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The Big Issue July 10 2017

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ESTABLISHED 1991
EVERY MONDAY
�50
bumper
summer
getaways
SPECIAL
JULY 10?16, 2017 NO.1264
A HAND UP NOT A HANDOUT
The joy of switching off
INSIDE
GO WILD WITH RAY MEARS ? WIN �0 OF ENID BLYTON BOOKS ? SUMMER AT BIGISSUESHOP.COM
EST. 1991
CONTENTS
JULY 10-16 2017 / NO. 1264
WIN!
�0 WOR
ENID BLYT TH OF
ON BOOKS
TURN TO PA
GE
4
38
CORRESPONDENC
CE
H
Hello,
my
name is
Glynn
8
STREET ART
10
LETTER TO MY
YOUNGER SELF
Wellcome to this week?s
bump
per edition of The Big
e. Our holiday special
Issue
take
es in lots of di?erent
ys to get away from it
way
all. I?v
ve moved around the
untry quite a lot over
cou
th
he years ? so I know
ome beautiful places
so
ac
cross the British Isles.
You can read about
Y
ho
ow walking in nature
can
n boost your mental
facu
ulties, as well giving
ou a better sense of
yo
we
ellbeing, on page 12.
becca Solnit explores
Reb
going on an adventure
and
d getting lost on page
17, and some famous
face
es and vendors share
their favourite places on
e 24. I reckon I?ve still
page
got a few adventures left
me, and I?d love to do
in m
som
me exploring in the
Amazon jungle.
Re
ead more about my
story
on page 54.
s
R&B heroine Mary J Bligge
12
GETTING LOST
Our great getaways
special starts here
24
WHERE IS YOUR
MAGICAL SPOT?
Well-known faces and vend
dors
share their cherished placces
30
THE LONG WALK
K
A homeless couple live wild
34
BOOKS FOR SUMM ER
Our guide to the best
holiday reads
41-45
THE
ENLIGHTENMEN
NT
FILM, RADIO,
MUSIC AND EVENT
TS
David Lynch?s art and Rob
bin
Ince on Kathy Burke
SPOT THE BALL
THE BIG ISSUE MANIFESTO
(and that tough sudoku
u)
WE BELIEVE in a hand up, not a handout...
Which is why our sellers BUY every copy of the
magazine for �25 and sell it for �50.
WE BELIEVE in trade, not aid?
Which is why we ask you to ALWAYS take your
copy of the magazine. Our sellers are working
and need your custom.
WE BELIEVE poverty is indiscriminate?
Which is why we provide ANYONE whose life is
blighted by poverty with the opportunity to
earn a LEGITIMATE income.
WE BELIEVE in the right to citizenship?
Which is why The Big Issue Foundation, our
charitable arm, helps sellers tackle social and
?nancial exclusion.
THE BIG ISSUE / p3 / July 10-16 2017
WE BELIEVE in prevention?
Which is why Big Issue Invest offers backing
and investments to social enterprises, charities
and businesses which deliver social value to
communities.
Photo: Travis Hodges
Can?t ?nd a regular
C
vendor? Subscribe to
Thhe Big Issue for �0.
See bigissue.com
for all offers.
co
ontact@selectps.com
/ 01202 586 848
CORRESPONDENCE
Write to: The Big Issue, Second Floor, 43 Bath St, Glasgow, G2 1HW
Email: letters@bigissue.com Comment: bigissue.com
@bigissueuk
facebook.com/bigissueUK
COMMENT OF THE WEEK
I guarantee that Gary will make your day
I?m always astounded at the courtesy and
kindness of Big Issue vendors wherever I go
but today I experienced something so moving
I was literally lost for words. Coming out of
Shoreditch High Street station I saw a young
man sitting outside alone, looking more than
a little worse for wear. Skip to 20 minutes later,
and I?m coming back to him with lunch, but
there?s already someone there. A Big Issue
vendor named Gary is looking after him.
I hand the young guy a sandwich and ask Gary
if I can buy a copy, who asks me if I don?t mind
giving the �50 to the young man instead.
@_la_?aneuse_牋
Having a lazy Sunday,
post-breakfast, read
this week?s @bigissue.
Respect the NHS
In reading issue 1261 [June
19-25], I was horri?ed to
read the doctor?s anecdotal
evidence of how little valued
the NHS appears to be. I?ve
often thought that the service
is taken for granted as
evidenced by the numbers
of appointments missed, at
whatever level, and the
instances of verbal and physical
assault visited upon staff.
If you value a service, you
show up and you don?t abuse
the person trying to help you.
I?m 52 so I?ve never known a life
without the NHS. I still value it,
only partly because I have
American relatives for whom
?doctors? bills? are a fact of life. I
hope the ladies in your doctor?s
ward get to see Michael Moore?s
?lm, Sicko. Terrifying. The
answers to this undervaluing
I honestly didn?t know how to react but
this small act of kindness seemed like no big
deal for him. He just thanked me and we had
a chat, while he continued taking care of the
man beside him.
This is why the Big Issue needs to exist.
Not only is it a great publication but it also
supports incredible, kind-spirited people
like Gary. People who exemplify the best in
us. If you?re in the Shoreditch area make sure
to look out for him. I guarantee he?ll make
your day, just like he made mine.
Andrew Bob Stanley, Facebook
have to be wide ranging but,
if I may ?place my elbow upon
the bar?, and assume the role
of benign dictator, I have to
wonder what effect charging
for missed appointments
would have. Much more
problematic to administer,
I know, would be some form
of penalty for what turned
out to be unnecessarily
booked appointments.
Well, before I really roll
up my sleeves and start
advocating stocks and public
birching, I?ll just close by
saying to NHS staff reading
this, sorry about the idiots
and the ignorant; most of us
worship the ground you walk
on. Please don?t give up on us.
Ashley Heath, Facebook
New system needed
Is it爐ime for radical change?
At general elections, we would
need to tick two boxes, one
for our choice of MP and the
other our preference as prime
minister. Then leave燤Ps
to vote freely and get rid of
the Government whips.
Parliamentary parties would be
consigned to the dustbin too. All
MPs would instead concentrate
on being true to the beliefs that
carried them into office.
George Brutton, Salisbury
CUDDLES
@addictionpsych�
So lovely to talk to Vio
again today & the best
dog cuddles!
THE BIG ISSUE / p4 / July 10-16 2017
@bigissue
@emzoticofficial
[To the] people who
helped assist the man
who suffered a ?t outside the
@sainsburys in Golders Green,
he is now with paramedics.
Thank you to the Euro tourists
who helped by calling an
ambulance & thank you to
the @BigIssue seller outside
Golders Green @sainsburys
for staying with me while I
checked the man over & got
him conscious.
Celebrating vendors
Good wishes to Matthew (the
vendor outside Oxford post
office) on his post-Big Issue life,
which starts next week. A
terri?c bloke who has cheered
my morning many a day ? and
the huge range of people who
always stop to say hello to
him while I?m chatting speaks
volumes. Seeing him get his life
together over the last year has
been humbling and inspiring,
and a vindication of everything
The Big Issue stands for.
Simon Townley, Oxford
Please could you pass on a big
thank you to Dave from the
High Street in Poole. He was
singing a ska/reggae mash up,
which gave us a little smile.
Later, he was kind enough to
spare a few minutes for a little
chat and to serenade my mum
with her fave song at the
moment, by Rag?n?Bone Man.
My mum lost everything in
a ?re and was feeling a little
down, Dave gave her a little
boost and a smile, which really
turned her day around.
Wishing Dave and The Big
Issue all the best ? thank you
for giving people a chance to get
themselves back on their feet.
Helen Rankin, Poole
@Jess_Southgate�
One of the things
I love best about
buying the @BigIssue is the
good news stories inside. A
happy antidote to all the rest.
NEWS
NEW MODEL FOR
AFFORDABLE HOMES
ADAM FORREST
TRUTH ABOUT
LIFE ON THE
STREETS
A powerful new ?lm
capturing the lives of
some of the young people
caught up in their own
housing crisis will be
shown on TV this week.
The More4 documentary Would You Take in a
Stranger? reveals the
workings of the emergency
accommodation service
Nightstop UK, which
matches ordinary families
with young people who
desperately need somewhere to stay.
The ?lmmakers follow
three young people in
trouble, including Dandi
(above), a 21-year-old who
has been using Nightstop
on and off because of a
difficult relationship with
her mum. Nicola Harwood,
head of Nightstop UK,
a project led by charity
Depaul UK, described the
documentary as ?a
powerful and compelling
portrayal of what we do
with nothing left out: the
heartache, difficulties,
tears and joy?.
Would You Take in a
Stranger? is on More4,
Tuesday, July 11 at 10pm.
I
nstead of waiting for
the Government or
big developers to ease
the housing crisis, one
community group in
Cornwall has shown it is
possible to get stuck in and get
genuinely affordable new
homes built.
The Cornwall Community
Land Trust is celebrating the
construction of 200 affordable
homes over the past 10 years.
Part of a growing movement of
community land trusts shaking
things up across the country,
the Cornwall CLT was set up a
decade ago to combat rising
house prices and the popularity of visitor-owned second and
third homes in the area.
?I believe we make the
difference between families
barely existing and being able
to live bigger lives to a greater
potential,? said director
Andrew George. ?We?ve shown
we can do it.?
Keziah Mannering, her
?anc� Callum Wilson and their
new baby Albie have just
moved into a house in the
CLT?s most recent development ? Briar Close in St
Teath. The house was
priced at only 56 per
cent of open market
value because of
terms set by
the CLT at
the outset of
the project.
Keziah and
baby Albie
WHAT?S A CLT?
Q A community land trust (CLT) is a small organisation set up
and run by people to build or restore homes for community
use. There are 225 with plans to build 3,000 homes by 2020.
Q If a CLT can obtain land or secure a long-term lease it can
dictate the terms of rent or insist on sale conditions for new
homes. The model allows the trust to make sure the asset is
affordable for future residents.
As The Big Issue has
explored in recent months, if a
CLT can afford to either buy or
get access to land on a bigger
development site, it can dictate
rent levels or sale prices, even
linking prices to average
earnings in the area.
?I lived at my mum?s house
for three-and-a-half years,
trying desperately to save
for a mortgage?, said
Keziah. ?Starting a family
it was important to me to
have a home in St Teath as
many of my family
live here but I
thought there was
no way I could
afford anything.
We feel
very
lucky.?
Cornwall CLT has been
involved in the building homes
at 20 developments in the
county, either directly or
assisting smaller groups. And
their efforts have been boosted
with the recent news that
Cornwall has received �million of funding to scale up
community-led housing
development.
?Many people are in the
situation that where they?ve
grown up, through no fault of
their own, they may never be
able to afford a house, even
when they have good jobs,?
said the CLT?s development
manager Helen Downing.
?That?s where we come in to try
and bridge the gap. We?ve got a
proven model and we just need
to keep expanding it.?
ROLL UP FOR THE SOCIAL ENTERPRISE OSCARS!
Each year, the brightest
brains behind the best
social enterprises in the
UK step into the spotlight
at the UK Social Enterprise
Awards 2017.
Celebrating business
excellence and outstanding
contributions to society, all
social enterprises can apply,
and there are speci?c
categories that investors,
corporates, public sector
bodies and charities can apply
for. And we are delighted to
announce that The Big Issue is
a sponsor of the 2017 Awards.
Winners will be announced at
a ceremony and gala dinner in
a central London venue on
Thursday November 23.
There are 13 categories in
total and this year we?ve added
two new ones ? Tech for Good
THE BIG ISSUE / p6 / July 10-16 2017
and Community Business of
the Year.
The closing date for entries
is July 14, so be quick off the
mark!
Read more about the SEUK
Awards at bigissue.com
?THERE IS A LOT OF BAD
STUFF THAT HAPPENS IN
THE WORLD RIGHT NOW.
IF YOU CHOOSE TO FOCUS
SIMPLY ON THE NEGATIVE
THEN OBVIOUSLY IT
APPEARS MUCH MORE THAT
WAY, BUT THERE ARE A LOT
OF PEOPLE DOING A LOT
OF GOOD THINGS AS WELL?
Harry Styles and the rest of the cast of Dunkirk
talk power and politics only in next week?s
edition of The Big Issue.
BIG ISSUE
VENDOR
TURNS HIGH
STREET HERO
One brave Big Issue vendor
helped save shoppers from a
dog rampaging through a
busy high street last week.
Winchester vendor Kevin
Collick grabbed a black
greyhound that got spooked
while attached to a chair and
began hurtling into pedestrians
nearby. Having prevented the
dog from colliding with more
people, Kevin then attended to
an injured man who suffered
cuts and bruises when the dog
caused him to fall.
Kevin is well-known ?gure
in the town, having dressed up
as a Christmas tree to raise over
�000 for last year?s Children
in Need campaign.
?Kevin is a popular member
of the community in which he
sells,? said Kirsten Thomson,
The Big Issue?s regional team
leader. ?His sense of humour
and enterprising nature have
long been admired by staff
and customers.?
JULY 6-12 1998. NO. 291
ON BIGISSUE.COM THIS WEEK?
? Corbynmania: Owen Jones and others explain the powerful appeal of the
Labour leader among young people
? Judy Murray: Inspirational matriarch reveals all as Wimbledon heats up
? John Bird: Explains his House of Lords bill to help private
renters in Britain
? WIN: Paul Verhoeven?s thriller Elle on DVD
? PLUS: A range of holiday gifts at bigissueshop.com
THE BIG ISSUE / p7 / July 10-16 2017
Our action hero cover star
Bruce Willis is riding high in
Hollywood, earning $20m per
?lm, and demanding lower taxes.
Meanwhile, back in the UK, PM
Tony Blair writes for us, pledging
a radical new approach to reduce
rough sleeping to ?as near as
zero as possible,? and we
report on property sharks
snaffling up London?s East
End around Hoxton.
BUY
STREET ART!
STREET ART
You can buy prints of some
artworks featured in Street Art
through The Big Issue Shop.
At least half of the pro?t from
each sale goes to the artist.
Order at
bigissueshop.com
S
W
BY MATTHEW NICHOLAS
Matt lives in a village in East
Yorkshire and has struggled with
ME for the last 20 years, dealing
with constant pain and fatigue. He
is trying to support himself through
his painting. His paintings take
six to eight weeks to create and
sometimes longer. To see more of
his work visit: mattnicholas.gallery
BY ANONYMOUS
This anonymous artist, who submits her work
via London homeless charity the 240 Project,
describes herself as ?a lone wolf?. ?My work
comes straight out my head ? it?s happy and
sad,? she says. ?At the end of the day, how you
feel comes out on the paper, in the colours
and the shapes. I get inspired by people at the
project and value their comments. We are like a
family ? they give you honest advice.?
