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The Hollywood Reporter August 2017 Emmy 1

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EMMY SPECIAL
AUGUST 2017 EMMY 1
THE BEST SHOW OF 2016
— J A M E S P O N I E WOZ I K,
FOR YOUR EMMY CONSIDERATION OUTSTANDING COMEDY SERIES
®
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AFI
GOLDEN GLOBE award
PGA Award
Outstanding Program of Year
Best television Series, musical or Comedy
Outstanding Producer of
Episodic Television, Comedy
WGA award
peabody award
tca award
Comedy Series
new Series
entertainment
OUTSTANDING Achievement
in Comedy
FELICITY HUFFMAN
Outstanding Lead Actress
in a Limited Series or Movie
Watch the full season, FYC panel and “Inside American Crime” at abcfyc.tv through 8/31/17
REGINA KING
Outstanding Supporting Actress
in a Limited Series or Movie
Actress, Limited Series, TV Movie
FEATURES
CROWN: ALEX BAILEY/NETFLIX. HOW: NICOLE WILDER/ABC. HOUSE: DAVID GIESBRECHT/NETFLIX.
HANDMAID’S: TAKE FIVE/HULU. AMERICANS: ERIC LIEBOWITZ/FX. WESTWORLD: COURTESY OF HBO.
12 ‘I’ve Had to Explore
Parts of Me That Are
Really Interesting’
22 ‘I Had to Create a
Balance Between Epic
and Intimate’
Lead actress nominees
carried the weight of the
laughs, gasps and tears
in Emmy’s hottest races.
12
From left: Claire Foy,
Viola Davis, Robin
Wright, Elisabeth
Moss, Keri Russell and
Evan Rachel Wood
were rewarded with
Emmy noms for
their dramatic turns.
Veteran theater director
George C. Wolfe divulges the
joys and challenges of
directing Oprah Winfrey in
HBO’s The Immortal Life of
Henrietta Lacks.
18 ‘The Writing Was Right
for Them’
26 ‘A Delicious Ride’
on Big Little Lies
The best script means
nothing if you don’t have the
right actors bringing it to
life, as evidenced by these five
standout series that grabbed
20 of 24 acting nominations
for the format.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
Laura Dern capped a busy
year, which featured work
on Twin Peaks and the next
Star Wars installment,
by nabbing an Emmy nom.
1
AUG U S T 2017 E M M Y 1
28 Saying Goodbye to
Saturday Night Live
Vanessa Bayer knows how to
leave on a high note: She
received an Emmy nom for
the show’s most watched
and most nominated season.
30 A Sweet Adieu to
37 Television Talents
In the last year, Hollywood
lost revered icons (Mary
Tyler Moore, Don Rickles),
heroes (Adam West),
villains (Powers Boothe),
moms (Florence Henderson)
and dads (Alan Thicke).
Actress, Limited Series, TV Movie
DEPARTMENTS
6 How Comedy Got Real
About Diversity
Cable, streaming and now
Peak TV have put funny
shows on the front lines of
serious cultural discussions.
8 Feinberg Forecast
Comedy and drama
actress nominees include a
first-timer (Claire Foy),
a seven-time winner (Julia
Louis-Dreyfus) and two
old friends (Jane Fonda and
Lily Tomlin) facing off.
The Oscar winner, who
scored a third consecutive
Emmy nomination for How
to Get Away With Murder
(she won in 2015), is a study
in how to make shape
and color pop. Her stylist
Elizabeth Stewart gives THR
the sartorial scoop.
36 88 Years of THR
Susan Saint James and
Jane Curtin made a
winning pair on Kate &
Allie in the 1980s.
30
Farewell to (clockwise
from top left) Adam
West, Carrie Fisher and
Debbie Reynolds, Mary
Tyler Moore, Florence
Henderson, Don Rickles
and Roger Ailes.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
2
AUG U S T 2017 E M M Y 1
WEST: PHOTOFEST/ABC. FISHER: BARRY SWEET/ZUMA PRESS. AILES: WESLEY MANN/FOX NEWS/GETTY IMAGES. MOORE: PHOTOFEST/CBS. RICKLES: PHOTOFEST/AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL. HERNDERSON: ALISON BUCK/GETTY IMAGES.
10 Viola Davis’ Fierce
Carpet Fashion
F O R YO U R E M M Y C O N S I D E R AT I O N
®
13 NOMINATIONS OUTSTANDING LIMITED SERIES
INCLUDING
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTOR
RIZ AHMED
“RIZ AHMED IS
EXTRAORDINARY”
– THE BOSTON GLOBE
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTOR
JOHN TURTURRO
“JOHN TURTURRO
IS PERFECT”
– THE WRAP
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR
BILL CAMP
“BILL CAMP IN A
SHOWSTOPPING
PERFORMANCE”
– VANITY FAIR
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR
MICHAEL KENNETH WILLIAMS
“ANOTHER TERRIFIC
TURN BY MICHAEL
KENNETH WILLIAMS”
– PEOPLE
EXQUISITE
“
”
- THE NEW YORK TIMES
©2017 Home Box Office, Inc. All rights reserved. HBO ® and related channels and service marks are the property of Home Box Office, Inc.
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EM M Y | T H E R ACE
From left:
Modern Family,
Atlanta,
All in the Family,
Black-ish and
Silicon Valley
How Comedy Got Real About Diversity
A
n unprecedented number of this
year’s Emmy-nominated programs
center on characters who are something other than straight white males, which
explains why so many of this year’s Emmy
acting nominees also fit that description. This
development is noteworthy in and of itself, but
what’s particularly interesting, to me, is that a
majority of these programs are comedies.
Each of this year’s seven nominees for
best comedy series — FX’s Atlanta, ABC’s
Black-ish and Modern Family, HBO’s Silicon
Valley and Veep and Netflix’s Master of None and
Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt — features protagonists who are people of color, immigrants
or second-generation Americans, LGBTQ
and/or women. Represented in the comedy
acting categories are shows about trans people
(Transparent), seniors (Grace and Frankie)
and a substance abuser (Mom). One even features a man playing a woman (Baskets).
What’s this all about? Well, for one thing,
there has been an explosion in TV programming of all sorts in the past few years — there
are likely to be more than 500 scripted series
in 2017, when all is said and done — hence the
term “Peak TV.” But why is this specifically
resulting in more — or at least more Emmyembraced — diverse comedies than dramas?
“I think the definition of ‘TV comedy’ has
really expanded,” says Silicon Valley actor
Kumail Nanjiani (who also co-wrote and stars
in this summer’s breakout indie, The Big Sick).
“I mean that in a really good way. You don’t
have to have a certain number of laughs per
minute anymore, which allows these themes
to be explored in a way that feels natural and
allows the issues to breathe. Also, if you can
make people laugh, they are more likely to
engage. Dealing with these issues dramatically can feel didactic or medicinal; comedy
allows people to laugh in the moment and
think about the serious stuff later.”
Comedies featuring and/or about diversity
are not new. They date back at least to the ’70s,
with CBS’ The Mary Tyler Moore Show, a revolutionary series about a “career woman,” and
the game-changing brainchildren of Norman
Lear, starting with CBS’ All in the Family,
in which race is discussed and debated,
and CBS’ Maude, which had a woman at its
center, followed by three shows built around
black families: NBC’s Sanford and Son, CBS’
Good Times and CBS’ The Jeffersons. These, in
turn, helped to create a climate in the ’80s in
different way: Rather than angling for the
least objectionable offerings, they create
a range of programming with the goal of
appealing across the demographic spectrum,
since just a single show can draw a fresh
set of subscribers. That gave us HBO’s Sex
and the City, which paved the way for Girls
and similarly personal comedies that helped
put the streamers on the map, including Netflix’s Orange Is the New Black and
Amazon’s Transparent.
↑ From left: Master of None, Transparent and Mom.
which other sitcoms focused on women, such
as NBC’s The Golden Girls and CBS’ Murphy
Brown, and people of color, such as NBC’s The
Cosby Show and A Different World, ABC’s Family
Matters and NBC’s The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air
— plus most of what showed up in the ’90s on
The WB and UPN, like Moesha — could thrive.
More recent barrier-busters include NBC’s
Will & Grace, the story of a gay man and
straight woman who are BFFs (Joe Biden, in
his endorsement of same-sex marriage, said
the show “probably did more to educate the
American public” on LGBTQ issues “than
almost anything anybody has ever done so
far”), and ABC’s Modern Family, which went on
the air in 2009.
But even more than these broadcast shows,
I would argue that the rise of pay cable and
streaming services changed the game because
they approach content creation in a totally
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
6
The more recent fragmentation of the TV
audience means that virtually no scripted
programs, even on broadcast, attract audiences the size of those 15 or 20 years ago. This
means that content creators no longer feel
as much pressure to create shows that will
appeal to everyone, and they increasingly aim
for programming that will appeal to niche
audiences and perhaps break out beyond that.
The TV Academy recognized many such
comedies with nominations this season
— and overlooked plenty of others, including a massively acclaimed series about young
black women (HBO’s Insecure); a sitcom in
which one of the main characters is — and
is played by — a person with cerebral palsy
(ABC’s Speechless); and a show about gender
(Amazon’s I Love Dick).
When it comes to diversity on TV, it seems
like comedies are getting the last laugh.
AUG U S T 2017 E M M Y 1
MODERN: PETER "HOPPER" STONE/ABC. ATLANTA: GUY D'ALEMA/FX. ALL: PHOTOFEST/ABC. BLACK-ISH: KELSEY MCNEAL/ABC. SILICON: JOHN P. JOHNSON/HBO. MASTER: COURTESY OF NETFLIX. TRANSPARENT: JENNIFER CLASEN/AMAZON PRIME VIDEO. MOM: MONTY BRINTON/CBS.
Peak TV, fueled by pay cable and streaming shows, is serving up inclusion with a side of laughs By Scott Feinberg
“2016’S MOST LIFE AFFIRMING
PIECE OF TELEVISION.”
F EI N BERG FOR ECAST
DRAMA
Viola Davis
Claire Foy
Elisabeth Moss
Keri Russell
Evan Rachel Wood
Robin Wright
How to Get Away
With Murder (ABC)
The Crown (NETFLIX)
The Handmaid’s Tale
(HULU)
The Americans (FX)
Westworld (HBO)
House of Cards (NETFLIX)
↑ Never, during her
show’s five seasons, has
the story of a KGB spy felt
more timely, and the critics’ darling, nominated for
the second year in a row
(having already garnered
a Critics’ Choice nomination this season), is the best
thing about it.
↓ She is one of only two
nominees in this category
whose show didn’t get a
series nom this year; it fell
off after getting one last
year, with some grumbling
about its slow-burn pacing.
↑ For her portrayal
of Dolores — a humanoid
host who becomes
sentient — on the most
nominated scripted
series of the year, this
2011 nominee (for Mildred
Pierce) already won a
Critics’ Choice award and
garnered a Golden Globe
nom. She’s HBO’s sole rep
in the category.
↓ At 29, she’s this category’s youngest nominee,
and very few actors have
won an Emmy while still in
their 20s.
↑ For all five seasons
of her show, her work as
the calculating Claire
Underwood has been
recognized with a nom
in this category. This
season, during which she
also starred in the hit film
Wonder Woman, she garnered Critics’ Choice and
SAG Award noms as well.
↓ The general consensus
seems to be that her show
is on the decline, and since
she hasn’t won yet, it’s
hard to imagine her picking
up her first victory now.
↑ For her portrayal of
attorney Annalise Keating,
this category’s 2015
winner is now its sole
nominee of color and sole
representative from a
broadcast show. She also
landed a Critics’ Choice
nomination this season.
↓ Of this category’s nominees, she’s one of only
two whose show did not
receive a drama series
nomination, and her soapy
hour has the fewest total
noms (just two).
↑ The diminutive upand-comer navigated the
tricky terrain of playing
Queen Elizabeth II — how
does one convey the inner
life of a woman famous for
hiding her emotions? — in
the first of two seasons in
which she’ll play the part.
She already has captured a SAG Award and a
Golden Globe.
↓ Unlike Elisabeth Moss,
she’s not American and
not well known, at least
beyond this part, to most
TV Academy members.
↑ The Mad Men alum’s
eighth nom comes for
playing sex slave Offred in
Hulu’s timely breakout, the
freshest show in this category (it released episodes
through June 14), which
received as many nominations as any drama.
↓ Unlike Foy, she doesn’t
have awards cred from
other groups this season
(if only because her show
debuted after they voted).
And some voters still are
catching up to Hulu.
Comedy and drama actress nominees include a first-timer (Claire Foy), a seven-time winner
(Julia Louis-Dreyfus) and two old friends (Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin) facing off By Scott Feinberg
COMEDY
Pamela Adlon
Jane Fonda
Allison Janney
Ellie Kemper
Better Things (FX)
Grace and Frankie
(NETFLIX)
Mom (CBS)
Unbreakable Kimmy
Schmidt (NETFLIX)
↑ A previous Emmy
winner for her voiceover work on King
of the Hill and a
nominee for her work
as a producer, writer
and guest star on
Louie, she’s back in
the running for her
semiautobiographical
portrayal of a divorced
actress raising her
three daughters alone
on this dramedy,
which she co-created
with pal Louis C.K.
↓ Unlike any of her
fellow nominees, she
represents her show’s
sole nomination.
↑ An Emmy winner
33 years ago for
The Dollmaker, the
79-year-old has
picked up four other
noms since, this one
her first for the Netflix
two-hander that pairs
her with her 9 to
5 co-star Lily Tomlin.
She garnered a SAG
Award nom this season.
↓ With her show
failing to snag a series
nom, and because
she’s competing with
Tomlin, it’s hard to see
her picking up trophy
No. 2 this year.
↑ Playing a recovering addict, she won
supporting Emmys in
two of the past three
years. Now jumping
to lead — as she did
on The West Wing,
after which she kept
winning — she, like
Julia Louis-Dreyfus,
is poised to tie Cloris
Leachman’s record of
eight acting wins.
↓ Janney’s show,
unlike those of three
fellow nominees,
didn’t receive a series
nom and, unlike all but
one, is constricted by
broadcast regulations.
↑ For her work this
season, in which
Kimmy went off to college, she landed SAG
Award and Critics’
Choice noms ahead of
her second consecutive Emmy nom. She
also helped to propel
her Tina Fey/Robert
Carlock-produced
show to its third consecutive series nom.
↓ Some find Kimmy,
with her arrested
development, to be
lovable, but for others,
her chirpy tone is like
nails on a chalkboard.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
8
Julia
Louis-Dreyfus
Veep (HBO)
↑ Her record 18th
acting nom for a comedy turn — namely,
bumbling Selina Meyer
on HBO’s best series
three-peat hopeful
— could result in two
other record-extenders: a sixth straight
win and seventh in this
category. She already
won a SAG Award and
bagged Golden Globe
and Critics’ Choice
noms this season.
↓ Selina no longer
seems as crazy — or,
to some, as funny
— in the Trump era.
AUG U S T 2017 E M M Y 1
Tracee Ellis Ross
Lily Tomlin
Black-ish (ABC)
Grace and Frankie
(NETFLIX)
↑ This year’s surprise
Golden Globe winner
(also a Critics’ Choice
nominee), nominated
here for the second
year in a row (along
with her show), is one
of only two nominees
in this category who
hails from broadcast
(and accordingly
has a large audience).
She could become
only the second black
winner in this category
(after The Jeffersons’
Isabel Sanford).
↓ Louis-Dreyfus has
been unstoppable in
this category.
↑ Few stars are
better known or loved
by the TV Academy
than this 77-year-old
veteran, a SAG Award
nominee this year, who
has accrued 24 nominations dating to 1971.
↓ She has won six
Emmys, but none for
acting (five for writing, one for narration),
and in a year in which
her show doesn’t
have a series nom and
she’s competing for
the first time against
Fonda, the odds seem
against her.
MURDER: ABC/NICOLE WILDER. CROWN: COURTESY OF NETFLIX. HANDMAID'S: GEORGE KRAYCHYK/HULU. AMERICANS: PATRICK HARBRON/FX. WESTWORLD, VEEP: COURTESY OF HBO. CARDS: DAVID GIESBRECHT/
NETFLIX. BETTER: COLLEEN HAYES/FX. GRACE: MELISSA MOSELEY/NETFLIX (2). MOM: ROBERT VOETS/WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT. UNBREAKABLE: ERIC LIEBOWITZ/NETFLIX. BLACK-ISH: ABC/KELSEY MCNEAL.
13 Lucky Leading Ladies
INCLUDING OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES
ROBIN WRIGHT
“WRIGHT’S PERFORMANCE IS THRILLING,
POWERFUL,
AND JUST DAMN GOOD ACTING.”
EM M Y | ST Y L E
Jan. 8
Golden Globes
“[This is] one of my personal
favorites,” says Stewart
of the custom-made canary
yellow, paillette-embroidered
Michael Kors Collection gown,
which was paired with more
than 90 carats of Harry Winston
diamonds. “It symbolized strength
and happiness and was a great
start to a great awards season!”
Jan. 15
Jan. 29
BAFTA: A Life in Pictures
Davis donned a merino wool
dress, accented with red and black
snakeskin trim and black
patent heels, to a London event
honoring her work. “Mimi Plange
is a new, young, unknown
talent, and Viola loves to support
young talent,” Stewart says
of the designer who created the
dramatic, figure-hugging frock.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
SAG Awards
For her supporting actress win
for Fences, Davis wore a structured
column dress from the Vivienne
Westwood Couture Collection,
accented with a 32-carat Nirav
Modi grand celestial necklace
set in 18-karat white gold. Says
Stewart: “I always love Viola in
white. Vivienne Westwood made
this stunning dress just for her!”
10
AUG U S T 2017 E M M Y 1
Feb. 2
Watermark Conference
for Women
“Jumpsuits are always a
favorite,” says the Santa Monicabased Stewart, who also counts
Jessica Chastain and Julia Roberts
as clients. For this event, Davis
complemented her lace Max Mara
jumpsuit with a tailored silk black
jacket with strong, pointed lapels,
sandals and a bold red lip.
GLOBES: VENTURELLI/WIREIMAGE. BAFTA: DAVE J HOGAN/GETTY IMAGES. SAG: DAN MACMEDAN/WIREIMAGE. WATERMARK: MARLA AUFMUTH/GETTY IMAGES FOR WATERMARK CONFERENCE FOR
WOMEN. HOLLYWOOD: ALLEN BEREZOVSKY/WIREIMAGE. ESSENCE: AMANDA EDWARDS/GETTY IMAGES. ACADEMY: FRAZER HARRISON/GETTY IMAGES. TIME: GARY GERSHOFF/WIREIMAGE.
Viola Davis’ Fierce Carpet Fashion
The Oscar winner, who scored a third consecutive Emmy nomination for How to Get Away With Murder (she won in 2015),
is a study in how to make shape and color pop. Her stylist Elizabeth Stewart gives THR the sartorial scoop By Jane Carlson
Feb. 26
THR’s Nominees Night
The Fences Oscar nominee
went for minimal elegance
in a colorblock tapered-leg Max
Mara jumpsuit, accessorized with
simple black pointy-toe pumps,
for The Hollywood Reporter’s
annual event, held last season at
Spago in Beverly Hills. Stewart
calls the streamlined ensemble
“easy and chic.”
Feb. 23
Feb. 26
Essence Black Women
in Hollywood Awards
Davis stunned in a fuchsia
Christian Siriano gown with a
halter neckline. A deep
red pout and Effy Jewelry drop
earrings, featuring more than
eight carats of white diamonds,
added extra impact to the
vibrant look. “Hot pink is a go-to
color for us,” says Stewart.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
Academy Awards
“Viola felt so good in this dress,”
says Stewart, who paired the
custom Armani Prive gown with a
silver clutch and 18-karat yellow
gold and spessartite garnet
earrings, bracelet and ring — all by
Niwaka. It was a lucky ensemble:
Davis won the supporting actress
Oscar. Stewart describes the
vibe as “strong, bold and simple.”
11
AUG U S T 2017 E M M Y 1
March 25
Time 100 Gala
The honoree chose another
gown by Armani Prive — a
one-shoulder column — for the
New York City event. “This was
one of two dresses Armani made
for the Oscars,” says Stewart.
“We loved the deep violet shade.”
More than $120,000 worth of
jade and pink sapphire Buccellati
jewelry completed the look.
EM M Y | L EA D ACT R ESS
‘I’ve Had to Explore Parts of
Me That Are Really Interesting’
Across comedy, drama and limited series, these 17 lead actress nominees carried the weight of the laughs, gasps
and tears — some playing against type, some revealing small-screen alter-egos — in Emmy’s hottest races
● COMEDY ● DRAMA ● LIMITED
Carrie Coon
● FARGO ( F X )
WHAT’S THE BIGGEST MISPERCEPTION THAT PEOPLE
HAD ABOUT YOUR CHARACTER?
Pamela Adlon
● BETTER THINGS ( F X )
HAVE VIEWERS MADE ASSUMPTIONS
THAT YOU AND YOUR CHARACTER
ARE THE SAME PERSON?
Yeah, and rightfully so. [Better
Things] has all the bones of my
life. I’m able to live out situations — “I should have done that,”
“What if I said that?” — and do
this extension of reality and
infuse it into my show. It’s a very
satisfying creative release.
YOU ALSO WRITE, PRODUCE AND
DIRECT, REQUIRING YOU TO WATCH
YOURSELF ACT. WHAT’S THAT LIKE?
If I’m on the set and I’m watching playback, I’ve just got to
say, “Oh, God, my neck looks
100 years old, but this is the
best take.” I have to separate
myself from “me” and look at
my show as a whole.
WHAT DID YOU LEARN ABOUT YOUR
STRENGTHS AS AN ACTRESS?
I just like to keep things small
and subtle and authentic and
ground everything in reality. So
that is something that I feel is
my strength as a director, and I
try to achieve that as an actor.
AND HAS THAT COME NATURALLY,
SINCE THIS IS YOUR FIRST TIME
WEARING ALL THESE HATS?
Unbelievably enough, it feels
like a second skin. Being a
single mom and raising three
girls, it’s almost easier. My
daughters don’t listen to me,
but all these other people have
to. — DANIEL J. FIENBERG
Probably the biggest problem is that they
loved Shea Whigham too much, because
he’s so good at what he does. They found
themselves inadvertently rooting for [his
character] Sheriff Moe Dammick instead of
Gloria. Maybe they thought she was going
to die. I know the sheriff never dies in Fargo.
Maybe they were looking for it this time,
because they know that Noah [Hawley]
plays with the tropes of the Coen brothers
oeuvre, and maybe they thought that Gloria
was going to get killed. Maybe they thought
she was going to fall in love. That’s probably the biggest misperception, because
she didn’t. Unless you count Winnie [Lopez,
played by Olivia Sandoval], which is kind of a
special friendship.
“Carrie is so completely
unself-conscious and free
to try stuff. You don’t need
to direct her, but she loves
to be directed. She always
knows what her character
is, but she also is so open
to input and feedback and
just, ‘Let’s try this.’ ”
“Adlon deserves enormous praise for her own voice, her own
individuality, her hard-won truths that shine through on
Better Things. … Part of the allure of the show is that Adlon’s
not going for mother of the year — she’s going for some
kind of modern mom trying to comprehend the frightening
blitz of advancing maturity that each of her kids faces.”
Tim Goodman, THR review, SEPT. 18, 2016
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
12
AUG U S T 2017 E M M Y 1
Fargo director Keith Gordon, JUNE 14, 2017
HOW DO YOU THINK GLORIA RESONATES
WITH VIEWERS IN TODAY’S POLITICAL AND
SOCIAL CLIMATE?
I think she represents the truth — that there is
in fact objective truth, there is no such thing
as an alternative fact, which undermines
the definition of the word “fact” — and that,
without the truth, it’s impossible for us to have
rational discourse. It’s impossible for us to
create a society with rules in which everyone
can operate freely and thrive. We are in a
very dangerous time regarding the end of the
truth. — JOSH WIGLER
series. It is difficult when there are
two title characters and one gets
nominated and one doesn’t. I never
minded. Everyone was going, “Oh,
poor Jane,” but that is not how I
felt. It’s nice for everyone that we
had two nominations this year. We
could whoop it up and celebrate
and have champagne.
Jane Fonda
● GRACE AND FRANKIE
(N ETFLIX)
DID YOU HAVE A FAVORITE GRACE AND
FRANKIE MOMENT FROM SEASON THREE?
THERE OUGHT TO BE AN EMMY WIN FOR …
Director of photography — and
our D.P. should win. Lily and I have
talked about how we should put
up before-and-after images
of ourselves: before [D.P.] Gale
Tattersall and his lighting and after.
Believe me, he would win an Emmy.
— MIA GALUPPO
We just shot the next season, so it
feels like so long ago. All the scenes
with [Frankie, played by Lily Tomlin]
going to banks and start-ups and
trying to sell our [dildo] product and
the way people reacted to us — that
showed that no one wanted to loan
[money] to older women because
they thought we would be dead
before we paid back the loan. And
no one thought we knew anything
about sex toys. It was all so misogynistic and ageist, and it was great to
get that exposed.
HOW IS IT BEING NOMINATED IN THE SAME
CATEGORY AS TOMLIN FOR THE FIRST TIME
SINCE THE SERIES STARTED?
Lily has been nominated twice now
for Frankie, and it was a great thing
for us, because it was good for the
DID YOU HAVE ANY IDEA THE CROWN WOULD BE RECEIVED THE WAY IT HAS BEEN?
Claire Foy
● THE CROWN
(NETFLIX)
Not a clue. I knew it was very special. I knew that the people who were making it were people I looked up to and respected and admired. I knew that I
was very lucky to be doing it, but you never know the outcome of something.
It’s kind of a chemical reaction when you get all of those people together
and see what comes out of the other end.
NOW THAT YOU’VE COMPLETED THE TWO SEASONS YOU WERE CONTRACTED FOR,
WHAT WAS IT LIKE SAYING GOODBYE TO QUEEN ELIZABETH?
I don’t really feel like I have yet because there’s so much postproduction
to do and publicity. I think once the show is on and once I start [my next
project] First Man, I’ll really be like, “OK, it’s over.” The amazing thing about
the show is that it will go on and that it hasn’t ended badly. It’s not like we’ve
done two seasons and they said, “We’re pulling the plug.” It’s going to go on
and have another life. Someone else will take on this amazing role. I’m not
the first person to play the part. I have taken that role on from other people
who’ve played it before. So, it’s in the nature of the role that it will keep reincarnating and that the story will keep being told. I can’t wait to watch it.
WHAT’S THE BIGGEST MISCONCEPTION ABOUT YOUR CHARACTER?
That she doesn’t feel. That she’s a distant, unfeeling person. I think she feels
everything. She just doesn’t express it. That’s my idea. — BRYN ELISE SANDBERG
“When she becomes queen, Foy is able to
split into two Elizabeths, constantly in
conflict — the woman and the crown.
She’s simultaneously a deer-in-headlights,
educated mostly on the constitution and
horses and instinctual and ready to learn.
Foy punctuates moments of fierceness
with uncertainty and moments of doubt
with cleverness.” D.J.F., THR review, NOV. 11, 2016
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
13
AUG U S T 2017 E M M Y 1
WHAT SURPRISED YOU MOST ABOUT HOW
BONNIE HAS BEEN RECEIVED?
Felicity Huffman
● AMERICAN CRIME
(ABC)
YOUR CHARACTERS IN THE FIRST TWO SEASONS WEREN’T
THAT SYMPATHETIC. HOW DID YOU THINK CREATOR
JOHN RIDLEY WAS SEEING YOU AND YOUR STRENGTHS?
I get surprised every time I get a
script. I’m like, “Am I really allowed
to say this?” She’s nothing if she’s
not completely honest, and it’s
endearing how unapologetic she is
about what she wants and needs.
People like to laugh at her because
they know she has a big heart.
WHERE SHOULD BONNIE GO?
IN SEASON THREE, YOUR CHARACTER IS DECIDEDLY MORE
SYMPATHETIC. WHAT WAS YOUR REACTION WHEN FIRST
LEARNING ABOUT HER?
I love that Bill [William Fichtner]
is still on the show as Adam. I love
their relationship. I want to see it
develop more. I want to get Christy
[Anna Faris] married off. Christy
deserves some love, too. There are
some rules about television, though,
to never see the main characters
happy, because then why would
you tune in? (Laughs.) It’s more fun
to see them struggle, fail and keep
getting back up.
It’s a simple story, she’s a simple housewife, and
the camera isn’t usually focused on those people.
I was pleased to get to bring light to that.
DO YOU LIKE BEING KEPT IN THE DARK
ABOUT YOUR CHARACTER?
You mean, why did he cast me as the internally
parched bigot and the school principal with no
heart? John Ridley brings a 360-degree perspective to his characters. They're not good or bad. I
hope that’s what he wanted me to bring to those
difficult characters, that they were human.
WHAT MOST SURPRISED THE NEWER CASTMEMBERS
ABOUT THE SET?
They were, like, “Wow, this is a heavy set.” I kept
going, "It’s a quiet set. There’s some heavy lifting
to do, so we all have to concentrate.” — D.J.F.
Jessica Lange
● FEUD
(FX)
They show us the scripts and we
jump in. I don’t mind because I’m
not a very gifted writer. Sometimes
it’d be nice to know; I might have
some input that would be worthwhile. — BRIAN PORRECA
Julia
Louis-Dreyfus
● VEEP
WHAT SURPRISED YOU
MOST ABOUT YOUR
CHARACTER, JOAN
CRAWFORD?
How huge she was for
me, emotionally, to
play. Sometimes you
do a part and then it
feels dimensioned in
a way when you’re
done. That could just
be an actor’s delusion,
but you think you’re
doing more than you
are but somewhere
along the process
it isn’t what you had
(HBO)
hoped it would be
or anticipated, or it
wasn’t even what
you thought you had
done. But this was
everything and more.
YOU’RE BREAKING YOUR OWN EMMY RECORDS WITH
YOUR 23RD NOMINATION. DOES THAT PUT MORE OR LESS
PRESSURE ON YOU?
Honestly, the real pressure is keeping this thing
going, and by “this thing,” I mean the show and
trying to keep up this level of excellence. We’re
just now breaking stories for season seven, and
that’s the real pressure. Don’t misunderstand me:
Winning is awesome, I love it, it’s fantastic — but
the work itself is the pressure cooker.
WHAT EXCITES YOU MOST ABOUT SELINA RETURNING
TO THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL? ARE YOU HAPPY THE SHOW IS
KEEPING ITS DISTANCE FROM THE REAL WHITE HOUSE?
I’m delighted to be as far away from the White
House as possible, personally. I don’t think we
can compete with that shitshow. But as far as
our little shitshow goes (laughs), I’m thrilled to
be getting back out there on the campaign trail
with Selina because she’s a fighter. She is just
staggeringly competitive, and that’s fun to get
into. — JACKIE STRAUSE
WHAT’S THE BIGGEST
MISCONCEPTION
ABOUT HER?
She was an extremely
kind, considerate
friend, but people think
of Mommie Dearest.
There’s a whole
other side to her.
“Julia has this ability to play
so many emotions at one
time. She has this revelatory
moment where she talks
about having a crush on Tom
[Hugh Laurie] ... I get chills
every time I watch it.”
— KATE STANHOPE
Showrunner Dave Mandel, MAY 28, 2017
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
14
AU G U S T 2017 E M M Y 1
EM M Y | L EA D ACT R ESS
Nicole
Kidman
● BIG LITTLE LIES (HBO)
Ellie Kemper
WHAT SURPRISED YOU THE MOST ABOUT
HOW YOUR CHARACTER WAS RECEIVED?
● UNBREAKABLE KIMMY SCHMIDT
(NETFLIX)
Allison Janney
● MOM
(CBS)
Elisabeth Moss
● THE HANDMAID'S TALE
(HULU)
PREVIOUS SPREAD, ADLON: COLLEEN HAYES/FX. COON: CHRIS LARGE/FX. FONDA: MELISSA MOSELEY/NETFLIX. FOY: ALEX BAILEY/NETFLIX. THIS SPREAD,
HUFFMAN: ABC/ERIC MCCANDLESS. LANGE: SUZANNE TENNER/FX. JANNEY: ROBERT VOETS/WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT. LOUIS-DREYFUSS, KIDMAN:
COURTESY OF HBO. KEMPER: ERIC LIEBOWITZ/NETFLIX. MOSS: TAKE FIVE/HULU. DAVIS: ABC/NICOLE WILDER. WRIGHT: DAVID GIESBRECHT/NETFLIX.
WHAT SURPRISED YOU THE MOST ABOUT HOW YOUR CHARACTER
WAS RECEIVED?
How everyone was so inspired by her and the other
handmaids and their fight to survive and get their freedom
back. It’s the thing I most connected to, and it was incredibly gratifying that the audience felt the same way.
WHAT’S THE MOST SURPRISING FAN INTERACTION YOU’VE HAD?
Not so much strange, but awesome! A flight attendant on
a flight recently handed me something, leaned down and
whispered, “Under his eye” with a wink. I almost died laughing. I got such a kick out of it.
“Moss has built one of the great
résumés of the Peak TV era,
lacking only an Emmy for final
validation. That drought should
end here.” D.J.F., THR review, APRIL 13, 2017
WHAT’S BEEN THE BIGGEST MISCONCEPTION ABOUT
YOUR CHARACTER?
Sometimes I worry that people think Kimmy
is flaky. Maybe she’s not book smart, but she
has to have a certain level of emotional intelligence to get through this horrendous ordeal
in the bunker. There are different ways of
measuring intelligence, and I think she has a
social IQ that’s off that charts.
IF KIMMY WERE TO JOIN ANOTHER SHOW, WHICH
WOULD IT BE AND WHY?
Kimmy could go to work on Silicon Valley as
an intern. I think she might force everyone
to be a bit more straightforward and ethical.
Those guys need some light and balance.
And females.
IF YOU COULD SWITCH ROLES WITH ANY OTHER EMMY
NOMINEE, WHO WOULD IT BE?
I would love to do anything on Veep — lights or
something behind the scenes — just because
I want to see how it’s made. I’ll do [craft services]. I’ll make all of the cupcakes and little
hot dogs. — MICHAEL O'CONNELL
I was just amazed at how people
emotionally responded to her and
really felt protective and attached
to her. The thing with Celeste and
the way in which her story unfolds
— it takes time in a series, so initially I
think people were like, “Hmm, OK” —
it’s not until the end of episode two
where you start to delve and dig
deep into her psyche. A lot of it was
more just taking the time, waiting.
WHAT WAS THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE IN
HOW CELESTE CHANGED IN THE SERIES?
Probably the hardest part of doing
a limited series is shooting out of
sequence. You have to track the
emotional arc of the character over
seven hours, whereas in a film you
have a much shorter amount of
time to do that. That’s the most difficult thing, knowing where you’re
at for each scene so that you’re
really building — and particularly
with a character like Celeste,
where you’re only peeling back
layers at different times. That was a
high-wire act. — REBECCA FORD
Two Other Nominees Who Had an Impact
V IOL A DAV IS How to Get Away With
Murder (ABC) Davis nabbed her 2017
Emmy nom on the heels of winning a
supporting actress Oscar for Fences. She
received an Emmy for this role in 2015.
ROBIN W R IGHT House of Cards
(NETFLIX) It’s been a banner year for
Wright, with Claire Underwood becoming president on HoC and starring in three
tentpoles this year: Wonder Woman,
Blade Runner 2049 and Justice League.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
15
AU G U S T 2017 E M M Y 1
Tracee Ellis Ross
● BLACK-ISH
(ABC)
HOW MUCH DO YOU KNOW ABOUT YOUR CHARACTER BEFORE SHOOTING STARTS, AND
DO YOU LIKE BEING KEPT IN THE DARK BY THE WRITERS?
Sometimes I have input. We talk and interact a lot. For the “Being BowRacial” episode, there was one section of the story that they were really
getting friction on in the [writers] room. They couldn’t land on what they
wanted it to be, and they brought me in and we just talked about what my
experience was as a mixed woman growing up. They didn’t write my story,
but they incorporated pieces of it. But in terms of pitching stories, that’s
the brilliance of our writers. It’s different on every project. On Girlfriends, I
was much more aware of what was coming.
WHAT HAVE YOU LEARNED THE MOST FROM PLAYING RAINBOW “BOW” JOHNSON?
I’m not married in real life. I’m not the same woman as Bow, and so
I’ve had to explore areas and parts of myself that have been really interesting and have helped me feel even fuller as a person. I have not yet
been pregnant and had a child, and who knows if that experience will
come up for me, but I got to experience it on Black-ish. I got to give birth!
(Laughs.) — B.P.
Reese Witherspoon
● BIG LITTLE LIES (HBO)
WHAT EMMY QUESTION DO YOU WISH YOU GOT ASKED MORE?
People congratulate me on my acting nomination, but what I’m most
proud of is that the show got 16 noms and created four roles for women
that got nominated. It’s a watershed moment. I haven’t had that experience of working with this many actresses of this caliber on one piece of
material. I’m certainly proud of acting. It’s my first love, but my passion
and mission is to create incredible roles for women and enlighten the
consciousness of people that women are complex, even when they’re
over 40. I’m proud that [Nicole Kidman and I] created this together.
WHAT’S THE STRANGEST OR MOST SURPRISING FAN INTERACTION YOU’VE HAD?
People come up to me and tell me they’re a Renata or Madeline or a
Jane. It’s so funny that groups of friends have all decided which character they are. — B.E.S.
Lily Tomlin
● GRACE AND FRANKIE
(NETFLIX)
WHAT WERE YOU MOST LOOKING
FORWARD TO FOR FRANKIE IN SEASON
THREE?
Frankie is torn between her kids and
[love interest] Jacob and her relationship with Grace. I wondered how
they were going to finesse that. I
was also excited about [convincing]
middle-aged women to use a dildo.
DID YOU EXPECT THE REACTION THAT THE
DILDO STORYLINE RECEIVED?
We just liked the idea that we
were getting into business by creating a product for older women.
Other than that, we just thought it
was fun and audacious. But it’s a
useful product. I have cousins who
are my age from different states
who want to know where they can
get one.
YOU GALS SHOULD START
SELLING THEM.
This thing is operable. We should
go on Shark Tank.
WHAT’S IT LIKE BEING NOMINATED WITH
JANE FONDA?
We whoop-de-dooed. We’re
hoping that we skunk Julia [LouisDreyfus] and win by a tie. — M.G.
16
“Witherspoon started from a position
of viciousness and then gradually let us
understand Madeline’s insecurities
related to parenting and sex and control.”
D.J.F., THR review, APRIL 2, 2017
EM M Y | L EA D ACT R ESS
WHAT’S THE BIGGEST MISCONCEPTION ABOUT
YOUR CHARACTER?
Susan
Sarandon
I like the misconceptions. People think of Elizabeth
as cold. It doesn’t bother me, because that’s what is
complex about her. She’s a rich, complicated character — and on the surface, yes, cool and tough.
● FEUD
(FX)
WHAT’S BEEN YOUR MOST INTERESTING FAN INTERACTION?
My favorite still to this day is the New York City
construction worker who, during season one, yelled
across the street to me, “Yo, you really kicked that
lady’s ass.” I was like, “I feel so cool right now.”
WHAT WAS YOUR BIGGEST
MISCONCEPTION ABOUT BETTE DAVIS?
HOW DOES IT FEEL COMING TO THE END OF THE SERIES?
This will be the sixth year. It will be sad to see it
go, but it’s time. It’s nice to be able to be given the
option to go out on a high note. — B.E.S.
“The Americans in season
five continues along the same
ground it always has: It’s
extremely well-constructed
and boasts consistently
top-tier acting from its stars.”
Keri Russell
● THE AMERICANS
(FX)
TOMLIN: MELISSA MOSELEY/NETFLIX. ROSS: ABC/KELSEY MCNEAL. RUSSELL: PATRICK
HARBRON/FX. WOOD, WITHERSPOON: COURTESY OF HBO. SARANDON: SUZANNE TENNER/FX.
T.G., THR review, MARCH 6, 2017
I didn’t know anything about her
except for her work and this exaggerated version of her. She seemed
like a no-bullshit kind of gal and a
workhorse. We don’t see too much
of her vulnerability in the series,
but I was shocked to learn of how
many ups and downs and heartbreaks she had. She really was a
romantic. The biggest blow was
the antagonism of her daughter.
Her daughter had been everything,
was really her companion in so
many ways, and suddenly, at 16,
she just disappeared.
“The first episode
seems balanced
toward Jessica Lange,
but just as I’d etched
her name on a
hypothetical Emmy,
Sarandon slipped
in and, with the quiet
yearning of those
well-cast Bette Davis
eyes, dominated
the second episode.”
D.J.F., THR review, FEB. 14, 2017
Evan Rachel Wood ● WESTWORLD (HBO)
WHAT WAS YOUR PROCESS FOR KEEPING THE MULTIPLE
VERSIONS OF DOLORES STRAIGHT?
I worked together so closely with [showrunners]
Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy and the writers and
directors. We all took the time to go over every
moment, every shift, to really map out what we
were going to do and when we were going to slip
in and out of different modes. In the span of 60
seconds, I could be four different people.
WHAT’S THE DRIVE BEHIND YOUR THEORIZING ON SET?
I love this kind of television. Maybe it’s because I
have a really overactive imagination and brain. This
show was kind of all of my favorite nerd things put
together. It was Western sci-fi and psychology and
spirituality and mythology. I was trying to figure it
out. You can’t help it. You get sucked in. — J.W.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
17
“The series benefits
from a number of
standout performances,
including from
Evan Rachel Wood as
Dolores, a Western host
at the futuristic theme
park whose life seems
to be endless torment.”
T.G., THR review, SEPT. 28, 2016
AUG U S T 2017 E M M Y 1
WHAT REACTIONS TO FEUD HAVE BEEN
THE MOST SURPRISING?
Someone told me that there were
viewing parties where people were
acting out scenes while we were
acting out scenes — which is kind
of like The Rocky Horror Picture
Show. That was pretty unusual. I’m
just really happy that people have
received it so well. — K.S.
EM M Y | L I M I T ED SER I ES
‘The
Writing
Was Right
for Them’
The best script in the world
means nothing if you don’t have
the right actors bringing it to life,
as evidenced by these five standout
series that also grabbed 20 of 24
acting nominations for the format
By Craig Tomashoff
I do know that if you took one of them out, it
wouldn’t be what it was.”
Murphy had recruited his central stars even
before he had a script to show them. In fact,
the other nominated actors in the series also
signed on even as Murphy, Minear and the
writing staff were piecing the story together.
A useful side effect was that Sarandon and
Lange had a lot of time to immerse themselves
in Davis and Crawford. “They 100 percent took
these parts very personally,” says Minear.
The result? During a particularly long,
talky scene in the third episode, in which Davis
and Crawford are having a drink together
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
18
and Crawford casually talks about losing her
virginity to her stepfather at age 12, the producer stopped seeing the actresses. “It really
was Bette and Joan; it felt like an intimate
moment that was happening in front of us. It
was one of a million moments where they could
both say something just with their eyes.”
Genius executive producer Ken Biller had
a much different experience on National
Geographic’s Albert Einstein biographical
series, in that he had to start the project picturing anyone but his Emmy-nominated
star, Geoffrey Rush, in the lead role. Along with
fellow EPs Ron Howard and Brian Grazer, Biller
AUG U S T 2017 E M M Y 1
BIG: HILARY BRONWYN GAYLE/HBO (2). FARGO: CHRIS LARGE/FX (2). NIGHT: CRAIG BLANKENHORN/HBO (3).
GENIUS: DUSAN MARTINCEK/NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC. FEUD: COURTESY OF FX (2). MINEAR: JAMIE
MCCARTHY/GETTY IMAGES. BILLER: TOMMASO BODDI/GETTY IMAGES FOR NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC. HAWLEY:
JIM SPELLMAN/WIREIMAGE. KELLEY: C FLANIGAN/GETTY IMAGES. ZAILLIAN: JASON LAVERIS/FILMMAGIC.
E
arning a limited series Emmy nomination this past season was no easy
feat. It helped to have a pair of battling
brothers who make Cain and Abel seem like
the Hemsworth boys. Two doyennes of the silver screen also came in handy, as did a bunch
of well-to-do liars, some theoretical physicists
and a group of complex convicts.
But to make those characters leap off the
screen, it took a boatload of exceptional acting
performances, the kind that garnered Emmy
nominations of their own. The five limited
series nominees — Fargo, Feud, Big Little Lies,
Genius and The Night Of — earned nearly all of
the limited series/TV movie acting noms this
year, including for all of their leads.
The showrunners certainly appreciate this
embarrassment of riches. Fargo’s Noah Hawley
jokes of his stellar cast this season, which
included nominees Ewan McGregor (a BAFTA
winner and Golden Globe nominee) and
acclaimed breakout Carrie Coon, “We’re really
scraping the bottom of the barrel, aren’t we?”
Adds Feud executive producer Tim Minear:
“Our cast was the gift that kept on giving.
We all had to realize what a rare opportunity
we were getting.” The FX drama, starring
Susan Sarandon as Bette Davis and
Jessica Lange as Joan Crawford,
clinched six acting noms alone
— two for the leads and four for
supporting players Stanley Tucci,
Minear
Judy Davis, Alfred Molina and
Jackie Hoffman.
“We knew we wanted Jessica
because we have many years of
experience with her, courtesy of
Biller
American Horror Story, but if [creator] Ryan Murphy couldn’t get Susan, we may
not ever have done Feud,” says Minear. “There
were never any other names we considered.
Was it fate that brought them to us for this?
← Clockwise from top left: Big Little Lies’ Kidman, Fargo’s
Coon, Feud’s Sarandon, Genius’ Rush, The Night Of’s Turturro,
Lies’ Witherspoon, The Night Of’s Williams, Feud’s Lange,
Fargo’s McGregor and The Night Of’s Ahmed.
wanted Rush to star as the older version of
Einstein, but the actor turned the part down.
“He’d seemed so interested at first,” says
Biller. “We looked into it and discovered
Geoffrey was technically available, but being
such a perfectionist and taking on an iconic
personality like this, he felt he wouldn’t have
enough time to prepare in the way he wanted.
Ron was going to direct that first episode, and
he was also on a tight schedule, but then we
thought, if we could rearrange the schedule and
shoot the younger Einstein scenes with actor
Johnny Flynn first, that would give Geoffrey a
month or so to get ready to go.”
The rejiggered schedule didn’t leave much
time to shoot the limited series, but it did
afford Rush the chance to meticulously work
through his personal process for becoming,
rather than just impersonating, the physicist.
Biller is still in awe of how his star would
present him with all kinds of suggestions,
right down to the type of pipe Einstein would
smoke or what watch he would wear. Every
step of the way, he says, “it was impressive
how genuinely collaborative Geoffrey was. He
wanted us to discover together what the best
choices for the character were.”
McGregor pulled off a slightly different
disappearing act, becoming not one but two
characters — brothers Emmit and Ray Stussy
— in FX’s Fargo. Hawley hadn’t written his
first script with McGregor in mind, but after
an initial phone call to suss out the actor’s
interest, he became the only person Hawley
went after, especially because of one particularly hairy situation he was grappling with
early on.
“When I heard Ewan was willing to shave
his head, it made all the difference,” says
Hawley. “He was going to have to
make a physical transformation
to play two different people, so
that gave us leeway for the look of
both. Ray would be balding, and
Hawley
we could create a wig for Emmit.
That suggested neither brother
looked like the other, and he
liked that.”
Fargo’s other Emmy-nominated
Kelley
actors — Coon and David Thewlis
— may not have undergone drastic physical
transformations, but their characters did
experience unique and challenging developments. Coon’s Minnesotan police chief, Gloria
Burgle, took what Hawley says was “a weird,
existential romp” in Los Angeles in the third
episode. Meanwhile, Thewlis was a villain
who suffered from bulimia, among other idiosyncratic characteristics.
“It’s rare for any movie to offer that much of
a range for any actor to play,” explains Hawley.
“Actors often call me six months or a year
after being on the show to say they felt spoiled
on Fargo. It’s hard to go back to just being the
usual hero or villain.”
HBO’s Big Little Lies was a bit reverse-engineered, in the sense that its Emmy-nominated
stars, Reese Witherspoon and Nicole Kidman,
first acquired the rights to Liane Moriarty’s
best-selling novel and boarded as producers.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
19
They then engaged David E. Kelley to come
on as writer-showrunner and Jean-Marc
Vallee as director.
Once Kelley started, he was immediately
struck by the “honesty and intelligence”
his leads were bringing to their roles as
seemingly happy housewives who harbor some dark secrets. Along with fellow
nominees Laura Dern, Shailene Woodley
and Alexander Skarsgard, Kidman and
Witherspoon “did their own research … this
was a very professional and committed
ensemble, which set a high bar for everyone.”
The end result, according to Kelley, was a
display of “utter humanity” that each character projected, including Skarsgard’s abusive
husband, Perry. “The monster that Perry was,
Alex still made him human and vulnerable.
He managed to evoke sympathy,” says Kelley.
“I even felt a little bad for him when Celeste
[Kidman] smashed his urethra. I got over it.”
HBO’s other Emmy-nominated limited
series, The Night Of, didn’t have as assured a
start as Lies. A pilot actually had been shot in
2012 featuring the late James Gandolfini in a
lead role. After the actor’s death from a sudden
heart attack in 2013, it took several years for
co-showrunner Steven Zaillian to revive and
recast the eight-episode series.
After seeing the original pilot,
Emmy nominee John Turturro
signed on to play Gandolfini’s role
of John Stone, an attorney working with a young Muslim man,
Zaillian
Naz (Riz Ahmed, also nominated),
sent to prison on Rikers Island in New York.
Ahmed didn’t come on board until very late in
preproduction and had only read the first script
when shooting started. All of this uncertainty
might explain why Zaillian was a bit nervous
about how The Night Of was going to play out,
until he saw Turturro, Ahmed and the series’
two other nominees, Bill Camp and Michael
Kenneth Williams, working together.
“It isn’t until you see the characters with each
other that you know if the choices in casting, in
terms of chemistry, were right,” says Zaillian.
“Since we shot in sequence, those scenes when
Detective Box [Camp] first questions Naz in the
interview room, when Stone first talks to Naz
in the precinct holding cell, and when Freddy
[Williams], in his Rikers cell, compares Naz to a
baby lamb in a dark crate — I was very pleased
as we were shooting those scenes to see who
Naz was to each of them and who they were to
him. All of the cast brought the things to their
parts that all great actors do — skill, dedication, themselves, who they are as people and
their life experiences. The writing was right for
them, and they were right for the writing.”
AUG U S T 2017 E M M Y 1
EM M Y | L I M I T ED SER I ES
What THR Critics Saw in 5 Standout Series
FARGO
GENIUS
“There’s something
about this show that
continually finds
its way to greatness.
Granted, Fargo’s not
for everybody. … What
remains interesting
about the series is
the unparalleled zeal
Hawley has for
telling a story that
allows for outrageous
serendipity, humorous
misfortune, pathos,
violence, both broad
and nuanced comedy,
a deep exploration of
familial bonds, a love
of language and its
confusions, an interest
in local traditions, a
study of the fear of
change and, of course,
that obsession with
what happens when
evil passes through
(or bubbles up from
within) smaller
American towns with
a tight-knit social
fabric and certain
niceties that locals
cling to almost against
their better judgment
when facing it.”
— TIM GOODMAN, APRIL 11
“Genius is an above-average event series about an
extraordinary man. In form and execution, it may
be an unremarkable depiction of being remarkable,
but it’s also handsomely produced, reasonably
intelligent and well served by paired leading men
Geoffrey Rush and Johnny Flynn. … It’s smart casting
and good acting alike.” — DANIEL J. FEINBERG, APRIL 20
BIG LITTLE LIES
THE NIGHT OF
“ It takes some moxie to
tackle an entire institutional
infrastructure and make
gripping television, especially
on a network where David
Simon has made a cottage
industry of such storytelling,
but Richard Price and Steven
Zaillian don’t lack for ambition,
mostly realized. … Perhaps
learning from the top-heavy
True Detective casting
strategy, the ensemble of The
Night Of more than makes
up for in depth what it lacks in
A-list glitz, filling even the
smallest parts with intriguing
performers. Such is the nature
of this cast that Peyman
Moaadi, internationally
celebrated lead in Asghar
Farhadi’s A Separation, slots
into a supporting role and feels
neither wasted nor woefully
overqualified. — D.J.F., JULY 6, 2016
“I couldn’t relate directly to
much in Big Little Lies, but I
could relate conceptually to all
of it, and every performance
reinforced sympathy, if not
always empathy. … The show
was never subtle, but I don’t
expect subtle from Vallee.
I expect camerawork of
uncomfortable urgency, slightlyon-the-nose editing and
performances of intimacy to
compensate for whatever
emotions were muted.” — D.J.F., APRIL 2
FEUD: BETTE AND JOAN
“This is Hollywood on the edge of a cliff, an industry desperately
trying to hold onto its faded Golden Age glamour — and in
Davis and Crawford, Murphy has the perfect ambassadors: former
matinee idols scraping and clawing to remain desirable in a
business that would prefer they be maternal or entirely invisible.
… Murphy and his leads have too much respect for these legends
to let their conflicts become Dynasty-style catfights, balancing the
fun of behind-the-scenes shenanigans with the desperation the
women were feeling. — D.J.F., FEB. 14
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
20
AUG U S T 2017 E M M Y 1
EM M Y | T V MOV I E
‘I Had to Create
a Balance
Between Epic
and Intimate’
Veteran theater director George C. Wolfe divulges the joys
and challenges of directing Oprah Winfrey (in 95-degree
Atlanta heat) in HBO’s The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
By Ashley Lee
T
↓ Winfrey as Deborah, a daughter searching for answers.
What first drew you to helm the adaptation of
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks?
Were you familiar with the book before being
approached about the project?
There are stories that have great characters,
there are stories that are about the world that
you live in, and then there are stories that are
intimate and compelling — they touch you.
Henrietta Lacks had all of that. It is rare, but
so wonderful when it happens. The characters are amazing, there’s an intimacy to the
story, and the scale of what it’s about and how
it affects the world that we’re living in right
now were all in one room. So I was excited
and honored that I got the opportunity to live
inside of that room and work on material
like that.
This story [captured] this incredibly odd
phenomenon of these people who knew nothing about what happened to their mother's
and their cells, and they incorporated — well,
they had to for their own sanity — that craziness into their normal existence. Deborah
doesn’t know the truth, but she knows
something happened, and she’s perpetually
looking for the truth everywhere. She’s really
fascinating once you realize how smart she is,
how imaginative she is, and how ferociously
determined she is to find out.
When the book first came out, I read it and
found it so thrilling. It’s an ambitious book
with a complicated, intimate story. One of the
things a good writer does is put the drama in
the details. I found the epic nature of it really
wonderful. When working on the film, I knew
I had to create a balance between epic and intimate, and that became the fun challenge.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
22
What was the toughest part about executing
that vision?
It was a fascinating challenge to figure out a
way to keep the story intimate. To me, that was
focusing on Deborah, Henrietta’s daughter,
who has a deeply primal desire — like most
of us — to know who made us. That was very
important. Then it was really understanding
that every single thing that happened — from
Henrietta’s story to the science — was part of
her journey.
Also, it was very interesting to read the book
and have that be a source of truth, and then
have the writer, Rebecca, share the original
tapes she had [recorded] when conducting
the interviews, to hear the actual family of
AUG U S T 2017 E M M Y 1
WOLFE: NICHOLAS HUNT/GETTY IMAGES FOR HBO. LACKS: QUANTRELL COLBERT/HBO.
he Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks has
at its origin a set of cells, taken from
an African-American tobacco farmer
in 1951 without her knowledge or consent, that
would go on to revolutionize medical research.
But while these “immortal” organisms helped
give rise to pharmaceuticals that could combat diseases like cancer and AIDS, the woman
from whom they came was never given her
due. Based on the true story, the plot unfolds
through the eyes of Lacks’ daughter Deborah
(played by Oprah Winfrey) and Rebecca Skloot,
the journalist (played by Rose Byrne) who
authored the 2010 best-selling source book, as
the two team up to search for the truth.
Also starring Renee Elise Goldsberry,
Courtney B. Vance and Ruben SantiagoHudson, it nabbed an Emmy nomination for
best television movie. Director George C.
Wolfe, who also has helmed the feature Nights
in Rodanthe and won two Tonys, tells THR about
leaning on his prolific theater career for this
project, working with Winfrey and managing
to capture such a complicated, charged story
within a 90-minute movie.
“LANGE’S PERFORMANCE IN FEUD IS THE
BEST OF HER CAREER”
– DARYL DEINO, OBSERVER
F O R
Y O U R
E M M Y®
C O N S I D E R A T I O N
JESSICA LANGE
OU T STAND ING LE AD ACTR ESS IN A LIMIT ED SERIES
4 Other
Small-Screen
Film Contenders
From De Niro’s gripping
turn as Bernie Madoff to a
‘love story’ episode of the
dystopian Black Mirror, the
movie race is a tight one
Above: Winfrey and Byrne with Wolfe on set. Left: Patrick R.
Walker (as Cousin Fred) and Goldsberry in a scene from the film.
a street where all the buildings were boarded
up and there would just be one family living there, and then you’d go downtown and
you’d be in an incredible, sophisticated, upand-coming neighborhood. That was really
culturally and politically fascinating.
BLACK M I RROR: “SAN JUNIPERO”
(Netflix)
This neon-tinged love story set in
’80s California is both an outlier and
fan favorite of the anthology.
Henrietta Lacks, to hear their tone and rhythm
in how they spoke. The word and the voice are
just so violently different. It’s one of the dangers of email. That difference altered the truth
in some respect, and things became more and
more layered.
What were some of the big challenges on set?
Every day in Atlanta was 95 degrees — your
skull becomes a microwave and your head
gets cooked, literally. I’ve never experienced
anything like that. We’d have a scene at a gas
station, which would be the simplest thing,
but because of the heat, it’d feel monumental.
Weird little moments would become overwhelming. Then, incredibly intense emotional
days when Deborah and Rebecca — Oprah
and Rose — were having some of their rawest
moments were long and draining days, but
somehow everybody was up for the occasion,
and it happened effortlessly.
Filming in Baltimore was really interesting
because it’s neither the North nor South, but
both. It’s very urban and has a lot of money,
but at the same time it has many areas that
are desolate. I felt like I was in three or four
different Americas at the same time. You felt
this incredible sense of Southern warmth,
and you’d drive a little bit and then there’d be
There was a fearlessness about the work.
Wherever the scene required her to go, she
would go seemingly without caution. I think
she felt such an incredible responsibility to
Deborah and her truth that she didn’t allow
anything internal to stop her from going
there. And she just had an incredible sense of
adventure and fun. Even when it was hard, it
always felt fun. Even when she was like, “They
ripped my guts out, they stole my mother’s
cells, and everybody in the family was violated
and abused,” she’d have a sense of excitement
and adventure about the work.
DOLLY PARTON ’S CH RISTMAS OF
MANY COLORS: CI RCLE OF LOVE
(NBC)
A true story of sacrifice based on
the legendary singer’s hardscrabble
upbringing.
What from your theater background helped you?
I love working with actors and creating a work
environment where they feel empowered and
safe to go to as many dark corners as they
need to be able to do the work. Throughout the
time I’ve spent working in theater, I’ve worked
with astonishing actors — some at the very
beginnings of their careers, some very accomplished. And as a result, I’ve learned how to
create an environment of safety and trust that
allows them to play in dangerous, thrilling
places. I take great pride in that.
TH E WIZARD OF LI ES (HBO)
Robert De Niro and Michelle Pfeiffer
elevate this biopic about the world’s
most notorious Ponzi schemer.
What are you working on next?
I’m doing some writing — a screenplay and
a play. I immediately started scouting locations [for Henrietta Lacks] a week after my
musical Shuffle Along opened on Broadway,
so I’ve been missing my writer self after all
that directing.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
24
AUG U S T 2017 E M M Y 1
SH E RLOCK: TH E LYI NG DETECTIVE
(PBS)
Benedict Cumberbatch’s Holmes
faces a powerful adversary in this
standout installment.
BTS: COURTESY OF HBO. LACKS: QUANTRELL COLBERT/HBO. BLACK: DAVID DETTMANN/NETFLIX. DOLLY: QUANTRELL COLBERT/NBC. WIZARD: CRAIG BLANKENHORN/HBO. SHERLOCK: COLIN HUTTON/HARTSWOOD FILMS & MASTERPIECE.
What struck you about working with Oprah?
"SARANDON NAILS THE STARE,
THE STIFFNESS, AND THE BLAZING, SEXY INTELLIGENCE
OF BETTE DAVIS”
– JEFF JENSEN, ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY
F O R
Y O U R
E M M Y®
C O N S I D E R A T I O N
SUSAN SARANDON
OU T STAND ING LE AD ACTR ESS IN A LIMIT ED SERIES
EM M Y | Q&A
think it’s really moving to consider how powerful women,
certainly in America, are placed.
I think we’ve seen a lot of that
in the past year — politically,
emotionally — the labels that are
put on women in places of power.
Who is she really and what has
she had to survive to get where
she is, I think, could be a really
beautiful ride.
You knew Witherspoon and Woodley
from other projects. What did
you learn from them while filming
Big Little Lies?
‘A Delicious Ride’
on Big Little Lies
Laura Dern capped a busy year, which featured work on
Twin Peaks and the next Star Wars installment, by nabbing
a supporting actress in a limited series nom By Rebecca Ford
L
aura Dern has played mom
to Reese Witherspoon (in
Wild) and Shailene Woodley
(The Fault in Our Stars), two
of her fellow Emmy-nominated
actresses from HBO’s limited
series Big Little Lies. However, on
the show, her character, Renata
Klein, a working mother determined to find out who is bullying
her child, is a threatening adversary to both. Dern spoke to
THR about why she relished playing a character viewers loved to
hate (and then eventually love)
and how she has been juggling her
busy schedule, one that includes
reuniting with David Lynch for
Showtime’s Twin Peaks and with
Alexander Payne for his upcoming film, Downsizing, as well as
a trip to a galaxy far, far away in
Disney’s Star Wars: The Last Jedi
(both films are out in December).
What’s the most surprising reaction
you’ve gotten to your character?
What’s awesome about this limited series format — especially in
terms of HBO because you’re not
having everything downloaded
instantly — is that you’re still in
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
that experience of people waiting
week by week to watch the characters unfold. The most fun was the
judgment ride people got on about
other people’s lives. Like, “Oh, my
God, you’re so evil,” “You’re the
worst,” “They have the best marriage,” “They’re so sexy together,”
and three weeks later everything
has shifted. I loved how Jean-Marc
[Vallee’s] direction and the writing — by Liane Moriarty, the
novelist [of the book on which the
series is based], and showrunner
David Kelley — allows perception
and projection to unfold. For my
character, there was a lot of hate
— and fun with the hating — but
what creeped up on people was
an empathy for the fear and the
powerlessness of protecting one’s
child. All of that was a really delicious ride.
You have so much going on with
all your projects. Were you just
shooting things back-to-back?
Season two hasn’t been announced,
but if it does happen, what would
you want to see for Renata?
Once in a lifetime. You’re dressed
in this amazing creation that
everyone put a lot of effort into,
you walk on set and the camera
starts to roll. You feel like an actor
on a movie until you see R2-D2,
and you’re like, “Wait a minute,
I’m 8 years old, what’s happening?
I’m pretending to be in Star Wars,
but it’s real.” That’s what sets
it apart from any experience I’ve
ever had. I’ll never forget it.
You’ve taken all those dynamics
of this tribe of women who have
a lot of resentment and a lot of
opinions and different camps
they’re members of. And now it’s
ended and they’re on the same
team and they have the same
secret. I find that fascinating. In
terms of Renata as a character, I
26
AUG U S T 2017 E M M Y 1
I was. And thanks to both
Jean-Marc and HBO, as well as the
producers and director of Star
Wars, I was juggling those things.
They were amazing and really
made it possible for me. I also
was finishing some of Twin Peaks
at the time, so it was a bit crazy.
Was it challenging jumping into
such different worlds?
Actors thrive on work and love the
art. When you’re on the train, it’s
an exciting energy to be part of.
It was incredible. It was only my
kids that had to be patient.
Fans have had a first look at your
character in Star Wars: The Last
Jedi. What did it feel like to put that
costume on for the first time?
DERN: AUSTIN HARGRAVE. BIG: HILARY BRONWYN GAYLE/HBO.
Dern’s fierce, career-oriented mom,
Renata, locks horns with Witherspoon’s
Madeline and Woodley’s Jane in Lies.
Nothing new, frankly. Just a
deepness. With Reese, the favorite thing I learned — after doing
what we considered was one of
the great love stories together [in
Wild] — was how much fun it was
to hate on each other.
“TV’S CURRENT MVP
CARRIE COON”
– ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY
F O R
Y O U R
E M M Y®
C O N S I D E R A T I O N
CARRIE COON
OU T STAND ING LE AD ACTR ESS IN A LIMIT ED SERIES
TCA WINNER
INDIVIDUAL ACHIEVEMENT IN DRAMA
EM M Y | Q&A
Saying Goodbye to
Saturday Night Live
Vanessa Bayer knows how to leave on a high note:
She received an Emmy nomination for the show’s most
watched and most nominated season By Brian Porreca
F
ans of Vanessa Bayer’s most memorable SNL characters — Jacob
the Bar Mitzvah Boy, a naughty Christmas elf, an uncanny
early-Friends Rachel Green, and chirpy, confusing weather lady
Dawn Lazarus — bid farewell to all of them when Bayer retired from
the sketch show in May. Ending her run after seven seasons wasn’t the
easiest decision — she was seen crying during her last curtain call.
But the heartache came with a silver lining in the form of her first-ever
Emmy nomination, in the supporting actress in a comedy category
(she’s up against castmates Kate McKinnon and Leslie Jones). “It meant
so much to be nominated for my last year,” she says. Bayer recently
spoke with THR about life in and outside Studio 8H.
It felt like it was time for me. I had
seven seasons and just felt like it
was time for someone else to do
that job.
What were the most memorable
reactions from the cast when they
heard you were leaving?
Colin [Jost] wrote this goodbye
sketch for the people who were
leaving. He wrote this song, and
all the details he put in it were
about me talking about my sketch
group from college and how I
bring my brother and best friend
to every show. I didn’t realize he
knew me so well. You make such
close friends there.
What did your wrap party look like?
We have this writers’ party at
the end of the season that’s just
for people who work at the show. I
usually don’t stay that late, but
I stayed until 4 a.m. and was one
of the last people there. I was
dancing a lot. I discovered a new
way I like to dance that is like
marching. I was like, “I’m going to
keep this party going as long as I
can.” (Laughs.)
Did you steal any memorabilia from
the SNL set?
It’s funny that you ask because
I just picked up the Super Bowl
woman’s activity pack. We did
these Super Bowl commercials
[for a sketch], and every year
there was a different twist on it.
The first year it was this woman’s activity pack for women to
have something to do during the
Super Bowl. Bobby [Moynihan]
found it and saved it for me. I
just got it framed. I also have the
Nuva Bling; a few years ago
we did this commercial for Nuva
Bling, which is a blinged-out
Nuva Ring. One time I did a Miley
Cyrus sketch, and I had this puppet named Smiley that looked like
Miley. I have that puppet.
Are there any secrets you want to
reveal about the show?
Something that never got on [the
show] was that I would try to
write these backstage sketches
where I would go into the host’s
dressing room and be really scary
and aggressive to them because
that’s not my personality. I’d say,
“Hey, don’t step on my lines.” I
thought it would be funny that
onscreen I’m really smiley, but
behind the scenes everyone is
really scared of me. It never got on
because I think even me pretending to be scary is sweet and silly.
Which of your characters is your
favorite?
The bar mitzvah boy Jacob. He
feels the closest to my personality. The shyness and awkwardness
is at the core of me. I went to bar
and bat mitzvahs every weekend
when I was in seventh grade, so
I was basing this off of all these
boys who were way too young to
be doing something so formal and
were acting so weird. A lot of my
friends who have seen it and know
my brother are like, “Oh, you’re
doing an impression of him.”
Is there a character that viewers
almost didn’t get to see?
We tried [a] meteorologist in a
couple of other sketches, like as
a game show host earlier in
the season, and it got cut twice.
And then we wrote it as the
weather lady, and it still didn’t
get on. Colin said, “You should try
it as a Weekend Update feature.”
Literally, I had three shows left,
↑ Bayer will next appear in the Netflix film
Ibiza with Gillian Jacobs and Phoebe Robinson.
It starts production in August.
and I was like, “OK, we’ll try it,”
and we did. I started it in January;
we thought that was one that was
never going to get on.
Is there a castmember you look
up to?
When I got to the show, Kristen
Wiig was there. Just getting to
watch her work was always so
cool. It was so educational and
inspiring. I was there with her for
two seasons and felt so lucky that
I got that much time with her.
Did she give you any advice about
life post-SNL?
I’m friends with her and [former
castmember] Fred Armisen.
The thing that’s really nice about
the show from the very first day
is that everyone is so open with
their advice. When you start
there, a lot of people haven’t been
in this industry before. From
day one, everyone gets advice.
People will tell you, “Don’t Google
yourself. Get rest.” That definitely
continues once you leave.
← Bayer and Fred Armisen play Vladimir Putin’s childhood friends in a recurring Weekend Update sketch.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
28
AUG U S T 2017 E M M Y 1
BAYER: JAMIE MCCARTHY/GETTY IMAGES. SNL: WILL HEATH/NBC.
Why did you decide to leave SNL?
“KERI RUSSELL BETTER
WIN A DAMN EMMY
BEFORE THIS SHOW IS OVER“
– TODD VANDERWERFF, VOX
F O R
Y O U R
E M M Y®
C O N S I D E R A T I O N
KERI RUSSELL
OU T STAND ING LE AD ACTRESS IN A DR AMA SERIES
EM M Y | I N M EMOR I A M
A Sweet Adieu to
37 Transcendent
Television Talents
Icons (Mary Tyler Moore, Don Rickles) and those who played heroes (Adam West),
villains (Powers Boothe), moms (Florence Henderson) and dads (Alan Thicke) are
among the industry luminaries lost since the 2016 Emmys By Mike Barnes
Adam West, 88
Batman
Raised on a ranch outside Walla
Walla, Washington, West caught
the attention of a Batman producer
when he played a James Bond-type
character on Nestle’s Quik commercials. He then kept his tongue
firmly in cheek while wearing the
iconic mask on the 1966-68 series. He
played Batman “for laughs,” he said,
“but in order to do [that], one had to
never think it was funny. You just had
to pull on that cowl and believe that
no one would recognize you.”
Patricia Barry,
93
Days of Our Lives
The actress also was a
standout on two other
soaps, All My Children
and Guiding Light.
West met his future wife while in costume
during a publicity event in Santa Monica.
The Mary Tyler Moore Show
William
Christopher, 84
M*A*S*H
He was seen as Father
Mulcahy on the legendary
sitcom, and a sequel,
for 13 straight seasons.
Martin Landau, 89
Mission: Impossible
Revered for his skills by actors everywhere, the former
New York newspaper cartoonist starred on the CBS show
with his wife (and future Space: 1999 co-star) Barbara
Bain after turning down the role of Mr. Spock on Star
Trek. Not once did he regret it. The part “was the antithesis of why I became an actor,” he said. “I mean, to play
a character that Lenny [Nimoy] was better suited for,
frankly, a guy who speaks in a monotone who never gets
excited, never has any guilt, never has any fear or was
affected on a visceral level, who wants to do that?”
Landau
(right)
showcased
his versatility
as a master
of disguise
on CBS’
Mission:
Impossible in
the 1960s.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
Mary Tyler Moore, 80
Mike Connors, 91
Mannix
By one count, his privateeye character was shot
17 times and knocked out
another 55 times.
Bill Dana, 92
The Steve Allen Show
He did his classic
“My Name … Jose
Jimenez” routine at JFK’s
inaugural gala in 1961.
30
Her first big break may have come when
she starred as a dancing kitchen appliance
— Happy Hotpoint, the Hotpoint Appliance
elf — in commercials, but Moore went on
to become America’s sweetheart by playing housewife Laura Petrie on The Dick Van
Dyke Show and then local TV news producer
Mary Richards on her eponymous sitcom.
The latter represented a bold move for a series’
main character to be an independent woman.
Said Lena Dunham, “Her humor, style and
vulnerability had a profound influence on me
and on every woman I know working in TV to
upend expectations of traditional femininity.”
Don Rickles, 90
The Dean Martin Celebrity Roasts
“Mr. Warmth” was brilliant on the Martin specials and as Johnny Carson’s guest, but as the
star of his own TV show, success eluded him. He
played a Navy officer on CPO Sharkey (axed
after two seasons in the ’70s) and Richard
Lewis’ dad on 1993’s Daddy Dearest (done after
13 episodes), and two series titled The Don
Rickles Show lasted about as long as it took him
to fire off his next insult. His greatest performance was acting so mean. Said Bob and
Ginnie Newhart in a joint statement, “He was
one of the kindest, caring and most sensitive
human beings we have ever known.”
→ At the podium, Rickles cut celebrities like Bob Hope, Frank
Sinatra and Ronald Reagan down to size as Martin looked on.
AUG U S T 2017 E M M Y 1
Chuck Barris, 87
Roger
Ailes, 77
The Gong Show
His rationale for creating the classic game show?
“Everybody could relate to somebody wearing a
lampshade and dancing around,” he said. When
original host John Barbour wasn’t working out, NBC
execs insisted Barris come on as his replacement,
so the cuddly star donned a tuxedo and a floppy hat
to introduce the acts. “The Baron of Bad Taste” and
“Ayatollah of Trasherola” also was the manic mastermind behind The Dating Game and The Newlywed
Game. He often came off as a nut case, but he was
an astute businessman: When he sold his shares in
Chuck Barris Productions in 1968, the company was
valued at $195 million in today’s dollars.
As Laura,
Moore often
wore capri
pants
instead of a
dress, which
caused
quite a stir
at the time.
Fox News
Channel
June Foray, 99
Rocky and His Friends
She was the voice of
the flying squirrel, Tweety
Bird’s owner Granny and
so many others.
Barris’
original idea
for what
became The
Gong Show
had been to
feature only
excellent
performances.
But in his
search for
talent, he
frequently
encountered
awful acts.
Florence Henderson, 82
The Brady Bunch
No matter how
much mischief
those six darn
kids got into,
Henderson’s Carol
Brady was always
there to come to
the rescue, offering
sage wisdom and
loving parenting.
“There were certain
things I brought
to the role … my
experience as a
young parent, the
fact that I understood kids, that I felt
close to them,” she
once noted. “I was
really the only one
on the set who was
It was never explained just what had
married, who had
happened to Carol’s first husband. She then
children. In a way, I
married Mike (Robert Reed), a widow.
sort of became the
stability of the show.” And to think Brady Bunch creator
Sherwood Schwartz originally cast Joyce Bulifant to play
Carol. Before she became one of the most popular sitcom
moms of all time, Henderson, from a small town in Indiana,
was The Tonight Show’s first female guest host, a “Today
Girl” on the NBC morning program and an Oldsmobile
pitchwoman on TV commercials.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
A political consultant
who helped elect
presidents Richard Nixon,
Ronald Reagan and
George H.W. Bush, Ailes
Ailes was a young producer
was running CNBC when
on The Mike Douglas Show
Rupert Murdoch hired
when he first met Nixon.
him to launch Fox News
in 1996. The network began in a mere 17 million
cable homes, but within a decade, it was routinely
drawing more viewers than CNN and MSNBC
combined. Ailes’ legacy was tarnished when he quit
amid a flood of sexual-harassment allegations, but
make no mistake, Fox News was one of the great
media success stories of all time.
Zsa Zsa Gabor,
99
Talk show guest
To Merv Griffin: “I am a
marvelous housekeeper.
Every time I leave a
man, I keep his house.”
Dick Gautier, 85
Get Smart
His robot, Hymie, was the
best man at the wedding
of Agents 86 (Don Adams)
and 99 (Barbara Feldon).
Moore, who also portrayed Sherlock Holmes on television,
said, “I would have loved to have played a real baddie.”
Gary Glasberg,
50
NCIS
The NCIS showrunner was
“our rock, our captain,”
the cast and crew said
after he died in his sleep.
Ron Glass, 71
Barney Miller
He sparkled as Det.
Ron Harris on Barney
Miller and as the spiritual
Shepherd Book on Firefly.
31
Roger Moore, 89
Maverick, The Saint
Sure, he’s best known for portraying James
Bond in seven films, but the modest Londoner
was just as suave on the small screen. When
James Garner quit Maverick in the early 1960s
in a breach-of-contract dispute, Moore stepped
in as cousin Beau and even wore the costumes
that Garner had left behind. He then became an
international star by playing the slick Simon
Templar, who makes a living stealing from
crooks, on the British series The Saint. “I spent
my life playing heroes because I looked like
one,” he said. “Practically everything I’ve been
offered didn’t require much beyond looking
like me.”
AUG U S T 2017 E M M Y 1
EM M Y | I N M EMOR I A M
Alan Thicke, 69
Growing Pains
Barbara Hale, 94
Richard Hatch,
71
Battlestar Galactica
Before he was Captain
Apollo, he took over for
Michael Douglas on The
Streets of San Francisco.
One of Thicke’s final TV appearances came on the
NBC hit This Is Us, where he showed up as himself.
Paxton as Bill Henrickson with
his wives on the show Big Love
(from left), Ginnifer Goodwin,
Tripplehorn and Chloe Sevigny.
Bill Paxton, 61
Big Love
Gwen Ifill, 61
PBS NewsHour
The respected PBS
co-anchor and debate
moderator was known as
a “journalist’s journalist.”
Howard Leeds,
97
The Facts of Life
He developed that hit and
wrote and produced
The Brady Bunch, Diff’rent
Strokes and others.
Jared Martin, 75
Dallas
His Dusty Farlow seduced
Sue Ellen Ewing and
died in a plane crash, then
was brought back to life.
The everyman actor landed one of his first jobs in Hollywood when
James Cameron, then a production designer for producer Roger Corman,
hired him for the night crew. Paxton went on to appear in several
Cameron movies before landing his most indelible role, as a businessman and Mormon polygamist at the center of the complex HBO
drama. “I adored that man from Fort Worth, Texas,” said Jeanne
Tripplehorn, who played his wife (one of three) on the show. “From
the moment we met on Big Love, I knew he was a friend for life … but
then everyone has felt that after working with him.” His death came
just months after he had completed a season on CBS’ new Training Day.
Before he became a paragon of television
fatherhood, the gracious Canadian and hockey
fanatic from Kirkland Lake, Ontario, was a protege of Lorne Michaels at the CBC in the 1960s;
hosted a short-lived U.S. talk show that went
up against Johnny Carson; wrote shows for
Richard Pryor, Glen Campbell, Barry Manilow
and Flip Wilson; and composed TV theme
songs for Diff’rent Strokes, The Facts of Life
and Hello, Larry. Yet he’ll always be beloved for
his portrayal of husband, father and workingfrom-home psychiatrist Jason Seaver. “I share
the corny family values espoused on that
show,” he said in 2010. “I am happy for the role
for what it stood for and what it did for me and
my life and my family and my career. So if that’s
what goes on my tombstone, I’m perfectly
comfortable with it.”
Robert Osborne, 84
Grant Tinker, 90
Turner Classic Movies
MTM Enterprises, NBC
When Angela Lansbury
learned that she would
receive an honorary
Oscar at the 2013
Governors Award, the
actress picked the TCM
host to introduce her.
“I came to the conclusion that the one
person who really knew
my early work was
On April 14, 1994, Osborne
Robert,” she said in her
introduced the first TCM
acceptance speech.
movie: Gone With the Wind.
Osborne, who wrote
The Hollywood Reporter’s must-read Rambling
Reporter column for 25 years, joined TCM at the
cable network’s 1994 launch and never left, providing insightful tidbits to whet the appetites of viewers
young and old. “He’d make a wonderful professor,”
actress Eva Marie Saint said. “Wouldn’t you like to
be in his class?”
To create MTM Enterprises, the
prolific TV production house
he launched with his then-wife,
Mary Tyler Moore, and turn
around the fortunes of 1980s
ratings laggard NBC, Tinker went
with a simple formula: Hire the
best creatives (James L. Brooks,
Gary David Goldberg, Steven
Bochco, Bruce Paltrow) then step
aside to let them do what they
do best. The result? Memorable
series including The Bob Newhart
Show, Family Ties, St. Elsewhere
and Hill Street Blues. “Our dream,”
the former advertising agency
exec said in 1982, “is to have quality programs that succeed.”
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
32
AUG U S T 2017 E M M Y 1
“Tinker led [NBC] from the graveyard into
the gravy,” The New York Times once wrote.
PREVIOUS SPREAD, WEST: TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX TELEVISION/PHOTOFEST. BARRY: STEVE GRANITZ/WIREIMAGE. CHRISTOPHER: RON GALLELA, LTD./WIREIMAGE. LANDAU, CONNORS, M. MOORE: CBS/PHOTOFEST. DANA, RICKLES: NBC/PHOTOFEST. BARRIS: GAME SHOW NETWORK/PHOTOFEST. HENDERSON: ABC/PHOTOFEST.
GABOR, GAUTIER: PHOTOFEST. GLASBERG: SKIP BOLEN/WIREIMAGE. GLASS: KEVIN WINTER/GETTY IMAGES. AILES: WESLEY MANN/FOX NEWS VIA GETTY IMAGES. R. MOORE: UNITED ARTISTS/PHOTOFEST. FORAY: BRIAN TO/FILMMAGIC. THIS SPREAD, HALE: PAUL DRINKWATER/NBC/NBC PHOTO BANK VIA GETTY IMAGES. HATCH:
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Perry Mason
The Emmy winner played
secretary Della Street on
the legal drama for nine
seasons and 30 telefilms.
“POWERHOUSE
PERFORMANCE”
– MATTHEW GILBERT, THE BOSTON GLOBE
F O R
Y O U R
E M M Y®
C O N S I D E R A T I O N
PAMELA ADLON
OU T STAND ING LE AD ACTR ESS IN A COMEDY SERIES
EM M Y | I N M EMOR I A M
Craig Sager, 65
Charlie Murphy,
57
TNT basketball reporter
Chappelle’s Show
Marsh McCall, 52
Fuller House
A Late Night writer for
Conan O’Brien, he also
worked on Just Shoot Me!
and Last Man Standing.
Fans in NBA arenas waved “Sager Strong”
signs when he was in their building.
Debbie Reynolds, 84, and Carrie Fisher, 60
Bright Lights: Starring Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds
“Even though each was a heady potion in her own right,” says Bloom,
“together they were as intoxicating and funny as humans could be.”
As the cameras rolled on
the Emmy-nominated
documentary that would
premiere on HBO mere
days after mother and
daughter died a day apart,
co-director Alexis Bloom
realized that “Debbie and
Carrie were a kind of duet
— we didn’t realize how
symbiotic they were. … We
found that the film had
to be very much about
the two of them and this
dance they did together.”
A lesser-known TV dance
between the pair came
on a 1997 episode of
Roseanne that Fisher cowrote in which Reynolds
appeared as John
Goodman’s estranged
mom. (On her own, Fisher
is up for a posthumous
guest actress Emmy
this year for her final
episode on the Amazon
comedy Catastrophe.)
Agnes Nixon, 93
All My Children
She also was the creative
force behind another
legendary soap opera,
One Life to Live.
Michael Parks,
77
Then Came Bronson
He rode his Harley on the
1969-70 drama, then
played the ruthless Jean
Renault on Twin Peaks.
Robert Vaughn, 83
The Man From U.N.C.L.E.
Roger Smith, 84
77 Sunset Strip
The suave actor (and
husband of Ann-Margret)
starred as Jeff Spencer on
the crime-solving show.
Powers Boothe, 68
Deadwood
Keo Woolford,
49
In a career chock-full of villainous roles (Curly Bill Brocius in
Tombstone, Sen. Roark in Sin City: A Dame to Kill For, cult leader
Jim Jones in Guyana Tragedy: The Story of Jim Jones), the Emmy
winner was perhaps most famous for his turn as ruthless saloon
owner Cy Tolliver on the HBO drama. “It’s fun playing villains,” he
once said, “but every character has to think he’s right.”
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
Hawaii Five-0
The Honolulu native and
boy band singer portrayed
Det. James Chang
on the popular remake.
34
He had some amazing encounters
in the 1980s with musicians Rick
James, Prince and others from
his time as a hot-headed bodyguard for younger brother Eddie
Murphy, then he mined those
tales for skits on the Comedy
Central program. Murphy said
he became a comic after picking
fights with “haters” at Eddie’s
shows proved problematic. “I took
it as a personal crusade, and they
were like, ‘You know what, you’re
a little overzealous with your job.’
So, that is how I ended up not
[being a bodyguard] anymore.”
AUG U S T 2017 E M M Y 1
With Vaughn as the spy Napoleon
Solo, U.N.C.L.E. spawned a line of
toys, received 70,000 fan letters a
month and made it to No. 1 in the ratings. Female viewers were especially
attracted to the actor, who enjoyed
the Sunset Strip nightlife. “At the end
of our first season,” he recalled, “I had
to put up an electric fence around
my house to keep out the girls.”
SAGER: CHRISTIAN PETERSEN/GETTY IMAGES. FISHER: CBS VIA GETTY IMAGES. BOOTHE: MICHAEL TULLBERG/GETTY IMAGES. MCCALL: FRAZER HARRISON/GETTY IMAGES. NIXON: ABC PHOTO ARCHIVES/ABC VIA GETTY IMAGES. PARKS, MURPHY: BOBBY BANK/WIREIMAGE. WOOLFORD: TIBRINA HOBSON/GETTY IMAGES. VAUGHN: NBC/PHOTOFEST. SMITH: PHOTOFEST.
It’s hard to believe, but Sager — known for his
kaleidoscopic couture that captivated NBA
viewers, players and coaches — was more colorful in personality than in attire. He served for
three years as Northwestern University mascot
Willie the Wildcat, slept in Seattle Slew’s barn
the night before the colt completed the Triple
Crown, bailed out the busty Morganna (“The
Kissing Bandit”) after she was arrested for running on the field during the MLB All-Star Game
and married one of the Chicago Bulls dancers.
Sager never wavered in his long battle with leukemia, and that too is a part of his legacy.
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88 Years of THR
Memorable moments from a storied history
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1 9 76
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4
Kate & Allie Made a Winning Pair During the ’80s
The Emmys occasionally have shown
a soft spot for female buddy shows.
The classic case would be CBS’ police
procedural Cagney & Lacey, which
aired from 1982 to 1988. One of the
show’s two leads, Tyne Daly and
Sharon Gless, took home the lead
actress in a drama series award for
six years straight. Fast-forward to
2015, and a sitcom example would be
Netflix’s Grace and Frankie. In 2016,
Lily Tomlin was nominated, and this
year, both she and co-star Jane Fonda
are in the running for lead actress
in a comedy series. That pairing harkens to another sitcom named for its
two lead divorcees: Kate & Allie. The
CBS show starring Susan Saint James
and Jane Curtin aired from 1984 to
1989. The Hollywood Reporter’s first
take was less than positive. “We must
admit there was a time or two when
we even laughed out loud,” said the
reviewer, “but not enough to make it
worth our time.” But the show was
a ratings blockbuster out of the gate.
Curtin went on to win two Emmys
for lead actress in a comedy series,
while Saint James was nominated
three times in the same category.
“Three decades have passed, and it’s
still rare for network execs to see
there’s a huge audience hungry for
shows about women expressly for
women,” says Kate & Allie creator
Sherry Coben. “You can count on two
hands the number of female-driven
shows since. I’d hoped to set more of
a trend.” — BILL HIGGINS
The Hollywood Reporter, Vol. CDXXIII, No. 23A (ISSN 0018-3660; USPS 247-580) is published weekly; 40 issues — three issues in January, March, April, May, July, August, October and November, and four issues in February, June, September and December — with 15 special issues: Jan. (1), Feb. (1), June (4), Aug. (3),
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T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
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↑ Jane Curtin (left, as Allie Lowell) and Susan Saint James (as Kate McArdle) in a 1984 episode of Kate & Allie.
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