes of a
child. Young Norma spends a day out of
school to attend her
great-uncle Frank’s
funeral. She practices
her sad face in the
mirror but looks
forward to seeing her
younger, favorite
cousin, Ray. She tries
sounding out the
word on the flag
attached to their car: FUNeral. “Mom,
Uncle Frank was really old, right?”
Norma asks. At the church, out in the
countryside, the funeral seems very
long, “with all that talk about God and
souls, and not very much talk about
Uncle Frank.” Norma and Ray are
allowed to slip away from the reception
into the nearby meadow, filled with
flowers, under a pink-blossomed tree.
The clear blue sky seems huge with the
church looking “as though it might fall
off the ground and fly away in the heat
of the afternoon.” The world seems very
wide. The two children find a little
graveyard and a small pond, look for
frogs, and play in the tall grasses.
“Mom,” says Norma on the car ride
home, “I think Uncle Frank would have
liked his funeral.” Sweetly, gently funny
and poignant at the same time, “The
Funeral” is perfectly pitched to a child’s
understanding. This uncomplicated
story will also charm adults who
recognize that being remembered is a
gift.
Training
his eye on
the sins of
the South
K
BY
R ON C HARLES
evin Powers wasn’t old
enough to vote when he enlisted in the U.S. Army, but by
2004 he was fighting in Iraq as
a machine-gunner. When he
got back home to Virginia, he began
writing poetry and fiction about his
experiences in Mosul and Tal Afar, trying, he said, to give readers “a 10 percent
example of what that might be like.”
His debut novel, “The Yellow Birds,”
was one of the first about the Iraq War
and one of the most celebrated novels of
the era. A finalist for a National Book
Award, it won praise from Tom Wolfe,
Dave Eggers and writer-vets who knew
the horrors of battle
firsthand. If Powers’s
prose
sometimes
sounded florid, that
seemed a blemish
worth tolerating for
the emotional insight
he offered on that
quagmire 6,000 miles
away.
But now Powers
has turned his scope
A SHOUT IN
THE RUINS
on slavery and the
Civil War, the most
By Kevin Powers
well-trodden battleLittle, Brown.
field of American fic261 pp. $26
tion. “A Shout in the
Ruins” marches with
a phalanx of great novels by Colson
Whitehead, Toni Morrison, Edward P.
Jones, Geraldine Brooks, E.L. Doctorow,
Paulette Jiles, Charles Frazier, Jeffrey
Lent, Michael Shaara, Gore Vidal, Stephen Crane and so many more, stretching all the way back to Harriet Beecher
Stowe. Any new writer who tries to join
the ranks of these authors risks tripping
over their feet or, worse, being set upon
by the cliches that scamper after them
like mangy dogs.
But I’m getting ahead of myself.
“A Shout in the Ruins” moves between
two time frames separated by almost a
century. In 1956, a very old black man is
displaced from his house by the new
Richmond-Petersburg Turnpike carving
through Virginia. With a suitcase, a few
ancient possessions and some faded
memories, he sets off to solve the mystery of his origin.
That quiet, pensive search is effectively obliterated by the novel’s other story
line, set around the Civil War, which is
far more developed — and considerably
more dramatic. The geography, the
weaponry and the cause are entirely
different from the Iraq War, but Powers
brings to Virginia battle scenes the same
searing immediacy he brought to his
stories of carnage in “The Yellow Birds.”
— Kathie Meizner
ALLA DREYVITSER/THE WASHINGTON POST/IMAGES FROM LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
Once again, we come to feel the mix of
agony and absurdity suffered by soldiers
caught between the tectonic plates of
history. And, pulling back from those
poignant individual stories, Powers also
creates a haunting vision of Virginia in
economic and social collapse, a calamity
that strips away the last bulwarks of
civilization, inspiring some men to even
greater barbary and others to further
commercial exploitation.
One such man is Antony Levallois, an
ambitious plantation owner near Richmond. Weary of raping his slaves, male
and female, he thinks it might be time to
take a wife because he was “getting to a
point where the absence of a woman in
his life diminished him in the eyes of
other men.” And so this vampiric character sets his sights on his neighbor’s land
and his neighbor’s daughter, Emily.
We first spot Emily as a ghost flitting
across the Great Dismal Swamp, but
Levallois initially sees her as a beautiful
young woman who represents “both a
past and future that could be possessed.”
How their wretched relationship will
play out is foreshadowed in the smoldering opening paragraphs of the novel, but
another romance, pure and courageous,
draws us through these chapters and
encourages us to imagine something
better. Among the many people Levallois
controls is Rawls, a hobbled slave in love
with a fellow slave named Nurse. These
two highly sympathetic characters must
negotiate the whims of various masters
in hopes of surviving long enough to
realize the promise of the Civil War.
At one point, when Nurse is sold off to
another plantation, Rawls is determined
to find her again. An older slave warns
him to give up, but Rawls insists, “I need
her. . . . I love her.”
“No place for love in this world, son.”
“I’ll make a place. Don’t you worry.
Where is she?”
“This world’s gonna break your damn
heart, boy.”
“It’s been broke already.”
On Broadway, such earnest dialogue
would cue these two to break into a
soulful duet, but here it just signals an
awkward flaw in this overwrought novel:
Powers has curdled the gothic tradition
into a thick paste and spread it all over
these pages. Rather than highlighting
the perversity of slavery, his sententious
prose strains to upstage it. We’re told, for
instance, that “desire, unlike pain, was
something that no one, black or white,
would ever develop a resistance to while
the sun still sat as center of the heavens.”
That ornate line — with its melodratic
allusion to Copernican astronomy — is
typical of this novel.
One character’s face looks “like it was
permanently on the precipice of discovering that the true nature of the world
was one of sadness and isolation, even
when surrounded by those we love.”
Honestly, do you now have a clearer
impression of that face?
Another character’s “grief for himself
was replaced by a grieving for the world.
He felt as though he knew all the names
that had come before him and all that
would follow. He put the names on his
breath and with each exhalation he said
them in a language beyond speech.” This
is neither profundity nor poetry; it’s
merely posturing.
Such bombast was detectable in “The
Yellow Birds,” like mold in the basement,
but here, left unchecked, it’s overtaken
the whole structure. That’s particularly
lamentable because Powers can be such
a forceful writer when he resists the
temptation to substitute grandiose gestures for his own hard-won wisdom.
When he succumbs, we just get shouting
and ruin.
ron.charles@washpost.com
Ron Charles is the editor of Book World and
the host of TotallyHipVideoBookReview.com.
Karl Ove Knausgaard’s reflections on risk and parenthood
BY
R ODNEY W ELCH
This latest addition to Karl Ove Knausgaard’s ongoing seasonal quartet is a
tightly controlled story about risk, the
kind associated with birth.
From the beginning, this series of
memoirs has been directed toward a single
future reader: Knausgaard’s fourth daughter. The books so far
have been meditations on life, occasionally interspersed with
artful definitions of
things above, like the
sun and the moon,
SPRING
and things below, like
By Karl Ove
wasps, chairs, sugar
Knausgaard
and Q-Tips — a kind of
Translated from
glossary for a new bethe Norwegian
ing seeing the world
by Ingvild
afresh. “Spring,” by
Burkey
contrast, is a standPenguin Press.
alone narrative and,
182 pp. $27
while the concluding
“Summer” is still to
come, may prove the best of the lot.
Set within a single day, “Spring” focuses on a road trip that also becomes a
mental journey to the past. (That structure may be a tip of the hat to Ingmar
Bergman’s “Wild Strawberries”; the late
director is a minor character in the book’s
backstory.) Knausgaard travels with his
infant daughter from the family home in
Skane, in southern Sweden, to see his
wife in Helsingborg, about an hour away.
We do not immediately know why his
wife is there, but life has clearly become
messy. Knausgaard recently had to visit
Child Protective Services. “We as a family,” he notes dryly, “had approached the
zone where third parties had the right to
get involved.” He lets us know, too, he has
a bad temper — “There’s a reason why it’s
called the nuclear family” — and that,
during a trip to a bathroom this very
morning, he passed blood.
All of which is more than enough to
give Knausgaard a distinct sense of life’s
precariousness — not that he needs a
reminder, with the tot strapped in the car
seat in back. Along the way, he recalls the
events that lead up to his daughter’s
birth: a happy time, full of far-flung
family trips, including an academic conference at Bergman’s Faro Island home,
but also one plagued by the physical and
emotional complications of his wife’s
increasing depression.
Knausgaard reveals his life and tries to
impart some wisdom to his dozing infant
passenger. One insight is that a parent’s
love is “the only love that doesn’t bind
you but sets you free.” Another is that
even for an admittedly self-centered person like himself, the need for others is
absolute. “The person with no attachments is an anomaly,” he writes. Life
SAM BARKER
Karl Ove Knausgaard’s “Spring” is the
third volume in his seasonal quartet.
alone is a horror. He lets her know that
self-deception “isn’t a lie, it’s a survival
mechanism” and that she must be true to
herself even though peer pressure is
inevitable.
But as he recalls his wife’s difficult
pregnancy, the very idea of birth seems to
test his own views on life. He is preoccupied with how it all ends; his father’s
wretched alcoholic death casts a shadow
over his own life. So does the fact that he
and his wife have chosen to bring another
child into the world.
He never directly asks, “What compels
people to have children?” but it is a
question he seems bent on investigating.
He weighs the promise of life against the
meanness, cruelty and tragedy that await
us all. Existence is full of spontaneous
threatening swerves.
Knausgaard’s assets are on full display,
including his precise writing style and
his unerring sense of detail. He is constantly attuned to his surroundings, noting the changing weather and the colors
of flowers, which may account for why he
is so successful at what he does: transforming quotidian life into drama.
Perhaps it is the Proustian in him, this
desire to impart the full benefit of experience, no matter how small or seemingly
insignificant. Domestic life is his territory, and he enlarges it.
Likewise, this volume is strengthened
by the fact that he is less inclined to go off
the deep end. All the empty pontificating
and ponderous philosophizing of the
previous “Winter” has been put in storage.
For anyone who is curious about this
writer but has not felt the urge to invest
in the full 3,500 pages of his autobiographical series, “My Struggle,” “Spring”
makes for an excellent introduction. It is
the shortest book he has ever written, but
it is all muscle, a generous slice of a
thoughtful, ruminative life.
bookworld@washpost.com
Two richly illustrated new books
look back at some turbulent events of
the last century from an American
perspective. In More Deadly Than War
(Henry Holt, Ages 10 to 14), Kenneth C.
Davis explores the
Spanish flu, which
killed some 50 million
people worldwide in
1918 and 1919. Davis
draws on recent
research to explain
how the pandemic
was boosted by World
War I, spreading from
person to person via
training camps,
transport ships, battle
trenches and even
patriotic parades on
the home front.
Davis’s account
untangles the
scientific advances,
international conflicts
and cultural currents that shaped this
catastrophic event, ending with a call
for robust public-health systems to
combat future epidemics. Marc
Favreau’s Crash (Little, Brown, Ages 10
and older) looks at another difficult
historical moment: the Great
Depression. Using photographs and
firsthand accounts, Favreau shows how
the economic downturn affected a wide
variety of people. The book also
explains the New Deal in an accessible
way, focusing on the national recovery
efforts by such figures as Franklin and
Eleanor Roosevelt and NAACP leader
Walter White. Both books help young
readers understand calamities in our
past, offering valuable lessons on how
they inform our present and future.
— Abby McGanney Nolan
In Bob (Feiwel and Friends, Ages 8 to
12), Wendy Mass (“The Candymakers”
series) and Rebecca Stead (“When You
Reach Me”) team up to tell an endearing
story about the relationship between a
small greenish creature in a chicken suit
and the young girl
who befriends him.
Bob and Livy met five
years before the novel
opens, when Livy was
visiting family in
Australia. Now 11, Livy
has reluctantly
returned Down Under,
and her memories of
Bob begin slowly to
return, and their kinship blossoms. Bob
and Livy take turns narrating; reflective
Livy and curious, occasionally cranky
Bob emerge as distinct individuals in a
friendship believably shot through with
humor, hurt feelings and kindness.
Armed only with a black chess piece and
an old book of fairy tales, the two try to
determine Bob’s origins and how he can
return home. Meanwhile, their
immediate locale withers in the grip of a
long-term drought, and Livy’s
grandmother may lose her farm. The
authors avoid the usual fantasy tropes —
epic quests, winged fairies, castles — to
create a quirky, luminous tale grounded
in connection with the natural world. In
exploring a diminishing resource and
earth-centered magic, this charming,
compact book — with illustrations by
Nicholas Gannon — manages to be both
timely and unique.
— Mary Quattlebaum
bookworld@washpost.com
Rodney Welch frequently writes about books
for the Columbia, S.C., Free Times.
Literary Calendar
Saturday, May 19, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. | The Gaithersburg Book Festival features more than 100 authors in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, children’s and young adult literature. Other activities
include writing workshops, a Children’s Village, book signings and more. Admission and shuttles from Shady Grove Metro and Lakeforest Mall are free. City Hall, 31 S. Summit Ave.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C5
RE
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
5/16/18
7:00
7:30
8:00
◆ News
◆ Access
4.1 WRC (NBC)
The Nanny
The Nanny
4.2 WRC (IND)
◆ TMZ
Mod Fam
5.1 WTTG (Fox)
◆
◆
Wheel
J’pardy!
7.1 WJLA (ABC)
◆ ET
9.1 WUSA (CBS) Off Script
◆
La
Rosa
de
Guadalupe
14.1 WFDC (UNI)
◆ FamFeud
20.1 WDCA (MNTV) ◆ FamFeud
◆ MotorWeek
22.1 WMPT (PBS) Project
26.4 WETA (PBS) PBS NewsHour
Articulate-Jim
32.1 WHUT (PBS) DW News
Goldbergs
50.1 WDCW (CW) Goldbergs
66.1 WPXW (ION) Ghost Whisperer
BROADCAST CHANNELS
8:30
9:00
9:30
The Blacklist
Frasier
Frasier
◆ Empire
◆ Goldbergs
◆ Alex, Inc.
◆ Survivor
El rico y Lázaro
Fox 5 News ◆ Page Six
◆ Nature
Nature
The Rock Newman Show
◆ Riverdale
Ghost Whisperer
◆
Law & Order: SVU
Frasier
Frasier
◆ Star
◆ Mod Fam
◆ Housewife
(9:01) ◆ SEAL Team
Papá a toda madre
Big Bang
Big Bang
◆ NOVA Wonders
NOVA Wonders
Insight
Mosque
◆ The Originals
Ghost Whisperer
◆
10:00
10:30
Royal Wedding
Will & Grace Will & Grace
Fox 5 News at Ten
◆ Designated Survivor
◆ Code Black
Por amar sin ley
◆ Dateline
◆ Royal Wedding Watch
Royal Wedding Watch
Democracy Now!
◆ Seinfeld
News
Ghost Whisperer
◆
11:00
11:30
◆ J. Fallon
News
Will & Grace Will & Grace
News
The Final 5
◆ Kimmel
News
◆ Colbert
9 News
◆ Noticiero
Noticias
◆ Dateline
◆ Amanpour
◆ Beyond 100
Royal Wives at War
World News Poetry
◆ Mom
Two Men
Ghost Whisperer
CABLE CHANNELS
SVEN FRENZEL/ABC
Designated Survivor (ABC at 10) In the series finale, a natural disaster
threatens the lives of two White House staffers and President Kirkman
makes a shocking announcement. Above is Paulo Costanzo as Lyor Boone.
The Handmaid’s Tale (Hulu
streaming) Janine tries to figure out
her life in the colonies.
a decision about the future after
he’s offered money to expand the
company in the series finale.
Empire (Fox at 8) Cookie and
Lucious do what they can to keep
Empire in the family.
Modern Family (ABC at 9) Gloria’s
party is ruined when her nemesis
throws an even bigger bash next
door. Season finale.
Botched (E! at 9) The doctors have
a patient who almost died as a
result of a “mommy makeover.”
PREMIERE
SciJinks (Science at 10:05) Johnny
Galecki leads a team of scientists
who pull off wild stunts.
SEAL Team (CBS at 9) Jason and
the team plan a final mission.
Season finale.
American Housewife
(ABC at 9:30) Katie tries to save a
gala from failure. Season finale.
LATE NIGHT
SPECIAL
Inside the Royal Wedding: Harry
and Meghan (NBC at 10) Interviews
with friends of the couple, as well as
experts. Hosted by Savannah
Guthrie and Hoda Kotb.
FINALES
The Goldbergs (ABC at 8) Barry
pulls a senior prank that involves
Principal Ball’s car. Season finale.
Daily Show (Comedy Central at 11)
Terry Crews.
Fallon (NBC at 11:34) Will Ferrell,
Molly Shannon, Chrissy Metz,
Florence and the Machine.
Colbert (CBS at 11:35) Chadwick
Boseman.
Kimmel (ABC at 11:35) Diane
Keaton, Jim Acosta, Beach House.
Riverdale (CW at 8) Cheryl finalizes
her emancipation from her mother.
Season finale.
Corden (CBS at 12:37) Diane
Keaton, Andy Garcia, James
Acaster.
The Blacklist (NBC at 8) The truth
about the bones finally comes to
light. Season finale.
Meyers (NBC at 12:37) Josh Brolin,
Ella Purnell, the Aces, Matt Byrne.
— Sarah Polus
Alex, Inc. (ABC at 8:30) Alex makes
More at washingtonpost.com/tv
Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars (10:01) Flip Wars
Storage Wars Storage Wars
A&E
(5:25) The Bourne Ultimatum Movie: Escape Plan ★★ (2013)
(10:35) Movie: The Rock ★★★ (1996)
AMC
Insane Pools: Deep End
Insane Pools: Deep End
Insane Pools: Deep End
Insane Pools: Deep End
Insane Pools: Deep End
Animal Planet
Movie: Takers ★★ (2010)
Movie: Soul Plane ★★ (2004)
BET
Housewives/NYC
Housewives/NYC
Housewives/NYC
Real Housewives/Beverly
Watch
Housewives
Bravo
Gumball
King of Hill
Amer. Dad
Cleveland
Amer. Dad
Burgers
Burgers
Family Guy
Family Guy
Cartoon Network Craig
Erin Burnett OutFront
Anderson Cooper 360
Anderson Cooper 360
CNN Tonight
CNN Tonight
CNN
South Park
South Park
South Park
South Park
South Park
South Park
South Park
Daily
Opposition
Comedy Central South Park
Misfit Garage
Misfit Garage: Fired Up
Misfit Garage
Sticker Shock
Misfit Garage
Discovery
Gravity Falls Gravity Falls DuckTales
Gravity Falls Bunk’d
Bunk’d
Stuck/Middle Stuck/Middle Raven
Bunk’d
Disney
E! News
Botched
Botched
Botched
E! News
E!
MLB Baseball: New York Yankees at Washington Nationals (Live)
SportsCenter (Live)
SportsCenter (Live)
ESPN
NFL Live
World/Poker
World/Poker
World/Poker
Around/Horn NBA/Mic
ESPN2
Guy’s Grocery Games
Guy’s Grocery Games
Guy’s Grocery Games
Guy’s Grocery Games
Guy’s Grocery Games
Food Network
The Story With Martha
Tucker Carlson Tonight
Hannity
The Ingraham Angle
Fox News Night
Fox News
10 Things I Hate About You Famous in Love
(9:01) Movie: Zookeeper ★ (2011)
The 700 Club
Freeform
Deadpool
Movie: Everest ★★★ (2015)
The Americans
Americans
FX
Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing The Middle
The Middle
The Middle
The Middle
Golden Girls Golden Girls
Hallmark
Monk
Movie: This Magic Moment (2013)
Murder, She Wrote
Hallmark M&M Monk
War
VICE
(8:10) Movie: Dunkirk ★★★ (2017)
Serena
Wyatt Cenac Barry
Rock
HBO
Property Brothers: Buying
Property Brothers at Home Property Brothers
Hunters
Hunt Intl
Boise Boys
HGTV
American Pickers
American Pickers
American Pickers
(10:03) American Pickers
(11:05) American Pickers
History
Little Women: LA
Little Women: LA
Little Women: LA
(10:13) Little Women: LA
Little Women Little Women
Lifetime
MLB Baseball: New York Yankees at Washington Nationals (Live)
Nats
Softball 360 ESPNWS
MLB Baseball
MASN
Hardball Matthews
All In With Chris Hayes
Rachel Maddow Show
The Last Word
The 11th Hour
MSNBC
Jersey Shore
Jersey Shore
Jersey Shore
Jersey Shore
Jersey Shore
MTV
Explorer
Narco State
America Inside
America Inside Out-Katie
Nat’l Geographic Explorer
MLL Lacrosse: Chesapeake Bayhawks at Denver Outlaws Caps Road to the Cup
Redskins
Redskins 100
NBC SportsNet WA Caps Road to the Cup
Henry Danger Thundermans Movie: Evan Almighty ★★ (2007)
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Nickelodeon
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Movie: Fast Five ★★ (2011)
PARMT
(6:30) Movie: Hellboy II: The Golden Army ★★★ (2008)
The Expanse
Krypton
Hellboy II: The Golden Army
Syfy
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Full Frontal
Conan
TBS
Andy Hardy Comes Home
Five Little Peppers and How (9:15) Movie: Five Little Peppers at Home
Out West With the Peppers Five Peppers
TCM
Long Lost Family
Long Lost Family
This Is Life Live (Live)
(11:03) Long Lost Family
TLC
NCIS: New Orleans
NBA Pregame (Live)
NBA Basketball: Golden State Warriors at Houston Rockets (Live)
In NBA
TNT
Expedition Unknown
Expedition Unknown
Expedition Unknown
Locations
Locations
Expedition Unknown
Travel
Knockout
Knockout
Inside Jokes Inside Jokes Inside Jokes Inside Jokes Inside Jokes Inside Jokes Knockout
Knockout
TruTV
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
Mom
Mom
King
King
TV Land
Cosby Show Cosby Show Unsung
Unsung
Unsung
Good Times Good Times
TV One
NCIS
NCIS
NCIS
Colony
Mod Fam
Mod Fam
USA Network
Hip Hop Sq. Hip Hop Sq. Hip Hop Sq. Hip Hop Sq. Hip Hop Sq. Hip Hop Sq. Hip Hop
Hip Hop
Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta
VH1
GE Washington
Govt. Matters On Your Side SportsTalk
ABC News
News at 10pm
Govt. Matters On Your Side
WNC8
Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing
WGN
LEGEND: Bold indicates new or live programs
◆
High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
THEATER REVIEW
Olney’s ‘Invisible Hand’ has just the right touch
BY
N ELSON P RESSLEY
Ayad Akhtar’s “The Invisible
Hand” is a terrific political thriller about a topic you’d expect to
see more often onstage: money.
Capital is where the action is; it’s
why an investment banker
named Nick has been captured
in Pakistan. He’ll be freed when
he raises $10 million.
That’s the taut setup of
Akhtar’s intelligent four-character jail-cell drama, which
couldn’t be acted much better in
Michael Bloom’s staging in the
Olney Theatre Center’s intimate
black-box space. Nick can raise
the money; he’s a Citibank whiz.
But he needs Internet access and
working capital, and he’ll need to
instruct Bashir, his wary captor,
about the patterns of markets.
This is drama for the “Homeland” and “The Big Short” crowd,
and for audiences who admired
Akhtar’s Pulitzer-winning “Disgraced” and the light, sharp
touch of his “The Who and the
What.” “The Invisible Hand” was
written in the same flurry as
those plays and as his novel
“American Dervish,” and like
each of those works, it crackles
with purpose.
For actors, it’s fabulous —
tense with perpetually simmering conflict, rich with character
that’s both individual and geopolitical. Thomas Keegan delivers
one of his finest performances as
Nick, convincingly spitting out
figures and investment strategies while also freaking out at the
horrors of incarceration. (Luciana Stecconi’s cement-gray walls
and lone steel door bluntly render the scene.)
As Bashir, Maboud Ebrahimzadeh purposefully sounds
Pakistani by way of London, and
he blends the character’s defensive ego with a savvy streak. We
hear with Bashir’s ears as Nick
schools him in markets, and you
can almost hear the brain and
the blood whir as Bashir — who
positions himself as a moderate
terrorist, not the beheading kind
— gets the adrenaline of money
in him.
As befits this kind of thriller,
the talk is sharp and fast and
never far from menace. Mueen
Jahan coolly plays the local
imam who is Bashir’s superior,
which he demonstrates at gunpoint, and Ahmad Kamal is thoroughly compelling as a menial
jailer with keen eyes and ears.
Power shifts, with religion and
morality thick in the mix.
Akhtar rapidly catapulted
himself to the forefront of politically fluent U.S. dramatists, and
he excels at pitting varieties of
righteousness against one another. Of course the captors have
targeted an investment banker
to reverse Western exploitation
and put capitalism on trial,
which leads to compelling moral
arguments between Nick and
Bashir. Inarguably, money is
power. Is it ever in the right
hands?
Akhtar is a realist, not a sentimentalist, and he is not prone to
oversimplification in limning the
differences between strands of
American influence and strands
of Pakistani Muslim response.
STAN BAROUH
Thomas Keegan and Maboud Ebrahimzadeh are superb in Olney
Theatre Center’s “The Invisible Hand,” a political thriller.
His gift for dramatic, resonant
endings does not fail him here.
nelson.pressley@washpost.com
The Invisible Hand by Ayad Akhtar.
Directed by Michael Bloom. About
two hours. Through June 10 at the
Olney Theatre Center, 2001 OlneySandy Spring Rd. $49-$74. 301-9243400 or olneytheatre.org.
THEATRE
Special Encore Remount
Hooded, Or
Being Black
for Dummies
Helen Hayes
Award Winner!
Shear Madness
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Valet Parking at
1360 H St NE!
Wed May 16 @ 8 PM;
Thurs May 17 @ 8 PM;
Fri May 18 @ 8 PM;
Sat May 19 @ 3 & 8 PM;
Sun May 20 @ 3 & 7:30 PM
“one of my top picks of [last year]…I stand by it.”
(Washington Post) Don’t miss this irreverent dark
comedy about growing up black in America written by
local playwright Tearrance Arvelle Chisholm. “…deserves
every accolade it has earned.” (DCMTA) All productions are
accessible for Deaf audiences.
Atlas Performing
Arts Center
1333 H St NE
www.mosaictheater.org
Regular Schedule:
Tuesday–Friday at 8
Saturday at 6 & 9
Sunday at 3 & 7
This record-breaking interactive solve-the-crime comedy
keeps the audiences laughing as they try to outwit the
suspects and catch the killer. New clues and up to the
minute improvisation deliver “shrieks of laughter night after
night.” (Washington Post)
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Student Rush
Tickets Available
Tickets: 202-467-4600
Groups: 202-416-8400
www.shearmadness.com
$25-$65
Post-show
discussion after
Saturday & Sunday
matinee. Cast
Talkback Thursday.
Tickets
Available
at the
Box Office
Added Shows:
Mon at 8PM
Tue at 5PM
Wed at 5PM
Thu at 5PM
Great Group Rates
for 15 +
MUSIC - ORCHESTRAL
Noseda conducts
Brahms's
Fourth Symphony
Tomorrow at 7
Saturday at 8
In his final concerts of the season, Gianandrea Noseda
leads a program unified by J.S. Bach. The program includes
Berio's take on Bach's unfinished Contrapunctus XIX, plus two
more Bach-influenced works: Berg's Violin Concerto featuring
James Ehnes and Brahms's Symphony No. 4.
Kennedy Center
Concert Hall
nationalsymphony.org
or call (202) 467-4600
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
AfterWords post-performance discussion immediately
following the Thu., May 17 performance.
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
applause always sounds better when it roars.
Advertise in The Guide to the Lively
l Arts!
202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
16-2898
C6
EZ
Bon Jovi
still elicits
plenty of
‘whoas’
BON JOVI FROM C1
hops, jumps and wide-armed
claps. During “Raise Your Hands,”
he delivered what could have
passed for a jazz-hands routine.
As a good aerobics instructor
would, before the night’s first
massive all-hands singalong on
“You Give Love a Bad Name,” Bon
Jovi guilted those in their seats
into standing and dancing. He
also goaded the band’s two current guitarists, Phil X and John
Shanks, into the night’s first
shredding duel. Neither newish
guy made the fans forget Richie
Sambora, a beloved if rehabfriendly ax wielder who left the
band in 2013, apparently tortured
by three decades of playing second fiddle to the enviably content
lead singer.
Strangely enough, given the
stated reason for the tour, Bon
Jovi didn’t play “Runaway,” the
1983 single that launched its perennial rock stardom. But pretty
much every other nugget made
the set list. “It’s My Life” and “Bad
Medicine” had all in attendance
screaming along to choruses that,
like all the best Bon Jovi refrains,
were mindless and meaningless
— “I just wanna live while I’m
alive”? What the heck does that
mean? — and totally impossible
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
not to shout out loud. “Roller
Coaster,” the only other new song
thrown into the two-hour show,
and 1988’s “I’ll Be There for You”
both left the room filled with
mass croonings of “whoa oh oh!,”
the same way “Born to Be My
Baby” inspired roof-raising “na
na na na na” chants. During
another motivational pop gem,
“Keep the Faith,” the lead singer
left the stage and let the two
guitarists go on another extended
shredding shootout, which mostly served to make everybody miss
Sambora all over again.
The night also had a reminder
of that time Bon Jovi scared his
stonewashed
denim-attired
throngs by developing a faux
twang and threatening to go fullbore country: He performed
“Who Says You Can’t Go Home,” a
2005 tune he recorded alongside
Sugarland’s Jennifer Nettles that
KYLE GUSTAFSON FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Singer Jon Bon Jovi, drummer Tico Torres and the rest of the
Jersey band rolled out Bon Jovi’s hits of the past 35 years.
hit No. 1 on the country charts
(and also made the Top 40). But,
as we now know, before Bon Jovi
could make the move to tradition-
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
Sunset Boulevard (1950) presented by TCM 2:00-7:00
Breaking In (PG-13) 11:50-2:104:50-7:20-10:00
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:15- Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
2:30
3:30-6:40-10:20
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 1:50-3:30CC: 12:45-1:30-5:00-7:45-8:3010:30
9:00
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 5:50-8:2511:00
Digital 3D (PG-13) CC: 4:15
Life of the Party (PG-13) CC:
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin
2:10-4:45-7:30-9:40
IMAX Theater
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: 1:00601 Independence Avenue SW
3:40-6:20
Journey to Space 3D (NR)
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) CC: 4:3510:25-11:35-1:00-3:15
7:10-10:15
Avengers: Infinity War An
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 2:00- IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13)
4:30-7:00-9:30
3:55-9:55
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 1:45Avengers: Infinity War The
4:25-7:15-9:55
IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
Overboard (PG-13) CC: 1:556:50
4:40-7:25-10:10
Planet Power: An IMAX 3D
Disobedience (R) CC: 1:45-4:30- Experience (NR) 1:35
7:15-9:15
Pandas: An IMAX 3D ExperiAvengers: Infinity War The IMAX ence (G) 12:10-2:25
2D Experience (PG-13) CC:
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians
2:30-6:00-9:30
of the Seas 3D (2018) (NR)
RBG (PG) 1:40-4:15-6:45-9:45
11:00AM
Breaking In (PG-13) CC: 12:303:00-5:30-7:50-10:10
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
AFI Silver Theatre Cultural Ctr
12:00-3:30-7:00-10:30
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
MARYLAND
AMC Loews Uptown 1
3426 Connecticut Ave N.W.
8633 Colesville Rd
Samsara (PG-13) 9:45
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 12:20
In the Last Days of the City
CC: (!) 3:30-7:00
(Akher ayam el madina) (NR)
AMC Mazza Gallerie
4:45
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
The Death of Stalin (R) 2:30-7:15
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) You Were Never Really Here
CC: 12:00-1:10-4:30-7:00-7:50
(R) 9:30
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney Where Danger Lives (Voyage
Digital 3D (PG-13) (!) 3:30
sans retour) (NR) 3:15
Life of the Party (PG-13) CC:
Redoubtable (Godard mon
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30
amour) (Le Redoutable) (R)
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 12:40- 12:25-2:40-4:55-7:10-9:25
3:00-5:20-7:45
Western 7:15
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC:
The Starry Sky Above Me (Le ciel
12:40-5:40
étoilé au-dessus de ma tête)5:15
Overboard (PG-13) CC: 2:10Two Men in Manhattan (1958)
4:50-7:40
(NR) 5:15
Sunset Boulevard (1950) preAMC Academy 8
sented by TCM (!) 2:00-7:00
6198 Greenbelt Road
Breaking In (PG-13) CC: 12:00Avengers:
Infinity War (PG-13)
3:20-4:45-8:20
CC: (!) 2:45-4:30-6:00-8:00
Albert Einstein Planetarium - Avengers: Infinity War in
National Air and Space Museum Disney Digital 3D (PG-13) CC: (!)
6th Street and Independence Ave SW 3:30-7:00
To Space and Back 11:00AM
Life of the Party (PG-13) CC:
Dark Universe Space Show (NR) 2:15-4:45-7:15
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30 A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:00- 2:30-6:00
1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: (!)
3:00-5:20-7:45
Angelika Pop-Up
at Union Market
Overboard (PG-13) CC: 3:15550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
5:50-8:30
Breaking In (PG-13) CC: (!) 3:00A Quiet Place (PG-13) Open
5:15-7:30-8:35
Caption: 7:30
Measure of a Man (PG-13) 12:00AMC Center Park 8
3:35-5:45-7:45
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:45-1:45- Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:303:40-5:35
3:45-6:50-10:00
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
12:30-3:45-7:00
CC: 2:30-6:00-9:15
Avalon Theatre
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
5612 Connecticut Avenue
Digital 3D (PG-13) CC: 1:004:15-8:00
Tully (R) 12:15-2:45-5:15-7:45
Rampage (PG-13) CC: 4:10-9:35
Borg vs. McEnroe (R) 3:00
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 1:45Jeannette: The Childhood of
Joan of Arc (Jeannette l'enfance 4:00-6:45-9:00
Life of the Party (PG-13) CC: (!)
de Jeanne d'Arc) (NR) 8:00
2:15-4:45-7:45-10:15
Foxtrot (R) 12:30-5:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
Landmark
1:15-7:00
Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
Overboard (PG-13) CC: (!)
807 V Street, NW
12:45-6:30
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) Breaking In (PG-13) CC: (!) 2:20CC: 12:15-12:45-1:15-3:20-3:50- 4:35-7:15-9:45
4:15-6:45-7:00-7:15-9:45-10:00- Overboard (PG-13) (!) 3:45-9:30
10:15
AMC Columbia 14
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 11:3010300 Little Patuxent Parkway
1:30-3:30-5:30-7:30-9:35-9:50
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 11:45- Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
CC: (!) 11:30-3:00-6:30-8:00-10:00
2:15-4:45-7:45-10:10
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:55- Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) (!) 1:00-4:30
3:40-7:10
Rampage (PG-13) CC: 11:05-9:50
Landmark E Street Cinema
Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
555 11th Street NW
6:10-9:30
The Death of Stalin (R) CC: 3:15 Tully (R) CC: 10:55-1:35-4:10Grace Jones: Bloodlight and
6:45-9:20
Bami 1:05-4:05-7:05-9:45
Life of the Party (PG-13) CC: (!)
Racer and the Jailbird (Le fidele) 10:50-1:20-4:00-6:40-9:20
(R) 12:50-3:50-6:50-9:30
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 11:10Tully (R) CC: 1:10-3:20-5:301:40-4:15-6:50-9:35
7:40-9:50
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) CC:
12:10-3:10
1:00-9:50
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) CC: 11:20Disobedience (R) CC: 1:10-4:10- 2:00-4:40-7:30-10:10
7:10-9:30
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PGLu Over the Wall (Yoake Tsugeru 13) CC: 10:55-1:45-4:25-7:00-9:40
Lu no Uta) (PG) 12:45-3:00-5:15 I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 11:10RBG (PG) CC: 12:45-1:30-3:45- 2:10-5:00-7:40-10:20
4:30-6:45-7:30-9:15-9:50
Overboard (PG-13) CC: 11:00Lu Over the Wall (Yoake Tsugeru 1:45-4:30-7:20-10:10
Lu no Uta) (PG) 7:30-9:45
Sunset Boulevard (1950) preLandmark West End Cinema sented by TCM (!) 2:00-7:00
2301 M Street NW
Avengers: Infinity War The IMAX
You Were Never Really Here (R) 2D Experience (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:00-2:30-6:00-9:30
CC: 4:30
Claire's Camera (La caméra de Breaking In (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:50Claire) (Keul-le-eo-ui ka-me-la) 2:35-5:10-7:45-10:15
(NR) 1:15-3:30-5:45-8:00
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) (!)
The Judge 1:00-2:45
12:00-3:30-7:00-10:30
Beirut (R) CC: 7:15
AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18
Bullitt (1968) (PG) 1:30-4:30-7:30
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
Medal of Honor Theater - NMMC Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
CC: 11:30-6:30
The Magic of Flight (NR) 4:00
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the Digital 3D (PG-13) CC: 3:00-10:00
Seas 2D 11:00-2:00
Life of the Party (PG-13) CC:
We, the Marines (NR) 10:0011:00-1:40-4:15-7:00-9:40
12:00-1:00-3:00
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 1:50Regal Gallery Place Stadium 14 4:30-6:50-9:20
Overboard (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:10701 Seventh St Northwest
Black Panther (PG-13) 2:15-5:15- 2:00-5:00-7:40-10:20
Avengers: Infinity War The IMAX
8:10-11:15
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney 2D Experience (PG-13) CC: (!)
12:30-4:00-7:30-10:50
Digital 3D (PG-13) 12:40-4:00Breaking In (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:157:30-11:00
1:00-3:20-5:45-8:00-10:30
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
AMC Loews
11:00-11:30-12:00-1:10-3:00St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
4:40-5:15-6:30-7:00-8:10-8:3011115 Mall Circle
9:30-10:00
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
Rampage (PG-13) 11:00-2:20
Life of the Party (PG-13) 12:25- 6:45-10:00
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
2:55-5:25-8:00-10:35
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:15-1:30- CC: 10:00-12:00-3:30-7:00-10:15
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
3:45-6:00-8:15-10:30
Digital 3D (PG-13) CC: 11:00A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 2:252:30-6:00-9:30
5:05-7:55
Rampage (PG-13) CC: 11:15Bad Samaritan (R) 10:35
Overboard (PG-13) 12:05-2:45- 2:00-4:45-7:30-10:30
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 11:455:35-8:10-10:45
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:40AM
2:15-4:45-7:15-9:45
al country, Nashville stars decided they’d rather sound more like
vintage Bon Jovi than traditional
country icons.
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
Life of the Party (PG-13) CC: (!)
10:15-1:30-4:00-6:30-9:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
10:30-1:15-4:00
Overboard (PG-13) CC: 10:151:00-3:45-6:30-9:15
Breaking In (PG-13) CC: (!) 9:4511:30-1:00-2:00-3:30-4:30-6:007:00-8:15-9:30-10:30
AMC Magic Johnson
Capital Ctr 12
800 Shoppers Way
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
1:15-6:50
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) CC:
11:45-12:15-3:00-6:15-6:45-9:30
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) CC: 11:15-2:303:30-5:45-9:00-10:00
Rampage (PG-13) CC: 11:35-2:255:00-7:45-10:20
Life of the Party (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:30-2:20-4:50-7:20-9:50
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: 11:202:05-4:45-7:25-10:05
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 12:503:15-5:30-7:50-10:10
Traffik (R) CC: 11:40-2:15-4:407:00-9:20
Avengers: Infinity War The IMAX
2D Experience (PG-13) CC: 12:454:00-7:15
Breaking In (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:0011:50-12:30-2:00-2:45-4:15-5:156:30-7:30-8:45-9:45
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG13) 4:25-10:15
ArcLight Bethesda
7101 Democracy Boulevard
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:45-4:35
Rampage (PG-13) 3:00
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
2:00-8:30
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 5:15
Ready Player One (PG-13) 11:252:45-5:25
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 2:50
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 2:20-4:456:55-9:05-10:15
Life of the Party (PG-13) 11:502:25-4:55-7:25-8:20-9:50-10:30
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:35-2:104:40-7:10-9:35
Tully (R) 11:20-12:40-2:55-5:057:35-8:10-9:55
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:255:40
Overboard (PG-13) 11:40-2:154:50-7:20-10:00
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
1:15-4:30-7:45
Chappaquiddick (PG-13) CC:
12:20-4:25
Breaking In (PG-13) 11:55-2:055:30-7:40-9:40
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
11:30-12:00-12:45-1:45-2:303:15-4:00-5:00-5:45-6:30-7:007:15-7:30-8:15-9:00-9:45-10:25
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
12:00-3:30-7:00-10:20
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:452:20
Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero
(PG) 12:15-2:30
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:00-1:203:55-6:10-8:25-10:45
Super Troopers 2 (R) 5:10-7:4010:10
Overboard (PG-13) 11:20-2:004:40-7:20-10:00
Breaking In (PG-13) 11:15-1:303:45-4:50-6:00-7:10-8:15-9:2510:30
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
11:10-11:30-12:30-12:50-1:302:40-3:00-4:00-4:20-5:00-6:106:30-7:30-7:50-8:45-9:30-9:50
Bow Tie Harbour 9
2474 Solomons Island Road
Blockers (R) 11:30-2:10-5:007:30-10:20
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 1:00-9:20
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:303:30-6:30-9:40
Bad Samaritan (R) 2:20-4:5010:05
Disobedience (R) 10:30-1:104:00-6:50-9:30
Chappaquiddick (PG-13) 10:203:40-6:40
Tully (R) 10:00-12:20-2:50-5:107:40-10:10
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:00-1:404:20-7:00-10:00
RBG (PG) 11:20-2:00-4:30-7:109:50
Life of the Party (PG-13) 10:5011:50-1:20-3:50-6:20-7:20-9:00
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
XD: 12:15-7:10-10:30; 12:40-2:304:15-7:45-9:30
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 11:00-1:156:00-8:20
Blockers (R) 11:05-1:50
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:103:25-6:45-10:00
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) XD: 3:45
Rampage (PG-13) 3:30-6:10-8:50
Ready Player One (PG-13)
11:45AM
Tully (R) 11:30-2:00-4:25-7:009:45
Life of the Party (PG-13) 11:302:10-4:45-7:35-10:20
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 10:55AM
Mahanati (Telugu) (NR) 10:552:45-6:35-10:25
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG13) 11:05-1:35-4:05-6:35-9:15
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:40-3:105:35-8:00-10:30
Naa Peru Surya Naa Illu India
(NR) 4:30-8:30
Super Troopers 2 (R) 11:40-2:105:00-7:35-10:10
Raazi (NR) 11:25-3:00-6:45-10:20
Bad Samaritan (R) 11:30-2:155:00-7:45-10:30
Overboard (PG-13) 11:00-1:454:40-7:35-10:30
Traffik (R) 11:15-1:45-4:206:50-9:20
Sunset Boulevard (1950) presented by TCM 2:00-7:00
Breaking In (PG-13) 1:35-4:006:30-9:00
102 Not Out (PG) 11:15-2:00-4:357:20-10:05
Mehbooba (Telugu) 11:10-2:406:15-9:40
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
11:35-12:40-1:45-2:30-3:054:15-4:50-5:25-6:35-7:45-9:009:30-10:05
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 11:00-6:00
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) 10:00
Breaking In (PG-13) 10:55-12:303:00-5:20-7:45-10:15
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:203:00-6:00
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 12:00-2:30
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 1:00-3:205:40-8:00-10:20
Mahanati (Telugu) (NR) 12:003:35-7:10-10:40
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 5:00-7:5010:30
Naa Peru Surya Naa Illu India
(NR) 1:00-5:00-9:00
Hoyt's West Nursery Cinema 14 Bad Samaritan (R) 9:00
Overboard (PG-13) 1:10-4:001591 West Nursery Road
6:45-9:40
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
Sunset Boulevard (1950) pre12:50-4:00-7:00-9:55
by TCM 2:00-7:00
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) sented
CC: 11:00-11:50-12:40-1:30-2:30- Breaking In (PG-13) 1:15-3:353:20-4:10-5:00-6:05-6:55-7:45- 5:55-8:15-10:35
Regal Hyattsville Royale
8:35-9:25-10:10
Stadium 14
Life of the Party (PG-13) CC:
6505 America Blvd.
11:30-2:00-4:35-7:05-9:35
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 11:55- Black Panther (PG-13) 1:05-4:107:15-10:20
2:15-4:30-7:20-9:40
Super Troopers 2 (R) CC: 12:30- Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
12:00-12:45-2:45-3:20-3:352:55-5:20-7:55-10:20
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 11:05- 4:05-6:05-6:40-6:55-7:25-9:3010:00-10:45
1:40-4:15-6:50-9:30
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) CC: Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 12:15-12:3011:15-2:00-4:45-7:30-10:15
3:50-7:10-10:15-10:30
Bad Samaritan (R) CC: 11:40Rampage (PG-13) 1:30-4:152:10-4:40-7:25-10:05
7:00-9:45
Overboard (PG-13) CC: 11:00Life of the Party (PG-13) 1:351:35-4:10-6:45-9:20
Breaking In (PG-13) CC: 11:20- 4:20-7:05-9:50
12:20-1:40-2:40-3:55-4:55-6:35- Blumhouse's Truth or Dare
(PG-13) 10:35
7:35-9:00-10:00
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:05Landmark
1:50-4:35-7:25
Bethesda Row Cinema
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:10-2:357235 Woodmont Avenue
5:15-7:35-10:05
The Rider (R) CC: 1:50-4:45Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 12:10-2:507:30-10:00
5:20-7:55
Let the Sunshine In (Un Beau
Soleil Intérieur) 1:00-3:40-7:40- Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R)
2:25-7:45
9:55
RBG (PG) CC: 12:50-1:30-3:10- Traffik (R) 12:00-5:15-10:35
Bad
Samaritan (R) 10:25
4:00-5:30-6:50-7:50-9:00-10:05
Overboard (PG-13) 1:00-6:45The Death of Stalin (R) CC:
9:30;
4:00
1:40-4:10-7:10
Breaking In (PG-13) 12:00-2:40Beirut (R) CC: 1:20-4:20-7:205:15-7:45-10:15
9:50
Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) CC: 3:5014716 Baltimore Avenue
6:40-9:40
Disobedience (R) CC: 1:10-2:00- Black Panther (PG-13) 11:20-5:40
4:30-7:00-9:00-9:40
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
11:30-12:00-1:15-1:55-3:00-3:50Old Greenbelt Theatre
4:50-5:30-6:45-7:30-8:35-9:15
129 Centerway
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Borg vs. McEnroe (R) 8:00
Digital 3D (PG-13) 12:30-4:15Finding Your Feet (PG-13)
8:00-10:20
2:30-5:15
Rampage (PG-13) 3:40-9:25
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
Life of the Party (PG-13) 11:203899 Branch Ave
2:00-4:40-7:20-10:05
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:40-2:1011:45-1:00-3:15-4:30-7:00-8:30 4:30-7:10-9:35
Traffik (R) 5:30-8:45
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:40-7:00
Breaking In (PG-13) 12:45-1:50- Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R)
3:00-4:05-5:20-6:20-7:30-8:40
2:20-8:45
Rampage (PG-13) 12:20-2:55
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 1:00-6:30
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG- Bad Samaritan (R) 4:25-9:50
13) 12:30-3:05-5:25-8:05
Overboard (PG-13) 12:10-3:106:15-9:00
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
Breaking In (PG-13) 11:50-2:3015200 Major Lansdale Blvd
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) 5:00-7:40-10:15
Regal Rockville Ctr Stadium 13
1:00-1:40-2:20-3:20-5:00-5:40199 East Montgomery Ave
6:40-7:50-8:20-9:00-10:00
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney Black Panther (PG-13) 12:55Digital 3D (PG-13) 2:50-4:304:00-7:10
6:10-9:30
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
Rampage (PG-13) 4:20-10:00
12:00-12:40-1:40-3:30-4:10-5:10Tully (R) 2:30-5:00-7:45-10:15
7:00-7:40-8:10-8:40-9:45
Life of the Party (PG-13) 2:10Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
4:50-7:30-10:10
Digital 3D (PG-13) 1:10-2:00Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG- 4:40-5:30-9:00
13) 5:10-7:40-10:10
Tully (R) 12:15-2:50-5:15-7:50A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:00-3:55 10:30
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 2:45-5:20- Life of the Party (PG-13) 1:158:00-10:20
4:00-6:40-9:20
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 6:45-9:35
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 10:10
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) 1:00- I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 5:10-10:15
4:00-7:00-10:00
Bad Samaritan (R) 1:00-3:40Traffik (R) 1:30-4:10-6:45-9:20
6:20-9:15
Bad Samaritan (R) 2:00
Overboard (PG-13) 6:55
Sunset Boulevard (1950) preSunset Boulevard (1950) presented by TCM 2:00-7:00
sented by TCM 2:00-7:00
Breaking In (PG-13) 2:00-4:30- Breaking In (PG-13) 12:30-2:507:00-9:30
4:25-7:50-10:10
Overboard (PG-13) 1:00-4:00Regal Cinemas Majestic
10:20
Stadium 20 & IMAX
900 Ellsworth Dr
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:10-1:304:25-7:40-11:00
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
12:30-1:00-3:55-4:10-4:40-5:107:35-7:50-8:20-8:50-11:10
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 12:15-12:454:25-8:05-11:00
Rampage (PG-13) 1:40-4:307:20-10:00
Ready Player One (PG-13) 12:303:55-7:10-10:30
Tully (R) 12:30-3:05-5:40-8:1510:45
Life of the Party (PG-13) 12:002:35-5:10-7:45-10:20
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:154:05-6:55
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare
(PG-13) 10:10
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:50-3:105:45-8:15-10:50
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 1:50-4:407:20
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 12:35-3:256:15-9:05
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R)
5:10-10:50
Bad Samaritan (R) 9:45
Traffik (R) 12:10-2:40-8:10
Overboard (PG-13) 1:35-4:307:25-10:25
Avengers: Infinity War An
IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13)
12:00-6:40
Avengers: Infinity War The
IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
3:20-10:00
Breaking In (PG-13) 12:00-12:202:35-3:00-4:55-5:20-7:25-7:509:55-10:20
Nothing to Lose (Nada a Perder
- Contra Tudo. Por Todos.) (PG)
12:30-3:45-7:00-10:15
Regal Waugh Chapel
Stadium 12 & IMAX
1419 South Main Chapel Way
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:253:30-6:40-9:45
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
12:40-2:45-4:05-6:30-7:309:25-9:55
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 1:10-4:356:00-8:00
Rampage (PG-13) 6:50-9:30
Tully (R) 12:00-2:25-4:50-7:209:50
Life of the Party (PG-13) 1:204:10-7:15-10:00
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:55-3:205:45-8:10-10:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:00-3:50
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 1:30-4:15
Overboard (PG-13) 12:05-2:005:00-7:40-10:20
Avengers: Infinity War An
IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13)
12:15-7:00
Avengers: Infinity War The
IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
3:35-10:20
Breaking In (PG-13) 12:30-2:555:20-7:45-10:10
Regal Westview
Stadium 16 & IMAX
5243 Buckeystown Pike
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:052:50-10:30
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
11:00-11:30-12:00-1:30-3:003:30-5:00-6:00-6:30-7:00-8:3010:00-10:30
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 1:00-2:304:30-8:00-9:30
Rampage (PG-13) 11:40-2:405:20-8:20-11:00
Tully (R) 12:20-2:55-5:30-8:15Regal Germantown Stadium 14 10:50
20000 Century Blvd
Life of the Party (PG-13) 11:202:10-4:50-7:40-10:20
Black Panther (PG-13) 9:30
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:503:20-6:10
12:10-12:30-1:15-1:30-3:30A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:10-3:103:50-4:50-6:50-7:10-8:25-8:405:40-8:10-10:40
10:10-10:25
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 12:40-3:507:10-10:15
Digital 3D (PG-13) 12:45-4:05Bad Samaritan (R) 9:00
5:05-7:25-10:40
Life of the Party (PG-13) 12:00- Overboard (PG-13) 12:15-3:406:40-9:50
2:40-5:15-7:50-10:30
I Can Only Imagine (PG) 1:104:10-7:20-10:10
Avengers: Infinity War An
IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13)
4:00-11:00
Avengers: Infinity War The
IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
12:30-7:30
Breaking In (PG-13) 11:10-1:404:20-6:50-9:20
Suicide: The Ripple Effect 7:30
Breaking In (PG-13) CC: (!)