TURKEY(MO)HAWK
JAWS
Street Art is created by people who are marginalised by issues like homelessness, disability and mental health conditions.
Contact streetlights@bigissue.com to see your art here.
THE BIG ISSUE / p8 / July 10-16 2017
STREET ART BUY NOW AT THE BIG ISSUE SHOP FROM � PLUS P&P
Showcasing the work of talented individuals on the margins of society
PUTTING PEOPLE AND PLANET FIRST
bigissueshop.com
Mary J Blige
Teenage rebel and soul survivor
M
usic has surrounded me my entire life. When I was a little girl,
my father was a musician and my
mother was a singer. When I was
four or ?ve years old, I would hear
my mother singing old soul songs and gospel songs ?
and she would sound just like the record. My dad was
a bass player and he?d also play the piano. They had every record you could think of. I was surrounded by it.
The ?rst thing I would say to 16-year-old me
is ? stop playing yourself down because you are
going to be someone that people love and admire.
I know you don?t believe that right now but trust me.
Don?t dumb yourself down to please everyone else as
you?re never going to be able to please everyone. Just
believe. Believe in yourself.
I was just a typical teenager ? not listening
to my mother and not doing the right things.
When I was 16, I wasn?t thinking about anything,
really. Really just singing. Wanting to sing. My dream
was to sing, but it was just a dream. I was really just
trying to survive.
Music was going to be the escape route for
me and my family. Of course you want it to happen
immediately, especially when you live in an environment like we lived in [Blige grew up in The Bronx in
THE BIG ISSUE / p10 / July 10-16 2017
Photos: Getty / Rex Features
LETTER TO MY YOUNGER SELF
the 1970s]. You want it to happen so you can get your
mom and your family out of the projects. You want to
make money, so that everyone can get out of that bad
environment. You want it to happen quickly and not
to be squandering it.
Being in our environment and what it was,
music was the thing that made us happy ? singing in the house or at the block parties. It really
was all about music. It was very hard to get the songs
you loved and heard the DJs play at the block parties.
It was, ?How do we ?nd that song? That song was hot!
How do we ?nd out what it was?? It was very hard.
Now everything is every way that you can get it at any
time. There was no Spotify where you could go off
and listen to one song off the album. You had to go get anybody. Any. Body. Any male or any female singer.
the album and listen to it ? unless it was a single. We It gave me con?dence. It gave me strength. It gave
me freedom.
really appreciated it at that time.
My
rebelliousness
really
The music that saves us, I don?t
messed up my education. When
think we look for it ? it ?nds us.
I was in 11th grade, I dropped out
I was ?ve years old when I ?rst heard
Stevie Wonder?s Songs in the Key of
of high school. I de?nitely regret it. I
Life. When I was ?ve and I heard that
really wish that I had ?nished getting
album for the ?rst time, it just found
my education. Then again, I look at
me. You feel so good listening to
it and ask myself if I would be this
whatever lyrics that Stevie is singing.
person if I had ?nished school. Would
I felt like that was my music. It
I be this Mary J Blige today?
didn?t feel like it was my mother?s muI am not ashamed or embarsic or my father?s music; it felt like it
rassed [about dropping out of
was my music. Mostly what catches
school], it was just a mistake that I
me is the lyrics and the vocals. That is
made. I would tell anyone who is trywhy Songs in the Key of Life was so iming to make it in music, especially the
portant to me. There was a page with
younger people or those trying to get
the lyrics and me and my sister would
into the business, to get their educago off and learn the lyrics to Knocks
tion ?rst. You cannot be on top of your
Me Off My Feet, Pastime Paradise and
business if you can?t read the conSummertime Soft. And then when I
tracts properly, speak to your managheard Anita Baker?s Caught Up in the
er or deal with people properly if you
Rapture, it was one of the most beaudon?t have good education. I own [my
tiful love songs I had ever heard. The
mistake] but I am not embarrassed. It
same with Chaka Khan?s Everlasting
was just a mistake. That?s it.
Love. When I was growing up, that
I would tell my younger self
was the music that found me.
that not everyone is going where
I was always singing at home.
you are going. You can?t share everyI would have a brush and I would be
thing with everybody. Everyone is not
singing Teena Marie songs into the
always happy for you and everyone
mirror we had in the bathroom. The From the top: Mary J Blige in 1990, two
is not going where you?re going. I did
brush was my mic when I was a little years before the release of her debut album; learn that one early.
girl and I would be singing in the mir- clutching on to three Grammy Awards in
I?ve learned to be careful with
2007; with now estranged husband Kendu
ror ? like a lot of little girls do right Isaacs at Vanity Fair?s Oscar party in 2016
music ? it either builds or it
now who have a brush and are singdestroys. I have done 13 albums in
ing to Beyonc�. I was singing to Anita and Chaka and my career and what it has taught me is this: music is
Melissa Morgan. I guess I was a performer then ? or a one of the biggest forms of communication. You can
practising performer then. I loved to do it.
build something with it or you can destroy something
I was seven years old when I got on a talent with it. Our words are super-powerful. I have to be
show in elementary school. I sang Peaches & Herb?s careful with what I am putting out there because
Reunited. My music teacher, Miss Sweeny, was the there are people out there listening to music at home
one who pushed me to be in the talent show as I never and it?s helping them to stay alive or helping them
wanted to be in the front; I was always trying to be to get out of a bad relationship. Even if I am going
in the back. It was people pushing me. Friends would through something negative and feel like venting, I
always ask me to sing, sing, sing. That is something I have to make sure that it?s not going to hurt anyone
had to grow in con?dence to do.
else. So I have to pray and make sure that my message
Singing turns you into a better person. When is strong.
you can open your mouth and something comes out
of it that makes you feel con?dent and good, it turns
you into another person ? a better person. It gives Mary J Blige plays Birmingham O2 Academy, July 15, and Kew
you con?dence. When I was younger, I could sing way the Music at Kew Gardens, London, July 16; myticket.co.uk
better than I can sing right now and I could mimic Words: Eamonn Forde @Eamonn_Forde
?I would be singing
Teena Marie songs
into the bathroom
mirror. The brush
was my mic?
THE BIG ISSUE / p11 / July 10-16 2017
IN 1987
THE YEAR
MARY
J BLIGE
TURNS 16?
Prince Edward
leaves the Royal
Marines three
months after joining
/ The Simpsons
cartoon makes its
?rst appearance as
a series of shorts on
The Tracey Ullman
Show / The ?rst
acid house raves are
reported in the UK
GETTING LOST
Climb every mo
A walk in the great outdoors soothes souls, solves
problems and improves the memory. One man
claims it even slowed his Alzheimer?s. In this special
edition we show you how to dump the GPS, pick up a
compass and ?nd yourself by learning to be ?lost?
E
very day ? sometimes twice a day
? come wind, rain or shine, Sion Jair
climbs and descends the 803 metres
of the Old Man of Coniston in the
heart of the Lake District. The
67-year-old is in his element during
these walks, as much as a curlew in the wind or sheep
grazing on a hillside. And since being diagnosed with
Alzheimer?s four years ago, Jair, pictured below, has
found his daily hike soothes and exercises his mind.
Having walked the route more than 5,000 times, he
knows every single ridge, ravine and rock. ?I?ve been
navigating in the mountains for 50 years. The skills
and techniques are embedded in me,? he says. ?My
dementia only prevents me from learning new things
but doesn?t affect what I already know.? A comforting,
reassuring and sustaining ritual, he credits it with
delaying the progress of Alzheimer?s. His inspirational story gained widespread attention as an example
of coping with serious illness by focusing on the things
we enjoy most. And it is testament to the fundamental
power of walking, proving what science, psychology
and sociology have long known to be true.
Be it for exploration, exercise, escape, self-examination, solitude or simply
nipping down the shops, a long
trek or a short stroll in a rural
or urban environment, put one
foot in front of the other and see
where it leads you this summer.
And while you?re at it, switch off
your smartphone and shut down
the satnav. Disconnect, unplug,
unravel, get outside of yourself
and ? with obvious caution ?
don?t be afraid to get a little lost
in the process. Be adventurous, be curious. Be alone
if you need to be.
?It is still not totally clear why exercise in general,
and walking in particular, should have this positive
effect,? says neuroscientist and writer Ben Martynoga.
?Increased blood ?ow to the brain is probably one
factor. That blood will bring fuel and oxygen to brain
cells, helping them function well. Exercise also seems
to stimulate protein molecules in the brain ? the best
studied one is called brain-derived neurotrophic
factor, or BDNF for short, which can improve the
health of neurons and can also encourage them to
grow and to form new connections.
?There is evidence that walking can improve learning and memory,? Martynoga
continues. ?Exercise in general
seems to be one of the best
things you can do to improve
brain function. Many studies
show it is much more effective
than so-called ?brain training?
games and activities.?
While it?s impossible to be
sure if Jair?s Old Man of
Coniston ritual has truly slowed
the onset of his Alzheimer?s,
there is plenty of evidence to suggest that walking
helps to stem cognitive decline as people age, as
Martynoga explains. ?Our brains shrink as we get
older. Walking and other forms of exercise can have
quite a dramatic effect to slow or even reverse some
of that shrinkage,? he says. ?Part of the brain called
the hippocampus, crucial for many aspects of learning
and memory seems to respond very well to exercise
in young people and older people alike.?
THE BIG ISSUE / p12 / July 10-16 2017
GETTING LOST
untain?
There?s a neurological windfall too from surprising
and testing our brain as we go ? shoving it out of its
comfort zone, making it function in ways it is unused
to. Which is why it?s worth switching off your smart
devices when you strike out and go off-grid from our
hyper-connected society (don?t worry, Twitter,
Instagram and Snapchat will still be there when you
get back).
Martynoga says: ?Think of the clich� of inspiration
arriving suddenly and unexpectedly whilst you?re in
the shower, or strolling in the woods. When you step
back from the pressures of everyday life, things that
you?ve been consciously thinking about and problems
you?ve been actively trying to solve don?t disappear.
There is evidence that the unconscious parts of your
brain keep chipping away at these challenges and your
mind can wander, exploring possible solutions.
Sometimes your brain makes unexpected links or suddenly ?nds answers. This can feel like an ?aha? moment.?
It?s always nice to enjoy a walk in good company
? Jair is often accompanied by his partner Wendy
on the Old Man of Coniston trail. But there?s much to
be said for going it alone, too. Jack Fong, a sociologist
at California State Polytechnic University who
has studied solitude, advocates the sociological and
psychological value of moderated aloneness in order
to get to know oneself that bit better, and our context
in modern society.
?Walking is an ideal method for experiencing solitude,? says Fong. ?In fact, one of the 18th century?s
greatest philosophers, Jean-Jacques Rousseau wrote
Reveries of a Solitary Walker before the end of his life.
His book is divided into different ?walks? where each
walk provided a set of realisations about the human
condition. Walking is ideal for satiating our wanderlust, and if that could be secured through alone time,
then such walks are not merely casual breaks, but a
needed method and life practice for ?nding one?s centre
of gravity, so to speak.
?A nice walk in the forest, on the beach, on a trail,?
Fong continues, ?reminds us just how astoundingly
ridiculous modern society has become insofar as how
it pitches what we should do with our free time. Thus,
a solitary walk is not only therapeutic, it?s a statement
? perhaps a proverbial middle-?nger against the overload of scripts and super?cialities that are surfeit in
our society.? Walking as an act of de?ance ? against
the excesses of the modern world, even against serious
illness. Think of that next time you take a stroll.
Words: Malcolm Jack @MBJack
THE BIG ISSUE / p13 / July 10-16 2017
It?s not just adults who bene?t from a
walk on the wild side. Adam Forrest
investigates the joys of learning in the
great outdoors
A
s we get older, many of us come to
Stramash is part of a growing ?play? movement in
value the great outdoors as a chance Scotland that promotes outdoor education and the
to decompress, relax and reassess wider mental health bene?ts of encouraging children
our priorities in life. But what if to spend more time outside.
there was a way of kick-starting that
?If we believe in a better future for our children,
appreciation, of helping kids bene?t we need to make playing outdoors a fundamental part
from nature?s healing powers from of growing up,? says Rachel Cowper, a board member
a very young age? One social enterprise in Scotland is of Stramash. ?Playing doesn?t need expensive equipment or facilities, just space ? a street corner, a park,
doing just that.
Stramash was set up to use Scotland?s abundance a garden or woodland.
of wonderful landscapes to make a positive difference
?We need to start early and make outdoor play somein the lives of children and young
thing children do every single day ? not
people. Named after a lighthearted
the preserve of school holidays or a lucky
Scottish term for ?uproar?, the organifew kids,? she adds. ?All children want
to play.?
zation believes in the transformational power of outdoor play.
Big Issue Invest, the social investBased in Argyll on the rural west
ment arm of The Big Issue, has helped
coast, the Stramash team offers
finance the groundbreaking work
outdoor nurseries for two- to ?veof Stramash. In fact, Big Issue Invest
year-olds, and a wide range of outdoor
provides ?nance for a wide range of
The Stramash organisation believes in the
learning courses for schools right transformational power of outdoor play
organisations, expanding educational
across Scotland who have spent
opportunities and boosting mental
most of their education cooped up inside the health support across the UK.
?We have a strong interest in creating opportunity
classroom.
Both parents and teachers have found that quality by supporting high quality early years education,? said
time spent in nature boosts the self-esteem and per- Annie Minter, Investment Manager at Big Issue Invest.
sonal development of pupils, as well as helping them ?Stramash make a positive difference to the lives of the
appreciate their responsibility in looking after the young people they work with. We?re really excited to
environment.
see them grow and extend their social impact.?
?Our neighbours in Scandinavia have been educating their wee ones in the great outdoors for half a stramash.org.uk / bigissueinvest.com
century,? says Stramash?s CEO Mairi Ferris. ?All the
ECOTHERAPY: THE BENEFITS
evidence points to the fact that young children thrive
in an outdoor setting and minds and bodies develop
? Mental health charity Mind says its ?ecotherapy? projects ? using the
best when they have access to stimulating outdoor
outdoors to boost wellbeing ? found seven out of 10 experienced a
environment. It?s where they can learn through play
signi?cant psychological boost after working or spending time outside.
and real experiences and adventures.?
Set up in 2009, the social enterprise now has cam? Over 50 per cent of people who took part said their ?tness
puses in Elgin and Fort William, having expanded
improved, and 60 per cent felt more connected to nature.
from its Oban base. As well as creating a series of
apprenticeships for young adults, it also offers team? Men form 56 per cent of participants in ecotherapy, which helps
building adventure days for adults in need of a physiolder men in particular open up about their problems.
cal and psychological boost.
