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The Week UK - 14 October 2017

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The fall of
a Hollywood
mogul
FIGHTING
SEXISM
IN FRANCE
What it?s
like to live
in space
TALKING POINTS P23
PEOPLE P10
LAST WORD P56
THE WEEK
14 OCTOBER 2017 | ISSUE 1146 | �50
THE BEST OF THE BRITISH AND INTERNATIONAL MEDIA
Taming the Tories
Can May take back control?
Page 4
ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT EVERYTHING THAT MATTERS
www.theweek.co.uk
There are other ways to travel Transatlantic
4 NEWS
The main stories?
What happened
What the editorials said
May?s fightback
Theresa May sought to put her ill-fated
conference speech behind her this week by
reasserting her authority and offering more
detail on the Government?s Brexit plans. In an
interview with The Sunday Times, the Prime
Minister hinted that she might demote Boris
Johnson in a reshuffle, saying she wanted ?the
best people in my Cabinet?. Tory MPs have
mostly rallied around May since she saw off last
week?s backbench coup attempt, led by former
party chairman Grant Shapps.
?I?m in charge.? That was the message delivered by the PM in
the Commons this week, said The Daily Telegraph, and it was
aimed at two audiences: her MPs and Brussels.
But does either group believe it? They?ll
struggle to do so on the evidence of last week?s
Tory conference, said the FT. May?s failure to
discipline Johnson for his freelancing on Brexit
showed she was incapable of ?imposing
collective Cabinet responsibility?. And the
lacklustre policy agenda on show ? energy price
caps, a few more council houses, tweaks to
tuition fees ? hardly spoke of dynamic
leadership. As for the key issue of Brexit, said
The Observer, it must be clear to EU leaders
that the PM ?does not seem able to garner the
authority she needs to make an offer
sufficiently generous to unblock the talks?.
In the Commons on Monday, May said Britain
had made sufficient concessions for now in the
Brexit negotiations, and set out plans for how
the UK would keep trade flowing in the event of The PM: the least worst option
a no-deal scenario. The ball, she said, was now
Some Tories believe May must go, said The
in the EU?s court ? a claim swiftly rebutted by Brussels. The
Times. ?History says you can?t just carry on,? Shapps declared
PM angered pro-Brexit MPs, however, by conceding that the
this week, citing the lame-duck premierships of John Major
European Court of Justice would continue to have jurisdiction and Gordon Brown. But with Britain engaged in crucial Brexit
over the UK during the ?implementation period? after Britain
negotiations, we can?t afford the distraction and delays of a
leaves the EU in March 2019. The same MPs were also
leadership contest. May should stay in post until we leave the
aggravated by her repeated refusal, in a radio interview, to say EU in 2019. ?It is hardly a scenario that sets the heart racing,
whether or not she would back Brexit in another referendum.
but it is the least worst option for the country.?
What happened
Catalonia on the brink
What the editorials said
It wasn?t all bad
A pensioner who was targeted
by scammers has been reunited
with his life savings, thanks to the
intervention of a taxi driver. Barry
Stone, a retired cabinet maker
from Marlow, received a call from
someone who claimed to be
investigating bank fraud for Scotland
Yard. They told the 78-year-old to
withdraw �,000 and hand the cash
to a driver, who would take the notes
to London so they could be checked
for fingerprints. But the cabbie, Izy
Rashid, quickly smelled a rat, and
returned the notes. ?I?m very, very
relieved,? Mr Stone said.
A survivor of the Grenfell Tower fire who feared her cat had
died in the disaster has been reunited with her beloved pet.
When Kerry O?Hara, 53, discovered that the building was
ablaze, she only had time to grab her keys and a jacket before
fleeing her sixth-floor flat. She fought her way through thick
smoke down to the second floor, where she was rescued by
a firefighter. Her cat, Rosey, was left behind.
In the days after the fire, O?Hara repeatedly returned to the
area to put up ?missing? posters and ask if anyone had seen
Rosey ? but she eventually gave up hope that the cat had
survived the fire. Then, in August, two months after the
disaster, Rosey was spotted less than half a mile from Grenfell
Tower; she was taken to a vet, who found her old address by
scanning her microchip. ?I got a phone call from someone
saying we think we?ve found your cat,? said O?Hara. ?I was
asking, is she OK, is she burnt? But she just had a scratch on
her nose. She recognised me straight away. Now I don?t let her
out of my sight.?
COVER CARTOON: HOWARD MCWILLIAM
THE WEEK 14 October 2017
� TERI PENGILLEY/GUARDIAN NEWS & MEDIA
Catalonia stands ?on the edge of the abyss?, said El Pa韘
(Madrid). Its leaders ?are still considering going ahead with
The threat of a constitutional crisis in Spain
their suicidal plans?. They should understand
eased this week when the president of
the consequences. As the recent marches show,
Catalonia?s regional parliament stepped
the people of the region are far from united.
back from an immediate declaration of
Declaring independence would ?break Catalan
independence. In the wake of the referendum
society in two?. A head-on collision with the
of 1 October ? which saw 90% opt for
Spanish state would follow, with vast damage
independence on a turnout of 43%, during
to Catalonia?s economy. But Mariano Rajoy,
a vote marred by police violence ? Carles
Spain?s PM, must respond to Puigdemont?s
Puigdemont said he had signed a declaration
offer of talks, said The Times. His ?overly
of independence, but had suspended it so that
rigid strategy is at least partly to blame for the
talks could be held with Madrid. However,
worst constitutional crisis in recent Spanish
ministers reiterated the government?s position Puigdemont: ?head-on collision? history?. Without a dialogue, Spain will face
that the referendum was illegal, and said that
years of confrontation and division.
there would be no talks until Catalan leaders abandoned the
goal of independence.
Even now a deal should be possible, said The Economist. Any
settlement would have to involve an official independence
Earlier in the week, some 350,000 pro-unity protesters took referendum, an idea bitterly opposed by Madrid. But if
to the streets of Barcelona for a peaceful demonstration
Catalans were offered a few extra powers, including the right
under the slogan Hablemos (?Let?s talk?). Many of the
to raise and keep more of their own taxes and greater
marchers carried Spanish flags and chanted, ?Don?t be
protection for their own language, they would very likely opt
fooled ? Catalonia is Spain?.
to stay inside a united Spain.
?and how they were covered
NEWS 5
What the commentators said
What next?
In the wake of this year?s election debacle, said Bagehot in The Economist, a chastened May
told her colleagues that, ?I got us into this mess and I?m going to get us out?. But she hasn?t
made much progress on honouring that promise. Her chief mistake has ?been to use her
powers of patronage for purely defensive purposes, balancing the party?s established factions
against each other in order to shore up her position?. The result is a paralysed Cabinet lacking
in ?either direction or discipline?. If the PM wants to turn things around, she must clear the
deadwood from the upper echelons of her party and promote talented younger Conservatives.
The Chancellor told MPs this
week that he was preparing
for all outcomes from the
Brexit talks, but said he
would wait until the ?very
last moment? before
spending money on beefing
up border and customs
capabilities to handle a ?no
deal? scenario. He said he
wouldn?t take money now
from other areas, like health
and education, just to ?send
a message? to the EU.
The Tories need a ?full-scale blood transfusion?, agreed Dan Hodges in The Mail on Sunday.
May should announce that she will stand down after delivering Brexit ? a move that would
?neuter her critics and underline her conference message that public service remains her sole
motivation? ? and then sack her disloyal Foreign Secretary, Boris Johnson, as part of a wideranging reshuffle. On the contrary, said Charles Moore in The Daily Telegraph, the colleague
she most needs to dump is Philip Hammond. It?s the defeatist attitude of the Chancellor and his
allies to Brexit that is holding the Government back. To weather the Brexit process, the PM will
need to have ?a confident story to tell about what Britain has been, is and can be?.
Ultimately, it makes little difference who leads the Tories, said Janan Ganesh in the FT. For
whoever does the job will run into the same problem: the impossibility of reconciling the party?s
differences over Europe. Devising a Brexit model that is acceptable to both the party?s Leavers
and Remainers, and that can survive contact with EU negotiators, is a challenge that would
defy all but a modern-day ?Churchill or Alexander the Great? ? and there doesn?t seem to be
one of them around. The Conservatives ?cannot elect their way out of this fix?. If the Tories
know what?s good for them, said Stephen Daisley in The Spectator, they?ll stick with May and
let her take the blame for the inevitably messy Brexit outcome. ?Snatching the crown from [the
PM] at this point would be like mugging a dog walker of their poop bag.?
Tory sources say May is
planning a reshuffle after the
European Council meeting at
the end of next week. EU
leaders will decide at that
meeting whether ?sufficient
progress? has been made on
agreeing the UK?s exit terms
for the talks to move on to
the next phase ? trade and
future relations.
What the commentators said
What next?
?Civil war? is a phrase used sparingly in Spain, said Robert Hardman in the Daily Mail: it still
stirs memories of the conflict in the 1930s that led to half a million deaths and four decades of
fascist rule. But in Catalonia, the ?grim unmentionable is now part of daily conversation?.
Madrid?s brutal attempt to halt last week?s banned referendum has fostered a ?mood of
popular revolt? in ?one of the most civilised parts of an EU member state?. Certainly, the
authorities are preparing for the worst. Two cruise liners now moored off Barcelona hold
thousands of reinforcements from the national police and the Guardia Civil awaiting orders
in the event of trouble. Parallels with the past are unmistakeable, said Omar Encarnacion in
Foreign Policy. ?The drive towards regional autonomy? was one of the main triggers of the
civil war; after his victory, General Franco tried to impose ?cultural homogeneity? ? banning
Catalonia?s flag, language and national holiday. This helps explain the Catalans? hostility to
right-wing governments in Madrid. We must hope that Rajoy refrains from using ?the violent
methods? reminiscent of his Popular Party?s ?authoritarian predecessors?.
Rajoy has said he is
ready to use Madrid?s
constitutional powers to
suspend the Catalan
government, and call fresh
elections in the region, if it
claims independence. The
prime minister?s Popular
Party has also warned that
Puigdemont could face jail
if Catalonia goes ahead
with secession.
It?s no wonder Spain won?t lightly surrender control of its richest region, said Matthew
Campbell in The Sunday Times. With a population of 7.5 million, Catalonia has 16% of
Spain?s population, yet it accounts for almost a fifth of the Spanish economy and more than
a quarter of its foreign exports. Brussels too is desperately keen to avoid secession, said Tony
Barber in the Financial Times. The EU fears that Spain?s break-up would give heart to other
separatist movements across Europe, from French-ruled Corsica, to Flanders in Belgium and
Italy?s Alto Adige province, home to a German-speaking majority. The worry is that
?controversies about national borders, self-determination and minority rights that were once
the cause of many a European war will come to haunt the continent again?.
THE WEEK
Her predecessor, that smoothly confident PR man David Cameron,
decided to have a shot at being prime minister because he thought
he?d be ?rather good at it?. Her would-be successor is driven, at least
in part, by naked ambition: Boris Johnson reckoned, aged nine, that his destiny was to be World
King. Theresa May is not lacking ambition. She set her eyes on the top job while still at school. It?s
just that with her, it?s hard to imagine what her ambition rests on. What did she think, aged 15, she
would like about the job of PM? A private and apparently shy woman, she has no obvious interest in
the trappings of power. Aside from her love of fashion, her tastes are modest. It could be that it is
power itself that excites her. Yet she has no ?overarching vision?, and while her political views are
no doubt sincerely held, she shows no great anxiety to communicate them. On the contrary, she is
uncomfortable in front of an audience; and is equally ill-at-ease in smaller groups. Journalists find
her unclubbable; they say she has none of the political gossip and small talk that greases the wheels
at Westminster. It has been reported that the Queen finds meetings with her no more relaxing.
They say she doesn?t want to be PM any more, and who could blame her, after the last few days
and months? But for now, she is stuck. The Tories may not want her to stay, but while they fear that
any leadership contest could lead to a snap election, they don?t want her to go
Caroline Law
either. So May soldiers on. If nothing else, she is stalwart.
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Two of Spain?s largest
banks, Banco Sabadell and
CaixaBank, and several
leading businesses, say they
are moving their
headquarters out of
Catalonia to escape any
political and economic
uncertainty that might
follow independence.
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14 October 2017 THE WEEK
Politics
6 NEWS
Controversy of the week
Smearing the dead
?David Icke started it,? said Dominic Lawson in The Sunday
Times. The conspiracy theorist and self-styled ?son of God?
published a book in 1998 asserting that the former prime minister
Edward Heath was ?a practising Satanist, paedophile and
child-killer?. Perhaps Heath should have sued, but given that Icke
also claimed Heath had the ability to turn into a 12ft lizard, he
probably thought it not worth the effort. ?Who could possibly
believe the ravings of a lunatic?? The answer, unfortunately for his
reputation, was: Wiltshire Police. Last week, the force published
its report on Operation Conifer, a two-year inquiry into whether
Heath was indeed ?a Satanist, paedophile and child-killer?. The
report is a ?pathetic? attempt to justify a deeply ?awed operation
that rode roughshod over the presumption of innocence. This was
all too evident when, on 3 August 2015, Superintendent Sean
Heath: allegations of abuse
Memory stood outside Heath?s former home in Salisbury and
appealed on national TV for ?victims? of the former PM to come forward.
There has been ?a public rush to judgement? over this case, with some commentators ?crying
witch-hunt?, said Gaby Hinsliff in The Guardian. But we simply don?t know what the truth of the
matter is. All we do know is that 42 claims were made against Heath. Wiltshire Police dismissed
more than 30 of them, but seven met the threshold for interview: had Heath still been alive, police
would have questioned him under caution. The outcome is certainly ?unsatisfactory?. Either a dead
man has been smeared baselessly, or a powerful politician has got away with terrible crimes. But it
would have been a ?dereliction of duty? on Wiltshire Police?s part not to investigate: far too often,
victims of abuse have been ignored because they were not deemed credible.
That rather misses the point, said Matthew Scott in The Daily Telegraph. Saying that Heath would
have been interviewed ?tells us almost nothing?: there is a very low evidentiary bar for this. The
Operation Conifer report ?consists of 109 pages of self-justi?cation and virtually no evidence of any
kind?. It fails to make any sort of case against Heath, but ?equally fails to lift the miasma of
suspicion that will probably now surround him for all time?. It does not reveal that the most serious
allegation was made by a convicted child abuser, and was investigated by the Metropolitan Police,
who decided not to pursue it further. Since Jimmy Savile?s crimes were exposed, Britain has become
worried that there may be other well-connected abusers like him, said The Times. The result has been
a serious overreaction: witness Operation Midland, which saw several establishment ?gures hounded
on the evidence of a ?fantasist?. Conifer is a similar story. Heath was accused of killing boys and
throwing their bodies from his yacht. It was never even vaguely probable. ?Wiltshire Police?s desire
to justify its actions, even now, shows an unwillingness to accept how much it has blundered.?
Spirit of the age
The UK could soon become
one of the first countries in
the world in which citizens
aren?t required to officially
state their gender. The
Office for National Statistics
said that the question on
sex in the census, which
respondents must answer,
is ?unacceptable and
intrusive?, particularly for
transgender people. It is
now recommending that the
question becomes optional.
Oxford students banned the
Christian Union from their
college freshers? fair last
week. Balliol?s student union
argued that the society?s
presence could be deemed
a ?micro-aggression?,
given Christianity?s historic
use as ?an excuse for
homophobia? and ?neocolonialism?. But following
a backlash from its students,
Balliol said that the society
will appear at future fairs.
THE WEEK 14 October 2017
Good week for:
Heavy drinkers, with the news that hangovers may soon be a
thing of the past. Professor David Nutt, the drugs scientist and
former government advisor, says he is planning to launch a range
of ?synthetic alcohols? which mimic the effects of conventional
booze, without causing headaches or liver damage.
Poetry, which is back in style. More than a million poetry books
were sold in Britain last year: the highest number on record. The
revival is being led by so-called ?instapoets?, such as the
Canadian Rupi Kaur, who post their verses on social media sites.
God?s own country, which may soon get sweeping new powers.
The Yorkshire Devolution plan, written by senior civil servants,
proposes that the northern county should have its own mayor and
cabinet. Yorkshire has a slightly larger population than Scotland,
and a bigger economy than 11 EU nations.
Bad week for:
Dove, whose latest advert was denounced as racist. The
commercial for body wash shows a black woman peeling off
her T-shirt to reveal a white woman underneath. Dove apologised
and withdrew the advert, which it said ?missed the mark in
representing women of colour thoughtfully? (see page 49).
Dennis the Menace, who has had a makeover. In a new
CBBC series ? designed to appeal to the international market ?
the Beano?s most famous miscreant has swapped his catapult for
an iPad. His dog Gnasher now has neat white teeth in place of his
trademark fangs; and his nemesis Walter is no longer dubbed
a ?softie?, to avoid accusations of homophobia.
Torture ruling
Victims of torture have been
wrongfully imprisoned in
immigration detention
centres, the High Court has
ruled. A Home Office policy
introduced last year redefined
torture to apply only to
violence carried out by state
agents. As a result, hundreds
of asylum seekers ? including
victims of trafficking and
rape ? have been put in
detention centres, rather than
the private housing to which
torture victims are entitled.
But this week, a judge found
that the new definition lacked
a ?rational or evidence
basis?. The Government has
accepted the ruling.
Royal Mail strike
Royal Mail workers are set
to go on strike next week,
in protest over pension
reforms. Following the
company?s decision to close
its retirement fund, members
of the Communication
Workers Union (CWU)
voted to walk out for 48
hours next Thursday. Royal
Mail describes the current
system as unaffordable,
but the CWU says workers
could lose a third of their
retirement entitlements
under the proposals.
Royal Mail said this week
it would apply to the High
Court for an injunction to
stop the strike, on the
grounds that the CWU had
not followed dispute
resolution procedures.
Poll watch
Theresa May?s approval
rating appears to have been
hardly affected by the Tory
party conference, a BMG/
Independent poll has found.
33% of voters are satisfied
with the job she is doing,
and 52% are dissatisfied,
giving her a net rating of
-19, down from -18 two
weeks earlier. By contrast,
Jeremy Corbyn?s popularity
was boosted by the Labour
conference: he is on 0, up
from -10.
Despite May?s low rating,
57% of voters still think she
should remain PM until the
end of Brexit negotiations,
according to an ORB poll for
The Daily Telegraph.
72% of people think Britain
is ?on the wrong track? ?
up from 56% in April. By
contrast, just 8% of Chinese
people feel the same way
about their country.
Ipsos Mori
Europe at a glance
Copenhagen
Body parts
found: Danish
police divers
hunting for the
remains of the
Swedish
journalist Kim
Wall (pictured)
have found and
recovered her
severed head
and legs from the seabed. The body parts
were located not far from where her torso
was found ?oating, close to Copenhagen;
they had been placed in bags and weighted
with metal pipes. The divers also found her
clothes and a knife. Peter Madsen, the
inventor who is in custody on suspicion of
killing her, claims Wall died after being hit
on the head by a hatch on his submarine,
and that in a panic he then threw the body
overboard. Danish investigators con?rmed
that the head did not have the injuries
described by Madsen. They believe he
killed the journalist as part of a perverted
sexual fantasy.
NEWS 7
Oslo
Anti-nuclear coalition wins Nobel: The
Nobel Peace Prize for 2017 has been won
by the International Campaign to Abolish
Nuclear Weapons (Ican), a grass roots
coalition of 468 non-governmental
organisations in 101 countries worldwide.
The global campaign, which is run from
an of?ce in Geneva with three full-time
staff, was set up just a decade ago on the
fringes of a nuclear non-proliferation
conference in Vienna. It was the driving
force behind the UN?s Nuclear Weapon
Ban Treaty, which was signed by 122
countries last month (though not by any
of the nine countries known to possess
nuclear weapons). It?s not the ?rst time
that the Nobel Peace Prize has been
awarded to an anti-nuclear campaign.
In 1995, the prize went jointly to the
Pugwash Conferences, set up in 1957,
and Joseph Rotblat for their efforts to
diminish the part played by nuclear
arms in international politics.
St Petersburg, Russia
Hundreds arrested: At least 260 people
were arrested across Russia last
Saturday, as supporters of the jailed
opposition leader Alexei Navalny held
anti-government protest rallies in 80 cities
to mark the 65th birthday of President
Vladimir Putin. In the president?s home
town of St Petersburg, riot police dispersed
protesters chanting ?Putin is a thief!?;
several were injured and dozens arrested.
In Moscow, protesters shouted ?Down
with the tsar!? ? a mocking reference
to Putin, who has led the country for
18 years so far. Putin has not yet declared
that he will be a candidate in March?s
election, but is expected to do so next
month or in early December.
Dresden, Germany
Petry charged with perjury: The former
leader of the far-right Alternative for
Germany (AfD) party, Frauke Petry, has
been formally charged with perjury, and
faces a minimum of six months in jail if
found guilty. The charges relate to the
AfD?s campaign for regional elections
in Petry?s home state of Saxony in 2014.
Petry is accused of lying under oath to an
electoral commission that was probing
claims of irregularities in the AfD?s
campaign ?nancing. Petry, who denies the
charges, says she made an honest error and
?would gladly have corrected my mistake
if given the chance?. Petry dramatically
resigned from the AfD the day after its
general election breakthrough last month,
when it took 12.6% of the popular vote
and 94 seats in the Bundestag. She said the
party had become too extremist, and she
would sit as an independent; she now
hopes to found a rival party.
Demre, Turkey
Tomb of ?Santa Claus? found: Turkish
archaeologists have found what they
believe is the likely burial place of the
original Santa Claus ? the fourth-century
bishop Saint Nicholas of Myra ? in the
Antalya province of southern Turkey.
Electronic surveys have detected an intact
temple and burial grounds beneath the
St Nicholas church in Demre, the modern
town built on the ruins of Myra; experts
are now preparing for the slow work of
excavating the site, where they believe the
bishop was buried in 343 AD. St Nicholas
of Myra was famed for his generosity to
children, giving rise over the centuries to
the Christmas tradition of the gift-bringer
(which in some European countries is
still centred on 5 December, the eve of
St Nicholas Day). In Dutch, the name of
St Nicholas was elided into ?Sinterklaas?,
which among Dutch settlers in America
became anglicised as ?Santa Claus?.
Paris
Protests build: Millions of French public
sector workers took part in a one-day
national strike on Tuesday, in protest at
President Emmanuel Macron?s economic
reforms. It was the ?rst time in a decade
that all nine unions representing public
sector workers ? from hospital staff and
teachers to air traf?c controllers ? had
called strikes together. Macron?s
government has announced plans to cut
120,000 public sector jobs over the next
?ve years. Last week, Macron was caught
on camera remarking that factory workers
recently laid off in central France should
stop ?stirring up shit? by protesting
against job losses, and apply for other jobs.
Opponents from both Left and Right
pounced on the remarks, which (critics
say) showed Macron to be an out-of-touch
?president of the rich?.
Bochum,
Germany
?James Bond?
avoids jail:
A former spy
known as the
?German James
Bond? has been
convicted of
stashing around
$50m in offshore
accounts to avoid
more than s13m
in taxes. Werner Mauss (pictured), also
known as ?Institution M?, was ?ned
s200,000, but avoided prison due to
what the judge called his ?impressive life
achievements?. During his decades-long
undercover career, Mauss claims to have
saved 43 lives and had a hand in arresting
2,000 criminals. He had claimed the
accounts were being used to channel funds
in operations to free hostages.
Catch up with daily news at www.theweek.co.uk
14 October 2017 THE WEEK
8 NEWS
The world at a glance
Detroit, Michigan
Jailed for refusing vaccination:
A mother from Michigan was
jailed for seven days last week
for refusing to have her son
vaccinated, in de?ance of
a court order. Rebecca Bredow
(pictured), 40, told the court
?I am an educated vaccinechoice mother?, and said that immunisation ?goes against my
beliefs?. Bredow?s ex-husband, the boy?s father, had gone to
court to try to get the nine-year-old vaccinated; he has now
been granted temporary custody to enable the medical jabs to
take place. Child immunisation rates in Michigan are among the
worst in the US, ranking 43rd of the 50 states.
New York
Islamic State sting: Three men suspected of plotting an Isisinspired bomb and gun attack on targets in New York, including
concert venues, subway stations and Times Square, were foiled
last year in a sting operation by an undercover FBI of?cer, US
prosecutors have revealed. A Canadian, Abdulrahman El
Bahnasawy, 19, has been in custody since May 2016. He was
arrested in New Jersey and pleaded guilty in October 2016;
however, the case was sealed until last Friday while investigations
continued. A US citizen, Talha Haroon, 19, was arrested in
Pakistan, where he lives, around September last year. A Filipino
orthopaedic surgeon called Russell Salic, 37, was arrested in April
this year. He is accused of sending money to the ?rst two suspects.
Details of the charges were unsealed in a federal court last week,
and the US is seeking the extradition of Haroon and Salic.
Washington DC
Trump ?could cause world war?: The veteran Republican
senator Bob Corker ? a one-time Trump ally ? has
accused the president of derailing US diplomacy so
recklessly that he could put the world ?on the path
to World War III?. Corker, who is chairman of the
Senate foreign relations committee, said the White House had
become an ?adult day care centre? and that Trump?s volatility
was damaging the US. He recently revealed that he won?t be
standing for re-election. Separately, it was reported that Secretary
of State Rex Tillerson had called Trump a ?f*****g moron?. In
response, Trump told Forbes magazine: ?I guess we?ll have to
compare IQ tests ? and I can tell you who is going to win.?
Napa Valley, California
Wine country wild?res: At least 17 people have been killed, with
scores more missing, in catastrophic wild?res in northern
California?s wine country. At least 2,000 buildings, including
homes, were destroyed in the blazes; Governor Jerry Brown
declared a state of emergency in eight counties, with Napa and
Sonoma the worst affected. Separately, Hurricane Nate ? which
had killed at least 22 people in Nicaragua, Costa Rica and
Honduras ? weakened to a tropical depression as it hit the US.
It caused heavy rains and ?ooding in Alabama, Mississippi and
other parts of the southeastern US, but no structural damage on
the scale of Hurricanes Irma and Maria.
Las Vegas, Nevada
?Bump-stock? ban mooted: The Trump
administration says it is looking into
legislation that would ban ?bump-stocks?
? devices used to convert semi-automatic
guns into fully automatic weapons. The
attachments were used to deadly effect in
the Las Vegas concert massacre, in which
58 people died (see page 16). Police in Las
Vegas have revealed that the gunman,
Stephen Paddock (pictured), had used
complex mathematical calculations to
maximise the death toll, working out optimal distance and bullet
trajectories on paper found in his 32nd-?oor hotel suite. However,
Paddock?s motive remains unknown.
S鉶 Paulo, Brazil
?World?s biggest bank robbery? foiled: Brazilian police say they
have foiled an audacious plot to steal �8m from a bank in S鉶
Paulo, via a 500-metre underground tunnel complete with electric
lighting and a working ventilation system. Sixteen members of the
gang were arrested last week, days before the robbery ? on a S鉶
Paulo branch of Banco do Brasil ? was due to take place. They
had already spent an estimated �0,000 on building the tunnel.
?This would have been the biggest bank robbery in the world,?
chief investigator F醔io Pinheiro Lopes told The Guardian. He
added: ?They are an extremely dangerous and organised gang
with a long history, including some violent crimes like homicide.
If you look at their ages, most are above 35 ? well above the age
of your average Brazilian criminal.?
