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The Boston Globe - 10 01 2018

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Wednesday, January 10, 2018
From Trump, compromise, confusion on DACA
Meeting with lawmakers, he seems to back
‘clean’ Dreamers bill, then later ties it to wall
By Ed O’Keefe
and David Nakamura
WASHINGTON POST
WASHINGTON — President
Trump and congressional leaders
agreed Tuesday to pursue comprehensive changes to immigration
policy if negotiators can also strike
a deal to establish legal protections
for some undocumented immigrants while bolstering border se-
curity.
The discussions played out in a
spirited televised exchange at the
White House between Trump and
lawmakers from both parties that
highlighted the president’s apparent eagerness to broker a compromise.
‘‘I will take all the heat you want
to give me,’’ Trump declared, offering political cover in his quest for a
compromise, ‘‘and take the heat off
the Democrats and the Republicans.’’
Yet Trump also revealed his
changeability on immigration, an
emotionally charged issue that has
strongly divided Washington for
years. Over a meeting that lasted
about 90 minutes — more than half
of it televised — Trump appeared to
contradict himself, at turns professing support for a ‘‘clean’’ bill to
protect undocumented immigrants
brought illegally to this country as
children, reiterating his demands
for a border wall opposed by Democrats, and professing to support the
kind of comprehensive overhaul of
immigration policy that has been
anathema to conservatives.
All of it left the fate of a deal on
DACA, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, uncertain.
‘‘My head is spinning with all
the things that were said by the
president and others in that room
in the course of an hour and a half,’’
said Senator Richard Durbin, Democrat of Illinois and a lead negotiaIMMIGRATION, Page A6
GETTING THE BUGS OUT
LUKE SHARRET/BLOOMBERG NEWS/FILE 2017
STEPPING DOWN — Stephen Bannon,
who alienated a key financial backer with
his remarks about President Trump in a
new book, is leaving his post as executive
chairman of Breitbart News Network. A2.
Pot outlets
go cash-only
with fear of
crackdown
Mass. medical dispensaries
cry foul after vendor exits
By Dan Adams
GLOBE STAFF
РЕЛИЗ ПОДГОТОВИЛА ГРУППА
VK.COM/WSNWS
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
Riley, a Weimaraner puppy, was recently acquired by the Museum of Fine Arts to sniff for insects that might be hiding
in artworks and that could someday cause irreversible damage. The dog will work mostly behind the scenes. B1.
A majority of the state’s medical marijuana
dispensaries were forced to stop accepting debit
cards from patients Tuesday, after threats of a federal crackdown prompted a key payment processing company to pull out of the Massachusetts
cannabis market.
The disruption is exactly what marijuana patients, activists, and businesses feared after a recent tightening in US marijuana policy ordered
by Attorney General Jeff Sessions: that the mere
specter of prosecutions could subvert the stateregulated cannabis industry, whether or not federal agents actually start arresting operators of licensed dispensaries.
“It was very abrupt and very frustrating,” said
Keith Cooper, chief executive of the Revolutionary Clinics dispensary in Somerville, of the payment company’s decision. “It’s a terrible inconvenience for patients, and an additional expense for
dispensaries.”
Cooper said the payment company, Florida’s
Merchant Services Consulting Group Inc., called
MARIJUANA, Page A12
Virtual assistants lend ear to doctors
Melting plot
Wednesday: Seasonable.
High 31-36. Low 27-32.
Thursday: Warmer, windy.
High 45-50. Low 41-46.
High tide: 5:57 a.m., 6:26 p.m.
Sunrise: 7:13 Sunset: 4:31
Complete report, B14.
North Korea assured South
Korea that its nuclear
weapons are aimed only at
the United States, as it
struck a deal to send athletes to the Olympics. A4.
Three inmates with mental
illness sued officials at the
Bristol County Jail, saying
they were placed in solitary
confinement for at least
22 hours a day. B1.
Companies work to
make patient records
more accessible
By Priyanka Dayal McCluskey
GLOBE STAFF
It takes only a few seconds to
click a button and open a window
on a computer. But for a busy doctor
sifting through patient records,
those clicks can add up to extra
hours spent at a computer each day
completing tedious but necessary
tasks.
Now, in response to doctors’ demands for more efficient software,
several companies that make electronic health record systems are offering a new tool: voice-activated
virtual assistants. Think Apple’s Siri
or Amazon’s Alexa, but for health
care providers.
Westborough-based eClinicalWorks, a large vendor of electronic
health records, has launched what
the company calls a first-of-its kind
virtual assistant, named Eva, to
help doctors and other care providers more quickly find patient information.
Ju s t l i k e a n A l e x a u s e r c a n
stream music and ask for the weather forecast, a physician using Eva
can order a prescription or ask for a
patient’s medical history. Unlike Alexa, Eva is built into the computer
and doesn’t use a standalone device.
“It’s a gamechanger,” said Millie
Shinn, a nurse and director of cliniMEDICAL RECORDS, Page A9
providing services by unlicensed, unqualified, and unsupervised staff. B10.
The Wampanoag Tribe of
Gay Head has new leverage
in its plans to build a gambling hall on Martha’s Vineyard after a court victory. B1.
It’s possible to eat healthy
at even the most decadent
restaurants, say the chefs
surrounded by that food. G1.
VOL . 293, NO. 10
*
Suggested retail price
$2.00
Percentage of doctor’s visits for influenza-like
illnesses (fever greater than 100˚ with cough or sore
throat) in Massachusetts.
2017-’18
3.0%
Wife reported on board for Romney run
Concerns about
Trump, direction of
GOP called factors
By Matt Viser
WASHINGTON — As Mitt Romney considers whether to run for an
open US Senate seat in Utah, the
person who can most influence him
is encouraging him to get into the
race: his wife, Ann.
Ann Romney — a confidante for
nearly all of Romney’s adult life and
frequent catalyst for his political
ambitions — is fully supporting a
campaign for Senate, another
strong indicator he will run, according to four people close to the Romneys. Her own battle with multiple
sclerosis is not a major factor, with
all signs indicating that her health
remains strong, the people said.
“I think most folks would love to
have the relationship Ann and Mitt
have — an Ozzie and Harriet-esque,
honest relationship,” said one of the
people, who like the others spoke
on the condition of anonymity. “It’s
easy to say she would be very supportive. To say the least.”
“She’s on board,” said a second
2.98%
2016-’17
2015-’16
2.0
1.0
0.0
40
GLOBE STAFF
The state has sued a Brockton-based mental health
care company accused of
Flu arrives early and spreads fast
46
52
6
12
18
24
WEEKS OF THE YEAR
30
36 38
SOURCE: Massachusetts Department of Public Health
JAMES ABUNDIS/GLOBE STAFF
Flu season off
to a bad start,
bringing fears
of what’s next
By Felice J. Freyer
GLOBE STAFF
third person.
One reason Ann Romney is behind the bid, the people said, is that
she, like her husband, is alarmed by
President Trump’s style of politics
and his rapid takeover of the Republican Party. She also is con-
Feeling achy and feverish? Your misery has
plenty of company.
By the end of December, the tally of flu-like illnesses in the state exceeded the peaks in the two
previous seasons, when the biggest number of
cases occurred in February and March.
And while it’s unclear whether the annual flu
epidemic will be worse this year, or just arrived
earlier, fears have been stoked by the severity of
the flu in Australia during its most recent season
and the fact that the vaccine may protect against
the predominant strain of the flu only 30 percent
of the time.
Despite the worries, doctors and public health
officials say there is no evidence that people are
getting sicker than usual.
Flu cases in Massachusetts started rising
around Thanksgiving and increased steadily,
with an especially steep climb in the last week of
ROMNEYS, Page A8
FLU, Page A9
CHRISTOPHE PETIT TESSON/EPA/FILE 2017
Mitt and Ann Romney have “an Ozzie and Harriet-esque, honest
relationship,” one close adviser has said.
person. “Ann is supportive, and she
thinks Mitt would be a fabulous
senator.”
“Notwithstanding the meanness
of the political game, particularly in
D.C. with Trump, [she thinks] the
right thing to do is run, go serve,
and your voice is needed,” said a
T h e
A2
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
The Nation
Bannon exits Breitbart after row with Trump
A humbling chapter for former White House strategist
By Paul Farhi
and Josh Dawsey
WASHINGTON POST
WASHINGTON — Stephen
Bannon stepped down as executive chairman of Breitbart
News Network on Tuesday, ending his relationship with the
far-right website that he helped
become widely influential and
which in turn abetted his rise as
a political adviser and would-be
kingmaker.
Bannon’s departure — just
days after his public criticisms
of former White House colleagues led to a spectacular falling-out with President Trump
and his allies — was a humbling
denouement for a figure who
had reached the uppermost levels of power only a year ago. It
leaves him with no evident platform to promote his views and
no financial basis for his preferred candidates.
Bannon left Breitbart in August 2016 to join Donald
Trump’s campaign and later
served as President Trump’s
chief White House strategist.
He was fired by Trump almost
exactly a year after formally
signing up with him.
Bannon maintained his visibility by rejoining Breitbart in
August and directing it to serve
his political ends as the insurgent voice of the ‘‘anti-establishment’’ wing of the Republican Party, a faction many saw as
a socially intolerant and racist
fringe of white nationalism.
His departure from Breitbart followed what appears to
have been a vote of no confidence from a key supporter and
investor in the website, Rebekah Mercer, a wealthy political donor, people at the company said. Mercer and her father,
hedge-fund billionaire Robert
Mercer, own a minority share of
Breitbart and are influential
voices in its operation.
Bannon provoked Rebekah
Mercer’s ire by making critical
comments about Trump and
his family to author Michael
Wolff for his book ‘‘Fire and Fury,’’ published last week. Bannon is quoted as saying that
Trump’s son, Donald Trump Jr.,
and son-in-law, Jared Kushner,
engaged in ‘‘treasonous’’ behavior by secretly meeting with
Russian representatives during
the campaign to get unflattering information about Trump’s
opponent, Hillary Clinton.
Trump replied to Bannon’s
comments with a statement
savaging his former confidant.
‘‘Steve Bannon has nothing to
do with me or my presidency.
When he was fired, he not only
lost his job, he lost his mind,’’
the president said. He later attacked Wolff and the book in a
tweet in which he referred to
Bannon as ‘‘Sloppy Steve.’’
Mercer weighed in with a
rare statement of her own on
Thursday that distanced her
from Bannon. ‘‘I support President Trump and the platform
upon which he was elected,’’ she
wrote, adding that her family
had ‘‘not communicated with
Steve Bannon in many months
and have provided no financial
support to his political agenda,
nor do we support his recent actions and statements.’’
Although Bannon continued
to chair Breitbart’s editorial
meetings and host its radio program, Mercer’s comments appeared to signal his end, people
at the media company said.
Breitbart’s readers seemed to
side with Trump in the spat.
As late as this weekend, Bannon continued to tell people
t h a t h e p l a n n e d t o s t ay i n
charge at Breitbart and that he
would keep his radio show. He
argued that the show and the
site were doing better than ever.
The former chief strategist
continued to tell others Trump
ALEX BRANDON/ASSOCIATED PRESS/FILE 2017
‘I’m proud of what the Breitbart team
has accomplished in so short a period
of time.’
STEVE BANNON
would forgive him, and the
president was only a ‘‘vessel’’ in
the movement and that the
president was transactional. He
continued to say that Breitbart
chief executive Larry Solov supported him.
Some conservatives who
have worked with Bannon were
harsh in response, all but writing his political obituary in the
hours after the announcement.
‘‘He’s gone from the top of
the mountain to the deepest
valley, and it was all self-inflicted,’’ said veteran GOP strategist
Edward Rollins, chairman of
Great America, a pro-Trump
group. ‘‘Breitbart was his voice
and it’s been taken away from
him, leaving him with nothing.’’
In a statement carried on
Breitbart’s website, Bannon
said, ‘‘I’m proud of what the
Breitbart team has accomplished in so short a period of
time in building out a worldclass news platform.’’
The Mercers were largely responsible for Bannon’s place at
Breitbart, and vice versa; Bannon introduced them to the
site’s founder, Andrew Breitbart, in 2011, and helped persuade them to invest $10 million in Breitbart’s vision of an
insurgent conservative media
outlet that would take on Hollywood, the news media, and established Washington figures.
In exchange for their investment, the Mercers secured a
seat for Bannon on Breitbart’s
board. When Breitbart died of a
heart condition months later,
Bannon took over.
Bannon at one point described Breitbart as ‘‘the platform for the alt-right,’’ a phrase
that became associated with
white separatism, anti-Semitism, and generally racist sentiments. Breitbart’s editors insisted the site endorsed none of
those views.
Breitbart soared under Bannon, reaching 37 million
unique readers a month before
Trump upset Hillary Clinton to
win the 2016 election. Among
the writers he championed was
Milo Yiannopoulos, who elicited both a rapturous response
from Breitbart’s readers but
heavy criticism elsewhere for
columns about lesbians, blacks,
and Muslims.
Daily Briefing
NYPD union sues
over footage from
body cameras
White nationalist sues Ohio college
CINCINNATI — White nationalist Richard Spencer’s
campus tour organizer is suing the University of Cincinnati’s president, saying the
school wouldn’t rent space for
Spencer to speak on campus
unless a nearly $11,000 security fee was paid.
An attorney for Spencer
and tour organizer Cameron
Padgett said requiring such
payment because a speaker is
controversial or prompts hostile reaction is discriminatory
and unconstitutional. The federal lawsuit filed Monday
seeks $2 million in damages
for allegedly violating free
speech rights, attorney fees,
and an order requiring the
school to rent the space for a
‘‘reasonable fee.’’
The school calls the fee ‘‘a
mere fraction’’ of its anticipated security costs.
‘‘We hold firm in our ef-
forts to respect the principles
of free speech while maintaining safety on campus,’’ UC
spokesman Greg Vehr said.
His statement said Spencer
wasn’t invited or sponsored by
anyone affiliated with the
school. He said UC and its legal team will review the lawsuit for a response in court.
The suit names UC President
Neville Pinto as the defendant.
The university announced
in October that it would allow
Spencer to speak. At the time,
UC’s board of trustees condemned hate, but cited the
fundamental right to free
speech at a public university.
Attorney Kyle Bristow announced later that the visit
was planned for March 14,
during spring break, but UC
had said there was no contract
yet.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
US infant mortality high, study says
American babies are 76
percent more likely to die before they turn a year old than
babies in other rich countries,
and American children who
survive infancy are 57 percent
more likely to die before adulthood, according to a sobering
new study published in the
journal Health Affairs.
Comparing the United
States to 19 other wealthy democracies in the OECD, the
study found that if the United
States had simply kept pace
with average childhood mortality rates in those countries,
600,000 young lives could
have been saved since 1961.
That amounts to roughly
20,000 dead children and
teens each year.
In the 1960s the United
States had significantly lower
child mortality rates than the
other rich countries included
in the study. But starting in the
1970s, that changed.
Among infants, that shift
was driven primarily by
changes in the US premature
birthrate (babies born before
full gestational age), which is
the highest in the developed
world. Our rate of ‘‘extreme’’
prematurity — babies born before 25 weeks — is three times
higher than the OECD average.
Among older children, the
United Stands stands out on
the rate of deaths by injury. In
particular, Americans teens
age 15 to 19 are 82 times more
likely than teens in other rich
countries to die of a gun homicide.
CHAOS IN CALIF.
At least 13 people died in
California’s Santa Barbara
County on Tuesday after heavy
rains combined with ash and
debris from wildfire-scarred
hillsides to form large mudslides
that flowed through
neighborhoods and onto
freeways.
WASHINGTON POST
Kan. lawmaker links blacks, drugs
TOPEKA, Kan. — A white
Kansas lawmaker who suggested at a public forum that
blacks were predisposed to
abusing drugs resigned from
two legislative committee leadership jobs on Tuesday but did
not give up his seat in the Legislature.
Republican Representative
Steve Alford, from the western
Kansas town of Ulysses, faced
calls on social media to leave
office altogether from critics
who saw his remarks as racist.
And a black House member
said Alford should resign from
the Legislature.
Alford stepped down as
chairman of the House Children and Seniors Committee
MIKE ELIASON/SANTA BARBARA COUNTY FIRE DEPARTMENT VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS
and as vice chairman of a joint
legislative task force on child
welfare. He won’t keep a seat
on either panel but will retain
other committee assignments.
‘‘We came to a mutual understanding,’’ House Speaker
Ron Ryckman Jr., a Kansas
City-area Republican, told reporters after meeting Tuesday
with Alford. ‘‘His remarks
were a disappointment and
unfortunate.’’
But Representative Valdenia Winn, a black Kansas City
Democrat, said Tuesday that
Alford should leave the Legislature. She said giving up committee leadership jobs is ‘‘insignificant.’’
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Scalise to have
new surgery as
part of recovery
“Customs and Border Protection is a critical line of defense
in the battle to stop fentanyl
from flooding our communities, and the INTERDICT Act
will help provide it with the
latest technological tools to detect and intercept this deadly
drug.”
The Interdict Act was approved last year in a unanimous vote in the Senate and a
nearly unanimous vote in the
House. Though it was authored by Markey, it had significant Republican support.
ASTEAD HERNDON
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mass. lawmakers help craft successful bipartisan bill
Markey’s office said the law
will provide up to $15 million
for border agents to procure an
estimated 250 new screening
devices, which will help detect
the synthetic opioids sometimes brought across the USMexico border.
The senator worked with
Representative Niki Tsongas,
of Lowell, who helped shepherd the bill through the
House. “It is an immediate and
grave threat to the American
people, and we need to
staunch its flow through our
borders now,” Markey said.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — House
majority whip Steve Scalise
said he will undergo surgery
Wednesday as part of his recovery from last June’s shooting at a baseball practice.
The Louisiana Republican
said Tuesday he’s made tremendous progress recovering
from the shooting. He didn’t
provide details of the surgery,
only that it was planned for
about a month.
Scalise said he intends to
remain fully engaged in his
work as he heals, but gave no
specific timeline for his return.
He said: ‘‘I look forward to
returning to the Capitol as
soon as I can within the coming weeks.’’
Scalise was struck by a bullet in the hip, shattering bone
and damaging internal organs.
He now often uses a cane
when he walks.
MICHAEL OWEN BAKER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Massachusetts lawmakers have done
the impossible: navigated the
hyper-partisan waters of Congress to pass a bipartisan bill
that President Trump will soon
sign.
The Interdict Act, which appropriates funds to buy new
devices that could detect synthetic opioids such as fentanyl
at the border, was authored by
Massachusetts Senator Edward Markey and could be
signed by Trump as soon as
Wednesday, according to Senate aides.
NEW YORK — A union
representing New York City
police officers sued the department Tuesday, saying its
release of body camera footage without a court order violates a state law that makes
officer disciplinary records
confidential.
The Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association, which represents about 24,000 uniformed officers, said the public release of footage, which
began last summer on a limited basis, also violates the privacy of everyday citizens
caught on camera.
‘‘This conduct disregards
not only the clear prohibitions, but also the very serious safety, privacy, due process, and other interests’’ of
everyone seen in such videos,
said the lawsuit, filed in a
state court in Manhattan.
The city’s law department
said it is reviewing the complaint.
‘‘The mayor and the police
commissioner have spoken to
the need for increasing transparency into the way our city
is policed,” said Austin Finan,
a spokesman for the mayor.
“The release of body camera footage, when possible, is
an important extension of
that commitment,’’ Finan
added.
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
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W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
The World
North Korea says weapons pointed only at US
Agrees to send
athletes to South
for Olympics
By Anna Fifield
WASHINGTON POST
SEOUL — North Korea’s
representatives assured the
South Korean government
Tuesday that the country’s ‘‘cutting-edge’’ nuclear weapons are
aimed only at the United
States, not at its neighbors, as
they struck a deal to send athletes to next month’s Winter
Olympics and to reopen a military hot line.
The sobering words underscored how, despite the rare
agreement with the South,
Pyongyang continues to assert
its right to fend off the United
States with nuclear arms.
Nevertheless, South Korea
achieved its immediate goal of
bringing North Korean athletes
to compete in what Seoul has
dubbed the ‘‘peace games.’’
South Korean officials portrayed this agreement as a first
step in a significant improvement in bilateral relations. The
question, analysts said, is
whether the North will pursue
this opening with any sincerity.
South Korea signaled that it
was willing to suspend some of
its direct sanctions on North
Korea to facilitate a Northern
delegation’s travel to the Olympics, which will open Feb. 9 in
the South’s PyeongChang region.
Seoul will have to move
carefully to avoid alienating
the Trump administration,
which has been leading a campaign of ‘‘maximum pressure’’
to force North Korea to give up
its nuclear and missile programs.
B u t i n Wa s h i n gt o n , t h e
State Department applauded
the talks Tuesday and said
SOUTH KOREA OUT/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
North Korean delegate Ri Son-Gwon (center) crossed the border line into South Korea to attend talks on Tuesday.
South Korea has assured the
United States that North Korea’s participation in the Olympics will not violate any UN
sanctions.
The daylong talks at the
Panmunjom truce village on
the border between the two Koreas led to the unusual scene of
a delegation of smiling North
Korean men in black suits
walking across the concrete
curb that divides North from
South — the same line that a
North Korean soldier crossed
at the end of last year, as other
Northern soldiers shot at him.
After the talks, Ri Son
Kwon, the North’s previously
gregarious chief representative, chastised the South Korean media for reporting that the
discussions had included denuclearization as a subject. That
was not on the table, he said.
‘‘All our cutting-edge weapons, including our hydrogen
bomb and intercontinental ballistic missiles, are not targeting
our Korean brothers, China, or
Russia but the United States,’’
Ri said, according to pool reports from inside the room.
‘‘If we begin talking about
these issues, then today’s good
results might be reduced to
nothing,’’ he warned.
Cho Myoung-gyon, South
Korea’s unification minister
and its chief delegate to the
talks, said that despite the
quibbles, Tuesday’s discussions
were positive and could pave
the way for progress on the nuclear issue. ‘‘The most important spirit of the inter-Korean
talks is mutual respect,’’ he
said.
The talks, the first in more
than two years, have the backing of both Korean leaders. In
his New Year’s address, North
Korea’s Kim Jong Un wished
his ‘‘compatriots of the same
blood’’ success for the Games.
‘‘The talks are important
because they are a positive indicator for bilateral relations,’’
said Alison Evans, a Korea expert at IHS Markit, a consulting firm.
The governments in Beijing
and Tokyo both welcomed the
agreement as a positive step.
Steve Goldstein, the undersecretary for public diplomacy
at the State Department, said
the United States played no
role in the talks beyond a
phone call between President
Trump and South Korean President Moon Jae-in, which Sec-
retary of State Rex Tillerson sat
in on. He said no topics were
ruled off limits, and the United
States did not seek to have
South Korea discourage North
Korea from participating even
though the administration has
sought through sanctions to
have the government further
isolated.
‘‘If the Olympics provide an
opening for conversations to
occur, that’s better for the people of South Korea and also the
people of North Korea,’’ he
said. ‘‘We want to see their athletes participate and be part of
the community of nations.’’
Washington will send a delegation representing the administration, but Goldstein
said there are ‘‘no plans’’ for
them to have any direct contact
with the North Koreans attending.
Christopher Green, senior
adviser for the Korean Peninsula at the International Crisis
Group, said the question now
is, what is North Korea’s longterm strategy?
‘‘If the y want to drive a
wedge into the alliance between the United States and
South Korea, this could just be
their opening gambit,’’ he said.
At the talks, the two sides
agreed to ‘‘actively cooperate’’
for the PyeongChang Winter
Olympics. The North will send
athletes, cheering and performing-arts squads, press,
and a ‘‘high-level delegation’’ to
the Games, according to their
joint statement.
North Korea is hardly a
Winter Olympics powerhouse,
having won only two medals in
its history — a silver in 1964
and a bronze in 1992, both for
speed skating.
But International Olympic
Committee president Thomas
Bach hailed Tuesday’s agreement as ‘‘a great step forward
in the Olympic spirit.’’
Daily Briefing
S. Korea not seeking to undo Japan accord
HONG KONG — South Korea said Tuesday that it would
not undo a 2015 agreement
with Japan to shelve a longtime dispute over women who
were forced into sexual slavery
for the Japanese military during World War II.
The agreement has been
criticized in South Korea,
where many people don’t believe that Japan has fully
made amends for its wartime
legacy.
Under the 2015 accord, Japan apologized and promised
to pay $8.8 million for care for
survivors. The deal was
reached by the government of
President Park Geun-hye, who
was impeached in 2016 after
months of turmoil and street
protests. She was formally removed from office in March
2017 and is now facing charges of corruption and abuse of
power.
A panel appointed by the
government of her successor,
President Moon Jae-in, found
the government had failed to
represent the victims fully
when it reached the deal by
not having Japan take “legal”
responsibility and provide official reparations.
That created an opportunity for Moon to back out of the
agreement, but at the risk of
upending South Korea’s relationship with Japan at a time
when the countries are united
in confronting North Korea
over its weapons programs.
The United States, the biggest
ally of South Korea and Japan,
had praised the 2015 agreement, saying cooperation between the two major Asian democracies was important for
regional stability.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Quake hits off coast of Honduras
MEXICO CITY — A magnitude 7.6 earthquake struck in
the Caribbean Sea between
the coast of Honduras and the
Cayman Islands on Tuesday
night.
There were no early reports
of damage on land.
Tsunami warning centers
said that no tsunami waves
had been confirmed but they
stressed that people in Puerto
Rico, other Caribbean islands,
and the coast of Central
America should be alert to
the dangers of a possible tsunami.
The US Geological Survey
measured the quake at a preliminary magnitude of 7.6.
The tremor struck in the
sea about 125 miles northnortheast of Barra Patuca,
Honduras, and 188 miles
southwest of George Town,
Cayman Islands.
The tremor occurred about
6 miles below the surface.
The northern coast of Honduras closest to the quake’s
epicenter is sparsely populated, with much of it covered by
nature reserves. Some people
in the capital of Tegucigalpa
said they did not feel the tremor.
President Juan Orlando
Hernandez said via Twitter
that Honduras had activated
its emergency system.
He asked people to remain
calm.
In the Cayman Islands, Sergeant Dave McKay with Royal
Cayman Islands Police told the
Associated Press that hazard
management officials had not
issued a tsunami alert.
He added that authorities
were continuing to monitor
the situation.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
226 hurt in South Africa train crash
CAPE TOWN — A train
crash at a station near Johannesburg on Tuesday derailed
one rail car and injured at
least 226 people, adding to
concerns about rail safety and
oversight in South Africa after
the second serious accident in
a week.
Six to seven people suffered
moderate injuries, and 159
were taken to the hospital after the crash in Germiston, according to Eric Moloka, a
spokesman for the Ekurhuleni
Municipality Emergency Services. He added that there
were no serious injuries.
“One train was stationary.
The train in motion hit it at
the back,” Moloka said. “The
third coach from the rear then
derailed, causing more injuries. But people were not seriously injured.”
The accident came five days
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after a train crashed into two
vehicles at a crossing, killing at
least 19 people and injuring
hundreds more, about 110
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state-owned rail authority,
said the moving train had
been given permission to enter
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“How it was authorized to
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was already occupied will be
investigated,” she said.
Video footage after the
crash, which took place during
the busy morning commute as
South Africans returned to
work from summer holidays,
showed injured passengers sitting on the platform as they received care from paramedics.
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W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
The World
Iran’s leader slams Trump,
warns of revenge against US
Khamenei calls
him ‘psychotic,’
admits damage
INTRODUCING
By Thomas Erdbrink
NEW YORK TIMES
TEHRAN — In a furious series of Twitter posts and statements on his website Tuesday,
Iran’s supreme leader called
President Trump “psychotic”
and repeated accusations that
the United States bore primary
responsibility for instigating a
week of protests that rocked
Iran in recent weeks.
“He says that the Iranian
government is afraid of US
power,” the supreme leader,
Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, said of
Trump. “So, if we are ‘afraid’ of
you, how did we expel you from
Iran in the late 1970s and expel
you from the entire region in
the 2010s?”
Khamenei, who admitted
that the recent protests, where
people shouted harsh slogans
against him, had hurt Iran’s establishment, threatened the
United States with revenge.
“They damaged us during
these days, they know there will
be some sort of retaliation,” he
said. “This man who sits at the
head of the White House — although, he seems to be a very
unstable man — he must realize
that these extreme and psychotic episodes won’t be left without a response.”
Protests took place in more
than 80 cities nationwide, first
over economic concerns but later broadening into a general
critique of Iran’s clerical establishment.
Officially, 21 people have
died and 1,000 arrested, although a Parliament member
from Tehran, Mahmoud Sadeghi, said Tuesday that 3,700
EPA/SHUTTERSTOCK
Iranian supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said his
country will respond to US meddling.
protesters had been arrested.
The uprising appears to
have largely died down following a crackdown and the imposition of severe restrictions on
social media.
However, protests reportedly flared in the city of Ahvaz on
Monday night, a resident said
in a telephone interview, as
demonstrators and security
forces clashed inside the city.
The resident asked not to be
identified for fear of reprisals.
In Arak, a city that has seen
numerous protests, a local prosecutor, Abbas Qassemi, told the
Mizan news agency Tuesday
that an inmate had killed himself in a detention center.
“There is evidence on the
body showing that the man had
stabbed himself,” said Qassemi,
who did not identify the man or
provide video evidence. “Moreover, the footage of the moment
he committed suicide is available.”
On Monday, human rights
a d v o c at e s r e p o r t e d t h at a
young peddler by the name of
Vahid Heydari, who was arrest-
ed on New Year’s Eve, had died
in what the prosecutor called a
suicide in a detention center in
Arak. It is unclear if this was
the same person.
Human rights advocates and
many Iranians have raised
doubts about these official reports of suicides, saying the
protesters had died while in
custody but not by their own
hand.
Such was the case with Sina
Ghanbari, 23, who officials say
killed himself inside Tehran’s
Evin prison, known for its
harsh conditions and treatment
of prisoners, and where many
protesters are being held.
A popular actress, Mahnaz
Afshar, repeating popular sentiment, responded on Twitter,
saying the death was unacceptable.
Others accused prison officials of having injected Ghanbari with an overdose of methadone, though they could not
cite any evidence. It is unclear
whether he participated in the
protests or was arrested for
something else.
Israeli leader’s son under fire again
By Aron Heller
ASSOCIATED PRESS
JERUSALEM — Israel’s embattled Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu faced a new
scandal Tuesday after recordings emerged of his 26-yearold stay-at-home son joyriding
at taxpayer expense to Tel Aviv
strip clubs with his super-rich
buddies.
In the 2015 recording, Yair
Netanyahu and his friends recount their night out on the
town and make disparaging
comments about strippers,
waitresses, and other women,
including one of Yair’s former
girlfriends.
He is also heard drunkenly
bragging about how the prime
minister advanced a bill that
he appears to believe delivered
billions to his friend’s father —
an embarrassing blow to the
premier, who stands accused
of accepting a fortune’s worth
of cigars and champagne from
rich supporters.
At one point, Yair cryptically refers to 400 shekels (about
$115) paid to a prostitute.
‘‘Speaking of prostitutes,
what’s open at this hour?’’ he
asks his friends, before they
settle on a well-known bistro.
‘‘It’s possible the waitresses
there go with the flow,’’ he
adds.
The recording, aired Monday night on Israel’s top-rated
news broadcast, sparked outrage over its misogynistic content and raised questions over
why a state-funded bodyguard
and driver were necessary to
facilitate such debauchery.
Adding to the anger was the
fact that the salacious outing
took place on the eve of the
Jewish Sabbath — and was
aired just as Netanyahu’s government was passing unpopular legislation to curb business
on the Sabbath under pressure
from ultra-Orthodox Jewish
coalition partners.
One of Yair’s buddies, Roman Abramov, jokes that the
sec urity guard — who was
privy to the banter — would
have to be killed if he ever left
his job so the conversation
wouldn’t leak.
Most of the public outcry,
however, involves Yair’s comments to the third member of
his entourage — the son of Israeli tycoon Kobi Maimon —
about how the prime minister
advanced a controversial gas
deal in parliament that benefited his father.
‘‘My dad arranged $20 billion for your dad, and you’re
whining with me about 400
shekels,’’ he says, referring to
money he borrowed in a strip
club. The chatter is interrupted by a phone call from Yair’s
mother, which he screens and
apparently doesn’t answer.
‘‘How embarrassing,’’ he says.
Yair Netanyahu has long
drawn criticism for living a life
of privilege at taxpayers’ expense, hobnobbing with ultrarich donors, and making crude
social media posts, all while
never holding down a job. The
often combative younger Netanyahu issued a quick apology, saying the remarks did not
represent the values he was
raised on and were made under the influence of alcohol.
But the fallout was swift. A
pair of opposition lawmakers
appealed to the attorney general to investigate Yair Netanyahu’s security needs, saying it
was ‘‘disgraceful that public
funds fuel a culture of women’s exploitation.’’ Others piled
on. ‘‘Even big kids say what
they hear at home,’’ said Eitan
Cabel of the opposition Labor
party.
Netanyahu, who has repeatedly attacked the media as
his legal troubles have mounted, issued a typical response
after the recordings were released.
He called them the height
of a media-orchestrated witch
hunt aimed at ousting him,
saying the press had stooped
to unprecedented ‘‘persecution, bloodletting and shaming ,’’ and that his son had
nothing to do with policymaking or security arrangements.
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Polish leader reshuffles government
NEW YORK TIMES
WARSAW — Two months after taking office, Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki of Poland announced a sweeping reshuffling of the government
Tuesday, a move seen as an effort to punish political rivals
while improving the governing
party’s image abroad as it engages in a bruising battle with
other European nations.
Morawiecki dismissed a
third of his Cabinet, including
the foreign minister, the defense minister, and several others with tense relationships
with European leaders. He was
set to fly to Brussels for a working dinner with the European
Commission’s president.
At a news conference,
Morawiecki reiterated Poland’s
stance against Muslim immi-
grants. The country, he said,
needs to be “safe at its external
borders as well as inside the
country.” He said the new government seeks “to reconcile the
European dimension with our
Polish, local dimension.”
In December, the European
Commission, the European
Union’s executive arm, used the
most powerful threat in its arsenal to pressure Poland from
continuing on a path it viewed
as undermining the rule of law,
invoking Article 7 of the EU’s
founding treaty, which could
strip Poland of its voting rights.
The right-wing Law and
Justice Party has increased control over the media, sought to
curb public gatherings, and
curtailed the independence of
the Civil Service and prosecutors.
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Fusion founder said FBI had
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WASHINGTON POST
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After Democrats began paying for the research, Fusion
GPS hired Christopher Steele, a
former senior officer with Britain’s intelligence service, MI6,
to gather intelligence about any
ties between the Kremlin and
Trump and his associates.
Steele’s reports were eventually
compiled into a dossier alleging
the Trump campaign coordinated with the Kremlin — a
claim the president has repeatedly denied.
Steele first reached out to
the FBI with his concerns in
early July 2016, according to
people familiar with the matter.
When they re-interviewed him
in early October, agents made it
clear, according to Simpson’s
testimony released Tuesday,
that they believed some of what
Steele had told them.
‘‘My understanding was that
they believed Chris at this point
— that they believed Chris
might be credible because they
had other intelligence that indicated the same thing and one of
those pieces of intelligence was
a human source from inside the
Trump organization,’’ Simpson
said.
S i m p s o n s a i d h e d i d n’ t
know whether the person was
connected to the Trump campaign or a Trump company.
Trump offers compromise, confusion
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WASHINGTON — The head
of the research firm behind a
dossier of allegations against
then-presidential candidate
Donald Trump told congressional investigators that someone
inside Trump’s network had also provided the FBI with information during the 2016 campaign, according to a newly rel e a s e d t ra n s c r i p t , a c l a i m
quickly disputed by people
close to the investigation into
Russian interference in the
election.
Glenn Simpson, a founder of
the research firm Fusion GPS,
spoke to investigators with the
Senate Judiciary Committee for
10 hours in August. As the partisan fight over Russian interference in the 2016 election has
intensified, Simpson has urged
that his testimony be released,
and a copy of the transcript was
made public Tuesday.
It was released by the ranking Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee, Senator Dianne Feinstein of California.
That decision marks the most
serious break yet in the cooperative relationship she has had
with the Republican chairman
of the committee, Senator
Charles Grassley of Iowa.
A spokesman for Grassley
called Feinstein’s move ‘‘totally
confounding’’ and done without consultation. ‘‘Her action
undermines the integrity of the
committee’s oversight work and
jeopardizes its ability to secure
candid voluntary testimony relating to the independent recollection of future witnesses,’’
said the spokesman, Taylor Foy.
Feinstein said she released
the transcript to set the record
straight. ‘‘The innuendo and
misinformation circulating
about the transcript are part of
a deeply troubling effort to undermine the investigation into
potential collusion and obstruction of justice,’’ she said.
A representative for Fusion
GPS did not immediately offer a
comment.
Fusion GPS was hired in
mid-2016 by a lawyer for Hillary
Clinton’s presidential campaign
and the Democratic National
Committee to dig into Trump’s
background. Earlier that year,
the firm had been investigating
Trump for a conservative website funded by a GOP donor, but
that client stopped paying for
the work after it became clear
Trump would win the GOP
nomination, according to people familiar with the matter.
Continued from Page A1
Brigham House
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W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
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tor on immigration policy. But
Durbin said he appreciated that
the president demonstrated a
‘‘sense of urgency.’’
Among the details that negotiators and Trump left unresolved are which immigrants
would be protected in a new
deal and the scope of new security measures that Republicans
and the president are seeking.
That, in turn, leaves wide open
the question of whether an
agreement can be completed by
Jan. 19, the next budgetary
deadline that lawmakers must
meet to keep government open.
Democrats are clamoring to
include a DACA deal in a spending agreement ahead of Jan. 19.
But Senate majority leader
Mitch McConnell, Republican
of Kentucky, on Tuesday rejected tying the two issues together.
I n t h e m e e t i n g , Tr u m p
didn’t address whether the
DACA deal should be tied to a
spending agreement. Instead,
he repeatedly expressed confidence that a deal for DACA recipients was within reach
ahead of a March 5 deadline he
set before work permits issued
to nearly 700,000 immigrants
under an Obama-era executive
action begin to expire.
Meanwhile, Republicans
and Democrats emerging from
the meeting between Trump
and 26 lawmakers said the first
round of immigration talks
would focus on four major
points: settling the fate of
DACA recipients; restricting
family migration policy, which
some conservatives deride as
‘‘chain migration’’; curbing a diversity lottery system that
grants visas to 55,000 people
from countries with low immigration each year; and determining how to bolster security
along the border with Mexico.
The Trump administration
has called for $18 billion for
construction and renovation of
hundreds of miles of a border
wall, the president’s core campaign promise. Democrats and
some moderate Republicans
have resisted funding a wall at a
time when illegal immigration
over the Mexico border is at record lows.
Yet even as Trump sought to
instill confidence that a deal
could be done — suggesting he
would defer to Congress over
details and sign any bill that
reaches his desk — the president’s vague promises and often conflicting negotiating positions left both sides uncertain
about where he ultimately
would come down.
At one point in the talks,
Trump seemed to indicate he
would support a proposal from
Senator Dianne Feinstein,
Democrat of California, for a
‘‘clean DACA bill’’ — one without border security provisions
—- only to be quickly corrected
by House majority leader Kevin
McCarthy, Republican of Cali-
CHIP SOMODEVILLA/GETTY IMAGES
President Trump met with 26 lawmakers on Tuesday to
discuss immigration. More than half of it was televised.
fornia.
‘‘Mr. President, you need to
be clear, though,’’ McCarthy
said. ‘‘I think what Senator
Feinstein is asking there —
when we talk about just DACA,
we don’t want to be back here
two years later. You have to
have security.’’
Trump responded: ‘‘I think
that’s what she’s saying.’’
‘‘No, I think she’s saying
something different,’’ McCarthy
said.
Feinstein clarified: ‘‘If we
have some meaningful comprehensive immigration reform,
that’s really where the security
goes.’’
‘‘No,’’ some in the room said.
The lack of clarity led to unusual reactions beyond the
White House. Former Florida
governor Jeb Bush, who was
among Trump’s harshest critics
during the 2016 Republican
primary season, said in a tweet
that he was ‘‘encouraged’’ that
Trump is seeking a bipartisan
deal.
At the same time, immigration hawks denounced Trump,
who ran on a hard-line immigration position, for appearing
to tack toward the center. Political commentator Ann Coulter, a
passionate Trump supporter
during the campaign, said
Trump’s ‘‘DACA lovefest’’ would
prove more politically damaging than revelations in author
Michael Wolff’s new book.
‘‘Trump is playing with fire,’’
said Bob Dane, executive director of the Federation for American Immigration Reform, an influential immigration restrictionist group. ‘‘Suggesting he’ll
sign a clean DACA bill and then
deal with everything else later
is precisely what the Democrats
want.’’
Even Trump appeared to acknowledge the confusion,
tweeting later Tuesday that a
border wall must be part of any
DACA deal ‘‘as I made very
clear today.’’
The White House meeting
was highly unusual. In a break
with normal practice, Trump allowed reporters to remain in
the Cabinet Room for more
than 50 minutes as he and law-
makers laid out their bargaining positions.
The lone television camera
in the room darted back and
forth between Trump and lawmakers, who pressed the president for specifics as he challenged the group to ‘‘put country before party’’ and strike a
deal.
Lawmakers in both parties
have said they had been waiting
for Trump to specify his demands before the negotiations
could move forward.
Trump announced in September his plans to terminate
DACA, but he gave lawmakers a
six-month window to pass a legislative deal before the temporary work permits begin to expire at a rate of nearly 1,000 per
day. About 122 immigrants a
day already are losing their
work permits after failing to renew their applications last fall,
according to immigrant rights
organizations.
Adding to confusion about a
potential DACA agreement,
Trump reiterated several times
during the meeting that he
hoped to pursue a ‘‘comprehensive’’ immigration bill after lawmakers strike a deal on the
Dreamers. Comprehensive bills
addressing work visas and seeking to address the status of the
nation’s 11 million undocumented immigrants failed on
Capitol Hill during the tenures
of both Barack Obama and
George W. Bush.
Later, Senator Mazie Hirono, Democrat of Hawaii,
pressed Trump to clarify whether his administration’s request
for border-security funding is
required in exchange for protecting DACA recipients.
‘‘We can do a great wall —
you need the wall,’’ he said, but
added later, ‘‘I’d like to build
under budget, ahead of schedule.’’
Yet Trump also conceded:
‘‘There’s lots of places where
you don’t need a wall because of
nature. You’ve got a mountain
and rivers; you got a violent river.’’
The bipartisan talks are set
to continue Wednesday on Capitol Hill.
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
The Nation
A7
Trump to take populist message to globalists at Davos
President Trump, the populist self-proclaimed champion
of trade protection and the forgotten people,
POLITICAL
plans to go to
NOTEBOOK the annual
meeting of
world financial and economic
elite in Davos, Switzerland, later this month.
The gathering at an Alpine
ski resort is a redoubt of globalist, free-trade thinking starkly
at odds with Trump’s worldview. It is a regular stomping
ground for Trump nemeses
such as international investor
George Soros.
Trump would be the first sitting US president to attend the
meeting of bankers, corporate
chiefs, academics, and investors since Bill Clinton in January 2000.
Anxiety over Trump’s “America First” agenda dominated
conversation at the World Economic Forum last year, though
the incoming US administration eschewed sending any official representatives. An aide at
the time said participating in
the high-powered annual meeting would betray the president’s populist movement.
Chinese President Xi Jinping used the forum in 2017 for
a global call to reject trade wars
and protectionism in a rebuttal
to Trump.
White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said Trump
will use the forum to make the
case for his policies to the global leaders.
not save money.
On other issues, Azar clung
to Republican orthodoxy like
the conservative that he is. He
suggested that he favors converting Medicaid from its halfcentury history as an entitlement program open to anyone
who is eligible into a system of
blocks grants with more freedom for states to set the rules.
He acknowledged, however,
that ‘‘the devil is in the de-
tails.’’
WASHINGTON POST
Interior adds screening
process for grants
WASHINGTON — The Interior Department has adopted a
new screening process for the
discretionary grants it makes to
outside groups, instructing
staff to ensure those awards
‘‘promote the priorities’’ of the
Trump administration.
HHS pick says government
can’t control drug prices
WASHINGTON — Alex
Azar, in line to become the
Trump administration’s second
health and human services secretary, agreed at his Senate
confirmation hearing on Tuesday that drugs cost too much
but eschewed broad government steps to rein in prices.
The nominee weathered
Democrats’ broadsides at his
pharmaceutical industry ties
and accusations that his recent
history as a top executive of Eli
Lilly renders him ill-equipped
to preside over federal efforts to
make medicine more affordable. Their efforts during the
Finance Committee hearing
didn’t appear to halt his path
toward joining the president’s
Cabinet.
Republicans lauded superlatives on Azar and highlighted
his senior roles in the Health
and Human Service Department for a half-dozen years in
the early 2000s. And during
nearly 2½ hours of questioning, the nominee delivered a
polished, informed performance in the witness chair, assuring senators, who have at
times felt slighted by administration officials, that he is eager
to work with them.
Azar distanced himself from
a long-simmering idea that
President Trump has intermittently supported: allowing the
government to directly negotiate prices with pharmaceutical
manufacturers for the drugs
sold through Medicare. He insisted that such a system would
The EPA directive also targeted federal grants to universities and nonprofit groups. Although Cameron did not identify the total amount of funding
affected by the new policy, and
the department declined to
comment on the matter, former
Interior officials said hundreds
of millions of dollars in expenditures probably would be affected.
WASHINGTON POST
President says he’d like
to run against Oprah
BLOOMBERG NEWS
principal deputy assistant secretary for policy, management
and budget, instructed other
assistant secretaries and bureau and office heads to submit
most grants and cooperative
agreements for approval by one
of his aides. Those include any
award of at least $50,000 ‘‘to a
non-profit organization that
can legally engage in advocacy’’
or ‘‘to an institution of higher
education.’’
BLOOMBERG NEWS
President Trump said he’d
welcome a reelection challenge
from fellow billionaire Oprah
Winfrey.
“Oprah would be a lot of
fun,” he said Tuesday. But
Trump also predicted that he’d
win.
Speculation about Winfrey’s
possible presidential candidacy
rose to a fever pitch on Monday
after she delivered a stirring
speech at the Golden Globes
that was regarded as a rebuke
to Trump. The former talkshow host said after the speech
that she doesn’t plan to run,
but associates including her
longtime partner Stedman Graham suggested she is considering a campaign.
“I don’t think she’s going to
run,” Trump said at a meeting
with senators at the White
House on Tuesday.
Meanwhile, Winfrey’s best
friend, Gayle King, a CBS host,
says that Oprah is ‘‘intrigued by
the idea’’ of a presidential bid
in 2020, but that after a long
conversation with her friend
the night before, she doesn’t
see it happening.
She added, ‘‘You always
have the right to change her
mind.’’
The Dec. 28 directive, obtained by The Washington Post,
represents the latest attempt by
Trump political appointees to
put their mark on government
spending. Last summer, the
Environmental Protection
Agency instituted a system requiring that a political appointee in the public affairs office
sign off on each grant before it
is awarded.
Scott J. Cameron, Interior’s
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W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
Ann Romney said to back a run for Senate by husband
ROMNEYS
Continued from Page A1
cerned that the Senate could
soon lack strong, civil, moderating voices, given several retirements, as well as the failing
health of Senator John McCain, who has been diagnosed
with brain cancer.
Those close to Romney view
McCain as somewhat of a model for the type of senator he
would be, willing to forcefully
challenge Trump in some cases, while attempting to find
common ground with the president on others.
“With Ann, it’s somewhat
because of McCain’s problems
and the feeling that Mitt would
be someone who would add a
lot to the mix in D.C.,” one of
the people said.
Romney and some within
his close-knit circle of advisers
were surprised last week when
Senator Orrin Hatch, 83, announced he would not run for
reelection. Although Hatch
had initially encouraged Romney to seek the seat, in December he seemed to be heeding
the pleas of Trump — who prefers Hatch over his frequent
nemesis Romney — to run for
an eighth term.
Hatch’s announcement on
Jan. 2 set off deliberations,
with Romney consulting with
his tight-knit circle.
Romney is unlikely to make
any announcements over the
next week or two, according to
those who have spoken with
him. Part of the delay is caused
by an unrelated turn of events
in Utah.
T homas S. Monson, the
Mormon prophet and longtime
church president, died Jan 2,
and his funeral is being held on
Friday in Salt Lake City. The funeral, as well as the process of
installing new church leadership, precludes any major political announcements that
c o u l d o ff e n d Mo r m o n s i n
mourning. Romney himself
had deep respect for the Mormon leader and released a
statement last week saying that
“Monson walked where Jesus
walked, lifting the downtrod-
den, comforting the wounded,
healing the sick, brightening
the lives of the lonely at heart.”
While many of his friends
have been encouraging, particularly those in Utah, it is his
family whom Romney typically
relies on most for guidance.
Ann Romney’s behind-thescenes encouragement of her
husband’s political ambitions
— his run for senator in Massachusetts in 1994, for Massachusetts governor in 2002, and
his two bids for president, in
2008 and 2012 — has been a
steady aspect of his career.
She has recounted how one
morning in 1993 she grew frustrated about his complaints
about Senator Ted Kennedy,
nudging him into his first race
with an argument that she may
well be turning to now.
“Mitt, you’ve got to run,”
Ann Romney told him, she later recounted in an interview
with the Globe. “You can gripe
and gripe and gripe all you
want about how upset you are
about the direction the country’s going. But if you don’t
stand up and do something
about it, then, you know, shut
up and stop bothering me.”
Romney, pulling the covers
over his head, said he didn’t
want to do it.
Nevertheless, he did it (and
lost), after his wife appealed to
his spiritual side, to his sense
of obligation, and to his family’s political legacy.
As his five sons grew older,
he leaned on them as well. The
family in 2006 took a vote on
whether Romney should run
for the Republican presidential
nomination, which he lost to
McCain. The vote was unanimous.
But the political campaign
took a toll on a family that
largely tries to keep a sunny
outlook on life and public service.
Four years later, the family
gathered again and took a vote
on whether Romney should
run in 2012.
“The vote was 10-2 against,”
Ann Romney wrote in her
2015 memoir, “In This Togeth-
JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF/FILE
Mitt Romney, then the Republican candidate for president, and his wife, Anne, were at the
Boston Convention & Exhibition Center on Election Day in 2012.
Arpaio to run in Arizona for Flake’s seat
Joe Arpaio, the longtime
Phoenix-area sheriff whose
headline-grabbing approach
to immigration made him an
ally of President Trump, will
run in the 2018 Republican
primary to replace Senator Jeff
Flake, Republican from Arizona.
Arpaio, 85, made the bid official in an interview with the
Washington Examiner.
‘‘I’m not here to get my
name in the paper,’’ he said. ‘‘I
get that everyday, anyway.’’
Arpaio, who has frequently
talked about seeking higher office, said he decided to run as a
‘‘big supporter of President
Trump’’ who would back the
president wholeheartedly.
He is entering a primary
against Kelli Ward, a former
state senator also running as a
Trump ally.
His decision may create an
opening for Representative
Martha McSally, Republican of
Arizona, a Republican with
more moderate views on immigration who is contemplating a bid for the seat and is
backed by party leaders in
Washington.
The former sheriff ’s decision came as a surprise to
some Democrats, who thought
Arpaio’s career had ended in
2016. After 24 years as Maricopa County’s chief law enforcement officer, Arpaio was handily defeated by Democrat Paul
Penzone.
er: My Story.” “Only Tagg and I
voted in favor. Even Mitt voted
against, wondering, ‘Why go
through the process just to lose
again?’ ”
Ultimately, in her telling,
Mitt Romney got on board. But
after he lost that race, the family seemed to be finished. And
while Mitt Romney had a brief
flirtation with considering a
2016 presidential bid, he ultimately decided against it.
“Done,” Ann Romney told
The Los Angeles Times in
2014. “Completely. Not only
Mitt and I are done, but the
kids are done. Done. Done.
Done.”
As she has in the past, Ann
Romney has played a role of
encourager. There has been no
family vote, but there certainly
have been discussions. Romney would likely face little challenge among Republicans for
the nomination, and he would
be heavily favored to win the
general election in a state that
hasn’t elected a Democratic
senator since 1970.
“The family is 100 percent
supportive,” said one source
close to the family.
Romne y has listened to
some of the debate among his
family members. His life is
pretty appealing right now.
He’s basically retired, dividing
time among homes in California, Utah, and New Hampshire
and enjoying his grandchildren.
At 70, he is free to work on
projects of his choosing — supporting nonprofit causes or
helping his sons with their
business ventures — and weigh
in on day-to-day politics whenever he wants. Any television
producer would be happy to
have him on, and his Twitter
and Facebook messages tend to
gain national traction whenever he wants it.
But those close to Romney
say that he feels he has some-
By David Weigel
THE WASHINGTON POST
thing to offer, and that he can
bring a moral foundation to a
politically toxic environment.
An open Senate seat was not
exactly something he was
searching for, they say, but the
opportunity arose and he is
sensing that he should take it.
“He really feels like there
are a lot of things that he can
do to help the country as well
as Utah,” said one of the sources. “I really admire him for it,
as if I were in his shoes, I
would be pretty tempted to just
enjoy life.”
Ann Romney’s health is also
not a major factor, according to
the sources. She has spoken
and written about her daily
struggle with multiple sclerosis, and the toll that past campaigns have taken on her.
“She is doing really well and
has learned how to manage her
time such that campaigning
doesn’t become too much for
her,” a person close to the family said.
Campaign travel throughout Utah would be far less arduous than the presidential
campaign travel she did in
2012.
She has been skiing and
competing in horseback riding
events, which grew out of therapeutic riding that helped her
deal with multiple sclerosis.
“Ann’s doing awesome,” a
s e c o n d p e r s o n s a i d . “ He r
health is great. She works at it
and is very conscious.”
As Romney eyes the election, he is thinking about what
his campaign themes might be,
and how to make the case for
Utah voters that they should
send the former Massachusetts
g o v e r n o r t o Wa s h i n g t o n .
Those around him know that it
could be one of the easier campaigns he’s ever run.
“It’s certainly more joyful,
and he’s pushing the rock up
less than running for president
against Obama,” said one of his
longtime advisers. “He’s got
more breathing room. It will be
a more fun thing for him.”
Matt Viser can be reached at
matt.viser@globe.com.
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W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
The Region
A9
Flu season off to a bad start, bringing fears of what’s next
FLU
Continued from Page A1
the year.
“This is a bad flu season but
not a horrible one,” said Dr. Andrew G. Villanueva, a lung specialist and chief quality officer
at the Lahey Hospital & Medical Center in Burlington.
The flu season, while clearly
in full swing, doesn’t “feel different” from previous years, Villanueva said. “We’re not seeing
a lot of employees calling out
sick with the flu. We’re not seeing a lot of people being hospitalized because of flu,” he said.
Of course, that could change
in a heartbeat.
Even this far into the epidemic, there’s no telling what will
happen next, said Dr. Alfred DeMaria, medical director of the
Bureau of Infectious Disease and
Laboratory Sciences at the state
Department of Public Health.
Cases may continue their upward trajectory, or the epidemic
may have already peaked.
“Every October these experts
say it’s going to be a bad flu season,” DeMaria said. “They’re
just talking off the top of their
heads. It’s hard to predict.”
Worries about the flu’s impact this year were inflamed by
reports from Australia, which
had one of its worst flu seasons
ever. But DeMaria said other
countries’ experiences are poor
predictors of what will happen
in the United States.
Another source of concern is
the predominant strain of flu
circulating this year, H3N2,
which produces more severe illness, especially in older people.
Also, in Australia, the flu vaccine protected people against
H3N2 only 10 percent of the
time. DeMaria said that here
the vaccine seems to be 30 percent effective against that
strain, a little below the 40 to 60
percent effectiveness typical of
most years.
Dr. Jenifer L. Jaeger, interim
medical director of the Boston
Public Health Commission,
said Boston is experiencing
similar trends as the rest of the
state. “We’re not seeing anything that makes me concerned
that we’re going to see an unusually severe season,” she said.
“ What makes me most concerned is that people are shying
away from the vaccine.”
Jaeger and others emphasized that any protection is better than none, and that while
the vaccine may be relatively
weak against H3N2, it does
protect against other circulating strains. Even if the vaccine
doesn’t prevent sickness, it can
reduce the severity of symptoms. And younger people
should get vaccinated so they
don’t spread the illness to people who are old and sick or babies too young for the vaccine,
TONY DEJAK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
People over 65 or with chronic illnesses are at the greatest risk of complications from the
flu, although younger people should be vaccinated to avoid spreading the illness.
doctors say.
DeMaria said that people
over 65 or with chronic illnesses are at the greatest risk of
complications from the flu and
should take antiviral drugs
within 48 hours of feeling ill.
Dr. Benjamin Kruskal, chief
of infectious diseases at Atrius
Health, a large physicians’
group, said the number and se-
verity of flu cases are within the
normal range, although at the
upper edge of normal.
“It may be a bit more severe,
but not dramatically so,” he
said. “It’s certainly possible, if it
increases substantially, it will
put a burden on our health care
system,” Kruskal said. So far,
doctors’ offices are busy but not
overwhelmed, he said.
By the end of the 2017 season, influenza was widespread
in every state except Maine,
New Hampshire, New Jersey,
and Hawaii, according to the
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention.
Health officials track the epidemic with reports filed by outpatient health care providers
who have agreed to serve as
“sentinels.” These sentinel sites,
which include doctor’s offices
and community health centers,
report the percentage of visits
to treat “influenza-like illnesses” — cases involving a fever
and cough or sore throat. Not
all these illnesses are flu, but
tracking them is considered a
reliable indicator of the epidemic’s spread.
In Massachusetts, influenzalike illnesses had reached nearly
3 percent of doctor’s visits in the
last week of December, which
the CDC considers “moderate
activity.” That’s worse than in all
the other New England states,
where influenza-like illnesses
are minimal to low. But it’s better than in most of the country
— 26 states have high levels of
influenza-like illnesses.
Across Massachusetts, the
severity of the epidemic varies.
The hardest hit area of Massachusetts is the northeast corner,
where influenza-like illnesses
reached nearly 5 percent.
Even so, Lawrence General
Hospital is not seeing much
change from the previous season. There have been 51 flu cases to date, compared with 53
last year, said spokeswoman Jill
McDonald Halsey.
Felice J. Freyer can be reached
at felice.freyer@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@felicejfreyer
New virtual assistants to aid physicians
MEDICAL RECORDS
Electronic records are
standardized and
don’t need to be
stored in file cabinets,
but they are also a
leading cause of
burnout among
doctors, according to
a 2017 survey from
the medical news
website Medscape.
Continued from Page A1
cal informatics at Hamilton
Healthcare System in rural Texas, which uses eClinicalWorks
software. “To say, ‘Eva, show
me today’s lab,’ and it just pops
up — that efficiency is huge.”
Virtual assistants are in development at other big medical
software vendors, including
Water town-based athenahealth Inc. and Epic Systems
Corp. of Verona, Wis., whose
software is widely used by Massachusetts doctors and hospitals.
The voice-activated technology for health records is available to doctors, nurses, and
other care providers. But patients potentially could benefit
if they get more face time with
care providers who are less
burdened by their computers.
This technology is launching after huge volumes of patient information moved from
paper to computers over the
past several years, spurred
largely by federal government
incentives for the digitization
of health records. The companies that made computerized
record systems designed them
to meet federal requirements
and store large amounts of data, including patient medical
histories and physician notes.
But the software was not particularly user-friendly.
As providers become more
selective about which software
they want to use, and software
companies jockey for their
business, there is a new focus
on making health record systems more efficient and easier
to use.
At eClinicalWorks, the virtual assistant is designed to
simplify common tasks. For example, if a patient calls to request a medication refill, the
physician must find several
pieces of information before
placing the order: When was
the patient last seen? What
other medications is the patient taking? What do the patient’s most recent blood tests
show?
Instead of requiring the
doctor to search through several different windows, the virtual assistant — through one
click or voice command — can
save time by pulling up many
pieces of relevant information
on one screen.
Physicians can activate the
assistant by clicking on the
computer screen or saying
“Hello, Eva.” When a physician
asks Eva to find a patient file,
the file quickly appears. Eva
presents a menu of options and
says, “What would you like to
do?”
For patients with similar
sounding names, Eva shows
different options so the doctor
does not confuse them. The
health record also shows a
head shot of the patient.
“Physicians will be able to
SHUTTERSTOCK
interact with technology a lot
easier — as easy as using Alexa,” said Sameer Bhat, vice
president of sales and cofounder at eClinicalWorks, whose
health record system is used by
about 130,000 physicians.
“Technology like this will really
cut down the time and help
them find information.”
EClinicalWorks, a privately
held company, paid $155 million to settle federal allegations
last May that it made false
claims about its software and
gave kickbacks to customers.
Executives said that they took
steps to address those issues
and that the allegations did not
slow the company’s growth.
EClinicalWorks launched its
virtual assistant in December,
making it a standard feature
for customers who update to
the latest version of the company’s software.
The market for medical software is highly competitive, and
the launch of virtual assistants
and other features designed to
simplify software could give an
edge to companies trying to
pull customers from rivals.
“We’re seeing this kind of
evolution in the industry toward . . . a better user experience,” said Mutaz Shegewi, research director for provider IT
transformation strategies at
the research firm IDC Health
Insights in Framingham. “User
experience is key for a vendor
to sell products, and it’s key for
a vendor to enjoy a successful
relationship [with customers].”
Shegewi said assistants like
the one designed by eClinicalWorks sound promising — but
whether they will actually save
doctors time remains to be
seen. “If that doesn’t deliver,
that’s going to be a huge disappointment,” he said.
Epic, whose software is used
by many large hospital systems, is also developing a
voice-activated virtual assistant and plans to test it in February before launching it
broadly, the company said.
Adam Whitlatch, director of
research and development at
Epic, said the feature will be
built into the company’s mobile application, allowing doctors to view patient information and track appointment
schedules.
Technology has advanced to
the point that voice-activated
assistants are now possible,
and simultaneously, health
care providers have become
more comfortable with computers, Whitlatch noted. “This
is actually an ideal use case for
this type of technology,” he
said.
Epic’s health record software is used by several Massachusetts health systems including Partners HealthCare of
Boston, Lahey Health of Burlington, and UMass Memorial
Health Care of Worcester.
Many doctors and nurses
have found that Epic’s system
is particularly complex and tedious to use. Company officials
said they consider such feedback as they develop updates to
their software.
Electronic records have obvious advantages over paper records — they’re standardized
and don’t need to be stored in
file cabinets. But they are also a
leading cause of burnout
among doctors, according to a
2017 survey from the medical
news website Medscape.
“Number one right now,
folks are looking for work reduction,” said Kyle Armbrester,
chief product officer at athenahealth, which makes patient
record systems and other medical software.
Armbrester said virtual assistants are becoming “commodities” and are only as good
as the systems for which
they’re built. But he said the
company has seen dramatic results in early tests of its new
virtual assistant.
The application has helped
some health care providers
save hours per day on accessing, documenting, and sharing
information, according to athenahealth.
To Dr. Eugenia Marcus, a
pediatrician in Wellesley, the
concept of voice-activated assistants sounds helpful. Marcus said medical software companies must incorporate more
advice from clinicians to make
their systems user-friendly.
“At this point,” she said,
“most doctors are just complaining and don’t know what
they can do about it.”
Priyanka Dayal McCluskey
can be reached at
priyanka.mccluskey@globe.co
m. Follow her on Twitter
@priyanka_dayal.
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Editorial
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W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
Inbox
It’s the postseason —
heck, why not turn up
heat under the Patriots
Team, at a crossroad, needs to start
thinking about its future
Countless New England Patriots fans have tried to ignore
the reports of a rift among Robert Kraft, Bill Belichick, and
Tom Brady. In light of the team’s unparalleled success and
the opportunity for another Super Bowl victory, Patriots nation declares, “Say it ain’t so,” to allegations of discord in
the team hierarchy.
There is no means for the public to confirm whether any
of the rumors have validity. However, questions persist regarding the garage sale value received for Jimmy Garoppolo. Eyebrows have always been raised when Brady remains
in games in the final minutes of lopsided victories. Brady,
the best quarterback of all time, insists that he can play until he is 45, but this may be fantasy, and it ignores the realistic expectations of longevity shown by David Ortiz and Derek Jeter. Those baseball greats acknowledged that father
time affects all athletes and that planning was required for
the organization.
Who knows whether Kraft or Belichick believes Brady’s
confident claim of longevity. The fact is, the Big Three are
at a crossroad. Compromise is essential for the most successful sports franchise in recent years to stay intact. We
have all enjoyed a great run with the Patriots. However, remember that 20 years ago, after a Super Bowl appearance,
another coaching legend, Bill Parcells, left the team after
stating, “If they want you to cook the dinner, at least they
ought to let you shop for some of the groceries.”
Sounds like the Big Three need to start pushing the
same shopping cart if they want to continue serving gourmet dinners to Patriots nation.
STEVE KRAMER
Mashpee
Focus on football, not mudslinging
Can we just enjoy the postseason? Must sports media —
print, radio, and television — act like Hollywood, constantly fueling controversy through the focus of their reporting?
I am tired of the rants about Alex Guerrero, Tom Brady, and
Bill Belichick, and about the intrigue over Jimmy Garoppolo, Brady, Belichick, and Robert Kraft. I respect that the
principals in these stories have not participated in the mudslinging and instead are focused on football. It would be
nice if the media would focus on the sport and not the theatrics.
Football is about competition, entertainment, and regional pride. Let’s refocus on what is important: winning
another Super Bowl. Go Patriots!