12:05-1:30-2:30-4:00-5:00-6:407:40-9:00-10:00
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
12:00-3:30-7:00-10:45
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG13) 7:40-10:10
. WEDNESDAY,
There were no such hints, however, of the political forays Bon
Jovi has made in recent years. The
pal of former president Barack
Obama did several shows for Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign in 2016. But playing in a
building that is only a severalminute walk from the White
House, the frontman made zero
political comments and gave a
performance with nothing remotely partisan. However, another recent election went more
his way: Bon Jovi was voted into
the latest class of the Rock and
Roll Hall of Fame. And the Capital
One show, like his induction concert in Cleveland last month, climaxed with everybody in earshot
screaming along to every word of
“Livin’ on a Prayer” as if they had
no choice. Yeah, you could say it
was a hair-raising experience.
style@washpost.com
Wednesday, May 16, 2018
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Regal Countryside Stadium 20
National Theatre Live: Macbeth
45980 Regal Plaza
(NR) 2:00
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
10:00-11:30-1:25-3:15-4:55-7:00- 11:10-12:10-3:30-6:00-7:05-10:25
8:30-10:45
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 2:30-9:20
Bow Tie
Rampage (PG-13) 2:10-7:30
Reston Town Ctr 11 & BTX
Tully (R) 11:40-2:00-4:45-7:10-9:30
11940 Market Street
AMC Potomac Mills 18
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) Life of the Party (PG-13) 11:001:35-4:10-7:00-9:35
12:00-3:30-6:50-10:20
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 11:30Blockers (R) 1:50-6:55
12:05-3:05-6:05-9:05
2:05-4:40-7:15-9:50
UA Snowden Square
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) Tully (R) 2:00-4:50-7:30-10:05
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 12:00-2:35Stadium 14
CC: 12:30-1:00-3:45-4:30-7:15- Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 4:30-9:30
9161 Commerce Center Dr
Life of the Party (PG-13) 12:10- 5:05-7:35-10:05
7:45-10:45
Mahanati (Telugu) (NR) 11:252:40-5:10-7:50-10:25
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:10Avengers: Infinity War in
4:10-7:20-10:20
Disney Digital 3D (PG-13) CC: Chappaquiddick (PG-13) 1:00- 3:00-6:30-10:00
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:35-1:503:50-6:30-9:20
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) 11:30-3:00-6:30-10:15
12:00-12:30-1:00-3:20-4:20Rampage (PG-13) CC: 10:20- A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:30-2:50- 4:15-6:40-9:00
Naa Peru Surya Naa Illu India
5:40-8:10-10:30
6:40-7:10-7:40-10:00
1:05-3:55-6:50-9:25
Rampage (PG-13) 6:00-8:50
Ready Player One (PG-13) CC: I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 1:30-4:20- (NR) 1:00-4:30-8:00
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:20-4:557:10-9:50
Avengers: Infinity War in
2:40-6:15
Disney Digital 3D (PG-13)
Tully (R) CC: 11:35-2:20-4:45- Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) 10:10
Rangasthalam (NR) 11:45-3:1512:40-1:40-2:20-4:10-5:20-6:001:30-2:00-3:50-4:50-5:20-8:10- 7:05-9:35
6:45-10:15
7:40-9:00-9:40
8:40-10:30
Life of the Party (PG-13) CC:
Bharath Ane Nenu (NR) 11:15Overboard (PG-13) 1:10-7:00Ready Player One (PG-13) 9:50 11:20-1:50-4:40-7:20-9:55
2:40-6:15-9:40
10:00
Life of the Party (PG-13) 12:00- A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
Raazi (NR) 12:30-3:25-6:20-9:15
2:40-5:15-7:50-10:25
10:45-1:20
Cinema Arts Theatre
October (Hindi) (NR) 11:55-2:45A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:50- Blumhouse's Truth or Dare
9650 Main St
5:20-7:55-10:35
3:30-6:10
(PG-13) CC: 12:20-2:50-5:20Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) CC: Traffik (R) 12:45-3:10-5:45-8:10A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:207:50-10:20
10:00-1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
10:30
2:50-5:30-8:10-10:30
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC:
Tully (R) CC: 9:40-12:20-2:30-5:00- Irumbu Thirai (Irumbuthirai) (NR)
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 12:40-3:10 11:45-2:00-4:20-6:45-9:00
7:30-9:35
12:10-3:30-6:50-10:05
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 1:00-3:40- Isle of Dogs (PG-13) CC: 11:25- Lean on Pete (R) CC: 12:00-5:10
Breaking In (PG-13) 11:05-1:206:20-9:15
2:05-4:55-7:25-10:05
The Death of Stalin (R) CC: 12:15- 3:35-5:50-8:05-10:20
Bad Samaritan (R) 9:00
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 11:40- 4:30-7:10-9:20
102 Not Out (PG) 12:05-2:25-4:50Overboard (PG-13) 1:45-4:30- 2:30-5:05-8:00-10:35
Disobedience (R) CC: 9:45-12:05- 7:20-9:45
7:15-9:50
Bad Samaritan (R) 4:00-6:35- 2:35-5:05-7:40-10:00
Cake 12:40-3:20-6:10-8:50
9:15
Sunset Boulevard (1950)
Beirut (R) CC: 9:50-2:40-7:50-10:05 Mehbooba (Telugu) 11:50-2:50Traffik (R) CC: 11:55-9:30
presented by TCM 2:00-7:00
RBG (PG) CC: 9:55-12:10-2:206:05-9:05
Overboard (PG-13) CC: 10:50- 4:50-7:20-9:25
Breaking In (PG-13) 12:15Regal Dulles Town Ctr 10
1:35-4:10-7:10
2:30-4:45-7:00-9:30
After Auschwitz 10:05-2:25
21100 Dulles Town Circle
Avengers:
Infinity
War
The
Xscape Theatres Brandywine 14
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:157710 Matapeake Business Dr
1600 Village Market Blvd
CC: 10:30-2:15-6:00-9:45
3:30-6:30-9:30
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) Breaking In (PG-13) CC: 11:05- Black Panther (PG-13) 1:10Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
CC: (!) 9:00-12:30-4:05-7:30-11:00
4:10-7:05
12:00-12:45-3:15-4:15-6:45-7:30Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 3:30- 12:15-1:25-2:45-3:45-5:15-6:10Ready Player One (PG-13)
7:30-8:25-10:00-10:45
8:30-10:00-10:45
6:30-9:30
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) 4:20-7:20
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Avengers: Infinity War in
Tully (R) 12:10-2:30-5:20-7:50
12:00-3:30-7:00-10:30
Digital 3D (PG-13) 1:45-2:30Disney Digital 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) Overboard (PG-13) 9:50
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:00-2:50- 5:15-6:00-9:15
11:50-3:20
5:15-7:30
Life of the Party (PG-13) 12:00AMC Shirlington 7
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 9:40I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:45-2:20- 2:15-5:00-7:45-10:30
2772 South Randolph St.
12:40-6:00
5:10-7:45
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 2:00Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) CC: Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) Bad Samaritan (R) 11:20-1:50
4:30-7:15
CC: 1:00-4:15-4:45-7:45
11:00-2:00-5:00-7:50-10:50
Overboard (PG-13) 11:35-2:10- A Quiet Place (PG-13) 1:30-3:45Avengers: Infinity War in Disney 4:50-7:35
Rampage (PG-13) CC: 10:506:15-8:45-11:00
Digital 3D (PG-13) CC: 1:45-7:15 Life of the Party (PG-13)
1:40-4:20-7:00-9:55
Bad Samaritan (R) 10:10
Tully (R) CC: (!) 2:30-4:50-7:20
Bad Samaritan (R) CC: (!)
11:30-12:30-2:00-3:00-4:30-5:30- Overboard (PG-13) 1:00-4:00A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 1:15- 7:00-8:00
3:10-9:10
7:00-9:45
Overboard (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:10- 4:00-6:30
Breaking In (PG-13) 11:25-1:40- Breaking In (PG-13) 1:15-3:30I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 1:451:00-3:40-6:40-9:20
4:00-6:15-8:25
5:45-8:00-10:15
Traffik (R) CC: 10:30-12:50-3:30- 4:20-7:10
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
Regal Fairfax Towne Ctr 10
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) CC: 1:307:20-9:50
11:15-12:20-1:30-2:40-3:50-5:004110 West Ox Road
Life of the Party (PG-13) CC: (!) 4:10-6:45
6:00-7:10-8:10; 11:15-2:40-6:00
9:10-11:40-2:20-5:10-7:40-10:10 RBG (PG) (!) 2:00-5:00-8:00
Blockers (R) 1:30-4:15-7:20-10:10
Manassas 4 Cinemas
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
Rampage
(PG-13) 5:00-10:20
AMC Tysons Corner 16
8890 Mathis Ave.
9:50-12:50
Ready Player One (PG-13) 12:507850e Tysons Corner Center
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 10:00- Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 10:05- Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) 4:05-6:50-10:00
2:25-5:20-8:15; 1:55-4:50-7:45
12:20-2:50-5:20-8:00-10:30
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 12:05-2:401:10-4:20-7:25-10:35
Breaking In (PG-13) CC: (!) 9:30- Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) Life of the Party (PG-13) 2:155:15-7:50-10:25
4:30-6:45-9:00
12:10-3:00-5:30-8:10-10:40
CC: 10:10-10:50-1:30-2:10-4:50- A Quiet Place (PG-13) 2:00-4:00- A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:00Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) 5:35-8:20-9:00
3:50-6:40
6:00-8:00
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:00-3:00CC: (!) 11:10-2:40-6:10-6:50Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
9:40-10:20
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12 4:30-8:00-9:50
Digital 3D (PG-13) 11:30-2:50Super Troopers 2 (R) 9:20
Breaking In (PG-13) CC: 10:40- 6:20-9:40
6201 Multiplex Drive
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 12:20-2:2011:30-1:20-2:10-3:50-4:40-6:20- Rampage (PG-13) CC: 11:10Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00
5:20-7:40-10:20
7:10-9:00-10:00-11:20
Avengers:
Infinity
War
(PG-13)
1:55-4:45-7:30-10:10
Paul, Apostle of Christ (PG-13)
iPic Pike & Rose
Life of the Party (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:00-11:40-12:30-1:20-3:5011830 Grand Park Ave
10:40-12:05-1:15-2:40-4:00-5:20- 4:40-6:20-7:10-8:00-9:40-10:30 12:40-3:40-6:30-9:15
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney Bad Samaritan (R) 12:10-2:50Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) 6:35-8:00-9:15-10:45
5:30-8:10-10:50
Digital 3D (PG-13) 10:50-2:10A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
11:00-3:00-7:00-11:00
Sunset Boulevard (1950) pre3:00-5:30-8:50
10:00-1:05-4:05-6:45-9:30
Tully (R) 12:15-3:30-6:30-9:30
sented by TCM 2:00-7:00
Life
of
the
Party
(PG-13)
11:55Tully
(R)
CC:
9:55-12:20-2:55Life of the Party (PG-13) (!) 1:00Breaking In (PG-13) 12:10-2:302:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
5:25-7:50-10:15
4:15-7:30-10:30
4:50-7:10-9:30
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:30-2:30- A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 10:15- Mahanati (Telugu) (NR) 10:552:25-5:55-9:25
Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX
12:40-3:20-5:40-8:05-10:25
5:30-8:30-11:15
22875 Brambleton Plaza
Overboard (PG-13) 11:45-2:45- I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 10:25- A Quiet Place (PG-13) 10:2012:40-3:15-5:35-7:50-10:15
1:25-4:15-6:55-9:35
Blockers (R) 9:40
6:00-9:15
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
Traffik (R) 12:00-3:15-6:15-9:00 Bad Samaritan (R) 11:00-4:40- Raazi (NR) 3:05-6:10-9:15
Overboard (PG-13) 11:05-1:45- 12:30-1:15-2:45-4:00-4:45-6:159:45
Breaking In (PG-13) (!) 12:304:25-7:25-10:05
Overboard (PG-13) CC: 10:557:30-8:15-9:45
2:00-3:45-5:00-6:45-7:45-9:45Breaking In (PG-13) 11:25-2:00- Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
1:40-4:30-7:10-9:50
10:45
4:30-6:55-9:10
Sunset Boulevard (1950) preDigital 3D (PG-13) 2:00-5:30102 Not Out (PG) 11:35-2:15sented by TCM (!) 2:00-7:00
9:00
Avengers: Infinity War An IMAX 4:45-7:15-9:45
Rampage (PG-13) 1:00-3:40AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
Mehbooba (Telugu) 2:50-9:30
3D Experience (PG-13) CC:
6:20-9:15
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
Naa Peru Surya Naa Illu India
12:10-3:30-7:00-10:20
Ready Player One (PG-13)
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 1:15- Breaking In (PG-13) CC: (!) 9:40- (NR) 11:20-6:00
12:50-4:10-7:20-10:30
4:15-7:15-10:15
12:00-2:20-4:35-7:20-9:55
Rave Cinemas
Tully (R) 12:45-3:20-5:45-8:10Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme 10:40
CC: 2:30-3:30-6:00-7:00-9:1511900 Palace Way
9:30-12:50-4:10-7:40-11:00
Life of the Party (PG-13) 12:0010:15
2:40-5:15-8:00-10:40
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:20
AMC Worldgate 9
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:1013025 Worldgate Drive
Digital 3D (PG-13) CC: 1:303:50-6:30
11:25-11:45-3:10-3:30-6:15-6:45Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
4:45-8:00
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:207:25-9:40-10:15-10:50
Ready Player One (PG-13) CC: CC: 2:00-4:20-7:30
2:50-5:10-7:45-10:10
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney Avengers: Infinity War in
6:45-10:00
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 11:50-2:15Disney
Digital
3D
(PG-13)
XD:
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 1:00- Digital 3D (PG-13) CC: 2:354:40-7:10
10:50-8:30
4:45-8:00
3:15-5:30-7:45-10:00
Tully (R) 11:35-2:00-4:35-7:00- I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:40-2:20Rampage (PG-13) CC: 2:30A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
5:00-7:50-10:30
9:25
5:00-7:35
1:45-4:15
Ready Player One (PG-13) CC: Life of the Party (PG-13) 10:55- Bad Samaritan (R) 9:20
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 2:15The Miracle Season (PG) 12:101:30-4:10-7:15-9:55
4:40-7:55
5:00-7:45-10:15
1:50-4:30-7:00-9:30
Life of the Party (PG-13) CC: (!) A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:55Breaking In (PG-13) CC: 1:15Avengers: Infinity War An
2:25-4:50-7:50-10:25
2:10-5:35-8:00
3:30-5:45-8:00-10:15
IMAX
3D Experience (PG-13)
Mahanati
(Telugu)
(NR)
10:30A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 3:103:15-6:45
2:10-6:10-9:50
AMC Hoffman Center 22
5:30-7:50
Avengers: Infinity War The
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC: 2:00 Naa Peru Surya Naa Illu India
IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
(NR) 2:30-9:20
Blockers (R) CC: 1:15-4:00-6:35 I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 2:0011:45-10:15
Raazi (NR) 12:35-3:45-6:55Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 1:25- 4:35-7:10
Breaking In (PG-13) 11:4010:05
4:20-7:20-10:40
Overboard (PG-13) CC: 2:05Overboard (PG-13) 10:40-1:25- 12:40-3:00-5:20-7:40-10:00
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) 4:40-7:15
Mehbooba (Telugu) 12:10-3:104:30-7:30-10:30
CC: 12:30-1:00-4:15-4:45-7:45Breaking In (PG-13) CC: (!) 2:00Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) 6:10-9:10
8:30-9:15
5:15-7:40
XD: 10:15-1:40-2:15-5:00-5:40Regal Kingstowne
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema - 9:05
Stadium 16 & RPX
Digital 3D (PG-13) 2:45-6:30One Loudoun
RBG (PG) 10:25-1:10-4:20-7:455910 Kingstowne Towne Ctr
10:15
20575 East Hampton Plaza
10:40
Rampage (PG-13) CC: 1:45-4:40Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) Breaking In (PG-13) 12:15-2:40- Black Panther (PG-13) 12:20-3:207:35-10:20
6:10-9:30
10:10-11:50-1:25-2:00-3:50-5:455:05-7:40-10:10
Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
9:20-9:40
Mehbooba (Telugu) 11:20-6:05 12:15-3:25-6:45
12:10-3:30-6:50-10:25
Tully (R) CC: (!) 12:15-2:55-5:25- The Swimmer (1968) (NR) 7:40 Avengers: Infinity War in Disney Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13) Digital 3D (PG-13) 2:50
8:05-10:35
Digital 3D (PG-13) 10:05
11:20-3:15-7:00-10:50
Regal Ballston Common
Life of the Party (PG-13) CC:
Rampage (PG-13) 12:25-3:10Tully (R) 10:35-12:45-3:35Stadium 12
1:35-4:15-7:05-9:50
6:05-9:00
6:20-9:00
671 N. Glebe Road
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
Ready Player One (PG-13) 12:30Life
of
the
Party
(PG-13)
10:452:25-5:10
3:40-6:50-10:00
Avengers:
Infinity
War
(PG-13)
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 12:30- 1:45-4:45-8:00-10:55
(R) 1:00-3:10-5:30-7:45-10:05
Overboard (PG-13) 11:00-2:10- 12:00-1:30-2:00-3:30-4:00-5:00- Tully
3:00-5:20-7:45-10:30
5:30-7:00-8:30-9:00-10:00-10:30 Life of the Party (PG-13) 12:15-2:505:15-8:40-10:35
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) CC: 8:105:25-8:00-10:30
Avengers:
Infinity
War
in
Disney
RBG (PG) 10:20-1:05-4:10-7:2010:45
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:50-3:00Digital 3D (PG-13) 1:00-4:30I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 10:15 10:05
5:15-7:35-9:55
8:00
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) CC: Breaking In (PG-13) 12:10-2:50- Tully (R) 1:30-4:30-7:30-9:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:305:35-8:20-11:00
12:45-3:35-6:45-9:35
Life of the Party (PG-13) 1:15- 3:10-6:00
Angelika Film Center Mosaic 4:15-7:15-10:00
Bad Samaritan (R) (!) 12:05Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 12:20-2:452911 District Ave
2:45-8:15
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 12:05-2:40- 5:15-7:45
Overboard (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:40- Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 11:45I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 10:15
5:15-7:50
4:25-7:15-10:05
4:45-9:45
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 1:10-3:45- Bad Samaritan (R) 9:05
Traffik (R) CC: 1:40-4:10-6:55The Rider (R) 2:15-7:15
Overboard (PG-13) 4:50
6:15-8:45-11:00
9:30
Life of the Party (PG-13) 10:00- I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 12:20-3:15- Breaking In (PG-13) 12:15-2:30Beirut (R) CC: 2:00-4:45
12:30-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
4:50-7:15-9:35
6:00-8:50
Overboard (PG-13) (!) 5:30
Tully (R) 10:45-5:45-8:05-10:30 Bad Samaritan (R) 10:45
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Avengers: Infinity War The IMAX A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:00-2:35- Overboard (PG-13) 1:20-4:20- Digital 3D (PG-13) 2:50-6:20-9:45
2D Experience (PG-13) CC: (!)
5:05-7:35-10:00
Overboard (PG-13) 12:15-2:007:20-10:15
2:15-6:00-9:45
Disobedience (R) 11:15-2:00Sunset Boulevard (1950) pre- 7:30-10:10
Sunset Boulevard (1950) pre4:40-7:25-10:20
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
sented by TCM 2:00-7:00
sented by TCM 2:00-7:00
RBG (PG) 10:15-12:45-3:15-5:45- Breaking In (PG-13) 12:45-3:20- 12:35-1:00-1:30-2:20-3:55-4:20RBG (PG) (!) 1:45-4:30-7:10-9:40 8:15-10:40
4:50-5:50-7:10-7:40-8:10-9:10-10:30
5:45-8:15-10:40
VIRGINIA
MAY 16 , 2018
Regal Manassas
Stadium 14 & IMAX
11380 Bulloch Dr
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:504:10-7:10-10:25
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
1:20-2:40-3:20-4:40-5:20-6:408:00-9:20-10:00
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 12:00-2:006:00-8:40
Tully (R) 12:30-2:45-5:00-7:4010:15
Life of the Party (PG-13) 12:002:30-5:10-7:50-10:20
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:00-3:406:20-9:00
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:10-2:204:45-7:00-9:40
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 1:50-4:206:50
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 9:50
Bad Samaritan (R) 9:10
Overboard (PG-13) 4:30
I Can Only Imagine (PG) 1:103:50-6:30
Avengers: Infinity War An
IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13)
12:40-7:20
Avengers: Infinity War The
IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
4:00-10:40
Breaking In (PG-13) 12:15-1:153:30-5:50-8:10-10:30
Overboard (PG-13) 1:30-7:3010:10
Regal Potomac Yard Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Ave
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:153:35-6:50-9:55
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
12:00-12:35-1:10-2:20-3:203:55-4:30-6:40-7:15-7:55-9:0010:00-10:30
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 1:45-2:505:05-5:40-6:10-8:25-9:30
Rampage (PG-13) 1:40-4:257:05-9:50
Life of the Party (PG-13) 12:002:30-5:15-7:50-10:30
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:002:35-5:10-7:45
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:25-2:555:30-8:00-10:25
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 10:00
Super Troopers 2 (R) 12:20-3:005:35-8:05-10:30
Overboard (PG-13) 12:10-2:004:55-7:35-10:15
Bad Samaritan (R) 10:20
Traffik (R) 12:05-2:45-5:20-7:4510:10
Sunset Boulevard (1950) presented by TCM 2:00-7:00
Breaking In (PG-13) 12:00-2:305:00-7:30-10:00
Regal Springfield Town Ctr 12
6500 Springfield Town Ctr
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
11:20-12:20-12:50-2:50-3:506:10-6:50-7:10-7:40-9:40-10:40
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 4:20-6:4010:10-11:00
Rampage (PG-13) 11:25-2:205:10-8:00-10:50
Tully (R) 11:50-2:40-5:20-7:5010:15
Life of the Party (PG-13) 11:302:10-4:50-7:30-10:20
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:403:40
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:05-1:304:00-6:30-9:00
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 1:20-4:1010:15
Bad Samaritan (R) 11:10-4:409:50
Overboard (PG-13) 12:10-3:306:20-9:10
Traffik (R) 1:50-7:20
Breaking In (PG-13) 11:00-11:402:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
Regal Virginia Gateway
Stadium 14 & RPX
8001 Gateway Promenade Place
Black Panther (PG-13) 6:20-9:35
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
7:00; 10:30
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 12:00-3:30
Tully (R) 1:20-3:55-6:40-9:25
Life of the Party (PG-13) 12:202:15-5:10-7:55-10:40
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:553:50-6:35
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:35-3:055:35-8:05-10:50
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 12:45-3:35
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 1:25-4:257:25-10:20
Bad Samaritan (R) 9:35
Overboard (PG-13) 1:10-4:057:05-10:05
Breaking In (PG-13) 12:10-2:405:05-7:40-10:05
Avengers: Infinity War in Disney
Digital 3D (PG-13) 3:15-6:459:00-10:15
Avengers: Infinity War (PG-13)
12:15-1:00-1:30-2:00-3:45-4:305:00-5:30-7:15-8:00-8:30-10:45
Smithsonian - Airbus
IMAX Theater
14390 Air and Space Museum Pkwy
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D
(NR) 1:25
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G)
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:352:15-3:25
Avengers: Infinity War An
IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13)
4:00-10:00
Avengers: Infinity War The IMAX
2D Experience (PG-13) 7:00
Planet Power: An IMAX 3D
Experience (NR) 11:45AM
Pandas: An IMAX 3D Experience
(G) 12:35
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of
the Seas 3D (2018) (NR) 10:0011:10-2:50
University Mall Theatre
10659 Braddock Road
Sherlock Gnomes (PG) CC:
12:30-2:40-4:35
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 12:152:15-4:20
Tomb Raider (PG-13) CC:
7:30-9:50
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
12:00-2:30-4:45-7:15-9:35
I Can Only Imagine (PG) CC:
7:00-9:20
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
EZ
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
RE
PICKLES
C7
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
N-S VULNERABLE
NORTH
842
72
J97542
Q3
EAST
J97
10 8 6 5
863
K97
WEST
Q 10 6 5 3
A94
10
10 8 6 4
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH (D)
AK
KQJ3
AKQ
AJ52
The bidding:
SOUTH
WEST
NORTH
2
Pass
2
3 NT
All Pass
Opening lead — 5
EAST
Pass
C
y the Cynic says that in
today’s legal system,
an accused person is innocent until proven guilty — or
maybe guilty until proven
wealthy. But many bridgetable crimes are undeniable.
At 3NT (not North-South’s
best contract), South
took the king of spades,
unblocked his high diamonds
and tried to reach dummy
by leading a low club to the
queen. When East won,
dummy was seriously dead.
East then returned a spade,
and when West got in with
the ace of hearts, he cashed
three spades for down one.
Did South engage in any
criminal activity?
South misplayed. After he
takes his high diamonds, he
must lead the jack of clubs. If
East wins to return a spade,
South wins and reaches
dummy with the queen of
clubs to run the diamonds.
He wins six diamond tricks,
two spades and a club.
If instead East ducks the
jack of clubs, South is still
safe. He leads the king of
hearts to West’s ace, wins
the spade return and has
three diamonds, two hearts,
two spades and two clubs.
CLASSIC PEANUTS
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
LIO
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
CHARLES SCHULZ
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
Q 10 6 5 3 A 9 4
10 10 8 6 4
Your partner opens one
diamond, you respond one
spade and he bids two
hearts. The opponents pass.
What do you say?
ANSWER: As much as you
might want to pass (and
BLONDIE
that might happen to be a
winning action), partner’s
second bid is a “reverse” and
is absolutely forcing. Some
pairs agree that it is forcing
to game. Bid 2NT. In some
styles, to rebid your five-card
spade suit would be systemically correct.
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2018, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
C8
EZ
MUTTS
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
PATRICK McDONNELL
ZITS
. WEDNESDAY,
MAY 16 , 2018
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | MAY 16
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
This year you are on
life’s roller coaster
ride. Do not overreact
to the unexpected.
Situations could change
quickly, especially as you gain
new insights. If you are single,
you could meet someone very
special. Take your time getting
to know this person. If you are
attached, the two of you might
struggle over issues. The more
you understand each other,
the more gracious you can
be. Gemini encourages you to
work through your problems
by discussing your triggers.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
You might feel as if those
around you are full of
comments, slights and
general gossip. You could be
surprised by everything that
seems to be happening. The
unexpected runs riot through
your afternoon.
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
You might be surprised by
all the fussing you see at
work. Others could be acting
as though they need to take
control. Take a back seat
for now and be more of an
observer.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
You get a clear sense of
direction quickly. You also gain
a deeper understanding of a
situation. Sometimes you are
taken aback by what you see.
Pace yourself, as you have a
WEINGARTENS & CLARK lot of ground to cover. Your
imagination plays a role in
your day.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
Make it okay to feel uneasy.
When you know that
something or someone is out
of kilter, be patient. You will
gain lots of insight about what
is happening around you. You
could be wondering what is
needed to handle an ongoing
problem.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
You are likely to get exactly
what you want. Stay
levelheaded. You might want
to understand what could
happen when you deal with a
friend who can be open and
dynamic.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
Others encourage you to
take charge. You could be
distracted by an authority
figure. You find this person to
be demanding, and he or she
often crosses the line of what
is appropriate. Lighten the
mood.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
Reach out for more
information. Your sense of
humor emerges when dealing
with a child or loved one. This
person has a tendency to be
unpredictable. Your financial
involvement can become
unpredictable if dealing with a
matter involving a partner.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
One-on-one relating becomes
more important when dealing
with a money matter. Your
sense of humor comes into
play when handling the
unexpected. You will learn a
lot in the next few weeks about
the people around you.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
Defer to others, and
understand the role that anger
and frustration play in your
interactions. You will learn
to deal with sudden events
or surprises and confusing
issues.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
You might want to understand
what is happening around
you. You need to lose some of
the uptightness that you are
known for. You will feel much
better once you do. Others
could be delighted to have you
as a supporter.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
Your playfulness might be
difficult to sit on. You could
be involved in more than your
share of uproar. You might
have difficulty sorting through
what is realistic and what isn’t.
Don’t minimize the effect of
sudden changes.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
Stay centered and know what
you expect from a loved one.
A conversation between the
two of you must be done in the
morning. By the afternoon, you
could be somewhat withdrawn
and deep in thought.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2018, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C9
RE
THEATER REVIEWS
‘Soul,’ ‘Undeniable Sound’ sing praises of pop music performances of the past
BY
N ELSON P RESSLEY
So you’ve grown too old to hit
the dance floor, or maybe you just
miss the way music used to
sound. There’s still a place for
you. It’s called the theater.
Baltimore Center Stage is
winding up the wayback machine with “Soul: The Stax Musical,” which mechanically chronicles the rise and fall of the
Memphis studio through its
trademark tunes. “Respect,”
“(Sittin’ on) The Dock of the Bay,”
“I’ll Take You There” — the hits
keep coming.
So does tissue-thin dialogue
illustrating the struggle, like
“When were you going to tell
me?” and “How could you let this
happen?” In telling the true story
as quickly as possible so the show
can fit in a lot of songs, Matthew
Benjamin writes scenes that
could fit on index cards. How can
the scrappy founders afford to
get started? Can they avoid getting ripped off by the big record
companies? By the end of Act 1,
Channel
surfing
in small
ponds
NEWS FROM C1
owned by Gray Television
showed the same interview with
the same real estate agent about
a mall’s shuttered stores.
Sinclair, which boasts 192 stations, is already the nation’s
largest owner of TV stations and
is poised to grow even bigger if a
deal to acquire Tribune Media is
approved by federal regulators.
Sinclair faced widespread criticism this spring when it ordered
its many local news anchors
to read an identical script for
station promos that seemed to
echo President Trump’s slam on
mainstream news organizations
as “fake news.”
Sinclair said it wasn’t trying to
make a political point but was
merely standing up for “journalistic responsibility.” Nonetheless,
the video of dozens of Sinclair
anchors reading the same words
went viral as a vivid demonstration that “local” TV news often
isn’t always so local.
Johnstown’s TV stations provide a variation on that theme.
With Sinclair in charge of the
three news outlets, the stations
are, in essence, a single factory
producing the same product —
albeit one wrapped in different
packaging and distributed to
three different audiences.
Sinclair’s near-monopoly on
TV news in this part of Pennsylvania — its nearest commercial
competitor is CBS affiliate WTAJ, 45 miles away in
Altoona — gives it a big voice in a
relatively small place. Johnstown
is a largely blue-collar area famous for a catastrophic flood of
1889 and its once-thriving steel
mills. Health-care companies
and defense contractors are now
among the leading employers in
the surrounding mountains and
valleys. Hillary Clinton narrowly
won a majority of votes in the
city in 2016, although Trump
won overwhelmingly in surrounding
Cambria
County,
which had an estimated population of 133,054 in 2017.
W
ith its three stations, Sin-
clair plays an outsized
role in shaping the news
agenda here, particularly when it
comes to local and national politics. Any news it decides to air
can blanket the region multiple
times.
A story last month about the
release of the names of local
Catholic priests suspected of
abuse, for instance, aired on
WJAC’s 5 p.m. newscast. “I’m
expressing my sorrow and my
apologies for what has transpired in the church, and in
particular, in the Diocese of
Erie,” Bishop Lawrence Persico
said in a recorded interview.
That night, WWCP played the
same interview clip on its 10 p.m.
broadcast. WATM aired it on its
11 p.m. news.
Johnstown isn’t the only place
where channel-flippers are experiencing deja vu. As federal
regulators have eased rules restricting the number of stations a
company can own, big operators
have gobbled up more of them.
Sinclair has been at the forefront of the consolidation trend,
as Otis Redding (Ricky Fante)
sings “Try a Little Tenderness,”
the breathless cliffhanger is that
this brave but naive little studio
is on the verge. Of. Losing. Everything.
What “Soul” gets right is what
was also nailed three years ago by
the troupe’s “Marley” (another
premiere, also shepherded and
directed by recently departed
artistic director Kwame KweiArmah): The music sounds right.
The horns are tight. The rhythm
section is solid. The singers are
capable, and a notable presence
in the cast as Wilson Pickett (“In
the Midnight Hour”) and Johnnie Taylor (“Who’s Making Love”)
is the real Taylor’s son, Jon Harrison Taylor.
The costumes evolve from
pencil pants to late-1960s flares
and the platform shoes and jumbo furs Isaac Hayes (Boise
Holmes) wore during his “Shaft”
period. It’s well-produced and
energetically staged, as KweiArmah keeps the aisles busy and
even puts the irrepressible Rufus
but other big group operators
include Nexstar and Gray, which
run multiple stations in such
cities as Tallahassee, Toledo, Syracuse, N.Y., and Charlottesville
As a result, fewer stations are
producing their own news. Outlets using the same journalism as
another source in town — evident among the three Johnstown
stations analyzed by The Washington
Post,
using
data
from TVEyes.com — are on the
rise.
Critics say this means fewer
sources of independent reporting about government, civic affairs, economic development and
crime, at a time when local
newspapers — traditionally a
major source of watchdog journalism — are struggling or even
folding.
In Johnstown, the rapid recycling of stories and quick changes from station to station sometimes leads to confusion during
live shots. One reporter said she
had to present the same story
twice on two stations with no
more than 40 seconds between
her presentations. (The Sinclair
journalist and others interviewed for this story spoke on
the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized
to speak to the media.)
The fast pace, she said, sometimes leads reporters to identify
the wrong station while they’re
on the air. Otherwise, the stations offer few clues to viewers
that they’re effectively one news
operation.
Station anchors set up a story
by introducing a journalist in the
field as “our” reporter, even
though the reporter appears on
the other two stations. And there
is little public acknowledgment
of the relationship between the
three stations — not even their
websites clearly acknowledge the
connections to one another.
Still, viewers can sometimes
see one station’s brand bleed
through to the others. A story
about construction issues at a
local Veterans Affairs hospital,
for instance, aired on WATM
(which calls itself ABC 23) on the
same night it aired on WJAC
(also known as News 6). Viewers
watching the story on ABC 23
saw a union official being interviewed by a reporter holding a
microphone with the News 6
logo on it. In a recent segment
about wildfires, the Twitter handle that flashed on screen under
one reporter’s name identified
her as part of WJAC, even when
she appeared on another station.
Sinclair declined multiple requests from The Post to comment on this story. A company
spokesman, Ronn Torossian,
first asked for questions in writing, then declined to answer
them. Torossian later responded
by sending The Post a link to a
magazine interview with the
company’s chief executive.
Sinclair’s top executive has
said that consolidating local
news operations can bring “substantial” savings. “After that,
you’ve got stronger local content
producers, which will be able to
spread their content and their
resources across multiple platforms,” CEO Christopher S.
Ripley said last August during a
financial earnings call.
I
n Johnstown, Sinclair owns
WJAC directly. It also effective-
ly owns WATM, whose license
is held by Cunningham Broadcasting Corp., a Baltimore holding company controlled by members of the Smith family. The
Smiths are also Sinclair’s majority shareholders. (Cunningham
was the maiden name of the
mother of the four Smith brothers who control Sinclair.) WWCP
is licensed to a Pennsylvania
company but is managed by
in which the owner, Hank, growls
that club DJs are about to ruin
live music. It’s 1992, and the walls
of the Keegan Theatre set are
plastered with posters of vintage
rock acts that played his legendary dive.
Director Brandon McCoy creates a scruffy mood and Eason
pulls some good lines from these
die-hards, especially Hank’s lament: “I never thought pop
would be alternative, but now
that alternative is mainstream . . . .” Still, his zealous
romantic speeches about the
power of live rock get tedious,
even if you’re on his side, and
Chris Stezin gets stuck delivering
a grunting, grimacing performance. Ryan Sellers is more interesting as the young, respectful
DJ whose arguments aren’t half
bad.
Standing between these macho figures is Hank’s daughter, a
dyed-in-the-music young woman
who was raised in the bar (persuasively played by Jessie Power). Like a jukebox full of hits
BILL GEENEN
Trevon Davis, Warner Miller, Tasha Taylor, Mari Andrea Travis
and Allison Semmes in “Soul: The Stax Musical.”
Thomas ( jubilantly played by
Harrison White) in the balcony
for a session of the Funky Chicken. “Soul Man” and “Hold On, I’m
Comin’” take you home. No sur-
prises.
Hanging on to old music is
what Laura Eason explores in her
Chicago barroom drama “The
Undeniable Sound of Right Now,”
you’ve heard for decades, you can
see exactly where that’s going to
lead.
nelson.pressley@washpost.com
Soul: The Stax Musical Book by
Matthew Benjamin. Directed by
Kwame Kwei-Armah. Choreography,
Chase Brock; music supervision and
musical director, Rahn Coleman;
scenic and co-projection designer,
David Gallo; costumes, Dede Ayite;
lights, Mike Baldassari; co-projection
designer, Alex Basco Koch; sound
design, Shane Rettig and Charles
Coes. About two hours. Through June
10 at Baltimore Center Stage, 700 N.
Calvert St., Baltimore. $20-$79. 410332-0033 or centerstage.org.
The Undeniable Sound of Right
Now by Laura Eason. Directed by
Brandon McCoy. Set, Matthew J.
Keenan; lights, Katie McCreary;
costumes, Alison Samantha
Johnson; sound design, Veronica J.
Lancaster. About two hours. Through
May 27 at Keegan Theater, 1742
Church St. NW. $45. 202-265-3767
or keegantheatre.com.
age area that ranges 80 miles
from Johnstown to State College.
Janakovic, Johnstown’s mayor, describes the local stations as
“fair” in their reporting of local
issues, but he questions their
depth and breadth. “I feel like
there’s more coverage about
Johnstown by the Altoona station [WTAJ] than there is by the
Johnstown stations,” he said.
“They’re all fighting for a piece of
the market, I guess, but it seems
like [WTAJ] has more balance
toward us.”
A
STEVE RUARK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sinclair Broadcast Group’s headquarters near Baltimore. The company owns nearly 200 TV stations.
Sinclair’s nationwide reach
This map only highlights stations owned outright by Sinclair. It does not include the many stations licensed to
other operators but managed by Sinclair, as in Johnstown – a practice that has expanded the Baltimore
company’s reach.
Number of Sinclair-owned TV stations
1
2
3
5+
4
Designated market area
Seattle
Portland
Butte
Green
Bay
Minneapolis
Boise
Albany
Sioux City
Reno
Salt Lake City
Lincoln
Providence
Milwaukee
Des Moines
Springfield
Wichita
Bakersfield
St. Louis
Johnstown
Columbus
Baltimore
Fresno
Las Vegas
Portland
Buffalo
Flint
Lexington
Charleston
Norfolk
Asheville
Oklahoma
City
Little Rock
Birmingham
Macon
El Paso
Conway
Savannah
Mobile
Austin
Gainesville
San Antonio
West Palm Beach
Corpus Christi
Sources: U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission,
Nielsen, Television Bureau of Advertising, GeoCommons
Sinclair.
Critics have maintained for
years that Sinclair uses “sidecar”
companies such as Cunningham
to skirt federal limits on TV
station ownership, but the Federal Communications Commission
has blessed such arrangements.
The company has said it will
make new sidecar deals to complete its biggest acquisition yet,
its proposed $3.9 billion buyout
of Chicago-based Tribune Media.
If approved by the FCC, Sinclair would add many of Tribune’s stations to its existing
portfolio. The deal, details of
which are still in flux, could vault
Sinclair — which traditionally
operated in smaller markets like
Johnstown — into some major
metropolitan areas. It could also
give it multiple stations in some
markets, including the District,
though it has proposed placing
some stations with Cunningham
and another affiliated company
to satisfy government ownership
limits.
Across the nation, the number
of TV stations producing their
own newscasts fell to 703 last
year, the lowest figure since
the Radio Television Digital
News Association began surveying stations 10 years ago. At the
same time, the number of stations getting news from another
CHRIS ALCANTARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
Consolidation is
chewing up local news
770
Independent stations
703
369
205
Stations using
other sources
2009
2018
Source: Robert Papper,
Radio Television Digital News Association
CHRIS ALCANTARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
source — typically, a co-owned or
allied station — reached a survey
high of 369.
“There’s never been a better
time to be a corrupt politician,
because there’s no one there to
catch you,” said Carrie Biggs-Adams, a representative for the National Association of Broadcast
Employees and Technicians, a
union for TV station employees.
“It’s the same for the school
board, the city council. There’s
no substitute for having a real
reporter at city hall. And that’s
what you don’t have” when rivals
combine, she said.
Station mergers typically lead
to cuts of about 20 percent in the
news staff during the first year,
Biggs-Adams said. The job losses
are often a rationale for the
merger itself; it’s more profitable
for the station owner to reduce
staff and run a single newsroom
that feeds the same news to two
or three stations.
In Johnstown, the advent of
look-alike news came in 2002, a
decade before Sinclair came to
town, when WATM and WWCP
first combined their news staffs.
As ratings continued to fall, they
shut down their joint news operation in 2008. For some time
after that, WATM simply provided a simulcast of WJAC’s news
broadcast, while WWCP provided news programming that was
produced by WJAC, featuring
WJAC’s journalists and content.
Sinclair bought WJAC from Cox
Communications in 2013. By
2016, it had taken over management of all three stations altogether.
Sinclair’s Johnstown news
staff now numbers 25 on-air
anchors, weather forecasters and
reporters — a crew that is spread
thin in serving three stations,
multiple newscasts and a cover-
recent Emory University
study found that Sinclair
typically rolls back coverage of local politics when it buys
a station. Political scientists
Gregory J. Martin and Josh McCrain examined newscasts on
hundreds of stations and found
that Sinclair-owned stations increased their coverage of national politics by about 25 percent in
the first year after being purchased by the company and decreased local political reporting
by about 10 percent.
What’s more, the study found
that the national political reporting supplied by Sinclair to its
stations “shifts significantly
rightward,” compared with rivals. Among the “must-run” stories Sinclair has ordered its stations to air are commentaries by
Boris Epshteyn, a former Trump
campaign surrogate and briefly a
White House official. Sinclair
Chairman David D. Smith told
the New York Times in April that
the practice is not unique to
Sinclair and that “every local TV
station” is required by its owners
to run specific content.
McCrain argues that this shift
in content and tone is likely to
“increase the partisanship of
[Sinclair’s] viewers.” He added:
“This may be more pronounced
given many viewers are not
aware of Sinclair’s politics,” since
the stations are not as heavily
identified with an ideology as
national broadcasters such as
Fox and MSNBC.
Sinclair has aggressively rebutted the notion that its news
coverage is skewed toward the
right. Its top news executive,
Scott Livingston, has said that
“our local stations keep our audiences’ trust by staying focused on
fact-based reporting and clearly
identifying commentary.”
Sinclair’s journalists in Johnstown say they strive to be impartial, and none said they are
pressured by managers to tilt
their coverage politically. Both
Janakovic and Chip Minemyer,
the editor of the local TribuneDemocrat newspaper, agree.
“I’ve never really seen them
slanting one way or the other,”
Minemyer said.
Several Sinclair employees in
Johnstown told The Post their
main concern wasn’t ideology,
but their workload and compensation.
A starting “multimedia journalist” — who is expected to
report, write and edit news stories — earns around $27,000 to
$28,000 at WJAC. That’s about
$3,000 more per year than the
same position at rival WTAJ,
according to one reporter. WJAC
pays overtime, too.
The reporters say viewers occasionally notice that they appear on several stations at once,
but few people seem to understand the mechanics of the common news operation.
“They say things like, ‘They
sure are keeping you busy,’ or
‘Didn’t I see you on [another
station]?’ ” a second reporter
said. “I don’t think people realize
how this works.”
paul.farhi@washpost.com
jack.gillum@washpost.com
chris.alcantara@washpost.com
C10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
MAY 16 , 2018
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
KIDSPOST.COM
TODAY
The John Newbery Medal is awarded to successful and
inspirational books written for children. “Holes” by Louis
Sachar and “The Girl Who Drank the Moon” by Kelly
Barnhill are two of the many medal winners.
Are you looking for a
new book to read? Find
reviews in our online
Readers’ Corner.
Not as hot as Tuesday, and
we’ll have clouds and possibly
some more rain.
ILLUSTRATION BY JACOB NAYLOR, 8, FULTON
She knows how it feels to be hurt by other kids
BY
H
M ARY Q UATTLEBAUM
Kelly felt that way, too, as a kid when
she read her favorite books, “Blubber” by
Judy Blume and “Very Worried Walrus” by
Richard Hefter.
“I worried about everything, just like
that walrus,” she said with a laugh. “I was
scared to climb trees. I had trouble sleeping at night.”
ave you ever felt lonely or ignored at school?
That’s how author Erin Entrada Kelly felt growing up in
Lake Charles, Louisiana. She
was bullied because of her quiet personality and race.
“Books helped,” she said. “I could connect with the characters. I also became
friends with another girl who read a lot.”
Kelly draws on her childhood feelings
and experiences to write her novels. Dealing with bullies is a big theme in her recent
books “Hello, Universe” and “You Go First.”
In “Hello, Universe,” a boy named Virgil
is tormented by a neighbor, Chet. Virgil
tries to fight back when Chet steals his
backpack with pet guinea pig Gulliver
inside, but that only puts him and his pet
in greater danger. In February, the book
won a big award in children’s literature:
the Newbery Medal.
Bullying can take different forms. In
“You Go First,” Charlotte feels confused
and shamed by Bridget, her best friend of
many years. Bridget now excludes Charlotte and gossips about her. Why doesn’t
Bridget want to be friends anymore, Charlotte wonders. Charlotte doesn’t know
what she did wrong.
Meanwhile, Charlotte’s online Scrabble
partner, Ben, is mocked at his school. He
tries to fit in, but he doesn’t know how. No
one wants to sit with him at lunch. Mean
boys smear ketchup on his shirt and beat
him up. When he decides to run for student government, they rip his posters.
PHOTOS BY KRISTEN HOLLAND
Feeling less alone
Whenever she visits schools, Kelly
meets kids who have suffered similar insults. They come up to her to talk. They
slip her notes.
“They want to share what happened to
them,” Kelly said by phone recently from
Santa Monica, California, during a tour to
promote her books. These students tell
her that her books make them feel less
alone. Kelly’s writing gives them hope that
things will change.
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1 __ media
5 Last year’s frosh
9 With 65-Across,
it has a
54-Across,
so they say
14 Bug bite
symptom
15 Indonesian boat
16 British prime
minister before
Brown
17 “Cooking
From the Hip”
chef Cat __
18 Prilosec target
19 Well-manored
men?
20 Old Glory
23 Pigs and hogs
24 Nov. voting time
25 Dead heat
28 “Don’t incriminate yourself!”
31 Platters from
the past
34 “Otello”
baritone
35 “__ and Louis”:
1956 jazz album
36 Marjoram kin
38 Like the Constitution, 27 times
41 “Unforgettable”
father or
daughter
42 Nerve cell
transmitter
43 Sci-fi extras
44 1983 Lionel
Richie #1 song
49 Guitar great
Paul
50 Bring in
51 New, to Neruda
54 Upside of
9-Across/65Across ... and,
chemically
speaking, what
each pair of circles represents
57 Storage towers
60 City on its
own lake
61 Morally
repugnant
62 Fill with delight
63 Pie containers
64 “La Dolce __”
65 See 9-Across
66 Ford
contemporary
67 Eden exile
HARPERCOLLINS
Erin Entrada Kelly’s
book tour brought her
to such places as
Austin, Texas, where
she spoke last month
with students at an
elementary school.
“They want to share
what happened to
them,” Kelly said.
Relating to Virgil
Of all her characters, Kelly feels closest
to Virgil. They share a love for guinea pigs.
Virgil picks dandelions as treats for Gulliver, just as Kelly did for her pet, Clover.
As Kelly was when she was growing up,
Virgil is gentle and sensitive. He is also
Filipino American.
Kelly’s mother is from the Philippines,
an Asian country of more than 7,000
islands in the Pacific Ocean, and her father is a white American. Kelly and her
older sister were often the only Asian kids
at their school. She was teased because of
her Asian features.
“That hurt,” Kelly said.
When she talks to groups of kids, Kelly
asks them to think about what they are
putting out in the universe, every day,
through what they say and do and create.
“One act of kindness can change someone’s life,” Kelly said. “So can one act of
cruelty.”
What’s next?
After winning the Newbery, the past
three months have been “incredible and
very busy,” Kelly said.
When she finishes this book tour, she
will return to her home outside Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and complete a novel
to be published next year.
“I’m excited,” Kelly said. “This is my first
fantasy, and it is based on Filipino folklore.”
She will then eagerly dive into her next
project. The idea is already starting to take
shape, she said. She is jotting down notes
in a journal devoted to the new novel.
Unlike many writers, Kelly doesn’t stick
to a routine. She writes when she wants to.
“Fortunately, I love to write, so that’s
what I often want to be doing,” she said.
Show us scenes of
summer, and you
could win tickets
S
pring in Washington can be
very short. So even though it’s
not technically summer, we
at KidsPost have to be ready
for summery weather as we
line up artwork for our daily forecast.
So pull out your markers or colored
pencils and show us what summer
looks like. Yes, it can be sunny and
hot, but it also can be rainy or cloudy.
Summer can remind you of the beach,
the pool or an afternoon at the park.
Use your imagination.
Bright colors work best. You can
use whatever art supplies you have,
but try to avoid leaving a lot of white
space on the page. Be sure to include
your full name, age (5 to 13) and home
town on the back of your artwork. We
also need a note from a parent, guardian or teacher giving permission for
your drawing to be used.
Pictures should be sent to KidsPost, The Washington Post, 1301 K
Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20071.
Or have an adult fill out our form at
wapo.st/kidspostweatherart and upload your artwork.
Those who submit artwork by June
6 will be eligible to win one of four
family packs of tickets to see the
musical “You’re a Good Man, Charlie
Brown” at Imagination Stage in
Bethesda on June 23. Look for your
artwork all summer in our print
section or our gallery at kidspost.com.
kidspost@washpost.com
By Jared Tamarkin
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
New grandparents, new guilt trip
© 2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
21
22
25
26
27
29
30
31
32
DOWN
Layered silicate
Tiny physics
units
Threaded
hardware
Islamic law
Guy who is out
of this world?
Killer whale
Indicate with an
index finger
Lived it up
Online
marketing
technique
YouTube journal
Musical gift
Relieved (of)
Trips around the
sun: abbr.
Gandhi’s land
Early-to-midAugust baby
El Niño feature?
Shoreline
recess
“Jeepers!”
“May __ now?”
Lady bird
From this area
Humble worker,
briefly
33 Succeeds
commercially
37 Bk. with the
ark story
38 Rocker Rose
39 Like a
particularly
dark sky after
sunset
40 The blahs
42 In imminent
danger
5/16/18
45 Opened or
closed, as a
lens aperture
46 Hairdresser’s
goop
47 Must
48 Swiss
convention city
52 Brilliantly
colored
53 Soul singer
Baker
54 Annual
Jan. speech,
in Twitter
hashtags
55 Orange
skin
56 Flashy rock
genre
57 “Wait a __!”
58 Under the
weather
59 Poet __-tzu
TUESDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
Hi, Carolyn: My
husband and I, 68
and 61, were
thrilled to become
grandparents two
years ago. We are
Carolyn
enjoying our first
Hax
years of carefully
planned
retirement in our
home on the East Coast.
The problem is our sons, who
live in two of the most expensive
real estate markets on the West
Coast, are constantly pressuring
us to move closer to them. They
are breaking my heart to pieces
by telling me, “You know you are
missing out on your grandchild’s
life.”
The thing is, I was painfully
aware of this consequence the
day they both drove away from
their home! My husband and
visit them as often as we can (not
easy on a fixed income), however,
it just never seems to be enough.
Although I am flattered they
want us closer, they have
traveled all over the country/
world, but not once to visit their
“beloved grandparents.” Are we
being selfish to not want to forgo
our retirement, return to work
and downsize/relocate to
appease our children?
— Gramma
Gramma: If they really wish you
lived closer and miss you
terribly, then that’s a beautiful
thing, but the pressure is no way
to show it (and they ought to
stop).
If they are generally fine with
things but feel guilty for not
seeing you more, or if they think
they’re doing you a favor by
reminding you often how much
you’re missed, then that’s
disingenuous or presumptuous,
respectively (and they really
ought to stop).
If they are comfortable
enough with the arrangement
that they’re unwilling to make
sacrifices of their own to see you
more but hope they can enhance
their lives of choice by
pressuring you to make sacrifices
to see them more, then that is
selfish (and they really really
ought to stop).
So there could be many
different motives behind their
pressure tactics — indeed, each
son could have a different one —
just as you have your reasons for
staying put that have nothing to
do with your emotional tie to
your grandkids.
A simple “Please stop —
moving is not realistic, so your
asking us repeatedly is salt in a
wound” is where I suggest you
start, because people with
boundaries will accept that.
“Ought to” is the phrasing of an
optimist, though, so you may
need to address everyone’s
motives to have your best chance
of being heard.
That includes, potentially,
calling out a globe-trotter son
who talks about the grandparent
time his child is missing but then
walks his walk somewhere else.
Say it not with anger or pointed
fingers but with the facts at
hand: “You say you want X, then
do Y and push us to do X for you.
Which we’re happy to as much as
we can! But there are limits, and
if you want more of us, then
you’ll need to do your part, too.”
Fearing you’re in the wrong
can stand in the way of such
matter-of-fact reckoning, so be
assured: It is not selfish to
choose a home you know and
can afford over costly and
stressful unknowns. It’s not
selfish to run your own life.
Ultimately you might have to
declare the topic off-limits (and
on-limits again, should you ever
need your sons’ help), but that
still beats their beating you
down.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
KLMNO
SPORTS
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
M2
D
STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS
Power outage
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Put away the broom
— and the doom and gloom
It’s a series now, and deep down the
reasonable people who filed into Capital
One Arena knew it was always going to
be. It’s not because the Washington
Capitals are those Washington Capitals
and they’re destined to take manageable
Barry
situations and create chaos. It’s not, as we
Svrluga
have been taught all these years, that it’s
in their DNA. It’s because the Tampa Bay
Lightning was the best team in the Eastern Conference
during the regular season. Obediently laying down and
rolling over wouldn’t be its response.
This is not dire. (Let’s not even say, “Not yet,” because
that suggests impending doom.) The Capitals spent the
past month establishing reasons this group is somehow
different from its predecessors. Sixty lousy minutes — a
4-2 loss to the Lightning in Game 3 of the Eastern
Conference finals Tuesday night — don’t change that.