THE WEEK 14 October 2017
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Rio Olympics chief arrested: The
head of the Brazilian Olympic
Committee, Carlos Nuzman ? who
led the bidding and organising committees for the 2016 Rio
de Janeiro Olympics ? has been arrested by police and held in
custody on corruption charges. Nuzman is suspected of facilitating
a $2m payment from a Brazilian businessman to the son of Lamine
Diack, the disgraced former IOC member, two days before Rio
won the right to host the Games. Nuzman is also accused of
hiding assets, including gold bars worth $2m, held at a depository
in Geneva. Brazilian police said Nuzman was being held in
custody because he had tried to hamper the investigation by
?regularising? assets they say were bought with ?illicit? money.
The world at a glance
Cairo
Anti-gay crackdown: Egyptian authorities
have launched a brutal crackdown on the
gay community in recent weeks, arresting
58 men and one woman on offences such
as ?promoting sexual deviancy?. Some
of those held in prison are said to have
been beaten or subjected to forced anal
examinations. Homosexuality is not
illegal in Egypt, but gay men are often
arrested on grounds of ?debauchery?,
immorality or blasphemy. The recent
wave of arrests follows a rock concert
in Cairo last month, during which some
fans raised the rainbow ?ag in support
of Lebanese rock star Hamed Sinno, one
of the very few openly gay singers in the
Middle East. The scenes prompted an
immediate anti-gay backlash in the
Egyptian media, which is dominated by
conservative, pro-government channels.
Deir Ezzor, Syria
Deadly week: Hundreds of people were
killed or seriously injured in a surge of air
strikes in eastern Syria last week ? reported
to be the deadliest single week in the
country since the battle for Aleppo last
autumn. Russian and Syrian air forces
pummelled the province of Deir Ezzor,
where Islamic State?s remaining ?ghters
have congregated after being driven out of
Raqqa and other former strongholds.
Russia?s defence ministry claimed to have
killed 120 Isis ?ghters in the air strikes;
other sources said many of the casualties
were civilians. Scores of people ? including
families with young children ? were said to
have been killed by air strikes while trying
to cross the Euphrates on rafts to escape
the ?ghting. More than 330,000 people
have been killed since the Syrian con?ict
began in March 2011.
NEWS 9
Pyongyang
Sister promoted:
Kim Jong Un
has promoted his
younger sister
to North Korea?s
ruling politburo,
making her
(alongside Kim?s
wife) one of
the country?s
most important
women. Kim Yo
Jong (pictured), who is believed to be aged
30, is in charge of ?idolisation projects?
? promoting the cult of personality around
Kim Jong Un. According to analysts, the
promotion shows that her in?uence is
more substantial than previously realised,
and is a further consolidation of the Kim
family?s power.
Tokyo
Karoshi death: A 31-yearold journalist for Japan?s
state broadcaster died of
heart failure after working
159 hours of overtime in
a month ? the latest
high-pro?le example of
karoshi, or death by
overwork. Miwa Sado,
who worked for NHK,
died in 2014, and of?cials
attributed her death to
karoshi. The case was
only made public by NHK
last week at the insistence
of her family, who want to
prevent similar tragedies.
There were 107
recognised cases of
death from
overwork in
Japan last
year.
Nairobi
Odinga
withdraws:
Kenya?s
opposition leader,
Raila Odinga, has
withdrawn from the
re-run of the country?s disputed
presidential election ? due to take place
on 26 October ? saying that the electoral
commission hasn?t done enough to tackle
the ?irregularities and illegalities? of the
original August vote. Odinga?s shock
decision means that President Uhuru
Kenyatta appears certain to remain in
of?ce, at least for now. Kenyatta won the
August poll with 54% of the vote, but the
result was annulled by Kenya?s supreme
court on the grounds of irregularities and
fraud. Odinga now wants the election
to be cancelled, allowing the commission
time to organise a ?credible? re-run.
Kenyatta says it will go ahead regardless.
Tehran
Briton?s new
charges: The
London mother
being held in an
Iranian prison,
for supposedly
conspiring against
the regime, could
face up to 16
more years in jail
on three fresh
charges. Nazanin
Zaghari-Ratcliffe (pictured), 38, a dual
British-Iranian citizen, was arrested last
year while visiting her parents in Tehran.
The new charges relate to her work for
the Thomson Reuters Foundation, and
for her previous employer, the BBC. Both
organisations were ?speci?cally working
to overthrow the regime?, according to
the judge at a court hearing last weekend.
Bangkok
L鑣e-majest� charges for author: An
octogenarian Thai commentator has been
charged with l鑣e-majest� for questioning
the traditionally accepted account of a
Thai king?s battle with a Burmese prince
in 1593. Sulak Sivaraksa, 85, a wellknown author and social critic in
Thailand, was charged by a military court
this week, and faces up to 15 years in jail
if convicted. In comments made soon after
the military took power in 2014, he
allegedly cast doubt on the story of King
Naresuan routing an army by defeating
a prince in an elephant duel, and urged
people not to ?fall prey to propaganda?.
14 October 2017 THE WEEK
People
10 NEWS
Inventing The Hoff
David Hasselhoff is arguably
more famous now than in his
1990s heyday. The 65-year-old
actor was best known for two
cheesy TV series (Baywatch
and Knight Rider) and a brief
pop career, until he created his
showbiz alter ego: The Hoff.
?The Hoff is an accentuated,
overegotistical version of me,?
he told Sanjiv Bhattacharya in
The Observer. ?I created him
because when I was 50 years
old, a bunch of secretaries in
Australia were sending emails
with all these Hof?sms, like
Bravehoff, Some Like it Hoff,
He?s Hoff the cuff.? Now,
you can buy Hoff mugs and
keyrings, play a Hoff
videogame and watch the
?mockumentary? TV series
Hoff the Record. ?There are
even Hoff jokes,? marvels the
man himself. ?Like, Hasselhoff
walks into a bar and the
barman says: ?How you doing
Mr Hasselhoff?? and he says:
?From now on, I?m just The
Hoff.? And the barman says:
?No hassle.? That?s pretty
freaking funny! So I went out
and patented it: Don?t Hassel
the Hoff. And bing and a bang
and a boom, it?s made me
millions of dollars.?
Branson weathers a storm
Richard Branson?s Virgin
Group comprises 65 branded
companies and he has a
personal fortune of �8bn. He
is also, temporarily, homeless.
The Virgin founder lives on
Necker, a former paradise in
the British Virgin Islands (BVI).
But when Hurricane Irma hit
the island last month, his house
was torn apart and his
furniture, clothes and even
trees blown away. Branson and
his 70 staff hid in the cellar for
11 hours ? tucking into the
wine in case it was their last
night on Earth. ?The storm was
so strong, even our concrete
bunker was shuddering,? he
told John Arlidge in The
Sunday Times. When they
?nally ventured outside, ?it
looked like a nuclear bomb had
hit the island. Everything has
been devastated.? But Branson
is determined to rebuild ? both
the house and the island. ?I?m
speaking to the prime minister,
builders, tour operators, yacht
operators. We?ll be donating
money to get the BVI back to
their magical best.?
Castaway of the week
This week?s edition of Radio 4?s Desert Island Discs featured
composer and conductor Sir James MacMillan
1* Salve festa dies, plainsong, performed by Coro de monjes del
Monasterio Benedictino de Santo Domingo de Silos
2 Repton by C. Hubert Parry, performed by the Kettering Citadel
Band of the Salvation Army
3 Spem in alium by Thomas Tallis, performed by The Sixteen
4 Silver Machine by Robert Calvert and Dave Brock, performed
by Hawkwind
5 Clarinet Quintet in A, K 581, Larghetto by Wolfgang Amadeus
Mozart, performed by Benny Goodman with the Boston
Symphony String Quartet
6 Tristan and Isolde, End of First Act by Richard Wagner,
performed by Birgit Nilsson with the Vienna Philharmonic
7 Dream Angus, Scottish lullaby, performed Jackie Oates
8 Freude, sch鰊er G鰐terfunken by Gerald Barry, from his opera
The Importance of Being Earnest, performed by Alan Ewing and
the Birmingham Contemporary Music Group
Book: Selected Poems by Michael Symmons Roberts
* Choice if allowed only one record
Luxury: his old piano
THE WEEK 14 October 2017
Marl鑞e Schiappa has been charged with ending sexism in France,
says Adam Sage in The Times. Luckily, she is not easily daunted.
France?s 34-year-old minister for equality is the youngest member
of President Macron?s cabinet, and only went into politics three
years ago. But she is a seasoned feminist campaigner. A former
advertising executive, she started a hugely successful blog about
being a working mother, using it to lobby companies to improve
their employment practices and urge French women to change
their mentalities. ?I told them not to give their phone numbers to
their children?s school. I said, ?Give the Dad?s number instead, so
when your child is ill, the school will phone him.?? (Schiappa
practises what she preaches: ?My children?s school knows there?s
no point calling me because I won?t answer.?) Now that she has her
hands on the levers of power, Schiappa wants to name and shame
the companies with the fewest female executives, as well as
introducing ?nes for street harassment. The latter idea has caused
quite a stir. ?There are an enormous number of people who say
hold on, this is the French way of love, French seduction, the French
lover ? in other words, that we are going to kill French culture if
you?ve no longer got the right to follow women in the street. In fact,
I think we are encouraging French-style seduction by saying when
you are a consenting adult, everything is allowed.?
Viewpoint:
The pollution of fear
?In a 2011 essay, Martin Amis quoted
Eric Hobsbawm?s view that terrorism
is a new kind of urban pollution, and
elaborated: ?The pollution is an
insidious and chronic disquiet.? When
news broke last week that a car had
ploughed into a crowd outside the
Natural History Museum, everyone
made a guess at what had happened.
Car, pedestrian injuries, panicking
crowds, immediate police presence,
swirling rumours... well, you had to
wonder, didn?t you? In fact, it turned
out to be a road traf?c accident. But
the disquiet ? that pollution ? makes
all thoughts turn re?exively to
terrorism rather than traf?c. That is
terrorism doing its real work.?
Sam Leith, London Evening Standard
Farewell
Rodney Bickerstaffe,
union leader who
pushed for a national
minimum wage, died
3 October, aged 72.
Liam Cosgrave, Irish
former taoiseach, died
4 October, aged 97.
Herv� L間er, designer
and inventor of the
?bandage dress?, died
4 October, aged 60.
William G. Stewart, quiz
host and director, died
21 September, aged 84.
Jalal Talabani, Kurdish
?ghter elected president
of Iraq in 2005, died
3 October, aged 83.
� PAUL BARLET / LE PICTORIUM
Dan Brown?s criminal record
Before he became a bestselling
author worth $170m, Dan
Brown was a failure, says Lina
Das in The Mail on Sunday. His
?rst career choice was writing
pop songs ? an unlikely choice
for a clean-cut, brogue-wearing
young nerd. He even recorded
a soft rock album, featuring a
song, 976 Love, about phone
sex. (Sample lyrics: ?I take you
to bed and push the phone to
my head/You make me feel like
a man.?) Brown looks back on
it now with curled toes. ?There
was a lot of sexual content in
songs around then ? I was just
trying to get published,? he
says. ?I wanted to write songs
about princes and queens and
reading ancient manuscripts,
but no one was interested. The
album sold about nine copies.
I?m pretty sure my mum
bought all of them.?
Brie?ng
NEWS 13
Martin Luther?s revolution
500 years ago this month, a German cleric mounted a challenge to papal authority that unleashed the Reformation
What happened in 1517?
Tradition has it that on 31 October
1517, Martin Luther, an Augustinian
friar, nailed his 95 Theses to the door of
the castle church in Wittenberg, Saxony
? though the nailing may be a later
invention by his followers. The Theses
were an attack on the Catholic Church?s
sale of indulgences ? certi?cates offering
a remission of the punishment due in
purgatory in exchange for the
performance of good works ? to raise
money for the building of St Peter?s
Basilica in Rome. On the face of it, the
complaint was a relatively narrow one:
many previous reformers had attacked
corruption in the Church, and Pope
Leo X dismissed it as ?a quarrel among
friars?. But it was to have seismic effects.
day ? the printing press ? was a crucial
factor. Sermons and pamphlets could be
quickly printed and distributed. A series
of ?urban reformations? and popular
revolts gave way to the ?princely
conversions? of the late 1520s and
1530s, which saw most of northern
Germany convert to Lutheranism.
Denmark followed in 1536. Sweden
and England declared their churches
independent of Rome in the 1530s. The
general rule, laid down at the Peace of
Augsburg in 1555, was cuius regio, eius
religio (whose realm, his religion): rulers
dictated their subjects? religion.
How did this affect Europe?
It threw the continent into turmoil. Wars
of religion erupted everywhere. In 1529,
Luther: excommunicated by Pope Leo X
war broke out between Reformed and
Why was Luther?s critique so signi?cant?
Catholic Swiss cantons. In 1546 and 1552-1555, the Holy Roman
Luther came to the radical conclusion that the abuse of
Emperor Charles V fought against Germany?s Protestant princes.
indulgences stemmed from a deep perversion of the Church?s
France, with its large Huguenot Calvinist minority, saw multiple
doctrine of salvation. Over the following years, he argued that the civil wars of religion between 1562 and 1629. Protestants in the
whole late medieval system of piety and good works ? veneration
Netherlands fought against their Spanish Catholic overlords,
of saints, masses, pilgrimage, indulgences ? was corrupt, and had
eventually dividing into a Protestant north and a Catholic south,
no basis in scripture. Rather than being redeemed by such works,
which later became Belgium. All of these were dwarfed, though,
he concluded, man was to be redeemed by faith alone (sola ?de).
by the Thirty Years? War of 1618-1648 between the Catholic and
And if popes could err so badly in matters of faith, he concluded,
Protestant states of the Holy Roman Empire, among others,
the whole ecclesiastical system of authority must be bankrupt.
which is estimated to have killed eight million people.
Instead, he proclaimed, scripture alone is authoritative (sola
scriptura). In 1520, Pope Leo X ordered Luther, in a Papal Bull,
How did the Catholic Church react?
to recant his heresies. Luther refused, and publicly burnt the Bull.
Catholicism had its own reformation, a process that began with
He was excommunicated in 1521, and summoned before the
the Council of Trent (1545-1563). It was designed to clarify
Holy Roman Empire?s diet (assembly) in Worms. There, he again
doctrine contested by the Protestants (see box) and to standardise
refused to recant, declaring: ?Here I stand, I can do no other?,
religious rites; but also to decree reforms that would eliminate
or words to that effect (this too may be a later embellishment).
abuses that had fed hostility to the Church. Bishops were ordered
to reside in their dioceses and tend to their ?ocks, and to set up
Did the Reformation spring entirely from Luther?
seminaries for the training of clergy. The council played a vital
No. There had been comparable reformers in the late medieval
part in revitalising the Catholic Church, while the period also saw
Church, such as John Wycliffe in 14th century England and the
the creation of new religious orders, notably the Jesuits.
Bohemian priest Jan Hus, who in 1415 was burned as a heretic.
Humanists such as Erasmus had criticised the Church?s
What is the Reformation?s legacy?
corruption and obscurantism before
The Reformation shaped modern
Luther: it was said that Erasmus ?laid
Europe. In the past, Protestant
Protestants: the people of the book
the egg that Luther hatched?. And
historians have tended to see it as
Protestantism was embraced for a variety of hardindependently, parts of Switzerland
a story of spiritual liberation: a blow
headed reasons. It suited rulers to deny the authority
were moving towards what we now
against authoritarianism, heralding
of the papacy and to take Church lands, while those
further down the social scale had gripes against
call Protestantism: there, the pastor
individualism and the scienti?c
ecclesiastical landlords and avaricious monks.
Huldrych Zwingli, and later the
outlook, as well as ? in thriving
Nevertheless, writes Professor Peter Marshall in his
exiled French lawyer Jean Calvin,
Protestant cities ? the birth of modern
short history, The Reformation, the movement was
issued similar challenges to the
capitalism. Today?s historians are
primarily ?a protracted argument about the rules and
Church?s authority. Their followers
more inclined to be circumspect: most
mechanisms of salvation?.
eventually merged into what is known
Protestants were just as intolerant
From the basic principles of sola fide and sola
as the Reformed tradition. It was a
as their Catholic antagonists. Instead,
scriptura sprang all the distinctive features of
tradition that had signi?cant doctrinal
they suggest a different inheritance.
Protestantism: the central role of Bible reading and
divergences with Luther, but it
Much of Europe was left with large
vernacular translations of the Bible (Luther wrote his
likewise held that scripture was the
religious minorities. Wars that were
own German translation); and the rejection of
sole basis of truth, and the authority
intended to eradicate heresy ended
traditions deemed man-made, whether attending
Mass as a path to salvation or the doctrine of
of popes and councils was illusory.
with treaties ? notably the Peace of
transubstantiation (the bread and wine becoming
Westphalia, which ended the Thirty
Christ?s body and blood). Hence, too, the hostility to
How did the movement spread?
Years? War ? that gave people the
the Pope and a celibate priestly caste mediating
The Reformation spread across
right to practise their own religion.
between man and God ? ?we are all equally priests?,
Switzerland and Germany in the
A crucial, if unintended, consequence
wrote Luther in 1520 ? and to sacred images, which
1520s ? at the time, a patchwork of
of the Reformation was the
were regarded as idolatrous. ?Wherever the
princedoms and self-governing cities
beginning of the secular state, and
Reformation triumphed,? writes Marshall, ?it
and cantons. The reformers?
destroyed a priceless artistic and cultural inheritance.? one fundamental aspect of modern
exploitation of the new media of the
liberalism ? religious liberty.
7 October 2017 THE WEEK
Best articles: Britain
Social media
lifts the veil on
our opinions
Chris Bullivant
UnHerd
The two tribes
of modern
Britain
David Goodhart
The Observer
Finding the
guts to talk
about families
Juliet Samuel
The Daily Telegraph
The first duty
of Tories is to
be competent
Clare Foges
The Times
The rise of social media has polarised society by herding us
into self-reinforcing echo chambers. That?s the conventional
wisdom these days, says Chris Bullivant. But it?s not true. The
reality is that Britain has always been full of people with strong
and diametrically-opposed opinions ? we just weren?t so aware
of it before. We voiced our political opinions largely behind
closed doors and in like-minded circles. We read whichever
newspaper accorded most closely with our world view.
Vehement, polarised arguments only broke out in parliamentary
debate or street demonstrations, or in letters exchanged in the
press. Until the likes of Twitter came along, we seldom had to
contend with our fellow citizens? ?awkward political views?.
We might glimpse them through a car bumper sticker or a poster
in a window, or get a nasty shock at election time; but ?once your
next-door neighbour went home and closed their front door, their
opinions were held in private?. Social media has lifted this veil of
secrecy. The effect has ?not been to ghettoise the electorate, but
rather to introduce the electorate to each other?.
There?s a ?stand-off? in Britain today, says David Goodhart,
between those I call the Anywheres ? educated, mobile, typically
Remain-voting types ? and the Somewheres ? more rooted and
conservative, typically Leave-voting types. Their world views are
both ?decent and legitimate?, yet the two groups are separated
by a wide gulf of values and understanding. This is a symptom
of the unhealthy dominance of London and the southeast. Less
centralised countries such as Germany don?t have this sort of
cultural divide because able, ambitious people there don?t feel
the same need to up sticks and head for the capital. They can
?nd decent higher education and job opportunities in their
home town. There?s no rift between rootless Anywheres who
value ?diversity and freedom?, and Somewheres who care about
protecting their own patch, because everyone rubs along together
and shares a similar sense of regional identity. Britain can?t
become Germany overnight, but it does need to ?nd some
common causes and projects to bind our split society together.
At the Tory conference last week, a retired high court judge talked
of the ?river of human misery? he had seen during his career. Sir
Paul Coleridge was not referring to austerity or drug abuse, says
Juliet Samuel, but to Britain?s high rate of family breakdown.
Across the Developed World, only America fares worse than
Britain. In 2014, just 70% of British children were living with two
parents, compared with the OECD average of 82%. The Marriage
Foundation estimates that, if current trends continue, nearly half
of all children born in the UK today will have seen their families
break up by the time they?re 15. ?Given that the health of the
family unit is probably the most signi?cant determinant of
happiness, it?s rather extraordinary that this receives so little
attention.? Politicians talk about mental health and educational
achievement, but shy away from mentioning one of the key
factors behind such issues, for fear of being accused of attacking
gay people or single mothers. Their reticence is understandable,
but the family should not be a taboo subject. It?s just a case of
?nding the right words ? ?and the guts? ? to talk about it.
Competence, rather than ?likeability?, has always been the chief
Tory selling point, says Clare Foges. Even people who regarded
Tories as ?arrogant, high-handed bastards? still felt a grudging
respect for their ability to get stuff done. But the image of the
Tories as the ??xers? of British politics seems increasingly at
odds with reality today. After the botched election campaign and
the calamitous conference, the party looks hapless and ineffective,
its policies too feeble to make any real difference to the big
challenges facing our nation, such as the housing and social care
crises. Even the endless manoeuvring of Theresa May?s internal
rivals seems cack-handed and indecisive when compared with
the brutal ef?ciency with which the party used to dispatch
underperforming leaders. This represents a serious threat for the
Tories. Competence is as core to their brand as ?compassion? is
to Labour?s. They can?t afford to lose it. Unless they can present
a bolder domestic agenda and show they?re capable of seeing it
through, their electoral prospects are bleak indeed.
NEWS 15
IT MUST BE TRUE?
I read it in the tabloids
Five people were hospitalised
and an entire school
evacuated in Baltimore,
thanks to a sickly-smelling air
freshener. A hazardous
materials response team was
summoned to Cristo Rey
Jesuit High School after
a mysterious odour swept
through the building. Two
students and three adults
were taken to hospital with
stomach upsets, and several
others reported breathing
difficulties. Firefighters
eventually tracked the source
of the stench to a third-floor
classroom, where someone
had installed a pumpkin spice
plug-in air freshener.
A would-be mermaid who
was banned from her local
swimming pool has been
offered safe harbour at a
nearby leisure centre. Leia
Trigger, who also goes by
the name Mermaid Aries,
constructed her own fishy
tail out of spandex. But she
was ordered out of the water
at Bromsgrove swimming
pool, in Worcestershire, on
the grounds that the tail
posed a health and safety
risk. Now, nearby Perdiswell
Leisure Centre has invited
Trigger, 18, to use their pool
instead. ?It?s amazing,? she
says. ?I finally feel like my
dream is in reach.?
A tea-loving Yorkshireman
has changed his middle name
by deed poll to Yorkshire Tea.
Nathan Garner, 31, a
concrete-sprayer who lives
near Sheffield, drinks around
20 cups of tea every day. ?I
was at work one day and my
mate Billy said, ?Chuffin? hell,
you drink so much of that
stuff you should change
your name to Yorkshire
Tea,?? he explained. ?I went
on the internet and just
changed it. Everyone thinks
it?s right good.?
14 October 2017 THE WEEK
16 NEWS
Best of the American columnists
Sadly, gun control is now as unlikely as ever
There are strict unof?cial rules for
it experienced almost a third of the
discussing mass shootings in
world?s public mass shootings.
America, said David Frum in The
Atlantic. The ?rst is that you have
The US hasn?t always fetishised
to stick narrowly to the facts of the
guns in the way it does now, said
latest massacre: if the killer acquired
Kurt Andersen on Slate. Back in the
their gun illegally, for instance, ?it?s
1970s, around half of Americans
out of bounds to point out how
owned a ?rearm ? and it was
lethally easy it is to buy weapons
almost always just one ?rearm.
legally?. You must also focus
Today, only a quarter of Americans
obsessively on the details of the
are gun owners, but they have three
weaponry: in the case of last week?s
guns on average. The main reason
massacre in Las Vegas, everyone?s
people now give for owning a gun
talking about so-called bump
is self-defence; in surveys that
stocks, which are devices that
answer has doubled since the
effectively turn semi-automatic
1990s. Yet over the same period,
?rearms into machine guns. It?s OK,
the chance of an American having
as a liberal, to discuss tweaking the America?s fetishisation of guns has increased over the decades a potentially lethal encounter with
gun laws, but it?s not the done thing
a criminal has halved. The reality
to dwell on the danger posed by weapons per se, or to suggest
is that gun ownership, for most, is just about indulging a fantasy
that ?Americans die from gun?re in proportions unparalleled in
of rugged independence. Many see their ?rearms as a last,
the civilised world because Americans own guns in proportions
essential defence against jackbooted government thugs who are
unparalleled in the civilised world?.
set on seizing their weapons. As recently as the 1980s, even
conservatives regarded this view as ?screwball paranoia?. But
It?s the sheer number of guns that puts the US on its ?own
the tireless campaigning of the National Ri?e Association has
planet?, agreed Fareed Zakaria in The Washington Post.
moved it from the fringes into the mainstream.
Donald Trump described the Las Vegas shooter last week as
?demented?, but the rate of gun deaths in American is not
It?s not just about guns any more, said David Brooks in The
40 times greater than the rate in Britain because we suffer from
New York Times. The issue has become a proxy for a larger
more mental illness; it?s because we have 14 times as many guns
con?ict over values and identity. ?People in agricultural and
per capita. ?That?s the obvious correlation staring us in the
industrial America legitimately feel that their way of life is being
face.? To describe America as a global ?outlier? on the gun
threatened by post-industrial society,? and have come to see gun
issue would be an understatement, said Kara Fox on CNN.
control as part of this wider battle. This dynamic makes the
There are around 310 million ?rearms in private hands in the
issue particularly intractable, said Charles M. Blow in the same
US ? almost half the estimated 650 million civilian-owned guns
paper. ?It took us some time to get to this place, and it will take
worldwide. The country with the next-biggest stockpile of
us some time to walk back from it.? Laws and regulations
civilian ?rearms is India, which has an estimated 46 million.
won?t ?x the problem. ?Individual Americans are going to have
On a per capita basis, gun ownership in the US is also miles
to awaken to the reality that our gun hoarding has become a
ahead of the next-highest county, Yemen. The US makes up less
hysteria, and we are actually safer as a country with fewer
than 5% of the world?s population, yet between 1966 and 2012
weapons, rather than with more of them.?
Liberals are
wrong about
abortion
Jonathan S. Tobin
National Review
I wish we had
more parties ?
like Europe
James Traub
Foreign Policy
THE WEEK 14 October 2017
For years, liberals have denounced global warming sceptics as science ?deniers?, says Jonathan
S. Tobin, but they?re vulnerable to the same charge on the issue of late-term abortions. Their
?hypocrisy? was on display last week when the House voted, not for the ?rst time, to pass a bill
banning abortion after 20 weeks of gestation. Liberals insisted the bill was unconstitutional because
the landmark Roe v. Wade decision of 1973 guarantees the right to abortion until a foetus becomes
viable on its own ? a threshold the case placed at 24-28 weeks. That?s the position still championed
by abortion provider Planned Parenthood, which ?continues to throw money at Democratic
candidates? at a rate that makes the National Ri?e Association?s contributions to Republicans look
like chump change?. Yet it ignores the fact that neonatal care has moved on since then: a study more
than two years ago showed that foetuses have a decent chance of survival outside the womb after
just 22 weeks of gestation. Liberals are right in thinking that many pro-lifers would like to ban all
abortions, but given strong public support for early-term abortions, that?s not going to happen.
Indeed, Senate Democrats will almost certainly defeat even the 20-week ban, as they have before. In
the process, they?ll once again have to ?pretend that medicine hasn?t made any progress since 1973?.
Politics is in ferment across the West, says James Traub. From Germany to France to Britain, centrist
parties are losing support to the fringes. It?s happening in America, too, but here the breach is
masked by our two-party system. The Republicans are split between a ?laissez-faire and even
libertarian elite? and a ?resentful, nationalist rank-and-?le that elected as president one of its own?.
