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The Boston Globe July 27 2017

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Th u r s d a y, Ju l y 2 7, 2 0 17
Trump
reverses
military
policy
So, about that drive into Boston . . .
During repairs to Comm. Ave. Bridge, drivers
will need luck and some creative navigation
By Adam Vaccaro
GLOBE STAFF
Think you can avoid the construction
disruption that will soon hit the Massachusetts Turnpike? Well, so does everyone else — and we’re all likely to just
move the traffic nightmare from one
road to the next.
Transportation officials expect to see
more cars spill over to Route 2, Storrow
Drive, and Memorial Drive as Interstate
90 is reduced to two lanes of traffic each
way through Boston while workers rebuild the Commonwealth Avenue
Bridge overhead.
The road closures begin Thursday
when the BU Bridge to Cambridge and a
long stretch of Commonwealth Avenue
west of Kenmore Square are closed off to
most passenger and commercial vehicles. The Mass. Pike will be reduced to a
maximum of two lanes eastbound and
two lanes westbound starting Friday
night.
The shutdowns are likely to create a
further ripple effect across roads as everyone tries to shift to another route.
“There’s only so many ways to get in
and out of Boston from an east-to-west
standpoint. You’ve got the river roads,
Route 2, and the turnpike,” said Jonathan Gulliver, the state’s acting highway
administrator. “That’s what made this
project so difficult, is that there are very
limited options.”
TRAFFIC, Page A9
Constructed in 1965, the Commonwealth Avenue overpass bridge
deck is being replaced starting this week. The construction work will
be done during two, intense stages. The sequence:
90
COMMONWEA
LTH AVE.
Bridge
deck
Westbound
Green Line
Commuter Rail
Eastbound
Eas
tbo
50 ft.
STEP 1 JULY 26 TO AUG. 14
un
d
We
stb
ou
nd
STEP 2 SUMMER 2018
Westbound lane section of the
Commonwealth Avenue bridge
is replaced.
The Green Line B branch tracks,
the eastbound lanes of the
Commonwealth Avenue Bridge, and
commuter rail segment are replaced.
In tweet, he says
transgender people
will not be allowed
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis
and Helene Cooper
NEW YORK TIMES
‘The way various sounds of nature can combine and become synched can be one of the
greatest 20th­century musical pieces you have ever heard.’
STEVE WILKES, Berklee College of Music professor
A SOUND APPROACH TO HIKING
WASHINGTON — President Trump
abruptly announced a ban on transgender people serving in the military on
Wednesday, blindsiding his defense secretary and Republican congressional
leaders with a snap decision that reversed a year-old policy reviled by social
conservatives.
Trump made the surprise declaration on Twitter, saying that US forces
could not afford the “tremendous medical costs and disruption” of transgender
service members. He said he had consulted generals and military experts, but
Jim Mattis, the defense secretary, was
given only a day’s notice about the decision.
Trump elected to announce the ban
in order to resolve a quietly brewing
fight on Capitol Hill over whether taxpayer money should pay for gender
transition and hormone therapy for
transgender service members, which
had threatened to kill a $790 billion defense and security spending package
slated for a vote this week.
But rather than addressing that narTRANSGENDER, Page A8
Republicans
founder on
health votes
May instead push a
slimmer Obamacare
By Astead W. Herndon
GLOBE STAFF
their classroom performance.
For many advocates, the issue
boils down to a simple question: How
can you expect students to learn complex concepts in math, science, and
other subjects when they don’t even
yet know how to speak, read, or understand English?
The Senate is scheduled to vote on
WASHINGTON — Senate Republicans failed in another attempt to overturn the Affordable Care Act Wednesday, forcing them to next consider modestly scaling back the law rather than
the outright repeal they have long
promised.
Wednesday’s defeat made it increasingly likely that Republicans will fall
short of keeping their seven-year-long
promise to repeal Barack Obama’s signature health law and that large portions of it will remain in place, at least
for now. Repealing the law was the central domestic policy promise of President Trump’s campaign, but it appears
to be in trouble even though Republicans control the White House and both
houses of Congress.
The latest attempt would have eliminated the entire Affordable Care Act in
two years. Seven Republicans, however,
bucked leadership and refused to sup-
BILINGUAL, Page A7
HEALTH LAW, Page A8
JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF
Berklee professor Steve Wilkes, this year’s White Mountain National Forest Artist-in-Residence, recorded the sounds of the White
Mountains on the peak of Mt. Israel in Sandwich, N.H. Wilkes is spending three weeks in the forest, capturing all the sounds he
can — birds, creeks, people — to create an “aural map” of the New England landscape. B3.
Legislators hope to undo English­only education law
Critics say measure voters OK’d in 2002
is holding back many immigrant students
By James Vaznis
GLOBE STAFF
Fifteen years after Massachusetts
voters pushed bilingual education out
of most public schools, lawmakers
are on the verge of allowing school
systems to teach students academic
subjects in their own languages if
they’re not yet fluent in English.
The changes could affect more
than 90,000 Massachusetts students
classified as “English language learn-
Teens say TD Garden owners owe $13.8m
In the news
Chris Sale pitched seven
scoreless innings, and rookie
Rafael Devers was 2 for 4, including a home run, as the
Red Sox beat the Mariners
4-0. C1.
President Trump renewed his
attacks on Attorney General
Jeff Sessions, questioning on
Twitter why Sessions had not
replaced the acting FBI director. A2.
VOL . 292, NO. 27
*
Suggested retail price
$2.00
ers,” a steadily growing portion that
now represents nearly 10 percent of
the state’s public-school enrollment.
Lawmakers are responding to
growing calls from educators, parents, students, and immigrant-rights
advocates who argue that the requirement voters approved in 2002 to
teach all academic classes to non-native speakers in English is harming
By Milton J. Valencia
GLOBE STAFF
Vacation weak
Thursday: Clouds and sun.
High: 74-79. Low: 63-68.
Friday: More clouds than sun.
High: 76-81. Low: 61-66.
Sunrise: 5:32 Sunset: 8:09
Complete report, B15
The Taliban routed an Afghan
army outpost, killing dozens
of soldiers and raising fears of
a concerted insurgent offensive. A4.
Longtime Republican operative Beth Lindstrom said she
is considering a challenge to
Senator Elizabeth Warren. B1.
The group of teenagers who exposed TD Garden’s failure to comply with a 1993 state mandate
to raise funds for city recreation centers has calculated the organization’s obligation — and it’s a
whopping figure.
$13.8 million.
The teens say that amount would help pay for
a new ice skating rink in their neighborhood.
They held a press conference Wednesday to make
their case and take credit for their sleuthing.
“Since when is ignorance of the law an excuse
not to follow the law?” asked Lorrie Pearson, 17,
a member of the Hyde Square Task Force, surrounded by dozens of teens and mentors at the
press conference in Jamaica Plain.
She added, “We as teens have not been respected . . . we feel that we are doing the state of
Massachusetts a huge favor, but we are being
treated as third-class citizens by TD Garden and
state representatives.”
TD GARDEN, Page A12
KEITH BEDFORD/GLOBE STAFF
Edelind Peguero spoke at the Hyde Square Task Force news conference.
T h e
A2
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
The Nation
Trump renews his Twitter attacks on Sessions
Questions why
he didn’t replace
acting FBI head
By Matt Zapotosky
and Devlin Barrett
WASHINGTON POST
WASHINGTON — President
Trump renewed his attacks on
Attorney General Jeff Sessions
on Wednesday, questioning on
Twitter why the top US law enforcement official had not replaced the acting FBI director
— a move that Trump himself
has the authority to do.
In two tweets just before 10
a . m ., Tr u m p w r o t e : ‘ ‘ W h y
didn’t A.G. Sessions replace
Acting FBI Director Andrew
McCabe, a Comey friend who
was in charge of Clinton investigation but got big dollars
($700,000) for his wife’s political run from Hillary Clinton
and her representatives. Drain
the Swamp!’’
Trump has for days been attacking his attorney general,
and he has similarly been critical of McCabe, who took over as
the acting director of the FBI
after Trump fired James Comey. But the president’s latest attack is curious.
Sessions was not the attorney general during the FBI’s investigation into Hillary Clinton’s use of a private e-mail
server. And the president himself could remove Mc Cabe
without Sessions. Administration officials actually contemplated doing so after Comey’s
firing. Sessions and Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein met with four other candidates to lead the FBI on an interim basis, though the
administration ultimately stuck
with McCabe.
The others who interviewed
were Michael Anderson, the
special agent in charge of the
FBI’s Chicago division; Adam
Lee, the special agent in charge
of the FBI’s Richmond division;
Paul Abbate, the executive assistant director of the FBI’s
Criminal, Cyber, Response and
Services Branch; and William
‘Evanina, the national counterintelligence executive in the Office of the Director of National
Intelligence.
Asked during the White
House news briefing Wednesday why Trump hadn’t simply
removed McCabe himself, press
secretar y Sarah Huckabee
Sanders noted that he had
nominated Christopher A.
Wray, a white-collar defense
lawyer who had previously led
the Justice Department’s criminal division, to take the permanent FBI director job. She said
Trump was ‘‘looking forward to
getting him confirmed soon.’’
A Justice Depar tment
spokeswoman declined to comment. The FBI also declined to
comment.
In recent days, Trump has
talked with advisers about replacing Sessions as his attorney
general, and he has simultaneously criticized him in public.
He has called Sessions ‘‘very
weak’’ on investigating Hillary
Clinton’s ‘‘crimes’’ and claimed
he had not aggressively hunted
those who have leaked intelligence secrets since he has been
in office.
At a news conference Tuesday, he said he was ‘‘disappoint-
‘You can be
disappointed in
someone but still
want them to
continue to do
their job.’
SARAH HUCKABEE
SANDERS
On Trump criticism of Sessions
ed’’ in Sessions and declined to
say exactly what his future was.
‘‘We will see what happens,’’
Trump said. ‘‘Time will well.
Time will tell.’’
Sanders said Wednesday
that Trump was ‘‘disappointed’’
in Sessions, though she hinted
that didn’t necessarily mean he
would be ousted.
‘‘You can be disappointed in
someone but still want them to
continue to do their job,’’ Sanders said.
Sanders also seemed to reject the notion that Sessions
could redeem himself by, for example, launching a leak investigation.
‘‘I don’t think that’s the nature of the relationship,’’ Sanders said.
Officials have said Sessions
is due to announce in coming
days a number of criminal leak
investigations based on news
accounts of sensitive intelligence information. Sanders
said she did not believe the
president and Sessions had
spoken this week, though Sessions had been at the White
House for a principals committee meeting.
Congressional Republicans
have come to the defense of
Sessions, publicly urging
Trump to back off his criticism
of the attorney general.
In a brief interview Wednesday Senate Majority Leader
Mitch McConnell, a Kentucky
Republican, reiterated his public support for Sessions, which
came Tuesday when McConnell
praised Sessions’ job performance and voiced support for
the attorney general’s recusal of
the Russian investigation.
McConnell declined to say if
he directly raised the issue with
Trump, but made clear that he
has voiced that support for Sessions to high-level officials.
‘‘I’ve conveyed that to the
public and to others,’’ McConnell said.
A person familiar with internal White House discussions
about Sessions said Trump’s attacks on Sessions are a public
airing of what the president has
been saying for months privately — that he blames Sessions’s
recusal for the appointment of
a special counsel to investigate
possible ties to Russia.
Sessions has shown no indication of stepping aside voluntarily.
Daily Briefing
LEAD
A HORSE
TO WATER
Chincoteague
ponies made
their way to
shore during the
92nd annual
Chincoteague
Pony Swim in
eastern Virginia
on Wednesday.
During the fourminute swim,
about 100 wild
ponies went
across the
Assateague
Channel onto
Chincoteague
Island. They
were ferried
across by the
“Saltwater
Cowboys” hired
by the National
Parks Service for
the swim.
ALLISON HESS/THE VIRGINIAN-PILOT VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS
W.Va. pipeline stopped over violations
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. —
State environmental authorities have ordered a halt to Rover Pipeline construction in
places where it found permit
violations damaging streams
in northern West Virginia.
After inspectors in April,
May, June, and July found erosion-control failures that left
sediment deposits in creeks
and streams, the Department
of Environmental Protection
ordered Rover Pipeline LLC in
a July 17 letter to ‘‘immediately cease and desist any further
land development activity’’ until it complies. The DEP ordered Rover to provide a plan
within 20 days for installing
and maintaining needed
storm water and erosion controls.
In its February approval,
the department wrote that the
project includes 172 stream
crossings in West Virginia. It
specifically prohibits dumping
‘‘spoil materials from the watercourse or onshore operations, including sludge deposits,’’ into watercourses or wetlands or anywhere it will harm
surface or ground waters.
Parent company Energy
Transfer Partners said
Wednesday that construction
continues on two West Virginia segments in Hancock and
Marshall counties, while it
works with the DEP to resolve
issues on two others.
The 700-mile pipeline will
carry natural gas from shale
deposits in West Virginia and
Pennsylvania across Ohio and
into Michigan.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Recorders of drowning may face charges
COCOA, Fla. — Florida
prosecutors will decide whether to file charges against five
teenagers who laughed and recorded video as a disabled
man drowned.
Cocoa police officials said
Wednesday that they had
turned the case over to prosecutors. Police have recommended filing a misdemeanor
charge of failure to report a
death.
The teens, ages 14 to 18,
are heard in the video laugh-
ing at 31-year-old Jamel Dunn
as he drowned July 9 in a Cocoa retention pond.
Last week, Police Chief
Mike Cantaloupe said an initial review of the case determined no laws were broken.
However, Cantaloupe said further research showed the misdemeanor charge could apply.
State attorney’s office
spokesman Todd Brown said
there was no timetable for deciding whether to file charges.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Wife of slain NYPD officer has his child
Many people saw Pei Xia
Chen for the first time at one
of her most difficult moments.
In December 2014, her
husband, New York City police Officer Wenjian Liu, and
his partner, Rafael Ramos,
were ambushed and killed in
their patrol car.
On Tuesday, more than 2½
years after her husband’s
death, Chen gave birth to their
daughter, Angelina, at New
York-Presbyterian Hospital.
On the night her husband
was shot, Chen asked that his
semen be preserved with the
hope of one day having their
child, according to a New York
City Police Department announcement that included a
photo of the new mother and
baby Angelina wearing an
NYPD knit cap.
Liu’s mother, Xiu Yan Li,
said, ‘‘The past three years
have been the most difficult.
This is the best news we’ve
gotten.’’
Chen had recently married
Liu when he was fatally shot
in Bedford-Stuyvesant by
gunman Ismaaiyl Brinsley,
who would soon take his own
life.
Thousands attended the funeral for Liu, believed to be
the first Asian-American police officer killed in the line of
duty.
Liu, whom many of his colleagues knew as Joe, had
come to the United States
with his parents from China
when he was 12 in 1994.
WASHINGTON POST
Teacher who exposed self sentenced
PAWHUSKA, Okla. — A
former substitute teacher in
Oklahoma who exposed herself to students when she did a
cartwheel while wearing a
long skirt but no underwear
has pleaded guilty to a reduced
charge.
Lacey Sponsler pleaded
guilty Monday to assault after
the charge was reduced from
indecent exposure. She was
given a two-year suspended
sentence and can’t teach for
two years.
She will not have to register
as a sex offender.
Sponsler declined comment. Defense attorney Nathan Milner told KTUL-TV
that Sponsler believes the incident was ‘‘blown out of proportion’’ and is glad the case is
over.
Sponsler was charged in
February after allegedly performing a cartwheel in which
she exposed herself during a
high school choir class in
Pawhuska, about 100 miles
northeast of Oklahoma City.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
S.C. law ruled unfair to gay couples
COLUMBIA, S.C. — People
in same-sex relationships in
South Carolina should get the
same legal protections against
domestic violence as heterosexual couples, the state’s
highest court ruled Wednesday, deeming a portion of the
state’s domestic violence law
unconstitutional.
The court was asked to
weigh in after a woman tried
to get a protective order
against her former fiancée,
also a woman, and was denied.
Current law defines
‘‘household members’’ as a
spouse, former spouse, people
with a child in common, or
men and women who are or
have lived together. It does not
include unmarried same-sex
couples.
Acting Justice Costa Pleicones, who wrote the majority
opinion, said during oral arguments in March 2016 that he
felt the law was ‘‘pretty clearly
unconstitutional in its discriminatory impact upon
same-sex couples.’’
In 2015, during a massive
overhaul of South Carolina’s
criminal domestic violence
law, legislators made a number of changes including increasing penalties for offenders but left a gender-based definition of household members
intact.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
In video, victims drinking before crash
BETHEL PARK, Pa. — A series of Snapchat videos posted
by one of three young people
killed in an SUV crash shows
them drinking in the vehicle
beforehand and passing
around a vodka bottle, police
said. A fourth person in the vehicle was critically injured.
Police in Bethel Park, in
suburban Pittsburgh, have
been examining an eight-minute compilation of the videos
that an unnamed friend of one
victim, 23-year-old Bianca
Herwig, of McDonald, posted
on YouTube. Herwig had posted the series of short videos on
Snapchat in the time leading
up to the crash. Investigators
are hoping the video will help
them determine who was
drinking and how much before the crash Tuesday.
The SUV driven by 21-yearold Paige Nicole Smith, a single mother from Bethel Park,
struck a utility pole. Smith was
killed along with Herwig and
another passenger, 17-year-old
Heather Camisa, of Finleyville.
A third passenger, 21-yearold Brooke Molnar, was
thrown from the wreckage and
remained in critical condition.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
The Nation
Minneapolis police tweak camera rules
New chief says
more work will
be recorded
By Mark Berman
THE WASHINGTON POST
Police in Minneapolis must
now activate their body cameras during every call for service
or any self-initiated work, officials said Wednesday, a change
that comes amid a lingering
controversy over an officer’s fatal shooting of an unarmed
Australian woman there earlier
this month.
An officer fatally shot Justine Damond, a 40-year-old
woman who had called 911 to
report a possible sexual assault
near her home, on July 15. For
reasons that still remain unknown, one of the two police officers responding to Damond’s
call shot and killed her, and neither officer present activated
their body cameras.
Since her death, which
sparked international outrage
and prompted the ouster of the
city’s veteran police chief, more
questions than answers have
surrounded the shooting. Authorities have questioned why
Officer Mohamed Noor drew
and fired his gun, and have
been critical of the lack of video
footage.
Every patrol officer in Minneapolis is equipped with a
body camera, and Minneapolis
Mayor Betsy Hodges called it
‘‘unacceptable’’ that no footage
existed of the shooting. A day
after making these remarks,
Hodges forced out Janeé Harteau, the Minneapolis police
chief, saying she had ‘‘lost confidence in the chief ’s ability to
lead us further.’’
Hodges, who has herself
faced calls to resign since the
shooting and is up for reelection, joined the new police
chief, Medaria Arradondo, for a
news conference Wednesday
announcing the expansion of
when body cameras would be
utilized.
‘‘What good is a camera if it
is not being used when it may
be needed the most?’’ Arradondo said at the briefing. He added: ‘‘We are not passing judgment on a single officer nor are
we looking at a single event.’’
While Arradondo said the
change in body-camera policy
has ‘‘been in process for a few
months now,’’ the specter of Damond’s death loomed over this
shift. The changed policy will
go into effect on Saturday, two
weeks after Damond’s death.
Under the previous Minneapolis police policy, officers
have been required to activate
body-worn cameras before any
use of force or, if that is not possible, ‘‘as soon as it is safe to do
so.’’ The new policy directs officers to activate their cameras
before a wide range of actions,
and no longer states that cameras must be activated before a
use of force. Instead, it now
states that the cameras must be
activated for ‘‘any use of force
By Dana Hedgpeth
July 5 because of concerns
about infection, and subseUS Representative Steve
quently had another operation.
Scalise, who was wounded six
Hodgkinson used a highweeks ago when a man opened powered 7.62mm rifle and a
fire at a GOP baseball practice 9mm handgun as he shot at the
in Alexandria, Va., was dis- baseball field where the team of
charged earlier this week from congressional Republicans was
MedStar Washington Hospital playing. The shooting unfolded
Center.
as the Republican lawmakers
MedStar Washingand their aides were
ton said Wednesday
almost done with batthat the House majorting prac tice for a
ity whip was discharity baseball
charged on Tuesday
game.
and will begin intenSomeone shouted,
sive rehabilitation.
‘ ‘ H e ’s g o t a g u n ! ’ ’
Then came a torrent
The hospital also said
in a brief statement Steve Scalise
of bullets, as Hodgthat he is ‘‘in good will undergo
kinson unloaded his
spirits and is looking extensive
weapon and people
forward to his return rehabilitation.
tried to run and hide.
to work.”
Two members of ScaThe gunman, James Hodg- lise’s security team jumped
kinson, a 66-year-old unem- from a black SUV parked nearployed home inspector from by and returned fire.
southern Illinois, died after the
Hodgkinson had been living
shootout. Scalise, a Louisiana out of his white cargo van on a
Republican, and four others street in Alexandria, according
were injured in the attack, in- to federal officials. He had left
cluding two US Capitol police his home in a rural area outside
officers who were on Scalise’s St. Louis about two months
security detail.
ago, selling almost everything
Scalise’s Washington office he owned from his business bealso confirmed that he had fore coming to the Washington
been released from the hospital area.
and referred to the hospital’s
People in the Alexandria arstatement. Scalise suffered a ea said Hodgkinson had besingle bullet wound to the hip come a fixture at the YMCA,
in the June 14 shooting outside which is near the baseball field.
a YMCA facility.
He drew notice at the facility
Doctors said Scalise was in but not suspicions as he some‘‘imminent risk of death’’ when times sat in the YMCA’s lobby,
he was first admitted to the hos- focusing on his laptop and carpital and underwent several r ying a g ym bag but ne ver
surgeries. He was then readmit- working out.
ted to the intensive care unit on
Hodgkinson had shared
Photo: Michel Gibert, for advertising purposes only. Special thanks: Architect: www.christophebernard.eu. Summer Sale prices valid in USA from July 15 to 30, 2017; not to be used in conjunction
with any other offer. 1Conditions apply, contact store for details. 2Program available on select items, subject to availability. Discount applies to select models, contact store for more details.
THE WASHINGTON POST
Generous discounts on clearance and floor models
Escapade. Modular sofas, design Zeno Nugari.
HINES DERMATOLOGY
ASSOCIATES, INC.
situation.’’
‘‘It has been my expectation
that our body camera program
work for our city and work for
our people,’’ Hodges said at the
news conference. ‘‘It was my expectation then and it remains
my expectation today that the
program actually does what we
want, expect and need it to do.’’
Mystery has surrounded Damond’s death for days, in part
because no footage captured
what happened leading up to
the shooting. Noor, the officer
who fired the fatal shot, has so
far declined to be interviewed
by state investigators, who say
they cannot compel him to be
interviewed.
According to police records,
Damond had twice called 911
the night of her death to report
a possible sexual assault happening nearby. She first called
to say she may have heard a
rape happening , and then
called eight minutes later to
make sure officers had the right
address.
Scalise leaves hospital six weeks
after gunman’s attack at ballfield
is pleased to announce that we are now accepting
Blue Cross Blue Shield of
Massachusetts Patients
Call our office at 508-222-1976
to schedule an appointment
OFFICE HOURS
Monday & Wednesday 8am–4pm
Tuesday & Thursday 8am–5pm | Friday 8am–3pm
www.HinesDermatologyAssociates.com
555 Pleasant Street, Attleboro, MA
Access your Globe account online
at bostonglobe.com/subscriber
䄀搀瘀攀渀琀甀爀攀猀 椀渀 䌀爀攀愀琀椀瘀攀 刀攀琀椀爀攀洀攀渀琀
䠀攀愀氀琀栀Ⰰ 䠀漀甀猀椀渀最Ⰰ 愀渀搀 䌀漀洀洀甀渀椀琀礀
plenty of his political views, including online postings that
were mostly rants against Republicans and the ‘‘super rich.’’
One of his recent posts read:
‘‘Trump is a Traitor. Trump Has
Destroyed Our Democracy. It’s
Time to Destroy Trump & Co.’’
Rep. Mike Bost, R-Ill., who
represented Hodgkinson’s
hometown, said the man was
‘‘always angry’’ about the GOP
agenda. A photo of former presidential candidate Sen. Bernie
Sanders was his Facebook cover
image.
At times over the last decade, he had run-ins with
neighbors and a daughter that
prompted people to call police.
His wife, Sue Hodgkinson,
said her husband had run out of
money trying to live in the D.C.
region and was expected to
head home. She also said there
was no warning that he would
do anything violent.
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T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
The World
Taliban kill dozens of Afghan Army soldiers
Offensive by
insurgents with
new tactics feared
By Taimoor Shah
and Mujib Mashal
NEW YORK TIMES
KANDAHAR, Afghanistan
— In a bloody overnight attack
in Afghanistan’s Kandahar
province Wednesday, the Taliban routed an Afghan army
outpost, killing dozens of soldiers and raising fears of a concerted insurgent offensive in
the province, a former seat of
Taliban power that took years
of effort by coalition and Afghan forces to secure.
T he attack happened in
Khakrez district, about 30
miles from Kandahar city, and
the large number of casualties
has raised concerns about new
Taliban tactics against an Afghan force already losing men
in record numbers.
One senior security official
said 39 Afghan army soldiers
were killed in the attack, which
began at 10 p.m. Tuesday and
lasted three hours. The official
said 17 other soldiers were
wounded, and another dozen
have not been accounted for.
The Afghan government’s
media and information center
said 26 soldiers were killed,
and 13 others wounded. Army
officials in Kandahar confirmed the attack, but would
not provide details of casualties.
Mohammed Yousuf Younusi, a member of the Kandahar
provincial council, described
the episode as “a massacre” and
said there was prior intelligence that the Taliban would
attack in large numbers.
“The Taliban fooled the officials — they split into three
groups, and launched simultaneous attacks. One group attacked Shah Wali Kot district,
another attack Nish district,
and a third group attacked this
Afghan army base which is not
far from the district center,”
Younusi said. “Things are really
bad, and this is a shame.”
Kandahar was the original
seat of the Taliban regime when
it controlled Afghanistan from
the mid-1990s until its ouster
by the US invasion in 2001.
More than 550 NATO coalition
troops have died in the province, and it became relatively
secure only after a push during
then-president Barack Obama’s
troop surge starting in 2010.
The gains in Kandahar have
been solidified in recent years
by a strongman police chief,
General Abdul Raziq, a favorite
of US commanders who has
been accused of abuses by human rights groups.
Just how much the security
of the province has depended
on one individual, with no Plan
B and at the cost of reforming
the police as an accountable
force, has long worried diplo-
mats and Afghan officials.
The Taliban have steadily
been making gains in surrounding provinces, but in
Kandahar, Raziq’s forces have
long been successful in keeping
the insurgents at bay. But the
general’s control is now being
tested by this new wave attacks.
In recent weeks, in addition
to firing on security outposts in
most of the province’s districts,
the Taliban have carried out
heavier assaults and ambushes
in at least six districts, often inflicting casualties on Afghan
forces.
“For the last two weeks, the
Taliban have been attacking the
northern districts of Kandahar
and have killed many Afghan
security forces,” said Noor
Nawaz Piawari, a military analyst in Kandahar. “The northern districts are close to Helmand and Uruzgan, which they
control in large parts. They are
after expanding their territory
to create routes that connect to
Pakistan,” where most of the insurgency’s leadership is based.
Piawari said Raziq would
struggle to maintain security as
his police forces are stretched
and are receiving casualties,
with the Taliban often launching attacks on isolated outposts
across several districts.
For an Afghan force that lost
men in record numbers last
y e a r, t h e p a s t m o n t h h a s
proved particularly deadly. The
Taliban have overrun three districts across the country in the
past week, and the pattern suggests they are focused on inflicting heavy casualties on Afghan forces, rather than holding the territory they take over.
When they overrun outposts
and police stations, they often
capture even more weapons
and ammunition, most of it
paid for by the United States
and its allies to bolster the Afghan forces.
Both in Janikhel district of
Paktia province, and in Ko-
histan district of Faryab province, the Taliban looted all the
weapons and equipment left
behind by the Afghan forces. In
Taiwara district, in western
Ghor province, the Taliban
killed as many as 30 government forces.
When Afghan forces took
back the district center of Kohistan on Tuesday, they estimated the Taliban had seized
40,000 rounds of machine gun
ammunition, a mortar with 20
rounds, and 30 rocket-propelled grenades, according to
Sulaiman Rahmani, a militia
commander in the district. The
province’s police chief, however, said that whatever the Taliban took had been bombed by
the Afghan air force.
After overrunning the district center of Janikhel, and
seizing four pickup trucks, one
Humvee, and whatever weapons they could get their hands
on, the Taliban withdrew again,
officials there said.
Daily Briefing
Poland may still
face sanctions
WARSAW — The European
Union’s executive commission
remains open to triggering
sanctions against Poland for
limiting judicial independence,
despite the Polish president’s
veto of parts of a controversial
legal overhaul, a top EU official
said Wednesday.
The statement drew a protest in Warsaw from a few dozen right-wingers who support
the EU-skeptic government’s
view that overhauling the justice system is an internal Polish
matter.
At the same time, 200 other
protesters were showing their
displeasure with the conservative government’s policies, especially with the legal overhaul.
In recent days, tens of thousands of Poles have been protesting government moves
against the judiciary — actions
that have also drawn EU criticism.
‘‘Some things have changed
and some things have not,’’ European Commission Vice President Frans Timmermans said
at a news conference.
Timmermans said the commission was giving Poland one
month to resolve the problems
with the judicial changes approved by Poland’s Parliament.
It was not clear what the repercussions would be if Poland
fails to do so in that timeline.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
CLAUDE PARIS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEACHFRONT ESCAPE — Thousands of people were evacuated from homes and vacation sites in southeastern France on Wednesday as strong
winds fueled wildfires that had been raging across the region for days. At least 10,000 people were evacuated overnight after a forest fire started
near Bormes-les-Mimosas, a town on the Mediterranean coast. At least two homes were gutted.
US freezes 13 Venezuelans’ assets
Congo military tied to mass graves
Extremist in Germany gets five years
WASHINGTON — The
Treasury Department imposed
financial sanctions on a host of
current and former senior
Venezuelan officials on
Wednesday and threatened to
take more stringent action if
President Nicolás Maduro proceeds with plans for a constituent assembly on Sunday that
critics consider a danger to democracy.
Steven T. Mnuchin, the
Treasury secretary, ordered assets in the United States frozen
for 13 well-connected Venezuelan figures and barred Americans from doing business with
them. Among those targeted
by the administration were the
interior minister and heads of
the army, police, and national
guard, as well as government
DAKAR, Senegal — Congo
military ‘‘elements’’ are responsible for digging at least
42 mass graves in three Kasai
provinces after clashes with alleged militia members in recent months, the United Nations said as experts were appointed Wednesday to look
into a growing crisis that has
killed hundreds and displaced
more than a million people.
Human rights have deteriorated alarmingly due to the
‘‘brutal and disproportionate
repression against the Kamwina Nsapu militia by the Congolese defense forces,’’ the UN
BERLIN — A German court
on Wednesday sentenced one
of the country’s best-known Islamic extremists to more than
five years in prison for raising
money and recruiting people
for the Islamic insurgency in
Syria.
The Düsseldorf state court
found the man, Sven Lau, 36,
guilty of “serving as a contact
for those willing to leave the
country and fight” with the Army of Emigrants and Helpers,
known by the Arabic acronym
JAMWA, which is close to the
officials involved in the upcoming assembly.
Administration officials
urged Maduro to cancel the
Sunday assembly or face
tougher actions.
The constituent assembly
elections are seen by critics as
a way to cement Maduro’s hold
on power by rewriting the constitution and possibly dissolving state institutions.
Protests against the government have led to arrests and
violence.
The administration cited
opposition estimates that as
many as 15,000 civilians have
been wounded in recent protests and more than 3,000 arrested, with 431 political prisoners still behind bars.
NEW YORK TIMES
JUAN BARRETO/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Opposition protesters clashed with riot police in Caracas
on Wednesday amid a 48-hour general strike.
Joint Human Rights Office in
Congo said in a new report.
Congolese soldiers have
killed more than 428 people,
including 140 children, in the
once-calm Kasai provinces as
of June, the office said. The
militia has killed at least 37
people in that time, it said.
The UN human rights chief
appointed a three-member
panel to investigate.
In a separate statement, the
UN Security Council said such
abuses ‘‘might constitute war
crimes under international
law.’’
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Suspect charged in chain saw attack
After a search by hundreds
of officers, Swiss police arrested and charged a 51-year-old
man suspected of attacking
health insurance employees
last week with a chain saw, authorities said on Wednesday.
The suspect, Franz Wrousis, who had evaded the police
for 36 hours, was detained late
Tuesday in Thalwil, near Zurich, after a tip from a resident
who recognized him from images released by authorities,
said Ravi Landolt, a senior investigator for the regional police in Schaffhausen, where
the attack took place.
Wrousis was on foot and
carrying a plastic bag contain-
ing two crossbows loaded with
arrows and two sticks with
spiked tips at the time of his
arrest, a prosecutor, Peter
Sticher, said. The suspect did
not have a chain saw with him,
and police were still searching
for the one used in the attack,
Sticher said.
Wrousis was handed over
to authorities in Schaffhausen
and charged with committing
multiple personal assaults.
A motive for the assault
was still unclear, authorities
said. The attack injured two
employees, and two customers
of the CSS Insurance company
were treated for shock.
NEW YORK TIMES
Islamic State group.
Lau supplied the group
with money he had collected
in Germany and military materials, including night-vision
goggles. He was given a sentence of five years and six
months in prison, which the
judge said reflected the severity of the crime, despite Lau’s
lack of a criminal record.
Lau’s lawyer argued that
the prosecution built its case
on the testimony of a notorious liar.
NEW YORK TIMES
Man arrested in building collapse
MUMBAI — A man affiliated with a local political party
was accused of making illegal
alterations to the ground floor
of a five-story building that
caused it to collapse a day earlier, killing at least 17 people
and injuring a dozen others.
Deven Bharti, joint commissioner of the Mumbai police, said charges of culpable
homicide and endangering the
lives of others had been filed
against the man, Sunil Shitap.
Bharti said police believed that
Shitap had been making illegal
alterations to the ground floor
of the building, where he operated a nursing home, in Ghatkopar, an area east of the city
center.
Relatives of the victims and
other residents of the building
said Shitap was affiliated with
Shiv Sena, a local party. His
wife, Swati Shitap, contested
and lost local elections earlier
this year as a member of the
party.
“He had three flats on the
ground floor that he emptied
and broke the foundational
pillar, which is why the building fell,” said Vandana Singh,
45, who had lived in the building for nine years.
Rescuers continued
Wednesday digging through
the rubble of the building for
any survivors. Bharti, the police commissioner, confirmed
that 17 people had been killed
and 12 injured.
NEW YORK TIMES
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The World
T h e
B o s t o n
Russia hints at retaliation
against new US sanctions
Says they damage
relations between
the two nations
By Neil MacFarquhar
NEW YORK TIMES
MOSCOW — Russian legislators on Wednesday called for
“painful” measures against the
United States in response to
plans for new US sanctions,
while the Kremlin focused
more on the damage to relations between Washington and
Moscow.
Apart from demanding a
tough response, many in Russia
declared dead any hope for improved relations with Washington under a Trump administration, and there were suggestions that European pique over
the proposed measures created
an opening for an anti-US alliance.
Dmitry Peskov, spokesman
for President Vladimir Putin,
noted that the proposed US law
was still a draft. The House and
the Senate must reconcile their
versions before submitting it
for President Trump’s signature.
Any substantial response by
Putin would require more
study, Peskov said. Using one of
Trump’s favorite adjectives in
describing the law, he said, “In
the meantime, it can be said
that the news is quite sad with
regard to Russia-US relations
and prospects for their development.” He added that it was “no
less depressing with regard to
the international law and international commercial relations.”
Similar sentiments emerged
from several European capitals.
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In Paris, the Foreign Ministry
issued a statement saying that
the new sanctions, targeting
Iran and North Korea as well as
Russia, appeared to contradict
international law because of
their global reach.
There is concern in Europe
that the US sanctions could ripple through the energy market
because they target companies
that contribute to the development, maintenance, or modernization of the pipelines exporting Russian energy.
That would most likely affect a hotly debated natural gas
pipeline project linking Russia
with Germany, called Nord
Stream 2, which is owned by
the Russian state oil giant, Gazprom, but in which European
firms hold financial stakes.
Konstantin Kosachev, head
of the foreign relations committee in the Federation Council,
the upper house of the Russian
Legislature, said Moscow must
respond even if it waited for the
final law.
The reaction should be
“painful for the Americans,” he
wrote on Facebook. He also
suggested a temporary alliance
with Europe.
Sergei Ryabkov, the Russian
deputy foreign minister, said
that the new sanctions would
bury any prospect of improving
relations, calling the measures
“beyond common sense.”
“The authors and sponsors
of this bill are making a very serious step toward destruction of
prospects for normalizing relations with Russia and do not
conceal that that’s their target,”
Ryabkov said, according to the
Russian news agency ITARTass. Despite that, he added,
Moscow remained ready to cooperate on shared concerns, including fighting terrorism.
The US bill, passed 419-3 by
the House on Tuesday, bolsters
economic sanctions against
Russia that were imposed after
Moscow annexed Crimea and
destabilized Ukraine in 2014.
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
Ill British
infant
won’t go
home
Hospice, hospital
are only options
By Caroline Spiezio
ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON — Critically ill baby Charlie Gard will be transferred to a hospice and taken
off life support unless his parents and a hospital agree on a
plan that could potentially keep
the child alive for a bit longer, a
British judge ruled Wednesday.
High Court judge Nicholas
Francis gave 11-month-old
Charlie’s parents and the hospital that has been treating him
until noon Thursday to come to
terms on an end-of-life care
plan for the infant’s final hours
or days.
The baby suffers from a rare
genetic disease, mitochondrial
depletion syndrome, which has
caused brain damage and left
him unable to breathe unaided.
Recent tests found Charlie has
irreversible muscular damage.
‘‘It is in Charlie’s best interests to be moved to a hospice
and for him at that point to be
moved to a palliative care regime only,’’ the judge said as a
medical and legal battle that
has drawn international attention nears a wrenching conclusion.
The parents, Connie Yates
and Chris Gard, spent months
trying to persuade Great Ormond Street Hospital to let
Charlie go to the United States
for experimental treatment.
They gave up their fight on
Monday, acknowledging that
the window of opportunity to
help him had closed.
On Tuesday, they said they
hoped to bring their son, whose
1st birthday is next week, home
to die. Francis said Charlie’s
mother and father now accept
that the only options for their
son ‘‘are the hospital or the hos-
FAMILY OF CHARLIE GARD VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS
An undated photo of Chris Gard and Connie Yates with
their son, Charlie Gard. The parents and the hospital have
until noon Thursday to form a care plan for the child.
pice.’’
The Thursday deadline is
meant to yield a plan for what
happens after the baby is transferred to a hospice. The parents
want him kept on his ventilator
for a time. The hospital, in
fighting the parents’ earlier effort to secure experimental
treatment, had indicated that it
was responsible for sparing
Charlie unnecessary pain.
Francis said if the parties do
not reach an agreement, Charlie will be taken to hospice and
the ventilation system keeping
him alive will be turned off. He
issued an order barring publication of the name of the hospice and the date when Charlie
is taken there.
The judge said it was a ‘‘very,
very sad conclusion.’’
Charlie’s mother left the
courtroom in distress before
the judge gave his ruling.
‘‘What if it was your child?’’
Yates said amid sobs. As she
left, she said: ‘‘I hope you are
happy with yourselves.’’
In conceding that Charlie
would leave the hospital for a
hospice instead of home, Yates
requested a medical team of
her choosing that would work
to keep her son alive for a week.
He is not expected to survive
for more than a few hours once
his ventilator is removed.
The request indicated that
the parents had backed away
from their earlier expressed
wish to take Charlie home for
‘‘a few days of tranquility’’ before his ventilator was disconnected and he was allowed to
‘‘slip away.’’
Great Ormond Street Hospital said it was not practical to
provide life-support treatment
for days at the couple’s home.
Nurses from the hospital nonetheless have volunteered to
care for him in his final hours.
The parents’ cause caught
the attention of President Donald Trump and Pope Francis
and also garnered widespread
grassroots support. US-based
antiabortion activists have
flown to London to support
Charlie’s parents.
The case has become the
catalyst for discussions on
health care funding, medical
intervention, the role of the
state, and the rights of the
child.
The heated commentary has
prompted the judge to criticize
the effects of social media and
those ‘‘who know almost nothing about this case but who feel
entitled to express opinions.’’
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T h e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
English­only law may end
uBILINGUAL
Continued from Page A1
the proposed changes Thursday. The House approved a similar measure last month, 151 to
2.
“This is an important move
by the Legislature to correct a
wrong,” said Senator Sal DiDomenico, an Everett Democrat.
“Kids are falling through the
cracks and are not getting the
education they need.”
Supporters of the measures
are optimistic that bilingual education, in which students can
learn academic subjects in their
native tongue while gaining
English fluency, can be a regular feature again in Massachusetts schools. Some advocates
say they don’t necessarily favor
one version of the bill over the
other.
“ We just want a bill that
passes that gives kids a better
chance,” said Marion Davis,
spokeswoman for the Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy Coalition.
“Schools and parents should be
able to work together and decide what is the best approach
for each student.”
Brendan Moss, a spokesman
for Governor Charlie Baker,
said Baker has not taken a position yet on the bills but will
carefully review any legislation
that reaches his desk.
Massachusetts schools have
been struggling for years to
boost the performance of students who lack fluency in English — a population that has
nearly doubled over the past 15
years as more immigrant families settle in the state. On average, students lacking English
fluency have among the lowest
standardized test scores and
graduation rates.
But some students overcome
those dismal statistics. In Boston, for instance, many high
school valedictorians each year
are immigrant students.
Many educators, advocates,
and families blame the socalled English-only law for the
low achievement of most students who aren’t yet fluent.
They argue the law is too restrictive, creating a one-sizefits-all approach to a popula-
tion of students with vastly different academic needs and
fluency levels in English.
On one end of the spectrum,
some students who are classified as English-language learners were born in the United
States in immigrant households
where English is not the primary language, but those students
may have gained some understanding of it from relatives
who speak English or from TV
or neighbors.
On the other end of the spectrum, students themselves may
have arrived in the country
with no knowledge of English.
Some may not even have had
any formal schooling for several
years and could be suffering
trauma from war, political
strife, or natural disasters in
their home countries.
Under current law, school
systems must teach all courses
in English and can use a student’s native language only occasionally to check for understanding. The law provides
some exceptions, such as allowing dual-language programs in
which English-speaking students and non-native students
learn each other’s languages.
But students lacking English
fluency also performed poorly
under bilingual education,
prompting voters in part in
2002 to dismantle that program and replace it with what
is officially known as “structured English immersion.”
Rosalie Pedalino Porter, a
former bilingual education director for the Newton schools
who supported the ballot question, said she thinks it would be
a mistake to bring back bilingual education wholesale.
“I do not believe there is any
problem with the law as it is
written,” said Porter, who is
chairwoman of ProEnglish, a
Washington, D.C., organization
that advocates for laws that
make English the official language. “Any changes to that law
is going to be harmful to children.”
DiDomenico said he expects
the Senate will pass the bill
Thursday. He noted that the
Senate passed a similar bill last
year, and so did the House, but
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the votes came at the end of the
legislative session and time ran
out for a compromise.
This time, he said, the two
chambers will have up to a year
to iron out their differences.
The main difference between the two bills is the
amount of flexibility given to
school systems. The House
measure would loosen current
requirements for school systems to seek waivers to the English-only rule, while the Senate
bill would abolish the waivers
and instead give school systems
a choice of specific programs,
including English immersion
and bilingual education.
Adding urgency for a compromise is a desire among lawmakers to make Massachusetts
mo re wel com in g at a t im e
when President Trump’s administration has tightened immigration rules and Trump
himself has continued anti-immigrant rhetoric.
And the growing presence of
English-language learners in
school systems across the state
makes it tough for policy makers to ignore, some academic
experts said.
James Vaznis can be reached at
james.vaznis@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@globevaznis.
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Nation/Region
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
In Mass., the new ban
is quickly condemned
Elected officials,
LGBTQ allies
call it unpatriotic
By Sara Salinas
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
MICHAEL REYNOLDS/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY
A child identified as the transgender child of a member of the US military attended a Washington news conference where
House Democratic lawmakers and others voiced opposition to the banning of transgender people in the military.
Trump reverses military change
uTRANSGENDER
Continued from Page A1
row issue, Trump opted to upend the entire policy on transgender service members, a
move that few on Capitol Hill or
at the Pentagon expected.
Trump announced the decision with such haste that the
White House could not answer
basic inquiries on about how it
would be carried out, including
what would happen to openly
transgender people now serving on active duty; of eight defense officials interviewed,
none could say.
“That’s something that the
Department of Defense and the
White House will have to work
together as implementation
takes place and is done so lawfully,” Sarah Huckabee Sanders,
the White House press secretary, said.
Still, the announcement
thrilled elements of Trump’s
base, who have been dismayed
to see the president break so
bitterly in recent days with Attorney General Jeff Sessions, a
hard-line conservative.
Civil rights and transgender
advocacy groups denounced
the policy, with some vowing to
challenge it in court. Pentagon
officials expressed dismay that
the president’s tweets, blasted
out before they could consider
how to make the change, could
open them to lawsuits.
The ban would reverse the
gradual transformation of the
military under President Barack Obama, whose administration announced last year that
transgender people could serve
openly in the military. Obama’s
defense secretary, Ash Carter,
also opened all combat roles to
women and appointed the first
openly gay Army secretary.
And it represented a stark
turnabout from Trump’s rhetoric during his campaign, when
he billed himself as an ally of
gay, lesbian, bisexual, and
transgender people.
The president, Sanders said,
had concluded that allowing
transgender people to serve
openly “erodes military readiness and unit cohesion, and
made the decision based on
that.”
Mattis, who was on vacation, was silent on the new policy. People close to the defense
secretary said he was appalled
that Trump chose to unveil his
decision in tweets, in part because of the message they sent
to transgender active duty service members, including those
deployed overseas, that they
were suddenly no longer welcome.
The announcement came
amid the debate on Capitol Hill
over the Obama-era practice of
requiring the Pentagon to pay
for medical treatment related to
gender transition. Representative Vicky Hartzler, Republican
of Missouri, has proposed an
amendment to the spending
bill that would bar the Pentagon from spending money on
transition surgery or related
hormone therapy, and other
Republicans have pressed for
similar provisions.
Mattis had worked behind
the scenes to keep such language out of legislation, quietly
lobbying Republican lawmakers not to attach the prohibitions, according to congressional and defense officials.
But Trump was concerned
that the transgender medical
care issue could imperil the sec u r i ty s p e n d i ng m e a s u r e ,
which also contains $1.6 billion
for the border wall that he has
championed, and wanted to resolve the dispute cleanly and
straightforwardly, according to
a person familiar with his
thinking, who insisted on anonymity to describe it. That
prompted his ban.
The president’s decision
shocked even Republican congressional leaders, who were
aware Trump was looking into
whether taxpayer money
should be spent on medical procedures for transgender service
members, but had not expected
he would go so far as to bar
transgender people from serving altogether.
Trump and Republican lawmakers had come under pressure from Tony Perkins, the
president of the Family Research Council, a leading Christian conservative group, and an
ally of Trump. Perkins opposed
the bill over spending on transgender medical costs and lobbied lawmakers to do the same.
Opponents of allowing
openly transgender service
members had raised a number
of concerns, including what
they said was the questionable
psychological fitness of those
troops and the cost the military
would bear for their medical
treatment, potentially including gender reassignment procedures. They said the military
was being used for social experimentation at the expense of
national security.
The policy would affect only
a small portion of the approximately 1.3 million active-duty
members of the military. Some
2,000 to 11,000 active duty
troops are transgender, according to a 2016 RAND Corp. study
commissioned by the Pentagon,
though estimates of the number of transgender ser vice
members have varied widely,
and are sometimes as high as
15,000.
The study found that allowing transgender people to serve
openly in the military would
“have minimal impact on readiness and health care costs” for
the Pentagon. It estimated that
health care costs would rise
$2.4 million to $8.4 million a
year, representing an infinitesimal 0.04 to 0.13 percent increase in spending for activeduty service members.
Elected officials and members of the LGBTQ community
spoke out Wednesday against
Pr e s i d e n t Tr u m p’s b a n o n
transgender people serving in
the military. Many people reacted within the same 140-character limit with which the ban
was announced.
Trump tweeted just before 6
a.m. that transgender individuals would not be allowed to
“serve in any capacity in the US
Military,” adding, “Our military
must be focused on decisive
and overwhelming victory and
cannot be burdened with the
tremendous medical costs and
disruption that transgender in
the military would entail.”
Within hours, several Massachusetts members of Congress, including Senators Elizabeth Warren and Edward Markey and Representative Joe
Kennedy III, had taken to Twitter in response.
“The only thing — only thing
— that matters when it comes
to allowing military personnel
to serve is whether or not they
can handle the job,” Warren
tweeted just before 8 a.m.
Warren attacked the president, tagging his Twitter handle in two subsequent posts,
saying Trump’s announcement
“makes clear that he cares more
about extreme ideology than
military readiness.”
Markey questioned Trump’s
claim the ban is a cost-saving
measure, tweeting, “The ‘tremendous medical costs’ Trump
should focus on are in cruel
#Trumpcare proposals that gut
#Medicaid and rip away coverage.” In another tweet, Markey
called transgender service
members “dedicated patriots”
and said, “We welcome their
service & honor their love of
country.”
Kennedy, who chairs the
Congressional Transgender
Equality Task Force, tweeted a
two-minute video of a previously unscheduled speech on the
House floor, spurred by the
morning’s announcement.
“When our bravest men and
women raise their hand and
volunteer to defend our nation,
they defend all of her people,”
Kennedy said in the video.
“Our soldiers do not discriminate. They do not offer to
pay the ultimate sacrifice for
some Americans and not others. Their government owes
them that same courtesy — that
same decency — in return.”
In the speech, Kennedy directly addressed transgender
service members and said they
deserve better from the president and the country.
Kennedy said that Trump
“has told thousands of American soldiers that though they
fight for us, we will not fight for
them.”
OUTVETS, a New England
organization of LGBTQ service
members, posted a response on
Facebook: “We must work together to ensure all Americans
who wish to serve have opportunity to serve,” the statement
said. “We must be vigilant.”
The post called the president’s tweets “disgusting and
reprehensible” and said the
transgender ban could be the
first step toward reinstituting a
ban on all those in the LGBTQ
community.
US Representatives Katherine Clark and Seth Moulton
also issued statements vowing
to fight the ban.
“Trump’s attack is not only
un-American, it is harmful to
our national security. All of our
veterans and active service
members deserve our support,”
Clark said.
“These are Americans who
are willing to put their lives on
the line for our country, which
is far, far more than President
Trump has ever been willing to
do,” Moulton said.
Governor Charlie Baker,
who last year signed legislation
extending statewide protections to transgender individuals, issued a statement through
his press office.
“Governor Baker believes no
one should be discriminated
against based on their gender
identity, including the brave
men and women who serve in
our armed forces,” a spokeswoman for the governor said.
Wednesday’s announcement
reignited the conversation in
Massachusetts about transgender rights. The Massachusetts
Family Institute, which unsuccessfully opposed last year’s legislation, issued a statement in
support of Trump’s ban.
“We are very pleased to see
the Commander in Chief prioritize military readiness and the
privacy rights of our service
members.
“This is another demonstration that the American people
don’t want a radical anti-biology agenda forced on those who
sacrifice so much to serve in
our armed forces,” the institute’s president, Andrew Beckwith, said in the statement.
Sara Salinas can be reached at
sara.salinas@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter at
@saracsalinas.
New GOP health law vote will likely be on a slimmer Obamacare
uHEALTH LAW
Continued from Page A1
port the proposal without a
ready replacement. Among
them were Susan Collins of
Maine, the moderate who has
consistently opposed the Senate’s bills, and John McCain,
who returned from brain cancer treatments in Arizona to
cast a pivotal vote Tuesday to
start debate.
Though a similar measure
passed both houses of Congress
in 2015 before it was vetoed by
then-President Obama, Republican’s newfound reluctance
shows the degree to which governance has forced flip-flops
among GOP lawmakers. Also
elements of Obamacare have
become increasingly popular.
Tennessee Senator Lamar
Alexander, the Health Committee chairman, voted for the repeal in 2015 but against it on
Wednesday. In a statement, he
said his state’s situation had
changed in two years and it
could no longer afford a repeal
without a ready replacement.
“I don’t think Tennesseans
would be comfortable canceling insurance for 22 million
Americans and trusting Congress to find a replacement in
two years,” Alexander said. “Pilots like to know where they’re
going to land when they take
off, and we should, too.”
“The president is . . . very focused on repealing and replacing” the health law, said White
House Press Secretary Sarah
Huckabee Sanders in a press
briefing Wednesday. She made
no mention of the failed votes
in the Senate regarding alternatives. “We’re going to continue pushing forward until we
get a new and better health
care plan,” she said.
The Senate had come up
short in pushing another repeal
and replace bid Tuesday night.
Senate Republicans will
now attempt to pass what has
been dubbed a “skinny repeal”
of Obamacare — a measure
that would likely eliminate a
medical device tax and undo
the law’s requirements that individuals buy insurance and
large employers offer plans to
workers. No bill text has been
released.
The impact of the new proposal has not been measured
by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office or formally
presented to the American
public, but the office has said
similar ideas would result in 15
million fewer people having
health insurance and increase
premiums. Despite the unknowns, some Senate Republicans were already backing the
p r o p o s a l We d n e s d a y a s a
means of salvaging a slim political victory.
“I’m voting for anything that
continues the process,” said
Senator Bill Cassidy of Louisiana about the prospect of
“skinny repeal” during an interview with CNN. “We can’t
keep spinning in no man’s land
where nothing happens.’’
The House passed its version of an Affordable Care Act
repeal in May, so any plan that
CHIP SOMODEVILLA/GETTY IMAGES
‘I don’t think Tennesseans would be
comfortable canceling insurance for 22
million Americans and trusting Congress
to find a replacement in two years.’
SENATOR LAMAR ALEXANDER, explaining his “no’’ vote
passes the Senate would go into
a conference between lawmakers from both chambers to
hammer out a compromise.
Some Senate Republicans, including Rand Paul of Kentucky,
are openly saying that they do
not believe the Senate and
House could forge a deal, especially considering the Senate
could not even agree on a
broader repeal on its own.
“If you go back to conference committee and they stuff
all the goodies and all the bailouts back in there, we’ll simply
get back to where we were before and lose conservatives
again,” said Paul, a self-professed libertarian.
House members are already
saying they’re unlikely to back
a pared-do wn Senate bill .
Speaking to reporters, Mark
Meadows, the leader of the
conservative House Freedom
Caucus, said there’s “zero”
chance a piecemeal rollback of
the Affordable Care Act would
pass the House.
“The skinny version, in its e l f, i f i t c a m e b e f o r e t h e
House, would not pass,” Meadows said Wednesday. “That’s
not going to be signed into law,
but that’s used as a vehicle for
us to come together in conference and hopefully continue
negotiation.”
Senators acknowledged
they would support the pareddown Obamacare repeal in order to push the issue further
down the line — not because
they endorsed the policy proposals. Senator Bob Corker of
Tennessee said the “content” of
the latest Senate proposal is
less important than its function, forcing a conference with
the House.
Nevada Senator Dean Heller, largely considered the most
vulnerable Republican up for
reelection in next year’s midterm elections, also backed a
slimmer Obamacare — at least
for now. “Let’s put this behind
us,” Heller added.
Also Wednesday, Governor
Charlie Baker joined a bipartisan group of governors in signing a letter to Senate leaders
urging them to reject the “skinny repeal’’ and work closely
with governors on health care.
Policy experts say even incremental cuts to the law ’s
rules would seriously damage
health care markets. John McDonough, a professor of public
health at Harvard who was involved in drafting the Massachusetts version of health care
expansion, said repealing the
medical device tax and undoing the employer and individual mandates could upset insurance markets and accelerate
the death spiral of Obamacare
in some areas.
The mandates are necessary
to ensure that healthy individuals buy into insurance marketplaces and that insurance plans
don’t attract only sick people
with the most expensive needs.
McDonough was also skeptical
that Republicans would stick
with their limited repeals, once
the measure made it to a conference with House members.
“The big problem is that
passing a skinny repeal bill in
the Senate keeps the repeal/replace process alive for further
mischief,” McDonough added.
“This really is a vampire bill
that repeatedly keeps dying
and then returning to life to
threaten some more.”
This was also the argument
of Democrats, who sought to
drum up opposition to the new
proposal by calling it a “Trojan
horse” and a “zombie bill.”
On the floor of the US Senate Wednesday, Massachusetts
Senator Elizabeth Warren said
the true name for “skinny repeal” should be “gut and run.”
“Make no mistake, this is no
moderate version of the Republicans ugly plan to repeal the
Affordable Care Act,” Warren
said. “In fact, this may be the
worst idea they’ve had yet.”
Herndon can be reached at
astead.herndon@globe.com.
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
The Region
A9
How to survive the Comm. Ave. Bridge repairs
uTRAFFIC
Continued from Page A1
With so many different commutes affected through at least
Aug. 14, here are some options
for avoiding a pikeapalooza:
If you take the Mass. Pike
While every roadway may
back up, it’s important for
many turnpike drivers to find a
different route, Gulliver said. If
daily Mass. Pike commuters remain on I-90, the state Department of Transportation predicts the morning commute
will increase by a whopping 90
minutes.
The commuter rail’s Worcester-Framingham line will continue to operate on weekdays,
and Gulliver said people should
“seriously consider” that option.
“We expect to have sufficient
capacity, but certainly you’ll
p r o b a b l y h av e s o m e e x t ra
friends sitting next to you during the trip,” he said.
MBTA spokesman Joe Pesaturo said the commuter rail will
add coaches to trains as demand warrants.
If rail is not an option, Gulliver suggested using traffic and
mapping apps like Waze to find
the best turnpike alternative.
No, the other roads won’t be a
picnic either, but the apps will
at least give you the least bad
route.
However, Gulliver warned,
that solution isn’t perfect.
“They can tell you what the
traffic is now, but if you’re traveling from half an hour away,
that’s impossible to predict,” he
said. “All you need is a crash or
a car fire to throw off the whole
thing.”
No matter what, drivers
should build plenty of extra
time into their commutes, he
said. The worst case scenario
with leaving early is that you
get in early and catch up on email, rather than missing an
appointment.
The good news for Mass.
Pike commuters? They’ve only
got to deal with the lane clo-
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Workers on Commonwealth Avenue began the bridge replacement project Wednesday night. Road closures begin on Thursday.
sures for 10 days, starting Friday night. Up above, Commonwealth Avenue will be shut
down for another whole week.
If you take Comm. Ave.
Shuttle service will replace
the Green Line between Blandford and Babcock streets starting Wednesday night through
Aug. 14. The shuttles, as well as
other MBTA buses, will still be
allowed to drive on the section
of Commonwealth Avenue that
isn’t being torn apart this summer.
Or you can just get out and
walk. Though pedestrians and
cyclists may be stalled for a few
minutes at any given time as
materials are moved during
construction, they’ll still be able
to cross from Kenmore to All-
ston during the work. The regional bike-share network Hubway is positioning extra stations and bikes along
Commonwealth Avenue and is
also offering special $1 fares
while the road is shut down.
If you need to drive in the area, be prepared for a complex
set of detours through Allston,
the Fenway area, Brookline,
and Cambridge that should
cause even further traffic on
Memorial Drive, Storrow Drive,
and Beacon Street.
If you need the BU Bridge
It will also be closed to vehicle traffic during the period,
limiting access between that
side of Boston and Cambridge.
MBTA buses will still be allowed on the bridge, as will cy-
clists and pedestrians. Drivers,
however, will need to head east
to the Massachusetts Avenue
bridge or west toward the River
Street and Western Avenue
bridges.
If you’re coming in on the
weekend
The Mass. Pike will narrow
even further during the next
two weekends. There will be only one lane of eastbound traffic
on July 29 and 30, and one lane
westbound on Aug. 5 and 6.
And remember that part
about taking the commuter
rail? Yeah, that’s not looking so
good on these weekends, when
Worcester-Framingham trains
will end their route at the Boston Landing station to accommodate bridge work over the
tracks. Those passengers will be
offered shuttle service from
Boston Landing to the Green
Line or to the Yawkey commuter rail station near Fenway
Park.
Fenway, by the way, will host
home games the next two weekends, and Sox fans will want to
give themselves extra travel
time before the first pitch due
to these disruptions — especially this weekend, with only one
inbound lane open on the Pike.
And if you’re going to . . .
Albany?
Amtrak’s once-daily service
between Boston and Chicago
uses those tracks as well, meaning weekend service will be disrupted. Over the next two weekends, Amtrak will shuttle Bos-
to n passe ngers t o Al bany,
where they can catch the train.
If you can’t stand the
thought of it all
Maybe you should just get
out of here for a little while.
“If you haven’t planned a vacation and you have an opportunity to go on vacation for a
week, go to the Cape, go to the
Berkshires, it’s a great time of
year to go,” Gulliver said.
For that matter, you might
also want to think about planning next summer’s vacation,
too, because the state will resume work on the other half of
the bridge and we do this all
over again.
Adam Vaccaro can be reached
at adam.vaccaro@globe.com.