THE BIG ISSUE / p15 / July 10-16 2017
EXPERTS IN
ADVENTURE
SINCE 1913
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TO DISCOVER
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HOW TO
GET LOST
Whether in mystery, geography or art,
losing ourselves is an essential, primal
human action. The historian, writer and
wanderer Rebecca Solnit shows the way
L
eave the door open for the unknown, the
door into the dark. That?s where the most
important things come from, where you
yourself came from, and where you will
go. Three years ago I was giving a workshop in the Rockies. A student came in
bearing a quote from what she said was the pre-Socratic philosopher Meno. It read, ?How will you go
about ?nding that thing the nature of which is totally
unknown to you?? I copied it down, and it has stayed
with me since. The student made big transparent photographs of swimmers underwater and hung them
from the ceiling with the light shining through them,
so that to walk among them was to have the shadows
of swimmers travel across your body in a space that
itself came to seem aquatic and mysterious. The question she carried struck me as the basic tactical question
in life. The things we want are transformative, and we
don?t know or only think we know what is on the other
side of that transformation. Love, wisdom, grace,
inspiration ? how do you go about ?nding these E
THE BIG ISSUE / p17 / July 10-16 2017
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things that are in some ways about extending the
?Not to ?nd one?s way in a city may well be uninboundaries of the self into unknown territory, about
teresting and banal. It requires ignorance ? nothing
becoming someone else?
more,? says the 20th-century philosopher-essayist
Certainly for artists of all stripes, the unknown, the
Walter Benjamin. ?But to lose oneself in a city ? as one
idea or the form or the tale that has not yet arrived, is
loses oneself in a forest ? that calls for quite a different
what must be found. It is the job of artists to open doors
schooling.? To lose yourself: a voluptuous surrender,
lost in your arms, lost to the world, utterly immersed
and invite in prophesies, the unknown, the unfamiliar;
in what is present so that its surroundings fade away.
it?s where their work comes from, although its arrival
In Benjamin?s terms, to be lost is to be fully present,
signals the beginning of the long disciplined process
of making it their own. Scientists too, as J Robert
and to be fully present is to be capable of being in
Oppenheimer once remarked, ?live always at the ?edge
uncertainty and mystery. And one does not get lost
of mystery? ? the boundary of the unknown?. But they
but loses oneself, with the implication that it is a contransform the unknown into the known, haul it in like
scious choice, a chosen surrender, a psychic state
?shermen; artists get you out into that dark sea.
achievable through geography.
That thing the nature of which is totally unknown
Edgar Allan Poe declared: ?All experience, in
to you is usually what you need to ?nd, and ?nding it is
matters of philosophical discovery, teaches us that,
in such discovery, it is the unforeseen upon which we
a matter of getting lost. The word ?lost? comes from
must calculate most largely.? Poe is consciously juxthe Old Norse los, meaning the disbanding of an army,
taposing the word ?calculate?, which implies a cold
and this origin suggests soldiers falling out of formation
counting up of the facts or measurements, with ?the
to go home, a truce with the wide world. I worry now
unforeseen?, that which cannot be measured or
that many people never disband their armies, never go
counted, only anticipated. How do you calculate upon
beyond what they know. Advertising, alarmist news,
the unforeseen? It seems to be an art of recognising
incessant busyness and the design of public and private
the role of the unforeseen, of
space conspire to make it so.
keeping your balance amid surA recent article about the
? FOR M E , CHILDHOOD ROA MING
return of wildlife to suburbia
prises, of collaborating with
chance, of recognising that there
described snow-covered yards in
W A S W H AT D E V E L O P E D
are some essential mysteries in
which the footprints of animals
SELF-RELIANCE, A SENSE OF
the world, and thereby a limit to
are abundant and those of chilplan and control. To calculate A D V E N T U R E , A W I L L T O E X P L O R E ? dren are entirely absent. As far as
on the unforeseen is perhaps
the animals are concerned, the
exactly the paradoxical operasuburbs are an abandoned landtion that life most requires of us.
scape, and so they roam with con?dence. Children
p
On a celebrated midwinter?s ni
poet
seldom roam, even in the safest places. Because of their
John Keats walked home talking with some friends
parents? fear of the monstrous things that might happen
?and several things dove-tailed in my mind, and at
(and do happen but rarely), the wonderful things that
happen as a matter of course are stripped away from
once it struck me what quality went to form a Man of
Achievement, especially in Literature? I mean
them. For me, childhood roaming was what developed
Negative Capability, that is, when a man is
self-reliance, a sense of direction and adventure, imagcapable of being in uncertainties, mysteries,
ination, a will to explore, to be able to get a little lost
doubts, without any irritable reaching after
and then ?gure out the way back. I wonder what will
come of placing this generation under house arrest.
fact and reason.? One way or another this
notion occurs over and over again, like
Lost really has two disparate meanings. Losing
the spots labelled ?terra
things is about the familiar falling away, getting lost
is about the unfamiliar appearing. There are objects
incognita? on old maps.
and people that disappear from your sight or knowledge
or possession; you lose a bracelet, a friend, the key. You
still know where you are. Everything is familiar except
that there is one item less, one missing element. Or
you get lost, in which case the world has become larger
than your knowledge of it. Either way, there is a loss
of control. Imagine yourself streaming through time
shedding gloves, umbrellas, wrenches, books, friends,
homes, names. This is what the view looks like if you
take a rear-facing seat on the train. Looking forward
you constantly acquire moments of arrival, moments
of realisation, moments of discovery. The wind blows
your hair back and you are greeted by what you have
never seen before. The material falls away in onrushing experience. It peels off like skin from a moulting
snake. Of course, to forget the past is to lose the sense
of loss that is also memory of an absent richness and
a set of clues to navigate the present by; the art is not
one of forgetting but letting go. And when everything
else is gone, you can be rich in loss.
Extracted from燗 Field Guide to Getting Lost�(Canongate, �99)
by Rebecca Solnit
Great
Wall
of China Trek
25 MAY-2 JUNE 2018
Trek the Great Wall of
raise funds for the children?s charity of your choice
For more information and to register online:
www.actionforcharity.co.uk
01590 646410 | events@dreamchallenges.co.uk
DreamChallenges
@dreamchallenges #LetsTrekForChildren
FIND YOUR DIRECTION
HOW TO USE A COMPASS
A
compass is useful and can be essential if you walk in isolated areas or challenging conditions. It helps you
know which direction you are travelling in (your heading), align your map with your surroundings (setting),
work out which direction objects are in or how far they are (its bearing), and follow a line of travel (following
a bearing). Here is the Ramblers? essential guide on how to use one.
FEATURES OF A COMPASS
Baseplate ? the plastic base
Direction of travel arrow ?
the big arrow at the end of
the baseplate
Map scales 1:25 000,
1:50 000 and metric
measurer (known as
Romer scales)
Compass dial ?
also known as the
compass wheel, with
a mark every two
degrees covering� 360
degrees, and the four
main compass points,
N-S-E-W
Index line ? extension of
the direction of travel arrow
Magnetic needle
? red end for north,
white for south
Orienting arrow ?
?xed and aligned to
north within the dial
Compass lines ? on the
bottom of the base. These
are also called ?orienting lines?
To navigate successfully you need to
use your compass with a map, such as
an Ordnance Survey map.
? Put the map as ?at as possible in front
of you.
? Put the compass anywhere on the map.
? Turn the map and compass until
the needle on the compass aligns with
the north-south gridlines on the map,
with the red needle pointing to the top of
the map.
? Hold the compass in front of you with the
direction of travel arrow pointing in the
direction you?re walking.
? Rotate the dial so that the N aligns with
the red end of the compass needle.
? The ?gure on the rim of the housing at the
index line is your heading.
? Find a distant feature on the map that you
want to walk towards ? now you?ll follow
a bearing.
? Identify this feature on the ground.
? Put the compass on the map so that orienting lines on the compass point line up with
your route towards that feature, as it is
shown on the map.
? Without moving the map or compass,
rotate the dial so that the orienting arrow
points towards north on the map� the
?gure on the rim of the housing at the
THE BIG ISSUE / p21 / July 10-16 2017
index line is the bearing you need to follow.�
? Take the compass off the map and hold it
with the direction of travel arrow pointing
straight ahead away from you.
? Rotate your whole body, including the
compass, until the red end of the needle
lies parallel with the orienting arrow.
? The direction of travel arrow should now
point towards your distant feature.
? Walk in the direction indicated by the
direction of travel arrow until you reach
your destination, checking your bearing
along the way.
Ramblers.org.uk
am
ley, Birmingh
Simon Broad irmingham
B
P igeon Park in out even
ab
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ot
rg
gets fo
middle of
ugh it?s in the
RK
PIGEON PA
Anthony Williams , Bath
Whenever I go up to the Lak
e
District it takes me back to
my childhood, when I?d go
?shing there. It?s a beautiful
place, one of the very nicest
parts of the country.
THE LAKE DIST
TR
RIICT
g
mb i ge
am
Lisa Sharpe, C
g
in
az
am
e
There are som iver Cam.
R
e
th
g
places alon
oaatt for a
bo
usseeb
I lived on a ho
punt for the
to
ed
while, and us
t
tourists. A grea
students and
summer?s day.
RIVER CAM
Michaeel Williams, Edinburgh
It?s like being on a desert
h tide comes in and
island. The
cuts you off. There?s no lights,
it?s pitch black, you can see the
stars. Get a camp?re going
and bring your sleeping bag.
ISLA
O
MOND
M
CRAM
Feel the need to escape? Let our Big Issue vendors inspire you with their pick of the best places to get away from it all
DISCOVER
OUR BRITAIN
ntt
d, Ken
Rob, Long?el onderful
w
s
It?
.
nd
E
Land?s
a down thhere
there ? the se oper blue, a
is pr
on the coast
blue colour, so
of
nd
ki
pure
e bottles at
you can see th
the bottom.
LAND?S END
Stuart Drucker, Cardiff
I love ?shing. It?s great up at
Caerphilly Castle ? it?s difficult
to explain the appeal to
people who haven?t done it ?
it?s just a very relaxing thing to
do. You switch your mind off.
CAERPHILLY
HILLY CAS
CA
CASTLE
STLE
Kelvin McCann, Card
di
It is a brilliant place,
it?s lovely there. You
have the seaside town,
but walk the coast to a place
l
called Jackson?s Bay, it?s a very
beautiful, soothing spot.
BARRY ISLAND
Liam Harmer, Skett
Walk around Singleeton Parkk
There are
or along the coast. Th
points where you get amazing
views up to Swansea Bay or
down to Port Talbot. It?s nice
to get a chance to think.
SWANSEA
Jim Stephenson, No
ttinghaam
m
I went on an adventu
re holiday
there years ago and
did hill
walking, canoeing, go
rge
walking and cave ex
ploring.
It is a wonderful place
to visit,
the scenery is stunn
ing.
SNOWDONIA
th
ral.
to the cathed
the city next
t
ou
ill
ch
e to
It?s a great plac
er.
th
ge
to
ad
he
and get your
SOLSBUR
Y HIL
LL
Steve King
, Bat
I?ve camped h
up there, on
outskirts of
the
Bath. The n
ighttime is actu
ally the bes
t ti
to be up th
ere because me
it?s
so beautiful
to see the lig just
hts of
city below.
n
on
Steve Taylor,
a
o get away
t
to
ce
l
pla
ul
erf
A wond
in
ise
rad
pa
al
from it all, a natur
n,
row
erg
ov
s
It?
lis.
the metropo
vestones
peaceful, and the gra
autiful in
be
and sculptures are
y.
wa
of
d
kin
a gothic
ABNEY PA
CEMETERY
way to relax on
Jeff Arnold, Hastings
It?s a great place start terri??c
coastal walks. I like to go fo
or
a long wander. There are
ruined castles, and freshwatter
lakes, great for catching car
and bream if you like to ?sh.
HASTINGS
Colin Davey, Dover
It?s a great place to visit here
on the south coast. It?s got
great views of the cliffs from
the tower, and an amazing
history, too ? it dates back to
the 12th century.
DOVER CASTLE
E CAVES
Steve James
, Norwich
A series of
sea
the Norfolk caves along
coast. It?s a
sp
little place.
I used to go ecial
and
make driftw
oo
across it by d ?res. I came
ch
was walking ance when I
the clifftops.
CLIFTONV
ILL
Joseph Saunders, Nor
I?ve made time to go ?shing
again, and the best place to
do it is down on the River
Wensum in Norfolk. If you
?nd a quiet spot there?s
nothing better in the world.
RIVER WENSUM
M
RAY MEARS, WILDMAN
New Forest
You don?t have to go far in Britain to get into lovely
open countryside, in almost any corner you?re going
to ?nd something special. If you?re looking for a place
to go and explore start with the New Forest (right).
Forest doesn?t necessarily mean trees, it?s an old
hunting reserve so there are open areas too, heathland
and forest, but it has a special atmosphere, the light
is good there. It?s big enough to get lost in but it?s not
so harsh that you?re going to come to any harm without
special training. But you do need a compass and a map.
Take a pair of binoculars, ?nd a beautiful tree, sit down
under it and wait ? let the nature come to you.
I was born to be in wild places, that?s where I feel
most alive. I don?t mind getting lost because I?m exploring something new and I feel completely comfortable and I know how to take care of myself. That?s the
magic of having developed these skills ? I feel at home
when I go to wild places. You don?t wear a badge that
says I?m into bush craft, it?s invisible, except for the
special light that?s in the person?s eyes.
Ray Mears ? Born to Go Wild tours the UK from
October 8,爎aymears.com
MALACHY TALLACK, NORTHMAN AND
NATURE WRITER
Linn Park, Glasgow
When I need to escape the city, but don?t have the time
to go, I make my way to Linn Park. At 200 acres, it is
the second largest of Glasgow?s parks, and is surely
the wildest.燭his was once an industrial area, with the
remains of several mills still visible along the White
Cart River,燽ut today much of it is overgrown with
trees. I?ve watched king?shers and dippers here, buzzards and sparrowhawks. I?ve seen salmon jumping
below the Linn waterfall, and I?ve searched (so far
unsuccessfully) for
the otters that are also
present in the park.
Looking at the
map, it is surprising
just how close you are
to roads, to schools, to
homes, at all points
along this walk.營t can
feel, on a quiet day,
very far indeed from
all that. And if you
head south on the trail
from the White Bridge
(right), on the east
bank of the river, you
leave behind the dog
walkers and the
cyclists and the family
outings. You ?nd yourself, usually, alone.