The Democrats, meanwhile, are split between the Hillary Clinton wing and the anti-globalist Bernie
Sanders wing. ?The US increasingly feels like a four-party country trapped inside two parties.? If
only America, like Europe, had a multiparty system where these forces could play out in a more
clearly delineated fashion. The advantage of the European system is that fringe parties have to spell
out their agendas. When, as tends to happen, they descend into in?ghting, they can collapse without
taking a mainstream party down with them. America?s 165-year-old two-party system isn?t going to
disappear any time soon. But with the country?s politics becoming both more extreme and ?more
globalised?, in the sense that our system is being shaped by the same forces that are shaping Europe?s
systems, one wonders how much longer the US will remain ?the great anomaly of Western politics?.
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18 NEWS
Best articles: International
The telegenic governor shaking up Japanese politics
Japan?s prime minister, Shinzo Abe,
contesting half the seats and she herself
came to power in 2012 vowing to get
won?t be running (she wants to oversee
the country?s stagnant economy moving
the 2020 Olympics); but given the
again with his ?Abenomics? ? a much
demise of the Democrats, her party ?
ballyhooed programme of deregulation,
allied to a few smaller ones ? could end
monetary easing and fiscal loosening.
up tipping the balance of power.
He has failed to do so, said Wieland
Wagner in Der Spiegel (Hamburg).
Whatever the electoral outcome on
Most Japanese still hoard their savings
22 October, Japan?s neighbours have
instead of spending and the economy is
reason to be fearful says The Dong-A
still faltering: the drop in average
Ilbo (Seoul). Abe may be a right-wing
wages in July was the steepest in 24
nationalist (he wants to change Japan?s
months. All this, plus the fact that he?s
pacifist constitution to allow it to build
mired in a corruption scandal, has seen
up its army), but Koike is little different.
his popularity nosedive. However, his
Against all evidence, she denies that
Yuriko Koike: has a ?reformist backbone?
defiant response to North Korea?s
Imperial Japan ever forced Korean
nuclear missile tests gave it an unexpected boost, so last month
women into prostitution. But if she gets to power, as before long
he called a snap election, hoping to capitalise on the implosion
she surely will, she?ll be good for Japan, said William Pesek on
of the main opposition, the Democratic Party. What he hadn?t
Bloomberg (New York). She has the ?reformist backbone? Abe
foreseen was that Tokyo?s telegenic governor, Yuriko Koike,
lacks. As governor of Tokyo, she has challenged the ?ridiculous?
would steal his thunder by announcing the formation of a brand cost overruns for the Olympics sanctioned by her predecessor; is
new populist party, which at once began surging in the polls.
?rolling her eyes? at Abe?s craven support of the cigarette lobby
and is intent on making Tokyo smoke-free; and, determined to
Koike, a former television anchorwoman, has charmed her way
phase out nuclear power, is prepared to take on the nuclear
into Japan?s male-dominated politics, said Hiroshi Hiyama in
lobby that ?has Abe?s party over a proverbial barrel?. Where
Japan Today (Tokyo). Fluent in English and Arabic, and a
Abe just talks of bringing women into the workforce, Koike
former defence minister (the first woman in Japan to hold that
would likely as not make it happen: you can see her leaning on
post), she comes across as an internationalist, a rarity among
businesses to encourage diversity and entrepreneurship. Abe
?navel gazing? Japanese politicians. Her Party of Hope is only
promised change; Koike could actually deliver it.
AUSTRIA
We need to be
above these
dirty tricks
Der Standard
(Vienna)
IRAQ
There are
better targets
for heroism
L?Obs
(Paris)
INDIA
Snubbing the
Taj Mahal is
pure bigotry
FirstPost
(Mumbai)
THE WEEK 14 October 2017
It seems unthinkable that a moderate European political party would engage in Russian-style dirty
tricks, says Michael V鰈ker: yet that?s what?s occurring in Austria. The ruling Social Democratic
Party (SP�) had looked set for a hiding in this week?s election at the hands of their junior coalition
partner, the centre-right Austrian People?s Party (諺P), whose leader, Sebastian Kurz, is pushing for
strict immigration controls. But he is being undermined by a virulent social media campaign accusing
him of secretly planning to open Austria?s doors to Muslim immigrants. There have also been antiSemitic slurs alleging he?s being covertly funded by Jewish American investor George Soros. It was
assumed these slurs came from supporters of the far-right Freedom Party, which hopes to come
second and win a share in government. It turns out they?re being posted by associates of Tal
Silberstein, an Israeli political consultant noted for negative campaigning, who was working for the
SP�. SP� leader Chancellor Christian Kern says he knew nothing about the slurs, but he also did
nothing to rebut them. Silberstein has since been sacked, but the damage to Austrian politics has been
done. This sort of thing used to be taboo in Austria. We can only hope it doesn?t become the norm.
With so much human misery on display in shattered war zones, can it be right to spend precious
resources saving animals? Earlier this year, says Sara Daniel, journalists in Mosul were intrigued to
see a group of foreign activists poring over maps. Who had they come to rescue? It turned out to be
Simba and Lula, an asthmatic lion and a moulting brown bear ? who alone among the zoo?s residents
had survived starvation and bombardment. The operation was staged by Four Paws, a charity led by
an Egyptian that has mounted similar costly rescues in Libya, Gaza and Aleppo. Heroic, perhaps. But
Mosul?s streets are full of amputees and starving people ? victims of the three-year occupation by
Islamic State and the reconquest: there?s a desperate need for money to buy prostheses, feed families
and pay ransoms to free hostages. The competition to be the most pitied, most deserving of help, is
?erce. To decide in favour of mangy animals seems like taking charity to lunatic extremes: Iraqis
sneer at the rescuers for their ?obscene naivet�. Then again, in this nation of ?perpetual barbarism?,
maybe it?s a hopeful sign of humanity that these creatures have someone to care about them.
Are you planning to visit the Taj Mahal any time soon? India?s Hindu nationalists would rather you
didn?t, says Sandipan Sharma. Six months ago they came to power in Uttar Pradesh, and now the
new state government has published a booklet of local attractions that omits any mention of it.
Why? Because it?s a Muslim monument, a mausoleum built by the 17th century Mughal Emperor
Shah Jahan to commemorate his wife. The new chief minister, Yogi Adityanath, complains it doesn?t
?re?ect Indian culture?; some are even calling for it to be defaced along with other Mughal-era
monuments; and the state has dropped it from its maintenance budget, even though air pollution is
slowly turning the white marble yellow. What a ?nauseating example of bigotry?. The Taj is one of
the world?s most famous monuments: almost a quarter of visitors to India go to see it. Yet to our
chest-thumping nationalists it is what the Bamiyan Buddhas were to the Taliban, and Palmyra to
Islamic State ? a symbol of ?imagined grievances and inferiority?. Well, they may rage, but all over
the world the Taj is seen as ?a symbol of love? ? something they?ll never manage to change.
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Health & Science
NEWS 21
What the scientists are saying?
Globe-trotting bed bugs
That infestations of bed bugs have soared
in recent years, fuelled by the growth of
low-cost international travel, is well
established. But something has long
puzzled scientists: the creepy-crawlies,
which are a problem in hotels in particular,
prefer to keep a low pro?le, hiding in
mattresses or in the crevices of sofas ? so
what possesses them to venture out into
travellers? suitcases? Now a team at the
University of Shef?eld has come up with
an answer. Bed bugs are attracted to soiled
clothes (presumably because it has the
residual odour of the humans whose blood
they feast on). For the study, researchers at
Shef?eld placed open bags of soiled and
non-soiled laundry in two identical rooms
that contained an equal number of bed
bugs. After a few days, far more bugs had
congregated in and around the bags of
soiled laundry than the clean ones. For
travellers hoping not to bring bugs home,
the solution is obvious: keep your dirty
clothes in a sealed bag.
Sea animals and plastic rafts
The Japanese tsunami of 2011 prompted
the biggest continental migration of sea
creatures ever recorded, scientists have
discovered. Since 2012, nearly 300 living
species ? including mussel, worms,
crustaceans and sea slugs ? have been
found off North America?s Pacific coast
still attached to debris, such as pieces of
buoys, crates and vessels, swept out to sea
by the tsunami. Of these, more than twothirds had never previously been seen in
the US. The scientists believe that the
creatures survived because the slow
progress of their ?ocean rafts? gave them
time to adjust to their new environments.
However, it is as yet unclear whether any
have actually colonised North American
A Japanese sea star found in Oregon in 2012
waters or what their long-term impact on
native species could be. According to the
report, published in the journal Science,
such migrations are likely to become more
common even without further tsunamis,
because of the sheer volume of man-made
material in the sea. A 2015 study, also
published in Science, estimated that
around ten million tonnes of plastic waste
enter the ocean each year ? a figure that is
likely only to increase in coming decades.
Half of abortions ?unsafe?
Of the 56 million abortions each year,
nearly half ? 25 million ? are unsafe,
according to a report published in The
Lancet. Researchers from the World
Health Organisation (WHO) and the
Guttmacher Institute in New York looked
at abortions performed worldwide
between 2010 and 2014, and divided them
into three categories ? safe, less safe and
least safe ? based on what procedures were
� JOHN CHAPMAN
Dyson unveils electric car plans
Sir James Dyson has emerged as the newest
entrant to the crowded electric car market,
reports The Guardian. The inventor is
investing �5bn in a high end, batterypowered vehicle that he claims will be
ready by 2020. Although little is known
about the project ? Dyson has really only
said that the car will look ?radically
different? ? experts have cast doubt on how
realistic it is. Entering the car industry is
notoriously tricky: not only do newcomers
have to build their own infrastructure, but
automative regulation is exceedingly
onerous ? just getting a vehicle through the
Dyson: ?radically different?
crash testing procedures can take years.
Another problem is finding secure ? and ethical ? sources of minerals for the car?s
battery. Currently, electric car batteries are mainly powered using a mix of lithium
and cobalt. Yet the future availability of both is uncertain. The price of lithium has
doubled since 2015, and the situation with cobalt is even worse: around 65% of the
world?s supply comes from the Democratic Republic of Congo, a country that?s not
merely politically unstable, but where thousands of young children work in mines.
used and whether a trained provider was
involved. Less safe procedures, which
accounted for 17 million per year (31%),
were ones that used an outmoded method
but were provided by a trained person, or
which used a safe method but without
professional oversight. The largest
proportion of procedures in this category
took place in Latin America, and involved
women using the labour-inducing drug
misoprostol ? which is approved by the
WHO ? but doing so outside formal
medical channels. The eight million
(14.4%) ?least safe? abortions were
performed by, for instance, consuming
toxic substances or inserting wire into the
uterus, and were carried out by untrained
providers; most of these took place in
Africa. The report warns that Donald
Trump?s reinstatement of rules blocking
US aid to agencies which perform
abortions, or offer advice on them, is likely
to lead to yet more unsafe abortions.
The foods that make you full
It has long been known that some foods
trick the brain into feeling full, but
scientists have never been clear about the
chemical pathways involved. Now,
researchers at the University of Warwick
have identi?ed an appetite-regulating brain
cell that switches on immediately when
certain foods are consumed. Using
?uorescent tagging, the team discovered
that the brain cells, known as tanycytes,
are activated within 30 seconds of certain
amino acids touching the tongue. The
?nding suggests that people seeking to lose
weight should eat the high protein foods
that are rich in these key amino acids ?
including pork shoulder, chicken,
mackerel, lentils and almonds ? and could
lead to the development of new appetite
suppressant drugs that target tanycytes.
Musk?s airline sideline
Elon Musk, the founder of SpaceX, has
revealed a new use for his flagship BFR
spacecraft, said the Financial Times. The
South Africa-born entrepreneur believes
that the BFR, or ?Big F****** Rocket? ?
whose primary function, when built, will
be to transport passengers to Mars ?
could also have a sideline in earthbound
travel. By rising above the Earth?s
atmosphere, the craft would, Musk
claims, be able to fly from, say, London
to New York within 30 minutes; even a
trip to the other side of the world would
take no more than an hour. He also said,
in a tweet, that the cost ?should be
about the same as full fare economy in
an aircraft?. Although the plan may, as
Musk acknowledged, ?look ridiculous?,
it is relatively modest compared with
his ambitions for space travel, which
involve flying rockets to Mars by 2024,
and eventually establishing a colony of
one million people there.
14 October 2017 THE WEEK
22 NEWS
Pick of the week?s
Gossip
Files newly released by
the Margaret Thatcher
Foundation include her
favourite recipe: a ?mystery
starter? of beef consomm�,
cream cheese and curry
powder. The ingredients
were blended together and
left to set, before being
topped with a layer of jellied
soup and a black olive;
shrimps or leftover chicken
could be added. Mrs T may
have had a strong stomach,
says The Guardian, but she
was prone to fainting. She
passed out cold the first
time she met the Queen;
and then, in 1987, she had
to leave a royal reception
after coming over all dizzy.
?Oh look,? the Queen is said
to have remarked: ?She?s
keeled over again.?
They have enjoyed a longstanding ?bromance?, and
now Silvio Berlusconi has
found the perfect gift for
Vladimir Putin: a duvet
cover bearing a life-size
image of the two men. The
former Italian PM sent Putin
the cover (pictured) for his
65th birthday. Insiders say
he is a huge fan of the
Russian president?s ?macho,
decisive and authoritarian
governing style?.
Britain?s oldest peer is to
retire from the Lords next
month, after her 95th
birthday. Baroness
Trumpington, who was
caught on camera flicking
a V-sign at a fellow peer in
2011, has never been one to
mince her words. She was
once invited by a magazine
editor to a lunch where
someone praised Virginia
Bottomley as being ?one of
the chaps?. The editor found
this offensive, and said a
woman couldn?t be a chap.
?Trumpers? took the fag out
of her mouth, put down her
gin and said simply: ?Balls.?
THE WEEK 14 October 2017
Talking points
Boris: too timid to seize the crown?
There?s only one person who
Birrell in The Guardian. And
can save the Tories now, said
yet, in these desperate times, the
Sarah Baxter in The Sunday
?least worst option could be to
Times. Theresa May is a
allow Johnson to achieve the
?zombie? prime minister,
ambition corroding his soul?.
incapable of leading her party,
As PM, Johnson would have to
let alone rallying the nation at
take responsibility for his Brexit
this crucial time in our history.
baby. He might just ?grow up?
She should hand the job over to
and realise that a soft Brexit is
Boris Johnson. ?It was his all
the only sensible option. And he
along.? If Michael Gove hadn?t
would be better placed than
?strapped on his suicide belt?
May to deliver it, because he
at the crucial moment, Boris
doesn?t have her ?foes? on the
would have become PM
Tory Right. It?s a risky strategy,
straight after the EU
?but if it paid off it might salve
referendum. ?He had led the
some of the wounds in?icted by
Leave campaign, taking the
that silly referendum?.
political risk of arguing for
Johnson: boss or bottler?
Brexit, and deserved the spoils
It?s too late for that, said Jenni
of victory.? He still does ? ?and the electorate
Russell in The Times. Boris had his moment last
also has the right to get what it voted for in the
year ? with or without Gove?s support ? and he
referendum: a Brexit champion at the helm?.
bottled it. Now he agitates on the sidelines,
Boris ? although ?not the man he was before
writing articles undermining the PM?s position
Gove?s intervention? ? still has plenty of
on Brexit, but lacks the courage to follow
buccaneering appeal, as he showed with last
through. He wants to wear the crown without
week?s speech about Brexit, in which he
wielding the knife. Tory MPs have no time for
promised to ?let the lion roar?. ?If the cultish
cowards. They are not about to risk their own
worship of Jeremy Corbyn and the election of
careers by supporting a coup if ?the chief rebel
Donald Trump prove anything, it is that voters
is likely to retreat?. And with only 18 months
are willing to take a risk rather than have the
to go before the deadline for Brexit negotiations,
same tired faces in charge.? Bojo?s mojo might
they are in no mood to waste time on internal
just be enough to save the Tories at the next
squabbles. Many in the Cabinet are ?seethingly,
election. ?It?s either his turn ? or Corbyn?s.?
openly angry? about Boris?s attention-seeking.
For the rest, an ?icy realism? has set in: ?severe
As a Remainer, ?the idea of seeing Johnson in
as the party?s problems are, Boris?s fantasies are
Downing Street ?lls me with despair?, said Ian
not the answer?.
Racial inequality: facing the facts
Black men face the highest chance of being
found guilty in court. Roma children are falling
behind their peers at school. And white teenagers
are far more likely to smoke than their minority
ethnic counterparts. These were some of the
?ndings of the ?race disparity audit? published
this week, said Anushka Asthana in The
Guardian. The audit was commissioned by
Theresa May to shine a light on the dissimilar
experiences of different ethnic groups in Britain,
particularly in terms of public services. The
results laid bare the UK?s ?deep-seated racial
inequality?, said May Bulman in The
Independent. The unemployment rate for black,
Asian and minority people is 8% ? nearly
double that of white British people. Black
Caribbean pupils are excluded at three times the
rate of white British pupils. People from white
British and Indian backgrounds are more likely
to own their homes than other ethnic groups.
The scene has been set for ?another bout of
political self-?agellation regarding the subject of
race in Britain?, said Munira Mirza in The
Spectator. Endless reports have already revealed
that different ethnic groups ?experience different
outcomes? in education, crime rates, health,
employment and so on. The Prime Minister, like
much of the political class, is clearly determined
to conclude that these are the result of ?burning
injustices?. But in fact the statistics ?tell a more
complex story?. Ethnic minorities tend to be
younger, to live in urban areas and to come
from poorer families. So it is not surprising that
they differ from the white majority. In many
areas the gap is closing; poor white children
actually now do the worst at school of any
group. Yet too often, these statistics are used in
a way that casts minorities as victims of racism.
This is unhealthy and counter-productive. A
generation of young ethnic minority people
believe, wrongly, that they are disadvantaged
because of their race. As a result, ?they are
angry? and distrustful of the authorities.
That?s unfair, said Sunder Katwala on CapX.
The Government has explicitly stated that not
all racial disparities detailed in the audit are
likely to be due to prejudice. But the data will be
published on a website, and public bodies have
been told that if disparities ?cannot be explained
then they must be changed?. May?s hope is that
there will be ?nowhere to hide?, said The Times.
In practice, progress is likely to be slow, but this
is an admirable initiative: ?transparency is
fundamental to good government?. Racial
discrimination in Britain has lessened over time,
?but only by being forced into the open.
Tolerance is a work in progress.? The race
disparity audit is ?a step in the right direction?.
Talking points
Harvey Weinstein: a Hollywood god in ruins
?Even by the standards of
that despite dozens of camera
Hollywood, it has been a
?ashes going off, no photo of
spectacular fall from grace,?
the scene ever made it into
said Nick Constable in the
print. No one has dared hold
Daily Mail. The reputation
the physically imposing,
of Harvey Weinstein, the
well-connected Weinstein to
producer behind such ?lms as
account for his abuses. Alas,
The English Patient and Pulp
Hollywood has a long history
Fiction, is in ruins following
of ?predatory, institutional
a slew of sexual harassment
sexism?, said Hugo Rifkind in
allegations. The New York
The Times. But the Weinstein
Times reported last week that
scandal has not erupted now
the movie mogul was a serial
purely by chance. It?s a
sex pest who had reached at
symptom of a ?changing
least eight legal settlements
world? and evolving attitudes.
with women over the past three
decades. More accusers have
Wrong, said Lee Smith in The
since come forward, including
Weekly Standard. It?s nothing
Gwyneth Paltrow with Weinstein
the actresses Gwyneth Paltrow
to do with ?raised
and Angelina Jolie, alleging harassment, assault
consciousness?. The reason this story came out
and even rape. Their accounts share a common
now is because Weinstein?s power is on the
narrative: Weinstein invited them to his hotel
wane. Had Hillary Clinton won the presidency,
room for work reasons, only to greet them either it?s likely that Weinstein ? a major Democratic
in a dressing gown or naked, and ask them to
fundraiser who recently gave an internship to the
massage him or watch him shower. Weinstein,
Obama?s eldest daughter Malia ? would still be
who has been sacked by his ?lm company, says
getting away with it. The media model that
he is seeking help to ?conquer my demons?.
protected him has also collapsed. There was a
time when his company, Miramax, used to buy
Weinstein?s abusive behaviour has long been an
the movie rights to every big story published in
open secret in Hollywood, said Rebecca Traister
New York?s magazines. But the collapse of print
in New York magazine. I witnessed it ?rst-hand
advertising means few magazines can now pay
back in 2000 when I got into a row with him at
for the kind of journalism that translates into
a book party. He swore at me and, when my
screenplays, so they have no reason to keep him
boyfriend intervened, he got him in a headlock,
on side. Besides, the downfall of a movie mogul
dragged him onto Sixth Avenue, and proceeded
makes a great story. ?Maybe there?s even a
to pound him. Such was Weinstein?s power then, movie in it.?
Kazuo Ishiguro: a worthy Nobel winner
Last year, the decision to award the
sprawl? of The Unconsoled
Nobel Prize in Literature to Bob
(1995), about a pianist arriving
Dylan was greeted with some
in an unnamed European city for
scepticism, said Dwight Garner in
a concert he cannot remember
The New York Times. This year?s
agreeing to give. His biggest
winner, Kazuo Ishiguro, will not
recent success was the dystopian
inspire ?that sort of bickering?.
science ?ction of Never Let Me
Ishiguro ?is a safe choice ? he has
Go (2005) ? set in a boarding
been a blue-chip literary stock for
school for children cloned so their
nearly four decades ? but a
organs can be harvested. His last
formidable and not uninteresting
novel, The Buried Giant (2015),
one?. Born in Nagasaki, Ishiguro
was a ?post-Arthurian fantasy
moved to Guildford at the age of
replete with dragons, ogres and
?ve and was raised in England;
sprites?. Yet there?s also a thematic
?many of his characters are caught,
unity in his work, said Lorien Kite
in different ways, between worlds?. Ishiguro: a voice of sanity in the FT. The Second World War
He is still best known for his third
looms large in his novels. As the
novel The Remains of the Day (1989), told from Nobel committee put it, he is interested in the
the perspective of Stevens, a ?punctilious English themes of ?memory, time and self-delusion?.
butler?. Yet he has achieved a ?remarkable
consistency? during his long and notably varied
Ishiguro has ?supremely done his own kind of
career as a writer.
thing?, said James Wood in The New Yorker ?
?calmly undeterred by literary fashion, the
?It?s not just that he has a different idea each
demands of the market, or the intermittent
time,? said Duncan White in The Sunday
incomprehension of critics?. He is also ?that
Telegraph: it?s that each new novel could have
rare being, an artist without ego?, said Robert
been written by ?a completely different person?.
McCrum in The Observer, famous for his
Ishiguro ?slips convincingly between genres?,
kindness and good humour. ?In a frantic, fretful
from ?the intricate perfection of the earlier
and unstable world,? Ishiguro is ?a voice of
historical novels, to the surreal Kafkaesque
sanity, decorum, humanity and grace?.
NEWS 23
Wit &
Wisdom
?Time flies like an
arrow; but fruit flies
like a banana.?
Groucho Marx, quoted
in The Observer
?I like to write when I
feel spiteful. It is like
having a good sneeze.?
D.H. Lawrence, quoted
in The Guardian
?We have a finite
environment ? the planet.
Anyone who thinks that you
can have infinite growth in a
finite environment is either a
madman or an economist.?
David Attenborough,
quoted in The Observer
?The only way to get
30 minutes? uninterrupted
rest in a hospital is to ring
for a nurse.?
Old Southern saying,
quoted on Forbes.com
?Anyone who has the
power to make you
believe absurdities has
the power to make you
commit injustices.?
Voltaire, quoted in
The Wall Street Journal
?Luck is not something you
can mention in the presence
of self-made men.?
E.B. White, quoted in
The Daily Telegraph
?There is something bizarre
about the present popularity
of the word ?market? as a
metaphor for human
society. Markets are surely
a good and necessary part of
living together, as are law
courts and lavatories. But
none of these are a useful
model for what human
society essentially is.?
Theologian Herbert
McCabe, quoted in
The Guardian
Statistics of the week
Sex crimes and domestic
abuse offences now account
for 19.3% of prosecutions ?
up from 7.1% a decade ago.
The Guardian
Reports of children sexually
assaulting each other have
almost doubled in four years
? from 4,603 in 2013,
to 7,866 last year.
The Daily Telegraph
14 October 2017 THE WEEK
Sport
24 NEWS
Football: England?s ?deathly? World Cup qualification
The England football team ?must be doing something right?, said Daniel Taylor in The Guardian.
By defeating Slovenia 1-0 last week, they qualified
for next summer?s World Cup with a game to
spare. Sunday?s 1-0 win over Lithuania ensured
that they finished their campaign with eight wins
and two draws from ten matches; they have now
reached four successive major tournaments in a
row without losing a single qualifier. Yet for all
that, qualifying hardly felt like cause for celebration. In the ?joyless? match against Slovenia,
England were so stodgy that the spectators at
Wembley had to resort to ?creating their own
entertainment?, by launching paper planes.
England players in decades. Nowhere is that more
clear than in central midfield, where the side has
no ?creative force?. Instead, they must make do
with Eric Dier and Jordan Henderson ? ?workmanlike? Premier League players who lack ?the
technique to deliver incisive passes?.
But it?s not all doom and gloom, said Henry
Winter in The Times. England boast at least one
world-class player: Harry Kane, who has scored
15 goals in his last ten matches for club and
country. ?England?s leading light in every sense,?
he found the net against both Slovenia and
Lithuania. There are other glimmers of hope:
Kane?s Tottenham teammate Dele Alli, and
You?d have to go back to the 2006 World Cup
Manchester United?s Marcus Rashford. And with
to find a tournament when the national side
Gareth Southgate: a modest pool eight months to go before the World Cup starts,
generated optimism, said Barney Ronay in the
Southgate still has time to salve ?England?s woes?,
same paper. This time, ?England does not expect?. Yet even by
said Dominic Fifield in The Guardian. Liverpool?s Adam Lallana
their recent standards, ?this has been a deathly qualification?,
will soon return from injury, bringing his ?movement and frontwith just 16 goals. England have always been at their best playing
foot urgency? to central midfield. To really turn the team around,
?swift, sharp, counter-attacking football?, said Rod Liddle in The
however, Southgate should take a leaf out of Iceland?s book. The
Sunday Times. But since Gareth Southgate took over as manager
tiny country did so well at Euro 2016, where they reached the
last year, he has ?sucked out of the squad whatever small vestiges
quarter-finals, because they managed to ?implement a relatively
of creativity, excitement and verve still remained?. Southgate?s
simple game plan?. England are never going to play like Spain;
real problem is the dearth of talent in the side, said Graeme
but if they go into the World Cup with ?a clear and distinct?
Souness in the same paper. This is ?the most modest group? of
approach, they might just confound their supporters? pessimism.
Rugby league: Leeds end Castleford?s dream
The Super League Grand Final was supposed to
their ?brilliant but fatally flawed? full-back, was
be the happy ending to Castleford?s ?fairy tale?,
unexpectedly removed from the team list two
said Mike Keegan in The Mail on Sunday. A
days before the final, having tested positive for
club from a ?tiny town? in West Yorkshire, they
cocaine. In his absence, the Rhinos? ?peerless?
almost ?went bust? four years ago. But this year,
captain, Danny McGuire, stole the show: playing
they finished the regular season top of the table
in his final match before he joins Hull Kingston
for the first time, and they arrived at Old
Rovers, he scored two tries and two drop goals.