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A10
Editorial
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
Opinion
BOSTONGLOBE.COM/OPINION
Editorial
O
Trump’s cruel, unnecessary transgender ban
n the 69th anniversary of President Harry
S. Truman’s executive order that desegregated the military, President Donald
Trump reinstated a ban disqualifying
transgender people from serving in the
armed forces.
In a move no one, including members of the Senate
Armed Services Committee, anticipated, Trump tweeted, “After consultation with my generals and military
experts” — none of whom he named — “the United
States government will not accept or allow transgender
individuals to serve in any capacity in the U.S. military.”
The armed forces, he wrote, “cannot be burdened with
the tremendous medical costs and disruption that
transgender in the military would entail.”
The president did not specify when this order would
go into effect, or whether transgender men and women
currently serving would be discharged. According to a
June 2016 RAND Corporation study, there are between
1,320 and 6,630 transgender people in the military out
of 1.3 million active-duty service members.
As usual, Trump is playing fast and loose with the
facts. Studies conducted before the Pentagon lifted
the ban on transgender service members last year
found no evidence that they undermine combat readiness or unit cohesion. Furthermore, a RAND study
estimated that costs associated with medical care for
gender transition would only increase military health
care expenditures by $2.4 million to $8.4 million
each year, an increase of between 0.04 and 0.13 percent.
Even if treatment costs were truly unaffordable,
though, Trump’s ban goes far beyond the calls by some
conservatives to disallow coverage for gender transition.
His policy prohibits transgender people from the military entirely. And it apparently ends the military careers
of those serving currently, an outcome decried by both
Democrats and Republicans.
“There is no reason to force service members who
are able to fight, train and deploy to leave the military
— regardless of their gender identity,” Senator John McCain, chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said in a statement.
In all branches of the military, transgender people
have served this nation with distinction, and often did
so while forced to conceal their true selves. When the
ban was lifted last June, then-Defense Secretary Ashton
Carter said, “Our mission is to defend this country, and
we don’t want barriers unrelated to a person’s qualifications to serve preventing us from recruiting or retaining
the soldier, sailor, airman, or Marine who can best accomplish the mission.”
That should be the sole focus in maintaining a
strong military. Yet this commander in chief seems
more concerned with creating another distraction to
avert public attention from the Russia investigation, his
destructive health care bill, and his stillborn agenda. As
his approval ratings plummet, the reversal on transgender service members looks like nothing more than an
ugly appeal to shore up his base, and chip away another
piece of President Obama’s legacy.
What Trump has proposed threatens not only the
rights of transgender people — and, in the case of already serving service members, their livelihoods — but
the well-being of a country that deserves a military best
equipped for the unknown challenges ahead. To demean those who seek to honor this nation by serving in
its armed forces is more than spiteful and cruel. It’s unAmerican.
FDA commissioner
Frank Young
addresses an angry
crowd during a
conference on gay
health issues, in
Boston in 1988.
GLOBE FILE PHOTO
Preserving the vital mission
of the FDA
By Alison Bateman-House and Ameet Sarpatwari
consumer protection, the regulatory narrative changed
with the emergence of AIDS in the 1980s. In the face of a
seeming death sentence, patient-activists clamored for the
epeated scandals helped create the Food
opportunity to try investigational medicines of unknown
and Drug Administration we know today: a safety and efficacy. They argued that the drug approval prothriving agency that effectively protects
cess was too slow and wanted to avail themselves of any
chance, no matter how slight, of not dying from the disease.
consumers and patients from unsafe food
and drugs. However, Congress is overdue in
In response to this pressure, the FDA formalized a
passing legislation necessary to keep the process for patients with serious or life-threatening
FDA running, with one senator threatconditions to access investigational drugs. To allow such
ening further delay to force adoption of a policy that limits
“expanded access” requests, the FDA must determine that
the powers of the agency. It is important that we remember no similar therapies are already on the market, that access
the lessons of history and preserve the tools the FDA needs
will not interfere with ongoing clinical trials, and that the
for its vital mission.
benefits of access justify the potential harms. The FDA
In the 19th century, Congress granted the Customs Serapproves the overwhelming majority of expanded access
vice and Department of Agriculture limited powers to prorequests it receives.
tect Americans from adulterated drugs. However, it was not
Despite this fact, the perception of the FDA and its
until public exposure by muckrakers of egregious industry
procedures as obstacles to expanded access has persistpractices in the 1900s that more comprehensive legislation ed. In 2003, the Abigail Alliance for Better Access to Dewas passed. Signed by President Theodore Roosevelt in
velopmental Drugs sued the agency, arguing that termi1906, the Pure Food and Drug Act prohibited the introduc- nally ill patients had a constitutional right to access intion of adulterated or misbranded drugs in interstate comvestigational drugs. The case wound its way through the
merce but did not require premarket testing. It took the
courts, with a federal court of appeals ultimately ruling,
death of 107 people — many of them children — from the
in 2007, that “there is no fundamental right ‘deeply rootpoison-containing elixir sulfanilamide, to remedy this
ed in this nation’s history and tradition’ of access to [inshortcoming. The resulting outcry facilitated enactment of
vestigational] drugs for the terminally ill.” Yet this did
the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act in 1938, which
not end efforts to strip the FDA of its power to serve as
mandated that manufacturers demonstrate the safety of
the gatekeeper to potentially unsafe or ineffective invesdrugs prior to FDA approval. In 1962, the Kefauver-Harris
tigational medicines.
Amendments strengthened the protections of the FDCA, reIn 2014, Colorado enacted the first “right-to-try” law.
quiring premarket proof of efficacy in addition to safety.
Based on a model statute developed by the libertarian GoldAgain, the impetus for reform was tragedy: birth defects
water Institute, the law declared that patients’ interest in
caused by the drug thalidomide.
accessing investigational drugs superseded the federal govWhile the creation of the modern FDA is thus a story of
ernment’s interest in regulating those drugs and claimed to
R
abcde
Fou nd ed 1 8 72
JOHN W. HENRY
Publisher
BRIAN McGRORY
Editor
VINAY MEHRA
President and CFO
ELLEN CLEGG
Editor, Editorial Page
LINDA PIZZUTI HENRY
Managing Director
CHRISTINE S. CHINLUND
Managing Editor
SENIOR DEPUTY MANAGING EDITORS
Mark S. Morrow
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DEPUTY MANAGING EDITORS
Janice Page Arts and Newsroom Innovation
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negate the requirement of FDA review of expanded-access
requests. Variants of the Colorado law were enacted rapidly
in different states, despite unanswered questions about
their legality (such laws directly conflict with federal law)
and impact (no evidence exists that the laws have improved
patient access to investigational drugs). Today, 37 states
have right-to-try laws, and 11 more states have right-to-try
bills pending.
More recently, right-to-try supporters have set their
sights on a federal right-to-try law, which Republican
Senator Ron Johnson of Wisconsin would like to incorporate as an amendment to the stalled FDA funding bill.
This law would carve out access to investigational drugs
from the FDA’s mandate for certain patients and — unlike existing and pending state right-to-try laws — would
not be susceptible to constitutional challenges. It would
additionally forbid the FDA from considering any deaths
or serious side effects stemming from use of an investigational drug obtained under right-to-try. In other words,
the nation’s oldest consumer protection agency, forged in
the wake of tragedies, for the explicit purpose of protecting patients, would be blinded to harms linked to the
products it would be charged with reviewing for use in
the general population.
It is up to Congress to decide whether to maintain the
role of the FDA as protector or further limit its powers.
Hopefully, it will not take another public health tragedy to
check the current diminution of this vital agency.
Alison Bateman-House is an assistant professor of medical
ethics at NYU School of Medicine. Ameet Sarpatwari is an
instructor in medicine and assistant director of the
Program on Regulation, Therapeutics, and Law at Brigham
and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School.
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T h e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Opinion
A11
Inbox
Mass. faces challenges
on natural gas
Baker ‘pushes’ on gas facility?
‘Relents’ is more like it
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
Gov. Charlie Baker, accompanied by Lt. Gov. Karyn Polito, Secretary of Administration and Finance
Kristen Lepore, and Secretary of Health and Human Services Marylou Sudders, outline the budget.
JOAN VENNOCHI
Baker’s ‘MassHealth
switcheroo’
W
hen it comes to access to medical
care, it’s gut check time in America
— even in Massachusetts, the cradle
of health care reform.
In Washington, Republicans are
looking to cut billions in Medicaid funding and, with
that, health care access for as many as 20 million lowincome Americans. And in Massachusetts, Republican
Governor Charlie Baker wanted to cut costs by implementing what one aide calls “the MassHealth switcheroo.”
Under Baker’s plan, 140,000 nondisabled adults
between ages 21 and 64 would be transferred from
MassHealth — the state Medicaid program — to commercial health insurance, via the Commonwealth
Connector. Those affected, for example, would include
individuals earning $16,040 a year, or a two-person
household earning $21,600. They would pay no premiums, but would be responsible for what are described as modest copays. They would also have to pay
extra for dental care or seek it at a community health
center. But Democrats are balking, with the House
and Senate on Wednesday rejecting that piece of a reform package Baker called critical.
Senator Karen Spilka, a Democrat from Ashland
who heads the Senate budget committee, said Baker’s
proposal calls for “the most sweeping changes” to
MassHealth eligibility since the 1990s. Such changes
“cause me great trepidation,” she said at a Tuesday
State House hearing, which took place just as the US
Senate took the procedural vote necessary to begin debate on Republican-led efforts to repeal and replace
the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.
Citing the harm to Massachusetts from proposals
that could slash as much as $1 billion in Medicaid reimbursement funding, Baker has opposed the ACA repeal charge led by President Trump and GOP congressional leaders. Meanwhile, his own proposal would
shift thousands of people in Massachusetts from fully
subsidized health insurance to something different.
“Aren’t these the same people” already at risk of
losing coverage under the various congressional proposals? Spilka asked. In response, Marylou Sudders,
the state secretary of health and human services, cast
the administration’s effort as a way for Massachusetts
to prepare for expected cuts in federal funding and
make sure people don’t lose coverage. But this is mostly about saving money. If the status quo holds,
MassHealth spending will increase by $300 million,
administration officials told lawmakers.
As a piece in Commonwealth magazine, coauthored by Jim Stergios and Barbara Anthony of the Pioneer Institute, points out, MassHealth accounts for
43 percent of the state budget, with enrollment rising
from 1.3 million in 2011 to 1.95 million in 2017.
While enrollment went down slightly in 2018, due to
stricter oversight of applicant eligibility, continued enrollment growth is projected. To address the cost that
goes with it, Baker proposed, and the Legislature approved, $200 million in new employer taxes for two
years. But Beacon Hill Democrats rejected the
“switcheroo” part of Baker’s proposal, offering rare resistance to America’s most popular governor.
In another Commonwealth magazine piece, three
Democratic lawmakers argue it’s simply a way to balance the budget “on the backs of the working poor.”
Jay Gonzalez, a Democratic former budget chief who
is running for governor and testified against the measure at Tuesday’s hearing, said that “kicking 140,000
people off the MassHealth program is the wrong direction for Massachusetts.” But Sudders insists the
switch from MassHealth is a necessary step to preserve the state’s “commitment to universal health care
coverage.”
In Massachusetts, health insurance reform became
law in 2006, under Republican Governor Mitt Romney. At 2.8 percent, the uninsured rate today in Massachusetts is the lowest in the country. That good
news comes at a cost to taxpayers.
To cut spending, how many poor people can you
push, in good conscience, from fully subsidized health
care to what Baker is proposing? The “MassHealth
switcheroo” is another version of the values question
that is playing out in Washington.
Joan Vennochi can be reached at
vennochi@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter
@Joan_Vennochi.
Cancer brings it home
By Kathleen Hirsch
T
he china tea cups were laid
out beside a vase of roses. I arrived late to this reunion of
high school friends and former teachers, and could hear
the laughter from the door as I slipped in.
Lunch was over, and our hostess was holding forth, confessing the teenaged pranks
of which our former principal and a beloved English teacher were heretofore innocent. Tears of laughter rolled down their
cheeks.
Our hostess sat back and took a breath,
satisfied that her stories were having the
desired effect. This was her party. It would
not come again, this day. And in a way that
ordinary life doesn’t often underscore, we
all knew it.
Cancer is wasting her body. She is as far
beyond the reach of Western medical
treatment as an untethered kite in the
wind.
In the pause that followed our laughter,
someone asked how she is doing, really.
“Pain has become my constant companion,” she told us.
The medical marijuana, a lifeline to relief.
And then she was off again, regaling us
with more funny stories.
With the diagnosis of Senator John McCain, cancer has entered our collective
consciousness, if it wasn’t there already.
Through the dark days of dear ones, I have
received an unexpected, inestimable gift
— recalibration. My friend has brought me
back, from the chaos of tweets, and adventitious commentary, to bedrock. Each of us
— national heroes, scoundrels, and ordinary citizens alike — is given one singular
and precious life. And it is never long
enough.
We easily lose touch in the blurry
AP
brinksmanship of public life. My devices
alert me to yet another Facebook post
about lobster rolls, photo-shopped satire,
recipes for Turmeric tea. My friend, and
now our ailing senator, bring me back to
sanity. They remind me of the dignity that
accompanies real suffering. With nothing
as frontal as the current political patois,
they expose what is unworthy, even morally grotesque, in these times. Their argument is simply to wake up each morning
with the courage and grace to survive another day. We aren’t dying of cancer, my
friend tells me. We are living with it.
Recently with my friend, another visitor confessed her sense of awkwardness,
and uncertainty about how to behave in
the face of deep suffering.
“I just don’t know what to do,” she said,
“or what to say. It makes me avoid the
whole thing.”
I thought how frequently we all do this,
avoid suffering that we can’t single-handedly or simplistically change — racism,
poverty, unemployment, cancer.
My friend looked up from the quilt she
was stitching.
“There’s only one thing we really want,”
she said gently. “We just want for you to be
here with us. Just your presence.”
I was reminded of this the day I arrived
late for lunch. I took the empty chair and
looked around the table at old, beloved
friends. I know these women to be passionately verbal, lovers of story and debate. I know them to be activists, do-itnow people. But here, that day, we were all
silent. Occasionally one of us would ask a
question, but mainly we listened.
And it struck me that something quite
other than our usual verve for problem
solving was being asked of us. We were being asked to be witnesses.
Our friend had planned this luncheon
as a celebration, so that she could bequeath to us the most precious gift of all:
herself. She gave us snapshots that the
years had dimmed, tales of her spirited
and off-the-wall adolescence, her marijuana smoking, romance-filled 20s, her years
as a devoted mother and a successful
banker, and her recent journey into prayer
and acceptance. She is determined to create meaningful moments and memories as
long as she can.
While it is never what we want, there
are times when suffering offers what we
need, the image of our better nature. My
friend, with her generous heart, is teaching me invaluable lessons about how to
live. We are here to look one another in the
eye, to hold hands, to listen, and to laugh,
and somehow, from out of this genuine,
heart-felt engagement, to create the conditions that honor — with safety, hope, and
opportunity — each life that will never be
repeated.
Kathleen Hirsch lives in Jamaica Plain
and blogs at www.kathleenhirsch.com.
With the headline “Baker pushes on gas facility” and the
subhead “Directs officials to look into safety, air quality concerns” (Metro, July 18), the Globe creates the false impression that the governor has shown leadership on the Weymouth compressor station issue. In fact, the opposite is
true; “relents,” not “pushes,” would have been a much more
accurate word for this headline.
Saying repeatedly that the state could not get involved,
since this was a federal project, the governor tried to dodge
this issue for several months. He took this latest action only
after a tremendous, sustained effort, including a prolonged
sit-in outside his State House office, by community leaders
forced him to do so politically.
Meanwhile, Baker and Energy Secretary Matthew
Beaton seem to ignore the evidence (largely in a 2015 study
commissioned by Attorney General Maura Healey) that
Massachusetts does not need new supplies of natural gas to
meet its electricity needs, and that new gas infrastructure
proposed by Enbridge Inc., through Massachusetts and other states, is largely intended to export gas to more lucrative
overseas markets.
PAUL HORN
West Roxbury
People of Northfield have message
for Weymouth in gas facility battle
It was with great interest that I read about Governor Baker’s recent letter directing state agencies to investigate compressor station issues in Weymouth (“Baker pushes on gas
facility,” Metro, July 18). As a selectman in Northfield,
where a massive compressor station was proposed along
Kinder Morgan’s now-canceled Northeast Energy Direct
pipeline, I am glad to see the state stepping into an active
role of hearing citizens and advocating for their health and
safety.
Two years ago, with a compressor station looming, like
Weymouth we did our best to research potential air and
water pollution and associated health impacts. While our
community has been spared (for now), I offer our example
as encouragement to the concerned citizens of Weymouth:
You are not alone in this struggle.
Many of my neighbors who first learned about the dangers of natural gas pipeline infrastructure when it was a
threat to our town continue to actively oppose unnecessary
pipeline build-out in Otis State Forest in Western Mass. We
enthusiastically support energy policy that includes demand response, weatherization, and energy efficiency, as
well as sensibly sited renewable energy and an updated
grid that can handle distributed generation.
We must get beyond gas, for the sake of the climate, a
truly reliable grid, and stable electricity prices.
JULIA BLYTH
Northfield
McCain can’t be both a maverick
truth­teller and a loyal Republican
John McCain delivered eloquent comments, upon his return to the Senate following treatment for brain cancer, on
the need for bipartisanship and regarding his opposition to
the secrecy of the Republicans’ process (“GOP struggles
over health bill,” Page A1, July 26). However, it would have
been far more meaningful had McCain refused to vote on
what your reporter described as “a shell of a bill” that was
developed in secret, and stood with the two courageous Republicans — Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of
Alaska — who voted against the motion to proceed to debate.
McCain wants to have it both ways — to be seen as a
truth-teller and an honest man (which he often is) and to be
a loyal Republican who votes with his party on most crucial
issues. In this dire situation, when millions stand to lose
their health care and their nursing home services, not to
mention their lives, more than words are needed.
As many have pointed out, McCain received the best
possible (government-provided) health care. He should expect nothing less for his fellow Americans.
SUSAN JHIRAD
Medford
In matters of who’s insured,
race is a data point worth examining
In her July 25 letter “A curious obsession with haves and
have-nots” — in response to Leila Philip’s op-ed “So you
think you can do without health insurance?” — Brigitte
Beauchesne raises the important question in relation to
health insurance coverage: “Why does the color of her skin
matter?”
In 2016, according to the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention, 18 percent of Hispanic Americans, 10 percent of black Americans, and 6 percent of white Americans
did not have health insurance. Based on the current state
of insurance coverage, clearly the color of one’s skin matters.
I commend Beauchesne for raising this important question. If more of us would ask questions rather than hurl accusations, the state of race relations would improve greatly.
DOUGLAS REICHGOTT
Roslindale
I was a Boy Scout, I knew Boy Scouts —
Mr. President, you’re no Boy Scout
Re “Scouts get dose of politics” (Page A7, July 26): In the
1950s, we rural Iowa Boy Scouts would squirm a bit at the
aspirational earnestness of the Scout Law, but I still remember all of its elements: “A Scout is trustworthy, loyal,
helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful,
thrifty, brave, clean, and reverent.”
I presume that the current president showers from time
to time, but otherwise, none of those adjectives describes
the man.
DERRICK TE PASKE
Belmont
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The demand for payment
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they hold three fund-raisers a
year to benefit what is now the
state’s Department of Conservation and Recreation. The teens
discovered the law as they were
researching ways to fund a recreational center near Jackson
Square that would include the
neighborhood’s first ice rink in
decades.
The students landed on the
$13.8 million figure by calculating that TD Garden could raise
$150,000 at three fund-raising
events a year over 24 years, and
counted late fees, penalties,
fines, and interest. They called
the figure a conservative estimate considering the star power the arena could draw.
Tricia McCorkle, a spokeswoman for TD Garden, made
no promises to pay up.
“We appreciate and applaud
the efforts of Hyde Square Task
Force youth leaders to fight for
their community. Since the uncovering of this legislation by
these youth leaders, we have
been working directly with
DCR to correct the oversight,”
McCorkle said in a statement.
She added, “TD Garden and
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We’ll take care of the outside, so you can
met with the teenagers after the
press conference later Wednesday afternoon. Troy Wall, a
spokesman for the DCR, said in
a statement that officials wanted to “thank them for their efforts identifying the 1993 legislation that enables charity
events at TD Garden for state
recreational facilities.”
Troy said officials “will continue to work with [TD Garden]
to identify a resolution that satisfies the legislative requirement,” though he did not say
how much officials are demanding, or how that money
should be spent.
‘We’ve gone the
entirety of our
lives without a
recreation center,
and that’s
ridiculous.’
EDELIND PEGUERO
Member of the Hyde Square
Task Force
The students said later that
they will maintain their dem an d t h at T D G a r d e n p ay
$13.8 million in obligations
and that the money be used to
fund the completion of the recreation center.
The mandate for fund-raisers was part of the 1993 law
that authorized the construction of a new sports arena to replace Boston Garden. Jeremy
Jacobs, owner of the Boston
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10 YEARS
ware North, the corporation
that owns the new Garden, had
preferred the fund-raising requirement over another option
from state lawmakers — yearly
$3.5 million payments to benefit city recreation centers.
But since the law was
passed, no fund-raisers have
been held — and no one called
attention to it until the Hyde
Square Task Force teenagers began to review the law as part of
their effort to raise funds for a
new $21 million recreation center in Jackson Square.
The project is being developed by a nonprofit community
developer, Urban Edge. State
officials have previously committed $5.6 million to the project on the condition that Urban
Edge raise the remaining
amount on its own.
Now, the teenagers are demanding that TD Garden pay a
lump sum to the DCR to compensate for the lack of fundraising events. The teens want
some of those funds to be used
to complete the new recreation
center, saying their neighborhood has gone without an ice
rink for area youth for more
than two decades, when two
state rinks were closed because
of disrepair.
“We’ve gone the entirety of
our lives without a recreation
center, and that’s ridiculous,”
said Edelind Peguero, 16, of
Roxbury. She said the ice rink
would serve a neighborhood
that has 26,000 black and Latino youth within a mile and a
half, and she questioned whether other, pre-dominantly white
communities would go so long
without a recreation center.
Under the 1993 law, the proceeds from the annual fundraisers must benefit DCR for
the use and maintenance of recreation facilities in Boston. It is
not clear whether any funds
from TD Garden can be used to
develop the Jackson Square recreation center, because it is being developed by Urban Edge,
and not the state.
But the Hyde Square teenagers argue that the state can find
ways to fully fund the Urban
Edge center, because the state
closed the area’s only two ice
skating rinks and has failed to
replace them.
“So that the injustice and racial inequity of the past can be
addressed,” Peguero said.
The students also took issue
with state and TD Garden officials’ refusal to meet with them
when they first inquired about
the law, and they only responded after the students gathered
information by filing a public
records request.
Pearson also said that DCR
Commissioner Leo Roy responded to requests for a meeting only after they had scheduled the press conference.
State Representative Jeffrey
Sanchez, who represents the
neighborhood and was just promoted to Massachusetts House
budget chief, attended Wednesday ’s press conference and
called on officials to answer to
the neighborhood’s demand for
a new recreation center.
“I’m proud to stand with
them in this endeavor to bring
more attention to this rink, because it’s so important,” he said.
“This community is just asking,
‘come to the table.’ ”
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T H E B O S T O N G L O B E T H U R S DAY, J U LY 2 7, 2 017 | B O S T ON G L O B E.C O M / M E T R O
Insider
considers
taking on
Warren
Yvonne Abraham
Mr. Trump,
I’ll be your AG
Choose me, Mr. President!
As a highly-trained political analyst, I’m picking up
from your full week of publicly humiliating VERY
weak Jeff Sessions that his
days are numbered.
I know that, on paper, I
am dangerously unqualified
to be your next attorney general. But hey, if
dangerously unqualified was even a thing
anymore, would I be writing to you?
Now, it’s true, I am not technically an attorney. But I totally aced my citizenship test.
And I think we both know that, when it
comes to being your AG, unfamiliarity with
the law is a major plus.
Besides, the only thing that counts when
it comes to serving you, Sire, is blind loyalty.
And that, I have in spectacular abundance.
Not, perhaps, in as much abundance as your
new communications director and alpha-sycophant Anthony Scaramucci. He might look
like the villain from a late-1980s rom-com,
but he’s a softie, showering praise upon your
political instincts and athletic prowess.
But I love you too, Highness. So much.
The fake media, which I renounce, don’t understand how much this country adores you.
We love you as much as do your own kids —
who, by the way, are but innocent children,
not responsible for anything they say or do.
I would walk through fire for you, My
Liege. But of course, as you already know,
you’re under no obligation to return my fealty. You could throw me under a thousand
buses with those massive hands of yours,
and I would love it, because #MAGA.
To others, your recent speeches and interviews bespeak the randomly firing synapses
of a demented megalomaniac, your rhetoric
beneath the dignity of your office. But to me,
they are as a heavenly choir of angels, containing a logic too divine for most mortals to
comprehend. You got Boy Scouts to boo!
Also, like the Mooch, I am prepared to reverse every position I have held before now. I
will delete every tweet that displeases you.
My hypocrisy will be transparent, and therefore unassailable.
Such is my unconditional love for you,
Eminence. Also, my shamelessness. Though,
my rumored rival for this job, Senator Ted
Cruz, might have a slight edge on me there:
You insulted his wife, and suggested his father was involved in the JFK assassination,
yet still he falls at your enormous feet! It’s a
testament to your magnetism, Master.
And yet, somehow, beleaguered Jeff Sessions seems to have resisted it — at least in
that one moment where he recused himself
from the investigation into your campaign
(He apparently un-recused when it came to
firing former FBI head James Comey). Apart
from working night and day to enact your regressive agenda, Sessions knows nothing
about loyalty! Sure, he was the first senator
to endorse you, but as you say, that was all
about your crowds. Why couldn’t he love you
for you — like I do?
And why isn’t he protecting you now?
What’s the use of having an AG if he won’t
re-open closed investigations into your political opponents? Forget this namby-pamby
talk about the independence of the Justice
Department and the rule of law. I will work
for you alone, My Lord, and I will go after
whatever political enemies you tell me to.
On that subject, I know you’ve got your
heart set on Hillary Clinton, but might I suggest Susan Collins? The GOP senator from
Maine keeps gumming up the Obamacare repeal, whining about crippling Medicaid cuts
and tens of millions losing health insurance.
Then she was caught on a hot mike talking
smack about you, Your Grace. If that’s not illegal, we can totally make it so: Crimes
against calamity!
Who’s going to stop us, Majesty? Let’s
keep firing folks at Justice until we get to
Special Counsel Robert Mueller, investigating your campaign’s ties to Russia (led by
your bud and superstrong hunk Vladimir Putin). It’s not like the GOP Congress is going to
stand up to you. Here you are, launching an
unprecedented attack on your own Justice
Department, and House Speaker Paul Ryan
just rolls over, saying “The president gets to
decide what his personnel is.”
Too easy!
And if anybody does finally find the courage to do something? Well, Your Highness,
I’ll gladly take the fall. And beg your pardon.
Yvonne Abraham is a Globe columnist. She
can be reached at
yvonne.abraham@globe.com.
Lindstrom helped
Brown win in ‘10
Could encounter
crowded primary
By Jim O’Sullivan
GLOBE STAFF
PHOTOS BY CRAIG F. WALKER/GLOBE STAFF
Attorney Carmen Durso (from left), Rodney and Paula Ford, and attorney Mitchell Garabedian took
part in a press conference at Durso’s office in Boston on Wednesday.
PRIEST’S ALLEGED
VICTIMS DECRY
HIS RELEASE
By Michael Levenson
GLOBE STAFF
When John Harris was 21 and just coming out as gay, a professor at the University of Lowell referred him to a priest named Paul R. Shanley, who had started a retreat for gay people called the Exodus Center, in Milton. There, he said,
Shanley raped him in February 1979. He was one of scores of alleged victims of
the notorious former “street priest” whose lives were irreparably damaged by
sexual abuse at the hands of someone they trusted.
On Wednesday, Harris stood with other victims and denounced the doctors
who cleared the 86-year-old defrocked
priest for release from prison Friday,
finding that he was no longer a threat to
the public after 12 years behind bars for
raping a young boy at a Newton church
in the early 1980s.
By turns angr y, solemn, and resolved, the victims and their attorneys
demanded changes in the standards
used to determine whether a prisoner is
a “sexually dangerous person” who can
be held behind bars even after his or
her sentence is completed. They also
said they want the public to be on notice that they believe Shanley remains a
sexual predator, despite the doctors’
“I’m concerned he’s going to abuse again,” said John
opinion.
“This is a guy, Shanley, who has ma- Harris, one of Paul Shanley’s alleged victims.
nipulated the system, the church, and
the public, and knows how to manipulate people,” Harris, 59, said calmly at a
press conference at a downtown Boston law office. “I’m concerned he’s going to
abuse again.”
Shanley was one of the most reviled priests to emerge during the sexual
abuse crisis in the Catholic Church more than a decade ago. He preyed, according to victims’ attorneys, on children as young as 6 and adults as old as in their
50s. But he was notorious for abusing teenagers who came to him for counseling because they had run away from home, were confused about their sexuality,
or were struggling with drugs.
“If Paul Shanley doesn’t qualify as a sexually dangerous person, then nobody
will ever qualify,” said Carmen L. Durso, an attorney who represented many
Shanley victims in civil claims against the Catholic Church.
Middlesex District Attorney Marian T. Ryan’s office, which sought to have
Shanley committed to prison after his sentence was completed, said the doc- CARMEN DURSO,
tors’ reports that thwarted the effort have not been finalized and are not public. an attorney
As such, nothing is known about the basis for their decision.
‘If Paul
Shanley
doesn’t
qualify as a
sexually
dangerous
person, then
nobody will.’
SHANLEY, Page B4
Longtime Republican operative Beth Lindstrom, a former
senior aide to Mitt Romney and
manager of Scott Brown’s victorious Senate campaign, said
Wednesday she is considering a
challenge to US Senator Elizabeth Warren.
Lindstrom has held a series
of conversations with top state
Republicans about the prospect
of seeking
the party
nomination
and is leaning toward
running, according to
several people familiar
with her
thinking.
“ I a m a c - Beth
tively explor- Lindstrom
ing a run for also served on
U S S e n a t e ,” Mitt Romney’s
L i n d s t r o m staff.
wrote in an email. “I’m a wife and mother
with three kids who cares deeply about our state and where we
are heading as a country. So
much of our politics these days
is pointless bickering.
“We need a senator who will
work with people of all political
stripes to make progress for
Massachusetts.”
Lindstrom would be at least
the fourth Republican candidate actively campaigning or
moving toward a run against
Warren. All the others are men:
Shiva Ayyadurai, state Representative Geoff Diehl, and businessman John Kingston.
She has consulted with several veterans of Romney’s political orbit, GOP sources said, including Eric Fehrnstrom, Peter
Flaherty, Gail Gitcho, and Rob
Willington.
“If anyone is going to take on
[Warren], there’s probably no
other person better than Beth,
or a woman like Beth who is
strong and capable and going to
present herself well,” said Jennifer Nassour, a former state
party chairwoman. “She could
give Warren a really good challenge.”
Nassour added, “She is an
awesome woman. She’s smart,
she’s well-spoken, she is really
LINDSTROM, Page B3
Improper exhaust pipe blamed for blaze
Fire commissioner also cites delayed call
to 911 from Dorchester construction site
By Travis Andersen,
Tim Logan,
and John R. Ellement
GLOBE STAFF
BOSTON FIRE DEPARTMENT
A fire last month damaged a $45 million complex of apartments
and condos being built in Dorchester’s Ashmont section.
A poorly installed exhaust pipe
is to blame for the six-alarm fire
that tore through the Treadmark
building in Dorchester last month,
fire officials said Wednesday.
And the error was compounded
when construction workers testing
a generator waited about 90 minutes to call 911 after they first
smelled smoke and saw haze inside
the six-story building, said Boston
Fire Commissioner Joseph Finn,
who released the Fire Department’s
report on the fire Wednesday.
The blaze badly damaged the
$45 million building, an 83-unit
mix of affordable apartments and
market-rate condominiums being
developed by Boston-based Trinity
Financial that was set to open in
mid-July. It broke out on the afternoon of June 28 as workers were
testing the building’s emergency
systems ahead of safety inspections
planned for the following day.
They were testing an emergency
generator in the basement, Finn
said, and using a cast-iron exhaust
pipe, installed the day before, to
vent fumes from the generator up
through the six-story building and
FIRE, Page B4
B2
Metro
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
TheMetroMinute
CITY HALL
UPGRADE —
GET SMART
Renovations to the
main lobby at
Boston City Hall
have been
completed after
several months of
work, creating
what officials say
is a more pleasant
space. Renovations
include a welcome
desk, a large video
board streaming
city news and
updates, and selfservice
touchscreen kiosks
that can assist
users with city
information and
services in six
languages. There
are also new
lighting, a coffee
shop, and an art
installation.
YOON S. BYUN/GLOBE STAFF/FILE
What became
of the priests
By Roy Greene and Jeremiah Manion
GLOBE STAFF
Defrocked priest Paul R. Shanley is slated
to be released from prison as early as this
week after serving 12 years in prison for raping a Sunday school student in the early
1980s. Shanley, 86, is one of the most notorious Massachusetts figures in the Catholic
Church sexual abuse scandal. Here is a look at
some of the others, and details of what happened to them.
JOHN GEOGHAN For decades, Geoghan
preyed on more than 100
young boys in a half-dozen
Boston-area parishes. In February 2002, he was sentenced
to nine to 10 years in state
prison for fondling a youth at
a pool in Waltham. On Aug.
23, 2003, while in protective
custody at the maximum security Souza-Baranowski Correctional Center
in Shirley, Geoghan was strangled and
stomped to death in his cell by another inmate.
RONALD H. PAQUIN In 2002, Paquin pleaded guilty to three counts of
child rape involving a boy
from Haverhill from 1989 to
1992, when he was an associate pastor of St. John the
Baptist Church there. Paquin,
who is 75, was released from
prison in 2015 but arrested
again in February following
his indictment on 29 new counts of sexual
misconduct in Maine.
JOSEPH BIRMINGHAM Birmingham, who
died in 1989, was accused of being one of the
worst abusers in the Archdiocese of Boston.
More than 50 men claimed they were abused
by Birmingham during the priest’s 29-year
tenure with the Archdiocese.
ROBERT M. BURNS In 2005, Burns pleaded
guilty to raping and sexually
assaulting five boys while
working as a priest in Jamaica Plain and Charlestown in
the 1980s and 1990s. He was
given an eight- to 11-year
prison sentence. Burns has
been released and as recently
as 2015 was living in Boston.
JAMES F. TALBOT A former Boston College
High School priest, teacher,
and hockey coach, he faced
multiple accusations of
abuse. In 2005, when he was
67, Talbot pleaded guilty to
molesting two teenage boys
during wrestling practice in
the late 1970s and was sentenced to five to seven years
in jail. He was released in 2011.
Sources: Globe archives; news reports; and
BishopAccountability.org.
Roy Greene can be reached at
roy.greene@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter
@roygreene
KEITH BEDFORD/GLOBE STAFF
Pushing the season on Halloween
T
By Steve Annear
GLOBE STAFF
he cool and damp weather that hit the area this week
isn’t the only thing that has people feeling like fall has
arrived ahead of schedule.
In stores across the region, Halloween-themed
candy has already started to appear on shelves, and
the spooky sight has some people — who say it’s far too soon to promote the
fun-size treats — collectively shaking their heads.
Mike Mazzaferro, a Watertown resident, said he was taken aback by a
display of black-and-orange Kit Kat bars and large bags of candy corn during a recent summer trip to a supermarket in Plymouth.
“I don’t understand who is buying candy corn” this time of year, he said.
“It’s going to be there in September.”
When he asked a clerk why the candy was already out, the employee
told Mazzaferro that it was “harvest candy,” and not necessarily just for
Halloween, he said.
“What are they harvesting? It’s July,” Mazzaferro said. “I love fall as
much as everyone. But I happen to like summer more. I don’t see the point
of wishing it away, it’s not even August.”
Others have reported seeing pumpkin-shaped peanut butter cups and
bags of color-coordinated candy corn for sale in Somerville and Mansfield.
JONATHAN GULLIVER, the state’s acting
highway administrator, on work this week to
overhaul the Commonwealth Avenue bridge
Steve Annear can be reached at steve.annear@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @steveannear.
AROUND THE REGION
B U R L I N GTO N , V T.
Wet summer brings
out the mosquitoes
A wet summer has been good news for mosquitoes in Vermont. According to the Vermont
Agency of Agriculture, the state has seen about
30 percent more mosquitoes caught this year in
its traps. The Burlington Free Press reports the
area around Burlington has seen above average
rates of rainfall this summer — about 14.6 inches since May 1. (AP)
B O STO N
Judge affirms ruling on
police exam biases
US District Judge William G. Young Wednesday
upheld his previous ruling that Boston’s former
promotional exam to choose police lieutenants
had a discriminatory impact on minorities, rejecting the city’s appeal. In a 31-page opinion,
Young said the 2008 civil service exam, which
has since been replaced, “had a racially disparate impact.” The exam included a written test
of 100 multiple-choice questions, focusing on a
QUOTE OF THE DAY
‘There’s only so many ways
to get in and out of Boston
from an east­to­west
standpoint. You’ve got the
river roads, Route 2, and
the turnpike. That’s what
made this project so
difficult, is that there are
very limited options.’
A shopper in Carver shared a picture on social media last
week that showed rows of candy-packed boxes at a Shaw’s location, marked “Hershey’s Halloween.” The photograph was captioned, “Umm excuse me.”
Ryan Lee said orange boxes with pictures of castles, witches,
and black cats were stacked at a supermarket in East Boston
that he recently visited. Inside the boxes were plastic bags overflowing with miniature Hershey’s chocolate bars and Almond Joys.
“I was thinking it was a little early,” he said in a telephone interview. “It’s
not even August yet. I don’t ever remember seeing Halloween stuff up in
July.”
Philip Tracey, a spokesman for Stop & Shop, said the candy in their
stores is a “minimal product offering” ahead of a bigger push that typically
takes place near Halloween.
Teresa Edington, a spokeswoman for Star Market and Shaw’s, said
stores are in the process of setting up candy displays “to ensure that we are
meeting the needs of our customers. The timing of this setup and display,”
she said, “is consistent with past years.”
Still, some customers aren’t quite ready for the candy’s arrival.
candidate’s abilities to read, understand, interpret, and explain material in written form. Candidates had to score at least 70 on the written
test to advance to an education and experience
review. Critics of the test hailed the judge’s decision, which affirmed a 2015 ruling in the case.
In 2012, 10 sergeants sued the city over the exam, claiming it discriminated against minority
candidates. A spokesman for the Boston police
said the department “is reviewing the decision
and determining available options.”
B O STO N
Baker drafting
immigration bill
In response to a Supreme Judicial Court ruling
this week, Governor Charlie Baker is crafting
legislation that would allow the State Police to
hold some individuals on federal immigration
detainers after they post bail for a state crime
or if they’ve previously been convicted of a violent crime such as murder or rape. The state’s
top court on Monday ruled that nothing in Massachusetts law allows state or local police to
honor Immigration and Customs Services detainer requests for defendants wanted only for
civil immigration violations. The governor’s bill
would seek to reinstate a policy put in place by
the Baker administration in June 2016 broadening the level of cooperation between State Police and federal immigration police. (SHNS)
H A RT FO R D
Mother of four gets
deportation reprieve
A housekeeper and mother of four who received
sanctuary in a New Haven church has been
granted an emergency stay of a deportation order that would have sent her back to her native
Guatemala. Nury Chavarria, who entered the
country 24 years ago, had been fitted with an
ankle bracelet in June and ordered out of the
country by July 20. She instead took refuge inside the Iglesia de Dios Pentecostal church in
New Haven. Governor Dannel Malloy says that
US Immigration and Customs Enforcement
agreed Wednesday to take another look at Chavarria’s case and a US District Court judge issued the stay. The 43-year-old, who lives in Norwalk, has four children ranging ages from 9 to
21. Her oldest child has cerebral palsy. She had
been denied asylum but had been granted yearly stays and work permits since 2009. (AP)
POLICE BLOTTER
R MURDER SUSPECT A Worcester man accused of
murdering 27-year-old Vanessa Marcotte last
summer on a road in the rural town of Princeton
was ordered held without bail after his arraignment Wednesday in Worcester Superior Court.
Angelo Colon-Ortiz, 31, did not appear in the
courtroom. He stayed in the lockup and wore
headphones to listen to the proceedings.
Through a court interpreter, he entered a notguilty plea. His next court date is Aug. 24. His
lawyer, Edward Ryan, spoke to reporters outside
of the courtroom. When asked how Colon-Ortiz
was doing, Ryan said his client was frightened.
“It’s very difficult, very difficult,” Ryan said. “He
doesn’t speak any English. He’s never been involved in any court process before, at all — and
he’s quite nervous and frightened.” Colon-Ortiz
was indicted in June by a Worcester County
grand jury. He had previously been arraigned in
Leominster District Court on charges of aggravated assault and battery, and assault with intent
to rape, and was held on $10 million bail.
R CAT ATTACKED Brockton officials are asking for
the public’s help in investigating a serious injury
of a cat Sunday, after the animal was found impaled with a dart. The city animal control department responded Sunday to a report on the
injured cat on Mulberry Street, the department
said in a statement. The cat was found with what
appeared to be a handmade dart piercing its face
near its eye, the department said. The dart was
suspected to have been fired from a blowgun.
The department asked that anyone with information on the case to call 508-580-7835.
R DOUBLE STABBING Two young men were
stabbed on Boston Common Wednesday eve-
ning, and three people were arrested as they attempted to flee on a Red Line train at the MBTA
Park Street station, authorities said. One victim
was in critical condition at Tufts Medical Center
after being stabbed in the stomach, Police Commissioner William B. Evans said.The other victim suffered a “superficial” wound to the back,
he said. One of those arrested will be charged
with assault and battery with intent to murder,
Evans said. Neither the victims nor those arrested were identified. Evans said two “groups” of
people who looked to be in their early 20s were
fighting when the stabbing occurred, although
he said he did not think they were gang members.Evans said the stabbings were “unusual” for
the area of Boston Common, a popular spot for
residents and tourists. “The common is a safe
place. I don’t want people to be afraid to come
down here,” Evans said.
TOP STORIES Boston teens are pressing TD Garden to make good on a promise to raise money for recreation venues A1
A poorly installed exhaust pipe is to blame for the fire that destroyed an apartment complex in Dorchester B1
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Metro
B3
A walk in the woods . . . with sound equipment
By Steve Annear
GLOBE STAFF
Steve Wilkes has all of the
necessary equipment for trekking deep into the New Hampshire woods.
Boots? Check. A wool hat
and gloves? Yep. A knapsack for
his supplies? Ready to go.
But the Berklee College of
Music professor also lugged
along an 18-gallon plastic bin
stuffed to the brim with microphones, portable field recorders, and a mess of tangled cables.
As the winner of this year’s
White Mountain National Forest Artist-in-Residence program, Wilkes will spend three
weeks using the woods as his
muse, capturing the many
sounds of nature — those tiny
performances like birds signing
at dawn, or the huff and puff of
hikers as they ascend the tallest
peaks — that tell the story of a
vast New England landscape.
Wilkes will then upload
those clips to his website, “Hear
the Forest,” building an interactive “aural map” of the region to
share with the public.
“The way various sounds of
nature can combine and become synched can be one of the
greatest 20th-century musical
pieces you have ever heard,”
Wilkes said in an interview
Tuesday, as he packed his vehicle and prepared to make the
long drive north. “You can listen back to some of these things
that you can record — and it
probably happens more with
natural sounds — and it can actually take you to that place.”
The artist-in-residence project, now in its seventh year, is
sponsored by the White Mountain National Forest, along with
the Arts Alliance of Northern
New Hampshire and Friends of
JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF
Steve Wilkes pulled out his recorder to try to gather sound of children along the trail as he hiked Mt. Israel.
Mead Base Conservation Center, the organization that will
provide Wilkes with temporary
lodging at its camp.
Wilkes was announced the
2017 winner in May, after a
committee sifted through piles
of applications from a range of
interested artists. He will give a
talk about his project, and ways
people can get involved, on
Thursday, in Campton, N.H.
Frumie Selchen, executive
director of the Arts Alliance of
Northern New Hampshire, a
nonprofit, said Wilkes’s proposal stood out because of its
unique approach of involving
the public.
As part of his project, Wilkes
eventually wants hikers, campers, and anyone else visiting the
roughly 800,000 acres of land
that make up the national forest, to submit their own audio
recordings for his website.
The goal is to create a “time
capsule” of sounds that he
hopes people can turn to 10, 20,
or even 50 years from now to
see (or more precisely, to hear)
how the landscape may have
changed over time.
His project was also intriguing to the committee because it
allows people who can’t travel
— or have never traveled — to
the White Mountains to experience what’s hidden in the trees
and along the many trails.
“It’s both for the people who
do get a chance to go in the forest, but also something for people from all around the world,”
said Selchen. “It really is some-
thing that we hope will stay up
for a long time, and that ideally
we can keep adding to.”
Wilkes came up with the
concept to record and map the
sounds of the forest following a
similar project he launched in
2010 called “Hear Cape Cod.”
Since that project wrapped
up, Wilkes had been searching
for a new opportunity to record
snapshots of nature in an entirely different setting.
Because the national forest
is so large, and extends across
New Hampshire and into western Maine, Wilkes has a lot of
ground to cover. It goes without
saying that during his threeweek stay, he won’t be able to
document everything that’s intrinsic to his surroundings.
“This job could never fully
be finished,” he said. “But the
idea with my residency is to
simply get the process started.”
Wilkes, a percussion professor at Berklee, is now deep in
the forest, at a time of year ripe
with chirping crickets, robust
coneheads, and cicadas, he
said.
“Late afternoon and early
evening should be great for capturing a lot of those sounds in a
natural landscape like the forest,” Wilkes said.
Then there’s the chatter
from the many hikers who
trudge up mountains on day
trips, or ride the Mount Washington Cog Railway. Add to that
the rangers and forest workers
on site who are constantly interacting with visitors.
At night, he’ ll search for
owls, he said. And in the early
mornings, before the sun is
high in the sky, he’ll try to capture the songs of the many
birds.
Of course, there are also the
babbling brooks and waterfalls
that can be found buried within
the dense forest, which offer
their own type of chorus.
“Everything is going to kind
of be day-to-day and be different from day to day,” he said.
“I’ll be using my ear and following my ear, and listening to
what people have to say in
terms of their suggestions.”
Steve Annear can be reached at
steve.annear@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@steveannear.
Ex­aide to Romney and Brown considers taking on Warren
uLINDSTROM
Continued from Page B1
liked amongst people in the
party who have been around
for a while, just has a great
reputation as a hard worker.
She clearly understands what
the race takes since she was
Brown’s campaign manager.”
Lindstrom, who lives in
Groton, was executive director
of the state Lottery during the
1990s and, later, chief of consumer affairs and business
regulation during the Romney
administration.
The first female executive
director of the state Republican Party, she was Brown’s
campaign manager during his
2010 special-election win over
then-Attorney General Martha
Coakley.
During the 2014 cycle, she
led Commonwealth Future, a
super PAC backing Charlie
Baker against Coakley. According to the Center for Public Integrity, the group took in most
of its money from the Republican Governors Association
and spent $7.6 million on TV
ads, $4.8 million of which
went to negative ads targeting
You’re
Almost
HOME.
Loans up to $2 Million
No Points!**
Coakley.
Her LinkedIn profile says
Lindstrom, who has an MBA
from Northeastern University,
had previously been involved
with online startups.
She will be a familiar face
to many Massachusetts voters.
She appeared at the close of
Commonwealth Future ads in
2014, delivering the standard
disclosure of who approved
and paid for the message.
Like Kingston, Lindstrom
would represent the Romney/
Baker wing of the party, while
Ayyadurai and Diehl have
3
.883
3
carved out more populist profiles. Republicans acknowledge that Warren, a leading
national figure on the left, poses a tough challenge for
whomever emerges from the
GOP primary in 2018.
Richard Tisei, a former
state Senate minority leader
who was Baker’s running mate
during an unsuccessful 2010
campaign, called Lindstrom “a
formidable candidate.”
But he said Diehl was “the
odds-on favorite” to win the
primary, where the party ’s
more hard-core conservatives
generally vote. The more rightleaning grass-roots also wield
tremendous influence at the
party convention earlier in the
year.
“He’s been out there with
activists, and people have to
remember that the primary
electorate is different than
the general electorate,” Tisei
said.
Diehl is set to formalize his
campaign next week. Kingston’s website says he “is running,” and he is holding an
event for supporters next week
at a Boston steakhouse.
Nassour said Lindstrom in
the Senate would likely function along the lines of US Senator Susan Collins, Republican
of Maine, who has been an intraparty critic of President
Trump. “I don’ t think she
would be a puppet,” Nassour
said, adding, “Beth is definitely not the type of person who
will say, ‘Yes, Mr. President, I
will do that.’”
Jim O’Sullivan can be reached
at jim.osullivan@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter at
@JOSreports.
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*APR denotes Annual Percentage Rate as of 7/26/17 and is based on a $165,000 purchase loan with minimum credit score of 720 and
maximum LTV of 80%. Rate is subject to change without notice. Unit cost per $1,000 borrowed is $4.70. Minimum loan amount is $100,000, maximum
loan amount is $2 million. Single-family, owner-occupied residences only. Offer subject to credit approval. Property insurance required. Flood insurance
required if the property is located in a FEMA Special Hazard Flood Zone. Monthly payment examples do not include escrow amounts for real estate taxes
and/or insurance, if applicable. is may increase payment amount. Other terms and conditions may apply. Member FDIC • Member DIF
**Points and/or additional fees may be assessed for borrowers with credit scores lower than 720 and/or cash out refinance loans.
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for Businesses and Individuals
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to $249,999.99
2
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and above
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*APYs denote Annual Percentage Yields as of 7/26/17. is is a tiered rate account. Rates are variable and subject to change at any time without
notice. A minimum balance of $150,000 is required to open an account. If the balance drops below $150,000, a $10.00 monthly service charge
will be assessed and the APY will be reduced. e APY will also be reduced to the lower tier for balances that drop below $250,000. Maximum
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B4
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T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
Improper vent pipe blamed for construction site blaze
uFIRE
Continued from Page B1
out from the roof. Architectural
drawings called for a 12-inch
space around the exhaust pipe,
Finn said. It was put in place
with just 3 inches of clearance.
As the pipe heated up, the
wood caught fire.
“It was improperly installed,” Finn said of the piping.
“The heat source was too close
to combustibles. . . . That was
the cause of the fire.”
A Trinity spokeswoman said
Wednesday that the fire is “still
under investigation by many
parties” and declined to comment until those reviews are
complete. Cranshaw Construction of Newton, which oversaw
construction on the project,
also declined to comment until
all investigations are finished.
Later Wednesday, Inspectional Services forwarded the
Globe a safety violation notice
the agency had issued to Trinity
after the fire.
The blaze is one of a rash of
construction fires nationwide
in a type of mid-rise, woodframe apartment building that
has become popular in Greater
Boston and across the country
in recent years. A similar-style
apartment complex under construction in Waltham burned
down early Sunday, heightening local calls for stricter fire
safety regulations. The cause of
that fire was still under investigation Wednesday and the
state fire marshal appealed to
the public for help to see if any-
jobs
DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF
Boston Fire Commissioner Joseph Finn (at podium) spoke with William Christopher, Inspectional Services director. Finn
repeatedly pointed to a work crew’s 90-minute delay in alerting firefighters to signs of last month’s fire.
one has photos or videos of the
fire in its early stage.
Building with wood rather
than steel or concrete is less expensive and faster, and building code changes in recent
years have allowed for taller
wood-frame buildings above a
concrete ground floor, making
the technique attractive to de-
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICE
COMBINED NOTICE OF FINDING OF
NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT
AND NOTICE OF INTENT TO REQUEST
RELEASE OF FUNDS
July 27, 2017
boston.com/
monster
GENERAL
Program Assistants
60 Program Assistants
Massachusetts
Premier
Soccer LLC d/b/a GPS Massachusetts seeks 60 Program Assistants, temp. fulltime, 10/1/2017-12/1/2017.
Will conduct youth athletic
activities with groups. USSF
Grade C License, UEFA C
License, FA Youth Award,
Football Association of Ireland Kick Start Level 1 License, Scottish Football Association Grade C License,
Welsh Football Association
Grade C License, or equiv.
req. Worksites in Barnstable, Essex, Middlesex, Norfolk, Suffolk, & Worcester
Counties, MA. Workers assigned to 1 worksite & rarely travel between worksites
(less than 5% of time). Daily
transport to & from worksite provided. On-the-job
training provided. $14.18/
hr, paid bi-weekly. Overtime
not available. 35 hrs/wk.
May work on any day of wk.
Hours from 10am-5pm &
may vary. Single workweek
used to compute wages.
Housing offered & optional:
$1,275/month. House cost
deducted from paycheck if
used. All deductions from
paycheck req. by law made.
Reasonable transport &
subsistence costs to place
of emp. provided if worker
completes half of emp.
period. Reasonable return
transport & subsistence
costs provided if worker
completes emp. period or
dismissed early. Amount
of reimbursement equal to
most economical common
carrier. Daily subsistence
provided at $12.07/day to
a max. of $51/day. Guaranteed work hours for at least
three fourths workdays in
each 6-week period. All
req. tools, supplies, & equip.
provided at no charge. H-2B
workers
reimbursed
in
first workweek for all visarelated fees. Inquire at MA
SWA, 1010 Harrison Ave,
Boston, MA 02119. Job Order 9257370. Mail resume
to Justin Capell, GPS MA,
85 Central St., Waltham, MA
02453.
LEGAL NOTICES
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
The Massachusetts State Lottery Commission will hold a
public hearing regarding an
amendment to its current
Rules and Regulations. The
amendment is authorized by
M.G.L. c.10§24.
The hearing will take place on
August 24, 2017 at 10:00 a.m.
at the Headquarters of the
Massachusetts State Lottery
Commission, 60 Columbian
Street, Braintree, Massachusetts, 02184.
The purpose of the amendment is to amend regulations for the MEGA MILLIONS
game.
Anyone interested in receiving a copy of the Regulations
can do so by contacting
Carol-Ann T. Fraser, General Counsel, 60 Columbian
Street, Braintree, Massachusetts, 02184. Written or oral
comments in advance of the
hearing are welcome. Those
expecting to testify are requested to contact General
Counsel Fraser at (781) 8495515.
NOTICE
MASSACHUSETTS STATE
LOTTERY
The following Instant Games
have ended:
2009
HARLEY-DAVIDSON®
($5.00 purchase price)
2012 ACES & 8’S ($2.00 purchase price)
2015 $100,000 HOLIDAY BONUS ($2.00 purchase price)
2015 $2,500,000 HOLIDAY
BONUS ($10.00 purchase
price)
All claims for prizes must
be received at Lottery Headquarters, 60 Columbian St.,
Braintree, MA 02184 prior to
5:00 p.m. July 27, 2018.
Massachusetts Housing Partnership
160 Federal Street
Boston, MA 02110
857-317-8585
This notice shall satisfy two separate but related procedural
requirements for activities to be undertaken by Massachusetts Housing Partnership (MHP).
NOTICE OF INTENT TO REQUEST THE RELEASE OF
FUNDS
On or about August 12, 2017, MHP will submit a request
to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
(HUD) for the release of HUD Risk Share Mortgage Insurance
Funds under Section 542(c) of the Housing and Community
Development Act of 1992 to be utilized for a project known
as JFK Crossing, located at 420 Harvard Street and 49
Coolidge Street, in Brookline, Massachusetts. Project activities include demolition of existing commercial and residential structure at 420 Harvard Street and new construction of
a 4.5 story building with approximately 5,065 square feet
of retail space on the first level and 3.5 stories containing
23 residential units. Project activities also include renovation of the existing building at 49 Coolidge Street to contain
two residential units and project management space. Parking will be provided through a single level of below-grade
parking beneath the building containing approximately
23 parking spaces, and additional four at grade spaces. A
courtyard will be added between the new building and the
49 Coolidge building.
The calculated Day Night Noise Level (DNL) for the property
at 420 Harvard Street is 71.1 decibels, slightly above HUD’s
65 decibel threshold. New windows selected to be installed
at 420 Harvard Street will reduce the interior noise levels by
approximately 27 decibels, achieving the maximum indoor
noise level requirement of 45 decibels, and compliance has
been achieved.
Operations & Maintenance Programs for asbestos containing materials (ACMs) and lead based paint (LBPs) are or will
be in place, consistent with EPA recommendations, and will
be followed during demolition and renovation, including
abatement of LBPs identified during renovations. ACMs at
420 Harvard Street will be abated prior to demolition. A radon mitigation system will be installed and post-renovation
levels will be tested to ensure radon levels are below 4.0
picocuries per liter.
velopers hoping to build more
units on expensive land.
And fire experts agree that
the buildings are safe once
sheetrock, sprinklers, and other safety systems are built in.
But once it starts, a fire in an
unfinished building can move
fast. In the case of Treadmark,
sprinklers were installed but
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
BID INVITATION
Project No.: OPE8S01-ELV
Sealed bids submitted on a form furnished by the Facilities
Management & Capital Planning of the Office of Court Management and clearly identified as a bid, endorsed with the
name and address of the bidder and project number, will
be received at the Facilities Management & Capital Planning, Suffolk County Courthouse, Three Pemberton Square,
Room 114, Boston, MA 02108, no later than the dates and
time specified below and will be publicly opened and read
aloud.
Deadline for filing General Bids: Thursday, September 14,
2017 at 12:00PM
General Bids Opening: Thursday, September 14, 2017 at
2:00PM
A PRE-BID conference will be held on Wednesday, August
9, 2017 at 9:30 a.m. at the Suffolk County Courthouse,
Room 107, Three Pemberton Square, Boston, MA 01208.
In addition, bidders may visit sites per the Pre-Bid Site Visit
Schedule in Attachment C of the Instructions to Bidders.
Project Description: The scope includes, without limiting
the generality thereof, furnishing all labor, materials, tools
and equipment required to fully and completely maintain
the Trial Court Elevators and Lifts in a safe, efficient, code
compliant and reliable working order. Scope includes all
maintenance, inspection services, replacement, repair,
testing, adjusting and all related work as required to ensure and provide for the continued design performance
of all items referenced herein. There are five (5) Court Regions; each Region is to be bid/proposed separately. Contractors may bid on one, two, three, four or all five Regions,
see appendix for breakdown of facilities and equipment
UNITs by Region. Prevailing Wages to be paid on the project
have been determined by the Director of the Department
of Labor Standards under the provisions of the Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 149, Sections 26 to 27H. The
MBE/WBE participation goal for this Contract is a reasonable representation combined goal of 10.4% of the Contract Price. The applicable minority workforce utilization
percentage is 15.3%. The applicable women workforce
utilization percentage is 6.9%. General Contractors must
be certified by DCAMM for the category of Elevators. Each
bid proposal must be secured by an accompanying deposit
of 5% of the total bid amount, including all alternates, in
the form of a bid bond, a certified, treasurer’s, or cashier’s
check issued by a responsible bank or trust company made
payable to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The bidding documents may be obtained electronically via email
by sending a request to fm.contracts.department@jud.
state.ma.us, hard copies can be picked up at the Facilities Management & Capital Planning, Suffolk County
Courthouse, Three Pemberton Square, Room 114, Boston,
MA 02108, Tel (617) 725-3176 or 617-725-3164. Copies of
the bidding documents may be obtained without cost or
charge at the above address beginning on Wednesday, July
26, 2017.
Odair Brandao, Administrative Coordinator, 617-725-3176.
The total estimated project cost is $18,062,275 and of that
the risk share loan will be approximately $14,700,000.
FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT
MHP has determined that the project will have no significant impact on the human environment. Therefore, an
Environmental Impact Statement under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) is not required. Additional project information is contained in the Environmental Review Record (ERR) on file at MHP, 160 Federal Street,
Boston, MA 02110. The ERR may be examined or copied
at this location weekdays from 9am to 4pm.
PUBLIC COMMENTS
Any individual, group, or agency may submit written comments on the ERR to MHP, 160 Federal Street, Boston, MA
02110. All comments received by August 11, 2017 will be
considered by MHP prior to authorizing submission of a request for release of funds. Comments should specify which
Notice they are addressing.
RELEASE OF FUNDS
MHP certifies to HUD that Clark Ziegler in his capacity as Executive Director, consents to accept the jurisdiction of the
Federal Courts if an action is brought to enforce responsibilities in relation to the environmental review process
and that these responsibilities have been satisfied. HUD’s
approval of the certifications satisfies its responsibilities
under NEPA and related laws and authorities, and allows
the project, JFK Crossing, to use HUD program funds for the
purpose specified.
OBJECTIONS TO RELEASE OF FUNDS
HUD will accept objections to its release of funds and MHP’s
certification for a period of fifteen days following the anticipated submission date or its actual receipt of the request
(whichever is later) only if they are on one of the following
bases: (a) the certification was not executed by the Executive Director of MHP; (b) MHP has omitted a step or failed to
make a decision or finding required by HUD regulations at
24 CFR part 58; (c) the grant recipient or other participants
in the project have committed funds or incurred costs not
authorized by 24 CFR Part 58 before approval of a release of
funds by HUD; or (d) another Federal agency acting pursuant to 40 CFR Part 1504 has submitted a written finding that
the project is unsatisfactory from the standpoint of environmental quality. Objections must be prepared and submitted
in accordance with the required procedures (24 CFR Part
58, Sec. 58.76) and shall be addressed to HUD at the Boston
Regional Office, Thomas P. O’Neill, Jr. Federal Building, 10
Causeway Street, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02222-1092. Potential objectors should contact the CPD Director at HUD
Boston to verify the actual last day of the objection period.
