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The Big Issue July 3 2017

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EVERY MONDAY
ESTABLISHED 1991
�50
JULY 3-9, 2017 NO.1263
A HAND UP NOT A HANDOUT
The most
INSPIRATIONAL
PERSON in
British sport
JUDY
mURRAY
Dynasty creator
INTERVIEW
EST. 1991
CONTENTS
JULY 3-9 2017 / NO. 1263
W
IN!
TH
E THRILL
ELLE ON DVER
D
TURN TO PA
GE
REGULARS
4
44
Hello, my
name
e is
Daviid
CORRESPOND
DENCE
8
STREET ART
A
11
Welcome to this week?s
edition of The B
Big Issue.
nspired to
I was recently in
start doing art, a
and I have
now made my ?rst sale.
It?s very excitin
ng. Art can
bilities for
open up possib
people who hav
ven?t been
nities. On
given opportun
page 28 you can read
about the London
social enterprise that?s
used an empty
y car park
to create a space for all
mmunity
kinds of com
art projec
cts. And
ar Street
our regula
Art feature
e on page
eight sho
owcases
work by all sorts of
rginalised people.
You can re
ead more
about my story on
page 4
46.
JOHN BIR
RD
The uneven world
d of credit
12
DAMIAN BA
ARR
The politics of greed is to
blame for Grenfell Tower
15
PAUSE
How to get psyched up
16
LETTER TO
O MY
YOUNGER SELF
S
Judy Murray
20
RISE OF T HE
YOUNG LE
EFT
How Corbyn tu
urned
politics upside down
31-45
5
THE
ENLIGHTEN
NMENT
BOOKS
S
FILM, TV
V,
MUSIC & EV ENTS
SPOT THE BALL
THE BIG ISSUE MANIFESTO
(and that tough
h sudoku)
WE BELIEVE in a hand up, not a handout...
Which is why our sellers BUY every copy of the
magazine for �25 and sell it for �50.
WE BELIEVE in trade, not aid?
Which is why we ask you to ALWAYS take your
copy of the magazine. Our sellers are working
and need your custom.
WE BELIEVE poverty is indiscriminate?
Which is why we provide ANYONE whose life is
blighted by poverty with the opportunity to
earn a LEGITIMATE income.
WE BELIEVE in the right to citizenship?
Which is why The Big Issue Foundation, our
charitable arm, helps sellers tackle social and
?nancial exclusion.
THE BIG ISSUE / p3 / July 3-9 2017
WE BELIEVE in prevention?
Which is why Big Issue Invest offers backing
and investments to social enterprises, charities
and businesses which deliver social value to
communities.
Photo: Travis Hodges
Can?t ?nd a rregular
vendor? Subsccribe to
The Big Issue ffor �0.
See bigissuee.com
for all offeers.
contact@selectps.com
/ 01202 5866 848
The perils of beingg a young
Irish punk in 1970
0s Britain
CORRESPONDENCE
Write to: The Big Issue, Second Floor, 43 Bath St, Glasgow, G2 1HW
Email: letters@bigissue.com Comment: bigissue.com
@bigissueuk
facebook.com/bigissueUK
COMMENT OF THE WEEK
Generation Rent need help to buy homes
Housing now is a terrible problem. I have
?ve grandchildren. The 30-year-old is a
nurse in London, her husband also works
for the NHS and because their rent is so
high they cannot afford to save. Four other
grandchildren are living at home still, one in
school, but the three others aren?t earning
enough to pay the extortionate rent that is
charged or save for a deposit on a property.
Their only hope is to inherit some from me
when I die but as I am a healthy 75-year-old
that might be a long way off.
Artfully
A
tf ll d
done
Thanks for putting me in The
Big Issue [News, June 19-25],
already I have an enquiry
about a picture you published.
I hope some of you come to
the exhibition.
Jo Sunshine Art
Seeing red
I was disappointed to open your
June 19-25 issue and ?nd a letter
titled ?This isn?t equality? that
ended with a plug for The Red
Pill. The Red Pill is a violently
misogynistic online community,
started on Reddit, that promotes
emotional, occasionally
physical, abuse of women.
It?s also pretty damn cruel to
men, saying that men who treat
female partners as equals are
?weak? and ?not real men?.
While men are abused ? no one?s
disputing this, although I doubt
the veracity of Mr Red Pill?s
sources for obvious reasons
? communities like The Red Pill
do nothing at all to help them.
If anything, their narrative that
women are sociopathic children
and men need to keep them in
line makes things worse.
Name withheld
When I was able to buy my ?rst home with
my late husband we thought we struggled but
nothing compared to the prices today. We
both had secure jobs and as the years rolled
by things just got better and better. Prospects
are not the same now, only for those born
with a silver spoon in their mouths ? the gap
has certainly widened between rich and poor.
It?s not surprising that there are so many
rough sleepers ? most thrown out because
they cannot afford to pay their way.
Margaret Gibbon Yate, email
I?ve been buying The Big Issue
since the ?rst issue, and it
remains an excellent magazine.
Further to DJ Eggins? letter
concerning domestic violence
against women and men, I have
noticed over the last 20 years
or so a growing tendency
among ?the general public?
? particularly parents ? to view
single men walking alone in
parks or countryside with
suspicion and aggression,
especially when young
children are in the vicinity. The
ownership of one or more dogs
by single men often seems to
temper such reactions. Does pet
ownership mean that anyone is
less ?odd? (or dangerous)?
I avoid going to cinemas
alone as recently I was abused
by a group of teenagers. I am, in
fact, in a happy relationship of
16 years with a lovely woman
who has a large family; I attract
no ill will at all when I am
out and about with them.
I understand that the statistics
demonstrate that children are
more likely to be abused by
someone close to them than a
stranger and I also absolutely
understand that children must
be protected.
But it seems to me that what
I am witnessing is a new form
of persecution, that of the
?lone man?.
Dave McGowan, Monmouthshire
SNAP SHOT
@bigissue
@ianlovelandUK牋
Excellent point
raised in this week?s
@BigIssue ? govt?s housing
minister isn?t at cabinet
meetings. Why not? Housing
should be cabinet role
@Iris_Priest�
Compelling article
in @BigIssue on the
#NHS & health economics
which deftly illustrates why
we should invest more in
our vital public sector
Arise, Sir Jasper
Why do the powers that be
like to give celebrities honours
and knighthoods but not to
someone like Jasper Thompson
[News, June 19-25] who
deserves it. If we had more
people in the world like Jasper
the world would be better.�
Paul Nelson, email
A Swift rebuttal
I am always intrigued by The
Big Issue?s arts pages, often
discovering many new writers,
artists and ?lms. However,
Ethel Rohan?s ?Top 5 Irish
novels? [Books, June 19-25]
puzzled me; was her selection
based on gender, contemporary
writers or perhaps both?
I would have included James
Joyce?s A Portrait of the
Artist as a Young Man, a
semi-autobiographical novel
which veers between comedy
and terror, and Jonathan Swift?s
Gulliver?s Travels, acute satire
thinly disguised as fantasy.
David, email
Being ?exible
My local vendor and
friend Dave had a photo
shoot done on
Wednesday evening for
an upcoming article.
Dave asked me to be
with him and hopefully
be in a pic. Here?s
one I took.
Emma ?Bobite?
Faunch, Facebook
THE BIG ISSUE / p4 / July 3-9 2017
I support your campaign for a
Poverty Prevention Unit. If you
have globalised capitalism that
automatically means you have
rich and poor, haves and have
nots. That?s how it works. If you
have a ?exible labour force, you
also have unemployment. Is it
possible to ?nd a way to run the
world without causing poverty?
Sylvia Rose, email
SWAN THEATRE
STRATFORD-UPON-AVON
NOW PLAYING
G ARDIAN
P h o t o g r a p h o f M a t t h e w Te n ny s o n b y I s s a c J a m e s
N D AY T IM
IMES
BP �tickets for
16-25 year olds
Supported by BP
TICKETS FROM �
WWW.RSC.ORG.UK
WH
W
H
SONS
SO
NSTA
TAGE
GE
DIDN?T WE HAVE
A WELLY GOOD
TIME AT GLASTO
J
ohnny Depp mused on
presidential assassinations.
David Beckham championed
social housing. Radiohead made a
triumphant return. And a rock star
politician was born (see page 20 for
more on that). And, as more than
200,000 music fans soaked up the
surprisingly political vibes at this year?s
Glastonbury festival, four Big Issue
vendors were hard at work selling
magazines in the Shangri-La ?eld.
Well done to William from London,
Stuart from Cardiff, Garry from Bristol
and Constantine from Carmarthen for
giving the crowds an enriching read
at Glasto 2017!
FR
ROM THE VAULT...
JUL
LY 3-9 2000燦O.393
Witth this rare landscape cover, we
splaashed on the vicious circle of
prissoners being released without
sup
pport, ending up homeless
and
d jobless before reoffending.
Calling on prisons to do more
to rehabilitate,
r
we reported that
edu
ucation reduced reoffending.
Yeaars later, it?s a message we still
deliiver via our literacy campaign.
ON BIGISSUE.COM THIS WEEK
? William, it was really something ? our vendor
and the Queen at Westminster
? Mark Beaumont: pedal to the mettle
as he cycles the globe
? Dip into underground rivers
? Can empty properties be seized to house
the homeless?
? PLUS snazzy holiday togs at bigissueshop.com
THE BIG ISSUE / p6 / July 3-9 2017
NEWS
CREDIT WHERE
CREDIT?S DUE
John Bird?s landmark bill could save
millions of renters from suffering the
inequalities of the world of borrowing
M
illions of
people who
rent their
homes are
in line for a
credit boost after Big Issue
founder John Bird launched a
new renters? credit bill in the
House of Lords last week.
Many of the UK?s 11 million
renters are stung with poor
credit ratings ? which leads
to worse ?nance deals for
everything from mobile phones
to utilities to white goods
? because their regular rent
payments are not recorded or
recognised in the same way
mortgage payments are.
Lord Bird, now a crossbench
peer, introduced his own
private member?s bill on
creditworthiness, designed to
create a level playing ?eld when
it comes to the availability and
affordability of credit.
?If you are a rent payer,
even if you pay your rent on
time for many years, it won?t
?YOU DON?T WEAR
A BADGE THAT
SAYS I?M INTO
BUSH CRAFT. IT?S
INVISIBLE, EXCEPT
FOR THE SPECIAL
LIGHT THAT?S IN
THE PERSON?S EYES?
Ray Mears goes wild in next week?s
bumper summer getaways Big Issue
necessarily get you the credit
?le that you would if you
were paying a mortgage,?
Lord Bird explained.
?So we?re trying to help
reliable rent payers get the
same advantages as reliable
mortgage payers. Generation
Rent has been hit hard and
they deserve fair access to
credit. We want to empower
more people to get on in life.?
Lord Bird?s bill will oblige
credit service providers to
take rental payment data and
council tax payment data into
account. Big Issue Invest ? the
social investment arm of The
Big Issue Group ? has already
tested this approach in the
social housing sector to tackle
?nancial inclusion.
The Rental Exchange
scheme, a partnership with
Experian, has shown that 80 per
cent of tenants see their credit
score rise once in the initiative.
Read more on page 11
HAVE YOUR CAKE AND EAT IT
((WITH AN OLDER FRIEND)
?
?Free
cakes? is an offer you
ccan?t refuse. And a charity that?s
ttrying to ease the isolation of
eelderly people is hoping it?ll
ggive a sugar boost to its scheme
tto bring lonely seniors together
ffor chat and friendship.
Contact the Elderly runs
ffree get-togethers for people
THE BIG ISSUE / p7 / July 3-9 2017
who otherwise would be cut off
due to disability or care needs.
High street bakery giant
Greggs is backing the scheme,
with 20 of its Scottish shops
offering free buns to anyone
volunteering as a tea party host.
contact-the-elderly.org.uk
STREET ART
S
BUY
STREET ART!
You can buy prints of some
artworks featured in Street Art
through The Big Issue Shop.
At least half of the pro?t from
each sale goes to the artist.
Order at
bigissueshop.com
W
OLD QUEEN
ANATOMY OF
A CRUSTACEAN
BY TANGERINE
Tangerine is a mixed media
artist, photographer and graphic
designer born in Italy and now
living in Brighton. ?Art has always
been a very important part of my
life,? she says. ?I have been trying
to create something new and
personal, looking at my personality,
anxiety and social issues. I am really
inspired by music, and my artworks
always try to express what music
means to me.?
BY RENE ROBBINS
The daughter of an architect, Rene lives in
London. Following the death of her husband and
son, she experienced a period of homelessness
but doesn?t like to dwell on misfortune. At a low
point, one of her friends invited her to an art
project and she has been attending ever since.
Perhaps inspired by her father, her work has an
architectural quality, whether it be line drawing or
collage. She works slowly and patiently due to a
degenerative eye condition.
Street Art is created by people who are marginalised by issues like homelessness, disability and mental health conditions.
Contact streetlights@bigissue.com to see your art here.