Trafford last Saturday as favourites. On ?the big
McGuire?s teammate Stevie Ward may not have
stage?, however, the Tigers froze: Leeds Rhinos
?garnered the plaudits?, said Aaron Bower in
crushed them, winning their eighth title in 14
The Guardian, but the forward is ?a shining
seasons. It was ?a triumph of attrition?, said Jim
Stevie Ward: ?a shining example? example of everything that is good in rugby
White in The Sunday Telegraph. By far the more
league?. Two weeks ago, when he dislocated his
experienced team, Leeds were ?gnarled, canny, pragmatic?. It was shoulder ?to such a severe extent that it required surgery to be put
hard to believe this was the same Tigers side that had swaggered
back into place?, his chances of appearing in the final seemed to
through the season, thrashing the Rhinos 66-10 in March.
be over. But Ward committed himself to playing no matter how
painful it might be ? and, on the day, he lasted the full 80
Castleford were ?unrecognisable? because they were missing their minutes. He is a lifelong Leeds fan whose ?mental and physical
best player, said Christopher Irvine in The Times. Zak Hardaker,
toughness make him an obvious choice to succeed McGuire?.
Have Ferrari blown it?
Sporting headlines
There?s no longer any doubt
in Malaysia, the Ferrari driver
about whether Lewis Hamilton
suffered an engine problem in
will win this year?s Formula One
qualifying; this week, in Suzuka,
World Championship, said
a broken spark plug on his car
Andrew Benson on BBC Sport
forced him to retire.
online. ?It?s just a question of
?Ferrari are the most famous
when.? The Mercedes driver?s
team in F1,? said Rebecca
victory in the Japanese Grand
Clancy in The Times. And they
Prix on Sunday extended his
are the richest, with a budget of
championship lead over
around �0m. Yet they have
Sebastian Vettel to 59 points ?
gone a decade without winning
Sebastian Vettel: imploded
with only 100 available from the
the drivers? title ? and now,
season?s four remaining races. Just six weeks
barring a miracle, they will have to wait at least
ago, Vettel was still in the lead ? as he had been
another season. ?Ferrari?s lack of reliability has
all season ? and it looked as if ?the title fight
become a bad joke,? said Tom Cary in The Daily
would go to the last race?. But in the past
Telegraph. It has ?sucked the oxygen? out of a
month, his season has ?imploded... in quite
thrilling duel for the title. If Hamilton beats Vettel
astonishing fashion?. First, in the Singapore
by more than 16 points at the US Grand Prix,
Grand Prix, Vettel made a ?catastrophic
later this month, the season will be
misjudgement? and crashed at the start. Then,
?mathematically over?. In truth, ?it already is?.
Football Ireland beat Wales
1-0 to reach the play-offs for
the World Cup, ending Wales?
qualifying hopes. Northern
Ireland earned a place in the
play-offs, despite losing 1-0
to Norway, but Scotland
missed out.
Golf British golfer Tyrrell
Hatton became the first man
to successfully defend the
Alfred Dunhill Links
Championship title.
Cricket Pace bowler Steve
Finn was added to England?s
Ashes squad.
Rugby union Saracens went
top of the table with a 38-19
win over Wasps.
THE WEEK 14 October 2017
BEDS, SOFAS AND FURNITURE FOR LOAFERS
LOAF.COM
BATTERSEA
NOTTING HILL
SPITALFIELDS
LETTERS
Pick of the week?s correspondence
Plain English
To The Daily Telegraph
May I recommend Ofqual for
the 2017 ?Golden Bull?
award for murdering the
English language? Its response
to teachers? claims that the
Sats reading test was ?too
middle class? (and therefore
drove pupils ?to tears?) was:
?On the balance of evidence
presented, it seems plausible
that the combined impact
from multiple ostensibly
negligible challenges ?
stemming from both question
and text factors ? may have
rendered the 2016 reading test
unduly hard to access for at
least some pupils.?
Perhaps Ofqual?s response
should be included in future
exams, with instructions to
explain what it means ? or
would that be too difficult?
John Sutherland, Uxbridge,
Middlesex
Untested PMs
To the Financial Times
Jacob Rees-Mogg has clearly
not read Tony Blair?s memoir,
A Journey, when he notes that
?there has never been a prime
minister who has reached the
highest office without having
first served as minister?.
A Journey begins: ?On
2 May 1997, I walked into
Downing Street as prime
minister for the first time.
I had never held office, not
even as the most junior of
junior ministers. It was my
first and only job in
government.?
Martin Westlake, Brussels,
Belgium
Standing up for farmers
To The Guardian
George Monbiot?s fear of the
few remaining British farmers
reached new levels when he
wrote that the ?rich mosaic of
rainforest and other habitats
that once covered our hills has
been erased?, and blamed us
for the tectonic drift that
moved Britain away from the
equator towards the Arctic
perhaps 300 million years
ago. In the rest of his article,
he mixed unrelated science
with the claims of noted
eccentrics, and suggested that
we should plough unsuitable
land to grow soya, which will
not grow in this climate, to
produce artificial meat in
urban factories.
The problem with Pankhurst
To The Guardian
June Purvis paints a very admirable picture of Emmeline
Pankhurst as a colourful campaigner. But she was also an
extremist who supported planting bombs and committing
acts of arson. When anyone disagreed with her she simply
tended to throw them out of the movement, including her
own daughter, Sylvia Pankhurst, who believed workingclass women should have the right to vote, but her middleclass mother wasn?t interested and they fell out over it. So
much for diversity.
Emmeline Pankhurst caused too much hoo-ha to possibly
be forgotten, but as a radical society frowned upon, she
made the issue of women?s votes frowned upon, and
the only helpful thing she ever did was to put a stop to her
militant ?deeds not words? tactics after the outbreak of the
First World War.
It was women doing their bit for the country by working
in so many vital positions previously held by men that
helped rebuild support for the suffragists? cause. It was
Millicent Fawcett and the National Union of Women?s
Suffrage Societies (NUWSS) pointing out the contribution
they had made that was instrumental in achieving the
Representation of the People Act in 1918. Not Pankhurst
chaining herself to railings, heckling politicians and
inflicting damage to property.
It?s about time more people heard of Millicent Fawcett,
as she proves you don?t need to value or use militancy in
a cause. Peaceful patience is key.
Emilie Lamplough, Trowbridge, Wiltshire
He didn?t mention
inconvenient features of the
British ruminant livestock
industry, such as the fact that
most feed that animals get
other than grass is made up of
byproducts of the human food
industry, such as brewers?
grains, sugar beet and fruitjuice pulp, most of which
would go to landfill if cows
and sheep did not recycle it.
Without the income from this
form of recycling, the price of
food would increase. We do
need to moderate excessive
meat consumption and act on
climate change, but this article
sows confusion that will delay
necessary change.
Huw Jones, St Clears,
Carmarthenshire
It?s not cricket
To The Daily Telegraph
As a very senior European
official laughingly told me,
way back in 1973: ?You
British are so funny ? once
rules are made you think you
have to abide by them. You
play cricket; we play rugby!
Everything is negotiable.?
While in Florence, Theresa
May offered a s20bn budget
contribution. Michel Barnier,
Guy Verhofstadt and JeanClaude Juncker should be
told that the figure has now
been reduced to s19bn; and,
if the deal isn?t sorted by
30 November, it will drop to
s18bn. They will understand
that, and start to negotiate
for real.
Keith Beaumont, Leicester
Dental demons
To The Daily Telegraph
I see that ?rogue kernels? in
popcorn are now demonised
for damaging teeth. Many
years ago when I was working
at a dental practice in
Birmingham, a session was
always left vacant in the
appointment book on a
Monday, to accommodate
emergency treatment of
fractured teeth caused by pork
scratchings eaten in a public
house over the weekend.
J.D. Price, Sheffield, South
Yorkshire
27
Rogers is misinformed.
Classical architecture came
to Britain with the Romans
two millennia ago. Elements
of classicism re-emerged early
in the 16th century in Henry
VII?s tomb at Westminster,
and under Elizabeth I (to name
but two examples) at Longleat
and Caius, Cambridge. Inigo
Jones introduced the classical
style of the Italian Renaissance
400 years ago in an unadulterated form. What deeper
roots does Rogers want?
Certainly the classical style
has deeper roots than his
modernism ? a mere 80 or so
years old in the UK, and hardly
any more indigenous than the
classicism he rejects.
Colin Armstrong, Belfast
Dodging germs
To The Daily Telegraph
The suggestion that shoppers
should have separate bags for
life ? one for raw food and
one for other items ? to avoid
contamination leads to the
conclusion that checkouts
should have two conveyor
belts for similar reasons.
Both ideas are specious.
A colleague (a consultant
bacteriologist) told me that
we are all covered in our own
and other people?s germs ? on
our clothes, as well as through
contact with door handles and
stair rails touched by people
who have not washed their
hands. The answer is to wash
one?s hands often, cook raw
meats well and to wash raw
food; followed by a campaign
about washing hands after
using the toilet ? which many
people fail to do.
Dr Charles Essex, Leamington
Spa, Warwickshire
Rogers is wrong
To The Guardian
Richard Rogers says classicism
is an odd choice of architectural
style for the Prince of Wales to
promote, as it does not have
?deep roots in England?.
� MATT/THE DAILY TELEGRAPH
? Letters have been edited
14 October 2017 THE WEEK
ARTS
Review of reviews: Books
29
Book of the week
in terms of ?evil robots?, said Yuval
Noah Harari in The Guardian. But
as Tegmark points out, the real
Life 3.0
danger is competence, not malice.
by Max Tegmark
?A superintelligent AI will
be extremely good at accomplishing
Allen Lane 384pp �
its goals, and if those goals aren?t
The Week bookshop �
aligned with ours, we?re in trouble.?
Yet achieving such ?value alignment?
Max Tegmark is a Swedish physicist
is no easy task, said Steven Poole in
with the ?smile of Cliff Richard and
The Daily Telegraph. Even if we
the mind of a modern Aristotle?, said
programmed a ?godlike AI? to
Oliver Moody in The Times. In his
maximise the happiness of all
new book, he grapples with what he
humanity, it might decide to ?cut
believes is the single most important
out our brains and connect them to a
issue facing humanity today: ?the
heavenly virtual reality in perpetuity?.
Arti?cial intelligence: our future in their hands?
prospect of an artificial general superDefining what we want from a superintelligence?. This, crudely, is a computer program capable of
intelligence turns out to be fiendishly complex ? though Tegmark
expanding its own capabilities ? or designing other intelligent
finds grounds for optimism, stressing that ?we have a choice
machines ? to the point where AI can ?do anything we can do,
about what will happen with technology?.
but better?. For Tegmark, the key question is not whether AI will
This may be about more than just the survival of humanity,
surpass humanity, nor even when this may happen, but ?how we
said Clive Cookson in the Financial Times. Tegmark believes that
will survive when it does?. He outlines various scenarios, ranging the rapid expansion of computer power will eventually ?propel
from the utopian (AIs, cyborgs and humans living peacefully
AI across the universe, generating energy billions of times more
together) to the nightmarish (an artificial super-intelligence that
efficiently than present-day technology? ? possibly by using black
wipes out most of mankind, preserving only a ?Slaughterhouseholes as a power source. So what?s at stake is ?nothing less than
Five-style zoo of human curiosities?). Though its tone can be
the ultimate future of life in our universe?. Inconceivably remote
irritatingly smug, Life 3.0 is a ?rich and visionary? book that
as such scenarios may seem, now is the time to start thinking
illuminates a ?phenomenally difficult? topic.
about them. In this clear-eyed and authoritative book, Tegmark
The media habitually oversimplifies AI, depicting the threat
makes an invaluable start.
Novel of the week
Black Tudors
The Sparsholt Affair
by Miranda Kaufmann
Oneworld 384pp �.99
by Alan Hollinghurst
Picador 464pp �
The Week bookshop �.99
The Week bookshop �
Alan Hollinghurst?s sixth novel is a masterful
chronicle of gay experience, family life and the
passage of time, said John Mullan in The Times.
Narrated in five sections ?divided by intervals of
many years?, it centres on David Sparsholt, a
wealthy industrialist whom we first encounter as
an engineering student at Oxford, during the
Second World War. The ?heartily unintellectual? Sparsholt at first seems to be
straight, but it gradually emerges that he?s a ?stranger character than he
appears?. Just how strange is made clear by the novel?s key event, the ?Sparsholt
Affair? of the title, a hazily sketched sex scandal ?involving Sparsholt, a Tory
MP and rent boys?. Later, the focus shifts to Sparsholt?s son Johnny, a
?moderately successful? artist who, unlike his father, is able to lead an openly
gay life. This is a moving, ?absorbingly complex novel? whose deepest
pleasures ? as ever with Hollinghurst (pictured) ? are its beautiful sentences.
The scandal that prompts its central character?s downfall isn?t the only hazy
thing about The Sparsholt Affair, said Peter Kemp in The Sunday Times. The
?larger puzzle? is why the story becomes so ?ungripping?. Though
Hollinghurst?s prose is as ?richly textured? as ever, there are ?too many
oddly entangled minor characters?, and even the protagonists suffer from a
?lack of interesting substance?. I disagree, said Alex Preston in The Observer.
Like its predecessor The Stranger?s Child, this is a novel concerned with the
?subterranean narratives of gay life?. It is also, though, an ?unashamedly
readable? work. Funny, warm-hearted and full of superlative writing, this may
be Hollinghurst?s ?most beautiful? book yet.
In the popular imagination, Tudor England
is ?hideously white?, said Dan Jones in The
Sunday Times. But as Miranda Kaufmann
shows in her ?splendid book?, hundreds of
people of African origin lived in the country
between the 15th and 17th centuries. Black
Tudors is ?arranged around the biographies
of ten of them?: its subjects include John
Blanke, a trumpeter at the court of Henry
VII and Henry VIII; the ?tawny moor?
Annie Cobbie, a prostitute in Westminster in
the 1620s; and a woman named Cattelena who
lived alone in a Gloucestershire village. People
with dark skin were generally seen as ?exotic,
rather than hateful?; England had yet to
seriously enter the transatlantic slave trade,
and was then ?one of the less terrible parts of
Europe? for a black person to live.
Kaufmann?s material is ?sometimes very thin?,
said Leanda de Lisle in The Times. One of her
subjects left no more than a probate list of her
possessions. Yet she brings her subjects to life
using ?empathy tethered to fact and context?.
At once deeply researched and ?light as a
feather?, Black Tudors is ?an absolute joy?.
To order these titles or any other book in print, visit
www.theweek.co.uk/bookshop or speak to a bookseller on 020-3176 3835
Opening times: Mon to Fri 9am-6pm, Sat 9am-5.30pm and Sun 10am-2pm
14 October 2017 THE WEEK
Theatre
Labour of Love
Playwright: James Graham
Director: Jeremy Herrin
No雔 Coward Theatre,
St Martin?s Lane,
London WC2
(0844-482 5140)
Until 2 December
Running time:
2hrs 45mins
(including interval)
???
Theatre
The Tin Drum
Adapted by Carl Grose,
from the novel by
G黱ter Grass
Director: Mike Shepherd
Music: Charles Hazlewood
West Yorkshire Playhouse,
Leeds (0113-213 7700),
17 to 28 October; then
Bristol, Truro and
Shoreditch
(www.kneehigh.co.uk)
Running time:
2hrs 30mins
(including interval)
???
Drama
James Graham has lately joined
dry, fear not. ?Graham?s writing,
the ranks of playwrights ?who
brought to life with real warmth
are not simply prolific but
and humanity? by director
virtually ubiquitous?, said Ian
Jeremy Herrin, is such that
Shuttleworth in the FT. His
his characters are real, complex
breakthrough hit, This House,
people rather than partisan
about 1970s Westminster whips?
mouthpieces. And ?it?s rare that
offices, heads out on tour in the
five minutes go past without a
new year. His feted Fleet Street
proper roar of laughter?.
drama, Ink, is at the Duke of
I admired Freeman?s ?rumpled
York?s. And he is already in
sincerity?, but Greig steals the
rehearsals for his next play,
show, said Dominic Cavendish
about the coughing quiz
in The Daily Telegraph. She
cheat on Who Wants to Be a
makes ?even low-level backchat
Millionaire? In the meantime,
soar to comic heights?, and her
said Michael Billington in
character?s ?no-nonsense
The Guardian, Graham has
confidence, warmth and
yet another hit on his hands ?
kookiness proves a snug fit
this ?brilliant new play? which
for her strengths?. I wasn?t
Tamsin Greig: steals the show
charts the ups and downs of the
convinced about all of Graham?s
Labour party over recent decades with
characterisation: Rachael Stirling as David?s
?surprising tenderness? and a romcom plot that
snooty lawyer wife is ?saddled with the sort
recalls Much Ado About Nothing.
of horsey, stuck-up stereotype even Class War
This ?vastly enjoyable? evening ?sugars its
would find lacking in nuance?. In the main,
analysis of the internal struggles of the Labour
though, this is deft, witty and stirring stuff.
party with an extremely high gag rate?, said
Holly Williams in The Independent. Martin
The week?s other opening
Freeman plays David, a Blairite MP, while
The Norman Conquests Chichester Festival
Tamsin Greig is Jean, his ?staunchly Leftie?
Theatre (01243-781312). Until 28 October
long-time constituency officer. We track this
Blanche McIntyre?s excellent revival of Alan
sparring pair from the 2017 election back to
Ayckbourn?s 1973 trilogy transforms Chichester
into a theatre in the round, allowing the 1970s
1990 (and then, after the interval, forward again
decor to be enjoyed in all its hideous detail. Do
to the present day) watching the ?sparks fly?
see the full trilogy if you can (Sunday Times).
between people holding radically different views
of what their party should be. If that sounds
You have to admire the sheer
Second World War becomes
nerveless ambition of Kneehigh?s
an allegory for all conflict.
latest production, said Robin
The Nazi Party has become the
Brown on What?s On Stage.
non-specific ?Order?, led by
It?s a touring musical version
an alluring rock star figure.
of G黱ter Grass?s novel The
?The prescient suggestion is
Tin Drum, a dense Homeric epic
that anyone, at any time, can
about ?an ageless child fighting
fall under the spell of fascism.?
Nazis with percussion?. And if
What?s lacking here, though,
that summary sounds ?glib?,
is clarity: amid the mess of war
then it is not totally out of
and ?narrative tangle? it is all
keeping with the spirit of this
too easy to get lost. A few more
?irreverent? show, in which
moments of ?quiet within the
a ?giddily alchemical? clash
chaos? might give the piece more
of musical styles, puppetry,
emotional force.
props and ?sheer knockabout
Still, the leading character of
physicality? makes for a heady ?
Oskar is brought vividly to life
if sometimes dissonant ? mix. In
by puppeteer Sarah Wright,
lesser hands, the results of such
said Nigel Smith in The Stage.
Oskar: brought vividly to life
abandon might have been
And there?s a raft of brilliant
?grisly?. With Kneehigh, the performances and
acting and vocal performances across the board.
production are confident and ?watertight?; you
This is a ?glorious? theatrical achievement:
can sit back and enjoy the ?riotous, colourful
challenging, certainly ? but ?captivating? and
and immensely fun? ride. Is this a rock?n?roll
funny too.
opera, a comedy or tragedy? A musical, folklore
or simply a warning from the past? ?All of those
CD of the week
things, one suspects. But above all it?s magical.?
Liam Gallagher: As You Were
In this ?surreal and gleefully inventive?
Warner Bros. �.99
adaptation ? written by Carl Grose with a
On his solo debut, the ?pedestrian psychedelia?
?chaotic, genre-mashing? score by Charles
Gallagher indulged in with Beady Eye is absent
Hazlewood ? Kneehigh has homed in on the
? replaced by warmth, clarity and some sharp
novel?s folk tale qualities, said Catherine Love
tunes. ?That unimaginable prospect, Liam?s
in The Guardian. Grass?s story of life in Danzig
mature phase, is off to a strong start? (FT).
(now Gdansk) before, during and after the
Stars reflect the overall quality of reviews and our own independent assessment (4 stars=don?t miss; 1 star=don?t bother)
Book your tickets now by calling 020-7492 9948 or visiting TheWeekTickets.co.uk
THE WEEK 14 October 2017
� JOHAN PERSSON
30 ARTS
English wine merchants have a long
and illustrious history. The ?rst one I
dealt with was just off St James?s
Square and I was recommended it by a
British spy in Laos during the
Indochina war. It certainly looked quite
ancient, so I mentioned this to the
manager, who said rather proudly:
?Yes, we are the oldest wine merchant
in London.? So how long have you
been here then? He replied with a smile,
?Since the Fire...?
Haynes, Hanson & Clark (HHC)
doesn?t quite go back that far in history,
though Anthony Hanson was a
co-founder of the business nearly 40
years ago and still remains a buying
consultant. Anthony is a well-known
expert on Burgundy and has written
extensively on the subject. He is still
best remembered for his memorable
statement that ?Great Burgundy smells
of s**t?. I remain grateful to him for
introducing me to the joys of MoreySaint-Denis, one of the less sung regions
of Burgundy. However, there is no point
just focusing on one particular wine at
the expense of all the others. I am
particularly pleased with the wines in
this month?s offering that are either
from lesser known regions or, in the
case of the red Sancerre, something not
normally associated with the
appellation. For me, that is one of the
most satisfying aspects of wine ? ?nding
a wine merchant that you like and trust.
We all know the phrase in vino veritas
(in wine, truth) ? perhaps once we have
done some due diligence, we should add
the importance of in vinum mercator
veritas (in wine merchant, truth).
Le Temps Est Venu, C魌es du Rh鬾e,
Domaine St閜hane & Michel Ogier
2015 St閜hane Ogier is one of the
greatest producers of C魌e-R魌ie;
perhaps the most elegant wine from the
northern Rh鬾e. Le Temps Est Venu is
his latest project in the southern
Rh鬾e, where the weather is
hotter. C魌es du Rh鬾e is a
large appellation which
includes many run of the mill
wines but this is a complex,
big, saturated wine, made
mostly from grenache along
with 20% shiraz. The structure
is more akin to a Ch鈚eauneufdu-Pape and it will come into
its own with game or red meat.
Greenhough Pinot Noir,
Nelson 2015 Pinot noir is one
of the most temperamental
grape varieties to grow outside
its natural habitat of Burgundy.
However, this organic version
from the relatively unknown
Nelson district of New
Zealand succeeds in delivering
the complexity and subtlety for
which pinot noir is renowned.
What makes this all the more
impressive is its price ? it would be
impossible to match the freshness and
?oral ?avour for a similar price point in
Burgundy. The average age of the vines
is 15 years and from their careful
techniques they have made an
impressive wine with enough backbone
to last for a few more years.
Sancerre Rouge Terre de
Maimbray, Pascal et Nicolas
Reverdy 2015 Not many
people know that red Sancerre
is also produced and that it is
100% pinot noir. Pascal
Reverdy, who makes splendid
white Sancerre, picks all of
these low yielding grapes by
hand and uses no pesticides. It
is lighter and slightly more
acidic than red Burgundy but gains in
freshness and weightlessness. Think of
it as more like a high quality Beaujolais
such as Fleurie. It would be perfect as
an aperitif or with ?sh or white meat.
Kumeu Village Hand
Harvested Chardonnay, Kumeu
River 2016 Kumeu Estate was
the ?rst chardonnay producer
in New Zealand to be taken
seriously by lovers of white
Burgundy ? in fact, in blind
tastings, its top wines were
frequently mistaken for
Meursault. Kumeu Village is
produced by their top
winemaker from their young grapes.
Because they use less oak, this wine is
fresher and better for early drinking.
Superb quality ? and a bargain.
Quincy Villalin, Domaine
Jacques Rouz� 2016 Essentially
this is a Loire sauvignon blanc
from the region of Sancerre and
Pouilly-Fum� and a far cry
from the New World fruit
bombs from New Zealand. It is
understated with a minerally,
almost saline taste, which gives
it a freshness and clean
aftertaste which makes it ideal
as an aperitif as well as with white ?sh
and meat. It is one of HHC?s favourite
sauvignon blancs and they have shipped
it for more than 20 years.
Rully Montagne La Folie,
Claudie Jobard 2015 This was
the ?rst time I had tasted Claudie
Jobard?s Rully wines, though
she is well known for her wines
at other grander vineyards in
Pommard and Beaune and her
family have held vineyards for
nearly 70 years. Rully is one of
the smaller appellations in the
C魌e Chalonnaise, just south
of the well-known Burgundy producers,
but the power and ?nesse here is a
revelation. With 100% chardonnay and
15% new oak, this superb wine has
exceptional freshness and intensity, and
is ready to drink now.
Order now with Haynes, Hanson & Clark on 020-7584 7927
and quote ?The Week? or visit TheWeekWines.co.uk
Your details
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Our wine editor, Bruce Palling, introduces some great wines from
lesser-known regions, courtesy of Haynes, Hanson & Clark
0
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The Week Wines
Film
ARTS 33
Blade Runner 2049
????
A worthy sequel to Ridley Scott?s sci-fi classic Dir: Denis Villeneuve 2hrs 43mins (15)
?Such is my love? for 1982?s visionary
masterpiece Blade Runner, I was
consumed with ?first-night fear
immediately prior to seeing this
sequel?, said Chris Hunneysett in the
Daily Mirror. I needn?t have worried.
Blade Runner 2049 is, quite simply, the
?best sci-fi film of the decade?. Anchored
by a compelling performance from Ryan
Gosling, Denis Villeneuve?s 160-minute
epic is a gripping, visually stunning and
?deeply humane? thriller, which wrestles
with complex ?questions of memory,
identity and the meaning of love and life?.
tycoon, Niander Wallace, and ultimately
that of Deckard himself, who is now a
hermit hiding out in the wreckage of Las
Vegas. We?re made to wait two hours for
it, but Ford?s grizzled, humorous,
conflicted turn includes some of his ?best
dramatic work for years?, said Robbie
Collin in The Daily Telegraph. It reminds
you ?how much more? the actor can do
than just ?dog-eared charisma?.
At the screening I attended, a studio
executive begged us not to reveal the
plot, said Deborah Ross in The Spectator.
A visually stunning and ?deeply humane? thriller Yet even if subjected to ?waterboarding
Like Star Wars: The Force Awakens, this
followed by a foot-whipping?, I couldn?t
is a ?reboot cloned from beloved DNA?, said Joshua Rothkopf
tell you a thing about it, since the storyline is so ?Byzantine?.
in Time Out. The action takes place 30 years on from the
The tempo is slow, and I found Ford ?moody and annoying?,
original, but the setting, as before, is a troubled, futuristic LA.
said Kevin Maher in The Times. Nevertheless, the film is worth
And it?s ?still raining?. Like Deckard, the protagonist played by
watching for the extraordinary cinematography of Roger
Harrison Ford in the first film, Gosling is a hard-bitten, trenchDeakins. ?See it in an Imax if you can?, since the scale of this
coated hunter of ?replicants? ? that?s to say, robots that are
cinematic tour de force is ?jaw-dropping?, agreed Brian Viner
almost indistinguishable from humans. To complicate matters,
in the Daily Mail. While I admit the narrative is sometimes hard
he is a replicant himself, who has a loving relationship with his
to follow, it is ?never less than a lot of fun trying?. ?A gorgeous
housemaid, a shape-shifting hologram named Joi (Ana de
confession of soullessness?, Blade Runner 2049 delivers a
Armas). Then, while on a case, he makes a discovery that forces
?sweet, synthetic ache?, which may be ?the best that Hollywood
him to doubt everything, including his own origins. His quest
has to offer right now?, said Tom Shone in The Sunday Times.
throws him into the path of Jared Leto?s spooky, blind tech
?A masterpiece? It?s a pretty good replicant of one.?
The Mountain Between Us
??
Mushy romantic drama with Kate Winslet Dir: Hany Abu-Assad 1hr 52mins (12A)
Twenty years after Titanic propelled her to
stardom, Kate Winslet is back in another
?mushy? romantic drama that sees her
weathering ?sub-zero temperatures?, said
Geoffrey Macnab in The Independent.
Here she plays Alex, a feisty photojournalist on her way to Denver, where
she?s due to get married the next day.
However, the plane she charters with
fellow traveller Ben (Idris Elba), a hunky
surgeon, crashes in the mountains.
