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The Boston Globe July 26 2017

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Wednesday, July 26, 2017
Key figure
in church sex
abuse scandal
to be released
GOP struggles over health bill
McCain’s arrival
helps start debate,
but early repeal
version rejected
By Astead W. Herndon
Bid to keep Shanley in jail
failed, prosecutors say
GLOBE STAFF
By Michael Levenson
GLOBE STAFF
Paul R. Shanley, a former “street priest” who
became one of the most notorious figures in the
Catholic Church’s sexual abuse scandal, is set to
be released from prison as early as this week after serving 12 years behind bars for raping a
Sunday school student in the
early 1980s.
Middlesex prosecutors said
they had hoped to keep the 86year-old defrocked priest behind bars even after his sentence was completed by having him declared a “sexually
dangerous person.” But two
Paul Shanley
doctors who examined Shanwas convicted of rape.
ley found that he did not meet
the required criteria, prosecutors said.
“We are awaiting their final reports,” Middlesex District Attorney Marian T. Ryan’s office
said in a statement Tuesday. “However, both
doctors have informed us that they have concluded that Shanley does not satisfy the legal
criteria for a petition to be filed.”
Shanley was accused of abusing roughly two
dozen victims over several decades, many of
them troubled adolescents who came to him for
BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
‘Stop listening to the bombastic loudmouths on the radio, television,
and the Internet. To hell with them!’
JOHN MCCAIN, in address to his fellow senators
Republican Senator Susan Collins got caught on a hot mike Tuesday at a hearing’s end talking
to Democratic Senator Jack Reed of Rhode Island. First, she complained about a budget
maneuver by the Trump administration and Reed responded with a comment on the president:
SHANLEY, Page A8
A devastating
tally of football,
brain disease
‘‘I think he’s crazy,’’
Reed says.
Most detailed study by BU,
VA reveals disturbing toll
And Collins adds,
‘‘I’m worried.’’
By Felice J. Freyer
Collins was heard
making unflattering
GLOBE STAFF
Boston researchers who studied the brains
of 202 deceased football players published the
most detailed portrait to date Tuesday of the
devastation wrought by a degenerative brain
disease linked to repeated blows to the head, a
grim tally they hope removes any final doubts
of the severity and long-lasting damage it
causes.
In Tuesday’s Journal of the American Medical Association, a team from the Boston University School of Medicine and the VA Boston
Healthcare System documented the troubling
behavior, disturbed moods, and impaired
thinking in people who had chronic traumatic
encephalopathy, or CTE.
Among the 111 National Football League
players whose brains were donated for the
study, all but one was found to have the disease.
But the difficulties were found even in some
high school players. College, semi-professional,
and professional players had the most severe
cases, however.
Even those with mild CTE had suffered from
By David Abel
GLOBE STAFF
The current flounder population
is estimated to be
42% below
The parents of Charlie Gard
asked a British judge for per-
Summer 2.0
Wednesday: Warmer, sunny.
High 74-79; low 61-66.
Thursday: More clouds, humid.
High 75-80, low 62-67.
High tides: 1:46, 2:23.
Sunrise: 5:31. Sunset: 8:10.
Complete report, B15.
mission to bring the terminally ill child home to die. A5.
For Massachusetts drivers,
the phrase “rush hour’’
VOL . 292, NO. 26
*
Suggested retail price
$2.00
Sessions besieged
President Trump escalated his
verbal attacks on Attorney
General Jeff Sessions. A2.
Scouts speech
Collins continues, ‘‘I
don’t mean to be
unkind but he’s so
unattractive it’s unbelievable.’’ (A2)
A barrage of political remarks
by President Trump at the
Scouts Jamboree enraged
many parents A7.
the level regulators consider
to be sustainable
The Trump administration,
in an unprecedented decision,
has rejected the recommendation of a commission that has
long overseen fishing issues
along the East Coast, raising
deep concerns about political
meddling in the ongoing preservation of fragile stocks from
Maine to Florida.
More specifically, the decision by Commerce Secretary
Wilbur Ross has stirred worries about the consequences
for summer flounder, one of
the most fished species in the
Northeast. The decline of summer flounder could have a
wider impact across the region’s marine ecosystem.
Ross earlier this month dismissed the findings of the 75year-old Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission,
which concluded that New Jersey was violating a conserva-
tion plan for summer flounder
that all the other states in the
compact approved. Many conservationists thought that New
Jersey, while following protocols, was bowing to the fishing
industry.
The decision, which effectively allows New Jersey to
harvest more summer flounder, marked the first time the
federal government had disregarded such a recommendaFLOUNDER, Page A8
A FINAL COURSE
The Berkshire Museum’s
plans to sell 40 artworks, in-
despite Israeli efforts to defuse the tensions. A4.
east’’ for blocking
health care. He said
he wished he could
challenge them to a
duel ‘‘Aaron Burrstyle.’’
HEALTH LAW, Page A6
Overruling of panel called unprecedented, unwarranted
In the news
Muslim protests continued at
a revered Jerusalem holy site
remarks about Republican Representative Blake Farenthold of Texas a
day after he blamed
‘‘some female senators from the North-
‘‘I know,’’ Reed replies. ‘‘Trust me. Do
you know why he
challenged you to a
duel? ‘Cause you
could beat the s--out of him.’’
In wake of US fishery decision: confusion, anger
CTE, Page A9
cluding two paintings by Norman Rockwell and works by
Alexander Calder, have generated criticism and questions
about its priorities. B1.
‘‘Did you see the
one who challenged
me to a duel?’’ Collins asks.
‘‘Whenever there
was a grant, they
just X-ed it out, with
no metric, no thinking about it, no
nothing,’’ Collins
tells Reed. ‘‘I mean
it’s just incredibly
irresponsible.’’
WASHINGTON — Senate
Republicans, after a dramatic
return by an ailing Senator
John McCain, suffered a setback Tuesday night in their effort to repeal and replace the
Affordable Care Act when they
came up short of necessary
votes in early maneuvering.
A plan to replace President
Obama’s signature law stumbled during a vote, falling 5743. It was a sign of the difficult
road ahead for Republicans as
they try to make good on a seven-year-old promise to ditch
the federal health law.
Earlier in the day, majority
leader Mitch McConnell muscled through an opening vote,
51-50, on a shell of a bill, with
Vice President Mike Pence
casting the tiebreaker to continue debate. That was enough
to keep the repeal effort alive,
but it began a confusing process of endless amendments,
without any idea of what a final bill will look like, if the
Senate can pass one at all.
“Let the voting take us
where it will,” McConnell said,
exposing the massive uncertainty of the debate moving
forward.
His words summed up an
extraordinary day on Capitol
Hill. It included an anti-Republican protest in the Senate
chambers that led to several
arrests, a dramatic floor dis-
seems almost quaint in these
times of bumper-to-bumper
traffic seemingly morning-tonight. B1.
Tenants in a South End rowhouse are fighting plans to
turn the building into condominiums, part of a trend of
battles between property
owners and renters. B9.
In 34 years as maître d’ at L’Espalier, Louis Risoli has seen and served
them all, presiding over one of Boston’s remaining bastions of couth
H
By Kara Baskin
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
e has sliced rare cheeses and
soothed big ones.
The guest who had a heart
attack — and the diners who
grumbled that those sorts of medical hassles disrupt service. The notorious rock
star who spoke so eloquently about wine. The
decades-long customers, regulars since they
were a young couple, who returned for a meal
with a granddaughter.
After 34 years as maître d’ and fromager at
L’Espalier, Louis Risoli, 64, has seen and served
them all. Most of all, he has presided over a
vanishing foodscape where unhurried service
and all-out luxury seems quaint. New York City
had its Walter Weiss and Elaine Kaufman;
Boston had Risoli.
His reign over one of Boston’s last bastions
of couth ended with his retirement this month,
harkening the end of an era in Boston dining.
RISOLI, Page A9
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2014
Louis Risoli retired this month from L’Espalier at age 64.
T h e
A2
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
The Nation
Trump again
takes aim at
attorney general
Says Sessions’
recusal is unfair
to the presidency
By Devlin Barrett,
Philip Rucker,
and Sari Horwitz
WASHINGTON POST
WASHINGTON — The public standoff between the White
House and the nation’s senior
law enforcement official took
another strange turn Tuesday
as President Trump escalated
his verbal attacks on Attorney
General Jeff Sessions, who was
urged by fellow conservatives to
stand his ground.
Trump was asked at a Rose
Garden news conference if he
would fire the attorney general,
who angered the president by
recusing himself from the criminal probe into possible connections between the Trump campaign and Russia.
‘‘We’ll see what happens,’’
said Trump, a potentially ominous choice of phrase, considering the president used the same
expression when talking to FBI
Director James Comey before
he was fired.
‘‘I’m disappointed in the attorney general,’’ Trump said. ‘‘If
he was going to recuse himself,
he should have told me prior to
taking office, and I would have
picked somebody else. It’s a bad
thing not just for the president,
but also for the presidency. I
think it’s unfair to the presidency.’’
He said he wanted Sessions
‘‘to be much tougher on leaks in
the intelligence agencies that
are leaking like they never have
before. . . . You can’t let that
happen.’’
Sessions showed no sign of
buckling Tuesday, and in fact
his position was bolstered by
support from prominent conservatives taking his side in the
fight with Trump.
Trump’s reluctance to act on
his anger and fire Sessions may
be based in part on the lack of
an immediate plan for a successor at the Justice Department.
While Trump has discussed potential candidates to replace
Sessions, senior White House
officials have not settled on anyone and may not anytime soon,
administration officials said. If
Sessions were to be fired without even a temporary replacement lined up, the deputy attorney general who oversees the
Russia probe, Rod Rosenstein,
would assume authority over
the entire Justice Department.
One Republican close to the
White House said a number of
senior aides, including newly
hired communications director
Anthony Scaramucci, have
urged Trump to sit down with
Sessions and work through their
differences. So far, there has
been little enthusiasm for the
suggestion, the Republican said.
One informal adviser to the
Trump White House said there
is another reason Trump has
yet to fire Sessions.
‘‘The president doesn’t want
to be seen as firing another law
enforcement official.’’
After Trump fired Comey,
one unintended consequence
SHAWN THEW/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/FILE
Aides have reportedly urged President Trump to meet with Attorney General Jeff Sessions to work out their differences.
was the appointment of Robert
Mueller as special counsel overseeing the Russia probe.
Earlier Tuesday, Trump had
tweeted that Sessions was ‘‘very
weak’’ on investigating Hillary
Clinton’s ‘‘crimes’’ and had not
aggressively hunted those who
have leaked intelligence secrets.
The president’s insistence
that Clinton be investigated
runs contrary to his own past
statements and the decision by
the Justice Department and the
FBI last year to close the investigation into her use of a private
e-mail server when she was secretary of state. Sessions has recused himself from Clinton-related matters, citing his involve-
ment with the presidential
campaign as one of Trump’s
major advisers.
The public humiliation of
Sessions at the hands of the
president he helped get elected
was galling to many conservatives, who see Sessions as the
Cabinet official who has most
assiduously pursued Trump’s
policy goals, from cracking
down on illegal immigration to
targeting street gangs.
Officials said Sessions is due
to announce in coming days a
number of criminal leak investigations based on news accounts of sensitive intelligence
information. And within hours
of Trump’s public broadside,
the Justice Department announced it would change a police funding program to add
new requirements that cities
help federal agents find undocumented immigrants to receive
grants.
On Tuesday, Republicans
publicly rallied to Sessions’ defense.
“Jeff Sessions is among the
most honorable men in government today,” said Senator Orrin
Harch of Utah. “I have full confidence in Jeff ’s ability to perform the duties of his office
and, above all, uphold the rule
of law.’’
And Breitbart, the conservative website, posted an article
saying the president’s public attack on Sessions ‘‘only serves to
highlight Trump’s own hypocrisy,’’ warning that the president’s
stance could ‘‘fuel concerns
from his base [which sees] Sessions as the best hope to fulfill
Trump’s immigration policies.’’
Even among Democrats,
Trump’s treatment of Sessions
raised concerns.
‘‘What’s happening is just
terrible,” said Senator Dianne
Feinstein of California. “The attorney general did the right
thing. The attorney general was
nothing but loyal to Donald
Trump. He took an oath of office to represent the Constitution, the law and the people.’’
Maine, R.I. senators on hot mike: Trump is ‘crazy,’ ‘I’m worried’
By Philip Bump
WASHINGTON POST
At the end of a Senate subcommittee hearing on Tuesday
morning, chairwoman Susan
Collins, a Maine Republican,
didn’t switch off her microphone. Apparently speaking to
Senator Jack Reed of Rhode Island, the ranking Democrat of
the committee, Collins discussed the federal budget —
and President Trump’s apparent lack of familiarity with the
details of governing.
After Reed praises Collins’s
handling of the hearing, held by
the Transportation, Housing
and Urban Development, and
Related Agencies subcommittee of the Senate Appropriations Committee, she laments
the administration’s handling
of spending.
‘‘I swear, [the Office of Management and Budget] just went
through and whenever there
was ‘grant,’ they just X it out,’’
Collins says. ‘‘With no measurement, no thinking about it, no
metrics, no nothing. It’s just incredibly irresponsible.’’
‘‘Yes,’’ Reed replies. ‘‘I think
— I think he’s crazy,’’ apparently
referring to the president. ‘‘I
mean, I don’t say that lightly
and as a kind of a goofy guy.’’
‘‘I’m worried,’’ Collins replies.
‘‘Oof,’’ Reed continues. ‘‘You
know, this thing — if we don’t
get a budget deal, we’re going to
be paralyzed.’’
‘‘I know,’’ Collins replies.
‘‘[Department of Defense] is
going to be paralyzed, everybody is going to be paralyzed,’’
Reed says.
‘‘I don’ t think he knows
there is a [Budget Control Act]
or anything,’’ Collins says, referring to a 2011 law that defines
the budget process.
‘‘He was down at the Ford
commissioning,’’ Reed says, referring to a weekend event
launching a new aircraft carrier, ‘‘saying, ‘I want them to pass
my budget.’ Okay, so we give
him $54 billion and then we
take it away across the board,
which would cause chaos.’’
‘‘Right,’’ Collins replies.
‘‘It’s just — and he hasn’t —
not one word about the budget.
Not one word about the debt
ceiling,’’ Reed says.
‘‘Good point,’’ Collins replies.
‘‘You’ve got [Budget Director
Mick] Mulvaney saying we’re
going to put in all sorts of stuff
like a border wall. Then you’ve
got [Treasury Secretary Steve]
Mnuchin saying it’s got to be
clean,’’ Reed continues. ‘‘We’re
going to be back in September,
and, you know, you’re going to
have crazy people in the
House.’’
In a more salacious part of
what was recorded, Collins
then addressed a radio interview in which US Representative Blake Farenthold, a Texas
Republican, suggested that if
Collins were a man, he’d have
challenged her to a duel for opposing the Senate Republicans’
Obamacare overhaul bill.
‘‘Did you see the one who
challenged me to a duel?’’ Collins asks.
‘‘I know,’ ’ Reed replies .
‘‘Trust me. Do you know why he
challenged you to a duel?
‘Cause you could beat the s___
out of him.’’
‘‘Well, he’s huge,’’ Collins replies. ‘‘And he — I don’t mean to
be unkind, but he’s so unattractive it’s unbelievable.’’
‘‘Did you see the picture of
him in his pajamas next to this
Playboy bunny?’’ she continues,
referring to an infamous photo
of Farenthold.
At that point, the mike went
dead.
Daily Briefing
Potomac security zone modified
American killed in Syria targeted ISIS
WASHINGTON — The
commandant of the Coast
Guard said Tuesday that recreational paddlers can use the
Maryland side of the Potomac
River when the president or
senior administration officials
visit Trump National Golf
Club, amending a controversial policy that kicked boats off
the river whenever the president golfed.
Admiral Paul F. Zukunft
announced the surprise policy
change while testifying before
a House Transportation and
Infrastructure Committee panel.
‘‘As long as they stay to the
Maryland side of the Potomac
River they can pass clearly
when the security zone is in effect,’’ Zukunft said. The Trump
National Golf Club is in Sterling, Va., along the river, which
divides Virginia from Maryland.
In a minute-long exchange
with Representative Peter DeFazio, an Oregon Democrat,
Zukunft said the Coast Guard
is working with the American
Canoe Association and other
groups to allow access for recreational paddlers. Boaters
and paddlers have been infuriated by the shore-to-shore
shutdown, which has taken
place intermittently since
ORLANDO — A former
Marine believed so strongly in
the war against the Islamic
State group that he secretly
traveled to Syria, where he
was killed this month while
fighting for a Kurdish militia
group.
David Taylor, a 25-year-old
former Florida resident, had
kept his plans to join the
Kurdish group a secret from
his family and only told a
high school friend, whom he
swore to secrecy. Taylor’s father said Tuesday that he
didn’t even know of his son’s
plans until after he had arrived in Syria last spring and
was training with the group
known as YPG.
‘‘I got an e-mail and he
said, ‘Pops, don’t worry. I’m
with the YPG,’ ” David Taylor
Sr. said from his West Virginia
home. ‘‘He said, ‘I’m doing the
right thing. It’s for their freedom.’ ’’
Taylor Sr. said that when
his son set his mind on something, he did it.
‘‘There was no middle
ground. He wasn’t wishywashy,’’ the father said.
A Kurdish militia group released a video saying Taylor
was ‘‘martyred fighting ISIS’
barbarism’’ on July 16.
The US State Department
March.
‘‘We listened and we are
making that accommodation
to the public,’’ Zukunft said.
DeFazio, the ranking Democrat on the House Transportation Committee, sent a letter
to the Coast Guard last week
saying the newly established
security zone along roughly 2
miles of the Potomac that borders the golf course is unfair to
those who use the river.
During the hearing, he said
he welcomed the changes as
‘‘very good news.’’
It remains unclear how the
partial closure will be delineated or enforced.
Over the weekend, Coast
Guard personnel at two river
access points on the Maryland
shore and on the river told
boaters — canoers, kayakers,
and stand-up paddle boarders
— they could use the river as
long as they stayed to the
Maryland shore.
Adam Van Grack, a Bethesda, Md., attorney who chairs
the US Olympic organization
for kayakers and canoers,
called the accommodation a
step in the right direction, but
said that until the policy is
changed in writing, the Coast
Guard has the right to deny access entirely.
WASHINGTON POST
GOTSHALL/SEAWORLD VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS
Newborn Kyara was guided by her mother, Takara, at
SeaWorld San Antonio in April.
Last orca born in SeaWorld program dies
A killer whale calf that was
the last to be born in captivity
under SeaWorld’s now-shuttered orca-breeding program
died Monday at the company’s
San Antonio park.
Kyara, a 3-month-old orca
calf who was born to mother
Takara in April, came down
with ‘‘very serious and progressive health issues’’ over the
past week, SeaWorld said.
Although Kyara’s ailment
was ‘‘likely pneumonia,’’ an official cause of death may not
be available for several weeks.
With the loss of Kyara, SeaWorld now has 22 orcas at its
Orlando, San Antonio, and
San Diego facilities, a company spokeswoman said.
SeaWorld has tried to retool
its image and many of its programs after an outcry following a tragic 2010 incident in
which a male orca, Tilikum,
killed a trainer in front of park
visitors at SeaWorld Orlando.
Three years later, the documentary ‘‘Blackfish’’ sparked
another, more intense wave of
public backlash against the
park.
Last March, SeaWorld announced it would immediately
end its captive-breeding program for orcas and begin phasing out its killer whale performances.
Kyara was conceived before
the announcement.
WASHINGTON POST
said in a statement that it was
aware of reports of a US citizen being killed while fighting
in Syria but offered no further
comment.
Taylor’s father said the
family was told about the
death last weekend by a US
consular official.
Taylor’s high school friend
e-mailed the father after he
learned of the death. The
friend said Taylor told him
during a visit to St. Petersburg Beach, Fla., last February that he believed the Islamic State group needed to be
stopped.
‘‘One night he got drunk
and told me of the atrocities
he had witnessed in the Middle East during his time in the
Marine Corps,’’ the friend, Alex Cintron, wrote in an e-mail
to Taylor’s parents.
‘‘He said to the effect that
‘Isis was the bane of modern
existence and needed to be
stopped before they destroy
any more lives and priceless
works of human achievement,’ ’’ Cintron said in the email.
Cintron said in the e-mail
that Taylor died from an improvised explosive device. The
YPG video offered no details
on how Taylor died.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
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W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
The World
Muslims pray in protest at Jerusalem holy site
Israel removes
metal detectors
around mosque
By Mohammed
Daraghmeh
and Ian Deitch
ASSOCIATED PRESS
JERUSALEM — Thousands
of Palestinian Muslims prayed
in the streets near Jerusalem’s
most contested holy site Tuesday, heeding a call by clergy to
not enter the shrine despite Israel’s seeming capitulation
when it removed metal detectors it installed there a week
earlier.
Muslim leaders said they
would only call off the protests
once they made sure Israel had
restored the situation to what
it was before the latest crisis.
Some Muslim officials alleged that Israel used the absence of Muslim clerics from
the walled compound in the
past week of protests to install
new security cameras.
T he continued standoff
highlighted the deep distrust
between Israel and the Palestinians when it comes to the
shrine — the third-holiest in
Islam and the most sacred in
Judaism.
T he 37-acre esplanade,
known to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary and to Jews as
the Temple Mount, has been a
lightning rod for rival religious
and national narratives of the
two sides. It has triggered major confrontations in the past.
Israel seemed eager to put
the crisis behind it and restore
calm after a week of prayer
protests, street clashes, and
several incidents of deadly violence.
Prime Minister Benjamin
Netanyahu and his government also faced a growing
backlash at home for what
critics said was hasty decisionmaking and embarrassing policy zigzags.
In a face-saving compromise, Israel’s security Cabinet
ODED BALILTY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dozens of Muslims prayed in the street outside the Al-Aqsa Mosque on Tuesday. Muslim clergy said they’re worried Israel tampered with the mosque.
announced that in place of the
metal detectors, it would employ nonintrusive ‘‘advanced
technologies,’’ repor tedly
smart cameras that can detect
hidden objects.
The new security system is
to be set up in the next six
months at a cost of $28 million.
Meanwhile, Palestinian politicians and Muslim clerics demanded that Israel restore the
situation at the shrine in Jerusalem’s Old City to what it was
before July 14.
On that day, three Arab
gunmen opened fire from the
shrine at Israeli police guards,
killing two before being shot
dead.
In response, Israel closed
the shrine for two days for
weapons searches and installed the metal detectors.
The decision quickly triggered
Muslim protests amid allegations that Israel was trying to
expand its control at the site
under the guise of security — a
claim Israel has denied.
On Tuesday, hours after Israel removed the metal detectors, Muslim leaders said a
technical committee would
check the area in and around
the compound carefully to see
if Israel had made any unilateral changes during the time
the shrine stood empty.
Protests would continue
until the check was completed,
they said.
By Tuesday evening, thousands of worshippers prayed
at the Old City’s Lions’ Gate,
one of the main flash points in
recent days.
They knelt on prayer rugs
arranged in neat rows on the
asphalt as Israeli riot police
lined up nearby.
After the prayers, many in
the crowd chanted, ‘‘Oh God,
o h G o d , o h G o d ,’ ’ a s t h e y
raised their right index finger
to the sky in a sign of religious
fervor.
Khalil Abu Arafeh, a 67year-old retiree, said he and
the others would follow the
lead of the Muslim clergy. ‘‘We
will not go. We will keep praying here,’’ he said, alleging Israel hadn’t removed all of the
new security measures.
Israeli police spokesman
Micky Rosenfeld said some
cameras remained ‘‘as part of
the security measures to prevent terror attacks’’ in and
around the Old City.
The Israeli daily Haaretz
said the security Cabinet had
decided to remove the metal
detectors but leave in place the
newly installed cameras.
Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas said security coordination between
his forces and Israeli troops in
the West Bank would remain
on hold until Israel has restored the situation at the
shrine to what it was before
July 14.
He h a d a n n o u n c e d l a s t
week that he was freezing all
ties with Israel until the metal
detectors were down.
Daily Briefing
Abe grilled again about scandal
TOKYO — Japanese lawmakers questioned Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Parliament
for a second day Tuesday about
a cronyism scandal, with some
opposition members accusing
him of testifying falsely a
day earlier when he denied using his influence to help a
friend.
Documents and whistleblowers suggest that officials
bent rules and provided special
advice to Abe’s friend Kotaro
Kake to help him open a new
veterinary school in western
Japan.
The two-day hearing in Parliament focused on whether
Abe was personally involved.
Abe repeatedly denied using
his influence to help Kake, and
said he learned of the plan for
the school only after Kake submitted a formal application in
January, correcting his earlier
explanations of when he first
heard of it.
‘‘We meet as friends, but we
never seek or give favors,’’ Abe
said. ‘‘I have never advised him
to visit the ministers in charge.’’
Opposition lawmakers criticized Abe for giving several different dates for when he first
learned of his friend’s plan for
a new veterinary school, with
some accusing him of perjury.
They said it was impossible for
Abe to be unaware of his
friend’s years-long plan until
January if other officials already knew.
‘‘It’s totally unbelievable,’’
said Akira Koike, an opposition
Communist Party lawmaker.
Opposition Democratic Party senior lawmaker Hiroshi
Ogushi told lawmakers on
Monday that Abe and Kake
met seven times last year, six of
them after July when the
Polish leader signs bill on judiciary
KIMIMASA MAYAMA/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY
Demonstrators protested outside Parliament in Tokyo on
Tuesday. The prime minister’s approval ratings have sunk.
school plan was being pushed.
Since the late 2000s, Kake
and the city of Imabari had
worked together to open a veterinary school in the region,
but were unsuccessful until the
creation of a special economic
zone directly headed by Abe.
Abe is expected to reshuffle
his Cabinet, after scandals and
the railroading of unpopular
legislation pushed his approval
ratings as low as 26 percent.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
N. Korea a year from ability to strike US
US fires warning shot at Iranian ship
WASHINGTON — American intelligence agencies say it
is likely to take North Korea
just one year to put the finishing touches on a missile that
can reach the continental
United States, according to
several administration officials
briefed on the new assessment.
Until a few weeks ago, the
official estimate was that it
would take roughly four years,
give or take a year, for North
Korea to develop a missile that
could carry a nuclear weapon
small enough to fit into the
missile’s warhead and capable
of surviving the stresses of reentry and deliver it to the
United States. But the realities
of the past few months, especially a July 4 test, forced intelligence experts to conclude
that their estimates have been
too conservative. In the aforementioned test, a missile car-
A US Navy patrol boat fired
a warning shot at an Iranian
military ship Tuesday as it
made an alarmingly fast and
close approach in the Persian
Gulf, marking the latest aggressive encounter between
the two adversaries.
The unidentified Iranian
Revolutionary Guard Corps
vessel got within 200 yards of
the USS Thunderbolt before
the American patrol boat fired
the warning shot, quickly ending the encounter. A Pentagon
official described it as an isolated incident and said one
person was hurt.
It was not clear where in
the Persian Gulf the incident
occurred or how many Americans were aboard the Thunderbolt. The vessel, based in
Norfolk, can carry a crew of 27
and is used primarily to patrol
coastlines and provide surveillance for interdiction opera-
ried a warhead 1,700 miles into space and returned it at
high speed in a sharp parabola. If the trajectory were flattened out, the missile could
strike Alaska.
General Paul Selva, testifying before the Senate Armed
Services Committee last week,
said the most recent test
stopped short of demonstrating that North Korea possesses
“the capacity to strike the
United States with any degree
of accuracy or reasonable confidence of success.”
But that statement went far
beyond what most Pentagon
officials had been allowed to
say in public before the test.
And it reflects a growing view,
from the Defense Intelligence
Agency to the CIA, that at this
point North Korea’s missile engineers have cleared most of
the major hurdles.
NEW YORK TIMES
tions.
US officials also have not
disclosed what type of weapons the crew fired.
At least three other US vessels were nearby at the time.
Iranian military officials
characterized the incident as a
US provocation and took credit for having ‘‘neutralized’’ the
threat.
In a report published last
winter, the Office of Naval Intelligence indicated that vessels operated by the Revolutionary Guard Corps routinely
monitor US and allied warships in the Persian Gulf and
the Strait of Hormuz, a busy
waterway that links to the Gulf
of Oman.
The majority of the encounters are ‘‘safe and routine,’’ it
said, but ‘‘unprofessional or
aggressive’’ run-ins are becoming more frequent.
WASHINGTON POST
WARSAW — The office of
Poland’s president said Tuesday that he has signed into
law one of three contested
bills that critics say limit the
independence of the judiciary.
President Andrzej Duda
announced Monday after days
of protests that he would veto
two of the bills. His office said
early Tuesday that he signed
the third one, despite demonstrations the previous evening
in several cities urging him to
block that one, too.
The law allows the justice
minister, who is also the prosecutor general, to name the
heads of all lower courts.
Critics say it is unconstitutional, but welcomed his rejection of the other bills. One of
them would have allowed the
justice minister to immediately fire all Supreme Court justices and choose their replacements.
The ruling party says not
all judges meet professional
and ethical standards.
The European Union had
expressed concern over the
package of legislation and
threatened to act soon to sanction Poland.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Vietnamese activist gets nine years
HANOI — A Vietnamese
court on Tuesday sentenced an
activist to nine years in prison
on charges of producing videos
that defamed the country’s
leadership, in the latest crackdown on dissent.
Tran Thi Nga was convicted
of spreading propaganda
against the state in the oneday trial at the People’s Court
in Ha Nam province in northern Vietnam, her lawyer said.
Nga, 40, campaigned
against environmental pollution, police brutality, and illegal land confiscation, and
called for a tougher stance toward China’s assertive territorial claims in the South China
Sea.
Nga maintained her innocence during the trial, saying
she did not oppose anyone,
but was only against corruption and injustice, her lawyer
said.
The lawyer said there was
no proof that 13 videos used
against Nga in the trial — 11
taken from the Internet and
two allegedly found on her
computer — were hers.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Another Australian official resigns
CANBERRA, Australia —
An Australian government
minister quit the Cabinet on
Tuesday after his mother told
him he might be Italian and
ineligible to be a lawmaker.
Resources Minister Matt
Canavan’s shock announcement that the Italian government lists him as a citizen followed the resignations this
month of two senators who
discovered days apart that
they had technically never
been elected because they
were dual citizens.
Australia’s constitution
states that a ‘‘citizen of a foreign power’’ is not eligible to
be elected to Parliament.
Canavan said his mother
contacted him last week with
news that he might be Italian.
His predicament amplified
calls for changes to a section of
the constitution penned in the
19th century.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
The World
A5
Rival Libyan leaders agree
to cease­fire and elections
French president
works to lay
the groundwork
By Elaine Ganley
and Nadine Achoui-Lesage
ASSOCIATED PRESS
LA CELLE SAINT-CLOUD,
France — Two rival Libyan
leaders committed themselves
on Tuesday to a cease-fire,
working toward presidential
and parliamentary elections,
and finding a road map to secure lawless Libya against terrorism and trafficking of all
kinds, according to a document
released by the French presidency.
The meetings at a chateau in
La Celle Saint-Cloud, west of
Paris, brought together Fayez
Serraj, prime minister of the
UN-backed unity government,
and General Khalifa Hifter, the
Egyptian-backed commander
of Libya’s self-styled national
army. French President Emmanuel Macron met separately
with each ahead of the session
between the two Libyans in the
presence of the UN’s newly appointed special envoy for Libya,
Ghassan Salame.
‘‘There is political legitimacy
in the hands of Mr. Serraj.
There is military legitimacy in
the hands of Mr. Hifter. They
have decided to work together,’’
Macron said.
The 10-point joint declaration that capped the encounter
was the first of its kind since
Libya spiraled into chaos after
the 2011 toppling and killing of
leader Moammar Gadhafi.
Among the points agreed
upon was a commitment to a
cease-fire with armed force reserved ‘‘strictly ’’ for use in
counter-terrorism operations.
The rivals also ‘‘solemnly
commit to work towards the
holding of presidential and parliamentary elections as soon as
possible.’’
The French president said
later that the goal is for balloting in the spring.
Macron’s bid to work toward
laying the groundwork for a
state with a functioning government and institutions is a
priority of his presidency.
Talks were centered on creating a propitious climate for
elections next year, security
and military issues, respect for
human rights, and economic
development of the oil-rich nation where residents struggle
despite the resources, French
officials said.
Macron, Salame, and Serraj,
along with French Foreign Mini s t e r Je a n - Yv e s L e D r i a n ,
walked into the chateau to begin the first set of talks after
shaking hands before Republican Guards in their ornate gear.
Hifter arrived later.
The encounter was never expected to resolve the knotty
problems of Libya, politically
fractured and awash in militias
and human traffickers preying
on migrants who use the Libyan coast as a jumping off point
to Europe, mainly Italy. But it
was seen as a way to lay the basis for the UN envoy to come up
with proposals in the weeks
and months ahead.
Paris has made clear that
the French initiative is not
meant to brush aside numerous initiatives by others, including the European Union,
the African Union, and individual countries, like Morocco.
France ‘‘wants to facilitate a
political entente’’ and ‘‘mark its
support for efforts to build a
political compromise, under
the auspices of the United Nations,’’ that includes all actors
in the country, a statement
Monday by the president’s office said.
Airstrikes
in Syria
leave eight
civilians dead
ASSOCIATED PRESS
DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Connie Yates and Chris Gard have ended their legal efforts
to bring son Charlie to the United States for treatment.
Dying baby’s parents
ask to take him home
Family seeks
‘a few days of
tranquility’
By Jill Lawless
ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON — Charlie Gard’s
parents know their treasured
son is about to die. They have
one final wish — to take him
home, put him to bed, and kiss
him goodbye.
The mother of the critically
ill baby at the center of an international medical and legal
battle returned to London’s
High Court on Tuesday, asking
a judge to let the family take
Charlie home for ‘‘a few days of
tranquility’’ before his ventilator is disconnected and he is allowed to ‘‘slip away.’’
After months of court hearings over the 11-month-old baby’s fate that drew attention
from Pope Francis, President
Trump, and people around the
world, discussion came down
to the mundane, heart-wrenching details of ending a life:
How could Charlie be transported from a hospital to his
parents’ west London home?
Could ventilation be maintained on the way? Would his
ventilator fit through the front
door of the house?
‘‘The parents’ last wish is to
take Charlie home for a few
days of tranquility outside the
hospital,’’ family lawyer Grant
Armstrong said in a written
statement.
He accused London’s Great
Ormond Stree t Hospital,
where Charlie is being treated,
of putting obstacles in the way
of that outcome.
The hospital’s lawyer, Katie
Gollop, said Great Ormond
Street wanted ‘‘above all’’ to
fulfill the parents’ last wish,
but also had to take the baby’s
best interests into account.
‘‘The care plan must be safe,
it must spare Charlie all pain
and protect his dignity,’’ she
said.
The hospital said Charlie
would be able to die with digni-
ty, surrounded by his family, in
a hospice. Armstrong said
Charlie’s parents regarded that
as the second-best option, ‘‘a
notch better’’ than the hospital.
Judge Nicholas Francis,
who has dealt with the emot i o n a l l y d ra i n i n g c a s e f o r
months, said the sensitive issues cried out ‘‘for mediation’’
— not for the ruling of a judge.
But so far attempts to find
agreement have failed.
At the end of a hearing attended by Charlie’s mother,
Connie Yates, Francis said he
felt a hospice, rather than the
‘The care plan
must be safe, it
must spare Charlie
all pain and
protect his dignity.’
KATIE GOLLOP
lawyer for Great Ormond Street
Hospital
family home, would be best.
The judge said he would make
his final ruling on Wednesday.
‘‘I don’t think it’s fair to prolong their suffering any longer,’’ he said.
Charlie suffers from mitochondrial depletion syndrome,
a rare genetic disease. He has
brain damage and is unable to
breathe unaided.
His parents — Yates and her
partner Chris Gard — have battled for months to take Charlie
to the United States for an experimental treatment they believed would improve his condition. Doctors at Great Ormond Street opposed that,
saying it would not help and
could cause Charlie more suffering.
British courts and the European Court of Human Rights
have all sided with Great Ormand Street, one of the world’s
leading children’s hospital, in
its bid to remove life support
and let Charlie die naturally.
BEIRUT — Airstrikes in a
Damascus suburb have killed
eight people, including children, the area’s first casualties
since Russia said three days
ago that it reached an agreement with the Syrian opposition on the boundaries for a deescalation zone in the capital’s
eastern suburbs, opposition activists and a paramedic group
said on Tuesday.
The airstrikes on Arbeen,
just before midnight Monday,
also caused material damage.
Damascus residents said insurgent groups fired several shells
an hour later that fell near the
Russian embassy in Damascus
with no reports of casualties.
The Syrian Civil Defense
group, more popularly known
as the White Helmets, and the
Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights say the
airstrikes on Arbeen killed
eight and wounded dozens.
The White Helmets said the
eight killed included five children and two women.
In neighboring Lebanon,
two international human
rights groups called on Lebanese authorities to disclose
their findings into the fate of
four Syrian refugees who died
while in custody of the Lebanese army.
The four were detained in a
sweeping security raid late last
month in refugee settlements
in and around the border town
of Arsal that netted 355 Syrians. The town was the scene of
a major cross-border attack in
2014, when more than two
dozen Lebanese soldiers were
abducted.
A Lebanese military probe
aired on state-run media on
Monday said the four died of
natural causes.
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The Nation
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
GOP health bill advances, then stumbles
uHEALTH LAW
Continued from Page A1
cussion between McConnell
and a Republican holdout, and
a passionate speech by McCain, who flew in from Arizona
for the vote between treatments for brain cancer.
McCain denounced the secrecy in which McConnell and
his leadership team drafted
versions of a repeal bill, even
as he enabled Tuesday’s unusual strategy by making the
trip to cast his pivotal vote.
In his afternoon speech,
McCain made a poignant pitch
for bipartisanship and a call
for the chamber in which he
has served for three decades to
recognize once more that compromise and comity can advance the interests and meet
the needs of Americans.
“Stop listening to the bombastic loudmouths on the radio, television and the Internet,’’ he said. ‘‘To hell with
them! They don’t want anything done for the public good.
Our incapacity is their livelihood.’’
Two Republican senators
voted against the initial motion to proceed to debate, Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa
Murkowski of Alaska, leaving
Republicans with only the
slimmest of margins.
But for a Senate that has
struggled to make progress on
a vow to repeal and replace
Barack Obama’s signature Affordable Care Act, even advancing a dummy bill for debate counts as progress.
“I’m extremely happy that
we got this vote,” President
Trump said at a Rose Garden
press conference with the
prime minister of Lebanon.
“This is the tough vote to get.
Now we’re all going to sit together and we’re going to try
and come up with something
that’s really spectacular. We
have a lot of options and a lot
of great options.’’
But finding an option that
can win support of 50 Republican senators has proved to be
impossible thus far, and the
hurdles remain significant.
On the Senate floor Tuesday, McConnell challenged his
colleagues, saying they have a
“duty to act.” He even held a
awkward, visibly uncomfortable talk with a Republican
holdout, Senator Ron Johnson
from Wisconsin — who ended
up casting the important 50th
vote, even after McCain, setting up Pence’s tiebreaker.
“With a surprise election
comes a great opportunity to
do things we never thought
possible,” McConnell said on
the Senate floor, referring to
the unlikely Trump presidency
and the campaign promise to
repeal the federal health law.
There have been no public
hearings in the Senate’s process to repeal-and-replace
Obamacare. Even after their
struggle with the replacement,
Republicans are expected to
introduce amendments to that
bill, or merely replace, the law.
The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office has said
those options would leave 22
million or 32 million people
uninsured respectively, as opposed to the current law. Republicans are also expected to
consider amendments that
would repeal discrete unpopular portions of Obamacare,
C-SPAN2/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Arizona Republican John McCain was embraced Tuesday on the Senate floor by minority leader Charles Schumer of New York.
‘Let’s trust each other. Let’s return to regular order.’
Excerpts from a speech by Senator
John McCain on the Senate floor:
I’VE KNOWN AND ADMIRED men
and women in the Senate who played
much more than a small role in our history, true statesmen, giants of American politics. They came from both parties, and from various backgrounds.
Their ambitions were frequently in
conflict. They held different views on
the issues of the day. And they often
had very serious disagreements about
how best to serve the national interest.
But they knew that however sharp
and heartfelt their disputes, however
keen their ambitions, they had an obligation to work collaboratively. . . . The
most revered members of this institution accepted the necessity of compromise in order to make incremental
progress on solving America’s problems and to defend her from her adversaries.
That principled mindset, and the
service of our predecessors who pos-
such as the individual mandate or a medical device tax.
Senator Chris Murphy, a
Connecticut Democrat, said
his office has prepared more
than 100 amendments. He
said some of his Democratic
colleagues have even more.
“When you break this
down, it’s life or death,” Murphy said. “When you get rid of
all the Senate jargon, lots of
people will die if this bill becomes law. Millions of people
will go bankrupt. And those
are terms that anyone can understand.”
Ma s s a c h u s e tt s S e n at o r
Elizabeth Warren, a Democrat
and a chief critic of Trump and
McConnell, blasted Republicans for the nontransparent
process. She charged that Republicans are taking the first
sessed it, come to mind when I hear
the Senate referred to as the world’s
greatest deliberative body. I’m not sure
we can claim that distinction with a
straight face today.
OUR DELIBERATIONS TODAY . . .
can still be important and useful, but I
think we’d all agree they haven’t been
overburdened by greatness lately. And
right now they aren’t producing much
for the American people.
Both sides have let this happen.
OUR SYSTEM DOESN’T DEPEND on
our nobility. It accounts for our imperfections, and gives an order to our individual strivings that has helped make
ours the most powerful and prosperous society on earth. It is our responsibility to preserve that, even when it requires us to do something less satisfying than ‘winning.’ Even when we must
give a little to get a little. Even when
our efforts manage just three yards
and a cloud of dust, while critics on
steps to “destroy” the health
care system.
“They have no idea what
bill they’re going to be asked
to vote on,” Warren said. “They
don’t know exactly how many
families it will kick to the curb
. . . this isn’t just irresponsible. This isn’t just reckless.
This isn’t just cruel. It’s immoral.”
B u t w h i l e Mc C o n n e l l ’s
strategy had the lasting impact, the day’s optics belong to
McCain. The Arizona senator,
who was diagnosed with brain
cancer last week, triumphantly returned to Congress to help
his party in a critical moment,
entering the Senate chambers
to a bipartisan standing ovation. A surgical scar partially
framed his left eye.
After he flashed a “thumbs
both sides denounce us for timidity, for
our failure to ‘triumph.’
I hope we can again rely on humility, on our need to cooperate, on our
dependence on each other to learn
how to trust each other again and by
so doing better serve the people who
elected us. Stop listening to the bombastic loudmouths on the radio and
television and the Internet. To hell with
them. They don’t want anything done
for the public good. Our incapacity is
their livelihood.
Let’s trust each other. Let’s return
to regular order.
a bipartisan response to a national
problem or threat are the proudest moments of my career, and by far the
most satisfying.
WHAT HAVE WE TO LOSE by trying
to work together to find those solutions? We’re not getting much done
apart. I don’t think any of us feels very
proud of our incapacity. Merely preventing your political opponents from
doing what they want isn’t the most
inspiring work.
. . . The times when I was involved
even in a modest way with working out
I’M GOING HOME FOR A WHILE to
treat my illness. I have every intention
of returning here and giving many of
you cause to regret all the nice things
you said about me. And, I hope, to impress on you again that it is an honor
to serve the American people in your
company.
up” to approve of proceeding
with the health care debate, he
e m b r a c e d Mc Co n n e l l a n d
Democratic L eader Chuck
Schumer.
“Let’s trust each other,” McCain said. “We’ve been spinning our wheels on too many
important issues because we
keep trying to find a way to
win without help from across
the aisle.”
McCain’s dramatic return
strongly echoed the actions of
Massachusetts Senator Edward M. Kennedy, who in the
last year of his life made several trips to Washington as he
suffered from the same form of
brain cancer, although his mission was much different.
When an ailing Kennedy
went to Washington in November 2008, he was advocat-
WE’VE TRIED to [amend the Affordable Care Act] by coming up with a
proposal behind closed doors in consultation with the administration, then
springing it on skeptical members, trying to convince them it’s better than
nothing, asking us to swallow our
doubts and force it past a unified opposition. I don’t think that’s going to work
in the end, and it probably shouldn’t.”
ing for universal health care,
one of his life’s missions. “I’m
looking forward to the session
. . . I’m looking forward, particularly, to working with Barack Obama on health care,”
Kennedy said then.
Kennedy died in 2009, before pivotal votes on the health
c a r e l aw, w h i c h p a s s e d i n
2010. Still, he managed to cast
deciding votes to protect
Medicare payments to doctors
in 2008, and he returned to
Washington to cast an important vote to proceed on
Obama’s stimulus package in
February 2009, pushing it past
a possible GOP filibuster.
It remains to be seen
whether McCain’s choice to return will bolster his legislative
reputation, in the same way it
added to the Kennedy lore.
WASHINGTON POST
McCain shocked observers
Tuesday evening by voting to
advance the repeal-and-replace bill, which he had previously said he didn’t support.
Earlier in the day, the unpopularity of that measure
was on full display throughout
the Capitol, including one protest which erupted just moments before McCain entered
the Senate floor.
“Shame! Shame! Shame!”
chanted protes ters at one
point. At another, they yelled
“Kill the bill! Don’t kill us!”
The seated Republican lawmakers, who did not respond
to the provocations, waited for
the protesters to be escorted
out before beginning to vote.
Herndon can be reached at
astead.herndon@globe.com.
White House communications director says leakers will be fired
By Ashley Parker
WASHINGTON POST
WASHINGTON— Anthony
Scaramucci, the new White
House communications director, threatened on Tuesday to
fire his entire staff in an effort
to stem the leaking that has
plagued President Trump’s administration since almost the
first day he took office.
‘‘I’m going to fire everybody,
that’s how I’m going to do it,’’
Scaramucci said. “You’re either
going to stop leaking or you’re
going to get fired.’’
Scaramucci, wearing bluetinted aviator sunglasses and
speaking to a small group of reporters in the White House
driveway Tuesday morning,
gestured to the guard booth on
the outskirts of the complex to
emphasize his threat.
‘‘If they don’t stop leaking,
I’m going to put them out on
JIM LO SCALZO/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY
Anthony Scaramucci said he is willing to fire the entire
White House communications staff to stop the leaks.
Pennsylvania Avenue,” he said.
“It’s a very clear thing. You
want to sell postcards to the
tourists outside the gate or you
want to work in the West Wing?
What do you want to do? If you
want to work in the West Wing,
you’ve got to stop leaking.’’
Scaramucci entered the
White House over the strenuous objections of both former
White House press secretary
Sean Spicer — who ultimately
resigned in protest — and chief
of staff Reince Priebus.
Despite publicly claiming
that he and Priebus have a long
and respectful working relationship, one of Scaramucci’s
first moves has been to launch a
broad overhaul of the press office, singling out Priebus allies,
m a ny o f w h o m p r e v i o u s l y
worked at the Republican National Committee, for further
scrutiny.
An unofficial list of Priebus
loyalists has been circulating
among Scaramucci allies as
those most likely to lose their
jobs or be reassigned to somewhere else in the administration.
Asked about press reports
that he has already begun to
fire West Wing staffers, Scaramucci mentioned the name of a
staff member floated in a news
story as a likely candidate for
firing, and said this was one of
his frustrations with the leaks
coming from the West Wing.
‘‘This is actually a terrible
thing,’’ he said. “The fact that
you guys know about it before
he does really upsets me as a
human being and as a Roman
Catholic, you got that? So I
should have the opportunity, if I
have to let someone go, to let
the person go in a very humane,
dignified way.’’
Kellyanne Conway, counselor to the president, said that in
a meeting of White House communications staff, Scaramucci
had promised all aides ‘‘a clean
slate’’ and ‘‘amnesty’’ to prove
that they are not leaking and
are working hard to defend the
president and support his agenda.
But Scaramucci also made
clear he’s ‘‘1,000 percent’’ prepared to fire any communications staff member he suspects
of disloyalty.
“I’ve got the authority from
the president to do that,’’ he
said. ‘‘There are leakers in the
comms shop, there are leakers
everywhere. And leaking is
atrocious. It’s outrageous. It’s
unpatriotic. It damages the
president personally. It damages the institution of the presidency, and I don’t like it. I just
don’t like it.’’
Typically, the job of firing
staffers — even those in the
press shop — would be left to
the chief of staff, but Priebus
has found himself increasingly
isolated in recent days, with few
areas of the White House reporting directly to him.
Scaramucci added he was
willing to upend the entire his
entire team and rebuild it from
scratch.
‘‘If I’ve got to get this thing
down to me and Sarah Huckabee,’’ he said, ‘‘then the leaking
will stop.’’
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
The Nation
A7
Scouts get dose of politics
Trump highlights
Electoral College
win in speech
By Alan Blinder
and Mitch Smith
NEW YORK TIMES
A barrage of political remarks by President Trump delivered Monday to the Boy
Scouts of America National
Jamboree in West Virginia has
enraged many parents and form er S co u ts , t h ru s t in g the
Scouts once again into the middle of the nation’s culture wars
and providing yet another example of the unusual and polarizing nature of the Trump presidency.
The Scouts, plainly sensing a
new threat that supporters
feared could under mine a
movement still reeling from extended controversies over the
appropriate role for gay boys
and leaders in Scouting, said in
a statement that the group was
“wholly nonpartisan and does
not promote any one position,
product, service, political candidate or philosophy.” The organization added that its traditional speaking invitation to a
sitting president was “in no way
an endorsement of any political
party or specific policies.”
It was far from clear whether the statement would curb the
tide of skepticism, outrage, and
division that began even before
Trump concluded his 38-minute address in Glen Jean, West
Virginia. Although Scouting offices were besieged with phone
calls and some alumni were
warning that they would withhold support for the group, others celebrated Trump’s speech.
Glenn Elvig, an artist in
Minnesota, said he was angered
by the president’s speech and
believed its contents deviated
from the organization’s stated
values.
Elvig said he had been calling the Boy Scouts office for
hours on Tuesday to express his
dismay, but had been getting a
busy signal.
“I would like a public denouncement of what happened
yesterday and reaffirmation of
the values I think I learned in
Scouts,” Elvig said. “If they can’t
do that, I will be returning my
medal.”
Either way, the firestorm
was an unwelcome and surprising development during a gathering that is among Scouting’s
most important events, a quadrennial meeting that attracts
tens of thousands of people
and, very often, presidents,
who in the past have spoken
about service, values, or citizenship, not partisan politics.
Trump’s appearance before
an enthusiastic crowd of neckerchief-clad, saluting Scouts at
a 14,000-acre compound was a
distinct break from 80 years of
presidential speeches to the nation’s Scouts.
In the speech’s opening moments, it seemed that Trump,
who was not a Boy Scout as a
youth, would mostly avoid talking about the partisan clashes
that have divided Washington.
But the speech by Trump,
the 19th occupant of the White
House to also serve as the honorar y president of the Boy
Scouts of America, was punctuated by a brand of political oratory that proved startling at a
Boy Scout gathering.
He recounted how he won
last year’s presidential election:
“ We w o n F l o r i d a . We w o n
South Carolina. We won North
Carolina. We won Pennsylvania.” He said Hillary Clinton
“didn’t work hard” in Michigan,
a state Trump won, and he resurfaced his grievances with
“fake news” and “fake polls.”
And when he landed on the
second point of the Scout Law
— loyalty — Trump interrupted
himself to say, “We could use
some more loyalty, I will tell
you that.”
House OK’s new sanctions on Russia
WASHINGTON POST
WA S H I N G T O N — T h e
House on Tuesday voted overwhelmingly to advance new financial sanctions against key
US adversaries and deliver a
foreign-policy brushback to
President Trump by limiting his
ability to waive many of them.
Included in the package,
passed 419 to 3, are measures
targeting key Russian officials
in retaliation for the country’s
alleged interference in the 2016
US presidential election, as well
as sanctions against Iran and
North Korea in response to
their weapons programs.
Members of the Trump ad-
ministration have resisted the
congressional push, in particular a provision attached to the
Russian measures that would
require Congress to sign off on
any move to relieve those sanctions. The legislation was revised last week to address some
administration concerns, including its potential effect on
overseas oil and gas projects
that include Russian partners.
But the bill passed Tuesday retains the congressional review
requirement.
‘‘These three regimes in different parts of the world are
threatening vital US interests,
and they are destabilizing their
neighbors,’’ House Foreign Affairs Committee chairman Edward Royce, Republican of California, said. ‘‘It is well past time
that we forcefully respond.’’
White House press secretary
Sarah Huckabee Sanders declined to say Monday if Trump
would sign the bill, adding he
‘‘has been very vocal about his
support for continuing sanctions on those three countries.’’
‘‘He has no intention of getting rid of them, but he wants
to make sure we get the best
deal for the American people
possible,’’ Sanders said. ‘‘Congress does not have the best record on that.”
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W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
Overruling of panel roils flounder fisheries
uFLOUNDER
Continued from Page A1
tion by the commission, and it
drew a swift rebuke from state
officials along the East Coast.
“The commission is deeply
concerned about the nearterm impact on our ability to
end overfishing on the summer flounder stock as well as
the longer-term ability for the
commission to effectively conserve numerous other Atlantic
coastal shared resources,”
Douglas Grout, the commission’s chair, said in a statement.
Millions of pounds of summer flounder, also known as
fluke, are caught every year by
commercial and recreational
fishermen between Virginia
Beach and Cape Cod. But the
commission — an interstate
pact established by Congress
to manage migratory fisheries
to protect the fishery, but it
was rejected by the commission, whose scientists concluded the plan would result in
nearly 94,000 additional fish
being caught.
Ross, who oversees the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,overruled the commission, allowing New Jersey to proceed.
“New Jersey makes a compelling argument that the
measures it implemented this
year, despite increasing catch
above the harvest target, will
likely reduce total summer
flounder mortality in New Jersey waters to a level consistent
with the overall conservation
objective,” Chris Oliver, assistant administrator of fisheries
at NOAA, wrote the commission in a letter on behalf of
Ross.
The move infuriated com-
‘The secretary’s decision goes against
long­standing protocol, and there’s
a cost to that.’
JOHN BULLARD, administrator of NOAA’s
Greater Atlantic Regional Fisheries
— has determined that fluke
are being overfished, with an
estimated population that is
42 percent below the level regulators consider to be sustainable.
The commission has reduced catch limits significantly since state and federal surveys found the fluke population had plummeted by nearly
one-quarter since its 2010
peak. But if the population
falls another 14 percent,
reaching a critical threshold
for the ability of the fishery to
rebuild, commissioners will be
required by their rules to reduce quotas drastically or implement a region-wide moratorium on catching fluke.
Officials in New Jerse y,
which has one of the region’s
largest fluke populations, had
drafted an alternative plan
that they said would do more
missioners and fishing officials throughout the area, as
well as the region’s NOAA officials.
They said it was unprecedented for a Commerce secretary to make a decision without seeking their input. Such
rulings are routinely vetted by
NOAA’s regional officials and
scientists, who review the
commission’s recommendations and then prepare the
agency’s response, they said.
“This is the first time that
no one asked me for a formal
recommendation,” said John
Bullard, NOAA’s Greater Atlantic regional administrator.
“The secretary’s decision goes
against long-standing protocol, and there’s a cost to that.”
He added: “There’s a reason
to have regional administrators, because their experience
and knowledge is valuable in
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making decisions like this one.
This is an unfortunate precedent.”
Bullard, who has served as
regional administrator since
2012 and plans to retire in December, said that the “chain of
command was broken with
this decision” and that fishing
officials throughout the region
would gather to discuss the
potential repercussions.
“This is a system that keeps
all states accountable to each
other,” he said. “We’re now going to have to figure out how
to repair that system.”
Officials from the Baker administration who oversee fishing issues declined to answer
questions about Ross's decision. But they said that executive committee members of
the commission,which includes officials from Massachusetts, have asked the secretary to justify his decision with
supporting material.
Officials from the Commerce Department also declined to answer questions. A
spokesman for the department
agreed to provide a statement
but only if his name wasn’t
used.
“The long-term sustainability of American fishing stocks,
as well as the jobs that rely on
them, are of the utmost concern to Secretary Ross,” the
statement read.
Fishing officials from New
Jersey did not return calls, but
they issued a statement praising Ross’s decision.
“We are very pleased that
NOAA worked with us to understand our position,” said
Bob Martin, commissioner of
the state’s Department of Environmental Protection. “New
Jersey is fully committed to
employing science and public
education to conserve a species that is critical to the fishing culture and economy of
the state.”
The commission’s conservation plan would have required
recreational fishermen in New
Jersey to throw back nearly all
fluke under 19 inches, catch
no more than three fish a day,
and go to sea a maximum of
Floundering flounder
Since 2010, summer flounder,
also known as fluke, have
plummeted by about
one-quarter. Federal regulators
say the species is being
overfished.
Population, in millions of lbs.
At 69 million pounds, fluke
would be considered overfished,
and the Atlantic States Marine
Fisheries Commission would be
required to implement draconian
cuts.
69 million
2010
2015
104.7
80
Landings, quotas
Commercial landings
Commercial quota
Recreational landings
Recreational harvest limit
20 million pounds
15
10
5
0
’10 ’11 ’12 ’13 ’14 ’15 ’16
Percent of catch landed
Commercial quota landed
Recreational harvest limit landed
120 percent
100
80
60
40
20
0
’10 ’11 ’12 ’13 ’14 ’15 ’16
SOURCE: Atlantic States Marine
Fisheries Commission
GLOBE STAFF
128 days a year. Similar limits
apply to all states with fluke in
their waters.
New Jersey’s fishermen argued that those limits would
make it difficult to catch any
fluke other than brood stock,
the large females that replenish the population.
The secretary’s decision, affirming the state’s plan, allows
fishermen to catch fluke an
inch smaller and keep four of
them per day. However, the
state will only allow the fishermen to take 104 trips to sea a
year.
“Ross was brilliant in his
decision,” said Jim Donofrio,
executive director of the Recreational Fishing Alliance in
New Jersey, which represents
thousands of recreational fishermen across the countr y.
“The Trump administration
has challenged a broken fishery management system in
this country, and I applaud
them for doing it.”
But fishing officials elsewhere worry that Ross’s decision could open a Pandora’s
box, in which states feel free to
reject the commission’s findings and appeal directly to federal authorities.
Some also raised concerns
that Ross’s decision may have
been influenced by President
Trump’s close relationship
with New Jersey Governor
Chris Christie.
“Protocols have been dismissed here,” said Cheri Patterson, supervisor of marine
fisheries at the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department. “There needs to be some
clarity whether this was a political decision, and how the
secretary made this decision.”
Bob Ballou, assistant to the
director at Rhode Island’s Department for Environmental
Management, said he’s already
hearing “cries of fouls and unfairness” from fishermen in
his state, urging Rhode Island
to go its own way as well.
“Going forward, does this
mean states should feel free to
act in an autonomous way, regardless of the laws they’re
bound by, because there’s a decent chance that the secretary
could over turn their decision?” Ballou asked. “What the
secretary did is very disturbing.”
David Abel can be reached at
dabel@globe.com. Follow him
on Twitter @davabel.
US vows
sanctuary
cities will
pay penalty
New rules call for
canceling grants
GLOBE STAFF AND WIRES
WASHINGTON — The Justice Department escalated its
promised crackdown on socalled sanctuary cities Tuesday,
saying it will no longer award
coveted grant money to cities
unless they give federal immigration authorities access to
jails and provide advance notice if someone in the country
illegally is about to be released.
Under old rules, cities seeking grant money needed only to
show they were not preventing
local law enforcement from
communicating with federal
authorities about the immigration status of detainees.
Massachusetts municipalities including Amherst, Boston,
Cambridge, Northampton, Salem, and Somerville have declared themselves sanctuary
cities. And Monday, the state’s
highest court ruled local law enforcement officials cannot hold
a person who is wanted solely
for immigration violations, providing a basis for cities to refuse
to cooperate with US officials.
‘‘So-called ‘sanctuary’ policies make all of us less safe because they intentionally undermine our laws and protect illegal aliens who have committed
crimes,’’ Attorney General Jeff
Sessions said. ‘‘These policies
also encourage illegal immigration and even human trafficking by perpetuating the lie that
in certain cities, illegal aliens
can live outside the law.”
The rules affect a program
that gives police money to buy
everything from bulletproof
vests to cameras. A judge in
April blocked the presidents order withholding funding, saying he can’t set conditions on
spending Congress had approved. But Justice said it still
could condition some grants.
Notorious former priest to be released
uSHANLEY
Continued from Page A1
counseling when he ran a
“ministry for alienated youth”
in Boston in the 1960 s and
70s.
Prosecutors and prison officials would not say when
Shanley will be released from
Old Colony Correctional Facility, a medium-security prison
in Bridgewater where he is
serving his sentence. But victims’ attorneys said they were
told it would be this week,
most likely on Friday.
Carmen L. Durso, a victims’
attorney, said Shanley is serving the minimum required of
his 12 to 15 year sentence because he earned time for good
behavior behind bars.
Durso, who represented
many of Shanley’s alleged victims in civil claims against the
Catholic Church, said he was
outraged that the doctors who
examined Shanley did not find
him to be sexually dangerous.
“If Paul Shanley is not a
continuing threat, then nobody is,” Durso said.
After he is released, Shanley will be monitored by the
state Probation Department
for the next 10 years and has
been ordered to have no contact with children under the
age of 16, the district attorney’s office said. He will have
to register as a sex offender.
Rodney Ford, whose son,
Gregory, was allegedly molested by Shanley in the 1990s,
said he was disappointed, angry, and upset that Shanley
will not be held behind bars
under the state’s civil commitment law for sexually dangerous persons.
“People need to know this
is a monster who is going to be
let out of prison, and age and
frailty don’t mean anything,”
said Ford, whose son said he
was abused by Shanley between the ages of 6 and 11.
“It’s about power and control
for Paul Shanley.’’
Ford said he plans to speak
at a press conference with
Shanley’s victims and their attorneys at Durso’s office on
GLOBE FILES
Early in his ministry, Father Paul Shanley built a reputation at such churches as St.
Francis of Assisi in Braintree for his activism and antiestablishment viewpoints.
Wednesday.
“It’s a sad day for many victims,” said Mitchell Garabedian, who represented Shanley’s
victims in civil claims against
the church. “Father Shanley
has ruined their lives from sexually abusing them, and they
feel not only did Father Shanle y ge t away with sexually
abusing them, but the supervisors of Father Shanley got
away with allowing him to do
it.”