SCOT LEHIGH
Trump turns presidential
W
onders never cease.
On Tuesday, Donald J.
Trump played a completely
unaccustomed role: that of
president of the United States of America.
Not a pugnacious partisan or a tinny
demagogue, but, for the better part of an
hour, a grown-up chief executive seemingly
ready to rise above the political tumult in
search of compromise. The setting was a
bipartisan meeting of congressional leaders the White House convened to discuss
DACA — Deferred Action for Childhood
Arrivals — as well as other immigration issues. It was an extraordinary scene, watching Republican and Democratic lawmakers
voice their concerns and make their points
as the cameras rolled and rolled.
But what was more extraordinary was
witnessing Trump. Gone for the moment
was the man who has spent months playing to bigotry, nativism, and xenophobia.
He didn’t act erratically. He wasn’t obnoxious or antagonistic or boorish or bullying.
Rather, Trump listened, responded to concerns, facilitated the discussion, and acted
like someone genuinely interested in solving the problem of the 800,000 unauthorized immigrants who were brought to the
country as young people and raised here,
but will soon be at risk of deportation if
Congress fails to pass protections for them.
In a week when Washington has been
roiled, and his administration rocked, by
“Fire and Fury,” Michael Wolff’s new book
detailing a chaotic, dysfunctional administration, the president helped himself considerably.
It isn’t at all clear what will come of this
bipartisan discussion. One reason: Until
THEW/EPA-EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
President Trump hosted a meeting on
immigration on Tuesday.
Tuesday, Trump had repeatedly said he
wanted to pair DACA reform with funding
for a border wall — the wall he once vowed
Mexico would pay for — as well as the end
of so-called chain migration and the diversity visa lottery. Are those still drop-dead
demands for an agreement on DACA?
On Tuesday, it didn’t sound that way.
“My position is going to be what the
people in this room come up with,” he said.
“What I approve will be very much reliant
on what people in this room come to me
with.” That was a sentiment he repeated
several times, saying he’d sign such a bill
even he wasn’t in love with it.
You can easily read that as Trump’s attempt to set Congress up as the fall guy
here; if lawmakers can’t come to an agreement, he can then wash his hands of the
failure. And indeed, having the responsibility essentially passed to them seemed to
distress some of the Republicans in the
room, who clearly wanted Trump to dictate
some terms. That said, Trump talked like a
man who wanted to get this done, going so
far at one point as to suggest that Congress
could tackle DACA first and then move on
to other, more nettlesome issues.
So why the change in tone? Perhaps it’s
all just a skillful act. But here’s my guess:
Trump was talking at close range with informed adults, and not pandering to his
low-information nativist base or to the
blowhards on Fox News. So adult parameters set the contours for, and constrained,
the discussion. Further, Trump knew he
badly needed to demonstrate some eventempered leadership.
It would be naive to think this signals
that an old Trump can learn new tricks. Or
that this marks a genuine pivot. Still,
Trump is nothing if not politically heliotropic, which is to say, he covets praise and
approval. He’ll get some for his Tuesday
performance.
And that creates the hope that every
now and again, when deadlines press on
problems that could otherwise blow up in
his face, Trump may find the wherewithal
to rise above his usual instincts.
Scot Lehigh can be reached at
lehigh@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter
@GlobeScotLehigh.
DAN WASSERMAN
STEPHEN FITCH
Putney, Vt.
Oprah has many gifts,
but do they translate to statecraft?
I love Oprah. Her integrity, her ability to communicate, her
empathy are all without question. My values also tend to
align with hers. So why am I against an Oprah-for-president campaign? The 2016 elections prove that just because
a candidate shares the ideals of a voting bloc, that doesn’t
necessarily make them qualified for elected office.
Today’s voters mistakenly equate fame with the ability to
lead or govern. However, fame can be attained in many
ways in today’s culture: through cable television, Hollywood, YouTube, Twitter, talk radio — all wonderful platforms to gain celebrity status, but not always a marker for
fitness to govern.
Back in the 1970s, advertisers learned that you sell the
sizzle, not the steak, and today’s voters have fallen for the
same scheme. They crave spectacle over substance, bullet
points over depth. The current White House is a case in
point.
Oprah Winfrey and other media-savvy types may be repulsed by Washington politics, as are many of us, but revulsion of the status quo is not in itself an electable quality.
BRIAN POMODORO
Pembroke
Lawmakers are right to resist
update of wiretap law
In the article “Wiretap law update resisted” (Page A1, Jan.
2), Martha Coakley, former state attorney general, asserts
that Beacon Hill lawmakers’ “unwillingness” to expand
wiretapping authority is “a little inexplicable.” It’s not incomprehensible, however; it is simply a matter of legislators doing the job they were elected to do: pass and uphold
laws in the best interest of the people, from every strata of
society.
District attorneys argue that expanding the law is necessary to prosecute dangerous criminals. That’s contradicted
by the chief legal counsel of the Massachusetts Bar Association: “There are enough tools already available to federal
prosecutors, and we worry about the erosion of people’s
privacy rights and due process rights if we expand the wiretap law here in Massachusetts.”
Further, the governor’s wiretap bill was not the modest
expansion of the statute its backers claimed; beyond giving
DAs the power to wiretap only in murder cases, it would
have enabled them to use wiretaps even in the lowest-level
drug investigations.
I am grateful for the integrity and foresight of our legislators to pass on such an unwise expansion of the war on
drugs, which continues to disproportionately target and incarcerate people of color.
JENNIFER QUERBES
Acton
JEFF JACOBY
As a matter of fact, minimum
wage laws hurt the poor
W
hen National Review’s
critic at large, Kyle Smith,
last week published a
piece with the headline
“We Were Wrong About
Stop-and-Frisk,” people noticed.
Smith and National Review are conservative. Like many conservatives, they had
predicted that if Mayor Bill de Blasio of
New York fulfilled his campaign pledge to
end stop-and-frisk — the police practice of
stopping, questioning, and patting down
people merely because they seemed suspicious — crime in the city would go up. But
that’s not what happened.
In the four years since de Blasio became
mayor, conceded Smith, major crime has
declined “to the lowest rates since New York
City began keeping extensive records on
crime in the early 1960s.” The left-wing
mayor was right about stop-and-frisk, and
the right-wing journal said so. In so doing,
it displayed more loyalty to truth than to
theory.
Following facts where they lead is a
principle easier to state than to live up
to, particularly when the facts upend our
preconceptions. Some public-policy debates are endless because they are rooted
in disagreement over fundamental principles — the question of capital punishment, for example. But other disputes
ought to be resolvable, at some point, by
facts on the ground. Advocates of an aggressive stop-and-frisk policy were certain the only alternative was higher
crime rates. They were mistaken. The
honest response is to acknowledge it and
end the debate.
Another controversy that should be laid
to rest is the impact of minimum wage
laws.
When government raises the lowest
hourly wage at which a worker may lawfully be employed, does it help those at
the foot of the economic ladder? The issue has been fought over for decades.
Yet reality repeatedly renders the same
verdict: Artificially hiking minimum
wages makes it harder to employ unskilled workers. Raising the cost of labor invariably prices some marginal laborers out of the job market. Advocates
of higher minimums may wish to ensure
a “living wage” for the working poor. Yet
the result is that fewer poor people get
work.
Two years ago, Seattle’s hourly minimum wage jumped to $13, the second hike
in less than a year. Before the legislation
was enacted, there had been the usual arguments pro and con. But the impact of Seattle’s law is now a matter of facts, not theory. And those facts confirm what opponents of the increase had foretold:
Minimum wage hikes hurt the poor.
In a major research paper last summer,
economists commissioned by the city of Seattle reported that the hike to $13 an hour
caused a decline in the employment of lowwage workers. For those who remained
employed, it caused a sharp cutback in
hours. When the gain from higher hourly
wages was set against the loss of jobs and
hours, the bottom line was stark: “The
minimum wage ordinance lowered lowwage employees’ earnings by an average of
$125 per month in 2016.”
Another 2017 study, by Harvard
Business School scholars, analyzed the
effect of minimum wage hikes on San
Francisco-area restaurants. The upshot:
Every $1 increase in the mandatory
minimum wage led to a 14 percent increase in the likelihood that a medianrated restaurant would go out of business. Decades of empirical research,
dating back to the first federal minimum wage law, have reached similar
conclusions.
In 18 states this month, minimum
wages are going up. Will those changes
make unskilled workers more employable? Will the hours they work be increased? As in Seattle and the Bay Area,
these questions will have answers. Soon
enough, fresh data will shed even more
light on the question of what happens to
unskilled laborers when their labor is
made more costly. Maybe that will be
the moment when someone more loyal
to truth than to theory publishes a reality-based essay conceding: “We Were
Wrong About the Minimum Wage.”
Jeff Jacoby can be reached at
jacoby@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter
@jeff_jacoby.
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
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A11
Opinion
BOSTONGLOBE.COM/OPINION
Editorial
A blow to Salvadorans — and the Mass. economy
F
The protections were granted to Salvadorans for the first
time in 2001, after a series of earthquakes killed more than
1,000 people and displaced more than 1 million. The program has been reauthorized 11 times after different administrations have reached the same conclusion: Extraordinary
conditions — poverty, governance challenges, extreme violence — make it unlikely the Central American country could
adequately handle the return of its nationals.
That’s still true. Conditions in El Salvador remain dire.
Trump’s own State Department issued an advisory warning
American travelers of El Salvador’s “high rates of crime and
violence,” adding that gang activity is widespread. “El Salvador has one of the highest homicide levels in the world.”
Meanwhile, the economic impact of the roughly 6,000 Salvadorans with protected status who live in Massachusetts is
significant. About $400 million would be lost from state’s annual GDP if they were to leave, according to a Center for
American Progress study. They work in construction, the restaurant industry, as janitors, and in maintenance — like Portillo and her husband. Portillo’s union, 32BJ SEIU, represents
18,000 property service workers in the Greater Boston area.
A spokeswoman for the union says that at least 1,000 of their
or the past 16 years, Juana Portillo has worked for
C&W Services, a Massport contractor, cleaning terminal B at Logan. Portillo and her husband, a maintenance worker at a building in downtown Boston,
bought a home in Chelsea two years ago and have five American-born kids. Originally from El Salvador, Portillo and her
husband are law-abiding, tax-paying residents of Massachusetts. Their kids attend the Chelsea public schools and are
American in every sense.
Yet President Trump intends to throw workers like Portillo and her husband out of the country, a callous move that
will also turn their children into collateral damage. On Monday, the US Department of Homeland Security announced
the termination of the temporary protected status for El Salvador, a program that has allowed more than 200,000 immigrants like Portillo and her husband to legally live and work
in the US. The termination is effective Sept. 9, 2019, meaning
they have 18 months to leave or face deportation.
Beyond the cruelty of turning our backs on longstanding
vetted immigrants and sending them to a country that cannot absorb them, ending protected status for citizens of El
Salvador is a self-inflicting wound to the American economy.
members are Salvadorans with protected status.
There’s another universe of people affected: an estimated
190,000 US-born children of Salvadoran parents in the country on protected status.
“I don’t plan on abandoning my kids here if the time
comes for us to leave,” said Portillo. “But it’s tragic to take
them to a country they don’t belong and know nothing
about. Our lives are . . . here. There is no future there for us.”
Ten-year-old Gabriela Martinez feels the same. She’s a US
citizen and lives with her mom, Carolina Mata, and her teenage brother in Leominster. Mata has worked in the same
plastics factory in Leominster for almost 17 years. The
Trump administration’s decision would be dire for Mata and
her daughter. “Life in El Salvador is bad,” Martinez said.
“There are a lot of gangs that threaten people.”
A lot can happen in 18 months, and Congress could extend the protections to save children like Martinez and families like Portillo’s. The humanitarian case is clear. It is an advocacy fight that could use the voice of the local business
community. The cleaning companies and factories and other
employers that have benefited from the labor of Salvadoran
workers should speak up for them and their families now.
RENÉE GRAHAM
Oprah for
president? Get
a grip, America
Y
es, she can! But, no, she
shouldn’t.
More than an international
icon, Oprah Winfrey is damn near a
miracle. Born in 1950s rural
Mississippi to a single, teenage
mother, Winfrey survived poverty,
racism, an itinerant childhood, teenage
pregnancy, the death of her premature
child, and physical and sexual abuse to
become one of the most savvy and
revered self-made billionaires on the planet.
None of this means she should be president of the United
States.
Yes, Winfrey gave an electrifying speech Sunday after
accepting the Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime
achievement at the Golden Globes. Some heard a rousing
moment catapulted by the #MeToo movement; others are
convinced this was tantamount to a candidate’s
announcement.
Bill Kristol, editor of the conservative Weekly Standard,
tweeted, “Oprah: Sounder on economics than Bernie
Sanders, understands Middle America better than Elizabeth
Warren, less touchy-feely than Joe Biden, more pleasant
than Andrew Cuomo, more charismatic than John
Hickenlooper. #ImWithHer.” Meryl Streep told The
Washington Post, “She launched a rocket tonight. I want her
to run for president. I don’t think she had any intention [of
declaring]. But now she doesn’t have a choice.”
Of course she has a choice. She’s Oprah. Get a grip,
America.
When asked last year about her political ambitions on
“CBS This Morning,” Winfrey said, “There will be no
running for office of any kind for me.” On Tuesday, Gayle
King, that show’s coanchor and Winfrey’s BFF, said Winfrey
is “intrigued by the idea. She loves this country and would
like to be of service in some way, but I don’t think that she’s
actively considering it.”
That’s not stopping speculation about Winfrey, who
delivered the kind of soaring oratory we once expected from
our president.
And speaking of President Obama, some see parallels
between his 2004 Democratic National Convention speech,
which all but announced his presidential aspirations, and
Winfrey’s passionate opus. Yet a great speech does not a
president make. If the past year has shown us anything —
and it’s shown us far more than we ever could have
imagined — being an effective leader must be determined
by more than a famous name who can rally a politically
aligned crowd.
I am not comparing Winfrey and President Trump. She
is intelligent and empathetic. Personally and through her
foundation, she has donated hundreds of millions to causes
abcde
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ranging from college scholarships and the National African
American Museum of History and Culture to the
International Brain Research Foundation. And Winfrey
built her career without a $1 million head start. She’s
everything Trump thinks he is.
Winfrey would be a better president than Trump, but
that’s not saying much. And it’s not the same thing as
endorsing Winfrey for president.
Celebrities have always been sought for political careers.
It’s a bipartisan affliction — Senate majority leader Mitch
McConnell is reportedly trying to convince J.D. Vance,
“Hillbilly Elegy” author and Trump America whisperer, to
run for the Senate in Ohio. On the Democratic side, some
are encouraging San Antonio Spurs coach Gregg Popovich,
an outspoken Trump critic, to move from the basketball
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court to the political arena.
None of this speaks well of American politics, where
name recognition is becoming more important than actual
political experience. We’re already struggling with the dire
results of that misadventure. Nor is it a great sign that
Democrats are more excited about Winfrey than any of the
lawmakers also mentioned as possible 2020 contenders.
The party is at sea; Winfrey won’t bail them out.
Democrats need focus, not distractions. Winfrey might
be intrigued by the chatter, but believe her when she says
she’s not interested in running. Besides, why would she
want to be president? She’s already Oprah.
Renée Graham can be reached at renee.graham@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter @reneeygraham.
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Dan Krockmalnic General Counsel
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Charles H. Taylor Founder & Publisher 1873-1921
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Pot dispensaries forced to go cash­only after vendor exits
uMARIJUANA
Continued from Page A1
his office Monday to say that recent comments by the top federal prosecutor in Massachusetts hinting at a crackdown on
cannabis firms and their financial institutions made it “too
risky to continue.” As a result,
Revolutionary Clinics and at
least nine other medical dispensaries of the 17 currently
operating in the state will soon
only accept cash.
Merchant Services Consulting Group did not respond to
multiple requests for comment.
With recreational pot sales
scheduled to begin in July, Cooper now fears there will be few
financial institutions willing to
serve Massachusetts marijuana
businesses. For example, he
said, banks from Colorado,
where recreational dispensaries have been selling the drug
for four years, were poised to
expand into Massachusetts but
are now reconsidering. “It’s going to slow them down,” he
said.
The ominous remarks from
the US attorney in Massachusetts, Andrew E. Lelling, a recent Trump administration appointee, drew an increasingly
sharp response Tuesday from
the state’s political leaders.
Lelling and other federal
prosecutors were given broad
discretion by Sessions to pursue cases against anyone involved in the marijuana trade.
While other US attorneys hinted — or said explicitly — that
they would continue the handsoff approach of the Obama era,
Lelling on Monday declined to
make a similar promise. Instead he said he would “vigorously enforce” federal rules,
raising the prospect that dispensaries, cultivators, and financial institutions could be
prosecuted for activities legal
under Massachusetts law.
That prompted Republican
Governor Charlie Baker, who
opposed the 2016 ballot initiative that legalized pot in Massachusetts, to make some of his
most supportive comments
about cannabis to date as he
urged Lelling to back off on
marijuana and focus instead on
the deadly opioid crisis.
“What I would stress to him
is the big public health crisis
we’re dealing with in the Commonwealth these days is opioid
addiction and street drugs like
fentanyl,” Baker said, according
to his office. “A big message to
the US attorney’s office should
be, if you have limited resources, let’s focus on the thing that
is killing people every day here
in the Commonwealth.”
The governor went on to say
cannabis has “proven to be an
effective way to deal with nausea, anxiety, pain, and a variety
of other issues.”
A top official at the state
Cannabis Control Commission,
which will oversee the recreational pot market, went even
further, calling the Trump administration’s approach regressive.
“Prohibition has been a failure,” said commissioner Shaleen Title, who said she was
speaking for herself and not the
agency. “It’s time to let go of the
idea of locking people up over
marijuana. The people of Massachusetts have been clear that
they want a safely regulated industry with new jobs and tax
revenue.”
Steve Hoffman, chairman of
the commission, said at a meeting of the agency Tuesday that
it would move forward with
setting up regulations for the
recreational pot industry.
Ironically, the cannabis
commission Tuesday approved
a program designed by Title to
provide incentives to residents
of communities with disproportionately high rates of arrests for drug crimes to apply
for cannabis businesses licenses.
Lelling has set a tough tone
on pot since the decision by
Sessions last week to rescind
Obama-era policies that protected licensed businesses that
work with marijuana, including financial institutions, in
states where it is legal. He
called cannabis a “dangerous
drug” and pledged to “aggres-
JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2017
‘What I would stress to him is the big public health crisis
we’re dealing with in the Commonwealth these days is
opioid addiction and street drugs like fentanyl.’
GOVERNOR CHARLIE BAKER
sively investigate and prosecute
bulk cultivation and trafficking
cases, and those who use the
federal banking system illegally.”
That comment apparently
spooked Merchant Services
Consulting Group, which handles debit card transactions for
most the state’s medical dispensaries. Dispensary owners said
the company notified them
Monday that it would no longer
accept marijuana-related debit
card transactions from Massachusetts.
The change, Cooper and
others in the state’s medical
cannabis industry said, means
that dispensaries will have to
process more cash and transport deposits to the bank more
often, adding to their costs and
increasing security risks.
A number of medical dispensaries on Tuesday told customers that they must pay in
cash, including Central Ave
Compassionate Care in Ayer, In
G ood Health in Brockt o n,
Healthy Pharms in Georgetown, Ermont in Quincy, and
Garden Remedies in Newton,
according to online posts and emails to patients compiled by
marijuana activist Eric Casey.
Credit cards have never been
accepted at dispensaries.
A group representing patients also decried the move to
cash-only transactions, and
called on Massachusetts political leaders to shore up the
state’s medical marijuana program.
The shift in federal policy
has “caused ample confusion
within the patient community,”
said Nichole Snow, president of
the Massachusetts Patient Advocacy Alliance. She asked Baker and Attorney General Maura
Healey “to assure us they will
offer as much state guidance
for vendors and providers as
possible, and . . . do what is necessary to protect safe access for
patients.”
A congressional budget rider bars the Department of Justice from spending money on
most prosecutions of state-licensed medical marijuana operations, meaning the current
operating dispensaries should
be safe from raids despite the
recent policy shift. That
amendment is due to expire later this month along with the
current federal budget.
Even if that amendment is
renewed, it would not protect
financial institutions that service marijuana businesses —
whether medical or recreational.
So far, the one bank in Massachusetts that dispensaries say
provides them with financial
services — Century Bank of
Medford — appears to be continuing that business. Century
did not respond to requests for
comment.
Some industry specialists
said the withdrawal of Merchant Services hardly signals
the end of the marijuana industry in Massachusetts.
The pullback by the payment processor in Massachusetts “is not a good sign at all,
obviously, but the sky is not falling,” said Kris Krane, a consultant to numerous cannabis
firms in the state. “No one
should get ahead of themselves
and extrapolate that to mean
there’s worse to come.
However, Krane cautioned
that the Trump administration’s posture toward the industry could significantly dampen
investment in the space.
“If investors who are interested in the space start backing
out because of increased federal actions, that would really impact smaller players,” Krane
said. “They already have less access to angel investors than
folks who are wealthy.”
Dan Adams can be reached at
daniel.adams@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@Dan_Adams86.
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Business
A lack of female speakers
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male­dominated industries
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For breaking news, go to
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AG sues Brockton mental health care company
Kraft funds van to help city address addiction crisis
Intriguing, if way­out, ideas on display at CES in Vegas
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T H E B O S T O N G L O B E W E D N E S DAY, JAN UA RY 1 0 , 2 01 8 | B O S T ON G L O B E .C O M / M E TR O
Adrian Walker
Breaking
tradition
Chrystal Kornegay
would be the very first
person to say that she
doesn’t fit anyone’s traditional image of a
banker, not even her
own.
But that is exactly
what she became on
Tuesday, when she was tapped as the first
woman and the first person of color to lead
MassHousing, the billion-dollar, quasi-public agency that drives investment in affordable housing across the state. Among other
roles, it’s basically the state’s bank for financing affordable housing.
Until now, its leadership has been the
domain of low-key, white male bureaucrats
who served dutifully, and under the radar.
That’s about to get shaken up, because
there is nothing reticent about the dreadlocked passionate housing activist from
Brooklyn who will assume the helm sometime in February.
Kornegay assumes the post after three
years as an undersecretary for housing and
urban development. But her new role caps
a two-decade rise from poverty in New York
City to influence in her accidentally adopted hometown of Boston.
“I don’t think of myself as the typical
kind of person to do this job, because I
grew up black and poor,” Kornegay said. “I
pulled myself up by my bootstraps, but I
had to make my boot and my straps. Even if
you look at people of color in these roles,
it’s not the black woman in dreads from
Bed-Stuy.’’
Kornegay grew up in the BedfordStuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn. She
was a young community activist working in
job training programs when she noticed
something: Few of the people enrolled in
her program seemed to finish.
“People couldn’t get through the program, because they had all these crazy
housing situations,” Kornegay said. “They
had to move, or someone was kicking them
out. And the other thing I noticed was that
the young people around me, including myself, were thinking about what we wanted
to be when we grew up. But so much of that
was defined by what we saw around us. So
it got me into the idea that where you live
matters.”
After finishing Hunter College, she won
a scholarship to study urban planning at
MIT. After graduate school there, she eventually became the head of Urban Edge, the
great neighborhood housing program in
Jackson Square, on the Roxbury-Jamaica
Plain border.
That’s where Charlie Baker became part
of her story, when he was running for governor in 2014. After they met at an event
for housing activists, Kornegay invited him
to visit Urban Edge to see what her community needed. She extended the same offer to all the gubernatorial candidates, she
says, but only Baker took her up on it.
Then, to her surprise, he kept dropping
by, to talk about housing, and about neighborhoods. “Whenever I was in the neighborhood after that, I just pulled into the
parking lot and knocked on the door and
asked if she was there,” the governor said
Tuesday. “First off, I liked her. And, second,
I got a point of view about housing and development that was just different than I got
from a lot of other people. I just developed
a real appreciation for both her intelligence
and her sensibilities.”
When Baker won, Kornegay was quickly
tapped for the new administration, despite
never having worked in government. She
went from being consumed with community issues to dealing with housing on a much
larger scale.
In her new role, Kornegay will play a
major role in figuring out how to fund affordable housing. She comes to it with a
deep knowledge of both the issue and her
new institution — in her state job, she sat
on the board of MassHousing.
She also bring years of wondering how
the area’s real estate boom will affect the
many people who can’t afford to take part
in it. It’s no longer a problem affecting the
so-called working poor. Housing is a middle-class issue, too. “When I think about affordable housing, I’m just thinking about
people who are working,” Kornegay said.
“Where are they going to live?”
Adrian Walker is a Globe columnist. He can
be reached at adrian.walker@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter @adrian_walker.
Vineyard tribe eyes casino options
Wampanoag may
seek mainland facility
By Mark Arsenault
GLOBE STAFF
The Wampanoag Tribe of Gay
Head (Aquinnah) has new leverage
in its plans to build a gambling hall
on Martha’s Vineyard and is signaling a readiness to lobby for a more
lucrative prize — a casino on the
mainland.
On Monday, the tribe won a substantial legal victory when the US
Supreme Court declined to hear a
case challenging the proposed slot
parlor, leaving in place a lower
court decision that appears to let
the project move forward.
The federally recognized tribe
wants to build a small casino with
several hundred machines on sovereign land on the western end of
the island, as permitted by federal
law. Vineyard officials and residents have fought hard against the
plans, saying a casino would
change the character of the beloved
summer resort and occasional pres-
idential retreat.
“Now that this issue is finally resolved, we’d like to put the legal
battles behind us, and focus on
working with the town and Commonwealth; to weigh our options
and determine the best pathway
forward for us to provide the necessary services of health care, elders’
and children’s services, education,
housing, and employment opportunities for all of our tribal members,”
the tribe’s chairwoman, Cheryl Andrews-Maltais, said in a statement.
From the tribe’s point of view,
‘A mainland casino
has long been their
end game.’
CLYDE BARROW, University of
Texas professor, on the Wampanoag
Tribe’s efforts
the best path forward could be a
mainland casino in Southeastern
Massachusetts, which would bring
in far more business than a small
TRIBE, Page B4
PHOTOS BY JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF
Farewell to a colorful,
charismatic pol
As treasurer and lottery director
for many years, Robert Crane
could have been considered the
state’s “numbers’’ guy. But the
tributes and stories at his funeral
Mass in Wellesley Tuesday
crackled with the more personal
qualities of humor, generosity, music, and loyalty.
Many old-time colleagues came, including former
House speaker Charles Flaherty (left), talking to
ex-senator Warren Tolman. B4.
Mentally ill prisoners sue
over solitary confinement
By Maria Cramer
GLOBE STAFF
Three inmates with serious mental
illness filed a lawsuit against officials at
the Bristol County Jail Tuesday, alleging
they were placed in solitary confinement for at least 22 hours a day while receiving little treatment for their conditions.
“It should be obvious to defendants
and to any reasonable person that the
conditions imposed [on the inmates]
cause tremendous mental anguish, suffering and pain to such individuals,” asserts the lawsuit, filed against Sheriff
Thomas M. Hodgson and other jail officials in Plymouth Superior Court. “Defendants are deliberately indifferent to
the substantial risk of serious harm suffered by plaintiffs.”
The allegations are based on complaints by the inmates and interviews
with dozens of former inmates at the
Bristol County House of Correction and
Jail in North Dartmouth and the Ash
Street Jail in New Bedford.
After receiving repeated complaints
about the facilities, lawyers from two advocacy groups, Prisoners’ Legal Services
of Massachusetts and the Mental Health
Legal Advisors
Committee, interviewed 100
inmates who either had mental
health issues or
had been put in
solitary confinement, also
known as segregation.
They also reSheriff Thomas
Hodgson is accused v i e w e d t h e i r
of ignoring mental m e d i c a l r e health issues.
cords.
“ We had
been hearing horror stories for many
years from prisoners in Bristol,” said
Bonnie Tenneriello, a staff attorney at
Prisoners’ Legal Services.
The lawsuit accuses the Bristol County Sheriff’s Office of failing to assess inmates’ mental health history before
placing them in segregation or providing effective treatment.
Hodgson sharply denied the allegations in the complaint and said the lawyers had been manipulated by the inmates.
SOLITARY, Page B4
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
Weimaraner Riley has an important job at the MFA.
A work of bark
MFA to train puppy to detect pests
By Steve Annear
GLOBE STAFF
The newest staff member
at the Museum of Fine Arts
doesn’t have much of an eye
for aesthetics, which makes
him a bit of a peculiar addition to the renowned institution.
He didn’t attend a fancy
college where they teach students about art appraisals.
And he won’t be able to differentiate a van Gogh from a
Degas, or an oil on canvas
from an ancient Egyptian
bust.
But he does have this: a
keen sense of smell that
could help officials at the
museum keep its many exhibits, both new and old,
from going to the dogs.
DOG, Page B3
B2
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TheMetroMinute
GET SMART
NEW YORK TIMES FILE/2016
Cutting through
fog on marijuana
By Dan Adams
GLOBE STAFF
The announcement by US Attorney General Jeff Sessions last week giving federal
prosecutors the authority to press marijuana
cases in states where it has been legalized is
stirring confusion and wariness among Massachusetts officials and consumers. Here is a
look at five key questions.
Is marijuana legal in Massachusetts?
Massachusetts voters approved Question
4, which legalized marijuana, by a vote of 54
percent to 46 percent in a statewide referendum in 2016. Recreational pot sales are on
track to begin in July under the supervision
of the newly-created Cannabis Control Commission. There’s one major problem: Marijuana is still illegal under federal law.
Why wasn’t there a problem before
this?
As states nationwide began approving
marijuana for medical or recreational use,
the Obama administration curtailed enforcement of the federal marijuana laws in
those states, sharply limiting prosecution of
dispensaries, banks, and other participants
in the newly legitimate marijuana business.
But the Trump administration last week rescinded those policies. As a result, each US
attorney now has more flexibility to enforce
— or not — the federal prohibition on production and sale of the drug in those states.
So what are federal prosecutors in Mas­
sachusetts planning to do?
On Monday, Massachusetts US Attorney Andrew E. Lelling said,
“Congress has unambiguously made it a federal
crime to cultivate, distribute, and/or possess
marijuana. As a law enforcement officer in the
executive branch, it is my
US Attorney
Andrew Lelling sworn responsibility to
enforce that law.” However, he also said he would assess on a case-bycase basis whether it was worth using “limited federal resources” to clamp down on marijuana operations. Massachusetts Attorney
General Maura Healey said she wants more
clarification on what he meant.
Why are people concerned about Lel­
ling’s statement?
While federal prosecutors in some other
parts of the country suggested state-licensed
marijuana growers and retailers wouldn’t be
the focus of enforcement efforts, Lelling, an
appointee of President Trump, has declined
to make such a pledge. The prosecutor left
open the possibility he would spare stateregulated companies to focus federal law enforcement resources on illicit growers and
dealers. But last week he called marijuana a
“dangerous drug” and said his office would
go after “bulk cultivation” operations.
What effects do people foresee on the
burgeoning marijuana industry in the
state?
Some in the industry are concerned that,
with the threat of federal enforcement hanging over their heads, investors might shun
marijuana businesses, and banks might
drop them as clients. They also say it might
reduce the incentive for underground operators to join the state-regulated market, undermining licensed companies and resulting
in less safe products.
Others say that the threat of federal action won’t be a problem, contending that
cannabis has always been illegal at the federal level and that investors in the space are
comfortable with the risk.
Martin Finucane of the Globe staff
contributed to this report.
TIME MACHINE
Jan. 10, 1947: A group of wives of Boston
police officers lobbies the Legislature for raises for their husbands, the Globe reports. Their
goal: a $3,000 per year minimum salary for
patrolmen.
KEITH BEDFORD/GLOBE STAFF
A BIRD (OR TWO OR THREE) IN THE HAND — Jeff Kennedy fed pigeons rice in the Boston Common Tuesday.
Randolph couple lucky in life, love
By Travis Andersen
GLOBE STAFF
RANDOLPH — Jane and Robert Goodwin are living quietly here in retirement and caring for three pets, a rescue dog named Blue and two cats,
Nickel and Penny.
They’ve taken in rescue animals for years, and maybe that’s why fate has
rewarded them with a remarkable stroke of good fortune. First, Jane Goodwin, 70, won a $1 million Publishers Clearing House prize in August, and
then Robert, 72, collected a $1 million prize from the state lottery Monday.
For Jane, there’s an easy explanation for their back-to-back windfalls.
“Because we’re such marvelous people,” she joked during an interview
with her husband in the kitchen of the couple’s modest home, while Blue
looked on quizzically.
She and Robert said they have no idea why they won two hefty prizes in
a matter of months, and they have no strategy for playing the lottery.
“Just get lucky,” Robert said.
Long before their cash prizes, the couple was lucky in love.
They met when they were both working at Boston Edison and married
in 1969. On Tuesday, they didn’t hesitate when asked whether they could
recall their first date: a trip to Nantasket Beach in Hull.
And their love of the ocean continues. The Goodwins have made several
trips to Hawaii, and, after spreading out some of the winnings among their
Jane and Robert Goodwin
have both won $1 million
prizes in recent months.
nieces and nephews, they plan to go
back.
Jane found out she had won the Publishers Clearing House prize on a dock in
Plymouth, where she had returned from
a trip to Cape Cod with a friend.
She didn’t think the company representatives were looking for her.
Then the reps shouted, “Jane! Jane!”
and she realized she had won.
“They were wonderful,” she said.
Four months later, Robert bought a
$1 million Platinum Payout scratch ticket at Fast Lane Convenience in Holbrook.
He scratched off the winning number
at home and couldn’t believe his eyes.
“I said it’s gotta be fake,” he said.
“This can’t be true.”
But when the couple visited lottery headquarters in Braintree on Monday, their hot streak was confirmed.
Travis Andersen can be reached at tandersen@globe.com.
AROUND THE REGION
BOSTO N
Primary election set for
right after Labor Day
The 2018 statewide primary elections will be
held Tuesday, Sept. 4, the day after Labor Day,
and Secretary of State William Galvin has asked
legislative leaders to fund a five-day early voting
period leading up to the primaries. The date of
the state primary is usually settled without much
discussion or public attention, but this year Galvin was required by law to move the primary to
an earlier date in September due to a conflict
with a Jewish religious holiday. His choice, Sept.
4, is the earliest possible date Galvin could have
set for the elections. Galvin’s office said his determination came after consultation with House
Speaker Robert DeLeo and acting Senate President Harriette Chandler. (State House News)
WAR R E N
safe filled with about $90,000 worth of valuables,
according to court documents. Thomas Balliet
reported the theft last Friday, after he returned
from the funeral of his fiancee, Audra Johnson.
The daughter, Alyce Davenport, had recently
been kicked out of the home because of her problems with drugs, according to a police report.
Balliet told police he believed Davenport, along
with her boyfriend, Diron Conyers, broke in and
stole the safe. Davenport, Balliet told police, did
not attend her mother’s funeral and did not answer phone calls from relatives during and after
the funeral. The duo were arrested Saturday at a
motel in Sturbridge. Davenport and Conyers
were arraigned Monday in East Brookfield District Court on a slew of charges, including breaking into a depository, larceny over $250, larceny
from a building, malicious destruction of property, and stealing a will. Davenport was held on
$15,000 bail. Conyers was held without bail, due
to a warrant in a separate case, Worcester prosecutors said.
CON CO R D, N . H .
Police say daughter
Legislators take step on
stole safe during funeral
legalizing marijuana
A woman is facing charges that she broke into
her dead mother’s Warren home with her boyfriend during the mother’s funeral and stole a
State lawmakers moved toward legalizing the
recreational use of marijuana on Tuesday even
though a commission studying the issue is
months away from finishing its work. The House
gave preliminary approval to a bill that would allow adults to possess up to 1 ounce of marijuana
and to cultivate it in limited quantities. Provisions that would have created a regulatory system for selling and taxing the drug were dropped
from the bill, which advanced to the House Ways
and Means Committee on a vote of 207-139. Opponents argued the bill is premature because a
commission created to study the issue won’t
make its recommendations until November. (AP)
H A RT FO R D
Governor proposes ban
on gun bump stocks
Connecticut Governor Dannel P. Malloy has proposed a statewide ban on bump stocks, the devices designed to make semi-automatic rifles mimic
the firing action of fully automatic weapons. The
Democratic governor announced the legislation
Tuesday, citing the October mass shooting in Las
Vegas in which the shooter used a bump stock to
kill 58 people, including Rhonda LeRocque, 42,
of Tewksbury, and injure hundreds more. Possession and sale of bump stocks and other rate-offire enchancers would be felonies carrying up to
five years in prison. (AP)
POLICE BLOTTER
R HEROIC FIREFIGHTERS While a raging fouralarm fire was consuming a large Lynn apartment building Monday, two Lynn firefighters
rushed to the third floor, pulled a woman out of a
smoke-filled apartment, and carried her to safety, fire officials said. The woman, whose name
was not released, suffered significant burns and
was rushed to Massachusetts General Hospital,
Lynn District Chief Stephen Archer said. Her
condition was not released. An estimated 28 people were left homeless. The fire might have been
started by food left on a stove in the injured
woman’s apartment, but the investigation is ongoing and no formal decision has been made on
the cause, officials said. The wood-frame building at 26 Broad St. was built in 1860 and contained 18 apartments, according to records and
officials.
R RESIDENTS ESCAPE Ten people fled a house
fire in Lancaster on Monday night as a resident
knocked on doors to alert people to the blaze, fire
officials said. Lancaster Fire Chief Michael Han-
son said his department received a 911 call at
11:57 p.m. reporting the fire at 81 Narrow Lane,
and firefighters spent at least two hours battling
the blaze, which was difficult due to “hoarding
conditions” on the third floor. The cause of the
three-alarm fire appears to be accidental and
electrical in nature, according to Hanson. There
were no injuries. Hanson said a resident on the
third floor was awoken by the sound of a smoke
alarm. She grabbed her baby and knocked on the
doors of the other apartments, alerting the other
tenants.
R SUSPECTS ARRESTED The Canton Police Department made two arrests in a violent New
Year’s Eve armed home invasion, police officials
said. David K. Lynch, 19, of Abington surrendered to police on Monday and was charged with
assault with a dangerous weapon, illegal possession of ammunition, discharging a firearm within a dwelling, and drug violations, police said.
Police also arrested Richard P. Natale, 22, of
Brockton on Friday on drug charges. Police said
both men were involved with the Dec. 31 home
invasion at the Avalon Housing Complex on Randolph Street that included a report of shots fired.
No injuries were reported, police said in a statement. After securing a search warrant of the
property, police found a money-counting machine, a scale, a sum of US currency, and $80,000
to $100,000 worth of marijuana, they said. They
also found ammunition, both discharged and
live, inside and around the property, police said.
R WOMAN STABBED A 23-year-old Fitchburg
woman was arrested Tuesday morning after
stabbing another woman, police said. Fitchburg
police arrested Monique Baldwin in Leominster
on charges of assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, said Fitchburg Police Captain Steven Giannini. The confrontation occurred at 8:26
a.m. near 186 Charles St. between Baldwin and
another Fitchburg resident. The two women are
“well-known to each other,” Giannini said. “It’s
still under investigation,” he said. “But it’s a very
minor injury.”
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G l o b e
Blaze
tears
through
store
But says it’s wrong
to condemn breed
By John R. Ellement
GLOBE STAFF
By Danny McDonald
GLOBE STAFF
and Adam Sennott
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
SCOTT EISEN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
A fire spokesman said no one was injured Tuesday evening in the quick-moving fire at
Nikki’s Fashion clothing store in Roxbury.
Traffic was heavy in Dudley
Square at the time of the fire,
said MacDonald. Several
streets were closed to traffic in
the square area, snarling traffic further.
The fire is believed to have
started in the rear of the clothing store, the spokesman said.
It crept up a wall of the building and across the ceiling,
eventually working its way up
through the rubber roof of
the structure, he said.
The building was not in
danger of collapse, he said.
The nearby liquor store suffered minor smoke damage,
while the three-story building
suffered minor damage as fire-
fighters used it to battle the
fire in the clothing store, MacDonald said.
Most of the fire was
knocked down within about
30 minutes, said MacDonald.
About 90 firefighters responded to the blaze.
The store was closed when
the fire started, said MacDonald. Firefighters had to break
into the building to gain access, using saws to cut through
metal grates in the front and
rear of the building.
The interior of the clothing
store appeared to be blackened and charred Thursday
night as firefighters walked
through the wreckage of the
blaze shortly after 7 p.m.
Tuesday’s blaze marked the
second fire in Boston to reach
at least four alarms in recent
days. Late Saturday night, a
five-alarm fire badly damaged
a three decker on Allston
Street in Dorchester, displacing 14 people.
The cause of that fire has
yet to be determined, MacDonald said Tuesday night.
Globe correspondent Jacob
Carozza contributed to this
report. McDonald can be
reached at daniel.mcdonald
@globe.com. Sennott can be
reached at adam.sennott
@globe.com.
Pilgrim nuclear plant remains shut down
By David Abel
GLOBE STAFF
Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station remained shut down
Tuesday after power lines that
connect the plant to the region’s electric grid failed during last week’s winter storm.
Officials at Entergy Corp., a
Louisiana-based company that
owns the 46-year-old nuclear
plant, declined to say when
Pilgrim would resume producing power.
“Pilgrim’s return to 100
percent is considered business-sensitive information,
and that information is not
made public,” said Patrick
O’Brien, a plant spokesman.
O’Brien said it was not unusual for the plant to remain
closed for a prolonged period
after a sudden shutdown. During each of the past two winters, Pilgrim went offline for
five days after storms, he said.
“The time offline really re-
News
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lates to the amount of preventative maintenance you undert a k e d u r i n g t h e o u t a g e ,”
O’Brien said.
Officials at the US Nuclear
Regulatory Commission said
they weren’t concerned about
the shutdown.
“ We would not consider
this outage to be out of the ordinary,” said Neil Sheehan, a
spokesman for the commission. “Our view is that we expect safety checks and any repair work to be successfully
completed before the reactor
is restarted.”
He said nuclear plants typically take advantage of unplanned shutdowns to perform required maintenance.
Officials at Pilgrim have
been repairing a safety relief
pilot valve that had been leaking, Sheehan said.
Before restarting the plant,
operators need to complete a
safety checklist and tasks such
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Pilgrim shut the plant down
manually during the storm
last Thursday after an electrical line that provides power to
the plant failed, apparently because of a glitch at another
plant in Sandwich, Sheehan
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Officials at ISO New Eng-
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City
as topping off the fuel tanks of
emergency diesel generators,
he said.
Commission inspectors are
monitoring the maintenance,
Sheehan said.
Control room operators at
Former firefighter
arraigned in child
pornography case
Lottery
TUESDAY MIDDAY
B3
MSPCA official:
dog attack ‘tragic’
Snarls traffic in
Dudley Square
A fast-moving four-alarm
fire swept through a clothing
store in Roxbur y ’s Dudle y
Square during Tuesday even i n g ’s r u s h h o u r, c a u s i n g
$300,000 worth of damage, a
fire official said.
The fire was reported at
about 5:45 p.m. at Nikki’s
Fa s h i o n , l o c a t e d a t 2 3 6 5
Washington St., said Boston
fire spokesman Steve MacDonald at the scene.
No injuries were reported.
The fire was caused by an
electric short-circuit in a baseboard heater, MacDonald said
late Tuesday night.
Heavy smoke and fire could
be seen from the roof as dozens of firefighters attacked
both the rear and front of the
squat, brick, v-shaped building, said MacDonald.
T h e c lo thi ng s tor e wa s
sandwiched between a liquor
store and a three-story buildi n g t h a t i n c l u d e d o ff i c e s ,
which were safely evacuated.
The clothing store is across
the street from the Dudley
MBTA station. Silver Line buses were detoured onto Dudley
Street, according to the T.
Metro
Night
4872
0225
2594
0146
9619
TUESDAY NUMBERS
AROUND NEW ENGLAND
Maine, N.H., Vermont
Day: 3-digit 577
4-digit 6537
Eve: 3-digit 911
4-digit 2301
Rhode Island
1477
A former Hudson firefighter
was arraigned Tuesday in Middlesex Superior Court on a
charge of child pornography after authorities said they found
hundreds of images on his laptop and cellphone.
Raymond Spellman, 44,
pleaded not guilty and was released without bail but ordered
to have no contact with anyone
under age 18 and to continue
counseling, the Middlesex district attorney’s office said.
He could not be reached for
comment Tuesday night.
Spellman resigned after a
search warrant was executed
on May 30 at his home on Dean
Street in Hudson and the electronic devices were confiscated,
prosecutors said. A second warrant was obtained to examine
the devices and turned up more
than 600 digital files, including
videos, the release stated.
Authorities started to investigate Spellman after State Police received a tip in March
from the National Center for
Missing and Exploited Children
about child pornography being
downloaded, prosecutors said.
Adam Sennott can be reached
at adam.sennott@globe.com
land, a company in Holyoke
that operates the region’s grid,
said the lack of power from
Pilgrim hasn’t interrupted the
supply of electricity throughout New England. Pilgrim typically provides enough power
to supply more than a halfmillion homes and businesses.
“The regional power system
is currently operating reliably,”
said Marcia Blomberg, an ISO
New England spokeswoman.
Activists who oppose the
plant, however, said the shutdown should raise red flags.
“You would think at a time
for high energy need. . . that
they would get right back into
the game,” said Diane Turco,
director of Cape Downwinders. “It is also disconcerting
that it takes [an unplanned
shutdown] to initiate preventative maintenance work.”
David Abel can be reached at
dabel@globe.com.
It may never be clear what
triggered a family pit bull into
attacking 1-year-old girl in
their Falmouth home on Sunday, but it is clear that the individual animal is to blame, not
the pit bull breed, according to
the Massachusetts Society for
Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.
“What happened is tragic
and awful,’’ said Michael Keiley,
director of the MSPCA’s adoption program. “But for those of
us who have worked in animal
welfare for a long time . . . there
are many situations where a
family pet may act aggressively,
and it has nothing to do with
the breed. It has a lot to do with
the individual child, the individual animal.”
He said unless an adult witnessed the
moments
leading up
to the attack, it may
never be fully understood what Remmy Goulart
triggered
t h e att a c k
on the young girl. “It could be
anything,’’ he said, including
startling the dog, or not interfering with the animal as it
tried to eat or chew on a bone.
The child was airlifted to
Boston Children’s Hospital for
treatment of injuries to her face
that police described as “major
trauma.”
Relatives of the toddler have
launched a GoFundMe campaign for the family that has
raised $22,780 in 19 hours,
double the original goal of
$10,000, according to the site.
The girl is identified as Remmy
and her parents as Stephenie
and Reece.
“As many of you know, Remmy is at Boston Children’s
(Hospital) for an undetermined
amount of time. While there,
she will undergo multiple surgeries,’’ the posting reads. “Your
donation will help with incoming medical expenses, as well as
accommodations so Reece and
Stephenie can stay close by at
all times.”
According to Falmouth police, the pit bull-terrier had
been part of the Goulart family
living in a Brick Kiln Road
home for about five years when
it attacked the child in the
kitchen around 9 a.m., Sunday,
while the father was nearby.
Reece Goulart first tried to
separate the child and the animal, and when that was unsuccessful, he tried to shoot the
dog but realized the gun was
unloaded, police wrote. He
then grabbed a knife and
stabbed the animal until it
died.
Susan L. Moran, chairwoman of the town’s Board of Selectmen, said she considered the
child’s father a hero for acting
to protect his daughter at risk
of being attacked by the dog
himself. Moran said she does
not know the family and her
knowledge of the case is limited
to details released by police.
“I think that he’s a heroic father who was so completely reactive to make every effort to
save that baby and to himself at
great risk,’’ she said Monday in
a telephone interview. “Our
thoughts and prayers are with
the family, just really hoping
for the best. This is the most
tragic thing I could imagine.”
Moran said there are concerns about dog attacks on
Cape Cod and in her town, but
she said she did not see the value of immediately banning anyone in town from owning a pit
bull.
“I think that would be an
overgeneralization,’’ she said,
adding she is open to discussing how to respond to the dog
attack. “I certainly think this incident should be reviewed . . .
[But] smaller dogs can cause
injury as well and also no matter how vigilant you are. It
seems to me this was really a
tragic accident that the father
responded to heroically.”
Keiley said the MSPCA does
not issue a special warning to
families, especially those with
children, when they seek to
adopt a pit bull. Last year, the
MSPCA adopted out 192 pit
bulls, he said.
The breed, he said, receives
negative press attention in the
same way rottweilers and German shepherds were perceived
to be dangerous breeds following high-profile attacks on humans years ago, but no longer
are considered a threat to humans.
“We feel strongly that pit
bulls are individuals,” he said.
“I have personally done many,
many adoptions with pit bulls
into homes with children and
feel . . . that this is a very secure
situation for the dog, the [family], and the child. There are
many wonderful pit bulls in
homes with kids.”
Last year in Lowell, a pit
bull attacked and killed a 7year-old boy who came near the
fenced backyard where the animal was kept. And nonfatal pit
bull attacks were reported in
Amesbury, Brockton, West
Bridgewater, Norton, and Cambridge, The Boston Globe has
reported.
John R. Ellement can be
reached at
ellement@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @JREbosglobe.
MFA to employ puppy to sniff out pests
uDOG
Continued from Page B1
Riley, a Weimaraner puppy, was recently acquired by the Museum of Fine Arts on a volunteer basis to detect insects and other pests that
might be hiding on existing or incoming collections at the gallery.
Seemingly harmless moths or bugs have the
potential to damage certain types of artwork,
like textiles, wood, or organic materials.
And Riley will be tasked with sniffing them
out — once he has been properly trained, of
course.
“We have lots of things that bring, by their
very nature, bugs or pests with them,” said Katie Getchell, chief brand officer and deputy director of the Museum of Fine Arts. “If he can be
trained to sit down in front of an object that he
smells a bug in, that we can’t smell or see, then
we could take that object, inspect it, and figure
out what’s going on — that would be remarkable in terms of preserving objects.”
The museum has existing protocols in place
to handle any potential infestation issues before they arise, but bringing Riley into the fold
will offer an added layer of protection, she said.
“Pests are an ongoing concern for museums,” Getchell said. “It’s exciting to think about
this as a new way to address the problem.”
The arrival of the floppy-eared pup with the
oversized paws and droopy eyes, marks a firstof-its-kind initiative for the museum. Getchell
said she’s not aware of another institution using a dog for similar work. Riley’s assistance is
being billed as a pilot project, as they get a
sense of his effectiveness.
While the idea of a puppy at the museum
might give art lovers more incentive to visit, Riley will mostly work behind the scenes, meaning he won’t be spotted by those walking
through the galleries on a daily basis.
His scent training, which will take place
with his owner, the museum’s head of Protective Services, will begin in the next few months.
“If it is something that works, it’s something
that other museums, or other libraries, or other
places that collect materials that are susceptible to any kind of any infestation like that
could use as another line of defense,” Getchell
said. “That would be an amazing outcome.”
The American Kennel Club describes the
breed’s demeanor and personality traits as
“fearless, friendly, and obedient,” and notes
that Weimaraners — males can weigh anywhere between 70 to 90 pounds when full
grown — are always “eager to please.”
“The Weimaraner is a graceful dog with
aristocratic features,” the website says. “Bred
for speed, good scenting ability, courage and
intelligence, he remains an excellent game
hunter and active participant in other dog
sports.”
Sue Thomas, who owns Rhode Island-based
Camelot Weimaraner and has been breeding
the dogs for 40 years, said they’re known for
their olfactory capabilities.
“Anything that is determined on ability of
sense of smell could be done with them,” she
said. “I think they’re smart, and I think they’re
very trainable.”
Although Riley is still very young, that sort
of untapped potential could bode well for the
museum and its mission.
“It’s a fun way to think about how we might
be able to improve our care. That’s why we are
here, to care for and share these works of art,”
said Getchell, of the MFA. “If we can do that
through an adorable dog, it’s pretty awesome.”
Steve Annear can be reached at
steve.annear@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @steveannear.
B4
Metro
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
Old guard bids adieu to Robert Q. Crane
Ex­treasurer feted
at funeral Mass
By Emily Sweeney
GLOBE STAFF
WELLESLEY — The old
guard of Massachusetts politics
came out in full force to pay
their respects to former state
treasurer Robert Q. Crane, who
died Friday at 91.
Politicians and power brok e r s g a t h e r e d a t S t . Pa u l
Church in Wellesley Tuesday
and paid a rousing tribute to
the longest-serving state treasurer, who was remembered for
his generosity, charismatic
smile, and colorful personality.
The pews were filled with
many familiar faces, including
Massachusetts House Speaker
Robert A. DeLeo, former speakers Charles Flaherty and Thomas Finneran, and a former lieutenant governor, Thomas P.
O’Neill III.
Boston businessman Jack
Connors spoke at the Mass and
described Crane as a role model. Connors recalled asking
Crane over lunch about which
candidate he should support for
a particular office.
Co n n o r s s a i d C r a n e r e sponded like this: “That’s the
easiest question anyone’s ever
asked me. We’re going to be
with the winner. We’re going to
support everyone, and then remind the winner that ‘We’ve
been with you from the very beginning.’ ”
Connors praised Crane’s
generosity and public service
and joked that when Crane was
treasurer, the unemployment
rat e i n h i s n e i g h b o r h o o d,
Brighton, was under 1 percent.
“Bob Crane used his power
for good. He knew what a job
meant to a family,” Connors
said. “He spent a lifetime doing
good, and nobody did it better.”
When David Crane delivered
his eulogy, he spoke of his father’s humble beginnings in
Brighton and of how he joined
the Marines and ser ved in
World War II.
After graduating from Boston College, Crane got married
and went on to a successful political career in the House of
Representatives from 1957 until 1964, when he was elected
treasurer, a position he held for
26 years. He also served as the
state lottery’s first chairman.
uTRIBE
Continued from Page B1
County Jail in November 2014.
“Nevertheless, he has repeatedly been housed in segregation for prolonged periods,
where at times he has become
delusional as his mental health
deteriorates,” the lawsuit states.
Welch has been in segregation for nearly two years.
Medical professionals recommend that jails and prisons
identify inmates with serious
mental illness and avoid putting them in segregation. But
medical records at the jail show
there is often no clinical review
of inmates before they are segregated, the lawsuit claims.
“When such a clinical review
is documented in the records, it
often appears to be cursory,” it
read.
facility on the island.
“If the Vineyard is the only
alternative, they’ll build on the
Vineyard,” said a person close
to the tribe and familiar with
its thinking. “If there is another
alternative, they’ll build there.”
The person spoke on the
condition of anonymity because the person is not authorized to speak on the tribe’s behalf.
The tribe has long harbored
aspirations for a casino on the
mainland, dating back to at
least the administration of
Governor William Weld in the
1990s.
In 1995, Weld struck a deal
with the tribe to build a casino
in New Bedford, but the plans
fizzled.
“A mainland casino has long
been their end game,” said
Clyde Barrow, a University of
Texas professor who has studied the New England gambling
industry.
In 2012, the Aquinnah tribe
proposed a casino in Freetown
and Lakeville, but residents opposed the idea in a pair of nonbinding votes.
Striking a deal with state officials for a mainland casino
would not be easy, and would
probably require amending the
state’s 2011 casino law, Barrow
said.
“If they were to go down
that road, it’s another decade
away, in my view,” Barrow said.
“It’s way down the road, and a
lot of politics.”
Barrow said he has seen no
appetite among lawmakers to
expand gambling in Massachusetts, especially with the state’s
resort casinos — Wynn Resorts
in Everett and MGM in Springfield — still under construction.
“People want to see what
happens with Springfield and
Wynn,” he said.
The more likely outcome is
that the tribe eventually builds
on its Vineyard reservation,
Barrow said, despite its limitations.
“From a marketing standpoint” a remote spot on a summer resort island “is just a horrible location for a casino,” he
said.
“You don’t go to Martha’s
Vineyard to play slot machines,” he added.
On the other hand, most
tribal casinos in the United
States are small facilities with a
few hundred slots, he said.
These facilities can still turn a
decent profit for a tribe looking
to expand services to its members.
Barrow estimated that a
tribal slot parlor on the Vineyard would earn about $3 million a year, or perhaps a bit
more.
Casino specialist Paul DeBole, a Lasell College political
scientist, said the Vineyard casino would not be taxed by the
state. That could potentially allow the tribe to compete with
commercial casinos by paying
out more in winnings.
Governor Charlie Baker’s office did not address the prospect of discussions with the
tribe, but in a statement
pledged it would “continue to
closely monitor any developments.”
Andrews-Maltais was out of
state Tuesday and not available, her office said.
The Massachusetts Gaming
Commission, which regulates
commercial casinos in the
state, said it “does not currently have any statutory role or authority over the matter involving the Town of Aquinnah and
the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay
Head.”
Still, the commission said
that it will keep an eye on the
developing situation with the
tribe. The state’s other federally
recognized tribe, the Mashpee
Wampanoag, has been trying
for several years to build a tribal casino in Taunton, but its
plans have been tied up in
court.
Maria Cramer can be reached
at mcramer@globe.com. Follow
her on Twitter
@GlobeMCramer.
Mark Arsenault can be reached
at mark.arsenault@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@bostonglobemark
PHOTOS BY JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF
The Rev. Monsignor Joseph Lind celebrated Tuesday’s funeral Mass for Robert Q. Crane at St. Paul Church in Wellesley.
Thomas P. O’Neill III, a former lieutenant governor, was
among the political notables at the funeral.
“People sought him out for
advice, and he always left them
with a smile,” he said.
David Crane said his mother
and father spent more than 60
years together.
“Dad would tell everyone,
her’s was the most important
vote he ever won,” he said.
Former Boston Globe columnist Mike Barnicle also
spoke at the Mass and recalled
Crane’s love of singing with his
band, the Treasury Notes.
“Bob took great pride in the
fact that he was the only statewide constitutional officer —
maybe nationwide, if you think
about it — to have practically an
entire orchestra on the state
payroll,” Barnicle quipped. “He
had a piano player, a guitar
player, a drummer, an alto, a soprano, and by the way, he also
had a dentist on the payroll.”
Laughter filled the church.
Barnicle said that Crane never tried to hide anything or
dodge questions from the press.
He told another story of how
the Globe’s Spotlight Team once
questioned Crane about raises
he’d given to three of his deputies. Two deputies received
$2,500 raises, and a third got a
$5,000 raise, Barnicle said, so
the Globe wanted to know:
Why the discrepancy?
B a r n i c le s a i d : “ B o b a n swered right away, ‘Simple —
the other two don’t paint my
house every summer.’ ”
As the packed church burst
into laughter again, Barnicle
added that “Somewhere, Mike
Dukakis is having to be resuscitated.”
Taking a more serious tone,
Barnicle recalled Crane as being intensely loyal, thoughtful,
and kind.
He said that when Kevin
White, the late mayor, was suffering from Alzheimer’s, Crane
made it a point to take him out
to lunch regularly at the Stockyard in Brighton.
“Bob would order for the
mayor, sit alongside him, take
care of him, make him laugh.
And there were moments when
the fog in Kevin’s eyes would recede . . . for just a moment, for
just a minute,” Barnicle said.
“And Bob would say after in the
parking lot, ‘This has been a
good day.’ ”
Emily Sweeney can be reached
at esweeney@globe.com.
Mass. transgender advocate is slain
Police say spouse
admitted guilt
By John R. Ellement
GLOBE STAFF
The woman allegedly murdered by her husband in their
North Adams home was a longtime transgender advocate who
helped create a beauty pageant
for transgender women, friends
and activists say.
Christa Leigh Steele-Knudslien, 42, was also the first
transgender woman murdered
in the United States this year,
according to advocates, including GLAAD, an LGBTQ civil
rights organization.
Her husband, Mark Steele-
Knudslien, 47, went to the police station in neighboring Adams around 9 p.m. Friday and
told police he had killed his
wife, officials said. On Tuesday,
he was being held without bail
after pleading not guilty to a
murder charge in a North Adams courthouse.
“He did admit to the murder,” an Adams police sergeant,
Scott McWhirt, told the Globe
Saturday.
According to the office of
Berkshire District Attorney David Capeless, an autopsy by the
state’s medical examiner concluded she died from the “loss
of blood due to a stab wound to
the torso; a contributing factor
was multiple blunt force trau-
ma to the head.”
The couple had lived in Adams for several years before
moving to North Adams, where
they were living on Veazie
Street. According to postings by
friends on social media, they
were renovating their home.
Vickie Boisseau, a longtime
friend, wrote on Facebook that
she had officiated at the couple’s wedding in April. They
“were a loving couple renovating their new home,’’ Boisseau
wrote. “She was a big advocate
in the intersex/trans community. She loved helping others to
grow and live life truly.”
NoHo Pride, the nonprofit
group that operates an annual
parade in Northampton,
marked Steele-Knudslien’s
death on its website.
“Our hearts are deeply saddened by the news of Christa
Leigh Steele-Knudslien’s tragic
and untimely death,’’ the post
reads. “Noho Pride had the
pleasure of working along side
Christa at the time the Miss
Trans Northampton Pageant
was created, now the Miss
Trans New England Pageant.
Christa, and her hard work for
the community, will be sadly
missed.”
McWhirt said the couple
had lived in Adams for “quite a
few years” before moving to
North Adams about a year ago.
They had been well-known to
police due to “neighborhood
FACEBOOK
Christa Leigh SteeleKnudslien was 42.
disputes . . . nothing between
the two,” he said.
John R. Ellement
can be reached at
ellement@globe.com.
Mentally ill prisoners sue over solitary confinement
uSOLITARY
Continued from Page B1
“This lawsuit is riddled with
inaccuracies, misconceptions,
and out-and-out lies,” he said.
“Surprise, surprise, we might
have people in our facilities
who are not telling the truth.”
Hodgson said state agencies
and national accreditation organizations regularly visit the
jails and review their policies
and procedures toward inmates.
The jails have consistently
been found to be in compliance
with national standards, Hodgson said. Mental health services
are provided by Correctional
Psychiatric Services in Braintree, which has decades of experience treating inmates with
mental illness.
“I’m going to rely on the experts when I’m deciding how
policy is going to work here and
how we need to improve our
Fresh off
win, tribe
weighs its
options
system,” Hodgson said. “I don’t
go and ask inmates in a kind of
polling situation whether or not
the y think the y ’re ge tting
enough food or this or that and
rely solely on what they say.”
Hodgson accused Prisoners’
Legal Services of using the inmates to further their “political
agenda” of regulating solitary
confinement more closely. The
Legislature has passed a criminal justice bill that calls for
more oversight of inmate segregation.
“Shame on Prisoners’ Legal
Services for trying to use this
tactic in such an underhanded
way,” he said. “We’re going to
fight [this lawsuit], and when
the facts come out I think
they’re going to be embarrassed
that they tried this route.”
The lawsuit states that the
suicide rate at Bristol County
jails is twice as high as in other
county jails in Massachusetts
and three times higher than the
national rate in jails. In 2016,
there were four suicides at the
Bristol County Jail, two of them
by inmates who were held in
segregation, according to the
lawsuit.
Inmates are placed in segregation if jail officials believe
they pose a security threat,
need protection from other inmates, or are found guilty of a
disciplinary infraction.
The inmates want a judge to
prevent jail officials from placing inmates with serious mental illness in segregation, develop alternative disciplinary measures for mentally ill inmates,
and evaluate inmates for mental health conditions when they
arrive at the jail.
Prisoners can spend weeks
or even years in segregation, inmates alleged.
The lawsuit was filed by two
men and one woman who were
placed in segregation despite
well-documented mental illness.
Danyel Battle, 27, has a long
history of bipolar disorder and
depression and has been held at
the jail since March 2016. He
was placed in segregation for
fighting and disobeying orders,
impulsive behavior connected
to his mental health problems,
according to the lawsuit.
Megan Downey, 31, had
been hospitalized repeatedly
for depression and anxiety. She
was sent to solitary for minor
infractions, such as receiving a
book from another inmate and
refusing to share a cell with a
woman who had fought with
her, according to the suit.
Andy Welch, 43, who was
abused as a boy, had a history of
suicide attempts and diagnoses
of post-traumatic stress disorder and bipolar disorder when
he was sentenced to Bristol
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B5
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
BY CITY AND TOWN
ABINGTON
BARRY, Joan Winifred (Wallace)
ACTON
BEDROSIAN, Vera R. (Houston)
ANDOVER
DELUDE, David
ARLINGTON
BEAUDETTE, Clinton T. ‘Buddy’
ATTLEBORO
LaCROIX, Robert P.
LINDSTROM, Sara L. (Zoehler)
BELMONT
FITZGERALD, Paul F.
O’NEIL, Cathleen L.
PENNACCHIA, Daniel G.
BOSTON
FITZGERALD, Paul F.
LaCROIX, Robert P.
MANCUSI, Frank V.
McNICHOLS, John E. Esq.
SHEPROW, Dr. David
BRAINTREE
BARRY, Joan Winifred (Wallace)
BREWSTER
COVEL, Louise Theresa Driscoll
BROCKTON
LaCROIX, Robert P.
BROOKLINE
DALY, Patricia S.
LINDSTROM, Sara L. (Zoehler)
MALINN, James J.
MERRICK, Edward Michael, Jr.
CAMBRIDGE
CASSIDY, Margaret M.
CHAMBERS, Robert J.
DAVIS, Jean (Porras)
HODGE, Jane Beverly
MANCUSI, Frank V.
CHARLESTOWN
BRADSHAW, Mary E. (Carvalho)
GHERGUROVICH, Giuseppe
CHINATOWN
CHING, Jenny (Jiang)
DARTMOUTH
McDOWELL, Putnam Ballou
DEDHAM
CASTAGNA, Vildo
CHING, Jenny (Jiang)
DONOVAN, John
McDOWELL, Putnam Ballou
POGGIO, Pilar (Real)
STANGER, Ruth (Shapiro)
DENNIS
BUTLER, Rev. William L.
