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The Artist September 2017

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TA09FC1 Retail Final_TA12 Front cover 31/07/2017 13:53 Page 1
PACKED WITH INSPIRING DEMONSTRATIONS TO FOLLOW
artist
www.painters-online.co.uk
September issue 2017 �20
T H E P R AC T I C A L MAG A Z I N E F O R A R T I S TS BY A R T I S TS ? S I N C E 1 9 3 1
WATERCOLOUR
A simple approach to painting
light-filled landscapes
WATERCOLOUR
OILS
MIXED MEDIA
PLUS!
l Tablescapes: be inspired by
familiar objects
l How to keep your summer
greens clean & bright
l Brushwork techniques to
create energy & movement
!
How to capture the
effects of transparency
& glass
Discover the colours
& secrets for painting
skin tones
New ideas for great
results with collage
& paint
LP04_IndiaSoan_v2_Layout 1 30/01/2017 14:48 Page 38
Reader holiday
Paint in Rajasthan,
India with Hazel Soan
October
16 to 31,
2017
Join popular art tutor, Hazel Soan, on the ultimate painting holiday
in India and return with an impressive portfolio of work
l
Paint the grandeur of the
Mughal Empire in the Royal
lakeside city of Udaipur
l Experience Diwali ?
the Festival of Lights
l Capture the fervour of the
annual Pushkar Camel Fair
in the Rajasthan desert
l Portray the serenity of a
Brahma Temple pilgrimage
l Extend your stay to
enjoy the sublime beauty
of the Taj Mahal under
a full moon
Udaipur, known as the ?city of sunrise?
is a glistening oasis in the Rajasthan desert.
It is one of the most serene, romantic and
paintable places in India. Apart from the
special light, its ornate white-marbled
palaces and lakeside location are most
appealing. Women washing their clothes
on the shores of Lake Pichola, people bathing
at the ghats, colourful saris and impressive
turbans and moustaches will add wonderful
content to your paintings. You?ll be in
Udaipur during Diwali, which is one of
the most celebrated Hindu festivals and
known as the Festival of Lights.
Pushkar is a holy Hindu town in the
heart of the Rajasthan desert and every
October there is a Brahma Temple
Pilgrimage on the shores of Pushkar Lake.
The annual Pushkar Camel Fair also takes
place in October, when thousands of local
villagers gather to trade their cattle, horses
and camels. Both are colourful and
atmospheric spectacles, and not to be missed.
Hazel Soan will be extending her stay
in India to paint the Taj Mahal under a full
moon and invites you to join her. This most
iconic monument is a must for anyone who
has not already seen it.
Painting programme & tutor
Hazel Soan is a versatile and
talented artist, and an excellent
teacher with a natural gift of
drawing out the best in
students. She will illustrate a
wide range of the topics with
talks and demonstrations.
There will also be an
opportunity for you to paint a
model. This tutorial painting
holiday is ideal for intermediate students,
but more experienced students are welcome to
work independently. Hazel Soan will be working
in watercolour, but all media are welcome.
As well as your own travel escort, there will be
a local Indian guide with you, helping you find
the most suitable places to paint and provide
an explanation of the various ceremonies.
l Number of students: 8 to 12 l Price per
person in a twin room: �995 l Single
supplement: �0 l Taj Mahal extension
October 31 ? November 3: from �0
Includes: flights, hotels, all meals, local
guide, art tutor and travel escort.
01825 714310 art@spencerscott.co.uk www.spencerscotttravel.com
The Artist and Leisure Painter magazines have been offering overseas painting holidays since 1990 with renowned tutors. These holidays are organised by fully licensed
operator Spencer Scott Travel Services Ltd CAA ATOL 3471 Other holidays in 2017 include the Gardens of Belgium & Holland with Pamela Kay NEAC, RBA, RWS,
Antibes and the C魌e d?Azure with Lachlan Goudie ROI, Amsterdam with Ken Howard OBE, RA and Vietnam with Peter Brown NEAC, ROI.
TA09p3_5_Contents_TA04p3_4_Contents 27/07/2017 10:37 Page 5
WELCOME
incorporating ART & ARTISTS
First established 1931
ISSN 0004-3877
Vol 132 No. 10
ISSUE 1046
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T
he BP Portrait Award at the National Portrait Gallery (on show until September 24,
then at the Royal Albert Memorial Museum & Art Gallery, Exeter, from October 4 to
December 3) is one of my favourite annual exhibitions. It provides the opportunity
to see some of the most exciting and innovative work being produced by artists of
all ages, from all parts of the world, and continues to attract the best practitioners of the
genre. The winner of the 2017 BP Portrait Award, Benjamin Sullivan, for his intimate portrait
of his wife Virginia and their baby daughter Edith, entitled Breech, referring to Edith?s
difficult birth, is a stunning painting that has been well documented in the national press
and on social media. There are, however, some real gems to be discovered and enjoyed
amongst the non award-winning works. For example, I first came across up-and-coming
artist Richard Burger?s work in the 2016 BP Portrait Award at the NPG and was delighted
when he agreed to talk to us about his approach and working methods (pages 12 to 14).
The fact that he engages his sitters in the process of deciding on the pose and
environment for a portrait painting helps him to appreciate and capture their character
and individuality. Unlike some reluctant professionals, he happily discusses combining
painting from life with the aid of photographs, which come into their own for him when
painting children who are, of course, less likely to sit or pose for any sensible length of time.
His powerful portraits make great paintings that convey tenderness and intimacy,
characteristics that are very much on display in the current BP Portrait Award exhibition.
President of the New English Art Club, Richard Pikesley, also reveals a fascinating insight
into why and how he paints the seemingly ordinary objects in his studio ? his ?tablescapes?
- when transformed by moving sunlight (pages 16 to 19). The lesson here is that anything,
including the general paraphernalia in a domestic setting, can provide ideal subject matter
for a painting if you allow the effects of light and dark to dominate and dictate your design,
and avoid becoming overwhelmed by worries about formal compositional ideas or rules.
As Richard says, ?with my watercolours ready and enough drawn marks on the paper I can
move quickly and say a lot with a few simple washes.? Richard loves the ?fizz? of this kind of
painting practice and sees obvious parallels with landscape painting. If you?re inspired by
Richard?s approach and work, why not consider joining him and other The Artist readers on
his next reader painting holiday to Italy in September (email info@spencerscott.co.uk for
full details)?
Other highlights for me in this issue include Paul Riley?s advice to keep it all simple in
order to capture the effects of transparency and glass (pages 20 to 23), our vicarious visit to
Australia with Chris Forsey (pages 24 to 27), who feels a holiday is missing something
unless he has his ?painting fix?, Rob Wareing?s portrait demonstration on pages 38 to 41 with
advice on colours for skin tones, and Liz Seward?s suggestions for breaking out of a safe
and predictable rut and overcoming the dreaded painter?s block by turning to collage, on
pages 48 to 50.
Enjoy the issue and look out for our special celebration of The Artist readers? prizewinning
works in our next, October edition.
Best wishes
THIS MONTH?S COVER
Sally Bulgin Publishing Editor
Paul Gadenne Sunday Afternoon at
Horse Guards Parade, watercolour,
14?22in (35.5?56cm). See page 54
Let us know what you think at ? theartistletters@tapc.co.uk ? www.painters-online.co.uk/forum
? www.facebook.com/paintersonline ? twitter.com/artpublishing
artist September 2017
3
TA09p3_5_Contents_TA04p3_4_Contents 27/07/2017 10:37 Page 6
16
12
24
CONTENTS
24 Australia ? a painter?s view
FEATURES
12 Richard Burger
IN CONVERSATION Susie Hodge
discovers the influences behind
Richard Burger?s powerful oil
portraits
Chris Forsey reveals the secrets of his oil
painting travel kit and demonstrates a
light-filled painting of a beach on
Australia?s Great Ocean Road
28 A?Z of colour
W is for white, by Julie Collins
34 Landscape in perspective
Robert Dutton explains how to
apply the rules of perspective to the
open landscape, with a
demonstration in mixed media
FC
Rob Wareing shares his hints and
tips for painting darker complexions
and demonstrates a portrait in oil
16 The studio corner
MASTERCLASS Richard Pikesley
describes waiting for the light to reach
a corner of his studio before painting
a series of small still lifes in oil
42 Depth and flatness
As he nears the end of his series on
contrasts in watercolour, Paul TalbotGreaves shows you how to achieve
depth and sets this month?s exercise
70 Adebanji Alade?s
motivational tips
46 A class act
Face your fears
Max Hale reviews Jackson?s Black
Hog brushes, and discovers that they
exceed all expectations
PRACTICALS
FC
Paul Riley shows how to use
watercolour to depict all forms of
glass, including reflections and
shadows
4
Marie Antoniou urges you to paint
with a 2in brush and experiment with
gestural marks as she demonstrates
an expressive acrylic painting made
with just one brush
38 Portraits of African lives
15 Charles Williams?
musings: Beauty in France
20 The illusion of glass
31 Express yourself in acrylics
artist September 2017
31
48 Shake-up your style with
collage FC
Still life and collage provide the
perfect antidote to painter?s block,
says Liz Seward
www.painters-online.co.uk
TA09p3_5_Contents_TA04p3_4_Contents 27/07/2017 10:37 Page 7
NEXT MONTH
IN
FEATURES
46
u MASTERCLASS
Peter Burgess shares
his thoughts on, and
approach to
composition,
including using the
Golden Section and
tonal structure
51 Boats and harbours
Barry Herniman finds an idyllic location to gather
reference material for a watercolour painting of boats
54 Get started with watercolour
PRACTICALS
FC
Paul Gadenne offers tips and advice to help newcomers to
the medium avoid some of the common pitfalls
t Peter Graham
reveals how to capture
the beauty of roses in
vibrant still-life
paintings in oils
57 How to keep your greens clean
Mix clean, vibrant greens with help from Catherine Strong
Try Paul Riley?s
suggestions about
when, why and
how to introduce
gouache and
pastels to your
watercolours for
best results
u
PLUS
6 Your views 9 The Art World
60 Retailer directory 61 Artbox
63 Art Books & DVDs 65 Opportunities
66 Exhibitions
EDITORIAL CONSULTANTS
l How to use the rules of one, two and three-point
perspective to create dynamic cityscapes in pastel
by Robert Dutton
l Exercises to try to build your confidence in painting
alla prima, with Haidee-Jo Summers
l Michael Jules Lang shows how to create a variety
of edges for more subtle, sophisticated paintings
l ?Start with a mess, end in success? says Paul TalbotGreaves, who concludes his series on maximising
the power of contrast in your watercolour paintings
l When and why you should use body colour in your
watercolours, by Judi Whitton
PLUS
Ken Howard OBE, RA
studied at Hornsey
School of Art and the
Royal College of Art. He
is a member of the
NEAC, ROI, RWS, RWA
and RBA. He exhibits
extensively and has
won numerous awards.
Jason Bowyer NEAC,
RP, PS
studied at Camberwell
School of Art and the
Royal Academy Schools.
He is the founder of the
NEAC Drawing School
and exhibits his work
widely.
Bernard Dunstan RA
studied at Byam Shaw
School of Art and the
Slade School. He taught at
the Camberwell and Byam
Shaw Schools of Art
among others. He exhibits
widely including in the
annual exhibitions of the
NEAC, of which he is a
member, and RA.
David Curtis ROI,
RSMA
has won many awards
for his en plein air and
figurative paintings in
both oils and
watercolours. He has had
several books published
on his work as well as
DVD films, and exhibits
his work extensively.
l The A to Z of watercolour by Julie Collins: X is for
dangerous colours!
l Max Hale discovers the joys of painting on
Jackson?s Linen Panels
And much more! Don?t miss out:
our October issue is on sale from September 8
artist September 2017
5
Sept letters_Layout 1 31/07/2017 14:20 Page 1
YOUR
VIEWS
X
Letters, emails and comments
Email theartistletters@tapc.co.uk or write to The Editor,
The Artist, 63/65 High Street, Tenterden, Kent TN30 6BD
Emotional expression
STAR LETTER
Whilst in London recently I took the opportunity to
visit the exhibition ?Sargent: The Watercolours? at Dulwich Picture Gallery. Sargent
has long been a painting hero of mine and so to see his watercolours up close was
just incredible. For me this is the ?must-see? show of the year. Sargent?s flawless
draughtsmanship and skill at capturing light and all manner of forms en plein air
was simply amazing. Made whilst he was on his travels, the paintings record what
caught his eye ? figures, buildings, animals, water and landscape ? for the pleasure
of painting, free from the pressure of commissions and galleries.
His direct brushwork, powerful use of tone and creative composition combine
with a fresh luminosity that still looks alive and contemporary today. Many
subjects involved white fabric or architectural structures, capturing shadows and
reflected light with warm and cool tones with such apparent ease. A study of a
white cow with the warm light reflecting in the shadows of its neck was a personal
favourite, along with his portrayal of water, reflections and the weathered
buildings in the Venice studies.
I haven?t seen an exhibition that left me feeling so creatively elated and charged
for years ? it is thoroughly recommended!
P Weaver, by email
Jackie Poulouktsi (The Artist letters,
August 2017 issue), was upset by the
criticism she received from those who
thought the PaintersOnline gallery post
of her watercolour of the Grenfell Tower
fire inappropriate. I looked at the website
and found the comments were largely
supportive of her; those who disagreed
were polite but they questioned the
timing. No-one asked for the picture to
be removed.
If Jackie feels that she has free rein to
express her emotions in paint she must
allow others the right to express their
feelings in words ? and not be offended.
People will react to such a tragedy
differently. I was horrified but not
?emotionally wrecked? as Jackie said she
was. We should allow room for varying
opinions, expressed in paint or words;
people can then make their own
judgements on whether they find a
contribution helpful or harmful.
Sandra Jones, by email
You can read our review of this exhibition in the summer 2017 issue of The Artist. The
exhibition continues until October 8 ? Ed.
Lack of pigment knowledge
This month?s star letter writer will receive a Landscape
Selection of 48 Van Gogh soft pastels worth �.99, courtesy
of Royal Talens. For more information about these, and
other Royal Talens products, see www.royaltalens.com
Sargent?s watercolours
Sorolla museum
Relaxing pastime
For those readers who have the chance to
visit Madrid, I highly recommend
spendng a couple of hours at the
Museo Sorolla.
After spending a long weekend in the
Spanish capital, and ?doing? the Art Walk
(the Prado, Reina Sof韆 and Thyssen) I
found that my visit to Sorolla磗 house and
studio was the highlight of my trip. This is
a must for any art lover and not to be
missed. It?s full of his breathtaking lightfilled masterpieces, his personal objets
d碼rt and even his used paintbrushes.
Then there are the elegant rooms where
he and his family lived and the beautiful
gardens, which the painter designed.
Joaquin Sorolla has long been my
favourite Spanish painter and a visit to
this museum only reinforced my
admiration. Entry to the museum is free
on Saturday afternoons and Sundays ?
what more could you wish for!
Elizabeth Del Pino, by email
I?m a grounds maintenance operative
and use a hedge cutter or lawnmower
more that I do a paintbrush, but I like to
wind down from a day?s work by reading
The Artist. Recently my son, who is
studying photography at school, urged
me to paint a self portrait, even though I
hadn?t painted for a while. Here is the
result ? I hope you approve!
Paul Rix-Clancy, by email
I wholeheartedly agree with the letter
from Jenny Hopkins (The Artist July 2017
issue) about the lack of proper pigment
information in certain articles. I have
noticed this lack of knowledge on many
occasions, even from professional artists I
have talked to at exhibitions, or whose
books I have read. To this end, I would like
to recommend the excellent work of
Michael Wilcox. One of his many books,
The Artist?s Guide to Selecting Colours
(www.michaelwilcoxschoolofcolour.com),
is very useful if you don?t want to go into
it too deeply, and covers all
media. Likewise, I also
recommend Tony Paul?s How to
Mix and Use Colour (Amazon).
Carole Wood, by email
t Paul Rix-Clancy Self Portrait,
oil on canvas, 193?4?233?4in (in
(50?60cm)
Subscribe at www.painters-online.co.uk or telephone 01580 763673
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artist September
2017
www.painters-online.co.uk
2017
LEEDS
ART & PHOTOGRAPHY
EXHIBITION & SALE
REGISTRATIONS NOW BEING ACCEPTED
REGISTERED CHARITY NO. 1015941
OCTOBER 26 - 28
10AM - 6PM
OCTOBER 29
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900 FRAMED ORIGINAL PIECES
OF ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY
ALL AVAILABLE TO PURCHASE
FOR MORE INFORMATION
OR TO BOOK:0113 218 5505
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SBA DLDC ad 2017 HC issue:SBA DLDC ad June 09.qxd
30/06/2017
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? Expert guidance and tuition: learn from experienced members
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Applications being taken now for the
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the-artist-advert-0917.indd 1
September 2017
77
24/07/2017 14:27:07
01/08/2017 11:04:43
The Society of Botanical Artists
?A Seasonal Tapestry? by Janie Pirie SBA
Annual Open
Exhibition
Changing Seasons
13 - 21 October 2017
Central Hall Westminster,
London SW1H 9NH
Free admission
Ticketed demonstrations
Charity Reg.
No:1110869
Available through a select group of stockists
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for full information on ranges, sets, prices.
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An Exhibition of WATERCOLOURS by
23rd September ? 1st October 2017
www.jamesfletcherwatson.com
p08_tasept17.indd 8
September 2017
Windrush, Gloucestershire OX18 4TU
Steve Hall
Jake Winkle
OPENING
TIMES
11am - 5pm
8
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ARTISTS?
VALUE
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Tel. 01451 844425
www.painters-online.co.uk
31/07/2017 16:24:53
Sept TAW _Layout 1 31/07/2017 14:44 Page 9
THE ART WORLD
NEWS, VIEWS, INFORMATION AND SPECIAL EVENTS IN THE ART WORLD
compiled by Deborah Wanstall
p
Hilaire-Germain-Edgar Degas The Red Ballet Skirts, c1900, pastel on tracing paper, 301?4?223?4in (77?58cm)
To mark the centenary of Degas?s death in September 1917,
the National Gallery has drawn together works from the
Burrell Collection in Glasgow, one of the finest collections of
Degas pastels in the world, works from its own and those
from other collections. The exhibition is divided into three
sections: Modern Life, Dancers and Private Worlds, and
www.painters-online.co.uk
examines the art historical and personal contexts in which
these works were created.
Drawn in Colour: Degas from the Burrell is at the National
Gallery, Trafalgar Square, London WC2 from September 20
to May 7, 2018. Admission is free.
www.nationalgallery.org.uk
artist
September 2017
9
Sept TAW _Layout 1 31/07/2017 14:44 Page 10
l Warwickshire Watercolourists
are exhibiting new works at the
Berkswell Reading Rooms, Berkswell
CV7 7BE on August 26 to 28, from
10am to 5pm. All works are for sale.
Admission and parking are free and
refreshments will be available.
l The Great North Art Show will
p
Claire Harkess Walrus of Magdalene Fjord I, watercolour, 373?4?491?4in (96?125cm).
Winner of The Artist Magazine Award and Wildlife Artist of the Year Award
Double scoop for Claire
Watercolourist Claire Harkess won the
Wildlife Artist of the Year Award for her
painting Walrus of Magdalene Fjord I
(above) in this year?s David Shepherd
Wildlife Foundation (DSWF) annual open
competition. Additionally, and
completely independently of the main
judging panel, Claire was also chosen by
our editor Sally Bulgin to receive The
Artist Magazine Award. We?ll be
featuring Claire and her work in a future
issue of The Artist.
The David Shepherd Wildlife
Foundation?s annual Wildlife Artist of the
Year competition has become a major
event, attracting entrants and buyers
from across the world. This year, 136
pieces were shortlisted for the selling
exhibition at the Mall Galleries, which
ended on July 2. Since its inception the
event has raised over �0,000 for the
charity?s wildlife conservation projects.
Details of how to enter the 2018 Wildlife
Artist of the Year will be published in our
pullout guide to open competitions in
our January 2018 issue. For more
information about the DSWF see
www.davidshepherd.org
again be held at Ripon Cathedral.
This year a selection of new of works
by Tom Wood (see The Artist May
2016 issue) will be on show
alongside the work of over 56
established and emerging artists
whose output includes paintings,
prints, photographs and sculpture.
The exhibition runs from September
2 to 24 at Ripon Cathedral, Minster
Road, Ripon HG4 1QS. Admission is
free and most works are for sale. For
more information see
https://greatnorthartshow.co.uk
l 56 Group Wales are exhibiting in
Pembrokeshire?s new residential art
space, The Set House, Upper
Ripperston, St Brides, Haverfordwest,
Pembrokeshire SA62 3AH from
August 22 to September 15. For
more details telephone 07841
682982 or see
https://sethousearts.com
EDITOR?S GALLERY CHOICE
This month?s editor?s choice from our website gallery is by Jenny Hancock,
who comments:
?I enjoy selecting subjects for my still-life paintings which have a strong
colour contrast. These orange geums were picked from my garden and
combined with cherries and a small blue/green ceramic pot.
I begin with acrylic paint, which dries quickly, thus enabling me to build up
layers of colour. I often use Winsor & Newton Artisan water-mixable oil
colour in the same colour palette as the acrylics for the final layers. I use
mostly flat brushes as I like the choppy marks they make, starting with
larger sizes and getting progressively smaller as the painting evolves. After
painting the background using a combination of cadmium yellow medium
and cadmium orange in varying proportions, the composition was drawn
using a white Cont� pencil. I worked on the geums first, deciding to paint
one of the flowers blue so that it dropped back behind the others. The
background was added at the same time using a variety of blues with hints
of purple and green but letting some of the previous orange layer show
through. Next I painted the cherries and pot, noticing how the colours of the
pot were reflected in the shiny surface of the cherries. Finally, changing from
acrylic to oil, I softened some of the brushstrokes on the cherries and geums
and also darkened the side of the pot.?
t Jenny Hancock Orange Geums, acrylic and oil on board, 6?6in
(15?15cm). On show in our online gallery at www.painters-online.co.uk
To upload images of your own work and receive valuable feedback, go to
our website and click on the link to the gallery. This is a free service.
10
artist
September 2017
www.painters-online.co.uk
www.painters-online.co.uk
Sept TAW _Layout 1 31/07/2017 14:44 Page 11
l Exhibition on Screen, the film series
dedicated to bringing the world's best
art to the big screen, returns for a fifth
season with three brand-new films.
Canaletto and the Art of Venice, released
on September 26, follows the world's
largest Canaletto collection from Venice
to the royal residences of England. David
Hockney at The Royal Academy of Arts,
released on November 21, celebrates
Britain's best-loved living artist and
features never-before-seen interviews
discussing his latest work. Finally,
C閦anne ? Portraits of a Life, released on
January 23, explores the portraiture of
the ?father of modern art? in order to
reveal his inner life. You can find full
details of all screenings at
www.exhibitiononscreen.com
l The Association of Animal
Artists? autumn exhibition is at
The Station, Station Yard,
Richmond, North Yorkshire DL10
4LD from September 9 to October
4, with a ?Meet the Artists? session
on Saturday September 9 from
10am to 2pm. Entry is free. For
more information see www.the
station.co.uk or https://associat
ionofanimalartists.com
p
l An exhibition of drawings, paintings
and prints by John Sprakes is to be held
in the Michael Heseltine Gallery,
Chenderit School, Middleton Cheney,
Banbury, Oxfordshire OX17 2QR from
September 16 to October 15. John is a
member of the Royal Institute of Oil
Painters, the Royal Society of British
Artists and the Manchester Academy of
Fine Arts. He is also one of the judges for
The Artist Open Art Competition in
The exhibition is open from Monday to
Friday, 10am to 4pm; and weekends from
1.30 to 4.30pm. Admission is � Tickets
will be available from the Library,
Middleton Cheney, or online at
www.ticketsource.co.uk/MCLSG
The Jerwood Drawing Prize is
the largest and longest running
annual open submission
exhibition for drawing in the
UK. This year?s exhibition of 69
works by 65 artists has been
selected from nearly 3,000
entries from across the UK. The
winner will receive �000.
is exhibiting at The John Bowen
Gallery, Town Hall, Malmesbury,
Wiltshire SN16 9BZ from
September 1 to 22. Admission is
free. For more information see
http://guildofwiltshireartists.com
The Jerwood Drawing Prize
opens at The Jerwood Space,
171 Union Street, London SE1
0LN from September 13 to
October 22. Admission is free.
The exhibition then tours to
East Gallery, University of
Norwich, from November 14 to
January 6, and The Edge,
University of Bath, from
February 10 to March 31, 2018.
www.jerwoodvisualarts.org
l Todmorden Open Studios is
from September 8 to 10. Brochures
will be available from local visitor
information centres and libraries.
l Devon Open Studios fortnight
www.painters-online.co.uk
partnership with Patchings Art Centre.
On October 1 John will be at the gallery
to talk about his working methods
whilst painting a still life, and will
welcome questions as he works.
Creative drawing
l The Guild of Wiltshire Artists
is from September 9 to 24. A free
guide is available from tourist
information centres, libraries and
galleries, or download a copy from
www.devonartistnetwork.co.uk
John Sprakes Beach Huts, acrylic on canvas, 233?4?493?4in (50?60cm)
p
Caragh Savage Henriette: Quiet Memory, charcoal on drafting film, 15?93?4in (38?30cm)
artist
September 2017
11
TA09p12_14_In conversation_Layout 1 27/07/2017 10:21 Page 12
I N C O N V E R S AT I O N
Richard Burger
Susie Hodge discovers how Richard Burger achieves his powerful oil
portraits, which are influenced by his time in Italy and in London
B
orn in Genoa, Italy, Richard
Burger studied in New York and
London at art schools
internationally recognised for
their independent approach to
teaching art and their success at
nurturing accomplished, often
groundbreaking, artists. Now living and
working in London, he recalls his
formative years before he became an
artist, and the influences that affected
his career choice and painting style: ?I
grew up in an artistic household where I
was always encouraged to pick up
colours and a paintbrush. Both my
mother and my sister were artists.?
Richard's sister Carol is the subject of
the portrait that was accepted for the
2016 BP Portrait Award (right).
Powerful images
Richard's figurative paintings are
powerful and colourful: ?I love painting
in oil. I find it very forgiving as a
medium, providing you follow the rules.
I sometimes use acrylic for backgrounds
to get rid of the whiteness of the
canvas. I also love using watercolour
pencil for sketches and preparatory
drawings, expressive observations of
people around me and everyday life.?
Of his continually evolving style,
Richard says: ?Every subject requires
me to look at things afresh. I have
always loved people, both interacting
with and looking at them. Everyone is
different and that makes for a challenge
every time. Also, somehow painting
from the model is more companionable
than being alone in the studio! Having
said that, I also love landscapes and
beach scenes since they get me out in
the world.?
