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The Hollywood Reporter July 19 2017

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July 19, 2017
EXCLUSIVE
Deaths on a
Tom Cruise
Movie Shoot
A plane crash,
lawsuits and a
survivor speaks
Comic-Con
How to build a better
black superhero
BY KAREEM ABDUL-JABBAR
Franchise
Freakout!
Studios rethink amid
a humdrum summer
Roger Ailes,
One Year Later
BY MICHAEL WOLFF
Queen Elisabeth
ON THE HEELS OF 13 EMMY NOMS FOR THE HANDMAID’S TALE
TALE,
T
E MS
MS. PEAK TV MOSS
EMBRACES HER NEW ROLE AS AN ACCIDENTAL ACTIVIST IN TRUMP’S AMERICA: ‘I’M A STAUNCH
BELIEVER IN WOMEN’S RIGHTS. I DON’T REALLY GIVE A SHIT ABOUT ANYBODY WHO ISN’T’
Plus
Emmys: The Haves
and Have-Nots
CONGR
AL L O U R 2 0 1 7 E
WESTWORLD
OUTSTANDING DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES - ANTHONY HOPKINS
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES - EVAN RACHEL WOOD
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES - JEFFREY WRIGHT
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES - THANDIE NEWTON
OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR A DRAMA SERIES - JONATHAN NOLAN
OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR A DRAMA SERIES - LISA JOY, JONATHAN NOLAN
OUTSTANDING PRODUCTION DESIGN FOR A NARRATIVE CONTEMPORARY OR FANTASY PROGRAM
(ONE HOUR OR MORE) - 2 NOMINATIONS
OUTSTANDING CASTING FOR A DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING CINEMATOGRAPHY FOR A SINGLE-CAMERA SERIES (ONE HOUR)
OUTSTANDING PERIOD/FANTASY COSTUMES FOR A SERIES, LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
OUTSTANDING SINGLE-CAMERA PICTURE EDITING FOR A DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING HAIRSTYLING FOR A SINGLE-CAMERA SERIES
OUTSTANDING MAIN TITLE DESIGN
OUTSTANDING MAKEUP FOR A SINGLE-CAMERA SERIES (NON-PROSTHETIC)
OUTSTANDING PROSTHETIC MAKEUP FOR A SERIES, LIMITED SERIES, MOVIE OR SPECIAL
OUTSTANDING ORIGINAL MAIN TITLE THEME MUSIC
OUTSTANDING SOUND EDITING FOR A SERIES
OUTSTANDING SOUND MIXING FOR A COMEDY OR DRAMA SERIES (ONE HOUR)
OUTSTANDING SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS
OUTSTANDING CREATIVE ACHIEVEMENT IN INTERACTIVE MEDIA WITHIN A SCRIPTED PROGRAM
LAST WEEK TONIGHT WITH JOHN OLIVER
®
VEEP
®
OUTSTANDING COMEDY SERIES
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES - JULIA LOUIS-DREYFUS
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES - TONY HALE
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES - MATT WALSH
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES - ANNA CHLUMSKY
OUTSTANDING GUEST ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES - HUGH LAURIE
OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR A COMEDY SERIES - DAVID MANDEL
OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR A COMEDY SERIES - MORGAN SACKETT
OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR A COMEDY SERIES - DALE STERN
OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR A COMEDY SERIES - DAVID MANDEL
OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR A COMEDY SERIES - BILLY KIMBALL
OUTSTANDING PRODUCTION DESIGN FOR A NARRATIVE PROGRAM (HALF-HOUR OR LESS)
OUTSTANDING CASTING FOR A COMEDY SERIES
OUTSTANDING SINGLE-CAMERA PICTURE EDITING FOR A COMEDY SERIES - 2 NOMINATIONS
OUTSTANDING SOUND MIXING FOR A COMEDY OR DRAMA SERIES (HALF-HOUR) AND ANIMATION
OUTSTANDING CINEMATOGRAPHY FOR A SINGLE-CAMERA SERIES (HALF-HOUR)
THE WIZARD OF LIES
OUTSTANDING TELEVISION MOVIE
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTOR IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE - ROBERT DE NIRO
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE - MICHELLE PFEIFFER
OUTSTANDING CASTING FOR A LIMITED SERIES, MOVIE OR SPECIAL
THE IMMORTAL LIFE OF HENRIETTA LACKS
OUTSTANDING VARIETY TALK SERIES
OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR A VARIETY SERIES - PAUL PENNOLINO
OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR A VARIETY SERIES - KEVIN AVERY, TIM CARVELL, JOSH GONDELMAN, DAN GUREWITCH,
GEOFF HAGGERTY, JEFF MAURER, JOHN OLIVER, SCOTT SHERMAN, WILL TRACY, JILL TWISS, JULI WEINER
OUTSTANDING PICTURE EDITING FOR VARIETY PROGRAMMING - 2 NOMINATIONS
OUTSTANDING INTERACTIVE PROGRAM
OUTSTANDING SOUND MIXING FOR A VARIETY SERIES OR SPECIAL
OUTSTANDING TECHNICAL DIRECTION, CAMERAWORK, VIDEO CONTROL FOR A SERIES
OUTSTANDING TELEVISION MOVIE
THE LEFTOVERS
OUTSTANDING GUEST ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES - RIZ AHMED
OUTSTANDING GUEST ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES - MATTHEW RHYS