The Archdiocese of Boston
released a statement Tuesday,
saying, “Paul Shanley’s crimes
against children were reprehensible. No young person
should ever have to experience
such violations of their safety
and dignity. We continue to assure all victims of abuse of our
prayers and our concern.”
Shanley ’s rose to prominence in the 1970s as denimclad, shaggy-haired counter-
culture figure, well known for
criticizing the church’s stance
on homosexuality. But his victims said counseling sessions
with the former priest often
resulted in coerced sex at his
apartment in Back Bay.
Shanley was one of the few
priests implicated in the
church’s pedophile priest scandal to face a criminal trial because he left Massachusetts
and moved to California in
about 1989, stopping the clock
on the statute of limitations
for sexual abuse prosecutions.
At Shanley’s trial in 2005, a
27-year-old firefighter testified
that he was raped by Shanley
while attending Sunday school
at St. Jean’s Church in Newton
from the time he was 6 until
he was 9.
Shanley had been named
pastor of that church in 1979,
even though in 1974, according to one of Shanley’s victims,
Cardinal Humberto Medeiros
had been notified of Shanley’s
abuse by a victim’s mother.
Shanley was convicted of
two counts of rape of a child
and two counts of indecent assault and battery on a child.
Middlesex prosecutors asked
for a life sentence, but Judge
Stephen A. Neel sentenced
him to 12 to 15 years behind
bars.
In a statement read by a
prosecutor in court, the firefighter who was raped by
Shanley said he hoped the former priest would never be released. “I want him to die in
prison, whether it’s of natural
causes or otherwise,” his statement said. “However he dies, I
hope it’s slow and painful!”
Michael Levenson can be
reached at
mlevenson@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @mlevenson.
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
The Region
A9
Maître d’ ends long reign over a Boston bastion of couth
uRISOLI
Continued from Page A1
“If you came in a year or
two ago, then came back
again, he’d remember your
name, the last time you dined
with us, and if you had an anniversary or birthday. He has
an extraordinary memory for
dates and names,” says L’Espalier chef-proprietor Frank
McClelland, who estimates
that Risoli worked about 55
hours per week.
L’Espalier service director
Federico Salvador and fromager Matt Helvitz will replace
him, though Risoli will host
Tuesday night cheese-tastings
through September.
“ We k n e w t h i s d a y w a s
coming, so we put in place really outstanding individuals to
carry on,” McClelland says.
They have big shoes to fill.
This is, after all, a man with a
vast reference book of cheeses
and a sixth sense of not only
what cheese to serve but also
the finely honed instinct to
know when a diner needs just
a little more attention.
“A w e e k d o e s n ’ t g o b y
where he doesn’t have to do
something extraordinary to
bring someone back to happiness,” McClelland says. Plus,
McClelland added later without a hint of hyperbole, “He’s
become a leader in cheese
worldwide.”
It’s a long way from his days
as a dishwasher at the erst-
Study
reveals
toll from
football
uCTE
Continued from Page A1
disabling mental problems, including agitation, impulsivity,
explosive tempers, and memory loss. More than half contemplated suicide. Suicide, in
fact, was the leading cause of
death among those with mild
CTE.
T he study presents the
largest number of CTE cases
ever published, said the
study’s lead author, Dr. Ann C.
McKee, director of BU’s CTE
Center and chief of neuropathology at the Boston VA.
“It’s impossible to ignore
this anymore,” McKee said.
Dr. David L. Brody, neurology professor at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, said the new
study deepens and solidifies
researchers’ understanding of
CTE. Similar findings have
been observed previously, “but
never on this scale, and never
so systematically,” said Brody,
who was not involved with
this study but has collaborated
with McKee on other research.
CTE is believed to occur
when multiple hits to the
head, including those that
don’t cause a concussion or
produce symptoms, trigger a
degenerative process in the
brain that years or decades later can cause disabling symptoms. CTE has been diagnosed
in former amateur and professional athletes as well as militar y veterans, but it is not
known how common it is or
why some are afflicted and not
others.
A big research challenge is
that CTE can be diagnosed only by examining brain tissue
after death.
For the study published
Tu e s d a y, t h e r e s e a r c h e r s
sought to connect the condition of football players’ brains
with their experiences during
life. They thoroughly examined multiple sections from
each of the 202 donated
brains, interviewed the survivors of the patients at length,
and reviewed medical records.
The vast majority of donated brains — 177 in all — bore
the telltale clusters of a protein called tau, the sign of
CTE. And every participant
whose brain showed CTE had
experienced symptoms while
alive.
“One of the large mysteries
of this disease is why are people so affected even in the early stages,” McKee said.
The participants played
while Harvard Square hangout
Ferdinand’s, where he worked
his way up to maître d’.
Ten years later, he arrived
at L’Espalier, where he served
politicians, tycoons, and celebratory everymen, both at the
restaurant’s Gloucester Street
town house and later in bigger
environs in the Mandarin Oriental, Boston hotel.
‘A week doesn’t go
by where he
doesn’t have to do
something
extraordinary to
bring someone
back to happiness.’
FRANK MCCLELLAND
L’Espalier proprietor
“L’Espalier is a very special
place for people. It’s a haven. I
know so many people who
have come for their anniversary or a birthday and have done
this for over 20 years. It’s a real
obligation,” Risoli says.
He treated them all with
deference and calm, although
as a child of the 1960 s, the
rock stars made him a bit giddy, he admits. He waited on
the likes of Elvis Costello, Roger Daltrey, Ringo Starr — and a
“pleasant, friendly” Mick Jagger, who feasted on halibut
and Sagne-Montrachet.
“He knows his cheese. He
knows his wine. He knows his
food. He was sophisticated
and not pompous,” Risoli says.
A man of wealth and taste,
indeed. But while the VIPs
trickled in year after year, the
state of dining shifted and
evolved over three decades,
Risoli says.
“Expectations have risen
over time, as they should. Food
is better in Boston now than it
has ever been. Service is better.
Dining out has a more prominent place in people’s lives
than it once did — nobody
cooks anymore!” he says with a
laugh. “That’s obviously an exaggeration, but I think it’s become more entertaining, a natural thing to do for people.”
And Risoli, who maintains
a vast reference book of cheeses and has trained front-line
waiters on more than 100 of
them, has been happy to deliver, weaving an invisible cocoon
for diners who felt cared for,
tended, but never pressured or
pandered to — night af ter
night.
“Everyone now wants an
‘ e x p e r i e n c e .’ I n t h e e a r l y
1980s, the word you could use
would be ‘stuffy.’ I think one of
the first things I tried to do is
help service be more relaxed
and more about the guest than
about the server, which was re-
In a study of 202 former football
players whose brains had been
donated for research, the vast
majority bore the telltale signs of
chronic traumatic encephalopathy,
or CTE.
Pre-high
school
High
school
TOTAL
TOTAL
2
14
None
21% (3)
CTE
diagnosed
87.6%
(177)
(25)
202
music professor Charles Fisk, a
classical pianist.
He’ll also continue to paint
and exhibit abstract oil paintings at Gallery NAGA on Newbury Street.
“I really spent my life balancing the restaurant with studio time,” he says. “I wanted to
be able to spend more time
producing my art.”
And, yes, he’ll keep eating
cheese. He speaks lovingly of
the restaurant’s most requested variety, an aged Gouda from
Holland that was “crunchy,
with savory butterscotch flavors”; he’s also planning a trip
to Vermont’s Spring Brook
Farm, home of a nutty, spicy
Tarentaise.
“I have a soft spot for New
England cheeses,” he allows.
Risoli might never forget a
face, and he never forgets a
cheese. For him, it’s personal.
“You can name the cheese
maker. You can almost name
the cows, in some cases,” he
says.
Ever the diplomat, he declines to name a cheese he simply can’t abide.
“I can’t do that! I tend to
like the intention behind every
cheese, if not the actuality.” He
pauses. “ Well, I would say
[there is] some mass-produced
cheese with no soul. If a real
person made the cheese, you
have to respect that.”
And really, it’s this love for
people that kept him going. At
L’Espalier, it seemed, the diner
— not the chef, not the food —
was always the star. And Risoli
was in charge of the spotlight.
How did he do it?
“By being human.” he says.
“By making contact. By smiling. By letting the guest know
just through gesture, expression, and kind words that it’s
their night.”
Now, after 34 years, it’s his.
Kara Baskin can be reached at
kara.baskin@globe.com.
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College
Semi-pro
TOTAL
TOTAL
TOTAL
8
14
91% (48)
12.4%
All football
players surveyed
Canadian
Football
League
53
No CTE
diagnosis
ally what fine dining seemed
to be a long time ago,” he says.
And so Risoli schooled himself in the imperceptible: the
stiffening of a diner’s back, the
tensing of a shoulder.
“A slight rise in the shoulder can say more than anything a guest could ever tell
you. Sometimes it means you
need to focus a little more.
Maybe they’re thinking they’re
not getting enough attention.
If something distracts you for
a split-second, in that second,
you maybe lose them a little bit
b e c a u s e y o u w e r e n’ t w i t h
them. You have to redirect,” he
says.
Which, let’s face it, might
get exhausting. After decades
of catering to others, Risoli is
taking time for himself: gardening at his Ashland home
(he raises orchids), reading
(currently on his shelf: Thomas Mann’s “Buddenbrooks”),
and traveling with his husband, former Wellesley College
64% (9)
National
Football
League
TOTAL
111
99% (110)
88% (7)
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OTHER FINDINGS
ALL FORMER
HIGH SCHOOL
PLAYERS HAD
MILD
PATHOLOGY,
WHILE
MAJORITY OF
COLLEGE,
SEMIPRO AND
PRO HAD
SEVERE
PATHOLOGY.
AMONG 27
WITH MILD CTE ...
96%
26
had behavioral or
mood symptoms,
or both
89%
75
had behavioral or
mood symptoms,
or both
85
23
had cognitive
symptoms
95
80
had cognitive
symptoms
33%
9
had signs of
dementia
85%
71
signs of dementia
%
SOURCE: Journal of the American Medical Association
football for an average of 15
years. More than 90 percent of
college players in the study
sample had CTE.
It was expected that a large
number in the study would
have the disease, because relatives donated the brains out of
concern about their late family
member’s symptoms, McKee
said. This data cannot be used
to estimate the prevalence of
CTE, which remains unknown, the researchers noted.
Still, McKee, who has been
studying CTE for years, said
she and her team were “startled” by the exceedingly high
prevalence of CTE among
their samples.
“To me this says that this a
public health problem, something that should concern parents and athletes,” she said.
“All the participants were exposed to a relatively similar
type of repetitive head trauma
while playing the same sport.”
David A. Hovda, director of
the UCLA Brain Injury Research Center, called the Boston report an “excellent study”
but noted some limitations.
He questioned whether researchers looking at pieces of
the brain can truly tell whether the disease is mild or severe.
Additionally, Hovda said,
new rules and better protective equipment have been put
in place in recent years, so the
study may be measuring yearsold effects that may not occur
now.
The study broke down subjects by the football position.
3RD ANNUAL
AMONG 84
WITH SEVERE CTE ...
%
JAMES ABUNDIS/GLOBE STAFF
They ranged from 44 former
linemen, who sustain hits on
nearly ever y play, and one
punter and one place kicker,
who rarely get hit.
The report did not name
specific players, but those who
have been publicly identified
as having the disease include
Mike Webster, Ken Stabler,
Bubba Smith, Dave Duerson,
and former Patriots Mosi Tatupu, Junior Seau, and Kevin
Turner.
It did not include players
in other contact sports, such
as ice hockey.
Asked for comment, the
National Football League released a statement praising
the researchers’ work and
stressing its own commitment
to research.
“The medical and scientific
communities will benefit from
this publication, and the NFL
will continue to work with a
wide range of experts to improve the health of current
and former NFL athletes,” the
statement said. “The NFL is
committed to supporting scientific research into CTE and
advancing progress in the prevention and treatment of head
injuries.”
In 2016, the NFL pledged
another $100 million to support research into brain trauma and its prevention.
A spokesman for the New
England Patriots declined to
comment on the study.
Felice J. Freyer can be reached
at felice.freyer@globe.com
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Opinion
BOSTONGLOBE.COM/OPINION
Editorial
A chance for
Mass. to avert
gun tragedies
I
n the spring of 2014, Elliot Rodger murdered
his two roommates and one of their friends in
his apartment, near Santa Barbara, Calif.,
changed out of his blood-stained clothes,
bought a triple-vanilla latte at Starbucks, and
went on a shooting spree that killed three more and
wounded 14.
After exchanging gunfire with police, he shot himself in the head.
Of all the tragedies that converged that day, there
was none, perhaps, as maddening as this: Rodger’s
mother and a mental health worker had raised concerns with police in the run-up to the rampage, but because he had broken no law, there was little that law
enforcement could do to intervene.
Afterward, the California legislature moved to fix
that deadly shortcoming in the law — passing a measure that allows family members to seek court orders
seizing guns from potentially violent people before
they hurt somebody. Similar laws in Washington, Connecticut, and Indiana have doubtless saved lives. Now,
Massachusetts lawmakers have an opportunity to
adopt similar protections.
Representative David P. Linsky, a Natick Democrat,
has filed legislation that would allow family and household members, police, district
attorneys, and health care
providers to go to court and
seek “extreme risk protective
orders” for individuals who
pose a significant danger to
themselves or others. The bill,
which has raised the hackles
of gun rights groups, stands
up to constitutional scrutiny and builds in an important hearing mechanism before long-term restrictions
can be imposed. The Legislature should pass it.
Judges would be able to impose an immediate 10day bar on possession or purchase of guns and extend
the order to a year after a full hearing.
When the Supreme Court established an individual
right to bear arms, in its landmark Heller ruling in
2008, it also carved out unambiguous exceptions.
“Nothing in our opinion,” the court wrote, “should be
taken to cast doubt on long-standing prohibitions on
the possession of firearms by felons and the mentally
ill.”
Guns have exacted an enormous toll in Massachusetts. Between 2000 and 2015, almost 3,500 people
died by firearms in this state — in crimes ranging from
domestic disputes that spun out of control to street
fights fueled by unstable personalities.
The Commonwealth has not been immune from
mass shootings. Linsky, a former Middlesex prosecutor, recalls the so-called “Wakefield massacre,” when
software tester Michael “Mucko” McDermott slaughtered seven co-workers, on a Tuesday morning in 2000.
Linsky’s bill would also afford protection for someone threatening suicide. Taking guns from the despondent won’t save every life, of course, but could help
ease a growing public health problem: More than half
of those who die by firearm, Linsky points out, kill
themselves.
Guns are a ruthlessly efficient means to death — for
the despondent woman intent on ending her own life,
and for the angry young man determined to take others with him. Those closest to would-be shooters —
and most likely to be in danger — deserve the legal
tools that might add an essential layer of protection.
A new bill could help
ease a growing public
health problem.
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What’s being
memorialized?
T
he proposal
for a Global
War on Terrorism Memorial on the National Mall in
Washington,
to honor the country’s post-9/11
war dead, described in Sunday’s
Globe, may seem like a no-
By Andrew J. Bacevich
brainer. It is, in fact, premature.
Before proceeding further,
Americans would do well to reflect further on exactly what
they propose to memorialize.
Existing federal legislation
prohibits installing a war memorial on the Mall until at
least 10 years after the fighting has ended. Democratic
Representative Seth Moulton
of Massachusetts is cosponsoring a bill that will waive
that requirement. On the surface, the argument in favor of
such a waiver is compelling.
Given the open-ended nature
of the conflict in which US
forces are presently engaged,
to wait for it to end before
honoring the fallen is in effect to postpone that honor
indefinitely. In effect, “forever
war” may well mean “soon
forgotten.”
Yet Moulton’s proposed legislation skips past larger issues
that demand prior resolution.
Two in particular stand out: the
war’s actual purpose and when
exactly it began.
“Global War on Terrorism”
has never accurately described the enterprise upon
which the United States embarked in the wake of 9/11.
The formulation is at best
misleading where not simply
fraudulent. In practice, US
opposition to terrorism is selective rather than global.
When it comes to regimes
that it deems useful for other
reasons — Saudi Arabia and
Pakistan, for example —
Washington routinely turns a
blind eye to their overt promotion of terrorism. Indeed,
on occasion, the United States
itself supports groups that en-
RENÉE GRAHAM
Sessions marches toward the abyss
I
declare, Jefferson Beauregard Sessions, where
shall you go, whatever shall you do?
Frankly, my dear, Donald Trump doesn’t
give a damn.
On Tuesday, the president again lambasted Jeff Sessions, tweeting that the attorney general
“has taken a VERY weak position on Hillary Clinton
crimes (where are E-mails & DNC server) & Intel
leakers!” This was a day after he referred to Sessions as “our beleaguered A.G.” Even Anthony Scaramucci, the new White House communications director, said in a Tuesday interview, that it’s “probably right” to assume that his boss wants Sessions
out before he added, “I don’t want
to speak for the president.” The
Mooch doesn’t have to — Trump is
speaking plenty by himself.
Trump’s Twitter tantrums come a
week after he excoriated Sessions
during a New York Times interview
for recusing himself from the Russia
investigation. Had he known Sessions would do that, “I would have
picked somebody else” as attorney
general, Trump said.
Now Sessions has the hangdog
countenance of a man who knows
the end is near. Names of equally
NYT
terrible replacements, like Senator
Attorney General
Ted Cruz, are already popping up all
Jeff Sessions
over the place, and that’s so Trump –
shopping for the next warm body
before he has officially filed for divorce. In his first
public comments after Trump’s Times interview, Sessions didn’t exactly present a strong case when asked
if he would leave: “We love this department, and I
plan to continue to do so, as long as that is appropriate.”
Translation: Until his position becomes too untenable, or Trump just straight up dumps him.
Sessions is marching toward the abyss, but he
never saw it coming. Early in the campaign when
Trump’s candidacy was as welcome as a swarm of
hornets at a picnic, there was Sessions with a
“Make America Great Again” cap perched on his
head, standing shoulder to elbow with Trump at his
raucous rallies. He was the first senator to wholeheartedly endorse Trump, and he helped mold the
fledging candidate’s combative, discriminatory
rhetoric around immigration and law enforcement.
He gave that campaign a whiff of legitimacy, and
however abhorrent Sessions’ political views, the
blessings of a US senator offered Trump a toehold
in the GOP establishment.
For his own loyalty, Sessions likely expected the
same from Trump, but this is where he got it all twisted. If Trump felt any debt to Sessions, it ended when he
chose the former Alabama senator to head the Justice
Department. After that, it was Sessions who would always need to prove his unwavering devotion to Trump,
even if it meant obstructing justice. For the president,
that devotion was forever shattered when Sessions recused himself from the Russian investigation.
Even Rush Limbaugh has called the president’s actions against Sessions “a little bit discomforting, unseemly for Trump to go after such a loyal supporter
this way,”
For Trump, loyalty is a one-way street. He demands
it, expects it, but is loyal only to those closest to him,
like Don Jr., Ivanka, and her husband, Jared Kushner.
He never hesitates to come to their defense when their
suspect behavior is publicly questioned. Sessions, however, is neither family nor a fundamental cog in the
Trump machine like staff schemers Steve Bannon or
Stephen Miller. He has outlived his usefulness to
Trump and is being destroyed 140 characters at a time.
Sessions, who lied under oath about his own Russian connections during his confirmation hearings,
was always unfit to be attorney general. The Democrats had no power to ditch him; instead, that act will
fall to the man who once called Sessions “an adviser,
friend, and ally.” Soon Sessions, a Southerner who
knows all about lost causes, will be removed just like
one of those dusty old statues of his Confederate heroes whose names he carries and has again brought
low in defeat and disgrace.
Renée Graham can be reached at
renee.graham@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter
@reneeygraham
T h e
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B o s t o n
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Opinion
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Can the Democrats
mount a comeback?
Democrats need to channel FDR
I agree with Scot Lehigh’s assessment that the Democrats
have essentially lost their way (“Two political parties, two
difficult dilemmas,” Opinion, July 14). The Democrats were
once a “big tent” party that appealed to all segments of society based on a set of basic ideas, best articulated by Franklin D. Roosevelt in his second “bill of rights.”
These included “the right to a useful and remunerative
job . . . ; the right to earn enough to provide adequate food
and clothing and recreation; . . . the right of every businessman, large and small, to trade in an atmosphere of freedom
from unfair competition and domination by monopolies at
home and abroad; the right of every family to a decent
home; the right to adequate medical care and the opportunity to achieve and enjoy good health; the right to adequate
protection from the economic fears of old age, sickness, accident, and unemployment; the right to a good education.”
Roosevelt said, “We are trying to construct a more inclusive society. We are going to make a country in which no
one is left out.” I would argue that the Democrats need
again to embrace these rights as their basic goals, which
would get them and the country back on the right track.
LEN SOLO
Marlborough
Party has little time to find
a hardy messenger for 2020
L E SL E Y B E C K E R /G L O B E ST A F F ; A P
gage in terrorist activities, albeit while rebranding those
groups as “freedom fighters.”
Furthermore — and crucially — terrorism per se was all
but irrelevant to the George W.
Bush administration’s decision
to initiate what became the
largest and most costly of our
post-9/11 military campaigns,
the Iraq War of 2003-2011.
Saddam Hussein and Osama
bin Laden were not allies. They
were sworn enemies. Rather
than reducing terrorism, Operation Iraqi Freedom fostered it.
That may not have been the intention. It was undeniably the
result.
To depict the 2003 invasion
of Iraq as part of a larger project undertaken to combat terrorism, therefore, is nothing
short of Orwellian. Sustaining
that fiction serves only to allow
proponents of that disastrous
conflict to evade accountability.
We can more usefully characterize the US invasion of
Iraq in 2003 as a continuation of a prior Iraq War that
the United States had seemingly won in 1991. In short,
the aim in 2003 was to finish
unfinished business. That unfinished business had next to
no connection to the terrorists who perpetrated 9/11.
Yet to acknowledge the linkage between Operation Desert
Storm and Operation Iraqi
Freedom is to highlight this important fact: Well before the
events of September 2001, US
troops were already serving,
fighting, and sometimes dying
in the Middle East. In other
words, to identify 9/11 as the
date when hostilities began is
arbitrary, misleading, and ultimately unhelpful.
It is worth noting that today,
26 years after the fact, no memorial honoring US troops lost
during Operation Desert Storm
exists in our nation’s capital.
Should they not be included in
the memorial that Moulton
proposes? I see no reason why
they should not.
And why stop there? Why
not include the Marines killed
by a suicide bomber in Beirut
back in 1983? Were not these
241 “peacekeepers” de facto
combatants confronting adversaries that US officials classified as terrorists?
In sum, the problem with a
proposed Global War on Terrorism Memorial in remembrance
of US service members killed
since 9/11 is twofold. First,
fighting terrorism comes nowhere close to describing the
actual purpose of US military
endeavors in the Middle East
since 9/11. If a war against terrorism, it has also been a war
for oil and regional dominion.
It has been a 21st-century
equivalent of a war for empire.
Second, to the extent that
the US can be said to be
fighting (some) terrorist entities (some of the time), that
fight commenced a full two
decades prior to September
2001. The events of 9/11
merely called the attention of
the American people to an
ongoing military project in
the Middle East that had pre-
viously escaped their notice.
That the nation has a solemn obligation to honor the
sacrifices of those who lost
their lives in military campaigns throughout the Islamic
world is no doubt the case. Yet
remembrance should begin
with a truthful accounting of
the events that led to those sacrifices. To base remembrance
on convenient half-truths or
willful self-deception would be
to dishonor the dead.
The proper moment for constructing some suitably somber
edifice out of granite and marble will present itself in due
course. For now, the imperative
is to reckon with what has occurred and continues to occur.
That means coming to a full
understanding of why these
young men and women died. In
that regard, we still have a long
way to go.
Andrew J. Bacevich is the father
of First Lieutenant Andrew
John Bacevich, who was killed
in Iraq on May 13, 2007.
JEFF JACOBY
The health benefits of alcohol,
and the funding by brewers
T
his fall, the National Institutes of Health will launch a
major study to determine
whether regular consumption
of alcohol helps prevent heart
attacks. The clinical trial will comprise
nearly 8,000 participants, recruited from
16 sites in North and South America, Europe, and Africa. The volunteers will be
randomly assigned to one of two groups:
Those in the first group will have one
drink each day, while those in the other
group abstain. This enormous study will
come with an enormous price tag: more
than $100 million.
If you’re like me, news of the planned
NIH study may make you wonder: Does
the world really need another investigation of alcohol’s health benefits? If
you’re like The New York Times, on the
other hand, you wonder how a study
funded largely by Big Alcohol can avoid
being biased.
Over the years, there have been innumerable studies on this topic. Most have
found that moderate drinking is linked to
fewer occurrences of heart attack, ischemic stroke, and death from heart disease. The medical journal BMJ published
just such a study in March. It concluded
that drinking in moderation — one to two
alcoholic beverages per day — “is associated with a lower risk of . . . several but
not all cardiovascular diseases.” For eight
common heart ailments, both nondrinkers and heavy drinkers were at greater
risk than moderate drinkers. In short,
having a little alcohol tends to be good for
you; having too much or none at all tends
to be bad.
So why the new NIH study? Dr. George
Koob, director of the National Institute on
AP
Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, says it will
be the first in which researchers monitor
health effects that develop during the trial. Consequently, says Koob, interest in
this study will range “from the World
Health Organization to the beverage companies . . . to regular American citizens.”
The Times has a different interest. It
reports that nearly two-thirds of the
study’s hefty tab is being picked up by five
leading beverage manufacturers — Anheuser-Busch, Heineken, Diageo, Pernod
Ricard, and Carlsberg. They have committed $67.7 million to a foundation that raises money for the National Institutes of
Health, causing “concern among researchers who track influence-peddling in science.”
But is industry funding inherently suspect? There is no indication that the cor-
porate donors will have any involvement
in the conduct of the study. The project’s
principal investigator, Harvard Medical
School Professor Kenneth Mukamal, told
the Times he was unaware of the companies’ financial backing. “This isn’t anything other than a good old-fashioned
NIH trial,” he said. “We have had literally
no contact with anyone in the alcohol industry in the planning of this.” Gemma
Hart, an Anheuser-Busch vice president,
concurs: “We have no role in the study. We
will learn the outcome of the study when
everybody else does.”
Of course it is wise to be wary of conflicts of interest; when corruption in research is discovered, it should be publicized and penalized. But “industry” and
“corrupt” are not remotely synonymous.
Business is indispensable to scientific exploration and employment. It is no more
logical to automatically distrust research
funded by industry than research funded
by government, or advocacy groups, or
opinionated philanthropists. Research is
expensive and someone has to pay for it.
Chase away a major source of scientific
funding, and the result will be less research.
Scientific progress doesn’t depend on
eliminating preconceived notions or institutional predilections. It depends on testing hypotheses and replicating earlier research. Industry dollars can and do underwrite excellent science, including when it
comes to alcohol. The best system? Keep
the funding transparent, and let the NIH
do its work.
Jeff Jacoby can be reached at
jacoby@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter
@jeff_jacoby.
The populist surge that tore the GOP asunder in 2016 did
so over the dead bodies, so to speak, of talented and energetic presidential contenders including Marco Rubio, Chris
Christie, and Ted Cruz (“Two political parties, two difficult
dilemmas”). Who will stand in the way of a similar surge on
the Democratic side in 2020 — Nancy Pelosi and the Clintons?
“Ripe for the taking” seems too mild a description for an
old guard that struggled to repel the cartoonish Bernie
Sanders and then lost to the cartoonish Donald Trump. The
Democratic establishment is in fact overripe and ready to
fall.
Everything one needs to know about the party’s future
identity and direction was revealed in the dreary sense of
duty surrounding Hillary Clinton’s campaign, which contrasted so vividly with the enthusiasm generated by Sanders’ every-day-is-Christmas message. Now Democrats have
two years to find a younger messenger with a broader rhetorical repertoire.
It probably can’t be Elizabeth Warren — 2020 is too soon
for another preachy, hectoring woman.
MICHAEL SMITH
Cynthiana,
Ky.
y
y
Federal guidance, enforcement
are crucial tools for overdue reform
on campus assault
In his July 20 Opinion column about campus sexual assault, Dante Ramos misrepresented the law as well as its
importance (“Will DeVos fix Obama’s toxic campus sexual
assault policy?”). For decades, the civil rights law Title IX
has required schools to address sexual violence. Until 2011,
though, the federal government gave the issue little attention, and colleges freely disregarded survivors’ rights. As a
result, too many students missed crucial opportunities to
learn. This backdrop prompted the Department of Education to send a letter to remind schools of their responsibilities and make clear the agency meant business.
That letter and increased department enforcement are
crucial tools for overdue reform on campus. Now a handful
of people claim schools have violated the rights of students
accused of sexual violence. To the extent colleges mistreat
students involved in either side of a disciplinary complaint,
sexual or not, that injustice must be corrected. Title IX,
which requires that schools adopt a process that is prompt,
fair, and equitable, is part of the solution, not the problem.
None of the fair-process violations courts have identified
derived from Title IX guidance, and in many cases they directly contradict it. Rolling back Title IX protections won’t
ensure fair process, but enforcing the law and helping
schools get it right will.
FATIMA GOSS GRAVES
President and CEO
National Women’s Law Center
Washington, D.C.
It’s an unpardonable offense for Trump
to even consider pardoning himself
I can’t believe we are all calmly discussing whether the
president has the legal right to pardon himself (“Trump’s
power to pardon himself is questionable,” Page A1, July 22).
The very concept that he would even consider such a thing
makes him unqualified to lead a democracy. This is the behavior of a banana republic dictator. It doesn’t matter
whether it is technically legal; it’s morally and ethically
wrong. And a country with a president who has indicated
that he may do so can no longer claim to be a beacon of
freedom to the world.
DANIEL HART
Boston
Letters should be written exclusively to the Globe and
include name, address, and daytime telephone number.
They should be 200 words or fewer. All are subject to
editing. Letters to the Editor, The Boston Globe, P.O. Box
55819, Boston, MA 02205-5819; letter@globe.com; fax:
617-929-2098
T h e
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1
Business
In some neighborhoods, big
money offers to landlords
threaten to oust tenants
PAGES B9­14
For breaking news, go to
www.bostonglobe.com/business
Median house price tops $400,000 for first time
Left something in your Uber? It’ll cost you to get it back
LEUNG: Mass. talks back on diversity with its money
Metro
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T H E B O S T O N G L O B E W E D N E S DAY, J U LY 2 6 , 2 017 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / M E T R O
These days, you’re likely
to get trapped in traffic
at any time of day or night.
R
By Beth Teitell
GLOBE STAFF
emember the good old days of traffic,
when backups, congestion, and delays
were confined to what now seems like
the quaint notion of “rush hour’’?
These days the endless lines of
brake lights are striking earlier and
later — often seemingly at random —
and in the process upending vacation
patterns, triggering spousal tension,
and forcing families to leave their
homes at 5 a.m. for a day at the
beach, as if they were fleeing the law.
“I don’t even know when ‘rush hour’ is anymore,” said John Paul, a spokesman for AAA
Northeast.
And really, who could know? These days, rush
hour is not even associated with a time when
most people would be in a rush.
“You can now find rush-hour traffic on the expressway between Boston and Braintree on a Saturday or a Sunday,” said Kristen Eck, WBZ NewsRadio 1030’s helicopter traffic reporter.
“You think you are leaving early,” said Alex
Iacobacci, owner of Newbury Street’s Avanti salon, ‘‘but it’s never early enough.”
The good — or the bad — news is that all this
griping about traffic is not just the typical Boston
KEITH BEDFORD/GLOBE STAFF
The number of miles driven in Massachusetts increased by
10 percent
from the first quarter of 2013 to the first quarter of 2017, from
17.2 billion miles to 18.9 billion miles,
according to Inrix, a Seattle­based firm that provides traffic data and analytics.
TRAFFIC, Page B5
Berkshire Museum hit for plan to sell artwork
Despite criticism, director cites low endowment, shift in emphasis
By Malcolm Gay
GLOBE STAFF
The Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield is drawing fire after it announced this month that it plans to
sell 40 artworks — including two by
American master Norman Rockwell
— to help fund a $60 million reinvention plan, bolstering its endowment and renovating the building as
it shifts its emphasis toward science
and history.
The financially struggling museum said it anticipates the combined
sale will fetch around $50 million,
which would go a long way toward
its goal of building a $40 million endowment and spending $20 million
on facilities improvements and programming in science and history.
The museum has also raised more
than $5 million as part of a $10 million fund-raising campaign.
The planned art sale has sparked
controversy, however, as many museum professionals hold that artworks may be deaccessioned in order to purchase other artworks, but
shouldn’t be sold to pay for operating costs or bolster an endowment.
The American Alliance of Museums and the Association of Art Museum Directors issued a joint statement saying they are “deeply opposed to the Berkshire Museum’s
plans to sell works from its collection to provide funds for its endowment, to make capital investments,
and to pay for daily operations.”
“[A] collection is held in the public trust and must not be treated as a
disposable financial asset,” the statement continued. “Actions such as
those being proposed by the Berk-
‘Why not be the one
institution that’s
doing something
different — the only
institution that’s
focused on science
and history, and the
arts?’
VAN SHIELDS
Museum’s executive director
MUSEUM, Page B4
signed to different bus stops.
John Hanlon, the school system’s
chief of operations, said the school
system is trying to minimize layoffs
as much as possible.
“I understand they have concerns, and we intend to work with
them,” Hanlon said.
The school system is making the
changes via a computer model developed by a team of researchers from
Massachusetts Institute of Technology that aims to generate routes that
are more efficient than those that
can be crafted by the human eye and
BUSES, Page B4
HOSPITAL, Page B5
sidewalk fruit
vendor did some
brisk business
Tuesday beside an
umbrella
protecting his
goods on Beach
Street in
Chinatown.
Wednesday
promises warmer
temperatures and
sunny skies. Full
report, B15
By Jan Ransom
GLOBE STAFF
VIOLENCE, Page B5
LANE TURNER/GLOBE STAFF
School bus drivers blast city’s route plan
GLOBE STAFF
The Boston school bus drivers
union Tuesday blasted a cost-cutting
plan from the city’s public school system that would consolidate scores of
bus routes and lay off dozens of drivers, predicting that the move will
lead to chaos in the fall with many
buses arriving at schools late.
“It’s crazy,” said Andre Francois,
the bus union’s president, in an interview. “It’s not a sound plan. This
might be the biggest mistake that
this mayor will make.”
Francois said the bus drivers
MIT team develops
a computer model
union is prepared to fight the cuts
every step of the way, saying “we’re
not going to lay down and take this.”
The drivers union weighed in one
day after the school system announced its plan, which officials said
could save between $3 million and
$5 million. Under the changes, many
students who board the buses could
end up with commutes that are longer or shorter than the ones they had
last school year, and could be as-
By Andrea Estes
GLOBE STAFF
UNDERCOVER
OPERATION — A
By James Vaznis
Orders a ‘wholly
independent review’
The top Veterans Affairs official on
Tuesday expanded the agency’s investigation of the Manchester VA Medical
Center, ordering the VA’s inspector
general to launch its own “separate,
wholly independent review” of conditions at New Hampshire’s only hospital for veterans.
Secretary of Veterans Affairs David
J. Shulkin also agreed to meet the
state’s congressional delegation at the
hospital Aug. 4, where he will brief
them on any preliminary findings of
investigations that have been going on
since the Globe reported earlier this
month that 11 members of the medical staff have alleged there is substandard care at the hospital.
“I’ve been clear that our review of
the allegations in the article will be
comprehensive, transparent and
brand-new,” Shulkin said in a statement, noting that he has directed one
of his undersecretaries to personally
lead the review.
Shulkin has taken a series of steps
since the Globe detailed the whistleblowers’ concerns, which ranged from
flies in an operating room to veterans
permanently disabled due to neglect.
He removed the two top administrators and sent two teams to conduct
their own investigations. Shulkin also
agreed to name a panel of medical experts who will review the final reports.
But the whistle-blowers on Tuesday
expressed skepticism that the various
investigations would be thorough,
since one of the two teams — from the
VA’s Office of the Medical Inspector —
exonerated the hospital in an internal
report in June. Despite widespread
complaints from doctors, including
the hospital’s chief of medicine and
chief of surgery, the Office of the Medical Inspector found “no substantial or
specific danger to public health.”
The whistle-blowers also said they
Police make
advances
in solving
homicides
After the weather turned warm,
the bullets started to fly in some of
Boston’s most violent neighborhoods, amounting to 28 murders
this year, slightly more than in the
same period in 2016.
Boston police have solved 15 of
those homicides, and made arrests
in five other murders from 2016,
making for a clearance rate of 74
percent so far this year, officials
said Tuesday.
Some homicides took a week or
two to solve, while others took a
month or more, police said. And in
a rare instance, within minutes of
the fatal shooting last week of a beloved hardware store owner, Boston police arrested three men they
say were responsible.
Lieutenant Detective Darrin P.
Greeley, commander of the Boston
Police Homicide Unit, credits the
resolve of investigators to solve the
city’s most violent crimes.
“It’s a lot of great work from the
men and women in the department
who never give up,” Greeley said
Tuesday during an interview at police headquarters. “We’re trying to
send a message and hold those ac-
VA chief
expands
probe of
N.H. care
B2
Metro
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
TheMetroMinute
GET SMART
MIKE COHEA/BROWN UNIVERSITY
Water is found
in moon rocks
By Martin Finucane
GLOBE STAFF
Researchers at Brown University say that
they’ve found evidence of water trapped inside the moon. But don’t expect any underground rivers or lakes.
The researchers say that by using data collected by a lunar probe, they’ve studied pyroclastic deposits, the rocks ejected by ancient
volcanos, across the moon, and found glass
beads with water trapped inside.
That suggests that the moon’s mantle, the
layer of the moon between the core and the
crust, contains water.
There wouldn’t be pockets of liquid water,
though. The water would be dispersed and
bound within the rocks and minerals of the
mantle, as it is within the Earth’s, said Ralph
Milliken, lead author of the new research and
an associate professor in Brown’s Department
of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences.
Milliken co-wrote the paper in Nature Geoscience with Shuai Li, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Hawaii.
The researchers undertook their study of
the moon after a fellow researcher at Brown
University in 2008 found trace amounts of
water in glass beads brought back from the
Apollo 15 and Apollo 17 missions.
The latest discovery has a number of implications. One of the most intriguing is that the
deposits could provide a source of water for
future moon settlements.
“In theory, that water could be extracted,”
Milliken said.
While individual beads don’t have much
water in them, the “size of the deposits are
huge,” he said. And that could solve a big
headache for astronauts.
“Other studies have suggested the presence
of water ice in shadowed regions at the lunar
poles, but the pyroclastic deposits are at locations that may be easier to access,” Li said in a
statement. “Anything that helps save future
lunar explorers from having to bring lots of
water from home is a big step forward, and
our results suggest a new alternative.”
BY THE NUMBERS
DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF/FILE
3,810
The number of documents released online by the
National Archives that offer a firsthand glimpse into
the investigation of John F. Kennedy’s killing. The
Archives says the document dump is the first of
several expected releases under the John F.
Kennedy Assassination Records Act of 1992, which
called for all records of the assassination in the
Archives to be publicly disclosed after 25 years.
TIME MACHINE
July 26, 1980: Three of Boston’s 11 pools,
including the Frog Pond on Boston Common,
are closed when 25 city lifeguards stage a sickout over late paychecks. Boston Parks and
Recreation Commissioner John Vitagliano
says the lifeguards who did not show will be
docked one day’s pay and that they will receive a check for one week’s pay when they return to work. Vitagliano says the lifeguards
are owed a month’s back pay and blamed the
City Council’s “problems” with the new budget for the delay.
JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF
Eamonn was all smiles as he headed home with his father, Sean. Nurse Julia Ravinal waved goodbye on his release from the hospital.
Ten months later, he’s headed home
A
By Ben Thompson
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
baby born at only 24 weeks was discharged from Franciscan
Children’s in Brighton on Tuesday, the hospital said.
The baby, 10-month-old Eamonn, has “battled almost every
possible issue a premature child could encounter” on his path
to being released from the hospital’s care and joining his parents at home, a Franciscan Children’s release said.
Following his premature birth at a Beverly hospital on Sept. 1, Eamonn
struggled with respiratory issues and went through treatment at Boston
Children’s Hospital before arriving at the Franciscan Children’s Inpatient
Medical Rehabilitation Unit in February, where he eventually learned to
breathe on his own while focusing on pulmonary rehabilitation.
While Eamonn was finally ready to leave the hospital Tuesday, his path
to making it back to his family’s home in Melrose has not been easy. Eamonn weighed only around 1 pound at birth, and early on at Boston Children’s he was intubated to help with respiratory difficulties. He also underwent a tracheotomy to surgically fit a tube into his trachea for air flow, as
well as a procedure that removed a portion of his intestines, Franciscan associate chief medical officer Dr. Elisabeth Schainker said.
After arriving at Franciscan Children’s, Eamonn was kept on ventilator
support 24 hours a day, eventually working with respiratory therapists to
be able to breathe most of the time on his own. “He still uses it part of the
day, but he doesn’t need it all the time,” Schainker said.
Throughout the past five months at Franciscan Children’s, Eamonn was
comforted by his own books, stuffed animals, a crib made up with blankets
from home, and around 50 caring medical workers that worked with Eamonn during his time there. “The staff is like family,” Franciscan Children’s
spokeswoman Lauren Guess said. “Mom and dad have always talked about
how much the staff cares.”
“The parents are amazing people and have taken this all in stride,”
Schainker said. “They are by his side most of the time and they love him
very much.” The day finally came for hopeful conversations between the
medical staff and Eamonn’s parents, and Schainker said it was recently decided that the “chubby little boy with a beautiful smile” was ready to head
home. “They’re thrilled,” Guess said after Sean and Meghan took Eamonn
home Tuesday.
“There was a crowd of people waving him goodbye and blowing bubbles,” Schainker said. “He seemed very happy to be leaving the hospital.”
Eamonn will still be on ventilator support at his home and will require
further care, but doctors are optimistic that he will be breathing on his
own, off support systems, and just like any other child within a few years.
Ben Thompson can be reached at ben.thompson@globe.com
AROUND THE REGION
N A N T U C KE T
Diver dies near site of
Andrea Doria sinking
A diver who lost consciousness Monday while
diving near the site of the 1956 Andrea Doria
sinking in waters off Nantucket has died, the
Coast Guard said Tuesday. Petty Officer Nicole
Groll, a Coast Guard spokeswoman, said the diver traveled to the site on a commercial vessel
Monday afternoon and was unresponsive when
he was pulled back onto the boat. Crew members
performed CPR for over two hours as the vessel
traveled back to Montauk, Groll said. She said
the diver was later pronounced dead at a hospital. Groll could not provide the diver’s name, age,
or gender. The diver’s death came as the region
marked the 61st anniversary of the sinking of the
Andrea Doria.
BOSTO N
Delegation seeks review
of planned Wi­Fi poles
The state’s 9-member congressional delegation
sent a letter to Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai Monday asking for a
review of a proposal to construct hundreds of
Wi-Fi poles, some as tall as 74 feet, along the
route of the Massachusetts commuter rail system. The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority entered into a contract with inMotion
Wireless in 2014 to provide enhanced Wi-Fi on
the commuter rail system. Under the contract,
inMotion would build over 300 Wi-Fi poles,
about 1.3 miles apart, through as many as 60
communities along the rail system. Local homeowners and town officials call the poles eyesores
that would diminish home values. (AP)
P O RTLA ND, M A I NE
Fishing monitor fight
going to Supreme Court
A New England fishermen’s group is taking its
fight over the cost of monitors who collect sea
data to the US Supreme Court. The monitors are
workers who collect data used to help develop
fishing regulations. The government shifted the
cost of paying for monitors to fishermen last
year. A group of fisherman led by David Goethel
of New Hampshire sued the government over the
change and lost in a federal district court and later in a federal appeals court. An attorney for
Goethel says he filed a petition with the Supreme
Court earlier this month seeking a review. (AP)
CON CO R D, N . H .
Lack of staff delays
women’s prison
The opening of New Hampshire’s new women’s
prison will be delayed for about a year because
the state is struggling to find enough people to
staff it. The 101,000-square-foot facility in Concord was set to open this year and is triple the
size of the prison in Goffstown that currently
houses nearly 140 prisoners. The new facility has
room for 224 women and will provide muchneeded classroom space and health care facilities. But the state’s unemployment rate of 2.9
percent has made it difficult to find the 74
guards, nurses, teachers, and other staffers. (AP)
L E B A N O N, N . H.
Lost high school ring
found 52 years later
Fifty-two years after losing his high school ring
just after graduation, a man has gotten it back —
and it was 3 miles away from where he grew up
in New Hampshire. It belongs to Ray Goodwin,
of White River Junction, Vt. A woman found it in
her backyard and tracked him down. (AP)
POLICE BLOTTER
RDRIVER KILLED BY TRAIN A commuter train
struck a pickup truck in Abington Tuesday night,
killing a 78-year-old man who was driving, according to the MBTA police. At approximately
8:20 p.m., Transit Police responded to 236 North
St. for a report of a crash involving a train and a
vehicle, according to the statement.A preliminary investigation shows that the train was traveling to Boston, with 10 passengers on board,
when it struck the pickup truck at the North
Street crossing, according to Transit Police.The
victim was not identified. The crash remains under investigation, but foul play is not suspected,
police said.
R WILD STRUGGLE The Boston police officer had
his hand on the barrel and the suspect allegedly
had his hand near the trigger during a dangerous
struggle over a firearm, a fight in Dorchester on
Monday that left the officer injured and the suspect facing illegal gun charges. The harrowing
drama unfolded Monday when an officer pulled
over a car with an expired registration plate
around 5:30 p.m. on Washington Street, according to police. A two-man unit came to assist the
sole officer. The driver of the car, identified as Tyrone C. Hicks, 41, complied with police requests,
stepped out of the car, and was arrested for driving after his license was expired. The passenger,
identified as Darnell R. Pierre, allegedly started
moving his hand toward the waistband of his
pants, leading an officer to start a pat frisk on the
26-year-old Dorchester man, according to police.
“A violent struggle ensued, during which the officer held on to the barrel of a firearm as Pierre attempted to pull the firearm out,” police wrote in
a statement. Police were able to subdue Pierre
and said they recovered the Taurus Millennium
G2 .40 caliber handgun. The officer was treated
and released at a Boston hospital, police said.
R HOME INVASION Two armed men forced their
way into a home in Quincy around 7:30 a.m.
Monday, police said. A 53-year-old woman
opened the back door of the duplex on Standish
Avenue after the men knocked, according to
Quincy Police Sergeant Karen Barkas. The woman screamed when the men forced their way past
her carrying firearms, Barkas said. The scream
alerted three other men in the home. Upon seeing the other occupants of the home, the invaders fled the property in a gray SUV. No injuries
were reported and nothing was stolen.
TOP STORIES Paul R. Shanley, a former Catholic priest jailed for 12 years for raping a Sunday school student could be
released Friday A1 The Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield plans to sell 40 works to fund endowment and expansion B1
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Metro
B3
Man, 65,
faces
prison
again
‘Career criminal’
robbed bank in ’15
By Travis Andersen
GLOBE STAFF
PAT GREENHOUSE/GLOBE STAFF
Judge Jonathan R. Tynes ruled at the Tuesday arraignment of Shaquille Brown and Keith
Cousins that the men be held without bail in connection with a June shooting.
2 men held without bail in
fatal Dorchester shooting
By Maria Cramer
GLOBE STAFF
Christopher Austin was
walking to Ashmont Station on
a bright June morning, headed
to his job handling baggage at
Logan Airport, when a gaptoothed man in khaki pants approached him, prosecutors
said.
They spoke briefly when
suddenly the man pulled out a
firearm and shot Austin once in
the head, according to officials
and Austin’s death certificate.
Assistant District Attorney
David Bradley described the
June 28 shooting as “brazen” in
Dorchester District Court on
Tuesday. Austin clung to life at
Boston Medical Center for two
days before succumbing to his
injuries, a death that came
amid a 30 percent rise in gun violence since last July that has
alarmed city officials.
Bradley identified the shooter as 22-year-old Shaquille
B r o wn , n o t p r es e n t i n t h e
courtroom at the request of his
lawyer and charged with first
degree murder. Suspects in killings are often kept out of view
during arraignments to avoid
false witness identifications.
Keith Cousins, 30, was arraigned alongside Brown,
charged with first-degree murder for his alleged role in the
killing. Bradley said Cousins
was waiting in a blue two-door
Honda coupe seen leaving the
scene after the shooting.
Not guilty pleas were entered on behalf of both men.
Cousins’s lawyer, John Hayes,
said none of the evidence cited
during the arraignment
showed that Cousins participated in the act of killing.
James Powderly, who represented Brown during the arraignment, said prosecutors
have given him minimal information about the homicide.
Powderly was standing in for
Mark Bennett, the lawyer assigned to Brown’s case.
“I understand the seriousness of the offense would require at this stage that he be
held without bail,” Powderly
said. But he asked Judge Jonathan Tynes to set the bail without prejudice so Brown could
view evidence and make anoth-
er bail argument.
Tynes ordered both men
held without bail.
Bradley said surveillance
footage caught both men lurking in the parking lot of the station about half an hour before
the shooting.
Bradley said when Austin arrived on Ashmont Street,
Brown got out of the car and
crouched behind it, appearing
to want to hide from Austin.
Austin stopped into a store,
then returned to Ashmont
Street, where Brown allegedly
confronted him.
After the shooting, witnesses and the cameras caught both
men fleeing the parking lot in
the blue Honda, Bradley said.
A search warrant at Brown’s
home led to the recovery of a revolver and ammunition, Bradley said.
Police apprehended Cousins
in Marietta, Ga., on July 14.
They also found the same blue
car that was allegedly used to
flee Ashmont, Bradley said.
Maria Cramer can be reached
at mcramer@globe.com.
A 65-year-old career criminal who killed a man in
Brookline in 1968 and repeatedly escaped from custody
should serve more than nine
years behind bars for his latest
brush with the law, an armed
bank robbery in Brighton in
2015, federal prosecutors said
Tuesday.
Joseph G. Rachal, who made
off with nearly $2,400 during
the November 2015 heist, is “a
dangerous individual who has
no intention of becoming a lawabiding citizen,” prosecutors
wrote in a legal document filed
Tuesday in US District Court in
Boston.
A jury convicted Rachal of
the robbery in April.
The government requested
Tuesday that he receive a 111month prison term when he is
sentenced Thursday. Rachal’s
lawyer declined to comment.
Prosecutors said his life of
crime began at the age of 15
and quickly escalated two years
later, when he fatally shot Walter B. Howe, 23, on June 20,
1968, in Brookline. Howe had
graduated from Northeastern
University two days earlier.
Rachal and two accomplices
stole a vehicle belonging to
Howe’s friend. When Howe and
the friend caught up with the
thieves, Rachal shot Howe in
the stomach as the two scuffled,
according to prosecutors and
Globe archives.
He pleaded guilty to seconddegree murder the following
year and escaped from the
courthouse after receiving a life
term, the filing said. Rachal was
OLLIE NOONAN JR./GLOBE STAFF/FILE 1968
Joseph G. Rachal was captured after he fatally shot Walter
B. Howe, 23, in 1968 in Brookline.
apprehended a short time later,
and he was granted a new trial
in 1979 when his plea was vacated. Rachal later pleaded
g u i l ty t o m a n s l a u g h t e r i n
Howe’s death and served 11 ½
years for the killing.
He continued his violent
ways after his release, racking
up convictions for offenses including armed robbery, assault
with a dangerous weapon, possession of a firearm without a
permit, armed assault to kill,
being a felon in possession of a
firearm, and drunken driving,
the filing said.
While serving a lengthy sentence in the 1980s, Rachal escaped from the MCI-Walpole
Pre-Release Center and remained on the lam for three
years, the filing said.
“Throughout his life, Rachal
has continuously displayed an
absolute disregard for the law
and societal norms,” prosecutors wrote.
During his murder trial, Ra-
chal’s accomplices testified he
apologized for the shooting,
saying, “I didn’t mean to shoot
the guy” and “I thought I shot
the guy in the leg,” according to
Globe archives.
During the 2015 robbery of
a TD Bank branch in Brighton,
Rachal brandished a loaded
Glock .9 millimeter firearm and
was arrested on a nearby street,
the government said.
“At one point during the pursuit, Rachal stopped and assumed a ‘bladed stance,’ ” prosecutors wrote. “At this time, the
pursuing officers were able to
catch and gain control of Rachal after a violent struggle.”
William Fick, Rachal’s attorney, wrote in a filing before trial
that his client suffered significant injuries during the arrest.
Globe correspondent Chuck
Leddy contributed to this
report. Travis Andersen can be
reached at travis.andersen
@globe.com.
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W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
Berkshire Museum decried for plan to sell major artwork
uMUSEUM
Continued from Page B1
shire Museum undermine the
public’s trust in the mission of
nonprofit museums — and
museums’ ability to collect,
teach, study, and preser ve
works for their communities
now and into the future.”
On Monday, the museum
said the works in question
were “not essential to the museum’s refreshed mission,” as
it released a full list of artworks slated for sale, including pieces by Alexander
Calder, Henry Moore, Benjamin West, and Albert Bierstadt.
“We’re facing an existential
threat, and we’re using all the
resources we have to overcome
that so we can continue to deliver our services to this beloved community far into the
future,” said Berkshire Museum executive director Van
Shields. “The bottom line is
that if someone came up and
said, ‘Hey, we can make it possible for you to survive into the
future . . . and we’re going to
do that with a single swipe of
our keypad, that’d be great.
But it’s not going to happen.”
Laurie Norton Moffatt, director and CEO of the Norman
LEGAL NOTICES
Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, pleaded with museum
leaders to reconsider.
“[M]ost museums that have
resorted to de-accessioning
have not, in fact, rebooted
their finances,” Norton Moffatt
wrote in an op-ed page article
in the Berkshire Eagle. “To
think that selling the art will
save the future is simply to
push the challenge down the
road while diminishing the
strength of the institution.”
Shields said the museum
has struggled for years with its
finances. Today, its endowment is $8.6 million, and it
has an ongoing structural deficit of about $1.15 million, he
said.
Shields added that after
consulting with the community, canvassing the philanthropic sector, and bringing in Boston-based consultants TDC,
the museum determined that
there “wasn’t enough money
in the system” to launch the
sort of traditional campaign it
would take to put the museum
on sound financial footing.
“It’s not even close,” said
Shields, who observed that
there is much more competition in the Berkshires now,
when it comes to cultivating
LEGAL NOTICES
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
- M.G.L. C. 149 CONSTRUCTION
ADVERTISEMENT OF INVITATION FOR BIDS
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION and RECREATION
251 Causeway Street, Suite 600, Boston, MA
02114-2104
PHONE: 617-626-1250
FACSIMILE: 617-626-1351
www.mass.gov/dcr
Contract No: P17-3148-C1A
Title: POWDER MAGAZINE INTERIOR REHABILITATION
Location:MAGAZINE BEACH, 668 MEMORIAL DRIVE,
CAMBRIDGE MA 02139.
Sealed Sub-BID proposals shall be submitted on a form furnished by the Department and will be received until 11:00
AM on Wednesday, August 23, 2017 for the following
FILED SUB- BIDS, (SECTION 042000 - Unit Masonry, SECTION 220000 - Plumbing, and SECTION 260000 - Electrical) at the Boston address above, and will be, at that time
and place, publicly opened and read.
Sealed GENERAL BID proposals shall be submitted on a
form furnished by the Department and will be received until 11:00 AM on Wednesday, September 13, 2017 and will
at that time and place be publicly opened and read.
Individual sets of contract documents, in the form of (CDs),
including specifications, are available at the Boston f re e
of charge. Parties who wish to have the CDs shipped must
provide a completed address including phone number.
Please send request via email to Carol.A.Bernardi@state.
ma.us with request to ship thru USPS or with YOUR FedEx
# for overnight service. When possible will email.
In the event that any addenda are issued throughout the
open period for this project, DCR will distribute these addenda via email to the email identified by the prospective
bidders to DCR at the time the CD of plans and specifications is issued. PLEASE NOTE: All bidders must confirm
receipt of any DCR email communication by sending a
return email stating: “(name of bidder) confirms that we
have received Addendum # for Project No. P17-3148-C1A
and Title “POWDER MAGAZINE INTERIOR REHABILITATION”. The email must show the name and phone number
of the bidder’s responsible contact person.
A pre-bidding conference for prospective bidders will be
held on Wednesday, August 9, 2017 at 10:00 AM at the
site.
The project consists of: New toilet rooms, re-pointing of
existing interior stone walls, and various other interior upgrades to the Powder Magazine.
The estimated project cost is $250,000.
The work is to be accomplished within 90 calendar
days of a notice to proceed. Liquidated damages in
the amount of $500 per day will be assessed if
the work has not been completed in accordance with
the provisions of the contract within the time specified (as
extended by any authorized extension of time granted in
accordance with the contract provisions).
The proposed contract includes a combined participation goal of 10.4% of the bid price for minority-owned
business enterprises and women-owned business enterprises. Proposed MBE/WBE participation plans that
include solely MBE or solely WBE participation, or do
not include a reasonable amount of participation by
both MBE and WBE firms to meet the combined goal, will not be considered responsive.
The applicable local minority workforce utilization percentage is a minimum goal of 15.3%. The applicable
local women workforce utilization percentage is a
minimum goal of 6.9%.
The Commonwealth encourages the participation
of Service-Disabled Veteran- Owned Business Enterprises (“SDVOBE”) on its construction projects. The
Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Business Enterprise
participation benchmark for this contract is 3.0%.
Each bid must be accompanied by a bid deposit, in the
form of a bid bond, cash, certified check, or a treasurer’s
or cashier’s check issued by a responsible bank or trust
company, payable to the Department of Conservation and
Recreation in the amount of 5% of the bid. Each bid must
be enclosed in a sealed envelope on which the bidder’s
return address, including the bidder’s name, is listed, and
be addressed as follows:
John Clarkeson, Director of Contract Administration and
Procurement Department of Conservation & Recreation
251 Causeway Street, 6th Floor
Boston, MA 02114
SEALED BID/PROPOSAL ENCLOSED
Contract No.: P17-3148-C1A
Contract Title: POWDER MAGAZINE
INTEROR REHABILITATION
Bids are subject to the provisions of M.G.L. Ch. 149, sections 44A to H, inclusive. In addition, bids are also subject
to Ch. 30, Sect. 39F, G, H and M inclusive. Wages are subject to minimum wage rates as per Mass. Gen. L. Ch. 149,
sections 26 to 27D inclusive. The Department reserves the
right to waive any informalities in or to reject any and all
bids if it be in the public interest to do so.
All Bidders, both Sub and General, for this project are required to be certified with the Massachusetts Division of
Capital Asset Management and Maintenance (DCAM) for
the work they are bidding on, and must submit with the bid
an update of their respective qualifications.
Leo P. Roy, Commissioner
Massachusetts Department
of Conservation and Recreation
INFORMAL PROBATE
PUBLICATION NOTICE
Docket No. SU17P1223EA
Commonwealth of
Massachusetts The Trial
Court Probate and Family
Court Suffolk Division
Estate of: Betty Brandner
Date of Death:
September 21, 2016
To all persons interested in
the above captioned estate,
by Petition of Petitioner
Harvey A. Brandner of Boynton Beach, FL a Will has
been admitted to informal
probate. Harvey A. Brander
of Boynton Beach, FL has
been informally appointed
as the Personal Representative of the estate to serve
without surety on the bond.
The estate is being administered under informal
procedure by the Personal
Representative under the
Massachusetts
Uniform
Probate Code without supervision by the Court. Inventory and accounts are
not required to be filed with
the Court, but interested
parties are entitled to notice regarding the administration from the Personal
Representative and can
petition the Court in any
matter relating to the estate, including distribution
of assets and expenses of
administration. Interested
parties are entitled to petition the Court to institute
formal proceedings and to
obtain orders terminating
or restricting the powers of
Personal Representatives
appointed under informal
procedure. A copy of the
Petition and Will, if any, can
be obtained from the Petitioner.
INFORMAL PROBATE
PUBLICATION NOTICE
Docket No. SU17P1354EA
Commonwealth of
Massachusetts The Trial
Court Probate and Family
Court Suffolk Division
Estate of:
Marvin A. Collier
Date of Death: 4/27/2017
To all persons interested in
the above captioned estate,
by Petition of Petitioner
Ann K. Collier of Boston,
MA, a Will has been admitted to informal probate.
Ann K. Collier of Boston,
MA has been informally
appointed as the Personal
Representative of the estate to serve without surety
on the bond.
The estate is being administered under informal
procedure by the Personal
Representative under the
Massachusetts
Uniform
Probate Code without supervision by the Court. Inventory and accounts are
not required to be filed with
the Court, but interested
parties are entitled to notice regarding the administration from the Personal
Representative
and can
petition the Court in any
matter relating to the estate, including distribution
of assets and expenses of
administration. Interested
parties are entitled to petition the Court to institute
formal proceedings and to
obtain orders terminating
or restricting the powers of
the Personal Representative appointed under informal procedure. A copy of
the Petition and will, if any,
can be obtained from the
Petitioner.
LEGAL NOTICES
This 1875
Frederic
Church oil on
canvas,
“Valley of the
Santa Ysabel,”
is among
those slated
for sale by the
Berkshire
Museum in
Pittsfield.
BERKSHIRE MUSEUM
arts philanthropy and audiences.
He n o t e d t h a t b o t h t h e
Massachusetts Museum of
Contemporar y Art and the
Sterling and Francine Clark
Art Institute have undergone
huge growth in recent years.
“We’re the community museum that cannot pretend to
be anything like the Clark, or
Mass MoCA, or the Norman
Rockwell Museum, for that
matter,” he said. “Rather than
be one of four institutions that
LEGAL NOTICES
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
- M.G.L. C. 149 CONSTRUCTION
ADVERTISEMENT OF INVITATION FOR BIDS
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION
and RECREATION (DCR)
251 Causeway Street, Suite 600,
Boston, MA 02114-2104
PHONE: 617-626-1250 FACSIMILE: 617-626-1370
Contract No.: P18-3195-M1A
Title:
Lead paint Removal at Various DCR Facilities
Sealed GENERAL BID proposals shall be submitted on a
form furnished by the Department and will be received until 11:00 AM on Wednesday, August 9th 2017 at the Boston
address above, and will at that time and place be publicly
opened and read.