As the pair battles to survive, their
mutual attraction grows ever stronger, said Jonathan Pile in
Empire. Because the focus is on the romance, it?s all a bit soft
focus, but the end result is ?witty? and ?likeable?. There is one
particularly ?hair-raising? scene in which Alex is attacked by a
cougar, said Peter Bradshaw in The
Guardian. Yet after an ?entertaining?
first act, the story becomes predictable,
?even slightly dull?. Worst of all, I just
didn?t believe in the ?emotional
connection? between the two.
I found it ?slightly frustrating? that
the story, which is based on the 2010
novel by Charles Martin, nearly always
requires Winslet?s character to be the one
who needs looking after, said Anna Smith
in Time Out. Yet the performances are
strong, there?s solid chemistry between the leads, and the
suspense is skilfully handled by director Hany Abu-Assad.
Overall, the blend of romance and disaster movie makes for
?a heady combination?.
On the Road ??
Part rock documentary, part romance Dir: Michael Winterbottom 2hrs 1min (15)
Like The Trip, Michael Winterbottom?s
latest offering is an intriguing blend of
fact and fiction, said Gail Tolley in
Time Out. On the face of it, On the Road
is a conventional documentary about the
experience of touring with the indie rock
band Wolf Alice. Yet to make things
more interesting, the director persuaded
the band members to allow into their
midst two actors. Leah Harvey and James
McArdle play a photographer and a roadie
who strike up a backstage romance.
The film succeeds in capturing the ?camaraderie? of touring,
as well as the inevitable tedium and ?exhaustion?, said
Geoffrey Macnab in The Independent. Technically, this is
?a subtle and clever piece of work?.
For my money, it?s Winterbottom?s
?best film in years?, said Peter Bradshaw
in The Guardian. ?Romantic, erotic and
musically euphoric,? On the Road excels,
above all, as an introduction to the music
of Wolf Alice. The background love story
provides, as it were, a ?soundtrack?
against which to appreciate it.
The trouble is, the romance is only
lukewarm, said Guy Lodge in Variety. The
two lovers are apparently ?lonely people
making the best of what?s available?. It?s hard to see ?why
audiences should invest much in these attractively indifferent
characters?. All told, On the Road is ?an amiable misfire?.
14 October 2017 THE WEEK
Art
34 ARTS
Exhibition of the week Dal� / Duchamp
Royal Academy, Piccadilly, London W1 (020-7300 8000, www.royalacademy.org.uk). Until 3 January 2018
Salvador Dal� and
mannequins?
Marcel Duchamp
propped against
make an unlikely
the walls.
pair, said Rachel
Elsewhere,
Campbell-Johnston
we encounter
in The Times. While
some striking
Duchamp is revered
juxtapositions,
as the ?intellectual?
including
who more or less
Duchamp?s famous
single-handedly
urinal sitting
invented conceptual
?cheekily? next
art, and shaped the
to Dal�s equally
postwar art world,
iconic ?lobster
Dal� is dismissed
telephone?.
as an attentionNevertheless, the
seeking ?clown?
exhibits are ?far
? ?as famous for
too crammed?
his posturing
into the show?s
and outlandish
small space, and
pontifications
its arguments are
as he was for his
hampered by
Dal�s Lobster Telephone (red) (1938) and Duchamp?s Fountain (1917)
paintings?. Yet as
some ?rather silly?
this new exhibition at the Royal Academy reveals, the two artists
attempts to highlight the artists? shared interests. In one instance,
shared an ?improbable? friendship, as well as an ?obsession?
we see portraits both painted of their fathers hanging side by side;
with eroticism and a ?mutual delight in games?. The show brings
what this is supposed to reveal about either man is beyond me.
together ?world-famous masterworks? by both artists, as well as
many lesser-known pieces, and a wealth of ?fascinating? archival
This is ?not a meeting of equals?, said Jonathan Jones in The
material. The effect is ?as riveting as it is playful and fun?,
Guardian. Dal� was a gifted painter, but his work ? notably the
shedding intriguing new light on both men. Though I doubt it will ?awful? painting of Christ on the cross seen here ? often lapses
improve Dal�s reputation, it is a truly ?delightful? exhibition.
into ?cod surrealism? and ?sheer kitsch?. His role in this show
is effectively to provide ?light relief? from Duchamp?s ?sublime?
The show is ?convincing, at least in part?, said Michael Glover in
but often complicated ideas. Dal� contributes ?a shot of down to
The Independent. Among the things we learn is that Dal� and
earth humour and Catalan exuberance?, while the exhibition as
Duchamp actually worked together, collaborating on an entire
a whole allows us to see a richer, more human Duchamp (he is
room at a Paris surrealist exhibition in 1938. A partial recreation
often regarded as a ?cold philosopher?). Ultimately, this ?great?
of the display here is a ?dimly lit, grotto-like space?, adorned with exhibition is a show ?about one man who told everyone he was
?clusterings of coal sacks? hanging from the ceiling and ?sexy
a genius, Dal�, and one man, Duchamp, who really was one?.
Where to buy?
Alex Katz
at Timothy Taylor
The American artist Alex Katz is
regarded by some as one of the
greats of 20th century painting.
Now 90, he is still going strong,
producing works that more often
than not feel every bit as vital as more
modish efforts by artists a quarter of
his age. This show combines new
paintings and sculptures with a
little-seen series of sketches Katz
drew on the New York subway in
the 1940s, when he was still a student.
In terms of subject, recent paintings
of woodland scenes recall David
Hockney?s late works, but where
the latter depicted autumn in
comparatively genteel Bridlington,
Katz goes for the wild pine forests
of upstate New York. Delightful as
they are, the real thrill comes from
those subway drawings. Every detail
THE WEEK 14 October 2017
Two Trees (2015), 12in x 96in
? a stubbly double chin, a raincoat
collar, a soiled cuff ? viscerally reeks
of that strange underground perfume
of second-hand smoke, cheap cologne
and sweat. Prices range from $10,000
to $500,000.
15 Carlos Place, London W1 (0207409 3344). Until 18 November
A painting by
Adolf Hitler on
display in northern
Italy ?has been
attacked by a man
wielding a
screwdriver?, says
Tom Kington in
The Times. A man
burst into an
exhibition about
madness at the
Museo di Sal�, on
the banks of Lake
Garda, last week, shouting: ?Where is that shit
Hitler?? He then lunged at the oil painting with
a screwdriver, but failed to do much damage,
because it was covered with a protective film.
The man was subsequently restrained, and
fled. Hitler?s painting (pictured), loaned by a
private German collector, features two men in
a long, dark corridor. Vittorio Sgarbi, an Italian
art critic who curated the exhibition, described
it as ?a piece of crap?, adding: ?It is the work
of a desperate man.? The president of the
museum, Giordano Bruno Guerri, said he
would not press charges if the attacker was
arrested. ?An exhibition about madness
would not have been complete without an
episode of madness,? he said.
� SALVADOR DALI, FUNDACIO GALA-SALVADOR DALI, DACS 2017; SUCCESSION MARCEL DUCHAMP/ADAGP, PARIS AND DACS, LONDON 2017
?An episode of madness?
The Week reviews an
exhibition in a private gallery
We believe in a
diferent perspective.
Matilda armchair, �0 Brompton lamp, �0.
neptune.com/adifferentperspective
PROPERTY
MARKET REPORT
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?The most successful, often those
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qualified workers and offer a good
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Bristol, which has the fastest-selling
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Affordability is, of course, key
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In Scotland, the fall in oil prices
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?Property sales in Scottish cities
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City
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Bristol
34
2. Coventry
35
3. Edinburgh
36
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Brought to you by
The List
37
Best books? Jeremy Vine
Jeremy Vine, the Radio 2 presenter and host of BBC1?s Eggheads, picks his
favourite books. His own book, What I Learnt: What My Listeners Say and
Why We Should Take Notice, has recently been published by W&N at �.99
The Penguin Complete
Sherlock Holmes by Sir
Arthur Conan Doyle (Penguin
�.99). I wanted to give my
oldest daughter, then aged
nine, a taste of detective
fiction. I was looking for the
best story and I found The
Red-headed League in this
collection. Then we read loads
more. A portrait of London in
the age of the hansom cab.
Jaws by Peter Benchley,
1974 (Pan �. From the
very first paragraph, you
are drawn in and held by
the author?s fabulous
storytelling. The girl killed
by the shark; the mayor who
wants to keep the beaches
open; the subplot with the
police chief?s wife (which isn?t
in the movie, by the way).
Time?s Arrow by Martin
Amis, 1991 (Vintage �99).
This books runs the life of
a war criminal backwards,
starting with the moment he
returns to consciousness in
his garden and feels a pain
in his chest. Because some of
his deeds were horrific, when
he relives them in reverse he
appears to be healing people.
An Officer and a Spy by
Robert Harris, 2013 (Arrow
�99). Thank you, Robert,
for writing about the Dreyfus
case (a long, complex French
story) in a way that made me
tear at the pages to move
through the book faster. I
read this in the garden of my
in-laws in Devon one summer.
The sun shone and I could
hear sheep in the nearest field.
A perfect memory.
Snow Falling on Cedars
by David Guterson, 1994
(Bloomsbury �99). What
a soft, masterful touch this
writer has. The novel is about
Kabuo Miyamoto, a Japanese
American accused of killing
Carl Heine, a fisherman. It is
set in 1954, when there was a
lot of postwar, anti-Japanese
feeling in the US. Guterson,
who was a teacher, wrote this
in his spare time. It took him
ten years. He gave up his job
when it sold in its millions.
Titles in print are available from The Week Bookshop on 020-3176 3835. For out-of-print books visit www.biblio.co.uk
The Week?s guide to what?s worth seeing and reading
Last Chance
Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black
Power at the Tate Modern, London SE1
(020-7887 8888). Exhibition charting artists?
responses to the Civil Rights movement.
?Fascinating and movingly heartfelt? (Times).
Ends 22 October.
True to Life at the Scottish National Gallery of
Modern Art, Edinburgh (0131-624 6200). This
?enthralling? show re-examines British realist
painting of the 1920s and 1930s, and is packed
with unjustly neglected artists as well as known
ones, including Stanley Spencer and Winifred
Knights (Guardian). Ends 29 October.
� 2017 THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION/ARS, NEW YORK & DACS, LONDON
Book now
Sally Cookson ? who did wonders with Peter
Pan and whose production of Jane Eyre is
Programmes
George Michael: Freedom
This film about the life of
George Michael, made just
months before he died, was
narrated by the singer himself.
Featuring interviews with stars
including Naomi Campbell and
Ricky Gervais. Mon 16 Oct, C4
21:00 (110 mins).
Reformation Two-part
German drama telling the story
of Martin Luther, the rebellious
monk who stood up to the
abuses of the Catholic Church.
Tue 17 and Wed 18 Oct, BBC4
22:00 (60mins).
Army: Behind the New
Frontlines Filmed over
12 months, this three-part
series follows British soldiers
and their commanders as they
face up to complex new
threats. It begins here with the
Battle for Mosul. Wed 18 Oct,
BBC2 21:00 (60mins).
Trump and Russia: Sex,
Spies and Scandal Matt
Frei looks into the allegations
that Trump?s aides colluded
with Russian officials before
the US presidential election.
Wed 18 Oct, C4 22:00 (65mins).
H is for Hawk: A New
Chapter After the death of her
father, Helen Macdonald overcame her grief by training a
goshawk, a notoriously freespirited bird of prey. Her book
about her experiences, H is for
Hawk, was a bestseller. Here
she adopts another goshawk to
raise as her own. Thur 19 Oct,
BBC2 21:00 (60mins).
Showing now
Ink at the Duke of York?s, London WC2 (0844871 7623 ). James Graham?s ?riveting? account
of Rupert Murdoch?s takeover of The Sun has
transferred to the West End (Daily Telegraph).
With Bertie Carvel. Ends 6 January 2018.
Television
Warhol?s Muhammad Ali at Tate Modern
currently at the National ? directs a new
adaptation of C.S. Lewis?s The Lion, The
Witch and The Wardrobe. 29 November21 January 2018, West Yorkshire Playhouse,
Leeds (0113-213 7700).
Just out in paperback
History of Wolves by Emily Fridlund
(Weidenfeld �99). An unsettling coming of age
story, this novel is sometimes awkward, but has
?an underlying power? (Sunday Times).
The Archers: what happened last week
Noluthando asks Kate why she left South Africa and points out that lots of parents stay close to their
children after separating. Kate insists she always kept in touch. Justin tries to get Lilian to sign the
contract to incorporate Amside into Damara before he leaves for Scotland. Lilian says she wants time
to read it. Kate surprises Adam by offering to be his surrogate. Adam?s saved from turning her down
by Alice, who warns Kate that it may affect her children and her figure. Mandy Beesborough informs
Lilian that she saw Justin with Miranda in Edinburgh. They are restructuring the business she won in
the divorce. Matt visits Lilian before moving to Ecuador. He says he?s always there if she needs to
talk. Noluthando asks to stay at Home Farm. When Kate hesitates she storms out. Noluthando claims
Lucas?s girlfriend has turned her father against her. Kate rings Lucas to accuse him of neglect. Kate
doesn?t believe his claim that Noluthando?s behaviour has been awful. She tells her daughter to stay
as long as she likes. Justin returns home to find Lilian has torn up the contract. Lilian says she knows
about Miranda. Justin claims he didn?t want to upset her. Lilian banishes him to the guest bedroom.
Films
The Impossible (2013) Ewan
McGregor and Naomi Watts
are excellent in this true story
of a family caught up in the
2004 tsunami. Sun 15 Oct, C4
23:00 (125mins).
Ida (2014) A novice Polish nun
journeys through her family?s
past in Pawe? Pawlikowski?s
outstanding drama. Mon 16
Oct, C4 2:55 (80mins).
New to Sky Atlantic
Curb Your Enthusiasm
After a six-year hiatus, the
comic and writer Larry David
returns for a ninth season
playing an exaggerated
version of his curmudgeonly
self. The brilliant comedy of
manners follows Larry as he
navigates life with a complete
lack of filter. Available to
download now.
14 October 2017 THE WEEK
Best properties
38
Striking town houses
? Kent: Hamilton House, 105 Beach Street, Deal.
A Grade II town house in a seafront location, with
uninterrupted views over the Channel. Master suite,
4 further beds, family bath, 2 showers, kitchen/dining
room, 2 further receps, study, office, playroom, double
garage, walled garden. �275m; Bright & Bright via
OnTheMarket.com (01304-267926).
?
West Sussex: North House, Petworth. A Grade
II* Georgian town house in historic Petworth, close
to the town square. 7 beds, 4 bath/showers, breakfast/
kitchen, grand recep, inner hall, 2 further receps,
family room, study, cellar/utility, cellars, 2 garages,
car-port, outdoor heated swimming pool, landscaped
gardens. �15m; Savills (01798-343111).
?
Kent: 71 London
Road, Tunbridge Wells.
A Grade II semidetached 19th century
town house, with a
separate 1-bed coach
house, overlooking the
common. Main house:
2 suites, 3 further beds,
family bath, shower,
kitchen, 2 receps,
morning room,
2 cloakrooms, hall,
conservatory, storage
rooms; Coach house:
1 bed suite, 1 recep,
cloakroom; gardens,
parking. �475m;
Savills (01892-507000).
?
Devon: 6 Taw Vale,
Barnstaple. Presented
in great condition, this
4-storey Regency town
house overlooks the
River Taw, close to
the town centre.
The house has been
sympathetically
modernised,
maintaining the many
original features.
Master suite, 4 further
beds, 2 further baths,
breakfast/kitchen, 2
receps, study, games
room, recep 3/bed 6,
hall, utility/2nd
kitchen, balcony,
cellar, enclosed
courtyard garden,
off-road parking.
�5,000; Stags
(01271-322833).
? London: Connaught Square, Hyde Park W2. A
Grade II restored Georgian town house on this
prestigious garden square beside Hyde Park. Master
suite with walk-through wardrobe, 4 further beds, 2
further baths, breakfast/kitchen, 2 receps, hall, study,
office, balcony, patio, gym/bed 6, guest cloakroom.
�95m freehold; Savills (020-7578 5100).
THE WEEK 14 October 2017
on the market
39
? Somerset: St Vincent?s Priory, Clifton, Bristol.
Constructed circa 1829, this Grade II Regency town
house has fantastic views over Clifton Suspension
Bridge. Master suite, 2 further beds, family bath,
kitchen, utility, 3 receps, cloakroom, self-contained
annexe, study/bed 4, south-facing garden, courtyard.
�395m; Savills (0117-93 5800).
?
West Sussex: Avola House, 16 Tarrant Street,
Arundel. An impressive Grade II 18th century house
in the heart of Old Arundel, on the market for the
first time in 20 years. The house has been used as a
family home and offices and could be divided into
two dwellings. 3 beds, 3 baths, 2 kitchens, 4 receps,
conservatory, study, stores, south-facing courtyard,
terraces. �25m; Sims Williams (01903-885678).
?
Cornwall: 7
Castle Street,
Launceston. A
Grade II house, next
to the castle, with
views over the town
and surrounding
countryside. John
Betjeman said Castle
Street had ?the most
perfect collection of
18th century town
houses in
Cornwall?. 4 beds,
family bath, shower,
kitchen, utility, 3
receps, garden.
�5,000; Stags
(01566-774999).
? North Yorkshire: Fenton House, 9 Precentor?s Court, York. A double-fronted
Grade II* town house in the shadow of York Minster, with panoramic views. 4
suites, 4 further beds, 2 further baths, breakfast/kitchen, 3 receps, utility, cloakroom,
cellar, garden, roof terrace, off-street parking. �6m; Savills (01904-617820).
14 October 2017 THE WEEK
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table where our pints waited, golden as Minor and his wife Debbie from
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The Talk of The Pub.
LEISURE
Food & Drink
41
What the experts recommend
Seoul Kimchi 275 Upper Brook Street,
Manchester (0161-273 5556)
The table I manage to bag just before
7pm on a Tuesday night at this rammed
Korean corner shop turned restaurant is
?by far the worst table for two I have
ever had the pleasure of lunging for?,
says Jay Rayner in The Observer. It?s
so close to the door you have to lean in
every time anyone enters or leaves; it?s
cramped; and the view is of a ?quasiindustrial cul de sac?. Yet for the ?cheap,
gutsy Korean soul food? on offer here,
I could forgive anything. Highlights
include jeon (a thick savoury pancake)
with squid and prawn; fried chicken with
a ?sweet and salty, hot and fiery?
gochujang sauce (a ?culinary opioid?);
galbi (soy-marinated Korean beef ribs);
and a bibimbap (rice bowl) of ground
beef ? ?one of the single most satisfying
items of comfort food available?. One
point: Seoul Kimchi is unlicensed, but
the food cries out for beer; you can bring
your own drinks for minimal corkage.
Meal for two: �-�.
The Wigmore 15 Langham Place,
London W1 (020-7965 0198)
This recently opened addendum to the
swish Langham Hotel claims to be a
pub, says Marina O?Loughlin in The
Guardian. And so it is ? in the sense that
it sells alcoholic beverages and its menu
features pies, roasts and toasties. In other
of crabmeat on tiny crumpets with
slivers of nori. And a cheese toastie
oozing ?excellent aged cheddar, red
onion, mustard and cornichons in the
most lascivious way? is verging on
Satanic. About � a head plus drinks.
Mr Hanbury?s Mason Arms: ?a curious beast?
respects, The Wigmore is ?as far
removed from Wetherspoon as it?s
possible to be while sharing the same
atmosphere?. Walls decorated in a
?beautiful?, high gloss sage green
?bring to mind Victorian gin palaces;
there?s intricate parquetry underfoot; and
the bar appears to be lined with endpaper
from ancient, precious books?. The food
is pub grub as ?reimagined by angels?
(in the guise of consultant Michel Roux
Jr). A ?prince? among chicken pies ?
properly crisp crust, flavourful meat
bound in cream and loads of leeks ?
comes with Robuchon-style, perfectly
smooth buttery mash. I love the idea
Recipe of the week
Tataki is a great way of cooking meat or fish, says Tim Anderson: it is seared, so
you get the rich flavours, but still raw in the middle, giving the most tender,
juicy texture. This recipe also works well with tuna, swordfish or salmon
Beef tataki
60ml sake 15g caster (superfine) or granulated (raw) sugar 60ml soy sauce
2 tbsps oil 2 garlic cloves, finely sliced 300?350g steak, cut about 2.5cm-thick ?
lean cuts free of sinew work best, so go for fillet, bavette or rump � bunch of chives,
finely sliced pinch of toasted sesame seeds handful of peppery leaves, like rocket or
watercress 1 shallot, finely sliced and soaked in cold water
? Combine sake and sugar
� PAUL MASSEY
in a small saucepan and
bring to the boil. Remove
from the heat and add the
soy sauce. Leave to cool.
? Put the oil in a sturdy
frying pan and add garlic.
Turn heat to medium and
slowly brown the garlic;
remove when golden, and
drain on kitchen paper. Crank the heat
up on the pan to stupidly, surface-ofthe-Sun hot (to get a nice colour on
the outside of the meat while
remaining raw, or rare, in the middle).
? Dry the surface of your
steak with kitchen paper.
Lay steak in the hot pan
and let it develop a very
rich, deep, dark brown
colour. Turn the steak to
colour the other side.
? Remove from the pan
and transfer to the freezer.
Let the meat firm up there
for about 20 mins, then remove and
slice it very thinly. Pour the sake and
soy mixture over it. Garnish with fried
garlic, chives and sesame seeds. Top
with the leaves and drained shallot.
Taken from JapanEasy: Classic & Modern Japanese Recipes to Cook at Home
by Tim Anderson, published by Hardie Grant at �. To buy from The Week
Bookshop for �, call 020-3176 3835 or visit www.theweek.co.uk/bookshop.
Mr Hanbury?s Mason Arms
Station Road, South Leigh, Oxfordshire
(01993-656238)
This just-opened place is part of a trendy
new hotel chain called Artist Residence ?
and visually it?s a curious beast, says
Michael Deacon in The Daily Telegraph.
It is housed in a 16th century farmhouse,
?cosy and dark? and traditional ? but is
decorated with ?kitsch hipster artworks?
including a vast neon sign that, in chaotic
pink capitals, reads, ?WHAT DID I DO
LAST NIGHT?? Still, the staff are
?extremely friendly? and the food is
decent ? local ingredients, vegetables
they?ve grown in the garden ? without
being astounding. Grilled sardine is
nicely salted, with a crunchy dusting of
golden batter, complemented by fennel
and buttery samphire. A ?hearty wedge?
of grouse is enlivened with pearl barley
and cocoa nibs, girolle mushrooms,
lardons and chunky savoy cabbage
underneath. And a pudding of many
flavours and textures ? fat strawberries,
champagne jelly, crumble, sorbet and ice
cream ? is ?luscious?. Three courses for
two: about � plus drinks
Wine choice
If you love premier cru and grand cru
red burgundy wine but baulk at
paying the �0?�0 it costs, it?s high
time you got to know pinot noir?s
new home on California?s cool,
foggy Sonoma Coast, says Jane
MacQuitty in The Times. The
region?s best pinots rival top
burgundies, and are often around
half the price.
2014 Kutch Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir,
California (�; Roberson Wine) is a silky,
smoky, red berry and cherry Sonoma Coast
pinot noir with elegance and length. Or try
Littorai?s extraordinarily elegant, sensual,
wild strawberry-scented 2014 Sonoma
Coast Pinot Noir (�; Handford Wines).
If you can, splash out on a single-vineyard
edition. Kutch?s 2015 Bohan Vineyard is
a lovely, long, silky herbaceous rosehip
triumph (�.15; Roberson Wine), and
Hirsch?s rich, herby, blood orange-fruited
2014 East Ridge Sonoma Coast Pinot
Noir (�; Roberson Wine) is a star. For
considerably less money, I?d also recommend
La Crema?s vibrant, black cherry-licked 2014
Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir (�.99; Noel
Young Wines).
For our latest offers, visit theweekwines.co.uk
14 October 2017 THE WEEK
Consumer
LEISURE 43
New cars: what the critics say
Alfa Romeo Stelvio
from �,990
Evo
These days, ?you?re no
one in the car world if you
aren?t making an SUV?.
A number of sports car
brands ? Porsche, Maserati
and Aston Martin among
them ? have already got
in on the action, and Alfa
Romeo is now joining
the club. These cars sell
in ?huge volumes? ? and
the Italian firm expects
its offering, the Stelvio,
to account for nearly twothirds of its sales in the UK
next year.
Auto Express
Aesthetically, the Stelvio
has ?plenty to shout
about?: it?s ?one of
the prettiest SUVs? on
the market, outdoing
any of its German
rivals. The interior is
?similarly elegant?, with
an ?intuitive? dash and
?pleasing? materials ?
even if the infotainment
isn?t top notch. It?s not the
roomiest SUV, though:
the rear?s a little cramped,
and the 525-litre boot is
?merely average?.
The Daily Telegraph
On the road, the Stelvio?s
handling ?sets it apart?:
there?s the kind of firm
suspension more often
found in sports cars, as
well as ?exceptionally
quick? steering. Ride
quality is mostly good,
though the car suffers on
?ropier? roads, and the
brakes take a bit of getting
used to. If you?re looking
for a stylish car that offers
?real driving pleasure?,
the Stelvio will be ?very
difficult to beat?.
The best? tablets
Google Pixel C If you
pay an extra � for a
keyboard, the Pixel C turns
into a hybrid laptop/tablet
(or ?tabtop?). Either way,
it has impressive battery
life of ten hours and a
sharp 2K display (�4;
store.google.com).
Samsung Galaxy Tab
S3 Widely considered the
best Android tablet on the
market, the Galaxy Tab S3
is just 6mm thick. Yes,
it?s expensive, but it has
a stunning 9.7in screen
and comes with
Samsung?s excellent
S Pen stylus (�9;
www.samsung.com).
?
reMarkable The
reMarkable is ideal for
drawing: it has a ?digital
paper? screen, with a
rough texture that creates
friction when you apply the
stylus to it. It doubles as an
e-reader ? but it doesn?t have
a backlight (�9;
www.remarkable.com).
Tips? how to get
et the best
results from a builder
ild
? Insist on a fixed price, rather than one
based on how long the job takes. Ask for
a thorough breakdown of the quote by
room, labour and materials.
? Sign a contract with your builder. Use the
Joint Contracts Tribunal's homeowner or
minor works contracts, depending on the
size of the job; they're available, for �.40
and �.40, from www.jctltd.co.uk.
? Unless you have lots of time and
experience, hire a main building contractor
or project manager. Expect to pay between
10% and 15% of the total cost of the build.
? Set aside an extra 10%-20% of the
budget as a contingency fund. Extra charges
aren?t necessarily a rip-off ? they?re often
caused by problems that surface midway.
? When the work is done, withhold up to
5% of the fee. Don?t keep calling your
builder about every crack or faulty switch;
instead, wait a month, then get them back
to sort out all the snagging in one go. Only
pay up when everything is fixed.
SOURCE: THE SUNDAY TIMES
? iPad The best option in this
price range, the standard
iPad is now cheap for an
Apple product. It?s
powerful and has a bright
(if rather too reflective)
display; but if you?re
looking for something
more sophisticated,
consider the iPad
Pro (from �9;
www.apple.com).
And fo
for those who
h
have everything?
Paper airplanes are fun to make, but less
fun to throw. PowerUp has got round
that problem by creating a kit that comes
with a miniature motor, allowing you to
control the plane via an app. It?s available
for pre-order until next Wednesday.
�; www.poweruptoys.com
SOURCE: STUFF
Where to find? autumn
exhibitions in Europe
Joan Mir� A big hit in Porto, this exhibition
has now moved to Lisbon?s Pal醕io
Nacional da Ajuda. It covers works by the
Catalan painter from the 1920s to the 1980s.