DORCHESTER
GROSS, Melvin M.
NEAL, Donna M.
DOVER
CASTAGNA, Vildo
GRAHAM, Catherine A.
THORNDIKE, Jack
EAST BOSTON
DeSIMONE, Lorraine
GHERGUROVICH, Giuseppe
EAST BRIDGEWATER
LaCROIX, Robert P.
NORFOLK
GUNNING, Helen Meehan
RAVINSKI, Georgia M. (Lang)
HOLLISTON
GETMAN, Albert E.
HULL
DALY, Patricia S.
JAMAICA PLAIN
THORNDIKE, Jack
KINGSTON
QUINTAL, Edward A.
LEXINGTON
DiRE, John J.
O’NEIL, Cathleen L.
TRANSUE, Ruby C. (Cochran)
LINCOLN
CASSIDY, Margaret M.
LYNN
CHEFFI, Diane R. (Ogle)
HARRIS, Deborah Christine Rayndles
LYNNFIELD
POPP, William Randy Jr.
MALDEN
CHARRON, Eileen E. Sheehan
COTTER, Michael A.
HUGHES, Margaret C.
PAULK, Robert Lee
SARDONE, Frank N.
SHAW, Josephine (Yetman)
MARSHFIELD
MERRICK, Edward Michael, Jr.
MASHPEE
DiRE, John J.
PLYMOUTH
QUINTAL, Edward A.
QUINCY
GUNNING, Helen Meehan
McKENNA, Kathleen M. (D’Arcy)
RANDOLPH
HARRIS, Deborah Christine Rayndles
RAYNHAM
DAVIS, Jean (Porras)
READING
VENUTO, Onofreo A.
READVILLE
DONOVAN, John
POGGIO, Pilar (Real)
REVERE
BUTLER, Rev. William L.
CHEFFI, Diane R. (Ogle)
COTTER, Michael A.
DISHONG, James M.
TRAGER, Charlotte
ROSLINDALE
McNICHOLS, John E. Esq.
ROXBURY
BARRY, Joan Winifred (Wallace)
McNICHOLS, John E. Esq.
SALEM
DeGREGORIO, John C.
SAUGUS
CHEFFI, Diane R. (Ogle)
SCITUATE
THORNDIKE, Jack
SOMERVILLE
MANCUSI, Frank V.
PAULK, Robert Lee
SOUTH BOSTON
REGAN, Evelyn V. (Sullivan)
SHAW, Josephine (Yetman)
SOUTH END
CHING, Jenny (Jiang)
STONEHAM
CHAMBERS, Robert J.
GHERGUROVICH, Giuseppe
SUDBURY
BEAUDETTE, Clinton T. ‘Buddy’
WABAN
DALY, Patricia S.
WAKEFIELD
BEDROSIAN, Vera R. (Houston)
DeGREGORIO, John C.
POPP, William Randy Jr.
SHAW, Josephine (Yetman)
WALPOLE
CASHEN, Richard F.
WALTHAM
BEAUDETTE, Clinton T. ‘Buddy’
BEDROSIAN, Vera R. (Houston)
DiRE, John J.
O’GRADY, Joan (Wright)
O’NEIL, Cathleen L.
WATERTOWN
BEAUDETTE, Clinton T. ‘Buddy’
CASSIDY, Margaret M.
DiRE, John J.
FITZGERALD, Paul F.
O’GRADY, Joan (Wright)
WELLESLEY
CASTAGNA, Vildo
GRAHAM, Catherine A.
LINDSTROM, Sara L. (Zoehler)
WEST ROXBURY
DONOVAN, John
GRAHAM, Catherine A.
McNICHOLS, John E. Esq.
POGGIO, Pilar (Real)
WESTFORD
PENNACCHIA, Daniel G.
WESTWOOD
LINDSTROM, Sara L. (Zoehler)
McDOWELL, Putnam Ballou
WINTHROP
BUTLER, Rev. William L.
CHEFFI, Diane R. (Ogle)
DISHONG, James M.
SARDONE, Frank N.
WOBURN
MURPHY, Harry
MEDFORD
MANCUSI, Frank V.
WOODS HOLE
SHEPROW, Dr. David
MEDWAY
McCARTHY, Margaret A. (Ford)
WORCESTER
SHEPROW, Dr. David
MILTON
GUNNING, Helen Meehan
MERRICK, Edward Michael, Jr.
MISSION HILL
McNICHOLS, John E. Esq.
NATICK
BRADSHAW, Mary E. (Carvalho)
GROSS, Melvin M.
NEEDHAM
CASTAGNA, Vildo
CHING, Jenny (Jiang)
DONOVAN, John
GRAHAM, Catherine A.
POGGIO, Pilar (Real)
NEW BEDFORD
McDOWELL, Putnam Ballou
QUINTAL, Edward A.
NEWBURY
POPP, William Randy Jr.
NEWBURYPORT
SARDONE, Frank N.
NEWTON
CASTAGNA, Vildo
CHAMBERS, Robert J.
DALY, Patricia S.
DiRE, John J.
GRAHAM, Catherine A.
McCARTHY, Margaret A. (Ford)
POGGIO, Pilar (Real)
STANGER, Ruth (Shapiro)
NEWTONVILLE
McCARTHY, Margaret A. (Ford)
Funeral Services
PLAINVILLE
MERRICK, Edward Michael, Jr.
MAYNARD
BEDROSIAN, Vera R. (Houston)
MELROSE
HUGHES, Margaret C.
MURPHY, Harry
SARDONE, Frank N.
Funeral Services
PEABODY
BEDROSIAN, Vera R. (Houston)
POPP, William Randy Jr.
TEWKSBURY
MANCUSI, Frank V.
WENGLER-MAHONEY, Maureen
HARWICH
RAVINSKI, Georgia M. (Lang)
Of Sudbury, formerly of Waltham,
January 5, 2018. Beloved husband
of Patricia A. (Powers) Beaudette.
Father of Deborah B. Richard and her
husband, James of Arlington, Susan
B. Caldwell and her husband, Daniel
of Charlotte, NC, and the late Karen
A. Beaudette. Grandfather of Delaney,
Ella, Kelsey, and Petra Caldwell, and
Henry Richard. Brother of Robert Beaudette of Waltham, Mary Marchant of
Watertown and Elizabeth Cheever and
her husband, Jack of La Jolla, CA; also
survived by nieces and nephews. Family
and friends will honor and remember
Buddy’s life by gathering for calling
hours at The Joyce Funeral Home, 245
Main Street (Rt. 20), WALTHAM, on
Sunday, January 14 from 2 to 5 pm,
followed by his Funeral Service at 5
pm. Burial is private. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made in his name to
the Brain Tumor Fund at Brigham and
Women’s Hospital. www.bwhgiving.
org or Cape Cod Commercial Fishermen’s Alliance capecodfishermen.org
For complete obituary, guestbook and
directions please visit
www.JoyceFuneralHome.com
CASSIDY, Margaret M.
“Peg”
OXFORD
DONOVAN, John
EVERETT
CUMMINGS, Gordon
DeGREGORIO, John C.
QUINTAL, Edward A.
SHAW, Josephine (Yetman)
VENUTO, Onofreo A.
HANOVER
GUNNING, Helen Meehan
Died on January 8th, 2018 at home
in Braintree, where she had lived
since 1962. She was present until the
end, with a stream of visitors from all
seasons of her life. “Joanie Wallace”
was born and raised in Roxbury and
grew up around the corner from her
then future husband Phil’s family. She
described herself as unprepared to be a
wife, homemaker, and mother, but she
was a great success at all three. As her
family aged up, she used bookkeeping
skills she acquired at Quincy College
and went to work in the jewelry business with E.H. Saxton and DeScenza in
Boston, until retiring in her mid-70s.
She solved crossword puzzles in ink
and shared books by her favorite
authors with family and friends. She
groaned at bad puns and fell for jokes,
even if it meant picking up the lunch
tab. Joan greeted everyone with the
nicest smile. She was a constant recipient of postcards, notes, calls and visits
from her friends and extended family,
especially her children, grandchildren,
and great grandchildren for whom she
was always there to hear news and talk,
but never with judgment or unaskedfor instructions on what one should
do. She enjoyed family get-togethers,
many of which became traditions, such
as a monthly Barry Lunch or hosting
an annual Saturday breakfast at The
Goldenrod in York Beach, Maine for
anyone that came. Joan enjoyed her
neighborhood friends and their children, remained close to her Holy Trinity High School classmates, and talked
about activities at Norfolk House. Later
she began going to the Braintree Senior
Center and made a new group of Bingo
friends that she truly enjoyed, saying
that they came along at the right time.
Joan was married to Philip J. Barry Jr.
for 57 years until he died in 2011. She
was the daughter of the late Coleman
E. and Marion Wallace of Boston. She
loved her children and their spouses:
Mark and his wife Michele of Duxbury,
Michael and his wife Donna of Dighton,
Paul and his wife Maureen of North
Attleboro, Jane and her husband Francis McGourty of Walpole, Marie and
her husband Christopher Parsons of
Mansfield, and Rose and her husband
Robert Teele of Norwood. Grandmother
of Caitlin, Mark Ryan and Timothy
Barry; Matthew Cohen, and Jessica and
her husband Robbie Loud; Meghan
and her fiancé James Norris, Michael
and his wife Meredith, Philip, and Julia
Barry; Alison and Thomas McGourty;
Daniel and his wife Lauren, Brian,
James and Grace Parsons. Great-grandmother of Joshua and Julia Cohen,
Ava, Mackenzie and Khloe Loud. Sister
to Coleman (Ted) Wallace and his late
wife Mary Louise (Lou) of Abington,
David Wallace and his wife Kathleen
of Manassas, Virginia, and siblings
Donald and Margaret who died in infancy. She was close to her brothers and
sisters-in-law and aunt to many nieces
and nephews. Visiting hours at the
Clancy-Lucid Funeral Home, 100 Washington St. WEYMOUTH LANDING,
on Friday, January 12th from 3 until
8 pm. Funeral from the Funeral Home
on Saturday, January 13th at 9:00 am.
Funeral Mass in Sacred Heart Church,
Weymouth at 10:00 am. Relatives and
friends are invited. Burial service at
Massachusetts National Cemetery,
Bourne, MA on Monday, January 15th
at 10 am. If desired, donations may
be made to Sacred Heart Church, 55
Commercial St., Weymouth, MA 02188
or Agassiz Village, 238 Bedford St.,
Suite 8, Lexington, MA 02420. Grateful
thanks to the Home Health Aides from
Bayada and the Nurses from South
Shore Hospice who provided care and
assistance with compassion and professionalism. For directions and messages,
see clancylucid.com.
BUTLER, Rev. William L.
NORTH READING
SHAW, Josephine (Yetman)
VENUTO, Onofreo A.
SUTTON
RAVINSKI, Georgia M. (Lang)
FRAMINGHAM
COVEL, Louise Theresa Driscoll
GETMAN, Albert E.
SR. ROSEMARY HEATON, O. Carm.
BEAUDETTE, Clinton T.
‘Buddy’
NORTH ATTLEBOROUGH
LINDSTROM, Sara L. (Zoehler)
EASTON
QUINTAL, Edward A.
FALMOUTH
BEAUDETTE, Clinton T. ‘Buddy’
BARRY, Joan Winifred
(Wallace)
BEDROSIAN, Vera R.
(Houston)
Of Peabody, formerly of Waltham, January 8, 2018. Loving wife of 59 years of
Hagop A. Bedrosian, devoted mother of
James Bedrosian and his wife Wendy
(Ames) of Maynard, David Bedrosian of
Acton, Linda Hurton and her husband
Thomas of Wakefield, and Robert Bedrosian and his wife Mary (Chandler) of
Wakefield , sister of William Houston
of Alberta, Canada, and cherished
grandmother of Melissa, Michelle, and
Megan Hurton, all of Wakefield, Colleen
Bedrosian-Spinney of Ayer, Stephen
Bedrosian and Anthony Bedrosian
both of Watertown, and Alexander and
Adam Bedrosian both of Wakefield.
Relatives and friends are respectfully
invited to attend A Funeral Service in
celebration of Vera’s life at the Mary
Catherine Chapel of Brasco & Sons,
773 Moody St., WALTHAM, Thursday,
January 11, 2018 at 11 a.m. Interment
will follow at Mount Feake Cemetery.
Visiting hours will be held prior to
the service from 9 to 11 a.m. Parking
attendants will be on duty. Expressions
of sympathy may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association by visiting www.
alz.org. For guestbook and complete
obituary please visit;
www.BrascoFuneralHome.com
Waltham 781-893-6260
“Creating Meaningful Memories”
Vazza Funeral Home
Revere 1-800 -252-1127
BRADSHAW, Mary E.
(Carvalho)
92 years of age. Of Charlestown, January 8, 2018. Beloved wife of the late
John F. Bradshaw. Devoted mother
of John Bradshaw of Natick, Richard
Bradshaw of Jaffrey, NH & the late Gerald, Joseph & Ralph Bradshaw. Loving
Nana of 8 grandchildren & 8 greatgrandchildren. Beloved sister of the late
Frances Williams, Gertrude Keating,
Ralph & Joseph Carvalho. Also several
loving nieces & nephews. Relatives &
friends are invited to attend Mary’s
Funeral on Friday at 9:45 AM. from
The Carr Funeral Home, 220 Bunker
Hill St., CHARLESTOWN, followed by
her Funeral Mass in St. Francis De Sales
Church at 10:30 AM. Burial is private.
There are no funeral home visiting
hours. For obituary, directions & online
condolences, www.carrfuneral.com
YARMOUTH
CASHEN, Richard F.
OUT OF STATE
CALIFORNIA
DAVIS, Jean (Porras)
ZABLUDOWSKI, Jamie
COLORADO
CHARRON, Eileen E. Sheehan
CONNECTICUT
GHERGUROVICH, Giuseppe
LaCROIX, Robert P.
MYER, Jean Dithmar
PENNACCHIA, Daniel G.
FLORIDA
DAVIS, Jean (Porras)
STANGER, Ruth (Shapiro)
ZABLUDOWSKI, Jamie
GEORGIA
CHARRON, Eileen E. Sheehan
NEW HAMPSHIRE
DAVIS, Jean (Porras)
HUGHES, Margaret C.
TRAGER, Charlotte
TRANSUE, Ruby C. (Cochran)
NEW MEXICO
DELUDE, David
PENNSYLVANIA
COTTER, Michael A.
RHODE ISLAND
HODGE, Jane Beverly
SARDONE, Frank N.
Affordable Cremation
1310 complete
617 782 1000
$
Lehman Reen & McNamara
Funeral Home
www.lehmanreen.com
Serving Greater Boston
500 Canterbury St.
Boston, MA 02131
617-524-1036
www.stmichaelcemetery.com
Have the
Talk
of a
Lifetime
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You talk about many things with your loved ones: from
day-to-day details to big events. Meaningful memorialization
starts when loved ones talk about what matters most:
memories made, lessons learned and how they hope to
be remembered.
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talko falife time.or g
Of West Palm Beach, Florida and
Dennis, Mass., formerly of Winthrop,
passed away unexpectedly and suddenly while on a vacation cruise in the
Caribbean, December 17th, 2017.
Fr. Butler was born in Boston on
October 29th, 1934 to his beloved
Parents, Edward I. and Margaret (Peggie) Lindsey Butler. He was the oldest
of four siblings, a late brother Edward
F. (Buddy) of P.E. lsland, Canada two
surviving Sisters, Helen E. Gibbs of Salem N.H. and Linda M. McGeorge and
partner Richard Perrier of Winthrop.
He was the beloved and proud uncle
of Joseph and Robyn Gibbs Jr., Calif.,
Bruce and Helen Ann (Gibbs) Gusler,
Plaistow N.H., William and Cindy Gibbs
N.H., John and Tricia Gibbs, Salem,
N.H., Edward T. Butler, Lowell, Scott
and Kelly A. (Butler) Cazel, Calif.,and
Geoff and Dana (McGeorge) Luparello
of Hilliard, OH. His Great Uncle duties
extended to nieces, A.J., April, Stephanie, Katylyn and to nephews Bill Jr.,
Aaron, Brock, Cole. His extended family
aunts, uncles, cousins covered the
United States and Canada. His loyalty
and friendships reached out all over the
world and lasted for decades up and to
this present time. Fr. Butler attended
Winthrop Schools, Salem State, St.
Philip Nieri, the Cardinal O’Connell Jr.
Seminary and lastly St. Johns Seminary
when he was ordained at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross Boston on May
2nd,1961 by Richard Cardinal Cushing.
His assignments were in parishes of
The Archdiocese. He became the Director of Parish Councils in 1964. During
the same time, he served as a Chaplain
in the U.S. Air Force. His Education
continued on an ongoing basis earning
several Masters degrees. His insatiable
appetite to learn and to know was one
of his many quiet attributes. His political stances were well known amongst
his family and friends. His love for his
family, his religion and his God was
unquestionable. He mentored and
advised all who asked and never turned
a soul away. He was a loving, wise,
personable, kind man. He will sadly be
missed by all who had the chance to
meet him and love him for who he truly
was. As he always said, “His God knew
him best.”
Family and friends will honor
Fr. Butler’s life by gathering in Vazza’s
“Beechwood” Funeral Home, 262 Beach
St., REVERE, on Friday, January 12th
from 3:00pm to 8:00pm and again on
Saturday morning at 10:00am before
leaving in procession to St. John the
Evangelist Church, Winthrop, for a
Concelebrated Funeral Mass in his
honor at 11:30am. Committal will take
place in the summer at the St. James
Parish Cemetery, Georgetown, Prince
Edward Island, Canada as requested.
May he rest in peace.........
CASHEN, Richard F.
Of Watertown Jan. 6, 2018. Beloved
daughter of the late Peter J. & Kathleen
M. (Duffy) Cassidy. Devoted sister of
Mary M. Buonopane & her husband
Paul of Lincoln and the late Thomas
J., Catherine F., & Peter J. Cassidy.
Cherished aunt of Cheryl Cassidy,
Sean Cassidy, Michelle Day & Cindy
Charles. Great aunt of Caitlin, Allyson
& Jennifer Cassidy, Mia & Elli Day &
Wyatt Charles. She was an Alumna of
Regis College and served in the Peace
Corps. Peg was a lifelong parishioner
of Sacred Heart Parish and devoted
countless hours volunteering in various
capacities. She was a retired teacher for
the City of Cambridge at the Cambridge
Rindge and Latin High School. Funeral
from the Stanton Funeral Home 786
Mt. Auburn St. (Rt16) Watertown on
Saturday at 9:30 am. Funeral Mass in
the Sacred Heart Church, Watertown
at 10:30 am. Relatives and friends
respectfully invited to attend. Visiting
hours Friday 3-7 P.M. In lieu of flowers contributions in Peg’s memory
to the Carroll Center for the Blind,
770 Centre St, Newton, MA 02458 or
to the Perkins School for the Blind,
175 North Beacon St. Watertown,
MA 02472 would be appreciated.
www.stantonfuneralhome.com
CASTAGNA, Vildo
Of Dover, formerly of Needham,
January 8th. Born in Capestrano, Italy.
Devoted father of Marco Castagna of
Needham, Antonio Castagna of Dover,
and the late Maro Castagna and Leonardo Castagna. Grandfather of Annalisa
and Amanda Castagna. Brother of Clara
DiPersio, Osvaldo and Vittorio Castagna
and the late Dino and Nicola Castagna,
Guiseppina Riccitelli and Lina DiSano.
Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Vildo was a retired construction
worker and former employee of Wonder Bread. He enjoyed gardening and
lived life to the fullest. Funeral from the
George F. Doherty and Sons Funeral
Home, 1305 Highland Ave., NEEDHAM, Friday at 9:30 a.m. Followed by
a Funeral Mass in Mary Immaculate of
Lourdes Church, Newton Upper Falls at
10:30 a.m. Relatives and friends kindly
invited. Visiting hours Thursday 5-8
p.m. Interment St. Mary’s Cemetery,
Needham. For directions and guestbook
www.gfdoherty.com
George F. Doherty and Sons
Needham
781-444-0687
CHAMBERS, Robert J.
97, of South Yarmouth and
formerly of Walpole, died
January 7, 2018. Husband
of the late Emma V. (Walter) Cashen.
Father of the late William M. Cashen.
Grandfather of Joseph Kourafas,
Pamela Mitchell, Michael, Nicole,
Samantha and Adam Cashen. Great
grandfather of Paige and Billie Prescott
and Logan Mitchell. A Funeral Mass
will be celebrated at 11 a.m. Friday,
January 12 in St. Pius X Church, Station Ave., South Yarmouth. Interment
will follow at 2:30 p.m. in the Massachusetts National Cemetery, Bourne.
Visiting hours will be held from 3 to
6 p.m. Thursday, January 11 in the
Hallett Funeral Home, 273 Station Ave.,
SOUTH YARMOUTH. As an expression
of sympathy, memorial donations may
be made to Independence House, 160
Bassett Ln., Hyannis, MA 02601.
www.hallettfuneralhome.com.
Hallett Funeral Home
South Yarmouth, MA 02664
www.hallettfuneralhome.com
Funeral Services
CANNIFF MONUMENT
(617) 323-3690
800-439-3690 • 617-876-9110
531 Cummings Highway, Roslindale
583 Mt. Auburn Street, Cambridge
MON-FRI 9-9; SAT 9-5, SUNDAY 12-5
Of Newton, January 8. Father of Robert
Chambers of Cambridge and Jacquelyn
Chambers of Atlanta, GA. Son of Rita
(DeRose) Chambers and the late Robert
R. Chambers. Brother of Edward
Chambers and his wife Cheri of Jupiter,
FL. Son of the late Robert R. and Rita
(DeRose) Chambers. Grandfather of
Brianna. Also survived by his 2 granddaughters. His Funeral Mass will be
celebrated in St. Patrick Church, 71
Central St., Stoneham on Friday at 10
a.m. Relatives and friends are invited
to attend. In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to ALS Therapy Development Institute, 300 Technology Square,
Suite 400, Cambridge, MA 02139. For
obit/directions/guestbook,
www.mcdonaldfs.com
CHARRON, Eileen E.
Sheehan
In Atlanta, GA, January 5,
2018 formerly of Malden,
MA, Colorado Springs, CO
and a life of adventure living on Air
Force bases throughout the world.
Beloved wife of the late Dr. Thomas W.
Charron. Cherished mother of Thomas
W. Charron of Wellesley, MA; Deborah
Charron Pollard of Clifton, VA; Daniel
J. Charron of Atlanta, GA; Dr. Kevin M.
Charron of Carrollton, GA; and Eileen
E. Charron of Atlanta, GA. Mother-inlaw of Lyndsay Charron, John Pollard,
Susan Charron, and Kim Charron. Treasured grandmother of Alexandra and
Cameron Charron; Meghan and Aidan
Pollard; Joseph and Kathleen Charron;
and Brendan, Liam and Ronan Quigley.
Daughter of the late James and Dora
(Shea) Sheehan. Dear sister of Doreen
Walsh of Melrose, and the late Margaret M. Moriarty, Donald J. Sheehan and
James F. Sheehan Jr. Funeral Mass at
the Church of the Sacred Hearts, 297
Main Street, MALDEN at 10:00 a.m. on
January 12, 2018. Relatives and friends
kindly invited. Interment will be at the
US Air Force Academy, CO at a later
date. In lieu of flowers, donations may
be made in Eileen’s memory to the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s
Research (www.michaeljfox.org).
T h e
B6
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
McDOWELL, Putnam Ballou
Forever Remembered with Love
P
utnam Ballou McDowell, age
93, died on Tuesday, January 2, 2018 at this home in
Westwood, MA following
an extended illness. He is
survived by his beloved wife of twenty
seven years, Rosamond (Robin) Brooks
McDowell and by four daughters, and
a son from his marriage to Margaret
(Retta) Ferguson McDowell, eleven
grandchildren, and seven great-grand
children; Margaret Putnam Lofberg of
Ricketsons Point, South Dartmouth,
MA and Cumberland Island, GA
and her husband Per, Lucy Karrys of
Payson, AZ and her husband, George,
Barbara McDowell of Dartmouth, MA
and former husband, Bruce Read,
Martha Ferguson McDowell and her
husband James Sandall of Fernandina
Beach, FL and Cumberland Island, GA,
and Putnam Ricketson McDowell and
his wife, Georgiana (Annie) of New
Bedford, MA.
Surviving him as well are four step
children, four step grandchildren and
five step great grandchildren: Timothy
Lee and wife Margaret of Brookline,
MA, Rosie Lee of Westlake Village, CA,
Pamela Jennings and husband John
Jennings of Orlando, FLA, and Dr.
Ellen Lee of Edgecomb ME. In addition, he is survived by a half brother,
Latimer Ballou Eddy of Westfield MA
and his wife, Barbara, and a half sister,
Linda Baratta of Brecksville, Ohio.
A native of the Boston area, Putnam McDowell attended the Charles
River School, the Park School, Noble
& Greenough School, Harvard College
and Harvard Business School.
Putnam was the eldest child of
Putnam McDowell and Barbara Ballou
McDowell. His Ballou, Chilton, White
and Winslow ancestors were among
the original settlers of the Plymouth
Colony, and of Providence Plantation
(Rhode Island). The Putnams and the
Blakes were early settlers of Salem Village and Boston.
Putnam entered Harvard (Class of
1946) in July of 1942. In early 1943
McDowell left Harvard’s Naval Reserve
Program for active duty as an Air Force
fighter pilot. During the second stage
of his flight training he graduated #2
in a class of 600 pilots. In 1944-45 he
flew 50 photo reconnaissance missions
in un-armed P-38s over New Guinea,
Borneo, the China coast, Formosa and
Japan from bases in New Guinea, the
Philippines and Okinawa. He earned
six battle stars, the Air Medal with
CHEFFI, Diane R. (Ogle)
cluster, The Presidential Unit Citation and a special commendation for
a mission in support of MacArthur’s
1945 American invasion of Luzon at
Lingayan Gulf.
In the years spanning 1946 to 1950
McDowell completed his work at Harvard (College & Business School), and
married Margaret (Retta) Ferguson
McDowell. He moved with his growing family to Pittsburgh, PA to work at
the Scaife Company, a manufacturer of
pressure vessels. In 1955 he joined the
Pittsburgh Coke and Chemical Co., currently the Hillman Company, a diversified, privately-owned holding company.
In time he became Sr. V.P. and Director
of Hillman Co.. He was the CEO of
several Hillman subsidiaries, including
Marion Power Shovel, a world leader
in the manufacture of very large power
shovels and drag lines. McDowell took
early retirement from Hillman in 1979
and for a time was a consultant to
Cordelia Scaife May and her holding
company, Roldiva.
In 1982 he became CEO of Mesta
Machine Co (NYSE) once the world
leader in the manufacture of steel
rolling mills and large forging presses.
When then leader of the Soviet Union,
Nikita Krushev, visited the U.S., the
only company he asked to visit was
Mesta, whose ability to cast and
machine very large components of its
machines and of naval guns was appealing to the Russians.
Amidst the 1980’s collapse of its
steel industry’s custsomers, McDowell ran a successful reorganization of
Mesta, renaming it Mestek. For this,
the Pittsburgh Business Times awarded
him its annual Enterprise Award for
“Visionary Risk Taking and Superior
Business Skills”.
In 1986 Mestek was the surviving
company in a merger with a profitable private company, Reed National
of Westfield, MA. Reed made good use
of Mestek’s NYSE listing and of its tax
loss carry forwards. McDowell served
as the chairman of the merged company until he retired in 1990 at age 66.
Throughout his years in Pittsburgh, Mr. McDowell sat on numerous boards including The Western
PA School for the Blind and Magee
Women’s Hospital amongst others. He
served for many years as Head of the
Board of Trustees at The Winchester
Thurston School where all of his four
daughters were students. The school
honored him in 2015 for having saved
COTTER, Michael A. “Gus”
Lovingly
Remembered
Of Saugus, formerly of Winthrop, age
72, January 5th. Daughter of the late
George & Ruth (Nelson) Ogle. Dear
sister of Karen Ciampoli & her husband
David of Saugus & George Ogle of Wildomar, CA. Cherished aunt of Michael
Ciampoli, Lauren Fike & the late David
Ciampoli. At the request of the family,
services are private. Donations in Diane’s name may be made to Compassus
Hospice, 790 Turnpike St., Suite 302, N.
Andover, MA, 01845. For condolences
www.BisbeePorcella.com.
CHING, Jenny (Jiang)
Of Needham, formerly of Dedham
and the South End of Boston, January
5, 2018. Beloved wife of Matthew L.
Ching. Loving mother of David and
Dennis Ching. Devoted daughter of
Zhou Ming Jiang and Liu Chang Ou of
Boston. Dear sister of Yue Ling Jiang
and her husband Jiong Qin Mei of Boston and the late Wen Dong Jiang. Aunt
of Jason Mei. Also survived by many
cousins and friends. Visiting hours will
be held in the Eaton Funeral Home,
1351 Highland Ave., NEEDHAM, on
Wednesday, January 10th, from 4-8
pm. Relatives and friends are kindly
invited to attend. A Mass of Christian
Burial will be held in St. Joseph’s
Church, 1362 Highland Ave., Needham,
on Thursday at 11:30am. Interment is
private. In lieu of flowers, please make
a donation to The Ching Educational
Fund (for the education of Jenny and
Matt’s two sons), c/o Needham Bank,
1063 Great Plain Ave., Needham, MA
02492. Jenny was a longtime employee
of New Garden Restaurant in Needham. She will be remembered for her
beautiful smile, her kindness to all,
and her devotion to her family. Most
importantly, Jenny will be remembered
for her boundless love for her two sons,
David and Dennis, of whom she was
so proud. For obit, directions or to
share a memory of Jenny, please visit:
www.eatonfuneralhomes.com
Eaton Funeral Home
781-444-0201
Of Fayetteville, PA, passed away peacefully January 5, 2018, after a brief
illness. Gus was born November 30,
1935, in Revere, MA to the late Michael
A. and Helen J. Cotter.
Gus is survived by his sister, Sr. Jean
Marie Cotter, PBVM and his nieces and
nephews, Gladys Cotter, Daniel Cotter,
Jean Cotter, Helen Pinkham, Michael
Crane, John Crane, and David Crane.
Gus was preceded in death by his parents, his brothers Daniel and John, his
sister Catherine, his niece Mary, and his
close friend, Lee West.
Family and friends may call at the
Thomas L. Geisel Funeral Home and
Cremation Center, 333 Falling Spring
Rd., Chambersburg, PA on Saturday,
January 13, 2018, from 2-4 PM. A Mass
of Christian Burial will be celebrated
at St. Colman’s on Monday, January
15, 2018, at 10 AM in Watervliet, NY.
Private graveside services will be held
at Holy Cross Cemetery in Malden, MA.
Memorial contributions may be made
to the Sisters of the Presentation at St.
Colman’s Convent, 11 Haswell Street,
Watervliet, NY 12189. Online condolences may be expressed at
www.geiselfuneralhome.com.
To submit a paid death
notice for publication in
The Boston Globe and
on Boston.com,
contact your funeral director,
visit boston.com/deathnotices
or call 617.929.1500.
To submit an obituary for
editorial consideration,
please send the information and a photo by e-mail to
obits@globe.com, or
information by fax to
617.929.3186. If you need
further assistance about
a news obituary, please
call 617.929.3400.
To access death notices and
obituaries online, visit
boston.com/obituaries.
DALY, Patricia S.
adjacent property from sale during
financial difficulties during his tenure.
Winchester’s upper school now sits
on that property. He was surprised to
find this amongst his most gratifying
accomplishment.
His commitment to family ran
deep and extended to his wife’s family,
his mother and father-in-law of Cumberland Island, Georgia and countless
nieces, nephews, and cousins who
spent extended time there. From the
late 1950s through the early 1970s
McDowell, along with two other family
members worked tirelessly to keep the
island out of the hands of developers,
to insure that his mother-in-law Lucy
Ricketson Ferguson, the only full time
resident of the island, would be able to
live her life out there, that other family
members would retain use of their
land and homes if they wished, and
that the island would be preserved in
perpetuity for the public to enjoy without compromising its pristine, natural
beauty. The Island was designated a
National Seashore in October, 1972
McDowell lived in the Shady Side
section of Pittsburgh and owned a farm
north of the city from the late 1950’s
until after he retired to New England
in 1990 . He was an avid gardner,
outdoorsman, huntsman, and gentleman farmer, raising chickens, pigs,
pheasants, ducks, and a small herd of
Hereford cattle. He worked with The
Western PA Conservancy and planted
thousands of trees to provide habitat
for wild life. The farm, with the help of
Arthur Kinney, a local teenage boy who
came to work and stayed for decades,
grew from its original sixty run down
acres to three hundred acres of thriving fields, woodlands, and ponds.
On his retirement and return
to New England and to a life long
summer haunt at Nonquitt in South
Dartmouth, MA, Putnam was reacquainted with a college sweetheart,
Robin Brooks Lee. They were married
in 1990 and settled in Dedham, MA,
moving in more recent years to Fox
Hill Village in nearby Westwood.
A service in Putnam’s memory will
be held at 11:00 AM Saturday, January 13. St. Pauls Episcopal Church, 59
Court Street, Dedham MA.
For guestbook please visit website.
Folsom Funeral Home
www.folsomfuneral.com
COVEL, Louise Theresa
Driscoll
Age 81, passed away peacefully on
January 8, 2018 at her home after a
long illness. She was the loving wife
of the late James V. Covel. Louse was
born in Boston in 1936 to the late David
Ignatius and Theresa Driscoll (nee
Hogan). She was a graduate of Brighton
High School in 1953 and later graduated form Framingham State College in
1957 with a dual major in Dietetics and
Education. During her career, Louise
was a teacher in Boston and Lynnfield,
a flight attendant at TWA airlines and a
Registered Dietician at several facilities
in Massachusetts. She was active in the
Framingham State College alumni association, loved to travel and enjoyed living on Cape Cod for many years during
her retirement.
Louise is survived by her children,
Mary Plesac and her husband Michael of
Brookline, NH, Richard Covel of Pomfret
Center, CT and Stephen Covel and his
wife Lynne of Norfolk, MA. She is also
survived by five grandchildren Michael
& Colleen Plesac and Brennan, Reagan
and Lorelai Covel, a brother David
Driscoll of Venice, FL and several nieces
and nephews. She was pre-deceased by
her sister, Mary Hermann.
Friends and Family may call from 4-8
pm on Friday, January 12, 2018 at the
MetroWest Funeral & Cremation Service
of Wadsworth-Chiappini, 318 Union
Avenue, FRAMINGHAM, MA. A Mass
of Christian Burial will be celebrated at
10:00 AM on Saturday, January 13, 2018
at St. Bridget’s Parish in Framingham.
Burial will follow at Evergreen Cemetery
in Brighton, MA.
In lieu of flowers, donations in Louise’s memory may be made to Alzheimer’s Association, alz.org or P.O. Box
96011, Washington, D.C. 20090-6011.
For additional information, tributes and
guestbook please visit:
Wadsworth-Chiappini.com
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CUMMINGS, Gordon “Go”
Of Everett passed away January 2,
2018. Beloved husband of the late
Georgie (Eisnor) Cummings. Devoted
father of Leslie Cummings and Stefanie
Montinieri and husband Jason. Dear
brother of Carl “Roger” Cummings
and the late John “Red” Cummings,
Alan Cummings and Jeannie Mueller. Cherished grandfather of Aiden
Mathew Montinieri. Relatives and
friends are invited to attend a Memorial
Service in the JF Ward Funeral Home,
772 Broadway, EVERETT on Saturday,
January 13, 2018 at 1:30 p.m. Visitation will begin at 11 a.m. on Saturday.
In lieu of flowers donations in Gordon’s
name may be made to: Leukemia &
Lymphoma Society, 9 Erie Dr., Natick,
MA 01760 or American Lung Assoc. @
www.lung.org. For online guestbook
and directions please visit:
www.jfwardfuneralhome.com
JF Ward Funeral Home
617-387-3367
Honor your
loved one
with a photo in
The Boston Globe.
Ask your
funeral director
for details.
Patsy or Pat to friends and family,
passed away on January 7, 2018. Born
in Brookline, Patsy lived in Newton
most of her life and spent many summers of her early life at the family home
in Hull. Patsy was a well-respected
health care professional at Boston City
Hospital for over 40 years, working
with many doctors and nurses and
managing the Hematology lab. Upon
her retirement, Patsy worked in real
estate in Newton. A lifelong Red Sox
fan, Patsy was a season ticket holder
for many years and a member of the
BoSox Club. She had the distinction
of attending the 1967, 1975 and 1986
World Series games at Fenway Park.
Patsy was an inveterate shopper and
was known for her stylish dressing.
Patsy is survived by her sister, Joan of
Waban, who will miss her dearly. She
was predeceased by her brother Francis
and sisters Louise Daly, M. Geraldine
Gallivan, Elizabeth Schaller, Eileen
Brennan, Lucille Long and Rosalie Daly,
as well as many nieces, nephews and
their children. Relatives and friends
are kindly invited to attend a Funeral
Mass in Sacred Heart Church 1317
Centre St Newton on Thursday January
11th at 12 pm. Visiting Starting in the
church at 11 am. Interment Holyhood
Cemetery Brookline. In lieu of flowers, kindly consider a donation to the
Jimmy Fund PO Box 849168 Boston,
MA 02284. For directions and guest
book please visit www.lehmanreen.com
Lehman Reen McNamara
617 782 1000 Brighton
DAVIS, Jean (Porras)
Greatly Loved
85, of Salem, NH died Sunday, January
7, 2018 at Salemhaven.
Jean was born in Boston, MA., the
daughter of the late Victoria (Salvato)
and Ramiro Porras. She had lived in
Cambridge, MA for many years and was
very active in the community, including
the PTA at her children’s school. Jean
was a true friend to many, and it was
often said that she never knew a stranger. Jean was also one of the founders of
the Tons of Fun Club in Cambridge, a
group of local ladies that got together
regularly to socialize. Jean loved to
cook, and the kitchen at her house was
never closed. She was a member of St.
Matthew’s Parish in Windham, NH,
and a member and former Chaplin for
the American Legion Ernest W. Young
Post #63 Ladies Auxiliary.
She will by sadly missed by her
beloved husband, Roy Davis of Salem,
NH; her 4 daughters, Victoria Duval
of Raynham, MA, Karen Davis of
Cambridge, MA, Cheryl Davis of
Melbourne, FL, and Jeanne MacAskill
and husband Skip of Los Gatos, CA; her
sisters, Lucie Morande of Salem, NH,
and Beverly Call of Cambridge, MA; her
2 granddaughters Sheighlin and Ariana
MacAskill and several nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her sister,
Ruth Vrettas.
Visitation will be Saturday, January 13th from 10:00 AM – 12 Noon,
followed by a funeral service at 12:00
PM at the Douglas & Johnson Funeral
Home, 214 Main St., Salem, NH.
Memorial contributions in Jean’s
memory may be sent to: American
Legion, Ernest W. Young Post #63, 38
Millville St., Salem, NH 03079 or to
Salemhaven Resident Council Fund, 23
Geremonty Dr., Salem, NH 03079.
To send a message of condolence to
the family, please view the obituary at
www.douglasandjohnson.com
DeGREGORIO, John C.
Of Everett on January 8 at age 90.
Beloved husband of the late Mary
(Cosentino). Beloved father of Wilma
DeGregorio of Salem, Judy Taylor
and her husband Alan of Everett and
Anthony DeGregorio and his wife
Joan of Wakefield. Loving brother of
Toni DeSimone of Italy and many late
siblings. He is survived by his 5 beloved
grandchildren, 5 great-grandchilden
and many loving nieces and nephews.
Funeral from the Salvatore Rocco &
Sons Funeral Home, 331 Main St.,
EVERETT, on Saturday, January 13 at
9 a.m. Funeral Mass at St. Anthony’s
Church in Everett at 10 a.m. Relatives and friends are kindly invited.
Visiting hours are Friday only, 4-8 p.m.
Complimentary valet parking Friday at
Main Street entrance. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to Children’s
Hospital, 400 Brookline Ave., Boston
02215. Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery in Everett.
1-877-71 ROCCO
DELUDE, David
David Delude, 69, of Santa Fe, NM
(previously of Andover, MA), died January 4, 2018. Arrangements are with
Berardinelli Funeral Home in Santa Fe.
DESIMONE, Lorraine
Age 69, passed away on Jan. 7, 2018.
Wake Fri. Funeral Sat. More info in
Thurs. Edition or visit ruggieromh.com
Ruggiero Family Memorial Home
East Boston 617-569-0990
DiRE, John J.
Age 74, of Waltham, formerly of Watertown January 8, 2018. Dear Companion
of Patricia Denihan of Watertown.
Brother of Anthony DiRe and his wife
Virginia of Mashpee, Mary Coffey and
her husband James of Watertown, Robert DiRe and his late wife Patricia of
Florida and Richard DiRe and his late
wife Barbara of Lexington and Watertown. Also survived by many nieces &
nephews and great nieces & nephews.
Funeral from the Nardone Funeral
Home, 373 Main St., WATERTOWN
on Friday at 8 AM followed by a 9 AM
Funeral Mass in St. Patrick’s Church.
Burial in Mt. Feake Cemetery Waltham.
Visiting hours Thursday 4 to 7 PM.
Nardone Funeral Home
617-924-1113
www.NardoneFuneralHome.com
DISHONG, James M.
Of Revere and Winthrop, Jan. 5, 2018.
Beloved son of the late Susan (Casey)
and Steven Marcella. Cherished grandson of Frank Marcella. Loving nephew
of Linda Humphries, Peter Casey, Diana
Marcella and Donna Gentile. Dear
cousin of Heidi Freda, Laura, Nick
and Samuel Allhoff, Luke Casey and
Kristine Humphries. Beloved godfather
of Jordan Washington-Freda. Also survived by many loving cousins, friends
and great Auntie Lil.
Visiting Hours: Family and friends
are cordially invited to attend the
visitation from the Ernest P. Caggiano
and Son Funeral Home, 147 Winthrop
St., Winthrop, on Thursday, January
11, 2018 from 4:00 to 8:00 PM. The
funeral will be conducted from the
funeral home on Friday, January 12,
2018 at 9:00 AM followed by a funeral
mass in St. John the Evangelist Church,
Winthrop, at 10:00 AM. Committal will
be private. For directions or to sign the
online guestbook go to
www.caggianofuneralhome.com.
Caggiano-O’Maley-Frazier
Winthrop
DONOVAN, John “Jack”
Retired Fire Chief, Town
of Dedham. Of Dedham,
January 7, 2018. Beloved
husband of the late Alice L. (Ponte)
Donovan. Devoted father of Mark S.
Donovan and his wife Cathleen of
Oxford, and the late Brian Donovan.
Grandfather of Michael, Kevin, Meagan, and Sean. Dear friend of Leota
Patterson and daughters Carolyn Anderson and Linda Victoria of Dedham.
Jack was a World War II Veteran, U.S.
Navy. Member of the Dedham Knights
of Columbus 234, Dedham Retired
Men’s Club, Dedham American Legion
Post 18, Fire Chiefs Association of
Massachusetts, and the International
Association of Fire Chiefs. Funeral from
the George F. Doherty & Sons WilsonCannon Funeral Home, 456 High St.,
DEDHAM, Saturday, Jan. 13 at 8am
followed by a Funeral Mass in St. Susanna’s Church, Dedham at 9am. Relatives and friends kindly invited. Visiting
hours at the funeral home Friday, Jan.
12 from 4-8pm. Interment in Brookdale
Cemetery, Dedham. In lieu of flowers,
gifts may be made to Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in memory of Jack to support cancer research and patient care at
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, P.O. Box
049168, Boston, MA 02284 or www.
jimmyfund.org/gift Online guestbook
and directions at gfdoherty.com.
George F. Doherty & Sons
Dedham 781-326-0500
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B7
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
MYER, Jean Dithmar
FITZGERALD, Paul F.
Of Belmont, January 7, 2018. Beloved
husband of the late Patricia (Flood)
Fitzgerald. Son of the late Thomas E.
& Dorothy (Gillis) Fitzgerald. Brother
of the late Donald D. Fitzgerald &
Judith Ann Fitzgerald. Brother-in-law
of Mary Hennessey & her husband
Fred of Hudson, Patricia Fitzgerald of
West Roxbury and Kathleen Flood of
Malden. Also survived by several nieces,
nephews and cousins. Graduate Boston
English H.S. Paul was retired from the
City of Boston, Property Management
Dept. He served as Director of the City
of Boston Credit Union. He was a volunteer for 40 years at the former Youville Hospital, Cambridge serving as a
Eucharistic Minister and assisting with
Pastoral Care. He was also a Eucharistic
Minister at St. Luke’s Church. Funeral
from the Stanton Funeral Home, 786
Mt. Auburn St. (Rt 16) WATERTOWN
on Friday at 9:30 am. Funeral Mass in
the Church of St. Luke, 132 Lexington
St., Belmont at 10:30 am. Relatives
and friends respectfully invited to attend. Visiting hours Thursday 4-8 PM.
Interment Belmont Cemetery. In lieu of
flowers, contributions in Paul’s memory
to the St. Vincent DePaul Society of St.
Luke’s Parish would be appreciated.
GETMAN, Albert E.
Of Framingham, on January 9, 2018.
Beloved husband, father, grandfather,
uncle and friend, who will be dearly
missed. He will be remembered as
a kind, caring, man with a sense of
humor, who always considered other’s
needs before his own. He leaves his
wife, Doris (Sorgman) of 64 years,
his sons Carl & Richard, grandchildren Zachary, Benjamin, Madelyn,
and Joshua, and numerous friends.
Graveside services will be held at
Lindwood Memorial Park, 497 North
St., Randolph, Thursday, January 11th
at 11 AM, Memorial Observance will
be held at the home of Carl and Mary
Anne Getman from 2-6 following
interment. Remembrances may be
made in memory of Albert Getman to
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
at http://www.bidmc.org/giving or by
check to BI Deaconess Medical Center
with “In Memory of Albert Getman
/ Dr. Peter Chang, Urologic Surgery
research Fund on the memo line and
mailed to BI Deaconess Medical Center
Office of Development, 330 Brookline
Ave OV, Boston, MA. 02215
GRAHAM, Catherine A.
Of Needham, Jan. 8th, age 54. Beloved
daughter of Dr. Robert D. Graham and
the late Carol A. (King) Graham of
Needham. Sister of Maura R. Lizotte
and her husband Joseph of West
Roxbury, Theresa A. Santry and her
husband Michael of Needham. Loving
aunt of Christopher Santry. Kathy was
a Teacher’s Assistant at the Chestnut
Children’s Center in Needham and also
was a Receptionist at the Needham
Bank. Funeral from the George F.
Doherty and Sons Funeral Home,
1305 Highland Avenue, NEEDHAM,
Saturday at 10:30 am. Funeral Mass in
St. Joseph Church, Needham at 11:30.
Relatives and friends kindly invited.
Visiting hours Friday 4-8. Interment
Needham Cemetery. Expressions of
sympathy may be made in Cathy’s
memory to the charity of your choice.
For directions and guest book,
www.gfdoherty.com.
George F. Doherty & Sons
Needham 781-444-0687
GROSS, Melvin M.
Passed away January 7, 2018 in his
94th year. He was the son of Jack and
Anna (Lipson) Gross. He leaves a son,
Kenneth N. Gross, and a daughter,
Laura Weinstein and her husband
Ron Weinstein, and a grandson Max
Weinstein. His wife of 35 years, Rosalyn
(White) Gross, predeceased him, as
did his son, Jeffrey Gross. Melvin was
born and raised in Dorchester. In
the early 1940’s, he graduated from
Bentley College with an accounting
degree. After working as an accountant,
he became the owner of the Kemble
Waste Company, a recycling business
in Roxbury, which he operated for
nearly 40 years. He was also a WWII
veteran and served in the Army, where
he was stationed in England. He lived
in Natick over 60 years. As well as
being an avid sports fan, particularly
of the Boston Red Sox, he liked to play
cards and bowl. He was also a Mason
and a member of both the Jewish War
Veterans and the Dorchester-RoxburyMattapan Group. He will be fondly
remembered by his family and friends
for his unusual sense of humor and
many anonymous acts of generosity.
Funeral services will be at the Stanetsky
Memorial Chapel, 475 Washington
Street, Canton, MA on Friday, January
12, 2018 at 12:00 Noon, followed by
Interment at Sharon Memorial Park,
Sharon. Expressions of sympathy in
his memory may be donated to Natick
Visiting Nurse Association, 209 West
Central Street, Suite 313, Natick, MA
01760, or at www.natickvna.org. To
leave online condolences, please visit
www.stanetskycanton.com.
Stanetsky Memorial Chapel
(781) 821-4600
GUNNING, Helen Meehan
GHERGUROVICH, Giuseppe
Lovingly
Remembered
Age 90, passed away on January 8,
2018.
Giuseppe was born in Crno, Croatia to
Marko Grgurovic and Tonka Grgurovic.
Giuseppe married Yolanda (Vukosa)
Ghergurovich in which they shared
over 61 years of marriage.
Devoted father of John Ghergurovich and his wife Carol of Connecticut,
Frank Ghergurovich and his loving
companion Margaret Dirck of Charlestown and Anthony Ghergurovich and
his wife Kristen of Stoneham.
Dear Brother of the late Pavle
Grgurovic , Zorka Grgurovic , Danica
Vukosa, Anka Zekanovich, Yolanda
Zadkovich and Pina Grgurovic .
Cherished grandfather of Jonathan
Ghergurovich and his wife Katlin,
Jacklyn Tobin and her husband Kevin,
Jennifer, Joseph, Megan, Anthony, Robert, Joseph, Julia and the late Daniel
Ghergurovich.
Special great-grandfather of Alina,
James and Nicholas.
Also survived by many loving nieces
and nephews.
Family and Friends will honor Giuseppe’s life by gathering on Thursday,
11th of January, from 4:00 to 8:00 PM
at Ruggiero Family Memorial Home
and again on Friday, morning, at 8:30
AM before leaving in procession to
Sacred Heart Church Brooks St., East
Boston for a 10:00 AM funeral mass in
celebration of Giuseppe’s life. Services
will conclude with Giuseppe being laid
to rest in Woodlawn Cemetery Everett,
MA.Funeral Home is handicapped
accessible, courtesy valet parking,
complimentary transportation to funeral home, please call 617 569 0990.
Ample off street parking with attendant
in our several off street lots. For more
info www.ruggieromh.com
East Boston
(617) 569-0990
Ask your funeral director
for details.
J
ean Dithmar Myer, 71, passed
away suddenly on Tuesday, December 19th at the
Meadow Ridge Senior Living
Community in Redding, CT
after a long and valiant struggle with
Alzheimer’s disease. Friends and family
were shocked and deeply saddened to
learn of her passing, but understood
that she had left this life the way she
entered it: by living it to the fullest and
bringing joy to all who loved her. She
has left a void in many hearts that can
be repaired only over time.
Jean was born to the late Edward
Dithmar and Nancy Bawden Dithmar
Masterson on October 15, 1946 and
is survived by her sister Jill Dithmar
Fransen, Jill’s husband Jim, and their
children Robert and James. While
growing up in Glenview, Ill, with her
parents’ encouragement, she actively
participated in and developed a lifelong love for ballet and sports. After
graduating from Middlebury College
in 1968 with a math degree, Jean was
immediately hired by IBM where she
enjoyed a long, successful career in
important field and management posi-
HARRIS, Deborah Christine
Rayndles, “Debbie”
Age 63, of Randolph, (formerly Lynn),
passed away on January 4, 2018 after a
lengthy battle with breast cancer. Born
on February 17, 1954 in Lynn, MA. A
graduate of Lynn English High School
and 40-year employer of Verizon. Debbie was a committed member of the
Church of Living God, a lover of travel,
cuisine, cooking, interior design, and
spending time with her family. Loving
mother of James D. Harris Jr., Yolanda
Harris and Jerome Bishop, sister Gail
Rayndles, nephew Ross Rayndles and
a host of relatives & friends. She is
preceded by her husband, James Douglas Harris Sr. and her brother Thomas
D. Rayndles Jr. and parents. Wake &
Funeral Services will be held on Friday,
January 12, at 10 a.m. 2018 at Spring
of Water Christian Assembly, 374 N.
Main St., Randolph, MA. Burial will
follow in Central Cemetery.
HODGE, Jane Beverly
Age 95, of Quincy, formerly of Milton,
passed away peacefully in the company
of her loving family on January 8th.
Beloved wife of the late Thomas S. Gunning and Thomas M. Meehan. Devoted
mother of Dr. Carole Roberts of Kentucky, Patricia Ceurvels & her husband
Arthur of Hanover, Thomas G. Meehan
& his wife Suzanne of Norfolk, Elaine
Branca & her husband Richard of IL,
Janet Fitzgerald & her husband Michael
of Hanover, Michael M. Meehan of RI,
Brian Meehan & his wife Madeline of
Quincy. Dear sister of the late C. Ruth
Kelley and Frederick Barrett. Cherished
grandmother of 19 grandchildren and
18 great grandchildren. Funeral Mass
at St. Agatha Church, Milton, Friday
morning at 10. Visiting hours at the
Alfred D. Thomas Funeral Home, 326
Granite Ave., MILTON, Thursday 4 to
7 PM. In lieu of flowers donations may
be made in her memory to the Jimmy
Fund, P.O. Box 849168, Boston, MA
02284-9618. For complete obituary and
guestbook please see
www.alfreddthomas.com
Alfred D. Thomas Funeral Home
Milton (617) 696-4200
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A Joyful and Positive Spirit, Fine
Sailor, World Traveler, Lover of the
Arts, and Technical Professional
Unyielding Love
of Life
Who died on January 6, 2018, in
Cambridge, Massachusetts, age 67, was
an adventurous, humorous and strong
woman who will be remembered for
her bright laugh, compassion for others
and unyielding love of life, even while
bravely struggling with cancer. A retired mental health counselor, Jane was
born on April 18, 1950 in Providence,
Rhode Island, but called many places
home.
A graduate of Case Western Reserve
University in Cleveland, Ohio, she also
lived in the San Francisco Bay Area,
where she pursued degrees at San
Francisco State University and John F.
Kennedy University. Like her ancestors
who were among the first settlers on
Block Island, Jane enjoyed traveling
to Europe and farther afield to India,
Nepal and Tibet.
Growing up, Jane loved the windswept beaches of Block Island and her
family home there; she also co-founded
the spectacular Hodge Family Wildlife
Preserve. Jane was a dog breeder and
lover of animals, especially her four
Italian greyhounds, and also started a
successful pet-sitting business.
After relocating to the Boston
area, Jane was always eager to travel,
whether to Washington, D.C. to march
for women’s rights or abroad. “My thing
my whole life has been that I wanted
to see as much of the world as I could,”
she told the Boston Globe in a story
about around-the-world travel.
There will be a private family burial.
Condolences may be left at monahananddrabblesherman.com
BostonGlobe.com
tions. At the same time, she continued
to pursue her interests in sailing, art,
ballet, travel, photography, investments, and sports.
In 1988 she joined a sailing crew in
the Boston area who were to become
part of her extended family for the rest
of her life. After retiring in 2000 Jean
spent more of her time racing competitively and cruising long distances
with these shipmates and others. She
crossed the Atlantic eight times and
the Pacific twice; cruised the Baltic
Sea, Greenland, Nova Scotia, Hudson’s
Bay, the coast of Thailand, the Pacific
Northwest, and the Great Lakes.
Jean was a patron of the arts with
many interests that included the
Ridgefield (CT) Symphony, the New
York City Ballet, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern
Art, and the Metropolitan Opera. She
continued her lifelong love of jazz by
attending jazz events worldwide, often
accompanied by her close friend and
jazz pianist, Ginny Avery.
Jean’s intellect, love of life, positive
outlook, and sense of humor affected
everyone around her. She always
HUGHES, Margaret C.
“Peggy” “Margee”
Of Reading, formerly of Malden,
January 8th at the age of 77. Daughter of the late John and Anna Mae
(Collins) Hughes. Peggy is survived
by her two sons, John J. Cram and his
wife, Jacqui Walsh-Cram of Malden
and Brian M. Cram and his partner,
Serena M. Rodger of Bristol, NH, her
grandchildren Jordan and Joshua
of Malden and Nicholas of Melrose,
three sisters, Catherine M. “Kay” (the
late William D.) Post of Somerville, Sr.
Irene M. Hughes of Wilton, CT and the
late Dorothy T. Hughes of Malden, her
four nephews, William D. (Frances)
Post Jr., Stephen M. (Virginia) Post
of Somerville, the late Lawrence G.
(Susan Callahan) Post of Somerville
and Thomas F. (Debbie) Cheever of
Wollaston. Family and friends are
kindly invited to attend Visiting Hours
in the Carroll Funeral Home, 721 Salem
Street, (Maplewood Square) MALDEN
on Thursday, January 11th from 4-8
PM. Committal Services are private.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be
made in Peggy’s memory to The Shade
Foundation, 3220 N Street, NW, Box
281, Washington, DC 20007 or at
shadefoundation.org/donate or to a
charity of one’s choice.
Carroll Funeral Home
781-322-6322
www.carrollfh.com
LaCROIX, Robert P.
Of Attleboro, formerly of Boston, age
68, January 6. Son of the late Eugene
H. and Eileen T. (Flanagan). Brother
of Eugene E. LaCroix of East Bridgewater and Joan E. Cahill of Colchester,
CT. Also survived by several nieces,
nephews, grand-nieces, grand-nephews
and cousins.
Visitation will be held from St.
Vincent de Paul Church, 71 Linden St.,
Attleboro on Friday from 10-11 AM
followed by a Funeral Mass at 11 AM.
Interment will be private. Donations
in Robert’s memory may be made to
the American Cancer Society, PO Box
22478, Oklahoma City, OK 73123. Late
longtime employee Fidelity Investments. Directions and obituary at
www.farleyfh.com.
LINDSTROM, Sara L.
“Sally” (Zoehler)
Of North Attleboro, formerly of
Brookline, passed away peacefully on
January 8, 2018. Beloved wife of the
late Frederick H. Lindstrom. Loving
mother of Frederick G. and wife Kristin
of Wellesley; M. Cathy O’Regan and
husband Feargal of Westwood; John
J. and wife Allison, and Joseph T. and
wife Libby all of North Attleboro,
and Sara L. Lindstrom of Attleboro.
Cherished grandmother of Tommy,
Hannah, Katie, Sophia, Kelsie, and
Ella. Devoted daughter of the late
Ferdinand B. and Mary K. (O’Hara)
Zoehler. Dear sister of Joan Fitzpatrick
of Dedham, Carol Roddy of Brookline,
and the late Eleanor Lowe and Marie
Smith. Also survived by many nieces
and nephews. A Funeral Service will be
held in the Bell-O’Dea Funeral Home,
376 Washington St., Brookline, Friday,
at 10:30 AM. Relatives and friends are
kindly invited. Visiting hours: Thursday
from 4:00 to 8:00 PM. Interment: St.
Joseph Cemetery. In lieu of flowers,
please make donations to either the
Stanley R. Tippett House, 920 South St.,
Needham, MA. 02492, or the American
Lung Assoc. www.lung.org
Share a memory
Or add a condolensece
to the guestbook at
boston.com/obituaries
seemed to know what was funny; her
laughter and sheer joy was wonderful
to behold. A loving, forward-looking
“feminist” who thrived in a traditionally male world, she served as a superb
role model and mentor for talented
young women. Jean Myer will be
remembered as a true woman of the
world whose genuine charm and amazing vitality were the essence of her
humanity.
Her family will receive friends for an
informal memorial gathering and a celebration of her life at Meadow Ridge in
Redding, CT on Saturday, January 13th
from 3-5 p.m. and at The Country Club
in Brookline, MA on Saturday, April
14th from 1-3 p.m. In lieu of flowers,
Jean has asked that donations be made
to The Alzheimer’s Association or the
American Cancer Society.
MALINN, James J. “Jim”
Of Brookline on January
4, 2018. Beloved husband
of 65 years to Theresa J.
(O’Leary) Malinn. Loving father of
Maureen Malinn-Sullivan and husband
Walter of Brookline, James P. and wife
Mary of Dedham, John F. of Brookline,
Michael J. and wife Vicky of Medway,
Kevin G. and wife Mary of Norwood,
Francis X. and wife Cristina of West
Roxbury, Joanne Malinn Jacobson and
husband Robert of Foxboro, Christopher B. and wife Joanna of Walpole
and the late Joseph T. Malinn. Adored
grandfather of Matthew, William,
Jennifer, Joanna, Joseph, Julie, Brian,
Meredith, Veronica, Robert, Tori, Lizzy,
Sofia, Connor, Annabel and Erin and
cherished great grandfather of Declan,
Gwen, Luke, and Grace. Loving son of
the late Patrick and Margaret (Donnelly) Malinn. Dear brother of the
late Francis J. Malinn. Also survived
by his dear sister in law Ann Gaine
of Dorchester and several nieces and
nephews. Late Army Veteran Korean
War, Ret. Patrolman Brookline Police
Dept., and longtime parishioner and
head usher at St. Mary’s Church. After
retirement, when not spending time
with his children and grandchildren,
Jim very much enjoyed his years serving as concierge to the international
community at Dexter Park in Brookline.
Being a part of the Edelweiss Village
community these past two years offered
Jim and Theresa a joyful life surrounded by dear friends and staff. His
compassionate care at their rehab and
long term care facilities most recently
are sincerely appreciated. Our brightly
shining star has passed on to heaven
where he has surely been welcomed
by beautiful arias, Greek dancing &
a place on the bench with his beloved
Red Sox greats! We will keep your beautiful spirit within each of us forever.
Funeral from the Bell-O’Dea Funeral
Home, 376 Washington St., Brookline
on Thursday morning at 9:10 followed
by a Funeral Mass in St. Mary of the
Assumption Church at 10:00. Relatives
and friends are kindly invited. Visiting
hours in the funeral home on Wednesday from 4:00 – 8:00. Interment St.
Joseph Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations in Jim’s memory may be given
to St. Mary’s Building Fund, 5 Linden
Pl., Brookline, MA.
MANCUSI, Frank V.
Of Somerville, Jan. 8. Beloved husband
of the late Antoinette (DiRusso)
Mancusi. Devoted father of Janice Park
and her husband Wesley of Somerville.
Loving grandfather of Dina ParkMatsas and her husband James of
Tewksbury. Loving great grandfather
of Krystal, Amber, and Charlie. Dear
uncle of Arthur Mancusi. Frank was
employed as a sheet-metal worker and
built the Citgo sign in Kenmore Square.
A funeral mass will be celebrated in
St. Clement Church, 71 Warner St.,
Medford, Tuesday, January 16 at 11:30
AM. Services will conclude with burial
at Holy Cross Cemetery, Malden. Relatives and friends are respectfully invited
to attend and may visit with the family
at the Dello Russo Funeral Home, 306
Main St., MEDFORD, from 9 - 11 AM
prior to the mass. To leave a message of
condolence visit www.dellorusso.net.
McCARTHY, Margaret A.
(Ford)
Of Newtonville, January 8, 2018.
Beloved wife of the late Raymond
J. McCarthy, Jr.. Devoted mother of
Raymond J. 3rd of Newton, Edmund
J. and his wife Jessica of Medway and
the late Elizabeth “Bea” McCarthy. Dear
sister of Robert Ford of Wilmington,
Catherine Garoian of Natick and the
late Frank, John and Mary Ford. Loving grandmother of R.J., Jason, Julia,
Eamon and Liam. Funeral from the
Burke & Blackington Funeral Home ,
1479 Washington St., (Rte. 16), WEST
NEWTON, Saturday, January 13, 2018
at 9:00, followed by a Funeral Mass
in St. Bernard Church, West Newton
at 10:00 AM. Interment in Newton
Cemetery.
Burke & Blackington Funeral Home
BurkeFamilyFuneralHomes.com
McDOWELL, Putnam Ballou
See Enhanced Listing
McKENNA, Kathleen M.
(D’Arcy)
79, of Quincy, passed away on Monday,
January 8th, 2018 at Milton Hospital
with her family by her side. Kathleen
was born in Boston to Thomas and
Elizabeth (McGonagle) D’Arcy.
She was the beloved wife of 55
years of Joseph P. McKenna of Quincy,
and the devoted mother of Joseph P.
McKenna, Jr. and his wife Barbara,
Elizabeth J. Leonard, and John P.
McKenna and his wife Paula, and
benevolent grandmother of Joseph P.
McKenna, III, Deirdre McKenna, and
Nora McKenna of West Roxbury, and
Erin McKenna and Ryan McKenna of
North Andover. Sister of the late John
P. D’Arcy of Kinnelon, New Jersey, aunt
of Michael D’Arcy of Glen Ridge, New
Jersey and aunt of Stephanie Nigito of
New York, New York.
Kathleen, originally from Dorchester,
is a graduate of Girls’ Latin School.
She was a member of St. Ann’s Parish
in Quincy, MA where she taught CCD
for more than 30 years. Kathleen also
worked as a work compensation supervisor at CNA Insurance Companies for
many years. She took tremendous pride
and enjoyment in her church, her family, and her grandchildren.
Relatives and friends are respectfully
invited to attend the visiting hours
on Thursday 4-8 PM in the Keohane
Funeral Home, 785 Hancock St.,
QUINCY. A Funeral Mass will be held
Friday at St. Ann’s Church, Quincy at
10 AM. Burial in Blue Hill Cemetery,
Braintree. In lieu of flowers, donations
can be made to the Little Sisters of the
Poor, 186 Highland Ave., Somerville,
MA, 02143. See www.Keohane.com or
call 1-800-Keohane for directions and
online condolences.