“Individual sets of contract documents, in the form of
Compact Discs (CDs), which include specifications, are
available at the Boston address above, free of charge.
Other interested parties may also receive an informational copy of the CD containing plans and specifications, free of charge. All parties who wish to have the
CDs shipped to them must Email Carol.A.bernardi@
state.ma.us with your approved account number for
mailing service (i.e. - Federal Express), or you may
request to have CD sent by the United State Post
Service. In the email, please include your company’s
name, address, telephone and fax numbers, and contact person’s name and email address.”
In the event that any addenda are issued throughout the
open period for this project, DCR will distribute these addenda via email to the email identified by the prospective
bidders to DCR at the time the CD of plans and specifications is issued. PLEASE NOTE: All bidders must confirm
receipt of any DCR email communication by sending a return email stating: “(name of bidder) confirms that we have
received Addendum #__ for Project No.P18-3195-M1A and
Title “lead paint Removal at Various DCR Facilities” .The
email must show the name and phone number of the bidder’s responsible contact person.
MEDFORD HOUSING
AUTHORITY
REQUEST FOR DESIGN
SERVICES (RFS)
The
Medford
Housing
Authority, the Awarding
Authority invites sealed
proposals from registered
Architectural firms to provide professional design and
construction administration
services for Phase I of a
three phase siding replacement project at its Willis
Avenue 15-1 Federal Family Housing Development in
Medford,
Massachusetts.
The estimated construction cost is $445,000. The
Fee for Basic Services is
set at $40,000. The Award
is subject to HUD requirements and guidelines. A
briefing and site inspection is scheduled for 10:00
A.M on Tuesday, August 15,
2017 at the Willis Avenue
Community Center on Exchange Avenue, Medford,
MA 02155. Response to
this RFS must be submitted
no later than 2:00 p.m., on
Thursday, August 24, 2017.
The RFS may be obtained
from the MHA website at
www.medfordhousing.org
under bidding opportunities
or by contacting bvivian@
medfordhousing.org. All addenda will be posted on this
website as well. Questions
must be sent in writing to
bvivian@medfordhousing.
org no later than the close
of business on Friday, August 18, 2017.
The project consists of Lead Paint Removal at Various DCR
Facilities.
The estimated project cost is $ 500,000.00
The work is to be accomplished within 730 calendar days
of a notice to proceed. Liquidated damages in the amount
of $ 500 per day will be assessed if the work has not been
completed in accordance with the provisions of the contract within the time specified (as extended by any authorized extension of time granted in accordance with the
contract provisions).
The proposed contract includes a combined participation goal of 0% of the bid price for minority-owned
business enterprises and women-owned business enterprises. Proposed MBE/WBE participation plans that
include solely MBE or solely WBE participation, or do
not include a reasonable amount of participation by
both MBE and WBE firms to meet the combined goal,
will not be considered responsive.
The applicable local minority workforce utilization percentage is a minimum goal of 15.3%. The applicable
local women workforce utilization percentage is a
minimum goal of 6.9%.
The Commonwealth encourages the participation of
Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Business Enterprises
(“SDVOBE”) on its construction projects. The ServiceDisabled Veteran-Owned Business Enterprise participation benchmark for this contract is 0.0%.
Each bid must be accompanied by a bid deposit, in the
form of a bid bond, cash, certified check, or a treasurer’s
or cashier’s check issued by a responsible bank or trust
company, payable to the Department of Conservation and
Recreation in the amount of 5% of the bid. Each bid must
be enclosed in a sealed envelope on which the bidder’s
return address, including the bidder’s name, is listed, and
be addressed as follows:
John Clarkeson, Director of Contract Administration and
Procurement
Department of Conservation & Recreation
251 Causeway Street, 6th Floor
Boston, MA 02114
SEALED BID/PROPOSAL ENCLOSED
Contract No.: P18-3195-M1A
Contract Title:
Lead paint Removal at Various
DCR Facilities
Bids are subject to the provisions of M.G.L. Ch. 149, sections 44A to H, inclusive. In addition, bids are also subject
to Ch. 30, Sect. 39F, G, H and M inclusive. Wages are subject to minimum wage rates as per Mass. Gen. L. Ch. 149,
sections 26 to 27D inclusive. The Department reserves the
right to waive any informality in or to reject any and all bids
if it be in the public interest to do so.
All Bidders for this project are required to be certified
with the Massachusetts Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance (DCAM) for the DELEADING
CONTRACTOR, and must submit with the bid an update of their respective qualifications.
Leo P. Roy, Commissioner
Massachusetts Department
of Conservation and Recreation
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Pursuant to the authority of M.G.L. c. 118E and in accordance with M.G.L. c. 30A, a public hearing will be held on
Monday, August 21, at 1 p.m. in the First Floor Conference
Room, 100 Hancock Street, Quincy, MA relative to the
adoption of:
101 CMR 304.00:
CENTERS
The proposed amendments to 101 CMR 304.00 update
rates of payment for Community Health Center (CHC) services, implement a supplemental payment to help CHCs
transition from providing drugs acquired through the 340B
Drug Pricing Program to treat MassHealth managed care
organization (MCO) enrollees, update certain procedure
codes, update reporting requirements and related penalties, and make technical corrections and changes to improve clarity and readability.
EOHHS is making these changes to ensure that payments
are reasonable and adequate to meet costs that must be
incurred by efficiently and economically operated facilities,
and to ensure that payment rates are consistent with efficiency, economy, and quality of care. Annual aggregate
expenditures are expected to increase by $17.7 million as
a result of the proposed amendments. There is no fiscal
impact on cities and towns. The proposed rate regulation is
planned to go into effect no sooner than October 1, 2017.
Individuals who notify EOHHS of their intent to testify at
the hearing will be afforded an earlier opportunity to speak.
Speakers may notify EOHHS of their intention to testify at
the hearing by registering online at www.mass.gov/eohhs/
gov/laws-regs/hhs/public-hearings.html. Individuals may
also submit written testimony by e-mailing ehs-regulations@state.ma.us. Please submit electronic testimony as
an attached Word document or as text within the body of
the e-mail with the name of the regulation in the subject
line. All submissions must include the sender’s full name,
mailing address, and organization or affiliation, if any. Individuals who are unable to submit testimony by e-mail
should mail written testimony to EOHHS, c/o D. Briggs, 100
Hancock Street, 6th Floor, Quincy, MA 02171. Written testimony must be submitted by 5:00 p.m. on August 21.
All persons desiring to review the current draft of the proposed actions may go to www.mass.gov/eohhs/gov/lawsregs/hhs/public-hearings.html or request a copy in writing
or in person from MassHealth Publications, 100 Hancock
Street, 6th Floor, Quincy, MA 02171.
Special accommodation requests may be directed to the
Disability Accommodations Ombudsman by e-mail at
ADAccommodations@state.ma.us or by phone at 617-8473468 (TTY: 617-847-3788 for people who are deaf, hard of
hearing, or speech disabled). Please allow two weeks to
schedule sign language interpreters.
In case of inclement weather or other emergency, hearing cancellation announcements will be posted on the
MassHealth website at www.mass.gov/masshealth.
July 26, 2017
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of the Hudson River School, a
pair of works by sculptor Alexander Calder, a watercolor by
Edouard Vuillard, and an oil
painting by Benjamin West.
“It would be disingenuous
to not acknowledge that the
value of the works that are going to sale are a factor in this,”
said Shields. “But at the end of
the day, it’s a matter of recognizing the fact that these are
simply not essential to carry
our mission.”
While bolstering the muse-
uBUSES
Continued from Page B1
drivers’ experience on the
roads — the longtime method
used by the school system.
Ma y o r Ma r t i n J. Wa l s h
threw his support behind the
plan Tuesday.
“ Ma y o r Wa l s h h a s l o n g
been committed to finding
greater efficiencies and cost
savings in school transportation,” said Nicole Caravella, a
spokeswoman. “ With FY18
having the highest school budget in Boston history, it’s the
mayor’s priority that as many
dollars as possible go directly
to students and their education.”
The new plan comes a
month after several city councilors were sharply critical of
the school system’s high spending on transportation when it
approved the school system’s
$1 billion budget for next year.
Transportation costs account
for about $116 million in that
spending plan.
Councilor Mark Ciommo,
who chairs the council’s Ways
and Means Committee, said he
welcomed the plan.
“Any way we can create efficiencies, save time, and reduce
pollution with fewer buses in
News
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the morning and afternoon is a
cost benefit, an environmental
benefit, and a quality of life
benefit,” Ciommo said. “All
those dollars can go back in the
classroom.”
But Councilor Tito Jackson,
‘Any way we can
create efficiencies,
save time, and
reduce pollution
. . . is a cost
benefit, an
environmental
benefit, and a
quality of life
benefit.’
MARK CIOMMO, councilor
who is challenging Walsh in
his reelection bid, questioned
the timing of the school system’s announcement, coming
after the City Council budget
deliberations and while many
families are away on vacation.
“Something of this impor-
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School bus drivers union blasts
route plan offered by MIT team
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EOHHS may adopt a revised version of the proposed actions taking into account relevant comments and any other
practical alternatives that come to its attention.
Experience Globe.com
LEGAL NOTICES
are trying to make an art play,
why not be the one institution
that’s doing something different — the only ins titution
that’s focused on science and
history, and the arts?”
Among the important
works the museum plans to
auction at Sotheby’s within the
next six months are Norman
Rockwell’s “Blacksmith’s Boy
— Heel and Toe (Shaftsbury
Blacksmith Shop)” and “Shuff l e t o n’s B a r b e r s h o p ,” tw o
paintings by Albert Bierstadt
um’s endowment was his primary aim, Shields described
the reimagined museum as an
interdisciplinary institution,
heavy on technology, that does
away with static galleries, opting instead for interactive
teaching laboratories that
combine science, history, and
art.
The Berkshire Museum is
not the first to be criticized for
selling artworks to raise money. Brandeis University reversed course in 2011 after
facing intense public scorn
over its plan to shore up its finances by selling the Rose Art
Museum’s collection.
Shields said the Berkshire
Museum can withstand the
criticism.
“At the end of the day [we]
chose the interest of this community over those national organizations,” said Shields.
“There’s no way that someone’s going to convince me
that if you bring your endowment up to $40 million that it’s
not going to make things better.”
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tance and magnitude should
have been disclosed much earlier in the school year so that
everyone would have an understanding of the plan and what
it means,” Jackson said. “This
is BPS, again, lacking transparency and accountability.”
The school system selected
the MIT model after holding a
hackathon-like event in April,
and has been working with the
researchers to refine the approach and integrate it into its
current routing system, Hanlon said.
Students on the new routes,
he said, will spend on average
24 minutes traveling to school
in the mornings and 25 minutes in the afternoon, according to information MIT provided. He could not say how those
rates compared with the past
school year.
This is the school system’s
second attempt in recent years
to take a high-tech approach to
routing. Its previous effort in
2011 — when it adopted software to replace hand-drawn
routes — resulted in school
buses running chronically late
well into the fall, drawing the
ire of parents, teachers, and
then-mayor Thomas M. Menino.
That experience is leading
some parents and others to
greet the new MIT model with
caution.
‘ May b e i t w i l l w o r k o u t
beautifully, but based on past
experience I’m not sure,” said
Kevin Murray, a member of
Quality Education for Every
Student, a grassroots parent
organization in Boston.
Samuel Tyler, president of
the Boston Municipal Research
Bureau, a watchdog organization funded by nonprofits and
businesses, said, “It’s a worthwhile initiative, given the extremely expensive transportation system the school department has now, but [the school
system] is going to need time
to test the plan in real traffic to
be sure it is an improvement.”
Francois predicted the MIT
model, like the previous effort
in 2011, will result in a slew of
late buses, and he complained
that the district did not seek
input from the bus drivers
union as it developed the new
routes. He said school officials
“told us: ‘It won’t affect you
right now. We are looking at it
in the long run. We are just entertaining ideas.’”
Hanlon said the school system intends to work with drivers in the coming weeks to perfect the routes, after they do
dry runs to see if there are any
unforeseen obstacles that need
to be addressed.
“We are interested in being
close partners with the union
on this,” he said.
James Vaznis can be reached at
james.vaznis@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@globevaznis.
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B5
Remembered
Rush hour encroaching on all hours
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
uTRAFFIC
Continued from Page B1
grousing that everything was
better “back in the day.”
Recent figures show that
volume and travel times in
some spots are significantly up
from just a few years ago. A few
problems stem from positive
factors: Gas prices are relatively
low, the economy is humming,
construction is booming, and
people with a little extra money
in their pockets are getting out
more. But an increase in fatal
crashes and distracted driving
are also slowing things down.
And it all means that traffic,
and the fear of it, is now driving
lots of decisions.
In Falmouth, Laura TupperPalches, an intern at a farm in
Western Massachusetts, decided that setting her alarm for 4
a.m. on July 5 would be smarter
than trying to get off the Cape
the night of July 4. “I figured I’d
get more sleep,” she said.
Traffic dread has caused
Beth Jones of Brookline to mislead her son’s teachers with
vague talk of family obligations
so she can pull him out early on
their way to visit her family in
New York’s Hudson Valley.
“I have P TSD from a few
Thanksgivings and Easters
when it took me five hours to
get home,” she said.
At the Blue Harbor House
Inn in Camden, Maine, breakfast starts at 8 a.m., but guests
stressed about the trip home
have started asking Annette
Hazzard, a co-owner, if she can
make her famous eggs Florentine at 6:30 a.m. so they can hit
the road.
She does, she said, but then
regretted going public. “Everyone might ask for it.”
There are several ways to
measure the congestion. One is
by numbers, and we’ ll get to
those in a moment. Another is
by what might be called the
shrink factor. People have started talking to their therapists
about traffic.
Kyle Carney, a clinical social
worker at the Mount Auburn
Counseling Center in Harvard
Square, said that traffic has gotten so bad that it’s affecting relationships.
A common scenario involves
BY CITY AND TOWN
AMESBURY
LEWIS, John J.
ANDOVER
BARRY, Kenneth Michael
BILLERICA
DONOVAN, Daniel
FOSTER, Beverly A. (Clough)
O’BRIEN, William F.
BURLINGTON
DONOVAN, Daniel
REVERE
CUOZZO, Anthony V.
LAMBIASE, Rita (Bavaro)
CANTON
LASDEN, Gertrude S.
CARVER
LOVETT, Margaret E. (Schilling)
the husband venting his frustration, Carney said. “And the
wife feels this is intolerable, being in this car with you getting
so irritated.”
The stress of being caught in
backup after backup after a vacation causes a kind of domestic road rage, she says, in which
couples turn on each other.
“The traffic,” she said, “almost
negates the relaxing experience
of being away.”
Traffic’s unpredictability
causes great angst,” she said.
“People will make a decision
based on certain assumptions
— like this is an hour round-trip
— and then there’s construction
or an accident.”
Mothers on carpool duty
stress out about kids waiting on
the curb; people heading to the
doctor worry they’ll miss their
appointment.
When you look at the statistics, it’s no wonder everyone is
stressed.
The number of miles driven
in Massachusetts increased by
10 percent from the first quarter of 2013 to the first quarter
of 2017, from 17.2 billion miles
to 18.9 billion miles, according
to Inrix, a Seattle-based firm
that provides traffic data and
analytics.
Despite the ever-growing sophistication of navigation apps,
the backups are growing, with
big increases outside of traditional peak hours, the numbers
show.
Heading north on Interstate
93 out of Boston between 2 and
3 p.m. on a weekday, for example, the average travel time for
the 11-mile stretch between exit 24 and exit 37 increased nearly 50 percent from May and
June 2013 to the same period in
2017, from 12.5 minutes to
nearly 18.
Going into the city on I-93
from the south, the average
weekend noontime trip from
exit 8 to exit 24 increased from
13.6 minutes in May and June
2013 to 22 minutes in the same
period this year, according to
Inrix.
The situation on the Cape is
similarly dispiriting. Traffic going over the Sagamore and
Bourne bridges — at any time of
year — is now roughly double
what it was during the same period in 1972, according to Steven Tupper, a transportation
planner with the Cape Cod
Commission, the regional land
use, economic development,
and regulatory agency for Cape
Cod.
It used to be that if you waited until evening and hit the
Sagamore after 8 on a Friday
night you were fine, but now
the bridge is sometimes busy at
10 p.m. or even 11 p.m., said
Tupper.
“Traffic in January is now
like what it used to be in August,” he said.
In Lexington, crash-prevention expert Dan Strollo sees the
effect of rush-hour creep in the
calls he gets from senior citizens and others fearful about
driving on crowded roads.
“In the past, they would try
to get their errands done between 10:30 and 2, when the
traffic was light,” said Strollo,
who runs In Control, a nonprofit safety program. “But people
don’t feel they have that opportunity anymore.”
Back on Newbury Street,
Iacobacci, the hair stylist, described how traffic changes the
math of a weekend away. “You
used to be able to leave Friday
morning,” he said. “Now you
have to leave on Wednesday,
even if you don’t want to, and
come back on Tuesday.”
Beth Teitell can be reached at
beth.teitell@globe.com. Follow
her on Twitter @bethteitell.
uVIOLENCE
Continued from Page B1
countable. Eventually we will
make the arrest.”
At least three homicide cases
are currently being presented
before a grand jury, he said.
And Police Commissioner William B. Evans said there is a
warrant for the arrest of Desmond Tahatdil, 55, who is accused of killing his son, Brendan Tahatdil, 35, in March.
By the end of 2016, Boston
police reported a 63 percent
clearance rate for homicides
that year, up slightly from a 61
percent clearance rate for homicides in 2015.
More resources and changes
to investigative practices have
led to this year ’s improved
clearance rates, Greeley said.
In the last several years, the
homicide unit expanded to include 40 detectives, allowing
the department to put more resources toward solving cases.
Detectives are able to gather
surveillance videos and other
evidence, and interview more
witnesses, he said.
In some homicides this year,
suspects were captured on video surveillance committing brazen acts of violence, sometimes
in the middle of the day. The
footage helped lead to speedy
arrests.
It took detectives less than
24 hours to arrest 15-year-old
McKinley Archie for stabbing
18-year-old Anthony Woodbridge to death on Warren
Street near Dudley Square Station shortly before 10 a.m. on
July 7.
Information from witnesses
also helped investigators to
solve that case, Evans said.
“The community has helped
us and stepped up,” Evans said.
Since homicides often occur
outdoors and involve firearms,
surveillance video from local
businesses and information
from witnesses have also
helped solve cases, Suffolk District Attorney Daniel F. Conley
said.
“We’ve had a good rate of
more witnesses stepping up,”
Conley said by telephone. “So
many more people and businesses are investing in surveillance and equipment, [officials]
are able to capture some of
these events as they unfold.”
Greeley said police understand that some witnesses may
be reticent to supply information out of concern for their
safety. But the district attorney’s office helps to protect witnesses to homicide, and police
will meet people where they are
most comfortable speaking, he
said.
Still, homicides are up by
five this year compared with
the same period last year. The
number includes one that occurred in 2016, but was determined to be a homi cide in
2017.
Police officials said the recent spike in violence was largely the result of gang disputes. At
least three murders were committed during the course of a
robbery — two doctors inside
of their South Boston home in
May, and Andres Cruz inside
his Mission Hill hardware store
last week.
“We’re going to work hard to
get guns off the street,” Evans
said. “We’re working hard so
that these kids don’t have guns
and don’t pull the trigger.”
Greeley said he expects that
more of the homicides will be
cleared.
“They’re all our kids,” Greeley said of the victims. “That’s
the bottom line.”
Evans said he’d like to see
improvements in the number of
arrests made in nonfatal shootings. As of Sunday, 122 people
have been shot in Boston and
survived, up by 27 percent compared to the same period in
2016. Most are gang-related
and challenging to solve, he
said.
“We don’t get the cooperation from victims,” Evans said.
“Victims will tell us to go ‘fly a
kite,’ and that’s frustrating.”
Jan Ransom can be reached at
jan.ransom@globe.com. Follow
her on Twitter @Jan_Ransom.
VA chief expands probe of problems in N.H.
uHOSPITAL
Continued from Page B1
had previously filed complaints
with the VA’s inspector general
that went nowhere.
“We’ve been in contact with
the inspector general’s office
many times,” said Dr. Stewart
Levenson, the hospital’s chief
of medicine, who is leaving the
post this month. “I sent a complaint to [the inspector general[ and they never even answered it. This is beginning to
look like the prelude to a
coverup.”
The whistle-blowers also say
they want to meet with Shulkin
so they can air their concerns
directly.
“I’m happy that Dr. Shulkin
is coming to New Hampshire,”
said Andrea Amodeo-Vickery,
the lawyer for the whistle-blow-
ers. “But he has not included in
his announcement that he intends to meet in person with
the whistle-blowers . . . The
whistle-blowers would like to
speak to him, doctor to doctor,
about the issues they have
found at the Manchester Veterans Medical Center.”
The controversy began more
than a year ago when eight doctors and three other medical
staff members reported problems to a federal whistle-blower agency, the Office of Special
Counsel.
The independent agency zeroed in on three allegations:
that there were flies in an operating room, that a doctor cut
and pasted patient medical records without updating patients’ conditions, and that
scores of Manchester patients
were suffering from debilitating spinal problems that might
have been prevented.
Earlier this year, the Office
of Special Counsel found a
“substantial likelihood” the allegations were true and ordered the VA’s Office of the
Medical Inspector to launch an
investigation, which began in
January.
The Office of the Medical Inspector investigators, in their
June report, did find that Manchester staff had made mistakes in patient care, but did
not find that patients were
harmed as a result.
Shulkin agreed to meet with
the New Hampshire elected officials after Senators Jeanne
Shaheen and Maggie Hassan as
well as US Representatives Carol Shea-Porter and Ann Kuster
wrote to him July 21, asking
him to accompany them on a
site visit “as soon as possible to
examine these issues.”
They also sent 11 questions
and asked for prompt responses “given the seriousness of
these allegations.”
They also asked what
Shulkin was doing to “ensure
the quality and continuity of
care” for Manchester patients
while the investigations are ongoing. And they asked for progress reports every two weeks.
In a wri tten s tatem ent ,
Manchester VA spokeswoman
Kristin Pressly said, “We fully
s u p po r t t h o s e a c t i o n s [ b y
Shulkin] and will work to facilitate and expedite them.”
Andrea Estes can be reached at
andrea.estes@globe.com.
ROSLINDALE
WHITE, Timothy H.
SALEM
CASAZZA, Charles T.
SANDWICH
RAND, William F.
CHATHAM
EICHENBAUM, Howard B.
SAUGUS
POTTLE, Bradford H.
SECOR, John R.
CHELSEA
GOODMAN, Dorothy
SCITUATE
HORGAN, John P.
DANVERS
SCHIRRIPA, Rocco
SOMERVILLE
CANAVAN, John Patrick
DONOVAN, Daniel
FOSTER, Beverly A. (Clough)
GREENE, William A., Jr.
PUCILLO, Patricia Ann
DEDHAM
MacQUEEN, David A.
SPADONI, Edward R.
TAYLOR, Jonathan V.
DORCHESTER
ARAUJO, Angelica
REDDRICK, Lottie Rebecca
ROSENFIELD, Patrick S.
SHEA, Kevin M.
STONEHAM
STEEVES, Charlotte Nathalie (Williams)
DUXBURY
COURTNEY, Genevieve (Murray)
WABAN
GALLIGAN, Lauretta Ellen (Durkin)
EAST BOSTON
CUOZZO, Anthony V.
MAGNOLIA, Olga (Coscia)
SCHIRRIPA, Rocco
WAKEFIELD
POTTLE, Bradford H.
STEEVES, Charlotte Nathalie (Williams)
THABET, James Devlin
EVERETT
ARAUJO, Angelica
O’BRIEN, William F.
FALMOUTH
GOODMAN, Dorothy
FOXBOROUGH
ANDERSON, James J.
GEORGETOWN
MacQUEEN, David A.
GLOUCESTER
TAYLOR, Jonathan V.
HINGHAM
HERSTAD, Nancy E.
HYDE PARK
ARAUJO, Angelica
ROSENFIELD, Patrick S.
SPADONI, Edward R.
JAMAICA PLAIN
BYRNE, James D.
KINGSTON
LOVETT, Margaret E. (Schilling)
LOWELL
ATWATER, Timothy W.
LYNNFIELD
ARAUJO, Angelica
MALDEN
CHIN, Cai Xia Huang
DEL GENIO, Anthony J.
FOSTER, Beverly A. (Clough)
MEDFIELD
CAVANAUGH, Paul F.
MEDFORD
EPSTEIN, Helen (Silver)
MELROSE
POTTLE, Bradford H.
Boston homicides are up, as is solving them
READING
RAND, William F.
THABET, James Devlin
READVILLE
ROSENFIELD, Patrick S.
SPADONI, Edward R.
CAMBRIDGE
CANAVAN, John Patrick
BILL GREEN/GLOBE STAFF/FILE
PLUM ISLAND
DEL GENIO, Anthony J.
BOSTON
GALLIGAN, Lauretta Ellen (Durkin)
LASDEN, Gertrude S.
BYFIELD
DEL GENIO, Anthony J.
Traffic going over the Sagamore and Bourne bridges at any time of year is now roughly
double what it was during the same period in 1972, according to a transportation planner.
PEABODY
COSMAN, Phylllis A. (Newton)
SCHIRRIPA, Rocco
MIDDLETON
COSMAN, Phylllis A. (Newton)
STOUGHTON
ROSENFIELD, Patrick S.
WALPOLE
SPADONI, Edward R.
WALTHAM
ANNIS, Helen F. (Flannery)
HANDRAHAN, Jann-Carol
KENNEDY, Charles W. Sr.
McELLIGOTT, Frances M. (Ward)
PUCILLO, Patricia Ann
WATERTOWN
ANNIS, Helen F. (Flannery)
Di STEFANO, Renato G.
McELLIGOTT, Frances M. (Ward)
QUIGLEY, Maryellen (Schiavone)
WAYLAND
MORDECAI, Edna M. (Miller)
WELLESLEY
EICHENBAUM, Howard B.
LASDEN, Gertrude S.
MacQUEEN, David A.
QUIGLEY, Maryellen (Schiavone)
WEST HARWICH
BYRNE, James D.
WEST ROXBURY
ROSENFIELD, Patrick S.
WHITE, Timothy H.
WESTFORD
BROOKINGS, William R.
SECOR, John R.
WESTWOOD
GALLIGAN, Lauretta Ellen (Durkin)
WHITE, Timothy H.
WILMINGTON
BROOKINGS, William R.
MAGNOLIA, Olga (Coscia)
WINTHROP
HOWARD, Janice M. (Murdock)
LAMBIASE, Rita (Bavaro)
MILFORD
ANNIS, Helen F. (Flannery)
COMPAGNONE, Marguerite A. (Oliva)
WRENTHAM
COMPAGNONE, Marguerite A. (Oliva)
GOODMAN, Dorothy
MILTON
COMPAGNONE, Marguerite A. (Oliva)
SHEA, Kevin M.
OUT OF STATE
NEEDHAM
CAVANAUGH, Paul F.
EICHENBAUM, Howard B.
MacQUEEN, David A.
TURANO, Mary R. (Terrazzino)
FLORIDA
DEL GENIO, Anthony J.
EPSTEIN, Helen (Silver)
HANDRAHAN, Jann-Carol
QUIGLEY, Maryellen (Schiavone)
NEW BEDFORD
CANAVAN, John Patrick
MAINE
BROOKINGS, William R.
COSMAN, Phylllis A. (Newton)
PUCILLO, Patricia Ann
NEWBURYPORT
CASAZZA, Charles T.
DEL GENIO, Anthony J.
NEWTON
Di STEFANO, Renato G.
GALLIGAN, Lauretta Ellen (Durkin)
KENNEDY, Charles W. Sr.
TULSKY, Adele L. (Horwitz)
NORFOLK
RUSSO, Joy L. Dardinski (Davies)
NORTH ANDOVER
MacQUEEN, David A.
NORWOOD
FOLEY, James F. Jr.
SPADONI, Edward R.
OSTERVILLE
GALLIGAN, Lauretta Ellen (Durkin)
Announcements
IRONWORKERS UNION
LOCAL 7
We regret to announce the death
of Brother William Conneen
(Retired Member). Visitation
July 29, at Enon Baptist Church,
Montevallo AL. from 10-11am,
Funeral services at 11a.m. with
Burial to follow at Enon Baptist
Cemetary. Our sincerest condolences go out to his family and
friends.
Walter Belmonte, Jr.
President
NEW HAMPSHIRE
CAVANAUGH, Paul F.
COSMAN, Phylllis A. (Newton)
FOSTER, Beverly A. (Clough)
MORDECAI, Edna M. (Miller)
O’BRIEN, William F.
SECOR, John R.
NORTH CAROLINA
QUIGLEY, Maryellen (Schiavone)
TEXAS
BYRNE, James D.
OUT OF COUNTRY
GUATEMALA
ARAUJO, Angelica
Funeral Services
CANNIFF MONUMENT
(617) 323-3690
800-439-3690 • 617-876-9110
531 Cummings Highway, Roslindale
583 Mt. Auburn Street, Cambridge
MON-FRI 9-9; SAT 9-5, SUNDAY 12-5
SWEENEY BROTHERS
HOME FOR
FUNERALS, INC.
One Independence Ave., Quincy
Funeral Services
617-472-6344
Serving Quincy & The South Shore
Affordable Cremation
$
1310 complete
617 782 1000
Lehman Reen & McNamara
Funeral Home
www.lehmanreen.com
Serving Greater Boston
500 Canterbury St.
Boston, MA 02131
617-524-1036
www.stmichaelcemetery.com
Honor your loved ones
Honor your loved ones with a photo in The Boston
Globe. Ask your funeral director for details.
T h e
B6
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
ANDERSON, James J.
Age 75, native of County Cavan, Ireland, passed away on Sunday, July 23,
2017 at Brigham and Woman’s Hospital
in Boston. He was the son of the late
George and Winifred (Connolly) Anderson. Retired Technician from Revco.
Beloved husband of Mary (Norton) Anderson. Loving father of Kerri Forman
and her husband John of Foxborough,
David Anderson and his wife Elyse of
Wrentham and Kristina Anderson and
her partner Josh Preble of Foxborough.
Devoted grandfather of Noah, HelenElizabeth and Jace. Dear brother of
Mary Vasquez and her husband Bill of
E. Bridgewater and Chris Anderson,
Martin Anderson and his wife Rosetta,
Dina Mulchrone, and Bridie McGuire
all of Ireland. Also survived by many
loving nieces and nephews. A Funeral
Mass will be celebrated on Friday at 10
AM at St. Mary’s Church, 58 Carpenter
St. in Foxborough. Interment to follow
at St. Mary’s Cemetery in Foxborough.
To light a special candle in his memory
please visit the funeral home web site at
www.robertsandsonsfuneralhome.com.
Visiting Hours: Relatives and
friends are kindly invited to attend
calling hours on Thursday, July 27,
2017 from 4-8 pm at the Roberts and
Sons Funeral Home, 30 South St. in
FOXBOROUGH.
Roberts and Sons Funeral Home
508-543-5471
ANNIS, Helen F. (Flannery)
Of Watertown July 24, 2017. Age 91.
Beloved wife of the late Joseph S. Annis. Devoted mother of Donna Rowe
of Waltham, David Annis & his wife
Heather of BC, Canada and the late
Michael Annis. Loving grandmother of
Stephanie Annis of Milford. Dear sister
of the late Elizabeth Murphy, Anna
Brutting, William Flannery, George
“Bud” Golding & Arthur Golding. Also
loved by many nieces & nephews.
Funeral from the MacDonald, Rockwell
& MacDonald Funeral Home, 270 Main
St., WATERTOWN, on Friday, July 28
at 9:30 AM followed by a Funeral Mass
at 10:30 AM in the Church of Saint
Jude, 147 Main St., Waltham. Visiting
hours: Thursday 4-7 PM. Relatives and
friends are kindly invited. Interment
St. Joseph’s Cemetery, West Roxbury.
Retired admissions clerk, St. Elizabeth’s
Hospital.
MacDonald, Rockwell & MacDonald
www.macdonaldrockwell.com
ARAUJO, Angelica
Of Boston, on July 20th. Mother of
Diana Ubinas and her husband Anthony Guerriero of Lynnfield and Jorge
Ubinas and his wife Nora of Dorchester. Daughter of the late Salvador and
Lucila Araujo of Guatemala City, Guatemala. Sister of Isabel Ramirez of Guatemala City, Guatemala, Emilia Palacios
of Dorchester, Elizabeth Araujo of Hyde
Park, the late Aurora Garcia, Cristobal
Araujo, Ovidio Araujo, Trinidad Araujo,
Amparo Pineda, and Ofelia Araujo, all
of Guatemala City, Guatemala. Also
survived by 5 grandchildren: JorgeAndres Salvador Ubinas, Christian
Samuel Ubinas, Kaela Ivelisse Ubinas,
Daniel Joaquin Ubinas, Nicholas Anthony Guerriero, and many nieces and
nephews. Visiting hours will be in the
Salvatore Rocco & Sons Funeral Home,
331 Main St., EVERETT, Friday, July
28th from 2 to 4 p.m. A Prayer Service
will immediately follow in the funeral
home. Relatives and friends are kindly
invited. Interment will be in the San
Raymundo Cemetery, San Raymundo,
Guatemala at a later date. Complimentary valet parking will be available at
the funeral home during Friday’s visiting hours and service.
Rocco-Carr-Henderson F.H.
1-877-71-ROCCO
www.roccofuneralhomes.com
ATWATER, Timothy W.
Of Lowell, Sun., July 16. Devoted
husband of Virginia May (Lang) twater.
Beloved father of Timothy W. Atwater,A
Jr. and Harvey “The Wonder Dog”. Beloved brother of the late Jerald Simms.
He also leaves 2 grandchildren, 1 great
grandchild, a sister in law, Audrey
Simms, and a host of other relatives
and friends. Visitation with the family
Thurs., July 27, 5-8 p.m. at the A. J.
Spears Funeral Home, 124 Western
Ave., CAMBRIDGE. Family and friends
will meet at the Funeral Home on Friday, July 28 at 10 a.m. and proceed to
Puritan Lawn Cemetery, Peabody.
A.J. Spears Funeral Home
Cambridge 617-876-4047
BARRY, Kenneth Michael
Kenneth Michael Barry born on July
22, 1950 returned to his maker on July
22, 2017
Ken, a kind, forgiving, steadfast soul,
brought love and light into everyone’s
lives. All who knew Ken were touched
by his optimistic outlook and his huge
open heart. Ken was passionate about
skiing, motorcycling, cars and his
kitties, Jack and Ziggy. He was as committed to his friends and family as he
was his sobriety, proudly proclaiming
that AA gave him everything that was
good in his life.
The epic journey to heal his aggressive cancer took him from Mexico
to Oklahoma and after a 9 hour ride,
concluded at his daughter Heather’s
wedding in Colorado with a monumental speech and gorgeous father daughter dance. This ultimate goal and final
wish were accomplished with divine
intervention from the lord above.
In lieu of flowers please send your
generous donations to the Bill W.
House in Dorset, Vermont.
He is survived by his loving wife
Martha Russell Barry, his three children
Sara Barry, Christopher Barry and
newly married Heather Campbell and.
the twinkle of his eye granddaughter
Cameron Barry. He is also survived
by his sisters Eileen Hogan & Joanne
Ebrecht any many nieces and nephews.
Visiting hours will be held at the
home of Martha and Ken (Camp Azalea) on Thursday, July 27th from 4 - 7
pm and Friday, July 28th from 5 - 8 pm.
11 Azalea Dr., Andover Ma 01810
A Celebration of life is planned for
later in August - stay tuned for more
details.
CANAVAN, John Patrick
“Jack”
Of Somerville, formerly
of Cambridge, July 22,
2017. Cherished son
of the late Margaret (Gannon) and
James J. Canavan. Loving brother of
Rosemary Sullivan and her husband
Bill and Eileen Canavan all of New
Bedford, James Canavan of San Diego,
CA, Stephen Canavan of Cambridge,
Michael Canavan and his wife Marilyn
of Somerville, Richard Canavan of
Cambridge and Paul Canavan and his
wife Wendy of FL. Dear uncle of Eileen
Sullivan, Kevin and Maura Canavan.
Funeral Procession from the George L.
Doherty Funeral Home, 855 Broadway (Powder House Sq.) Somerville
on Thursday, July 27th at 10:30 AM
followed by a Funeral Mass celebrated
in St. Catherine of Genoa Church at
11:00AM. Relatives and friends invited
to attend. Calling Hours Thursday
morning from 8:30AM to 10:30AM.
Interment will be private. In lieu of
flowers please send donations in his
memory to the Joslin Diabetes Center,
1 Joslin Place, Suite 745, Boston, MA
02215. Late Army Veteran and member
of the Boston Carmen’s Union, Local
589. For more information please visit
www.dohertyfuneralservice.com
George L. Doherty Funeral Service
Somerville, MA
CASAZZA, Charles T.
BROOKINGS, William R.
“Bill”
Of Wilmington, July 24th. Cherished
husband of 56 years to Barbara (Skirus). Beloved father of Bill Brookings
and his wife Deborah of Westford.
Brother of Lillian Gendron and her
husband Charles of Tewksbury and
the late Theresa Boyd and George
Brookings. Brother in law of Dorothy
Kane of NY, Jack Skirus and his wife
Pearl of Stoneham and Helen O’Brien
and her husband William of Billerica.
Devoted grandfather of Trent and Ruth
Brookings. Bill is also survived by many
loving nieces and nephews and his dear
friends Larry Kuhn and Frank Agresti.
Funeral service in the Cota Funeral
Home, 335 Park St. (corner of Park
St. and Rte.28) NORTH READING, at
Reading line on Friday, July 28th at
11am. Relatives and friends may visit
at the funeral home on Thursday from
4-8pm. Interment Wildwood Cemetery,
Wilmington. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Bill’s name to the
V.N.A of Middlesex East, 800 Cummings Park, Suite 5000, Woburn, MA
01801. Bill was a past Master Mason in
the Friendship Lodge in Wilmington.
www.cotafuneralhomes.com
Cota Family Funeral Home and
Cremation Service
North Reading
978-664-4340 / 781-944-1765
BYRNE, James D.
88, of West Harwich and
The Woodlands, Texas,
formerly of Jamaica Plain,
passed away July 14th. In 2005, Jim
was the innocent victim of a terrible
accident in Dennis Port when he was
almost crushed to death after being
struck by a car while sitting on a bench.
The quality of his life was greatly
diminished but Jim never gave up
fighting for his life and amazed his
many doctors at several hospitals with
his strength and ability to overcome
numerous obstacles. Jim leaves his
devoted wife Barbara (Smith), daughter
Paula and her husband Robert Howard
of Harwich Port and The Woodlands,
Texas and loving grandson Neal
Howard. He was predeceased by his
beloved daughter Sharon Byrne Tirrell
along with his sister and brother-in-law
Hazel and Frank Antonelli. He is also
survived by granddaughter Jessica
(Tirrell) Pumphret of Winthrop,
Massachusetts and great grandchildren
Ava and Joseph Pumphret. Jim and
Barbara enjoyed many happy years
together on Cape Cod after purchasing
their home in West Harwich in 1975.
Jim retired from the MBTA in 1995 and
it was then he and Barbara decided to
winter in Texas and summer on Cape
Cod. Jim was proud of his military
service as a Marine during the Korean
War. A Mass of Christian Burial will be
celebrated on Saturday, July 29th at
10:00 AM at Holy Trinity Church, 246
Main Street, West Harwich 02671.
Burial will be at the Massachusetts
National Cemetery in Bourne on
Monday, July 31st at 11:15 AM.
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Of Salem, MA, formerly of Newburyport, MA passed away at Tufts NE
Medical Center on July 19, 2017 after
a sudden illness. Charlie was born in
Cambridge, MA on October 13, 1945 to
the late Charles Casazza and Beatrice
(Boudreau) Casazza. He grew up in
Arlington, MA and graduated from
Arlington High School in 1963. He
graduated from Northeastern University with a BA in Finance in 1968. He
was a member of the US Army Reserves
during the Vietnam War serving as a
medic.
Charlie enjoyed a 50 year career in
the investment business. Since 2003,
he has been employed at Boston Financial Management where he was Chief
Investment Strategist and Managing
Director. Prior to joining BFM, Charlie
worked at Woodstock Corporation, The
Boston Company, Cowan & Company,
William D. Witter and Eaton & Howard
Inc. Charlie was a member of the
Boston Economic Club.
He is a former member of Wentworth by the Sea, Old Town Country
Club; and a Board Member of the
Salem Dog Park. Throughout his adult
life he enjoyed tennis, golf, fishing and
boating.
He is survived by his two children,
Jeffrey P. Casazza of Newton, MA and
Kristen E. Casazza of Brooklyn, NY.,
his former wife Elizabeth B. Casazza,
of Newburyport, and his beloved Airedale, Maggie.
Services are private at the family’s
request. The Twomey, LeBlanc, & Conte
Funeral Home 193 High St. NEWBURYPORT, MA 01950 is assisting
Mr. Casazza’s family with his funeral
arrangements.
In lieu of flowers, donations may
be made to the Joslin Diabetes Center,
online at www.joslin.org.
To offer online condolences please
visit www.tlcfuneralhome.com.
CAVANAUGH, Paul F.
Former City Solicitor for the City of
Concord NH, of Medfield formerly of
Needham on July 24, 2017. Beloved
husband of Mary (Ryder) Cavanaugh.
Visiting hours Thurs 4-8 Pm. Funeral
Mass Fri at 10 AM St. Joseph Church,
Needham. Complete notice will appear
on Thurs. For more info please visit
www.eatonfuneralhomes.com
CHIN, Cai Xia Huang
Of Malden, MA, passed away on July
23, 2017. Devoted mother of the late
Susan Ying Lau, Amanda Chin and
Melissa Chin. Loving grandmother of
5 grandchildren and 2 great grandchildren. Friends and relatives are respectfully invited to visiting hours on July
31st from 5pm to 8pm at Wing Fook
Funeral Home. A traditional Chinese
service will be on August 1st at 9:30
am, procession will leave at 11 AM.
Interment will be held at Forest Hills
Cemetery.
Wing Fook Funeral Home
13 Gerard Street
Boston MA 0211
(617) 989-8833
COMPAGNONE, Marguerite
A. (Oliva)
Of Milford, MA, 89, died Monday (July
24, 2017) at her residence. Beloved wife
of the late retired Uxbridge District
Court Judge Anthony N. Compagnone;
the loving mother of Marian Press
and her husband Irvin of Wrentham
MA, Dr. Anthony N. Compagnone Jr.
of Milton MA, Angela Consigli and
her husband Paul of Milford MA and
Charles J. Compagnone and his wife
Wendy of Southlake TX; the beloved
sister of Anthony “Babe” Oliva and his
wife Mary of Milford MA and Eleanor
C. Bernat of Upton MA; and the sisterin-law of Elizabeth Oliva of Milford MA,
Elena Compagnone of Milford MA and
Alice Compagnone of Putnam CT; also
a loving grandmother, aunt & cousin.
Her Funeral will be held Saturday
(July 29th) at 9am from the Edwards
Memorial Funeral Home, 44 Congress
Street, Milford, MA, followed by a Mass
of Christian Burial at 10am in Sacred
Heart of Jesus Church, 7 East Main
Street, Milford MA. Visiting hours will
be Friday (July 28th) from 4pm to 8pm.
Visit www.edwardsmemorialfuneralhome.com for condolence book.
Memorial donations may be made
to the Oliva Family Comfort Care
Fund, c/o Milford Regional Healthcare
Foundation, 14 Prospect Street, Milford
MA 01757.
Edwards Memorial Funeral Home
Milford MA
COSMAN, Phylllis A.
(Newton)
Of Peabody, July 24, 2017, formerly of
Middleton, age 87, beloved wife of the
late Francis Cosman. Aunt of James
LaBelle of Acton, ME, Robert LaBelle
& Kathleen of Manchester, NH, Mark
LaBelle & Robbin of Acton, ME, and
Richard LaBelle & Linda of Grand Prairie, TX, and she leaves 8 grand-nieces &
grand-nephews, 4 great-grand-nieces/
nephews as well as other extended
family and friends, and sister of the late
Priscilla (LaBelle) Winsor.
Visiting Hours: Relatives and
friends are kindly invited to her Funeral
Service on Friday July 28, 2017 at 9:30
AM at the Brooksby Village Chapel,
Peabody, and to gather for visitation on
Thursday from 4-7 P.M. in the Conway,
Cahill-Brodeur Funeral Home, 82
Lynn St., PEABODY. Burial will be in
Puritan Lawn Memorial Park, Peabody.
Memorial donations may be made to
the Brooksby Benevolent Fund, 300
Brooksby Village Dr., Peabody, MA
01960. Please visit www.ccbfuneral.
com for online obituary & sign condolences.
Conway, Cahill-Brodeur
Funeral Home
82 Lynn St.
Peabody, MA 01960
COURTNEY, Genevieve
(Murray)
Mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, sister, aunt and friend peacefully passed away at Bay Path Nursing
and Rehab on July 20th. She was 92
years old. She was born in Wollaston,
resided in Squantum for 30 years and
Braintree for 40 years. Dear wife to
the late Charles R. Courtney. Loving
mother to Joan LeGallo and her husband Lawrence of Charlottesville, VA,
Richard Courtney and his wife Chirline
of San Antonio, TX, James Courtney of
Center Ossippe, NH, Jean White and
her husband Charles of Yarmouth, MA.
Cherished sister to Carole Haigney of
East Orleans, MA. Also survived by
five grandchildren and thirteen greatgrandchildren. Relatives and friends
are respectfully invited to attend the
visiting hours on Saturday, July 29th,
from 4-7 PM in the Keohane Funeral
Home, 785 Hancock St., QUINCY.
In lieu of flowers, please consider a
donation in memory of Genevieve to
Rosie’s Place, 889 Harrison Ave, Boston,
MA 02118. See www.Keohane.com or
call 1-800-Keohane for directions and
online condolences.
CUOZZO, Anthony V.
Of Revere, formerly of East Boston,
passed away on July 24, 2017 at the age
of 66. Longtime companion of Hilarie
Chandler of Revere. Dear brother of
Alesandra Rice of Revere, and her
late husband Robert Sr. Cherished
uncle of Robert Rice Jr. and his wife
Susan of Rowley, and Ronald Rice of
Saugus. Family and friends will honor
Anthony’s life by gathering in Vazza’s
“Beechwood” Funeral Home, 262 Beach
Street, REVERE on Thursday, July 27
from 4:00 P.M. to 8:00 P.M. and again
on Friday at morning 9:00A.M. for a
service to be held in our Chapel of the
Resurrection at 10:00A.M. Interment
will follow in Woodlawn Cemetery,
Everett. In lieu of flowers, donations
can be made to A Better English Setter
Rescue c/o Candy Bordonaro, 423
Sideliner Rd., Union, ME 04862, www.
abettersetter.org. For guest book and
directions www.vazzafunerals.com
Vazza Funeral Home
Revere 1-800-252-1127
Celebrate
their lives
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with a photo in the
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Ask your funeral
director for details.
DEL GENIO, Anthony J.
“Tony”
86, of Punta Gorda, Florida
passed away peacefully
Friday, July 21, 2017 after a
short battle with dementia.
He was born March 18, 1931 in Malden, Massachusetts to the late Angelo
and Roserina (nee-Troissi) Del Genio.
Tony was a member of IUOE Local #4
and worked as an operating engineer
and shop steward at Essex Bituminous
in West Peabody, MA from the mid
50’s until his retirement. He was also
co-owner with his wife Rose of The
Bungalow Convenience and Gift Shop
on Plum Island, MA and then Clipper
City Bowl and Skate at Port Recreation
Center and shopping complex in Newburyport, MA.
Tony was raised on the hill in Revere,
MA. After marrying Rose in 1957, he
lived in Malden, Byfield, Plum Island
and Newburyport, MA. In 1993 he
retired and moved to Punta Gorda and
then Deep Creek, FL as a seasonal resident. He served in U.S. Marine Corps
from 1951 to 1954 serving in Korea
during the Korean War.
Tony enjoyed his retirement, cooking, growing tomatoes, deep sea fishing, driving with Louise throughout the
United States and Canada, especially
several trips to Alaska and overfeeding
his grand dogs. He also enjoyed playing semi-pro baseball after Korea, being
a member of the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary, and umpiring and coaching
the Braves in his sons’ Little League
where in 1994 he was honored as one
of the founders of the Byfield-Newbury
Baseball League.
Survived by and deeply missed by
his, sons, John and daughter-in-law
Mary Ann, Paul and daughter-inlaw, Kathy; beloved granddaughters,
Cathy and Caroline; and his dear and
constant company for the past nineteen
years, Louise Knuttel; and scores of
nieces and nephews. Tony was the
youngest and last survivor of nine
brothers and sisters. He was preceded
in death by his wife of 38 years, Rose
(nee-Desmond) Del Genio in 1995, his
parents and siblings, George, Millie,
Annette, Albert, Esther, Ami, Loretta
and Nina.
Memorial services will be held Monday 4:00 PM, July 31, 2017 at Roberson
Funeral Home Chapel, 2151 Tamiami
Trail, PORT CHARLOTTE, FL 33948.
Memorial services celebrating Tony’s
life will also be held at a later date in
Massachusetts.
Memorial contributions in lieu of
flowers may be made to the Peace
River Wildlife Center, 3400 Ponce de
Leon Parkway, Punta Gorda, FL 33950.
Friends may visit on line at www.robersonfh.com to extend condolences to
the family. Arrangements by Roberson
Funeral Home & Crematory Port Charlotte Chapel.
EICHENBAUM, Howard B.
Of Needham and Chatham, formerly of
Wellesley, a Distinguished Professor in
the Department of Psychological and
Brain Sciences at Boston University,
and an internationally recognized
figure in advancing our understanding
of the fundamental nature and brain
mechanisms of memory died, in Boston
on July 21, 2017, following recent
spine surgery at age 69. Eichenbaum’s
contributions to the field of memory
research were profound; elucidating the
mechanisms underlying memory and
its organization in the brain, including the discovery of “time cells” in the
hippocampus. Eichenbaum joined the
BU faculty after obtaining a BS in cell
biology and a PhD in Psychology at the
University of Michigan, completing a
post-doctoral fellowship in the MIT
Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, then holding faculty positions at
Wellesley College, University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill and SUNY
Stony Brook. Eichenbaum served as
founding Director of the BU Center for
Memory and Brain and of the Cognitive
Neurobiology Laboratory, after having
earlier founded both the Undergraduate Program for Neuroscience and the
Graduate Program for Neuroscience.
Eichenbaum’s non-science pursuits
included coaching his two sons’ Little
League baseball teams for many years,
taking his sons around the country to
catch a game at every Major League
Baseball Park in America that spanned
summers across 15 years, kayaking in
the waters off Chatham and rooting
passionately for his Boston Red Sox
and University of Michigan teams. He
is survived by his beloved wife of 35
years, Karen J. Shedlack; two sons, both
pursuing graduate studies, Alexander
E. Eichenbaum, at Washington State
University and Adam S. Eichenbaum, at
the University of California - Berkeley;
100-year-old mother, Edith (Kahn)
Eichenbaum of San Diego; brother,
Jerold Eichenbaum of San Diego and
sister, Miriam Eichenbaum Drop of Los
Angeles. A memorial will be announced
at a later date. Online guestbook at
gfdoherty.com.
George F. Doherty & Sons
Needham 781-444-0687
Di STEFANO, Renato G.
Of Watertown, July 24 2017. He was
born in Atina Italy in 1936. He was
the cherished son of the late Felice and
Loreta Di Stefano of Newton. He leaves
his beloved wife of 60 years Luisa (DiLuca) Di Stefano, his daughter Maria
McWhinnie and her husband Robert of
Andover, Anthony Di Stefano and his
wife Erin and his cherished grandson
Aidan Di Stefano. Renato was an avid
gardener and fisherman and enjoyed
spending time with his many friends at
the Sons of Italy in Watertown. Visiting
hours in the Andrew J. Magni & Son
Funeral Home, 365 Watertown St, Rt.
16, NEWTON, Thursday from 4-8PM.
Funeral Mass Friday at 10:30AM in Our
Lady Help of Christians Church, 573
Washington St, Newton. Burial Newton
Cemetery.
Andrew J. Magni & Son FH, Newton
www.magnifuneralhome.com
DONOVAN, Daniel
Of Billerica, formerly of Somerville, July
21, 2017. Beloved husband of Robin
(White) Donovan. Loving father of Elizabeth DeCoste and her husband Ryan
of Burlington, Daniel Donovan and
his wife Krista of Texas. Son of the late
Eileen (Hayes) and Daniel Donovan.
Brother of Michael and Timothy Donovan, Eileen Mahoney and Theresa Callahan. Dear grandfather of Abigail. Also
survived by many nieces and nephews.
Funeral procession from the George L.
Doherty Funeral Home, 855 Broadway
(Powder House Sq.), SOMERVILLE,
Friday morning at 9am, followed by a
Funeral Mass in St. Clement Church,
Somerville, at 10:00. Relatives and
friends invited. Calling hours Thursday
4-8. Interment Woodbrook Cemetery,
Woburn. Late Veteran US Air Force. In
lieu of flowers, donations maybe made
in Daniel’s memory to the New England
Center for Homeless Veterans, 17 Court
St., Boston, MA 02108. For more information and guestbook, please visit:
dohertyfuneralservice.com
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EPSTEIN, Helen (Silver)
99, of Boynton Beach, FL & Medford.
Entered Eternal Rest unexpectedly July
24, 2017. Former owner of the Princess
Corset Shop with her late husband Eliot
Epstein. Beloved mother of Marilyn
Susman & her husband Gary Auerbach
and Sue & her husband Greg Paskerian.
Cherished grandmother of Andrew
Susman and Scott Paskerian. Dear
sister of the late Rose Liner and Meyer
Silver. Services at Temple Shalom, 475
Winthrop St. (Route 38) MEDFORD
on Thursday, July 27 at 10:30 AM.
Interment in Sharon Memorial Park,
Sharon. Condolence calls may be made
following the interment at her Medford
residence until 9PM only. In lieu of
flowers, donations in her memory
may be made to Temple Shalom, 475
Winthrop St., Medford, MA 02155 or
a charity of one’s choice. For online
condolences and directions go to:
www.goldmanfc.com
Goldman Funeral Chapel, Malden
1-800-982-3717
FOLEY, James F., Jr.
Lifelong resident of Norwood, passed
away peacefully on July 22, 2017.
Beloved husband of the late Mary
Lou (McGuff) Foley. Loving father of
James F. Foley, III and his wife Denise
of Wolcott, CT, Gerard T. Foley and his
ex-wife Paula of Norwood and David P.
Foley and his wife Sheryl of Middleton,
WI; cherished grandfather of Ryan and
Leah Foley, Lyndsey Foley Alyn and her
wife Samantha Alyn, Heather Foley,
and Madison and Makayla Foley; dear
step-grandfather of John Houston,
Bryanna Houston Lydon and Nicolas
Houston; proud great-grandfather of
Ellyson Fahey; beloved son of the late
James F. “Shinksy” Foley, Sr. and Mary
E. (Drummey) Foley; devoted brother
of Stephen Foley and his wife Margaret
of Norwood and the late Mary Jennings, Ellen Cotter, Anne Foley, William
Foley and Margaret Eckhardt. He is
also survived by many loving nieces and
nephews. Funeral services will be held
on Wednesday, July 26th at 8:00am
from the Gillooly Funeral Home, 126
Walpole Street (Rte. 1A), Norwood,
followed by a Mass of Christian
Burial at 9:00am in St. Catherine of
Siena Church, 547 Washington Street,
Norwood. Interment will follow the
Mass in Highland Cemetery, Norwood.
Visiting hours will be held on Tuesday
from 4:00-8:00pm at the funeral home.
Memorial contributions in memory
of James F. Foley, Jr. may be made
to the National Shrine of the Divine
Mercy, 2 Prospect Hill Rd., Stockbridge,
MA 01262.
Gillooly Funeral Home
Norwood
781-762-0174
www.gilloolyfuneralhome.com
GALLIGAN, Lauretta Ellen
(Durkin)
97, of Westwood, peacefully entered
eternal rest at Clark House on July 25,
2017. Beloved wife of the late Thomas
J. Galligan, Jr. with whom she shared
66 years of marriage. Born in Syracuse,
NY, Lauretta was a devoted spouse,
mother of five sons, grandmother,
great-grandmother, and engaged friend
to many over the years. Her abiding joy
and enthusiasm was raising her family
in Newton and especially in later years
with multi-generation family gatherings
and reunions at the summer home in
Osterville. She was friend to many over
the years and active with her husband
in many business, community and
social activities in the Boston area as a
member of the Board of Overseers at
Boston Symphony Orchestra, World
Affairs Council, and Board of Directors
for H.P. Hood. Lauretta and Tom were
very engaged in fund raising campaigns
for Boston College and Mass General
Hospital. She had travelled to every
continent except the Arctic and Antarctic. In 1972, Lauretta was among those
profiled in a Time magazine cover story
on the role of women in a changing
America. Time did a follow-up story
with her in 2009. (“I wouldn’t change
a thing” she said). She was active over
the years as a member of the Oyster
Harbors and Wianno clubs in Osterville, and Brae Burn in Newton. In their
later years Lauretta and her husband
Tom enjoyed an active life at Fox Hill
Village. Three years ago she moved to
Clark House assisted living at Fox Hill.
Lauretta was an engaging and enthusiastic friend whose curiosity about what
people thought, and why, was always
evident. She loved meeting people and
connecting people with each other. For
many years, her signature contribution to family Christmas and reunions
was a rendition of the poem “Hugs”.
Lauretta was one of six children of Irish
immigrants John James and Mary Ellen
(McKeon) Durkin. Her father was a
Navy veteran of the Spanish America
War. Lauretta was an alumna of Syracuse University. She was predeceased by
her siblings Ann, Jack, Patrick, Kay, and
Dorothy. Lauretta will be sorely missed
and long remembered for her abiding
devotion to faith and family. She was
the loving and devoted mother of:
Thomas J. Galligan III and his wife Dr.
Ann of Weston; John D. Galligan and
his wife Kathleen of Wenham; Christopher M. Galligan and his wife Andrea
of So. Hamilton; Martin P. Galligan
and his wife Nancy of Wellesley and
Peter A. Galligan and his wife Margaret
of Needham. Also survived by eleven
grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. Visiting hours at the George
F. Doherty & Sons Funeral Home, 477
Washington St., (Rt.16) WELLESLEY,
Friday, July 28 from 4-7pm. Funeral
Mass in St. Margaret Mary Church,
845 High St., (Rt. 109), Westwood,
Saturday, July 29 at 10am. Relatives
and friends kindly invited. Interment in
Newton Cemetery. Memorial donations
may be made to the Galligan Chair in
Strategic Operations, Boston College,
Office of University Advancement, 140
Commonwealth Ave., Chestnut Hill,
MA 02467 or St. Margaret Mary Parish,
PO Box 386, Westwood, MA 02090.
Online guestbook and directions at
gfdoherty.com.
George F. Doherty & Sons
Wellesley 781-235-4100
FOSTER, Beverly A.
(Clough)
79, of Plaistow, NH and formerly of Billerica, Malden and Somerville, MA, on
July 24, 2017. Wife of Gerald M. Foster,
and mother of Gerald M. Foster, Jr. and
wife Elaine of Sandown, NH, Stephen
A. Foster and wife Marinez of Manchester, NH, William R. Foster of Derry,
NH, John R. Foster and wife Donna
of Tewksbury, MA and the late Paul
J. Foster. Sister of Albert Clough and
wife Cynthia Nyhen of Malden, David
Clough and wife Laura of Melrose, and
Joyce McKay of Derry, NH and the late
Katherine Clough and Dennis Clough.
Sister-in-law of Donna Clough of Wilmington and the late Doug McKay. Also
survived by grandchildren Rachelle
Young, Leslie Foster, Ashley Foster,
Kaley Foster and Michael Foster.
Visiting Hours: Relatives and
friends are invited to call on Thursday, July 27, 2017 from 5 to 9 p.m. at
Brookside Chapel & Funeral Home,
116 Main St., PLAISTOW, NH. Funeral
service on Friday at 10:30 a.m. in the
funeral home. Memorial donations to
the American Cancer Society. Online
condolences may be sent to
www.brooksidechapelfh.com
Every life
is a story
worth
sharing
The Boston Globe’s new
Featured Life offering lets
you honor your loved one
with a professionally written
narrative about their life and
For more details, contact
Boston Globe Classifieds
at 617-929-1500 or
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Ask your funeral director for details.
Of Falmouth and formerly of Wrentham and Chelsea, died peacefully on
July 22, 2017 at the age of 92. Beloved
wife of the late Kenneth Goodman for
over 60 years.
Dorothy leaves three loving children,
Lori Bellavance of North Attleboro,
Scott Goodman of Williamston, SC and
Glen Goodman and his wife, Rachel of
Wrentham. Also loving grandmother
to Ian, Noelle, Lore, Scott Jr., Lauren,
Kim, Mark, and Drew. Her family was
her life. Having been orphaned for
portions of her childhood, she knew the
strength of love.
Although she retired as a very successful full-time office administrator,
Mom was always in her true glory after
she arrived home. Den mother, Little
League wiz, school activities director,
term paper editor, ham radio operator
and friend to all - that is her legacy.
Relatives and friends are kindly
invited to attend a graveside service
at 1:30 p.m. on Friday, July 28 at the
Massachusetts National Cemetery in
Bourne. Service under the direction
of Chapman Cole & Gleason Funeral
Home in FALMOUTH.
In lieu of flowers, donations to the
Dorothy and Kenneth Goodman Memorial Scholarship Fund at King Philip
Regional High School, 201 Franklin
St., Wrentham, MA 02093 will be appreciated.
“The death of a mother is the first
sorrow wept without her.” Author
unknown.
For an online guestbook, obituary and directions please visit
ccgfuneralhome.com.
Chapman, Cole & Gleason
Falmouth, MA - 508.540.4172
GREENE, William A., Jr.
Of Somerville, July 23, 2017.
Beloved husband of Susie M.
(Cureton) Greene. Dear
father of Denise Greene, William “Sonny”
Greene, Francine Reddick, Leon and
Scott Greene and Deborah Whitley.