For MHP
Clark Ziegler, Executive Director
LEGAL NOTICE
Request for Proposal (RFP)
The Montachusett Regional Transit Authority (MART) invites
qualified contractors to submit proposals for the Building
Automation System Project, in accordance with plan specifications, at our five facilities located in Fitchburg, Leominster, and Gardner MA.
Contractors are invited to obtain the Request for Proposal
document which outlines the instructions and format for
proposals by accessing our website at http://www.mrta.
us/doing-business/contracting-opportunities or contacting
procurement@mrta.us Proposals will be accepted
until 4pm on Monday August 7, 2017 at the MART Office,
840 North Main Street, Leominster, MA 01453. Proposals
received after the date and time specified above will be
considered late. MART reserves the right to accept or to
reject any and/or all proposals.
The award under this solicitation is subject to funding
from Federal Transit Administration and Massachusetts
Department of Transportation. Disadvantaged Business
Enterprises are encouraged to submit proposals; and no
proponent will be subject to discrimination based on race,
color, national origin, gender, age, or disability. The successful proponent will be required to comply with federal and
state regulations including Equal Employment Opportunity
and the Americans with Disabilities Act.
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
ADVERTISEMENT
CITY OF BOSTON
not yet activated, Finn said, because it was not yet occupied.
“We would have had a very
different outcome” had the
sprinklers been on, Finn said,
though he noted they are not a
cure-all for fire risks, which, he
noted, are far higher during
construction in this sort of
wood-frame building.
He repeatedly pointed to the
work crew’s 90-minute delay in
alerting firefighters to the
blaze. “It’s a grave concern, to
be honest with you,” Finn said.
He said city officials must
“educate the construction industry in how quickly we need
the [911 call] to take place.”
The string of mishaps was
uSHANLEY
Continued from Page B1
But Dr. Paul Zeizel, a psychologist who has evaluated
sexually dangerous persons,
said Shanley’s age was probably a key factor.
“What I can say is most 86year-old men usually have very
nominal sex drive — it doesn’t
mean he doesn’t have one —
and probably would not be
considered sexually dangerous,” Zeizel said.
Dr. Martin Kafka, a psychiatrist who has worked with sex
offenders for 30 years, agreed.
He said recidivism rates for
sex offenders fall sharply after
age 60 and continue to plummet as they age and their serum testosterone levels decline. Pedophiles, however,
have higher recidivism rates
than other sex offenders, he
said.
“One of the reasons you
would want to keep Shanley
[behind bars] is he was a child
‘What I can say is
most 86­year­old
men usually have
very nominal sex
drive . . . and
probably would
not be considered
sexually
dangerous.’
DR. PAUL ZEIZEL,
a psychologist
molester of boys. That is a factor,” Kafka said. “But the fact
that he’s in his late 80s would
be a very important factor, as
well.”
Mitchell Garabedian, an attorney who represented doze n s o f S h a n l e y ’s v i c t i m s ,
roundly rejected the notion
that the former priest’s age
PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT
NOTE: For information specific to this particular bid
please contact Marie McDonald, @ 617-635-4912
THE MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (MASSDOT) HAS PROVIDED A LIST TO THE
BOSTON PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT OF APPROVED
ELIGIBLE BIDDERS FOR THIS PROJECT. ONLY THOSE
CONTRACTORS ON THIS LIST WILL RECEIVE OFFICIAL
BID DOCUMENTS. ALL OTHERS WILL BE PROVIDED
WITH AN INFORMATIONAL COPY.
Every sealed bid shall be submitted in accordance with the
Invitation for Bids. All sealed bids shall be filed not later
than Thursday, August 17, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. at the office
of the Commissioner, Public Works Department, Room 714,
City Hall. All bids must be from bidders of record (those
who have purchased contract documents) on file at Room
714, City Hall.
The attention of all bidders is directed to the provisions of
the Invitation for Bids and contract documents, specifically
to the requirements for bid deposits, insurance and performance bonds as may be applicable. A bid deposit of 5
percent of the total contract amount shall be required from
each bidder. A performance bond in the amount of 100 percent of the contract shall be required from the successful
bidder. Sealed bids shall be publicly opened by the Official
on Thursday, August 17, 2017, at 2:00 pm in Boston City
Hall, Room 801. The award of any contract shall be subject
to the approval of the Mayor of Boston.
The maximum time for bid acceptance by the City after the
opening of bids shall be ninety (90) days. The City/County
and the Official reserve the right to reject any or all bids or
any item of items thereof.
NOTICE
The attention of all bidders is specifically directed to the
City of Boston Resident Section contract provision of the
specifications and the obligation of the contractor and subcontractors to take affirmative action in connection with
employment practices in the performance of this contract.
During the performance of this contract, the general contractor shall agree and shall require that his subcontractors agree to the following Workforce Requirements (labor).
Minority Workforce: The contractor and its subcontractors
shall maintain a not less than 25 percent ratio of minority manhours to total employee manhours in each trade
worked on the contract. Boston Resident Workforce: The
contractor and its subcontractors shall maintain a not less
than 50 percent ratio of Boston resident employee manhours to total employee manhours in each trade worked
on this contract. Female Workforce: The contractor and
its subcontractors shall maintain a not less than 10 percent ratio of female employee manhours to total employee manhours in each trade worked on this contract.
The workforce requirements of paragraphs (1), (2), and (3)
above shall apply to each trade that appears on the list of
“Classification and Minimum Wage Rates,” as determined
by the Commissioner of Labor and Workforce Development
Industries under the provisions of chapter 149, sections 26
through 27G, of the General Laws of Massachusetts, as
amended.
(July 31)
CHRIS OSGOOD
Chief of Streets, Transportation and Sanitation
News
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Alleged victims of ‘street priest’
decry his release from prison
Invitation for Sealed Bids for Capital Improvement
Project 17-24 for Highway Reconstruction in Summer
Street in South Boston.
The City of Boston, acting by its Commissioner, invites
sealed bids for the performance of the work generally described above, and particularly set forth in the Invitation
For bids which may be obtained at Room 714 (Contract Office), City Hall, Boston, Mass., commencing at 9:00 a.m. on
Monday, July 31, 2017. Invitation for bids shall be available
until the time of the bid opening. There will be a charge of
twenty-five dollars ($25) NOT REFUNDABLE, for each set of
contract documents taken out.
concerning to Jill Grozalsky, a
Brighton resident who had purchased one of the condos in August. “To be honest, it’s upsetting to hear the cause of the
fire, because it sounds like it
could’ve easily been prevented
and also that there were mistakes made throughout the
day,” Grozalsky wrote in an
e-mail Wednesday.
Other would-be tenants said
they still plan to move into the
Treadmark, whenever it opens.
Specialty grocer American Provisions has a lease to put a store
in the building’s ground floor.
Those plans are still on, said coowner Andy Fadous.
Trinity has said it plans to
salvage as much of the building
as possible and has vowed to
rebuild it. The city’s Inspectional Services Department is still
determining how much of the
structure can be kept.
The ISD’s director, William
“Buddy” Christopher, said at
Wednesday’s news conference
that his office is working with
fire officials on recommendations to tighten safety protocols
and prevent similar fires. But
they do not believe problems
with wood-frame construction
are widespread, or that such
projects should stop.
“We do not think this is a
systemic problem across the
city,” he said.
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Night
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4-digit 5101
Eve: 3-digit 335
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8355
means he is no longer a threat
to the public.
“Age is not a factor when it
comes to a pedophile priest
victimizing innocent children,”
Garabedian said. “It’s not necessarily about sex. It’s about
control.”
In g e n e r a l , K a f k a s a i d ,
mental health professionals
who conduct sexual dangerousness evaluations consider a
wide range of factors, including the offender’s record in
prison and their mental health
and criminal histories.
Most doctors also use a 10item assessment tool called
the Static-99R to determine
whether a sex offender is likely
to offend again. The tool evaluates offenders based on such
risk factors as the their age at
the time of release, whether
they have ever lived with a lover for at least two years, and
whether they have a history of
violence.
Prosecutors can then use
the evaluations to try to prove
i n c o u r t t h at t h e o ff e n d e r
meets the legal definition of a
sexually dangerous person.
Massachusetts law says the offender must have “a mental
abnormality or personality disorder which makes such person likely to engage in sexual
offenses if not confined to a secure facility.”
“Nobody wants to be wrong
in predicting dangerousness,
so we, as a group, tend to
make conservative predictions,” Kafka said. “So if these
two examiners feel he’s at a
low risk and should be released, I have to put some
trust in their examinations.”
After he is released from a
medium-security prison in
Bridgewater on Friday, Shanley will be monitored by the
state Probation Department
for the next 10 years and has
been ordered to have no contact with children under the
age of 16. He will have to register as a sex offender.
But the fact that he will be
free is a blow to victims and
their families. Rodney Ford,
whose son, Gregory, was allegedly molested by Shanley in
the 1990s, said if he ran into
the former priest on the street,
he would feel tempted to hurt
him.
“I have those thoughts,” he
said. “What father wouldn’t
have those thoughts [about
someone] that destroyed his
son? I have to be real and tell
you that.”
Michael Levenson
can be reached at
mlevenson@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @mlevenson.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B5
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
BOYLE, Anne M.
(McDonnell)
BY CITY AND TOWN
ARLINGTON
FITZGERALD, Dorothy A.
GIURLEO, Wendy A.
SOLARI, Joseph
SPARKS, Gary T.
ZOFFREO, Concetta (Amato)
NORTON
DeAMELIO, William M.
NORWOOD
ROCHE, Carol A. (Gallucci)
ORLEANS
DOCKSER, Sidney J.
BELMONT
FITZGERALD, Dorothy A.
QUINN, John, J.
OSTERVILLE
GALLIGAN, Lauretta Ellen (Durkin)
BEVERLY
GURMAN, Steven D.
PLYMOUTH
RUSSO, Joy L. Dardinski (Davies)
BILLERICA
DREW, Robert G.
GIURLEO, Wendy A.
QUINCY
DART, Jean M. (Ahearn)
BOSTON
DOCKSER, Sidney J.
GALLIGAN, Lauretta Ellen (Durkin)
SHOOLMAN, Barbara (Perlmutter)
BRIGHTON
CHASAN, Bernard M.
BROOKLINE
CHASAN, Bernard M.
DOCKSER, Sidney J.
MANWARING, David R.
MITCHELL, Marion R. (Mendoza)
BURLINGTON
HERLIHY, Francis X.
READING
FITZGERALD, Dorothy A.
HILL, Banks David
REVERE
FAUCI, Stephen L.
LAMBIASE, Rita (Bavaro)
ROSLINDALE
DeAMELIO, William M.
WHITE, Timothy Hagan
George F. Doherty & Sons
Dedham 781-326-0500
SAUGUS
FAUCI, Stephen L.
POTTLE, Bradford H.
SHARON
CONNOLLY, Edmund L.
CAMBRIDGE
FITZGERALD, Dorothy A.
GIURLEO, Wendy A.
QUINN, John, J.
ZOFFREO, Concetta (Amato)
BYRNE, James D.
SWAMPSCOTT
GURMAN, Steven D.
CANTON
CONNOLLY, Edmund L.
RUSSO, Joy L. Dardinski (Davies)
CENTERVILLE
SOLARI, Joseph
TAUNTON
DUSSEAULT, Roland A.
TOWNSEND
GENOVA, Anthony
TYNGSBOROUGH
KILEY, Frederick L.
CHATHAM
DART, Jean M. (Ahearn)
WABAN
GALLIGAN, Lauretta Ellen (Durkin)
CHELSEA
GOODMAN, Dorothy
WAKEFIELD
HILL, Banks David
POTTLE, Bradford H.
DANVERS
FAUCI, Stephen L.
MARKOWSKI, Br. Lloyd, CFX
DEDHAM
BOYLE, Anne M. (McDonnell)
GLASHEEN, Virginia M. (Donoghue)
MacQUEEN, David A.
ROCHE, Carol A. (Gallucci)
EAST BOSTON
MOCCIA, Gloria (Catrone)
FALMOUTH
GOODMAN, Dorothy
WALTHAM
CARRIER, Elsa (Feiertag)
GENOVA, Anthony
QUINN, John, J.
WATERTOWN
QUINN, John, J.
SPARKS, Gary T.
ZOFFREO, Concetta (Amato)
WELLESLEY
MacQUEEN, David A.
FRANKLIN
ROCHE, Carol A. (Gallucci)
WELLFLEET
KILEY, Frederick L.
GEORGETOWN
MacQUEEN, David A.
WEST HARWICH
BYRNE, James D.
HINGHAM
CRISTADORO, Louis J. “Lou”
WEST ROXBURY
WHITE, Timothy Hagan
HYDE PARK
CHASAN, Bernard M.
WESTFORD
GENOVA, Anthony
JAMAICA PLAIN
BYRNE, James D.
CHASAN, Bernard M.
WESTWOOD
GALLIGAN, Lauretta Ellen (Durkin)
GLASHEEN, Virginia M. (Donoghue)
WHITE, Timothy Hagan
LEOMINSTER
TALL, Alvan J.
LITTLETON
COLLUM, Hugene R.
WEYMOUTH
HERLIHY, Francis X.
LYNNFIELD
FAUCI, Stephen L.
WILMINGTON
HILL, Banks David
MALDEN
KILEY, Frederick L.
MANSFIELD
RUSSO, Joy L. Dardinski (Davies)
WINCHESTER
BOYLE, Anne M. (McDonnell)
COLLUM, Hugene R.
MARSTONS MILLS
GLASHEEN, Virginia M. (Donoghue)
WINTHROP
LAMBIASE, Rita (Bavaro)
MEDFIELD
CAVANAUGH, Paul Francis
GLASHEEN, Virginia M. (Donoghue)
WOBURN
BOYLE, Anne M. (McDonnell)
DREW, Robert G.
HERLIHY, Francis X.
SOLARI, Joseph
MELROSE
MOCCIA, Gloria (Catrone)
POTTLE, Bradford H.
WRENTHAM
GOODMAN, Dorothy
MIDDLETON
FAUCI, Stephen L.
MILLBURY
CARRIER, Elsa (Feiertag)
OUT OF STATE
NEEDHAM
BOYLE, Anne M. (McDonnell)
CAVANAUGH, Paul Francis
DOCKSER, Sidney J.
MacQUEEN, David A.
MAINE
DeAMELIO, William M.
FLORIDA
GURMAN, Steven D.
ROCHE, Carol A. (Gallucci)
NEWTON
CHASAN, Bernard M.
GALLIGAN, Lauretta Ellen (Durkin)
QUINN, John, J.
NEW HAMPSHIRE
CAVANAUGH, Paul Francis
HERLIHY, Francis X.
NORFOLK
RUSSO, Joy L. Dardinski (Davies)
TEXAS
BYRNE, James D.
NORTH ANDOVER
MacQUEEN, David A.
VIRGINIA
GILIBERTO, Neli
Of Dedham, July 25, 2017. Beloved wife
of the late John J. Boyle. Loving mother
of Margaret Crawford, John Boyle, and
Kevin Boyle all of Dedham, Stephen
Boyle and his wife Amelia of Winchester, and Brian Boyle of Riverside,
CA. Sister of Helen Smith of Woburn,
Francis McDonnell and his wife Mary
of Needham, and the late Gregory,
John, James, and Philip McDonnell.
Grandmother of Damien Crawford and
his wife Kate, Ian Crawford and his
wife Andrianna, Logan Crawford, John
Boyle, and Willam and Katherine Boyle.
Also survived by 4 great-grandchildren.
Funeral Mass in St. Mary’s Church,
420 High St., DEDHAM, Saturday, July
29 at 10am followed by interment in
Brookdale Cemetery, Dedham. Relatives and friends kindly invited. Online
guestbook at gfdoherty.com.
88, of West Harwich and
The Woodlands, Texas,
formerly of Jamaica Plain,
passed away July 14th. In 2005, Jim
was the innocent victim of a terrible
accident in Dennis Port when he was
almost crushed to death after being
struck by a car while sitting on a bench.
The quality of his life was greatly
diminished but Jim never gave up
fighting for his life and amazed his
many doctors at several hospitals with
his strength and ability to overcome
numerous obstacles. Jim leaves his
devoted wife Barbara (Smith), daughter
Paula and her husband Robert Howard
of Harwich Port and The Woodlands,
Texas and loving grandson Neal
Howard. He was predeceased by his
beloved daughter Sharon Byrne Tirrell
along with his sister and brother-in-law
Hazel and Frank Antonelli. He is also
survived by granddaughter Jessica
(Tirrell) Pumphret of Winthrop,
Massachusetts and great grandchildren
Ava and Joseph Pumphret. Jim and
Barbara enjoyed many happy years
together on Cape Cod after purchasing
their home in West Harwich in 1975.
Jim retired from the MBTA in 1995 and
it was then he and Barbara decided to
winter in Texas and summer on Cape
Cod. Jim was proud of his military
service as a Marine during the Korean
War. A Mass of Christian Burial will be
celebrated on Saturday, July 29th at
10:00 AM at Holy Trinity Church, 246
Main Street, West Harwich 02671.
Burial will be at the Massachusetts
National Cemetery in Bourne on
Monday, July 31st at 11:15 AM.
CARRIER, Elsa (Feiertag)
Of Waltham, July 25th, 2017. Beloved
wife of the late Joseph R. Carrier. Dear
sister of Walter Feiertag. Devoted &
loving aunt to many nieces, nephews,
great nieces & great nephews. Relatives
& Friends are respectfully invited to attend a Funeral Service in celebration of
Elsa’s Life in the Mary Catherine Chapel
of Brasco & Sons Memorial, 773 Moody
St., WALTHAM on Friday morning at
10:30 a.m. Interment will follow at V.A.
Mass National Cemetery in Bourne at
1:00 p.m. Visiting Hours will be held
prior to the service on Friday from
9:00-10:30 a.m. For complete obituary,
guestbook & additional information
please refer to:
www.BrascoFuneralHome.com
Waltham 781-893-6260
“Creating Meaningful Memories”
CHASAN, Bernard M.
Dr. Bernard
Chasan: Father,
BU Professor and
Renaissance Man
Professor Bernard Chasan, of Brookline,
passed away on July 24 at Beth Israel
Deaconess Medical Center.
Bernie was born to Sally and Louis
Chasan in 1934 in Brooklyn, NY. He attended Stuyvesant High School, graduating from Columbia College and then
Cornell University, where he earned a
PhD in Physics. After a brief stint at
SUNY Binghamton, he joined Boston
University’s Physics department, where
he spent the rest of his career, studying
nuclear physics and biophysics. In addition to his research accomplishments,
he was known among students as a particularly devoted and spirited teacher.
After his retirement, Bernie explored his love of painting, producing
hundreds of works in watercolor, oil,
pastels and acrylic. Several of his paintings were recently featured in an art
show in the building where he resided.
Also during his retirement, he taught at
Boston, Brandeis and Hampton Universities and was a Sigma Xi Distinguished
Lecturer.
Bernie loved discussing philosophy
and politics, was a devoted listener of
classical music, had a tender spot for all
animals, was a steadfast Boston sports
fan (especially the Red Sox), and was a
voracious reader of fiction, poetry and
scientific works.
Bernie was preceded in death by
his sister, Evelyn Rose, of Berkeley,
California. He is survived by his life
partner, Paula Chasan; his daughter
Rebecca Chasan and her partner Eric
Van Buskirk; and his daughter Holly
Chasan-Young and her husband Forrest Young. He is also survived by his
devoted caregiver, Veronica Nji.
In lieu of flowers, contributions in
his memory may be made to Project
STEP or the Animal Rescue League of
Boston. A Celebration of Life will be
held later in the summer.
CRISTADORO, Louis J. “Lou”
A longtime resident of
Hingham, passed away July
25, 2017 at the age of 96.
Lou worked for many years for the
MBTA and was a member of Carmen’s Union 589. He proudly served
the United States Coast Guard during
WWII. He enjoyed a lengthy, relaxing
and well-deserved retirement. Lou
loved driving around town to his favorite spots, spending time with his family
and his beloved Red Sox. He was also
the best husband, father and “Nonno”
anyone could ask for. He will be sadly
missed by all who had the pleasure of
knowing him.
Beloved husband of 70 years to
Josephine “Jay” Cristadoro (Ternullo)
of Hingham. Dear father to John Cristadoro of Quincy, Richie Cristadoro of
Hull, Lou Cristadoro of Ft. Lauderdale,
FL, Carol Dominguez and her husband
Mario of Cohasset, Joe Cristadoro and
his wife Stephanie of Hanover, Lisa
Harrington and her husband Bob of
Hingham, and best friend and TV
buddy Michael Cristadoro of Hingham
and the late Jim Cristadoro. Brother to
the late Emily Abany, Marie Feehily and
Margie St. Martin. Cherished grandfather to Julie, Matt, Tom, Robin, Angela,
Joe, Nick, Sean, Alyssa, Wyatt, Ryan,
Camille, and Anthony. Brother-in-law
to Rose Sutcliffe of Lexington and the
late Ann Orsi and James Ternullo. Also
survived by well-loved many nieces and
nephews.
Relatives and friends are respectfully
invited to attend the visiting hours on
Friday 4-8 PM in the Pyne Keohane
Funeral Home, 21 Emerald St. (off
Central St.), HINGHAM. A Celebration of Life Service will be held in the
funeral home at 9:15 AM on Saturday
prior to the Funeral Mass in St. Paul’s
Church, Hingham at 10 AM. Burial in
Blue Hill Cemetery, Braintree. In lieu of
flowers, please consider a donation to
www.autismspeaks.org. See www.
Keohane.com or call 1-800-Keohane for
directions and online condolences.
COLLUM, Hugene R.
In Winchester July 25, 2017, 81 years
of age. Beloved husband of the late
Barbara (Hickey) Collum, loving father
of Tracey Toombs, her husband Robert
of Littleton, Special “PaPa” of Megan.
Devoted brother of Gaydene McCool
of WA. A Funeral service will be held
in the Lane Funeral Home, 760 Main
St., WINCHESTER on Friday, July
28th at 1:00 PM. Relatives and friends
are invited to attend calling hours on
Thursday, July 27 from 3:00 to 7:00PM.
Interment in Wildwood Cemetery, Winchester. Donations in his memory may
be made to the charity of your choice.
Gene was a supporter of the United
Way, 51 Sleeper St., Boston, Ma. 02210
Lane Funeral Home 760 Main St
Winchester, Ma 01890
We know
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DART, Jean (Ahearn)
Age 94, of Chatham, MA, died peacefully in her sleep, surrounded by family,
on July 22, 2017, at Pleasant Bay Nursing Home.
She was predeceased by her beloved
husband of 48 years, Richard M. Dart,
M.D. two daughters Frances (Dart)
Dowd, Joanne (Dart) Fitzpatrick and
grandson William A. Dart. She is
survived by five children Eileen (Dart)
Bolesky and husband Ed, Richard Dart
and wife Mary (Bunny), Daniel Dart
and wife Tracy, Robert Dart and fiance
Amanda, and Paul Dart. She is also
survived by her sister Eileen (Ahearn)
Crane of Sandwich, Massachusetts. She
is survived by seventeen grandchildren
and seven great grandchildren: Kristen
(Bolesky) Richmond, husband Scott
and daughters Charlotte, Katie and Ellie; Kara Bolesky and husband Brandon
Woolkalis; Meredith Dart, Richard Dart
and wife Katie; Patrick Dowd, wife
Alex and son William; Caroline (Dowd)
Dampier, husband Drew and daughter
Emily, Ryan Dowd, and Robert Dowd;
Danielle Fitzpatrick and spouse Ellen
Fitzpatrick, Christopher Fitzpatrick,
Lauren (Fitzpatrick) McConnell and
husband Chris, Paul Fitzpatrick; Ashley
Dart, and Sophie Dart; Megan Dart,
fiance Joe Montoya and sons Jack and
Alex, Erin Dart and fiance Jonathan
DiNapoli, and Michael Dart.
Jean Dart was born in Quincy, MA
on January 18, 1923. She graduated from Quincy High School and
is a graduate of Boston State College
(University of Massachusetts, Boston)
in 1977 with a B.S. in Nursing. She was
predeceased by mother Agnes (Lucy)
Ahearn of South Boston and her father
Thomas Ahearn of Weymouth; brother
James Ahearn, sisters Audrey, (Ahearn)
Finn and Eleanor (Ahearn) Collins.
Jean was known as a loving, compassionate and energetic person. She
became a nurse later in life to help
others and be in the same field as her
cardiologist husband. She was an enthusiastic walker and avid participant
at Eastward Ho! Country Club. She was
also a resident at Bears Paw Country
Club in Naples, Florida. Her parents
were musicians and she enjoyed singing with others at the piano bar at
Christian’s Restaurant in Chatham.
A Memorial Mass will be held on
Saturday, August 5 at 10:00 a.m. at
Holy Redeemer Church in Chatham
followed by a reception at Eastward
Ho! County Club at 11:30. All her
friends and extended family are invited
to attend.
Jean will be interred, in a private
ceremony, alongside her husband
Richard, on July 27 at Massachusetts
National Cemetery in Bourne, MA.
For online condolences, please visit
www.nickersonfunerals.com
Nickerson Funeral Home
508-945-1166
DeAMELIO, William M.
CONNOLLY, Edmund L.
“Ned”
To submit a paid death
notice for publication in
The Boston Globe and on
CAVANAUGH, Paul Francis
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84, of Medfield, MA,
passed away Monday, July
24, 2017, surrounded by
family. Paul was a long-time resident
of Needham, MA, and worked as
the City Solicitor of Concord, New
Hampshire for 38 years and was a US
Army veteran. He was predeceased in
death by two brothers, Jackie and Joe.
He will be lovingly remembered by his
wife of 57 years Mary (Ryder), daughter
Catherine Cavanaugh, daughter Mary
Elizabeth (Dimitri Racklin) Cavanaugh,
son Paul (Christine Thayer) Cavanaugh,
son John (Wendy Ware) Cavanaugh,
daughter Anne (George) Sawan, son
Brian Cavanaugh, daughter Eileen
(Michael) McCarthy, daughter Janet
(Jay) Hajj, son Owen Cavanaugh, son
James (Christine) Cavanaugh, daughter
Jeanne (Michael) McLaine, son Michael
(Linda) Cavanaugh, and 31 grandchildren. Paul was a loving father, husband,
grandfather, and friend to all. Visitation
will be from 4:00 to 8:00 PM at Eaton
Funeral Home in Needham, MA on
Thursday, July 27, 2017. His Mass of
Christian Burial will be in St. Joseph’s
Church in Needham, MA on Friday,
July, 28 at 10.00 AM. For directions or
to share a memory of Paul please visit
www.eatonfuneralhomes.com
Eaton Funeral Home
Needham 781-444-0201
Funeral Services
CANNIFF MONUMENT
323-3690
(617)
800-439-3690 • 617-876-9110
531 Cummings Highway, Roslindale
583 Mt. Auburn Street, Cambridge
MON-FRI 9-9; SAT 9-5, SUNDAY 12-5
Boston.com, contact
your funeral director, visit
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or call 617.929.1500. Now
offering custom headings
and enhanced listings.
Of Sharon passed away July 26th at
home surrounded by his loving family.
Beloved husband of Joyce (Forsythe).
Son of the late William E. and Frances
E. (Flynn) Connolly. Brother of Susan
E. Harris of Wrentham, Virginia M.
“Ginger” of Harpswell, Maine, Claire
F. Copeland of N. Attleboro, William E.
Connolly, Jr. of York, Maine and the late
Richard J. Connolly. Also survived by
many nieces and nephews. Funeral service at the Dockray & Thomas Funeral
Home, 455 Washington St., CANTON,
Saturday morning at 11 am. Visiting
hours prior to the service Saturday
morning from 9 to 11 am. Burial
Private. In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made in Ned’s memory to Old
Colony Hospice, 321 Manley St., W.
Bridgewater, MA 02379. For complete
obituary and guestbook see
dockrayandthomasfuneralhome.com
Dockray & Thomas Funeral Home
(781) 828-0811
Funeral Services
To submit an obituary
for editorial consideration,
please send the information and a photo by e-mail
to obits@globe.com, or
send information by fax
to 617.929.3186. If you
Age 73, of Maine, formerly of Norton,
MA, passed away on Wednesday, July
19, 2017. He was the son of the late
William DeAmelio and Catherine
(Armata) DeAmelio. Loving father of
Deborah (DeAmelio) Smith and her
husband Paul of Warwick, RI, and
the late William “Billy” DeAmelio of
Norton. Devoted grandfather to Paul
and Zachary. A Funeral Mass will be
held Monday, July 31 at 11am at St.
Mary’s Church, 330 Pratt St. in Mansfield. Interment to follow at St. Mary’s
Cemetery in Mansfield.
need further assistance
about a news obituary,
please call 617.929.3400.
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Funeral Services
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Lehman Reen & McNamara
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www.lehmanreen.com
Serving Greater Boston
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FUNERALS, INC.
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617-472-6344
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500 Canterbury St.
Boston, MA 02131
617-524-1036
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DOCKSER, Sidney J.
Age 85, passed away
peacefully at home on July
26, 2017. He brightened
and enriched the lives of those close to
him and everyone he encountered with
humor, compassion and wisdom.
A lawyer for nearly 60 years, he provided counsel and practical advice to a
myriad of clients in corporations, small
businesses, criminal cases, the arts, and
in tax matters. Throughout his career
he defended the underprivileged and
disadvantaged.
A lifelong democrat, he was politically active in Needham and Orleans
serving in a variety of elected and
appointed positions. He was the Chair
of the Needham Housing Authority,
a member of the Needham Council
on Aging and Chair of the Orleans
Democratic Town Committee. He was a
staunch supporter of democratic candidates on local, state and national levels.
Sid proudly served in the US Air
Force during the Korean War and later
as a Judge Advocate General in the Air
Force Reserves. He retired as a Major.
Sid had a strong zest for living. Even
facing many challenges, he always
maintained a positive attitude and
strong will to live life to the fullest.
He loved music, literature, art,
theater, and he was a film aficionado.
His favorite things included his family,
nature, the Cape, travel and meeting
new people. To his friends and relatives
alike, Sid was known as a great story
teller and it was a joy to be with him.
He is survived by his wife of 60 years,
Cheryl (Bahn) Dockser, his brother Bob
Dockser, children Mark Dockser and his
wife Linda Snow Dockser, Ken Dockser
and his wife Dana, and 6 grandchildren, Josh, Aaron, Avery, Jennie, Corey
and Shelby Dockser.
Services will be held at Levine Chapels, 470 Harvard Street in BROOKLINE on Friday at 1 pm. Burial will
follow at Sharon Memorial Park, 40
Dedham Street, Sharon, MA. Shiva will
be held at his late residence in Brookline following the burial until 5:45 pm,
and then on Sunday and Monday at
Mark and Linda’s home from 1-5pm
and 7-9:30pm. Shiva will continue
Tuesday and Wednesday at his late
residence from 1-5pm and 7-9:30pm.
Donations in his memory can be
made to one of his favorite charities,
The Grow Clinic for Children at Boston
Medical Center, 725 Massachusetts
Avenue, Boston, MA 02118.
Levine Chapels, Brookline
(617) 277-8300
www.levinechapel.com
DREW, Robert G. “Bob”
66, of Billerica, formerly of Woburn
July 25, 2017. Bob is survived by his
loving wife and best friend Ann V.
(Graham) Drew, his daughter Kerry L.
(Drew) Costa, son in law Edward J. Costa and two granddaughters, Meredyth
A. and Theresa L. Costa all of Billerica.
Also survived by his brother Leonard
B. Drew of Wakefield, MA. The family
invites friends and family to visiting
hours at the Graham Funeral Home,
3 Arlington Rd. (corner of Pleasant
St.), Woburn, on Sunday, July 30 from
4:00 to 8:00PM. A graveside service
will be held at Fox Hill Cemetery, 130
Andover Rd, Billerica on Monday, July
31 at 11:00 AM. In lieu of flowers the
family wishes donations be forwarded
to St. Jude Hospital. (www.stjude.org).
www.grahamfuneral.com
Paying
tribute to
your loved
ones is
important
To submit a paid death
notice for publication in
The Boston Globe and on
Boston.com, contact
your funeral director, visit
boston.com/deathnotices
or call 617.929.1500. Now
offering custom headings
and enhanced listings.
To submit an obituary
for editorial consideration,
please send the information and a photo by e-mail
to obits@globe.com, or
send information by fax
to 617.929.3186. If you
need further assistance
about a news obituary,
please call 617.929.3400.
To access death notices
and obituaries online, visit
boston.com/obituaries.
DUSSEAULT, Roland A.
U.S. Air Force
Age 81, of Taunton, entered
into rest Thursday, July 20
in the Good Samaritan
Medical Center, Brockton, following a
period of declining health. He was the
beloved husband of Carol (Reilly)
Dusseault. He was born in Taunton, the
son of the late Rodolphe L. and Lydia
(Courcy) Dusseault. He was educated in
Taunton and was a graduate of UMass
Amherst, in 1958, where he was a
member of the Tau Beta Pi National
Engineering Honor Society. Roland was
a distinguished ROTC Cadet while at
UMass, and was commissioned into the
U.S. Air Force upon his graduation,
serving for three years in South Dakota.
He spent twenty years at the Mass.
Department of Environmental
Protection, working on clean water
supply in southeastern Mass. Later, he
worked for Flynn Engineering of
Middleboro, and for DeFeo, Wait and
Pare of Raynham. Following retirement, he built a small development off
Scadding Street in Taunton known as
Cal’s Court and Lydia Lane, named
after his parents. He was a devoted
family man and a Master Carpenter
who enjoyed cooking, gardening and
sports, playing both baseball and
basketball for St. Jacques in the City
CYO Leagues in his youth.
In addition to his wife, he leaves:
1 son: Douglas E. Dusseault and his
partner, Diane Evers of Taunton; 3
daughters: Donna Calleja and her
husband, Ricardo of Watertown, Ma.,
Deborah Schwiegershausen and her
husband, Karl of Harvard, Ma., and
Darlene Dusseault and her partner, Lisa
Kelley of Taunton; 1 brother: Richard
Dusseault and his wife, Jean of Berkley;
2 sisters: Louise Dean and Jeanne
Chase and her husband, Robert all of
Taunton; 5 grandchildren: Marisa and
Julian Calleja, and Erica, Katya and
Mark Schwiegershausen, and several
nieces, nephews and cousins. Roland
was also the grandfather of the late
Paul Schwiegershausen and the brother
of the late Alice Beaulieu and Colette
Terpak.
A Funeral Service will be conducted
at The Riendeau-Mulvey Funeral
Home, 467 Bay Street, TAUNTON, on
Saturday, July 29 at 12:00 Noon. Relatives and friends are invited to attend.
Visiting Hours will be held prior to the
Service, Saturday, from 10:00 A.M. to
12:00 Noon. Expressions of sympathy
in his memory may be made to the
Perkins School for the Blind, 175 No.
Beacon St., Watertown, Ma., 02472. For
online guestbook, directions and obituary information, please visit
www.r-mfh.com.
FAUCI, Stephen L.
Alumnus of
Bentley College
1989 Bio-Tech
Sales Executive
At 51 years, in Middleton, formerly of
Saugus, unexpectedly July 22. Beloved
& adored son of Leonard M. Fauci and
Josephine P. (Carco) Fauci. Devoted
brother of Michael A. Fauci & wife
Deborah of Saugus, David C. Fauci &
wife Kerri of Medford, Jennifer L. Grasso of Lynnfield, Marc L. Fauci & wife
Margaret “Maggie” of Tiverton, R.I. &
Louis J. Fauci & wife Cara of Melrose.
Proud & faithful companion of Whendy
A. Kelliher & cherished surrogate
“Dad” to Alexa Rae Walker & Robert
S. Walker all of Danvers. Also lovingly
survived by many aunts, uncles, nieces,
nephews, cousins & his constant canine
companion “Hunter”. Family & friends
are invited to attend visiting hours on
Friday, July 28 from 4-8 p.m. in the
Vertuccio & Smith Home for Funerals,
773 Broadway (Rte. 107) REVERE.
Family & friends are also invited to attend the Funeral Mass on Saturday, July
29th in St. Anthony of Padua Church,
250 Revere St., REVERE at 11 a.m.
All are asked to report directly to St.
Anthony’s Church, Revere on Saturday.
Interment is private. Stephen was a
former Lector at St. Anthony’s Church.
He was a Regional Bio Tech Salesman
for Roche Medical Sales. In lieu of flowers, remembrances may be made to St.
Jude Childrens’ Research Hospital, P.O.
Box 1000, Dept. 142, Memphis, TN.
38101-9908, or to The New England
Center for Veterans, P.O. Box 845257,
Boston, MA. 02284-5257. Please visit
www.vertuccioandsmith.com
BostonGlobe.com
FITZGERALD, Dorothy A.
“Dottie”
Of Belmont, July 24,2017. Beloved
daughter of the late John and Agnes
Fitzgerald. Loving sister of Marie
Maloney and her husband William of
Reading. Devoted aunt of Karen Plant
of Reading, Susan Murray of Needham
and Michelle Friend of New York.
Beloved Grandaunt of 7 grandnieces
and grandnephews. Close cousin of
Kathleen Weaver, Virginia Finn and
Gail Laszlo. Funeral from the Brown &
Hickey Funeral Home, 36 Trapelo Rd.,
BELMONT, Saturday at 9AM. Funeral
Mass in St. Agnes Church, 51 Medford
St., Arlington, at 10AM. Relatives and
friends kindly invited. Visiting hours
Friday 4-7PM. In lieu of flowers please
send donations in Dottie’s memory
to the charity of your choice. Online
guestbook www.brownandhickey.com
Brown & Hickey Funeral Home
617-484-2534
617-547-1500
GALLIGAN, Lauretta Ellen
(Durkin)
97, of Westwood, peacefully entered
eternal rest at Clark House on July 25,
2017. Beloved wife of the late Thomas
J. Galligan, Jr. with whom she shared
66 years of marriage. Born in Syracuse,
NY, Lauretta was a devoted spouse,
mother of five sons, grandmother,
great-grandmother, and engaged friend
to many over the years. Her abiding joy
and enthusiasm was raising her family
in Newton and especially in later years
with multi-generation family gatherings
and reunions at the summer home in
Osterville. She was friend to many over
the years and active with her husband
in many business, community and
social activities in the Boston area as a
member of the Board of Overseers at
Boston Symphony Orchestra, World
Affairs Council, and Board of Directors
for H.P. Hood. Lauretta and Tom were
very engaged in fund raising campaigns
for Boston College and Mass General
Hospital. She had travelled to every
continent except the Arctic and Antarctic. In 1972, Lauretta was among those
profiled in a Time magazine cover story
on the role of women in a changing
America. Time did a follow-up story
with her in 2009. (“I wouldn’t change
a thing” she said). She was active over
the years as a member of the Oyster
Harbors and Wianno clubs in Osterville, and Brae Burn in Newton. In their
later years Lauretta and her husband
Tom enjoyed an active life at Fox Hill
Village. Three years ago she moved to
Clark House assisted living at Fox Hill.
Lauretta was an engaging and enthusiastic friend whose curiosity about what
people thought, and why, was always
evident. She loved meeting people and
connecting people with each other. For
many years, her signature contribution to family Christmas and reunions
was a rendition of the poem “Hugs”.
Lauretta was one of six children of Irish
immigrants John James and Mary Ellen
(McKeon) Durkin. Her father was a
Navy veteran of the Spanish America
War. Lauretta was an alumna of Syracuse University. She was predeceased by
her siblings Ann, Jack, Patrick, Kay, and
Dorothy. Lauretta will be sorely missed
and long remembered for her abiding
devotion to faith and family. She was
the loving and devoted mother of:
Thomas J. Galligan III and his wife Dr.
Ann of Weston; John D. Galligan and
his wife Kathleen of Wenham; Christopher M. Galligan and his wife Andrea
of So. Hamilton; Martin P. Galligan
and his wife Nancy of Wellesley and
Peter A. Galligan and his wife Margaret
of Needham. Also survived by eleven
grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. Visiting hours at the George
F. Doherty & Sons Funeral Home, 477
Washington St., (Rt.16) WELLESLEY,
Friday, July 28 from 4-7pm. Funeral
Mass in St. Margaret Mary Church,
845 High St., (Rt. 109), Westwood,
Saturday, July 29 at 10am. Relatives
and friends kindly invited. Interment in
Newton Cemetery. Memorial donations
may be made to the Galligan Chair in
Strategic Operations, Boston College,
Office of University Advancement, 140
Commonwealth Ave., Chestnut Hill,
MA 02467 or St. Margaret Mary Parish,
PO Box 386, Westwood, MA 02090.
Online guestbook and directions at
gfdoherty.com.
George F. Doherty & Sons
Wellesley 781-235-4100
Honor your
loved one
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The Boston Globe.
GENOVA, Anthony “Tony”
U.S. Army Veteran
81, of Townsend, MA, died
unexpectedly, surrounded
by his family, at Tufts
Medical Center on July 25. 2017.
Tony grew up in Waltham, Massachusetts, the eldest son of Anthony
and Angelina Genova. In his youth, he
was an Altar Server, Boy Scout and a
Big Brother. In 1959, he earned a BS
in Electrical Engineering at Northeastern University, where he served in
ROTC and then in the US Army as an
Airborne 2nd Lieutenant, 4th Armored
Division in Germany. His professional
career spanned over 40 years, during
which he designed and implemented
many important radar systems. Tony
was a nationally recognized expert in
the field of Radio Frequency Interference (RFI). He served as a member of
the Townsend Board of Appeals and
was active in the Ducks Unlimited
Association.
Tony was an avid and accomplished
hunter, fisherman, and outdoorsman.
He knew everything about the woods.
He loved gardening and making sauce
from his home-grown San Marzano
tomatoes. He is survived by his loving
wife of 35 years, Mary (McKay) Genova
of Townsend. He leaves his children
Tracey Green and her husband, Kevin,
of Marblehead; Kelly Genova and
her husband, James, of New Mexico;
Anthony Genova and his wife, Denise,
of California; Julie Tucker and her
husband, Chris, of Townsend and Jaret
Barr of Texas. Also, his grandchildren
Christopher, Zoe and Jason Tucker and
Elizabeth & Anthony Green. He was
the eldest son of nine children and
is survived by all his siblings: Anne
Carey of Florida, Arthur Genova of
Plymouth, Tom Genova of Marlboro,
Rose O’Donnell of Westford, Arlene
Genova of Concord, John Genova of
Needham, Mary MacGregor of South
Carolina and Laurel Daly of Waltham.
Tony was a devoted and loyal friend to
many good men, especially Ron Peck
and Bob Sullivan of Groton and Dennis
Martino of Townsend and also many
hunting and fishing buddies. He will be
deeply missed and always remembered
by his family and friends. Visitation will
be at the McGaffigan Funeral Home,
37 Main St, (Rte. 113), PEPPERELL,
on Friday, July 28th, from 4-7 PM;
Funeral Mass at St. John the Evangelist Church, 1 School St, Townsend,
on Saturday, July 29th, at 10:00 AM.
Remembrances in Tony’s name can be
made to St. John’s Church. Please see
www.mcgaffiganfuneral.com
GILIBERTO, Neli
Born into her life with Jesus, Neli was
deceased at home, July 16, 2017. She
was born in Barinas, Venezuela April
5, 1965.
Neli came to the United States sponsored by her uncle, Constantine (Chris)
Giliberto at the age of five. A special
act of Congress allowed her and her
parents, Salvatore Giliberto and Rosetta
Rombolini Giliberto and her older
sister, Domenica, to accompany her.
Sandra, her younger sister was born in
this country.
She required emergency heart
surgery to save her life. This surgery
was new and available only at Boston
Children’s Hospital. Previously almost
all children born with this condition
did not survive.
By this compassionate act of Congress and the efforts of her Uncle Chris,
Neli has provided her whole family
sanctuary and shelter in the United
States.
Neli is survived by her beloved life
partner of 22 years, George B. Primbs,
II; and by her parents, her sister
Domenica (Filippo) DeVirgilio, her
sister Sandra (Matthew) Callahan and
her sister’s children who held a special
place in her heart. Niece Tania (Justin)
DeVirgilio Quinn; great nephews Liam
and Lincoln Quinn; niece Lisa DeVirgilio; nephew Nicholas DeVirgillio;
nieces Chloe and Brooke Callahan; and
nephew Matthew Callahan Jr.
Independent described Neli well.
She came to Virginia as a young woman
alone bought her home here and never
wanted to live elsewhere. She went to
George Washington Graduate School
of Political Management for a Mater’s
Degree in Political Management and
the University of Virginia for a second
Master’s Degree for Procurement and
Contract Management.
In March, 2007 Neli came “home”
to her work with the Navy Department
and her “work family” at the Navy Yard.
Her last job description was: Civilian
Employee, Department of the Navy,
PEO Submarines; Department of Submarine Imagery-Electronics Warfare,
as an Acquisition Manger and Radar
Assistant Program Manager.
Services conducted by Mountcastle
Turch Funeral Home, 4143 Dale Blvd,
Dale City, VA 22193. A wake for Neli
will be held Friday, July 28th from 7:009:00 PM at Mountcastle Turch Funeral
Home in Dale City, Mass will be on
Saturday July 29th at 11:00AM at Saint
Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church,
12807 Valleywood Dr., Lakeridge, VA
22192. Interment at Fairfax Memorial
Park on July 31st at 11:00 AM 9900
Braddock Road, Fairfax, VA 22032
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GIURLEO, Wendy A.
Lifelong resident of Arlington, passed
peacefully on July 25, 2017. She was 52
years old. Beloved daughter of Virginia
(Oppedisano) and the late Joseph D.
Giurleo Sr. Loving sister of Ellen Giurleo of CA, Joseph Jr. and his wife Mary
of Billerica, Pamela Towle and her husband Chris of Arlington, Carol Sullivan
and her husband David of Woburn and
Kimberly Samuels and her husband
Alex of Arlington. Also survived by
many cherished nieces, nephews, and
great nieces and nephews. Funeral from
the Keefe Funeral Home, 5 Chestnut
St., Rt. 60 (adjacent to St. Agnes
Church) ARLINGTON on Saturday at
10am. Funeral Mass in Saint Eulalia
Church, Winchester at 11am. Burial
in Mt. Pleasant Cemetery, Arlington.
Relatives and friends invited. Visiting
hours Friday 4-7:30pm. In lieu of
flowers, donations in Wendy’s memory
may be made to the Brain & Behavior
Research Foundation, 90 Park Avenue,
16th Floor New York, NY 10016. For
directions or to send a condolence visit
www.keefefuneralhome.com
GLASHEEN, Virginia M.
(Donoghue)
Of Dedham, died July 24th, 2017.
Beloved wife of the late George L.
Glasheen. Loving mother of George
W. Glasheen and his wife Christine of
Marstons Mills, Kevin G. Glasheen and
his wife Nancy of Medfield and Marie
E. Marshall and her husband Kevin of
Dedham. Sister of the late William J.
Donoghue and Gloria M. Corley. Also
survived by 15 grandchildren, 7 great
grandchildren and many loving nieces
and nephews. Virginia (Ginny) retired
from the Town of Dedham after serving
as a Crossing Guard for many years.
There will be no visiting hours.
Relatives and friends are invited to
attend a Mass of Christian Burial in
St. Denis Church, 157 Washington St.,
Westwood, on Saturday morning, July
29th at 10am. Interment at Brookdale
Cemetery, Dedham. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made in Virginia’s
memory to Massachusetts General
Hospital, c/o Heart Failure and Transplantation Fund: Development Office,
125 Nashua Street, Suite 540, Boston,
MA 02114.
Holden-Dunn-Lawler
www.hdlfuneralhome.net
GOODMAN, Dorothy
Of Falmouth and formerly of Wrentham and Chelsea, died peacefully on
July 22, 2017 at the age of 92. Beloved
wife of the late Kenneth Goodman for
over 60 years.
Dorothy leaves three loving children,
Lori Bellavance of North Attleboro,
Scott Goodman of Williamston, SC and
Glen Goodman and his wife, Rachel of
Wrentham. Also loving grandmother
to Ian, Noelle, Lore, Scott Jr., Lauren,
Kim, Mark, and Drew. Her family was
her life. Having been orphaned for
portions of her childhood, she knew the
strength of love.
Although she retired as a very successful full-time office administrator,
Mom was always in her true glory after
she arrived home. Den mother, Little
League wiz, school activities director,
term paper editor, ham radio operator
and friend to all - that is her legacy.
Relatives and friends are kindly
invited to attend a graveside service
at 1:30 p.m. on Friday, July 28 at the
Massachusetts National Cemetery in
Bourne. Service under the direction
of Chapman Cole & Gleason Funeral
Home in FALMOUTH.
In lieu of flowers, donations to the
Dorothy and Kenneth Goodman Memorial Scholarship Fund at King Philip
Regional High School, 201 Franklin
St., Wrentham, MA 02093 will be appreciated.
“The death of a mother is the first
sorrow wept without her.” Author
unknown.
For an online guestbook, obituary and directions please visit
ccgfuneralhome.com.
Chapman, Cole & Gleason
Falmouth, MA - 508.540.4172
Honor your loved one’s memory
with a photo in The Boston Globe.
Ask your funeral
director for details.
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GURMAN, Steven D.
LAMBIASE, Rita (Bavaro)
Lovingly
Remembered
On July 23. Devoted wife of Richard
Lambiase. Loving mother of Francesca
Lambiase/ Dear sister of Lucia Bavaro
and Maria DiLaurie both of Revere.
Visiting Hours: Family and friends
are cordially invited to attend the visitation from the Ernest P. Caggiano and
Son Funeral Home 147 Winthrop St.,
WINTHROP on Friday, July 28, 2017
from 8:30 to 9:30 AM followed by a
funeral mass in St. John the Evangelist
Church, Winthrop at 10:00 AM. Interment to follow the mass in the Belle Isle
section of Winthrop Cemetery. For directions or to sign the online guestbook
go to www.caggianofuneralhome.com.
Of Lake Worth, Florida, formerly of
Swampscott and Beverly MA passed
away on July 19, 2017 at the age of 69.
He was the husband of the late Claire
Gurman (Tenenblatt ), son of Saul and
Eva Gurman of Beverly MA, brother of
Robert Gurman and his wife Martha
of Marblehead and brother of Debra
Gurman of Beverly. He was the uncle
of Jessica Wilson and Michael Gurman.
The memorial service will be private.
Expressions of sympathy in his memory
may be donated to the American Diabetes Association, 2451 Crystal Dr., Suite
#900, Arlington, VA 22202-4803 or the
charity of your choice.
Caggiano-O’Maley-Frazier
Winthrop
MacQUEEN, David A.
HERLIHY, Francis X.
Of Amherst, NH, formerly of Burlington, passed away at the Lahey Hospital
& Medical Center on July 24, 2017, after a brief illness, with his loving family
by his side. Francis was the youngest of
five boys born to Dennis and Catherine
(Murphy) Herlihy on May 3, 1929. He
was born in Weymouth and attended
Weymouth schools. He was a graduate
of Boston College and was employed
by the Hallmark Corporation for over
forty years. He leaves his wife, Janet
(Conveney), son Michael & his wife
Cheryl of Burlington, Matthew & his
wife Nancy of Woburn and daughter
Bridget of Amherst, NH. His daughter,
Anne, predeceased him. He was the
proud and loving grandfather of ten
grandchildren. During his retirement
his greatest joy was attending whatever
sporting event or activity they were
involved in. They are Caroline, Mary Jo
& Keith of Burlington, Brianna, Evan,
Sam & Caleb of Woburn and Katelyn,
Patrick & Tommy Casper of Amherst,
NH. He loved family times, being Irish,
Boston College, Bar Harbor & playing
golf with his grandkids. He also leaves
many nieces and nephews. He was
a good man and he will be missed.
Funeral from the Edward V Sullivan
Funeral Home, 43 Winn St., BURLINGTON (Exit 34 off Rt., 128/95 Woburn
side) on Saturday, July 29 at 9 a.m.
Followed by a Mass of Christian Burial
in St. Margaret’s Church, 111 Winn St.,
Burlington at 10 a.m. Visiting hours
Friday 4-8 p.m. Interment in Pine
Haven Cemetery, Burlington. In lieu
of flowers memorials in Francis’s name
may be made to the Carmelite Monastery, 15 Mt. Carmel Road, Danvers,
MA 01923. For directions, obituary &
online guestbook see www.sullivanfuneralhome.net & www.stmargaretburlington.org
HILL, Banks David
Of Wakefield, July 25. Husband of
Charlene M. (Ellis) Hill. Father of Joseph Hill & wife Catherine of Wilmington, Jennifer Sousa of Wilmington, Julie Hill of Wakefield, and the late Banks
David Hill, Jr. Step-father of Robert
Mahan & wife Kim of Danvers, Sharon
Mahan of Seabrook, NH, and Diane Veroneau & husband Kevin of Acton, ME.
He was the brother of Margaret “Peg”
Campbell of Reading. Grandfather of
Olivia, Joseph, Julia, Kristopher, Kailee,
Kolin, & Makayla. Step-grandfather of
Ashley, Amanda, Samantha, Crystal
and Kyle. Also survived by one great
grandchild: Emma; his niece Stacey
Cosco & husband Pete; nephew Matthew Campbell, and great niece, Sierra.
A Funeral Service will be held in the
McDonald Funeral Home, 19 Yale Ave.,
Wakefield on Saturday at 11am. Visitation for relatives and friends at the
Funeral Home on Friday from 4-8pm.
In lieu of flowers, contributions may
be made to The Center for Melanoma,
c/o Massachusetts General Hospital, 55
Fruit St., Boston, MA 02114. For obit/
guestbook, www.mcdonaldfs.com
KILEY, Frederick L.
Of Malden, July 23, 2017.
Fred is survived by daughter
Kimberley & her husband
Joseph Vitale Jr. of Wellfleet, MA &
their children Kara, Joseph, James,
& Kiley. His daughter Kristina & her
husband Edgar McLean Jr. of Tyngsborough, MA & their son Campbell. Survivors also include sisters Nancy Poisson,
Carol Sheehan & brother Robert (all
residing in Florida) & numerous nieces
& nephews. Fred was pre-deceased by
his parents Vincent & Alberta (Prescott)
Kiley & his brother Richard. He was a
much loved father, grandfather, brother,
uncle & very generous friend to many.
He will be sorely missed by all who
knew him. Visiting hours will be held
from the A.J.Spadafora Funeral Home
865 Main St., MALDEN, on Saturday,
July 29th from 11:00am-2:00pm. A
service will be held at 1:30pm during
the visitation. Relatives & friends are
respectfully invited to attend. Interment will be private. U.S. Army Veteran
Vietnam era. In lieu of flowers donations in Fred’s memory can be made to
St. Jude Children’s Hospital, 262 Danny
Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105.
For directions & guestbook visit www.
spadaforafuneral.com
Spadafora Funeral Home
781-324-8680
Of Needham, July 25th.
Beloved husband of Ann I.
(Burns) MacQueen. Loving
father of Margaret A. Rowe and her
husband Daniel of Georgetown.
Grandfather of Emily Grimes of
Georgetown and Ellen Rowe of Salem.
Great-grandfather of Daniel and Olivia.
Brother of John MacQueen of CO,
Frederick MacQueen of FL, James
MacQueen of Raynham, Gladys Keenan
of Milton and the late Robert
MacQueen and Marie Keenan. Also
survived by several nieces and
nephews. Funeral from the George F.
Doherty & Sons Funeral Home, 1305
Highland Avenue, NEEDHAM, Friday
at 9 a.m. Funeral Mass in St. Bartholomew Church, Needham, at 10 a.m.
Relatives and friends kindly invited.
Visiting hours Thursday 4 to 7.
Interment Calvary Cemetery, Waltham.
Expressions of sympathy may be made
in David’s memory to St. Bartholomew’s
Church, 1180 Greendale Ave.,
Needham, 02492. World War II Navy
veteran. For directions and guestbook
www.gfdoherty.com
George F. Doherty & Sons
Needham (781) 444-0687
MANWARING, David R.
84, of Brookline on Monday, July
24, 2017. Beloved husband of Jane
(Makler) Manwaring. Devoted father
of Roger Manwaring and his wife,
Catherine, and Jeffrey Manwaring and
his wife, Sarah. Adored grandfather of
Steven, Laura, Colin and Zoe. For 39
years , a professor of Political Science at
Boston College, specializing in American Government and Constitutional
Law. A committed Democrat, avid
chess player, talented cook, and above
all, lover of all things family. Memorial
Services will be held at a future date.
Remembrances in David’s memory may
be made to the Democratic National
Committee (https://my.democrats.org/
page/contribute/help-democrats-fightback) or to Siamese Cat Rescue Center
(www.siameserescue.org/sponsor.php)
Levine Chapels, Brookline
617-277-8300
www.levinechapel.com
MARKOWSKI, Br. Lloyd, CFX
(Anthony J. Markowski) of Danvers, a
Xaverian Brother for sixty-two years,
died July 25. During his ministry,
the Baltimore native served in several
Catholic elementary schools in New
York and Maryland, and locally at the
former Working Boys’ Home in Newton
Highlands. He leaves several nieces
and nephews and his brothers in religion. His Funeral Mass will be celebrated on Friday, July 28, 2017 at 10:30AM
in the Chapel of Saint John’s Preparatory School, 72 Spring St., Danvers.
Burial will follow in Xaverian Brothers
Cemetery. Relatives and friends are invited. Visitation will begin prior to the
Mass in the chapel at 10AM. In lieu of
flowers, donations may be made to the
Xaverian Brothers Retirement Fund,
4409 Frederick Ave., Baltimore, MD
21229. Arrangements are by C.R. Lyons
& Sons Funeral Directors, 28 Elm St.,
DANVERS. www.LyonsFuneral.com.
MITCHELL, Marion R.
(Mendoza)
In Brookline on July 24, 2017. Beloved
mother of Diane and Patricia Mitchell.
Adored grandmother of Eric, Stephen,
Lisa, Laura, Justin, Allen and Angela
and cherished great-grandmother of
Tyrell, Cameron, Sophia, Marcus and
C.J. Visiting hours will be in the BellO’Dea Funeral Home, 376 Washington
St., BROOKLINE on Friday from 4:00
-7:00 with a prayer service at 7:00.
Interment will be private. In lieu of
flowers donations made to the Alzheimer’s Assoc. www.alz.org would be
appreciated. www.bellodeafh.com
Share a memory
Or add a condolensece
to the guestbook at
boston.com/obituaries
MOCCIA, Gloria (Catrone)
Beloved wife of the late Frank A. Moccia, Sr. with whom she shared 28 years
of marriage. Devoted mother of Frank
A. Moccia, Jr. and his wife Doreen of
Melrose. Cherished grandmother of Alexander Moccia. Loving sister of Tootsie
Correia and her late husband Tony,
Pat Catrone, and the late John Catrone
and his surviving wife Ann, and the
late Robert Catrone and his surviving
wife Marie Tocco. Also survived by
many nieces and nephews. Relatives
and friends will gather in honor and
remembrance of Gloria’s life during
visiting hours at the Robinson Funeral
Home, 809 Main St., MELROSE, on
Friday, July 28 from 9-10am, before
leaving in procession to First Baptist
Church, 561 Main St., Melrose for her
Funeral Service at 11am. Interment at
Puritan Lawn Memorial Park, Peabody.
Gifts in memory of Gloria may be made
to First Baptist Church, 561 Main St,
Melrose, MA 02176. For online tribute
or directions:
RobinsonFuneralHome.com.
Robinson Funeral Home
Melrose
(781) 665-1900
POTTLE, Bradford H.
“Brad”
QUINN, John, J.
SOLARI, Joseph “Jay”
Of Watertown, July 25,
2017surrounded by his loving family. Age 85. Devoted
son of the late John and Margaret
(Doherty) Quinn. Dear brother of the
late Irene Henderson, Pauline Brennan,
Jean Coffin and Francis Quinn (WFD).
Also love by many nieces & nephews.
Funeral from the MacDonald, Rockwell
& MacDonald Funeral Home at 270
Main St. Watertown on Saturday July
29, 2017 at 8:00 AM, followed by
Funeral Mass in St. Luke’s Church, 132
Lexington St., Belmont at 9:00 AM.
Relatives and friends kindly invited.
Visiting hours Friday from 3-7 PM.
Interment St. Patrick Cemetery. Retired
inspector, MBTA. US Navy Veteran,
Korea.
Of Centerville, formerly of
Woburn and Arlington,
died peacefully surrounded
by family on July 23, 2017. Preceded in
death by his beloved wife, Shirley and
brothers, Donald and Robert. He is
survived by his daughter, Nancy Solari
Wilcox and her husband, Steven, and
his son, Richard J. Solari and his wife,
Jean, his sister, Sister Joanne Solari,
CSJ and four grandchildren. Jay is a
World War II Veteran. Funeral Mass
held at Christ the King, Mashpee, and
Burial at National Cemetery, Bourne.
Funeral services will be private. In lieu
of flowers, donations may be made to
the Alzheimer’s Family Support Center
of Cape Cod, 2095 Main Street,
Brewster, MA 02631 or www.
alzheimerscapecod.org.For online
guestbook and directions, please visit
www.johnlawrencefuneralhome.com.
MacDonald-Rockwell-MacDonald
www.macdonaldrockwell.com
ROCHE, Carol A. (Gallucci)
74 of Foxboro, formerly of Norwood
and Dedham, Wednesday July 26.
Daughter of the late George and Carinda (Greco) Gallucci. Beloved wife of the
late William J. Roche Sr. Devoted mother of Denise Jones and her husband
Jim of Franklin, Colleen Roche and her
husband Michael Moroney of Norwood,
and William Roche Jr. and his wife
Maureen of Satellite Beach FL. Sister of
George Gallucci, Marguerite Finn, and
the late Barbara Wallace. Loving grandmother of eight grandchildren. She is
survived by many nieces, nephews, and
cousins. Carol worked for many years
as Secretary to the Principal at Dedham
High School. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated on Saturday July
29, in St. Timothy’s Church, Norwood
at 10 o’clock. Interment Highland Cemetery, Norwood. Visiting hours omitted.
Expressions of sympathy may be made
in Carol’s memory to the Dedham High
Boosters Club, 231 Bussey St., Dedham,
MA 02026.
SPARKS, Gary T.
Of Watertown, July 25th. Beloved
husband of Suely M. Sparks. Loving
father of Robyn and Gary T. Sparks
Jr. and stepfather of Frederico and
Shanna Simmone. Dear grandfather
to Alanna Sparks. Brother of the late
Wayne Sparks. Funeral from the
DeVito Funeral Home, 761 Mt. Auburn
St., WATERTOWN, on Saturday at 8
am with a Funeral Mass to be held in
Sacred Heart Church at 9 am. Burial to
follow in Ridgelawn Cemetery. Relatives
and friends are invited to visit in the
Funeral Home on Friday from 4-7pm.
Please visit devitofh.com for online
guestbook.
TALL, Alvan J.
Gillooly Funeral Home
Norwood
(781)-762-0174
www.gilloolyfuneralhome.com
RUSSO, Joy L. Dardinski
(Davies)
A resident of Saugus, passed away
peacefully on Tuesday, July 25, 2017,
at the Kaplan Family Hospice House
in Danvers, at age 79. Brad was born
in Stoneham on June 10, 1938, one
of three children of the late Herman
and Laura (Wheeler) Pottle. He was
raised in Wakefield where he graduated
from Wakefield High School, Class of
1956. He married Patricia Tarr on April
19, 1968 and remained in Wakefield
for many years until 1980 when they
moved to Melrose, and later to Saugus
in 1999. Brad worked as a Salesman
in several capacities, co-owned Pottle
Florist in Melrose and Hoffman Florist
in Boston, and in retirement served as
property manager. Brad was an active
and dedicated member of the Masons
for 49 years. He was member and past
Master of the Golden Rule Lodge in
Wakefield, the Winslow Lewis Lodge
in Boston, and was appointed the Rt.
Worshipful Representative to the Grand
Lodge of Puerto Rico. In addition, Brad
was a recipient of the Joseph Warren Distinguished Service Award, a
member of St. Bernard Commandery
No. 12, the Masters Lodge AF&AM,
Massachusetts College M.S.R.I.C.F., the
Aleppo Temple Shrine, and the Royal
Order of Jesters. Quick witted and
sociable, Brad made many long term
friendships that he always appreciated
through his many years as a Mason.
Brad also served as Chairman of the
Boston Executives Association, and
was a longtime member of the Ancient
and Honorable Artillery Company. In
his free time, he enjoyed boating with
his wife Patti aboard “Pistachio” along
coastal New England waters from Kennebunkport, ME to Newport, RI. For
someone who never knew how to swim,
he loved being on the water and spending summer weekends on the boat.
Friendly and never shy to tell a (short)
story, he was elected to several terms as
the Commodore of Danversport Yacht
Club Association. A proud American,
Brad was also passionate politically. He
served as a campaign coordinator for
many years with the Republican party,
as chairman of the Wakefield Republican Town Committee, and was elected
to serve as a State Representative for
the Commonwealth of MA. Brad’s other
main love in life was animals. He had a
soft spot for most any animal, but especially loved his birds, and was a regular
supporter of many animal organizations. He was particularly close to his
loveable Bichon Frise girlfriend, “Mitzi”
who often led him around. Brad will be
deeply missed by his family and friends,
but will be lovingly remembered for
his quick wit, sense of humor, and generosity of spirit. Brad was the beloved
husband of Patricia A. (Tarr) Pottle with
whom he shared 49 years of marriage.
Caring brother of Nance Hallstrom of
Ipswich, and Robert Pottle and his wife
June of N. Reading. Brother-in-law of
Wayne Tarr and his wife Maryrose of
Wakefield. Also lovingly survived by
many nieces and nephews. Relatives
and friends will gather in honor and
remembrance of Brad’s life during
visiting hours at the Robinson Funeral
Home, 809 Main St., MELROSE on
Friday, July 28 from 4-8pm with a Masonic Service at 7pm, and again for his
Funeral Service celebrated on Saturday
at 10am. Interment in Lakeside Cemetery, Wakefield. For directions, online
tribute or to share a memory, visit
RobinsonFuneralHome.com
Robinson Funeral Home
Melrose
(781) 665-1900
58, died on July 20, 2017 at the Tibbet
House of Needham after a short fight
against cancer. She leaves behind her
husband of nine years, James Russo;
her mother, Joan (Balletti) Davies; her
brother, James Davies, and his wife,
Kelly, and their children, Caitlyn and
Brenna; her brother, Jay Davies and
his wife, Eileen, and their children,
Jacquelyn and Jay; her nephew, Paul
Warlop, and many relatives and close
friends. Joy is reunited in Heaven with
her father, James H. Davies, and her
older sister, Joan (Davies) Warlop.
Joy was born on February 2, 1959 in
Stafford Springs, CT before her family
relocated to Norfolk, MA.
Joy graduated Magna Cum Laude
from Bentley College with a Bachelor
of Science in Marketing. She most
recently worked for Needham Electrical
Supplies as a marketing director for the
last twelve years where she was highly
respected for her diligent work ethic.
Joy was dearly loved by her family and friends, and she will be truly
missed by everyone who knew and
loved her.
Memorial services will be held at the
Evangelical Covenant Church, 841 N.
Main Street, Attleboro on Saturday,
July 29, 2017 at 11:00 am. Relatives
and friends are invited to attend. In
lieu of flowers, please send donations to the American Cancer Society
(www.cancer.org/donate).
Arrangements by the Bolea-Amici
Funeral Home.
SHOOLMAN, Barbara
(Perlmutter)
Of Boston on Wednesday, July 26, 2017.
For 54 years, she was the beloved wife
of the late Alan R. Shoolman. Cherished
mother of Amy Shoolman Gordon &
her husband George, Nina Shoolman
Capeles & her husband Joe, and Jennifer Shoolman Davis & her husband
Luke. Adored grandmother of Matthew
Gordon & his wife Kristen, Zachary and
Margot Gordon, Alicia Pina & her husband Danny, Jackson Davis and loving
great grandmother of Mariah, Jaydon
and Sophia Pina, Ezra Theodore Gordon and the late Teddy Alan Gordon.
Fond sister of Linda & Barry Goldman.
Dear sister-in-law of Norma & the late
Jack Arnow, and Joan & David Weimer.
Special aunt to her nieces and nephews.
Services at Temple Israel, 477
Longwood Avenue, Boston (parking
available on the Riverway), on Friday,
July 28 at 10:00A.M. Burial at Sharon
Memorial Park, Sharon. Following
burial, memorial observance will be
at her late residence until sundown
and on Sunday from 1:00-6:00P.M.
and Monday 1:00-4:00P.M. In lieu of
flowers, remembrances may be made
to Barbara Shoolman Scholarship
Fund, c/o Brimmer and May School,
69 Middlesex Road, Chestnut Hill, MA
02467 or Alan Shoolman Library Fund,
c/o Franciscan Children’s, 30 Warren
Street, Boston, MA. 02135.
Levine Chapels, Brookline
617-277-8300
www.levinechapel.com
Of Leominster on
Wednesday, July 26, 2017.
For 60 years, he was the
beloved husband of Sandra (Gibber)
Tall. Loving father of David Tall & his
wife Sandy, Jeffrey Tall & his wife
Rebecca and Deborah Namiot & her
husband Drew. Adored grandfather of
Shira, Norman, Evan, Caleb, Mitchell,
Ilana, Jake and Bennett. Dear brother
of Edna Klebanow and the late Dorothy
Ozer. Services at the Levine Chapels,
470 Harvard St., Brookline on Friday,
July 28 at 10:30am. Burial in the
Tifereth Israel of Everett Cemetery, 232
Fuller St., Everett. Shiva is private. In
lieu of flowers, the family asks that each
person who loved Al share a random
act of kindness. Be like Al: leave a
generous tip, rescue a dog, take time to
listen, take a friend to lunch, be
present. Donations may also be made
to the Michael J. Fox Foundation, P.O.,
Box 5014, Hagerstown, MD, 21741 or
MSPCA/Angell Animal Medical Center,
350 South Huntington Ave., Boston,
MA 02130, or a charity of one’s choice.
WHITE, Timothy Hagan
54, of West Roxbury, passed away
unexpectedly on Sunday, July 23, 2017.
Uncle Timmy was adored and beloved
by his nephews, Taylor, Brendan and
Connor and his niece, Alina. He was
also godfather to Connor. To match
that adoration, he had an abundance
of love for them and infinite love and
devotion to his family, in particular,
an incredible devotion to his parents.
Tim is survived by his beloved mother,
Carole, and was predeceased by his
father, Brendan Hagan White in 2010.
He is also survived by his devoted
siblings, Brendan White, Jr., Deirdre
White, Sarah White and Matthew
White, and their spouses Brigid, Martin
and Helen. He is also survived by his
loving aunts and uncles, including
Maureen and Peter Mercier, Nancy and
Terrence White, Joan Abend and the
late Honorable Kevin H. White former
Mayor of the City of Boston and cousins
Justin White, Chris White, Bill Shea,
Jennifer Shea, Patrick Mercier, Patrick
Hegarty and many other loving cousins
and dear friends. A graduate of the
Boston University School of Communications, with a degree in Journalism,
he used his wide array of talents to help
build up and support the family real
estate business, Carole White Associates, over the past 20 + years. He also
used his early understanding of the
evolution of the technology industry as
an entrepreneur for a number of tech
related small businesses. All who knew
or worked with Tim could appreciate
his intensity, his intellect and talents,
his use of language, his exceptional
spirit of generosity, his authenticity, his
keen sense of humor, his dry wit, and
most importantly, his unconditional
love and devotion to his family. Tim
was truly a good person, a good son, a
good brother, an incredible uncle and a
good friend to many in this community.
All who knew him well, loved him and
his heart was always in the right place.
Funeral from the William J. Gormley
Funeral Home, 2055 Centre St., WEST
ROXBURY, Saturday, July 29th at
9am. followed by a Funeral Mass in St.
Theresa Church at 10 o’clock. Visiting
hours Friday 4-8 pm. Relatives and
friends invited. Interment St. Joseph
Cemetery. For directions and guestbook www.gormleyfuneral.com
William J. Gormley Funeral Service
617-323-8600
ZOFFREO, Concetta
(Amato)
Levine Chapels, Brookline
617-277-8300
www.levinechapel.com
Every life
is a story
worth
sharing
The Boston Globe’s new
Featured Life offering lets you
honor your loved one with a
professionally written narrative
about their life and achievements.
For more details and pricing
information, contact
Boston Globe Classifieds
at 617-929-1500 or
deathnotices@globe.com.
Of Cambridge. July 23rd. Beloved
wife of the late Egidio Zoffreo. Loving
mother of Pasquale Zoffreo of Cambridge and the late Nicholas Zoffreo.
Daughter of the late Maria Codamo
and Giovanni Battista Amato. “Mom”
of Ann Rizzuto and her late husband
Joseph of Cambridge and John Zoffreo
and his wife Ellen of Brighton. Also
survived by five loving grandchildren
and six great-grandchildren. Sister of
the late Nicola Amato, Giovanni Battista Amato, Alfonso Amato. Funeral
from the DeVito Funeral Home 761 Mt.
Auburn St., WATERTOWN on Monday
at 9am with a Funeral Mass to begin
at 10am in Our Lady of Comforter
Afflicted, Waltham. Burial to follow in
Cambridge Cemetery. Relatives and
friends are invited to visit in the funeral
home on Sunday from 3-5pm. In lieu of
flowers, donations can be made to The
Italian Home for Children, 1125 Centre
St., Boston, MA 02130. Please visit
devitofh.com for an online guestbook.
To submit a paid death
notice for publication in
The Boston Globe and
on Boston.com,
contact your funeral director,
visit boston.com/deathnotices
or call 617.929.1500.
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To access death notices and
obituaries online, visit
boston.com/obituaries.
T h e
B8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
Obituaries
Fenwick Smith, 68; BSO flutist
reclaimed Masonic Temple as studio
By Bryan Marquard
GLOBE STAFF
Among his many fans, Fenwick Smith’s annual flute recital was a sign that autumn’s classical music concerts had begun.
“In its way, it’s as sure a seasonal token as the furnace’s first
rumblings, frost on the pumpkin, and yard sales,” Globe critic
Richard Buell wrote in 1993.
Though Mr. Smith didn’t envision a tenure stretching some
three decades when he gave his
first recital in the mid-1970s,
he soon found that audiences
eagerly anticipated each year’s
performance as the crowds outgrew venues. The Cambridge
Friends Meeting House gave
way to the Longy School of Music, and he moved the concerts
to Jordan Hall after joining the
New England Conservatory faculty.
He settled on an annual Sunday in September, the timing
owing much to his role as second flute with the Boston Symphony Orchestra. September
was “a logical time to do it because the BSO was on vacation,”
he told the Globe in 2001, just
before his 25th annual recital.
It was a month when “there
was not much happening,” even
though many were searching
for classical concerts.
As accomplished a craftsman as he was a musician, he
built the flute he played and
nearly single-handedly constructed a summer house in the
woods of the Berkshires, a few
miles from Tanglewood. Mr.
Smith, who last performed with
the BSO in August 2006, died
July 19 in Springhouse in Jamaica Plain of complications
from Alzheimer’s disease. He
was 68 and had also converted
the aging Masonic Temple in
Roslindale into living quarters
and a recording studio.
“He was a superb flutist, a
superb musician, and a superb
teacher,” said Leone Buyse, a
former acting principal flutist
for the BSO who sat next to Mr.
Smith for many years.
Mr. Smith, she said, brought
musical intelligence and a keen
collaborative ability to the second flute position. “It was a
sense of knowing how to blend,
how to really lock into another
person’s ideas,” said Buyse, who
also is a former principal flutist
for the Boston Pops and is now
a professor at Rice University’s
Shepherd School of Music in
Houston.
During Mr. Smith’s fall recitals, his playing was front and
center, and critics took notice.
“He plays the flute fabulously
well, with a big, pliant vocal
sound over the entire range, unclouded by vulgar excesses of vibrato,” the Globe’s Richard Dyer
wrote in 1985.
Mr. Smith “was just one of
the more elegant musicians I’ve
ever played with,” said Sally
Pinkas, a pianist and Dartmouth College music professor
who performed with him at the
annual recitals. She added that
he possessed “this beautiful, noble demeanor” in his playing
and in person. “He was internally elegant. One’s musical
persona goes together with
one’s persona-persona.”
The younger of two brothers, Mr. Smith grew up in Medford. His mother was the former Marion Bonner. His father,
Newlin R. Smith, was an economics professor at Tufts University and a director of fundraising to build the Cambridge
Fr i e n d s S c h o o l , a Q u a k e r
school.
Mr. Smith initially attended
Westtown School, a Quaker
school in Pennsylvania, and finished high school at the Cambridge School of Weston, said
Janet Corpus, a friend and Mr.
Smith’s power-of-attorney.
He graduated in 1972 from
the Eastman School of Music at
the University of Rochester in
New York, where he studied
flute with Joseph Mariano and
where Buyse was a few years
ahead of him.
For a dozen years, starting
a s a t e e n a g e r, M r. S m i t h
worked building flutes for
Verne Q. Powell Flutes, now located in Maynard, and eventually set aside flute-making after
joining the BSO in 1978. For
five years Mr. Smith was the
BSO’s acting assistant principal
flute. He also had been first
flute with the Boston Pops, and
earlier in his career he was a
member of the New England
Woodwind Quintet.
Mr. Smith, who had lived in
Germany for a few years, also
had been a member of Boston
Musica Viva, a contemporarymusic ensemble, and was the
founding flutist of the Boston
Chamber Music Society. The
Boston Musicians’ Association
named him musician of the
year in 2008, and two years later the National Flute Association honored him with a lifetime achievement award. In
2013, the winner’s recital for
the James Pappoutsakis Memorial Flute Competition was renamed the Fenwick Smith Tribute Concert.
At New England Conservatory, Mr. Smith was a studio
teacher and chamber music
coach, and in 2001 he received
the school’s Laurence Lesser
Award for excellence in teaching.
Sometimes he and Buyse
taught classes together at the
conservatory. “It was a wonderful example for the students to
see how it’s important to share
ideas and be open to another
person’s way of expressing musicality,” she said.
“I could not have had a finer
colleague,” Buyse added. “I have
never stopped being grateful
for those years together in the
BSO.”
John Heiss, a flutist who
teaches at New England Conservatory, composed pieces for
Mr. Smith to perform at his annual fall recital. Mr. Smith, an
advocate for new music, insisted on recording “Serenade,” an
Mr. Smith served as second
flutist for the Boston
Symphony Orchestra. He
was also known for his
prowess as a craftsman,
building his own flutes and
transforming the Masonic
Temple in Roslindale into a
recording studio and living
quarters. To many music
lovers, his annual flute
recital was a sign that
autumn’s classical music
concerts had begun.
GLOBE FILE PHOTOS/2003
album of Heiss’s compositions.
Mr. Smith had “flair, passion, precision, and a profound
deep caring about the music itself and how to serve that,”
Heiss said. “He had a great
sound and a great technique,
but that wasn’t all of it. He understood the emotional message of the music, and he was
unusual among performers in
his affinity for particular composers.”
He i s s a d d e d , “ He w a s a
deeply moral man and a profoundly gifted musician who
was extremely generous to
those around him. He was one
of the finest musicians and one
of the finest persons I’ve ever
known.”
A memorial service will be
held for Mr. Smith, who leaves
no immediate survivors, at 1
p.m. Oct. 28 in the Cambridge
Friends Meeting House.
Mr. Smith first showed signs
of failing memory about a dozen years ago, and his friends
said his acceptance of the diagnosis provided an example to
them.
Hi s Q u a ke r u p b r i n g i n g
could be seen in much of his
life, from the few clothes he
owned to the careful frugality
he brought to all tasks, from
music to building his solar,
post-and-beam house in the
Berkshires and renovating an
old building in Roslindale.
“I was thinking about how
much he did in his life, so many
different things,” Corpus said.
Connolly denied bid for early release
By Shelley Murphy
GLOBE STAFF
Former FBI agent John J.
Connolly Jr.’s bid for early release was rejected Monday by a
Florida commission that ruled
he won’t be eligible for parole
until 2039 for his role in a 1982
slaying orchestrated by James
“Whitey” Bulger.
Connolly, whose 77th birthday is Tuesday, was not present
during the brief hearing in Tallahassee that marked his first
bid for parole since he was convicted of second-degree murder
in 2008 for the shooting death
of Boston businessman John
Callahan.
Although Connolly was sentenced to 40 years in prison, he
was eligible for early release because the slaying was in 1982,
before tougher sentencing laws
were adopted in Florida.
The Florida Commission on
Offender Review set a presumptive parole release date of June
26, 2039, for Connolly, according to a commission spokeswoman. He would be 98. However, he will have another opportunity to argue for parole in
December 2023.
“I’m pleased with the decision,” Callahan’s son, Patrick,
49, of Winchester, said during a
telephone interview. “It’s essentially a life sentence.”
However, Callahan added
that he has sympathy for Connolly’s three sons because he
knows what it’s like not to have
your father around.
A number of Connolly ’s
longtime friends wrote letters
and e-mails urging the commission to release him.
“Of course, we believe he
was wrongly convicted on the
basis of lies of career criminals,
mobsters and killers,” wrote
William M. Connolly, a retired
attorney from Chestnut Hill.
“John has been punished far
too much!”
The once-decorated FBI
agent, who grew up in the same
South Boston housing development as Bulger and recruited
him as an informant, was not in
Florida when Callahan was
killed. But a Miami jury found
Connolly leaked information to
longtime informants Bulger
and Stephen Flemmi that
prompted the gangsters to order the death of 45-year-old
Callahan, an accountant and
former gambling company executive with ties to Bulger’s
gang.
Flemmi testified Connolly
warned him and Bulger that
the FBI wanted to question Callahan and that the businessman would probably implicate
them in the 1981 slaying of
World Jai Alai owner Roger
Wheeler in Oklahoma, as well
as two other slayings in Boston.
A Bulger associate, John
Martorano, testified that at the
urging of Bulger and Flemmi,
he lured Callahan to Florida
and shot him to death. In a controversial deal, Martorano
served only 12 years in prison
for participating in 20 murders
in exchange for his cooperation
with the government.
“I can’t stand the fact he is
walking around,” Patrick Callahan said of Martorano, adding
that the only consolation is that
the others involved remain behind bars.
“Everyone else has to stay
locked up or there would be no
justice.”
Bulger, who was captured in
2011 after more than 16 years
on the run, is serving a life sentence for participating in 11
murders. Flemmi is serving a
life sentence for 10 murders.
Connolly continues to maintain his innocence. In January,
the director of the Miami Law
Innocence Clinic filed a motion
to overturn Connolly’s conviction.
GLOBE STAFF
and Jake Johnson
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
WAREHAM — A powerboat
overturned off Wareham near
Hog Island ChannelWednesday
afternoon, prompting the rescue of a dozen people and causing an 8-year-old boy to be airlifted to a Boston hospital, according to state authorities.
The condition of the boy,
who was unresponsive, was unknown Wednesday night.
He was believed to have
been wearing a life jacket when
the boat capsized, according to
the US Coast Guard.
Three adults and nine children were rescued in the harrowing incident that unfolded
in 63 degree water at about
4:40 p.m. near Stony Point Dike
in Wareham.
The Massachusetts Environmental Police is investigating,
said Katie Gronendyke, a
spokeswoman for the agency.
Coast Guard petty officer Nicole Groll said one witness who
saw the boat before it capsized
said it appeared to be overloaded with passengers and was
struggling against waves.
“It is recommended that
mariners verify the max
amount of horsepower and capacity a vessel can handle before going underway,” said Scott
Bacholm, a Coast Guard officer
in a statement.
When the boat overturned,
it threw a dozen people into the
water, Gronendyke said.
Someone on a private vessel
nearby spotted the capsized
boat, which was about 20 feet
long, called the Coast Guard,
and started to take onboard
those in the water, she said.
By the time environmental
police arrived, the 8-year-old
boy who was on the boat at the
LIEUTENANT JOHN DOHERTY/BARNESTABLE SHERIFF’S OFFICE
Twelve people were rescued from the overturned boat.
time it capsized was still missing. The other 11 people on
board were accounted for.
An environmental police officer and an unidentifiedperson
s e a r c h e d f o r t h e b o y,
Gronendyke said in a statement.
When the child was found,
he was unresponsive and was
taken aboard an environmental
police boat, where an officer
and the Marion assistant harbormaster performed CPR on
him until the vessel reached
Tempest Knob in Wareham.
Tempest Knob is a small,
public boat launch and pier.
Several smaller boats bobbed in
the shallow waters, and rowboats were tied to the dock after
the incident Wednesday night.
The child was first taken to
Tobey Hospital in Wareham,
Marquard can be reached at
bryan.marquard@globe.com.
US: Keep
witness in
ISIS case
nameless
By Maria Cramer
GLOBE STAFF
MARSHA HALPER/MIAMI HERALD VIA
ASSOCIATED PRESS/FILE 2008
Former FBI agent John J.
Connolly Jr. recruited
James “Whitey” Bulger as
an informant.
Shelley Murphy can be reached
at shelley.murphy@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@shelleymurph.
8­year­old injured after boat overturned off Wareham
By Danny McDonald
“He had so few things, but he
had time. He had time to give to
community — the music community, the gay community. I’m
told he was a hero in Roslindale
Square because of his involvement with the community
there.”
Mr. Smith let his personal
philosophy guide the construction of his summer house. He
began the project in 1982 and
wasn’t able to live inside the
home until 1988. It was “an exercise in noninstant gratification,” he told the Globe in 1990.
“It has required resourcefulness
and perseverance. I let myself
enjoy the process.”
before being airlifted to a Boston hospital, according to
Gronendyke’s statement.
At the time and location of
the capsizing, winds were to
five to ten knots, seas were one
to three feet, said Groll.
According to the Coast
Guard, someone aboard a private vessel named Disco Volante plucked nine of the 12 people from the water. Authorities
rescued the other three.
A 45-foot Coast Guard boat
escorted the Disco Volante to
the Massachusetts Maritime
Academy.
The other 11 who were rescued had no serious injuries,
Gronendyke said. One adult
and eight children were being
examined at Tobey Hospital on
Wednesday evening.
Danny McDonald can be
reached at
daniel.mcdonald@globe.com.
Prosecutors on Wednesday
asked a federal judge to shield
the identity of a confidential informant in the case of an Everett man accused of plotting to
support the Islamic State terrorist group.
“There have been threats
made against this confidential
informant by this defendant,”
Assistant US Attorney B. Stephanie Siegmann told US District
Judge William G. Young during
a pretrial conference.
The defendant, David
Wright, 27, is accused of plotting to kill people in the United
States on behalf of the Islamic
State. Wright was charged after
his uncle, Usaamah Abdullah
Rahim, was shot in a Roslindale
parking lot by an FBI agent in
June 2015. Authorities said the
shooting occurred after Rahim,
26, attacked police with a military knife.
Law enforcement officials
had confronted Rahim to question him about an alleged plot
to kill police, according to authorities. Wright and Nicholas
Alexander Rovinski, 26, of Warwick, R.I., had allegedly discussed that plot with Rahim, as
well as a plan to behead anti-Islam activist Pamela Geller.
Rovinski pleaded guilty in
September to charges of conspiracy to support the Islamic
State and committing acts of
terrorism. Under a plea agreement, he will serve 15 to 22
years in prison. He will be sentenced after Wright’s trial,
scheduled to begin Sept. 13.
On Wednesday, Siegmann
said the confidential informant
“will testify to critical evidence
in the case.”
Maria Cramer can be reached
at mcramer@globe.com.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B9
Business
Lawmakers again rebuff Baker on health costs
By Priyanka Dayal McCluskey
GLOBE STAFF
Massachusetts legislators, in a showdown with Governor Charlie Baker, again
rebuffed his plan to curb the state’s rising
health care costs, in part by moving some
poor adults off of the state’s health care safety net program.
The Democrat-controlled House and
Senate on Wednesday approved a related
Baker proposal to raise $200 million a year
for the state’s Medicaid program through
new fees on employers and use it to help
fund health costs. But they rejected a complementary set of proposals to curb spending, which Baker wanted lawmakers to approve as a package.
The governor could accept or veto their
decision. It was not immediately clear how
he would respond. Democrats in the Legislature have enough votes to override his veto.
OK new
employer
Medicaid
fee but not
spending
reductions
The policy dispute between the governor
and lawmakers, who generally get along,
highlights the immense challenge of helping the poor while keeping public spending
in check. It also puts Baker in a difficult spot
with the business community, which supports paying new fees only if the state also
implements the governor’s cost-cutting
plan.
Business groups said Wednesday that
they would urge Baker to use the veto.
“It’s disappointing,” Jon B. Hurst, president of the Retailers Association of Massachusetts, said of the Legislature’s votes.
“There doesn’t seem to be the political will
at this time to do what we think are reasonable expense reforms.”
Baker presented his health care proposals in late June, when members of the
House and Senate were already in the final
stages of drafting state budget legislation.
HEALTH CARE, Page B12
Total Wine
wins price
dispute
Retailer had sued to
overturn suspensions
By Dan Adams
GLOBE STAFF
CARL COURT/GETTY IMAGES
Could eliminating cash
improve your T commute?
Hiawatha Bray
TECH LAB
If the future of
money is a cashless
economy where all
transactions are done
electronically, some of
us will get there by bus.
Or train, or subway.
The MBTA said it is
ready to move forward
on a plan to ban the
use of cash and have
riders pay by some notso-new-tech methods, ranging from smartphone apps
to wave-and-go credit cards. In use in other parts of
the world, these options haven’t been embraced by
American consumers. But that will begin to change in
a few years, when T riders find they will have only two
options at the farebox — plastic or silicon.
As the T and other public transit systems worldwide move to digital payment systems, I expect consumers to become more comfortable using electronic
payments for nearly everything they buy. When we get
into the habit of unlocking a Red Line entry gate with
a tap of an iPhone or a Visa card, we’ll probably start
doing the same thing at the supermarket.
Right now about 18 percent of commuter rail passengers pay cash for their tickets, and 7 percent of bus
passengers. But even that small minority can be a nuisance, said MBTA chief technology officer David
Block-Schachter. On buses, for example, cash-paying
riders often recharge their CharlieCards at boarding,
usually under the gaze of other passengers furious
about the delay.
ARAM BOGHOSIAN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE/FILE
The train
system in
London (above)
accepts
payment via
contactless
cards (bottom
left). The MBTA
has announced
it is read to
move forward
on a plan to
ban cash and
have riders pay
by alternative
methods. Those
could range
from
contactless
cards to
smartphone
apps.
CARL COURT/GETTY IMAGES
TECH LAB, Page B12
A Boston judge has ruled that Massachusetts alcohol retailers can legally
sell booze at deep discounts when they
order it in bulk, rebutting state regulators who said the practice can violate a
state law that prohibits selling alcohol
at less than cost.
The decision Tuesday by Suffolk Superior Court Judge Robert B. Gordon
came in response to a lawsuit brought
by the country’s largest alcohol chain,
Maryland-based Total Wine & More,
against the state Alcoholic Beverages
Control Commission.
In January, the agency slapped Total Wine’s Everett and Natick stores
with several-day license suspensions
for allegedly selling Smirnoff vodka,
Bacardi rum, and other liquors for $1
to $6 below their wholesale costs. State
alcohol laws and regulations forbid retailers from offering such below-cost
“loss leaders,” a policy the state says is
necessary to prevent excessive drinking and predatory pricing.
Total Wine sued to overturn the license suspensions. The company argued its prices for consumers weren’t
actually below its costs but were based
on quantity discounts the company expected to receive from its wholesalers
later on, after it had ordered enough of
‘This is something the
law should promote
rather than punish.’
ROBERT B. GORDON, Suffolk
Superior Court judge
the products to qualify. The ABCC, Total Wine said, unfairly refused to acknowledge the true, ultimate cost of
the liquor to the company, and instead
looked only at initial invoices that listed a higher cost.
Gordon, the judge, agreed, saying
the ABCC’s “starchy” and “semantic”
definition of cost “bears no rational relationship to the legislative policy of
prohibiting anti-competitive pricing
practices.”
“There was clearly no predatory
pricing carried out in this case,” Gordon wrote in his decision, “only a salutary effort by a retailer to pass along
savings derived from volume purchasing at the wholesale level to its customers. This is something the law should
promote rather than punish.”
The ABCC, he added, should have
realized that the delayed quantity discounts were “integral to a calculation
of the true net cost of an alcoholic beverage product” — a question simply of
“the sequencing of the invoice paperwork, and not the substance of the
product pricing itself.”
Total Wine coowner David Trone
hailed the ruling as a victory for conTOTAL WINE, Page B12
MORE
AUTOMOTIVE
Ford’s new CEO Jim
Hackett (right) saw a
better­than­expected
second quarter B13
TAXES
Over 2,000 get bad bills
because of software B11
SBLI completes transformation to mutually owned
By Deirdre Fernandes
GLOBE STAFF
It’s official: The banks are out as
owners of the Savings Bank Life Insurance Company of Massachusetts, and
the policy holders are in charge.
The Woburn-based SBLI took the
unusual step of converting into a mutually owned firm. The company spent
$57.3 million in surplus funds and
debt to buy out its 30 bank shareholders.
About 10 percent of SBLI’s policy
holders, about 61,500 people, took
part in voting on whether to convert
the firm into a mutual company. A vast
majority of those voting, 92 percent,
were in favor, said James Morgan, the
insurer’s chief executive officer.
But the conversion process did hit
some road bumps along the way.
Earlier this summer, a New Hampshire woman with an SBLI policy
asked a Suffolk County Superior Court
judge to block the conversion. She argued that SBLI was paying the bank
shareholders — including Bank of
America Corp. and Citizens Financial
Group — too much for their shares,
leaving policy holders with millions of
dollars in debt. The insurance company had also failed to adequately inform
policy holders of its intentions, the
complaint said.
Superior Court Justice Mitchell H.
Kaplan, however, denied the request
for an injunction. Kaplan said he
wasn’t deciding whether the conversion was, “good, bad, or indifferent,”
for policy holders, but based his ruling
on a finding that SBLI’s disclosures
SBLI, Page B13
10%
Percentage of SBLI
policy holders who
took part in the
voting.
92%
Percentage of
voters who favored
converting the firm
into a mutual
company.
Business
B10
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
TALKING POINTS
ALCOHOL
MILLENNIALS
AREN’T FANS
OF BEER
AVIATION
BUSINESSMEN SUE
UNITED AIRLINES
OVER DEATH
OF GIANT RABBIT
Agenda
Thinking of opening a craft brewery or a bar? You might want to avoid targeting
millennials in your marketing — and definitely cut back on the beer. Goldman Sachs
recently downgraded the stocks of two major brewers — Boston Beer Company (the
makers of Sam Adams and Angry Orchard cider) and Constellation Brands (the
third-largest beer company in the United States, and one known for importing
Corona and Modelo) — due to ‘‘sluggish sales,’’ according to a CNBC report.
Apparently, younger generations aren’t drinking as much beer as they used to. The
data shows they now prefer wine and spirits instead. — WASHINGTON POST
A group of Iowa businessmen filed a lawsuit Wednesday against United Airlines over the
death of a giant rabbit after a flight from London to Chicago. The businessmen filed the
lawsuit more than three months after airline workers found the continental rabbit named
Simon dead on April 20. The animal had been placed in a United kennel in Chicago’s
O’Hare airport while awaiting a connecting flight to Kansas City, where his new owners
planned to pick him up. The lawsuit seeks unspecified damages to cover the costs of the
rabbit as well as punitive damages. Attorney Guy Cook represents three Iowa businessmen
who bought the rabbit with the intention of showing him at the Iowa State Fair and then
displaying the animal and selling related merchandise to raise money for the annual event.
— ASSOCIATED PRESS
➔ EARNINGS
Stocks to watch today
American Tower Corp., Boston Scientific
WORKPLACE
JUDGE DISMISSES
CLASS­ACTION RACIAL
DISCRIMINATION SUIT
AGAINST
TIME WARNER
SODA
COKE ZERO
TO GET A NEW NAME,
MAKEOVER
REAL ESTATE
SALES OF NEW HOMES
UP SLIGHTLY IN JUNE
A federal judge has dismissed a class-action racial discrimination lawsuit filed by current
and former black employees of Time Warner, owner of Turner networks including CNN,
TNT, and TBS. US District Court Judge William Duffey of the Northern District of Georgia
said in Tuesday’s order that the employees didn’t meet legal standards to prove ‘‘a pattern
and practice of intentional race discrimination.’’ The lawsuit filed in December claimed a
pattern of discrimination against black employees, particularly men, in evaluations, pay,
and promotions. Duffey says neither of the two employees named in the lawsuit showed
intentional discrimination based on their race. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Corp., and Raytheon Co., are expected to
release earnings reports for the fiscal
quarter that ended in June.
Coke Zero is getting revamped as Coke Zero Sugar. The new name is
intended to make clearer that the drink has no calories, and a new
recipe is intended to make the drink taste more like regular Coke.
The company isn’t specifying what it’s changing aside from saying it
tweaked the ‘‘blend of flavors.’’ It says the drink will use the same
artificial sweeteners. Atlanta-based Coca-Cola Co. says the new cans
and bottles, which will incorporate more red like regular Coke, will
start hitting shelves in August. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
US sales of new homes perked up slightly in June, a sign that more would-be buyers are
seeking newly built properties. The Commerce Department said Wednesday that new home
sales edged up 0.8 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 610,000. Sales have registered a healthy 10.9 percent increase so far this year. The gains come amid a broader shortage of homes listed for sale, likely pushing more buyers into new construction. Despite
steady growth since the housing bubble began to burst a decade ago, sales of new homes
remain below historic averages. Builders are contending with a lack of land for construction, a shortage of workers and rising costs for some materials. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
➔ REAL ESTATE
US mortgage rates
New numbers for the average 30-year,
fixed-rate mortgage will be released
Thursday. Last week, Freddie Mac
reported the average 30-year, fixed-rate
mortgage fell to 3.96 percent from 4.03
percent the week before.
LABOR
AMAZON HAS
50,000 JOBS TO FILL
FAST FOOD
CHIPOTLE HOPES
NEW MENU ITEMS
WILL GAIN
CUSTOMERS AFTER
HEALTH SCARES
JOBS
FOXCONN TO BUILD
$10 BILLION FACTORY
IN WISCONSIN
VIDEO GAMES
NINTENDO PROFIT
RISES ON POPULARITY
OF SWITCH HYBRID
GAME MACHINE
Amazon has some job openings. Lots of them. The company on Wednesday said that it’s
looking to fill more than 50,000 positions across the United States. The announcement
comes at a time when the labor market is growing tight with back-to-school and holiday
shopping around the corner. Others will be competing for many of those potential hires.
Amazon.com Inc. will open the doors to job seekers on Aug. 2, next Wednesday, at 10
shipping sites. The majority of jobs will be full-time. More than 10,000 part-time jobs will
also be available at sorting centers, along with some supporting and managerial positions.
Amazon said in January that it wanted to hire 100,000 full-time workers over the next 18
months. Since that time it’s steadily announced jobs, including plans to add 900 workers in
Boston and 1,600 in Michigan. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Chipotle Mexican Grill, looking to finally put concerns about food safety behind it, sees the
rollout of queso and other initiatives as a way to win back customers. The melted-cheese
dish, a staple of Tex-Mex cuisine, is slated to be added to Chipotle menus
nationally as early as mid-September. The company also is testing frozen
margaritas, new salads, and a crispy cinnamon dessert, items that eventually could get wider adoption. Menu changes, which have been rare for
Chipotle during its more than two-decade history, are part of efforts to
get customers’ attention back on the food rather than health scares. The
company sustained a new round of headaches last week, when a norovirus outbreak was reported in Virginia and mice were discovered at a
Texas restaurant. Chipotle received a new subpoena from a US Attorney’s Office in California over the norovirus case, part of an ongoing investigation. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
➔ MEETUP
Startups in style
Attend an event featuring Boston startups
and creative entrepreneurs bringing
innovation to the style community. There
will be networking and shopping
opportunities. Thursday, 6:30 to 8:30
p.m., General Assembly, 125 Summer St.,
Boston. Free.
➔ INFO SESSION
Artificial intelligence
and its impact
Join the conversation on the future of
artificial intelligence and machine
learning and its impact on the business
ecosystem. Thursday, 6 to 9 p.m.,
Cambridge Innovation Center, 50 Milk St.,
Boston. $25 for general admission. $10
for students. Free for TiE-Boston
members.
President Trump said Wednesday that electronics giant Foxconn will build a $10 billion
factory in Wisconsin that’s expected to create 3,000 jobs. The factory will produce liquidcrystal display panels that are used in televisions and computer screens, according to a
senior White House official who insisted on anonymity to discuss the announcement.
Foxconn will locate its plant in the congressional district of US House Speaker Paul Ryan,
although the official declined to provide a specific location. Foxconn could eventually
employ 13,000 workers at the factory, the official said. This would mark a substantial gain
for a state that currently has 472,000 manufacturing jobs and is still recovering from
factory layoffs — including the closure of a General Motors plant in Ryan’s hometown —
that hit after the 2008 financial crisis. Taiwan-based Foxconn is perhaps best known for
assembling Apple iPhones in China. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Japanese video game maker Nintendo Co. has reversed into
profit for the April-June quarter from losses the previous year,
boosted by the popularity of its Switch hybrid game machine.
Nintendo sold 1.97 million Switch machines during the quarter, for cumulative sales of 4.7 million units since March. It left
unchanged its estimate of selling 10 million Switch machines
in the fiscal year through March 2018. The Switch is a new
kind of machine for Nintendo, which allows for playing both at
home and on-the-go. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
➔ PANEL DISCUSSION
Business of beer
Stop by Cambridge Innovation Center for
a panel discussion by the disruptors of
the beer industry. Meet local brewers, get
SOCIAL MEDIA
FACEBOOK GROWTH
BOOSTED BY
INSTAGRAM
Facebook Inc. churned out faster-than-expected quarterly sales growth from its main social
network, fueled by continued strength in mobile video advertising. Instagram, the company’s popular photo-sharing app, also helped second-quarter sales climb 45 percent to $9.3
billion, Facebook said Wednesday in a statement. Analysts projected $9.2 billion. Facebook’s social network, now with 2.01 billion monthly active users, is steadily driving revenue at a faster pace than at other technology giants. That consistency, which executives
have warned may not last, funds the company’s efforts in chat applications and virtual reality, which may take years to contribute meaningfully to revenue. To keep up growth, Facebook has been heavily investing in video. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
tips on starting your own brewery, and sip
on small pours. Food is included in the
ticket price. Thursday, 6 to 8 p.m.,
Cambridge Innovation Center, 50 Milk St.,
Boston. $20 for Branchfood community
members. $30 for general admission.
Events of note? E­mail us at
agenda@globe.com
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
B11
Over 2,000 in Mass. get bad
tax bill because of software
By Lauren Feiner
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
DANIEL BERMAN FOR STAT
Dr. Shoukhrat Mitalipov of Oregon Health and Science University led research in which
scientists edited the DNA of viable human embryos.
Using CRISPR, scientists edit
genome of viable human embryos
By Sharon Begley
STAT
In a step that some of the
nation’s leading scientists have
long warned against and that
has never before been
STAT accomplished, biologists in Oregon have
edited the DNA of viable human embryos efficiently and
apparently with few mistakes,
according to a report in Technology Review.
The experiment, using the
revolutionary genome-editing
technique CRISPR-Cas9, was
led by Shoukhrat Mitalipov of
O r e g o n He a l t h & S c i e n c e
University.
It went beyond previous experiments using CRISPR to alter the DNA of human
embryos, all of which were
conducted in China, in that it
edited the genomes of many
more embryos and targeted a
gene associated with a significant human disease.
The first experiment using
CRISPR to alter the DNA of human embryos, in 2015, used
embryos obtained from fertility clinics that had such serious
genetic defects they could never have developed. In the new
work, Technology Review reported, Mitalipov and his colleagues created human embryos using sperm donated by
men with the genetic mutation
that they planned to try to repair with CRISPR. The embryos are described as “clinical
quality.”
A 2017 experiment, also in
China, used CRISPR to edit
DNA in normal fertilized eggs,
or one-cell human embryos.
Also in contrast to the
experiments in China, those
led by Mitalipov reportedly
produced very few “off-target”
effects, or editing of genes that
CRISPR was supposed to leave
alone. And the experiment
Such experiments
using CRISPR to
alter the DNA of
human embryos
have triggered
warnings about
‘designer babies,’
in which parents
customize their
IVF embryos by
adding, removing,
or changing genes
for certain traits.
avoided what is called “mosaicism,” in which only some
cells of an embryo have the intended DNA changes. The embryos were not allowed to develo p be yond a ver y early
stage.
First he pioneered a new
way of making life. Now he
wants to try it in people.
Because changing the DNA
of an early embryo results in
changes to cells that will eventually produce sperm and eggs,
if the embryo is born and
grows to adulthood, any children he or she has will inherit
the genetic alteration, which is
called germline editing. That
has led to fears that such manipulations could alter the
course of human evolution.
It has also triggered warnings about “designer babies,” in
which parents customize their
IVF embryos by adding, removing, or changing genes for
certain traits.
A recent report on genome
editing from the National
Academies did not call for a
moratorium on research into
germline editing, arguing that
it might one day be a way for
some parents to have healthy,
biological children, such as
when both mother and father
carry genetic mutations that
cause severe diseases.
“But we anticipated that
there would need to be a lot of
research to see if you could
make these changes without
any unintentional effects,” bioethicist Alta Charo of the University of Wisconsin, who cochaired the Academies committee, told STAT.
Mitalipov, who did not respond to requests for comment, has now shown that the
answer to that might be yes.
Around 2,100 Massachusetts residents received one of
those chilling notices that says
you owe the taxman some
money. But it turns out to have
been a false alarm.
After receiving calls from
confused taxpayers and tax preparers, the Massachusetts Department of Revenue said it
found a fault in a commercial
software program called TaxAct
that some professionals and individuals use to file returns.
The program had incorrectly coded payment vouchers
from those customers to 2017
instead of 2016, so their checks
were applied to the wrong year.
A DOR spokeswoman said
the agency received payments
from fewer than 50 taxpayers,
all of whom should receive a
refund by next week. The 2,100
affected taxpayers will also
soon receive a letter to let them
know that the issue has been
resolved, although the spokeswoman said many had already
learned of the mistake by calling into the agency.
John Warren, president of
the Massachusetts Society of
Enrolled Agents, said he began
hearing of the problem last
week from members.
“We found out about it by
just networking with each other, and taking the initiative to
contact the right person at
DOR,” Warren said.
The DOR spokeswoman
said that the mix-up was due to
human error: Upon receiving
the specifications for state
forms to prepare its program,
TaxAct put the wrong year in
the barcode, and the DOR did
not catch the mistake when the
software was reviewed.
In a statement, TaxAct said
it became aware of the problem
on Monday through the DOR.
It added that 5 percent of TaxAct filers in the state were affected.
“We have a good working
relationship with the Massachusetts Department of Revenue and are working quickly
and diligently with them to
rectify the situation. We apologize to those impacted for the
inconvenience and concern
this has caused, and we will be
contacting those filers impacted,” TaxAct wrote.
The issue affected a relatively small portion of the approximately 3 million taxpayers in
the state, but may make some
question the accuracy and security of software like TaxAct.
Last fall, Massachusetts decided to forgo its free online taxfiling system and encouraged
residents to use commercial
software programs. It joined
the Free File Alliance, which offers software such as TurboTax
for free to people with an income of less than $64,000. Only 2 percent of Massachusetts
residents had used the state’s
own system, and officials said
at the time that commercial
software is more secure.
But in 2015, Massachusetts
and Vermont withheld almost
170,000 tax returns to investi-
gate potential identity theft
and fraud for taxes prepared
through TurboTax. The company temporarily suspend its filing program because of suspicions that identity thieves were
filing false returns using stolen
identities.
TaxAct itself said a small
number of accounts were affected by a data breach in late
2015, according to SC Media, a
tech-industry publication. The
next year, problems with
TurboTax and other software
was thought to cause up to
19,000 Vermont residents to
pay less than what they owed
the state government. H&R
Block and Intuit, which makes
TurboTax, paid nearly $2.5
million to the state tax agency
to cover the arrears of their
customers.
Amy Pitter, president and
CEO of the Massachusetts Society of CPAs, said national tax
software companies tend to
wait to the last minute to get
updated versions of their programs approved by local tax
authorities, which can cause
problems for tax preparers.
While the TaxAct issue seems
like a minor fluke, Pitter said
Mass DOR should have been
able to detect the mistake.
“The more you have automation, the more you need to
put in checks to make sure the
automation doesn’t run away
with itself,” Pitter said.
Lauren Feiner can be reached
at lauren.feiner@globe.com.
Follow her @lauren_feiner.
Once upon a time, a
fairy tale came to an
end. The couple wisely
chose mediation &
kept their sanity
& more of their
treasure. The End.
MORAL OF THE STORY: A mediated divorce is
generally quicker and costs less. Let us help
with the end of one story and the start of a
new story. Visit www.provobislaw.com, call
831.232.0092 or tweet us @ProVobisLaw.
Sharon Begley can be reached at
sharon.begley@statnews
.com.Follow her on Twitter
@sxbegle. Follow Stat
@statnews.
Boston Globe Night at
Finding
Neverland
Tuesday, August 8th | 7:30 p.m. | Boston Opera House
Directed by visionary Tony winner Diane Paulus, FINDING NEVERLAND
tells the incredible story behind one of the world’s most beloved characters: Peter Pan. Playwright J.M. Barrie struggles to find inspiration until
he meets four young brothers and their beautiful widowed mother. Spellbound by the boys’ enchanting make-believe adventures, he sets out to
write a play that will astound London theatergoers. With a little bit of
pixie dust and a lot of faith, Barrie takes this monumental leap, leaving
his old world behind for Neverland where nothing is impossible and the
wonder of childhood lasts forever.
Jeremy Daniel
Join Boston Globe Arts Editor, Rebecca Ostriker, post-performance,
as she talks to two local actors, John Davidson from West Bridgewater
who plays Hook and Christine Dwyer from Lynnfield who plays Sylvia,
and other leading cast members.
For tickets and additional information visit BroadwayInBoston.com
B12
Business
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
Britain to ban new diesel and gas cars by 2040
By Stephen Castle
NEW YORK TIMES
LONDON — Scrambling to
combat a growing air pollution crisis, Britain announced Wednesday
that sales of new diesel and gas
cars would reach the end of the
road by 2040, the latest step in Europe’s battle against the damaging
environmental impact of the internal combustion engine.
Britain’s plans match a similar
pledge made this month by
France, and are part of a growing
global push to curb emissions and
fight climate change by promoting
electric cars. Carmakers are also
adjusting, with Volvo notably saying recently that it would phase
out the internal combustion engine in coming years and BMW
deciding to build an electric version of its popular Mini car in Britain.
France
has also
set 2040
as its
target, but
Norway
intends to
sell only
electric
cars from
2025, and
India
wants to
do so by
2030.
But the shift to electric vehicles
will be a gradual one, and the target set by Britain is less ambitious
than efforts elsewhere. President
Trump’s decision to withdraw the
United States from the Paris climate accord has also dented optimism.
Britain’s new clean air strategy,
published Wednesday, calls for
sales of new gas and diesel cars
and vans to end by 2040. The government will also make more than
200 million pounds, or $260 million, available for local governments to take short-term action,
such as retrofitting buses, to reduce air pollution.
“It is important that we all gear
up for a significant change which
deals not just with the problems to
health caused by emissions but the
broader problems caused in terms
of accelerating climate change,”
Michael Gove, the country’s environment secretary, said in an interview with the BBC.
“We can’t carry on with diesel
and petrol cars, not just because of
the health problems that they
cause, but also because the emissions that they cause would mean
that we would accelerate climate
change.”
The strategy document was
published after a protracted legal
battle in which ministers were ordered by the courts to produce
new plans to tackle illegal levels of
nitrogen dioxide.
In France, the promise to end
sales of traditional cars was made
as part of a renewed commitment
to the Paris climate change accord.
In Britain, which is also committed to the Paris treaty, the measures have particular political significance because of rising con-
cern over the level of air pollution,
particularly in large cities like
London. Poor air quality, much of
it a result of pollution from vehicles, is estimated to cause more
than 23,000 deaths a year in Britain.
Frederik Dahlmann, assistant
professor of global energy at Warwick Business School, described
Gove’s announcement as “an important step” that set a clear longterm target, and “also gives car
buyers an incentive to consider the
different types of engine options
available in light of the long-term
development of the market.”
Still, he said, the long-term nature of the announcement left a
significant question hanging:
“How does the government intend
to improve air quality and reduce
transport related emissions in the
short term?”
Some critics say the country’s
efforts are not aggressive enough
— France has also set 2040 as its
target, but Norway intends to sell
only electric cars from 2025, and
India wants to do so by 2030.
Cars typically have a life span of
around 15 years, so even if Britain
follows through with its target,
conventional engines are likely to
be on the country’s roads more
than a decade later.
In the meantime, industry
groups warned against introducing bans on gas and diesel vehicles
in specific parts of Britain.
“Outright bans risk undermining the current market for new
cars and our sector, which supports over 800,000 jobs across the
UK,” said Mike Hawes, chief executive of the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders, an industry group.
Legislators again nix
Baker health­cost cuts
uHEALTH CARE
HE’S OPPOSED
Continued from Page B9
JOSH REYNOLDS FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
MBTA moving toward cash-free rides
uTECH LAB
Continued from Page B9
“It takes an incredibly long
time,” said Block-Schachter.
So when the new system
kicks in during the second half
of 2020, the T will deploy
vending machines in currently
underserved areas, but riders
will have to charge up their
CharlieCards before they
board. And yes, these machines
will still accept cash. Ditto for
those cash-wielding commuter
rail riders.
All T riders will also get the
option of using a smartphone
“mobile wallet” like Apple Pay,
Android Pay, or Samsung Pay.
Passengers would simply tap
their phones against a compatible terminal to pay the fare. It’s
an excellent option for tourists,
who will no longer have to fuss
with a T vending machine before every ride, or obtain a
CharlieCard they’ll never need
again. My native city of Chicago
installed a similar system years
ago, and I use it with pleasure
whenever I’m back for a visit.
The T’s fare terminals will
also recognize a different kind
of credit card popular elsewhere, but nearly unknown in
America. Instead of using a
magnetic strip, like the old
swipe cards, or an embedded
data chip, these “contactless”
cards work like Apple Pay. They
use a tiny radio transmitter
chip that broadcasts data over
very short distances — just a
few inches. That’s close enough
to make a purchase just by wav-
ing the card over a payment
terminal. There’s no need to enter a PIN number or sign anything. Contactless cards can only be used to make small purchases — $20 to $30 max,
limiting the owner’s risk if the
card is stolen.
Cards like these have been
around for at least a decade.
But until recently it’s been
pointless to have one in the US,
because hardly any retailers
were equipped with compatible
payment terminals. That same
problem has hampered Apple
Pay and other smartphone payment systems. Apple Pay has
been available for nearly three
years, yet according to the latest numbers from Apple, only
about 36 percent of US retailers
accept it.
That would explain why few
iPhone owners ever actually
use it, according to the trade
publication Pymnts.com. Other
smartphone payment systems
have posted similarly dismal results. And after a failed attempt
to introduce contactless cards
to the US over a decade ago,
they’re almost nonexistent on
this side of the Atlantic.
But what will happen when
thousands of people begin using these methods every day, to
get on the subway? Probably a
modest version of what happened in the United Kingdom,
after the London public transport system started accepting
contactless cards in 2012. At
about the same time, retailers
began installing contactless ter-
PAT GREENHOUSE/GLOBE STAFF
minals. Not much happened at
first, but then contactless payments took off. By last year, one
of every five credit card purchases in the UK was made
with a wave-and-go card. And
London’s transit system appears to be running just fine
three years after banning cash
on its buses.
It’s possible that public
transportation will be the “killer app” of the cashless society,
the first use of digital payment
technologies in the US that will
appeal to millions of ordinary
consumers. Right now, Apple
Pay is a toy for geeks and contactless cards are rare as hen’s
teeth. Both technologies work
just fine, but people have been
waiting for a good reason to use
them. And the bus is on its way.
Currently, 18
percent of
commuter rail
and 7 percent
of MBTA bus
passengers use
cash to pay for
their tickets.
When the T
moves to its
cash-free plan,
it will deploy
vending
machines in
underserved
areas where
riders can use
cash (above) to
charge
CharlieCards
before getting
on a bus or
train.
Hiawatha Bray can be reached
at hiawatha.bray@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@GlobeTechLab.
Lawmakers didn’t include Baker’s
proposals in their budget, saying
they didn’t have enough time to fully
consider the complex set of ideas,
which would affect hundreds of
thousands of people.
Last week, Baker again urged lawmakers to approve his plan. But, in
one of the biggest clashes yet between the Republican governor and
Democratic Legislature, lawmakers
rejected Baker a second time.
Baker administration officials had
presented their health care plan as a
common-sense approach to reining
in the costs of the state Medicaid program, or MassHealth, which covers
1.9 million people. Perhaps their
most significant proposal would
move 140,000 adults, including
100,000 parents, from MassHealth
onto subsidized health plans on the
state Health Connector.
These adults would not have to
pay premiums, but they would be hit
with higher out-of-pocket costs — on
average, about 3 percent of their income. They also would have to pay
extra for dental benefits, unless they
sought dental care at community
health centers.
The change would apply to adults
just over the poverty line, earning between $16,240 and $21,600 a year
for a household of two.
Additionally, Baker proposed barring many low-income adults from
obtaining MassHealth if they have
access to affordable coverage from
their employers.
Administration officials have
warned that without these changes
to MassHealth, they might be forced
to make cuts to state spending, on
top of what some lawmakers have described as the most painful funding
levels in years.
But legislators, at least for now,
are siding with health care advocates
who argued that the governor’s plan
would hurt poor families who can’t
afford even modest hikes in what
they pay for health care.
“There is considerable uncertainty around the effects this plan will
have on low-income individuals, the
elderly, and the disabled,” State Representative Jeffrey Sánchez, a Boston
Democrat, said on the House floor
Wednesday.
“There is no easy solution to tackle rising health care costs,” added
Sánchez, the House budget chief.
Brian Rosman, policy director at
Health Care For All, said he was glad
lawmakers heard advocates’ concerns.
“We’re really pleased that they rejected the governor’s Medicaid cuts,
which would really have been detrimental to people who depend on
Medicaid,” he said.
Medicaid cuts
would hurt
poor people,
Rep. Jeffrey
Sánchez warns.
Medicaid, or MassHealth, accounts for about $16 billion in public
spending in Massachusetts, which is
split between the state and federal
governments.
“At the Legislature’s request, the
administration presented lawmakers
with a comprehensive package that
ensures quality health care coverage
for residents [and] addresses the
health care safety net’s fiscal sustainability over time while protecting taxpayers from having to pick up the bill
for more individuals’ health care,” a
Baker spokeswoman, Lizzy Guyton,
said in a statement. “The administration looks forward to continuing to
work collaboratively on solutions.”
Sánchez said the health care debate isn’t over and indicated that legislators may continue to deliberate
B a k e r ’s i d e a s f o r c h a n g i n g
MassHealth at some point in the future. Senate leaders have said that
they are also working on legislation
to tackle health care costs.
Wednesday’s vote came one day
after a lengthy State House hearing
on the governor’s proposals. At the
hearing, Democratic legislators were
skeptical of the proposals and questioned the wisdom of making big
changes to MassHealth at a time
when Republicans in Congress are
trying to repeal and replace the national Affordable Care Act.
The plan approved by state legislators Wednesday would slow the
rate of growth for unemployment insurance rates that employers pay to
the state, in exchange for charging
employers higher fees on health care.
But business leaders said that is not
enough. They said the state must get
serious about containing
MassHealth, or it will continue to
squeeze out other important budget
priorities.
“We’re talking about a program
that has become the dominant feature of state spending,” said Mark
Gallagher, executive vice president at
the Massachusetts High Technology
Council, an employer group. “We
have to get serious in addressing the
underlying cost drivers.”
Priyanka Dayal McCluskey
can be reached at
priyanka.mccluskey@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@priyanka_dayal.
Judge sides with Total Wine in challenge on discount alcohol pricing
uTOTAL WINE
Continued from Page B9
sumers.
“The court clearly recognized
that Total Wine is lawfully providing the best values for the products we carry,” he said in an interview.
“It’s a strongly written opinion
that sent a clear message to the
ABCC that consumers are first.”
However, Gordon declined to
rule on Total Wine’s argument that
the pricing law violated US antitrust laws, a claim the company also pursued in an ultimately unsuccessful federal lawsuit challenging
a similar minimum pricing re-
quirement in Connecticut.
That means Massachusetts retailers are still barred from selling
below cost, a reprieve for the owners of smaller package stores who
say the requirement prevent large
chains such as Total Wine that can
afford to sell products at a loss
from unfairly undercutting their
prices and driving them out of
business.
The head of the association
representing package stores in the
state declined to comment.
Total Wine has a long history of
challenging alcohol regulations
that prevent it from leveraging its
size — the company owns around
“The court
clearly
recognized that
Total Wine is
lawfully
providing the
best values for
the products
we carry,” Total
Wine co-owner
David Trone
said in an
interview.
160 stores in 20 states — to prevail
over local competitors.
Company officials said that, for
now, they have no plans to challenge the Massachusetts pricing
law again, but will continue a campaign to loosen other booze laws
in the state.
A spokeswoman for state Treasurer Deborah Goldberg, whose
office oversees the ABCC, said the
agency is still reviewing the ruling
and has not yet decided whether
to appeal.
Dan Adams can be reached at
daniel.adams@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @Dan_Adams86.
JOHN BLANDING/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2017
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
THE BOSTON GLOBE
25
Index of publicly traded companies in Massachusetts
Globe 25 index
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
B13
Fed leaves interest rates unchanged
By Binyamin Appelbaum
NEW YORK TIMES
WASHINGTON — The Federal
Reserve delivered no surprises
Wednesday after a two-day meeting of its policymaking committee.
The Fed, which is wrapping up its
post-crisis economic stimulus campaign, said in a post-meeting statement the next step would come
“relatively soon” so long as moderate economic growth continues.
The Fed, as expected, left its
benchmark interest rate in a range
between 1 percent and 1.25 percent. It remains officially sanguine
about a recent downturn in inflation.
That is likely to reinforce market expectations that the Fed will
tighten policy at its next meeting,
in September. Rather than raising
its benchmark rate, the Fed is expected to announce that it will begin to reduce its bond holdings.
The Fed accumulated more than
$4 trillion in Treasury securities
and mortgage-backed securities as
part of its campaign to reduce borrowing costs for businesses and
consumers.
Under its exit plan, which it described in June, it would gradually
reduce those holdings — initially at
the slow pace of $10 billion a
month.
The Fed has held borrowing
costs at low levels since the financial crisis to increase economic activity by encouraging borrowing
and risk-taking. It is now trying to
raise costs to reduce those incentives.
By the end of the year, the Fed
projects that rates could return to a
level that would neither encourage
nor discourage economic activity.
So far, however, markets have
largely shaken off the Fed’s retreat.
Borrowing costs remain low and
loan terms have shown little sign of
tightening. Some measures show
financial conditions have eased
since the Fed began its retreat.
At its last meeting, in June, the
Fed raised its benchmark interest
rate for the third consecutive quarter, to a range from 1 percent to
1.25 percent. The Fed also described its plans for reducing its
bond holdings, a process that analysts expect to begin at the Fed’s
next meeting. Those steps reflected
the Fed’s confidence in the health
of the economy.
Since then, however, some Fed
officials have expressed concern
about fresh weakness in inflation.
The Fed’s preferred measure declined in the last three monthly reports, to 1.4 percent in May from
an annualized pace of 2.1 percent
in February. The Fed aims to keep
inflation at a 2 percent annual rate.
While high and rising inflation
is economically disruptive, lower
inflation can cause problems, too.
Neel Kashkari, president of the
Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, has been most vocal in warning that the Fed may be raising interest rates too quickly.
He voted against the quarterpoint rate hikes in March and
again in June. Several other members of the Fed’s policymaking
committee have expressed concern
in recent weeks.
Janet Yellen, the Fed’s chairwoman, has acknowledged the recent weakness, but she has said
that she expects inflation to rebound. Job growth remains strong,
with most Fed officials seeing a
tight labor market that is likely to
result in higher prices.
The Fed has predicted one more
rate increase this year, but analysts
do not expect a decision any earlier
than December, so the Fed has
time to consider the incoming data.
Rather
than
raising its
bench­
mark rate,
the Fed is
expected
to
announce
in its
Septem­
ber
meeting
that it will
begin to
reduce its
bond
holdings.
SBLI now
owned by
its policy
holders
uSBLI
Continued from Page B9
Markets
Stocks edge up; bond yields fall
US stock indexes inched further into record territory
Wednesday after AT&T, Boeing, and others joined a parade
of companies reporting stronger profits than expected.
Stocks that pay big dividends were particularly strong after
the Federal Reserve paused its campaign to lift interest
rates. The Fed said it may begin paring its $4.5 trillion balance sheet, built up after the financial crisis, ‘‘relatively
soon.’’ Drops for Treasury yields accelerated; the 10-year
yield fell to 2.29 percent from 2.33 percent late Tuesday.
The two-year yield sank to 1.35 percent from 1.39 percent.
Lower bond yields make dividends paid by stocks more attractive. Utility stocks in the S&P 500 climbed 0.9 percent,
for example. Telecom stocks jumped after AT&T reported
stronger earnings than Wall Street had forecast. AT&T rose
5 percent. Boeing was the top-performing stock, up 9.9 percent; it raised its forecast for this year and reported betterthan-expected earnings for the second quarter. Akamai had
the worst loss in the S&P 500, despite strong quarterly results. It third-quarter forecast was lower than analysts were
expecting, and the stock dropped 14.6 percent.
DOW JONES industrial average
NASDAQ Composite index
S&P 500 index
SOURCE: Bloomberg News
about the deal were adequate.
Massachusetts banks started
SBLI, but new banking regulations
and the low-interest-rate environment have made their involvement
in the company increasingly expensive. The banks were demanding
higher dividend payments, Morgan
said.
The insurer plans to continue using the SBLI brand in its marketing
but will officially be known as The
Savings Bank Mutual Life Insurance
Company of Massachusetts. The
newly-named firm has a nine-member board of directors, including
four members who are affiliated
with banks and will serve out their
terms, Morgan said.
Other insurers, who have no ties
GLOBE STAFF FILE/2000
to banks, still have banking experts
on their board of directors who can
help on accounting issues, Morgan
said. As members retire and step
down, the chief executive said, he
plans to seek out investment and
technology experts to fill the vacant
positions.
Deirdre Fernandes can be reached at
deirdre.fernandes@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@fernandesglobe.
SBLI, founded
in 1907 by
Louis Brandeis,
is based in
Woburn.
Ford’s 2nd­quarter profit better than expected
By Dee-Ann Durbin
ASSOCIATED PRESS
DEARBORN, Mich. — Ford Motor Co. had a better-than-expected
second quarter despite lower sales
and upheaval in its executive ranks.
Net income rose 4 percent to $2
billion, thanks to a change in the
company’s tax rate and a strong performance from its credit arm.
Ford’s new CEO Jim Hackett
called it ‘‘a solid performance’’ but
said the company still needs to get
much more fit and nimble.
‘‘ We know we’re going to be
quicker and more purposeful in our
decisions about where to play and
how to win,’’ Hackett told analysts
and media in his first earnings call
since he became Ford’s CEO. ‘‘We’re
in an incredibly competitive industry and the competition just doesn’t
r e l a x b e c a u s e w e’r e t h i n k i n g
through a decision.’’
Adjusted profits of 56 cents per
share easily surpassed Wall Street
expectations of 43 cents, according
to analysts polled by FactSet. Onetime items included a $248 million
charge as the company shifted production of the Ford Focus small car
from Mexico to China.
Ford’s automotive revenue of $37
billion was in line with Wall Street’s
expectations. Total revenue rose 1
percent to $39.85 billion.
The elevated performance in the
second quarter was due mostly to a
lowering of the company’s corporate
tax rate, from 30 percent down to 10
percent, chief financial officer Bob
Shanks acknowledged. Ford has put
some overseas losses back on its
books in anticipation of changes in
the US corporate tax code, Shanks
said. The company expects to have a
15 percent rate this year, but that
will return to 30 percent next year.
Ford’s full-year guidance shifted
upward due to the tax change. Ford
expects adjusted earnings of $1.65
to $1.85 for the full year, up from its
previous guidance of $1.58 per
share, Shanks said. But analysts
pointed out that with the lower tax
PAUL SANCYA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
rate, that likely means a lower fullyear net income than the $9 billion
Ford previously guided.
Barclay’s analyst Brian Johnson
said Ford may be lowering the bar to
make it easier to meet expectations.
But the move wasn’t greeted well by
investors. Ford shares dropped 1.86
percent to $11.06.
Ford’s sliding stock price was one
reason the company abruptly replaced former CEO Mark Fields with
Hackett in May. Hackett was a member of Ford’s board and had been
leading Ford’s mobility unit.
Hackett said Wednesday that he’s
confident Ford’s stock performance
will improve.
‘‘The share price over time is going to reflect what we’re going to get
done, and we’re going to get a lot
done,’’ he said.
Hackett, the former CEO of office
furniture company Steelcase Inc., is
in the midst of a 100-day review of
Ford’s operations. He said he has already whittled down his list of direct
reports to eight, from the 19 that
Fields had. That team is working on
maximizing revenue on popular
products like its commercial vans.
Hackett also said Ford is considering exiting some markets. General
Motors Co. abandoned the European market earlier this year, but
Hackett said Ford is competitive in
Europe and plans to stay.
Hackett also said Ford will prove
that it can compete in new mobility
efforts like ride-sharing and driverless vehicles. He said Ford’s recent
$1 billion investment in Argo AI, an
artificial intelligence startup, will
put the company at an ‘‘elite level’’ in
terms of its deep learning capability.
Overall sales fell 3 percent to 1.65
million vehicles. Much of that decrease was due to lower sales of the
Fiesta in Europe as the company
prepares to launch a new Fiesta,
Shanks said.
Ford earned $2.2 billion in North
America, its biggest market. That
was down 19 percent from the AprilJune period a year ago as Ford spent
more on incentives and commodities, including steel.
It was the best quarter since
2011 for Ford Credit, which is seeing stronger-than-expected auction
values for Ford’s off-lease vehicles,
Shanks said.
Ford CEO Jim
Hackett (left),
seen with Bill
Ford Jr.,
executive
chairman of
Ford Motor
Company,
called Ford’s
second-quarter
results “solid,”
but said the
automaker
needs to be
more fit and
nimble.
B14
Business
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
Auto Dealer Directory
Alfa Romeo of Boston*
Herb Chambers, 531 Boston Post Road,
Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
alfaromeoofboston.com
Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo*
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
herbchambersfiat.com
Kelly Alfa Romeo*
151 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0006
kellyauto.com
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Millbury*
Herb Chambers Honda Westboro*
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Kelly Chrysler*
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
Premier Cape Cod
Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram
141 Derby Street, Hingham
866-237-9636
herbchamberslexusofhingham.com
Honda Cars of Boston*
Herb Chambers Lexus of Sharon*
100 Broadway, Rte 99, Everett
617-600-6045
hondacarsofboston.com
25 Providence Highway,
Rte 1, “The Automile,” Sharon
877-338-9671
herbchamberslexus.com
Honda Village*
Lexus of Northborough*
371 Washington Street, Newton Corner
888-511-5869
hondavillage.com
460 Yarmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-5000
drivepremier.com
Herb Chambers Lexus of Hingham*
350 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-0329
herbchambershondaofwestborough.com
Rte 9, Northborough
508-870-3222
Herb Chambers Porsche Burlington*
62 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
porscheofburlington.com
Chambers Motorcars of Natick*
157 W Central St, Rte 135, Natick
888-920-3507
chambersmotorcarsofnatick.com
Kelly Honda*
Audi Brookline Herb Chambers*
308 Boylston Street, Rte 9, Brookline
855-889-0843
audibrookline.com
Audi Burlington Herb Chambers*
62 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
audiburlington.com
Audi Cape Cod – A Premier Company
25 Falmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-5600
drivepremier.com
Audi Shrewsbury
540 Lynnway, Rte 1A, Lynn
781-595-5252
shopkellyhonda.com
Herb Chambers Dodge of Danvers*
107 Andover St., Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
855-975-6891
BochHyundai.com
Premier Cape Cod
Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram
Herb Chambers Hyundai of Auburn*
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
888-318-7927
herbchambershyundaiofauburn.com
460 Yarmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-5000
drivepremier.com
Mirak Hyundai*
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakhyundai.com
Ferrari Of New England*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
FerrariNE.com
1198 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-857-4431
herbchambersinfinitiofboston.com
Herb Chambers Fiat of Danvers*
Herb Chambers Infiniti Westboro*
Herb Chambers BMW of Sudbury*
128 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-483-1828
bmwofsudbury.com
Herb Chambers Fiat of Millbury*
Kelly Infiniti*
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
fiatusaofworcesterma.com
155 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-1000
kellyinfiniti.com
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
Framingham Ford*
1200 Worcester Rd, Rt 9, Framingham
1-800-626-FORD
framinghamford.com
Jaguar Sudbury Herb Chambers*
83 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-268-7851
jaguarsudbury.com
Herb Chambers Ford of Braintree*
Herb Chambers Ford-Westborough*
310 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-6736
herbchambersfordofwestborough.com
1511 Bald Hill Road, Rte 2, Warwick, R I
877-206-0272
herbchamberscadillacofwarwick.com
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-904-0800
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Herb Chambers Jeep of Millbury*
Herb Chambers Genesis*
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
877-287-9139
herbchambersgenesisofauburn.com
128 Derby St, Exit 15 off Rte 3, Hingham
800-649-6781
bestchevyusa.com
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
Herb Chambers Chevrolet Danvers*
90 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-206-9332
herbchamberschevrolet.com
Mirak Chevrolet*
1125 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakchevrolet.com
Herb Chambers Kia of Burlington*
Boch Honda West*
93 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
866-271-6366
herbchamberskiaofburlington.com
Route 110, Westford
978-589-4200
BochHondaWest.com
Boch Honda*
Herb Chambers Lamborghini Boston*
Herb Chambers Honda Burlington*
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchamberslamborghiniboston.com
Herb Chambers Honda in Boston*
1186 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
877-205-0986
herbchambershondainboston.com
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Danvers*
Herb Chambers Honda of Seekonk*
185 Taunton Ave, Rte 44, Seekonk
877-851-3362
herbchambershondaofseekonk.com
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchambersrollsroyceofnewengland.com
smart center Lynnfield*
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway,
Rte 1 N, Lynnfield
844-222-6929 smartcenterlynnfield.com
Land Rover Sudbury*
Herb Chambers, 83 Boston Post Rd,
Rt 20, Sudbury
866-258-0054
landroverofsudbury.com
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-359-6562 smartcenterboston.com
141 Stevens St, Hyannis
508-815-5900
drivepremier.com
Cityside*
Flagship Motorcars of Lynnfield*
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway, Rte 1 N,
Lynnfield
877-337-2442
flagshipmotorcars.com
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-426-8963
mercedes-benzofboston.com
Mercedes-Benz of Burlington *
80 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
781-229-1600
mbob.com
Herb Chambers, 253 North Main St, Natick
866-266-3870
mercedesbenzofnatick.com
Mercedes-Benz of Shrewsbury*
760 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
888-551-7134
mercedesbenzofshrewsbury.com
Smith Motor Sales of Haverhill, Inc.
420 River Street, Haverhill
978-372-2552
onlymercedes.com
790 Pleasant St, Rte 60, Belmont
781-641-1900
buycitysidesubaru.com
VillageSubaru.com
61 Powdermill Rd, Acton
978-897-1128
sales@villagesubaru.net
Boch Toyota*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
888-321-6631 BochToyota.com
Herb Chambers Toyota of Auburn*
809 Washington Street, Rte 20, Auburn
855-872-6999
herbchamberstoyotaofauburn.com
Herb Chambers Toyota of Boston*
32 Brighton Avenue, Boston
877-884-1866
herbchamberstoyotaofboston.com
Toyota of Braintree*
210 Union St, Exit 17 off Rte 3, Braintree
781-848-9300
toyotaofbraintree.com
Toyota of Wellesley*
Rte 9, Wellesley
781-237-2970
Toyota/Scion of Watertown*
Herb Chambers MINI of Boston*
149 Arsenal St, Watertown
617-926-5200
1168 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
888-994-1075
herbchambersmini.com
Colonial Volkswagen of Medford*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
855-996-7751
BochNissan.com
Herb Chambers Nissan of Westboro*
75 Otis St @ Rte 9, Westborough
508-618-7032
herbchambers.com
Kelly Nissan of Beverly*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
888-364-2550
BochHonda.com
196 Great Rd, Rte 2A, Acton
888-871-3051
actonchrysler.com
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Premier Mazda Cape Cod
Boch Nissan
33 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
877-842-0555
herbchambershondaofburlington.com
Acton Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram*
151 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0007
kellymaserati.com
460 Yarmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-5000
drivepremier.com
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
Boch Chevrolet
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
844-464-3560
BochChevrolet.com
Kelly Maserati*
Kelly Jeep*
Premier Cape Cod
Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram
Colonial Buick-GMC*
Best Chevrolet
Acton Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram*
Herb Chambers Jeep of Danvers*
211 Rantoul Street, Rte 1A, Beverly
978-922-0059
shopkellyford.com
395 Broadway, Rte 1 N, Lynnfield
866-233-8937
herbchamberscadillaclynnfield.com
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Warwick*
Rolls-Royce Motorcars of New
England, a Herb Chambers Company*
531 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
herbchambersmaserati.com
Mercedes-Benz of Natick*
196 Great Rd, Rte 2A, Acton
978-263-7300
actonchrysler.com
Kelly Ford*
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Lynnfield*
Herb Chambers Maserati of Boston*
Mercedes-Benz of Boston*
75 Granite Street, Braintree
855-298-1177
herbchambersfordofbraintree.com
Colonial Buick-GMC*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
BochMaserati.com
312 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
855-878-9603
herbchambersinfinitiofwestborough.com
Herb Chambers BMW of Boston*
1168 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
866-803-9622
herbchambersbmwofboston.com
Boch Maserati*
Herb Chambers Infiniti of Boston*
107 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchambers.com
500 Yarmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-500
drivepremier.com
460 Yarmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-5000
drivepremier.com
smart center Boston*
Bentley Boston, a Herb Chambers
Company*
BMW Cape Cod – A Premier Company
1130 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“On The Automile,” Norwood
855-278-0016 herbchamberslincoln.com
Premier Cape Cod
Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram
Boch Hyundai
Herb Chambers Dodge of Millbury*
780 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
866-890-0081
wagneraudisales.com
533 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
bentleyboston.com
Herb Chambers Lincoln Norwood*
420 Cabot St, Route 1A, Beverly
978-922-1405
nissanofbeverly.com
Kelly Nissan of Lynnfield*
340 Mystic Ave, Medford, MA
781-475-5200
vwmedford.com
Kelly Volkswagen*
72 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-8000
kellyvw.net
Minuteman Volkswagen
39 North Road, Bedford
781-275-8000
minutemanvw.com
Wellesley Volkswagen*
231 Linden St, Wellesley
781-237-3553
buywellesleyvw.com
275 Broadway, Rte 1 North, Lynnfield
781-598-1234
kellynissanoflynnfield.com
Kelly Nissan of Woburn*
Herb Chambers Volvo Cars Norwood*
95 Cedar St, Exit 36 off I93 & I95, Woburn
781-835-3500
kellynissanofwoburn.com
1120 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“On The Automile,” Norwood
888-920-2902 volvoofnorwood.com
Herb Chambers Porsche of Boston*
Volvo Cars Cape Cod – A Premier
Company
1172 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-778-1912
herbchambersporscheofboston.com
270 North St, Hyannis
508-815-5400 drivepremier.com
Please call (617) 929-1314 to include your dealership in this directory. *For more information on this dealer, please visit boston.com/cars.
Go antiquing this summer.
Just don’t drive one.
Herb Chamberss
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B15
By Dave Green
Boston’s forecast
6 A.M.
NOON
6 P.M.
SATURDAY
6 A.M.
Times of clouds and sun
with a shower or two
around in the afternoon.
A shower will linger
through the first half of the night;
cloudy.
HIGH
74-79
LOW
63-68
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
More clouds than
sunshine. A developing
area of low pressure will
move toward the area
at night, producing clouds and
some rain just to the south.
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
Some rain possible in
the morning on the
Cape; otherwise, breezy,
cooler and less humid
with some sun returning. Partly
cloudy skies at night.
HIGH
76-81
LOW
61-66
HIGH
68-73
LOW
59-64
13
MONDAY
SUNDAY
NOON
6 A.M.
6 P.M.
NOON
6 P.M.
A beautiful day with an
abundance of sunshine
with high pressure overhead; pleasantly warm in
the afternoon. Skies will remain
clear at night.
With high pressure
beginning to build in
from the west, it will
be a nice day with sunshine and a few clouds; warmer.
Clear skies at night.
HIGH
79-84
LOW
65-70
HIGH
74-79
LOW
61-66
8
2
1
12
1
9
20
6
18
2
2017 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
FRIDAY
TODAY
11
5
15
1
6
Difficulty Level
7/27
Each row and column must contain the numbers 1 through
6 without repeating.
The numbers within the outlined boxes, or cages, must
combine using the given operation (in any order) to pro­
duce the target numbers in the top­left corners.
Fill in the single­box cages with the number in the top­left
corner.
DAILY BRIDGE CLUB
BY FRANK STEWART
New England
forecast
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Tides
TODAY: Clouds and some intervals of sunshine; an
approaching cold front will produce a couple of afternoon
showers and, in spots, a thunderstorm.
TOMORROW: Plenty of clouds. Low pressure
developing to the southwest will lead to the chance
of rain for southern areas late day and at night.
EXTENDED: Some rain possible early
Saturday for the Cape back into Rhode
Island; otherwise, breezy, cooler and less
humid with some sun returning.
A.M. P.M.
Boston high
Height
Boston low
Height
High tides
Old Orchard ME
Hampton
Beach NH
Plum Island
Ipswich
High tides
A.M. P.M.
Gloucester
Marblehead
Lynn
Scituate
Plymouth
Cape Cod
Canal East
Cape Cod
Canal West
Falmouth
2:38 3:12
11.1 10.5
8:54 9:15
-0.8 0.0
2:30 3:07
2:44 3:21
2:50 3:21
2:29 3:06
2:38
2:38
2:42
2:40
2:44
1:31 2:01
2:22 2:56
Actual Temperatures
Temperatures are
today’s highs
and tonight’s lows.
Degree days
Yesterday
Monthly total
Normal to date
Season total
Season normal
Last year to date
A.M. P.M.
Hyannis Port
Chatham
Wellfleet
Provincetown
Nantucket
Harbor
Oak Bluffs
New Bedford
Newport RI
2:29 3:02
Boston’s recent climate
Yesterday
High/low
77/59
Mean
68
Departure from normal -6
Departure for month -16
Departure for year +250
7 p.m. rel. humidity 59%
High tides
3:12
3:12
3:18
3:13
3:16
3:41
3:36
2:52
2:45
4:21
4:14
3:26
3:18
Cool
3
228
223
479
382
471
Normal Temperatures
July readings
Avg. daily high
Avg. daily low
YTD avg. temp.
Actual
80.8
65.5
50.5
Norm.
81.4
65.3
49.0
Record Temperatures
Yesterday’s high 77°
120
1989
Record
high
100
96
Normal
high
82
80
New England marine forecast
Boston Harbor
Wind
Seas
Temp
SW 7-14 kts.
1-2 ft.
76/65
East Cape
 Small craft advisory
 Gale warning  Storm warning
Wind
Normal
low
66
Record
60
Seas
low
Temp
Yesterday’s low 59°
Martha’s
Vineyard
SW 7-14 kts.
1-3 ft.
75/65
Cod Canal
S 7-14 kts.
1-2 ft.
77/66
Nantucket
S 7-14 kts.
1-2 ft.
71/64
Buzzards Bay
S 7-14 kts.
1-2 ft.
76/66
Provincetown
S 7-14 kts.
1-2 ft.
74/64
40
July
Sunrise
Sunset
Day length
Moonrise
5:32 a.m.
8:09 p.m.
14:37
10:14 a.m.
Mount Washington (7 p.m. yesterday)
Weather
Mostly cloudy
Visibility
70 miles
Wind
southwest at 17 m.p.h.
High/low temperature
56/43
Snow depth at 7 p.m.
0.0”
0.9"
0.3
0.08
0.11
T 0.07
T
T
0.6"
0.4
T
0.17
0.14
T
0.12
0.3"
T
T
0.01
26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
FIRST
July 30
FULL
Aug. 7
LAST
Aug. 14
Evening sky sights – A. MacRobert
NEW
Aug. 21
The crescent moon, bright Jupiter and Spica form
a low arc in the west-southwest at nightfall. High
above them shines Arcturus, pale yellow-orange.
June
24 Hr. Precipitation
Yesterday
Precip days in July
0.0"
July
0.00”
15
(valid at 7 p.m. yesterday)
Month to date
3.99”
Norm. month to date 2.80”
Year to date
29.67”
Norm. year to date 24.64”
Climate data are compiled from National Weather Service records and are subject to change or correction.
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2017
BY JACQUELINE BIGAR
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
You can clear out a lion's share of
the work today. You will complete
even more than you thought possible. Others clearly appreciate
what you are doing and will let
you know. A friend's words might
inspire you; recognize the importance of this feedback. Tonight:
Defer to others.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
Use the morning to the max. Others respond well to your overtures. You will need to settle into
a pattern of accomplishing key
tasks by the afternoon. You cannot let details and other matters
slip by. Tonight: Demonstrate
how efficient you can be, and
squeeze in some exercise.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Your creativity and ability to un-
THIS DAY IN HISTORY
Today is Thursday, July 27, the
208th day of 2017. There are
157 days left in the year.
Birthdays: TV producer Norman Lear is 95. Actor Jerry Van
Dyke is 86. Sportscaster Irv
Cross is 78. Actress-director
Betty Thomas is 70. Olympic
gold medal figure skater Peggy
Fleming is 69. Singer Maureen
McGovern is 68. Comedian
1.2"
Moon phases
HOROSCOPE
HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Thursday, July 27, 2017:
This year you open up to new opportunities that result from your
strong goals and caring temperament. Others respond to you. You
develop an unusual meticulousness when it comes to handling
money. You also have expansive
views. If you are single, you will
have many potential suitors.
Making choices would be easier if
you knew what type of relationship you desire. If you are attached, your interactions with
your sweetie deepen with greater
trust and more understanding.
Your relationship seems to flourish. LIBRA always adds some
positive energy to your day.
1.5"
1.41
1.33
For current Charles River Basin water quality, call (781) 788-0007 or go to http://www.charlesriver.org.
Almanac
56
1920
26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
June
Carol Leifer is 61. Comedian
Bill Engvall is 60. Jazz singer
Karrin Allyson is 55. Rock singer Juliana Hatfield is 50. Comedian Maya Rudolph is 45. Singer-songwriter Pete Yorn is 43.
MLB All-Star Alex Rodriguez is
42. Golfer Jordan Spieth is 24.
ºIn 1789, President Washington signed a measure establishing the Department of Foreign
West
East
♠ K 10 8 7
♥ Q J 10
♦ 854
♣QJ9
♠J9532
♥ None
♦KQ7
♣ 10 7 6 5 2
South
3:48 4:26
3:14 3:44
11:52 --11:45 ---
(valid at 7 p.m. yesterday)
Heat
0
10
0
10
0
7
North dealer — N-S vulnerable
North
♠ AQ
♥ A842
♦ J 10 9 3
♣K84
♠ 64
♥K97653
♦ A62
♣A3
North
1♦
2♥
East
Pass
Pass
Opening
South
1♥
4♥
lead — ♠
West
Pass
All Pass
3
I do crossword puzzles. I figure as long as I can finish the
New York Times Sunday puzzle in ink, I’m not on the brink
of senility. A recent clue was “What fastidious people can’t
be.”
In today’s deal, declarer’s play was fast but hardly fastidious. He finessed with dummy’s queen on the first spade,
and East won and led the eight of diamonds. South played
low, and West won and exited with a spade.
Declarer then cashed the ace of trumps — and West
showed out. South took the king of trumps, led a club to
dummy and tried another diamond finesse, but West won,
and East’s trump trick defeated the contract.
Fastidious people can’t be too careful, and neither can
good declarers. South should take the ace of spades at Trick
One and cash the A-K of trumps. He next takes the A-K of
clubs, ruffs dummy’s last club and exits with a spade.
East can win and lead a diamond, but when West wins,
he is end-played. He must return a diamond or concede a
fatal ruff-sluff.
DAILY QUESTION You hold: ♠ J 9 5 3 2 ♥ None ♦ K Q 7
♣ 10 7 6 5 2. Neither side vulnerable. Your partner opens
one spade, the next player doubles, you bids four spades
and left-hand opponent tries five hearts. Two passes follow.
What do you say?
ANSWER: To go to five spades might be right. Your partner
might even make it if he has a suitable hand. But once you
have preempted and the opponents have bid on, it is often
best to hope they have misjudged. I would pass.
derstand others' issues could encourage you to be more forthright
and expressive. Your drive to
communicate what you feel
comes through. Do not hesitate
to express yourself and elicit
strong reactions. Tonight: Out
and about with friends.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
Listen to news, and understand
how it will affect you. Consider a
new possibility more openly. Although this option could cost you
financially, it also might create
the stability you seek. Seek a new
way to approach a recurring
problem. Tonight: Happiest at
home.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Your energy will carry you past
others' resistance. You might be
surrounded by people who are
conservative thinkers and not
risk-takers. Understand the limitations you are facing. Be more
direct in how you handle those
who try to hold you back. Tonight: Just be yourself.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
You might feel at your best in the
morning. You'll notice that others
can't seem to say "no" to you.
However, know that this abundance of congeniality could subside by the afternoon. Understand the moodiness of the moment. Tonight: Be more
accessible to loved ones.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
You might be amazed by how one
day can have such highs and
lows. The good news is that your
day will be mostly positive, especially if you include a male friend
in a discussion. You know what is
happening beyond the obvious.
Tonight: Go for what you want -you deserve it.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Use the morning for any matter
in which you are vested in the
outcome. You are sailing with a
tail wind at that point in the day.
Unfortunately, the winds could
reverse in the afternoon. You
might have second thoughts, and
will decide to head in a new direction. Tonight: All smiles.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Others clearly trust your perspective and are willing to move forward with you leading the way.
You could be touched and
pleased by this acknowledgment.
Your positive light and high energy allow others to know what to
do. Tonight: Time to have some
fun.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Observe what is happening behind the scenes. You might want
to move a personal matter forward. Someone else could be
pushing you to follow his or her
lead. You need to make your own
choice. Your confidence will determine your actions. Tonight: A
must appearance.
Affairs, forerunner of the Department of State.
ºIn 1880, British and Indian
troops suffered a major defeat
to Afghan forces during the
Second Anglo-Afghan War.
ºIn 1921, Canadian researcher
Frederick Banting and his assistant, Charles Best, succeeded in isolating the hormone insulin at the University of Toronto.
ºIn 1953, the Korean War armistice was signed at Panmun-
jom, ending three years of
fighting.
ºIn 1967, President Lyndon B.
Johnson appointed the Kerner
Commission to assess the
causes of urban rioting.
ºIn 1974, the House Judiciary
Committee voted 27-11 to
adopt the first of three articles
of impeachment against President Nixon.
ºIn 1980, on day 267 of the
Iranian hostage crisis, the deposed Shah of Iran died at a
military hospital outside Cairo,
at age 60.
ºIn 1995, the Korean War Veterans Memorial was dedicated
in Washington.
ºIn 1996, terror struck the Atlanta Olympics as a pipe bomb
exploded at Centennial Olympic Park, directly killing one
person and injuring 111. (Antigovernment extremist Eric Rudolph later pleaded guilty to
the bombing.)
ºIn 2007, the House sent Pres-
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Your high energy will encourage
you to have a long-overdue conversation with someone you care
a lot about. Your perspective will
make a difference, as will his or
hers. Together, you make a great
team. Relax and detach before
making a strong decision. Tonight: Take the reins.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
You might want to understand
where someone else is coming
from, but you could feel put off by
his or her words. Know that this
person's intention is well-meaning. Ask questions, if need be.
Maintain your high visibility with
an important project. Tonight:
Paint the town red.
Jacqueline Bigar is on the internet at www.jacquelinebigar.com.
(c) 2017 by King Features Syndicate Inc.
ident George W. Bush legislation to intensify domestic antiterror efforts, carrying out major recommendations of the
independent 9/11 Commission
(Bush signed the measure).
ºLast year, more than a year
after Freddie Gray, a black
man, suffered a broken neck in
a Baltimore police van, the effort to hold six officers criminally responsible collapsed
when the city abruptly dropped
all charges in the case.
T h e
B16
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
Names
Mark Shanahan & Meredith Goldstein
Esperanza Spalding is a Harvard professor
Grammy-winning, Berklee College
of Music-educated singer and jazz
bassist Esperanza Spalding is now a
Harvard professor.
The school announced this
week that the 32-year-old Spalding was named a Professor
of the Practice, and will
teach classes in “songwriting, arranging, improvisation, and performance,
while also bringing her commitment to music as a voice for
social justice.”
Spalding, whose most recent album
was 2016’s “Emily’s D+Evolution,” has
won four Grammys, including best
new artist in 2011. Other nominees
who were up for the honor that year
were Justin Bieber, Drake, Florence &
The Machine, and Mumford & Sons.
Spalding is also a curator; her “Esperanza Spalding Selects” exhibition is
up at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum through Jan. 7, 2018.
Suzannah Clark, chair of the Harvard University Department of Music,
said the appointments of Spalding and flute star Claire
Chase — who was also
named a Professor of Practice — were about two
years in the making. Clark
believes there may have
been Professors of Practice
at Harvard in the past, but
that the school hasn’t “had anyone
like [Spalding] and Claire Chase for a
long time.”
Clark said that Spalding, who’ll
teach in the spring, will most likely
work with a range of students — including those studying Theater, Dance
& Media — when she arrives.
“We kind of imagine she’ll work
collaboratively,” Clark said.
Baldwin Bar’s Duan to open new location
Award-winning bartender Ran
Duan (inset) has just been approved
for another location.
Duan, who made a name for himself as mixologist-in-residence at the
Baldwin Bar in Woburn, plans to
open Blossom Bar inside his
parents’ Brookline restaurant, Sichuan Garden.
The Brookline Board of
Selectmen approved the
new bar at Tuesday’s meeting, a development that
Duan then shared with the
public in an Instagram post.
According to the website, Blossom
will strive to “focus on pairing comforting flavors with unique [ingredients]. Our goal is to bridge the gap between different cultures to help our
guests discover an experience with
each beverage.”
Duan could not be reached for
comment.
Duan opened Baldwin Bar —
which, along with his parents’ restaurant Sichuan Garden II can be found
in the historic Baldwin Mansion — in
2009. He soon added a second location, a 45-seat lounge called
Baldwin & Sons Trading Co.,
which is also located inside
the mansion. That bar
made Esquire’s Best Bars
in America list this year,
and Duan’s signature cocktails have become so popular
that the Baldwin Bar website
warns that if you want a seat at
the bar, you’ll probably need a reservation. If that weren’t enough, Duan has
also placed highly in several national
bartending competitions.
There is currently no word on
when Blossom Bar is expected to open,
although the website says that they
will be remodeling soon and are looking to hire front-of-house employees.
Urban renewal
Picture book art on
display in Watertown
PHOTOS BY JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Partygoers celebrate the Podcast Garage’s one-year anniversary.
Podcast Garage celebrates a year
PRX, the Cambridge-based nonprofit radio distributor, celebrated the
one-year anniversary of its Podcast
Garage in Allston on Wednesday
night.
The guest list for the festivities included talent from “Greater Boston”
and local podcasters with “Harry Potter and the Sacred Text,” and
“Shakesplaining.” The party coincided
with Aeronaut Neighborhood Nights,
which meant there was also beer, live
music, and food trucks.
PRX opened its Podcast Garage
with the hope that anyone could use
it. The base rate for renting the space
and equipment is $1 a minute. The
Garage has also hosted live classes
and recording events, including this
month’s live recording of Unfriendly
Black Hotties.
Podcasts made at the Garage in-
From left: podcasters Wade
Rousch, Kerri Hoffman, and
Mable Chan at the celebration.
clude Heidi Legg’s “The Editorial,”
which features interviews with visionaries; Larry Cohen’s “Ringler
Radio”; Lucas Spivey’s “Culture
Hustlers,” and the Rev. Jeffrey
Brown’s “The Courage to Listen.”
Globe correspondents Terence Cawley and Kaitlyn Locke contributed.
Read local celebrity news at www.bostonglobe.com/names.
Names can be reached at names@globe.com or at 617-929-8253.
In a continuing effort to engage patrons with featured art, The Mosesian
Center for the Arts in Watertown will
host a reception on Thursday for
guests to meet artists featured in the
exhibition “Forever Young: Picture
Book Art Exhibition,” running now
through Sept. 15.
The show features more than 25
artists and picture book illustrators,
most of whom are based in New England. About two-thirds of the artists
will attend the reception, including
artist Susanna Chapman, who will
represent the book she illustrated,
“The Girl Who Ran: Bobbi Gibb, the
First Woman to Run the Boston Marathon.” The book, a collaboration with
Gibb that depicts her 1966 Marathon
run, was written by Kristina Yee and
Frances Poletti, and published last
month.
Other illustrators at the event include Jannie Ho, illustrator of “Wheels
on the Bus” and “Bear and Chicken,”
Jennifer P. Goldfinger, who illustrated
“Hello, My Name Is Tiger,” and Mad­
die Frost with “The Snowflake Mistake” and “How Do You Do, Mr Gnu?”
Books and prints will be for sale in a
Pop-Up Shop, with artists on hand to
meet guests and sign books.
“Picture books, I think, really are
kind of the introduction of art to children and kind of start this lifelong
love of art,” said Kimberly Thompson
Panay, director of exhibitions.
The first part of the reception,
from 3 to 5 p.m., will include book
readings from artists every half hour,
gallery tours, a raffle giveaway of
books from the exhibition, and an interactive oil pastel art activity hosted
by the Watertown Free Public Library.
From 5 to 7 p.m., artists will mingle
with guests as snacks are served, the
bar opens, and Charlesbridge Publishing’s pick for the best in show among
artists seeking publication will be announced.
‘I came home to loving arms.’
NICOLE KIDMAN, on the emotional toll of filming HBO’s “Big Little Lies,” and the support of her husband, Keith Urban
ICA deals with a controversy over a painting that isn’t there
By Malcolm Gay
GLOBE STAFF
Activists are calling on the Institute of Contemporary Art to cancel an exhibit by the artist
Dana Schutz, whose painting “Open Casket”
stirred controversy at this year’s Whitney Biennial for its depiction of Emmett Till’s corpse.
The ICA show, which opened to the public
Wednesday, does not feature “Open Casket.”
Nevertheless, in a letter published before the
show’s opening, activists said it was “clear the institution stands to gain by virtue of [the painting’s] absence.”
“Please pull the show. This is not about censorship. This is about institutional accountability,” the activists wrote.
At the biennial exhibit at New York’s Whitney
Museum of American Art this spring, some artists and activists protested the depiction of Till,
an African-American teenager who was beaten
and lynched in 1955. They charged that Schutz,
who is white, was part of “the long tradition of
white people sharing and circulating images of
anti-black violence” and that her painting perpetuated “the same kind of violence that was enacted” on Till.
The Boston-area protesters appear to share
similar concerns about the ICA show, despite the
painting’s absence.
“Even though the painting will not be shown,
even in its absence, backing its artist without accountability nor transparency about proceeds
from the exhibition, the institution will be participating in condoning the coopting of Black pain,”
wrote the protesters, who identify themselves as
“a group of local artists, activists, and community
members.” “[W]e do not feel that the ICA is making a responsible decision as an institution of art
and culture. At this point we are unconvinced
that ICA has the will to challenge the egregiousness of continued institutional backing of this
type of violent artifact.”
In advance of the show’s opening, the museum reached out to the activists and ICA chief curator Eva Respini held a three-hour meeting with
members of the group to hear their concerns.
“Though ‘Open Casket’ is not in the ICA exhibition, we welcome the opportunity for debate
and reflection on the issues of representation and
responsibility, sympathy and empathy, art and
social justice,” ICA director Jill Medvedow said in
statement. “[T]hese are issues deserving of
thoughtful discourse, and museums are one of
the few places where the artist’s voice is central to
the conversation.”
Schutz, an acclaimed and highly successful
American painter known for evocative works that
combine abstract and figurative elements in
tight, disorienting spaces, has covered a range of
subjects during her 20-year career. Her work,
which critics have praised as both “lyrical and
monumental,” is occasionally drawn from current events, such as “Men’s Retreat,” a painting
created during the height of the Iraq war that
shows blindfolded men in business suits playing
conga drums in nature, or her 2015 work “Fight
in an Elevator,” based on video footage of Solange
Knowles attacking Jay Z in an elevator.
In an interview with the New Yorker, Schutz
said the painting “Open Casket” — which is based
on a photo of Till’s corpse lying in a casket that
his mother left open to show the brutality of his
murder by racist whites — had been inspired by a
recent series of highly publicized shooting deaths
of black men.
“It’s a real event, and it’s violence. But it has to
be tender, and also about how it’s been for his
mother,” Schutz told the magazine. “How do you
make a painting about this and not have it just be
about the grotesque? I was interested because it’s
something that keeps on happening. I feel somehow that it’s an American image.”
Respini, who began working on the show with
Schutz before the Whitney controversy erupted,
ALINA HEINEKE/AP
Artist Dana Schutz’s “Open Casket,” shown
on display at the Whitney Museum of
American Art in New York.
said “Open Casket,” with its clearly identifiable subject, “sits a little outside” much of Schutz’s work.
“Her subject matter writ large is the human
condition,” said Respini on Wednesday, noting
that many pictures in the Boston show depict
struggle or conflict. “These are paintings of our
time, and our time is a divisive one.”
The question of cultural appropriation has
proved a fraught one for museums in recent
years, as white artists have increasingly drawn
fire from communities of color for their portrayals
of racially charged subjects. Jeffrey Uslip resigned
last year as chief curator at the Contemporary Art
Museum St. Louis after mounting an exhibition of
works by the artist Kelley Walker that showed images of black civil rights activists covered in chocolate. Earlier this year, the Walker Art Center in
Minneapolis removed a gallows-like sculpture by
artist Sam Durant after members of the Dakota
Nation objected to its cavalier reference to the
mass execution of 38 Native Americans in 1862.
“I just wanted to apologize for the trauma, the suffering that my work has caused in the community,” Durant reportedly said at the time.
Similarly, the Museum of Fine Arts recast a
2015 event series called “Kimono Wednesdays,”
featuring Claude Monet’s “La Japonaise,” after
protesters accused the museum of promoting racial stereotypes.
In an effort to engage the public with issues
raised by the exhibit, the ICA is holding a series of
public events around the show, including a conversation this September between Respini and
Boston poet laureate Danielle Legros Georges
and a gallery talk next month with curatorial associate Jessica Hong.
But the signatories are demanding more,
promising that they “will continue to organize
around this regardless of the decisions the ICA
makes.”
The museum said it is taking the activists’ concerns seriously.
“Art often exposes the fault lines in our culture, and ‘Open Casket’ raised difficult questions
about cultural appropriation, race, and representation,” said Medvedow. “We have designed our
programs — panels, lectures, gallery talks, as well
as exhibitions and performances — to offer a
broad range of artistic voices and a creative space
for experimentation, and we look forward to audiences having the opportunity to see for themselves the range of Schutz’s art and engaging in
the art and issues of our time.”
Respini, who said the museum had no intention of closing the show, added that the ICA had a
responsibility to its public to engage with difficult
questions.
“These are hard conversations to have, the debate is multifaceted,” said Respini. “For us, the responsible thing to do is not to shy away from that
conversation, and canceling the show would be
to shy away.”
Malcolm Gay can be reached at
malcolm.gay@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter
at @malcolmgay
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Connecting forces
LINDSEY WASSON/GETTY IMAGES
Rookie third baseman Rafael Devers connects for his first hit, and home run, in the majors, a shot to center off Seattle’s Andrew Moore to lead off the third that gave the Sox a 2-0 lead.
Sale (who else?) ends
Red Sox’ four­game skid
Dan Shaughnessy
Devers comes
shining through
SEATTLE — It was quite a week for 20year-old Red Sox rookie Rafael Devers. He
made his first six-hour flight, got his first
$60 haircut (clubhouse barber), and hit
his first major league home run in a muchneeded, 4-0 Red Sox victory (thank you,
Chris Sale) over the Mariners Wednesday.
So what’s the reward?
No one knows. Devers went 2 for 4 in
his second career game, but might be headed right back to
the minors before the reeling Red Sox come home for David
Price’s return party at Fenway Friday night.
It’s a tricky situation. After calling up Devers on Monday, the Sox made a deal for Giants third baseman Eduardo
SHAUGHNESSY, Page C5
Thomas
in clear
Celtics star
does not need
hip surgery. C3
Sox add
Nunez
Djokovic
sidelined
Tennis star out
for the season
because of elbow injury. C6
Same old Brady
expected at camp
FOXBOROUGH — Shortly before 9 o’clock Thursday
morning, Tom Brady will bounce up the stairs leading to
the back fields at Gillette Stadium and the murmurs will
begin.
As more and more fans spot his red No. 12 jersey
among the sea of blue and whites worn by teammates,
those murmurs will grow in intensity until they reach a
hysterical pitch and Patriots training camp officially will
be open.
Though he’ll be just a week from his 40th birthday,
Brady’s energy level will be in line with the 20-somethings
PATRIOTS, Page C2
RED SOX, Page C5
Ben Volin
ON FOOTBALL
Hey, Patriots
are not perfect
By Jim McBride
Imperial Cars
i
TED S. WARREN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Chris Sale yielded three hits and had 11 K’s in seven scoreless innings —
well, he did walk a batter — and won both games of the Sox’ 2-4 trip.
GLOBE STAFF
Third baseman
acquired from
Giants. C4
ç
GLOBE STAFF
Red Sox 4 SEATTLE — Chris Sale left Safeco Field
around the fourth inning on Tuesday night,
Mariners 0 the lefthander heading back to the team hotel to have dinner and get some sleep before his start against
the Seattle Mariners on Wednesday afternoon.
The rest of the Red Sox were just getting started on what
proved to be a long and painful night. The game went 13 innings and lasted just a few ticks under five hours before the
Mariners won by a run.
“I actually fell asleep before the end of it. So I woke up
this morning and heard the news,” Sale said.
Sale knew then he had to give his tired teammates a lift.
He did more than that, throwing seven dominant innings as
the Sox beat the Seattle Mariners, 4-0.
Sale allowed three hits, walked one, and struck out 11,
adding a bold line to what looks increasingly like a perfect
Cy Young Award résumé.
JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF
Josh McDaniels, 41, is surprised by nothing that
soon-to-be 40-year-old Tom Brady can do.
FOXBOROUGH — Matthew Slater can only shake his
head. He can’t believe what fans and media are predicting
for the 2017 Patriots.
“I think it’s quite foolish some of the things that are being said,” Slater said on Wednesday. “I honestly think it’s
quite disrespectful to say some of the things that have been
said about our football team to the other players and
coaches in this league.”
Slater wouldn’t even say specifically what he finds “disON FOOTBALL, Page C2
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T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
Same old Brady
is expected at camp
uPATRIOTS
Continued from Page C1
experiencing their first taste of
life in the NFL.
Brady has stated his desire
to play well into his 40s, and he
hasn’t dismissed the notion
that he could be an effective
player at 50. He doesn’t care
about how old he is — and neither do the people with whom
he works.
“I only have one answer —
his age is not a factor to me,’’ offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels said on Wednesday.
“We just worry about our preparation and our performance.
He’s prepared himself to come
into camp and have a good
camp. Our goal is to go out
there and get better every day.
He’ll be no different than any of
our guys in that regard.’’
McDaniels, who turned 41
in April, said he’s never surprised by the things Brady is
able to do.
“No, because I’m around
him a lot,’’ McDaniels said. “He
cares deeply about doing his job
right. He’s prepared. He works
hard. He takes care of himself.
This is a very important part of
who he is and there’s not many
things in life that he doesn’t attack this way.’’
Matthew Slater has been
Brady’s teammate for 10 seasons and isn’t in the business of
doubting Thomas Edward Brady Jr.
“Tom does more than anybody on this team to get himself
prepared to do what he needs
to do mentally and physically to
play this game,’’ said Slater. “We
all just take it one day at a time
and that’s Tom’s approach. We
all have personal goals for ourselves, but again, ultimately nobody is promised tomorrow.
The good Lord allows you to
wake up, you attack that day,
and then you go from there. I’ll
be waiting to see, just like you
guys, where it ends up. Remember, like Kevin Garnett said,
‘Anything is possible.’ ’’
Devin McCourty said he’s
not too concerned about Brady’s age, he’s more focused on
trying to soak up as much
knowledge as he can from the
five-time Super Bowl champion.
“Obviously, I don’t know
what’s possible, but I just keep
watching him and trying to
learn different things from him,
see what he does, because the
guy has been able to have such
longevity at such a high level. I
d o n’ t s e e a r e a s o n w h y h e
would slow down,’’ said McCourty, an eight-year veteran.
“He still does so much to help
his body, so much mentally and
physically to stay prepared and
ready in the game. So I think
for a lot of us it’s just trying to
learn as much as possible from
him. He can teach us so much
just about how to stay sharp
and be ready to play at a high
level whenever called upon.’’
This will be Brady’s 18 th
camp in Fort Foxborough, and
unlike the last two summers he
won’t have the Deflategate saga
hanging over his head.
The stated mission coming
into last season was to get Jimmy Garoppolo ready to start
Week 1. Brady and Garoppolo
split the first-team reps pretty
evenly during the dog days,
with Jacoby Brissett getting the
leftovers. It was a practice strategy that worked exceptionally
well.
Garoppolo proved in his
brief window that he was ready
to be starter — and maybe a future star — in the NFL, while
Brady returned from his fourgame suspension looking like a
guy who never left, leading the
Patriots to a Super Bowl title.
As an unexpected bonus, Brissett gained valuable experience
with a pair of starts, including a
victory.
Though it remains to be
seen how the reps will be divvied up for camp 2017, McDaniels is excited to see the battles
among the quarterbacks, who
dubbed themselves “The Wolfpack” last season.
“If you’re here, you’re responsible to try to push the people ahead of you so you can get
out there on the field and help
us win,’’ he said. “I don’t think
there’s a lot of deferring going
on in [the quarterback] room,
and that’s a great thing. That
means we have competition,
and that’s the thing that makes
everybody better.’’
Jim McBride can be reached at
james.mcbride@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@globejimmcbride.
STEVEN SENNE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bill Belichick
isn’t buying,
or even
reading,
any of
the hype
surrounding
the Patriots.
“Yeah, we’re
focused on
one day at a
time,” the
coach said.
STEVEN SENNE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Matthew Slater, entering his 10th season with the Patriots, acknowledges the “inherent risks” with playing football.
Players take note of CTE study
By Jim McBride
GLOBE STAFF
FOXBOROUGH — With
chronic traumatic encephalopathy continuing to be a major
concern in
PATRIOTS
football, severNOTEBOOK al Patriots
touched on the
subject Wednesday afternoon.
Matthew Slater and Devin
McCourty were asked their reaction to the Boston University
medical study released Tuesday
that found 110 of 111 former
NFL players’ brains showed
signs of CTE.
In total, researchers examined 202 donated brains of
men who played football at all
levels. CTE was detected in 177
(or 88 percent) of them.
“As a player, you’re definitely
thankful that they’re starting to
look into that, do the necessary
research and hopefully get us to
a better place when it comes to
that,’’ said Slater, who is entering his 10th NFL season. “Being married to a pathologist, I
know that there is a lot I don’t
know and there is a lot that we
still have to learn. I let her do
the worrying about that and I
just try to focus on playing football, understanding that there
are inherent risks with playing
this game . . . I hope for players
past, present, and future that
we can continue to research,
continue to search for things,
and see where it goes.’’
McCourty, an eight-year
NFL veteran, shared similar
thoughts when asked if CTE is
something he thinks about as
his career extends.
“Yeah, I think all of the technology has shown that we’re
getting more and more research,’’ he said. “I think the
good thing for us, as players, is
that the NFL and the NFLPA
are finding ways to get all of
that information to us [so that
we’re] knowledgeable of the situation.’’
Last September, the league
pledged $100 million for concussion research, including $60
million for technological development and $40 million for
medical research.
“This is an important area
that’s being given a lot of attention, as it should,’’ said coach
Bill Belichick.
School’s in session
Slater and McCourty said
Wednesday’s reporting day was
“like the first day of school.”
The perennial captains said
one thing that won’t be on the
syllabus this season will be any
lectures concerning the national narrative of the Patriots possibly going 19-0.
Both players said such talk
is “disrespectful” to the other
teams across the league.
“We need to remember it’s
hard to have success in this
league. There’s so many good
players, so many good coaches,’’
said Slater. “I honestly think it’s
quite disrespectful to say some
of the things that have been
said about our football team to
the other players and coaches
in this league. We have to remember who we are and we
have to remember we have to
build this thing from the
ground up.’’
Slater said it’s easy for him
to put those distractions aside,
but he is aware of some of the
things that are being predicted.
“I don’t subscribe to the
Twitters and Instagrams as you
guys know, but I watch a little
‘SportsCenter’ and some stuff
from time to time and you guys
know what’s being said about
us,’’ said Slater when asked
about possibly going undefeated. “I think it’s quite foolish
some of the things being said, I
really do. So, we can’t believe
that as a football team.’’
Earlier in the day, Belichick
also was asked about the high
expectations, but he wanted no
part of it.
“Yeah, right now, we’re just
trying to have a good day here
today, get off to a good start in
training camp,’’ he said. “We’re
not really worried about all
that’s in the future.’’
Not surprised
One of the most talkedabout topics around the NFL
offseason has been Colin Kaep­
ernick’s quest to find employment. The former 49ers quarterback gained attention last
year for his national anthem
protests, and many believe
that’s a major reason no team
has taken a chance on him.
McCourty, who along with
then-teammate Martellus Ben­
nett raised his fist during the
national anthem on opening
night last season in Arizona,
said Wednesday that he’s “honestly not surprised” Kaepernick
remains unsigned.
“I think he was kind of
aware of what he was getting
into. [It’s] sad but the guy’s a
good player, he’s done some
successful things in this
league,’’ said McCourty, who indicated he talked to Kaepernick
before the teams met in San
Francisco last season. “It’s just
how things shake out. What he
has done, I think, has made it
hard for him to get a job . . . It’s
tough for him, I would imagine. We’ll see. Hopefully he gets
picked up [and] has a chance to
still play.’’
Working it out
Belichick revealed that the
Patriots will work with the Lions prior to the clubs’ matchup
in Week 3 of the preseason. It
will likely be a walkthrough the
day before Aug. 25 game in Detroit. The Patriots previously
announced they would hold
joint practices with the Jaguars
in Foxborough and the Texans
at the Greenbrier Resort in
West Virginia . . . Though it
wasn’t listed on the NFL transactions wire, New England
signed defensive end Caleb
Kidder, according to a tweet
from his representatives at
Reign Sports. Kidder was released by the Vikings last week.
The 6-foot-5-inch, 259-pound
undrafted rookie piled up 31
sacks in three seasons at Montana . . . The first training camp
practice of the season is Thursday at 9 a.m. Expect a full
house.
Jim McBride can be reached at
james.mcbride@globe.com.
With all due respect, Patriots have some imperfections
uON FOOTBALL
Continued from Page C1
respectful,” but we all know.
He’s referring, of course, to
the idea of the Patriots going
undefeated this year and exorcising the demons from 2007.
The Patriots are No. 1 in all
the preseason power polls, and
the clear Las Vegas favorites to
win the Super Bowl. USA Today
already published a piece predicting the Patriots will go 16-0
this regular season.
Bill Belichick, of course, will
have none of it.
“Yeah, we’re focused on one
day at a time,” the coach said. “I
guess I missed some of the big
reading you guys have had.
Honestly, I don’t really pay any
attention to it. Sorry.”
The Patriots’ hype is deserved, of course. Tom Brady is
better than ever, he’s got a deep
arsenal of talented weapons,
and the defense retained its
core and added a physical No. 1
cornerback.
But there’s a reason they
play the games, anything can
happen on any given Sunday,
yadda yadda, yadda. There’s
still a large degree of unpredictability in the NFL, and the Patriots are obviously no lock to
win their sixth Super Bowl.
They have their flaws, like
every other team. Their flaws
may not be as pronounced, and
Brady covers up many of their
warts, but they exist.
So let’s take a look at what
could prevent the Patriots from
winning another Lombardi
Trophy. And we’re going beyond the obvious angles of
“Tom Brady gets injured” or
“Marcus Cannon falls off a
cliff,” because those are inherent in every season and are
largely unpredictable.
The schedule is tougher.
To reach the Super Bowl, the
Patriots usually need the No. 1
seed and to be home for the
AFC C hampionship game.
When they had to go on the
road to face Denver in 2014
and 2016, they lost both
games.
The Patriots won’t have an
easy time locking up that top
seed. They have a difficult
stretch of five road games in six
weeks in November and December that will make or break
the season. This stretch includes tough games at Denver,
at Pittsburgh, at Miami (where
the Patriots often struggle),
and against a good Raiders
team in Mexico City.
The Patriots play several top
quarterbacks this season —
Matt Ryan, Drew Brees, Cam
Newton, Ben Roethlisberger,
Derek Carr, and Philip Rivers —
and have a Super Bowl rematch
with the Falcons. They also
have a tricky game at New Orleans in Week 2, and an always
difficult Thursday night road
game in Tampa Bay in Week 5.
All this talk about going undefeated seems foolish given
the difficulty of the schedule.
L o c k i n g u p t h e No . 1 s e e d
won’t be a gimme, either.
The pass rush is suspect.
Trey Flowers might be a
budding star, with seven sacks
in the last nine games of last
regular season plus 2½ sacks
in the Super Bowl. And Dont’a
Hightower is one of the better
blitzing linebackers in the NFL.
But the Patriots had a pedestrian pass rush last season, finishing 16th with just 34 sacks, and
now have to find a way to replace the nine total sacks from
Jabaal Sheard and Chris Long.
Kony Ealy is coming off a
disappointing season with only
five sacks. Geneo Grissom has
been a disappointment since
the Patriots drafted him in the
third round in 2015. Rob Ninkovich is probably on his last
legs, and Derek Rivers and Deatrich Wise are unproven rookies.
The Patriots were able to get
away with a mediocre pass
rush last year because they
played so many bad quarterbacks. This year, against a
tough slate of gunslingers, they
need to find a way to bring
more heat.
Other than Gronk, there’s
not a lot of height at receiver.
Chris Hogan and Malcolm
Mitchell are the tallest at 6 feet
1 inch (though neither would
be described as a “big” receiver). Julian Edelman, Brandin
Cooks, and Danny Amendola
are all under 6 feet, as are running backs James White and
Dion Lewis. Even the backup
tight end is smaller this year —
Dwayne Allen is listed at 6-3, a
full 4 inches shorter than Martellus Bennett.
Height isn’t a necessity in
the NFL, but it can’t hurt, especially in the red zone. And the
Patriots don’t have much of it if
Rob Gronkowski goes down.
Shaky depth at tight end
and linebacker.
Speaking of Gronk, the
depth chart behind him doesn’t
look as good as it did last year.
Bennett had 55 catches for 701
yards and a team-high seven
touchdowns, playing a crucial
role in the 11 games that
Gronkowski missed because of
injury (including playoffs).
But the Patriots could be in
trouble at tight end if Gronk
gets hurt again. Allen, this
year’s backup, is smaller, often
banged up (missing eight
games over his last three
years), and had just 35 catches
for 406 yards last year. Battling
for the third spot are journeymen James O’Shaughnessy and
Matt Lengel, and a couple of
undrafted rookies in Jacob Hollister and Sam Cotton.
And the linebacker depth
chart looks a little thin, as well.
Hightower is great when
healthy but always seems to be
dealing with injuries. David
Harris is entering his 11th season and might not have a ton
left in the tank. Kyle Van Noy
and Elandon Roberts are still
learning how to play in space,
and Shea McClellin made little
impact last year in his first season in New England.
L a c k of s i ze at r u n n i n g
back.
Last year, the Patriots made
a point to pound the football
with their 250-pound running
back, LeGarrette Blount. They
finished third in the NFL in
rushing attempts and seventh
in rushing yards, with Blount
handling a majority of the load
and finishing with 1,161 yards
and 18 touchdowns.
Now that Blount is gone, the
Patriots’ heaviest running back
is newcomer Mike Gillislee,
listed at 219 pounds. Fellow
newcomer Rex Burkhead is
210, while White is 205 and
Lewis 195. Rookie LeShun
Daniels is 225 pounds and veteran Brandon Bolden is 220,
but neither should factor much
into the offense.
“We’ve got enough guys that
can play, you know, finesse
football,” running backs coach
Ivan Fears said on Wednesday.
“Somebody’s got to play power
football for us.”
Stephon Gilmore has been
inconsistent.
The Patriots paid Gilmore
the largest free agent contract
in franchise history to be their
No. 1 cornerback and cover big,
physical No. 1 receivers. The
Patriots chose Gilmore over Lo-
gan Ryan, who did an admirable job covering guys such as
Julio Jones and Demaryius
Thomas and came up with 13
interceptions (including playoffs) in four seasons.
Gilmore has the measurables and tools to be a lockdown cornerback, but he struggled with consistency in five
seasons in Buffalo. The Patriots
obviously saw something in
Gilmore to give him the big
contract, but it would be foolish to assume that he will instantly improve the Patriots’
secondary.
The kicker might have the
yips.
Stephen Gostkowski is surpassing Adam Vinatieri for all
of the Patriots’ kicking records,
but he had a rough 2016 season, developing a bit of a slice.
He missed three extra points
during the regular season, another one in the second half of
Super Bowl LI that almost
thwarted the Patriots’ comeback, and also missed two field
goals of less than 40 yards —
kicks he never used to miss.
The Patriots’ closest and
most important games always
seem to come down to a field
goal, and Gostkowski wasn’t
nearly as automatic last season
as we had come to expect from
him.
Ben Volin can be reached at
ben.volin@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @BenVolin
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
C3
Whitehead lands
on feet with Jets
ASSOCIATED PRESS
The New York Jets claimed
wide receiver-kick returner
Lucky Whitehead on Wednesday, two days
NFL
after the DalNOTEBOOK las Cowboys
cut him following a shoplifting charge in
what turned out to be a case of
mistaken identity.
The Jets, desperate for help
at receiver, claimed the threeyear veteran and waived receiver Devin Street.
Chargers get Bills QB
The LA Chargers acquired
Bills second-year quarterback
Cardale Jones in a trade that
sent a seventh-round conditional pick to Buffalo, according to ESPN . . . The Vikings
signed two-time Pro Bowl defensive end Everson Griffen to
a two-year extension . . . The
LA Rams signed veteran Dan
Orlovsky as the third quarterback on their roster . . . The
Raiders signed safety Obi Me­
lifonwu, the team’s secondround pick (56th overall) from
Connecticut, to a four-year
contract . . . The Titans agreed
to a multi-year extension with
offensive tackle Dennis Kelly.
Rehabbing Thomas
avoids hip surgery
By Adam Himmelsbach
GLOBE STAFF
Hip surgery has been ruled
out for Celtics point guard Isa­
iah Thomas, president of basketball operaCELTICS
tions Danny
NOTEBOOK Ainge said on
Wednesday.
Ainge said Thomas, who severely aggravated an injury to
his right hip during Game 2 of
the Eastern Conference finals,
has resumed light on-court
work and has been ramping
up his cardiovascular training
off the court.
“Isaiah is making good
progress,” Ainge said. “He’s out
on the court; he’s shooting.
He’s full-speed ahead on the
stationary bike and working in
the swimming pool. He’s progressing nicely.”
Thomas originally injured
the hip during the third quarter of the March 15 game
against the Timberwolves and
missed the next two games.
The two-time All-Star aggravated the injury in Game 6 of
the Eastern Conference semifinals against the Wizards, yet
pushed on. But following the
Game 2 loss to Cleveland a
week later, the pain was simply too severe for him to continue.
As the Celtics made another
big splash this summer, signing the All-Star forward Gor­
don Hayward and drafting
Duke’s Jayson Tatum with the
third overall pick, some of the
enthusiasm was tempered
with uneasiness about Thomas’s condition.
He was evaluated by several
hip specialists, and for weeks
the Celtics ominously declared
that he had to wait for swelling
to subside before deciding on a
course of action. But barring
any further setbacks, it has
now been determined that surgery will not be needed.
Thomas is on course to rejoin
the team at the start of training camp this fall.
Last week, the Celtics
signed veteran point guard
Shane Larkin to a one-year
deal, and the move was viewed
as a possible sign that Boston
was forming a backup plan in
case Thomas was not ready to
return.
But Ainge said the addition
of Larkin was unrelated to
Thomas and his health.
“This in and of itself is just
an opportunity to take a look
at a really terrific player on a
good contract for us to get a
chance to see,” Ainge said.
Money well spent
By signing Larkin, the Celtics are in position to enter
camp with 16 guaranteed contracts. That number will need
to be whittled to 15 by the
start of the regular season, but
it has become a familiar approach for the franchise.
Boston had 16 players on
guaranteed deals in training
camp two seasons ago before
Perry Jones III was waived.
The Celtics had 16 guaranteed
contracts last year, too, as
James Young ultimately beat
out R.J. Hunter for the final
roster spot.
“It’s not ideal, because
some guaranteed money gets
thrown out,” Ainge said. “But I
think it gives us an opportunity to have competition, but also see more players we’ve followed and watched and looked
at. And it’s another good indi-
cation that ownership is really
willing to spend money to give
us these luxuries, these opportunities to see more players. It
speaks a lot to them as much
as anything.”
Last season, Larkin averaged 13.6 points, 5.3 assists,
and 3 rebounds per game for
the Spanish club Baskonia,
which competes in the Euroleague. The 5-foot-11-inch point
guard was selected with the
18th pick of the 2013 draft
and averaged 5.8 points and
3.2 assists over three NBA seasons with the Mavericks,
Knicks, and Nets.
“Shane, we felt like, was
one of the best players in Europe this year,” Ainge said.
“He’s really improved his playmaking abilities and we
thought he had a terrific year.
He has great speed and he’s a
terrific shooter. We think he’s a
better shooter than his numbers indicate. So we just really
like his speed and his ability to
get into the paint.”
The Celtics last week officially signed German forward
Daniel Theis. The 25-year-old
averaged 9.5 points and 5.7 rebounds while shooting 61.8
percent from the floor for the
Euroleague team Brose Bamberg last season.
“He’s at a good age,” Ainge
said. “He’s 25 years old, he’s
coming off three good years in
Germany. He’s a tough kid.
He’s got good athleticism. He
can make a 3-point shot and
he’s a versatile kid. He’s just a
good, athletic, hard-playing
kid.”
Maine man
Ainge said that Celtics lead
video coordinator Brandon
Bailey has been promoted to
head coach of the team’s DLeague affiliate, the Maine
Red Claws.
“Brandon is a guy that Brad
[Stevens] has leaned heavily
on the last couple years,” Ainge
said. “He’s been in the video
room and done a lot of scouting of the teams in our league
and spent a lot of time on the
court with some of our younger players. I think he’s earned
this opportunity. This is a
great opportunity. The DLeague is becoming more and
more important with more
players under contract with
us, and that head coaching experience is invaluable. I think
Brad just believes in Brandon
in having this opportunity to
grow as a coach.”
Former Red Claws coach
Scott Morrison, meanwhile,
has joined the Celtics’ staff as
an assistant.
“We think he’s done a terrific job,” Ainge said. “He’s excited to join the Celtics’ staff.
Scott’s had head coaching experience prior, but he did a
terrific job for us in Portland
and we value that a great deal.”
Ainge said the Celtics remain in contract discussions
with 2017 second-round draft
pick Jabari Bird, who could be
a candidate to receive the
team’s final “two-way” deal.
That would lead Bird to join
the Red Claws for most of the
season while being eligible to
spend up to 45 days with the
Celtics.
Adam Himmelsbach can be
reached at
adam.himmelsbach@globe.co
m. Follow him on Twitter
@adamhimmelsbach.
TED S. WARREN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Chris Sale (right) was all smiles after striking out 11 over seven innings to help the Red Sox avoid a sweep in Seattle.
Sale (again) lifts the gloom
Nick Cafardo
ON BASEBALL
SEATTLE — Whatever
gloom and doom has hovered
over the Red Sox this season,
it’s usually lifted after a Chris
Sale start.
That’s why you call him the
ace, the stopper.
You had that feeling when
Roger Clemens and Pedro Martinez pitched. They improved
the outlook. The Red Sox had
lost four straight for the first
time this season after a daggerin-the-heart, 6-5 setback to the
Mariners in 13 innings that
ended at almost 3 a.m.
Wednesday in Boston. But
have no fear, Sale is here.
The lanky lefthander improved to 13-4, adding another
gem to his Cy Young-contending résumé that featured seven
innings, no runs, three hits,
one walk, and 11 strikeouts.
He was in control from Pitch 1
right through Pitch 115 in the
4-0 win over the Mariners on
Wednesday afternoon.
As we approach the trade
deadline there is no lamenting
the loss of Michael Kopech or
Yoan Moncada, dealt to the
Chicago White Sox in the offseason for Sale. You’d make
that deal 100 times out of 100.
Sale has been a breath of fresh
air, a guy with an upbeat attitude, a thick skin, and a toughness that matches his grit on
the field.
Dennis Eckersley? You don’t
have to worry about Sale going
after you. Not that there’s anything to criticize about Sale,
but even if there were he would
be looking in the mirror instead of looking to blame others.
Everything seemed to flow
nicely out of Sale’s left arm slot
Wednesday and the Red Sox
responded. Rookie Rafael Devers made his first major
league hit a homer, driving a
solo shot 427 feet to center
field in the third inning. Sandy
Leon also went deep, a two-run
insurance blast to right in the
fourth inning that made it 4-0.
Two homers from this team is
like a World Series win —
something that doesn’t come
along very often. Sale has often
been the victim of poor run
support in 2017, giving up only
10 runs total in his four losses.
But Sale, who is conjuring
up comparisons with Randy
Johnson, continues on his Cy
Young trek, looking to join fellow starters Rick Porcello
(2016, Red Sox) and David
Price (2012, Tampa).
The four-game skid — their
most recent win was in Sale’s
last outing — had left the Red
Sox perilously close to falling
out of first place to the rebounding Yankees. The Red
Sox needed Sale to, in the
words of former Red Sox manager Joe Morgan, “spin a beauty.” And that he did, as usual.
Red Sox statistics
BATTING
G
Pedroia...................... 84
Bogaerts ................... 93
Hernandez................ 21
Betts .......................... 99
Bradley Jr. ................ 85
Benintendi ................ 96
Ramirez..................... 87
Vazquez .................... 59
Devers ......................... 2
Young ........................ 61
Leon........................... 57
Moreland .................. 95
Marrero..................... 58
Holt ............................ 18
Totals..................... 103
R
AB
332 36
363 53
58
7
411 70
316 39
357 48
324 45
191 18
8
2
173 20
186 23
331 43
151 30
51
6
3575 479
H
103
103
16
112
85
95
83
48
2
42
45
79
32
10
929
RBI
54
43
2
61
40
54
40
17
1
18
26
44
23
2
449
Avg.
.310
.284
.276
.273
.269
.266
.256
.251
.250
.243
.242
.239
.212
.196
.260
OBP 2B
.385 17
.340 22
.300
3
.348 31
.341 18
.347 14
.342 12
.291 10
.400
0
.327
9
.294
8
.328 19
.258
7
.276
0
.331 181
3B HR
0
6
4
6
0
0
0 17
2 12
1 12
0 17
1
1
0
1
0
5
0
6
0 12
0
3
0
0
11 102
H
18
103
12
29
25
33
103
55
62
61
161
12
30
40
880
ER
6
39
4
8
10
17
43
19
28
31
67
7
21
22
383
SB
4
9
0
17
5
9
1
4
0
3
0
0
5
1
61
CS BB SO
3 40 37
1 28 74
1
1 15
3 47 43
2 32 80
3 44 70
3 36 67
1
9 39
0
2
1
2 22 35
0 14 44
1 41 89
0 10 51
0
6 15
22 363 750
PITCHING
App.
Kimbrel ....................... 41
Sale.............................. 21
Workman...................... 8
Boyer ........................... 19
Abad ............................ 31
Barnes ......................... 46
Pomeranz ................... 20
Hembree..................... 45
Price ............................ 11
Rodriguez ................... 13
Porcello....................... 21
Ross Jr........................... 8
Fister ............................. 7
Wright ........................... 5
Totals....................... 103
W
2
13
0
1
2
5
10
1
5
4
4
0
0
1
56
L
0
4
0
1
0
2
4
3
3
3
13
0
5
3
47
ERA
1.27
2.37
2.57
2.84
2.90
3.12
3.59
3.74
3.82
3.89
4.52
7.00
7.46
8.25
3.69
Sale threw six shutout innings and got the victory in a
6-2 win over the Angels last
Friday. He has thrown 21„
consecutive scoreless innings,
the longest active streak by a
starting pitcher in MLB. His
211 strikeouts lead the majors,
and he recently joined Nolan
Ryan (1977), Johnson (19992001), and Martinez (1999) as
the only pitchers in baseball
history to strike out at least
200 batters in their first 20
starts of a season.
What we’ve come to know
about Sale is he doesn’t concern himself with numbers.
He’s uncomfortable talking
about being on pace for 330
strikeouts, for instance, and
shrugs it off by saying, “The
bottom line is wins. At the end
of the day, that’s all that matters.” He keeps saying those
numbers are for the media to
discuss. And we do.
He’s 3-1 with a 1.04 ERA
and 56 strikeouts in five July
starts. And he knew the situation going into Wednesday’s
game. He didn’t want to let
anyone down.
“I don’t know if you gear up
for it but you definitely want to
cut [the losing streak] short as
much as you can,” Sale said.
“We’ve been playing well but
just on the short end of it a
couple of times. Heading into
an off day and a long flight
home it’s nice to get this one.”
And being a one-time reliever early in his career, he understands the need to give the
bullpen a rest.
“Any time you can give
those guys a day off, it’s nice,”
Sale said. “They’ve been used a
lot . . . they’ve been working
hard, getting a lot of big outs
for us. Every time a situation
like this comes up you definitely have that in the back of your
mind, but you don’t want to
weigh too much on it. Just
pitch your game.”
Sale said he left Safeco Field
IP
42„
148‚
14
25‚
31
49
107„
45„
66
71„
133‚
9
25‚
24
934‚
CG
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
4
BB
7
27
3
7
10
22
43
11
22
27
25
5
17
5
284
SO
78
211
12
21
23
57
115
49
63
79
121
9
21
13
977
HR
3
11
2
2
3
3
13
8
8
11
23
0
4
9
121
Sv.
25
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
27
at about 8:30 Tuesday night
and got sufficient rest. He said
he fell asleep before the end of
the 13-inning marathon and
woke up to learn the team had
lost. While Sale said he had
more incentive and drive to
pitch well, “I don’t want to be
thinking too much when I’m
out there. In the back of your
mind you think about it. We
know where we’re at. We know
how we’ve done on this road
trip. This gives us a little positive momentum going into the
off day and for the ride home.”
And Sale once again praised
Leon, his batterymate. Unlike
some pitchers, Sale allows Leon to call every pitch. He never
shakes him off.
“I don’t think I had great
fastball command, but [Leon]
used different pitches in fastball counts to get strikes,” he
said.
Sale also loves what he has
seen of Devers. He loves the
energy the 20-year-old has
brought and his obvious offensive skills.
But Sale knows it’s all about
having a full season of excellence, not just one half. That’s
something he does think about
a lot, which is why he enjoyed
an extra day of rest this week.
Sale has never been to the postseason, he’s eager to go there
for the first time, and he knows
he’ll need to have a strong August and September, something that plagued him in his
time with the White Sox.
He’s working hard toward
that goal, but until then he offered some sunshine on what
was otherwise a cloudy West
Coast trip for the Red Sox.
Nick Cafardo can be reached at
cafardo@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @nickcafardo.
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Sports
C4
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
Baseball
AL
EAST
BOSTON
New York
Tampa Bay
Baltimore
Toronto
W
56
53
53
48
47
L
47
46
49
53
54
Pct.
.544
.535
.520
.475
.465
GB
—
1
2½
7
8
Div. Last 10 Streak
21­22
4­6
W1
23­17
6­4
W3
22­22
4­6
W2
27­22
6­4
L2
17­27
5­5
W3
CENTRAL
*Cleveland
*Kansas City
*Minnesota
*Detroit
*Chicago
W
53
52
49
45
39
L
45
47
50
54
58
Pct.
.541
.525
.495
.455
.402
GB
—
1½
4½
8½
13½
Div. Last 10 Streak
23­20
6­4
W5
20­23
8­2
W7
23­22
4­6
L3
24­21
5­5
L2
19­23
1­9
L1
WEST
*Houston
Seattle
*Texas
*Los Angeles
Oakland
W
67
51
49
49
44
L
33
52
51
52
57
Pct.
.670
.495
.490
.485
.436
GB
—
17½
18
18½
23½
Div. Last 10 Streak
31­14
6­4
W2
20­22
5­5
L1
17­20
4­6
W1
19­19
5­5
L1
15­27
3­7
L3
NL
EAST
*Washington
Atlanta
*New York
*Miami
*Philadelphia
W
59
48
47
45
34
L
39
52
51
53
64
Pct.
.602
.480
.480
.459
.347
GB
—
12
12
14
25
Div. Last 10 Streak
26­17
7­3
L1
18­22
3­7
L1
22­24
6­4
W2
17­18
4­6
L1
17­19
5­5
L2
CENTRAL
*Milwaukee
*Chicago
Pittsburgh
*St. Louis
Cincinnati
W
54
52
50
49
41
L
48
47
52
51
60
Pct.
.529
.525
.490
.490
.406
GB
—
½
4
4
12½
Div. Last 10 Streak
20­21
3­7
W1
24­18
8­2
W1
20­19
6­4
L2
17­25
5­5
W2
19­17
2­8
L3
WEST
*Los Angeles
Arizona
*Colorado
*San Diego
San Francisco
W
70
58
58
43
40
L
31
43
44
57
63
Pct.
.693
.574
.569
.430
.388
GB
—
12
12½
26½
31
Div. Last 10 Streak
24­17
8­2
W4
23­19
5­5
W1
29­21
6­4
L2
19­28
4­6
L2
17­27
5­5
W2
* — Not including late game
RESULTS
WEDNESDAY
BOSTON 4
at Seattle 0
Kansas City
At Tampa Bay 5
Baltimore 1
LA Angels
At NY Yankees 9
Cincinnati 5
Miami
At Arizona 10
at Texas
Atlanta 3
Chi. Cubs
At San Francisco 2
Pittsburgh 1
Colorado
At Washington 8
Milwaukee 5
Minnesota
At Toronto 3
Oakland 2
Houston
at Detroit
at Cleveland
at Chi. White Sox
at St. Louis
at LA Dodgers
NY Mets
at San Diego
at Philadelphia
TUESDAY
At Seattle 6 (13 inn.)
At Chi. Cubs 7
BOSTON 5
Cleveland 11 (11 inn.) LA Angels 7
Chi. White Sox 2
At NY Yankees 4
At Texas 10
Cincinnati 2
Miami 4
At St. Louis 3
Colorado 2
Houston 5
at Philadelphia 0
Atlanta 8
at Arizona 3
Milwaukee 8
at Washington 0
At LA Dodgers 6
Minnesota 2
At Toronto 4
Oakland 1
At Tampa Bay 5
Baltimore 4
Kansas City 3
at Detroit 1
NY Mets 6
at San Diego 5
At San Francisco 11
Pittsburgh 3
ERIC RISBERG/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pirates reliever Tony Watson tries to regroup
after giving up the go-ahead run to the Giants.
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Odds
.......2017 ....... Team ...... 2017 vs. opp ...... ......Last 3 starts ......
W­L ERA rec. W­L
IP ERA
IP ERA W­L
MILWAUKEE AT WASHINGTON, 12:05 p.m.
Garza (R)
Scherzer (R)
Off
Off
4­5
11­5
3.83
2.26
7­8
13­8
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
1­1
1­0
16.1
12.0
1.65
3.75
11­8
9­10
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
2­1
1­2
18.0
10.2
2.50
8.44
9­9
12­8
1­0
0­0
6.0
0.0
3.00
0.00
1­1
1­0
19.2
21.1
4.12
0.84
3.77
3.44
12­9
12­4
1­1
2­0
13.1
10.0
3.38
0.90
0­1
2­1
19.2
13.2
2.75
3.29
8.10
5.40
0­1
2­1
0­1
0­0
5.1
4.2
8.44
5.79
0­1
1­1
5.1
15.0
8.44
5.40
3.32
0.00
8­5
0­0
0­1
0­0
7.0
0.0
3.86
0.00
0­2
0­0
17.1
0.0
5.71
0.00
12­9
6­10
0­0
0­0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
2­1
0­1
15.2
13.0
4.02
4.15
Flexen (R)
Off
—
—
0­0
0­0
0.0 0.00
Perdomo (R)
Off
4­5 4.71 7­10
0­0
0.0 0.00
Team rec. — Record in games started by pitcher this season
0­0
1­1
0.0
13.1
0.00
4.73
LA ANGELS AT CLEVELAND, 12:10 p.m.
Ramírez (R)
Bauer (R)
Off
Off
9­8
8­8
4.38
5.58
OAKLAND AT TORONTO, 12:37 p.m.
Manaea (L)
Stroman (R)
Off
Off
8­5
9­5
3.82
2.98
TAMPA BAY AT NY YANKEES, 7:05 p.m.
Archer (R)
Sabathia (L)
Off
Off
7­6
9­3
Newly acquired
Nunez will be busy
By Peter Abraham
GLOBE STAFF
SEATTLE — Eduardo
Nunez will join the Red Sox
on Friday for the start of
their series
RED SOX
against the
NOTEBOOK Kansas City
Royals. He
can expect to play a lot. Manager John Farrell sees the 30year-old infielder being an
important part of the lineup.
“We’re adding a quality
guy, a high-energy player
who can run the bases well.
He’s got really good linedrive power. His .300-plus
batting average to mix into
this lineup is a good addition,” Farrell said Wednesday.
The Sox sent minor
league righthanders Shaun
Anderson and Gregory San­
tos to the San Francisco Giants on Tuesday to obtain
Nunez, who hit .308 with a
.752 OPS, 31 RBIs, and 18
steals in 76 games.
Nunez was primarily a
third basemen for the Giants
but also started 10 games at
shortstop, 17 in left field,
and one in right field. He has
previous experience at second base.
Since June 1, Nunez has
hit .358 with an .896 OPS.
He is a singles hitter with
doubles power who adds to
his offensive profile by stealing bases. There are few
walks, but also limited strikeouts. His defense is adequate.
“As far as the defense, he’s
had to continue to work at
it,” Farrell said, choosing his
words carefully. “Certainly
not a detriment to his game.
But he’s known as an offensive player and that’s the way
we view him as well.”
Nunez should give the
Red Sox stability at third
base and perhaps fill in for
shortstop Xander Bogaerts,
who has struggled at the
plate in the last three weeks.
Bogaerts was 0 for 4 in
Wednesday’s 4-0 victory
against Seattle and is 7 of 51
(.137) in his last 13 games
since being hit on the right
hand by a pitch on July 6.
His OPS has dropped from
.818 to .756.
Farrell suggested Bogaerts
is healthy and needs work on
his timing. But Nunez does
give them the ability to make
a move if needed.
“Any time you’ve got that
type of player, you can mix
and match and spell different
guys and get them off their
feet on a given day,” Farrell
said.
“This is a quality bat that
we’ve got in our uniform now
. . . He’s going to get a high
number of at-bats.”
Nunez played for Farrell
in 2014 as part of an All-Star
series against players in Japan.
Nunez will add $1.5 mil-
lion to the payroll, which
leaves the Sox space to add at
least one other player via
trade. The non-waiver trade
deadline hits Monday afternoon.
To make room for Nunez
on the 40-man roster, lefthanded reliever Luis Ysla was
designated for assignment.
He had a 5.44 earned run average for Double A Portland.
Farrell did not say how
the active roster would be adjusted, and he didn’t commit
to rookie third baseman Ra­
fael Devers still being with
the team on Friday.
Betts gets a break
For the first time since
April 8, Mookie Betts was
out of the lineup. He has two
hits in his last 18 at-bats.
“Felt like with the off day
[Thursday], this is a chance
for him to recharge before we
start on the 10-game homestand,” Farrell said. “He’s
played every inning over this
post All-Star Game stretch
and that’s been taxing.”
Brock Holt started in
right field and was 1 for 4.
First timer
Deven Marrero played
3„ innings at first base in
Tuesday’s 13-inning game.
Marrero has played second
base, shortstop, and third
base in his career. First base
was something new.
Marrero borrowed Hanley
Ramirez’s glove and handled
the position well.
“The glove felt huge on
my hand. But it was fine,”
Marrero said. “I just didn’t
want to mess up.”
Boyer returns
Right-handed reliever
Blaine Boyer was activated
off the disabled list and
worked 1‚ innings. He
missed exactly 10 days with
what the team said was an elbow strain. Right-handed reliever Ben Taylor went to the
DL because of an oblique
strain . . . Doug Fister is 0-5
with a 7.46 ERA since joining
the Sox. He took the loss on
Tuesday, giving up two runs
in the 13th inning, the first
on a wild pitch. Farrell said
the Sox believe Fister can
succeed in relief while at the
same time providing rotation
depth . . . Chris Sale’s 14
games with 10 or more
strikeouts are the most in a
season since 2002, when
Randy Johnson had 15 and
Curt Schilling 14 . . . Seattle
Seahawks quarterback Rus­
sell Wilson threw out the
first pitch. With Malcolm
Butler busy at Patriots’ training camp, Robinson Cano
was able to catch the ball.
Peter Abraham can be
reached at
pabraham@globe.com.
CINCINNATI AT MIAMI, 7:10 p.m.
Stephenson (R)
O’Grady (L)
Off
Off
0­3
1­1
ARIZONA AT ST. LOUIS, 7:15 p.m.
Godley (R)
Weaver (R)
Off
Off
3­4
0­0
CHI. CUBS AT CHI. WHITE SOX, 8:10 p.m.
Lester (L)
Pelfrey (R)
Off
Off
7­6
3­7
3.95
4.46
NY METS AT SAN DIEGO, 9:10 p.m.
LEADERS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING
R
H Avg.
AB
Altuve, Hou................. 382 72 139 .364
Segura, Sea................. 310 45 101 .326
Gamel, Sea.................. 309 52 100 .324
JoRamirez, Cle............ 371 66 119 .321
Correa, Hou ................ 325 64 104 .320
Hosmer, KC................. 377 57 117 .310
Pedroia, Bos ............... 332 36 103 .310
Judge, NYY.................. 342 80 106 .310
Springer, Hou ............. 368 82 114 .310
StCastro, NYY............. 316 52 97 .307
HOME RUNS
Judge, New York........................................32
Moustakas, Kansas City...........................29
KDavis, Oakland.........................................28
Springer, Houston.....................................27
Smoak, Toronto.........................................27
Morrison, Tampa Bay...............................26
Gallo, Texas................................................25
Sano, Minnesota........................................23
Napoli, Texas..............................................22
Schoop, Baltimore....................................22.
RUNS BATTED IN
Cruz, Seattle...............................................75
Judge, New York........................................73
Schoop, Baltimore.....................................72
KDavis, Oakland.........................................69
Sano, Minnesota........................................68
Correa, Houston........................................ 67
Springer, Houston.....................................66
Cano, Seattle..............................................66
Moustakas, Kansas City...........................65
Smoak, Toronto........................................65.
PITCHING
Sale, Boston............................................13­4
JVargas, Kansas City.............................12­4
ESantana, Minnesota............................ 11­7
Paxton, Seattle.......................................10­3
Pomeranz, Boston..................................10­4
Carrasco, Cleveland.............................. 10­4
Fulmer, Detroit....................................... 10­8
Keuchel, Houston.....................................9­0
Sabathia, New York.................................9­3
Berrios, Minnesota...................................9­4
BATTING
AB
R
H Avg.
JuTurner, LAD............. 264 43 96 .364
DMurphy, Was ........... 359 64 122 .340
Harper, Was ............... 343 83 115 .335
Posey, SF..................... 317 44 104 .328
Blackmon, Col ............ 413 87 134 .324
CTaylor, LAD............... 290 52 93 .321
Zimmerman, Was...... 331 56 105 .317
Cozart, Cin .................. 278 48 88 .317
DPeralta, Ari ............... 326 55 103 .316
Rendon, Was .............. 317 52 100 .315
HOME RUNS
Stanton, Miami.......................................... 32
Bellinger, Los Angeles..............................28
Votto, Cincinnati........................................26
Harper, Washington..................................25
Bruce, New York........................................25
Blackmon, Colorado..................................24
Thames, Milwaukee..................................24
.....................................................4 tied at 23.
RUNS BATTED IN
Arenado, Colorado....................................86
Lamb, Arizona............................................79
Harper, Washington..................................75
Goldschmidt, Arizona...............................75
Shaw, Milwaukee......................................73
DMurphy, Washington............................. 72
Ozuna, Miami.............................................72
MarReynolds, Colorado............................70
Blackmon, Colorado..................................69
Votto, Cincinnati.......................................69.
PITCHING
Kershaw, Los Angeles...........................15­2
deGrom, New York................................12­3
Davies, Milwaukee.................................12­4
Greinke, Arizona.....................................12­4
AWood, Los Angeles............................. 11­1
Wainwright, St. Louis............................11­5
Scherzer, Washington...........................11­5
Strasburg, Washington.........................10­3
Senzatela, Colorado.............................. 10­4
, .....................................................................2­
Severino pitches
Yankees past Reds
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Luis Severino dominated over seven innings, Didi Gregorius and Todd Frazier homered, and the Yankees beat the Cincinnati Reds, 9-5, on Wednesday in New York to sweep the
two-game series.
ROUNDUP
The Yankees have won six of eight, and are
one game behind the Red Sox in the AL East.
Severino did not allow a runner past second base until the
seventh. He struck out nine, eight swinging, many on a devastating slider that looked untouchable at times.
Diamondbacks 10, Braves 3 — J.D. Martinez homered twice
and Ketel Marte hit an inside-the-park two-run homer in Arizona’s rout of Atlanta in Phoenix.
Marte ripped a high drive off the right-field corner fence
with one out in the bottom of the third inning, and the ball
bounced and rolled back toward the infield with Braves outfielder Sean Rodriguez unable to gather it in.
Marte circled the bases and crossed home plate standing
with his arms outstretched.
Rays 5, Orioles 1 — Evan Longoria and Steven Souza Jr. homered and Alex Cobb pitched seven strong innings to lead Tampa Bay over Baltimore in St. Petersburg, Fla.
Longoria’s two-run shot off Baltimore starter Ubaldo Jimenez, his 15th of the season, put Tampa Bay up 2-1 in the sixth
after a walk to Mallex Smith.
Cobb gave up one run on four hits with six strikeouts. He
has given up two runs or fewer in seven of his last nine starts.
Giants 2, Pirates 1 — Brandon Belt doubled in the go-ahead
run in the bottom of the seventh inning in support of starter
Jeff Samardzija, who threw seven strong innings to lift host
San Francisco over Pittsburgh.
RAYS 5, ORIOLES 1
BALTIMORE
Jones cf
Machado 3b
Schoop 2b
Davis 1b
Trumbo dh
Mancini lf
SSmith rf
Joseph c
Tejada ss
Totals
D’BACKS 10, BRAVES 3
AB R H BI BB SO
4 0 0 0 0 0
4 0 1 0 0 1
4 1 1 1 0 1
3 0 1 0 1 1
4 0 0 0 0 2
3 0 0 0 0 2
3 0 2 0 0 1
3 0 1 0 0 1
3 0 0 0 0 0
31 1 6 1 1 9
Avg.
.276
.241
.303
.218
.243
.301
.266
.299
.250
TAMPA BAY AB R H BI BB SO
MSmith cf
2 1 0 0 1 1
Bourjos ph­cf
1 0 1 0 0 0
Dickerson lf
3 1 0 0 1 2
Longoria 3b
4 2 3 2 0 1
Morrison 1b
4 0 1 1 0 1
Souza Jr. rf
4 1 1 2 0 2
Miller dh
3 0 0 0 1 1
Ramos c
3 0 1 0 0 1
Beckham 2b
3 0 1 0 0 0
Hechavrria ss 3 0 0 0 0 2
Totals
30 5 8 5 3 11
Avg.
.289
.250
.303
.273
.250
.271
.202
.217
.263
.250
Baltimore............000 100 000 — 1 6 0
Tampa Bay.........000 002 12x — 5 8 0
LOB—Baltimore 4, Tampa Bay 4. 2B—
SSmith 2 (14), Ramos (3). HR—Schoop
(22), off Cobb, Longoria (15), off Jiménez,
Souza Jr. (21), off O’Day. SB—Souza Jr.
(6). DP—Baltimore 2; Tampa Bay 2.
Baltimore
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Jiménez L 4­7
6 3 2 2 2 9 6.93
O’Day
1 2 1 1 1 1 4.79
Britton
1 3 2 2 0 1 3.50
Tampa Bay
Cobb W 9­6
Hunter
Boxberger
IP H R ER BB SO
7 4 1 1 1 6
1 1 0 0 0 1
1 1 0 0 0 2
ERA
3.46
1.93
4.32
PB—Joseph. NP—Jiménez 99, O’Day 16,
Britton 22, Cobb 94, Hunter 19, Boxberger
14. Umpires—Home, Andy Fletcher; First,
Alan Porter; Second, Joe West; Third,
Hunter Wendelstedt. T—2:46. A—18,430
(31,042).
YANKEES 9, REDS 5
CINCINNATI
Hamilton cf
Gennett 2b
Votto 1b
Duvall lf
Schebler rf
Suárez 3b
Mesoraco dh
Barnhart c
Peraza ss
Totals
AB R H BI BB SO
4 0 0 0 0 2
4 1 0 0 0 2
2 1 2 0 2 0
4 1 1 3 0 1
4 1 0 0 0 2
3 1 1 1 1 1
4 0 0 0 0 2
4 0 0 1 0 2
4 0 0 0 0 0
33 5 4 5 3 12
Avg.
.256
.306
.299
.269
.234
.257
.219
.258
.246
NY YANKEES
Gardner lf
CFrazier rf
Sánchez c
Holliday dh
Gregorius ss
Headley 1b
TFrazier 3b
Ellsbury cf
Torreyes 2b
Totals
AB R H BI BB SO
4 0 2 0 1 0
4 1 2 2 1 1
5 1 1 1 0 0
5 1 1 1 0 1
4 2 1 2 0 0
4 1 1 1 0 0
3 1 2 1 0 0
4 0 0 0 0 1
4 2 2 1 0 1
37 9 12 9 2 4
Avg.
.259
.290
.264
.238
.307
.265
.209
.244
.290
Cincinnati...........000 000 230 — 5 4 2
NY Yankees........001 012 50x — 9 12 1
E—Peraza (7), Votto (2), Gregorius (3).
LOB—Cincinnati 4, NY Yankees 7. 2B—
Suárez (17), Sánchez (11). HR—Duvall
(21), off Cessa, Gregorius (16), off Cingra­
ni, TFrazier (17), off Cingrani. SB—Gard­
ner (13). DP—Cincinnati 1.
Cincinnati
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Bailey L 2­5
6 10 7 5 1 0 8.37
Cingrani
„ 2 2 2 0 1 5.64
Wojcichowski 1 0 0 0 1 2 4.73
Iglesias
‚ 0 0 0 0 1 1.45
NY Yankees
Svrino W 7­4
Cessa
Robertson
IP H R ER BB SO
7 3 2 0 2 9
1 1 3 3 1 2
1 0 0 0 0 1
ERA
3.03
5.40
2.65
H.Bailey pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
Inherited runners­scored—Cingrani 1­1,
Iglesias 1­0. HBP—by Bailey (TFrazier).
WP—Severino, Cessa. NP—Bailey 96, Cin­
grani 13, Wojciechowski 21, Iglesias 4,
Severino 112, Cessa 25, Robertson 7. Um­
pires—Home, Mark Wegner; First, Marty
Foster; Second, Mike Winters; Third, Ry­
an Blakney. T—2:52. A—42,421 (47,422).
GIANTS 2, PIRATES 1
PITTSBURGH AB R H BI BB SO
Marte lf
4 0 0 0 0 1
Harrison 3b
4 0 2 0 0 1
McCutchen cf 4 0 0 0 0 1
Bell 1b
4 0 0 0 0 2
Jaso rf
3 1 0 0 1 1
Cervelli c
4 0 1 0 0 3
Frazier 2b
3 0 2 1 0 0
Mercer ss
2 0 0 0 1 0
Williams p
2 0 0 0 0 0
Freese ph
1 0 0 0 0 0
Watson p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Nicasio p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals
31 1 5 1 2 9
Avg.
.255
.284
.285
.249
.216
.268
.273
.264
.071
.257
.000
—
SAN FRANCISCO AB R H BI BB SO
Span cf
3 0 1 0 0 0
Panik 2b
4 1 1 0 0 0
Belt 1b
3 0 1 1 1 1
Posey c
1 0 1 0 3 0
Crawford ss
4 0 0 1 0 1
Pence rf
4 0 0 0 0 1
Gillaspie 3b
4 0 0 0 0 0
Hernández lf
4 0 2 0 0 0
Samardzija p
2 0 0 0 0 1
Gómez ph
1 1 1 0 0 0
Strickland p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Dyson p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals
30 2 7 2 4 4
Avg.
.286
.265
.238
.328
.232
.244
.164
.249
.093
.294
—
—
Pittsburgh.......... 010 000 000 — 1 5 0
San Francisco....100 000 10x — 2 7 0
LOB—Pittsburgh 5, San Francisco 9.
2B—Frazier (14), Span (22), Panik (20),
Belt (24), Gómez (2). HR—. SB—Harrison
(11), Hernández (8). S—Span. DP—San
Francisco 1.
Pittsburgh
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Williams
6 5 1 1 3 2 4.53
Watson L 5­3
1 2 1 1 1 1 3.74
Nicasio
1 0 0 0 0 1 2.53
San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO
Smrdzj W 5­11 7 4 1 1 2 8
Strickland
1 1 0 0 0 0
Dyson S 6
1 0 0 0 0 1
ERA
4.85
2.39
2.33
IBB—off Williams (Posey), off Watson
(Posey), off Samardzija (Mercer). WP—
Williams. NP—Williams 99, Watson 13,
Nicasio 15, Samardzija 105, Strickland 7,
Dyson 19. Umpires—Home, Ron Kulpa;
First, Chris Conroy; Second, Shane Liven­
sparger; Third, Jerry Meals. T—2:38.
A—41,038 (41,915).
AL LEADERS
STOLEN BASES
Maybin, Los Angeles................................25
Dyson, Seattle........................................... 22
Altuve, Houston.........................................21
Andrus, Texas............................................20
Davis, Oakland...........................................19
DeShields, Texas.......................................19
Betts, BOSTON...........................................17
Buxton, Minnesota....................................16
Cain, KC......................................................16
Merrifield, KC.............................................16
RUNS
Springer, Houston.....................................82
Judge, New York.......................................80
Altuve, Houston.........................................72
Betts, BOSTON...........................................70
Ramirez, Cleveland...................................66
Correa, Houston........................................64
Gardner, New York...................................64
Dickerson, TB.............................................63
Sano, Minnesota.......................................63
Trumbo, Baltimore....................................62
HITS
Altuve, Houston.......................................139
Ramirez, Cleveland.................................119
Dickerson, TB...........................................117
Hosmer, KC..............................................117
Springer, Houston...................................114
Abreu, Chicago........................................113
Andrus, Texas..........................................113
Schoop, Baltimore..................................113
Betts, BOSTON.........................................112
Cabrera, Chicago....................................111
ATLANTA
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Inciarte cf
4 0 1 0 1 0 .298
Phillips 2b
4 1 1 1 0 1 .286
FreFreman 1b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .332
Kemp lf
5 0 0 1 0 2 .289
Flowers c
4 0 2 0 1 0 .301
Rodríguz rf­3b 4 0 1 0 1 2 .150
Camargo 3b
4 0 0 0 0 2 .305
Krol p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Swanson ss
4 2 2 0 0 0 .213
Blair p
1 0 1 0 1 0 1.000
Jackson p
0 0 0 0 0 0
—
Santana ph
1 0 0 0 0 0 .206
Morris p
0 0 0 0 0 0
—
Markakis rf
1 0 1 1 0 0 .273
Totals
36 3 11 3 4 7
ARIZONA
AB R H BI BB SO
Blanco lf
4 1 2 0 1 0
Pollock cf
5 0 0 0 0 1
Lamb 3b
3 1 0 1 1 0
Gldschmidt 1b 2 3 2 0 3 0
Martinez rf
4 2 2 4 1 1
Descalso 2b
5 1 1 2 0 3
Marte ss
4 2 2 2 1 0
Mathis c
3 0 1 0 2 2
Corbin p
2 0 1 0 0 1
Barrett p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Drury ph
1 0 1 1 0 0
JDe La Rosa p 0 0 0 0 0 0
Herrmann ph
1 0 0 0 0 0
RDe La Rosa p 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals
34 10 12 10 9 8
Avg.
.259
.300
.268
.314
.250
.244
.220
.213
.079
—
.277
—
.165
—
Atlanta................100 100 010 — 3 11 0
Arizona................104 200 12x — 10 12 0
LOB—Atlanta 12, Arizona 11. 2B—Fre­
Freeman (17), Flowers (11), Swanson
(14), Goldschmidt 2 (24), Marte (3), Ma­
this (9). 3B—Descalso (3). HR—Martinez 2
(3), off Jackson, off Krol, Marte (3), off
Blair. SB—Blanco 2 (10). S—Corbin. SF—
Phillips, Lamb. DP—Arizona 1.
Atlanta
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Blair L 0­1
3 5 5 5 5 3 15.00
1 2 2 2 0 1 4.09
Jackson
Morris
2‚ 3 1 1 2 2 1.23
1„ 2 2 2 2 2 6.03
Krol
Arizona
Corbin W 8­9
Barrett
JoDe La Rosa
RuDe La Rosa
IP H R ER BB SO
6 7 2 2 4 5
1 1 0 0 0 1
1 2 1 1 0 0
1 1 0 0 0 1
ERA
4.36
1.00
4.26
4.50
Inherited runners­scored—Krol 2­0.
HBP—by Corbin (FreFreeman). WP—
Blair, Krol, Corbin. NP—Blair 75, Jackson
21, Morris 52, Krol 39, Corbin 112, Barrett
13, JoDe La Rosa 10, RuDe La Rosa 9. Um­
pires—Home, Larry Vanover; First, David
Rackley; Second, Alfonso Marquez;
Third, Chad Whitson. T—3:17. A—25,836
(48,686).
BLUE JAYS 3, ATHLETICS 2
OAKLAND
Joyce rf
Semien ss
Lowrie 2b
KDavis lf
Brugman cf
Alonso 1b
Healy dh
Chapman 3b
Maxwell c
RDavis cf­lf
Totals
AB R H BI BB SO
3 1 0 0 1 0
3 1 1 2 1 0
2 0 0 0 2 0
4 0 0 0 0 2
0 0 0 0 0 0
4 0 2 0 0 2
4 0 0 0 0 1
3 0 0 0 1 2
4 0 0 0 0 1
3 0 0 0 0 1
30 2 3 2 5 9
Avg.
.223
.208
.266
.245
.255
.267
.258
.197
.236
.224
TORONTO
AB R H BI BB SO
Bautista rf
3 0 1 0 1 0
Donaldson 3b
3 1 1 0 1 1
Smoak 1b
3 1 1 2 1 1
Morales dh
3 1 1 1 1 0
Pearce lf
3 0 0 0 0 0
Tulowitzki ss
3 0 0 0 0 1
Montero c
3 0 1 0 0 0
Pillar cf
3 0 0 0 0 0
Goins 2b
3 0 0 0 0 1
Totals
27 3 5 3 4 4
Avg.
.221
.238
.297
.254
.270
.249
.080
.244
.207
Oakland.............. 000 020 000 — 2 3 0
Toronto...............000 000 003 — 3 5 0
LOB—Oakland 6, Toronto 4. 2B—Alonso
(16), Bautista (16), Donaldson (12). HR—
Semien (3), off Estrada, Smoak (28), off
Casilla, Morales (18), off Casilla. DP—
Oakland 2.
Oakland
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Blackburn
7 2 0 0 3 3 2.25
Treinen
1 1 0 0 0 1 0.00
Csl BS 6; L 2­5 0 2 3 3 1 0 4.66
Toronto
Estrada
Dermody
Leone
Loup
Biagini W 3­8
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
5 3 2 2 4 4 5.43
‚ 0 0 0 0 1 67.50
2 0 0 0 0 1 2.56
1 0 0 0 0 2 4.95
„ 0 0 0 1 1 4.89
Casilla pitched to 3 batters in the 9th.
NP—Blackburn 98, Treinen 17, Casilla 11,
Estrada 100, Dermody 4, Leone 26, Loup
17, Biagini 12. Umpires—Home, James
Hoye; First, Will Little; Second, Jeff Kel­
logg; Third, Tim Timmons. T—2:51.
A—41,984 (49,286).
NATIONALS 8, BREWERS 5
MILWAUKEE
Villar 2b
Santana rf
Braun lf
Shaw 3b
Aguilar 1b
Piña c
Brinson cf
Arcia ss
Nelson p
Barnes p
Hader p
Hughes p
HPérez ph
Totals
AB R H BI BB SO
5 0 1 0 0 2
5 1 2 1 0 2
4 0 0 0 0 0
4 1 1 0 0 1
4 0 0 0 0 4
3 1 1 0 1 0
3 1 1 2 1 1
4 1 2 0 0 0
3 0 0 0 0 2
0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0
1 0 1 1 0 0
36 5 9 4 2 12
Avg.
.223
.292
.264
.297
.286
.303
.118
.282
.091
—
—
—
.266
WASHINGTON AB R H BI BB SO
Goodwin cf­rf 4 1 1 0 0 3
Difo ss
4 1 1 1 0 0
Harper rf
4 0 1 0 0 1
Stevenson cf
0 0 0 0 0 0
Zimmrman 1b 4 1 1 2 0 1
Murphy 2b
3 2 1 1 1 1
Rendon 3b
4 1 1 1 0 1
Lind lf
4 1 2 2 0 1
Wieters c
2 0 1 0 1 1
Severino pr­c
1 0 1 1 0 0
González p
2 0 0 0 0 2
Madson p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Sanchez ph
2 1 0 0 0 1
Doolittle p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals
34 8 10 8 2 12
Avg.
.237
.255
.334
.000
.316
.340
.315
.331
.248
.500
.116
—
.063
—
Milwaukee..........200 000 003 — 5 9 0
Washington........000 000 17x — 8 10 1
E—González (1). LOB—Milwaukee 6,
Washington 4. 2B—Villar (13), Shaw (25),
HPérez (16), Goodwin (14), Zimmerman
(24), Lind (9), Severino (1). HR—Santana
(17), off González, Brinson (1), off Doolit­
tle, Murphy (17), off Nelson. SB—Villar
(20), Shaw (8), Arcia (9). CS—Braun (2).
DP—Washington 1.
Milwaukee
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Nelson
7 4 2 2 1 10 3.38
Bns BS 3;L 3­2 ‚ 2 2 2 0 0 4.30
Hader
‚ 0 0 0 0 1 1.06
Hughes
‚ 4 4 4 1 1 3.83
Washington
IP H R ER BB SO
González
7 5 2 2 1 8
Madson W 1­0 1 1 0 0 0 1
Doolittle
1 3 3 3 1 3
ERA
2.81
0.00
9.00
Nelson pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Inherited runners­scored—Barnes 1­1,
Hader 2­0, Hughes 2­2. IBB—off Hughes
(Murphy). WP—González, Doolittle. NP—
Nelson 103, Barnes 8, Hader 4, Hughes 17,
González 102, Madson 12, Doolittle 28.
Umpires—Home, Chris Segal; First, Mike
Everitt; Second, Jordan Baker; Third,
Bruce Dreckman. T—2:58. A—35,296
(41,339).
CARDINALS 3, ROCKIES 2
Tuesday night game
COLORADO
AB R H BI BB SO
Blackmon cf
4 0 0 0 0 0
LeMahieu 2b
2 1 0 0 2 1
Arenado 3b
4 0 1 0 0 2
Parra lf­1b
3 0 1 1 0 0
Desmond 1b
1 0 0 0 0 1
Reynolds 1b­lf 2 0 1 0 1 1
González rf
4 0 1 0 0 0
Story ss
4 1 1 1 0 2
Hanigan c
2 0 1 0 0 1
Gray p
1 0 0 0 0 0
Amarista ph
1 0 0 0 0 0
Dunn p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Oberg p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Valaika ph
0 0 0 0 0 0
McGee p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals
28 2 6 2 3 8
Avg.
.324
.311
.311
.356
.285
.284
.227
.237
.264
.133
.254
—
—
.263
—
ST. LOUIS
AB R H BI BB SO
Carpenter 1b
4 1 1 0 0 1
Pham lf
4 0 1 0 0 2
DeJong ss
4 1 2 2 0 1
Grichuk rf
4 0 1 0 0 0
Molina c
4 0 2 0 0 1
Wong 2b
4 0 2 0 0 0
Bader cf
4 1 1 0 0 1
Garcia 3b
3 0 1 0 0 1
Lynn p
1 0 0 0 0 1
Siegrist p
0 0 0 0 0 0
JoMartínez ph 1 0 1 0 0 0
Bowman p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Rosenthal p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Gyorko ph
0 0 0 1 0 0
Totals
33 3 12 3 0 8
Avg.
.248
.307
.292
.227
.272
.303
.250
.232
.083
—
.282
—
—
.284
Colorado.............000 000 110 — 2 6 0
St. Louis..............200 000 001 — 3 12 0
LOB—Colorado 5, St. Louis 7. 2B—Are­
nado (32), Parra (11), Bader (1). HR—Sto­
ry (14), off Bowman, DeJong (13), off
Gray. SB—Molina (7). S—Valaika, Garcia,
Lynn. SF—Parra, Gyorko. DP—Colorado 2;
St. Louis 3.
Colorado
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Gray
5 8 2 2 0 6 5.84
Dunn
1 1 0 0 0 1 4.54
Oberg
1 1 0 0 0 1 5.58
McGee L 0­1 1„ 2 1 1 0 0 3.27
St. Louis
Lynn
Siegrist
Bowman BS 3
Rsnthal W 3­4
IP H R ER BB SO
6 3 1 1 2 6
1 0 0 0 1 0
0 1 1 1 0 0
2 2 0 0 0 2
ERA
3.21
4.22
3.92
3.69
Lynn pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
Bowman pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
Inherited runners­scored—Siegrist 2­1,
Rosenthal 1­0. HBP—by Bowman (Hani­
gan). NP—Gray 96, Dunn 12, Oberg 14,
McGee 20, Lynn 94, Siegrist 12, Bowman
5, Rosenthal 34. Umpires—Home, Fieldin
Culbreth; First, Mark Carlson; Second, CB
Bucknor; Third, Manny Gonzalez. T—3:11.
A—41,514 (45,529).
DODGERS 6, TWINS 2
Tuesday night game
MINNESOTA AB R H BI BB SO
Dozier 2b
4 1 0 0 0 1
Granite cf
4 0 1 1 0 1
Mauer 1b
2 0 1 0 2 0
Escobar 3b
4 0 1 1 0 1
EdRosario lf
3 0 1 0 0 0
Pressly p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Sanó ph
1 0 0 0 0 1
Busenitz p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Kepler rf
4 0 0 0 0 1
Polanco ss
3 1 0 0 1 1
Castro c
4 0 1 0 0 1
Berríos p
1 0 0 0 0 1
Grossman ph
1 0 0 0 0 0
Hildnberger p 0 0 0 0 0 0
Adrianza lf
2 0 0 0 0 0
Totals
33 2 5 2 3 8
Avg.
.247
.256
.285
.269
.296
—
.271
—
.254
.214
.223
.333
.251
—
.293
LA DODGERS
Taylor lf
Seager ss
Turner 3b
Bellinger 1b
Grandal c
Pederson cf
Utley 2b
Puig rf
Maeda p
Avilán p
Forsythe ph
Ravin p
Totals
Avg.
.321
.292
.364
.269
.268
.239
.229
.256
.154
.000
.243
.000
AB R H BI BB SO
4 0 2 3 0 1
4 0 1 0 0 2
4 0 0 0 0 2
3 1 1 0 1 0
4 0 0 0 0 1
3 2 1 1 0 0
4 1 2 0 0 1
4 1 3 1 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0
1 1 1 1 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0
31 6 11 6 1 7
Minnesota..........001 010 000 — 2 5 1
LA Dodgers........ 000 402 00x — 6 11 1
E—EdRosario (4), Seager (7). LOB—
Minnesota 7, LA Dodgers 5. 2B—Taylor 2
(23), Pederson (15). HR—. SB—Bellinger
(6). S—Maeda 2. DP—Minnesota 1.
Minnesota
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Berríos L 9­4
4 7 4 4 1 3 3.76
Hildenberger 1‚ 0 1 1 0 1 3.52
Pressly
1„ 3 1 1 0 3 6.75
Busenitz
1 1 0 0 0 0 1.86
LA Dodgers
Maeda W 9­4
Avilán
Ravin S 1
IP H R ER BB SO
5 5 2 1 2 4
1 0 0 0 0 3
3 0 0 0 1 1
ERA
4.09
3.41
0.00
Inherited runners­scored—Pressly 1­1.
HBP—by Hildenberger (Pederson). NP—
Berríos 80, Hildenberger 24, Pressly 23,
Busenitz 11, Maeda 91, Avilán 15, Ravin
33. Umpires—Home, Lance Barrett; First,
Clint Fagan; Second, Bill Welke; Third,
Jim Reynolds. T—3:35. A—44,403 (56,000).
METS 6, PADRES 5
Tuesday night game
NY METS
AB R H BI BB SO
Granderson cf 4 2 2 0 1 1
Cabrera 3b
4 1 1 1 0 0
Céspedes lf
4 2 3 3 0 0
Sewald p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Reed p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Bruce rf
4 1 1 0 0 1
T.Rivera 2b
4 0 1 0 0 1
Duda 1b
4 0 0 0 0 1
Reyes ss
3 0 0 0 1 0
Td'Arnaud c
4 0 1 1 0 1
Lugo p
2 0 0 0 0 1
Flores ph
1 0 0 0 0 1
Conforto lf
1 0 0 0 0 0
Totals
35 6 9 5 2 7
Avg.
.224
.256
.284
.000
—
.264
.291
.245
.227
.240
.188
.283
.292
SAN DIEGO
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Pirela lf
5 0 0 0 0 0 .289
Asuaje 2b
4 0 1 0 0 1 .314
Myers 1b
3 0 0 1 0 1 .248
Sánchez c
4 0 1 0 0 1 .264
Renfroe rf
4 1 1 1 0 1 .232
Spngnberg 3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .268
Margot cf
4 1 3 0 0 0 .269
Cordoba ss
3 1 1 2 0 0 .227
Maton p
0 0 0 0 0 0
—
Baumann p
0 0 0 0 0 0
—
Blash ph
1 0 0 0 0 0 .234
Lloyd p
1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Yates p
0 0 0 0 0 0
—
Szczur ph
1 1 1 0 0 0 .240
Torres p
0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000
Coleman ss
2 0 1 1 0 0 .200
Totals
36 5 10 5 0 4
NY Mets..............100 120 200 — 6 9 1
San Diego...........030 010 001 — 5 10 2
E—Cabrera (12), Myers (5), Sánchez
(2). LOB—NY Mets 4, San Diego 5. 2B—
Granderson (19), Cabrera (14), Céspedes
(11), Coleman (1). 3B—Céspedes (2).
HR—Céspedes (10), off Lloyd, Renfroe
(20), off Lugo, Cordoba (4), off Lugo. SB—
Reyes (13). SF—Myers. DP—San Diego 1.
NY Mets
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Lugo W 5­2
6 8 4 3 0 1 4.10
Sewald
2 0 0 0 0 3 4.17
Reed S 18
1 2 1 1 0 0 2.63
San Diego
Lloyd
Yates
Torres L 5­3
Maton
Baumann
IP H R ER BB SO
4 6 4 4 2 2
1 1 0 0 0 1
1„ 1 1 1 0 2
1‚ 1 1 0 0 1
1 0 0 0 0 1
ERA
9.00
1.67
4.50
3.38
0.00
Lloyd pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. In­
herited runners­scored—Yates 1­1, Ma­
ton 1­1. NP—Lugo 105, Sewald 18, Reed
17, Lloyd 83, Yates 17, Torres 36, Maton
15, Baumann 11. Umpires—Home, Tom
Hallion; First, Phil Cuzzi; Second, Vic Car­
apazza; Third, Mark Ripperger. T—3:05.
A—28,024 (40,209).
ELSA/GETTY IMAGES
Third baseman Todd Frazier follows the flight of his solo home run in
the seventh inning Wednesday afternoon, his first with the Yankees.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
Sports
C5
Sale snaps Sox’ losing skid
Devers
shining
through
uRED SOX
Red Sox 4, Mariners 0
Continued from Page C1
uSHAUGHNESSY
Continued from Page C1
Nunez late Tuesday. They say
Nunez is going to be their everyday third baseman. Soooooo
. . . despite his high ceiling and
amazing bat speed, Devers
might wind up being the guy
who makes room for Nunez.
“He hasn’t hurt his cause by
any means,’’ said Sox manager
John Farrell. “He’s taken care of
what he can on his end.’’
Speaking through Sox translator Daveson Perez, the babyfaced Devers said, “I haven’t
thought much about what’s to
come. The way I’ve always been
is, wherever they put me to
play, I’m going to give 110 percent and the cards are going to
fall where they may.’’
This much we know: Devers
is the most talented prospect in
the Sox system and his long
blast on Wednesday makes him
the youngest Sox player to hit a
home run since Tony Conigliaro.
Given how things have been
going for the Red Sox, it was
great to have a day when folks
were talking about Tony C (who
hit 24 homers as a teenager in
1964) instead of losing streaks,
bad behavior, and non-apologies. Talking about Devers was
fun for everybody as the club
got ready for its long flight to
Boston.
“He’s got something special
in that bat,’’ said Farrell. “This
is not an easy ballpark to hit a
ball out in center field. He’s
been impressive. He looks very
much at ease.’’
Sale, who book-ended the
2-4 coast trip with wins on each
end, added, “I think he’s great.
He had two walks in his debut
and then the big swing for us
today. He’s fun to watch. To see
him doing what he’s doing —
the youngest player in the big
leagues — the way he handles
himself, we’ve got all the confidence in the world in him.’’
It will be less fun to watch
this team if the Sox don’t keep
Devers when they make room
for Nunez.
Phenoms in the Red Sox system don’t sneak up on Boston’s
hardcore fans anymore. It’s not
like Freddie Lynn getting the
call from Pawtucket in the mid
1970s and having folks say,
“Wow. This kid is really good.
Where’d he come from?’’
No. Nowadays hardcore fans
know tons about a prospect
when he finally makes it to The
Show. Baseball America makes
superstars out of high school
and college players before they
sign professional contracts.
Websites are dedicated to minor league prospects. Players
are researched and rated long
before they make it to the bigs.
G l o b e
LINDSEY WASSON/GETTY IMAGES
Rafael Devers is mobbed by teammates celebrating his first
career hit, a home run to center field in the third inning.
Eduardo Nunez’ career statistics
Year
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2016
2016
2017
Total
Team
NYY
NYY
NYY
NYY
Min
Min
Min
SF
Tot.
SF
G
AB
R
30
50
12
112 309 38
38
89
14
90 304 38
72 204 26
72 188 23
91 371 49
50 182 24
141 553 73
75 300 35
630 1997 259
H Avg. OBP 2B
14 .280 .321
1
82 .265 .313 18
26 .292 .330
4
79 .260 .307 17
51 .250 .271
7
53 .282 .327 14
110 .296 .325 15
49 .269 .327
9
159 .288 .325 24
92 .307 .331 20
556 .278 .316 105
Xander Bogaerts and Andrew
Benintendi already had fan
clubs when they were called up
by the Red Sox. There are no secrets on the top guys anymore.
It was obvious that the Seattle Mariners already had a book
on Devers even though he’s only played nine games in Triple
A. It was weird to see the Mariners go into shift mode when
Devers came to the plate for his
first big-league at-bat Tuesday
night. Devers flied softly to left
and went 0 for 4 and walked
twice, scoring one run in his
big-league debut.
Game 2 was another story.
The Sox had an insurmountable 1-0 lead (Sale pitching)
when Devers led off the top of
the third against 23-year-old
Mariners righty Andrew
Moore. Moore was making his
sixth big-league start.
Devers took the first two
pitches for balls, fouled off the
next pitch, then unloaded on a
2-and-1 90-miles-per-hour,
four-seam fastball and drove it
high and deep to center. Mariners center fielder Guillermo
Heredia ran back a few steps,
then watched the ball sail over
the green wall, a little to the left
of the 401-foot sign. It was a
safe landing spot for the kid’s
first homer. The ball landed in a
sod farm/vegetable garden in
front of the batter ’s e ye at
Safeco Field, then bounced over
a slice of stands and into a Mariners TV stage platform.
Devers circled the bases in
humble rookie fashion (“I knew
it would go out, but of course I
had to run hard out of the
3B
0
2
1
4
4
1
1
3
4
0
16
HR
1
5
1
3
4
4
12
4
16
4
38
RBI
7
30
11
28
24
20
47
20
67
29
216
BB
3
22
6
20
5
12
15
14
29
12
109
SO
2
37
12
51
31
29
58
30
88
29
279
box’’), then made his way toward the dugout. He was greeted by Hanley Ramirez, who
hugged him and removed his
helmet. Sox players gave Devers
the traditional big freeze for a
few moments, then showered
him with hugs and noogies.
Upstairs in the press box, a
Seattle official made an inhouse call to ask one of the center-field attendants to get the
baseball for Devers. Moments
later, the baseball was fished
out of the TV area and handed
over to the Red Sox in the visiting bullpen. A Sox clubhouse
attendant presented Devers
with the ball after the game.
Devers squared up a couple
more balls after the homer. He
lined to right in the fourth and
cracked a hard single off the leg
of Mariners veteran lefty reliever Marc Rzepczynski in the seventh. It was impressive leftyon-lefty crime. Lefties had hit
.186 off Rzepczynski.
“It’s the same baseball for
me at the end of the day,’’ said a
smiling Devers.
“I don’ t know how, but I
guarantee that my dad [in the
Dominican Republic] found a
way to watch the game today
and that my whole family was
watching with him.’’
Nice. A warm and fuzzy moment for the beleaguered, stillfirst-place Red Sox. Here’s hoping they find a way to keep the
kid on the team for the rest of
the season.
Dan Shaughnessy is a Globe
columnist. He can be reached at
dshaughnessy@globe.com.
Rookie Rafael Devers was 2
for 4 and homered as the Sox
headed home with a sense of relief, not dread. They open a 10game homestand on Friday
against the Kansas City Royals.
“We had the right man on
the mound,” Jackie Bradley Jr.
said. “But that’s the way he always pitches.”
The Sox were 2-4 on their
road trip, Sale winning the first
and last games. He threw 13
shutout innings and struck out
20.
Sale (13-4) dropped his
earned run average to 2.37. He
has 10 or more strikeouts in 14
of 21 starts and since the AllStar break has thrown 20„ innings without giving up a run.
“We’re watching one of the
better years ever pitched by a
major league pitcher in the
American League,” manager
John Farrell said.
For the Sox, spirits were lifted. Several of the players are
fighting through injuries and
others are mired in slumps. For
some, it’s both. As a team, the
first-place Sox have been on a
steady decline for three weeks.
One more loss would have
put them percentage points behind the Yankees in the American League East.
Games like this are why you
trade golden boy prospects to
get a pitcher like Sale.
“We know where we’re at.
We know what we did on this
road trip,” Sale said. “It’s nice to
come here and get the last one.
Especially going into the off
day. A little positive momentum
for the flight home.”
The Mariners never came
close to scoring against Sale.
When Jean Segura doubled
in the third inning, Sale struck
out Ben Gamel and Nelson Cruz
on seven pitches.
Gamel had a single in the
sixth inning and Sale responded with strikeouts of Cruz and
Danny Valencia on nine pitches.
Sale retired the final six batters he faced, four by strikeout.
Blaine Boyer got through the
eighth inning but put two on in
the ninth. Craig Kimbrel, who
threw 30 pitches on Tuesday,
struck out both batters he faced
for his 25th save.
Seattle rookie righthander
Andrew Moore (1-3) retired the
Sox in order in the first inning,
then gave up four runs in the
next three.
Hanley Ramirez walked and
took third on a double by Bradley to start the second inning.