Richard's art comments on society, but
also allows viewers to interpret what
they see within them. ?When planning
paintings, I try to find something that I
like and that the viewer may find
interesting, and work on that. With
people, the poses are worked out with
the model. I think that anything that the
model contributes helps the painting to
show that sitter's character. With
landscapes, I plan and sketch the
composition out before I begin the final
painting, although changes do
inevitably happen as I work.?
Influences
My Father Thinking of Me, oil on canvas, 471?4?311?2in (120?80cm).
?One of my first portraits from life; I used a mixture of sittings and photos, partly because the
sitter tended to nod off during the sittings, and I was determined to get the eyes right. The
technique I developed with this painting was to use a darker skin tone for the outline and then
to build the skin tones dark to light in subsequent sittings.?
p
12
artist September 2017
?My vision, acquired over many years of
open studio drawing and painting,
takes its influence from where I grew up
in Italy and from where I have chosen
to live in London.? As far as individual
influences are concerned, he says: ?I
grew up in Genoa, so 17th-century
Italian painters seem to haunt me! In
New York, I studied under Mary Beth
McKenzie and William Scharf, and with
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TA09p12_14_In conversation_Layout 1 27/07/2017 10:21 Page 13
t Carol, oil on linen,
271?2?232?4in (70?60cm).
?Carol is the exception to my
own rules! I started the
portrait on a blank canvas
and at home, as I was inbetween studios. I did a total
of three sittings of three
hours each and then added
the background at a later
stage once I was happy with
the face and hands. After the
three sittings, I used photos
to check the details and
make sure everything
worked together.?
q
Bella, oil and spray paint
on canvas, 12?12in
(30.5?30.5cm).
?This was a commissioned
portrait. For most of my
paintings, I paint a nonwhite background to 'break
the ice' of the canvas. On this
occasion, the background
was spray-painted to give a
slightly more edgy look.?
p
Dorje, oil on board, 18?12in (45.5?30.5cm).
?I painted Dorje entirely from life in five three-hour
sessions. The heavier marks on the face were outlined
using sepia and, due to the speed the painting was made,
it is unglazed. It is painted on board, which has become
my favourite surface, mainly because I don't have to worry
about damaging the canvas.?
www.painters-online.co.uk
artist September 2017
13
TA09p12_14_In conversation_Layout 1 27/07/2017 10:21 Page 14
I N C O N V E R S AT I O N
t Lulu, oil and spray paint on canvas,
12?12in (30.5?30.5cm).
?As a rule, I much prefer painting from life.
However, I think it is unfair to ask children to
pose from life for obvious reasons, so my
tactic is to get to know them; I spend a few
hours with them, taking photos and generally
trying to make them feel comfortable. On this
occasion, we went to an art fair in the
afternoon with the family and then we all
went out for dinner. So by the time I sat down
to paint, I had a feeling for what could work.?
Richard Burger
studied at the Art Students League of
New York and Chelsea College of Art in
London. He has exhibited in London,
Genoa and New York and his painting
of his sister was shortlisted for the 2016
BP Portrait Award at London's National
Portrait Gallery.
Enver G黵sev at Chelsea. I always seek
to observe the everyday and renew
how we see it, and in this respect,
Frank Auerbach is probably the reason
I paint. I also love Lucian Freud, Peter
Doig and Chantal Joffe.?
Variety
In his studio ? a shared complex in
London run by Bow Arts ? Richard
experiments with materials and
formats. ?I love experimenting with
both textured and smooth finishes. At
the moment, I'm going through a bit of
a phase of painting on board or
Masonite. These rigid surfaces let me
hit them hard without answering back.
The sizes of my paintings vary. My
biggest painting so far is about
72?28in (183?71cm), and sometimes I
paint very quickly, so a large painting
probably takes me less than two weeks
to complete. At other times, I work on
paintings over a long period of time,
letting them stew, and picking them up
again later. Most of the time, I have
several paintings on the go at once.?
His process is fairly traditional.
?Normally after making preparatory
sketches, I sketch the composition on
14
artist September 2017
to my canvas or other surface with oil
paint. I tried charcoal for this, but I
found it left too much of a mark
through the paint. When I paint, there
are certain colours that I tend to use
more than others, which go in and out
of use depending on the theme of the
work I'm painting.? Like many other
artists, he struggles to leave his
paintings alone when they are
finished. ?It's very easy to overwork a
painting. The key is to step back and
leave it alone.?
Portraiture
?My approach to portraiture is simple,
I much prefer my subjects to sit for me
from life, but I am aware that people
have busy lives, so I try to use a
mixture of life, to capture the essence
of the portrait, and then work from
photos until I'm happy with the result.
Often the painting goes very quickly at
the beginning and then sits there for a
few months until I'm completely happy
with it. This delay also allows me to
use glazing techniques to add the final
nuances to the work.
?I normally try to avoid using black in
my portraits. My favourite black
alternative is sepia, simply because as
it is lightened it resembles a dark skin
tone. I also like to try to include the
hands in my portraits, because I think
they can say almost as much about a
person as the face.?
The driving force
With his wide variety of projects,
Richard works both for himself, as he
chooses, and for commissions. ?With
commissioned paintings you have
people working with you to develop
what they want. The best bit about that
is that once you achieve these common
aims you know the work will have a
good home. I also exhibit as much as
possible. Getting your work out there is
what it's all about. I guess the best
thing about exhibiting is the positive
reaction of the people ? the viewers ?
interacting with the work.? So what next
for him? ?A spin-off of the BP Portrait
Award, involving all participants, has
been organised by Cass Art in Islington,
so I'll be involved with that, and in
September 2016 I had a residency at
the Vermont Studio Center in the USA
that gave me the time and space to
develop some more exciting works.? TA
www.painters-online.co.uk
TA09p15_Charles MusingsREDONE_Layout 1 25/07/2017 12:47 Page 1
Charles Williams? musings: BEAUTY IN FRANCE
I
n Montreuil with my wife last year, l
was interested to see that the local
council had placed information
plaques around their beautiful town.
The plaques commemorate American
artists from the end of the 19th and
beginning of the 20th centuries who had
spent time there, painting pleasant
scenes in the impressionist manner they
had learnt either at the Academies in Paris
or in studies at the Slade. I was a little
miffed that it was only American artists
represented; I expect an American charity
had paid for the plaques, but surely some
English painters visited, or was the
invasion of English aesthetes confined to
recent years? Certainly the town seemed
to echo with English voices discussing the
extraordinary elegance of the place.
There was something familiar about the
paintings reproduced on the plaques.
They reminded me of work by British
artists of the same era, things I have seen
reproduced in monographs to illustrate
development of style from the stiff and
over-fussy Victorian academic manner,
through Impressionism, and eventually to
a Post-Impressionist realisation. Work by
people such as Robert Bevan.
There is a reason for this resemblance. In
that period, France held absolute sway
over Western visual culture. It was de
rigeur for anyone with pretensions to the
avant-garde to spend formative time in
Paris, followed by more time wandering in
the north, west and south of the country,
painting the local scene and the local
people. Impressionism was the new thing:
standing in a field with an easel and a
palette, recording the view, was what the
new artist did. Paintings of things
previously confined to the background or
to genre paintings were composed with
great seriousness, tonal and colour values
sought out and nursed into works that redefined what was thought of as beautiful.
The eye of the beholder
As I walked with Anna around the
ramparts of Montreuil we pointed out the
lovely scenes to each other ? trees in
clumps, dilapidated houses against
medieval walls. ?Isn?t it beautiful?? she said.
But the same scene would not always
have seemed beautiful. That is because
the natural world, bucolic scenes, the
untamed and the scruffily tasteful, have
not always been universally accepted as
beautiful. Before Romanticism and artists
like Constable, Turner, Cozens and
Courbet, Corot and Cotman, Thomas
Gilpin and David Cox, raw nature was not
thought of as particularly suitable for
www.painters-online.co.uk
painting. Samuel Johnson described the
wilds of Scotland as 'horrible', and the Rev.
Gilpin's view of the picturesque was
commonly lampooned. Ideas about art
change and they continue to change.
So is that the point of artists? Making
you think different things are beautiful?
Deep in its core Impressionism had an
idea about recording light, and this search
for an objectivity about how things
looked was linked to Realism, the great
cultural movement that preceded and
then ran alongside Impressionism and
Post-Impressionism ? Balzac and Zola, for
example, the latter a great friend of
Manet and of C閦anne. It wasn't to do
with finding beauty, but of telling a truth,
and it?s hard to see much beauty in Zola,
as anyone who has struggled through
Germinal can confirm.
I suppose you might see beauty as a byproduct of this search for truth. The artist
standing in the field is not trying to paint
a beautiful picture, but a truthful one, to
find a resolution between tone and
colour, and to make a convincing new
form that meshes the material with the
visual information to hand.
There is the wonderful, and possibly
apocryphal, story of the Kitchen Sink
painter in the 1950s who is teaching at a
residential school in a hotel. On fire with
the excitement of the new Realist ideas,
one evening he shows the class a series of
slides of the work of Bratby, Middleditch,
Smith and so on, with their simplified,
honest forms and direct portrayal of
everyday ?50s Britain ? the browncoloured rooms and still lifes of sprawling
breakfast tables, cornflakes and teapots
and bottles of milk. This is the latest thing,
he says. A new definition of beauty in the
everyday. The next morning finds the
cornflake packets wrapped in brown
paper. ?Good morning?, his host says. ?Look,
we have covered the cornflakes packets.
We never realised how ugly they were
until you showed us those paintings last
night?.
I wonder what the French country folk
of Montreuil of the 1890s would have
made of the paintings by the American
artists of their cottages and pig sties. I
don't suppose many of them would have
suddenly seen the decayed rendering and
stoved-in roofs in a new light. More likely
they would have thought ?he is right, the
sharp-eyed American, that wall could do
with a lick of paint?, although that may
have been complicated even then by the
peculiar French rates system that allows
you to pay less if your house is a bit
dilapidated.
p
Anna Gardiner Power Supply, charcoal on
paper, 311?2?251?4in (80?64cm).
This lovely tonal study reminds me of a
conversation about landscape painting with
someone in the early 1990s as we sped
through the Kent countryside on a train. He
pointed out the rape fields, bright yellow in
the summer sunshine and told me that he
had no objection to them, even though a lot
of people complained about their garishness.
?It?s not quite the proper, English landscape
we are used to?, he said. This must be related
to 18th-century ideas about ?Decorum? in
painting; Constable is supposed to have been
rebuked by an older Academician for
painting too brightly, and told that a
landscape should have the same overall
colour values as the wood of an old violin
But maybe l am wrong. Perhaps their
rates system is actually a way of ensuring
that the French provincial scene is in a
state of perpetual picturesque decay.
Maybe the French were waiting, all
through the centuries, resolutely refusing
to clean up or repaint, knowing that one
day, maybe not now but sooner or later,
the American, British and Scandinavian
avant-garde would finally realise how
ravishingly beautiful it all was. Who
knows. They are an enigmatic people. TA
Charles Williams NEAC RWS Cert.RAS is a
painter, writer and lecturer.
artist September 2017
15
TA09p16_19_Masterclass_Layout 1 25/07/2017 12:48 Page 16
MASTERCLASS
The studio corner
Richard Pikesley describes how the changes of sunlight in his studio
provide drama for a series of small paintings to use for later reference
M
y studio is an old cider barn
that looks out across a
farmyard from a large, westfacing window. As a painting
space, it can be pretty dark through the
winter months, but each spring, like
some ancient Druid, I wait for the day
when the sun just gets into one corner
of the studio before setting over the
barn across the yard. From that day on,
through the spring and up to midsummer, the puddle of sunlight gets
bigger and the light stronger until, by
mid-June, I often can?t work in there at
16
artist September 2017
all as the sunlight blazes in and lights
up the whole building.
There are days when I hope it might
be cloudy, or perhaps even rain, to
slow things down a little so that I can
do things in a more considered way,
but every spring I find myself waiting
with growing excitement for the day
that I can start to make paintings out of
the frenzy of the returning sunlight. The
sun moves quickly ? in minutes the
shadow of a glazing bar moves across
the newspapers sprawled on the studio
table. The reflected bounce of colour
and light is quite unlike anything I?ve
seen all through the winter.
Day one
On one such day I manoeuvred my
easel so that I could paint a succession
of little panels as the scene changed. I
laid out my usual palette in the usual
way, with a handful of brushes and a jar
of spirit to swill them in, so at least that
part of the process would be automatic.
No particular thought went into
setting up a still life as whatever I did
would be subverted by the
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TA09p16_19_Masterclass_Layout 1 25/07/2017 12:48 Page 17
t Corner Table, Spring Sun, oil
on canvas, 20?24in
(51?61cm).
Painted over three sessions, I
liked the strong diagonal
accents of alternating shadow
and light, and the reflection in
the mirror at the back of the
group
u April Sun, watercolour,
12?9in (30.5?23cm).
Painted with simple washes
over lightly drawn pencil, this
enabled me to draw the
structure first and only start
using watercolour once the
light was where I wanted it
unpredictability of the splashes of
brilliance and darkness ? as the sun
passes over the studio clutter all things
move in and out of the light. There
wasn?t too much thought about
composition either ? this isn?t about
stable pyramids of carefully drawn
structure ? I got it down as it happened
by watching the movement of the light
through the next hour or so, painting a
sequence of little notes.
I started by looking at a boundary
between light and dark and making a
pair of marks to establish the
relationship between the two. The
painting grew quickly from this point; I
constantly looked at whether a colour
was darker, lighter, warmer or cooler
than its neighbour, but my eye had to
keep sweeping across the whole field
of view to allow the pattern of lights
and darks to sink in. I got about ten
minutes before a key part of my little
design fell into shadow. I could chase it,
modifying what I?ve done to keep up
with the change, or leave it. I decided
to leave it; I had another little board
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?Shifting my position to gain a slightly different
view, I kept my angle of view fairly restricted?
ready for the easel and took a minute
to reset my thoughts about what might
make an interesting ?eyeful?.
Shifting my position to gain a slightly
different view, I kept my angle of view
fairly restricted, a bit more ?telephoto?
than ?wide-angle?. There was enough to
think about without the complexities of
spreading my gaze too wide. In an hour
or so I?d made five little studies: one
seemed complete in itself and one was
a dud; the other three were all
interesting, a toe in the water of a few
possible visual ideas, and gave me a
glimpse of what might be done.
Days two and?
The next day was cloudy and my
afternoon was spent priming boards,
stretching canvases and thinking,
catching my five little studies out of the
corner of my eye. In fact, several days
passed before I could get back to this
subject.
I wanted to do something a bit bigger
but along the same lines. I had two or
three canvases ready, to give me a
choice of format, but beyond about
20in the size becomes an issue in the
limited time available. I find pencil and
watercolour useful for collecting
information so, knowing that the light
will be just where I want it at say 3pm,
I can start drawing at 2pm, concentrating
on mapping out lines and getting the
structure right. With my watercolours
ready and enough drawn marks on the
paper I can move quickly and say a lot
with a few simple washes. As the
weather forecast looked fair for the rest
of the week I thought I could plan
something bigger. Oil paint will let me
work over two afternoons, maybe three,
before it becomes too sticky to do
artist September 2017
17
TA09p16_19_Masterclass_Layout 1 25/07/2017 12:48 Page 18
MASTERCLASS
t Pheasant Eyes, oil on board, 10?12in
(25.5?30.5cm).
These scented narcissus grow along our little
stream and there?s always a few in the studio
window when they?re in flower. Made in just a
few minutes, I grabbed the moment when the
balance of light and dark shapes seemed just
right
aspects. I got about ten minutes slightly
ahead of the moment I wanted, another
fifteen with it just about right, then a
few more minutes of relying on my
visual memory, stopping as that began
to fade. About half an hour is as much
as I could hope for in one day.
Session two
another day. Beyond those two or three
days, the sun would be on a noticeably
different trajectory.
I?d been watching how my simple
tablescape was transformed by the
sunlight and had made some simple
drawings to plan my composition on a
bigger canvas. I was very aware that the
range of tone in front of me was
enormous; looking at this group, I loved
the way that much of the foreground
was covered with a big shadow and all
the bits and pieces in that area were
very quiet, and need a very restricted
range of light and dark. I also noticed
that the light was bouncing colour
around the shadows, giving variety to
these rather restrained parts of the
composition.
Session one
The first painting session was fairly
brief ? I started just a few minutes
before the light was just how I wanted
it, working in a similar way to the earlier
studies, but focusing on trying to block
everything in very quickly. I
concentrated on getting the big
relationships right rather than worrying
too much about the more hidden
The following day was bright enough for
me to work again on the larger oil. At its
first stage, I?d just got the bare bones
so I wanted to elaborate a little further.
This way of painting means I?m doing
everything at once, drawing and settling
the composition as well as making
decisions about tone and colour. For
this reason, it?s inevitable that there
will be adjustments and I spotted some
drawing corrections that needed to be
made. A few marks quickly indicated
those adjustments. The previous day?s
paint was still fairly wet so the surface
was quite receptive and I worked
quickly with a loaded brush.
There was stuff going on in the
foreground that I hadn?t really noticed ?
a pair of scissors made a good X shape,
and the blue-and-white plastic bag was
bouncing its colour into the foreground
along with the yellow from the little
glass bottle. The plastic water bottle on
the right-hand side was refracting the
?I love the excitement
and fizz of this sort of
painting and I can see
obvious parallels with
the sort of landscape
subjects I look for?
p
Studio Table, Shadow Edge, oil on board, 9?12in (23?30.5cm).
A few minutes before I painted this, the shadow of the flowers ran into the shadow of the toy
boat. I waited for them to separate before grabbing this little oil study
18
artist September 2017
strong sunlight and becoming a focus in
the painting. I got just a little longer but
once again, as my visual memory began
to fade I stopped, knowing that if I
carried on the effect of one moment
would be weakened.
I love the excitement and fizz of this
sort of painting and I can see obvious
parallels with the sort of landscape
subjects I look for. I?ll carry on making
paintings of this corner of my working
space until, in the autumn, it?s reduced
TA
to a tiny slice of light.
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TA09p16_19_Masterclass_Layout 1 25/07/2017 12:48 Page 19
Richard Pikesley
studied at Harrow School of Art,
Canterbury College of Art and the
University of London Institute of
Education. He is president of the New
English Art Club and a member of the
Royal Watercolour Society. Richard has
exhibited widely and won many awards.
Richard will be leading a The Artist
holiday to Ponza in Italy in September
2018. More details will be published
when available.
p
Toy Boats (first state), oil on canvas, 16?20in (40.5?51cm).
The main structure was put down simply and quickly. I really enjoyed the way the shadows
overlayed the various objects with a sort of counterpoint of shapes. I?d noticed the reflection
of the sail in the window but not had time to make much of it
p
Toy Boats (second state), oil on canvas, 16?20in (40.5?51cm).
Making only minor adjustments to my initial placing of the subject, I had less than an hour to take things a little further. There was lots to do all at
once before the light moved beyond where I wanted it
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artist September 2017
19
TA09p20_23_Paul Riley_Layout 1 27/07/2017 10:23 Page 20
The illusion of glass
Paul Riley explains how to capture the
transparency of glass using watercolour, with tips
on how to depict cut glass, reflections, liquids (such
as wine) and shadows
p
Glass of Water with Cornflower, watercolour
on Saunders Waterford HP 300gsm, 13?9in
(33?23cm).
Note the dark tone of the reflections of the
water in the glass; the tonal contrasts of the
rim and base; the highlight at the base; the
refraction of the stalk. Also, note where the rim
has been negatively painted, where the stalk
passes both behind and in front of the rim
I
put my satisfaction with watercolour
painting down to its elusive quality.
The merest touch of colour dropped
onto a wet surface can express so
much. So often it is the case of what is
not painted that says what is intended
and in this article I shall give you a few
hints and tips that will help to explain
almost nothing!
To get to grips with how to depict
glass you need to note exactly what you
actually see as opposed to what you
think you ought to see. Because we see
through glass we need to paint what is
behind it and, if it is a vessel, what it
contains. Glass in the form of a vessel
can do all kinds of things to the above
depending on its make, thickness and
shape. Distortion is common together
20
artist September 2017
with reflections and refractions.
Additionally, glass is a hard, crispedged material that looks worse if
painted with a woolly edge. Needless
to say if one tries to depict all the
aspects the image could look
overloaded and unreal. The trick is to
know what to put in and what to leave
out, along with the illusion. Imply rather
than overstate ? keep it simple!
Masking
First things first: Don?t put an outline
around a glass object. If you look
carefully you will note that the edge is
sometimes not even there unless the
glass is tinted.
I have found the most efficient way to
obtain this elusive but crisp edge is to
p
Tomatoes in Cut Glass, watercolour on
Saunders Waterford HP 300gsm, 9?13in
(23?33cm).
This multifaceted glass bowl has a scalloped
edge. A series of pale grey dots positioned
the various ellipses, which were then painted
in using a good-quality flat sable. Even the
shadow had complex issues. It was difficult to
know when to stop but less is more in a
situation like this. You will notice a few
changes, made with the sponge, and several
drawing corrections. Be brave ? be ruthless
when working on complex items such as this
use masking tape. If the glass is
straight-sided then it is simple.
However, if the glass is curved in any
way a symmetrical template has to be
cut. With the sides taped off you can
www.painters-online.co.uk
TA09p20_23_Paul Riley_Layout 1 27/07/2017 10:23 Page 20
PRACTICAL
DEMONSTRATION Czech Coloured Glass
p
STAGE ONE
This vase has a complex symmetrical
shape. To achieve this, a paper cut out is
needed. Fold the paper in half and draw
the shape against the fold ? when opened
out you have your symmetrical shape. Lay
this over masking tape (or Frisk Film) and
cut out the shape
t
STAGE TWO
The masking tape has been
cut out and masking fluid
applied. When the fluid had
dried, the first layer of paint
was applied
paint what is behind or within without
worrying about the edge. At a later
stage in the painting you may well
need to mask out the vessel in order to
paint in the background.
Masking tape is also useful when
there are reflections in the surface of
the glass, which may appear as lighter
vertical lines. These will need to be
masked out, leaving a slot that can then
be lifted. You may also note reflected
highlights, which can be shown by using
masking fluid at the outset.
Reflections, refraction and
shadows
If the glass vessel contains water the
surface of the water seen through the
glass will be reflective. It will also be
distorted where objects such as stalks
www.painters-online.co.uk
p
FINISHED PAINTING
Czech Coloured Glass, watercolour on Saunders
Waterford HP 300gsm, 13?9in (33?23cm).
A second layer of colour was applied to darken
and define edges. I used a sponge to lose some
edges. Finally I applied a transparent shadow
pass through. In this instance note the
relative tone of this reflection as it will
be different to the glass. You may see
the elliptical surface of the water but
only partially ? another phenomenon
particular to reflective substances and
materials. Clear glass usually has quite
strong tonal contrasts in its reflections.
Circular vessels act like lenses that
both distort and magnify contrasts.
Note this especially at their bases and
rims. Dark liquids in a glass or bottle
reflect most strongly, quite often your
own face. Again, because of the shape
of the vessel these reflections are
distorted, especially at the sides.
Refraction is that peculiar effect that
distorts any object that passes through
the surface of the water. Note that the
stem appears to be separated at the
water surface level.
Because clear glass has no tone or
colour to indicate form it cannot
theoretically cast a shadow, but
anything in it will. The rim, base and
sides of the glass cast a shadow
because the light cannot quite pass
through these greater masses. Notice
how, if the light comes from behind the
glass container, the base acts as a lens
and produces a bright light in the
middle. Any texture in the glass such as
subtle ribbing will produce ribbed-type
shadows. If the light comes from in
front, any shadows seen through the
glass are distorted at the sides.
Cut glass and coloured glass
Surface decoration on glass, whether
coloured or cut, produces even further
artist September 2017
21
TA09p20_23_Paul Riley_Layout 1 27/07/2017 10:23 Page 21
W AT E R C O L O U R
DEMONSTRATION Handblown Glass
u
STAGE ONE
The vase has many cyclic curves so I decided to keep the
whole thing simple and use my compass brush. Shown
here are the brushes I typically use for glass images,
notably various flats (one stroke), a sable and a fine No. 2
sable round. The masking fluid is in one lid and some
liquid soap, to protect the brush from the fluid, in
another. My colours for glass are typically phthalo blue
and indigo. For a green tint I use intense green (phthalo)
and occasionally a touch of May green by Schmincke
p
STAGE TWO
I put in the basic colours. These were worked wet-intowet then allowed to dry before putting in the crisp
shapes. I then softened areas with my natural sponge
u
FINISHED PAINTING
Handblown Glass, watercolour on Saunders Waterford
Not 300gsm,13?9in (33?23cm).
Notice where the masking on the glass has enabled me
to paint the cornflower in front ? this way you don?t
get any muddying of the colour. Final details included
intensifying some of the tones, tinting highlights and
plenty of negative painting for the flowers
challenges for the artist. I have some
cut-glass fruit bowls that are immense
fun to paint but very difficult and, to
add to the fun, the rims are also
scalloped (page 20). To paint one I start
with several dots to establish the
relevant ellipses, then the high and low
points of the scallops. Following this,
with intense concentration, I paint
exactly what I see. Well almost. The
bowl invariably contains fruit of some
22
artist September 2017
kind. Another piece of torturous
glassware I possess is a brass-based
twisted oil lamp with an engraved glass
bowl, through which can be seen the
glass flue. Yes, a serious piece of work
especially when I put in blue- or pinkcoloured paraffin and light it. Modern
glass can often have colours swirled
into it. The best way to achieve this
effect is to work wet-into-wet whilst still
preserving a crisp edge. If the vessel is
a complicated shape a stencil cut in
Frisk Film* will probably do the trick.
Some glass objects have surface
colouring that has been cut, engraved
or etched to reveal the natural glass.
Similarly, as for engraving on natural
glass, you can use masking fluid to
delineate the decoration; I have often
used this method to illustrate my oil
lamp where the orange glow of the light
reveals the decoration.
www.painters-online.co.uk
TA09p20_23_Paul Riley_Layout 1 27/07/2017 10:23 Page 22
p
Jam Jar with Wild Flowers, watercolour on
Saunders Waterford Not 300gsm, 9?13in
(23?33cm).
The crisp definition of the jar is due to strong
contrast and sharp edges
Glass containing coloured
liquids
I have already touched on coloured
liquids in glass vessels. In an object
such as a bottle of wine you have three
factors to take into account: the label,
the colour of the glass and the colour of
the liquid. The colour of the glass or its
contents can vary considerably
according to what the glass reflects.
This is particularly noticeable if there is
any candle light about. Again acute
observation is the name of the game. If
you don?t trust your eyes, take a
photograph and look intensely at the
various phenomena revealed. The brain
tends to deceive, willing you to simplify
and make logical. Unfortunately the
truth is more complex and therefore
more interesting ? trust your eyes.
Glass details
Elements such as bases, stems, rims,
handles or any form of excrescence
added to the surface basically have
crisp-edged tonal contrasts. They are
not necessarily outlined but owe their
look to the basic shape of these quite
specific reflections.