THE BIG ISSUE / p8 / July 3-9 2017
STREET ART BUY NOW AT THE BIG ISSUE SHOP FROM � PLUS P&P
Showcasing the work of talented individuals on the margins of society
PUTTING PEOPLE AND PLANET FIRST
bigissueshop.com
JOHN BIRD
Here?s a bright idea ?
let?s ?x the uneven
world of credit
E
arly morning is my bright
idea time; very early.
It always has been. Often
I would walk the streets
through the night and
compose songs which, by
morning, as I got to a Victoria station early
cafe, or Edinburgh Waverley, or even Gare
St-Lazare, I would have realised they were
not heading for the Hit Parade. And that
all the money I was going to spend once I
had sold a million of If You Ever Want Fame
& Fortune, or whatever other ditty I was
making up, was not happening.
This habit had started the year that
Buddy Holly?s plane crashed and killed him
and other artists. I was 13 and desperate
to get my hands on some money so that we
did not have to starve a few days of the week
and my mum and dad could have a seaside
holiday. Everything Is Gonna Be Alright,
though, also did not see the light of day and
did not make the money necessary to lift
the Bird family out of penury.
A vast collection of genuine silver
cutlery taken from a bomb-damaged house
turned out to be silver-plated, and the 10
shillings me and my mates got meant two
shillings each. I could not even seem to
steal successfully.
Instant wealth never left my mind. But
I couldn?t be arsed to actually put the effort
in to get it. I was incapable of doing a
Michael Caine or Sean Connery, or a John,
Paul, George and Ringo and lift myself out
of straitened circumstances by hard
application. By burning the candle at both
ends. The above strivers did strive, and I
was not in their bracket. Because I had not
discovered what I wanted to do in the
world. And I obviously did not want money
so much that I would sweat blood for it.
What is so interesting is that the above
mentioned, and people like Alan Sugar, put
enormous efforts into ?getting on?. Into
honing their abilities to make something
that would lead to money. And I seemed
unable to do such a thing.
But I still got up pre-dawn, and still do,
to come up with ideas. But now instead of
composing songs that will make me rich,
or invent things that will do likewise, I get
up and think: ?How can I save the world
from itself?? ?How can I dismantle
poverty?? ?How can I drive a coach and
horse through governmental ineptitude
in dealing with people in need??
Thank God I?ve moved on from those
dreadful songs with the big pay-off
imagined. But am I not kidding myself
Lord Bird introduces his bill to the House of Lords
imagining that I can in some way magic
out of the air, out of the early-morning air,
some graspable and do-able thing that will
bring us nearer to heaven on earth.
Last week, I introduced my first
private member?s bill into the House of
Lords. A bill about creditworthiness.
It aims to change the anomaly that you
could be a rent payer and a council tax
payer for donkey?s years, but that may as
well count for nothing in the eyes of a
lender. A level playing field does not
exist in credit. Far from it. Firms
lend renters money at a higher rate. People
with low scores, and less wealth, are
excluded and effectively treated as
second-class citizens.
?This is grown-up
thinking. Helping
people paying
rent and council
tax to raise their
credit rating?
THE BIG ISSUE / p11 / July 3-9 2017
I am pleased to say though that this bill
did not appear in my early-morning mind.
This bill is ?rmly based on the work done
by a Big Issue business called Big Issue
Invest. Which, if you don?t know, takes
money from investors and invests it into
businesses with a social purpose. It?s a form
of social brokering.
This is grown-up thinking. Already Big
Issue Invest has helped a million and half
people paying rent and council tax into
raising their credit rating. Meaning that
they don?t have to borrow at the high rates
offered to the people in most need.
Unfortunately more and more people
will be housed in the rented sector, so that
without helping people to get credit at a
better rate, the renter is left to stew.
I?ll keep you informed how this bill
progresses but it really is a good bit of
Big Issue thinking. And a development
of helping to dismantle poverty and not
simply preserve people in it. It may look like
a small step but in some ways it?s more of
a giant step. Because it is about ?nding
methods to change ?nance for many millions more people who may ?nd themselves
operating in the uneven world of borrowing.
In the meantime I still come up with
schemes. And early-morning thinking.
My latest to solve the housing crisis by
upping the game on creating prefabricated
housing. Houses that can be put up in one
day, as is beginning to happen. Put houses
up quickly and move them if necessary
later. But also to actually put housing on a
state-of-emergency plane, and not just
leave it to local authorities to totter along,
and never catch up in a month of Sundays.
I?d like to think that I?m getting my feet
more ?rmly on the ground the further I get
away from my earlier pop song career that
never quite took off.
But then there is the million tea towels
I want to sell by year?s end to help charities
that use gardening to get people into health
and well-being.
Watch this space.
John Bird is the founder and Editor in Chief
of The Big Issue. @johnbirdswords
john.bird@bigissue.com
OPINION
Strange brew: Tory PM Margaret Thatcher with
a new Right to Buy homeowner in the 1980s
DAMIAN BARR
After Right to Buy, ?council
tenant? was an insult. But now
it?s the greed that?s shameful
I
didn?t know we lived in a council
house until Broseley Homes
started going up down the road.
Until then, it was just our home:
semi-detached, three-bed, one
bath, back and front door,
bleached front steps. Same as all the others
on our street. Built to last for miners over
mines now still as graves.
We could decorate as we liked. My mum
variously subjected our walls to ?modern?
textured Graham & Green, ?luxurious? red
velvet ?ock and swirls of ?easy to clean?
Artex. Our floors were concrete but
carpeted. When we moved in, in 1987, the
windows were old and brittle and Jack
Frost left fingerprints on the inside.
One summer the council came round and
replaced every window in every house on
every street in our scheme and ?tted gas
central heating, so my mum had to regloss
our skirting boards. No more trying to sit
closest to the ?re. But not every house got
done, here and there the old windows stared
back. It took a while to work out they were
the people who?d quietly exercised Maggie?s
Right to Buy. We felt sorry for them.
Down the road, the shiny black diamond
slag heaps of the bing were being ?attened
to make way for Broseley?s ?bought hooses?.
Billboards promised ?luxury family living?
and after school we?d break into the building
site and swing from scaffolding in un?nished rooms smaller than the ones we went
home to. Who would sleep here? What was
a mortgage? What was a luxury family?
At school, ?council house? became an
insult, as much a marker of shame as the
free school dinners I ate every lunchtime.
Walking my girlfriend home to the bungalow her parents owned, I marvelled at her
red monoblock driveway, her front porch,
her utility room ? a luxury family! One day,
I vowed, I would own a bought hoose. Now,
I have two (or at least mortgages on them).
I have gone from council tenant to homeowner and landlord. Maggie would be proud.
As Grenfell Tower burned I recalled what
it felt like growing up in that council house
in Scotland in the 1980s and 1990s. I felt
cared for and lucky. I also felt trapped. When
my mum, who?d survived a cerebral haemorrhage, developed something like multiple
sclerosis our home needed adapting. For
nearly a year, she had to lobby for a shower
because she couldn?t get in and out of the
bath any more. During all those months, I
now know she couldn?t get properly clean,
felt scared of falling, ashamed at having to
shout to her teenage son to lift her naked
out of the bath. The council eventually made
the changes and made it all good. Now?
Pro?t, literally suffocating, has replaced
paternalism, merely sti?ing. Grenfell hasn?t
been about politics, it was caused by the
politics of greed. Residents of Grenfell
Tower warned for years that the 24-storey
tower had no ?re alarms, sprinklers or ?re
escape and just one staircase. Fatal, regardless of being wrapped in the cladding that?s
banned in America ? where it?s made and
where the pro?ts go ? and since found on
THE BIG ISSUE / p12 / July 3-9 2017
dozens of other blocks across Britain.
Metropolitan Police blame these materials
for the inferno, which has so far claimed 79
lives ? 79 futures up in ?ames, 79 families
burnt to the ground. Charges of manslaughter may be brought. Now hundreds of families are being evacuated from similar blocks
to where, who with, when will they get home?
Air beds in leisure centres with strangers
either side and a suitcase if they?re lucky.
This doesn?t happen to luxury families.
I recently got the chance to buy our old
house, my mum still lives there. It would
have cost �,000. Next door is on at
�0,000. But I just couldn?t. It felt wrong.
Public housing was the cornerstone of
community and ?bought hooses? the exception. Statistically, this is still true ? home
ownership is actually falling, especially
among the young. According to ONS, in
1991, 67 per cent of 25- to 34-year-olds were
homeowners. By 2014, this had fallen to 36
per cent. But still, if you can?t afford to buy
you probably don?t deserve to.
Some owner-occupiers in the development Grenfell survivors have been placed
in reportedly fear falling house prices.
I listened with sadness, but not shock, to one
woman on an LBC phone-in: ?I pay a �,500
service charge? I feel sorry for those people
but if someone was getting it for free I would
move. I am not hard-hearted.? She felt angry
with the people who?d lost everything and
not the developers ripping her off. It?s easier
to direct anger down not up.
After university, I rented privately,
which made me miss the council.
One landlady forced my boyfriend and me
to sleep in single beds because she disapproved of our ?lifestyle?. We pushed them
together but she caught us out on an unannounced ?inspection? then threw us out.
She also picked all the apples off our tree
because she said she owned them. Another
increased the rent 10 per cent year on year
while leaving us without a bathroom for
three months. I never want to be that landlord. Amazingly, it?s quite easy not to be.
My tenants ? and I only say ?my? because
I take personal responsibility for keeping
them safe and, to a certain degree, comfortable, in the ?at I own ? have smoke alarms
and a carbon monoxide detector, which I
check annually. I also pay the �0 for gas
and electrical safety checks ? one engineer
told me I could save money by cutting off
the gas ?re. I cut him off. These are not
luxuries ? they are basics. If tenants can?t
sleep at night, then landlords shouldn?t be
able to either. The garden is thick with apples
and plums I?ve never thought to pick.
Damian Barr is an author and Big Issue
columnist. @Damian_Barr
Great
Wall
of China Trek
25 MAY-2 JUNE 2018
Trek the Great Wall of
raise funds for the children?s charity of your choice
For more information and to register online:
www.actionforcharity.co.uk
01590 646410 | events@dreamchallenges.co.uk
DreamChallenges
@dreamchallenges #LetsTrekForChildren
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Illustration: Mitch Blunt
PAUSE
DANIEL McGINN
How to get psyched up
T
here?s no arguing with
the phrase ?practice
ma kes per fect ?. But
sooner or later, you run out of
rehearsal time. Whether your
performance takes place in a
courtroom or boardroom, and
whether it involves a presentation, sales pitch or job interview,
you have just a few moments to
collect your thoughts and
prepare your mind.
There?s a growing body of
research on how best to spend
t hose cr ucia l moment s ?
research I outline in my new
book. This body of knowledge
provides quick-hit tactics and
life hacks in the ?nal moments
before a high-stakes performance. Here are ?ve of them...
Get excited, not nervous. It?s
natural for people to tell you
?don?t be nervous? before a
make-or-break event. Trouble
is, that?s hard to actually do.
According to resea rch by
using a lucky pen for an important exam, dozens of studies
have shown that people who
have a consistent pre-performance routine tend to perform
better, whether they?re playing
rugby or darts. So
r at her t h a n look
askance at the hocuspocus of superstition
and ritual, embrace
it. If you believe some
special routine will
help you do better, it
Daniel McGinn is
probably will.
Ha r va rd Business School
professor Alison Wood Brooks,
the smarter tactic is to focus
on feeling excited ? a more
positive emotion that?s similar
to ner vousness but more
achievable tha n
trying to feel calm.
Recall your
greatest hits. Sports
psychologists sometimes create ?highlig ht ? v ideos of
athletes? best performances, which they
ca n watch before
games. The purpose:
to remind them of
how skilled they are,
increasing their con?dence to put them in
the right mindset to
perform well again.
a senior editor at
Harvard Business
Review and the
author of Psyched
Up: How the
Science of Mental
Preparation Can
Help You Succeed
(Portfolio, �.99),
which is out now.
Practise a ritual.
Whether it?s crossing your
fingers, repeating a mantra or
Listen to a psych-up
song. In studies,
listening to a motivational song can help
people run faster or
feel more energised.
Costas Karageorghis
of Brunel University,
London, is the world?s
foremost researcher
on how music can motivate, and
his work suggests that intrinsic
THE BIG ISSUE / p15 / July 3-9 2017
musicality (including tempo
and rhythm) combine with your
emotional connection or association (say, it played at your
wedding) to make a song motivational. Keep it on your phone
and play it to get motivated.
Talk to your doctor. The dry
mouth, shallow breathing and
sweating that ca n a f f lict
nervous public speakers is
caused by the surge of adrenalin
that creates a fight-or-flight
response. One solution is to ask
your doctor about beta blockers,
a class of drugs that reduces the
body?s response to adrenalin.
Many of my friends are introverted writers who get nervous
while on book tours, and several
have found this class of drugs
to be a big help. ?This medicine
helps immeasurably, and I?ve
become an evangelist for it,?
says one. ?It?s improved my
career by making me a more
con?dent public speaker.?