(Man, it’s tempting to write “yet.” But I’m not going to
do it. I’m not. (Yet.))
“Nobody say it’s going to be easy,” said captain Alex
Ovechkin. “They’re not going to give us two wins in a
SVRLUGA CONTINUED ON D8
Boston holds court at home to take
2-0 Eastern Conference finals lead
CELTICS 107,
CAVALIERS 94
BY
K YLE H IGHTOWER
Associated Press
boston — Jaylen Brown scored 23
points, and the Boston Celtics withstood
a 42-point night by LeBron James to
beat the Cleveland Cavaliers, 107-94, on
Tuesday and take a 2-0 lead in the
Eastern Conference finals.
Terry Rozier added 18 points, while Al
Horford finished with 15 points and 10
rebounds.
Boston improved to 8-0 this postseason at TD Garden. The Celtics have
never blown a 2-0 lead in a best-of-seven
playoff series.
James added 12 assists and 10 rebounds. He scored 21 of Cleveland’s 27
points in the first quarter, tying his
playoff career high for points in a period.
His 42 points marked his fifth 40-point
game of this postseason. James had just
15 points and missed all five of his
three-point attempts in the Cavs’ Game 1
loss.
But he didn’t seem to play with the
same force after straining his neck in a
NBA CONTINUED ON D5
WESTERN CONFERENCE FINALS
Game 2: Warriors at Rockets
Today, 9 p.m., TNT
Golden State leads series, 1-0
LIGHTNING 4, CAPITALS 2:
Tampa Bay mobs center
Brayden Point after his secondperiod goal gave the Lightning a
4-1 lead. Two of Tampa Bay’s
goals came on the power play
while Washington was held
scoreless on three chances with
the man advantage.
EASTERN CONFERENCE FINALS
Game 4
Lightning at Capitals
Tomorrow, 8 p.m., NBCSN
Washington leads series, 2-1
Takeaways: Caps had issues, and
they started on special teams. D9
HIGH SCHOOLS
Wilson boys’ basketball
coach is placed on leave
as DCPS probes
possible residency
violations of players. D2
BASEBALL
An upbeat Adam Eaton
finally has some certainty
on his ankle injury — and
has hopes to return to
Nats in late June. D3
PRO BASKETBALL
The Phoenix Suns, the
worst team in the NBA
during the regular season,
get their lottery number
called for No. 1 pick. D6
Tampa Bay shows some life,
pulls within 2-1 in series
BY
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
There was a broom at the Washington Capitals’ practice
facility Tuesday morning. A group of overeager fans asked
injured center Nicklas Backstrom to sign it, hopeful for a
sweep in the Eastern Conference finals against the Tampa
Bay Lightning.
Though Washington remains in control of the series, the
Capitals’ 4-2 loss to the Lightning in Game 3 ensured this
won’t be a sweep, not that the team ever really expected the
matchup to be easy. Players anticipated a desperate Tampa
Bay team on Tuesday night at Capital One Arena after the
Lightning dropped the first two games of the series in its
home arena. Costly penalties and a leaky penalty kill just
made it a little easier for Tampa Bay to take the third game
and cut Washington’s lead in this best-of-seven series to
2-1.
“No one expected 4-0, right?” Capitals center Evgeny
Kuznetsov said. “We all know it’s going to be a tough series.
We just have to relax a little bit and stay positive. It’s still
fun.”
Though teams have a 21-0 series record when they have
CAPITALS CONTINUED ON D7
Nats-Yanks suspended, and Harper
won’t play games with N.Y. media
BY
C HELSEA J ANES
Bryce Harper knew the questions were
coming. He sensed the horde closing in
as he approached his locker Tuesday
afternoon in the clubhouse at Nationals
Park. Washington had not hosted the
Yankees since 2015. The first game of
their two-game series ended up being
suspended by rain, tied at 3 in the sixth,
and will pick up Wednesday at 5:05 p.m.
before the start of the regularly scheduled game.
Though there was no result to make
the papers, the New York papers will
definitely feature Harper.
“Come on over,” he said, motioning
with his arm as if to lasso all the New
York reporters there to ask him about his
future without explicitly asking about
where he wants to play next year. After
all, Harper’s spring training declaration
warned that he would walk out the room
if anyone asked about 2019. Tuesday, no
one brought it up — at least not explicitly.
One reporter said he heard Harper
admired Mickey Mantle and was a Yankees fan growing up. He asked if that was
true.
“I’m a National now,” he said, before
moving on to canned phrases about
NATIONALS CONTINUED ON D3
Yankees at Nationals
Today, 5 p.m.: MASN
(resumption of
suspended game)
Today, 7 p.m.: ESPN,
MASN (regularly
scheduled game)
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
MAY 16 , 2018
washingtonpost.com/sports
REDSKINS
D.C. SPORTS BOG
HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL
Kouandjio
could miss
less time
than feared
K AREEM C OPELAND
There is increased optimism for
Washington Redskins guard Arie
Kouandjio after he received a second opinion on a quadriceps injury he suffered last week.
Coach Jay Gruden said Friday
that the fear was Kouandjio’s injury would cause him to miss the
2018 season, but after the second
opinion there’s hope he could be
sidelined for a shorter period.
The NFL Network reported
Tuesday that Kouandjio will have
surgery this week to fix a partially
torn quad. The severity of the injury will be assessed during the surgery. A precise recovery period is to
be determined, but it could be several months rather than all season.
The injury is another blow to an
offensive line that has been hit
hard by injuries and is in flux.
Tackles Trent Williams and Morgan Moses are coming off surgeries, and center Chase Roullier,
who’s entering his second season,
will replace Spencer Long, who
signed with the New York Jets.
Kouandjio was expected to
compete for the starting left guard
spot after an offseason in which
the Redskins did not add anyone
at that position through free agency or the draft. Shawn Lauvao has
started the past four years, but
injuries have been a constant issue
for him. He was expected to leave
via free agency but earlier this
month signed a one-year deal to
return.
Doug Williams, the Redskins’
senior vice president of player personnel, said taking a guard in last
month’s NFL draft was considered
but the players on the team’s board
were gone by the time Washington
was ready to address the position.
The Redskins did draft Louisville
lineman Geron Christian in the
third round, but he’s expected to
stay at tackle. Veteran tackle Ty
Nsekhe is thought to be able to
slide to guard, and Tyler Catalina
and Kyle Kalis are other backup
guards on the roster. Two-time Pro
Bowl selection Brandon Scherff
starts at right guard.
Organized team activities start
June 22.
kareem.copeland@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/insider
QUOTABLE
“They’re going to win
the Stanley Cup. This
is their year. They
finally have luck.
They’re strong.”
TONY KORNHEISER,
speaking about the Capitals
on Monday’s episode of “Pardon
the Interruption” on ESPN.
(Via D.C. Sports Bog)
BY
THE WASHINGTON POST
On April 26, 1933, The Post had coverage of the previous day’s Senators-Yankees melee in which fans stormed the field.
Nats-Yanks rivalry was once fiery
BY
F REDERIC J . F ROMMER
If Sports Illustrated’s preseason
prediction proves correct, the New York
Yankees’ visit to Washington for a pair of
games this week will offer a 2018 World
Series preview.
It will also represent a return to an era
when New York and Washington were
fierce competitors, as the Yankees
battled the Senators for the American
League pennant in the 1920s and ’30s —
followed by decades of D.C. playing
doormat to baseball’s greatest franchise.
The short-lived rivalry started in 1924,
when Washington dethroned the
Yankees to win the pennant — and went
on to win the District’s only World Series
championship by defeating the New
York Giants. Nearly a decade later,
Washington claimed its last pennant in a
year when the Yankees and Senators
were such ferocious rivals that riot police
had to be called to separate the teams
(along with hundreds of angry
Washington fans) at a melee in D.C.
Like both the Nationals and Yankees
this year, the 1924 Senators entrusted
their team to a rookie skipper, 27-yearold player-manager Bucky Harris. The
Senators, also known as the Nationals,
got off to a so-so start (24-26) but then
took off and battled the Yankees in a
down-to-the-wire pennant race. As Babe
Ruth recalled in his autobiography,
“Washington got hot quicker than
almost any club I ever saw.”
The Senators went 14-6 on a seasonending road trip in front of friendly
crowds that wanted to see the Yankees
deprived of a fourth straight AL flag.
Washington finally clinched the pennant
at Fenway Park in the second-to-last game
of the season, with Red Sox fans storming
the field to celebrate their opponents’
pennant — and the Yankees’ elimination.
The Nats won the ’24 World Series in
seven games and repeated as pennant
winners the next year but lost the Series
to the Pittsburgh Pirates. Over the next
seven years, Washington took a back seat
to a pair of baseball dynasties: The
The Senators and Yankees
brought out the police in 1933.
Is a new era of clashes here?
Yankees, stacked with the “Murderers’
Row” anchored by Ruth and Lou Gehrig,
and the Philadelphia Athletics, who
featured future Hall of Famers Jimmie
Foxx, Al Simmons and Mickey Cochrane.
But in 1933 the Senators once again
challenged the defending champion
Yankees, again with a rookie leader, this
time player-manager Joe Cronin. A
turning point arrived early that season at
Griffith Stadium.
In the fourth inning of a Tuesday
afternoon game in late April, Yankees
outfielder Ben Chapman — who would
gain notoriety years later for his 1947
race-baiting of Jackie Robinson as
manager of the Philadelphia Phillies,
one of the signature scenes in the movie
“42” — spiked Senators second baseman
Buddy Myer with a hard slide. Myer
kicked Chapman in the back several
times, and Chapman responded with a
fusillade of fists. Both benches emptied
before order was restored.
Chapman and Myer were ejected, but
that’s when things really escalated —
because on his way off the field,
Chapman had to walk through the
Senators’ dugout to get to the Yankees’
clubhouse. The ornery Yankees
outfielder responded to a comment by
Washington pitcher Earl Whitehill by
punching him in the face. Hundreds of
Washington fans stormed the field from
the lower section, mostly men wearing
coats and ties, as was the custom in that
more formal era. Some fans took the
opportunity to pummel Chapman in the
face and body, prompting the Yankees to
run across the field from their dugout to
rescue their teammate — all in front of
Vice President John Nance Garner.
The police riot squad was called to the
ballpark to supplement the dozen officers
on regular duty, and the game was delayed
20 minutes. It was, as Washington Post
sports editor Shirley Povich wrote, an
“old-fashioned free-for-all.”
American League President Will
Harridge fined Chapman, Myer and
Whitehill $100 each and suspended them
for five games. Both Chapman and
Whitehill suffered cuts across the face,
but the Yankees did the only thrashing on
the field, wiping out Washington, 16-0.
The rout dropped the Senators to 6-6,
three games behind the first-place
Yankees, but it seemed to spark the
upstarts from Washington. They won
eight of their next 10 games and took off
from there, finishing with a 99-53 record.
The Nats won the pennant by seven
games over New York before losing the
World Series in a rematch to the Giants.
Things went downhill for Washington
after that. D.C. mounted just one real
pennant race over the next four decades
(in 1945, when most of the sport’s best
players were serving in World War II). In
1971, when the second Senators franchise
played its last game in Washington before
moving to Texas and leaving the city
without a team, it was the Yankees who
were here for the funereal send-off.
Washington led 7-5 with two outs in the
ninth inning, but like they did four
decades before, fans rushed the field, this
time to say goodbye, and the game went
down as a forfeit to New York, 9-0.
That’s just a bad memory now, with
the Nats firmly established in
Washington and once again taking on
the Yankees as equals, not punching
bags. Speaking of punching, let’s hope
Washington fans will be a bit more
restrained than they were 85 years ago.
sports@washpost.com
Frederic J. Frommer is the author of “You Gotta
Have Heart,” a history of Washington baseball,
from which some of this story is based, and
head of the Sports Business Practice at the
Dewey Square Group, a public affairs firm.
Hedge fund billionaire David
Tepper is completing
arrangements to purchase the
Carolina Panthers from Jerry
Richardson for about $2.2 billion
with the expectation that he
would keep the franchise in the
Charlotte area, according to
multiple people familiar with the
sale process, confirming reports.
Tepper, a minority partner in
the Pittsburgh Steelers, could be
approved by the other NFL owners
as the new Panthers owner as soon
as next week. The owners are
scheduled to meet next Tuesday
and Wednesday in Atlanta and
could vote then to ratify the deal,
which would complete the process
put in motion last year after
Richardson was accused of
workplace misconduct. Tepper
would be required to sell his share
of the Steelers.
Tepper, 60, is the founder and
president of Appaloosa
Management. He is described as
“arguably the greatest hedge fund
manager of his generation” by
Forbes, which estimates his net
worth at $11 billion.
— Mark Maske
Jesse Dougherty contributed
to this report.
Excerpted from allmetsports.com
TELEVISION AND RADIO
STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS, CONFERENCE FINALS
9 p.m.
Billionaire Tepper
poised to buy Panthers
Wilson High boys’ basketball
Coach Angelo Hernandez is on
administrative leave while D.C.
Public
Schools
investigates
whether all of his players live in
the
Northwest
Washington
school’s zone, he confirmed to The
Washington Post in a brief phone
interview last week.
Hernandez, who led the Tigers
to D.C. city and state titles this past
winter and has had recent success
with adding transfer players, said
his ban started more than three
weeks ago in mid-April but he
hasn’t received an explanation for
a potential infraction.
A person with knowledge of the
investigation, who spoke on the
condition of anonymity to describe
an ongoing process, said the inquiry is focused on at least two players’
residencies and could take about
six months to complete. Hernandez has coached at Wilson for 10
years and has been the head coach
of the boys’ team for the past four
years; he also is Wilson’s pathways
coordinator, a role in which he
helps struggling students graduate
on time. Should he be found in
violation of a rule, he could face
termination or a fine.
In response to a question about
the status of the investigation and
Hernandez, DCPS deputy press
secretary Ashlynn Profit provided
the following emailed statement
Monday: “We cannot discuss the
specifics of the personnel matter
but when issues are found or
brought to our attention, we review them and act in the best
interest of our students.”
Wilson Principal Kimberly
Martin and Athletic Director
Mitch Gore did not return multiple requests to comment.
The investigation comes a few
months after Hernandez’s team
completed a championship run
and he was named The Post’s AllMet Coach of the Year.
The Tigers went undefeated in
the D.C. Interscholastic Athletic
Association and beat Theodore
Roosevelt for the league championship. Wilson then defeated Theodore Roosevelt, Gonzaga and St.
John’s for the first D.C. State Athletic Association title in team history.
Two transfer players were consistent contributors this past season: Junior guard Jay Heath and
sophomore forward Dimingus
Stevens transferred to Wilson
from O’Connell before the year.
The Tigers also expect two highprofile transfers to bolster their
frontcourt next season. Makhi and
Makhel Mitchell, twin 6-foot-9
power forwards who orally committed to the University of Maryland for the Class of 2019, returned
to the Washington area after playing last season at national champion Montverde Academy (Fla.).
callie.caplan@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
dcsportsbog
DIG ES T
PRO FOOTBALL
C ALLIE C APLAN
SOCCER
D.C. United’s Ulises Segura is
likely to miss six to eight weeks
after spraining the medial
collateral ligament in his right
knee near the end of Tuesday’s
workouts at the RFK Stadium
training grounds. He received
medical attention for several
minutes before leaving the field
under his own power.
It’s been a tough 24 hours for
Segura, who on Monday learned
he was left off the Costa Rican
national team heading to Russia
this summer for the World Cup.
Segura, 24, has started seven of
eight matches and scored the only
goal in United’s only victory, last
month against Columbus in
Annapolis. He becomes the third
member of the central corps
sidelined by injury, joining
Russell Canouse (knee) and
Junior Moreno (hamstring).
— Steven Goff
About 50 intruders forced their
way into Sporting Lisbon’s
training center in Alcochete,
Portugal, public television RTP
reported. RTP showed images of
bloody wounds to the head of
Sporting striker Bas Dost and of a
trashed changing room. Police
detained 21 suspects, according to
Isabel Oneto, assistant secretary
of state for the interior.
HOCKEY
Finland handed the United
States its first defeat at the world
championships in a 6-2 thumping
in Herning, Denmark.
The Finns supplanted the U.S.
to top Group B and will face
Switzerland in the quarterfinals.
The Americans will play the
Czech Republic.
Canada beat Germany, 3-0, to
secure third place in Group B and
set up a matchup against Russia.
TENNIS
Denis Shapovalov pulled off
another big win, overcoming a
slow start to beat 15th-seeded
Tomas Berdych, 1-6, 6-3, 7-6 (7-5),
in the first round of the Italian
Open in Rome. The 19-year-old
beat Milos Raonic in last week’s
Madrid Open.
Also, three-time Rome
champion Maria Sharapova
defeated 16th-seeded Ashleigh
Barty, 7-5, 3-6, 6-2. . . .
Alize Cornet was cleared of a
doping charge by an independent
tribunal. The International
Tennis Federation said the
decision was made because a
doping control officer “did not
satisfy all of the requirements” in
trying to locate Cornet, 28, for
what was considered a third
missed drug test in 12 months.
GOLF
The wife of 2009 U.S. Open
champion Lucas Glover is facing
a domestic violence charge
stemming from an altercation
with Glover and his mother after
he missed the 54-hole cut at the
Players Championship in Ponte
Vedra Beach, Fla.
Krista Glover was arrested
Saturday night and taken to the
St. John’s County Jail. She was
released the next day after
posting $2,500 in bond. She faces
a May 31 court date on
misdemeanor charges of
domestic violence battery and
resisting arrest without violence.
Glover and his wife were
having a fight after Glover shot a
78 in the third round, according
to the arrest report. When his
mother, Hershey Glover, tried to
intervene, Krista Glover began
attacking her, the report said.
“Everyone is fine,” Glover wrote
on Twitter. “Regrettably, although
Krista was charged, we are
comfortable that the judicial
system is able to address what
actually happened and Krista will
be cleared in this private
matter.” . . .
Doug Ford, who won the 1957
Masters, died at 95. The PGA Tour
said Ford’s family notified the
tour that he died Monday night.
Western Conference, Game 3: Winnipeg at Vegas » NBC Sports Network
NBA PLAYOFFS, CONFERENCE FINALS
9 p.m.
Western Conference, Game 2: Golden State at Houston » TNT, WTEM (980 AM)
MLB
Noon
1 p.m.
4 p.m.
5 p.m.
7 p.m.
10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Baltimore » MASN, WTEM (980 AM)
St. Louis at Minnesota » MLB Network
Milwaukee at Arizona (joined in progress) » MLB Network
New York Yankees at Washington (completion of suspended game)
» MASN, WJFK (106.7 FM)
New York Yankees at Washington » MASN, ESPN, WJFK (106.7 FM)
Houston at Los Angeles Angels (joined in progress) »MLB Network
TENNIS
5 a.m.
6 a.m.
ATP/WTA: Italian Open, early-round play » beIN Sports
ATP/WTA: Italian Open, early-round play » Tennis Channel
SOCCER
2:30 p.m.
UEFA Europa League, final: Marseille vs. Atletico Madrid » Fox Sports 1
CYCLING
4:30 p.m.
Tour of California, Stage 4 » NBC Sports Network
VS
Tonight @ 6:30pm
MISC.
Team Penske topped
opening day at Indianapolis
Motor Speedway as Simon
Pagenaud and Helio
Castroneves paced the first
practice sessions for the
Indianapolis 500. . . .
Overall leader Simon Yates
gained three bonus seconds in
the 10th stage of the Giro
d’Italia, but teammate Esteban
Chaves dropped out of
contention. Matej Mohoric
ADVERTISEMENT
BY
Wilson
boys’ coach
on leave
amid probe
edged Nico Denz in a two-man
sprint to win the stage from
Penne to Gualdo Tadino. . . .
Toms Skujins won his third
career stage in the Tour of
California, and Egan Bernal
finished safely in the peloton to
maintain his overall lead. . . .
Romania was disqualified
from the 2019 Rugby World Cup
for fielding ineligible players in
qualifying. Russia took its place.
— From staff reports
and news services
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
M2
baseball
NATI ONALS NOTE S
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/nationals
Upbeat Eaton aiming
to return in late June
PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Members of the grounds crew cover the infield during a rain delay in the sixth inning of a Nationals game slated to finish up Wednesday.
Even before the rain, all eyes on Harper
NATIONALS FROM D1
NATIONALS ON DECK
doing what he can to help the
Nationals win games.
Another reporter asked if he
had paid attention to the Yankees’
offseason moves, most notably
the offseason trade for Giancarlo
Stanton, that left little room in
their star-studded outfield.
“Not much,” he said, before
moving on to canned phrases
about doing what he can to help
the Nationals win games.
Another asked Harper if he
still feels any affinity for the
teams he liked as a kid. Harper
said it didn’t matter, then listed a
few teams that apparently didn’t
matter a little more than the
others.
“It doesn’t matter who we’re
playing — if it’s the Yankees,
Cubs, Dodgers, Phillies, name it
— it doesn’t really matter the
team or the atmosphere. Just
trying to go in there and win
ballgames. Doesn’t really matter,
anything else.”
Then one creative reporter
asked about young Yankees outfielder Clint Frazier, who once
tweeted at Harper about joining
the Yankees years ago, suggesting
they could trade hair tips. The
reporter asked if Harper had noticed Frazier later cut off his hair
in accordance with Yankees rules
— a thinly veiled attempt to see
how much Harper had thought
about all this.
vs. New York Yankees
Today (1)
5 MASN
Today (2)
7 MASN, ESPN
vs. Los Angeles Dodgers
Friday
7:05 MASN
Saturday
7:05 MASN
Sunday
1:35 MASN
vs. San Diego Padres
Monday
7:05 MASN
Tuesday
7:05 MASN
May 23
4:05 MASN
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
or WDCH (99.1 FM)
“Not really,” Harper said. “I
don’t know what you’re trying to
ask me.”
But Harper, 25, knew exactly
what they were trying to ask him.
He refused to indulge them. The
stage was set for him to make a
statement, but five months or so
before he finally begins one of the
most talked-about free agencies
in baseball history, showing is a
safer approach than telling.
Harper didn’t make much of a
statement in the six innings the
Nationals and Yankees played before the rain came Tuesday night,
going 0 for 2 against Masahiro
Tanaka on a night when the
stands and Twitter-verse were
packed with Yankees fans buzzing about his every pregame
word.
His team entered the game
trying to make a statement of its
own. The Nationals had won 13 of
15 and are playing like a team that
can compete with the best, and
the Yankees (28-12) entered this
series as baseball’s measuring
stick.
The Nationals (24-18) also entered Tuesday night’s game
knowing a storm was coming,
perhaps more than one, that
would threaten their ability to
play nine full innings against a
team not scheduled to return
here this season. So when they
jumped out to a 3-0 lead, thanks
to RBI singles from Andrew Stevenson and Pedro Severino and a
home run from Anthony Rendon,
a race began: Play five innings, an
official game, before the rain
began.
They could not do it without
giving up their lead. The rain
began falling in the top of the
fifth, when Gio Gonzalez seemed
to slow after working out of jam
after jam.
The Yankees scored two runs
against him on Tyler Austin’s
fourth-inning homer, and another in the fifth, but he had
stranded seven runners, too. His
111th pitch ended a lengthy fifth
inning as the rain began to fall.
NEED TO RENT THE PLACE OUT?
NO
WELL, KEEP Us IN MIND
IT’s ANOTHER yEAR
Of CLARINET PRACTICE
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
Murphy update
Daniel Murphy traveled back to
West Palm Beach, Fla., to begin
playing in extended spring
training games, Manager Dave
Martinez said. Murphy spent a
couple weeks last month at the
Nationals’ facility there, where he
accumulated at-bats in games
but wasn’t a full participant in
games before returning to
Washington. This time, he’ll play
in games fully, playing in field and
running the bases.
Murphy, 33, underwent
microfracture knee surgery on his
right knee in October. He had
spent the last couple weeks with
the Nationals, continuing his
rehab with the team’s medical
and training staff eyes on him,
and made significant progress
with his running, the last obstacle
in his rehab, during Washington’s
recent West Coast road trip.
— Jorge Castillo
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
“We’re in the best-case scenario possible,” Adam Eaton said
Tuesday. “I have fixed the bone. I have fixed my knee. I feel great.”
There's a smarter way to remodel
your kitchen.
ARE YOUR TENANTS
MOVING OUT?
YES
Gonzalez allowed three runs —
two earned — on six hits and
stranded seven Yankees in five
hard-fought innings. He walked
four batters but held down the big
bats of Aaron Judge and Giancarlo Stanton.
When Judge emerged as a star
in right field last season, and
when the Yankees traded for another stationary slugger in Stanton to go with him, many believed
they had ended their pursuit of
Harper before it began.
Harper wouldn’t admit it Tuesday, but he always had admired
Mantle — chosen 34 because the
sum of the parts was Mantle’s
number 7 — and watched the
Yankees as a kid. Given his proclivity for the big stage, and the
Yankees’ proclivity for big spending, he seemed destined for the
Bronx.
Teammates joked about it
whenever the Yankees games
showed on clubhouse TVs. Other
players, like Frazier, joked about
it publicly whenever the occasion
arose. Harper knew people would
ask. He also knew he wouldn’t
have answers.
But even as the Nationals and
Yankees watched rain wash away
their evening, Harper was the
center of attention, the spectacle
within a spectacle — the man
destined to be the talk of the
town, though he didn’t say much
at all.
Adam Eaton was in remarkably
high spirits Tuesday afternoon for
someone with his left ankle in a
cast and crutches by his side. The
Washington Nationals outfielder
finally had certainty. He finally
knew why that piercing pain in
his ankle wouldn’t go away. It
came last week, when — after
three doctors, two MRI exams
and a bone scan over the past
month — arthroscopic surgery
revealed a chondral flap as the
source of his discomfort.
For most baseball players, the
news would’ve been devastating.
For Eaton, whose Nationals
career consists of 31 games in 14
months, it provided clarity and
relief. “I’m pumped,” Eaton said
while sitting at his locker in the
clubhouse.
The Nationals won’t delve into
timetables publicly, but Eaton
floated one himself: He’s hoping
to return six weeks after the
procedure, which would mean a
return in late June.
“We’re in the best-case scenario
possible,” the 29-year-old Eaton
said. “I have fixed the bone. I have
fixed my knee. I feel great. I’m so
excited that the next six weeks,
my plan, the next six weeks is to
get strong and ready. I can never
be in a better place right now, for
me, mentally and physically. I
have answers on both ends.”
The saga began more than a
year ago, when Eaton slipped
lunging for first base at Nationals
Park on April 28. He tore
his anterior cruciate ligament on
the play, effectively ending his
season, and the knee became the
focus of an arduous rehab. But
Eaton also hurt his left ankle,
though the Nationals downplayed
that damage publicly. It wasn’t
until Tuesday that Eaton
revealed, for the first time, that he
dislocated it and “shattered
everything besides the bones.”
While the knee improved over
the offseason, Eaton said his
ankle “wasn’t moving properly.”
The problem was concerning
enough for a Nationals training
staff member to visit him to
examine it. He said it then began
making some progress. He was
able to run but it remained
uncomfortable through spring
training and the early part of the
season, which he began by being
named the National League
player of the week (in the season’s
shortened first week) after going
8 for 13 in three games against the
Cincinnati Reds.
The stiffness became
unbearable pain when he ran
first-to-home in the Nationals’
home opener April 5. Eaton said
he isn’t sure exactly when it
happened — whether during his
sprint or his slide — but scar
tissue in the ankle broke up on
the play. That scar tissue was
keeping the dime-sized bone flap
down, which created a bone
bruise. Without it, the flap’s
friction created worse pain.
Eaton explained MRI scans
didn’t pick up on the problem
because it was so small and would
only flare up when he was active
— either running or walking.
The discomfort would come and
go. Sometimes he’d run without a
problem. Other times, he couldn’t
stand up. He was placed on the
disabled list six days later after
playing in eight games.
“It was going to happen one
way or another,” said Eaton, who
was moved to the 60-day disabled
list last weekend and isn’t eligible
to return until June 8. “That bone
was going to surface one way or
another. It’s just a tough draw
because I’ve had it for a year, but
with that scar tissue it protected it
and when we broke that scar
tissue up, it came to fruition with
the pain. Again, we did
everything we could.”
Eaton believes that’s all finally
behind him. He is sure they’ve
discovered and eliminated the
problems from that tumble last
April. His knee feels good. His
ankle was fixed. Now he wants to
push things. The cast was
scheduled to come off later
Tuesday, and he wants to begin
baseball activities — throwing
and hitting — within the next
week. He’ll be two weeks into his
recovery period by then. He
envisions another month before
he’s back in uniform. The thought
has him giddy.
After
Avoid the mess, time and
cost of major remodeling,
while renewing the look of your
kitchen in about 3-5 days.
YES
$500 OFF
or 12 Months
Same as Cash
Before
CLASSIFIED
Coupon must be presented
at the time of estimate.
Offer cannot be combined with
any other discounts.
KLMNO
Prepare to be impressed.™
2.1 million readers, renters included.
202.334.6200 • wahingtonpot.com/claified • Open 24/7
Or place our ad in Expre, our dail commuter read,
and reach 536,000 reader.
Source: Scarborough 2012, Release 2. Average Washington Post newspaper 7-day cumulative reach.
Schedule Your FREE In-Home Consultation Today!
202-996-3563 DC | 301-265-5719 MD
703-520-6154 VA
C054F 3x4.75
MHIC#28743 District of Columbia Basic Business License #420214000004 Virginia Class A Contractor’s License #2705152898
D4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. WEDNESDAY,
MAY 16 , 2018
Baseball
National League
EAST
W
American League
L PCT GB L10 STR
CENTRAL
W
L PCT GB L10 STR
WEST
W
L PCT GB L10 STR
Atlanta
25 16 .610
— 6-4 L-1
Pittsburgh
24 17 .585
— 7-3 W-1
Arizona
25 17 .595
— 4-6 W-1
Philadelphia
23 16 .590
1 7-3 W-1
Milwaukee
25 18 .581
— 6-4 L-1
Colorado
23 20 .535 21/2 5-5 L-1
EAST
W
L PCT GB L10 STR
CENTRAL
W
L PCT GB L10 STR
WEST
W
L PCT GB L10 STR
New York
28 12 .700
— 8-2 W-2
Cleveland
20 21 .488
— 3-7 L-2
x-Los Angeles 25 16 .610
— 6-4 W-2
Boston
28 14 .667
1 5-5 L-2
Minnesota
18 20 .474
1/
2
x-Houston
26 17 .605
— 6-4 L-1
8 3-7 L-3
7-3 W-1
Washington
24 18 .571 11/2 8-2 W-4
Chicago
22 17 .564
1 6-4 W-1
x-San Francisco 21 21 .500
Toronto
21 21 .500
Detroit
19 22 .463
1 6-4 W-3
x-Seattle
23 17 .575 11/2 5-5 W-1
New York
20 18 .526 31/2 3-7 W-1
St. Louis
22 17 .564
1 5-5 L-3
Los Angeles
16 25 .390 81/2 2-8 L-5
Tampa Bay
18 22 .450 10 4-6 W-2
Kansas City
13 29 .310 71/2 3-7 L-4
Oakland
21 21 .500 41/2 5-5 W-2
Miami
15 26 .366 10 4-6 W-1
x-Cincinnati
14 28 .333 101/2 6-4 L-1
San Diego
17 27 .386
Baltimore
13 28 .317 151/2 5-5 W-1
Chicago
10 28 .263 81/2 2-8 L-1
x-Texas
16 26 .381 91/2 4-6 L-2
4 4-6 W-2
9 5-5 W-1
x-Late game
x-Late game
NO T E S
TOD AY
CANO SUSPENDED
Interleague games
Mariners all-star 2B
Robinson Cano was
suspended 80 games for
violating baseball’s joint
drug agreement.
YANKEES AT NATIONALS, 5:05
W-L
ERA TEAM
Tanaka (R)
4-2
4.86
6-2
Gonzalez (L)
4-2
2.22
4-4
YANKEES AT NATIONALS, 7:05
MLB announced Cano’s
suspension Tuesday, a
stunning development for
the stalwart in the middle
of Seattle’s lineup and for
a club expected to
contend. Cano tested
positive for Furosemide, a
diuretic. In a statement
released through the
players’ association,
Cano said, “This
substance was given to
me by a licensed doctor
in the Dominican
Republic to treat a
medical ailment.” He said
he didn’t realize it was
banned.
PERSONNEL DEPT.
Cardinals: Placed RHP
Adam Wainwright back
on the 10-day disabled
list after he struggled with
velocity in his last start.
The 36-year-old had been
on the DL with elbow
inflammation before
returning Sunday and
lasting just 21/3 innings.
Dodgers: 3B Justin
Turner and 2B Logan
Forsythe were activated
from the DL. Turner made
his season debut after
breaking his left wrist in
spring training, and
Forsythe played for the
first time since April 14
because of right shoulder
inflammation.
Mets: OF Yoenis
Cespedes was out of the
lineup because of a
strained right hip flexor
and could be headed to
the DL. GM Sandy
Alderson said the club
would decide in the next
couple of days.
Rangers: Put 3B Adrian
Beltre on the 10-day DL
after he aggravated his
left hamstring injury.
Red Sox: RHP Carson
Smith went on the 10-day
DL a day after he
dislocated his pitching
shoulder during a
tantrum. Smith was hurt
when he threw his glove
in the dugout Monday
night after allowing a
home run.
AL leaders
Entering Tuesday’s games
BATTING
Betts, Bos ........................................ .362
Machado, Bal ................................... .350
Martinez, Bos .................................. .346
Simmons, LA ................................... .338
Lowrie, Oak ...................................... .331
Brantley, Cle .................................... .331
Gordon, Sea ..................................... .327
Castellanos, Det .............................. .326
HOME RUNS
Betts, Bos ........................................... 13
Machado, Bal ...................................... 13
Ramirez, Cle ....................................... 13
Davis, Oak ........................................... 12
Gallo, Tex ............................................ 12
Lindor, Cle ........................................... 12
Trout, LA ............................................. 12
RBI
Machado, Bal ...................................... 38
Davis, Oak ........................................... 36
Lowrie, Oak ......................................... 36
Judge, NY ............................................ 35
Martinez, Bos ..................................... 34
Upton, LA ............................................ 32
Gregorius, NY ..................................... 31
Haniger, Sea ....................................... 30
Sanchez, NY ........................................ 30
ERA
Verlander, Hou ................................ 1.21
Cole, Hou ......................................... 1.43
Morton, Hou .................................... 2.03
Severino, NY .................................... 2.14
Sale, Bos .......................................... 2.17
Kluber, Cle ....................................... 2.34
Manaea, Oak .................................... 2.35
Lopez, Chi ........................................ 2.44
SAVES
Diaz, Sea ............................................. 14
Kimbrel, Bos ....................................... 11
Chapman, NY ........................................ 9
Osuna, Tor ............................................ 9
Greene, Det ........................................... 8
Herrera, KC ........................................... 8
Kela, Tex ............................................... 8
STRIKEOUTS
Cole, Hou ............................................ 86
Sale, Bos ............................................. 78
Verlander, Hou ................................... 77
Paxton, Sea ........................................ 71
Severino, NY ....................................... 70
Morton, Hou ....................................... 62
Kluber, Cle .......................................... 61
McCullers, Hou ................................... 58
2-0
2.23
4-3
Scherzer (R)
7-1
1.69
8-1
PHILLIES AT ORIOLES, 12:05
Pivetta (R)
2-2
4.15
6-2
Cashner (R)
1-4
4.84
2-6
WHITE SOX AT PIRATES, 12:35
Santiago (L)
0-1
5.60
0-2
Taillon (R)
2-3
4.08
4-4
CARDINALS AT TWINS, 1:10
Mikolas (R)
5-0
2.51
5-2
Lynn (R)
1-3
7.34
2-5
BLUE JAYS AT METS, 1:10
Happ (L)
4-3
4.80
5-3
Wheeler (R)
2-2
5.03
3-3
Interleague scores
MONDAY'S RESULTS
No games scheduled.
TUESDAY'S RESULTS
Yankees 3, at Nationals 3, susp., rain
Phillies at Orioles, ppd., rain
at Pirates 7, White Sox 0
at Mets 12, Blue Jays 2
at Twins 4, Cardinals 1
ORIOLES-PHILLIES PPD
Tuesday’s game in
Baltimore was postponed
because of rain after a
delay that lasted more
than three hours. It has
been rescheduled for July
12. Wednesday’s game
has been moved up from
12:35 to 12:05.
Sabathia (L)
NL games
BREWERS AT DIAMONDBACKS, 3:40
GREGORY BULL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Almost perfect
Padres 4, Rockies 0
Marlins 4, Dodgers 2
Pirates 7, White Sox 0
Cubs 3, Braves 2
Tigers 9, Indians 8
Twins 4, Cardinals 1
Jordan Lyles came within five outs of the first perfect game in San Diego history before allowing a single to Trevor Story in a victory over Colorado.
Lyles retired the first 22
Rockies batters before Story’s single with one out in
the eighth landed just in
front of LF Franchy Cordero.
Los Angeles went 0 for 7
with runners in scoring position and was beaten by a
last-place team for the fifth
straight game.
Wei-Yin Chen entered
with a 10.22 ERA but threw
41/3 scoreless innings
against L.A., which had lost
four in a row to the Reds.
Pittsburgh’s Trevor Williams scattered six hits in
seven strong innings, and
Adam Frazier homered to
start a four-run first against
Chicago starter Reynaldo
Lopez. Williams struck out
six and walked none in his
longest outing this season.
Chicago threw out two
runners at home plate and
another at third base before rallying for two runs in
the ninth to stun Atlanta.
Back-to-back doubles by
Albert Almora Jr. and Addison Russell tied the game,
and Ben Zobrist’s single
put the Cubs ahead.
JaCoby Jones homered
and doubled, and Detroit
rallied against Andrew Miller during a five-run seventh inning to beat Cleveland. The Indians led 4-0
and 8-4 before the Tigers’
breakthrough seventh for
their third straight win.
Bobby Wilson hit his first
home run in more than a
year, and Jose Berrios
bounced back from four
straight rough starts as
Minnesota beat St. Louis.
Wilson, a catcher for six
teams in nine major
league seasons, hit a slider into the left field stands
for a two-run homer to cap
a three-run seventh inning.
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 2 .298
0 0 0 1 .262
0 0 0 2 .317
0 0 0 2 .219
1 0 0 2 .229
0 0 1 0 .115
0 0 0 1 .138
0 0 0 2 .148
0 0 1 0 .275
0 0 0 1 .286
0 0 0 0 .300
0 0 0 0 .171
1 0 2 13 —
SAN DIEGO
AB
Jankowski cf-rf.... 3
Hosmer 1b ........... 4
Pirela 2b............... 3
Asuaje 2b ............. 0
Cordero lf ............. 4
Reyes rf................ 3
Margot pr-cf ........ 1
Lopez c ................. 3
Villanueva 3b ....... 3
Galvis ss............... 3
Lyles p.................. 3
TOTALS
30
R
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
4
H BI BB SO AVG
2 0 1 0 .370
2 2 0 1 .270
0 0 1 1 .260
0 0 0 0 .198
0 0 0 2 .252
1 0 0 1 .143
0 0 0 0 .200
1 0 0 0 .214
2 2 0 1 .238
0 0 0 0 .232
0 0 0 1 .000
8 4 2 7 —
COLORADO ..... 000 000 000 — 0 1 0
SAN DIEGO ..... 200 002 00X — 4 8 0
LOB: Colorado 3, San Diego 4. HR: Hosmer (6), off Marquez; Villanueva (10),
off Rusin.
COLORADO
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Marquez .............. 5 6 2 2 1 5 5.15
Rusin ................... 2 2 2 2 0 2 6.27
Dunn .................... 1 0 0 0 1 0 8.71
SAN DIEGO
IP
Lyles ................. 7.1
Yates ................ 0.1
Hand ................. 1.1
H
1
0
0
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 1 10 2.53
0 0 0 1 0.71
0 0 1 2 2.45
L.A.
AB
Taylor ss..............3
Hernandez cf.......2
Pederson ph-cf....2
Turner 3b.............4
Kemp lf................4
Barnes c...............2
Grandal ph-c........2
Bellinger 1b.........4
Forsythe 2b .........4
Puig rf..................2
Wood p ................1
Muncy ph.............1
TOTALS
31
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
2
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 1 0 .234
0 0 0 1 .216
0 0 0 0 .237
1 0 0 0 .250
0 0 0 2 .306
1 0 0 0 .222
0 0 0 0 .270
1 1 0 1 .269
0 0 0 0 .160
1 1 2 1 .210
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 .232
5 2 3 5 —
MIAMI
AB
Prado 3b ..............4
Realmuto c..........4
Castro 2b.............3
Anderson rf.........4
Bour 1b................4
Maybin lf-cf.........4
Rojas ss...............3
Brinson cf............2
Rivera ph .............1
Chen p..................1
Shuck lf ...............1
TOTALS
31
R
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
4
H BI BB SO AVG
2 0 0 1 .167
3 1 0 1 .322
0 0 1 2 .284
2 1 0 0 .268
2 0 0 1 .244
1 0 0 0 .229
0 1 0 0 .255
1 0 0 1 .176
1 0 0 0 .147
0 0 0 0 .200
0 0 0 0 .232
12 3 1 6 —
L.A. .................. 000 000 101 — 2 5 1
MIAMI ............. 100 100 20X — 4 12 0
E: Forsythe (5). LOB: L.A. 6, Miami 6. 2B:
Realmuto (5), Rivera (1). HR: Puig (2),
off Guerrero; Bellinger (6), off Ziegler.
L.A.
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Wood.................... 6 9 2 1 0 5 3.35
Liberatore ......... 0.1 1 1 1 0 0 3.38
Chargois............ 0.2 2 1 1 1 1 4.80
Venditte............... 1 0 0 0 0 0 6.75
MIAMI
IP
Chen .................. 4.1
Wittgren........... 1.2
Guerrero............... 1
Barraclough ......... 1
Ziegler.................. 1
H
3
0
1
0
1
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 3 3 7.56
0 0 0 0 0.69
1 1 0 0 3.98
0 0 0 1 1.93
1 1 0 1 6.23
CHICAGO
AB
Moncada 2b.........4
Sanchez 3b..........4
Abreu 1b .............4
Delmonico lf........4
Castillo c .............4
Palka rf................3
Davidson ph ........1
Garcia cf-rf..........4
Anderson ss........3
Lopez p................1
Beck p..................1
Engel cf ...............1
TOTALS
34
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 1 .263
1 0 0 0 .295
2 0 0 2 .290
0 0 0 0 .222
1 0 0 1 .242
0 0 0 2 .260
0 0 0 1 .259
1 0 0 0 .255
1 0 0 0 .239
0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 0 .191
7 0 0 9 —
PITTSBURGH AB
Frazier 2b............4
Polanco rf............4
Marte cf ..............1
Rodriguez cf........4
Bell 1b .................4
Dickerson lf.........4
Cervelli c .............1
Diaz c...................2
Moran 3b.............2
Mercer ss ............4
Williams p...........3
Osuna ph.............1
TOTALS
34
R
2
2
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
7
H BI BB SO AVG
1 1 0 0 .231
2 1 1 1 .234
1 0 0 0 .308
1 1 0 3 .167
2 3 0 0 .258
1 0 0 0 .317
0 0 0 0 .302
1 0 0 0 .378
1 1 2 0 .292
0 0 0 1 .237
0 0 0 2 .063
0 0 0 1 .353
10 7 3 8 —
CHICAGO......... 000 000 000 — 0 7 0
PITTSBURGH .. 420 001 00X — 7 10 0
LOB: Chicago 7, Pittsburgh 8. 2B: Abreu
(9), Polanco (11), Marte (5), Bell 2 (9),
Moran (9). 3B: Rodriguez (1). HR: Frazier (3), off Lopez.
CHICAGO
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Lopez ................... 2 7 6 6 2 0 3.50
Beck .................. 3.2 0 1 1 0 3 3.94
Bummer............ 1.1 3 0 0 1 3 4.26
Volstad ................ 1 0 0 0 0 2 4.50
PITTSBURGH IP
Williams .............. 7
Crick..................... 1
Rodriguez ............ 1
H
6
1
0
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 0 6 2.72
0 0 0 1 2.61
0 0 0 2 1.72
WP: Williams (5-2); LP: Lopez (0-3). Lopez pitched to 2 batters in the 3rd. Inherited runners-scored: Beck 2-0, Bummer 1-1. HBP: Lopez (Cervelli), Beck
(Frazier). T: 3:03. A: 11,847 (38,362).
WP: Lyles (1-1); LP: Marquez (2-5); S:
Hand (12). Inherited runners-scored:
Yates 2-0, Hand 2-0. T: 2:23. A: 19,598
(42,445).
WP: Wittgren (2-0); LP: Wood (0-4); S:
Ziegler (6). Inherited runners-scored:
Chargois 1-1, Wittgren 2-0. T: 2:54. A:
6,242 (36,742).
Rays 6, Royals 5
Mets 12, Blue Jays 2
Athletics 5, Red Sox 3
Joey Wendle singled in a
run with two outs in the
ninth inning to lift Tampa
Bay past Kansas City.
Jonny Venters got two
outs for his first victory
since Sept. 27, 2012, while
with Atlanta. He had been
out since that year because of four major elbow
surgeries, including three
Tommy John operations.
Noah Syndergaard won
for the first time in five
weeks, knocking in two early runs to rouse a sluggish
New York offense in a rout.
Missing injured sluggers
Yoenis Cespedes and Todd
Frazier, the Mets broke
through after an 86-minute
rain delay at the start.
Stephen Piscotty homered in his first at-bat after
being reinstated from the
bereavement list and saluted his late mother as he
crossed home plate, helping lead Oakland past Boston in a game delayed almost two hours because of
weather. Piscotty’s third
homer of the season was
his only hit of the night.
TAMPA BAY AB
Span lf ................5
Cron dh ...............5
Wendle 2b ..........5
Duffy 3b..............3
Robertson 3b ......2
Miller 1b .............2
Hechavarria ss....4
Smith cf ..............3
Gomez rf .............1
Field rf ................1
Sucre c ................3
TOTALS
34
R
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
6
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 1 .248
2 2 0 2 .284
1 1 0 1 .284
1 0 0 0 .322
0 0 0 1 .261
1 0 2 0 .235
1 1 0 0 .268
1 1 0 2 .310
0 0 1 1 .200
1 0 0 0 .289
1 1 0 1 .238
10 6 3 9 —
KANSAS CITY AB
Merrifield dh.......5
Jay rf...................4
Perez c ................4
Moustakas 3b.....4
Escobar ss...........4
Gordon lf.............3
Dozier 1b ............4
Almonte cf..........3
Goins 2b..............4
TOTALS
35
R
0
0
0
1
0
2
2
0
0
5
H BI BB SO AVG
2 3 0 0 .290
1 0 0 0 .288
0 0 0 0 .256
2 0 0 0 .299
2 0 0 1 .240
1 1 1 1 .275
2 0 0 0 .286
0 0 0 1 .203
1 1 0 1 .245
11 5 1 4 —
TAMPA BAY ... 301 001 001 — 6 10 0
KANSAS CITY . 010 020 200 — 5 11 0
LOB: Tampa Bay 7, Kansas City 5. 2B:
Duffy (7), Miller (4), Smith (8), Moustakas (10), Dozier (1). HR: Cron (9), off
Kennedy.
TAMPA BAY IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Banda .................. 5 6 3 3 0 1 5.40
Alvarado........... 1.2 2 2 2 1 1 2.95
Romo ................ 0.2 1 0 0 0 0 4.96
Venters............. 0.2 1 0 0 0 1 1.42
Colome ................ 1 1 0 0 0 1 4.34
KANSAS CITY IP
Kennedy .............. 6
McCarthy............. 1
Hill ....................... 1
Herrera ................ 1
H
7
0
0
3
R ER BB SO ERA
5 5 3 6 4.98
0 0 0 2 3.24
0 0 0 1 3.46
1 1 0 0 1.15
WP: Venters (1-0); LP: Herrera (1-1); S:
Colome (8). Inherited runners-scored:
Romo 2-2. T: 2:53. A: 21,500 (37,903).
ERA TEAM
1-0
8.03
2-0
Koch (R)
2-1
2.43
3-2
REDS AT GIANTS, 3:45
Padres starter Jordan Lyles, shown during the seventh inning of San Diego’s 4-0 win over Colorado, retired the first 22 hitters he faced before allowing a single
to Rockies shortstop Trevor Story with one out in the eighth. Lyles, who was making his second start of the season after being promoted from the bullpen, was
pulled after surrendering just the one hit. The former Rockies right-hander finished with 10 strikeouts in 71/3 innings and lowered his ERA to 2.53.
COLORADO
AB
Dahl cf ..................4
Parra lf..................4
Arenado 3b ...........4
Gonzalez rf ...........3
Story ss ................3
Valaika 1b-2b .......2
Wolters c ..............3
Castro 2b ..............2
Blackmon ph .........0
Marquez p.............1
Cuevas ph .............1
Desmond ph-1b ....1
TOTALS
28
W-L
Woodruff (R)
TORONTO
AB
Granderson lf ......4
Donaldson 3b ......4
Urshela 3b ...........0
Smoak 1b ............3
Hernandez rf .......2
McGuire p............1
Solarte 2b............4
Pillar cf ................4
Martin c-ss..........3
Urena ss ..............3
Maile c.................1
Garcia p ...............2
Smith Jr. rf..........1
TOTALS
32
NEW YORK
AB
Nimmo lf .............5
Lagares cf............5
Cabrera 2b...........4
Guillorme 2b........1
Flores 1b..............4
Bruce rf ...............5
Mesoraco c ..........2
Reyes 3b..............5
Syndergaard p.....1
Gonzalez ph.........1
Lugo p..................1
Rosario ss ...........4
TOTALS
38
R
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
R
0
2
0
0
1
1
4
1
0
1
0
2
12
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 2 .265
1 0 0 1 .240
0 0 0 0 .500
1 0 1 1 .250
1 0 0 0 .264
1 0 0 0 1.00
1 2 0 0 .253
0 0 0 1 .300
0 0 1 1 .167
0 0 0 2 .200
0 0 0 1 .313
0 0 0 2 .000
0 0 0 1 .400
6 2 2 12 —
H BI BB SO AVG
1 1 0 1 .254
4 3 0 1 .357
1 1 0 1 .327
1 1 0 0 1.00
0 0 1 1 .215
1 0 0 0 .232
2 2 3 0 .214
1 0 0 1 .146
1 2 0 0 .111
1 0 0 0 .258
0 0 0 1 .000
3 2 0 0 .261
16 12 4 6 —
TORONTO........ 002 000 000 — 2 6 1
NEW YORK...... 010 530 03X — 12 16 0
E: Pillar (2). LOB: Tor. 6, N.Y. 7. 2B: Donaldson (7), Cabrera (13), Bruce (8), Syndergaard (2), Rosario (8). 3B: Lagares
(1). HR: Mesoraco (3), off McGuire.
TORONTO
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Garcia................ 3.2 6 6 6 3 3 6.28
Petricka................ 1 6 3 3 0 0 8.44
McGuire ............ 3.1 4 3 3 1 3 8.10
NEW YORK
IP
Syndergaard ........ 5
Lugo ..................... 3
Rhame.................. 1
H
5
1
0
R ER BB SO ERA
2 2 2 7 3.14
0 0 0 4 2.13
0 0 0 1 5.79
WP: Syndergaard (3-1); LP: Garcia (2-3).
Inherited runners-scored: Petricka 1-1,
McGuire 2-0. HBP: Syndergaard (Hernandez). T: 3:02. A: 28,967 (41,922).
OAKLAND
AB
Semien ss ...........5
Pinder lf ..............5
Lowrie 2b............4
Davis dh..............4
Chapman 3b........3
Olson 1b..............2
Canha cf..............4
Piscotty rf...........4
Lucroy c...............3
TOTALS
34
R
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
5
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 1 .271
1 0 0 1 .265
1 0 0 0 .329
1 0 0 2 .218
2 2 1 0 .237
0 0 1 0 .231
1 2 0 1 .270
1 1 0 0 .248
1 0 1 0 .295
9 5 3 5 —
BOSTON
AB
Betts rf ...............5
Benintendi cf ......5
Ramirez dh .........5
Martinez lf..........4
Bogaerts ss ........4
Moreland 1b .......3
Nunez 2b.............4
Devers 3b............4
Vazquez c............3
Holt ph................1
TOTALS
38
R
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
3
H BI BB SO AVG
0 1 0 1 .349
3 1 0 0 .266
1 0 0 0 .282
1 0 0 1 .344
2 0 0 1 .308
2 1 1 0 .330
0 0 0 1 .233
0 0 0 2 .250
0 0 0 0 .174
1 0 0 0 .328
10 3 1 6 —
OAKLAND ....... 210 000 020 — 5 9 1
BOSTON.......... 000 110 001 — 3 10 1
E: Chapman (5), Nunez (2). LOB: Oakland 6, Boston 9. 2B: Chapman (4), Canha (6), Benintendi (12), Moreland 2 (9),
Holt (8). HR: Piscotty (3), off Rodriguez;
Benintendi (3), off Mengden.