Painting glass objects is, like painting
water, a peculiar challenge and one that
can give a great deal of satisfaction
once mastered. In a future article on
buildings I will refer to glass in
TA
windows!
www.painters-online.co.uk
*Frisk Film (also Frisket Film) is used by
airbrush painters for masking large and/or
complicated areas.
p
Red and White Wine, watercolour on
Saunders Waterford HP 300gsm, 13?9in
(33?23cm).
The crisp edges of the circles and ellipses
were achieved by using a custom-made brush
compass and had to be calculated carefully.
I protected the paper from the compass point
by using folded card. Everything was very
simply painted with only two layers. The
white wine glass is tinted green, hence the
effect on the clear-coloured wine. Note how
the edges of the glasses come and go ? there
is no solid outline. The bubbles were masked
out with fine dots circled in grey
Paul Riley
runs short residential courses from his
home and studios in south Devon.
For details telephone 01803 722352 or
email lara@coombefarmstudios.com
www.coombefarmstudios.com
artist September 2017
23
TA09p24_27_Chris_Layout 1 25/07/2017 12:53 Page 24
Australia ?
a painter?s view
Chris Forsey demonstrates how he captures the pure,
glittering light and colours of Australia?s Great Ocean Road in mixed
media, and shares the contents of his travel painting kit
C
lose family ties take me to
Australia, to a town on the
Great Ocean Road. This coastal
strip has wide beaches of
white, soft sand and dunes, backed by
low tree-covered hills. On my last trip I
endeavoured to do a painting most
days and very nearly achieved my aim;
a holiday can seem to be missing
something unless I do a few works ? I
guess I?m an addict and just can?t do
without my painting fix. My
sketchbooks fill quite quickly. But I also
had a small pack of basic equipment
with me and the newness of this
landscape prompted me to paint small
works on acrylic paper, working from my
sketches and glancing occasionally at
the image on my mobile phone screen.
Light and colour
I have painted numerous times in the
south of Europe and used my
24
artist September 2017
experience of portraying this landscape
to help me with my Australia paintings.
Perhaps it is due to the area?s lack of air
pollution, and also its proximity to the
colder south polar seas, but here the
light seems clearer, with an added
sparkle and intensity, compared with
the sun-filled glory of the
Mediterranean. The red-orange cliffs
with colour-filled shadows, blues and
violet, and the ochre and red sunlit
surfaces are topped with blue-green
foliage and complementary colours,
yellows, lemon, pink and lime green.
The colour of the sea changes from
cobalt to turquoise, pale violet and
cerulean blue, all hues deep, clean and
pure with not a hint of grey!
Bearing in mind flight weight
restrictions when packing, I choose
colours that are clear, bright, and
versatile. These increase my colour
mixing opportunities and help me steer
p
Beneath the Lighthouse, Split Point,
mixed media, 10?13in (25.5?33cm).
The light was dazzling, the dark rocks
glittering in the strong sunshine, the
towering cliff stack reflecting darkly in the
turquoise waters. I didn?t have time for
much of a sketch here but managed a quick
snap while walking, and then worked from
that a few hours later while the image was
still vivid in my mind. I used ultramarine
blue, alizarin crimson and raw umber to
give monumental solidity to the rocks,
allowing flashes of bright colour to describe
the form of the cliff. In the foreground I
painted swift, broad brushstrokes of
turquoise, alizarin, lemon yellow and umber
to give light and strength without overdescribing the plants and grasses. For the
shallow water at the base of the cliffs I used
semi-transparent turquoise and crimson
applied over the pale pink background,
with cobalt blue and pale dioxazine purple
for the deeper waters
www.painters-online.co.uk
TA09p24_27_Chris_Layout 1 25/07/2017 12:53 Page 25
PRACTICAL
u Beach Activity, Jan Juc Beach, mixed
media, 10?13in (25.5?33cm).
I sketched quickly, sitting on a rock whilst
watching the silhouettes of figures along the
top of the dark rock and bright shapes
against the dark shadows. I used orange and
cadmium red with purple lake ink on the
rocks and sand and the complementary
colours of cerulean and turquoise to give
maximum impact where the sea meets the
beach; a mix of purple and cerulean added
depth and perspective to receding cliffs
q
Jan Juc Rocks from Torquay Beach, mixed
media 10?13in (25.5?33cm).
Here I made maximum use of complementary
colours, with cadmium red, ochre and orange
against strong hues of cerulean, turquoise
and ultramarine. The shadows of the rocks
and cliffs are raw umber, exploiting the reds
and warms in the portrayal of sun-lit
sandstone
My Australia painting kit
l Small tubes of acrylic colour: azo
yellow, yellow ochre, cadmium orange,
cadmium red, magenta, cobalt blue,
Prussian blue, turquoise, dioxazine
www.painters-online.co.uk
violet, titanium white and raw umber.
l Two bottles of Daler-Rowney FW
Acrylic ink: purple lake and antelope
brown.
l Oil pastels: white, lemon, ochre, pale
olive, purple, pale orange and magenta
for mixed-media work.
l Two Rosemary & Co flat brushes
(I recommend these, good value and
hard wearing), 1in and 11?2in.
l My fold-up palette (a WH SMITH
plastic document case with a pad of
tear-off paper palette sheets); a palette
knife and 20 sheets of 10?13in acrylic
paper.
l My sketching kit comprises:
hardback sketchbook with two large
bull-dog clips to hold pages down in
breezy conditions, a pack of children?s
wax crayons, felt-tip pens, (large Italic
from Berol and fine 0.5 tip by Pilot,) two
chunky water-soluble crayons in blue
and black, a field box of watercolours
and watercolour brushes.
t
well away from the grey neutrals that
one very often experiences in the
northern Europe landscape and help
me to capture the luminosity of light ?
visiting in January can be quite a visual
shock after our English winter!
artist September 2017
25
TA09p24_27_Chris_Layout 1 25/07/2017 12:53 Page 26
MIXED MEDIA
DEMONSTRATION Sail Boats, Cliffs and Pines
t
MATERIALS
ACRYLIC PAINTS
l Yellow ochre l Cadmium red
l
l
Azo yellow l Turquoise
Cobalt blue l Dioxazine purple
ACRYLIC INKS
l
Dioxazine purple
OIL PASTELS
l
p
STAGE ONE
To give the painting a warm,
sunny glow that would peep
through the next layers, I
painted the support with
yellow ochre and cadmium
red with uneven vigorous
brushmarks, hinting at the
shapes that would be painted
in at the next stage
Pale olive green l Purple l White
STAGE TWO
When the underpainting was completely dry,
and without any drawing, I added some loose
structure using darker yellow ochre, cadmium
red and dioxazine purple to describe
background cliffs and foreground shapes.
I kept it loose and transparent, allowing some
of the background to show through
STAGE THREE ABOVE RIGHT
The tree shapes were added in a loose
expressive way, and I used some pale olive
pastel and turquoise acrylic plus a touch of
acrylic ink to hint at detail in the trees and
cliffs
u
STAGE FOUR
Next I added sea and sky, using cobalt,
turquoise and a hint of purple, mixed with
white; the colours were laid down close to
each other to give movement and interest to
the surface. I painted sky holes and described
the tree shapes with a small amount of
negative painting
26
artist September 2017
www.painters-online.co.uk
TA09p24_27_Chris_Layout 1 25/07/2017 12:53 Page 27
PRACTICAL
p
FINAL PAINTING
Sail Boats, Cliffs and Pines, mixed media,
14?18in (35.5?45.5cm).
Using combinations of ochre with white I
added a little more solidity to the cliff and
foreground and hints of light on foliage using
turquoise, red and pale olive pastel. Wet sand
on the shoreline was painted in pale,
transparent purple, and I added more light
cloud detail to the sky to give a feeling of
movement. Lastly I painted the white waves,
a little more tree detail using purple ink, and
finished by adding a few sail boards to add a
little human interest, reflecting how popular
the beach is for surfing and water pursuits
?A holiday can seem to be missing something
unless I do a few works ? I guess I?m an addict
and just can?t do without my painting fix?
www.painters-online.co.uk
Chris Forsey?s
new DVD From Dynamic Sketch to Finished
Painting is a mixed-media masterclass. It?s
available from Town House Films, telephone
01603 782881, www.townhousefilms.co.uk
price �.95 plus p&p. He is a member of the
Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours
and the Society of Graphic Fine Artists. Chris
is showing at Dorking Group of Artists?
annual exhibition at Denbies Wine Estate,
London Road, Dorking, Surrey, from October
13 to 15. http://chrisforsey.com
artist September 2017
27
TA09p28_29_colourREORGANISED 2b_Layout 1 25/07/2017 12:54 Page 28
THE A-Z OF COLOUR
Julie Collins explains how to ?paint? white
in watercolour and suggests some pale
mixes to use
Julie Collins
studied painting at the University of
Reading. In 2016 she received the
Watercolour Award, 1st Prize at the Royal
West of England Academy. Julie has been
regularly selected for the ING Discerning
Eye, where she has won the regional award, and she has
received many awards from the Royal Watercolour Society.
Her paintings have been selected for many exhibitions and
she is the author of six art books. www.juliecollins.co.uk
W
is for white
I
f we are to follow Leonardo da
Vinci?s advice we are immediately
at an advantage when painting in
watercolours, as usually we will be
painting on a white paper. I am often
asked how to paint the colour white.
This is an important question,
particularly when painting in
watercolour, as normally we work on
white paper and the white paper will
shine through the watercolour paint.
There are various ways to achieve white
in your watercolours.
?For those colours
which you wish to be
beautiful always
prepare a white
background first?
Leonardo da Vinci
Watercolour papers
First of all we can consider what kind
of white our watercolour paper is.
Papers vary considerably from one
manufacturer to another and it is
worth noticing these differences.
l Bockingford is a bright, clean
white
Creating white in
watercolour
To create white areas or
highlights in watercolour you
can literally leave areas of your
paper unpainted white. This can
be achieved by using masking
fluid to preserve those areas,
painting around white shapes or
using a resist such as a white
wax candle, as I have here.
Notice how the whites in the
picture above bring the painting
alive
Colour mixes for the
tree painting
TONE
French ultramarine blue
dark
medium
pale
Permanent alizarin crimson
dark
medium
pale
Permanent alizarin crimson and French
ultramarine blue mixes
l Saunders Waterford is a cream
white
l Arches is also cream, but not as
cream as Saunders Waterford
l Schoellershammer is very white
l Fabriano is very slightly off-white
French
ultramarine
blue
Permanent
alizarin
crimson
dark
medium
pale
l Canson is described as naturally
white
l Khadi is also described as white
but is quite off-white
28
artist September 2017
More red
�+�
more blue
www.painters-online.co.uk
TA09p28_29_colourREORGANISED 2b_Layout 1 25/07/2017 12:54 Page 29
PRACTICAL
Colour mixes for whites
Cobalt blue +
burnt sienna
Cobalt blue +
burnt sienna
French
ultramarine blue
Burnt sienna +
cobalt blue
French
ultramarine blue
+ burnt sienna
Cerulean
blue
Burnt sienna +
cobalt blue
Cerulean
blue+burnt
sienna
White buildings
You can create your white subject by painting another colour behind. In the
example shown here (above) the blue sky sets off the buildings very
effectively and, for a simple study like this, you would only need to add
some grey shadows to complete the picture. Colours for greys can be seen in
the chart (below left)
Cobalt blue
Cobalt blue+
permanent rose
French
ultramarine blue
+light red
French
ultramarine
blue+light red
Cobalt blue
+permanent
alizarin crimson
French
ultramarine blue
+permanent rose
Cobalt blue
+Winsor red
French
ultramarine blue
+permanent
White in watercolour paint
It is tempting to think of white as one colour but there
are many forms of white and grey when you start to
examine white subjects. White buildings show this off
particularly well and at certain times of day there may be
little or no bright or pure white at all. Above is a chart of
some mixes that you could use for white subjects ? such
as buildings, flowers and still life. It is important to
remember to keep these mixes quite watery otherwise
these subtle colours will be too dark. As always, test your
mixes and let them dry before you paint with them.
Colour mixes for the white flower:
The same grey mixes could be used for greys in white buildings
French
ultramarine
blue
Winsor
green (yellow
shade)
Burnt
sienna
Chinese white
Chinese white is opaque and most Chinese white is made
from zinc. It is similar to white gouache, but white gouache is
much more opaque than Chinese white. It can be used to
create highlights in watercolour paintings but these highlights
won?t be as fresh as the white of the paper. The best advice
I can give you is to try it out and see if it creates the effect you
want in your work.
White flowers
A white flower is a
wonderful subject to use
for practising white in
watercolour. Using a single
flower immediately
simplifies matters and it
should be easier for you to
see the whites and shadows
on the white flower.
Remember to take care
with mixing your depth of
tones for white flowers. If
your tones are too dark you
will end up with a dull, grey
flower. If your tones are too
light you will hardly be able
to see your flower
Winsor green (yellow
shade)+burnt sienna
(for the stem)
Greys mixed with French ultramarine and burnt sienna:
Browner
www.painters-online.co.uk
Grey �+�
Bluer
artist September 2017
29
September issue 17 sub ad_Layout 1 31/07/2017 14:39 Page 1
Summer subscriber
OFFERS
PACKED WITH INSPIRING DEMONSTRATIONS TO FOLLOW
artist The Artist print edition
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September issue 2017 �20
T H E P R AC T I C A L MAG A Z I N E F O R A R T I S TS BY A R T I S TS ? S I N C E 1 9 3 1
WATERCOLOUR
A simple approach to painting
light-filled landscapes
comes direct to your home with FREE
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WATERCOLOUR
OILS
MIXED MEDIA
MIXED MEDIA
PLUS!
DEMONSTRATION
Tablescapes: be inspired by
familiar objects
How to keep your summer
greens clean & bright
Brushwork techniques to
create energy & movement
Sail Boats, Cliffs and
Pines
MATERIALS
ACRYLIC PAINTS
Yellow ochre Cadmium
Azo yellow
Cobalt blue
STAGE ONE
To give the painting
a warm,
sunny glow that would
peep
through the next layers,
I
painted the support
with
yellow ochre and cadmium
red with uneven vigorous
brushmarks, hinting
at the
shapes that would
be painted
in at the next stage
red
Turquoise
Dioxazine purple
ACRYLIC INKS
Dioxazine purple
OIL PASTELS
Pale olive green
ONLY
�92
Purple
White
!
How to capture the
effects of transparency
& glass
New ideas for great
results with collage
& paint
Discover the colours
& secrets for painting
skin tones
an issue
Australia ?
a painter?s view
how he captures the pure,
Chris Forsey demonstrates
in mixed
Australia?s Great Ocean Road
glittering light and colours of
ts of his travel painting kit
media, and shares the conten
lose family ties take me to
Australia, to a town on the
Great Ocean Road. This coastal
strip has wide beaches of
backed by
white, soft sand and dunes,
my last trip I
low tree-covered hills. On
most
endeavoured to do a painting
my aim;
days and very nearly achieved
missing
a holiday can seem to be
works ? I
few
a
do
I
something unless
can?t do
guess I?m an addict and just
without my painting fix. My
I also
But
quickly.
sketchbooks fill quite
equipment
had a small pack of basic
of this
with me and the newness
to paint small
landscape prompted me
from my
working
paper,
acrylic
on
works
y at
sketches and glancing occasionall
phone screen.
the image on my mobile
NEW!
C
Mobile friendly app
for a great reading
experience
Light and colour
times in the
I have painted numerous
my
south of Europe and used
24
artist September 2017
this landscape
experience of portraying
paintings.
to help me with my Australia
lack of air
Perhaps it is due to the area?s
to the
pollution, and also its proximity
here the
colder south polar seas, but
added
light seems clearer, with an
with
sparkle and intensity, compared
the sun-filled glory of the
cliffs
Mediterranean. The red-orange
blues and
with colour-filled shadows,
red sunlit
violet, and the ochre and
blue-green
with
topped
are
surfaces
colours,
foliage and complementary
lime green.
yellows, lemon, pink and
from
The colour of the sea changes
violet and
cobalt to turquoise, pale
clean and
cerulean blue, all hues deep,
grey!
of
pure with not a hint
Bearing in mind flight weight
I choose
restrictions when packing,
and
colours that are clear, bright,
my colour
versatile. These increase
help me steer
mixing opportunities and
Point,
Beneath the Lighthouse, Split
.
mixed media, 10?13in (25.5?33cm)
dark rocks
The light was dazzling, the
the
glittering in the strong sunshine,
darkly in the
towering cliff stack reflecting
time for
turquoise waters. I didn?t have
managed a quick
but
here
sketch
a
of
much
worked from
snap while walking, and then
the image was
that a few hours later while
ultramarine
still vivid in my mind. I used
raw umber to
blue, alizarin crimson and
to the rocks,
give monumental solidity
to describe
colour
bright
allowing flashes of
foreground I
the form of the cliff. In the
of
painted swift, broad brushstrokes
yellow and umber
turquoise, alizarin, lemon
without overto give light and strength
grasses. For the
describing the plants and
of the cliffs I used
shallow water at the base
and crimson
turquoise
rent
semi-transpa
background,
applied over the pale pink
dioxazine purple
with cobalt blue and pale
for the deeper waters
www.painters-online.co.uk
Beach Activit
y, Jan Juc Beach,
media, 10?13
mixed
in (25.5?33cm)
I sketched
.
quickly, sitting
on a rock whilst
watching the
silhouettes
of figures along
top of the
dark rock and
the
bright shape
against the
s
dark shado
ws. I used
cadmium red
orange and
with purple
lake ink on
rocks and sand
the
and the compl
colours of
ementary
STAGE TWO
cerulean and
turquoise to
maximum
When the underpaint
give
impact where
ing was completely
the sea meets
dry, beach; a mix
and without any drawing,
the
of purple and
I added some loose depth
cerule
an added
and perspe
structure using darker
ctive to recedi
yellow ochre, cadmium
ng cliffs
red and dioxazine purple
to describe
Jan Juc Rocks
background cliffs and
from Torqua
foreground shapes.
media 10?13
y Beach, mixed
I kept it loose and transparen
in (25.5?33cm)
.
t, allowing someHere I made
maximum
of the background
use of compl
to show through
colours, with
ementary
cadmium red,
ochre and
against strong
orange
hues of cerule
STAGE THREE ABOVE RIGHT
and ultram
an, turquo
arine. The
ise
The tree shapes were
shadows of
and cliffs are
added in a loose
the rocks
raw umber
expressive way, and
, exploiting
I used some pale olive and warms in the
the reds
portrayal of
pastel and turquoise
sandstone
sun-lit
acrylic plus a touch
of
acrylic ink to hint at
detail in the trees and
cliffs
STAGE FOUR
Next I added sea and
sky, using cobalt,
turquoise and a hint
of purple, mixed with
white; the colours were
laid down close to
each other to give movement
and interest to
the surface. I painted
sky holes and described
the tree shapes with
a small amount of
negative painting
26
artist September 2017
www.painters-online.co.uk
well away
from
one very often the grey neutrals that
northern Europ experiences in the
e landscape
me to captu
and help
re the lumin
osity of light
visiting in
January can
?
be quite a
shock after
visual
our English
winter!
My Australia
painting kit
Small tubes
yellow, yellow of acrylic colour: azo
cadmium red, ochre, cadmium orang
e,
Prussian blue, magenta, cobalt blue,
turquoise,
dioxazine
PACKED WITH INSPIRING DEMONSTRATIONS TO FOLLOW
www.painters-on
line.co.uk
violet, titaniu
m white and
raw
Two bottle
s of Daler-Rown umber.
tear-off paper
Acrylic ink:
ey FW
purple lake
knife and 20 palette sheets); a palett
and antelo
brown.
sheets of 10
e
pe
paper.
?13in acryli
Oil pastels:
c
white, lemon
My sketch
olive, purpl
ing
e, pale orang , ochre, pale
hardback sketch kit comprises:
for mixed-med
e and mage
book with
nta
ia work.
bull-d
two large
og clips
Two Rosem
ary & Co flat
breezy condi to hold pages down
(I recommend
brushes
in
tions, a pack
these
wax
, good
of childr
crayons, felt-ti
hard weari
ng), 1in and 1 value and
p pens, (large en?s
from Berol
1 ?2in.
My fold-up
Italic
and
chunky water fine 0.5 tip by Pilot,)
plastic docum palette (a WH SMITH
two
-soluble crayo
ent case with
and black,
ns in blue
a pad of
a field
and watercolou box of watercolou
rs
r brushes.
artist The Artist digital edition
www.painters-online.co.uk
PRA CTICA L
September issue 2017 �20
artist Septem
ber 2017
25
T H E P R AC T I C A L MAG A Z I N E F O R A R T I S T S BY A R T I S T S ? S I N C E 1 9 3 1
WATERCOLOUR
A simple approach to painting
light-filled landscapes
WATERCOLOUR
OILS
MIXED MEDIA
allows you instant access and the opportunity to
read anytime, anywhere on your smartphone or
tablet from just �99.
PLUS!
Tablescapes: be inspired by
familiar objects
How to keep your summer
greens clean & bright
Brushwork techniques to
create energy & movement
!
How to capture the
effects of transparency
& glass
Discover the colours
& secrets for painting
skin tones
New ideas for great
results with collage
& paint
Available from pocketmags.com/theartist
TA09p31_33_MarieALTERNATIVE_Layout 1 25/07/2017 12:55 Page 31
Express yourself
in acrylics
Marie Antoniou shows you how, through
a series of controlled or gestural marks, you can
restrict yourself to a 2in brush to make a uniquely
expressive painting
Your marks make you special
Imagine a straight line. If you were to
draw or paint a straight line without a
ruler, it might be a little shaky. For
some people that can be upsetting and
create a feeling of failure, but for me it
brings me closer to the person behind
it. That singular mark is what makes you
special, so embrace the shakes!
Some of the greatest artists can be
identified through their marks. Van
Gogh is a good example of this. When I
saw his work in the Van Gogh museum I
couldn't help but feel his presence
through his brushstrokes ? his marks
are so alive and expressive. What
makes you special is how you interpret
your subject, whether through mark
making, powerful subject matter or
strong colour, these elements will make
you stand out.
Many people comment on the sense
of movement in my own paintings ?
marks going in different directions with
flicks, twists and turns are what create
this impression. Every mark is as
important as the next and I want the
viewer to enjoy the scene through my
own energy encompassed in every
mark made.
www.painters-online.co.uk
CHALLENGE YOURSELF
Sometimes we can get too comfortable when producing our paintings. Marks
can appear dull, lifeless and overworked. I can normally tell when I view a
painting if someone has got bored as their marks become repetitive. A good
example of this is when painting grass, lots of similar lines all going in the
same direction with a tiny brush. Stepping out of your comfort zone will
create another dimension to your work and help you evolve as an artist. You
can make a start by:
l Trading in your tiny brushes for a large brush
l Use your largest brush for details
l Use your whole arm rather than working from the wrist, which gives
ultimate control
l Paint a subject unfamiliar to you, even something you don't like!
l Work larger or smaller
l On a small surface, don't scale down brush size, use a large brush
l Restrict your equipment: one or two brushes
l Restrict your colour palette
Initially you may feel uncomfortable and awkward but it's purely for your own
benefit ? no one else needs to see your experimental artworks. For me art is
about exploring the different ways in which a subject can be interpreted, not
being predictable.
t
W
hether you make art to sell
or for therapy, allowing
yourself to shine through
your work is something you
shouldn't shy away from. You don't
have to spend years of studying to be
able to express yourself. We all have
feelings and emotions that we can use
in our artwork. Whether on paper,
canvas or clay, self-expression normally
begins with some sort of mark, even for
photorealistic painters.
artist September 2017
31
TA09p31_33_MarieALTERNATIVE_Layout 1 25/07/2017 12:55 Page 32
ACRYLICS
DEMONSTRATION One Brush Does All
People gasp when I show them my large brushes. I guess to most people a large brush appears scary and uncontrollable but
it?s not the size that matters, rather the marks it creates. Here?s how I develop a picture from start to finish using one 2in brush
MATERIALS
l
Daler-Rowney acrylic paints:
burnt sienna, deep violet,
cerulean blue, process cyan,
white, phthalo green, yellow
ochre, cadmium yellow
l
Daler-Rowney artist-quality
canvas
l
Liquitex 2in flat brush
l
Mixing tray
l
Kitchen roll
l
Water pot
u
STAGE ONE
On a base colour of process cyan,
burnt sienna and white I started with
a loosely sketched outline using the
corner of my 2in brush with a pure
mix of burnt sienna and deep violet
p
STAGE TWO
Still using the corner of my brush I applied more pressure
to create a slightly thicker mark to block in areas of the
dog. The face and ears were blocked in with directional
strokes using cerulean blue, deep violet and white. Next I
used the full width and corner of the brush in different
directions to fill the body. Short and long strokes applied
side by side create contrasts using various mixes of burnt
sienna, yellow ochre and white, as well as separate mixes
of cerulean blue, burnt sienna and white. The different
strengths of the colour tints also help each mark to be seen
clearly when layered or placed alongside one another
32
artist September 2017
p
STAGE THREE
Once I had blocked in the main areas of the dog I allowed the paint to
settle and dry. Moving on to the background I used the full width of the
brush to block in large areas behind the dog with phthalo green, burnt
sienna, yellow ochre and white on the left-hand side. On the right-hand
side I broke up the colour, applying a mix of burnt sienna, deep violet and
white, and a mix of process cyan, deep violet and white. Introducing
another colour helps to break up the monotony of a similar colour. I then
went back to using a pure mix of deep violet and burnt sienna to identify
my darkest tones around the dog and, in turn, bring out the shape. This
also can help if you have made so many marks you have lost the subject. I
had used all areas of the brush with long and short twists, drags and flicks
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TA09p31_33_MarieALTERNATIVE_Layout 1 25/07/2017 12:55 Page 33
PRACTICAL
t
q
FINISHED PAINTING
Boo, acrylic, 24?18in (61?45.5cm).
When the first few layers had settled and
dried I continued with the same colours in a
variety of tints with a few more interesting
brushstrokes pulling out highlights and
darks, while introducing smaller marks
through dragging and dabbing so they can
be seen against the larger marks made earlier
in the process. The highlights in the eyes
were made with a tiny dab using the corner
tip of the brush. For the very dark areas
around the eyes, nose and ears I used the
corner tip with a short drag. I saved my
smallest marks til the end ? they help draw
the viewer into a more concentrated area
within the face
Tips
l
l
Rather than cleaning your brush
every few minutes, overcome the
colours already on your brush either
by loading with a colour to create
tone or white to vary the tints.
To avoid a drippy muddy mess,
make sure you use your kitchen roll
to dab off excess water in between
cleaning ? the brush should be
damp, not soaking wet!
Marie Antoniou
teaches drawing and painting, privately
and in adult education classes. She
exhibits widely, and has been selected
for The Society of Wildlife Artists?
annual exhibition, the David Shepherd
Wildlife Artist of the Year, the BBC
Wildlife Artist of the Year competition
and won many awards. Maria
contributed to the acrylics section of
Artist?s Painting Techniques, published
by Dorling Kindersley, price �, ISBN
9780241229453. For more information
about Marie?s workshops, and to see
more of her work, visit
www.marieantoniou.com
www.painters-online.co.uk
artist September 2017
33
TA09p34_37_Robert Dutton2ND SORT_Layout 1 25/07/2017 12:56 Page 34
PERSPECTIVE IN FOCUS: 1 OF 3
Landscape in perspective
Robert Dutton begins a new series in which he outlines the importance of
perspective ? this month he applies perspective to the wide-open landscape
T
he very word perspective makes
most art students shudder ? all
that ?technical drawing?, precision
and formulaic planning ? yikes!
Well, it?s easier than you think and let?s
face it, you need to get to grips with at
least the very basic principles of
perspective to see real improvements
in your art.
Regardless of your subject, good
perspective is the foundation on which
a good painting is based. Even the
simplest compositions are stronger
when artists show evidence of good
perspective skills.
Assess your subject
The most obvious subjects that require
perspective are buildings and
cityscapes. In the next issue we will
look at this more closely but let?s not
overlook landscape. The ?big
landscape? can appear daunting at first
? especially to beginners and artists
just starting to paint the subject but
some pre-planning will help you as you
work.
Firstly, ask yourself why you want to
paint the scene. Take your time ? look,
think and assess the scene (through a
viewfinder if that helps); rushing
headlong into drawing and painting
your scene before you?ve really
planned what you want to do will get
you into all sorts of trouble ? especially
with scale.
When looking for perspective within a
flat open expanse of moorland, sparse
of any redeeming features, it?s hard to
find anything at first to use as a guide
to lead the eye through your painting
and to discover the true characteristics
of the perspective within the scene.
By following the contours of the land,
the undulating shapes and shadows,
then plotting those shapes, the angle of
the deep gullies and carefully
observing the angle of boulders,
pathways and tracks, all is revealed.
By analysing your chosen composition
into a series of shapes, forms, tones
and, of course, the ?feel ? for your
subject, you can begin to apply the
basic principles of perspective to those
elements to bind them all together. In
Sun and Shadow over the Old Moors ? South
Pennines (below) the underlying
perspective forms a strong framework
on which all the above principles are
intertwined.
Everything on the level
The most important thing to establish
before you begin is your eye level in
relation to what you are looking at. If it
is difficult to ascertain this, try drawing
a series of lines at the correct angle
from objects you can see ? where they
cross over or correspond with one
another will establish their vanishing
points. Be prepared for the vanishing
points to be outside your composition;
p
p
Sun and Shadow over the Old Moor? South Pennines, mixed media on
Canson Moulin du Roy Not 140lb (300gsm), 20?22 in (51?56cm)
34
artist September 2017
By following the perspective angles and direction
of the top coping stones of the wall using their edges
as a guide, and the angle of the laid stones within the
middle distance wall (the red lines), I could quickly
confirm where my eye level was (the green horizontal
line) and thus keep a strong focus on the structure of
the landscape at every stage during the painting
process from start to finish
www.painters-online.co.uk
TA09p34_37_Robert Dutton2ND SORT_Layout 1 25/07/2017 12:56 Page 35
PRACTICAL
p
don?t force a vanishing point back into
a composition just to make it easy for
yourself because it will be wrong and
throw everything out.
Tonal values also help with
perspective. Working from light to dark
(stronger colours in the foreground and
lighter colours towards the back) helps
to give the impression of aerial
perspective. In watercolour the lightest
light is the white of the paper ? adding
white during the process or at the end
will never be a substitute for the pure
white of the paper as the same
brightness or lightness of tone cannot
be achieved.
Proportions
The distances between each and every
element in the composition, and their
scale in relation to one another is really
important as it will unify everything in
the painting. Pay close attention to the
actual solid volume, tone and colour of
the shapes, the negative spaces and
distances between each creates the
framework too. As a painting develops
don?t just paint with a brush, draw with
it too.
Creating some sort of added drama,
point of focus or contrast gives a
painting the edge. Equal amounts of
dark and light within a painting can
stifle it, despite your best efforts. Try to
think about different proportions or
relationships between light and dark in
your compositions ? more light in ratio
to dark or, more dramatic still, more
dark in relationship to ?spotlight? light.
t
p Pathway Over the Moors, Van Gogh gouache, Rembrandt and Unison
pastels, Quink ink, Royal Talens acrylic ink and Nitram charcoal on
Canson Moulin du Roy Not 140lb (300gsm), 20?22in (51?56cm)
Notice how the red perspective lines linking the Pennine
gritstone slabs converge to a single eye-level point in the
distance (the green horizon line in the diagram). You can tell I
was standing to paint this because you get the impression of
looking down on the subject
DEMONSTRATION Summer Mists, Malhamdale, Yorkshire Dales
q
Perspective and tonal sketch on Canson Moulin
du Roy Not 140lb (300gsm), 22?30in (56?76cm).
Using a variety of mixed black and white media
I planned in tone what direction to take for the full
colour mixed-media studio painting
p
My reference photo
See if you can discover the perspective lines in the composition for yourself now I
have explained how to find them
www.painters-online.co.uk
artist September 2017
35
TA09p34_37_Robert Dutton2ND SORT_Layout 1 25/07/2017 12:56 Page 36
PERSPECTIVE IN FOCUS: 1 OF 3
p
STAGE ONE
Paying close attention to perspective, I drew out the main
shapes with a 9B graphite stick then, with Derwent Inktense
water-soluble pastels, I quickly established the main shapes,
tones and local colour areas. The flexibility of the pastels allowed
big brush washes of rich, saturated colour and expressive handdrawn marks
p
STAGE TWO
Once the first washes had dried I strengthened several areas using Royal
Talens acrylic inks (working flat this time), adding water to weaken the highly
saturated pigments when needed. By developing the full painting in all areas
at the same time rather than in disparate parts, the painting quickly
interlocked as a whole
t
STAGE THREE
When the ink had dried I added transparent and more opaque layers (adding
white at this stage) using Royal Talens Extra Fine Quality Gouache, firstly
with weaker washes of cobalt blue mixed with violet and a little burnt umber
in a variety of strengths to sort out the main shapes and further develop
light and dark areas as well as topographical detail. Using Pro Arte
Connoisseur round size 20 and Series 106 Prolene One Stoke Flat 11?4in
brushes, I blocked in the deeper shades of the sloping fields and trees using
viridian, ultramarine light, blue violet and a little alizarin crimson, paying
close attention to the various tones within these areas ? particularly the
shadows ? strengthening the colours as I moved forwards
u
STAGE FOUR
I loosely developed everything, again using dry Inktense sticks ?
especially to imply texture. Keeping everything as ?free flowing?
and as expressive as possible, the whole painting had begun to
take shape. Using direct and confident mark-making techniques
with different media throughout the painting helped to create a
good balance between detail and expression
36
artist September 2017
www.painters-online.co.uk
TA09p34_37_Robert Dutton2ND SORT_Layout 1 25/07/2017 12:56 Page 37
PRACTICAL
p
FINISHED PAINTING
Summer Mists, Malhamdale, Yorkshire Dales, mixed media
on Canson Moulin du Roy Not 140lb (300gsm), 20?22in
(51?56cm).
To bring the painting together I assessed the composition
in terms of light and shade and points of focus. In selected
areas I used Amsterdam spray paints and added opaque
and semi-opaque Amsterdam Expert Acrylics with a
palette knife, notably the sky and foreground (the Canson
100 per cent rag content paper is strong enough to take
this). Once done, I intensified selected areas in terms of
light and dark and again adjusted the tones with both
Rembrandt and Unison pastels. The result is an expressive
and dramatic painting, with a strong composition and
good drawing in perfect perspective!
www.painters-online.co.uk
Robert Dutton
teaches pastel, acrylic, watercolour
and mixed-media techniques
nationally and tutors art holidays in
the Lake District, Norfolk and Spain.
He exhibits widely and has won
several awards for his work. Robert
has contributed pastel paintings to
Artist?s Drawing Techniques to be
published by Dorling Kindersley, price
�, ISBN9780241255988. To learn
more about Robert?s art holidays and
workshops and to see more of his
work, visit: www.rdcreative.co.uk
artist September 2017
37
TA09p38_41_Rob wareingSHORTER_Layout 1 25/07/2017 12:57 Page 1
Portraits of African lives
Rob Wareing, who uses the same palette for both dark and light
complexions, shares his hints and tips for painting portraits
O
ne of the most exciting things
about painting people with
darker complexions is the way
that light reflects on their
skin. The contrasts are greater and the
form and structure of the head more
evident. Colours are also easier to see.
My studio in South Africa has a large
south-facing window (the equivalent of
a north-facing window in the northern
hemisphere), which gives me a cool
constant natural light source with no
direct sunlight coming into the room.
The intensity of the light can change
with cloud cover but the shapes of
light, half-tone and shadow remain the
same.
Occasionally I paint a subject
outdoors. In these situations I will
either paint in a shaded area or with
the sun almost directly behind the
model, creating more of an edge light ?
the features of the sitter will then be in
the reflected light. A wide-brimmed hat
is essential to protect my eyes from the
fierce African sun and I find that an
hour is about as much as the sitter and
I can take in these direct sun situations.
Palette
I am often asked what colours I use for
painting dark skin. My palette remains
the same whether I am painting a
blonde child on the beach or an elderly
African gentleman in my studio: burnt
sienna, ultramarine blue (deep),
alizarin crimson, raw sienna, yellow
ochre, cadmium red, cadmium red light,
cadmium orange, cadmium yellow
deep, cadmium yellow pale and
titanium white. Other colours that I only
use when the situation requires are
cerulean blue, ultramarine blue, violet
and viridian green.
In the oil sketch The Miner (below), I
show mixtures used to paint the head
under cool natural light. This might not
seem like a lot of colours but I have
always been fascinated by the beautiful
colourful paintings of Anders Zorn who
it is said only used four colours: black,
t The Miner, oil sketch, 15?12in
(38?30.5cm).
Here I used a limited palette (which can be
added to) to show colour combinations:
A Darkest dark (black):
burnt sienna and ultramarine blue, no
white and painted transparently
B Shadow:
E
burnt sienna and ultramarine blue with
titanium white
C Shadow halftone:
burnt sienna, ultramarine blue and a little
alizarin crimson with white
D
D Light halftone:
F
C
B
(where colour appears strongest) burnt
sienna with a touch of cadmium red and
yellow ochre with white
E Light and highlight:
cadmium yellow, pale alizarin crimson and
a touch of blue with white
A
F Reflected light:
burnt sienna and yellow ochre
Other colour combinations that can be
tried are viridian green and burnt sienna
in the shadows and alizarin crimson, burnt
sienna with ultramarine blue violet to give
a cool red grey in light halftones. These
are just suggestions to help in painting
what you see. Much more important is
getting the values right
38
artist September 2017
www.painters-online.co.uk
TA09p38_41_Rob wareingSHORTER_Layout 1 25/07/2017 12:57 Page 38
u Portrait of Molly and Yenzaogolthi, oil on
canvas, 30?24in (76?61cm).
Before embarking on this portrait I was aware
of most of the difficulties I would face and
needed to be clear about what I wanted to
capture
white, yellow ochre and vermilion. This
really emphasises how important
values are.
My preferred way of working is to
have the model in front of me
throughout the painting process and
most of my work is done in this way. Of
course a painting of the mother with
baby on her back (right) would be
almost impossible for me to complete
without photographic reference but I
still have a go and find that so much
information is gained in a 20-minute
session that this sketch becomes my
most important reference. Having the
model in front of me allows me to
judge colours and values accurately. I
work looking regularly in a mirror
behind me where I can see both model
and painting together. It still amazes
me how faults in drawing and values
become exaggerated in the mirror. This
way of working is exciting and involves
you totally and when successful leaves
you on a high and inspired for hours
after the sitting.
How I approach more
complicated subjects
www.painters-online.co.uk
?I work looking regularly in a mirror
behind me where I can see both model
and painting together?
also with us on this day, which helped
greatly because he had decided that
modelling was not for him. In the
afternoon I started the large canvas,
paying attention to design and head
sizes. I was able to get a lot of Molly
done because she could hold the pose
for longer without Yenza on her back. I
finished the painting from my
references and would certainly not
have been able to complete Yenza
without photographic references.
Edges
I simplify the edges in my painting into
four types of edges: hard, firm, soft and
lost. When observing my subject I
always squint my eyes so that I can
easily see the sharpest edges first. I
then search for the lost edges; after that
the firm edges and then soft edges. A
good control of edges can improve the
strength and appeal of a painting
immensely and also gives us the ability
as artists to guide the viewer's eye to
see what we are seeing. Somewhere in
our past we have been conditioned to
outline everything (probably as far back
as colouring-in books). Photographs
might be amazing in capturing
moments and details but they are
distinctly lacking in values and edges,
especially peripheral edges. This is
another reason why life drawing and
painting from life is so important to
improve an artist's observational skills.
t
A mother with a baby on her back is a
very common sight in Africa and a great
subject for a painting. In Molly and
Yenzaogolthi (above right) I opted for
natural studio lighting rather than direct
sunlight, to allow for a more
comfortable environment for the
models and for myself to fully resolve
the painting. We started with tenminute pastel sketches, exploring the
shapes of light, halftone and shadow.
These are broad studies where heads
and hands are reduced to one or two
values with no detail. Lots of photos
are also taken from every angle. By the
end of the day and after a few nappy
changes and a couple of naps and
feeds we arrived at a pose that I could
explore further.
In the morning I completed two small
oil studies of the pose, working with a
large brush and focusing on large
shapes and peripheral edges and
searching for lost edges and selective
hard edges. Yenza's grandmother was
artist September 2017
39
h
La
exh
He
me
se
of
TA09p38_41_Rob wareingSHORTER_Layout 1 25/07/2017 12:57 Page 39
OIL PORTRAIT
DEMONSTRATION Lindo
u
STAGE ONE
After arriving at a
pose that my model
can comfortably
hold, I started with a
charcoal sketch.
Although I was not
after an exact
likeness at this
stage I wanted my
proportions and
design to feel right.
I had toned my
canvas before
starting with a light
mid-tone grey and
used Nitram
charcoal (B) to lay in
the drawing. A lot of
emphasis was put on proportions of length and angles
u
STAGE TWO
Using a large brush (size 10 filbert) I tried to establish a tonal range
and, in the process, cover the initial drawing. I focused on shapes,
value and colour temperature
p
p
STAGE THREE
I started to recover the drawing, focusing on bringing the eyes to a
finish. I used a small brush (size 2 filbert) to redraw and check
important proportions
40
artist September 2017
STAGE FOUR
By now I was working on the smaller shapes with appropriate
brushes. I had been working for about an hour and a half, with a
break and lots of conversation, which had allowed me to study the
movement, especially on the lower part of the face. I was trying to
capture something that is fleeting but there ? to quote the American
painter Caroline Anderson: ?the balance between accurate analysis
and intuition?
www.painters-online.co.uk
TA09p38_41_Rob wareingSHORTER_Layout 1 25/07/2017 12:57 Page 40
p
FINISHED PAINTING
Lindo, oil on canvas, 24?20in (61?51cm).
After refining important details and a final
check on edges I was finished. One of the
main advantages of having a model in front
of me is that it helps me to not over-work the
painting and my focus remains only on the
important things
www.painters-online.co.uk
Rob Wareing
is a professional portrait painter. This year he will be hosting his
annual portrait and figure painting workshops in the UK in
October. The emphasis is on painting from life, with an interesting
selection of models to paint or draw at each workshop. The
workshops are suitable for people of all abilities; see
www.robwareing.com for dates and details. He will also be
demonstrating for a number of art societies throughout the UK.
artist September 2017
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TA09p42_45_Paul TG_Layout 1 25/07/2017 13:00 Page 42
C O N T R A S T S I N W AT E R C O L O U R : 5 O F 6
Near versus far
Paul Talbot-Greaves shows you how to achieve depth in your
watercolour painting ? it?s not always about following the rules of aerial
perspective, as he explains
t a recent workshop I was asked
why my demonstration painting
appeared to have a great
amount of depth when I had
used values that were darker in the
background than in the foreground. The
person asking the question had always
been told you had to make the
distance pale and the foreground
strong and that cool colours have to be
used in the background. Distance is an
illusion that is achieved through the
use of aerial perspective and whilst
colours are often cooler towards the
horizon, they aren?t always. Likewise,
they?re not always pale values either.
The distance, like all other elements of
a painting is relative to the focus you
A
choose and, in turn, how you decide to
treat it.
Exaggerating distance
You can make anything distant, even
features in the middle ground. Distance
is relative to your focus, so choose that
first and decide where it is going to be
in the painting. A focus is part of the
painting that holds the viewer?s
attention so it needs to be prominent
and interesting. A focus can be anything
from a figure or figures to trees, a
splash of light, a building, a lake and so
on. Once you have decided on your
focus you may need to use a
compositional grid to place it in an
appropriate setting near or around two
A
of the intersecting compositional lines.
Features behind the focal point can be
made to appear more distant than they
might really be, which in turn puts more
emphasis on the focus you have chosen
and creates greater depth in your work.
There are a few techniques to use but
the main intention is to use less detail
and blur most of the hard edges. Use a
large brush to suggest any would-be
fine detail shapes to generate simpler
marks and a more distant feel. To blur
edges, the wet-into-wet technique is an
evocative way to create softness;
alternatively, paint the shapes in a
conventional hard-edged manner and
allow them to dry. Take a fine spray
bottle and lightly spray the area with
B
Three approaches to generating distance
A
Here the distance has been achieved traditionally, using diluted
colour to allow more of the paper to show through
B
Following a similar approach, I used thinner colour but added
opaque white paint to the mix. The result is a slightly more solid,
duller finish
C
I mixed some colour with thick white paint and applied it neat to the
paper. Notice that the application has formed a ragged edge because
only a tiny amount of water was added to the paint. With colour so
thick, I was able to place it more precisely than thinner paint
42
artist September 2017
C
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TA09p42_45_Paul TG_Layout 1 25/07/2017 13:00 Page 43
Aerial perspective
This is the illusion of depth and helps
create recession in your work. As I have
just outlined it?s not necessary to make
your background paler, as it is subject
to the overall image and lighting.
However, if you do use paler colours
you will create a huge amount of
recession. Use your paints quite dilute
and maybe add extra blue to colour
mixes, such as cobalt blue to give the
impression of intervening atmosphere.
Other ways of creating aerial
perspective are through using
repetitive, similar-sized features such
as people, poles, trees or animals.
These will reduce in both size and
detail as they recede and often a
simple estimation of the reduction in
visible detail is all that is required.
With structures such as buildings and
roads, one- or two-point perspective
can be used to gain the receding lines
of the feature. Whilst perspective can
be a confusing experience for many
people it really doesn?t have to be and
if you paint loose, your perspective
lines don?t need to be entirely
accurate, so long as they are roughly
going in the right direction. A simple
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rule of thumb is that of expectation:
you either expect a perspective line to
slope downwards or upwards. First
locate your eye level; any lines above
will slope downwards towards a
vanishing point located on it and those
below will slope upwards towards it in
the same way. Lines near your eye level
will have a shallow gradient and those
further away will have a steep gradient.
There is no replacement for looking,
but the expectation of which way a line
will slope, and the steepness of the
angle, will help you place the lines
correctly.
Foregrounds
The foreground is, of course, relative to
the focus of the painting. If the focus is
in the foreground then you may need a
reasonable amount of detail to support
it, but most of the time the focus is in
or near the middle ground. With a
foreground, you want to hint at what is
there without necessarily painting
everything in intricate detail. After all,
you want the viewer to look at your
focal point, not the clumps of grass in
the front of the picture. I try to
encourage people to look at things this
way instead of painting something just
because it is there. The best way is to
hint at rather than state. Paint clumps
of grass, mole hills, reeds and so on
using a damp-into-damp technique
with paint containing very little
moisture onto paper that is damp but
not saturated. Soft shapes like this
suggest at detail rather than state it
and, in context of a sharper focus, will
p
Long Ridging, Oxenhope, watercolour on
Saunders Waterford 300lb (640gsm) Rough,
15?22in (38?56cm).
I mixed a little white into the distant colours
and also used spray to generate soft and
broken edges. The trees under the horizon
were hinted at, putting more emphasis on
the building. The distance was contrasted
with the big foreground shapes and
perspective, which really open up the visual
space
allow the eye to absorb what is there
without being drawn to it.
Using white
White paint such as titanium white,
opaque white, gouache or Chinese
white will create tints in your colour
that will help to generate the feel of
distance. Chinese white is weakest and
will add a subtle, milky appearance to
your colour, whereas titanium white is
strongest and will alter your colour
quite drastically. The reason for adding
white over traditional methods of
diluting colour is to add a slightly
opaque haziness to the colour. This
often gives an illusion of light and
depth to the distance. Another way of
using white is to mix it thickly with
colour. This also dulls the colour
slightly which helps to create an
automatic feeling of distance,
especially when contrasted against
richer colour and stronger values
elsewhere in the painting. Thicker paint
is slightly easier to control if you wish
to blur small shapes together in the
distance or achieve drag-brush effects.
artist September 2017
t
water so that it is just damp, then
follow up with a stiff brush and gently
work the edge of the paint into a blur.
Any feature in the background of your
painting that has soft or blurry edges
will automatically look distant whether
they are dark or light. Don?t always
concern yourself with values and rules,
look at the edges.
43
TA09p42_45_Paul TG_Layout 1 25/07/2017 13:00 Page 44
C O N T R A S T S I N W AT E R C O L O U R : 5 O F 6
DEMONSTRATION Light through the Gate
p
STAGE ONE
After drawing out I freely washed cobalt blue in the sky and
brought this into burnt sienna and Winsor violet in the
background using a size 6 squirrel mop brush. I then continued
into viridian and yellow ochre on the left and cobalt blue with
touches of viridian on the right
u
p
STAGE TWO
When dry, I sprayed some areas of the sky with a small diffuser and
worked on the distance using a simple wash on the right-hand side
and mixing colours on the paper to the left. I tried to suggest as much
as I could using a wet-into-wet technique to give the background a
soft appearance
STAGE THREE
Next I worked on the stronger elements of shade using ultramarine
with neutral tint and, in the shadows, viridian with neutral tint. I left
some of the starting wash for the highlights on the walls
q
STAGE FOUR
I sharpened up some features with a size 4 squirrel mop brush and
suggested stonework in the wall. Here I aimed to strike a delicate
balance with the distance and decided to add a couple of simple wall
shapes in the middle ground
44
artist September 2017
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TA09p42_45_Paul TG_Layout 1 25/07/2017 13:00 Page 45
p
FINISHED PAINTING
Light through the Gate, watercolour on Arches
140lb (300gsm) Rough, 11?15in (28?38cm).
Finally I added a little texture to the wall using
some dilute gouache and painted the lit gate,
again using gouache for its opacity. I softened
some parts of the painting with spray to play
down hard edges. The distant feel to this
painting was achieved through aerial
perspective and by blurring distant parts
THIS
MONTH?S
CHALLENGE
Create a painting from my
photograph of the river. I?d like
you to put the right-hand trees
and water into strong focus,
keeping the foreground simple
and using techniques to blur and
simplify the entire background.
Take a good-quality photo of your
painting and email your work to
dawn@tapc.co.uk together with a
brief description (no more than
100 words) about the process you
used, with PTG5 in the subject
line, by October 27.
Have fun, good luck
and happy painting
www.painters-online.co.uk
artist September 2017
45
TA09p46_47_jacksons test report_Layout 1 25/07/2017 13:01 Page 46
TEST REPORT
A class act
Max Hale says Jackson's Black Hog brushes are well
made and exceeded his expectations in all respects
y first sight of this range was a
year ago when I reviewed the
whole stable of Jackson's oil
and acrylic brushes for The
Artist June 2016 issue. I've been working
with the test brushes in one form or
another since my initial review.
In general hog brushes are tough little
chaps, perhaps slightly primitive. They
exude resilience and are totally able to
carry paint, no matter how viscous. They
stand up to rough treatment but
eventually lose some of their shape and
become a different beast to the one you
originally bought. Experienced painters
M
46
artist September 2017
expect this metamorphosis and cope with
it by using worn brushes for other strokes
or marks.
Black Hogs in close-up
Jackson?s Black Hogs are different ? not
rudimentary but sophisticated in so many
ways ? a class act. When you pick up a
brush the first thing you notice is the
balance. It sits perfectly in the hand and
the fulcrum, or balance point, is a third of
the way up the handle. The long, matt
black handle has the feel of coolness and
contrasts beautifully with the chrome
ferrule and the unusual dual colour of the
bristle ? burnt umber at the business end,
fading to a much lighter shade as it
reaches the ferrule.
When compared to other hogs the Black
Hog bristles are silky smooth, fine and
springy, almost like a hybrid, perhaps a
hog/sable mix? The manufacture and
q
Two Gentlemen and a Bike, oil on canvas
board, 93?4?113?4in (25?30cm).
Using Jackson's Black Hog brushes, mostly
filberts, I kept the approach soft and almost
without edges of any description. Even the
bicycle was kept loose and without emphasis
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TA09p46_47_jacksons test report_Layout 1 25/07/2017 13:01 Page 47
p
Boscastle, Tide In, acrylic on gessoed
hardboard, 113?4?233?4in (30?60cm).
Jackson?s Black Hog flats were used to make
particularly edgy and definite brushmarks in
a loose but specific way to protect the boat
shapes but make the harbour less obvious.
The mark making was the focus of this
painting, with the value structure being
secondary. I expected this to be semiabstract, and was successful
quality of all Jackson's brushes is superb
and, in my opinion, the Black Hog is at the
zenith of this.
I tested the flats, sizes 2, 4, 8 and 12, and
filberts sizes 4, 6, 8 and 10. The crafting of
the bristle shape at the toe end is very
important, as is mark making. Leaving a
particular brushmark in a heavy or
impasto paint would influence my choice
of brush from the outset, which is why
this brush surprised me particularly. It has
a sophisticated, up-market appearance
and feel, yet behaves like a street fighter.
Mark making
Hog brushes are at their best when being
flexed, splaying out as the pressure
applied to make the bristles spread gives
the paint a softer, more cloud-like
appearance. They are perfect for blending
oils or laying in a light underpainting;
Black Hogs are equal to this, and bounce
back for more, almost like a synthetic in
everything but the mark they leave.
Pushing a brush against the bristles is
not a movement or painting method
www.painters-online.co.uk
I would recommend but in my testing
I tried it with a regular hog and a Black
Hog. They both behaved similarly, but the
mark making was different, possibly
because the regular hog was slightly
stiffer and therefore required greater
effort. In a more usual painting action
such as stroking or placing of pigment,
Jackson?s Black Hogs exceeded my
expectations in their ability to hold paint,
the springiness of the filaments helping
to support a stroke shape, and also the
physical aspects of the manufacture,
particularly balance. I tried them on
cotton canvas, linen boards and gessoed
hardboard. In each case the mark was
true and without fuss.
If, unlike me, you are a painter who
prefers a smoother finish to your work
then the Black Hog brushes would be
your perfect tool, too. As I mentioned
previously the strength of this particular
brush is in its flexibility and longevity,
which is why it is a must to try regardless
of your painting style. In my painting kit I
have used two particular brushes for
about 14 months and they show little
sign of wear and have become a
staple of my brush armoury.
One other point to take note is
that Black Hogs work well with oil
and acrylic paint. Because of their
springiness and ability to leave marks but
are slightly malleable, they suit both
media for slightly different reasons. I am a
great believer in trying out a brush type
to see if it suits my process and I have
used Jackson's Black Hogs across oil and
TA
acrylic work with great success.
Jackson's Black Hog brushes come in three
series: Pointed Round 333; Flat 334; and
Filbert 335, all in sizes 2 to 12.
www.jacksonsart.com
Max Hale
studied at Harrow School of Art. He
teaches workshops and painting
holidays, and offers personal
mentoring. His DVD First Steps in
Water-Mixable Oils is available from
Town House Films price �.95;
www.townhousefilms.co.uk;
telephone 01603 782888.
www.maxhaleart.co.uk
artist September 2017
47
TA09p48_50_Liz_Layout 1 25/07/2017 13:08 Page 48
Shake-up your style
with collage
Liz Seward turns to collage whenever she wants to lift herself out
of a rut, with still life the perfect subject matter ? the possibilities are
endless, she says, so why not give it a go?
D
uring the course of a long
career teaching painting and
drawing I have spent a lot of
time persuading students that
the subject of still life can be as
exciting as any other, with considerable
advantages over many of them. It
doesn?t move, the light source is
usually constant, it can be as colourful
as desired ? or not, and it is personal to
you and can have a story to tell. In
addition, it will teach you all you need
to know about drawing shapes,
perspective, texture and composition?
what?s not to like?
Banish the block
About 25 years ago I had a period of
painter?s block. I was painting mostly in
watercolour and selling well, but
wanted to break out of the ?safe? and
predictable rut I was in. An artist friend
advised I change media and try working
on textured surfaces, including collage.
Although I had misgivings I gave it a go,
with startling results. From that time I
was hooked and although I paint in
48
artist September 2017
many forms of mixed media, whenever I
need a bit of a shake-up I turn to
collage and allow it to (partially) tell me
what to do.
As it had worked so well for me, I
wondered whether it would work for my
more advanced students. Well, it did
but with mixed results. However, the
real result was that it persuaded them
that still life is not boring and has
endless possibilities.
Ways with collage
There are many different ways of
working with collage. I have artist
friends who will paint the whole piece
with cut paper before applying paint,
others who will use paint until the
piece is almost finished before
applying any collage. Some artists will
incorporate text into a painting to give
both a message and texture, and some,
like me, will use decorative papers to
spring surprises of colour, pattern and
texture. Many discover their own
preferred way through a process of trial
and error, as I did.
So what materials are used? Over the
years, I have built up a large collection
of papers, from very beautiful handmade
papers, available at good art shops and
stationers, to serviettes with music,
flowers, smiley faces and all manner of
shapes. Coloured paper, wrapping
paper and tissue have all been
squirrelled away to await the moment
when they are just what I?m looking for.
Many old watercolour paintings have
had a second lease of life.
The surface that I stick onto is usually
mountboard that has had a thin
skimming of gesso primer first. I have
also used cheap watercolour paper very
successfully. Both these surfaces need
to be framed under glass, which
enables me to use pastels and crayons
on them. I have worked on canvas
board and canvas, but because these
are framed unglazed I usually confine
myself to working only in paint. The
glue is usually PVA in various dilutions
to suit the thickness of the paper that?s
being stuck (the thicker the paper the
thicker the glue needs to be). The
paint, of course, is acrylic, both in ink
form and heavy body, which will paint
on absolutely anything. Having
assembled all this I start work ?
remember, this is the way I do it, others
do it differently.
With all my still-life paintings, by the
time I reach the final stage the original
subject has usually died, been eaten,
drunk and generally dismantled, which
helps me to consider the painting in its
own right and not keep comparing it to
what I started with. This stops me
fiddling to get things exactly right and
overloading the piece with excessive
detail that it doesn?t need, given the
surfaces that I?m working on and the
way that I paint. When finished, I hide
all my work away for a period of time ?
days, months, and sometimes years ?
and then look at it with fresh eyes to
see if anything further needs to be
TA
done.
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TA09p48_50_Liz_Layout 1 25/07/2017 13:08 Page 49
PRACTICAL
DEMONSTRATION Tulips and Plums
COLOURS USED
Naples yellow l Parchment l Cadmium orange (hue)
Napthol red light l Transparent burnt sienna l Quinacridone
burnt orange l Pthalocyanine blue (red shade) l Cobalt blue
(hue), and titanium white all in heavy body acrylics.
l
l
p
STAGE TWO
Using a pigment marker I drew the subject over the collage, some of
which I aimed to retain in the final painting. This is a personal choice as
I like the strength that it gives, but most will be covered by paint so it
doesn?t matter if I get things wrong! I added an extra plum by the vase
to take the eye to that part of the piece
www.painters-online.co.uk
p
STAGE ONE
Pieces of patterned papers that had been both cut and torn to give a
variety of shapes were stuck onto mountboard, arranged to follow
the subject in an approximate way; this is not the time to get down to
detail. Some of the papers have glitter in them, which will give an
interesting surface if retained. Other areas that would be painted
conventionally, such as the jug, have old watercolour paintings on
them. White tissue paper gives areas without objects textural
interest. This part of the painting is always fun and stress-free, almost
like being a child again
p
STAGE THREE
I started to paint by running thin washes of acrylic paint over the
piece, trying to keep some semblance of local colour in the areas
where I needed it, such as the flowers and the tinted drinking glass.
Trying to keep paint this liquid under control is never easy so I let it
have its own way, hoping for some nice surprises. I enjoy the feeling
of being led by the paint, letting the paint talk to me, before I talk to
the paint and tell it what to do
artist September 2017
t
As a still life this is
fairly routine, the
flowers are simple
shapes and bright
colours and match
the plums. It has
some glass, which
I adore painting,
and a neutralcoloured jug,
which gave me
the opportunity
to play with
colour rather than
just paint boring
old beige. Set
against a window
in the studio it has
a strong natural
light source. This
was just a starting
point though
49
TA09p48_50_Liz_Layout 1 25/07/2017 13:08 Page 50
t
STAGE FOUR
I painted mostly in the negative spaces
around the objects, using the appropriate
colours tinted with titanium white or
parchment, keeping the collage in areas such
as the glass and the flowers but totally
obliterating it where it was not needed. I also
picked up the chequered pattern from the
collage and placed similar shapes elsewhere,
to give balance and interest where needed.
The ruggedness of this surface made painting
extremely interesting and my tendency to be
a bit precious and tight was put firmly to one
side. Whole areas of colour and texture
required little intervention from me, such as
the musical score in the window frame ? I like
the idea of the observer looking closely and
trying to work out what the tune is
t
FINISHED PAINTING
Tulips and Plums, acrylic and collage on
board, 22?19絠n (56.5?49.5cm).
I used water-soluble wax pastels for some
finishing touches such as the highlights on all
the glass articles, the china bowl and along
the top edges of the flowers where they catch
the light. These pastels allow me to draw on
solid colour with a degree of accuracy that is
sometimes missing from my brushstrokes. I
left all the pastel marks dry initially but later
decided to wet and soften some of them,
such as on the tulip leaves and the plum by
the vase, to blend them into the composition
more. Overall, I was happy with it but as with
all my other work, I put it away so that I could
look at it with fresh eyes after a period of
time
Liz Seward
taught and demonstrated for 36 years
and is a member of the Society of
Women Artists and the Society of Floral
Painters. She has exhibited widely, her
work has been reproduced as greetings
cards, and she has won many awards.
Liz teaches residential courses at
Dedham Hall and demonstrates to art
societies. www.sewardart.co.uk
50
artist September 2017
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TA09p51_53_Barry herniman_Layout 1 27/07/2017 10:25 Page 51
Boats and harbours
Once again Barry Herniman is out and about with his
travelling sketchbook. This month he demonstrates a watercolour of
another inspiring location, Porlock Weir in Somerset
I
find that a lot of people struggle
with boats but by getting people to
sketch rather than try a full-blown
painting I have had some really
good results. Because ?it?s only a sketch?
people loosen up and forget their boat
block, and often produce some loose
and lively work.
Boats and harbours offer a wealth of
painting opportunities. The scene is
constantly shifting ? boats languidly
rolling on their moorings are left high
and dry when the tide goes out. I do
love getting down into the harbour floor
to look up at the jaunty angles of the
boats and it's easy to become
engrossed and overlook the fact that
the water is on it's way in ? I have got
my feet wet a few times.
Depending on weather and the time
of year, harbours can be rather chilly
venues so I always pack a waterproof
jacket, which also keeps out the wind.
I also tend to weigh down my
lightweight easel when painting in case
sudden gusts of wind take my kit on
flying lessons. There have been times
when I have had to go on a fishing
expedition to retrieve a piece of kit
that has been blown over the edge into
the water. It's all part of the enjoyment
of painting en plein air!
The importance of the
sketchbook
I tend to sketch in pen and watercolour
wash, going straight in with the pen
work and then overlaying a series of
watercolour washes. I find this stops me
from fiddling and also forces me to
concentrate on the scene so that each
mark is as accurate as possible. There's
no rubbing out an ink line once it's
down so careful observation is
paramount. That's not to say that I don't
get it wrong sometimes but so what ? I
put in the correct mark and then colour
over the wrong one, it's only a sketch
after all.
Porlock Weir
I have been to Porlock Weir a few times
and am always excited by the wealth of
painting material. On this occasion I
had taken a group for a day?s sketching;
the tide was out but the lock gates and
the harbour walls presented a great
subject, which I managed to capture in
my sketchbook. Just before we left the
tide came right in and the whole scene
changed, so I took a series of photos
around the area with all the moored-up
boats riding high in the water. I decided
to get to grips with a studio piece
demonstration of this lovely sunlit
TA
scene.
DEMONSTRATION Tide?s In, Porlock Weir
MATERIALS
Hahnem黨le Quattro paper
block 140lb (300gsm) semismooth paper
l
Schmincke Horadam Artists?
watercolours: pure yellow,
Indian yellow, rose madder,
cobalt blue, helio turquoise,
cobalt turquoise, orange,
manganese violet
l
Da Vinci Cosmotop brushes:
round Nos. 12, 8, 4; riggers
6 and 4
l
Faber-Castell Artists? Pitt
pens, fine and superfine
l
?Cloverleaf? paintbox
p
l
Schmincke masking fluid:
I use white but coloured
mask is available from
Schmincke ?some artists
find this easier to use as you
can see where the mask is
I drew in the main features, buildings, boats
and banks, and just a hint of where the
reflections would be, with my F and S Pitt pens
l
Pitt pens size: F and S
www.painters-online.co.uk
STAGE ONE
p
STAGE TWO
With deep wells of Indian yellow, pure yellow, cobalt
blue and cobalt turquoise I started to paint in the tree
areas, taking care to leave a clear distinction between
foreground and background trees. With Indian yellow,
rose madder, orange, cobalt blue and manganese violet
I laid some basic washes into the buildings and the weir
wall, leaving small unpainted breaks to give that rough
stone feel
artist September 2017
51
t
l
TA09p51_53_Barry herniman_Layout 1 27/07/2017 10:25 Page 52
STAGE THREE
p
With my sky colours I established the sky reflections in the water
and then dropped in some light stone reflections, keeping the
washes very fluid throughout. A little orange was dropped into
the foreground boat. With a creamier mix of ultramarine, orange
and manganese violet and No 6 brush, I delineated the windows
and fascia boards
p
Tip
When using masking fluid don?t aimlessly dab
it on here, there and everywhere ? apply it painterly
and sparingly! I have seen many a promising painting
spoilt by carelessly applied masking fluid
p
STAGE FIVE
With my stone colours I started to determine the darker
reflections in the water, keeping the paint fluid and moving the
brush back and forth, leaving small areas of the underwash
shining through. The small orange boat got another glaze of
paint, plus some darks at the waterline
52
artist September 2017
STAGE FOUR
With some creamier mixes of cobalt blue, helio turquoise and Indian yellow
I began to develop the stands of trees, painting round the individual
varieties. The poles in the banks were painted with varying mixes of orange,
cobalt blue and manganese violet. With a slightly creamier mix of the same
colours I punched some dark accents into the foreground poles
p
STAGE SIX
I removed the masking fluid and added ultramarine to my stone mixes to
describe all the shadow areas in the buildings and the weir walls. I also
extended some sunlit wall reflections into the water next to the left-hand
boat, keeping it lighter in tone than the shadow reflections
www.painters-online.co.uk
TA09p51_53_Barry herniman_Layout 1 27/07/2017 10:26 Page 53
PRACTICAL
Barry Herniman
organises and tutors painting
holidays at home and abroad. He is also
available for workshops and
demonstrations to art societies. His
Cloverleaf paintbox is available online
at: cloverleafpaintbox.com. Barry buys
his sketchbooks from Frances Iles
Artworks, 104 High Street, Rochester,
Kent ME1 1JT, telephone 01634 843881.
Copies of Barry Herniman's Travelling
Sketchbook are available from his
website, price � inc p&p.
www.barryherniman.com
p
STAGE SEVEN
I pulled all the reflections
together with a glaze of
rose madder and cobalt
blue plus some dilute
orange under the
foreground boat to give
unity to the water area.
I also added some
shadow areas next to the
left-hand boat and the
lock wall
u FINISHED
PAINTING
Tide?s In, Porlock Weir,
watercolour, 153?4?153?4in
(40?40cm).
Putting the finishing
touches to a painting is
always very rewarding. I
glazed the shadows with
ultramarine, manganese
violet and rose madder,
taking care to keep the
washes fluid and
transparent so all the
underlying washes
showed through. Finally,
with my rigger and some
white gouache, I ticked in
the windows, add
mooring ropes and a few
sparkles to the water
www.painters-online.co.uk
artist September 2017
53
TA09p54_56_Paul GadenneSORTED_Layout 1 27/07/2017 10:28 Page 54
Get started with
watercolour
Watercolour is always said to be the hardest of the painting media
to master. Paul Gadenne provides a guide for newcomers to watercolour
that should help you to avoid some common errors and pitfalls
O
nce you?ve cracked
watercolour, there?s nothing
like it, but before starting the
variety of decisions you need
to make can be quite daunting. I am
talking about paper, paint and brushes.
Paper
The paper that artists use is thicker
than ordinary paper, meaning it is less
likely to buckle, and it has a built-in
coating that makes it less absorbent. It
is described by three characteristics:
weight (thickness), texture and size.
The thickness of paper is defined by
its weight in grams per square metre
(gsm). If you use paper that is no
thinner than 300gsm it will usually
remain flat enough without stretching, if
kept to a small size. I quite often use
640gsm papers, which remain very
stable. Try to get used to using the
54
artist September 2017
metric system and don?t get confused
with imperial measurements.
The texture of the paper is expressed
as: hot pressed (HP), cold pressed
(Not) and rough; these are the most
common papers and they work
perfectly well for everybody. To keep
things simple, just go for cold pressed.
HP is a very smooth surface, usually
used for highly detailed work; rough is
exactly what it says it is.
Paper is sold in a variety of sizes as
individual sheets, pads and blocks. The
information is usually found on a label
or the outer leaf explaining the weight,
texture and size. Again, stick to the
metric system.
Paint
Watercolour paint is sold as pans ?
small blocks of solid paint in
watercolour boxes ? in tins and in
p
Sunday Afternoon at Horse Guards Parade,
watercolour, 14?22in (35.5?56cm).
Foregrounds are often focal points but by
using shadow the foreground is working as a
frame for the buildings
tubes. As a general rule, sets with pans
tend to work well with smaller paintings
and tubes with larger. Tubes allow a lot
of liquid paint to be put on your
palette to create big puddles of paint
ready to use. Getting big pools of paint
with pans is both slow and hard work as
they take a while to soften enough to
use ? I flood water over the whole set
to get them all soft! I use pans for
open-air sketching as they are smaller
and more portable.
Manufacturers have no idea what you
are going to paint so the range of
www.painters-online.co.uk
TA09p54_56_Paul GadenneSORTED_Layout 1 27/07/2017 10:28 Page 55
PRACTICAL
colours is very general. It?s best to
assume that all colours have to be
mixed to achieve more natural hues
than those you see in paint squeezed
straight from the tube. And, while I?m
on the subject, Chinese white is
usually used for adding white bits at
the end, not for making lighter tints. If
you add it to any colour it will make it
opaque and milky. If you want a
lighter tint, just add more water.
Finally, always mix more paint than
you think you will need. If you run out
halfway through a wash, it will start to
dry while you are mixing more,
leaving a ?tide mark? and, of course,
your new mix is never the same
colour!
Brushes
With brushes you really do get what
you pay for. The brush must be
controllable, retain lots of paint and
produce a reliable mark that can be
repeated. The best (and most
expensive) are natural-hair brushes,
the most common being sable. Sable
brushes will retain more paint when
loaded and make a variety of marks
both thick and thin with the same
brush. Synthetic brushes will do the
same only less so but also for
considerably less money. I use a mix of
both sorts.
Do not use hog-hair brushes for
watercolour. As a general rule, longhandled brushes are normally used
for acrylic or oils and short handles for
watercolour. Always choose brushes
from recognised makers if you can. To
get started buy yourself a set of
brushes from a size 10 round right
through to a size 1 or 0 rigger brush.
Manageable chunks
In Sunday Afternoon at Horse Guards
Parade (left) I followed a number of
principles and processes that work
well for me. All artists will have their
own versions of how to proceed but
hopefully I will have ticked enough
boxes to get you going. I always try to
break images into manageable
chunks; here I have divided the view
WATERCOLOUR BASICS
Lose the Chinese white.
l To make lighter colours, use more water.
l Avoid using paints straight from the tube.
l For foliage, tone down the greens with a
brown.
l Use a blue/violet in your shadow mix.
l Mix more watercolour paint than you think
you will need.
l Do not use paper lower than 300gsm
without stretching first.
l Do not use hogs hair brushes.
l Avoid long-handled brushes.
l Test your colours and mixes on the same
paper.
l Test masking tape and masking fluid for
easy removal.
l Work on a sloping drawing board. Gravity is
important.
l Rub out unwanted pencils marks ? they
will be sealed in by the watercolour.
l Don't go back into a wash ? you can?t fix it.
l Buy the best you can afford ? you always
get what you pay for.
l It?s only a piece of paper.
l
DEMONSTRATION Sunday Afternoon at Horse Guards Parade
u
STAGE ONE
Before you even
draw the image,
use photographs
and sketches taken
on site to provide
the best final
drawing, and then
test your colours
and marks on the
same paper you
intend to use for
your final painting
p
STAGE TWO
Draw lightly ? keep the lines simple as the brush will do the details
later. Do not score the paper. You can make changes but do not
erase too vigorously and erase all marks you don?t want ? after you
have painted over them they are sealed and fixed to the paper
www.painters-online.co.uk
p
STAGE THREE
Paint the sky first, it is usually the lightest part of the picture. Ignore any
darker foreground details such as trees. Darker elements can be painted
over the sky areas without any significant colour change
artist September 2017
55
TA09p54_56_Paul GadenneSORTED_Layout 1 27/07/2017 10:28 Page 56
W AT E R C O L O U R
p
STAGE FOUR
p
Paint your buildings without shadows. Get your colours right and
make sure to leave any white areas as unpainted paper. Use
masking fluid if you need it. I used it for the flagpoles and taxi but
always check it first on your test paper to make sure you can
remove it afterwards
STAGE FIVE
Put the shadows and architectural features on the buildings.
The most commonly used colour for this is Payne?s grey.
However, shadows are picking up indirect light from the sky so
put a little blue/violet in your shadow mix. On buildings it
works particularly well
t
STAGE SIX
The foreground gives scale and depth to a
painting; its colours are usually warmer and
more vibrant than those in the distance. Here
I wanted the background to dominate, so the
warmer colours bring the buildings a little
closer.
In the finished painting (shown on page 54)
the shadows again have blue/violet in the
mix. Broken light coming through foliage is
shown by either not painting the shadows or
lifting out with a dry bush or my favourite
accessory ? a loo roll!
into sky, buildings, parade ground,
foreground and trees and close
foreground.
Another basic rule is that you start
with the lighter colours; watercolour is
transparent and you cannot paint a
light colour over a dark one, but you
can do the reverse. So I started with the
sky and the buildings, and finished with
the darkest colours in the close
foreground.
I chose my colour range carefully ?
warm ochres for the buildings and
violet/blues for the shadows. Although
most newcomers would reach for
Payne?s grey or even black, areas in
shadow are not receiving direct
sunlight; they get their light from the
sky, which is usually blue and still has a
56
artist September 2017
blue cast even on cloudy days. So put a
bit of blue in your shadows. My
foreground is full of people and trees,
again in shadow. So again put in some
blue. Yellows and violet/blues are
complementary colours and together
make for a much more vibrant painting.
I have broken one rule here, one that
is usually quite important. To create
depth the standard method is to use
the cooler colours for the distance with
warmer colours to the front. I ignored
this simply to make the buildings jump
forward as they are in fact the focal
point and I wanted them to dominate
the foreground, which is painted quite
cool here.
So, the rules can be broken. You just
TA
have to know them first!
Paul Gadenne
worked as a chartered designer and
taught graphics and design at Hastings
College of Art and St Edmund?s School,
Canterbury for over 20 years. His
paintings are in private and public
collections and he has had work
selected for the Royal Academy
Summer Exhibition, the Cork Street
Open, The Sunday Times Watercolour
Competition, The Royal Watercolour
Society Open Exhibition, the Royal
Institute of Painters in Watercolours
and the Royal Society of Marine Artists,
among others. Paul currently teaches
Art for Everyone ? art lessons for adults
of all abilities. For details see
www.gadenne.co.uk
www.painters-online.co.uk
TA09p58_60_Greens_Layout 1 27/07/2017 10:31 Page 57
How to keep your
greens clean
Catherine Strong shows you how to
mix greens in acrylics and oils for a
vibrant painting of summer flowers
G
Catherine Strong
has exhibited widely. She demonstrates
regularly to art groups in the south
west of England and her work can be
seen at Hadfield Fine Art and Sarah
Sclater Art at home.
www.catherinestrongart.co.uk
reen is everywhere. It is the
most common colour in the
natural world, and second only
to blue as a favourite colour.
Many artists are nervous of using it,
however, and for good reason ? unless
handled skilfully, it is easy to end up
with a mud-coloured mess! If you are
new to, or nervous of, painting green
then I recommend starting with a
restricted range of greens that work
well together. With experience, it can
be very satisfying to mix your own
greens from blues and yellows, but it is
easier to begin painting greens using a
ready-mixed hue such as
phthalocyanine green (acrylics) or
viridian green (oils) ? the equivalent
colour in the two different media. By
mixing tones of two or three hues of
green it is possible to keep control of
?OVERLOADED BRUSH? TECHNIQUE
Using a small brush, such as Pro Arte filbert 1 or any very small watercolour or
acrylic brush, ?overload? it with paint by dipping the brush into paint and scooping
up as much as you can until it?s top-heavy. Then smear the paint over the
canvas/board. I call this the ?overloaded brush? technique. It?s especially good for
blending paint wet-into-wet, or for producing a more abstract appearance. You
are aiming to create areas of thick paint, blending them into each other. Keep the
lighter tones
towards the back
right-hand side of
the painting, and
place darker tones
on the left-hand
side, and to mark
areas in the top
quarter of the
painting to suggest
dark bushes. Mix
cobalt blue with
white to create a sky
colour and mix two
tones as shown in
the finished painting
www.painters-online.co.uk
your greens, even when painting wetinto-wet: these blend and work well
together, and do not have a tendency
to produce mud!
Painting a garden scene using
acrylics and oils
For this demonstration the
underpainting will be in acrylics and
the top layer in oils. You?ll mix three
hues of green, and for each there will
be three or four tones. After applying a
simple wash of colour, you?ll build up
the painting using acrylics. Acrylics are
water-soluble and dry quickly, unlike
oils. The advantage of doing the
underpainting in acrylics is that it will
be dry enough to paint over within
about an hour. The top layer will consist
of thicker paint, applied wet-into-wet,
in oils. When working in greens, I like to
work in oils for the final ? visible ? layer
of paint. More than any other colour, I
find greens are far more vibrant and
pleasing to the eye in oil paint than
acrylics, although if you only have one
of these media, the whole painting can
be done either in acrylics or in oils.
Materials
You?ll be using the same basic palette
of colours in acrylics and oils. However,
phthalocyanine (phthalo) green acrylic
paint is not equivalent to phthalo green
in oils. You will be using phthalo green
(yellow or blue shade) acrylic paint,
and its equivalent colour in oils ?
viridian green. You will also need
cadmium yellow (light), titanium white,
Payne?s grey, raw sienna, yellow ochre,
burnt sienna, burnt umber, prism violet,
cobalt blue, permanent rose and
vermilion (I find vermilion more
pleasing than cadmium red for
poppies). I use a mix of Daler-Rowney,
Golden, Liquitex and Winsor & Newton
colours. For acrylics I use heavy-body
paints where possible.
artist September 2017
57
TA09p58_60_Greens_Layout 1 27/07/2017 10:31 Page 58
ACRYLICS & OILS
DEMONSTRATION Garden in Summer
u STAGE TWO
Building up the colour
in acrylics
p STAGE ONE
Underpainting
Using acrylics, squeeze a small amount of
permanent rose, raw sienna and burnt sienna
onto your palette. Mix a little of all three
colours together using a small palette knife.
You are aiming for a red-ochre colour as
shown. Using a Daley-Rowney No. 1 flat
acrylic brush, dip the brush into water and
pick up some of the mixed paint on your
brush and apply this colour to your board.
Cover the surface of the board evenly and
leave to dry (about 20 minutes)
Mark in the horizon line about
12cm from the top of the board
with a pencil. Using a No. 3 filbert
brush take some of green hue 3
and loosely block in the darkest
areas across the horizon. Then,
using green hues 1 and 2, take a
No. 2 filbert or No. 3 brush (use
No. 3 in the foreground and No. 2
for the distance) and apply paint
in individual brushstrokes across
the canvas in small dashes and
lines.
I favour ?long filbert? brushes as
they have a pleasing springiness
as you apply paint. Taking one
hue at a time (start with hue 1),
paint the dark tones first then
move through to lighter tones
across the canvas. Vary the
direction of your strokes and keep
the paint thin at this stage so it
dries quickly. Next paint in the
earth colours: raw umber/raw
sienna, and raw sienna/yellow
ochre. Use yellow ochre/cadmium
yellow medium to add some
lighter earth tones. Use prism
violet to add depth to the dark
areas, then block in some pure
cobalt blue to mark in the sky
I find the brands largely
interchangeable, except for Payne?s
grey ? I have a strong preference for
Liquitex heavy-body Payne?s grey
(some of the other brands tend to be
much too blue for my liking). I use
mainly Winsor & Newton oil paints.
Other materials
Paint palette
58
artist September 2017
You?ll be painting on a wood panel
193?4?93?4in (50?25cm). You could also
use a canvas board or canvas/box
canvas. Filbert brushes are ideal,
especially for the underpainting, which
is built up with carefully laid individual
brushstrokes. Most of these will not be
visible in the finished painting, but
they create a wonderful colour base for
your final wet-into-wet work. You?ll use
painting knives for the final layer as
well as small brushes. I use a mix of
painting knives, but tend to favour
Winsor & Newton and Daler-Rowney
brands as they both have an excellent
selection of shapes and sizes, and last
well. You?ll also need water for mixing
www.painters-online.co.uk
TA09p58_60_Greens_Layout 1 27/07/2017 10:31 Page 59
PRACTICAL
u STAGE THREE
Using oils
For this wet-into-wet stage you?ll be applying
oil paints with brushes and knives. Mix green
hues using oils in exactly the same way as you
did for acrylics, but use viridian instead of
phthalo green. For larger flower heads use a
Winsor & Newton No. 25 knife. Scoop up pure
cadmium yellow (use light and medium
shades) and smear onto the canvas to suggest
flowers in a herbaceous border, then use a
small knife such as Winsor & Newton No. 20 to
dot vermilion across the canvas to suggest
poppies. Use pure vermilion; make a lighter
tone for the poppies by mixing cadmium
yellow (light) with vermilion. For a darker
shade use Payne?s grey mixed with vermilion.
Use cobalt blue and white (mix two tones) to
suggest cornflowers. Remember, you are not
trying to make them realistic, and using a
knife helps achieve an impressionist look!
u
FINISHED PAINTING
Garden in Summer, acrylic and oils, 193?4?93?4in
(50?25cm)
acrylics, and turps or odourless thinners
for mixing oil, as well as plenty of
kitchen roll.
Mixing greens
Working with acrylic paints, squeeze
generous blobs of phthalo green,
cadmium yellow (light) and titanium
white onto your palette ? I never use
?mixing? white as, paradoxically, I find it
doesn?t mix well!
Use phthalo green and cadmium
yellow (light) to make a new green hue
(hue 1). You are now going to make four
tones of this hue. To make the darkest
tone, take a generous portion of the
phthalo green and place it on your
palette. To this, add a small amount of
the yellow and mix using your palette
knife until both colours are completely
blended together. I usually mix the next
tone by taking a small amount of the
previous tone and adding more yellow,
and repeating the process until I have
four tones.
Use phthalo green and titanium white
to make a second green hue (hue 2).
Make four tones of this following the
procedure above. These two hues will
form the basis of our painting.
Now make a very dark green mixing
Payne?s grey and phthalo green (hue 3).
You?re aiming for a colour that is
noticeably darker than pure phthalo
green. Add a touch of prism violet to
make it even darker.
Note that in the final stage of the
painting you will mix all these colours
again in oils, substituting viridian for
TA
phthalo green.
www.painters-online.co.uk
artist September 2017
59
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Fabriano, Somerset.
www.theartradingcompany.co.uk
Stocking:� Golden, Lascaux, Unison,
NORTH YORKSHIRE
Park, Gloucester GL2 2FN
Art
Shop
Tel:The
0145
222
6378
2 Newmarket
Opening
times:Street, Skipton,
North Yorks BD23 2JB
Monday to Friday 9am - 5pm
Tel: 01756 70177
www.jacksonsart.com
www.theartshop.co.uk
Stockistwarehouse
of: Derwent,
Pebeo,
Loxley
Jackson?s
holds
painting,
Reeves, Unison, Daler-Rowney,
drawing,
printmaking
and
sculpture
Sennelier, Winsor & Newton, Conte
materials
from
Golden,Hahnemuhle,
Sennelier,
Saunders
Waterford,
Fabriano,Winsor
Art Master
Schmincke,
& Newton etc.
SURREY
W F Gadsby
Saunders
Waterford and accessories.
347 High Street, Lincoln,
Lincolnshire LN5 7DQ
Tel: 01522 527 487
www.gadsbys.co.uk
Stockist of: Winsor & Newton,
Jackson's
ArtD?Ache
Supplies
Daler Rowney, Caran
etc
1 Farleigh Place,
LONDON
Westgate Gallery�
London N16 7SX
83 Westgate, Grantham NG31 6LE
Tel: 020 7254 0077
Tel 01476 578800
Opening
Monday
to Friday
Stocking:� times:
Royal Talens,
Da Vinci,
Schmincke
9am ? 5.30pm, Saturday 10am ? 6pm
WEST YORKSHIRE
Pullingers
HAMPSHIRE
www.jacksonsart.com
109 West Street, Farnham,
Surrey GU9
7HH
Perrys
Art
Suppliers Ltd
Tel:
01252
715390
109
East
Street,
Southampton
www.pullingers.com
SO14
3HD
Stockist
of: Canson, Caran D Ache, Cretacolor
C
60
LINCOLNSHIRE
September 2017
Stockists
of: painting,
and
The Art
Shop -drawing
Ilkley�
printmaking
materials
Hawksworth
Street, from
Ilkley,�
West Yorkshire
LS29 9DU
Daler-Rowney,
Winsor
& Newton,
Tel & Fax: +44(0)1943 432016
Old Holland and Michael Harding etc.
www.theartshops.co.uk
W
Support your specialist art retailer by purchasing
your materials from the shops listed here
Jackson's Art Supplies
SUFFOLK
Arch 66, Station Approach,
The Art Trading Company
London SW6 3UH
36a Earsham Street,Bungay N35 1AQ
Tel:
020
7384 3055
01986
897939
www.theartradingcompany.co.uk
Opening
times: Monday to
Stocking:� Golden, Lascaux, Unison,
Thursday 9am ? 6pm, Friday,
Sennelier, Daniel Smith, Pro Arte, Da Vinci,
Pip Seymour,
Canson, Derwent, Roberson,
9am
? 5.30pm,
Saturday 9am ? 5pm
NORTH YORKSHIRE
www.jacksonsart.com
The Art
Stockists
of:Shop
essential high-quality
2
Newmarket
Street, Skipton,
painting and drawing
materials from
North Yorks BD23 2JB
brands
including
Tel: 01756
70177 Sennelier,
www.theartshop.co.uk
Winsor
& Newton, Golden,
Stockist of: Derwent, Pebeo, Loxley
Old
Holland
and
more.
Reeves, Unison,
Daler-Rowney,
Sennelier, Winsor & Newton, Conte
Saunders Waterford, Hahnemuhle,
Fabriano, Art Master
NOTTINGHAMSHIRE
SURREY
Local
Art Shop
Pullingers
4
Main Road, Gedling,
109 West Street,
Farnham,
Nottingham
NG4
3HP
Surrey GU9 7HH
Tel:
0115 715390
9401721
Tel: 01252
www.pullingers.com
Opening
times:
Stockist of: Canson, Caran D Ache, Cretacolor
Tuesday to Friday 10am - 5.30pm,
Clairfontaine, Da Vinci, Daler-Rowney, Derwent,
Faber-Castell,12.30pm
Golden, Royal
Talens, Schmincke
Saturday
- 5pm
Sennelier, Winsor & Newton, Fabriano
www.localartshop.co.uk
Stockists of: Royal & Langnickel,
LINCOLNSHIRE
Sennelier, Pebeo, Loxley, Golden,
W F Gadsby
House of Crafts, Cretacolor, Jakar,
347 High Street, Lincoln,
Daler-Rowney,
Caran
Lincolnshire LN5
7DQd?Ache.
Tel: 01522 527 487
www.gadsbys.co.uk
Patchings
Art Centre
Stockist of: Winsor & Newton,
Oxton
Road,Caran
Calverton,
Daler Rowney,
D?Ache etc
Nottingham NG14 6NU
Westgate Gallery�
Tel: 0115 965 3479
83 Westgate, Grantham NG31 6LE
Opening
times: every day
Tel 01476 578800
NORTH YORKSHIRE
SURREY
Pullingers
The Art Shop Skipton
109
West Street,
Farnham,
Online
& instore
Surrey GU9 7HH
22
Newmarket
Tel: 01252 715390 Street, Skipton,
North Yorkshire BD23 2JB
www.pullingers.com
Stockist
of: Canson,
Caran D Ache, Cretacolor
Tel: 01756
701177
Clairfontaine, Da Vinci, Daler-Rowney, Derwent,
Opening times: Monday to Friday
Faber-Castell, Golden, Royal Talens, Schmincke
9am - 5.30pm,
Saturday
9am ? 5pm.
Sennelier,
Winsor & Newton,
Fabriano
www.theartshopskipton.co.uk
LINCOLNSHIRE
Stockists of: Pebeo, Derwent, Sennelier,
Winsor & Newton, Daler-Rowney,
WUnison,
F Gadsby
Loxley,
Reeves, Hahnem黨le,
347
HighArtmaster,
Street, Lincoln,
Lincolnshire
LN5and
7DQmany more.
AMT Products,
Tel: 01522 527 487
www.gadsbys.co.uk
Artist's
Palette
Stockist
of: Winsor
& Newton,
Daler
Rowney, Caran
D?Ache
etc1AA
1 Millgate,
Thirsk
YO7
Tel: 01845 574457
Westgate
Gallery�
Opening times: Monday to
83 Westgate, Grantham NG31 6LE
Saturday
9am - 5pm
Tel
01476 578800
Stocking:�
Talens,&DaNewton,
Vinci, Schmincke
StockistsRoyal
of: Winsor
Daler-Rowney, Loxley, Sennelier,
WEST
YORKSHIRE
Clairefontaine
and many more. Craft
The
Art model
Shopkits
- Ilkley�
materials,
and bespoke framing
Hawksworth
Street, Ilkley,�
service. Professional
artist and tutor-owner
West
Yorkshire
9DU
happy
to offerLS29
expert
advice.
Tel & Fax: +44(0)1943 432016
www.theartshops.co.uk
The&Art
Shop
Winsor
Newton,
Daler Rowney, Pro Arte,
Canson,
Liquitex,
Derwent,
Unison, Caran
230 High
Street,
Northallerton,
D?Ache, Loxley, Sennelier Mapac
North Yorkshire DL7 8LU
Tel: 01609 761775
SUFFOLK
Opening times: Monday to
The
Art Trading Company
Saturday 9.30am ? 5pm
36a Earsham Street,Bungay N35 1AQ
www.theartshops.co.uk
01986 897939
Stockists of: Winsor & Newton,
www.theartradingcompany.co.uk
Stocking:�
Golden,Loxley,
Lascaux,
Daler-Rowney,
PipUnison,
Seymour,
Sennelier, Daniel Smith, Pro Arte, Da Vinci,
Pan Pastel, Unison, Pro Arte, Artmaster,
Pip Seymour, Canson, Derwent, Roberson,
Hahnem黨le, Pebeo.
NORTH YORKSHIRE
Stocking:� Royal
Talens, Da Vinci, Schmincke
9.30am
- 5.30pm
The Art Shop
www.patchingsartcentre.co.uk
2 Newmarket Street, Skipton,
North Yorks BD23 2JB
Emrys
Art Supplies Ltd
Tel:
01756 70177
22 Market Street, Haverfordwest,
www.theartshop.co.uk
Stockist
of: Derwent, Pebeo,
Loxley
Reeves,
Pembrokeshire,
Wales
SA61
1NH
Unison, Daler-Rowney, Sennelier, Winsor
Tel: 01437 779646
& Newton, Conte Saunders Waterford,
Opening times:
Tuesday
to
Hahnemuhle,
Fabriano,
Art Master
Saturday 9am ? 5pm
WEST YORKSHIRE
Stockists of: Winsor & Newton,
The Art Shop
- Ilkley�
Daler-Rowney,
Derwent,
Caran d?Ache,
Hawksworth
Street,
Unison,
Liquitex,
OldIlkley,�
Holland, Pro Arte,
West Yorkshire LS29 9DU
Leonard
Brushes,
Sennelier,
Canson,
Tel & Fax: +44(0)1943 432016
www.theartshops.co.uk
St
Cuthberts Mill, Artmaster, Pebeo.
Winsor & Newton, Daler Rowney, Pro Arte,
Canson, Liquitex, Derwent, Unison, Caran
D?Ache, Loxley, Sennelier Mapac
SUFFOLK
SUFFOLK
The Art Trading
The Art Trading Company
Company
36a Earsham Street,Bungay N35 1AQ
55
Earsham
01986
897939 Street, Bungay
www.theartradingcompany.co.uk
Suffolk
NR35 1AF
Stocking:� Golden, Lascaux, Unison,
Tel: 01986 897939
Sennelier, Daniel Smith, Pro Arte, Da Vinci,
Pip Seymour,
Canson,
Derwent, to
Roberson,
Opening
times:
Monday
Saturday 10am ? 5pm
NORTH YORKSHIRE
(closed Sunday and Bank Holidays)
The Art Shop
www.TheArtTradingCompany.co.uk
2 Newmarket
Street,
Skipton,
Stockists
of: Old
Holland,
Michael
North Yorks BD23 2JB
Harding,
Sennelier,
Golden,
Lascaux,
Tel: 01756 70177
www.theartshop.co.uk
Daniel
Smith, Rohrer & Klingner, Winsor
Stockist of: Derwent, Pebeo, Loxley
& Newton, Liquitex and many more.
Reeves, Unison, Daler-Rowney,
S
WALES
www.emrysart.co.uk
SURREY
Stockists of: Winsor & Newton, plus many
Pullingers
more
including
Sennelier,
109
West
Street, Daler-Rowney,
Farnham,
Surrey
GU9
Unison,
Pro7HH
Arte, Derwent.
Tel: 01252 715390
www.pullingers.com
Stockist of: Canson, Caran D Ache, Cretacolor
Clairfontaine, Da Vinci, Daler-Rowney, Derwent,
Faber-Castell, Golden, Royal Talens, Schmincke
Sennelier,
WinsorShop
& Newton, Fabriano
The Art
WEST YORKSHIRE
Hawksworth Street, Ilkley,
LINCOLNSHIRE
West Yorkshire LS29 9DU
WTel:F 01943
Gadsby
432016
347
High Street,
Lincoln,
Opening
times:
Monday to
Lincolnshire LN5 7DQ
Saturday 9am ? 5.30pm
Tel: 01522 527 487
www.theartshops.co.uk
www.gadsbys.co.uk
Stockist
of:of:Winsor
&&
Newton,
Stockists
Winsor
Newton, Daler-Rowney,
Daler Rowney, Caran D?Ache etc
Loxley, Pip Seymour, Pan Pastel, Unison,
Pro Arte, Artmaster,
Hahnem黨le, Pebeo.
Westgate
Gallery�
�
www.painters-online.co.uk
6
p60_61_tasept17.indd 60
28/07/2017 10:53:54
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Artist_FullPage_September.indd 1
05/07/2017 13:00:42
TA09p63_BooksFITS_Layout 1 25/07/2017 13:15 Page 71
ART BOOKS & DVDS
Reviewed by Henry Malt
Painting with
Watercolour
Painting Portraits of Children
David Howell
This thorough survey
of classic watercolour
techniques teaches
by example rather
than demonstration.
It is a book to read
rather than work
through and experienced artists will
welcome it all the more for that. There is a
slant to the subject matter and in this case it
is buildings and water. This does, however,
encompass a good variety and includes
coastal scenes, boats and the figures that
people the settings. David Howell?s style
could best be summed up as wash-andgranulation, which he explores and exploits
to the maximum. Observations from
someone who is a consummate master of
their method are always worth reading, and
this is no exception. While the text includes
technical information where it is needed,
the main emphasis is on the creative process
? the message rather than the medium.
Crowood �.99, 128 pages (P/B)
ISBN 9781785002304
Howard Hodgkin ? Painting India
Edited by Eleanor Clayton
India was a source
of inspiration from
Howard Hodgkin?s
first visit in 1964.
Although his
collection of Indian
art has featured
elsewhere, this is
the first book to
explore the
country?s influence
on Hodgkin?s own work. As well as a series
of helpful and illuminating essays by writers
on Indian art that discuss the book?s subject
in some detail and from a variety of
perspectives, the book includes over 40
colour plates dating from 1967 to 2017.
Presented chronologically, though without
comment, these chronicle the artist?s
journey through discovery and
representation of his inspiration and his
move from canvas to wood as a support. An
interview with Hodgkin from November
2016 adds further illumination to the
subject. This is a thorough account of a
major figure of recent art and of one of his
most important influences.
Lund Humphries �.99, 96 pages (P/B)
ISBN 9781848222359
Simon Davis
Children are some of
the most difficult,
yet rewarding,
subjects to paint.
Rarely still and their
features constantly
in development, any
fixed point is hard to
find and it is hardly
surprising that many choose simply to resort
to photographs. Simon Davis starts not with
a photograph but a quick sketch that
captures his impression of the subject and
gets the basic shapes down. This can often
look like a caricature, but it?s a personal note
from which everything else flows. Unlike
most Crowood books, this is entirely
demonstration-based and the steps are
carefully chosen to show the build-up of the
image from sketch to finished result. The
text explains the creative as much as the
technical process and greatly aids
understanding.
Crowood �.99, 96 pages (P/B)
ISBN 9781785002908
Drawing and Painting Cars
Keith Woodcock
This would be an easy
book to recommend
even if it wasn?t so
good and so
thorough, because it
is, as far as I am aware,
the only book on this
subject. If you want to
paint cars, you won?t
be disappointed. The
range of subjects and styles is impressive.
There are classic cars, everyday cars and
racing cars. Media include drawing, oils,
watercolours and acrylics. Styles range from
poster-style records to impressionistic blurs
of speed that capture automotion to
perfection. Each subject and type of
painting is treated sympathetically, with
appropriate backgrounds and ancillary
features and figures ? they?re believable, in
short. There are even a few portraits of
famous drivers.
Crowood �.99, 128 pages (P/B)
ISBN 9781785002922
Stanhope Forbes ? Father of the
Newlyn School
Elizabeth Knowles
Stanhope Forbes was a
master of Victorian
narrative painting. At
its best, it carries with it
both documentary
recording and social
comment. At its worst,
it can descend into the
mawkish sentimentality
that so often afflicted
the age. Like all good art, Forbes? paintings
are constructs. His fisherfolk are suspiciously
well-clad and nourished, their boats
generally in a good state of repair. He also
had to get them to sit for him and his scenes
are always perfectly constructed. There is
frequently an air of idealisation, but also of
reality and occasionally grim realism.
This generously illustrated and superbly
reproduced volume accompanies an
exhibition at the Penlee Gallery and includes
an excellent variety of work: the fishing
scenes are here, but so too are landscapes,
urban views, interiors and portraits.
Sansom �, 128 pages (P/B)
ISBN 9781911408062
Ready to Paint in 30 Minutes
Flowers in Watercolour Ann Mortimer
Street Scenes in Watercolour Grahame Booth
The original Ready to Paint series sold well to more experienced
artists who might have been expected to dismiss it as ?jumpedup painting by numbers?. A complete re-think has produced this
development, which is a whole new departure. In place of
complete paintings, there are 30-odd half-hour exercises that
concentrate on a single element ? skies, shadows, trees,
rosebuds, seed heads or leaves. There is also more emphasis on
technique and therefore on the learning process. It?s definitely
worth a look.
Search Press �.99, 96 pages plus tracings (P/B)
Flowers in Watercolour ISBN 9781782215196
Street Scenes in Watercolour ISBN 978-1782214151
Some of the books reviewed here can be purchased from our online bookshop:
visit www.painters-online.co.uk/store and click on the link for books
www.painters-online.co.uk
artist September 2017
63
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p64_tasept17.indd 64
September 2017
19.04.16 09:25
www.painters-online.co.uk
31/07/2017 13:44:29
Sept Opps_Layout 1 31/07/2017 12:50 Page 1
OPPORTUNITIES
& COMPETITIONS
Sending-in days
Great Sheffield Art Show
Details: Art show/sale for amateur
and professional artists. Up to six
works may be submitted, in any
medium, including hand-made
prints and digital art. Photographs
not accepted. Works on paper should
be framed behind glass. Minimum
selling price �. There are two
themes, ?Sheffield?s Heritage? and
?Maritime?; winners of these
categories will receive a prize. Entry
forms and full details can be
downloaded from
www.greatsheffieldartshow.co.uk.
The exhibition is at the Millennium
Gallery, 48 Arundel Gate, Sheffield S1
2PP on November 18 and 19.
When: Submissions deadline,
September 16; handing-in,
November 16.
Cost: �hanging fee per work.
Contact:
www.greatsheffieldartshow.co.uk
South West Academy of Fine
and Applied Arts
Details: Local, national and
international artists are invited to
submit up to six works although a
maximum of four will be selected. All
media considered. Maximum size
391?2in (100cm) in any dimension,
including frame where applicable.
Online submission in first instance.
For full details and to enter, go to
www.southwestacademy.oess.uk.
Prizes and awards. The exhibition will
be at Exeter Castle, Castle Street,
Exeter, Devon EX4 3PU from
November 14 to 25.
When: Submissions deadline,
September 15, 11.59pm Handing-in,
November 12, 2?4pm.
Cost: � per work; artists under the
age of 26, � per work.
Contact:
www.southwestacademy.org.uk
Royal Glasgow Institute of
the Fine Arts (RGI)
Details: Annual open exhibition
established in 1861 to promote
contemporary art in Scotland. Works
previously submitted for this
competition will not be accepted. Up
to five works may be submitted in
painting, sculpture, fine art
photography, drawing, mixed media,
stained glass and architectural
drawing and models. Three works
should be no larger than 59in
(150cm) in any dimension, including
frame; two works should not exceed
141?4in (36cm) in any dimension.
Online registration and submission
in first instance. All work must be for
www.painters-online.co.uk
sale. Cash prizes. The exhibition is at
the RGI Kelly Gallery, 118 Douglas
Street, Glasgow G2 4ET from
November 11 to 26. Full details and
enter online at
https://theroyalglasgowinstituteofth
efinearts.co.uk
When: Submissions deadline,
October 1. Handing-in, October 30
and 31.
Cost: First work �; two works �;
three works �; four works �; five
works �. Concessions available for
students. Hanging fee for selected
works, � per work.
Contact: RGI Kelly Gallery.
) 0141 248 6386
Daiwa Foundation Art Prize
Details: The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese
Foundation?s triennial competition.
The winning artist receives a first
solo show at a gallery in Tokyo,
Japan; a participation fee of �000
and a period of support and
introduction to key individuals and
organisations in the Japanese
contemporary art world. The
competition is open to British artists
resident in the UK who have neither
had, nor are planning, a solo
exhibition in Japan. Acceptable
media are painting, photography,
print, drawing, sculpture, ceramics,
installation and moving image.
Entrants may submit one
application, to be supported by four
recent works in any medium, a
supporting CV and personal
statement in the first instance. An
exhibition of shortlisted artists will
be held at the Daiwa Foundation?s
Japan House Gallery, London in June
2018. The winner?s exhibition at
Mizuma Gallery, Tokyo, Japan will be
autumn/winter 2018. For full details
and to apply, see www.dajf.org.uk.
When: Submissions deadline,
October 2.
Cost: �per artist.
Contact: Queries to project
managers Parker Harris.
) 01372 462190
ING Discerning Eye
Details: Competition to encourage a
wider understanding of the visual
arts and to stimulate debate about
the purpose and place of art in our
society, selected by two critics, two
collectors and two artists. Up to six
original works, in any media
including paintings, photographs,
sculptures and prints, may be
entered, maximum size 20in (51cm)
in longest dimension. All works must
be for sale. Online registration
preferred; regional submission
points. Awards include ING Purchase
Prize, �000; The Discerning Eye
Check out the latest competitions to enter
and make a note of important deadlines
Founder?s Purchase Prize, �500; The
Discerning Eye Chairman?s Purchase
Prize, �000. Selected works will be
exhibited at the Mall Galleries, The
Mall, London SW1 from November 16
to 26. Full details and entry
schedules available at
https://thediscerningeye.
artopps.co.uk
When: Registration deadline, August
23, 5pm; London submissions,
September 2 and 3, earlier from
regional collection points.
Cost: London submissions, � per
work; regional submissions, � per
work.
Contact: Parker Harris:
de@parkerharris.co.uk
) 01372 462190
Institute of East Anglian
Artists open exhibition 2017
Details: Entries are invited from
artists living in the East Anglian
region. Up to three works may be
submitted in any painting media or
etchings, linocuts, woodcuts or
engravings. Other prints and
photographs are not accepted. All
must be for sale. Online submission
in first instance. Some prizes
awarded, and exhibiting artists may
be considered for Provisional
Membership of the IEA. The
exhibition is at The Gallery
Picturecraft, in Holt, Norfolk from
October 20 to November 1.
When: Submissions deadline,
September 22, 12 noon; handing-in,
October 13 and 14.
Cost: � per work.
Contact: For full details see
www.eastanglianartists.com.
) 01328 830056
Royal Society of Miniature
Painters, Sculptors and
Gravers (RMS)
Details: Annual open exhibition of
miniature art. Up to five works may
be submitted; all must be for sale ?
human portraits are the only
exception, but portrait artists must
submit one non-commissioned work
that is for sale. Minimum price for
portraits, �0; �0 for sculpture
and subject work. Maximum sizes,
including frames: rectangles and
ovals, 41?2?6in (11.5?15cm), squares
41?2?41?2in (11.5?11.5cm), rounds
41?2in (11.5cm) diameter and
sculptures 8in (20cm) across the
longest measurement, including the
base. Heads that are the primary
focus of the work must not be larger
than 2in (5cm). ?Heads? is interpreted
as heads with normal hairstyles and
does not include hats; for animal
and bird heads this includes ears
and beaks. Prizes include the Gold
Memorial Bowl for the best
miniature; The Prince of Wales
Award for Outstanding Miniature
Painting, the President?s Special
Commendation, and many other
awards. The exhibition is at the Mall
Galleries, The Mall, London SW1
from September 20 to October 1.
For full details and entry forms go to
www.royal-miniature-society.org.uk
When: Handing-in, September 9,
10am to 5pm.
Cost: � per work.
Contact: Claire Hucker, Executive
Secretary, 89 Rosebery Road,
Dursley, Gloucestershire GL11 4PU.
) 01454 269268
The Royal Institute of Oil
Painters (ROI)
Details: The ROI seeks submissions
of oil paintings from artists over the
age of 18 for its annual open
exhibition. A maximum of six works,
in oil ? but acrylic is accepted if
framed as an oil ? may be entered;
up to four may be selected.