LETTER TO MY
Judy
Murray
Inspirational matriarch
Photo: Getty
T
here was no high school in Dunblane
when I was 16 so my parents decided
to send me to a private girls school
in Crieff. I?ll always be grateful to them
for that because the sporting opportunities there were huge and obviously sport has been a
massive part of my life ever since. I played netball,
hockey, swimming, badminton ? my life revolved
around sport. My plan was to get accepted for university then take a year off to concentrate on tennis.
All through high school I thought I?d be a PE teacher.
In the end I went in a different direction but my work
as national coach, British Fed captain and now in grass
roots coaching has kind of brought me full circle.
The tennis world was very different 40
years ago. There was no academy or even full-time
trainers in Scotland. Only one per cent of women
played tennis in Scotland. It was not a viable career.
So for me then, tennis was just a hobby I got quite
good at. To play in competitions I had to travel abroad
myself a lot at 17 and that was tough. When I had my
purse stolen from my bag in Barcelona one day ? all
my money, my tickets, my passport, my hotel key ? I
suddenly realised how alone I was. This was before
ATMs or mobile phones ? I had to go to the British
Embassy for help. And when I got home my dad said,
no, that?s enough. I hate to quit on anything but the
truth is, I think I was glad he said it.
I still sometimes look back at my own life
and wonder, if I?d made different choices when
I was playing, if I?d been braver, how good could
I have been? Probably I wasn?t good enough to make
a career of it anyway but there were no opportunities
in Scotland to help me ?nd out. And I wasn?t tough or
mature enough to do what I had to abroad. When I
was at school I was also offered a tennis scholarship in
Virginia and I didn?t go. I think back now and think, oh,
I wish I?d have been brave enough to do that. It would
have given me the chance to grow up, to learn so much
about the sport and that kind of life.
Due to inexperience, wanting my son to have
opportunities I hadn?t taken, and being ?attered by the attention of people telling me how
special he was, I made a mistake sending him from
home too soon. [Jamie went to train in Cambridge
when he was 12.] He was young and innocent, dreaming of being a tennis player. I knew he wouldn?t get the
opportunities in Scotland. But it didn?t work out the
way the LTA promised and six months later we brought
him home. It was too early to take a child out of a
comfortable, safe, caring environment, away from
friends, family, trusted coaches. It damaged his con?dence and his game and caused a lot of anguish. Fortunately he came out of the other side and now he?s got his
Grand Slam titles and his number one ranking last year.
But I waited till Andy was 15 before I let him go away.
I haven?t been able to watch Andy or Jamie on
TV for years. I ?nd it too stressful. I can?t help, I can?t
do anything. I just ask someone to text me when it?s
all over. I don?t go to the matches as often as I used to
either, it?s just too stressful ? all the expectation and
the pressure. I?d love to be able to enjoy it more. But
when I?m there, no matter how hard it is, I can?t get up
and leave. Even if I feel like I?m having a heart attack
I can?t slide under the seat or walk out. Because, just
THE BIG ISSUE / p16 / July 3-9 2017
YOUNGER SELF
?I made a
mistake sending
my son from
home too soon. It
didn?t work out?
Clockwise from top: baby Judy with her
mother Shirley; with (now ex-) husband
William and sons Andy (left) and Jamie;
with Anton Du Beke on Strictly Come
Dancing; cheering on Andy in the
Davis Cup (not her real personality!);
Judy, aged 14, with her tennis trophies
IN 1975
THE YEAR
JUDY
MURRAY
TURNS 16?
Margaret Thatcher
is voted leader of the
Conservative Party
/ In London, the Sex
Pistols play their ?rst
gig / After 20 years,
the Vietnam War
comes to an end
like they did when they were little, they still look up for
reassurance and encouragement.
It?s hard hearing people on the media attack
Andy?s personality. You just have to keep reminding yourself the people who write articles criticising
him generally haven?t ever met him. They don?t know
anything about him. I reassure myself with that. I only
care about the opinion of people who know us, who
care about us, who love us. The rest is just words.
I?ve read an enormous amount of rubbish
about me. And it is upsetting. The sporting world
is full of male journalists, male photographers and
male editors. Right from the start they?ve chosen to
use pictures of me bearing my teeth or pumping my
?sts, looking scary or aggressive. So people only ever
saw me in the most stressful situations, and I am
very sensitive and I do show my emotions. So the
media built an image of me as this angry tiger mother.
I used to get angry letters at the house, written very
spidery, saying I was terrible, aggressive... ?awful behaviour?. People forget ? I never asked for any attention.
I was just a mother watching her sons play tennis.
The same as I?d been since they were seven years old.
Dunblane has always been enormously
supportive and proud of everything Jamie and
Andy have done. The boys don?t get back very
often but they still think of Dunblane as home.
I think their success brought a lot of excitement and joy to the town and I think that?s
helped a bit with the recovery [since the 1996
killings at the primary school Andy and Jamie
attended]. It?s good to think that people round
the word now think of Dunblane with happy
associations, and not just as a place of tragedy.
The teenage me would be happy to see
how her con?dence and courage grew
so much she was able to do a show like
Strictly Come Dancing. All glammed and
sequinned-up on national Saturday night TV!
I didn?t have a lot of con?dence as a teenager.
I had no interest in what I looked like. I would
never stand up in class or ask a question. I was
very quiet, didn?t like to be looked at or singled
out. I didn?t feel attractive. And even after that,
I didn?t have the time or money to go and buy
fashionable clothes. But in just these last ?ve
or six years I?ve had more money and more
time and I?ve come to enjoy going to the spa,
learning how to put on make-up, shopping for
nice clothes. And that would come to a huge
surprise to the younger me in her hoodie and trainers.
I think my 16-year-old self would be amazed
by what her sons have achieved. The Davis Cup
victories, winning Wimbledon ? that would have
been such a huge thing to that teenage Scottish tennis
lover. Back then you were lucky if tennis got one line
in the sports round-up in the Glasgow Herald or The
Scotsman. It was absolutely a minority sport. Now,
against a backdrop of no support for tennis anywhere
in the country, this little Scottish town has produced
two world champions. Sometimes we even get onto
the front page?
Knowing the Score by Judy Murray is out now (Chatto &
Windus, �.99). Words: Jane Graham @Janeannie
THE BIG ISSUE / p17 / July 3-9 2017
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JEREMY
CORB
How you feeling
Glastonbury?
The Labour leader
takes to the stage
THE BIG ISSUE / p20 / July 3-9 2017
The incredible rise of the no-hoper, and
how the mainstream were blindsided
BYN!
How did we
get to here?
L
ast week an estimated 100,000 people gathered at
the Pyramid Stage at Glastonbury to see Katy
Perry?s warm-up act. It was one of the biggest crowds
of the event. There were claims ? unsubstantiated
? that it was the biggest Glastonbury crowd ever.
It was for Jeremy Corbyn.
To the tune of The White Stripes? Seven Nation Army, Corbyn?s
name was chanted. T-shirts emblazoned with his name were
doing brisk business across the Somerset site. Within hours, a
YouGov poll put Corbyn ahead of Theresa May for the ?rst time
as the nation?s favoured PM.
How did it come to this?
Eight weeks ago, when May called a snap general election,
Jeremy Corbyn was a busted ?ush. The Labour Party languished
20 points behind the dominant Tories in the polls, while Corbyn?s
approval rating was around -30 per cent compared to May?s +20
per cent. In April, 55 per cent of voters polled felt May was a strong
(and, presumably, stable) leader, with just 17 per cent saying the
same for Corbyn.
Corbyn, of course, didn?t win the election. But something
remarkable happened. A formerly quiet tide of, mostly young,
voters rose. And nobody saw them coming. Activists and
canvassers for the ?rst time in their lives, they were more than
simply people putting an X in a ballot box and moving on.
The 18 to 24-year-olds of Britain came out and voted in droves,
confounding everybody. And Labour were ahead in every age
category up to 50.
This election campaign was a story of the ancient and the
modern. Old-school political rallies at which Corbyn and his
Labour allies addressed thousands of people, alongside new
left-leaning online news organisations working to counteract the
attack lines from the other side. Good old-fashioned door-to-door
canvassing was directed by new apps enabling would-be
canvassers not only to ?nd their nearest marginal seat but to
organise car-sharing to get there. Appearances by supporters
in the established news media were allied with dedicated
teams creating videos specifically to go viral and the
Grime4Corbyn movement.
We have looked at who these new voices leading a new
political resurgence are. It?s not enough to dismiss them as
idealists with a smartphone and no sense of ?scal policy. There
is more going on. There is a community of news makers and
opinion formers; of vote-registration drivers and political
agitators who have brought Corbyn to the very cusp.
They are not going away. What will come next?
ADRIAN LOBB REVEALS THE MOBILISERS, CONCERT
ORGANISERS, MAGAZINE EDITORS, EDUCATORS,
CAMPAIGNERS AND PUNDITS WHO ARE CHANGING
THE POLITICAL LANDSCAPE AND ENERGISING A NEW
GENERATION FOR THE LEFT IN BRITAIN. AND ALEX
MASSIE ASKS IF THE RIGHT CAN EVER CATCH UP. E
NEW POLITICS
GETTING OUT THE VOTE
?The real win here is that people are seeing more than
ever that politics can be about change,? says Michael
Sani, founder of Bite the Ballot. The organisation
worked tirelessly at this election and the previous one
to mobilise and engage young voters. The Big Issue has
worked with them for several years . You can read Sani?s
columns at bigissue.com
Ahead of GE17, two million young people registered
to vote for the ?rst time. Rize Up campaigned to get
under-25s out to cast their ballots ? founder Josh Cole
says mobilisation is vital.
I?ve been representing street culture and the
perspective of the disenfranchised youth for a long
time. As a young man I was a drug dealer and addict
and when I got clean I dedicated my life to creating a
bridge between the lost generation and mainstream
society. What I noticed was that young people from
disadvantaged backgrounds were not engaging with
politics, so I created Rize Up which, unlike other voting
campaigns, is directly targeting this group.
I have worked as a photographer and director for
almost 20 years and started out in hip hop and dance
music, so I know quite a lot of artists. My ?rst step was
to connect with people I know. We managed to put an
Big Narstie in
original track together with Big Narstie with
We Need a Change a video, which was one of the great achievements of the campaign. We also got
more celebrity
endorsements than
any other voter
campaign ? we had
Rudimental, Tinie
Tempah, Professor
Green, Riz Ahmed,
Emeli Sande, Lily
Allen and loads
more. We also had
a massive online presence producing viral videos
with millions of people
reached on social media.
Remember we only launched
on May 11, so we did a lot in
a short period of time! In the
weekend running up to the
voter registration deadline,
after only 10 days of campaigning we had street teams
in 12 cities across the countryy
engaging with young people
and handing out half a
million ?yers. We also had
our message on almost everyy
UK high street in the
windows of all the Lush
stores in the country. In
addition, every Lush store
there was a sign in the
window advertising advice
for homeless registration.
It is very hard to quantifyy
but we know that voter registration signi?cantly picked
up after our campaign started, and just under a million
under-25s registered and another million between
25 and 35, which is 45 per cent more than in 2015.
We don?t support any political agenda or wing of
any party. In this election you had a very clear choicee.
In previous elections things have become quite middlle
of the road and it?s hard to tell one manifesto from th
he
other. Young people were responding to the policiees
rather that any media hype or idolisation of any partty
leader. People underestimated the intelligence an
nd
street smarts of the youth of this country and I?m
m
proud of them for doing their research and understand
ding what?s going on.?
Rize Up?s
social media
campaign
reached millions
of people in just
a few weeks
Being the
change: Amal
Warsame
rizeup.org / bitetheballot.co.uk
MUSIC
Sick of seeing Jeremy Corbyn attacked in the
press, music journalist Lois Wilson organised
a gig in support of him. Paul Weller was ?rst
to sign up. It sold out and Corbyn took to the
stage to speak to fans.
For me, music has always been a huge force
for social change. So I have never questioned the link between politics and music.
I ?rst heard of Jeremy Corbyn through
his links with CND and Stop the War. I
remember being on the 2003 Stop The War
march and rushing to Hyde Park to see
him speak. For me there was never any
doubt that if he wanted it, he should be
leader of the Labour
L
Party. He
was so passionate, so honest.
I was at playgroup with
my thre e-year-old and
heard yett another person
disparaaging him and I
thought, that?s it: I?m a music journalist, I
knew if I put on a concert with acts that
were credible in the eyes of the mainstream press, the worst they could do was
ignore us ? which they did.
But I also knew that the music press
would pick up on it. They?d get the event
out. I?m lucky enough to have a great
friendship with Paul Weller, we?ve had
many conversations about politics over
the years. I asked him and he said yes
straight away. I made sure that the bill was
diverse ? reggae from Ghetto Priest, jazz
from Soweto Kinch ? and The Farm
because of their political affiliation to the
left. Momentum gave us the funding
and helped with merchandise.
That Jeremy Corbyn then came and
gave a speech and John McDonnell was
also in the audience was brilliant.
Corbyn connects with people because
THE BIG ISSUE / p22 / July 3-9 2017
Above: a People Powered concert in Brighton. Inset: Paul
Weller backs a gig for Corbyn. Right: NME and Kerrang!
put the Labour leader on their covers
he doesn?t patronise. He actually wants to
make a better society so he listens.