OAKLAND
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Mengden ............. 6 8 2 1 0 3 3.75
Trivino ................. 2 1 0 0 1 2 0.64
Treinen ................ 1 1 1 1 0 1 1.33
BOSTON
IP
Rodriguez ............ 5
Wright .............. 2.1
Poyner .............. 0.2
Johnson ............... 1
H
6
2
1
0
R ER BB SO ERA
3 3 0 4 4.68
2 2 3 1 7.71
0 0 0 0 2.08
0 0 0 0 6.00
WP: Mengden (3-4); LP: Rodriguez
(3-1); S: Treinen (8). Inherited runnersscored: Poyner 2-2. HBP: Rodriguez (Olson). WP: Treinen. T: 3:16. A: 34,906
(37,731).
CHICAGO
AB
Zobrist rf ............4
Bryant 3b............4
Rizzo 1b ..............3
Contreras c .........3
Baez 2b ...............4
Schwarber lf .......4
Happ lf ................0
Almora cf............3
Russell ss ...........4
Darvish p ............2
Bote ph ...............1
La Stella ph.........1
TOTALS
33
R
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
3
H BI BB SO AVG
1 1 1 1 .290
2 0 1 1 .288
0 0 1 2 .202
1 0 1 2 .274
0 0 0 3 .267
0 0 0 3 .250
0 0 0 0 .232
1 0 1 0 .299
1 1 0 2 .250
0 0 0 1 .100
0 0 0 0 .263
0 0 0 0 .308
6 2 5 15 —
ATLANTA
AB
Albies 2b.............3
Acuna lf ..............3
Freeman 1b.........3
Markakis rf .........4
Suzuki c ..............4
Inciarte cf ...........4
Bautista 3b.........3
Camargo ss.........3
Foltynewicz p .....1
Culberson ph.......1
Flaherty 3b .........1
TOTALS
30
R
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 1 1 .278
1 1 1 1 .263
0 0 1 1 .318
0 0 0 0 .337
0 0 0 0 .262
2 1 0 0 .269
0 0 0 3 .156
1 0 0 0 .200
0 0 0 1 .125
0 0 0 0 .191
0 0 0 0 .290
5 2 3 7 —
CHICAGO......... 000 100 002 — 3 6 2
ATLANTA........ 000 100 010 — 2 5 1
E: Contreras (5), Baez (9), Suzuki (4).
LOB: Chi. 8, Atl. 4. 2B: Contreras (13),
Almora (6), Russell (9). HR: Inciarte (4),
off Darvish; Acuna (4), off Edwards.
CHICAGO
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Darvish ................ 4 3 1 1 2 5 5.56
Montgomery ....... 2 1 0 0 1 0 3.86
Strop.................... 1 0 0 0 0 1 1.50
Edwards .............. 1 1 1 1 0 1 2.41
Morrow................ 1 0 0 0 0 0 1.20
ATLANTA
IP
Foltynewicz......... 5
Gohara.............. 2.1
Winkler............. 0.2
Vizcaino............... 1
H
3
0
0
3
R ER BB SO ERA
1 0 5 10 2.87
0 0 0 2 1.69
0 0 0 2 0.98
2 2 0 1 2.75
WP: Edwards (2-0); LP: Vizcaino (1-2);
S: Morrow (10). WP: Foltynewicz. T:
2:51. A: 34,452 (41,149).
Brewers 7,
Diamondbacks 2
Late Monday
A.J. Pollock sprained his
left thumb trying to field PH
Tyler Saladino’s inside-thepark home run in the ninth
inning of Milwaukee’s win
over Arizona.
MILWAUKEE AB
Cain cf.................4
Santana rf...........3
Saladino ph.........1
Aguilar 1b ...........5
Shaw 3b ..............3
Perez lf-rf ...........4
Pina c ..................4
Villar 2b ..............4
Arcia ss...............4
Guerra p..............2
Yelich ph-lf .........2
TOTALS
36
R
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
3
1
0
1
7
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 1 1 .284
0 1 0 2 .266
1 2 0 0 .375
0 0 0 2 .313
0 0 1 2 .240
1 0 0 1 .262
2 0 0 1 .216
3 1 0 1 .282
1 2 0 2 .218
0 0 0 0 .000
2 1 0 0 .299
10 7 2 12 —
ARIZONA
AB
Peralta lf-rf ..........4
Descalso 3b-lf ......2
Goldschmidt 1b ....4
Pollock cf..............4
Marrero 3b ...........0
Souza Jr. rf-cf ......4
Marte 2b...............3
Ahmed ss .............3
Murphy c ..............3
Corbin p ................2
Owings ph ............1
Avila ph ................1
TOTALS
31
R
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 0 .288
0 0 2 1 .260
1 0 0 0 .211
0 0 0 2 .293
0 0 0 0 .196
2 1 0 0 .152
1 0 1 0 .230
0 1 0 3 .217
1 0 1 0 .231
0 0 0 0 .294
0 0 0 0 .209
0 0 0 0 .129
5 2 4 6 —
MILWAUKEE .. 020 000 203 — 7 10 0
ARIZONA ........ 000 200 000 — 2 5 0
LOB: Milwaukee 5, Arizona 7. 2B: Pina
(3), Arcia (4), Souza Jr. (1). HR: Villar
(2), off Salas; Saladino (1), off Salas.
MILWAUKEE IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Guerra ................. 6 3 2 2 4 3 3.08
Hader................... 2 2 0 0 0 2 1.44
Williams .............. 1 0 0 0 0 1 2.57
ARIZONA
IP
Corbin .................. 6
Hirano............... 0.1
Chafin .................. 0
Sherfy............... 0.2
Salas.................... 2
H
6
0
1
0
3
R ER BB SO ERA
4 4 1 8 2.53
0 0 0 0 2.45
0 0 0 0 2.02
0 0 1 0 0.00
3 3 0 4 5.66
WP: Guerra (3-3); LP: Corbin (4-1).
Corbin pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
Chafin pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Hirano 2-0,
Chafin 2-1, Sherfy 2-1. T: 3:06. A: 17,390
(48,519).
CLEVELAND AB
Davis lf ...............6
Brantley dh.........4
Ramirez 3b .........5
Lindor ss .............1
Gomes c ..............4
Guyer rf ..............5
Kipnis 2b.............4
Gonzalez 1b ........2
Alonso ph-1b ......3
Allen cf ...............5
TOTALS
39
R
2
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
1
1
8
H BI BB SO AVG
3 2 0 0 .232
1 0 2 0 .328
3 1 0 0 .297
0 0 4 1 .316
1 0 1 2 .255
1 4 0 1 .160
1 0 1 0 .172
1 1 0 0 .367
2 0 0 0 .226
0 0 0 1 .192
13 8 8 5 —
DETROIT
AB
Jones cf ..............5
Kozma 3b............4
Castellanos rf .....4
Martinez dh ........3
Goodrum lf..........3
Mahtook lf ..........0
Hicks 1b ..............3
McCann c ............4
Iglesias ss...........4
Machado 2b ........4
TOTALS
34
R
2
1
1
0
1
0
2
1
0
1
9
H BI BB SO AVG
2 2 0 1 .254
1 1 0 0 .316
1 1 0 0 .324
0 0 1 1 .222
1 0 1 2 .260
0 0 0 0 .173
2 2 1 1 .304
2 1 0 1 .272
0 1 0 0 .236
1 1 0 0 .225
10 9 3 6 —
CLEVELAND.... 410 003 000 — 8 13 0
DETROIT ......... 100 021 50X — 9 10 1
E: Greene (1). LOB: Cleveland 12, Detroit 4. 2B: Davis (3), Ramirez 2 (13),
Alonso (4), Jones (9), Kozma (2), McCann 2 (8). HR: Guyer (3), off Liriano; Gonzalez (1), off Liriano; Jones (3), off
Tomlin; Castellanos (4), off Tomlin.
CLEVELAND
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Tomlin .............. 5.1 6 4 4 0 4 7.84
Olson ................ 0.2 0 0 0 0 1 6.23
Otero ................ 0.1 2 3 3 0 0 7.47
Miller ................ 0.1 2 2 2 3 0 3.09
Ramirez ............ 1.1 0 0 0 0 1 0.00
DETROIT
IP
Liriano .............. 4.1
Reininger.......... 1.2
Coleman .............. 1
Stumpf ................ 1
Greene ................. 1
H
7
3
2
1
0
R ER BB SO ERA
5 5 3 3 4.03
3 3 3 0 10.1
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 2 1 5.40
0 0 0 0 3.72
ST. LOUIS
AB
Pham cf...............4
Carpenter 1b.......4
Martinez dh ........4
Ozuna lf ..............4
Gyorko 3b ...........3
DeJong ss ...........2
Bader rf...............3
Wong 2b .............2
Kelly c .................2
Garcia ph.............1
Pena c .................0
TOTALS
29
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 3 .308
0 0 0 2 .140
0 0 0 1 .286
0 0 0 1 .258
0 0 0 2 .308
0 0 1 0 .259
1 0 0 2 .262
0 0 0 0 .182
1 1 0 0 .111
0 0 0 1 .239
0 0 0 0 .174
2 1 1 12 —
MINNESOTA AB
Mauer 1b ............4
Dozier 2b ............3
Rosario lf ............4
Escobar 3b ..........4
Kepler rf..............4
Morrison dh ........4
Buxton cf ............3
Adrianza ss.........3
Wilson c..............3
TOTALS
32
R
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
1
4
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 1 .282
1 0 1 0 .250
1 0 0 2 .284
2 1 0 1 .281
0 0 0 0 .241
1 0 0 0 .195
1 0 0 0 .175
1 0 0 0 .233
1 2 0 1 .133
9 3 1 5 —
ST. LOUIS........ 001 000 000 — 1 2 1
MINNESOTA... 000 001 30X — 4 9 0
E: Gregerson (1). LOB: St. Louis 3, Minnesota 5. 2B: Morrison (6). HR: Wilson
(1), off Gregerson.
ST. LOUIS
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Flaherty............ 5.2 5 1 1 1 3 2.87
Cecil.................. 0.1 1 1 1 0 0 3.86
Gregerson......... 0.1 2 2 2 0 0 8.64
Tuivailala.......... 1.2 1 0 0 0 2 3.00
MINNESOTA IP
Berrios.............. 7.1
Reed ................. 0.2
Rodney ................ 1
H
2
0
0
R ER BB SO ERA
1 1 1 10 4.05
0 0 0 2 2.53
0 0 0 0 3.07
WP: Berrios (4-4); LP: Cecil (0-1); S:
Rodney (8). Cecil pitched to 1 batter in
the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Cecil
2-0, Gregerson 1-1, Reed 1-0. HBP: Berrios (Wong). WP: Gregerson. T: 2:45. A:
24,259 (38,649).
Rockies 6, Padres 4
Giants 10, Reds 7
Late Monday
Noel Cuevas, Daniel
Castro and Gerardo Parra
all homered to lead Colorado past San Diego.
Cuevas and Castro homered in the fifth inning
while Parra hit a three-run
blast in the sixth inning to
give the Rockies their second win in three games.
Late Monday
Andrew McCutchen doubled in his first two at-bats
to reach his 1,500th hit,
and San Francisco
snapped Cincinnati’s sixgame winning streak.
R
0
1
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
0
6
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 1 1 .275
1 1 0 0 .308
3 1 1 0 .326
0 0 0 0 .227
1 0 0 3 .172
1 0 0 0 .229
1 3 0 0 .271
1 1 0 0 .160
1 0 1 1 .083
1 0 0 0 .119
11 6 3 5 —
SAN DIEGO
AB
Margot cf .............5
Hosmer 1b............3
Pirela 2b ...............4
Villanueva 3b .......4
Cordero lf .............4
Reyes rf................4
Galvis ss...............4
Ellis c ....................4
Lucchesi p.............0
Szczur ph..............1
Spangenberg ph ...1
Jankowski ph .......0
TOTALS
34
R
0
0
0
0
1
0
2
0
0
1
0
0
4
H BI BB SO AVG
1 1 0 1 .202
1 1 1 0 .264
0 0 0 1 .265
1 0 0 1 .227
0 0 0 2 .261
0 0 0 2 .000
3 0 0 0 .237
1 1 0 0 .286
0 0 1 0 .000
1 0 0 0 .256
0 0 0 1 .190
0 0 1 0 .349
8 3 3 8 —
COLORADO ..... 001 023 000 — 6 11 1
SAN DIEGO ..... 001 111 000 — 4 8 0
E: Story (4). LOB: Colorado 7, San Diego
6. 2B: Hosmer (13), Galvis (4), Szczur
(3). 3B: Galvis (2). HR: Castro (1), off
Lucchesi; Cuevas (1), off Lucchesi; Parra
(2), off Makita.
COLORADO
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Anderson.......... 5.2 7 4 3 1 3 4.30
Shaw ................ 1.1 1 0 0 1 2 4.95
Ottavino .............. 1 0 0 0 0 3 1.17
Davis ................... 1 0 0 0 1 0 2.95
SAN DIEGO
IP
Lucchesi............... 5
Makita ................. 1
Strahm ................ 2
Erlin ..................... 1
H
6
3
0
2
R ER BB SO ERA
3 3 1 2 3.23
3 3 0 1 7.94
0 0 2 1 5.40
0 0 0 1 3.60
WP: Anderson (3-1); LP: Makita (0-1);
S: Davis (15). Inherited runners-scored:
Shaw 1-1. T: 2:55. A: 17,245 (42,445).
0-2
6.10
3-2
Suarez (L)
1-2
4.57
1-3
DODGERS AT MARLINS, 7:10
Buehler (R)
2-1
1.64
3-1
Smith (L)
2-4
3.63
3-5
CUBS AT BRAVES, 7:35
Chatwood (R)
3-3
3.35
3-4
McCarthy (R)
4-2
5.58
5-3
NL scores
MONDAY'S RESULTS
Braves 6, at Cubs 5
Brewers 7, at Diamondbacks 2
Rockies 6, at Padres 4
at Giants 10, Reds 7
TUESDAY'S RESULTS
at Padres 4, Rockies 0
at Marlins 4, Dodgers 2
Cubs 3, at Braves 2
at Diamondbacks 2, Brewers 1
Reds at Giants, Late
AL games
INDIANS AT TIGERS, 1:10
W-L
ERA TEAM
Bauer (R)
2-3
3.00
3-5
Carpenter (L)
0-0
7.36
0-1
RAYS AT ROYALS, 2:15
WP: Coleman (1-0); LP: Miller (1-2); S:
Greene (9). Inherited runners-scored:
Miller 1-1, Ramirez 3-0, Reininger 2-0.
WP: Liriano, Tomlin, Greene. T: 3:21. A:
20,997 (41,297).
COLORADO
AB
Blackmon cf ........4
Cuevas rf ............5
Arenado 3b .........4
Story ss ..............5
Desmond 1b........4
Iannetta c ...........4
Parra lf................4
Castro 2b ............4
Anderson p .........2
Valaika ph...........1
TOTALS
37
Harvey (R)
CINCINNATI AB
Winker lf.............5
Peraza ss ............5
Votto 1b..............2
Duvall 1b.............2
Gennett 2b..........5
Suarez 3b............4
Schebler rf ..........4
Barnhart c...........3
Romano p............1
Stephens p..........0
Herrera ph ..........1
Blandino ph.........1
Hamilton cf.........4
TOTALS
37
R
1
0
0
1
0
0
3
1
0
0
0
0
1
7
H BI BB SO AVG
2 0 0 0 .269
1 0 0 2 .271
1 0 0 0 .291
2 3 0 0 .188
0 0 0 0 .318
0 0 0 1 .286
3 1 0 0 .264
2 3 1 0 .286
1 0 0 0 .077
0 0 1 0 --0 0 0 0 .091
0 0 0 1 .254
1 0 0 1 .216
13 7 2 5 —
SAN FRAN.
AB
Blanco lf-cf .........5
McCutchen rf......5
Posey c................4
Belt 1b ................5
Longoria 3b.........5
Crawford ss ........4
Jackson cf ...........3
Sandoval ph ........1
Tomlinson 2b......5
Stratton p...........1
Slater ph-lf .........1
TOTALS
39
R
1
2
2
2
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
10
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 3 .268
2 1 0 0 .259
2 1 1 1 .312
3 3 0 1 .297
2 1 0 0 .243
2 2 1 0 .270
0 0 1 0 .227
0 0 0 0 .267
1 2 0 0 .246
0 0 0 1 .111
1 0 1 0 .273
14 10 4 6 —
Faria (R)
3-2
5.09
4-4
Hammel (R)
0-4
6.13
1-7
RANGERS AT MARINERS, 3:40
Colon (R)
1-1
3.32
3-3
TBD ( )
0-0
0.00
0-0
ATHLETICS AT RED SOX, 7:10
Cahill (R)
1-1
2.25
3-1
Sale (L)
3-1
2.17
5-4
ASTROS AT ANGELS, 9:40
Verlander (R)
4-2
1.21
5-4
Richards (R)
4-1
4.08
6-2
AL scores
MONDAY'S RESULTS
Rays 2, at Royals 1
at Tigers 6, Indians 3
Athletics 6, at Red Sox 5
Mariners 1, at Twins 0
at Angels 2, Astros 1
TUESDAY'S RESULTS
at Tigers 9, Indians 8
Rays 6, at Royals 5
Athletics 5, at Red Sox 3
Astros at Angels, Late
Rangers at Mariners, Late
NL leaders
Entering Tuesday’s games
BATTING
Herrera, Phi ..................................... .360
Markakis, Atl ................................... .346
Cabrera, NY ...................................... .329
Arenado, Col .................................... .326
Freeman, Atl .................................... .325
Dickerson, Pit .................................. .319
Pham, StL ........................................ .319
Gennett, Cin .................................... .318
Kemp, LA ......................................... .317
HOME RUNS
Albies, Atl ........................................... 13
Harper, Was ....................................... 13
Blackmon, Col ..................................... 11
Pollock, Ari ......................................... 11
Adams, Was ....................................... 10
Baez, Chi ............................................. 10
Story, Col ............................................ 10
Shaw, Mil .............................................. 9
Villanueva, SD ...................................... 9
RBI
CINCINNATI .... 010 201 003 — 7 13 2
SAN FRAN. ..... 312 003 01X — 10 14 1
E: Peraza 2 (6), Blanco (3). LOB: Cincinnati 6, San Francisco 10. 2B: Winker (9),
Schebler (5), Romano (1), McCutchen 2
(10), Posey (10), Belt (9), Longoria (13),
Crawford 2 (8). HR: Barnhart (3), off
Stratton; Schebler (5), off Stratton; Duvall (7), off Valdez; Belt (7), off Brice.
CINCINNATI
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Romano ............ 2.1 8 6 6 2 2 4.84
Stephens .......... 2.2 1 0 0 0 2 5.40
Floro .................... 2 3 3 2 2 2 1.69
Brice .................... 1 2 1 1 0 0 4.30
SAN FRAN.
IP
Stratton .............. 5
Johnson ............... 1
Gearrin ................ 2
Valdez.................. 1
H
9
0
1
3
R ER BB SO ERA
4 4 2 1 4.88
0 0 0 1 5.03
0 0 0 1 3.78
3 3 0 2 22.5
WP: Stratton (4-3); LP: Romano (2-4).
Stratton pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
Inherited runners-scored: Stephens 2-0,
Johnson 1-0. HBP: Gearrin (Duvall). T:
3:02. A: 36,156 (41,915).
Baez, Chi ............................................. 36
Pollock, Ari ......................................... 33
Story, Col ............................................ 32
Albies, Atl ........................................... 31
Freeman, Atl ....................................... 31
Harper, Was ....................................... 30
Markakis, Atl ...................................... 30
Cespedes, NY ...................................... 28
Franco, Phi .......................................... 28
Suarez, Cin .......................................... 28
ERA
Martinez, StL .................................. 1.62
Scherzer, Was ................................. 1.69
deGrom, NY ..................................... 1.83
Nola, Phi .......................................... 1.99
Gonzalez, Was ................................. 2.22
Mikolas, StL .................................... 2.51
Newcomb, Atl .................................. 2.51
Corbin, Ari ........................................ 2.53
WINS
Scherzer, Was ................................... 7-1
Nola, Phi ............................................ 6-1
Mikolas, StL ...................................... 5-0
Strasburg, Was ................................. 5-3
SAVES
Davis, Col ............................................ 15
Boxberger, Ari .................................... 11
Familia, NY ......................................... 11
Hand, SD ............................................. 11
Doolittle, Was ...................................... 9
Morrow, Chi .......................................... 9
Neris, Phi .............................................. 8
Norris, StL ............................................ 8
Strickland, SF ....................................... 8
Iglesias, Cin .......................................... 7
Vizcaino, Atl ......................................... 7
Vazquez, Pit ......................................... 7
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
M2
NBA playoffs
Celtics’ Tatum has been a cut above in his first postseason
BY
C ANDACE B UCKNER
boston — In his rookie season,
Jayson Tatum has emerged as
perhaps the next great young
player for the Boston Celtics. He
has blossomed in the Eastern
Conference playoffs, joining Donovan Mitchell of the Utah Jazz as
the only rookies to score 20 or
more points in seven consecutive
postseason games since Julius
Erving did it in the ABA in 1972.
Tatum is a big reason the depleted
Celtics are not only in the conference finals but leading LeBron
James and the Cleveland Cavaliers two games to none.
But with all due respect to his
basketball excellence, we’re here
to talk about his hair game.
Tatum’s hairline — meticulously crafted by a gloved barber
wielding an Andis Professional
Styliner II trimmer like a paintbrush on a canvas — is glorious.
It’s become a popular discussion topic on social media whenever the Celtics play on national
television.
It’s so admired that, within the
Celtics’ locker room, it has been
identified as a landmark for preservation.
“I think he has great hair. I
think he gets his hair cut too
much, my personal opinion,” forward Marcus Morris said. “When
it comes to having a strong hairline, you can’t let people take it
back. . . . I tell him all the time.”
Tatum, 20, remains undeterred
by his veteran teammate.
“I know!” Tatum said of Morris’s crusade on behalf of his
hairline. “But I got to look good. I
told him I got to get a haircut.”
Thankfully for fans of fades,
Tatum does his best to guard his
hairline from trimmers with ill
intentions. Though he lives and
works in Boston, Tatum, a St.
MICHAEL DWYER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Celtics rookie forward Jayson Tatum has earned attention for more than just his play in the playoffs. His hair is the envy of his teammates.
Louis native, tries to meet up with
the barber from his home town
who has been shaping him up for
eight years.
“He’s very picky. I try to keep
him as fresh as I can,” Julius
Gutierrez said in a phone interview. “For him, it’s his hair and he
values that. He wants [his hair]
looking like draft day every day.”
While the topic of hairlines
might seem frivolous to some, it
matters to many men, said Guti-
errez, 44, who has been cutting
hair for more than half of his life.
“It’s the first thing people see,
your smile and your hairline,
especially in the urban community. It’s just something about it,”
Gutierrez said. “You have a certain swag with it. . . . It just gives
you this certain confidence.”
Tatum was thankful that Boston drew the Milwaukee Bucks in
the first round of the playoffs —
not only because the matchup
ultimately favored the Celtics,
who won in seven games, but
because St. Louis is a breezy
1-hour 5-minute flight away. Gutierrez and his clippers made two
trips to Milwaukee during the
series.
“I usually fly him out when I’m
on the road, somewhere close to
St. Louis. He’ll cut me up,” Tatum
said. “So people usually notice
after he cuts my head.”
Although Tatum believes in
barber fidelity, sometimes he gets
impatient.
When Tatum’s eye starts wandering and Gutierrez, who owns
Jules Unique Studios in St. Louis,
can’t get to Boston or wherever
the Celtics are playing, the young
NBA player will go elsewhere.
Terry Rozier, another young
Celtics guard having a breakthrough in these playoffs, said he
understands.
“It’s like everything,” Rozier
said before Game 1 against Cleveland. “You know you’re going to
be on TV. You got to make sure
that hairline is looking right, for
sure.”
He then added: “I might go see
my barber after this.”
Cavaliers guard Jordan Clarkson, another candidate for sharpest hairline in the NBA, said he
gets it, too.
“Everybody wants to have that
good hairline. It makes you look
good. . . . I’m going to be young
forever. Knock on wood,” said
Clarkson, reaching down to tap
the TD Garden court. “But my
hairline is going to be like this
forever, you feel me?”
Ah, so innocent. And yet so
unaware that one day Father
Time will come brandishing a
pair of his own clippers. A hairline can recede with age, or because of genes, and even the best
player of this generation isn’t safe
from nature’s shears.
“LeBron!” one Celtics fan
called out to the 33-year-old
James during Cleveland’s Game 1
loss. “You’re fading like your hairline, boy!”
Morris has his own reasons for
being so opinionated about Tatum’s hair. At 28, the burly forward
who sometimes sports a headband is trying his best to prevent
his own male-pattern balding. He
lives by the same advice he shares
with the rookie: Chill with the
clippers and protect that hairline.
“I think a lot of the players in
the NBA don’t understand that
because they’re all about: ‘Let me
have it cut because we’re playing
on TV,’ ” Morris said, before
chuckling. “My thing is, I’m trying to keep my hair for as long as
possible. After I finish playing
basketball, I still want to have
good hair.”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
WESTERN CONFERENCE FINALS
Kerr, Warriors get huge results from going small
houston — Steve
Kerr’s tenure as
coach of the
Golden State
TIM
Warriors has been
BONTEMPS
defined by a
couple of things.
The first, and most obvious, is a
ridiculous number of wins.
Another, and more subjective, is
the conservative nature of his
decision-making.
Kerr has often been prodded —
by the media, the fans, even at
times by his players — to go for
the jugular more often. Even
when Warriors guard Stephen
Curry was at his peak a couple
years ago, Kerr resisted going
away from his egalitarian, ballmovement offense to allow Curry
just to run one pick and roll after
another. He has constantly
declined to start his best lineup —
going small and featuring
Draymond Green at center —
until he has absolutely had to do
so.
That’s what made Kerr’s
decision to start Game 1 of the
Western Conference finals
Monday night with that smallball lineup so telling of his mindset — as well as his team’s —
heading into this series.
“We felt it was important to get
off to a good start,” Kerr said after
Golden State emerged with a 119106 victory over the Houston
Rockets. “That’s why we made the
decision [to start small]. We had
good momentum from the last
series, and the matchups were
good.”
That explanation also leaves
out something else: Golden State
knew that a win Monday night —
and stealing home-court
advantage — potentially could
end this series before it began.
Kerr’s actions underscored that
belief. So did his team’s play. So,
frankly, did the desperation with
which the Rockets came out of the
gates. But the Houston players’
slumped shoulders in the final few
minutes of the fourth quarter
made it clear there was nothing
they could do to change the
outcome.
Suddenly, after spending seven
months building to this moment,
Houston was seemingly right
back to square one — and without
the added edge of an extra game
at home in the series.
“Obviously, we lost,” Rockets
Coach Mike D’Antoni said. “Now,
the next most important game is
Wednesday. Let’s see if we have a
short memory.”
Kerr didn’t allude to it, but
there is a moment in his past that
is analogous to this situation, and
it happened not that far from
here.
In 2001, the Los Angeles Lakers
— featuring prime versions of
Kobe Bryant and Shaquille
O’Neal — came to San Antonio to
On
the NBA
GREG M. COOPER/USA TODAY SPORTS
Marcus Morris and Boston improved to 8-0 at home during the 2018 playoffs with Tuesday night’s win.
Home cooking continues to suit Boston
NBA FROM D1
first-half collision and the Cavaliers wilted in the second half,
with the Celtics outscoring them
59-39.
Kevin Love finished with 22
points and 15 rebounds for Cleveland.
As expected, Tristan Thompson started in place of Kyle
Korver in the hopes his presence
could energize what was a sluggish Cavs offense in Game 1.
Thompson got Cleveland’s first
basket of the night and helped to
limit Horford’s effectiveness on
the inside early on.
Korver added 11 points off the
bench for Cleveland. But starters
Thompson, JR Smith and George
Hill combined for just 11 points
on 5-of-17 shooting.
Tempers flared with 3:49 to
play with Boston leading 97-89.
Marcus Morris got in Smith’s
face after Smith pushed Horford
in the back to prevent a layup.
Smith shoved Morris and the
pair had to be separated.
Smith was assessed a flagrant
foul and both received technical
fouls.
Boston’s balanced attack was
effective again, with six players
reaching double figures. Cleveland had 15 turnovers leading to
13 Boston points. The Celtics
turned it over just six times.
Boston led 84-77 after three
quarters and took command late
in the fourth with the Cavs
getting little offense other than
from James. Cleveland’s starters
were pulled with 1:48 left and the
Cavs down 14. They sat more
than seven minutes to conclude
Game 1.
James was on the attack from
the opening tip. He turned the
ball over the Cavs’ first possession. But it was one of his only
miscues in the first quarter.
James was also astoundingly
efficient, using his dribble to
create space, while he knocked
down an assortment of jump
shots.
He finished the opening quarter 8 of 13 from the field and 4 of
7 from the three-point line.
His momentum was stunted
briefly at the 3:50 mark of the
second quarter, when Tatum was
whistled for a foul after catching
James jaw with his shoulder as
he attempted a steal. James
stayed in the game and connected on one of his ensuing free
throws, but then exited to the
locker room with Cleveland leading 47-36.
The Cavaliers said James had a
neck sprain. He returned after
missing less than two minutes of
game time.
Boston flurried just before the
half, getting six points from Morris in the final minute to trim
Cleveland’s lead to 55-48 at the
break.
RONALD MARTINEZ/GETTY IMAGES
Coach Steve Kerr was aggressive in starting a small-ball lineup with
Draymond Green at center in Game 1, and Golden State rolled.
face the top-seeded Spurs in the
Western Conference finals. It was
a highly anticipated showdown
between the past two NBA
champions, and they were a
combined 14-2 in the first two
rounds of the playoffs.
The Lakers promptly won
Game 1 by 14 points, then
prevailed in Game 2 before taking
the series back to Los Angeles and
blowing out the Spurs in Games 3
and 4 on their way to a second
straight title.
That’s how fast this can get
away from teams, even at the
highest level. Just look at what
happened to the 59-win Toronto
Raptors in the Eastern
Conference semifinals. In Game 1
against the Cleveland Cavaliers,
the Raptors never trailed in
regulation, lost the game in
overtime and never looked as if
they had a chance to win the
series after that.
There’s still plenty of
basketball to be played. The
Rockets won 65 games for a
reason — well, several reasons,
from presumptive league MVP
James Harden to Chris Paul to
Clint Capela to an excellent
switching defense that has
confounded most opponents. The
fact that it took a remarkable 37point performance from forward
Kevin Durant for Golden State to
prevail was proof Houston did
anything but roll over.
But all of the Rockets’ effort
wasn’t enough for a victory. And
given how Houston’s season
ended last year — with Harden
disappearing on this very court in
a 39-point loss to a Spurs team
without Kawhi Leonard in the
West semifinals — could the
Rockets lose the momentum that
they have spent the past seven
months working to obtain?
“We have to look at the film, see
what we can do better,” Paul said.
“Obviously it’s a different team
and whatnot,” he added. “But, for
us, our focus right now is just on
Game 2.”
Golden State’s focus was clearly
on Game 1. Green brought his
trademark physical play early,
getting a technical foul for
shoving Harden for no apparent
reason other than to try to get in
his face after Harden’s hot start.
“It’s the conference finals, and
the further along you go in the
playoffs, the more intensity you
have to bring to win,” Green said.
“Being that we’ve been in the
[NBA] Finals three straight years,
I understand that. I know where
my intensity level needs to be to
help this team win games.
“So that’s what I try to do.”
The Warriors, you can be sure,
have heard every bit of the talk
coming out of Houston for the
past four months about how the
Rockets were ready for them.
They remember Capela telling
ESPN that Houston is the better
team. They saw, as Kerr joked in
light of the Supreme Court
decision allowing states to set up
legalized sports gambling, that
they were 11/2-point underdogs
before Game 1.
Golden State then went out
and played like the team everyone
knew existed within the one that
sleepwalked its way through the
regular season and still won 58
games behind the NBA’s best
offense.
“Our guys have been here
before,” Kerr said. “This is our
fourth straight conference finals
and the first one we’ve started on
the road. But our guys have a lot
of experience, and they’ve felt
this.
“They relish it, and I think they
took the challenge tonight and
played awfully well.”
The Warriors won Game 1 of a
best-of-seven series Monday
night. But as the crowd filed out
and the Rockets slumped off the
court, it felt as if the life had left
the place as well. That was what
Kerr hoped to do by playing small
in Game 1. And, by doing so, he
just might have ended these
Western Conference finals after
only one game.
tim.bontemps@washpost.com
D6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. WEDNESDAY,
MAY 16 , 2018
Professional basketball
Ingram’s 15 minutes of NBA fame may be over, but his sense of purpose remains
Andre Ingram
walks into a
Georgetown
restaurant with
his wife, Marilee.
He smiles. He is
Jerry
anonymous again.
Brewer
He keeps smiling.
He no longer
wears his April fame, from when
he ended the NBA season as the
ultimate underdog fairy tale. On
this May afternoon, he looks
most comfortable in a T-shirt
and track pants.
“Each day, the recognition, it
kind of goes down a little bit
more, a little bit more,” Ingram
says.
He is home now, where the
Andre Ingram Story is much
more intimate. He isn’t merely
the remarkable basketball lifer
who toiled in the NBA
developmental league for 10
years before getting a late-season
shot with the Los Angeles Lakers
and turning it into a moment
worthy of Hollywood. In his
home town of Richmond, he’s a
friend and family member who
swells with pride when people
tell him, “Man, we felt like it was
us out there doing that.” And
when he took a trip to D.C. last
week, he disappeared into
nostalgia, thinking back to how
well American University
prepared him in hoops and life
and reveling in rediscovering the
city as an adult.
“I always look back at my time
at American, and the only regret
is that I didn’t see more of places
like I’m doing now,” Ingram said.
“Just traveling in D.C. today,
these places were five minutes
from me my whole career, and I
didn’t see none of them, you
know? It was basketball. It was
school. It was basketball. It was
school. I’ll always regret that
part of it, but I’m thankful for
what it prepared me for.”
It prepared him to get more
from life than fleeting fame. So
here is the 32-year-old Ingram,
on a Thursday a month after he
scored 19 points against
Houston in his long-awaited
NBA debut, ready to talk about
what’s next. And here is his
unremarkable answer: He
doesn’t know. We may never see
him make another three-pointer
on an NBA court, but he learned
long ago not to define victory so
narrowly.
What now? More of the same.
More grinding. More following
that feeling that he is on the
right path. For Ingram, this has
been a spiritual journey more
than a dream with an absolute
destination in mind. He would
like to stick in the NBA and
finally earn millions. But he
MARK J. TERRILL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
“The story is not just about ‘Keep going,’ ” said Andre Ingram, who shined in his NBA debut at 32. “It’s about, ‘What are you going for?’ ”
needs something greater,
something intangible.
“What I hope people take
from the story isn’t just that he
keeps going, keeps going,”
Ingram said. “It’s, well, what
kept him going? It’s not like you
just go blindly for 10 years. You
can be fooled, and you can be
going after the wrong thing and
keep going after it. So the story
is not just about ‘Keep going.’ It’s
about, ‘What are you going for?’
“For me, this was a dream, of
course, to play in the NBA, but it
was also something I was led to
do. I was led to play basketball.
Like, I’m supposed to be playing
basketball. I know that. This
road I’ve taken has shown me
that. That’s what the ‘Keep
going’ is about with me. When
those times come — no ‘if’ —
when those times come where
it’s not going anywhere and
you’re ready to do something
else, you’re ready to let go, I just
believe there will be something
to pull you back in. That’s how
you know. Every time I got to
that jump-off-the-cliff point,
something pulled me back in.
That’s the part that gets
generalized, and then people
think, ‘Just keep going, and
dreams come true.’ No, that’s not
it.”
Ingram has had many
moments when he thought
about quitting. The most recent
and profound came about 18
months ago. Tired of being a
developmental project, he left
the NBA’s G League and signed a
contract to play in Australia. He
was going to make good money.
He joined a good organization.
But he was so miserable that he
left after two games.
“I had to go to the coaches and
say, ‘Listen, this is not for me.
I’m miserable. I’m depressed,’ ”
Ingram said. “It was hard to
explain. They were like, ‘Why are
you leaving?’ I could only say,
‘My spirit’s wrong. There’s no
peace in me.’ That was one of the
hardest things, man.”
He returned home and tried
to answer the same questions
from others. Ingram had left for
Australia saying, “Man, I’m just
done with the G League.” He had
lost in the league finals and
played poorly in the deciding
game. After eight years trying to
get called up, Ingram didn’t
know his purpose. Then he went
to Australia, flopped and
realized: “The place I was done
with, the place that I hated then,
I need it. It’s where I’m supposed
to be.”
Ingram returned to the South
Bay Lakers and played 10 games
during the 2016-17 season.
Finally, after another season,
after playing 384 games and
hoping for a call-up, he was
invited to the big stage. He
played the Los Angeles Lakers’
final two games, following that
19-point performance in
Houston with five points and six
assists against the Los Angeles
Clippers the next night. If
Ingram had enjoyed his time in
Australia, he would have been
making a name for himself
Down Under and not receiving
the NBA promotion of his
dreams. Maybe that’s why his
spirit was wrong.
Currently, Ingram is working
out, preparing to audition again
in the summer league. The
Lakers still own his rights; he is
a restricted free agent. He’ll be
competing to earn an NBA
contract this summer. If he
doesn’t, he is expected to return
to the G League.
He signed with WME, and the
agency will help him turn his
story into a book and, possibly, a
movie or television program.
Ingram continues to work with
his longtime business manager
and former American teammate,
Romone Penny, of Pursuit Sports
Group. Ingram will visit
Washington again June 1 to be
featured in the Pursuit
“EndGame” speaker series,
which will be held at 7 p.m. at
the Watergate Hotel. The next
day, he will hold a basketball
clinic at Georgetown Day School.
Ingram can accept it if he
ends up being widely
remembered as “that unknown
guy who did an amazing thing
that one time.” But to him, his
basketball career has been more
than that. He has lived his
passion. He hasn’t cheated the
game; Ingram is lauded for his
work ethic. Wherever he plays,
he’s in the right place. He can
feel it.
As the NBA playoffs move
toward crowning a champion,
Ingram will be in the gym for
several hours a day, still going,
still dreaming, still trusting in
the unknown. There is peace in
him, even if the fame vanishes.
“My focus, my clarity, is in my
direction,” Ingram said. “I know
what I’m supposed to be doing.
I’m going to do it.”
jerry.brewer@washpost.com
For more by Jerry Brewer, visit
washingtonpost.com/brewer.
Suns land top pick in draft lottery after finishing with league’s worst record
BY
T IM B ONTEMPS
The worst team in the league
got what it earned — the top pick
in next month’s NBA draft.
The Phoenix Suns, a franchise
that has never picked first overall,
had the best odds of winning the top
pick entering the NBA draft lottery
Tuesday night in Chicago, and
wound up getting it. The Sacramento Kings got the second pick, and the
Atlanta Hawks will pick third.
The focus now shifts to whom
the Suns will take with that pick.
There are two clear choices for
the Suns — both of which would
fill a glaring need. The leader at
the moment is DeAndre Ayton, a
center from Arizona who is a
mountain of a man with impressive athleticism and a working
jump shot. But the Suns recently
hired Igor Kokoskov, a Utah Jazz
assistant, as their coach, and
Kokoskov spent last summer
coaching Slovenia to the Eurobasket title — a team led by the other
contender for the No. 1 overall
pick, European wunderkind Luka
Doncic. Phoenix desperately
needs a point guard next to Devin
Booker, and Doncic has a chance
to be a wonderful pick-and-roll
player in the NBA.
This also was a big night for
Sacramento, which will be picking
inside the top three for only the
third time in 22 trips to the lottery.
In a twist, the Kings tied with the
Chicago Bulls — which won a coin
flip to pick sixth. Had the Bulls
lost, the Kings would be picking
seventh.
But the Kings caught a break,
one they badly needed. For a franchise desperate for a talent infusion, taking whomever Phoenix
passes on between Ayton and
Doncic will be a no-brainer.
Atlanta also benefited slightly,
jumping up from fourth to third in
the lottery. The Hawks will have
four picks in the top 33 of this
year’s draft, allowing General
Manager Travis Schlenk a chance
to add to last year’s lottery pick,
ETHAN MILLER/GETTY IMAGES
With the top pick in June’s draft, the Suns likely will choose between Arizona’s DeAndre Ayton, above, and European star Luka Doncic.
big man John Collins, and continue to put his imprint on the franchise.
The Memphis Grizzlies and
Dallas Mavericks dropped two
spots each, falling to fourth and
fifth, respectively, where they’ll
likely be taking big men in a draft
where, other than Doncic, the top
is expected to be dominated by big
men.
There were no other surprises,
as the picks at the bottom of the
lottery went as anticipated. The
Los Angeles Lakers sent their unprotected first-round pick — 10th
overall — to the Philadelphia
76ers, finally completing the Steve
Nash trade from six years ago after
picking second the past three
years. If the pick had jumped to
second or third, it would have
gone to the Boston Celtics, while
the 76ers got it if it landed 10th or
first.
The Detroit Pistons didn’t jump
up from the 12th pick, either —
meaning that their first-round selection went to the Los Angeles
Clippers (also owners of the 13th
pick) as part of the Blake Griffin
trade earlier this season.
The Cleveland Cavaliers, meanwhile, didn’t jump up from the
eighth pick — which is the final
selection the Brooklyn Nets will
deliver after giving up the rights to
five consecutive first-round picks
in a pair of trades (the 2015 pick to
Atlanta for Joe Johnson; the 2014,
2016-18 picks to Boston for Paul
Pierce and Kevin Garnett — the
last of which the Celtics sent to
Cleveland in the Kyrie Irving
trade).
This will be the last year the
draft is held under the current
framework, with the team with
the worst record having a 25 percent chance of winning the lottery,
and the odds going down from
there — as well as the top three
spots being determined by the
drawing of ping-pong balls.
Next year, there will be four
spots selected, rather than three,
and the odds will be much different; the teams with the three
worst records will each have a 14
percent chance of getting the top
pick, while the fourth team will
have a 12.5 percent chance, fifth
will be 10.5 percent and sixth will
be 9 percent.
In an interview on ESPN before
the lottery drawing, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver said he wasn’t
sure the changes would work as
intended — to keep teams from
tanking — intentionally losing, in
other words — to improve draft
position.
“I don’t use that word,” Silver
joked. “But the idea there is to
disincentivize the race to the bottom. But you ask the right question. Do I feel it will deal completely with the issues of incentives? I
don’t know.
“I feel bad for some of the [general managers], too, because some
of the fans are coming up to them
and saying they’re mad about winning, and we can’t have that as a
sports league. This will help
around the margins but we have to
have teams competing all the
time.”
tim.bontemps@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
M2
D7
stanley cup playoffs
PHOTOS BY JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Lightning defenseman Braydon Coburn and Capitals defenseman Matt Niskanen chase after a loose puck in the third period. Tampa Bay converted on 2 of 5 power-play opportunities to get back into the series.
Capitals give Lightning too many chances in Game 3 defeat
“It’s kind of like we have [Alex
Ovechkin] on that one side, and
they kind of have it on both sides”
with Stamkos and Kucherov, Orpik said. “You take one guy away,
and it leaves the other guy open.”
For Washington, Eller’s infraction marked a 60th minor penalty
in these playoffs, which is a postseason high. Because the puck
movement on the Lightning’s
power play has given the Capitals
fits, discipline becomes even
more important. Though Tampa
Bay’s power play had been overshadowed by Washington’s in the
first two games, the Lightning
scored three goals on seven opportunities. It was 2 for 5 on
Tuesday night, which meant it got
too many looks in Coach Barry
Trotz’s opinion.
“To get back in a game, it took a
lot of flow out of our game,” Trotz
said.
Less than two minutes after
Kucherov’s power-play goal, Hedman made it a three-goal deficit
for Washington with just the second even-strength goal Tampa
Bay has scored in the series. A
home arena that had been anxious for its first conference final
game in 20 years deflated.
Meanwhile, the Capitals’ power play, hot all postseason with a
goal in all but two games entering
Game 3, couldn’t convert. Brett
Connolly narrowed the deficit
with his wrister midway through
the second period, and that
seemed to shift momentum in
Washington’s favor. The Capitals
got a power play less than three
minutes later, but Lightning goaltender
Andrei
Vasilevskiy
stopped all three shots he faced
during it. Brayden Point’s shot
through Chandler Stephenson’s
legs then made it a 4-1 game
before second intermission.
“I don’t think they were more
desperate,” Ovechkin said. “They
just scored power-play goals, and
we didn’t.”
The pushback from Tampa Bay
was expected, and though Washington couldn’t match on Tuesday
night, the margin for error will be
slimmer in Thursday’s Game 4,
when the Capitals would prefer to
push the Lightning to the brink of
elimination rather than return to
Tampa Bay with the series tied.
“Nobody said it was going to be
easy,” Ovechkin said. “We was
ready for it, and nobody going to
give up.”
CAPITALS FROM D1
won the first two games on the
road in the final two rounds of the
Stanley Cup playoffs, the Capitals
know how quickly things can
change. They fell into a twogames-to-none hole after losing
both games in Washington in the
first round against Columbus, but
then reeled off four straight wins.
The Capitals expected a Lightning squad that won the most
games in the NHL during the
regular season to respond in
Game 3, and for the first time in
the series, Tampa Bay scored the
first goal.
Goaltender Braden Holtby was
called for tripping Tampa Bay
forward Yanni Gourde, and after
defenseman
Brooks
Orpik
whiffed on his attempt to clear
the puck out of the Washington
zone, the puck made its way to
center Steven Stamkos in the left
faceoff circle. His one-timer was a
laser, a shot Holtby had no chance
of stopping.
On Tuesday morning, Tampa
Bay Coach Jon Cooper lamented
how little his team had played
with the lead through the first
two games. Washington had been
starting strong throughout the
playoffs, scoring first in all but
three of its postseason games
entering Game 3.
“You have to make them play
catch-up because when they do
have the lead, they sit back,”
Cooper said before the game.
“You have to go through four
guys. They all can skate, they’re
all angling, they’re all in lanes,
and it just makes it tougher.
When they don’t have the lead,
they’re a little bit more loose in
the way they play. They don’t sit
back as much. They’re not waiting for you to make a mistake
because they’re trying to create
offense themselves. If you want to
have a chance to open things up
for yourself, make sure you get
the lead.”
The Lightning was able to do
just that thanks to its power play.
Less than two minutes into the
second period, Capitals center
Lars Eller was called for closing
his hand on the puck, and it was a
one-timer from the opposite circle that got past Holtby this time.
Defenseman Victor Hedman set
up a Nikita Kucherov one-timer
to lift Tampa Bay to a 2-0 lead, the
Lightning’s first edge of more
than one goal in the series.
A shot by Tampa Bay’s Brayden Point sneaks by Capitals goaltender Braden Holtby to give the Lightning a 4-1 lead in the second period.
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
D8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. WEDNESDAY,
MAY 16 , 2018
stanley cup playoffs
PHOTOS BY JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Capitals forward T.J. Oshie battles in front of the net in the third period of Game 3 on Tuesday night as Lightning goaltender Andrei Vasilevskiy makes one of his 36 saves. Washington outshot Tampa Bay, 38-23.
BARRY SVRLUGA
It is not time for Capitals to panic, but it is time for them to stay out of penalty box
SVRLUGA FROM D1
row in our house.”
What they need, now, is one
win in their house — a house in
which they have now lost four of
seven postseason games —
before heading to Tampa for
Saturday’s Game 5. What we
know is another performance
like Tuesday’s will be
unacceptable. If that happens,
jitters would be warranted.
So a bit of instruction for the
Capitals to make sure that extra
cigarette can stay in the pack:
Stay out of the gosh-darn
penalty box.
“They’re going to make it
count,” forward Tom Wilson
said, “if they get too many
chances.”
They made it count Tuesday.
Through three games, it’s really
the only area of the series in
which Tampa Bay has a distinct
advantage. Steven Stamkos is
here to remind the Caps of that.
Nikita Kucherov is here to
remind the Caps of that. Slow
down the replay of their shots,
and you might catch a glimpse
of either one. But that’s the only
way, because they were blazing.
This is blatantly obvious, but
let’s say it anyway: The
Lightning power play is deadly.
I’d argue it won Tampa
Tuesday’s game, because
Stamkos scored on its first
opportunity and Kucherov on
the next, and a Capitals team
that absolutely dominated two
games in Tampa suddenly felt as
if it was being dominated at
home.
It felt that way because of 5
vs. 4, not 5 vs. 5.
“Both guys shoot the puck
really well,” Washington
defenseman Brooks Orpik said.
“It’s kind of like we have Ovi on
that one side and they kind of
have it on both sides. So take
one guy away, and it leaves the
other guy open. Against a lot of
guys, you force them to shoot
from out there and you’re pretty
happy with yourself.”
Not against Stamkos. Not
against Kucherov. Not against
the Lightning.
The penalties that led to the
goals were avoidable: Capitals
goalie Braden Holtby, of all
people, tripped Lightning
forward Yanni Gourde in front
of the net. And then early in the
second period, Capitals center
Lars Eller corralled a high
rebound in front of Holtby with
his glove — and closed his hand
on the puck.
That’s a no-no, and an
unnecessary one. The Capitals
ended up taking six minors
Capitals defenseman Dmitry Orlov collides with Lightning center J.T. Miller in the second period. Orlov had three hits in the game.
Tuesday. Welcome to the night
of living dangerously.
“We just didn’t do a good
enough job killing them,”
defenseman John Carlson said.
Points for taking ownership
of it, for sure. At one juncture
earlier this postseason,
Washington killed off 24
straight penalties. That, though,
was against the Columbus Blue
Jackets’ feeble power play and a
Pittsburgh Penguins team that
opened the series without
Evgeni Malkin — diminishing
what is normally a lethal unit.
It wasn’t against Stamkos,
who scored 15 goals on the
power play (tied for third in the
NHL) in the regular season, and
it wasn’t against Kucherov, who
had 36 power-play points (tied
for sixth in the league).
Defenseman Victor Hedman,
who assisted on both Tampa Bay
power-play goals Tuesday, is a
master distributor. There’s a
reason this was the third-best
unit during the regular season
and a reason it picked apart
Washington’s penalty kill
Tuesday.
This all warrants
examination. There’s time for
that.
“We’re talking about it, for
sure,” Wilson said. “I think
we’ve got to get back to our
basics. Maybe we’re thinking a
little bit too much.”
That’s the only hint of
searching you’ll get out of the
Capitals’ dressing room at the
moment. Because the playoffs
are more than a month old,
Washington now has a new box
of experiences from which to
draw. Instead of thinking about
the folds of the past, the first
Capitals group to reach the
conference finals in 20 years can
tap into its response when it
lost the first two games of the
postseason, how it has handled
playing without injured center
Nicklas Backstrom for four
games, how it responded when
Wilson was suspended, how it
beat back a Tampa surge in
Game 2.
“We know,” Ovechkin said,
“exactly what we have to do.”
Clean up the penalties on
Thursday, and there’s reason for
optimism that the Caps will
head to Tampa with a threegames-to-one lead. They have
been the better hockey team in
the neutral zone, on defense, in
so many aspects of the game.
They have eight five-on-five
goals over three games. Tampa
Bay has three.
Give the Lightning the man
advantage, and hold on for dear
life. Stay at even strength, and
feel pretty darned good about
yourselves.
“We just got to try to find a
way to win the next one at
home,” Orpik said.
But there’s one other element
that can’t be repeated Thursday
if panic is to be staved off:
Holtby has to be a hero, again.
This might be unfair, because
how was he supposed to stop
any of the Tampa goals Tuesday
night? They were either sniped,
or he was screened.
“There’s always something
you can do a little bit better,”
Holtby said.
Again: the right attitude. For
all the analysis of the Capitals’
more responsible play in this
postseason and all we have
wondered about what might be
different in the dressing room,
the difference in the first 14
games of their postseason was,
in fact, Holtby, their springtime
MVP.
For the Capitals to get to
where they want to go, they
need heroes. It says here Holtby
needs to be one of them.
That’s the thing about this
series, though. There’s still
plenty of time for all of that to
happen. Game 3 was a setback,
discouraging to the red-clad
fans who wanted so badly to
welcome their lads back home,
to cheer them to victory. But it
wasn’t more than a bump.
So don’t start pacing. This is
now a series, sure. But it’s not a
disaster or a meltdown or any of
the various phrases we used to
have to write about this
franchise, regardless of the year.
It’s not any of that stuff.
(Yet.)
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
For more by Barry Svrluga, visit
washingtonpost.com/svrluga.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D9
M2
stanley cup playoffs
GAME 1
GAME 2
GAME 3
Capitals 4,
Lightning 2
Capitals 6,
Lightning 2
Lightning 4,
Capitals 2
Washington leads, 2-1
Game 4
Thursday
at Washington
8 p.m., NBCSN
GAME 5
GAME 6 (IF NEC.)
GAME 7 (IF NEC.)
Saturday
at Tampa Bay
7:15 p.m., NBC
Monday
at Washington
8 p.m., NBCSN
May 23
at Tampa Bay
8 p.m., NBCSN
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Washington center Evgeny Kuznetsov (92) takes a punch to the face by Lightning defenseman Anton Stralman during the third period of Tuesday night’s Game 3. The home team has yet to win a game in this series.
also scored two goals at even
strength, more than it had in the
first two games combined. The
Capitals went 0 for 3 with the
man advantage.