Maximum size, 941?2in (240cm) in the
longest dimension. All works must
be for sale, have been completed in
the last three years and not
previously exhibited in London.
Online submission in first instance at
http://mallgalleries.oess.uk. Among
the many awards are the Stanley
Grimm Prize, two awards of �0 for
visitors? choices; the Alan Gourley
Memorial Award, �000; the Phyllis
Roberts Award, �000; and The Artist
Award of a feature in the magazine.
Selected works will be shown at the
Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1
from November 29 to December 10.
For full details see
www.mallgalleries.org.uk
When: Submissions deadline, August
25, 12 noon. Handing-in, October 7
10am to 5pm.
Cost: � per work; � per work for
artists under the age of 35.
Contact: The Federation of British
Artists, 17 Carlton House Terrace,
London SW1 5BD.
) 020 7930 6844
A much larger selection of opportunities can be viewed on our
website, where you will find a list of workshops, tutors, painting
holidays and more.
www.painters-online.co.uk
artist
September 2017
65
Sept Exhibitions_Exhibitions for Vivien 31/07/2017 11:01 Page 62
EXHIBITIONS
GALLERY OPENING TIMES AND EXHIBITION DATES CAN VARY; IF IN DOUBT, PHONE TO AVOID DISAPPOINTMENT
National Portrait
Gallery
LONDON
Bankside Gallery
48 Hopton Street SE1.
? 020 7928 7521
Off the Wall; selling exhibition
by members of the Royal
Society of Painter-Printmakers
and the Royal Watercolour
Society,
until September 10
Browse & Darby
19 Cork Street W1.
? 020 7734 7984
Contemporary Gallery
Artists; includes Julian Bailey,
Edmund Chamberlain, Victoria
Crowe, Robert Dukes, Anthony
Eyton, Anthony Fry, Eileen
Hogan, Kate Hopkins, Thomas
Lamb, Andy Pankhurst, Janie
Patterson, Susan Wilson and
Duncan Wood,
until September 28.
Dulwich Picture Gallery
College Road SE21.
? 020 8693 5254
Sargent: The Watercolours;
until October 8.
Estorick Collection of
Modern Italian Art
St Martin?s Place WC2.
? 020 7306 0055
BP Portrait Award;
until September 24.
The Queen?s Gallery
Buckingham Palace.
? 020 7766 7301 (tickets)
Canaletto and the Art
of Venice;
until November 12.
Royal Academy of Arts
Piccadilly W1.
? 020 7300 8000
Matisse in the Studio;
until November 12.
Second Nature: the Art of
Charles Tunnicliffe RA;
until October 8.
Tate Modern
Bankside SE1.
? 020 7887 8888
Alberto Giacometti;
until September 10.
Fahrelnissa Zeid; abstracts
with Islamic, Byzantine, Arab
and Persian influences fused
with European approaches,
until October 8.
39a Canonbury Square N1.
? 020 7704 9522
Franco Grignani: Art as
Design 1950?1990;
until September 10.
Millbank SW1.
? 020 7887 8888
Queer British Art;
until October 1.
Flowers
Victoria Miro Mayfair
21 Cork Street W1.
? 020 7920 7777
Freya Payne: Returning;
paintings, sculptures and
monoprints,
until September 2.
Flowers
82 Kingsland Road E2
? 020 7439 7766
Mono: An Exhibition of
Unique Prints;
until September 3.
Lyon & Turnbull Gallery
22 Connaught Street, W2
? 020 7930 9115
Colourists at Connaught;
20 unseen works by the
Scottish Colourists S.J. Peploe,
F.C.B. Cadell, G.L. Hunter and
J.D. Fergusson,
September 4 to 15.
Mall Galleries
The Mall SW1.
? 020 7930 6844
20/21 British Art Fair;
September 13 to 17.
Sunday Times Watercolour
Competition;
September 19 to 24.
66
artist
Tate Britain
14 St George St W1.
? 020 3205 8910
Hernan Bas: Cambridge
Living; new paintings inspired
by the lore and romanticism of
life at Cambridge,
September 6 to October 21.
BIRMINGHAM
Royal Birmingham
Society of Artists
4 Brook Street, St Paul?s Square.
? 0121 236 4353
Metropolis 2017;
August 24 to September 30.
BRISTOL
Bristol Museum & Art
Gallery
Queen?s Road.
? 0117 9223571
Alternative visions:
Undiscovered Art in the
South West; artists facing a
barrier to the art world ,
until September 10.
Royal West of England
Academy
Queen?s Road, Clifton.
? 0117 9735129
Air: Visualising the Invisible
in British Art 1768?2017;
until September 3.
BUXTON
Museum & Art Gallery
Terrace Road.
? 01629 533540
Derbyshire Open Art
Competition 2017;
until September 1.
CHICHESTER
Pallant House Gallery
9 North Pallant.
? 01243 774557.
John Minton: A Centenary;
until October 1.
DITCHLING
Ditchling Museum of
Art and Craft
REGIONS
BANHAM
NWAG Gallery
Banham Zoo, Kenning Hall
Road
? 01953 887771
Natural World Art Group;
exhibition of wildlife art,
until September 17.
BATH
Victoria Art Gallery
Bridge Street.
? 01225 477244
John Eaves: Echoes of Place;
vibrant compositions in oil,
watercolour and collage,
until October 8.
September 2017
Lodge Hill Lane.
? 01273 844744.
Eric Gill: The Body; with 80
works,
until September 3.
EASTBOURNE
Towner Art Gallery
College Road.
? 01323 434670.
Ravilious & Co: The Pattern of
Friendship, English Art
Designers 1922?1942;
until September 17.
Sussex Open 2017;
until October 1.
FALMOUTH
Falmouth Art Gallery
Municipal Buildings, The Moor.
? 01326 313863
Winifred Nicholson:
Liberation of Colour; touring
exhibition,
until September 16.
Alphonse Mucha: In Quest of
Beauty; drawings, paintings,
photographs and poster
designs; touring exhibition,
until October 29.
FROME
MANCHESTER
Black Swan Arts
Imperial War Museum
North
2 Bridge Street.
? 01373 473980
Sketch: artists?sketchbooks,
open competition
until September 3.
GUILDFORD
Watts Gallery
The Quays, Trafford Wharf
Road
? 0161 836 4000
Wyndham Lewis: Life, Art,
War;
until January 1, 2018.
MORETON-INMARSH
Down Lane, Compton.
? 01483 810235
GF Watts: England?s
Michelangelo; the artist?s
most significant paintings
from private and public
collections,
until November 26.
Evelyn Dunbar: Studies,
Illustrations and Paintings;
until September 24.
The Old Dairy Plant,
Stratford Road.
? 01608 652255
A Selling Retrospective,
Part 1; the work of the late
David Prentice,
until August 26.
HASTINGS
NOTTINGHAM
Jerwood Gallery
Nottingham Castle
Museum & Art Gallery
John Davies Gallery
Rock-a-Nore Road.
? 01424 728377
Jean Cooke: Delight in the
thing Seen;
until September 10.
Lenton Road.
? 0115 8761400
Reportrait;
until September 10.
KENDAL
OXFORD
? 01539 722464
Abbot Hall Art Gallery
Painting Pop;
until October 7.
KINGSBRIDGE
Harbour House Gallery
The Promenade.
? 01548 854708
Anita Reynolds: Controlled
Burning; new paintings and
prints,
September 5 to 17.
LIVERPOOL
Tate Liverpool
Albert Dock.
? 0151 702 7400
Portraying a Nation:
Germany 1919?1933;
Germany between the two
world wars seen through the
eyes of painter Otto Dix and
photographer August Sander,
until October 15.
Walker Art Gallery
William Brown Street.
? 0151 478 4199
Ashmolean Museum
Beaumont Street.
? 01865 278002
Raphael: The Drawings;
until September 3.
PENZANCE
Penlee House Gallery
and Museum
Morab Road.
? 01736 363625
Stanhope Forbes: Father of
the Newlyn School;
until September 9.
SHEFFIELD
Graves Gallery
Surrey Street.
? 0114 278 2600
Going Public: International
Art Collectors in Sheffield;
includes painting, sculpture,
works on paper and
photography by Carl Andre,
Donald Judd, Joseph and Anni
Albers, Bridget Riley, Lewis
Baltz and more.
September 2 to December 2.
www.painters-online.co.uk
Sept Exhibitions_Exhibitions for Vivien 31/07/2017 11:01 Page 63
Millenium Gallery
Surrey Street.
? 0114 278 2600
Master of all Trades: The
John Ruskin Prize 2017;
until October 8.
SOUTHAMPTON
City Art Gallery
Civic Centre Road.
? 023 8083 2277
Capture the Castle;
until September 2.
STOW ON THE
WOLD
Fosse Gallery
The Manor House, The Square.
? 01451 831319
Selected members of the
NEAC;
September 3 to 23.
STRATFORD ON
AVON
Compton Verney
Wellesbourne.
? 01926 645500
Seurat to Riley: The Art of
Perception;
until October 1.
WAKEFIELD
The Hepworth
Wakefield
? 01924 247360
Gallery Walk.
Howard Hodgkin: Painting
India;
until October 8.
YORK
York Art Gallery
Exhibition Square.
? 01904 687687
Albert Moore: Of Beauty and
Aesthetics;
until October 1.
Hatoum, Louise Hopkins,
Pete Horobin, Tessa Lynch,
Jock McFadyen, Rivane
Neuenschwander, Tony
Swain;
until September 24.
Scottish National
Portrait Gallery
1 Queen Street.
? 0131 624 6200
True to Life: British Realist
Painting in the 1920s
and 30s;
until October 29.
Lyon &
Turnbull
Gallery,
London
Sidmouth Society
of Artists
Bexhill Art Society
www.thegalleryupstairs.org.
uk
Charity art exhibition at
Connaught Gardens, on
August 26. Tel: 01395 514333.
Gravesend Art Group
Southend Art Club
Annual exhibition at the De
La Warr Pavilion, from August
26 to 28. http://bexhillart.wix
site.com/bexhillartsociety
Bothwell Art Club
Annual exhibition at Saint
Andrew?s Art Centre, from
August 26 to September 2.
Exhibition at Bothwell Village
Church, on September 2
and 3.
Haslemere Art
Society
WALES
SCOTLAND
CARDIFF
EDINBURGH
74b Albany Road,
Summer Exhibition;
until September 9.
Summer exhibition at Church
House, High Street,
Wimbourne, from August 27
to September 2.
www.broadstoneartsociety.
org
Royal Scottish Academy
The Mound.
? 0131 225 6671.
RSA Open Art Exhibition;
until October 1.
Scottish National
Gallery
The Mound.
? 0131 624 6200
Beyond Caravaggio;
Caravaggio and his followers,
until September 24.
Scottish National
Gallery of Modern Art
75 Belford Road.
? 0131 624 6200
Now: Nathan Coley, Mona
www.painters-
CONWY
Royal Cambrian
Academy
Crown Lane.
? 01492 593413
Academicians Annual Show;
until September 9.
MACHYNLLETH
MOMA Wales
Heol Penrallt.
? 01654 703355
Margaret Forman RBA;
until September 16
Samuel John Peploe (1871?1935) Paris Plage, oil on
panel, 7?9in (18?23cm)
ART SOCIETIES
Broadstone Art
Society
Albany Art Gallery
p
Cheltenham Art Club
Exhibition at the Gardens
Gallery, Montpellier Gardens,
from September 13 to 19.
www.cheltenhamartclub.co.
uk
Ferndown Art
Society
Summer exhibition at The
Gallery Upstairs, Upton
Country Park, Poole, from
August 31 to September 11.
Exhibition at Cliffs Pavilion,
Westcliff-on-Sea, from
September 1 to 3.
Westerham Art Group
Annual exhibition at Haslemere
Educational Museum, from
September 9 to 16.
www.haslemere.com/artsoc/
Lechlade Art Society
Summer exhibition at the
Pavilion, Oak Street, from
August 26 to 29.
www.lechladeartsociety.co.uk
North Lincs Art
Society
Annual exhibition at the John
Fryth Room, St Mary?s Church,
from August 26 to 28.
West Wycombe
Art Group
Summer exhibition at West
Wycombe Village Hall, from
August 25 to 28.
www.westwycombeartgroup.
com
Winchester Art Club
Exhibition at the United
Reformed Church, Weelsby
Road, Grimsby, from
September 18 to 22.
www.nlasart.co.uk
Annual exhibition at the
Discovery Centre, from
September 16 to October 8.
Tel: 01962 860564.
Oxford Art Society
Woking Society
of Arts
Open exhibition at Cloister
Gallery, SJE Arts, from
September 13 to October 1.
www.oxfordartsociety.org.uk
Outdoor exhibition in Mercia
Walk, Woking Town Centre, on
Saturdays September 9 and 16.
www.wokingartsociety.org
To submit details of an exhibition for possible listing here, email
Deborah Wanstall at deborah@tapc.co.uk or telephone 01580 763673
artist
September 2017
67
Project2_Layout 1 10/10/2013 14:30 Page 2
Projec
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TA09p70_Adebanji_Layout 1 25/07/2017 13:16 Page 66
A D E B A N J I ? S M O T I V AT I O N A L T I P S : 1 0 T H O F 1 3
Face your fears
What sends shivers down your artistic spine? Take heart,
says Adebanji Alade, fears are in the mind so have the
courage to face them and move your career forward a step
I
fears, because what makes you fearful
is no big deal for them.
For instance, I have been sketching on
public transport for over 18 years; only
twice did I get some real opposition
and I must confess that if it hadn?t been
for some encouraging words from my
wife after the second incident, I would
never have sketched on public
transport again. She made me
understand that the person who
opposed me may just have been
having a bad day. It took me a while to
Don?t give way to your fears
digest those words; each time I
The first thing we need to clarify is that
boarded a train or bus I felt that
fear lives in our minds. It?s not actually
everyone would oppose my sketching.
real! Someone said F.E.A.R. is False
In other words, I painted a picture in
Evidence Appearing Real. What has
my mind that was far from real ? I made
really happened is that we have made
it consume me with fear.
a situation appear larger and a bit more
Now ? and this is the dangerous part ?
distorted than it really is. This could be
if I had allowed those two incidents to
because of past experiences and
hinder me, I would have never gone on
feedback or simply from what we have
to inspire so many people to sketch
decided to believe. You?ll notice that
every day; I would never have won the
other people may not understand your
Harold Riley Sketchbook Prize of
�000, just for sketching;
and I wouldn?t have had the
book deal with Search
Press to write about being
addicted to sketching and I
wouldn?t be improving my
eye-to-hand co-ordination,
which indirectly improves
my painting skills.
So, what have you allowed
to hold you back on your
creative journey? Is it a
blank canvas, is it a
particular medium, the
thought of going to study
an art course, submitting to
an open exhibition,
planning a solo exhibition,
approaching a gallery,
making that call to get the
next lead or commission?
Identify what it is and
decide, today, to face it
squarely with courage. If
you don?t, you?ll never
move to the next level in
your artistic pursuit. Just
remember that it is not
p The Beauty of Silence, oil on canvas, 24?20in (61?51cm)
want you to visualise a situation in
which you have decided to do
something that you are convinced
you can do then, at the last
moment, you talked yourself out of it ?
a creepy feeling engulfed your selfbelief and you let go. If this sounds
familiar you are not alone. Take heart
and ride on with me on this journey
and I hope I will help get you back to
face those fears with courage, because I
know it is possible to overcome them.
70
artist September 2017
Failure but Feedback! There?s
something that you simply need to
adjust and, once you sorted it out in
your mind you will be able to take the
necessary steps to face that fear with
confidence.
Finally, let me tell you of an
experience I had in 2011: I was invited
to run a workshop on the Urban
Landscape at Cass Art, Islington,
London. I was fired-up and ready to go,
and leaflets had been printed and
distributed. Then, from nowhere, two
weeks before the workshop I started to
feel inadequate, that I wasn?t good
enough to run such a workshop.
I couldn?t tell Cass Art, for I had no
reason to give them. My fears affected
me physically, too, for three days
before the workshop I developed a cyst
on my right eye; the following day a
cyst developed on the other eye; both
were swollen and I could barely see.
This gave me a tangible excuse, with
visual evidence, to chicken out of doing
the workshop. My excuse was accepted
but they didn?t invite me back after
that! However, I have learnt from the
experience and in 2014 I decided to run
the workshop on my own. Then in 2015
the ROI asked me to run the same
workshop at the Mall Galleries during
their annual exhibition. I had learnt my
lesson so I did it! I want you to do the
same: face your fears and do it anyway! TA
Adebanji Alade
studied fine art in Nigeria and has a
diploma in portraiture from Heatherley?s
School of Fine Art, where he teaches in
the Open Studio. He has exhibited
widely and won many awards. Adebanji
is a member of the Royal Institute of Oil
Painters and a council member of the
Chelsea Art Society; he tutors
workshops and gives demonstrations
for art societies and also offers private
coaching. For more details see
www.adebanjialade.co.uk
www.adebanjialade.blogspot.com
www.sketchinspiration.com
www.painters-online.co.uk
LP08 LPforTA_Layout 1 28/07/2017 09:34 Page 1
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TA09p58_60_Greens_Layout 1 27/07/2017 10:31 Page 57
How to keep your
greens clean
Catherine Strong shows you how to
mix greens in acrylics and oils for a
vibrant painting of summer flowers
G
Catherine Strong
has exhibited widely. She demonstrates
regularly to art groups in the south
west of England and her work can be
seen at Hadfield Fine Art and Sarah
Sclater Art at home.
www.catherinestrongart.co.uk
reen is everywhere. It is the
most common colour in the
natural world, and second only
to blue as a favourite colour.
Many artists are nervous of using it,
however, and for good reason ? unless
handled skilfully, it is easy to end up
with a mud-coloured mess! If you are
new to, or nervous of, painting green
then I recommend starting with a
restricted range of greens that work
well together. With experience, it can
be very satisfying to mix your own
greens from blues and yellows, but it is
easier to begin painting greens using a
ready-mixed hue such as
phthalocyanine green (acrylics) or
viridian green (oils) ? the equivalent
colour in the two different media. By
mixing tones of two or three hues of
green it is possible to keep control of
?OVERLOADED BRUSH? TECHNIQUE
Using a small brush, such as Pro Arte filbert 1 or any very small watercolour or
acrylic brush, ?overload? it with paint by dipping the brush into paint and scooping
up as much as you can until it?s top-heavy. Then smear the paint over the
canvas/board. I call this the ?overloaded brush? technique. It?s especially good for
blending paint wet-into-wet, or for producing a more abstract appearance. You
are aiming to create areas of thick paint, blending them into each other. Keep the
lighter tones
towards the back
right-hand side of
the painting, and
place darker tones
on the left-hand
side, and to mark
areas in the top
quarter of the
painting to suggest
dark bushes. Mix
cobalt blue with
white to create a sky
colour and mix two
tones as shown in
the finished painting
www.painters-online.co.uk
your greens, even when painting wetinto-wet: these blend and work well
together, and do not have a tendency
to produce mud!
Painting a garden scene using
acrylics and oils
For this demonstration the
underpainting will be in acrylics and
the top layer in oils. You?ll mix three
hues of green, and for each there will
be three or four tones. After applying a
simple wash of colour, you?ll build up
the painting using acrylics. Acrylics are
water-soluble and dry quickly, unlike
oils. The advantage of doing the
underpainting in acrylics is that it will
be dry enough to paint over within
about an hour. The top layer will consist
of thicker paint, applied wet-into-wet,
in oils. When working in greens, I like to
work in oils for the final ? visible ? layer
of paint. More than any other colour, I
find greens are far more vibrant and
pleasing to the eye in oil paint than
acrylics, although if you only have one
of these media, the whole painting can
be done either in acrylics or in oils.
Materials
You?ll be using the same basic palette
of colours in acrylics and oils. However,
phthalocyanine (phthalo) green acrylic
paint is not equivalent to phthalo green
in oils. You will be using phthalo green
(yellow or blue shade) acrylic paint,
and its equivalent colour in oils ?
viridian green. You will also need
cadmium yellow (light), titanium white,
Payne?s grey, raw sienna, yellow ochre,
burnt sienna, burnt umber, prism violet,
cobalt blue, permanent rose and
vermilion (I find vermilion more
pleasing than cadmium red for
poppies). I use a mix of Daler-Rowney,
Golden, Liquitex and Winsor & Newton
colours. For acrylics I use heavy-body
paints where possible.
artist September 2017
57
TA09p58_60_Greens_Layout 1 27/07/2017 10:31 Page 58
ACRYLICS & OILS
DEMONSTRATION Garden in Summer
u STAGE TWO
Building up the colour
in acrylics
p STAGE ONE
Underpainting
Using acrylics, squeeze a small amount of
permanent rose, raw sienna and burnt sienna
onto your palette. Mix a little of all three
colours together using a small palette knife.
You are aiming for a red-ochre colour as
shown. Using a Daley-Rowney No. 1 flat
acrylic brush, dip the brush into water and
pick up some of the mixed paint on your
brush and apply this colour to your board.
Cover the surface of the board evenly and
leave to dry (about 20 minutes)
Mark in the horizon line about
12cm from the top of the board
with a pencil. Using a No. 3 filbert
brush take some of green hue 3
and loosely block in the darkest
areas across the horizon. Then,
using green hues 1 and 2, take a
No. 2 filbert or No. 3 brush (use
No. 3 in the foreground and No. 2
for the distance) and apply paint
in individual brushstrokes across
the canvas in small dashes and
lines.
I favour ?long filbert? brushes as
they have a pleasing springiness
as you apply paint. Taking one
hue at a time (start with hue 1),
paint the dark tones first then
move through to lighter tones
across the canvas. Vary the
direction of your strokes and keep
the paint thin at this stage so it
dries quickly. Next paint in the
earth colours: raw umber/raw
sienna, and raw sienna/yellow
ochre. Use yellow ochre/cadmium
yellow medium to add some
lighter earth tones. Use prism
violet to add depth to the dark
areas, then block in some pure
cobalt blue to mark in the sky
I find the brands largely
interchangeable, except for Payne?s
grey ? I have a strong preference for
Liquitex heavy-body Payne?s grey
(some of the other brands tend to be
much too blue for my liking). I use
mainly Winsor & Newton oil paints.
Other materials
Paint palette
58
artist September 2017
You?ll be painting on a wood panel
193?4?93?4in (50?25cm). You could also
use a canvas board or canvas/box
canvas. Filbert brushes are ideal,
especially for the underpainting, which
is built up with carefully laid individual
brushstrokes. Most of these will not be
visible in the finished painting, but
they create a wonderful colour base for
your final wet-into-wet work. You?ll use
painting knives for the final layer as
well as small brushes. I use a mix of
painting knives, but tend to favour
Winsor & Newton and Daler-Rowney
brands as they both have an excellent
selection of shapes and sizes, and last
well. You?ll also need water for mixing
www.painters-online.co.uk
TA09p58_60_Greens_Layout 1 27/07/2017 10:31 Page 59
PRACTICAL
u STAGE THREE
Using oils
For this wet-into-wet stage you?ll be applying
oil paints with brushes and knives. Mix green
hues using oils in exactly the same way as you
did for acrylics, but use viridian instead of
phthalo green. For larger flower heads use a
Winsor & Newton No. 25 knife. Scoop up pure
cadmium yellow (use light and medium
shades) and smear onto the canvas to suggest
flowers in a herbaceous border, then use a
small knife such as Winsor & Newton No. 20 to
dot vermilion across the canvas to suggest
poppies. Use pure vermilion; make a lighter
tone for the poppies by mixing cadmium
yellow (light) with vermilion. For a darker
shade use Payne?s grey mixed with vermilion.
Use cobalt blue and white (mix two tones) to
suggest cornflowers. Remember, you are not
trying to make them realistic, and using a
knife helps achieve an impressionist look!
u
FINISHED PAINTING
Garden in Summer, acrylic and oils, 193?4?93?4in
(50?25cm)
acrylics, and turps or odourless thinners
for mixing oil, as well as plenty of
kitchen roll.
Mixing greens
Working with acrylic paints, squeeze
generous blobs of phthalo green,
cadmium yellow (light) and titanium
white onto your palette ? I never use
?mixing? white as, paradoxically, I find it
doesn?t mix well!
Use phthalo green and cadmium
yellow (light) to make a new green hue
(hue 1). You are now going to make four
tones of this hue. To make the darkest
tone, take a generous portion of the
phthalo green and place it on your
palette. To this, add a small amount of
the yellow and mix using your palette
knife until both colours are completely
blended together. I usually mix the next
tone by taking a small amount of the
previous tone and adding more yellow,
and repeating the process until I have
four tones.
Use phthalo green and titanium white
to make a second green hue (hue 2).
Make four tones of this following the
procedure above. These two hues will
form the basis of our painting.
Now make a very dark green mixing
Payne?s grey and phthalo green (hue 3).
You?re aiming for a colour that is
noticeably darker than pure phthalo
green. Add a touch of prism violet to
make it even darker.
Note that in the final stage of the
painting you will mix all these colours
again in oils, substituting viridian for
TA
phthalo green.
www.painters-online.co.uk
artist September 2017
59
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September 2017
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Main Road, Gedling,
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Farnham,
Nottingham
NG4
3HP
Surrey GU9 7HH
Tel:
0115 715390
9401721
Tel: 01252
www.pullingers.com
Opening
times:
Stockist of: Canson, Caran D Ache, Cretacolor
Tuesday to Friday 10am - 5.30pm,
Clairfontaine, Da Vinci, Daler-Rowney, Derwent,
Faber-Castell,12.30pm
Golden, Royal
Talens, Schmincke
Saturday
- 5pm
Sennelier, Winsor & Newton, Fabriano
www.localartshop.co.uk
Stockists of: Royal & Langnickel,
LINCOLNSHIRE
Sennelier, Pebeo, Loxley, Golden,
W F Gadsby
House of Crafts, Cretacolor, Jakar,
347 High Street, Lincoln,
Daler-Rowney,
Caran
Lincolnshire LN5
7DQd?Ache.
Tel: 01522 527 487
www.gadsbys.co.uk
Patchings
Art Centre
Stockist of: Winsor & Newton,
Oxton
Road,Caran
Calverton,
Daler Rowney,
D?Ache etc
Nottingham NG14 6NU
Westgate Gallery�
Tel: 0115 965 3479
83 Westgate, Grantham NG31 6LE
Opening
times: every day
Tel 01476 578800
NORTH YORKSHIRE
SURREY
Pullingers
The Art Shop Skipton
109
West Street,
Farnham,
Online
& instore
Surrey GU9 7HH
22
Newmarket
Tel: 01252 715390 Street, Skipton,
North Yorkshire BD23 2JB
www.pullingers.com
Stockist
of: Canson,
Caran D Ache, Cretacolor
Tel: 01756
701177
Clairfontaine, Da Vinci, Daler-Rowney, Derwent,
Opening times: Monday to Friday
Faber-Castell, Golden, Royal Talens, Schmincke
9am - 5.30pm,
Saturday
9am ? 5pm.