Ultimately it?s his beliefs and policies ? a
more equal distribution of wealth, a
welfare state providing free education and
health service, everyone with a roof over
their heads, the end of poverty. And once
people actually got to hear that message
they connected.
@LoiswilsonUK
NEW POLITICS
ACTIVISM AND ADVOCACY
The Advocacy Academy is a training school for young
activists. Founder and director Amelia Viney
explains how it works.
My aim is that every citizen has power to make
world more fair,just and equal, no matter what their
background. I was an activist as a kid, very passionate about
justice, I wanted social change. That came from my parents,
very little from school. I worked as a lobbyist in Washington,
and was a researcher at Westminster. Kids from my area in
Stockwell would get on my bus every morning, funny, loud,
brilliant, so dynamic, very angry and aware ? but nobody
at Westminster spoke for them. The Academy grew out
of that. We teach eight-month scholarships, with
four residentials that are really intense. We give
kids establishment politics ? lobbying, campaigning and how
to become a councillor. Then the radical stuff ? grassroots
organising and activism. They learn the theory and practice
of all if it. So you can come out of the academy and be a
politician or you can work for Save The Children. You can
join Black Lives Matter or you can occupy a building. The
aim is you know the tactics available to you and the strategies
available to you so you can use them and win.
theadvocacyacademy.com
Advocacy Academy gra
aduate Amal Warsame,
18, has already been m
making a difference.
Here?s how:
From a young age I wass politically engaged, and the
Advocacy Academy waas an opportunity to get to grips
with it all. Because I?m frrom London, a multicultural city,
a lot of us are in our ownn bubble. I wanted to learn about
things affecting peoplee who are not same as me and
understand their struggle. We?ve done intense
sessions onn issues around sexuality, gender,
racism, homelessness, which have opened
my eyees to what is happening around
me. I??m a Muslim, and I turned 18 two
In the ?nal days of the election campaign,
newly resurgent music bible NME took a punt
with a grey-bearded politician on their cover.
Editor Mike Williams says it paid off.
Politics matters again. Everyone is thinking
about and talking about. During the snap
election campaign, politics was as much
part of our agenda as music and pop culture
?爏o how could we not? The Friday before
the election, there is not a single person on
Earth more important to our audience ?
from music, ?lm or pop culture. Nobody
stood for something that mattered so much
in their lives as Jeremy Corbyn did.
There was the gradual build up to the
decision [to put him on the cover], but then
it was the biggest no-brainer ever. The
opportunity was there to set the
agenda and it would have been irresponsible not to take it. The NME
weeks ago ? so 9/11 happened when I was very young. My
whole life I have felt my people were tarnished in the news and
on television. That angers me because I know that is not what
my religion is about. The Advocacy Academy helped me
express that in a meaningful and purposeful way. We each did
a campaign. Mine was about the media and how they speak
about Muslims. At ?rst when the video went live, it got a
couple of thousand views but didn?t reach the big people. But
I met with Stop Funding Hate and when they were on board
with campaign, it got thousands and it even reached Tony
Gallagher, Editor-in-Chief of The Sun. I met him a couple of
months ago. We spoke about how his headlines had been very
misleading, I gave him examples and we were being real and
honest about how we feel and how he has power to change
it. We spoke about how non-Muslim people aren?t called
terrorists when they commit terrible acts, but are labelled lone
wolves with mental illness. We are asking for everyone to be
judged same way, terrorism has no creed or colour or religion.
I missed being able to vote by four days. I was gutted. But
I got all my friends to vote. The Tory manifesto was pensions
and Brexit. Labour talked housing, tuition fees, young people?s
issues. In the last 30 years, Jeremy Corbyn has been very
open and honest and raw on everything he feels. People need
to see a vulnerable leader who can connect on a personal
level ? he is still human even though he is a leader.?
has always been politicised. And it has been
bubbling under again since the EU referendum. We?d see the people we were writing
about and talking to becoming more
engaged. More importantly, we are an audience business. Decisions on who we write
about are based on our audience?s passion
points. He [Corbyn] became de facto ?gurehead of the ?ghtback. But the more we
shone a light on him the more
we saw that this guy has something ? he can not only vocalise what we?re feeling, but
suggest a new way of thinking.
There was a path to follow.
And meeting him, he was
exactly as I?d imagined. Open,
honest, warm and also human
enough to take the piss out of
himself a little bit. The fact his
name was sung to Seven
THE BIG ISSUE / p23 / July 3-9
The Advocacy
Academy is
forming the
agitators of the
future, and the
present
Nation Army? I use this in
the positive sense, but it is
that mob mentality you get
in football stadiums, that
collective belief and support.
Glastonbury was more than
a continuation of Corbyn?s
momentum. I stood in the crowd at the
Pyramid stage and all around me there were
people in tears. This
wasn?t just rousing a
crowd, this was a speech
of enormous magnitude.
To see people so empowered by his words ? right
now, the support and
belief in him is really
legitimate. He feels he is
deserving of it?
Nme.com
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NEW POLITICS
NEW MEDIA
Who are you aimed at?
Our demographic is a bit Club Med
Novara, a news site targetting 18 to ? 18-30! But we are trying to break out
Momentum is the youth-led movement that
grew out of Corbyn?s 2015 leadership bid.
Some within Labour were hostile but organiser Joe Todd knew it would come to be a key
player in GE17.
WHAT IS MOMENTUM?
Momentum is one of the most important
political organisations in the country, youth-led
and dynamic. It acts as bridge between social
movements and the Labour Party. It?s a very
important coalition and one of the reasons we
could get so many people knocking on doors.
WHAT DIFFERENCE DID THE
SOFTWARE ?MYNEARESTMARGINAL?
THAT YOU DEVELOPED MAKE?
We had more than 100,000 unique
users over the campaign using that
app. That?s equivalent to nearly one
?fth of the Labour Party. It was about
getting people?s con?dence up. If you have
never knocked on doors it is a weird thing to
do. Talking about politics to strangers is not
normal! But we do believe genuine face-to-face
conversations hold a lot of weight.
DID YOUR VIDEOS MEAN THE PARTY
WON THE CYBER-ELECTION?
There are two ways we produce videos. There
are pieces of content we want to go viral.
These can be clipped from the news or satirical
videos we make to high production values.
We commission them through a network of
volunteers across the country who make them in
their spare time. Some went really big. ?Daddy
Do You Hate Me?? reached eight million views.
Our other key stream of content was aimed at
activists. These were aimed at people on the
edge of door knocking to push them over the
line to make them go to do it.
HOW DID YOU WORK WITH THE
MANIFESTO LEAK?
It was electrifying, it gave activists something
tangible to argue about. The ?Oh, Jeremy
Corbyn? chant, I ?rst became aware of it at
Tranmere Rovers? stadium before a Libertines
show. It showed the possibility I?d seen among
new members percolating out into wider society.
I?ve never seen a popular reaction to a politician
like that. I knew we were on to something.
30-year-olds with punchy political
analysis, is also taken seriously by big
media hitters. Senior editor Ash Sarkar
says there are still millions of untapped
young votes out there.
of that. How we do that is by doing mainstream TV on Sky, BBC, Channel 4 ? people
are taking us seriously now, I was on Any
Questions with Ken Clarke, Rachel Reeves,
and Jonathan Dimbleby. Now they are all
trying to scramble for broader analysis.
Where we start from is re?ection, analysis
and criticism. We come from activist
circles, and there is also an
academic impulse with all of
us. We started with hour-long
podcasts ? that wasn?t doing
it, but people liked the videos
and the dialogue, the to and
fro, and building on ideas. We
diversi?ed. From long form
documentaries to super quick,
one-minute autoplay-in-thetimeline video that make a
speci?c intervention. Useful,
salient, accessible ? they are
our key words. What is the
most accessible and quick?re
way to get complex ideas into
a shareable format?
Why did Corbyn cut through with the
younger voters?
You only have to look at senior
Tories saying young people
won?t get off their arses to vote.
It?s indicative of a cynical,
insincere, patronising and
condescending attitude
towards young, debt-burdened
and working-class people.
They forgot to listen to people.
But the people involved with
Corbyn?s Manifesto didn?t
forget to listen. And you saw
how it connected with people
from a traditionally dispossessed background ? including
the grime scene, JME,
Stormzy, Akala, Novelist, they
What was your General
all have ?rst-hand experience
Election strategy?
of being dismissed and not
Our strategy was seatbealts
listened to. They saw that what
on, try not to die! Our job was
our political institutions
two-fold. One was to push back
should be doing ? namely eduas hard as possible at every
cation and enfranchisement
Tory attack line ? from the IRA Ash Sarkar (top) and the Stormzy ? was deliberately not happenstuff to ?no magic money tree? lea?ets that galvanised young voters ing to keep young people
to hard Brexit and ?strong and stable?. The powerless. That is where they stepped in
other was to inject new and fresh anti- with Grime4Corbyn, who could pile in
racist perspectives, link up globally on alongside Momentum and the NUS.
climate change and resistance to Trump.
We are not just pushing back against the What happens next?
right, but pulling things towards the left. The Labour party youth vote increased ?
We don?t try to impose uniformity. but not as high as the 72 per cent initially
Building a social majority, committed to reported. That is more encouraging ? it
radical change isn?t about erasing differ- means there are another two million votes
ence but about negotiating difference. in the young next time.
Theresa May is scared of critique. This
project has to be different, based on
novaramedia.com
dialogue and lively debate.
Owen Jones says Labour?s optimistic vision won the youth vote
Owen Jones has been one of the most
prominent left-wing voices in recent years,
a near ubiquitous presence on TV, radio,
in print and on social media. According to
recent research, the 32-year-old was the
most in?uential individual on Twitter
during the election campaign apart from
Jeremy Corbyn himself.
Even Jones had a crisis of con?dence in
Corbyn, if not his policies. So, once the
snap election was called, what was his
strategy? ?I had campaigned for Jeremy E
HOW DO YOU KEEP THE MOMENTUM
GOING AFTER THE ELECTION?
We are not stopping campaigning. We will keep
going. We expect a general election within the
year, and we are going to be ready.
peoplesmomentum.com
THE BIG ISSUE / p25 / July 3-9 2017
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NEW POLITICS
to be leader the ?rst time and voted for him
twice. But I looked at the polling before
and thought, blimey, we?re in a lot of
trouble.
?I just decided to throw everything at
it. We had nothing to lose. My own strategy had quite a few elements to it.
?I tried to up my social media game at
this election. I was sceptical before, even
though I use it a lot. But, without wishing
to humblebrag, my Facebook reach
exploded ? from around 2 million to
10 million engagements, by sharing
posts, articles, videos. I really tried to
get younger people to register to vote.
?One key strategy of mine was to try to
get people to come and knock on doors in
constituencies we needed to defend, but
also places like Battersea and Croydon
Central where we might have a chance to
win. And we did. I worked closely with
Momentum. They did a brilliant job. It was
about co-ordnating with other people and
using social media to get people to do faceto-face campaigning.
?Thousands came out. Lots had never
knocked on doors, some had never even
voted. Some were below voting age, trying
to get people enthused on their behalf.
?The manifesto genuinely inspired
people, caught the imaginations of people
who were fed up with the way the country
HOW DO YOU SOLVE A
PROBLEM LIKE CORBYN?
Photo: Getty
Despite losing the election, the Labour leader emerged
as the big winner. The Spectator?s Scotland editor Alex
Massie ponders the Tory ?ghtback
Many wizened old hands scoffed at the #JezWeCan
phenomenon and I confess I was one of those cheerfully
scoffing too. Look, we said, however avuncular he may seem,
the British people are not going to vote for Jeremy Corbyn.
He will lead Labour to 1983, not 1997 and not just in terms of
policy either. The result would be a rout; the kind of humiliation
that sets a party back by at least a decade.
In like fashion, we recalled that the single most important
truth about non-voters is that they do not vote. Appealing
to them, then, was a quixotic enterprise, doomed to ultimate
disappointment. This was not baseless commentary; we had
science ? or, at any rate, political science ? on our side.
Sometimes, however, circumstances change. There are
always exceptions to general rules. The 2017 election refuted
the long-established, and deservedly popular, observation
that campaigns usually make little difference. Well, this
time they did. Late-deciding voters swung heavily behind
Labour rather than, as is more often the case, behind the
incumbent party. Meanwhile, the proportion of younger votes
who bothered to vote increased by more than 15 points,
compared to 2015. Just 30 per cent of ?Generation Rent?
voters endorsed the Conservatives. Less noticed, but equally
importantly, the percentage of pensioners who voted actually
fell. Both phenomena helped Labour at the expense of the
Conservatives.
And so even though ? and it is important to insist upon
this ? Labour did not win the election, Corbyn emerged from
it with his reputation enhanced and, just as signi?cantly, with a
vice-like grip on the Labour party?s future. The doubters within
was run.
?Labour had an optimistic vision of
society. The Labour Party?s campaign
was witty, funny, creative, upbeat ?
and you had Grime4Corbyn, which
really cut through particularly with young
working class and minority people. The
polling shows that Corbyn Labour?s biggest
supporters are young working-class people.