T A K E A WA YS
It’s a series
It’s a series: For the first time in
three games, the Lightning
looked a little something like the
team that led the Eastern
Conference with 113 points
during the regular season and
stormed through the first two
rounds of the playoffs against the
Devils and Bruins. Tampa Bay
scored first for the first time in
the series and took a 3-0 lead
with a pair of goals less than two
minutes apart early in the
second period. The Capitals have
never swept a best-of-seven
series and they’ll have to wait
until at least the next round —
whether that’s this season or
next — to change that. The
Lightning’s dominating win also
ensures that the Eastern
Conference finals will return to
Tampa Bay for at least one more
game. Game 4 is Thursday at
Capital One Arena.
Lightning
Capitals
1
2
3
FINAL
1
0
3
1
0
1
4
2
Vasilevskiy rebounds
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Tampa Bay, Stamkos 6 (Point, Hedman), 13:53 (pp). Penalties: Stralman, TB, (boarding), 8:58; Holtby, WSH, served
by Chiasson, (tripping), 12:57.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Tampa Bay, Kucherov 7 (Stamkos, Hedman), 1:50 (pp). 3, Tampa Bay, Hedman 1 (Palat, Kucherov), 3:37. 4, Washington, Connolly 4 (Stephenson, Niskanen), 10:31. 5, Tampa Bay, Point 6 (Johnson, Coburn), 16:03. Penalties: Eller, WSH, (closing hand on the puck), 1:34; Eller, WSH, (slashing), 6:44; Callahan, TB, (roughing), 13:20.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 6, Washington, Kuznetsov 9 (Oshie, Eller), 16:58. Penalties: Killorn, TB, (interference), 4:01; Stamkos, TB, (roughing),
7:01; Eller, WSH, (cross checking), 7:01; Kempny, WSH, (cross checking), 7:17; Kuznetsov, WSH, (high sticking), 12:03.
SHOTS ON GOAL
Tampa Bay .................................................... 10
Washington ................................................. 14
8
11
5
13
23
38
Power-play opportunities: Tampa Bay 2 of 5; Washington 0 of 3. Goalies: Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 9-4 (38 shots-36 saves).
Washington, Holtby 10-4 (23-19). A: 18,506 (18,277). T: 2:39.
Special teams
disparity
The Lightning and Capitals
entered Game 3 with similarly
well-performing power plays,
and while Tampa Bay stayed hot
with the man advantage,
Washington fizzled. Steven
Stamkos opened the scoring with
his third power-play goal of the
series in the first period, while
Nikita Kucherov added to the
Lightning’s lead with a powerplay strike early in the second.
Tampa Bay, which benefited
from six Capitals penalties and
went 2-for-5 on the power play,
FACEOFF PCT.
PENALTY MIN.
HITS
BLOCKS
GIVEAWAYS
SAVE PCT.
Lightning
56%
8
22
18
10
.947
Capitals
44%
12
33
7
9
.826
Source: NHL.com
Lightning goalie Andrei
Vasilevskiy, who was pulled
during the second intermission
of Game 1 and looked shaky
while allowing six goals Sunday,
returned to the form that made
him a Vezina Trophy finalist this
season. The 23-year-old Russian
stopped all 14 Capitals shots in
the first period and 36 of 38
shots in the game. Washington’s
first goal, a Brett Connolly tally
midway through the second
period, came after officials
missed what should have been
an icing call.
Home-ice advantage?
With the Capitals playing at
home for the first time in 10 days
and hosting an Eastern
Conference finals game for the
first time since June 2, 1998,
Capital One Arena was rocking
for Game 3. Most of the sellout
crowd went home disappointed
after Washington fell to 3-4 in its
home rink this postseason.
Home teams are now 33-39 in
the playoffs this year, which
would rank as the second-worst
winning percentage since 1968,
according to ESPN Stats and
Information. What’s more, the
Capitals remained winless and
have been outscored 20-11 in six
playoff home games against the
Lightning all-time.
— Scott Allen
Lightning goaltender Vasilevskiy settles in, helps Tampa Bay get on board
BY
S AMANTHA P ELL
Andrei Vasilevskiy slid to his
right, the puck rocketing from
Alex Ovechkin’s stick and hitting
the 6-foot-3, 207-pound goaltender in the chest.
The Washington Capitals’ captain eyed the sliver of open net,
stood poised at point-blank range
to Vasilevskiy’s left, ready to net a
tying goal late in the first period of
Game 3 of the Eastern Conference
finals at Capital One Arena. But
the 23-year-old goalie had an answer for the Russian superstar.
And for a moment — and nearly
the next 40 minutes after — the
criticism that had peppered Vasilevskiy in the first two games of
this series came to a screeching
halt. Yes, he gave up 10 goals in the
games, but on Tuesday, the net was
his with 36 saves on 38 shots.
“It wasn’t really fair for him the
first couple and we really didn’t do
a good job in front of him so it was
big,” defenseman Anton Stralman
said. “He played great and I think
he liked the fact that we played a
good team game and structure
and made his life a little bit easier.”
Vasilevskiy’s first-period save
was key — the Capitals have had a
knack for scoring late in periods in
this series. The stop allowed Tampa Bay to enter the first intermission with a lead. And with the
big-time save came two big-time
plays for the Lightning, which
scored twice in the first few minutes of the second period en route
to a 4-2 victory.
Vasilevskiy had come under
scrutiny after yielding six goals in
the Game 2 loss, but his teammates and coaches remained committed to a goalie many view as a
Vezina Trophy front-runner for
the league’s top goaltender.
“They got some looks, but he
was right there. He has been outstanding for us all year and he was
great tonight,” Lightning captain
Steven Stamkos said.
Vasilevskiy allowed 10 goals in a
five-game first-round playoff series and 12 in the second-round
series against the Boston Bruins.
None of that mattered Tuesday.
Vasilevskiy finished the regular
season with a 44-17-3 record, a 2.62
goals against average and a .920
save percentage. He also set a
Lightning record for wins, road
wins (18), shutouts (8), road shutouts (6) and saves (1,908).
“I just thought he was in the
zone tonight right from the get go,”
Tampa Bay Coach Jon Cooper said.
“But our team helped him tonight.”
Vasilevskiy’s solid night was
dinged midway through the second period, when forward Brett
Connolly’s one-timer from the left
circle cut the Capitals’ deficit to
3-1, providing a glimmer of hope
for the hosts. But a crucial threeon-one stop from Vasilevskiy on
defenseman Christian Djoos minutes later turned momentum back
to Tampa Bay as Vasilevskiy rebounded from two troubling performances at Amalie Arena.
The Capitals’ second goal came
after Washington played with an
empty net late in the third period
and Evgeny Kuznetsov scored
from a sharp angle along the line
to cut the Lightning lead to 4-2.
The Capitals kept their net empty
after that, and Vasilevskiy once
again stopped a flurry of shots.
In Game 1, Vasilevskiy allowed
four goals on 25 shots and was
replaced by backup goalie Louis
Domingue to start the third period. In Game 2, he allowed six goals
on 37 shots. Twenty-seven of the 37
shots came in the final two periods
after the Capitals took a 2-1 lead.
But in Game 3, with Tampa Bay
shuffling its forward lines to get
better matchups against the Capitals’ top line, the Lightning rolled.
But as the final horn sounded in
D.C. and Vasilevskiy skated off the
ice as teammates went over to pat
him on the helmet, the Lightning
had changed the momentum of
the series.
“That is when you need your
best players to step up,” Stralman
said. “I liked the way we played in
front of him and I think that would
give him more confidence too that
he knows the team is on tonight
and we are doing our job.”
samantha.pell@washpost.com
D10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
METROS CHAMPIONSHIP GOLF
. WEDNESDAY,
MAY 16 , 2018
MAC BASEBALL CHAMPIONSHIP
Georgetown Prep overtakes Gonzaga Panthers walk off with outright title
BY
JOSHUA NEEDELMAN
Georgetown Prep wasn’t supposed to win at Tuesday’s Metros
championship. That’s what Little
Hoyas junior Gus Haglund said,
anyway, after the final scores had
been tallied at PB Dye Golf
Course in Ijamsville. So, who was
the favorite?
“Gonzaga,” Haglund said, referencing the defending champions.
Haglund’s
premonition
proved wrong, thanks in part to
his own play on the back side.
The junior shot a 40-34 on
Tuesday, helping Georgetown
Prep to a tournament-low 373
strokes and the championship
cup, which Gonzaga Coach Mike
Hanagan presented to the Little
Hoyas.
The
Eagles,
fresh
off
their Washington Catholic Athletic Conference title last week,
shot a 383 for second place.
Landon (417 strokes) and Bishop
O’Connell (431 strokes) earned
third and fourth, respectively.
Georgetown Prep Coach Bob
Barry, in his 34th year with the
team, attributed his team’s victory to its resiliency after a
tough first side during which
Coach credits resiliency
of Little Hoyas in win
over defending champs
three of his golfers shot 4 over
par and another was 3 over.
“I had no clue that we were in
the hunt, at all,” Barry said.
Haglund shared that sentiment.
“I was like, all right, we’re
going to lose. I said to [former
teammate] Jack [Rolle], midround: ‘Jack, where are we going
to eat after this? I want to get out
of here,’” Haglund said.
Then the tide turned for Haglund and his teammates. He
finished with a par and a birdie,
in the process hearing whispers
that the Eagles’ play was faltering.
Still, the Little Hoyas didn’t
feel confident until the tournament official wrote their final
stroke count in red marker on
the scoring whiteboard.
The win marks a noteworthy
turnaround for a team that Haglund described as “horrible”
last season, when Georgetown
Prep came up short not just at
Metros but at the Interstate Athletic Conference championship.
The Little Hoyas reclaimed the
IAC title this season, not forgetting the memories of last season’s disappointment, deriving
motivation from the shortcomings.
Their efforts were aided by
two new golfers, freshmen Joe
Hemsley and Nick Foster. On
Tuesday, Hemsley shot 39-36,
and Foster 38-37.
Haglund believes the future is
bright for the team, with the
pair set to return next season
along with himself and Keegan
Shreves (40-40) and Gary Bullard (36-39).
For now, though, the Little
Hoyas plan to savor the moment.
Haglund said he had never
touched the championship cup
before this season — only seen it
in pictures.
On Tuesday, after the rest of
the teams had dispersed, Georgetown Prep stuck around for a few
minutes, holding the cup atop a
cliff, looking out on the picturesque course full of slopes, trees
and rivers. The Little Hoyas were
back.
joshua.needelman@washpost.com
BY
M ICHAEL E RRIGO
Of all the motivational chirps
and verbal encouragements
lobbed at Potomac School pitcher
Carter Bosch throughout his
eight innings on the mound during Tuesday’s Mid-Atlantic Athletic Conference championship
game in McLean, one question
from second baseman Matthew
Plaza stood out.
“How bad do you want it,
Bosch?” he asked, as the Georgetown commit worked his way
through the Saint James lineup
for the third time.
Bosch answered over and over
again in the Panthers’ 3-2 walkoff nine-inning win over the
Saints, pitching into extra innings and hitting a game-tying
double with two outs in the bottom of the seventh.
Bosch’s performance helped
the Panthers (14-5) win an outright MAC title for the first time
in team history. This was their
fifth tournament win, but they
had never before won the regular
season and the tournament in the
same year.
“This game was important to
me. This was a chance to do
something pretty special as a
POTOMAC SCHOOL 3,
SAINT JAMES 2 (9)
Bosch delivers for hosts
in extra-inning victory
senior,” Bosch said.
After Saint James took a 2-1
lead on a bloop single in the top of
the seventh, Plaza started a rally
with a leadoff double in the bottom of the inning. Two outs later
there were men on the corners
and Bosch was at the plate. Staring down the end of his high
school baseball career, he sent a
line drive to Potomac School’s
short right field fence. It was
ruled a ground-rule double as the
ball skidded into a neighboring
house’s back yard. Tie game.
“It was fitting of him,” Coach
Eric Crozier said. “He’s a guy that
has a lot on him and he has to live
up to that hype. He keeps finding
a way to get it done.”
In extras, senior Thomas Riley
reached base on a controversial
safe call at first and quickly stole
second. On Plaza’s single up the
middle, Riley raced toward home
and the title seemed to be in
hand. But a dart from the center
fielder reached the plate first,
Riley was out, and the game
continued.
Senior Brenden Mabus relieved Bosch in the ninth after the
senior reached his pitch limit. He
struck out a batter and got a
lunging catch from center fielder
Michael Valentine to set up what
would become his own heroic
half-inning.
In 2016, the Panthers won the
MAC tournament on a walk-off
single. This year, Mabus had a
chance to do the same.
He came to the plate in the
bottom of the ninth with one out
and the bases loaded. A flyball
would end it. So would a wellplaced grounder. Mabus waited
for his pitch, and on a 3-2 count
he finally got it. A ball four.
The winning run walked home,
and the Panthers mobbed Mabus
at first base.
“We talked about it all season,
but this was one of the first games
where we fought back and got
through it,” Bosch said. “We lost a
couple after getting down this
season, but I had no doubt in my
mind today. We just really wanted
it.”
michael.errigo@washpost.com
SCOREBOARD
HOCKEY
B A S K ET B A L L
SOCCER
Stanley Cup playoffs
NBA playoffs
NBA DRAFT ORDER
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Best of seven
Best of seven
Thursday, June 21
At Barclays Center, Brooklyn, N.Y.
EASTERN CONFERENCE
CAPITALS ELIMINATED PENGUINS, 4-2
EASTERN CONFERENCE
CAVALIERS ELIMINATED RAPTORS, 4-0
Game 1: Pittsburgh 3, at Washington 2
Game 2: at Washington 4, Pittsburgh 1
Game 3: Washington 4, at Pittsburgh 3
Game 4: at Pittsburgh 3, Washington 1
Game 5: at Washington 6, Pittsburgh 3
Game 6: Washington 2, at Pittsburgh 1 (OT)
Game 1: Cleveland 113, at Toronto 112 (OT)
Game 2: Cleveland 128, at Toronto 110
Game 3: at Cleveland 105, Toronto 103
Game 4: at Cleveland 128, Toronto 93
Game 1: at Boston 117, Philadelphia 101
Game 2: at Boston 108, Philadelphia 103
Game 3: Boston 101, at Philadelphia 98 (OT)
Game 4: at Philadelphia 103, Boston 92
Game 5: at Boston 114, Philadelphia 112
Game 1: Boston 6, at Tampa Bay 2
Game 2: at Tampa Bay 4, Boston 2
Game 3: Tampa Bay 4, at Boston 1
Game 4: Tampa Bay 4, at Boston 3 (OT)
Game 5: at Tampa Bay 3, Boston 1
WESTERN CONFERENCE
WARRIORS ELIMINATED PELICANS, 4-1
Game 1: at Golden State 123, New Orleans 101
Game 2: at Golden State 121, New Orleans 116
Game 3: at New Orleans 119, Golden State 100
Game 4: Golden State 118, at New Orleans 92
Game 5: at Golden State 113, New Orleans 104
WESTERN CONFERENCE
JETS ELIMINATED PREDATORS, 4-3
Game 1: Winnipeg 4, at Nashville 1
Game 2: at Nashville 5, Winnipeg 4 (2OT)
Game 3: at Winnipeg 7, Nashville 4
Game 4: Nashville 2, at Winnipeg 1
Game 5: Winnipeg 6, at Nashville 2
Game 6: Nashville 4, at Winnipeg 0
Game 7: Winnipeg 5, at Nashville 1
ROCKETS ELIMINATED JAZZ, 4-1
GOLDEN KNIGHTS ELIMINATED SHARKS, 4-2
Game 1: at Vegas 7, San Jose 0
Game 2: San Jose 4, at Vegas 3 (2OT)
Game 3: Vegas 4, at San Jose 3 (OT)
Game 4: at San Jose 4, Vegas 0
Game 5: at Vegas 5, San Jose 3
Game 6: Vegas 3, at San Jose 0
Best of seven; x-If necessary
EASTERN CONFERENCE
CELTICS LEAD CAVALIERS, 2-0
Best of seven; x-If necessary
EASTERN CONFERENCE
CAPITALS LEAD LIGHTNING, 2-1
Game 1: Washington 4, at Tampa Bay 2
Game 2: Washington 6, at Tampa Bay 2
Game 3: Tampa Bay 4, at Washington 2
Thursday’s game: Tampa Bay at Washington, 8
Saturday’s game: Washington at Tampa Bay, 7:15
x-Monday's game: Tampa Bay at Washington, 8
x-Wednesday’s game: Washington at Tampa Bay, 8
WESTERN CONFERENCE
JETS AND GOLDEN KNIGHTS TIED, 1-1
Game 1: at Winnipeg 4, Vegas 2
Game 2: Vegas 3, at Winnipeg 1
Wednesday’s game: Winnipeg at Vegas, 9
Friday’s game: Winnipeg at Vegas, 8
Sunday’s game: Vegas at Winnipeg, 3
x-Tuesday’s game: Winnipeg at Vegas, 9
x-Thursday, May 24: Vegas at Winnipeg, 8
WESTERN CONFERENCE
WARRIORS LEAD ROCKETS, 1-0
Game 1: Golden State 119, at Houston 106
Wednesday’s game: Golden State at Houston, 9
Sunday’s game: Houston at Golden State, 8
Tuesday’s game: Houston at Golden State, 9
x-Thursday, May 24: Golden State at Houston, 9
x-Saturday, May 26: Houston at Golden State, 9
x-Monday, May 28: Golden State at Houston, 9
Cleveland ............................ 27
Boston ................................ 23
Entering Tuesday’s game
GOALS
G
12
10
10
9
8
7
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
PLUS/MINUS
+/12
10
10
9
9
8
8
8
8
7
7
6
6
6
6
6
5
5
5
5
L A C RO S S E
NCAA men’s tournament
OPENING ROUND
WEDNESDAY’S RESULT
Robert Morris 12, Canisius 6
FIRST ROUND
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
Yale 15, U-Mass. 13
Duke 17, Villanova 11
Albany 18, Richmond 9
Loyola (Md.) 13, Virginia 9
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Maryland 14, Robert Morris 11
Denver 9, Notre Dame 7
at Johns Hopkins 10, Georgetown 9 (OT)
Cornell 10, at Syracuse 9
QUARTERFINALS
SATURDAY’S GAMES
IN HEMPSTEAD, N.Y.
Yale (14-3) vs. Loyola (Md.) (13-3), noon
Albany (NY) (15-2) vs. Denver (13-3), 2:30
SUNDAY’S GAMES
IN ANNAPOLIS
Maryland (13-3) vs. Cornell (13-4), noon
Johns Hopkins (12-4) vs. Duke (14-3), 2:30
IN FOXBOROUGH, MASS.
SEMIFINALS
SATURDAY, MAY 26
Maryland-Syracuse-Cornell winner vs. Johns HopkinsDuke winner, noon or 2:30
Yale-Loyola (Md.)-Virginia winner vs. Albany (NY)-Denver winner, noon or 2:30
Semifinal winners, 1
SECOND ROUND
Game 1: at Boston 108, Cleveland 83
Game 2: at Boston 107, Cleveland 94
Saturday’s game: Boston at Cleveland, 8:30
Monday’s game: Boston at Cleveland, 8:30
x-Wednesday’s game: Cleveland at Boston, 8:30
x-Friday, May 25: Boston at Cleveland, 8:30
x-Sunday, May 27: Cleveland at Boston, 8:30
Celtics 107, Cavaliers 94
STANLEY CUP PLAYOFF LEADERS
CHAMPIONSHIP
MONDAY, MAY 28
Game 1: at Houston 110, Utah 96
Game 2: Utah 116, at Houston 108
Game 3: Houston 113, at Utah 92
Game 4: Houston 100, at Utah 87
Game 5: at Houston 112, Utah 102
CONFERENCE FINALS
CONFERENCE FINALS
Name Team .......................................... GP
Brooks Orpik Washington.....................14
Jake Guentzel Pittsburgh .....................12
Jonathan MarchessaulVegas................12
William Karlsson Vegas........................12
Tom Wilson Washington ......................11
Olli Maatta Pittsburgh..........................12
Tyler Myers Winnipeg...........................13
Nate Schmidt Vegas .............................12
Paul Stastny Winnipeg .........................14
Zdeno Chara Boston..............................12
Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh .....................12
Patrice Bergeron Boston.......................11
John Carlson Washington.....................14
Mark Scheifele Winnipeg......................14
Reilly Smith Vegas................................12
Jacob Trouba Winnipeg.........................14
Dustin Byfuglien Winnipeg...................14
Dylan DeMelo San Jose.........................10
Nikolaj Ehlers Winnipeg........................13
Brayden McNabb Vegas ........................12
1. Phoenix
2. Sacramento
3. Atlanta
4. Memphis
5. Dallas
6. Orlando
7. Chicago
8. Cleveland (from Brooklyn via Boston)
9. New York
10. Philadelphia (from LA Lakers via Phoenix)
11. Charlotte
12. LA Clippers (from Detroit)
13. LA Clippers
14. Denver
15. Washington
16. Phoenix (from Miami)
17. Milwaukee
18. San Antonio
19. Atlanta (from Minnesota)
20. Minnesota (from Oklahoma City via Utah)
21. Utah
22. Chicago (from New Orleans)
23. Indiana
24. Portland
25. LA Lakers (from Cleveland)
26. Philadelphia
27. Boston
28. Golden State
29. Brooklyn (from Toronto)
30. Atlanta (from Houston via LA Clippers)
CELTICS ELIMINATED 76ERS, 4-1
LIGHTNING ELIMINATED BRUINS, 4-1
Name Team .......................................GP
Mark Scheifele Winnipeg ................. 14
Jake Guentzel Pittsburgh ................. 12
Alex Ovechkin Washington .............. 14
Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh ................. 12
Evgeny Kuznetsov Washington........ 14
Filip Forsberg Nashville .................... 13
Patrice Bergeron Boston................... 11
Jake DeBrusk Boston........................ 12
Tomas Hertl San Jose....................... 10
Nikita Kucherov Tampa Bay ............. 12
Jonathan MarchessaultVegas .......... 12
David Pastrnak Boston ..................... 12
Paul Stastny Winnipeg ..................... 14
Viktor Arvidsson Nashville............... 13
Sean Couturier Philadelphia ............... 5
William Karlsson Vegas.................... 12
T.J. Oshie Washington...................... 14
Ondrej Palat Tampa Bay ................... 12
Steven Stamkos Tampa Bay............. 12
Austin Watson Nashville.................. 13
FIRST ROUND
CLEVELAND
James
Love
Thompson
Hill
Smith
Green
Korver
Hood
Nance Jr.
Calderon
Osman
TOTALS
28
25
22
36
17 — 94
23 — 107
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
38:47 16-29 5-10 1-10 12 3 42
35:16 9-18 2-2 2-15 2 4 22
29:40
4-6 0-0 4-7 0 3
8
33:18
1-4 1-2 1-2 1 3
3
27:22
0-7 0-0 0-3 1 2
0
27:52
2-5 1-2 0-2 1 3
6
21:29
4-8 1-1 0-1 0 0 11
11:20
1-2 0-0 0-2 1 1
2
11:20
0-1 0-0 0-3 0 2
0
1:48
0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0
0
1:48
0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0
0
240 37-80 10-17 8-45 18 21 94
Percentages: FG .463, FT .588. 3-Point Goals: 10-31, .323
(James 5-11, Korver 2-5, Love 2-6, Green 1-3, Hill 0-2,
Smith 0-4). Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers: 15 (13
PTS). Blocked Shots: 5 (Green 2, Hill 2, James).
Turnovers: 15 (James 6, Green 5, Thompson 2, Hood,
Love). Steals: 2 (Nance Jr. 2). Technical Fouls: Thompson, 5:14 third
BOSTON
Morris
Tatum
Horford
Brown
Rozier
Smart
Baynes
Ojeleye
Monroe
Yabusele
Nader
TOTALS
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
34:03 5-14 1-1 1-5 3 5 12
31:32 5-12 0-0 0-3 2 3 11
37:27 5-13 4-5 3-10 4 0 15
35:10 9-18 2-4 2-7 3 2 23
35:53 7-16 2-2 0-5 2 3 18
30:58
3-9 4-4 3-5 9 3 11
17:05
4-7 0-0 2-6 1 0
9
9:19
0-0 2-2 0-4 0 1
2
6:07
1-2 2-2 0-1 0 1
4
1:21
0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0
0
1:05
1-1 0-0 0-0 0 0
2
240 40-92 17-20 11-46 24 18 107
Percentages: FG .435, FT .850. 3-Point Goals: 10-31, .323
(Brown 3-8, Rozier 2-8, Baynes 1-1, Smart 1-3, Tatum
1-3, Horford 1-4, Morris 1-4). Team Rebounds: 5. Team
Turnovers: 5 (5 PTS). Blocked Shots: 2 (Horford 2).
Turnovers: 5 (Tatum 2, Brown, Morris, Rozier). Steals: 8
(Smart 4, Horford 2, Brown, Tatum). Technical Fouls:
Morris, 5:14 third
NBA PLAYOFF LEADERS
Entering Tuesday’s game
SCORING
G
James, CLE ........................ 12
Davis, NOR .......................... 9
Harden, HOU ..................... 11
Westbrook, OKC ................. 6
Durant, GOL ...................... 11
Wall, WAS .......................... 6
Antetokounmpo, MIL ......... 7
McCollum, POR ................... 4
Middleton, MIL ................... 7
George, OKC ........................ 6
Mitchell, UTA .................... 11
Holiday, NOR ...................... 9
Aldridge, SAN ..................... 5
Beal, WAS ........................... 6
Oladipo, IND ........................ 7
DeRozan, TOR ................... 10
Paul, HOU .......................... 11
Thompson, GOL ................ 11
Embiid, PHL ........................ 8
Tatum, BOS ...................... 13
Dragic, MIA ......................... 5
Lillard, POR ......................... 4
Redick, PHL ....................... 10
Brown, BOS ....................... 12
Lowry, TOR ....................... 10
Rozier, BOS ....................... 13
FG
145
106
104
64
116
56
69
40
67
49
102
88
37
49
53
87
91
93
60
84
35
25
60
82
60
75
FIELD GOALS
FG
Gobert, UTA .................................... 55
Capela, HOU .................................... 70
Scott, WAS ..................................... 26
Favors, UTA ..................................... 42
Turner, IND ...................................... 33
Young, IND ...................................... 36
Middleton, MIL ................................ 67
Horford, BOS ................................... 86
Adams, OKC .................................... 27
Sabonis, IND ................................... 36
Antetokounmpo, MIL ...................... 69
Gortat, WAS ................................... 24
Johnson, MIA .................................. 23
Valanciunas, TOR ............................ 58
James, CLE .................................... 145
Davis, NOR .................................... 106
McCollum, POR ............................... 40
Aminu, POR ..................................... 27
Holiday, NOR ................................... 88
Rose, MIN ........................................ 29
FT PTS. AVG.
87 392 32.7
53 271 30.1
80 326 29.6
33 176 29.3
63 317 28.8
40 156 26.0
38 180 25.7
10 101 25.2
14 173 24.7
31 148 24.7
39 268 24.4
21 213 23.7
41 118 23.6
20 139 23.2
30 159 22.7
43 227 22.7
34 241 21.9
20 240 21.8
43 171 21.4
58 242 18.6
15
93 18.6
15
74 18.5
36 182 18.2
15 209 17.4
26 174 17.4
38 226 17.4
FGA
84
108
41
68
54
60
112
145
46
62
121
43
42
107
269
204
77
52
170
57
PCT.
.655
.648
.634
.618
.611
.600
.598
.593
.587
.581
.570
.558
.548
.542
.539
.520
.519
.519
.518
.509
31. Phoenix
32. Memphis
33. Dallas
34. Atlanta
35. Orlando
36. New York (from Chicago via Oklahoma City)
37. Sacramento
38. Philadelphia (from Brooklyn)
39. Philadelphia (from New York)
40. Brooklyn (from LA Lakers via Toronto via Orlando)
41. Orlando (from Charlotte via Phoenix via Memphis)
42. Detroit
43. Denver (from LA Clippers via New York via Philadelphia)
44. Washington
45. Brooklyn (from Milwaukee)
46. Houston (from Miami via Memphis)
47. LA Lakers (from Denver via Chicago via Utah)
48. Minnesota
49. San Antonio
50. Indiana
51. New Orleans
52. Utah
53. Oklahoma City
54. Dallas (from Portland via Denver)
55. Charlotte (from Cleveland via Brooklyn via Philadelphia)
56. Philadelphia
57. Oklahoma City (from Boston)
58. Denver (from Golden State)
59. Phoenix (from Toronto)
60. Philadelphia (from Houston)
TE N NI S
MLS
ATP/WTA
EASTERN
W
Atlanta United FC ............8
Columbus .........................6
New York City FC .............6
Orlando City .....................6
New York .........................6
New England ....................5
Chicago ............................3
Philadelphia .....................3
Montreal ..........................3
Toronto FC .......................2
D.C. United .......................1
L
2
3
2
3
3
3
5
5
8
6
5
T PTS
1
25
3
21
3
21
1
19
0
18
2
17
2
11
2
11
0
9
1
7
2
5
GF
25
17
21
20
23
18
13
8
14
12
10
GA
13
10
16
16
11
14
17
14
26
18
16
WESTERN
W
Sporting KC ......................7
Los Angeles FC ................6
Dallas ...............................4
Portland ...........................4
Vancouver ........................4
Real Salt Lake ..................4
Minnesota United ............4
Houston ...........................3
LA Galaxy .........................3
San Jose ...........................2
Colorado ...........................2
Seattle .............................2
L
2
2
1
3
5
5
7
3
6
5
5
5
T PTS
2
23
2
20
4
16
2
14
2
14
1
13
0
12
3
12
1
10
2
8
2
8
2
8
GF
23
22
14
14
12
13
13
20
14
15
11
7
GA
12
16
9
14
20
21
21
15
19
17
13
11
NFL
Cleveland Browns: Claimed OL Anthony Fabiano off
waivers from Indianapolis and OL Avery Gennesy off
waivers from Jacksonville. Waived P Michael Carrizosa
and OL Christian Schneider.
Detroit Lions: Acquired OL Adam Bisnowaty off waivers
from the New York Giants. Signed S Tracy Walker.
Waived OL Brett Kendrick.
Green Bay Packers: Signed CB Jaire Alexander.
Los Angeles Rams: Agreed to terms with WRs LaQuvionte Gonzalez, Ricky Jeune and Steven Mitchell; RB Nick
Holley; DTs Dalton Keene and McKay Murphy; OL
Jeremiah Kolone; DBs Afolabi Laguda, Steven Parker
and Chucky Williams; TE Codey McElroy; CBs Curtis
Mikell and Ramon Richards; QB Luis Perez; LB Tegray
Scales and DE Brian Womac.
San Francisco 49ers: Claimed CB C.J. Goodwin off
waivers from the New York Giants. Waived WR DeAndre
Carter. Signed DL Blaine Woodson to a three-year
contract.
Tennessee Titans: Agreed To Terms With LB Rashaan
Evans.
NHL
Arizona Coyotes: Signed C David Ullstrom to a one-year,
two-way contract.
Colorado Avalanche: Signed D Mark Barberio to a
two-year contract.
COLLEGES
St. Norbert: Named B.J. Bryant men’s volleyball coach
when the program begins in the 2019-20 academic year.
Texas Tech: Announced graduate basketball G Matt
Mooney is transferring from South Dakota and will be
eligible to play next season.
At Foro Italico; In Rome
Purse: Men, $5.82 million (Masters 1000)
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
MEN’S SINGLES — FIRST ROUND
Nikoloz Basilashvili, Georgia, def. Filippo Baldi, Italy,
6-4, 4-6, 6-4; Damir Dzumhur, Bosnia-Herzegovina, def.
Fernando Verdasco, Spain, 6-3, 6-1; Lucas Pouille (16),
France, def. Andreas Seppi, Italy, 6-2, 3-6, 7-6 (7-3);
Diego Schwartzman (14), Argentina, def. Nicolas Jarry,
Chile, 6-4, 6-1; Stefanos Tsitsipas, Greece, def. Borna
Coric, Croatia, 4-1 retired; Denis Shapovalov, Canada,
def. Tomas Berdych (15), Czech Republic, 1-6, 6-3, 7-6
(7-5).
MEN’S SINGLES — SECOND ROUND
Peter Gojowczyk, Germany, def. Lorenzo Sonego, Italy,
6-3, 6-4; David Goffin (9), Belgium, def. Marco Cecchinato, Italy, 5-7, 6-2, 6-2; Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany,
def. Jack Sock (13), United States, 6-4, 6-2; Ryan
Harrison, United States, tied with Marin Cilic (4),
Croatia, 6-6 (3-3), susp., rain.
WOMEN’S SINGLES — FIRST ROUND
at Portland 1, Seattle 0
Atlanta United FC 2, at Orlando City 1
New York City FC 2, at Los Angeles FC 2, tie
WEDNESDAY’S MATCH
MEN’S DOUBLES — FIRST ROUND
at Real Salt Lake 3, D.C. United 2
San Jose 3, at Minnesota United 1
Philadelphia 2, at Montreal 0
at Dallas 3, LA Galaxy 2
at Columbus 3, Chicago 0
at New England 3, Toronto FC 2
New York 2, at Colorado 1
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Steve Johnson, United State, and Dominic Thiem,
Austria, def. Alexander and Mischa Zverev, Germany,
6-7 (7-4), 6-3, 10-7; Robin Haase, and Jean-Julien Rojer,
Netherlands, def. Julio Peralta, Chile, and Horacio
Zeballos, Argentina, 6-4, 6-4; Juan Martin del Potro and
Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, def. Simone Bolelli and
Fabio Fognini, Italy, 6-4, 1-6, 11-9.
San Jose at Vancouver, 10:30
FRIDAY’S MATCH
Orlando City at Toronto FC, 8
SATURDAY’S MATCHES
D.C. United at San Jose, 10:30
Colorado at New York City FC, 1
Los Angeles FC at Portland, 3
Vancouver at Dallas, 4
Columbus at New England, 7:30
Real Salt Lake at Philadelphia, 7:30
WOMEN’S DOUBLES — FIRST ROUND
Madison Keys and Venus Williams, United States, def.
Barbora Krejcikova and Katerina Siniakova, Czech Republic, 2-6, 6-1, 10-8; Daria Gavrilova, Australia, and
Hsieh Su-Wei, Taiwan, def. Alicja Rosolska, Poland, and
Abigail Spears, United States, 6-4, 6-4.
SUNDAY’S MATCHES
Sporting KC at Minnesota United, 2
Houston at Chicago, 4
New York at Atlanta United FC, 7
AU TO R AC I NG
MONDAY’S MATCH
NASCAR Cup
LA Galaxy at Montreal, 3
SCHEDULE
FRIDAY, MAY 20
FC Dallas at Toronto, 8
New York City FC at Houston, 9
San Jose at LA Galaxy, 11
NWSL
Baltimore Orioles: Announced INF Renato Nunez cleared
waivers and was assigned outright to Norfolk (IL).
Boston Red Sox: Placed RHP Carson Smith on the 10-day
DL. Recalled LHP Bobby Poyner from Pawtucket (IL).
Acquired LHP Josh Taylor from the Arizona Diamondbacks to complete the trade for INF Deven Marrero.
Chicago White Sox: Reinstated 2B Yoan Moncada from
the 10-day DL.
Cleveland Indians: Selected the contract of RHP Neil
Ramirez from Columbus (IL). Placed OF Bradley Zimmer
on the 10-day DL, retroactive to May 12. Transferred
LHP Ryan Merritt from the 10- to the 60-day DL.
New York Yankees: Recalled OF Clint Frazier from
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Designated RHP David Hale
for assignment.
Oakland Athletics: Reinstated OF Stephen Piscotty from
the bereavement list. Optioned RHP Kendall Graveman
to Nashville (PCL).
Seattle Mariners: Placed 2B Robinson Cano on the
restricted list.
Texas Rangers: Placed 3B Adrian Beltre on the 10-day
DL, retroactive to May 14. Purchased the contract of INF
Hanser Alberto from Round Rock (PCL).
Atlanta Braves: Claimed LHP Chad Bell off waivers from
Detroit Tigers and optioned him to Gwinnett (IL).
Chicago Cubs: Activated RHP Yu Darvish from the 10-day
DL. Optioned OF Mark Zagunis to Iowa (PCL).
Los Angeles Dodgers: Activated 3B Justin Turner and 2B
Logan Forsythe from the 10-day DL. Optioned INF/C Kyle
Farmer and OF Tim Locastro to Oklahoma City (PCL).
New York Mets: Placed LHP Jerry Blevins on the
paternity leave list. Recalled LHP Buddy Baumann and
RHP Jacob Rhame from Las Vegas (PCL). Optioned RHP
Corey Oswalt to Las Vegas.
Philadelphia Phillies: Sent RHP Jerad Eickhoff on a rehab
assignment to Reading (EL).
St. Louis Cardinals: Placed RHP Adam Wainwright back
on the 10-day DL. Recalled RHP Jack Flaherty from
Memphis (PCL).
San Diego Padres: Placed LHP Joey Lucchesi on the
10-day DL. Recalled INF Carlos Asuaje from El Paso
(PCL).
San Francisco Giants: Optioned OF Austin Slater to
Sacramento (PCL). Recalled INF Miguel Gomez from
Richmond (SL).
ITLAIAN OPEN
Timea Babos, Hungary, def. Sara Errani, Italy, 6-3, 7-6
(8-6); Daria Kasatkina (14), Russia, def. Ajla Tomljanovic, Australia, 6-0, 6-4; Danielle Collins, United
States, def. Sorana Cirstea, Romania, 6-3, 4-6, 6-4;
Hsieh Su-Wei, Taiwan, def. Aryna Sabalenka, Belarus,
6-2, 6-4; Elena Vesnina, Russia, def. Laura Siegemund,
Germany, 7-6 (7-5), 6-2; Maria Sakkari, Greece, def. Kiki
Bertens, Netherlands, 6-2, 4-6, 6-3; Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia, def. Polona Hercog, Slovenia, 6-2, 6-4;
Angelique Kerber (11), Germany, def. Zarina Diyas,
Kazakhstan, 6-2, 7-6 (8-6); Irina-Camelia Begu, Romania, def. Peng Shuai, China, 4-6, 6-4, 6-1; Maria Sharapova, Russia, def. Ashleigh Barty (16), Australia, 7-5, 3-6,
6-2; Elina Svitolina (4), Ukraine, def. Petra Martic,
Croatia, 6-1, 6-2; Anastasija Sevastova (15), Latvia, def.
Kristina Mladenovic, France, 6-3, 3-0 retired; Jelena
Ostapenko (5), Latvia, def. Zhang Shuai, China, 6-2, 7-5.
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
TRANSACTIONS
MLB
H I GH S C HOOLS
W
North Carolina .................6
Seattle .............................4
Orlando ............................3
Chicago ............................2
Portland ...........................2
Utah .................................1
Houston ...........................1
Washington .....................1
Sky Blue FC ......................0
L
0
1
2
2
3
1
3
4
4
T PTS
2
20
1
13
3
12
5
11
3
9
5
8
4
7
2
5
1
1
GF
13
11
8
12
11
6
7
7
4
GA
5
6
7
11
12
5
12
11
10
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
at North Carolina 1, Washington 0
Orlando 2, at Portland 1
at Houston 2, Chicago 2, tie
at Seattle 4, Sky Blue FC 1
SATURDAY’S MATCHES
Portland at Washington, 7
Houston at Utah, 3:30
North Carolina at Sky Blue FC, 7
Chicago at Seattle, 10
WEDNESDAY, MAY 23
Sky Blue FC at Washington, 7:30
North Carolina at Orlando, 7:30
Seattle at Houston, 8
FRIDAY, MAY 25
Utah at Porland, 10:30
BOXING
Feb. 11: x-Advance Auto Parts Clash (Brad Keselowski)
Feb. 15: x-Can-Am Duel 1 (Ryan Blaney)
Feb. 15: x-Can-Am Duel 2 (Chase Elliott)
Feb. 18: Daytona 500 (Austin Dillon)
Feb. 25: Folds of Honor QuikTrip 500 (Kevin Harvick)
March 4: Penzoil 400 (Kevin Harvick)
March 11: TicketGuardian 500 (Kevin Harvick)
March 18: Auto Club 400 (Martin Truex Jr.)
March 26: STP 500 (Clint Bowyer)
April 8: O’Reilly Auto Parts 500 (Kyle Busch)
April 15: Food City 500 (Kyle Busch)
April 21: Toyota Owners 400 (Kyle Busch)
April 29: GEICO 500 (Joey Logano)
May 6: AAA 400 Drive for Autism (Kevin Harvick)
May 12: KC Masterpiece 400 (Kevin Harvick)
May 19: x-NASCAR All-Star Open, Concord, N.C.
May 19: x-NASCAR All-Star Race, Concord, N.C.
May 27: Coca-Cola 600, Concord, N.C.
June 3: Pocono 400, Lond Pond, Pa.
June 10: FireKeepers Casino 400, Brooklyn, Mich.
June 24: Toyota/Save Mart 350, Sonoma, Calif.
July 1: Overton’s 400, Joliet, Ill.
July 7: Coke Zero 400, Daytona Beach, Fla.
July 14: Quaker State 400, Sparta, Ky.
July 22: New Hampshire 301, Loudon
July 29: Gander Outdoors 400, Long Pond, Pa.
Aug. 5: GoBowling at The Glen, Watkins Glen, N.Y.
Aug. 12: TBA, Brooklyn, Mich.
Aug. 18: Bass Pro Shops NRA Night Race, Bristol, Tenn.
Sept. 2: Bojangles’ Southern 500, Darlington, S.C.
Sept. 9: Big Machine Brickyard 400, Indianapolis
Sept. 16: South Point 400, Las Vegas
Sept. 22: Federated Auto Parts 400, Richmond
Sept. 30: Bank of America 500, Concord, N.C.
Oct. 7: TBA, Dover, Del.
Oct. 14: 1000Bulbs.com 500, Talladega, Ala.
Oct. 21: Hollywood Casino 400, Kansas City, Kan.
Oct. 28: First Data 500, Martinsville, Va.
Nov. 4: AAA Texas 500, Fort Worth
Nov. 11: Can-Am 500, Avondale, Ariz.
Nov. 18: Ford Ecoboost 400, Homestead, Fla.
x-Non-points race
Fight schedule
NASCAR Cup
THURSDAY
POINTS LEADERS
At Fantasy Springs Resort Casino in Indio, Calif. (ESPN),
Romero Duno vs. Gilberto Gonzalez, 10, lightweights;
Oscar Duarte vs. Rey Perez, 10, lightweights.
Through Saturday
1. Kyle Busch .......................................................... 503
2. Joey Logano ........................................................ 491
3. Kevin Harvick ...................................................... 484
4. Brad Keselowski ................................................. 396
5. Kurt Busch .......................................................... 393
6. Clint Bowyer ....................................................... 386
7. Denny Hamlin ..................................................... 380
8. Martin Truex Jr. .................................................. 376
9. Ryan Blaney ........................................................ 365
10. Kyle Larson ......................................................... 356
11. Aric Almirola ....................................................... 342
12. Jimmie Johnson .................................................. 286
13. Erik Jones ........................................................... 285
14. Alex Bowman ...................................................... 271
15. Chase Elliott ....................................................... 266
SATURDAY
At MGM National Harbor, Oxon Hill, Md. (SHO), Gary
Russell Jr. vs. Joseph Diaz Jr., 12, for Russell’s WBC
featherweight title; Romero Duno vs. Gilberto Gonzalez,
10, lightweights; Oscar Duarte vs. Rey Perez, 10,
lightweights.
At Leeds, England, Lee Selby vs. Josh Warrington, 12, for
Selby’s IBF featherweight title; Darren Tetley vs. Mason
Cartwright, 12, welterweights.
At Montreal (SHO), Adonis Stevenson vs. Badou Jack,
12, for Stevenson’s WBC light heavyweight title.
SUNDAY
At Tokyo, Ryoichi Taguchi vs. Hekkie Budler, 12, for
Taguchi’s WBA World-IBF junior flyweight titles.
MAY 25
At Tokyo, Jamie McDonnell vs. Naoya Inoue, 12, for
McDonnell’s WBA World bantamweight title; Ken Shiro
vs. Ganigan Lopez, 12, for Shiro’s WBC light heavyweight title.
MAY 26
At Las Vegas, Jerwin Ancajas vs. Jonas Sultan, 12, for
Ancajas’ IBF junior bantamweight title.
JUNE 8
At Turning Stone Resort Casino, Verona, N.Y. (ESPN),
Diego De La Hoya vs. Jose Salgado, 10, for De La Hoya’s
NABF and NABO super bantamweight titles.
JUNE 9
At Staples Center, Los Angeles (SHO), Leo Santa Cruz
vs. Abner Mares, 12, for Cruz’s WBA featherweight title;
Jermell Charlo vs. Austin Trout, 12, for Charlo’s WBC
junior middleweight title.
At MGM Grand, Las Vegas, Jeff Horn vs. Terence
Crawford, 12, for Horn’s WBO welterweight title; Alex
Saucedo vs. Lenny Zappavigna, 10, junior welterweights.
AR E N A F O OTBALL
Arena Football League
W
Baltimore...........................3
Philadelphia.......................3
Albany................................2
Washington .......................0
FRIDAY’S RESULT
Albany 53, at Washington 42
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Baltimore at Washington, 3
Albany at Philadelphia, 6
FRIDAY, MAY 25
Philadelphia at Baltimore, 7
SATURDAY, MAY 26
Washington at Albany, 6
L
1
1
2
4
T
0
0
0
0
Pct
.750
.750
.500
.000
PF
193
198
184
172
PA
180
166
173
228
BASEBALL
MARYLAND
Leonardtown 10, North Point 2
VIRGINIA
Edison 4, Wakefield 1
VIRGINIA 6A Lake Braddock 6, Robinson 5
PRIVATE
Potomac School 3, St. James 2
SOFTBALL
DISTRICT
Wilson 11, Washington Latin 1
MARYLAND
Manchester Valley 12, Blake 0
Northwest 12, Quince Orchard 2
VIRGINIA
Edison 10, Falls Church 0
James Madison 10, Centreville 1
Lake Braddock 12, Robinson 0
CONFERENCE 6 South Lakes 13, Langley 0
Freedom-Woodbridge 0, Hylton 0
PRIVATE
Potomac School 5, Norfolk Christian 3
Potomac School 5, Norfolk Christian 3
DCSAA Georgetown Visitation 16, Maret 11
Paul VI 5, Flint Hill 1
BOYS' LACROSSE
MARYLAND
Marriotts Ridge 7, Glenelg 6
Urbana 7, Sherwood 6
Westminster 19, Blake 4
Westminster 19, Blake 4
GIRLS' LACROSSE
MARYLAND
Sherwood 14, Urbana 10
VIRGINIA
Freedom-South Riding 17, Broad Run 5
Woodgrove 15, Loudoun County 7
PRIVATE
Paul VI 23, Bishop Sullivan Catholic 14
St. Stephen's/St. Agnes 19, Collegiate 9
Bishop Ireton 16, Episcopal 5
BOYS' SOCCER
VIRGINIA
Manassas Park 2, Skyline 0
South County 1, Fairfax 0
GIRLS' SOCCER
VIRGINIA
Potomac Falls 1, Tuscarora 0
Yorktown 4, Washington-Lee 0
Chantilly 1, Oakton 0
James Madison 2, Centreville 0
THE TOP 10
BOYS' LACROSSE
WCAC champion Gonzaga will graduate nine players
bound for Division I lacrosse programs. . . . Isaac
Aronson netted the game-winner with 8.6 seconds left
in Bullis's Interstate Athletic Conference championship
win. . . . Riverside closed out the regular season with 12
straight victories, scoring at least 10 goals in all but one.
. . . Robinson will face W.T. Woodson, which it beat by
four goals on May 4, in the Patriot District championship
Wednesday. . . . In a season in which the Bears had eight
games decided by two goals or fewer, Landon couldn’t
push past Bullis in the IAC championship. . . . Paul VI will
start the Virginia Independent Schools Athletic Association tournament as the No. 1 seed.
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Team
Gonzaga
Bullis
Churchill
Riverside
Glenelg
Howard
South Lakes
Robinson
Landon
Paul VI
Record
17-3
15-3
13-0
13-1
14-1
14-1
13-1
13-2
12-6
16-4
THE TOP 10
GIRLS’ LACROSSE
For a third straight year, Glenelg defeated Marriotts
Ridge in the Maryland 2A South region semifinal. . . .
Having beaten St. Stephen’s/St. Agnes in overtime for
the VISAA championship last year, Bishop Ireton will
start its quest for a repeat this week. . . . Georgetown
Visitation started the ISL AA championship on a 6-0 run
and will return to the final, leading 9-3, on Wednesday
against Holton-Arms. . . . After its first ISL AA tournament loss on record, St. Stephen's/St. Agnes enters the
VISAA tournament as the No. 1 seed. . . . South River
downed Broadneck, 15-11, on Monday to set up an Anne
Arundel County championship rematch against Severna
Park in the 4A East region final. . . . Stephanie Hong, who
had the deciding score against St. Stephen’s/St. Agnes
in the ISL AA semifinals, leads Holton-Arms with 60
goals this season. . . . Dominion downed George Mason,
12-7, on Friday to finish the regular season undefeated
and win its first Dulles District title.
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Team
Glenelg
Bishop Ireton
Georgetown Visitation
St. Stephen's/St. Agnes
Marriotts Ridge
South River
Holton-Arms
Langley
Dominion
Glenelg Country
Record
14-2
18-3
16-2
24-3
12-3
15-2
15-5
12-1-1
14-0
12-5
GOLF
World Golf Ranking
Through Sunday
1. Justin Thomas ............................USA
2. Dustin Johnson...........................USA
3. Jordan Spieth..............................USA
4. Jon Rahm .................................... ESP
5. Justin Rose .................................ENG
6. Rickie Fowler ..............................USA
7. Jason Day....................................AUS
8. Rory McIlroy ................................NIR
9. Hideki Matsuyama ..................... JPN
10. Tommy Fleetwood ....................ENG
11. Brooks Koepka ..........................USA
12. Paul Casey.................................ENG
13. Patrick Reed..............................USA
14. Sergio Garcia............................. ESP
15. Henrik Stenson ........................SWE
16. Marc Leishman .........................AUS
17. Alex Noren ...............................SWE
18. Bubba Watson ..........................USA
19. Phil Mickelson...........................USA
20. Webb Simpson..........................USA
21. Tyrrell Hatton ...........................ENG
22. Matt Kuchar..............................USA
23. Xander Schauffele ....................USA
24. Pat Perez...................................USA
9.18
8.93
8.09
8.07
7.34
6.96
6.93
6.20
5.94
5.40
5.39
5.39
5.29
5.09
5.04
4.66
4.57
4.54
4.52
4.27
4.19
3.98
3.92
3.73
LOC AL GOLF
In the MVCC Grandmothers tournament, Julie Rakes
finished first place with a net 73. In the LGA-18, first
place net went to Barb Mathis with a 70 and first place
gross went to Julie Rakes with an 89.
EFGHI
washingtonpost.com/classifieds
CLASSIFIED
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 2018
new and pre-owned
cars, trucks and suvs
homes for sale,
commercial real estate
rentals
merchandise, garage
sales, auctions, tickets
dogs, cats, birds, fish
washingtonpost.com/jobs
cars.com
washingtonpost.com/
realestate
apartments.com
washingtonpost.com/
merchandise
washingtonpost.com/pets
1405
N
Cars
To place an ad, go to washingtonpostads.com
Non-commercial advertisers can now place ads 24/7
by calling 202-334-6200
N
JOBS
MERCEDES-BENZ 2010 E550 COUPESilver, 53,000 miles,
excellent cond., garage housed,
white leather, new battery,
maintenance/euro motors,
$20,000. Call 202-236-0534
1408
840
JOBS
840
Trustees Sale - DC
1447
Autos Wanted
To apply, go to
deliverthepost.com
840
DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, RV'S.
LUTHERAN MISSION SOCIETY. Your
donation helps local families with
food, clothing, shelter, counseling.
Tax deductible. MVA License
#W1044. 410-636-0123 or
www.LutheranMissionSociety.org
Career Training - Emp Svcs
AIRLINES ARE HIRING-Get
FAA approved hands on
Aviation training. Financial aid
for qualified students – Career
placement assistance.
CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance
888-896-7869
JOBS
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
The Washington
Post
for the following
areas:
For routes in
Upper NW area
in D.C.
Call Dan Santos at
240-912-7978
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
The Washington
Post
for the following
areas:
For routes in
Bladensburg,
Riverdale and
Lanham, MD
Call
Monique Reddy at
301-728-0459
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
Trustees Sale - DC
SALE OF 156 DANBURY STREET SW, WASHINGTON, DC 20032
Pursuant to the August 4, 2017 Court Order in Danbury Station
Homeowners Association v Barrett; 2016 CA 049 R(RP) (District
of Columbia Superior Court), the Notice of Foreclosure Sale
for Unpaid HOA Assessments dated May 2, 2018, and at the
request of the Attorney for the Danbury Station Homeowners
Association, Inc. (the “Association”), we shall sell at public
auction on the 14th day of June 2018, at 10:15 A.M., within the
office of Alex Cooper Auctioneers, Inc. at 4910 Massachusetts
Ave., NW #100, Washington, DC 20016, the following described
premises situated in the District of Columbia and designated as
and being:
PART of Lot 54 in a subdivision made by Danbury Street, LLC, of
the land known as Square 6223, as per plat recorded in Liber
County No. 198 at Folio 59 among the Land Records of the Office
of the Surveyor of the District of Columbia,
COMMENCING from the northerly end of the North, 102.00 foot
plat line of Lot 54 as shown on the said plat, said line also being
the common division line between Lot 54 and an a 16 feet wide
alley, as shown on said plat; thence building on said line, South,
16.00 feet, thence running perpendicular East 64.00 feet to the
point of beginning of the piece or parcel of land to be described;
and running thence so as to cross and include part of said Lot
54, the following four courses
1.)East, 16.00 feet to a point; thence binding on the common
division line between Lot 815 and 816
2.)South, 40.00 feet to point; thence,
3.)West, 16.00 feet to point; thence, binding on the common
division line between Lot 814 and 815
4.)North, 40.00 feet to the point of beginning; containing 640
square feet or 0.0147 an acre of land.