Honor your loved one’s memory
with a photo in The Boston Globe.
Dello Russo Family Funeral Homes
Medford-Woburn-Wilmington
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McNICHOLS, John E. Esq.
MURPHY, Harry
O’NEIL, Cathleen L.
Of Melrose, 1/6/18. Visiting Hours on
Thurs., 1/11/18 from 4-7 PM at the
Gately Funeral Home, Melrose. Funeral
Service at 10 AM on Fri., 1/12/18 at
the Gately Funeral Home. Interment
at Woodlawn Cemetery, Everett. For
the obituary & directions please visit
gatelyfh.com.
MYER, Jean Dithmar
See Enhanced Listing
Retired Chief Court Administrator for
the State of Massachusetts and Retired
Chief Probation Officer for Suffolk
County Probate Family Court. Longtime
resident of West Roxbury, formerly of
Roslindale and Roxbury passed away
on January 8, 2018. Devoted father of
Kathi Murphy and her husband Peter
of SC, John E. McNichols III, and his
wife Darlene of Shrewsbury, William
McNichols and his wife Michele of
Norton and Leighcea Granatiero and
her husband Perry of RI. Loving grandfather of Kelli, John, Michael, Olivia
and Sean. Graduate of Northeastern
University and Suffolk University, Judis
Doctorate. Visitation in the P.E. Murray
- F.J. Higgins, George F. Doherty & Sons
Funeral Home, 2000 Centre St., WEST
ROXBURY on Thursday, January 11th
from 5-8 p.m. Relatives and friends
kindly invited. Interment Private. In
lieu of flowers donations may be made
in John’s memory to the MSPCA, 350
South Huntington Ave, Jamaica Plain,
MA 02130 or to the American Cancer
Society, 30 Speen St., Framingham, MA
01701. For directions and guestbook
pemurrayfuneral.com.
P.E. Murray - F.J. Higgins
George F. Doherty & Sons
West Roxbury 617-325-2000
MERRICK, Edward Michael,
Jr. “Ned”
Former Plainville
Chief of Police
Peacefully passed away on
Friday, January 5, 2018 at
his home in Plainville, MA
after a lengthy illness at the age of 72.
He was the beloved husband of Donna
Marie (Leone) Merrick, with whom
this year he would have celebrated his
Thirtieth wedding anniversary.
In addition to his wife, Donna, Chief
Merrick leaves his loving children:
Lynne Merrick Nagle; Edward M. Merrick III and his wife, Susan Merrick;
and Stephen Merrick and his wife,
Christina Merrick, all of Marshfield,
MA. He was the proud and adoring
grandfather of Jeffrey Nagle, Edward
Michael Merrick IV, Connor Merrick,
Joseph Merrick, Stephen Merrick, and
Isabella Merrick, all of Marshfield,
MA. Chief Merrick was the brother of
Lee Ellicott of Porter, IN; Viki Merrick
of Woods Hole, MA; Brian R. Merrick
and his wife, Rebecca Merrick, of West
Barnstable, MA; John H. Merrick and
his wife, Joanne, of Manchester, NH;
and Christopher Merrick, and his
wife, Barbara Merrick, of Kingston,
MA. He was predeceased by his twin
brother, the late Carl G. Merrick; and
his late siblings: Michael Merrick,
James Merrick, and Ann Klein Dale.
He is survived by twenty-four nephews
and nieces; his brother-in-law, Kevin
S. Leone of North Attleboro, MA, and
his fiancée, Kimberly Macallister, of
Centerville, MA; his extended family,
many dear friends, and his faithful
companions: “Ollie” and Tessa”.
Chief Merrick leaves behind all of
the honorable men and women of the
Police Departments with whom he had
the distinct privilege of serving.
Members of the police departments
will privately pay their final respects to
Chief Merrick on Sunday, January 14,
2018 from 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. in the
“Memorial Chapel” of the Dyer-Lake
Funeral Home - the national historic
Colonel Obed Robinson Home, 161
Commonwealth Avenue, Village of
Attleboro Falls, NORTH ATTLEBORO,
MA, followed by a Necrology service offered by the Plainville Lions Club from
2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m., and by a Family
Prayer from 2:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
The doors to the funeral home will
be open to the general public on Sunday, January 14, 2018 from 2:30 p.m.
– 6:30 p.m., so that family and friends
may gather to honor and remember
Chief Merrick for a Visitation with full
Police and Veteran’s Honors.
Relatives and friends are cordially
invited to attend a Mass of Christian
Burial on Monday, January 15, 2018
at 10:30 a.m. at St. Martha Catholic
Church, 227 South Street, Route 1A,
Plainville, MA.
A Children’s Room is available
during the visitation. Burial services
will immediately follow in St. Joseph
Cemetery, West Roxbury, MA.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be
made in memory of Chief Merrick to
either Cops for Kids with Cancer, Inc.,
Attn: Deputy Chief Rafferty, c/o Canton
Police Department, 1492 Washington
Street, Canton, MA 02021, Massachusetts Lions Eye Research Fund Inc.
c/o PDG Dr. James Roth, 43 Stewart
Terrace, Belmont, MA 02478 or to the
Plainville Lions Club, P.O. Box 1804,
Plainville, MA 02762.
For additional information or to
send the family a written expression of
sympathy, please visit an online guest
book at dyer-lakefuneralhome.com.
NEAL, Donna M.
Of Dorchester, died January 7, 2018.
Donna loved her family, especially her
beloved wife Joan. She was an avid
reader and loved to travel. She worked
as the Assistant Director of the Office
of Student Activities, Arts, and Media
at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. There she inspired many students
through her work and passion. Donna
was a big Patriots and Miami Dolphins
fan and always won the Kentucky
Derby with her pick of horses. She was
a kind, creative, and loving woman who
will be greatly missed by all who knew
her. Beloved wife of Joan E. Keith of
Dorchester. Loving daughter of the late
Gerard J. and M. Grace Neal. Cherished
sister of James L. Neal, Sr. and his wife
Mary Kelly, Marygrace Neal, Deirdre
A. McCaul and her husband Peter, all
of Quincy, Robert G. Neal of Braintree, John D. Neal and his wife Beth
of Brockton, and Gerard J. Neal, Jr.
and his wife Amanda of Dorchester.
Wonderful aunt of James L. Neal, Jr.
and his wife Tina of Quincy, Michael P.
Neal and his wife Danielle, Caitlin R.
Walsh and her husband Aiden, Zachary
P. McCaul, all of Quincy, Brendan J.
Neal of Dorchester, Austin J. Neal of
Dorchester, Joseph G. Neal of Brockton,
Grace M. Neal of Brockton, Kristen E.
McCaul-Sass and her husband Michael
of Plymouth, and James Wood and his
wife Valerie of Vermont. Also survived
by 11 great-nieces and 3 great-nephews.
Relatives and friends are respectfully
invited to attend the visiting hours on
Thursday 4-7:30 PM in the Keohane
Funeral Home, 785 Hancock St.,
QUINCY with a prayer and remembrance gathering starting at 7:30 PM.
A Celebration of Life Service will be
held in the funeral home at 10:30 AM
on Friday prior to the Funeral Mass in
St. Ann’s Church, Quincy at 11:30 AM.
Cremation will follow. In lieu of flowers,
donations in memory of Donna may
be made to the Mass Media at the University of Massachusetts. Please make
memorial gifts payable to UMass Boston, and indicate “Mass Media”. Mail to
UMass Boston c/o University Advancement, 100 Morrissey Blvd, Boston, MA
02125 or visit www.alumni.umb.edu/
DonnaNeal. See www.Keohane.com or
call 1-800-Keohane for directions and
online condolences.
O’GRADY, Joan (Wright)
Of Watertown, January 8, 2018.
Beloved wife of the late William P.
O’Grady. Mother of Rev. Robert M.
O’Grady of Arlington, Maureen J.
Amedio and her husband, Anthony, of
Watertown and Jean M. MacDonald
and her husband, Gerry, of Watertown.
Grandmother of Kaitlyn DeStefano and
her husband, David, Brianne Greeley
and her husband, Darren, Brendan,
Kerilyn and Patrick Amedio, Kelly Riordan and her husband, Bryan, Sandy,
Ryan and Mark McDonald. Greatgrandmother of Colin, Reagan and
Molly DeStefano, Aubrey Greeley and
Libby and Lyla Riordan. Also survived
by many nieces and nephews including
Patricia Dragone and her husband,
Robert. Family and friends will honor
and remember Joan’s life by gathering
for calling hours in the Joyce Funeral
Home, 245 Main St. (Rte. 20), Waltham
on Thursday January 11th from 2 to
4 and 7 to 9 p.m. and again at 10 a.m.
on Friday morning before leaving in
procession to Saint Patrick’s Church,
212 Main St., Watertown where her
Funeral Mass will be celebrated at 11
a.m. Burial will follow in Saint Patrick’s
Cemetery, Watertown. Memorial donations may be made to Pilot Catholic
Media, 66 Brooks Dr., Braintree, MA
02184. For complete obituary, guestbook and directions please visit
www.JoyceFuneralHome.com
Honor your
loved one
with a photo in
The Boston Globe.
Ask your
funeral director
for details.
Of Lexington, a former a resident of
the Walter E. Fernald Development Ctr.
Waltham, passed away on Jan. 6, 2018.
Beloved daughter of the late Henry C.
& Catherine F. (Feeley) O’Neil. Loving
sister of Henry C. O’Neil of Newton,
Nancy A. Eckstein & her husband Bill
of Mashpee, Kevin B. O’Neil & his wife
Lynda of Akron OH & Richard O’Neil &
his wife Carol of Hilton Head SC. Also
survived by many nieces, nephews
and friends. Funeral Mass in St. Jude’s
Church, 147 Main St. (Rt. 20) Waltham,
on Friday at 11 A.M. Relatives and
friends respectfully invited to attend.
Visitation in the church prior to the
Mass 10 A.M. - 10:45 A.M. Interment
St. Joseph Cemetery, West Roxbury.
In lieu of flowers, contributions to the
National Down Syndrome Society, 8 E
41st Street, 8th Floor, New York, NY
10017, would be appreciated.
www.stantonfuneralhome.com
POPP, William “Randy” Jr.
Of Lynnfield. Jan. 9.
Husband of the late
Eleanor G. (Cannon) Popp.
Father of Randy Popp and wife Patti of
Peabody, Ronald Popp and wife Sandra
of Tewksbury, Bryon Popp and wife
Margaret of Newbury and Stephen
Popp and wife Kerri of Derry, NH.
Brother of Carol Smith of VA and the
late Janice Howland. Grandfather of
Heather, Randy, Melissa, Ron, Bryon,
Lydia, Melody, Caitlyn, Cassandra and
Crystal. Relatives and friends are
invited to attend a graveside service at
Forest Hill Cemetery in Lynnfield on
Thursday at 1 p.m. Arrangements are
in the care of the McDonald Funeral
Home, WAKEFIELD. For obit/
guesbookwww.mcdonaldfs.com
QUINTAL, Edward A.
Of Everett, formerly of
New Bedford, Kingston
and Plymouth, January
6, 2018. Son of the late Manuel and
Mary E. (Costa) Quintal Jr. Relatives
and friends are respectfully invited to
attend a Graveside Service on Thursday,
January 11, 2018 at 1:45 p.m. in the
Massachusetts National Cemetery,
Bourne. Arrangements are by Kane
Funeral Home & Cremation Services,
Easton. For directions or condolences
visit www.kanefuneralhome.com
PAULK, Robert Lee
RAVINSKI, Georgia M.
(Lang)
Of Malden, MA, formerly of Somerville,
MA, passed away peacefully on January
7, 2018 surrounded by his family and
friends. By his side were his daughters,
Elizabeth and Kimberlee of Arlington,
their mother Mary McKenna of Brighton and his sister Barbara of Hudson,
NH. He was preceded in death by his
brother Thomas of Winchester. He is
survived by 3 beautiful granddaughters
and many nieces and nephews. He
spent the last 20 years of his career at
Hillside Machine in Malden where he
was loved by his coworkers. He will
be missed by all. Services private. For
guest book please visit
www.lehmanreen.com
Lehman, Reen & McNamara
Brighton 617-782-1000
PENNACCHIA, Daniel G.
Of Westford formerly of Stamford, CT,
and Belmont, January 7, 2018. Beloved
husband of 54 years, to the love of
his life, the late Roberta (Garrahan)
Pennacchia. Devoted father of Daniel
Pennacchio, Jr. of New Rochelle, NY,
Robert Pennacchio and his wife Rebeca
of Norwalk, CT, and Paul Pennacchia
and his wife Kate of St. Louis, MO.
Brother of Regina Perrone of Belmont,
and cherished grandfather of Trey and
Alex. Also survived by many nieces
and nephews. Relatives and friends
are respectfully invited to attend
funeral services from the Brasco & Sons
Memorial, 325 Trapelo Rd., BELMONT,
Saturday at 8 a.m. with a Mass of Christian Burial at St. Luke’s Church, 132
Lexington St., Belmont, at 9 a.m. Interment will follow at St. Patrick Cemetery
in Watertown. Visiting hours will be
held Friday from 3 - 7 p.m. Parking attendants will be on duty. For guestbook
and complete obituary please visit;
www.BrascoFuneralHome,com
Belmont 617-484-2088
“Creating Meaningful Memories”
POGGIO, Pilar (Real)
Of Dedham, January 7, 2018. Spouse of
Enrico Poggio. Devoted mother of Alessandra and her husband Cabell Curran
of Cumberland, ME, and Giuliana Poggio of Washington D.C. Grandmother
of Cosima Curran and Henry Curran.
Daughter of the late Manuel and Pilar
(Juste) Real. Beloved god-daughter
of Ramon Gomez and Dolores Juste
Gomez. Visitation at the George F. Doherty & Sons Wilson-Cannon Funeral
Home, 456 High St., DEDHAM, Saturday, Jan. 13 from 9:00-10:30am followed by a Funeral Mass in St. Mary’s
Church, Dedham, at 11:00am. Relatives
and friends kindly invited. Interment
in Newton Cemetery, Newton. In lieu of
flowers donations may be made in Pilar’s memory to the MSPCA, 350 South
Huntington Ave., Jamaica Plain, MA
02130. Online guestbook and directions
at gfdoherty.com.
George F. Doherty & Sons
Dedham 781-326-0500
Of Norfolk, January 7, 2018, age 90.
Beloved wife of the late Robert Francis
Ravinski. Loving mother of Joan M.
Lorusso of Harwich Port and Anthony
Lorusso, Diane LaFontaine and her
husband David of Sutton, and Robert
F. Ravinski, Jr. and his wife Kathleen
of Norfolk. Cherished grandmother of
Anthony Lorusso, Jr. and his wife Kerry,
James Lorusso and his wife Lindsay,
Joseph Lorusso and his wife Jessica,
Samantha LaFontaine, Jake LaFontaine, and Margaret LaFontaine and
great-grandmother of Hunter Lorusso,
Lacey Lorusso, and Joseph Lorusso. Devoted sister of Donald Lang of Dennis,
Thelma Saucier of Florida, Eleanor Kerridge of Florida, the late Philip Lang,
the late Earl Lang, the late William
Lang, the late Lawrence Lang, the late
Eileen Mastramatteo, the late Edward
Lang, and the late Herbert Lang. Also
survived by many nieces and nephews.
Relatives and friends are kindly invited
to attend Georgia’s Life Celebration on
Thursday from 4-7 PM and Friday from
9-9:30 AM in the James H. Delaney &
Son Funeral Home, 48 Common Street,
WALPOLE. A Mass of Christian Burial
will be celebrated in Saint Jude Church,
86 Main Street, Norfolk on Friday at
10 AM. Interment will follow in Knollwood Memorial Park in Canton. In lieu
of flowers, memorial donations may be
made to: The Alzheimer’s Association,
309 Waverly Oaks Road, Waltham, MA
02452.
Delaney Funeral Home
www.delaneyfuneral.com
REGAN, Evelyn V. (Sullivan)
Of South Boston, passed away January
8, 2018, at the age of 92, surrounded
by her loving family. Beloved wife of
the late Paul F. Regan. Devoted mother
of Paul K. Regan, Esq., his wife Judith
of Chevy Chase, MD, Joseph M. Regan
(Ret. BFD) of Folly Beach, SC, Ellen
M. McGonagle, her husband William,
Patricia A. Roberts, her husband Robin
all of South Boston, Dorothy A. Foley,
her husband Leo of Holliston, Evelyn
Stoddard, her husband William of
South Boston, Stephen G. Regan, his
wife Joan of Norwell, Eileen F. Mignosa, her husband Paul of Pembroke.
Dear sister of Mildred Murray, Dorothy
Flebotte both of South Boston, the
late James, Joseph, Timothy Sullivan,
Mary Ridge, John “Jackie” Sullivan
and Claire Steele. Also survived by 23
grandchildren, the late Paul E. Regan,
24 great grandchildren, many loving
nieces, nephews, relatives and friends.
Visiting hours in the O’Brien Funeral
Home, 146 Dorchester St., SOUTH
BOSTON, Friday from 3-8PM. Funeral
Mass in Gate of Heaven Church, 615
East Fourth St., South Boston, Saturday
at 10:00AM. Interment Blue Hill
Cemetery, Braintree. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made in Evelyn’s
memory to the Marfan Foundation,
22 Manhasset Ave., Port Washington,
NY 11050 or the American Diabetes
Foundation, 260 Cochituate Rd. #200,
Framingham, MA 01701.
SARDONE, Frank N.
Of Ashaway, RI, died Sunday in Boston
at the age of 72. Frank is survived by
his wife, Linda, son Derek, daughtersin-law Jaclyn and Nicole, sisters Mary
Ann, Joanne and Debra, 5 grandchildren, nieces and nephew. He was proceeded in death by his parents Francis
and Katherine Sardone and son Frank
Jr. Visiting hours will be held at the
Gately Funeral Home, 79 W. Foster St.,
MELROSE on Saturday, Jan. 13th from
10AM-1PM. Relatives & friends respectfully invited to attend. Burial will be
private. In lieu of flowers, memorials
may be sent to Ashaway Free Library,
15 Knight St, Ashaway, RI 02804 or
Reel Recovery, 160 Brookside Rd.,
Needham, MA 02492. For directions
& to sign online condolence visit www.
gatelyfh.com
Gately Funeral Home
781-665-1949
SHAW, Josephine (Yetman)
SHEPROW, Dr. David
Of Everett, passed away surrounded by
her family, on January 8, 2018. Beloved
wife of the late William “Bill” Shaw,
with whom she shared 69 yrs of marriage. Devoted mother of Claire Laidlaw
and dear friend Jason Marcus of Everett, Kathleen Logue and husband Bryan
of Everett, Doris Borgonzi and husband
Alfred of Malden, William Shaw Jr. and
wife Margaret of N. Reading, Robert
Shaw and wife Mary of Wakefield,
Ann Gallant and husband Charles of
N. Reading, and Paul Shaw and wife
Ashley Judge of Salem. Dear sister
of the late Francis, Alice, Harry, Bill,
Gertrude, Paul and Dolly. Cherished
grandmother of Matthew and Mark
Laidlaw, Noelle Merchant, Christopher
Logue, Michael and David Borgonzi,
Julia, Alice and Robert Shaw, Lauren,
Kristyn and Nicole Gallant and Sedona
Shaw. Great-grandmother of Anthony,
Olivia, Sam, Gabriella, Marina, Joseph,
Nina, Gianna, James and Charlie. Also
survived by many loving nieces and
nephews. Relatives and friends are
kindly invited to attend a funeral at the
JF Ward Funeral Home, 772 Broadway,
EVERETT on Friday, January 12th at
9:30 am. Followed by a Funeral Mass in
Our Lady of Grace Church, 149 Nichols
St., Chelsea/Everett line at 10:30am.
Visiting Hours will be held on Thursday
from 4-8pm. Interment in Glenwood
Cemetery, Everett. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to: Cystic
Fibrosis Foundation @ www.cff.org. For
online guestbook and directions please
visit: www.jfwardfuneralhome.com
Of Woods Hole, Mass., died
peacefully on January 5,
2018, age 93. David was
a professor emeritus in the Departments of Biology and Surgery at Boston
University. Born on Valentine’s Day
1924 in Holyoke, Mass., David was the
only child of Morris and Irma Shepro.
A first-generation American from a
humble upbringing, he had an innate
intelligence, and love of books and
learning that spurred him to higher
education. His undergraduate studies
at Clark University in Worcester were
interrupted by World War II, during
which he served at Camp Detrick and
was officially recognized for his work
on viruses. He received an honorable
discharge in 1946.
Following the war, David returned
to Clark University where he met the
love of his life, Marilyn Aronson. The
couple married in 1949. David then
attended Boston University earning his
PhD in Biology and remaining there as
a professor, and later an academic dean
of the Medical School. To the many
scientists he trained in his research lab
over the decades of his career, he was
the ultimate mentor. He taught the
next generation of scientists not only
the scientific method, but how to think
creatively, do science generously, and
live life fully.
For over 40 years, his laboratory’s
research focused on the biology and
pathology of the microvasculature.
He was one of the first to develop
methods to isolate and culture vascular
endothelial cells, an accomplishment
most people in his field believed was
not possible. The work revolutionized
the study of microvasculature research
and contributed to the understanding
of diabetic eye disease, wound healing,
and dementia.
The founding editor, and for 38
years, the editor-in-chief of the international journal Microvascular Research,
David also edited a two-volume encyclopedic review on the biology and pathology of microvessels, published in 2006
by Academic Press/Elsevier.
David had a long association with
the Marine Biological Laboratory
(MBL) in Woods Hole that started in
the early 1960s when he established a
summer research lab there. David and
Marilyn brought their young family
to Woods Hole each summer and they
developed many friendships and a deep
attachment the Woods Hole community. They retired to Woods Hole in 2004.
David was a lifetime proponent
of fitness, publishing “Complete
Conditioning” in 1976, much before it
became fashionable, and cycling to B.U.
each day from his home on Long Wharf
in Boston. He was a horticulturist and
avid Japanese gardener, a connoisseur of good wine and food, and was
renowned for his sartorial style.
Among his honors, David was a
fellow of the American Association
for the Advancement of Science and
a fellow of the American Physiological Society. He received the American
Microcirculatory Society’s Landis and
Zweifach Gold Medal awards and the
Taylor Smith Gold award from the New
England Ophthalmological Society. He
served as chairman of the Literature
Selection Technical Review Committee
for the U.S. National Library Medicine,
National Institutes of Health.
David is survived by his wife of 69
years, Marilyn; his daughter Lisa Sheprow Adelberg of Camden, Maine; and
son Douglas Sheprow and daughterin-law Stephanie Murphy of Falmouth,
Mass. He is also survived by his beloved
dog, Maxx.
A small graveside service will be held
at the Woods Hole Village Cemetery in
Woods Hole on Thursday, Jan. 11, at
11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, the family
suggests donations may be made to the
Woods Hole Public Library or WCAI,
the Cape and Islands NPR station in
Woods Hole.
For online guestbook,
obituary and directions visit
www.ccgfuneralhome.com
JF Ward Funeral Home
617-387-3367
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SR. ROSEMARY HEATON,
O. Carm.
Passed into eternal life on the evening
of January 7, 2018, at St. Patrick’s
Manor, Framingham, in her 66th year
of religious life. Born in Chicago, IL
on December 20, 1930, she was the
daughter of the late Trueman J & Sarah
A. (Sutkevic) Heaton. Sr. Rosemary
entered the Congregation on August
14, 1952, professed her first vows on
May 3, 1954, and her perpetual vows
on December 8, 1958. During her
more than six decades in Carmel, Sr.
Rosemary ministered in FL, PA, KY,
IA, and lastly at St. Patrick’s Manor in
Framingham, where she was known
as a great community person and an
ambassador of good will. Sr. Rosemary
is survived by her brother, John Heaton
& his wife Beverly of NH, and her two
sister-in-laws, Barbara Heaton of CO
and Barbara Heaton of FL, and several
nieces and nephews. Besides her parents, she was predeceased by her brothers, Conrad and David Heaton. Family
and friends will honor and remember
Sr. Rosemary’s life by gathering for visiting hours in the Holy Family Chapel
of St. Patrick’s Manor, 863 Central St.,
Framingham, on Wednesday, January
10th from 2 – 7 P.M. Her Funeral Mass
will be celebrated in the Holy Family
Chapel on Thursday morning at 10
o’clock. Interment will follow in St.
Joseph Cemetery, West Roxbury. In lieu
of flowers, remembrances may be made
in Sr. Rosemary’s name to: The Carmelite Sisters for The Aged & Infirm,
863 Central Street, Framingham, MA
01701. Arrangements by the McCarthy,
McKinney & Lawler Funeral Home of
FRAMINGHAM. For directions and
messages of condolence, kindly visit
www.mccarthyfh.com
STANGER, Ruth (Shapiro)
Of Dedham, formerly of Lake Worth,
FL and Newton, on Monday, January
8, 2018. Beloved wife of the late David
Stanger. Devoted mother of Amy &
Mark Furman and Jay & Nancy Stanger.
Loving grandmother of Alexandra, Matthew & Sharon, Zachary and Zoey.
Dear sister of Fred & Judy Shapiro.
Fond aunt of Greg Shapiro, Jeffrey &
Lisa Shapiro. Services at Temple Beth
Shalom, 670 Highland Ave., Needham
on Thursday, January 11 at 9:30am.
Interment at Sharon Memorial Park,
Sharon. Memorial observance at the
home of Amy & Mark Furman on
Thursday through 7pm and Saturday
6-9pm. Additionally on Friday from
1-4pm at the Great Hall at NewBridge
on the Charles, 5000 Great Meadow Rd,
Dedham. In lieu of flowers, remembrances may be made to Dana-Farber
Cancer Institute, Dr. David Fisher Research Fund, P.O. Box 849168, Boston,
MA 02284-9168.
Levine Chapels, Brookline
617-277-8300
www.levinechapel.com
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THORNDIKE, Jack
61, of Jamaica Plain, died December
28, 2017, of prostate cancer. Son of
John Lowell Thorndike and the late
Dorothy Dudley Thorndike, he is
survived by his wife Mary Thorndike,
children Allegra and Isabel, a loving extended family, and many dear friends.
Jack attended the Fessenden School
and was a graduate of NorthfieldMount Hermon School, Class of 1975,
and Tulane University, Class of 1979.
He received an M.S. in Psychology
from Villanova University in 1984 and
an MFA in Creative Writing from the
University of Montana in 1995. As a
young man, Jack studied psychology as
a means to uncover solutions to conflict
and aggression in human life, one of
his primary interests. After a year in a
doctoral program at Boston University,
he concluded that he did not want to
address these concerns through academic research, but wanted to be more
politically involved, and he began a career as an activist. He worked for many
years for Committee for a Sane Nuclear
Policy, first in Cambridge, then in San
Francisco. Through SANE, he met his
beloved wife Mary, whom he married
in 1989 in Oakland, California. Shortly
thereafter, they moved to Montana,
where Jack attended the University of
Montana, became deeply involved in
environmental activism, and became
an award-winning environmental
journalist, including writing a column
called “Eco-Logic” for the Missoula
Independent. Jack loved Montana: he
felt deeply at home in a place that embodied so many of his passions, including environmental activism, wilderness,
skiing, hiking, and backpacking. But
in 1998, Jack and his family bid a sad
farewell to Montana and moved to Jamaica Plain so that Mary could attend
medical school in Boston. While staying
home with his two young children, Jack
continued to pursue his interests in environmental writing; became interested
in video as a means of journalistic and
artistic expression and took classes at
the School of the Museum of Fine Arts;
and furthered his musical education
through the Extension School at the
New England Conservatory of Music,
delving deep into his love of jazz. As
his daughters grew older, he returned
to full-time work, using his journalism skills as a science writer for the
Brigham and Women’s development
office. In February 2014, Jack was diagnosed with incurable prostate cancer.
He continued to work during his first
year of treatment, but chose to retire
in 2015, in order to make the best use
of his remaining time. Determined to
make the most of their lives together,
his family bought a house in southern
Vermont, where Jack was able to spend
much of his time until the last months
of his illness. Studying and playing at
the Vermont Jazz Center was one of the
great pleasures of those years. Jack was
happiest sailing his boat off the coast
of Scituate, where his extended family
had a beloved summer home; hiking
in the woods of California, Montana,
and Vermont; playing bass with other
jazz musicians and banjo with his
family and friends at their beloved
singalongs; and spending time with his
family. Jack was a loving and involved
father to Allegra and Isabel. When they
were young, he spent hours making
up songs, participating in imaginary
world-building, and transmitting his
love of the outdoors. Up until his last
hours, they were at the center of his
heart and thoughts. The family wishes
to thank everyone who supported them
through this difficult period, including
the staff at Dana Farber and Brigham
and Women’s. A memorial service will
be held on Saturday January 13, at
11:00 a.m., at the Dover Church, 17
Springdale Avenue, Dover. Contributions in Jack’s memory can be made
to Citizens Climate Lobby (www.
citizensclimatelobby.org) or Vermont
Jazz Center (www.vtjazz.org).
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TRAGER, Charlotte
Charlotte (Krassnoff) Trager, 74, of
Hudson, NH passed away peacefully
at Community Hospice House in Merrimack NH surrounded by family.
She was born on February 4, 1943
in Revere, MA, the daughter of the late
Molly (Goren) Krassnoff.
Mrs. Trager was the wife of Alan
Trager. They have shared over 54 years
of marriage and truly devoted to each
other.
Charlotte is remembered as a
devoted wife, mother and grandmother.
She was extremely proud of her grandchildren and loved to spend time with
them. She enjoyed being outdoors and
decorating her home.
Besides her beloved husband, Alan,
she is survived by her daughter, Adrienne Lee Levine; her grandchildren,
Alyssa and Eric Levine; her sister, Ann
Lucido; her brothers, Larry Krassnoff
and Eddie Krassnoff; and her nieces
and nephews.
SERVICES: A Funeral Service in her
honor will be held the Davis Funeral
Home, One Lock St., Nashua on Thursday afternoon, January 11, 2018 at 1:15
PM. Rabbi Jonathan Spira-Savett will
officiate. Friends and family are invited
to attend. Interment prayers and burial
will follow at Beth Abraham Cemetery,
Nashua. In lieu of flowers, those planning an expression of sympathy are
asked to consider a memorial donation
to Home Health and Hospice Care, 7
Executive Park Dr., Merrimack, NH
03054 (www.hhhc.org).
Davis Funeral Home, 1 Lock St.,
Nashua, NH in charge of arrangements.
Online guest-book is available at www.
davisfuneralhomenh.com. (603) 8833401 “One Memory Lights Another”.
TRANSUE, Ruby C.
(Cochran)
Of Nashua, NH, formerly of Lexington,
MA, January 8, 2018. Wife of the late
Richard C. Transue. Survived by her
son Wes Transue and his partner Jay
Brundage of Pompano Beach FL, and
her daughter Anne T. McGrory and her
husband Bernard of Nashua, NH. Ruby
is also survived by a grandchild, Sarah
McGrory and extended family member
Tom Lyons. Visiting hours will be held
Saturday, January 13 at the Douglass Funeral Home, 51 Worthen Rd.
Lexington from 9am to 11am, followed
by a Graveside Service at Westview
Cemetery, Lexington at 11:30am. A
Memorial Service will be celebrated
Sunday January 14 at Hancock Church
in Lexington at 2pm. Relatives and
friends are kindly invited. Donations in
her memory may be made to Hancock
Church, 1912 Mass. Ave. Lexington,
MA 02421.
Lexington 781-862-1800
www.douglassfh.com
VENUTO, Onofreo A.
“Charles”
Of Reading formerly of
Everett, Jan. 6th. Beloved
husband of Maryann
(Amato). Father of Frank Venuto and
his wife Penny of North Reading,
Charlie Venuto and his wife Dawne of
North Reading and Mark Venuto of FL.
Brother of the late Vito Venuti.
Grandfather of Matt, Jenna, Stephanie,
Stacey and CJ. Funeral from Cota
Funeral Home, 335 Park St. (corner of
Park St. and Rte. 28), NORTH
READING, at Reading line, on Friday,
Jan. 12th at 9:30am. Funeral Mass in
St. Theresa’s Church, 63 Winter St.
(Rte. 62), North Reading at 10:30am.
Relatives and friends may visit at the
funeral home Thursday 4-8pm.
Entombment at Holy Cross Cemetery,
Malden. In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made in Charlie’s name to the
American Heart Association, 20 Speen
St., Framingham, MA 01701. Charlie
was a member of the DAV in Everett
and served his country proudly in the
US Air Force during the Korean War.
Cota Family Funeral Homes
and Cremation Service
North Reading
(781) 944-1765 / (978) 664-4340
WENGLER-MAHONEY,
Maureen
Age 61, of Tewksbury, passed away on
Jan. 7, 2018, following a courageous 5
year battle with cancer. Beloved wife of
James M. Mahoney. Mother of Keagan
J. and Keara M. Mahoney both of
Tewksbury.
Calling hours are Friday, Jan. 12 from
4-8 p.m. at the Farmer & Dee Funeral
Home, 16 Lee St., TEWKSBURY. Her
Funeral procession will begin Saturday,
Jan. 13, at 9 a.m. at the Funeral Home,
followed by her Funeral Mass at 10
a.m. at St. William’s Church, 1351 Main
St., Rte. 38, Tewksbury. Please Omit
Flowers. Donations in her memory may
be made to Dana Farber’s Jimmy Fund,
www.jimmyfund.org, P.O. Box 849168,
Boston, MA 02284.
www.farmeranddee.com
ZABLUDOWSKI, Jamie
Age 27, of Los Angeles, CA, formerly
of Key Biscayne, FL. Beloved daughter of Daniel and Debra (Fialkow)
Zabludowski. Dear sister of Jason
Zabludowski and his wife Melanie.
Dear granddaughter of Jay Fialkow and
the late Jane, the late Louis and Edith
Zabludowski. Loving niece of Michael
Zabludowski and his wife Jodi, David
Fialkow and his wife Nina, Linda Sternberg and her late husband Richard.
Also survived by loving cousins. Services are Private for family only. In lieu
of flowers remembrances may be made
to Rosie’s Place, Attn: Donations, 889
Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02118.
B9
Dick Balzer, 73; expressed
curiosity, passion in pursuits
By Bryan Marquard
GLOBE STAFF
A film broke part way
through the show during one of
Dick Balzer’s many trips to
Brookline’s Coolidge Corner
Theatre, and rather than wait
for it to resume, “within minutes he had the whole group in
the theater in conversation
about the film,” said his friend
Paul Reville, who was with him
that day.
When led by Mr. Balzer,
such impromptu discussions
did more than skim the surface.
“Having a conversation with
Dick was unusual because it
immediately went deeper than
the typical conversation,” Reville said. “He would throw you
a curveball, and he would love
it if you threw a knuckleball
back in return.”
A writer, documentary photographer, executive coach, and
respected collector of antique
inventions that create optical illusions, Mr. Balzer wasted no
time in a life that found him
shooting photos in urban
neighborhoods of New Haven
at one point and creating presentations for the Harvard Art
Museums at another.
“He was so alive,” said his
wife, Patti Bellinger. “He just
devoured life like he didn’t have
a moment lose.”
Mr. Balzer, who along with
running his organizational consultant firm had been a senior
fellow at the Harvard Kennedy
School, died in his Brookline
home on Dec. 3 of cancer. He
was 73.
“First and foremost he had a
giant heart — not just for his
friends and family, but also for
social justice and political issues, too. He felt them in his
bones,” said Larry Lucchino, a
longtime friend.
“He frequently urged all of
his friends to express their feelings and their love for each other,” said Lucchino, a part-owner
of the Red Sox, and the team’s
former president and CEO
emeritus. “He was way ahead of
all of us in terms of being in
touch with his feelings and paying attention to human connection and love in this life.”
The range of Mr. Balzer’s
creative curiosity was on display in books he published in
the 1970 s. They included
“Street Time,” a collection of his
illuminating photographs of
the Hill neighborhood of New
Haven, with text drawn from
notes he jotted down during the
many hours he walked the
streets with Fred Harris, a black
community organizer.
Mr. Balzer also wrote “China: Day by Day,” which included his photos from a 1972 trip
to that country with his first
wife, Eileen Hsu-Balzer, and
“Next Door, Down the Road,
Around the Corner: A Family
Album,” a photographic journ e y t h r o u g h a l l 5 0 s t at e s .
“Clockwork: Life In and Outside an American Factory,” was
drawn from his months work-
ing at Western Electric in the
Merrimack Valley and included
his photos of coworkers.
In 1998, Mr. Balzer published “Peepshows: A Visual
History,” a history of optical
toys such as magic lanterns and
peepshows that predated movies, and which created the illusion of images that moved. The
devices, which flourished as
popular entertainment in the
18th century, had fascinated
him for decades.
“The peepshow, often a simple wooden box, with a biconvex lens, a set of prints, and the
magic storytelling powers of a
showman, was for a curious
public a transporter through
time and space, a purveyor of
both edification and pleasure,”
he wrote on a website he created to showcase his expansive
collection.
“Itinerant showmen hawked
their wares in competition with
other street entertainers in Europe’s great cities,” wrote Mr.
Balzer, who for many years led
the Magic Lantern Society of
the US and Canada, and who
gave a lecture and presentation
about the devices at the Harvard Art Museums last June
while very ill. “The peepshow
had to compete with dancing
bears, learned pigs, jugglers,
balancing acts, conjurers, pantomimes, and puppeteers. The
magic occurred only when a
viewer set their eye near a hole
and entered the private space of
the box to see the wonders of a
world beyond their daily life.”
The middle child of three
siblings, Richard J. Balzer grew
up in Great Neck, N.Y., on Long
Island, and graduated from
Cornell University.
A student activist, and a
conscientious objector during
the Vietnam War, Mr. Balzer
was a VISTA worker with youth
gangs in New Haven and in later years would work as a consultant and strategist for
unions such as the United Automobile Workers and the United Steelworkers.
At Yale Law School, he was
part of a circle of friends that
included Nancy Gertner, a retired federal judge who is now a
senior lecturer at Harvard Law
School. “They say that you can’t
choose your family. That is not
so. I chose Dick Balzer to be my
brother,” she said during a service held for Mr. Balzer on Dec.
10 at Fenway Park. (He was an
ardent Red Sox fan, and those
gathered went out onto the
field at the end to sing “Sweet
Caroline.”)
From his law school days to
his years as an executive coach,
when his clients in more than
80 countries included British
Petroleum and Goldman Sachs,
“the range of his friends and the
people who counted him as a
friend was just extraordinary,”
Gertner recalled in an interview.
Traits close friends recognized — “his extraordinary intuitiveness and extraordinary
Mr. Balzer was a writer and
executive coach.
judgment” — became the foundation for his executive coach
career, she added.
“He had a really high standard for what he expected of
people,” said Reville, a former
Massachusetts secretary of education who now teaches at the
Harvard Graduate School of
Education. “He expected people
to engage seriously and not be
distracted, and he held himself
to that standard.”
In his often intense conversations, Mr. Balzer offered wisdom and candid critiques —
leavened with playful humor —
to the executives with whom he
worked, to his friends and children, and even to the person
next in line while waiting for a
movie.
“I think of Dick as a magic
lantern himself,” Reville said.
“He was constantly illuminating aspects of character and of
people and of life that you
wouldn’t ordinarily see.”
In 2004, Mr. Balzer married
Patti Bellinger. “He didn’t do
things by half and he didn’t let
me or the kids do things by half
either — he believed life was
lived right in the middle of the
fray,” Bellinger, a senior fellow
at the Center for Public Leadership at the Harvard Kennedy
School, said at his December
memorial service.
In addition to his wife, Mr.
Balzer leaves his daughter, Julie
Fei-Fan Balzer of Watertown;
his son, Matthew of New York
City; his stepchildren, Jordan
Badia Bellinger of New York
City and Isabella Badia Bellinger of Palo Alto, Calif.; his
brother, Bob of Santa Fe, N.M.;
and his sister, Nancy Miller of
Florida.
“He was a man who wanted
to see and taste and smell and
feel all of life,” Matthew said in
a eulogy.
Yet even though Mr. Balzer’s
work took him around the
world, “he was certainly a family-focused person,” Reville said.
“Dick’s love is intense, fierce,
sometimes too enveloping, protective, loyal – like a magnificent spirit animal, beside you
every step of your way,” his wife
said in her eulogy.
With his death, Gertner
said, “there’s a silence in our
lives that I can’t quite figure out
how to fill.”
Marquard can be reached at
bryan.marquard@globe.com.
Aharon Appelfeld, writer, Holocaust survivor
By Harrison Smith
WASHINGTON POST
WASHINGTON — Aharon
Appelfeld, who leaped out a
window, was taken in by a criminal gang, and found refuge
with a prostitute to survive the
Holocaust — all before turning
14 — died Jan. 4 at a hospital in
Petah Tikva, near Tel Aviv. He
was 85.
Mr. Appelfeld later drew on
his childhood experiences to
craft lean, dreamlike novels
that made him one of Israel’s
most acclaimed writers. Born
into a wealthy Jewish family in
Romania, he wrote more than
40 books in Hebrew, a language
he taught himself by copying
out parts of the Bible as a teenager in the Israeli army.
Nearly all his novels, stories,
and essays concerned the Holocaust, although Mr. Appelfeld
preferred to say that his focus
was far broader: Jewish loneliness, immigration and — as he
once joked to The New York
Times — ‘‘trivialities,’’ the depiction of ‘‘small, ordinary, unheroic people.’’
Unlike Primo Levi or Elie
Wiesel, fellow chroniclers of the
Holocaust, Mr. Appelfeld rarely
ventured into historical analy-
sis or first-person anecdote. Instead, the murder of 6 million
European Jews hung ominously in the background of his
books, addressed obliquely
through the presence of dirtied
trains, curls of smoke, and
characters with disabilities or
missing limbs.
‘‘The reality of the Holocaust
surpassed any imagination,’’
Mr. Appelfeld told novelist and
admirer Philip Roth in a 1988
interview, explaining why he
had not yet written a memoir
about his experiences. ‘‘If I remained true to the facts, no one
would believe me.’’
Mr. Appelfeld did eventually
write his memoir — titled ‘‘The
Story of a Life,’’ it was translated into English in 2004 — but
he had already drawn from
memory in novellas such as
‘‘Tzili’’ (1982), about a Jewish
girl who is left to fend for herself after German forces invade
her home town, and ‘‘Badenheim 1939,’’ which introduced
him to Western readers when it
was translated into English in
1980.
Considered a classic of Holocaust literature, “Bedenheim
1939” depicted a Jewish resort
near Vienna at the onset of
World War II. Nazis are not
mentioned by name, but Mr.
Appelfeld’s idyllic, bourgeois
world is slowly turned into a
nightmare, as the town’s Jewish
residents are forced to register
in a ‘‘Golden Book,’’ barred
from leaving the community,
and then, at the novella’s close,
ushered onto ‘‘four filthy freight
cars’’ without realizing their final destination.
‘‘If the coaches are so dirty,’’
one character says, ‘‘it must
mean that we have not far to
go.’’
Mr. Appelfeld received many
of his country’s highest literary
honors, but Israeli critics had
initially urged him to become
more political, to write about
Zionism rather than focusing
more broadly on Judaism. Better yet, some said, he ought to
avoid the Holocaust altogether
and look forward rather than
back.
‘‘Everywhere the slogan was
‘Forget,’” Mr. Appelfeld once
told Israel’s Haaretz newspaper,
‘‘but I wanted to remember. To
be close to people who went
through experiences similar to
mine. Even later on, I did not
want Israeli ‘localism.’ I wanted
to be me. A stubborn child.’’
T h e
B10
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
Business
State
alleges
fraud in
billings
AG sues provider of
mental health care
By Priyanka Dayal McCluskey
GLOBE STAFF
ALEX HOGAN/STAT
S
By Rebecca Robbins
and Meghana Keshavan
STAT
AN FRANCISCO — There are more men
named Michael (22) than female CEOs
(20) giving company presentations at
this week’s J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference.
All told, men represent 94 percent of
the 540 people presenting these highprofile corporate updates at the conference for
biotech executives and investors. In addition, men
represent 77 percent of the speakers for
STAT JPM’s special sessions — a slate of talks
that includes nine panel events, four of
which are all-male panels with no women moderators or panelists at all.
The speaker lineups are slightly more diverse
at several of the ancillary conferences surrounding the main JPM event, but those, too, skew
male. Sixty-seven percent of speakers at the Biotech Showcase are male. And 75 percent of speakers at the Startup Health Festival are male.
STAT tallied these numbers by reviewing agendas for each of the three conferences. The paucity
of female speakers reflects the dynamics of the
male-dominated industries — finance and biopharma — that converge at the gathering. Each
January, thousands of industry investors, executives, and staffers assemble into an army of dark
suits in San Francisco’s Union Square for a highstakes week of deal making, networking, and after-hours socializing.
This year’s conference comes two years after an
infamous party on the sidelines of the conferences
in which investor relations firm LifeSci Advisors
hired models in short dresses to socialize with
guests at their reception, stirring widespread outrage. It also comes as the #MeToo movement has
raised awareness not only about sexual harassment but gender issues in the workplace.
One of the 20 female CEOs giving a corporate
presentation at JPM is Julia Owens of privately
held Millendo Therapeutics. She told STAT she
Notice
a trend?
A lack of female
speakers reflects
the dynamics of the
male­dominated
industries —
finance and
biopharma —
converging at this
week’s J.P. Morgan
Healthcare
Conference
77%
of speakers at
the conference
are men.
SPEAKERS NAMED MICHAEL (22)
FEMALE CEOS GIVING
PRESENTATIONS (20)
SPEAKERS NAMED JOHN (18)
SPEAKERS NAMED DAVID (14)
SPEAKERS NAMED MARK (14)
Attorney General Maura Healey
has sued a Brockton mental health
care company, accusing it of providing services by unlicensed, unqualified, and unsupervised staff and
fraudulently billing the state for tens
of millions of dollars.
The company, South Bay Community Services (formerly known as
South Bay Mental Health) provided
services to some 30,000 people on the
Massachusetts Medicaid program for
low-income residents, called
MassHealth.
Since August 2009, the state has
paid the company more than $123
million for providing mental health
counseling and other services to
MassHealth members — but Healey’s
office said “a significant portion” of
that sum was based on fraudulent
claims.
“This company provided substandard care to many vulnerable patients and fraudulently billed the
state for its inadequate services,” Healey said in a statement. “MassHealth
members deserve competent treatment from qualified individuals, and
our office will continue to take action
in order to remove these significant
barriers to accessing critical mental
health care in our state.”
In a statement issued through a
public relations firm, South Bay Community Services disputed the allegations.
The company “intends to follow
the legal steps necessary to resolve
this matter as efficiently as possible,”
the company said. “We remain focused on the well-being of our consumers and employees. Our daily operations have not been affected, and
we will continue to provide the best
possible behavioral health services to
SOUTH BAY, Page B12
SPEAKERS NAMED ROBERT (13)
MORE
BIOTECH
SPEAKERS NAMED
STEVEN/STEPHEN (12)
CRISPR chief brushes aside
negative data. B12
COMPUTING
SOURCE: JPM Healthcare
Conference agenda
STAT, Page B12
Microsoft says some servers
may be slowed by chip fix. B13
From talking toilets to cuddly bots
At CES, way­out
ideas are often
most intriguing
By Geoffrey A. Fowler
and Hayley Tsukayama
WASHINGTON POST
DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF
Robert Kraft said he has been alarmed by the number of Mass. deaths
from opioid overdoses, which, on average, has approached six a day.
Kraft­funded van will bring
addiction services to city streets
By Jon Chesto
GLOBE STAFF
Another prominent Boston-area
business leader is stepping up to address the state’s opioid crisis.
The Kraft Center for Community
Health at Massachusetts General Hospital — funded by New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft and his family’s charitable foundation — on Tuesday rolled out a specially equipped
mobile van, dubbed CareZone, to
bring health services to Boston residents who are struggling with addic-
tion. The van will rotate between two
locations in the city, one in the Dudley
Square area and the other close to
North Station.
Kraft said he has been alarmed by
the number of deaths statewide from
opioid overdoses, which, on average,
has approached six a day.
“People are falling through the
cracks and not getting the care they
need,” said Kraft, who has committed
$25 million to fund the center since
2011. “We thought we would bring onVAN, Page B12
LAS VEGAS — Are you
ready to talk to your toilet? Or
cuddle with a robot?
Those are just a few of the
ideas we’ve seen at CES 2018,
the annual consumer technology confab here at the Las Vegas Convention Center and
other venues. Sure, there are
tech titans here battling to
control our computers, TVs,
and smart homes.
But our favorite part is the
thousands of other companies
that gather to launch something new.
While these ideas sometimes catch on, like fitness
trackers and wireless ear buds,
many go nowhere. But the eager attempts are always interesting and often say something about where we’re headed in our relationships with
technology. Here are the most
out-there ideas that caught
our attention.
JAE C. HONG/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Attendees
watched a
presentation
using VR
headsets at the
Continental
booth at CES
2018 on
Tuesday.
Kohler Numi, an
Internet­connected toilet
You can now ask Alexa to
flush. Kohler’s latest high-end
toilet connects to the Internet
and responds to voice commands. Beyond flushing, you
can ask Amazon’s Alexa (as
well as Google Assistant and
Apple’s Siri) to lift the seat or
activate your favorite bidet
spray configuration. (Amazon
chief executive Jeff Bezos also
owns The Washington Post.)
There’s no microphone on the
toilet itself, but there are
speakers to play your favorite
tunes. Plus, it keeps track of
water usage. At $5,625 and up,
i t w i l l b e ava i l a b l e i n t h e
fourth quarter of the year.
Somnox, a robot you can
cuddle with
This bot just wants to cuddle. Somnox is a bed companion that simulates human
CES, Page B13
W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
B11
TALKING POINTS
INTERNET
SENATE
TO HOLD
SYMBOLIC
VOTE
ON NET
NEUTRALITY
MEDIA
VERMONT EDITOR
FIRED FOR TWEET
AUTOMOBILES
TOYOTA RECALLING
601,000 MORE
VEHICLES OVER
DEFECTIVE AIRBAGS
EMPLOYMENT
FEWER JOBS POSTED
IN NOVEMBER
MEDIA
VIRGIN TRAINS, DAILY
MAIL FEUD OVER
NEWSPAPER’S
EDITORIAL STANCES
BENEFITS
COMPANIES OFFER
‘PAWTERNITY’
LEAVES TO CARE
FOR A NEW PUPPY
FINANCE
DIMON REGRETS
DISMISSING BITCOIN
ADVERTISING
ATHLETES, ARTISTS
WEIGH IN ON H&M AD
TECHNOLOGY
PARIS PROSECUTORS
OPEN PROBE INTO
SLOWED­DOWN
IPHONES
The Senate will hold a vote on Net neutrality — albeit a symbolic one. Less than a month after the Federal Communications Commission reversed Obama-era rules that prohibited
Internet providers from blocking or slowing down certain
websites, or accepting payment for faster service, Democratic
senators have collected enough support to force a vote to block
the changes from taking effect. The Democrats, led by Massachusetts Senator Ed Markey (left), are using a vehicle known
as a Congressional Review Act, or CRA, which is essentially an
official form of disapproval of the FCC’s action. If passed, it
would block the commission’s new rules. If 30 senators call for
a CRA, they can make the entire Senate vote on it. Claire McCaskill became the 30th senator to get behind Markey’s move.
None of them are Republicans. To take effect, the CRA would
need majority votes in both houses, in addition to sign-off
from the president. Given that Republicans have almost unanimously supported the FCC’s new rules, the prospects for the
CRA are dim. But in this case having a vote is the entire point.
Democrats are eager to make Net neutrality a political issue,
and they want Republicans on record taking a stance they’re
convinced will be unpopular. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
The editor of Vermont’s largest newspaper, who was fired after a series of tweets about a
state proposal to add a third gender option to driver licenses, said he voiced the wrong
opinion. Gannett, the owner of the Burlington Free Press, said former editor Denis Finley
violated the company’s social media guidelines. Finley was criticized after tweeting about
the possibility of adding a third gender option on driver’s licenses. On Friday, he tweeted:
‘‘Awesome! That makes us one step closer to the apocalypse.’’ In a story published on the
newspaper’s website Monday, the Free Press said Finley ‘‘left the company.’’ USA Today Network vice president Randy Lovely said Finley’s tweets failed to adhere to company policies.
Finley said Tuesday his comments were ‘‘intended to question why the state would sponsor
a third sex on driver’s licenses.’’ — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Toyota is recalling 601,000 more vehicles in the United States to replace defective and potentially deadly Takata airbag inflators. The company said the recall covers the Toyota Corolla and Matrix, Scion xB, Lexus IS250 and 350, and the Lexus IS-F from 2009, 2010, and
2013. Also covered are the 2010 and 2013 Toyota 4-Runner, Lexus IS250C and 350C, and
Lexus GX460, as well as the 2009 and 2010 Toyota Yaris and Lexus ES350, and the 2013
Toyota Sienna. The recalls came after Takata revealed that another 3.3 million inflators are
defective. Its inflators can explode and hurl shrapnel. At least 20 people have died worldwide and more than 280 have been hurt. Owners will be notified by March and dealers will
replace front passenger inflators or airbag assemblies. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Employers posted fewer open jobs in November, the second straight month of decline after
openings reached a record high in September. The Labor Department said Tuesday that the
number of available jobs slipped 0.8 percent to 5.88 million, down from 5.93 million in October. September’s peak was 6.18 million. Job openings are still 4.4 percent higher than a
year ago. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Virgin Trains and the Daily Mail are sparring in
Britain after the rail operator said it had stopped
stocking the newspaper on its west coast trains
amid concern it was ‘‘not compatible’’ with the
company’s brand. An internal memo in November
took issue with the newspaper’s ‘‘editorial position
on issues such as immigration, LGBT rights, and
unemployment.’’ The newspaper, which has been
critical of Virgin founder Richard Branson (right)
and ever-increasing rail fares in Britain, called the decision ‘‘disgraceful,’’ and said Virgin
was ‘‘censoring’’ the choice of newspapers ‘‘for political reasons.’’ — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Think having a baby is rough? Just try bringing home a new
puppy. But don’t worry. It’s 2018. The labor market is tight,
good employees are in high demand, and paid time off, particularly for new parents, is a hot benefit many firms are offering. Now some of these firms are taking this concept one
step further and offering the ultimate solution to the ultimate first-world problem: paid time off specifically for new
pet owners. It’s called ‘‘pawternity.’’ More firms — particularly in urban areas that attract a younger workforce — are
also allowing pets to be brought to work as well as other
perks like pet insurance, time off for veterinary appointments, pet adoption consulting, and even pet bereavement
leave. — WASHINGTON POST
Jamie Dimon is having second thoughts about wading into the bitcoin controversy. The JPMorgan Chase & Co. chief executive, who earlier called the cryptocurrency a “fraud,” said
Tuesday he wishes he hadn’t dismissed the technology in such broad terms. “I regret making” those comments, Dimon said in an interview with the Fox Business network. “The
blockchain is real. You can have crypto yen and dollars and stuff like that.” In September,
Dimon said bitcoin was “worse than tulip bulbs,” and threatened to fire any trader who
bought or sold them for being “stupid.” The 61-year-old CEO said Tuesday he’s still not very
interested in the subject, and thinks that government intervention may eventually hamper
bitcoin’s growth and acceptance. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
NBA star LeBron James, rapper Diddy, and other artists have responded with outrage to an
advertising image by retailer H&M showing a black child in a sweat shirt with the words
‘‘Coolest monkey in the jungle.’’ The retailer has apologized and removed the image, but not
before the ad was widely challenged Tuesday on social media as being racist and inappropriate. James posted a refreshed image showing the model wearing a crown. Diddy posted
an image with a sweat shirt revised to read ‘‘Coolest king in the world.’’ Singer The Weeknd,
who has a clothing line at the retailer, said he was ‘‘shocked and embarrassed’’ by the photo
and that he would end his ties with the company. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
French prosecutors have opened an investigation into Apple over revelations it secretly
slowed down older versions of its handsets. The Paris prosecutor’s office said Tuesday a
probe was opened last week over alleged ‘‘deception and planned obsolescence’’ of some Apple products. It is led by the French body in charge of fraud control, which is part of the finance ministry. It follows a legal complaint filed in December by a French consumer rights
group that aims to stop intentional obsolescence of goods by companies. In France it is illegal to intentionally shorten the life span of a product in order to encourage customers to replace it. A 2015 law makes it a crime, with penalties of up to two years in prison and fines of
up to 5 percent of the company’s annual turnover. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
GIULIA MARCHI/THE NEW YORK TIMES
Customers tried out the new Mate 10 smartphone in
a Huawei store in Beijing. Huawei is trying to lift its
image as a global competitor.
Huawei phone
dropped by AT&T
amid security fears
By Paul Mozur
NEW YORK TIMES
SHANGHAI — With an advanced screen, a special artificial-intelligence microchip, and an eye-popping price, the
newest smartphone from Huawei Technologies was meant
to show Americans what China can do with technology.
Instead, Huawei’s push to sell the phone in the United
States has suddenly lost a powerful backer — and the push
has attracted some unwanted scrutiny from Washington.
AT&T walked away from a deal to sell the Huawei smartphone, the Mate 10, to customers in the United States just
before the partnership was set to be unveiled, said two people familiar with the plans, who spoke Tuesday on the condition of anonymity because the discussions were not public. The Wall Street Journal reported earlier that AT&T had
changed plans.
The reasons that led to AT&T’s shift were not entirely
clear. But last month, a group of lawmakers wrote a letter to
the Federal Communications Commission expressing misgivings about a potential deal between Huawei and an unnamed US telecommunications company to sell its consumer products in the United States. It cited longstanding concerns among some lawmakers about what they said are
Huawei’s ties to the Chinese government.
The letter, which was reviewed by The New York Times,
said Congress has “long
been concerned about
Chinese espionage in
general, and Huawei’s
role in that espionage in
particular.”
While the letter did
not mention AT&T, its
pending deal to sell the
Huawei smartphone in
the United States had
been widely reported.
Fletcher Cook, a
spokesman for AT&T,
declined to comment.
Huawei, a private
company, has long denied that it presents security risks. In a statement, Huawei said that
it had delivered “premium devices with integrity globally and in the US market”
over the past five years, adding that it would introduce new
products for the US market Tuesday.
The last-minute disruption is the latest in a long line of
setbacks for Huawei, which has struggled for years with political opposition to its efforts to tap the hugely valuable US
market. More broadly, it underscores a deepening political
rift over issues of technology, user privacy, and security — a
rift that adds to a brewing trade dispute between the world’s
two largest economies.
Huawei has been counting on the Mate 10 to compete
with Apple’s high-end iPhones, in a test of the potential appeal of a Chinese brand in the US market. While Huawei
has long sold budget phones, some Mate 10 versions cost
$900 or more without subsidies from phone carriers.
Huawei sells smartphones in the United States, but it
does not have smartphone deals with any of the major wireless carriers in the country. Those carriers — Verizon, AT&T,
Sprint, and T-Mobile — dominate the market, making it
more difficult for Huawei to get a foothold in the country.
The AT&T deal was supposed to cement the company’s status as a top maker of the devices, alongside Apple and Samsung Electronics of South Korea.
Congressional misgivings about the company’s close relationship with the Chinese government have long plagued
Huawei. Already, other major telecommunications companies refuse to buy the equipment Huawei makes for telecommunications networks — its core business — because of
worries in Washington over security.
In the letter, the lawmakers said that Huawei had ties to
the Chinese Communist Party, as well as to the country’s intelligence and security services, and they accused Huawei of
disregarding intellectual property.
Analysts said the political opposition to Huawei was not
surprising. Leaders in China and the United States view
technology made in the other country with suspicion. In
policy guidance and speeches, Chinese officials have repeatedly called for technology made by US companies to be replaced by locally produced ones. Beijing has also widely
blocked major US Internet companies from offering products in the country.
US lawmakers have stated their suspicions before. In
2012, a House intelligence committee report said two Chinese companies, including Huawei, were a threat to US national security. Huawei is also under investigation by the
Treasury and Commerce departments over whether it broke
US trade sanctions against countries including Iran and
North Korea.
The last­minute
disruption is the
latest in a long line
of setbacks for
Huawei, which has
struggled for years
with political
opposition to its
efforts to tap the
hugely valuable
US market.
B12
Business
T h e
THE BOSTON GLOBE
25
Index of publicly traded companies in Massachusetts
Globe 25 index
B o s t o n
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At biotech event, few women speakers
uSTAT
Continued from Page B10
was “disappointed but not surprised
to hear that it’s that low.”
In addition to the 20 female
CEOs, there are 13 scheduled female
presenters with different titles like
chief financial officer or vice president. They are in most cases scheduled to present alongside one or
more male colleagues. Many of them
come from the 22 nonprofit companies, mostly health systems, presenting at JPM. In this category, 27
percent of scheduled presenters are
women.
By comparison, there are 18
scheduled presenters named John,
14 named David, and 14 named
Mark.
The organizers of JPM are not responsible for the dearth of women
among the company presenters.
That’s because companies invited to
present can choose to send any of
their executives to give the 30-minute talk. They usually, but not always, dispatch their CEO to take the
stage alone.
JPM conference organizers do
choose the slate of high-profile
speakers who give opening remarks,
talk on panels, participate in fireside
chats, and deliver keynote speeches.
T h i s y e a r ’s s c h e d u l e f e a t u r e s
23andMe CEO Anne Wojcicki and
the billionaire philanthropist Bill
Gates, among others.
Gurpreet Kaur, a spokeswoman
for J.P. Morgan, declined to comment for this story.
In addition to having higher proportions of female speakers than
JPM, the Biotech Showcase and the
Startup Health Festival avoided allmale panels. Both conferences had
at least one woman on each of their
scheduled panels. These and other
ancillary conferences surrounding
JPM are known in biopharma circles for drawing a more diverse
crowd than the main event. That’s in
part a reflection of the size of the
companies that they draw.
“As companies get larger and
larger, fewer and fewer of the CEOs
are women,” said Lisa Suennen,
managing director at GE Ventures.
“I don’t expect it to change a lot in
my lifetime.”
The J.P. Morgan conference
tends to feature more of these mature biopharmaceutical companies,
most of which are public — and
“they just don’t have enough women
in the C-suite,” said Nina Kjellson, a
general partner at the venture capital firm Canaan. The startups have
more visible females, she said,
which is why “more Biotech Showcase companies need to grow up and
make it to the J.P. Morgan roster.”
Adding in some gender balance
was a top priority for the organizers
of the Startup Health Festival, because “it’s essential to balance the
perspectives that set the agenda for
the future of health care,” a spokeswoman said in an e-mail. As most of
the industry — from investor teams
to company leadership — is run by
men, the hope is that buoying more
women to launch their own startups
might have a positive downstream
effect on the industry long term.
Biotech Showcase, too, has
“made a concerted effort to diversify
our speaker lineup,” said Anna
Chrisman, who serves as managing
director for EBD Group, which organized the conference. It isn’t easy,
however, given the demographics of
the biopharmaceutical industry —
and the Biotech Showcase numbers
“reflect the diversity of the industry
quite well,” she said.
“Our attendees don’t want a program that’s like an echo chamber,”
she said. “When we include people
with different backgrounds, it creates a more meaningful and engaging event.”
‘As
companies
get larger
and larger,
fewer and
fewer of
the CEOs
are
women.’
LISA SUENNEN
Managing
director,
GE Ventures
Rebecca Robbins can be reached at
rebecca.robbins@statnews.com.
Follow her on Twitter @RebeccaD
Robbins. Follow Stat on Twitter:
@statnews.
Kraft­
funded van
to serve
addicts
uVAN
Continued from Page B10
Markets
Stocks keep rising as calm reigns
Stocks pushed further into record territory Tuesday, and
the Standard & Poor’s 500 index’s immaculate start to the
year extended to a sixth day. Health care stocks and banks
led the way, as calm continues to reign over markets
around the world. The strong gains overshadowed weakness for dividend-paying stocks and other areas of the market hurt by rising interest rates after 10-year Treasury
yields hit their highest level since March. Stocks have been
rising at a remarkably steady pace for more than a year as
investors bask in a global economy that’s strengthening in
sync. Corporate profits are also on the upswing, and the recently approved tax cut should goose earnings even higher.
Health care stocks rose 1.1 percent for the biggest gain
among the 11 sectors that make up the S&P 500. Boston
Scientific was at the front of the pack after it gave preliminary results for its revenue last quarter that were stronger
than Wall Street was expecting. The medical device company’s shares rose 8.3 percent. Illumina likewise reported preliminary results for fourth-quarter revenue that topped analysts’ expectations. Its shares jumped 6.9 percent.
demand access to addiction care
where people need it the most.”
The Kraft Center covered the
$160,000 cost of the van, along with
assistance from Ford Motor Co.,
General Electric Co., and Mass. General’s parent organization, Partners
HealthCare. Partners and GE were
also involved in launching the Rize
Massachusetts initiative last March
to help fund innovative ways to deliver addiction services; Partners
chief executive David Torchiana, former Partners chairman Jack Connors, and GE chief medical officer
David Barash have been among the
key movers behind that initiative.
The CareZone van will operate
during a test period that could last
as long as eight months, with a projected operating cost of $157,000 for
that time. GE and the Hearst Foundation are helping the Kraft Center
pay for it. Approximately 1,000
antioverdose Narcan kits will be
provided by the state Department of
Public Health.
Governor Charlie Baker, Mayor
DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF
Martin J. Walsh, and Attorney General Maura Healey were among the
local leaders who joined Kraft at an
event at City Hall Plaza on Tuesday
to unveil the new van.