?People also changed their mind. They
saw, I think, the real Jeremy Corbyn,
because as soon as broadcasting election
rules kicked in they were forced to give
space to the leader of the opposition. And
Theresa May had the opposite ? the more
people saw her, the less they liked her.?
his own party, to say nothing of his many enemies, must bow to
the people?s verdict and kiss the leader?s ring. The right remains
baffled and so it has become important to sneer at the young
boobies who voted for Corbyn. One day, the thinking (if we
can so dignify it) goes, these people will come to their senses
and appreciate that Corbyn is not the man they think he is.
Many Labour voters, it is true, seem unaware that Corbyn is a
long-time Eurosceptic whose vision for Brexit is considerably
?harder? than that of the Labour Party as a whole. But ? and
this is the crucial point ? Corbyn didn?t start it. He didn?t foist
Brexit upon a younger generation that, on the whole, voted
to remain in the EU. And when he speaks of solidarity and a
colour-blind politics in which we should all rub along together
he speaks directly to how the millennial mind likes to think of
itself: decent and liberal, even if sometimes earnestly so.
The Tories, by contrast, spent so much time courting the
Ukip vote they forgot this might be noticed by voters appalled
by everything Nigel Farage says and stands for.
Rallies and music festivals aren?t everything but Corbyn?s
comfort in front of a crowd ? and his willingness to speak
anywhere ? is easily contrasted with Theresa May?s evident
discomfort whenever she appears in public. Asking the Tory
leader to appear at Glastonbury would be an act of cruelty.
The Prime Minister?s aversion to public displays of emotion
does not make her a wicked or inadequate person, but in the
modern era it is undoubtedly a considerable handicap.
John Major wanted a Britain ?at ease with itself? and
David Cameron was determined that the Tory Party should
look a little more like the country it aspired to govern. Some
progress was made on that front, only for much of it to be
jettisoned, at least as a matter of perception, in the dash to
hoover up Ukip votes. No one expects Tory politicians to
be hip or with it or whatever passes for being on trend these
days, but a basic ability to understand and speak to the hopes
and aspirations of voters under 40 should be considered an
entry-level requirement for Mrs May?s successor. That means
honouring a social contract which demands that, in return
for accepting disagreeable features such as university tuition
fees, good jobs and affordable house prices are the reward for
studying by the rules. It also requires a Conservative Party that
is capable of accepting that the longer-term trends in Britain
are metropolitan and multicultural. London is the great maw
but also the great driving engine of the British economy and
the Tories, if not quite persona non grata in the capital, have a
London-sized hole at the heart of their electoral strategy and,
increasingly, their identity too.
That can?t be ?xed by social media whizzbangs but the ?rst
order of business is accepting that the party has a problem.
Only then can it move to the secondary matter: doing
something about it.�
THE BIG ISSUE / p27 / July 3-9 2017
BOLD THINKING
R
enovation can mean many things.
Plenty of interesting empty
buildings across Britain have found
new life and purpose in recent years:
churches, hospitals, cinemas, banks
and factories. Perhaps the most
striking conversion project of all has been the
transformation of an empty municipal car park in
south London into a vibrant centre for the arts.
Here, on ?oors seven to 10 of the former
multi-story parking garage in
Peckham, the social enterprise
Bold Tendencies has created a
home for creative pursuits of all
kinds. The huge concrete
expanses now hum with activity:
a sculpture park and other display
spaces for up-and-coming visual
artists; workshops where kids
create art; a project for budding
?lm-makers; an orchestra working
with young musicians and children?s choirs.
Today, up on ?oor seven, children from local
primary schools have been experimenting with
pink-coloured materials around the staircase.
?It?s amazing to see how the children become
completely immersed in things so quickly,?
says Sasha Morgan
for pro?t
Morgan, leader of not
not-for-pro?t
organisation Bold Tendencies? educational
programme.
?There?s something about a big open space like
this that?s so ?exible, that gives them a feeling of
freedom. It?s very different from the classroom.?
Hannah Barry, founder of Bold Tendencies,
started the project back in 2007. When she was just
23 years old, Barry forged a deal with Southwark
Council to make use of the car park. Living in
Peckham and constantly passing the huge,
empty site, Barry and fellow artist Sven M黱dner
envisaged a future for the place that municipal
transport planners could scarcely have imagined.
?We thought we?d like to see a new space for
sculpture ? a place to create more opportunities for
young artists,? Barry recalls. ?It grew from there
and quickly became something much, much bigger.
?We thought it was really important to reach out
to as many different types of people as possible,? she
adds. ?We wanted people in the local area to feel
engaged with what we were doing, so that plenty of
great ideas got the chance to ?ourish here.?
The car park?s rooftop was given over to the
independent bar Frank?s Caf�, helping make the
Peckham site one of the capital?s
most fashionable destinations
(and owner of some of south
London?s best views). But one of
the most important partnerships
forged by Bold Tendencies came
in 2011, when The Multi-Story
Orchestra held a groundbreaking
concert here.
The classical orchestra, which
includes some of the country?s most
talented young musicians, turned one ?oor of the
car park into a concrete concert hall, performing
Stravinsky?s monumental Rite of Spring to a dazzled
audience. Bowled over by the reaction, the group
began playing in schools, before opening up to
pupils to join as choirs and instrumentalists for
special one-off
one off performances.
performances
special,
Later this week the orchestra joins forces with
singers from Hollydale, John Donne, Kender and
Lyndhurst primary schools for a performance of
the brand new work In Colour. In August, the
BBC Proms 2017 will feature a full concert by
The Multi-Story Orchestra.
?We?re playing music that we think is great
and we think everybody, given the chance, would
love,? says the artistic director and composer
Kate Whitley. ?We want as many different people
from as many different backgrounds as possible.?
Working with schools is a key part of Bold
T
L
U
C
K
R
A
P
CAR
BOLD THINKING
Tendencies? vision. Now
gathered under the new
charity Bold Everywhere,
the educational initiatives
include a scheme that sees
professional artists going
into London schools to inspire
pupils, they provide creative
workshops throughout the
school holidays and organise
My Museum project,
which sees children create
a gallery of work based on
their own stories.
Big Issue Invest, the social
investment arm of The Big
Issue Group, has helped
?nance an expansion in Bold
Peckham meets Stravinsky (top):
The Multi-Story Orchestra ?lls the car
Tendencies? work. In fact,
park with Rite of Spring; above and left:
Big Issue Invest is providing
Bold Tendencies have brought life back
?nance for several lifeto an abandoned space
changing, opportunity-giving
arts enterprises across the country.
?Bold Tendencies is a wonderful organisation
with a clear social mission,? says Kevin LloydEvans, Investment Manager at Big Issue Invest.
?Their entrepreneurial spirit and dedication to the
arts is commendable
commendable, and we were really impressed
by the work they do to engage all sorts of people in
the community beyond the traditional art world.?
Despite its success, the future of Bold Tend c
TURE
at the Peckham car park is not exactly secure.
With the temporary leasing arrangement coming to
an end in 2020, the council recently rejected an
ambitious bid by Bold Tendencies and the social
business Second Home to create 800 artists? studios
across the rest of the car park. Southwark Council
instead picked Pop Community Ltd?s application for
temporary use: a plan that will see 50 artists?
studios alongside ?multi-use event spaces, pop-up
retail and a cafe/bar?.
Bold Tendencies will at least be able to stay
put until 2020 as part of the new plan. Wherever
they end up operating in the long term, Barry is
adamant Bold Tendencies will ?keep pressing
forward and doing new things?.
She is determined to give more young people the
chance to act on their innate self-belief.
?When you?re young you have this advantage in
not being too scared to take risks,? Barry explains.
?It would be great to encourage more young people
to feel they can take risks and then make things
happen. That?s really our aim ? to create a system of
opportunity, so new things are possible for others.
For more information go to bigissueinvest.com
boldtendencies.com / multi-story.org.uk
Can art really
storey? Adamthrive in a multicreativity am Forrest discovers
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Un
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MA by Research in
DICKENS STUDIES
October 2017-September 2018
A one-year, London-based programme of supervised study and research, with a stimulating
programme of seminars and research workshops Led by Professor John Drew and Dr Pete
Orford, experts in Dickens and 19th-century studies. Teaching takes place at the Charles
Dickens Museum (48 Doughty St, WC1) and at the University of Buckingham?s offices
in Bloomsbury. The course includes field trips, access to the Museum?s rare collections, and
memberships of the International Dickens Fellowship and of the Dickens Society.
For further details, please Google ?University of Buckingham London Programmes?.
For enquiries about the course or to apply, contact Ms Nancy Zulu on email:
nancy.zulu@buckingham.ac.uk or telephone: 01280 820156
The course is offered in partnership with the Charles Dickens Museum, London.
Seminar speakers include:
?
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Professor Michael Slater
Professor Joanne Shattock
Simon Callow (TBC)
Judith Flanders
Dr Tony Williams
THE UNIVERSITY OF
BUCKINGHAM
LONDON PROGRAMMES
THE
ENLIGHTENMENT
B O O K S / F I L M / T V/ M U S I C
THEATRE
THE LAST
PLANTAGENET
Now is the summer of our
discontent, so what better time
to revisit Shakespeare?s Richard
III to remember there were
periods of history with more
turbulence, intrigue, conspiracy
and villains than today.
The award-winning
theatre company Antic
Disposition presents a thrilling
new production that tours
cathedrals across the country
this month, including a special
performance in Leicester
Cathedral (July 19 & 20),
where the real king?s recently
recovered remains reside.
X Richardiii.co.uk
THE BIG ISSUE / p31 / July 3-9 2017
BOOKS
No pretty vacancies
W
k Barry McKinley
Seventies London was calling Irish pun
with the hippies
? but ?rst he had to make his peace
hen I moved from Ireland cliches. ?That guy is as cool as a customer,? The ?oor as sticky as ?ypaper and the walls
to London at the end of the he?d say, or: ?He?s a mine?eld of useless scrawled with mascara and magic marker.
It was heaven, decorated as hell.
1970s, I slept in a different information.?
?What sort of music are you into??
?What sort of music are you into??
bed every week. I wasn?t
Hendrix? Too strident for the women.
restless, just deeply
I had to commit. I scrunched up my eyes
unpopular. Being a punk, Baez? Too menstrual for the men. My head and came up with a name. I tossed it out
I had to stay angry all the was exploding. I needed to pass this test. and hoped for the best.
Apart from the inhabitants, it was a
time and hostility is a hard sell when you?re
?Neil Young,? I said. ?I like Neil Young.?
pretty nice house, right next door to the
looking for a place to stay.
Every face at the table smiled. Bingo.
There was one squat in Kennington, Imperial War Museum. How many guns Nail on the head.
full of hippies, where I had to undergo a does it take to kill a pygmy? How much
?Neil is cool,? said the hippies, because
rigorous interview before admittance. opium to enslave a nation? If the Irish had they were clearly on ?rst-name terms with
Three dudes and two dudettes sat opposite a war museum, we?d ?ll it with a ?ne collect- the Canadian whiner.
?What?s his best album?? they asked.
me at a greasy kitchen table.
ion of nail bombs and rebel songs. Stop!
The obvious answer was a toss-up:
?What sort of food are you into?? Focus. Concentrate. I was taking too long
they asked.
to come up with an answer. I was losing Harvest or After the Gold Rush but that
was far too obvious. I decided to play the
?Lentils,? I lied, and then, for good the crowd.
measure, I threw in, ?Beans too.?
?Are you sure you?re not a punk?? asked goal from a different angle. I dodged,
weaved and tackled them from behind.
?Baked beans?? they probed.
the hippies.
?On the Beach,? I said.
Of course not. ?Hah-hah-hah,? I
I felt like I was rumbled. Most nights
The hippies sucked up all the air in the
laughed. No, I could only eat Indian mung I hung out at the Roxy or the Vortex, watchbeans, bought by the hessian sack-load in ing bands ?ing themselves around the stage room, and then let it out slowly.
?On the Beach?? they said. ?Pretty
Brick Lane market and carried home on like marionettes in the hands of an epilepthe crossbar of a 1954 Rudge bicycle.
tic. Noise fused with music, bursting from depressing album.?
?It?s about truth,? I somehow replied
The hippies smiled in unison.
the wire-covered speakers like a ?st, smack?What sort of music are you into?? they ing the human punching bags. Women with without smirking.
The hippies relaxed. It was indeed all
asked.
Picasso eyes and boys with Lowry bodies.
With my slicked hair
about truth. The mood in
and black suit, I didn?t
the kitchen was suddenly
rea lly look like a
so light, we almost ?oated
punk. It was more a
away. The hippies went as
Peruvian undertaker
one body to the stereo in
motif but their suspthe corner of the kitchen.
icions were raised. They
They selected an LP with
didn?t want a punk on the
Neil Young on the cover.
premises. They had no
The turntable turned and
problem with ?eas and
the speakers crackled.
Somebody lit a patchouli
cockroaches ? just punks.
incense stick and waved
?What sort of music
are you into??
it around. A house key was
My brain went into
laid before me like a
overdrive. What sort of
sacred offering. I picked it
music did hippies like?
up and put it in my pocket.