NOTE: at the date hereof the above described land is designated
on the Records of the Assessor of the District of Columbia for
assessment and taxation purposes in Lot 815 in Square 6223
Parcel ID: Square 6223, Lot 0815.
TOGETHER WITH all the appurtenances incident to said Unit, as
contained in said Declaration of the Association. The Declaration
was recorded with the DC Recorder of Deeds on October 17,
2005.
SUBJECT, HOWEVER, to all the provisions, restrictions, easements liens, and conditions of record, including but not limited
to those contained in prior deeds, said Declaration of Association and the Bylaws relating thereto, or in law or equity.
TERMS OF SALE: Sold subject to a deed of trust of approximately
$279,600.00 (balance as of January 30, 2007) and real estate
taxes, if any. Also sold subject to any other prior liens, encumbrances and municipal assessments if any, further particulars
of which will be announced at time of sale. Property is sold
“as-is, where-is”, without warranty. A deposit of $10,000.00
will be required at time of sale, such deposit to be in cash,
certified check, or in such other form as Danbury Station
Homeowners Association in its sole discretion may determine.
All conveyances, recordings, recordation tax, transfer tax, etc.
shall be at purchaser’s cost. All adjustments made as of date
of sale. The balance of the purchase price, together with
interest at the rate of 10% per annum from date of sale to
date of receipt of the balance of the purchase price, must be
paid in cash or by cashier’s or certified check and all other
terms to be complied with within 30 days, otherwise deposit
is forfeited and the property may be re-advertised and resold
at the discretion of the Association and at the risk and cost of
the defaulting purchaser. In the event of failure on the part of
the Danbury Station Homeowners Association to convey such
deed purchaser’s sole remedy shall be a return of the deposit.
The Association shall convey a deed pursuant to the August 4,
2017 Order in Danbury Station Homeowners Association, Inc.
v. Barrett; 2016 CA 049 R(RP) (District of Columbia Superior
Court), and makes no further representations or warranties as
to title. The Association does not guarantee clear title or the
purchaser’s ability to obtain title insurance. For this reason,
the purchase may not be able to obtain financing and must be
able to pay the purchase balance in any case within 30 days.
Contact Attorney for Danbury Station Homeowners Association,
Inc.:
Aaron Sokolow 202-269-3333/ Aaron@SokolowLaw.com
Washington Post
May 16, 23, 30, June 6
12181951
825
E JOBS
Bids & Proposals
Engineer
Terracon Consultants, Inc.
SENIOR
GEOTECHNICAL
ENGINEERING
for the following
areas:
Professional Engineer specialized in Geotechnical Engineering / Construction Materials Testing Services.
Requirements
H Bachelor’s degree in Engineering
H Minimum 8-10 years of
experience
H Master’s Degree in Engineering (preferred)
H Professional Engineer (PE)
registration in VA, MD,
and/or DC
H Valid Driver’s License with
acceptable violation history
Bladensburg,
Riverdale and
Lanham, MD
Call Monique
Reddy at
301-728-0459
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
JOBS
Tow truck driver, HD. CDL
required.
FT, incl days,
nights, wkends. PG Cty, MD
based. Call 301-669-7200
Domestic
HOUSEKEEPER
Full-time housekeeper /
laundress needed
From 1:00PM to 9:00PM
Monday through Friday
Must have car. Must speak
English and be legally eligible
to work in the U.S.
Contact (571) 406-9467
or (571) 330-9451
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
Trustees Sale - DC
ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC.
4910 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., NW #100
WASHINGTON, DC 20016 202-364-0306
WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM
The Washington
Post
For routes in
840
Benefits:
Excellent Starting Salaries/
Health and Life Insurance
Plans /Paid Vacation Time
and Holidays / 401k Contribution
In order to be considered
for this opportunity, please
visit the CAREERS section at
www.Terracon.com. 0
820
Official Notices
ABC LICENSE: Village at Leesburg
Master Association, Inc. trading
as Village at Leesburg Master Association, Inc., 1602 Market Village
Boulevard SE Leesburg (Loudoun
County) Virginia 20175. The above
establishment is applying to the
VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL (ABC)
for a Commercial Lifestyle Center
license to sell or manufacture alcoholic beverages. Stephen R. Pugh,
President NOTE: Objections to the
issuance of this license must be
submitted to ABC no later than 30
days from the publishing date of the
first of two required newspaper
legal notices. Objections should be
registered at www.abc.virginia.gov
or 800-552-3200.
ABC LICENSE: Forever Farm & Vineyard, LLC trading as Forever Farm
& Vineyard, 15779 Woodgrove Road
Purcellville (LoudounCounty) Virginia 20132. The above establishment is applying to the VIRGINIA
DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL (ABC) for a Farm
Winery Class A license to sell or
manufacture alcoholic beverages.
Teresa Riggs, Owner NOTE: Objections to the issuance of this license
must be submitted to ABC no later
than 30 days from the publishing
date of the first of two required
newspaper legal notices. Objections
should be registered at www.abc.virginia.gov or 800-552-3200.
Capitol Paving of D.C., Inc.
Capitol Paving is soliciting qualified
CBE subcontractors to perform
DDOT - local Pavement Restoration
DCKA-2018B-0030.
email
–
bids@capitolpaving.com ; call –
571.277.1022 or fax – 202.832.5126
– Bid Opening 4/16/2018.
850
Montgomery County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
DIANE S. ROSENBERG
MARK D. MEYER
JOHN A. ANSELL, III
JENNIFER ROCHINO
SYDNEY ROBERSON
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway
Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiff(s)
v.
Blanca Flores
Jose A. Flores
2812 Urbana Drive
Silver Spring, MD 20906
Defendant(s)
Case No. 441303V
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 3rd
day of May, 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Montgomery County,
Maryland, that the sale of 2812
Urbana Drive, Silver Spring, MD
20906, made and reported, will
be ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 4th day
of June, 2018, provided a copy of
this notice be inserted in a daily
newspaper printed in said County,
once in each of three successive
weeks before the 4th day of June
2018. The Report of Sale states
the amount of the foreclosure
sale price to be $245,000.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Montgomery County, MD
May 16, 23, 30, 2018
12183348
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
Trustees Sale - DC
SF
By virtue of a certain Deed of Trust and Security Agreement, duly recorded December 11,
2006, as Instrument No. 2006166553, in the land records of the District of Columbia (the
“Land Records”), (the foregoing instrument, as assigned or amended, being referred to
herein as the “Deed of Trust”), in accordance with Public Law 90-566 notice filed April 20,
2018, and at the request of the party currently secured thereby (the “Noteholder”), the
current Trustee under the Deed of Trust (the “Substitute Trustee”) will cause to be sold, at
public auction, at the office of Alex Cooper Auctioneers, Inc., 4910 Massachusetts Ave.,
N.W., Suite 100, Washington, DC 20016 (the "Auctioneer"), on the 23rd day of May, A.D.
2018 at 11:00 A.M., the real property and improvements more fully described in the Deed
of Trust (collectively, the “Property”), situate in the District of Columbia, designated as Lot
868 in Square 387, as more fully described in the Deed of Trust, recorded in the Land
Records.
Terms of Sale. The Property will be sold in “AS IS, WHERE IS” condition, for all cash without
recourse. Neither the Substitute Trustee, the Noteholder, nor any of their respective agents,
successors or assigns (collectively, the “Selling Parties”) makes any representations or
warranties, express or implied, with respect to the Property, or any tenancies or parties in
possession, including, without limitation, the description, use, structural integrity, physical
condition, subdivision, zoning, environmental condition, ordinances or regulations, fitness
for a particular purpose or merchantability of all or any part of the Property. The purchaser is
responsible for, and the Property is sold subject to, any environmental matter or condition,
whether latent or observable, if any, that may exist at or affect or relate to the property and
to any governmental requirements affecting the same. The purchaser waives and releases
the Selling Parties from any and all claims the purchaser and/or purchaser’s successors and
assigns may now have or may have in the future relating to the condition of the Property.
All interested bidders are encouraged to contact the appropriate governmental authorities
prior to the sale date regarding the permitted uses for the Property and, if applicable, the
requirements for development. A deposit of $750,000 will be required at the time of sale,
such deposit to be in certified check or in such other form as the Substitute Trustee may
determine in his sole discretion, except no deposit shall be required of the Noteholder
or its successors and assigns. An additional deposit to bring the total deposit up to five
percent (5%) of the purchase price is due two (2) business days after the sale to the office
of the Substitute Trustee, such deposit to be in certified check or in such other form as the
Substitute Trustee may determine in his sole discretion, except no deposit shall be required
of the Noteholder or its successors and assigns. The Substitute Trustee will, as a condition
of sale, require all potential bidders except the Noteholder to show their $750,000 initial
deposit before any bidding begins. The balance in cash or immediately available funds, with
interest at ten percent (10%) per annum from the date of the sale to the date of settlement
or the date the balance of proceeds are received by the Substitute Trustee, whichever is
later, payable within thirty (30) days after the sale. Terms of sale to be complied with within
thirty (30) days from day of sale, otherwise, the Substitute Trustee reserves the right to
forfeit the deposit, re-advertise, and sell the Property at the risk and cost of the defaulting
purchaser; or without forfeiting the deposit, the Substitute Trustee may avail itself of any
legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. Notwithstanding the foregoing,
the Substitute Trustee absolutely reserves the right to postpone the sale and/or cancel the
sale at any time until the Auctioneer announces the Property is “sold” and the deposit
in the required amount is received. Adjustment of the current year real property taxes
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter be assumed by the purchaser. Water
and sewer to be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
All other public charges and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary
and/or metropolitan district charges are to be adjusted for the current year to date of sale
and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, recording,
recordation taxes, transfer taxes and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid
by the purchaser. In the event the Substitute Trustee is unable for any reason to convey
title to the Property, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be to request and
receive a return of the deposit. Upon return of the deposit, this sale shall be void and of no
effect and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Selling Parties. For further
information, please contact Constantinos G. Panagopoulos, Esq., at Ballard Spahr LLP, (202)
661-2202.
Note: The information contained herein was obtained from sources deemed to be reliable,
but it is offered for informational purposes only. The Substitute Trustee and Noteholder do
not make any representations or warranties with respect to the accuracy of the information
contained herein. Prospective purchasers are urged to make their own inspection.
Glenn J. Figurski, Esq.
Constantinos G. Panagopoulos, Esq.
Substitute Trustees
Washington Post
May 11, 14, 16, 18 and 21, 2018
12181024
852
Anne Arundel County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
Diane S. Rosenberg, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Versus
Kevin P. McLaughlin
Regina Verow
Defendant
No. C-02-CV-15-000819
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this Friday,
April 20, 2018 that the sale of the
property in the proceedings mentioned, made and reported by Mark
D. Meyer, Substitute Trustee.
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 21st
day of May 2018 next; provided,
a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, once in each
of three successive weeks before
the 21st day of May 2018 next. The
report states that the amount of
sale of the property at 209 Poplar
Road, Riva, MD 21140 to be
$215,000.00.
/S/Robert P Duckworth
Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, MD
May 2, 9, 16, 2018
12179450
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
Thomas W. Hodge, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Versus
Amanda V. Fitzgerald
Defendant
No. C-02-CV-17-003318
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this Friday,
April 20, 2018 that the sale of the
property in the proceedings mentioned, made and reported by
Thomas W. Hodge, Substitute
Trustee.
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 21st
day of May 2018 next; provided,
a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, once in each
of three successive weeks before
the 21st day of May 2018 next. The
report states that the amount of
sale of the property at 200 WILLOW
LANE, GLEN BURNIE, MD 21061 to
be $163,000.00.
/S/Robert P Duckworth
Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, MD
May 2, 9, 16, 2018
12180442
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
Diane S. Rosenberg, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Versus
Paul M. Shelton
Felicia Shelton
Defendant
No. C-02-CV-17-001129
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this Tuesday, May 1, 2018 that the sale of
the property in the proceedings
mentioned, made and reported by
Jennifer Rochino, Esq, Substitute
Trustee.
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 31st
day of May 2018 next; provided,
a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, once in each
of three successive weeks before
the 31st day of May 2018 next. The
report states that the amount of
sale of the property at 812 VACATION DRIVE, ODENTON, MD 21113 to
be $322,300.00.
/S/Robert P Duckworth
Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, MD
May 9, 16, 23, 2018
12181632
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
850
Montgomery County
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
850
Montgomery County
850
www.hwestauctions.com
mypublicnotices.com/
washingtonpost/PublicNotice.asp
FREE UNDER $250
850
Montgomery County
875
Montgomery County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
12140 Brittania Circle
Germantown, MD 20874
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
JASON PATRICK VINCENT HEDDEN AKA JASON HEDDEN,
dated June 30, 2014 and recorded in Liber 48951, folio
380 among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD,
default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed
as Case No.443442V; Tax ID No.09-02804706 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
JUNE 4, 2018 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $25,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 581564)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Number 18-274026.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
utive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3279381.
May 9, 16, 2018
You, too, could have
home delivery.
12182033
12179498
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
If the merchandise you’re selling is priced under $250, your 3-line, 3-day ad is FREE!
Go to washingtonpostads.com for complete details and to order your free ad.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
3804 Berleigh Hill Court
Burtonsville, MD 20866
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to PRLAP, INC. , Trustee(s), dated July 24,
2006, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 33208, folio 713, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of
the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction at THE MONTGOMERY
www.hwestauctions.com
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
MAY 16, 23, 30, 2018
12182378
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
852
Anne Arundel County 875 Fauquier County
JUNE 4, 2018 at 1:30 PM
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
36 MADISON STREET,
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
WARRENTON, VA 20186
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described Diane S. Rosenberg, et al.
Substitute
Trustees
as follows:
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated January 4, 2016,
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST Versus
in the original principal amount
of $321,835.00 recorded in the
RECORDED OCTOBER 23, 2006 IN LIBER 33208, FOLIO Fernande Victor Georges
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Defendant
713.
Fauquier County, Virginia, in Book
1504 at Page 2368 as Instrument
No.
C-02-CV-17-001740
THE PROPERTY IS SUBJECT TO A PRIOR MORTGAGE. IF
No. 2016-00000090 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
AVAILABLE THE AMOUNT WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT THE
NOTICE
for sale at public auction in the
Notice is hereby issued this TuesTIME OF THE SALE
front of the Circuit Court building
day, May 1, 2018 that the sale of the
for Fauquier County, 40 Culpeper
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition property in the proceedings men- Street, Warrenton, Virginia on June
tioned, made and reported by Mark
14, 2018, at 12:00 PM, the property
without either express or implied warranty or representation, D. Meyer, Substitute Trustee.
described in said Deed of Trust,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, located at the above address, and
particularly described as folunless
cause
to
the
contrary
thereparticular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, of be shown on or before the 31st more
lows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, day of May 2018 next; provided, PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND, WITH
ALL IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
a
copy
of
this
Notice
be
inserted
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- in some newspaper published in AND ALL APPURTENANCES THEREchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other Anne Arundel County, once in each TO BELONGING, LOCATED AND
BEING IN THE TOWN OF WARRENthree successive weeks before
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and of
TON, COUNTY OF FAUQUIER, COMthe 31st day of May 2018 next. The
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record report states that the amount of MONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA, AND
DESIGNATED AS FOLLOWS:
sale
of
the
property
at
2607
PORTOwhich affect the same, if any. The property will be sold LA COURT, ODENTON, MD 21113 to BEING
LOT 14, MADISON SQUARE, AS THE
SAME IS DULY DEDICATED, PLATsubject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of be $240,500.00.
TED AND RECORDED IN DEED
/S/Robert P Duckworth
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
BOOK 1470, PAGE 2046, AMONG
Circuit Court for
THE LAND RECORDS OF FAUQUIER
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
Anne Arundel County, MD
COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
May
9,
16,
23,
2018
12181627
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL 872 Fairfax County
of the sale price or ten percent
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
of the purchase price with interest at 4.49% per annum from
whichever is lower, in the form
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
of cash or certified funds payable
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
1425 FISHERS MILL COURT,
to the Substitute Trustee must be
HERNDON, VA 20170
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
execution of a Deed of Trust
will be due within fifteen (15) days
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed In
in the original principal amount
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
$586,800.00, with an annual
deposit may be forfeited to
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner of
interest rate of 9.000000% dated
Time is of the essence.
association dues and assessments that may become due after August 31, 2005, recorded among Trustee.
If the sale is set aside for any
land records of the Circuit
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. the
Court for the County of Fairfax
shall be entitled to a return of the
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer as Deed Book 17725, Page 0850, deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
undersigned appointed Subif provided by the terms of the
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement the
stitute Trustee will offer for sale
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreare to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for at public auction all that property closure Sale, be entitled to a $50
in the County of Fairfax,
cancellation fee from the Substithe purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the located
on the courthouse steps at the
tute Trustee, but shall have no
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting front of the Circuit Court building further recourse against the Mortthe County of Fairfax located
gagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortpurchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class for
at 4110 Chain Bridge Road, Fairgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by fax, Virginia on June 13, 2018 at to be announced at the sale. A
PM, the property with
form copy of the Trustee's memsaid Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any 2:30
improvements to wit:
orandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a Tax Map No. 010-2-14-0155
available for viewing at
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A iswww.bwwsales.com.
This is a
communication from a debt collecthe sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to DEBT COLLECTOR.
tor and any information obtained
TERMS
OF
SALE:
ALL
CASH.
A
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the bidder's deposit of 10% of the will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirpurchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
sale price, will be required in cash,
mation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
certified or cashier's check. SetTrustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Trustee's File No. (49680)
tlement within fifteen (15) days
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
For more information contact:
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
to
be
announced
at
sale.
Loan
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Exectype: Conventional. Reference
MAY 16, 23, 30, 2018
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
840
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND IMPROVEMENTS
LOCATED AT 950 L'ENFANT PLAZA, SW
WASHINGTON, DC 20024
Great part-time income opportunity!
Transportation required.
JAGUAR 1961 XK150 SE - FHC,
frame off restoration, absolutely
gorgeous, won many awards.
$92,500. Call 410-978-7319
Trustees Sale - DC
Alex Cooper Auctioneers, Inc.
4910 Massachusetts Ave., NW #100
Washington, DC 20016 202-364-0306
WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM
Newspapers carriers
needed to deliver
The Washington Post
in
DC, MD and VA area.
Antiques & Classics
Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
or call 202-334-6200
MERCEDES-BENZ
D
EZ
the local expert
on local jobs
For Jobs advertisements, go to
washingtonpost.com/recruit
or call 202-334-4100
(toll free 1-800-765-3675)
C
D11
May 9, 16, 2018
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated June 15, 2007, in
the original principal amount of
$276,700.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Fauquier County, Virginia, in Book
1267 at Page 153 as Instrument
No. 2007-00007825 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Fauquier County, 40 Culpeper
Street, Warrenton, Virginia on June
14, 2018 , at 12:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT OR
PARCEL OF LAND IN MEADOWBROOKE SUBDIVISION, SITUATE
OFF THE NORTH SIDE OF VIRGINIA
STATE ROUTE 28, AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE AFORESAID
ROUTH WITH VIRGINIA STATE
ROUTE 661 IN LEE MAGISTERIAL
DISTRICT, FAUQUIER COUNTY, VIRGINIA AND ACCORDING TO A PLAT
OF SURVEY BY P. DUANE BROWN,
CLS, DATED DECEMBER 5, 1986,
ENTITLED "FINAL PLAT, SECTION B,
MEADOWBROOKE SUBIDIVISION"
OF RECORD IN DEED BOOK 568 AT
PAGE 378 IN THE OFFICE OF THE
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
FAUQUIER COUNTY, VIRGINIA THE
SAID LOT IS DESIGNATED AS LOT
16, IN SECTION B, OF MEADOWBROOKE SUBDIVISION AS DEDICATED. TOGETHER WITH AND SUBJECT
TO THE RIGHTS OF OTHERS TO THE
FIFTY FOOT (50‘) WIDE EASEMENT
FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS TO VIRGINIA STATE ROUTE 28 AND 661 AS
SHOWN ON THE AFORESAID PLAT
OF SURVEY.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3278811.
May 16, 23, 2018
877
12181391
Spotsylvania County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
129 HILL STREET,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22408.
In execution of a certain Deed of
Trust dated October 8, 2010, in
the original principal amount of
$72,750.00 recorded in the Clerk’s
Office, Circuit Court for Spotsylvania County, Virginia as Instrument
No. 201000018016 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Spotsylvania County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane, Spotsylvania, Virginia on June 14, 2018, at 4:00
PM, the property described in said
Deed of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND,
SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN THE
LEE HILL DISTRICT, SPOTSYLVANIA
COUNTY, VIRGINIA, BEING ALL OF
LOT 20, IN BLOCK D, AS SHOWN
ON THE PLAT OF COTTAGE GREEN
SUBDIVISION, RECORDED IN THE
CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA, IN DEED BOOK 119 AT
PAGE 249.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3216381.
May 9, 16, 2018
12177259
How about some
home delivery?
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated May 11, 2012, in
the original principal amount of
$169,550.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 201200008727 .
The
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction in the front of the Circuit
Court building for Spotsylvania
County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, Virginia on June 14,
2018 , at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT OR
PARCEL OF LAND, SITUATE, LYING
AND BEING IN LEE HILL DISTRICT,
SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA,
AND KNOWN AS LOT ONE HUNDRED FORTY NINE (149), SECTION
2-B (TWO-B), LANCASTER GATE
SUBDIVISION, AS MORE PARTICULARLY SHOWN AND DESCRIBED ON
THAT CERTAIN PLAT OF SECTION
TWO-B, MADE BY SULLIVAN, DONAHOE AND INGALLS, DATED JUNE
12, 1997, RECORDED IN THE
CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA, IN PLAT FILE 6, AT
PAGES 275 THROUGH 276.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3158311.
May 9, 16, 2018
12179593
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
8410 SHEPHERDS WAY,
PARTLOW, VA 22534
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated July 7, 2005, in
the original principal amount of
$359,600.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 200500027630 .
The
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction in the front of the Circuit
Court building for Spotsylvania
County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, Virginia on June 14,
2018, at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT, PARCEL OR TRACT OF LAND, WITH ALL
BUILDINGS AND IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON, AND ALL RIGHTS AND
PRIVILEGES THERETO APPURTENANT, SITUATE, LYING AND
BEING IN BERKELEY MAGISTERIAL
DISTRICT, SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY,
VIRGINIA AND FURTHER BEING
DESCRIBED AS LOT 5, ON PLAT
OF EXEMPT SUBDIVISION AND
BOUNDARY LINE ADJUSTMENT
ENTITLED "SHEPHERDS KNOLL",
PREPARED
BY
H.
AUBREY
HAWKINS, L.S., H. AUBREY
HAWKINS
ASSOCIATES,
LTD.,
DATED JANUARY 20, 2004 AND
RECORDED IN THE CLERK‘S OFFICE
OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA AS
INSTRUMENT
NUMBER
LR0400015121.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3281741.
May 9, 16, 2018
12181575
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
Wake up
to home delivery.
SF
Wake up
to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Spotsylvania County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
8713 OLDHAM ROAD,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22408.
12179989
1-800-753-POST
SF
877
Fauquier County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
6650 BROOKSIDE COURT,
BEALETON A/R/T/A
BEALTON, VA 22712
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
D12
850
Montgomery County
OPQRS
850
Montgomery County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
11657 DOXDAM TERRACE
Germantown, MD 20876
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to OMNI LAND ESCROW, Trustee(s), dated
December 5, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records
of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 33521, folio
087, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at
the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
MAY 25, 2018 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWENTY FOUR (24) IN BLOCK LETTERED
"F" IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "WEXFORD" AS PER
THEREOF IN PLAT BOOK 120 AT PLAT 14114 AMONG THE
LAND RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND,
BEING IN THE 9TH ELECTION DISTRICT.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $24,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.6983%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-00252)
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris, Thomas W.
Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Johnson,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
MAY 9, 16, 23, 2018
12181386
850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1204 Caddington Avenue
Silver Spring, MD 20901
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
JASON PASSPORT AND SOPHAY PRES AND VIRA LEE, dated
January 11, 2008 and recorded in Liber 35277, folio 106
among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD,
default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed
as Case No.434556V; Tax ID No.13-01348545 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
MAY 21, 2018 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $26,900.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 577417)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
12180034
NEITHER SHOULD
YOUR SUBSCRIPTION.
ENROLL IN EASY PAY TODAY
Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy
or call 202-334-6100.
12180797
851
S0447A 2x1.5
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 2018
EZ
Prince Georges County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
11712 CAPSTAN DR.
UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Lisa
A. Scroggins dated July 29, 2016 and recorded in Liber 38707, folio 438
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
JUNE 5, 2018 AT 10:52 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #15-1736826.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $52,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 68289.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
May 16, May 23 & May 30
12181699
PostPoints takes you
to special exhibits.
OUR PRESSES DON’T STOP.
www.hwestauctions.com
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE LEASEHOLD PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
8483 Greenbelt Road Apartment T2
Greenbelt, MD 20770
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to VALORIE KACHERIAN, Trustee(s), dated August
11, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 22816, folio 375, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MAY 31, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
UNIT NUMBERED 8483 - T-2 GREENBELT ROAD OF A PLAN
OF CONDOMINIUM ENTITLED "CHELSEA WOOD CONDOMINIUM", AS PER PLATS AND PLANS THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK WWW 84 AT PLATS 12 THROUGH 25, BOTH
INCLUSIVE, AS MODIFIED AND AMENDED BY PLATS AND
PLANS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK WWW 84 AT PLATS
79 THROUGH 92, BOTH INCLUSIVE, AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND; AND
BEING PART OF THE LAND AND PREMISES MADE SUBJECT
www.hwestauctions.com
MAY 2, 9, 16, 2018
12180093 TO A HORIZONTAL PROPERTY REGIME BY MASTER DEED
DATED APRIL 30, 1973 AND RECORDED IN LIBER 4218
AT FOLIO 597, AS MODIFIED BY AMENDMENT TO MASTER
DEED DATED JULY 16, 1973 AND RECORDED IN LIBER 4250
AT FOLIO 678, AMONG THE AFORESAID LAND RECORDS.
ORLANS PC
PREMISES: 8483 GREENBELT ROAD, T-2, GREENBELT, MD
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
20770
LEESBURG, VA 20175
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
703-777-7101
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
11111 Weatherburn Place
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merGaithersburg, MD 20879
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
CONNIE D. MONTE AND MICHAEL A. MONTE, dated May subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
21, 2009 and recorded in Liber 37743, folio 094 among which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
Case No.415768V; Tax ID No.09-02213112 ) the Sub. assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE, TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $3,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
MAY 21, 2018 at 9:30 AM
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
Terms of Sale: A deposit $30,000.00 will be required at the purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense. and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale, the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-16710)
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
Jeana
McMurray, Brennan Ferguson, Jessica Elliott,
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
Substitute Trustees
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
www.hwestauctions.com
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible MAY 16, 23, 30, 2018
12183134
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
Membership is rewarding.
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 568041)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
ERIN M. AUGUST,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
19359 HOTTINGER CIRCLE
Germantown, MD 20874
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to RICHARD W. GUBER, Trustee(s), dated April 27,
2006, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 32284, folio 599, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of
the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction at THE MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
MAY 25, 2018 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWENTY-THREE (23) IN BLOCK LETTERED
E IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "GUNNERS VIEW" AS
PER PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 123, PLAT NO. 14390,
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $27,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of % on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale MAY 2, 9, 16, 2018
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-06789)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris, Robert
M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
MAY 9, 16, 23, 2018
851
From dinosaur bones and
space shuttles to panda
bears and modern art,
discover great ways to
save money, win tickets
and have fun at museums.
washingtonpost.com/postpoints
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE LEASEHOLD PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
10105 Glen Way
Fort Washington, MD 20744
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to ANDREW VALENTINE, Trustee(s), dated August
25, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 23544, folio 556, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MAY 31, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED ONE HUNDRED FOURTEEN (114), IN THE
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT OF CORRECTION, PLAT
ONE, ROSE VALLEY", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND, IN PLAT BOOK REP 196, AT PLAT 65.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $48,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.563%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-14474)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jeana McMurray, Brennan Ferguson, Jessica Elliott,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
MAY 16, 23, 30, 2018
12182978
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
7403 HAWTHORNE ST.
HYATTSVILLE, MD 20785
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Burnett
Dockery dated August 23, 2007 and recorded in Liber 29151, folio 292
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
JUNE 5, 2018 AT 10:55 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #13-3237468.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $29,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 65175.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
May 16, May 23 & May 30
12181250
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
10804 KINGSMERE CT.
UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20774
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Janet
B. Whitfield dated May 25, 2007 and recorded in Liber 28083, folio 234
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
JUNE 5, 2018 AT 10:51 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #13-1482694.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $60,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 16766.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
May 16, May 23 & May 30
12181698
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE LEASEHOLD PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
5607 62nd Avenue
Riverdale, MD 20737
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to VINH PHAM, Trustee(s), dated December
20, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 27215, folio 152, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MAY 31, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED 34 IN BLOCK LETTERED "H" IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "TEMPLETON KNOLLS" AS PER PLAT
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK WWW 18 AT PLAT 68 ONE OF THE
LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $8,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.625%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-13082)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jeana McMurray, Brennan Ferguson, Jessica Elliott,
Substitute Trustees
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE LEASEHOLD PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
11656 COSCA PARK DRIVE
Clinton, MD 20735
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to LARRY RICE, Trustee(s), dated October
12, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 27573, folio 211,
RERECORDING : RECORDED DATE: JANUARY 12, 2011,
RECORDED BOOK: 32332 RECORDED PAGE: 101 the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MAY 31, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWENTY-ONE (21), IN BLOCK LETTERED
"A" IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT FOUR, SECTION
THREE, BONIWOOD", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK NLP 125 AT PLAT NO. 73, AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, CITY OF CLINTON,
AND STATE OF MARYLAND. TAX ID#09-0900647
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $16,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0769%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (13-23513)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
Not a member? It’s free! JOIN TODAY.
S2931 2x4
MAY 16, 23, 30, 2018
12182980 MAY 16, 23, 30, 2018
12182973
OPQRS
WEDNESDAY MAY 6 20 8
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
4715 AMBERFIELD DR.
UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #03-2856490.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $29,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 69597.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
12179833
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
9418 GWYNNDALE DR.
CLINTON, MD 20735
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Catherine
O. Johnson and Clarence L. Johnson, Jr. dated November 24, 2008 and
recorded in Liber 30219, folio 37 among the Land Records of Prince
George's County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof,
the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince
George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing
entrance, located on Main St.), on
MAY 29, 2018 AT 10:54 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #09-0953612.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $24,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 66345.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
May 9, May 16 & May 23
12179834
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
11905 PITT DR.
FORT WASHINGTON, MD 20744
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Kenyatta
M. Fletcher dated January 17, 2007 and recorded in Liber 27201, folio 476
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
JUNE 5, 2018 AT 10:53 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #05-0316224.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $49,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 69008.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
May 16, May 23 & May 30
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
815 DRUM AVE.
CAPITOL HEIGHTS, MD 20743
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Frankie
C. Barnhardt dated August 31, 2006 and recorded in Liber 26174, folio 562
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
JUNE 5, 2018 AT 10:54 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #18-2048726.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $18,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 66746.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
May 16, May 23 & May 30
12181249
851
D13
Prince Georges County
14103 RIVERBIRCH CT.
LAUREL, MD 20707
7603 FOUNTAINBLEAU DR., UNIT #2324
A/R/T/A 7603 FONTAINEBLEAU DR., UNIT #2324
NEW CARROLLTON, MD 20784
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Yetunde
Shafar dated November 17, 2005 and recorded in Liber 24119, folio 472
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
MAY 29, 2018 AT 10:55 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #10-3581519.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $72,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 60779.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
May 2, May 9 & May 16
12178405
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
22200 GARRETTS CHANCE CT.
AQUASCO, MD 20608
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #08-3713757.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $43,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 67165.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
May 2, May 9 & May 16
12178300
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
9610 GEENA NICOLE DR.
CLINTON, MD 20735
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 63829.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
May 9, May 16 & May 23
Anne Arundel County
12179490
852
Anne Arundel County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
5110 HOLLY DR.
WEST RIVER, MD 20778
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Phillip
Anthony Cook dated November 21, 2012 and recorded in Liber 25422,
folio 496 among the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court
House Door, 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
MAY 22, 2018 AT 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #07-738-01842600.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $34,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 65868.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
May 2, May 9 & May 16
12178299
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
855
Charles County
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #09-3631876.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $57,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 66647.
12179102
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
7210 WESTCHESTER DR.
TEMPLE HILLS, MD 20748
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Coy L.
Goff a/k/a Coy Len Goff and Edith V. Goff dated February 19, 2008 and
recorded in Liber 29524, folio 419 among the Land Records of Prince
George's County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof,
the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince
George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing
entrance, located on Main St.), on
MAY 22, 2018 AT 10:52 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #09-0980607.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $27,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 56416.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
12178637
C
C
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
426 OLD RIVERSIDE RD.
BROOKLYN PARK, MD 21225
2247 DELIGHT CT.
WALDORF, MD 20601
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Alex
Mitchell dated May 27, 2004 and recorded in Liber 14981, folio 514 among
the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House Door, 8 Church
Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
MAY 22, 2018 AT 9:29 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Kim
Jordan a/k/a Kim Grenier dated April 18, 2006 and recorded in Liber 5798,
folio 516 among the Land Records of Charles County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Charles County, 200 Charles St., La Plata,
MD 20646, (Sale will be held in the breezeway between the Circuit Court
and the District Court), on
MAY 22, 2018 AT 1:07 PM
ALL THAT LEASEHOLD LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #05-047-11585100.
The property will be sold subject to an annual ground rent of $78.00,
payable on the 22nd day of April and October.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $7,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 63954.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
May 2, May 9 & May 16
12178297
855
Charles County
855
Charles County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
6325 NAYLORS RESERVE CT.
HUGHESVILLE, MD 20637
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Karen I.
Ray and Arnie Ray, Sr. dated February 16, 2007 and recorded in Liber 6218,
folio 727 among the Land Records of Charles County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Charles County, 200 Charles St., La Plata,
MD 20646, (Sale will be held in the breezeway between the Circuit Court
and the District Court), on
JUNE 5, 2018 AT 1:07 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Charles County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #09-032681.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $66,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Charles County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 69562.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Charles County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #06-085334.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $27,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Charles County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 70478.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
May 2, May 9 & May 16
856
C
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
29 S Bentz Street
Frederick, MD 21701
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
RICHARD R. KLINE AND MARGARET M. KLINE, dated June
20, 2007 and recorded in Liber 6631, folio 0539 AND RERECORDED IN LIBER 6666, FOLIO 0680 among the Land
Records of FREDERICK COUNTY, MD, default having occurred
thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.C-10-CV-18000151; Tax ID No.02-063999 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell
at public auction at the FREDERICK COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
located at 100 W. PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, MD 21701, on
JUNE 4, 2018 at 1:15 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $21,700.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for FREDERICK
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addresse
Mm
m
M
w
O
M
D
R
m
m
w
m
m
m
D
N
m
w
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
May 16, May 23 & May 30
12179444
Frederick County
m
m
m
m
m
12182386
m
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Larry
Preston Baker and Cynthia Ann Baker dated August 18, 2006 and recorded
in Liber 26096, folio 4 among the Land Records of Prince George's County,
MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County,
14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located
on Main St.), on
MAY 22, 2018 AT 10:49 AM
May 2, May 9 & May 16
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD
and described as Unit 2324, in the condominium subdivision known
as "Frenchmans Creek Condominium" and more fully described in the
aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #20-2263747.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $16,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
852
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Bettina V.
Hodges a/k/a Bettina Victoria Hodges and Spencer J. Hodges dated June
1, 2011 and recorded in Liber 32760, folio 587 among the Land Records
of Prince George's County, MD, default having occurred under the terms
thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court
for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772
(Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
MAY 22, 2018 AT 10:53 AM
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
May 2, May 9 & May 16
852
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Joel
B. Reyes a/k/a Joel B. Reyes-Contreras dated September 29, 2006 and
recorded in Liber 26117, folio 590 among the Land Records of Prince
George's County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof,
the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince
George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing
entrance, located on Main St.), on
MAY 22, 2018 AT 10:55 AM
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
12181247
Prince Georges County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Martinique
L. Person dated June 27, 2007 and recorded in Liber 28449, folio 527
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
MAY 29, 2018 AT 10:53 AM
May 9, May 16 & May 23
851
m
w
w
w
D
w
w
m
m
m
w
w
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
4935 BEECH ST.
SHADY SIDE, MD 20764
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Dolores
A. Flannery dated October 7, 2009 and recorded in Liber 21743, folio 485
among the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House
Door, 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
MAY 29, 2018 AT 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #07-001-90059652.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $21,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 70573.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
May 9, May 16 & May 23
12179488
ARE YOUR TENANTS
MOVING OUT?
NO
YES
NO SUCH
LUCK
KEEP US
IN MIND
m
w
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
56 MATTINGLY AVE.
INDIAN HEAD, MD 20640
m
w
m
m w
m
m
m
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Eric
McNab dated September 2, 2015 and recorded in Liber 9093, folio 501
among the Land Records of Charles County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Charles County, 200 Charles St., La Plata, MD 20646, (Sale
will be held in the breezeway between the Circuit Court and the District
Court), on
JUNE 5, 2018 AT 1:08 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Charles County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #07-001665.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $22,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Charles County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 69025.
m
m
m
w
m
w
m
m
w
m
w
w
M
RK
HUGH GR N
H NNON M N
HR N M DR
BR N HOM
UB
U RU
www.hwestauctions.com
MAY 16, 23, 30, 2018
M m
12182380
w
PostPo nts takes you
out to the game
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
May 16, May 23 & May 30
12182387
Membership is rewarding.
kes you
PostPoints ta
INSIDE THSIEC.
MU
NEED TO
RENT THE
PLACE OUT?
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054F 2x4
om am dun and home un o
ouchdown and goa d co e g ea
wa o a e mone w n c e and
ha e un a po ng e en
From classical and swing to alt rock
and synth pop, discover great ways to save
money, win tickets and have fun at concerts.
washingtonpost.com/postpoints
wash ng onpos com pos po n s
mm
Not a member? It’s free! JOIN TODAY.
S2929 2x4
851
N
D14
856
Frederick County
OPQRS
856
Frederick County
856
Frederick County
856
857
Frederick County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
111 Fieldstone Court
Frederick, MD 21702
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from ANNE
J. WILTSHIRE, dated September 21, 2010 and recorded in
Liber 8047, folio 0288 among the Land Records of FREDERICK
COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure
Case docketed as Case No.C-10-CV-17-000175; Tax ID No.02244837) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at
the FREDERICK COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 100 W.
PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, MD 21701, on
JUNE 4, 2018 at 1:15 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $19,300.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for FREDERICK
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 573666)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
6552 Ellington Way
Frederick, MD 21703
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
JONATHAN D'ALESSIO AND MARCI LEPORE, dated May 23,
2005 and recorded in Liber 5401, folio 0447 among the Land
Records of FREDERICK COUNTY, MD, default having occurred
thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.C-10-CV-18000109; Tax ID No.28-575866 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell
at public auction at the FREDERICK COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
located at 100 W. PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, MD 21701, on
MAY 21, 2018 at 1:15 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $22,400.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for FREDERICK
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 581368)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
MAY 16, 23, 30, 2018
12182376 MAY 2, 9, 16, 2018
857
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
9824 Mahogany Run
Ijamsville, MD 21754
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from MEGHAN
R. MEADE AND SHAWN J. MEADE, dated July 20, 2006 and
recorded in Liber 6154, folio 0312 among the Land Records of
FREDERICK COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.10C15000182; Tax ID
No.09-297758 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
at the FREDERICK COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 100 W.
PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, MD 21701, on
JUNE 4, 2018 at 1:15 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
PURCHASER ACKNOWLEDGES THAT THE PROPERTY IS SUBJECT TO AN IRS RIGHT OF REDEMPTION. Balance of the
purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for FREDERICK COUNTY.
Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the purchaser
defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the property shall
be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense. The purchaser
waives personal service and accepts service by first class mail
and certified mail addressed to the address provided by said
Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property.In
the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser shall not be
entitled to receive any benefit from the resale, including, but
not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus which may arise
therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note from the
date of sale to the date funds are received by the Substitute
Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in the event
additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or any
time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed for
any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes a
forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 582120)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12180027
Howard County
857
Howard County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
6100 Rippling Tides Terrace
Clarksville, MD 21029
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY, Trustee(s),
dated March 7, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of
HOWARD COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 9081, folio 347, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction at THE HOWARD COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX
ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD. 21045 ON,
MAY 25, 2018 at 12:00 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT 50, AS SHOWN
ON THE PLAT ENTITLED, "COLUMBIA, VILLAGE OF RIVER
HILL, SECTION 4, AREA 3, LOTS 1 THRU 69", WHICH PLAT
IS RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF HOWARD
COUNTY, MARYLAND AS PLAT NO. 12758.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $35,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of HOWARD COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.875% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (13-25169)
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris, Thomas W. Hodge,
Thomas J. Gartner, Robert M. Oliveri, David M. Williamson
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
12182377
THE NEWS DOESN’T STOP.
NEITHER SHOULD
YOUR SUBSCRIPTION.
ENROLL IN EASY PAY TODAY
Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy
or call 202-334-6100.
S0447B 2x1.5
www.hwestauctions.com
MAY 9, 16, 23, 2018
12181387
LEGAL NOTICES
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
WP 2x1
MAY 16, 23, 30, 2018
857
Howard County
5388 FALLRIVER ROW CT.
COLUMBIA, MD 21044
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Janette
Mwamba a/k/a Janette Mwamba Whilby and Peter Mwamba dated
October 5, 2007 and recorded in Liber 10944, folio 640 among the Land
Records of Howard County, MD, default having occurred under the terms
thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction, AUCTION SALE TO BE
HELD AT THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD, COLUMBIA,
MD 21045, on
MAY 21, 2018 AT 9:26 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Howard County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #15-024666.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $41,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Howard County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 45310.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
12179184
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
6544 SEEDLING LA.
COLUMBIA, MD 21045
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Johanny R.
Guerrero Diaz and Jerlyn A. Guerrero dated October 5, 2006 and recorded
in Liber 10348, folio 695 among the Land Records of Howard County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction, AUCTION SALE TO BE HELD AT THE THOMAS DORSEY
BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD 21045, on
MAY 21, 2018 AT 9:25 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Howard County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #16-115975.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $40,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Howard County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 60869.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
May 2, May 9 & May 16
877
12178286
All that tract or parcel of land together with all buildings and improvements
thereto appurtenant situate, lying and being in the Chancellor Magisterial
District, Spotsylvania County, Virginia, contain 5.199 acres, more or less,
and better described as Lot 5 (erroneously referred to as Lot 6) on Plat
of Trapper’s Den, by E.W. Knisely Surveys dated November 13, 1978, a
copy of said plat is recorded in the Clerk’s Office of the Circuit Court of
Spotsylvania County, Virginia, in Plat Book 14, at pages 25, and 26, and as
more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
May 9, 16, 2018
877
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
35 HOLDEN LANE,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22406
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated July 12, 2005, in
the original principal amount of
$193,471.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 200500028219 .
The
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction in the front of the Circuit
Court building for Spotsylvania
County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, Virginia on June 14,
2018 , at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: LOT 16B, SECTION 2, CHANCELLOR WOODS, SPOTSYLVANIA
COUNTY, VIRGINIA, SUBJECT TO
EXISTING INGRESS/EGRESS EASEMENTS, AND OTHER EASEMENTS
AND RESTRICTIONS, ALL IN THE
DEED OF COVENANTS AND
RESTRICTIONS DATED MARCH 14,
1977 AND RECORDED IN DEED
BOOK 416 AT PAGE 25, IN ACCORDANCE WITH AND AS SHOWN ON
PLAT DATED APRIL 24, 1990, PREPARED BY THE FIRM OF DAVIS E.
DELAW & ASSOCIATES OF FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA, CERTIFIED
LAND SURVEYORS, AND DEED OF
RESUBDIVISION RECORDED IN
DEED BOOK 925 AT PAGE 739, ALL
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3256391.
Apr 11, May 9, 16, 2018 12176391
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated August 4, 2009,
in the original principal amount
of $188,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. 090013697 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Stafford County, 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on
June 14, 2018, at 2:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND
SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN
ROCK HILL DISTRICT, STAFFORD
COUNTY, VIRGINIA, TOGETHER
WITH ALL IMPROVEMENTS THEREON AND APPURTENANCES THERETO BELONGING, AND BEING
DESCRIBED AS LOT 4 CONTAINING
1.00 ACRE, AS SHOWN ON A PLAT
MADE BY REXFORD L. OSTRANDER, C.L.S., DATED JUNE 22, 1994,
SAID PLAT IS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 26, PAGE 85, IN THE OFFICE
OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF STAFFORD COUNTY,
VIRGINIA. THERE IS FURTHER CONVEYED UNTO THE GRANTEES,
THEIR HEIRS AND ASSIGNS, A NONEXCLUSIVE RIGHT OF WAY OVER
THE 30‘ EASEMENT SHOWN ON
THE HEREINABOVE DESCRIBED
PLAT FOR THE PURPOSE OF
INGRESS AND EGRESS TO ROUTE
627 FROM THE LAND HEREBY
CONVEYED.
THE
GRANTORS
RESERVE UNTO THEMSELVES,
THEIR HEIRS AND ASSIGNS THE
SAME NON-EXCLUSIVE RIGHT OF
WAY OVER THAT PORTION OF THE
30‘ EASEMENT WHICH LIES WITHIN
THE BOUNDS OF LOT 4 HEREIN
CONVEYED.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-2004561.
May 16, 23, 2018
12183230
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Howard County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #06-411711.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as
is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $38,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Howard County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 64036.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
12179835
873
Prince William County
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
15247 STREAMSIDE COURT,
DUMFRIES, VA 22025
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust
dated September 7, 2005, and recorded at Instrument Number
200509120156384 in the Clerk's Office for the Circuit Court for Prince
William County, VA, securing a loan which was originally $84,000.00. The
appointed SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, S&T Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at
public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William
County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
May 31, 2018 at 10:00 AM
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of All
that certain lot or parcel of land with improvements thereon and
appurtenances thereto appertaining, lying and being situate in Prince
William County, Virginia and more particularly described as follows:
Lot 103, Section N-6, Stage 2, MONTCLAIR, as the same appears duly
dedicated, platted, and recorded in Deed book 1299, at Page 343 among
the Land Records of Prince William County, Virginia., and as more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: PROPERTY IS BEING SOLD SUBJECT TO FIRST MORTGAGE
HELD BY WELLS FARGO HOME MORTGAGE, INC. RECORDED AT INSTRUMENT NUMBER 200404300073071 IN THE ORIGINAL AMOUNT OF
$86,274.00. The property will be sold "AS IS," WITHOUT REPRESENTATION
OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions, restrictions,
reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters of record
taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time of
sale. A deposit of $8,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is lower,
in cash or cashier's check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will be
required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted from
the date of sale at the time of settlement. If Purchaser requests counsel
for Substitute Trustee to draft any settlement documents including but
not limited to a deed, a fee of $350.00 shall be paid. Seller shall not
be responsible for any costs incurred by the purchaser in connection
with their purchase or settlement, including, without limitation, state and
local recording fees, title insurance or research, or any other costs of
purchaser’s acquisition. Trustee shall have no duty to obtain possession
for purchaser. All risks of casualty pass to the successful bidder at
conclusion of bidding. In the event the sale is legally null and void,
the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the
Purchaser’s deposit without interest.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding. The
Substitute Trustee is S&T Trustees, LLC, 6802 Paragon Place, Suite 410,
Richmond, VA 23230. For information contact: Diana C. Theologou at
301-468-4990.
May 16,23, 2018
12182781
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$95,752.70, dated April 23, 2007
recorded in the Clerk's Office of
the Circuit Court of Stafford County, Virginia, in Document No.
070011830,
default
having
occurred in the payment of the
Note thereby secured and at the
request of the holder of said Note,
the
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Judicial Center, 1300 Courthouse
Road, Stafford, on May 29, 2018 at
11:00 AM the property described
in said deed, located at the above
address and briefly described as:
All that certain real estate situate,
lying and being in Falmouth District, Stafford County, Virginia,
bounded and described as follows:
Beginning at "D" a stake near the
dwelling house on the lot herein
conveyed, and running thence N.
9° 30' E. 102.0 feet to "A" stake,
Thence S. 50° 00' E, 283.0 feet
to "B" a stake; Thence S. 43° 30'
W 230.0 feet to the beginning,
containing 0.57 acres of land.
Together with an area of 2,830
square feet described as follows:
Beginning at a point at the northwestern corner of 0.57 acres
heretofore described, thence in
a southerly direction along the
boundary of said .57 acres and the
lands of H. S. Bradshaw and N.M.
Bradshaw S. 50° 00' E 283.0 feet to
a point, thence at right angles in a
northeasterly direction N. 40° 00' E
10.0 feet to a point, Thence N. 50°
00' W 283 feet to a point, Thence
S. 40° 00' W. 10 feet to the point
of beginning, with improvements
thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust,if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (58479)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
May 9, 16, 2018
12181173
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
92 JACOBS LANE,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22406
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated December 1, 2009,
in the original principal amount
of $137,464.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. 090020314 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Stafford County, 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on
June 14, 2018, at 2:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: THAT CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN HARTWOOD DISTRICT, STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA, TOGETHER WITH
IMPROVEMENTS THEREON AND
APPURTENANCES
THERETO
BELONGING, AND DESCRIBED A
1.271 ACRES. AND ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF
LAND CONTAINING 0.057 ACRE OF
LAND, AS THE SAME IS SHOWN
AND IDENTIFIED AS A CERTAIN
"SHADED AREA" ON A PLAT OF
BOUNDARY AND QUIT-CLAIM SURVEY DATED DECEMBER 10, 1997,
MADE BY FARMER SURVEYS, INC.,
UNDER SEAL OF ROBERT W.
FARMER, JR., L.S., AND RECORDED
WITH
INSTRUMENT
NO.
LR010001212. SUBJECT TO THE
PRESCRIPTIVE RIGHT OF WAY
KNOWN AS JACOB‘S LANE (STATE
ROUTE 723). AND BEING THE SAME
PROPERTY CONVEYED TO ROY LEE
BOYD AND MARGARET ANN BOYD
IN INSTRUMENT NO. LR970018248
AND TO ROY LEE BOYD (ERRONEOUSLY SHOWN AS RAY LEE
BOYD) AND MARGARET ANN BOYD
IN INSTRUMENT NO. LR010001212.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3278331.
May 16, 23, 2018
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of Lot 1,
Section 1, Lynnehaven, as the same appears duly dedicated, platted
and recorded in Instrument No. 030007982, among the land records of
Frederick County, Virginia, and as more fully described in the aforesaid
Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
May 16, 23, 2018
878
12182974
12182050
Stafford County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
1108 KINGS CREST DRIVE,
STAFFORD, VA 22554
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated June 6, 2007, in
the original principal amount of
$222,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. 070013984 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Stafford County, 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on
June 14, 2018, at 2:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: LOT 243, AS
SHOWN ON A PLAT OF SUBDIVISION FOR SECTION 6-B, POTOMAC
HILLS, PREPARED BY HARRY A.V.
LUNDSTROM, JR., AND RECORDED
IN THE CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE
CIRCUIT COURT OF STAFFORD
COUNTY, VIRGINIA IN PLAT BOOK
28 AT PAGE 215.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3282021.
May 16, 23, 2018
12183229
879
Culpeper County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
819 PERSIMMON PLACE,
CULPEPER, VA 22701.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated August 17, 2006,
in the original principal amount
of $303,818.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Culpeper County, Virginia as Instrument No. 060008943 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Culpeper County, at the corner
of West Davis Street and North
West Street in the Town of
Culpeper on June 14, 2018 , at
11:00 AM, the property described
in said Deed of Trust, located at the
above address, and more particularly described as follows: LOT 498,
LAKEVIEW OF CULPEPER, PHASE
9A, AS THE SAME APPEARS DULY
DEDICATED,
PLATTED
AND
RECORDED IN INSTRUMENT NO.
050006027, AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF CULPEPER COUNTY,
VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-2047381.
May 16, 23, 2018
12182990
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
SF
Apartments H Condos
Co-ops HHouses
2 brm, 1.5 ba brick carriage house
on a small prvt farm, near La Plata
MD, pool, all app's $1300/mo+sec.
Call 301-934-3824
225
Collectibles
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
Will Come to you!