At Safeco Field, Seattle
BOSTON
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Holt rf
5 0 1 0 0 0 .196
Benintendi lf
4 0 1 0 0 1 .266
Pedroia 2b
4 0 2 0 0 0 .310
Ramirez dh
2 1 0 0 1 0 .256
Bradley Jr. cf
4 1 2 0 0 2 .269
Moreland 1b
3 0 0 1 0 1 .239
Bogaerts ss
4 0 0 0 0 0 .284
Leon c
4 1 1 2 0 1 .242
Devers 3b
4 1 2 1 0 0 .250
Totals
34 4 9 4 1 5
SEATTLE
Segura ss
Gamel lf
Cruz dh
Valencia 1b
Seager 3b
Heredia cf
Haniger rf
Ruiz c
Espinosa 2b
Totals
AB
4
4
4
4
4
2
3
4
3
32
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 0 0 2 .326
2 0 0 1 .324
0 0 0 2 .275
0 0 0 1 .265
1 0 0 1 .255
1 0 1 0 .275
0 0 1 2 .254
0 0 0 3 .216
0 0 0 2 .159
5 0 2 14
Boston............................... 011 200 000 — 4 9 0
Seattle...............................000 000 000 — 0 5 0
LOB—Boston 6, Seattle 8. 2B—Bradley Jr. 2 (18),
Segura (20), Heredia (7). HR—Leon (6), off Moore,
Devers (1), off Moore. SF—Moreland. Runners left
in scoring position—Boston 3 (Bogaerts 2, Leon),
Seattle 4 (Cruz, Haniger, Ruiz 2). RISP—Boston 1
for 8, Seattle 0 for 6. GIDP—Pedroia. DP—Seattle 1
(Espinosa, Segura, Valencia).
Boston
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Sale W 13­4
7 3 0 0 1 11 115 2.37
Boyer
1‚ 2 0 0 1 1 29 2.84
Kimbrel S 25
„ 0 0 0 0 2 9 1.27
Seattle
Moore L 1­3
Rzepczynski
Pagán
Cishek
IP
6„
‚
1
1
H
6
2
1
0
R ER BB SO NP ERA
4 4 1 3 103 5.65
0 0 0 0 8 3.44
0 0 0 2 19 2.45
0 0 0 0 16 3.15
Rzepczynski pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. In­
herited runners­scored—Kimbrel 2­0, Pagán 1­0.
HBP—by Sale (Heredia), by Pagán (Ramirez).
Umpires—Home, Paul Nauert; First, Ben May;
Second, Carlos Torres; Third, Dana DeMuth.
T—2:53. A—39,797 (47,943).
HOW THE RUNS SCORED
SECOND INNING
RED SOX — Ramirez walked. Bradley Jr. dou­
bled to right, Ramirez to third. Moreland hit a
sacrifice fly to left, Ramirez scored. Bogaerts
lined out to right. Leon struck out.
THIRD INNING
RED SOX — Devers homered to center. Holt
grounded out to third. Benintendi lined out to
short. Pedroia singled to center. Ramirez ground­
ed into fielder’s choice, short to second, Pedroia
out.
FOURTH INNING
RED SOX — Bradley Jr. doubled to right. More­
land popped out to third. Bogaerts popped out to
center. Leon homered to right, Bradley Jr. scored.
Devers lined out to right.
Mariners 6, Red Sox 5
Tuesday night game
At Safeco Field, Seattle
BOSTON
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Betts rf
6 0 0 0 0 2 .273
Benintendi lf
5 1 2 0 1 0 .266
Pedroia 2b
6 1 2 2 0 1 .308
Ramirez dh
6 2 2 1 0 0 .258
Bradley Jr. cf
6 0 1 1 0 1 .266
Bogaerts ss
5 0 0 0 1 3 .287
Moreland 1b
3 0 0 0 1 1 .241
a­Young ph
1 0 0 0 0 0 .243
0 0 0 0 1 0 .212
Marrero 1b
Vázquez c
4 0 1 0 0 0 .251
b­Holt pr
0 0 0 0 0 0 .196
Leon c
2 0 1 1 0 0 .242
Devers 3b
4 1 0 0 2 1 .000
Totals
48 5 9 5 6 9
SEATTLE
Segura ss
Valencia 1b
c­Espinosa pr­1b
Canó 2b
Cruz dh
Seager 3b
Haniger rf
Gamel lf
Heredia cf
Zunino c
Totals
AB
5
5
1
6
6
4
5
5
6
4
47
R H BI BB SO Avg.
0 1 1 2 0 .327
0 1 0 0 3 .268
0 0 0 0 0 .162
0 2 0 0 1 .272
0 0 0 0 5 .278
1 1 0 2 2 .255
0 0 0 1 2 .257
2 1 0 1 1 .321
2 3 3 0 0 .273
1 1 1 2 2 .226
6 10 5 8 16
Boston................... 000 103 000 000 1 — 5 9 0
Seattle...................030 000 100 000 2 — 6 10 1
a­popped out for Moreland in 11th, b­ran for
Vázquez in 9th, c­ran for Valencia in 10th. E—
Canó (8). LOB—Boston 10, Seattle 11. 2B—Pe­
droia (17), Canó (17). HR—Ramirez (17), off Her­
nandez, Heredia (6), off Pomeranz, Zunino (15),
off Hembree.SB—Marrero (5), Espinosa (4). Run­
ners left in scoring position—Boston 5 (Betts,
Ramirez, Bradley Jr., Devers 2), Seattle 3 (Valen­
cia, Haniger 2). RISP—Boston 3 for 13, Seattle 2
for 10. Runners moved up—Ramirez, Heredia.
GIDP—Devers, Valencia. DP—Boston 1 (Bogaerts,
Pedroia, Moreland); Seattle 1 (Seager, Segura,
Valencia).
Boston
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Pomeranz
5 4 3 3 4 7 105 3.59
Hembree BS 2
1 1 1 1 1 0 26 3.74
Barnes
2 1 0 0 0 2 21 3.12
Workman
1 0 0 0 0 1 14 2.57
Kimbrel
1 1 0 0 1 3 30 1.29
Fister L 0­5
2„ 3 2 2 2 3 57 7.46
Seattle
Hernandez
Cishek
Phelps
Rzepczynski
Díaz
Vincent
Pazos
Zych W 5­2
IP
5„
1‚
„
‚
1
1
1
2
H
4
0
2
0
1
0
0
2
R ER BB SO NP ERA
4 4 2 4 95 4.08
0 0 1 1 15 3.32
0 0 0 0 16 0.00
0 0 0 0 6 3.50
0 0 1 0 12 3.16
0 0 0 0 15 1.91
0 0 1 1 24 3.99
1 1 1 3 37 2.14
Hembree pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inher­
ited runners­scored—Barnes 1­0, Cishek 1­0,
Rzepczynski 2­0. WP—Pomeranz, Fister, Hernan­
dez, Zych. PB—Zunino. Umpires—Home, Dana
DeMuth; First, Paul Nauert; Second, Ben May;
Third, Carlos Torres. T—4:59. A—28,992 (47,943).
HOW THE RUNS SCORED
Ramirez tagged up on a shallow
fly ball to left field by Mitch Moreland and scored on a close
play.
Devers homered to center
field leading off the third inning, hammering a fastball 427
fee t . It was his first major
league hit after going 0 for 4
with two walks on Tuesday.
The last Red Sox player with
a home run for his first major
league hit was Daniel Nava,
who had a grand slam on June
12, 2010.
The slam was on the first
pitch Nava saw in the majors.
For Devers, the home run came
in his seventh plate appearance.
“I knew it was going out. But
of course I had to run hard out
of the box,” Devers said via a
translator. “But I knew it was
going out. It was surreal when I
got back to the dugout. I could
barely walk.”
The 20-year-old Devers is
the youngest Sox player to homer since Tony Conigliaro late in
the 1965 season and the youngest in the majors since Houston’s Carlos Correa in 2015.
Bradley doubled again in the
‘We’re watching one of the better years
ever pitched by a major league pitcher
in the American League.’
JOHN FARRELL, on Red Sox ace Chris Sale
SECOND INNING
MARINERS — Cruz struck out. Seager singled
to right. Haniger lined out to right . Gamel
walked, Seager to second. Heredia homered to
left, Seager and Gamel scored. Zunino walked.
Segura lined out to right.
FOURTH INNING
RED SOX — Benintendi flied out to center. Pe­
droia struck out. Ramirez homered to left . Brad­
ley Jr. grounded out, pitcher to first.
SIXTH INNING
RED SOX — Devers walked. Betts struck out.
Benintendi walked, Devers to second. On wild
pitch, Devers to third, Benintendi to second. Pe­
droia doubled to left, Devers and Benintendi
scored. Ramirez grounded out to third, Pedroia to
third. Bradley Jr. singled to center, Pedroia
scored. Cishek pitching. Bogaerts struck out.
SEVENTH INNING
MARINERS — Zunino homered to center. Segu­
ra walked. Barnes pitching. Valencia grounded
into a double play, shortstop to second to first,
Segura out. Canó singled to center. Cruz struck
out.
13TH INNING
RED SOX — Ramirez singled to right. Bradley Jr.
struck out. Bogaerts struck out. On wild pitch,
Ramirez to second. Marrero walked. Leon singled
to left, Ramirez scored, Marrero to second. Mar­
rero stole third. Devers flied out to center.
MARINERS — Seager struck out. Haniger
walked. Gamel grounded into fielder’s choice,
short to second, Haniger out. Heredia singled to
right, Gamel to third. On wild pitch, Gamel
scored, Heredia to third. Zunino walked. Segura
hit an infield single to short, Heredia scored.
fourth inning and scored when
catcher Sandy Leon homered to
right field.
“The early offense was maybe more a reflection of the competitiveness that’s here,” Farrell
said.
Sale will not pitch again until Tuesday, however.
“I don’t think we’ve played
our best,” Bradley said. “Baltimore was the hot team early in
the division. Then it was the
Yankees. I don’t think we’ve
had that yet.
“We needed today, for sure.
Hopefully we’ve gotten through
the tough times.”
Peter Abraham can be reached
at pabraham@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@PeteAbe.
Bruins’ Spooner takes one­year deal, avoids arbitration
By Kevin Paul Dupont
GLOBE STAFF
The Bruins made it clear to
Ryan Spooner in May and June
that they’d like him back for
2017-18, but on their narrow
terms, specifically a one-year
deal. In management’s eyes, he
remains more a project than a
finished product.
“I think the next step for
me,” said the 25-year-old pivot,
“is when the offense kind of
dries up, is to be able to be more
of a dependable, defensive guy.
If that is strength or the mental
side of the game, that’s kind of
for me to figure out, and that’s
what I’ve been trying to do.”
With that mind-set, Spooner
opted Wednesday not to follow
through on his scheduled salary
arbitration hearing and agreed
t o a o n e - y e a r c o n t ra c t f o r
$2.825 million. It was the midpoint between Boston’s offer of
$2 million and the $3.825 request Spooner planned to make
formal at the bargaining table.
“I don’t think a player wants
to sit through that,” noted
Spooner, whose production
slipped 10 points, to 11-28—39,
last season. “It’s not pleasant.”
Spooner, the 45 th pick in
the 2010 draft, will report to
camp in September still pegged
as a center, though in a somewhat crowded workplace with a
number of pivots hoping to
grab third-line duty behind Pa-
trice Bergeron and David Krejci. Riley Nash, Noel Acciari, and
raw rookie Jakob Forsbacka
Karlsson, the former BU standout, will be vying for the same
standing.
Spooner has a slight edge on
the pack, given his history on
the power play, mainly his ability to distribute the puck off the
right half-wall.
“We know Ryan has the offensive skills to be an impactful
player,” GM Don Sweeney said
in a team release, “especially
while on the power play. We expect Ryan to continue to take
the necessary steps with his development to be an even more
complete, two-way player.”
At his best, Spooner is a fast
and elusive skater with a
s m o o t h , a c c u rat e p a s s i n g
touch. Legs and hands are his
top assets. On the downside, he
is frustratingly weak on faceoffs
(a lowly 38.9 percent win rate
last season), and offers little resistance along the boards or in
the sandpaper areas in the offensive or defensive zones.
He is well aware he has to
improve his grit factor.
“Just competing on pucks,”
he said. “Just battling for pucks,
being hard to play against, I
think that is the main thing I
took away from the season.
Looking back on it, if I was
playing against myself, I’d ask,
‘ Would I find t hat ha rd or
would I find that easy?’ I think
the answer to that is, at times
when I am on my game, skating
and making plays, it would be
hard. At times when I am not
doing that, I think it would be
easy. I need to work on that part
of my game.”
With Spooner signed and
delivered, the Boston payroll is
now just under $65 million,
some $10 million south of the
CBA-imposed cap of $75 million for next season — a bump
of $2 million over 2016-17.
Sweeney still must come to contract terms with No. 1 right
winger David Pastrnak, who
stands to be the GM’s costliest
negotiation of the summer.
About to enter his fourth
season, after a breakout campaign of 34-36—70 last season,
Pastrnak is believed to be seeking a long-term deal of some $6
million per season, ranking him
among veterans Brad Marchand and David Backes on the
payscale. A reasonable bridge
contract, not likely something
Pastrnak would accept, would
be for two years in the $4.5 million to $4.8 million range.
Spooner was expected to
show more offensive pop when
the Bruins in February ditched
long-time coach Claude Julien
and put Bruce Cassidy in
charge. Other than a flash or
two, however, Spooner’s output
remained tepid. A new season
and a fresh start, he thinks,
could make a difference.
“The thing that kind of hurt
me at the end of the year was
my offense kind of took a hit because I wasn’t really attacking
with the puck,” he said. “I think
I wasn’t playing the game I
could. I think at the start of the
year here, a fresh start, we have
a new assistant coach [Kevin
Dean]. It’s a fresh start. I’m ex-
cited for it.”
Kevin Paul Dupont can be
reached at dupont@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@GlobeKPD.
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C6
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
SportsLog
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
Scoreboard
Djokovic to miss rest of
year with elbow injury
Transactions
Baseball
BASEBALL
Boston (AL): Placed P Ben Taylor on
10­day DL, retroactive to July 23. Desig­
nated P Luis Ysla for assignment. Rein­
stated P Blaine Boyer from 10­day DL.
Chicago (AL): Traded P Anthony
Swarzak to Milwaukee for OF Ryan
Cordell. Reinstated P Jake Petricka
from 10­day DL.
Cleveland (AL): Optioned P Tyler Ol­
son to Columbus (IL). Reinstated OF
Austin Jackson from 10­day DL.
Houston (AL): Assigned P Ashur Toll­
iver outright to Fresno (PCL).
Kansas City (AL): Optioned P Jake
Junis to Omaha (PCL).
Minnesota (AL): Sent P Hector Santi­
ago to Rochester (IL) for a rehab as­
signment.
Oakland (AL): Sent P Bobby Wahl to
Nashville (PCL) for a rehab assign­
ment.
Tampa Bay (AL): Placed P Jake
Odorizzi on 10­day DL, retroactive to
July 25. Recalled P Andrew Kittredge
from Durham (IL). Sent P Diego More­
no to Charlotte (FSL) for a rehab as­
signment.
Toronto (AL): Optioned OF Anthony
Alford to New Hampshire (EL). Placed
P Danny Barnes on 10­day DL. As­
signed P Jeff Beliveau outright to Buf­
falo (IL). Recalled P Matt Dermody
from Buffalo.
Arizona (NL): Optioned P J.J. Hoover
to Reno (PCL). Reinstated P Rubby De
La Rosa from 10­day DL.
Miami Marlins : Placed 1B Justin
Bour and SS JT Riddle on 10­day DL;
Riddle retroactive to July 22. Recalled
C Tomas Telis from New Orleans
(PCL). Selected the contract of SS Mike
Aviles from New Orleans.
New York (NL): Sent P Tommy Mi­
lone to the GCL Mets for a rehab as­
signment. Signed P Jonathan Albalade­
jo on a minor league contract.
Philadelphia (NL): Optioned P Ricar­
do Pinto to Lehigh Valley (IL). Recalled
P Jake Thompson from Lehigh Valley.
St. Louis (NL): Recalled P Mike May­
ers from Memphis (PCL).
San Francisco (NL): Traded 3B Edu­
ardo Nunez to Boston for P Gregory
Santos and P Shaun Anderson.
BASKETBALL
LA Lakers (NBA): Re­signed G Tyler
Ennis.
Phoenix (NBA): Signed C­F Alan Wil­
liams to a three­year contract.
FOOTBALL
Buffalo (AFC): Placed S Colt Ander­
son on the PUP list.
Cincinnati (AFC): Placed HB Jarveon
Williams on the PUP list and S Brandon
Wilson on the NFI list.
Green Bay (NFC): Promoted Charles
Walls to area scout. Named Brandian
Ross scouting intern.
Miami (AFC): Placed S Reshad Jones
and OT Avery Young on the NFI list and
WR Rashawn Scott the PUP list. Acti­
vated RB De’Veon Smith and OT Eric
Smith from the PUP list.
Minnesota (NFC): Signed DE Everson
Griffen to a contract extension. Signed
CB Sam Brown. Waived OT Arturo Uz­
davinis.
Tampa Bay (NFC): Placed DE Jac­
quies Smith on the PUP list.
HOCKEY
Arizona (NHL): Signed assistant
coaches John MacLean and Scott Allen
to multi­year contracts.
Colorado (NHL): Signed F Rocco
Grimaldi and D Jesse Graham to one­
year contracts.
New Jersey (NHL): Re­signed Fs
Blake Coleman, Stefan Noesen, Blake
Pietila, Kevin Rooney and Ben Thom­
son.
Vegas (NHL): Named Brian Killings­
worth senior vice president, chief mar­
keting officer.
SOCCER
Colorado (MLS): Signed M Stefan
Aigner to a multi­year contract.
COLLEGE
Butler: Named Will Vergollo men’s
basketball analyst.
College Of Charleston: Named Ma­
likah Willis women’s basketball assis­
tant coach.
South Carolina: Named Jerry Meyers
pitching coach, Stuart Lake assistant
baseball coach, Mark Current baseball
recruiting coordinator, Trip Couch di­
rector of player baseball development
and Tyson Lusk director of baseball
operations.
Tennis star Novak Djokovic announced Wednesday he will sit out the
rest of this season because of an injured right elbow, meaning he will
miss the US Open, which starts Aug. 28, and end his streak of 51 consecutive Grand Slam tournaments. Djokovic has not missed a major since
he entered his first, the 2005 Australian Open. That is the third-longest
active run among men and seventh-longest in history. The 30-year-old
has won 12 Grand Slam titles, including the US Open in 2011 and 2015.
Djokovic said Andre Agassi will be his coach upon his return to the tour
next year. He plans to return with a tuneup tournament ahead of January’s Australian Open. Djokovic’s last match was a July 12 Wimbledon
quarterfinal against Tomas Berdych. At the time, Djokovic said he had
been struggling with the elbow for about 1½ years and so far had opted
against having surgery — which he reiterated he does not need . . . Second-seeded American John Isner beat Vasek Pospisil, 6-3, 6-4, in the
first round of the BB&T Atlanta Open, and will next face Lukas Lacko, a
6-3, 6-1 winner over sixth-seeded American Donald Young.
SWIMMING
Ledecky fails to win sixth world gold medal
American Katie Ledecky's bid to become the second female swimmer
to win six gold medals at a single world championships ended when she
was beaten in the 200-meter freestyle in Budapest, by Italy’s Federica
Pellegrini, the world record-holder who finished in 1 minute, 54.73 seconds. Ledecky, who tied Australia’s Emma McKeon for silver at 1:55.18,
was 12 for 12 over the last three world championships . . . The United
States set two world records while winning the 4 x 100 mixed medley relay. Matt Grevers, Lilly King, Caeleb Dressel, and Simone Manuel
cruised to victory in 3:38.56. That easily eclipsed the mark of 3:40.28 put
up by Ryan Murphy, Kevin Cordes, Kelsi Worrell, and Mallory Comer­
ford in the preliminaries.
GOLF
Lyle hospitalized after latest cancer relapse
Jarrod Lyle is in a hospital with a recurrence of the cancer he has
twice overcome. Golf Australia issued a statement on behalf of the Lyle
family, saying the 35-year-old was in Royal Melbourne Hospital for what
doctors suspect will be a third fight against acute myeloid leukemia.
Lyle’s wife, Briony, confirmed the diagnosis to the Sydney Morning Herald. First diagnosed in 1998, Lyle had a relapse in 2012. He returned to
the US in 2015 to use his medical exemption in an attempt to win back
his PGA Tour card but missed out and returned to Australia in 2016.
MISCELLANY
Wall, Wizards finalize four­year extenstion
Guard John Wall and the Washington Wizards completed a four-year,
$170 million extension, announced team president Ernie Grunfeld. Wall
said in a Twitter video Friday that he agreed to the extension that begins
in 2019-20 and includes a player option for 2023-24 . . . Dallas Keuchel
will rejoin the Houston Astross rotation Friday at Detroit. The lefty has
been out since June 2 with a neck injury . . . A strained right thumb ligament will sideline White Sox All-Star outfielder Avisail Garcia for a couple of weeks . . . Monaco vice president Vadim Vasilyev denied a report
by L’Equipe that the club has a world-record $186 million transfer fee
agreement to sell rising soccer star Kylian Mbappe to Real Madrid.
THU
7/27
Pct. GB
.627 —
.615
1
.573 5½
.510 12
.417 21½
.353 28
South Division
W
L
Durham....................63 39
Gwinnett..................50 52
Norfolk .....................45 58
Charlotte .................44 58
Pct. GB
.618 —
.490 13
.437 18½
.431 19
West Division
W
L
Indianapolis ............57 46
Columbus ................54 48
Toledo ......................44 57
Louisville .................42 61
Y
FRI
SAT
SUN
MON
TUE
WED
KC
7:10
NESN
KC
7:10
NESN
KC
1:35
NESN
CLE
7:08
NESN
CLE
7:10
NESN
CLE
7:08
NESN
7/28
INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE
North Division
W
L
Scranton/W­B.........64 38
Lehigh Valley..........64 40
Rochester ................59 44
Pawtucket ...............52 50
Buffalo .....................43 60
Syracuse..................36 66
Y
7/29
7/30
7/31
8/1
Y
8/2
PHI
7:30
CSN
Home games shaded
For updated scores: bostonglobe.com/sports
On the radio, unless noted: Red Sox, WEEI­FM 93.7; Revolution, WBZ­FM 98.5
Pct. GB
.553 —
.529 2½
.436 12
.408 15
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Buffalo 8....................................Durham 3
Lehigh Valley 8......................Gwinnett 2
Pawtucket 7............................... Toledo 1
Rochester 7.......................Indianapolis 1
Syracuse 4..............................Louisville 2
Columbus at Charlotte.....................7:05
Scranton/W­B at Norfolk.................7:05
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Scranton/W­B at Norfolk...............12:05
Durham at Buffalo.............................1:05
Louisville at Syracuse.......................6:35
Pawtucket at Toledo.........................7:05
Rochester at Indianapolis................7:05
Columbus at Charlotte.....................7:05
Gwinnett at Lehigh Valley...............7:05
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Charlotte 4............................Columbus 1
Durham 3....................................Buffalo 1
Indianapolis 5.......................Rochester 2
Lehigh Valley 5......................Gwinnett 0
Louisville 4..............................Syracuse 3
Louisville 6..............................Syracuse 5
Pawtucket 5............................... Toledo 3
Scranton/W­B 5........Norfolk 3 (10 inn.)
EASTERN LEAGUE
Eastern Division
W
L
Trenton ....................69 33
Binghamton ............56 44
Reading....................54 47
Portland...................47 54
Hartford...................47 55
New Hampshire .....42 61
Pct.
.676
.560
.535
.465
.461
.408
Western Division
W
L
Altoona ....................53 48
Erie ...........................53 48
Bowie .......................54 49
Akron........................50 51
Richmond ................42 59
Harrisburg...............42 60
Pct. GB
.525 —
.525 —
.524 —
.495
3
.416 11
.412 11½
GB
—
12
14½
21½
22
27½
WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS
Altoona 6..................................Reading 2
Binghamton 3..............................Akron 2
Erie 6.............................................Bowie 3
Harrisburg 5.........................Richmond 3
Portland 6.................. New Hampshire 4
Trenton 8.................................Hartford 4
THURSDAY'S GAMES
Erie at Richmond...............................6:35
New Hampshire at Binghamton.....6:35
Portland at Harrisburg.......................... 7
Trenton at Altoona.................................7
Reading at Hartford..........................7:05
Akron at Bowie..................................7:05
TUESDAY'S RESULTS
Akron 1..............................Binghamton 0
Altoona 2..................................Reading 1
Binghamton 6..............................Akron 0
Erie 4.............................................Bowie 3
New Hampshire 11..............Portland 10
Richmond 6.........................Harrisburg 0
Trenton 7.................................Hartford 1
Trenton 4.................................Hartford 0
CAPE COD LEAGUE
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Bourne 5....................................Orleans 3
Chatham 7..............................Brewster 4
Cotuit 4..................................Wareham 0
Falmouth 7...............................Hyannis 6
Harwich 6................Yarmouth­Dennis 5
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Cotuit at Hyannis....................................6
Bourne at Harwich............................6:30
Brewster at Wareham......................6:30
Falmouth at Chatham............................7
Yarmouth­Dennis at Orleans................7
ON THE AIR
BASEBALL
Noon
7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Washington
Tampa Bay at NY Yankees
Legion Baseball
MLB
MLB
MASS STATE TOURNAMENT
PRO FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
CFL: Montreal at Winnipeg
ESPN2
GOLF
7 a.m.
9:30 a.m.
3 p.m.
4 p.m.
5 a.m. (Fri.)
Golf
Golf
Golf
FS1
Golf
Senior British Open
LPGA: Ladies Scottish Open
PGA: RBC Canadian Open
US Girls’ Junior Championship
European: Porsche European Open
Fino Field, Milford
Wednesday’s Results
Senior
Shrewsbury 12.........................Ashland 1
Junior
Pittsfield 4...............................Methuen 9
Tuesday’s Results
Senior
Milford 9..........................Northampton 4
Shrewsbury 2...........................Newton 0
Junior
Pittsfield 5...........................Barnstable 3
Franklin 3............................... Acushnet 2
HORSE RACING
4 p.m.
Saratoga Live
FS2
SOCCER
10 p.m.
ESPN
Little League
NBCSN
MASS STATE TOURNAMENT
Women: US vs. Australia
SWIMMING
11:30 a.m.
FINA World Aquatics Championships
At Benevento Park, North Reading
Thursday’s Games
Holden vs. Milton National..............3:30
Melrose vs. Gloucester.....................7:30
Friday’s Games
Milton National vs. Melrose................. 4
Holden vs. Gloucester............................7
Saturday’s Games
Holden vs. Melrose..........................noon
Milton National vs. Gloucester.............3
Sunday’s Games
Championship Game..............................1
Soccer
CONCACAF GOLD CUP
MLS
CHAMPIONSHIP
Wednesday, July 26
At Santa Clara, Calif.
United States vs. Jamaica................9:30
SEMIFINALS
Sunday, July 23
At Pasadena, Calif.
Jamaica 1...................................Mexico 0
Saturday, July 22
At Arlington, Texas
United States 2...................Costa Rica 0
NWSL
Chicago.................. 8
North Carolina ...... 9
Portland ................. 7
Seattle.................... 6
Sky Blue FC ........... 7
Houston.................. 6
Orlando .................. 5
BOSTON ................. 3
Kansas City ........... 3
Washington........... 3
3
5
4
3
7
7
6
7
7
8
4
0
4
6
2
2
4
5
4
3
28
27
25
24
23
20
19
14
13
12
20
20
19
30
28
16
24
10
14
17
14
13
13
22
28
23
23
16
22
24
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts.
Toronto FC...........11 3 7 40
Chicago................11 4 5 38
NYC FC .................11 6 4 37
Atl. United FC......10 7 3 33
New York.............10 8 2 32
Columbus.............10 10 1 31
Orlando City.......... 8 8 5 29
Montreal ................ 6 7 6 24
Philadelphia .......... 6 9 5 23
NEW ENGLAND ..... 6 9 5 23
D.C. United ............ 5 13 3 18
GF
37
38
40
40
28
31
22
30
26
33
18
GA
22
21
27
27
26
32
30
32
24
34
38
WESTERN CONFERENCE
FC Dallas................ 9 3 7 34
Kansas City ........... 8 4 9 33
Houston.................. 9 7 5 32
Seattle.................... 8 7 6 30
Portland ................. 8 8 6 30
Vancouver ............. 8 8 3 27
San Jose................. 7 9 5 26
Real Salt Lake....... 7 12 3 24
Los Angeles........... 6 10 4 22
Colorado ................ 6 11 2 20
Minn. United ......... 5 12 4 19
32
25
37
32
37
26
23
28
31
20
25
19
15
30
31
36
29
34
42
37
28
45
NOTE: Three points for victory, one
point for tie.
WEDNESDAY’S RESULT
Philadelphia 3.......................Columbus 0
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Orlando City at Atlanta United FC.4:30
Montreal at New York......................7:30
Philadelphia at NEW ENGLAND......7:30
Chicago at Sporting Kansas City.........8
Colorado at San Jose.............................8
Columbus at Real Salt Lake................. 8
D.C. United at Minnesota United.........8
Portland at Houston...............................8
Vancouver at FC Dallas.........................8
Seattle at Los Angeles.........................10
SUNDAY’S RESULT
Portland 2............................Vancouver 1
NOTE: Three points for victory, one
point for tie.
NO GAMES WEDNESDAY
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Kansas City at Boston...........................7
Washington at Sky Blue FC..................7
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Houston at Portland..........................3:30
Seattle at North Carolina.................7:30
Chicago at Orlando...........................7:30
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
Chicago 2..................................Orlando 1
Houston 1................................ BOSTON 0
North Carolina at K.C.......................ppd.
Portland 2..........................Washington 1
Seattle 5.............................Sky Blue FC 4
WNBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W
L Pct.
Connecticut.............13
9 .591
Washington.............13
9 .591
New York.................10 10 .500
Atlanta .....................10 11 .476
Chicago......................8 14 .364
Indiana.......................8 14 .364
GB
—
—
2
2½
5
5
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Minnesota ...............17
2 .895 —
Los Angeles ............15
6 .714
3
Phoenix....................11 10 .524
7
Dallas .......................11 12 .478
8
Seattle........................9 12 .429
9
San Antonio ..............3 19 .136 15½
NO GAMES WEDNESDAY
NO GAMES THURSDAY
FRIDAY’S GAMES
New York at Indiana..............................7
Connecticut at Washington..................7
Minnesota at Atlanta........................7:30
Los Angeles at San Antonio.................8
Phoenix at Chicago...........................8:30
Dallas at Seattle....................................10
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Atlanta 99......................Phoenix 91 (OT)
Connecticut 93...................... Chicago 72
Dallas 84.................................. Indiana 82
Los Angeles 68........................Seattle 60
Minnesota 76......................New York 75
Washington 85...............San Antonio 76
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ThursdayScene
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E T H U R S DAY, J U LY 2 7, 2 017 | BO ST ONG L OB E .C O M / L I F E S T Y L E
PHOTOS BY SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
At the MFA, a difficult homecoming
H
ounded by memories of
ghetto life, Arie Kasiarz
hadn’t been able to sleep.
He rarely talked about
his hardships during the
war, once fainting at the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.
The Philadelphian preferred to focus on the
living, so rising from his hotel bed he bathed
before dawn, dressed carefully in a crisp
brown blazer, and was standing at the ready
when his son came to collect him.
Now, as rain poured outside the Museum
of Fine Arts, Kasiarz, 90, clutched some of
those memories in a white plastic bag: a pair
of tattered photographs from his life during
World War II. He’d traveled here to brave
“Memory Unearthed,” an exhibition of Henryk Ross’s photographs from Poland’s Lodz
Ghetto, where Kasiarz, a Jew, had lived during the German occupation.
“I get sick if the memory comes back to
me,” said Kasiarz, who entered the ghetto
with his parents and two sisters when he was
12. “I can forget what I ate yesterday, but I
can’t forget what I got through in the ghetto.”
Those memories include being chased
from his family’s well-appointed home in
central Lodz to a one-room apartment in the
A Lodz Ghetto survivor journeys to Boston
to confront his past in ‘Memory Unearthed’
B Y M AL C O LM G AY | G L O B E S TA F F
Arie Kasiarz (above, and top with curator Kristen Gresh) views Henryk Ross’s
photographs of Poland’s Lodz Ghetto, where Kasiarz lived during World War II.
Comedy — and couples therapy
By Jon Mael
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
In the ever-evolving business of
making people laugh, the topic of romance and relationships has withstood the test of time — almost every
comedian who has ever picked up a
microphone has commented on love
at some point. So when two stand-up
comics who happen to be married to
each other perform on the same
stage, what else could they possibly
talk about?
Moshe Kasher and Natasha Leggero became a comedy power couple
when they married Oct. 11, 2015.
Their “Honeymoon Tour,” which features a stand-up set from each and a
joint encore where they bring couples onstage and offer them relationship counseling, includes a stop at
the Wilbur Theatre Saturday.
“It’s the job of the stand-up comedian to look through the human experience and find the absurd,” says
Kasher, “And there’s nothing more
absurd than two animals who have
biological needs but feel the extra
need for things like love. And we all
do stupid things to satisfy our heart’s
[desires].”
Kasher knows the feeling well. He
eyed Leggero from afar while they
ghetto where they were sealed off from the
rest of the city with barbed wire fence. The
Germans forbade them from taking money
or even clothes. Neighbors disappeared.
Death was common and hunger was constant. His mother used grass to make soup.
Kasiarz once stole a potato from the depot
where he worked, cutting it into slices that
he hid under his pants.
“I was a crook,” he said. “If they’d checked
us I’d have gone to jail, but people took a
chance.”
To illustrate the point, Kasiarz reached into his plastic bag to present the worn remains of his internment at Lodz: A jagged photograph, its top torn in a dramatic
“V,” that shows a teenage Kasiarz kneeling
with his fellow workers behind a mound of
potatoes. In another group portrait — a near
compositional twin to one in the exhibition
— Kasiarz stands with other workers by a
horse.
“I don’t know how I still have them,” he
said. “I have nothing else.”
Could his images have been taken by
Ross?
“It’s certainly possible,” said MFA curator
of photographs Kristen Gresh, who orgaKASIARZ, Page G6
Passion Pit forging a new
relationship with listeners
By Isaac Feldberg
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
It’s been an eventful week for Passion Pit’s Michael Angelakos. Friday
will see the official release of the Cambridge artist’s fourth record, “Tremendous Sea of Love,” a by turns euphoric
and elegiac collection for which Angelakos, 30, stepped outside his label —
and away from traditional collaborators — with the principal goal of connecting directly with listeners.
To wit, though the album is being
released digitally and on streaming
platforms this week, Angelakos initially made the new music available
were doing comedy together in Los
Angeles. When he finally worked up
the courage to ask her out, they went
for a drive that culminated with Leggero fishing around the floor of
Kasher’s car looking for a lit cigarette
and coming across some “rather
large” lingerie. “I told her I don’t
know whose those are, what those
are, what kind of fabric that is, what
fabric is, what the Industrial Revolution that led to large-scale garment
manufacturing was, or the concept
of undergarments in the first place,”
Kasher says. Despite the incident
COUPLE, Page G5
PASSION PIT, Page G4
Inside
PITCH PERFECT PR
Married comedians
Natasha Leggero and
Moshe Kasher.
months ago, sending it directly to Twitter followers in exchange for retweets
in support of the #weneedscience campaign. All royalties from the release,
he’s announced, will be donated to the
Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research
at Broad Institute.
Unorthodox though it may be, the
rollout — based on comments Angelakos made during a wide-ranging, indepth interview with the Globe on
Monday — may be Passion Pit’s new
normal.
A fierce critic of the profits-overpeople mentality he sees rife through-
THEATER
MUSIC
BRINGING ALBEE
FULL CIRCLE
A MARRIAGE MADE
FOR AN ARENA
G3
G5
‘At Home at the Zoo’ enlarges
the unsettling tale begun in
‘The Zoo Story’
Adam Lambert adds his
flamboyant style to Queen’s
music in TD Garden show
T h e
G2
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
Insider
THING TANK
A REVIEW OF THE WEEK IN THINGS
FROM THE BAR
ENJOY THE SILENCE
Oh Jared Kushner, we’ve been
waiting for you to talk at or
near us for so long, and then, finally, you did (I didn’t really
catch the gist of it) and now we
understand why that doesn’t
happen very often. Wow. If
nothing else, Kushner united
the country, momentarily, in
frantically searching for the little speaker icon on their video
players. I mean it even looked
like it sounded annoying. In
any case, if any of you need
the crack in your iPhones fixed
after that, I know a guy.
A refreshing
summer smash
LIZA WEISSTUCH
SQUASH MATCH
We’ve all been there: Walking
into a grocery store, mistaking
cubed butternut squash for
cubed cheddar cheese, leaving
only to discover your error in
front of a party full of guests,
racing back to the store to demand a refund as well as reparations paid in cheese, having
the whole humiliating campaign for consumer justice documented by a nosy stranger on
Twitter and . . . wait, I’m receiving an update. OK, my error:
We haven’t all been there. Just
this one guy. Wow, I actually
feel a lot better.
CHARTREUSE SMASH
Makes 1 drink
2 ounces Green Chartreuse
¾ ounce fresh lime juice
¼ ounce simple syrup (to make syrup:
In a small saucepan over low heat,
heat equal parts sugar and water just
until sugar dissolves)
6 mint sprigs
LIZA WEISSTUCH FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
JANKY DOODLES
Microsoft drew fire (really just
a bunch of red and yellow zigzags) when reports circulated
this week of the potential discontinuation of MS Paint. “But
how will our memes impart a
sense of ironic childlike technological brutalism?” asked Internet trolls, quietly, to themselves, and in not so many
words. “Not to worry,” responded Microsoft, sort of:
“MS Paint is here to stay, it will
just have a new home soon, in
the Windows Store where it
will be available for free.” Only
difference is that now it’s
known as Paint 3D, “the new
app for creativity” and/or drawing genitals on things.
RHETORICAL QUESTIONS
Elsewhere in poorly rendered
representations, President
Trump addressed the Boy
Scouts of America at the organization’s annual jamboree, delivering a speech in which he
marveled aloud at the crowd
size, derided the press, criticized President Obama, called
Washington a cesspool, recounted his election victory,
thanked the children assembled for voting for him, made
false claims about job reports,
called for loyalty, and wished
everyone a Merry Christmas.
In related news, the Boy Scouts
announced plans to change
its official motto from “Be Prepared” to “You Know? Screw It.
Let’s Just See Where This Goes.
Whatever.”
MICHAEL ANDOR BRODEUR
To call a drink a smash is like
calling a dessert a cake, which is
to say there are countless varia­
tions. As a category, a smash is a
cocktail at its most basic: spirit,
sweetener, some kind of fruit,
and an herb. In theory, it’s a way
to ease into a spirit that lies out­
side your comfort zone, so bour­
bon avoiders would be well
served with a whisky smash. At
Viale, Central Square’s casual yet
classy Mediterranean­minded
neighborhood joint, the smash
has a curiously Gallic slant: Co­
owner Mark Young’s version is
made with Green Chartreuse,
that prodigiously, pungently
herbal — a polarizing quality,
for sure — centuries­old liqueur.
But the sweet simple syrup and
tangy lime subdue the hyperac­
tive herbal notes, making this
not only an easy­drinking sip­
per, but a refreshing summertime
smash.
BOTTLES
Beer with a lobster
background note? Yes, really.
By Gary Dzen
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Tim Adams was eating lobster rolls at Portland’s Eventide restaurant one night a few
years ago when an Italian brewer who was in
town for a collaboration had a suggestion.
“We had this concept going that we’re going
to do this salted, funkytart saison,” says Adams, head brewer at Oxbow Brewing Co. “And
Giovanni [Campari,
brewmaster at Birrificio
del Ducato] turns to us
and says, ‘Oh, man,
we’ve gotta put some
lobsters in this beer.’ ”
For promotion’s sake
alone, it seems inevitable a Maine brewer
would eventually make
a lobster beer. But Adams is not a kitschy
brewer, and Oxbow’s
beers — as nuanced and
refined as any in New
England — aren’t gimmicks. So while Adams
wanted to appease his
Italian guest’s ingredient request, he wanted
to do it right.
“We get pretty wild
at Oxbow when it
comes to fermentation
and aging and barrels,”
says Adams. “But we
don’t even spice our
beers at all. So the idea
of doing something so wild and unconventional, we were taken aback a little bit.”
The Oxbow team decided to go ahead with
the mixed fermentation gose — a take on a German beer brewed with salt and coriander —
and add a lobster twist.
“I think as long as we were light-handed
with the lobster it could add a fun, seaside, sort
of maritime funk to the beer,” says Adams.
On brew day, the team mashed in the grain
— the start of the brewing process — then
drove 10 minutes to a lobster pound, where
they picked up a dozen lobsters, snipped off the
rubber bands, and added them — alive and secured in a mesh bag — to the boiling kettle.
“Twelve minutes and they were red,” says
Adams, “We sat down
and feasted . . . it’s the
tastiest lobster meat
you’ve ever had.”
The brewers used
the shells during other
parts of the brewing
process, absorbing every bit of flavor they
could through two fermentations. Oxbow has
brewed Saison Dell’Aragosta the same way for
each of the last three
years.
Saison Dell’Aragosta
shows some serious effervescence in the glass,
with hundreds of tiny
bubbles racing to form
a sea-foamy head. Adams uses words like
“floral,” “fruity,” “citrusy” to describe how
the beer smells. It tastes
salty and tart — like
squirting a lemon onto
your oysters — albeit
with less briny character. At 4.5 percent ABV,
it’s unequivocally refreshing.
“There’s a little bit of sweetness from the
lobster that provides a nice balance,” says Adams. “But when you pour yourself a glass of
this beer, you’d never say, ‘Oh my God this
takes like lobster.’ It is really more of a background note, which is probably a good thing.”
Gary Dzen can be reached at
gary.dzen@globe.com.
1. Pour Chartreuse, lime juice, and simple syrup over ice in a cocktail shaker.
Add torn leaves from four mint sprigs.
Shake vigorously 30 to 45 seconds.
2. Strain into a rocks glass filled with
crushed ice. Garnish with 2 mint sprigs.
Adapted from Viale
LAUGH LINES
AHMED BHAROOCHA
‘If you tell anyone that owns a
cat you’re afraid of cats they all
have the same reaction — they
all want to give you the cat.
Wanna put the cat on top of
you. “Oh, not my cat! My cat’s
different, he’s like a dog! Pet
him!” That’s not how you treat
a phobia. If you come over to
my house, you tell me your
claustrophobic, I won’t try to
shove you in a closet.’
— Bharoocha performs Thursday at
Thunderfest at Wonder Bar
NICK A. ZAINO III
COMEDY CENTRAL
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
G3
Albee’s ‘At Home at the Zoo’ brings his story full circle
By Don Aucoin
S TA G E R E V I E W
GLOBE STAFF
STOCKBRIDGE — In the first half
of “Edward Albee’s At Home at the
Zoo,’’ Ann, the restless wife of mildmannered Peter, openly yearns for “a
little disorder around here, a little chaos . . . a little madness.’’ She believes Peter, a publishing executive, should explore his “animal’’ side.
Disorder, chaos, and madness enter
Peter’s life in the play’s second half
when he is yanked into a scattershot
conversation with an aggressively intrusive outcast named Jerry while sitting on his favorite Central Park bench.
Oh, and that animal side? It gets fully
explored.
Be careful what you wish for.
Berkshire Theatre Group’s taut and
absorbing production of “At Home at
the Zoo’’ directed by Eric Hill, furnishes a reminder (not that one should be
needed) that the illustrious legacy of
Albee, who died last year, does not rest
solely on his masterwork, “ Who’s
Afraid of Virginia Woolf?’’
A kind of late-in-life experiment by
the playwright, “At Home at the Zoo’’
exemplifies the creative daring and
ruthless honesty that characterized Albee’s career from beginning to end.
The play’s very existence stems from
Albee’s determination to finish what
he considered an unfinished work,
nearly half a century after he introduced it to the world.
The story behind the story begins in
1959, when “The Zoo Story’’ premiered in Berlin, followed by an offBroadway run in 1960. “The Zoo Story’’ contained just two characters, Peter and Jerry, and revolved entirely
around their fateful encounter on that
park bench. It was the play that established Albee as a rising star of the
American theater.
But Albee was dissatisfied with
“The Zoo Story.’’ He felt that it was, as
he told Globe writer Christopher Wallenberg in 2011, “a play with one-anda-half characters,’’ that Peter was “a
backboard . . . not fully developed.’’ So
Albee wrote a new one-act prequel titled “Homelife,’’ focusing on the relationship between Peter and Ann, and
paired it with “The Zoo Story’’ to make
a new play that premiered in 2004 at
Hartford Stage (then called “Peter and
Jerry,’’ later retitled “At Home at the
Zoo’’).
EDWARD ALBEE’S
AT HOME AT THE ZOO
Play by Edward Albee. Directed by
Eric Hill. Presented by Berkshire
Theatre Group. At Unicorn Theatre,
Stockbridge, through Aug. 26.
Tickets $52, 413­997­4444,
www.berkshiretheatregroup.org
EMMA K. ROTHENBERG-WARE
Joey Collins (left) and
David Adkins as Jerry and
Peter in “Edward Albee’s At
Home at the Zoo.’’
While engrossed in Berkshire Theatre Group’s “At Home at the Zoo’’ —
which features finely etched performances by David Adkins as Peter, Tara
Franklin as Ann, and Joey Collins as
Jerry — one is struck by the rightness
of Albee’s decision.
Though the original “Zoo Story’’
was, and remains, a powerfully unsettling work, its depiction of Peter as a
plodding bourgeois does indeed shortchange the character, registering as an
insufficiently imaginative portrait by a
young writer instinctively inclined to
sympathize with a social rebel like Jerry. (Albee was not yet 30 when he
wrote “The Zoo Story.’’) The playwright
was wise to fill out that one-dimensional picture, and director Hill was
wise to cast an actor as capable of subtle shifts from key to key as Adkins is.
Because the Peter we see now in
the first act of “At Home at the Zoo’’
has had his humanity restored, the Peter we see in Act 2 does not come
across as merely the acted-upon object
of Jerry’s aggression, verbal and otherwise. Speaking in a formal, slightly
slowed-down cadence, Collins is so
persuasively creepy as Jerry that it’s
not quite credible that Peter would remain engaged with him, even going so
far as to tell Jerry where he lives. Jerry
probes into Peter’s life, drops unsettling details about his own, spews disgust about his obese landlady, and
launches into a long monologue about
his landlady’s dog that brings us deep
inside Jerry’s psyche, and his overpowering need for connection.
Peter is a sympathetic listener. A
decent, well-meaning man, he is raising two daughters with Ann in a handsome Upper East Side apartment. But
Peter is often a beat behind, baffled by
a physical change he’s going through
and confused, in Act 1, by the way Ann
is suddenly chafing at the security of
their marriage. As so often with Albee,
existential dread is ticking away beneath their comfortable life. Ann is
battling a sense of meaninglessness,
which Franklin conveys with exquisite
restraint.
The first words Ann speaks to Peter
are: “We should talk.’’ Immersed in a
book, he doesn’t hear her. In Act 2, the
first words Jerry speaks to Peter are:
“I’ve been to the zoo.’’ Peter doesn’t
hear him, either, being once again absorbed in a book, and Jerry is forced to
repeat it twice more. The suggestion
that communication is an intricate
and tangled business whether it’s with
the people we’re closest to or with
strangers is one of several ways that Albee — who was always careful about
structure — artfully connected the two
halves of “At Home at the Zoo.’’
You sense that Peter believes there
is value in leaving some things unsaid,
but Ann is intent on saying the unsayable. “It’s not pain I want, or loss; it’s
what I can’t imagine — but I imagine
imagining,’’ she tells Peter, shortly before he heads out for an encounter in
the park that will exceed the wildest
imagining of either of them. We
should be grateful that Albee was willing to reimagine his early work, because in crafting a new beginning, he
brought “The Zoo Story’’ to an even
more resonant end.
Don Aucoin can be reached at
aucoin@globe.com.
“Taking Steps”
features a set
dominated by a
large staircase
suspended at
an angle over
the stage.
DANIEL RADER
‘Taking Steps’ — and a few stumbles — at Barrington Stage
By Don Aucoin
GLOBE STAFF
PITTSFIELD — The line between
hit and miss is awfully thin in farce,
perhaps more so than in any other
genre.
Even a supremely accomplished
farceur like Alan Ayckbourn is bound
to whiff from time to time, and that’s
what too often happens in Ayckbourn’s “Taking Steps,’’ now at Barrington Stage Company under the direction of Sam Buntrock.
T his is not to say there aren’ t
laughs in “Taking Steps,’’ which premiered in England nearly four decades
ago and had a relatively brief run on
Broadway in 1991. There are, especially when the spotlight is trained on rubber-faced Carson Elrod, playing Tristram, a nebbishy solicitor who’s in way
over his head, or Claire Brownell, as
Elizabeth, a onetime dancer turned
discontented, about-to-flee wife.
But the plot machinery of “Taking
Steps’’ is more creaky and conspicuous, and the comedy is more labored,
than is usually the case with the old
master. The prolific Ayckbourn has
written more than one play (82, according to his website) for every year
he’s been on the planet (78); his works
include “The Norman Conquests,’’ “Absurd Person Singular,’’ and “Bedroom
Farce,’’ presented last fall at Boston’s
Huntington Theatre Company.
As with many Ayckbourn comedies, “Taking Steps’’ is built on fractious relationships in which the bloom
is decidedly off the rose of romance.
But his justly celebrated gift for razorsharp observation of manners and
morals is only occasionally in evidence, and “Taking Steps’’ seldom
strikes to the depths of dark truth that
Ayckbourn plumbs in his best work.
The play takes place over the course
of a Friday night and Saturday morning in 1979, within a three-story Victorian manor in Britain. Indeed, the single most memorable thing about Barrington Stage’s production may be its
marvelous set. Designed by Jason
Sherwood, it is dominated by the sur-
S TA G E R E V I E W
TAKING STEPS
Play by Alan Ayckbourn. Directed by
Sam Buntrock. Presented by
Barrington Stage Company.
At Boyd­Quinson Mainstage,
Pittsfield, through Aug. 5.
Tickets $15­$62, 413­236­8888,
www.barringtonstageco.org
real sight of a large staircase suspended at an angle over the stage, like a
runaway remnant of an Escher print.
The actors stay on one level; they trot
to signify that their characters are
climbing or descending stairs.
What sets the plot in motion is Elizabeth’s decision to end her 3½-monthlong marriage to the wealthy Roland
(a bluffly amusing Richard Hollis) by
writing him a farewell letter. That letter, and especially the words “by the
time you read this, I will be gone,’’ will
subsequently feed a skein of misunder-
standings and mishaps.
Another prominent factor in the
ensuing mixups that will convulse the
household is an alleged ghost. Roland
is preparing to buy the house from a
motorcycle-helmet-wearing builder
named Leslie (Matthew Greer) who is
very eager to unload it. Formerly a
high-toned brothel, the manor is reputedly haunted by a prostitute slain
many years earlier on the premises.
Lore has it that the ghost will sometimes slip into bed with residents, who
are then found dead the next morning.
Roland scoffs at the story, but a nervous Tristram thinks he hears her
moving around upstairs.
A none-too-engrossing subplot of
“Taking Steps’’ involves Elizabeth’s
brother, Mark (Luke Smith), who is
desperately trying to reunite with his
fiancee, Kitty (Helen Cespedes). Kitty,
however, is equally desperate to avoid
him, because Mark is so boring he literally puts people to sleep.
Even subpar Ayckbourn has its undeniable pleasures, and it should be
noted that after a somewhat laborious
Act 1 the mirth quotient of “Taking
Steps’’ rises in Act 2 as the Barrington
Stage production finds its rhythm.
Brownell is deliciously funny throughout as the vain, superficial Elizabeth,
flexing her feet or extending a splayed
hand as she reminds anyone within
earshot that she was a dancer, and
sometimes launching herself into jetees across the stage to prove it.
But it is Elrod, a cast member in the
original 2012 Broadway production of
“Peter and the Starcatcher,’’ whose
portrayal of the inept, yet strangely
lucky, Tristram provides many of the
high points in “Taking Steps.’ Elrod’s
facial expressions and body language
are priceless as the bewildered, bumbling solicitor struggles to understand
an increasingly confusing situation,
which may or may not eventually include a carnal visit from that fabled
ghost.
Don Aucoin can be reached at
aucoin@globe.com.
T h e
G4
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
Decades after her
photograph with
Graham Nash, a fan
gives it another shot
Carolyn
Armistead
interviewing
Graham Nash for
her college
newspaper in
1980 (left) and recreating the photo
last week (below).
By Carolyn Armistead
T
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
he black-and-white photograph of Graham Nash
and me chatting in a college corridor on April 29,
1980, has been a treasured artifact of mine for nearly four
decades. Nash was 37 and in the midst
of a solo tour following the “No-Nukes”
benefit concert. I was 21, a college senior writing about Nash for the campus newspaper at Allegheny College in
Meadville, Pa. In the photo, I was
clutching a reporter’s pad so my hands
wouldn’t tremble, poised to scribble
down every word Nash — who’d contributed a wealth of music to the
soundtrack of my young life — had to
say in response to my interview questions. He was wearing a jeans jacket. I
was in a red-and-white checked shirt. I
still remember that shirt.
After recently tracking down the article, I was reminded that for the entire 1980 concert Nash had a goldfish
named “Joey” swimming around in a
bowl on the stage. “He’s our own personal nuke tester,” Nash told us. “If he
goes belly-up during this concert, we
should all split real fast.”
Fast-forward 37 years, and at 75
Nash is handsome as ever, his thick
hair now snowy white. As for me, age
60 is clearly on the horizon. The good
news is that we both survived the ’80s.
The even better news is that last Friday
I met Graham Nash for the second
time, clutching a reporter’s pad so my
hands wouldn’t tremble and wearing a
brand new red-checked shirt.
Nash, on tour to promote his 2016
album, “This Path Tonight,” was performing as part of the Lowell Summer
Music Series in Boarding House Park.
That I would attend the concert was a
given. Could I also finagle a way to get
the 1980 photo signed by Nash? It was
worth a shot.
After a flurry of e-mails and public
Facebook pleas, success. A friend of a
friend who works on Nash’s tour
would grant my request. And then, a
new idea: How cool would it be if Nash
would agree to re-create the picture
with me? When the answer was yes, I
immediately ordered a new redchecked shirt online, with expedited
shipping. And since my college cub reporter days had led to a professional
writing career, why not write another
article?
Trying to keep my fan-girl ecstasy
in check, I scheduled a phone inter-
view with Nash at noon on Friday. At
the concert’s intermission, I would go
backstage to meet him. And this
wasn’t even the best part of my day.
That was the music.
There’s a reason Nash’s music remains the soundtrack of my not-soyoung life, and millions of others’. The
man transcends time and space, spinning magic in music and story. Accompanied on vocals and guitar by Shane
Fontayne (who has played with Sting
and Bruce Springsteen) Nash treated
us to favorites like “Our House,” “Just a
Song Before I Go,” and “Marrakesh Express,” along with new tunes like the
beautiful “Golden Days” from “This
Path Tonight.”
Nash expressed his activist’s soul
during “Military Madness,” from 1971,
when he altered the lyrics: “And after
the wars are over/ And the body count
is finally filed/ I hope that Trump discovers what’s driving us wild.”
The good news is that we both survived the ’80s.
The even better news is that last Friday I met
Graham Nash for the second time, clutching a
reporter’s pad so my hands wouldn’t tremble
and wearing a brand new red­checked shirt.
During our phone chat Friday afternoon, we talked a bit about the elephant in the White House — er, I mean
room. What is Nash’s take on the current political climate? He didn’t mince
words.
President Trump “has undone 50
years of incredibly hard work,” said
Nash, who became a US citizen in
1978. “We deserve better. We cannot
normalize this. This is not normal.”
The headline for the article I wrote
in 1980, I reminded him, was “Nash
Gives Hope for the ’80s.” Could he offer
some hope for the 2020s?
“I can,” he said without hesitation.
“I can, because of physics. The pendulum will swing back. It may take four
years, it may take eight, but it will
swing back, because that’s what pendulums do.”
Then Nash said something unexpected: “[White House press secretary] Sean Spicer just resigned. I’m
watching CNN.”
There was something eerily poetic
Merging music, advocacy
uPASSION PIT
Continued from Page G1
out the music industry, Angelakos —
f o u n d e r o f t h e Ne w Yo r k - b a s e d
Wishart Group, which emphasizes
mental wellness in providing legal, educational, and health care services to
artists — says he’s committing fulltime to his organization in hopes of reforming artist protections and breaking stigma around mental illness. For
Angelakos, who’s been open about living with bipolar disorder and depression, as well as how his mental illnesses inform his artistry (“My music is audible bipolar,” he says by phone), few
initiatives could be as important.
What does that mean for Passion
Pit? Angelakos doesn’t see unshackling
himself from industry expectations as
an end so much as an evolution. “I
don’t think I’m done making music,”
he says. “I just want people to see I’m
not the point, that I’m just an example.
If I’m inspiring to anybody, that’s
great, but I want to see tangible evidence of what that means — to put my
money where my mouth is.”
Q. “Tremendous Sea of Love” signifies
a shift in Passion Pit’s approach to releasing music. How did it come about?
A. The way the record came together
was that I had a lot of songs lying
around. I only have three full-length
records in 10 years; [“Tremendous Sea
of Love”] is not a technical record to
my label [Columbia], and they were
very kind as to let me have the royalties from it. I had sent versions of one
or two of these songs to the label, because I just wanted to see what they
wanted. That was my life, trying to
make people happy. When I made
[2008 EP] “Chunk of Change,” I made
Q. What drove the decision to undertake this kind of project now?
A. I’m in no position to just sit here and
Carolyn Armistead is the author of the
young adult novel “Being Henry
David.” She can be reached at
cal.armistead@yahoo.com.
r e l ea s e a n o t h e r r e c o r d . It ’s n o t
enough. None of this is enough — the
way we’re talking about mental illness
especially isn’t enough. What does
someone like me do in this position? I
go and try new things. I’ve been really
successful with music while seemingly
completely a failure in every other aspect of my life, I’ve dealt with some
crazy circumstances, but at the end of
the day I’m just a person who has a lot
in common with other people. I hated
it when I was tricked into thinking I
was so different, and I hated the reason for that more than anything else. I
had to unlearn that by doing something completely illogical: giving music away for free, for no reason other
than that I want to know who you are.
it for my friends, to have a dance party.
I knew my audience, and that’s how I
wrote “Sleepyhead.” I would let them
come into my room and dance as I
showed them parts of the song, as I
was building it. But recently, I realized
I had no idea who my audience was.
And if you look at the way everything
is structured with labels, working at a
glacial step with such an extraordinarily archaic mode of controlling every
step, it suddenly occurred to me, 10
years into my career, if I don’t know
who my audience is, that’s probably
why. It seemed like [the label] didn’t
really need me, and I didn’t really need
them.
Q. It feels like this release, then, was
about circumventing the official channels to rediscover those people to
whom Passion Pit matters most.
A. I didn’t know who was going to respond to it, but I just wanted to give
them something. Despite what anyone
said, it was probably the best way to
deal with my mood swings, and by far
the most successful manic episode I’ve
ever had. It was my way of saying, “If
people aren’t going to ask me how I’m
doing, I’m going to ask them how
they’re doing in a way that makes
sense to them.” I’m just going to release music and see what they say. And
they inspected the mixes — people
would say they liked this part of it or
leave comments, and I’d read them
and agree. And we updated [the demos] several times, as a way of saying
that it’s such a gift to be in this position.
about receiving this news from Graham Nash the moment it was made
public. Did the pendulum just twitch
itself in a new direction? A little bit?
Only time will tell.
At intermission that night, my new
red-checked shirt and I were escorted
backstage to reunite with Nash. He
signed the original photo with a black
Sharpie, then decided the black trailer
behind his tour bus was the best background for our new photo. We laughed
as we mimicked our poses while my
husband snapped pictures.
“I hope you didn’t spend too much
on that new red-checked shirt,” Nash
called out to me before returning to his
tour bus.
I did. It was worth it.
STEVE C.MITCHELL/EPA
‘If I’m inspiring to anybody, that’s
great, but I want to see tangible
evidence of what that means — to put
my money where my mouth is.’
MICHAEL ANGELAKOS, Passion Pit frontman
Q. In March, you passed the band’s
Twitter account off to neuroscientist
Michael F. Wells, who discussed mental health issues under the hashtag
#weneedscience. And now, through
the Wishart Group, you’re continuing
to prioritize that outreach. What has it
been like to merge your music and advocacy so directly?
A. I cannot believe the fact that someone donating proceeds from one show
is considered enough. That is a lot,
and it’s great when an artist does that,
but this is so much easier than that, actually. It’s so much simpler. It’s scary
to think about your fanbase and
who will react to what, but it’s kind of
like having friends around you for certain reasons who stop hanging out
with you when you’re yourself. They
weren’t very good friends, were they?
You only really need fans who you matter to.
Interview was edited and condensed.
Isaac Feldberg can be reached at
isaac.feldberg@globe.com, or on
Twitter at @i_feldberg.
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
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NICHOLAS PFOSI FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Guitarist Brian May, drummer Roger Taylor, and Adam Lambert at TD Garden Sunday.
Adam Lambert and Queen
a marriage made for an arena
By Maura Johnston
MUSIC REVIEW
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Since the ’90s, guitarist Brian May and drummer Roger
Tay l o r h av e p e r f o r m e d a s
“Queen +” with a number of
singers — famed tenor Luciano
Pavarotti, original Fugee Wyclef
Jean, former Bad Company
frontman Paul Rodgers — attempting to fill the jazz shoes of
Freddie Mercury, who passed
away in 1991. Recently, the duo
has joined up with singer and
“American Idol” alumni Adam
Lambert, whose flamboyant
style and theatrical vocals are
of a piece with Mercury’s aesthetic, if a bit more amped-up.