Sennelier,
Winsor & Newton,
Fabriano
www.theartshopskipton.co.uk
LINCOLNSHIRE
Stockists of: Pebeo, Derwent, Sennelier,
Winsor & Newton, Daler-Rowney,
WUnison,
F Gadsby
Loxley,
Reeves, Hahnem黨le,
347
HighArtmaster,
Street, Lincoln,
Lincolnshire
LN5and
7DQmany more.
AMT Products,
Tel: 01522 527 487
www.gadsbys.co.uk
Artist's
Palette
Stockist
of: Winsor
& Newton,
Daler
Rowney, Caran
D?Ache
etc1AA
1 Millgate,
Thirsk
YO7
Tel: 01845 574457
Westgate
Gallery�
Opening times: Monday to
83 Westgate, Grantham NG31 6LE
Saturday
9am - 5pm
Tel
01476 578800
Stocking:�
Talens,&DaNewton,
Vinci, Schmincke
StockistsRoyal
of: Winsor
Daler-Rowney, Loxley, Sennelier,
WEST
YORKSHIRE
Clairefontaine
and many more. Craft
The
Art model
Shopkits
- Ilkley�
materials,
and bespoke framing
Hawksworth
Street, Ilkley,�
service. Professional
artist and tutor-owner
West
Yorkshire
9DU
happy
to offerLS29
expert
advice.
Tel & Fax: +44(0)1943 432016
www.theartshops.co.uk
The&Art
Shop
Winsor
Newton,
Daler Rowney, Pro Arte,
Canson,
Liquitex,
Derwent,
Unison, Caran
230 High
Street,
Northallerton,
D?Ache, Loxley, Sennelier Mapac
North Yorkshire DL7 8LU
Tel: 01609 761775
SUFFOLK
Opening times: Monday to
The
Art Trading Company
Saturday 9.30am ? 5pm
36a Earsham Street,Bungay N35 1AQ
www.theartshops.co.uk
01986 897939
Stockists of: Winsor & Newton,
www.theartradingcompany.co.uk
Stocking:�
Golden,Loxley,
Lascaux,
Daler-Rowney,
PipUnison,
Seymour,
Sennelier, Daniel Smith, Pro Arte, Da Vinci,
Pan Pastel, Unison, Pro Arte, Artmaster,
Pip Seymour, Canson, Derwent, Roberson,
Hahnem黨le, Pebeo.
NORTH YORKSHIRE
Stocking:� Royal
Talens, Da Vinci, Schmincke
9.30am
- 5.30pm
The Art Shop
www.patchingsartcentre.co.uk
2 Newmarket Street, Skipton,
North Yorks BD23 2JB
Emrys
Art Supplies Ltd
Tel:
01756 70177
22 Market Street, Haverfordwest,
www.theartshop.co.uk
Stockist
of: Derwent, Pebeo,
Loxley
Reeves,
Pembrokeshire,
Wales
SA61
1NH
Unison, Daler-Rowney, Sennelier, Winsor
Tel: 01437 779646
& Newton, Conte Saunders Waterford,
Opening times:
Tuesday
to
Hahnemuhle,
Fabriano,
Art Master
Saturday 9am ? 5pm
WEST YORKSHIRE
Stockists of: Winsor & Newton,
The Art Shop
- Ilkley�
Daler-Rowney,
Derwent,
Caran d?Ache,
Hawksworth
Street,
Unison,
Liquitex,
OldIlkley,�
Holland, Pro Arte,
West Yorkshire LS29 9DU
Leonard
Brushes,
Sennelier,
Canson,
Tel & Fax: +44(0)1943 432016
www.theartshops.co.uk
St
Cuthberts Mill, Artmaster, Pebeo.
Winsor & Newton, Daler Rowney, Pro Arte,
Canson, Liquitex, Derwent, Unison, Caran
D?Ache, Loxley, Sennelier Mapac
SUFFOLK
SUFFOLK
The Art Trading
The Art Trading Company
Company
36a Earsham Street,Bungay N35 1AQ
55
Earsham
01986
897939 Street, Bungay
www.theartradingcompany.co.uk
Suffolk
NR35 1AF
Stocking:� Golden, Lascaux, Unison,
Tel: 01986 897939
Sennelier, Daniel Smith, Pro Arte, Da Vinci,
Pip Seymour,
Canson,
Derwent, to
Roberson,
Opening
times:
Monday
Saturday 10am ? 5pm
NORTH YORKSHIRE
(closed Sunday and Bank Holidays)
The Art Shop
www.TheArtTradingCompany.co.uk
2 Newmarket
Street,
Skipton,
Stockists
of: Old
Holland,
Michael
North Yorks BD23 2JB
Harding,
Sennelier,
Golden,
Lascaux,
Tel: 01756 70177
www.theartshop.co.uk
Daniel
Smith, Rohrer & Klingner, Winsor
Stockist of: Derwent, Pebeo, Loxley
& Newton, Liquitex and many more.
Reeves, Unison, Daler-Rowney,
S
WALES
www.emrysart.co.uk
SURREY
Stockists of: Winsor & Newton, plus many
Pullingers
more
including
Sennelier,
109
West
Street, Daler-Rowney,
Farnham,
Surrey
GU9
Unison,
Pro7HH
Arte, Derwent.
Tel: 01252 715390
www.pullingers.com
Stockist of: Canson, Caran D Ache, Cretacolor
Clairfontaine, Da Vinci, Daler-Rowney, Derwent,
Faber-Castell, Golden, Royal Talens, Schmincke
Sennelier,
WinsorShop
& Newton, Fabriano
The Art
WEST YORKSHIRE
Hawksworth Street, Ilkley,
LINCOLNSHIRE
West Yorkshire LS29 9DU
WTel:F 01943
Gadsby
432016
347
High Street,
Lincoln,
Opening
times:
Monday to
Lincolnshire LN5 7DQ
Saturday 9am ? 5.30pm
Tel: 01522 527 487
www.theartshops.co.uk
www.gadsbys.co.uk
Stockist
of:of:Winsor
&&
Newton,
Stockists
Winsor
Newton, Daler-Rowney,
Daler Rowney, Caran D?Ache etc
Loxley, Pip Seymour, Pan Pastel, Unison,
Pro Arte, Artmaster,
Hahnem黨le, Pebeo.
Westgate
Gallery�
�
www.painters-online.co.uk
6
p60_61_tasept17.indd 60
28/07/2017 10:53:54
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p60_61_tasept17.indd 61
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Artist_FullPage_September.indd 1
05/07/2017 13:00:42
TA09p63_BooksFITS_Layout 1 25/07/2017 13:15 Page 71
ART BOOKS & DVDS
Reviewed by Henry Malt
Painting with
Watercolour
Painting Portraits of Children
David Howell
This thorough survey
of classic watercolour
techniques teaches
by example rather
than demonstration.
It is a book to read
rather than work
through and experienced artists will
welcome it all the more for that. There is a
slant to the subject matter and in this case it
is buildings and water. This does, however,
encompass a good variety and includes
coastal scenes, boats and the figures that
people the settings. David Howell?s style
could best be summed up as wash-andgranulation, which he explores and exploits
to the maximum. Observations from
someone who is a consummate master of
their method are always worth reading, and
this is no exception. While the text includes
technical information where it is needed,
the main emphasis is on the creative process
? the message rather than the medium.
Crowood �.99, 128 pages (P/B)
ISBN 9781785002304
Howard Hodgkin ? Painting India
Edited by Eleanor Clayton
India was a source
of inspiration from
Howard Hodgkin?s
first visit in 1964.
Although his
collection of Indian
art has featured
elsewhere, this is
the first book to
explore the
country?s influence
on Hodgkin?s own work. As well as a series
of helpful and illuminating essays by writers
on Indian art that discuss the book?s subject
in some detail and from a variety of
perspectives, the book includes over 40
colour plates dating from 1967 to 2017.
Presented chronologically, though without
comment, these chronicle the artist?s
journey through discovery and
representation of his inspiration and his
move from canvas to wood as a support. An
interview with Hodgkin from November
2016 adds further illumination to the
subject. This is a thorough account of a
major figure of recent art and of one of his
most important influences.
Lund Humphries �.99, 96 pages (P/B)
ISBN 9781848222359
Simon Davis
Children are some of
the most difficult,
yet rewarding,
subjects to paint.
Rarely still and their
features constantly
in development, any
fixed point is hard to
find and it is hardly
surprising that many choose simply to resort
to photographs. Simon Davis starts not with
a photograph but a quick sketch that
captures his impression of the subject and
gets the basic shapes down. This can often
look like a caricature, but it?s a personal note
from which everything else flows. Unlike
most Crowood books, this is entirely
demonstration-based and the steps are
carefully chosen to show the build-up of the
image from sketch to finished result. The
text explains the creative as much as the
technical process and greatly aids
understanding.
Crowood �.99, 96 pages (P/B)
ISBN 9781785002908
Drawing and Painting Cars
Keith Woodcock
This would be an easy
book to recommend
even if it wasn?t so
good and so
thorough, because it
is, as far as I am aware,
the only book on this
subject. If you want to
paint cars, you won?t
be disappointed. The
range of subjects and styles is impressive.
There are classic cars, everyday cars and
racing cars. Media include drawing, oils,
watercolours and acrylics. Styles range from
poster-style records to impressionistic blurs
of speed that capture automotion to
perfection. Each subject and type of
painting is treated sympathetically, with
appropriate backgrounds and ancillary
features and figures ? they?re believable, in
short. There are even a few portraits of
famous drivers.
Crowood �.99, 128 pages (P/B)
ISBN 9781785002922
Stanhope Forbes ? Father of the
Newlyn School
Elizabeth Knowles
Stanhope Forbes was a
master of Victorian
narrative painting. At
its best, it carries with it
both documentary
recording and social
comment. At its worst,
it can descend into the
mawkish sentimentality
that so often afflicted
the age. Like all good art, Forbes? paintings
are constructs. His fisherfolk are suspiciously
well-clad and nourished, their boats
generally in a good state of repair. He also
had to get them to sit for him and his scenes
are always perfectly constructed. There is
frequently an air of idealisation, but also of
reality and occasionally grim realism.
This generously illustrated and superbly
reproduced volume accompanies an
exhibition at the Penlee Gallery and includes
an excellent variety of work: the fishing
scenes are here, but so too are landscapes,
urban views, interiors and portraits.
Sansom �, 128 pages (P/B)
ISBN 9781911408062
Ready to Paint in 30 Minutes
Flowers in Watercolour Ann Mortimer
Street Scenes in Watercolour Grahame Booth
The original Ready to Paint series sold well to more experienced
artists who might have been expected to dismiss it as ?jumpedup painting by numbers?. A complete re-think has produced this
development, which is a whole new departure. In place of
complete paintings, there are 30-odd half-hour exercises that
concentrate on a single element ? skies, shadows, trees,
rosebuds, seed heads or leaves. There is also more emphasis on
technique and therefore on the learning process. It?s definitely
worth a look.
Search Press �.99, 96 pages plus tracings (P/B)
Flowers in Watercolour ISBN 9781782215196
Street Scenes in Watercolour ISBN 978-1782214151
Some of the books reviewed here can be purchased from our online bookshop:
visit www.painters-online.co.uk/store and click on the link for books
www.painters-online.co.uk
artist September 2017
63
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p64_tasept17.indd 64
September 2017
19.04.16 09:25
www.painters-online.co.uk
31/07/2017 13:44:29
Sept Opps_Layout 1 31/07/2017 12:50 Page 1
OPPORTUNITIES
& COMPETITIONS
Sending-in days
Great Sheffield Art Show
Details: Art show/sale for amateur
and professional artists. Up to six
works may be submitted, in any
medium, including hand-made
prints and digital art. Photographs
not accepted. Works on paper should
be framed behind glass. Minimum
selling price �. There are two
themes, ?Sheffield?s Heritage? and
?Maritime?; winners of these
categories will receive a prize. Entry
forms and full details can be
downloaded from
www.greatsheffieldartshow.co.uk.
The exhibition is at the Millennium
Gallery, 48 Arundel Gate, Sheffield S1
2PP on November 18 and 19.
When: Submissions deadline,
September 16; handing-in,
November 16.
Cost: �hanging fee per work.
Contact:
www.greatsheffieldartshow.co.uk
South West Academy of Fine
and Applied Arts
Details: Local, national and
international artists are invited to
submit up to six works although a
maximum of four will be selected. All
media considered. Maximum size
391?2in (100cm) in any dimension,
including frame where applicable.
Online submission in first instance.
For full details and to enter, go to
www.southwestacademy.oess.uk.
Prizes and awards. The exhibition will
be at Exeter Castle, Castle Street,
Exeter, Devon EX4 3PU from
November 14 to 25.
When: Submissions deadline,
September 15, 11.59pm Handing-in,
November 12, 2?4pm.
Cost: � per work; artists under the
age of 26, � per work.
Contact:
www.southwestacademy.org.uk
Royal Glasgow Institute of
the Fine Arts (RGI)
Details: Annual open exhibition
established in 1861 to promote
contemporary art in Scotland. Works
previously submitted for this
competition will not be accepted. Up
to five works may be submitted in
painting, sculpture, fine art
photography, drawing, mixed media,
stained glass and architectural
drawing and models. Three works
should be no larger than 59in
(150cm) in any dimension, including
frame; two works should not exceed
141?4in (36cm) in any dimension.
Online registration and submission
in first instance. All work must be for
www.painters-online.co.uk
sale. Cash prizes. The exhibition is at
the RGI Kelly Gallery, 118 Douglas
Street, Glasgow G2 4ET from
November 11 to 26. Full details and
enter online at
https://theroyalglasgowinstituteofth
efinearts.co.uk
When: Submissions deadline,
October 1. Handing-in, October 30
and 31.
Cost: First work �; two works �;
three works �; four works �; five
works �. Concessions available for
students. Hanging fee for selected
works, � per work.
Contact: RGI Kelly Gallery.
) 0141 248 6386
Daiwa Foundation Art Prize
Details: The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese
Foundation?s triennial competition.
The winning artist receives a first
solo show at a gallery in Tokyo,
Japan; a participation fee of �000
and a period of support and
introduction to key individuals and
organisations in the Japanese
contemporary art world. The
competition is open to British artists
resident in the UK who have neither
had, nor are planning, a solo
exhibition in Japan. Acceptable
media are painting, photography,
print, drawing, sculpture, ceramics,
installation and moving image.
Entrants may submit one
application, to be supported by four
recent works in any medium, a
supporting CV and personal
statement in the first instance. An
exhibition of shortlisted artists will
be held at the Daiwa Foundation?s
Japan House Gallery, London in June
2018. The winner?s exhibition at
Mizuma Gallery, Tokyo, Japan will be
autumn/winter 2018. For full details
and to apply, see www.dajf.org.uk.
When: Submissions deadline,
October 2.
Cost: �per artist.
Contact: Queries to project
managers Parker Harris.
) 01372 462190
ING Discerning Eye
Details: Competition to encourage a
wider understanding of the visual
arts and to stimulate debate about
the purpose and place of art in our
society, selected by two critics, two
collectors and two artists. Up to six
original works, in any media
including paintings, photographs,
sculptures and prints, may be
entered, maximum size 20in (51cm)
in longest dimension. All works must
be for sale. Online registration
preferred; regional submission
points. Awards include ING Purchase
Prize, �000; The Discerning Eye
Check out the latest competitions to enter
and make a note of important deadlines
Founder?s Purchase Prize, �500; The
Discerning Eye Chairman?s Purchase
Prize, �000. Selected works will be
exhibited at the Mall Galleries, The
Mall, London SW1 from November 16
to 26. Full details and entry
schedules available at
https://thediscerningeye.
artopps.co.uk
When: Registration deadline, August
23, 5pm; London submissions,
September 2 and 3, earlier from
regional collection points.
Cost: London submissions, � per
work; regional submissions, � per
work.
Contact: Parker Harris:
de@parkerharris.co.uk
) 01372 462190
Institute of East Anglian
Artists open exhibition 2017
Details: Entries are invited from
artists living in the East Anglian
region. Up to three works may be
submitted in any painting media or
etchings, linocuts, woodcuts or
engravings. Other prints and
photographs are not accepted. All
must be for sale. Online submission
in first instance. Some prizes
awarded, and exhibiting artists may
be considered for Provisional
Membership of the IEA. The
exhibition is at The Gallery
Picturecraft, in Holt, Norfolk from
October 20 to November 1.
When: Submissions deadline,
September 22, 12 noon; handing-in,
October 13 and 14.
Cost: � per work.
Contact: For full details see
www.eastanglianartists.com.
) 01328 830056
Royal Society of Miniature
Painters, Sculptors and
Gravers (RMS)
Details: Annual open exhibition of
miniature art. Up to five works may
be submitted; all must be for sale ?
human portraits are the only
exception, but portrait artists must
submit one non-commissioned work
that is for sale. Minimum price for
portraits, �0; �0 for sculpture
and subject work. Maximum sizes,
including frames: rectangles and
ovals, 41?2?6in (11.5?15cm), squares
41?2?41?2in (11.5?11.5cm), rounds
41?2in (11.5cm) diameter and
sculptures 8in (20cm) across the
longest measurement, including the
base. Heads that are the primary
focus of the work must not be larger
than 2in (5cm). ?Heads? is interpreted
as heads with normal hairstyles and
does not include hats; for animal
and bird heads this includes ears
and beaks. Prizes include the Gold
Memorial Bowl for the best
miniature; The Prince of Wales
Award for Outstanding Miniature
Painting, the President?s Special
Commendation, and many other
awards. The exhibition is at the Mall
Galleries, The Mall, London SW1
from September 20 to October 1.
For full details and entry forms go to
www.royal-miniature-society.org.uk
When: Handing-in, September 9,
10am to 5pm.
Cost: � per work.
Contact: Claire Hucker, Executive
Secretary, 89 Rosebery Road,
Dursley, Gloucestershire GL11 4PU.
) 01454 269268
The Royal Institute of Oil
Painters (ROI)
Details: The ROI seeks submissions
of oil paintings from artists over the
age of 18 for its annual open
exhibition. A maximum of six works,
in oil ? but acrylic is accepted if
framed as an oil ? may be entered;
up to four may be selected.
Maximum size, 941?2in (240cm) in the
longest dimension. All works must
be for sale, have been completed in
the last three years and not
previously exhibited in London.
Online submission in first instance at
http://mallgalleries.oess.uk. Among
the many awards are the Stanley
Grimm Prize, two awards of �0 for
visitors? choices; the Alan Gourley
Memorial Award, �000; the Phyllis
Roberts Award, �000; and The Artist
Award of a feature in the magazine.
Selected works will be shown at the
Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1
from November 29 to December 10.
For full details see
www.mallgalleries.org.uk
When: Submissions deadline, August
25, 12 noon. Handing-in, October 7
10am to 5pm.
Cost: � per work; � per work for
artists under the age of 35.
Contact: The Federation of British
Artists, 17 Carlton House Terrace,
London SW1 5BD.
) 020 7930 6844
A much larger selection of opportunities can be viewed on our
website, where you will find a list of workshops, tutors, painting
holidays and more.
www.painters-online.co.uk
artist
September 2017
65
Sept Exhibitions_Exhibitions for Vivien 31/07/2017 11:01 Page 62
EXHIBITIONS
GALLERY OPENING TIMES AND EXHIBITION DATES CAN VARY; IF IN DOUBT, PHONE TO AVOID DISAPPOINTMENT
National Portrait
Gallery
LONDON
Bankside Gallery
48 Hopton Street SE1.
? 020 7928 7521
Off the Wall; selling exhibition
by members of the Royal
Society of Painter-Printmakers
and the Royal Watercolour
Society,
until September 10
Browse & Darby
19 Cork Street W1.
? 020 7734 7984
Contemporary Gallery
Artists; includes Julian Bailey,
Edmund Chamberlain, Victoria
Crowe, Robert Dukes, Anthony
Eyton, Anthony Fry, Eileen
Hogan, Kate Hopkins, Thomas
Lamb, Andy Pankhurst, Janie
Patterson, Susan Wilson and
Duncan Wood,
until September 28.
Dulwich Picture Gallery
College Road SE21.
? 020 8693 5254
Sargent: The Watercolours;
until October 8.
Estorick Collection of
Modern Italian Art
St Martin?s Place WC2.
? 020 7306 0055
BP Portrait Award;
until September 24.
The Queen?s Gallery
Buckingham Palace.
? 020 7766 7301 (tickets)
Canaletto and the Art
of Venice;
until November 12.
Royal Academy of Arts
Piccadilly W1.
? 020 7300 8000
Matisse in the Studio;
until November 12.
Second Nature: the Art of
Charles Tunnicliffe RA;
until October 8.
Tate Modern
Bankside SE1.
? 020 7887 8888
Alberto Giacometti;
until September 10.
Fahrelnissa Zeid; abstracts
with Islamic, Byzantine, Arab
and Persian influences fused
with European approaches,
until October 8.
39a Canonbury Square N1.
? 020 7704 9522
Franco Grignani: Art as
Design 1950?1990;
until September 10.
Millbank SW1.
? 020 7887 8888
Queer British Art;
until October 1.
Flowers
Victoria Miro Mayfair
21 Cork Street W1.
? 020 7920 7777
Freya Payne: Returning;
paintings, sculptures and
monoprints,
until September 2.
Flowers
82 Kingsland Road E2
? 020 7439 7766
Mono: An Exhibition of
Unique Prints;
until September 3.
Lyon & Turnbull Gallery
22 Connaught Street, W2
? 020 7930 9115
Colourists at Connaught;
20 unseen works by the
Scottish Colourists S.J. Peploe,
F.C.B. Cadell, G.L. Hunter and
J.D. Fergusson,
September 4 to 15.
Mall Galleries
The Mall SW1.
? 020 7930 6844
20/21 British Art Fair;
September 13 to 17.
Sunday Times Watercolour
Competition;
September 19 to 24.
66
artist
Tate Britain
14 St George St W1.
? 020 3205 8910
Hernan Bas: Cambridge
Living; new paintings inspired
by the lore and romanticism of
life at Cambridge,
September 6 to October 21.
BIRMINGHAM
Royal Birmingham
Society of Artists
4 Brook Street, St Paul?s Square.
? 0121 236 4353
Metropolis 2017;
August 24 to September 30.
BRISTOL
Bristol Museum & Art
Gallery
Queen?s Road.
? 0117 9223571
Alternative visions:
Undiscovered Art in the
South West; artists facing a
barrier to the art world ,
until September 10.
Royal West of England
Academy
Queen?s Road, Clifton.
? 0117 9735129
Air: Visualising the Invisible
in British Art 1768?2017;
until September 3.
BUXTON
Museum & Art Gallery
Terrace Road.
? 01629 533540
Derbyshire Open Art
Competition 2017;
until September 1.
CHICHESTER
Pallant House Gallery
9 North Pallant.
? 01243 774557.
John Minton: A Centenary;
until October 1.
DITCHLING
Ditchling Museum of
Art and Craft
REGIONS
BANHAM
NWAG Gallery
Banham Zoo, Kenning Hall
Road
? 01953 887771
Natural World Art Group;
exhibition of wildlife art,
until September 17.
BATH
Victoria Art Gallery
Bridge Street.
? 01225 477244
John Eaves: Echoes of Place;
vibrant compositions in oil,
watercolour and collage,
until October 8.
September 2017
Lodge Hill Lane.
? 01273 844744.
Eric Gill: The Body; with 80
works,
until September 3.
EASTBOURNE
Towner Art Gallery
College Road.
? 01323 434670.
Ravilious & Co: The Pattern of
Friendship, English Art
Designers 1922?1942;
until September 17.
Sussex Open 2017;
until October 1.
FALMOUTH
Falmouth Art Gallery
Municipal Buildings, The Moor.
? 01326 313863
Winifred Nicholson:
Liberation of Colour; touring
exhibition,
until September 16.
Alphonse Mucha: In Quest of
Beauty; drawings, paintings,
photographs and poster
designs; touring exhibition,
until October 29.
FROME
MANCHESTER
Black Swan Arts
Imperial War Museum
North
2 Bridge Street.
? 01373 473980
Sketch: artists?sketchbooks,
open competition
until September 3.
GUILDFORD
Watts Gallery
The Quays, Trafford Wharf
Road
? 0161 836 4000
Wyndham Lewis: Life, Art,
War;
until January 1, 2018.
MORETON-INMARSH
Down Lane, Compton.
? 01483 810235
GF Watts: England?s
Michelangelo; the artist?s
most significant paintings
from private and public
collections,
until November 26.
Evelyn Dunbar: Studies,
Illustrations and Paintings;
until September 24.
The Old Dairy Plant,
Stratford Road.
? 01608 652255
A Selling Retrospective,
Part 1; the work of the late
David Prentice,
until August 26.
HASTINGS
NOTTINGHAM
Jerwood Gallery
Nottingham Castle
Museum & Art Gallery
John Davies Gallery
Rock-a-Nore Road.
? 01424 728377
Jean Cooke: Delight in the
thing Seen;
until September 10.
Lenton Road.
? 0115 8761400
Reportrait;
until September 10.
KENDAL
OXFORD
? 01539 722464
Abbot Hall Art Gallery
Painting Pop;
until October 7.
KINGSBRIDGE
Harbour House Gallery
The Promenade.
? 01548 854708
Anita Reynolds: Controlled
Burning; new paintings and
prints,
September 5 to 17.
LIVERPOOL
Tate Liverpool
Albert Dock.
? 0151 702 7400
Portraying a Nation:
Germany 1919?1933;
Germany between the two
world wars seen through the
eyes of painter Otto Dix and
photographer August Sander,
until October 15.
Walker Art Gallery
William Brown Street.
? 0151 478 4199
Ashmolean Museum
Beaumont Street.
? 01865 278002
Raphael: The Drawings;
until September 3.
PENZANCE
Penlee House Gallery
and Museum
Morab Road.
? 01736 363625
Stanhope Forbes: Father of
the Newlyn School;
until September 9.
SHEFFIELD
Graves Gallery
Surrey Street.
? 0114 278 2600
Going Public: International
Art Collectors in Sheffield;
includes painting, sculpture,
works on paper and
photography by Carl Andre,
Donald Judd, Joseph and Anni
Albers, Bridget Riley, Lewis
Baltz and more.
September 2 to December 2.
www.painters-online.co.uk
Sept Exhibitions_Exhibitions for Vivien 31/07/2017 11:01 Page 63
Millenium Gallery
Surrey Street.
? 0114 278 2600
Master of all Trades: The
John Ruskin Prize 2017;
until October 8.
SOUTHAMPTON
City Art Gallery
Civic Centre Road.
? 023 8083 2277
Capture the Castle;
until September 2.
STOW ON THE
WOLD
Fosse Gallery
The Manor House, The Square.
? 01451 831319
Selected members of the
NEAC;
September 3 to 23.
STRATFORD ON
AVON
Compton Verney
Wellesbourn
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