275
Merchandise Wanted
Freon R12 WANTED—Certified
buyer will pick up, pay CASH. Cylinders and cans. Call 312-291-9169
REDSKINS TICKETS WANTED—
Call 1-800-296-3626 X3
355
Garage Sales, VA
Herndon—Chantilly
Highlands
Neighborhood, 3225 KINROSS CIRCLE, VA, OAK HILL, 05/19/2018, 8
AM-12 PM, 703-435-0736
Penderbrook—Huge Community Yard Sale - Sat.5/19, 8am1pm. Rain or shine. Enter community from Penderbrook Dr,
South Penderbrook Dr & Center
Way. Items sold from individual
drives and garages. Search Golf
Trail Ln, Fairfax, 22033.
408
Tickets, Sports
REDSKIN TICKETS
2 season tickets, section 215.
Call 240-593-7594
416
Tickets, Wanted
REDSKINS
Season Tickets Wanted.
Buying all locations. Top $ paid.
Please call 1-800-786-8425
610
Dogs for Sale
AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD - AUSTRALIAN CATTLE DOG PUPS
Gorgeous bl merles, some blue eyes.
8 wks. s/w $480 cash. 301-797-7056
BERNESE MOUNTAIN PUPPIES - AKC,
3 males, 1 female, shots, wormed,
ready. $2,250. Call 717-823-8512
www.hilltopheritagemtndogs.com
Bostons, Yorkiepoos—304-904-6289,
$100 Off & some also 10% discount
w/Cash, CC, Finance, wvpuppy. com
59 East Rd. Martinsburg WV
Boxer—$800, M/F, 9 weeks old,
703-232-5461. Beautiful Brindle
boxers. Crate trained and
potty trained. No Papers.
Collie—Great personalities,
males/females, 14 wks,
meet pure bred parents
onsite $400. 301-868-2008
GERMAN SHEPHERD AKC PUPS
8 wks, shots/dewormed,west
german bloodlines Parents on prem
refs avail. $850. 540-538-7029
GERMAN SHEPHERD WORKING
LINE PUPPIES - 4 Males, sable &
black/tan. Ready 5/12. Vet chkd,
UTD shts, hlth guar. $1,800. World
class ped. AKC reg. 301-956-4635
German Shepherd—$2250 Female,
16 weeks old, 703-851-0666 All
shots, vet checked, dewormed,
microchipped, housebroken, very
outgoing. Ready for active family.
Eligible for full AKC registration.
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS 3 F, 1 M, black & sable. $600/obo,
S/W, parents on premises. AKC reg.
Ready now. Call 240-606-3815
Golden Retrieve—3 AKC Males
remaining 9 weeks old,
540-507-9001.
www.goldensofdanbury. $1200
GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPPIES
AKC, vet checked, shots & wormed,
both parents on site
$1000. Call 540-383-9443
JACK RUSSELL PUPPIES - Ready to
go, 2 males, 2 females, short hair
& legs, 1st shots, beautiful companions. $700 each. 540-270-5557
Laborador Retriever—puppies. AKC
Registered, UTD on vaccines, ready
to go this week. Beautiful dogs, 3
colors avail. $600-800. 540-209-3867
SHIH TZU & SHIH TZU POODLE MIXED
Will have shots/wormed Well socialized, mother/father on premises.
Ready
to
go!
540-406-0740
Standard Poodle Puppies - 7, Males &
females, AKC reg, black, red &
chocolate, blue, apricot, vet checked,
$1800 and up Call 703-408-6027
MARYLAND
BOWIE - Shr furn house, room for
1, pref M. Internet, near shopping,
Sat TV, kit/laun priv, conv. $695/mo.
Call 301-328-4286 or 240-687-1519
COLLEGE PARK - 1BR w/ Den pvt entr
& prvt BA $850/mo. sec dep req. No
smoking. Pref male. 240-423-7923
FT WASH-Furn rms, beautiful house
to shr. Master BR $700. Incl utils.
wifi & cable rdy.
571-283-2422
Layhill— $500, 1 bedrm, 1 ba, Sun
Valley Circle, 240-534-9920
Sil Spg- Wlk Metro. Shr wonderful
hse. BR&BA, $655, $699. NS/NP.
Inc most utils. Call 301-593-2435
TAKOMA PK/Bethesda- House rooms,
Nr METRO. $695+. Text/Call 301-7172996 professionalexperts@gmail.com
Alexandria-Next to Metro/bus. Prof
male pref. Furn BR. Share house,
kitchen & W/D. All util + int & cable
incl. N/S. $800. Call 703-360-2518
1-800-753-POST
SF
DELAWARE New Move-In Ready
Homes! Low Taxes! Close to
Beaches, Gated, Olympic pool. New
Homes from low $100’s. No HOA
Fees. Brochures Available.
1-866-629-0770 or
www.coolbranch.com
Roommates
Roommates
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
Out-of-Town
Real Estate
LEGAL SERVICES
Lung Cancer? And Age 60+?
You And Your Family May Be
Entitled To Significant Cash Award.
Call 844-591-5210 for information.
No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket.
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
1-800-753-POST
VIRGINIA
SF
How about some
home delivery?
Landover MD
By Owner
3BD 1.5BA New Kitchen
Loaded with appliances
$105,000 or Best Offer
Open Saturday & Sunday 10-5
Will be Sold Sunday Night to
HIGHEST BIDDER (301) 276-0722
Shih-Tzu—White Pups purebred. CKC
Regist/Current vaccina/$550/Only
Female Avail/ 12 Weeks. Falls
CAPITAL HGHTS: Newly reno fully furn Church.VA (787)486-1232
house to share. Nr metro & shops. All
utils incl, cable, wifi, W/D. Must see. Shorkies, Shihchon—SALE. Toy PooStarting $185+/wk. 240-463-2554 dles, 304-904-6289 Maltese M,
Beaglier, Beagle, Yorkies, Black ShepCAPITOL VIEW, NE- Near Metro, furn herd, Pomsky, Shihchon, Shorkies,
room, shr BA, utils inc. $600-$650. Yorkie-Poo, BIG SALE $100. Off plus
Kitchen privs. TEXT 410-440-8174 some also have a 10 percent discount with Cash, CC, Easy Finance
MD H CHARLES CO.
on www.wvpuppy.com 59 East
Rd Martinsburg wv 304-268-3633
SILVER SPRING/ROCKVILLE - 3 rooms.
Near shops & trans. N/P, N/S. $500$600 + sec, utils incl. 301-343-6198
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
Prince George's Co.
MD
Prince George's Co.
Roommates
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
Home delivery
is convenient.
Frederick County
502 Farmington Boulevard,
Winchester, VA 22602-6793
Stafford County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
9720 COLBY TERRACE,
SPOTSYLVANIA, VA 22553.
Stafford County
882
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust
dated March 27, 2006, and recorded at Instrument Number 060006176
and a Loan Modification recorded on December 7, 2013 in Deed Book
130014123, Page 0232, in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for
Frederick County, VA, securing a loan which was originally $400,000.00.
The appointed SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will
offer for sale at public auction at Main Entrance of the Circuit Court for
Frederick Co., Judicial Center, 5 North Kent Street, Winchester, VA on:
June 7, 2018 at 12:00 PM
12173757
878
Spotsylvania County
36 Bradshaw Lane,
Falmouth, VA 22405
Stafford County
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Cynthia
S. Thorpe f/k/a Cynthia S. Hall and James E. Thorpe dated February 25,
2008 and recorded in Liber 11335, folio 458 among the Land Records of
Howard County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the
Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction, AUCTION SALE TO BE HELD AT THE
THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD 21045, on
JUNE 4, 2018 AT 9:30 AM
Prince William County
Frederick County
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of Land
situated in the County of Spotsylvania in the State of VA
TRUSTEE SALE
8815 BALTIMORE ST.
SAVAGE, MD 20763
May 16, May 23 & May 30
882
Spotsylvania County
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
October 7, 2013, and recorded at Instrument Number 201300023787 in the
Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Spotsylvania County, VA, securing
a loan which was originally $281,084.00. The appointed SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at public auction
at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Spotsylvania County, 9107 Judicial
Center Lane, Spotsylvania, Virginia 22553 on:
June 4, 2018 at 11:30 AM
878
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
873
877
Spotsylvania County
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
12901 Orange Plank Road,
Locust Grove, VA 22508
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
May 2, May 9 & May 16
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 2018
EZ
Howard County
SF
FALLS CHURCH - Room for rent,
24x13. Near Metro. Must have prof
references. Call 703-536-3570
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
KLMNO
Food
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 2018
.
SECTION E
MG VA PG
EE
STACY ZARIN GOLDBERG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST; FOOD STYLING BY LISA CHERKASKY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Sometimes, it’s fun to put a lot of effort into dinner. But then there are weeknights.
Pastas, without a big production
BY
D OMENICA M ARCHETTI
Special to The Washington Post
For pasta lovers like me, Sundays are for long-simmered ragùs, and,
when I’m feeling really ambitious, homemade noodles. For the rest of
the week, thankfully, there are boxed pastas and pantry sauces I can
pull together in about the time it takes to boil a pot of water.
Pasta is a great vehicle for seasonal vegetables: peas and asparagus
now, eggplant and peppers in summer, hearty greens in fall. But it also
lets you get creative with everyday supermarket staples such as lemons
and cherry tomatoes from the produce aisle, salmon from the fish
counter and bacon from the deli. Plus cheese — don’t forget the cheese.
Pasta and cheese love each other. In fact, if all you have on hand is a box
of pasta and a wedge of cheese, you can still make a nice dish of pasta.
The array of pasta shapes available, including fat, rustic bucatini and
elegant farfalle (bowties), to name a couple of my favorites, gives you
even more to play around with.
Start with Cacio e Pepe Alla Colu — a classic Italian pasta of cheese
and pepper. Here, it’s enriched with a bit of butter. Next time, try my
BLT Bucatini, where pancetta and cherry tomatoes melt into a sauce
with the flavors of America’s favorite sandwich (arugula gets the green
nod instead of lettuce). Farfalle With Salmon, Peas and Sage is all about
spring, while the Lemon Spaghettini, although simple, is classy enough
to serve to company.
With any of these recipes, it’s easy to add your own spin. To cook
pasta like a pro, check out the tips at Voraciously.com that guarantee a
better plate of pasta every time: wapo.st/pastatips.
Marchetti is the author of, most recently, “Preserving Italy: Canning, Curing,
Infusing, and Bottling Italian Flavors and Traditions” (Houghton Mifflin
Harcourt, 2016).
RECIPES E8
Pictured at top, from left: Lemon Spaghettini BLT Bucatini
Farfalle With Salmon, Peas and Sage Cacio e Pepe Alla Colu
Graham Kerr is back, finding new joy in cooking
BY
R EBEKAH D ENN
A skillet with
good smells
Special to The Washington Post
TOM SIETSEMA
The new Opaline at the
Sofitel looks pretty but
falls short on flavor. E3
WINE
Steven Mnuchin took an
affordable Bordeaux
blend to Jared Kushner. E7
MORE AT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/
RECIPES
Mushroom, Spinach and Goat Cheese
Quesadillas E2
Crispy Cauliflower Steaks W ith Ginger
Scallion Sauce E2
Creamy Orange Cookies E6
Newsletter: Sign up at voraciously.com
Chat At noon: live.washingtonpost.com
You, the cook, will
not have to send
out a “Dinner!”
alert when this
week’s simple,
one-pan dish is
Bonnie S. ready. Anyone
Benwick
with a working
olfactory system
DINNER IN
who is in the
30 MINUTES
vicinity will be
compelled by the
compounding, lovely aromas of
shallot, garlic and fresh rosemary
as you add them to a hot skillet
gilded with bits of just-seared
chicken.
In 10 minutes’ time, broth and
coconut milk will cook down to a
sauce creamier than you can
imagine — with no discernible
coconut flavor. The mix will
create perhaps more than is
necessary to coat the chicken
breasts you return to the pan. No
matter; you might want to mop
up that herby, softly chunky sauce
with crusty bread or just slurp it
with a spoon.
And just when your dinner
companions can’t bear another
moment of waiting, a finishing
sprinkle of fresh rosemary will hit
the chicken and waft anew the
invitation to come and get it.
Graham Kerr galloped into culinary celebrity nearly 50 years
ago. He has spent most of the time
since trying to walk away from it.
The charming, cheeky “Galloping Gourmet” was credited as one
of the first entertainers of food
TV, labeled “the high priest of
hedonism”; he received a Broken
Spoon Award from Weight
Watchers International for the
“dangerous” excess of his CBS hit.
But Kerr abandoned that butterand-cream persona when he ended the show in 1971. For decades
after, his life followed new scripts
— low-fat regimens, flavor-forward cooking, religious missions,
vegetable gardening.
At 84, he’s still a master of
human connection at his home in
the verdant Skagit Valley near
Seattle. His voice brims with
warmth as he strides from his
compact kitchen, balancing a
platter of soup bowls. “Let me
know who is vegan, please,” he
said, serving a group of college
students visiting for a gardening
project and a Q&A. He extolled
the local Samish Bay cheese on
the table with delighted bombast:
“It has a texture and a flavor that
is a-maze-ing.”
bonnie.benwick@washpost.com
KERR CONTINUED ON E4
BOB PETERSON/RIZZOLI NEW YORK
RECIPE
Farmhouse Vegetable Soup E4
Graham Kerr and his wife, Treena, back in the day. “The Graham Kerr Cookbook,” first
published in the United States in 1969, is being reissued this month.
RECIPE
Lemon Rosemary Chicken
Skillet E3
E2
MG
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
‘Steaks,’
and a sauce
that’s A-1
The last time I
made cauliflower
“steaks,” I was
playing with the
chicken-fried
idea, and I served
Joe Yonan them with a misomushroom gravy.
WEEKNIGHT
VEGETARIAN
This time, my
approach is
lighter and
brighter. In this recipe by Jodi
Moreno in “More With Less”
(Roost Books, 2018), they’re
coated in a chickpea flour batter,
pan-fried and served with a
chunky, sharp sauce made from
thinly sliced scallions, grated
ginger, sesame oil and lime juice.
The only trick to cauliflower
steaks, by the way, is in the
cutting. It’s hard to know just
how many steaks you’ll get out of
a head, because at a certain stage
of the slicing you’re out of stem,
which means that the florets no
longer hold together. No worry.
There’s enough batter for you to
fry up all the stray bits, too.
joe.yonan@washpost.com
PHOTOS BY DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Crispy Cauliflower Steaks With Ginger Scallion Sauce
12
4 to 6 servings, Healthy
MAKE AHEAD: The sauce can
be refrigerated for up to 3 days.
Adapted from “More With
Less: Whole Food Cooking Made
Irresistibly Simple,” by Jodi Moreno (Roost Books, 2018).
For the sauce
1 teaspoon peeled, grated fresh
ginger root
6 scallions, trimmed and thinly
sliced
1 jalapeño or mild green chile
pepper, stemmed, seeded and
thinly sliced
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
1 teaspoon honey
1/ teaspoon sea salt, or more as
4
needed
For the cauliflower
1 large head cauliflower
1 cup chickpea flour
1 cup water
1 teaspoon garlic powder
(granulated garlic)
1/ teaspoon sea salt
2
/ teaspoon freshly ground
black pepper
3 tablespoons grapeseed,
sunflower or other vegetable oil
Steps
For the sauce: Stir together the
ginger, scallions, jalapeño or
mild green chile pepper, lime
juice, toasted sesame oil, honey
and salt in a medium bowl. The
yield is 2/3 cup.
For the cauliflower: Trim and
discard the green leaves and any
brown stem off the bottom of the
cauliflower. Place the cauliflower
on a cutting board, stem side
down. To create steaks, you’ll be
starting in the middle and working your way outward. Cut the
cauliflower down the center,
then cut each half into 1/2-inchthick slices, starting from the cut
side and working toward the
outer edge, repeating until the
steaks no longer hold together.
You should end up with 3 or 4
whole steaks. Break up the remaining pieces into florets.
Whisk together the chickpea
flour, water, garlic powder, salt
MILKBOY
Italian Sparkling
Fruit Sodas
Assorted Flavors
11 oz Cans 6 Pk
DISCOUNT GOURMET
$3.99
Shop Online! www.rodmans.com
$5.99
8 oz
$7.99
8 oz
Duck Rillettes
$11.99
7 oz
Duck Mousse w Port
$7.99
8 oz
Duck Mousse Foie Gras
$11.99
8 oz
Mousse Royale
au Sauternes
8 oz
$8.99
Chorizo Slice
5.75 oz
2/$3.00
Pitted Black Olives
4 oz
$4.49
5.75 oz
4 oz
$4.49
25 oz
$1.99
8 oz
$7.99
Jambon Sec Slice
3 oz
$4.49
Crafted in California for the
Past 100 Years
8 oz Chubs
$4.99
Lindor Truffle Bags
$1.99
in Olive Oil
$3.99
Pesto Sauce
6.5 oz
$2.99
WALKERS
SALE DATES:
05-04-18 thru 05-21-18
Shortbread
BONNE MAMAN
Fingers, Rounds, Triangles,
Highlanders, Chocolate Chip
4.7 oz – 5.3 oz
2/$7.00
13 oz
2/$7.00
WASA
Assorted Types
Gluten Free
2/$4.00
$2.99
$2.99
$2.99
SELECT- A- VISION
Buy One Get One
FREE All Readers!!
Clementines
Tomatoes................... 99¢ Lb
3 Lb Bag ............. $4.99 Ea Broccoli Crowns.....$1.19 Lb
Mangos...................... 99¢ Ea Idaho Potatoes
Mini Watermelons... $2.59 Ea 5 Lb Bag ............. $1.99 Ea
Pilsner Urquell, Peroni 6 Pack $7.99...Case $27.99
Palm Belgian Ale, Founders 6 Pack $9.99 ...Case $32.99
Atlas Assorted 6 Pack $10.99 .............Case $36.99
Hollandia 12 Pack $12.99......................Case $19.99
Bell’s Two Hearted 6 Pack $10.99 ...Case $36.99
Czechvar, Eggenberg, 6 Pack $8.99 ...Case $29.99
Kronenbourg 1664, Carlsberg, Carlsberg
Elephant, Redhook 6 Pack $8.99 .....Case $29.99
Paulaner, Bold Rock Ciders, Jack’s Ciders
6 Pack $9.99..............................................Case $34.99
21st Amendment, Founders,
SweetWater 15 Pack .................................Can $17.99
Bitburger German Pils, Kostritzer Schwarzbier,
Benediktiner Helles
16oz Can Case $29.99.............................4 Pack $6.99
Tecate, Sapporo 12 Pack....................................$11.99
Sierra Nevada & New Belgium, Sam Adams
6 Pack $9.99..............................................Case $34.99
Stella, Heineken & Heineken Light
12 Pack...................................................................$17.99
Stella, Corona, Corona Light, Heineken
& Amstel.........................................Loose Case $27.99
Yuengling Suitcase Can $17.99 .....Bottles $20.99
Beck’s 16oz Can ............................................Case $23.99
Natural Light 36 Pack ........................................$15.99
Bud, Bud Light, Miller Lite,
Coors Light, MGD, &
Rolling Rock
t DC STORE & PHARMACY
5100 WISCONSIN AVE., NW
DISCOUNT GOURMET
All Locations
K֛Äò›Ùùƒù͊
WASHINGTON, DC
DISCOVER OUR
PHONE (202) 363-3466 Lower Level Pharmacy,
Fragrances, Housewares,
24-HOUR REFILL LINE
and Many More Values!
(202) 363-1041
24 Pack Cans
$16.99
INDEPENDENCE CARDS
ACCEPTED AT
WISCONSIN AVE &
RANDOLPH ROAD
4 servings, Healthy
From nutritionist and cookbook author Ellie Krieger.
8 oz
$2.99
$2.99
Marinated
Artichoke Hearts
6 oz
2/$3.00
Gelee
Pine Ridge Chenin/Viognier .........$9.99
Terrazas Reserva Malbec ...........$13.99
St. Supery SB ..............................$13.99
“J” Pinot Gris................................$11.99
Perrin CDR Red & White .................$7.99
Chat. St. Michelle Indian Wells
Cab, Chard, Merlot .......................$13.99
Jacob’s Creek 1.5 L Asst Types ...$7.99
Josh Cab...........................................$9.99
Erath PN $14.99 Pinot Gris....$12.99
Chat. St. Jean Chard & SB ...........$7.99
William Hill North Coast Asst Types....$10.99
Mulderbosch .................................$8.99
Mont Gravet .................................$6.99
Segries Tavel................................$14.99
Zweigelt .........................................$7.99
Perrin...............................................$7.99
Caceres ...........................................$7.99
Alexander Valley .....................$10.99
Fleurs de Prairie ......................$13.99
Wolftrap .........................................$7.99
Minuty..........................................$14.99
Chapoutier .................................$10.99
Grand Cassagne ..........................$8.99
St. Baillon ...................................$13.99
Aurellian......................................$13.99
MiMi ..............................................$11.99
The Federalist Zinf & Cab........$11.99
Dona Paula Estate Malbec ........$7.99
Rodney Strong Cab...................$14.99
Black Box 3.0L Asst Types ........$15.99
Clos Du Bois Asst Types...............$7.99
Campo Viejo Temp & Garnacha...$7.99
Reserve ...........................................$9.99
Columbia Crest “Grand Estates” Chard, Cab, Merlot ...$8.99
Apothic Red ....................................$8.99
Newton Chard .............................$13.99
Graffigna Malbec & PG ................$7.99
Terredora Falanghina & Aglianico ....$11.99
La Porte du Caillou .................$17.99
Lauverjat Sancerre.....................$17.99
Saleya ..............................................$9.99
Kim Crawford............................$11.99
Simi................................................$10.99
Band of Roses ..............................$8.99
Van Duzer ...................................$11.99
Meiomi .........................................$16.99
Apothic............................................$8.99
Chat. St. Michelle .......................$8.99
Connundrum..............................$17.99
A to Z ............................................$11.99
Jadot ................................................$8.99
Brezette.......................................$12.99
Mathilda Tournon.......................$11.99
BIG RED SALE
WE ACCEPT ALL
FLEX SPENDING
& HEALTH
SAVINGS PLANS
NEW ZEALAND SB SALE
Prophecy.........................................$8.99
Allan Scott ..................................$10.99
Monkey Bay ..................................$6.99
Spy Valley ...................................$11.99
Villa Maria ....................................$9.99
CHAMPAGNE & SPARKLING SALE
Veuve Clicquot ..........................$45.99 Biutiful Asst Types .......................$9.99
Taittinger ....................................$37.99 Lamarca Prosecco .......................$12.99
Trouillard ....................................$23.99 Montelliana
Laurent Perrier.........................$35.99 Prosecco ..........................................$8.99
Dom. Carneros..........................$24.99 Campo Viejo .................................$7.99
Gruet Asst Types..........................$12.99 Segura Viudas..............................$6.99
Ruffino Prosecco ............................$9.99 Cristalino .......................................$6.99
Mohua ..........................................$10.99
Matua ..............................................$9.99
Kim Crawford............................$11.99
Nobilo ..............................................$8.99
Icon...............................................$12.99
RODMAN’S FOOD &
DRUG STORE
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Imported Butter
VITABATH
“Like” us on
Krieger is a registered dietitian,
nutritionist and author who hosts
public television’s “Ellie’s Real Good
Food.” She blogs and offers a weekly
newsletter at www.elliekrieger.com.
Mushroom, Spinach and Goat Cheese Quesadillas
FINLANDIA
Mondavi Maestro........................$29.99 Justin Cab.....................................$21.99
Artemis........................................$47.99 Shafer Hillside Select 2012 ......$279.99
Jordan Cab...................................$47.99 Limited Edition Limited Quantities
Honig Cab.....................................$36.99 Groth Cab.....................................$49.99
DC BEER SPECIALS
food@washpost.com
Recipe tested by Joe Yonan; email questions
to food@washpost.com
Assorted Types
3.5 oz
browned, and a heap of fresh
spinach, cooked until just wilted.
They are seasoned with garlic,
smoky Spanish paprika and a
splash of sherry vinegar, and
piled onto whole-grain flour
tortillas that have been smeared
generously with soft goat cheese
(which is lower in calories and
saturated fat than hard cheese
such as cheddar).
When toasted in the skillet,
the tortillas brown and crisp and
the cheese melts and fuses with
the vegetables for a fast-cooked
meal that begs to be devoured
immediately.
Nutrition | Per serving (based on 6): 190
calories, 7 g protein, 19 g carbohydrates, 11
g fat, 1 g saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol,
320 mg sodium, 5 g dietary fiber, 6 g sugar
ROSÉ SALE
Swedish Crispbread
at White Flint
Mini Cocktail Toasts SABRA PRODUCE SPECIALS Sale DatesNot05/09/18
thru 05/22/18
2.8 oz $1.99
Hummus
Assorted Types Red Delicious Apples ... 99¢ Lb Green Peppers .......... 99¢ Lb
Cornichons Piquant
10 oz
Blueberries 1 Pt ... $3.99 Ea 3 Pack Corn .......... $1.69 Ea
12.4 oz
All Fragrances
32 oz Reg $43.99
$3.99
Preserves
Sun Dried Tomatoes
10 oz
Assorted 12 Ct Bags
Imported from France
Assorted Types
Saucisson Sec Slice Red Wine Vinegar
Saucisson Sec
Basque Chub
Salame
Swiss
Chocolate
Bars
There is arguably
nothing that
satisfies more
simply and
universally than
cheese melted on
Ellie
toasted bread,
Krieger
which is why
there are
NOURISH
countless
variations on that
theme across cultures. The
accompanying recipe borrows
from one of those: the Mexican
quesadilla, where, of course,
tortillas are the “bread.”
Consider this a quick,
healthfully balanced meal with
intercontinental flair. The wealth
of vegetables here make all the
difference for flavor and
nutrition, with a bounty of meaty
mushrooms sliced and sauteed
with onion until they are nicely
and pepper in a wide, shallow
bowl.
Line a plate with paper towels.
Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a
large skillet, preferably nonstick, over medium heat. Once
the oil shimmers, dip a few of
the steaks into the batter and
turn to coat evenly. Transfer
them to the pan; cook for 3 to 5
minutes on each side, until
golden brown and crisped.
Transfer to the lined plate. Repeat with any remaining steaks.
Add the remaining tablespoon
of oil to the skillet. Toss all the
remaining florets into the batter so they are well coated, then
transfer them to the pan and fry,
turning every 2 minutes or so,
until golden brown and crisped.
Restir the sauce; taste and add
more salt, as needed. Serve the
cauliflower steaks warm, with
spoonfuls of the sauce on top.
Large
Pasta
20 oz Bags Belgian Chocolates Italian
Organic
Olive Oil
Fresh Mozzarella
Sale
$9.99 Special Mother’s Traditional Cuts
Balls or Pearls
Lindt Chocolate
1 L $9.99
$34.99
8 oz $2.99
Gift Boxes
Peet’s K-Cups Day Prices On 17.6 oz $4.99
Italian Crostini
6 oz Petits Desserts Assortment
For Keurig Ballotin Boxes, Assorted Egg
Log Sliced
Made With Extra Virgin
6.2 oz Classics Assortment
Mom
Brewing Systems Truffles, And
Olive Oil
7.3 oz Gourmet Truffles
Noodles
8 oz $2.99
Your Choice Wants
Brussels
5.3 oz $1.79
10
Ct
$5.99
8.8
oz
$5.99
Parmesan, Asiago, $8.99 This!!
Collections.
Gorgonzola or
Romano Cheese
FIJI
DC WINE & BEER SPECIALS
5 oz
Crushed or Plum
Cups 2/$5.00 Water 1 L
Tomatoes
PRICES FOR
ALL WINES 750 ML
20% OFF $1.69
UNLESS NOTED
DC STORE ONLY
28 oz $1.69
Entire Line From Our Cs of 12 $18.99
Stuffed Manzanilla
BLOCKBUSTERS
Already Low Prices
Olives
Award Winning
American Cheeses
Italian Extra Virgin
Mousse Truffee
SAN PELLEGRINO
Pate Campagne
MAY 16 , 2018
These quesadillas bring
goat cheese into the fold
Ingredients
The chickpea batter coating
makes for an especially crisped
exterior.
. WEDNESDAY,
t WHEATON, MD
4301 RANDOLPH RD (AT VEIRS MILL RD)
PHONE 301.946.3100
tWHITE FLINT PLAZA
Follow Us 5148 NICHOLSON LA. N. KENSINGTON, MD
@rodmansdc
PHONE 301.881.6253
FREE PARKING
AT ALL LOCATIONS
SALE DATES
05-09-18 THRU 05-22-18
IMAGES SHOWN ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION
PURPOSES ONLY. ACTUAL PRODUCTS
MAY DIFFER - NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR
TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
Ingredients
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive
oil, plus more for the pan
10 ounces button mushrooms,
trimmed and sliced
1 small red onion, cut into thin
half-moon slices
1 large clove garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon Spanish smoked
paprika
1 tablespoon sherry vinegar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground
black pepper
4 ounces baby spinach, coarsely
chopped (4 cups lightly packed)
4 ounces soft goat cheese
(chevre), at room temperature
Four 8-inch whole-wheat
tortillas
Steps
Heat the oil in a large nonstick
skillet over medium-high heat.
Once the oil shimmers, add the
mushrooms and onion; cook for
about 6 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms
have released their water and
begin to brown, and the onion
has softened. Stir in the garlic
and cook for 30 seconds.
Add the smoked paprika, vinegar, salt and pepper, then add
the spinach and cook for 2 to 3
minutes, stirring, until just wilted. Transfer the mixture to a
bowl and cover to keep warm.
Wipe out the skillet.
Spread the goat cheese on one
half of each tortilla, then distribute the mushroom mixture
on top of the goat cheese. Fold
the other half of the tortilla over
the filling to create a half-moonshaped quesadilla.
Brush the skillet lightly with oil
and heat over medium-high
heat. Working with 2 quesadillas at a time, cook for 1 to 2
minutes per side, until they are
golden brown on both sides and
the cheese is melting.
Cut into wedges and serve.
Nutrition | Per serving: 290 calories, 13 g
protein, 28 g carbohydrates, 16 g fat, 6 g
saturated fat, 15 mg cholesterol, 580 mg
sodium, 6 g dietary fiber, 3 g sugar
Recipe tested by Lynn O’Brien and Miriam
Albert; email questions to
food@washpost.com
FREE RANGE EXCERPTS
How should you prepare
oxtails? Try braising.
Wednesdays at noon, we field
questions about all things food
for
one
hour
at
live.
washingtonpost.com. There was
no discussion last week, but here
are edited excerpts from previous
chats. Recipes whose names are
capitalized can be found in our
Recipe
Finder
at
washingtonpost.com/recipes.
Q: I’ve purchased two pounds
of oxtail from a local farm. What
recipes or preparation methods
would you suggest? Other than
the need to avoid gluten, we’re
game for pretty much anything.
A: Braising’s always a good
way to go with oxtails. Season
them, sear them in a hot Dutch
oven with oil, add vegetables you
like, maybe some wine or tomato
juices or broth (or a combination
of those) just to cover; put the lid
on and cook on the stove top or
in the oven at a moderately low
heat for three hours or so. Once
they are tender, you can remove
them and the vegetables long
enough to reduce the remaining
liquid to a saucy consistency.
The recipe for Braised Oxtails
With Kimchi Fried Rice and
Greens is terrific, with unexpected flavors. It’s from chef Haidar
Karoum of the newly minted
Chloe restaurant.
— Bonnie S. Benwick
Q: When a recipe calls for
cooking something (on top of the
stove) at, for example, mediumhigh or medium-low heat, how
do you know you’re using the
correct setting? My stove has five
burners — one is a power burner,
one is a simmer burner, and the
other two seem to fall in the
middle. I’m often switching between burners and settings to get
what I think is called for in the
recipe.
A: With so many different
stoves and settings out there, this
strikes me as something that’s
getting more and more subjective,
which is why good recipes will
give you lots of ways to judge
when something’s done (or ready
to move to the next step), beyond
just the time. In general, though,
let’s think about your two regular
burners: Turn one on to the lowest
possible setting, look at the flame,
and then turn it all the way up,
and look at the flame. That’s your
low and high settings. In the
middle is your medium. Split the
differences, and you’ll have
medium-low and medium-high.
— Joe Yonan
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
E3
EE
DINNER IN 30 MINUTES
Lemon Rosemary Chicken Skillet
2 servings
The simple pan-sauce technique used in this recipe can be tweaked
and applied to other meats and proteins cooked in a single skillet.
Canned coconut milk and its fat add richness here, but its flavor is
not pronounced.
Serve with sauteed carrots.
Adapted from “The Everything Healthy Meal Prep Book,” by Tina
Chow (Adams Media, 2018).
Ingredients
1 large shallot
2 stems rosemary
2 cloves garlic
Two 6-ounce boneless skinless
chicken breast halves (may
substitute 1 large boneless,
skinless breast half that’s 11 or
12 ounces total; cut in half
horizontally)
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, or
more as needed
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground
black pepper, or more as
needed
1 tablespoon vegetable or
coconut oil
1 cup chicken broth, preferably
no-salt-added (may use 1/2 cup
broth plus 1/2 cup dry white
wine)
2/3 cup coconut milk (including
fat skimmed from the top)
1/2 lemon
Steps
Finely chop the shallot to yield
at least 1/4 cup. Mince the
rosemary leaves (to yield at
least 1 tablespoon) and the
garlic.
If your chicken breast halves
are of uneven thickness, place
plastic wrap over them and use
a rolling pin or mallet to pound
them into an even thickness of
about 3/4 inch. Season on both
sides with half the salt and
pepper. Heat the oil in a medium skillet over medium heat.
Once the oil shimmers, add the
chicken and cook for about 3
minutes on each side, until
lightly browned in spots. Transfer to a plate.
Add the shallot to the pan; cook
for about 2 minutes, so it
softens, then stir in the garlic
and 2 teaspoons of the rosemary, the broth, the coconut
milk and the remaining salt
and pepper. Cook for about 10
minutes, stirring occasionally,
to form a thickened, bubbling
sauce.
Squeeze the juice of the lemon
half (about 2 tablespoons) into
the sauce, then return the
chicken to the pan, turning to
coat it with the pan sauce.
Taste, and add more salt and/or
pepper, as needed. Sprinkle the
remaining rosemary over each
portion and serve hot.
Nutrition | Per serving: 500 calories, 41 g
protein, 10 g carbohydrates, 34 g fat, 17 g
saturated fat, 125 mg cholesterol, 410 mg
sodium, 0 g dietary fiber, 3 g sugar
PHOTOS BY STACY ZARIN GOLDBERG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST; FOOD STYLING BY BONNIE S. BENWICK
To make this dish . . .
. . . cook the chicken just long enough to develop some nice color, then remove it from the pan while you cook the shallot by itself before
adding the rosemary and garlic; bring the broth and coconut milk to a boil so it thickens into a sauce; then return the chicken to the pan,
turning to coat it evenly.
Find other quick meals with The
Post’s Recipe Finder:
washingtonpost.com/recipes
Bonnie S. Benwick tested this recipe. Questions? Email her: food@washpost.com. Have a quick dinner recipe
that works for you? Send it along, too.
A feast for the eyes — but not much else — at Opaline Bar & Brasserie
Tom
Sietsema
FIRST BITE
The refreshed
dining room in
the Sofitel
certainly lives up
to its lustrous
name. To look
around Opaline Bar & Brasserie
is to admire shiny black tables,
sleek saffron-colored chairs,
mirrored columns and walls
treated to wavy blue fabric, a
textural detail that tempts
visitors to run their hands over
the plush ripples.
The all-day menu, from chef
de cuisine Doug Islieb, is French,
a flavor that’s enjoying a
resurgence across the country,
including in Washington, most
recently with the wine bar
Primrose. While concise, the
collection of dishes reads like a
French primer. Enter escargots,
steak frites and apple tarte tatin.
And disappointment. Black
bread crumbs made an
unappealing cover for an
appetizer of snails, and thick
ravioli contains spinach of so
little flavor, if you ate the pasta
with your eyes closed, you’d have
a hard time naming the filling.
Really, the only takeaway from
the starter is cheese and a brown
butter sauce. Duck a l’orange has
the texture of sawdust and is
missing any sign of the expected
citrus. Best for its large scallops,
bouillabaisse is an otherwise
wan rendition of the Marseille
classic, while soft roast chicken
is draped with a jus that simply
tastes — can “brown” be
considered a flavor?
“Is everything okay?” a host
inquires at one point. My
companion wants to pipe up, but
she’s chewing . . . and chewing
. . . on a steak that is cooked to
the shade of red she likes but is
so tough she wants to ask for a
chainsaw to cut the culotte. A
nearby cone of french fries looks
good, but its contents taste like
factory issue. No amount of
chopped parsley or mayonnaise
can rescue a bouquet of blanks.
Kudos, though, for all the
bronzed garlic in the
accompanying sauteed spinach.
Warm apple tart with vanilla
ice cream is a modest step in the
right direction, a far better finish
CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: The decor trends toward the plush at
Opaline Bar & Brasserie inside the Sofitel in Downtown
Washington. Menu items include beet hummus and
roast chicken.
PHOTOS BY DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
than a so-called “pavlova”
consisting of pale strawberry
slices, each topped with a hard,
white meringue kiss. Honestly,
the confection looked like
something kindergarten
students would make for a
Mother’s Day project.
Unfortunately, service is as
inept as the cooking. Even when
the dining room finds a handful
of pants and dresses in seats, the
servers bumble their way
through meals. Waiting . . . and
waiting . . . for bread one night, a
waiter explains the delay by
telling us the bread is being
baked as he speaks. Yet the
basket he eventually drops off is
neither warm nor especially
evocative of an in-house baker.
As we exit Opaline, we pass
tables whose occupants left
before us but whose surfaces
have yet to be cleared of dirty
settings.
The best luck I’ve had in
multiple visits to the rethought
Sofitel is a seat on the patio,
framed in greenery and featuring
a separate menu. A daiquiri and
a snack of pink beet hummus
with a rainbow of crudites are
pleasant ways to unwind in good
weather. More, please — and less
of the mess that brands Opaline
mere eye candy out of the gate.
tom.sietsema@washpost.com
806 15th St. NW. 202-730-8701.
opalinedc.com. Sandwiches and
entrees to share, $16 to $45.
4BMF&OET
$IFDLPVU0VS8FCTJUF'PS0VS0OMJOF"E
'PS.PSF4BWJOHT4QFDJBM&WFOUT
4JHO6Q'PS/FXTMFUUFS
.BHSVEFSTPGEDDPN
$POOFDUJDVU"WF/8
HUNGRY?
Gourmet Deli
-FU0VS
$SFBUF:PVS4BOEXJDI
0S5SZ0OF0G0VS
Signature Sandwiches
"OE
8FMM5BLF
0GG
plans? We’ve got them.
Fridays in
Santa Margherita
Noble Vines
1JOPU(SJHJP
$BCt1/PJS $IBSEt.FSMPU
17.99
ML
ML
9.99
7.99
4POPNB$BCFSOFU
10.99
ML
6150."*-*/3&#"5&
8)*-&4611-*&4-"45
Columbia Crest
Bread & Butter
Anne Delaroche
$IBSEPOOBZt.FSMPU
$BCt$IBSEt1/PJS
$PUFTEV3IPOF
3PVHFt#MBODt3PTÏ
ML
6.99
10.99
ML
7.99
LaLuca
"MUFP
$IJBOUJ
.POUIMZ8JOF$MBTTFT
1SPTFDDP
'JSTU5IVSTEBZ&BDI.POUIt
8.99
Per Person
+VOF$MBTTFT3PTFGSPNBSPVOEUIF8PSME
-53
10.99
ML
39.99
$
American Anthem
Hendrick’s
Knob Creek
7PELB
(JO
#PVSCPO
-53
23.99
1&3#5-(0&4507&54
-53
59.99
ML
Jameson
*SJTI8IJTLZ
20.99
ML
20.99
BEER OF THE WEEK
Goose Island
Sam Adams
Oskar Blues
Sam Adams
32.99 $4 16.99 1,
8.99 1,
4UPVU
/FX&OHMBOE*1"
)B[Z+VJDZ
5FO'JEZ#PVSCPO#BSSFM
*NQFSJBM4UPVU
9.99
.-
1,$"/4
9.99
0;$"/
11.99
*OTUPSF
UBTUJOHT
FWFSZ
'SJEBZ
&
4BUVSEBZ
.BHSVEFSTJTOPUSFTQPOTJCMFGPSUZQPHSBQIJDBMFSSPSTJOUIJTBE
So handy. So reliable. Home delivery.
N0779 3x1.5
Louis Martini
New Great Value
5"45*/('3*4"5
Need
202-686-5271
.0/o5)6".o1.t'3*o4"5".o1.t46/%":".o1.
1-800-753-POST
SF
E4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. WEDNESDAY,
MAY 16 , 2018
Graham Kerr comes full circle, after fame left a sour taste
KERR FROM E1
Most of the 30-some students
from an organic farming program
at the Evergreen State College
hadn’t heard Kerr’s name before;
their parents and grandparents
were more excited to hear about
the day’s plans. But they were as
intently focused as any studio
audience, discussing goals and
leaving with hugs and dreams of
making the world a better place.
That’s the kind of one-on-one
impact that matters to Kerr now.
“I know what it is to have been
big, and I know what it is to be
me. And I really prefer to be me,”
he said.
So how, then, is a Galloping
Gourmet cookbook coming out
this month? Kerr’s youthful face
is smiling from the reissue of
“The Graham Kerr Cookbook,”
first released in the United States
in 1969, at the height of his
considerable fame. Original recipes, some newly annotated in
Kerr’s neat, rounded script, include a saddle of lamb with brandied rice stuffing and a “Porterhouse Pie” of steak wrapped in
pastry.
The answer takes in a much
richer picture. Kerr hasn’t been
walking away all these years so
much as coming full circle. And
the journey started years before
he started leaping over chairs
carrying a glass of wine.
“We kept finding he was a
touchstone for so many people as
an educator, not just as an entertainer,” said Ted Lee, who selected
the book with brother Matt Lee
for their Rizzoli imprint of vintage treasures. It was captivating,
they said in a phone interview,
full of integrity, decades ahead of
its time while reflecting its own
“James Bondian” era.
The book, researched over seven years and printed in Australia
in 1966, was meant partly as a
guide to cooking methods, with
step-by-step photos for tasks such
as prepping lamb kidneys. Kerr, a
chief catering adviser for the Royal New Zealand Air Force, also
tried to create a cooking style for
the region’s stunning local ingredients: Queensland duckling, the
small kumara sweet potato, the
giant and now-rare Toheroa clam.
“I was brash in those days,” he
said.
When the Lee brothers (“these
young people from Charleston”)
called, he reread the first edition
for the first time in years, writing
notes on his own copy. He gave
the go-ahead to put it back on
shelves.
The original, Kerr said, “was
untouched by the Galloping
Gourmet, except they put that
title on it. . . . It seemed to me to
be out of a time of my life which
was unvarnished, if you will.”
It was also written before another tectonic shift in his life,
when his most defining personal
relationship — his marriage —
turned professional.
Kerr was raised in Britain, the
son of hotel managers and an
only child. “I had to play somewhere. So I got to play in the
kitchen,” he said. At age 11, he
wrote in a 2015 memoir, “Flash of
Joy,” he fell for a 10-year-old girl
with tight black curls and “a face
that shone with pure joy.” He and
Treena married when he was 21.
“They were a unit. They are a
unit,” said Suzanne Butler, Kerr’s
longtime cooking assistant, before helping him plate dessert for
the student gardeners.
He studied hotel management,
served in the British army catering corps, and then briefly managed the Royal Ascot hotel before
taking on the New Zealand position. Commercial TV was just
getting its start in the country,
and Kerr was asked to cook omelets on an early talk show.
He wasn’t a natural — not then.
When the experience led to his
own show, “Eggs With Flight
Lieutenant Kerr,” Treena, a
trained actor, found his performance about as engaging as the
title.
He was “the most unutterably
boring man in the entire world,”
she told him, and he should liven
up his act. Before long, he was
rehearsing in front of her thespian friends, British expatriates
with irreverent senses of humor.
She became his Emmy-nominated producer on “The Galloping Gourmet,” adding laughs and
snappy signatures like his leaping
entry.
Celebrity was instant and overwhelming. “Comedian in the
Kitchen,” headlined the 1969
spread in Life magazine (which
also included sniffy blowback
from the likes of James Beard).
Kerr’s combination of food and
entertainment was immediately
pegged as a new phenomenon,
and his style paved the way for
today’s stars, author Kathleen
Collins wrote in her 2009 book
“Watching What We Eat,” a history of food TV.
Julia Child’s show aired in the
United States six years ahead of
Kerr’s, and they both tapped into
BOB PETERSON/RIZZOLI NEW YORK
CLOCKWISE FROM
LEFT: Graham Kerr with
Treena Kerr, who became
his producer on “The
Galloping Gourmet” and
coached him on TV
performance; Kerr on “The
Galloping Gourmet,” the
pressure of which
ultimately strained their
marriage; the cover of “The
Graham Kerr Cookbook,”
which is being made
available to a new
generation of cooks.
the cultural shift that made people view eating as an experience,
she wrote.
But Child was primarily an
educator, appealing to the uppercrust PBS audience, she wrote.
Kerr targeted “the great unwashed.” Between the two of
them, Collins wrote, they captured virtually the entire TVwatching public in a way that’s
hard to imagine today. “Julia
made gourmet cooking feasible
and Graham made it fun.”
The pace of producing “The
Galloping Gourmet” was grueling, and the reviews that mattered most to him were the letter
grades his wife wrote for each
performance on an office white
board. The show became a pressure cooker of misery, straining
their marriage and their relationship with their three children.
The show ended after just
three years on the air, when both
were badly injured in a car crash,
ironically rear-ended by a vegeta-
ble truck. Eventually, struggling
toward a new life, they found God
— Treena first. They walked away
from financial security, relinquishing rights to the franchise in
a dispute over religious references in their TV credits. (“Galloping
Gourmet: I Gave Away $3 Million
Fortune For Christ!” read a cover
blurb in the National Enquirer.)
Treena produced hundreds of
other TV episodes: “The Graham
Kerr Show,” “Graham Kerr’s
Kitchen.” It was his name, but so
much was in response to her.
Treena’s health issues — a
heart attack and a stroke — inspired Kerr toward “Minimax”
cooking, minimizing fat and cholesterol and maximizing good
things. And when he went too far,
Treena drew him back, like the
day he told her she couldn’t put a
bologna sandwich in their son’s
lunchbox.
He still smiles ruefully, recalling how she flung the slices of
bologna at him like a dealer in Las
BOB PETERSON/RIZZOLI NEW YORK
RIZZOLI NEW YORK
Vegas, yelling, “There is NOTHING left in this world to eat . . .
nothing, nothing nothing!”
In 2011, when Rachael Ray devoted a show to her food heroes
and brought Kerr on air, he once
again brought his life back to his
wife: “Every meal for me is a
challenge to be able to find a new
way to delight her, and it’s wonderful,” he said.
Today, her smile shines from
photos on his Mount Vernon wall.
Treena died in 2015, just shy of
their 60th wedding anniversary.
The loss was unimaginable.
But Kerr, with time, is still looking forward. Living modestly —
they really did give up a fortune —
he expects to be able to stay in the
house they loved. Although he
shut down his website and email
list, he has been recording short,
personal videos about life alone,
which he may post to help people
on their own journeys — not on
TV, not where anyone can sell
things from it, just as a way to
connect.
Seated on a tall chair before the
students, he spoke with charismatic aplomb, gesticulating for
emphasis, rising from his chair
for what seemed like dramatic
effect. (He said later that one of
his legs had gone numb and he
had to move around.)
“If each of us thought, we are
not likely to get a major TV show,
but we are likely to have neighbors — and if you could contribute to neighbors, like growing a
garden or sharing produce —
there’s nothing like it,” he told the
group. He shared advice on picking mustard greens and stories of
his first “tomahto,” of missions
and being a catalyst for change.
Araminta Little, 18, asked
whether he might consider doing
a TED talk. Not anymore.
“You can make a difference on
a one-to-one basis. When you
yourself feel that you’ve got to
inspire thousands of people,
something rotten takes place in-
side, and you start to think of
yourself as something more than
you are. And we have a world
that’s full of people like that, and
they lead people astray very often,” he said.
The new book means so much
to him, he told the students, but
he didn’t want to go to New York
for a big release party. He didn’t
want to tour or speak on TV. “I
would like this to be the formal
launch of the book,” he told them.
He read a blessing, and then went
on.
“I want it to nourish people,
and I want it to delight people,
and I can’t think of anybody’s
company I would rather be in the
moment than yours.”
Once again, for Graham Kerr,
applause filled the room.
food@washpost.com
Denn is a freelance writer based in
Seattle. Kerr will join our online chat
with readers at noon Wednesday:
live.washingtonpost.com.
Farmhouse Vegetable Soup
3 to 4 servings (makes 3 cups)
Rich-tasting, thick and a little
sweet, this is the kind of soup you
serve in small portions.
The original recipe calls for a
small variety of sweet potato
called kumera; we used turnip for
testing and liked the flavor.
MAKE AHEAD: The soup can
be refrigerated for up to 3 days; to
reheat, you will need to add more
broth or some water as the soup
thickens quite a bit once chilled.
Adapted from “The Graham
Kerr Cookbook: The Galloping
Gourmet,” by Graham Kerr (Rizzoli, May 2018).
Ingredients
2 medium carrots, trimmed
and scrubbed well
1 small, young turnip (3
ounces), trimmed and
scrubbed well
1 small parsnip (2 ounces),
trimmed and scrubbed well
1 medium onion
4 tablespoons clarified butter
or ghee (see NOTE)
1 clove garlic, cut into thin
slices
13/4 cups vegetable broth,
preferably no salt added
3 bay leaves
4 stems parsley
3 sprigs lemon thyme (may
substitute regular thyme)
9 whole black peppercorns
Kosher or coarse sea salt
1/2 cup heavy cream
Steps
Cut the carrots, turnip, parsnip
and onion into 1/4-inch slices.
Melt the clarified butter or ghee
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
in a large saute pan or skillet
over medium-low heat. Stir in
the vegetables and garlic; cook
for about 4 minutes or until
they have softened a bit. They
should not pick up any color.
Add the broth, bay leaves, parsley, lemon thyme sprig and peppercorns, then season with a
good pinch of salt. Increase the
heat to medium and cook for
about 25 minutes, until the vegetables are quite tender. Discard the bay leaves, parsley and
lemon thyme.
Working in batches as needed,
transfer the mixture to a blender (with the center knob of the
lid removed and a towel placed
over it) or food processor; puree
until smooth. (Alternatively,
you can use a food mill, and
discard the solids.)
Return to the pan and stir in the
cream. Taste, and add more salt,
as needed. Serve warm.
NOTE: To clarify butter, place it
in a saucepan over low heat.
Cook without stirring until it
has liquefied, then begin skimming the foam off the top (discarding the foam) until the butter is clear enough to see
through to the milky solids at
the bottom of the pan. Remove
from heat and strain the clear
butter into a separate container; discard the solids.
Nutrition | Per serving (based on 4, using
1 teaspoon kosher salt): 320 calories, 2 g
protein, 13 g carbohydrates, 26 g fat, 16 g
saturated fat, 65 mg cholesterol, 340 mg
sodium, 2 g dietary fiber, 7 g sugar
Recipe tested by Diana Maxwell; email
questions to food@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MG
E5
EE
Over 8,000 Wines
Apothic Red
California. 750ml
7.97
Kendall Jackson
Vintner’s Reserve
Chardonnay
California. 750ml
9.97
ONLY UNTIL JUNE 3RD
Case Sale
Wine Favorites 750ml
14 Hands-Cabernett ........................................................ 7.97
14 Hands-Merlot.............................................................
t
7.97
19 Crimes-Red Blend .....................................................6.97
19 Crimes-The Banished ................................................6.97
7-Deadly Zins ................................................................ 11.97
Alamos-Malbec .............................................................. 7.97
Apothic-Dark Red ........................................................... 7.97
Bogle-Chardonnay..........................................................
y
8.97
Bogle-Merlot...................................................................
t
8.97
Ch Ste Michelle-Chardonnayy ..........................................7.47
Ch Ste Michelle-Riesling ................................................6.47
Clos du Bois-Chardonnay...............................................
y
9.97
Columbia Crest Grand Estate-Cabernet........................
t
7.97
Dom Perignon .............................................................149.97
Ecco Domani-Pinot Grigio .............................................. 7.97
Freixenet-Cordon Negro Brut.........................................
t
8.47
J Lohr-Cabernet Seven Oaks ....................................... 11.97
J Lohr-Chardonnay Riverstone ......................................8.97
Joel Gott-Cabernet.......................................................
t
12.97
Josh Cellars-Cabernet..................................................10.97
Kendall Jackson-Chardonnay Grand Reserve.............13.97
Kim Crawford-Sauvignon Blanc ..................................10.97
Korbel-Brutt ................................................................... 10.97
La Crema-Chardonnay Sonoma Coast........................
t
14.97
La Marca-Prosecco ...................................................... 11.97
Mark West-Pinot Noir.....................................................
r
7.97
Meiomi-Pinot Noir.........................................................
r
16.97
Menage a Trois-Red ........................................................7.47
Mirassou-Pinot Noir........................................................6.97
Moet & Chandon-Imperial Brut....................................
t
43.97
Nobilo-Sauvignon Blanc ................................................. 7.97
Rodney Strong-Cabernet Sonoma...............................
a
14.99
Santa Margherita-Pinot Grigio ..................................... 17.97
Sonoma-Cutrer Chardonnay Sonomaa ......................... 19.97
Toasted Head-Chardonnay.............................................8.97
Veuve Clicquot-Brut NV................................................