Dr. Elsie Taveras, the Kraft Center’s executive director, said the van
service has been in the works for the
past year. The goal, she said, was to
come up with a way to address the
city’s biggest public health crisis.
The Kraft Center will work with the
Boston Public Health Commission
and the Boston Health Care for the
Homeless Program to staff the van,
she said.
She hopes the van’s staff can steer
addicts toward long-term services.
“Many times, people aren’t coming into a brick-and-mortar facility
because of a fear of stigma,” Taveras
said.
If successful, the concept could
be replicated in other parts of New
England, or the country.
“We’re definitely not the only
ones nationally that are facing this
kind of epidemic,” Taveras said.
Jon Chesto can be reached at
jon.chesto@globe.com. Follow him
on Twitter @jonchesto.
The CareZone
van will
operate during
a test period of
as long as eight
months, with a
projected
operating cost
of $157,000 for
that time. GE
and the Hearst
Foundation are
helping the
Kraft Center
pay for it.
DOW JONES industrial average
State accuses mental health service of fraud
uSOUTH BAY
Continued from Page B10
those who need it most in the
New England area.”
The company has several
clinics in Massachusetts, including in Boston, Fall River,
Lawrence, Springfield, and
Worcester and on Cape Cod.
South Bay Community Services says it offers services to
children and adults, including
mental health and substance
abuse counseling and other
outpatient services.
The attorney general’s suit,
filed in federal court in Boston
on Friday, joins a federal whistle-blower case that raised similar allegations of fraud against
the company.
Healey’s suit cites allega-
tions against 17 clinics operated by South Bay Community
Services. It alleges that many
employees at those clinics did
not have degrees in social
work, making them ineligible
for the licenses needed to provide services. (Instead, the
workers allegedly had degrees
in other fields, such as art therapy and school counseling.)
South Bay is backed by
H.I.G. Growth Partners, an
arm of H.I.G. Capital, a global
private equity firm with offices
in Boston.
Priyanka Dayal McCluskey
can be reached at
priyanka.mccluskey
@globe.com. Follow her on
Twitter @priyanka_dayal.
NASDAQ Composite index
CRISPR chief brushes aside negative data
By Jonathan Saltzman
GLOBE STAFF
S&P 500 index
SOURCE: Bloomberg News
SAN FRANCISCO — The
new head of a genome editing
company whose main research
lab is in Cambridge on Tuesday
brushed aside an unpublished
paper that raised concerns
about preexisting immune responses to the biotech’s geneediting technology, known as
CRISPR.
Samarth Kulkarni, who last
month rose from chief business
development officer of the
Swiss company CRISPR Therapeutics to chief executive, acknowledged that the paper,
posted Friday on the bioRxiv
website, presented data that
caused the stocks of his company and two Cambridge rivals to
tumble. But, Kulkarni said, the
findings had already been presented at conferences six to
eight months ago and were irrelevant to the science.
“The data are not new,” he
told the Globe in a hotel confer-
ence room during the J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference, the
biggest annual investors event
in biotechnology. “What’s new
is that someone in the press
picked it up and sensationalized it, and all of a sudden everyone else picked it up.”
Kulkarni said the research
paper will not delay CRISPR
Therapeutics, which has almost
all of its 120 employees in Cambridge, from beginning tests of
a gene-editing therapy in clinical trials this year.
The company applied late
last year to begin trials in Europe on patients with beta thalassemia, a rare inherited blood
disorder. It is asking the Food
and Drug Administration to let
it test the same treatment in the
United States this year on patients with sickle cell disease,
another rare blood disorder.
Boston-based Vertex Pharmaceuticals is working with
CRISPR to develop and market
the treatment.
‘What’s new is
that someone in
the press picked it
up and sensation­
alized it.’
SAMARTH KULKARNI
On data posted at bioRxiv
Kulkarni said CRISPR “has
the pole position” and would be
the first to begin clinical trials
of gene editing in patients. It
was the last of three gene-editing startups — the others are
Editas Medicine and Intellia
Therapeutics — to go public.
The three companies are
among several parties in a patent fight that is currently in the
US Court of Appeals for the
Federal Circuit. Gene editing
has attracted major investment
because of its potential to cure
deadly intractable diseases.
The bioRxiv paper’s senior
author, Dr. Matthew Porteus of
Stanford University, recently
told the online health and life
sciences publication STAT —
launched in 2015 by Boston
Globe owner John Henry —
that the findings on immune responses shouldn’t stop development of CRISPR therapies. But
Porteus said the field needs to
address possible problems as
the first clinical trials get closer.
If the immune system did attack proteins used in a CRISPR
therapy, he said, it could make
the treatment useless, or even
provoke a dangerous inflammatory attack in the patient. Porteus is a scientific founder of
CRISPR Therapeutics.
Kulkarni said any problems
with the immune response
would be fleeting and have no
impact on patients’ health.
Jonathan Saltzman
can be reached at
jsaltzman@globe.com.
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
B13
At CES, the out­there ideas hint at where tech is headed
uCES
Continued from Page B10
breathing. When you hug the robot, the rising and falling sensation subconsciously calms you
down and helps you get to sleep
faster, say its makers. Somnox can
also make the soothing sounds of
heartbeats, lullabies, and guided
meditation, which you activate
from an app. Best part: It doesn’t
ever snore. $600, shipping in September.
Modius, a headband to help you
lose weight
Pack on a few pounds during
this cold snap? Modius has built a
headset that stimulates your vestibular nerve, which runs behind
your ear and into your brain. You
use Modius by attaching a pad to
your skin, which has a wire that
runs up to the headband. The electric current, Modius says, stimulates the part of the brain that controls your appetite. It’s meant to be
an extra boost to supplement your
weight-loss plan. Brain-zapping
technology is still somewhat unproven, but several companies
claim it can help everything from
concentration to pain relief. $500,
expected in February.
Foldimate and Laundroid,
robots that fold your laundry
These competing robots tackle
one of the week’s most arduous
chores. Foldimate promises to fold
a load of laundry in 4 minutes, but
asks you to feed each piece in, individually. The much pricier Laundroid folds from a drawer of
clothes, but takes much longer.
Sadly, neither can tackle socks or
sheets yet. Those still must be
done by hand. $16,000 for Laundroid, $980 for Foldimate.
Kingston Nucleum, a 7­in­1 hub
for MacBooks
but we commend the idea to develop tech to help discourage attackers. About $70 shipping now.
Okay, this one is just wildly
practical. Remember when the
MacBook Pro was useful for actual
professionals? That was before Apple took away useful inputs and replaced them with USB Type-C
ports requiring adapters and dongles. Plug a Nucleum hub into a
MacBook and those useful ports
return. You get back two traditional large USB ports, HDMI for an
external monitor, an SD card slot,
a microSD card slot — and still two
USB Type-C ports. It even has
pass-through power, so you can
charge your phone or laptop. $80,
shipping now from Kingston.com.
Isolation is a significant problem for some older adults. ElliQ is
a tabletop robot with a swiveling
head that connects seniors to
friends for messages and video
chats and makes it a bit easier for
them to take advantage of online
information and services. It suggests physical activities, such as
taking medicine or going for a
walk, and also makes personalized
recommendations for news, music
or games. Headed to beta trials before a launch this year.
PowerSpot, a charging hub with
no cords or mats
3DRudder, a game controller
for your feet
More gadgets? That means
more charging cables. But Powercast’s PowerSpot hub promises to
charge devices such as watches,
headphones, and keyboards within an 80-foot radius without any
charging accessories. It does that
by using technology that promises
to be like Wi-Fi, but for electricity.
With recent approval from the
Federal Communications Commission, it’s closer than ever to hitting the market. $100, expected in
the third quarter of this year.
Dell XPS 13, a woven­glass
laptop
Dell’s 2018 refresh of its popular XPS 13 line uses an extra-hardy
white glass fiber weave finish that
resists the most devilish stains and
yellowing over time. We attacked
one with a black Sharpie permanent marker, and it eventually
came out (with a bit of elbow
grease). At a time when lots of other companies are making cloth-
ElliQ, a social robot for seniors
FOLDIMATE
covered gadgets, Dell gets a highfive for recognizing that road warriors really want a laptop that
stands up to abuse. $1,000 and up,
shipping now on Dell.com.
Xeros, a washing machine that
could slash your water bill
Running a laundry load uses a
lot of water — while also subjecting your clothes to some serious
roughhousing. Xeros fills washing
machines with nylon balls about
the size of green peas that help
massage away dirt and absorb
loose dye using half as much water. It also jostles your clothes less,
leading to energy savings and
clothes that last longer. The tech is
already used in some commercial
washers and is trying to work its
way into home models. Price
hasn’t been set yet; could arrive in
the consumer home market within two years.
Foldimate’s
robot promises
to fold a load of
laundry in four
minutes, but
you have to
feed each piece
in individually.
INVI, a bracelet to fight assault
INVI’s stylish bracelet is actually a deterrent against sexual assault. Like a skunk, INVI’s bracelet
releases a foul odor to repel attackers, in this case when you break its
clasp. It’s not clear how much of a
deterrent a bad smell would be,
Virtual reality is all about immersion, but in real life most people don’t move anywhere by using
the thumbstick that most VR systems employ. 3DRudder is a foot
pad that rocks and turns to simulate footsteps while seated. We
first saw 3DRudder at CES in
2015; its software has come far
since then, and it has added straps
to keep you from losing your footing. $139, shipping now.
Aibo, a robot dog
Sony’s iconic Aibo dog, discontinued in 2006, has been reborn
and is cuter and smarter than ever.
Originally announced last fall, the
new pup stole the show at Sony’s
CES news conference, where he
was shown to a US audience for
the first time. Aibo has a camera in
its nose, a microphone to pick up
voice commands and 22 adorably
articulated parts. The bad news:
Sony is only selling it in Japan, for
now. $1,800, ships Jan. 11.
Microsoft says some servers may be slowed by chip fix
Intel insists effects
should be minimal
By Dina Bass
BLOOMBERG NEWS
SEATTLE — Microsoft Corp.
said fixes for security flaws
present in most processors may
significantly slow down certain
servers and dent the performance of some personal computers, the software maker’s
first assessment of a global
problem that Intel Corp. initially downplayed.
Microsoft’s statement suggests slowdowns could be more
substantial than Intel previously indicated. While Intel chief
executive Brian Krzanich on
Monday said the problem may
be more pervasive than first
thought, he didn’t discuss the
degree of impact — only that
some machines would be more
affected than others.
Microsoft cautioned in a
blog post that servers, the computers that underpin corporate
networks, used for certain tasks
may show “more significant impact.” Not all servers will be affected, it said. Microsoft, which
didn’t provide specific numbers, said it is testing a variety
of systems and will update users on what it finds.
PCs running Windows 10
and sold since 2016 will face
MICHEL EULER/ASSOCIATED PRESS/FILE 2016
Microsoft Corp. is testing ways to correct security flaws in
Intel Corp. chips that drive most computers and servers.
slowdowns of less than 10 percent, which Microsoft said will
probably not be noticeable to
users. Customers with older
Windows 10 PCs will notice
some slowness because those
machines contain older
chips. Machines running Windows 7 and Windows 8 from
2015 or earlier will be the most
affected with users noticing a
decrease in system performance, Microsoft said.
On Jan. 3, Intel confirmed
its chips contain a longstanding
feature that makes them vulnerable to hacking. There are
two main flaws, dubbed Meltdown and Spectre, and one or
both are present in almost all of
the billions of processors that
run personal computers, servers, and phones and could give
attackers unauthorized access
to data. The world’s largest
technology companies are releasing software updates to
patch these security holes, and
there’s been intense debate
about how much this will affect
performance.
The increasingly dire assessments of the problem mean
some customers will have to accept worsening computer performance in the name of security, forcing them to add more
servers to get back to where
they were before applying the
security updates. It also shows
the challenge of patching such
widespread hardware flaws.
Intel has more than 99 percent market share in servers,
and its chips are in more than
90 percent of laptops and 88
percent of desktops sold.
Krzanich said late Monday
that patches from companies
like Microsoft may slow computers. Previously, Intel had
played down such concerns,
saying tests showed minimal or
no impact on performance, although certain unusual workloads may be slowed by as
much as 30 percent.
In a statement on Tuesday,
Intel maintained its stance that
most typical PC users won’t see
a “significant” impact. Based on
tests of PCs using the latest
components, slowdowns will be
6 percent or less, it said, while
noting that results ranged from
14 percent to 2 percent.
It conceded that for servers,
the whole picture is not yet
clear and said that slowdowns
will vary according to the technique used to protect machines.
“We still have work to do to
build a complete picture of the
impact on data center systems,”
Intel said. “In some cases there
are multiple mitigation options
available, each with different
performance implications and
SpaceX defends rocket in secret satellite launch
By Marcia Dunn
ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. —
SpaceX defended its rocket performance during the weekend
launch of a secret US satellite,
responding Tuesday to media
reports that the satellite codenamed Zuma was lost.
Company president Gwynne
Shotwell said the Falcon 9 rocket ‘‘did everything correctly’’
Sunday night and suggestions
otherwise are ‘‘categorically
false.’’
Northrop Grumman —
which provided the satellite for
an undisclosed US government
entity — said it cannot comment on classified missions.
The company chose SpaceX as
the launch provider, noting late
last year that it took ‘‘great care
to ensure the most affordable
and lowest risk scenario for Zuma.’’ The name refers to a Malibu beach in Southern California.
This was SpaceX’ s third
classified mission for the US
government, a lucrative customer. It was so shrouded in se-
SPACEX VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS
The launch of SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket carrying the Zuma
satellite was shrouded in secrecy.
crecy that the sponsoring government agency was not even
identified, as is usually the case.
The Falcon’s first stage completed its job, lifting the rocket
off the pad and toward space,
then separated and landed back
at Cape Canaveral. But secondstage information was kept to a
minimum because of all the secrecy surrounding the flight.
The rocket’s second stage pro-
pels the satellite into orbit.
The Wall Street Journal
quotes unidentified congressional officials who were briefed
on the mission as saying the
satellite apparently did not separate from the second stage,
and plunged through the atmosphere and burned up.
Originally scheduled for a
November launch, Zuma was
delayed by potential concern
about another mission’s payload fairing, the shell on top
that protects a satellite during
launch. The company later said
it had cleared the issue.
Shotwell said in a statement
that since no rocket changes are
warranted for upcoming
flights, the company’s launch
schedule remains on track. If
additional reviews uncover any
problems, she said, ‘‘we will report it immediately.’’
Last year was a banner year
for the private space company
with 18 launches. It’s shooting
for even more flights in 2018.
SpaceX’s new, powerful
rocket, the Falcon Heavy, was at
its launch pad at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center on Tuesday,
awaiting an engine test-firing
sometime this week. The California company aims to launch
the new rocket by month’s end,
making its debut with chief executive Elon Musk’s own personal Tesla Roadster on board.
Another Falcon 9, meanwhile,
is scheduled to fly in three
weeks with a communication
satellite for Luxembourg.
implementation specifics.”
Microsoft is offering more
data about the impact so its corporate customers can decide
whether it is worth it to apply
the security fixes. In certain cases, where servers aren’t at risk
from data theft, companies may
decide speed is more important
than security.
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notices
& more
boston.com/classifieds
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS
MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
– HIGHWAY DIVISION
NOTICE OF A PUBLIC HEARING
Project File No. 605287
A Design Public Hearing will be held by MassDOT to discuss
the proposed bridge rehabilitation project in Chelsea, MA.
WHERE: Chelsea City Hall – City Council Chamber
500 Broad
Chelsea MA, 02150
WHEN: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 at 6:30 PM
In case of inclement weather on January 24, a snow date
will be provided for this hearing on Wednesday, January
31, 2018 at 6:30 PM.
PURPOSE: The purpose of this hearing is to provide the
public with the opportunity to become fully acquainted
with the proposed rehabilitation of the Chelsea Viaduct,
consisting Bridges C-09-007 & C-09-011 which carry Route
1 north and southbound over Chelsea between County
Road and the Tobin Bridge. All views and comments made
at the hearing will be reviewed and considered to the maximum extent possible.
PROPOSAL: The proposed project consists of replacement of the roadway surface and deck of the Chelsea Viaduct in addition to repairs to the viaduct’s foundations and
support columns. The project also proposes to improve
drainage from the viaduct as well as roadway lighting both
on the elevated section of Route 1 and local roadways
which pass under the structure.
A secure right-of-way is necessary for this project. Acquisitions of permanent or temporary easements may be
required. MassDOT is responsible for acquiring all needed
rights in private or public lands. MassDOT’s policy concerning land acquisitions will be discussed at this meeting.
Written views received by MassDOT subsequent to the
date of this notice and up to five (5) days prior to the date
of the hearing shall be displayed for public inspection and
copying at the time and date listed above. Plans will be on
display one-half hour before the hearing begins, with an
engineer in attendance to answer questions regarding this
project. A project handout is available at www.massdot.
state.ma.us/highway/HighlightedProjects/ChelseaRoute1ViaductRehabilitationProject.
Written statements and other exhibits in place of, or in
addition to, oral statements made at the Public Information Meeting regarding the proposed undertaking are to be
submitted to Patricia A. Leavenworth, P.E., Chief Engineer,
MassDOT, 10 Park Plaza, Boston, MA 02116, Attention:
Bridge Project Management, Project File No. 605287. Such
submissions will also be accepted at the meeting. Mailed
statements and exhibits intended for inclusion in the public meeting transcript must be postmarked within ten (10)
business days of this Public Meeting. Project inquiries may
be emailed to dot.feedback.highway@state.ma.us
This location is accessible to people with disabilities. MassDOT provides reasonable accommodations and/or language assistance free of charge upon request (including
but not limited to interpreters in American Sign Language
and languages other than English, open or closed captioning for videos, assistive listening devices and alternate material formats, such as audio tapes, Braille and large print),
as available. For accommodation or language assistance,
please contact MassDOT’s Chief Diversity and Civil Rights
Officer by phone (857-368-8580), fax (857-368-0602), TTD/
TTY (857-368-0603) or by email (MassDOT.CivilRights@dot.
state.ma.us). Requests should be made as soon as possible prior to the meeting, and for more difficult to arrange
services including sign-language, CART or language translation or interpretation, requests should be made at least ten
(10) business days before the meeting.
In case of inclement weather, hearing cancellation announcements will be posted on the internet at http://www.
massdot.state.ma.us/Highway/
Jonathan Gulliver
Highway Administrator
Patricia A. Leavenworth, P.E.
Chief Engineer
Notice is hereby given:
ExteNet Systems, Inc. proposes to replace existing
street lights with new street
lights with top-mounted
telecommunications antennas and associated equipment concealed in the
base. Replacement poles
will not to exceed an overall height of 29.5 feet AGL,
installed within the public
right of way at the followCheck out new
ing approximate locations
and used car specials
within the City of Boston,
Suffolk County, MA: (BBHfrom over 100
006) Charles St & Silver Pl
local dealers.
(42.360605,
-71.070761);
(BBH-016) Beacon St & Park
St (42.357783, -71.063213).
Any interested party wishing to submit comments regarding the potential effects
the proposed facilities may
have on any historic property may do so by sending
such comments to: Project
6117000379-KR
c/o
EBI
Consulting, 21 B Street,
Burlington, MA 01803, or via
telephone at 413-281-4650.
This notice is a requirement
of Section 106 of the Napowered by
tional Historic Preservation
Act of 1966.
Comments
must be received within 30
days of this notice.
Buying
a car this
week?
LEGAL NOTICES
(SEAL)
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS
LAND COURT
DEPARTMENT OF THE
TRIAL COURT
17SM009947
ORDER OF NOTICE
To:
Donald F. Crowe
Cora Crowe, a/k/a Cora A.
Crowe
and to all persons entitled
to the benefit of the Servicemembers Civil Relief
Act, 50 U.S.C. c. 50 §3901
et seq.:
Bank of America, N.A. successor by merger to Fleet
National Bank successor by
merger to
Fleet Bank of Massachusetts National Association
claiming to have an interest
in a Mortgage covering real
property in Hyde Park (Boston), numbered 6 Reddy
Avenue, given by Donald F.
Crowe and Cora Crowe to
Fleet Bank of Massachusetts, N.A., dated August
21, 1992, and recorded in
Suffolk County Registry of
Deeds in Book 17661, Page
079 (the “Mortgage”), has/
have filed with this court a
complaint for determination
of Defendant’s/Defendants’
Servicemembers status.
If you now are, or recently
have been, in the active military service of the United
States of America, then you
may be entitled to the benefits of the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act. If you
object to a foreclosure of
the above mentioned property on that basis, then you
or your attorney must file a
written appearance and answer in this court at Three
Pemberton Square, Boston,
MA 02108 on or before February 12, 2018 or you will be
forever barred from claiming that you are entitled to
the benefits of said Act.
Witness, JUDITH C. CUTLER
Chief Justice of said Court
on December 29, 2017.
Attest: Deborah J. Patterson
Recorder
17-030958
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS LAND COURT
DEPARTMENT OF THE TRIAL
COURT 17 SM 006613 ORDER OF NOTICE TO: Lisa
V. Arciero-Bocchino and
Michael Bocchino and to
all persons entitled to the
benefit of the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act, 50
U.S.C. App. § 3901 et seq.:
Wells Fargo Bank, National
Association, as Trustee for
Certificateholders of Bear
Sterns Asset Backed Securities I LLC, Asset Backed Certificates, Series 2007-AC6
claiming to have an interest in a Mortgage covering
real property in Boston,
numbered 51 Montmorenci
Avenue, given by Lisa V. Arciero-Bocchino and Michael
Bocchino to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems,
Inc. as Nominee for Bear
Stearns Residential Mortgage Corporation, dated
May 30, 2007, and recorded
at Suffolk County Registry of
Deeds in Book 41924, Page
330 affected by loan Modification agreement dated
January 05, 2013 recorded
in Book 51701 Page 85, and
now held by Plaintiff by assignment, has filed with this
court a complaint for determination of Defendants’
Servicemembers
status.
If you now are, or recently
have been, in the active military service of the United
States of America, then you
may be entitled to the benefits of the Servicemembers
Civil Relief Act. If you object to a foreclosure of the
above-mentioned property
on that basis, then you or
your attorney must file a
written appearance and answer in this court at Three
Pemberton Square, Boston,
MA 02108 on or before Feb
5, 2018 or you will be forever barred from claiming that
you are entitled to the benefits of said Act. Witness,
JUDITH C. CUTLER, Chief
Justice of this Court on Dec
21, 2017 Attest: Deborah J.
Patterson Recorder
T h e
B14
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
Boston’s forecast
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
A mixture of clouds and
sunshine with a seasonably chilly afternoon.
High pressure will settle
right over the area. Freezing
drizzle at night north.
FRIDAY
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
It will turn milder with a
gusty southwest breeze
and a partly sunny sky.
High temperatures will
be well-above average. Mild at
night with rain late.
HIGH
31-36
LOW
27-32
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
An unseasonably mild
day across the area
with periods of rain and
drizzle. There will be a
few downpours as well. Rain
continues at night.
HIGH
45-50
LOW
41-46
SUNDAY
SATURDAY
NOON
6 A.M.
6 P.M.
1
6 P.M.
Cloudy to partly sunny
as high pressure begins
to settle back into the
area. It will be cooler
than recent days with a gusty
northwest wind.
Mild with clouds and
periods of rain. The rain
is expected to taper off
during the afternoon
hours. Skies will clear at night; it
will remain windy.
HIGH
51-56
LOW
42-47
NOON
HIGH
31-36
LOW
15-20
HIGH
45-50
LOW
29-34
2
10
10
2
15
4
2
6
2018 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
6 A.M.
By Dave Green
THURSDAY
TODAY
18
10
30
11
8
6
4
Difficulty Level
1/10
Each row and column must contain the numbers 1 through
6 without repeating.
The numbers within the outlined boxes, or cages, must
combine using the given operation (in any order) to pro­
duce the target numbers in the top­left corners.
Fill in the single­box cages with the number in the top­left
corner.
DAILY BRIDGE CLUB
BY FRANK STEWART
New England
forecast
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Tides
TODAY: A seasonably chilly day across the region with
a mixture of clouds and sunshine. Light southwesterly
winds.
TOMORROW: Some freezing drizzle early in the
10s
day for the northern mountains; otherwise, turning
PRESQUE ISLE
milder with partly sunny skies.
22/10
EXTENDED: Mild with rain across central
and southern parts Friday while an icy mix
MILLINOCKET
falls in the northern mountains and near
24/15
the Canadian border.
20s
NEWPORT
29/24
30s
BURLINGTON
32/30
RUTLAND
35/26
MT. WASHINGTON
23/20
LEBANON
28/19
High tides
A.M. P.M.
Gloucester
Marblehead
Lynn
Scituate
Plymouth
Cape Cod
Canal East
Cape Cod
Canal West
Falmouth
5:57 6:26
9.6 8.8
---12:11
--- 0.8
5:55 6:26
6:09 6:40
6:04 6:31
5:54 6:25
5:57
5:57
5:56
6:00
6:00
Yesterday
High/low
43/32
Mean
38
Departure from normal +9
Departure for month -104
Departure for year -104
5 p.m. rel. humidity 44%
BAR HARBOR
31/26
PORTLAND 31/24
Actual Temperatures
30s
Temperatures are
today’s highs
and tonight’s lows.
Degree days
Yesterday
Monthly total
Normal to date
Season total
Season normal
Last year to date
6:26
6:26
6:27
6:30
6:29
5:49 6:19
4:46 5:18
5:41 6:10
Boston’s recent climate
LACONIA
31/20
MANCHESTER
PORTSMOUTH 33/26
BRATTLEBORO
35/26
32/23
NASHUA 37/23
PITTSFIELD
34/26
BOSTON 33/29
WORCESTER
PROVINCETOWN
SPRINGFIELD
NEW
32/26
33/25 PROVIDENCE
35/31
BEDFORD
34/25
35/28
HYANNIS 33/27
HARTFORD
34/26
NEWPORT
34/30
BRIDGEPORT
OAK BLUFFS NANTUCKET 33/30
33/29
34/30
New England marine forecast
High tides
Old Orchard ME
Hampton
Beach NH
Plum Island
Ipswich
30s


A.M. P.M.
Boston high
Height
Boston low
Height
BANGOR
26/17
AUGUSTA
28/21
BERLIN
29/16
MONTPELIER
29/23
High tides
A.M. P.M.
Hyannis Port
Chatham
Wellfleet
Provincetown
Nantucket
Harbor
Oak Bluffs
New Bedford
Newport RI
7:05
7:02
6:11
5:59
7:36
7:33
6:40
6:30
7:09
6:27
2:35
2:28
7:41
6:47
2:55
2:48
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Heat
27
423
320
2307
2304
2145
Cool
0
0
0
0
0
0
Normal Temperatures
Jan. readings
Avg. daily high
Avg. daily low
YTD avg. temp.
Actual
24.7
10.7
17.7
Record Temperatures
Yesterday’s high 43°
80
70
Record
high
Normal
high
40
36
30
Normal
low
20
22
10
SW 4-8 kts.
1-2 ft.
34/30
Vineyard
S 4-8 kts.
1-2 ft.
35/30
Cod Canal
SW 4-8 kts.
1-2 ft.
35/27
Nantucket
E 4-8 kts.
1-2 ft.
33/31
Buzzards Bay
SW 3-6 kts.
1-2 ft.
34/26
Provincetown
SW 4-8 kts.
1-2 ft.
35/32
1.5"
For current Charles River Basin water quality, call (781) 788-0007 or go to http://www.charlesriver.org.
1.2"
Sunrise
Sunset
Day length
Moonrise
7:13 a.m.
4:31 p.m.
9:18
1:16 a.m.
Mount Washington (5 p.m. yesterday)
Weather
Snow shower
Visibility
0 miles
Wind
west-northwest at 77 m.p.h.
High/low temperature
13/5
Snow depth at 5 p.m.
26.0”
Temp
Record
low
Temp
Almanac
Seas
0
Seas
East Cape
Wind
1937
64
60
50
Small craft advisory
Gale warning  Storm warning
Norm.
36.2
22.8
29.5
Wind
Boston Harbor
South dealer — E-W vulnerable
North
♠ AK73
♥ 10 9 5 2
♦ J753
♣6
Martha’s
Yesterday’s low 32°
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
December
-4
1968
January
0.3"
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
NEW
Jan. 16
FIRST
Jan. 24
FULL
Jan. 31
LAST
Feb. 7
Moon and planets at dawn – A. MacRobert
Before 6 a.m. tomorrow, look south-southeast for
the waning crescent moon. To its lower left are
bright white Jupiter and smaller, yellow-orange
Mars.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
You will make a point of having
one-on-one talks with those who
are key to your well-being. You
easily could feel inspired by a
mere suggestion. Problems might
arise later in the afternoon, as
there seems to be confusion surrounding an agreement. Tonight:
Confirm plans.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
You instinctively know what to
do. Ask a loved one to help you
with a cause that's close to your
heart. You are able to see the impossible as possible. You will follow through on what is important. A friend inspires you to continue on your chosen path.
Tonight: Out and about.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
You are on top of your game right
THIS DAY IN HISTORY
Famer and entrepreneur
George Foreman is 69. Roots
rock singer Alejandro Escovedo
is 67. Singer Pat Benatar is 65.
Hall of Fame race car driver Rahal is 65. Singer Shawn Colvin
is 62. Crash Test Dummies
singer Brad Roberts is 54. Presidential adviser and son-in-law
Jared Kushner is 37. American
roots singer Valerie June is 36.
East
♠ J 10 5
♥K6
♦ Q982
♣Q985
South
♠ Q2
♥J8743
♦ K6
♣AKJ4
South
1♥
2♣
4♥
West
North
Pass
1♠
Pass
3♥
All Pass
Opening lead — ♣
East
Pass
Pass
2
Today’s deal reminds me of the man who liked to tell
jokes — but always punched up the goofline.
At four hearts, South took the ace of clubs and feared
that if he led a trump, East might win and lead a diamond
through the king. So South next took the queen, king and
ace of spades to pitch a diamond.
East-West followed — fine so far — but South then led
a trump. West won with the queen, cashed his ace of diamonds and then led his last spade. East ruffed with his
king of trumps, and West’s ace won the setting trick.
South almost made it through the deal. He could have
succeeded by leading a trump at Trick Two, then guessing
right if East won and switched to a diamond.
But South could have made the game with his actual line
of play. After he took the top spades, he could lead dummy’s fourth spade and discard his king of diamonds. When
West won and led the ace of diamonds, South could ruff
and start the trumps, losing only two trump tricks.
0.9"
0.6"
BY JACQUELINE BIGAR
Today is Wednesday, Jan. 10,
the 10th day of 2018. There are
355 days left in the year.
Birthdays: Opera singer Sherrill
Milnes is 83. Blues artist Eddy
Clearwater is 83. Baseball Hall
of Famer Willie McCovey is 80.
Movie director Walter Hill is
78. Singer Rod Stewart is 73.
Steely Dan cofounder Donald
Fagen is 70. Boxing Hall of
-20
Moon phases
HOROSCOPE
HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018:
This year you seem to be able to
flawlessly bind your intellect to
your feelings, creating results
that please you and others to no
end. You could become impulsive
at times, but you'll learn to trust
your judgment. If you are single,
you will make excellent choices
when dating. If you want a major
relationship, the time has come
to make it so. If you are attached,
confirm that you and your sweetie are on the same page when
making important decisions. Together, you can create inspiring
results. SCORPIO can be an earnest yet blunt friend.
-10
West
♠9864
♥A Q
♦ A 10 4
♣ 10 7 3 2
December
24 Hr. Precipitation
Yesterday
Trace
Precip days in January
2
0.0"
January
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Month to date
1.35”
Norm. month to date 0.99”
Year to date
Norm. year to date
1.35”
0.99”
Climate data are compiled from National Weather Service records and are subject to change or correction.
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2018
DAILY QUESTION You hold: ♠ Q 2 ♥ J 8 7 4 3 ♦ K 6 ♣ A K
J 4. Your partner opens one spade, you bid two hearts, he
rebids two spades and you try three clubs. Partner then
bids three hearts. What do you say?
ANSWER: Partner lacks good heart support. With three
decent hearts, he often would have raised to three hearts
at his second turn. To bid 3NT now would not be wrong,
but many players would bid three spades, leaving open a
chance to play game at either spades or notrump.
now. You might feel the need for
a checkup, as you sense that
something is off. Understand
your limits. An older friend
seems to have a better sense of
what will work, so listen carefully
to what he or she has to say. Tonight: Pace yourself.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
Keep heading down your chosen
path. Make sure that others understand your goals. Your sunny
side emerges when dealing with a
loved one. This person might be
disruptive. Let your mind wander
as only it can, and you'll come up
with an unusual solution. Tonight: Go for it.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
You sense an unusual problem
brewing, or at least one you
would prefer not to deal with.
You might need to have a conversation with an irate friend who
seems ready to erupt. You will
want to think through a problem
carefully before taking any action. Tonight: Stay close to home.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Investigate what is happening,
and try not to sit on any anger.
You'll want to distance yourself
from someone who is being a bit
hot-headed. You might not like
what this person has to say, but
know that there is some truth behind his or her words. Tonight:
Meet a friend halfway.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
You might be too hard on yourself. Relax and listen to what
someone is sharing, especially if
it has to do with finances. You
can and will bypass a budgeting
problem. Your creativity points to
a vague yet wonderful idea that
could affect your life. Tonight:
Put your feet up.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
You can't smile enough, as you
see your energy creating the results you desire. You work hard
and are diligent. Express your
unique ingenuity; it often paves
the path to an effective solution.
Do not be too strict about mixing
business and pleasure. Tonight:
Do your thing.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
You might want to be quiet and
removed, but someone will try to
draw you out of your shell. You'll
want to handle a problem directly, so you will need to rethink
how to use your energy most effectively. Express your emotions.
Tonight: Dinner at a favorite
place.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
You might want to rethink a matter more carefully. You could be
challenging to others, and are
likely to cause yourself a problem
as you seek the right path or solution. Consider reaching out to a
friend who wants to give you
some feedback. Tonight: Where
the action is.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
ºIn 1776, Thomas Paine anonymously published his influential
pamphlet, ‘‘Common Sense,’’
which argued for American independence from Britain.
ºIn 1863, the London Underground had its beginnings as
the Metropolitan, the world’s
first underground passenger
railway.
ºIn 1870, John D. Rockefeller
incorporated Standard Oil.
ºIn 1920, the League of Nations was established as the
Treaty of Versailles went into
effect.
ºIn 1946, the first General Assembly of the United Nations
convened in London. The first
manmade contact with the
moon was made as radar signals transmitted by the US Army Signal Corps were bounced
off the lunar surface.
ºIn 1967, President Lyndon B.
Johnson, in his State of the
Union address, asked Congress
to impose a surcharge on both
corporate and individual income taxes to help pay for his
‘‘Great Society’’ programs as
well as the war in Vietnam.
Massachusetts Republican Edward W. Brooke, the first black
person elected to the US Senate
by popular vote, took his seat.
ºIn 1984, the United States
and the Vatican reestablished
full diplomatic relations.
ºIn 2000, America Online said
it was buying Time Warner for
$162 billion (the merger, which
proved to be disastrous, ended
in December 2009).
ºIn 2008, John Kerry, the 2004
Democratic presidential nominee, endorsed Barack Obama’s
White House bid.
ºLast year, an unrepentant Dylann Roof was sentenced to
death in Charleston, S.C., for fatally shooting nine black
church members during a Bible
study. President Obama bid
farewell to the nation in an
emotional speech in Chicago.
Confusion arises when dealing
with a loved one. You could sense
a sudden rigidity that causes you
to stop and think. Get down to
basics and zero in on your priorities before initiating a conversation. Tap into your creativity, and
you'll know what to do. Tonight:
Till the wee hours.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
You enjoy yourself no matter
where you are and no matter
what you are doing. You are in
the process of gaining more insight into what motivates others.
With that understanding, success
in various realms of your life becomes even more possible. Tonight: With a favorite person.
Jacqueline Bigar is on the internet at www.jacquelinebigar.com.
(c) 2018 by King Features Syndicate Inc.
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
B15
Boston Convention & Exhibition Center • January 11-15, 2018
Thursday, January 11: 4:00 PM –10:00 PM • Friday, January 12: 12:00 PM – 10:00 PM • Saturday, January 13: 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Sunday, January 14: 10:00 AM – 7:00 PM • Monday, January 15: 10:00 AM – 6:00 PM
Box Office closes 1 hour prior to the end of the Show each day.
Auto Dealer Directory
Alfa Romeo of Boston*
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Millbury*
Herb Chambers, 531 Boston Post Road,
Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
alfaromeoofboston.com
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo*
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
herbchambersfiat.com
Kelly Alfa Romeo*
151 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0006
kellyauto.com
Kelly Chrysler*
Premier Cape Cod
Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram
460 Yarmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-5000 drivepremier.com
Herb Chambers Honda
Westborough*
Herb Chambers Lexus of Hingham*
350 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-0329
herbchambershondaofwestborough.com
Honda Cars of Boston*
100 Broadway, Rte 99, Everett
617-600-6045
hondacarsofboston.com
Honda Village*
Audi Brookline Herb Chambers*
308 Boylston Street, Rte 9, Brookline
855-889-0843
audibrookline.com
Audi Burlington Herb Chambers*
62 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
audiburlington.com
Audi Cape Cod – A Premier Company
25 Falmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-5600
drivepremier.com
Herb Chambers Dodge of Danvers*
107 Andover St., Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Herb Chambers Dodge of Millbury*
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Premier Cape Cod
Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram
460 Yarmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-5000 drivepremier.com
Audi Shrewsbury
780 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
866-890-0081
wagneraudisales.com
Bentley Boston, a Herb Chambers
Company*
533 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
bentleyboston.com
Ferrari Of New England*
Herb Chambers Fiat of Danvers*
107 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchambers.com
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
fiatusaofworcesterma.com
1168 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
866-803-9622
herbchambersbmwofboston.com
Herb Chambers BMW of Sudbury*
128 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-483-1828
bmwofsudbury.com
540 Lynnway, Rte 1A, Lynn
781-595-5252
shopkellyhonda.com
Boch Hyundai*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
855-975-6891
BochHyundai.com
Herb Chambers Hyundai of Auburn*
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
888-318-7927
herbchambershyundaiofauburn.com
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakhyundai.com
1198 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-857-4431
herbchambersinfinitiofboston.com
Herb Chambers Infiniti
Westborough*
Kelly Infiniti*
Framingham Ford*
1200 Worcester Rd, Rt 9, Framingham
1-800-626-FORD
framinghamford.com
Herb Chambers Ford of Braintree*
75 Granite Street, Braintree
855-298-1177
herbchambersfordofbraintree.com
310 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-6736
herbchambersfordofwestborough.com
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
Kelly Ford*
211 Rantoul Street, Rte 1A, Beverly
978-922-0059
shopkellyford.com
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Lynnfield*
395 Broadway, Rte 1 N, Lynnfield
866-233-8937
herbchamberscadillaclynnfield.com
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Warwick*
1511 Bald Hill Road, Rte 2, Warwick, R I
877-206-0272
herbchamberscadillacofwarwick.com
Best Chevrolet*
128 Derby St, Exit 15 off Rte 3, Hingham
800-649-6781
bestchevyusa.com
Boch Chevrolet*
Herb Chambers Genesis*
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
877-287-9139
herbchambersgenesisofauburn.com
Mirak Genesis
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakgenesis.com
Jaguar Sudbury Herb Chambers*
83 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-268-7851
jaguarsudbury.com
Boch Honda West*
Boch Honda*
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
151 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0007
kellymaserati.com
Rolls-Royce Motorcars of New
England, a Herb Chambers Company*
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchambersrollsroyceofnewengland.com
smart center Lynnfield
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway,
Rte 1 N, Lynnfield
844-222-6929 smartcenterlynnfield.com
smart center Boston
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-359-6562 smartcenterboston.com
Premier Mazda Cape Cod
141 Stevens St, Hyannis
508-815-5900
drivepremier.com
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway, Rte 1 N,
Lynnfield
877-337-2442
flagshipmotorcars.com
Herb Chambers Honda Burlington*
Herb Chambers Honda in Boston*
Mercedes-Benz of Burlington *
809 Washington Street, Rte 20, Auburn
855-872-6999
herbchamberstoyotaofauburn.com
Mercedes-Benz of Natick*
Herb Chambers Jeep of Millbury*
760 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
888-551-7134
mercedesbenzofshrewsbury.com
Smith Motor Sales of Haverhill, Inc.*
185 Taunton Ave, Rte 44, Seekonk
877-851-3362
herbchambershondaofseekonk.com
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
888-321-6631 BochToyota.com
Herb Chambers Toyota of Auburn*
Herb Chambers Toyota of Boston*
32 Brighton Avenue, Boston
877-884-1866
herbchamberstoyotaofboston.com
Toyota of Braintree*
210 Union St, Exit 17 off Rte 3, Braintree
781-848-9300
toyotaofbraintree.com
Toyota of Wellesley*
Rte 9, Wellesley
781-237-2970
wellesleytoyota.com
Toyota of Watertown*
Kelly Jeep*
420 River Street, Haverhill
978-372-2552
onlymercedes.com
Premier Cape Cod
Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram
Herb Chambers MINI of Boston*
Colonial Volkswagen of Medford*
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
1168 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
888-994-1075
herbchambersmini.com
149 Arsenal St, Watertown
617-926-5200
340 Mystic Ave, Medford, MA
781-475-5200
vwmedford.com
Kelly Volkswagen*
93 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
866-271-6366
herbchamberskiaofburlington.com
Lev Kia of Framingham*
510 Cochituate Rd (Rte 30), Framingham
866-931-3035
levkia.com
Boch Nissan*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
855-996-7751
BochNissan.com
Herb Chambers Nissan
of Westborough*
75 Otis St @ Rte 9, Westborough
508-618-7032
herbchambers.com
72 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-8000
kellyvw.net
Minuteman Volkswagen
39 North Road, Bedford
781-275-8000
minutemanvw.com
Wellesley Volkswagen*
231 Linden St, Wellesley
781-237-3553
buywellesleyvw.com
Kelly Nissan of Beverly*
Herb Chambers Lamborghini Boston*
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchamberslamborghiniboston.com
420 Cabot St, Route 1A, Beverly
978-922-1405
nissanofbeverly.com
Kelly Nissan of Lynnfield*
275 Broadway, Rte 1 North, Lynnfield
781-598-1234
kellynissanoflynnfield.com
1186 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
877-205-0986
herbchambershondainboston.com
Herb Chambers Honda of Seekonk*
61 Powdermill Rd, Acton
978-897-1128
sales@villagesubaru.net
Boch Toyota*
Mercedes-Benz of Shrewsbury*
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
790 Pleasant St, Rte 60, Belmont
781-641-1900
buycitysidesubaru.com
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-426-8963
mercedes-benzofboston.com
Herb Chambers Jeep of Danvers*
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-904-0800
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Cityside*
VillageSubaru.com
Flagship Motorcars of Lynnfield*
Herb Chambers, 253 North Main St, Natick
866-266-3870
mercedesbenzofnatick.com
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
888-364-2550 BochHonda.com
33 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
877-842-0555
herbchambershondaofburlington.com
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Danvers*
Acton Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram*
196 Great Rd, Rte 2A, Acton
978-263-7300
actonchrysler.com
Herb Chambers Kia of Burlington*
Mirak Chevrolet*
196 Great Rd, Rte 2A, Acton
888-871-3051
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Kelly Maserati*
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
Route 110, Westford
978-589-4200
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Acton Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram*
157 W Central St, Rte 135, Natick
888-920-3507
chambersmotorcarsofnatick.com
Herb Chambers Maserati of Boston*
531 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
herbchambersmaserati.com
80 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
781-229-1600
mbob.com
Colonial Buick-GMC*
90 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-206-9332
herbchamberschevrolet.com
1125 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakchevrolet.com
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
BochMaserati.com
Mercedes-Benz of Boston*
460 Yarmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-5000
drivepremier.com
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
844-464-3560
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Herb Chambers Chevrolet Danvers*
Boch Maserati*
312 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
855-878-9603
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Herb Chambers Ford-Westborough*
Colonial Buick-GMC*
62 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
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Chambers Motorcars of Natick*
1130 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
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155 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-1000
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500 Yarmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-5500
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Herb Chambers BMW of Boston*
Herb Chambers Porsche Burlington*
25 Providence Highway,
Rte 1, “The Automile,” Sharon
877-338-9671
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Herb Chambers Infiniti of Boston*
Herb Chambers Fiat of Millbury*
BMW Cape Cod – A Premier Company
Herb Chambers Lexus of Sharon*
Herb Chambers Lincoln Norwood*
Mirak Hyundai
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
FerrariNE.com
1172 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-778-1912
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Herb Chambers Porsche of Boston*
141 Derby Street, Hingham
866-237-9636
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Kelly Nissan of Woburn*
Land Rover Sudbury*
Herb Chambers, 83 Boston Post Rd,
Rt 20, Sudbury
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95 Cedar St, Exit 36 off I93 & I95, Woburn
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1120 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
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888-920-2902
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Volvo Cars Cape Cod – A Premier
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270 North St, Hyannis
508-815-5400
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Please call (617) 929-1314 to include your dealership in this directory. *For more information on this dealer, please visit boston.com/cars.
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T h e
B16
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
Names
Mark Shanahan & Meredith Goldstein
In ‘Tom vs. Time,’ an off­field look at Brady
LIONSGATE AND ROADSIDE ATTRACTIONS
Jake Gyllenhaal as Marathon bombing survivor Jeff Bauman in “Stronger.”
Why didn’t ‘Stronger’ generate awards­show love?
Notably absent from Sunday’s
Golden Globes was Boston Marathon
biopic “Stronger,” the Jake Gyllenhaal
starrer that drew awards buzz back in
September for the “Nightcrawler” actor’s portrayal of bombing survivor
Jeff Bauman, who lost both his legs in
the blast.
But despite its warm reception
from critics, many of whom had
called Gyllenhaal an early lock for
best actor, the movie’s failure to materialize at the Golden Globes is hardly
surprising. In fact, barring a significant surprise when Oscar nominations are announced later this month,
it seems safe to say that “Stronger”
has fallen off voters’ radars.
As the Oscar race grew crowded
this past fall, with films like “Lady
Bird” and “Three Billboards Outside
Ebbing, Missouri” emerging as
awards heavyweights (and ultimately
earning Golden Globes for best picture in their respective genres), discussion of “Stronger” as a bona fide
contender noticeably cooled off. And
Gyllenhaal, though praised for his
performance, was being inched back
from frontrunner to long shot even
before critics started hailing James
Franco (for “The Disaster Artist”),
Daniel Day­Lewis (for “Phantom
Thread”), and Gary Oldman (for
“Darkest Hour”). Considering the
cold shoulder Gyllenhaal’s received
from both the Golden Globes and the
SAG Awards — two major tests for
Oscar hopefuls — it would be surprising to see his fortunes shift this late in
the game.
Why didn’t “Stronger” go the distance? The answer, as is often the case
in Hollywood, might have something
to do with that pesky bottom line. The
movie made just $6 million against its
modest $30 million budget, rendering
it a big box-office failure for Lionsgate
and Roadside Attractions. (For comparison’s sake, “Patriots Day” — another drama built around the 2013
bombing — made just over $50 million worldwide against a $45 million
budget, a disappointing figure but at
least one that broke even.) Though it’s
not entirely unheard of for financial
flops to find awards success, that usually requires continued buzz from
critics and robust campaigning efforts from a studio — neither of
which “Stronger” could harness.
If “Stronger” is truly out of the
running, Massachusetts can expect to
come up unusually short at the Oscars this year. In 2017, locals (well,
those still amenable to Casey Af­
fleck, at least) had “Manchester by
the Sea” to cheer on; the year before,
of course, saw “Spotlight” win best
picture, drawing international attention to the Globe’s prized investigative unit in the process. Looking back
a little further, the Bay State also
struck gold in 2013 — with Ben Af­
fleck’s best picture victor “Argo” —
and 2011 — when five-times-nominated “The Fighter” earned supporting actor and actress trophies for
Christian Bale and Melissa Leo, and
“The Town” nabbed a supporting actor nom for Jeremy Renner. This may
just not be Boston’s year — though,
especially considering that generous
Mass. film tax credit, no one’s saying
it’s unlikely next year could find the
Bay State coming back, ahem, stronger.
Hatfield covers Newton­John in new album
And now for something completely
different. . . Rocker Juliana Hatfield is
releasing an LP of Olivia Newton­John
songs.
Titled, appropriately enough, “Juliana Hatfield Sings Olivia NewtonJohn,” the album, which comes out
April 13, features 14 songs, including
hits like “I Honestly Love You,”
“Physical,” and “Xanadu.” (Hatfield announced the LP on
Twitter Sunday night, calling
it a “tribute” to NewtonJohn, not merely a collection
of her songs.)
In a statement posted on the
website of American Laundromat
Records, which is releasing the disc,
Hatfield has this to say:
“I have never not loved Olivia Newton-John. Her music has brought me
so much pure joy throughout my life. I
loved her when I was a child and I love
her still. Her voice and her positive energy and her melodies have stood the
test of time and they give me as much
pleasure now as they ever did. Listening to her is an escape into a beautiful
place. She has inspired me so much
personally and I just wanted to give
something back; to share some of
these tremendous songs, reinterpreted, with love, by me.”
The album will be available on cassette, CD, and a variety of vinyl, including 12 signed, personalized
test pressings ($125).
The 50-year-old Hatfield,
who lives in Cambridge, has
never been one to sit still.
She’s formed several bands —
Blake Babies, the Juliana Hatfield Three, Some Girls, and Minor
Alps (with Nada Surf’s Matthew
Caws) — and also cut, or contributed
to, records with the likes of Evan Dan­
do, Howe Gelb, and former Replacements singer Paul Westerberg. Last
year, Hatfield released a very fine solo
album, “Pussycat,” inspired, obliquely,
by the results of the presidential election.
Young at heart
Fans have seen Tom Brady battle
Father Time on the football field for
years. But the inner-workings behind
the 40-year-old quarterback’s unprecedented peak performance is now coming to their computer screens.
In a new Facebook Watch docu-series called “Tom vs. Time,” Brady will
welcome viewers with a never-beforeseen peek into his private life. Created
by filmmaker Gotham Chopra, the six
episodes will track not only his quest
for a sixth Super Bowl ring but also
highlight some of the off-field challenges that come with his commitment to football.
“I have thought for many years
how cool it would be to show fans other aspects of my life and interact with
them in a different way,” Brady said in
a press release. “I have been a part of
features in magazines, newspapers
and TV shows, but I’ve never tried
anything like what we decided to do
with this docu-series. I hope fans enjoy seeing what we captured.”
One of the primary topics covered
will be Brady’s familial relationships, including those with his
wife, Gisele Bundchen; young
children, Jack, 10, Ben, 8,
and Vivian, 5; and his parents, Tom Sr. and Galynn.
While Brady frequently shares
images of his family on social
media, “Tom vs. Time” will take that
look-in one step further.
The series will also showcase the
mental and physical preparations that
go into perfecting his craft, as well as
the balancing act of personal and professional obligations. Fittingly, the
minute-long trailer splices together
clips of intimate moments from both
Brady’s home life and the football
field.
JASON BEHNKEN/AP/FILE
Tom Brady is featured in a new
Facebook Watch docu-series by
Gotham Chopra (below).
“What are you willing to do and
what are you willing to give up to be
the best you can be?” Brady says in the
voice-over. “You only have so much energy and the clock is ticking on all of
us. If you’re going to compete against
me, you better be willing to give up
your life. Because I’m giving up mine.”
Chopra, a Boston native, said he
wanted to work with the five-time
Super Bowl champion and produce the concept as a way “to
get an inside look and see
that he’s not some alien or
genetic freak.”
“There’s a relentlessness
and humanity to his training —
physically, mentally, spiritually,” he
said in the press release. “It truly takes
a village with equally impassioned
teammates, coaches, and family members. It actually makes his success that
much more impressive.”
The “Tom vs. Time” release dates
have not yet been announced, but all
episodes will be available on the Facebook Watch page. (Nicole Yang, Boston.com)
Local nonprofit benefits from MTV show
Seeing people struggle through obstacle courses on TV shows like “American Ninja Warrior” and “Wipeout” is
a guilty pleasure for a lot of people.
But Bay State residents watching this
season of MTV’s “The Challenge”
should feel better about their viewing
habit. Why? Because the reality stars
were competing for charity, and one
for a local cause fighting the opioid
crisis.
During the finale of “The Challenge: Champs vs. Stars” Tuesday,
Chris “C.T.” Tamburello’s team competed against former NFL receiver
Terrell Owens to win a share of the
$150,000 cash prize for their respective charities. In a battle of initials,
C.T. and T.O. went head-to-head and
C.T. came out on top, winning $55,000
for the charity FIGHT
Called Film Intervening Getting
High Team (FIGHT), the new nonprofit gives people in recovery opportunities to tell their stories, and the
Boston Institute for Nonprofit Journalism has pledged to generate print
and online versions of those stories.
FIGHT was founded by Charlestown native Johnny Hickey, the writerdirector of the 2010 movie “Oxy-Morons,” about a Boston gang who commit a series of robberies driven by
their addiction to Oxycontin.
Obviously, the launch of FIGHT
and the finale of “The Challenge” coincided to provide the nonprofit with
some timely publicity — at least
among the reality TV viewers with a
soft spot for giving back.
Artists in residence named for city program
JONATHAN STARK
Juliana Hatfield says the music
of Olivia Newton-John (inset) has
brought her joy and inspiration.
Mayor Marty Walsh announced the
seven artists who’ll participate in the
city’s third annual Boston AIR (Artistin-Residence) program. Hizzoner
praised this year’s eclectic group,
which includes painters, poets, choreographers, visual artists, and musicians.
The AIR program is designed to
bring local artists, city employees, and
community members together to col-
laborate on projects exploring local issues, such as racial and social inequity,
and intertwining art and public policy.
This year’s participants are poet Dan­
iel Johnson of Roslindale, choreographer Marsha Parrilla, Idjeli Theater
Works founder D. Farai Williams of
Roxbury, Nepali artist Sneha Shrest­
ha, percussionist Karen Young of Jamaica Plain, writer Nakia Hill, and visual artist Steve Locke.
Globe correspondents Sophie Cannon, Isaac Feldberg, and Robert Steiner
contributed. Read local celebrity news at www.bostonglobe.com/names.
Names can be reached at names@globe.com or at 617-929-8253.
‘Young people infuse you with so much vivacity.’
STERLING K. BROWN, Golden Globe winner for actor in a TV drama, on how his children help serve him as an actor
How comic Sarah Silverman changed an Internet troll’s outlook on life
By Allison Klein
THE WASHINGTON POST
KEVIN WINTER/GETTY IMAGES/FILE
Sarah Silverman responded to a
man’s profane message with: ‘‘I
believe in you.”
Sarah Silverman’s comedy is bawdy
and brawny and often takes a sharp
turn to vulgar to make a point. She
shocks with off-color jokes and gags
and seems like a person who would
not back down from a fight.
So when a man on Twitter responded to one of her tweets using a profane
term for a female private part, her fans
might have expected her to return fire.
Instead, she wrote a series of sympathetic and compassionate tweets that
the man said changed his outlook on
life.
Silverman then rallied her Twitter
followers to help the man get medical
assistance for his hurt back.
After his one-word tweet to her,
which cannot be reprinted in a family
newspaper, she responded: ‘‘I believe
in you. I read ur timeline & I see what
ur doing & your rage is thinly veiled
pain. But u know that. I know this feeling. Ps My back . . . sux too. see what
happens when u choose love. I see it in
you.’’
The man, @jeremy_jamrozy, a
Twitter user in San Antonio, replied by
opening up to Silverman about his
problems. It was a few days after
Christmas.
‘‘I can’t choose love. A man that resembles Kevin spacey took that away
when I was 8. I can’t find peace if I
could find that guy who ripped my
body who stripped my innocence I’d
kill him. He . . . me up and I’m poor so
its hard to get help,’’ he wrote.
Silverman empathized and suggested he try out a support group: ‘‘Good. I
want to kill him too so I can’t imagine
your rage. All I know is this rage — and
even if you could kill him — it’s punishing yourself. And you don’t deserve
punishment. You deserve support. Go
to one of these support groups. You
might meet ur best bros there.’’
He told her he is antisocial, does
not trust people, and does not have
any friends. But he said he would try a
support group, and then he apologized
for trolling her.
Silverman responded:
‘‘Dood I don’t care. I’m fine. I see
something in you. My gut tells me you
could have a great life. My shrink says
we don’t get what we want, we get
what we think we deserve. I’m telling
you, you deserve so much more than
you know.’’
‘‘Lol how?? And wut do u see?? Im
jus confused how u can see that I can
do better. I have multiple problems a
big hole to crawl out of. And usually I
choose not to express it or its hard to
articulate my emotions
- Jeremy jamrozy’’
‘‘ Welcome to the human race,
Friendo. You are not alone
- Sarah Silverman’’
After a few more exchanges, Jamrozy told her he is actually a big fan
and thinks she is funny. He explained
more about his back problem and described his pain. Silverman put out a
call to her followers to see whether
anyone might step up to help. Plenty of
people did. A few days later, she followed up:
‘‘Jeremy went for a consult and it’s
worse than we hoped. If you’re so inclined, help get him on his feet and
working again.He’s in San Antonio if
you’re an actual expert that can help
with ur skills.
- Sarah Silverman’’
Jamrozy started a GoFundMe campaign to get $150 to help him with
doctors’ fees. He has already raised
$1,774.
He is now tweeting about gratitude
and humanity.
‘‘Thank you to all the support financially, emotionally, and donations. This
is more than I could have wished for.
Thank you nicos organics I received ur
package am excited to try the products
out. Thank u everyone. U showed me a
lot within a few days. Love u all
- Jeremy jamrozy’’
Silverman, again, has shocked her
fans.
TV HIGHLIGHTS
College basketball: La Salle-Harvard, noon, NESN
NHL: Wild-Blackhawks, 8 p.m., NBCSN
NBA: Clippers-Warriors, 10:30 p.m., ESPN
Listings, C6
Sports
C
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E W E D N ES DAY, JA N UA RY 1 0 , 2 01 8 | B O S T O N G L O B E.C O M / S P O RT S
Youth serves Alabama
Freshmen play key role in OT title victory
christopher l. gasper
ATLANTA — Alabama coach Nick Saban changed his
quarterback. Whether it was desperation
or divine inspiration, that decision
changed the College
Football Playoff National Championship Game and the
course of college football history.
What started as a sleepy SEC slugfest between Alabama and Georgia
ended up as a nail-biting instant classic. It was a game that enhanced the
legend of Saban and introduced the
Legend of Tua Tagovailoa, the Crimson Tide’s unlikely Hawaiian Hero.
Riding Tagovailoa and his fellow unflappable freshmen, Alabama captured its second national title in three
seasons — its fifth under Saban since
2009 — with a 26-23 overtime victory
Monday night at Mercedes-Benz Stadium.
Youth was served for Alabama,
and it served the Crimson Tide well.
Saban was forced to hit the fast-forward button on the future. All those
players with recruiting stars became
stars when it mattered most, turning
the tide for the Tide. All of Alabama’s
touchdowns involved freshmen, including three touchdown passes from
true freshman Tagovailoa, the last a
41-yard game-winner in overtime to
fellow frosh DeVonta Smith that will
GASPER, Page C6
DAVID J. PHILLIP/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Alabama called on freshman Tua Tagovailoa in the
second half, and he led the Tide to a national title.
Tennessee waltz
No need to
remember
these Titans
Dan Shaughnessy
And so the Patriots
get back-to-back bye
weeks. Think of Saturday’s Titans game
as a playoff layoff.
Again.
It’s hard to know
where to start with
the compulsory
trashing of the not-ready-for-primetime Tennessee Titans.
Let’s acknowledge up front that
the Titans are professional football
players who have achieved much by
SHAUGHNESSY, Page C5
This Shaq
also makes
key blocks
By Anthony Gulizia
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF
Defensive end Eric Lee (55) and the Patriots were back at work on Tuesday, preparing for Saturday night’s playoff game against Tennessee.
FOXBOROUGH — Of course Shaquille Olajuwon Mason can dunk a
basketball.
If he couldn’t, it would all but be an
insult to the name given to him by his
mother Alicia, an avid basketball fan,
who named him after NBA greats Shaquille O’Neal and Hakeem Olajuwon.
“Not at all [during the season],”
said Mason, who was quick to point
out he would never risk the injury.
Mason guessed he hasn’t played
PATRIOTS, Page C4
Heinen finds a home in the NHL
By Fluto Shinzawa
GLOBE STAFF
Danton Heinen was angry. On Oct.
17, after a three-game, three-assist recall, the Bruins directed Heinen back
to Providence. A return trip up 95
North was not guaranteed.
By then, in sporadic NHL windows
and an 18-point, 17-game AHL playoff
run last year, Heinen had shown
bursts of wheels, hands, and smarts.
Intermittent appearances, however, do
not translate to permanent NHL residence.
So Heinen, just 22, already was approaching a professional crossroads
following his fourth career banishment to Providence: Get with it, or
keep spinning his tires. The AHL, Europe, even weekend beer leagues have
plenty of players with adult talent but
a boy’s battle level.
“You’ve seen it for years,” said Bruins president Cam Neely. “You’re looking at someone and you’re like, ‘Oh my
God, this guy’s good.’ But when you get
into a game, they just don’t have the
compete. Because of not having the
compete, you’re not able to see the real
true skill they have.”
Thirty-three games later, it is clear
which route Heinen selected. On Oct.
26, following his recall from Providence, Heinen scored his first two career NHL goals in a 2-1 win over San
Jose. He has taken shifts as the No. 1
left wing. The left-shot forward has
seen time at right wing. He has replaced Ryan Spooner on the first power-play unit. He is averaging 0:28 of
shorthanded time per game.
Most recently, his on-ice home has
been on the third line next to Riley
Nash and David Backes. Off the ice,
general manager Don Sweeney informed Heinen he is free to seek permanent housing. Aside from a few
HEINEN, Page C3
I N S ID E
Talent
search
Matkevicius
does everything
as Celtics’ scout
covering Europe — all by
himself. C2
Eagles
routed
FILE/JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF
By being stronger on the puck — and opponents —
Danton Heinen has been sticking with the Bruins.
Slow-starting
BC can’t keep
up with No. 20
North Carolina
in a 96-66 loss
at Chapel Hill,
N.C. C6
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Sports
C2
T h e
NBA
GLOBE STAFF
W
33
28
19
19
15
L
10
11
19
21
25
Pct. GB Streak Home
.767 —
W6
18­5
.718
3
L1
14­2
.500 11½
W4
9­9
.475 12½
W1
15­7
.375 16½
L2
9­12
Conf.
21­8
17­5
8­9
9­15
8­14
CENTRAL
Cleveland
Milwaukee
Detroit
Indiana
Chicago
W
26
21
21
21
14
L
14
18
18
19
27
Pct. GB Streak Home
.650 —
L1
15­4
4½
.538
L1
13­7
.538
4½
L1
13­5
.525
5
W2
13­9
.341 12½
L2
9­11
Conf.
19­8
9­13
12­12
16­11
12­13
SOUTHEAST
Miami
Washington
Charlotte
Orlando
Atlanta
W
23
23
15
12
10
L
17
17
23
28
30
Pct. GB
.575 —
.575 —
.395
7
.300 11
.250 13
Conf.
15­9
11­10
7­14
7­17
6­19
Streak Home
W5
11­9
L1
13­7
W 2 10­10
L4
7­12
L4
7­11
WESTERN CONFERENCE
PACIFIC
Golden State
LA Clippers
Phoenix
*Sacramento
*LA Lakers
W
33
18
16
13
12
L
8
21
26
26
27
Pct. GB Streak Home
.805 —
W5
16­5
.462 14
W1
11­9
.381 17½
W1
8­14
.333 19
L1
7­12
.308 20
W1
7­14
Conf.
20­5
12­13
10­15
8­13
5­19
SOUTHWEST
Houston
San Antonio
New Orleans
Dallas
Memphis
W
28
28
20
13
12
L
11
14
19
28
27
Pct. GB Streak Home
.718 —
W1
14­6
W1
18­2
.667
1½
.513
8
W1
10­9
.317 16
L3
8­14
.308 16
L2
7­13
Conf.
15­6
15­8
10­14
8­17
11­15
NORTHWEST
Minnesota
Portland
Oklahoma City
Denver
Utah
W
26
22
22
21
16
L
16
18
19
19
24
Pct. GB Streak Home
.619 —
W2
15­6
.550
3
W 3 10­10
.537
3½
L2
14­7
.525
4
L2
14­4
.400
9
L3
13­7
Conf.
21­6
11­10
13­12
12­13
9­14
* — Not including late game
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Portland 117
at Okla. City 106
At Dallas 114
Sacramento
Orlando 99
at LA Lakers
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Miami at Indiana
7
Okla. City at Minnesota
8
Utah at Washington
7
Orlando at Milwaukee
8
Dallas at Charlotte
7
Portland at Houston
8
Detroit at Brooklyn
7:30
Atlanta at Denver
Chicago at New York
7:30
LA Clippers at Golden St.
New Orleans at Memphis
8
Milwaukee 96
At Minnesota 127
Cleveland 99
Toronto 114 at Brooklyn 113 (OT)
S. Antonio 107 at Sacramento 100
At New Orleans 112
At Golden St. 124
Denver 114
At LA Clippers 108
Atlanta 107
Houston 116
Detroit 109
at Chicago 107
HEAT 90, RAPTORS 89
MIAMI
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Olynyk .. 22 2­5 0­0 2­5
Rchrdsn 38 3­13 0­0 1­6
Whitesd 30 6­16 1­1 6­15
Jones..... 28 2­5 4­4 2­5
Dragic ... 39 10­21 3­5 3­12
J.Johnsn 14 2­6 0­0 0­3
Ellingtn . 35 6­17 0­0 1­3
Adebay . 33 8­14 0­0 5­15
Totals .... 39­97 8­10 20­64
A
1
4
1
1
4
2
2
3
18
F
3
1
4
3
2
3
0
3
19
BLAZERS 117, THUNDER 106
Pt
4
6
13
8
24
4
15
16
90
FG%: .402, FT%: .800. 3­pt. goals: 4­
22, .182 (Richardson 0­3, Jones Jr. 0­1,
Dragic 1­3, J.Johnson 0­2, Ellington 3­
12, Adebayo 0­1). Team rebounds: 7.
Team turnovers: 14 (17 pts.). Blocks: 14
(Richardson 3, Whiteside 2, Jones Jr. 2,
Dragic, Ellington, Adebayo 5). Turn­
overs: 13 (Olynyk 3, Richardson 5, Whi­
teside 2, Dragic, J.Johnson, Ellington).
Steals: 2 (Dragic, Ellington). Technical/
Ejection: J.Johnson, 7:50/3rd.
TORONTO
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
Anuno­
26 1­3 0­0 0­5 0 1 2
by ..........
Ibaka..... 22 4­10 2­3 1­5 0 1 11
Valanci­
21 4­8 0­0 1­3 0 1 8
unas ......
Wright... 29 5­9 2­2 0­7 4 2 13
DeRo­
35 10­29 4­4 2­4 6 3 25
zan.........
Brown ..... 6 0­0 0­0 0­0 1 0 0
Noguei­
15 1­1 2­2 0­0 0 0 4
ra ...........
Miles ..... 18 3­7 0­0 0­2
Powell... 24 2­8 0­0 0­6
VanV­
19 3­9 1­2 1­3
leet ........
Siakam.. 15 1­4 0­0 1­1
Poeltl....... 9 1­2 1­2 1­1
Totals .... 35­90 12­15 7­37
1 2
1 1
9
4
2 2
8
0 2 2
0 1 3
15 16 89
FG%: .389, FT%: .800. 3­pt. goals: 7­
21, .333 (Ibaka 1­2, Valanciunas 0­1,
Wright 1­2, DeRozan 1­3, Miles 3­5,
Powell 0­3, VanVleet 1­5). Team re­
bounds: 10. Team turnovers: 5 (6 pts.).
Blocks: 12 (Ibaka 2, Valanciunas 2,
Wright, Nogueira 4, Powell 2, Siakam).
Turnovers: 5. Steals: 7 (Powell 2, VanV­
leet 2). Technical/Ejection: Ibaka,
7:50/3rd.
Miami ....................22 29 21 18 — 90
Toronto .................21 20 23 25 — 89
A — 19,800 (19,800). T — 2:13. O —
Boland, Brown, Twardoski.
MAVS 114, MAGIC 99
ORLANDO
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Simmns 20 1­7 1­1 0­1
Hezonja 27 5­9 2­2 2­4
Biyomb . 22 3­6 0­0 2­8
Payton .. 23 3­7 0­2 1­2
Fournier 35 6­14 0­0 1­4
Gordon.. 33 6­16 6­8 2­8
Iwundu . 17 1­2 2­3 0­2
Speight . 21 5­8 1­2 1­10
Augustn 23 5­8 4­4 0­3
Birch........ 1 0­0 0­0 0­0
Mack ....... 1 0­0 0­0 0­0
Afflalo ... 16 1­2 0­0 0­0
Totals .... 36­79 16­22 9­42
A
2
4
1
4
2
2
3
2
5
0
0
2
27
F
4
1
3
2
4
3
0
4
1
0
0
1
23
PORTLAND
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Turner... 22 2­3 2­2 0­0
Aminu ... 31 4­10 0­0 1­7
Nurkic ... 23 8­15 4­5 4­8
Napier... 34 5­10 9­10 0­5
McCllm . 33 11­19 4­4 0­3
Cnnghtn 30 4­7 0­0 1­4
Davis ..... 23 1­4 0­0 1­7
Collins... 22 4­9 0­0 1­5
Harklss . 18 3­3 2­5 0­2
Layman... 2 0­0 0­0 0­0
Vonleh .... 2 1­1 0­0 0­1
Totals .... 43­81 21­26 8­42
A
3
0
2
2
7
0
1
2
2
0
0
19
F Pt
2 7
2 10
4 20
2 21
1 27
3 10
3 2
2 9
1 9
0 0
0 2
20 117
FG%: .531, FT%: .808. 3­pt. goals: 10­
23, .435 (Turner 1­1, Aminu 2­6, Napier
2­3, McCollum 1­5, Connaughton 2­4,
Collins 1­3, Harkless 1­1). Team re­
bounds: 8. Team turnovers: 16 (13
pts.). Blocks: 2 (Turner, Davis). Turn­
overs: 15 (Turner 2, Aminu, Nurkic 3,
Napier 4, McCollum, Connaughton,
Collins, Harkless 2). Steals: 10 (Turner,
Aminu 3, Nurkic, Napier 2, McCollum,
Collins, Harkless).
OKLAHOMA CITY
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
Anthony 34 8­17 0­0 0­6 0 3 19
George.. 33 8­18 1­2 0­4 2 4 22
Adams .. 32 6­8 4­4 5­6 1 2 16
Fergusn 30 0­2 0­0 1­2 0 3 0
Westbrk 35 7­20 7­10 2­9 12 1 22
Huestis . 15 0­1 0­0 0­3 1 0 0
Grant..... 17 1­3 2­2 1­3 1 1 5
Felton.... 18 4­8 3­4 0­2 1 2 13
Pattersn 11 0­1 0­0 0­0 0 0 0
Abrines . 12 2­5 2­2 2­2 2 1 7
Singler .... 3 1­1 0­2 0­1 0 0 2
Totals .... 37­84 19­26 11­38 20 17 106
FG%: .440, FT%: .731. 3­pt. goals: 13­
31, .419 (Anthony 3­9, George 5­9, Fer­
guson 0­1, Westbrook 1­3, Grant 1­2,
Felton 2­4, Abrines 1­3). Team re­
bounds: 9. Team turnovers: 14 (15
pts.). Blocks: 4 (Anthony 2, Westbrook
2). Turnovers: 14 (Anthony 2, George 3,
Adams 2, Westbrook 6, Felton). Steals:
6 (Anthony, Westbrook 3, Grant, Fel­
ton). Technicals: George, 9:55/2nd.
Portland ................24 30 34 29 — 117
Oklahoma City.....26 24 26 30 — 106
A — 18,203 (18,203). T — 2:02. Offi­
cials — Karl Lane, Ed Malloy, Justin
Van Duyne.
Acosta, K. Cutler, S. Foster.
T’WOLVES 127, CAVS 99
Pt
3
14
6
8
12
19
4
13
18
0
0
2
99
FG%: .456, FT%: .727. 3­pt. goals: 11­
29, .379 (Simmons 0­2, Hezonja 2­4,
Payton 2­2, Fournier 0­4, Gordon 1­7,
Speights 2­5, Augustin 4­5). Team re­
bounds: 9. Team turnovers: 13 (4 pts.).
Blocks: 4 (Biyombo, Fournier, Speights
2). Turnovers: 13 (Hezonja, Biyombo 3,
Payton 3, Fournier, Gordon, Speights 2,
Augustin 2). Steals: 2 (Hezonja, Pay­
ton).
DALLAS
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
Kleber ..... 5 1­2 0­0 0­1 0 1 2
Barnes .. 36 5­9 3­4 0­6 2 1 15
Nowitzk 24 6­13 7­7 0­3 1 1 20
Mtthws . 33 5­10 4­5 1­5 3 4 16
Smith . .. 34 8­19 2­2 1­7 3 5 20
Ferrell ... 33 6­9 1­1 3­8 4 2 15
Mejri...... 10 3­3 1­1 0­2 0 2 7
Harris.... 14 2­5 0­0 0­1 1 0 4
Powell... 23 3­4 1­2 0­3 1 4 7
Barea .... 25 4­8 0­0 0­2 12 1 8
McRbrts.. 3 0­1 0­0 0­0 0 1 0
Cllnswrth ... 1 0­0 0­0 0­0 0 0 0
Totals .... 43­83 19­22 5­38 27 22 114
FG%: .518, FT%: .864. 3­pt. goals: 9­
26, .346 (Kleber 0­1, Barnes 2­3, Nowit­
zki 1­3, Matthews 2­6, Smith Jr. 2­5,
Ferrell 2­3, Harris 0­1, Powell 0­1, Barea
0­2, McRoberts 0­1). Team rebounds: 3.
Team turnovers: 4 (0 pts.). Blocks: 2
(Smith Jr., Mejri). Turnovers: 4 (Barnes,
Matthews, Ferrell, Mejri). Steals: 6
(Kleber, Barnes 2, Matthews, Smith Jr.,
Harris).
Orlando .................19 29 27 24 — 99
Dallas.....................25 18 39 32 — 114
A — 19,306 (19,200). T — 2:07. O —
Corbin, Phillips, Richardson.
LONDON — Benas Matkevicius
could stroll unnoticed through the
streets of Boston if he wished, but
he is one of the most essential parts
of the Celtics operation. His task is
simple, yet also massive and almost
inconceivable. He just has to identify, keep track of, and evaluate basketball prospects on an entire continent from his one-man traveling
European office.
“It is not easy,” Matkevicius said,
chuckling. “At first I was pretty
flabbergasted by the whole situation. It took a while to organize myself and figure out the ins and outs
of where to start.”
Over the past two years, the
Celtics have been busy in Europe.
In 2016, they drafted French forward Guerschon Yabusele and Croatian center Ante Zizic. Then last
summer they signed German forward Daniel Theis and veteran
point guard Shane Larkin, who
spent last season playing in Spain.
With so much focus on college
basketball, and for obvious logistical reasons, the Celtics’ small and
diligent Boston-based scouting
staff cannot have a constant presence overseas. So that is what Matkevicius is tasked with, and the
Celtics’ lone full-time staffer and
scout in Europe played a key role in
all of the recent additions.
“Benas has an amazing work
ethic,” Celtics president of basketball operations Danny Ainge said.
“He just seems tireless.”
9
10:30
MONDAY’S RESULTS
At Indiana 109
W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
By Adam Himmelsbach
ATLANTIC
BOSTON
Toronto
Philadelphia
New York
Brooklyn
at Toronto 89
G l o b e
Celtics have one-man Europe scout team
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Miami 90
B o s t o n
Monday night game
CLEVELAND
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Crowdr.. 21 2­5 0­0 0­4
James.... 27 4­8 1­3 1­8
Love ...... 21 1­7 0­0 1­2
Smith .... 25 0­7 2­2 1­1
Thomas. 19 3­11 2­2 1­1
Wade .... 24 4­9 5­5 0­4
Thmpsn 23 3­4 0­0 2­8
Green .... 27 9­15 1­3 2­3
Osman .. 16 2­3 1­1 0­2
Korver... 23 7­11 0­0 0­2
Caldern... 9 0­0 0­0 0­1
Frye ......... 6 2­4 0­0 0­1
Totals .... 37­84 12­16 8­37
A
0
5
0
0
3
6
1
3
0
5
3
0
26
F
2
2
0
0
1
2
3
1
0
3
1
0
15
Pt
4
10
3
2
9
13
6
22
6
19
0
5
99
FG%: .440, FT%: .750. 3­pt. goals: 13­
38, .342 (Crowder 0­3, James 1­3, Love
1­4, Smith 0­6, Thomas 1­5, Wade 0­1,
Green 3­5, Osman 1­1, Korver 5­8, Frye
1­2). Team TOs: 14 (19 pts.). Blocks: 4
(Crowder, James 2, Wade). TOs: 13
(James 3, Thomas 3, Wade 3, Green 2).
Steals: 0 Flagrant/Ejection: Thomas,
6:47/3rd.
MINNESOTA
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
Gibson .. 31 8­13 0­0 2­13 1 3 16
Wiggins 31 9­19 5­6 2­6 1 2 25
Towns... 30 8­11 2­2 3­12 4 3 19
Jones..... 28 3­8 0­0 1­2 8 1 6
Butler.... 27 7­13 3­4 2­8 9 1 21
Brooks .. 17 2­4 0­0 2­3 2 2 4
Bjelica... 17 3­6 0­0 0­2 0 3 7
Dieng..... 26 4­10 3­4 3­8 2 2 11
Crawfrd 19 4­9 0­1 0­1 3 0 10
Georges.. 9 2­4 0­0 0­0 0 0 4
Mhmmd.. 4 2­3 0­0 0­1 0 0 4
Totals .... 52­100 13­17 15­56 30 17 127
FG%: .520, FT%: .765. 3­pt. goals: 10­
31, .323 (Gibson 0­1, Wiggins 2­6, Towns
1­2, Jones 0­4, Butler 4­6, Brooks 0­1,
Bjelica 1­3, Dieng 0­2, Crawford 2­4,
Georges­Hunt 0­2). Team TOs: 5 (5 pts.).
Blocks: 2 (Gibson, Towns). Turnovers: 5
(Towns 2, Butler 2). Steals: 6 (Jones 2,
Butler 3, Brooks).
Cleveland..............18 24 25 32 — 99
Minnesota.............32 37 33 25 — 127
A — 18,978 (19,356). T — 1:57. O — L.
Holtkamp, K. Scott, T. Washington.
NATHAN DENETTE/THE CANADIAN PRESS VIA AP
Toronto’s DeMar DeRozan (left) scoots past
the defense of Heat center Kelly Olynyk.
A unique transition
Matkevicius was born in the
part of the Soviet Union that is now
Lithuania. His family moved to
Germany when he was 5 because
his father signed to play for a professional basketball team there.
Matkevicius became a good
player, too. He came to the United
States to finish high school in
Shreveport, La., before earning a
scholarship to Division 2 ArkansasMonticello. His brief pro career in
Cuxhaven, Germany, was cut short
by injuries, and he became an assistant coach there before working as
assistant for the Euroleague powerhouse CSKA Moscow.
In the summer of 2012, Matkevicius was sitting in the stands
scouting an under-18 tournament
in Poland when Celtics director of
player personnel Austin Ainge
walked over and introduced himself. The two traded scouting stories and stayed in touch afterward.
Ainge was impressed by Matkevicius’s knowledge and thoroughness, and when the Celtics
had an opening for a European
scout in 2014, the choice was obvious.
For Matkevicius, the idea of
evaluating basketball players —
even for the most decorated team
in the world — was not daunting.
He had an eye for skill, and had developed a deep network of connections. But there were unique challenges.
As a player and coach, days had
been scripted for Matkevicius. He
knew the exact schedule for the
season, he was never in charge of
booking a flight or hotel, meals
were readily available, and he was
never alone.
BENAS MATKEVICIUS PHOTO
Benas Matkevicius is the only international scout listed by the
Celtics, which means he has a lot of territory to cover.
No w h e w o ul d have to be a
scout, schedule-maker, and travel
agent, all while journeying to distant cities he would never visit if
there weren’t an intriguing basketball player there.
“ The hardest thing is when
you’re working in a one-man office,” Austin Ainge said. “It gets
lonely. Benas is so diligent and detail-oriented. He just works and
works and works, and that can be
hard to stay motivated by yourself
on the road all the time.
“He’s amazing. He never tires,
and he watches video constantly in
all his travels. He’s a huge asset.”
Scout’s honor
Matkevicius is based in Berlin,
but home is always temporary.
Over the past two years, he has
logged nearly 300,000 airline
miles, not to mention all the trains,
buses, and cars. It is common for
him to forget his hotel room number, because the cities begin to blur.
Matkevicius rises early most
mornings and makes the first of
many espressos that day. If the
Celtics played the previous night,
he first watches the replay.
It’s partly because he’s intrigued
to see players he helped bring to
Boston, but mostly because he
wants to become more familiar
with the team’s style and system.
He wants to have intimate knowledge of the kind of players Danny
Ainge is seeking.
After watching the Celtics, Matkevicius scans box scores from
games across Europe, a particularly lengthy task after a full weekend
slate.
For a point of reference, he also
watches replays of NCAA games
that feature draft prospects. An 18year-old forward in Spain, for example, could seem intriguing. But
then when Matkevicius sees film of
a player such as former Duke forward Jayson Tatum, who was drafted third overall by the Celtics last
year, it might reset his evaluation of
the Spaniard.
Despite his heavy workload and
massive territory to cover, Matkevicius is not totally isolated. He texts
or talks to Austin Ainge almost every day and sends e-mails to the entire staff three or four times a week.
Ainge might give Matkevicius instructions about some prospects he
would like him to see, or Matkevicius might share information
about a player who is thriving.
Austin Ainge visits Europe
about five times each year, but he
and Matkevicius tend to split apart
there so they can cover more
ground. Director of scouting Dave
Lewin also travels overseas to focus
on some younger prospects, and
Danny Ainge usually makes at least
one trip to Europe a year. The Celtics also have Brazil-based scout Luiz Lemes, and the staff in Boston
continuously combs through lists
of players from all over the world.
The prevalence of video cuts
down on some of the travel, and
messaging apps and manageable
international data plans have made
correspondence much more convenient than it once was. But there is
no substitute for seeing a player in
person. And most often in Europe,
that responsibility falls to Matkevicius.
“The building-relationships part
is really the biggest challenge,”
Matkevicius said, “because information flow is really important.
And through the year, the better
the relationships you build, the
more trust you have, and the information flow becomes a two-way
street.”
On the road again
For Matkevicius, traveling
through Europe can be wild, solitary, and invigorating all at once.
He has seen at least one game in every European country, and some
gyms are more convenient and
calm than others.
Austin Ainge recalled a game in
Athens when a bomb threat halted
play, and a game in Varazze, Italy,
when a frustrated fan threw a shoe
at a referee, and the referee simply
threw it back to him, and play continued. Then there was the Croatian playoff game two seasons ago,
when a group of fans started a bonfire in the stands using the opposing team’s flag.
“And they didn’t stop the game,”
Ainge said. “They just came over
with some extinguishers and put it
out. There was smoke in the arena,
and they just kept playing.”
Matkevicius sees hundreds of
prospects each year, but it is much
more likely than not that none of
them will ever become Celtics.
Most often, his tasks are thankless.
“In scouting,” Austin Ainge said,
“90 percent of the job is just crossing guys off the list.”
The European clubs are not focused on holding showcase events
for NBA teams. So when an 18year-old prospect is not yet one of
the best players on his squad, a
coach might not play him at all. Or
sometimes Matkevicius might go to
great lengths to see a player, and
then the player sits out because he
is in foul trouble.
Matkevicius is also an assistant
coach for the Lithuanian national
team, so that gives him a chance to
see even more top players during
offseason tournaments and events.
And his unusual upbringing is another asset.
Talking game
Lithuanian was the primary language in his household, and then
he attended school in Germany and
the United States, learning English
by watching Disney movies. He is
trying to learn Spanish now, too, so
language barriers are not as daunting as they are for some others in
the basketball world.
Much of the scouting process involves talent evaluation, but communication also is essential.
If the Celtics are intrigued by a
player, they will speak to his coaches about him, and even when the
language is familiar, it is possible
for evaluations to get lost in translation.
“The things that coaches and
people value in players is different
across cultures,” Austin Ainge said.
“So when I’m talking to an assistant coach about a player, the
things they get excited about or
frustrated with are very different
than maybe the next country.”
That presented a challenge for
Matkevicius, too, because initially
he had just cursory knowledge of
the NBA game. But now he is much
more comfortable.
He prefers to keep a low profile
when he is scouting. He usually
dresses in a sports jacket rather
than Celtics attire. He saw Theis
play in Bamberg, Germany, many
times over the last few seasons, and
Theis knew he was an NBA scout,
but he never knew what team he
worked for.
For Matkevicius, some of the
most rewarding moments come
when he watches a Celtics game
and sees players such as Theis and
Yabusele in uniform, the clearest
and most tangible reminder that
his unusual line of work does yield
results, even when most often it
does not.
“Sometimes you sit on the plane
and look through the window and
realize what kind of job you have,”
Matkevicius said. “We all live in
some bubbles, but it feels like
you’re living in a different universe.
Life is passing you by through the
window, but you love this basketball life that you’ve always wanted
to live.”
Adam Himmelsbach can be
reached at adam.himmelsbach
@globe.com.
Players aren’t lagging in first London practice
By Adam Himmelsbach
clear. But the big man acknowledged that he was happy to see
one of Florida’s Southeastern
Conference rivals, Alabama, win
the NCAA football championship
Monday.
“I’m a Nick Saban fan,” Horford said. “I’ve always been. I’m a
Gator, obviously. But I have a
thing for coaches like Nick Saban
and Bill Belichick, some of the
guys I really, really admire and
look up to. So I’m just very happy
for him, and for them winning.”
GLOBE STAFF
LONDON — The Celtics arrived here Monday night and held
a Tuesday practice that began
around noon.
CELTICS
That does not
NOTEBOOK seem out of the
ordinary until the
time change is taken into account, as it was essentially a 7
a.m. session.
“There’s no easy way to do it
travel-wise, but we wanted to
practice in the early afternoon,
and guys had a good vibe about
them,” coach Brad Stevens said.
“We ended up going pretty hard
and cutting a little bit of the back
end of the practice, because I
thought we got a lot accomplished, so it was good.”
When the Celtics travel to the
West Coast, they sometimes practice upon arrival rather than waiting until the next day.
“I think one of the best things
to do is get out on the court and
move,” Stevens said. “Not overdo
it, but move and sweat a little bit
and work into it that way. Getting
in late, we tried to get everybody
to bed at a reasonable time. But
it’s just part of it.”
Point guard Kyrie Irving said
he hadn’t thought much about
the time change.
“Just taking it day by day,” he
The far side
FILE/MICHAEL DWYER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Celtics’ Al Horford (right) felt knee pain Friday against the
Timberwolves, and then sat out Saturday’s game against the Nets.
said. “It’s a long trip, but it’s kind
of a quick trip at the same time.
The five-hour difference, you just
kind of make do.”
Horford feels better
Forward Al Horford, who
missed Boston’s game against the
Nets last Saturday with knee soreness, completed a full practice
and is expected to play against
the 76ers Thursday afternoon.
“I felt some discomfort there
but was able to practice, so I
should be good to go,” Horford
said.
Horford felt pain in the knee
during the Celtics’ win over the
Timberwolves last Friday. He said
the cause was a bit of a mystery.
“It was kneecap area, something very different than happened to me before,” Horford
said.
“A couple days’ rest has been
good for me. I have to keep treating it.”
Gator is no hater
Horford won two NCAA titles
at the University of Florida, and
his allegiance to the Gators is
Stevens was asked how far he
sees his team going this season.
“Well, London’s the furthest,”
he quipped. “LA probably next. I
don’t know after that.”
When the brief comedy session
ended, Stevens was asked more
directly about his expectations for
his team.
“Oh, yeah,” he said. “I don’t really have expectations other than
to try to get better today. Teams in
the league are so good. Every
night’s a bear. You have to play
great every night to have a chance
to win. So I don’t try to predict
the future with that.”
Adam Himmelsbach can be
reached at adam.himmelsbach
@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @adamhimmelsbach.
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
Heinen at home in NHL
uHEINEN
Continued from Page C1
sniffs, Heinen has yet to engage in a full-fledged search to
leave the team-issued apartment that has served as his
temporary home.
“ I t w a s f i n e ,” H e i n e n
shrugged. “We’re used to it,
right? I’ve been in hotels a lot.
You’re up and down. You’re in
hotels and stuff like that. It
was fine for me. It’s an apartment. I’ ll live wherever, as
long you keep me up.”
Heinen’s reluctant house
hunt illustrates the reserved
rookie’s conflicted nature. He
is as confident in his abilities
now as when he was a teenager in British Columbia with
nothing but the NHL in mind.
But Heinen still has a degree of disbelief that he is not
just playing in the NHL but
thriving. Coach Bruce Cassidy
is confident enough to roll
Heinen against elite talent: Erik Karlsson one night, John Tavares the next. Heinen is not
above acknowledging the coolness of his assignments.
“ You grow up watching
those guys and you’re like,
‘Wow, these guys are unbelievable,’ ” Heinen said. “Now
you’re on the same ice as them.
You definitely still get a little
bit starstruck.”
Under the radar
For high-end teenagers,
greater Vancouver is WHL territory. Milan Lucic, Evander
Kane, and Ryan Johansen are
among the players who used
the hard-nosed junior league
as their NHL launch pad. It
didn’t happen that way for
Heinen.
Kelowna was the only club
to invite Heinen, then 15, to
rookie camp. He did not approach the next checkpoint.
“No, didn’t get invited back
to main camp,” Heinen said.
Junior A, however, is a fine
NCAA showcase. Nash, Heinen’s center, played well enough
in the British Columbia Hockey League to score a Cornell
scholarship and be drafted in
the first round in 2007. Kyle
Turris, also a member of the
2007 draft class (No. 3 overall), transitioned smoothly
from the BCHL to the University of Wisconsin.
In 2013-14, Heinen had 29
goals and 33 assists in 57
games for the Surrey Eagles.
That year, after considering
Nebraska-Omaha and Michigan Tech, Heinen committed
to the University of Denver
and then-rookie coach Jim
Montgomery.
Being welcomed by an
NCAA powerhouse, however,
did not translate to professional interest. In 2014, the second
year Heinen was draft-eligible,
210 other names landed on
NHL Central Scouting’s rankings of North American skat-
G l o b e
Sports
NHL
JETS 7, SABRES 4
Winnipeg......................2
Buffalo..........................1
EASTERN CONFERENCE
MATTHEW J. LEE/GLOBE STAFF
Danton Heinen’s skill has been on display, and he has
been rewarded with a spot on the third line with Bruins.
scratch for the next two
games. On Dec. 15, Heinen
was directed back to Providence, this time for good.
In October, after a disappointing training camp, Heinen was back in the Providence
rental he was due to share
with Rob O’Gara for a second
season. It would not be long
before Heinen would qualify
for the same unpleasant category as ex-Bruins such as Seth
Griffith, Alex Khokhlachev,
and Carter Camper: AHL star,
NHL washout.
Heinen was not hard
enough on the puck. He could
not express any of his assets
from the safe spaces of the
rink.
“When he first came up
here, he was not ready,” Neely
said. “He was not strong on
the puck. He wasn’t making
good decisions.
“But we all felt he had this
skill set, ability to play, and
hockey sense to play in the National Hockey League.
“But he went back to Providence and worked on it. We
give him a ton of credit for understanding where his deficiencies were, working on
them, and being able to bring
them back to the NHL level
and actually have success with
it.”
I t ’s h a r d t o p i n p o i n t
whether it was urgency, increased strength, or experience that allowed Heinen to
cap his AHL service time at 89
regular-season and playoff
games. He now manages the
puck with greater care than he
does his wallet.
He has earned Cassidy’s
trust to the point where the
coach has fed him 15:51 of ice
time per game, most of any of
his rookie forwards.
Heinen has 10 goals and
30 points, fourth-most among
NHL rookies after Brock Boeser, Mathew Barzal, and Clayton Keller. All three were firstround picks. None has played
an AHL game.
Heinen is not surprised at
h i s p l a ce m en t amon g h is
peers. He just needed time to
get there.
ers.
To the NHL, the spindly
left wing did not merit consideration. The Bruins thought
differently.
On June 28, 2014, Heinen,
settled in at Denver for summer classes, was following the
draft online. In the fourth
round, the Bruins liked the 18year-old’s speed and skill
enough to make him the No.
116 selection. Heinen did not
expect his name to be called.
“I was just by myself on the
computer, having breakfast,”
Heinen recalled. “Got the
phone call, then my phone
started blowing up. My parents were calling because
they’d seen it. They were following it. They were probably
following it more than me.”
The Bruins acknowledged
Heinen’s lankiness was an issue. They trusted Denver’s
staff to address the shortcoming. Strength, both physical
and mental, would be the
thing that would stand between Heinen and his dreams.
Becoming a pro
As a freshman, Heinen led
Denver in scoring with 16
goals and 29 assists. He sat
atop the scoresheet as a sophomore too (20-28—48). The development of Heinen’s speed,
hands, and processing power
convinced both player and organization he was ready for
pro hockey after two years.
At first, it looked like a
slam dunk. Heinen cleared his
first NHL training camp as
Boston’s No. 2 right wing. He
made his NHL debut in the
2016-17 season opener with
Spooner and David Krejci.
A 6-3 win over Columbus
helped mask the truth about
Heinen (0-0—0, no shots,
11:25 of ice time): He wasn’t
ready for NHL battle. Six
scoreless games and two
healthy scratches later, Heinen
was assigned to Providence.
On Dec. 10, 2016, the Bruins brought Heinen back. As
the No. 2 left wing next to Krejci and David Backes, Heinen
went scoreless in a 4-1 loss to
Toronto. He was a healthy
ATLANTIC
GP W
Tampa Bay
BOSTON
Toronto
Florida
Detroit
Montreal
Ottawa
Buffalo
43
40
44
42
41
42
41
43
METROPOLITAN
GP W
Washington
Columbus
New Jersey
NY Rangers
Pittsburgh
Philadelphia
Carolina
NY Islanders
43
44
41
42
44
42
42
43
L OL
31
23
25
18
17
18
14
10
9
10
16
18
17
20
18
24
L OL
27
25
22
22
22
19
19
21
Pts. ROW
3
7
3
6
7
4
9
9
13
16
11
15
19
15
15
18
65
53
53
42
41
40
37
29
29
21
21
16
14
16
13
10
Pts. ROW
3
3
8
5
3
8
8
4
57
53
52
49
47
46
46
46
24
20
19
19
20
19
16
18
GF
GA
160
131
143
120
112
108
113
96
107
102
127
137
127
129
146
150
GF
GA
135
121
130
128
126
123
119
146
121
121
125
117
138
122
131
158
CENTRAL
GP W
Winnipeg
Nashville
St. Louis
Dallas
Chicago
Minnesota
Colorado
44
42
46
43
42
43
41
PACIFIC
GP W
Vegas
Los Angeles
San Jose
Calgary
Anaheim
Edmonton
Vancouver
Arizona
41
42
40
42
43
44
43
43
L OL
26
25
26
24
21
22
22
11
11
17
16
15
17
16
7
6
3
3
6
4
3
L OL
29
24
21
22
19
18
16
10
Pts. ROW
10
13
13
16
15
23
21
27
59
56
55
51
48
48
47
25
22
23
21
21
20
21
Pts. ROW
2
5
6
4
9
3
6
6
60
53
48
48
47
39
38
26
27
22
19
20
17
17
16
9
GF
GA
151
131
134
132
133
125
135
121
114
122
118
116
126
124
GF
GA
143
126
110
118
117
119
111
98
113
99
106
121
120
143
143
150
ROW — Regulation plus overtime wins
At Washington 3
Winnipeg 7
Vancouver 1
Calgary 3
at Buffalo 4
At Tampa Bay 5
Chicago 8
at Minnesota 2 (OT)
At Nashville 2
Carolina 4
Florida 7
Edmonton 1
at St. Louis 4
at Ottawa 2
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Ottawa at Toronto
7:30
Minnesota at Chicago
8
MONDAY’S RESULT
Columbus 3
at Toronto 2 (OT)
PREDATORS 2, OILERS 1
Edmonton ....................0
Nashville ......................2
1
0
0 —
0 —
1
2
estu, Edm (slashing), 12:40.
Shots on goal — Edmonton 8­11­7 —
26. Nashville 11­7­6 — 24.
Power plays — Edmonton 0­1; Nash­
ville 1­3.
Goalies — Edmonton, Talbot 15­16­2
(24 shots­22 saves). Nashville, Rinne
21­8­3 (26 shots­25 saves).
Referees — Francis Charron, Fran­
cois St.Laurent. Linesmen — Shandor
Alphonso, Scott Cherrey.
A — 17,188 (17,113). T — 2:24.
First period — 1. Nashville, CSmith 15
(Arvidsson, Subban), 8:26 (pp). 2.
Nashville, Arvidsson 13 (Josi, Johans­
en), 15:31. Penalties — Lucic, Edm (in­
terference), 8:18. Cammalleri, Edm
(slashing), 18:01.
Second period — 3. Edmonton, Mc­
David 15 (Benning, Draisaitl), 0:45. Pen­
alties — None.
Third period — None. Penalties —
Subban, Nsh (interference), 11:08. Let­
CAPITALS 3, CANUCKS 1
7
4
LIGHTNING 5, HURRICANES 4
1
1
1 —
2 —
4
5
First period — 1. Carolina, McGinn 7
(Williams, Slavin), 3:23 (pp). 2. Tampa
Bay, Hedman 6 (Kucherov, Stamkos),
10:02. 3. Carolina, Aho 14, 12:10. 4.
Tampa Bay, Johnson 14 (Stralman,
Point), 16:26. Penalties — Callahan, TB
(tripping), 2:18.
Second period — 5. Tampa Bay,
Johnson 15 (Dotchin, Point), 1:58. 6.
Carolina, Faulk 4 (Teravainen, Staal),
10:36 (pp). Penalties — , TB, served by
Namestnikov (too many men on ice),
4:50. Coburn, TB (cross check), 10:05.
Third period — 7. Tampa Bay,
Dotchin 3 (Point, Palat), 9:27. 8. Tampa
Bay, Johnson 16 (Hedman), 14:54. 9.
Carolina, Lindholm 12 (Faulk, Teravain­
en), 18:42. Penalties — Stamkos, TB
(delay of game), 15:51.
Shots on goal — Carolina 8­15­9 —
32. Tampa Bay 14­11­9 — 34.
Power plays — Carolina 2­4; Tampa
Bay 0­0.
Goalies — Carolina, Ward 11­4­2 (34
shots­29 saves). Tampa Bay, Vasilevs­
kiy 27­6­2 (32 shots­28 saves).
Referees — Gord Dwyer, Kyle Reh­
man. Linesmen — Matt MacPherson,
Jonny Murray.
A — 19,092 (19,092). T — 2:45.
PANTHERS 7, BLUES 4
Florida ..........................2
St. Louis .......................2
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
2 —
2 —
First period — 1. Winnipeg, Laine 19
(Wheeler, Connor), 6:43 (pp). 2. Buffa­
lo, Eichel 16 (Okposo, O’Reilly), 14:51. 3.
Winnipeg, Byfuglien 2 (Perreault, En­
strom), 15:40. Penalties — Guhle, Buf
(hooking), 4:47. Trouba, Wpg (hook­
ing), 10:02.
Second period — 4. Winnipeg, Ehlers
18 (Perreault, Morrissey), 1:26. 5. Win­
nipeg, Connor 14 (Wheeler, Trouba),
12:49. 6. Winnipeg, Ehlers 19 (Myers,
Little), 15:42 (pp). 7. Buffalo, O’Reilly 11
(Eichel, Okposo), 18:42 (pp). Penalties
— Nolan, Buf, served by Reinhart, dou­
ble minor (roughing), 13:26. Nolan, Buf
(misconduct), 13:26. Enstrom, Wpg (in­
terference), 17:27. Kane, Buf (tripping),
19:03.
Third period — 8. Winnipeg, Connor
15 (Trouba), 7:08. 9. Buffalo, Pominville
9 (Scandella, O’Reilly), 8:31. 10. Buffalo,
Eichel 17 (Okposo, Ristolainen), 14:53.
11. Winnipeg, Armia 7 (Copp), 18:55
(en). Penalties — Kulikov, Wpg (slash­
ing), 11:43.
Shots on goal — Winnipeg 13­13­11
— 37. Buffalo 9­11­14 — 34.
Power plays — Winnipeg 2­4; Buffalo
1­3.
Goalies — Winnipeg, Mason 3­6­1 (34
shots­30 saves). Buffalo, Johnson 1­8­3
(19 shots­16 saves). Buffalo, Lehner 9­
16­6 (17 shots­14 saves).
Referees — Furman South, Chris
Rooney. Linesmen — Scott Driscoll,
Steve Miller.
A — 17,398 (19,070). T — 2:29.
Carolina........................2
Tampa Bay ..................2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
3
1
3
1
2 —
1 —
C3
7
4
First period — 1. St. Louis, Stastny 10
(Edmundson, Barbashev), 0:48. 2. St.
Louis, Parayko 5 (Tarasenko, Schenn),
8:05. 3. Florida, Ekblad 7 (Yandle, Mal­
gin), 9:14. 4. Florida, Barkov 14 (Hu­
berdeau, Dadonov), 16:57. Penalties —
Upshall, StL (slashing), 3:15. Bouw­
meester, StL (slashing), 5:00. Haley, Fla
(roughing), 7:23. Bortuzzo, StL (cross
check), 7:23. McGinn, Fla, major (fight­
ing), 12:27. Edmundson, StL, major
(fighting), 12:27.
Second period — 5. St. Louis, Tara­
senko 19 (Barbashev, Stastny), 4:17. 6.
Florida, Vrbata 5 (Brickley, Trocheck),
12:23. 7. Florida, Huberdeau 16 (Bark­
ov), 15:55. 8. Florida, Trocheck 16
(Matheson), 16:37. Penalties — Brick­
ley, Fla (roughing), 15:39. Sobotka, StL
(roughing), 15:39. Pysyk, Fla (rough­
ing), 18:59.
Third period — 9. Florida, Sceviour 6
(DMacKenzie), 13:02. 10. St. Louis,
Thompson 3 (Sobotka), 17:19. 11. Flori­
da, Trocheck 17 (Huberdeau, Barkov),
17:56 (en). Penalties — Vrbata, Fla
(holding), 12:29.
Shots on goal — Florida 15­12­9 — 36.
St. Louis 7­9­14 — 30.
Power plays — Florida 0­2; St. Louis
0­2.
Goalies — Florida, Reimer 12­11­5 (30
shots­26 saves). St. Louis, Allen 18­14­2
(23 shots­18 saves). St. Louis, Hutton 8­
3­1 (12 shots­11 saves).
Referees — Chris Lee, Jake Brenk.
Linesmen — Ryan Galloway, Trent
Knorr.
A — 18,783 (19,150). T — 2:38.
Vancouver ...................1
Washington.................2
0
1
BLACKHAWKS 8, SENATORS 2
Chicago ........................1
Ottawa .........................0
5
2
UConn women hit century mark
Azura Stevens had 19 points and 10 rebounds to lead the top-ranked UConn women’s
basketball team (14-0, 4-0 American) to its
100th straight regular-season win, 80-44, over
visiting Central Florida (11-6, 3-1) . . . Jake Hor­
ton gave Harvard (7-6-2, 6-3-1 ECAC) a onegoal lead at 5:56 of the third period before Jared
Wilson tied it as RPI (3-15-4, 2-7-2) salvaged a
2-2 tie in men’s hockey action at Troy, N.Y. . . . In
women’s hockey, McKenna Brand got the winner 40 seconds into the second period as Northeastern (11-9-2, 7-6-1 Hockey East) pulled out a
4-2 win over UConn (6-9-7, 0-8-4) at Matthews
Arena . . . Northeastern will introduce Jeff
Konya as its new director of athletics on
Wednesday, according to multiple reports.
Konya joins the Huskies after 3½ years at Oakland University in Michigan, replacing Peter
BASEBALL
Fenster takes Portland reins
The Red Sox promoted Darren Fenster to
lead Double A Portland after managing Single A
Greenville for the past four seasons. Fenster replaces Carlos Febles, who is now Boston’s third
base coach. Kevin Boles will return to Triple A
Pawtucket for his fifth year as manager.
MISCELLANY
Gonzalez to play for Mexico
Highly regarded midfielder Jonathan Gon­
zalez, 18, is leaving the United States national
team soccer program to play for Mexico. Born
in Santa Rosa, Calif., to Mexican parents, Gonzalez played for the US Under-17 and Under-20
teams but says he will switch to Mexico, which
qualified for the 2018 World Cup . . . American
skier Mikaela Shiffrin rallied to stretch her winning streak to five at a women's World Cup slalom race in Flachau, Austria. She is the first
woman to start a calendar year with five
straight wins . . . Angelique Kerber won her
sixth straight match, beating Venus Williams,
5-7, 6-3, 6-1, in the second round of the Sydney
International in Australia . . . Rafael Nadal lost,
4-6, 5-7, to Richard Gasquet in the Kooyong
Classic exhibition event at Melbourne.
2 —
0 —
FLAMES 3, WILD 2
Calgary.....................1
Minnesota................0
1
0
0
2
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1 —
0 —
3
2
First period — 1. Calgary, Ferland 18
(Monahan, Gaudreau), 6:00. Penalties
— Giordano, Cgy (interference), 3:33.
Foligno, Min (hooking), 8:26. Stone,
Cgy (holding), 17:16. Parise, Min (trip­
ping), 17:48.
Second period — 2. Calgary, Monah­
an 20 (Ferland, Gaudreau), 19:09. Pen­
alties — Ennis, Min (hi stick), 4:58.
Hathaway, Cgy (hi stick), 9:55. Tka­
chuk, Cgy (slashing), 14:05. Foligno,
Min (slashing), 14:05.
Third period — 3. Minnesota, Gran­
lund 12 (Koivu, Suter), 7:16. 4. Minne­
sota, Spurgeon 5 (Suter, Granlund),
12:13. Penalties — Prosser, Min (el­
bowing), 9:10. Stone, Cgy (hooking),
13:25. Jankowski, Cgy (holding), 17:36.
Overtime — 5. Calgary, Hamilton 6
(Gaudreau, Giordano), 2:39. Penalties
— Dumba, Min (slashing), 0:56. Brodie,
Cgy (cross check), 0:56.
Shots on goal — Calgary 8­14­5­2 —
29. Minnesota 8­10­15­2 — 35.
Power plays — Calgary 0­4; Minne­
sota 0­5.
Goalies — Calgary, MSmith 18­13­3
(35 shots­33 saves). Minnesota, Stal­
ock 7­8­2 (29 shots­26 saves).
Referees — Dan O’Rourke, Jean He­
bert. Linesmen — Brian Mach, Andrew
Smith.
A — 19,011 (17,954). T — 2:43.
ONE TICKET – FIVE HUNDRED RIDES
ALL UNDER ONE ROOF!
KICK THE TIRES
8
2
First period — 1. Chicago, Panik 6
(Kempny, Murphy), 18:51. Penalties —
Burrows, Ott (slashing), 8:27.
Second period — 2. Chicago, Sharp 6
(Kane, Kampf), 5:14. 3. Chicago,
Schmaltz 11 (Oesterle, Kane), 8:15
(pp). 4. Chicago, Toews 13 (Oesterle,
Keith), 9:53. 5. Ottawa, Stone 18, 10:35.
6. Ottawa, Brassard 12 (Stone, Ceci),
16:39. 7. Chicago, Schmaltz 12 (Sharp,
Kane), 17:33 (pp). 8. Chicago, Rutta 4
(Kane, Forsberg), 19:07 (pp). Penalties
— Brassard, Ott (slashing), 7:40. Rutta,
Chi (interference), 14:28. Smith, Ott
(delay of game), 17:11. Karlsson, Ott
(interference), 18:01. Panik, Chi (inter­
ference), 19:27.
Third period — 9. Chicago, Toews 14
(Hinostroza), 3:24. 10. Chicago, Kane
18 (Keith, Schmaltz), 10:01 (pp). Penal­
ties — Kempny, Chi (roughing), 6:24.
Harpur, Ott (roughing), 6:24. Saad, Chi
(tripping), 7:21. Phaneuf, Ott (slash­
ing), 9:08. Kempny, Chi (hi stick), 10:38.
Stone, Ott (tripping), 17:44.
Shots on goal — Chicago 17­14­12 —
43. Ottawa 8­11­8 — 27.
Power plays — Chicago 4­6; Ottawa
0­4.
Goalies — Chicago, Forsberg 3­5­3
(27 shots­25 saves). Ottawa, Anderson
11­13­5 (26 shots­22 saves). Ottawa,
Condon 3­5­4 (17 shots­13 saves).
Referees — Dave Jackson, Eric Furla­
tt. Linesmen — Brandon Gawryletz, Mi­
chel Cormier.
A — 14,007 (17,000). T — 2:35.
Alabama No. 1 in final AP poll
Roby, who will retire after 15 years at NU, including the last 10 as AD . . . Florida State defensive lineman Jalen Wilkerson is forgoing his
final two years of eligibility to enter the NFL
Draft . . . Stanford safety Justin Reid will skip
his senior season to enter the NFL Draft . . . Missouri quarterback Drew Lock said he will return
for his senior season.
1
3
First period — 1. Vancouver, DSedin
10 (Edler, HSedin), 8:23 (pp). 2. Wash­
ington, JCarlson 5 (Ovechkin, Back­
strom), 15:13. 3. Washington, Eller 7
(Bowey), 17:52. Penalties — Stecher,
Van (delay of game), 3:45. Smith­Pelly,
Was (hooking), 7:05. , Was, served by
Stephenson (too many men on ice),
7:57.
Second period — 4. Washington,
Kuznetsov 13 (Niskanen, Orlov), 4:57.
Penalties — Granlund, Van (tripping),
6:56.
Third period — None. Penalties —
Hutton, Van, major (fighting), 2:17.
Smith­Pelly, Was (misconduct), 2:17.
Smith­Pelly, Was, major (fighting),
2:17. Smith­Pelly, Was, served by Con­
nolly (instigator), 2:17.
Shots on goal — Vancouver 14­4­20
— 38. Washington 11­18­7 — 36.
Power plays — Vancouver 1­3;
Washington 0­2.
Goalies — Vancouver, Markstrom
10­14­5 (36 shots­33 saves). Washing­
ton, Grubauer 3­5­3 (38 shots­37
saves).
Referees — Kendrick Nicholson, Kev­
in Pollock. Linesmen — Greg Devorski,
Brad Kovachik.
A — 18,506 (18,506). T — 2:36.
SportsLog
Following its overtime win in the national
championship game against Georgia on Monday night, Alabama was voted No. 1 in the final
Associated Press college football poll. Central
Florida, the only unbeaten team in the country,
finished sixth. The Crimson Tide received 57 of
61 first-place votes from the media panel after
its 26-23 overtime win. The game drew 28.443
million viewers, making it the second-most
watched title game in the four-year-old format
of the College Football Playoff. UCF received the
other four first-place votes to finish with the
best ranking in program history. Georgia finished second and Oklahoma third, followed by
Clemson and Ohio State . . . The Seattle Times
reported quarterback Jacob Eason, Georgia’s
Week 1 starter who hurt his knee against Appalachian State, is leaning toward transferring to
Washington.
0 —
0 —
Supported by:
C4
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
NFL DIVISIONAL ROUND
AFC
(5) TENNESSEE (10-7) at
(1) NEW ENGLAND (13-3)
Saturday, 8:15 p.m., CBS
NFC
(3) JACKSONVILLE (11-6) at
(2) PITTSBURGH (13-3)
Sunday, 1:05 p.m., CBS
Winners play at highest seed in championship Sunday, Jan. 21, 3:05 p.m. (CBS)
(6) ATLANTA (11-6) at
(1) PHILADELPHIA (13-3)
Saturday, 4:35 p.m., NBC
(4) NEW ORLEANS (12-5) at
(2) MINNESOTA (13-3)
Sunday, 4:40 p.m., FOX
Winners play at highest seed in championship Sunday, Jan. 21, 6:40 p.m. (FOX)
LeBeau’s defense
no match for Brady
By Alex Speier
GLOBE STAFF
Tom Brady’s introduction to
Titans defensive coordinator
Dick LeBeau and his zone-blitz
scheme was a moment of such
infamy that it remains easy to
r e m e m b e r a f t e r n e a rl y 1 5
years.
In Week 1 of the 2003 season, against a Bills team for
whom LeBeau was an assistant coach overseeing the defense, Brady turned in the
worst performance of his sterling career. At a time when the
Patriots were dazed by the release of Lawyer Milloy, Brady
was picked off four times, including a pick-6 by monster
defensive lineman Sam Adams. His 22.5 passer rating in
that 31-0 loss in Buffalo was
the worst of his career, while
his four picks matched a career-worst.
In that game, Brady and the
Patriots looked discombobulated, confused by the cleverly disguised blitzes and varied personnel schemes that could feature a 370-pound mountain
such as Adams dropping back
in coverage. That New England
team wasn’t the only one to suffer such a fate against LeBeau, a
Hall of Fame defensive back
who is now 45 years into his
coaching career.
“He’s a great coach, was a
great player,” Patriots coach
Bill Belichick said in a conference call this week. “He’s been
a tremendous asset and has
made so many contributions to
the game of professional football in the National Football
League.
“There are few coaches that
I think you could put above him
in terms of the amount of what
he’s accomplished and how
much respect I have for him,
how much respect all of us in
the league have for him and
what he’s done.
“He’s had a tremendous career. He’s made this game a better game and he’s done a lot for
the coaching profession.”
Yet while the Patriots hold
LeBeau in high regard, that initial introduction of Brady to
Tennessee’s current defensive
guru represents an aberration.
At the end of the 2003 regular
season, Brady and the Patriots
flipped the script with their
own 31-0 win over the Bills on
the way to their second Super
Bowl title. In the rematch, Brady went 21 of 32 for 204 yards,
with 4 touchdowns and no
picks.
In nine games beginning
with that contest, Brady and
the Patriots consistently have
dissected LeBeau’s defensive
schemes with the Bills, Steelers, and most recently Titans.
New England is 7-2 in its last
nine contests against LeBeau,
av e ra gi ng 32.6 p oi nt s p e r
game.
In those contests, Brady has
thrown for 23 touchdowns and
just three interceptions, completing 68 percent of his pass
attempts, averaging exactly 300
yards per game, and posting a
passer rating of 112.3. Brady
hasn’t thrown an interception
in any of his last five games
against LeBeau’s defenses.
Pa r t o f B r a d y ’s s u c c e s s
against LeBeau likely stems
from his mastery of blitzes.
The quarterback’s reads are so
quick that his ability to find
the open receiver typically exceeds the defense’s ability to
get to him, particularly in zone
schemes that create open
pockets in which to target receivers.
That has helped Brady shred
blitzes from LeBeau-designed
defenses in recent years. According to Stats Inc., in Brady’s
last five games against LeBeau’s
teams, he’s 42 for 60 with 6
touchdowns, no picks, 2 sacks,
and a 126.7 passer rating
against blitzes.
Perhaps in deference to
that, LeBeau has been more judicious in sending an extra
rusher after Brady in recent
years. After blitzing a whopping 38 times with the Steelers
against Brady in December
2007 (a 34-13 Patriots win), LeBeau’s teams have reduced
their blitz totals in each of their
last four games with New England. When the Titans faced
Brady near the end of the 2015
regular season, they blitzed
just 11 times in the 37 instances when the quarterback
dropped back.
That said, it remains an
open question whether LeBeau
will remain relatively conservative in his blitz schemes this
week. In a year when Julian
Edelman hasn’t been available
as the ultimate safety valve
against blitzes, the Patriots
have been unusually ineffective against a release-thehounds pursuit of their quarterback.
Whereas Brady posted ratings of 100.0 or better against
the extra rusher from 2014-16
— including his NFL-leading
mark of 126.7 in 2016 — he had
just an 85.0 passer rating (22nd
among qualifying quarterbacks) against blitzes this year.
Whether that struggle creates an opening for LeBeau and
the Titans to stifle Brady remains to be seen. If the legendary defensive coach does identify a blueprint to control New
England’s passing offense, it
will represent a distinct change
of course from what has been a
one-sided dynamic for most of
Brady’s career.
Alex Speier can be reached at
alex.speier@globe.com. Follow
him on twitter at @alexspeier.
STEVEN SENNE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Patriots Kyle Van Noy (53), who has battled a calf injury, and cornerback Malcolm Butler (21) warm up prior to practice.
Van Noy feeling spring in step
By Jim McBride
GLOBE STAFF
FOXBOROUGH — Kyle Van
Noy returned to action in Week
17 after a calf injury forced him
to miss three
PATRIOTS
games.
NOTEBOOK Though the
linebacker
didn’t play his normal workload against the Jets — just 12
snaps — he said Tuesday he
was feeling “great” as the Patriots began on-field preparations
for Saturday night’s playoff
game against the Titans.
“I feel like any time you can
get some snaps after being on
the bench for a little bit always
helps,’’ Van Noy said. “Just to be
out there with the guys, and get
back into the rhythm of things
before the playoffs is going to
be huge.’’
Asked how he’s feeling now,
Van Noy, who led the Patriots
linebacking corps with 73 tackles this season, cracked a big
smile.
“I’m great. It all goes to the
trainers — a lot of props to
them for helping me and my
personal trainer and the
strength coaches — we all did
our part in getting me back to
where I needed to be,’’ Van Noy
said.
Van Noy has been a central
figure in the defense’s resurgence after a shaky first month
when New England gave up at
least 33 points in three of the
first four games. Since then,
Matt Patricia’s crew has given
up a league-low average of just
14 points per game.
When the defense struggled,
many of the players pointed to
poor communication. Enter
Van Noy, who took on more responsibility. He took on even
more after fellow linebacker
Dont’a Hightower tore his pectoral muscle in Week 7. Van
Noy welcomed any and all assignments.
“Honestly I’m just trying to
do my job and if my job is to
communicate to others, so be
it,’’ he said. “But at the end of
the day I’m all about winning
and whatever they ask me to do
— sign me up.”
Being one of the communicators is a role he has grown
very comfortable in.
“Yeah, yeah. I feel like players respect me and I respect
players to get on the same page
and we see the same way,’’ said
Van Noy. “We just want to win
and it doesn’t matter who’s doing the communicating, cheering, or whatever, we’re just trying to win.’’
Van Noy’s ability to play
multiple positions within the
Patriots scheme has been
something that has impressed
teammates.
“The thing about KV is he’s
very versatile, so we’ve used
him a bunch of different ways,’’
said safety Devin McCourty, also a great communicator. “He’s
been able to play [an] end type
of position, outside linebacker,
inside linebacker . . . so having
him back out there has been
great, obviously from his versatility but [also] from a communication standpoint because
he’s a guy that’s been in there.
He’s been a leader, he’s run the
huddle kind of since he’s been
in there, obviously with him
and High and Elandon Rob­
erts. He’s been a big asset to
our team.’’
Tennessee coach Mike Mu­
larkey said the Patriots are a
classic “bend, don’t break” defense that gives up very little in
the red zone. That is obviously
a point a pride for Van Noy.
“At the end of the day, you
don’t want the opponents to
score and we like winning,’’
Van Noy said of the Patriots,
who were the second-best redzone defense in the league in
terms of points allowed per trip
at 3.4. “When you stop the offense from scoring, you’re one
step closer to winning.”
On to Tennessee
Patriots coach Bill Belichick
did not want to discuss the reports of discord inside Gillette
Stadium that dominated the
news over the weekend.
“Dealt with some non-Tennessee subjects over the last
few days. At this point I’m allin on Tennessee,” Belichick said
at a news conference Tuesday,
adding that the upcoming
game against the Titans was all
he was willing to address.
Belichick did take some questions about Friday’s ESPN report which claimed, among
other things, that owner Rob­
ert Kraft had directed Belichick
to trade quarterback Jimmy
Garoppolo at this year’s trading
deadline, on a Monday conference call in which he said that
he “absolutely” plans to be the
Patriots’ head coach in 2018.
Asked if he had addressed
the reports with the team,
Belichick trotted out an old favorite: “We’re on to Tennessee,”
he said.
Perhaps Belichick was just
sleepy. He did say that he had
stayed up to see the end of the
national championship game
between Alabama and Georgia,
where close friend Nick Saban
and former tight ends coach
Brian Daboll prevailed with the
Crimson Tide.
“I didn’t want to stay up
that late but I couldn’t pull myself away from it,” Belichick
said.
Pair sidelined
Running back Mike Gillislee
and receiver Malcolm Mitchell
were the lone absences from
the Patriots’ practice, held inside Gillette Stadium.
Gillislee, who hurt his knee
on Christmas Eve against the
Bills, has not practiced since.
Mitchell, who has spent the
season on injured reserve while
dealing with knee issues, had
returned to practice two weeks
ago. His absence does not bode
well for his chance to be activated anytime soon.
Earlier in the day, Belichick
was asked about the progress
Mitchell has made the last two
weeks.
“We see him out there trying to get back into practice
and do the things he’s asked to
do,’’ said the coach, who also
agreed with the assessment
that the second-year receiver
has a lot of ground to make up.
Better Brady?
The Patriots listed six players as limited participants on
the injury report, but the big
news was the name that wasn’t
on it.
Tom Brady, who has been a
regular on the list over the last
six weeks with Achilles’ and left
shoulder ailments, was not included this week.
The limited participants
were Van Noy; running backs
Rex Burkhead (knee) and
James White (ankle); receiver
Chris Hogan (ankle); defensive
tackle Alan Branch (knee); and
defensive end Eric Lee (ankle/
finger)
Inside information?
Mularkey drew laughs during a conference call when
asked if he was seeking knowledge about the Patriots defense
from cornerback Logan Ryan.
“Oh, we interrogated him until
he was ready to drop yesterday,’’ he said with a smile. “No,
it wasn’t quite that serious, but
we had a cup of coffee together,
I’ll say that.’’ . . . McCourty was
asked if recent negative reports
have a galvanizing effect on his
team. “Honestly, I don’t think
so,’’ he said. “I don’t care about
it and I think a lot of guys don’t
really care about what goes on
outside and who writes what
and if we [stink], if we’re great
— it doesn’t matter. So, I just
think guys are motivated by
playing for each other [and]
their families more than an ESPN article.’’ . . . Second-year Patriots Cyrus Jones and Vincent
Valentine, both on injured reserve, were spotted in the locker room Tuesday . . . Ron
Torbert has been assigned as
the referee for Saturday’s game.
He also worked the DolphinsPatriots game in Foxborough in
November.
Nora Princiottti contributed.
Jim McBride can be reached at
james.mcbride@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@globejimmcbride.
Patriots’ Shaq helping to pave the way for running game
uPATRIOTS
Continued from Page C1
basketball since his sophomore
or junior year in high school,
around the same time he
stopped playing third base for
the baseball team at Columbia
Central in Tennessee.
His most athletic feats undoubtedly have come on the
football field, where the Patriots’ right guard has carved a
role for himself as an invaluable piece of the team’s interior
offensive line.
T he 6-foot-1-inch, 310pound Mason has anchored
the unit as its best run blocker.
I t ’s l i k e l y t h a t Ma s o n’s
strengths will be even more evident in the playoffs, a time
when it’s crucial to control the
pace of the game and manage
the clock.
Perhaps what is most impressive is the way Mason uses
his athleticism and how he has
handled the versatile role assigned to him. He’s the Patriots’
lineman best equipped to pull
in outside blocking schemes
and is often visible blocking in
the second level against faster,
lighter linebackers.
“Yeah, I don’t think we’ve
had many guards as athletic as
S h a q ,” Pat r i o t s c o a c h B i l l
Belichick said earlier this season. “He’s really an athletic
player that’s strong, and explosive, and can make blocks inline, and can also get out into
space and run and make blocks
in space. That’s a pretty tough
combination. It’s hard for an
offensive lineman. He makes a
lot of good blocks and some of
them are pretty different from
the one he made on the play before.”
The Patriots finished the
s e as o n b y ru s hi ng f o r 3 4 0
yards in their final two games.
Mason was frequently a step or
two ahead of his running
backs, ready to clear a lane.
That’s where he spent most of
his time against the Buffalo
Bills in Week 16, when the Patriots rumbled for 197 rushing
yards.
Often times, the chunk
gains came behind Mason’s
lead, such as Dion Lewis’s 13yard burst in the first quarter.
On that particular secondand-5 play, Mason hustled to
the edge. He was 2 yards ahead
of Lewis when he squared up a
Bills defender, who hardly had
a shot at getting to Lewis.
“I take a lot of pride and it’s
fun to [pull on running plays],”
Mason said. “I love doing it. I
mean, I still have strides to
make. Definitely taking it day
by day. Just [working] at something to improve my overall
play.”
Most of that work has come
in pass protection, something
Mason was rarely asked to do
at Georgia Tech in the team’s
triple-option offense.
James Ferentz, a backup
center on the Patriots’ practice
squad, works closely with Mason and admires the way he approaches the game. Mason, like
Ferentz, has been considered
undersized by NFL standards.
Ferentz is an inch taller than
Mason, but 25 pounds lighter.
Since joining the Patriots this
season, he has looked up to
Mason because of the way he
has used his skill set to overcome bigger opponents.
“Just on the field, it seems
like not every day, but every
now and then he gets in an
aw kw a r d s i t u a t i o n w h e r e
somebody would normally end
up on their back, and Shaq
somehow keeps his balance
and keeps playing,” Ferentz
said. “It’s really impressive to
see on tape.
“There are things physically
he can do that nobody can, but
it’s still really fun to play behind him and learn from him.”
The website footballoutsiders.com, which evaluates offensive line play based on a formula that takes all running back
carries and assigns responsibility to the line based on percentages, ranks the Patriots as the
top unit.
“Our running backs make
the plays look very good because of the special groups of
backs we have,” Mason said.
Sure, that statement is valid. Lewis has rushed for a career-high 896 yards. James
White and Rex Burkhead have
giv en the Patrio ts offen se
unique options as pass-catchers.
It was not surprising to hear
Mason deflect praise because
that’s what offensive linemen
typically do. Their line of work
isn’t typically as exciting as
one-handed catches or finely
placed touchdown passes.
Strong offensive line play hardly goes noticed and they get
ripped when their star skill
players get walloped in the
backfield.
Mason’s challenge on Saturday against the Tennessee Titans will be to help neutralize
Jurrell Casey, the veteran defensive end who can be disruptive in the running game.
“He’s not a real long guy but
he plays with great leverage.
He’s got very good quickness,”
Belichick said. “He’s quick
enough to get up field and get
the edge.”
Belichick’s description of
Casey was reminiscent of Mason’s best qualities, which
makes him the most likely lineman to overcome whatever the
Titans’ defensive front throws
the Patriots’ way.
W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
C5
Odds stacked against them
By Julian Benbow
GLOBE STAFF
NASHVILLE — If the Tennessee Titans weren’t aware of
the staggeringly lopsided odds
against them
TITANS
in the AFC DiNOTEBOOK visional
matchup
against the Patriots on Saturday, it was splashed on their radar after practice Tuesday.
Much of the chatter in the
Titans media availability centered on Tennessee being a 13point underdog to the reigning
Super Bowl champions.
One particularly odds-making nugget made Titans linebacker Derrick Morgan do a
double-take.
A reporter threw some
numbers at Morgan, telling
him the Titans were 13-point
underdogs and they had 80to-1 odds to win the Super
Bowl.
Morgan stopped him in his
tracks.
“80?”
“Yeah,” the reporter said,
pushing through the question
not seeing the utter shock on
Morgan’s face.
“Did you say 80?” Morgan
said for clarification.
“You actually had better
odds, according to that, preseason and now you’re in the
tournament,” the reporter said.
Morgan tried to do a quick
math check.
“How many teams are in the
playoffs?” he asked.
“Eight.”
“And we’re 80 to 1?” he said.
Morgan gathered himself,
ultimately he said he understood the odds, but they didn’t
matter.
“I mean, it’s just — it doesn’t
surprise me. You have to earn
respect in this league. So you
can’t just get respect off of one
road playoff win. It’s a gradual
process. So you look at it, you
use it as motivation, whatever.
But it doesn’t have too much of
an impact on me personally
and I don’t think too much as a
team.”
For a team making its first
playoff appearance in nine
years, the odds are out the window.
The Titans were long shots
to even reach the playoffs, pulling out a 15-10 win over the
Jacksonville Jaguars in the final week of the season to get to
9-7 and watching all the pieces
fall into place for them to secure the fifth seed.
The oddsmakers were the
last thing on coach Mike Mu­
larkey’s mind as he prepped
for a chess match with Patriots
coach Bill Belichick in just his
second playoff game as a head
coach.
He didn’t think the long
odds added any extra motivation for his team.
“At this level, that shouldn’t
be a motivating factor,” Mularkey said. “I think if you’re a
competitor, I think you take
things personal. I think this
team does that quite often —
without having to promote it.”
Hawaii connection
The Patriots might be the
top priority for Titans quarterback Marcus Mariota, but he
had a watchful eye on the College Football Playoff national
championship game Monday
night.
Tua Tagovailoa, the freshman quarterback who came off
the bench to lead Alabama to a
26-23 OT win over Georgia,
may have been an unknown
commodity to many, but he’s
been a close protege of Mariota
since he was a fourth-grader.
Mariota went to Saint Louis
School in Honolulu and Tagovailoa followed in his footsteps.
Mariota took him under his
wing and they’ve been tight ever since. He said watching Tagovailoa throw for three touch-
downs made him proud.
“He’s a stud,” Mariota said.
“He’s the next guy coming up
and I’m proud of him. From
where that kid’s come and how
he’s grown and how he handles
the situation last night was
very impressive. He’s a special
player and hopefully he can
continue his success.”
Growing up in Hawaii, Mariota had several prominent
names helping him on his path
to the NFL, including former
Red Sox outfielder Shane Vic­
torino. Seeing Tagovailoa’s success was like passing the torch.
“It’s important that you remember that you represent
much more than yourself, and
I think he understands that,”
Mariota said. “It’s nice to see
these next generations of kids
coming up and representing
Hawaii well and hopefully
they’re kind of laying the
groundwork for the next group
that’s coming up behind them.”
Murray hopeful
Running back DeMarco
Murray, who has been out
since Christmas Eve with a torn
MCL, has hopes of returning
this week, but sat out practice
Tuesday.
“Holding out hope for him,”
Mularkey said.
Murray, in his second season with the Titans, rushed for
659 yards and six touchdowns
in 15 games. He split carries
with second-year running back
Derrick Henry, who rushed for
156 yards and a touchdown on
23 carries last week against
Kansas City.