Loving brother of Carolyn Emmanuel,
Ronald, Rodney and Richard Greene. He
leaves 6 step-children and a host of
grandchildren, extended family and dear
friends. Funeral service Saturday at 11
AM at the Davis Funeral Home, 89
Walnut Ave., ROXBURY. Visiting with the
family at 10 AM. Burial Massachusetts
National Cemetery, Bourne, departing
the funeral home Monday at 10:30 AM.
To post a sympathy message visit
www.DavisofBoston.com.
HANDRAHAN, Jann-Carol
Born 12/25/1950, passed away unexpectedly on Friday, July 21, 2017. Jann
graduated from Waltham High School
in 1968 from the accelerated business
courses. She worked locally at Raytheon
and Computer Library Systems, Inc. in
Massachusetts. Jann moved in October of
1988 to Pompano Beach Florida, where
she took a position with Florida Department of Transportation and retired in
March of 2016. Jann is survived by her
beloved son, Matthew L. Handrahan
and 7 siblings, Tom Handrahan, Eileen
Handrahan, Rick Handrahan his wife
Lisa, John Handrahan, Ruthie Handrahan LaChance and husband Don, Patty
Blankenship her husband Gene and Joe
Handrahan his wife Sandy along with 9
nieces and nephews. A memorial service
will be held at Forest Lawn Funeral
Home, 200 W. Copans Road Pompano
Beach, FL 33064, on Friday, July 28 at 3
pm. Receiving visitors at 2:00 pm. In lieu
of flowers, please make a donation to:
Leukemia and Lymphoma foundations.
HERSTAD, Nancy E.
achievements.
Honor your loved one’s memory
with a photo in The Boston Globe.
GOODMAN, Dorothy
Nancy Elizabeth Herstad, a resident of
Hingham for over fifty years, passed
away peacefully at age 89 on July 15,
2017 at the Merriman House in North
Conway, New Hampshire, where she
had been living for the past two years.
Nancy is survived by her daughters,
Gwen Herstad of Ottawa, Canada, Lisa
Koed of Brookline, and Julie Sargent
of Chatham, NH. She also leaves five
grandchildren, Evan, Kristen and Timothy Runge of Ottawa, Canada, Ashley
Koed of Brookline, and Mariel Koed
of Somerville, as well as three greatgrandchildren. She was predeceased by
her husband, Thor Herstad.
Nancy was born in South Boston
on January 16, 1928, the only child of
Elmer and Ruth Pyne. Her childhood
memories, which she was fond of reciting, included many family excursions
on her grandfather’s boat to Peddocks
Island in Boston harbor.
After graduating from South Boston
High School, Nancy worked as an
operator for the telephone company. In
1947, she married Thor Herstad, whom
she had met at a square dance. Nancy
and Thor first settled in Quincy but
soon moved to their permanent residence in Hingham where they brought
up their three daughters.
Nancy exhibited an active enthusiasm for the arts, taking classes in
pottery, flower arranging and painting,
in which she was well served by her
eye for color. Nancy loved to cook for
her family, always eager to add a new
ethnic cuisine to the menu.
She had a flair for fashion, loved to
travel, and enjoyed spending a day at
a museum or a night at the theater. In
her spare time, she served as a volunteer at the Hingham Historical Society
and the Hingham Public Library.
A memorial service to celebrate her
life will be scheduled at a later date.
HORGAN, John P.
LEWIS, John J.
Age 67, of Scituate, passed away peacefully July 23, 2017. Loving husband
to Donna Ruffner for 27 years. Son to
the late Michael and Margaret Horgan.
Cherished father to Jillian Beck, her
husband Craig and their son Francis
Beck, Brendan, Connor and Trevor. Beloved brother to Ann Herrmann, Catherine Fahy, her husband Gerard, and
Michael, his wife Jeanne. He will also
be remembered by his brothers in law
Peter J. Ruffner, his wife Margarita and
Richard Ruffner. Visitation will take
place on Thursday, July 27 from 4-8pm
at Richardson-Gaffey Funeral Home,
382 First Parish Road, SCITUATE. A
Funeral Mass will be Friday, July 28 at
10:00 am from St. Mary of the Nativity
Church, 1 Kent Street, Scituate. In
lieu of flowers donations may be made
to the Dana Farber Cancer Institute.
1-800-525-4669. Full obituary at www.
richardsongaffeyfuneralhome.com
52 of Amesbury, MA, passed away on
July 17, 2017. John was predeceased
by his mother Joan Beaulieu, and is
survived by his father Joseph B. Lewis
and his wife Mary Ann, his brother Joseph B. Lewis and his wife Teresa, their
children Colin, Kristina, and Joseph,
and by many aunts, uncles, cousins and
friends. John was a graduate of Salem
State College and had a career as a software engineer for BNY Mellon. He will
be deeply missed and forever loved.
A private family memorial will be
held at a future date.
Richardson Gaffey Funeral Home
(781) 545-0196
HOWARD, Janice M.
(Murdock)
Of Winthrop, July 22. Devoted wife
of the late Robert J. Howard. Loving
mother of Richard Howard of VT,
Douglas Howard and his wife Pamela
of Saugus, Scott Howard and his wife
Sheryl of Winthrop and Jill Petersen
and her husband Gregg of Winthrop.
Also survived by 10 grandchildren and
3 great grandchildren.
Visiting Hours: Family and friends
are cordially invited to attend the
visitation from the Ernest P. Caggiano
& Son Funeral Home, 147 Winthrop
St., WINTHROP Wednesday, July 26,
4-8 PM. The funeral will be conducted
from funeral home Thursday, July 27
at 10:30 AM followed by a funeral
mass in St. John the Evangelist Church,
Winthrop at 11:30 AM. Interment to
follow the mass in Winthrop Cemetery. Memorial donations may be
made to Leanne’s Dream at www.
leannesdream.org. For directions or
to sign the online guestbook, go to:
www.caggianofuneralhome.com
Caggiano-O’Maley-Frazier
Winthrop
KENNEDY, Charles W. Sr.
Longtime Newton resident,
July 23, 2017. Son of the
late Michael J. and Mary
(Quinlan) Kennedy. He was the last
surviving child of ten siblings. He was
predeceased by his former wife Marie
Kennedy, son Joseph, son-in-law Philip
Clossey and daughter-in-law Helena
Kennedy. Survived by his children and
their spouses: Martin and Ellen LangKennedy, Diane Kennedy, Chuck Kennedy and his companion Becca Matuza,
Marie and Tim McAvoy, Kevin and Beth
Kennedy, Carol and Dan Bersaw, Steven
and Holly Kennedy, Donna Clossey,
and Amy Kennedy. Also survived by 19
beloved grandchildren and 12 greatgrandchildren and many nieces and
nephews. A retired Newton Police Sergeant, Charles could still cite Massachusetts General Law. He also served in the
Army of Occupation in Japan after the
Second World War. In his retirement,
he took up art and could be seen often
with his easel in Waltham. He was also
a musician and travelled extensively.
Visiting hours in the Andrew J. Magni
& Son Funeral Home, 365 Watertown
St, Rt. 16, Newton, Friday from 4-8PM.
Funeral Mass Saturday at 10:30AM in
Our Lady Help of Christians Church,
573 Washington St, Newton. Burial St.
Mary’s Cemetery, Needham.
Andrew J. Magni & Son FH, Newton
www.magnifuneralhome.com
LAMBIASE, Rita (Bavaro)
On July 23. Devoted wife of Richard
Lambiase. Loving mother of Francesca
Lambiase/ Dear sister of Lucia Bavaro
and Maria DiLaurie both of Revere.
Visiting Hours: Family and friends
are cordially invited to attend the visitation from the Ernest P. Caggiano and
Son Funeral Home 147 Winthrop St.,
WINTHROP on Friday, July 28, 2017
from 8:30 to 9:30 AM followed by a
funeral mass in St. John the Evangelist
Church, Winthrop at 10:00 AM. Interment to follow the mass in the Belle Isle
section of Winthrop Cemetery. For directions or to sign the online guestbook
go to www.caggianofuneralhome.com.
Caggiano-O’Maley-Frazier
Winthrop
LASDEN, Gertrude S.
Of Canton, passed away peacefully
on Monday, July 24, 2017. Devoted
daughter of the late Joseph & Minnie
(Goldman) Miller. Beloved wife for 58
years to the late Morris Lasden. Loving
mother of Dale Lasden & her husband
Christopher Lyman of Wellesley and
Kenneth Lasden & his wife Deborah
of Stowe, VT. Cherished grandmother
of Zoe, Jamie, Danielle, Kristen & her
husband Neil and Matthew & his wife
Katarina. Great grandmother to Anna,
Natalie and Lily. Dear aunt to many
nieces and nephews. Sister to the late
Dorothy Gilman and Phillip Miller.
Graveside Services at Sharon Memorial Park, 40 Dedham St., Sharon, MA
on Thursday, July 27th at 11:45 AM.
Memorial reception following the burial
at Orchard Cove until 4pm. In lieu of
flowers, donations may be made to
Orchard Cove Scholarship Fund, 1 Del
Pond Dr., Canton, MA 02021 or to the
charity of your choice.
Schlossberg & Solomon Memorial
Chapel “Family Owned”
www.SchlossbergChapel.com
781-828-6990
LOVETT, Margaret E.
(Schilling)
73, of Carver, died July 24, 2017.
Beloved wife of Francis G. Lovett. Loving mother of Sean Lovett of Carver
and Laura Lovett of Plymouth. Visiting
hours at the Shepherd Funeral Home,
216 Main St., KINGSTON, on Friday
July 28, from 4-8PM. A Funeral Mass
will be celebrated at the Providence
House, 363 Bishops Highway, Kingston,
on Saturday at 10:00AM. Donations in
Margaret’s memory may be made to
the Sisters of Divine Providence, 363
Bishops Highway, Kingston, MA 02364.
Interment at St. Joseph’s Cemetery,
Plymouth, MA. For directions and
online condolences please visit:
www.shepherdfuneral@aol.com
MacQUEEN, David A.
McELLIGOTT, Frances M.
(Ward)
Of Waltham. July 23, 2017. Wife of the
late James M. McElligott. Mother of
Gary M. McElligott of Watertown and
Janet F. Flaherty and her husband,
David, of Melbourne, Florida; grandmother of Jennifer M. Wayne and her
husband, Matthew, of Palm Bay, Florida; sister of the late Robert Ward and
step-sibling of the late James Ward and
Elizabeth Fitzgerald; also survived by
nieces & nephews. Family and friends
will honor and remember Frances’ life
by gathering for calling hours in The
Joyce Funeral Home, 245 Main Street
(Rte. 20), Waltham on Thursday, July
27th from 4 to 7 p.m. and again at 9
a.m. on Friday morning before leaving
in procession to Saint Mary’s Church,
133 School Street, Waltham where her
Funeral Mass will be celebrated at 10
a.m. Burial in Massachusetts National
Cemetery, Bourne, will be at 1:15 pm.
Memorials in her name may be made
to Make-A-Wish, 4742 North 24th
St., Suite 400, Phoenix, AZ 85016. For
complete obituary, guest register and
directions please visit
www.joycefuneralhome.com
MORDECAI, Edna M. (Miller)
Of Needham, July 25th.
Beloved husband of Ann I.
(Burns) MacQueen. Loving
father of Margaret A. Rowe and her
husband Daniel of Georgetown.
Grandfather of Emily Grimes of
Georgetown and Ellen Rowe of Salem.
Great-grandfather of Daniel and Olivia.
Brother of John MacQueen of CO,
Frederick MacQueen of FL, James
MacQueen of Raynham, Gladys Keenan
of Milton and the late Robert
MacQueen and Marie Keenan. Also
survived by several nieces and
nephews. Funeral from the George F.
Doherty & Sons Funeral Home, 1305
Highland Avenue, NEEDHAM, Friday
at 9 a.m. Funeral Mass in St. Bartholomew Church, Needham, at 10 a.m.
Relatives and friends kindly invited.
Visiting hours Thursday 4 to 7.
Interment Calvary Cemetery, Waltham.
Expressions of sympathy may be made
in David’s memory to St. Bartholomew’s
Church, 1180 Greendale Ave.,
Needham, 02492. World War II Navy
veteran. For directions and guestbook
www.gfdoherty.com
George F. Doherty & Sons
Needham (781) 444-0687
MAGNOLIA, Olga (Coscia)
Age 84, of Wilmington, formerly of East
Boston, passed away on July 21, 2017.
Olga was the beloved wife of Sebastiano Magnolia; devoted mother of
Adriene Magnolia & her husband Kirk
Mainville and Lisa Magnolia-Maffei
& her husband John Maffei; loving
“Nonni” of Tyler and Spencer Maffei;
cherished daughter of the late Stefano
and Eugenia (Conti) Coscia; dear sister
of the late Alfonsina “Nellie” Bruno and
Margherita Coscia; aunt of John Bruno
of Derry, NH and Nancy Hopkins of
Newport Richie, FL.
Visiting Hours: Family and friends
will gather for Visitation at the Nichols
Funeral Home, 187 Middlesex Ave.
(Rte. 62), WILMINGTON, on Saturday,
July 29th from 10:45 – 11:45 a.m.
followed by a Mass of Christian Burial
in St. Dorothy’s Church, Main Street,
(Rte. 38), Wilmington, at 12:00 noon.
Entombment will follow in Holy Cross
Cemetery, Malden. In lieu of flowers,
Memorial donations in Olga’s name
may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association, 309 Waverly Oaks Road,
Waltham, MA 02452.
October 1, 1930July 22, 2017
Edna Mae (Eddi) Mordecai passed away
surrounded by family on July 22nd,
2017. She was the oldest of four children born to Helen (Huyck) and Daniel
Miller. Born in Omro, Wisconsin, she
quickly found her roots in New England
where she spent her life.
She attended the Northfield School
for Girls and then Colby College from
which she graduated in 1952. At Colby,
she met her husband of almost 64 years,
Mark Mordecai. They were wed in
1953 and raised four children, living in
Wayland for more than 35 years.
In mid-life, Eddi decided to pursue a
career in mental health. She eventually
earned a PhD in Clinical Psychology and
spent much of her subsequent professional career as a teacher, supervisor
and Director of Training at the Boston
Institute for Psychotherapy. While there,
she founded an Infant-Family Mental
Health training program; supporting
the development of infants and parents
would continue to be an interest of hers
throughout life.
Eddi and Mark retired to a home
on Pleasant Lake in New London, NH,
where Eddi continued to remain actively
engaged in causes she cared about.
Eddi is survived by her husband,
Mark, their children and grandchildren,
and two sisters.
A memorial service will be held on
Sunday, July 30, 2017 at 3:00 P.M. at St.
Andrew Episcopal Church, Gould Road,
New London, NH.
The family would appreciate donations in lieu of flowers to your favorite
charity.
For more information please visit
www.chadwickfuneralservice.com.
O’BRIEN, William F.
Nichols Funeral Home, Inc.
978-658-4744
www.nicholsfuneralhome.com
Talk
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Of Billerica, formerly of Everett and
Hampstead, NH. Beloved husband of
Barbara M. (Gallant) O’Brien. Loving
father of William T. O’Brien of Portland,
ME, Kellie A. O’Brien and her fiance
Brian Downing of Billerica, Michelle
P. Clifford and her husband Barry of
Billerica, Michael P. O’Brien and his
wife Vicky of Saugus. Devoted Grandfather of Gregory, Matthew, McKinzey,
Sarah and Samantha. Brother of David
O’Brien of Everett, Dorothy O’Brien of
Marshfield and the late Edward and
Paul O’Brien. Funeral Thursday from
the Sweeney Memorial Funeral Home,
66 Concord Rd., BILLERICA at 8 a.m. A
Funeral Mass will be held in St. Theresa
Church, Billerica at 9 a.m. Relatives
and friends respectfully invited. Visiting
hours will be held Wednesday from
4 – 7 p.m. Burial in Fox Hill Cemetery,
Billerica. In lieu of flowers memorial
contributions may be made to the
Alzheimer’s Assn., 480 Pleasant St.,
Watertown, MA 02472. Late 40+ year
Lineman for Boston Edison and member Local 369.
www.sweeneymemorialfh.com
B8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Remembered
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
POTTLE, Bradford H.
“Brad”
Of Saugus, July 25, 2017, at age 79.
Beloved husband of Patricia A. (Tarr)
Pottle with whom he shared 49 years
of marriage. Caring brother of Nance
Hallstrom of Ipswich, and Robert
Pottle and his wife June of N. Reading.
Dear brother-in-law of Wayne Tarr and
his wife Maryrose of Wakefield. Also
lovingly survived by many nieces and
nephews. Relatives and friends will
gather in honor and remembrance of
Brad’s life during visiting hours at the
Robinson Funeral Home, 809 Main St.,
Melrose on Friday, July 28 from 4-8pm,
and again for his Funeral Service
celebrated on Saturday at 10am. For
directions, or online tribute visit
RobinsonFuneralHome.com
Robinson Funeral Home
Melrose
(781) 665-1900
PUCILLO, Patricia Ann
76, of Berwick, died Monday morning,
July 24, 2017 at her residence. She
was born in Waltham, MA on August
13, 1940, the daughter of James and
Olive M. (Hill) Cormier. She grew up in
Somerville, MA, where she worked for
several years as a florist clerk, retiring
in 2003. Patricia enjoyed watching
television (especially MASH), and
spending time with her grandchildren.
She absolutely loved her Red Sox!
Patricia is predeceased by her husband,
Ferdinando Anthony Pucillo; and by
her partner, Robert Murphy. She is survived by her daughter, Angella Pucillo
Driscoll and husband Kevin of Berwick;
three grandchildren: Jared and Alyssa
Pucillo, Sara Pucillo Driscoll; her aunt,
Jean Linton of Needham, MA; nephews
Mark Cormier of Kennebunk and Billy
Cormier of Sammamish, WA. Visiting
hours will be on Friday, July 28, 2017
from 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon, followed by a Funeral Service at 12:00
noon at Laing-Bibber Funeral Chapel,
36 Rochester Street, Berwick. In lieu
of flowers, memorial donations in her
name are encouraged to: American
Diabetes Association – New England
Chapter, 260 Cochituate Road, #200,
Framingham, MA 01701. To share a
memory or leave a message of condolence, please visit Patricia’s Book of
Memories Page at www.bibberfuneral.
com. Arrangements are in care of Laing
Bibber Funeral Chapel, 36 Rochester
Street, Berwick, ME 03901,
www.bibberfuneral.com
QUIGLEY, Maryellen
(Schiavone)
Of Cary, North Carolina formerly of
Wellesley July 22, 2017. Age 72. Beloved wife of the late Lt. Col. H. Arthur
Quigley. Devoted mother of Alexander
Quigley & his wife Ashley of Durham,
NC. Loving grandmother of Aidan
James, Harper Alexander, Maeve Frances, & Evan Arthur Quigley. Dear sister
of Patricia MacDonald and husband
Dan A. Macdonald of Naples FL. Aunt
of Pierce and Taylor Davis, formerly of
Wellesley. A Funeral Mass will be held
in the Rosary Convent, 1 Rosary Drive,
Watertown (off Lexington St) on Saturday, July 29 at 10:30 a.m. Relatives
and friends kindly invited. Interment
Newton Cemetery. For guestbook &
complete obituary visit
www.macdonaldrockwell.com
MacDonald, Rockwell & MacDonald
www.macdonaldrockwell.com
Honor your loved one’s memory
with a photo in The Boston Globe.
RAND, William F. Jr.
ROSENFIELD, Patrick S.
SCHIRRIPA, Rocco “Rocky”
Former
co-owner of
Meridian Market,
East Boston
Of Sandwich, formerly of
Reading, passed away on
July 24, 2017 at 83. He was
the devoted and loving husband of
Carol for the past 19 years. He was
preceded in death by his former wife,
Shirley (Williams), of 35 years and
leaves behind their children Sheryl and
her husband Sonny Pappalardo of
Meredith, NH, Bill and his wife Cindy
of Andover, Shawn and his significant
other Gidget Manning of Walpole, and
Thomas and his wife Martha of
Sandwich. He also leaves behind his
stepsons Rob and his wife Chris of
Atlanta, GA, Tim of Sandwich, and
Sean and his wife Michelle of
Sandwich. He was the proud grandfather of many grandchildren; Valerie,
Lisa, Billy, Abigail, Mackenzie, Troy,
T.J., Joshua and Mary and many step
grandchildren; Jonathan, Angela, Alex,
Kathryn, Riley, Julia, Amanda and
Kelly. He had two great grandsons,
Evan and Cohen. Bill graduated college
from Merrimack College, where he was
the varsity hockey goaltender. He
proudly served his country for 3 years
in the Korean War for the US Army.
While raising his family in Reading he
had a career in sales and engineering at
various companies including Electroswitch and ITT. He was very active in
his children’s youth sports programs
and their education. Bill loved boating
in Gloucester before moving to the
Cape where he enjoyed golfing, the
beaches and its many restaurants. He
loved to cook and would spend hours
preparing meals for family and friends.
He also loved to travel to the southern
climates in the winters and his favorite
spot was Tortola. A Mass of Christian
Burial will be held on Thursday, July
27, 2017 at 11:30 a.m. at Corpus Christi
Parish, 324 Quaker Meeting House
Road, East Sandwich, MA. Burial with
military honors at the Massachusetts
National Cemetery Connery Ave.,
Bourne, MA. Calling hours will be held
on Wednesday, July 26 2017 from 4 to 7
p.m. at the Nickerson-Bourne Funeral
Home, 154 Route 6A, SANDWICH. In
lieu of flowers, gifts in Bill’s memory
may be made in support of Mass
General Hospital’s Radiation Oncology
Department. Checks may be made out
to Massachusetts General Hospital, c/o
Development Office, Attn: Erin
MacAdam, 125 Nashua Street, Suite
540, Boston, MA 02114.
REDDRICK, Lottie Rebecca
A long-time resident of the Dorchester
area, died Friday the 21st of July at Season Hospice House, Milton, MA. Born
on the 25th of July, 1924 in West Point,
Virginia, to Edward Farley and Mamie
(Jackson) Farley. Loving wife of Zachariah A. Reddrick married December
24, 1948, who preceded her in death
January 1998. Lottie received a certificate from LaBoure College in the field
of Dietary services and was employed
at Nelson Manner Nursing Home in
Dorchester. Preceding her in death, her
brothers Archie and Ananias Farley and
sisters Josephine and Victoria Farley.
Lottie is survived by one sister Eudora
Farley who resides in Boston, MA,
four children; William L. Reddrick of
Dorchester, Allan F. Reddrick and wife
Frances J. Reddrick of Mattapan, Vicki
E. Braswell of San Jose, California and
Denise Reddrick of Mattapan. She is
also survived by six grandchildren and
six great-grandchildren. Lottie had an
unconditional ear and a very giving
heart, never spoke a harsh word against
anyone and was always available to all.
She enjoyed doing puzzles, crossword
games, traveling with her oldest sister
and making sweet potato pies for her
family at Thanksgiving. Visitation
will be held at Dolan Funeral Home,
1140 Washington St., DORCHESTER
LOWER MILLS, Friday, July 28th
from 10-11 AM, followed by a Funeral
Service at 11:00 AM. Interment Forest
Hills Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, please
feel free to make a donation in Lottie’s
memory to Seasons Hospice Foundation, Donation Processing Center, 8537
Solution Center, Chicago, IL 60677.
Age 29, of Hyde Park, suddenly July 22,
2017. Loving fiance of Alicia MacDonald. Devoted father of Anthony, Avah,
and Amayah. Beloved son of Michael
and Margaret (Gillis) Rosenfield.
Brother of Michael Rosenfield and his
wife Jessica and John Rosenfield and
his wife Megan. Grandson of Irene
Borelli, and the late Sumner Rosenfield,
Anthony Borelli, and Murdock and
Rose Gillis. Uncle of Jack, Abby, Alexis,
Devine, and Ariana. Patrick leaves his
Godmother Kerry Duke, Godfather
John Gillis (deceased), his cousins Nicole Boisvert, Danny Gillis and Janine
Higgins, as well as other loving cousins
and friends. Funeral from the P.E.
Murray-F.J. Higgins, George F. Doherty
& Sons Funeral Home, 2000 Centre
St., WEST ROXBURY, on Friday, July
28th at 10:30am. Followed by a Funeral
Mass in St. Pius X Church, Milton, at
11:30am. Relatives and friends kindly
invited. Visiting hours Thursday, July
27th from 4-8pm. Interment Cedar
Grove Cemetery, Dorchester. In lieu
of flowers donations may be made in
Patrick’s memory to the Rosenfield
Children’s Fund, C/O John Rosenfield
1834 Centre St. PO BOX 320400 West
Roxbury, MA 02132. For directions and
guestbook pemurrayfuneral.com
P.E. Murray - F.J. HIggins
George F. Doherty & Sons
West Roxbury 617 325 2000
RUSSO, Joy L. Dardinski
(Davies)
Of Peabody, formerly of East Boston,
passed peacefully surrounded by his
loving family on Monday, July 24th at
the age of 80. Rocco was born in Marina Gioiosa Ionica, Italy on August 21,
1936 to Salvatore Schirripa and Maria
Caterina Totino. He was the former
co-owner of Meridian Market where he
was fondly known as Rocky. He will be
missed by all who knew him. Beloved
husband of Marianna (Petrolo). Devoted father of Maria Accardi and her
husband Anthony of Wilmington, Salvatore Schirripa and his fiance Lynne
Kelly of Danvers and Luigi Schirripa
and his wife Angelina of Peabody. Dear
brother of Frank Schirripa and his wife
Catherine of Saugus and Rosa Petrolo
and her husband Rocco of East Boston.
Fond brother-in-law of the late Rocco
Petrolo and his surviving wife Rosa of
Australia and Giulia Petrolo and her
late husband Pasquale Romeo of Italy.
Cherished grandfather of Alexander,
Elizabeth, Joseph, Rocco, Salvatore,
Marco and Sofia. Also survived by many
loving nieces and nephews. Family
and Friends will honor Rocky’s life by
gathering on Thursday, July 27th from
4:00 PM to 8:00 PM at the Ruggiero
Family Memorial Home, 971 Saratoga
St., EAST BOSTON, MA and again on
Friday morning at 8:30 AM before leaving in funeral procession to St. Joseph
- St. Lazarus Church, 59 Ashley St., East
Boston for a 10:00 AM. Funeral Mass in
celebration of Rocky’s life. Services will
conclude with Rocco being entombed
at Woodlawn Mausoleum, Everett, MA.
In lieu of flowers memorial donations
may be made to the American Liver
Foundation,188 Needham St., Newton,
MA 02461. Funeral Home is handicap
accessible. Courtesy valet parking at
front entrance. Ample off-street parking. Children’s Room available. For
complimentary transportation to the
visiting hours please call 617-569-0990.
For more info or to send an online condolence, please visit ruggieromh.com
East Boston (617) 569-0990
SECOR, John R.
58, died on July 20, 2017 at the Tibbet
House of Needham after a short fight
against cancer. She leaves behind her
husband of nine years, James Russo;
her mother, Joan (Balletti) Davies; her
brother, James Davies, and his wife,
Kelly, and their children, Caitlyn and
Brenna; her brother, Jay Davies and
his wife, Eileen, and their children,
Jacquelyn and Jay; her nephew, Paul
Warlop, and many relatives and close
friends. Joy is reunited in Heaven with
her father, James H. Davies, and her
older sister, Joan (Davies) Warlop.
Joy was born on February 2, 1959 in
Stafford Springs, CT before her family
relocated to Norfolk, MA.
Joy graduated Magna Cum Laude
from Bentley College with a Bachelor
of Science in Marketing. She most
recently worked for Needham Electrical
Supplies as a marketing director for the
last twelve years where she was highly
respected for her diligent work ethic.
Joy was dearly loved by her family and friends, and she will be truly
missed by everyone who knew and
loved her.
Memorial services will be held at the
Evangelical Covenant Church, 841 N.
Main Street, Attleboro on Saturday,
July 29, 2017 at 11:00 am. Relatives
and friends are invited to attend. In
lieu of flowers, please send donations to the American Cancer Society
(www.cancer.org/donate).
Arrangements by the Bolea-Amici
Funeral Home.
Share a memory
Or add a condolensece
to the guestbook at
boston.com/obituaries
Honor a Life
with a death notice announcement in
The Boston Globe and on Boston.com.
Visit Boston.com/DeathNotices or
contact your funeral director.
John R. Secor, formerly of Saugus, MA,
Contoocook, NH and Westford, MA,
passed away in Exeter, NH on July
24th after a long and brave battle with
Parkinson’s Disease and Alzheimer’s
Disease. He was born in Everett, MA
on April 22, 1939 and graduated from
Saugus High School in 1957. He was
predeceased by his loving wife, Sally.
He is survived by children Glen and
Rosheen Secor of Westford, MA, Heidi
Coen of Concord, NH, and Traci and
Martin Britten of South China, ME, as
well as nine grandchildren and three
great-grandchildren. He also leaves his
sister Cathy Neri and her husband Phil
of Dover, NH, and his brother Richard
Secor and his wife Melissa of Punta
Gorda, FL. John was a dynamic personality and a successful entrepreneur.
In 1971, he acted upon his great love
of books and libraries, forming Yankee
Book Peddler, Inc., in Contoocook, NH.
From its beginnings in the basement of
his home, he grew YBP into a leading
national and international bookselling
company. He will be missed by the library and publishing communities and
by his friends and colleagues at YBP. He
will also be missed by the wonderful
staff of Riverwoods in Exeter. John was
exceptionally loving and generous to
his children and grandchildren, who
will forever cherish him as their Binty.
He was also a dog and cat lover and
was rarely without his canine and feline
companions.
Visiting Hours: Will be held on
Friday from 4:00 to 8:00 PM at the
Blake Chelmsford Funeral Home, 24
Worthen St., CHELMSFORD. A Mass of
Christian Burial will be celebrated on
Saturday at 9 o’clock at St. Catherine
of Alexandria Parish, 107 N. Main
St., Westford. KINDLY MEET AT
CHURCH. Interment will follow in St.
Catherine Cemetery, Westford. In lieu
of flowers, the family asks that donations be made to the New Hampshire
SPCA, 104 Portsmouth Ave., Stratham,
NH 03885. To leave a condolence
or a fond memory of John, visit
chelmsfordfuneralhome.com or find us
on Facebook.
SHEA, Kevin M.
Ask your funeral director for details.
SPADONI, Edward R.
Of Dorchester, passed away peacefully
of July 24th. Beloved husband of Susan
(Gallagher). Devoted father of Connor
G. Shea of Dorchester. Visiting Hrs. at
the Alfred D. Thomas Funeral Home,
326 Granite Ave., MILTON, Tues., Aug.
1, 2017, 4 to 8PM. For complete obituary see: www.alfreddthomas.com
Affiliate of
Sox eyeing
Worcester
By Jim O’Sullivan
GLOBE STAFF
Of Dedham formerly of Readville,
July 23, 2017. Loving husband of
Norma (Distasio) Spadoni. Cherished
father of Edward Spadoni Jr. and
his wife Regina of Norwood, Deacon
Reynold Spadoni and his wife Laura of
Walpole, and Robert Spadoni and his
wife Diana of Shaker Heights, Ohio. He
leaves behind 8 grandchildren: Claire
and her husband Mark, Peter and his
wife Kathleen, Nicole and her husband
William, Stephanie, Joseph, Nora,
Louise and Matilda and 2 great grandchildren: Max and Gabriel. He was the
loving son of the late Basil and Erice
of Readville and cherished brother of
Reynold Spadoni, who gave his life in
service to his country. Funeral from
the George F. Doherty & Sons WilsonCannon Funeral Home, 456 High St.,
DEDHAM, Friday, July 28 at 9am
followed by a Funeral Mass in St. Anne
Church, 90 West Milton St., Readville
at 10am. Relatives and friends kindly
invited. Visiting hours at the funeral
home, Thursday, July 27 from 4-8pm.
Interment in Fairview Cemetery, Hyde
Park. Online guestbook and directions
at gfdoherty.com.
George F. Doherty & Sons
Dedham 781-326-0500
STEEVES, Charlotte
Nathalie (Williams)
March 26, 1923 –
July 22, 2017
Ms. Charlotte Steeves, 94, passed away
at home Saturday, July 22, 2017, surrounded by her family.
She was born March 26, 1923 in
St. Albans, Maine, daughter of Roger
and Nathalie (Lewis) Williams. She
received her Bachelor of Science in
Education from Salem State Teachers
College and Master of Education from
Boston College. She retired after 30
years as a teacher in the Stoneham,
MA school district. In retirement, she
enjoyed being a watercolor artist and
singing with the Sweet Adelines. Later
she moved to York, PA and became an
active member of the First Presbyterian
Church and the Retired Professional
Womens Club. In 2015, she relocated
with her son to South Carolina.
She was predeceased by sister Barbara and brother Roger Williams.
Survivors include her sons, Edward
(Monique) Steeves of France and Jon
(Peg) Steeves of South Carolina; and
daughters Marcia (Bob) Lehmann of
Florida and Barbara Wright of Pennsylvania. She leaves 7 grandchildren, 9
great grandchildren and 1 great great
granddaughter. She also leaves siblings
Katherine (Allan) Johnson and David
(Gail) Williams.
The family will hold a private memorial service at a later date.
TAYLOR, Jonathan V.
Of Dedham, July 24. Beloved husband
of Marjorie (Williams) Taylor. Loving
father of Rebecca T. Glasgow of GA
and Holly T. Fabbri of NY. Brother of
William Taylor of Gloucester and Sarah
Harrison of Dedham. Also survived by
3 grandchildren. A Memorial Service
will be held on Friday at 10:30AM at
the First Church of Dedham Unitarian
Universalist, 670 High St., Dedham.
Interment private. In lieu of flowers
donations to Masonic Angel Fund, P.O.
Box 1389, Orleans, MA 02653 would
be appreciated. Visit website for obituary and guestbook.
Folsom Funeral Home
www.folsomfuneral.com
THABET, James Devlin
Worcester officials have
launched a full-scale push to
persuade the Pawtucket Red
Sox to relocate there, enlisting
assis tance from G overnor
Charlie Baker’s administration.
Top officials from the Red
Sox’ Triple-A affiliate visited
Worcester Friday and said they
have not explored any other
options, despite other Massachusetts cities hoping to land
the team.
“It doesn’t mean others haven’t expressed any interest,
and in due time we’ll respond
to those,” PawSox spokesman
Bill Wanless said.
Worcester Regional Chamber of Commerce president
Timothy P. Murray called the
visit part of “a preliminary conversation.”
“There’s tremendous economic development momentum underway in the city, and
the fact that there’s this level of
interest speaks to that,” Murray
said.
After an invitation from
Worcester officials, PawSox
chairman Larry Lucchino led a
contingent to Worcester. They
met with City Manager Edward
Augustus, Mayor Joe Petty,
Murray, and others, Wanless
said.
Any relocation deal would
probably involve a blend of
public and private funds.
“The administration is always willing to assist partners
like the City of Worcester in exploring potential economic development initiatives,” Baker
press secretary Billy Pitman
said in an e-mail.
A state economic development official said later that
Baker administration members had met with PawSox representatives “to discuss a number of different communities
across Massachusetts for potential options should they
chose to pursue a new location.”
Jim O’Sullivan can be reached
at jim.osullivan@globe.com.
Remembered
SHARE MEMORIES AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
TULSKY, Adele L. (Horwitz)
Of Newton, MA, passed away on July
23, 2017. Beloved wife of the late Dr.
Alexander Tulsky. Dear daughter of
the late Joseph and Elizabeth (Fisher)
Horwitz. Devoted mother of Linda
Richmond and the late Howard Tulsky.
Cherished grandmother of Jared
Richmond and Julia Richmond. Proud
great-grandmother of Dylan Richmond. Loving sister of the late Irving
Horwitz, Harold Horwitz, and Stanley
Horwitz. Adele is also survived by many
loving nieces and nephews. Services
at Stanetsky Memorial Chapels, 475
Washington St., CANTON, on Thursday,
July 27, 2017 at 2 pm. Following
interment at Sharon Memorial Park,
memorial observance will be held at the
Coleman House, 677 Winchester Street,
Newton, MA. In lieu of flowers, donations in Adele’s memory may be made
to the Jewish Community Housing for
the Elderly (JCHE), www.jche.org, or
the charity of your choice.
Stanetsky Memorial Chapels
617-232-9300
www.stanetsky.com
TURANO, Mary R.
(Terrazzino)
Of Reading, July 23rd, 2017 at age
19. Loving son of Khaire Thabet and
Sheila (Clegg) Thabet. Cherished
twin brother of Cary Thabet. Devoted
grandson of John Clegg and the late
Kathleen (Devlin) Clegg. Family and
friends are kindly invited to gather and
share remembrances with the family
on Thursday July 27th, 2017 in the
Doherty Barile Family Funeral Home,
11 Linden St., READING, from 4-8pm.
Parking attendants and ramp entrance
available. A Funeral Mass Celebrating James Eternal Life will be held on
Friday July 28th, 2017 in St. Patrick’s
Church 71 Central St. Stoneham at
10am. Please go directly to church. Interment Woodend Cemetery, Reading.
For directions or to send a memorial
condolence www.barilefuneral.com
or www.facebook.com/Barile/Family/
Funeral/Home.
Doherty-Barile Family
Funeral Home
Celebrating Life-Sharing Memories
781.944.1589
Life-long resident of Needham, July
23rd. Beloved wife of the late James
J. Turano. Loving mother of Carmelo
Turano and his wife Elaine of Lexington,
Angelo Turano and his wife Rosemary
of Maynard and Virginia DiMonte and
her husband Philip of Plainville. Sister
of Samuel Terrazzino of Needham and
the late Carmelo, John, Peter and Guy
Terrazzino. Also survived by five grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.
Funeral from the George F. Doherty &
Sons Funeral Home, 1305 Highland
Avenue, NEEDHAM, Thursday at 9
a.m. Followed by a Funeral Mass in St.
Joseph’s Church, Needham at 10 a.m.
Relatives and friends kindly invited.
Visiting hours Wednesday 4 to 8. Interment St. Mary’s Cemetery, Needham.
Expressions of sympathy made be made
in Mary’s memory to the Jimmy Fund,
10 Brookline Place, Brookline, MA
02445. For directions and guestbook
www.gfdoherty.com.
George F. Doherty & Sons
Needham
781-444-0687
WHITE, Timothy H.
Of West Roxbury, July 23, 2017. Visiting hours Friday 4pm - 8pm. Complete
notice to appear on Thursday, July 27,
2017.
William J. Gormley Funeral Service
www.gormleyfuneral.com
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B9
Business
Single-family homes in Mass.
Homes for sale in June
June median sales price
$500,000
30,000
25,000
$410,000
$400,000
20,000
$300,000
State’s median house price
tops $400,000 for first time
By Katheleen Conti
15,000
GLOBE STAFF
Homes sold
10,000
13,973
5,000
6,614
0
$200,000
$100,000
0
’13
’14
’15
’16
’17
’13
SOURCE: Mass. Association of Realtors
’14
’15
’16
’17
GEORGE PATISTEAS/GLOBE STAFF
Depending on whom you ask, the
state’s real estate market is either incredibly healthy or we’re in the middle
of a housing crisis.
It’s all a matter of perspective. People who are considering selling will
like what the latest numbers show — a
record high statewide median price for
June. For buyers, however, it was an-
other month during which the low
number of properties on the market
fueled heated competition and bidding
wars.
Last month, traditionally one of the
year’s busiest for real estate activity,
marked the 64th time in the last 65
months that the inventory of singlefamily homes went down compared
with the same month the year before,
according to the Massachusetts Associ-
ation of Realtors.
There were about 14,000 homes for
sale last month, the lowest level for
June since at least 2004, the realtors’
group reported. At the same time, the
n u m b e r o f c l o s e d s a l e s i n Ju n e
dropped 4.8 percent.
“It’s an inventory crisis,” said Paul
Yorkis, who is the group’s president
and also operates Patriot Real Estate in
HOME SALES, Page B12
Tenants
not included
The family trust that owns a Harrison
Avenue row house accepted a $2 million
purchase offer and agreed to deliver the
building vacant of its low­income tenants
T
The tenants of
410-412
Harrison Ave.
in the South
End are
seeking a court
decision that
would prevent
their eviction
from a row
house (right)
that is for sale.
Tenants say
they cannot
find affordable
housing in the
neighborhood.
PHOTOS BY JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF
Shirley Leung
Mass. — and its cash —
talk back on diversity
W
hat do Amazon, Facebook,
and Netflix have in common?
Not a single person of color
sits on their corporate boards.
For that reason alone, the
Massachusetts pension fund refused this year
to support the slate of board nominees recommended by each company.
When it comes to diversity in the boardroom, Treasurer Deb Goldberg, who also
serves as chair of the state pension board, is
taking a hard line. The state’s $66 billion pension fund is a shareholder in about 9,000
companies, and its new proxy voting guideline related to diversity means it voted against
or withheld its vote in 69 percent of director
elections this year. That’s up from 17 percent
in 2012.
Goldberg’s message to corporate America
is simple: Massachusetts doesn’t tolerate a
board whose makeup is less than 30 percent
women and people of color. Diversity matters,
and study after study shows that different
viewpoints are good for the bottom line.
About 1,690 companies failed to meet the
State Treasurer
Deb Goldberg
is taking a hard
line on
diversity at the
companies in
which the state
pension fund
invests.
state’s new criteria on diversity, and many of
them are household names: JP Morgan
Chase, Hershey Co., Nordstrom, Under
Armour, TripAdvisor, and Wal-Mart.
Most public companies have at least one
woman or minority on their boards. But in
2017, tokenism is no longer acceptable.
Goldberg is building on what her predecessor, Steve Grossman, started in 2011. He
called it “zero tolerance for zero diversity,”
and Goldberg ratcheted it up a notch by setting specific requirements. Calling for 30 percent diversity on a board isn’t an arbitrary figure; that’s critical mass.
It used to be if you wanted to take a stand,
you would unload your holdings. Goldberg
doesn’t think that works anymore.
“These companies can sell stock to someone else. They don’t care if you have divested,”
said Goldberg, adding that having a “voice is
much more influential than walking away.”
So the pension fund sticks with these companies but sticks it to them through proxy
voting. Such shareholder activism is all the
LEUNG, Page B12
By Katheleen Conti
GLOBE STAFF
wo years ago, Zhen You Mo received a notice
from his employer informing him that his job as
an assistant at Quinzani’s Bakery was ending
because developers had purchased the space,
conveniently located steps from Mo’s Harrison
Avenue home.
Now, ongoing development in the
South End neighborhood is threatening his home.
“It was tough when I found out I
was going to lose my job, and now I’m
about to lose my home, and it’s difficult,” Mo, 50, said in Chinese through
a translator. “Landlords are fixing up
apartments to rent out to people who
can afford more, but we don’t have a
place to go and it also feels like there
isn’t much we can do.”
It’s a familiar story in the South
End and other rapidly changing city neighborhoods like
Chinatown and East Boston: Investors eager for new
properties to develop are pushing up prices, tempting
owners to sell small residential and commercial spaces
where longtime residents live and work.
In Mo’s case, a local investor has offered to pay $2
million for the four-story brick row house where he
rents a small two-bedroom first floor apartment with
his wife, 13-year-old daughter, and 8-year-old son.
About 14 people live in the building, which could be
converted into a condo complex.
The family trust that has owned the property for 30
years has signed a purchase and sale agreement and in
May gave tenants 30 days notice, telling them they
would have to move out by the end of June. But the residents, with the help of an advocacy group, are fighting
to stay put. They have what they hope is a powerful ally
in Lam Chung Chu, the fourth floor tenant and building
manager who also is one of the five family trustees.
Chu, who has lived in the building for 30 years and
owns 25 percent of the property, doesn’t want to sell.
HARRISON AVENUE, Page B14
‘Landlords
are fixing
up apart­
ments to
rent out to
people who
can afford
more, but
we don’t
have a
place to
go.’
ZHEN YOU MO,
Harrison Avenue
tenant
Left something in your Uber?
Now it’ll cost you to get it back
By Adam Vaccaro
ºLyft rises on Uber’s missteps, B10.
GLOBE STAFF
Maybe you’ve been there before: An
hour after you get out of your Uber,
you realize you dropped your keys or
left your sunglasses behind in the car.
It will now cost you $15 to get those
items back.
The new lost-item fee was introduced by Uber Technologies Tuesday
in Boston and Chicago, and it will expand to all US cities by September.
The change is one of several Uber is
launching in response to complaints
from drivers that the company doesn’t
do enough to support them. The fee
will be paid to drivers, not the company, and riders will also have the option
to add a tip.
According to Tom Maguire, Uber’s
Boston general manager, the average
driver returns 11 lost items a year. But
until now, there was no way to compensate them through the app, with
drivers generally relying on riders to
tip in cash.
“That’s a lot of lost time and lost
UBER, Page B14
MORE
HEALTH CARE
Children’s Hospital to team
with Cleveland Clinic B10
GOVERNMENT
Lawmakers skeptical about
Baker’s MassHealth plan B10
B10
Business
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
Baker’s health plan gets
a skeptical reception
By Priyanka Dayal
McCluskey
GLOBE STAFF
Baker administration officials
received a skeptical reception in
the Legislature on Tuesday as
they made their case for a broad
set of proposals that they argued
are critical for containing the
state’s health care costs.
A key part of Governor Charlie
Baker’s plan would change eligibility rules and move thousands
of people off MassHealth, the
state Medicaid program that covers low-income individuals and
families. Those people instead
would be covered through commercial health insurance.
House and Senate lawmakers
rejected these and other elements
of the Baker plan in the state budget, saying they didn’ t have
enough time to vet such significant proposals. But last week
Baker asked them to schedule a
public hearing and reconsider.
Administration officials have
cast their plan as a commonsense approach for ensuring that
low-income families have access
to health care while tackling the
rising costs of MassHealth, a joint
state-federal program that covers
1.9 million people in Massachusetts.
The Baker administration, the
House, and the Senate have all
agreed to one element of the
plan: imposing fees on employers
to raise $200 million in the next
fiscal to help cover state health
care costs. But business groups
say it’s unfair for them to pay
those fees unless the Legislature
also accepts the administration’s
proposals for cutting costs.
“The cost of inaction is too
high,” Eileen McAnneny, presi-
dent of the business-backed Massachusetts Taxpayers Foundation, said at Tuesday’s hearing at
the State House.
The administration wants to
shift 140,000 adults, including
100,000 parents, from
MassHealth onto subsidized
commercial health plans. This
group of people, earning between
$16,240 and $21,600 a year for a
household of two, would not have
to pay premiums, but they would
have higher out-of-pocket costs.
They also would have to pay extra
for dental benefits or seek dental
care at a community health center, where they could get reimbursed for care.
In addition, Baker wants to reestablish a rule that would bar
many low-income people from
obtaining MassHealth if they
have access to affordable health
insurance at work.
Baker asked the Legislature to
act on his proposals by mid-September. After lawmakers act,
Baker can approve or veto their
plan.
Karen E. Spilka, the Senate
budget chief, called the administration’s proposals “the most
sweeping changes” to
MassHealth since the 1990s. She
signaled that lawmakers are reluctant to agree to restrictions to
the program’s eligibility.
“There are other ways to get
savings than moving people off
MassHealth,” Spilka, an Ashland
Democrat, said at the hearing.
Senator Jason M. Lewis, a
Winchester Democrat, said the
administration’s plan doesn’t
seem to target the underlying
costs of health care. “It’s more
about moving people between
health plans and changing the
nature of their insurance,” he
said.
Other Democratic lawmakers
said the administration should
propose other steps, such as tackling the high prices charged by
doctors and hospitals, before
shifting more health care costs
onto poor families.
The hearing, which lasted several hours and often delved into
the weeds of health policy, included testimony from health
care advocates, business groups
— and three men with physical
disabilities who feared they and
others would lose access to certain services through an administration proposal to curb “optional” benefits.
Jay Gonzalez, a Democratic
former state budget chief who is
running for governor against
Baker, also testified against the
administration’s ideas, which he
said went against Massachusetts’
“values.”
Members of the House and
Senate budget and health care financing committees also questioned whether this is the right
time to make changes to the state
Medicaid program, given the uncertainty around the future of the
federal Affordable Care Act.
The Republican-led US Senate
on Tuesday agreed to debate repealing and replacing the health
care law. Massachusetts Democrats and the state’s Republican
governor have raised alarms
about the repeal effort, which
could result in major cuts to federal spending on health care.
State Representative Jeffrey
Sánchez, the newly installed
House budget chief, said massive
changes to the nation’s health
care system “could be one tweet
Lyft taking
advantage
of Uber’s
missteps
ELISE AMENDOLA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
away,” apparently referring to
President Trump’s penchant for
Twitter.
But administration officials
said if the Legislature doesn’t act
quickly, MassHealth spending
will rise by more than $300 million.
“If the federal landscape
changes, we’ll be prepared to adjust accordingly,” said Marylou
Sudders, the state secretary of
health and human services.
Sudders said the administration’s plan represents a “balanced” approach and “reaffirms
our Commonwealth’s commitment to universal health care
coverage.”
Although the legislature has
yet to agree to their ideas for
changing MassHealth, administration officials have already begun the process of applying for
approval from federal officials.
Their plan includes other
measures that affect the broader
health care market, including establishing a moratorium on new
health insurance mandates and
allowing for a new type of provider called a dental therapist to provide basic dental care to adults
and children.
Officials in the
administration
of Governor
Charlie Baker
cast their plan
as a commonsense approach
for ensuring
that lowincome families
have access to
health care
while tackling
the rising costs
of MassHealth.
Priyanka Dayal McCluskey can
be reached at
priyanka.mccluskey@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@priyanka_dayal.
Hospitals team up to expand kids’ heart treatment
By Lauren Feiner
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Boston Children’s Hospital
plans to make complex heart
treatment for children available
to more patients through a new
collaboration with the Cleveland
Clinic, the hospitals announced
Wednesday.
In its latest move to grow out
of state, Children’s will become a
part of the Cleveland Clinic’s national network of cardiovascular
care providers. The network is
available through direct contracts with employers.
Children’s said it will have
“special status” within the network, allowing it to help develop
best practices for pediatric heart
care.
Nine other hospitals are part
of the cardiovascular network,
but Children’s is the first outside
pediatric hospital to join.
The network contracts directly with employers, giving their
workers and their families access
to care for specific conditions in
participating hospitals. The arrangement is similar to General
Electric Co.’srecent contract with
New England Baptist Hospital
for hip and knee replacement operations for its employees.
The idea is that employers can
save money and reduce complications for certain medical services
by dealing directly with top hospitals, rather than going through
insurance companies. But many
employers who use the network
will continue to offer insurance
plans to their employees.
“The joint interest of the Clinic and Boston Children’s is to provide more accessible care for rare
and complex conditions in a costeffective, value-driven manner,”
said Dr. Steven Fishman, codirec-
ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT — General Motors’
second-quarter net profit fell
more than 40 percent as the carmaker lost money on the pending sale of its European unit and
warned it still faces billions of
dollars in further losses to come.
GM made net income of $1.66
billion, compared with a record
$2.87 billion a year ago. But
when the European loss and onetime items are stripped out, GM
made $2.4 billion from continuing operations, or $1.89 per
share. That’s down 12 percent
By Eric Newcomer
BLOOMBERG NEWS
SAN FRANCISCO — Lyft Inc.’s
business has been booming as its
primary competitor, Uber Technologies Inc., has faced an executive
exodus and a string of self-inflicted
scandals.
Total revenue generated by Lyft
drivers, or the company’s gross
bookings, grew about 25 percent to
more than $1 billion in the second
quarter from more than $800 million in the previous period, according to people familiar with the matter. That’s a faster rate than Uber,
which told investors earlier this
month that it expected gross bookings would increase in the “midteens,” in percent, for the quarter.
Lyft’s continued growth is a sign
the company has seized on its competitor’s missteps. In a reversal,
Uber has played catch up to Lyft
lately, finally embracing in-application tipping after years of resisting.
In June, Uber started a campaign to
win over drivers, many of whom
say they prefer to work for Lyft.
It’s not just drivers that have defected to Lyft: Uber saw more than
500,000 people delete the app in
late January and early February after the company was accused of attempting to subvert a driver strike.
That public unrest, rooted in Uber’s
decision to join an advisory council
to President Trump, was the first of
a number of incidents that humbled the company and ultimately
forced chief executive and founder
Travis Kalanick to resign.
‘Lyft has achieved
incredible growth
this year and enters
the second half of
2017 in a very strong
position.’
BRIAN ROBERTS
Chief financial officer
JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF /FILE 2008
tor of the Vascular Anomalies
Center at Boston Children’s.
“The way we get great at what
we do is by caring for complex
problems frequently,” he added.
Kevin Sears, executive director of market and network services at the Cleveland Clinic, said a
patient whose employer contracts with the hospital could be
referred by a local doctor to advanced cardiovascular care. At
that point, a care coordinator
from Cleveland Clinic would
reach out to the patient and his
or her family to determine care
options from the facilities within
the network, arrange travel, and
review medical and financial records.
Fishman said Children’s and
the Clinic hope to quickly expand
offerings to pediatric patients beyond just heart treatment.
“We want to make ourselves
available to as many patients as
most need our care,” he said.
The collaboration shows Chil-
dren’s continued outreach to patients outside Massachusetts.
In 2015, Children’s acquired a
for-profit group of 276 doctors
from New York, New Jersey, and
Connecticut. In October, Massachusetts health officials granted
the hospital final approval for its
$1 billion expansion of its facilities.
Children’s
Hospital in
Boston has
entered a
collaboration
with the
Cleveland
Clinic.
Lauren Feiner can be reached at
lauren.feiner@globe.com. Follow
her on Twitter @lauren_feiner.
GM earnings fall on loss from sale of European unit
By Tom Krisher
Ride­sharing app
posts gross revenue
of $1b in 2nd quarter
from last year but still easily beat
Wall Street estimates. Analysts
polled by FactSet expected only
$1.68 per share.
Revenue was $37 billion excluding Europe, falling short of
analyst estimates of $40.3 billion.
GM’s bottom line includes a
$770 million loss as it prepares
for the sale of its European Opel
and Vauxhall brands to France’s
PSA Group, owner of Peugeot
and Citroen. It also includes
$654 million in one-time items
from restructuring in India, the
sale of GM’s South Africa business, and lingering legal costs
from an embarrassing ignition
switch recall.
GM agreed to sell its European operations to PSA in March
for $2.2 billion, and the company
disclosed Tuesday in a regulatory
filing that it expects to take a $5.5
billion to $6 billion charge from
the sale to be counted when the
deal closes — expected by the end
of this year. The charge includes
$3.9 billion in previous losses
that GM will not be able to use to
offset future tax obligations.
On a conference call with analysts, CEO Mary Barra disclosed
that GM is working on new elec-
trical and infotainment systems
that will allow over-the-air remote software fixes before 2020.
At present, only electric car maker Tesla Inc. can do such software
updates for safety-critical systems that operate the vehicle, but
GM and others can update entertainment systems, said Navigant
analyst Sam Abuelsamid.
GM made a strong profit in
the United States even though
sales were down 4 percent for the
quarter. That’s because much of
the sales drop came from lowerprofit cars, which were down 19
percent.
CEO Mary
Barra says GM
is working on
systems that
will allow overthe-air remote
software fixes
before 2020.
Lyft has generally avoided public gloating about Uber’s fumbles,
while at the same time seizing on
its competitor’s vulnerability. Lyft
made a $1 million donation to the
American Civil Liberties Union just
as Uber was under fire for its
Trump ties.
Despite Uber’s problems at its
San Francisco headquarters, the
company’s business has continued
to grow. Uber’s gross bookings surpassed $8.25 billion in the second
quarter of this year based on what
the company told investors during
a conference call earlier this month.
Lyft operates in the United States
while Uber, in conjunction with
partners, is a global business.
While losses for both companies
remain significant, investors have
continued to put billions into the
ride-hailing companies. Uber lost
$708 million in the first three
months of the year. Lyft expected to
lose about $130 million in the first
quarter, according to financial documents prepared before the end of
that period that have been reported
by Bloomberg. Neither company’s
second quarter losses have become
public, though Uber told its investors that its losses were declining.
“Lyft has achieved incredible
growth this year and enters the second half of 2017 in a very strong position,” chief financial officer Brian
Roberts said in a statement.
Uber has begun to disclose its financials to reporters, after first
sharing its 2016 financials with
Bloomberg in April. Lyft has been
far more secretive about its results.
Gross bookings provide a crude
estimate of the value of a ride-hailing company’s business. Lyft and
Uber aim to take anywhere from a
20 percent to 30 percent cut of
gross bookings, meaning that $1
billion in bookings for Lyft this
quarter could translate to anywhere
between $200 million to $300 million in revenue.
Rides also grew significantly. Lyft passengers took about as many
rides in the first half of this year as
they did in all of 2016, said the people, who asked not to be identified
because the numbers are private. In
June, Lyft began facilitating 1 million rides a day.
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
B11
TALKING POINTS
REAL ESTATE
JAMAICA PLAIN
APARTMENT COMPLEX
SOLD FOR
$103 MILLION
TECHNOLOGY
MAKER OF
RESTAURANT
MANAGEMENT
SOFTWARE GETS
$101 MILLION
IN NEW FUNDING
The developer of a new apartment complex in Jamaica Plain has sold it for $103 million.
Boston Residential Group last week sold its 196-unit Olmsted Place on S. Huntington Ave.
to North Carolina-based apartment management firm Bell Partners, which manages about
60,000 apartments nationwide. The building will now be called Bell Olmsted Park. Boston
Residential bought the site — formerly the Home for Little Wanderers — for $10.1 million
in 2013 and developed the building in a partnership with The Carlyle Group. Olmsted
Place, which opened in late 2015, is now fully leased, according to Boston Residential.
Rental websites list one-bedroom apartments rent starting at around $3,200 a month.
— TIM LOGAN
Toast Inc., a Boston-based maker of restaurant management software, has landed $101 million in fresh venture funding, including an investment from Generation Investment Management, a firm chaired by former Vice President Al Gore. Toast makes cloud-based software that allows restaurants to take meal orders and payments electronically. Diners can
use Toast-enabled devices to place meal orders or make payments using tablet computers
instead of paper. Restaurant managers can log on to the system from their smartphones to
keep tabs on sales and track inventories. Toast cofounder Steve Fredette said that much of
the cash influx will be used on an aggressive sales campaign to sign up new users. “We believe that we have the opportunity to build the biggest restaurant technology company in
the world,” Fredette said. Founded in 2013, Toast has about 500 employees. The company’s
services are used by restaurants throughout the United States, including local chains Flour
and Fresh City. — HIAWATHA BRAY
Agenda
➔ EARNINGS DATE
Stocks to watch today
Facebook Inc., Vertex Pharmaceuticals
Inc., Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc., State
Street Corp., Teradyne Inc., are expected
to release earning reports for the fiscal
PHARMACEUTICALS
BIOGEN EARNINGS
SOAR ON SALES OF
BREAKTHROUGH
DRUG
Biogen Inc.’s second-quarter revenue exceeded expectations, helped
by strong sales of Spinraza, its new breakthrough drug for a devastating muscle-wasting disease — and one of the most expensive medicines in the United States. The Cambridge-based company’s revenue
rose to $3.1 billion for the quarter, a 6 percent increase over the previous year. Revenue from Spinraza more than quadrupled over the prior quarter, from $47 million to $203 million. The drug, which won
approval from the Food and Drug Administration just before Christmas, treats spinal muscular atrophy, or SMA. The disease, sometimes
called “baby ALS,” is the leading genetic cause of infant mortality. Nationwide, 145 sites — including those in Boston — have administered the drug, which is injected into the spine. It comes with a hefty price tag of $750,000 per patient for the first
year and $375,000 annually in subsequent years. Some insurers have balked at covering the
medicine or have limited access to patients with certain forms of the illness. During a Tuesday conference call with industry analysts after the release of the earnings report, Biogen’s
new chief executive Michel Vounatsos (right) also vowed to streamline operations to free up
about $400 million a year by 2019 for research and development, and to buy drugs being
developed by other companies. — JONATHAN SALTZMAN
quarter that ended in June.
➔ WORKSHOP
RETAIL
MICHAEL KORS
TO BUY
JIMMY CHOO
Michael Kors has picked out some new shoes to go with its handbags. On Tuesday, Michael Kors Holdings said it had agreed to buy the shoe company Jimmy
Choo for 896 million pounds, or about $1.2 billion, the latest push by a US
high-end fashion house to find sources of growth in an increasingly competitive retail landscape. Many upscale brands like Michael Kors have faced plummeting sales and tepid profits. Mall traffic in North America has declined
sharply, while shoppers who have traditionally been loyal to the so-called middle market have gravitated toward brands at extremes of the style and price
spectrum. Jimmy Choo, which shot to prominence thanks to celebrity patrons
like Princess Diana and the “Sex and the City” star Sarah Jessica Parker, could
give Michael Kors a new avenue for growth. — NEW YORK TIMES
Enhance your
marketing strategy
Attend a workshop that covers how to
successfully create content that
resonates with consumers. Hosted by
New England School of Business, this
event will focus on how to create
powerful writing through innovation.
Wednesday, 12 p.m. to 1 p.m., New
England College of Business, 10 High St.,
Boston. Free.
GOVERNMENT
HOUSE VOTES TO
BLOCK RULE
ALLOWING SUITS
AGAINST BANKS,
CREDIT UNIONS
MEDIA
NIELSEN TO TRACK
LIVE TV WATCHING ON
HULU AND YOUTUBE
WORKPLACE
WISCONSIN COMPANY
WANTS TO IMBED
MICROCHIPS IN
WORKERS
BOOKSTORES
ACTIVIST
INVESTOR
WANTS BARNES
& NOBLE TO
PUT ITSELF UP
FOR SALE
Targeting government regulations, the Republican-led House on Tuesday voted to nullify a
rule that would let consumers join together to sue their banks or credit card companies
rather than use an arbitrator to resolve a dispute. The repeal resolution passed by a vote of
231-190, almost entirely along party lines. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau finalized the rule just two weeks ago. It bans most type of mandatory arbitration clauses,
which are often found in the fine print of contracts governing the terms of millions of credit
card and checking accounts. Republican lawmakers, cheered on by the banking sector and
other leading business groups, wasted no time seeking to undo the rule before it goes into
effect next year. They’ll succeed if they can get a simple majority of both chambers of Congress to approve the legislation and President Trump to sign it. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Nielsen will begin to tabulate how many people get
their live TV from Hulu and YouTube, giving media
companies and advertisers a better idea of how many
people now stream broadcast networks rather than
watching them on traditional TV. Hulu and YouTube
have not revealed how many people subscribe to the
live TV services that they launched in the spring as a
counter to cable TV. Subscribers can stream channels
live on laptops, smartphones, and elsewhere. They
can also record shows digitally or watch them on demand. Both services cost nearly $40 a month. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
➔ NETWORKING
Innovation mixer
Come to a networking event for Boston’s
startup and tech community. Wednesday,
6 to 8:30 p.m., The Tip Tap Room, 138
Cambridge St., Boston. $25 for general
admission.