V
46.97
SAVE
20%
1.5L Wines
Barefoot Cellars--Chardonnay.........................................
y
8.97
Beringer--White Zinfandel................................................ 8.47
Cavit--Pinot Grigio ............................................................ 9.97
Clos du Bois--Chardonnay.............................................
y
13.97
Woodbridge--Mondavi Cabernett ..................................... 8.97
Woodbridge--Mondavi Chardonnayy ................................ 8.97
Yellow Tail--Chardonnayy .................................................. 8.97
Almaden-Chardonnay 5L Box........................................
x
15.29
Black Box-Cabernet 3L Boxx ........................................... 16.99
Black Box-Chardonnay 3L Box.......................................
x
16.99
Black Box-Malbec 3L Boxx .............................................. 16.99
Black Box-Merlot 3L Box..............................................
x
16.99
Black Box-Pinot Grigio 3L Box......................................16.99
Franzia-Chardonnay 5L Box.........................................
x
14.99
2
Courtney
Benham
Cabernet
Napa
Olema Rose
Cotes De
Provence
2014 California.
750ml
16.99
France. 750ml
SAVE 20%
19.99
Buy a full case
13.59/btl
SAVE 20%
Buy a full case
15.99/btl
4
3
When you buy a full case
of the same Top 10 wine
Value Wines
1
Muirwood
Chardonnay
Arroyo Seco
D’Autrefois
Reserve Pinot
Noir
California.
750ml
France. 750ml
13.99
SAVE 20%
16.99
SAVE 20%
Buy a full case
13.59/btl
Buy a full case
11.19/btl
Over 3,000 Spirits
Tito’s Handmade
Vodka
1.75L
28.99
6
5
Jack Daniel’s
Black Bourbon
1.75L
39.99
Cottesbrook
Sauvignon
Blanc
Marlborough
Rondel GOLD
Brut Cava
Vodka
Absolut 1.75L..........................................................27.99
Grey Goose 1L........................................................ 32.99
Ketel One 1.75L ..................................................... 35.99
Skyy 1.75L..............................................................19.99
Smirnoff 1.75L ........................................................18.99
Stolichnaya 1.75L .................................................. 26.99
Svedka 1.75L..........................................................17.99
Spain. 750ml
10.99
New Zealand.
750ml
SAVE 20%
Buy a full case
8.79/btl
Rum
10.99
SAVE 20%
Bacardi-Gold 1.75L.................................................18.99
Bacardi-Superior 1.75L ..........................................18.99
Captain Morgan-Spiced Rum 1.75L........................24.49
Malibu-Coconut Rum 1.75L ....................................17.99
Buy a full case
8.79/btl
Bourbon
Bulleit-Bourbon 1.75L............................................ 35.99
Evan Williams 1.75L................................................19.99
Jack Daniel’s-Black 750ml .....................................19.99
Jim Beam 1.75L ......................................................24.99
Maker’s Mark 1.75L ............................................... 49.99
Maker’s Mark 750ml ..............................................24.99
Woodford Reserve 750ml ...................................... 29.99
Qualifying cases include 12
identical bottles. In store only.
Whiskeys
Bulleit-Rye Whiskey 1.75L ..................................... 40.99
Crown Royal 1.75L ..................................................42.99
Fireball Cinnamon Whisky 1.75L ........................... 26.99
Jameson 1.75L .......................................................41.99
Jameson 750ml ..................................................... 20.99
7
8
9
10
Oak Ridge
Zinfandel
Lodi Ancient
Vines
Cloud Break
Red Blend
Black Cloud
Conte Fini
Pinot Grigio
Radius Merlot
Italy. 750ml
Washington.
750ml
California. 750ml
Don Julio-1942 Limited Edition 750ml .................. 99.99
Jose Cuervo-Especial Silver 1.75L .........................27.99
Jose Cuervo-Gold 1.75L .........................................27.99
Patron-Silver 1.75L ................................................ 84.99
Patron-Silver 750ml ...............................................41.99
California.
750ml
9.99
13.99
10.99
Buy a full case
11.19/btl
Buy a full case
8.79/btl
Beefeater 1.75L ..................................................... 25.99
Bombay Sapphire 1.75L......................................... 33.99
Tanqueray Gin 1.75L .............................................. 29.99
Buy a full case
11.59/btl
Scotch
Chivas-Regal 1.75L ............................................... 56.99
Dewar’s 1.75L........................................................ 28.99
Glenlivet 12 Yr 750ml............................................. 39.99
Johnnie Walker-Black 1.75L .................................. 59.99
Johnnie Walker-Black 750ml................................. 29.99
Johnnie Walker-Red 1.75L..................................... 32.99
Macallan-12 Yr Single Malt 750ml ..........................57.99
Tequila
14.49
SAVE 20%
Gin
SAVE 20%
Buy a full case
7.99/btl
SAVE 20%
SAVE 20%
Cordials, etc.
Baileys-Irish Cream 1.75L ..................................... 39.99
Baileys-Irish Cream 750ml .....................................19.99
Courvoisier-VS 750ml ............................................ 23.99
Grand Marnier 750ml ............................................ 32.99
Remy Martin-VSOP 750ml......................................37.99
Over 2,500 Beers
Guinness Extra
Stout
From poolside sippin’ to a glass by the grill, these are our top
go-to wines that make every moment this summer AWESOME.
12-11.2oz btls
10.99
Yuengling Lager,
Light
24-12oz loose btls
17.49
12oz Cans
Busch Light, Busch 30-12oz cans ................................ 17.49
Heineken 24-12oz cans .................................................23.99
Michelob Ultra 30-12oz cans ........................................23.99
National Bohemian 30-12oz cans .................................16.99
Natural Light 30-12oz cans ...........................................15.49
Sierra Nevada Pale Ale 12-12oz cans ...........................13.99
Yuengling Lager 24-12oz cans......................................16.99
CELEBRATE AMERICAN SPIRIT
Total Wine & More is delighted to support Folds
of Honor on their mission to provide educational
scholarships to spouses and children of America’s fallen
and disabled service members. Honor their sacriţce.
Educate their legacy.
12oz Bottles
American Made
1 Donated for Every Bottle Sold
$
1 bottle = $1 for Military Family Scholarships
TotalWine.com
TotalWineAndMore
TotalWine
Gre
en E
l Ft
Mea
de R
d
Chick-fil-A
Target
198
Total
Wine
Total
Wine
Hobby
Lobby
295
KOHLS
Find us at TotalWine.com
Corridor Fine Wine is independently owned and operated.
1805RO0008_CFW_2X-WED-THU-FRI
Prices valid 5/16/2018 - 5/23/2018. Rebate offers vary. See store for details. Total Wine & More is not responsible for
typographical errors, human error or supplier price increases. Products while supplies last. We reserve the right to limit quantities.
Total Wine & More is a registered trademark of Retail Services & Systems, Inc. © 2018 Retail Services & Systems, Inc. All rights
reserved. Please drink responsibly. Use a designated driver.
3335 Corridor Marketplace
Laurel, MD 20724
(301) 617-8507
Mon-Sat 8am-11pm,
Sun 8am-9pm
Laure
sett
Corridor Marketplace
Shopping Center
Rus
CORRIDOR
Rd
$1 donated by Total Wine & More to Folds of Honor with the purchase of Starr Blue Vodka 1.75L, The American Plains Vodka 1.75L, Tower Vodka 1.75L, Two Founders 80 Acres Vodka 1.75L, Veil Vodka 1.75L.
Purchase must be made between 5/16/2018-7/15/2018.
Clay
*
Red
Amstel Light 24-12oz loose btls....................................23.99
Beck’s 12-12oz btls .......................................................12.99
Blue Moon Belgian White 12-12oz btls .........................14.99
Bud Light 24-12oz loose btls.........................................19.99
Budweiser 24-12oz loose btls .......................................19.99
Coors Light 24-12oz loose btls......................................19.99
Corona Extra 12-12oz btls .............................................13.99
Corona Light 12-12oz btls .............................................13.99
Dogfish Head 60 Minute IPA 6-12oz btls ........................8.49
Fat Tire Amber 12-12oz btls ..........................................13.99
Guinness Extra Stout 6-11.2oz btls.................................5.99
Heavy Seas Loose Cannon Hop3 Ale 6-12oz btls........... 7.99
Heineken 12-12oz btls ...................................................12.99
Michelob Ultra 24-12oz loose btls.................................22.99
Miller Lite 24-12oz loose btls ........................................ 17.99
Red Stripe 12-11.2oz btls ................................................9.99
Samuel Adams Boston Lager 12-12oz btls...................14.99
Sierra Nevada Pale Ale 12-12oz btls .............................13.99
Sierra Nevada Torpedo Extra IPA 12-12oz btls .............13.99
Stella Artois 12-11.2oz btls ...........................................13.99
Stella Artois 24-11.2oz loose btls .................................25.99
Yuengling Lager 12-12oz btls ..........................................9.99
E6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. WEDNESDAY,
MAY 16 , 2018
Voraciously
It’s just a cookie, but it can make you feel like a kid again
BY
B ECKY K RYSTAL
Nostalgia is a powerful thing,
especially in food. It makes me
want to eat what I ate growing
up, and it even makes me want to
eat things that merely remind
me of growing up.
This might explain why I was
drawn to these Creamy Orange
Cookies, which cookbook author
Megan Porta said were inspired
by Creamsicles. I could practically feel the summer sun beating
down on me at my childhood
pool when I saw the recipe.
I have to say, I was skeptical
before I baked them, but these
soft and chewy cookies are a
pretty fine ringer for the essence
of the frozen treat. Except, of
course, the flavors are brighter,
cleaner and, yeah, a bit more
adult.
A piece of advice: Do not
disregard the recommended
2 inches of space between
mounds of dough. The cookies
do spread a lot (the degree can
vary in the same batch, or even
on the same baking sheet), so
unless you enjoy cookies that run
into each other, be sure you allow
enough room. That means baking multiple batches. If you have
to re-use baking sheets, be sure
to let them cool completely,
which takes 10 to 12 minutes. I’d
also suggest using a fresh piece
of parchment paper for each
batch, as reusing greasy parchment can cause additional cookie spread. (I prefer parchment to
a silicone liner these days when I
bake cookies, because the latter
seems to also result in flat cookies.)
Like many recipes for cookies,
and baked goods in general, this
one originally called for the dry
ingredients to be whisked in a
separate bowl and then gradually added to the bowl where you
have already mixed together the
butter, sugar and a few other wet
ingredients. But at Voraciously,
I’m on a one-bowl kick.
The first time I made these
cookies, I sifted the dry
ingredients onto a sheet of
parchment and then folded the
paper to funnel them into the
mixing bowl in a couple of
additions. I lost a little bit, and it
was kind of messy, but hey, no
bowl! The second time, I was
feeling particularly rebellious
and dumped all the dry ingredients in at once as I measured
each into the mixing bowl. It
worked fine. The cookies were
great. Just make sure you start
the mixer on low speed right
after you add the dry ingredients
so the dry ingredients don’t go
flying out.
And that is how a single bowl
can be a time machine. All that’s
missing is the wooden stick.
becky.krystal@washpost.com
PHOTOS BY STACY ZARIN GOLDBERG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Creamy Orange Cookies
Makes about thirty 2 1/2- to 3-inch
cookies
White chocolate and orange give these cookies the flavors that
recall Creamsicles. And the dough comes together in one bowl.
We found some variation in
how much the cookies spread. So
don’t be surprised if a single
batch features some thin and
large with others taller and
rounder. It didn’t bother us, especially because some people prefer
one or the other. Expect a relatively soft and chewy cookie either
way.
MAKE AHEAD: The cookies
can be stored in an airtight container at room temperature for
several days.
Adapted from “Cookie Remix:
An Incredible Collection of Treats
Inspired by Sodas, Candies, Ice
Creams, Donuts and More,” by
Megan Porta (Page Street Publishing, 2018).
Five cheap kitchen tools that make
cooking and cleaning way easier
BY
B ECKY K RYSTAL
There are certain kitchen tools
that are must-haves. So far here at
Voraciously, we have talked about
chef’s knives, wooden cutting
boards and sheet pans. It is hard to
imagine getting much cooking
done without those.
Then there is a kind of secondary level of equipment that
makes your life easier and neater
— items you may eventually not
be able to live without. If you are
looking for small upgrades to
your kitchen arsenal, these five
are worth their cheap price tag.
(Approximate ranges are included below.)
Bench scraper. As its name
indicates, this blade-looking tool
can be used to sweep away messes on your counter — flour you
have dusted for pizza dough or,
uh, the couscous that spilled
everywhere. It is also handy for
scooping up ingredients you have
chopped on a cutting board and
need to move somewhere else.
Mine gets a good workout cutting
dough for bagels or scones, which
is why my husband has nicknamed it the “dough guillotine.”
Price range: $2 to $10.
Cake tester. If you bake at all,
a cake tester is worth having
around. You use it to test for
doneness of cakes (obviously),
but also brownies, blondies and
muffins. Toothpicks are commonly used the same way, but I
hated going through so many and
also never remembering where I
stashed the box. And sometimes I
don’t even have them in the
house when I need them. Moreover, thin metal testers can help
you determine whether your vegetables and even meat or fish are
cooked through. $2 to $5.
Splatter screen. A splatter
screen can protect your kitchen
and yourself from splatters.
(These are well-named gadgets,
aren’t they?) It comes in especially handy for pan-frying food such
as chicken cutlets, as well as
simmering tomato sauce, which
is prone to vigorous, explosive
bubbling. When set over a bowl,
you can use it in lieu of a strainer,
such as when you have made
broth and need to remove the
solids. Or use it to smooth out
vegetable purees and even
mashed potatoes. $10 to $20.
Spoon rest. For years, I would
stick my dirty, in-use spoons and
spatulas on wadded-up paper
towels, plates, the counter, the
stove top or, precariously, the
edge of the pot. Then we were
passed along a beautiful ceramic
spoon rest from Italy, and I was
immediately sold. It earned a
permanent place on the counter
adjacent to the big burner on our
stove. That first spoon rest even-
tually cracked in a tumble, and
now I treasure its replacement, a
blue-and-white one we picked up
in London. There are some spoon
rests that are just big enough for
the end of the spoon or spatula,
but I’m messy, so I prefer having a
full-length version that can hold
dirty handles, as well. $8 to $20.
Brushes. A firm scrubber
brush is perfect for cleaning
produce, especially fruit and vegetables you don’t plan on peeling.
You can also use it for general
cleaning tasks — you know, that
burned-on stuff you have been
meaning to get off your stove top.
The model I use, from Oxo, has
a nonslip grip and can go through
the dishwasher. A bottle brush
with a long handle makes cleaning tall glasses and water bottles
a breeze. I also have one with a
long handle to clean awkwardly
shaped items, such as my glass
pitcher and teapot. $3 to $6.
becky.krystal@washpost.com
Voraciously.com
Our new destination makes it
easier than ever to build kitchen
skills, get dinner on the table,
improve your equipment game
and share food with friends
Ingredients
8 tablespoons (1 stick) salted
butter, at room temperature
11/2 cups sugar
1/2 cup sour cream
1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
1 tablespoon finely grated zest
and 3 tablespoons juice from 1
large orange
21/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 cup white chocolate chips
Steps
Position racks in the upper and
lower parts of the oven; preheat
to 350 degrees. Line three baking sheets with parchment paper. (If you have one or two
baking sheets, bake in batches
and allow each pan to cool for at
least 10 minutes before the next
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
mounds of about 11/2 tablespoons’
worth of dough on the baking
sheets, spacing the mounds 2
inches apart. (The spacing is important, as these cookies tend to
spread; about 9 per sheet.)
Bake (upper and lower racks for
multiple baking sheets; reposition for middle rack when baking one sheet at a time) for 10 to
11 minutes, or until the cookies
are golden brown around the
bottom edges. Let cool on the
baking sheet for 5 minutes, then
transfer the cookies to a wire
rack to cool completely before
serving.
Nutrition | Per cookie: 160 calories, 1 g
protein, 23 g carbohydrates, 7 g fat, 5 g
saturated fat, 15 mg cholesterol, 65 mg
sodium, 0 g dietary fiber, 14 g sugar
Recipe tested by Becky Krystal; email
questions to food@washpost.com
Immersion blenders are a smooth
introduction to the task of pureeing
BY
B ECKY K RYSTAL
Several kitchen tools can blend
or puree. And while the jar blender and food processor are the big
guys who hog the spotlight, the
handheld immersion blender is
the
smaller-but-still-plentypowerful dark horse for MVP.
When you’re trying to decide
which is best for you, Mary Rodgers, director of marketing and
communications for Cuisinart,
recommends that you think
about what you’re going to be
making. Each appliance performs
similar tasks. An immersion
blender — also known as a stick or
hand blender — can blend, puree
and emulsify, she says. A standard
jar blender can also handle
rougher tasks such as crushing
ice, but it requires more liquid to
achieve smooth results. Food processors operate at lower speeds
than those types of blenders, she
explains, which gives you greater
control and lets you chop rather
than puree, if you want, not to
mention shred and slice with the
proper attachments.
So what can you make with an
immersion blender? Soups. Gravy. Smoothies. Mayonnaise. Guacamole. Vinaigrette. Pancake batter. Sauces. Frothed milk.
Whipped cream. Baby food. Salsa.
In other words, this little appliance can do a lot. Here’s why you
might want to have one in your
kitchen, along with tips for making the most of it.
It’s not a huge commitment. The most basic models,
These inexpensive tools — a bench scraper, cake testers, brushes, spoon rest and splatter screen —
aren’t imperative, but they can make life easier in the kitchen.
use; also, line with fresh parchment paper.)
Combine the butter, sugar, sour
cream, heavy whipping cream
and orange juice in the bowl of a
stand mixer or use a handheld
electric mixer; beat on medium
speed for about 2 minutes, until
creamy and free of lumps. Add
the orange zest and beat on low
speed, just until evenly distributed. Stop to scrape down the bowl.
Add the flour, baking soda and
baking powder; begin mixing on
low speed and then increase to
medium speed and beat just until incorporated, to form a soft,
relatively sticky dough. Reduce
the speed to low; add the white
chocolate chips and beat until
incorporated.
Use a disher (maybe a #40) or two
large tableware spoons to drop
which offer one or two speeds, go
for around $30. (I paid about that
much some years back for an
earlier version of the baseline
Cuisinart model, and Serious
Eats picked a Hamilton Beach
model as its budget buy.) They
don’t take up a lot of storage room
either, especially when the motor
body is disconnected from the
blending shaft. If you haven’t
been able to take the leap to a jar
blender or food processor, think
about starting with an immersion
blender. Some hand blenders move even more into the territory of other tools, offering interchangeable blades or attachments, such as whisks and choppers.
It can be more efficient than
minutive size. Immersion blenders can take a pot of vegetables
from chunky to perfectly smooth
in a matter of minutes. I recently
tested mine on large pieces of
unripe cantaloupe, too, and it had
no problem turning them into a
frothy puree.
But
know
its
limitations. Rodgers said Cuisinart
DIXIE D. VEREEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
doesn’t
recommend
trying
to buzz through hard items such
as coffee beans, frozen fruit or ice
with an immersion blender because doing so can damage the
blade. (Some models specify they
can crush ice.)
And understand how to safely
use it. Immersion blenders are
STACY ZARIN GOLDBERG
FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
An immersion blender lets you
puree things such as soups and
sauces right in the pot. But the
blades are very sharp, so be
careful.
other blending appliances. Some
of my favorite soup recipes call for
pureeing by transferring the mixture to a jar blender or food processor. This was always an annoying multistep process, usually involving batches and the whole
problem of getting the contents of
a Dutch oven into my blender by
ladle and measuring cup. More
things to clean, more fussing.
With an immersion blender, you
can do everything right in the pot
and not worry about putting hot
soup in a jar blender, which can
blow the top off and make a huge
mess, not to mention burn you.
Rodgers says her favorite thing
to do with her immersion blender
is to crush whole canned tomatoes for tomato sauce — right in
the can. Other foods you can
blend in their containers: tahini
or peanut butter that has separated in the jar. An immersion
blender is good at handling small
amounts of ingredients that larger tools would struggle with,
whether it’s a single smoothie,
small batch of mayo or a serving
of pureed baby food.
A stick blender is pretty powerful. Don’t be fooled by the di-
right up there with mandolines
when it comes to the tools home
cooks are most likely to tell horror
stories about. Many injuries have
occurred when people accidentally turn on the blender while
reaching to pull something from
the blade. The blade is really
sharp, so best to keep those fingers clear of it.
Also, just go ahead and unplug
the appliance as soon as you stop
using it and definitely before you
detach the blending shaft. Some
models offer a separate unlock
button that you must press each
time you want to use the blender. I
say, however, better safe than sorry. For safe and neat usage, be sure
you always keep the blade submerged, or “it will start spewing
the liquid sideways and make a
mess,” Rodgers says. Immersion
blenders are designed to create a
sort of vortex and pull food under
the blade and then out, but you do
want to gently move the appliance around whatever container
you’re blending in to ensure
you’ve reached all the food.
Clean it correctly. Do not immerse the motorized end of this
type of blender in water. You can
certainly hand-wash the blender
shaft (just be careful of the blade,
as noted above), though generally
it can go in the dishwasher. Rodgers says she puts hers in the
silverware holder. Just be sure to
read the manual for your model.
Another easy way to clean it is to
fill an accompanying blender cup
with a few drops of soap and some
warm water, then run the blender
in it.
becky.krystal@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
E7
EE
R E C O M M E N D ATI O N S
Exceptional
Excellent
Very Good
If you’re willing to spend about
$20 on a bottle of wine, you can
find some beauties. Here are five,
including three delicious pinot
noirs, from Oregon and Northern
California.
— D.M.
GREAT VALUE
Vega Escal 2014
Priorat, Spain, $21
Priorat is Spain’s Chateauneuf-duPape in that it produces big red
wines with ample tannin and
alcohol. This wine has a bit of an
identity crisis, as it’s labeled as a
blend of grenache (the French
name for what is garnacha in
Spain), shiraz (the Australian
name for syrah) and carignan
(which is sometimes called
carinena in Spain). Never mind
that: The wine is delicious and big,
with firm tannic structure and a
bright core of fruit shining through.
Alcohol by volume: 14 percent.
PATRICK T. FALLON/BLOOMBERG NEWS
The bottle of wine Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin brought
when he visited Jared Kushner offered up a hint of undue ridicule.
A $20 wine just means
Mnuchin knows value
Here’s a
sentence I never
thought would
emanate from my
fingertips: I write
in defense of
Wine
Steven Mnuchin.
The U.S.
DAVE
treasury secretary,
MCINTYRE
worth a reported
$300 million and
who has been criticized for his
expensive travel on the
taxpayer’s dime and his wife’s
Marie Antoinette-like
connection to the common
people, was recently ridiculed by
the British tabloids for his taste
in wine. Mnuchin, dressed down
in jeans and a polo shirt — just
like you and me! — was snapped
by a paparazzo showing up at the
home of Jared Kushner,
President Trump’s son-in-law
and senior adviser, with a
“cheap” bottle of wine.
Mnuchin is smart in
choosing a 2015
Bordeaux. I have raved
about this vintage, as
has just about everyone.
It offers exceptional
value at all price
ranges.
The Daily Mail got a shot of
the label as Mnuchin was greeted
by Kushner, who evidently saw
the photographer and had an
“Oh what now?” expression as he
greeted the treasury secretary
with a hug. The wine was the
2015 Arbalest, a red blend from
Bordeaux that retails for $20 to
$23.
“A taste for budget booze!
Steven Mnuchin dresses down to
visit Jared Kushner and takes
along a $22 bottle of wine,
despite being worth
$300 million!” the Daily Mail
crowed. “It appears even Steven
Mnuchin can’t say no to a cheap
bottle of wine,” it added.
U.S. news outlets picked up
the story, hyperventilating that
Mnuchin wasn’t bringing an
expensive first growth or a rare
bottle of DRC Burgundy.
“While Mnuchin gifts
affordable wine, he has had no
problem spending taxpayer
Distributed by Elite: Available in the District
at Arrowine and Spirits, Cork & Fork, Grand
Cata, Paul’s of Chevy Chase, S&R Liquors.
Available in Maryland at Jason’s Wine &
Spirits in Ellicott City, Shawan Liquors in
Cockeysville, Wine Cellars of Annapolis,
Wine Source in Baltimore. Available in
Virginia at Balducci’s and Planet Wine &
Gourmet in Alexandria, Williamsburg
Pottery in Williamsburg.
La Follette Pinot Noir North
Coast 2015
money,” Newsweek huffed. The
San Jose Mercury News crowed
that Arbalest’s winemaker,
Benoit Touquette, consults with
several Napa Valley wineries.
Let’s get a few things straight.
First, $22 is not “cheap” for a
bottle of wine. Not when the
average price paid for
750 milliliters — the standard
bottle size — is about $9. Second,
filthy rich people don’t have to
drink filthy expensive wine all
the time. The Arbalest does
qualify as “affordable,” given that
the sweet spot for value tends to
be between $15 and $25. Buying
up to get into that range is often
rewarding, while the increase in
quality becomes more subtle as
you go above $25. (This is my
opinion; others may slide that
value window one way or the
other.)
And Mnuchin is smart in
choosing a 2015 Bordeaux. I have
raved about this vintage, as has
just about everyone. It offers
exceptional value at all price
ranges. I have not tasted the
Arbalest, but wine writer Jeb
Dunnuck has, and he gave it 91
points out of 100.
“It offers a perfumed,
gorgeous bouquet of plums,
incense, spice and hints of forest
floor,” Dunnuck wrote. “Fullbodied, ripe and rounded, with a
sexy, opulent style, lots of midpalate depth and a great finish.”
Who could object to that?
Third, let’s remember the
occasion. Well, okay, we don’t
really know what the occasion
was, as neither the White House
nor the Treasury Department has
issued a statement clarifying why
the two were meeting and
drinking together. Mnuchin was
carrying an iPad as well as the
bottle of wine, so work may have
been involved. (I’m assuming they
weren’t gathering to watch TED
talks.) With work on the agenda,
you wouldn’t want an expensive
wine that would distract attention
and dominate the conversation. A
delicious, unpretentious bottle
will fuel the conversation without
commandeering it.
Mnuchin may not have made
headlines with his taste in wine
if he hadn’t visited Kushner on a
slow news day. But despite the
easy and silly ridicule, we’ve
learned one thing about our
treasury secretary. Given an
appropriate occasion, he has a
nose for value.
food@washpost.com
McIntyre blogs at dmwineline.com. On
Twitter: @dmwine.
Operators standing by. Call for home delivery.
California, $27
Greg La Follette is one of the most
personable and engaging
winemakers in Northern
California, and his wines keep
getting better vintage after
vintage. He specializes in pinot
noir and chardonnay from
Sonoma and Mendocino counties.
This North Coast blend
incorporates wines that didn’t get
into his single-vineyard bottlings,
and it really makes me want to
taste those. It has beautiful
Distributed by Elite: Available in the District
at Cork & Fork, Streets Market (14th Street,
Massachusetts Avenue), Whole Foods
Market (Foggy Bottom, Tenleytown); on the
list at Bistro Aracosia, Lincoln, Siren.
Available in Virginia at Arrowine and
Cheese in Arlington, Dominion Wine and
Beer in Falls Church, Libbie Market in
Richmond, Society Fair and Streets Market
in Alexandria.
R. Stuart & Co. “Love, Oregon”
Pinot Noir 2014
Oregon, $21
The label is styled after a postcard
from the Pacific Northwest, and
the wine tastes like the memory of
a wonderful vacation. Flavors of
black cherry and berries with hints
of sage and thyme invite a
lingering discussion over a
beautiful meal. ABV: 13.7 percent.
Montinore Estate Red Cap Pinot
Noir 2016
Willamette Valley, Ore., $23
I’m a fan of this winery in the
northern reaches of Oregon’s
Willamette Valley. Montinore
practices biodynamic viticulture
and produces wines with verve
and sophistication. This pinot noir
is on the fun, rather than serious,
side. ABV: 13.6 percent.
Distributed by DMV: Available in the District
at Paul’s of Chevy Chase, Rodman’s, Yes!
Organic Market (14th Street, Cleveland
Park, Georgia Avenue). Widely available in
Maryland, including at Bethesda Co-Op in
Cabin John, Cork 57 Beer and Wine, and
Georgetown Square Wine and Beer in
Bethesda; Finewine.com in Gaitherseburg;
Potomac Beer & Wine and Mom’s Organic
Poggio la Luna Vermentino
2016
Tuscany, Italy, $20
Enjoy this scintillating white —
crisp and refreshing with tree fruit
flavors — with any seafood dishes.
This wine deserves wider
distribution. ABV: 13 percent.
Distributed by Simon N Cellars: Available in
the District at A. Litteri, on the list at Lupo
Verde. Available in Virginia at the Italian
Store in Arlington (both locations).
Availability information is based on
distributor records. Wines might not
be in stock at every listed store and
might be sold at additional stores.
Prices are approximate. Check
Winesearcher.com to verify
availability, or ask a favorite wine
store to order through a distributor.
FINE WINES & SPIRITS ★ LA CHEESERIE & INTERNATIONAL DELI
★ Sauvignon Blanc Sale ★
1.75 Liter Sale
-America-
Ketel One t(MFOMJWFU Famous
33.99 t(MFOmEEJDI Grouse
Bonterra /PSUI$PBTU ...................10.69
Cakebread Napa 2016 .........................29.99
Cliff Lede Napa 2016............................21.99
%FDPZ%VDLIPSO
4POPNB ......16.99 Grey Goose
%SZ$SFFL4POPNB.......................12.49 48.99
Duckhorn Napa 2016............................23.69
38.99
Ferrari Carano 4POPNB .............12.49
Belvedere
Frog’s Leap 3VUIFSGPSE ...............21.99
(JSBSENapa 2016...................................13.69
(SPUINapa 2016....................................19.69 Luksusowa
Honig Napa 2016 ...................................16.49
.BUBO[BT$SFFL4POPNB ..........15.99
Mondavi Napa 2015 .............................16.99
.VSQIZ(PPEF/PSUI$PBTU ....... 8.99
3PEOFZ4USPOHi$IBSMPUUFTw4POPNB.... 9.69 t4UPMJDIOBZB
Simi 4POPNB .................................... 9.69 tAbsolut
4U+FBO4POPNB ............................. 6.99
Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars i"WFUBw/BQB......25.99
83.99 24.99
Tito’s
Dewar's
Chivas
Regal
Johnnie
Walker
Red
27.99 29.99
15.99 47.99
-France#MBODEF-ZODI#BHFT#PSEFBVY ...48.99
Bois-Martin 1FTTBD-ÏPHOBO.......20.99
Chantegrive i$BSPMJOFw(SBWFT....22.99
$IFWJMMZ2VJODZ .............................15.99
Corbillières 5PVSBJOF...................10.99
Crochet i$IÐOF.BSDIBOEw4BODFSSF ...19.99
Crochet i5IJCBVEFw4BODFSSF .......17.99
Delaporte Sancerre 2016......................23.99
Du Cros #PSEFBVY .........................11.99
D’Yquem i::HSFD
w#PSEFBVY...96 WS ... 149.00
D’Yquem i::HSFD
w#PSEFBVY...91 WA ... 149.00
(SBWJMMF-BDPTUF(SBWFT ....................17.99
(VJSBVEi(EF(VJSBVEw ...8" ......17.99
)BVU#FSHFZ1FTTBD-ÏPHOBO ...8" .... 29.99
La Louvière 1FTTBD-ÏPHOBO .......34.99
Latour-Martillac 1FTTBD-ÏPHOBO ....90 WA ......39.99
-F1FUJU)BVU-BGJUUF1FTTBD-ÏPHOBO ...90 WA ......34.99
L’Hémonière5PVSBJOF .................10.99
Lucien Crochet i-F$IÐOFw4BODFSSF ...34.99
Maison Legrand 2016 ......................... 8.99
Malartic-Lagravière1FTTBD-ÏPHOBO....92 WA ......59.99
Martinon &OUSF%FVY.FST ..........12.99
Mellot i-B.PVTTJÒSFw4BODFSSF ...29.99
Renaissance i$BJMMPUUFTw4BODFSSF ....22.99
3FWFSEZ4BODFSSF..........................17.99
Salvard $IFWFSOZ ..........................13.49
Sauger i7JFJMMFT7JHOFTw$IFWFSOZ ...14.99
5IJFVMFZ#PSEFBVY........................13.99
Thomas i-B$SFMFw4BODFSSF.........20.99
-New ZealandAllan Scott ..................................10.99
$MPVEZ#BZi5F,PLPw.................34.99
$MPVEZ#BZ ..................................22.99
$SBHHZ3BOHFi5F.VOB3PBEw....90 WS ......18.99
%PH1PJOUi4FDUJPOw ........93 WA ......27.99
%PH1PJOU2016.................................90 WS ......18.99
)BZ.BLFS..................................... 8.99
,JN$SBXGPSEy3FCBUF#PU ...11.99
-JUUMF#FBVUZ2016 ..............................17.99
Matakana ...............................11.99
Matua 2016.............................................. 8.99
Mohua ............................................. 9.99
.POLFZ#BZ ................................. 6.99
Nautilus 2016 .....................................90 WS ......12.99
Nobilo y3FCBUF#PU.............. 8.99
0ZTUFS#BZ .................................... 9.99
1PVOBNV2016 ..................................92 WS ......13.99
4QZ7BMMFZ ....................................11.99
Villa Maria i1SJWBUF#JOw .............. 9.99
-South Africa-
-ItalyAttems 7FOF[JB(JVMJB ..................13.99
BONUS WINE
Cline
Ancient Vines
Zinfandel
84
SF
structure and balance to gird
succulent black fruit. ABV:
13.5 percent.
Market in Rockville; Friendship Gourmet
Market in Chevy Chase; Snider’s Super
Foods in Silver Spring; Yes! Organic Market
in Hyattsville.
★ ★ ★ ★ PARK FREE ON OUR LOT ★ ★ ★ ★
Klein Constantia 2016............90 WA ......14.99
Mulderbosch 4UFMMFOCPTDI ....90 WA ......13.99
Southern Right 8BMLFS#BZ .......13.99
Steenberg 8FTUFSO$BQF............... 8.99
1-800-753-POST
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Distributed by Roanoke Valley: Available in
the District at Batch 13, Rodman’s.
Available in Virginia at Screwtop Wine Bar
& Cheese Shop in Arlington, Society Fair in
Alexandria; on the list at Liberty Barbecue
in Falls Church, Red’s Table in Reston.
11.99
6Q5P.BJM*O3FCBUF
Johnnie
Walker
Black
26.99 55.99
Jameson
t4LZZ
Reb. Up To $12
t3 Olives
17.77
Svedka
Reg & Citrus
38.99
34.99
18.49
t5BORVFSBZ
t4BQQIJSF
Courvoisier VS .................................... 24.99
Ferrand "NCSF...................................... 38.99
20.99
)FOOFTTZ7401 .................................... 49.99
Martell Blue Swift ................................. 39.99
21.99 Martell 7401................................... 27.99
Cutty Sark
3FNZ.BSUJO7401............................. 36.99
Kentucky
Gentleman
9.88
Maker's
Mark
Evan
Reb $3=17.99
Gold &
Silver
Jim
Beam
1.5 Liter Magnum Sale
Cavit....................................................... 10.99
$JUSBt'FU[FS ........................................9.99
Concha y Toro ................................ 6.88
Folonari ...................................................8.99
La Vieille Ferme ................................ 11.99
Lindeman’s Bins ...................................8.49
Vendange................................................6.99
Woodbridge...3FC6Q5P .................9.49
Yellow Tail...3FC6Q5P .............. 7.99
Champagne & Sparkling Sale
26.99 25.99 Bollinger
Brut ...................................... 49.99
Henri Abele #SVUt#SVU3PTÏ .............. 32.99
Crown
Royal
Bacardi
New
Jack
Amsterdam
Daniel’s
Gin
Malibu
30.99
Cognac Sale
26.99
Bushmills
Cuervo
Small Batch Gin Sale
Aviation ................................................ 24.99
Bloom .................................................... 26.99
Bluecoat ............................................... 21.99
Bols (FOFWFS .......................................... 33.99
Boodles................................................. 22.99
Caledonia Barr Hill ......................... 29.99
(SFFO)BU3FHt4QSJOH....................... 30.99
)BZNBOhT0ME5PN ............................... 24.99
)FOESJDLhT ........................................... 31.99
-FPQPMEhT ............................................. 31.99
.POLFZ ................................NM33.99
Opihr ...................................................... 26.99
Plymouth ........................................ 26.99
The Botanist ....................................... 34.99
Grant's
16.99 44.99 Williams
20.99
Smirnoff
Malt Scotch Sale
Aberlour t)JHIMBOE1BSL12 Year .... 46.99
Ardbeg 10 Year ................................ 39.99
Balvenie$BSJCCFBO$BTL:FBS ......... 69.99
Balvenie 12 Year ................................... 55.99
%BMXIJOOJF15 Year ............................. 52.99
(MFOGJEEJDIt(MFOMJWFU12 Year .... 46.99
(MFONPSBOHJF10 Year...3FC .. 34.99
Lagavulin 16 Year ................................ 69.99
Laphroaig 10 Year ......................... 37.99
Macallan:FBSt%PVCMF$BTL .......... 55.99
Oban :FBS ......................................... 57.99
Talisker 10 Year..................................... 52.99
Tomatin 12 Year .................................... 32.99
37.88 18.99
15.88 36.49 15.98
Can. Mist
tBeefeater 12.99
t#PNCBZ
10.99
25.99
Black Velvet
Captain
Morgan
21.99
Case Beer Sale
12 OZ. CANS
Busch 3FHt-JHIU ..........................30pk 15.99
#VEXFJTFSt#VE-JHIU t.JMMFSLite ...... 16.99
Yuengling 3FHt-JHIUt$PPST-JHIU...... 16.99
Natural -JHIU ..................................30pk 16.99
12 OZ. BOTTLES
Yuengling Lagert.JMMFSLite ........... 20.99
Kirin *DIJCBOtBeck’s Regular ............. 25.99
Corona &YUSBt-JHIUt1SFNJFS......... 25.99
Bass Ale t4U1BVMJ(JSM .................... 26.99
)FJOFLFOt"NTUFM ........................... 27.99
Dos Equis "NCFSt-BHFStMichelob Ultra ... 27.99
Stella Artois ......................................... 28.99
Modelo/FHSBt&TQFDJBM ....................... 29.99
1FSPOJt1JMTOFS6SRVFMMt.JDIFMPC1VSF(PME .... 30.99
Samuel Adams "MM7BSJFUJFT ......... 32.99
Devils Backbone-BHFSt*1"tBlue Moon .... 33.99
Tastings:
5IVSTQN$BQUBJO-BXSFODF
'SJQNLeft Hand
4BUQNDC Brau
Taittinger Brut ..................................... 39.99
Veuve Clicquot Brut .......................... 45.99
Chandon #SVUt#MBODEF/PJS3FC ....... 17.99
Valdo 1SPTFDDP#SVU ............................... 10.99
Small Batch Bourbon & Rye Sale
Basil Hayden’s ............................. 32.99
Booker’s ............................................... 56.99
Bulleit #PVSCPOt3ZF ........................... 29.99
High West 1SBJSJFt%PVCMF3ZF ........... 31.99
+BDL%BOJFMT(FOUMFNBO+BDL ............ 25.99
Knob Creek 9 Year #PVSCPOt3ZF....... 24.99
Woodford Reserve#PVSCPO ............ 34.99
Catoctin Creek 3ZF ........................... 34.99
Rittenhouse 3ZF ................................. 24.99
Templeton :FBS3ZF .......................... 35.99
8IJTUMF1JH:FBS3ZF........................ 69.99
-JRVFVSt.JYPMPHZ4BMF
#BJMFZTt%JTBSPOOP"NBSFUUP ........ 24.99
##t%PNBJOF$BOUPO ................ 31.99
%SBNCVJFt$PJOUSFBV ................... 32.99
(SBOE.BSOJFS3FC ......... 31.99
Kahlua ................................................... 17.99
Luxardo .BSBTDIJOP ............................. 29.99
4U(FSNBJOt'SBOHFMJDP.............. 27.99
Aperol...3FCBUF ................... 20.99
★ ★ Full Service La Cheeserie & International Deli ★ ★
New York Times #1
Fresh
Cambridge
Smoked Salmon
Spinach Dip
Reg. $6.99
5.99 LB
CHEESES
OF THE WORLD
14.99
Saval New York Style
LB
Reg. $16.99
Hand Sliced To Order
Lean Regular Cut
Chopped Chicken Livers
Corned Beef
From Brooklyn
10.99
12.99 LB
8.69 LB
★
Special
Emmenthal (Switzerland) 1VSDIBTF
7.49 lb.
4.99 lb.
5.99 lb.
Special
★ Campo de Montalban (Spain) 1VSDIBTF
11.99 lb.
Reg. $13.99 11.99 LB
Busseto
10-12 OZ Average
Aged Tillamook 24 Mos 0SFHPO
7.99 lb.
San Francisco High Harvest
Romano Pecorino *UBMZ
8.99 lb.
Salamis
EV Olive Oil ★
Special
500
Reg. $6.99 4.99 OZ
P'tit Basque (France) 1VSDIBTF
14.99 lb.
Reg. $19.99 16.99 ML
5BTUJOHX(SPXFSt4BUVSEBZBNQN
Reggianito Parmesan Type (Argentina) 8.99 lb.
Smoked
Fine Hams
Turkey Breast
Goat Gouda )PMMBOE
9.99 lb.
Capicola
Reg. $9.99 7.99 LB
Special
★ Parrano )PMMBOE
1VSDIBTF 9.99 lb.
Reg. $6.99 5.99 LB
Trois Petits Cochons
Citterio
Stilton
(England)
12.99 lb.
Fine Patés
Rosemary
Mahon (Spain)
12.99 lb.
Canard a
Reg. $10.99 9.69 LB
Special
★ Gruyere (Switzerland) 1VSDIBTF
11.99 lb.
Madrange
l’Orange
Jambon Francaise
3FH 6.99 LB
Valdeon
Blue
(Spain) 14.99 lb.
Reg. $9.99 8.49 LB
Mousse Royale Prosciutto San Daniele Sartori BellaVitano 8JTDPOTJO
14.99 lb.
Special
★
Saint Nectaire (France) 1VSDIBTF
8.99 lb.
Reg. $9.99 8.99 LB
3FH 10.99 LB
Reg. $12.99
LB
Extra Lean 1st Cut
Reg. $9.99
3FH
Idaho Trout
Fresh Smoked
Cheddar /FX:PSL
Brie 60% d'Amir (France)
FRESH COFFEE BEANS
8.98
LB.
Regular
$10.99
★ From Our Selection of More Than 40 ★
t'SFODI3PBTURegular & Decaffeinated
t+BNBJDBO4UZMFt1FSV0SHBOJD
t4XJTT$IPDPMBUF"MNPOEt1SBMJOF
4339 Connecticut Ave. NW ★ Adjacent to Van Ness Metro Stop
202-966-4400 | Wineline: 202-966-0445
calvertwoodley.com | wine@calvertwoodley.com
)PVST.'t4BUt4VOEBZ
4BMF5ISV4VOEBZ
Bonus
Santa Lucia
Regular & Decaffeinated
7.98 LB
Regular $10.99
SIGN UP TO
RECEIVE
EMAIL OF AD
ON MON
E8
EZ
EE
THE WASHINGTON POST
K
. WEDNESDAY,
MAY 16 , 2018
quick pasta recipes
RECIPE FINDER
.
SEARCH MORE THAN 7,900 POST-TESTED RECIPES AT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RECIPES
.
RECIPE QUESTIONS? EMAIL FOOD@WASHPOST.COM
Lemon Spaghettini
4 to 6 servings
Yes, you can have luxury on a Tuesday (or whatever) night. All you need is
a squeeze of lemon juice, some cream,
a shower of herbs, good cheese — and
pasta.
Spaghetti’s skinnier sibling is what
you want for this delicate sauce.
MAKE AHEAD: The pasta can be
refrigerated for 3 or 4 days.
Adapted from “Preserving Italy:
Canning, Curing, Infusing, and Bottling Italian Flavors and Traditions,”
by Domenica Marchetti (Houghton
Mifflin Harcourt, 2016).
Ingredients
Salt
1 small lemon
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup heavy cream
Leaves from 2 large sprigs fresh flatleaf parsley
Leaves from 2 sprigs fresh basil
1 pound dried spaghettini (thin
spaghetti)
1/2 cup freshly grated ParmigianoReggiano cheese, plus more for
serving
Freshly ground black pepper
Steps
Bring a large pot of water to a rolling
boil over high heat. Salt it generously.
Zest the lemon with a Microplane
grater or zester (no white pith).
Squeeze the lemon and measure out
2 tablespoons of juice.
Combine the oil and lemon zest in a
medium heavy-bottomed saucepan
over low heat. Cook, stirring now and
again, for a couple of minutes, until
the zest starts to sizzle gently.
Stir in the cream and increase the
heat to medium-high. Bring to a boil,
reduce the heat to medium and cook
for 3 minutes, until the cream is
heated through. Then whisk in the
lemon juice, one tablespoon at a
time, to form a thickened sauce. Turn
off the heat and cover to keep warm.
Finely chop the parsley and basil;
you should end up with about a
tablespoon of each.
Add the spaghettini to the boiling
water, reduce the heat to mediumhigh and cook according to the package directions (for al dente). Watch
closely, as this thin spaghetti cooks
quickly. Drain in a colander set in the
sink, reserving 1/2 cup of the cooking
water.
Return the pasta to the pot, then
pour the sauce over it. Toss gently to
combine. Stir in the cheese, herbs
and a few grindings of black pepper.
Add a splash or two of cooking water,
as needed, to loosen the sauce. Toss
once more, then divide among individual bowls, and serve with additional cheese.
Nutrition | Per serving (based on 6, using 1
teaspoon salt): 520 calories, 14 g protein, 59 g
carbohydrates, 25 g fat, 12 g saturated fat, 60 mg
cholesterol, 540 mg sodium, 1 g dietary fiber, 4 g
sugar
Recipe tested by Bonnie S. Benwick ; email
questions to food@washpost.com
Cacio e Pepe Alla Colu
4 servings
This Roman classic is traditionally
made with just three ingredients: spaghetti, pecorino Romano and black
pepper — lots of it. Cookbook author
Colu Henry adds butter to help emulsify the cheesy sauce.
MAKE AHEAD: The pasta can be
refrigerated for 3 or 4 days.
Adapted from Henry’s “Back Pocket
Pasta: Inspired Dinners to Cook on the
Fly” (Clarkson Potter, 2017).
PHOTOS BY STACY ZARIN GOLDBERG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST; FOOD STYLING BY LISA CHERKASKY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
CLOCKWISE, FROM TOP LEFT: Lemon Spaghettini; Cacio e Pepe Alla Colu; Farfalle With Salmon, Peas and Sage; BLT Bucatini.
BLT Bucatini
Farfalle With Salmon, Peas and Sage
4 to 6 servings
2 servings main-course or 4 small servings
America’s favorite sandwich gets an Italian makeover, with pasta standing in for
the bread, pancetta for the bacon and spicy arugula for the lettuce.
Pancetta is pork belly, same as bacon, but cured with salt and spices rather than
smoked. You can use thickly sliced bacon to give your bucatini a smoky flavor.
MAKE AHEAD: The pasta can be refrigerated for up to 3 days.
Adapted from “The Glorious Pasta of Italy,” by Domenica Marchetti (Chronicle,
2011).
This dish provides yet another good reason to keep a bag of green peas in your
freezer. They’re as good as fresh. Not only do they make a fast side dish (say, sauteed
with shallots), but you can also add them to curries, frittatas and potpies.
Here, they combine with salmon for an easy, elegant pasta dish.
Adapted from “The Glorious Pasta of Italy,” by Domenica Marchetti (Chronicle,
2011).
Ingredients
Salt
8 ounces thickly or thinly sliced
pancetta (may substitute thick-cut
bacon; see headnote)
11/2 pounds cherry tomatoes
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 pound bucatini (also known as
perciatelli)
5 ounces baby arugula leaves
1/2 cup freshly grated pecorino
Romano cheese
12
Steps
Bring a large pot of water to a rolling
boil over high heat. Salt it generously.
Cut the sliced pancetta into 1/2-inch
cubes or pieces. Cut each tomato in
half.
Warm the oil in a large skillet over
medium heat. Once the oil shimmers,
scatter the pancetta in the pan and
cook for 8 to 10 minutes, stirring often,
until the pancetta fat has started to
render (melt) and the meat is lightly
browned and somewhat crispy.
Add the tomatoes to the pan; increase
the heat to medium-high. Cook for 15
minutes, stirring occasionally, or until
the tomatoes have collapsed and the
liquid in the pan has thickened into a
sauce. Reduce the heat as needed to
keep the sauce barely bubbling at the
edges. Taste, and season with salt, as
needed.
Turn off the heat and cover to keep the
sauce warm.
Add the bucatini to the boiling water;
reduce the heat to medium-high and
cook according to the package directions (for al dente). Drain the pasta in
a colander set in the sink, reserving
1/ cup of the cooking water.
2
Transfer the bucatini to the skillet and
gently toss with the sauce, adding a
splash or two of the cooking water, as
needed, to loosen the consistency.
Add the arugula by the handful and
continue to toss for a minute or so, just
until the greens are wilted.
Divide among individual bowls and
sprinkle each portion with 1 to 2
tablespoons of the cheese. Serve
warm.
Nutrition | Per serving (based on 6, using 1 teaspoon
salt): 500 calories, 22 g protein, 62 g carbohydrates,
19 g fat, 6 g saturated fat, 45 mg cholesterol, 1,270
mg sodium, 3 g dietary fiber, 6 g sugar
Recipe tested by Bonnie S. Benwick; email questions
to food@washpost.com
Ingredients
/ teaspoon salt, plus more as needed
8 ounces wild-caught salmon fillet,
skinned
1 tablespoon butter (salted or
unsalted)
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 medium shallot
Leaves from 1 large sprig fresh sage
Freshly ground black pepper
3 tablespoons dry white wine
1/4 cup heavy cream
1/2 cup frozen green peas, defrosted
8 ounces dried farfalle (bowtie pasta)
Steps
Bring a large pot of water to a rolling
boil over high heat. Salt it generously.
Cut the salmon into 3/4-inch cubes.
Combine the butter and oil in a large
skillet over medium heat. Once the
butter starts to sizzle, stir in the shallot
and sage. Cook, stirring often, for 5 to 6
minutes, until the shallot has begun to
soften.
Increase the heat to medium-high;
add the salmon, the 1/2 teaspoon of salt
and a generous grinding of pepper.
Cook for about 1 minute, tossing the
salmon gently to coat evenly.
As soon as the salmon begins to turn
opaque, sprinkle in the wine. Let it
bubble for about 30 seconds, then stir
in the cream and peas; cook for 5 to 7
minutes to form a sauce that is barely
bubbling at the edges. The peas should
be heated through yet still bright
green. Remove from the heat and
cover to keep warm.
Add the farfalle to the boiling water;
reduce the heat to medium-high and
cook according to the package directions (for al dente). Drain the pasta in
a colander set in the sink, reserving
1/ cup of the cooking water.
2
Transfer the farfalle to the skillet;
gently toss with the sauce until well
incorporated. Add a splash or two of
the cooking water, as needed, to loosen
the sauce.
Divide among individual bowls and
serve.
Nutrition | Per serving (based on 4, using unsalted
butter): 420 calories, 20 g protein, 44 g
carbohydrates, 17 g fat, 6 g saturated fat, 60 mg
cholesterol, 500 mg sodium, 3 g dietary fiber, 4 g
sugar
Recipe tested by Bonnie S. Benwick; email questions
to food@washpost.com
Ingredients
Salt
12 ounces dried spaghetti
4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) butter
(salted or unsalted)
2 teaspoons freshly ground black
pepper, plus more for serving
1 cup freshly grated pecorino
Romano cheese, plus more for
serving
Steps
Bring a large pot of water to a rolling
boil over high heat. Salt it generously.
Add the spaghetti; reduce the heat to
medium-high and cook according to
the package directions (for al dente).
When the pasta is about halfway
done cooking, start the sauce: Melt
the butter in a 12-inch skillet over
medium-high heat. Add the pepper
and stir for about 2 minutes, until it
is aromatic. Add 1/2 cup of the cooking water directly from the pasta pot;
once the mixture is bubbling, cook
for 1 minute, stirring, to form a
well-blended (emulsified) sauce.
Drain the pasta, reserving another
1/ cup of its cooking water.
2
Reduce the heat to medium; add the
cooked pasta and the cheese directly
to the skillet, tossing vigorously until
evenly coated and the cheese has
melted. Add the 1/2 cup of pasta
cooking water; cook for 1 minute
more.
Divide among individual bowls or
plates; serve with additional cheese
and pepper.
Nutrition | Per serving (using 1 teaspoon salt): 520
calories, 19 g protein, 64 g carbohydrates, 19 g fat,
11 g saturated fat, 50 mg cholesterol, 890 mg
sodium, 2 g dietary fiber, 3 g sugar
Recipe tested by Domenica Marchetti; email
questions to food@washpost.com
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
72
Размер файла
27 347 Кб
Теги
The Washington Post, newspaper
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа