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The Guardian - 30 October 2017

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Section:GDN BE PaGe:1 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:S
Cumbrian
punk!
Inside the
new northern
underground
Sent at 29/10/2017 21:50
cYanmaGentaYellowblack
Black Tudors
England?s
secret
history
Anna
Maxwell
Martin
Motherland
really
is me
all in g2
�00
Monday 30.10.17
Published in London
and Manchester
theguardian.com
�60 for
subscribers
page 30
MPs fear more
sleaze claims
will emerge
Hamilton clinches fourth F1 title
Sam Jones, Stephen Burgen and
Emma Graham-Harrison Barcelona
The deposed Catalan president, Carles
Puigdemont, could be in jail within weeks
for his part in the regional parliament?s
unilateral declaration of independence,
the Spanish government has said.
The warning came yesterday afternoon
as hundreds of thousands of people took
to the streets of Barcelona to call for Spanish unity, two days after just over half of
Catalan MPs voted for independence and
the Spanish government assumed control
of the region.
Spain?s prime minister, Mariano Rajoy,
has fired Puigdemont and his government
and called new regional elections for 21
December. Speaking to Associated Press,
the country?s foreign minister, Alfonso
Dastis, said Puigdemont could ?theoretically? run for re-election if the courts
decide he should remain free until then.
Spanish prosecutors said on Friday
evening that they would file charges of
?rebellion? against Puigdemont, a crime
punishable with up to 30 years in prison.
?I don?t know what kind of judicial
activity will happen between now and 21
December,? said Dastis. ?If he is not put in
jail at that time I think he is not ineligible.?
According to a poll for El Mundo, the
election might be very close, with antiindependence parties on 43.4% of the vote
and pro-independence parties on 42.5?%.
Dastis told Catalan separatists to ?think
twice? before rejecting the election result,
but hinted at negotiations for a new deal
for the region. ?I rule out full independence, but not necessarily more autonomy,
even if they are now already one of the
regions with the highest powers and competences not only in Spain but in the world
at large,? he said.
The demonstration in Barcelona, convened by the anti-independence group
Societat Civil Catalana, had a turnout of
1.3 million people, according to organisers. Police put the figure at 300,000. A
pro-unity protest earlier this month drew
similar numbers.
People with Spanish flags tied around
their necks congregated on the Passeig
de Gr郼ia, one of Barcelona?s main thoroughfares. Others carried white banners
with the flags of Catalonia, Spain and the
EU surrounded by a heart. The slogan was
?We are all Catalonia. Common sense for
co-existence? and the event
drew people from the region 7 May calls for action to protect staff
as minister admits sex toy accusation
Heather Stewart
Political editor
Theresa May insisted last night that she
is determined to take tough action to
protect Westminster staff against sexual
harassment as MPs in both main parties
predicted more sleaze allegations would
emerge in the coming days.
The prime minister wrote to the Speaker
of the House of Commons yesterday, calling for him to establish an independent
mediation service for staff wanting to
raise concerns about MPs? behaviour, and
to enforce a grievance procedure that is
currently voluntary.
The Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority recommends that a grievance procedure be included in employees?
contracts, but parliamentary staff work
directly for MPs, who are in effect selfemployed and so do not have to adopt
the policy.
?It does not have the required teeth as
contractually an MP does not have to follow the procedure. I do not believe this
situation can be tolerated any longer,? May
says in her letter.
A number of claims about the behaviour of senior politicians have emerged in
recent days, after the Harvey Weinstein
scandal encouraged women in other professions to share their experiences.
The former work and pensions secretary Stephen Crabb apologised for
?sexual chatter? with a 19-year-old who
had applied for a job in his office, while
the trade minister Mark Garnier admitted
asking a former assistant to buy sex toys
and calling her ?sugar tits?.
Labour MPs believe that more allegations will emerge on their own side.
Sheffield Hallam?s MP, Jared O?Mara, was
suspended from the party last week for a
series of misogynistic and homophobic
remarks on social media.
?We?re not going to be immune from
it,? said the Manchester Central MP, Lucy
Powell. ?It?s the attitudes, and the power
inequalities, whether it?s Hollywood, the
BBC or Westminster.?
The prime minister?s call for a mediator
follows demands from the Labour MPs
John Mann and Sarah Champion for
staff to be able to report allegations to
an independent authority ? particularly
when the person harassing them may be
their boss.
MPs say that late working hours, the
fact that many politicians literally lead a
double life ? with one home in London and
another in their constituency ? and Westminster?s many bars can all intensify the
risks for young staffers.
The shadow home secretary, Diane
Abbott, told the BBC?s Andrew Marr that
the culture was even worse 30 years ago
when she was first elected.
?You would have sort of micro-sexual
aggression. So women would get up in
the chamber and Tories opposite would
do this gesture like they were weighing
their breasts,? she said.
?There was harassment, there were
jokes which weren?t that funny ? it was
partly to do with the fact it was a very
male environment ? 650 MPs; when I went
there, just 20-odd women.
?It was partly to do with the idea of all
these men away from home, it was partly
to do with the fact there were eight bars
and the very long hours and the bars were
open for as long as we?re sitting, and partly
with the notion that what happens in
Westminster stays in Westminster.
?It was worse ? it?s a little bit better now
? but there?s a long way to go.?
Mann has threatened to name a parliamentary colleague who he said was
thrown off a foreign trip for harassing
women.
Separately, MPs were sharing stories
yesterday about a Conservative MP who
allegedly takes pictures of young men in
compromising positions and uses them
to extract sexual favours. And the Sunday Times reported an unnamed senior
cabinet minister had grabbed a woman?s
thigh and said: ?God I love those tits.? One
former Tory minister said that ?the whole
culture needs to change?.
Downing Street flatly denied reports
Continued on page 4 Catalonia?s
president
facing jail,
Spain warns
Lewis Hamilton took his fourth F1 world title in Mexico yesterday despite finishing
ninth after a collision on the first corner Photograph: Tee/LAT/Rex Sport, page 1 Continued on page 2 Brown: I didn?t show enough emotion to win the election
12A
*
Heather Stewart
Gordon Brown believes Labour failed
to win the 2010 general election partly
because he was ?not an ideal fit? for
today?s ?touchy-feely? politics and the
public displays of emotion required.
In his autobiography, published next
week, Brown says his strategy to cushion
the economy against the impact of the
global financial crash was correct, but he
failed to express his ideas to voters. ?I fell
short in communicating my ideas. I failed
to rally the nation. We won the battle ? to
escape recession ? but we lost the war ? to
build something better,? Brown says.
He says today?s politicians ? unlike
those of the past ? are expected to show
their feelings, and reveal aspects of their
personal lives, something he found particularly difficult. He expresses bewilderment at the popularity of Twitter and
says the internet is often little more than
a shouting match.
?The modern version of ?connecting?
seems to increasingly include a public display of emotion, with the latter ? authentic or not ? seen as evidence of a sincerity
required for political success,? he writes.
?In a far more touchy-feely era, our lead-
?Being conspicuously
demonstrative is
uncomfortable for me?
Gordon Brown
ers speak of public issues in intensely personal ways and assume they can win votes
simply by telling their electors that they
?feel their pain?. For me, being conspicuously demonstrative is uncomfortable.?
He adds: ?I am not, I hope, remote, offhand or uncommunicative. But if I wasn?t
an ideal fit for an age when the personal
side of politics had come to the fore, I hope
people will come to understand this was
not an aloofness or detachment or, I hope,
insensitivity or a lack of emotional intelligence on my part.?
Brown?s discomfort with the personal
nature of today?s politics has echoes in
some of the criticisms of Theresa May,
whose sometimes stilted delivery has
seen her branded a ?Maybot?.
As a politician who was born, as he puts
it, ?40 years before the world wide web?,
Brown expresses bafflement at the pervasiveness of Twitter and other social media
platforms in politics.
?The internet often functions like a
shouting match without an umpire. Trying to persuade people through social
media seems to matter less than finding
an echo chamber that reinforces one?s
own point of view.
?Too often, all we are hearing is the
sound of voices like our own. The turnaround is so instantaneous that, for the
luxury of sounding off, we often forgo
the duty to sit and think. And because
differentiation is the name of the political game ? showing what divides you
Continued on page 2 Blue Planet II
After 125 expeditions to
39 countries, it?s back ?
Sam Wollaston?s review
In g2 Section:GDN BE PaGe:2 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
2
Sent at 29/10/2017 21:12
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*
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
News
The
TheGuardian,
Guardian,King's
Kings Place, 90 York Way, London N1 9GU
Catalan leader
could be jailed,
Spain warns
Brown: I wasn?t
touchy-feely
enough to win
continued from page 1
continued from page 1
and beyond as well as members of the
Spanish government and pro-unity Catalan MPs.
Speaking before the rally, In閟 Arrimadas of the Citizens party said: ?The silent
majority of Catalans are once again taking to the street to show that the majority of Catalans feel Catalan, Spanish and
European.? She said the time had come to
?restore Catalonia?s institutions?.
Juan Montalvo, 65, from Matar�, 20
miles from Barcelona, said: ?Catalan society is divided. We need to achieve more
unity, but also to show [pro-independence
Catalans] that we are 50% and they need to
respect us like we need to respect them.?
Some protesters shouted ?viva Espa馻?
while others vented their anger, chanting:
?Puigdemont to prison!?
Despite the Spanish government?s
unprecedented use of article 155 of the
constitution to take control of Catalonia?s
civil service, police, finances and public
media, some politicians have refused to
recognise the measures.
Writing in the Catalan newspaper El
Punt Avui yesterday, Oriol Junqueras,
the vice-president of the deposed Catalan government, accused Rajoy?s ruling People?s party (PP) of overthrowing
regional democracy. ?We cannot recognise the coup d?閠at against Catalonia,
nor any of the anti-democratic decisions
that the PP is adopting by remote control
from Madrid,? he said. ?The president is
and will continue to be Carles Puigdemont
? at least until the day the citizens decide
otherwise in a free election.
However, he said decisions would have
to be made over the coming days that
?won?t be easy to understand?.
from your opponent, not what you have
in common ? achieving a consensus in
a wilderness of� silos is difficult, if not
impossible.?
Brown, who had long had problems
with his eyes caused by a rugby accident
when a teenager, also reveals that for a
period in 2009, he believed he could be
about to lose his sight, after doctors discovered the retina in his remaining good
eye was torn in two places.
He says that he woke in Downing Street
and ?I knew something was wrong. My
vision was very foggy.? He attended an
engagement, speaking off the cuff because
he could not see well enough to read his
notes, and was then driven straight to
Moorfields eye hospital. When advised
to have surgery he asked for a second
opinion, and the second surgeon said an
operation would be too risky. Brown says
he feels ?lucky beyond words? that his
retina has not deteriorated further.
The former Labour prime minister,
who spent years harrying his old political
ally, Tony Blair, to hand over the reins of
power, says he remains proud of his record
during the financial crisis.
?While I did not predict the recession
that exploded out of America and infected
the world, I did immediately grasp the
need to act with unprecedented speed.?
But he says he regrets not being allowed
to finish the job of reforming the economy.
?Banking should have been transformed,
our international institutions refashioned, inequality radically reversed ? and
if we are to be properly equipped to face
the next crisis this is still the agenda we
must pursue.?
David Cameron and his shadow chan-
NEWSPAPERS
SUPPORT
RECYCLING
The recycled paper
content
of UK newspapers
�
in 2016 was 62.8%
Pro-unity
protesters
gathered in
Barcelona
yesterday, waving
Spanish flags,
after the Catalan
parliament voted
to split from Spain
and the national
government in
Madrid imposed
direct rule
Photograph: Jeff
J燤itchell/Getty
1.3 m
Estimated crowd at the demonstration in
Barcelona yesterday calling for unity with
Spain, according to the organisers
While the Spanish government has
sacked the Catalan government and as
many as 150 officials, it remains to be seen
to what extent it will take over the running
of the civil service. Government employees, head teachers and tax officials said
they had not received any instructions.
In an open letter to all police stationed
in Catalonia ? including the regional police
force, the Mossos d?Esquadra ? Spain?s
interior minister, Juan Ignacio Zoido said
officers had a duty to ?obey orders, guarantee the rights of all, and fulfil the mandates? of both the Spanish constitution
and the region?s statue.
It is unclear whether Madrid plans to
micro-manage Catalonia for the 53 days
until the election.
Belgium?s immigration minister, Theo
Francken, incurred Madrid?s wrath by
suggesting that Puigdemont could be
offered asylum in the country.
AFP contributed to this report
Matthew d?Ancona, page 25 020 3353 2000
cellor and political strategist George
Osborne ran a successful general election
campaign in 2010 that pinned the blame
for the financial crisis on Labour mismanagement, and the party has struggled to
regain its reputation for economic competence ever since.
Brown also seeks to reclaim his reputation as a firm enemy of neoliberalism ?
the set of rightwing economic policies in
which some backers of the current Labour
leader, Jeremy Corbyn, suggest the Blair
and Brown governments were complicit.
?Throughout my years in parliament,
we were up against what it really meant
? to liberalise, privatise, deregulate and
tolerate high levels of unemployment as
the price for keeping inflation down.
?In its unbridled form, this stateshrinking, taxcutting, freemarket fundamentalism meant, for many people, the
pain of unemployment, poverty and being
left behind,? he says.
Gordon Brown?s share
of the proceeds from
his book will go to a
research laboratory
set up in memory of
the baby he and his
wife lost in 2002
When Brown stood to succeed Blair as
Labour leader ? and prime minister ? the
only candidate who stood against him was
John McDonnell, now the shadow chancellor, who argued that Brown was not
sufficiently leftwing.
Brown continued to serve as the MP for
his home constituency of Kirkcaldy and
Cowdenbeath during the Tory-Lib Dem
coalition, but stepped down from parliament before the 2015 general election.
He rarely makes forays into politics,
though he has called for radical constitutional reform as a response to the challenges created by Brexit.
Brown?s earnings from the book, My
Life, Our Times, will go to the Jennifer
Brown research laboratory at Edinburgh
University, set up in memory of the baby
daughter Brown and his wife lost in 2002.
Guardian News & Media, Kings Place, 90 York Way, London N1 9GU. 020 3353 2000. Fax 020 7837 2114. In Manchester: Centurion House, 129 Deansgate, Manchester M3 3WR. Telephone Sales: 020 7611 9000. The Guardian lists links to third-party websites, but does not endorse them or guarantee their authenticity
or accuracy. Missing sections: 0800 839 100. Back issues from Historic Newspapers: 0870 165 1470. guardian.backissuenewspapers.co.uk. The Guardian is published by Guardian News & Media, Kings Place, 90 York Way, London N1 9GU, and at Centurion House, 129 Deansgate, Manchester M3 3WR. Printed at Guardian
Print Centre, Rick Roberts Way, Stratford, London E15 2GN; Guardian Print Centre North, Longbridge Road, Manchester M17 1SN; and at Carn Web, 2 Esky Drive, Carn, Portadown, Craigavon, County Armagh BT63 5YY. No. 53,241, Monday 30 October 2017. Registered as a newspaper at the Post Office ISSN 0261-3077
Section:GDN BE PaGe:3 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 29/10/2017 17:54
cYanmaGentaYellowblack
*
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
3
News
Weimar-era
drama that
could make
Germany a
major power
in television
Big-budget production with contemporary
echoes sold to 60 countries including UK
Kate Connolly Berlin
A lavish 16-part TV series set between
the two world wars is being tipped as
the first big-budget German production
that could become a global blockbuster.
Babylon Berlin, a drama set in the
Weimar Republic replete with crime,
corruption and decadence, cost ?38m
(�m) to make and is the most expensive TV series ever filmed in Germany.
Critics are predicting it will compete
with the likes of Breaking Bad, House of
Cards and Downton Abbey.
The series began airing in Germany
earlier this month to critical acclaim and
attracted the sort of attention usually
reserved for Scandinavian crime dramas
or US productions. It has been sold to
60 countries, including the UK, where
it is due to show on Sky Atlantic in
33m
�
Budget for the
16-part drama,
said to be the
most expensive
ever filmed
in Germany
November. Die Zeit called it ?extremely
dynamic ? combining sex, crime and
history in a pleasantly undemanding
way?, but added that its artistic success was topped by its ability to mirror
aspects of the present political mood.
The series charts the fragile democracy in the Weimar Republic shortly
before the Nazi rise to power, and
comes at a time when fears are growing
over the successes of the populist right
across Europe, including the entry into
the German parliament of the rightwing
Alternative f黵 Deutschland (AfD) party.
?The plot points at almost uncanny
parallels to the present day, which gives
it another relevance altogether,? Die
Zeit?s critic wrote.
Filmed over 180 days, the series was
largely shot at 300 different locations
in Berlin and the nearby Babelsberg
Studios, employing 5,000 extras. Made
with a foreign audience in mind, critics
say it could be a gamechanger for German television.
?At last, a big television series from
Germany ? one which has the potential
to match up internationally ? the start of
a new era,? declared Manager Magazine.
Based on the bestselling crime novels
of Volker Kutscher, whose plots span the
years from 1929 to 1934, Babylon Berlin
tells the tale of Gereon Rath (Volker
Bruch), a police inspector and trau-
matised veteran of the first world war,
who takes morphine to control his posttraumatic stress disorder. His forays into
Berlin?s criminal underworld drive the
story and give an insight into the heady
days of Berlin in the late 1920s.
The production opulently reproduces
the wild nightclubs full of risque revelry,
juxtaposed with massacres of political activists and depictions of poverty
amid rising inflation. Ever present is
the building tension that will ultimately
lead to the rise of the Nazis.
Babylon Berlin?s makers hope to cash
in on the growing international interest
in depictions of German history in popular culture, as seen by the recent success of Deutschland ?83, which followed
the exploits of a young Stasi officer.
But Babylon Berlin is by far the
riskiest project yet from
m a commercial
standpoint. Cultural observers
bservers say
it coincides with Germany?s
any?s
increased prominence on the
international stage, as well
as recognition of its efforts
to deal with its dark history.
story.
?It could be that Babylon
ylon
Berlin is the first big Gererman TV production
since Das Boot which
enjoys really relevant
success abroad,? wrote
Spiegel?s cultural critic,,
Scenes from
Babylon Berlin
(above) and
previous screen
successes
Deutschland 83
(bottom), made
in 2015, and Das
Boot, from 1981
Main photograph:
Fr閐閞ic Batier/
X Filme
Christian Buss. ?Let?s not be shy to say
it: we [Germans] are big again ? as the
world champions of angst.?
Not everyone is full of praise, however. Kurt Scheel, a veteran cultural
observer, has called it ?abhorrent? for
depicting cliches about ?evil Germans?.
?This was about making a German hit
series that is replete with enough cliches
(?can we have a bit more Nazi??) so that
it can be well-marketed and sold to the
enemy ? it is cowardly and risks nothing,? he wrote.
Babylon Berlin?s three directors have
insisted the series is relevant for modern
audiences. ?Even while we were making it, we were effectively confronted
with contemporary events as they happened,? Tom Tykwer, one of the trio,
said, citing the Brexit vote, the rise of
Trump and the success of the
Donald Trum
populist right
rig in Europe.
?As an idea,
democracy is up for
id
negotiation again, as much a topic
series as it is now,? he said.
in the serie
to us and while
?That was striking
st
unexpected ? rather creepy.?
not quite unex
Babylon Berlin is on Sky
Baby
Atlantic
from 5 November.
Atl
The novel of the same
Th
name by Volker Kutscher
na
is published in English by
Sandstone Press.
S
Nazis were Hitler?s second-choice party after alternative turned him down
Dalya Alberge
Adolf Hitler initially tried to join a different political party, and only after it
rejected him did he turn to the Nazis, a
leading historian has discovered.
Thomas Weber, professor of history at
the University of Aberdeen, has unearthed
a document revealing that in 1919, the
newly formed German Socialist party
shunned Hitler, telling him it did not want
him joining or writing for its paper.
Weber said ?history would have taken
a different path? if he had been accepted.
Although also far-right, the party was then
bigger and more successful than the Nazis.
Hitler might have settled for a minor role
and would ?have been unlikely to ever
come to power?, Weber said. ?Until a year
earlier, [he] had not shown any leadership
Hitler might never
have come to
power in Germany
qualities and had been happy to follow
orders.? Hitler became leader of the Nazis
in 1921. The German Socialist party was
dissolved the following year.
All other senior members in the early
Nazi party favoured merging with the German Socialists as a junior partner in the
early 1920s. ?Had it not been for Hitler?s
steadfast refusal ? at one point, he even
resigned from the party for that reason ?
the Nazi party would have been absorbed
by the German Socialist party and thus
would have disappeared, and history
would have taken a different path,? Weber
said. ?With Hitler?s rejection by the party,
Hitler?s behaviour at the time ? which no
one could really previously explain persuasively ? finally makes sense.?
The document discovered by Weber
is from the testimony of Hans Georg
Grassinger, founding chairman of the
German Socialists. Weber found it in the
archive of the Institute of Contemporary
History in Munich: ?It?s just been overlooked ? they have so much stuff.?
The document records: ?In the autumn
of 1919, around September, Hitler
appeared in the office of the publishing
house to see Grassinger and offered [to]
write for the paper, and to join and work
for the German Socialist party. He didn?t
have any money at the time and he also
asked to borrow money from Grassinger.
But they [told] him that they had no use
for him in the paper and that they also did
not want to have him in the party.?
Weber?s research will feature in his
forthcoming book, Becoming Hitler: The
Making of a Nazi. He describes the discovery as ?highly significant?, saying: ?There
?They said
they had
no use for
him and
that they
did not
want
him in
the party?
has been a tendency to see in Hitler?s
behaviour, between his joining the Nazi
party and the mid-1920s, the erratic doings
of a prima donna, who acted totally irrationally and ? besides being a gifted orator
? did not have many talents as a political
operator. In my book, I show that this gets
the story totally wrong. Hitler was, in fact,
a skilful and conniving political operator
who ? would never forgive anyone who
had ever cold-shouldered him and turned
him down.?
Weber added that, on all three occasions when mergers were proposed
between the two parties, ?Hitler put up
an absolute stink?.
?The story of Hitler being turned down
by one party and then his actions in the
new party that did accept him ? the Nazi
party ? are thus intimately linked,? he said.
Section:GDN BE PaGe:4 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
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Sent at 29/10/2017 21:15
*
cYanmaGentaYellowblack
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
National
Figures in art
world say abuse
common after
publisher quits
amid sex claims
Nicola Slawson
Theresa May and
her husband,
Philip, attending
church in her
Maidenhead
constituency
yesterday as
sleaze rumours
swirled around
Westminster
Photograph:
Peter
Macdiarmid/
LNP
May: ?Those working in the Commons
should be treated properly and fairly?
continued from page 1
that the prime minister receives regular
updates from the whips, who enforce
party discipline, about the sexual antics of
her MPs. Instead they said she had asked
to see the chief whip, Gavin Williamson,
and her chief of staff, Gavin Barwell, on
Friday to ask if more should be done about
those accused of sexual harassment.
In her letter to the Speaker, John Bercow, May said parliament should be a safe
place for young people to work. ?I believe
it is important that those who work in the
House of Commons are treated properly
and fairly, as would be expected in any
modern workplace?. She called for other
political leaders to work on a cross-party
The trade minister
Mark Garnier, above,
did not deny calling
Caroline Edmondson,
left, ?sugar tits? and
getting her to buy
two vibrators
basis to tighten up the rules.
A spokesman for Jeremy Corbyn said
that ?there must be robust procedures
inside as well as outside parliament ?
Jeremy is ready to meet the Speaker and
the prime minister as soon as possible to
strengthen those procedures and parliamentary staff employment conditions.?
Labour also accused May of ?washing her hands? of the harassment claims
against Garnier after she asked the Cabinet Office to investigate the circumstances
in which he asked his former assistant to
Media
BBC suspends 5 Live presenter
buy sex toys. The Cabinet Office oversees
the ministerial code, which demands ?the
highest standards of propriety?.
However, the events in question took
place in 2010, before Garnier was a minister. The shadow Cabinet Office minister
Jon Trickett said: ?By referring wrongdoing to the Cabinet Office, the prime
minister appears to be attempting to
narrow any judgment on her minister?s
behaviour to whether or not he is in breach
of the ministerial code, but this is limited
in scope. The prime minister ? as party
leader ? ought not to wash her hands of
these matters in this way.? Garnier, the MP
for Wyre Forest did not deny the events
detailed by his former assistant Caroline
Edmondson in the Mail on Sunday. ?I?m
not going to be dishonest,? Garnier said.
He insisted that referring to Edmondson
as ?sugar tits?, as she says he did, was a
reference to the BBC comedy Gavin and
Stacey, saying: ?It absolutely does not
constitute harassment.? Neither did he
deny encouraging her to buy two sex toys
in Soho, standing outside the shop while
she made the purchase.
The BBC Radio 5 Live sports presenter
George Riley has been suspended by
the broadcaster after complaints of
sexual harassment.
Riley had been due to cover the
Rugby League World Cup for 5 Live
but was absent for the opening match
between Australia and England on Friday and for Saturday?s match between
Wales and Papua New Guinea.
Riley did not respond to a request
The sports presenter
George Riley is understood to have been
told of his suspension
last Friday morning
after complaints of
sexual harassment
for comment. He is understood to have
been told of his suspension on Friday
morning. Riley joined 5 Live, based in
Salford, in 2004. He has also presented
sports events for the BBC and fronted
Channel 5?s Football on 5, which shows
highlights from the English Football
League, between 2015 and 2017.
It is understood the BBC has received
eight complaints about Riley and that
these are now being handled by the
broadcaster?s internal corporate secu-
rity and investigations team. The team
is led by Carol Ann Kinley-Smith, a former Metropolitan police detective, and
is handling multiple allegations of sexual harassment. The BBC is expected
to make a decision on Riley?s future
following the inquiry.
The BBC?s latest annual report ?
published in July ? reveals it opened
41 formal cases regarding bullying and
harassment complaints in the previous
12 months. They included three sexual
harassment cases, up from one in 201516. Eight of the cases were continuing.
The BBC has encouraged staff to
come forward with complaints since
the Harvey Weinstein scandal began.
Weinstein faces numerous allegations
of sexual assault and harassment.
The allegations against Riley were
first reported by the Sunday Times,
which said that a ?secret group of the
BBC?s top female presenters?, including
Mishal Husain and Victoria Derbyshire,
had uncovered suspected cases of sexual harassment at the broadcaster.
Yesterday Husain hit back at the
article, saying it was wrong to portray
the group as being ?focused on sexual
harassment or targeting individuals?.
More than 150 artists, curators, museum
directors and others have signed a letter denouncing sexual harassment and
abuses of power in the art world.
It follows allegations against Knight
Landesman, co-publisher of the leading
arts journal Artforum, who resigned on
Wednesday hours after a lawsuit was filed
in New York accusing him of harassment.
?We are gallerists, artists, writers, editors, curators, directors, arts administrators, assistants and interns ? workers of
the art world ? and we have been groped,
undermined, harassed, infantilised,
scorned, threatened and intimidated by
those in positions of power who control
access to resources and opportunities,?
the letter says.
Those who signed the letter, which
will be shared on social media platforms
using the hashtag #notsurprised, say that
?abuse of power comes as no surprise?
and that requests for sexual favours in
exchange for career advancement are
commonplace. ?The resignation of one
publisher from one high-profile magazine does not solve the larger, more insidious problem: an art world that upholds
inherited power structures at the cost of
ethical behaviour. Similar abuses occur
frequently and internationally on a large
scale within this industry,? they say.
Sarah McCrory, director of the new
contemporary art gallery at Goldsmiths,
University of London, said the letter came
about ?from discussions on social media
between colleagues initially about how to
react to the Artforum situation. We were
concerned about how it was being dealt
with and about accountability.?
The art writer Valerie Werder, who is
one of the women named in the lawsuit
against Landesman, got involved in the
letter?s creation after being disappointed
by Artforum?s handling of the Landesman
allegations.
She said: ?After the news of that broke,
Artforum?s response was something that
I couldn?t support. It wasn?t enough and
I was very disappointed as it seemed to
absolve the responsibility I thought Artforum should take. What started as an original group of people to discuss this specific
case became a really strong collective of
voices around the world that wanted to
make active change, stand up for victims
and show acts of solidarity.?
She added that choosing to speak out
was hard but the group of women had
helped. ?Suddenly we were over 100
strong and I felt this incredible amount of
support from an international and very
diverse community of women and gender
non-confirming people,? she said.
Emma Astner, co-founder of the Koppe
Astner gallery in Glasgow, said they hoped
the letter would get people talking. ?The
issue is incredibly complex and has many
layers but the only way to start to address
it is to start a conversation and that?s what
I believe the letter will do,? she said.
She added: ?There isn?t one solution
because it?s a problem that?s embedded
in society in many different ways, so we
have to fix it from many different angles.
The only way to do that is to talk about it.?
Graham Ruddick
Letters, page 26 Leader comment, page 24 Royal Court artistic chief to draw up anti-harassment rules for theatres
Nicola Slawson
The sexual harassment allegations about
the theatre director Max Stafford-Clark
are just one of many ?skeletons in the cupboard? in the theatre industry, according
to the artistic director of one of Britain?s
most famous theatres, who will be drawing up behaviour guidelines she hopes all
theatres, and other industries, will adopt.
Vicky Featherstone, who has been in
post at the Royal Court Theatre in London since 2013, was speaking after No
Grey Area, a day of action at the theatre
that aimed to shine a light on the systemic nature of sexual harassment in the
theatre industry while also seeking to find
a solution.
For more than five hours on Saturday,
150 stories of sexual harassment were
read out on stage, ranging from tales of
subtle belittling to serious sexual assault
that Featherstone said left those present
?ashen-faced? and ?quite shaken?.
After the Harvey Weinstein scandal
broke, Featherstone tweeted to followers that British theatre must speak out
as Hollywood had, and asked for suggestions on what could be done. She received
a deluge of messages from colleagues
and peers in theatre, and within 10 days
had set up the event. Since her tweet, it
has emerged that Stafford-Clark, a former artistic director of the Royal Court,
was forced out of the Out of Joint theatre company he founded as a result of a
formal complaint that he had made lewd
comments to a member of staff. He has
denied any unlawful behaviour.
Speaking yesterday, Featherstone said
she knew stories would come out from
the past at her own theatre: ?The Royal
Court has always been a place where brave
and courageous stories have been told but
it has also had a real history of complex
abuses of power. There are a lot of skeletons in the cupboard at the Royal Court
? Max is just one to come out but there are
others. But there are in other places as
well; it is no worse at the Court.?
She was quick to stress that she had
also been contacted by people working in
journalism, the music industry and parliament. ?Yes, it?s hugely problematic [in
theatre] but it?s just hugely problematic in
society, and that?s really important to say.?
However, Featherstone was optimistic
that theatre, and society as a whole, were
reaching the point where sexual harassment would no longer be acceptable. ?It
felt like the day [of action] did that and like
we have got to the top of a mountain and
a rip has been torn in the patriarchy,? she
said. ?I?m not saying it will all be solved
but things will never be the same again.?
Featherstone admitted to being ?more
scared than ever before? when sending
the first tweet. ?I knew if I started the conversation, it was about to unleash so much
and that you can never go back from it.?
She added: ?There have been stories for
years but there hasn?t been a Harvey Weinstein moment to kick things off before.
We?re fortunate that that Hollywood outpouring has galvanised us to stop us being
hypocritical and knowing these things
without doing anything about it.?
Last year, the Royal Court held a
company-wide meeting on sexual harassment, following five complaints of
?Max is just one ? there
are a lot of skeletons in
the theatre?s cupboard?
Vicky Featherstone
incidents, which resulted in a mutually
agreed code of conduct. Featherstone said
the aim of that meeting was to ?eliminate
the so-called grey areas that so often allow
people to get away with abuses of power?.
On Saturday, four similar industry-wide
meetings were held. Featherstone will be
using the ideas gathered in these meetings
to draw up a code of behaviour that she
hopes will be adopted by theatres, casting directors, agents, drama schools ? and
even other industries.
The 150 accounts of sexual harassment
read out on Saturday had been submitted
anonymously through an open call on the
Royal Court website. They were curated
by Lucy Morrison, associate director of the
theatre, who said it was important to hear
stories so patterns of behaviour could be
recognised. No perpetrators were named,
so the stories could be shared free of legal
consequences.
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*
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
National editor: Dan Sabbagh
national@theguardian.com
5
National
020 3353 2000
?The future?s bright? as Young Lions roar to victory
Triumph for under-17s in
World Cup gives England
fans hope for glories ahead
Ben Fisher
?The future is bright,? tweeted the
former England striker Gary Lineker.
The Chelsea manager, Antonio Conte,
echoed the same sentiment, while Pep
Guardiola and Ars鑞e Wenger looked
decidedly excited.
The reason for their animation was
the performance of an England football team ? not the lacklustre seniors,
but this weekend?s England under-17s?
World Cup triumph and the prospect of
what this team could become.
?Our future is bright, congratulations to the boys, staff and families,?
said David Beckham. ?What an amazing
?We have very talented
players in England
capable of outstanding
achievements?
Huw Jennings, Fulham FC
achievement ? let?s now build for the
future and give this talented group the
opportunity.?
Defender Marc Guehi, who joined
Chelsea as an under-eight and is now
17, described the Young Lions? victory
in Kolkata as ?the best moment of my
life?, while goalkeeper Curtis Anderson
dedicated his winner?s medal to his late
grandfather. ?I want to dedicate this win
to my grandad, who died while I was at
the Euros,? he said. ?It?s something you
work towards. It?s a dream come true.?
The Sessegnon household in Surrey
would certainly have been a good place
to be after the young England side?s
remarkable 5-2 win against Spain. It is
England players
celebrate after the
Fifa U-17 World
Cup final in India.
Above right,
Steven (left) and
Ryan Sessegnon
Photograph: Jan
Kruger/Fifa/Getty
home to 17-year-old twin brothers, Ryan
and Steven: both are Fulham players
and both have starred on the international stage in this unprecedented year
for England?s youth teams. Steven was
part of the England under-17s side that
put a smile on the face of the country?s
soccer fans with Saturday?s dramatic
comeback victory. In July, brother Ryan
helped England?s under-19s to the European Championship title.
They are a football family: the twins
live with their older brother, Chris,
a semi-professional footballer with
Margate, and their mother in Worcester
Park, Surrey. St閜hane Sess鑗non, a
former Premier League midfielder with
West Bromwich Albion, is a cousin.
In the past five months England?s
under-17 and under-20 teams have been
crowned world champions, while the
under-19s won the European Champion-
ship in Georgia. A mixed-age squad also
successfully defended their title at the
Toulon Tournament in June.
Before England?s weekend triumph,
the Duke of Cambridge, who is president of the Football Association, sent a
letter to the under-17s squad, which was
read to the team before Saturday?s final
in Kolkata.
The Sessegnon brothers are at the
forefront of England?s next generation,
alongside players such as Manchester
City?s Phil Foden and Liverpool?s Rhian
Brewster, both of whom scored for the
under-17s in the World Cup final.
In the aftermath of Saturday?s victory,
the manager, Steve Cooper, heralded
the爀ffect of St George?s Park, the 330acre site opened five years ago in Burton
upon Trent, which acts as the national
football hub.
Huw Jennings, Fulham?s academy
director, reckons a ?refreshing greater
unity? between clubs and the England youth programme has helped
the nation?s youth teams, but also
points towards the mentality of players
involved in recent success stories.
?We have very talented players in
England, who are capable of outstanding achievements,? he said. ?We can
show that we are as good as anyone.?
Section:GDN BE PaGe:6 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:S
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*
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
Catalonia
7
News
Analysis
Plenty of scope
on both sides
for things
to go wrong
Giles Tremlett
W
Pro-unity
demonstrators,
some at Casa
Batll�, left,
wave Spanish
and Catalan
flags yesterday.
Below: Carles
Puigdemont, the
separatist leader
Main photograph:
Pierre-Philippe
Marcou/Getty
?We are Catalans too?: silent majority
find voice in support of united Spain
Hundreds of thousands
gather in central Barcelona
Rally includes leftwingers
as well as conservatives
Emma Graham-Harrison Barcelona
Dario Fern醤dez Barbero headed into
central Barcelona with one word for
his fellow citizens, printed out in red
and attached to his backpack: ?Pau?,
meaning peace in Catalan.
A sea of flags, Spanish, European and
the official Catalan senyera banner ? a
rival to the unofficial pro-independence
estrelada version ? waved around him,
but the 65-year-old said he wasn?t comfortable with any of them.
?I?m not very keen on flags, so I
printed this out to carry,? he said, pointing to the sign on his pack. ?It?s important for democracy that people know
not all Catalans are supporters of independence, and we are just as Catalan as
those who want to leave Spain.?
There was a sense of exhilaration
among the hundreds of thousands who
joined him, flocking into one of Barcelona?s most famous boulevards for only
the second major pro-union demonstration in recent years.
?I think marches can change
things,? said Mar韆 Carmen Rodr韌uez
Pareja, who has two jobs, as a cleaner
and at a bakery. Still recovering from
surgery that forced her to sit out the
last pro-union march on 8 October, she
was determined to turn out yesterday.
?We have shown ourselves. We have
come out on the streets to show we
have voices and votes too,? she said
of a group often dubbed the silent
majority.
Opinion polls show independence
supporters are a minority in Catalonia, although their ranks have swelled
considerably from a decade ago, and
quirks of the voting system gave proindependence parties a slim majority in
parliament after the last election. But
they have usually been far more vocal,
and visible, than those who support
remaining part of Spain.
?This is my first time at a demonstration,? said Geraldine, 14, out with her
older sister and draped in the Spanish
flag. ?We wanted to say that we don?t
see a future outside Spain. Today gives
us hope. It shows we aren?t a minority,
we are a majority.?
In the brilliant autumn sun, crowds
gathered, chanted, listened to speeches
and sometimes peeled off into tapas
bars and cafes lining the route to grab
a snack or drink. Many came in family
groups, and even brought their pets,
including beagles and chihuahuas
boasting miniature Spanish flags tied to
their collars.
?I am also part of Catalonia, and I
don?t recognise [Catalan leader Carles] Puigdemont?s right to speak in my
name,? Josep Borrell, a Catalan and
former president of the European parliament, told the crowd, summing up the
sentiments of many listening to him.
?What are borders? They are the scars
that history has left engraved on the
world, engraved with blood and fire.
Let?s not raise more, because they have
cost a lot to build,? he added.
The rally, called under the slogan ?We
are all Catalonia?, united rival groups
from socialists to the conservatives who
control the central government. It was
organised by the grassroots Societat
Civil Catalana, which put turnout at
more than a million, although police
said it was only 300,000.
No violence was reported, but there
were undercurrents of anger and frustration. Some were directed at the
regional government ? with marchers
chanting ?Prison for Puigdemont? ? others at what they described as a climate
of fear created by vocal and well-organised supporters of independence.
?I am tired of being looked at badly
for wanting to be Spanish as well as Catalan,? said Caridad San Jos�, a 33-yearold dental nurse helping to carry a vast
Catalan flag ? the official banner of the
regional government, not the estrelada
of independence supporters ? down the
Passeig de Gr郼ia.
Like many on the march, she has family roots outside the region but was
?We wanted to say
ay
that we don?t seee
a future outside
Spain. Today
gives us hope?
Geraldine, 14
born in Catalonia, grew up there speaking Catalan, and resents having her
Catalan identity questioned. ?If you say
you don?t want an independent Catalonia, you are called a fascist, a hangover
from the Franco era. [The independence
movement] is like a sect,? she said.
Angel Pena, 58, a pharmacist, was
particularly angry at being attacked as a
fascist. ?My whole family are leftwing,?
he said. ?My grandfather was executed
by fascists, shot in the head.?
He also came out to protest because
he was frightened about rifts opening up
in the Catalonia he moved to as a child,
and has considered his home ever since.
?This is breaking apart families,
friendships of 20, 30 years,? he said.
?I have a brother who I can?t speak to
about this. He?s from [the western Spanish region of] Extremadura just like me,
but supports independence.?
Calls for unity, and an end to division
in one of the most prosperous parts of
Spain, also came from the platform.
?I?m here to speak in the name of
coexistence
and mutual respect,?
coexiste
said燜rancisco
Frutos, former secsaid燜
retary general of the Spanish Communist
muni party.
He followed up with a mockiing declaration of guilt, aimed
at pro-independence groups
a
which have accused their
w
opponents of betraying Catao
llonia. ?Yes, I?m a traitor ? a
ttraitor to the cause of identitybased racism.?
b
Stephen Burgen contributed to
St
report
this re
hen Catalans
vote for a new
regional government on
December 21,
truncheonwielding riot
police should
be absent and the results will clearly be
valid. But Mariano Rajoy?s decision to
call a snap election, combined with the
imposition of direct rule, does not magically resolve the problem.
Much can, and probably will, go
wrong before then. It is still not clear
that all separatist parties will stand. If
they do, they look unlikely to maintain
the unity that has turned them into
such a formidable force. Conservatives and anti-capitalists were always a
strange, and strained, alliance.
Oriol Junqueras, sacked as deputy
prime minister with the rest of the
Catalan government on Friday, is set to
become the independence movement?s
leader as his Catalan Republican Left
(ERC) party storms past more moderate
rivals. His warning yesterday that the
movement must now take ?decisions
that will be difficult to understand?
reveals a terrible dilemma. If his party
stands, it will be accused of backtracking on claims that Catalonia is now an
independent republic. But if it does not
stand, it will be accused of cowardice.
Rajoy?s government has challenged
the deposed Catalan prime minister,
Carles Puigdemont, to stand so that
voters can ?judge? his behaviour. Yet
Puigdemont will reportedly step back.
His conservative Catalan European
Democratic party ? a recent convert to
separatism ? has clearly lost its position
as the region?s dominant party.
With emboldened unionists taking a
turn to demonstrate in Barcelona yesterday and many politicians already in
campaign mode, the separatist side was
considering its options. In many ways,
this is the best possible moment for it to
go into elections. With some of its leaders now remanded in jail (but able to run
as candidates) while Puigdemont and
others face long-running court cases,
sympathy is running high. The memory
of police violence during the chaotic
October 1 referendum remains fresh.
Rajoy wants voters to punish separatists for recent chaos and any future disruption ? including forthcoming strikes.
With Catalonia?s biggest banks and other
companies moving their headquarters
elsewhere, and the lack of EU support
now obvious, he hopes waverers will
back away from independence.
R
ajoy expects a ?silent majority? of non-separatists
to shake off their apathy
and vote. This is risky,
since the police violence
on October 1 may have
shrunk their numbers, or
they may prove to be a
figment of unionist imagination.
In the meantime, legal action against
Puigdemont for flouting the Spanish
constitution is likely to provoke another
round of peaceful mass demonstrations.
Separatists know violence would dramatically damage their cause.
Separatists will seek other ways to
keep people mobilised. The remains of
the deposed government, for example,
could issue their own instructions to
200,000 public sector workers, hoping
some will defy direct rule. Separatist
mayors may start a campaign of disobedience that will lead them to court.
Open elections are impossible to predict, especially since Catalonia seems to
be divided into two almost equal parts.
At the last regional elections in September 2015, separatists won 48% of the
vote but took a majority of seats.
After the events of recent weeks, a
unionist victory would be deeply humiliating for the separatists. Yet Rajoy is
taking a risk, since a clear victory by the
independence movement would help
win it the support that it lacks among
EU governments. It might also oblige his
conservative People?s party to accept
that the constitution that Spaniards, and
Catalans, approved so massively in 1978
is overdue for a rewrite.
Section:GDN BE PaGe:8 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
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*
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
National
BBC female
presenters
may take
legal action
on pay gap
Graham Ruddick
At least 10 senior women at the BBC are
working with lawyers on the gender pay
gap and could take action if talks with the
broadcaster fail to resolve the issue.
They are being advised by Mishcon de
Reya, but other law firms are understood
to be working with BBC employees on pay.
The women include presenters whose
names were included in the list of top
earners published by the BBC.
Mishcon is helping to establish whether
the broadcaster has failed to pay people
equally for doing the same job, what the
discrepancy is, how long it has gone for,
and how the BBC will resolve instances
where there has not been equal pay for
doing the same jobs.
Legal action ? potentially through an
employment tribunal on sex discrimination or a high court case ? has not been ruled
out if the talks with the BBC do not succeed.
There is an urgency to the talks
between the BBC and female staff because
equal pay claims have to be lodged in the
employment tribunal within six months
of the discrimination. The BBC?s pay list
was published on 19 July, meaning the corporation in effect has until mid-January to
resolve disputes.
Its pay list revealed that just a third of
its highest paid on-air stars were women
and that the top seven were men. This led
more than 40 of the BBC?s highest-profile
female presenters, including Clare Balding, Fiona Bruce and Emily Maitlis, to publicly call for the BBC to change and ensure
equal pay for equal jobs.
Some stars are understood to have been
frustrated by a series of reviews the corporation published on pay this month.
These reports stated that men are being
paid 9.3% more than women at the BBC
on average ? far less than the UK average
of 18.1% ? and concluded there is ?no sys-
temic discrimination against women? at
the corporation.
However, the reviews did not include
the vast majority of on-air presenters, editors and senior managers and also found
there was a lack of women in senior roles,
and that in almost one in 10 occasions
Of the seven highest paid on-air stars
at the BBC, all were
men ? leading to
calls for action, and
the setting up of a
series of reviews
9.3%
7
The BBC put its
average gender pay
gap at 9.3%, about
half the UK average, but its review
excluded many staff
in senior roles
where there was substantial difference in
pay between men and women doing similar jobs there was no clear reason for the
disparity other than gender.
Jennifer Millins , a partner in the
employment department at Mishcon,
said: ?The figures from the BBC highlight
the need for businesses across all sectors
to seriously consider their diversity and
makeup. The reputational fallout of any
significant pay gaps is likely to be what
costs businesses most dearly.?
The BBC has pledged to publish a report
on the pay of on-air presenters this year.
It has said it is taking equal pay seriously,
but that it is complex.
Tony Hall, the director general, said
earlier this month: ?Fairness in pay is
vital. We have pledged to close the gender pay gap by 2020 and have targets for
equality and diversity on our airwaves.
We have done a lot already, but we have
more to do.?
Bookies ready
to accept curbs
on fixed-odds
machines
Rob Davies
Bookmakers are bracing for restrictions
on fixed-odds betting terminals (FOBTs)
and a new requirement to fund a problem
gambling awareness campaign, as part of
a government review to be published early
this week.
The Department for Digital, Culture,
Media and Sport (DCMS) is preparing a
narrow range of options for reducing the
maximum stake on FOBTs, which currently allow gamblers to place bets of up to
�0 every 20 seconds. Whitehall sources
said Theresa May was personally against
maintaining the status quo.
Options are expected to include a cut
to a stake of � supported by the Labour
party and campaigners against FOBTs; a
reduction to �, likely to be celebrated
by bookmakers; or an alternative between
� and �. Publication of the review will
be followed by a 12-week consultation.
Bookmakers, who earned �8bn last
year ? more than half of their revenues ?
from the machines, are expected to lobby
heavily against a cut to � The Association of British Bookmakers has said this
would cost 20,000 jobs and would slash
the Treasury?s income from machine gaming duty, worth more than �0m in 2016.
Fixed-odds betting
terminals allow
bets of up to �0
to be placed every
20 seconds and
have been linked to
gambling addiction
But the industry is understood to have
accepted that the days of the �0 maximum stake are over and has privately
ruled out challenging any government
decision via judicial review, after taking
legal advice on the odds of succeeding.
?You?ve got to virtually prove that the
secretary of state was insane at the time
of making the decision,? said one senior
industry source.
The review is also expected to include
proposals for gambling companies ? and
broadcasters who benefit from their
adverts ? to fund a public awareness campaign about problem gambling.
The Guardian this year revealed that
TV and betting firms had proposed the
measure in the hope of staving off restrictions on gambling adverts linked to live
sporting events, prompting a warning
of a ?stitch-up? from the Labour deputy
leader, Tom Watson.
Bookies have also been criticised by
the charity GambleAware for failing to
train staff to spot problem gambling and
not displaying anti-addiction messages
prominently enough. One well placed
industry source said he believed that the
review could also recommend tighter
restrictions on children?s access to seaside amusement arcade machines. This
could even affect the ?penny pusher? coin
games, amid concern that they normalise
gambling at an early age.
Such a measure would head off potential allegations from bookmakers that they
are being unfairly punished, particularly
in the light of amusement arcade body
Bacta?s involvement in the campaign to
cut FOBT stakes.
The DCMS is expected to publish the
review tomorrow, after the stock market
has opened, owing to the potential impact
of its findings on gambling companies?
share prices. It was originally due to be
released in June but was delayed when the
prime minister called the general election.
Section:GDN BE PaGe:9 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:S
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*
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
9
National
Blanket ban on
prisoner voting
may be lifted
Weapons expert Kelly?s
body exhumed after
gravesite ?desecration?
Family cremate body of
scientist behind BBC story
Widow upset at attention
of conspiracy theorists
Kevin Rawlinson
The body of Dr David Kelly, the government chemical weapons expert who killed
himself in 2003 after being outed as the
source of a BBC story, has been exhumed,
police have confirmed.
His family reportedly had his remains
cremated after asking for the grave to be
dug up because they were upset it was
being ?desecrated? by conspiracy theorists who believe Kelly was murdered.
According to the Sunday Times, a
source close to the scientist?s relatives
claimed the Justice for Kelly campaign
group placed placards and notes by the
grave and held vigils there, upsetting
Janice Kelly, his widow. ?[She] hated it,
she felt it was a desecration, and asked
the police to get them to stop,? a family
source told the newspaper.
The campaigners admitted putting a
placard calling for an inquest by the grave
but insisted they had not desecrated it.
?We have been at this for four and a half
years,? said Gerrard Jonas, of the campaign group. ?We did put placards ? one
placard ? asking for a coroner?s inquest.
There has been no desecration. About
three years ago Mrs Kelly sent the police
round to me one Saturday night. They
started questioning me.?
He told the Sunday Times: ?Dr Kelly?s
body was ? removed in the last week of
July, headstone and all. They dug it up
overnight. It was all done in haste. What
looked like pieces of the coffin were
left behind.?
Kelly?s body was found on 18 July
2003, a day after he had gone for a walk
near his home. He had been exposed as
the source of the report alleging that the
government?s dossier on Iraq?s weapons
of mass destruction, presented as central
to the case for war, had been ?sexed up?.
Haroon Siddique
The Hutton inquiry found he had killed
himself, though there has been no inquest
into his death.
A group of doctors has led a campaign
for an inquest, seeking a high court ruling
in 2010 that one should be held. The
former attorney general, Dominic Grieve,
reviewed documents relating to Kelly?s
death but said an inquest would only take
place if new evidence came to light.
One of the group, Dr Stephen Frost, has
been quoted as saying: ?We have lots of
evidence ? No coroner in the land would
reach a verdict of suicide as Lord Hutton
did.? But Grieve decided there was no justification for holding an inquest, leaving
the doctors ?perplexed and outraged?.
Lord Hutton, who led the inquiry into
the circumstances surrounding Kelly?s
death, attacked the conspiracy theories
that have abounded since. In a rare public statement on the matter, Hutton was
?No coroner in the land
would reach a suicide
verdict as Hutton did?
Dr David Kelly is
questioned by a
Commons select
commitee on
15燡uly 2003. His
body was found
in woodland
near his home in
Oxfordshire two
days later. Left,
flowers by his
grave in 2004
Photographs:
PA; Dan Chung
for the Guardian
Dr Stephen Frost, campaigner
quoted as saying: ?At no time ? was there
any suggestion from any counsel for the
interested parties or in any of the extensive media coverage that any of the police
officers engaged in investigating Dr Kelly?s
death or any of the medical or scientific
witnesses was involved in any sort of
cover-up or plot to make a murder appear
like a suicide.?
A spokesman for Thames Valley police
said: ?The body of Dr David Kelly was
exhumed a few months ago at the request
of his family.?
The licence for the exhumation was
granted by the chancellor of the diocese
of Oxford. A spokesman said: ?There is a
presumption that Christian burial is permanent and that remains should not be
portable. Therefore, a faculty for exhumation is only granted in exceptional circumstances. The body of Dr David Kelly was
exhumed at the request of his family.?
May?s EU lobbying tactics
set back prospects of deal
Daniel Boffey Brussels
The British government?s attempt to lobby
individual EU leaders in the run-up to the
recent crunch summit, where member
states were to judge the progress of the
negotiations, actively damaged Theresa
May?s hopes of a better outcome, the
Guardian has learned.
A secret plan had been drawn up under
which the EU leaders would have made
the surprise and highly symbolic move of
stating in their conclusions on the day of
the European council meeting that they
would take into account Britain?s positions as they announced their intention
to scope out their ideas on a post-Brexit
transition period and trading relationship.
The act of the 27 leaders changing the
draft conclusions ? a copy of which had
been widely leaked before the summit,
and which appeared fixed ? would have
given the prime minister a boost by suggesting that May?s address to them at a
working dinner had been effective.
But according to one senior diplomatic
source with detailed knowledge of the
Angela Merkel, in Brussels for the EU
meetings, was lobbied by Theresa May
behind-the-scenes discussions, the plan
was ditched because of concerns that the
EU would be rewarding May?s ?divide
and rule? tactics in the days before
the爏ummit.
The prime minister had made calls to
the German chancellor, Angela Merkel;
the French president, Emmanuel Macron;
and the Irish taoiseach, Leo Varadkar. The
Brexit secretary, David Davis, had also
engaged in an energetic round of bilateral
meetings with ministers in the Netherlands, Belgium and Denmark.
The EU leaders subsequently agreed in
90 seconds, on the Friday morning of the
summit, that sufficient progress had not
been made on the three opening issues ?
citizens? rights, the Irish border and the
financial settlement ? for trade talks to
start, as had long been expected.
They also agreed they would discuss
their positions internally in the hope that
negotiations on a transition and future
relationship could be opened with the
UK after a summit on 14 December, as the
leaked conclusions had suggested.
There was no additional mention in the
written conclusions that the EU would
take the UK?s views into account.
One EU source said: ?It was considered
but killed because the story would then be
?the divide and rule tactic worked?. On the
[Friday] morning ? nobody was proposing it and we needed to make this demonstration ? agree in 90 seconds.?
In comments at the end of the summit,
the European council president, Donald
Tusk, did verbally offer Britain reassurance that its ideas would be taken into
account when the internal scoping was
done, but in a manner that avoided giving May a public relations victory.
Hopes of opening direct talks on trade in
October were dashed months ago because
of the British government?s refusal to spell
out the financial commitments it is willing
to honour in its divorce bill.
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The government is reportedly to scrap its
blanket ban on prisoners being allowed to
vote, 12 years after the European court of
human rights ruled that it was unlawful.
Britain has ignored a series of judgments by European courts since 2005,
maintaining that it is a matter for parliament to decide. But the government is
planning to end its long-running defiance by allowing prisoners serving a sentence of less than a year who are let out
on day release to be allowed to go home
to vote, according to the Sunday Times.
The newspaper said the decision had been
made by David Lidington, the justice secretary, who circulated plans to ministers
last week.
The paper said it would affect hundreds
of prisoners, and quoted a senior government source as saying: ?This will only
apply to a small number of people who
remain on the electoral roll and are let out
on day release. These are not murderers
and rapists, but prisoners who are serving
less than a year who remain on the electoral roll. No one will be allowed to register
to vote if they are still behind bars.?
Responding to the report, the Ministry
of Justice?s statement left open the possibility of prisoners on day release being
allowed to vote.
A spokeswoman said: ?We do not comment on speculation. Our policy on prisoner voting is well established: it remains
a matter for the UK to determine, and
offenders in prison cannot vote.?
Any weakening of the blanket ban is
likely to leave many MPs dismayed. When
the government proposed legislation to
restrict it in 2011, MPs voted overwhelmingly by 234 to 22 in favour of a crossparty motion that said parliament should
decide on such an important issue. Britain
is the only western European country with
a blanket ban on prisoner voting.
Section:GDN BE PaGe:10 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 27/10/2017 18:38
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Section:GDN BE PaGe:11 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 29/10/2017 19:25
cYanmaGentaYellowblack
*
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
11
National
Artists plan painting protest to save ?living memorial?
More than 100 painters to
stage Armistice Day event
Trees planted in 1919 are
earmarked for destruction
Helen Pidd
North of England editor
An artist who has previously been commissioned to paint the Queen is to lead
a ?mass painting? of a Sheffield street
lined with trees that are facing destruction despite being designated living war
memorials.
Dan Llywelyn Hall, who painted the
Queen in 2013, as well as the last surviving
first world war veterans, will be joined by
more than 100 artists from Sheffield and
beyond who will immortalise the trees on
Western Road on Armistice Day, Saturday
11 November.
Two artists will paint each of the 53
trees, planted in 1919 to honour former
pupils of Western Road school (now Westways primary) who died in the war.
The trees ? London plane, lime, sycamore and ash ? are registered by the Imperial War Museum and the War Memorials
Trust as living war memorials. Twentythree of them ? all healthy, according to
campaigners ? have been earmarked to be
chopped down under Sheffield?s controversial Streets Ahead project.
Amey, an outsourcing company that
secured a �2bn private finance initiative
(PFI) contract to carry out the works, has
decided to take the trees down, arguing
their roots are churning up pavements and
causing an obstruction. It has said it will
plant other trees in their place.
Protesters accuse Amey of simply costcutting, as new trees are much cheaper to
maintain than big, old ones.
On Friday, a Green party councillor
walked free from court after Sheffield
city council attempted to send her to jail
for allegedly breaking an injunction while
Rivelin Valley
Road, Sheffield,
where Amey
plans to fell 31
lime trees. Left,
a 120-year-old
elm in Chelsea
Road. Experts
are backing the
push to save it, so
it can be studied
Photograph:
Christopher
Thomond for
the Guardian
Remembrance day row as vicar
bans ?Christian soldiers? hymn
Harriet Sherwood
Religion correspondent
A vicar has dropped the hymn Onward,
Christian Soldiers from a Remembrance
Sunday service next month because of
the participation of non-Christians in the
commemoration.
Some members of the Royal British
Legion social club in Oadby, Leicestershire, are threatening to boycott the service or sing the 19th-century hymn outside the church in protest.
The Rev Steve Bailey of St Peter?s
church, Oadby, made the decision with
the agreement of the local British Legion.
It will be replaced with another hymn, All
People that on Earth Do Dwell.
In a statement released by the diocese
of Leicester, Bailey said: ?We agreed the
change in hymn with the Oadby Royal
British Legion, who run this major civic
occasion, because members of the community from a wide range of cultural
backgrounds attend this event, which is
a parade, a service in church and laying of
wreaths at the war memorial.?
The legion committee recognised that
people from different faiths served in the
armed forces, he said. The Oadby Multicultural Group would be laying a wreath at
the parish war memorial for the first time
?and we do want people of all faiths, who
are paying respect to those from their own
faiths and cultures who served and gave
their lives, to feel welcome in the service?.
Ian Thorpe, the vice-chair of the legion
social club, said: ?It?s been done nearly
every year in recent memory, but [the
vicar] said they?re not doing it because not
everyone at the service will be Christian.
It?s not the ?soldiers? bit, it?s the ?Christian?
bit.?
Most members of the legion were not
?We want people of all
faiths, paying respect
to those who gave their
lives, to feel welcome?
happy with the decision, Thorpe told the
Leicester Mercury. ?One family, who go
to the church, have said they?re going to
stand outside the church and sing it.?
Onward, Christian Soldiers was written
as a processional hymn, but some consider it overly militaristic and imperialist.
Bailey said he was willing to meet those
who had complained about the decision.
?I am happy to discuss the matter with
them as well as to provide reassurance
that the remembrance service in the
church remains a Christian service and
one in which everyone can feel welcome,?
his statement said.
Parky perky about spinal surgery
Press Association
Sir Michael Parkinson has talked about
learning to walk again after surgery on his
back. The 82-year-old TV chatshow veteran said he was able to ?stagger around?
and his mind was still sharp.
He told the Sunday Mirror: ?I?ve been ill
for the last five years. I?ve overcome prostate cancer, but it?s been a difficult period
of my life. And my spinal operation has
involved a long and unpleasant recovery.
?But in many ways what gets me
through is the thought of not becoming
redundant. I don?t want to be on the waste
heap ? and that is the best motivation for
anyone growing old.?
Parkinson said his surgeon came to him
about two months ago and insisted he had
the spinal operation after having ?kept the
inevitable at bay? for 11 years.
?So we did it, and it?s been successful,
but you have to learn to walk again, for one
thing,? he added. ?I?m still not too great
on my feet, but I can stagger around and
do my work.?
He was diagnosed with prostate cancer
in 2013, given the all-clear in 2015, and said
he did not ?take a pessimistic view of it?.
?Same with the spinal operation. I
knew it wasn?t going to be pleasant, but
I knew I wasn?t going to bloody die of it. I
hope not anyway,? he continued.
?A lot don?t do that and leave it too late.
I know a couple of people who waited too
long. You?ve got to get it checked because
it is not a pleasant experience. Even if you
survive it, there are still ramifications.?
Chain gang
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views and
gossip
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protesting against tree felling. Another
protester, Calvin Payne, was found guilty
of inciting others to break the injunction
and will be sentenced next Friday.
A further 27 memorial trees on four
other Sheffield streets face felling. The
council has vowed to plant 300 extra
memorial trees across the city?s parks, but
campaigners say that is no substitution for
these ?irreplaceable? trees.
The council claims that keeping the
memorial trees by deploying ?engineering solutions? would cost �0,000 to
�0,000 and could result in a large
reduction in residential parking.
Llywelyn Hall, who painted some of
the Western Road trees during a visit to
Sheffield in August, said he was disappointed the headteacher of Westways had
declined his invitation to take part in the
event, believing she felt under political
pressure as a council employee.
Sam Fearnehough sent an email apologising and saying it was ?not possible for
Westways to get involved with the proposed event on 11 November?.
Llywelyn Hall described the invitation
knockback as ?frankly spineless?. He
said: ?Can you tell me why else they ?cannot? take part in what is an event entirely
centred on the trees planted for pupils of
theirs who did not return from the war? I
do find this appalling and a gross insult.
?It is frankly spineless and tests the
notion of a war memorial to the fullest
extent. Pupils are still coming on the 11th,
as the parents are clearly objecting to the
school?s stance.?
The Armistice Day event will start at
10.45am with a silent procession made up
of ex-service personnel, Westways pupils,
residents and the general public. They will
observe a two-minute silence before laying wreaths.
Llywelyn Hall, who was commissioned
to paint portraits of the first world war veterans, Harry Patch and Henry Allingham,
said: ?Next year will see the centenary of
the end of the first world war. I believe it
is important to keep alive the memory of
those who fought and died. A mature, living, recognised war memorial such as the
unique one on Western Road has a nationwide significance that we must fight to
keep and maintain.?
The War Memorials Trust, which is
responsible for the upkeep and preservation of memorials, said: ?The charity
would encourage the preservation of the
original trees wherever possible as they
have a direct link with those who lost
family and friends.
?Appropriate maintenance should be
undertaken to ensure [the original trees]
are managed within their environment.?
The armistice event will be followed
by an exhibition as part of National Tree
Week, inspired by trees throughout Sheffield, from 25 November to 3 December.
Section:GDN BE PaGe:12 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
12
Sent at 29/10/2017 21:05
*
cYanmaGentaYellowblack
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
National
Whistleblowers warned of Bannon ?volunteers? at Ukip
Electoral Commission told
of ?unusual arrangements?
Breitbart support behind
Brexit success, Farage says
Stephanie Kirchgaessner
Nick Hopkins
Ukip whistleblowers filed complaints to
the Electoral Commission over concerns
the party was making ?unusual arrangements? with a pro-Trump news website in
the months before the Brexit referendum.
Their worries included allegations
that individuals paid by Breitbart, the
rightwing American news organisation,
were working as senior unpaid Ukip volunteers, raising questions about whether
their work could be construed as an indirect political donation by a foreign donor.
One whistleblower said that concerns
that the party was turning to ?off-balancesheet financing?, possibly in violation of
UK rules, prompted the decision to turn
to the watchdog.
Separately, a Labour MP, Ben Bradshaw, last week called on the government to investigate the possible role ?dark
money? played in the referendum, including concerns of foreign interference.
Steve Bannon, who has a close relationship with Nigel Farage, the former Ukip
leader, was Breitbart executive chairman
at the time. He became Donald Trump?s
campaign adviser and served as White
House strategist until August, when he
left the White House and returned to
Breitbart. The website is popular among
the so-called ?alt-right? in the US, an
increasingly vocal movement of extreme
rightwing white nationalists.
Bannon launched Breitbart London in
2014. Within a short period, the website
was seen as being aligned with Ukip, a
party that Bannon saw as a British version of the rightwing Tea Party movement
in America.
Farage has often praised Breitbart for its
support of Brexit, saying the referendum
would not have gone in favour of the leave
campaign without the website?s ?supportive voice?.
Sources said that they were alarmed
by what they viewed as a ?deliberate
strategy? by Breitbart to wield influence over Ukip in ways that emphasised
views against migrants and other farright positions. One former insider said:
?It wasn?t clear whether certain people
were being paid for on the balance sheet
of the party. It is important that people
should be employed by the party and that
funding for Ukip is officially and properly
declared and registered at the Electoral
Commission.?
Sources pointed to Farage?s close relationship with Bannon and Breitbart and
work performed by a lawyer, Matthew
Richardson, who served as party secretary
for Ukip and was close to Bannon.
Richardson had left Ukip following an
internal shake-up after the general election in May 2015, but he returned to serve
as party secretary in June, in what was
viewed at the time as a win for Farage.
A blog in the Spectator at the time said
Richardson was a ?core member of the
?Tea Party? faction? of Ukip.
In one case, according to people familiar with the matter, Richardson suggested
in late 2014 that before the general election Ukip could make use of the services of
a US-based electoral data company, Voter
Gravity, which would not have to be paid
for by Ukip and would be provided as a
donation in kind. The offer was declined,
according to sources.
Voter Gravity promises to ?turn data
into votes?. It was founded by a conservative, Ned Ryun, a regular contributor to
Breitbart. Ryun, who has been described
in media reports as being close to Bannon,
said he worked with Ukip in late 2014 and
early 2015 to ?assist them in the general
election? but that it did not work out due
to ?regulatory problems?.
?We were prepared to work for noth-
Raheem Kassam and Nigel Farage in Trump Tower, New York, before meetings with
the president-elect last November Photograph: Yana Paskova/Getty Images
ing,? Ryun said, because the company was
allegedly trying to gain a foothold in the
UK. ?I wanted to work on the referendum
but nothing materialised there either,?
he said.
In another case, Farage sought an internal legal opinion about whether he could
accept funds from a US donor to pay for
a driver and security guard, according to
sources. The legal opinion determined
that such a donation was not permissible.
?It means someone was willing to pay up,?
one former Ukip insider said.
Neither Farage nor Richardson
responded to requests for comment.
Raheem Kassam was also seen as a link
between Ukip and Breitbart. Kassam, who
now heads Breitbart London, worked as a
key adviser to Farage. According to a 2015
report in the Spectator, Bannon saw Kassam as a rising star of the British right and
approached him as an ?ideal apprentice?.
There is no evidence that Ukip or
Breitbart broke the law. Bannon did not
respond to emails and calls.
It is illegal for British campaigns to
accept foreign donations or donations
from anyone who is not UK-registered.
But one expert said that volunteering
presented an ?interesting grey area? in the
law that could be difficult to define, since
most electoral campaigns are managed
by volunteers.
Damian Tambini, director of the media
policy project at the London School of
Economics, said: ?A donation in kind, giving goods and services, is subject to the
same rules as a donation and also subject
to spending limits.?
Sources with close knowledge of the
matter said the Electoral Commission
made inquiries about the allegations but
determined that it did not have enough
information to launch a full investigation.
The commission thought the complaint
was serious enough, however, to warrant
a review by the Metropolitan police.
The police contacted at least one of the
whistleblowers but decided not to take
further action.
Police require extra �3bn
to tackle crime, chiefs say
Kevin Rawlinson
Police forces in England and Wales will
need nearly �3bn extra between 2018
and 2020 to tackle crime, according to
police and crime commissioners.
They attributed the need for more
funding to the increasing quantity and
complexity of crimes being committed,
as well as the threat posed by terrorism.
The Association of Police and Crime
Commissioners (AP CC) said an extra
�0m would be required in 2018-19 and
�5m more the following financial year.
The extra money would pay for 5,000
more officers to deal with new types of
crime, as well as an additional 1,100 armed
police force members.
The plea comes after a sustained period
of cuts to police funding since the Conservative party came to power in 2010.
The government agreed to protect overall spending in the 2015 spending review,
but the way that money is allocated means
some forces are likely to lose out.
?The police workforce has been reduced
by nearly 19% over the last seven years and
at a time when the population is growing
and the sheer complexity of policing is
increasing, it is clear that more funding is
required if we are going to deliver the right
level of service for the public,? said Paddy
Tipping, the APCC?s finance deputy lead.
Tipping, the police and crime commissioner for Nottinghamshire, added: ?This
year, the police have had to respond to
horrific terrorist acts and unprecedented
levels of demand at our control rooms and,
increasingly, we know that officers and
staff, whose work we all value so greatly,
have become stretched like never before.?
The APCC said it was responding to a
Home Office request to it and the National
Police Chiefs? Council to stress-test the
policing service. ?We believe that a lack of
investment will lead to increases in crime
and a reduction of police and state legitimacy,? Tipping said yesterday.
The APCC looked at the 43 territorial
police forces in England and Wales. The
question is devolved in Scotland and the
Police Service of Northern Ireland has its
own funding arrangement.
The APCC?s finance lead, Roger Hirst,
said: ?Whilst the service continues to
commit to further modernisation and
efficiency, there are investments that
need to be made now in order to ensure
the service is able to meet the challenges
we will all face.?
Thousands affected by Grenfell
Press Association
In the frame
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The mental health response following the
Grenfell Tower fire is the biggest operation
of its kind in Europe, a doctor has said,
with numbers affected likely to exceed
11,000. The unprecedented need has
transformed the Central and North West
London NHS trust into ?the largest trauma
service in the UK?, according to the chief
psychologist, Dr John Green.
More than 1,300 people have been seen
by the trust and GPs since the fire, either
for post-traumatic stress disorder screening or related physical health concerns.
Health professionals in London estimate that about 11,000 people in the wider
Grenfell area may experience some difficulties, though not all will seek treatment,
while the fire may also have had impact on
others across the country.
Green, clinical director for the Grenfell
Tower NHS mental health response team,
said: ?I think this is the biggest programme
there?s ever been in Europe.?
He said it might be years before the true
mental health toll was revealed, with one
person involved in the 7 July 2005 bombings only recently seeking help.
The trust has earmarked some of its 200
staff to contact people who may be struggling in the wake of the fire, thought to
have killed around 80 people.
It has made almost 4,000 approaches in
the north Kensington community, where
GPs have logged more than a thousand
Grenfell-related appointments.
Nearly 400 adults and children have
been, or are still being, treated for PTSD.
About 60 people remotely affected are
also being treated for a variety of mental
health issues. It raises the possibility that
there could be hundreds more affected
after watching the fire on television.
Section:GDN BE PaGe:13 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 29/10/2017 19:39
cYanmaGentaYellowblack
*
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
13
National
From fan
dancers
to Frankie:
V&A marks
fall and rise
of Wilton?s
Music Hall
Archive traces the history of
gem that survived the Blitz
and East End developers
images of the hall in its Victorian pomp,
and photoshoots and videos shot there
in the late 20th century when art directors were seduced by its decrepitude.
Among them is that for Frankie Goes
to Hollywood?s Relax in 1984. The live
tigers were the least dangerous part of
the shoot: the main scenes were set in
a space lit by flaming cauldrons set on
a straw-covered floor. ?It?s an absolute
miracle that the whole building didn?t
go up like a box of matches,? Offord said.
In 1853 five narrow houses on an alley
near the docks in east London were
joined into a large pub by John Wilton,
who added a handsome music hall
behind the houses. A pen and ink sketch
of 1871 shows an audience including
soldiers in uniform eating and drinking
and paying scant attention to the singer
on the stage, while up in the cheap seats
in the gallery, where the women and
Maev Kennedy
An archive recording the glory days,
the decay and the near collapse of
Wilton?s Music Hall ? now in rollicking
business again and claiming to be the
oldest grand Victorian music hall in the
world ? has been acquired by the V&A
theatre collection.
The archive includes a tattered and
yellowed campaign poster showing
a shattered window in a mouldering
brick wall, a reminder of the halfcentury of attempts to save the rotting
building. Archivist Sabrina Offord said:
?Normally we wouldn?t even try to save
a piece of paper in this state, but its
state after being moved from noticeboard to noticeboard over the years is
part of the story.?
The archive traces the extraordinary
history of the building, including rare
Figures suggest 1m extra patients
could face long A&E waits by 2020
Haroon Siddique
A million more patients could face waits of
over four hours in A&E wards in England
by 2019-20 in the absence of urgent action,
the British Medical Association has said.
Analysis shared exclusively with the
Guardian suggests the number of people
attending emergency wards and waiting
more than four hours could reach 3.7爉illion a year in three years, up from 2.6 million in the year ending September 2017.
The projections assume numbers rise at
the same rate as the average over the past
five years and that funding remains at its
current level while proposed measures to
address pressures have little or no effect.
If accurate, it would mean 84.8% of
patients being seen within four hours
between October 2019 and September
2020, down from 89% in 2016-17 and significantly short of the 95% target, which
was in effect scrapped by Jeremy Hunt,
the health secretary, in January.
The BMA chair of council, Dr Chaand
Nagpaul, said: ?It is clear from this analysis that we need urgent action to close
the gap between investment and rising
demand on the NHS.?
The union also predicts that ?trolley
3.7m
Projection for the
number of people
attending A&E and
waiting more than
four hours in three
years? time
waits?, where patients are left waiting
more than four hours for a hospital bed
after a decision to admit them, will more
than triple by 2019-20, from 566,000 last
year to 1.78m.
It says there could be an average of
5.2爉illion patients on the elective treatment waiting list by then ? up from 3.9爉illion ? for operations such as cataract
removal, or hip and knee replacement.
The number waiting more than four
hours at A&E is predicted to hit 2.95 million by September 2018, with trolley waits
up 44% to 816,000.
Doctors have said overstretched emergency departments in England could
struggle to cope with a major flu outbreak,
such as that seen in recent weeks in Australia and New Zealand.
There could be 300,000 people a month
waiting more than four hours at A&Es by
December, according to the BMA . This
could exceed 400,000 by 2020.
The problems are being partly driven
by an expected surge in attendances,
predicted to hit 23.8m over the next 12
months, up 345,000 on 2016-17.
A Department of Health spokeswoman
described the research as oversimplifying
the trajectory of waiting lists.
Charity warns over staff turnover in NHS
Haroon Siddique
NHS England?s workforce planning is ?not
fit for purpose?, according to a report that
claims a high turnover of staff is hurting
the health service financially and reducing continuity of care.
The Health Foundation found that the
number of nurses and GPs has fallen at a
time when the NHS is struggling to cope
with rising demand, though a rise in managers and consultants contributed to an
overall increase in the NHS workforce by
2% in the year to April.
In its report, published today, the charity says in some trusts almost a third of
staff are leaving each year, meaning management is fighting ? and spending huge
amounts of money ? just to stand still.
Anita Charlesworth, director of research
and economics at the charity, said: ?There
is a growing gap between rhetoric about
?The gap
is growing
between
rhetoric
and falling
numbers
of nurses
and GPs?
the government?s ambitions to grow the
NHS workforce, and the reality of falling
numbers of nurses and GPs.?
The Health Foundation reports a fall in
the number of nurses of 0.2% in the year to
April, with GP numbers down 0.7% from
December last year to the end of June.
It casts doubt on the government?s ability to meet targets including increasing
the number of GPs by 5,000 and creating
21,000 new posts in mental health by 2020.
The fall among nurses was found to be
steepest in community nursing and mental health. Additionally, the report says
that 1,220 fewer students applying from
England started undergraduate nursing
degrees this year, blamed partly on the
switch from bursaries to loans for training.
A Department of Health spokeswoman
said: ?Patients can be assured that the
NHS has the staff it needs to provide the
best possible care.?
dock workers sat, the noise probably
drowned out the performers.
The site was much better known as
the Old Mahogany than as Wilton?s, and
the name ? together with the bar, the
distinctive barleysugar twist columns,
and a near perfect acoustic ? survived
many later uses after the music hall
failed, including a Methodist mission
and a rag sorting warehouse. The building survived the Blitz, but came closest
to destruction in the wholesale demolition and redevelopment of the district in
the 1960s. By the time it became a listed
building, and the first of many preservation trusts was set up in 1970, it was in
danger of falling down by itself.
As the campaign rumbled on, proposals included a national centre for music
hall studies, a shopping centre and a pub
and restaurant complex, but 1997 was a
landmark when the building reopened
The auditorium
at Wilton?s now;
the Seamen?s Bar
when the building
was known as the
Old Mahogany;
stepping out with
Swing Patrol in
the hall last year.
Left, a campaign
poster; below,
tickets from 2009
with an acclaimed performance of TS
Eliot?s The Waste Land ? a desolate poem
matched to its decaying surroundings.
Salvation finally came through a Heritage Lottery Fund grant, and the building reopened fully in 2015, structurally
sound but still atmospherically shabby.
The archive holds letters and signed
photographs of the many celebrities
who threw themselves into the preservation campaign, including Liza Minnelli and Spike Milligan, who pestered
the great and good, including politicians and royals. Many of his letters are
preserved in the archive, all signed off
?love, light and peace?. In his letter to
Lord Goodman, who chaired the Arts
Council, he wrote: ?What we need now
is what Captain Kidd also needed, ie,
loot ? Remember, your great great
lo
grandmother may have been a fan
gr
dancer!?
Section:GDN BE PaGe:14 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
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*
cYanmaGentaYellowblack
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
International
$400m plan to fight traffickers in balance
Aim of new army to bring
stability to Sahel region
European support but US
and Britain withhold cash
Patrick Wintour
Unprecedented plans to combat human
trafficking and terrorism across the Sahel
and into Libya will face a major credibility
test today when the UN decides whether
to back a proposed new five-nation security force across the region.
The 5,000-strong army, costing $400m
(�0m) in the first year, is designed to
end growing insecurity, a driving force of
migration, and combat the people smuggling that has since 2014 resulted in the
deaths of 30,000 people in the Sahara and
an estimated 10,000 drowned in the central Mediterranean.
The so-called G5 force, due to be fully
operational next spring and work across
five Sahel states, has the strong backing
of France and Italy, but is suffering a massive shortfall in funds, doubts about its
mandate and claims that the Sahel region
needs better coordinated development
aid, and fewer security responses, to combat migration.
The Trump administration, opposed to
multilateral initiatives, has so far refused
to let the UN back the G5 Sahel force with
cash. The force commanders say they
need ?423m (�5m) in its first year, but
so far only ?108m has been raised, almost
half from the EU. The British say they
support the force in principle, but have
offered no funds as yet.
Western diplomats hope the US will
provide substantial bilateral funding ,
even if they refuse to channel their contribution multilaterally through the UN.
France, with the support of the UN
secretary general, Ant髇io Guterres, and
regional African leaders, has been pouring diplomatic resources into persuading
a sceptical Trump administration that the
UN should back the force financially.
In an attempt to persuade the Americans, Guterres warned in a report to the
security council this month that the
?region is now trapped in a vicious cycle
in which poor political and security governance, combined with chronic poverty
and the effects of climate change, has contributed to the spread of insecurity?.
He added: ?If the international community stands idly by and does not take
urgent action to counter these trends, the
stability of the entire region and beyond
will be in jeopardy, leaving millions of
people at risk of violence, with ordinary
civilians paying the heaviest price. Ultimately, the international community will
bear the responsibility for such a disastrous scenario.?
The aim is for the force to combat jihadist terrorism and human traffickers by
operating across state borders in Burkina
Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania and Niger.
Europe has a particular interest in changing the dynamic in north Africa because
record migration has overwhelmed southern Europe, divided the EU and polarised
politics. This year, the EU has controversially sought to ?export? the problem back
to north Africa, funding better security
in Libya, migrant repatriation and programmes to boost local economies.
France ? which currently holds the
UN rotating presidency and is the former
colonial power ? is sending its foreign minister, Jean-Yves Le Drian, to chair today?s
A joint counter-insurgency patrol
involving Malian and French troops
UN meeting in New York in a sign of the
importance with which Paris regards the
initiative and the UN?s backing.
A joint command headquarters for the
force has been set up in the Malian town
of S関ar�, with operations already under
way. The force will have an initial focus on
taking back control of border areas, where
attacks occur regularly because domestic
Libyan route
to Europe
ends in a
dead end
and despair
troops cannot cross borders.
Some diplomats believe the deadly
ambush of four US special forces by Islamist militants in Niger on 4 October has
awoken the US military to the extent to
which countries such as Mali have become
the new strategic centres for terrorism.
The Tony Blair Institute for Global
Change has produced a report urging a
new plan of action for the Sahel. Blair, the
former British prime minister, told the
Guardian: ?Security measures will not be
enough on their own. Globally a renewed
focus must go on uprooting the ideology,
while a comprehensive plan of action for
the Sahel, which builds institutions and
ensures governments in the region can
tackle issues of poverty, a lack of jobs and
education, must be put in place.?
Critics say UN endorsement of the
G5 Sahel force could leave the UN open
to charges of overseeing human rights
abuses. It is also claimed there is a form
of ?security traffic jam? in Mali. The UN
already funds an 11,000-strong anti-terror
force in Mali, France has 4,000 troops in
the country and the US is thought to have
as many as 900 special forces personnel
in Niger.
Migrant
detention
centres have
proliferated
around Libya.
Below, a mural
of broken
dreams at the
Abu Salim
centre in Tripoli
Photograph:
Hani Amara/
Reuters
Francesco Semprini Tripoli
Jacob Svendsen Tunis
In the humanitarian horror that Libya
has become, the migrant detention
centre at Abu Salim is by no means the
worst.
Migrant centres here, packed with
thousands of people seized on the trafficking routes that criss-cross Libya,
have become renowned for forced
labour, beatings, torture and rape.
But in southern Tripoli, Abu Salim
offers something close to respite for
people who have been on the road for
weeks or months. Run by the interior
ministry, it?s one of the few detention
sites in Libya that journalists can safely
visit. There?s a health clinic, a kitchen,
dormitories and mattresses, spaces for
prayer.
But there is little hope. The 150 or so
migrants stuck here have made perilous
journeys from Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Ivory
Coast, Burkina Faso, the Gambia, Guinea
and Senegal, but Abu Salim is likely to
be the closest they will get to Europe.
The next and final stage of their journey
will be home again.
Since the EU intensified efforts this
year to prevent African migrants from
travelling north in their thousands,
Libya, once a funnel to Europe, has
largely become a dead end. Diplomatic
deals have made the authorities beef
up their efforts; many of the smuggling
gangs too have been co-opted, for now.
Ali, a 24-year-old Nigerian who has
been here for weeks, is resigned to
going back. ?There was plenty of work
at home, but we were poor. My mother
died and I wanted to go to Italy or
Europe to ensure a better future for my
dad and brothers,? he says.
He and his brother Mokhtar travelled
first to Agadez in Niger, the west African
hub of clandestine migration and people
trafficking. They paid ?300 (�0) each
to cross deserts and mountains in various groups, a tortuous route towards
an uncertain destination. In Misrata,
in north-west Libya, they paid another
?300 for a berth in a Chinese-made
dingy that was supposed to be leaving
from Garabouli, east of Tripoli.
But the boat trip never happened.
They were arrested by local militias and
brought to Abu Salim. Detainees usually
stay in the camp for between two and
three months before being returned to
their country of origin.
UNHCR, the UN?s refugee agency,
estimates that there are about 30 government-run detention centres in Libya,
but that doesn?t include clandestine
facilities run by traffickers and militias.
There are thought to be several hundred
thousand migrants in the country.
?In general, conditions are really
bad in these detention centres,? says
the UNHCR?s Libya chief, Roberto
Mignone. ?At best, they are more or
less functional, but serious human
rights violations and sexual assaults are
committed there.?
UNHCR is trying to help migrants
move out of the illicit detention centres and into facilities that it manages.
But the agency?s freedom to operate is
limited by a parlous security situation:
Mignone and his staff operate out of
neighbouring Tunisia, with the help of a
few dozen Libyan associates.
?The security situation is very complicated and it is frustrating not to have
free access to all in need. We have no
overview of the militias? or traffickers?
detention centres or prisons,? he says.
?My mother died. We
were poor. I wanted to
go to Italy for a better
future for my brothers?
Ali, 24, from Nigeria
Since Muammar Gaddafi was ousted
in 2011, Libya has been a magnet for
migrants desperate to get to Europe.
After record-breaking numbers
reached Italy in 2016 and unprecedented
numbers dying in the Mediterranean
over the past two years, the EU signalled
a new determination to halt the migration through a series of deals with Libya.
One part of the strategy involved the
south of the country ? where more than
1,500 miles (2,500km) of desert borders
with Algeria, Chad, Niger and Sudan
provide multiple channels north.
There were consultations between
the Italian interior minister, Marco
Minniti, and mayors representing local
groups and tribes. The deal pinpointed
seven ?elements? to pacify the different
factions. It was heavily supported by
Ahmed Maetig, the vice-president of the
Libyan presidential council, and greeted
warmly in southern Libya, by the mayor
of Sebha, Hamed al-Khayali. ?The project we are carrying forward now with
Italy involves the development and
growth of southern Libya within the
framework of the fight against illegal
immigration,? Khayali said.
Italy has helped to secure the border,
offered infrastructure and electricity,
and pledged to help improve employment prospects for young people.
Further north, the emphasis has been
on a new Italian mission to support the
Libyan coastguard in the Mediterranean. There has also been an ?under the
radar? deal between Italians and leading
figures who control the coastline and
the trafficking there. Boats no longer
leave the shore.
But nothing is straightforward
in a country with two antagonistic
governments, many fiefdoms and
strongmen, few legitimate ways of
earning a living and myriad trafficking
groups jostling for status, territory and
business.
For example, EU diplomacy managed,
for a while, to placate the smuggling
hub of Sabratha in western Libya. But
since the beginning of October, groups
have been fighting for control of the city.
Militias not part of the deal with the EU
and Italy are under pressure, because
they lack funding.
?We have seen fighting between
the different groups in Sabratha,? said
Mignone. ?One of them advanced and
the authorities later uncovered thousands of people who were detained by
smugglers. Now, they are trying to get
these people to detention centres run
by the government, but they are already
overcrowded.?
At Abu Salim, some still talk of
trying爐o reach Europe; not Ali. ?No,
absolutely not,? he says. ?Actually I
want to ask Italy and all those who
want to help to ? help us live a better
life in爋ur country, with our family and
our爌eople.?
Francesco Semprini works for the Italian
newspaper La Stampa; Jacob Svendsen
works for the Danish newspaper Politiken
Exporting a crisis
Something happened to the deadly
migrant trail into Europe in 2017. It
dried up. Not completely, but palpably.
In the high summer, peak time for traffic across the Mediterranean, numbers
fell by as much as 70%.
This was no random occurrence.
European policymakers have been
desperately seeking solutions that
would not just deal with those already
here, but prevent more from coming.
European leaders have sought to
send the problem back to where it
came from: principally north Africa.
The means have included disrupting
rescue missions in the Mediterranean
and offering aid to countries that
promise to stem the flow of people.
The upshot has been to bottleneck the
migration crisis in a part of the world
not equipped to cope with it.
To find out more about the ramifications of this new EU approach, six
European newspapers ? Politiken, Der
Spiegel, Le Monde, El Pa韘, La Stampa
and the Guardian ? are teaming up this
week to report from the region. We
will investigate what is happening in
Libya, how migrants are being driven
on to different, less well-travelled
routes ? and whether the Mediterranean horror is deterring would-be
migrants from leaving their homes
further south.
Section:GDN BE PaGe:15 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
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cYanmaGentaYellowblack
*
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
Head of international news: Jamie Wilson
international@theguardian.com
020 3353 3577
15
International
@guardianworld
Trump tweets fury
over Russia inquiry
?poised for arrest?
President goes on attack as
CNN reports indictment
Supporters hint at Mueller
bias and criminal leaks
Molly Redden New York
President Donald Trump sent out an
extraordinary fusillade of angry tweets
about the investigation into possible ties
between his election campaign and Russia yesterday, amid reports that the special counsel leading the inquiry is about
to make his first arrests.
Trump, in a series of tweets referencing what he called ?phony Trump/Russia
?collusion,? which doesn?t exist?, accused
US Democrats of a ?witch hunt? and ?evil
politics?, before adding that Republicans
are ?fighting back like never before?.
The outburst followed reports by CNN,
Reuters and the Wall Street Journal that
a grand jury had approved charges filed
by investigators led by special counsel
Robert Mueller against at least one person, and that the indictment has been
sealed by a federal judge, pending arrest.
There was no information of the nature
of the charges or their target. The reports
suggested one or more arrests could take
place as early today.
The investigation has been circling
some of Trump?s closest confidants, such
Donald Trump sent
a barrage of tweets
referencing ?phony
Trump/Russia
collusion? and
accused Democrats
of a witch-hunt
as his former national security adviser
Michael Flynn and his former campaign
manager Paul Manafort . Federal law
enforcement officials raided and searched
Manafort?s Virginia home this summer.
This month, Mueller?s team also questioned Sean Spicer, Trump?s former
spokesman, and Reince Priebus, his former chief of staff.
The president yesterday sought to
focus attention instead on supposed scandals involving the defeated Democratic
presidential candidate, Hillary Clinton,
demanding authorities ?do something?.
Trump?s most bullish defender, the
governor of New Jersey, Chris Christie,
yesterday tried to cast doubt on Mueller?s
integrity.
Appearing on several news shows on
a difficult day for the White House, he
raised the possibility that Mueller?s team
was engaged in criminal leaks to the
media. ?We have to have the public have
confidence in the fact that the grand jury
process is secret and, as a result, is fair,?
he told ABC.
?It?s supposed to be kept secret,? he
said on CBS?s Face the Nation. ?There are
very strict criminal laws about disclosing
grand jury information. Now, depending
upon who disclosed this to CNN, it could
be a crime.?
Speaking on ABC?s This Week, Christie
said he ?hoped? the news was not traceable to Mueller?s team.
?As a [former] prosecutor,? he said, ?I
can tell you that the thing that we emphasised the most with our prosecutors and
our agents was, ?Let me tell you something: we will prosecute you if we find that
you leaked this stuff.??
Trump tweeted furiously ? without referencing the sealed indictment outright.
?Never seen such Republican ANGER
& UNITY as I have concerning the lack
of investigation on Clinton,? he wrote,
floating as supposed scandals involving
Clinton ?the uranium to Russia deal, the
33,000 plus deleted emails, the Comey fix
and so much more?.
He wrote: ?Instead they look at phony
Trump/Russia, ?collusion?, which doesn?t
exist. The [Democrats] are using this terrible (and bad for our country) Witch Hunt
for evil politics, but the [Republicans] are
now fighting back like never before.
?There is so much GUILT by Democrats/
Clinton, and now the facts are pouring
out. DO SOMETHING!?
He concluded: ?All of this ?Russia? talk
right when the Republicans are making their big push for historic Tax Cuts &
Reform. Is this coincidental? NOT!?
Russian interference in the 2016 election has cast a shadow over Trump?s
presidency. In January, several US intelligence agencies concluded that Russia had
hacked sensitive information and spread
propaganda through social media in an
effort to help Trump defeat Clinton.
Mueller is investigating whether Trump
campaign officials colluded with Russia.
His operation has also expanded to examine whether Trump officials attempted to
stymie the investigation, or committed
money laundering or tax evasion.
Mueller was appointed as special
counsel after Trump fired James Comey
as director of the FBI, a move he told NBC
was made because of ?this Russia thing?.
Trump and his supporters have disparaged Mueller and tried to portray him as a
sympathiser of Clinton and Comey.
Some Republicans in Trump?s orbit,
such as the former White House adviser
Sebastian Gorka, have called for Mueller
to step down. Many observers have suggested that firing Mueller, a possibility floated by Trump surrogates, would
trigger congressional action against the
president. Any attempt by Trump to have
Mueller fired would lead to a severe political crisis.
There are also mounting concerns
among US allies over how the president,
besieged at home, would act on the world
stage, especially in the western Pacific
where there is a worsening nuclear standoff with North Korea.
An American
voter salutes
her president
The president of the United States is
used to being saluted, but a cyclist in
Virginia put her own slant on the tradition on Saturday when she was overtaken by Donald Trump?s motorcade.
The woman on her bike was photographed raising her middle finger as
The Trump administration is working on
a nuclear weapons policy that is intended
to mark a decisive end to the era of postcold war disarmament by bolstering the
US arsenal and loosening the conditions
under which it would be used.
A draft of the new Nuclear Posture
Review (NPR) was presented in September at a White House meeting between
Donald Trump and his national security
advisers. Congress and US allies have been
briefed on the progress of the draft, with
a target for completion by the end of this
year or the beginning of next.
Among elements under consideration
are a low-yield ballistic missile intended
to deter Russia?s use of a small nuclear
weapon in a war over the Baltic states.
But Adam Mount, a nuclear weapons
expert at the Federation of American Scientists, said: ?When a new procurement
plan affords US strategists new options,
that?s when it starts to transform the
arsenal, and that?s when it takes us on the
road to an arms race.?
Trump has frequently voiced his intention to build up the US arsenal. On Friday
Mike Pence, the vice-president, said on a
morale-boosting visit to Minot air force
base, North Dakota, home to Minuteman
III intercontinental ballistic missiles: ?You
can ? be assured that our administration
is committed to strengthen and modernise America?s nuclear deterrent.
?History attests the surest path to peace
is through American strength. There?s no
greater element of American strength,
there?s no greater force for peace in the
world, than the US nuclear arsenal.?
Barack Obama began his administration with a major speech in Prague in April
2009 committing the US to disarmament
and the eventual elimination of nuclear
weapons globally. A year after the speech,
the US and Russia signed the New Start
agreement, restricting both sides to 1,550
deployed strategic warheads and bombs,
down by 30% from previous limits.
However, aspirations to cut the strategic stockpile by another third, unilaterally
if necessary, were abandoned in the face
of congressional resistance, North Korea?s
?There is no greater
force for peace in
the world than the
US nuclear arsenal?
the cyclist caught up, still offering the
finger, before turning off in a different
direction. Motorcade is now gathering
speed and heading for DC.?
According to a report, Trump has
spent four consecutive weekends at his
Virginia golf club. He often criticised
Barack Obama for playing golf while he
was president and has subsequently
faced accusations of hypocrisy for
doing so even more regularly himself.
Kevin Rawlinson
Photograph: Brendan Smialowski/
AFP/Getty
Cancel Puerto Rico contract, says governor
Reuters
The governor of Puerto Rico has called
for the immediate cancellation of a tiny
Montana firm?s $300m contract to restore
power to the hurricane-hit US territory.
The contract with Puerto Rico?s power
utility has come under increased criticism
after it was revealed that the terms were
obtained without a competitive public
bidding process and that the company had
only two full time employees at the time
Hurricane Maria struck.
Criticism increased, including from
the US house Democratic leader, Nancy
Pelosi, after a copy of the contract surfaced online and raised more questions,
particularly over costs and profits.
The governor, Ricardo Rossell�, said:
?Following the information that has
emerged, and with the goal of protecting
US nuclear plans ?will lead to arms race?
Julian Borger Washington
Trump?s cavalcade passed her on its
way from the Trump National Golf Club
on the banks of the Potomac river, on
the outskirts of Washington. She then
repeated the gesture when she caught
up with the motorcade.
The White House pool report noted
drily: ?POTUS?s motorcade departed the
Trump National Golf Club at 3.12pm,
passing two pedestrians, one of whom
gave a thumbs-down sign. Then it overtook a female cyclist, wearing a white
top and cycling helmet, who responded
by giving the middle finger.
?The motorcade had to slow and
growing nuclear weapons programme and
worsening relations with Russia.
On Thursday, Christopher Ford, special
assistant to the president on weapons
of mass destruction, told a meeting on
nuclear threats organised by the Ploughshares Fund: ?The traditional post-cold
war approach of seeking to demonstrate
disarmament bona fides by showing
steady numerical movement towards
elimination ? has largely run its course.?
S ources briefed on the NPR said elements under consideration include:
? A low-yield missile, possibly using the
Trident D5 but using only the first, fission,
part of its two-stage warhead.
? Bringing back nuclear Tomahawk sealaunched cruise missiles, dropped in 2013.
? Reducing the time needed to resume
nuclear testing from its current three years.
? Relaxing constraints in Obama?s 2010
NPR pledging the US would use its nuclear
weapons only in ?extreme circumstances
to defend the vital interests of the United
States or its allies and partners?.
Congress, which controls funding for
nuclear weapons, is already concerned
about ballooning costs under the Obamaapproved programme, expected to be
revised up this week from $1tn to $1.25tn
(�0bn) over the next three decades.
public interest, as governor I am asking
government and energy authorities to
immediately activate the clause to cancel
the contract to Whitefish Energy.?
Whitefish officials have insisted that
they secured the deal legitimately and
would not oppose an audit of the company?s work. A Whitefish spokesman could
not immediately be reached for comment.
Several weeks after Hurricane Maria hit
Puerto Rico in September, about 75% of
homes and businesses still lack electricity.
Rossell� said he hoped that 30% of power
75%
Proportion of homes
and businesses in
Puerto Rico that are
still without power.
The governor wants
to replace the present
US contractor
would be restored to the island by the end
of October.
He said he had contacted Florida?s
governor, Rick Scott, and the New York
governor, Andrew Cuomo, to seek help
in replacing Whitefish and that they were
prepared to assist in restoring power.
?I have given instructions to immediately proceed with the necessary coordination with the states of Florida and New
York, in order for brigades and equipment
to arrive on the island,? Rossell�s statement said.
Rossell� called for an investigation into
how the contract between the Puerto Rico
Electric Power Authority (PREPA) and
Whitefish was decided so quickly.
The contract and the slow restoration
of power on the island have raised questions about the management of PREPA?s
response to Maria.
Section:GDN BE PaGe:16 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
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cYanmaGentaYellowblack
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
International
Somali government
fires security chiefs
after latest bombing
Al-Shabaab kills at least 23
in weekend suicide attack
Bodies of three children
and woman in hotel ruins
Jason Burke Nairobi
Somalia?s government has fired two of the
country?s most senior security officials
in the wake of a new attack by Islamist
militants that killed at least 23 people and
wounded more than 30 others at a hotel in
the centre of Mogadishu, the capital.
A statement from the prime minister?s
office yesterday said Abdullahi Mohamed
Ali, director general of Somalia?s National
Intelligence and Security Agency, and
Gen燗bdihakim Said, the head of police,
were sacked following a cabinet vote.
The move is aimed at restoring public
confidence after a string of attacks includ-
ing a truck bombing two weeks ago that
killed more than 350 people on a busy
Mogadishu street in one of the single most
lethal terrorist strikes in recent years anywhere in the world.
Somali investigators have said alShabaab was behind that bombing, though
the group did not claim responsibility.
Despite the reshuffle, the attack this
weekend will raise further questions
about the ability of the Somali government to protect civilians in the capital.
The extremists stormed the NasaHablod hotel, known as a favoured haunt
of government officials, on Saturday
afternoon after a suicide car bomber detonated an explosives-laden vehicle at the
entrance gate.
Somali special forces finally secured
the building yesterday morning. Three
gunmen were killed and two captured,
local officials said. The bodies of a woman
and three children, including a baby, were
found in the ruins of the hotel.
People assist a victim of the blast in Mogadishu Photograph: Feisal Oma/Reuters
Al-Shabaab, which is Africa?s deadliest
Islamist extremist group, quickly claimed
responsibility for the attack.
Analysts said the group?s prompt claim
of responsibility for Saturday?s attack was
in part intended to contrast with its failure
to claim responsibility for the devastating
attack earlier this month.
Al-Shabaab says it strikes only military
or official targets and would have seen no
advantage in taking responsibility for an
operation that killed many civilians and
failed to hit its target, thought to be the
heavily fortified airport compound in
Mogadishu.
The site is home to the United Nations,
embassies and the headquarters of African
Union troops in Somalia.
The group, which has been fighting to
establish an Islamist state in Somalia for a
decade, has been hit hard in recent years
by a series of offensives by government
troops and the 22,000-strong African
Union force stationed in the country.
Significant casualties have also been
inflicted on al-Shabaab?s leadership by US
drones. The US has been ramping up its
presence in the anarchic and drought-hit
east African country for some time, with
a new push since Donald Trump became
president this year.
Trump has also authorised the deployment of regular US forces to Somalia for
the first time since 1994. The US pulled out
of Somalia after 1993, when two helicopters were shot down in Mogadishu and the
bodies of American soldiers were dragged
through the streets.
Somalia?s president said the latest
attack on the capital aimed to instil fear
among people who showed unity in the
wake of the bombing two weeks ago.
?They want to create fear among
our people who showed support to the
ongoing efforts aimed at pacifying the
country,? President Mohamed Abdullahi
Mohamed, who took power in February,
said in a statement.
Ali, the sacked intelligence chief,
recently wrote a lengthy article in the New
York Times criticising the international
community for failing to help Somali
security forces.
?We appealed to our international
partners to share all information and evidence that they gathered from bombings
in Somalia with the national authorities.
The silence was deafening,? Ali wrote.
Suggestions that Ali was fired as a result
of the article were misplaced, said one
international official.
?There is simply a lot of public anger
around at the moment and someone
needed to carry the can,? the official said.
Kurdish leader
to resign after
independence
poll turmoil
Martin Chulov
Middle East correspondent
Masoud Barzani is to step down as Kurdish president after the spectacular backfiring of the contentious independence
referendum he called, which led to the
Kurds of northern Iraq being stripped of a
third of their territory and facing attacks
by Baghdad.
The veteran Kurdish leader told a parliamentary sitting in Erbil yesterday he
would not re-contest the presidency,
and asked for his powers to be dispersed.
His decision comes six weeks after the
poll, which returned a 93% yes vote but
prompted recriminations from neighbouring states and a rival political bloc.
The move had been expected after the
ballot, which, rather than strengthen the
Kurdish hold on northern Iraq, has left it
splintered and weakened, and led officials
scrambling to avert the imminent loss of
their last remaining revenue streams
? border crossings to Syria and Turkey
through which the region?s oil is exported.
Barzani said his position will become
vacant on 1 November, after which parliament will redistribute his powers. The
Kurdish prime minister, Nechirvan Barzani, is expected to be handed some of
Masoud Barzani
called the independence referendum
that returned a 93%
yes vote but left the
Kurds of northern
Iraq weakened
the presidency?s duties, with the rest to
be contested among senior officials.
In the wake of the poll, Iraqi Kurdistan
lost oil-rich Kirkuk to military forces sent
by Baghdad, which had been angered by
the contested city and other disputed territories being included in the referendum.
Officials in the Iraqi capital saw the
move as an annexation of the city, control
of which had been contested for centuries.
Military units and allied militias quickly
seized oil fields and other strategic sites,
turning off overnight more than half the
Kurdish region?s revenues and leaving it
with little hand to play in negotiations.
Since then, central government forces
have pushed further into disputed areas,
reverting the boundaries of the Kurdish
north to those it held in 2003, and sharply
exposing both its military and political
limitations as it calls for internationally
brokered dialogue to end the crisis.
The Iraqi military and Shia-led units
continued to stalk two border crossings
that account for almost the entirety of the
region?s revenues. The loss of remaining
revenues would be a crippling blow to
Erbil, the power base of the Barzani clan
and the seat of power in the fractured
Kurdish north, which has been blockaded
by Turkey, Iran and Baghdad in the aftermath of the poll.
Section:GDN BE PaGe:17 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
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The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
17
International
French feminists threaten to disrupt Polanski tribute
Retrospective for fugitive
film director ?an insult?
Campaigners rally amid
new allegations of rape
Kim Willsher Paris
The film director Roman Polanski will
attend a retrospective of his life?s work in
Paris today in spite of threats of protests
and new rape allegations against him.
A leading French feminist organisation
has called for a demonstration outside the
Cin閙ath鑡ue Fran鏰ise after a petition
to have the event cancelled failed.
Polanski, who is French-Polish, is still
wanted in America on charges of drugging
and raping a 13-year-old girl in 1977. He
admitted having sex with his under-age
victim. He fled to Paris before sentencing,
and repeated attempts to extradite him to
the US have failed.
Another woman came forward earlier
this month to claim the director raped
her in the Swiss Alps in 1972 when she
was underage. Three others also claim
the director raped them when they were
minors.
The tribute retrospective has been
described as ?indecent? and an insult to
women victims of assault mobilised by
the #MeToo campaign on social media.
?It?s an affront to all rape victims and
particularly Polanski?s victims,? the petition reads. ?Polanski deserves dishonour,
not honours?.
The petition questions the Cin閙ath鑡ue?s timing in honouring Polanski, whose films include Rosemary?s Baby,
Chinatown, The Pianist and The Ghost
Writer, at the height of the scandal sur-
rounding the Hollywood producer Harvey
Weinstein.
The retrospective has sparked outrage
among women?s rights campaigners,
including the Osez le F閙inisme group.
In January, Polanski, 84, was forced to
step down as host of the C閟ar awards,
the French equivalent of the Oscars, after
61,000 people signed a petition opposing
him being given the prestigious job.
Costa-Gavras, the Greek-French director who is head of the Cin閙ath鑡ue
Fran鏰ise, insisted it was not the institution?s role to be judge or jury or to moralise, and he accused critics of ?out and out
censorship?.
?True to its values and independent
tradition, the Cin閙ath鑡ue does not see
itself as a substitute for the law,? CostaGavras said in a statement.
?We don?t give out prizes or certificates
for good behaviour. Our ambition is differ-
ent: to show the complete work of filmmakers and to place them in the permanent history of the Cin閙ath鑡ue.?
The Weinstein scandal has sparked
claims from French women that they were
preyed on by influential and well-known
figures in the film industry.
The actor Isabelle Adjani claimed
French culture turned a blind eye to
sexual violence and harassment and that
?predators and harassers use the seduction game as one of the weapons in their
defence arsenal?.
?There are those who claim that these
women are not so innocent, because they
themselves lend themselves to this game
that is part of our culture. In production
houses or among decision-makers, I have
often heard: ?All sluts, all whores, anyway,
these actresses!?,? Adjani wrote in the
Journal du Dimanche.
Laure Salmona, a feminist campaigner
and researcher into sexual violence who
launched the petition against the retrospective, said it was time to end the tolerance of ?a rape culture that gives rise to a
language that seeks to minimise, excuse
and perpetuate sexual violence?.
She added: ?We also need to end the
impunity of famous men who rape,
assault and kill women and their children
without it affecting their careers.?
Salmona said of Polanski: ?A great
filmmaker perhaps, but also a big criminal ? what message is the Cin閙ath鑡ue
sending by announcing this retrospective? That crimes are, when all is said
and done, diluted by fame and that rape
is of little importance if committed by a
talented man?
?How many more victims do there have
to be for the film industry to realise that it
cannot continue praising a paedophile to
the skies??
Iceland poised
to shift left after
scandal-hit PM
loses majority
Jon Henley
European affairs correspondent
Iceland?s ruling centre-right parties have
lost their majority after a tight election
that could usher in only the second leftof-centre government in the country?s
history as an independent nation.
With all votes counted after the island?s
second snap poll in a year, the conservative Independence party of the scandalplagued outgoing prime minister, Bjarni
Benediktsson, was on course to remain
the largest. But it lost five of its 21 seats
in the 63-member parliament, potentially
paving the way for its main opponent, the
Left-Green Movement, headed by Katr韓
Jakobsd髏tir, to form a left-leaning coalition with three or more other parties.
The makeup of the new government,
however, remains uncertain since both
left and rightwing blocs have said they
deserve a chance to try to form a coalition
and Iceland?s president has yet to designate a party to begin talks.
Benediktsson called the election last
month after his three-party centre-right
government collapsed over an alleged
attempt to cover up efforts by his father to
help ?restore the honour? of a convicted
child sex offender. The outgoing government had been formed only 10 months ago
after early elections triggered by his predecessor?s resignation. Sigmundur Dav眇
Gunnlaugsson stepped down amid public
fury at revelations in the Panama Papers
his family had sheltered money offshore.
The Guardian revealed this month that
while an MP, Benediktsson ? a member of
one of Iceland?s wealthiest and most influential families, whose name also appeared
in the Panama Papers ? had sold millions
of kr髇ur of assets in a major Icelandic
bank?s investment fund as the state was
about to seize control of the failing financial sector during the 2008 financial crisis.
Final results showed Jakobsd髏tir, 41,
could forge a left-of-centre alliance with
the Social Democrats, the Progressive
party and the Pirate party that would hold
32 seats ? the slimmest possible majority in parliament. ?The opposition has a
majority, so that?s a message. But we?ve
also discussed maybe doing things differently and creating a broader government,?
the Left-Greens leader said in a television
debate yesterday.
Jakobsd髏tir has she would not rule
out working with the new Centre party,
formed last month by Gunnlaugsson,
which ended with a healthy 11% vote
share. Polls heading into the election
showed nearly half of Iceland?s voters
would like her to be their next prime minister, making her more than twice as popular as her party.
Almost half of Iceland?s voters would
like Katr韓 Jakobsd髏tir to take the reins
Mexicans mark their dead
Mexico City?s Day of the Dead honoured the nearly 500 people lost in last month?s earthquakes in a procession along more than four miles of the Paseo de la Reforma.
Participants and onlookers painted their faces and wore masks in the centuries-old Mexican celebration, which culminates on Thursday Photograph: EFE News/Alamy
Section:GDN BE PaGe:18 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
18
*
Eyewitness
Ian Walsh, 34, of
Hawaii, winner
of the World Surf
League?s 2017
Pe?ahi challenge
off Maui island,
Hawaii, at the
weekend when
challengers from
around the world
rode towering
waves of up to
12 metres (40ft)
Photograph:
Tony Heff/AFP/
Getty
Sent at 29/10/2017 17:38
cYanmaGentaYellowblack
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
Haiku, Hawaii
19
*
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
Galleries
A world of photography online
theguardian.com/inpictures
Section:GDN BE PaGe:18 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
18
*
Eyewitness
Ian Walsh, 34, of
Hawaii, winner
of the World Surf
League?s 2017
Pe?ahi challenge
off Maui island,
Hawaii, at the
weekend when
challengers from
around the world
rode towering
waves of up to
12 metres (40ft)
Photograph:
Tony Heff/AFP/
Getty
Sent at 29/10/2017 17:38
cYanmaGentaYellowblack
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
Haiku, Hawaii
19
*
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
Galleries
A world of photography online
theguardian.com/inpictures
Section:GDN BE PaGe:20 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
20
Sent at 29/10/2017 21:08
cYanmaGentaYellowblack
*
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
Financial
Business editor: Julia Finch
financial@theguardian.com
020 3353 3795
@businessdesk
First rate rise since 2007 expected this week
Bank of England poised to
lift borrowing cost to 0.5%
Move would boost pound
and help to cut inflation
Richard Partington
The Bank of England is poised to raise
interest rates this Thursday for the first
time in more than a decade, putting up the
cost of borrowing for British households
already hurt by an earnings squeeze.
Threadneedle Street is expected to
reverse emergency action taken following the EU referendum, when it cut rates
from 0.5% to 0.25% to avert a recession.
While a slump has not materialised, the
British economy appears in worse health
than most other major countries, with
potential to be blown further off course
by faltering talks to leave the EU.
The UK is growing at half the rate
recorded in the US for the year to September, at 1.5%, while growth is expected to
trail Italy, France and Germany next year.
Stepping up the cost of borrowing
would add to household costs, such as
mortgage payments and taking out personal loans, at a time when wage growth
is failing to keep pace with inflation. The
cut to real earnings means average pay is
no higher than it was in February 2006,
despite the economy being 4.4% bigger
per person than at that time, according to
the Resolution Foundation.
Average earnings excluding bonuses
increased by 2.1% in the three months
to August, down from 2.2% in the three
months to July after a revision to the earlier data, according to the latest figures.
That is despite the bargaining power of
workers potentially being raised by the
lowest level of unemployment since
the 爉id-1970s.
The increase in earnings is only a fraction below the expectations of the Bank?s
monetary policy committee (MPC), which
decides where to set the cost of borrowing. But the MPC may take action now if it
is confident wages can rise further in the
coming months.
Although it will draw to a close the longest period in living memory without a rate
rise ? the last was in July 2007, when rates
increased to 5.75% ? economists expect
this week?s increase to be modest and
followed by few, if any, further rises over
the coming year. Mark Carney, the Bank?s
governor, has cautioned that this is likely
to be his preferred course of action.
Howard Archer, the chief economic
adviser to the EY Item Club, said: ?Given
that interest rates have not risen since
2007, the MPC may well sit tight for an
extended period after an initial hike to see
how consumers and businesses respond.?
While increasing borrowing costs could
hurt squeezed households, it will support
the pound and help to cut inflation, which
reached 3% in September, driven by the
higher cost of importing food and fuel.
Economists at HSBC expect two rate
rises from the Bank, one on Thursday and
one in May next year. They estimate this
could reduce annual average inflation to
2.5% from a previous forecast of 2.9%
The Bank?s preparations come as business investment flatlines, with companies
reluctant to spend because of fears over
a hard Brexit. Just as families are seeing
a higher cost of living on the high street,
companies have faced steeper prices for
materials, eroding profitability. Raising
interest rates would make borrowing
more expensive for firms, potentially
compounding the problem.
Threadneedle Street had said in September that a majority of the MPC?s nine
members, including Carney, saw a need to
1.5%
UK economic growth
for the year to September ? half that of
the US. The Bank has
said it will raise rates
only if the economy is
sufficiently resilient
raise rates should the economy continue
to show signs of resilience. City analysts
expect the MPC to split on Thursday, with
two of the Bank?s deputy governors, Sir
Dave Ramsden and Sir Jon Cunliffe, voting against raising rates.
Although the economy is growing more
slowly than before the EU referendum, the
Bank had been looking for a growth rate of
0.3% in the third quarter, which is below
the rate recorded last week. City analysts
viewed this as confirmation enough of an
increase this week.
Failure to act on Thursday could pose
fresh risks. With financial markets apportioning a more than 80% chance of the
MPC voting for a rise, keeping rates on
hold could trigger a drop in the value of
the pound immediately after the decision.
Philip Rush, the founder of the consultancy Heteronomics, said: ?A dovish disappointment would weaken the currency
and reintroduce inflationary pressures
that previously appeared to be intolerably excessive.?
Forecast hole in
public finances
will constrain
chancellor ? IFS
Richard Partington
Fresh analysis revealing a hole of almost
�bn in the public finances will heighten
the pressure on the chancellor, Philip
Hammond, before next month?s budget.
Britain is on track for the deficit ? the
gap between government spending and
tax receipts ? to reach �bn by 2021-22,
more than twice the initial �bn forecast
by officials, according to the Institute for
Fiscal Studies (IFS) thinktank.
The stark analysis adds to the weight on
the chancellor as he increasingly appears
trapped between the government?s fiscal
targets and calls to raise spending amid a
deteriorating economy and uncertainty
over Brexit. He is due to deliver his budget
on 22 November.
?It is hard to see how the chancellor
can both maintain the credibility of his
fiscal targets and respond effectively to
the growing demands for spending?, the
IFS said.
At the root of the problem for Hammond
is an admission by the government?s official economic forecaster that weak levels
of productivity since the financial crisis
are unlikely to improve any time soon.
The Office for Budget Responsibility
AllSaints on the rise
Boosted by its growing international operations, sales of the British fashion label AllSaints rose by 20% last year, to just over �0m, with sales outside the UK
accounting for almost 50%. Profits fell 9% to �m, reflecting the costs of its move into Japan and startup costs of its travel division Photograph: Grant Lamos IV/Getty
UK still top country for business
despite Brexit risks, report says
Angela Monaghan
The UK is still the most attractive European country for employers and staff,
despite the uncertainty created by the
Brexit vote, according to a report by
Colliers International.
A combination of talent, location, quality of life and cost puts Britain ahead of
rivals, the commercial property firm said,
with London ranking first in a league table
of 50 European cities. Birmingham, Edinburgh, Manchester, Bristol and Glasgow
also featured in the top 20.
?In the face of negative reports surrounding the UK?s political, social,
economic and country risk issues, our
research demonstrates that the country
as a whole remains in a particularly strong
position ? companies in the capital have
started to place more emphasis on creating workplaces that help accelerate their
business and attract talent,? said Simon
Ford, a director at Colliers.
The government has insisted in recent
weeks that London and the UK will remain
an attractive place for business to invest
after Britain leaves the EU. There are fears,
however, that in the absence of any clarity on a potential deal with the EU, multinational firms are preparing to activate
their Brexit contingency plans and move
jobs from the UK to other European countries where they will enjoy guaranteed
access to the single market.
Frankfurt is one of the frontrunners
hoping to attract jobs from London after
Brexit. Dublin, Paris, Madrid, Amsterdam
and Luxembourg are also contenders.
However, according to Colliers? analysis, London beats Paris into second place.
Frankfurt is ranked in 14th place for
employees and 15th for employers.
Colliers said that the UK was still among
the lowest-risk European countries in
which to set up and operate a business.
Bristol features in the top 20 in a league
table of 50 European cities by Colliers
Monarch?s owner admits ?moral
obligation? to share cost of flights
Richard Partington
The owner of the collapsed Monarch airline has said it has a ?moral obligation? to
help meet the costs of flying holidaymakers back to Britain, after taxpayers footed
the �m bill.
Writing in a letter to the chairman of
the Commons transport select committee, the private equity firm, Greybull
Capital, indicated that profits recovered
from the failed firm could be shared with
the government. It said in a statement this
would mean ?helping to defray the costs
incurred by the Department for Transport
in repatriating Monarch customers.?
It comes after the transport secretary,
Chris Grayling, argued that Greybull
should pay if it profited from the firm
going into administration.
A Greybull spokesman said: ?We concur wholeheartedly with the secretary of
state?s recent statement that any stakeholder who finds themselves in pocket
at the end of the administration process
would be under a moral obligation to contribute to other stakeholders.?
The Civil Aviation Authority put on 567
flights that brought nearly 84,000 passengers back to Britain after the airline went
into administration on 2 October.
The government said previously it
hoped to recoup part of the cost from
credit card firms and tour operators with
customers booked on Monarch flights.
Greybull?s handling of the company?s
finances has come under intense scrutiny in the month since the airline went
into administration. Monarch?s staff lost
thousands in pension cuts when the private equity firm took over the company
in 2014, and 750,000 passengers had forward bookings when the airline collapsed.
Nearly 84,000 passengers booked on
Monarch flights had
to be brought back to
Britain after the airline went into administration in October
In the letter sent to Lilian Greenwood,
chair of the transport select committee,
the firm said that it had not taken out
dividends, loan repayments or interest
since its first investment in Monarch in
October 2014.
As Monarch?s main secured creditor,
Greybull has first call on any cash collected from asset sales by the administrator, KPMG, which is expected to recoup
millions from selling the airline?s landing
slots.
The size the deficit
could reach by
2020-21, according
to the Institute for
Fiscal Studies. That
is more than twice
the initial forecast
36bn
�
(OBR) has said it will need to ?significantly? lower its estimates for the economic output per hour worked in Britain.
Treasury officials are understood to
have known about the impact of the revision on the public finances for some time.
The OBR has said it views the 0.2% rate
of productivity growth over the past five
years as a better guide for 2017 than its
forecast of 1.6% in March.
Were the forecasting body to decide the
low productivity growth of the last seven
years ? about 0.4% a year ? is now the normal rate for Britain, borrowing could rise
to almost �bn in 2021-22, according to
the IFS. Downgrading the growth rate to
about 1% a year would put the deficit on
course to be almost �bn higher over the
same period.
The changes make it harder for Hammond to increase public sector pay ? as
demanded by unions and conceded as
a priority by Theresa May for prison and
police officers ? without breaking his
pledge to get the public finances back into
surplus by the mid-2020s.
Carl Emmerson, deputy director at the
IFS, said: ?Given all the current pressures
and uncertainties ? and the policy action
that these might require ? it is perhaps
time to admit that a firm commitment to
running a budget surplus from the mid2020s onwards is no longer sensible.?
An admission that austerity is no longer
working would come as a big blow to the
Conservative party after seven years of
dogmatic fiscal rectitude. British workers
are feeling increasingly squeezed by negative real wage growth and rising inflation.
Section:GDN BE PaGe:21 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
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*
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
21
Financial
?Big variations in
Analysis
Full employment? Why
Blackpool begs to differ
From the home counties it
may look as if everyone is
in work ? but the real figures
tell a different story,
writes Larry Elliott
F
alling unemployment has
been the one bright spot in
what has been a distinctly
mediocre year for the
economy. Harold Wilson
was prime minister the last
time Britain had a jobless
rate as low as 4.3%. When
the Bank of England?s monetary policy
committee meets this week to discuss
interest rates, the state of the labour
market will feature prominently. Many
of the members think that Britain is at,
or very close to, full employment and
that any further falls in joblessness will
lead to wage inflation.
We?ve been here before. The Bank
thought earnings growth would start to
pick up when unemployment hit 7%, 6%
and 5% and was wrong every time. Nor,
to be frank, is there any evidence of an
imminent wage-price spiral now.
That?s because the bulk of the jobs
being created are low-skill, low-wage
jobs in the service sector competed
for by retired people coming back into
the labour market to supplement their
pensions, those arriving in Britain from
overseas and former welfare claimants
looking for work as a result of tougher
benefit rules. The increase in the supply
of labour is keeping pace with demand,
keeping the lid on pay.
The lack of any real upward pay
pressure is one difference between
today?s labour market and that of
the mid-1970s. Hidden unemployment is the other big change, as
research from Sheffield Hallam
University, funded by the Joseph
Rowntree Foundation, shows. It
concludes the real level of unemployment is considerably higher than
the officially reported rate.
There are two ways in which
the Office for National Statis-
tics calculates unemployment. First,
there is the claimant count, which picks
up the number of people out of work
and claiming jobseeker?s allowance or
universal credit. In the spring, the claimant count stood at 785,000.
The claimant count fell out of favour
in the 1980s, however, when the then
Conservative government made more
than 30 changes to the way in which it
was calculated, almost all of them leading to a lower total. Greater attention
was paid to a broader measure of unemployment based on criteria laid down by
the International Labour Organisation.
This second method states a person is
unemployed if he or she doesn?t have a
job, has looked for work in the past four
weeks and can start within a fortnight.
This methodology tops up the claimant count with another 735,000 people,
giving a total of just over 1.5m.
The Sheffield Hallam researchers ?
Christina Beatty, Steve Fothergill and
Tony Gore ? say 760,000 should be
added because they are people hidden
on incapacity benefits. Real unemployment, the study says, is just shy of 2.3m.
Parking people on incapacity benefits
was a way of keeping the official unemployment total down in the 1980s and
1990s. Despite the population becoming
gradually healthier, the number on incapacity benefits rose from 750,000 at the
end of the 1970s to more than 2.5 million
by the end of the 1990s. Vigorous efforts
have subsequently brought the total
down, but not by much.
The researchers say many of those
claiming incapacity benefits would like
to work but take a dim view of their job
prospects because they feel their health
is too poor or disability too severe, or
because they think the chances of
finding a job are small, especially
when they are in competition
with fit and healthy workers
likely to catch the eye of potential
employers. The research does
not say these people are claiming
incapacity benefits to which they
are not entitled. But it notes
ill health is not necessarily an insuperable barrier
to holding down a job,
the health of
regional economies
are still very much
with us?
Government figures suggest Blackpool has 3,760 unemployed, but the outlook may
not be quite so sunny Photograph: Christopher Thomond for the Guardian
and the employment rate of those with
a work-limiting disability depends on
geography.
According to official data, 44% of the
6.1 million people of working age classified as having a work-limiting disability
are in employment, but the key factor
is whether jobs are in short supply or
hard to come by. In the north-east of
England, for example, the employment
rate among men and women with a
work-limiting disability was 37%, with
similar rates for Scotland (38%), Wales
(39%) and northwest England (40%). By
contrast, it was 53% in the south-east
and 52% in the south-west.
The researchers calculate the level
of hidden unemployment by benchmarking a town or region against what
would be achievable were the local
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economy to be operating at full employment. As would only be expected, the
highest rates of hidden unemployment
are in the parts of the country where
de-industrialisation has been most
marked: South Wales, Merseyside,
north-east England and Clydeside. In
these areas, incapacity benefits can
account for up to 10% of the entire
working-age population. While it is
the case that these are places where
standards of health have long been
below the national average, a generation
ago the incapacity claimant rates were
far lower.
The good news is hidden unemployment is coming down, from just over 1
million in 2007 to 900,000 in 2012 and
now to 760,000. That means the Sheffield Hallam estimate of real unemploy-
ment has also fallen, by more than a
million in the past five years.
The bad news is that the total remains
high and is concentrated in the regions
with the weakest labour markets. Blackpool has the highest hidden unemployment on incapacity benefits, estimated
at just more than 7% of the town?s working population. According to the claimant count, unemployment is 3,760.
Adding in those classified as unemployed under the ILO, the total comes to
4,260. Yet the study suggests a further
6,100 people are hidden unemployed,
taking the total to 10,400, or 12% of
the working population. Hartlepool,
Blaenau Gwent, Merthyr Tydfil and
Middlesbrough fill the next four spots in
the real unemployment list.
Britain, whatever the official figures
might suggest, is a long way from full
employment. Some parts of the country
are in the happy state of having enough
jobs for all who want them, including
those who feel marginalised, but almost
all of them are in the home counties.
Fothergill dismissed the idea Britain
was at or close to full employment,
saying: ?What our estimates of the real
level of unemployment show is big
variations in the health of regional and
local economies are still very much
with us.?
So if the Bank puts up interest rates
this week, it won?t be because the labour
market is overheating in the Welsh valleys or former Pennine textile towns.
It is now almost 40 years since the
recession of the early 1980s decimated
Britain?s manufacturing base and more
than 30 years since the miners? strike
heralded the end for coal. Those parts
of the country have never recovered.
Section:GDN BE PaGe:22 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
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The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
Financial
Digital technologies offer antidote to Brexit, ministers told
Angela Monaghan
Britain?s manufacturing sector could
unlock �5bn over the next decade and
create thousands of jobs if it cracks the
?fourth industrial revolution? and carves
out a successful post-Brexit future.
That is the conclusion of a governmentcommissioned review on industrial digitalisation, published today and led by
Juergen Maier, the UK boss of the German
engineering giant Siemens.
A sector deal between government and
industry could put Britain at the forefront
of new technologies such as robotics,
artificial intelligence, 3D printing, and
augmented and virtual reality, giving a
much-needed productivity boost and a
net gain of 175,000 highly skilled jobs.
Maier ? who was tasked by Theresa May
with providing a long-term vision for the
industry ? said the ambitious proposals
outlined in the review could serve as an
?antidote? to challenges facing manufacturing as a result of the Brexit vote.
?The business and academic commuJuergen Maier, chief
executive of Siemens
in the UK, was commissioned by the
government to lead a
review on industrial
digitalisation
nity has set out a vision for much greater
ambition needed for Britain to be a world
leader in the fourth industrial revolution,?
Maier said. ?The good news here is Britain is not starting from nothing. The UK
has brilliant knowledge, assets and skills
in this space but it is sometimes not as
organised as it could be.?
The 246-page review brings together in
a series of recommendations input from
more than 200 firms and organisations,
including Rolls-Royce, Accenture and
Cambridge and Newcastle universities.
The so-called ?made smarter? proposals include building a national digital ecosystem ? to be piloted in the north-west
? which would allow smaller and medium-
sized engineering companies the chance
to experiment with new technologies.
Government support would be offered
through tax incentives and funding.
The review also recommends the creation of 12 digital innovation hubs, where
start-ups would work with universities
and established firms such as Siemens.
It calls for a new national body to safeguard a long-term commitment to the programme, which Maier hopes will lead to
the ?up-skilling? of one million industrial
workers in Britain.
The government will now consider the
proposals, and a white paper is expected
before Christmas.
The business secretary, Greg Clark,
said the review outlined the huge potential digitalisation offers to manufacturing: ?The UK manufacturing sector has
the potential to be a global leader in the
industrial digital technology revolution.
Government and industry must work
together to seize the opportunities that
exist in this sector.?
It is hoped the net gain in jobs would be
achievable ? despite areas such as robotics and artificial intelligence making some
shopfloor roles redundant ? through
growth in the sector and new roles in IT,
analytics, and research and development.
If taken up, the proposals would contribute an additional 3% to annual growth in
manufacturing, Maier said.
Piracy battles
over music and
sport dominate
high court cases
Mark Sweney
The legal battle against music piracy and
the illegal streaming of football such as
Premier League matches dominates cases
in the high court, an analysis shows.
Football and music bodies were the top
three claimants at the high court last year,
bringing almost 300 cases against pirates
in the battle to protect the value of the
multi-billion pound industries.
More than 100 cases were brought by
the music licensing and performance
rights body PPL, formerly known as Phonographic Performance Ltd, in the year to
the end of March 2017. The Football Association brought 39 cases and the Performing Right Society brought 27.
The FA has stepped up the number of
actions in recent years ? in 2013 it brought
just five cases ? as illegal streaming of
matches on services such as Facebook and
via pirate set-top boxes gathers pace. BritSky won damages
against an individual who illegally
streamed the
Anthony JoshuaWladimir Klitschko
fight on Facebook
ain?s football governing body has focused
its clampdown on owners of pubs and
bars that are either not paying a full fee
or using illegal streaming services, such
as Kodi set-top boxes that circumvent the
need to pay rights holders such as Sky and
BT to watch sport.
?Pubs are feeling the brunt,? said Ciara
Cullen, a partner at the professional
services firm RPC, which analysed the
cases brought to the high court in the year
to the end of March.
Sky and BT, which own billions of
pounds of rights to sport including
Premier League and Champions League
football, made the top 10 list of claimants with 14 cases between them. Sky,
which paid more than �n for the rights
to air the lion?s share of Premier League
matches in Britain, has been particularly
aggressive in seeking to make an example
of sports pirates to deter others.
In a recent case, Sky won damages
against an individual who illegally
streamed the hugely popular Anthony
Joshua v Wladimir Klitschko world
title fight on Facebook, which attracted
600,000 viewers.
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journal
*
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
23
opinion | letters | reviews
Britain can deal with
Islamic State returnees.
But not by killing them
Richard Barrett
The values of justice and tolerance are our greatest
source of resilience. Abandon them, and Isis wins
Richard Barrett
is爁ormer director
of global counterterrorism at MI6
? Illustration by
Thomas Pullin
T
he British pride
themselves on their
resilience to terrorism. We like to identify
with the man who went
back to pay his bill the
morning after the attack
at London Bridge last
June; or the crowds of concert-goers
who refused to be intimidated by the
Manchester bombing in May. We express
our outrage and carry on.
Other countries do the same. It took
just 24 hours before Somalis began to
rebuild after the enormous truck bomb
that shattered buildings and killed
over 350 people in Mogadishu earlier
this month. The streets of Barcelona
are now爐hronged with crowds
demonstrating in favour or against
Catalan independence, undeterred by
the terrorist attack there in August.
But the aim of terrorist groups such
as the so-called Islamic State is not just
to destroy infrastructure or undermine
local economies. It is also to destroy
societal cohesion. Isis has made no
secret of this. Its propaganda ? both of
the word and of the deed ? is directed
not at the overwhelming majority of
Muslims and non-Muslims who find
its actions and ideology repellent. It
is aimed at the very few whose sense
of alienation and lack of agency make
them vulnerable to recruitment. In this
respect, its closest competitors at the
local level are cults and gangs.
Isis talks of eliminating the grey
zone ? in other words, forcing people to
choose between supporting it through
violence or being counted as the enemy.
In the minds of its ideologues there is no
middle ground, and nothing to debate or
negotiate: they are fulfilling a prophecy.
They hope that the images of blood and
gore, and the stories of their atrocities,
will provoke a social and governmental
backlash that reinforces the divide
between supporters and opponents,
driving more people to their cause. The
global growth in extremism, nativism
and supremacism is in part a measure
of爐heir success, as well as the medium
in which they grow.
Resilience is therefore not just about
Keeping Calm and Carrying On. It is
about continuing to trust in and pursue
the values that most people support:
tolerance, justice, equal opportunity,
the peaceful resolution of disputes, and
above all the rule of law ? values that the
tactics of terrorism aim to erode.
The extraordinary circumstances
in the Middle East that allowed Isis to
control territory and function as a state,
even down to issuing parking tickets,
encouraged people without much sense
of belonging or purpose in their own
countries to think that a better alternative was truly possible, and that they
could contribute in person to its development. They flocked to Syria in their
thousands from all parts of the world.
When they got there, many found
that the reality fell far short of the
rhetoric, and soon left. Others stayed
longer, but while they may have
continued to believe in the utopian
dream they recognised the actual
dystopian consequences of the actions
of the Isis leadership. They too left.
Others may have enjoyed the fighting
and the sex slaves, but given up when
the novelty paled or the squalid reality
became too much to bear. Others will
have fled only when squeezed out from
shrinking territory. Still others will have
gone, on the orders of their leaders, to
carry on the fight elsewhere.
All these groups of returnees present
a threat to the countries to which they
go back, especially if the circumstances
at home are no different from when they
left. Those who went to join something
new but were soon disillusioned will
perhaps be less inclined to morph into
domestic terrorists than those who
came back only because the coalition
against Isis prevailed, or because they
were sent back by their leaders. But all,
by definition, rejected the country they
left and are unlikely to feel any greater
sense of loyalty or belonging on return.
There is only so much the state
can燿o爐o repel, detain or indefinitely
keep watch on the returnees.
International law prevents a state from
leaving anyone without citizenship, and
citizenship denotes a right of residence.
Furthermore, detention requires
investigation, trial and sentencing
according to the law. And爏urveillance is
hugely resource-intensive. Hoping that
these people may die before they come
back, or even deliberately trying to kill
them, as the foreign office minister Rory
Stewart suggested last week ? apart
from raising serious legal issues ? overlooks the fact that a large number are
back already: about 400, in the case of
the United Kingdom. There is no advantage in abandoning our values in this
way. In爁act the reverse is true: it gives
the terrorists an easy victory.
O
n top of the returnees,
there are many who
thought of going but
never did, and some
who tried but were
stopped while they
were en route. These
Isis supporters will not
have had their naivety doused in the
cold water of reality, and may be more
motivated to do something against
society at home as a result.
In fact, returnees have not so far
been notably engaged in terrorist
plots,燿espite the significant increase
in Isis-inspired terrorism since 2015.
That may change as more fighters go
home. The rate of return has slowed
considerably over this same period,
but爐hat may be because the less
committed got out爀arly while the
hardcore燼re爋nly爈eaving now.
Whenever the police learn of a
returnee in the United Kingdom,
they will try to establish whether he
or she has committed a crime. But
the numbers are overwhelming, the
evidence hard to collect and, despite
the major effort to assess and assign a
level of priority in each case, mistakes
will be made. There may be room for
new laws,燽ut these will add to the
pressures on the police, the courts and
the prison service. Prison, in any case,
can prove a爌articularly fertile ground
for spreading extremist ideas.
But there is more going on than
this, and it underpins our resilience
in a way爐hat the use of force cannot.
Britain爃as become a world leader in
engaging the broader community in
dealing with violent extremism. At
times the government has got it wrong,
but it is learning, and now supports a
range of non-traditional civil society
partners that have proved successful in changing the mindset of violent
extremists or of those who may be
tempted to join them.
These groups also engage terrorist prisoners and returnees. They do
so on燼n intensive and personal basis,
listening to their local and individual
grievances and explaining the global
context in exactly the same way
that Isis爎ecruiters do. Many of their
interlocutors ending up joining in this
effort, and as these numbers grow their
influence will spread and become an
increasingly effective counter to the
ideas of violent extremism.
It will be many years before the
cauldron of social conflict in the
Middle燛ast ? and elsewhere ? becomes
any sort of melting pot. But in the
United Kingdom there is an effort
to reinforce social cohesion and
community resilience by striking the
right balance between official and civic
engagement, all the while holding firmly
to our values. Given time, it will work.
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The Guardian | Monday
onday
nday 30 October 2017
opinion
Founded 1821
Owned by the Scott Trust
Number 53,241
Sexual harassment
What used to define
us was irony. Now
it?s self-importance
Zoe Williams
MPs must grasp this chance to
reshape the national conversation
Many male MPs and peers will have passed
the weekend anxiously reviewing their social
media accounts. Older ones may be trying
to recall all the lunches with journalists and
researchers where they chanced their luck
with what was once known in some circles
as the 10% rule, the one that says that for
every 10 women a man propositions, one
will say yes. For generations of women who
work in and around Westminster ? from
MPs to young爎esearch assistants ? fending
off men has been part of the job. Now that
a WhatsApp group of women in politics
is sharing information about them, the
persistence of sexual harassment and worse
ought to become clear. At last.
Anyone who still struggles to understand
why women?s voices are only now being
heard need do no more than parse Michael
Gove?s ?clumsy? attempt at humour during
Saturday morning?s 60th birthday party
for the BBC Radio 4 Today programme.
Mr燝ove is not a comedian, but he has a quick
mind and is highly articulate, and he has a
comic?s knack for taking a complex story and
reducing it to its essentials. So it stretches
credibility to believe, as he would like, that
he suddenly blurted out a joke comparing
John Humphrys? interviewing technique to
Harvey Weinstein?s abusive and predatory
exploitation of women. Did he爎eally just
drop his guard? It didn?t sound like that.
It sounded as if he thought it was funny.
His fellow guest, the former Labour leader
Neil Kinnock, thought it was funny. John
Humphrys thought it was funny. Even the
sedate and highbrow Wigmore Hall, hosting
the live broadcast, rang with audience
laughter. It felt like yet more proof that many
men still don?t grasp what women face, or
how damaging it can be.
Later, he apologised. Courtesy is another
Govean hallmark. But this is a joke straight
out of that compendium of bad taste jests,
the Westminster playbook. It is the kind of
joke that relies on complicity, in this case
with a worldview that draws no distinction
apparently between allegations of rape
and a燘BC radio interviewer?s technique.
Move燼long, ladies, nothing to fuss about.
Westminster, by most accounts, is a
much less nasty place to work for women
now that there are so many more female
MPs and staff. Yet it remains, like most
other workplaces, dominated by men with
a爏ense of entitlement. It is also a world of
multiple bars, where people often have to
work intensely hard and late into the night.
It is sometimes described as a village, and
for all爐he political differences, the whiff of
cultural uniformity lingers.
Part of this culture, again true of all
parties, is that the whips know everything
that might be used against every one of
their MPs. Downing Street is silent on the
suggestion that the prime minister is kept
informed of every allegation or suspicion
about any wrongdoing connected with any
Conservative MP, but it has certainly been
true of some of her predecessors. That is
why the rumours now circulating about
some members of her cabinet are potentially
so damaging for her, as well as for the men
concerned. There is a risk that Theresa May
will appear to be complicit. That is why there
is to be a cabinet office investigation into the
international development minister Mark
Garnier?s Soho shopping trip, and why Mrs
May has written to the Speaker proposing a
wider commission of inquiry. Jeremy Corbyn
also understands that when he demands that
these allegations be taken seriously.
Over the next few days stories seem likely
to emerge that will test the meaning of sexual
harassment in a much more nuanced way
than the crassness of Michael Gove?s joke.
It is an important moment. MPs seethe with
frustration at the lack of political business in
a Commons bogged down by Brexit. But here
is a moment where they could have a lasting
influence on the national conversation. That
does not mean letting this open another front
in the culture wars. It?s about putting respect
at the centre of human relations.
Brexit has warped the national identity, giving
birth to a politics with no sense of the absurd
I
Economy
Low pay: the real cause of
Britain?s productivity puzzle
Theresa May originally wanted her purpose
in power to be defined by improving the
wellbeing of the less well-off. Despite all
that has happened since, she has not,
apparently, given up: with the gender pay gap
in mind, at the weekend she pressed even
those smaller firms not legally required to
publish the difference between their male
and female employees? earnings to survey
their workforce. This is typical of her style:
imprecation rather than action. Within weeks
of that Downing Street pledge, she was
backtracking on some of the measures, such
as workers and consumers on boards, that
she had proposed as a way of showing she
would be the voice of the just-getting-by.
Yet there is no doubt she got one thing
right: she identified the issue that is likely
to do most damage to her government,
whatever the upshot of the Brexit
negotiations. A decade after the crash, many
voters are still not better off; the roll-out of
universal credit is going to leave some even
poorer. And many of those who have had real
income growth don?t feel the difference.
A whole batch of figures in the last
couple爋f weeks has confirmed the bleakness
of爐he picture: beneath the impressive
level爋f爀mployment, real wages fell for the
sixth month in a row, average real pay was
back below pre-crash levels, and the state
of the high street, as illustrated by the retail
sales,爁igures suggests it is lurching into
renewed crisis.
After the June election, the obituary
notices for austerity were drafted. Yet so far,
they look premature. On Thursday, it?s likely
that an interest rate rise will be at last be
announced, a blow for many households who
have maxed out their credit. There are a few
signs of easing up: the introduction of the cap
on housing allowance has been delayed; and
the cap on public sector pay, after seven years
of virtual freeze, is due to go too. A new paper
from the thinktank the IPPR today points
out that if the chancellor, Philip Hammond,
used his first autumn budget on 22 November
cYanmaGentaYellowblack
to advance the cash so that the NHS could
link pay to inflation for the next three years,
nearly half the �8bn cost would come back
to the Treasury in the form of lower welfare
bills and higher tax receipts.
The best news for the low paid has been the
living wage. It has increased legal minimum
pay from �70 to �20 an hour, a 7.5% rise;
the pay of the lowest-earning tenth of the
population has grown faster than at any time
since the peak of UK pay equality in 1977.
Yet even by 2020 there will still be 6爉illion
people earning less than the so-called
national living wage, measured by what
is needed to reach an acceptable standard
of living. Meanwhile the gender pay gap,
which has halved over the past 20 years, is
narrowing at a slower rate again; the gap for
part-time workers, who are mainly women,
is nearly double that for full-time employees.
And, even if the waiting time is reduced from
six to four weeks, the impending cuts to
universal credit undermine its fundamental
justification of making work pay.
The chancellor is said to spend more time
puzzling over Britain?s productivity problem
(worsening again) than anything else. So
he might be interested in the results of a
Resolution Foundation study into the impact
of the living wage, on the women who have
been its major beneficiaries. Focus group
surveys found that far from feeling like
progress, it had merely made employers more
demanding without also making them more
willing to offer the training that would make
them more productive. Britain?s low-paid
sectors ? hospitality and food processing ?
are notoriously described as an investment
wasteland. The consequences of Brexit may
change that but, for now, the government?s
hopes for improving productivity are
pinned爋n its new apprenticeship levy,
where爀mployers rather than the taxpayer
pay for training. Yet the first results show
not more, but dramatically fewer young
people taking up apprenticeships. Back to
the燿rawing board, chancellor.
The letBritainroar, growwings-andfly pap is an
unsettling
departure
from
maturity
and reason
Pro-Brexit
demonstrators
at Westminster,
November 2016
Wiktor
Szymanowicz/
Alamy
t?s important not to romanticise the past, otherwise you end
up like a cut-price, leftist Nigel
Farage marching to a whinier,
less exhilarating drumbeat. But
I燿istinctly remember, this time 20
years ago, it being normal to object
to Halloween: not because it was
satanic, but because it was American.
It was the festival of consumerism and
excess, unmoored from any deeper
significance, but most of all ? being
expressly conceived as fun for children,
and entailing talking to strangers and
asking for things ? it was un-English.
Nationalism has taken a depressing turn, this past year and a half. The
suspicion of foreigners and alienation
of former allies are the greatest practical threats to the country?s wellbeing
and prosperity. The let-Britain-roar,
grow-wings-and-fly pap is the most
unsettling departure from maturity
and reason. But it?s the exceptionalism,
freely vented for the world to hear, that
is the most embarrassing: the idea that
our success is assured, whatever decisions we make, because we?re the best
at trading, with the best stuff, the finest
minds, the most illustrious history.
This is not, however, a story of a
nation that was bumbling happily along
when suddenly the patriotic beast
within was awakened. There was no
shortage of national identity before it
mutated and was weaponised. There
was a very clear sense of Englishness. It
was just a different England.
Prior to this Tory rampage, we
didn?t爏ay ?British?, because we knew
that was a euphemism for ?English?,
which itself was code for flag-toting,
nostalgic monoculturalism. But we were
pretty comfortable describing what was
un-English: self-aggrandisement; vocal
pride ? especially for things you had no
hand in, such as where you were born;
and making large claims for superiority
in abstract areas, like national character.
These were un-English. The idea of
?British values? was oxymoronic, since
appropriating some value and claiming
to have it in greater quantity than any
other country would have been the least
English thing.
Of course, you cannot claim for yourself the accolade ?most modest?, unless
you?re Donald Trump. So the foundation stone of this patriotism was pride
in the thing you wouldn?t be seen dead
taking pride in: or, to put it more briefly,
all nationalism was ironic. We used the
union flag ironically, as a backdrop for
Patsy Kensit or to set off Liam Gallagher?s
eyes. We mentioned national traits only
to mock them ? chiefly, a collective inability ever to say what we meant. Irony,
at the turn of this century, became synonymous with insincerity: a thin gruel,
no match for the hearty stew of passion.
But in fact the irony was anything
but insincere. Rather, it was the navigational tool of acute self-awareness,
an acknowledgment of a delicate
tightrope between celebrating the
achievements of your compatriots and
lauding them燼s爌roof of your nation?s
supremacy; between feeling loyalty
to your fellow citizens, in recognition
of the fact that you were all embarked
on the creation of a shared future,
and fostering an us-against-the-world
interiority; between relishing cultural
cross-pollination and importing any
old爊onsense, like Halloween.
A nationalism constantly asserted
defines itself against the foreign;
a爊ationalism that goes unstated defines
itself from within ? its tacit understandings are its connective tissue. It was no
accident that we rarely talked about
patriotism. But if meaningful patriotism is social ? a nationhood based on
building collectively within borders
because those are the perimeters of
your燿emocratic agency ? there was
never any shortage of it.
S
ubtlety has its drawbacks.
That brand of tacit solidarity
has been under attack now
since 2010, when it became
routine to divide citizens
by whether or not they
claimed benefits, were hardworking, were economically
active, were northern or southern, were
net contributors or recipients. It would
have been good to rebut these tropes
and defend our sense of responsibility for one another a bit more vocally,
rather than leaving it to Twitter and
The News Quiz. But ironic distance, the
instinctive distrust of grand passions
hurled bombastically about, was also
protective. It would have been impossible, when irony was the signature of national identity, to imagine a prime minister speechifying about ?taking back
control? when she didn?t have control
even of her three nearest underlings. It
would have been unthinkable for ministers to talk about importing chlorinated
chicken or growing our own food as an
alternative to being party to modern
international trading agreements. Not
because we would have laughed ? we?re
laughing now ? but because they would
have anticipated the ridicule and taken
some rudimentary steps to avoid it.
A politics with no sense of the absurd
starts to believe its own flourish. Without
the deflation of humour, the government
is locked into an ever-building climax
of preposterous overstatement and bald
assertion. Its decisions have never been
more consequential, and their unfolding
never more dramatic. Yet every week
feels eerily similar, ominously stalled.
Following Brexit is like trying to find your
way out of the woods in twilight and
seeing the same tree again and again.
It?s gone from disaster movie to horror
film: the May Witch Project.
I am reconciled to the import
of Halloween. I cannot, however,
reconcile myself to this post-English
politics, pumped-up, self-regarding and
humourless. If our national identity
meant anything, Brexit is its opposite.
Section:GDN BE PaGe:25 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
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The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
opinion@theguardian.com
facebook.com/guardianopinion
journal
opinion
@guardianopinion
25
The rise of the
robots need not
spell downfall
for us humans
Chi Onwurah
T
The Catalan dream will not
be extinguished by force
Matthew d?Ancona
Secession would be unwise. But in this hectic age
the search for identity cannot simply be dismissed
I
t?s remarkable what you can learn
in Slovenia. At a conference on
politics, security and development in Bled earlier this year,
I爓as lucky enough to chat to
the Catalan delegates, proudly
representing the interests and
wisdom of their ancient principality. With considerable poise and dignity,
they seemed to me to be channelling
Pericles on the Athenians: we do not
imitate, but are a model to others.
So I am not surprised that Madrid
is as frightened as it evidently is by
Catalonia?s unilateral declaration of
independence. This is not a tinpot province threatening to secede as a means of
squeezing a bridge or two out of central
government. Recognised as a distinct
political entity since the 12th century,
it has always treasured its autonomy
? lost under Franco and recovered
after his death in 1975. Since Friday, its
separation from Spain to become a fully
functioning sovereign state, though still
improbable, is quite conceivable.
This alone represents a terrible defeat
for Mariano Rajoy, the Spanish prime
minister, whose response was to order
the sacking of the entire Catalan government, the closure of Barcelona?s ministries, the dismissal of Catalonia?s police
chief and the dissolution of its regional
parliament. Though Madrid has generously declared that Carles Puigdemont,
the deposed Catalan president, is
welcome to run in the snap election on
21 December, he remains, confusingly, at
risk of arrest for rebellion.
There are all sorts of cogent arguments against secession ? the best
of which is that Catalonia itself is
profoundly divided on the question.
The region has a low credit rating, and
debts that have more than tripled since
2009. It is not remotely ready to manage its own defence, currency, utilities,
border controls and infrastructure. An
absolute rupture from Spain would
make Brexit seem a mere bagatelle.
Yet Madrid ? aided by Brussels ?
appears determined to inflame separatist
emotions rather than seek a diplomatic
solution to the crisis. The independence referendum held on 1 October may
have been technically illegal, as Spain?s
constitutional court asserted, but the
often brutal manner in which the poll
was obstructed by the national police
and Guardia Civil made such appeals to
the rule of law seem like a preposterous
fig leaf for street-level authoritarianism.
While the Spanish government
pontificated, social media fizzed with
shocking video of officers in riot gear
using violence to prevent Catalan citizens from peacefully casting their votes.
At that point, the question changed
from ?Is this referendum meaningful??
to ?How are such scenes possible on the
streets of a modern liberal democracy??
Rajoy?s strategy has been spectacularly unnuanced. At every turn, he has
scorned the independence movement
as no more than a plot ?to liquidate our
constitution?, a ?criminal? conspiracy.
King Felipe VI has loftily chastised
Catalans for trying ?to break the unity
of Spain and its national sovereignty,
which is the right of all Spaniards
to democratically decide their lives
together?. With dependable insensitivity, Jean-Claude Juncker declared:
?There isn?t room in Europe for other
fractures or other cracks ? we?ve had
enough of those.? The Brussels naughty
step is getting rather crowded.
Because of Spain?s singular history,
the integrity of the nation has special
significance. In a country governed by a
military dictator between 1939 and 1975,
the threat of disaggregation and lawlessness is especially vivid.
But in an age of hectic change such
as ours, history must be granted a vote
rather than a veto. Bad memories may
explain present errors, but they do
not excuse them. And Rajoy is proving
himself unequal to the moment. Simply
asserting that the rules have been broken
and will be enforced is a pitiful approach
to a hugely complex cultural dilemma.
Take a step back: if the early 21st
century has a unifying theme, it is that
the rules-based order that seemed
triumphant in 1989 faces a series of
fundamental challenges. Prime among
them is a burgeoning of the secessionist impulse, of tribalism and populist
resistance to distant elites. In this era
of disruption, nomadism and technological revolution, the appeal of
place and space has returned. A longing for what Heidegger called wohnen
Madrid
appears
determined
to inflame
separatist
emotions
rather
than seek
a燿iplomatic
solution to
the crisis
? ?dwelling? ? is suddenly resurgent.
In some instances, as in Charlottesville, this takes the form of a despicable blood-and-soil nativism. But the
instinct is not always reprehensible.
For Catalans to crave their own nation
is not intrinsically wrong, whatever its
impracticalities and inconveniences.
T
hose of us who still value
rules-based internationalism have to acknowledge that not everyone
is at ease on the rollercoaster of modernity.
That much was made
clear by last year?s EU
referendum and the election of Donald
Trump. The notion that politics is simply a branch of economics is no longer
sustainable (if, indeed, it ever was). The
issue of identity has assumed a fresh
importance that we ignore at our peril.
It takes pathological form in the
ugly ?identitarian? movements of the
European far right. But it also infuses
the politics of the mainstream ? from
Catalan separatism to parliament?s
scrutiny of the EU withdrawal bill. The
primal need to belong, to be more than a
tiny cog in a global machine, is asserting
itself. As Sebastian Junger writes in his
book Tribe: ?Humans don?t mind hardship, in fact they thrive on it; what they
mind is not feeling necessary.?
I am deeply suspicious of the populism that offers easy solutions to complex problems: secession, like hostility
to immigration, cannot possibly be the
panacea that its champions typically
claim. I still believe in the liberal order,
viable nation-states and the supranational agreements that make possible
global collaboration between them.
But it is idle to pretend in 2017 that this
order is in especially good shape.
We are in the foothills of a formidable debate about its future, and how it
should be adapted to address the inequities of globalisation, the transformative
power of technology, and the fears of
communities great and small that they
will be swept away by the hurricane
of change. If the Catalan crisis has a
lesson to date, it is that Madrid?s answer
? repressive constitutionalism, so to
speak ? is no answer at all. Saying the
same, only louder, will not preserve the
integrity of Spain or of anything else.
In the unfolding of history, the greatest
mistake is to believe there is a script.
he robots are coming.
They?re going to take
your job and destroy
your life ? and there?s
nothing you can do about
it. That?s the hype: we
are facing a dystopian
future in which human
labour is about to be rendered obsolete.
The announcement last week that a
robot had been granted Saudi Arabian
citizenship ? a gimmick, admittedly
? was nevertheless reported as yet
another step in the direction of our
much-anticipated demise.
I am a tech evangelist. I like to say I
went into politics for exactly the same
reason I went into engineering, two
decades earlier: to make the world work
better, for everyone.
It?s true that we are going through a
period of intense technological change,
with data, algorithms and automation
uniting to revolutionise much of what
we currently take for granted. That is
not hype ? it?s for real. As we live and
breathe, we excrete data trails that
giant web crawlers digest into business
opportunities that neither we nor our
government can grasp. Brains far bigger
than ours are working to replicate everything we do, whether it?s kicking a football or empathising with a sick friend.
Yes, there is a chance that all these
changes will end up making our lives
worse. That future generations will
inhabit a surveillance society in which
humans are controlled by jailers they
have bought ? smartphones ? while an
army of slave robots maintains a narrow
elite in extravagant luxury.
But it does not have to be that way.
There are choices to be made, and
we can爉ake them well ? if, instead
of running scared, we face up to the
responsibilities of this new era.
In other words, we need to establish
a social compact that defines our relationship with technology. It should start
with the question: who is in charge?
For instance, is it ever appropriate
for燼n algorithm to take an important
decision about a human without a right
of appeal by that human? US teachers who are performance-managed
by algorithm are not allowed see the
?commercially sensitive? basis for its
decisions. That, to me, offends both
employment and civil rights.
And shouldn?t we put people in
charge of their own data too, so it?s not a
commodity to be bought and sold but an
agent of empowerment and a source of
income? As the digital economy bill goes
through parliament, the Labour team
is looking at an individual copyright
model for data ownership.
Bill Gates and Elon Musk have
spoken爁avourably of a robot tax to
ensure the dividends from increased
productivity are shared. I am all for the
fair distribution of wealth, but I hope
there is a more effective solution than
a robot poll tax. We need to incentivise businesses ? and governments ? to
invest in people as well as machines. At
the moment, in this country, after the
age of 24 you are effectively abandoned
to autodidacticism ? there is no such
thing as free education for adults. Of
course that puts people at a disadvantage, when robots can be reprogrammed
at will. But human programming is so
much more versatile and valuable. The
model has to be one of assisted rather
than purely artificial intelligence.
People have an amazing ability to
create fulfilling work for other people.
I don?t think that capacity is anywhere
near exhausted. If we can build the
right爏ystem of rules and responsibilities around technology, we can rise
with爐he爎obots, not fall below them.
If爓e get ahead of the game as a
nation, we will be able to set an example
to the爓orld of how people can be the
winners when the power of innovation
is placed at their service. It is striking
that the world of Blade Runner 2049,
like that of its predecessor, has a police
force but no government. The first
industrial revolution took place before
working men and women had the vote.
It took decades before its rewards were
effectively distributed. Let?s make the
robotic revolution different.
Chi Onwurah MP is shadow minister
for爄ndustrial strategy
Section:GDN BE PaGe:26 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
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The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
journal
letters
Silent no more over
art world harassment
Catalonia and the rich breaking with the poor
Corrections and
clarifications
We are gallerists, artists, writers, editors,
curators, directors, arts administrators,
assistants, and interns ? workers of the
art world. We have been groped, undermined, harassed, infantilised, scorned,
threatened, and intimidated by those in
positions of power who control access
to resources and opportunities. We have
held our tongues, threatened by power
wielded over us and promises of institutional access and career advancement.
We are not surprised when curators
offer exhibitions or support in exchange
for sexual favours; when gallerists
romanticise, minimise, and hide sexually
abusive behaviour by artists they represent; when a meeting with a collector or a
potential patron becomes a sexual proposition; when we are retaliated against for
not complying. Abuse of power comes as
no surprise. There is an urgent need to
share our accounts of widespread sexism,
unequal and inappropriate treatment,
harassment and sexual misconduct,
which we experience regularly.
Many institutions and individuals
with power in the art world espouse the
rhetoric of feminism and equity in theory,
often financially benefiting from these
flimsy claims of progressive politics,
while preserving oppressive and harmful
sexist norms in practice. Those in power
ignore, excuse, or commit everyday
instances of harassment and degradation,
creating an environment of acceptance
of and complicity in many more serious,
illegal abuses of power. We have been
silenced, ostracised, pathologised, dismissed as ?overreacting?, and threatened
when we have tried to expose abusive
behaviour. We will be silenced no longer.
Sadie Coles Gallery owner, London,
Cindy燬herman Artist, New York, Coco
Fusco Artist, New York, Laura Barlow
Curator, Mathaf, Suzanne Cotter Museum
director, Porto, Sarah Munro Director,
Baltic Gateshead, Anicka Yi Artist,
New燳ork, Helen Marten Artist
See gu.com/letters for the longer version
of爐his letter and the Full list of signatories
Paul Mason?s normally incisive journalism seems lacking in his latest piece on
regional self-determination (G2, 24 October). The common thread linking separatist movements in Catalonia, Lombardy
and Veneto is rich regions objecting to
subsidising poorer parts of their countries.
What?s more, the core message from Brexiters is that ?we want our money back?
because people are ?fed up with subsidising less prosperous parts of Europe?.
What we lack in this debate is any
appreciation of the benefits of solidarity,
with richer regions/countries working
hard to help poorer areas catch up.
Instead, the mentality is one of rich
regions pulling up the drawbridge to protect their wealth. The greatest example of
postwar solidarity remains the Marshall
plan. The US recognised that if it didn?t
invest in wartorn Europe, it would have
nowhere to sell its products and would
lose all political influence. Without it,
there was a strong prospect of a string
of failed states in Europe. Isn?t there a
danger that support for national selfdetermination swamps any notion of
solidarity with less successful regions?
John Rigby
Much Wenlock, Shropshire
the UN called for a similar plebiscite
in Kashmir. And today, some are campaigning for just such a ballot in Taiwan
and Hong Kong, despite the fact that,
if repeated in X?nji?ng, it would almost
certainly cause yet more bloodshed.
Peter Emerson
Director, the de Borda Institute
? Gurminder Bhambra, professor of
postcolonial and decolonial studies at
the University of Sussex, is a woman,
not a man as suggested by our mistaken
use of the pronoun ?he?. The error was
introduced during the editing process
(The Bard and Batman enter post-colonial
syllabus debate, 27 October, page 9).
? We register our opposition to the Spanish government. The actions of sending
civil guards and national police to smash
their way into polling stations, to seize
ballot boxes and attack voters in an effort
to stop the 1 October Catalan referendum;
its jailing of Jordi S醤chez, the president
of the Catalan National Assembly (ANC),
and Jordi Cuixart, the president of
襪nium Cultural, on charges of sedition;
and its decision to implement article
155 of the Spanish constitution revoking
Catalonia?s autonomy, represents the
most serious attack on democracy in
western Europe in recent years.
For Catalans this is the most serious
attack on their rights since the death of
General Franco in 1975. The actions of
the Spanish state have awoken bitter
memories of his dictatorship when the
Catalan language was banned in public
and from use in places of education.
Friends of Catalonia has been formed
to help defend Catalan democracy and
civil rights. We are concerned that the
Spanish government will intensify its
repressive measures. We demand that
the British government and the EU
seek immediate assurances that legal
measures will not be used to punish any
organisation or individual for activities in
connection with the referendum.
We have different positions on whether
Catalonia should be independent but
believe that is a matter for the Catalans
to燿ecide democratically and peacefully.
Prof David Whyte University of Liverpool,
Chris Bambery Co-author of Catalonia
Reborn (March 2018), Prof Gilbert Achcar
Soas, University of London, Tariq Ali
and eight others (see gu.com/letters)
? An article about diversity at elite
universities mentioned ?Eton alumnae?.
Alumnae is the plural of alumna, a
female graduate; as Eton is a boys?
school the article should have referred
to alumni, the plural of alumnus (Bring
on quotas ? and break the middle-class
lock on privilege, 25 October, page 25).
Don?t be a turnip, eat
up all your pumpkin
At this time of year I always wonder
what happens to the flesh of the pumpkins. The number bought is boggling.
Just how much is eaten? How many
American-style pumpkin pies could
be baked ? this is where the tradition
has come from? In my day, it was the
humble turnip and my mother would
serve turnip mash for dinner that day.
Jean Curry
Huddersfield
? Milton Keynes (Report, 28 October)
may have a greater obstacle than Brexit
in its bid to become a European City of
Culture in 2023 ? it isn?t actually a city.
Ian Joyce
Milton Keynes, Bedfordshire
? Several examples of literary
?graveyard voices? have been cited
(Letters, 26 October), but none of them
guardian.letters@theguardian.com
? Paul Mason points out that selfdetermination has been promoted with
a variety of historic objectives. However,
one aspect of the Catalan referendum
that has received little comment in the
UK, or on the BBC, is the second part
of the question on their ballot paper ?
the demand for a republic. Many of us
believe this should be a central issue for
socialists, when contemplating future
self-determination ? and it is a very good
reason for supporting the Catalan cause.
Trevor Skempton
Llanrhaeadr-ym-Mochnant, Powys
? Your editorial (24 October) rightly says
of the Catalonia-Spain crisis, ?an honest
broker can help the two sides back from
the brink?. At this time, the UN under the
English. Thomas Hardy?s poetry is full
of爏uch hauntings: eg, Friends beyond,
and most familiar, Channel Firing,
where the grave-dwellers are disturbed
by gunfire in 1914: ?And many a skeleton
shook his head. / Instead of preaching
forty year, / My neighbour Parson
Thirdly said, / I wish I had stuck to pipes
and燽eer.?
Richard Allen
Cambridge
? What a good idea (NHS may rent spare
rooms to ease bed crisis, 25 October).
This could be extended. Prisons are
overcrowded. I have a small, spare
bedroom. I could put a bolt on the door.
Andy McGuffog
London
? Page 49 of this week?s Guide (28
October) states: ?Yes, it?s spring again:
don?t forget to put your clocks forward
an hour tonight.? Surely, this was only
meant to be in the Sans Serif edition?
Mike Cobb
Stanford-le-Hope, Essex
leadership of Ant髇io Guterres is expanding its establishment of mediators, as well
it might, because in recent years, separatism and secessionism is a major factor in
a third to a half of all wars. Secessionism
requires protracted, detailed negotiations
brokered by an objective third party, and
the UN is ideally placed to do this.
It takes humility and statesmanship
to ask the UN to help, but since the EU
does not seem to be offering assistance,
it would set an excellent precedent for
the world if Mariano Rajoy and Carles
Puigdemont would do just that.
Dr Richard Lawson
Churchill, North Somerset
? The right of self-determination was
meant to counter external problems of
imperial possession, not internal ones of
secession. Secondly, like those famous
Russian dolls, every majority has its own
minority and, if exercised by a majority
vote, the right could lead to the break-up
of numerous nations. Thirdly, as in營raq,
adjusting the boundary lines could
leave Kirkuk as part of a predominantly
Kurdish, Shia or Sunni constituency. The
right as written is a recipe for conflict.
Binary referendums have been a cause
of tension in Quebec, violence in East
Timor, havoc in the Balkans and mayhem
in South Sudan. And one poll may lead
to another: in 2014, the word Shotlandiya
(Scotland) was used in Ukraine.
Will we never learn? In resolution�,
Binary referendums have
been a cause of tension in
Quebec, violence in East
Timor, havoc in the Balkans
and mayhem in South Sudan
Peter Emerson
Abortion shouldn?t
be燼 postcode lottery
The proposal by Zoe Williams (G2, 26
October) that there should be no specific
legal framework for the regulation
of abortion suggests a comparison
with the situation which pertained
in Scotland before the passage of the
1967 Abortion Act. The 1861 Offences
Against the Person Act, which outlawed
abortion in England and Wales, did
not apply to Scotland.燩rosecutions of
backstreet abortionists were brought
under the common law of unlawful
killing or, sometimes, on the grounds of
practising medicine without a licence.
Scottish police made it clear that they
had no interest in investigating what
occurred in hospitals. Thus, as far as the
performance of abortion by qualified
medical practitioners was concerned,
the matter was left to the conscience of
individual doctors. The result was what
we would now call a postcode lottery,
determined by the views of individual
gynaecologists and the relative
influence of the Catholic church. It is
not燼 coincidence that the proposer
of the 1967 bill, David Steel, and its
principal medical advocate, Professor
Dugald Baird, were both Scottish.
Professor Malcolm Nicolson
Director, Centre for the History of
Medicine, University of Glasgow
? In his response to Zoe Williams? article
on abortion, CDC Armstrong (Letters,
27 October) misses a critical point.
In爏uggesting that the decision to abort
a pregnancy shows a lack of maternal
devotion, Armstrong neglects to understand that a number of women chose to
abort an unplanned pregnancy simply
to enable them to continue to provide a
full maternal role to爐heir existing child
or children. A mother who places the
needs of her living children ahead of
those of an early gestation foetus shows
true maternal devotion.
Sally Johnson
Guildford, Surrey
@guardianletters
? The actor Rosemary Leach was
educated at Oswestry girls high school,
not Oswestry school as we said in her
obituary (23 October, page 33).
? A footnote on a feature about the BBC
Radio 4 series The Confidence Trick
said it begins at 8pm on ?Monday 31
October?. For those left in any doubt,
it爏tarts today, Monday 30 October
(One爂iant leap, 26 October, page 6, G2).
The readers? editor?s office looks at
queries燼bout accuracy and standards.
Email guardian.readers@theguardian.com,
or find us on Twitter @GdnReadersEd.
You燾an also write to The readers? editor,
King?s Place, 90 York Way, London N1 9GU;
or call 020 3353 4736 between 10am and
1pm Monday to Friday excluding public
holidays. The Guardian?s policy is to correct
significant errors as soon as possible
Religion in Russia is
a燾omplicated matter
Clearly, as Giles Fraser correctly states
(Loose canon, 27 October), Soviet
communism failed to kill off religion
in Russia. However, it is a lot more
complicated than Giles suggests. For
millions in Russia, Stalin had become the
infallible god. When Stalin had to fend
off Hitler?s aggression, he needed all the
help he could get. He reopened many
churches and appointed loyal bishops.
Khrushchev later made an attempt to
put down religion. Once again, he closed
churches. The new Orthodox leaders
simply awaited their time. With Putin it
has come. The new self-appointed tsar
knew that giving new life to Orthodox
tradition would help to secure his rule.
Vast riches have been returned to the
church, new cathedrals built, ?Holy
Russia? is back on course. Once more,
church and state are in perfect harmony.
Western decadence is the enemy. All is
back to before 1917. The murdered Tsar
Nicholas is now a saint. Today those
Christians with a vision of a reformed
church that has learned from history
will quietly have to bide their time.
Canon Dr Paul Oestreicher
Former east-west relations secretary,
British Council of Churches
We do not publish letters where only an email address is supplied; please include a full postal address, a reference to the article and a daytime telephone number. We may edit letters. Submission and publication of all
letters is subject to our terms and conditions: see http://gu.com/letters-terms
Open door
A time of change
in the Guardian?s
relationship
with its readers
Siobhain
Butterworth
O
nly a couple of fragmented memories
survived the grilling I
underwent from the
Scott Trust when I
applied for the job of
readers? editor: Alan
Rusbridger, the then
editor-in-chief, popping his head round
the door of the interview room to say,
?The doctor will see you now?; and Will
Hutton telling me afterwards that the
column I?d submitted with my application wasn?t all that.
If done right, the job can be lonely-
ish: journalists are naturally a bit wary
when the internal regulator comes to
call. But, on the plus side, I had freedom爐o roam and was out of reach of
even the most senior editors because,
under the rules, only the Scott Trust
could sack me.
Introducing the Guardian to this system of self-regulation, Rusbridger recognised that as an editor it was ?a very
radical move to place even a few inches
of your paper out of your control?. But
it was absolutely necessary to safeguard
the independence of the readers? editor,
and he was true to his word.
When I took over from the unimpeachable Ian Mayes, the Guardian was
already firmly ensconced in the digital
world, but its relationship with its
audience was changing fast. Comment
is Free, then just over a year old, had
heralded a shift in the journalist/reader
dynamic. Guardian users were responding to web content, sometimes shouting
back and yelling at each other in comments below the article. The website
had become the place for journalists and
readers to coexist.
Around this time, the archetypal
Guardian reader seemed to be disappearing. The site was attracting millions
of global users and it was apparent
from the complaints I received that
some readers were unfamiliar with the
newspaper?s values and traditions.
And, as I discovered when I dealt with
complaints about changes to the homepage, the majority of Guardian users
were not accessing its online articles that
way. People were finding our web content in different ways, not browsing the
whole, and many had a fragmented view
of the Guardian as a result of getting
isolated articles through social media or
alerts to which they?d signed up.
In this changing landscape there was
still plenty of thinking to be done about
online ethical issues, such as invisible
mending versus flagging corrections, or
whether changes to older articles should
be made so that certain types of content,
for example restaurant reviews and
reports of criminal convictions, did not
come up in search results.
We were also still grappling with the
question of how user comments should
be moderated. And whereas print corrections to flawed journalism had previously been the norm, now complaints
were usually accompanied by requests
to delete online articles.
All of these things settled down over
time, but during my stint as readers?
editor, the reach and longevity of online
publication was still a major issue. I
returned to the subject in various guises
The website
had become
the place for
journalists
and readers
to coexist
Siobhain
Butterworth was
readers? editor
from April 2007
to January 2010
several times, and one of my columns
was even quoted at length in a high
court libel judgment.
Children and young people were
particularly affected, and I dealt with
several cases in which articles had
become a source of embarrassment for
them. This led to changes to the Guardian?s editorial code to protect children
from embarrassment or harm as they
grew older, and to require that even
anonymised articles containing significant intrusions into children?s private lives should have a strong public
interest justification. These provisions
extended to journalists who were writing about their own children, something of a phenomenon at the time.
The readers? editor needs help to
engage with the huge numbers of emails
arriving every week. My able assistants
were Helen Hodgson, Barbara Harper
and Charlotte Dewar. We were later
joined by Leslie Plommer, a highly experienced newswoman, whose dedication
to Guardian readers was seemingly
boundless and who wisely opined that
the product of journalism is its readers.
? This is the second of four columns
marking the 20th anniversary of the
readers? editor role, one written by each
holder of the post. Next week: Chris Elliott
Section:GDN BE PaGe:27 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
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The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
the critics
@guardianculture
27
journal
From the cricket ground to the Thames, would-be
impressionists shine a light on long-lost London
Art
Impressionists
in燣ondon
Tate Britain, London
?????
T
his exhibition turns art
history on its head. For
more than a century it
has been assumed that
modern art began in
Paris. We?ve heard so
much about how the
bohemian atmosphere
of爐he French capital, with its druggy
poets and dirty novels, inspired the
impressionists.
Now Tate Britain shows that it was
the smog of Victorian London and not
the lights of Paris that inspired Claude
Monet and his contemporaries. In a very
important sense, the most French of all
art movements turns out to be British.
That?s how my review might start if
I爃ad swigged an entire bottle of
absinthe and was some kind of
deranged燘rexit Little Englander.
Unfortunately, I must soberly report
that Tate Britain has created the worst
show about the impressionists I have
ever seen. It comes close to achieving
the impossible: making Monet dull.
Instead of letting the light of impressionism into the stuffy drawing rooms
of燰ictorian Britain, it smothers these
spontaneous, life-loving artists in a
brown study of academic gloom. Worst
of all, the commercial cynicism of the
enterprise is obvious. Monet on the
poster will seduce unsuspecting art
lovers into a desiccated seminar in
third-rate history.
At the heart of Impressionists
in燣ondon is what should be an
intriguing爐ale. In 1870, the FrancoPrussian war drove Monet, Camille
Pissarro and Alfred Sisley to London.
They were already well on the way to
inventing a爁ree, immediate style of
painting that爓ould soon get them
?燼long with Degas, Renoir, Cezanne
and爋ther artists爓ho don?t make it
into爐his show燽ecause they somehow
ignored London as a subject ? the
nickname impressionists.
The nascent impressionism of
Tantalising ? The Ball on Shipboard by Tissot; below, The Avenue, Sydenham, by Pissarro Images: Tate/National Gallery
the爃andful of London scenes they
painted燿uring their brief stays are
like燼燽rilliant light thrown on the
lost爓orld of Victorian everyday life.
It爄s爈ovely to look at Pissarro?s 1871
painting The Avenue, Sydenham,
with爄ts fresh eye for life in the
London爏uburbs close to 150 years
ago:燰ictorians as dapples of colour.
And that?s it, at least until Monet
and燩issarro returned for holidays
much爈ater on.
That doesn?t worry the curators
because, in spite of the Monet-heavy
publicity, they don?t seem that
interested in impressionism as such.
Their real theme is the social history of
French 閙igr� artists. For while Monet
his mates got back to the boulevards as
soon as possible, other French artists ?
really bad artists ? made a home in the
London art world. There is a vast room
in the exhibition dedicated to the
mediocrities Alphonse Legros and Jules
Dalou. They were welcomed into
Victorian art because they shared its
conservative outlook. Another room is
dedicated to minor late works by a much
finer artist, Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux,
who followed the deposed dictator
Louis Napoleon into British exile.
None of these artists have anything
to燿o with impressionism, yet the exhibition is called Impressionists in London.
Pissarro brings a fresh
eye爐o life in the London
suburbs: Victorians as
dapples of colour
It?s intellectual murder to obscure
and爉uddy impressionism?s bold
new爓ay of seeing the world as
this燿oes.
James Tissot is more tantalising.
This燜rench artist who made his
home爄n London was never quite an
impressionist ? his forms are always
conventionally clear ? but he lets a
shaft爋f their brightness into scenes of
Victorian life. He is one of those artists
who always seem ripe for rediscovery,
but this encounter reveals how shallow
and calculated some of his scenes are.
A爓oman accidentally displaying her
bottom perfectly plays to Victorian
sexual hypocrisy.
This exhibition could have been a
fascinating exploration of British links
with impressionism, for those links do
exist, though they are not made here.
Why not start with Constable, who
was爌ainting in the open air, the basic
impressionist method, in the early
1800s ? and got a medal in France for it?
Later, Whistler and Sargent moved
freely between Paris and London and
were friends with the impressionists.
The Tate owns Sargent?s portrait of
Monet at work, but doesn?t include it
in爐his show. And Whistler, meanwhile,
gets just three Thames views. Nor is
there space made for Sickert, who saw
London through the eyes of Degas.
To include such artists would
have燽een a way of exploring impressionism itself: how it evolved, what it
was and why it matters. Yet this show
simply wants to claim the name
without爋ffering any such insight.
The爎esult is爏o pointless that when
I爁inally got to爓hat is meant to be a
show-stopping room of Monet?s
late爌aintings of the Houses of
Parliament, I was too fed up爐o care.
And營 love Monet.
The artist who does shine through
this pea souper is Pissarro. His pixellated�91 painting of a cricket match
at燞ampton Court Green held me
entranced. It is Pissarro?s complex
tension between observation and
abstraction that makes it just about
worth buying a ticket for this infuriating爀xercise in how not to tell the
story of modern art?s beginnings.
Jonathan Jones
2 November-7 May.
Box office: 020-7887 8888.
Fidelity amid fascism as top-notch cast
embrace dark vision of Handel
Barenboim?s Quixote is
sublime tribute to lost love
Opera
Classical
Rodelinda
Coliseum, London
?????
I
n its original 1724 form, Handel?s
opera dealt with complex political
and amorous machinations
among a seventh-century ruling
Lombard elite. Richard Jones?s
2014 production moves the
action爐o爁ascist Italy, where
the sense of a lawless dictatorship燼nd爐he constant threat of
violence爏eem equally apposite.
Jeremy Herbert?s split-stage set
means that on one side we see
Rodelinda ? widow of the supposedly
dead king Bertarido ? imprisoned with
her son Flavio in a grungy dungeon,
while on the other, the vile Grimoaldo
and his even wickeder ally Garibaldo
plot their next move in attempting
to爌ersuade Rodelinda to marry
her燾onsort?s usurper.
Rodelinda?s extraordinary fidelity
to爐he husband she believes dead
causes爃er to play any available card
?爄ncluding some pretty extreme ones
?爐o hold her infatuated persecutor
firmly at bay, and allows Jones to find
in爐he piece numerous touches of the
dark humour in which he specialises,
while the stark ambiguities of the
?happy? ending are not lost on him.
Handel?s operas depend crucially
on爐he quality of the singing, and here
ENO has been canny in selecting a topnotch cast who can enter confidently
into the manifold intricacies of the
staging while still delivering the vocal
goods. In the enormous title role,
Rebecca Evans has to jump through
innumerable vocal hoops yet is never
found wanting; her tone is consistently
beautiful and her expression exact.
As her missing-presumed-dead
husband Bertarido, Tim Mead draws on
a爓ide range of colour and charts his
character intelligently. Spanish tenor
Juan Sancho offers a disturbing portrayal
of the iniquitous Grimoaldo, and like the
rest of the cast he gets his words over
in燗manda Holden?s fine translation.
Neal Davies channels heightened
villainy as Garibaldo, betrothed to
Bertarido?s sister Eduige ? delivered in
grand tones by Susan Bickley ? but
constantly urging Grimoaldo on to ever
baser deeds. In an equally ambivalent
secondary role, Christopher Lowrey
turns Unulfo ? adviser to Grimoaldo but
secretly supporting Bertarido ? into a
painfully touching study in loyalty.
To燤att Casey falls the tricky task of
playing the silent role of Rodelinda?s son
? considerably beefed up in爐his staging
? and does so with a convincing blend
of燽arely repressed燼nger and defiance.
ENO?s orchestra plays efficiently for
Christian Curnyn, though his conducting could do with sharper definition
and occasionally more impetus.
George Hall
At Coliseum, London, until 15 November.
Box office: 020-7845 9300.
WEDO/Barenboim
Royal Festival Hall, London
?????
This wonderful concert was the first of
a爌air given by Daniel Barenboim and the
West-Eastern Divan Orchestra to fundraise for the MS Society in tribute to
Barenboim?s first wife, Jacqueline du Pr�,
who died 30 years ago this month. The
evening began with extracts from Christopher Nupen?s film Jacqueline du燩r�
A燝ift Beyond Words, a celebration of
her爐alent and instinctive musicianship.
The爌rogramme opened, meanwhile,
with Strauss?s Don Quixote ?爊ot the
first爓ork, perhaps, that comes to mind
when du Pr� is mentioned, though her
recording ranks燼mong the greatest.
Rebecca Evans jumps
through vocal hoops
as Rodelinda but is
never wanting
Black widow ? Neal Davies and Rebecca Evans Photo: Tristram Kenton
Soloist Kian Sultani Photo: Mark Allan
Strauss?s tone poem, with its cello and
viola solos representing Quixote and
Sancho Panza respectively, is a bittersweet negotiation of the boundaries
between illusion and reality, its point
being that the Don?s chivalric fantasies
transcend the mundane world around
him. Barenboim?s interpretation, gloriously played by the orchestra of Israeli
and Arab musicians he founded, was
beautiful in its sad wit, emotional
veracity and attention to detail.
Dulcinea?s oboe solo hovered in the air
at the start, before a jumble of themes,
wedged against each other in delirious
but clear counterpoint, suggested the
clouding of Quixote?s mind. Windmills,
sheep and unctuous clerics ? his
imagined enemies ? were realised with
bitter humour and great virtuosity. But it
was the big flights of fancy, as the Don
dreams of love and holds his knightly
vigils, that took one?s breath away. Kian
Soltani was the sublime cello soloist,
effortlessly lyrical and profoundly
touching in the closing moments, when
Quixote prepares for death. Miriam
Manasherov, playing among the orchestral violas, dexterously outlined
Sancho Panza?s naive loquacity. The
whole thing was outstanding ? the best
performance of爐he work I?ve heard live.
Soltani joined the orchestral cellos
after the interval for Tchaikovsky?s Fifth
Symphony, done on a majestic scale, and
a high-voltage interpretation that vividly
captured the work?s progression from
darkness to light. Baleful clarinets gave
way to a real sense of turbulence as爐he
first movement gathered momentum.
The Andante?s horn melody had wonderful poise, while the finale was exceptional in its elation and elan.
Tim Ashley
On BBC Radio 3 tonight and on
BBC爄Player for� days.
Section:GDN BE PaGe:28 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
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cYanmaGentaYellowblack
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
Media
Read more on
theguardian.com/media
Insidious blurring of editorial and
advertising weakens democracy
Emily Bell
A
lmost a year after
the shock election
of Donald Trump,
the communication
tactics and tools that
helped him win power
remain the most controversial issue in US
politics and media. The 2016 ?October
surprise? was, in retrospect, not so
much the leak of Hillary Clinton?s boring emails as the realisation that Silicon
Valley had accidentally built a highly
efficient real-time trading system for
targeted propaganda.
A small office of Russian trolls could
derail 241 years of US political history
with a handful of dank memes and an
advertising budget that would barely
buy you a billboard in Brooklyn.
On Wednesday, lawyers from Twitter,
Facebook and Google will head to Washington to try to explain to congressional
intelligence committees exactly how
they allowed groups of foreign actors to
target US voters.
Facebook has admitted selling
$100,000 of advertising, some of it in
roubles, to suspicious parties, even
though it found it impossible to say
exactly what the ads were or who might
have seen them. Twitter has been so
mortified by the possibility that uncontrolled bot armies on its platform might
have swayed the vote that it is opening a ?transparency centre? for future
political advertising disclosures. It
also announced last week it was banning two Kremlin-supported media
outlets, RT and Sputnik, from buying
advertising. Embarrassingly for Twit-
Billboards in New York in September
2016, including one supporting Donald
Trump?s presidential campaign
Photograph: Drew Angerer/Getty
ter, RT responded by publishing details
of meetings between RT and Twitter?s
?partnership? teams before the 2016
election where Twitter ?brainstormed?
ad strategies with the Russians.
The details from RT are excruciating
for Twitter, if they are accurate. The
Russian broadcaster claims Twitter
approached RT with a comprehensive
pre-election advertising plan. To entice
RT to agree to the exclusive elections
offer, Twitter promised a package of
perks and bonuses. The offer included
closed beta testing of new tools and
products; a customised emoji hashtag
that would help RT stand out with special election coverage; customised analytics and research solutions; and a team
of Twitter experts to help with content
curation and media strategy.
This kind of service is available from
most platform ?partner? teams at social
media companies, whose job it is to
encourage publishers to use their technologies and pay money to boost their
presence on them. Perhaps the most
ironic aspect of Twitter banning RT and
Sputnik from buying advertising is that
both Russian media outlets still have
active accounts serving, in RT?s case,
more than 2.5 million followers. And, to
further highlight the problem with platform governance, they have accounts
?verified? with Twitter?s blue ticks.
While the spotlight has shone brightly
on the Russian advertising issue, it
seems likely that activities that had no
financial component were more influential in moving or subduing voters. A
blend of ?organic? ? unpaid ? activity
promoted with a sprinkling of cash is
what really propels brands, arguments,
events and other content to the top of
people?s social media feeds. (Jonathan
Albright, a research director at Columbia
University?s Tow Center, has collected
data showing that the overall reach and
activity of the Russian propagandists
vastly exceeds the reach of the 3,000
ads Facebook admits to selling.)
Politicians and the media are realising that the way we think and talk about
different types of messages has been
well and truly broken. Social media have
made a practice ? and a fortune ? out of
erasing traditional boundaries between
different types of material. Where once
we had propaganda, press releases, journalism and advertising, we now have
?content?. Where once we had direct
marketing, display advertising and promotions, now we have ?monetisation?.
Where we once had media owners,
ad agencies and clients, now we have
?partners?. Who could object to partners monetising their content? It sounds
so mutually beneficial and efficient. On
the other hand, neo-Nazis paying to target pensioners with racist propaganda
has a less wholesome ring to it.
Research released last week by the
US academics Daniel Kreiss and Shannon MacGregor describes the role social
media companies played in 2016?s
domestic politics, noting with surprise
that the relationship between technology firms and political campaigns often
went far beyond that of vendor and purchaser. It describes how the technology
companies wooed campaigns, and partnership teams within companies such
as Google, Facebook, Twitter and Microsoft served ?as quasi-digital consultants
to campaigns, shaping digital strategy,
content, and execution?. This will sound
eerily familiar to media companies and
news organisations that have a similarly
symbiotic relationship with their technological frenemies. This closeness is
perhaps as big a worry for the long-term
health of democracy as the inadvertent
access tech companies have given to
malicious actors.
One response to the crisis is the honest ads act, a bipartisan bill that aims to
bring digital political advertising into
line with other media, demanding full
disclosure about funding sources from
Facebook has
admitted selling
$100,000 of
advertising, some of
it in roubles, to
suspicious parties
anyone spending more than $500. Until
now, digital advertising has been classified in the same way as skywriting,
avoiding the necessity for disclosure for
practical reasons. If that defence was
ever relevant to digital advertising it is
certainly no longer applicable.
The problem is that it is not clear even
that paid persuasion in online messaging would be classified as political
advertising. It might not even mention a
candidate or a party but just propagate
a certain set of values. It might be, as
some of the Russian activity was, an
invitation to a public meeting or a rally.
I
t is so difficult to know exactly
what messages are being targeted
where, and almost impossible for
users to identify what might be a
targeted ad. Investigative journalists at the US non-profit news organisation ProPublica have built a
project to collect and index all political ads circulated through Facebook.
Once, similar projects examined election
flyers, or pamphlets pushed through
doors. Now, collecting and analysing the
vast amount of varied material requires
algorithms and browser extensions. The
content of targeted ads is considered
confidential by the platforms and their
clients, so unless disclosure is voluntary
it takes a forensic operation to even look
at the content of commercial messages.
The inability to know an ad when you
see one is more convenient for media
companies than they would like to
admit. The dwindling display advertising model is giving way to a model of
?native advertising?, which merges with
editorial. Media companies can now
operate in effect as advertising agencies
for companies, helping them shape and
write ?stories? that throw an innocuous
light on a given subject or present the
advertiser or their sector in a sanitised
and uncritical way.
Most publishers would reject the idea
that their partnerships with companies
and advertisers are part of the same
problem as the democratic threat from
overseas authoritarians. But the tools
and techniques of political messaging
and manipulation are the same as those
used by commercial publishers to create
new types of advertising revenue.
The Russian campaign advertising scandal has electrified US media,
not least because they enjoy the ritual
humiliation of their Silicon Valley overlords. But if the root of the problem is
tackled, it could have unwelcome repercussions for them far closer to home.
Section:GDN BE PaGe:29 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
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29
More jobs at guardianjobs.com
Monday 30 October 2017
Courses
theguardianjobs
Section:GDN BE PaGe:30 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:S
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The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
obituaries@theguardian.com
other.lives@theguardian.com
31
Obituaries
@guardianobits
Cherif Bassiouni
Other lives
Janet Simpson
Advocate for human
rights who ushered in
two new international
criminal courts
T
he Egyptian law professor Cherif Bassiouni, who
has died aged 79, made
an important contribution to the struggle for
global justice and to the
revival of the Nuremberg
legacy. His work, both
academic and in his UN reports from
war zones, led to the creation of two
international criminal courts.
In 1992, he was appointed by the
UN to chair a commission of experts to
examine war crimes in the former Yugoslavia. His report delivered a searing
verdict on the behaviour of all parties
to the Balkan wars, but especially on
the Serbs under Slobodan Milo?evi?. It
argued, in a novel development of the
law of war, that through using rape as
an instrument of ethnic cleansing, the
Serb commanders were guilty of a crime
against humanity.
The UN had to act and, over the objections of British diplomats (who believed
that peace could be negotiated without
justice), accepted Bassiouni?s recommendation to set up a war crimes court
? the international criminal tribunal for
the former Yugoslavia or ICTY? in The
Hague. Bassiouni, whose report and lobbying was instrumental in establishing
the court (the first since Nuremberg),
was an obvious choice as prosecutor,
and was nominated by the US. He was
blocked by Britain, for no good reason,
although perhaps for a bad one ? he was
a Muslim. The court, in time, delivered
justice on Radovan Karad?i? and Ratko
Mladi? and other Serbian and Croat
mass-murderers; Milo?evi? died halfway through his trial.
Bassiouni was appointed instead
by the UN to report on the conflict in
Afghanistan, where he upset the Bush
regime by exposing the excesses of
its military. He went on to lobby for a
proposal he had supported when it was
just a professorial pipe-dream: an international criminal court. He dominated
the Rome conference in 1998 that established this court, the ICC, chairing the
drafting committee that produced its
statute and lobbying behind the scenes
to obtain a large measure of agreement
until it began operation in 2002.
His work won him nomination for
the 1999 Nobel prize (which went,
instead, to M閐ecins Sans Fronti鑢es).
More recently, however, he had spoken
despairingly of the UN security council?s
failure to permit ICC involvement in
Syria, and of the continuing damage to
the court by the refusal of Russia, China
and the US to sign up to its statute.
Bassiouni was born in Cairo, into an
elite family: his grandfather had been
president of the senate, and his father a
senior diplomat ? ironic, given Cherif?s
long battle against diplomats who preferred to give tyrants expedient amnesties rather than to put them on trial.
His upbringing was unusual ? a Muslim youth sent to be schooled by Jesuits
in Egypt and thence to study law in
France. He returned to fight for Egypt
during the Suez Crisis in 1956, and was
wounded and decorated for his courage. His patriotism did not stop him
from speaking out about the brutality
of Gamal Abdel Nasser?s security forces,
and he was placed under house arrest (it
would have been prison, had his family
not been well connected). After seven
months of confinement he fled, smuggled himself on board a ship sailing for
the US, and continued his legal studies.
His conspicuous brilliance soon led
him to be appointed professor of law at
DePaul University in Chicago, where in
1990 he set up an International Human
Rights Law Institute, as one of the
first academics to teach this subject. It
remained the base for his outpourings
of books (he published 27) and lengthy
Bassiouni: conspicuously brilliant
essays in learned journals (270). He
established a base at the Siracusa Institute in Sicily, where he trained judges
who now sit on war crimes cases. They
speak of him as an inspiring teacher, a
role that he never neglected despite his
UN work and trips to war zones.
As well as this intellectual output,
he conducted no fewer than 22 UN
inquiries and commissions. His reports
carefully weighed the evidence, some
of which he had collected himself at
risk to his own life (his light aircraft was
once hit by sniper fire over Sarajevo,
his hotel in Bosnia was attacked and
he narrowly escaped a suicide bomb in
Fallujah). Despite the fears of British
diplomats, he did not display bias, other
than against the authors of the atrocities
he examined. His reports had the particular merit of expedition ? he usually
produced them within six months or so
of his mandate.
In 2011 he chaired a commission of
inquiry set up by the king of Bahrain
to investigate the killings and torture
of protesters. His 500-page report,
produced in five months, pulled no
punches and condemned the culture of
impunity that had come about through
failures in the local judiciary and in military courts. Several thousand detainees
were released as a result.
Bassiouni was, in private, an ebullient man, witty and sophisticated, who
loved fine wines and classical music
and (at least when I met him) was never
without a fine cigar. He was a clever,
insistent lobbyist for his projects behind
the scenes at the UN, and an advocate
for truth who never took money for
slanting it. When the UN underfunded
his inquiry into the Balkan atrocities he
did accept money from the Soros Foundation to pay for some investigations ? a
matter that the Serbian government criticised, but he believed it was the only
way to complete the report, and the
funds came without strings attached.
Although some states were cautious
over suspicions of his Muslim background, this should have been seen as
an asset: he was one of the first scholars to examine the concept of jihad in
books and articles and to nuance Islamic
teaching in a way that disfavoured violence. He did speak out against the discrimination that Muslims were suffering
in the US, and defended the Gaza flotilla
after it was attacked by Israel.
Bassiouni watched the developments in his native Egypt with concern
and some despondency. He shared the
values of the protesters but knew the
power of the army too well to think that
the overthrow of Hosni Mubarak in 2011
would pave the way to freedom. He was,
of course, correct.
Bassiouni?s first wife, Rosanna Cesari,
and second wife, Nina Delmissier, both
predeceased him. He is survived by his
third wife, Elaine Klemen-Bassiouni,
and by a stepdaughter and two
grandchildren.
Geoffrey Robertson
Mahmoud Cherif Bassiouni, legal scholar,
born 9 December 1937; died 25 September
2017
Billy Hatton
Founding member of
the 60s Liverpool pop
group the Fourmost
Janet Simpson?s
last academic post
was at St George?s
hospital in Tooting,
London, investigating falls among
elderly people
(now Coventry University), then working in research at Arthur Exton-Smith?s
influential memory clinic at St Pancras
hospital in London.
Towards the end of her career she
returned to teaching, at the University of East London, and completed
a PhD in the early 1990s. Her final
academic post was as a research fellow at St George?s hospital in Tooting,
south-west London, investigating falls
among elderly people.
Janet was a member of the Labour
party throughout her adult life. She
loved adventurous holidays, and it was
on a trip to Yemen in 1993 that she met
David Knight, who became her partner. Over the next 20 years they shared
many more adventurous journeys.
After the onset of dementia, which
led to Janet?s steep decline, David
cared for her at home. He survives her.
Margaret Holness
Submission and publication of all
Other lives pieces and letters is subject
to our terms and conditions:
see http://gu.com/letters-terms
B
illy Hatton, who has
died aged 76, was the
bass player and harmony
singer with the Fourmost,
the Liverpool beat group
signed in 1963 with the
Beatles manager Brian
Epstein?s NEMS company.
Their first hits, Hello Little Girl and I?m
In Love, released later that year, were
produced by George Martin and written
by John Lennon and Paul McCartney.
Hatton?s relationship with Lennon was
strained, however, as he had stopped
the Beatle from beating up the Cavern
Club DJ Bob Wooler at McCartney?s
21st birthday party. ?Lennon deserved
a smack, no doubt about that,? Hatton
said, ?but someone shouted out: ?Billy,
if you hit him, your career will be over!??
The Fourmost made the Top 10 in
April 1964 with the up-tempo A Little
Loving, then had a record-breaking run,
from June to December that year, in
the Startime revue at the London Palladium with Tommy Cooper, Cilla Black
and Frankie Vaughan, and appeared in
the film Ferry Cross the Mersey (1965).
Three further singles made the Top 40,
and their versatility was showcased on
the album First and Fourmost (1965).
The group?s promotion of their cover of
the Four Tops? Baby I Need Your Loving
on Ready Steady Go! was helped when
an enthusiastic fan made a grab at Hatton on live TV.
Hatton had a love of American cars,
and on the back of this success swapped
his old Ford Prefect for a Mercury Monterey, which created a sensation when
he took it home to Liverpool.
Son of Harry, a fireman, and Alice,
Hatton was born in a terraced house in
the Dingle area of Liverpool. At nursery school, his playmates were Ronnie
Wycherley (later Billy Fury) and Richard
Starkey (Ringo Starr). During his teens,
Hatton and Wycherley played guitars
together and he encouraged Wycherley
to write songs and to perform. ?He was
a sexy sod, wasn?t he?? recalled Hatton.
My friend Janet Simpson, who has
died aged 79, was a physiotherapist
and academic who emphasised the
importance of a psychological understanding of patients, particularly when
it came to the care of elderly people.
Born in East Ham, London, the only
child of Robert Simpson, who ran a
cobbler?s shop, and his wife, Mary, she
won a place at East Ham girls? grammar school. In 1955 she began training
as a physiotherapist at the London
hospital (now the Royal London) in
Whitechapel. There she was noted
for the unusual quality of her medical drawing, her sense of style and an
adventurous spirit.
After working as a physiotherapist,
first in London, then in a clinic in Switzerland, she took time out to study at
an art school in Berlin before returning to London to hold senior physiotherapy posts at the Royal Free and
Mile End hospitals. She studied for a
degree in psychology at Bedford College, University of London, and thereafter remained in higher education,
first teaching at Coventry Polytechnic
Birthdays
Hatton, right, with his Fourmost
bandmates, from left, Brian O?Hara,
Mike Millward and Dave Lovelady
Dezo Hoffmann/Rex/Shutterstock
?He would walk into a party and all the
girls would turn into blobs of oil. I was
lucky to be with him.?
Hatton sang and played the guitar
in a country band and then with the
Four Jays. In 1962 they were Epstein?s
second choice to sign, after the Beatles,
but there were problems. Their lead
singer and guitarist, Brian O?Hara, was
studying accountancy; the rhythm
guitarist, Mike Millward, worked for a
solicitor; the drummer, Dave Lovelady,
had his sights on being an architect;
and Hatton was serving an apprenticeship with the Atomic Energy Authority
in Cheshire. They were regarded as
the brainiest group on Merseyside and
they did not want to throw away their
work prospects for the slim chance of
a hit record. For the time being, they
remained on Merseyside and played in
their spare爐ime.
?We never wanted to just stand there
and sing,? said Hatton, and they developed a fast-moving act which included
comedy routines and a lengthy version
of September in the Rain, packed with
impersonations. The Beatles had them
as special guests for their fan club night
at the Cavern in April 1962.
Once the NEMS artists were having
hit records, Epstein approached the
Four Jays again. By then, both O?Hara
and Hatton had passed their examinations and they turned fully professional
as musicians, securing a record contract
with Parlophone. Wooler suggested a
name change to the Fourmost.
For all their early success, Hatton
lacked confidence and in his private life
he never wanted responsibility. He said
he regretted not marrying his onetime
girlfriend, Nicky Stevens, singer with
the pop group Brotherhood of Man.
In later years he mostly worked as
a security officer on Merseyside but
he often played with Lovelady and
Joey燘ower as Clouds and later the
Original Fourmost. In 2008, they lost
a court case to a tribute band calling
themselves the Fourmost. ?We made
those records, we established the
name,? Hatton railed. ?Doesn?t that
count for anything??
He was a popular figure in Liverpool,
especially in the Roscoe Head, the pub
he called his office. His final television
appearance was with the Hairy Bikers in
their Liverpool episode of The Pubs That
Built Britain (2016).
?I?ve had a good life,? Hatton told me.
?I never thought I would even get on TV
with my spiky nose.?
He is survived by his sister, Ada.
Spencer Leigh
William Henry Hatton, guitarist
and singer, born 9 June 1941; died
19燬eptember 2017
Richard Alston, choreographer,
69; Marcel Berlins, journalist and
broadcaster, 76; Sir Christopher Foster,
political economist, 87; Rusty Goffe,
actor and entertainer, 69; Prof Harvey
Goldstein, statistician, 78; Jessica
Hynes, actor and writer, 45; Claude
Lelouch, film director, 80; Diego
Maradona, footballer, 57; Shlomo Mintz,
violinist, 60; Brendan Mullin, rugby
player, 54; Daniel Poulter, Conservative
MP, 39; Gavin Rossdale, singer, 52;
Grace Slick, singer, 78; Juliet Stevenson,
actor, 61; Mario Testino, photographer,
63; Lord (David) Triesman, former chair,
Football Association, 74; Courtney
Walsh, cricketer, 55; Vanessa White, pop
singer, 28; Otis Williams, soul singer,
76; Bob Wilson, goalkeeper, football
commentator, 76; Sir David Wilson,
archaeologist, 86; Henry Winkler, actor
and writer, 72.
Announcements
Section:GDN BE PaGe:32 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 27/10/2017 15:12
cYanmaGentaYellowblack
Section:GDN BE PaGe:33 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 27/10/2017 15:12
cYanmaGentaYellowblack
Section:GDN BE PaGe:34 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
34
Sent at 29/10/2017 18:37
cYanmaGentaYellowblack
*
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
Weather
Today
London
Manchester
Newcastle
Southampton
Aberdeen
Glasgow
Cardiff
Belfast
High 11 | Low 4
Precipitation: 5%
Partly sunny
High 10 | Low 6
Precipitation: 5%
Partly sunny
High 9 | Low 7
Precipitation: 55%
A little rain
High 11 | Low 3
Precipitation: 0%
Partly sunny
High 8 | Low 6
Precipitation: 60%
A little rain
High 10 | Low 7
Precipitation: 55%
A little rain
High 10 | Low 7
Precipitation: 0%
Partly sunny
High 11 | Low 9
Precipitation: 55%
Some showers
ILLUSTRATION: CLIFFORD HARPER
Country Diary Fionn Choire, Isle of Skye
Gabbro is youthful rock. Barely born, on
a timeline started by British geology?s
eldest foundations. But it is impressive,
expressive rock. The coarser the grain,
the slower the cooling of the magmatic
paste that birthed it explosively, then
insipidly, from the sea floor, at a time
when dinosaurs still walked. When your
nose is against it you smell the tang of
rust and feel its surface worry your skin.
Some of Britain?s most recent geology
was layered by water and compressed
over time, and crumbles with fragility;
but gabbro was spat from the earth and
cooled hard and dark.
High on Skye?s Cuillin Ridge, it interrupts the horizon with a fearful signature, frilled and switch-blade sharp.
The last of Britain?s volcanism left
this place to speak its eulogy. Here on
the ridge it formed, at Bruach na Frithe,
hulking rock shapes tilt blackly like
primed guillotine blades as climbers
hasten beneath or over them. The lean-
Starwatch
ing Basteir Tooth. The horned back of
Sgurr nan Gillean. They look like this
because the rock is young, raw, the
canny angle of its bedding crafted sharp
by glaciers and yet to blunt beneath the
bludgeoning Hebridean weather.
Mountaineering here is dangerous.
The drops are big. Basalt dykes,
treacherous veins through the gabbro,
are fractious and slick, next to rock
that is solid and grips. Quick-cooling
lava, slow-cooling lava. Soft, hard. Slip,
grip. Watch your feet, the guides say.
Pay attention. The iron in the rock will
queer your compass, don?t trust it. Wear
gloves, because the same rock that
chews your boots will flay your fingers
to ribbons.
Then there is the danger of overconfidence on rock that clutches you with
that uncommon friction. You might
think yourself invincible on the Cuillin?s
steeples. Helpful, until the moment you
realise you?re not.
Gabbro on the whole appears brown,
rusty, grey. But the ridge is dark in many
lights, and on the map: the Black Cuillin.
Light changes the colour chemistry on
the smaller scale, like a fragment of clear
ice pulled from a blue-hued glacier. It?s
bulk that turns the ridge black, hoists it
high, gives it teeth.
Simon Ingram @MrSimonIngram
In a month that has the Milky Way
stretching almost overhead during most
of Britain?s hours of darkness, the highlights are a conjunction in our pre-dawn
twilight between the two brightest planets, Venus and Jupiter, and a return of
the Leonid meteor shower under moonless skies.
The chart plots Pegasus and Andromeda high in the S as the Plough swings
counterclockwise below Polaris in the
N. Deneb in Cygnus is near the zenith at
nightfall, but lies almost due W at our
map times as Orion climbs into view at
our E horizon.
Above Orion is Taurus whose
main star, Aldebaran, lies against the
V-shaped Hyades star cluster. The night
of the 5th-6th sees the bright Moon hide
several stars as it crawls along the lower
arm of the V towards Aldebaran. The
latter slips behind the Moon?s lower-left
limb between 02.39 and 03:24 as seen
from London and 02:27 to 03:26 for
watchers in Edinburgh.
With Saturn bright (mag 0.6) but very
low in the SW sky at nightfall, our main
planetary interest is just before dawn.
Venus continues as a brilliant morning
star of mag ?3.9 but its altitude at sunrise falls from 13� to only 6� this month
as it moves towards the Sun?s far side.
Jupiter, about to emerge in our dawn
twilight at mag ?1.7, may be glimpsed
below and to the left of Venus from
the 8th or so and passes a mere 16
arcminutes below-right of Venus on
the�th as they hover very low in the
ESE in the brightening twilight. Mars,
much fainter at mag 1.8, rises in the E by
04:00 and tracks ESE through Virgo to
pass 3� N of Spica on the 28th. Check our
Diary for conjunctions between these
Summary
Around the world
Channel Is, Cent S England, SW England, W
Midlands, Wales Largely dry with bright intervals.
A light south-westerly wind. Max 9-12C (48-54F).
Staying largely dry tonight with clear periods.
Min 2-8C (36-46F).
癈
Ajaccio
21
Algiers
24
Alicante 22
Ams?dam 11
Athens
21
Auckland 19
B Aires
22
Bangkok 31
Barcelona 20
Basra
36
Beijing
15
Belgrade 11
Berlin
8
Bermuda 25
Bordeaux 13
Boston
16
Brussels 11
Budapest 9
C?blanca 26
C?hagen
7
Cairo
26
Cape Town32
Chicago
8
Christ?rch 22
Corfu
22
The brighter stars at 21.00 GMT on 1 November,
20.00 on 16 November and
19.00 on 30 November
Looking north
CEPHEUS
CASSIOPEIA
3
1
DRACO
CYGNUS
LYRA
4
2
AURIGA
The Plough
HERCULES
BOOTES
West
1 Deneb
2 Vega
3 Polaris
PERSEUS
URSA
MINOR
5
6
GEMINI
URSA
MAJOR
7
North
East
7 Betelgeuse 10 Aldebaran 13 Altair
8 Algol
11 Mira
9 Pleiades
12 Fomalhaut
4 Capella
5 Castor
6 Pollux
Looking south
EDA
Galaxy
ROM
AND
8
PERSEUS
9
TAURUS
TRIANGULUM
ARIES
Square of
Pegasus
PEGASUS
11 CETUS
13
AQUARIUS
10
ION
OR
CYGNUS
DELPHINUS
ERIDANUS
AQUILA
CAPRICORNUS
West
12
East
South
planets and the waning earthlit Moon.
Very swift Leonids meteors, many
leaving bright trains in their wake, arrive
between the 15th and 20th and are most
numerous near the shower?s peak, predicted for the 17th. They diverge from a
radiant point in the Sickle, above Leo?s
main star Regulus, and are seen after
this rises in the NE at 22:00. Numbers
should only improve as this climbs
through the E later in the night but are
expected to be well down on the stormforce levels seen in 1966 and 1999 ? perhaps no more than a dozen per hour.
Alan Pickup @alanpickup
November diary
1st
4th
6th
10th
13th
15th
16th
17th
18th
21st
24th
26th
28th
15h Venus 4� N of Spica
05h Full moon
03h Moon occults Aldebaran for UK
02h Moon 2.4� S of Praesepe;
21h Last quarter
06h Venus 0.3� N of Jupiter
01h Moon 3� N of Mars
21h Moon 4� N of Jupiter
06h Moon 4� N of Venus;
19h Peak of Leonids meteor shower
12h New moon
00h Moon 3� N of Saturn
00h Mercury furthest E of Sun (22�)
17h First quarter
00h Mars 3� N of Spica
Weather forecast
UK and Ireland Noon
Shetland Islands
9
Temperature(�) X
1020
Wind (mph) X
Mist
Fog
Sunny
Sunny intervals
12
Mostly cloudy
Overcast/dull
Sunny showers
SE England, London, E Anglia, E Midlands
Mainly dry with sunny periods. A light northerly
wind. Max 9-12C (48-54F). Staying mainly
dry tonight with clear periods. Min 2-5C
(36-41F).
Sunny and heavy showers
1024
Light showers
10
Rain
Sleet
Light snow
10
Snow showers
11
Moderate
Heavy snow
Thundery rain
Thundery showers
12
1028
10
12
Lincolnshire, Yorkshire, NW England Mostly
cloudy with spells of rain mainly in the afternoon.
A light westerly wind. Max 8-11C (46-52F).
Overcast tonight with spells of rain. Min 4-9C
(39-48F).
NE England, SE Scotland, SW Scotland, NE
Scotland Mostly cloudy with spells of rain in the
afternoon. A light south-westerly wind.
Max 5-10C (41-50F). Overcast tonight with spells
of rain. Min 1-7C (34-45F).
35�
Slight
30�
25�
20�
15�
10�
11
5�
Channel Islands
0�
12
12
Slight
1032
-5�
-10�
-15�
UK and Ireland Five day forecast
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
W Isles, N Isles, NW Scotland Mostly cloudy
with spells of rain, mainly in the afternoon. A
light south-westerly wind. Max 5-12C (41-54F).
Overcast tonight with spells of rain. Min 3-10C
(37-50F).
Northern Ireland, Ireland Mostly cloudy with the
odd shower across the north. A moderate southwesterly wind. Max 10-14C (50-57F). Overcast in
the north today; otherwise, clear intervals.
Min 7-12C (45-54F).
Atlantic front Noon today
Friday
Saturday
L 984
1000
992 1000
1008
1008
1016
1032
1024
1016
High 14
Low 8 High 12
Low 8 High 12
Low 6 High 11
Low 8 High 11
Low 5
Weather
Fair
Sunny
Sunny
Fair
Fair
Sunny
Fair
Fair
Fair
Sunny
Sunny
Fair
Fair
Rain
Fair
Rain
Fair
Fair
Sunny
Fair
Sunny
Sunny
Windy
Fair
Fair
Air pollution
London
North East
NW & Mersey
York & Humber
East Midlands
West Midlands
Eastern
South East
South West
South Wales
North Wales
Borders
Cent Scotland
NE Scotland
Highland
N Ireland
1024
L
Cold front
low
low
low
low
low
low
low
low
low
low
low
low
low
low
low
low
Today?s forecast in towns and cities
by busy roads. Low (1-3); moderate
(4-6); high (7-9); very high (10).
Source Defra.
Lighting up
Warm front
Occluded front
Trough
High pressure will be over south-west England.
World weatherwatch
Belfast
Birmingham
Bristol
Dublin
Glasgow
London
Manchester
Newcastle
1652 to 0726
1641 to 0701
1647 to 0702
1656 to 0722
1641 to 0722
1638 to 0654
1640 to 0706
1633 to 0709
Sun & Moon
Last week, the states surrounding the
Great Lakes in the USA saw a deep area
of low pressure barrel northwards from
Ohio to Michigan, whipping up 70mph
wind gusts and large waves. The storm
system underwent rapid intensification
in its track, with the surface pressure falling 27mb in 24 hours. This is meteorologically labelled as ?explosive cyclogenesis?,
or more informally, ?a weather bomb?.
For this to merit its title, the surface pressure must drop at least 24mb in 24 hours.
In its wake however, the jet stream
nosedived southwards into northern
America and winds swung northerly,
pulling in cold air from Canada. As cold
air continued to invade from the north
towards the end of last week, parts of
the Midwest saw their first flakes of the
season as rain turned to snow. Across
Minneapolis-Saint Paul, the Twin Cities
of Minnesota, it is rare to see snow in
October, with this being the first snowfall at this time in several years; daytime
temperatures barely exceeded 0C (32F).
Western parts of New York, Michigan
and Ontario are no strangers to high
snowfall at this time of the year. These
regions are susceptible to the phenomenon of lake-effect snow, whereby cold air
intrudes from the north-west, moves over
the warm body of lake water and picks up
moisture; the air rises, cools and freezes,
to deposit snow on leeward slopes.
Former Super Typhoon Lan, which
battered Japan last week, can also be
held partially responsible for this cold
snap. As the ex-typhoon recurved into
the Northern Pacific, it jolted the jet
stream further southwards and helped
drive cold air into parts of northern
America. Tamsin Green (MetDesk)
Sun rises
Sun sets
Moon rises
Moon sets
Full Moon
Dakar
Dallas
Denver
Dhaka
Dublin
Faro
Florence
Frankfurt
Funchal
Geneva
Gibraltar
H Kong
Harare
Helsinki
Innsbruck
Istanbul
Jo?burg
K Lumpur
K?mandu
Kabul
Karachi
Kingston
Kolkata
L Angeles
Lagos
癈 癋 Weather
33 92 Sunny
25
1
23
11
23
20
10
24
10
20
26
25
1
7
15
26
31
22
25
36
30
29
23
31
78
34
75
53
74
69
51
76
51
69
80
78
35
45
60
80
88
73
77
98
87
85
74
88
癈
Larnaca 26
Lima
21
Lisbon
25
Lux?bourg 9
Madrid
21
Majorca 21
Malaga
21
Malta
22
Melb?rne 15
Mexico C 23
Miami
22
Milan
17
Mombasa 30
Montreal 15
Moscow
5
Mumbai 35
Munich
8
N Orleans 23
Nairobi 24
Naples
20
New Delhi 32
New York 14
Nice
21
Oporto
23
Oslo
5
Sunny
Snow
Fair
Cloudy
Sunny
Fair
Fair
Sunny
Fair
Sunny
Fair
Cloudy
Snow
Fair
Fair
Fair
Storms
Fair
Sunny
Sunny
Storms
Sunny
Fair
Storms
癋
79
70
78
49
70
71
71
72
60
74
73
64
87
59
41
95
47
75
76
69
90
58
70
74
42
Weather
Sunny
Cloudy
Sunny
Fair
Sunny
Fair
Sunny
Fair
Showers
Fair
Sunny
Fair
Showers
Rain
Rain
Sunny
Fair
Sunny
Showers
Storms
Sunny
Rain
Fair
Sunny
Fair
癈
Paris
12
Perth
26
Prague
7
Reykjavik 9
Rhodes 22
Rio de J 26
Rome
20
Shanghai 16
Singapore 28
St P?burg 5
Stockh?m 3
Strasb?g 11
Sydney
32
Tel Aviv 24
Tenerife 26
Tokyo
17
Toronto 10
Tunis
24
Vancouv?r 12
Venice
15
Vienna
8
Warsaw
6
Wash?ton 15
Well?ton 17
Zurich
9
癋
55
79
46
49
72
80
69
61
84
42
39
53
91
76
80
64
50
76
55
59
48
43
60
64
49
Weather
Fair
Sunny
Fair
Cloudy
Fair
Fair
Storms
Cloudy
Storms
Rain
Fair
Fair
Showers
Fair
Sunny
Windy
Windy
Sunny
Sunny
Fair
Windy
Fair
Sunny
Fair
Fair
High tides
H
L
H
癋
71
76
73
52
70
67
72
88
68
98
59
52
47
78
57
62
52
49
79
46
80
91
48
72
72
0652
1638
1458
0035
4 Nov
Forecasts and
graphics
provided by
AccuWeather, Inc �17
Aberdeen
Avonmouth
Belfast
Dover
Galway
Greenock
Harwich
Holyhead
0934
0213
0647
0650
0032
0747
0650
0628
3.5m
9.4m
2.9m
5.4m
3.8m
2.8m
3.3m
4.5m
2140 3.6m
1505 10.0m
1906 3.1m
1922 5.5m
1256 4.0m
2028 3.0m
1937 3.4m
1839 4.8m
Hull
0134 5.8m
Leith
1026 4.5m
Liverpool
0655 7.2m
London Bridge 0845 5.5m
Penzance
0018 4.2m
Southport
0556 6.9m
Weymouth
0149 1.3m
Whitby
-- --
1430
2247
1918
2139
1245
1826
1423
1212
5.9m
4.6m
7.7m
5.8m
4.5m
7.4m
1.5m
4.5m
Source: � Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Times are GMT
Around the UK and Ireland Yesterday
Sun Rain Temp (癈) Weather
hrs mm High/Low
Aberdeen
Aberporth
Aberystwyth
Alnwick
Aviemore
Barrow/Furness
Basingstoke
Belfast
Belmullet
Beverley
Birmingham
Bournemouth
Bradford
Brecon
Bristol
Brize Norton
Camborne
Carlow
Channel Isles
Chester
Coleraine
Cork
Crawley
Cromer
Dublin
Edinburgh
Enniskillen
Eskdalemuir
Glasgow
Herstmonceux
Holyhead
Ipswich
2.2
0.6
*
3.0
1.7
*
2.6
5.4
*
2.2
*
2.6
*
*
1.1
2.1
0.2
*
0.3
*
3.3
*
*
*
*
3.1
2.8
5.3
4.7
1.9
2.9
2.2
24 hours to 5pm yesterday.
1.3
0.0
5.3
0.0
0.0
0.5
0.3
0.0
0.3
0.3
1.0
0.3
0.5
1.8
0.0
0.8
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.5
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.3
0.0
0.3
1.3
0.8
0.0
0.0
0.5
14 6
13 12
14 12
16 8
14 4
14 9
15 12
14 9
13 11
15 8
15 11
15 13
12 7
13 10
15 12
16 11
14 12
14 12
16 13
16 12
14 9
14 12
16 12
15 9
13 11
14 6
13 11
13 5
13 7
14 12
14 12
14 9
Showers
Cloudy
Cloudy
P/cloudy
Cloudy
Cloudy
Showers
P/cloudy
Showers
Showers
Cloudy
Showers
Showers
Showers
Cloudy
Showers
Cloudy
Cloudy
Cloudy
Cloudy
P/cloudy
Cloudy
Cloudy
Cloudy
Cloudy
P/cloudy
Cloudy
P/cloudy
P/cloudy
Cloudy
Cloudy
Showers
Sun
hrs
Isle of Man
Isle of Wight
Keswick
Kinloss
Kirkwall
Lerwick
Leuchars
Lincoln
Liverpool
London
Manchester
Margate
Milford Haven
Morecambe
Newcastle/Tyne
Northallerton
Nottingham
Okehampton
Peterborough
Plymouth
Portland
Portsmouth
Prestwick
Shannon
Shrewsbury
Southend
St Athan
Stornoway
Stranraer
Tiree
Tulloch Bridge
Yeovil
4.9
*
*
1.3
3.0
2.7
4.4
3.2
2.8
1.6
4.4
0.3
*
5.2
*
*
3.4
*
2.7
*
*
*
3.9
*
3.7
0.9
3.0
2.7
*
2.1
*
*
Rain Temp (癈) Weather
mm High/Low
0.0
0.0
0.5
0.0
2.0
2.8
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
1.0
0.0
0.8
0.5
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.5
0.3
0.5
0.0
0.5
0.8
0.5
0.8
0.0
0.5
0.8
0.0
0.5
0.3
0.3
14 10
15 13
14 8
13 7
11 6
9 4
16 6
15 9
16 12
16 12
14 9
16 11
14 12
14 10
13 5
15 9
14 9
15 12
16 10
15 12
16 13
16 13
13 7
14 13
16 11
16 12
14 13
11 6
15 9
12 8
12 4
15 13
P/cloudy
Cloudy
P/cloudy
Cloudy
Showers
Showers
P/cloudy
P/cloudy
Cloudy
Cloudy
Showers
Cloudy
Cloudy
P/cloudy
P/cloudy
Cloudy
P/cloudy
Showers
Showers
Showers
Windy
Showers
P/cloudy
Showers
P/cloudy
Cloudy
P/cloudy
Showers
P/cloudy
Cloudy
P/cloudy
Cloudy
* Information not supplied by nearest weather station
Section:GDN BE PaGe:35 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 29/10/2017 18:36
cYanmaGentaYellowblack
*
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
35
Puzzles & Crossword
Codeword
Killer Sudoku
Easy
Medium
Each letter of the alphabet makes at least one appearance in the grid, and is
represented by the same number wherever it appears. The letters decoded
should help you to identify other letters and words in the grid.
The normal rules of Sudoku
apply: fill each row, column and
3x3 box with all the numbers
from 1 to 9. In addition, the
digits in each inner shape
(marked by dots) must add up
to the number in the top corner
of that box. No digit can be
repeated within an inner shape.
Pieceword
Use the jigsaw pieces to recreate this
completed crossword. We?ve listed only
clues for the Across words, but the pattern
of the grid should help you.
1
2
3
1
3
4
6
8
10
12
13
15
4
5
6
7
8
9
Loud noise ? Constrain
Defendant?s opposer
Coastal inlet
Enduring
Breath of relief ? Diplomacy
Washing rituals
Overact
In a tardy fashion
Petrol, eg ? Loosen
10
11
12
13
14
15
Suguru�
Wordsearch
Fill the grid so that each square in an
outlined block contains a digit. A block of
two squares contains the digits 1 and 2, a
block of three squares contains the digits 1,
2 and 3, and so on. No same digit appears in
neighbouring squares, not even diagonally.
Can you find 14 things that can fly in the
grid? Words can run forwards, backwards or
diagonally, but always in a straight, unbroken
line.
Guardian cryptic crossword
1
2
3
4
5
9
6
7
10
11
12
13
14
16
15
17
18
19
21
25
26
27
Wordwheel
Find as many words as possible using the
letters in the wheel. Each must use the
central letter and at least two others. Letters
may be used only once. You may not use
plurals, foreign words or proper nouns.
There is at least one nine-letter word to
be found. TARGET: Excellent-60. Good-51.
Average-39.
No 27,341 set by Rufus
Stuck? For help call 0906 200 83 83 or text GUARDIANC followed by a space, the day and date the crossword
appeared another space, and the CLUE reference (e.g GUARDIANC Monday12 Across1) to 88010. Calls cost
�10 per minute, plus your phone company?s access charge. Texts cost �per clue plus standard network
charges. Service supplied by ATS. Call 0330 333 6946 for customer service (charged at standard rate).
Want more? Access over 4,000 archive puzzles at theguardian.com/crossword. Buy the Guardian
Cryptic燬etters series (4 books) for only � including UK p&p (save �96). Visit guardianbooks.co.uk
or燾all 0330 333 6846.
Saturday?s
solutions
Futoshiki 577
Divide the grid into blocks that are either
square or rectangular. Each block must frame
a single number, and each block must contain
the same number of cells as the number it
frames.
4
?
2
1
5
3
2
1
3
?
1
3 < 4
5
?
?
3 < 4 < 5
2
?
?
2
1
3 < 4
?
?
?
4
5 > 2 > 1
Codeword
Suguru
Cell Block
Wordsearch
1 NCO arranged battle
course (8)
5 Speculation is in the
wind about doctor (6)
9 More than one saw book
of the Old Testament (8)
10 Doesn?t fancy being
drunk (6)
12 A sucker for oldfashioned treatment (5)
13 It?s clear to me, anyway,
one will miss a deadline
(4-5)
14 What a game knight
does when his coach is
leaving? (5,2,5)
18 Where a marathon
runner may eventually
succeed? (2,3,4,3)
21 Down-at-heel illegal
tenants (9)
23 Spell ?shape? incorrectly (5)
24 End of the beef soup?
(6)
25 Arrange for a mechanic
(8)
26 Small number remove
clothing and fall asleep
(3,3)
27 It?s suitable in public (8)
5
Saturday?s ?Sudoku classic? solution appears on the back page of today?s G2
Friday?s
solutions
20
23
24
Killer Sudoku 577
Cell Block
22
Across
8
Down
1 Breaking up coal for the
furnace (6)
2 Caught ? so done for it
(6)
3 It offers hospitality to
all, but it?s cold in
winter (4,5)
Pieceword
Wordwheel
Solution No. 27,334
S
H
E
E
T
M
U
S
I
C
H
O I
T
C H
E
E R
T
T O
O F
I
C H E
A
S
L A T
F
A
G
C
P O L L O
B
A
E L ON
E
I T
S T
C
MA C HD
P
E
F E EMU
R
A
M I S T
E
I
C A
I N
T
S
M J
L
I
A S I D
S
L
T
QU A R T E
U
P
L
ON E D E A
T
N
I S O R D E
N
E
G
S A C K
E
E
MEME N T
O
P
N
R P E D I E
I
R
A
B
E
A
R
F
I
R
E
S
T
O
R
M
S
This week?s winners of Can You Solve My Problems?
are: Amanda Mann, London; Eve Hume, Saltburn
by the Sea, North Yorkshire; Helen Hunt, Cropredy,
Oxfordshire; Susan Leakey, Lincoln; Anne Fazey,
Winchester
Please allow 28 days for delivery
Killer Sudoku
Easy
SLINGBACK
4 Communications equipment used in Alabama?
(6,6)
6 Greek for ?upper room?
(5)
7 What a dogs likes with
food is fertiliser (4,4)
8 Adore old novel featuring a place of wealth
and opportunity (2,6)
11 A powerful comparison
(6,2,2,2)
15 Plan to produce an
indecent picture (9)
16 Dicky disowned, fades
away (4,4)
17 Took vain steps, having
support (8)
19 Rush to find a vocation
(6)
20 There?s a point in this
system (6)
22 What he does is
appropriate (5)
Medium
Section:GDN BE PaGe:36 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 27/10/2017 18:03
cYanmaGentaYellowblack
Mason points out that selfdetermination has been promoted with
a variety of historic objectives. However,
one aspect of the Catalan referendum
that has received little comment in the
UK, or on the BBC, is the second part
of the question on their ballot paper ?
the demand for a republic. Many of us
believe this should be a central issue for
socialists, when contemplating future
self-determination ? and it is a very good
reason for supporting the Catalan cause.
Trevor Skempton
Llanrhaeadr-ym-Mochnant, Powys
? Your editorial (24 October) rightly says
of the Catalonia-Spain crisis, ?an honest
broker can help the two sides back from
the brink?. At this time, the UN under the
English. Thomas Hardy?s poetry is full
of爏uch hauntings: eg, Friends beyond,
and most familiar, Channel Firing,
where the grave-dwellers are disturbed
by gunfire in 1914: ?And many a skeleton
shook his head. / Instead of preaching
forty year, / My neighbour Parson
Thirdly said, / I wish I had stuck to pipes
and燽eer.?
Richard Allen
Cambridge
? What a good idea (NHS may rent spare
rooms to ease bed crisis, 25 October).
This could be extended. Prisons are
overcrowded. I have a small, spare
bedroom. I could put a bolt on the door.
Andy McGuffog
London
? Page 49 of this week?s Guide (28
October) states: ?Yes, it?s spring again:
don?t forget to put your clocks forward
an hour tonight.? Surely, this was only
meant to be in the Sans Serif edition?
Mike Cobb
Stanford-le-Hope, Essex
leadership of Ant髇io Guterres is expanding its establishment of mediators, as well
it might, because in recent years, separatism and secessionism is a major factor in
a third to a half of all wars. Secessionism
requires protracted, detailed negotiations
brokered by an objective third party, and
the UN is ideally placed to do this.
It takes humility and statesmanship
to ask the UN to help, but since the EU
does not seem to be offering assistance,
it would set an excellent precedent for
the world if Mariano Rajoy and Carles
Puigdemont would do just that.
Dr Richard Lawson
Churchill, North Somerset
? The right of self-determination was
meant to counter external problems of
imperial possession, not internal ones of
secession. Secondly, like those famous
Russian dolls, every majority has its own
minority and, if exercised by a majority
vote, the right could lead to the break-up
of numerous nations. Thirdly, as in營raq,
adjusting the boundary lines could
leave Kirkuk as part of a predominantly
Kurdish, Shia or Sunni constituency. The
right as written is a recipe for conflict.
Binary referendums have been a cause
of tension in Quebec, violence in East
Timor, havoc in the Balkans and mayhem
in South Sudan. And one poll may lead
to another: in 2014, the word Shotlandiya
(Scotland) was used in Ukraine.
Will we never learn? In resolution�,
Binary referendums have
been a cause of tension in
Quebec, violence in East
Timor, havoc in the Balkans
and mayhem in South Sudan
Peter Emerson
Abortion shouldn?t
be燼 postcode lottery
The proposal by Zoe Williams (G2, 26
October) that there should be no specific
legal framework for the regulation
of abortion suggests a comparison
with the situation which pertained
in Scotland before the passage of the
1967 Abortion Act. The 1861 Offences
Against the Person Act, which outlawed
abortion in England and Wales, did
not apply to Scotland.燩rosecutions of
backstreet abortionists were brought
under the common law of unlawful
killing or, sometimes, on the grounds of
practising medicine without a licence.
Scottish police made it clear that they
had no interest in investigating what
occurred in hospitals. Thus, as far as the
performance of abortion by qualified
medical practitioners was concerned,
the matter was left to the conscience of
individual doctors. The result was what
we would now call a postcode lottery,
determined by the views of individual
gynaecologists and the relative
influence of the Catholic church. It is
not燼 coincidence that the proposer
of the 1967 bill, David Steel, and its
principal medical advocate, Professor
Dugald Baird, were both Scottish.
Professor Malcolm Nicolson
Director, Centre for the History of
Medicine, University of Glasgow
? In his response to Zoe Williams? article
on abortion, CDC Armstrong (Letters,
27 October) misses a critical point.
In爏uggesting that the decision to abort
a pregnancy shows a lack of maternal
devotion, Armstrong neglects to understand that a number of women chose to
abort an unplanned pregnancy simply
to enable them to continue to provide a
full maternal role to爐heir existing child
or children. A mother who places the
needs of her living children ahead of
those of an early gestation foetus shows
true maternal devotion.
Sally Johnson
Guildford, Surrey
@guardianletters
? The actor Rosemary Leach was
educated at Oswestry girls high school,
not Oswestry school as we said in her
obituary (23 October, page 33).
? A footnote on a feature about the BBC
Radio 4 series The Confidence Trick
said it begins at 8pm on ?Monday 31
October?. For those left in any doubt,
it爏tarts today, Monday 30 October
(One爂iant leap, 26 October, page 6, G2).
The readers? editor?s office looks at
queries燼bout accuracy and standards.
Email guardian.readers@theguardian.com,
or find us on Twitter @GdnReadersEd.
You燾an also write to The readers? editor,
King?s Place, 90 York Way, London N1 9GU;
or call 020 3353 4736 between 10am and
1pm Monday to Friday excluding public
holidays. The Guardian?s policy is to correct
significant errors as soon as possible
Religion in Russia is
a燾omplicated matter
Clearly, as Giles Fraser correctly states
(Loose canon, 27 October), Soviet
communism failed to kill off religion
in Russia. However, it is a lot more
complicated than Giles suggests. For
millions in Russia, Stalin had become the
infallible god. When Stalin had to fend
off Hitler?s aggression, he needed all the
help he could get. He reopened many
churches and appointed loyal bishops.
Khrushchev later made an attempt to
put down religion. Once again, he closed
churches. The new Orthodox leaders
simply awaited their time. With Putin it
has come. The new self-appointed tsar
knew that giving new life to Orthodox
tradition would help to secure his rule.
Vast riches have been returned to the
church, new cathedrals built, ?Holy
Russia? is back on course. Once more,
church and state are in perfect harmony.
Western decadence is the enemy. All is
back to before 1917. The murdered Tsar
Nicholas is now a saint. Today those
Christians with a vision of a reformed
church that has learned from history
will quietly have to bide their time.
Canon Dr Paul Oestreicher
Former east-west relations secretary,
British Council of Churches
We do not publish letters where only an email address is supplied; please include a full postal address, a reference to the article and a daytime telephone number. We may edit letters. Submission and publication of all
letters is subject to our terms and conditions: see http://gu.com/letters-terms
Open door
A time of change
in the Guardian?s
relationship
with its readers
Siobhain
Butterworth
O
nly a couple of fragmented memories
survived the grilling I
underwent from the
Scott Trust when I
applied for the job of
readers? editor: Alan
Rusbridger, the then
editor-in-chief, popping his head round
the door of the interview room to say,
?The doctor will see you now?; and Will
Hutton telling me afterwards that the
column I?d submitted with my application wasn?t all that.
If done right, the job can be lonely-
ish: journalists are naturally a bit wary
when the internal regulator comes to
call. But, on the plus side, I had freedom爐o roam and was out of reach of
even the most senior editors because,
under the rules, only the Scott Trust
could sack me.
Introducing the Guardian to this system of self-regulation, Rusbridger recognised that as an editor it was ?a very
radical move to place even a few inches
of your paper out of your control?. But
it was absolutely necessary to safeguard
the independence of the readers? editor,
and he was true to his word.
When I took over from the unimpeachable Ian Mayes, the Guardian was
already firmly ensconced in the digital
world, but its relationship with its
audience was changing fast. Comment
is Free, then just over a year old, had
heralded a shift in the journalist/reader
dynamic. Guardian users were responding to web content, sometimes shouting
back and yelling at each other in comments below the article. The website
had become the place for journalists and
readers to coexist.
Around this time, the archetypal
Guardian reader seemed to be disappearing. The site was attracting millions
of global users and it was apparent
from the complaints I received that
some readers were unfamiliar with the
newspaper?s values and traditions.
And, as I discovered when I dealt with
complaints about changes to the homepage, the majority of Guardian users
were not accessing its online articles that
way. People were finding our web content in different ways, not browsing the
whole, and many had a fragmented view
of the Guardian as a result of getting
isolated articles through social media or
alerts to which they?d signed up.
In this changing landscape there was
still plenty of thinking to be done about
online ethical issues, such as invisible
mending versus flagging corrections, or
whether changes to older articles should
be made so that certain types of content,
for example restaurant reviews and
reports of criminal convictions, did not
come up in search results.
We were also still grappling with the
question of how user comments should
be moderated. And whereas print corrections to flawed journalism had previously been the norm, now complaints
were usually accompanied by requests
to delete online articles.
All of these things settled down over
time, but during my stint as readers?
editor, the reach and longevity of online
publication was still a major issue. I
returned to the subject in various guises
The website
had become
the place for
journalists
and readers
to coexist
Siobhain
Butterworth was
readers? editor
from April 2007
to January 2010
several times, and one of my columns
was even quoted at length in a high
court libel judgment.
Children and young people were
particularly affected, and I dealt with
several cases in which articles had
become a source of embarrassment for
them. This led to changes to the Guardian?s editorial code to protect children
from embarrassment or harm as they
grew older, and to require that even
anonymised articles containing significant intrusions into children?s private lives should have a strong public
interest justification. These provisions
extended to journalists who were writing about their own children, something of a phenomenon at the time.
The readers? editor needs help to
engage with the huge numbers of emails
arriving every week. My able assistants
were Helen Hodgson, Barbara Harper
and Charlotte Dewar. We were later
joined by Leslie Plommer, a highly experienced newswoman, whose dedication
to Guardian readers was seemingly
boundless and who wisely opined that
the product of journalism is its readers.
? This is the second of four columns
marking the 20th anniversary of the
readers? editor role, one written by each
holder of the post. Next week: Chris Elliott
Section:GDN BE PaGe:27 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 29/10/2017 18:05
cYanmaGentaYellowblack
*
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
the critics
@guardianculture
27
journal
From the cricket ground to the Thames, would-be
impressionists shine a light on long-lost London
Art
Impressionists
in燣ondon
Tate Britain, London
?????
T
his exhibition turns art
history on its head. For
more than a century it
has been assumed that
modern art began in
Paris. We?ve heard so
much about how the
bohemian atmosphere
of爐he French capital, with its druggy
poets and dirty novels, inspired the
impressionists.
Now Tate Britain shows that it was
the smog of Victorian London and not
the lights of Paris that inspired Claude
Monet and his contemporaries. In a very
important sense, the most French of all
art movements turns out to be British.
That?s how my review might start if
I爃ad swigged an entire bottle of
absinthe and was some kind of
deranged燘rexit Little Englander.
Unfortunately, I must soberly report
that Tate Britain has created the worst
show about the impressionists I have
ever seen. It comes close to achieving
the impossible: making Monet dull.
Instead of letting the light of impressionism into the stuffy drawing rooms
of燰ictorian Britain, it smothers these
spontaneous, life-loving artists in a
brown study of academic gloom. Worst
of all, the commercial cynicism of the
enterprise is obvious. Monet on the
poster will seduce unsuspecting art
lovers into a desiccated seminar in
third-rate history.
At the heart of Impressionists
in燣ondon is what should be an
intriguing爐ale. In 1870, the FrancoPrussian war drove Monet, Camille
Pissarro and Alfred Sisley to London.
They were already well on the way to
inventing a爁ree, immediate style of
painting that爓ould soon get them
?燼long with Degas, Renoir, Cezanne
and爋ther artists爓ho don?t make it
into爐his show燽ecause they somehow
ignored London as a subject ? the
nickname impressionists.
The nascent impressionism of
Tantalising ? The Ball on Shipboard by Tissot; below, The Avenue, Sydenham, by Pissarro Images: Tate/National Gallery
the爃andful of London scenes they
painted燿uring their brief stays are
like燼燽rilliant light thrown on the
lost爓orld of Victorian everyday life.
It爄s爈ovely to look at Pissarro?s 1871
painting The Avenue, Sydenham,
with爄ts fresh eye for life in the
London爏uburbs close to 150 years
ago:燰ictorians as dapples of colour.
And that?s it, at least until Monet
and燩issarro returned for holidays
much爈ater on.
That doesn?t worry the curators
because, in spite of the Monet-heavy
publicity, they don?t seem that
interested in impressionism as such.
Their real theme is the social history of
French 閙igr� artists. For while Monet
his mates got back to the boulevards as
soon as possible, other French artists ?
really bad artists ? made a home in the
London art world. There is a vast room
in the exhibition dedicated to the
mediocrities Alphonse Legros and Jules
Dalou. They were welcomed into
Victorian art because they shared its
conservative outlook. Another room is
dedicated to minor late works by a much
finer artist, Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux,
who followed the deposed dictator
Louis Napoleon into British exile.
None of these artists have anything
to燿o with impressionism, yet the exhibition is called Impressionists in London.
Pissarro brings a fresh
eye爐o life in the London
suburbs: Victorians as
dapples of colour
It?s intellectual murder to obscure
and爉uddy impressionism?s bold
new爓ay of seeing the world as
this燿oes.
James Tissot is more tantalising.
This燜rench artist who made his
home爄n London was never quite an
impressionist ? his forms are always
conventionally clear ? but he lets a
shaft爋f their brightness into scenes of
Victorian life. He is one of those artists
who always seem ripe for rediscovery,
but this encounter reveals how shallow
and calculated some of his scenes are.
A爓oman accidentally displaying her
bottom perfectly plays to Victorian
sexual hypocrisy.
This exhibition could have been a
fascinating exploration of British links
with impressionism, for those links do
exist, though they are not made here.
Why not start with Constable, who
was爌ainting in the open air, the basic
impressionist method, in the early
1800s ? and got a medal in France for it?
Later, Whistler and Sargent moved
freely between Paris and London and
were friends with the impressionists.
The Tate owns Sargent?s portrait of
Monet at work, but doesn?t include it
in爐his show. And Whistler, meanwhile,
gets just three Thames views. Nor is
there space made for Sickert, who saw
London through the eyes of Degas.
To include such artists would
have燽een a way of exploring impressionism itself: how it evolved, what it
was and why it matters. Yet this show
simply wants to claim the name
without爋ffering any such insight.
The爎esult is爏o pointless that when
I爁inally got to爓hat is meant to be a
show-stopping room of Monet?s
late爌aintings of the Houses of
Parliament, I was too fed up爐o care.
And營 love Monet.
The artist who does shine through
this pea souper is Pissarro. His pixellated�91 painting of a cricket match
at燞ampton Court Green held me
entranced. It is Pissarro?s complex
tension between observation and
abstraction that makes it just about
worth buying a ticket for this infuriating爀xercise in how not to tell the
story of modern art?s beginnings.
Jonathan Jones
2 November-7 May.
Box office: 020-7887 8888.
Fidelity amid fascism as top-notch cast
embrace dark vision of Handel
Barenboim?s Quixote is
sublime tribute to lost love
Opera
Classical
Rodelinda
Coliseum, London
?????
I
n its original 1724 form, Handel?s
opera dealt with complex political
and amorous machinations
among a seventh-century ruling
Lombard elite. Richard Jones?s
2014 production moves the
action爐o爁ascist Italy, where
the sense of a lawless dictatorship燼nd爐he constant threat of
violence爏eem equally apposite.
Jeremy Herbert?s split-stage set
means that on one side we see
Rodelinda ? widow of the supposedly
dead king Bertarido ? imprisoned with
her son Flavio in a grungy dungeon,
while on the other, the vile Grimoaldo
and his even wickeder ally Garibaldo
plot their next move in attempting
to爌ersuade Rodelinda to marry
her燾onsort?s usurper.
Rodelinda?s extraordinary fidelity
to爐he husband she believes dead
causes爃er to play any available card
?爄ncluding some pretty extreme ones
?爐o hold her infatuated persecutor
firmly at bay, and allows Jones to find
in爐he piece numerous touches of the
dark humour in which he specialises,
while the stark ambiguities of the
?happy? ending are not lost on him.
Handel?s operas depend crucially
on爐he quality of the singing, and here
ENO has been canny in selecting a topnotch cast who can enter confidently
into the manifold intricacies of the
staging while still delivering the vocal
goods. In the enormous title role,
Rebecca Evans has to jump through
innumerable vocal hoops yet is never
found wanting; her tone is consistently
beautiful and her expression exact.
As her missing-presumed-dead
husband Bertarido, Tim Mead draws on
a爓ide range of colour and charts his
character intelligently. Spanish tenor
Juan Sancho offers a disturbing portrayal
of the iniquitous Grimoaldo, and like the
rest of the cast he gets his words over
in燗manda Holden?s fine translation.
Neal Davies channels heightened
villainy as Garibaldo, betrothed to
Bertarido?s sister Eduige ? delivered in
grand tones by Susan Bickley ? but
constantly urging Grimoaldo on to ever
baser deeds. In an equally ambivalent
secondary role, Christopher Lowrey
turns Unulfo ? adviser to Grimoaldo but
secretly supporting Bertarido ? into a
painfully touching study in loyalty.
To燤att Casey falls the tricky task of
playing the silent role of Rodelinda?s son
? considerably beefed up in爐his staging
? and does so with a convincing blend
of燽arely repressed燼nger and defiance.
ENO?s orchestra plays efficiently for
Christian Curnyn, though his conducting could do with sharper definition
and occasionally more impetus.
George Hall
At Coliseum, London, until 15 November.
Box office: 020-7845 9300.
WEDO/Barenboim
Royal Festival Hall, London
?????
This wonderful concert was the first of
a爌air given by Daniel Barenboim and the
West-Eastern Divan Orchestra to fundraise for the MS Society in tribute to
Barenboim?s first wife, Jacqueline du Pr�,
who died 30 years ago this month. The
evening began with extracts from Christopher Nupen?s film Jacqueline du燩r�
A燝ift Beyond Words, a celebration of
her爐alent and instinctive musicianship.
The爌rogramme opened, meanwhile,
with Strauss?s Don Quixote ?爊ot the
first爓ork, perhaps, that comes to mind
when du Pr� is mentioned, though her
recording ranks燼mong the greatest.
Rebecca Evans jumps
through vocal hoops
as Rodelinda but is
never wanting
Black widow ? Neal Davies and Rebecca Evans Photo: Tristram Kenton
Soloist Kian Sultani Photo: Mark Allan
Strauss?s tone poem, with its cello and
viola solos representing Quixote and
Sancho Panza respectively, is a bittersweet negotiation of the boundaries
between illusion and reality, its point
being that the Don?s chivalric fantasies
transcend the mundane world around
him. Barenboim?s interpretation, gloriously played by the orchestra of Israeli
and Arab musicians he founded, was
beautiful in its sad wit, emotional
veracity and attention to detail.
Dulcinea?s oboe solo hovered in the air
at the start, before a jumble of themes,
wedged against each other in delirious
but clear counterpoint, suggested the
clouding of Quixote?s mind. Windmills,
sheep and unctuous clerics ? his
imagined enemies ? were realised with
bitter humour and great virtuosity. But it
was the big flights of fancy, as the Don
dreams of love and holds his knightly
vigils, that took one?s breath away. Kian
Soltani was the sublime cello soloist,
effortlessly lyrical and profoundly
touching in the closing moments, when
Quixote prepares for death. Miriam
Manasherov, playing among the orchestral violas, dexterously outlined
Sancho Panza?s naive loquacity. The
whole thing was outstanding ? the best
performance of爐he work I?ve heard live.
Soltani joined the orchestral cellos
after the interval for Tchaikovsky?s Fifth
Symphony, done on a majestic scale, and
a high-voltage interpretation that vividly
captured the work?s progression from
darkness to light. Baleful clarinets gave
way to a real sense of turbulence as爐he
first movement gathered momentum.
The Andante?s horn melody had wonderful poise, while the finale was exceptional in its elation and elan.
Tim Ashley
On BBC Radio 3 tonight and on
BBC爄Player for� days.
Section:GDN BE PaGe:28 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
28
Sent at 29/10/2017 17:26
*
cYanmaGentaYellowblack
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
Media
Read more on
theguardian.com/media
Insidious blurring of editorial and
advertising weakens democracy
Emily Bell
A
lmost a year after
the shock election
of Donald Trump,
the communication
tactics and tools that
helped him win power
remain the most controversial issue in US
politics and media. The 2016 ?October
surprise? was, in retrospect, not so
much the leak of Hillary Clinton?s boring emails as the realisation that Silicon
Valley had accidentally built a highly
efficient real-time trading system for
targeted propaganda.
A small office of Russian trolls could
derail 241 years of US political history
with a handful of dank memes and an
advertising budget that would barely
buy you a billboard in Brooklyn.
On Wednesday, lawyers from Twitter,
Facebook and Google will head to Washington to try to explain to congressional
intelligence committees exactly how
they allowed groups of foreign actors to
target US voters.
Facebook has admitted selling
$100,000 of advertising, some of it in
roubles, to suspicious parties, even
though it found it impossible to say
exactly what the ads were or who might
have seen them. Twitter has been so
mortified by the possibility that uncontrolled bot armies on its platform might
have swayed the vote that it is opening a ?transparency centre? for future
political advertising disclosures. It
also announced last week it was banning two Kremlin-supported media
outlets, RT and Sputnik, from buying
advertising. Embarrassingly for Twit-
Billboards in New York in September
2016, including one supporting Donald
Trump?s presidential campaign
Photograph: Drew Angerer/Getty
ter, RT responded by publishing details
of meetings between RT and Twitter?s
?partnership? teams before the 2016
election where Twitter ?brainstormed?
ad strategies with the Russians.
The details from RT are excruciating
for Twitter, if they are accurate. The
Russian broadcaster claims Twitter
approached RT with a comprehensive
pre-election advertising plan. To entice
RT to agree to the exclusive elections
offer, Twitter promised a package of
perks and bonuses. The offer included
closed beta testing of new tools and
products; a customised emoji hashtag
that would help RT stand out with special election coverage; customised analytics and research solutions; and a team
of Twitter experts to help with content
curation and media strategy.
This kind of service is available from
most platform ?partner? teams at social
media companies, whose job it is to
encourage publishers to use their technologies and pay money to boost their
presence on them. Perhaps the most
ironic aspect of Twitter banning RT and
Sputnik from buying advertising is that
both Russian media outlets still have
active accounts serving, in RT?s case,
more than 2.5 million followers. And, to
further highlight the problem with platform governance, they have accounts
?verified? with Twitter?s blue ticks.
While the spotlight has shone brightly
on the Russian advertising issue, it
seems likely that activities that had no
financial component were more influential in moving or subduing voters. A
blend of ?organic? ? unpaid ? activity
promoted with a sprinkling of cash is
what really propels brands, arguments,
events and other content to the top of
people?s social media feeds. (Jonathan
Albright, a research director at Columbia
University?s Tow Center, has collected
data showing that the overall reach and
activity of the Russian propagandists
vastly exceeds the reach of the 3,000
ads Facebook admits to selling.)
Politicians and the media are realising that the way we think and talk about
different types of messages has been
well and truly broken. Social media have
made a practice ? and a fortune ? out of
erasing traditional boundaries between
different types of material. Where once
we had propaganda, press releases, journalism and advertising, we now have
?content?. Where once we had direct
marketing, display advertising and promotions, now we have ?monetisation?.
Where we once had media owners,
ad agencies and clients, now we have
?partners?. Who could object to partners monetising their content? It sounds
so mutually beneficial and efficient. On
the other hand, neo-Nazis paying to target pensioners with racist propaganda
has a less wholesome ring to it.
Research released last week by the
US academics Daniel Kreiss and Shannon MacGregor describes the role social
media companies played in 2016?s
domestic politics, noting with surprise
that the relationship between technology firms and political campaigns often
went far beyond that of vendor and purchaser. It describes how the technology
companies wooed campaigns, and partnership teams within companies such
as Google, Facebook, Twitter and Microsoft served ?as quasi-digital consultants
to campaigns, shaping digital strategy,
content, and execution?. This will sound
eerily familiar to media companies and
news organisations that have a similarly
symbiotic relationship with their technological frenemies. This closeness is
perhaps as big a worry for the long-term
health of democracy as the inadvertent
access tech companies have given to
malicious actors.
One response to the crisis is the honest ads act, a bipartisan bill that aims to
bring digital political advertising into
line with other media, demanding full
disclosure about funding sources from
Facebook has
admitted selling
$100,000 of
advertising, some of
it in roubles, to
suspicious parties
anyone spending more than $500. Until
now, digital advertising has been classified in the same way as skywriting,
avoiding the necessity for disclosure for
practical reasons. If that defence was
ever relevant to digital advertising it is
certainly no longer applicable.
The problem is that it is not clear even
that paid persuasion in online messaging would be classified as political
advertising. It might not even mention a
candidate or a party but just propagate
a certain set of values. It might be, as
some of the Russian activity was, an
invitation to a public meeting or a rally.
I
t is so difficult to know exactly
what messages are being targeted
where, and almost impossible for
users to identify what might be a
targeted ad. Investigative journalists at the US non-profit news organisation ProPublica have built a
project to collect and index all political ads circulated through Facebook.
Once, similar projects examined election
flyers, or pamphlets pushed through
doors. Now, collecting and analysing the
vast amount of varied material requires
algorithms and browser extensions. The
content of targeted ads is considered
confidential by the platforms and their
clients, so unless disclosure is voluntary
it takes a forensic operation to even look
at the content of commercial messages.
The inability to know an ad when you
see one is more convenient for media
companies than they would like to
admit. The dwindling display advertising model is giving way to a model of
?native advertising?, which merges with
editorial. Media companies can now
operate in effect as advertising agencies
for companies, helping them shape and
write ?stories? that throw an innocuous
light on a given subject or present the
advertiser or their sector in a sanitised
and uncritical way.
Most publishers would reject the idea
that their partnerships with companies
and advertisers are part of the same
problem as the democratic threat from
overseas authoritarians. But the tools
and techniques of political messaging
and manipulation are the same as those
used by commercial publishers to create
new types of advertising revenue.
The Russian campaign advertising scandal has electrified US media,
not least because they enjoy the ritual
humiliation of their Silicon Valley overlords. But if the root of the problem is
tackled, it could have unwelcome repercussions for them far closer to home.
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29
More jobs at guardianjobs.com
Monday 30 October 2017
Courses
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*
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
obituaries@theguardian.com
other.lives@theguardian.com
31
Obituaries
@guardianobits
Cherif Bassiouni
Other lives
Janet Simpson
Advocate for human
rights who ushered in
two new international
criminal courts
T
he Egyptian law professor Cherif Bassiouni, who
has died aged 79, made
an important contribution to the struggle for
global justice and to the
revival of the Nuremberg
legacy. His work, both
academic and in his UN reports from
war zones, led to the creation of two
international criminal courts.
In 1992, he was appointed by the
UN to chair a commission of experts to
examine war crimes in the former Yugoslavia. His report delivered a searing
verdict on the behaviour of all parties
to the Balkan wars, but especially on
the Serbs under Slobodan Milo?evi?. It
argued, in a novel development of the
law of war, that through using rape as
an instrument of ethnic cleansing, the
Serb commanders were guilty of a crime
against humanity.
The UN had to act and, over the objections of British diplomats (who believed
that peace could be negotiated without
justice), accepted Bassiouni?s recommendation to set up a war crimes court
? the international criminal tribunal for
the former Yugoslavia or ICTY? in The
Hague. Bassiouni, whose report and lobbying was instrumental in establishing
the court (the first since Nuremberg),
was an obvious choice as prosecutor,
and was nominated by the US. He was
blocked by Britain, for no good reason,
although perhaps for a bad one ? he was
a Muslim. The court, in time, delivered
justice on Radovan Karad?i? and Ratko
Mladi? and other Serbian and Croat
mass-murderers; Milo?evi? died halfway through his trial.
Bassiouni was appointed instead
by the UN to report on the conflict in
Afghanistan, where he upset the Bush
regime by exposing the excesses of
its military. He went on to lobby for a
proposal he had supported when it was
just a professorial pipe-dream: an international criminal court. He dominated
the Rome conference in 1998 that established this court, the ICC, chairing the
drafting committee that produced its
statute and lobbying behind the scenes
to obtain a large measure of agreement
until it began operation in 2002.
His work won him nomination for
the 1999 Nobel prize (which went,
instead, to M閐ecins Sans Fronti鑢es).
More recently, however, he had spoken
despairingly of the UN security council?s
failure to permit ICC involvement in
Syria, and of the continuing damage to
the court by the refusal of Russia, China
and the US to sign up to its statute.
Bassiouni was born in Cairo, into an
elite family: his grandfather had been
president of the senate, and his father a
senior diplomat ? ironic, given Cherif?s
long battle against diplomats who preferred to give tyrants expedient amnesties rather than to put them on trial.
His upbringing was unusual ? a Muslim youth sent to be schooled by Jesuits
in Egypt and thence to study law in
France. He returned to fight for Egypt
during the Suez Crisis in 1956, and was
wounded and decorated for his courage. His patriotism did not stop him
from speaking out about the brutality
of Gamal Abdel Nasser?s security forces,
and he was placed under house arrest (it
would have been prison, had his family
not been well connected). After seven
months of confinement he fled, smuggled himself on board a ship sailing for
the US, and continued his legal studies.
His conspicuous brilliance soon led
him to be appointed professor of law at
DePaul University in Chicago, where in
1990 he set up an International Human
Rights Law Institute, as one of the
first academics to teach this subject. It
remained the base for his outpourings
of books (he published 27) and lengthy
Bassiouni: conspicuously brilliant
essays in learned journals (270). He
established a base at the Siracusa Institute in Sicily, where he trained judges
who now sit on war crimes cases. They
speak of him as an inspiring teacher, a
role that he never neglected despite his
UN work and trips to war zones.
As well as this intellectual output,
he conducted no fewer than 22 UN
inquiries and commissions. His reports
carefully weighed the evidence, some
of which he had collected himself at
risk to his own life (his light aircraft was
once hit by sniper fire over Sarajevo,
his hotel in Bosnia was attacked and
he narrowly escaped a suicide bomb in
Fallujah). Despite the fears of British
diplomats, he did not display bias, other
than against the authors of the atrocities
he examined. His reports had the particular merit of expedition ? he usually
produced them within six months or so
of his mandate.
In 2011 he chaired a commission of
inquiry set up by the king of Bahrain
to investigate the killings and torture
of protesters. His 500-page report,
produced in five months, pulled no
punches and condemned the culture of
impunity that had come about through
failures in the local judiciary and in military courts. Several thousand detainees
were released as a result.
Bassiouni was, in private, an ebullient man, witty and sophisticated, who
loved fine wines and classical music
and (at least when I met him) was never
without a fine cigar. He was a clever,
insistent lobbyist for his projects behind
the scenes at the UN, and an advocate
for truth who never took money for
slanting it. When the UN underfunded
his inquiry into the Balkan atrocities he
did accept money from the Soros Foundation to pay for some investigations ? a
matter that the Serbian government criticised, but he believed it was the only
way to complete the report, and the
funds came without strings attached.
Although some states were cautious
over suspicions of his Muslim background, this should have been seen as
an asset: he was one of the first scholars to examine the concept of jihad in
books and articles and to nuance Islamic
teaching in a way that disfavoured violence. He did speak out against the discrimination that Muslims were suffering
in the US, and defended the Gaza flotilla
after it was attacked by Israel.
Bassiouni watched the developments in his native Egypt with concern
and some despondency. He shared the
values of the protesters but knew the
power of the army too well to think that
the overthrow of Hosni Mubarak in 2011
would pave the way to freedom. He was,
of course, correct.
Bassiouni?s first wife, Rosanna Cesari,
and second wife, Nina Delmissier, both
predeceased him. He is survived by his
third wife, Elaine Klemen-Bassiouni,
and by a stepdaughter and two
grandchildren.
Geoffrey Robertson
Mahmoud Cherif Bassiouni, legal scholar,
born 9 December 1937; died 25 September
2017
Billy Hatton
Founding member of
the 60s Liverpool pop
group the Fourmost
Janet Simpson?s
last academic post
was at St George?s
hospital in Tooting,
London, investigating falls among
elderly people
(now Coventry University), then working in research at Arthur Exton-Smith?s
influential memory clinic at St Pancras
hospital in London.
Towards the end of her career she
returned to teaching, at the University of East London, and completed
a PhD in the early 1990s. Her final
academic post was as a research fellow at St George?s hospital in Tooting,
south-west London, investigating falls
among elderly people.
Janet was a member of the Labour
party throughout her adult life. She
loved adventurous holidays, and it was
on a trip to Yemen in 1993 that she met
David Knight, who became her partner. Over the next 20 years they shared
many more adventurous journeys.
After the onset of dementia, which
led to Janet?s steep decline, David
cared for her at home. He survives her.
Margaret Holness
Submission and publication of all
Other lives pieces and letters is subject
to our terms and conditions:
see http://gu.com/letters-terms
B
illy Hatton, who has
died aged 76, was the
bass player and harmony
singer with the Fourmost,
the Liverpool beat group
signed in 1963 with the
Beatles manager Brian
Epstein?s NEMS company.
Their first hits, Hello Little Girl and I?m
In Love, released later that year, were
produced by George Martin and written
by John Lennon and Paul McCartney.
Hatton?s relationship with Lennon was
strained, however, as he had stopped
the Beatle from beating up the Cavern
Club DJ Bob Wooler at McCartney?s
21st birthday party. ?Lennon deserved
a smack, no doubt about that,? Hatton
said, ?but someone shouted out: ?Billy,
if you hit him, your career will be over!??
The Fourmost made the Top 10 in
April 1964 with the up-tempo A Little
Loving, then had a record-breaking run,
from June to December that year, in
the Startime revue at the London Palladium with Tommy Cooper, Cilla Black
and Frankie Vaughan, and appeared in
the film Ferry Cross the Mersey (1965).
Three further singles made the Top 40,
and their versatility was showcased on
the album First and Fourmost (1965).
The group?s promotion of their cover of
the Four Tops? Baby I Need Your Loving
on Ready Steady Go! was helped when
an enthusiastic fan made a grab at Hatton on live TV.
Hatton had a love of American cars,
and on the back of this success swapped
his old Ford Prefect for a Mercury Monterey, which created a sensation when
he took it home to Liverpool.
Son of Harry, a fireman, and Alice,
Hatton was born in a terraced house in
the Dingle area of Liverpool. At nursery school, his playmates were Ronnie
Wycherley (later Billy Fury) and Richard
Starkey (Ringo Starr). During his teens,
Hatton and Wycherley played guitars
together and he encouraged Wycherley
to write songs and to perform. ?He was
a sexy sod, wasn?t he?? recalled Hatton.
My friend Janet Simpson, who has
died aged 79, was a physiotherapist
and academic who emphasised the
importance of a psychological understanding of patients, particularly when
it came to the care of elderly people.
Born in East Ham, London, the only
child of Robert Simpson, who ran a
cobbler?s shop, and his wife, Mary, she
won a place at East Ham girls? grammar school. In 1955 she began training
as a physiotherapist at the London
hospital (now the Royal London) in
Whitechapel. There she was noted
for the unusual quality of her medical drawing, her sense of style and an
adventurous spirit.
After working as a physiotherapist,
first in London, then in a clinic in Switzerland, she took time out to study at
an art school in Berlin before returning to London to hold senior physiotherapy posts at the Royal Free and
Mile End hospitals. She studied for a
degree in psychology at Bedford College, University of London, and thereafter remained in higher education,
first teaching at Coventry Polytechnic
Birthdays
Hatton, right, with his Fourmost
bandmates, from left, Brian O?Hara,
Mike Millward and Dave Lovelady
Dezo Hoffmann/Rex/Shutterstock
?He would walk into a party and all the
girls would turn into blobs of oil. I was
lucky to be with him.?
Hatton sang and played the guitar
in a country band and then with the
Four Jays. In 1962 they were Epstein?s
second choice to sign, after the Beatles,
but there were problems. Their lead
singer and guitarist, Brian O?Hara, was
studying accountancy; the rhythm
guitarist, Mike Millward, worked for a
solicitor; the drummer, Dave Lovelady,
had his sights on being an architect;
and Hatton was serving an apprenticeship with the Atomic Energy Authority
in Cheshire. They were regarded as
the brainiest group on Merseyside and
they did not want to throw away their
work prospects for the slim chance of
a hit record. For the time being, they
remained on Merseyside and played in
their spare爐ime.
?We never wanted to just stand there
and sing,? said Hatton, and they developed a fast-moving act which included
comedy routines and a lengthy version
of September in the Rain, packed with
impersonations. The Beatles had them
as special guests for their fan club night
at the Cavern in April 1962.
Once the NEMS artists were having
hit records, Epstein approached the
Four Jays again. By then, both O?Hara
and Hatton had passed their examinations and they turned fully professional
as musicians, securing a record contract
with Parlophone. Wooler suggested a
name change to the Fourmost.
For all their early success, Hatton
lacked confidence and in his private life
he never wanted responsibility. He said
he regretted not marrying his onetime
girlfriend, Nicky Stevens, singer with
the pop group Brotherhood of Man.
In later years he mostly worked as
a security officer on Merseyside but
he often played with Lovelady and
Joey燘ower as Clouds and later the
Original Fourmost. In 2008, they lost
a court case to a tribute band calling
themselves the Fourmost. ?We made
those records, we established the
name,? Hatton railed. ?Doesn?t that
count for anything??
He was a popular figure in Liverpool,
especially in the Roscoe Head, the pub
he called his office. His final television
appearance was with the Hairy Bikers in
their Liverpool episode of The Pubs That
Built Britain (2016).
?I?ve had a good life,? Hatton told me.
?I never thought I would even get on TV
with my spiky nose.?
He is survived by his sister, Ada.
Spencer Leigh
William Henry Hatton, guitarist
and singer, born 9 June 1941; died
19燬eptember 2017
Richard Alston, choreographer,
69; Marcel Berlins, journalist and
broadcaster, 76; Sir Christopher Foster,
political economist, 87; Rusty Goffe,
actor and entertainer, 69; Prof Harvey
Goldstein, statistician, 78; Jessica
Hynes, actor and writer, 45; Claude
Lelouch, film director, 80; Diego
Maradona, footballer, 57; Shlomo Mintz,
violinist, 60; Brendan Mullin, rugby
player, 54; Daniel Poulter, Conservative
MP, 39; Gavin Rossdale, singer, 52;
Grace Slick, singer, 78; Juliet Stevenson,
actor, 61; Mario Testino, photographer,
63; Lord (David) Triesman, former chair,
Football Association, 74; Courtney
Walsh, cricketer, 55; Vanessa White, pop
singer, 28; Otis Williams, soul singer,
76; Bob Wilson, goalkeeper, football
commentator, 76; Sir David Wilson,
archaeologist, 86; Henry Winkler, actor
and writer, 72.
Announcements
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34
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*
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
Weather
Today
London
Manchester
Newcastle
Southampton
Aberdeen
Glasgow
Cardiff
Belfast
High 11 | Low 4
Precipitation: 5%
Partly sunny
High 10 | Low 6
Precipitation: 5%
Partly sunny
High 9 | Low 7
Precipitation: 55%
A little rain
High 11 | Low 3
Precipitation: 0%
Partly sunny
High 8 | Low 6
Precipitation: 60%
A little rain
High 10 | Low 7
Precipitation: 55%
A little rain
High 10 | Low 7
Precipitation: 0%
Partly sunny
High 11 | Low 9
Precipitation: 55%
Some showers
ILLUSTRATION: CLIFFORD HARPER
Country Diary Fionn Choire, Isle of Skye
Gabbro is youthful rock. Barely born, on
a timeline started by British geology?s
eldest foundations. But it is impressive,
expressive rock. The coarser the grain,
the slower the cooling of the magmatic
paste that birthed it explosively, then
insipidly, from the sea floor, at a time
when dinosaurs still walked. When your
nose is against it you smell the tang of
rust and feel its surface worry your skin.
Some of Britain?s most recent geology
was layered by water and compressed
over time, and crumbles with fragility;
but gabbro was spat from the earth and
cooled hard and dark.
High on Skye?s Cuillin Ridge, it interrupts the horizon with a fearful signature, frilled and switch-blade sharp.
The last of Britain?s volcanism left
this place to speak its eulogy. Here on
the ridge it formed, at Bruach na Frithe,
hulking rock shapes tilt blackly like
primed guillotine blades as climbers
hasten beneath or over them. The lean-
Starwatch
ing Basteir Tooth. The horned back of
Sgurr nan Gillean. They look like this
because the rock is young, raw, the
canny angle of its bedding crafted sharp
by glaciers and yet to blunt beneath the
bludgeoning Hebridean weather.
Mountaineering here is dangerous.
The drops are big. Basalt dykes,
treacherous veins through the gabbro,
are fractious and slick, next to rock
that is solid and grips. Quick-cooling
lava, slow-cooling lava. Soft, hard. Slip,
grip. Watch your feet, the guides say.
Pay attention. The iron in the rock will
queer your compass, don?t trust it. Wear
gloves, because the same rock that
chews your boots will flay your fingers
to ribbons.
Then there is the danger of overconfidence on rock that clutches you with
that uncommon friction. You might
think yourself invincible on the Cuillin?s
steeples. Helpful, until the moment you
realise you?re not.
Gabbro on the whole appears brown,
rusty, grey. But the ridge is dark in many
lights, and on the map: the Black Cuillin.
Light changes the colour chemistry on
the smaller scale, like a fragment of clear
ice pulled from a blue-hued glacier. It?s
bulk that turns the ridge black, hoists it
high, gives it teeth.
Simon Ingram @MrSimonIngram
In a month that has the Milky Way
stretching almost overhead during most
of Britain?s hours of darkness, the highlights are a conjunction in our pre-dawn
twilight between the two brightest planets, Venus and Jupiter, and a return of
the Leonid meteor shower under moonless skies.
The chart plots Pegasus and Andromeda high in the S as the Plough swings
counterclockwise below Polaris in the
N. Deneb in Cygnus is near the zenith at
nightfall, but lies almost due W at our
map times as Orion climbs into view at
our E horizon.
Above Orion is Taurus whose
main star, Aldebaran, lies against the
V-shaped Hyades star cluster. The night
of the 5th-6th sees the bright Moon hide
several stars as it crawls along the lower
arm of the V towards Aldebaran. The
latter slips behind the Moon?s lower-left
limb between 02.39 and 03:24 as seen
from London and 02:27 to 03:26 for
watchers in Edinburgh.
With Saturn bright (mag 0.6) but very
low in the SW sky at nightfall, our main
planetary interest is just before dawn.
Venus continues as a brilliant morning
star of mag ?3.9 but its altitude at sunrise falls from 13� to only 6� this month
as it moves towards the Sun?s far side.
Jupiter, about to emerge in our dawn
twilight at mag ?1.7, may be glimpsed
below and to the left of Venus from
the 8th or so and passes a mere 16
arcminutes below-right of Venus on
the�th as they hover very low in the
ESE in the brightening twilight. Mars,
much fainter at mag 1.8, rises in the E by
04:00 and tracks ESE through Virgo to
pass 3� N of Spica on the 28th. Check our
Diary for conjunctions between these
Summary
Around the world
Channel Is, Cent S England, SW England, W
Midlands, Wales Largely dry with bright intervals.
A light south-westerly wind. Max 9-12C (48-54F).
Staying largely dry tonight with clear periods.
Min 2-8C (36-46F).
癈
Ajaccio
21
Algiers
24
Alicante 22
Ams?dam 11
Athens
21
Auckland 19
B Aires
22
Bangkok 31
Barcelona 20
Basra
36
Beijing
15
Belgrade 11
Berlin
8
Bermuda 25
Bordeaux 13
Boston
16
Brussels 11
Budapest 9
C?blanca 26
C?hagen
7
Cairo
26
Cape Town32
Chicago
8
Christ?rch 22
Corfu
22
The brighter stars at 21.00 GMT on 1 November,
20.00 on 16 November and
19.00 on 30 November
Looking north
CEPHEUS
CASSIOPEIA
3
1
DRACO
CYGNUS
LYRA
4
2
AURIGA
The Plough
HERCULES
BOOTES
West
1 Deneb
2 Vega
3 Polaris
PERSEUS
URSA
MINOR
5
6
GEMINI
URSA
MAJOR
7
North
East
7 Betelgeuse 10 Aldebaran 13 Altair
8 Algol
11 Mira
9 Pleiades
12 Fomalhaut
4 Capella
5 Castor
6 Pollux
Looking south
EDA
Galaxy
ROM
AND
8
PERSEUS
9
TAURUS
TRIANGULUM
ARIES
Square of
Pegasus
PEGASUS
11 CETUS
13
AQUARIUS
10
ION
OR
CYGNUS
DELPHINUS
ERIDANUS
AQUILA
CAPRICORNUS
West
12
East
South
planets and the waning earthlit Moon.
Very swift Leonids meteors, many
leaving bright trains in their wake, arrive
between the 15th and 20th and are most
numerous near the shower?s peak, predicted for the 17th. They diverge from a
radiant point in the Sickle, above Leo?s
main star Regulus, and are seen after
this rises in the NE at 22:00. Numbers
should only improve as this climbs
through the E later in the night but are
expected to be well down on the stormforce levels seen in 1966 and 1999 ? perhaps no more than a dozen per hour.
Alan Pickup @alanpickup
November diary
1st
4th
6th
10th
13th
15th
16th
17th
18th
21st
24th
26th
28th
15h Venus 4� N of Spica
05h Full moon
03h Moon occults Aldebaran for UK
02h Moon 2.4� S of Praesepe;
21h Last quarter
06h Venus 0.3� N of Jupiter
01h Moon 3� N of Mars
21h Moon 4� N of Jupiter
06h Moon 4� N of Venus;
19h Peak of Leonids meteor shower
12h New moon
00h Moon 3� N of Saturn
00h Mercury furthest E of Sun (22�)
17h First quarter
00h Mars 3� N of Spica
Weather forecast
UK and Ireland Noon
Shetland Islands
9
Temperature(�) X
1020
Wind (mph) X
Mist
Fog
Sunny
Sunny intervals
12
Mostly cloudy
Overcast/dull
Sunny showers
SE England, London, E Anglia, E Midlands
Mainly dry with sunny periods. A light northerly
wind. Max 9-12C (48-54F). Staying mainly
dry tonight with clear periods. Min 2-5C
(36-41F).
Sunny and heavy showers
1024
Light showers
10
Rain
Sleet
Light snow
10
Snow showers
11
Moderate
Heavy snow
Thundery rain
Thundery showers
12
1028
10
12
Lincolnshire, Yorkshire, NW England Mostly
cloudy with spells of rain mainly in the afternoon.
A light westerly wind. Max 8-11C (46-52F).
Overcast tonight with spells of rain. Min 4-9C
(39-48F).
NE England, SE Scotland, SW Scotland, NE
Scotland Mostly cloudy with spells of rain in the
afternoon. A light south-westerly wind.
Max 5-10C (41-50F). Overcast tonight with spells
of rain. Min 1-7C (34-45F).
35�
Slight
30�
25�
20�
15�
10�
11
5�
Channel Islands
0�
12
12
Slight
1032
-5�
-10�
-15�
UK and Ireland Five day forecast
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
W Isles, N Isles, NW Scotland Mostly cloudy
with spells of rain, mainly in the afternoon. A
light south-westerly wind. Max 5-12C (41-54F).
Overcast tonight with spells of rain. Min 3-10C
(37-50F).
Northern Ireland, Ireland Mostly cloudy with the
odd shower across the north. A moderate southwesterly wind. Max 10-14C (50-57F). Overcast in
the north today; otherwise, clear intervals.
Min 7-12C (45-54F).
Atlantic front Noon today
Friday
Saturday
L 984
1000
992 1000
1008
1008
1016
1032
1024
1016
High 14
Low 8 High 12
Low 8 High 12
Low 6 High 11
Low 8 High 11
Low 5
Weather
Fair
Sunny
Sunny
Fair
Fair
Sunny
Fair
Fair
Fair
Sunny
Sunny
Fair
Fair
Rain
Fair
Rain
Fair
Fair
Sunny
Fair
Sunny
Sunny
Windy
Fair
Fair
Air pollution
London
North East
NW & Mersey
York & Humber
East Midlands
West Midlands
Eastern
South East
South West
South Wales
North Wales
Borders
Cent Scotland
NE Scotland
Highland
N Ireland
1024
L
Cold front
low
low
low
low
low
low
low
low
low
low
low
low
low
low
low
low
Today?s forecast in towns and cities
by busy roads. Low (1-3); moderate
(4-6); high (7-9); very high (10).
Source Defra.
Lighting up
Warm front
Occluded front
Trough
High pressure will be over south-west England.
World weatherwatch
Belfast
Birmingham
Bristol
Dublin
Glasgow
London
Manchester
Newcastle
1652 to 0726
1641 to 0701
1647 to 0702
1656 to 0722
1641 to 0722
1638 to 0654
1640 to 0706
1633 to 0709
Sun & Moon
Last week, the states surrounding the
Great Lakes in the USA saw a deep area
of low pressure barrel northwards from
Ohio to Michigan, whipping up 70mph
wind gusts and large waves. The storm
system underwent rapid intensification
in its track, with the surface pressure falling 27mb in 24 hours. This is meteorologically labelled as ?explosive cyclogenesis?,
or more informally, ?a weather bomb?.
For this to merit its title, the surface pressure must drop at least 24mb in 24 hours.
In its wake however, the jet stream
nosedived southwards into northern
America and winds swung northerly,
pulling in cold air from Canada. As cold
air continued to invade from the north
towards the end of last week, parts of
the Midwest saw their first flakes of the
season as rain turned to snow. Across
Minneapolis-Saint Paul, the Twin Cities
of Minnesota, it is rare to see snow in
October, with this being the first snowfall at this time in several years; daytime
temperatures barely exceeded 0C (32F).
Western parts of New York, Michigan
and Ontario are no strangers to high
snowfall at this time of the year. These
regions are susceptible to the phenomenon of lake-effect snow, whereby cold air
intrudes from the north-west, moves over
the warm body of lake water and picks up
moisture; the air rises, cools and freezes,
to deposit snow on leeward slopes.
Former Super Typhoon Lan, which
battered Japan last week, can also be
held partially responsible for this cold
snap. As the ex-typhoon recurved into
the Northern Pacific, it jolted the jet
stream further southwards and helped
drive cold air into parts of northern
America. Tamsin Green (MetDesk)
Sun rises
Sun sets
Moon rises
Moon sets
Full Moon
Dakar
Dallas
Denver
Dhaka
Dublin
Faro
Florence
Frankfurt
Funchal
Geneva
Gibraltar
H Kong
Harare
Helsinki
Innsbruck
Istanbul
Jo?burg
K Lumpur
K?mandu
Kabul
Karachi
Kingston
Kolkata
L Angeles
Lagos
癈 癋 Weather
33 92 Sunny
25
1
23
11
23
20
10
24
10
20
26
25
1
7
15
26
31
22
25
36
30
29
23
31
78
34
75
53
74
69
51
76
51
69
80
78
35
45
60
80
88
73
77
98
87
85
74
88
癈
Larnaca 26
Lima
21
Lisbon
25
Lux?bourg 9
Madrid
21
Majorca 21
Malaga
21
Malta
22
Melb?rne 15
Mexico C 23
Miami
22
Milan
17
Mombasa 30
Montreal 15
Moscow
5
Mumbai 35
Munich
8
N Orleans 23
Nairobi 24
Naples
20
New Delhi 32
New York 14
Nice
21
Oporto
23
Oslo
5
Sunny
Snow
Fair
Cloudy
Sunny
Fair
Fair
Sunny
Fair
Sunny
Fair
Cloudy
Snow
Fair
Fair
Fair
Storms
Fair
Sunny
Sunny
Storms
Sunny
Fair
Storms
癋
79
70
78
49
70
71
71
72
60
74
73
64
87
59
41
95
47
75
76
69
90
58
70
74
42
Weather
Sunny
Cloudy
Sunny
Fair
Sunny
Fair
Sunny
Fair
Showers
Fair
Sunny
Fair
Showers
Rain
Rain
Sunny
Fair
Sunny
Showers
Storms
Sunny
Rain
Fair
Sunny
Fair
癈
Paris
12
Perth
26
Prague
7
Reykjavik 9
Rhodes 22
Rio de J 26
Rome
20
Shanghai 16
Singapore 28
St P?burg 5
Stockh?m 3
Strasb?g 11
Sydney
32
Tel Aviv 24
Tenerife 26
Tokyo
17
Toronto 10
Tunis
24
Vancouv?r 12
Venice
15
Vienna
8
Warsaw
6
Wash?ton 15
Well?ton 17
Zurich
9
癋
55
79
46
49
72
80
69
61
84
42
39
53
91
76
80
64
50
76
55
59
48
43
60
64
49
Weather
Fair
Sunny
Fair
Cloudy
Fair
Fair
Storms
Cloudy
Storms
Rain
Fair
Fair
Showers
Fair
Sunny
Windy
Windy
Sunny
Sunny
Fair
Windy
Fair
Sunny
Fair
Fair
High tides
H
L
H
癋
71
76
73
52
70
67
72
88
68
98
59
52
47
78
57
62
52
49
79
46
80
91
48
72
72
0652
1638
1458
0035
4 Nov
Forecasts and
graphics
provided by
AccuWeather, Inc �17
Aberdeen
Avonmouth
Belfast
Dover
Galway
Greenock
Harwich
Holyhead
0934
0213
0647
0650
0032
0747
0650
0628
3.5m
9.4m
2.9m
5.4m
3.8m
2.8m
3.3m
4.5m
2140 3.6m
1505 10.0m
1906 3.1m
1922 5.5m
1256 4.0m
2028 3.0m
1937 3.4m
1839 4.8m
Hull
0134 5.8m
Leith
1026 4.5m
Liverpool
0655 7.2m
London Bridge 0845 5.5m
Penzance
0018 4.2m
Southport
0556 6.9m
Weymouth
0149 1.3m
Whitby
-- --
1430
2247
1918
2139
1245
1826
1423
1212
5.9m
4.6m
7.7m
5.8m
4.5m
7.4m
1.5m
4.5m
Source: � Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Times are GMT
Around the UK and Ireland Yesterday
Sun Rain Temp (癈) Weather
hrs mm High/Low
Aberdeen
Aberporth
Aberystwyth
Alnwick
Aviemore
Barrow/Furness
Basingstoke
Belfast
Belmullet
Beverley
Birmingham
Bournemouth
Bradford
Brecon
Bristol
Brize Norton
Camborne
Carlow
Channel Isles
Chester
Coleraine
Cork
Crawley
Cromer
Dublin
Edinburgh
Enniskillen
Eskdalemuir
Glasgow
Herstmonceux
Holyhead
Ipswich
2.2
0.6
*
3.0
1.7
*
2.6
5.4
*
2.2
*
2.6
*
*
1.1
2.1
0.2
*
0.3
*
3.3
*
*
*
*
3.1
2.8
5.3
4.7
1.9
2.9
2.2
24 hours to 5pm yesterday.
1.3
0.0
5.3
0.0
0.0
0.5
0.3
0.0
0.3
0.3
1.0
0.3
0.5
1.8
0.0
0.8
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.5
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.3
0.0
0.3
1.3
0.8
0.0
0.0
0.5
14 6
13 12
14 12
16 8
14 4
14 9
15 12
14 9
13 11
15 8
15 11
15 13
12 7
13 10
15 12
16 11
14 12
14 12
16 13
16 12
14 9
14 12
16 12
15 9
13 11
14 6
13 11
13 5
13 7
14 12
14 12
14 9
Showers
Cloudy
Cloudy
P/cloudy
Cloudy
Cloudy
Showers
P/cloudy
Showers
Showers
Cloudy
Showers
Showers
Showers
Cloudy
Showers
Cloudy
Cloudy
Cloudy
Cloudy
P/cloudy
Cloudy
Cloudy
Cloudy
Cloudy
P/cloudy
Cloudy
P/cloudy
P/cloudy
Cloudy
Cloudy
Showers
Sun
hrs
Isle of Man
Isle of Wight
Keswick
Kinloss
Kirkwall
Lerwick
Leuchars
Lincoln
Liverpool
London
Manchester
Margate
Milford Haven
Morecambe
Newcastle/Tyne
Northallerton
Nottingham
Okehampton
Peterborough
Plymouth
Portland
Portsmouth
Prestwick
Shannon
Shrewsbury
Southend
St Athan
Stornoway
Stranraer
Tiree
Tulloch Bridge
Yeovil
4.9
*
*
1.3
3.0
2.7
4.4
3.2
2.8
1.6
4.4
0.3
*
5.2
*
*
3.4
*
2.7
*
*
*
3.9
*
3.7
0.9
3.0
2.7
*
2.1
*
*
Rain Temp (癈) Weather
mm High/Low
0.0
0.0
0.5
0.0
2.0
2.8
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
1.0
0.0
0.8
0.5
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.5
0.3
0.5
0.0
0.5
0.8
0.5
0.8
0.0
0.5
0.8
0.0
0.5
0.3
0.3
14 10
15 13
14 8
13 7
11 6
9 4
16 6
15 9
16 12
16 12
14 9
16 11
14 12
14 10
13 5
15 9
14 9
15 12
16 10
15 12
16 13
16 13
13 7
14 13
16 11
16 12
14 13
11 6
15 9
12 8
12 4
15 13
P/cloudy
Cloudy
P/cloudy
Cloudy
Showers
Showers
P/cloudy
P/cloudy
Cloudy
Cloudy
Showers
Cloudy
Cloudy
P/cloudy
P/cloudy
Cloudy
P/cloudy
Showers
Showers
Showers
Windy
Showers
P/cloudy
Showers
P/cloudy
Cloudy
P/cloudy
Showers
P/cloudy
Cloudy
P/cloudy
Cloudy
* Information not supplied by nearest weather station
Section:GDN BE PaGe:35 Edition Date:171030 Edition:01 Zone:
Sent at 29/10/2017 18:36
cYanmaGentaYellowblack
*
The Guardian | Monday 30 October 2017
35
Puzzles & Crossword
Codeword
Killer Sudoku
Easy
Medium
Each letter of the alphabet makes at least one appearance in the grid, and is
represented by the same number wherever it appears. The letters decoded
should help you to identify other letters and words in the grid.
The normal rules of Sudoku
apply: fill each row, column and
3x3 box with all the numbers
from 1 to 9. In addition, the
digits in each inner shape
(marked by dots) must add up
to the number in the top corner
of that box. No digit can be
repeated within an inner shape.
Pieceword
Use the jigsaw pieces to recreate this
completed crossword. We?ve listed only
clues for the Across words, but the pattern
of the grid should help you.
1
2
3
1
3
4
6
8
10
12
13
15
4
5
6
7
8
9
Loud noise ? Constrain
Defendant?s opposer
Coastal inlet
Enduring
Breath of relief ? Diplomacy
Washing rituals
Overact
In a tardy fashion
Petrol, eg ? Loosen
10
11
12
13
14
15
Suguru�
Wordsearch
Fill the grid so that each square in an
outlined block contains a digit. A block of
two squares contains the digits 1 and 2, a
block of three squares contains the digits 1,
2 and 3, and so on. No same digit appears in
neighbouring squares, not even diagonally.
Can you find 14 things that can fly in the
grid? Words can run forwards, backwards or
diagonally, but always in a straight, unbroken
line.
Guardian cryptic crossword
1
2
3
4
5
9
6
7
10
11
12
13
14
16
15
17
18
19
21
25
26
27
Wordwheel
Find as many words as possible using the
letters in the wheel. Each must use the
central letter and at least two others. Letters
may be used only once. You may not use
plurals, foreign words or proper nouns.
There is at least one nine-letter word to
be found. TARGET: Excellent-60. Good-51.
Average-39.
No 27,341 set by Rufus
Stuck? For help call 0906 200 83 83 or text GUARDIANC followed by a space, the day and date the crossword
appeared another space, and the CLUE reference (e.g GUARDIANC Monday12 Across1) to 88010. Calls cost
�10 per minute, plus your phone company?s access charge. Texts cost �per clue plus standard network
charges. Service supplied by ATS. Call 0330 333 6946 for customer service (charged at standard rate).
Want more? Access over 4,000 archive puzzles at theguardian.com/crossword. Buy the Guardian
Cryptic燬etters series (4 books) for only � including UK p&p (save �96). Visit guardianbooks.co.uk
or燾all 0330 333 6846.
Saturday?s
solutions
Futoshiki 577
Divide the grid into blocks that are either
square or rectangular. Each block must frame
a single number, and each block must contain
the same number of cells as the number it
frames.
4
?
2
1
5
3
2
1
3
?
1
3 < 4
5
?
?
3 < 4 < 5
2
?
?
2
1
3 < 4
?
?
?
4
5 > 2 > 1
Codeword
Suguru
Cell Block
Wordsearch
1 NCO arranged battle
course (8)
5 Speculation is in the
wind about doctor (6)
9 More than one saw book
of the Old Testament (8)
10 Doesn?t fancy being
drunk (6)
12 A sucker for oldfashioned treatment (5)
13 It?s clear to me, anyway,
one will miss a deadline
(4-5)
14 What a game knight
does when his coach is
leaving? (5,2,5)
18 Where a marathon
runner may eventually
succeed? (2,3,4,3)
21 Down-at-heel illegal
tenant
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