A Wisconsin company is offering to microchip its employees, enabling them to open doors,
log onto their computers, and purchase break room snacks with a simple swipe of the hand.
Three Square Market, also known as 32M, says it expects about 50 employees to take advantage of the technology. The chips are the size of a grain of rice and will be implanted underneath the skin between the thumb and forefinger. 32M provides technology for the selfserve break room market. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
An activist investor has bought a ‘‘meaningful’’ stake in Barnes & Noble
Inc. and is urging the bookseller to sell itself. Sandell Asset Management
Corp. CEO Thomas E. Sandell, in a letter to Barnes & Noble’s board, said
‘‘the public market for retail stocks is contributing to a risky and inhospitable environment’’ and the company would be better served if it were private or part of a larger company. He did not disclose the amount of Sandell’s stake. Shares of Barnes & Noble jumped 70 cents, or 9.9 percent, to
$7.83 in early Tuesday trading. In the letter to board, Sandell said the company is the only ‘‘truly national bookstore chain’’ and compared its locations to ‘‘beachfront property.’’ He said the company could get more than
$12 per share. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
➔ SHOWCASE
Summer of startups
Attend a venture showcase, hosted by
Babson College. Listen to the stories and
GOVERNMENT
TRUMP SAYS HE
MIGHT REAPPOINT
YELLEN
President Trump said Tuesday that he’s considering either re-nominating Janet Yellen for a
second term as Fed chair or replacing her with someone else, possibly Gary Cohn, who
leads his National Economic Council. Trump said in an interview with the Wall Street Journal that he has a ‘‘lot of respect’’ for Yellen and thinks she is serving capably. The president
said he’s still considering asking her to serve four more years after her term ends in February. But he said he’s also considering other candidates, including Cohn, who joined the
Trump administration after a 26-year career at Goldman Sachs. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
ventures of 14 startups, with networking
opportunities as a capstone. Thursday, 1
to 4:30 p.m., Federal Reserve Bank of
Boston, 600 Atlantic Ave., Boston. Free.
Events of note? E­mail us at
agenda@globe.com
B12
Business
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
Big firms hope
to lure teenagers
with tech futures
By Amanda Gordon
BLOOMBERG NEWS
NEW YORK — At the first
New York edition of Internapalooza, engineers from Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and
Quicken Loans Inc. greeted
hundreds of computer science
s tudents with smiles and
swag as their firms worked to
recruit young talent.
But one high school senior on a day off from from
his internship at a venture
capital firm wasn’t sold.
“ They ’re looking pretty
d e s p e r a t e ,” s a i d S h r e y a s
Parab, wearing a mustacheprint necktie made by a company he founded. “They’re not
super attractive for people
who are entrepreneurial.”
Luckily he had someone to
set him straight, someone he
trusted implicitly even though
they had just met: a softwareengineering intern at Google.
“Any of these can be interesting experiences,” Mahmoud Atef, a senior at Alexandria University in Egypt, said
of the opportunities he’d surveyed including at startup
mortgage-technology firm
Blend and hedge fund Two
Sigma. “These companies will
be as competitive as Google,”
he said. The Quicken Loans
staff “had a lot of energy,” he
added.
“I’m still figuring things
out,” Parab, 16, conceded.
Financial-services companies have contended with a bias among younger job-seekers
who are dazzled by tech startups after the conspicuous success of firms like Alphabet
Inc.’s Google, Amazon.com
Inc., and Facebook Inc.
Students attending Sunday’s Internapalooza seemed
receptive to overtures from
the world of finance, even
without some of the creature
comforts long associated with
a Wall Street firm’s recruiting. Soda, snacks, and coffee
— not steak — were offered at
the midtown event space
where air conditioning never
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really kicked in, though the
Quicken Loans fans powered
by iPhones came in handy.
Hundreds of STEM students — science, tech, engineering, and math — heard
about the event through word
of mouth, said organizer Cory
Levy. They showed up ready
to learn — and to stand in
lines, some of them more
than 15 people plus backpacks deep, just to meet an
engineer or recruiter at a
company that might one day
offer them a position.
Top STEM students with a
bachelor’s degrees can earn
up to $150,000 at most leading banks, hedge funds, and
tech firms, according to research by Options Group, an
exec utive-search firm. At
some tech firms, stock bonuses can increase the total package to $200,000, said Jessica
Lee, an executive director at
Options Group.
“I’m fine working in finance or tech,” said Naeem
Hossain, 21, a senior at Rutgers University in New Jersey
who has a software-engineering internship at Prudential
Financial Inc. this summer
and talked with an engineer
at Blend. The jobs sounded
hands-on, which he liked.
“My criteria is, I get to learn a
lot and I am personally invested in the project.”
Rohan Doshi, who’s 20 and
a senior at Princeton University, said his job search is
about “optimizing my chance
to have as much impact as
possible.” He’s majoring in
computer science and minoring in financial engineering
and East Asian studies.
Wall Street is working to
reach out to STEM students
with campus recruiting visits
and “hackathons,” intensive
coding events that promote
collaboration. Goldman Sachs
analyst Maria Samuel, 24,
who works on Marquee, the
firm’s digital platform for institutional investors, talked to
about 50 students at Internapalooza and noticed a change
in attitudes since a Goldman
Sachs hackathon she attended
a year and a half ago.
She said that students at
Internapalooza had “done
their homework” and had less
aversion to financial services.
“We can train you in the
business,” she said. “ What
we’re looking for is curiosity,
the desire to learn.” The Marquee team alone is looking to
double in size to 100 people,
she said.
Find
your happy
pace
Trail Run / 5K or 5 Miler
Sept. 23 / Spectacle Island
Register at Boston.com/islandrun
#IslandRun17
JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/GETTY IMAGES/FILE 2017
In New York City, the “Fearless Girl” statue stands facing the more established “Charging Bull” of Wall Street.
Pension fund calls diversity a key criterion
uLEUNG
Continued from Page B9
rage now, and while the state
almost always finds itself on
the losing side, this isn’t a lost
cause.
“Companies are being
called to the mat on this,”
Goldberg told me. “It
becomes an embarrassing
situation. The public scrutiny
that occurred around Uber
and harassment claims is
what is impacting its bottom
line and what instituted
change.”
Goldberg is referring to the
wildly successful ride-hailing
company and how allegations
of a sexist corporate culture
ultimately led investors to
push out the CEO in June.
She’s right. The same
shock factor could be used to
diversify boardrooms — as in
it’s quite shocking that
Amazon, Facebook, and
Netflix don’t have a person of
color on their boards.
Amazon declined to
comment, while Facebook
and Netflix never got back to
me. I can only imagine,
because there’s simply no
good explanation.
But Goldberg is hardly
going it alone when pushing
for more women and people
of color in the boardroom.
Institutional Shareholder
Services, a research firm that
advises the Massachusetts
pension fund and other large
investors, reports an uptick in
the number of clients that are
focused on board diversity
and want help developing
voting policies to address the
issue.
‘Companies are
being called to the
mat on this. It
becomes an
embarrassing
situation.’
DEB GOLDBERG
State treasurer, on the lack of
diversity on corporate boards
Momentum is building,
especially with the industry’s
biggest investment firms
stepping up the pressure.
This year, State Street
Global Advisors, which
manages about $2.5 trillion,
is using proxy voting powers
and other methods to lobby
for increases in the number of
female directors at the 3,500
public companies it invests in.
To promote this new
strategy, the firm — the
investment arm of State
Street Corp. — famously
commissioned the “Fearless
Girl” statue, which stares
down the bronze “Charging
Bull” near Wall Street in New
York City.
But the true fearlessness is
what happened when State
Street began scrutinizing
companies for gender
diversity. The money manager
identified 476 firms in the
United States, United
Kingdom, and Australia that
did not meet its standard and
voted against managementrecommended directors at
400 of them.
“We expect the 76
remaining companies that
were screened to show
improvement in the area of
gender diversity on their
boards or we will take voting
action in the future,” Rakhi
Kumar, head of ESG
Investments and Asset
Stewardship at State Street
Global Advisors, said in a
statement.
BlackRock, a New York
firm with about $5.7 trillion
under management, also
declared this year that board
diversity would be one of its
corporate governance
priorities.
“More specifically, over the
coming year, we will engage
companies to better
understand their progress on
improving gender balance in
the boardroom,” according to
a document BlackRock posted
online. “Diverse boards,
including but not limited to
diversity of expertise,
experience, age, race and
gender, make better
decisions.”
This past proxy season,
BlackRock supported eight
shareholder proposals on
board diversity, and at five of
those companies, the money
manager voted against the
nominating committee
members for failing to
address investor concerns on
board diversity.
The gadflies who once
badgered companies about
corporate governance have
gone the way of the stock
certificate. Today, as some of
the country’s biggest investors
step into the fray, it could be
obstinate directors whose
time is running out.
Shirley Leung is a Globe
columnist. She can be reached
at shirley.leung@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter @leung.
Median
price for a
house tops
$400,000
uHOME SALES
Continued from Page B9
Medway. “And instead of it getting better, it’s getting worse,
because there’s no housing production. It’s way off in terms of
demand.”
That demand continues to
drive up prices. The realtors’
group reported that the median price for a single-family
home rose 7.9 percent compared with June 2016, reaching $410,000. It’s the first time
the median price in the state
has exceeded $400,000. The
Warren Group, which also
tracks home sales in Massachusetts, put the June median
price at $395,000.
“The market remains
strong,” said Warren Group
chief executive Tim Warren.
“There are a lot of people who
want to buy a home. If there
was more inventor y, there
would be more sales.”
Not unexpectedly, June also
was a record-breaking month
for prices in the superheated
Greater Boston market. Singlefamily homes reached a median of $615,000, a 5.1 percent
increase over June 2016, according to the Greater Boston
Association of Realtors, which
covers 64 cities and towns.
Although June marked the
third straight month that single-family home sales declined
in Greater Boston, the 1,907 total was still the second highest
ELISE AMENDOLA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
High demand and low inventory are continuing to push up housing prices in the state,
particularly in Greater Boston, according to the Massachusetts Association of realtors.
number for June ( just behind
last year’s figure of 1,938).
Skyrocketing prices in communities closest to Boston are
forcing more homebuyers to do
their house hunting farther
from the city, said Guillermo A.
Molina Jr., president of the
Northeast Association of Realtors and managing partner at
Coco, Early & Associates in
Haverhill.
“These folks that are coming up here are living in Boston, and this might be their
first home,” Molina said. “The
prices seem to be more affordable in comparison.”
But it’s getting more difficult for first-time homebuyers
to enter the market, as well as
for homeowners to downsize.
“It’s the same old song,” he
said. “But I would say it’s an octave higher in this sense: sales
are down, [and] prices are up
because there is still an absolutely incredibly high unmet
demand for housing across
Massachusetts, and it’s at all
price points.”
Statewide, the number of
single-family homes for sale in
June was 32.4 percent lower
compared with the same period last year. As a result, the
homes that become available
are getting scooped up fast —
single-family homes and condos spent about 30 percent
fewer days on the market last
month than in June 2016. In
Greater Boston, single-family
homes spent an average 37
days on the market last month,
about 25 percent lower than
June 2016.
The record rise in prices is
what’s most worrisome about
this market, Warren said. Me-
dian single-family house price
increases since 2014 have hovered in the 2 percent range, “so,
very slow and modest in the
median price — pretty much
along the line of what inflation
was doing,” Warren said.
“This year it’s a 6.3 percent
increase in the first six
months,” he added. “Prices are
growing faster than the growth
in earnings and wages and
earned income, and that really
can’t be sustained.”
But Warren said the market
may right itself before the bottom falls out. If inventory continues to be low, it could eventually lead to a slowing or decrease in median prices, he
said.
Katheleen Conti can be reached
at kconti@globe.com. Follow
her on Twitter @GlobeKConti.
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
B13
Auto Dealer Directory
Alfa Romeo of Boston*
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Millbury*
Herb Chambers, 531 Boston Post Road,
Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
alfaromeoofboston.com
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo*
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
herbchambersfiat.com
Kelly Alfa Romeo*
151 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0006
kellyauto.com
Kelly Chrysler*
Premier Cape Cod
Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram
460 Yarmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-5000
drivepremier.com
Herb Chambers Honda Westboro*
Herb Chambers Lexus of Hingham*
350 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-0329
herbchambershondaofwestborough.com
141 Derby Street, Hingham
866-237-9636
herbchamberslexusofhingham.com
Honda Cars of Boston*
Herb Chambers Lexus of Sharon*
100 Broadway, Rte 99, Everett
617-600-6045
hondacarsofboston.com
25 Providence Highway,
Rte 1, “The Automile,” Sharon
877-338-9671
herbchamberslexus.com
Honda Village*
Lexus of Northborough*
371 Washington Street, Newton Corner
888-511-5869
hondavillage.com
Rte 9, Northborough
508-870-3222
Herb Chambers Porsche Burlington*
62 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
porscheofburlington.com
Chambers Motorcars of Natick*
157 W Central St, Rte 135, Natick
888-920-3507
chambersmotorcarsofnatick.com
Kelly Honda*
Audi Brookline Herb Chambers*
Herb Chambers Dodge of Danvers*
308 Boylston Street, Rte 9, Brookline
855-889-0843
audibrookline.com
107 Andover St., Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Audi Burlington Herb Chambers*
Herb Chambers Dodge of Millbury*
62 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
audiburlington.com
Audi Cape Cod – A Premier Company
25 Falmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-5600
drivepremier.com
Audi Shrewsbury
540 Lynnway, Rte 1A, Lynn
781-595-5252
shopkellyhonda.com
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
855-975-6891
BochHyundai.com
Premier Cape Cod
Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram
Herb Chambers Hyundai of Auburn*
780 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
866-890-0081
wagneraudisales.com
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
888-318-7927
herbchambershyundaiofauburn.com
Mirak Hyundai*
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakhyundai.com
Ferrari Of New England*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
FerrariNE.com
Bentley Boston, a Herb Chambers
Company*
533 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
bentleyboston.com
500 Yarmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-500
drivepremier.com
Herb Chambers Fiat of Danvers*
Herb Chambers Fiat of Millbury*
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
fiatusaofworcesterma.com
Herb Chambers BMW of Boston*
1168 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
866-803-9622
herbchambersbmwofboston.com
Herb Chambers BMW of Sudbury*
128 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-483-1828
bmwofsudbury.com
Colonial Buick-GMC*
1198 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-857-4431
herbchambersinfinitiofboston.com
Herb Chambers Infiniti Westboro*
Herb Chambers Ford of Braintree*
Herb Chambers Ford-Westborough*
310 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-6736
herbchambersfordofwestborough.com
211 Rantoul Street, Rte 1A, Beverly
978-922-0059
shopkellyford.com
395 Broadway, Rte 1 N, Lynnfield
866-233-8937
herbchamberscadillaclynnfield.com
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Warwick*
1511 Bald Hill Road, Rte 2, Warwick, RI
877-206-0272
herbchamberscadillacofwarwick.com
Kelly Infiniti*
155 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-1000
kellyinfiniti.com
Jaguar Sudbury Herb Chambers*
83 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-268-7851
jaguarsudbury.com
Herb Chambers Genesis*
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
877-287-9139
herbchambersgenesisofauburn.com
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
Acton Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram*
196 Great Rd, Rte 2A, Acton
978-263-7300
actonchrysler.com
Herb Chambers Jeep of Danvers*
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-904-0800
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Herb Chambers Chevrolet Danvers*
90 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-206-9332
herbchamberschevrolet.com
Mirak Chevrolet*
1125 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakchevrolet.com
Boch Honda West*
Route 110, Westford
978-589-4200
BochHondaWest.com
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
Premier Cape Cod
Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram
Premier Mazda Cape Cod
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
888-364-2550
BochHonda.com
Herb Chambers Honda Burlington*
Herb Chambers Kia of Burlington*
93 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
866-271-6366
herbchamberskiaofburlington.com
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Danvers*
Herb Chambers Honda of Seekonk*
185 Taunton Ave, Rte 44, Seekonk
877-851-3362
herbchambershondaofseekonk.com
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchambersrollsroyceofnewengland.com
smart center Lynnfield*
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway,
Rte 1 N, Lynnfield
844-222-6929 smartcenterlynnfield.com
Herb Chambers Lamborghini Boston*
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchamberslamborghiniboston.com
Land Rover Sudbury*
Herb Chambers, 83 Boston Post Rd,
Rt 20, Sudbury
866-258-0054
landroverofsudbury.com
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-359-6562 smartcenterboston.com
Cityside*
Flagship Motorcars of Lynnfield*
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway, Rte 1 N,
Lynnfield
877-337-2442
flagshipmotorcars.com
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-426-8963
mercedes-benzofboston.com
Mercedes-Benz of Burlington *
80 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
781-229-1600
mbob.com
Herb Chambers, 253 North Main St, Natick
866-266-3870
mercedesbenzofnatick.com
Mercedes-Benz of Shrewsbury*
760 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
888-551-7134
mercedesbenzofshrewsbury.com
Smith Motor Sales of Haverhill, Inc.
420 River Street, Haverhill
978-372-2552
onlymercedes.com
790 Pleasant St, Rte 60, Belmont
781-641-1900
buycitysidesubaru.com
VillageSubaru.com
61 Powdermill Rd, Acton
978-897-1128
sales@villagesubaru.net
Boch Toyota*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
888-321-6631 BochToyota.com
Herb Chambers Toyota of Auburn*
809 Washington Street, Rte 20, Auburn
855-872-6999
herbchamberstoyotaofauburn.com
Herb Chambers Toyota of Boston*
32 Brighton Avenue, Boston
877-884-1866
herbchamberstoyotaofboston.com
Toyota of Braintree*
210 Union St, Exit 17 off Rte 3, Braintree
781-848-9300
toyotaofbraintree.com
Toyota of Wellesley*
Rte 9, Wellesley
781-237-2970
Toyota/Scion of Watertown*
Herb Chambers MINI of Boston*
149 Arsenal St, Watertown
617-926-5200
1168 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
888-994-1075
herbchambersmini.com
Colonial Volkswagen of Medford*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
855-996-7751
BochNissan.com
Herb Chambers Nissan of Westboro*
75 Otis St @ Rte 9, Westborough
508-618-7032
herbchambers.com
Kelly Nissan of Beverly*
Herb Chambers Honda in Boston*
1186 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
877-205-0986
herbchambershondainboston.com
Rolls-Royce Motorcars of New
England, a Herb Chambers Company*
141 Stevens St, Hyannis
508-815-5900
drivepremier.com
460 Yarmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-5000
drivepremier.com
Boch Honda*
196 Great Rd, Rte 2A, Acton
888-871-3051
actonchrysler.com
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
151 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0007
kellymaserati.com
Boch Nissan
33 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
877-842-0555
herbchambershondaofburlington.com
Acton Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram*
Kelly Maserati*
Kelly Jeep*
Boch Chevrolet
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
844-464-3560
BochChevrolet.com
460 Yarmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-5000
drivepremier.com
531 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
herbchambersmaserati.com
Mercedes-Benz of Natick*
Herb Chambers Jeep of Millbury*
Colonial Buick-GMC*
Best Chevrolet
128 Derby St, Exit 15 off Rte 3, Hingham
800-649-6781
bestchevyusa.com
Herb Chambers Maserati of Boston*
312 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
855-878-9603
herbchambersinfinitiofwestborough.com
Framingham Ford*
Kelly Ford*
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Lynnfield*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
BochMaserati.com
Mercedes-Benz of Boston*
1200 Worcester Rd, Rt 9, Framingham
1-800-626-FORD
framinghamford.com
Premier Cape Cod
Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram
smart center Boston*
75 Granite Street, Braintree
855-298-1177
herbchambersfordofbraintree.com
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
Boch Maserati*
Herb Chambers Infiniti of Boston*
107 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchambers.com
BMW Cape Cod – A Premier Company
1130 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“On The Automile,” Norwood
855-278-0016 herbchamberslincoln.com
Boch Hyundai
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
460 Yarmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-5000
drivepremier.com
Herb Chambers Lincoln Norwood*
420 Cabot St, Route 1A, Beverly
978-922-1405
nissanofbeverly.com
Kelly Nissan of Lynnfield*
340 Mystic Ave, Medford, MA
781-475-5200
vwmedford.com
Kelly Volkswagen*
72 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-8000
kellyvw.net
Minuteman Volkswagen
39 North Road, Bedford
781-275-8000
minutemanvw.com
Wellesley Volkswagen*
231 Linden St, Wellesley
781-237-3553
buywellesleyvw.com
275 Broadway, Rte 1 North, Lynnfield
781-598-1234
kellynissanoflynnfield.com
Kelly Nissan of Woburn*
Herb Chambers Volvo Cars Norwood*
95 Cedar St, Exit 36 off I93 & I95, Woburn
781-835-3500
kellynissanofwoburn.com
1120 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“On The Automile,” Norwood
888-920-2902 volvoofnorwood.com
Herb Chambers Porsche of Boston*
Volvo Cars Cape Cod – A Premier
Company
1172 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-778-1912
herbchambersporscheofboston.com
270 North St, Hyannis
508-815-5400 drivepremier.com
Please call (617) 929-1314 to include your dealership in this directory. *For more information on this dealer, please visit boston.com/cars.
Buy a new air-conditioner.
ed.
With a beautiful car attache
Herb Chambers
B14
Business
T h e
THE BOSTON GLOBE
25
Index of publicly traded companies in Massachusetts
Globe 25 index
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
IRS sees big drop in identity theft
By Stephen Ohlemacher
ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The IRS is seeing a big drop in the number of identity theft victims after the agency
teamed up with tax preparers to
fight the problem, IRS Commissioner John Koskinen said Tuesday.
The number of victims was nearly cut in half last year, compared to
the previous year. At the same time,
he said, more businesses are being
targeted.
In 2015, thieves stole the identities of nearly 700,000 victims. Last
y e a r, t h e n u m b e r d r o p p e d t o
377,000.
Koskinen said the IRS identified
107,000 identity theft victims in the
first five months of this year.
Thieves use stolen identities to
try to obtain fraudulent tax refunds.
They get the refunds by obtaining
private information about victims —
Social Security numbers, birth
dates, and income data — and using
it to file fraudulent tax returns in
their name.
Victims then have to go through
a sometimes lengthy process to get
their legitimate tax refund.
The IRS is a popular target for sophisticated identity thieves because
the agency issues more than $300
billion in tax refunds each year. Several years ago, the IRS started teaming up with the major tax preparers
to crack down on the problem.
The IRS has updated its computer filters to identify more fraudulent
tax returns while tax preparers have
stepped up their security.
‘‘They are having more trouble
getting past our security protections
in our tax processing systems, so
they are increasingly taking aim at
the places where large amounts of
taxpayer data reside,’’ Koskinen said.
‘‘That means trying to access data belonging to tax return preparers
and other tax professionals, as well
as the payroll community, small em-
GABRIELLA DEMCZUK/NEW YORK TIMES
ployers and human resources departments,’’ Koskinen said.
One ploy involves thieves e-mailing workers in the payroll department of a large employer, masquerading as a supervisor seeking W-2
information about other workers.
The payroll worker thinks they
are e-mailing the information to the
company CEO, but ‘‘instead of going
to the CEO it goes to someone in Belarus,’’ Koskinen said.
IRS
Commissioner
John Koskinen
said stolen
identities
dropped from
700,000 in 2015
to 377,000 in
2016.
Markets
US stocks back to record highs
US stock indexes returned to records Tuesday as corporate
profits continued to come in better than analysts expected.
McDonald’s and Caterpillar were among the big companies
that reported healthier-than-forecast results. Sharp moves
higher in prices for oil, metals, and other commodities also
helped lift companies that produce energy and raw materials. That more than offset losses for health care companies
and stocks that pay relatively big dividends, which were
hurt by a rise in Treasury yields. Energy stocks benefited
from a second strong day after benchmark US crude oil
rose 3.3 percent. Brent crude, the international standard,
gained the same. That helped energy stocks in the S&P 500
climb 1.3 percent. Devon Energy rose 3.9 percent, for example, as did Marathon Oil. Financial stocks were strong as
a pickup in interest rates raised expectations that banks
could charge more for loans. Tech stocks have been the
year’s stars, but those in the S&P 500 slipped after several
reported results that fell short. Seagate sank 16.5 percent
on disappointing revenue and earnings. McDonald’s rose
4.8 percent; its earnings topped Wall Street’s forecast.
DOW JONES industrial average
NASDAQ Composite index
JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF
Building sale means eviction for tenants
uHARRISON AVENUE
Continued from Page B9
But he’s outnumbered — two of
Chu’s brothers, who handle the
property’s business matters, own 50
percent of the property, while his
two sisters own the other 25 percent. Lam Chung Chu said he’s the
only one who opposes the sale. Attorneys representing the trust did
not return messages seeking comment.
Karen Chen, codirector of the
Chinese Progressive Association,
which is assisting the tenants, said
property records show the trust,
formed in 1989, was set to expire 20
years after it was created, meaning
that it may have been defunct since
2009 — an argument they hope a
Boston Housing Court judge will
agree nullifies the evictions and, ultimately, the sale of the building.
Chen said this is just one of
many eviction cases the association
is dealing with, not merely to stop
landlords from selling, but to pressure city officials into coming up
with “some sort of policy that limits
land speculation, but also stabilizes
people’s rents.”
T h r o u g h a t r a n s l a t o r, L a m
Chung Chu said all the tenants at
410-412 Harrison Ave. pay belowmarket rents, allowing them to afford to live and work in the area. As
the building manager, Chu pays just
$550 a month for a three-bedroom
unit he shares with his wife. It’s
where they raised three children,
now all in their 30s. Everyone else
pays between $1,200 and $1,250
per month.
Chu said it will be impossible for
them to find comparable housing in
the neighborhood, which is being
hemmed in by an increasing number of luxury developments like the
Ink Block complex, where apartments rent for upwards of $6,000 a
month. Condo units under construction in the complex are going
for as much as $2 million.
“Even if we sell the building, for
the money we get, I will not be able
to get a three bedroom place in the
area,” Chu said. “That’s to rent, never mind about buying; I will not be
able to buy a place in the area. It’s
not even a matter of whether or not
people are willing [to move], it’s just
that there’s a housing crisis. Where
do they go?”
W i t h t h e Ju n e 3 0 d e a d l i n e
passed, Chu’s brothers have begun
the process of evicting tenants.
Their July rent payments — as well
as security deposits — were returned to them. T he matter is
scheduled for an Aug. 10 hearing in
Boston Housing Court.
Paul W. Chu, Lam Chung Chu’s
brother, said that when his family
bought the building in the 1980s,
the area “had a bad reputation.”
Now that it’s transformed, he got an
offer from a cash buyer that proved
too hard to pass up.
“Somebody came in and gave us
a good price,” Paul Chu said. “And
it’s about time to move on.”
Because the tenants have no
lease agreements and live there on a
month-to-month basis, Paul Chu
said, the 30-days notice complied
with state guidelines. Still, he called
the current tenants “really good”
and acknowledged he feels somewhat conflicted over the sale and
the tenants’ legal challenges. If the
building doesn’t sell, Chu said, he
may still apply with the city to convert the apartments to condominiums.
“We might apply for condos just
for convenience,” he said. “I can’t
handle that building too long.”
The city’s Department of Neighborhood Development is aware of
the pending sale of the building and
has offered to assist residents, a
spokeswoman said. If the tenants
are evicted and their units converted to condos, the spokeswoman
said they would be entitled to specific protections under the city’s
condo conversion laws, including
being given more time to move out,
and a relocation stipend from the
landlord.
“There are many eviction cases
especially right now, especially in
these types of row houses... There’s
a lot of development; tenants in a
lot of neighborhoods in Boston are
feeling a lot pressure,” said Bethany
Li, an attorney with Greater Boston
Legal Services who is advising the
Harrison Avenue tenants. “People
can decide to sell their properties
when they want; they just have to
do it the proper way.”
Zhen You Mo
worked at
Quinzani’s
Bakery on the
South End’s
Harrison
Avenue until it
closed in 2015
and its building
was sold. Now
Mo faces threat
of eviction
from his home,
also located on
Harrison
Avenue,
because the
building’s
owners are
selling the row
house.
Katheleen Conti can be reached at
kconti@globe.com. Follow her on
Twitter @GlobeKConti.
Uber to charge fee to return items left behind
S&P 500 index
uUBER
Continued from Page B9
SOURCE: Bloomberg News
money,” Maguire said.
Riders will be charged only if
they agree to have the lost item returned.
By contrast, taxi drivers in Boston turn over lost items to the police,
and passengers are also directed to
contact the police, not the cabbie.
Police then contact passengers when
the lost items turn up.
Other changes Uber announced
Tuesday include a 24-hour, sevenday-a-week support hotline for driv-
ers, which also launched in Boston
and 15 other cities and will eventually expand across the country.
And drivers nationwide will no
longer be penalized if a passenger
gives a poor review of a ride that is
not related specifically to the driver’s performance, such as a technical
issues with the app.
The moves build off Uber’s June
announcement that it would install
a tipping feature in its app, ending
years of resistance to a top demand
from drivers. Long available for
drivers with Uber’s rival Lyft, in-app
Uber tipping launched in Boston
earlier this month.
Uber has faced a series of scandals this year, culminating in the
forced resignation of former chief
executive Travis Kalanick. The trouble at Uber included questions
about how the company treats its
drivers, after Kalanick was caught
on video berating a driver who complained about pay rates.
Adam Vaccaro can be reached at
adam.vaccaro@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter at @adamtvaccaro.
By
contrast,
taxi drivers
in Boston
turn over
lost items
to the
police.
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B15
By Dave Green
Boston’s forecast
6 A.M.
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
High pressure overhead
will lead to a nice day
with mostly sunny skies;
pleasantly warm in the
afternoon. Clear to partly skies
at night.
FRIDAY
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
An approaching cold
front will produce a
mixture of clouds and
sunshine; more humid.
Mostly cloudy at night; a couple
of showers, mainly early.
HIGH
74-79
LOW
61-66
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
More clouds than sunshine; a developing low
to the southwest can
produce a bit of rain
in the afternoon and at night,
especially to the south.
HIGH
75-80
LOW
64-69
NOON
6 A.M.
6 P.M.
NOON
5
11
HIGH
76-81
LOW
63-68
HIGH
74-79
LOW
60-65
2
2
6 P.M.
A beautiful day with an
abundance of sunshine
and comfortably warm
in the afternoon. Skies
will remain generally clear at
night.
Clouds will gradually
give way to some sunshine later in the day;
pleasantly warm. High
pressure will begin to build in at
night; clearing.
HIGH
75-80
LOW
62-67
9
SUNDAY
SATURDAY
4
4
2017 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
THURSDAY
TODAY
14
3
2
10
2
10
2
10
18
Difficulty Level
7/26
Each row and column must contain the numbers 1 through
6 without repeating.
The numbers within the outlined boxes, or cages, must
combine using the given operation (in any order) to pro­
duce the target numbers in the top­left corners.
Fill in the single­box cages with the number in the top­left
corner.
DAILY BRIDGE CLUB
BY FRANK STEWART
New England
forecast
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Tides
TODAY: It will be a nice, comfortably warm day across the
region with high pressure overhead, leading to plenty of
sunshine.
TOMORROW: An approaching cold front will
produce times of clouds and sun but will bring
PRESQUE ISLE
clouds in northern New England and a couple of
79/58
showers.
EXTENDED: A developing low along a
MILLINOCKET
cold front that will be just offshore Friday
81/59
will lead to a chance of rain, especially
to the south.
BURLINGTON
80/65
MONTPELIER
76/59
RUTLAND
77/60
MT. WASHINGTON
55/44
LEBANON
81/59
Wind
Boston Harbor
NE 6-12 kts.
Seas
Temp
1 ft.
76/63
East Cape
1:38 2:16
1:52 2:30
2:00 2:32
1:37 2:15
Yesterday
High/low
65/56
Mean
61
Departure from normal -13
Departure for month -10
Departure for year +256
7 p.m. rel. humidity 70%
BAR HARBOR
74/58
PORTLAND 78/60
LACONIA
80/60
MANCHESTER
PORTSMOUTH 78/61
BRATTLEBORO
80/61
80/60
NASHUA 80/60
PITTSFIELD
76/58
BOSTON 76/62
WORCESTER
PROVINCETOWN
SPRINGFIELD
NEW
75/58
80/59 PROVIDENCE
74/61
BEDFORD
78/55
79/60
HYANNIS 75/60
HARTFORD
80/60
NEWPORT
77/63
BRIDGEPORT
OAK BLUFFS NANTUCKET 72/58
75/58
80/67
New England marine forecast
High tides
A.M. P.M.
Gloucester
Marblehead
Lynn
Scituate
Plymouth
Cape Cod
Canal East
Cape Cod
Canal West
Falmouth
2:23
10.7
8:23
-0.3
1:46
1:46
1:49
1:49
1:54
12:40 1:12
1:30 2:07
Degree days
Yesterday
Monthly total
Normal to date
Season total
Season normal
Last year to date
Actual Temperatures
Temperatures are
today’s highs
and tonight’s lows.
 Small craft advisory
 Gale warning  Storm warning
Wind
Heat
4
10
0
10
0
7
Seas
Normal Temperatures
July readings
Avg. daily high
Avg. daily low
YTD avg. temp.
Actual
80.9
65.8
50.4
1882
Record
high
96
82
66
Record
low
53
Yesterday’s low 56°
SE 6-12 kts.
1-3 ft.
76/57
E 6-12 kts.
1-3 ft.
72/58
Buzzards Bay
NE 4-8 kts.
1-3 ft.
77/59
Provincetown
N 4-8 kts.
1-3 ft.
74/61
40
25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
June
1901
July
1.5"
1.41
1.33
For current Charles River Basin water quality, call (781) 788-0007 or go to http://www.charlesriver.org.
1.2"
0.9"
Moon phases
0.3
T
0.08
0.11
T 0.07
T
LAST
Aug. 14
Evening sky sights – A. MacRobert
NEW
Aug. 21
T
The waxing crescent moon shines low in the west
in twilight. Well to its upper left shines Jupiter. Left
of Jupiter is fainter Spica.
June
T
0.17
0.14
T
0.12
T
T
0.05
Yesterday
Precip days in July
0.3"
0.0"
July
24 Hr. Precipitation
0.05”
15
(valid at 7 p.m. yesterday)
Month to date
3.99”
Norm. month to date 2.68”
Year to date
29.67”
Norm. year to date 24.52”
Climate data are compiled from National Weather Service records and are subject to change or correction.
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2017
HOROSCOPE
BY JACQUELINE BIGAR
you to go off and break past a restriction. Avoid becoming critical, as it could detract from your
unusual creativity. Note how you
handle a surge of liveliness. Try
not to overthink things. Tonight:
Do not steamroll over a loved
one's plans.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
Tap into the depth of a conversation between you and someone
else. Address a lack of clarity that
is keeping you from coming to a
resolution. Be sure to get some
exercise today, as your temper
might be closer to the surface
than you are aware. Tonight: Add
some mischief!
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Tension and stress seem to be
part of your day. You will express
THIS DAY IN HISTORY
Hamill is 61. Actor Kevin
Spacey is 58. Actress Sandra
Bullock is 53. Actor-comedian
Danny Woodburn is 53. Actor
Jeremy Piven is 52. Actor Jason Statham is 50.
ºIn 1775, the Continental
Congress established a Post
Office and appointed Benjamin Franklin postmaster-general.
ºIn 1847, the western African
East
♠ Q4
♥Q986
♦ 10 5 4
♣ J 10 9 5
South
♠ A653
♥72
♦ K7
♣AQ873
North
1♥
2♦
3♦
6 NT
East
South
West
Pass
2♣
Pass
Pass
2♠
Pass
Pass
3 NT
Pass
All Pass
Opening lead — ♠ J
“The man’s overtrick obsession has reached new depths,”
Ed, the club expert, told me.
Joe Overberry thinks it’s nobler to go down in pursuit
of overtricks than to make his bid. Losing a cold contract
thereby doesn’t bother him but drives his partners mad.
At 6NT, Joe won the first spade with the ace and led a
heart to dummy’s jack.
“I was East,” Ed said, “and played low. Joe could see a
treasured overtrick. He took the king of clubs, led a diamond to his king and threw diamonds from dummy on the
A-Q of clubs. Joe then led a second heart to the 10. I won
and took the jack of clubs.”
“What did North say?” I asked.
“He was speechless.”
Joe chucked 1,540 points trying for a 30-point overtrick.
After the jack of hearts won, he could take the A-K and lead
a fourth heart to get 12 sure tricks.
Of course, had Joe known diamonds were split 3-3, he
could have made an overtrick after his first heart finesse
won. In fact, he could always take 13 tricks.
0.6"
0.4
25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
FULL
Aug. 7
Norm.
81.4
65.3
48.9
Record Temperatures
Yesterday’s high 65°
120
Temp
Nantucket
Today is Wednesday, July 26,
the 207th day of 2017. There
are 158 days left in the year.
Birthdays: Jackson Five patriarch Joe Jackson is 89. Singer
Darlene Love is 76. Rolling
Stones singer Mick Jagger is
74. Movie director Peter
Hyams is 74. Actress Helen
Mirren is 72. Actress Susan
George is 67. Olympic gold
medal figure skater Dorothy
Cool
0
225
214
476
373
451
Normal
low
Vineyard
HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Wednesday, July 26, 2017:
This year you often get premonitions. You will note how much
your instincts are right-on. You
might know who is calling even
before you pick up the phone! If
you are single, you are likely to
meet several people who are fun
to date. You might become aware
of the fact that you care a lot
more about one person than others. If you are attached, the two
of you interact well, though you
have very different ideas about
how to handle money. Consider
getting separate bank accounts.
Virgo enjoys giving you practical
feedback and suggestions.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
Your high energy will encourage
(valid at 7 p.m. yesterday)
Martha’s
FIRST
July 30
3:28
3:24
2:37
2:28
West
♠ J 10 9 8 2
♥5 4
♦J96
♣6 4 2
2:55 3:35
2:23 2:52
11:0011:22
10:5311:15
60
77/59
Mount Washington (7 p.m. yesterday)
Weather
Mostly cloudy
Visibility
3 miles
Wind
north-northeast at 12 m.p.h.
High/low temperature
46/36
Snow depth at 7 p.m.
0.0”
2:47
2:44
2:00
1:53
80
1-3 ft.
5:31 a.m.
8:10 p.m.
14:39
9:08 a.m.
A.M. P.M.
Normal
high
N 6-12 kts.
Sunrise
Sunset
Day length
Moonrise
High tides
Hyannis Port
Chatham
Wellfleet
Provincetown
Nantucket
Harbor
Oak Bluffs
New Bedford
Newport RI
100
Cod Canal
Almanac
2:23
2:23
2:26
2:23
2:26
1:39 2:12
Boston’s recent climate
AUGUSTA
81/60
BERLIN
81/55
1:46
11.6
8:05
-1.3
High tides
Old Orchard ME
Hampton
Beach NH
Plum Island
Ipswich
BANGOR
82/58
NEWPORT
78/61
A.M. P.M.
Boston high
Height
Boston low
Height
North dealer — Both sides vulnerable
North
♠ K7
♥ A K J 10 3
♦ AQ832
♣K
DAILY QUESTION You hold: ♠ A 6 5 3 ♥ 7 2 ♦ K 7 ♣ A Q 8
7 3. You open one club, your partner responds one diamond, you bid one spade and he raises to three spades.
What do you say?
ANSWER: Partner’s raise invites game. Your king of diamonds may be a useful card, and you may be able to set up
your long clubs. Your trumps are weak, and your high-card
values are minimum. Bid four spades if you’re vulnerable.
your views loudly and clearly. Understand that you could be surprised by a close associate's reaction. Your feelings are mixed, and
you might need to stop and take a
deep breath. Tonight: Decide to
play it low-key.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
You might be very clear in your
mind and will believe that you
are well-organized. You seem to
be more intuitive than usual.
Others' communication with you
would indicate that you are working from different points of view.
Seek mutual understanding. Tonight: Hang out.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Become more aware of a possessive side that reveals itself when
you least expect it. You might feel
that your intuition is right-on.
You could confuse others when
following your intuition. A creative idea might be hard to take
across the finish line. Tonight:
Treat yourself.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
You could be tired of pushing so
hard to accomplish what you
want. A loved one is likely to be
distracting. You might need to
make an adjustment. Put your effort into moving forward with a
personal project that you have yet
to share with others. Tonight: On
top of your game.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Much that is going on in your life
is a secret to those around you, as
you have chosen not to share it.
Know that this attitude has isolated you from others. Make this
reclusiveness OK, as it is how you
are best able to process your
thoughts. Tonight: Try to catch
some extra zzz's.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
You know what you want, and
you are determined not to allow
others to distract you. Nevertheless, a loved one will manage to
pull you away. Make it your pleasure rather than fight it. Use caution with spending, as you easily
could go overboard. Tonight: Accept an offer.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
You could be more upset than
you realize. You also might feel
confused by a domestic issue.
Right now is not the best time to
make a decision, as your emotions are likely to cloud your
thinking. Put important matters
on hold. Tonight: Take another
look at a personal matter.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Visualize more of what you want.
Try to share your vision with others. You might opt to update your
views because of a discussion, so
much so that you could startle
others. Some people will feel as if
you have done a reversal. To-
night: Do some reflection that
might be overdue.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
One-on-one relating takes unusually high precedence right now.
You might balk at some of what
you hear. On the other hand,
you'll get a greater perspective of
different possibilities as you head
into a special project. You'll energize others with your enthusiasm. Tonight: Out late.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
Seriously consider what is being
said, even if you are on totally different wavelengths from the person who is making the suggestion. This individual might be
able to offer some suggestions
that are practical and workable.
Tonight: Be ready for a burst of
energy.
Jacqueline Bigar is at www.jacquelinebigar.com. (c) 2017 by
King Features Syndicate Inc.
country of Liberia, founded by
freed American slaves, declared its independence.
ºIn 1887, the artificial language Esperanto, intended as
a universal form of communication, was published by its
creator, Dr. L.L. Zamenhof.
ºIn 1945, the Potsdam Declaration warned Imperial Japan
to unconditionally surrender,
or face ‘‘prompt and utter destruction.’’ Winston Churchill
resigned as Britain’s prime
minister after his Conserva-
tives were soundly defeated by
the Labour Party; Clement Attlee succeeded him.
ºIn 1952, King Farouk I of
Egypt abdicated following a
coup led by Gamal Abdel Nasser.
ºIn 1990, President George
H.W. Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act.
ºIn 2007, the Senate passed,
85-8, a package of security
measures recommended by
the 9/11 Commission. (The
House followed suit the next
day by a vote of 371-40; President George W. Bush signed
the legislation into law.)
ºIn 2012, the White House
said President Barack Obama
would not push for stricter
gun laws, one day after his impassioned remarks about the
need to keep assault weapons
off the streets. With the Olympics Games as a backdrop, Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney held a day
of meetings with Britain’s
most powerful people; howev-
er, Romney rankled his hosts
with comments he’d made upon his arrival calling London’s
problems with the games’
preparation ‘‘disconcerting.’’
ºLast year, Hillary Clinton became the first woman to be
nominated for president by a
major political party at the
Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. A man
armed with a knife killed 19
disabled people at a care home
in Japan (a suspect turned
himself in).
T h e
B16
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
Names
Mark Shanahan & Meredith Goldstein
Lehr writes novel based on Drumgold case
Dick Lehr, the former Globe reporter who coauthored, with Gerry O’Neill,
the estimable Whitey Bulger book
“Black Mass: The True Story of an Unholy Alliance Between the FBI and the
Irish Mob,” is back with a new book.
Lehr, who teaches journalism at
Boston University, has written a
young adult novel called
“Trell,” inspired by the case of
Shawn Drumgold, who spent
14 years in prison for a murder
in Roxbury he didn’t commit.
Lehr (inset), whose reporting led to
Drumgold’s conviction ultimately being overturned, tells a fictional version
of the events from the point of view of
Drumgold’s daughter, who was just a
newborn when her father was arrested
in 1988.
“[That] became the seed for this
novel. I wondered periodically what it
must be like to grow up with a parent
wrongfully imprisoned,” Lehr says in a
note released by the publisher, Candlewick Press.
“I also wondered about telling a
story for a younger audience, a story
showcasing the themes in the Globe’s
stories — about gross injustice and
the eventual search for justice,
about journalism and the difference it can make. I began
asking: What if the daughter
were the central character?
What if she possessed the true
grit required to push for justice
against a system that has failed? What
if she convinced a reporter to help her,
and together they uncovered the
truth?”
“Trell” comes out Sept. 12, and
Lehr will be among the featured
speakers at the ninth annual Boston
Book Festival Oct. 28 in Copley
Square.
Wait, that’s why Bieber canceled his tour?
Did Justin Bieber bail on the rest of
his tour, including a gig next month at
Gillette Stadium, for religious reasons?
Maybe.
According to TMZ, the heavily tattooed 23-year-old singer from Canada
has “rededicated his life to Christ,” and
that apparently precludes finishing his
concert tour. (Who knew?) Fans were
stunned — and more than a little upset — to learn Monday that Bieber was
abruptly canceling his 14 remaining
shows due to “unforeseen circumstances.” Word is his tour crew is none
too pleased with the news either.
Maybe it should have been foreseen. Bieber has been spending a lot of
time with Carl Lentz, the pastor with
Hillsong Church who wears mirrored
shades and black leather jackets, and
likes to be photographed with Bieber.
TMZ caught up with Bieber after
the announcement, and the singer
said he’s looking forward to “just resting and getting some relaxation.”
Asked if he has a message for his fans,
Bieber said: “I’m sorry for anybody
who feels disappointed or betrayed.
That’s not my heart. And have a
blessed day.”
PAUL MAROTTA
Judd Apatow says hi to local teens
Before his stand-up show at the Wilbur Theatre the other night, Judd Apatow
met with teens from Zumix, the East Boston-based nonprofit that tries to build
community (and help kids) using music. Apatow, creator of “Freaks and Geeks”
and director of “The 40-Year-Old Virgin” and “Knocked Up,” was one of the early
donors to The Shout Syndicate, a new group that’s establishing a competitive
grant program for Boston-area arts organizations that serve kids. Julie Burros,
Boston’s chief of arts and culture, was at the Wilbur and gave Apatow a copy of
Mayor Marty Walsh’s proclamation declaring July 24 Judd Apatow Day in the
city. Apatow (back row, second from right) is pictured beside Mark Kates from
Shout Syndicate and behind Madeleine Steczynski, executive director of Zumix.
Start them up
TMZ (LEFT); MARY SCHWALM/AP/FILE
Several films tied to Mass. to premiere at Toronto festival
“Stronger,” the David Gordon Green film about
Boston Marathon bombing survivor Jeff Bauman, will
get its world premiere at the Toronto International Film
Festival in September. TIFF, which runs Sept. 7-17, released its gala titles Tuesday morning.
“Stronger” stars Jake Gyllenhaal as Bauman (pictured above with the actor at a Red Sox game in April)
and Tatiana Maslany as Bauman’s girlfriend, Erin
Hurley. (Bauman married and had a daughter with
Hurley in 2014; in February, they confirmed plans to
divorce.) A trailer for the film was released in June.
Other Massachusetts-made movies set to premiere
in Toronto include the Ben Lewin-directed “The Catcher Was a Spy,” and the Angela Robinson-directed
“Professor Marston & the Wonder Women.” “Catcher,”
starring Paul Rudd, Sienna Miller, Connie Nielsen,
and Guy Pearce, is about MLB catcher Moe Berg’s
work as an intelligence officer. Lewin filmed a scene at
Fenway Park in April. “Professor Marston” stars Luke
Evans as the Harvard professor who created “Wonder
Woman.” Scenes were filmed around Boston last year.
We can count two other festival films as local, even
though they didn’t base filming in Massachusetts. “I,
Tonya,” which stars Margot Robbie (above left, on
set) as Tonya Harding, is about the infamous attack
on local skater Nancy Kerrigan, played by Caitlin
Carver, of “The Fosters.” And “Battle of the Sexes”
stars Massachusetts’s own Steve Carell as Bobby
Riggs opposite Emma Stone as Billie Jean King.
Matt Damon is in two Toronto films: George Cloo­
ney’s “Suburbicon” and Alexander Payne’s “Downsizing.”
Faxon cast in new Groening show
MSNBC rates No. 1
After 28 seasons and 600-plus episodes of “The Simpsons,” creator Matt
Groening is ready to try something
new.
Deadline.com reports that Netflix
has given the green light to “Disenchantment,” described as an adult animated comedy/fantasy series. Voicing
the oddball characters on the show,
which debuts on Netflix next year, will
be Manchester-by-the-Sea native Nat
Faxon (inset), Berklee College of Music
grad Eric Andre, and Abbi Jacobson.
The show, set in the medieval kingdom of Dreamland, follows the misadventures of hard-partying princess
Bean (Jacobson), her elf companion
Elfo (Faxon), and her personal demon
Luci (Andre). The cast of voices also
Left-leaning MSNBC, which has
been no fan of President Trump,
racked up big numbers last week
on its way to becoming the mostwatched network across all of primetime cable, according to The Hollywood Reporter.
The cable news network averaged
2.33 million viewers between 8 p.m.
and 11 p.m. from Monday to Friday
last week. MSNBC had twice before
bested all other cable news outlets, but
this is the first time it also outranked
entertainment networks, including
Disney, USA, and HGTV. (The folks at
Fox News Channel point out that
when Saturday and Sunday primetime
numbers are included, FNC eclipses
MSNBC for the week.)
includes Billy
West, who got his
start way back
when as a regular on
Charles Laquidara’s “The Big Mattress” radio show on WBCN.
The multi-talented Faxon won an
Academy Award for best adapted
screenplay for co-writing “The Descendants” and also co-wrote and co-directed “The Way, Way Back” with his
writing partner, Jim Rash. He also appears in the Netflix series “Friends
From College.”
Read local celebrity news at
www.bostonglobe.com/names. Names
can be reached at names@globe.com
or at 617-929-8253.
‘Very shortly.’ KEITH RICHARDS, Rolling Stones guitarist, on the band’s timetable for returning to the recording studio
In Ruhl’s masterful ‘Clean House,’ empathy for untidy humans
By Terry Byrne
S TA G E R E V I E W
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
WILLIAMSTOWN — Sarah Ruhl’s
“The Clean House” delights in sharp
contrasts: the mournful, black outfits
worn by a young woman who describes herself as the funniest person
on the planet; the doctor whose orderly appearance in white clothing masks
the dark mess that lies just beneath the
surface of her life. In fact, much of the
power of this extraordinary play
emerges from Ruhl’s ability to wring so
much from these extremes, taking the
audience from the heights of laughter
to the depths of tears.
The beauty of the current Williamstown Theatre Festival production lies
in director Rebecca Taichman’s ability
to embrace Ruhl’s imaginative universe, while steering her cast toward
the characters’ subtler moments of unexpected connection. Those moments,
which often come with an exchange of
glances between two characters, a
pause, or a simple gesture, add another compelling layer to this moving
comic-drama.
The play opens with a maid named
Matilde (Guenia Lemos) telling a joke
in Portuguese. Lemos delivers the joke
with so much physical exuberance and
verbal enthusiasm that even though
we have no idea what’s so funny, we
are eager to know more. In short order,
we learn that cleaning makes Matilde
sad and prevents her from her life’s
work: thinking up the perfect joke.
Coming up with jokes is her birthright,
since her parents were the funniest
people and her mother died laughing
THE CLEAN HOUSE
Play by Sarah Ruhl. Directed by
Rebecca Taichman. Presented by
Williamstown Theatre Festival.
At the Main Stage, Williamstown,
through July 29. Tickets $40­$68,
413­458­3253, www.wtfestival.org
DANIEL RADER
From left: Bernard White, Priscilla Lopez, Guenia Lemos, and Jayne Atkinson in “The Clean House.’’
at the perfect joke her father told.
Fortunately, Virginia (Jessica
Hecht), whose sister is Matilde’s boss,
finds that dust gives her otherwise
empty life meaning, and she agrees to
clean the house so that Matilde can
work on her jokes, without telling her
sister Lane (Jayne Atkinson). Just as
this tidy arrangement is moving forw a r d, w e m e e t L a n e’s h u s b a n d ,
Charles (Bernard White), a surgeon,
and his patient Ana (Priscilla Lopez),
with whom he has fallen in love.
The complexities of this set-up
might overwhelm another playwright,
but Ruhl manages to deftly add increasingly whimsical imagery and ever-deepening emotions without ever
losing her balance. Apples tossed from
Ana’s balcony land incongruously in
Lane’s living room; Charles treks to
Alaska to find a tree that might provide a cure for Ana’s cancer; and Matilde has the power to tell a joke so funny
that it will make the listener die laughing. All of these flights of fancy are
deeply rooted in complex characters
whose fragilities and strengths are all
on display.
Director Taichman has gathered a
truly outstanding ensemble to surf
these emotional waves with affecting
grace. Atkinson, all sweeping gestures
and self-confidence, and Hecht, a bundle of tentative, birdlike movements,
capture the resentment and tension
between two sisters before moving to a
deeper understanding of what each
can provide for the other. When Lane
is so overcome by emotion she alternates between laughter and sobs, Atkinson’s delivery is so sincere, we can’t
help but be pulled right along those
dramatically opposing emotional directions with her. Lopez and Lemos
communicate the passion for life that
defies order and reason and demands
instead an embrace of whatever surprises life hurls our way.
Taichman also gives this production an extraordinary pace and rhythm
that encompasses the uneven nature
of the way our lives progress. There are
choreographed moments, particularly
between Charles and Ana, that communicate the sweeping power of love
without ever feeling schmaltzy. At other times, the action slows or speeds up,
in keeping with the feelings that
evolve, from resentment to compassion, allowing the actors to deliver a
kind of melody that emerges between
the notes.
“The Clean House” has a timeless
quality that manages to meet us wherever we are and remind us — as Matilde says — that “life isn’t clean, it’s dirty,
like a good joke.”
Terry Byrne can be reached at
trbyrne@aol.com.
Sports
TV HIGHLIGHTS
Baseball: Red Sox-Mariners, 3:40 p.m., NESN
Baseball: Cubs-White Sox, 8:08 p.m., ESPN
Soccer: Gold Cup final: US vs. Jamaica, 9:30 p.m., FS1
Listings, C6
C
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E W E D N E S DAY, J U LY 2 6 , 2 017 | BOS T ON GL O B E .C O M / S P O RT S
Dan Shaughnessy
Nick Cafardo
Leaders
or followers?
ON BASEBALL
SEATTLE — These are strange days for the
Red Sox. They are in first place in the
American League East. They are almost
certain to be in first place when they return to Fenway against the Royals Friday
night.
But John Henry’s team has been taking
on water since just before the All-Star
break. Going into Tuesday night’s game
and the major league debut of Rafael Devers, the Sox had
dropped 11 of 17. There’s been a power outage, a gaping
hole at third base, and some well-publicized bad behavior.
A team that’s been characterized as a tad “boring” (NESN
SHAUGHNESSY, Page C5
Power numbers
need upswing
SEATTLE — Memo to the Red Sox: Home runs are being
hit at a historic pace. Did you lose this memo? Let me resend.
Are juiced-up balls and badly located pitches not getting
to Boston? And by the way, you play 81 games at Fenway
Park. You know, the Wall, that Green Monster only 310 feet
from home plate?
This reporter certainly saw it coming.
In the offseason I kept harping that without David Ortiz
and without a suitable replacement this team would have
trouble hitting homers. The Sox would always counter
with, “Well, we’re a doubles-hitting team.” And I would
STEPHEN BRASHEAR/GETTY IMAGES
Red Sox rookie Rafael Devers had his hands full as he made his major
league debut — starting at third base — Tuesday night at Seattle.
ON BASEBALL, Page C5
SKY IS THE LIMIT
STAN GROSSFELD/GLOBE STAFF
FLYING A KITE — Juraj Bencat of Nantucket takes to the skies — and seas, eventually — on a kiteboard, a sport that received some attention last winter when
then-President Barack Obama gave it a whirl. Bencat, 42, is a certified instructor. “I love it up in the air when it’s stormy and crazy,” he said. Story, C3
Celtics continue
to make changes
Gary Washburn
ON BASKETBALL
Irving trade
would be costly
By Adam Himmelsbach
GLOBE STAFF
When Celtics guard Danny Ainge dislocated the index
finger on his shooting hand during a game in the late
1980s, team trainer Ed Lacerte popped the digit back into
place and taped it up, and Ainge returned to play.
But that was just the beginning. Over the next month,
Lacerte put Ainge through painful yet essential treatment
sessions. And whenever Ainge protested, Lacerte referenced Larry Bird’s mangled fingers, the result of dislocations that had not received adequate care.
“All I had to do was look at Larry’s fingers, and then I
knew I had to go in and endure the pain Eddie put on me
to make the finger right,” said Ainge, who is now the Celtics’ president of basketball operations. “Now, you’d never
know I had a dislocated finger.”
CELTICS, Page C2
TheBestChevy.com
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
The Celtics would likely have to surrender a great
deal of their young core to acquire Kyrie Irving.
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The Celtics will never be done trying to improve
their team. Their offices aren’t closed until training
camp despite a flurry of moves over the past few weeks.
When Cavaliers All-Star guard Kyrie Irving reportedly asked for a trade (players get fined if they go public
with trade demands, so Irving hasn’t confirmed it other
than privately informing the Cavaliers), the Celtics were
one of the teams that placed a call to Cavaliers management to gauge a price.
It’s not that the Celtics are ready to deal Isaiah
Thomas and completely overhaul their roster to accommodate Irving, but if Irving is available (depending on
ON BASKETBALL, Page C2
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Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
Celtics continue changes
uCELTICS
Continued from Page C1
Ainge chuckled as he recounted this story. He considers Lacerte a friend, and he
said it was incredibly difficult
to part ways with him as part
of a major restructuring of the
franchise’s sports medicine
and strength training departments this summer.
In addi tion to L acer te,
strength coach Bryan Doo,
who just completed his 14th
season with the Celtics, and
massage therapist Vladimir
Shulman, who was with the
franchise for 35 years, will not
return. Doo was offered another position within the organization, but declined.
The department will now
be led by director of performance Art Horne and director
of sport science Johann Bilsborough, Ainge said.
Horne spent the past two
seasons as the Atlanta Hawks’
head trainer. Previously, he
worked at Northeastern University from 2003-15, first as
an athletic trainer and later as
direc tor of spo r ts per formance. Bilsborough was hired
by the Celtics in 2015.
“We’re certainly not pointing the finger at [Lacerte, Doo,
or Shulman] as bad,” Ainge
said. “It’s just that when you’re
making changes, it’s hard to
bring in people into a new
organization with ideas and
control over departments. It’s
just hard on everybody, and so
we just decided to move in a
different direction.”
According to a league
source, there was some uneasiness about the hierarchy of
the Celtics’ sports medicine
and performance staff, and the
Celtics believed a fresh start
was the best option.
The departure of Lacerte
resonated most strongly
among Celtics fans. Over his
30 years he had cared for
everyone from Bird to Paul
Pierce to Isaiah Thomas. Lacerte was one of the franchise’s
few familiar constants, jogging onto the court on so
many winter nights to treat a
sprained ankle or other malady.
When reached by telephone, Lacerte said he was
touched by the outpouring of
support from fans this month,
2015 FILE/JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Head trainer Ed Lacerte cared for many Celtic players,
including Jae Crowder, over the last 30 years.
JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF
but declined to comment
about his exit.
“I will always be grateful
for Eddie and the team success
he helped us have,” Ainge said.
“He’s a good person, he’s a
hard worker, and he’s a very
confident trainer. We’ll always
be grateful for him.”
Ainge said that Shulman
was his massage therapist during his rookie season in 1981
and that he later convinced
the Celtics to hire him. Shulman had been with the team
ever since.
Shulman has a thick Russian accent and knew little
English when he started working for the team. Ainge said
players used to joke with him
that if anyone asked, he
should just tell them he was
“Joe Smith from Albuquerque.”
Ainge said he will always
remember Doo’s infectious energy. He recalled Doo’s unique
ways of ge tting players to
warm up — such as throwing
Frisbees into buckets — that
livened up normally humdrum exercises.
“There were many, many
days when he’d be working out
a player or running wind
sprints with an injured player
who was trying to get back,
and B. Doo was doing all the
exercises with the player,”
Ainge said. “I always appreciated that.”
Still, Ainge said, the Celtics
could not allow their close personal ties with these staffers
factor into their quest for
progress and a more stream-
lined sports performance department. Ainge said he envisions Horne and Bilsborough
overseeing a staff of about six.
He said those hires will be
made soon.
Horne was widely viewed
as an industry pioneer at
Northeastern when he worked
to blend sports performance
and sports medicine departments into one.
“I think that model worked
r e a l ly, r e al l y w e l l f o r u s ,”
Northeastern men’s basketball
coach Bill Coen said Tuesday.
“He understood what was going on for us at practice. If a
guy was hurt, he was the same
guy that handled his rehab
plan along with his rehab
treatment. Everything was coordinated at a very high level.
“ I j u s t f e l t l i ke w h e n i t
wasn’t under that type of model, the trainer would have to
talk to the strength coach and
keep him up to date on where
the student-athlete was in
terms of what his needs were.
This was all one-stop shopping.”
Northeastern’s current director of sports performance,
Dan Boothby, worked with
Horne for about eight years
and said that Horne remains
“a rock star” at the university.
“Art can really do it all, and
he covers a massive area of
that care continuum,” Boothby
said. “He has a wealth of
knowledge and a wealth of resources in his network. He can
get information and he can get
answers, and he’s not going to
stop working until he does.”
Trade for Irving would be costly
uON BASKETBALL
Continued from Page C1
the price), the Celtics were obligated to inquire.
And of course, having so
many assets and young players, the Celtics are the first
team many others call when a
top-caliber player becomes
available. So don’t be alarmed
by talks between the Celtics
and Cavaliers. They simply
chatted and never got into
particulars.
The question is whether
the Celtics should make a serious push for Irving, and this is
dangerous territory. Would
the Cavaliers make a deal with
a conference rival looking to
overtake them? Is Irving good
enough to push the Celtics to
the NBA Finals when they
w o u l d h av e t o r e l i n q u i s h
Thomas and likely two other
starters/rotation players and
draft picks to get him?
Irving is a splendid offensive player who, like Thomas,
can take over games. The two
a r e s i m i l a r o ff e n s i v e l y —
small, crafty around the rim,
s treaky 3-po int shooters,
score-first players who have
learned to become better distributors. So if you’re the Celtics and you are interested in
Irving, you believe he’s an upgrade over Thomas (a close
decision) and he is signed for
two more seasons.
That’s not all that much security. Irving has an opt-out
clause in his contract after the
2018-19 season, when he will
be will be 27 years old and
will command a maximum
contract. But what is difficult
about making such a drastic
move is the Celtics have no
idea how their new core will
work out.
Since free agency began,
Avery Bradley, Kelly Olynyk,
Amir Johnson, Tyler Zeller,
and James Young have left, replaced by Gordon Hayward,
Jayson Tatum, Aron Baynes,
Marcus Morris, and Daniel
Theis. Getting Irving would
likely require relinquishing
four of those players along
with a draft pick. That’s a little too expensive because adding Irving doesn’t necessarily
make you a title team.
The Celtics are at a point
where they need to be careful
with their moves. They are
getting close, and just about
every team besides Philadelphia and Miami has taken a
step back in the Eastern Conference. They have a chance to
rule the conference for many
y e a r s i f t h e y m a ke a s t u t e
moves, not ones fueled by
emotion or quick decisions.
“I think when you stop
thinking that you can get better, that’s a big mistake,” president of basketball operations
Danny Ainge told the Globe.
“I think you always think that
you can get better, as a player,
as a coach, as an organization.
We’re always trying to improve. That’s always an objective. You have to be able to
adapt on the move in our
business because unexpected
things happen, both good and
bad, and you have to be able
to change your course in the
middle of a plan because of an
injury or mishap.”
Ainge’s phone never stops
ringing. He remains camped
out in his office making and
taking calls. But the team he
has assembled over the past
month is intriguing.
“I feel like our team is in a
good place,” Ainge said. “We
don’t have to do anything, but
there’s no pressure on us to do
anything. If we can do something to make our team better,
we always will. It’s not that
complicated. It’s always a
temptation to get really good
players. That’s what we’re trying to accomplish.
“We don’t feel like we’re as
good as we could possibly be.
I don’t ever tell anybody what
I’m up to. I’m trying to get
better.”
The question is not whether the Celtics should swap
Thomas for Ir ving. That
would be a close tradeoff that
may benefit the Celtics in the
long run.
But they are not a better
team if they also sacrifice
their young core. Thomas finished this past season with a
26.5 player efficiency and
made the All-NBA second
team. Irving finished with a
23.0 player efficiency rating.
There is a difference in age
(Thomas is 28, Irving is 25).
Thomas gets to the free throw
line on average four more
times per game, while Irving
is a slightly better 3-point
shooter but attempts fewer
threes than Thomas.
Their offensive similarities
are uncanny, which makes
this trade a wash if it were
straight up, unless the Celtics
believe Irving has more upside because of his age. But
they would need to re-sign
him two years from now when
players such as Jaylen Brown
and Tatum will be nearing extensions.
It’s not an easy decision,
and one the Celtics may continue to discuss when the Cavaliers determine if they truly
have to part ways with Irving.
Players have made trade demands before, such as 10
years ago when Kobe Bryant
said nothing could keep him
with the Lakers. We all saw
how that turned out.
This is in the early stages,
and the Celtics have made the
courtesy call, but it would be
difficult to sacrifice so many
parts to acquire Irving and
also help rebuild the Cavaliers. The Celtics want the
Cavaliers out of their path to
the NBA Finals.
Gary Washburn can be
reached at
gwashburn@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@GwashburnGlobe.
Undrafted linebacker Harvey Langi could contribute immediately on special teams.
Jobs won’t come easy
for undrafted Patriots
By Jim McBride
GLOBE STAFF
Similar to the situation on
offense, the Patriots’ undrafted
rookie class of defenders face
long odds of finding jobs on
the 53-man roster.
Several could crack the inner circle, however, with several more good candidates to
land employment on the 10member practice squad.
Linebacker appeared to be
a group that needed some
depth behind last year’s core
quartet of Dont’a Hightower,
Shea McClellin, Kyle Van Noy,
and Elandon Roberts. The Patriots made Harvey Langi a
priority when the draft concluded, giving the Brigham
Young product a three-year
deal with $115,000 guaranteed.
New England bolstered this
group by adding veteran tackling machine David Harris after he was jettisoned by the
Jets.
Langi has solid size (6 feet 2
inches, 252 pounds) and superior athleticism and versatility.
He started his college career as
a running back at Utah before
switching schools and positions.
Despite being raw, Langi
excelled as a linebacker, using
his power and closing burst to
shed blocks and make plays.
He struggled last season when
switched to defensive end, but
it’s likely he’ll make his NFL
b o n e s a s a l in e b a cke r. He
could contribute immediately
on special teams as Bill
Belichick and Matt Patricia
help carve out a niche for him
on defense.
Brooks Ellis was a consistent contributor during his
four-season run at Arkansas.
He’s got good size (6-2, 245)
and intelligence (pre-med major). He’s an instinctive player
with underrated athleticism,
but speed is a major question
mark.
New England signed a couple of massive lane cloggers in
Josh Augusta (6-4, 335
pounds) and Adam Butler
(6-5, 300).
Augusta is a powerful man
who can shine as part of a rotation. He can dominate at times
but struggles with balance,
and conditioning could be a
problem as he lagged behind
during spring practices. If he
can strengthen his lower body
and consistently get low, he
could cause problems.
Butler is a tweener who
played both end and tackle at
Vanderbilt. He’s smart and instinctive and must have
caught Belichick’s attention at
the Commodores’ pro day.
The Patriots loaded up with
seven defensive backs as part
of their undrafted class. The
top candidate of this deep
group to break through is D.J.
Killings, a cornerback from
Central Florida.
Killings (6 feet, 185
pounds), who was given
$31,000 guaranteed, is known
as a sticky defender and film
junkie. He prides himself on
not only knowing his assignments but those of his teammates. Killings likely will contribute on special teams immediately, but could find himself
in the rotation before long.
Dwayne Thomas (6 feet,
201 pounds) was buried on a
deep depth chart at LSU before breaking out as a senior
and impressing at the Senior
Bowl after receiving a late invitation. He excelled as a nickel
corner, using his quickness
and length to cover receivers
of all shapes and sizes.
Kenny Moore (5-9, 179) is
an intriguing prospect out of
Va l d o s t a S t a t e , w h e r e h e
played corner and strong safety. He played football as a
youth but didn’t play in high
school until his senior season.
He has nice quickness and athleticism and plays bigger than
his size would suggest.
Jason Thompson (6-2, 208)
is a big-hitting safety from
Utah. He has the athleticism to
be a rangy center fielder, but
also the strength to step up in
the box and play a hybrid linebacker role.
Damarius Travis (6-2, 215)
is another smashmouth safety
who is at his best closer to the
line. The Minnesota product
has excellent instincts and did
his fair share of covering tight
ends for the Golden Gophers,
something he’ll get to do a lot
more of in camp.
Will Likely (5-7, 175) was a
corner at Maryland, but will
likely earn his playing time as
a return man at this level. He’s
extraordinarily quick and
shifty and wouldn’t look out of
place covering shorter receivers, but the bigger guys will be
able to outmuscle him and
shield him from the ball.
A best guess would be Langi and Killings as the players
most ready to earn a spot on
the opening night 53-man roster.
There’s a number of players, however, who could secure
jobs on the practice squad.
All of the defensive backs
looked comfortable during
spring practices and it
wouldn’t be a shock if as many
as three (again, a best guess
here would be Moore, Thomas, and Travis) hooked on after
the final cuts and other teams
have closed their rosters.
Jim McBride can be reached at
james.mcbride@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@globejimmcbride.
PAT R I OT S 2 0 1 7 C A M P C O U N T D O W N
1
DAY
TO GO
Branch plays big role up front
By Brad Almquist
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
The Patriots return to training camp Thursday to begin
their quest for a third Super
Bowl title in four seasons.
Their summer of celebration —
from the post-Super Bowl parade to the ring ceremony — is
officially over, and it’s time to
look ahead to 2017-18.
The Patriots kick off the season in Foxborough against the
Chiefs on Thursday, Sept. 7.
Quick fact: Ten Patriots
were born in each of California
and Texas, the most of any
state. Florida is next with nine,
followed by Georgia with six.
P l a ye r s p o t l i g h t : A l a n
Branch
T h e Pa t r i o t s r e - s i g n e d
Branch to a two-year deal
worth up to $12 million on
March 9. He has been a runstopping force at defensive
tackle since arriving in Foxborough in 2014. Branch forced a
fumble in the AFC Championship game and recorded a career-high 49 tackles last season.
One of Branch’s top moments last season came on the
biggest stage. With less than
nine minutes left in the Super
B o w l , D o n t ’a H i g h t o w e r
popped the ball loose from Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan.
Branch located the ball and
jumped on it, which led to a
scoring drive that cut the Falcons’ lead to 8 points.
The 32-year-old Branch has
played some of the best football of his career in New England. Branch’s ability to clog
the line was a major reason the
Patriots defense didn’t allow a
90-yard rushing performance
in 2016.
Trey Flowers played his best
football down the stretch last
season, capped by a 2½-sack
per formance in the Super
Bowl. Flowers, who is only 270
pounds, and Branch, the heaviest player on the team at 350,
complement each other in the
middle of the defensive line.
Branch will start training
camp on the PUP list.
Coach spotlight: Bill
Belichick
In the pantheon of all-time
great coaches, Belichick may
stand tallest.
Consider this: The other 31
active head coaches in the NFL
have combined for the same
number of Super Bowl victories as Belichick (five).
He has 237 career victories,
fourth all time. He has led New
England to 11 conference
championship games in the
last 16 years, a stretch of dominance unlike any in NFL history.
The normally reticent
Belichick loosened up a bit in
the offseason, whether he was
posing for a photo shoot in
Nantucket with longtime girlfriend Linda Holliday or celebrating with his team at the
Super Bowl LI ring ceremony.
He returned to camp in
Belichickian fashion, refusing
to reflect on the 2016 Super
Bowl triumph and instead focusing on the 2017 season.
On paper, New England’s
schedule is more difficult than
it was last season. But the Patriots may be better. They are
heavy favorites to emerge from
the AFC once again. And
Belichick, 65, shows no signs
of slowing down.
Brad Almquist can be reached
at brad.almquist@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter at
@bquist13.
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
C3
STAN GROSSFELD/GLOBE STAFF
Juraj Bencat gets airborne over Pocomo Point on Nantucket. “There’s just so much excitement going out in the big waves, jumping high and doing all kinds of tricks,” he said.
A SOAR SPOT
FOR THE WIND
By Stan Grossfeld
GLOBE STAFF
NANTUCKET — The breeze feels warm and salty as Juraj Bencat, 42, soars over a
deserted Pocomo Point. The kiteboarder’s view is stunning and his landing is graceful.
It’s late afternoon but Bencat has no intention of going home before nightfall. On the
shore, his 2-year-old dog Sena yawns and digs deeper in the sand. Bencat is no summer
tourist. He’s out here all year long, whenever there’s wind. The more wind the better.
“When nobody else wants to
be out, I want to be there. I
want to be riding it. I love it up
in the air when it’s stormy and
crazy,” he said. “There’s just so
much excitement going out in
the big waves, jumping high
and doing all kinds of tricks.”
He’s kiteboarded on nights
when the full moon rises orange and on days when the only
spectators are seals. He’s had a
bird’s eye view of schools of fish
returning in the spring and million-dollar yachts with women
wearing the latest summer bikinis. He prefers the foamy, angry
seas in the winter when it blows
40 knots and the locals refer to
the island as “the Rock.”
Bencat worked as a structural engineer in Slovakia before
making his biggest leap, taking
a job as a carpenter on Nantucket. When he’s not kiteboarding, he does residential
design projects.
On this day he’s also an International Kiteboarding Organization certified instructor
and owner of KiteTucket, a kiteboarding school where the lessons are held on the beach and
in the water. His clients range
from 10 to 76 years old.
“If I can make a living out of
it why not?” he said. “The season is so short, I wish I could
only be teaching kiteboarding.
It’s ideal being outside enjoying
the summer.”
He said no experience is
needed. “We can teach you how
to catch the wind. It’s fun, it’s
exciting,” he said. Occasionally
he has to rescue a rookie kiteboarder, but nothing serious, he
said.
Over the 15 past years, more
than 50,000 kiteboarders have
been certified worldwide. Since
2014, the number of certifications has increased by 8 percent
each year, according to the IKO.
Bencat is definitely hightech. His board automatically
records his jumping height, airtime, and landing G-force.
He doesn’t check it but he is
currently 54th in the nation in
total height, according to a
woosports.com leaderboard.
That’s behind such characters
as the Yeti, DJ Guacamole,
Night Rider Kent, and Mike
“Wind Jesus” Zinser. Bencat’s
highest jump was more than 50
feet. The world record is more
than 90 feet.
Kiteboarding got some attention last winter when former President Barack Obama
tried the sport in the British
Virgin Islands.
Bencat said it’s similar to
teaching skiing and that it is a
great core exercise that uses the
legs and midsection more than
the arms.
His main advice is simple.
“Stay safe, watch the conditions so you can make a plan,’’
he said. “You need to land it.”
He acknowledges to being a
bit crazy.
“Of course,” he said. “It’s a
huge adrenaline rush.”
STAN GROSSFELD/GLOBE STAFF
Certified instructor Juraj
Bencat, 42, has simple
advice for his fellow
kiteboarders: “Stay safe,
watch the conditions so you
can make a plan. You need
to land it.”
Stan Grossfeld can be reached
at grossfeld@globe.com.
WR Hawkins, 31, abruptly retires
By Andrew Mahoney
GLOBE STAFF
Patriots wide receiver Andrew Hawkins announced in a
video posted on Twitter he is retiring from the NFL, one day
before veterans are supposed to
report to training camp.
“After OTAs and through the
summer training, my body just
wasn’t responding and didn’t
feel the way that it should going
into camp,” Hawkins said.
Hawkins, 31, played 74
games over six seasons with the
Cincinnati Bengals and the
Cleveland Browns. He finished
his career with 209 receptions
and nine touchdowns.
Hawkins likely would have
only made the team if Julian
Edelman or Danny Amendola
were injured in training camp,
Ben Volin wrote last month.
Additionally, Brandin Cooks,
FILE/RON SCHWANE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Wide receiver Andrew Hawkins passed up a chance to wear
the Patriots uniform, retiring on the eve of training camp.
Chris Hogan, and Malcolm
Mitchell all appeared to be
ahead of Hawkins entering
camp.
Hawkins said he turned
down more money elsewhere to
sign with the Patriots for the
veteran minimum $775,000
salary. He was scheduled to
make $1.8 million with the
Browns before they released
him this offseason.
His departure could leave a
narrow opening for Austin
Carr, DeAndrew White, Cody
Hollister, or Devin Lucien, although all are long shots, with
perhaps one landing on the
practice squad.
Hawkins also said he will
donate his brain after his death
to the Concussion Legacy Foundation for research into chronic
traumatic encephalopathy.
Earlier Tuesday, a study by
Boston University researchers
provided new details on the effects of CTE in football players.
Follow Andrew Mahoney on
Twitter @GlobeMahoney
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Sports
C4
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
Baseball
AL
CUBS 7, WHITE SOX 2
EAST
*BOSTON
New York
Tampa Bay
Baltimore
Toronto
W
55
52
52
48
46
L
46
46
49
52
54
Pct.
.545
.531
.515
.480
.460
GB
—
1½
3
6½
8½
Div. Last 10 Streak
21­22
4­6
L3
23­17
6­4
W2
21­22
4­6
W1
27­21
6­4
L1
17­27
4­6
W2
CENTRAL
*Cleveland
Kansas City
*Minnesota
Detroit
Chicago
W
52
52
49
45
39
L
45
47
49
54
58
Pct.
.536
.525
.500
.455
.402
GB
—
1
3½
8
13
Div. Last 10 Streak
23­20
5­5
W4
20­23
8­2
W7
23­22
4­6
L2
24­21
5­5
L2
19­23
1­9
L1
WEST
Houston
*Seattle
*Los Angeles
*Texas
Oakland
W
67
50
49
48
44
L
33
51
51
51
56
Pct.
.670
.495
.490
.485
.440
GB
—
17½
18
18½
23
Div. Last 10 Streak
31­14
6­4
W2
20­22
6­4
W1
19­19
5­5
W2
17­20
4­6
L1
15­27
4­6
L2
NL
EAST
Washington
*Atlanta
*New York
*Miami
Philadelphia
W
59
47
46
45
34
L
39
51
51
52
64
Pct.
.602
.480
.474
.464
.347
GB
—
12
12½
13½
25
Div. Last 10 Streak
26­17
7­3
L1
18­22
4­6
L3
22­24
6­4
W1
17­18
4­6
W1
17­19
5­5
L2
CENTRAL
Milwaukee
Chicago
*Pittsburgh
*St. Louis
Cincinnati
W
54
52
50
48
41
L
48
47
50
51
59
Pct.
.529
.525
.500
.485
.410
GB
—
½
3
4½
12
Div. Last 10 Streak
20­21
3­7
W1
24­18
8­2
W1
20­19
7­3
W1
17­25
5­5
W1
19­17
2­8
L2
WEST
*Los Angeles
*Arizona
*Colorado
*San Diego
*San Francisco
W
69
57
58
43
38
L
31
42
43
56
63
Pct.
.690
.576
.574
.434
.376
GB
—
11½
11½
25½
31½
Div. Last 10 Streak
24­17
8­2
W3
23­19
4­6
W1
29­21
6­4
L1
19­28
5­5
L1
17­27
3­7
L2
* — Not including late game
RESULTS
TUESDAY
Boston
at Seattle
At Chi. Cubs 7
LA Angels
Chi. White Sox 2
At NY Yankees 4
Miami
Cincinnati 2
at Texas
Colorado
at St. Louis
Houston 5
at Philadelphia 0
Atlanta
Milwaukee 8
at Washington 0
Minnesota
At Toronto 4
Oakland 1
At Tampa Bay 5
Baltimore 4
Kansas City 3
at Detroit 1
at Cleveland
at Arizona
at LA Dodgers
NY Mets
at San Diego
Pittsburgh
at San Francisco
MONDAY
At Seattle 4
Boston 0
Miami 4
at Texas 0
at Chi. Cubs 1
At St. Louis 8
Colorado 2
at Philadelphia 4
At Arizona 10
Atlanta 2
Chi. White Sox 3
Houston 13
At Toronto 4
Baltimore 5
Oakland 2
At LA Dodgers 6
at Tampa Bay 0
At Cleveland 6
Minnesota 4
NY Mets 5
Cincinnati 2
Pittsburgh 10
at San Diego 3
at San Francisco 3
Kansas City 5 (12 inn.) at Detroit 3
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
.......2017 ....... Team ......2017 vs. opp ...... ......Last 3 starts ......
Odds W­L ERA rec. W­L
IP ERA W­L
IP ERA
BOSTON AT SEATTLE, 3:40 p.m.
Sale (L)
Moore (R)
­225
+185
12­4
1­2
2.48
5.70
15­6
2­3
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
1­0
0­1
15.2
15.0
0.00
7.80
BALTIMORE AT TAMPA BAY, 12:10 p.m.
Jiménez (R)
Cobb (R)
+120
­140
4­6
8­6
7.19
8­7
3.57 10­10
0­1
0­1
5.2 19.06
11.1 6.35
1­2
2­0
14.0 10.29
23.1 1.54
CINCINNATI AT NY YANKEES, 1:05 p.m.
Bailey (R)
Severino (R)
+195
­245
2­4
6­4
8.56
3.21
2­4
10­9
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
1­2
1­0
16.2
21.0
5.94
1.71
—
4.43
0­0
9­11
0­0
0­0
0.0
5.0
0.00
3.60
0­0
1­1
0.0
18.1
0.00
2.45
7­7
7­13
0­0
1­0
6.0
6.0
3.00
3.00
1­1
0­2
16.0
17.1
5.06
8.31
12­7
7­8
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
2­1
1­1
20.0
21.0
2.70
2.14
3.43 11­9
2.83 10­10
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
1­1
1­2
16.2
20.0
4.86
3.15
2.88
5.52
2­2
8­12
0­0
0­1
0.0
5.2
0.00
6.35
1­1
0­1
19.0 3.79
13.0 10.38
9­9
4­2
1­1
0­0
10.0
0.0
6.30
0.00
0­0
2­0
16.2
17.2
5.40
5.09
—
3.62
0­0
14­5
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
0­0
1­1
0.0
19.1
0.00
4.19
3.78
3.44
10­5
9­12
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
1­1
0­1
14.0
22.0
5.79
2.86
4.11 10­10
5.79
3­6
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
1­1
0­1
18.1
15.0
2.95
9.60
7­4
9­11
0­0
0­1
0.0
7.1
0.00
3.68
1­1
0­1
16.0
18.0
8.44
4.50
11­9
0­0
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
1­2
0­0
18.1
0.0
4.42
0.00
Matz (L)
Off
2­3 4.67
3­5
0­0
0.0 0.00
TBA
Off
—
—
0­0
0­0
0.0 0.00
Team rec. — Record in games started by pitcher this season
0­2
0­0
10.1 13.06
0.0 0.00
ATLANTA AT ARIZONA, 3:40 p.m.
Blair (R)
Corbin (L)
+160
­190
—
7­9
PITTSBURGH AT SAN FRANCISCO, 3:45 p.m.
Williams (R)
Samardzija (R)
+115
­135
4­4
4­11
4.74
5.05
HOUSTON AT PHILADELPHIA, 7:05 p.m.
Fiers (R)
Nola (R)
­135
+115
7­4
7­6
3.59
3.38
MILWAUKEE AT WASHINGTON, 7:05 p.m.
Nelson (R)
González (L)
+130
­150
8­5
8­5
OAKLAND AT TORONTO, 7:07 p.m.
Blackburn (R)
Estrada (R)
+145
­170
1­1
4­7
KANSAS CITY AT DETROIT, 7:10 p.m.
Kennedy (R)
Sanchez (R)
+100
­120
3­6
2­0
4.61
5.95
LA ANGELS AT CLEVELAND, 7:10 p.m.
TBA
Carrasco (R)
Off
Off
—
10­4
MIAMI AT TEXAS, 8:05 p.m.
Ureña (R)
Darvish (R)
+160
­190
8­4
6­8
CHI. CUBS AT CHI. WHITE SOX, 8:08 p.m.
Arrieta (R)
Shields (R)
­225
+185
9­7
2­2
COLORADO AT ST. LOUIS, 8:15 p.m.
Hoffman (R)
Martínez (R)
+135
­160
6­2
6­8
5.10
3.34
MINNESOTA AT LA DODGERS, 10:10 p.m.
Santana (R)
Stewart (R)
Off
Off
11­7
0­0
3.26
0.00
NY METS AT SAN DIEGO, 10:10 p.m.
LEADERS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING
AB
R
H Avg.
Altuve, Hou................. 378 71 138 .365
Segura, Sea................. 301 45 99 .329
Gamel, Sea.................. 300 50 97 .323
JoRamirez, Cle............ 367 65 118 .322
Correa, Hou ................ 325 64 104 .320
Hosmer, KC................. 373 56 116 .311
Springer, Hou ............. 368 82 114 .310
Judge, NYY.................. 339 79 105 .310
Pedroia, BOS .............. 322 35 99 .307
StCastro, NYY............. 316 52 97 .307
HOME RUNS
Judge, New York........................................32
Moustakas, Kansas City...........................29
KDavis, Oakland.........................................28
Springer, Houston.....................................27
Smoak, Toronto.........................................27
Morrison, Tampa Bay...............................26
Gallo, Texas................................................23
Sano, Minnesota........................................23
.....................................................3 tied at 21.
RUNS BATTED IN
Cruz, Seattle...............................................75
Judge, New York........................................73
Schoop, Baltimore.....................................71
KDavis, Oakland.........................................68
Sano, Minnesota........................................68
Correa, Houston........................................ 67
Springer, Houston.....................................66
Cano, Seattle..............................................66
Smoak, Toronto.........................................65
Moustakas, Kansas City..........................64.
PITCHING
Sale, BOSTON......................................... 12­4
JVargas, Kansas City.............................12­4
ESantana, Minnesota............................ 11­7
Paxton, Seattle.......................................10­3
Pomeranz, BOSTON...............................10­4
Carrasco, Cleveland.............................. 10­4
Fulmer, Detroit....................................... 10­7
Keuchel, Houston.....................................9­0
Sabathia, New York.................................9­3
Berrios, Minnesota...................................9­3
BATTING
AB
R
H Avg.
JuTurner, LAD............. 260 43 96 .369
DMurphy, Was ........... 355 64 121 .341
Harper, Was ............... 339 83 114 .336
Blackmon, Col ............ 409 87 134 .328
DPeralta, Ari ............... 321 55 103 .321
Posey, SF..................... 312 42 100 .321
CTaylor, LAD............... 286 52 91 .318
Zimmerman, Was...... 327 56 104 .318
Cozart, Cin .................. 277 48 88 .318
Ozuna, Mia.................. 375 54 118 .315
HOME RUNS
Stanton, Miami.......................................... 32
Bellinger, Los Angeles..............................28
Votto, Cincinnati........................................26
Harper, Washington..................................25
Bruce, New York........................................25
Blackmon, Colorado..................................24
Ozuna, Miami.............................................23
Lamb, Arizona............................................23
Thames, Milwaukee..................................23
Rizzo, Chicago...........................................23.
RUNS BATTED IN
Arenado, Colorado....................................86
Lamb, Arizona............................................79
Harper, Washington..................................75
Goldschmidt, Arizona...............................74
DMurphy, Washington............................. 72
Ozuna, Miami.............................................72
MarReynolds, Colorado............................70
Shaw, Milwaukee......................................70
Blackmon, Colorado..................................69
Votto, Cincinnati.......................................69.
PITCHING
Kershaw, Los Angeles...........................15­2
deGrom, New York................................12­3
Greinke, Arizona.....................................12­4
AWood, Los Angeles............................. 11­1
Davies, Milwaukee.................................11­4
Wainwright, St. Louis............................11­5
Scherzer, Washington...........................11­5
Strasburg, Washington.........................10­3
Senzatela, Colorado.............................. 10­4
RAYS 5, ORIOLES 4
CHICAGO
AB R H BI BB SO
Cabrera lf
5 0 1 0 0 0
3 0 0 0 0 1
Abreu 1b
AvGarcía rf
5 0 0 0 0 1
3 0 0 0 0 1
Davidson 3b
Moncada 2b
2 0 0 0 1 1
TAnderson ss
3 1 1 0 0 1
Beck p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Infante p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Holmberg p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Sánchez ph
1 0 1 0 0 0
Clippard p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Narváez c
2 1 2 0 2 0
Engel cf
4 0 1 0 0 2
Rodón p
2 0 1 2 0 1
Saladino ss
2 0 0 0 0 1
Totals
32 2 7 2 3 9
Avg.
.292
.296
.303
.245
.100
.243
—
—
—
.262
—
.268
.239
.333
.202
CHICAGO
AB R H BI BB SO
Zobrist rf
4 1 3 1 1 1
Bryant 3b
3 0 0 0 0 3
Jay lf
0 1 0 0 2 0
Rizzo 1b
3 2 1 0 2 1
Contreras c
5 1 3 4 0 1
Happ lf­2b
2 1 1 0 2 1
Almora Jr. cf
4 0 1 2 0 1
Báez 2b­3b
5 0 0 0 0 5
Russell ss
4 1 1 0 1 2
Lackey p
2 0 0 0 1 1
Edwards Jr. p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Strop p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Schwrber ph
1 0 0 0 0 1
Rondón p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Duensing p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals
33 7 10 7 9 17
Avg.
.228
.278
.304
.253
.273
.255
.277
.267
.238
.139
.000
—
.181
.000
.000
Chicago...............020 000 000 — 2 7 0
Chicago...............310 002 01x — 7 10 0
LOB—Chicago 10, Chicago 13. 2B—En­
gel (6), Rodón (1), Zobrist 2 (12), Almora
Jr. (11), Russell (19). 3B—Sánchez (6).
HR—Contreras (16), off Rodón. SB—
Abreu (1), Zobrist (2), Happ 2 (5). SF—Al­
mora Jr.. DP—Chicago 2.
Chicago
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Rodón L 1­4
4 7 4 4 3 11 6.29
Beck
1‚ 1 2 2 4 2 4.76
Infante
„ 0 0 0 0 1 4.73
Holmberg
1 1 0 0 1 2 3.74
Clippard
1 1 1 1 1 1 5.26
Chicago
Lackey W 7­9
Edwards Jr.
Strop
Rondón
Duensing
CHARLES REX ARBOGAST/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Catcher Willson Contreras (3 for 5, 4 RBIs) connects for a single that gave the
Cubs a 5-2 lead in the sixth inning over the White Sox at Wrigley Field.
Contreras (4 RBIs) lifts
Cubs over White Sox
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Willson Contreras drove in four runs
and Carl Edwards Jr. provided some timely
relief, helping the Chicago Cubs beat the
visiting Chicago White Sox,
ROUNDUP 7-2, on Tuesday.
Ben Zobrist reached four
times from the leadoff spot as the Cubs
won for the ninth time in 11 games since
the All-Star break. John Lackey (7-9) became the first major leaguer to hit four batters in two years, but managed to get into
the sixth inning for his second straight victory.
The AL-worst White Sox were unable to
overcome a strange performance by Carlos
Rodon (1-4) in their 10th loss in 11 games.
The lefthander matched a career high with
11 strikeouts and smacked a two-run double for his first career hit, but lasted just
four innings in his third straight loss.
Contreras helped the Cubs get off to a
fast start with a three-run drive in the first
for his 16th homer. He singled in the third
and drove in Jon Jay with another base hit
in Chicago’s two-run sixth.
Contreras’s three-hit day was a nice rebound performance after he struck out
looking with two runners on for the final
out in the Cubs’ 3-1 loss in the series opener on Monday. He is batting .347 (25 for 72)
with seven homers and 18 RBIs in 18 July
games.
The Cubs carried a 4-2 lead into the
sixth, but Lackey was pulled after the
White Sox put runners on second and third
with no outs.
Edwards came in and struck out Tyler
Saladino before making an athletic play on
Melky Cabrera’s comebacker for the second
out. With the Wrigley Field crowd of
40,717 standing and cheering, Edwards
then struck out Jose Abreu to end the inning.
The wiry reliever held his arms out and
yelled as he left the mound after escaping
the jam.
Omar Narvaez went 2 for 2 with two
walks for the White Sox, who have dropped
22 of 30. Rodon, the No. 3 overall pick in
the 2014 draft, was charged with four runs
and seven hits.
Both benches were warned by home
plate umpire Lance Barksdale after White
Sox reliever Chris Beck plunked Ian Happ
in the fifth. Lackey hit three batters in the
top half of the inning, including Abreu for
the second time, but Tim Anderson
bounced into a fielder’s choice for the final
out.
Astros 5, Phillies 0 — Derek Fisher drove
in two runs just hours after arriving in Philadelphia and Charlie Morton pitched seven
innings to lead Houston to a shutout road
victory.
Jose Altuve extended his hitting streak
to 17 straight games with a sixth-inning
double to help the AL West-leading Astros
improve to an American League-best 6733. Houston is 9-0 in interleague play.
Houston suffered an injury for the second straight day, as Alex Bregman left with
discomfort in his right hamstring after tripling and scoring in the third. On Monday,
outfielder George Springer departed with a
left quadriceps injury that resulted in Fisher’s call-up.
Philadelphia had four hits — all doubles
— while dropping its major-league worst
record to 34-64.
Morton (8-4) gave up three hits and
struck out nine. The 33-year-old was
signed by the Phillies before last season but
played in just four games before suffering a
season-ending hamstring injury.
Nick Pivetta (3-6) allowed five runs and
six hits with seven strikeouts and one walk
in six innings.
Yankees 4, Reds 2 — Todd Frazier had an
unforgettable first at-bat in his home debut
at Yankee Stadium, grounding into a rare
run-scoring triple play as New York beat
Cincinnati.
Rookie Jordan Montgomery took a nohit try into the sixth inning, and Didi Gregorius homered to boost the AL East contenders, his third in two games.
Last-place Cincinnati lost for the 10th
time in 12 games. Billy Hamilton’s bid for a
tying extra-base hit in the eighth was
thwarted when pinch-runner Zack Cozart,
out of the starting lineup to rest his tender
quadriceps, hobbled into third.
Aroldis Chapman closed for his 12th
save in 15 chances.
Rays 5, Orioles 4 — Tim Beckham’s threerun homer capped a five-run inning for
Tampa Bay and rookie Jake Faria pitched
into the eighth inning to snap a five-game
losing streak with a narrow win over visiting Baltimore.
Faria (5-1) posted his eighth quality
start in nine starts, giving up three runs
and seven hits while striking out five in 7‚
innings.
Alex Colome pitched the ninth for his
29th save after the Orioles got the potential
tying run in scoring position in each of the
last two innings.
Blue Jays 4, Athletics 1 — Cesar Valdez
pitched a career-high six innings to win for
the first time since his big league debut
more than seven years ago and Ryan Goins
had two RBIs for host Toronto.
Making his first start with Toronto and
just the fourth of his career, Valdez (1-0) allowed one run and five hits, walked one
and struck out four. He left to a standing
ovation from the crowd of 40,624 after giving up a leadoff double to Khris Davis in
the seventh.
With more than half a dozen scouts on
hand to monitor his performance ahead of
the July 31 trade deadline, Oakland starter
Sonny Gray (6-5) allowed four runs, none
earned, in six innings.
Royals 3, Tigers 1 — Whit Merrifield homered on the first pitch of the game and Kansas City led the rest of the way, beating host
Detroit for its seventh consecutive victory.
Danny Duffy (7-6) pitched into the seventh inning for the Royals, who added two
runs in the fourth to keep the pressure on
in the AL Central race. Kansas City came
into the night 1½ games behind first-place
Cleveland.
Merrifield homered to left-center off Michael Fulmer (10-8) to open the scoring.
Fulmer struck out the next four hitters he
faced, and the All-Star right-hander ended
up allowing three runs and eight hits in
eight sharp innings. He struck out six without a walk.
Brewers 8, Nationals 0 — Travis Shaw, Eric
Thames and Manny Pina homered, Zach
Davies tossed 7„ shutout innings and Milwaukee beat host Washington.
Shaw’s three-run blast highlighted a
four-run fourth inning. Thames and Pina
went back-to-back off Edwin Jackson (1-1)
in the fifth for the NL Central-leading
Brewers. Milwaukee, which had lost six of
seven to open its 10-game road trip, maintained a half-game lead over the Chicago
Cubs.
Davies (12-4) allowed three hits and
struck out seven to win his fifth consecutive decision.
IP H R ER BB SO
5 5 2 2 2 5
1 0 0 0 0 2
1 0 0 0 0 1
1 1 0 0 1 1
1 1 0 0 0 0
ERA
4.97
2.68
2.58
4.31
2.51
Lackey pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
Inherited runners­scored—Infante 3­1,
Edwards Jr. 2­0. IBB—off Beck (Russell).
HBP—by Beck (Happ), by Lackey (Abreu
2, Davidson, Moncada). WP—Lackey.
NP—Rodón 98, Beck 39, Infante 7, Holm­
berg 28, Clippard 19, Lackey 91, Edwards
Jr. 15, Strop 12, Rondón 21, Duensing 13.
Umpires—Home, Lance Barksdale; First,
John Tumpane; Second, Ted Barrett;
Third, Angel Hernandez. T—3:38.
A—40,717 (41,649).
YANKEES 4, REDS 2
CINCINNATI
AB R H BI BB SO
Hamilton cf
4 0 1 1 0 1
Suárez 3b
4 0 0 0 0 3
Votto 1b
4 0 0 0 0 1
Duvall dh­lf
3 0 1 0 1 1
Kivlehan lf
2 0 0 0 0 1
Gnnett ph­2b
2 0 0 0 0 0
Mesoraco c
2 1 0 0 1 0
Schebler rf
3 1 1 0 0 1
Peraza ss
2 0 0 0 1 0
Alcntara 2b­lf
2 0 0 1 0 0
Cozart ph
1 0 0 0 0 0
Stphenson pr
0 0 0 0 0 0
Lorenzen p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals
29 2 3 2 3 8
Avg.
.258
.256
.295
.269
.208
.310
.226
.237
.249
.191
.317
.200
.125
NY YANKEES
Gardner cf
CFrazier lf
Judge rf
Holliday dh
Gregorius ss
Headley 1b
TFrazier 3b
Wade 2b
Romine c
Totals
Avg.
.256
.277
.310
.238
.307
.266
.205
.125
.238
AB R H BI BB SO
3 0 1 0 1 1
4 0 0 0 0 1
3 1 1 0 1 2
4 1 1 0 0 0
3 1 2 2 0 0
4 0 1 0 0 1
2 0 1 0 1 0
3 1 0 0 0 0
3 0 1 1 0 1
29 4 8 3 3 6
Cincinnati...........000 001 010 — 2 3 0
NY Yankees........010 110 01x — 4 8 0
LOB—Cincinnati 3, NY Yankees 5. 2B—
Hamilton (12), Schebler (16), Romine (7).
HR—Gregorius (15), off Lorenzen. SF—
Gregorius. DP—NY Yankees 1. TP—Cin­
cinnati 1.
Cincinnati
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Castillo L 1­4
5 7 3 3 2 2 4.05
Peralta
1 0 0 0 1 0 2.74
Storen
1 0 0 0 0 2 3.12
Lorenzen
1 1 1 1 0 2 3.98
NY Yankees
IP H R ER BB SO
Mgmry W 7­5 6„ 2 1 1 1 6
Kahnle
‚ 0 0 0 0 0
Betances
„ 1 1 1 2 1
Warren
‚ 0 0 0 0 1
Chpman S 12
1 0 0 0 0 0
ERA
3.92
2.29
2.83
1.98
3.38
Inherited runners­scored—Kahnle 1­0,
Warren 2­0. Balk—Castillo. PB—Mesora­
co. NP—Castillo 86, Peralta 13, Storen 13,
Lorenzen 20, Montgomery 85, Kahnle 4,
Betances 24, Warren 7, Chapman 8. Um­
pires—Home, Ryan Blakney; First, Mark
Wegner; Second, Marty Foster; Third,
Mike Winters. T—2:38. A—44,268 (47,422)
ASTROS 5, PHILLIES 0
HOUSTON
Altuve 2b
Reddick rf
Gurriel 1b­3b
Gattis c
González ss
Fisher cf­lf
Bregman 3b
White 1b
Aoki lf
Giles p
Morton p
Sipp p
Martes p
Marisnick cf
Totals
AB R H BI BB SO
4 1 1 0 0 1
4 1 1 1 0 1
4 1 1 0 0 2
4 0 0 0 0 2
4 1 2 1 0 1
3 0 1 2 1 0
1 1 1 0 0 0
2 0 0 0 1 1
3 0 0 1 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0
3 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0
32 5 7 5 2 8
Avg.
.364
.306
.293
.280
.321
.286
.267
.167
.277
—
.000
.000
—
.250
PHILADELPHIA AB R H BI BB SO
CHrnndez 2b
4 0 0 0 0 1
Galvis ss
3 0 1 0 0 0
Williams rf
3 0 0 0 1 2
Kendrick lf
3 0 0 0 0 1
Herrera cf
3 0 0 0 0 2
García p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Blanco ph
1 0 0 0 0 0
Neris p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Franco 3b
4 0 0 0 0 3
Joseph 1b
4 0 1 0 0 2
Rupp c
4 0 2 0 0 0
Pivetta p
2 0 0 0 0 1
Perkins cf
2 0 0 0 0 0
Totals
33 0 4 0 1 12
Avg.
.278
.253
.303
.343
.272
—
.154
—
.224
.247
.228
.077
.208
Houston..............001 004 000 — 5 7 2
Philadelphia.......000 000 000 — 0 4 0
E—Altuve (8), Gurriel (9). LOB—Hous­
ton 3, Philadelphia 9. 2B—Altuve (31),
Galvis (21), Joseph (19), Rupp 2 (11). 3B—
Bregman (2). HR—. SB—Gurriel (3),
González (5). CS—Fisher (2). SF—Aoki.
Houston
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Morton W 8­4 7 3 0 0 1 9 3.83
Sipp
‚ 0 0 0 0 0 5.16
Martes
„ 0 0 0 0 1 4.02
Giles
1 1 0 0 0 2 3.19
Philadelphia
Pivetta L 3­6
García
Neris
IP H R ER BB SO
6 6 5 5 1 7
2 0 0 0 0 0
1 1 0 0 1 1
ERA
5.73
2.14
3.27
Inherited runners­scored—Martes 1­0.
HBP—by Morton (Galvis, Kendrick). WP—
Martes. PB—Rupp. NP—Morton 105, Sipp
9, Martes 10, Giles 14, Pivetta 97, García
15, Neris 16. Umpires—Home, Dan Ias­
sogna; First, Brian Gorman; Second, Stu
Scheurwater; Third, Tripp Gibson.
T—2:44. A—17,176 (43,651).
ROYALS 3, TIGERS 1
KANSAS CITY AB R H BI BB SO
Merrifield 2b
4 1 2 1 0 1
Bonifacio rf
4 1 2 0 0 1
Cain cf
4 0 0 0 0 2
Hosmer 1b
4 1 1 1 0 1
Perez c
2 0 1 0 0 1
Butera c
2 0 0 0 0 0
Mostakas 3b
3 0 0 1 0 0
Moss dh
4 0 1 0 0 0
Escobar ss
3 0 0 0 0 0
Gordon lf
3 0 1 0 0 0
Totals
33 3 8 3 0 6
Avg.
.291
.263
.264
.310
.285
.250
.275
.206
.227
.203
DETROIT
AB R H BI BB SO
Kinsler 2b
3 0 0 0 1 0
Cstellanos 3b
4 0 0 0 0 1
Upton lf
4 0 1 0 0 2
Cabrera 1b
4 0 2 0 0 0
Mahtook cf
4 1 1 0 0 0
Martinez dh
3 0 2 0 1 0
McCann c
3 0 1 1 0 1
Presley ph
1 0 0 0 0 0
Romine rf
3 0 1 0 0 0
Avila ph
1 0 0 0 0 1
Iglesias ss
4 0 0 0 0 0
Totals
34 1 8 1 2 5
Avg.
.246
.242
.278
.259
.293
.262
.228
.326
.221
.278
.257
Kansas City........100 200 000 — 3 8 0
Detroit.................000 100 000 — 1 8 0
LOB—Kansas City 4, Detroit 8. 2B—
Martinez (13). 3B—Mahtook (3). HR—
Merrifield (11), off Fulmer. SF—Mousta­
kas. DP—Kansas City 1; Detroit 1.
Kansas City
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Duffy W 7­6
6‚ 6 1 1 1 4 3.56
Moylan
„ 0 0 0 1 0 4.46
Soria
1 2 0 0 0 0 3.14
Herrera S 21
1 0 0 0 0 1 4.28
Detroit
Fulmer L 10­8
Stumpf
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
8 8 3 3 0 6 3.35
1 0 0 0 0 0 2.70
Inherited runners­scored—Moylan 2­0.
IBB—off Moylan (Kinsler). NP—Duffy 105,
Moylan 7, Soria 15, Herrera 12, Fulmer
108, Stumpf 14. Umpires—Home, Jim
Wolf; First, D.J. Reyburn; Second, Sam
Holbrook; Third, Greg Gibson. T—2:49.
A—27,259 (41,297).
BALTIMORE
AB R H BI BB SO
Jones cf
5 0 2 0 0 0
Machado 3b
4 0 2 1 0 0
Schoop 2b­ss
4 1 1 0 1 2
Trumbo dh
5 0 0 0 0 2
Mancini 1b
3 2 2 1 1 1
SSmith lf
2 0 0 0 2 0
Castillo c
4 1 2 2 0 0
Tejada ss
3 0 0 0 0 0
Kim ph
1 0 0 0 0 1
Giavotella 2b
0 0 0 0 0 0
Rickard rf
4 0 1 0 0 0
Totals
35 4 10 4 4 6
Avg.
.279
.241
.304
.246
.304
.261
.272
.258
.232
.100
.259
TAMPA BAY AB R H BI BB SO
Beckham 2b
4 1 1 3 0 1
Bourjos cf
3 0 0 0 1 0
Longoria 3b
3 0 1 0 1 1
Souza Jr. rf
3 1 1 0 0 0
Plouffe 1b
3 0 0 0 1 1
3 1 1 0 0 1
Miller dh
Ramos ph­dh
1 0 0 0 0 0
Hechvarria ss 3 1 1 0 0 0
MSmith lf
3 1 1 1 0 0
Sucre c
1 0 0 1 1 0
Totals
27 5 6 5 4 4
Avg.
.262
.243
.268
.271
.207
.205
.211
.260
.293
.246
Baltimore............000 011 020 — 4 10 0
Tampa Bay.........050 000 00x — 5 6 1
E—Beckham (11). LOB—Baltimore 9,
Tampa Bay 4. 2B—Machado (19), Longo­
ria (26). HR—Mancini (16), off Faria,
Beckham (12), off Miley. CS—Bourjos (4).
SF—Machado, Sucre. DP—Baltimore 1;
Tampa Bay 2.
Baltimore
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Miley L 4­9
6 5 5 5 3 4 5.69
Castro
1„ 1 0 0 1 0 2.70
Hart
‚ 0 0 0 0 0 2.61
Tampa Bay
Faria W 5­1
Hunter
Colomé S 29
IP H R ER BB SO
7‚ 7 3 3 2 5
„ 1 1 1 2 1
1 2 0 0 0 0
ERA
2.67
1.99
3.55
Inherited runners­scored—Hart 1­0,
Hunter 1­1. HBP—by Miley (Souza Jr.).
WP—Hunter. NP—Miley 97, Castro 30,
Hart 3, Faria 103, Hunter 22, Colomé 8.
Umpires—Home, Hunter Wendelstedt;
First, Andy Fletcher; Second, Alan Porter;
Third, Joe West. T—2:50. A—12,471
(31,042).
BREWERS 8, NATIONALS 0
MILWAUKEE
Sogard 2b
Braun lf
HPérez lf
Shaw 3b
Santana rf
Thames 1b
Drake p
Piña c
Phillips cf
Arcia ss
Davies p
Aguilar 1b
Totals
AB R H BI BB SO
5 1 0 0 1 1
5 1 1 1 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0
3 1 2 3 2 0
4 0 1 1 1 2
4 1 1 1 0 1
0 0 0 0 0 0
4 2 3 1 1 0
5 0 2 0 0 2
5 1 1 0 0 1
2 1 0 1 0 1
1 0 0 0 0 0
38 8 11 8 5 8
Avg.
.313
.270
.263
.297
.291
.251
—
.302
.229
.280
.097
.292
WASHINGTON AB R H BI BB SO
Goodwin cf
4 0 0 0 0 2
Drew ss­3b
2 0 0 0 2 0
Harper rf
4 0 1 0 0 2
Zmmrman 1b
4 0 1 0 0 0
Murphy 2b
4 0 1 0 0 0
Rendon 3b
2 0 1 0 1 0
Blanton p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Stevenson ph
1 0 0 0 0 0
Lind lf
4 0 1 0 0 0
Wieters c
4 0 0 0 0 1
Jackson p
1 0 0 0 0 0
Severino ph
1 0 0 0 0 1
OPérez p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Difo ss
1 0 0 0 0 1
Totals
32 0 5 0 3 7
Avg.
.236
.253
.335
.317
.340
.315
—
.000
.326
.246
.000
.000
—
.255
Milwaukee..........010 420 010 — 8 11 0
Washington........000 000 000 — 0 5 1
E—Zimmerman (10). LOB—Milwaukee
11, Washington 8. 2B—Harper (25), Mur­
phy (33), Rendon (23). HR—Shaw (23), off
Jackson, Thames (24), off Jackson, Piña
(7), off Jackson. S—Davies 2.
Milwaukee
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Dvies W 12­4 7„ 3 0 0 3 7 4.45
Drake
1‚ 2 0 0 0 0 4.86
Washington
Jackson L 1­1
OPérez
Blanton
IP H R ER BB SO
5 7 7 3 3 3
2 0 0 0 1 4
2 4 1 1 1 1
ERA
3.75
3.86
7.24
Inherited runners­scored—Drake 1­0.
HBP—by OPérez (Thames). PB—Piña.
NP—Davies 114, Drake 12, Jackson 112,
OPérez 32, Blanton 35. Umpires—Home,
Bruce Dreckman; First, Chris Segal; Sec­
ond, Mike Everitt; Third, Jordan Baker.
T—3:05. A—28,428 (41,339).
BLUE JAYS 4, ATHLETICS 1
OAKLAND
Joyce rf
Semien ss
Alonso 1b
KDavis lf
Lowrie 2b
Healy dh
Chapman 3b
Maxwell c
RDavis cf
Totals
AB R H BI BB SO
3 1 2 0 1 0
4 0 1 0 0 0
4 0 1 0 0 1
4 0 2 1 0 2
4 0 0 0 0 0
4 0 0 0 0 0
2 0 0 0 1 2
3 0 0 0 0 0
3 0 0 0 0 1
31 1 6 1 2 6
Avg.
.225
.204
.264
.247
.267
.261
.205
.247
.227
TORONTO
AB R H BI BB SO
Bautista rf
3 0 1 1 1 2
Martin c
3 0 0 0 1 1
Donaldson 3b
2 0 0 0 2 2
Smoak 1b
4 1 1 0 0 2
Morales dh
3 1 0 0 0 1
Barney pr­dh
0 0 0 0 0 0
Tulowitzki ss
4 0 2 1 0 0
Carrera lf
4 1 1 0 0 2
Pillar cf
4 0 0 0 0 1
Goins 2b
3 1 1 2 0 0
Totals
30 4 6 4 4 11
Avg.
.220
.219
.237
.297
.253
.217
.252
.297
.245
.210
Oakland.............. 000 100 000 — 1 6 2
Toronto...............040 000 00x — 4 6 0
E—Chapman (4), Gray (2). LOB—Oak­
land 5, Toronto 7. 2B—Joyce (17), KDavis
2 (17), Bautista (15), Goins (13). HR—.
DP—Oakland 1; Toronto 2.
Oakland
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Gray L 6­5
6 5 4 0 2 9 3.43
Hendriks
1 0 0 0 2 2 5.01
Castro
1 1 0 0 0 0 6.75
Toronto
Valdez W 1­0
JoeSmith
Tepera
Osuna S 26
IP H R ER BB SO
6 5 1 1 1 4
1 0 0 0 0 1
1 0 0 0 1 0
1 1 0 0 0 1
ERA
4.97
3.48
3.33
1.96
C.Valdez pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Inherited runners­scored—JoeSmith 1­0.
HBP—by Castro (Morales). Balk—Valdez.
WP—Gray 2. NP—Gray 103, Hendriks 39,
Castro 10, Valdez 77, JoeSmith 12, Tepera
15, Osuna 16. Umpires—Home, Tim Tim­
mons; First, James Hoye; Second, Will Lit­
tle; Third, Jeff Kellogg. T—2:55. A—40,624
(49,286).
AL LEADERS
STOLEN BASES
Maybin, Los Angeles................................25
Dyson, Seattle........................................... 22
Altuve, Houston.........................................21
Andrus, Texas............................................20
Davis, Oakland...........................................19
DeShields, Texas.......................................19
Betts, BOSTON...........................................17
Buxton, Minnesota....................................16
Cain, KC......................................................16
Merrifield, KC.............................................16
DOUBLES
Betts, BOSTON...........................................31
Altuve, Houston.........................................30
Ramirez, Cleveland...................................30
Lindor, Cleveland......................................29
Lowrie, Oakland........................................28
Upton, Detroit............................................28
Abreu, Chicago..........................................27
Dickerson, TB.............................................27
Gurriel, Houston........................................27
Santana, Cleveland...................................26
Schoop, Baltimore....................................26
EARNED RUN AVERAGE
Sale, BOSTON.........................................2.48
Kluber, Cleveland...................................2.74
Stroman, Toronto...................................2.98
Vargas, KC.............................................. 3.08
Severino, New York...............................3.21
Santana, Minnesota.............................. 3.26
Fulmer, Detroit.......................................3.35
Darvish, Texas........................................3.44
Pomeranz, BOSTON...............................3.51
Cobb, TB..................................................3.57
SAVES
Colome, TB.................................................28
Kintzler, Minnesota..................................27
Osuna, Toronto..........................................25
Kimbrel, BOSTON......................................24
Giles, Houston...........................................21
Herrera, KC................................................20
Diaz, Seattle...............................................18
Allen, Cleveland........................................ 17
Brach, Baltimore.......................................16
Casilla, Oakland........................................16
NL LEADERS
STOLEN BASES
Hamilton, Cincinnati.................................43
Gordon, MIA...............................................35
Turner, Washington................................. 35
Villar, Milwaukee......................................19
Broxton, Milwaukee................................. 17
Nunez, SF....................................................17
Goldschmidt, Arizona...............................15
Peraza, Cincinnati.....................................15
Pollock, Arizona........................................ 14
Inciarte, Atlanta........................................13
Pham, St. Louis......................................... 13
DOUBLES
Herrera, PHI...............................................32
Murphy, Washington................................32
Arenado, Colorado....................................31
Duvall, Cincinnati......................................28
Drury, Arizona........................................... 25
Phillips, Atlanta.........................................25
Harper, Washington.................................24
Seager, Los Angeles.................................24
Shaw, Milwaukee......................................24
Owings, Arizona........................................23
Zimmerman, Washington....................... 23
EARNED RUN AVERAGE
Kershaw, Los Angeles...........................2.04
Scherzer, Washington...........................2.26
Gonzalez, Washington..........................2.83
Greinke, Arizona.................................... 2.92
Ray, Arizona............................................3.15
Leake, St. Louis......................................3.20
Strasburg, Washington.........................3.25
Lynn, St. Louis........................................3.30
deGrom, New York................................3.30
Martinez, St. Louis.................................3.34
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
C5
Smith optimistic return to mound not far off
By Peter Abraham
needs to show he can pitch
again to avoid being non-tendered.
For Smith, a trip to Seattle
was a shot of confidence.
“Being here refreshed the
memories of being a good
pitcher at one point. I can’t
wait to be that pitcher again,”
he said.
GLOBE STAFF
SEATTLE — For the first
time since the Seattle Mariners
traded him to the Red Sox in
2015, Carson
RED SOX
Smith was
NOTEBOOK back at Safeco
Field on Monday. It was a strange feeling for
the 27-year-old righthander.
Smith was one of the most
valuable players for the Mariners in 2015, appearing in 70
games and throwing 70 innings. He struck out 92 and finished the season without allowing an earned run in 18„ consecutive innings.
Angels star Mike Trout faced
Smith six times that season and
was for 1 for 5 with a single and
four swinging strikeouts.
That was better than AllStar second baseman Jose Al­
tuve of the Astros. He was 0 for
6 and struck out swinging four
times against Smith.
Smith was that good. But
the Mariners traded him to the
Red Sox that winter and he has
pitched only three games since.
Smith underwent Tommy John
elbow surgery on May 24,
2015, and has been on a rehabilitation program since, one
that seems endless.
“It’s good to be back here.
It’s a great city and I had some
good memories here,” Smith
said. “But obviously I’d rather
he back on the mound and be
Rutledge in limbo?
FILE/TONY GUTIERREZ/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rehabbing Carson Smith returned to Seattle for the first time since being traded in 2015.
facing these guys.”
Smith still had his arm in a
brace when the Red Sox visited
Seattle last season and he
skipped the trip. This time
around he threw in the bullpen
Tuesday afternoon.
Smith should soon be ready
to face hitters, something he
last did June 14 before shoulder soreness further delayed
his progress.
“It feels like I’ve been close
for a long time, so I’m not going
to set a deadline. But I’m close,”
Smith said. “Taking it one day
at time. But hopefully it’ll be
soon.”
Smith said his elbow and
shoulder are now sound.
“The shoulder is strong. I’ve
done everything I can to make
sure my shoulder is strong. It’s
more a mechanical issue to
make sure I’m on time with my
delivery. If you’re not on time,
something is going to ache,” he
said. “I feel like I’m ready to
pitch.
Once Smith gets through
facing hitters, he would start a
minor league rehabilitation assignment. Because of the long
layoff, he is likely to need a se-
ries of games before coming off
the disabled list.
“We have plenty of time. I’m
sure I can get back. I just want
to make sure I am ready when I
do get back,” Smith said. “I
miss the competition. That has
been the biggest thing.”
Sox manager John Farrell
has tempered expectations
with Smith in recent weeks,
saying only that the Sox haven’t
given up on the idea he can still
help the team.
Smith has other incentives,
too. He will be eligible for arbitration after the season and
Josh Rutledge started at
third base for Triple A Pawtucket and was 0 for 2 with a walk
and a strikeout at Toledo. He is
2 of 16 with seven strikeouts
five games into a rehabilitation
assignment.
Rutledge, who is on the DL
with a concussion, can remain
with Pawtucket through Aug. 8.
They Sox would then have a decision to make.
Because Rutledge was a
Rule 5 Draft pick, he would
have to be activated off the disabled list or offered back to the
Colorado Rockies.
With Brock Holt again
healthy and Triple A utility
player Tzu­Wei Lin having demonstrated his value in a 19game stint in the majors, Rutledge may not fit on the major
league roster.
Kelly nearing return
Back at Fenway Park, Joe
Kelly threw 25 pitches in the
bullpen at what he estimated
was 80-85 percent intensity.
The righthander is scheduled
to do that again on Friday and
from there could pitch in a minor league game.
“That was an encouraging
bullpen by Joe today,” said Farrell, who spoke to Kelly on the
phone. “He’s making pretty
good progress.”
Kelly has not pitched since
July 9 because of a strained left
hamstring.
Historically bad
Monday’s 4-0 loss was an
unusual one. It was only the
fourth time in team history the
Sox had no runs, no walks, and
12 or more strikeouts in a
game. It had not happened
since 2001 . . . Chris Sale, who
starts Wednesday afternoon, is
4-2 with a 1.61 earned run average in his last seven starts
and has struck out 74 in 50‚
innings. Sale’s 200 strikeouts
lead the majors. Max Scherzer
of the Nationals is second with
192. Sale is 4-1 with a 2.34 ERA
in nine career appearances
against Seattle . . . When Dustin
Pedroia struck out three times
Monday, it was only the eighth
time that has happened in
1,480 games. He struck out
four times in two of those
games.
Peter Abraham can be reached
at pabraham@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@PeteAbe.
Sox’ power needs more muscle
uON BASEBALL
Mitch
Moreland
started out
hot but has
been
hobbled by a
broken toe
and is
hitting just
.150 in July
with no
homers.
Continued from Page C1
FILE/JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF
David Price will turn his attention to the Royals when gets the ball Friday night at Fenway.
Wondering where this leads
uSHAUGHNESSY
Continued from Page C1
ratings were down 20 percent
in the first half of the season),
has finally become a topic of
discussion back home in New
England, but it’s not exactly the
kind of attention a franchise
wants. Just as the wildly popular Patriots are ready to start
training camp, the Sox are back
in the news cycle, but it’s not
their fine play that has tongues
wagging.
David Price’s airplane ambush of club broadcaster/Hall
of Famer Dennis Eckersley coupled with the disclosure that
teammates applauded Price’s
comments has some fans wondering how much they like this
team at the moment. The notion that no one in uniform has
apologized — that everybody is
OK with it — is shameful. And
that includes the manager.
Manager John’s reluctance
to stand up for what’s right
(Farrell’s media coach must be
telling him to keep saying
“We’ve moved on and our focus
is on winning ballgames”) only
makes the ever-scrutinized
skipper more of a target for fans
who want change in the corner
office.
Farrell and Price had a 10minute closed-door meeting
Tuesday afternoon in the manager’s office at Safeco Field.
When Farrell was asked about
the nature of the meeting, he
answered, “Nothing out of the
ordinary.’’
In the end, of course, fans
will love the Red Sox and their
manager if the team wins in October. If the Duck Boats are rolling down Boylston Street on
Halloween, nobody will care
about a dearth of homers, the
Bermuda Triangle at the Hot
Corner, or the notion that the
Sox are too sensitive to criticism.
But at this hour it’s fair to
ask if this talented, highly-paid,
first-place ballclub has the right
stuff for what lies ahead. If they
can’t handle the truth from
Eckersley — who is hardly a
bomb-tosser — how are they going to handle the Astros and Indians in October?
The Sox were swept from the
playoffs in a matter of hours
last season and that was with
David Ortiz in the lineup. Until
they prove otherwise, questions
linger about their ability to win
games in any postseason. None
of the Boston pitchers (Doug
Fister won’t be here and doesn’t
count) have won a postseason
start. Chris Sale, enjoying a Cy
Young-caliber season, has never
started a playoff game. Craig
Kimbrel has never been on a
team that won a playoff series.
Rick Porcello (three starts) and
Price (nine starts) have never
won a postseason start. One
can only imagine the weight
Price will carry when he takes
the ball for his 2017 playoff season start. He certainly would
not be a candidate for a winnertake-all wild-card game.
It should be appointment
TV when Price gets the ball Friday night at Fenway. Folks who
buy tickets to ballgames tend to
be far more positive and supportive than those who call talk
shows or comment on social
media, but Price has put a giant
bull’s-eye on his back with his
attack on Eckersley and insistence that he did a good thing
for his teammates.
Where’s the leadership? One
has to wonder. Dustin Pedroia
sets a great example with the
way he prepares and plays every day, but he is not a vocal
presence. He wants no part of
taking charge verbally, and is
no doubt still smarting from
the “It’s not me, it’s them” fallout in Baltimore.
What’s particularly alarming
is any possibility that Price is
ascending to a role as team
leader. The thin-skinned lefty
clearly thinks he’s taking care of
his teammates and no one has
stepped forward to tell him he’s
wrong.
While all this is going on, we
wonder if the ubiquitous Dave
Dombrowski (Boston’s oldschool baseball boss goes on every road trip) will make any acquisitions between now and
Monday’s trading deadline.
Too bad Dombrowski can’t
make a deal for David Ortiz,
Bobby Orr, or Tom Brady.
More than anything, the
first-place Red Sox could use a
touch of dignity and clutch play
right about now. It’s not too
late. This is a team with enough
talent to go deep in the playoffs.
Friday night should be fun.
David Price will be on the
mound.
No one knows who’ll be in
the NESN booth with Dave
O’Brien.
Dennis Eckersley will be
spending the weekend where
he belongs . . .
In Cooperstown.
Dan Shaughnessy is a Globe
columnist. He can be reached at
dshaughnessy@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@dan_shaughnessy.
counter that home runs are better than doubles.
Whether it’s home runs or
simply an offensive issue in
general, you can argue that the
Red Sox’ overall philosophy on
not needing a big bopper hasn’t
worked. Yes, they are in first
place, but they should be 10
games ahead by now. They have
missed so many opportunities.
What they were right about is
that their pitching would be superior to other teams and therefore they wouldn’ t need as
much offense.
After being shut out for the
ninth time this season on Monday night (4-0 by the Mariners),
the Red Sox remain in first in
the American League East, but
does anyone feel good about it?
We understand teams go
through slumps and they have
periods where they simply
don’t score runs. We understand they run into buzzsaws
now and again. Mariners
lefthander James Paxton has
been dominating other teams,
too, and he made sure they got
n o t h in g go in g o n Mo n d ay
night.
Last season, the Red Sox finished ninth in the majors in
home runs, first in runs, and
first in OPS. This season they’re
27th in homers, 11th in runs,
and 19th in OPS. As far as being a “doubles-hitting team,”
they’re 11th this season and
were first, by a lot, last season.
They have also hit into 96 double plays, which ranks second
in the majors.
Here’s a positive twist: After
101 games, the Red Sox have 99
homers. Only once before have
they had exactly 99 homers after 101 games (2007, when they
went on to win the World Series).
The Red Sox are patient at
the plate. In fact, they lead the
majors, having seen 15,489
pitches. But not many are going
out of the ballpark.
The staring pitching has
lived up to its billing. They are
fourth overall with a 3.72 ERA,
second in innings, and have allowed the third-fewest walks
with the fourth-most strikeouts. The bullpen is also fourth
overall, with a 2.96 ERA, with a
17-10 record, 2.96 ERA, and
1.16 WHIP. All that is good.
But the downswing in offense has been puzzling.
I’ve already heard people say
it’s the hitting coaches’ fault.
Maybe Chili Davis and Vic Rodriguez aren’t stressing the
right things. But they are the
same coaches that presided
over the No. 1 offense in baseball last season. Let’s just stop
this nonsense of trying to blame
everyone except the ones who
actually have to do the job —
the hitters.
Deep down we knew Mitch
Moreland couldn’t replace Or-
FILE /MATTHEW J. LEE/GLOBE STAFF
tiz. Moreland is a good first
baseman who got off to a hot
start. He’s a gamer. The guy has
played with a broken toe and
he’s been a good guy to have
around. Whether it’s the injury
or not, he’s worn down. He
probably is a platoon player but
a good one.
The emphasis on staying under the luxury tax has certainly
hurt the offense. The Red Sox
could have had Edwin Encarnacion, who settled for three years
at $60 million with the Indians.
But he was too expensive and
he would have blocked the way
for Sam Travis.
Now, I have no idea how
good Travis will be. He seems to
have a good idea at the plate,
but not going after Encarnacion
because they had Travis? That’s
a decision on which the Red Sox
may want a do-over. Encarnacion was a slow starter in Cleveland and there were things
written about how the Red Sox
were right about choosing Moreland over Encarnacion, who
went into Tuesday’s games with
20 homers, 55 RBIs and an .852
OPS.
T he Red Sox could have
signed Jose Bautista, who also
got off to a terrible start but has
picked it up. And it was recently
suggested by a major league
scout that the Red Sox should
pursue Bautista as a third baseman since he’s played in 389
games at the position.
There’s no doubt third base
has been a black hole for the
second straight year. The Red
Sox have a major league-low
.595 OPS at third this year, and
they were last in 2016 with a
.686 OPS at third.
Xander Bogaerts should be a
20-25-home run player, but he’s
hit only six. Maybe Andrew Benintendi will hit more homers
as he matures. The Red Sox are
26th overall in first base OPS
(.748). So, the corners have not
been productive enough.
We await what Rafael Devers can do to improve that,
and while the Red Sox don’t
want to put pressure on the 20year-old to revive the offense,
they are putting pressure on
him simply by being the new
kid in the lineup.
President of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski likely
has decided not to pursue a
third baseman with Devers being given a chance, but should
he go after a first baseman or
Mariners 4, Red Sox 0
Monday night game
At Safeco Field, Seattle
BOSTON
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Betts rf
4 0 1 0 0 1 .277
Benintendi lf
4 0 0 0 0 2 .264
Pedroia 2b
4 0 0 0 0 3 .307
Ramirez 1b
4 0 1 0 0 1 .256
Bradley Jr. cf
3 0 2 0 0 1 .268
Young dh
3 0 0 0 0 2 .244
Marrero ss
3 0 0 0 0 2 .212
Vázquez c
3 0 0 0 0 0 .251
Holt 3b
3 0 0 0 0 0 .196
Totals
31 0 4 0 0 12
SEATTLE
Segura ss
Valencia 1b
Canó 2b
Cruz dh
Seager 3b
Haniger rf
Gamel lf
Heredia cf
Zunino c
Totals
AB
2
4
4
3
4
4
3
3
3
30
R
0
0
0
0
1
0
2
1
0
4
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 1 1 0 .329
1 1 0 2 .269
0 0 0 1 .271
0 0 1 0 .283
1 1 0 1 .255
0 0 0 0 .264
2 0 0 1 .323
1 1 0 0 .267
0 0 0 2 .225
6 4 2 7
Boston............................... 000 000 000 — 0 4 0
Seattle...............................030 100 00x — 4 6 1
E—Valencia (5). LOB—Boston 4, Seattle 5. 2B—
Segura (19), Valencia (16). 3B—Gamel (3). HR—
Seager (14), off Rodríguez. CS—Heredia (4). Run­
ners left in scoring position—Boston 3 (Pedroia,
Marrero 2), Seattle 3 (Valencia, Canó 2). RISP—
Boston 0 for 5, Seattle 1 for 4. GIDP—Marrero.
DP—Seattle 1 (Segura, Canó, Valencia).
Boston
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Rodríguez L 4­3 5‚ 6 4 4 2 6 99 3.89
Workman
1„ 0 0 0 0 1 18 2.77
Fister
1 0 0 0 0 0 11 7.54
Seattle
Paxton W 10­3
Vincent
Phelps
IP
7
1
1
H
4
0
0
R ER BB SO NP ERA
0 0 0 10 103 2.84
0 0 0 0 18 1.96
0 0 0 2 12 0.00
Inherited runners­scored—Workman 1­0.
HBP—by Rodríguez (Segura). WP—Paxton. Um­
pires—Home, Carlos Torres; First, Dana DeMuth;
Second, Paul Nauert; Third, Ben May. T—2:40.
A—29,262 (47,943).
HOW THE RUNS SCORED
SECOND INNING
MARINERS — Seager homered to center on a
2­1 count. Haniger grounded out, shortstop Mar­
rero to first baseman Ramirez. Gamel tripled to
right. Heredia safe on failed fielder’s choice,
Gamel scored. Zunino struck out. Segura doubled
to center, Heredia scored. Valencia popped out to
second baseman Pedroia.
FOURTH INNING
MARINERS — Gamel singled to center. Heredia
flied out to center fielder Bradley Jr. Zunino
struck out. Segura was hit by a pitch, Gamel to
second. Valencia doubled to right, Gamel scored,
Segura to third. Canó lined out to left fielder Ben­
intendi.
simply give the job to Travis?
There are likely better first
base choices available, but is
Dombrowski steadfast in his
philosophy of not impeding
Travis’s path to the job starting
next season? If he is, that would
likely limit the choices. But
you’d still have candidates such
as Lucas Duda, Matt Adams,
Jay Bruce, and Mike Napoli
who could add some offense
and man the position. It’s unlikely the Red Sox would give
up the prospects for Oakland’s
Yonder Alonso.
The Red Sox have been
scouting relievers such as Detroit’s Justin Wilson, but they
may soon shift their attention
to first base/DH. At a time
when the teams around them
are hitting a lot of home runs,
the Red Sox are watching the
show rather than participating
in it.
The memo has been resent.
Nick Cafardo can be reached at
cafardo@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @nickcafardo.
C6
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
SportsLog
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
Scoreboard
Jaguars make Linder
NFL’s best­paid center
International
League
The Jaguars signed center Brandon Linder to a five-year extension
worth $51.7 million. According to NFL.com, the new deal will make
Linder the highest-paid center in NFL history. The deal includes $24 million in guaranteed money for the former third-round pick, who was entering the final year of his rookie deal. Atlanta’s Alex Mack and Dallas’
Travis Frederick are the only centers with more guaranteed money . . .
La’el Collins and the Cowboys agreed to terms on a two-year contract extension that will pay the offensive lineman a total of $15.4 million, including a $4 million signing bonus, NFL.com reported. Projected to go in
the top 20 in the 2015 draft, Collins went undrafted after being named a
person of interest in a murder investigation. He signed a three-year, $1.6
million deal with Dallas . . . Dolphins linebacker Koa Misi was placed on
injured reserve after he failed to receive medical clearance. Misi suffered
a neck injury last season and played in only three games . . . Former Cowboys receiver Lucky Whitehead’s identity was falsely used in a shoplifting arrest, police in Virginia said. Police said they were confident the
man charged in a case involving $40 worth of stolen food in June wasn’t
Whitehead. The Cowboys released him Monday after reports that he was
arrested and subsequently cited for missing a court hearing. Coach Ja­
son Garrett said Whitehead’s release was an accumulation of events, not
just the arrest . . . Former NFL quarterback Michael Vick will be working
as a coaching intern this summer for Chiefs coach Andy Reid as he looks
to get into coaching. Reid coached Vick on the Eagles from 2009 to 2012
. . . Gary Kubiak is returning to the Broncos in a scouting capacity seven
months after stepping down as coach over health concerns.
Eastern League
North Division
W
L
Scranton/W­B.........64 38
Lehigh Valley..........63 40
Rochester ................58 44
Pawtucket ...............51 50
Buffalo .....................43 60
Syracuse..................35 66
Pct.
.627
.612
.569
.505
.417
.347
South Division
W
L
Durham....................63 39
Gwinnett..................50 51
Norfolk .....................45 58
Charlotte .................44 58
Pct. GB
.618 —
.495 12½
.437 18½
.431 19
West Division
W
L
Indianapolis ............57 45
Columbus ................54 48
Toledo ......................44 56
Louisville .................42 60
Pct. GB
.559 —
.529
3
.440 12
.412 15
GB
—
1½
6
12½
21½
28½
TUESDAY'S RESULTS
Lehigh Valley 5......................Gwinnett 0
Pawtucket 5............................... Toledo 3
Louisville 4..............................Syracuse 3
Louisville 6..............................Syracuse 5
Charlotte 4............................Columbus 1
Durham 3....................................Buffalo 1
Indianapolis 5.......................Rochester 2
Scranton/W­B 5...Norfolk 3...10 innings
Pawtucket 5, Toledo 3
at Fifth Third Field, Toledo, Ohio
PAWTUCKET AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
ATavarez rf
5 0 1 1 0 2 .248
TLin ss­3b
5 0 0 0 0 0 .261
RCastillo cf
4 0 1 0 1 1 .300
Travis 1b
3 1 0 0 2 0 .257
Rutledge 3b
2 0 0 0 1 1 .120
Menses ph­ss 2 0 1 0 0 1 .301
MDmngez dh 5 1 2 2 0 0 .249
Court lf
4 0 0 0 0 2 .283
DButler c
2 1 1 0 1 0 .283
MMiller 2b
3 2 3 0 1 0 .273
Totals
35 5 9 3 6 7
BASEBALL
Nationals hope Strasburg is ready to go
TOLEDO
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Adduci rf
5 1 2 0 0 1 .283
JJones cf
5 1 2 0 0 2 .247
Infante 2b
4 0 2 0 0 1 .279
Navarro 1b
4 0 1 1 0 1 .273
JHicks c
3 1 1 2 0 0 .277
Krizan dh
3 0 0 0 0 1 .274
Perez ph­dh
1 0 0 0 0 0 .214
Ficociello 3b
4 0 2 0 0 1 .235
den Dekker lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .267
BRyan ss
2 0 0 0 2 1 .222
Totals
35 3 11 3 2 9
The Nationals are hopeful that Stephen Strasburg will make his next
scheduled start despite exiting Sunday’s outing with pain in his forearm.
The team said Strasburg was diagnosed with a nerve impingement that
is no longer a problem . . . Cardinals ace Adam Wainwright went on the
disabled list with back tightness, and outfielder Dexter Fowler joined
him on the DL because of a strained left wrist.
Pawtucket 010 010 210 — 5 9 0
Toledo
100 100 010 — 3 11 0
LOB—Pawtucket 10, Toledo 8. 2B—
MMiller (9). HR—MDominguez (8),
JHicks (7). SB—Travis (5), MMiller 2
(3), BRyan (3), Ficociello (1), Adduci
(6). SF—JHicks. GIDP—TLin, BRyan.
DP—Pawtucket 1, Toledo 1.
PAWTUCKET IP H R ER BB SO ERA
KKendrick
5 7 2 2 1 7 6.48
Olmos W 7­2 3 3 1 1 0 1 2.84
Callahan S 4
1 1 0 0 1 1 4.18
MISCELLANY
Ledecky captures third gold; King also wins
Katie Ledecky breezed to her third gold medal of the world championships in Budapest, Hungary. Ledecky captured the 1,500-meter freestyle by more than half the length of the pool, and returned just 49 minutes later to post the fastest time in the semifinals of the 200 free. Lilly
King notched another win in the 100 breaststroke against rival Yulia Efi­
mova. King led the final all the way, touching in 1 minute, 4.13 seconds
to shave 0.22 off the Lithuanian’s mark from the 2013 worlds . . . The
Rangers avoided arbitration and signed center Mika Zibanejad to a
$26.75 million, five-year deal . . . The Sabres re-signed goaltender Robin
Lehner to a $4 million, one-year contract . . . Suns backup guard Brandon
Knight tore his left ACL playing basketball in Miami and will miss the
entire season . . . The Trail Blazers traded Allen Crabbe to the Nets for
forward Andrew Nicholson . . . In WNBA play, Alyssa Thomas had 20
points, 9 rebounds, and 5 assists to help the host Connecticut Sun beat
the Chicago Sky, 93-72. In San Antonio, Elena Delle Donne had 29 points
and the Washington Mystics beat the Stars, 85-76 . . . Sporting Kansas
City forward Dom Dwyer was traded to Orlando City for what could be a
Major League Soccer-record $1.6 million.
TOLEDO
IP H R ER BB SO
AVasquez
6 5 2 2 2 4
Kensing L 1­2 1 2 2 2 1 0
Alaniz
„ 1 1 1 2 1
Labourt
1‚ 1 0 0 1 2
ERA
4.34
2.55
4.91
2.84
HBP—by Alaniz (DButler). T—2:58.
A—8,032.
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Louisville at Syracuse..........................12
Rochester at Indianapolis................1:35
Columbus at Charlotte.....................7:05
Durham at Buffalo.............................7:05
Gwinnett at Lehigh Valley...............7:05
Pawtucket at Toledo.........................7:05
Scranton/W­B at Norfolk.................7:05
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Scranton/W­B at Norfolk...............12:05
Durham at Buffalo.............................1:05
Louisville at Syracuse.......................6:35
Pawtucket at Toledo.........................7:05
Rochester at Indianapolis................7:05
Columbus at Charlotte.....................7:05
Gwinnett at Lehigh Valley...............7:05
WED
Pct. GB
.673 —
.556 12
.540 13½
.465 21
.465 21
.406 27
Western Division
W
L
Bowie .......................54 48
Altoona ....................52 48
Erie ...........................52 48
Akron........................50 50
Richmond ................42 58
Harrisburg...............41 60
Pct. GB
.529 —
.520
1
.520
1
.500
3
.420 11
.406 12½
TUESDAY'S RESULTS
Trenton 7.................................Hartford 1
Akron 1..............................Binghamton 0
Richmond 6.........................Harrisburg 0
Trenton 4.................................Hartford 0
Altoona 2..................................Reading 1
Erie 4.............................................Bowie 3
New Hampshire 11..............Portland 10
Binghamton 6..............................Akron 0
New Hampshire 11,
Portland 10
at Northeast Delta Dental Stadium,
Manchester, N.H.
PORTLAND
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Monge cf
4 1 1 0 1 1 .229
DeLaGerra ss 5 1 0 0 1 0 .321
Chavis 3b
3 3 2 2 3 1 .281
Barfield rf
2 2 1 2 2 0 .291
Strgeon pr­lf 0 0 0 1 0 0 .240
Olt 1b
5 2 2 1 1 1 .261
Mars lf­rf
3 0 0 1 1 1 .300
Romanski dh 5 0 1 1 0 1 .241
Tobias 2b
5 1 1 1 0 0 .265
5 0 2 1 0 1 .200
Procyshen c
Totals
37 10 10 10 9 6
NEW HAMP
JDavis lf
RUrena ss
Alford cf
HRamirez rf
Jansen c
Lopes 3b
Heidt dh
Dean 1b
Guillotte 2b
Totals
AB
5
5
2
5
4
3
4
2
4
34
R
2
1
1
2
0
1
0
2
2
11
H
2
2
0
2
0
1
0
1
2
10
BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 1 .255
2 0 0 .244
1 1 0 .314
3 0 1 .263
0 0 0 .298
2 1 1 .287
0 0 3 .224
1 2 0 .162
0 0 0 .303
9 4 6
Portland
024 200 011 — 10 10 3
Nw Hmpshr 501 210 02x — 11 10 3
E—De La Guerra (6), Procyshen (6),
Villanueva (1), Young (1), Lopes (16),
JDavis (2). LOB—Portland 13, New
Hampshire 5. 2B—Romanski (2), Procy­
shen (5), Olt (18), Chavis (7), HRamirez
(16). HR—Barfield (14), Chavis (7),
Dean (2), HRamirez (6). SB—Lopes
(15). SF—Mars, Sturgeon.
PORTLAND
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Villanueva
3‚ 7 8 6 2 3 8.10
JSmith
2„ 1 1 1 0 3 3.59
Buttrey L 1­3 2 2 2 2 2 0 3.56
NW HMPSHR IP H R ER BB SO
Dawson
4 7 8 8 4 2
Robson
2 0 0 0 1 1
Young
1‚ 3 1 1 2 1
CRmrz W 2­0 1„ 0 1 0 2 2
THU
7/26
Eastern Division
W
L
Trenton ....................68 33
Binghamton ............55 44
Reading....................54 46
Hartford...................47 54
Portland...................46 53
New Hampshire .....41 60
ERA
6.43
2.45
6.43
0.00
HBP—by Robson (Barfield), by Rob­
son (Monge), by JSmith (Alford, Al­
ford). WP—JSmith, Robson. T—3:22.
A—4,188.
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Hartford at Trenton........................... 11a
Altoona at Reading......................... 12:05
Binghamton at Akron..................... 12:05
Bowie at Erie....................................12:05
Harrisburg at Richmond.................12:05
Portland at New Hampshire............7:05
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Erie at Richmond...............................6:35
New Hampshire at Binghamton.....6:35
Portland at Harrisburg.......................... 7
Trenton at Altoona.................................7
Reading at Hartford..........................7:05
Akron at Bowie..................................7:05
Atlantic League
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Lancaster 8........................New Britain 4
York 9...................................Bridgeport 1
Long Island 6.....................Sugar Land 1
Southern Maryland at Somerset....7:05
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Bridgeport at York............................. 11a
Southern Maryland at Somerset11:05a
Sugar Land at Long Island..........11:05a
Lancaster at New Britain.................6:35
Southern Maryland at Somerset....7:05
Y
7/27
FRI
SAT
SUN
MON
TUE
KC
7:10
NESN
KC
7:10
NESN
KC
1:35
NESN
CLE
7:08
NESN
CLE
7:10
NESN
7/28
SEA
3:40
NESN
Y
7/29
7/30
7/31
Y
8/1
PHI
7:30
CSN
Home games shaded
For updated scores: bostonglobe.com/sports
On the radio, unless noted: Red Sox, WEEI­FM 93.7; Revolution, WBZ­FM 98.5
ON THE AIR
BASEBALL
12 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3:40 p.m.
8:08 p.m.
Baltimore at Tampa Bay
Atlanta at Arizona
Boston at Seattle
Chicago (NL) at Chicago (AL)
Transactions
MLB
MLB
NESN
ESPN
GOLF
5 a.m. (Thu.) European Tour: Porsche Open
Golf
HORSE RACING
4 p.m.
Saratoga Live
FS2
SOCCER
7:30 p.m.
9 p.m.
9:30 p.m.
11:30 p.m.
Barcelona vs. Man United
Paris Saint­Germain vs. Juventus
Gold Cup final: US vs. Jamaica
Man City vs. Real Madrid
ESPN2
ESPNews
FS1
ESPN
SWIMMING
11:30 a.m.
World Aquatics Championships
NBCSN
Soccer
MLS
CONCACAF GOLD CUP
CHAMPIONSHIP
Wednesday, July 26
At Santa Clara, Calif.
United States vs. Jamaica................9:30
SEMIFINALS
Sunday, July 23
At Pasadena, Calif.
Jamaica 1...................................Mexico 0
Saturday, July 22
At Arlington, Texas
United States 2...................Costa Rica 0
WNBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W
L Pct.
Connecticut.............13
9 .591
Washington.............13
9 .591
New York.................10 10 .500
Atlanta .....................10 11 .476
Chicago......................8 14 .364
Indiana.......................8 14 .364
GB
—
—
2
2½
5
5
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts.
Toronto FC...........11 3 7 40
Chicago................11 4 5 38
NYC FC .................11 6 4 37
Atlanta Utd FC....10 7 3 33
New York.............10 8 2 32
Columbus.............10 10 1 31
Orlando City.......... 8 8 5 29
Montreal ................ 6 7 6 24
Philadelphia .......... 6 9 5 23
NEW ENGLAND ..... 6 9 5 23
D.C. United ............ 5 13 3 18
GF
37
38
40
40
28
31
22
30
26
33
18
GA
22
21
27
27
26
32
30
32
24
34
38
WESTERN CONFERENCE
FC Dallas................ 9 3 7 34
Kansas City ........... 8 4 9 33
Houston.................. 9 7 5 32
Seattle.................... 8 7 6 30
Portland ................. 8 8 6 30
Vancouver ............. 8 8 3 27
San Jose................. 7 9 5 26
Real Salt Lake....... 7 12 3 24
Los Angeles........... 6 10 4 22
Colorado ................ 6 11 2 20
Minnesota Utd...... 5 12 4 19
32
25
37
32
37
26
23
28
31
20
25
19
15
30
31
36
29
34
42
37
28
45
NOTE: Three points for victory, one
point for tie.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 26
Columbus at Philadelphia................7:30
SATURDAY, JULY 29
Orlando City at Atlanta United FC.4:30
Montreal at New York......................7:30
Philadelphia at NEW ENGLAND......7:30
Chicago at Sporting Kansas City.........8
Colorado at San Jose.............................8
Columbus at Real Salt Lake................. 8
D.C. United at Minnesota United.........8
Portland at Houston...............................8
Vancouver at FC Dallas.........................8
Seattle at Los Angeles.........................10
SUNDAY, JULY 30
New York City FC at Toronto FC.........2
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Portland 2............................Vancouver 1
Seattle 3.................................. San Jose 0
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Minnesota ...............17
2 .895 —
Los Angeles ............14
6 .700 3½
Phoenix....................11 10 .524
7
Dallas .......................11 12 .478
8
Seattle........................9 11 .450 8½
San Antonio ..............3 19 .136 15½
TUESDAY'S RESULTS
Washington 85...............San Antonio 76
Dallas 84.................................. Indiana 82
Connecticut 93...................... Chicago 72
Atlanta 99......................Phoenix 91 (OT)
Minnesota 76......................New York 75
Seattle at Los Angeles....................10:30
WEDNESDAY'S GAMES
No games scheduled
THURSDAY'S GAMES
No games scheduled
BASEBALL
Boston (AL): Selected the contract of
3B Rafael Devers from Pawtucket (IL).
Detroit (AL): Optioned OF/1B Jim Ad­
duci to Toledo (IL). Recalled P Drew
VerHagen from Toledo.
Seattle (AL): Traded RHPs Jean
Machi and Mark Lowe to the Chicago
White Sox for cash. Sent SS Shawn
O’Malley to Arkansas (TL) for a rehab
assignment. Transferred P Hisashi
Iwakuma to 60­day DL. Signed 2B Dan­
ny Espinosa on a minor league con­
tract.
Tampa Bay (AL): Released 1B Rickie
Weeks Jr. Optioned P Andrew
Kittredge to Durham (IL).
BASKETBALL
Atlanta (NBA): Re­signed F Mike
Muscala to a two­year contract.
Cleveland (NBA): Signed G Derrick
Rose to a one­year contract.
Golden State (NBA): Signed G Ste­
phen Curry to a five­year contract, G/F
Andre Iguodala and G Shaun Livings­
ton to three­year contracts and C Zaza
Pachulia and F David West to one­year
contracts.
FOOTBALL
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE
Buffalo (AFC): Signed S Bacarri Ram­
bo, OL Karim Barton and LB Sam Bar­
rington. Placed C Patrick Lewis on the
Waived/Non­football injury list. Re­
leased LB Anthony Harrell.
Denver (AFC): Named Gary Kubiak
senior personnel advisor.
Indianapolis (AFC): Placed Ss Malik
Hooker and Clayton Geathers and QB
Andrew Luck on the PUP list.
Jacksonville (AFC): Signed CB Stan­
ley Jean­Baptiste.
Miami (AFC): Placed LB Koa Misi on
injured reserve. Signed CB Alterraun
Verner.
New England (AFC): WR Andrew
Hawkins announced his retirement.
HOCKEY
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE
Buffalo (NHL): Re­signed G Robin
Lehner to a one­year contract.
New Jersey (NHL): Signed G Scott
Wedgewood to a one­year, two­way
contract; F Joseph Blandisi to a two­
year, two­way contract; and D Mirco
Mueller to a two­year contract.
NY Rangers (NHL): Signed C Mika Zi­
banejad to a five­year contract.
SOCCER
MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER
Sporting Kansas City: Traded F Dom
Dwyer to Orlando City for general allo­
cation money, targeted allocation
money and future allocation money.
Legion Baseball
STATE TOURNAMENT
Fino Field, Milford
Tuesday’s Results
Senior
Milford 9..........................Northampton 4
Shrewsbury 2...........................Newton 0
Junior
Pittsfield 5...........................Barnstable 3
Franklin 3............................... Acushnet 2
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WednesdayFood
T H E B O S T O N GL OB E W ED N E S DAY, J U LY 2 6 , 2 017 | BOS T ON GL OB E .C O M / FO O D
Sisters Marilynn
(near right) and
Sheila Brass star
in the PBS show
“Food Flirts.”
Below: Some of
their antique
food molds.
PHOTOS BY PAT GREENHOUSE/GLOBE STAFF
The sister act
B Y K ARA BAS K IN | G L O B E CORR ESP ON D EN T
Deep in the heart of Chinatown, two women of a
certain age hover before a
noodle-making machine,
preparing ramen. The noodle-maker has a name: Gertrude.
“Push, Gertrude, push!” yells one of the women.
“This is like childbirth!” says another.
This is also great television. The women are Marilynn
and Sheila Brass, known as the Brass Sisters. Marilynn is
75. Sheila is 80. Together, they star in the upcoming PBS
show “Food Flirts,” an eight-episode series debuting on
July 28.
In each episode, they visit two restaurant kitchens to
sample two ingredients they’ve never had before. Then
they retreat to their shared Cambridge abode to create a
dish that features both.
An early episode finds them at Kendall Square’s mod-
To know Marilynn and Sheila Brass
is to want to cook up a show for them
ern Jewish deli, Mamaleh’s, salivating over pastrami
alongside chef Tyler Sundet. They’re allured by the cure
and crust — a mixture of toasted cloves, coriander, allspice, and black pepper.
“The smell of spices takes me back!” kvells Sheila.
“I wax nostalgic when I smell cigar smoke and pastrami,” adds Marilynn, recalling the scent of her Uncle Julius’s pastrami sandwiches.
They’re also allured
by Sundet (and other
chefs), hence the
show’s title. After taking turns grinding the
spice mixture, Sundet
and Sheila take turns
feeling one another’s
“big guns.”
SISTERS, Page G2
DINING OUT
Mario Batali’s spirit presides at Terra
By Devra First
GLOBE STAFF
PHOTOS BY ARAM BOGHOSIAN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE; KEITH BEDFORD/GLOBE STAFF (ABOVE CENTER)
He’s not here, but he’s here.
You could almost swear you saw the sole of an orange Croc disappear around the corner, a hearty
laugh echoing in your ears. Mario Batali’s spirit is everywhere at Terra, the restaurant on the third floor
of Eataly, the culinary megastore in which the highprofile chef is a partner.
It is present in the loud music, the loud room, the
rock ’n’ roll looseness that stands in contrast to the
pop quiz-ready service. There is something infectious and generous about the place. There is also
something frankly, refreshingly commercial: The
people behind Eataly are passionate about Italian
cuisine. They’ve found a successful formula for turning that into profit. Salute!
Put Terra in a different setting and it would feel
like an entirely different restaurant. Its energy is fueled by a potent Negroni of celebrity, concept, and location in equal measure. It is one of the few places in
town where getting a midweek, midsummer reservation can require a bit of forethought.
But get one. The gatekeepers at the bottom of the
stairs are fickle. Sometimes they wave you up with
DINING OUT, Page G7
Top (from left): Gran Tagliere, ravioli, pork chop at Terra. Above (from left): bomboloni, calamari, rigatoni.
BY THE GLASS
FRENCH SPARKLERS
Wow a thirsty crowd with
bubbly from the Loire Valley
G3
Inside
SEASONAL RECIPES
SUMMER DISHES
How to prepare fresh corn
salad and deviled crab
G5
CHEAP EATS
MILLENNIAL VIBE
The Automatic in Kendall
Square raises the bar on bars
G6
T h e
G2
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
Insider
The Trustees bring
farm’s bounty to
city’s neighborhoods
P
T
ESCALI’S NEW
DIGITAL
SCREEN
TIMER
Keeping track of minutes and seconds
when you’re cooking is a snap with Escali’s
new digital screen timer ($19.95, with batteries).
The timer, which counts to 99 minutes
and 59 seconds, can be set to count up or
down at the tap of the screen. Counting
down, one second a a time, is a little like
watching the ball drop on New Year’s Eve
— it’s hard not to look. For repetitive jobs,
like batches of cookies, there’s a memory
that recalls the baking time. The timer has
a magnetic back for the refrigerator, a kickstand for the counter, and a set of directions. The learning curve is ridiculously
short.
Available at Kitchen Outfitters, Acton
Woods Plaza, 342 Great Road, Acton, 978263-1955; Kitchenwitch JP, 671 Centre St.,
Jamaica Plain, 617-524-6800; and TAGS
Hardware, Porter Square Shopping Center,
29 White St., Cambridge, 617-868-7711.
JEAN KRESSY
he concept of
shared
kitchen
space is popular
in Greater Boston,
but the newly
opened Food Revolution in Stoneham is hoping to
serve a very particular niche — burgeoning
businesses that cater to
those with dietary restrictions. “The new space is totally gluten-free, totally
dairy free, for Boston food
startups that have similar
needs as Nutty Life,” says
Caroline Huffstetler, owner
of the nut milk business
who just last August cofounded the Local Fare, a retail space and shared kitchen in Arlington.
“I will still be a part of
the Local Fare, it will just be
in a different capacity because Nutty Life won’t be
there,” says Huffstetler, who
is hoping to bring about 15
businesses into her new
space, which is 1,200
square feet. “A lot of the
other shared kitchens are so
big, and include so many
other businesses, that it’s
hard for them to exclude
certain ingredients. But with
a smaller style like the Local
Fare and the new space
Food Revolution, we are
able to do that,” says the
entrepreneur.
Huffstetler hopes that
Food Revolution will act as
an incubator to help grow
health-conscious businesses. So far she has a least
two tenants: Lauren Lampert, owner of AukaLife,
which makes superfood
blends you can stir into
owisset Farm in Dover grows plump tomatoes, beautiful
heads of lettuce, kale and collard greens, zucchini, garlic
scapes, and even more. It sells the produce through its
Community Supported Agriculture program and at its
farm stand, along with local fruits, meats, and dairy.
Now, The Trustees, a land conservation nonprofit that runs Powisset
and other Massachusetts farms, has launched The Trustees Mobile
Farmers Market and takes the bounty on the road inside a retooled,
refrigerated truck modeled after a food truck. It’s the first mobile
market to sell all-local, farm-fresh foods, and at affordable prices.
The truck makes two-hour stops on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays through October at community and health centers in Dorchester and Roxbury. A grant from the USDA Farmers Market Promotion Program funded the project. The mobile market grew out of
the desire of Powisset’s team to reach customers beyond those who
come to the Dover farm to shop, and to make buying locally grown
food convenient in neighborhoods without green markets nearby.
“It’s a chance for us to share what we grow with a diverse audience,“
says Cathy Wirth, agriculture program director for The Trustees. “We
wanted to bridge the gap between where our food grows and where it
goes.” For more information and the schedule go to www.thetrustees
.org/places-to-visit/csa/mobile.
ANN TRIEGER KURLAND
A shared kitchen
space for dietary
restrictions
JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF
Plenty of light fare on
sisters’ cooking show
uSISTERS
Continued from Page G1
“We love to flirt, but we’re harmless,” confesses Marilynn.
“Speak for yourself,” says Sheila.
Later, they bundle off to Chinatown’s Shojo — with producer Bruce
Seidel at the wheel — home of Gertrude the Noodle Machine. There, former chef Mark O’Leary (he’s since departed) teaches them how to make an
aromatic ramen broth, using kelp and
chicken feet for richness. After spending time in the kitchen, they settle into
the dining room, where they grapple
with chopsticks (“We haven’t been to
Chinatown in 40 years,” they admit)
and slurp on ramen as O’Leary and
owner Brian Moy beam.
“They’re the sweetest two people
you’ ll ever meet. They’re both rich
with wit, curiosity, and charm,” says
O’Leary, who fist-bumped the ladies
instead of embracing them on camera
because he was recovering from the
flu.
Lest you think these are two twittering grannies endearing themselves
to patient chefs, think again. They
have lived as neighbors or roommates
for four decades — no children, never
married, though both have “come
close,” Marilynn says — opting instead
to cook and bake.
“We have 130 years of combined experience,” they like to say.
And they know their stuff.
After careers at WGBH and in the
antiques business, they wrote several
cookbooks, including “Baking With
the Brass Sisters,” “Heirloom Cooking
With the Brass Sisters,” and “Heirloom
Baking With the Brass Sisters,” in
which they reworked handwritten and
antique manuscript cookbook recipes
for modern readers.
That last cookbook, published in
2006, put them on the map: It was a finalist for a James Beard Foundation
award, and the chatty duo went on to
appear on TV shows like “Throwdown
With Bobby Flay,” where they baked
pineapple upside-down cake (and beat
him).
“People now change jobs once,
twice, three times in a lifetime. The ladies are the originators of reinvention,”
says Seidel.
Now they reside in a narrow singlefamily rented home on the fringes of
North Cambridge packed with antique
food molds accumulated from yard
sales (they once went to 40 in one
weekend) and dealers. Slices of watermelon — not antique — sit atop a display case. The letters “EAT” protrude
from a wall in front of the kitchen,
bubbling up like marshmallows on a
graham cracker crust.
It’s like a gourmet Grey Gardens,
just crying out for a film crew.
The idea was the brainchild of former Cooking Channel and Food Network executive Seidel, who encoun-
smoothies or sprinkle onto
granola; and Craig Olsen,
cofounder of Food Revolution and founder of Nutty
Life’s body-care line of
soaps, deoderants, and lotions that can be whipped
up in the kitchen. Their
products use all food-grade
ingredients.
In addition to workspace,
Huffstetler hopes she can
provide guidance to help
business owners avoid
some of the roadblocks she
faced at the start. Her biggest piece of advice? “Find
a mentor on day one,”
something she thinks would
have helped her launch her
business sooner.
She also says a support
system is key. “Find people
who are doing the same
thing that you are doing, because your friends aren’t
going to understand what
you are doing. You need to
find people who are striving
towards the same goals.”
As she looks to fill the dozen or so spots left at Food
Revolution, she’s hoping to
build a community of food
entrepreneurs.
After
founding
two
shared kitchens in just under one year, Huffstetler
knows how challenging the
food business can be. “You
are going to have days
when you think you aren’t
doing a great job, but you
have to remind yourself how
far you’ve come.”
CATHERINE SMART
PAT GREENHOUSE/GLOBE STAFF
‘What we like to say is:
It’s not just what you
put on the table. It’s
what you bring to the
table. And the show is
a celebration of that.’
MARILYNN BRASS (right), with
sister Sheila, her “Food Flirts” costar
tered the ladies during their Food Network appearances. He grew even more
charmed during a lunch at New York
City’s Morimoto restaurant, known for
raw fish. They initially ordered black
cod, says Marilynn, because neither
had tried sushi before, something they
confessed to Seidel.
Ergo, a TV show in which they’d try
new foods with support from similarly
charmed chef pals.
“There are so many things we’ve
never tried. We’re tackling our culinary bucket list,” says Marilynn.
After their pastrami and ramen adventure, the pair went home and created an original “knock your socks off ”
ramen noodle kugel with chicken fat,
topped with a lattice-work of breadcrumbs and pastrami. Then, they invited chefs from both restaurants over
for a hybrid feast.
“This is about the blending of cultures in America,” says Marilynn, who
grew up Jewish in a triple-decker in
Winthrop. “What we like to say is: It’s
not just what you put on the table. It’s
what you bring to the table. And the
show is a celebration of that.”
Other episodes include “Burger
Meets Dosa,” where the ladies visit
FOOD REVOLUTION
3 Marble St., Stoneham,
www.food-rev.com
Cambridge’s Mainely Burgers (Marilynn guessed every ingredient in their
secret sauce despite not having cooked
a burger since the 1960s) and Somerville’s Dosa-n-Curry (where Sheila was
offered a private cooking lesson, winkwink).
The women test recipes up to 10
times. Lest you think they shop at elite
grocers, however, think again. Marilynn prefers Market Basket.
“I like the diverse work force and
customers who come in their native
costumes and speak many languages,”
she says.
True enough, this isn’t a slicked-up
Food Network affair. Instead, everyone
pitched in, including former TV executive Seidel, who helped to clean the ladies’ bathroom and take out trash. Various rooms in the small Cambridge
house functioned as dressing rooms
and staging areas.
“The thing I loved is that everybody
did everything. We shot four episodes
in two weeks without a lot of money. I
did Sheila’s makeup and mine because
I’ve taken a tutorial with a good makeup person,” says Marilynn.
No divas here. What does it take to
live together, film together, and cook
together for all these years?
“We work like dogs, but we love it.
And we apologize to each other. We say
‘Thank you,’ or, ‘I didn’t mean to be
rude.’ We never go to bed angry,” Marilynn says.
“And we didn’t gain an ounce during filming,” adds Sheila.
Kara Baskin can be reached at
kara.baskin@globe.com. Follow her
on Twitter @kcbaskin
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
G3
BY THE GLASS
WINES WORTH A POUR BETWEEN $12 AND $30
French sparklers
as effervescent
as their makers
I
SALLY PASLEY VARGAS FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
THE CONFIDENT COOK
GOOD FOOD AND KITCHEN KNOW­HOW
You only need a food processor
to make dark­chocolate gelato
B Y SA L LY PA S LE Y VA R G A S | G L O B E C O R RE S P O ND E N T
Milk, rather than cream, is the differentiating factor between ice cream and its Italian cousin,
gelato. Here, milk forms the base of an eggless dark-chocolate gelato, which has a no-holds-barred
intensity. Because there is less butterfat in milk to coat the tongue, the flavor pops. Another ingredient, corn syrup, helps reduce the chance of crystallization when freezing. If you have a gelato
machine it will churn the mixture slowly and cut the amount of air beaten in so the mixture is
dense and creamy, less fluffy than ice cream (and quicker to melt than ice cream).
But enough science. The best part of this gelato formula is that you can make it without an ice
cream or gelato machine. Mix the base, freeze it until firm (overnight is best), and then cut the frozen slab into pieces. Whir them in a food processor, pack the mixture into a container, and freeze it
again for a few hours. Ecco la! With hardly any effort, you have Italian gelato.
By Ellen Bhang
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
f bottles of bubbly are on
your list for a summer soiree,
three Loire Valley producers
hope you’ll select their sparklers for your thirsty crowd.
These winegrowers craft pours in
a French region whose lifeblood is
the Loire River. As it traverses more
than 600 miles from the Massif Central to the Atlantic, the river connects
a diverse array of wine appellations.
To make sparkling wine, many producers here use a technique known
as méthode ancestrale. Fermentation
of the wine begins, but then is
paused — usually by means of a good
chill — before the yeast has completed its work. The wine is bottled, and
fermentation continues, trapping
CO2 inside. Soft, creamy bubbles result. While some winemakers do not
disgorge (clarify out) the yeast sediment that remains, each of the producers in this month’s trio choose to
do so, resulting in brilliantly clear
sips.
Vigneron Julien Braud crafts a
sparkler called “La Bulle de l’Ouest”
from melon de Bourgogne, the same
grape used to make Muscadet. He
grows his fruit organically on a dozen
acres in Sèvre-et-Maine, southeast of
Nantes, near the mouth of the Loire.
Braud emphasizes that he uses only
the sugar present in the grapes to
make the frothy pour. Describing it
as “friendly and festive,” his sense of
fun is reflected on the label, which
depicts a talking horse, dryly observing that the vigneron beside him
“opens the bottle faster than his
shadow.” French-speakers recognize
this as a reference to the cartoon
character Lucky Luke, a cowboy famous for being quick on the draw.
Joie de vivre is also evident in a
wine called “La Vie en Rose” from
Food­processor dark­chocolate gelato
Makes about 1 quart
1
2
½
‚
½
½
4
1
½
quart whole milk
tablespoons cornstarch
cup dark, unsweetened cocoa powder
cup sugar
cup light corn syrup
teaspoon salt
ounces bittersweet chocolate, finely chopped
teaspoon vanilla extract
cup roasted, unsalted almonds, coarsely chopped
(for garnish)
1. Line a 9-inch square pan (preferably metal) with plastic
wrap or foil.
2. In a small bowl, whisk ¼ cup of the milk and the cornstarch together until smooth.
3. In a large saucepan, whisk the cocoa powder and sugar
until blended. Gradually whisk in ½ cup of the milk until
adjusting the heat as necessary to prevent the mixture
from boiling over. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the
chocolate, stirring until it is completely smooth. Stir in the
night.
6. Remove from the freezer. Lift the chocolate slab from
the pan and transfer to a cutting board. Let it sit for a few
minutes to soften. With a large knife, cut the slab into 1inch pieces.
7. In a food processor, work one-third of the frozen pieces
until the gelato looks creamy and no frozen chunks remain.
Scrape down the sides of the workbowl as necessary. Pack
the mixture into a container. Continue until you have
worked all the gelato in the food processor. Press the top of
the mixture with a piece of parchment paper, and cover
with foil. Freeze for several hours, or until ready to serve.
4. Bring to a rolling boil, stirring constantly with a heat-
lato has frozen until hard, let it soften for a few minutes
before scooping. Sprinkle with chopped almonds.
proof spatula. Boil for 45 seconds to cook the cornstarch,
“La Bulle de l’Ouest” Peachy on
the nose with mineral, white
flowers, and a rustic whiff. Foamy
bubbles carry the flavors of sweet
tree fruit. 9.8 percent alcohol by
volume (ABV). Around $20.
Berman’s Fine Wines & Spirits,
Lexington, 781-862-0515;
Medfield Wine Shoppe, Medfield,
508-359-4097.
Domaine du Pas Saint Martin “La
Vie en Rose” Plentiful bubbles
settle quickly, carrying waterfallfresh aromas of stone fruit and
citrus. Gently sweet and juicy, this
pink is perfect for brunch. 9
percent ABV. Around $20.
Dave’s Fresh Pasta,
Somerville, 617-6230867; The Spirited
Gourmet, Belmont,
617-489-9463.
Domaine de la Taille aux
Loups “Triple Zero” Fine
streaming bubbles lead
to scents of mineral,
citrus, and lanolin, with
lively acid and a dry,
delicious note of
saline. 12.5 ABV.
Around $26. Dave’s
Fresh Pasta; Central
Bottle Wine +
Provisions,
Cambridge,
617-225-0040.
vanilla. Cool to room temperature.
5. Pour the gelato mixture into the lined pan, cover with
plastic wrap or foil, and freeze for at least 6 hours or over-
smooth. Set the saucepan over medium heat and stir in the
remaining milk, cornstarch mixture, corn syrup, and salt.
Domaine du Pas Saint Martin, situated in Saumur. Winegrower Laurent
Charrier, together with his mother,
create the frothy pink sparkler from
organically cultivated grolleau noir
grapes, grown in nearby Anjou.
Charrier takes pride in continuing
the winemaking traditions of his
grandfather.
Travel further west to Montlouissur-Loire, and you’ll encounter the
pours of Jacky Blot, who crafts a
sparkler made from old-vine chenin
blanc at Domaine de la Taille aux
Loups. (“Taille” is an old term that refers to the amount of land one person
could work in a day. “Loups” are the
wolves that roamed nearby forests.)
The pour’s name, “Triple Zero,” refers
to all that is not done to the wine —
namely, zero chaptalization (no sugar
is added to the grape must), zero tirage (no mixture of sugar and yeast is
added to induce a second fermentation), and zero dosage (no sweetening of the final product). The result is
a beautifully dry pour with fine
streaming bubbles.
These special bottles will delight
your guests all summer long. Each effervesces with the personality of its
maker.
Ellen Bhang
can be reached
at bytheglass@
globe.com.
8. When ready to serve, remove from the freezer. If the ge-
ELLEN BHANG FOR
THE BOSTON GLOBE
Q&A
BRITTANY WOOD NICKERSON
She dishes on the flavor
and health benefits of herbs
I
JOE KELLER/KELLER + KELLER PHOTOGRAPHY
By Michael Floreak
a very good example. Then the other
piece of it is flavor. It’s easy to think we
put basil in our tomato sauce because
it tastes good. But actually, if you look
back at the traditional use of herbs,
there’s just as much evidence to show
that herbs are incorporated because of
their medicinal properties. All culinary
herbs are somewhat antimicrobial and
they also all support digestion in some
way. Rosemary and sage are really
good examples of that. They both contain antioxidants that prevent food
from spoiling.
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
n her new book “Recipes From
the Herbalist’s Kitchen: Delicious, Nourishing Food for
Lifelong Health and Well-Being,” Brittany Wood Nickerson
asks readers to consider that food and
medicine can be one and the same.
With recipes such as crispy sage and
roasted garlic risotto and elderflowermint mojitos, the medicine Nickerson
makes can be quite easy to take. “The
book really spans the gamut from food
recipes to medicine recipes. The idea
being that the kitchen is a place where
we historically have made not just
food, but medicine,” Nickerson says.
The Conway resident has been practicing this holistic approach to using
herbs for both flavor and health benefits in courses and workshops she
teaches in New England and around
the Northeast.
Q. How do you approach using herbs
differently than a chef or a home cook
might?
A. A lot of folks address herbs in one of
two ways. Either via tradition — basil
with tomato sauce or on mozzarella is
Q. Gardens are producing a lot of basil
right now. What are some benefits of
using it?
A. Basil has a very sunny and uplifting
spirit. Basil is a powerful relaxing
herb. But it also stimulates circulation
throughout the body including to the
brain. It’s what I call a calm focus herb.
Continued on next page
T h e
G4
Many benefits
of herbs
Continued from preceding page
Usually we need both of those. It helps
to ease feelings of indigestion, especially if people experience indigestion
from fats or oils because it supports
liver function. It helps with the absorption of nutrients. In the book, I talk
about using it in different recipes.
There’s a roasted tomato recipe with
very thinly sliced basil. There’s also a
recipe for basil oil, which really takes
advantage of those beautiful aromatic
oils. Then there’s also recipes for
things like basil tea that you can use to
help relax and promote mental clarity.
Q. Do you need to use herbs in concentrated doses to get medicinal benefits?
A. The taste that an herb has gives you
a pretty clear indication of what its
medicine might be. Bitter-tasting
foods for example have a direct effect
on the digestive system. Mildly spicy or
pungent foods also have a direct effect
on the digestion. They stimulate circulation and improve the absorption of
nutrients. Salty tasting foods, things
B o s t o n
G l o b e
like spinach or Swiss chard, usually indicate a high mineral content, indicating that they’re very nutritive. The reason for revealing that to the reader is
that they should start to trust their intuition a little. Also to say: Hey, to get
the medicinal benefit of these herbs,
all you have to do is taste them.
Q. What other ways do you like to
make use of herbs?
A. You can make herbal teas. You can
make herbal syrups which are basically water-based preparations cooked
down and then preser ved with a
sweetener. These have become really
popular in recent years as additions to
cocktails and homemade sodas. Then
in the diet, we can incorporate larger
amounts of herbs by making condiments. Condiments offer us the opportunity to premake something and have
it in the fridge. Herb salads or chutneys are also great ways to get larger
quantities of herbs in the diet. You
could make a salad with herbs like a
parsley salad or a combination of parsley, cilantro, and dill. If you eat half a
cup or a cup of that, you’re getting a
medicinal dose.
Q. How do you like people to think
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
about using herbs and food as medicine?
A. We need to think long-term and big
picture. We need to think about it in
relationship to our lifestyle and our attitudes. One thing that deters people
from using herbs and natural remedies
instead of drugs is that they take longer to work sometimes. Not always.
But if we’re working with long-term
health benefits, it might be three
months before we really see deep, lasting change. It’s a lesson in patience.
Michael Floreak can be reached at
michaelfloreak@gmail.com.
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The Boston Globe Movie Directory is a paid
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of each cinema. Towns may appear out of alphabetical order so that listings will remain unbroken from
column to column
ARLINGTON
CAPITOL THEATRE
204 Massachussetts Ave. 781-648-4340
6 I DIG
www.capitoltheatreusa.com
BEATRIZ AT DINNER (R) 12:00, 4:10
CARS 3 (G) 12:15, 2:45
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 12:20, 2:30, 4:45, 7:15
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 12:15, 4:00,
7:00
THE LITTLE HOURS (R) 5:30, 7:40
THE BEGUILED (R) 2:00, 6:00, 8:10
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 12:30, 4:15, 7:10
BELLINGHAM
REGAL BELLINGHAM STADIUM 14
259 Hartford Ave. 844-462-7342-443
5 6 8 DIG
www.REGmovies.com
DUNKIRK (PG-13) G (12:30, 3:45) 7:45
GIRLS TRIP (R) (12:05, 3:20) 7:05, 10:00
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) (12:20) 6:50
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) G (3:35) 9:55
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) (1:00,
4:15) 7:30
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13) G
(12:00, 3:15) 6:30, 9:40
WISH UPON (PG-13) 8:15
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) (12:15, 12:45,
3:30, 4:00) 6:45, 7:15, 10:00
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING 3D (PG-13) G (11:45,
3:00) 6:15, 9:30
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) (11:30, 2:15, 5:00) 8:00
BABY DRIVER (R) (12:50, 4:20) 7:35
THE BIG SICK (R) (12:35, 3:50) 7:20
CARS 3 (G) (1:05, 4:05) 7:00, 9:50
CAPTAIN UNDERPANTS: THE FIRST EPIC MOVIE
(PG) (11:50, 2:20, 5:05)
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) (11:35, 3:05) 6:35, 9:55
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) 10:00
SING (PG) 10:00
BELMONT
BELMONT STUDIO CINEMA
376 Trapelo Rd. 617-484-1706
www.studiocinema.com
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 3:00, 5:30, 8:00
BERLIN
REGAL SOLOMON POND STADIUM 15
591 Donald Lynch Blvd. 844-462-7342-448
5 6 8 DIG
www.REGmovies.com
DUNKIRK (PG-13) G (10:55, 1:15) 4:10, 7:00, 9:40
GIRLS TRIP (R) (11:45, 1:20) 4:25, 7:30, 10:30
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) (12:20, 3:50) 7:10, 10:05
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) G
(11:50, 1:00, 3:10) 4:20, 6:30, 7:45, 9:45
WISH UPON (PG-13) 4:35, 7:40, 10:20
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) (12:10, 1:25,
3:30) 4:40, 6:50, 8:00, 10:10
THE BEGUILED (R) (2:45) 5:30, 8:05, 10:30
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) (11:00, 1:10, 2:00, 3:40)
6:15, 8:45
BABY DRIVER (R) (11:00, 1:40) 4:30, 7:20, 10:15
THE BIG SICK (R) (11:05, 1:30) 4:25, 7:35, 10:25
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) 10:00
SING (PG) 10:00
CARS 3 (G) (11:05, 1:50) 4:35, 7:15, 9:55
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) (12:00, 3:20) 6:45, 10:00
GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY VOL. 2 (PG-13) (11:20,
2:40) 6:00, 9:20
BOSTON
ARTSEMERSON: PARAMOUNT CENTER
559 Washington St. 617-824-8000
5 8 DOL
www.artsemerson.org
NO FILMS SHOWING TODAY
AMC LOEWS BOSTON COMMON 19
175 Tremont St. 617-423-3499
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
www.amctheatres.com
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 11:00, 12:45,
1:45, 8:05
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) G 4:00, 7:05,
10:20
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D
5:00
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 1:00,
3:00, 4:15, 6:15, 7:30, 9:30
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13)
RealD 3D 11:45, 2:00, 5:15, 8:30, 10:45
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 11:10, 6:30
DESPICABLE ME 3 3D (PG) RealD 3D 2:30, 9:15
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 12:05, 3:15, 6:35, 9:50
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) G 12:30, 7:15
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) G RealD 3D 11:30, 2:45, 3:45, 6:15,
9:30, 10:30
BABY DRIVER (R) 11:40
BABY DRIVER (R) G 2:30, 5:10, 8:00, 10:45
DUNKIRK (PG-13) G 12:00, 3:00, 6:00, 9:00
DUNKIRK (PG-13) G 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00
DUNKIRK: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) G
11:00, 2:00, 5:00, 8:00, 11:00
GIRLS TRIP (R) 11:15, 2:15, 5:15, 8:15
GIRLS TRIP (R) G 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 10:15
THE BEGUILED (R) AMC Independent 11:20
WISH UPON (PG-13) AMC Independent 10:15
A GHOST STORY (R) AMC Independent 11:45, 2:15,
4:45, 7:30, 10:00
THE BIG SICK (R) AMC Independent 12:15
THE BIG SICK (R) G AMC Independent 3:30, 6:45,
9:45
MEOW (NR) AMC Independent 11:00, 1:45, 4:30, 7:00
MEOW (NR) AMC Independent 9:45
MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, BOSTON
465 Huntington Ave. 617-369-3907
5 8 DOL DIG
http://www.mfa.org/programs/film
NO FILMS SHOWING TODAY
SIMONS IMAX THEATRE
New England Aquarium, Central Wharf 617-973-5200
5 8 DIG
www.neaq.org
AMAZON ADVENTURE 3D (NR) 10:00, 4:00
GREAT WHITE SHARK (NR) 12:00, 3:00, 6:00
GALAPAGOS 3D: NATURE'S WONDERLAND (NR)
11:00, 2:00, 5:00
SAVING SEA TURTLES (NR) 1:00
REGAL FENWAY STADIUM 13 & RPX
201 Brookline Ave 844-462-7342-1761
5 6 8 I K DIG
CHESTNUT HILL
SHOWCASE SUPERLUX
55 Boylston St.
http://www.showcasecinemas.com/
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 11:00, 2:30, 6:00, 9:30
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 11:00, 2:30, 6:00, 9:30
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 11:30, 2:00, 5:00, 8:30
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 11:30, 2:00, 5:00, 8:30
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 12:00, 3:00,
6:30, 10:20
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 12:00, 3:00,
6:30, 10:20
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00
BABY DRIVER (R) 12:30, 3:30
BABY DRIVER (R) 12:30, 3:30
THE BIG SICK (R) 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:40
THE BIG SICK (R) 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:40
FALSETTOS (NR) 8:00
FALSETTOS (NR) 8:00
www.REGmovies.com
THE ANCIENT MAGUS' BRIDE: THOSE AWAITING A
STAR PART 3 (NR) Advance Tickets Available 7:00
DUNKIRK (PG-13) G (1:20) 4:20, 7:30, 10:45
GIRLS TRIP (R) (11:30, 12:00, 3:00, 3:30) 6:15, 7:00,
9:40, 10:30
DUNKIRK (PG-13) RPX G (11:00, 1:50) 4:40, 7:45,
10:50
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) (11:10) 6:30
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) G (2:50) 10:15
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) G
(11:45, 3:10) 6:20, 10:20
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13) G
(11:15, 2:45) 9:50
FALSETTOS (NR) 7:00
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) (11:50, 1:00)
4:30, 8:00
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING 3D (PG-13) G (3:10)
10:20
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) (11:05, 1:40) 4:10, 6:45,
9:30
BABY DRIVER (R) (1:10) 4:15, 7:20, 10:25
THE BIG SICK (R) (12:30, 3:40) 7:15, 10:35
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) (11:20, 3:05) 6:40, 10:10
BRAINTREE
AMC BRAINTREE 10
121 Grandview Rd.
5 6 DIG
www.amctheatres.com
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 10:30, 4:20,
10:40
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D
1:50, 7:30
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 11:30,
2:45, 6:00, 9:20
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13)
RealD 3D 12:30, 3:45, 7:00, 10:20
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 10:30, 11:20, 4:30, 9:10
DESPICABLE ME 3 3D (PG) RealD 3D 2:00, 6:50
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) G 1:20, 7:20
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) G RealD 3D 11:00, 4:45, 10:40