Guard Quinton Spain also
missed practice with a back injury, while cornerback Logan
Ryan (ankle) was sidelined for
precautionary reasons.
Julian Benbow can be reached
at jbenbow@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter
@julianbenbow.
No need to remember Titans
uSHAUGHNESSY
Continued from Page C1
advancing to the divisional
round of the NFL playoffs.
Nashville is one great town
and the Titans are an estimable organization. They almost
won a Super Bowl in 2000, and
they threw a big scare into
New England’s Super Bowl
champs on a cold night in Foxborough back in January of
2004.
All that said, let’s cut to the
chase and call this what it is.
The Titans are a joke and have
no business making the trek to
Foxborough for a divisional
playoff game Saturday night.
These Titans are accidental
tourists in the 2017-18 NFL
tournament. They are 13-point
underdogs. They have absolutely zero chance to beat the
Patriots Saturday night.
I wrote this last year. I write
this every year. Because nothing ever changes. Since 2011,
the Patriots in the divisional
round have played four of the
worst playoff teams in NFL history: the 2011 Broncos (45-10;
hello, Tim Tebow), the 2013
Colts (43-22), last year’s Texans
(34-16; hi, Brock Osweiler),
and this year’s Titans. Wow.
What a lineup. The Mount
Rushmore of Playoff Chumps.
Last year I wrote that the
Texans were the Chuck Wepner/Randall “Tex” Cobb/Peter
McNeeley of NFL playoff
teams. They were Tomato Cans
Sui Generis, Tomato Cans Di
Tutti, the Houston Warhols.
These Titans might be
w o r s e t h a n t h o s e Te x a n s .
These Titans trailed the Kansas City Chiefs, 21-3, last Saturday before coming back for
the franchise’s first playoff win
in 14 years. They have a quarterback (Marcus Mariota) who
threw more interceptions than
touchdown passes this year
(passer rating 79.3). They
ranked in the bottom third of
the league in turnover differential. They ranked 23rd in total offense and 17th in points
allowed. They lost three of
their last four regular-season
games.
The Titans were outscored
by their opponents this season
(356-334). Got that? By definition, you can be good in sports
only if you score more points
than the other team. And now
the Patriots have a playoff opponent that surrendered more
PHOTO COURTESY OF SCOTT ZOLAK
The Sports Hub’s midday co-host Scott Zolak, also the
Patriots’ color analyst on the radio, is ready for the Titans.
points than it scored during
the season.
Tennessee coach Mike Mularkey is a lock to be intimidated by Bill Belichick. Mularkey
is 0-6 life time agains t the
Hoodie. By his own admission,
he was on the verge of being
fired last weekend (and replaced by Josh McDaniels?) before the big comeback against
Andy Reid’s Chiefs. When Mularkey was asked if he felt safe
before that game, he answered, “No, I haven’t had any
support to say that I was. So
no. I just assumed the worst.’’
And we are expecting these
guys to compete in New England Saturday?
The Titans’ defensive coordinator is Dick LeBeau. I loved
LeBeau back in the 1960 s
whe n he was inte rc ep ting
passes for the Detroit Lions.
He is a legit Hall of Famer. But
he is also one of those guys
Belichick worships, then abuses every time they meet (remember Jack Del Rio, Wade
Phillips, Greg Schiano?). When
LeBeau was D-coordinator for
the Steelers, the Patriots averaged 32 points per game vs.
Pittsburgh and Brady threw 19
touchdowns with three interceptions. LeBeau is a Belichick
pushover.
The Titans like to blitz. The
Patriots kill teams that blitz.
The Titans like to establish
the run. The Patriots kill teams
that try to establish the run.
Titans left tackle Taylor Lewan did a good job sticking up
for his quarterback and his
team when speaking with The
Tennessean after Saturday’s
win: “It’s time for you guys to
start backing him [Mariota]. I
don’t know if it’s just Nashville
or if it’s all over the place, but
you guys can really crucify us
sometimes.’’
Sorr y, Taylor. But if you
think things are rough with the
media in Nashville, please cover your eyes and ears over the
next few days. It might get
loud.
Frankly, I liked the Titans
be tter when the y were the
Houston Oilers with those
great derrick-logo helmets in
the early days of the AFL. I
liked them when they came to
Foxborough in 1978 with Earl
Campbell toting the rock and
Oail Andrew “Bum” Phillips
making the calls from the sideline.
The Oilers were fun and
competitive when they were
coached by Bum.
Forty years later, the grandsons of Bum’s Oilers are back
in Foxborough. And now they
are just bums — a speed bump
on the Patriots’ road to Minneapolis.
JUSTIN SULLIVAN/GETTY IMAGES
Jon Gruden had 100 million reasons to smile as the Raiders introduced their new coach.
Gruden gets hero’s welcome
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jon Gruden was welcomed
back for a second stint as Oakland Raiders coach with an
elaborate inNFL
troductory
NOTEBOOK news conference.
Gruden was greeted by
owner Mark Davis on Tuesday
with a video of the highlights
from his first tenure in Oakland nearly 20 years after he
was first introduced as coach
as an unproven 34-year-old by
late owner Al Davis.
‘‘I feel this is the thing to do,
what I want to do,’’ said
Gruden, who received a 10year, $100 million contract
from the Raiders. ‘‘This is an
organization that I want to be a
part of. I'm all in. I only live
one time. This is something I
feel deeply and strongly about.’’
Gruden coached the Raiders
from 1998-2001 before being
traded to Tampa Bay.
About 50 former Raiders
were on hand for the event, including former Gruden players
Charles Woodson, Jerry Rice,
Tim Brown, and Rich Gannon.
Mark Davis said he had
been trying to bring Gruden
back for six years ever since
taking over the franchise following his father’s death and
the opportunity was finally
right this year.
Gruden, who has a 95-81
career record, returns to the
sideline after nine seasons as
an analyst at ESPN.
coordinator. Austin spent the
past four seasons as Detroit’s
defensive coordinator, but his
future was in doubt after the
Lions fired coach Jim Caldwell
last week . . . The Giants interviewed Panthers defensive coordinator Steve Wilks for their
vacant head coaching job.
Panthers fire Shula
Ryan misses practice
Panthers coach Ron Rivera
fired longtime offensive coordinator Mike Shula, saying the
team’s offense needs a ‘‘different perspective.’’ Along with
Shula, the Panthers also cut
ties with quarterbacks coach
Ken Dorsey two days after a
playoff loss to the New Orleans
Saints. ‘‘I believe we need some
different ideas going forward,’’
Rivera said at a news conference. Shula spent seven seasons with Carolina, working as
the quarterbacks coach before
being promoted to offensive coordinator in 2013 . . . Ravens
coach John Harbaugh promoted linebackers coach Don Mar­
tindale to defensive coordinator, assuring a seamless transition in the wake of Dean Pees’s
retirement . . . The Bengals
hired Teryl Austin as defensive
Falcons quarterback Matt
Ryan left team headquarters
because of an undisclosed personal matter and did not practice with the team. Team
spokesman Brian Cearns said
the Falcons did not plan to give
a reason for his absence, adding that Ryan would address
the matter when he meets on
Wednesday with reporters ‘‘if
he decides to do so.’’ . . . Bills
general manager Brandon
Beane said there may have
been a misunderstanding during an on-field exchange that
led to Jaguars defensive end
Yannick Ngakoue accusing
Buffalo guard Richie Incognito
of using ‘‘weak racist slurs.’’
Beane said the Bills have spoken to Incognito and understand their player’s side of the
story.
C6
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
BC demolished by Tar Heels
Scoreboard
WED
By Kip Coons
1/10
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
THU
1/11
FRI
1/12
UNC 96 C H A P E L H I L L , N. C . —
North Carolina’s favorite
BC 66 son and author, Thomas
Wolfe, chronicled the downside of
homecomings in two of the most famous literary works of the early 20th
century, “Look Homeward, Angel” and
“You Can’t Go Home Again.”
The UNC graduate’s message probably wasn’t lost Tuesday night on Boston College’s Jerome Robinson and Ky
Bowman. The BC guards hoped to celebrate a triumphant return to their
home state, but another North Carolina native had other ideas.
Junior forward Luke Maye had
game highs of 32 points and 18 rebounds, plus a 4-of-5 effort from 3point range, as No. 20 North Carolina
routed Boston College, 96-66, on Tuesday night for its 400th victory in the
Dean E. Smith Center.
It was the 11th consecutive loss in
the series for the Eagles (11-6, 2-3),
who haven’t beaten UNC since a 71-67
victory in Conte Forum on Feb. 20,
2010.
The Eagles return to action and
host Dartmouth at 1 p.m. Saturday in a
nonconference game. UNC (13-4, 2-2)
travels to Notre Dame on Saturday.
Robinson, a junior wing, grew up
25 miles from the UNC campus in Raleigh, while Bowman, the sophomore
point guard, hails from Havelock, 160
miles away near the Atlantic coast.
For his part, Robinson said he grew
up a fan of the Tar Heels.
“[UNC] started recruiting me really
late going into my senior year, but BC
was already on me and giving me an
opportunity to play right away,” Robinson said. “I was a big UNC fan growing
up. It was awesome to play here tonight. It’s the mecca of college basketball, I think. Yeah, I was a Tar Heel for
a little bit.”
UNC coach Roy Williams said he
didn’t know about Robinson despite
the player’s proximity but was familiar
with Bowman because UNC football
coach Larry Fedora was recruiting him
as a wide receiver.
“Larry Fedora called me and said
that they have a receiver that’s committing and he wants to play basketball,
and I said, ‘Great,’ ” Williams said.
Although Bowman committed to
UNC for football, he changed his mind
over the winter of his senior year and
opted for ACC basketball instead.
Against UNC, Bowman led BC with
21 points, and Robinson added 15, his
low for an ACC game this season. Steffon Mitchell and Jordan Chatman had
11 apiece, with Mitchell adding 10
boards, but offense wasn’t the problem, according to BC coach Jim Chris-
Continued from Page C1
live forever in the hound’s-tooth hearts
of the Alabama faithful.
That’s sobering news for the rest of
college football. Alabama doesn’t rebuild. It reloads on the run and wins
national titles with kids who were in
high school when Alabama lost the title game last year to Clemson and Deshaun Watson in similarly dramatic
fashion. Sorry, but Bama is only going
to get better as its precocious playmakers get more experience and soak up
more of Saban’s wisdom.
The poor folks of the Peach State
again had a vaunted football empire
leave a pit in their stomachs. Playing
in the home stadium of the Atlanta
Falcons, the Georgia Bulldogs imitated
their NFL counterparts, squandering a
championship game they seemingly
controlled. This wasn’t egregious like
the Falcons coughing up a 28-3 lead to
the Patriots in Super Bowl LI. But paralleling the Falcons’ failure, Georgia
never trailed until the decisive overtime touchdown.
The Bulldogs led, 20-7, and had the
ball at the Alabama 39-yard line with
6:32 left in the third quarter after a Tagovailoa interception. However, Georg i a f r e s h m a n q u a r t e r b a c k Ja k e
Fromm gave the ball right back with a
fluke interception that deflected off
the helmet of Alabama’s Da’Shawn
Hand. It was a turning point; Alabama
cashed in with a field goal.
But the real turning point was Saban’s decision to turn to Tagovailoa to
start the second half after Alabama
trailed, 13-0, at halftime. The highly
touted Hawaiian set his state’s high
school career passing mark with 8,158
yards at the same school that produced Heisman Trophy winner and
Tennessee Titans quarterback Marcus
Mariota.
“We needed a spark on offense,”
said Saban. “Tua certainly gave us that
and did a really good job.”
The lefthander jump-started an
anemic Alabama offense and finished
14 of 24 for 166 yards. Tagovailoa said
“aloha” to college football lore, rallying
Bama from a 13-point third-quarter
SUN
1/13
1/14
MON
1/15
Y
Y
TUE
1/16
TEN
8:15
CBS
MON
7:00
NESN*
DAL
1:00
NESN
PHI
3:00
NBA,
NBCSB
NO
7:30
NBA,
NBCSB
Home games shaded
For updated scores: bostonglobe.com/sports
On the radio, unless noted: Patriots, Bruins, and Celtics, WBZ­FM 98.5; *ALT 92.9
ON THE AIR
GERRY BROOME/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Luke Maye (32 points) blocks BC’s Nik Popovic’s shot in the second half.
tian.
“It was defense the whole night, it
was defense and rebounding,” Christian said. “We did an awful job guarding the ball. We did an awful job rebounding the ball. We did an awful job
on rotations. I give [UNC] full credit.
They came ready to play. They played
fantastic. Luke Maye was phenomenal,
Cameron Johnson was phenomenal. ”
Johnson, the graduate transfer from
Pitt, made his first start for the Tar
Heels in his sixth game after missing
the first 11 following preseason surgery for a torn meniscus. He backed
Maye with 14 points, and Joel Berry
added 13 and Kenny Williams had 10.
Johnson’s presence in the starting
lineup meant that UNC’s two post players stood only 6 feet 8 inches. Despite
starting the smaller lineup, the Tar
Heels enjoyed a whopping 58-23 rebounding advantage, including 23 on
the offensive boards that resulted in a
24-6 difference in second-chance
points.
“I thought there would be some
tweaks,” Christian said of the Tar
Heels, who were coming off back-toback ACC losses at Florida State and
Virginia. “With the small lineup they
were a little quicker on defense, but
they missed 21 shots in the first half
and got 13 back. That’s ridiculous. It’s
our fault. We didn’ t play physical
enough, we didn’t hit people. We’ve
been a really good rebounding team, a
really good defensive rebounding
team, but tonight we were absolutely
awful.”
For the third time this season, Maye
had a double-double by halftime, 21
points and 10 rebounds, as the Tar
Heels built a 50-35 halftime lead. That
point total was significant, as UNC had
managed one fewer over 40 minutes in
a 61-49 loss at Virginia on Saturday in
its previous outing.
Maye’s 21 points represented 1
more than he scored in his last two
games combined.
BC missed 10 straight shots over
one stretch and went scoreless for a
5:18 span of the first half as the Tar
Heels pulled away to an 18-7 advantage in the opening eight minutes.
Bowman started 1 of 6 from the
field, but he kept the Eagles from falling farther behind by drilling three
consecutive 3-pointers in the final
three minutes of the half among his 12
points.
BC flipped the script to open the
second half, hitting seven of its first
eight shots to close to within 8 points
at three junctures, the last at 59-51
with 16:24 remaining on a baseline
jumper by Robinson. But the Tar
Heels, who hit 10 of their first 15 shots
of the second half, went on an 18-2 run
to regain control.
Berry bookended Christian’s timeout at the 11:39 mark with two of his
three treys, and at 77-53 the rout was
on.
“They out-toughed us,” Christian
said. “Luke Maye made some plays,
and they out-toughed us. They outtoughed us on the glass, they drove the
ball. We started taking really good
shots at the start of the half, and then
we went a little too much one on one.
Guys started to try to make too many
plays.”
However, with BC off to its best
start in seven years, Christian tried to
maintain that perspective.
“After watching today, if they have
some pride, they will step up and play
harder,” he said. “I don’t have to worry
about that. If I have to worry about
that, we have big problems. But I’m
not. It was one game, and we didn’t
play hard. They need to look in the mirror, we all need to look in the mirror,
and grow. Our effort was bad tonight.”
Alabama title was fueled by freshmen
uGASPER
SAT
Y
deficit to tie the game on a fourthdown TD pass to Calvin Ridley with
3:49 remaining. Freshman running
back Najee Harris ignited Bama’s stagnant running game in the fourth quarter, accumulating all 64 of his rushing
yards on six fourth-quarter carries.
Alabama nearly won the game in
regulation as Tagovailoa drove Bama
to set up a potential game-winning
field goal on the last play of regulation.
But Andy Pappanastos experienced
the cruelest fate for a kicker. He bent
the kick of a lifetime wide left from 36
yards, sending the championship
game to overtime for the first time in
its history — and allowing Tagovailoa
and Saban to make history.
After Georgia took a 23-20 lead in
overtime on a 51-yard field goal by Rodrigo Blankenship, Tagovailoa took a
16-yard sack on first and 10 from the
25, which is where teams start with
the ball in the odious college overtime
format.
Former Patriots tight ends coach
and current Alabama offensive coordinator Brian Daboll dialed up an allverticals call on second down, and Tagovailoa hit a streaking Smith.
Ballgame, Bama.
Alabama was positively Patriot-like
in pulling out this victory. Saban has
beaten his good friend and former
boss Bill Belichick to the punch in winning his sixth championship. Nicky
National Title now joins the late Paul
“Bear” Bryant as the only college football coaches to win six national championships. It was fitting that it was
Smith, wearing No. 6, who delivered
title No. 6 for the best football coach
on the planet not named Belichick.
“This is a great win for our players,
and I’ve never been happier in my life,”
said Saban.
Saban remained undefeated in 12
games against his protégés as Alabama coach. It was a soul-crushing defeat for Georgia coach Kirby Smart, Alabama’s former defensive coordinator
who in his second season at his alma
mater had Georgia on the precipice of
its first national title since 1980.
“In overtime, we didn’t finish when
we had to and Alabama did,” said
Smart. “Give them credit. But I think
everybody can see that Georgia is going to be a force to be reckoned with.
I’m very proud of this team and this
university.”
It would have been hard to anticipate a heart-pounding denouement
and duel between true freshman quarterbacks in the first half. The biggest
drama associated with the game was
the attendance of President Trump,
which caused some fans in the proGeorgia crowd of 77,430 to get caught
in a morass of security measures that
delayed their entrance into the stadium.
Mo s t o f t h e f i r s t h a l f w a s l i ke
watching the Monitor and the Merrimack bounce cannonballs off each
other in the famous Civil War naval
tussle. The game didn’t lack entertainment value, but it did lack a touchdown until the final seven seconds of
the half.
Leading, 6-0, on a pair of field
goals, Georgia got the ball on its own
31 with 1:19 to go. The Bulldogs converted a third and 10 with a 14-yard
run by Sony Michel (14 carries for 98
yards), who set up Georgia’s first field
goal by ripping off a 26-yard run on
third and 20 from the Bulldogs’ 48.
Georgia cashed in on a creative play
call. It ran the Wildcat, direct snapping the ball to wide receiver Mecole
Hardman, who raced into the end
zone from a yard out.
It was an uncharacteristic half for
Alabama. It committed costly penalties and allowed chunk plays (26, 23,
16, 16, and 14 yards) on third down.
Alabama was outgained, 223 yards to
94. Nearly a third of those yards came
on a QB draw by Jalen Hurts.
The rhythmic chant of Georgia fans
rang true: “It’s great . . . to be . . . a
Georgia . . . Bulldog.”
It was.
But it wouldn’t last.
Saban and Tagovailoa changed the
game.
Christopher L. Gasper is a Globe
columnist. He can be reached at
cgasper@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @cgasper.
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
noon
La Salle at Harvard
noon
Richmond at Saint Joseph’s
7 p.m.
Duke at Pittsburgh
7 p.m.
La Salle at UMass
7 p.m.
Notre Dame at Georgia Tech
7 p.m.
Central Florida at UConn
7 p.m.
Virginia Tech at Wake Forest
8 p.m.
Oklahoma St. at Kansas St.
8 p.m.
Xavier at Villanova
9 p.m.
Georgia at Missouri
9 p.m.
Louisville at Florida State
9 p.m.
TCU at Texas
9 p.m.
Temple at SMU
10 p.m.
Colorado at USC
NESN
NBCSN
ESPN2
NESN+
ESPNU
CBSSN
NESN
ESPNews
FS1
ESPN2
NESN
ESPNU
CBSSN
FS1
PRO BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Minnesota
10:30 p.m. LA Clippers at Golden State
ESPN
ESPN
PRO HOCKEY
8 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago
NBCSN
SOCCER
2:55 p.m.
ESPN2
Carabao Cup: Chelsea vs. Arsenal
WINTER SPORTS
5 p.m.
Biathlon: World Cup
NBCSN
Schools
BASKETBALL
BOYS
ATLANTIC COAST
Falmouth 53.............................Nauset 40
Sandwich 66..........Dennis­Yarmouth 47
BAY STATE
Brookline 63......................Weymouth 49
Natick 66...............................Norwood 48
Needham 63.........................Braintree 46
Newton North 68.......... Framingham 44
Wellesley 78..............................Milton 49
BIG THREE
Brockton 61...................New Bedford 55
BOSTON CITY
Latin Acad. 61.............Boston United 52
Madison Park 62..................O’Bryant 49
CAPE ANN
Ham.­Wenham 54.....................Triton 41
Manchester 72..................N. Reading 63
Masconomet 59..................... Ipswich 50
CATHOLIC CENTRAL
Austin Prep 62.........................Marian 39
Card. Spellman 54....Arlington Cath. 36
Matignon 66.......................Cristo Rey 43
CATHOLIC CONFERENCE
BC High 74....................Malden Cath. 43
Cath. Memorial 80....St. John’s Prep 76
COMMONWEALTH
Mystic Valley 66..............Shawsheen 61
DUAL COUNTY
Acton­Boxboro 59................Wayland 50
Boston Latin 61...................Westford 46
Cambridge 61.........................Weston 42
Lincoln­Sudbury 62Concord­Carlisle 22
HOCKOMOCK
Canton 61.................................Milford 51
Foxboro 54......................... Stoughton 41
Franklin 72.............................Taunton 60
Mansfield 64........................Attleboro 51
MAYFLOWER
Blue Hills 65.................................Avon 59
MERRIMACK VALLEY
Andover 82.......................Chelmsford 41
Central Cath. 78.......................Dracut 37
Lawrence 78.....................Tewksbury 45
N. Andover 71.......................Haverhill 36
MIDDLESEX
Arlington 65........................Lexington 58
Burlington 69......................Stoneham 43
Wakefield 64....................Wilmington 39
Watertown 44........................Melrose 38
Winchester 72.......................Belmont 62
Woburn 52..............................Reading 47
NORTHEASTERN
Everett 80.................................Revere 42
Lynn Classical 60................... Beverly 57
Lynn English 61..............Marblehead 52
Malden 66..............................Medford 51
Peabody 61..............................Saugus 43
Salem 60...............................Winthrop 52
Somerville 49.........................Danvers 36
OLD COLONY
Bridge.­Raynham 66........Barnstable 62
PATRIOT
Quincy 78..................Plymouth North 59
Whit.­Hanson 61...................Duxbury 38
SOUTH COAST
Apponequet 74...........Old Rochester 63
Case 65.....................................Bourne 51
Somerset 66....Digh.­Rehoboth 54 (OT)
SOUTH SHORE
Norwell 57............................ Abington 32
Rockland 67..........................Cohasset 53
TRI­VALLEY
Ashland 55................Dover­Sherborn 51
Medfield 69.............................. Norton 58
Medway 50.......................Bellingham 45
Westwood 59........................Holliston 58
NONLEAGUE
Durfee 65............................Stoughton 47
Marshfield 70.....................Pembroke 61
Marshfield 70.....................Pembroke 61
GIRLS
ATLANTIC COAST
Nauset 41.............................Falmouth 28
Sandwich 58..........Dennis­Yarmouth 32
BAY STATE
Braintree 51.........................Needham 43
Natick 56...............................Norwood 23
Wellesley 55..............................Milton 47
Weymouth 48......................Brookline 46
BIG THREE
Brockton 41...................New Bedford 37
CAPE ANN
Masconomet 61..................... Ipswich 33
Newburyport 55.............Georgetown 31
N. Reading 51..................Manchester 48
CATHOLIC CENTRAL
Abp. Williams 48............Bp. Fenwick 24
Arlington Cath. 55....Card. Spellman 28
Cathedral 76.......................St. Mary’s 59
Matignon 50...................Lowell Cath. 48
Pope John 53........Saint Joseph Prep 33
COMMONWEALTH
Gr. Lowell 55................................PMA 21
Mystic Valley 50..............Shawsheen 38
Northeast 32...........Fellow. Christian 21
DUAL COUNTY
Boston Latin 61...................Westford 46
Cambridge 64.........................Weston 36
Lincoln­Sudbury 49Concord­Carlisle 26
Newton South 63.................Waltham 25
HOCKOMOCK
Foxboro 74......................... Stoughton 46
Franklin 55.............................Taunton 41
Mansfield 52........................Attleboro 31
Milford 49.................................Canton 38
Oliver Ames 47.................King Philip 34
Sharon 51..................North Attleboro 49
MERRIMACK VALLEY
Andover 53.......................Chelmsford 37
Central Cath. 71.......................Dracut 43
N. Andover 51.......................Haverhill 43
MIDDLESEX
Arlington 41........................Lexington 23
Belmont 66.......................Winchester 21
Melrose 56........................Watertown 21
Wakefield 51....................Wilmington 47
Woburn 62..............................Reading 54
NORTHEASTERN
Danvers 54.........................Somerville 35
Lynn Classical 47................... Beverly 32
Malden 48..............................Medford 24
Revere 62.................................Everett 48
Saugus 51..............................Peabody 35
Swampscott 39.................Gloucester 28
OLD COLONY
Bridge.­Raynham 56........Barnstable 29
PATRIOT
Duxbury 56...................Whit.­Hanson 38
Hingham 46.......................Silver Lake 32
N. Quincy 36............Plymouth South 24
Scituate 39.............................Hanover 31
SOUTH COAST
Bourne 52.....................................Case 32
Gr. New Bedford 49...........Fairhaven 33
SOUTH SHORE
Carver 40..............................Randolph 19
TRI­VALLEY
Medfield 79.............................. Norton 24
Medway 74.......................Bellingham 25
NONLEAGUE
Bp. Stang 47.............................Durfee 46
Marshfield 48...........Notre Dame (H) 40
Ursuline 47...................Norfolk Aggie 33
HOCKEY
BOYS
CAPE ANN
Pentucket 2..................Ham.­Wenham 2
GIRLS
NONLEAGUE
Natick 4....................Wayland/Weston 3
INDOOR TRACK
BOYS
EASTERN ATHLETIC
Bp. Feehan 78...........Martha’s Vnyd. 22
TRI­COUNTY
Cath. Memorial 69.......Malden Cath. 34
NONLEAGUE
Brockton 60.....................Shrewsbury 35
GIRLS
EASTERN ATHLETIC
Bp. Feehan 70...........Martha’s Vnyd. 30
COED
CATHOLIC CENTRAL
Arlington Cath. 90....Card. Spellman 64
Austin Prep 104................. St. Mary’s 33
Bp. Fenwick 107......................Marian 25
SWIMMING
BOYS
BAY STATE
Framingham 96...................Wellesley 90
Natick 95..............................Needham 91
HOCKOMOCK
Franklin 126.........................Attleboro 45
SOUTHERN
Seekonk 91...........................Brockton 78
NONLEAGUE
BC High 101.....................Chelmsford 82
Old Rochester 91......Martha’s Vnyd. 69
St. John’s Prep 97½..........Andover 80½
GIRLS
HOCKOMOCK
Franklin 103.........................Attleboro 67
PATRIOT
Duxbury 99........................Silver Lake 78
NONLEAGUE
Old Rochester 86......Martha’s Vnyd. 81
Seekonk 94...........................Brockton 81
COED
NORTHEASTERN
Beverly 91..................................Salem 86
Marblehead 99..................... Peabody 85
NONLEAGUE
Gr. Lowell 85.........................O’Bryant 76
Medford 89.................... Lynn English 77
Transactions
BASEBALL
Arizona (NL): Signed P Randall Del­
gado on a one­year contract.
Boston (AL): Named Kevin Walker
pitching coach of Pawtucket (IL), Dar­
ren Fenster manager and Paul Abbott
pitching coach of Portland (EL), Lance
Carter pitching coach of Salem (Caroli­
na), Iggy Suarez manager of Greenville
(SAL), Corey Wimberly manager and
Nick Green pitching coach of Lowell
(NYP), Angel Berroa coach and Mickey
Jiang coach and interpreter of the GCL
Red Sox, Fernando Tatis and Aly Gon­
zalez managers of the two DSL Red
Sox clubs and Joe Hudson and Richard
De Luna minor league strength and
conditioning coaches.
Cincinnati (NL): Signed P Vance
Worley on a minor league contract.
Colorado (NL): Named Brandon
Emanuel pitching coach and Tim Do­
herty hitting coach of Albuquerque
(PCL); Warren Schaeffer manager,
Mark Brewer pitching coach, Lee Ste­
vens hitting coach and Hoshito Mizuta­
ni trainer of Hartford (EL); Frank Gon­
zales supervisor and Dave Burba pitch­
ing coach of Lancaster (Cal);
Ronbinson Cancel manager of
Asheville (SAL); John Pierson supervi­
sor and Cesar Galvez coach of Boise
(NWL); Jake Opitz hitting coach of
Grand Junction (Pioneer); and Frank
Ovalles trainer of the DSL Rockies.
Detroit (AL): Signed Ps Phillippe Au­
mont, Orbandy Rodriguez, Liarvis Bre­
to, C Brayan Pena, INF Pete Kozma and
OF Herlis Rodriguez to minor league
contracts.
Los Angeles (AL): Signed P Andrew
Heaney on a one­year contract.
Minnesota (AL): Signed 1B Jordan
Pacheco on a minor league contract.
Texas (AL): Signed OF Ryan Rua on
a one­year contract.
FOOTBALL
Baltimore (AFC): Promoted line­
backers coach Don Martindale to de­
fensive coordinator.
Carolina (NFC): Fired offensive coor­
dinator Mike Shula and quarterbacks
coach Ken Dorsey.
Cleveland (AFC): Signed DL Collins
Bevins to a reserve/futures contract.
Minnesota (NFC): Placed DT Dylan
Bradley on the practice squad injured
reserve. Signed OT Dieugot Joseph and
Caushaud Lyons to practice squad.
Washington (NFC): Signed DB Ken­
ny Ladler to a reserve/future contract.
HOCKEY
Anaheim (NHL): Reassigned RW On­
drej Kase and LW Kevin Roy to San Di­
ego (AHL).
Chicago (NHL): Assigned D Cody
Franson to Rockford (AHL). Recalled D
Erik Gustafsson from Rockford.
Colorado (NHL): Assigned F J.C. Be­
audin from San Antonio (AHL) to Colo­
rado (ECHL).
Nashville (NHL): Signed Ds Y. Weber
and M. Irwin to two­year contracts and
D Anthony Bitetto to a one­year deal.
Washington (NHL): Assigned F
Hampus Gustafsson from Hershey
(AHL) to South Carolina (ECHL).
SOCCER
Atlanta United (MLS): Announced
affiliation with Atlanta United 2 (USL).
Columbus (MLS): Signed M E. Sosa.
LA Galaxy (MLS) : Traded general
and targeted allocation money to D.C.
United for rights to M Kitchen and
signed.
Minnesota United (MLS): Signed F
Frantz Pangop.
COLLEGE
Albany (NY): Named Keith Dudzinski
associate head football coach/ defen­
sive coordinator and Nick Sanchez as­
sistant defensive coordinator/corner­
backs coach.
Arkansas: Named Joe Chavis offen­
sive coordinator and Joe Craddock de­
fensive coordinator.
Cumberland (Tenn.): Named Ron
Pavan interim football coach.
Davis & Elkins: Named Tommy Kelly
women’s lacrosse coach.
Florida State: DL Jalen Wilkerson
will enter the NFL draft.
North Carolina: Named Tommy
Thigpen assistant football coach.
Colleges
BASKETBALL
MEN
HOW AP TOP 25 FARED
2. West Virginia beat Baylor, 57­54
3. Virginia beat Syracuse, 68­61
5. Purdue played at Michigan
8. Tx. Tech lost to 9. Oklahoma, 75­65
12. Kansas played Iowa State
13. Seton Hall played at Marquette
20. N. Carolina beat BC, 96­66
21. Kentucky beat Texas A&M, 74­73
22. Auburn played Mississippi
24. Tennessee played at Vanderbilt
25. Creighton beat Butler, 85­74
NEW ENGLAND
Albertus Magnus 97.........Mount Ida 77
Bowdoin 81........Maine­Presque Isle 62
Castleton St. 64.........................Rivier 63
Connecticut College 79........... Fisher 70
Dean 106....................Newbury 103 (OT)
E. Nazarene 128.......UNew England 102
Endicott 69.................... Western N.E. 59
Gordon 77.........................Wentworth 66
Husson 95............Maine­Farmington 68
Johnson St. 109............Lyndon State 86
Le Moyne 58................Southern N.H. 53
Lesley 81...................................Becker 77
Merrimack 92................Adelphi 89 (OT)
Mitchell 80....................................Elms 71
New Haven 72...............St. Michael’s 66
Nichols 100................................. Curry 68
North Carolina 96.....Boston College 66
Rhode Island 72...............Saint Louis 65
Roger Williams 74........Salve Regina 65
Southern Vermont 97........Wheelock 64
St. Anselm 93...........Southern Conn. 69
St. Joseph’s (Maine) 69....J & Wales 62
Suffolk 83...............................Norwich 66
OTHER EAST
Georgetown 69....................St. John’s 66
SOUTH
Alabama 76................South Carolina 62
Campbell 83...................Presbyterian 79
Dayton 87............................Richmond 81
Gardner­Webb 62.............High Point 45
Liberty 73.............................Winthrop 70
Memphis 96..............................Tulane 89
Radford 64..................Charleston So. 61
Regis 73..............................Emmanuel 70
South Alabama 99.....Trinity Baptist 34
UNC Asheville 90...............Longwood 80
VCU 78.................................Duquesne 67
MIDWEST
Ball State 75.................................Ohio 68
Bowling Green 66.............No. Illinois 57
Bradley 68...........................So. Illinois 62
Buffalo 87...................................Akron 65
E. Michigan 79............. Central Mich. 74
Indiana 74..........................Penn State 70
Miami (Ohio) 80................Kent State 69
Toledo 84........................W. Michigan 61
WOMEN
HOW AP TOP 25 FARED
1. UConn beat UCF, 80­44
NEW ENGLAND
Adelphi 63......................... Merrimack 60
Albertus Magnus 82.........Mount Ida 57
Bowdoin 82.....New England College 38
Coast Guard 66....................Wheaton 61
Colby­Sawyer 65........................Bates 55
Curry 64....................................Nichols 38
Emerson 89...............Mount Holyoke 35
Endicott 71... Western New England 65
Fisher 81........................SUNY­Canton 47
Gordon 68.........................Wentworth 43
Husson 87............Maine­Farmington 51
Le Moyne­Owen 62....Southern N.H. 59
Lyndon State 75..............Johnson St. 23
Maine Maritime 67....................Colby 59
Middlebury 63...............Castleton St. 39
Mitchell 75............................Bay Path 41
New Haven 52...............St. Michael’s 43
Norwich 62...........................Simmons 52
Regis 77.......................................Lasell 56
Roger Williams 70........Salve Regina 60
Saint Joseph’s 64.....J & Wales (R.I.) 57
Smith 83...................................Babson 73
Springfield 61................................MIT 52
St. Anselm 67...........Southern Conn. 53
Trinity 74.......................Dean College 56
UConn 80........................................UCF 44
U. of New England 79....E. Nazarene 59
WPI 71..........................................Clark 35
OTHER EAST
Rensselaer 59..............William Smith 53
Utica 48.........................Stevens Tech 39
SOUTH
Campbell 58...............Charleston So. 49
Drexel 65...................William & Mary 58
Gardner­Webb 61.............Longwood 54
High Point 81.................Presbyterian 55
Liberty 63.............................Winthrop 37
UNC Asheville 67...................Radford 56
MIDWEST
IPFW 76.................................... Omaha 65
HOCKEY
MEN
ECAC HOCKEY
Rensselaer 2............................ Harvard 2
OTHER NEW ENGLAND
Castleton St. 2..................Potsdam St. 2
N.E. College 6................Morrisville St. 3
Sacred Heart 4......................... Bentley 1
Southern N.H. 5.........................Becker 4
UNew England 4.....................Bowdoin 1
Western N.E. 3.............................King’s 2
Williams 5............................. Brockport 1
OTHER EAST
Robert Morris 3........................Niagara 1
WOMEN
HOCKEY EAST
Northeastern 4...........................UConn 2
OTHER NEW ENGLAND
Amherst 4...................Southern Maine 0
Colby 1..........................UNew England 0
Middlebury 4.................Morrisville St. 1
Plymouth St. 2..................N.E. College 0
Post 3............................................King’s 1
Sacred Heart 9...........Lebanon Valley 0
St. Anselm 1.................. Conn. College 0
Wesleyan 3................................Nichols 1
OTHER EAST
Cornell 6..................................Syracuse 3
MIDWEST
Minnesota 2.................St. Cloud State 1
Latest line
NFL playoffs
Saturday
Favorite................Pts. ............Underdog
At New Eng........ 13 ..........Tennessee
Atlanta...................2½ ..............At Phila.
Sunday
At Pittsburgh........7½ ........Jacksonville
At Minnesota........4 ......New Orleans
NBA
Wednesday
Favorite...............Line ............Underdog
At Indiana..............4 ..................Miami
At Washington.....7 .....................Utah
At Charlotte..........6½ ...................Dallas
Detroit................... 1½ ........At Brooklyn
At New York.... OFF ...............Chicago
At Milwaukee.....10½ ...............Orlando
New Orleans.........1 ........At Memphis
At Houston.......OFF ..............Portland
At Minnesota........4 ...Oklahoma City
At Denver..............9½ ................Atlanta
At Golden State..OFF .........LA Clippers
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Wednesday
Favorite...............Line ............Underdog
St. Joseph’s...........4½ ...At Geo. Mason
At Davidson..........8½ ..........Geo. Wash
La Salle.....................2 ............At UMass
At St. Bon............16½ ............. Fordham
Duke.....................16½ .....At Pittsburgh
At UConn...............PK ......................UCF
At Ga. Tech..............1 ........Notre Dame
At Wake Forest.......1 ..............Va. Tech
At Michigan St......22 ................Rutgers
Milwaukee................1 ...............At Iupui
At Oakland.............16 ..........Yngstn. St.
At Detroit..............3½ .............Cleve. St.
At Indiana St........1½ ................N. Iowa
At Florida..............9½ ..............Miss. St.
At Utah St................ 7 ...............Colo. St.
Missouri St...............3 ......At Evansville
At Valpo....................2 ...................Drake
At Ill.­Chicago..........8 ...........Green Bay
At Illinois St..........PK ......... Loyola­Chi.
At Kansas St............3 .............. Okla. St.
At Villanova.............9 ..................Xavier
At SMU..................8½ ................Temple
At Texas...................1 ......................TCU
At Florida St.............6 .............Louisville
At N’western............3 ...........Minnesota
At New Mex.............1 ............Wyoming
At Arkansas..........9½ .......................LSU
At Missouri...........4½ ............... Georgia
UNLV......................9½ ........At Air Force
At USC.................... 10 .............Colorado
At L. Beach St....13½ ..........CS Nthrdg.
At Hawaii..............8½ ...............Cal Poly
NHL
Wednesday
Favorite...........Line Underdog........Line
At Toronto.......OFF Ottawa.............OFF
At Chicago......­113 Minnesota.....+103
G
WednesdayFood
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E W E D N E S DAY, JAN UA RY 1 0 , 2 01 8 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / F O O D
REMI THORNTON (TOP LEFT); ARAM BOGHOSIAN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE (TOP MIDDLE, ABOVE RIGHT); JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF
Clockwise from top left: The Automatic’s Frito Pie From Hell, Highland Fried’s whole fried chicken,
Davio’s spring rolls, Highland Fried’s nachos, The Automatic’s Korean fried chicken sandwich and Funky fries.
SOMETHING’S BEEN
WEIGHING ON US
WE RESOLVED TO FIND OUT: IS IT POSSIBLE TO EAT HEALTHY WHEN YOU’RE AROUND RESTAURANT FOOD ALL THE TIME? THESE CHEFS SAY YES.
A
BY K A RA BAS K I N | G LO B E COR R E S P O N D E N T
t his heaviest, chef Dan Raia
weighed 441 pounds. He’d worked in
kitchens since junior high school,
where the tasting, the grazing, the
post-shift nocturnal Chinatown
feasts were part of the gig. And as
chef-partner at the Fenway’s Sweet
Cheeks, the guy was constantly surrounded by delicious barbecue.
But then a varicose vein popped
in his leg. Twice. The first time was
during work on Marathon Monday
in 2012. He was rushed from the kitchen, blood gushing, to Brigham and
Women’s Hospital.
“I was told to take weight off the leg, off of my body,” he says.
He didn’t.
In 2015, the vein popped again, while he was at a wedding in Las Vegas.
Another trip to the emergency room. It was time to make a change. At first,
Raia tried a weight-loss program at Mount Auburn Hospital, but he was
kicked out for missing meetings. Ultimately he opted for gastric sleeve surgery, a stomach-reduction procedure covered by his insurance plan. He
WEIGHT, Page G7
WHAT SHE’S HAVING
OPEN-FACED
KHACHAPURI
A WONDERFUL
MELTED MESS
AT A NEW
SPOT IN
WATERTOWN
By Sheryl Julian
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Until recently, Americans
didn’t appreciate the simple beauty of eggs. Yes, they knew eggs
could raise baked goods, enrich a
casserole, and elicit a smile if presented sunny-side up at breakfast,
with fat pieces of crusty potato beside them.
But where Chinese cooks
stirred an egg into fried rice or
dropped one into bubbling soup,
French cooks added an egg and
bacon to frisee lettuce, and North
Africans poached them in spicy
tomato sauce, chefs here were still
using them in cooking — as ingredients really, rather than celebrating the perfect ovoid on its own.
Then the light dawned (or as
my friend likes to say, “dawn
breaks over Marblehead”), and
Before weight loss (left) and after.
‘I had a tiny bit
of everything.
Mentally, I miss
it, physically, not
so much.’
CHEF DAN RAIA (above),
speaking about a recent work
outing
Inside
GETTING SALTY
ONE­NIGHT
POP­UP
Avi Shemtov discusses
‘progressive Israeli food’
and much more
G3
SALLY PASLEY
VARGAS FOR THE
BOSTON GLOBE
SEASONAL RECIPES
SEAR AND
SIMMER
From caramelized
cabbage wedges
to Greek bean soup
G7
HAVING, Page G6
Recipes on
Page G5
Bowled over
Grain bowls are enjoying
a healthy popularity
By Sally Pasley Vargas
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
CONFIDENT COOK
MEXICAN
GRILLED CHEESE
SANDWICHES
DINA RUDICK/GLOBE STAFF
The khachapuri at Flaming Pit in Watertown.
Making roasted butternut
quesadillas with salsa
G2
If the burgeoning number of
grain-bowl restaurants sprouting
up (sorry, couldn’t resist) is evidence of public demand, then
healthy fast food is the wave of
the future. Restaurants, food
trucks, and stands that feature
them are popping up all around
the area.
The trademark of these bowls,
which makes them distinctly
contemporary, is vegetable goodness piled prettily on a canvas of
grains, brightened with unexpected flavors like pickled vegetables, Thai basil, and spicy dressings. These are not your mother’s
(or grandmother’s) hippie bowls
of dull brown rice with overcooked vegetables.
A great grain bowl might have
a base of brown rice mixed with
quinoa, charred broccoli,
smashed cucumbers, edamame,
o r s h av e d B r u s s e l s s p r o u t s .
Chickpeas fried to a crackling
crunch, toasted nuts, currants,
dried cranberries, spiced and
roasted squash, or tofu resting on
a bed of black rice or farro just
scratch the surface of possibilities. In a restaurant that serves
bowls, you typically go through a
cafeteria-style line and choose a
combination from the menu or
GRAIN BOWLS, Page G5
T h e
G2
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
Insider
FROM MEAT FARM-SHARE
TO BUTCHER SHOP
SuperSeedz
are kid friendly,
gourmet approved
A
handful of shelled and seasoned pumpkin seeds from
SuperSeedz make a tasty, nutritious snack. Dry roasted
and flavored naturally, the seeds come spicy and also in
sugar and cinnamon and chocolate with vanilla sea salt
flavors. Recently, the company introduced an organic
line, flavoring the seeds with pink Himalayan salt, garlic and dill, and
dark chocolate and sea salt ($4.79 for 4 ounces). Connecticut mom
Kathie Pelliccio started roasting and seasoning shelled pumpkin seeds
a decade ago as a healthy snack for her five children. They were a hit
with the family so she decided to sell them at farmers’ markets. Now
her no-shell, flavored seeds are available nationwide. To add crunch,
toss some into salads or oatmeal, stir into yogurt, or sprinkle them on
top of muffins before you bake. It’s a pleasure not having to shell
them. The new flavors are available at bfresh, 240 Elm St., Somerville,
857-997-2292; Good Health Natural Foods, 1630 Hancock St., Quincy,
617-773-4925 and 219 Columbia Road, Hanover, 781- 826-0808;
Roots Natural Foods, 100 Crawford St., Leominster, 978-534-7668, or
go to www.superseedz.com. Original flavors ($4.79 for 5 ounces) are
available at Shaw’s, Stop & Shop, and Whole Foods Market locations.
ANN TRIEGER KURLAND
T
he food truck-to-restaurant story is
an increasingly familiar one on the
local dining scene. But a pastureraised meat farm-share to butcher
shop? That narrative had not been
written until Charley Cummings,
the founder of Walden Local Meat
Co., opened a pristine 800-squarefoot butcher shop in the South End
in early November. He wasn’t thinking brickand-mortar when he started the business four
years ago, selling grass-fed and pasture-raised
beef, pork, lamb, and chicken from 75 farms
in New England and New York. But, says
Cummings, “Lots of businesses sell meat online. We felt we were doing something more
meaningful. We felt we needed a place to explain what we do.”
Cummings describes Walden’s primary
business as a meat share, in which members
receive monthly deliveries of a mix of cuts that
they select, rather than a CSA because the
business doesn’t farm the animals whose meat
they sell (though they now own several hundred head of cattle, spread over a half dozen of
their partners’ farms). Unlike many vendors,
they only buy whole animals, assuming the
burden of marketing, inventory management,
and, of course, selling not only steaks and ribs
but also lesser-known parts. Their goal, he
says, is to feed families on a month-in, monthout basis and to build a partnership with the
farmers, “where they’re paid more for what
our customers value.”
The shop is as focused on education as
trade. Whole sides of animals are delivered
weekly and broken down in-house. Head
butcher Tommy Trainor, who most recently
was sous chef at Babbo, in New York, will offer
cooking demonstrations and butchering classes. The shop will also bring in outside experts
for demos.
But there is plenty to buy. On a recent visit,
the long glass case displays five different cuts
of lamb from a farm in Vermont; three cuts of
pork, bacon, and multiple sausages — including loose sage breakfast sausage and blueberry
breakfast sausage patties — from farms in Vermont and Maine; beef short ribs, pot roast,
marrow bones, oxtails, and other cuts from
farms in Vermont. Everything is beautifully
arranged and each selection has a tag with the
farmer’s name and location. Butchers are happy to cut meat on demand to customers’ specifications. The shop also carries spices, sauces,
pasture-raised eggs, grass-fed butter, and soon
will add craft beer and wine. Walden Local
Meat Company, 316 Shawmut Ave., Boston,
857-277-0773.
ANDREA PYENSON
If bacon is your jam, try this
If bacon is your comfort food, then Bacon
Jam from TBJ Gourmet will warm your heart.
Thick, smoky, sweet, and salty, the spreadable
condiment can be slathered or stirred into anything you want to taste like bacon. Made by
slowly cooking bacon, brown sugar, onions, and
spices, the company offers three choices: Original, Black Pepper, and Red Chili & Garlic ($11 to
$15 for 9 ounces). Top your morning toast with
the bacon jam. Smear it on a flatbread, a BBQ
sandwich, or swirl it into a sauce or chowder to
add the punch of umami. Available at DeLuca’s
Market, 239 Newbury St., Boston, 617-2625990; Pemberton Farms Marketplace, 2225
Mass. Ave., Cambridge, 617-491-2244: Wayside
Gourmet, 80 Andrew Ave., Wayland, 508-3582123; High Street Market, 687 High St., Westwood, 781-326-2715, or go to www.tbjgourmet.com.
ANN TRIEGER KURLAND
ANDREA PYENSON FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Rob McCarthy, Tommy Trainor, and Charley Cummings at Walden Local Meat Co.
THE CONFIDENT COOK
GOOD FOOD AND KITCHEN KNOW­HOW
Think of quesadillas as Mexican grilled cheese sandwiches
and add butternut and pickled peppers
B Y SAL LY PA S LE Y VA R G A S | G L O B E C O R RE S P O ND E N T
Quesadillas, the Mexican version of grilled cheese sandwiches, have a lot to offer. Tortillas stand in for bread, and
cheese possibilities include Monterey Jack, cheddar, gouda,
or any other soft melting cheese. After that, the fun begins.
Add leftover vegetables, chicken, steak, or pork, canned refried beans for more substance, or roast vegetables you have
on hand. Squash and pumpkin have always been important
in Mexican cooking, so it makes perfect sense to roast
chunks of chile-spiced butternut and tuck them into tortillas.
Tortillas right out of the package are undercooked and
need to be heated and lightly browned in a hot, dry skillet to
bring out their best flavor. Put one in the pan, add squash
and cheese, then top with another tortilla to make a sandwich. For a sauce, stir your own better-than-store-bought salsa with nacho-style pickled jalapenos from a jar mixed with
fire-roasted tomatoes. Add a fresh twist with lime juice, avocados, and cilantro. Your quick, easy, vegetarian supper will
leave you satisfied.
QUESADILLAS
½ large (1½ pounds) peeled and
seeded butternut squash, cut into
1­inch pieces
2 tablespoons olive oil
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 teaspoon ancho chile powder
8 (8­inch) flour or corn tortillas
1½ cups (6 ounces) grated Monterey
Jack or cheddar cheese
3 scallions, chopped
½ cup coarsely chopped fresh cilan­
tro
2 tablespoons chopped nacho­style
pickled jalapenos in a jar, or more
to taste
1. Set the oven at 450 degrees.
2. On a rimmed baking sheet, mound the
squash in the center. Sprinkle with oil,
salt, pepper, and chile powder. Toss to
Roasted butternut quesadillas
with pickled jalapeno salsa
coat the squash with the oil and spices.
Serves 4
Spread on the baking sheet in one layer.
Roast for 20 minutes, or until tender and
SALSA
golden.
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
3. Set a large dry, heavy skillet over medi-
can (15 ounces) fire­roasted diced tomatoes
ripe avocado, halved, pitted, peeled, and cut into small
cubes
tablespoons finely chopped onion
tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
tablespoons chopped nacho­style pickled jalapenos in a jar,
or to taste
tablespoon brine from the jar of pickled jalapenos, or more
to taste
tablespoons lime juice
Salt, to taste
um heat and heat until hot. Place 1 tortilla in the skillet. Spread ¼ of the squash
on top and sprinkle with ¼ of the
Monterey Jack or cheddar. Top with scallions, cilantro, and jalapenos. Place a second tortilla on top.
4. Heat for 1 to 2 minutes, or until the
cheese begins to melt, checking the bottom by lifting one edge the tortilla with a
spatula to make sure it does not burn
(adjust heat, if necessary). Press gently
1. In a bowl, stir together the tomatoes, avocado, onion, cilantro, jala-
and flip the quesadilla over in the pan.
penos, jalapeno brine, and lime juice.
Cook for 30 seconds more, or until the
2. Add salt, taste for seasoning, and more jalapenos or brine, if you
like.
SALLY PASLEY VARGAS FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
cheese melts. Transfer to a plate, cut into
quarters, and serve with salsa.
W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
GETTING SALTY
G3
Karl’s
Cafe
AVI SHEMTOV
IT IS FONDUE TIME!
Traditional house made swiss cheese paired
with veggies, pretzels, and of course, sausage
Chocolate fondue paired with cake and fruits
Karl’s Cafe Hours:
Sun-Wed 9:00am-5:45pm • Thu-Sat 9:00am-8:00pm
One Bourbon Street, Peabody, MA
978-854-6650 • karlssausage.com
FAITH NINIVAGGI
On ‘progressive Israeli food’ and more
A
By Kara Baskin
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
vi Shemtov opened the Chubby Chickpea in
Canton eight years ago, specializing in kosher
Middle Eastern cuisine. He later took the restaurant on the road, turning it into a popular
food truck that still makes the rounds. This
month, he’ll host a brunch series at the Dorchester Brewing Co.
every Sunday with lamb belly hash, challah French toast, and
his signature shakshuka (eggs poached in spicy tomato sauce).
And on Jan. 28, he’ll appear at the South End’s Wink & Nod for
a one-night pop-up feast highlighting what he calls “modern,
progressive Israeli food.”
What’s the first restaurant you
ever ate at in Boston? Pho Pasteur, when it was in Allston. My
dad came over from Israel in his
early 20s and opened restaurants in the Boston area. One
was in Allston, a hole in the
wall place right on Brighton Avenue. That area was near and
dear to his heart. From age 5 to
high school, every two Sundays,
we’d go in from Sharon and eat
at Pho Pasteur, before Vietnamese food was cool. He’d try to
find where to buy sriracha,
when it was just this bottle with
a rooster on it.
What’s one thing you’d like to
fix about the restaurant indus­
try here? I like the Boston restaurant scene. But I think the
scene is too “new”-centric; I
think that whatever is new and
exciting gets a lot of attention.
From a food perspective, it deincentivizes being good at what
you do and incentivizes constantly changing what you do.
How has the restaurant land­
scape changed since you ar­
rived in Boston? Chickpea
opened eight years ago. Since
that time, it’s crazy how much
has changed. I’m biased since I
started by owning a food truck.
I think street food and food
trucks have driven this really
progressive food scene. Eight
years ago, you would have
looked at the scene and said it’s
weird, Boston doesn’t have
much ethnic food. Now, every
place that’s hot is very much, at
least in their ethos, trying to be
ethnic.
What other restaurants do you
visit? My favorite in the world
is Sweet Basil. And Juniper. I’m
a big Dave Becker fan. I love the
Smoke Shop, I love Little Donkey, and I would say I’m a fan of
some really dive-y places, like
the Avenue. It’s a real dive at
the corner of Harvard and Commonwealth avenues.
What’s your earliest food
memory that made you think:
“I want to work in restau­
rants”? My mom was a social
worker, My dad owned restaurants. I have a twin. My sister
and I were always in the basement of whatever restaurant
my dad owned, with a couch
and a TV, because my parents
worked like 80 hours per week.
It was just — that was what life
was. My dad is a pure immigrant. [He] always used to tell
me, “You always want to work
for yourself. You always want to
be the guy writing the check,
not the guy waiting for the
check.” I always assumed this is
what growing up was.
What’s the worst restaurant
experience you’ve ever had?
During the 2007 American
League Championship [Series],
I went to Boston Beer Works at
Fenway with my then-girlfriend, now my wife. I never
send food back. I just don’t do
that. We waited for an hour and
a half for a table, understandably. The place was packed, and
we spent almost $100 at the
bar. We ordered burgers. My
burger came, and there was a
hair on it. My girlfriend shamed
me into sending it back. My
girlfriend’s burger was straightup bloody. I eat steak blue, but I
‘Eight years ago,
you would have . . .
said . . . Boston
doesn’t have much
ethnic food. Now,
every place that’s
hot is . . . at least
in their ethos,
trying to be
ethnic.’
will not eat a burger bloody.
The third burger came, and it’s
a totally different burger, a
plain burger. A manager came
out, got down on one knee, eye
to eye with me, and asked if I
could cut it for him. I started
yelling at him in front of the
crowded restaurant.
How could Boston become a
better food city? It could be a
cooler food scene if Boston people wouldn’t try to be like other
people who cook in Boston. You
look at the scene, at Instagram,
and it’s not hard to find out why
some other place is doing something that some other place is
doing. It was Asian fusion five
or six years ago. Now it’s becoming Middle Eastern and Israeli food. I think there’s a real
value in trying to be the guy or
girl who’s trying to do the next
thing.
Name three adjectives for Bos­
ton diners. Hungry, inquisitive,
and fierce. The thing about Boston diners is, they love you or
they hate you. They let you
know.
What’s the most overdone
trend right now? I would love
to not see shakshuka on everybody’s menu. It’s such a weird
thing for people to be running
with. I’m self-serving in saying
that. But where does this make
sense? What part of [your restaurant] is this?
What are you reading? I just
ordered the “Fire and Fury”
book about [Donald] Trump!
And I just read “Playing for
Keeps,” about the economic
side of Michael Jordan’s career.
not that the customer isn’t always right — but they always
have the right. You have to own
up to the fact that you let them
down. You made them a promise, but you failed to live up to
it. [They] pay my bills. They’re
my boss. We’re not equal. I gave
that up by stepping onto the
other side of the counter. This
customer taught me that.
If you had to eat your last meal
in Boston, what would it be?
Juniper in Wellesley. I would
order everything.
Noir
ulent Pinot Noir
nberries and graham
vertones. The palate
avors complemented
ins and a long,
finish.
Access your Globe account online
at bostonglobe.com/subscriber
Kara Baskin can be reached at
kara.baskin@globe.com.
How’s your commute? I’m always on the road. I drive five
different vehicles at any one
point, because of catering vans,
my food truck, my beer truck,
and my personal vehicle. I live
in Sharon.
What’s the one food you never
want to eat again? Liver, when
it’s by itself. I despise it. I want
to like it.
Boston Atmosphere with Neighborhood Prices
What kind of restaurant is Bos­
ton missing right now? We’ve
got great pizza, we’ve got great
Italian, we’ve got great barbecue now — we have great Asian
food of all kinds, great Middle
Eastern food. Do we have great
Indian food? Maybe we’re missing great Indian food.
What’s your most missed Bos­
ton restaurant? I miss the Rattlesnake. I used to go and sit on
the roof deck in the late afternoon, early evening. I wish it
were still open.
Who was your most memora­
ble customer? I had a customer
who changed the course of my
career. I measure myself on
this. We were kosher at the
time, then gave it up. And there
are these customers who grab
you and make you theirs. In
some weird ways, they don’t
like you, but they’re coming to
you because it’s all they have.
It’s really hard.
My son was like less than a
year old, the rabbi who supervised my food truck was late,
my generator wouldn’t start.
It’s like 15 degrees. I was late.
This guy is standing in the cold.
I knew him from him having
complained before.
He looks me in the face and
says, “You have to learn to be on
time.”
I tried to explain my morning. He didn’t care, and we had
a sort of friendly but sort of not
friendly conversation. Then he
posted an open letter he’d written to me on this negative blog.
He’s always blogging negative
things.
At the time, it made me angry. I felt he’d attacked me. I
was aggressive back. We had
this back and forth.
[Today], I’m just as stressed
as I always was, but I know it’s
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T h e
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B o s t o n
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W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
FOOD & TRAVEL
Chapulines
to chicharrones
Learning secrets of Mexican cuisine
in ‘The Best City in the World’
By Diane Bair
and Pamela Wright
GLOBE CORRESPONDENTS
SAN MIGUEL DE ALLENDE, Mexico — “ This is
what I’m looking for!” Chef Victor Martinez said, rushing over
to a stall at the traditional food
market in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico. “We call it the
Mexican truffle.” He reached for
one of the ugliest pieces of food
we’d ever seen: a wildly deformed cob of corn, with
bumpy, irregularly shaped, bulbous growths, tainted a sooty
blue-gray.
“Corn smut,” Martinez whispered with reverence. “Huitlacoche.”
Wee-ta-koh-chee?
That’s the Mexican name for
the fungus-infected ear of corn,
Martinez explained. In the
United States, farmers have
been trying to eradicate the disease for years. But here in Mexico, it’s a sought-after culinary
delicacy. Martinez selected and
paid for three of the uglier clusters of corn smut, along with a
handful of sweet, apricot-smelling pink oyster mushrooms.
Martinez is a chef at the
Rosewood San Miguel de Allende, and teaches the resort’s
on-site culinary classes, designed for guests who want to
learn the secrets of traditional
Mexican cuisine. We’d signed
up, and met Martinez at the
bustling Saturday market,
where we’d pick up the ingredients needed for the morning
class.
We a v i n g t h r o u g h t h e
crowds, we stopped to buy fresh
fennel and ruda (an evergreen-y
herb); celery root, cilantro, epazote leaves, lemon caviar, peppers, and nopal cactus. We tasted soft skinned avocados, eating them like plums, skin and
all, and sampled artisan cheeses. “We have great cheese producers in central Mexico,” Martinez said, handing us a slice of
an appenzeller-style cheese that
had been cured in oak ashes.
He bought it to go with the lavender ice cream we’d be making
in class. On our way out, we
stopped in front of a bucket of
dead, black crickets. “Chapulines!” Martinez said. “I love
their crunch.” He snagged a bag
of them. On our way back to the
Rosewood, we ducked into a tiny shop to pick up some handmade, natural corn dough that
we’d use to make tortillas.
The outdoor Los Pirules Artisan Kitchen and Garden Bar
at the Rosewood resort, where
the cooking class was held, is
beautiful, with hand-painted
tiles, exposed stone, and a
wood-burning oven. Tucked
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PHOTOS BY PAMELA WRIGHT FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
away at the back of the sprawling property, it overlooks sways
of flowers, lavender hedges and
a lush herb garden, with expansive views of the town of San
Miguel de Allende. We oohed
and aahed, took pictures, and
then got to work. We learned to
hand-press tortillas. We made
pink oyster mushroom and fennel salad, lightly searing the
mushrooms in olive oil, before
topping them with ruda, roasting them in the wood oven, and
serving them with celery root
puree, chopped fennel, and caviar lemon. We lightly sautéed
the squash blossoms with onion and garlic and stuffed them
in the tortillas, with fresh guacamole, served alongside a
crunchy nopal cactus salad.
Chapulines were there to add
crunch, or to simply snack on,
though we’d yet to acquire a
taste.
We made lavender ice cream
from flowers picked from the
garden. In advance, Martinez
had prepared a rich, layered
broth with the huitlacoche, to
go with slow braised short ribs.
In the final presentation, the
short ribs were placed in the
huitlacoche soup and topped
wit h Mar tinez’s fresh and
bright chimichurri.
We sat at the long, live-edge
wood dining table to enjoy the
meal, and talk about food in
San Miguel. “Our local farmers
and producers are doing some
amazing things,” Martinez said.
“And the food scene has exploded.” His advice: For traditional,
unfussy local food, go to the
street carts and market vendors. “That’s where you’ll find
Victor Martinez is a
chef at the Rosewood
San Miguel de Allende
and teaches culinary
classes there. Top: The
San Miguel de Allende
traditional market.
me on my day off.”
San Miguel de Allende, the
clamorous colonial town in the
Sierra Madre mountains in cent r a l Me x i c o , w a s r e c e n t l y
named “The Best City in the
World” by Conde Nast magazine readers, and is fast becoming a world class tourist destination, known for its art, architecture, rich culture, and
booming culinary scene. We
went for all of that, but mostly
for the food. And while you can
find a variety of fine ethnic restaurants in town, we weren’t
here to eat French food, or Italian, or Argentine. We wanted
traditional Mexican dishes and
local delicacies.
We took Martinez’s advice
and returned to the market and
sampled pozole, roasted corn,
grilled chicken, and (fried pig
skin) from a variety of vendors,
elbow to elbow with local families. We drank fresh squeezed
juices and smoothies from plastic bags (delicious), snacked on
spicy garbanzo beans and jicama pops dusted with chili powder, and ate plates of paella,
stuffed peppers, and roasted
pork tacos.
Early one morning, we spotted a line snaking out the door
of Lavanda Café (Calle Hernandez Macias 87, 52 415 152
1610; www.lavandacafe.com).
We’re glad we waited, and returned twice more for the cazu-
ela, a tasty potato, mushroom,
and cheese casserole topped
with a fried egg and loaded
with bacon; molletes with
chorizo bacon and house-made,
creamy guacamole; and eggs
benedictinos with spinach, avocado, and bacon. We also returned a few times to Torta
Mundo (Umaran 29, 52 415
121 1287) for piled-high tortas
(Mexican sandwiches), topped
with fresh vegetables.
Baja Fish Tacos (Mesones
11-B, 52 415 121 0950; www.facebook.com/BajaFishTaquito)
was a favorite lunch spot. We
grabbed a table on the outdoor
deck and enjoyed fresh shrimp
tacos, smoked marlin tortillas,
octopus cooked in garlicky olive
oil, and ceviche, washed down
with a local craft beer. And the
walk to Muro Cafe, outside of
Centro in Barrio del Obraje
(Calle San Gabriel 1, 52 415 152
6341; www.cafemuro.com) was
worth every uphill step. The
contemporary, upscale eatery
specializes in regional Mexican
cuisine prepared with modern
flourish. The Chile Muro was
worth the trek alone, a poblano
pepper stuffed with zucchini,
corn, and panela cheese topped
with a sauce of hibiscus flower
petals. Ditto for the gorditas,
stuffed with beans, nopales,
and cheese, and drizzled with a
unique pico de gallo mixed with
cactus pickle pear.
One of the real joys of dining
in San Miguel is snagging a
rooftop table. At El Pegaso (Corregidora 6, 52 415 152 1351;
www.facebook.com/elpegasosma), we had spectacular views
of La Parroquia, while dining
on duck tacos and the wildly
popular chiles en nogada.
Our last evening, we returned to Rosewood’s Luna
Rooftop Tapas Bar, with one of
the finest views in the city. The
place was buzzing , but we
snagged seats at the bar to
watch the sunset, and enjoy
Chef Martinez’s culinary creations once again: this time, rib
eye tacos, red snapper ceviche,
and grilled octopus with potatoes bravas. Deliciosa!
Rosewood San Miguel de Allende, Nemesio Diez 11, 52 415
152 9700; www.rosewoodhotels.com. The resort offers a variety of immersive experiences,
including cooking classes, vineyard visits and wine tastings,
cheese tours and art workshops.
Diane Bair and Pamela
Wright can be reached at
bairwright@gmail.com.