There is a spot here,
beside the river, where I like to sit in silence, not really
thinking, just waiting, watching, until I feel ready
once again for the city.�
BIG ISSUE VENDOR LYNNE SM
MITH,
SAINSBURY?S, UNION STREET,
BIRMINGHAM
Isle of Arran, main picture
I used to go on holiday there wheen I
hadn?t been anywhere outsidee of
Birmingham. It was peaceful and beeautiful, I?d love to go back there again.
THE BIG ISSUE / p24 / July 10-16 2017
Being out in nature can transport us ? and places take on
special meanings for many di?erent reasons.
Here well-known faces and Big Issue vendors share the cherished
places that mean most to them
CHARLOTTE SMITH,
COUNTRYFILE ADVENTURESS
Gormire Lake, North Yorkshire
The Howardian Hills in North Yorkshire
is an area of outstanding beauty, between
York and the North York Moors. The most
famous bit is Castle Howard, which is like
a stately home on acid ?爃umongous, with
really nice grounds.燤y husband dragged
me up there when we first met and
we ended up going for our honeymoon
in 2004. We sat in the pub, watched the
rain coming down and went for walks. It
is proper Yorkshire, so you get brilliant food and
lots of it.�
A short drive from there is Sutton Bank, a big cliff
in the middle of nowhere, with a lovely walk down to
Gormire Lake,
Lake a wonderful old gglacial lake.
BBC Country?le Live is at Blenheiim Palace, August 3-6,
country?lelive.com
CHARLEY BOORMAN,
CIRCUMNAVIGATING BIKER
Sally Gap, Ireland
It runs from nortth-west Dublin
over the Wicklo
ow Mountains
all the way to Glen
ndalough then
down past the hou
use where I grew
up. It?s one of the most beautiful pieces of
road that you can ride. When I was young
I used to ride motorbikes all around that
area. My friend, who lived on the other
side of the river, and I used to ?ll our bikes
up with petrol then put a little spare in a
bottle on the back of the bikes. We?d head
out into the mountains until our petrol
tank ran out then we?d ?ll it up again and
ride home.
Last year I had an accident in Portugal
and smashed both my legs up. Going into
emergency surgery because my leg was
almost hanging off, I remember asking the surgeon,
?Look, just tell me the truth, how long will it be until
I can get back on the motorbike?? I ended up spending
?ve months in a wheelchair.
My walking now is not so good, I hobble around still,
but I can ride a bike so I?m delighted. I was just over in
Ireland, visiting my father for a couple of days
and
d I met up with some mates and went for a
ride ? over Sally Gap. I feel like I?m back now.
Charley Boorman?s Long Way Back is out now
C
SHAPPI KHORSANDI, FUNNY GIRL
Maiden Castle, Dorset
I roamed around Dorset recently with
my children, because for a four- and nineyear-old the very words ?Jurassic Coast?
widens eyes and creates adventure. We
drove to Maiden Castle, the awesomely huge
Iron Age fort. It?s nothing other than a jaw-droppingly beautiful link to our ancient past. The place envelopes you, you become tiny and that the real world,
with all its chaos, is pushed terribly far away.
Shappi Khorsandi: Mistress and Mis?t at the Edinburgh
Festival Fringe, August 3-27, edfringe.com >
THE BIG ISSUE / p25 / July 10-16 2017
NEW
CUSTOMISABLE
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SHOUT OUT ABOUT THINGS
THAT MATTER TO YOU,
with a fully customisable T-shirt.
PART OF OUR CUSTOM COLLECTION AT THE BIG ISSUE SHOP
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MAGIC IN NATURE
MARTIN CREED, TURNER-WINNING
POLYMATH
Dulwich Park, London
I feel like I learn a lot from my dog. I often go for a
walk with my partner and Jimmy the dog in Dulwich
Park, which is this big, beautiful park. When you see
a dog run and run in a big open space, you see the joy
of life. And that is infectious. I envy him what seems
like a real pure joy. When I aim for that I always spoil
it by having thoughts. When it comes to getting away,
I actually prefer just lying face down on the ?oor
with my eyes closed, or lying down getting underneath
some furniture. That seems the best way to get
away from everything. It?s about trying to minimise
your movements.
Martin Creed?s Words and Music, Edinburgh International
Festival, August 4-27, eif.co.uk
end of her life. There?s an Alice
in Wonderland perfection to
how well it?s kept. I love the
idea of a perfect public rose
garden that everyone can
share. There?s a place my
family calls Duck Island ? a
little island with a bridge off
the main park onto the Inner
Circle canal. It?s often locked
so there?s always the anticipation of whether you can get on
or not. My children love
heading for it. It?s a little
kingdom and there are often birds nesting on the
sculpture of the giant bird of prey in there which I ?nd
quite weird.
ELLIE TAYLOR, ICE-CREAM LOVER
AND COMEDIAN
Whitsand Bay, Cornwall
Last year I needed a break away from the city, so
decamped down to the South West and it was one of
the loveliest breaks I?ve ever had. Incredible beaches,
great walks, truly sexy ice-cream and some of the most
spectacular sunsets I?ve ever seen.
BIG ISSUE VENDOR
NICK CUTHBERT
A farm outside Truro
I stayed in a caravan there nexxt
to a river. You could see baby baadgers
and fox cubs feeding. I love spending
my time wandering the wild
dlife trails
there with my binoculars.
BIG ISSUE VENDOR
ARRY BUCHAN, BRISTOL
GA
Ben Nevis
The views are amazing ? they really
blow you away. I was up there once
when a thunder storm started so I had
w
to descend 600ft as quickly as possible.
Ranmore Common,
Dorking
Photos: Alamy
CHRISTIAN O?CONNELL,
ABSOLUTE MORNING RADIO LEGEND
D
Ranmore Common, Dorking
About 10 minutes from where I live.
Amazing views. I walk my dogs there
and just love it. There is a bench. I go
sit there. I look out, and sometimes I
look in. When my dog died I sprinkled
some of his ashes there.
SAMIRA AHMED, BROADCASTER
Regent?s Park, London
It has always been an oasis in the heart of London and
there is still no more magical place ?rst thing in the
morning or on a summer evening, walking round the
Rose Garden checking out the dozens of varieties, and
their names which each tell a story ? City of Bradford,
Ingrid Bergman, Savoy Hotel, Princess of Wales. I
remember reading how Paul McCartney used to walk
through there to visit Linda in hospital towards the
Left:
Regent?s
Park?s Rose
Garden
From top:
Dulwich
Park;
Ben Nevis
CERYS MATTHEWS, MUSIC MAVEN,
FESTIVAL ORGANISER
Hawarden, Flintshire
Flintshire is not quite Snowdonia. It?s near to
the English border, not in west Wales, not on
the coast. It?s really lovely, huge oak trees and
rolling hills. There?s a village called Hawarden
and a mound is the particular place I like ? they
built a lake at some point, and left this mound of
soil. I like to walk to the top of this mound and sit there
and watch people ? it?s usually during the festival time,
which is harvest time, mid-September ? and it?s a farm
so it grows pumpkins. The ?elds are full of pumpkins.
And it grows maize and blackcurrants, you can pick
your own. It?s pretty magical for that reason.
thegoodlifeexperience.co.uk
Tell us yours: editorial@bigissue.com
@BigIssue facebook.com/BigIssueUK
THE BIG ISSUE / 27 / July 10-16 2017
POSTCARD COMPETITION
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MODERN NATURE
I WAS UP WITH THE LARKS?
Christopher Fitch, 28
Dawn chorus audio on memory stick
The power of immersion in the natural
world... I was in Kenya, sleeping in a
safari park in a bed rolled out at night
so ? mosquito net aside ? I was asleep
beneath the stars. Through the night I
would occasionally awake to the sound
of howling hyenas or grunting hippos.
Then, in the morning, I was blown
away by the great explosion of sound,
as the morning was broken by the
dawn chorus: birds and other animals
squawking, hooting, chirping, singing
and generally creating an amazing
natural orchestra. I grabbed a recorder
so I could capture the amazing sound
and transport myself back to that
moment in the future.
MY WORLD OF
WARCRAFT?
Felix and Vito Wayman-Thwaites,
both seven
Weapons
Our object is an axe and a hammer
put together. It?s made of wood,
string and concrete. We like being
outside in nature and the wood
came from just on the ground in
Mayow Park, near where we live. We
tied the concrete onto a stick with
some string and it has a bug living in it
but it?s dead now.
CLAW AND ORDER?
Merle and Bette Nunneley, 17 and 15
Crab coffins
Me and my sister found the crabs
when we were walking our dog in
Medway Country Park, by the Thames
Estuary, when we were maybe 10
and 12. There were loads of them,
hundreds of crabs on the beaches,
strewn everywhere. They were like
pebbles and they had been dried out
by the sun, I think. Shell and bone and
stuff. And so we picked them up and
put them in dog-poo bags to bring
them home and then we made coffins
out of cardboard to put them into.
I think we were reasonably serious.
WHAT CONNECTS US TO
THE GREAT OUTDOORS
A map, a key, a pair of wellingtons ? or something more
metaphysical? The Wellcome Collection?s new exhibition, A
Museum of Modern Nature, invites the public to share objects
that tell stories about their relationship with nature, to explore
how Brits see their place in the natural world. Here is a selection.
Until October 8; wellcomecollection.org
GRAMPS? GARDEN WAS GNOME
SWEET GNOME?
Julie Carr
Garden gnome
Born in 1901, William Thomas Cooper ran away to sea
aged 14. Fast forward to 1947, when he became my
mum?s stepdad. Mum says the gnomes were already
there when they moved into his maisonette, a huge big
bank of them carefully arranged in the yard. Initially,
when I picked this gnome, I did it somewhat ironically.
But, in reality, it has contributed signi?cantly to my
love of nature as an adult. Many of my pastimes now
involve the countryside, its birds and beasts, and my
garden or my allotment. There are few greater pleasures
than pootling around the garden on a warm summer?s
morning. If those odd little fellows hadn?t drawn me
outside while the grown-ups talked inside, my life would
certainly have been a poorer one. I would have missed
watching Gramps garden and bearing witness to the
pure and simple joy that nature can bring us.
OH, I DO LIKE TO BESIDE THE SEASIDE?
Joan Scott, 91
Black-and-white family photograph
I think I might have been about four and my sisters
were looking after me. They look like guardians,
don?t they? But sometimes they couldn?t be
bothered with me at all. They wanted to lose me.
Usually every weekend we went to the seaside
somewhere or other, you know? Local, not far, you
know? Margate, Ramsgate, Southend. Just for the
day. I think we might have stayed once or twice. We
didn?t book up anywhere, just if you saw someone
with a notice in the window, ?Bed and Breakfast? or
whatever it was, you just went there. Music and a fair,
the happiness of the place, everybody was enjoying
themselves, you know? It was lovely, just lovely. I
think it?s very funny because there?s a boat, a little
boat, toy boat, and I know I really wanted that boat
so I must have kept on until I got the boat. Although
we were poor, a poor family, we were very well
looked after ? rather spoilt really, I was.
THE BIG ISSUE / p29 / July 10-16 2017
A LONG
WALK
HOME
After losing her home and business, and learning that
her partner had a terminal illness, Raynor Winn decided
the only way for the couple to survive was to pack their
rucksacks and live wild at the edge of the land
THE BIG ISSUE / p30 / July 10-16 2017
walk. I hadn?t carefully considered walking 630
miles with a rucksack on my back ? I hadn?t
thought about how I could afford to do it, or that
I?d be wild camping for nearly 100 nights, or
what I?d do afterwards. It just seemed like the
best response to the door-hammering of the bailiffs.
It was the end of one of those weeks that happen to
someone else. A ?nancial dispute with a lifetime friend
had led to a court case that lasted for three years, culminating in us being served with an eviction notice from our
home of 20 years. Two days later a doctor sat on the edge
of his desk and told my husband, Moth, that he had a rare
neurodegenerative disease, that there was no cure, no
treatment and he was going to die. The only help available was physiotherapy that may help retain some
muscle strength. My world and all that kept me stable
slipped from beneath my feet.
No-one would rent to us now we had a CCJ [county
court judgment] on our credit record. The local authority refused our application for priority housing, saying
Moth ?wasn?t ill enough? to qualify. Local hostels prioritised dependents, mental health issues and the young.
for a while, as I walked on my hands and our life
spiralled into chaos.
We grasped the idea of physiotherapy as if it was a
lifeline, and as Moth threw himself into a punishing
exercise routine the idea of the walk grew. Not only as a
form of extreme physio but also in the hope that by
following a line on a map we would ?nd a reason to put
one foot in front of another, a way to rebuild our lives.
And I desperately wanted a map, something to show me
the way. We ?lled two rucksacks with the bare essentials
and headed south to walk the 630 miles of the South
West Coast Path ? the wild strip of land that surrounds
the whole south west from Somerset, through North
Devon, Cornwall, South Devon and into Dorset.
It?s a shock, making the leap from owning your own
home and business, to living wild at the edge of the land,
homeless, with very little money, where every day is a
struggle to just keep moving and your priority is ?nding
food. A bigger shock is the instant shift in public perception and it doesn?t take long for the illusions of life to roll
away. For me it happened outside a shop in Lynton,
North Devon. I was counting the few coins we had left >
THE BIG ISSUE / p31 / July 10-16 2017
Main picture: pitched
at Chesil Beach near
West Bexington; above:
Moth in his temporary
shelter at Green Cliff,
near Westwood Ho! and
Raynor admiring the view
at High Cliff, looking
towards the headland
of Cambreak, near
Crackington Haven
ND
A
NEWCITING7
EX R 201 ?17
FO PTEMBER
SE
16 & 17
?ONE OF BRITAIN?S BEST VINTAGE FESTIVALS?
E
IN
L
N
O
S
T
N
U
O
C
IS
D
D
IR
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EARLY
O .U K /S A LU TE TO TH E4 0 S
W W W.T H ED O C K YA R D .C
Supported by
A LONG WALK HOME
Top right: looking out of
their tent in Portheras
Cove, near Pendeen
Watch; below: Moth and
Raynor on the South
West Coast Path; the
sunset at Constantine
Ba , near Porthcothan
before going into the shop, unaware that I stood ne
to a labrador dog tied up by the door. A woman cam
around the corner, middle aged, middle class, onl
weeks before she could have been a guest in our
holiday rental, holding a huge white dog on a long
lead. The white dog lunged for the labrador,
knocking my arm, sending the coins spinning down
the street. Moth ran down the hill after a pound
coin, I fell to the ground as one slipped between my
?ngers and into a drainage grill. Lying on the paveme
as the woman castigated me for being a tramp: ?W
are you, drunk I expect.? That was the moment my se
of self ?nally collapsed.
It seems that in rural England the homeless are a
problem to be hidden. In the land of high-value housing,
holiday homes and tourists, the authorities regularly run
campaigns to clear the streets of rough sleepers.
Maintaining the public view that there is no homeless
problem. Consequently, the few that are seen in rural
areas are shunned and prejudice levels are high. But the
rural homeless are still there. We met many hidden communities, in sheds, barns, woods, in caves and under
bridges. Unseen, but very real, staying hidden because of
the prejudice. We were regularly asked: ?How come you
have enough time to walk so far?? When we told the
truth, children were held closer, dogs retracted on leads,
doors were closed and conversations ended very quickly.
The view from the rural idyll is that losing your home
and becoming homeless makes you a social pariah. So,
we twisted our story ? we had sold our home and become
homeless, and the general view then was that we were
inspirational. It became a game, to observe how
changing one word changed reactions.
Help and kindness did come, but from the most unexpected places. Sheltering inland away from a storm, we
discovered an invisible community. A group of people,
who lived and worked in a beautiful spot, but couldn?t
afford to rent even a room in an area of high-value
holiday rentals. After work, they drifted along a wooded
valley to sleep in hammocks strung in sheds, horse boxes,
and grain silos. Not travellers, or dependent rough
sleepers, but average people who just couldn?t afford a
home in the countryside where their
,
question. But possibly the most poignant of all was the
night in Plymouth, when a rough sleeper insisted on
sharing his only can of beer, because it was his birthday.
At the very lowest ebb, we walked. In putting one foot
in front of another, the burning sun turning our skin to
leather and horizontal rain driving through our clothes,
we found an unexpected salvation. The metronome of
movement didn?t allow us time to think, it stopped us
from thinking and the basic need to ?nd the next meal
wiped out any material thoughts. Living in a landscape of
sea and sky, as wild as the badger sniffing in the tent ?aps
and the oyster catchers sharing the cold sand through
?AS THE WOMAN
CASTIGATED ME FOR
BEING A TRAMP; THAT
WAS WHEN MY SENSE
OF SELF COLLAPSED?
long black nights, we were held back from the edge of
despair. The path had become a walking meditation,
rebuilding Moth?s strength and our self-belief.
I found some seasonal work as a wool wrapper with a
sheep shearing team, giving us enough money for a
rental deposit. But we were still homeless so returned to
the path and kept walking ? until, by chance, stopping
for water at a caf� on a beach, we met a woman who
listened to our story and offered us her flat to rent.
Overnight our homeless life came to an end.
We were lucky, we found a home at the end of our
trail, and now live where the Coast Path runs past the
front door. But for the unknown numbers of hidden
rural homeless that never happens. If the beautiful
British countryside is to have any integrity, we must
open our eyes to the desperate need of people who are
not on our doorsteps, but in our hedgerows.
Read more about Raynor Winn?s journey in her book
Lightly Salted Blackberries
THE BIG ISSUE / p33 / July 10-16 2017
LOST IN
BOOKS
Illustration: Dom McKenzie
Beach fodder or enriching reads, our books editor Jane Graham and
critic Doug Johnstone guide you through best of the summer?s titles
NO GOOD DEED
by John Niven
(William Heinemann, �.99)
Anyone who has read any of
Niven?s half dozen novels will
know that the Scottish author
doesn?t suffer fools gladly.
This is another coruscating
and bleakly hilarious story in
which Alan, a well-to-do restaurant critic,
tries to help out Craig, an old school friend
who he discovers living rough on the
streets. As the story develops Craig decides
he rather likes Alan?s life, and sets about
claiming it for himself. Amongst the scatological comedy and acerbic asides, this is
a genuinely deep look at childhood friendships and how they develop, and whether
we can ever really escape who we once
were. Cracking stuff. DJ
THE SECRET TEACHER by anon
(Guardian Faber, �99) out August 3
Don?t be put off by the low-rent
TV-in?uenced front cover; this
no-holds-barred account of
teaching English in an inner-city
comp is a frank, illuminating and
brilliantly written gem, funnier
than Lucky Jim, and though far
less sentimental than To Sir with
Love, equally inspiring. The
writer passes on many great
wisdoms, such as that jumpers
are a no-no in hot classrooms,
due to the vulnerability created
THE BIG ISSUE / p34 / July 10-16 2017
by pulling them off to reveal a ?ash of ?ab
or pubic hair. He shares the touching levels
of support among fellow teachers (?You?ll
get nuked,? one says to him on his ?rst day,
eyeing up his jumper). Admittedly ? often
hilariously ? he is not always
the exemplary public servant;
his more vexing pupils are not
cheeky rogues but ?fucking
shitasses?. His honesty, alongside his anonymity, gives us
complete faith in the authenticity of his expose, so that
when the magical transformative powers of comprehensive
school education kick in ? and
they really do ? you want to
punch the air. JG
SUMMER BOOKS
THE PARK BENCH by Christophe
Chaboute (Faber & Faber, �.99)
On the face of it a 300-page graphic
novel with no words by a French
artist wouldn?t appear to be the most
obvious of summer reads, but The Park
Bench is a delightful and subtly moving piece
of work. The premise is simple, the story
revolves around a park bench and all human
life that orbits around it. There are mums
and toddlers, lovers, the elderly, teen, hooligans, musicians and loners. There is an
ongoing feud between a homeless guy and
a security guard. It?s wonderfully executed
and beautifully drawn, and as the seasons
pass there is real cumulative power behind
the seemingly simple interactions we all
have. As you might expect from a French
author there?s an undercurrent of existential
angst and melancholy, but ultimately The
Park Bench is sublime, uplifting stuff. DJ
SEEING RED by Lina
Meruane (translated by
Megan McDowell)
(Atlantic Books, �.99) out
August 3
Lauded as ?one of the one or
two greats in the new generation of Chilean writers?
by no less than Roberto Bola駉, Meruane
has already made a name for herself as a
leading light in the thriving world of
modern South American ?ction. This is a
high-impact novel, beginning with a shocking description of a sudden rush of blood
into the eye, followed by a slow, gruesome
descent into the world of blindness and
dependency. In protagonist Lucina?s case,
this involves an increasingly twisted, exploitative relationship which reads like
something out of a nightmarish Polanski
or John Cassavetes movie. The book is
partly based on Meruane?s own experience
of temporary blindness but the dark horror
it creeps towards is a triumph of a feverish,
thrilling imagination. JG
THE GRAYBAR HOTEL by Curtis Dawkins
(Canongate, �.99)
This debut collection of short stories offers
a behind the scenes look at life inside
prison, perhaps unsurprising given that
the author is serving a life-without-parole
sentence for murder in Michigan. Setting
aside the morality of the situation, this is
an assured and ultimately humane collection, and Dawkins reveals a keen eye for
the little indignities and coping mechanisms that ordinary people have to employ
to survive in such a tough environment.
The prose is sparse and precise yet brimming with resonance and meaning, and
there is a seam of deathly dark
humour running through the stories.
An impressive and authentic glimpse
at a world most of us will thankfully
never know. DJ
FALL DOWN 7 TIMES GET
UP 8 by Naoki Higashida
(translated by Keiko Yoshida)
(Sceptre Books, �.99) out now
It?s a common publishers? claim, that
a book will ?change the way you see?
something. Higashida?s work is an
exception to the rule that such claims
inevitably end in disappointment. He
suffers from severe non-verbal autism and
his ?rst book The Reason I Jump ? an
eloquent, sensitive and self-aware autobiography ? so radically challenged longstanding ideas about the psychological and
emotional limitations imposed by autism
it was claimed by some to be a fake.
The Reason I Jump focused on
Higashida?s childhood; in this book he
moves into adolescence, and explains how
he navigates a world he ?nds it difficult to
interact with, but fully understands. He
writes with beautiful clarity, and often a
poetic touch, replacing the popular notion
of the uncomprehending autistic innocent
with that of a deep-thinking, highly expressive soul imprisoned in a stubborn,
unyielding body. Revelatory. JG
A MANUAL FOR
HEARTACHE by Cathy
Rentzenbrink (Picador, �99)
Rentzenbrink?s ?rst book, The
Last Act of Love, was a runaway
success, a hard-hitting and
honest memoir about the
author?s struggle to come to terms with the
death of her brother in a road accident. This
second book is a loose follow up, a more
general and positive look at how we can all
cope with the trials and tribulations that
life throws at us. The book grew from conversations the author had with fans at
events publicizing her ?rst book, and it is
thoughtful and kind, using anecdote and
hard-earned wisdom to gently guide the
reader through the sometimes overwhelming nature of modern life. DJ
THE DESTROYERS by Christopher Bollen
(Scribner �.99) out July 27
Bollen?s deliciously dark literary thriller,
set in the jewel-bright sun-soaked Greek
island of Patmos, is the perfect summer
read. A satisfyingly chunky 500 pages of
clever psychological intrigue, this has all
the plot nous of Bollen?s beloved Agatha
Christie, rendered through the elegant,
seductive language of a McInerney or
Hollinghurst. Fictional comparisons
abound but the irresistible comparison
regarding this tale of yacht-dwelling rich
folk masterful in the arts of wit, deceit and
betrayal is with Patricia Highsmith?s The
Talented Mr Ripley. If you enjoyed that
classic of slick, sensual escapism powered
by high-octane suspense, you won?t ?nd
many novels more pleasing this
summer. JG
THE BIG ISSUE / p35 / July 10-16 2017
NOT THOMAS by Sara Gethin
(Honno, �99)
Having previously written awardwinning children?s books, this is the
Welsh author?s debut novel for adults.
Writing from the point of view of a
young child can be difficult but
Gethin gets the voice of her ?ve-year-old
narrator Tomos just right. We see the world
through his eyes and his language, as he
recounts his deprived circumstances
through the innocence of youth. Tomos
lives with his mum but would rather
be elsewhere, like in school, where
he has a sympathetic teacher, but when
bad men come to the door, his world
is turned upside down. It?s heartwrenching at times, but the clever use
of voice adds a layer of intrigue and
tension, keeping the reader hooked to
the end. DJ
GATHER THE DAUGHTERS by Jennie
Melamed (Tinderpress, �.99) out July 25
The comparisons between this intriguing
speculative novel and The Handmaid?s Tale
and Lord of the Flies are unavoidable, and
acknowledged by the author. But psychiatric nurse Jennie Melamud?s debut about
an island community in which boys are
reared to rule, and women to rear children,
reaches a conclusion quite different in
emotional tone to both. Every summer on
the island the children are given a ?reprieve?
from its strict social rules, and set free from
their homes to expend their energy
running, ?ghting, sleeping on the beach,
building nests in the trees. It is an unexpected event during one of these wild
summers, which unleashes the novel?s
heartstopping dramatic turn and from that
point, it?s irresistible. At times harrowing
in its depiction of cruelty, at
other times joy-filled and
buoyed by the spirit of liberated
girlhood, this is an exhilarating,
feminist cry-out, which I hope
?nds a wide readership. JG
NO IS NOT ENOUGH by Naomi Klein
(Allen Lane, �99)
This fourth book from the famous left-wing
Canadian activist was apparently rushed
out in the wake of Donald Trump?s election
in the US, and it takes Trump?s populist
rise as its polemical starting point. Klein
coherently argues that we must understand
Trump?s success as a symptom of wider
malaises in politics, business and popular
culture, rather than simply condemning
his outrageous policies and opinions. It?s
rousing stuff but Klein goes further in suggesting that the rise in populism might
bene?t the left, who can now begin to say
what was previously unsayable in common
political discourse. It?s heartfelt and angry
stuff but with Klein?s typically
solid steel at its core. DJ
2014, 2015 & 2016
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SUMMER BOOKS
RIPPING
YARNS
FOR
YOUNG
READERS
Channelling everything
from Samuel Beckett to
Scandi-noir, The Big Issue
recommeneds six gripping
reads for children of all ages
3+
WAITING FOR GOLIATH
Antje Damm
(Gecko Press, �.99)
A children?s book that looks to the
changing of the seasons, touches on the
strange logic of The Gruffalo, carries a
gentle nod to Samuel Beckett, all the while
retaining an incredible warmth, presents
a rare gem indeed.
Add to that an ending that is surprising
enough to make you delighted to read time
and time again during the holiday ? and
when you return home ? and you have a
new classic-in-waiting.
Antje Damm?s touching and beautiful
illustrations make this a special book.
IN FOCUS: CITIES
Created by Libby Walden
(360 degrees, �.99)
Oshiyas, the people employed to push
Tokyo commuters onto packed trains, need
to train for six months. The story of the
hunchback of Notre Dame was
conceived by Victor Hugo to draw
attention to the ruinous state of
the cathedral and bring visitors,
and their money, in. These, and
many, many more brilliant pieces
of info jump out of this glorious book. A look at 10 of
the world?s most famous
cities ? Moscow, Rome,
Cairo and London are amongst the others
? it includes beautiful illustrations, hyperreal maps and a sense of genuine globehopping. Even if your break is limited a
little this year, here, the world for
your young reader, opens.
8+
EDDY STONE AND THE EPIC
HOLIDAY MASH-UP
Simon Cherry (Usborne, �99)
In the grand kids? story tradition of great
adventures coming when a summer
holiday looks like being the dampest
squib, Simon Cherry plants a new ?ag.
And his is a jolly roger.
Eddy?s poor summer moves on immeasurably when he discovers a pirate in his
gran?s bath. There?s a grumpy penguin
and ship-shaped shed and illustrations
that, as Lenny Henry noted, add to the
Pythonesque air of the proceedings.
Ripping yarns.
8+
GO WILD IN THE WOODS,
AN ADVENTURE
HANDBOOK
Goldie Hawk & Rachael Saunders
(Nosy Crow, �99)
Working alongside the National
Trust, this ?how to? guide is properly useful and not patronising.
It?s about the glory of getting
outside and knowing what to do when the
iPad is switched off. The guides are varied
? from reading a map and compass, to
identifying leaves, building a toilet and
noting the constellations and how to use
them. Adult companions would do well to
knuckle down and learn from here. Start
at the glossary, daddio. A hardback and
one to treasure.
THE BIG ISSUE / p37 / July 10-16 2017
9+
THE MATILDA EFFECT
Ellie Irving (Corgi Children?s, �99)
As every whip-smart primary
school child will tell you, the Matilda
Effect is the name of the bias against
women in science who see their work
attributed to their male colleagues.