Until 8 January (www.palacioajuda.gov.pt).
Chagall Basel?s Kunstmuseum is looking
at the Russian-French artist?s work in
his ?breakthrough years?, between
1911 and 1919, when he depicted life in
Paris and rural Russia. Until 21 January
(www.kunstmuseumbasel.ch).
The Cinquecento Palazzo Strozzi in
Florence is hosting a show dedicated to
the art produced in the city during the 16th
century. There are 70 works on display, by
artists including Michelangelo and Vasari.
Until 21 January (www.palazzostrozzi.org).
Dutch Masters Six Rembrandts are among
the Dutch masterpieces on display at
Amsterdam?s Hermitage. On loan from the
Hermitage in St Petersburg, many are in the
Netherlands for the first time in centuries.
Until 27 May (www.hermitage.nl).
SOURCE: THE GUARDIAN
14 October 2017 THE WEEK
SOURCES: STUFF/T3/THE DAILY TELEGRAPH
?
?
?
Amazon Fire The Fire isn?t
as good as pricier models:
its screen is poor and the
operating system limited
compared with Android or iOS.
But it?s still incredible value.
It?s solidly built and has
Amazon?s Alexa technology
(�; www.amazon.co.uk).
Travel
LEISURE 45
This week?s dream: a small-boat safari in the Norwegian Arctic
It is home to some of the world?s most
grow up to a metre long. Less welcome
remarkable creatures, and about as far
are the frequent appearances by other
?off the grid? as you can go. But though
boats and cruise ships: tourist numbers
the Arctic is an exceptionally tough
have nearly doubled in the past decade
environment, it is also fragile. Go soon
(with the Chinese leading the charge).
to see it before global warming changes
The ?enforced intimacy? with fellow
it irrevocably, says Emma Duncan in
passengers on a small vessel can also be
1843 magazine ? and eschew cruise
wearing. But the relaxing effect of being
ships in favour of smaller boats, which
?unplugged? from the modern world
let you get closer to the wildlife. The
compensates, as does the ?clear, silent
Freya, a recently-refurbished Swedish
brightness? of snow, blue sea and
class 1A ice-breaker, has comfortable
?striated? mountains.
beds, good food and guides who are
Each day, passengers don ?spacesuit?serious? academics. And on a tour
type? protective clothing and clamber
of Norway?s Svalbard archipelago there
into Zodiacs, rubber boats that act
is the chance to spot land mammals as
as safari ?jeeps?, for trips into fjords.
well as sea creatures, and flora too.
There, you can get ?thrillingly? close
Smaller boat tours take in the Svalbard archipelago
There?s no guarantee of seeing polar
to glaciers, icebergs, birds and animals,
bears, but chances are you will. Despite global warming and
including reindeer, arctic foxes and seals. You might even want to
receding ice, their numbers appear to be bouncing back after
join the latter in the icy water following a sauna ? generating an
centuries of hunting. The walrus population is also booming,
endorphin rush that will keep you on a high for hours. Natural
making for many sightings of these vast, Jabba the Hut-like
World Safaris (01273-691642, www.naturalworldsafaris.com)
creatures, with their knobbly skin and immense tusks, which can
has an eight-day trip from �795pp, excluding flights.
Getting the flavour of?
Hotel of the week
A Moroccan motorcycle tour
Hotel Awa, Chile
?The ultimate hybrid of cosy
and cool,? this new 16-bedroom
hotel is ?a game-changer? for
Chile?s spectacular (and
fashionable) Lake District, says
Cond� Nast Traveller. Set beside
Lake Llanquihue, it has an
asymmetrical steel-and-glass
facade, volcanic-rock interior
walls, open fires and ?roughhewn? Mapuche fabrics. In the
rooms, floor-to-ceiling windows
frame views of the snow-capped
Osorno volcano. For lunch, drive
to pretty Puerto Varas, nearby;
for dinner, stay put for roast
Patagonian lamb or great seafood.
The hotel can arrange hikes, bike
rides and kayaking trips, and
there?s a spa with a large pool.
Doubles from �0 (00 56 65 229
2020, www.hotelawa.cl).
For bikers who love the great outdoors,
a tour of Morocco?s Rif mountains with
Legendary Motorcycle Adventures is an
absolute joy, says Chris Caldicott in The
Daily Telegraph. This new British company
runs ?relaxed? group trips with a ?nonmacho? ethos and excellent kit (including
?retro-style? Royal Enfield bikes and
Outhaus tents). Heading east from Tangier
towards the Algerian border, you can ride for
days through a remote wilderness, stopping
from time to time in friendly settlements
that seem almost untouched by modernity
(including the beautiful ?blue town? of
Chefchaouen). Among the highlights of
the tour are wild camping under a dark sky
full of stars, swimming off deserted beaches,
washing in hammams and shopping in
ancient souks. This is a ?raw, simple,
authentic? way of travelling. A ten-day tour
costs �620pp, incl. fuel, kit, food and ferry
crossings (0771-113 3396, www.lma.life).
Following in Luther?s footsteps
This year marks the 500th anniversary of the
Protestant Reformation, sparked by Martin
Luther nailing his 95 theses to the door of
the castle church in Wittenberg. A 40-minute
train ride from Berlin, the city is well worth
a visit, says Andrew Eames in The Times.
Its ?pastel-painted? houses look ?like a film
set?, and among them is the Lutherhaus,
where the theologian lived most of his life
? now a museum stuffed with paintings by
his friend Lucas Cranach. Nearby is Erfurt,
where Luther studied, a beautiful town with
the longest inhabited bridge in Europe; and
Eisenach, which sits below the Wartburg,
a ?spectacular? Romanesque castle where,
in hiding, he translated the New Testament
into German. For more information, see
www.luther2017.de.
Tracking Ted Turner?s bison
Over-hunting in the 19th century reduced
the US?s bison population to 1,000.
Today, the animals are resurgent, thanks
in part to the efforts of billionaire media
mogul turned environmentalist Ted Turner.
You can see the bison, as well as other
species that once roamed the western plains,
at Ladder Ranch, one of three huge tracts of
land in New Mexico that he is ?rewilding?,
says Bella Pollen in the FT. Guests stay in
Turner?s own house (decorated in ?gently
kitsch? style by Jane Fonda, his former
wife), and, with experts guides, go on safari
?across hillsides dense with prickly pear,
across high mesas and flowing creeks?. The
sight of the bison is ?profoundly moving?:
it?s ?as if they?d always been there, as if
nothing had ever changed?. From $3,000
a night for two people, plus $800 each
for additional guests (00 1 877 288 7637,
www.tedturnerexpeditions.com).
Last-minute offers from top travel companies
Cheshire short break
A 2-night stay for two at the
superb Grade II De Vere
Cranage Estate, with dinner on
the first night, costs from
�1pp b&b. 01904-717362,
www.superbreak.com. Arrive
17 November.
Wondrous beach holiday
Spend 7 nights at the Acapulco
Beach and Spa Resort in
Cyprus on a half-board basis
from �0pp, London flights
included. 0800-170 0777,
www.cyprusparadise.com.
Depart 29 November.
5-star Marrakech retreat
Offering a wealth of activities,
the Eden Andalou Aquapark
& Spa has a 7-night stay, with
Manchester flights, from
�6pp all-incl. 020-3897
1179, www.loveholidays.com.
Depart 14 December.
6 nights in Hua Hin
The boutique Cape Nidhra
Hotel, set on Hua Hin Beach,
offers a 6-night stay from
�035pp b&b, including
Edinburgh flights. 020-3130
6976, www.bestattravel.co.uk.
Depart 1 December.
14 October 2017 THE WEEK
Obituaries
47
Lord Lucan?s troubled wife
Veronica, the Dowager
Countess of Lucan, was a key
player in one of the great
mysteries of the 20th century:
the fate of ?Lucky? Lord Lucan. On the night
of 7 November 1974, Lady Lucan ran into a
pub near her house in Belgravia, covered in
blood, screaming that her estranged husband
had attacked her and killed her nanny. Back at
the family home, 29-year-old Sandra Rivett was
found bludgeoned to death. Lucan was
presumed to have broken into the basement,
and to have mistaken Rivett, who?d gone down
to make a cup of tea, for his wife. Lady Lucan
claimed that she?d met him on the stairs ? and
that he?d have killed her too had she not
escaped. He drove to a friend?s house in Sussex;
he left the next morning ? and was not seen
again. The car was later found abandoned,
with a bandaged lead pipe in the boot.
Veronica
Duncan
1937?2017
sister Christina went with their mother to live
in South Africa. By her late teens, however,
she was back in the UK, working as a model
and secretary in London. Christina married the
dashing, womanising wallpaper heir Bill Shand
Kydd ? and introduced Veronica to John
Bingham, the future 7th Earl of Lucan. Tall
and rakish, he?d served in the Coldstream
Guards, and was now a professional gambler,
playing games of skill. He acquired the name
?Lucky? Lucan in 1964, when he won �,000
at baccarat. The nickname stuck, said The New
York Times, but his luck didn?t.
Though Lucan was well known as a member
of a louche circle that gambled at the Clermont
Club in Mayfair, Lady Lucan would recall that
when they married in 1963, their wedding was
not well attended ?because neither of us was
very popular?. They cut their honeymoon
Lord and Lady Lucan: bitter separation short because they ran out of things to talk
From then on, Lord Lucan was ?spotted? all
about. Back in London, he went on gambling
over the world. In December 1974, police in Australia arrested
while she shopped. Money started to run out; she suffered from
an Englishman they presumed to be Lucan, only to find that he
postnatal depression following the birth of their children. Later,
was John Stonehouse ? the ex MP who?d faked his own death a
she claimed he was a sadist who beat her before having sex with
few weeks earlier. In 2003, a Sunday paper published sensational
her. Yet even in old age, she kept mementoes and pictures of him
evidence that Lucan had died in Goa in 1996. That lead went
on display. After nine years of marriage they separated, and he
dry when readers identified the bearded man in the picture as
moved into a mews house around the corner. A bitter custody
?Jungle Barry?, a folk singer from Lancashire. There were
battle followed; Lucan lost, and was distraught. In November
rumours that Lucan?s children had been taken to see him in South
1974, he apparently delivered a kitten to his children ? only for
Africa. Others insisted he was long dead: some speculated that his
it to be posted back through his door a few hours later, its throat
aristocratic friends had left him in a room with a gun, then fed his
cut. Friends say that at that point, he became frantically
body to the tigers at John Aspinall?s zoo. (Aspinall pooh-poohed
concerned that his wife was not fit to look after the children.
that idea, saying his tigers were used to the choicest cuts: they?d
not have eaten ?stringy old Lucky?.) Lady Lucan never wavered
Six years after Sandra Rivett?s murder, Lady Lucan suffered
from her view that he?d jumped off a cross-Channel ferry.
a serious breakdown, and the children went to live with the
?He was not the sort of Englishman to cope abroad,? she said.
Shand Kydds. She never saw them again ? although her children
tried to make contact with her. Earlier this year, she said: ?Time
Veronica May Duncan was born in Bournemouth in 1937. Two
has passed and my life has carried on in a quiet, untroubled
years later, her father ? an army major ? died, and she and her
manner. I cannot see any advantage in seeing them.?
Hang ?em, flog ?em Tory who loved Bob Marley
Teddy Taylor, who has died
died, went to work in a textile factory. Though
Teddy Taylor aged 80, was an old school
the family was working class, they were better off
1937-2017 Tory, best known for his
than some: Taylor said it was passing by the
extreme Euroscepticism. One
notorious Gorbals tenements on his way to his
interviewer observed that asking him his views
grammar school, High School of Glasgow, that
on the EU was ?like putting a coin in a coffee
got him thinking about politics. At Glasgow
vending machine and getting gallons of hot
University, where his contemporaries included
water all over your shoes?. Of himself, he
John Smith and Donald Dewar, he joined the
confessed: ?I am the biggest Euro-bore ever.?
Conservative Association. He stood as an MP for
But as MP for a working class district of
the first time aged just 22, and won Glasgow
Glasgow, and later Southend, he took a stand on
Cathcart in the 1964 election. At 27, he was the
a number of issues ? usually on the losing side.
Baby of the House, but that didn?t deter him from
He was pro-capital punishment and the birch; he
making his immoderate views known.
was anti-Sunday trading, and anti-abortion. He
called for all the bars in the Commons to be
Taylor?s career was marked by his passionate
closed and planned a Tory Teetotal Club, but
Euroscepticism. He resigned as a minister in the
couldn?t find a single MP willing to join. It was
Scottish Office in 1971, over Edward Heath?s
Taylor: immoderate views
said that no cause was truly lost until Taylor
decision to join the Common Market. He shared
backed it. Yet his views were not entirely predictable, said The
many values with Margaret Thatcher, and as her shadow
Daily Telegraph. He was deeply opposed to fox hunting, and
Scottish minister, did much to win her Scottish votes in the
was outspoken in his disgust for ?foul? racist attitudes. Voters
1979 election ? but, unsurprisingly, her whips did not trust him
were also surprised when he revealed his love of reggae: he was
to be reliable, said The Times, and he was not given a
a huge fan of Bob Marley.
ministerial post. On the backbenches, he rebelled consistently
on EU issues, and was one of the ?bastards? who defied John
Born into a Presbyterian family in Glasgow in 1937, he was the
Major over the Maastricht Treaty. He retired in 2005, but
son of Edward, a clerk, and Minnie, who, when her husband
followed the EU referendum with considerable interest.
14 October 2017 THE WEEK
CITY
Companies in the news
...and how they were assessed
CITY 49
Amazon: Brussels cracks whip
The French president, Emmanuel Macron, ?could not hide his jubilation? last week
when the European Commission slapped a s250m tax bill on Amazon, said Simon Duke
in The Sunday Times. ?Bravo to Europe,? he tweeted. And, in fact, ?this is one issue
over which it is hard not to be on the side of Brussels?, said Alex Brummer in the Daily
Mail. Thanks to an illegal ?sweetheart? deal with Luxembourg in the early 2000s, most
of Amazon?s European profits went untaxed. The s250m being clawed back by the
Commission?s competition tsar, Margrethe Vestager, is less than the s13bn she is seeking
from Apple for a comparable offence in Ireland, but is nonetheless significant. Vestager?s
ruling will ?add to the discomfort? of the Commission?s president, Jean-Claude Juncker,
who was PM of Luxembourg when ?the tax arrangement was hammered out?, said The
Economist. ?It could also stoke transatlantic tensions.? Many US politicians see Brussels?
tax probes as being ?driven by tech envy?. But though international corporate tax rules
certainly need reforming (Macron proposes taxing multinationals on their revenues,
rather than profits, in particular territories), punishing a firm for a 14-year-old ruling,
happily accepted at the time, ?looks harsh?. Don?t expect Vestager, who is currently
getting stuck into the tax affairs of McDonald?s and Fiat Chrysler, to worry too much.
Ryanair/Monarch: continuing turbulence
Now that Ryanair chief Michael O?Leary has apologised to his pilots, and plied them
with better terms and conditions, the airline will be hoping to head off further trouble,
said Michael Bow in the London Evening Standard. The City seems sanguine about the
debacle, which saw Ryanair cancel more than 20,000 flights ?due to a cock-up in
organising its pilots? holiday plans?. Shares have tumbled, but several of the airline?s
biggest investors have declared their ?rock solid? support. Ryanair?s travails certainly
look trivial compared with those of its defunct rival Monarch, said John Collingridge in
The Sunday Times. Creditors ? customers, suppliers, credit card companies ? and the
British taxpayer now ?face bills totalling hundreds of millions of pounds?. But the
airline?s owner, the ?secretive? private equity firm, Greybull, is likely to walk away with
losses that are a fraction of the �0m hit reported ? not least because, as a secured
creditor, it is ?the first in line to get paid?. Having already presided over a string of other
failures, Greybull, which last year bought Tata Steel?s vast Scunthorpe steelworks for �
now faces renewed questions about its opaque style of investment.
Unilever: soap duds
Unilever?s soap brand, Dove, has in the past enjoyed plaudits for its ?real women?
campaign, ?using females of all shapes and sizes for ads?, said Scheherazade Daneshkhu
in the FT. But the Anglo-Dutch group has been forced to pull a new campaign, following
?an outcry over alleged racism?. Aimed at Facebook users, it ?showed a black woman
removing a brown T-shirt and revealing a white woman in a white T-shirt underneath.
She then takes off her shirt to reveal an Asian woman.? Critics complain that it seems to
show ?a black woman turning white after using the soap?; Unilever has apologised. But
will its apology wash? This, after all, is the second time the company has been accused of
racism: it ran a very similar campaign, which also caused great offence, in 2011.
Seven days in the
Square Mile
The outlook for the British economy was
clouded by a slew of poor data. In a big
blow for Chancellor Philip Hammond,
the Office for Budget Responsibility
reported that UK productivity growth in
the first two quarters was much worse
than expected, forcing a likely
downgrade in growth projections and
taking a hammer to Hammond?s �bn
Budget war chest. Meanwhile, separate
official figures showed that Britain?s
trade gap hit a record �bn in August,
because of falling exports to non-EU
countries. Manufacturing and services
surveys also indicate slowing activity,
and sales of new cars fell in September
for the first time since 2011.
Stock markets shrugged off turmoil in
Spain to continue their generally upward
ascent. The bull run on Japan?s stock
market passed a milestone, with the
Nikkei 225 closing at its highest level in
21 years. The schisms exposed at the
Tory party conference triggered fresh
spasms in currency markets: the pound
fell to $1.30, its lowest level in a month,
before bouncing back.
Agriculture and Horticulture
Development Board research suggested
farm profits could halve in ?a worst case
scenario? post-Brexit. The Government
is facing scrutiny from European
regulators over claims it provided
illegal state aid to BT. Former PM
David Cameron took a role with the US
electronic payments firm First Data ? his
first significant job since leaving No. 10.
BAE Systems: from defence heavyweight to ?junior partner??
Britain?s largest defence supplier is axing
around 2,000 jobs amid ?a slowdown in
orders for its flagship Typhoon fighter jet?,
said Tom Rees in The Daily Telegraph.
Unions reacted with horror, but
shareholders were unmoved by the news.
The job losses ? double the expected
number, with the bulk coming from BAE?s
Warton plant in Preston, Lancashire ? are
aimed at giving the FTSE 100 company ?a
sharper competitive edge?, according to its
new boss, Charles Woodburn. The
restructuring won?t affect BAE?s secondbiggest operating country, the US.
Typhoon?s ?relative maturity?, but the
Unite union, which is threatening strike
action, warned that Britain?s capability to
make its own fighter jets could be ?lost
for a generation?. BAE is also working on
Lockheed Martin?s F-35 jet ? but only as
a ?junior partner?.
The threat of mass redundancies at
a flagship manufacturer like BAE is ?a
significant blow? to the Government?s new
industrial strategy, said Peggy Hollinger in
the FT. It doesn?t say much either for the
Typhoon: sales are losing altitude
Department for International Trade?s efforts
to drum up export orders for the Typhoon, said The Guardian ?
The latest setback to the Eurofighter Typhoon came in August,
despite its ?shamelessly cosy? relationship with BAE and other
when a big ?follow-up order from Saudi Arabia? failed to
big defence outfits. Recently obtained figures show that 15 of the
materialise, said Marcus Leroux in The Times. Yet the fighter has
30 business executives seconded to work at the DIT since its
been steadily losing altitude to rivals built by France?s Dassault
founding last year have links to the defence industry. When it
Aviation and America?s Lockheed Martin. The job cuts reflect the
comes to British jobs, they don?t seem to be pulling their weight.
14 October 2017 THE WEEK
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Talking points
CITY 51
Issue of the week: Brexit transition angst
Prepare for regulatory and customs chaos unless an interim deal is found fast
?Clarity is more important than
jobs?. The Chancellor, Philip Hammond,
perfection to businesses. They just want
?gets it?. He has described the putative
to know.? It wasn?t difficult to detect
transition period as ?a wasting asset? ?
the note of frustration in the voice of
the longer it takes to nail down, the less
one business chief who attended a tea
valuable it becomes. In the meantime,
party in Downing Street this week to
Deutsche B鰎se has made another
discuss Britain?s departure from the EU,
attempt ?to lure part of the euro clearing
said the FT. As he observed, the lack of
market to Frankfurt?, said Nils Pratley
information over a post-Brexit settlement
in The Guardian. Amid the impasse over
is ?the most worrying element for
the transition, ?Frankfurt sees an
companies trying to plan now for 18
opportunity to grab a slice of a lucrative
months down the line?. And a Tory
market?. Most City-based banks ?don?t
civil war has hardly made things easier.
want to trigger their contingency plans?,
Companies are convinced that a
but they?re obliged to plan for the
transition period after March 2019
possibility that the EU may issue new
is ?absolutely essential?. Yet the PM
rules forcing some financial activities to
seems to be stepping up preparations
relocate. ?The longer this goes on, the
The City: ?things are starting to get pressing?
for the possibility that Britain will exit
greater the risk to City jobs.?
the EU abruptly ?without a trade deal?, amid regulatory chaos.
Her customs white paper outlines ?a contingency plan? in which
?The British people didn?t vote for a revolution,? said Simon
traders would need to present goods for inspection ?as far inland
Nixon in The Wall Street Journal: they simply voted to leave the
as possible?, to avoid clogging ports. It also floats the idea of
European Union. ?Yet ultimately the odds are stacked against
companies ?self-assessing? imports.
those who want to preserve as much as possible of the current
order.? And now the clock is ticking. ?Sooner or later, hard
?The point is not simply that a deal needs to be done,? but that
decisions must be taken ? and if the political system proves unable
?it needs to be done soon?, said Patrick Hosking in The Times.
to take them, the UK will slide towards a chaotic EU exit, in
The City, in particular, urgently wants an agreed transitional deal
which regulatory and tariff barriers to trade go up.? Make no
? and ?things are starting to get pressing?. There is now a very
mistake, Brexit poses the risk of ?an abrupt end to the old
tight time frame ?to agree a deal to avoid an exodus of talent and
economic order?.
Catalonia and markets: what the experts think
Moneyweek.com. Still,
? Catalan cliff-edge
there are huge
News that Catalonia?s
?practical problems?:
president, Carles
the question of how you
Puigdemont, has put
split debts, for a start.
the region?s
Last week?s ?drama?
independence
showed ?just how hard
declaration on hold
it is for a separatist
came as a welcome
region to safeguard its
relief to markets.
financial system when
As the exodus of
debts in hard currency ?
companies from
in this case euros ? are
From street rally to relief rally
Catalonia gathered
beyond its control? and
pace last week,
there is no ?lender-of-last-resort?, said
investors were bracing themselves for
Ambrose Evans-Pritchard in The Daily
more ?turmoil?, said The Sunday Times.
Telegraph. No wonder companies
?Trading in Spanish government bonds
announcing relocations saw ?an instant
surged to double its normal volume?, as
surge? in their share price.
ratings agencies warned that escalation
of the crisis would hit Spain?s credit rating.
Meanwhile, ?amid mounting corporate
? What next?
panic?, the Spanish government passed
The relief rally greeting Puigdemont?s
an emergency decree ?allowing companies
climbdown saw Spain?s battered Ibex 35
to move their HQ without an emergency
index gain 1.5%, with banks leading the
vote?. The big concern of Catalan-based
advance, said the FT. ?Nonetheless, there
banks like CaixaBank and Sabadell, which
is a cautious feel to trade? in Europe.
owns Britain?s TSB, was that Spanish
?The stand-off between Madrid and the
customers would pull their deposits. ?The
separatists serves as a reminder of the risks
cost of insuring CaixaBank against default
faced by the market, after a bull run has
over a five-year period jumped by nearly
left valuations looking high.? Until now,
28% over the past three weeks.?
?the chaos in Catalonia had been largely
dismissed by global investors as a regional
? Debt questions
issue?, said Nigel Green of the deVere
?An independent Catalonia? might not be
Group. But with the prospect of
?on the cards right now?, but there?s no
independence really in play, a ?heightened
question that it ?would be a viable
game of cat and mouse between Barcelona
standalone entity?, said John Stepek on
and Madrid has been started?.
The best tech funds
?Exciting new technologies are
booming,? and with them the prospect
of making ?big returns?, says Sam
Meadows in The Daily Telegraph. But
investors who suffered heavy losses in
the tech boom of the late 1990s are
wary of having their fingers burnt
again. A good fund might be the
answer. Here?s a selection:
Broad tech exposure John Husselbee
of Liontrust thinks the safest way to
approach tech investing is to look for
established funds that offer ?a blend of
established companies? and ?exposure
to new technologies?. He picks
Henderson Global Technology, Polar
Capital Global Technology and Axa
Framlington Global Technology.
Robotics Both Husselbee and Brian
Dennehy of Fund Expert rate the �5bn
Pictet Robotics fund, which invests in
giants like Siemens and Alphabet in
addition to niche Japanese companies.
For ?robotics groupies? in search of
?purer exposure?, Dennehy suggests
the passive fund ETF Global Robotics.
Driverless cars/automation Most broad
tech funds already provide exposure to
driverless cars via major players like
Google, Uber and Apple. But investors
with a higher risk appetite might
consider smaller companies developing
components and software. HyunHo
Sohn of Fidelity Global Technology
tips the German-listed Infineon
Technologies and the US outfit Delphi.
14 October 2017 THE WEEK
52 CITY
Despite Trump,
Trumponomics
is working
Matthew Lynn
The Daily Telegraph
The Kremlin?s
weaponisation
of Facebook
Hannah Kuchler and
Barney Jopson
Financial Times
The IoD?s
strange take
on governance
Nils Pratley
The Guardian
Reinventing
the job
interview
Sathnam Sanghera
The Times
THE WEEK 14 October 2017
Commentators
As he approaches the first anniversary of his election victory,
Donald Trump is shaping up to be one of the most ?oafish? US
presidents yet, says Matthew Lynn. ?But just because he runs a
deranged White House,? it doesn?t mean his economic policies
aren?t working. On the contrary, ?Trumponomics? seems to be
thriving, and ?the results are starting to be seen in faster growth?.
Success is down to two key policies. A bonfire of federal
regulations is already under way. And Trump has come up with a
?bold and pro-business? plan to reform the tax system, which will
slash the headline rate of US corporation tax to 15% (one of the
lowest in the world) while giving US companies ?less incentive to
stack up cash offshore?. Even if it is watered down by Congress,
the plan is radical enough ?to make a big difference?. Trump is
not wholly responsible for America?s improving outlook: ?he took
over an economy in respectable shape?. But these policies could
have a major impact. ?There are still lots of things that may bring
Trump down. But the economy won?t be one of them.?
Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg initially said it was a ?pretty
crazy idea? that Facebook could have influenced the US election,
say Hannah Kuchler and Barney Jopson. But the recent revelation
that the Kremlin purchased 3,000 political ads from the social
media group, without its knowledge, threatens to shake the
business to its core. ?Russia?s weaponisation of Facebook? has
raised questions about whether the company ?is spinning out of
control?. As things stand, ?anyone with a credit card? can buy
ads without contacting a Facebook employee, and complex
algorithms mean that ?no single user has a full view of all the
campaigns?. Facebook has listed nine ?immediate? actions it will
take to fight further attempts to influence elections, but the
political pressure it now faces in Washington could be just the
start of a ?backlash against Big Tech on everything from anti-trust
to privacy?. Facebook has deep enough pockets to make changes.
Culturally, though, it could be an uphill struggle. As one critic
notes: Facebook managers are engineers, with less training than
school librarians when it comes to managing dubious content.