During Tuesday night’s energetic, if sometimes odd show
at TD Garden, Lambert and his
new bandmates roared through
some of the Queen catalog’s
highlights, the six-piece band’s
hefty arrangements resulting in
an atmosphere that at times
felt arena-shaking.
Lambert’s “Idol” run, during
which he originally met May,
showcased why he and Queen
were an ideal fit. He auditioned
with “Bohemian Rhapsody,”
hinting at both his appreciation
of the British band and his flair
for the dramatic. Over the
course of his season, he skipped
through the singing competition’s gauntlet of genres with
gusto, adding a sitar to “Ring of
Fire” and stripping “If I Can’t
QUEEN + ADAM LAMBERT
At TD Garden, Tuesday
Have You” of its disco flourishes. Queen’s approach to genre
was even more omnivorous —
“Radio Ga Ga” combines sumptuous synthpop with an arenaready chorus, “Stone Cold Crazy” is so thrashy it warranted a
faithful Metallica cover, and the
fanciful vocal melodies of “Bicycle Race” and “Killer Queen”
throw back to early-20th-century pop.
The setlist offered up a run
through the band’s biggest hits,
with the one solo track by Lambert — his just-released single,
whose phonetically challenging
title can’t be printed in a newspaper — getting an arrangement that called to Queen’s arena-size rock instead of the recorded version’s sparse EDMpop backing. That track came
after a short monologue where
he enthused over being onstage
with artists he’d idolized, and
answered snipes that he’s “not
Freddie Mercury” with a curt
rejoinder.
Mercury himself would have
probably noted that a concert
— particularly a large-scale
show with songs embedded in
the pop firmament — was
about the audience as well as
the performers onstage, and on
that level, the show delivered.
While Lambert’s vocal pyrotechnics contrast with the approach taken by the exceedingly precise Mercury, his obvious
enthusiasm for the material
was infectious. The version of
“Under Pressure” with Lambert taking Mercury’s part and
Taylor handling the late David
Bowie’s vocals was surprisingly
moving, while his swooning
“Somebody to Love” showed
how he could maneuver
around one of the band’s trickiest songs.
The late Queen frontman
appeared a few times via archival video; the most arresting
came during May’s sweet solo
version of the 1975 ballad
“Love of My Life,” while his appearance during the choir interlude of “Bohemian Rhapsody” was akin to him leading a
singalong. They were brief yet
tasteful, giving American audiences who never got to see
Queen in its original run (the
last North American tour was
in 1982) a glimpse of the past,
while Lambert’s performance
showed how the band’s catalog
will remain a pop force well into the 21st century.
Eleanor Cabot Bradley Estate
Canton, MA (Rte. 138, just off I-93)
Thursday evenings, 7–9 pm
JULY 27 | The Baha Brothers
AUGUST 3 | Santa Mamba
DETAILS ONLINE
thetrustees.org/bradleyconcerts
Presented by Natixis Global Asset Management
AUGUST 4-6 • 2017 | FORT ADAMS • NEWPORT RI
The Roots
Béla Fleck
& the Flecktones
Snarky Puppy
Andra Day
Branford Marsalis
Quartet
Maceo Parker
Hudson
Fly Toward the Sound:
For Geri, With Love
Maura Johnston
can be reached at
maura@maura.com.
They’re a real couple of jokers
uCOUPLE
Continued from Page G1
and his dubious denials, Leggero described the date as a good
time. The rest is history.
Since then, both comics
have seen their careers take off.
Leggero co-created and stars as
Lillian Bellacourt in “Another
Period” on Comedy Central, a
show set in 1902 Newport, R.I.,
that she describes as “like if the
Kardashians lived at Downton
Abbey.” Leggero has also appeared on “Reno 911!,” “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia,”
and “Chelsea Lately” among
many other TV shows. Kasher
has had plenty of TV exposure
too and recently began hosting
“Problematic,” a talk show on
Comedy Central. His special
“Live in Oakland” debuted on
Netflix in 2012.
Despite those commitments, Kasher and Leggero still
find the time to tour together.
While the grind can be tough
on comedians, having a partner
on the road can take the sting
out of the less bearable parts.
“This tour has brought us closer
and made it harder for me to go
on tour alone,” says Leggero.
“Many comedians will tell you
that traveling is the worst part
of the job.”
In addition to companionship of a spouse, both comics
value the chance to have a
knowledgeable and seasoned
set of eyes evaluating their performances each night. Leggero
says she’s taken a cue from
NATASHA LEGGERO
AND MOSHE KASHER
At the Wilbur Theatre,
July 29 at 7 p.m. Tickets $29,
617­248­9700,
www.thewilbur.com
Kasher and has learned to put
more emphasis on closing her
show with a bang. Both say the
tour has had a major impact on
their writing, and their relationship in general has led to a
shift in their onstage personas.
“I used to say having a baby was
a DUI from the universe,” says
Leggero. “It’s important to keep
‘It’s the job of the
stand­up comedian
to look through the
human experience
and find the absurd.’
MOSHE KASHER
growing and share your feelings and not stay in one persona that might not be true anymore.”
Kasher and Leggero say they
revel in the other ’s success
more than their own. They alternate the first and second slot
for each show as well, in the interest of fairness.
The highlight of each show
is the encore, when they take
the stage together and offer relationship advice to willing couples. The impromptu conversations often lead to fantastic results, such as a stop in Santa
Cruz, Calif., that took an R-rated turn when a husband discussed buying a sex toy for his
wife.
“One of the things we’ve
learned through trial and error
is that people who are really excited to get up onstage have
been drinking,” Kasher says.
“The more enthusiastic people
are, the worse idea it is to bring
them onstage. With people that
are kind of reluctant you can
find some of the most compelling, best stories.”
While this may seem like a
prime opportunity to embarrass everyday people, the comics value the chance to actually
help couples work through issues in a (somewhat) safe environment. Kasher and Leggero
say that a very public airing of
grievances can sometimes have
a lovely effect on relationships,
kind of like therapy.
“[Feedback] has only been
positive. One couple even got
married,” Leggero says. “They
didn’ t know what to do, we
talked to them, and they tweeted us [later] saying they’re getting married and we helped
them. We want a proposal onstage next.”
Jon Mael can be reached at
jmael2014@gmail.com
Jack DeJohnette, Larry Grenadier,
John Medeski & John Scofield
Jack Terri Lyne Carrington, Esperanza Spalding
w/ Vijay Iyer, Jason Moran & Christian Sands
PLUS 45 MORE ARTISTS! SEE THE FULL LINEUP AT
FRIDAY AUGUST 4 | 8PM |
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& Orleans Avenue
FOR FRIDAY NIGHT TICKETS & INFO, VISIT
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INTERNATIONAL TENNIS HALL OF FAME
AT THE NEWPORT CASINO • NEWPORT RI
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T h e
G6
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
‘I get sick if the
memory comes back
to me. I can forget
what I ate yesterday,
but I can’t forget
what I got through
in the ghetto.’
ARIE KASIARZ (far left), at the MFA’s
“Memory Unearthed,” an exhibition of
Henryk Ross’s photographs from
Poland’s Lodz Ghetto
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
Recalling bleak realities
of life in the Lodz Ghetto
uKASIARZ
Continued from Page G1
nized the Boston show and accompanied him during the visit.
Like Kasiarz, Ross was one of just
877 survivors in the Lodz Ghetto,
which housed more than 160,000 people during Germany’s World War II occupation of Poland. As a photojournalist, Ross was compelled by the Nazis to
serve as one of the ghetto’s official photographers, producing photo IDs for
Jews as well as German propaganda
about the ghetto, which had a Jewish
Council and police force to enforce Nazi policies.
Ross meanwhile documented the
bleak realities of ghetto life, surreptitiously producing a series of more
than 6,000 images that show Jews being deported, grim food distribution,
and death in streets, among other
things.
Ross hid his negatives in advance of
Poland’s liberation, later returning to
Lodz to retrieve them.
“I buried my negatives in the
ground in order that there should
be some record of our tragedy,” he
said before his death in 1991. “I
was anticipating the total destruction
of Polish Jewry.”
As one of the ghetto’s last remaining inhabitants, Kasiarz was pressed
into cleaning service as Russian troops
advanced. His duty: Use a humandrawn wagon to remove fecal waste
from the ghetto.
“They made us to be horses,” he
said in thickly accented English. “They
put a big barrel in the boot of a wagon,
and we had to go in the toilets and put
it in the barrel.”
Kasiarz bounced around Europe
following the war, living in Poland,
briefly attending school in Switzerland, opening nightclubs in Germany,
and fighting for the Israeli Army before emigrating to the United States
in 1958. He ultimately made his home
in Philadelphia, where he was the
part-owner of a meat packing company and raised two sons with his wife,
Doris.
Today, Kasiarz, whose formal education was cut short at age 12 by the
war, is an affable man, given to holding court and immensely proud of his
successful son David, an executive at
American Express.
“If I’m going to have children,
they’re going to be educated,” he said.
MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, BOSTON
Henryk Ross’s photo of children talking through the fence of a prison in
the Lodz Ghetto prior to deportation, from the MFA exhibit.
“They must have what I missed. That’s
why I’m a happy 90-year-old man.”
David Kasiarz, who joined his parents in Boston along with his own family, said the trip was part of an effort to
understand his father’s life.
“We wanted him to share his story
with the children — his grandchildren,” said David Kasiarz, who organized the trip before the show closes
July 30. “We felt like it was unfinished.
He’s always kept it in, and we did not
want to have any regrets.”
Accompanied by an entourage of
family and curators, Kasiarz drew a
crowd as he walked through the exhibition.
Inspecting a series of photographs
featuring Mordechai Chaim Rumkowski, whom the Nazis installed as
head of the ghetto’s Jewish Council before shipping him to Auschwitz, Kasiarz compared him to the American
gangster Al Capone.
“If the Germans come to him and
say, ‘Give me 10,000 Jews to send away
to Auschwitz,’ he’d say, ‘Here’s 10,000
people,’ ” Kasiarz said, sighing at the
memory. “What are you going to do?”
Did he resent the Jewish police in
the ghetto?
“A few, yes. I was afraid of them.”
As Kasiarz moved through the images, Abbie Fuksman of Atlanta
hugged him after explaining that her
parents were both from Lodz, her
mother a former resident of the ghetto. Stuart and Paula Lefkowitz of New
Jersey later approached with a portrait
of Paula’s grandfather, a synagogue
cantor who died in the ghetto. Did Kasiarz know him?
“I was a 12-year-old kid,” Kasiarz
said when he didn’t recognize the
bearded man in the photo. “I see the
picture, I cry.”
Buffeted by the images, Kasiarz was
caught short when a curator directed
him to a suite of photographs showing
young children yoked to a filthy wagon, a barrel atop it: the fecal workers.
“I can’t see this picture,” Kasiarz
said, his voice breaking as he took a
seat.
He later explained that similar images had caused him to faint at the US
Holocaust Museum.
“What can I tell you?” he asked.
“Life has to go on. You have to tell it to
our children, but sometimes it’s hard
to explain.”
Malcolm Gay can be reached at
malcolm.gay@globe.com. Follow him
on Twitter at @malcolmgay
THEATER
THEATER
THEATER
MUSIC
MUSIC
OPERA
now thru July 30 only!
kids save 50%
a mel brooks musical
august 15 - august 27
legendary musical great seats available!
the second generation
september 10 • 2pm
the legend continues
sePtember 7 at 7:30Pm
boston midsummer oPera
Presents
Based on the Oscar winning animated 1991 film,
this family musical follows a young woman held
in a castle occupied by a monstrous beast and
a host of enchanted objects. This eye-popping
spectacle is filled with imaginative sets and costumes, and breath-taking production numbers.
Many family friendly showtimes added!
From the creators of the musical sensation,
‘The Producers,’ comes this monster hit musical
based on Mel Brooks’ 1974 film. A wickedly
inspired re-imagining of the legend of
Frankenstein tells the story of a young
doctor who travels to Transylvania to
complete the work of his grandfather.
NORTH SHORE MUSIC THEATRE
62 Dunham Road | Beverly | MA
TICKETS: $57 - $82 • KIDS SAVE 50%
BOOK SEATS: NSMT.ORG or 978.232.7200
NORTH SHORE MUSIC THEATRE
62 Dunham Road | Beverly | MA
TICKETS: $57 - $82 • KIDS SAVE 50%
BOOK SEATS: NSMT.ORG or 978.232.7200
Director Maria Friedman recreates her acclaimed
London revival of Stephen Sondheim’s musical
just for Boston audiences! Starts Sept. 8!
A Huntington Theatre Company production
Avenue of the Arts / Huntington Avenue Theatre
617 266 0800 huntingtontheatre.org
MUSIC
• The Jackie Wilson Show with son Bobby
Wilson • The Legacy of Clyde McPhatter and
The Drifters with son Ron McPhatter • Honoring
The Del Vikings’ original lead Norman Wright
with sons Norman Jr. and Anthony • Young
James Brown • Porsha Funches - daughter
of former Platters’ lead
Engelbert Humperdinck’s music has
transcended time and his voice still
continues to reach out to people now;
serving to transport and inspire, to
embrace and to provoke feelings and
emotions… ingredients that are no doubt
the essence of his long-lasting success.
NORTH SHORE MUSIC THEATRE
62 Dunham Road | Beverly | MA
TICKETS: $57 | $47
BOOK SEATS: NSMT.ORG or 978.232.7200
NORTH SHORE MUSIC THEATRE
62 Dunham Road | Beverly | MA
Tickets: $79.50 | $69.50 | $59.50
BOOK SEATS: NSMT.ORG or 978.232.7200
Gaetano Donizetti’s
Elixir of Love
Sung in Italian with English Supertitles
Antonio Ocampo-Guzman, Stage Director
Susan Davenny Wyner, Conductor
Mosesian Center for the Arts
321 Arsenal Street, Watertown, MA
July 26 & 28 at 7:30 pm, July 30 at 3 pm
Tickets $60 and $50
www.bostonmidsummeropera.org
Phone: 617-923-0100
ACTIVITIES
a concert benefiting rfk
children’s action corPs
august 3 - 13
781-891-5600
romeo & Juliet
By William Shakespeare
Directed by Allegra Libonati
Now-August 6 at the Parkman Bandstand,
Boston Common
One of Greater Boston’s most beloved traditions
takes up residence once again with Romeo &
Juliet proving that the power of love triumphs
over divisions and differences. Tickets are FREE!
(Friend Section Chairs available $75 donation)
Visit www.commshakes.org
or call 617-426-0863
A Tap Dancing Musical Extravaganza
Starring Tom Wopat & Rachel York
ReagleMusicTheatre.com
617 Lexington St., Waltham
FREE PARKING
September 8 • 7:30pm
Special Guest Co-Hosts
CHARLES SHAUGHNESSY of TV’s ‘The Nanny’
& ‘Days of Our Lives’ and SUSAN WORNICK,
TV Journalist, Host, and Spokesperson.
Featuring: Brendan Carroll, Jamie Conway,
Sheree Dunwell, Ryann Murray, Amanda Rosa,
Tom Rosa, and Fred VanNess
NORTH SHORE MUSIC THEATRE
62 Dunham Road | Beverly | MA
TICKETS: $35 & $25
BOOK SEATS: NSMT.ORG or 978.232.7200
begins in two weeks!
august 8-20
“Far and away the best musical of the year.”
-NPR
Boston Opera House
800.982.2787 | BroadwayInBoston.com
Box Office Hours: Mon - Fri 10am-5pm
Groups (10+) Call 617.482.8616
only two hours from
boston!
Discover where master artists and new musical
leaders live, learn, and explore great chamber
music together in the foothills of Vermont.
Saturdays (8:00PM) and Sundays (2:30PM)
August 16 - Longwood Symphony Orchestra
Your Favorite SONG LYRICS On The BIG SCREEN!
Including * Tomorrow * It’s the Hard-Knock Life
$12.50-$17.50 * Group Rates Available!
Tickets: RegentTheatre.com * 781-646-4849 *
DRESS-UP AS YOUR FAVORITE CHARACTER!
*SAVE $3 with Code “SING”!*
8/26 Classic Albums Live: Sgt Pepper
8/31 Bruce Hornsby & The Noisemakers
9/1 Rosanne Cash
9/9 Banjo & Fiddle Contest
Survivors and Their Helpers
Friday August 11 - Sunday August 13, 2017
DoubleTree Hotel - Windsor Locks, Connecticut
Presentations, Speakers, Resources and Books
August 23 - Landmarks Dance Carnival
available for survivors and their helpers.
https://ritualabuse.us/smart-conference/
Pre-registration preferred
Please e-mail smartnews@aol.com
Boston Globe
Ticket to the Arts
8/18 Buddy Guy
Tues-Fri at 8, Sat at 5 & 8, Sun at 3 & 7
Added shows: 7/26 at 5, 7/31 at 8, 8/2 at 5
To order 617-426-5225 or shearmadness.com
Student rush & specially priced senior tix
Great group rates! 617-451-0195
Charles Playhouse, 74 Warrenton Street
Child Abuse Conference for Severe Child Abuse
landmarksorchestra.org
8/12 Lyle Lovett & His Large Band
8/20 Stephen Stills & Judy Collins
August 2 - Beethoven Symphony No. 9
*Programs & Tickets*
Call 802-254-2394
Visit www.marlboromusic.org
fri-sun, July 28-30
lowell folk festival
8/19 David Grisman Sextet
child and ritual abuse
conference
July 26 - Mercury Orchestra: Symphonic Opera
August 9 - Anthems of the World
8/6 Dawes
movie musical July 25-28
regent theatre arlington
DCR’s HATCH SHELL ON THE ESPLANADE
Now through August 13th
8/4 Amos Lee
boston’s hilarious
whodunit!
great music for free
wednesdays at 7Pm
movie musical July 25-28
regent theatre arlington
The Original High School Musical Is Back with...
ANIMATED SONG LYRICS On The BIG SCREEN!
Tickets: RegentTheatre.com * 781-646-4849
$12.50-$17.50 * SAVE $3 with Code “SING”
Group Rates Available!
Order Online through our Self Serve
Order Entry System. 24/7 from anywhere.
boston.com/tickettothearts
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
MOVIE STARS
B o s t o n
G l o b e
YYY½ Dunkirk Christopher Nolan’s
re-creation of the 1940 evacuation of
Dunkirk — a proving ground for the
British national character — is a towering achievement, made with craft
and sinew and honest sentiment, as
well as a tripartite time structure that
occasionally distracts from the flow.
With Tom Hardy, Kenneth Branagh,
and the invaluable Mark Rylance.
(106 min., PG-13) (Ty Burr)
YYYY Endless Poetry Volume two in
the cinematic autobiography of one of
the greatest surrealist poets of the
screen, and probably the last, this re-
lates the career of the young Alejandro
Jodorowsky as he leaves his family and
follows his calling in the poetic avantgarde of Santiago, Chile seven decades
ago. That is a synopsis — the experience is a glorious pandemonium of
endless poetry. (128 min., unrated)
(Peter Keough)
YYY Girls Trip A group of girlfriends
head to New Orleans for a reunion,
where they reignite their college
friendships with drinks, fights, and
near disasters. Equal parts hilarity and
empowerment, this is a high-energy
ride that lands its jokes, no matter
how ridiculous they may seem. Regina
Hall, Queen Latifah, Tiffany Haddish,
and Jada Pinkett Smith star.
(122 min., R) (Bethany Ao)
YYY Lady Macbeth An adaptation of
not Shakespeare but the 19th-century
Russian novella “Lady Macbeth of the
Mtsensk District,” this casts a phenomenal Florence Pugh as a proper
young English wife who throws away
convention and proceeds, step by step,
into hell. How far you follow her is up
to you. A striking feature debut for director William Oldroyd. (89 min., R)
(Ty Burr)
INFO VALID 7/27/17 ONLY
REGAL FENWAY STADIUM 13 & RPX
()
DEDHAM
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 12:45, 1:20, 3:25, 3:55, 6:05,
201 Brookline Ave 844-462-7342-1761
New releases
YYY½ City of Ghosts The members
of the Syrian civilian journalist organization Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered Silently are average people who could
not stand by and do nothing when the
Islamic State took over their city and
terrorized it. Matthew Heineman’s
documentary shows their extraordinary courage as they risk death and
exile to tell the world the truth.
(91 min., R) (Peter Keough)
G7
YY½ Valerian and the City of a Thou­
sand Planets Wonderful, dopey highsummer space nonsense, based on a
long-running French comic book series and brought to the screen by Luc
Besson, the madman of “The Fifth Element” and “Lucy.” Overlength and pallid leads Dane DeHaan and Cara Delevingne drag it down, but the movie’s
still enjoyably baroque eye candy.
With Rihanna. (137 min., PG-13)
(Ty Burr)
For movies coverage, go to
www.bostonglobe.com/movies.
()
G
5
8
6
I
DOL
DIG
DSS
K
Bargain show thimes are shown in
parentheses
Restrictions apply/No Passes
Handicapped accessible
Stadium Seating
Hearing Impaired
Rear Window Captioning
Dolby Stereo
Digital Sound
Dolby Surround Sound
Descriptive Video Service
The Boston Globe Movie Directory is a paid
advertisement. Listing appear at the sole discretion
of each cinema. Towns may appear out of alphabetical order so that listings will remain unbroken from
column to column
5 6 8 I K DIG
www.REGmovies.com
NT LIVE: ANGELS IN AMERICA PART TWO: PERESTROIKA (NR) Advance Tickets Available 7:00
ATOMIC BLONDE (R) Advance Tickets Available 7:00,
10:00
DUNKIRK (PG-13) G (1:20) 4:20, 7:30, 10:45
GIRLS TRIP (R) (11:55, 3:25) 6:55, 10:25
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) (11:10) 6:30
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) G (2:50) 10:15
BRAINTREE
AMC BRAINTREE 10
ARLINGTON
121 Grandview Rd.
CAPITOL THEATRE
5 6 DIG
204 Massachussetts Ave. 781-648-4340
6 I DIG
www.capitoltheatreusa.com
BEATRIZ AT DINNER (R) 12:00, 4:10
CARS 3 (G) 12:15, 2:45
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 12:20, 2:30, 4:45, 7:15
INDIANA JONES AND THE RAIDERS OF THE LOST
ARK (PG) 7:00
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 12:15, 4:00,
7:00
THE LITTLE HOURS (R) 5:30, 7:40
THE BEGUILED (R) 2:00
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 12:30, 4:15, 7:10
BELLINGHAM
REGAL BELLINGHAM STADIUM 14
259 Hartford Ave. 844-462-7342-443
5 6 8 DIG
www.REGmovies.com
NT LIVE: ANGELS IN AMERICA PART TWO: PERESTROIKA (NR) Advance Tickets Available 7:00
ATOMIC BLONDE (R) Advance Tickets Available 7:00,
10:00
BELMONT
www.amctheatres.com
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 10:30, 4:20,
10:40
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D
1:50, 7:30
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 11:30,
2:45, 6:00, 9:20
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13)
RealD 3D 12:30, 3:45, 7:00, 10:20
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 10:30, 11:20, 4:30, 9:10
DESPICABLE ME 3 3D (PG) RealD 3D 2:00, 6:50
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) G 1:20, 7:20
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) G RealD 3D 11:00, 4:45, 10:40
BABY DRIVER (R) 11:10, 1:40, 4:50, 7:40, 10:30
DUNKIRK (PG-13) G 10:40, 2:10, 4:30, 7:50, 10:30
GIRLS TRIP (R) G 10:50, 12:45, 1:45, 3:40, 4:40,
6:45, 7:30, 9:45, 10:30
ATOMIC BLONDE (R) G AMC Independent 7:00, 9:50
THE BIG SICK (R) G AMC Independent 10:30, 1:15,
4:00
BROOKLINE
COOLIDGE CORNER THEATRE
290 Harvard St. 617-734-2500
5 6
BELMONT STUDIO CINEMA
www.coolidge.org
376 Trapelo Rd. 617-484-1706
THE BIG SICK (R) 11:00, 1:45, 4:15, 6:30, 10:15
CITY OF GHOSTS (R) 11:45, 2:15, 4:45
A GHOST STORY (R) 11:15, 1:30, 4:00, 7:30, 9:45
DUNKIRK IN 70MM (PG-13) G 11:30, 2:00, 4:30,
7:00, 9:30
HAIL! HAIL! ROCK 'N' ROLL (PG) 7:00
THE BEGUILED (R) 9:00
www.studiocinema.com
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 3:00, 5:30, 8:00
BERLIN
REGAL SOLOMON POND STADIUM 15
591 Donald Lynch Blvd. 844-462-7342-448
5 6 8 DIG
www.REGmovies.com
NT LIVE: ANGELS IN AMERICA PART TWO: PERESTROIKA (NR) Advance Tickets Available 7:00
ATOMIC BLONDE (R) Advance Tickets Available 7:00,
10:00
BURLINGTON
AMC BURLINGTON CINEMA 10
20 South Ave.
5 6 DIG
www.amctheatres.com
CALL THEATER FOR SHOWTIMES
BOSTON
ARTSEMERSON: PARAMOUNT CENTER
CAMBRIDGE
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX LEGACY PLACE
670 Legacy Place 800-315-4000
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
4:10, 7:20, 10:20
ETS (PG-13) 12:10, 12:40, 3:20, 3:50, 6:35, 7:05, 9:45
FOXBORO
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 10:00, 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 9:40
GIRLS TRIP (R) 10:15, 12:45, 1:15, 3:45, 4:15, 6:45,
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) 10:15
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX PATRIOT PLACE
7:15, 9:35, 10:05
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 10:45, 1:30, 4:15, 7:10, 9:50
24 Patriot Pl. 800-315-4000
BABY DRIVER (R) 10:40, 1:35, 4:20, 7:05, 9:55
WISH UPON (PG-13) 12:20, 2:30, 4:50, 7:20, 9:55
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
THE BIG SICK (R) 10:10, 1:25, 4:40, 10:25
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLAN-
ATOMIC BLONDE (R) 7:00, 7:30, 10:00, 10:30
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 9:35, 12:10, 12:40, 3:20, 3:50, 7:10,
ETS (PG-13) 10:05, 1:10
www.nationalamusements.com
NT LIVE: ANGELS IN AMERICA PART TWO: PERESTROIKA (NR) 7:00
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 11:50, 3:00, 6:25, 9:30
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 12:10,
12:40, 3:20, 3:50, 6:30, 7:00, 9:35
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13)
10:05
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 11:30, 12:00, 2:00, 2:30,
4:25, 4:55, 6:45, 9:00
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 12:05, 3:10,
6:15, 9:25
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 1:25, 4:35,
7:45
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 1:00, 3:45, 6:40, 9:20
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 11:00, 1:45, 4:40, 7:20, 10:00
GIRLS TRIP (R) 1:20, 4:15, 7:30, 10:25
BABY DRIVER (R) 1:35, 4:15, 7:05, 9:50
THE BIG SICK (R) 1:15, 4:05
ATOMIC BLONDE (R) 7:10, 10:00
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 11:45, 3:15
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 12:35, 4:00
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 7:10, 10:15
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) 6:35, 9:45
FRAMINGHAM
5 8 DOL
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
THEATRES
www.applecinemas.com
22 Flutie Pass
175 Tremont St. 617-423-3499
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
www.amctheatres.com
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) G 4:00, 7:05,
10:20
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 12:45, 1:45,
8:05
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D
5:00
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 1:00,
3:00, 4:15, 6:15, 7:30, 9:30
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13)
RealD 3D 11:45, 2:00, 5:15, 8:30, 10:45
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 11:10, 4:10, 6:30
DESPICABLE ME 3 3D (PG) RealD 3D 1:30, 9:15
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 12:05, 3:15, 6:35, 9:50
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) G 12:30, 7:15
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) G RealD 3D 11:30, 2:45, 3:45, 6:15,
9:30, 10:30
BABY DRIVER (R) G 2:30, 5:10, 8:00, 10:45
BABY DRIVER (R) 11:40
DUNKIRK (PG-13) G 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00
DUNKIRK (PG-13) G 12:00, 3:00, 6:00, 9:00
DUNKIRK: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) G
11:00, 2:00, 5:00, 8:00, 11:00
GIRLS TRIP (R) G 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 10:15
GIRLS TRIP (R) 11:15, 2:15, 5:15, 8:15
ATOMIC BLONDE (R) AMC Independent 7:00, 9:45
THE BEGUILED (R) AMC Independent 12:10, 2:40
WISH UPON (PG-13) AMC Independent 10:40
A GHOST STORY (R) AMC Independent 11:45, 2:15,
4:45, 7:30, 10:00
THE BIG SICK (R) G AMC Independent 3:30, 6:45,
9:45
THE BIG SICK (R) AMC Independent 12:15
MEOW (NR) AMC Independent 11:00, 1:45, 4:30
MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, BOSTON
465 Huntington Ave. 617-369-3907
5 8 DOL DIG
http://www.mfa.org/programs/film
THE TOGETHER PROJECT (NR) 3:00
SIMONS IMAX THEATRE
New England Aquarium, Central Wharf 617-973-5200
5 8 DIG
www.neaq.org
AMAZON ADVENTURE 3D (NR) 10:00, 4:00
GREAT WHITE SHARK (NR) 12:00, 3:00, 6:00
GALAPAGOS 3D: NATURE'S WONDERLAND (NR)
11:00, 2:00, 5:00
SAVING SEA TURTLES (NR) 1:00
KENDALL SQUARE CINEMA
1 Kendall Square at 355 Binney St. 617-621-1202
5 6 G DOL DIG DSS
www.landmarktheatres.com
LADY MACBETH (R) 5 (1:10, 3:25, 5:35) 7:45, 9:55
MAUDIE (PG-13) 5 (3:50) 9:40
A GHOST STORY (R) 5 (1:05, 3:15, 5:25) 7:35, 9:50
THE BIG SICK (R) 5 (1:00, 1:40, 4:20) 6:35, 7:00,
9:15, 9:40
THE B-SIDE: ELSA DORFMAN'S PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY (R) 5 (1:35, 4:00) 7:10
CHESTNUT HILL
SHOWCASE SUPERLUX
55 Boylston St.
http://www.showcasecinemas.com/
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 11:00, 2:30, 6:00, 9:30
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 11:00, 2:30, 6:00, 9:30
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 11:30, 2:00, 5:00
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 11:30, 2:00, 5:00
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 12:00, 3:00,
6:30, 10:20
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 12:00, 3:00,
6:30, 10:20
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00
BABY DRIVER (R) 1:30, 4:30, 8:30
BABY DRIVER (R) 1:30, 4:30, 8:30
THE BIG SICK (R) 12:30, 3:30, 8:00
THE BIG SICK (R) 12:30, 3:30, 8:00
DANVERS
AMC LOEWS LIBERTY TREE MALL 20
100 Independence Way
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
www.amctheatres.com
ATOMIC BLONDE (R) G AMC Independent 7:00, 9:45
5 6 8 I K DIG
GIRLS TRIP (R) 1:15, 4:00, 7:30, 10:20
AMC FRAMINGHAM 16 WITH DINE-IN
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 11:00, 2:05, 3:30, 5:45, 8:00
ATOMIC BLONDE (R) 8:20
GIRLS TRIP (R) 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 10:00
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 11:00, 12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00,
10:30
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 11:00,
1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:30
ONDU MOTTEYA KATHE (NR) 8:00
JAGGA JASOOS (NR) 5:00
FIDAA (NR) 10:15
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 11:00, 1:55,
4:50, 7:45, 10:50
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 11:00, 2:00, 5:00, 8:00, 10:55
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 11:00, 2:00, 5:00, 7:15,
10:50
BABY DRIVER (R) 4:40, 10:15
565 Squire Rd. 800-315-4000
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING 3D (PG-13) 12:35, 7:15
NT LIVE: ANGELS IN AMERICA PART TWO: PERESTROIKA (NR) 7:00
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 12:15, 3:25, 6:35, 9:45
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 11:50,
12:50, 3:05, 3:35, 4:05, 6:20, 9:25
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13)
7:20, 10:25
CARS 3 (G) 10:05
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 10:50, 11:40, 1:10, 2:00,
4:25, 6:45, 9:05
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 12:10, 3:10
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 10:00, 12:55,
4:00, 7:00, 10:05
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 10:15
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 11:20, 1:00, 2:05, 3:45, 4:50, 6:40,
7:45, 9:20, 10:20
GIRLS TRIP (R) 11:00, 1:55, 4:40, 7:35, 10:30
GIRLS TRIP (R) 10:30
GIRLS TRIP (R) 1:30, 4:10, 7:10, 10:00
BABY DRIVER (R) 11:05, 4:35, 7:15, 9:50
THE BIG SICK (R) 10:55, 1:40, 4:30, 7:25, 10:10
ATOMIC BLONDE (R) 7:30, 10:30
ATOMIC BLONDE (R) 7:00, 10:00
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 12:40, 3:20, 3:50, 7:05, 10:15
WISH UPON (PG-13) 12:45
168 Alewife Brook Parkway.
AMC LOEWS BOSTON COMMON 19
6:15, 6:45, 9:15, 9:45
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 1:00, 3:45, 6:40, 9:20
APPLE CINEMAS CAMBRIDGE
NO FILMS SHOWING TODAY
REVERE
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX REVERE
www.nationalamusements.com
559 Washington St. 617-824-8000
www.artsemerson.org
8:35
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 11:35, 2:55,
5 6 8 I K DIG
www.amctheatres.com
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 8:00
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 12:00, 3:15,
7:00, 10:30
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D
1:00, 4:30
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 4:45
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 11:00,
2:45, 6:00, 9:30
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13)
RealD 3D 12:45, 8:30
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13)
RealD 3D 3:45
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 11:30, 2:00, 4:15, 6:45, 9:30
DESPICABLE ME 3 3D (PG) RealD 3D 1:15
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 12:00, 3:30, 7:15, 10:00
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 2:30
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 3:45, 10:30
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 6:00
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 12:30, 7:15
BABY DRIVER (R) 12:15, 3:15, 6:45, 10:30
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 12:00, 3:00, 6:15, 9:15
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 1:30, 4:15, 7:30, 10:15
CARS 3 (G) 1:00
GIRLS TRIP (R) 12:30, 3:45, 7:00, 10:15
GIRLS TRIP (R) 11:00, 2:00, 5:00
ATOMIC BLONDE (R) AMC Independent 7:00, 10:00
WISH UPON (PG-13) AMC Independent 4:00
NT LIVE: ANGELS IN AMERICA PART TWO: PERESTROIKA (NR) G 7:00
THE BIG SICK (R) AMC Independent 1:45, 5:15, 8:15,
9:45
LEXINGTON
BABY DRIVER (R) 1:25, 4:30, 7:25, 10:25
THE BIG SICK (R) 1:05, 4:20, 7:20, 10:05
ATOMIC BLONDE (R) 7:00, 7:30, 10:00, 10:30
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLAN-
32 Reiss Ave 800-315-4000
5 6 8 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 11:50, 3:15
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 11:40,
12:20, 3:10, 3:40, 6:30, 7:00, 9:40, 10:10
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13)
4:10, 10:30
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 11:50,
4:05, 7:30, 10:35
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 1:30, 4:15, 7:10, 9:50
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13)
WISH UPON (PG-13) 11:55, 2:20, 4:50
12:15, 3:55, 7:00, 10:10
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 12:45,
CARS 3 (G) 11:15, 1:55
MILLBURY
BLACKSTONE VALLEY 14: CINEMA DE LUX
70 Worcester Providence Turnpike 800-315-4000
5 6 8 DSS
www.showcasecinemas.com
NT LIVE: ANGELS IN AMERICA PART TWO: PERESTROIKA (NR) 7:00
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 12:10, 3:15, 6:30, 9:40
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 9:30,
TRANSFORMERS: THE LAST KNIGHT (PG-13) 9:35
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 10:50, 11:35, 1:15, 2:05,
3:30, 4:30, 6:15
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 11:05, 1:35, 4:00, 6:25, 8:50
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 12:00, 12:30,
3:05, 3:35, 6:20, 9:30
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 10:15, 1:00, 3:45, 6:40, 9:20
GIRLS TRIP (R) 12:35, 3:40, 7:15, 10:10
GIRLS TRIP (R) 1:05, 4:10, 7:45, 10:40
BABY DRIVER (R) 11:05, 2:00, 4:55, 7:40, 10:30
12:00, 12:30, 3:10, 3:40, 6:55, 10:00
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 9:40, 11:20, 11:50, 1:40,
THE BIG SICK (R) 10:55, 1:40, 4:25, 7:25, 10:20
2:10, 3:55, 4:25, 6:35
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 9:50, 12:50,
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLAN-
ATOMIC BLONDE (R) 7:00, 7:30, 10:00, 10:30
SOMERVILLE
10:15
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLAN-
SOMERVILLE THEATRE
ETS 3D (PG-13) 6:40, 9:45
55 Davis Square 617-625-5700
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 10:30, 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:10
5 6 I DIG
NATICK
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
FURNITURE - NATICK
1 Underprice Way 508-665-5525
http://somervilletheatre.com/
ATOMIC BLONDE (R) 7:20, 9:50
BABY DRIVER (R) 1:20, 4:30, 7:20, 9:55
DUNKIRK IN 70MM (PG-13) 2:00, 4:45, 7:30, 10:00
THE BIG SICK (R) 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 9:50
5 8
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 1:10,
www.jordansimax.com
4:10
DUNKIRK: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 1:30,
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 1:30, 4:40, 8:00
4:15, 7:00, 9:40
TAUNTON
NORTH ATTLEBOROUGH
REGAL SILVER CITY GALLERIA 10
SHOWCASE CINEMAS NORTH ATTLEBORO
2 Galleria Mall Dr. Suite 2832 844-462-7342-452
640 South Washington St. 800-315-4000
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
5 6 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 9:25, 12:35, 3:45, 6:55,
10:00
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 9:20,
9:50, 12:25, 12:55, 3:30, 4:00, 6:35, 9:35
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13)
7:05, 10:05
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 10:05, 10:35, 12:20, 12:50,
2:35, 4:50, 7:20, 9:55
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 10:30, 1:20,
4:05, 4:35, 7:00, 7:30, 9:50
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 10:10, 12:30, 1:10, 3:30, 4:10,
6:30, 7:10, 9:30, 10:10
GIRLS TRIP (R) 10:15, 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 10:10
www.REGmovies.com
ATOMIC BLONDE (R) Advance Tickets Available 7:05,
9:55
DUNKIRK (PG-13) G (11:45, 2:20) 5:00, 7:45, 10:30
GIRLS TRIP (R) (1:05) 4:10, 7:15, 10:20
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) (12:15) 7:00
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) G (3:40) 10:15
WALTHAM
EMBASSY CINEMA
16 Pine St. 781-736-7852
BABY DRIVER (R) 10:20, 1:00, 3:50, 6:50, 9:25
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
THE BIG SICK (R) 10:50, 1:40, 4:30
www.landmarktheatres.com
ATOMIC BLONDE (R) 7:00, 10:00
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 12:10, 3:20
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) 6:40, 9:45
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) 5 (12:55) 7:05
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS 3D (PG-13) 5 (3:55)
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 5 (12:45, 3:40)
RANDOLPH
ATOMIC BLONDE (R) 5 7:00
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX RANDOLPH
A GHOST STORY (R) 5 7:10
73 Mazzeo Dr. 800-315-4000
THE BEGUILED (R) 5 (1:10)
THE LITTLE HOURS (R) 5 (4:10)
5 6 8 DIG
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 5
www.nationalamusements.com
(12:50, 3:50) 7:05
NT LIVE: ANGELS IN AMERICA PART TWO: PERE-
BABY DRIVER (R) 5 (1:05, 4:05) 7:15
STROIKA (NR) 7:00
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 5 (1:00, 4:00)
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 11:20, 2:40, 6:05, 9:15
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 12:50,
7:00
4:10, 6:25, 7:25, 9:35, 10:35
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES 3D (PG-13)
WESTBOROUGH
12:20, 3:40, 6:55, 10:05
REGAL WESTBOROUGH STADIUM 12
CARS 3 (G) 3:20
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 11:00, 11:30, 1:25, 1:55,
231 Turnpike Road 844-462-7342-453
3:55, 4:25, 7:10, 9:40
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 12:25, 12:55,
5 6 8 DIG
www.REGmovies.com
3:35, 4:05
ATOMIC BLONDE (R) Advance Tickets Available 7:00,
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING 3D (PG-13) 7:20, 10:30
10:00
THE HOUSE (R) 6:45
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 1:00, 3:45, 6:40, 9:20
WOBURN
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 1:00, 3:45, 6:40, 9:20
DUNKIRK: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 11:15,
SHOWCASE CINEMAS WOBURN
2:00, 4:45, 7:40, 10:20
GIRLS TRIP (R) 1:05, 1:30, 4:00, 4:30, 7:00, 7:30,
5 6 DOL DIG
9:50, 10:25
GIRLS TRIP (R) 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:25
THE BIG SICK (R) 12:00, 3:00, 6:35, 9:30
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLAN-
SHOWCASE CINEMAS LOWELL
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 12:05, 3:15, 6:45, 10:05
ETS 3D (PG-13) 7:05, 10:15
1794 Massachussetts Ave. 781-861-6161
LOWELL
STROIKA (NR) 7:00
3:10, 6:30, 9:40
BABY DRIVER (R) 12:15, 3:05
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 4:00, 7:00
THE BIG SICK (R) 3:45, 6:45
NT LIVE: ANGELS IN AMERICA PART TWO: PERE-
ETS (PG-13) 12:40, 3:50
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLAN-
LEXINGTON VENUE
5 DOL DSS
https://www.showcasecinemas.com/
25 Middlesex Canal Pkwy 800-315-4000
www.nationalamusements.com
WONDER WOMAN (PG-13) 12:15, 3:20, 6:25, 9:40
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 1:20,
4:25, 7:30
ETS (PG-13) 12:40, 3:50, 7:05, 10:15
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 12:20,
WISH UPON (PG-13) 12:45, 9:05
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLAN-
3:25, 6:30, 9:35
DESPICABLE ME 3 (PG) 12:10, 1:45, 2:30, 4:05, 4:45,
ETS (PG-13) 12:05, 3:15
6:55, 9:15
SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (PG-13) 12:00, 12:30,
READING
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
FURNITURE - READING
50 Walkers Brook Dr. 781-944-9090
5 8
3:00, 3:30, 6:20, 6:50, 9:30, 10:00
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 1:00, 1:30, 3:45, 4:15, 6:40, 7:10,
9:20, 9:50
GIRLS TRIP (R) 1:15, 4:00, 6:35, 9:25
BABY DRIVER (R) 1:35, 4:20, 7:05, 9:55
THE BIG SICK (R) 1:40, 4:35, 7:20, 10:05
www.jordansimax.com
ATOMIC BLONDE (R) 7:10, 7:40, 9:50, 10:20
DUNKIRK: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 1:30,
VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLAN-
4:15, 7:00, 9:40
ETS (PG-13) 12:40, 1:10, 3:40, 4:10, 6:45, 9:45
G8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
DILBERT by Scott Adams
RED & ROVER by Brian Basset
BLISS by Harry Bliss
“Do you have this in an $11.99?”
CURTIS by Ray Billingsley
MISTER BOFFO by Joe Martin
DOONESBURY by Garry Trudeau
GET FUZZY by Darby Conley
BIZARRO by Dan Piraro
Today’s Sudoku Solution
6
9
3
7
5
8
4
2
1
5
1
2
4
3
9
7
6
8
Today’s Calcudoku Solution
4
8
7
1
2
6
5
9
3
ROSE IS ROSE by Pat Brady & Don Wimmer
7
5
9
2
4
1
8
3
6
ARLO & JANIS by Jimmy Johnson
2
3
4
8
6
7
9
1
5
RHYMES WITH ORANGE by Hilary Price
1
6
8
5
9
3
2
4
7
JUMPSTART by Robb Armstrong
3
7
5
9
1
2
6
8
4
ARCTIC CIRCLE by Alex Hallatt
8
2
1
6
7
4
3
5
9
POOCH CAFE by Paul Gilligan
9
4
6
3
8
5
1
7
2
ADAM@HOME by Rob Harrell
Today’s Crossword Solution
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
G9
ZIPPY “One with Everything” by Bill Griffith
THE PAJAMA DIARIES by Terri Libenson
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE by Lynn Johnston
NON SEQUITUR by Wiley
DUSTIN by Steve Kelley & Jeff Parker
PLUGGERS by Gary Brookins
ZITS by Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
A plugger’s “gofundme” doesn’t involve the internet.
SUDOKU
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM by Mike Peters
Fill in the grid so
that every row,
every column, and
every 3x3 box
contains the digits 1
through 9. Puzzle
difficulty levels:
Easy on Monday and
Tuesday, more
difficult on
Wednesday and
Thursday, most
difficult on Friday
and Saturday. Tips
and computer
program at
www.sudoku.com.
8 3
6 1
3 6
7
7
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
HOLDING PATTERN BY TIMOTHY E. PARKER
ACROSS
1 Regretted
5 Dizzying designs
10 Cold Adriatic wind
14 Bit of land
in the sea
15 Actor Humphrey’s
nickname
16 Asian border
mountain range
17 Things frequently
shipped from
Georgia
20 Choosing and
following
21 Carney or
Garfunkel
22 Some Greek
letters
23 “Whiz” starter
24 Thread holders
27 Singular blueprint
detail
29 Chases off
32 Swedish rug type
33 Dress ending
36 Lying adjacent to
38 Provider of many
colors
41 Older prom
attendee (var.)
42 Molecular
evidence
43 Links score
to shoot for
44 Loco
46 Capital on
the Baltic Sea
50 Not vegetable or
mineral
52 Fitting or suitable
55 Like the Who, once
56 Common can
material
57 Covered with
packaging
60 It’s a shot with
a kick
63 Follow, as advice
64 Arrange again
65 Palo ___, Calif.
66 Roughly
67 Thespian’s whisper
on stage
68 Gas in a bright
sign
DOWN
1 Matures, on the vine
2 Depletes, as a supply
3 Fade away,
time-wise
4 Creative “code”
anagram
5 Corpulent
6 Flowers in a poetic
pocketful
7 “Opposed,” to Jethro
8 Marriage symbol
9 Drink offered
by a caddy
10 Little donkey
11 Handel bars?
12 Fink
13 Beer variety
18 Warm squeeze
19 Cassette recorder
spindle
24 Audio
25 Wild cat with
tufted ears
26 Droop
28 Become painfully
dry, as lips
30 Lacks, briefly
31 Japanese belt
34 Certain organ
donation site
35 Conclusion to a
fable
37 Ski hill transport
38 Jackie of
“Rush Hour”
39 Uncommon objects
40 Word after
“fear” or “have”
41 Ledger maintainer
45 Displayed
drowsiness
47 Pierce with a stake
48 Attends
49 Accessorizes
51 Bungle
53 Talk foolishly
54 Garment label
57 Organs at 34-Down
58 Pending, in law
59 Something to hatch
60 Reporter’s question
61 Pronoun for a filly
62 Period of history
2
3
7
1
5
2
6
1
1
5
1
5
8 9
4 7
3 1
T h e
G10
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, J U L Y 2 7 , 2 0 1 7
ASK AMY
TV CRITIC’S CORNER
BY MICHAEL ANDOR BRODEUR
Family struggles with
adult daughter’s vitriol
MICHAEL BECKER/FOX
Contestants on Fox’s “Beat Shazam,” one of the many game shows on TV Thursday night.
Let the games begin
I come from a time when if one wanted to
enjoy a few hours’ worth of game shows, one
had to fake a fever and stay home sick from
school. And one did. Over and over again, one
did. Oh, how one misses that.
In any case, game shows, if you hadn’t noticed, have experienced something of a wholesale upgrade. Their slice of “reality” having
been usurped wholesale by the new reality of
television, game shows at large had to make
themselves over by upping the glam factor as
well as the stakes. We’re no longer here to bid
on Bisquick; survey says, we want to be a millionaire.
And on Thursday evenings, not a box of
Chex in the house is safe, as a cross-network
consensus has declared it Game Night in America. NBC has the comparably less dystopian
Lynchian vision of “Hollywood Game Night” at
8 p.m. and the psychological “Plinko” of “The
Wall” at 9 p.m. Over on Fox, there’s the “Name
That Tune”-meets-the-singularity showdown of
“Beat Shazam” at 8 p.m. and the Cohen co-opted “Love Connection,” shorn for good of its
Woolery.
And ever to be outdone, ABC offers the notreally-game-shows of “Boy Band” at 8 p.m.
(think musical talent meets mass-produced
beef patties), “Battle of the Network Stars” at 9
p.m. (it’s sitcom stars vs. fake cops Thursday),
and at 10 p.m., the revival of “The Gong Show,”
which, strangely, has yet to self-gong.
Of course, you could double your enjoyment
at a fraction of the cost with a YouTube clip of
Gene Gene the Dancing Machine tearing up the
stage on the original. Or the clip of the lady
winning a freakin’ plane on “The Price Is
Right.” Or the one of the woman owning a
“Wheel of Fortune” puzzle on the back of one
letter. Or Vicki Lawrence chewing out Dick
Clark on “$25,000 Pyramid”?! Why are we remaking these shows again?
There’s also something like eight hours of
“Family Feud” on Game Show Network. I’d
probably just go with that. Winning isn’t everything, but losing sure can be.
Thursday July 27, 2017
7:00pm
2
7:30pm
8:00pm
8:30pm
Movies
9:00pm
9:30pm
Sports
★★★ The Karate Kid (1984): A teen
learns self-defense. HD TV-PG-LV
6 WLNE ABC Insider
7
WHDH News
(CC) HD
In. Ed.
Boy Band Live.
Family
Extra HD Family
TV-PG
Feud
Feud
Battle NEW
News HD
Gong Show NEW
News HD
J Kimmel
(11:35)
Extra
NBC Boston
Access
Holly.
The Wall (CC) TVPG NEW
The Night Shift (CC) News
TV-14-DLSV NEW
(CC)
J Fallon
NEW
Battle NEW
The Wall (CC) HD
TV-PG NEW
Gong Show NEW
News
Night Shift (CC) HD News
TV-14-DLSV NEW
(CC)
J Kimmel
J Fallon
NEW
9 WMUR ABC N.H. Ch.
10
WBTS News
NBC (CC)
In. Ed.
Boy Band Live.
Extra HD Hollywood Game
TV-PG
HD TV-14-L NEW
11
Steves
WENH Greater
PBS Boston
Gordon Getty:
Phil's Having (CC): Phil's Having: A
There Will Be (2015) A visit to Barcelona. tour of L.A. TV-PG
12
WPRI Wheel of Jeopardy Big Bang Kevin
Big Brother (CC)
CBS Fortune NEW
Theory
Can Wait Live. HD TV-PG-L
25
WFXT ET/
FOX Tonight
27
Charlie Rose (CC)
HD TV-G NEW
News
Late Sh.
NEW
News
News
(CC) HD
Charlie Rose (CC)
HD TV-G NEW
Zoo: Jamie hunts
shepherds. NEW
News
News (CC)
News
(CC)
Late Sh.
NEW
(11:35)
TMZ
WUNI Rosa de Guadalupe José de Egipto (CC) La Doble Vida d
(CC) HD TV-14
HD TV-14-D
HD
CONCACAF Copa
Oro 2017 (CC) HD
News
(CC) HD
Noticiero
Uni
36
WSBE Harvest
PBS
Nazi M/Weapons
(CC) HD TV-PG
Double Feature
(CC)
BBC
News
As Time
Goes By
38
WSBK Big Bang Big Bang News HD
Theory
Theory
Bones (CC) HD TV14-DLV
Bones (CC) HD TV14-DLV
Seinfeld
TV-PG-D
Seinfeld
TV-PG
44
WGBX Ask This Am/Test Father Brown (CC)
PBS Old TV-G Kitchen TV-PG
Miss Fisher (CC) HD British Baking (CC)
TV-PG-V
HD TV-PG
50
56
WBIN F. Feud
WLVI Modern
CW Family
TMZ HD
TV-PG
Story
(CC)
Beat Shazam (CC)
HD TV-PG-DL NEW
Carved from Stone
(CC) HD TV-G
Love Connection
TV-14-DLS NEW
PBS NewsHour
(CC) HD
F. Feud
Modern
Family
Fam. Guy Fam. Guy 'Harry': Harry
Penn & Teller: Fool Hooten and the
Us (CC) HD NEW
Lady (CC) HD NEW
Am. Dad Cl/Show
News (CC)
TMZ HD
TV-PG
HD
Beat Shazam (CC)
TV-PG-DL NEW
Love Connection
TV-14-DLS NEW
News
Blue Bloods (CC)
HD TV-14-LV
Blue Bloods (CC)
HD TV-14-LV
Blue Bloods: Danny Blue Bloods: A tellgets interrogated.
all book is planned.
64
WNAC Family
FOX Feud
68
WBPX Blue Bloods (CC)
ION HD TV-14-L
PREMIUM CABLE
The Box (2009) (CC): A couple get a
mysterious box. HD PG-13
King/Hill
Pawn
Stars
(11:05)
Seinfeld
Wings
Pawn
Stars
Dish N.
NEW
(11:40)
Rookie
Cinemax
(6:10) Deadpool
(2016) (CC) HD R
Encore
Jaws 3 (1983): A great white
(10:41) ★★★ Groundhog Day:
(7:01) ★★ Jaws 2 (1978): Another great
wreaks havoc. HD PG
A man relives the same day.
white arrives in Amity. HD PG
Survival Island (2006) (CC): A couple are (9:45) ★★ Open Water 2 (2006) Bangkok
(6:00) ★★★ Civil
Danger.
Action (1998) PG-13 shipwrecked. HD TV-MA
Friends become stranded. R
Flix
Ouija: Origin (2016): Ghost
possesses a young girl. PG-13
HBO
Miss P.
Vice
News
Hacksaw Ridge (2016) (CC): A WWII medic refuses
a gun. HD R
HBO 2
Mamma
Mia!
Ballers
TV-MA
Game of Thrones
(CC) HD TV-MA
Showtime
(6:55) Southpaw (2015) (CC): Boxer tries
to regain title. HD R
Showtime 2
(6:00) Spymasters: Snowden (2016) (CC): Edward Snowden leaks info
CIA (CC) TV-MA-LV from the NSA. HD R
Starz!
(10:32) Nat'l Treasure (2007)
(7:13) ★ The Hot Chick (2002): A criminal ★★ John Tucker (2006): Girls
switches bodies. HD PG-13
get even with a cheater. PG-13 (CC) HD TV-14
★★ Mr. Brooks (2007) (CC): A cop tracks Pet (2016) (CC): A man locks a Hard
(6:15) Brand: A
woman in a cage. HD R
Second (2015) HD R a serial killer. HD R
Candy
TMC
(9:05) Keeping/Joneses (2016) (CC): A
couple deal with spy antics. HD PG-13
I'm Dying Up Here
(CC) HD TV-MA
(6:30) Early Edition
(CC) Live. HD
ESPN
World Series of Poker (CC): Final-table
play concludes. HD
ESPN Classic
(6:30) Battle of the NBA Hardwood Classics (CC): 2012: L.A.
Network Stars (CC) Lakers at New York.
ESPN 2
Coll.
Football
Golf
NBCSN
NESN
PGA Tour Golf (CC): RBC Canadian Open. Taped. HD
Grudge
Grudge
Grudge
Grudge
Grudge
Grudge
Behind/B Behind/B Heartland Poker HD Fight Sports HD
FAMILY
Gumball Gumball King/Hill Am. Dad Cl/Show Am. Dad
K.C. Un. Bizaard. Stuck/
Andi
Liv and
Liv and
Middle
Mack
Maddie Maddie
NFL Live (CC) HD
(10:55) Harold &
Kumar (2008) NR
Twin Peaks: There's Gigolos
fire. TV-MA
Gigolos
(10:15) Risk (2016) (CC) HD NR
SPORTS
State of/ Boston Sports Tonight (CC) Live. HD
Revs HD
Comcast
SportsNet
Cartoon
Disney
Training
Camp
(10:20) World/Disarray: A look
at U.S. foreign policy. TV-14
SportsCenter (CC)
Live. HD
Women's Soccer (CC): U.S. vs. Australia.
Live. HD
Classic College Basketball (CC): Kansas
at North Carolina from 1981.
CFL Football (CC): Montreal Alouettes at Winnipeg Blue
Bombers. From Investors Group Field. Live. HD
SCenter
LPGA Tour Golf (CC) Taped. HD
Motorcycle Taped. Hammers Hammers
Sports
Sports
Sports
Dining
Burgers
K.C. Un.
Burgers
K.C. Un.
(8:50) ★★★ Hercules (1997) (CC): The
strongman battles Hades. HD TV-G
Ice Age: Dawn: Animals find a new world. Nashville NEW
Bubble
Bubble
Peppa
Peppa
Paw P.
Paw P.
Fam. Guy Fam. Guy
Jessie
Bunk'd
HD TV-G HD TV-G
Freeform
(6:20) Willy Wonka/Chocolate Factory
(1971) (CC): Kids win a tour. HD TV-G
HD
Nickelodeon
Noggin
Henry D. Thunder
Rusty R. Blaze
Friends
Blaze
The 700 Club (CC)
TV-G
Friends
Umizoomi
A&E
AMC
7:30pm
Powered by
★★★ The Princess Bride (1987) (CC): A
(5:00) ★★★★
Goodfellas TV-14-LV fractured fairy tale. HD TV-PG
Jimmy
Kimmel
Hollywood Game
(CC) TV-14-L NEW
Specials
Akil The
NEW
Battle of Stars (CC) Gong Show (CC) HD News
TV-14-L NEW
(CC) HD
HD NEW
News
(CC)
Amy Dickinson can be reached at
askamy@amydickinson.com.
BASIC CABLE
F. 48 (CC): A woman The First 48 (CC)
The First 48 (CC)
is found strangled. HD TV-14 NEW
HD TV-14 NEW
Chronicle Boy Band: Iconic
NEW
movie songs. Live.
5
Q. “Still Shocked” was appalled that a newcomer
to their town showed up at their snooty club
dressed in a negligee. I couldn’t believe you
agreed with her! You should have told her to be
open to this person, no matter how she was
dressed!
APPALLED
A. I have traveled a lot and lived in many places.
It is respectful to at least attempt to conform to
the standards of wherever you are. Given the
modesty of the community this woman was trying to enter, she should expect some pushback
when she refuses their standard.
7:00pm
WCVB News
ABC (CC)
4
Q. I have been with my boyfriend for five years
now, and we have recently been discussing getting married. We’re talking about the wedding
and all that good stuff.
He has a very large and great group of friends,
and many of them would be groomsmen.
My question is, I have three brothers I am very
close to. They have taken a little longer to be close
with my boyfriend. What is the appropriate decision on making my brothers a part of his bridal
party as groomsmen?
CURIOUS
A. There is no one answer to the sometimes delicate question of who should be in the wedding
party. Asking all three brothers to be groomsmen
would be one way to build a closer relationship to
your guy, but you should not pressure him to do
this.
Remember, too, that it is not necessary for the
bride and groom to have the exact same number
of attendants. However, if you’re open to this sort
of thing, you may ask your brothers to stand with
you — as your attendants.
Aside from being official groomsmen during
the wedding, your brothers could also serve as
ushers for all of your guests, relieving groomsmen of this duty.
10:00pm 10:30pm 11:00pm 11:30pm
Steves
Phil's Having (CC):
A visit to Barcelona.
Big Brother (CC)
Live. HD TV-PG-L
News
der. But if she has this, she will thrive on punishing people close to her.
Any communication with your daughter
should focus on times when she behaved well,
and state that you miss having her in the fold.
Keep it very simple. You could suggest professional help, but expect this to trigger more rage
from her. Keep your door open for a relationship
in the future, but don’t let her dominate and punish you now.
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Q. My husband and I married 33 years ago, and
blended our family — his adolescent son and
daughter and my similarly aged daughter. After a
difficult custody battle for my husband’s children, we prevailed and our children grew up together. There were rocky moments but many
good ones, too. My husband’s ex-wife died tragically a few years later.
Our college-educated “kids” are now all in
their 40s, married, with excellent jobs and children of their own.
They live in different areas of the country but
have stayed connected until a year ago when our
oldest daughter began a mean-spirited tirade cataloging all the ways my husband and I had
wronged her over the years.
It started abruptly after we had to return one
day early from our granddaughter’s college graduation for an elderly friend’s funeral.
Our daughter accused us of demonstrating
that “some old dead guy” was more important
than her family. Her negativism escalated. Her
vitriol was in written form (e-mails and letters)
and on Facebook.
I stopped connecting with her on Facebook
because of her disrespectful public posts, then
she unfriended her dad.
We are told that her parental negativism continues online.
At my active encouragement, our son and his
dad flew across country to talk and listen, in an
effort to neutralize her attitude. It was not successful. She would not allow my husband to see
his 10-year-old grandson during that visit.
My husband is absolutely done with trying
and believes she is replaying a “generational
meanness” exhibited by her birth mother and
grandmother. Her brother tries to stay connected
with her. I think we should make a more creative
attempt to address her attitude toward us. She
needs professional counseling. How should we
approach this?
AN AGING STEPMOTHER
A. I don’t know what “generational meanness” is,
but I do know what narcissism is.
Here are some quotes from an article in Psychology Today describing a narcissist: “A cross
section of the narcissist’s ego will reveal high levels of self-esteem, grandiosity, self-focus, and selfimportance. . . . Narcissists’ language and demeanor is often geared toward one objective: to
maintain power in an interaction.”
Does this describe your daughter?
I am a layperson and I cannot diagnose your
daughter (or anyone) with a psychological disor-
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