It?s not clear if Roald Dahl had that
in mind for his feisty, not to be crossed
heroine, but Irving?s titular ?recracker is de?nitely railing against those wrongs.
Her journey starts when judges at school
stop her winning the science fair because
they don?t believe a girl could have come up
with the entry. Angry, she discovers her
grandmother, an astrophysicist, has discovered her own planet. But a male colleague
is going to get the Nobel Prize for HER work!
A brilliant race-against-time caper
follows. Ideal for the righteous and indignant change-makers in your house.
YA
OCTOBER IS THE COLDEST MONTH
Christoffer Carlsson
(Scribe, �99)
Given the prominence of Scandinoir in ?ction, both in novels and
TV, it?s not a surprise that a YA
book has appeared. The underlying elements that propels those
works ? claustrophobic small towns rippling
with brooding darkness, taut sparse language ? are all here. Add that to late teenage
concerns ? sexual awakening, identity, the
crossing into the adult world ? and you have
the makings of a compulsive read. Here, in
rural Sweden, Vega, 16, opens the door to
cops searching for her brother. She hasn?t
seen him in days, knows he was involved in
a terrible crime and also knows she was
present. Gripping.
How to have a Famous Five
Happy birthday Julian, Dick, George, Anne and Timmy
the dog! It has been 75 years since Enid Blyton?s most
popular gang had their ?rst outing (Five on a Treasure
Island) and although much in the world has changed,
it is still possible to have your own wild, outdoor
adventure. Lashings of ginger beer optional...
Go for a bracing wild swim
There are plenty of spots across the UK to
indulge in a back to nature, chlorine-free
swimming experience. For a gentle introduction for children try Bude Sea Pool (free), a
part-natural pool ?lled by Atlantic tides, or, in
Cumbria, Swim the Lakes (from �) offers a
range of wild swimming experiences in local
rivers and lakes (while you wouldn?t catch
Julian donning a wetsuit, they are provided here).
For a wilder adventure (experienced swimmers
only) Thurlestone Rock (free) in Devon is famous
for its unusual natural arch (above right), created
over centuries by the crashing waves.
Have a picnic
(ham sandwiches ahoy!)
Nothing says ?Famous Five? more than a hearty
picnic, and on August 11 (Blyton?s birthday), four
RHS Gardens ? Wisley in Surrey, Rosemoor in
Devon, Hyde Hall in Essex and Harlow Carr in
North Yorkshire ? will be holding a giant picnic
party to mark the occasion. It?s all part of a Five
Go on a Garden Adventure series in partnership
with Enid Blyton Entertainment and Hodder
Children?s Books, bringing to life the much-loved
values of the Famous Five: friendship, heroism,
adventure, outdoors and daring. Each garden will
offer family activities including themed adventure
trails (Help the Famous Five ?nd Uncle Quentin!),
writing workshops, garden displays, immersive
theatre, craft workshops and storytelling. Entry
prices vary per garden but we have a family ticket
to be won ? see over the page!
Go searching for smugglers in
underground tunnels
A mysterious tunnel is the epitome of a Famous Five
adventure. Recreate the intrigue at Honister Slate
Mine (from �50 per child and �.50 per adult for a
mine tour), an underground experience deep inside
the 2,126 feet high Fleetwith Pike near Keswick,
Cumbria. Following the route of the original mine
workings, each guided adventure lasts around two
hours and will see groups of up to 12 people led deep
underground to explore a secret world of hidden
passages and magni?cent caverns. Mystery also
abounds in Margate?s Shell Grotto (adults �
children �50) a remarkable subterranean enclave,
THE BIG ISSUE / p38 / July 10-16 2017
summer
where winding tunnels snake beside 2,000 square
feet of magni?cent symbol mosaics, made out of
cockle, whelk, mussel and oyster shells.
Watch out for pirates on the ?Island
of Adventure?
Just a short boat ride from the mainland, the Isle
off Wight is awash with smugglers, spies and pirates,
alll within a space the size of inner London. New
att Blackgang Chine for 2017, visitors can discover an
underwater cave and abandoned sunken shipwreck
(ffrom �.50 off peak, under 4s free). Or for a true
piirate experience, head to Shipwreck Isle (free) on
July 2 and help defend the island from pirates (left).
Ju
ollow in the Famous Five?s footsteps
i n Blyton country
Dorset?s Purbeck coast plays a starring role in the
Famous Five series and has its very own Enid Blyton
Trail. Follow in the Five?s footsteps on a trip to Corfe
Castle (below left), the inspiration for Kirrin Castle
(adults �90; children �95 or free to National
Trust members), by steam train from Swanage
(return tickets �.50 for adults and �60 for
children), then explore the ruins. Hop on the boat
to Brownsea Island ? Blyton?s Whispering Island
? and discover a haven of lakes, wildlife and heathland, all easily explored at just one mile long. There?s
now even the chance for back-to-basics camping
there, accessed via a 20-30 minute walk from the
boat dock or kayaking, sailing or paddling straight to
the south shore campsite from the mainland.
For more literary holiday inspiration check out
visitengland.com/literaryheroes
WIN over
�0 worth
of Enid Blyton
books!
Come rain or shine this summer, you can keep the kids entertained with
this bumper Blyton giveaway!
ONE LUCKY WINNER WILL RECEIVE:
?
A family ticket to one of the RHS Gardens, as they celebrate the 75th
anniversary of the Famous Five this summer.
?
A full set of the Famous Five series with brand new illustrations by Laura
Ellen Anderson.
?
A copy of Enid Blyton?s Summer Holiday Stories.
TWO RUNNERS UP WILL WIN:
?
A full set of the Famous Five series, plus Enid Blyton?s Summer
Holiday Stories.
Altogether the prizes are worth over �0!
To be in with a chance of winning, simply solve this ?endish
riddle ? what type of animal was Famous Five member Timmy?
Send entries marked FAMOUS FIVE to competitions@bigissue.com or post to
Famous Five Books, The Big Issue, 43 Bath Street, Glasgow, G2 1HW. Include your
name and address. Closing date is July 25.
THE BIG ISSUE / p39 / July 10-16 2017
LOOK GOOD,
DO GOOD IN OUR
LIMITED EDITION
T-SHIRT
All profits from the sale of
the t-shirt will help transform
the lives of children with
life-altering genetic disorders.
Modelled by Rachel Riley
Designed by Molly Lindsay from Glasgow School of Art
Available in sizes small to X-large
JEANSFORGENES.ORG/SHOP
Jeans for Genes � and ?, � 2017 Genetic Disorders UK.
Registered Charity Number 1141583.
THE
ENLIGHTENMENT
FILM/RADIO/MUSIC
PHOTOGRAPHY
When sel?e sticks don?t provide
a wide enough panorama, then
try a drone. Yes, these remote
controlled mini-helicopters
can be a nuisance when they
buzz a little too closely but you
can?t deny that they capture
spectacular pictures and will
revolutionise photography
and the way we see the world.
This is Christ the Redeemer in
THE BIG ISSUE / p41 / July 10-16 2017
Rio de Janeiro, by Alexandre
Salem. Taking off in 2013,
Dronestagram was the ?rst
online forum to share this kind
of aerial photography, and a
new book, Dronescapes, brings
together the best examples of
the art from around the world.
X Dronescapes, edited
by Ayperi Karabuda Ecer
(Thames & Hudson) is out now
� 2017 The Photographers of Dronestagram
THE SKY?S THE LIMIT
FILM
DAVID LYNCH: THE ART LIFE
Wild at art
An absorbing exploration of director David Lynch?s life and art
D
avid Lynch is sitting on a paint- rather than Lynch the ?lmmaker. While
splattered chair, backlit by bright there?s always been blurring and overlap
Californian sunlight that ?oods between these two practices ? Lynch dethrough a large window. scribes cinema, at one point, as ?a moving
Cigarette smoke envelops him, like a cloudy painting, only with sound? ? the documenthought bubble, but his expression still tary is likely to disappoint those wanting a
pokes through the haze. Is this David Lynch potted account of his best-known movies.
at work, lost in the faraway business of arBlending archive (notably home movies
tistic inspiration? Or is he simply taking a of Lynch?s mostly happy childhood), semoment, enjoying a fag break while a docu- quences of the artist at work in front of a
mentary crew impertinently pokes around canvas, and a generous if not always illumihis Los Angeles studio?
nating voiceover from Lynch himself, the
This is an image that ?lmmakers Jon ?lm takes us up only to the making of his
Nguyen, Rick Barnes and Olivia
debut feature Eraserhead.
Neergaard-Holm keep returning
Released in 1977 but produced
to in their portrait of the
over a four-year period while he
American director. The view of
was at ?lm school in Los Angeles,
Lynch in his studio that joins his
the ?lm effectively marks the
house is intimate, so intimate
beginning of Lynch?s movie
career. And as the documentary
that the 71-year-old?s toddler
concludes, the dark, unsettling
daughter frequently wanders
into the space to join him. But
triumphs of the decades to come
you?re still left wondering: what?s
? The Elephant Man, Blue Velvet,
on his mind? As if you?d want it Jean-Pierre L閍ud in
Wild at Heart, Mulholland Drive,
any other way, Lynch retains that The Death of Louis XIV
Twin Peaks and more ? are just
sense of enigma, of velvety
ahead of him.
mystery that runs through his best work.
Still, it?s impossible not ?nd echoes of
Not that David Lynch: The Art Life is these cinematic masterpieces in this ?lm?s
without moments of revelation or insight. absorbing look back at Lynch?s upbringing,
As its title suggests, the focus here is on his years at art school, and his struggles as
Lynch the painter (This Man was Shot an artist. Sometimes you can?t help thinking
0.9502 Seconds Ago, above) and sculptor about speci?c ?lms. His description of his
THE BIG ISSUE / p43 / July 10-16 2017
years as a kid, brought to life through softfocusSuper8andfamilyphotographs,ispure
Blue Velvet, for instance: outwardly suburban bliss, but underpinned by vague menace.
But mostly the biographical details yield
a sense of strangeness, the atmosphere of a
troubled dream, that is the hallmark of
Lynch?s work. A black-and-white photograph from the 1950s shows the pre-adolescent Lynch at play with his boyhood friends,
all them half buried in holes in the back
garden, like small corpses rising from their
grave. It is, to use a phrase much overused
in reference to Lynch, just weird.
Some poignant details emerge. Lynch?s
relationship to his father threads through
the recollections. Having proudly shown off
his latest experiments as an art student, the
young Lynch is offered this advice from his
dad: ?Dave, I don?t think you should ever
have children,? a memory which still affects
the ordinarily placid Lynch. So, this is a
goldmine for Lynch a?cionados like myself.
I?m not sure it?s the best place to start for
neophytes of the director ? though even if
you knew nothing of his ?lms, this is still a
hypnotic and honest portrait of a dedicated
visual artist at work in his studio.
David Lynch: The Art Life is in cinemas from
July 14
FINAL REEL...
The Catalan director Albert Serra?s The Death
of Louis XIV is set mainly in the bedchamber
of the dying French king. It sounds ghoulishly
dull, but in fact this is hypnotic and gorgeous.
Jean-Pierre L閍ud, the boyish emblem of French
cinema in the 1960s, plays the lead in a turn that
confronts mortality with rare fearlessness.
Words: Edward Lawrenson @EdwardLawrenson
RADIO
OUT AND ABOUT
A GOOD READ
Kathy the great
?E
veryone?s veryscaredofJulie
Burchill but I?m not.?
Of course Kathy Burke
doesn?t fear Julie Burchill ? part of the
delight at hearing her talk or seeing her
work is feeling that sense of fearlessness
that marks her out as one of our most
vivid and irrepressible actors. Lately,
social media has delighted in the unearthing of her early 1990s riposte to
Helena Bonham Carter?s comment: ?If
you?re not pretty and you?re working
class you have an easier time in terms
of people?s attitude to you.?
?As a lifelong member of the nonpretty working classes, I would like to
say to Helena Bonham Carter: shut up
you stupid cunt,? came the reply.
On Radio 4?s A Good Read, Burke
chose
Patrick
Hamilton?s Hangover
Square. Set in Earl?s
Court during the build
up towards World War
Two, it is a populated by
alcoholics, fascist sympathisers and George
Harvey Bone, a kind
man prone to blackouts.
Aged 12, Burke had
grown bored with her
children?s library card ? she wanted a
card that gave her access to the whole
library. Two years before it was officially acceptable, the librarians took
pity on her eager reading eyes and let
her into a world of more twisted imaginations. I didn?t come across Hangover
Square until my early 20s, when introduced to it by an actor named Robin who
was adept at portraying Quentin Crisp
and hung around with the dying embers
of the disreputable Soho bohemians of
the 1950s. It is still a dazzling novel and
the chat between Burke, comedian Tom
Allen and host Harriett Gilbert was
rambunctious and delightful. If the
purpose of A Good Read is to drive you
straight to the library, then this succeeded and my nose is contentedly back
in Hangover Square. George Harvey
Bone is a beautiful character, summed
up by Burke as ?his heart is so big, I?m
so full of love for him?.
The library of Burke?s audacious borrowings is on Essex Road, famous for Joe
Orton and Kenneth Halliwell returning
their loans with improvements of new
cover collages and surreal jokes. At the
time, this was considered to be defacement, and both spent time in prison.
Now, the books are on display at Tate
Britain. It is 50 years since Orton was
murdered by his lover, Halliwell. Radio
3 was the ?rst station
to broadcast his work
in 1964. To commemorate the 50th anniversary of his death, they
broadcast new productions of The Ruffian on
the Stair and Erpingham
Camp, with the addition
of an introduction by
Matthew Sweet and an
interview with actor
Kenneth Cranham. As Sweet stated, the
playwright has joined ?that small group
of writers whose name has become an
adjective ? if comedy is dark and disrespectful and has its knickers on the
wrong way round, then it?s Ortonesque.?
Now, I have to go back to the library
again to reread The Orton Diaries, a book
that made me blush as a teen reading it
on public transport. I promise not to
deface it ? a librarian?s reprimand is a
frightening thing.
?Aged 12,
Burke wanted
a card that
gave her
access to the
whole library?
Words: Robin Ince @robinince
THE BIG ISSUE / p44 / July 10-16 2017
TALES OF
THE CITY
It might be
getting ridiculously
overpriced, but
London still thrums
with excitement and
possibility. The City
Is Ours (July
14?January 2,
Barbican, London;
museumo?ondon.org.
uk) is a celebration
of it and other major
cities and how they
are adapting to
make urban life more
bearable ? including
better transport,
cleaner air and the
reduction of food
waste. Cities are
machines in a constant
state of ?ux and here
is a vision of where
they can be improved
and re?ned next.
In a similar vein, Pulse
(July 14?April 15,
Barbican, London;
museumo?ondon.
org.uk) is a digital
installation based
around the analysis
and visualisation of
live data (drawn from
social media sites)
about the capital
? ?nding a beauty
and rhythm amid
the chaos, crowds
and confusion.
From the urban to
the aquatic. Whales:
Beneath the Surface
(July 14?February 28,
South Kensington,
London; nhm.ac.uk)
is a major exhibition
on the biggest
sea-based mammals,
looking at how they
have evolved and
adapted over tens
of millions of years
as well as what they
share in common with
humans. Here?s some
new light let in on one
of the most mysterious
and majestic creatures
in the world.
From the majestic to
the mythical: March
of the Mermaids
(July 15, Brighton;
marchofthemermaids.
com) might seem
an oxymoron given
MUSIC
SMALL FESTIVALS
It?s a kind
of magic
T�
that you can?t really
?march? if you have
a tail instead of
legs. ?Hop of the
Mermaids?, however,
loses something in
translation. This is its
?fth year and it has
a nobler purpose of
celebrating aquatic life
and raising awareness
around marine
preservation.
For those who
?nd huge joy and
excitement in the past,
this week has much to
delight them. Festival
of Archaeology
2017 (July 1530, Nottingham;
archaeologyfestival.
org.uk), organised
by the Council for
British Archaeology,
has events and talks
all around the city
showing what digging
into the past literally
means and what it can
tell us about today.
Part of that is We
Dig the Castle
(July 17?August
18, Nottingham;
tparchaeology.co.uk)
where members of
the public can learn
the techniques of
archaeologists and
actually get their
hands dirty as they
dig for important
artefacts in the
grounds of the
historic castle. It?s
unlikely, however,
that if you ?nd a
load of gold that
you?ll be allowed to
keep it.
Finally, more gazing
back at times
gone by, albeit of
relatively recent
times, is at Poole
Goes Vintage
(July 16, Poole;
bournemouth.
co.uk) where
the clothes, cars,
entertainment and
memorabilia from
the 1940s will be
on display. A little
window on the
world during the
Second World War
and its immediate
aftermath.
Eamonn Forde
here?s something brilliant about
going to a concert in a barn
wearing your wellies. Put more
seriously: concerts in special
places make your listening deeper and more
intense than, say, at a weekly subscriber
concert. Wellies are sometimes needed at
my festival in coastal Fife ? the East Neuk
Festival ? though it is no Glastonbury: folk
like a seat rather than a ?eld. They also
prefer barns or even caves to fully kitted up
concert halls. For some reason, those places
make them more open to more kinds of Life?s a beach: the East Neuk Festival is a national treasure
music, the same kinds I had great difficulty
selling in Glasgow?s concert halls. ENF?s I have talked to many people whose life has
large-scale new commissions this year were been changed through such experiences.
among the ?rst things to sell out, even De
Britten taught us that ?regional? or ?rural?
Profundis for 60 amateur brass players in should never mean unambitious or secondthe dark. That event and its big audience rate. Many of these festivals put more presrepresent a kind of magic, also worked at tigious, better-funded events to shame when
other music festivals across the UK.
it comes to programming ?air and commitThese festivals are national treasures. ment to new music. Take a look at the proTheir work may start with music, but it grammes of Cumnock Tryst (thecumnockextends powerfully into the
tryst.com) or Presteigne Festival
fabric of our communities just
(presteignefestival.com). We
like my local bookshop/cafe.
proudly play our part in the local
I live in the country, and love
economy: 60 per cent of my audithat something so excellent is
ence comes from beyond Fife:
they have to eat, travel, stay
right there on the High Street.
It has become part of village life:
somewhere; they like to shop and
people meet up there surroundvisit local attractions. It all adds
ed by books and food. It goes
up to a cash injection for the area.
further: it brings famous Laura Snowden plays at
Sadly, the things that make
authors to speak; its ?book bus? Presteigne Festival
these festivals so special are also
takes writers into local schools.
their challenges. Like other rural
Its 5* rating on TripAdvisor puts us on the businesses, we operate far from the big
map, so visitors come from afar for words, cities, so have less easy access to lobbying
cakes and coffee. It makes our village a politicians, media, funding, sponsorship
better place to live. Substitute ?music? for and population than our city peers. We just
?book? and you have what many regional have to shout louder and better to be heard
music festivals do in their communities.
? and that is nothing new. But the addiEver since Benjamin Britten founded tional challenge of coping with funding cuts
Aldeburgh Festival, these festivals have right now puts an ever-tighter squeeze on
been popping up all over our map. Few budgets, and some of these festivals will ?nd
survive year one, but those that do are run themselves unable to continue. If they do
mostly by people who don?t want to just put go under we will lose so much, much more
on a few concerts: we want to leave audi- than the chance to wear wellies to a concert.
ences with amazing memories of the intense
joy of live music. We want it to permeate our Words: Svend McEwan-Brown,
community, to inspire local amateur musi- Director of the East Neuk Festival
cians to share the stage with the big names. eastneukfestival.com, @svendbr
THE BIG ISSUE / p45 / July 10-16 2017
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIED
To advertise: Jenny Bryan / jennifer_bryan@dennis.co.uk
The Big Issue Foundation is an independently funded registered
charity, which works exclusively with the Big Issue vendors.
We connect Big Issue vendors to the vital support they need
to enable them to rebuild their lives and determine their
own pathways to a better future.
Events Fundraising Assistant
12 Month Fixed Term Contract
Finsbury Park London
Full time 35 hours per week
Salary on application
The Big Issue Foundation is the charitable arm of The Big Issue. We are seeking a
committed and enthusiastic Events Fundraising Assistant to support the Head of Events
and Community Fundraising. You will play a pivotal role in delivering excellent customer
service to our event participants and enquirers, as well as helping with event logistics.
You will be handling records of events participants on the supporter database, The Raiser?s
Edge. As the ?rst point of contact for The Big Issue Foundation?s events enquirers, you will
need to have excellent customer service skills and telephone manner. You will need to be
motivational and enthusiastic, as you support our participants with their fundraising plans.
Your excellent organisational skills will be used when managing volunteers and brie?ng
them for events.
This is a fantastic opportunity for someone to gain invaluable experience in a small team in
our London Head Of?ce. It?s an exciting time for the team as we get ready to start our new
three year strategy and grow events and community fundraising.
The successful candidate will have excellent supporter care skills, proven experience in
customer service and excellent IT and database skills to use The Raiser?s Edge.
The Big Issue Foundation team is pro-active, busy and we get great results. We believe
passionately in our cause, we work hard and we believe in quality of service. If this appeals
to you then apply to come and join us!
Big Issue bene?ts include an incremental holiday scheme starting at 25 days per year plus
bank holidays, a health care scheme, pension scheme life cover & childcare vouchers.
Closing date: Sunday 30th July 2017
Role starts September 2017
If you would like to apply for this opportunity then please visit our website
www.bigissue.org.uk and click the ?Work for Us? tab at the top of the page.
If you have any queries, please email personnel@bigissue.com stating the
job title and location.
Housing is in crisis - because all the Government cares
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THE BIG ISSUE / p46 / July 10-16 2017
$%7$ 1R:
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIED
To advertise: Jenny Bryan / jennifer_bryan@dennis.co.uk
We are looking for Volunteers!
Are you the special person
we are looking for?
One in every 100 babies worldwide
are born with heart disease
Chain of Hope is a children?s cardiac charity, which runs an International Child Referral
Programme. We provide vital treatment to children from countries where there is little or
no access to cardiac care. We bring children to the UK for surgery and we are looking
for volunteers to help care for the child and their guardian whilst they are in London.
Do you have a spare room in your home to host a child and their guardian?
Do you live within 1 hour of central London, in Southampton or Cambridge?
If the answer is YES, get in touch today!
Please contact Zehra@chainofhope.org / 020 7351 1978 for more information
www.chainofhope.org / www.facebook.com/ChainofHopeUK
Chain of Hope is entirely funded by donations.
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please contact lucyb@chainofhope.org or call Lucy on 020 7351 1978 alternatively
visit www.chainofhope.org/donate. Thank you
Chain of Hope is a registered charity in the UK no. 1081384
CARING ACTIVISM
A 21ST CENTURY CONCEPT OF CARE
By Peter Limbrick ? edited by Professor Hilton Davis
A system for local citizens to counter austerity
Interconnections ? �.99 ? www.caringactivism.com
THE BIG ISSUE / p47 / July 10-16 2017
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIED
To advertise: Jenny Bryan / jennifer_bryan@dennis.co.uk
RESIGNED TO DIE
However, this dog was lucky as we took him in and
lovingly nursed him back to health and happiness.
But there are many more poor souls out there on the
streets of Sri Lanka, clinging to life, that desperately
need our help. We are currently caring for over 1000
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life. Animal SOS Sri Lanka is a UK Registered Charity
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for the street animals in Sri Lanka. We also conduct
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??????? ?? ???? YOUR support now.
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that.
ANIMAL
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Animal SOS Sri Lanka
h<Z??????????????????????
Please LIKE us on
PLEASE HELP US TO CONTINUE GIVING
THESE ANIMALS A FUTURE BY DONATING
TODAY. There is no greater gift
I enclose �0
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First Name....................Surname............................................... ????????????/?????????????????/??????/???h<?????????????/?????
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Signature..................................................... Date.....................................................
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THE BIG ISSUE / p48 / July 10-16 2017
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIED
To advertise: Jenny Bryan / jennifer_bryan@dennis.co.uk
A WORLD OF HOPE
A BEAUTIFUL COLLECTION OF SONGS
CELEBRATING HOPE, LOVE, UNITY & LIFE
IN SUPPORT OF POSTCARDS FOR PEACE.
FEATURING 26 INCREDIBLE ACTS INCLUDING
HOTHOUSE FLOWERS, LINDA THOMPSON, OYSTERBAND,
LAU, O?HOOLEY & TIDOW, KRIS DREVER, BOO HEWERDINE,
HORSE, JAKE MORLEY, HAFDIS HULD & MORE
?Quality of music aside, though, A World Of Hope
?? ?�??�??�? ?�?�襄� ?? ?�� ??� 棋??
?� ??� ????媳? �???�?? �� ?�� ??? ?????
(constructively and positively) as the central
theme of hope expands through love, unity,
courage and peace.? fRoots Magazine
CD, POSTCARDS, T-SHIRTS, BADGES & MORE
AVAILABLE FROM: POSTCARDSFORPEACE.ORG/SHOP
Postcards For Peace aims to help end discrimination on the grounds of race, gender, disability, sexual orientation
�� ?�????? � �灞???? 毕??????� ???� ��??�� � ??阱???��?? 棋??邋? ?�??� �?? �?�?票�?????�
and create an environment in favour of equality and diversity. Registered Charity No. 1168645
THE BIG ISSUE / p49 / July 10-16 2017
Postcards
for
peace
ADVERTISING CLASSIFIED
To advertise: Jenny Bryan / jennifer_bryan@dennis.co.uk
THE BIG ISSUE / p50 / July 10-16 2017
COMPETITION
N
FOUNDERS
John Bird and Gordon Roddick
Group chair
Nigel Kershaw
Managing director
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WIN!
JIMMY McGOVERN?S
N ON DVD
POWERFUL DRAMA BROKEN
EDITORIAL
Editor Paul McNamee
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Sean Bean (pictured ? Sharpe, Game of Thrones, The Lord of the
Rings) stars in Broken, a poignant and powerful BBC Worldwide
series centered around his character, Father Michael Kerrigan, a
Catholic priest presiding over an urban parish in northern England.
He must be a con?dant, counsellor and confessor to a congregation
struggling to reconcile its beliefs with the challenges of daily life.
With a chequered past and a complicated relationship with his
own family, the priest is determined to help his parishioners through
their troubles. However, despite his best efforts, Father Michael can?t
always ?x what?s broken.
From the multi-award-winning writer Jimmy McGovern, Broken
also stars Anna Friel (Pushing Daisies). It is released on DVD
this week (BBC Worldwide), with extras including the featurettes
Sean Bean as Father Michael, Real Life Stories, The Look and Jimmy
McGovern?s Writing.
We have ?ve copies to be won on
DVD. To enter tell us:
What was the name of Sean Bean?s
character in The Lord of the Rings?
PPA
PPA Scotland
Cover of the
Cover of the
Year 2015
Year 2015
Paul McNamee
British editor of the year 2016, BSME
Still time to win?
PAUL VERHOEVEN?S
ELLE ON DVD
Enter at bigissue.com/competitions
THE BIG ISSUE / p52 / July 10-16 2017
Send your answers
with BROKEN
as the subject to
competitions@bigissue.
com or post to The Big
Issue, 43 Bath Street,
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Include your name
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GAMES & PUZZLES
SUDOKU
SPOT THE BALL
A
B
C
D
There is just one simple rule
in sudoku: each row, column
and 3 x 3 box must contain
the numbers one to nine.
This is a logic puzzle and you
should not need to guess.
The solution will be revealed
next week.
ISSUE 1263 SOLUTION
F
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
To win Ed Sheeran: A Visual Journey, by Ed
Sheeran and Phillip Butah, mark where you
think the ball is, cut out and send to: Spot
the Ball (1264), 2nd ?r, 43 Bath St, Glasgow,
G2 1HW, by July 18. Include name, address,
phone no. Enter by email: send grid position
(eg A1) to competitions@bigissue.com.
8
9
10
(Last
week?s
Spot
the Ball
revealed:
Oldham v
Chelsea,
1991)
PRIZE CROSSWORD
QUICK CLUES
CRYPTIC CLUES
Across
1. Pets out in the pouring
rain? (4,3,4)
9. Terrorists conceal a
mistake (5)
10. Experiment with grain,
we hear, for fancy
headdress (7)
11. Tri?es with playthings
(4)
12. Polly got round the
multilinguist (8)
14. Said eight, reportedly,
were composed (6)
15. Bring down the gear (6)
18. Nurse taken in by
distraught nude was
uncared for (8)
20. Strip of wood to last
out (4)
22. Striving for equality
in this class? (7)
23. I am performing a turn
on the insect (5)
24. Payment not received
by one in a safe job?
(6,5)
To win a Chambers Dictionary, send completed crosswords (either cryptic
or quick) to: The Big Issue Crossword (1264), second ?oor, 43 Bath Street,
Glasgow, G2 1HW by July 18. Include your name, address and phone
number. Issue 1262 winner is Angela Tester from Leicester.
Down
2. Dressed for a surprise
attack, we hear (7)
3. Southern European
composer believed to
be included (4)
4. Into an unusual
state (6)
5. Teetotaller (no lady)
includes ?rst-class
dealer in milk (8)
6. Greek bird to make a
rumbling sound (5)
7. Your holiday is
guaranteed, so do
not worry (4,7)
8. Neglect to put a square
in the design (11)
13. Stupefying ? that?s very
attractive (8)
16. Murdered heir, say,
in Ireland (7)
17. Company get-together
(6)
19. Greek character in a
coat he takes out (5)
21. Where to ?nd
swimsuits that cover
nothing? (4)
Across
1. Member of
legislature (11)
9. Dryer (5)
10. Form of sugar (7)
11. Sort (4)
12. US state (8)
14. Plan (6)
15. Diving bird (6)
18. Inborn (8)
20. High (4)
22. Aromatic plant (7)
23. ----- Sewell, UK actor (5)
24. Ungratefully (11)
Down
2. Carelessly arranged (7)
3. Deserve (4)
4. Important person (inf.)
(6)
5. Young (8)
6. Surrounded by (5)
7. Ledge above ?replace (11)
8. Futile (11)
13. Protector (8)
16. Timorous (7)
17. Stalin (anag.) (6)
19. Emerge from egg (5)
21. Part of the eye (4)
IN ASSOCIATION WITH
Issue 1263 solution
CRYPTIC: Across ? 2 Sap; 5 Permit; 7 Resort; 9 Penalty kick; 10 Stayed; 11 Demand; 13 Invest; 16 Cagily; 18 Pedestrians; 19 Decree; 20 Sahara; 21 Day. Down ? 1 Teapot; 2 Styled;
3 Prayed; 4 Broken; 6 Moneylender; 8 Seismograph; 10 Ski; 12 Dry; 14 Nipper; 15 Tasted; 16 Curtsy; 17 Lustre. QUICK: Across ? 2 Pie; 5 Gospel; 7 Modern; 9 Maliciously; 10 Tricky;
11 Silent; 13 Wigwam; 16 Plasma; 18 Temperature; 19 Crania; 20 Steely; 21 Doe. Down ? 1 Former; 2 Plucky; 3 Emboss; 4 Crayon; 6 Policewoman; 8 Displeasure; 10 Tow; 12 Tea; 14 Intern;
15 Maenad; 16 Praise; 17 Meekly.
THE BIG ISSUE / p53 / July 10-16 2017
Photos: Action Images
E
MY PITCH
Glynn Weir, 30
OUTSIDE TK MAXX, BATH
?I?d eventually like to set up my own
caravan business, if I got the chance?
FACTS ABOUT ME...
MY FAVOURITE PLACE
Green Park. It?s a lovely little
park in Bath that sits beside
the River Avon. It?s a great
place to watch the world go by.
IF I COULD GO
ANYWHERE, I?D GO TO?
The Amazon rainforest. I?d love
to go and do some exploring
there. I?d like the heat, and they?d
have the biggest ?sh to catch.
ON MY
PITCH?
Outside TK Maxx,
Bath (8am?7pm)
I
?m sleeping rough in Bath
at the moment, so I like to
start selling the magazine
early, about 8am. I?ve got a lot
of great customers now who
keep me going throughout the
day. With Waitrose nearby and
plenty of cafes, people often
give me cups of tea and coffee.
I?ve been working really
hard selling the magazine for
the last 10 months now. I see
it as building up my own little
business. After a really rough
time of it, I saw it as a chance
at a fresh start. I had lost my
way, completely, for a time.
And then I had a bad fall from
a three-story building, so now
I?ve got a metal hip and a bit
of metal in my wrist, too.
It was something like a
near-death experience, but
I?ve recovered well since then,
thanks to The Big Issue. It gave
me a bit of structure ? it gave
me a chance to begin repairing
my life again. It?s given me
enough to buy some clothes
and keep myself going. If I can
keep my sales up and get some
normality back, I?d eventually
like to set up my own caravan
business, if I got the chance.
I think more caravans might
give more homeless people the
chance to rebuild their lives.
I stayed in a caravan for a
while, moving from site to site
in Somerset. I grew up in this
part of the world, and in recent
years I?ve tended to move from
town to town, and from hostel
to hostel. I think I?m ready to
settle down in Bath, if I can
?nd somewhere to stay. It?s a
really, really nice city. Plenty
of tourists come here for the
Roman Baths, Bath Abbey and
all the Georgian buildings.
There are some very nice
places along the River Avon
THE BIG ISSUE / p54 / July 10-16 2017
to stretch out when you want
to chill out and take a break.
That?s a very nice thing to
do in the summer, when the
weather?s been as nice as it has.
The one thing I miss most
is ?shing. My stepdad used to
take me ?shing in a few places
just north of Bath, back before
I ended up in care. It was a
great thing, just to sit there
for hours and enjoy the peace
and quiet. If I got the chance
I?d love to ?nd some of those
spots again. I suppose it
would be a sign of getting
back to normal life.
In the meantime, I?m
determined to keep working
hard and keep out of trouble.
I feel I?ve been given a
second chance at life, and I?m
determined to take it.
Words: Adam Forrest
Photo: Sean Malyon
look in. When my dog died I sprinkled
some of his ashes there.
SAMIRA AHMED, BROADCASTER
Regent?s Park, London
It has always been an oasis in the heart of London and
there is still no more magical place ?rst thing in the
morning or on a summer evening, walking round the
Rose Garden checking out the dozens of varieties, and
their names which each tell a story ? City of Bradford,
Ingrid Bergman, Savoy Hotel, Princess of Wales. I
remember reading how Paul McCartney used to walk
through there to visit Linda in hospital towards the
Left:
Regent?s
Park?s Rose
Garden
From top:
Dulwich
Park;
Ben Nevis
CERYS MATTHEWS, MUSIC MAVEN,
FESTIVAL ORGANISER
Hawarden, Flintshire
Flintshire is not quite Snowdonia. It?s near to
the English border, not in west Wales, not on
the coast. It?s really lovely, huge oak trees and
rolling hills. There?s a village called Hawarden
and a mound is the particular place I like ? they
built a lake at some point, and left this mound of
soil. I like to walk to the top of this mound and sit there
and watch people ? it?s usually during the festival time,
which is harvest time, mid-September ? and it?s a farm
so it grows pumpkins. The ?elds are full of pumpkins.
And it grows maize and blackcurrants, you can pick
your own. It?s pretty magical for that reason.
thegoodlifeexperience.co.uk
Tell us yours: editorial@bigissue.com
@BigIssue facebook.com/BigIssueUK
THE BIG ISSUE / 27 / July 10-16 2017
POSTCARD COMPETITION
Showcase your creative talent
.
d
r
a
c
t
s
o
p
a
n
o
,
Your Br itain
�000 Grand Prize!
Enter at prostudio.saxoprint.co.uk/TGBPC
MODERN NATURE
I WAS UP WITH THE LARKS?
Christopher Fitch, 28
Dawn chorus audio on memory stick
The power of immersion in the natural
world... I was in Kenya, sleeping in a
safari park in a bed rolled out at night
so ? mosquito net aside ? I was asleep
beneath the stars. Through the night I
would occasionally awake to the sound
of howling hyenas or grunting hippos.
Then, in the morning, I was blown
away by the great explosion of sound,
as the morning was broken by the
dawn chorus: birds and other animals
squawking, hooting, chirping, singing
and generally creating an amazing
natural orchestra. I grabbed a recorder
so I could capture the amazing sound
and transport myself back to that
moment in the future.
MY WORLD OF
WARCRAFT?
Felix and Vito Wayman-Thwaites,
both seven
Weapons
Our object is an axe and a hammer
put together. It?s made of wood,
string and concrete. We like being
outside in nature and the wood
came from just on the ground in
Mayow Park, near where we live. We
tied the concrete onto a stick with
some string and it has a bug living in it
but it?s dead now.
CLAW AND ORDER?
Merle and Bette Nunneley, 17 and 15
Crab coffins
Me and my sister found the crabs
when we were walking our dog in
Medway Country Park, by the Thames
Estuary, when we were maybe 10
and 12. There were loads of them,
hundreds of crabs on the beaches,
strewn everywhere. They were like
pebbles and they had been dried out
by the sun, I think. Shell and bone and
stuff. And so we picked them up and
put them in dog-poo bags to bring
them home and then we made coffins
out of cardboard to put them into.
I think we were reasonably serious.
WHAT CONNECTS US TO
THE GREAT OUTDOORS
A map, a key, a pair of wellingtons ? or something more
metaphysical? The Wellcome Collection?s new exhibition, A
Museum of Modern Nature, invites the public to share objects
that tell stories about their relationship with nature, to explore
how Brits see their place in the natural world. Here is a selection.
Until October 8; wellcomecollection.org
GRAMPS? GARDEN WAS GNOME
SWEET GNOME?
Julie Carr
Garden gnome
Born in 1901, William Thomas Cooper ran away to sea
aged 14. Fast forward to 1947, when he became my
mum?s stepdad. Mum says the gnomes were already
there when they moved into his maisonette, a huge big
bank of them carefully arranged in the yard. Initially,
when I picked this gnome, I did it somewhat ironically.
But, in reality, it has contributed signi?cantly to my
love of nature as an adult. Many of my pastimes now
involve the countryside, its birds and beasts, and my
garden or my allotment. There are few greater pleasures
than pootling around the garden on a warm summer?s
morning. If those odd little fellows hadn?t drawn me
outside while the grown-ups talked inside, my life would
certainly have been a poorer one. I would have missed
watching Gramps garden and bearing witness to the
pure and simple joy that nature can bring us.
OH, I DO LIKE TO BESIDE THE SEASIDE?
Joan Scott, 91
Black-and-white family photograph
I think I might have been about four and my sisters
were looking after me. They look like guardians,
don?t they? But sometimes they couldn?t be
bothered with me at all. They wanted to lose me.
Usually every weekend we went to the seaside
somewhere or other, you know? Local, not far, you
know? Margate, Ramsgate, Southend. Just for the
day. I think we might have stayed once or twice. We
didn?t book up anywhere, just if you saw someone
with a notice in the window, ?Bed and Breakfast? or
whatever it was, you just went there. Music and a fair,
the happiness of the place, everybody was enjoying
themselves, you know? It was lovely, just lovely. I
think it?s very funny because there?s a boat, a little
boat, toy boat, and I know I really wanted that boat
so I must have kept on until I got the boat. Although
we were poor, a poor family, we were very well
looked after ? rather spoilt really, I was.
THE BIG ISSUE / p29 / July 10-16 2017
A LONG
WALK
HOME
After losing her home and business, and learning that
her partner had a terminal illness, Raynor Winn decided
the only way for the couple to survive was to pack their
rucksacks and live wild at the edge of the land
THE BIG ISSUE / p30 / July 10-16 2017
walk. I hadn?t carefully considered walking 630
miles with a rucksack on my back ? I hadn?t
thought about how I could afford to do it, or that
I?d be wild camping for nearly 100 nights, or
what I?d do afterwards. It just seemed like the
best response to the door-hammering of the bailiffs.
It was the end of one of those weeks that happen to
someone else. A ?nancial dispute with a lifetime friend
had led to a court case that lasted for three years, culminating in us being served with an eviction notice from our
home of 20 years. Two days later a doctor sat on the edge
of his desk and told my husband, Moth, that he had a rare
neurodegenerative disease, that there was no cure, no
treatment and he was going to die. The only help available was physiotherapy that may help retain some
muscle strength. My world and all that kept me stable
slipped from beneath my feet.
No-one would rent to us now we had a CCJ [county
court judgment] on our credit record. The local authority refused our application for priority housing, saying
Moth ?wasn?t ill enough? to qualify. Local hostels prioritised dependents, mental health issues and the young.
for a while, as I walked on my hands and our life
spiralled into chaos.
We grasped the idea of physiotherapy as if it was a
lifeline, and as Moth threw himself into a punishing
exercise routine the idea of the walk grew. Not only as a
form of extreme physio but also in the hope that by
following a line on a map we would ?nd a reason to put
one foot in front of another, a way to rebuild our lives.
And I desperately wanted a map, something to show me
the way. We ?lled two rucksacks with the bare essentials
and headed south to walk the 630 miles of the South
West Coast Path ? the wild strip of land that surrounds
the whole south west from Somerset, through North
Devon, Cornwall, South Devon and into Dorset.
It?s a shock, making the leap from owning your own
home and business, to living wild at the edge of the land,
homeless, with very little money, where every day is a
struggle to just keep moving and your priority is ?nding
food. A bigger shock is the instant shift in public perception and it doesn?t take long for the illusions of life to roll
away. For me it happened outside a shop in Lynton,
North Devon. I was counting the few coins we had left >
THE BIG ISSUE / p31 / July 10-16 2017
Main picture: pitched
at Chesil Beach near
West Bexington; above:
Moth in his temporary
shelter at Green Cliff,
near Westwood Ho! and
Raynor admiring the view
at High Cliff, looking
towards the headland
of Cambreak, near
Crackington Haven
ND
A
NEWCITING7
EX R 201 ?17
FO PTEMBER
SE
16 & 17
?ONE OF BRITAIN?S BEST VINTAGE FESTIVALS?
E
IN
L
N
O
S
T
N
U
O
C
IS
D
D
IR
B
EARLY
O .U K /S A LU TE TO TH E4 0 S
W W W.T H ED O C K YA R D .C
Supported by
A LONG WALK HOME
Top right: looking out of
their tent in Portheras
Cove, near Pendeen
Watch; below: Moth and
Raynor on the South
West Coast Path; the
sunset at Constantine
Ba , near Porthcothan
before going into the shop, unaware that I stood ne
to a labrador dog tied up by the door. A woman cam
around the corner, middle aged, middle class, onl
weeks before she could have been a guest in our
holiday rental, holding a huge white dog on a long
lead. The white dog lunged for the labrador,
knocking my arm, sending the coins spinning down
the street. Moth ran down the hill after a pound
coin, I fell to the ground as one slipped between my
?ngers and into a drainage grill. Lying on the paveme
as the woman castigated me for being a tramp: ?W
are you, drunk I expect.? That was the moment my se
of self ?nally collapsed.
It seems that in rural England the homeless are a
problem to be hidden. In the land of high-value housing,
holiday homes and tourists, the authorities regularly run
campaigns to clear the streets of rough sleepers.
Maintaining the public view that there is no homeless
problem. Consequently, the few that are seen in rural
areas are shunned and prejudice levels are high. But the
rural homeless are still there. We met many hidden communities, in sheds, barns, woods, in caves and under
bridges. Unseen, but very real, staying hidden because of
the pre
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