The Institute of Directors (IoD) has published a Good Governance
Report ranking Britain?s largest companies on 47 different
?indicators? weighted according to significance. ?It all sounds
terrible objective and mathematical,? says Nils Pratley ? until you
break down the scores ?and realise nobody applied a filter for
common sense?. Glaxo, for instance, is ranked way below RollsRoyce and BT ?for audit risk and external accountability? three
years after its Chinese bribery scandal, yet Rolls has just paid
�1m to settle SFO corruption allegations and BT has confessed
to a �0m black hole in its Italian accounts. Tobacco group
Imperial Brands has ?a perfect score? for ?shareholder relations?
despite a revolt over the boss?s payrise; the stricken doorstep
lender, Provident Financial, rates highly for ?remuneration and
reward?. Barclays has shot to fourth place overall, although its
CEO is under investigation for attempting to unmask a whistleblower. The IoD should be praised for trying to tackle lax
standards. But does anyone there actually follow the news?
?Once every couple of months, someone somewhere announces
that they have reinvented the job interview,? says Sathnam
Sanghera. Over the years, we?ve had an American boss who
reckoned he could pick winners by checking their interactions
with waiters, and ?an Estonian biologist who claimed you could
assess the suitability of job candidates by measuring their facial
characteristics?. The latest bright spark, leadership coach
Lawrence M. Miller, says he finds the best employees by ?turning
the interview process upside down? and asking candidates to
interview each other. I had my own brainwave: why not allow
co-workers, not managers, to interrogate potential colleagues?
On consideration, though, I wasn?t so sure. There are clearly all
sorts of problems with the traditional job interview, ?but the
alternatives are often worse?. There?s a reason why the system has
survived so long: it involves applicants ?putting reasonable effort
into thinking up answers to predictable questions? while ?feigning
enthusiasm?. And after all, ?advance research and faking interest?
are ?the two most important skills in business?.
City profiles
Richard Thaler
Early in his career, the
economist Richard Thaler
made a list of ?Dumb Stuff
People Do? on his office
blackboard, said Tim
Harford in the FT. A
favourite example was the
way guests at his dinner
parties invariably ?hoovered
up? cashew nuts over
drinks. In principle, they
could have chosen to stop.
Most didn?t. And yet they
were mostly ?pleased to
see the temptation
removed?. Thaler, who has
just won the Nobel Prize in
Economics, wasn?t the first
to apply seemingly trivial
psychological insights to
argue that humans rarely
behave as rationally as
traditional economic models
assumed. But his book
Nudge (co-authored with
Cass Sunstein), and his work
in government policy units,
put bones on his theories.
Thaler?s win is ?a triumph for
common sense economics?.
A genial, witty academic,
who made a cameo
appearance in the 2015 film
The Big Short, Thaler has
spent his career exploring
how to incentivise people
out of shooting themselves
in the foot, financially or
otherwise, said The Daily
Telegraph. His work
inspired former PM David
Cameron to set up a ?Nudge
unit?, where the stakes were
much higher than cashew
nuts. The biggest success
was private sector pensions.
The simple expedient of
enrolling people on a
scheme by default, while
allowing them to opt out,
boosted take-up from 42% to
73% in four years. After the
$1m prize was announced,
Thaler, a professor at the
University of Chicago and
a keen golfer, said he would
try to spend the money ?as
irrationally as possible?.
Shares
CITY 55
Who?s tipping what
The week?s best buys
easyJet
The Mail on Sunday
easyJet is well placed to pro?t
from the turmoil in the budget
airline sector. Q3 revenue was
16% ahead and customer
numbers are increasing. The
acquisition of Air Berlin (if the
deal closes) could boost pro?ts
by 10%. Buy. �.53
Ferguson
The Times
Heating and plumbing
distributor Ferguson (formerly
Wolseley) is growing strongly
in the US, its biggest market.
Strong cash?ow, lower debt
and the sale of the Nordic ops
should allow the �0m share
buyback to continue. Buy.
�.60.
Hotel Chocolat Group
Investors Chronicle
This chocolatier and cocoa
grower is seeing rising margins
as digital improvements are
rolled out. Growing in the UK
and beyond, with a pipeline of
places, and deals with Amazon
and Ocado. Buy. 309p.
Moss Bros Group
Investors Chronicle
Moss Bros? formalwear hire
line might be tailing off, but
the menswear retail business is
performing well, boosted by
strong online growth. Pricey,
but good cash generation and
improved pro?tability support
the 6% yield. Buy. 100p.
Tesco
The Times
The retail giant has reached a
signi?cant point in its
turnaround. Costs have been
slashed, debt has more than
halved and management is
con?dent the 2.7% margin will
improve. Buy, but ?be ruthless
in taking pro?ts?. 188.5p.
Abcam
1,100
1,050
1,000
950
900
Founder sells
3.1m
850
May
June
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Abcam, which sells antibodies
to research institutions, has
been one of Aim?s ?biggest
successes?. Founder Jonathan
Milner has netted �.6m on
his annual sale ? about a 510%
return on his 2005 investment.
He still owns 10% of the ?rm.
?and some to hold, avoid or sell
Form guide
4d pharma
Investors Chronicle
This junior biotech is steadily
progressing with its IBS
(irritable bowel) treatment. But
it?s moving into a cash-greedy
trial phase for cancer and
asthma treatments and needs
?further signi?cant progress?
to raise capital. Sell. 365p.
Revolution Bars Group
The Daily Telegraph
In May shares in the bar chain
dropped on a pro?t warning,
but rose on an improved
outlook and takeover interest.
Now a major backer, Slater
Investments, has sold, citing
a 4% premium to a bid offer.
Follow suit. Sell. 211.5p.
Stanley Gibbons
Investors Chronicle
The troubled stamp and
coin specialist has suffered
a 48% fall in asset values,
a 28% decline in revenues
and widening losses. The
company is now in default
and dependent on its bank
maintaining support. Sell. 7.8p.
InterContinental Hotels
The Sunday Times
Shares in the hotel operator
leapt after the Brexit vote,
thanks to US revenues. But
bumper dividends have been
funded by property sales.
The group is now ?asset light?
with deteriorating revenues.
Sell. �.93.
Stagecoach Group
Investors Chronicle
The bus and rail operator
looks cheap, but London bus
revenues are expected to fall
rapidly following the loss of
TfL contracts, and growth in
regional buses is declining.
A spate of contract losses is
worrying. Sell. 167p.
WM Morrison
Sharecast
After two years of ?stellar
execution? since David Potts
became CEO, self-help and
catch-up opportunities are now
?more limited? for the grocer.
Berenberg fears a slow-down in
momentum could drive a
de-rating. Sell. 235.8p.
Shares tipped 12 weeks ago
Best tip
Dechra Pharmaceuticals
The Times
up 28.33% to �.61
Worst tip
Saga
Investors Chronicle
down 7.12% to 193.2p
Market view
?There are no obvious
triggers for historically
high global asset
valuations to correct.?
A Deutsche Bank report
suggests that the nearly
nine-year-long bull market
has further to run. Quoted in
The Daily Telegraph
Market summary
Key numbers
numbers for investors
Key
investors
FTSE 100
FTSE All-share UK
Dow Jones
NASDAQ
Nikkei 225
Hang Seng
Gold
Brent Crude Oil
DIVIDEND YIELD (FTSE 100)
UK 10-year gilts yield
US 10-year Treasuries
UK ECONOMIC DATA
Latest CPI (yoy)
Latest RPI (yoy)
Halifax house price (yoy)
�STERLING
10 Oct 2017
7538.27
4134.21
22794.73
6572.09
20823.51
28490.83
1291.40
56.89
3.84%
1.40
2.33
2.9% (Aug)
3.9% (Aug)
+4.0% (Sep)
$1.321 E1.115 �8.239
Best
shares
Best and
and worst performing shares
Week before
7468.11
4098.45
22634.97
6519.64
20614.07
28173.21
1271.25
55.88
3.87%
1.39
2.33
2.6% (Jul)
3.6% (Jul)
+2.6% (Aug)
Change (%)
0.94%
0.87%
0.71%
0.80%
1.02%
1.13%
1.59%
1.81%
WEEK?S CHANGE, FTSE 100 STOCKS
RISES
Price
% change
1880.00
+5.38
Admiral Group
680.00
+5.18
Mediclinic Internat.
468.20
+5.00
Merlin Entertainments
5025.00
+4.80
Carnival
667.50
+4.05
Barratt Developments
FALLS
Centrica
Next
EasyJet
Smurfit Kappa Gp.
Sainsbury (J)
176.10
5115.00
1253.00
2277.00
239.40
?7.75
?3.85
?3.39
?3.35
?3.27
BEST AND WORST UK STOCKS OVERALL
315.50
+425.83
Jersey Oil and Gas
44.00
?48.84
Applied Graphene Mat.
Source: Datastream (not adjusted for dividends). Prices on 10 Oct (pm)
Following the Footsie
7,600
7,500
7,400
7,300
7,200
7,100
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
6-month movement in the FTSE 100 index
14 October 2017 THE WEEK
SOURCE: INVESTORS CHRONICLE
De La Rue
The Times
De La Rue provides intellectual
property and sophisticated
security products for banknotes, including the forthcoming polymer � note. The
order book is strong, with
higher-margin activities. Yields
3.7%. Buy. 666.5p.
Directors? dealings
56
The last word
Life in space
Scott Kelly spent a year orbiting Earth, as commander of the International Space Station. Here he describes how it feels to cook
breakfast in zero gravity, survive a close encounter with space junk and get to know the world from every angle
A week into the mission,
bounces off the sandy
I?m getting better at
shallows and reefs.
knowing where I am
Sometimes when I?m
when I wake up. If I
looking out the window
have a headache, I know
it occurs to me that
it?s because I?ve drifted
everything that matters
too far from the vent
to me is down there.
blowing clean air at my
face. I?m often still
Out in Node 1, the
disoriented about how
module that serves largely
my body is positioned ?
as our kitchen and living
I?ll wake up convinced
room, I open a food
that I?m upside down,
container attached to the
because in the dark and
wall and ?sh out a pouch
without gravity, my inner
of dehydrated coffee with
ear just takes a random
cream and sugar. I ?oat
guess. When I turn on
over to the hot-water
a light, I have a sort of
dispenser in the ceiling
visual illusion that the
of the lab, which works
room is rotating rapidly
by inserting a needle into
as it reorients itself
a nozzle on the bag. When
around me, though
the bag is full, I replace the
The Bahamas, as seen from the Cupola module aboard the ISS
it?s actually my brain
needle with a drinking
readjusting. The space is barely big enough for me and my
straw equipped with a valve to pinch it closed. I ?ip through the
sleeping bag, two laptops, some clothes, toiletries, photos of my
breakfast options, choose some dehydrated eggs and reconstitute
partner, Amiko, and my daughters, a few books. I click through
them with the same hot water dispenser. I eat while catching up
new emails then ?sh around in my toiletries bag, attached to the
with the morning?s news on CNN. All the while I?m holding
wall down by my left knee, for my toothbrush. I brush, still in my
myself in place with my right big toe tucked ever so slightly under
sleeping bag, then swallow the toothpaste and chase it with a sip
a handrail on the ?oor. Handrails are placed on the walls, ?oors
of water out of a bag with a straw. There isn?t really a good way
and ceilings of every module and at the hatches where modules
to spit in space.
connect, allowing us to propel
ourselves around or stay in place
?It?s hard to explain how much we miss nature. rather than drifting away. The
Mission control schedules our
days into increments as short
We listen to recordings of rainforests, birds, ?table? we use for eating has
as ?ve minutes using a
Velcro strips and duct tape to
wind in the trees, even mosquitoes?
program called OSTPV
help us keep things in place, but
(Onboard Short- Term Plan
it?s still a challenge to manage all
Viewer), which rules our lives. Throughout the day, a dotted red
these potentially ?oating components. The biggest concern is food
line moves relentlessly across the OSTPV window on my laptop,
getting stuck on the hatch seal between modules, one of which is
pushing through the block of time estimated for each task. Nasa
right by the table where we eat. We need to be able to close and
people are optimists by nature, and unfortunately this optimism
seal that hatch quickly in an emergency.
can extend to the estimate of how long it will take me to perform
a certain task, such as repairing a piece of hardware or conducting Last night was movie night ? Gravity. We set up the big screen
an experiment. If I take longer than scheduled, the extra time has
in Node 1 facing the lab and gathered to watch it ? all of us but
to come out of something else ? a meal, my exercise time, the brief Samantha [Cristoforetti, the ?rst Italian woman in space], who
time I get to myself at the end of the day (which OSTPV labels
was ?nishing her workout. I?ve noticed a strange phenomenon
?pre-sleep?), or ? worst of all ? sleep.
when people watch movies in space: we instinctually move to
a position that looks like lying down ? the association between
It?s hard to explain to people how much we start to miss nature.
lying down and relaxing is so strong. The ?lm was great ? we
We all like to listen to recordings of nature ? rainforests,
were impressed by how real the International Space Station (ISS)
birdcalls, wind in the trees. Misha [one of the Russian
looked. It was a bit like watching a ?lm of your own house
cosmonauts] even has a recording of mosquitoes, which I think
burning while you?re inside it. When Sandra Bullock got out of
goes a bit too far. As sterile and lifeless as everything is up here,
her spacesuit and ?oated in her underwear, Samantha happened
we do have windows that give us a fantastic view of Earth. I feel
to come ?oating by the screen in her workout clothes ? I regret
as though I know the Earth in an intimate way most people
failing to get a picture of them together.
don?t ? the coastline, terrain, mountains and rivers. Some parts
of the world, especially in Asia, are so blanketed by air pollution
?Station, Houston on Space to Ground Two. We are privatising
that they appear sick, in need of treatment or at least a chance
the space-to-ground channel. The ?ight director needs to speak
to heal. Whenever new crewmates come up to the station for the
to you.? We are privatising. These are words that make any
?rst time, I make a point of taking them to the Cupola (a module
astronaut?s blood freeze. They mean something bad has
made entirely of windows looking down on Earth) to see the
happened. I grab the mic to talk to Houston. The last time I heard
Bahamas ? one of my favourite views of the Earth ? a large
?we are privatising? was when SpaceX blew up. ?This is a red
archipelago with a stunning contrast from light to dark colours.
late-notice conjunction,? says the capcom on duty, ?with a closest
The vibrant, deep blue of the ocean mixes with a much brighter
point of approach within a sphere of uncertainty.? ?Roger,? I say
turquoise, swirled with something almost like gold, where the Sun into the microphone. Then I make sure the microphone is off
THE WEEK 14 October 2017
The last word
57
before I say what I really think, which
is: ?F***.? A ?conjunction? is a
collision ? a piece of space junk is
headed our way, in this case an old
Russian satellite. ?Late notice? means
we didn?t see it coming or that we
miscalculated its trajectory, and ?red?
means it?s going to get dangerously
close. The ?sphere of uncertainty?
refers to the area it could pass through,
a sphere with a radius of one mile.
Because the impact could depressurise
the station, letting our air out and
killing us all, we will have to head to
the Soyuz and use it as a possible
lifeboat. If the debris streaking toward
us collides with us, we will likely all be
dead in two hours.
reply: ?I don?t freak out about
anything, Mr President, except getting
a Twitter question from you.?
Not long after, a reply appears from
Buzz Aldrin: ?He?s 249 miles above
the Earth. Piece of cake. Neil, Mike
& I went 239,000 miles to the Moon.
#Apollo11.? There is no good way
to engage in a Twitter debate with an
American hero, so I don?t. In my mind,
I re?ect on the fact that the crew of
Apollo 11 spent eight days in space,
travelling half a million miles; by the
time I?m done, I will have spent a total
of 520 days in space and travelled over
200 million miles, the equivalent of
going to Mars and back. Only later,
Scott Kelly ?juggling? in zero gravity
when the Twitter chat is over, do I
re?ect that I just experienced being trolled, in space, by the second
?How about relative velocity?? I ask. ?Closing velocity of 14
man on the Moon, while also engaging in a Twitter conversation
kilometres per second,? comes the answer. ?Copy,? I say into
with the president.
my headset. (?F***,? I say, again, to myself.) This is the worst
possible answer. If the satellite were in an orbit similar to ours,
On 28 October, after days of preparation, it?s time for the ?rst
the closing speed might be as low as a few hundred mph ?
of three spacewalks I?ll do on this mission. I tug and push and
a devastating speed for a car crash, but a best-case scenario
pull for a few minutes, and ?nally the hatch cracks open. Inside
for a space crash. Instead, the space station is travelling in one
my spacesuit, I feel as though I?m in a tiny spacecraft. Through
direction at 17,500mph, and the space junk is travelling at the
the earpiece, I can hear the voices of Tracy in Houston and Kjell
same speed in the exact opposite direction; a 35,000mph closing
just a few feet away from me out here in outer space ? that, and
rate ? 20 times faster than a bullet from a gun. If the satellite hits,
the strangely ampli?ed sound of my own breathing. The surface
the resulting destruction would be much worse than in Gravity.
of the planet is 250 miles below and whizzing by at 17,500mph.
I grab both the handrails on either side of my head, getting ready
Mission control directs me to close and check all the hatches on
to pull myself out. The airlock?s hatch faces the Earth, which
the US segment of the ISS. Luckily, there are no serious issues ?
would seem to be the direction we would call ?down?. Once
I don?t have the time to ?x any problems. I collect the items from
I?m about halfway through the hatch, I have a transition in
the US segment that we will need most if a collision destroys that
perspective. Suddenly I have the sensation of climbing up, as if
part of the station: the de?brillator, the life-support medical kit,
out of the sunroof of a car. The large blue dome of Earth hovers
my iPad with important procedures on it. Then I go to the
over my head like some nearby alien planet in a sci-? ?lm,
Russian segment, where I see that the cosmonauts have not
looking as if it could come crashing down upon us. For a
bothered with closing their
moment, I?m disoriented.
hatches. They think closing the
?An old satellite is headed our way, at a
hatches is a waste of time, and
I focus on what is immediately
they have a point. The two
closing rate of 35,000mph ? 20 times faster in front of me ? my gloves,
most likely scenarios are that
the handrail ? and ignore the
than a bullet from a gun?
the satellite will miss us, in
looming Earth above. I secure
which case closing the hatches
my safety tether to one of the
will have been pointless, or it will hit us, in which case the
rings just outside the airlock, checking to make sure the hook
station will be vaporised in an instant whether the hatches are
is closed and locked with complete certainty. During my last
open or closed. It is incredibly unlikely that one module could
long-duration mission on ISS, one of the Russian cosmonauts,
be hit and the others survive, but just in case, mission control has
Oleg Skripochka, became untethered from the station and
me spend more than two hours preparing for that eventuality; the
started to ?oat away. The only thing that saved him was hitting
Russian approach is to spend what might be their last 20 minutes
an antenna, sending him tumbling back towards the station,
having lunch.
close enough to grab onto a handrail. I?ve often pondered what
we would have done if we?d known he was drifting irretrievably
Ten minutes before potential impact we make our way to the
away from the station. It probably would have been possible to
Soyuz, which [Russian cosmonaut ] Gennady has prepared for
tie his family into the comm system in his spacesuit so they could
?ight. ?You know,? Gennady says, ?it will really suck if we get
say goodbye before the rising CO2 or oxygen deprivation caused
hit by this satellite.? ?Da,? Misha agrees. ?Will suck.? Only four
him to lose consciousness.
other times in 15 years have crews had to shelter as we are now.
Misha stares out the window. I remind him that he won?t be able
Packing up to leave space is strange. A lot of stuff goes in the
to see the satellite coming towards us ? it will be going way too
trash, which means stowing it in the Cygnus that will burn up
fast for the human eye to perceive. The clock counts down. Once
in the atmosphere. At the weekend, I ?nd time to take pictures
the time gets down to seconds, I feel myself tensing, starting to
of some stuff people have asked me to bring ? T-shirts, hats,
grimace. We wait. Then? nothing. Thirty seconds go by. We
photographs, artwork, jewellery. I gather it all up and take it to
look at one another with a last heartbeat of anticipation. Then
the Cupola, to photograph each object against the backdrop of
our grimaces slowly turn into expressions of relief. ?Moscow,
Earth. As I open the shutters, I glimpse tawny sand, and instantly
are we still waiting?? Gennady asks. ?The moment has passed,?
know from the colour and texture exactly where we are above the
Moscow responds. ?You can go back to work now.?
planet: the Somali plains just north of Mogadishu. In one way it?s
satisfying to know the planet with such intimacy. In another way,
Today I am doing a Twitter chat, answering questions about
it makes me feel as if I?ve de?nitely been up here too long.
food, exercise and the view of Earth, when I receive a tweet from
a user with the handle @POTUS, President Obama. He writes:
A longer version of this extract ?rst appeared in The Sunday
?Hey @StationCDRKelly, loving the photos. Do you ever look
Times. Taken from Endurance: A Year in Space, a Lifetime of
out the window and just freak out?? I think for a moment, then
Discovery by Scott Kelly, published by Doubleday at �.
14 October 2017 THE WEEK
Crossword
59
THE WEEK CROSSWORD 1077
This w
week?s crossword winner will receive
an Ettinger
Ett
(www.ettinger.co.uk) Brogue
Collection 4-hook key case, which retails
Collec
at �5,
� and two Connell Guides (www.
connellguides.com).
connel
An Ettinger Brogue Collection key case and two Connell Guides will be given to the
sender of the first correct solution to the crossword and the clue of the week opened on Monday
23 October. Send it to: The Week Crossword 1077, 2nd floor, 32 Queensway, London W2 3RX, or
email the answers to crossword@theweek.co.uk. Tim Moorey (www.timmoorey.info)
ACROSS
6 Novel joke named as a winner (9)
8 Aging Americans can?t do without
this nap perhaps (4)
10 Western part of hospital
disappeared (4)
11 Flogging meat associated with a
fraud (10)
12 Liberal chip supply in pub is the
vital ingredient (8)
14 Toy gun seen behind bandit?s
back (6)
15 Language one could shine in? (6)
16 Cleaner does it in prison (6)
18 Father interferes tons (6)
19 Cabaret star Gwyn seen in small
car (8)
21 Computer program coding as IT
ordered (10)
22 Murphy Ulster party?s backed (4)
23 President died in his sleep? (4)
24 Strengthen check on troops (9)
DOWN
1 Conceal man?s short camp
greeting (2-2-2)
2 Could be a Granny bond not
spoken of (4)
3 Meg Ryan?s moved into the
country (7)
4 Final record of meeting at the
eleventh hour (4-6)
5 English painter only working in
bright colours (8)
7 What?s front for drivers but back
for gondoliers? (4,8)
9 Innocent chap attacked for
removing vehicles (12)
13 Associates pass before many
miles (10)
15 Pressure on worker to become a
strong party supporter (8)
17 Clear your setter?s head over
heels in love (7)
20 Begin meal around one (6)
22 Learner interrupting broadcast
showing a lack of speed (4)
1
2
3
6
4
7
5
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Name
Address
Clue of the week: A red giant explodes, becoming a dark star, perhaps
(9, first letter T) The Guardian, Crucible
Solution to Crossword 1075
ACROSS: 1 Smasher 5 Aplomb 9 Nearly all 10 Motet 11 Wrest
12 Towcester 13 Cameraman 16 Torsi 17 Conga 19 Teetering 21 Uttermost
23 Enter 25 Serin 26 Geriatric 27 Assent 28 Mohawks
DOWN: 1 Sandwich course 2 Adage 3 Holster 4 Roast 5 Allowance
6 Lambert 7 Metatarsi 8 Starting prices 14 Men-at-arms 15 Methought
18 Arrange 20 Eye-wash 22 Thrum 24 Throw
Clue of the week: Move at speed with hint of madness? (8, first letter S)
Solution: STAMPEDE (anagram incl. m)
7
4
5
3
9
2
5
9
1
6
7
8
3
2
6
7
9
8
1
4
8
7
5
4
3
8
2
2
2
1
9
Sudoku 621 (easy)
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14 October 2017 THE WEEK
of sports car
brands ? Porsche, Maserati
and Aston Martin among
them ? have already got
in on the action, and Alfa
Romeo is now joining
the club. These cars sell
in ?huge volumes? ? and
the Italian firm expects
its offering, the Stelvio,
to account for nearly twothirds of its sales in the UK
next year.
Auto Express
Aesthetically, the Stelvio
has ?plenty to shout
about?: it?s ?one of
the prettiest SUVs? on
the market, outdoing
any of its German
rivals. The interior is
?similarly elegant?, with
an ?intuitive? dash and
?pleasing? materials ?
even if the infotainment
isn?t top notch. It?s not the
roomiest SUV, though:
the rear?s a little cramped,
and the 525-litre boot is
?merely average?.
The Daily Telegraph
On the road, the Stelvio?s
handling ?sets it apart?:
there?s the kind of firm
suspension more often
found in sports cars, as
well as ?exceptionally
quick? steering. Ride
quality is mostly good,
though the car suffers on
?ropier? roads, and the
brakes take a bit of getting
used to. If you?re looking
for a stylish car that offers
?real driving pleasure?,
the Stelvio will be ?very
difficult to beat?.
The best? tablets
Google Pixel C If you
pay an extra � for a
keyboard, the Pixel C turns
into a hybrid laptop/tablet
(or ?tabtop?). Either way,
it has impressive battery
life of ten hours and a
sharp 2K display (�4;
store.google.com).
Samsung Galaxy Tab
S3 Widely considered the
best Android tablet on the
market, the Galaxy Tab S3
is just 6mm thick. Yes,
it?s expensive, but it has
a stunning 9.7in screen
and comes with
Samsung?s excellent
S Pen stylus (�9;
www.samsung.com).
?
reMarkable The
reMarkable is ideal for
drawing: it has a ?digital
paper? screen, with a
rough texture that creates
friction when you apply the
stylus to it. It doubles as an
e-reader ? but it doesn?t have
a backlight (�9;
www.remarkable.com).
Tips? how to get
et the best
results from a builder
ild
? Insist on a fixed price, rather than one
based on how long the job takes. Ask for
a thorough breakdown of the quote by
room, labour and materials.
? Sign a contract with your builder. Use the
Joint Contracts Tribunal's homeowner or
minor works contracts, depending on the
size of the job; they're available, for �.40
and �.40, from www.jctltd.co.uk.
? Unless you have lots of time and
experience, hire a main building contractor
or project manager. Expect to pay between
10% and 15% of the total cost of the build.
? Set aside an extra 10%-20% of the
budget as a contingency fund. Extra charges
aren?t necessarily a rip-off ? they?re often
caused by problems that surface midway.
? When the work is done, withhold up to
5% of the fee. Don?t keep calling your
builder about every crack or faulty switch;
instead, wait a month, then get them back
to sort out all the snagging in one go. Only
pay up when everything is fixed.
SOURCE: THE SUNDAY TIMES
? iPad The best option in this
price range, the standard
iPad is now cheap for an
Apple product. It?s
powerful and has a bright
(if rather too reflective)
display; but if you?re
looking for something
more sophisticated,
consider the iPad
Pro (from �9;
www.apple.com).
And fo
for those who
h
have everything?
Paper airplanes are fun to make, but less
fun to throw. PowerUp has got round
that problem by creating a kit that comes
with a miniature motor, allowing you to
control the plane via an app. It?s available
for pre-order until next Wednesday.
�; www.poweruptoys.com
SOURCE: STUFF
Where to find? autumn
exhibitions in Europe
Joan Mir� A big hit in Porto, this exhibition
has now moved to Lisbon?s Pal醕io
Nacional da Ajuda. It covers works by the
Catalan painter from the 1920s to the 1980s.
Until 8 January (www.palacioajuda.gov.pt).
Chagall Basel?s Kunstmuseum is looking
at the Russian-French artist?s work in
his ?breakthrough years?, between
1911 and 1919, when he depicted life in
Paris and rural Russia. Until 21 January
(www.kunstmuseumbasel.ch).
The Cinquecento Palazzo Strozzi in
Florence is hosting a show dedicated to
the art produced in the city during the 16th
century. There are 70 works on display, by
artists including Michelangelo and Vasari.
Until 21 January (www.palazzostrozzi.org).
Dutch Masters Six Rembrandts are among
the Dutch masterpieces on display at
Amsterdam?s Hermitage. On loan from the
Hermitage in St Petersburg, many are in the
Netherlands for the first time in centuries.
Until 27 May (www.hermitage.nl).
SOURCE: THE GUARDIAN
14 October 2017 THE WEEK
SOURCES: STUFF/T3/THE DAILY TELEGRAPH
?
?
?
Amazon Fire The Fire isn?t
as good as pricier models:
its screen is poor and the
operating system limited
compared with Android or iOS.
But it?s still incredible value.
It?s solidly built and has
Amazon?s Alexa technology
(�; www.amazon.co.uk).
Travel
LEISURE 45
This week?s dream: a small-boat safari in the Norwegian Arctic
It is home to some of the world?s most
grow up to a metre long. Less welcome
remarkable creatures, and about as far
are the frequent appearances by other
?off the grid? as you can go. But though
boats and cruise ships: tourist numbers
the Arctic is an exceptionally tough
have nearly doubled in the past decade
environment, it is also fragile. Go soon
(with the Chinese leading the charge).
to see it before global warming changes
The ?enforced intimacy? with fellow
it irrevocably, says Emma Duncan in
passengers on a small vessel can also be
1843 magazine ? and eschew cruise
wearing. But the relaxing effect of being
ships in favour of smaller boats, which
?unplugged? from the modern world
let you get closer to the wildlife. The
compensates, as does the ?clear, silent
Freya, a recently-refurbished Swedish
brightness? of snow, blue sea and
class 1A ice-breaker, has comfortable
?striated? mountains.
beds, good food and guides who are
Each day, passengers don ?spacesuit?serious? academics. And on a tour
type? protective clothing and clamber
of Norway?s Svalbard archipelago there
into Zodiacs, rubber boats that act
is the chance to spot land mammals as
as safari ?jeeps?, for trips into fjords.
well as sea creatures, and flora too.
There, you can get ?thrillingly? close
Smaller boat tours take in the Svalbard archipelago
There?s no guarantee of seeing polar
to glaciers, icebergs, birds and animals,
bears, but chances are you will. Despite global warming and
including reindeer, arctic foxes and seals. You might even want to
receding ice, their numbers appear to be bouncing back after
join the latter in the icy water following a sauna ? generating an
centuries of hunting. The walrus population is also booming,
endorphin rush that will keep you on a high for hours. Natural
making for many sightings of these vast, Jabba the Hut-like
World Safaris (01273-691642, www.naturalworldsafaris.com)
creatures, with their knobbly skin and immense tusks, which can
has an eight-day trip from �795pp, excluding flights.
Getting the flavour of?
Hotel of the week
A Moroccan motorcycle tour
Hotel Awa, Chile
?The ultimate hybrid of cosy
and cool,? this new 16-bedroom
hotel is ?a game-changer? for
Chile?s spectacular (and
fashionable) Lake District, says
Cond� Nast Traveller. Set beside
Lake Llanquihue, it has an
asymmetrical steel-and-glass
facade, volcanic-rock interior
walls, open fires and ?roughhewn? Mapuche fabrics. In the
rooms, floor-to-ceiling windows
frame views of the snow-capped
Osorno volcano. For lunch, drive
to pretty Puerto Varas, nearby;
for dinner, stay put for roast
Patagonian lamb or great seafood.
The hotel can arrange hikes, bike
rides and kayaking trips, and
there?s a spa with a large pool.
Doubles from �0 (00 56 65 229
2020, www.hotelawa.cl).
For bikers who love the great outdoors,
a tour of Morocco?s Rif mountains with
Legendary Motorcycle Adventures is an
absolute joy, says Chris Caldicott in The
Daily Telegraph. This new British company
runs ?relaxed? group trips with a ?nonmacho? ethos and excellent kit (including
?retro-style? Royal Enfield bikes and
Outhaus tents). Heading east from Tangier
towards the Algerian border, you can ride for
days through a remote wilderness, stopping
from time to time in friendly settlements
that seem almost untouched by modernity
(including the beautiful ?blue town? of
Chefchaouen). Among the highlights of
the tour are wild camping under a dark sky
full of stars, swimming off deserted beaches,
washing in hammams and shopping in
ancient souks. This is a ?raw, simple,
authentic? way of travelling. A ten-day tour
costs �620pp, incl. fuel, kit, food and ferry
crossings (0771-113 3396, www.lma.life).
Following in Luther?s footsteps
This year marks the 500th anniversary of the
Protestant Reformation, sparked by Martin
Luther nailing his 95 theses to the door of
the castle church in Wittenberg. A 40-minute
train ride from Berlin, the city is well worth
a visit, says Andrew Eames in The Times.
Its ?pastel-painted? houses look ?like a film
set?, and among them is the Lutherhaus,
where the theologian lived most of his life
? now a museum stuffed with paintings by
his friend Lucas Cranach. Nearby is Erfurt,
where Luther studied, a beautiful town with
the longest inhabited bridge in Europe; and
Eisenach, which sits below the Wartburg,
a ?spectacular? Romanesque castle where,
in hiding, he translated the New Testament
into German. For more information, see
www.luther2017.de.
Tracking Ted Turner?s bison
Over-hunting in the 19th century reduced
the US?s bison population to 1,000.
Today, the animals are resurgent, thanks
in part to the efforts of billionaire media
mogul turned environmentalist Ted Turner.
You can see the bison, as well as other
species that once roamed the western plains,
at Ladder Ranch, one of three huge tracts of
land in New Mexico that he is ?rewilding?,
says Bella Pollen in the FT. Guests stay in
Turner?s own house (decorated in ?gently
kitsch? style by Jane Fonda, his former
wife), and, with experts guides, go on safari
?across hillsides dense with prickly pear,
across high mesas and flowing creeks?. The
sight of the bison is ?profoundly moving?:
it?s ?as if they?d always been there, as if
nothing had ever changed?. From $3,000
a night for two people, plus $800 each
for additional guests (00 1 877 288 7637,
www.tedturnerexpeditions.com).
Last-minute offers from top travel companies
Cheshire short break
A 2-night stay for two at the
superb Grade II De Vere
Cranage Estate, with dinner on
the first night, costs from
�1pp b&b. 01904-717362,
www.superbreak.com. Arrive
17 November.
Wondrous beach holiday
Spend 7 nights at the Acapulco
Beach and Spa Resort in
Cyprus on a half-board basis
from �0pp, London flights
included. 0800-170 0777,
www.cyprusparadise.com.
Depart 29 November.
5-star Marrakech retreat
Offering a wealth of activities,
the Eden Andalou Aquapark
& Spa has a 7-night stay, with
Manchester flights, from
�6pp all-incl. 020-3897
1179, www.loveholidays.com.
Depart 14 December.
6 nights in Hua Hin
The boutique Cape Nidhra
Hotel, set on Hua Hin Beach,
offers a 6-night stay from
�035pp b&b, including
Edinburgh flights. 020-3130
6976, www.bestattravel.co.uk.
Depart 1 December.
14 October 2017 THE WEEK
Obituaries
47
Lord Lucan?s troubled wife
Veronica, the Dowager
Countess of Lucan, was a key
player in one of the great
mysteries of the 20th century:
the fate of ?Lucky? Lord Lucan. On the night
of 7 November 1974, Lady Lucan ran into a
pub near her house in Belgravia, covered in
blood, screaming that her estranged husband
had attacked her and killed her nanny. Back at
the family home, 29-year-old Sandra Rivett was
found bludgeoned to death. Lucan was
presumed to have broken into the basement,
and to have mistaken Rivett, who?d gone down
to make a cup of tea, for his wife. Lady Lucan
claimed that she?d met him on the stairs ? and
that he?d have killed her too had she not
escaped. He drove to a friend?s house in Sussex;
he left the next morning ? and was not seen
again. The car was later found abandoned,
with a bandaged lead pipe in the boot.
Veronica
Duncan
1937?2017
sister Christina went with their mother to live
in South Africa. By her late teens, however,
she was back in the UK, working as a model
and secretary in London. Christina married the
dashing, womanising wallpaper heir Bill Shand
Kydd ? and introduced Veronica to John
Bingham, the future 7th Earl of Lucan. Tall
and rakish, he?d served in the Coldstream
Guards, and was now a professional gambler,
playing games of skill. He acquired the name
?Lucky? Lucan in 1964, when he won �,000
at baccarat. The nickname stuck, said The New
York Times, but his luck didn?t.
Though Lucan was well known as a member
of a louche circle that gambled at the Clermont
Club in Mayfair, Lady Lucan would recall that
when they married in 1963, their wedding was
not well attended ?because neither of us was
very popular?. They cut their honeymoon
Lord and Lady Lucan: bitter separation short because they ran out of things to talk
From then on, Lord Lucan was ?spotted? all
about. Back in London, he went on gambling
over the world. In December 1974, police in Australia arrested
while she shopped. Money started to run out; she suffered from
an Englishman they presumed to be Lucan, only to find that he
postnatal depression following the birth of their children. Later,
was John Stonehouse ? the ex MP who?d faked his own death a
she claimed he was a sadist who beat her before having sex with
few weeks earlier. In 2003, a Sunday paper published sensational
her. Yet even in old age, she kept mementoes and pictures of him
evidence that Lucan had died in Goa in 1996. That lead went
on display. After nine years of marriage they separated, and he
dry when readers identified the bearded man in the picture as
moved into a mews house around the corner. A bitter custody
?Jungle Barry?, a folk singer from Lancashire. There were
battle followed; Lucan lost, and was distraught. In November
rumours that Lucan?s children had been taken to see him in South
1974, he apparently delivered a kitten to his children ? only for
Africa. Others insisted he was long dead: some speculated that his
it to be posted back through his door a few hours later, its throat
aristocratic friends had left him in a room with a gun, then fed his
cut. Friends say that at that point, he became frantically
body to the tigers at John Aspinall?s zoo. (Aspinall pooh-poohed
concerned that his wife was not fit to look after the children.
that idea, saying his tigers were used to the choicest cuts: they?d
not have eaten ?stringy old Lucky?.) Lady Lucan never wavered
Six years after Sandra Rivett?s murder, Lady Lucan suffered
from her view that he?d jumped off a cross-Channel ferry.
a serious breakdown, and the children went to live with the
?He was not the sort of Englishman to cope abroad,? she said.
Shand Kydds. She never saw them again ? although her children
tried to make contact with her. Earlier this year, she said: ?Time
Veronica May Duncan was born in Bournemouth in 1937. Two
has passed and my life has carried on in a quiet, untroubled
years later, her father ? an army major ? died, and she and her
manner. I cannot see any advantage in seeing them.?
Hang ?em, flog ?em Tory who loved Bob Marley
Teddy Taylor, who has died
died, went to work in a textile factory. Though
Teddy Taylor aged 80, was an old school
the family was working class, they were better off
1937-2017 Tory, best known for his
than some: Taylor said it was passing by the
extreme Euroscepticism. One
notorious Gorbals tenements on his way to his
interviewer observed that asking him his views
grammar school, High School of Glasgow, that
on the EU was ?like putting a coin in a coffee
got him thinking about politics. At Glasgow
vending machine and getting gallons of hot
University, where his contemporaries included
water all over your shoes?. Of himself, he
John Smith and Donald Dewar, he joined the
confessed: ?I am the biggest Euro-bore ever.?
Conservative Association. He stood as an MP for
But as MP for a working class district of
the first time aged just 22, and won Glasgow
Glasgow, and later Southend, he took a stand on
Cathcart in the 1964 election. At 27, he was the
a number of issues ? usually on the losing side.
Baby of the House, but that didn?t deter him from
He was pro-capital punishment and the birch; he
making his immoderate views known.
was anti-Sunday trading, and anti-abortion. He
called for all the bars in the Commons to be
Taylor?s career was marked by his passionate
closed and planned a Tory Teetotal Club, but
Euroscepticism. He resigned as a minister in the
couldn?t find a single MP willing to join. It was
Scottish Office in 1971, over Edward Heath?s
Taylor: immoderate views
said that no cause was truly lost until Taylor
decision to join the Common Market. He shared
backed it. Yet his views were not entirely predictable, said The
many values with Margaret Thatcher, and as her shadow
Daily Telegraph. He was deeply opposed to fox hunting, and
Scottish minister, did much to win her Scottish votes in the
was outspoken in his disgust for ?foul? racist attitudes. Voters
1979 election ? but, unsurprisingly, her whips did not trust him
were also surprised when he revealed his love of reggae: he was
to be reliable, said The Times, and he was not given a
a huge fan of Bob Marley.
ministerial post. On the backbenches, he rebelled consistently
on EU issues, and was one of the ?bastards? who defied John
Born into a Presbyterian family in Glasgow in 1937, he was the
Major over the Maastricht Treaty. He retired in 2005, but
son of Edward, a clerk, and Minnie, who, when her husband
followed the EU referendum with considerable interest.
14 October 2017 THE WEEK
CITY
Companies in the news
...and how they were assessed
CITY 49
Amazon: Brussels cracks whip
The French president, Emmanuel Macron, ?could not hide his jubilation? last week
when the European Commission slapped a s250m tax bill on Amazon, said Simon Duke
in The Sunday Times. ?Bravo to Europe,? he tweeted. And, in fact, ?this is one issue
over which it is hard not to be on the side of Brussels?, said Alex Brummer in the Daily
Mail. Thanks to an illegal ?sweetheart? deal with Luxembourg in the early 2000s, most
of Amazon?s European profits went untaxed. The s250m being clawed back by the
Commission?s competition tsar, Margrethe Vestager, is less than the s13bn she is seeking
from Apple for a comparable offence in Ireland, but is nonetheless significant. Vestager?s
ruling will ?add to the discomfort? of the Commission?s president, Jean-Claude Juncker,
who was PM of Luxembourg when ?the tax arrangement was hammered out?, said The
Economist. ?It could also stoke transatlantic tensions.? Many US politicians see Brussels?
tax probes as being ?driven by tech envy?. But though international corporate tax rules
certainly need reforming (Macron proposes taxing multinationals on their revenues,
rather than profits, in particular territories), punishing a firm for a 14-year-old ruling,
happily accepted at the time, ?looks harsh?. Don?t expect Vestager, who is currently
getting stuck into the tax affairs of McDonald?s and Fiat Chrysler, to worry too much.
Ryanair/Monarch: continuing turbulence
Now that Ryanair chief Michael O?Leary has apologised to his pilots, and plied them
with better terms and conditions, the airline will be hoping to head off further trouble,
said Michael Bow in the London Evening Standard. The City seems sanguine about the
debacle, which saw Ryanair cancel more than 20,000 flights ?due to a cock-up in
organising its pilots? holiday plans?. Shares have tumbled, but several of the airline?s
biggest investors have declared their ?rock solid? support. Ryanair?s travails certainly
look trivial compared with those of its defunct rival Monarch, said John Collingridge in
The Sunday Times. Creditors ? customers, suppliers, credit card companies ? and the
British taxpayer now ?face bills totalling hundreds of millions of pounds?. But the
airline?s owner, the ?secretive? private equity firm, Greybull, is likely to walk away with
losses that are a fraction of the �0m hit reported ? not least because, as a secured
creditor, it is ?the first in line to get paid?. Having already presided over a string of other
failures, Greybull, which last year bought Tata Steel?s vast Scunthorpe steelworks for �
now faces renewed questions about its opaque style of investment.
Unilever: soap duds
Unilever?s soap brand, Dove, has in the past enjoyed plaudits for its ?real women?
campaign, ?using females of all shapes and sizes for ads?, said Scheherazade Daneshkhu
in the FT. But the Anglo-Dutch group has been forced to pull a new campaign, following
?an outcry over alleged racism?. Aimed at Facebook users, it ?showed a black woman
removing a brown T-shirt and revealing a white woman in a white T-shirt underneath.
She then takes off her shirt to reveal an Asian woman.? Critics complain that it seems to
show ?a black woman turning white after using the soap?; Unilever has apologised. But
will its apology wash? This, after all, is the second time the company has been accused of
racism: it ran a very similar campaign, which also caused great offence, in 2011.
Seven days in the
Square Mile
The outlook for the British economy was
clouded by a slew of poor data. In a big
blow for Chancellor Philip Hammond,
the Office for Budget Responsibility
reported that UK productivity growth in
the first two quarters was much worse
than expected, forcing a likely
downgrade in growth projections and
taking a hammer to Hammond?s �bn
Budget war chest. Meanwhile, separate
official figures showed that Britain?s
trade gap hit a record �bn in August,
because of falling exports to non-EU
countries. Manufacturing and services
surveys also indicate slowing activity,
and sales of new cars fell in September
for the first time since 2011.
Stock markets shrugged off turmoil in
Spain to continue their generally upward
ascent. The bull run on Japan?s stock
market passed a milestone, with the
Nikkei 225 closing at its highest level in
21 years. The schisms exposed at the
Tory party conference triggered fresh
spasms in currency markets: the pound
fell to $1.30, its lowest level in a month,
before bouncing back.
Agriculture and Horticulture
Development Board research suggested
farm profits could halve in ?a worst case
scenario? post-Brexit. The Government
is facing scrutiny from European
regulators over claims it provided
illegal state aid to BT. Former PM
David Cameron took a role with the US
electronic payments firm First Data ? his
first significant job since leaving No. 10.
BAE Systems: from defence heavyweight to ?junior partner??
Britain?s largest defence supplier is axing
around 2,000 jobs amid ?a slowdown in
orders for its flagship Typhoon fighter jet?,
said Tom Rees in The Daily Telegraph.
Unions reacted with horror, but
shareholders were unmoved by the news.
The job losses ? double the expected
number, with the bulk coming from BAE?s
Warton plant in Preston, Lancashire ? are
aimed at giving the FTSE 100 company ?a
sharper competitive edge?, according to its
new boss, Charles Woodburn. The
restructuring won?t affect BAE?s secondbiggest operating country, the US.
Typhoon?s ?relative maturity?, but the
Unite union, which is threatening strike
action, warned that Britain?s capability to
make its own fighter jets could be ?lost
for a generation?. BAE is also working on
Lockheed Martin?s F-35 jet ? but only as
a ?junior partner?.
The threat of mass redundancies at
a flagship manufacturer like BAE is ?a
significant blow? to the Government?s new
industrial strategy, said Peggy Hollinger in
the FT. It doesn?t say much either for the
Typhoon: sales are losing altitude
Department for International Trade?s efforts
to drum up export orders for the Typhoon, said The Guardian ?
The latest setback to the Eurofighter Typhoon came in August,
despite its ?shamelessly cosy? relationship with BAE and other
when a big ?follow-up order from Saudi Arabia? failed to
big defence outfits. Recently obtained figures show that 15 of the
materialise, said Marcus Leroux in The Times. Yet the fighter has
30 business executives seconded to work at the DIT since its
been steadily losing altitude to rivals built by France?s Dassault
founding last year have links to the defence industry. When it
Aviation and America?s Lockheed Martin. The job cuts reflect the
comes to British jobs, they don?t seem to be pulling their weight.
14 October 2017 THE WEEK
This is the definitive Norwegian
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Terms and conditions: From prices quoted are in GBP and are per person, based on full occupancy of an inside two-berth cabin. Single supplements apply. Cabins and excursions are subject to availability. Hurtigruten
operates a ?exible pricing system and prices are capacity controlled, correct at time of booking. Not included: travel insurance, luggage handling, optional excursions or optional gratuities. Flights booked with
Hurtigruten are ATOL protected (ATOL 3584), economy, and include all current taxes and charges. All itineraries are subject to change due to local conditions. See website for full itineraries. Full terms and conditions
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12 DAYS FULL BOARD
Manchester
14/10/2017; 29/01/2018; 10/02/2018;
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01/02/2018; 25/03/2018
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03/03/2018
Cardif
04/03/2018
Talking points
CITY 51
Issue of the week: Brexit transition angst
Prepare for regulatory and customs chaos unless an interim deal is found fast
?Clarity is more important than
jobs?. The Chancellor, Philip Hammond,
perfection to businesses. They just want
?gets it?. He has described the putative
to know.? It wasn?t difficult to detect
transition period as ?a wasting asset? ?
the note of frustration in the voice of
the longer it takes to nail down, the less
one business chief who attended a tea
valuable it becomes. In the meantime,
party in Downing Street this week to
Deutsche B鰎se has made another
discuss Britain?s departure from the EU,
attempt ?to lure part of the euro clearing
said the FT. As he observed, the lack of
market to Frankfurt?, said Nils Pratley
information over a post-Brexit settlement
in The Guardian. Amid the impasse over
is ?the most worrying element for
the transition, ?Frankfurt sees an
companies trying to plan now for 18
opportunity to grab a slice of a lucrative
months down the line?. And a Tory
market?. Most City-based banks ?don?t
civil war has hardly made things easier.
want to trigger their contingency plans?,
Companies are convinced that a
but they?re obliged to plan for the
transition period after March 2019
possibility that the EU may issue new
is ?absolutely essential?. Yet the PM
rules forcing some financial activities to
seems to be stepping up preparations
relocate. ?The longer this goes on, the
The City: ?things are starting to get pressing?
for the possibility that Britain will exit
greater the risk to City jobs.?
the EU abruptly ?without a trade deal?, amid regulatory chaos.
Her customs white paper outlines ?a contingency plan? in which
?The British people didn?t vote for a revolution,? said Simon
traders would need to present goods for inspection ?as far inland
Nixon in The Wall Street Journal: they simply voted to leave the
as possible?, to avoid clogging ports. It also floats the idea of
European Union. ?Yet ultimately the odds are stacked against
companies ?self-assessing? imports.
those who want to preserve as much as possible of the current
order.? And now the clock is ticking. ?Sooner or later, hard
?The point is not simply that a deal needs to be done,? but that
decisions must be taken ? and if the political system proves unable
?it needs to be done soon?, said Patrick Hosking in The Times.
to take them, the UK will slide towards a chaotic EU exit, in
The City, in particular, urgently wants an agreed transitional deal
which regulatory and tariff barriers to trade go up.? Make no
? and ?things are starting to get pressing?. There is now a very
mistake, Brexit poses the risk of ?an abrupt end to the old
tight time frame ?to agree a deal to avoid an exodus of talent and
economic order?.
Catalonia and markets: what the experts think
Moneyweek.com. Still,
? Catalan cliff-edge
there are huge
News that Catalonia?s
?practical problems?:
president, Carles
the question of how you
Puigdemont, has put
split debts, for a start.
the region?s
Last week?s ?drama?
independence
showed ?just how hard
declaration on hold
it is for a separatist
came as a welcome
region to safeguard its
relief to markets.
financial system when
As the exodus of
debts in hard currency ?
companies from
in this case euros ? are
From street rally to relief rally
Catalonia gathered
beyond its control? and
pace last week,
there is no ?lender-of-last-resort?, said
investors were bracing themselves for
Ambrose Evans-Pritchard in The Daily
more ?turmoil?, said The Sunday Times.
Telegraph. No wonder companies
?Trading in Spanish government bonds
announcing relocations saw ?an instant
surged to double its normal volume?, as
surge? in their share price.
ratings agencies warned that escalation
of the crisis would hit Spain?s credit rating.
Meanwhile, ?amid mounting corporate
? What next?
panic?, the Spanish government passed
The relief rally greeting Puigdemont?s
an emergency decree ?allowing companies
climbdown saw Spain?s battered Ibex 35
to move their HQ without an emergency
index gain 1.5%, with banks leading the
vote?. The big concern of Catalan-based
advance, said the FT. ?Nonetheless, there
banks like CaixaBank and Sabadell, which
is a cautious feel to trade? in Europe.
owns Britain?s TSB, was that Spanish
?The stand-off between Madrid and the
customers would pull their deposits. ?The
separatists serves as a reminder of the risks
cost of insuring CaixaBank against default
faced by the market, after a bull run has
over a five-year period jumped by nearly
left valuations looking high.? Until now,
28% over the past three weeks.?
?the chaos in Catalonia had been largely
dismissed by global investors as a regional
? Debt questions
issue?, said Nigel Green of the deVere
?An independent Catalonia? might not be
Group. But with the prospect of
?on the cards right now?, but there?s no
independence really in play, a ?heightened
question that it ?would be a viable
game of cat and mouse between Barcelona
standalone entity?, said John Stepek on
and Madrid has been started?.
The best tech funds
?Exciting new technologies are
booming,? and with them the prospect
of making ?big returns?, says Sam
Meadows in The Daily Telegraph. But
investors who suffered heavy losses in
the tech boom of the late 1990s are
wary of having their fingers burnt
again. A good fund might be the
answer. Here?s a selection:
Broad tech exposure John Husselbee
of Liontrust thinks the safest way to
approach tech investing is to look for
established funds that offer ?a blend of
established companies? and ?exposure
to new technologies?. He picks
Henderson Global Technology, Polar
Capital Global Technology and Axa
Framlington Global Technology.
Robotics Both Husselbee and Brian
Dennehy of Fund Expert rate the �5bn
Pictet Robotics fund, which invests in
giants like Siemens and Alphabet in
addition to niche Japanese companies.
For ?robotics groupies? in search of
?purer exposure?, Dennehy suggests
the passive fund ETF Global Robotics.
Driverless cars/automation Most broad
tech funds already provide exposure to
driverless cars via major players like
Google, Uber and Apple. But investors
with a higher risk appetite might
consider smaller companies developing
components and software. HyunHo
Sohn of Fidelity Global Technology
tips the German-listed Infineon
Technologies and the US outfit Delphi.
14 October 2017 THE WEEK
52 CITY
Despite Trump,
Trumponomics
is working
Matthew Lynn
The Daily Telegraph
The Kremlin?s
weaponisation
of Facebook
Hannah Kuchler and
Barney Jopson
Financial Times
The IoD?s
strange take
on governance
Nils Pratley
The Guardian
Reinventing
the job
interview
Sathnam Sanghera
The Times
THE WEEK 14 October 2017
Commentators
As he approaches the first anniversary of his election victory,
Donald Trump is shaping up to be one of the most ?oafish? US
presidents yet, says Matthew Lynn. ?But just because he runs a
deranged White House,? it doesn?t mean his economic policies
aren?t working. On the contrary, ?Trumponomics? seems to be
thriving, and ?the results are starting to be seen in faster growth?.
Success is down to two key policies. A bonfire of federal
regulations is already under way. And Trump has come up with a
?bold and pro-business? plan to reform the tax system, which will
slash the headline rate of US corporation tax to 15% (one of the
lowest in the world) while giving US companies ?less incentive to
stack up cash offshore?. Even if it is watered down by Congress,
the plan is radical enough ?to make a big difference?. Trump is
not wholly responsible for America?s improving outlook: ?he took
over an economy in respectable shape?. But these policies could
have a major impact. ?There are still lots of things that may bring
Trump down. But the economy won?t be one of them.?
Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg initially said it was a ?pretty
crazy idea? that Facebook could have influenced the US election,
say Hannah Kuchler and Barney Jopson. But the recent revelation
that the Kremlin purchased 3,000 political ads from the social
media group, without its knowledge, threatens to shake the
business to its core. ?Russia?s weaponisation of Facebook? has
raised questions about whether the company ?is spinning out of
control?. As things stand, ?anyone with a credit card? can buy
ads without contacting a Facebook employee, and complex
algorithms mean that ?no single user has a full view of all the
campaigns?. Facebook has listed nine ?immediate? actions it will
take to fight further attempts to influence elections, but the
political pressure it now faces in Washington could be just the
start of a ?backlash against Big Tech on everything from anti-trust
to privacy?. Facebook has dee
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