A multimedia, live-action ARTSEMERSON.ORG / 617.824.8400
mash up of cinema,
MUST
shadow-puppetry
CLOSE
SUNDAY!
and theatre. NOW - JAN 14
THEATER
noW eXtended thru feb. 4
due to PoPular demand!
Don’t miss this limited engagement of
Melinda Lopez’s acclaimed one-woman show!
“Piercingly honest & exquisitely moving.”
– THE BOSTON GLOBE
“Candid, raw, and exhilarating!” — WBUR
“A PROFOUND experience! ‘Mala’ shows us
why Melinda Lopez is so loved by Boston
audiences.” — EDGE BOSTON
“POWERFUL!” — WGBH
A Huntington Theatre Company production
South End / Calderwood Pavilion at the BCA
617 266 0800 huntingtontheatre.org
THEATER
these are the VoiCes of
the arab sPring
Through six powerful monologues from the voices
of ordinary female citizens comes the stories of
what it felt like to be in the chaos of the Arab
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the voices of the unheard.
JAN 24-28. 617.824.8400 artsemerson.org
uncle vanya
by
anton chekhov
eXhilarating unCle Vanya
oPens the neW year!
Theater lovers can’t miss this up-close encounter
with Chekhov’s masterpiece, translated & directed by Curt Columbus! Windy City Times calls this
VANYA “excellent, deft...enormously entertaining.” Jan 18-Feb 18 at The Gamm, Pawtucket, RI
(Exit 29 off I-95) GAMMTHEATRE.ORG
enter a silhouetted
World
Beside a New England lighthouse, twin sisters
tend to the tower’s guiding light and to each
other, until one unexpectedly dies.Through the
unique art of shadow puppetry, experience the
journey across the thresholds of life and death.
JAN 10 - 14. artsemerson.org
THEATER
irresistible Comedy –
starts Jan. 26!
Meet restaurant manager/shoe connoisseur
Haley Walker in this hilarious & sharp comedy.
“Irresistibly charming!” – THE BOSTON GLOBE
A Huntington Theatre Company production
Avenue of the Arts / Huntington Avenue Theatre
617 266 0800 huntingtontheatre.org
MUSIC
Joyful noise
GOSPEL CONCERT
with the Harlem Gospel Choir
Saturday, January 13 at 7:30pm
at Harvard University’s Sanders Theater
Tickets on sale now!
www.multiculturalartscenter.org
NIGHT FEVER
A EVENING
AN
V N NG OF
O THE
BEE GEES
Peter shaffer’s amadeus
Wrought with jealousy, Venetian composer
Antonio Salieri must either promote or destroy a
pompous young musician, Wolfgang Amadeus
Mozart. This iconic play is brought to Boston
through a live broadcast from the National
Theater. JAN 12-14. artsemerson.org
the interaCtiVe
solVe-the-Crime Comedy!
Superbowl Sunday $15 tickets
7 pm show. Must order by Fri Feb 2
To order 617-426-5225 or shearmadness.com
Student rush & specially priced senior tix
Great group rates! 617-451-0195
Charles Playhouse, 74 Warrenton Street
THEATER
January 14 at 2Pm
781-891-5600
The Ultimate Bee Gees Tribute
Spanning the 60’s to Saturday Night Fever
ReagleMusicTheatre.com
617 Lexington St., Waltham, MA
FREE PARKING
MUSIC &
LYRICS
this WeeK only!
January 12-14
“A lavish stage production”
– The New York Times
Boston Opera House
800.982.2787 | BroadwayInBoston.com
Box Office Hours: Mon - Fri 10am-5pm
Groups (10+) Call 617.482.8616
S�EP��N SO�D��IM
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february 25th at 2Pm
781-891-5600
A Celebration of Classic Country Music
Featuring the Music of Hank Williams,
Patsy Cline, Johnny Cash, Tammy Wynette,
Merle Haggard and Loretta Lynn.
ReagleMusicTheatre.com
617 Lexington St., Waltham. FREE PARKING!
baCh and Child
Based on the enchanting Oscar-winning film, this
witty, sexy, and timeless comedy goes behind
the scenes to show how the greatest playwright
and the greatest love story came to be.
New England Premiere through Feb. 10 only!
www.SpeakEasyStage.com / 617-933-8600
Music Director David Hoose conducts
J.S. Bach: Cantata 2 and Cantata 21
Peter Child: “Lamentations” world premiere
SAT, JAN 20, 2018 | 8PM | NEC’s JORDAN HALL
Tickets: $25-$75 | Discounts available
617.868.5885 | www.cantatasingers.org
MUSIC
DANCE
handel and haydn soCiety
Jan 26 + 28
China Arts & Entertainment Group presents the
stePhen sondheim’s latest
musiCal adVenture!
“LYRICALLY WITTY, MUSICALLY,RICH!
SATIRICAL & SARDONIC!” – the Guardian
The true boom-and-bust story of two of
the most colorful fortune-seekers in US history.
Now thru Feb 11 Lyric Stage Copley Sq
617.585.5678 lyricstage.com
THE
Country
Jamboree
“an absolute Joy from
beginning to end”
“This is the sound of a conductor and an
orchestra really clicking with their namesake
composer.” - Gramophone
merrimaCK rePertory
theatre
A brand new, Cambodian-authored play about
family, fluency, and the immigrant experience.
By Vichet Chum • Directed by KJ Sanchez
Jan 10 - Feb 4 • Lowell, MA
mrt.org/knyum
Haydn: Symphony No. 49, La Passione
Mozart: Sinfonia Concertante for Violin and Viola
Haydn: Symphony No. 87
FRIDAY, JAN 26 at 7:30PM
SUNDAY, JAN 28 at 3:00PM
SYMPHONY HALL
Boston
Globe
Ticket to
the Arts
Order Online
through our Self
Serve Order
Entry System.
24/7 from
anywhere.
January 11 & 12 only!
SHANGHAI DANCE THEATRE in
SOARING WINGS:
JOURNEY OF THE CRESTED IBIS
A new dance drama direct from China
Tickets starting at $30
Boch Center Box Office • bochcenter.org
866.348.9738
boston.com/tickettothearts
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
G5
Build your own grain bowl
B Y SAL LY PA S LE Y VA R G A S | G L O B E C O R RE S P O ND E N T
Ah, January. The good news is there are plenty of delicious things to eat even as we are still reeling from holiday feasting. No regrets: just begin again with
a bowl of goodness that you can make yourself. Start with a blank canvas of grains like brown rice, quinoa, black rice, farro, kamut or barley (cook in boiling
water as you do pasta), and top with vegetables (roasted, steamed, or raw). Then add something tart (a tangy dressing, a squeeze of lemon or lime) and
something sweet (dried currants, raisins, or cranberries). Be sure to include some greens (dark leaves like massaged kale or arugula, piquant herbs like Thai
basil, mint, Italian parsley, cilantro). The final touch should be crunchy (crispy chickpeas, roasted nuts, corn nuts, wasabi peas). Take some time at the begin­
ning of each week to cook the grains and prepare a few toppings, then just add more as you go through the rest of the week.
Roasted butternut squash
Quick pickled vegetables
Brown rice and quinoa pilaf
Makes enough for 4 bowls
Makes enough for 4 bowls
Makes enough for 6 servings
1¼
2
1
1
1
½
1
½
1
1
2
½
2
pounds peeled butternut squash, cut into 1­inch cubes
tablespoons olive oil
teaspoon ground coriander
teaspoon ground cumin
teaspoon ground ginger
teaspoon Aleppo pepper flakes
Salt, to taste
cup medium grain brown rice
cup quinoa (any kind)
1. Bring 6 cups of salted water to a boil.
2. Add the rice and cook for 10 minutes. Add
the quinoa and continue to cook for an additional 15 minutes, or until the rice is tender.
1. Set the oven at 475 degrees.
2. On a rimmed baking sheet, mound the squash cubes. Sprinkle with the oil, corian-
cup rice vinegar
teaspoon salt
tablespoons sugar
cup water
cups shredded carrots, beets, daikon or other thinly
sliced vegetables such as cauliflower or broccoli.
Drain. (Total cooking time is 25 minutes.)
1. In a bowl, stir together the vinegar, salt, and sugar until
Sally Pasley Vargas
the salt and sugar dissolve. Stir in the water.
2. Add the vegetables to the marinade and leave at room
der, cumin, ginger, pepper, and salt. Toss the squash, massaging the spices and oil into the cubes. Bake for 25 minutes, or until tender and golden. Sally Pasley Vargas
temperature for 30 minutes. Store in the refrigerator for up
to 1 week. Sally Pasley Vargas
PHOTOS BY SALLY PASLEY VARGAS FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Crispy chickpeas
Miso ginger salad dressing
Baked marinated tofu
Makes enough for 4 servings
Makes enough for 4 servings
Makes enough for 4 bowls
‚
1
1
½
¼
2
2
1
1
3
1
3
3
2
cup olive oil
can (15 ounces) chickpeas, rinsed, drained, and patted dry
Salt, to taste
1. In a 10-inch cast iron or other heavy skillet over medium heat,
heat the oil.
2. Add the chickpeas and cook, stirring occasionally for 10 to 12
minutes, or until the chickpeas are crisp golden and the inside is
crisp.
3. With a slotted spoon, transfer the chickpeas to a paper towellined plate to drain. Sprinkle with salt. Chickpeas can be stored in a
jar at room temperature for up to a week, as long as they are crisp in
the middle. Sally Pasley Vargas
Grain bowl
restaurants
sprout up
across area
uGRAIN BOWLS
Continued from Page G1
build your own bowl.
One established place, where everything that goes into a bowl is distinctive, is Whole Heart Provisions in
Allston. When a tiny space next to
Roxy’s Grilled Cheese became available in 2015, Roxy owner James DiSabatino and his partner, Rebecca Arnold, jumped at the opportunity to
showcase her food. Arnold, who studied nutrition and worked in area restaurants such as Alden & Harlow and
Sarma, wanted a place to reflect her
passion for vegetables in a fast, casual
piece (1­inch) fresh ginger, peeled and thinly sliced
clove garlic, thinly sliced
cup water
tablespoons rice vinegar
tablespoons red miso
tablespoon low­sodium soy sauce
tablespoon honey
tablespoons olive oil
tablespoon toasted sesame oil
1. In a blender, finely chop the ginger and garlic.
2. Add the water, vinegar, miso, soy sauce, honey, olive oil,
and sesame oil and blend until smooth. Sally Pasley Vargas
setting. “I wanted to show how vegetables can be the star of the show and
not pushed off to the side. Most customers are coming in for a meal, not
even realizing that the restaurant is
vegetarian,” says Arnold.
Arnold does not promote her vegan orientation. “I wanted to make a
statement about the environment and
create delicious flavors without using
animal products and to show how interesting vegetables can be on their
own, without labels.”
Signature and build-your-own
bowls are packed with surprises.
Crispy chickpeas and peanut crumble
are just two of the crunchy toppings
crowning bowls laden with seasoned
roasted vegetables, massaged kale,
spic y tofu, pi ckled carrots, and
topped with dressing such as orange
miso or creamy harissa. Arnold’s special stamp is on each ingredient, so
every single bite has a different flavor
or texture.
Another popular bowl destination
is Bon Me, a play on the Vietnamese
sandwich, banh mi. After Patrick
Lynch and Ali Fong won the City of
Boston’s food truck contest in 2010,
they quickly became a sensation with
bold Asian cuisine.
From the original truck, the duo
now has seven fair wage restaurants,
eight trucks, and two food carts. Their
deep commitment to the local community has spurred them to compost
food waste, give benefits to employees
who bike or train to work, and support the #FightFor15 movement to
decrease the wage gap.
“Fresh and fun is how I would describe our offerings,” says Fong, who
trained at the Culinary Institute of
America in Hyde Park, N.Y. “Transportable food is also key so that it still
looks and stays fresh when you bring
it home or to the office.” Like similar
places, Fong’s offerings are customizable. An online menu shows nutritional values and calorie counts. Protein options include spice-rubbed
chicken, Chinese barbecue pork,
roasted soy, and paprika tofu.
The newest Bon Me in East Cambridge features a dan dan noodle
tablespoons low­sodium soy sauce
tablespoons lime juice
tablespoons Thai sweet red chile
sauce
1 tablespoon olive oil
1¼ teaspoons brown sugar
3 scallions, finely chopped
1 block (14 ounces) extra­firm tofu,
cut into 1­inch cubes and patted dry
chili sauce, oil, and brown sugar. Stir in
scallions and tofu. Marinate for 30 minutes.
1. Set the oven at 475 degrees. Lightly oil
3. Transfer to the baking dish in one layer
a 9-by-13-inch baking pan.
2. In a bowl, mix the soy sauce, lime juice,
and bake for 30 minutes, or until golden
brown. Sally Pasley Vargas
bowl. “It’s not what you would get in
China,” says Fong, who is Chinese
American. “Ours is made with a
house-made spicy dan dan sauce and
ramen noodles, instead of the traditional Chinese wheat noodles.” Fong
is convinced that the healthy fast-food
trend is permanent. “It’s absolutely
here to stay,” she says. “We have the
opportunity to bring color and texture and a beautiful look to food, especially in the Instagram era.”
DiSabatino and Arnold are also
sure that bowls are going to get more
popular. They’re opening two new locations in Cambridge in 2018.
Three Washington college students have taken their healthy fast
food to eight states with 82 locations,
including a December 2017 opening
in Post Office Square. In 2007, a
month after graduating from Georgetown, Nicolas Jammet, Jonathan Neman, and Nate Ru opened their first
Sweetgreens, a Chipotle-style restaurant that features warm grain and
vegetable bowls and salads. Jammet’s
parents owned the former La Cara-
velle in New York City, but his vision
was different from their fancy food.
“We wanted to create a place that celebrates fresh, healthy food and a
brand that generates excitement
about that,” he says, and one way was
to connect to local growers in each location. You’ ll notice on the menu
board that Ward’s Berry Farm in Sharon provides local Sweetgreens with
Hubbard squash, berries, zucchini,
and yellow squash.
After a month of cookies and eggnog, all of this food is appealing —
and filling. And many of the tastes
you’ve heard about recently are here:
hot chile pastes like the Middle Eastern harissa or Asian gochujang, vegetables that are charred or blistered,
and warm creamy dressings with exciting flavors. Rebecca Arnold likes
nothing better than to give an unsuspecting carnivore a hefty bowl of vegetables and watch them leave with a
big smile on their face.
Sally Pasley Vargas can be reached at
sally.p.vargas@gmail.com.
T h e
G6
Cheesy idea as
old as the hills
uHAVING
Continued from Page G1
eggs were everywhere: a fried egg
might appear on a seared pork chop, a
poached egg on steamed asparagus, a
soft-cooked egg on a grain bowl, a jiggly egg on cheese pizza. Tender whites
and yolks that spill open with the
touch of a fork are extremely appealing
we all discovered, and not just at
breakfast.
And that’s where khachapuri comes
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
in. Think of it as the forefather of those
egg-on-pizza innovations. The idea is
really as old as the hills. Khachapuri
(catcha-PUR-ee), sometimes called
cheese bread, is an open-faced boatshaped cheese pie topped with an egg.
Its country of origin is the Republic of
Georgia, formerly under Soviet rule,
just north of Armenia, where
khachapuri is also on many menus.
The base is yeast dough, which is
rolled into an oval, pinched and twisted at the sides to make the oval shape,
filled with salted white cheese, and
baked. When it’s done, cooks add a
yolk to the cheese, and send it back to
the hot oven until the golden orb is just
set. You get it with a nubbin of butter,
which melts immediately. To eat it, you
break off pieces of dough from the
edge and dip them into the egg-cheese
mixture, which becomes a delicious
sauce for the crusty pieces.
At the new pizza shop Flaming Pit,
near Watertown Square, owned by Armenia-born Tigran Yesayan, Ajarakan
khachapuri is twice the size of the traditional ones, made with two eggs, so
the dish ($8.99) is ample for two. It’s
filled with feta cheese and grated mozzarella, then a whole egg, and your
butter is a pat of Land O’Lakes in gold
foil.
This outsize version is sight to be-
hold. You hardly know where to begin,
so do as the Georgians do and put the
butter on the yolk, break off one of the
pointy ends, and submerge it into the
golden center. It’s a big, wonderful
mess of melted cheese, dough, salt,
and crunch.
In Georgia khachapuri comes many
ways, flat, square, even turnovershaped, but one of the most popular is
Adjaruli (what Flaming Pit calls Ajarkan). The dish is popular in the Armenian sections of Los Angeles, and in
the neighborhoods in New York where
Georgian Jews settled five decades
ago.
Flaming Pit opened in October and
GOLDBUSTER (NR) AMC Independent 2:50, 7:50
HANSON AND THE BEAST (NR) AMC Independent
12:15, 5:10, 10:10
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 5 (1:45, 4:25) 7:05, 9:40
CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (R) 5 (1:05, 2:00, 5:00)
8:00
LADY BIRD (R) 5 (1:50, 4:05) 7:10, 9:20
I, TONYA (R) 5 (2:15, 5:15) 8:10
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) 5 (1:40, 4:15) 7:05, 9:45
THE POST (PG-13) 5 (1:00, 1:40, 3:40, 4:20) 6:30,
7:00, 9:10, 9:45
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 5 (1:35, 4:15) 6:55, 9:40
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 1:15, 4:10, 6:45,
9:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 1:20, 4:00, 5:00,
8:20
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D
12:20, 7:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D
2:30, 6:00, 9:20, 9:45
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 12:00, 2:40, 5:00, 7:45,
10:05
INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY (PG-13) G 2:15, 5:00,
7:30, 10:00
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 1:10,
4:00, 6:50, 9:50
FATHER FIGURES (R) 9:35
WONDER (PG) 1:20, 4:20, 7:00
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) AMC Independent 1:00, 4:15,
7:10, 10:05
DOWNSIZING (R) 6:30
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) AMC Independent 1:00,
4:15, 7:10, 10:00
MOLLY'S GAME (R) AMC Independent 12:10, 3:20
MOLLY'S GAME (R) AMC Independent 7:00, 10:10
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 12:45, 4:10,
7:15, 10:15
I, TONYA (R) AMC Independent G 1:40, 4:30, 7:20,
10:05
HOSTILES (R) AMC Independent G 12:30, 3:35, 6:35,
9:40
soon after had to close because of a fire
in the stove hood. The place is barebones with a menu of wood-fired kebabs, pizza, Italian specialties, bar
room snacks, and burgers.
It’s the khachapuri that stands out
here. It would stand out anywhere.
Once you have it, you’re smitten. Says
general manager Alexander Yeghiyan,
“I personally love it very much.”
222 Arsenal St., Watertown, 617393-0201, www.flamingpit.net
Sheryl Julian can be reached at
sheryl.julian@globe.com. Follow her
on Twitter @sheryljulian.
()
INFO VALID 1/10/18 ONLY
()
Bargain show times are shown in
parentheses
Restrictions apply/No Passes
Handicapped accessible
8
Stadium Seating
I
DOL
DIG
DSS
Rear Window Captioning
G
5
6
K
Hearing Impaired
Dolby Stereo
Digital Sound
Dolby Surround Sound
Descriptive Video Service
The Boston Globe Movie Directory is a paid
advertisement. Listings appear at the sole discretion
of each cinema. Towns may appear out of alphabetical order so that listings will remain unbroken from
column to column
ARLINGTON
CAPITOL THEATRE
204 Massachussetts Ave. 781-648-4340
6 I DIG
www.capitoltheatreusa.com
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 4:30, 7:15
FERDINAND (PG) 3:45, 7:10
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 4:15,
7:20
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 4:20, 7:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 4:00, 7:00
BELLINGHAM
REGAL BELLINGHAM STADIUM 14
259 Hartford Ave. 844-462-7342-443
5 6 8 DIG
www.REGmovies.com
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) (1:05, 4:20)
7:35
MOLLY'S GAME (R) (12:40, 4:10) 7:20
INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY (PG-13) (1:45, 4:45) 7:45
DOWNSIZING (R) (4:05)
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) (1:35, 4:00) 6:30, 9:30
TIGER ZINDA HAI (NR) (12:35) 7:05
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) (12:45,
2:00, 3:45, 5:15) 6:45, 8:15, 10:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) (1:00, 1:30,
4:30, 5:00) 8:00, 8:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) G (12:30,
3:50) 7:15
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) (1:15, 4:15) 7:00,
9:45
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) (12:50, 3:55) 6:50, 9:50
FERDINAND (PG) (1:50, 4:50) 7:50
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) (1:20, 4:35) 7:30
BELMONT
BELMONT STUDIO CINEMA
376 Trapelo Rd. 617-484-1706
www.studiocinema.com
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 4:30, 7:30
BERLIN
REGAL SOLOMON POND STADIUM 15
591 Donald Lynch Blvd. 844-462-7342-448
5 6 8 DIG
SIMONS IMAX THEATRE
New England Aquarium, Central Wharf 617-973-5200
5 8 DIG
www.neaq.org
AMAZON ADVENTURE 3D (NR) 12:00, 4:00
GREAT WHITE SHARK (NR) 1:00, 3:00, 5:00
GALAPAGOS 3D: NATURE'S WONDERLAND (NR)
11:00, 2:00, 6:00
REGAL FENWAY STADIUM 13 & RPX
201 Brookline Ave 844-462-7342-1761
5 6 8 I K DIG
www.REGmovies.com
INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY (PG-13) (12:50) 4:15,
7:20, 10:35
MOLLY'S GAME (R) (11:35, 2:55) 6:20, 9:50
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) (12:10, 3:20) 6:30, 10:45
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) (12:35,
3:45) 7:00, 10:15
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) (12:05, 3:10) 6:45,
10:45
FERDINAND (PG) (11:55, 3:05) 10:05
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) RPX G (11:30,
3:00) 6:35, 10:10
TOMMY WISEAU'S THE ROOM (NR) Advance Tickets
Available 8:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) (12:00, 3:35)
7:10, 9:40
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) G (12:40)
4:05, 7:45
I, TONYA (R) (12:55) 4:05, 7:30, 10:25
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) (11:50, 3:15) 10:00
COCO (PG) (12:25, 3:30) 6:40, 10:20
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) (12:15, 3:25) 6:50, 10:05
BRAINTREE
AMC BRAINTREE 10
BOSTON
ARTSEMERSON: PARAMOUNT CENTER
559 Washington St. 617-824-8000
5 8 DOL
www.artsemerson.org
NO FILMS SHOWING TODAY
AMC LOEWS BOSTON COMMON 19
175 Tremont St. 617-423-3499
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
www.amctheatres.com
FERDINAND (PG) 12:35, 3:10
COCO (PG) 12:10, 2:45, 5:20
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 12:00, 2:30, 5:00,
8:00, 10:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 1:45, 4:40, 5:45,
8:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI -- THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 12:00, 3:30, 7:00, 10:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 9:15
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 12:00, 2:20, 5:05, 7:25,
9:45
INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY (PG-13) 12:00, 2:40, 5:20,
8:00, 10:40
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 7:30,
10:25
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE 3D (PG-13)
RealD 3D 2:00, 4:45
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) AMC Independent 1:05, 4:00,
6:50, 9:50
CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (R) AMC Independent
12:55, 4:05, 7:25, 10:20
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) AMC Independent 1:30,
4:20, 7:10, 10:00
THE POST (PG-13) G 12:00, 1:15, 2:45, 4:15, 5:45,
7:15, 8:45, 9:30, 10:15
THE DISASTER ARTIST (R) AMC Independent 7:50,
10:15
MOLLY'S GAME (R) AMC Independent 12:30, 3:40,
6:55, 10:05
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 1:10, 4:10,
7:30, 10:30
YOUTH (NR) AMC Independent 3:35
I, TONYA (R) AMC Independent 1:00, 3:45, 6:45, 9:30
THE EX-FILE 3: THE RETURN OF THE EXES (NR) AMC
Independent 12:50, 6:40
HOSTILES (R) AMC Independent 1:15, 4:20, 7:20,
10:25
55 Boylston St.
http://www.showcasecinemas.com/
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 11:00, 2:30,
4:30, 8:00, 9:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 11:00, 2:30,
4:30, 8:00, 9:30
EXHIBITION ON SCREEN: THE ARTIST'S GARDEN:
AMERICAN IMPRESSIONISM AND THE GARDEN
MOVEMENT, 1887-1920 (NR) 7:00
EXHIBITION ON SCREEN: THE ARTIST'S GARDEN:
AMERICAN IMPRESSIONISM AND THE GARDEN
MOVEMENT, 1887-1920 (NR) 7:00
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 12:30, 3:00, 6:30, 9:00
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 12:30, 3:00, 6:30, 9:00
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 11:30,
3:30, 7:00, 8:30
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 11:30,
3:30, 7:00, 8:30
COCO (PG) 1:00
COCO (PG) 1:00
MOLLY'S GAME (R) 12:00, 4:00, 7:30, 10:00
MOLLY'S GAME (R) 12:00, 4:00, 7:30, 10:00
DOWNSIZING (R) 1:30, 5:00
DOWNSIZING (R) 1:30, 5:00
DANVERS
AMC LOEWS LIBERTY TREE MALL 20
100 Independence Way
121 Grandview Rd.
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
5 6 DIG
www.amctheatres.com
www.amctheatres.com
FERDINAND (PG) 1:15, 4:00, 6:45, 9:30
COCO (PG) 2:00
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 2:00, 4:45, 7:30,
10:15
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 12:30, 3:45,
7:10, 10:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 4:45
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI -- THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 2:40, 6:15, 9:45
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 8:15
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 9:45
INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY (PG-13) G 2:30, 5:15,
7:45, 10:30
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 4:40,
10:30
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE 3D (PG-13)
RealD 3D 1:40, 7:40
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) AMC Independent G 1:30,
4:15, 7:00, 10:00
MOLLY'S GAME (R) AMC Independent G 3:00, 6:30,
10:00
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 2:45, 6:15, 9:45
FERDINAND (PG) 11:20, 4:40, 10:00
FERDINAND 3D (PG) RealD 3D 2:00, 7:20
COCO (PG) 10:50
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 11:40, 2:20, 5:15,
7:45, 10:20
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 10:50, 2:10,
4:10, 7:00, 10:20
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D
1:25, 4:50, 7:30, 11:00
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 11:00, 2:20, 4:50, 7:15,
9:50
INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY (PG-13) G 10:55, 1:50,
4:30, 8:15, 10:45
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 11:05,
5:30
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE 3D (PG-13)
RealD 3D 1:25, 8:15, 11:00
FATHER FIGURES (R) 11:00
DOWNSIZING (R) 1:45, 4:50, 7:55, 11:00
MOLLY'S GAME (R) AMC Independent G 11:15, 1:25,
4:20, 7:30, 10:40
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) G 11:20, 2:10,
4:50, 7:50
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 10:50
www.REGmovies.com
TOMMY WISEAU'S THE ROOM (NR) Advance Tickets
Available 8:00
INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY (PG-13) (1:30) 4:40, 7:35,
10:10
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) (12:10, 3:25)
AGNYAATHAVAASI (NR) Advance Tickets Available
1:05, 2:45, 6:20, 9:55
MOLLY'S GAME (R) (12:25, 3:40) 7:05, 9:30
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) (12:05) 4:50, 7:30, 10:00
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) (12:20,
1:40, 3:20) 4:55, 6:30, 8:15, 9:35
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) (12:00) 4:20, 7:20,
10:25
FERDINAND (PG) (12:55, 3:45) 6:35, 10:20
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) (12:30, 1:00,
3:30) 4:25, 7:00, 8:00, 9:25
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) G (12:00,
2:30) 6:00, 9:55
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) (12:45) 4:05, 7:10, 10:15
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) (12:35, 3:35) 6:50, 9:45
WONDER (PG) (1:10) 4:10, 7:15, 10:05
CHESTNUT HILL
SHOWCASE SUPERLUX
BROOKLINE
COOLIDGE CORNER THEATRE
290 Harvard St. 617-734-2500
5 6
www.coolidge.org
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 11:15, 2:00, 4:30, 7:15,
9:45
CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (R) 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 9:55
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 11:00, 1:45, 4:45, 7:30,
10:05
LADY BIRD (R) 11:30, 1:30, 4:15, 6:45, 9:30
BURLINGTON
AMC BURLINGTON CINEMA 10
20 South Ave.
5 6 DIG
www.amctheatres.com
FERDINAND (PG) 11:15, 4:40, 9:20
FERDINAND 3D (PG) RealD 3D 2:00, 7:25
COCO (PG) 11:00, 1:30, 4:00
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 11:10, 2:05, 4:35,
7:05, 9:40
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 11:05, 6:30,
10:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D
1:30, 5:00, 8:30
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 12:35, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00,
10:25
INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY (PG-13) G 11:00, 2:30,
5:10, 7:50, 10:20
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 11:05,
4:35, 10:10
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE 3D (PG-13)
RealD 3D 1:50, 7:20
WONDER (PG) 11:10, 1:50, 4:30, 7:10
DOWNSIZING (R) 9:50
MOLLY'S GAME (R) AMC Independent G 12:40, 4:00,
7:10, 10:15
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 12:00, 3:10,
6:15, 10:05
CAMBRIDGE
APPLE CINEMAS CAMBRIDGE
168 Alewife Brook Parkway.
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
www.applecinemas.com
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 1:00, 2:30, 4:45,
6:15, 8:15, 9:30
FERDINAND (PG) 1:00, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 1:45, 4:15, 6:45,
9:15
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 3:30, 6:30, 9:30
COCO (PG) 1:00, 4:30, 7:00
TIGER ZINDA HAI (NR) 1:00
TIGER ZINDA HAI (NR) 9:30
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 1:15,
4:00, 6:50, 9:30
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 1:00, 2:45, 5:00, 7:15,
9:30
INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY (PG-13) 1:45, 4:15, 6:45,
9:15
KENDALL SQUARE CINEMA
1 Kendall Square at 355 Binney St. 617-621-1202
5 6 G DOL DIG DSS
www.landmarktheatres.com
I, TONYA (R) 5 (4:00) 9:40
DEDHAM
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX LEGACY PLACE
670 Legacy Place 800-315-4000
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
www.nationalamusements.com
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 2:30, 6:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 11:20, 12:30,
3:00, 4:00, 6:30, 7:30, 9:50
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) 9:20
EXHIBITION ON SCREEN: THE ARTIST'S GARDEN:
AMERICAN IMPRESSIONISM AND THE GARDEN
MOVEMENT, 1887-1920 (NR) 7:00
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 11:25, 11:55, 1:55, 2:25,
4:25, 4:55, 7:15, 7:45, 9:45
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 12:55,
4:10, 7:10, 10:05
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 11:05,
2:35, 5:10, 8:10
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 12:25, 3:40,
6:45, 9:35
COCO (PG) 12:50
MOLLY'S GAME (R) 1:00, 4:05, 10:10
FERDINAND (PG) 1:15, 3:45, 6:20, 9:20
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 11:20, 2:05, 4:45,
7:25, 9:55
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 1:05, 3:55, 9:15
INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY (PG-13) 11:50, 2:20, 4:50,
7:20, 9:40
DOWNSIZING (R) 3:50, 6:55, 10:00
TOMMY WISEAU'S THE ROOM (NR) 8:00
FOXBORO
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX PATRIOT PLACE
24 Patriot Pl. 800-315-4000
LEXINGTON
LEXINGTON VENUE
1794 Massachussetts Ave. 781-861-6161
5 DOL DSS
LADY BIRD (R) 4:15, 7:00
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 4:00, 6:45
LOWELL
SHOWCASE CINEMAS LOWELL
32 Reiss Ave 800-315-4000
5 6 8 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 11:30, 12:00,
3:00, 3:30, 6:30, 7:00, 10:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) 10:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 12:30, 7:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) 4:00
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 1:30, 4:50, 10:40
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 11:25, 11:55, 1:55, 2:25,
4:25, 4:55, 7:15, 7:45, 9:50, 10:20
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 1:20,
1:50, 4:10, 4:40, 7:10, 7:40, 10:05, 10:35
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 12:55, 3:55,
7:05, 10:10
COCO (PG) 11:15, 2:00
MOLLY'S GAME (R) 1:10, 4:20, 7:25, 10:25
FERDINAND (PG) 1:15, 4:05, 6:45, 9:40
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 11:05, 1:35, 4:15,
6:55, 9:30
INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY (PG-13) 11:45, 2:10, 4:45,
7:20, 9:55
DOWNSIZING (R) 4:30, 7:35, 10:45
TOMMY WISEAU'S THE ROOM (NR) 8:00
MILLBURY
BLACKSTONE VALLEY 14: CINEMA DE LUX
70 Worcester Providence Turnpike 800-315-4000
5 6 8 DSS
www.showcasecinemas.com
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) RealD 3D 12:20,
12:50, 3:20, 3:50, 4:20, 6:50, 7:20, 7:50, 9:40
COCO (PG) 11:40, 2:10
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 12:55, 4:00,
7:10, 10:20
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 12:15, 12:45, 2:35, 3:05,
4:55, 5:25, 7:15, 7:45, 10:05
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 12:40,
1:10, 3:40, 4:10, 4:40, 6:35, 7:35, 9:25, 10:10, 10:25
FERDINAND (PG) 1:00, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 11:50, 2:40, 5:10,
7:40, 10:15
INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY (PG-13) 12:00, 12:30,
2:30, 3:00, 5:00, 5:30, 7:30, 8:00, 10:00, 10:30
MOLLY'S GAME (R) 12:10, 3:30, 6:40, 9:50
DOWNSIZING (R) 12:25
TOMMY WISEAU'S THE ROOM (NR) 8:00
NATICK
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
FURNITURE - NATICK
1 Underprice Way 508-665-5525
5 8
www.jordansimax.com
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI -- AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 3:30, 6:40
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI -- THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 9:50
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
NORTH ATTLEBOROUGH
www.nationalamusements.com
SHOWCASE CINEMAS NORTH ATTLEBORO
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 11:10, 2:35,
6:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 11:40, 12:40,
3:05, 4:05, 6:30, 7:30, 9:55
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) 9:25
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 12:30, 3:35, 6:50, 9:45
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 11:50, 2:15, 4:40, 7:05,
10:10
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 1:20,
4:10, 7:10, 10:00
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 12:20,
3:20, 6:10, 9:30
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 12:15, 3:30,
6:55, 10:05
COCO (PG) 11:15, 1:45
MOLLY'S GAME (R) 12:00, 3:10, 6:40, 9:50
FERDINAND (PG) 1:00, 3:55, 6:45, 9:20
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 1:15, 4:00, 6:35,
9:05
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 1:35, 4:25, 7:25, 10:15
INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY (PG-13) 1:30, 4:20, 7:00,
9:35
DOWNSIZING (R) 4:15
TOMMY WISEAU'S THE ROOM (NR) 8:00
FATHER FIGURES (R) 10:25
FRAMINGHAM
AMC FRAMINGHAM 16 WITH DINE-IN
THEATRES
22 Flutie Pass
5 6 8 I K DIG
www.amctheatres.com
FERDINAND (PG) 4:00, 9:15
FERDINAND 3D (PG) RealD 3D 1:25, 6:35
COCO (PG) 1:40, 4:25
640 South Washington St. 800-315-4000
5 6 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:30,
12:00, 2:50, 3:20, 6:10, 6:40, 7:10, 9:30, 10:00,
10:30
COCO (PG) 12:40, 3:10
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 12:35, 3:40,
6:45, 9:50
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 12:15, 2:35, 5:05, 7:25,
9:45
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 12:30,
1:05, 3:35, 4:05, 6:35, 7:15, 9:45, 10:10
FERDINAND (PG) 1:10, 4:20, 6:55, 9:40
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 1:20, 4:10, 6:50,
9:35
INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY (PG-13) 11:35, 2:00, 4:25,
7:20, 9:55
MOLLY'S GAME (R) 11:45, 3:30, 7:05, 10:05
DOWNSIZING (R) 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:15
RANDOLPH
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX RANDOLPH
73 Mazzeo Dr. 800-315-4000
5 6 8 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:00,
11:30, 12:00, 12:30, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 6:05,
6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 9:35, 10:00, 10:20
COCO (PG) 11:45, 2:15
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 12:35, 3:40, 6:55, 9:55
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 12:55, 4:05,
7:00, 10:30
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 11:25, 11:55, 1:55, 2:25,
4:25, 4:55, 7:45, 9:50, 10:20
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 11:05,
1:20, 1:50, 4:10, 4:40, 7:10, 7:40, 10:05, 10:35
FERDINAND (PG) 1:00, 3:35, 6:25, 9:15
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 11:10, 1:40, 4:20,
6:50, 9:25
INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY (PG-13) 12:45, 1:15, 3:45,
4:15, 7:05, 7:35, 9:45, 10:15
MOLLY'S GAME (R) 12:05, 3:25, 6:45, 10:10
DOWNSIZING (R) 4:45
TOMMY WISEAU'S THE ROOM (NR) 8:00, 8:00
READING
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
FURNITURE - READING
50 Walkers Brook Dr. 781-944-9090
5 8
www.jordansimax.com
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI -- THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 12:20, 9:50
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI -- AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 3:30, 6:40
REVERE
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX REVERE
565 Squire Rd. 800-315-4000
5 6 8 I K DIG
https://www.showcasecinemas.com/
WONDER (PG) 1:10, 3:55, 6:35, 9:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 12:30, 4:00,
7:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 11:30, 12:00,
3:00, 3:30, 6:30, 10:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) 7:00, 10:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 11:00, 2:30,
6:05, 9:35
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 12:10, 3:20, 6:25, 9:15
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 11:20, 1:55, 4:25, 7:15,
9:50
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 11:50, 2:25, 4:55, 10:25
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 10:50,
12:50, 1:20, 1:50, 3:40, 4:10, 4:40, 7:10, 7:40,
10:05, 10:35
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 11:45, 2:55,
6:10, 9:20
COCO (PG) 12:45, 3:25, 6:15, 9:10
MOLLY'S GAME (R) 12:20, 3:35, 6:55, 10:10
FERDINAND (PG) 1:05, 3:45, 6:20
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 11:05, 1:45, 4:30,
7:05, 9:45
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 1:15, 4:20, 7:25, 10:25
INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY (PG-13) 8:55
INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY (PG-13) 10:55, 1:30, 4:05,
6:50, 9:25
DOWNSIZING (R) 12:15, 3:15, 6:45, 10:15
TOMMY WISEAU'S THE ROOM (NR) 8:00
TOMMY WISEAU'S THE ROOM (NR) 8:00
INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY (PG-13) 11:25, 2:00, 4:35,
7:20, 9:55
SOMERVILLE
SOMERVILLE THEATRE
55 Davis Square 617-625-5700
5 6 I DIG
http://somervilletheatre.com/
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 4:50, 7:45
I, TONYA (R) 4:40, 7:20
LADY BIRD (R) 5:00, 7:30
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 5:10, 7:40
THE DISASTER ARTIST (R) 4:45, 7:15
TAUNTON
REGAL SILVER CITY GALLERIA 10
2 Galleria Mall Dr. Suite 2832 844-462-7342-452
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
www.REGmovies.com
INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY (PG-13) (12:55, 3:45)
7:10, 10:05
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) (12:25, 3:35)
6:55, 10:05
DOWNSIZING (R) (12:20, 3:30) 6:45, 10:00
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) (1:40) 4:30, 7:25, 9:55
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13)
(12:40) 4:00, 7:10, 10:10
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) (1:25) 4:20, 7:15,
10:00
FERDINAND (PG) (1:25) 4:10, 7:05
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) (12:15, 3:40)
6:30, 9:45
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) G (1:30)
5:00, 8:45
DADDY'S HOME 2 (PG-13) (1:20) 4:15, 7:00, 9:45
WALTHAM
EMBASSY CINEMA
16 Pine St. 781-736-7852
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
www.landmarktheatres.com
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) 5 (1:15, 4:20) 7:00
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 5 (12:00,
3:45) 6:55
DOWNSIZING (R) 5 (12:15, 3:30)
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 5 (12:45, 4:15) 7:10
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 5 (12:30, 4:00)
6:30, 7:30
MOLLY'S GAME (R) 5 (1:00, 4:05) 7:05
WESTBOROUGH
WOBURN
SHOWCASE CINEMAS WOBURN
25 Middlesex Canal Pkwy 800-315-4000
5 6 DOL DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 12:00, 2:50,
3:20, 6:10, 6:40, 9:30, 10:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) 12:30, 3:50,
7:10, 10:30
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 1:10, 4:00, 6:50, 9:40
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 1:55, 4:25, 7:15, 9:50
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 12:55,
1:25, 3:40, 4:10, 6:25, 6:55, 9:10, 9:45
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 1:20, 4:20,
7:20, 10:25
MOLLY'S GAME (R) 12:45, 4:05, 7:05, 10:15
FERDINAND (PG) 1:35
FERDINAND (PG) 3:35, 6:15, 8:55
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 1:15, 3:55, 6:30,
9:00
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 1:40, 4:30, 7:25, 10:20
INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY (PG-13) 1:05
INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY (PG-13) 4:25, 7:00, 9:35
DOWNSIZING (R) 12:40, 3:45, 6:45, 10:05
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
MIKEY POZARIK
Chefs have the skinny
on healthy dining out
uWEIGHT
Continued from Page G1
missed about nine days of work, he
says.
This week, Raia celebrates his oneyear anniversary from surgery as well
as his 34th birthday. He has lost 200
pounds in total: roughly 60 pounds to
prepare for his surgery, and an additional 140 over the past 12 months.
“My goal is to be 240 — 200 pounds
less than my highest weight — this
week,” he says.
He’s just about there, thanks to the
surgery, carefully logging his caloric
intake on the MyFitnessPal app, and
regular trips to two gyms (Planet Fitness in Medford, which has cheffriendly hours, and Boston Sports Club
in the Fenway, close to work).
It hasn’t been easy: Gluttony is part
of the kitchen culture, propelled as
much by hedonism as it is by mindless
snacking. Downing 8,000 calories per
day — between shoveling in food between busy shifts, tasting dishes before
they go out to the dining room, and letting loose after work — was not unusual, Raia says.
“I lied to myself for so many years.
‘I’m not that bad; I’m not that bad.’ It
catches up with you,” he says. “But
[eating] fulfilled me. It was enjoyment.
I enjoyed gorging on food. It was my
comfort. At the end of the day, I enjoyed eating two entrees’ worth of Chinese food at two in the morning.”
Chef Steve Postal from Cambridge’s
Commonwealth and the upcoming Revival cafes at Alewife and Davis Square
has a similar story. He also underwent
gastric sleeve surgery.
“Eating used to be cannibalistic,” he
says. “No talking. Just eating.”
Taking home leftovers, he says, was
a mark of shame.
“It was like weakness, defeat,” he
says. “We can do this!”
Even civilians feel the pull. As anyone who’s ever stared down a plate of
nachos, vowed to eat just a few, and
then put away the whole thing could
tell you, indulgence is liberating. Time,
calories, and consequences take on a
certain weightlessness while in a restaurant, like dancing on the moon.
I eat in restaurants for work several
times per week, and I know how
tempting it is to lose all sense of proportion and control when beguiled by
Instagram photos of luscious meals
and floridly written menus promising
foods draped, smothered, covered, and
awash in cheeses, sauces, and fat. Am I
overweight? Not exactly. Am I dreading my upcoming cholesterol test that
coincides with my 39th birthday? You
bet.
Moody’s Back Bay, a (very tasty)
place I recently supped on assignment,
just advertised a near pornographic
photo of a walnut sticky bun, awash in
dewy glaze. A few photos later, there
was a portobello sandwich with the
caption: “Why not eat a little healthy
since, let’s be honest, you haven’t been
eating that well due to the holiday season.” No kidding.
At Cambridge’s new Highland
Fried, another recent outing, there’s a
come-hither photo of a fried chicken
thigh sandwich with mashed potatoes
and chicken gravy. At the Friendly
Toast, a pre-holiday assignment, feast
your eyes on fries coated in a Jackson
Pollock-like splatter of cheese sauce.
Yes, yes, it is also easier than ever to
dine out healthily, and nobody is being
force-fed lard. There are stylish vegan
emporiums such as by CHLOE. There
are honeygrows and sweetgreens and
Dig Inns on every corner. There are
juice bars and grain bowls. There is
brown rice sushi. Oh, yes, there is kale.
But let’s be honest: For every kale
salad and faro-avocado-almond bowl,
there are plenty of menus ready to
melt your New Year’s resolutions like a
puddle of Velveeta on a pile of Tater
Tots. Especially in January, when willpower is fragile.
Salad mixings at sweetgreen in
Lynnfield. Top: Guac burger, air
baked sweet potato fries, and
seasonal lemonade at by CHLOE.
How to cope?
“The sauce! The sauce on everything! Just stay away from the sauce!”
urges Davio’s CEO Steve DiFillippo,
whose restaurants offer free spring
rolls when the winter temperatures
dip below 15 degrees. “Do you know
how many calories are in béarnaise
sauce?”
He runs seven miles each day and
opts for steak without sauce, or fish.
He sees many customers doing the
same, especially in January.
“Most people like steak a la carte,”
he says.
The Seaport’s Legal Harborside began serving weekday lunch on its second floor this month with a healthy focus, like salmon burgers and grilled tuna.
‘Mindful eating seems
a little hokey, but it’s
about getting in touch
with your body,
understanding and
knowing [that] when
you’re full, you stop.
Now, I don’t take the
first bite. . . . I slow
down and let everyone
else go first.’
STEVE POSTAL, chef at
Commonwealth in Cambridge
“I have this conversation a lot with
chefs who want to develop something
— there’s a propensity for foie gras,
pork belly, very rich foods. As I get older, I always caution them: ‘Remember
your guest base. Make sure it’s balanced. I’m not saying it’s bad; it’s wonderful. But the whole menu doesn’t
have to be rich and over the top,’ ” says
chef Rich Vallente, who’s currently on
a “reset” eating plan that eliminates
sugar, wheat, and alcohol.
In Concord, Kristin Canty at Woods
Hill Table offers a dedicated Whole 30
menu for January diners participating
in the eating plan (herself included).
The plan restricts alcohol, sugar,
grains, legumes, MSG, dairy, and
sulfites, among other things.
“We also see a lot of ‘dry January’
customers,” she says. She sells turmeric juice and non-alcoholic Bloody
Marys instead.
At the Liberty Hotel’s Scampo, chef
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Alex Pineda has gone from selling up
to 70 pounds of short ribs per week
during the holidays to 20 pounds. Now
he’s making cauliflower couscous with
sautéed onions, carrots, raisins, and
chopped parsley.
“And forget about truffles and foie
gras in January,” he says.
But this restraint is usually temporary, chefs say.
“It only lasts a couple of weeks —
less burgers and fries, more salads. We
don’t sell as many Mudslides; we’ve
been selling more wine. It’s funny, the
resolution thing. It’s predictable. It tapers off every day, and it’s back to normal by Valentine’s Day,” says Dave Cagle, who runs the Automatic in Cambridge, where popular dishes include
skillets of baked gouda and fries with
bone marrow, parmesan, and “meat
debris.”
“Sometimes we joke around. ‘Oh,
God, we’re going to hurt people with
this food!’ ” he says, laughing.
Suzi Maitland of Trina’s Starlite
Lounge in Somerville (and now in
Amesbury) sees a shift in ordering,
too, at least temporarily. Her restaurants are decadent — at Trina’s, you’re
likely to find French fries topped with
blissful rivers of gravy and hot dogs
with melted cheese, candied jalapenos,
and sour cream.
“People fade away with the fried
foods a little more. At Starlite, that’s
what we do, but we also have a haddock with sautéed spinach and sweet
potato hash. We do more veggie burgers instead of regular burgers. For a
couple of months, people eat healthy,”
she says.
But around March, she says, diners
slide into their old ways. In fact, sometimes they fall off the wagon immediately.
“No time like the new year to try
new things! Come on in and discover
why our peanut butter burger has a
cult following,” trumpeted an Instagram post from Boston’s Bukowski
Tavern a few days ago. Chef Brian Poe,
who runs a Bukowski branch in Cambridge and also the Lower Depths
(known for tater tots) and the Tip Tap
Room (wild game) sees the dichotomy
first-hand.
“Kale salads take on a remarkable
spike in sales the first few weeks,” he
says. And yet: “At Bukowski, we take a
whole broccoli head, deep-fry it, and
cover it in beer cheese sauce with fried
black quinoa to ‘make it healthy.’ ”
Surely your cardiologist wouldn’t
approve. But who can blame these
chefs? These dishes look good, they
taste good, and they play to our latent
desires to be naughty. Deep in the
(healthy, unclogged!) heart of every
smoothie-drinking diner lurks a yearning to devour a plate of poutine.
“Regardless of what they say or
read about what they should and
shouldn’t eat, when you sit down and
get a menu in front of you, people just
want to have fun and let go a little bit,”
says Mark Romano, who runs Somerville’s Highland Kitchen as well as
Highland Fried. “Even with the way
things are going in the world today,
they just want to escape. I know that’s
how my family is. Us and our kids, we
eat good at home. When we go out, we
let loose. That’s what I’m seeing and
feeling.”
His biggest seller is fried chicken.
“People love fried food!” he says.
So how to maintain a healthy sense
of balance all year long?
Postal has little tricks to stay on
track.
“I keep a toothbrush in my kitchen
because you don’t want to eat after
you’ve brushed your teeth,” he says. He
eats small meals every few hours to
stay full.
He doesn’t completely punish himself, either. Instead, he practices what
he calls mindful eating — slowing
down to enjoy the food.
“Mindful eating seems a little
hokey, but it’s about getting in touch
with your body, understanding and
knowing [that] when you’re full, you
stop. Now, I don’t take the first bite.
Normally, I’d be fork and chopsticks in
hand — boom! I slow down and let everyone else go first. If something
doesn’t look amazing to me, I don’t eat
it,” he says.
But Postal doesn’t totally deprive
himself, either. Because eating is fun,
and it should be. It just shouldn’t be
sickening.
“You don’t want to white-knuckle
it. It’s not a sustainable balance. For
me to never eat fried chicken again, it
would be a horrible lifestyle. Live 10
years longer? It wouldn’t be worth it,”
Postal says.
Raia, meanwhile, recently went on
a work outing to Peach Farm in Chinatown.
“I had a tiny bit of everything. Mentally, I miss it. Physically, not so much,”
he says.
As for me, I’m fresh off a work trip
to Highland Fried. There were Brussels sprouts on the menu. They were
fried in buttermilk. And they had bacon. Romano will probably never remove them from the menu, he says.
They’re too popular.
I opted for his nachos, and I took
half of them home.
Kara Baskin can be reached at
kara.baskin@globe.com.
G7
SEASONAL RECIPES
WHAT TO COOK THIS WEEK
KAROLINE BOEHM GOODNICK FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Caramelized cabbage wedges with mustard
Serves 6
Sear cabbage wedges, then braise them with caraway seeds and white wine. Make a
quick pan sauce with grainy mustard and fresh dill, and you have a nutty flavor with
sweet-and-sour tastes reminiscent of sauerkraut — but much quicker to make. Serve
with pork chops or roast chicken or a big bowl of your favorite grain.
1
3
1
1
2
1
½
2
3
2
large, firm green cabbage
tablespoons olive oil
teaspoon caraway seeds
shallot, finely chopped
cloves garlic, finely chopped
cup white wine
cup water
tablespooons grainy mustard
tablespoons butter, cut into 3 slices
tablespoons chopped fresh dill
Salt and pepper, to taste
Extra sprigs fresh dill (for garnish)
1. Remove any loose exterior leaves from cabbage. Cut the head into 6 wedges, leaving
the core intact.
2. In a large skillet over medium-high heat, heat the oil. Add the wedges, packing
them in tightly. Cook for 7 to 10 minutes on a side or until well browned.
3. Reduce the heat to medium, and add the caraway seeds, shallot, and garlic. Cook 2
minutes more.
4. Add the wine and water. Cover and cook for 10 minutes or until the cabbage is tender.
5. Transfer the wedges to a platter. Add the mustard to the pan. Remove the pan from
the heat. Add the butter, 1 piece at a time, and slowly swirl the pan until the butter is
completely melted.
6. Add the chopped dill, salt, and pepper. Pour the sauce over the cabbage and garnish
with dill sprigs. Karoline Boehm Goodnick
SHERYL JULIAN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Greek bean soup (Fasolada)
Serves 6
The traditional Greek bean soup, fasolada (fah-so-LAH-da), relatively unknown outside the country, is so popular with residents that it is often called Greece’s national
dish. The name fasolada comes from fasoli, Greek for beans, a key ingredient in the
cuisine. The simple recipe doesn’t seem like it will result in a bowl that is quite as flavorful as it is. Soak dried white beans overnight and simmer them first on their own,
then with carrots, onions, and celery, and finally with pureed fresh tomatoes. If your
beans have been in the pantry for a long time, you may need to cook them longer than
the 1½ hours called for here (the soup hardly requires your attention during simmering). Fasolada benefits from generous salting, and do not skip adding a high-quality
olive oil at the end, which thickens the soup and is vital to the flavor. As with all bean
soups, this one thickens more on standing and may need water when reheated. Serve
with feta, olives, and bread.
1
8
2
2
1
2
3
1
¼
pound (2½ cups) dried Great Northern or cannellini beans, soaked over­
night and drained
cups water
carrots, chopped
stalks celery, chopped
small onion, chopped
teaspoons salt, or more to taste
Black pepper, to taste
fresh tomatoes, cored and cut into large chunks
tablespoon tomato paste
cup olive oil
1. In a soup pot, combine the beans and water. Bring to a boil and skim any foam that
rises to the surface. Lower the heat and simmer for 45 minutes.
2. Add the carrots, celery, onion, salt, and pepper and return to a simmer. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 30 minutes. Add more water during the cooking if the water level falls below the beans.
3. Meanwhile, in a blender, combine the tomatoes and tomato paste and blend until
smooth. Pour the tomato mixture into the pot, stir well, and return to a simmer. Cook,
stirring occasionally, for 15 minutes, or until the beans are tender.
4. Add the olive oil to the soup and simmer for 5 minutes. (Total simmering time is 1
hour and 35 minutes.) Taste for seasoning and add more salt and pepper, if you
like. Jill Gibson
G8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
DILBERT by Scott Adams
RED & ROVER by Brian Basset
BLISS by Harry Bliss
CURTIS by Ray Billingsley
MISTER BOFFO by Joe Martin
DOONESBURY by Garry Trudeau
GET FUZZY by Darby Conley
BIZARRO by Dan Piraro
Today’s Sudoku Solution
8
3
2
9
4
6
7
5
1
4
9
6
7
5
1
8
3
2
Today’s Calcudoku Solution
1
5
7
2
8
3
6
9
4
ROSE IS ROSE by Pat Brady & Don Wimmer
5
6
1
8
3
4
9
2
7
ARLO & JANIS by Jimmy Johnson
2
4
3
6
7
9
5
1
8
RHYMES WITH ORANGE by Hilary Price
7
8
9
5
1
2
3
4
6
JUMPSTART by Robb Armstrong
9
1
4
3
6
7
2
8
5
ARCTIC CIRCLE by Alex Hallatt
6
2
5
4
9
8
1
7
3
POOCH CAFE by Paul Gilligan
3
7
8
1
2
5
4
6
9
ADAM@HOME by Rob Harrell
Today’s Crossword Solution
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
G9
THE PAJAMA DIARIES by Terri Libenson
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE by Lynn Johnston
NON SEQUITUR by Wiley
DUSTIN by Steve Kelley & Jeff Parker
ZIPPY “Oh, my Word!” by Bill Griffith
PLUGGERS by Gary Brookins
ZITS by Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
A dieting plugger struggles to be an optimist.
SUDOKU
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM by Mike Peters
Fill in the grid so
that every row,
every column, and
every 3x3 box
contains the digits 1
through 9. Puzzle
difficulty levels:
Easy on Monday and
Tuesday, more
difficult on
Wednesday and
Thursday, most
difficult on Friday
and Saturday. Tips
and computer
program at
www.sudoku.com.
6 9
4 3
5
3
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
PAPER ROUTE BY TIMOTHY E. PARKER
ACROSS
1 Romantic
writings
6 Curve underfoot
10 Charitable goods
14 Minor key?
15 Formal
whoop-de-do
16 Type of thinker
or sleeper
17 Three paper
followers
20 “Moonlight,”
opus, e.g.
21 Purplish-pink
22 Apron for
art class
25 Vital sign
26 Mouthy plug
30 Try to hit the end
32 The end of
30-Across?
35 Former Spanish
coin
41 Three paper
followers
43 Cape ___ Island,
Nova Scotia
44 Mushrooms and
such
45 Rotated
47 “... for a ___
pittance”
48 Group known for
intelligence
53 Author Horatio
56 Trembling, if born
in 1650
58 Comes together
nicely
63 Three paper
followers
66 It may be meteoric
67 Some forest
creatures
68 Like great
shortstops
69 “Here’s what
I think” page
70 Kill, as a dragon
71 Very fat
1
2
3
4
DOWN
Dots on cards
Christiania, now
Assured vigor
Prefix with
“physical”
5 Dele nullifiers
6 “... ___ and far
away”
7 Yet to be cooked
8 Some record
keepers
9 Object in angel
paintings
10 French “see ya”
11 Not causing
arrests
12 Is introduced to
13 Bout of shopping
madness
18 Scot’s hat
19 Cookbook abbr.
23 Unseal or uncap
24 Not reckless
26 Malleted seafood
27 Will beneficiary
28 Nice-sized plot
29 Blubbered
31 Bridge distance
33 The center of
ventriloquism?
34 Delivery vehicles
36 You can break it
and poach it
37 Scourer’s target,
sometimes
38 Or ___ (ultimatum
words)
39 Cake level
40 Place for mass
deliveries?
42 Cask cork
46 Mailed package
48 Keystroke-saver
49 Provide with
necessities
50 Hospital caregiver
51 Fathered
52 “Hail!” long ago
54 Fowl down under
55 Copy
57 Loaf heels,
essentially
59 Cotton on a stick
60 Sharpen, as a razor
61 Joule’s 10 million
62 Scottish terrier
64 U-turn from “nay”
65 Wail
2
8
4
9 3
1
2
8
3
5 9
1
5
7
8
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W E D N E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8
ASK AMY
TV CRITIC’S CORNER
BY MATTHEW GILBERT
Grieving dad wrestles with his rage
JORDAN STRAUSS/INVISION/AP
The red carpet at Sunday’s 75th Golden Globe Awards.
Golden Globes ratings take a dip
To me, the Golden Globes are pretty ridiculous when it comes
to who wins. The non-peer voters — the 90 or so freelance journalists of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association — have a long history of making absurd and misguided choices. Maybe their movie
choices do have a little meaning, since they can send movies (such
as “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”) into Oscar season
with some buzz. Maybe not. The TV awards are just completely superfluous.
But the Golden Globes telecast has become a thing — an opportunity to promote movies and TV shows, to keep the high-priced
red carpet in business, and to gawk at stars when they’re in a relatively social setting. It’s a big, happy, long, tedious entertainment
infomercial.
The ratings are in, however, and they show the Globes, like
most other awards telecasts, are drawing fewer viewers. This
year’s event, hosted by Seth Meyers, dropped 5 percent from 2017
in total audience, with an average of 19 million viewers. It also
dropped 11 percent from 2017 in the important 18-49 demo — a
six-year low.
Q. I lost my beloved wife to cancer four
years ago. Her death was devastating
for me and my three children.
We are all working through our
shock and sorrow. My goal through all
this upheaval has been to maintain a
stable household. I want my kids to feel
like the home they love and remember
is still here for them whenever they return. Maintaining domestic rituals has
helped me work through my own grief.
But it also feels like this is having an unintended consequence with my youngest daughter.
While away at college, this daughter
has expressed a normal kind of homesickness. She is also a young adult who
is testing my boundaries and her independence, which can feel like self-centeredness on her part.
I have a history of anger-related issues. I’ve tried to grow, but my daughter’s displays of willfulness gradually
bring out a level of rage in me that even
I find surprising. My outbursts end up
dishonoring the memory of my wife
and ruining everything I’m trying to accomplish, which leaves me feeling very,
very sad. I can see the emotional dynamic, but that doesn’t keep me from
falling victim to it. Where do I turn for
help?
ANGRY FATHER
A. I sincerely hope that you have seen a
therapist since your wife’s death. If you
haven’t, you should see a professional
to help you deal with your anger.
You should also consider joining a
grief support group; these are typically
informal meetings with people who
have also walked this tough path. Many
hospitals provide information on sup-
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Sightings from Race Point in Provincetown included 3 Pacific loons, 10 rednecked grebes, 3 common murres, a
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You
worker finds love. HD TV-14-DLSV
Kiss Bang TV-14-V
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(7:08) ★★ Top Gun (1986): Pilot enters
(10:53) ★★★ Firm
elite program. HD PG
Enterprise fights the Borg. HD TV-PG
(1993) (CC) HD R
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★ 3 Strikes (2000)
(6:00) Family That
Preys (2008) TV-14 do battle in Mexico. HD TV-14 of disaster flicks. HD PG-13
(CC) HD R
King
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reunite family. HD R
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TV-MA
has a wild Xmas party. R
(9:45) Elizabeth: The Golden
Age (2007) (CC) HD PG-13
Conj. 2
(11:32)
★★ Bad Santa (2003): Con
artist robs stores. TV-14-DLSV The Chi
(9:35) Superhero Movie (CC): A (11:05) Sniper:
nerd becomes a superhero. NR Reloaded TV-14-DV
(6:35) ★ Bulletproof Middle School: (2016): A boy
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Higher
Zombieland (2009): Coward
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Learning and rebel slay zombies. TV-14 woos a meddlesome woman. HD TV-14
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T. Titan T. Titan King/Hill Am. Dad Cl/Show Am. Dad Burgers Burgers Fam. Guy Fam. Guy
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Stuck/
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5
Q. I am a single woman. I used to be a
binge eater. About 10 years ago I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. I have
since become fit and active.
I have a friend who is at least 200
pounds overweight. We are both retired. Last year we decided to start taking trips together. I enjoy her company,
but after two trips together I am very
disappointed in her as a traveling companion. She can barely walk two blocks.
We mostly drive around or sit on benches near where we parked the car and
watch the world go by. I am so sad and
frustrated at not being able to fully explore these dream destinations. I need
exercise to maintain my health and I
love taking long walks in new places. In
addition, watching her overeat at every
meal is depressing.
If I start traveling without her, I feel
like I would need to hide this part of my
life from her to protect her feelings.
Even worse, I have another friend,
also obese, who also now wants to travel with me!
How can I handle this?
ACTIVE TRAVELER
A . Trav e l i n g w i t h f r i e nd s i s o f t e n
fraught with peril; and in this case, I
feel like you are dangerously close to
doubling down on the peril.
Given your condition and that of
your friend’s, you must have realized
that being incompatible travel companions was a possibility.
You shouldn’t blame another person
for you not having enough fun or getting enough exercise on your vacation.
I’ve been on enough vacations (and exercise regimes) to know that there is only one person responsible for your experience: you.
If you really want to end your travels
with this person, then you’re going to
have to be honest, adult, and respectful.
Acknowledge that the trips aren’t quite
what you envisioned and that, for now,
you would like to become a solo traveler.
Q. My blood started to boil reading the
letter from “Devoted and Caring Parents,” who wanted an exact 50-50 sharing of all holidays with their son and future daughter-in-law (whose parents
are divorced).
The pressure these parents were exerting on the younger couple is neither
“devoted” nor “caring.”
BEEN THERE
A. Horror stories of people running
themselves ragged trying to please everyone on Christmas Day are flooding
my inbox.
Amy Dickinson can be reached at
askamy@amydickinson.com.
BIRD SIGHTINGS
Wednesday January 10, 2018
2
port groups in your area. You may be
surprised at how much better you feel
simply communing with others.
Remember that you cannot force everything to be “normal” just because
that’s what you want. Your daughter, on
the other hand, seems to be acting-out
within the normal range of older teens.
It seems unwise and perhaps unfair to
gauge your own behavior based on your
wife’s memory. She is gone; you are
grieving and you need to learn to turn
down the heat on your anger in order to
be gentle with yourself — and not triggered by your daughter’s behavior.
The 700 Club (CC)
TV-G
HD
Friends
Blaze
Friends
Blaze
thick-billed murre, 2,300 razorbills, 28
black-legged kittiwakes, 26 Iceland gulls,
a lesser black-backed gull, 2 snowy owls,
and 90 snow buntings.
Other sightings around the Cape included a rose-breasted grosbeak in
Woods Hole, a whimbrel and 2 Western
sandpipers in Chatham, a chipping sparrow in Brewster, a semipalmated plover
and a Baltimore oriole in Orleans,
2 American bitterns at Fort Hill in Eastham, and a rough-legged hawk at High
Head in Truro.
For more information about bird
sightings or to report sightings, call the
Mass. Audubon Society at 781-259-8805
or go to www.massaudubon.org.
Specials
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Chrisley
Superbad (7:27) ★★★ Mean Girls (2004) (CC): Nice Easy A (2010) (CC): A student fakes
Knows
having sex. HD TV-PG
teen joins snobby clique. HD TV-14
VH-1
WAM
WE
Black Ink Crew
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Black NEW
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Growing Up Hip HD ★★ Diary of a Mad: Dramedy about a divorcée.
Pawn
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Watch
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necn News 10Pm
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Content Ratings: TV-Y Appropriate for all children; TV-Y7 For children age 7 and older; TV-G General audience; TV-PG Parental guidance suggested; TV-14 May be unsuitable for children under 14;
TV-MA Mature audience only Additional symbols: D Suggestive dialogue; FV Fantasy violence; L Strong language; S Sexual activity; V Violence; HD High-Definition; (CC) Close-Captioned
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