Something with flutes
A pitiful whinge ?lled
up the kitchen and the
and tambourines? Jethro
Green day: Angry and hostile Irish punk
hippies sang about
Tull? Donovan? (Flute,
seeks ?at share. (Likes lentils and Neil Young)
?knights in armour?,
tambourine and hurdygurdy? That might be
?mother nature? and ?silver
pushing it.)
spaceships?. To ensure my place in the
The hippies waited for an answer.
household, I moved my lips and pretended
I needed this room. If I didn?t get this
to know the words. I did my best
to smile through the pain.
room I would be all out of options. I?d have
no choice; I?d have to go and live with my
uncle Joe. And nobody wanted to live with
Joe. When Joe moved into the shabby
Barry McKinley?s novel A Ton of
Malice: The Half-Life of an Irish Punk
bedsit in Harlesden, the mice moved out.
in London (Old Street Publishing,
His wife had dumped him, probably
�.99) is out now
because of the way he kept mangling his
?They didn?t want
a punk on the
premises. They
had no problem
with cockroaches
? just punks?
REVIEWS
1. UNWELL
Tara Booth
Intimate, funny comics
about things like drying
herself off after a shower
with toilet paper, ?peeing in a
romper?, or doing a headstand
against a new friend?s wall and
accidentally kicking a hole in it.
Limited edition self-published
books are on her website.
2. HIRAMEKI: DRAW
WHAT YOU SEE
Peng & Hu
A book of ink blobs for
the reader/drawer to turn
into things ? simple and fun.
I wish I?d thought of it.
3. LONDON, YOU?RE
BEAUTIFUL: AN
ARTIST?S YEAR
David Gentleman
Daily drawings from all over
the city, for anyone inspired
by London, and life.
4. THE ART
OF LOOKING
SIDEWAYS
Alan Fletcher
An introduction to visual
thinking. Huge tome full of
playful insights on perception,
colour, pattern, proportion,
paradox, illusion, language,
alphabets, words, letters,
ideas, creativity, culture, style,
aesthetics and value.
5. THE GRAPHIC
MEDICINE
MANIFESTO
MK Czerwiec
A book of essays and
graphic narratives about the
interplay between comics
and healthcare.
Matilda Tristram is an
artist based in London.
Her new book My
Year in Small Drawings:
Notice, Draw, Appreciate
(Leaping Hare Press, �99) is out
on August 17 in paperback.
@MySmallDrawings
NO DOMINION / SO HAPPY IT HURTS
The endgame
A compelling conclusion to Louise Welsh?s post-apocalyptic trilogy
S
ome authors more or
less write the same
book over and over
again but that?s not an
accusation you could ever level
at Louise Welsh. The Scottish
writer?s varied back catalogue
contains literary fiction,
historical, crime, thriller and
some books that frankly don?t
?t into any category.
More recently she?s been
dishing up a tremendous postapocalyptic trilogy, the last part
of which, No Dominion, is
published this week. The three
parts of the trilogy are not even
very like each other. The ?rst,
A Lovely Way to Burn, was set
in London and saw the outbreak
of a global pandemic, the
Sweats, wreak devastation on
the planet. The second book,
Death is a Welcome Guest, had
a different setting and different
lead characters but was no less
harrowing.
And now No Dominion kind
of ties those ?rst books together, bringing their protagonists,
Stevie and Magnus, to the bleak
shores of Orkney seven years on
from that initial outbreak.
A kind of basic and tenuous
civilisation has been established with Stevie nominally in
charge, but danger and chaos
are never far away in this fragile
community, and when three
strangers land in Stromness the
uneasy peace is shattered.
Central to this novel is the
idea of continuity of life. The
children and teenagers in
Orkney are lauded and fussed
over, seen as the possible future
of civilisation. So when several
of them go missing along with
the mysterious visitors, leaving
a trail of death in their
wake, Stevie and Magnus are
dispatched in pursuit.
The book then becomes a
desolate, brutal road trip of
sorts, as the pair journey south
through a Scotland where the
rule of law has been abandoned,
and where all kinds of insidious
and nasty pockets of life have
sprouted up. The journey ends
Illustration: Dom McKenzie
TOP 5 BOOKS
TO INSPIRE
US TO DRAW
MATILDA
TRISTRAM
in a deeply scarred Glasgow
in a smart and thrilling climax,
the atmosphere of dread
throughout leaving a lasting
impression.
Most impressive is Welsh?s
evocative and sharp prose, and
her keen observation of the
darkest recesses of the human
psyche, the stuff that bubbles
to the top in times of stress
and hardship. It?s unpleasant
reading at times but always
compelling.
Equally as impressive and
challenging is Anneliese
Mackintosh?s So Happy it
Hurts. The English writer?s
story collection, Any Other
Mouth, was one of my favourite
books of 2014, and this debut
No Dominion Louise Welsh
Out July 13 in hardback,
John Murray, �.99
So Happy it Hurts
Anneliese Mackintosh
Out July 27 in hardback,
Jonathan Cape, �.99
THE BIG ISSUE / p33 / July 3-9 2017
novel is every bit as assured,
honest and innovative as its
predecessor.
For a start the structure is
highly original, taking the form
of a scrapbook and diary of
Ottila, a 30-year-old woman
trying to take control of her life.
So that means giving up the
chaotic drinking, the cheating,
the self-harm and everything
else, and trying to ?nd love with
the equally confused Thales.
But she has to deal with her
former friends still out on
benders, her sister sectioned
with mental health problems,
and the death of her father.
Like Mackintosh?s previous
work, So Happy it Hurts is
something of a high-wire act,
laugh-out-loud funny at times
but also so emotionally honest
that it sometimes feels like a
punch to the guts. The mash-up
of diary entries, receipts, texts,
snapchat, emails, therapy transcripts and platitudinous aphorisms give the book a thrilling,
edgy feel without ever seeming
gimmicky, making this as sharp
a novel about 21st-century
living as you?ll ?nd anywhere.
Words: Doug Johnstone
@doug_johnstone
The JOSEPH
Communications
Around 3000 people are currently condemned to death in the
h^ D??? ???? ???? ????? ??? ???? ????? ??????? ????? ????
???????? ???? >????? ????????? ?? ???? Z?? ??? ?? ?????
??? ???????????? ???? ????????? ???? ????? ?????? ?? ??
?????? ????? ??? ?? ????? ? ??? D??? ???? ???? ????????? ??
?????? ??? ??????? ??? ???? ?????? ???? ???????? ??????????
??? ????? ??????????????????????????????????????????????
of life.
,???? t????? ?? ? ????"???????????# ?????????? ???????????
??????? ??? ??? ??????? ?? ??????????? ????????? ?? ????
Z?? ??????? ?????"?????? ???? ?? ??? h<# ?? ???? ???????
???? ???? ????????? ??? ??? ??????????? ?? ???? ????? ???
?????????????? ?????????
In the words of a prisoner ?My penfriend, his wife and family
have been a blessing for many years. I thank them for walking
this journey with me.?
/? ??? ????? ???? ?? ???? ???? ????? ??????? ??? ???????????
????????????????????#????????????^??
If you only read
one spiritual book
in your lifetime,
make it this one.
OBLIVION
OR OPPORTUNITIES AND
? just what, precisely,
awaits beyond physical death?
Authored by ?Joseph? from an
advanced reality ?beyond the
veil?, this internationally
a c c l a i m e d b o o k d e l ive r s
arguably
the
most
comprehensive, no-nonsense
account ever written of what lies
WONDERS
?Thanks to Joseph I am having a
fabulous old age ? hope is one thing,
knowledge another.?
Pauline Hutchins.
ahead upon leaving this world
behind.
Revealing, inspiring,
comforting ...Your Life After
Death dares to draw back the
final curtain and demystify the
mystery. Read it and you?ll never
look at the next life, or, indeed,
this one, in quite the same way
again.
?Over the years I have read many
books on this subject but none have
been more informative and in-depth.?
Peggy Sivyer.
AVAILABLE FROM: www.josephspeaks.com or amazon.co.uk
or send cheque for �.95 (includes p&p) made payable to
Band of Light Media Ltd.
Human Writes,
? >???? '????# t???????# t??? z????# >^?? ?Z>#
?"???? humanwritesuk@yahoo.co.uk
or visit our website at www.humanwrites.org
PLEASE HELP US FIND
www.missingpeople.org.uk/find
to: 10 Sparrable Row, Briercliffe, Burnley, Lancashire, BB10 3QW.
eBook versions available from:
#NotFunny
Carmel Fenech - London
Carmel has been missing from
London since 23 May 1998. She
was 16 years old at the time of
her disappearance.
Stephen Thompson - Norwich
Stephen has been missing from
Norwich since 25 June 2013. He
was 45 when he went missing.
Call or text 116 000
Email 116000@missingpeople.org.uk
It?s free, 24/7 and confidential
Missing People would like to thank
The Big Issue for sharing appeals for
missing people. Our helpline is supported
by players of People?s Postcode Lottery.
Animal cruelty sentences
are a joke.
The maximum sentence for animal cruelty is
six months in prison.
/LSW\ZPUJYLHZL[OPZ[V�]L`LHYZ
Visit battersea.org.uk/notfunny
to stand up for the animals
Registered Charity No. 1020419
� Battersea Dogs & Cats Home 2017
FILM
THE MIDWIFE
In her clutches
Catherine Deneuve?s mesmerising turn rescues a soapy drama
T
he Midwife is a glossy, sentimental drama from French
writer-director Martin Provost.
It?s elegantly poised, sometimes
moving and a little pedestrian. But this
otherwise unremarkable ?lm is graced
with greatness in the form of a fullblooded central turn by Catherine Deneuve.
As B閍trice, a penniless retiree living
beyond her means in a borrowed ?at in
Paris, she is magni?cent: it?s a performance
of grand stately gestures and barrelling
emotional power, and it provides good
evidence for why Deneuve, at 73, is still
French cinema?s leading star.
All credit to her co-star Catherine Frot
for managing not to be overshadowed by
Deneuve. Frot, in fact, plays the title
character, a 49-year-old midwife called
Claire in charge of a maternity clinic in a
small town just outside of Paris. She?s a
reserved, aloof ?gure, whose well-ordered
existence is given a shock when, after
years of silence, B閍trice phones her out
of the blue.
Claire arranges to meet B閍trice in
Paris, and there?s an absorbing intrigue to
these early scenes. B閍trice is warm and
familiar with Claire but the younger
woman is stand-offish, frosty to the point
of hostility. Provost is in no rush to explain
and refuses to take her medicine because
she doesn?t like the taste: ?I believe in the
power of pleasure,? she explains de?antly.
Claire, on the other hand, approaches the
idea of a good time with a frown of suspicion.
She avoids red meat and prefers tap water
to a glass of good Bordeaux with her meals.
The two women slowly change one
another: Claire experiences a late blossoming under the unruly in?uence of the ailing
B閍trice; B閍trice meanwhile begins to
reconcile herself with the regrets of her
past. But while The Midwife is predictable,
soapy stuff, it?s mostly enjoyable, with
plenty of nicely drawn digressions ? Olivier
Gourmet is particularly good support as a
kindly truck driver whom Claire falls for.
Above all there?s a performance to
cherish from Deneuve: a star turn that
exudes outsized glamour when the
situation requires but is also searingly
honest and achingly poignant in the ?lm?s
quieter, more moving moments. The ?lm
is lucky to have her.
the reason for this strained atmosphere,
preferring instead to stand back in admiration as his two actresses circle one another.
When the revelation comes, it does so
in increments. B閍trice was the mistress
of Claire?s father, a famous swimmer in the
1970s. B閍trice left him, and though she
claims that he remained her greatest love,
she never got back in contact. What she
doesn?t know ? and what Claire tells her in
a furious hiss ? is that this man committed
suicide not long afterwards, devastated by
B閍trice?s departure. And as if
The Midwife is in cinemas from
that?s not enough to take in,
July 7
B閍trice has a disclosure: she
has terminal cancer.
Claire nurses decades of
FINAL REEL...
resentment towards B閍trice
After decades of silence, ?lmbut the older woman, applying
maker Terrence Malick is now one
those reserves of assertiveness,
of the US?s most proli?c directors.
charm and neediness that saw
His latest ?lm Song to Song sees
her claim so many ardent male
the philosophically inclined
admirers in years past, wins her Bum note: Gosling stars
septuagenarian embed his typically
over. Reluctant at first but in Malick?s Song to Song
high-pro?le cast (Ryan Gosling,
moved by pity and a sense of
clinical duty, Claire begins to care for Rooney Mara, Michael Fassbender) at Austin?s
B閍trice, eventually making room in her South by Southwest festival for a near plotless
rumination of love against the backdrop of the
?at for her after a big operation.
The ?lm is essentially a study in oppos- music industry. One of Malick?s weakest ?lms.
ites. B閍trice is an impetuous sensualist,
who eats what she wants, boozes heartily Words: Edward Lawrenson @EdwardLawrenson
THE BIG ISSUE / p35 / July 3-9 2017
TV
OUT AND ABOUT
COUNT ARTHUR STRONG
You had to be there
I
?ve been trying to stop myself from
writing about Count Arthur
Strong. You see, it?s funny (or not,
depending on your point of view) in a
way that?s hard to describe without
people looking at you with blank pity.
It uses traditional sitcom devices that
make Mrs Brown?s Boys look like
American Gods. And er, the main
character is an old man in a hat.
No, don?t wander off, let me explain.
It?s about a befuddled, clapped-out
performer (Count Arthur, played, or
rather inhabited, by Steve Delaney)
who gets his words mixed up and
practically lives in a greasy spoon run
by an irate Turkish man called Bulent
and his beautiful sister Sinem.
He has a mate
called Eggy and
another called John
the Watch, who looks
like a snooker ball in
a tan leather bomber
jacket. Arthur?s
straight man sidekick, Michael, is an
uptight, anxious
writer played by
Rory Kinnear. They
do absolutely arse all
apart from get into elaboratescrapesthat
wouldn?t seem out of place in The Beano.
Nope, nothing about it sounds good.
I can see you?re holding up a brightly
coloured LED sign saying ?sounds
awful?. Your ?ngers are twitching on the
page/mouse, and I don?t blame you, I
really don?t. Count Arthur is an oddball.
The character is a Radio 4 comedy
stalwart, and Delaney is an impressive
live performer who can create borderline hysteria using tongue twisters and
malapropisms ? no mean feat in the 21st
century, when you need interactive light
shows and Drake to get bums on seats.
On TV, though, it never seemed to
work. However, now in its third series
and co-written by Delaney and Graham
Linehan ? whose Father Ted-shaped
?ngerprints are very happily all over it
? it?s starting to look like a comedy
classic. Last week?s episode, The
Soupover, was as good as Hancock?s
Half Hour. Count Arthur and his weird
friends were having a soupover.
?Everybody brings a selection of soup
and we put our pyjamas on and watch
the racing,? Arthur explains. ?So it?s like
a sleepover but with soup?? asks
Michael. ?No, no, you don?t sleep over.?
says Arthur, in disgust. ?It?s in the
middle of the day.?
It all degenerates
into farce, as if it could
go anywhere else.
They watch an
ancient VHS of the
same ?ve minutes of
racing on repeat,
then Count Arthur
samples the soup.
?Hmm? the leek suggests Suffolk and its
environs,? he says.
?Hmm, am I right in thinking that these
mushrooms are from? Lidl?s??
I don?t know why any of this is funny.
But my God, it is. Tears in your eyes
funny. And when it?s not so funny, it?s
comforting: buttered crumpets next to
a two-bar electric ?re comforting. The
whole thing is a silly, blithering joy. Not
everyone will like it but Count me in.
?It?s starting
to look like a
classic. Last
week?s episode
was as good
as Hancock?s
Half Hour?
Count Arthur Strong airs Fridays at
8.30pm on BBC One
Words: Lucy Sweet @lucytweet1
THE BIG ISSUE / p36 / July 3-9 2017
ARE YOU
A HIGHFLYER?
Increasingly, summer
festivals are all about
the upsell ? charging
you extra (on top of
an already expensive
ticket) for access
to better toilets or
what is laughably
known as a ?VIP? area.
Brainchild (July 7-9,
Halland, near Lewes;
brainchildfestival.
co.uk) was set up
?ve years ago as the
antidote to that, with
no VIP zones and an
emphasis on exciting
new music rather than
overpaid headliners
going through the
motions. Alongside
the music, there is
theatre, spoken word
and workshops. A
refreshing alternative
to the blanding of
festival season.
More outdoor fun is
at the Kite Festival
(July 8 & 9, Brighton;
brightonkite?yer.
co.uk), which is,
incredibly, a festival
with kites (main
image). It?s been
going for close to
four decades and is
run as a free event.
Alongside gravitydefying displays and
kite ?ghts, there are
workshops to get
you up to speed on
making your own
aeronautical creation.
Secret Cinema has
made a name for itself
with high-production
and immersive
experiences around
classic ?lms. But
sometimes simple is
more effective. The
Luna Cinema (July
5, Brockwell, London;
thelunacinema.com)
starts its outdoor
cinema season with
a screening of Jaws
at Brockwell Lido.
Hopefully they?ll have
a mechanical shark
thrashing about in the
deep end.
Staying al fresco,
Outdoor Theatre
MUSIC
HAIM / THIS IS THE KIT
A cool sister act
S
Season at
Nottingham Castle
(July 7, Nottingham;
nottinghamheritage.
org.uk) opens this
week. There are
assorted summer
dates, with the
opening night offering
A Midsummer Night?s
Dream performed by
the Chapterhouse
Theatre Company.
Culture and fresh air
at the same time?
What more could you
want (apart from the
weather to hold out)?
There are lots more
things this week
for those craving
the literary and
erudite. Inspire
Poetry Festival (July
11-16, Southwell;
inspireculture.org.uk)
has been running for
two decades now and
draws the biggest and
best names in the ?eld
to give you chapter
and verse (well, more
verse than chapter?).
Then there?s Midpex
(July 8, Leamington
Spa; midpex.
wordpress.com),
which has been
running biannually
since 1995 and
gathers together
those fascinated by
philately ? namely
collecting stamps.
The fact Royal Mail
recently issued a
series of stamps
to commemorate
David Bowie
is hopefully
changing negative
perceptions of this
hobby, although
the purists might be
irked by an invasion
of爊ewbies.
The incredible
Rubberbandits:
Work In Progress
(July 5-13,
Soho, London;
sohotheatre.com)
prove why they are
one of Ireland?s best
comedy exports in
recent years. Expect
a mix of the puerile
with a coruscating
attack on the mores
and hypocrisy of
Irish life and politics.
Eamonn Forde
ave for Pink at V and PJ Harvey at
Green Man, there isn?t a single
female artist or female-fronted
group headlining a major UK festival this summer. It?s a grim imbalance that
shouldn?t be accepted for a whole range of
reasons, and certainly not so long as bands
like Haim continue to keep coming strong.
Watch the disgustingly cool video for the
LA sibling three-piece?s latest single Want
You Back ? the trio striding down a closedset LA street at dawn, casually knocking out
?y dance moves in a single continuous choreographed take ? and just try and pretend LA swagger: Haim deliver hooks big enough to land a whale
like you wouldn?t want to be a Haim sister.
Written in their parents? front room, Mac. Right Now, with its feedback squalls
Haim?s second album Something to Tell You and a beat that never quite drops, is one of
arrives a patient and hard-touring three those songs that fascinatingly seems to defy
years after their successful 2014 debut Days the conventional algebra of pop in the way
Are Gone ? an exquisitely stylish and tune- that many of Beyonc�s best recent offerings
studded record with a foot planted ?rmly do. If Haim don?t smash the glass ceiling to
either side of the pop and rock divide. Its major festival headlining soon, it?ll be
successor does all of the same things right, through no fault of their own.
insofar as being one of those
Freshly signed to Rough
records you can come at from a
Trade after a pair of albums on
whole range of different direcBrassland, the label run by Aaron
tions and ?nd something to love.
and Bryce Dessner from The
Be it accessible reference points
National, This Is the Kit, AKA
from 1970s Michael Jackson to
Winchester-born alt-folk/indie
Fleetwood Mac, Chaka Khan
singer-songwriter Kate Stables,
and TLC, glossy production that
ascends to the next level with her
feels retro yet not anachronfourth album to date, Moonshine
istic, and above all hooks big Graceful: This Is the Kit?s
Freeze. Make that ?utters to the
next level in fact ? hers is one of
enough to land a whale.
Kate Stables soars again
the most graceful, birdsong-like
With its popping bassline
and regret-tinged lyrics ? multi-instrumen- voices your ears deserve be treated to, and
talists and co-vocalists Este, Danielle and it ?nds joyous new context on her most
Alana tossing the lead line and harmonies con?dent and richly-textured record to date.
back and forth between them like a medicine
Aaron Dessner, who produced TITK?s
ball ? Want You Back makes light work of previous album Bashed Out, features on six
swaggeringly sharing a title with one of the tracks in his ongoing bid to help convince
greatest pop songs of all time. It?s one of the rest of the world what he?s clearly known
several key collaborations with Ariel for some time now ? that Stables? songs
Rechtshaid, a ?nger-on-the-pulse writer- are deserving of a much wider audience.
producer behind hits by Adele and Carly From the melli?uous Bullet Proof to the
Rae Jepsen among many others, who helps skronking sax capped Hotter Colder and
bring a certain intangible freshness even to the circling, clipped, almost funky rhythms
a straight Motown-y pastiche like Little Of of the title track, Moonshine Freeze leaves
Your Love (eat your heart out Mark Ronson). you with scant reason to disagree.
You Never Knew is like an extra-dreami?ed reimagining of Tango in the Night era Words: Malcolm Jack @MBJack
THE BIG ISSUE / p37 / July 3-9 2017
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Contact zehra@chainofhope.org or 020 7351 1978 for more information.
www.chainofhope.org
www.facebook.com/ChainofHopeUK
Chain of Hope is a registered charity in the UK no. 1081384
Walking Holidays & Alpine Activities
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www colletts co uk - 01799 513331
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THE BIG ISSUE / p39 / July 3-9 2017
6KDPDQ IURP *DERQ
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIED
To advertise: Jenny Bryan / jennifer_bryan@dennis.co.uk
IGNORED BY MANY BUT
HELPED BY US
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ANIMAL
S S
SRI
LANKA
Animal SOS Sri Lanka
UK Registered Charity 1119902
Please LIKE us on
PLEASE HELP US TO CONTINUE GIVING
THESE ANIMALS A FUTURE BY DONATING
TODAY. There is no greater gift
I enclose �0
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Other �
Give more at no extra cost to you:
GIFT AID. /??????????????^K^^??>????????????????????????????????
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K?????????????????????????www.animalsos-sl.com {E} info@animalsos-sl.com {T) 07773 746108 thank you!
A WORLD OF HOPE
A BEAUTIFUL COLLECTION OF SONGS
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?Quality of music aside, though, A World Of Hope
???�??�??�??�?�襄�???��??�棋??
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(constructively and positively) as the central
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Postcards For Peace aims to help end discrimination on the grounds of race, gender, disability, sexual orientation
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and create an environment in favour of equality and diversity. Registered Charity No. 1168645
THE BIG ISSUE / p40 / July 3-9 2017
Postcards
for
peace
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIED
To advertise: Jenny Bryan / jennifer_bryan@dennis.co.uk
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THE BIG ISSUE / p41 / July 3-9 2017
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIED
To advertise: Jenny Bryan / jennifer_bryan@dennis.co.uk
THE BIG ISSUE / p42 / July 3-9 2017
ADVERTISING RECRUITMENT/CLASSIFIED
To advertise: Brad Beaver / bradley_beaver@dennis.co.uk
CRISIS TRAINEE
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As a Fundraising Trainee you will support two different fundraising teams
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ORPHANED
This kitten and
his three siblings
were rescued
after being
found on a piece
of land alone,
crying. Their
mother was
found poisoned,
nearby.
Please help us to pay for neutering, treatment and
care of abandoned sick and injured cats and kittens
in Greece.
People need housing. The government doesn?t care. It only wants
to sell houses for speculative gain by banks and developers and
to get GDP ?gures up. It doesn?t insist on their providing affordable
rented homes for fear of lowering their pro?ts. So we are doing
it ourselves.
The picture shows affordable low-running-cost completely
insulated ?ats, triple-glazed, photo-voltaic-powered, under?oor
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Tel: 0117 926 5931
email: tonycrofts1939@gmail.com
THE BIG ISSUE / p43 / July 3-9 2017
www.greekcats.org.uk
COMPETITION
FOUNDERS
John Bird and Gordon Roddick
Group chair
Nigel Kershaw
Managing director
Russell Blackman
WIN!
PAUL VERHOEVEN?S ELLE ON DVD,
STARRING ISABELLE HUPPERT
EDITORIAL
Editor Paul McNamee
Deputy editor Vicky Carroll
Senior reporter Adam Forrest
Features editor Steven MacKenzie
Social media editor Andrew Burns
Web content manager Theo Hooper
Books editor Jane Graham
Television editor Adrian Lobb
Film Edward Lawrenson
Radio Robin Ince
Music Malcolm Jack and David Fay
Special correspondent Mark Hamill
Walking and poverty correspondent
Charles Dickens
Business support manager Robert White
PRODUCTION
Art director Scott Maclean
Designer Jim Ladbury
Production editor Ross McKinnon
Production journalist Sarah Reid
Production co-ordinator Terry Cimini
ADVERTISING 020 3890 3899
Group advertising director Andrea Mason
Group advertising manager Helen Ruane
Display Brad Beaver
Classi?ed and recruitment: 020 3890 3744
Account director Jenny Bryan
Senior sales executive Imogen Williams
Marketing and communications director
Lara McCullagh
THE BIG ISSUE FOUNDATION
Chief executive
Stephen Robertson 020 7526 3458
Editorial
Second Floor, 43 Bath Street,
Glasgow, G2 1HW, 0141 352 7260
editorial@bigissue.com
Distribution / London: 020 7526 3200
Printed at William Gibbons. Published weekly by
The Big Issue, 3rd Floor, 113-115 Fonthill Road,
Finsbury Park, London, N4 3HH
PPA
PPA Scotland
Cover of the
Cover of the
Year 2015
Year 2015
Paul McNamee
British editor of the year 2016, BSME
Elle is a mesmerising thriller driven by the year?s most talked about
performance from Golden Globe winner and Academy Award
nominee Isabelle Huppert.
Wealthy entrepreneur Mich鑜e (Huppert) seems indestructible as
the head of a successful video game company, and brings the same
ruthless attitude to her private life as to business. But after being
attacked in her home by an unknown assailant, her life changes forever.
She becomes suddenly aware of the chaotic relationships that de?ne
her life ? an imprisoned father, her increasingly detached son and
a secret affair. When Mich鑜e resolutely tracks her attacker down,
her dangerous game risks spiralling out of control. Directed by Paul
Verhoeven (Basic Instinct, Total Recall) with his ?rst ?lm in 10 years,
Elle is available now on digital download and out on Blu-ray and
DVD on July 10 courtesy of Lionsgate Home Entertainment.
We have ?ve copies to be won on
DVD. To enter tell us: Who plays
Mich鑜e in Elle?
Still time to win?
VERSAILLES SERIES
ONE AND TWO ON DVD
Enter at bigissue.com/competitions
THE BIG ISSUE / p44 / July 3-9 2017
Send your answers
with ELLE as
the subject to
competitions@bigissue.
com or post to The Big
Issue, 43 Bath Street,
Glasgow, G2 1HW.
Include your name
and address. Closing
date is July 18. Include
OPT OUT if you
don?t want to receive
updates from The Big
Issue. We will not pass
your details to any third
party. For full T&Cs see
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GAMES & PUZZLES
SUDOKU
SPOT THE BALL
A
B
C
D
There is just one simple rule
in sudoku: each row, column
and 3 x 3 box must contain
the numbers one to nine.
This is a logic puzzle and you
should not need to guess.
The solution will be revealed
next week.
ISSUE 1262 SOLUTION
F
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
To win Roots, Radicals and Rockers by
Billy Bragg, mark where you think the ball
is, cut out and send to: Spot the Ball (1263),
2nd ?r, 43 Bath St, Glasgow, G2 1HW, by
July 11. Include name, address, phone no.
Enter by email: send grid position (e.g. A1) to
competitions@bigissue.com.
8
9
10
(Last
week?s
Spot
the Ball
revealed:
Man Utd
v Spurs,
1967)
PRIZE CROSSWORD
QUICK CLUES
CRYPTIC CLUES
Across
2. Step back for a
simpleton (3)
5. Let pass (6)
7. Expedient place to
go on holiday (6)
9. Fine shot on the
football pitch (7,4)
10. Remained
propped up (6)
11. Request that
could madden (6)
13. Put money in
a waistcoat in
the States (6)
16. Cautiously removed gal
with icy concoction (6)
18. Walkers who are
not very inspired
on Sunday (11)
19. Edict from
French Indian! (6)
20. A painter has
returned ?rst to
a very dry place (6)
21. Half of Monday?
All of it (3)
To win a Chambers Dictionary, send completed crosswords (either cryptic
or quick) to: The Big Issue Crossword (1263), second ?oor, 43 Bath Street,
Glasgow, G2 1HW by July 11. Include your name, address and phone
number. Issue 1261 winner is C Porter from Edinburgh.
Down
1. Home brewer?s
vessel (6)
2. Designated as
fashioned (6)
3. Appealed to high
authority (6)
4. Separated from
brother Kenneth (6)
6. Ron led enemy round
to the usurer (11)
8. It produces a
shocking record (11)
10. A runner in winter (3)
12. Fifty per cent tawdry
and uninteresting (3)
14. Little one that
pinches (6)
15. Stated in a way to
have had only limited
experience (6)
16. Brusque, say, without
a sign of respect (6)
17. Re?ected light
from Ulster (6)
Across
2. Baked dish (3)
5. Christian doctrine (6)
7. Current (6)
9. Spitefully (11)
10. Complicated (6)
11. Soundless (6)
13. Conical tent (6)
16. Blood product (6)
18. Degree of heat (11)
19. Skulls (6)
20. Coldly determined (6)
21. Female rabbit (3)
Down
1. Erstwhile (6)
2. Brave (6)
3. Carve in relief (6)
4. Coloured pencil (6)
6. Female constable (11)
8. Vexation (11)
10. Pull behind (3)
12. Meal (3)
14. House physician (6)
15. Frenzied woman (6)
16. Commend (6)
17. Submissively (6)
IN ASSOCIATION WITH
Issue 1262 solution
CRYPTIC: Across ? 1 Lollard; 8 Abolish; 9 Anxious; 10 Hadrian; 11 Outrage; 12 Scourge; 14 Undress; 18 Parvenu; 20 Buffalo; 21 Kitchen; 22 Secrete; 23 Nostril.
Down ? 1 Load of rubbish; 2 Laxity; 3 Aroma; 4 Dashes; 5 Road hog; 6 Tidier; 7 Channel tunnel; 13 Delayed; 15 Deface; 16 Spoken; 17 Nether; 19 Rites.
QUICK: Across ? 1 Tumulus; 8 Placebo; 9 Dowager; 10 Imprint; 11 Lanolin; 12 Termini; 14 Vibrant; 18 Impress; 20 Maximum; 21 Include; 22 Non-iron; 23 Genteel.
Down ? 1 Tidal movement; 2 Mewing; 3 Legal; 4 Sprint; 5 Carport; 6 Gemini; 7 Tortoiseshell; 13 Mammary; 15 Boxing; 16 Timing; 17 Refuse; 19 Pecan.
THE BIG ISSUE / p45 / July 3-9 2017
Photos: Action Images
E
MY PITCH
Dave Martin, 55
OUTSIDE TESCO, HAMMERSMITH, LONDON
?One of my customers took me to see a
Matisse because he said my art is similar?
FACTS ABOUT ME...
MY FAVOURITE ARTIST
Henri Matisse. I?ve started
producing my own artwork ?
abstract designs using coloured
card. One of my customers took
me to see Matisse paintings at
the Tate Modern because he
thought they were similar.
I was blown away.
One of Dave?s
artworks
ON MY
PITCH?
Brook Green Tesco
(near Shepherd?s Bush
Rd), Hammersmith,
9am to 4pm daily
I
?ve been selling the
magazine in Brook
Green for a few years,
and I really feel part of the
community. My customers
are great. I?m from Derby
originally, and spent my
childhood being moved
around a lot, ?rst with
extended family, then in
children?s homes and hostels.
Without being able to settle
anywhere, I?ve done a fair bit
of travelling ? Leeds, York,
Nottingham and London.
I was living on the streets
in London when a Big Issue
vendor came up to me and said
I could be doing something
better, making my own living
selling the magazine. I decided
to give it a go and it?s been great
? it?s given me some structure
and self-respect. I take it
seriously as an independent,
self-employed person.
After being in and out of
hostels, I had help from St
Ignatius Housing Association,
who moved me into supported
accommodation ? a good step
forward. Recently, thanks to
the St Mungo?s charity, I got
my own one-bedroom ?at in
Tottenham. It?s been good ?
I?m getting used to it, and I?m
very grateful and glad to have
a door to close behind me and
a roof over my head.
I?m a lot more con?dent,
and I?ve gotten involved in a lot
of new things. I did the Night
Walk through London, one of
The Big Issue Foundation?s
fundraising and awarenessraising events. The Big Issue
Foundation also arranged
a temporary ?corporate
placement? pitch inside the
office of Northern Trust, the
big ?nancial institution, which
I learned a lot from.
THE BIG ISSUE / p46 / July 3-9 2017
I got inspired recently
to produce some of my own
artwork. I did one collage
piece that?s appeared in The
Big Issue?s Street Art section.
And I?ve been creating
some abstract designs using
coloured card. Some people
seem to really like the colour
combinations ? I sold one to a
customer for �. My ?rst sale.
I even entered the Royal
Academy?s summer exhibition
this year. Even though I
wasn?t accepted, I?ll try again
next year. I?ll keep trying
new things, I?ll keep trying to
develop my artwork to take
it to a new level, and I?ll keep
working hard selling The Big
Issue as I settle into my ?at.
I?ve a lot to be thankful for,
and a lot to look forward to.
Words: Adam Forrest
Photo: Travis Hodges
Why Not Be
A Writer?
?I?m currently working on my fourth
book, have been paid for my writing
by at least 15 different magazines, and
now earn half my income from writing
? all thanks to The Writers Bureau?s
course."
Sarah Plater
?I enrolled in The Writers Bureau?s
Creative Writing course in the hope
of building my confidence as a writer
and ending my cycle of publishing
failures. I currently work as a content
writer with a writing agency and have even won a
writing competition."
Walter Dinjos
?I won the 2015 Flirty Fiction Prima
Magazine and Mills and Boon
competition. The prize was �0, a
three page feature in the magazine
and the chance to work with Mills and
Boon on my book. Also I have three stories in three
anthologies with other authors ? we?ve raised almost
�000 for cancer charities?
Rachel Dove
??I have been published in different
papers and magazines and am now
producing around 250 articles a year.
It?s going a bit too well at times!
Seriously, it?s very satisfying, stimulating
and great fun ? and thanks again to the WB for
launching me on a second career. I meet so many
interesting people and count myself mightly lucky.?
Martin Read
?If you listen to the tutors and take
time to read the material you can be a
working writer, it really is an excellent
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Being a writer can offer you a second income, extra spending money
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Enrol online to access your course modules TODAY at: www.writersbureau.com
ared of critique. This
project has to be different, based on
novaramedia.com
dialogue and lively debate.
Owen Jones says Labour?s optimistic vision won the youth vote
Owen Jones has been one of the most
prominent left-wing voices in recent years,
a near ubiquitous presence on TV, radio,
in print and on social media. According to
recent research, the 32-year-old was the
most in?uential individual on Twitter
during the election campaign apart from
Jeremy Corbyn himself.
Even Jones had a crisis of con?dence in
Corbyn, if not his policies. So, once the
snap election was called, what was his
strategy? ?I had campaigned for Jeremy E
HOW DO YOU KEEP THE MOMENTUM
GOING AFTER THE ELECTION?
We are not stopping campaigning. We will keep
going. We expect a general election within the
year, and we are going to be ready.
peoplesmomentum.com
THE BIG ISSUE / p25 / July 3-9 2017
2014, 2015 & 2016
Get the
#EalingFeeling
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NEW POLITICS
to be leader the ?rst time and voted for him
twice. But I looked at the polling before
and thought, blimey, we?re in a lot of
trouble.
?I just decided to throw everything at
it. We had nothing to lose. My own strategy had quite a few elements to it.
?I tried to up my social media game at
this election. I was sceptical before, even
though I use it a lot. But, without wishing
to humblebrag, my Facebook reach
exploded ? from around 2 million to
10 million engagements, by sharing
posts, articles, videos. I really tried to
get younger people to register to vote.
?One key strategy of mine was to try to
get people to come and knock on doors in
constituencies we needed to defend, but
also places like Battersea and Croydon
Central where we might have a chance to
win. And we did. I worked closely with
Momentum. They did a brilliant job. It was
about co-ordnating with other people and
using social media to get people to do faceto-face campaigning.
?Thousands came out. Lots had never
knocked on doors, some had never even
voted. Some were below voting age, trying
to get people enthused on their behalf.
?The manifesto genuinely inspired
people, caught the imaginations of people
who were fed up with the way the country
HOW DO YOU SOLVE A
PROBLEM LIKE CORBYN?
Photo: Getty
Despite losing the election, the Labour leader emerged
as the big winner. The Spectator?s Scotland editor Alex
Massie ponders the Tory ?ghtback
Many wizened old hands scoffed at the #JezWeCan
phenomenon and I confess I was one of those cheerfully
scoffing too. Look, we said, however avuncular he may seem,
the British people are not going to vote for Jeremy Corbyn.
He will lead Labour to 1983, not 1997 and not just in terms of
policy either. The result would be a rout; the kind of humiliation
that sets a party back by at least a decade.
In like fashion, we recalled that the single most important
truth about non-voters is that they do not vote. Appealing
to them, then, was a quixotic enterprise, doomed to ultimate
disappointment. This was not baseless commentary; we had
science ? or, at any rate, political science ? on our side.
Sometimes, however, circumstances change. There are
always exceptions to general rules. The 2017 election refuted
the long-established, and deservedly popular, observation
that campaigns usually make little difference. Well, this
time they did. Late-deciding voters swung heavily behind
Labour rather than, as is more often the case, behind the
incumbent party. Meanwhile, the proportion of younger votes
who bothered to vote increased by more than 15 points,
compared to 2015. Just 30 per cent of ?Generation Rent?
voters endorsed the Conservatives. Less noticed, but equally
importantly, the percentage of pensioners who voted actually
fell. Both phenomena helped Labour at the expense of the
Conservatives.
And so even though ? and it is important to insist upon
this ? Labour did not win the election, Corbyn emerged from
it with his reputation enhanced and, just as signi?cant
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