BABY DRIVER (R) 11:10, 1:40, 4:50, 7:40, 10:30
DUNKIRK (PG-13) G 10:40, 2:10, 4:30, 7:50, 10:30
GIRLS TRIP (R) G 10:50, 12:45, 1:45, 3:40, 4:40,
6:30, 7:30, 9:30, 10:30
THE BIG SICK (R) G AMC Independent 10:30, 1:30,
4:20, 7:10, 10:00
BROOKLINE
COOLIDGE CORNER THEATRE
290 Harvard St. 617-734-2500
5 6
www.coolidge.org
THE BIG SICK (R) 11:00, 1:45, 4:15, 6:30, 10:15
CITY OF GHOSTS (R) 2:15, 4:45
A GHOST STORY (R) 11:15, 1:30, 4:00, 7:30, 9:45
DUNKIRK IN 70MM (PG-13) G 11:30, 2:00, 4:30,
7:00, 9:30
BRING ME THE HEAD OF ALFREDO GARCIA (R) 7:00
THE BEGUILED (R) 9:00
BURLINGTON
AMC BURLINGTON CINEMA 10
20 South Ave.
5 6 DIG
www.amctheatres.com
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 1:40, 7:50
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D
10:40, 4:40, 10:50
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) G
12:20, 3:30, 6:40, 9:50
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13) G
RealD 3D 10:35, 1:20, 4:30, 7:40, 10:50
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 11:05, 4:00, 9:00
DESPICABLE ME 3 3D (PG) RealD 3D 1:45, 6:20
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 4:20, 10:40
WONDER WOMAN 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 1:15, 7:30
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) G 11:00, 3:45, 10:00
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) G RealD 3D 12:15, 6:50
BABY DRIVER (R) 2:10, 5:00, 8:00, 10:45
DUNKIRK (PG-13) G 10:30, 1:05, 3:40, 6:15, 9:15
CARS 3 (G) 10:35
GIRLS TRIP (R) G 11:00, 1:50, 4:50, 8:00, 10:55
THE BIG SICK (R) G AMC Independent 1:10, 4:10,
7:10, 10:10
CAMBRIDGE
APPLE CINEMAS CAMBRIDGE
168 Alewife Brook Parkway.
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
www.applecinemas.com
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 11:00, 2:05, 3:30, 5:45, 8:00
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 11:00,
1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:30
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 11:00, 1:55,
4:50, 7:45, 10:40
WISH UPON (PG-13) 8:35
JAGGA JASOOS (NR) 5:20
FIDAA (NR) 10:35
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 11:00, 2:00, 5:00, 7:15,
10:30
BABY DRIVER (R) 4:40, 8:00, 10:15
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 11:00, 2:00, 5:00, 8:00, 10:55
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 11:00, 12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00,
10:30
GIRLS TRIP (R) 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 10:00
KENDALL SQUARE CINEMA
1 Kendall Square at 355 Binney St. 617-621-1202
5 6 G DOL DIG DSS
www.landmarktheatres.com
MAUDIE (PG-13) 5 (3:50)
LADY MACBETH (R) 5 (1:10, 3:25, 5:35) 7:45, 9:55
ALL'OPERA: MANON LESCAUT (NR) 5 G 7:00
A GHOST STORY (R) 5 (1:05, 3:15, 5:25) 7:35, 9:50
THE BIG SICK (R) 5 (1:00, 1:40, 4:20) 7:00, 9:15,
9:40
THE B-SIDE: ELSA DORFMAN'S PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY (R) 5 (1:35, 4:00) 7:10
DANVERS
AMC LOEWS LIBERTY TREE MALL 20
BABY DRIVER (R) 12:15, 3:15, 6:45, 10:30
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 12:00, 3:00, 6:15, 9:15
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 1:30, 4:15, 7:30, 10:15
CARS 3 (G) 1:00
GIRLS TRIP (R) 11:00, 2:00, 5:00
GIRLS TRIP (R) 12:30, 3:45, 7:00, 10:15
WISH UPON (PG-13) AMC Independent 4:00
WISH UPON (PG-13) AMC Independent 8:15
THE BIG SICK (R) AMC Independent 1:45, 5:15, 9:45
THE BIG SICK (R) AMC Independent 6:30
LEXINGTON
LEXINGTON VENUE
1794 Massachussetts Ave. 781-861-6161
5 DOL DSS
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 4:00, 7:00
THE BIG SICK (R) 3:45, 6:45
LOWELL
SHOWCASE CINEMAS LOWELL
32 Reiss Ave 800-315-4000
5 6 8 DIG
100 Independence Way
www.nationalamusements.com
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 11:50, 3:15, 6:35, 9:55
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 11:40,
12:20, 3:10, 3:40, 6:30, 7:00, 9:40, 10:10
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13)
4:10, 10:30
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 12:45, 1:20, 3:25, 3:55, 6:05,
8:35
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 11:35, 2:55,
6:15, 6:45, 9:15, 9:45
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING 3D (PG-13) 12:35, 7:15
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 1:00, 3:45, 6:40, 9:20
GIRLS TRIP (R) 1:15, 4:25, 7:30, 10:20
BABY DRIVER (R) 1:25, 4:30, 7:25, 10:25
THE BIG SICK (R) 1:05, 4:20, 7:20, 10:05
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 12:40, 3:50
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) 7:05, 10:15
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 1:30, 4:15, 7:10, 9:50
WISH UPON (PG-13) 11:55, 2:20, 4:50, 7:40, 10:35
www.amctheatres.com
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 12:30, 2:45,
3:30, 6:45, 9:00, 9:45
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D
11:30, 6:00
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) G
11:45, 1:15, 3:00, 4:20, 6:05, 7:30, 9:15
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13) G
RealD 3D 10:45, 12:15, 2:15, 3:30, 5:30, 6:45, 8:45,
10:00
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 11:45, 2:00, 4:15, 6:45, 9:00
DESPICABLE ME 3 3D (PG) RealD 3D 1:15, 3:45
CAPTAIN UNDERPANTS: THE FIRST EPIC MOVIE
(PG) 11:15, 1:45, 4:15
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 11:45, 3:00, 6:15, 9:30
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) G 11:15, 2:30, 6:00, 9:15
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) G RealD 3D 12:15, 3:30, 6:45, 10:00
BABY DRIVER (R) 11:05, 1:50, 4:30, 7:10, 9:50
DUNKIRK (PG-13) G 11:45, 3:00, 6:15, 9:00
DUNKIRK: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) G
10:45, 1:30, 4:15, 7:00, 9:35
CARS 3 (G) 11:00, 1:40, 4:15, 7:00, 9:45
THE HOUSE (R) 6:30, 9:00
TRANSFORMERS: THE LAST KNIGHT (PG-13) 6:30,
9:45
GIRLS TRIP (R) 10:45, 1:30, 4:15, 7:15, 10:00
THE BEGUILED (R) AMC Independent 11:00, 12:30,
3:30, 9:00
WISH UPON (PG-13) G AMC Independent 11:00, 6:15,
8:45
THE BIG SICK (R) G AMC Independent 10:45, 1:30,
3:30, 4:15, 7:00, 9:45
THE LITTLE HOURS (R) G AMC Independent 1:20,
6:30
DEDHAM
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX LEGACY PLACE
670 Legacy Place 800-315-4000
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
www.nationalamusements.com
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 12:15, 3:25, 6:35, 9:45
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 11:50,
12:50, 3:05, 3:35, 4:05, 6:20, 6:50, 9:25, 9:55
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13)
7:20, 10:25
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 10:50, 11:40, 1:10, 2:00,
4:25, 6:45, 9:05
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 12:10, 3:10,
6:10, 9:00
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 10:00, 12:55,
4:00, 7:00, 10:05
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 10:15
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 11:20, 1:00, 2:05, 3:45, 4:50, 6:40,
7:45, 9:20, 10:20
GIRLS TRIP (R) 11:00, 1:55, 4:40, 7:35, 10:30
GIRLS TRIP (R) 10:30
GIRLS TRIP (R) 1:30, 4:10, 7:10, 10:00
BABY DRIVER (R) 11:05, 4:35, 7:15, 9:50
THE BIG SICK (R) 10:40, 1:25, 4:15, 10:10
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 12:40, 3:20, 3:50, 6:30
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) 7:05, 10:15
FALSETTOS (NR) 7:00
WISH UPON (PG-13) 12:45, 9:30
FOXBORO
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX PATRIOT PLACE
24 Patriot Pl. 800-315-4000
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
www.nationalamusements.com
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 11:50, 3:00, 6:25, 9:30
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 12:10,
12:40, 3:20, 3:50, 6:30, 7:00, 9:35
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13)
10:05
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 11:30, 12:00, 2:00, 2:30,
4:25, 4:55, 6:45, 7:35, 9:00
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 12:05, 3:10,
6:15, 9:25
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 1:25, 4:35,
7:45
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 1:00, 3:45, 6:40, 9:20
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 11:00, 1:45, 4:40, 7:20, 10:00
GIRLS TRIP (R) 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:25
BABY DRIVER (R) 1:35, 4:15, 7:05, 9:50
THE BIG SICK (R) 1:15, 4:05, 6:55, 9:40
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 11:45, 3:15
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 12:35, 4:00, 7:10, 10:15
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) 6:35, 9:45
WISH UPON (PG-13) 9:55
FRAMINGHAM
AMC FRAMINGHAM 16 WITH DINE-IN
THEATRES
22 Flutie Pass
5 6 8 I K DIG
www.amctheatres.com
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 12:00, 3:15,
9:15, 10:30
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D
1:00, 4:30, 8:00
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 11:00,
2:45, 6:00, 9:30
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 4:45
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13)
RealD 3D 12:45, 8:30
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13)
RealD 3D 4:00, 10:30
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 2:00, 4:15
DESPICABLE ME 3 3D (PG) RealD 3D 1:15
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 12:00, 3:30, 7:15, 10:00
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 2:30
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 3:45, 10:30
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 12:30, 7:15
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 6:00
MILLBURY
BLACKSTONE VALLEY 14: CINEMA DE LUX
70 Worcester Providence Turnpike 800-315-4000
5 6 8 DSS
www.showcasecinemas.com
BOOKWORM (NR) 10:00
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 12:05, 3:15, 6:30, 9:40
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 9:30,
12:00, 12:30, 3:10, 3:40, 6:55, 10:00
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13)
6:25, 9:30
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 9:40, 11:20, 11:50, 1:40,
2:10, 3:55, 4:25, 6:35, 9:00
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 9:50, 12:50,
4:10, 6:50, 7:20, 9:50, 10:20
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 10:00, 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 9:40
GIRLS TRIP (R) 10:15, 12:45, 1:15, 3:45, 4:15, 6:45,
7:15, 9:35, 10:05
BABY DRIVER (R) 10:40, 1:35, 4:20, 7:05, 9:55
THE BIG SICK (R) 10:10, 1:25, 4:40, 7:40, 10:25
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 9:35, 12:10, 12:40, 3:20, 3:50, 7:10,
10:15
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) 6:40, 9:45
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 10:30, 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:10
NATICK
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
FURNITURE - NATICK
1 Underprice Way 508-665-5525
5 8
REVERE
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX REVERE
565 Squire Rd. 800-315-4000
5 6 8 I K DIG
https://www.showcasecinemas.com/
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 12:05, 3:15, 6:45, 10:05
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 11:50,
3:10, 4:40, 6:30, 8:00, 9:40
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 12:45,
4:05, 7:30, 10:35
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13)
12:15, 3:55, 7:00, 10:10
CARS 3 (G) 11:15, 1:55
TRANSFORMERS: THE LAST KNIGHT (PG-13) 9:50
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 11:05, 1:35, 4:00, 6:25, 8:50
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 10:50, 11:35, 1:15, 2:05,
3:30, 4:30, 6:55, 9:15
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 12:00, 12:30,
3:05, 3:35, 6:20, 6:50, 9:30, 10:00
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 10:15, 1:00, 3:45, 6:40, 9:20
GIRLS TRIP (R) 1:05, 4:10, 7:45
GIRLS TRIP (R) 12:35, 3:40, 7:15, 10:10
BABY DRIVER (R) 11:05, 2:00, 4:55, 7:40, 10:30
THE BIG SICK (R) 10:55, 1:40, 4:25, 7:25, 10:20
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 12:10, 12:40, 3:20, 3:50, 6:35, 7:05, 9:45
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) 10:15
FALSETTOS (NR) 7:00
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 10:45, 1:30, 4:15, 7:10, 9:50
WISH UPON (PG-13) 12:20, 2:30, 4:50, 7:20, 9:55
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 10:05, 1:10, 4:20, 7:35, 10:45
SOMERVILLE
SOMERVILLE THEATRE
55 Davis Square 617-625-5700
5 6 I DIG
http://somervilletheatre.com/
BABY DRIVER (R) 1:20, 4:30, 7:20, 9:55
DUNKIRK IN 70MM (PG-13) 2:00, 4:45, 7:30, 10:00
THE BIG SICK (R) 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 9:50
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 1:10,
4:10, 7:10, 10:00
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 1:30, 4:40, 8:00
TAUNTON
REGAL SILVER CITY GALLERIA 10
2 Galleria Mall Dr. Suite 2832 844-462-7342-452
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
www.REGmovies.com
DUNKIRK (PG-13) G (11:45, 2:20) 5:00, 7:45, 10:30
GIRLS TRIP (R) (1:05) 4:10, 7:15, 10:20
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) (12:15) 7:00
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) G (3:40) 10:15
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) G
(12:30, 2:45) 7:05, 10:15
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13) G
(11:50, 3:35) 6:00, 9:20
WISH UPON (PG-13) (3:45) 10:30
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) (1:00) 7:25,
9:15
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING 3D (PG-13) G 4:15
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) (12:05, 2:30) 4:55, 7:30,
10:00
BABY DRIVER (R) (12:00) 6:15
THE BIG SICK (R) (12:20, 3:20) 6:45, 9:45
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) (11:55, 3:15) 6:30, 9:50
WALTHAM
EMBASSY CINEMA
www.jordansimax.com
16 Pine St. 781-736-7852
DUNKIRK: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 1:30,
4:15, 7:00, 9:40
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
NORTH ATTLEBOROUGH
SHOWCASE CINEMAS NORTH ATTLEBORO
640 South Washington St. 800-315-4000
5 6 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
BOOKWORM (NR) 9:00
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 9:25, 12:35, 3:45, 6:55,
10:00
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 9:20,
9:50, 12:25, 12:55, 3:30, 4:00, 6:35, 9:35
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13)
7:05, 10:05
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 10:05, 10:35, 12:20, 12:50,
2:35, 4:50, 7:20, 9:55
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 10:30, 1:20,
4:05, 4:35, 7:00, 7:30, 9:50
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 10:10, 12:30, 1:10, 3:30, 4:10,
6:30, 7:10, 9:30, 10:10
GIRLS TRIP (R) 10:15, 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 10:10
BABY DRIVER (R) 10:20, 1:00, 3:50, 6:50, 9:25
THE BIG SICK (R) 10:50, 1:40, 4:30, 7:25, 10:10
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 12:10, 3:20
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) 6:40, 9:45
RANDOLPH
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX RANDOLPH
73 Mazzeo Dr. 800-315-4000
5 6 8 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 11:20, 2:40, 6:05, 9:15
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 12:50,
4:10, 6:25, 7:25, 9:35, 10:35
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13)
12:20, 3:40, 6:55, 10:05
CARS 3 (G) 3:20
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 11:00, 11:30, 1:25, 1:55,
3:55, 4:25, 7:10, 9:40
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 12:30, 12:55,
3:35, 4:05, 6:50, 10:00
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING 3D (PG-13) 7:20, 10:30
THE HOUSE (R) 6:45
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 1:00, 3:45, 6:40, 9:20
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 1:00, 3:45, 6:40, 9:20
DUNKIRK: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 11:15,
2:00, 4:45, 7:40, 10:20
GIRLS TRIP (R) 1:05, 1:30, 4:00, 4:30, 7:00, 7:30,
9:50, 10:25
GIRLS TRIP (R) 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:25
BABY DRIVER (R) 12:15, 3:05, 6:20, 9:00
THE BIG SICK (R) 12:00, 3:00, 6:35, 9:30
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 12:40, 3:50, 7:05, 10:15
WISH UPON (PG-13) 12:45, 9:05
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 12:05, 3:15, 6:30, 9:45
READING
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
FURNITURE - READING
50 Walkers Brook Dr. 781-944-9090
5 8
www.jordansimax.com
DUNKIRK: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 1:30,
4:15, 7:00, 9:40
www.landmarktheatres.com
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 5 (12:55) 7:05
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) 5 (3:55)
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 5 (12:45, 3:40) 6:40
THE BEGUILED (R) 5 (1:10)
THE LITTLE HOURS (R) 5 (4:10) 6:50
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 5
(12:50, 3:50) 7:05
BABY DRIVER (R) 5 (1:05, 4:05) 7:15
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 5 (1:00, 4:00)
7:00
WESTBOROUGH
REGAL WESTBOROUGH STADIUM 12
231 Turnpike Road 844-462-7342-453
5 6 8 DIG
www.REGmovies.com
DUNKIRK (PG-13) G (11:30, 2:15) 5:00, 7:45, 10:30
GIRLS TRIP (R) (1:00) 4:20, 7:30, 10:25
MUNNA MICHAEL (NR) (2:00) 5:45, 9:40
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 7:00
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) G (12:15, 3:40) 10:20
JAGGA JASOOS (NR) (12:45) 4:45, 8:30
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) G
(12:20, 3:50) 7:15, 9:35
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13) G
(11:35, 2:55) 6:15, 10:30
WISH UPON (PG-13) 9:50
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) (11:45) 6:30,
9:45
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING 3D (PG-13) G (3:00)
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) (12:00, 2:30) 5:15, 8:00,
10:30
BABY DRIVER (R) (1:15) 4:00, 6:55
THE BIG SICK (R) (1:30) 4:30, 7:25, 10:25
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) (11:40, 3:15) 6:45, 10:00
WOBURN
SHOWCASE CINEMAS WOBURN
25 Middlesex Canal Pkwy 800-315-4000
5 6 DOL DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 12:15, 3:20, 6:25, 9:40
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 1:20,
4:25, 7:30
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 12:20,
3:25, 6:30, 9:35
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13)
7:00, 10:10
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 12:10, 1:45, 2:30, 4:05, 4:45
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 12:00, 12:30,
3:00, 3:30, 6:20, 6:50, 9:30, 10:00
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 1:00, 1:30, 3:45, 4:15, 6:40, 7:10,
9:20, 9:50
GIRLS TRIP (R) 1:15, 4:00, 6:35, 9:25
BABY DRIVER (R) 1:35, 4:20, 7:05, 9:55
THE BIG SICK (R) 1:40, 4:35, 7:20, 10:05
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 12:40, 1:10, 3:40, 4:10, 6:45, 9:45
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) 7:15, 10:25
FALSETTOS (NR) 7:00
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
G5
Hate to Fly?
SEASONAL RECIPES
WHAT TO COOK THIS WEEK
Cruise from
Boston, Massachusetts
7-Night Bermuda 14-Night Canada/NE 7-Night Canada/NE
from
$599* pp.
from
$1,439* pp.
from
$696* pp.
Choose from FREE Beverage Packages /
Shore Excursion Credits / Internet Packages /
Onboard Credits up to $350
Visit
www.DirectLineCruises.com/bostonglobe
for more information on cruises sailing from Boston.
Travel Insurance Included with sailings 5-nights or longer.
Senior and resident rates available on select sailings!
Call toll-free for a FREE Brochure & Reservations
1-877-589-7519
www.DirectLineCruises.com
* Rates shown above apply to select sailings and are subject to availability. Gov’t. taxes and fees are additional.
SHERYL JULIAN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
KAROLINE BOEHM GOODNICK FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Fresh corn salad
Deviled crab
Serves 6
Serves 8
With a little heat from jalapeno and
2. Meanwhile, set an ear of corn on
In Maryland, deviled crab features
aromatics from plenty of parsley
and oregano, fresh corn salad
a cutting board. Working from the
wide end to the narrow end, pull a
the region’s famous blue crabs, but
in New England, use Jonah or rock
shines in summer. Cut the corn off
knife across 3 or 4 rows so the ker-
(peekytoe) crab from Maine. Maine
the cobs, and cook it for 2 minutes
nels fall onto the board. Set the
crabs are available all year round;
only; the kernels are still a little
crunchy. Don’t stand ears on the
corn on its cut side (so it sits without wobbling). Remove 3 or 4 more
they’re meatiest in the fall. If you
are feeling particularly energetic or
cutting board because the method
rows. Turn and remove more rows
live near an area where crabs are
is a unsafe. Set the corn so the stalk
is parallel to the board, cut off a few
in this way until all the kernels are
off the cob. Do the same with the
pulled from the waters, you get a
few ounces of meat from each crab.
rows, then turn it onto the cut edge
remaining 3 ears. Transfer the ker-
Steam and pick them clean, and
1. Set the oven at 450 degrees.
so the cob doesn’t rock as you continue removing kernels a few rows
at a time.
nels to a bowl.
save the shells. Fill the empty shells
with the crab mixture and top it
with buttery cracker crumbs before
Brush an 8-inch square baking dish
with 1 tablespoon of the butter.
4
3
1
1
2
3
2
Salt and pepper, to taste
ears fresh corn, shucked
tablespoons white wine vine­
gar, or more to taste
jalapeno or other chile pepper,
cored, seeded, and chopped
wedge (½­inch) red onion, cut
into fine slivers
tablespoons olive oil
tablespoons chopped fresh
parsley
tablespoons chopped fresh
oregano
1. Bring a large saucepan of salted
water to a boil.
3. Drop the corn into the pot of water and set a timer for 2 minutes.
The water may not return to a boil,
but that’s OK. Drain the corn into a
colander and rinse with cold water
until it is no longer hot. Shake the
colander well to remove excess water.
4. Tip the corn into a bowl and
sprinkle with the vinegar and a
pinch of salt. Stir well and set aside
for 5 minutes.
5. Add the jalapeno or other chile,
red onion, olive oil, parsley, oregano, and pepper. Taste for seasoning.
Add more vinegar (it should be pronounced) and salt, if you like.
Sheryl Julian
2 tablespoons Old Bay
seasoning
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon Worcestershire
sauce
2 teaspoons hot sauce
¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
Extra chopped fresh chives
(for sprinkling)
2. In a bowl, mix the remaining 4
baking, which makes a striking presentation. This version uses lump
crab meat baked in a dish. The
tablespoons butter with the cracker
word “deviled” implies piquancy
and heat, which you get from seasonings like Old Bay, mustard,
3. In another bowl, combine crab
Worcestershire, hot sauce, and cayenne pepper. Adjust the hot sauce
and cayenne to your preference.
N ON
C
zealand
crumbs; toss gently until crumbs
are evenly coated.
“Crisp, light-bodied, intense and
refreshing, offering a beam of lime
centered citrus flavors that show a touch
of grassy green notes, with passion fruit
and peppery floral tones on the finish.”
meat, mayonnaise, lemon juice,
chives, Old Bay, mustard, Worcestershire sauce, hot sauce, and cayenne pepper. Stir gently. Taste for
seasoning and add more cayenne or
hot sauce, if you like.
5
1
tablespoons butter, melted
cup (approximately 25)
Ritz­style crackers, coarsely
crushed cracker crumbs
2 pounds lump crab meat
1½ cups mayonnaise
3 tablespoons lemon juice
¼ cup chopped fresh chives
4. Transfer the crab mixture to the
baking dish. Top with buttered
crumbs.
5. Bake for 15 minutes or until
Access your Globe account online
at bostonglobe.com/subscriber
golden brown and bubbling at the
edges. Garnish with chives.
Karoline Boehm Goodnick
Exchange Street Bistro
3 course prix-fixe
S U N DAY T H R O U G H T H U R S DAY
$27.99 per person
FIRST COURSE
( ch o i c e o f )
Watermelon Feta Salad
arugula, watermelon, feta cheese, citrus vinaigrette
Seafood Chowder
applewood smoked bacon, grilled corn
SECOND COURSE
( ch o i c e o f )
Baked Stuffed Lobster
crab and shrimp stuffing, newburg sauce
corn on the cob
Grilled Filet Mignon
bacon macaroni and cheese
sautéed spinach
THIRD COURSE
( ch o i c e o f )
Trio of Sorbet
amaretto cookie
Strawberry Shortcake
whipped cream, fresh strawberries
Excludes the use of any promotions, gift certificates, or coupons
Seating is limited • Dinner menu available
67 Exchange Street
Malden
Reservations
781-322-0071
exchangestreetbistro.com
T h e
G6
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
CHEAP EATS
DINING DEALS IN GREATER BOSTON
The Automatic raises
the bar on bars
By Catherine Smart
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
CAMBRIDGE — Your instincts
might tell you to be wary of a place
that offers frozen blue margaritas, Portuguese Chex Mix ($4), and Frito Pie
From Hell ($7), but you’d be wrong at
The Automatic, which opened last November in Kendall Square. Here, the
cocktails are expertly concocted and
the friendly servers steer you toward
mostly-delicious offerings, like that
slightly salty and not-too-sweet blue
margarita ($11) which, despite looking like something you’d order for the
first and last time on your 21st birthday, tastes of fresh lime, agave, and decent tequila, or the gochujang-slicked
Korean fried chicken sandwich ($10),
topped with sweet-tart and funky
housemade kimchi.
The Automatic has a millennial
vibe with a 74-seat wood-paneled
room, poured concrete floors, and delicious frozen drinks. But this is not the
owners’ first rodeo. After a decade of
throwing around the idea of opening
up a bar, East Coast Grill founder Chris
Schlesinger and B-Side Lounge bartender Dave Cagle decided to do just
that.
And it definitely is a bar. Though
there are tables and booths arranged
around the shiny cement slab that is
the focal point of the inside space, both
the cozy interior and the sizable sundrenched patio — which can seat another 40 — seem built for imbibing.
Cagle says he and the team, led by
Martin Su, of the now-shuttered Flora
restaurant in Arlington, did a lot of
crowdsourcing to “create stuff restaurant people love to eat, full of complex
spice and acidity.” That comes out in a
crispy pork belly special ($9), lacquered with a savory house-made oys-
ter sauce and served with an Asian apple and red cabbage slaw.
The Underappreciated Blackened
Fish Sando satisfies with spice-rubbed
pollock, grilled pineapple, and a Tabasco remoulade. Its tropical flair is reminiscent of something you might eat
over at East Coast Grill. Big fans of the
ECG buffalo shrimp, we took a chance
on the buffalo fried sweet plantains
($6.50). Unfortunately, the fried fruit
is cloying under the breadcrumbs and
blue cheese crumbles and the whole
thing feels heavy, with too much mush.
The flat patty burger ($8) is groanworthy. It’s topped with just your standard lettuce, tomato, onion, and “super secret sauce,” but there is some alchemy happening that makes it the
ideal burger, especially after one of
those alcoholic slushies that just went
down like juice.
And with burgers, you’ve got to
have fries. Funky fries ($7.50), with
spicy togarashi seasoning, Kewpie
mayo, and crunchy bits of nori are on
the pricey side, but we finish every last
one. Freaky fries ($10) are an umami
bomb with parmesan shavings, “meat
debris” (shreds of pleasantly chewy
beef ), and a split bone that, in our
case, went untouched as the marrow
was ice cold and rock solid. When the
server inquired about our food, and we
were honest about missing the custardy marrow, he took the item off our
bill without batting an eye.
The service is particularly good
here. The staff seems genuinely happy
and interested in making sure you are,
too. From steering you to the right
drink or can’t-miss special, to making
sure the New England frankfurter
($6.50) — a Pearl hot dog with snappy
casing, soft bun, and sides of vinegary
slaw and mac salad — comes out STAT
PHOTOS BY JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF
Korean fried chicken
sandwich (above left), blue
margarita (above), and
funky fries (left) at The
Automatic in Cambridge.
THE AUTOMATIC
50 Hampshire St., Cambridge
617­714­5226, www.theautomaticbar.com
All major credit cards accepted. Wheelchair accessible.
Prices Appetizers $4­$12.50, Entrees $6.50­$18,
Hours Mon­Fri 11 a.m.­2 a.m., Sat­Sun 4 p.m.­2 a.m.
Liquor Full bar
What to order Blue margarita, flat patty burger, freaky fries, Korean fried
chicken sandwich
when you’ve got a rambunctious toddler in tow.
Between sampling the lunch and
dinner menus, we missed out on tryi n g i z a k ay a - s ty l e m e at s ke w e r s
($4-$4.50), snackable sticks of beef
hearts, cumin pork, and nori chicken.
And how did we not order that Frito
pie with Schlesinger’s famous Inner
Beauty Hot Sauce? Or the Miami Vice
cocktail for two ($25)?
As Cagle said, the kitchen might be
cooking food for industry compatriots
but, “Luckily, other people like to eat
it, too.”
Catherine Smart can be reached at
cathjsmart@gmail.com. Follow her on
Twitter @catherinesmart.
THEATER
THEATER
THEATER
MUSIC
MUSIC
MUSIC
a mel brooks musical
august 15 - august 27
movie musical July 25-28
regent theatre arlington
romeo & Juliet
a concert benefiting rfk
children’s action corPs
only two hours from
boston!
movie musical July 25-28
regent theatre arlington
From the creators of the musical sensation,
‘The Producers,’ comes this monster hit musical
based on Mel Brooks’ 1974 film. A wickedly
inspired re-imagining of the legend of
Frankenstein tells the story of a young
doctor who travels to Transylvania to
complete the work of his grandfather.
Your Favorite SONG LYRICS On The BIG SCREEN!
Including * Tomorrow * It’s the Hard-Knock Life
$12.50-$17.50 * Group Rates Available!
Tickets: RegentTheatre.com * 781-646-4849 *
DRESS-UP AS YOUR FAVORITE CHARACTER!
*SAVE $3 with Code “SING”!*
NORTH SHORE MUSIC THEATRE
62 Dunham Road | Beverly | MA
TICKETS: $57 - $82 • KIDS SAVE 50%
BOOK SEATS: NSMT.ORG or 978.232.7200
legendary musical great seats available!
Director Maria Friedman recreates her acclaimed
London revival of Stephen Sondheim’s musical
just for Boston audiences! Starts Sept. 8!
A Huntington Theatre Company production
Avenue of the Arts / Huntington Avenue Theatre
617 266 0800 huntingtontheatre.org
NORTH SHORE MUSIC THEATRE
62 Dunham Road | Beverly | MA
TICKETS: $57 - $82 • KIDS SAVE 50%
BOOK SEATS: NSMT.ORG or 978.232.7200
boston’s hilarious
whodunit!
Tues-Fri at 8, Sat at 5 & 8, Sun at 3 & 7
Added shows: 7/26 at 5, 7/31 at 8, 8/2 at 5
To order 617-426-5225 or shearmadness.com
Student rush & specially priced senior tix
Great group rates! 617-451-0195
Charles Playhouse, 74 Warrenton Street
September 8 • 7:30pm
Special Guest Co-Hosts
CHARLES SHAUGHNESSY of TV’s ‘The Nanny’
& ‘Days of Our Lives’ and SUSAN WORNICK,
TV Journalist, Host, and Spokesperson.
Featuring: Brendan Carroll, Jamie Conway,
Sheree Dunwell, Ryann Murray, Amanda Rosa,
Tom Rosa, and Fred VanNess
NORTH SHORE MUSIC THEATRE
62 Dunham Road | Beverly | MA
TICKETS: $35 & $25
BOOK SEATS: NSMT.ORG or 978.232.7200
Discover where master artists and new musical
leaders live, learn, and explore great chamber
music together in the foothills of Vermont.
Saturdays (8:00PM) and Sundays (2:30PM)
Now through August 13th
august 3 - 13
781-891-5600
A Tap Dancing Musical Extravaganza
Starring Tom Wopat & Rachel York
ReagleMusicTheatre.com
617 Lexington St., Waltham
FREE PARKING
begins in two weeks!
august 8-20
“Far and away the best musical of the year.”
-NPR
Boston Opera House
800.982.2787 | BroadwayInBoston.com
Box Office Hours: Mon - Fri 10am-5pm
Groups (10+) Call 617.482.8616
OPERA
boston midsummer oPera
Presents
MUSIC
fri-sun, July 28-30
lowell folk festival
8/4 Amos Lee
the legend continues
sePtember 7 at 7:30Pm
The Original High School Musical Is Back with...
ANIMATED SONG LYRICS On The BIG SCREEN!
Tickets: RegentTheatre.com * 781-646-4849
$12.50-$17.50 * SAVE $3 with Code “SING”
Group Rates Available!
*Programs & Tickets*
Call 802-254-2394
Visit www.marlboromusic.org
8/6 Dawes
now thru July 30 only!
kids save 50%
Based on the Oscar winning animated 1991 film,
this family musical follows a young woman held
in a castle occupied by a monstrous beast and
a host of enchanted objects. This eye-popping
spectacle is filled with imaginative sets and costumes, and breath-taking production numbers.
Many family friendly showtimes added!
By William Shakespeare
Directed by Allegra Libonati
Now-August 6 at the Parkman Bandstand,
Boston Common
One of Greater Boston’s most beloved traditions
takes up residence once again with Romeo &
Juliet proving that the power of love triumphs
over divisions and differences. Tickets are FREE!
(Friend Section Chairs available $75 donation)
Visit www.commshakes.org
or call 617-426-0863
the second generation
september 10 • 2pm
Engelbert Humperdinck’s music has
transcended time and his voice still
continues to reach out to people now;
serving to transport and inspire, to
embrace and to provoke feelings and
emotions… ingredients that are no doubt
the essence of his long-lasting success.
• The Jackie Wilson Show with son Bobby
Wilson • The Legacy of Clyde McPhatter and
The Drifters with son Ron McPhatter • Honoring
The Del Vikings’ original lead Norman Wright
with sons Norman Jr. and Anthony • Young
James Brown • Porsha Funches - daughter
of former Platters’ lead
NORTH SHORE MUSIC THEATRE
62 Dunham Road | Beverly | MA
Tickets: $79.50 | $69.50 | $59.50
BOOK SEATS: NSMT.ORG or 978.232.7200
NORTH SHORE MUSIC THEATRE
62 Dunham Road | Beverly | MA
TICKETS: $57 | $47
BOOK SEATS: NSMT.ORG or 978.232.7200
Boston Globe
Ticket to the Arts
Order Online through our Self Serve Order Entry
System. 24/7 from anywhere.
boston.com/tickettothearts
8/12 Lyle Lovett & His Large Band
8/18 Buddy Guy
8/19 David Grisman Sextet
8/20 Stephen Stills & Judy Collins
8/26 Classic Albums Live: Sgt Pepper
Gaetano Donizetti’s
Elixir of Love
Sung in Italian with English Supertitles
Antonio Ocampo-Guzman, Stage Director
Susan Davenny Wyner, Conductor
Mosesian Center for the Arts
321 Arsenal Street, Watertown, MA
July 26 & 28 at 7:30 pm, July 30 at 3 pm
Tickets $60 and $50
www.bostonmidsummeropera.org
Phone: 617-923-0100
8/31 Bruce Hornsby & The Noisemakers
9/1 Rosanne Cash
9/9 Banjo & Fiddle Contest
great music for free
wednesdays at 7Pm
DCR’s HATCH SHELL ON THE ESPLANADE
July 26 - Mercury Orchestra: Symphonic Opera
August 2 - Beethoven Symphony No. 9
August 9 - Anthems of the World
August 16 - Longwood Symphony Orchestra
August 23 - Landmarks Dance Carnival
landmarksorchestra.org
ACTIVITIES
child and ritual abuse
conference
Child Abuse Conference for Severe Child Abuse
Survivors and Their Helpers
Friday August 11 - Sunday August 13, 2017
DoubleTree Hotel - Windsor Locks, Connecticut
Presentations, Speakers, Resources and Books
available for survivors and their helpers.
https://ritualabuse.us/smart-conference/
Pre-registration preferred
Please e-mail smartnews@aol.com
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
G7
great music for free!
at the
dcr’s hatch shell
Wednesdays at 7pm
July 19-august 23, 2017
For full concert details and a schedule
of neighborhood performances, visit
WWW.LANDMARKSORCHESTRA.ORG
or download our app.
ree for All
Concert Fund
A service of WGBH
Experience Globe.com
PHOTOS BY ARAM BOGHOSIAN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE (LEFT); KEITH BEDFORD/GLOBE STAFF
Beets with stracciatella (left) and rabbit agnolotti at Terra (below), the restaurant on the third floor of Eataly.
Plenty to snack on at Terra
Ask About Our Special
Tax Day Discount
August 12th-14th 2017
uDINING OUT
Continued from Page G1
barely a glance. Sometimes
they shoo you away firmly: Not
even a seat at the bar for you tonight. At the top of the stairs is
an inevitable bottleneck. Wires
get crossed. No, you can’t sit at
the chef ’s counter without a
reservation. Yes, you can sit at
the counter across from the bar.
Or can you? Depends on the
night.
So this part of the operation
could use a little fine-tuning.
Once you’re seated, it no longer
matters. You are in one of Boston’s best-looking new dining
rooms, filled with sweeping
skylights and lush greenery,
and all is abuzz and aflame. Behind the chef ’s counter is a
wood fire, over which staffers
char skewered morsels and substantial chops — grilling as
ringside sport. Behind a glass
wall are towering wine barrels,
pressed into service for Terra’s
intriguing oak-aged beer program. It’s like attending a highachieving kegger inside a very
elegant potting shed.
When it comes to eating local, Eataly finds the middle
way. The store is a showcase for
Italian products, but it also
sources from farms and providers in the area. That’s Terra’s approach when it comes to staffing, too. The chef de cuisine is
Dan Bazzinotti, whom you may
remember from Cambridge’s
BISq. That tiny wine bar made
much of Bazzinotti’s charcuterie; here it appears on the Gran
Tagliere, a board loaded up
with prosciutto, salami, pate,
cheeses, olives, and more, almost too much of a good thing.
There is plenty to snack on
at Terra: bruschette, little toasts
topped with dreamy, creamy
burrata, or with too-heavy gobs
of lardo (cured fatback) rather
than paper-thin slices. Skewers
of mushrooms, pork shoulder,
shrimp: all perfectly tasty. Rice
croquettes crisp-golden on the
outside, green with spring peas
inside; grilled Island Creek oysters. Simple pleasures. The
point-counterpoint of so much
modern cooking — richness offset by bright notes — is here replaced by a steady savoriness.
Of course there is pasta,
moderately sauced and maximally, sometimes excessively, al
dente. (Terra is adamant about
getting Americans to eat pasta
the way Italians do; I wonder
how that is going.) Meat and
fish off the grill can be matched
with sides, and there are large
plates for sharing — a dry-aged
porterhouse for two, a mixed
grill that incorporates every
beast in the barnyard.
Everything is live here: the
beer, the fire. It feels vital, and
also unpredictable. Sometimes
your double-cut, cider-brined
pork chop is hot-damn good,
rosy and infused with smoke.
Sometimes it tastes double-salted and brine-brined, arriving
gray at the center. The accompanying grilled apricots are the
juiciest thing on the plate. Stillman’s Farm chicken, cooked
under a brick, is dry too. Grilling is just as tricky in a restaurant as it is on your back deck.
For every fine-tuned plate of
golden and crimson beets,
served over supple stracciatella,
sprinkled with crushed pistachios and mint, there is an offkey Caprese salad with slithery
roasted tomatoes, too-cold
mozzarella, and flavorless
pesto. Rabbit agnolotti are tend e r, t i ny p a c ke t s l o v i n g l y
swathed in butter from Italian
dairy whisperers Luigi Guffan-
From traditional to contemporary, Hunter
Douglas window fashions enhance the
beauty of any décor. Contact us to explore
the wide variety of fabrics, textures, styles
and colors for your home. Whatever you
select, your rooms are sure to be inviting
for years to come.
Barrows Custom Window Treatments
365 Boylston St
M-F: 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Sat: 10:00 am - 4:00 pm
Sun: Closed
617-964-4580
www.barrowscwt.com
Duette® Architella® honeycomb shades
YY
TERRA
Eataly, 800 Boylston St., Back Bay, Boston, 617­807­7300,
terra.eataly.com
All major credit cards accepted. Wheelchair accessible.
Prices Bruschette $4­$11. Skewers $7­$12. Small plates $11­$17.
Pasta $17­$21. Entrees $23­$55. Sides $6­$9. Dessert $9.
Hours Sun­Thu 5­10 p.m., Fri­Sat 5­11 p.m.
Noise level ’80s radio hits played loud enough to make you
sing along, not so loud you can’t have a conversation.
What to order Burrata bruschette, pork shoulder skewer,
beets with stracciatella, rabbit agnolotti, calamari.
Silhouette® window shadings
Vignette® Modern Roman Shades
MICHAEL LOCCISANO/GETTY IMAGES
High-profile chef Mario
Batali is a partner in Eataly.
ti, but ricotta gnocchi are dense
and gluey. A lovely, fresh spring
dish of ravioli with ricotta, peas,
lemon butter, and mint has given way to summer’s less-good
version, with smoked corn and
chanterelles and an odd roasted
onion flavor reminiscent of
soup mix. Rigatoni with a ragu
of pork and veal reminds us
that sometimes basic building
blocks are enough; spaghetti
with smoked tomato calls out
for much more (any smoked flavor at all would be a great
start).
When it comes to dessert,
simplicity is all to the good —
whether it’s cylinders of barely
sweet walnut-bread crisps, like
Melba toast but airy, wrapped
around a creamy, honey-scented filling, or doughnut-esque
bomboloni rolled in sugar,
grilled rhubarb at their centers.
(The dessert menu has since
been updated.)
Some of Terra’s dishes are
successful time after time: I’d
be hard-pressed not to order
the tender calamari in tomato
broth with caper berries, olives,
pine nuts, and currants, its
smack of salt and sweet a direct
line to Sicily. Other dishes are
successful enough. What is consistent here is the energy, the
ebullience. No one wears orange Crocs because they are
tasteful. When we come to Terra to eat, it is the flavor of Eataly we are after.
©2017 Hunter Douglas. All rights reserved. All trademarks
used herein are the property of Hunter Douglas or their
respective owners. 5688586
A BURGER & BARTENDER BATTLE
CAMBRIDGE’S NEWEST
SUMMER FOOD FESTIVAL
TICKETS @ CHARBARWARS.EVENTBRITE.COM
WEDNESDAY AUGUST 2ND • 5-8 P.M.
UNIVERSITY PARK • 50 LANDSDOWNE STREET
Devra First can be reached at
dfirst@globe.com. Follow her
on Twitter @devrafirst.
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G8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
DILBERT by Scott Adams
RED & ROVER by Brian Basset
BLISS by Harry Bliss
“There was no getting around Lori’s book club. John
was trapped upstairs ... no food ... no beer.”
CURTIS by Ray Billingsley
MISTER BOFFO by Joe Martin
DOONESBURY by Garry Trudeau
GET FUZZY by Darby Conley
BIZARRO by Dan Piraro
Today’s Sudoku Solution
6
9
4
5
7
8
3
2
1
5
3
2
6
1
9
7
8
4
Today’s Calcudoku Solution
8
1
7
4
3
2
6
5
9
ROSE IS ROSE by Pat Brady & Don Wimmer
4
7
6
2
5
3
9
1
8
ARLO & JANIS by Jimmy Johnson
1
5
3
8
9
7
2
4
6
RHYMES WITH ORANGE by Hilary Price
2
8
9
1
4
6
5
3
7
JUMPSTART by Robb Armstrong
3
6
5
7
8
1
4
9
2
ARCTIC CIRCLE by Alex Hallatt
7
4
8
9
2
5
1
6
3
POOCH CAFE by Paul Gilligan
9
2
1
3
6
4
8
7
5
ADAM@HOME by Rob Harrell
Today’s Crossword Solution
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
G9
ZIPPY “Deflation Situation” by Bill Griffith
THE PAJAMA DIARIES by Terri Libenson
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE by Lynn Johnston
NON SEQUITUR by Wiley
DUSTIN by Steve Kelley & Jeff Parker
PLUGGERS by Gary Brookins
ZITS by Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
For a plugger, a twice-baked potato is one that didn’t
get eaten the night before.
SUDOKU
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM by Mike Peters
Fill in the grid so
that every row,
every column, and
every 3x3 box
contains the digits 1
through 9. Puzzle
difficulty levels:
Easy on Monday and
Tuesday, more
difficult on
Wednesday and
Thursday, most
difficult on Friday
and Saturday. Tips
and computer
program at
www.sudoku.com.
7
1
3
3
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
OUT OF MILK BY TIMOTHY E. PARKER
ACROSS
1 Ownership
document
5 Business abbr.
9 Plane divider
14 Legendary first
name in jazz
15 Provided by
mouth
16 Go shade
17 Hacked ATMs on
dairy farms?
20 Japanese and
Chinese, e.g.
21 Breakfast staple
22 Not tall
23 Part of NASCAR
25 Boise’s st.
28 Have some
21-Across
29 Long shooter
31 1998 De Niro film
33 Wild,
as an animal
34 Provide a makeup
exam for
35 Vaporized sort?
38 B vitamin type
39 Heavy fishhooks
40 Bearing weapons
41 High IQ group
42 Lap dog, for short
45 Prefix meaning
“new”
46 Scottish girl
47 Friend of Aunt Bee
in Mayberry
49 Moved like goo?
52 Word with “water”
or “ring”
53 Sterilized sheet
material?
57 Narrow mountain
ridge
58 La Scala solo
59 Feeling of comfort
60 Mexican coins
61 They’re fleeced
without shears
62 Backyard building
DOWN
1 Corrupt
2 Elevator innovator’s
first name
3 “Mama” Cass
4 Senegal’s capital
5 Joint tenants?
6 Alternative
to .com or .net
7 Father on a farm
8 River in Nebraska
9 Muslim title for
some bigwigs
10 State flower of
Tennessee
11 Watchman
12 Bruce or Brenda
13 Canadian couple?
18 Fearless
19 Pigeon sound
23 From a distance
24 Less-than-full
amounts for
containers
26 Vertebrate unit
27 Insect aardvarks
love
30 De-wrinkle clothes
31 Obviously
ashamed
32 2-Down’s last
name
33 Confront
34 Providers of
time-outs, briefly
35 Emerald Isle by
another name
36 Scrams
37 Browns via
the sun
38 Bert’s sister of
literature
41 Strong, fine-textured
cotton fabric
42 Social outcast
43 “Do what I say, ___!”
44 Graded, as school
papers
46 Romanian currency
48 Uses high-tech
surgery beams
50 Director Preminger
51 Last letters
52 Actress Arthur and
others
53 Soft baby food
54 “Ready when you ___!”
55 Keogh kin,
in savings
56 Pep
6 8
7 1
9 3
7
2
8
3
6
4
2 9
1 5
9 3
6
9
7
1
T h e
G10
B o s t o n
G l o b e
ASK AMY
TV CRITIC’S CORNER
BY MICHAEL ANDOR BRODEUR
Bipolar adult wants mom to apologize
PETER YANG/COMEDY CENTRAL
James Davis hosts “Hood Adjacent” on Comedy Central.
Is Davis the heir to Chappelle?
That’s the wrong question.
“11 years later and Comedy Central is STILL trying to replace
the Chappelle Show LOL!”
Ugh, shut up random YouTube commenter. This is but one of
many predictable responses to “Hood Adjacent With James Davis,”
Comedy Central’s new half-hour platform for the LA-based comedian and writer. To some extent, any show that blends stand-up,
sketch comedy, and field snark to explore issues specific to black
life in America is going to do its thing in the shadow of Chappelle.
But shadows being shadows, they shift as time goes by. Meaning
give the dude some time, dude.
Right now, all signs point to Davis just getting started. The
thrust behind his humor (as well as the show’s name) comes from
Davis’s upbringing in South Central LA — “just not the dangerous
part.”
This ambient awareness of two distinct realities, neither of
which he completely blends into, makes Davis a proficient and
“culturally bilingual” interpreter — he cut his teeth for Comedy
Central on the network’s Snapchat decrypting bits of slang (e.g.
meeking, woes, fetty, thot) for wider/whiter audiences — able to
blur incisive commentary into inventive comedy.
So far, he’s moderated a lively debate “Between Two DeRays”
(DeRay Mckesson and DeRay Davis) on the merits of college —
specifically a course on lobsters the former took at Bowdoin. He’s
customized a black teenager’s car to be more discrimination-proof
(cameras, ski rack, white lady in passenger seat). He’s investigated
Black Twitter’s affinity for sidechick/-dude humor (especially via
Kermit the Frog). He’s taken two friends to secure their “hood
passes,” and nearly gets his show handed to him. And on Wednesday at 9 p.m., he takes on gangs. Meaning he talks to them. I hope.
Will Davis prove heir apparent to Chappelle’s weighty legacy on
Comedy Central? Maybe, maybe not. It really doesn’t matter. Just
as “Chappelle’s Show” was necessary to its time, “Hood Adjacent”
feels charged with the same essential energy. If he can just make
two seasons out of one, he might make one audience out of two.
Q. When I was 31, I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. I started having symptoms
when I was 11. It took me years to seek
help, even after my dad was diagnosed
when I was in my mid-20s.
I told my mom a few times that I
thought that I had the illness. I was hoping she would help me seek treatment,
since I was so afraid of the stigma, but also
after having an acute episode, I would feel
better and convince myself that nothing
was wrong.
Every time, my mother told me that she
didn’t think anything was wrong with me,
even when I confessed that I was contemplating suicide.
Finally, I sought help on my own. Medication and therapy have helped me tremendously, and my mom has been supportive now that she has witnessed one of
my manic episodes and realized that I really do need help.
I still harbor resentment toward her for
not encouraging me to seek treatment earlier. I realize that I am an adult and ultimately responsible for myself.
I want to forgive her, but I want her to
apologize.
Am I wrong for wanting that? I bring
up my illness with her more often than I
should in the hopes that it will spur some
remorse. I want recognition that I had to
struggle with this, while she denied anything was wrong.
I would hate to damage our otherwise
good relationship.
WAITING FOR SORRY
A. Your narrative brings to mind the famous quote from Maya Angelou: “I did
then what I knew how to do. Now that I
Recent bird sightings on Cape Cod (as
of July 18) as reported to the Massachusetts Audubon Society.
An adult brown booby was photographed off Herring Cove in Provincetown. Two little gulls, 120 Wilson’s
storm-petrels, 3 black terns, 4 Arctic
terns, and 8 black-legged kittiwakes were
also reported.
The bar-tailed godwit at Tern Island
in Chatham was reported recently. Other
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HD TV-14
Law & Order (CC):
A crane collapses.
Law & Order (CC): A Law & Order (CC)
tourist is murdered. HD TV-14-D
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Fam. Guy Fam. Guy 'Harry': Harry
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HD TV-14-LV
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FOX Feud
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Live. HD TV-14-DL
Criminal Minds
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F. Feud
Modern
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64
Cinemax
MasterChef (CC)
HD TV-14-L NEW
J Kimmel
J Fallon
NEW
Great Race (CC) HD NOVA (CC): Wildlife Charlie Rose (CC)
TV-PG NEW
corridors. HD TV-PG HD TV-G NEW
12
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Pawn
Stars
(11:05)
Seinfeld
Wings
Pawn
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become rivals in Victorian-era London. HD TV-PG
thief ponders a last heist. HD R
★★★ Election (1999): Teacher fixes an
Triple 9
(5:45) ★★ Primal
(9:45) ★★★ Dazed/Confused
Fear TV-14-DLSV
election for class president. HD R
(CC): Classmates are followed. (CC) NR
Showtime
Showtime 2
Vice
News
Keeping Up With the Joneses (2016) (CC): (9:45) Game of
A couple deal with spy antics. HD PG-13 Thrones HD TV-MA
(10:50) Game of
Thrones HD TV-MA
Power: Tensions
(10:01) ★★ Patriot Games (1992) (CC):
run high. HD TV-MA Jack Ryan is targeted by a terrorist. R
Meet the Browns: A Chicago single mom (9:45) ★★ Down to Earth (CC): Your
meets offbeat relatives in Georgia. PG-13 A black comic is reincarnated. Caddy?
Starz!
(7:01) Passengers (2016) (CC): Duo
awaken on a spaceship. HD PG-13
TMC
(6:10) Pelé: Biopic
of soccer star Pelé.
SPORTS
Boston Sports Tonight (CC) Live. HD
Comcast
SportsNet
(6:00) Early Edition
(CC) Live. HD
Felger & Quick
Mazz HD Slants
ESPN
SportsCenter (CC)
Live. HD
MLB Baseball (CC): Chicago Cubs at Chicago White Sox. From
Guaranteed Rate Field. Live. HD
ESPN Classic
(6:00) NBA Classics Classic College Football (CC): 2002: North Classic College Football (CC): Virginia
(CC)
Carolina at Florida State.
Tech at Miami from 2002.
ESPN 2
Coll.
Football
Golf
NBCSN
NESN
Academy Learning Ins. PGA Golf's Greatest: 2007: PGA Championship. NEW
Ninja Warrior TV-PG Ninja Warrior TV-PG Ninja Warrior TV-PG Ninja Warrior TV-PG
Red Sox Face-Off MLB Baseball (CC) Taped. HD
Sports
Face-Off
FAMILY
Gumball Gumball King/Hill Am. Dad Cl/Show Am. Dad Burgers Burgers
K.C. Un. K.C. Un.
K.C. Un. Bizaard. Descendants 2 (2017) (CC): Mal returns
to the Isle of the Lost. HD TV-G
Cartoon
Disney
Freeform
Nickelodeon
Noggin
SCenter
ICC
Soccer
International Champions Cup Soccer (CC) ICC Soccer (CC): Paris Saint30 for 30 SCenter
Barcelona-Manchester United. Live. HD
Germain vs. Juventus. Live. HD HD TV-14
(6:20) ★★ Sandlot (CC): A boy
joins a baseball team. TV-PG-L
Henry D. Thunder Thunder
Rusty R. Blaze
Bubble
Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory (1971) (CC):
Kids win a tour of a candy factory. HD TV-G
Nicky
Bubble
News
10:00pm 10:30pm 11:00pm 11:30pm
NOVA (CC): Wildlife Charlie Rose (CC)
corridors. HD TV-PG HD TV-G NEW
Criminal Minds
News
Late Sh.
(CC) HD TV-14-DLV
NEW
6 WLNE ABC Insider
7
WHDH News
(CC) HD
News
(CC)
know better, I do better.”
Parenting sometimes seems like a long
string of opportunities to fail, and your
mother failed you. I can think of several
reasons why she didn’t seek help for you
earlier, including ignorance, denial, stigma, or flat-out fear. All of these reasons
will seem like excuses at this point, however, and now you are owed an acknowledgment and apology.
Rather than bringing up your illness
and being continually disappointed when
she doesn’t take the bait, I hope you will
ask your mother for what you want:
“Mom, it would help me a lot if you would
explain to me why you didn’t help me seek
treatment earlier. I need an acknowledgment.”
If you don’t get what you seek, you will
have to do the hard work of accepting your
mother, despite her own failings. Forgiveness should follow.
Q. My husband passed away last fall. Because grandchildren were in college, we
buried him just after Christmas.
Our daughter and her husband came
from Texas. Other siblings brought their
families from other parts of the country.
This summer we had a memorial
brunch and celebration of their father’s
life. Our Texas daughter refused to come
to this event because she was working 60
to 70 hours a week at a new job.
I wrote her a letter saying she owed it
to the family to appear. She says I’m not
being compassionate toward her for expecting this.
It has now been almost three months
that she has not answered my phone calls
or e-mails. I need suggestions on how to
deal with this.
GRIEVING
A. I’m sorry for this loss to your family. I
assume that your daughter is grieving,
too. Many people don’t respond well when
someone issues a basic demand that they
“owe” it to others to appear.
You don’t say why you didn’t hold a life
celebration when the entire family was
gathered at Christmastime, but I wonder
if there are reasons your daughter feels
you accommodated others, but not her.
The tone of your communication at this
point should shift from blame to reconciliation. It is vital after a death in the family
that everyone should do their best to be
gentle with one another. Gentleness from
you should inspire the same from her.
Q. Let me add my voice to others who objected to your response to “There’s No
Place Like (the Beach) Home,” whose sister had purchased the family’s vacation
house and now wanted to charge rent for
visits. You thought this request for rent
was a bit much. I disagree.
DISSATISFIED
A. As I said in my response, many families
find ways to successfully share expenses
for a family vacation house. This house
was not a shared house, but had been purchased by an individual. I think welcoming family back for a short summertime
visit should be an act of generosity —
many readers disagree.
Amy Dickinson can be reached at
askamy@amydickinson.com.
BIRD SIGHTINGS
Wednesday July 26, 2017
2
W E D N E S D A Y, J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7
Ins. PGA Central
Ninja Warrior TV-PG
Sports
Course
Fam. Guy Fam. Guy
Bunk'd
Jessie
HD TV-G HD TV-G
The 700 Club (CC)
TV-G
HD
F. House F. House F. House F. House Friends
Peppa
Peppa
Paw P.
Paw P.
Blaze
Friends
Umizoomi
birds reported from the island included a
whimbrel, a Hudsonian godwit, 20 red
knots, and a parasitic jaeger.
Possible south polar skuas were reported from Stellwagen Bank and the
waters east of Chatham.
A royal tern, 3 black terns, 16 Forster’s terns, a little gull, and a black headed
gull were among the sightings at Gray’s
Beach and Chapin Beach in Dennis.
Other sightings around the Cape included a continuing blue grosbeak at the
Crane Wildlife Management Area in Falmouth, 6 black skimmers, including two
newly hatched chicks, at South Monomoy in Chatham, a black vulture in West
Barnstable, and a rose-breasted grosbeak
in Orleans.
For more information about bird
sightings or to report sightings, call
the Massachusetts Audubon Society
at 781-259-8805 or go to
www.massaudubon.org.
Specials
7:00pm
7:30pm
A&E
Storage
Wars
Storage
Wars
AMC
(5:00) ★★★
Tombstone
Powered by
8:00pm
8:30pm
Storage
Wars
BASIC CABLE
Storage Storage Storage
Wars
NEW
NEW
9:00pm
9:30pm
10:00pm 10:30pm 11:00pm 11:30pm
Storage
NEW
Storage
NEW
Storage
Wars
Storage
Wars
★★★★ Goodfellas (1990): Study of New York mob life charting ★★★★ Departed
the true-life rise and fall of Henry Hill. HD TV-14-LV
(2006) TV-14-DLSV
Animal Planet Lone Star Law (CC) Lone Star Law (CC) Lone Star Law (CC) Lone Star Law (CC) Lone Star Law: A
HD TV-14
HD TV-14 NEW
HD TV-14 NEW
HD TV-14 NEW
robotic deer decoy.
BBC America
BET
(6:30) ★★ Patriot (2000): Farmer turns fighter in 1776. TV-14-V Broadchurch NEW
(5:00) ★★★ Hustle ★★★ Training Day (2001) (CC): A corrupt undercover cop
& Flow
tutors a rookie. Denzel Washington. HD TV-14-DLV
Bravo
Real Housewives of Housewives/NYC
NYC (CC) HD TV-14 HD TV-14 NEW
CMT
CNN
Comedy
Central
Last Man Last Man
OutFront HD NEW
Futurama South
Park
CSPAN
CSPAN 2
Dest. America
Discovery
DIY
E!
Fit & Health
Food
US House of Representatives Live.
Politics and Public Policy Today
U.S. Senate Live.
Public Affairs Events
UFOs/Untold St.
UFOs: Uncover.
UFOs: Uncover.
UFOs: Uncover.
Bride of Jaws
Great TV-PG NEW
Lost Cage NEW
Devil Sharks NEW
Backyard Backyard Amazing Amazing Amazing Amazing Amazing Amazing
E! News NEW
Hollywood Med.
Hwd/Med. NEW
Hollywood Med.
Mystery Diagnosis Mystery Diagnosis Mystery Diagnosis Mystery Diagnosis
To Be Announced
Chopped (CC) HD
To Be Announced
Cooks vs. Cons HD
TV-G
TV-G NEW
HD TV-G
HD TV-G
Fox Movies
Fox News
FUSE
FX
Hallmark
Home &
Garden
(5:00) This Is 40
(7:45) Aloha (2015) (CC) TV-14-DL
MacCallum NEW
Carlson NEW
Five (CC) HD NEW
Moesha Moesha Sister
Sister
Sister
Sister
Colomb. Gambler: Prof has a gambling problem. TV-MA-LV
Last Man Last Man Last Man Last Man Middle
Middle
Property Brothers
Property Brothers
Property Bros. (CC)
(CC) HD TV-G
(CC) HD TV-G
HD TV-G NEW
(9:55) Aloha (2015) (CC) TV-14-DL
Hannity HD NEW
Tucker Carlson HD
Moesha Moesha Moesha Moesha
Snowfall NEW
(11:04) Snowfall
Middle
Middle
G. Girls
G. Girls
House H. House
Listed Sisters (CC)
NEW
NEW
HD TV-G NEW
History
American Pickers
(CC) HD TV-PG
American Pickers
(CC) HD TV-PG
HD
Amer. Pickers (CC)
TV-PG NEW
(10:09) American
Pickers HD TV-PG
(11:08) American
Pickers HD TV-PG
HLN
HSN
ID
Forensic Forensic
Connected Life
Homicide Hunter
(CC) HD TV-14-LV
Primetime Justice
Connected Life
Homicide Hunter
(CC) HD TV-14-LV
Forensic Forensic
Outdoor Sol. TV-G
Perfect Murder HD
TV-14-DLV NEW
Forensic Forensic
Clever Solution
Murder/Numbers
(CC) HD NEW
Forensic Forensic
Health/Fitness TV-G
Homicide Hunter
(CC) HD TV-14-LV
IFC
(6:00) ★★ First
Blood TV-MA-LV
★★ Rambo: First Blood Part II (1985) (CC): A soldier (10:15) ★★ Rambo III (1988):
searches for POWs. HD TV-MA-LSV
The GI goes to Afghanistan.
Lifetime
LMN
MSNBC
MTV
National
Geographic
Little Women: LA
A Wife's Suspicion
Hardball HD NEW
Friends
Friends
Shark Swarm: Large
shark gatherings.
Little Women: LA
LittleW. NEW
A Neighbor: A woman accepts an offer.
All In/Hayes NEW
Maddow NEW
Catfish/TV Show
Catfish/TV Show
Drugs Inc.: A potent Drugs Inc.: Drug
strain of marijuana. use in Nashville.
NatGeoWild
NECN
Ovation
OWN
When Sharks Attack World's NEW
Shocking Sharks
Blitzkrieg (2016) HD World's HD TV-14
The Take Business The Take Business necn News 9PM
necn News 10Pm
necn News 11PM
★★★ Lethal Weapon 2: Cops battle a drug cartel.
★★ Young Guns: Cowhands are deputized. TV-14
Queen Sugar (CC)
Queen Sugar: Davis Queen Sugar (CC)
Queen Sugar (CC)
Queen Sugar: Davis
HD TV-14-L
meets a singer.
HD TV-14-L
HD TV-14-L NEW
meets a singer.
Oxygen
QVC
Science
Spike
Sundance
CSI: Crime TV-PG
CSI: Crime TV-PG
CSI: Crime TV-PG
CSI: Crime TV-PG
CSI: Crime TV-PG
In the Kitchen With David - PM Edition (CC) Live. HD
philosophy—beauty (CC) Live. HD TV-G
BattleBots on TV-PG BattleBots on TV-PG Outrag. NEW
BattleBots on NEW BattleBots on
Crashers ★★ The Longest Yard: Cons vs. guards in football. TV-14-DLV ★★ Longest Yard TV-14-DLV
S/
The Town (2010) (CC): A bank robber falls in love
Cleverman (CC) TV- (11:05) The Town
Redem. with woman his gang took hostage. TV-14-LSV
14-LSV NEW
(2010) TV-14-LSV
Syfy
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
Travel
TruTV
TV Land
TV One
USA
(5:56) Reign Of Fire
Seinfeld People
Kim Novak: Live
Outdaughtered
Bones TV-14-DLV
Expedition Unk.
Carbon. Carbon.
M*A*S*H M*A*S*H
Cosby
Cosby
Law & Order SVU
(CC) HD TV-14-LV
VH-1
WAM
WE
Black Ink Crew
Black NEW
Signed NEW
Black Ink Crew
Love & Hip Hop
(7:07) ★ Gordy (1995) HD
(8:39) ★★ Cheaper/Dozen 2
(10:14) ★★ Last Legion (2007) (CC) HD
Law & Order TV-PG ★★ Failure/Launch: Man won't move out. ★★ Failure/Launch: Man won't move out.
Housewives/NYC
TV-14 NEW
HD
(11:05) ★★ Patriot
Martin
Doc
TV-PG
Martin
Odd Mom Odd
Watch
NEW
Mom Out NEW
★★★ Enemy of State: A lawyer battles corrupt Feds. TV-14-LV
Anderson Cooper
Anderson Cooper
CNN Tonight Live.
South
South
Hood
South
South
South
Park
Park
NEW
Park
Park
Park
Real H.
Enemy of the State
CNN Tonight Live.
Daily
midnight
NEW
NEW
UFOs: Uncover.
Shark/AD Lost
Rehab
Rehab
E! News NEW
Mystery Diagnosis
Cooks vs. Cons HD
TV-G
So Sharp NEW
Little Women: LA
Bad Sister (2016) (CC) HD TV-14-DS
Last Word NEW
11th Hr NEW
Catfish NEW
Catfish/TV Show
Drugs Inc. (CC):
Drugs Inc.: A look at
Drug side effects.
hashish. TV-14-D
(7:58) G.I. Joe: Retal (2013) HD TV-PG
Blood Drive NEW
Midnight, Texas
Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Full Fr.
Conan TV-14-DLV
★★★★ Vertigo (CC): An acrophobic tails a woman. ★★★★ North by Northwest
I Am Jazz NEW
I Am Jazz NEW
Hair Goddess NEW (11:06) I Am Jazz
Expendables (2010): Mercenaries fight a CIA agent. (10:16) The Expendables 2
Expedition Unk.
Expedit. NEW
Expedition Unk.
Expedition Unk.
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Sorry
I'm Sorry Jokers
Jokers
M*A*S*H Raymond Raymond Raymond Younger Raymond King/Qu. King/Qu.
Fatal Attraction
Fatal Attraction
For My Man
Empire TV-14-DLSV
Law & Order SVU
Suits (CC) HD TV-14 (10:01) Law & Order (11:01) Law &
(CC) HD TV-14-DLV NEW
SVU (CC) HD TV-14 Order: Sp HD TV-14
Content Ratings: TV-Y Appropriate for all children; TV-Y7 For children age 7 and older; TV-G General audience; TV-PG Parental guidance suggested; TV-14 May be unsuitable for children under 14;
TV-MA Mature audience only Additional symbols: D Suggestive dialogue; FV Fantasy violence; L Strong language; S Sexual activity; V Violence; HD High-Definition; (CC) Close-Captioned
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