OUTSTANDING GUEST ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES - BECKY ANN BAKER
OUTSTANDING MUSIC SUPERVISION
OUTSTANDING GUEST ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES - ANN DOWD
THE YOUNG POPE
SM
OUTSTANDING PRODUCTION DESIGN FOR A NARRATIVE CONTEMPORARY OR FANTASY PROGRAM (ONE HOUR OR MORE)
OUTSTANDING CINEMATOGRAPHY FOR A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
TRACEY ULLMAN’S SHOW
OUTSTANDING VARIETY SKETCH SERIES
REAL TIME WITH BILL MAHER
OUTSTANDING VARIETY TALK SERIES
GIRLS
®
RATULATES
M MY NOMINE E S
®
SILICON VALLEY
®
OUTSTANDING COMEDY SERIES
OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR A COMEDY SERIES - MIKE JUDGE
OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR A COMEDY SERIES - JAMIE BABBIT
OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR A COMEDY SERIES - ALEC BERG
OUTSTANDING PRODUCTION DESIGN FOR A NARRATIVE PROGRAM (HALF-HOUR OR LESS)
OUTSTANDING CASTING FOR A COMEDY SERIES
OUTSTANDING SINGLE-CAMERA PICTURE EDITING FOR A COMEDY SERIES - 2 NOMINATIONS
OUTSTANDING SOUND MIXING FOR A COMEDY OR DRAMA SERIES (HALF-HOUR) AND ANIMATION
OUTSTANDING CINEMATOGRAPHY FOR A SINGLE-CAMERA SERIES (HALF-HOUR)
THE NIGHT OF
®
OUTSTANDING LIMITED SERIES
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTOR IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE - RIZ AHMED
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTOR IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE - JOHN TURTURRO
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE - BILL CAMP
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE - MICHAEL KENNETH WILLIAMS
OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR A LIMITED SERIES, MOVIE OR DRAMATIC SPECIAL - STEVEN ZAILLIAN
OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR A LIMITED SERIES, MOVIE OR DRAMATIC SPECIAL - JAMES MARSH
OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR A LIMITED SERIES, MOVIE OR DRAMATIC SPECIAL - RICHARD PRICE, STEVEN ZAILLIAN
OUTSTANDING CASTING FOR A LIMITED SERIES, MOVIE OR SPECIAL
OUTSTANDING CINEMATOGRAPHY FOR A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
OUTSTANDING SINGLE-CAMERA PICTURE EDITING FOR A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
OUTSTANDING SOUND EDITING FOR A LIMITED SERIES, MOVIE OR SPECIAL
OUTSTANDING SOUND MIXING FOR A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
BRIGHT LIGHTS: STARRING CARRIE FISHER
AND DEBBIE REYNOLDS
BIG LITTLE LIES
OUTSTANDING LIMITED SERIES
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTRESS IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE - REESE WITHERSPOON
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTRESS IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE - NICOLE KIDMAN
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE - ALEXANDER SKARSGÅRD
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE - SHAILENE WOODLEY
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE - LAURA DERN
OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR A LIMITED SERIES, MOVIE OR DRAMATIC SPECIAL - JEAN-MARC VALLÉE
OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR A LIMITED SERIES, MOVIE OR DRAMATIC SPECIAL - DAVID E. KELLEY
OUTSTANDING CASTING FOR A LIMITED SERIES, MOVIE OR SPECIAL
OUTSTANDING CINEMATOGRAPHY FOR A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
OUTSTANDING CONTEMPORARY COSTUMES FOR A SERIES, LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
OUTSTANDING SINGLE-CAMERA PICTURE EDITING FOR A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
OUTSTANDING HAIRSTYLING FOR A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
OUTSTANDING MAKEUP FOR A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE (NON-PROSTHETIC)
OUTSTANDING SOUND MIXING FOR A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
OUTSTANDING MUSIC SUPERVISION
VICE
OUTSTANDING INFORMATIONAL SERIES OR SPECIAL
OUTSTANDING PICTURE EDITING FOR A NONFICTION PROGRAM
A HOUSE DIVIDED (VICE SPECIAL REPORT)
OUTSTANDING DOCUMENTARY OR NONFICTION SPECIAL
ONCE UPON A SESAME STREET CHRISTMAS
OUTSTANDING CHILDREN’S PROGRAM
BALLERS
®
EXCEPTIONAL MERIT IN DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKING
OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR A NONFICTION PROGRAM - ALEXIS BLOOM, FISHER STEVENS
OUTSTANDING CINEMATOGRAPHY FOR A SINGLE-CAMERA SERIES (HALF-HOUR)
MUHAMMAD ALI: ONLY ONE
DIVORCE
SM
OUTSTANDING NARRATOR - LIEV SCHREIBER
OUTSTANDING CINEMATOGRAPHY FOR A SINGLE-CAMERA SERIES (HALF-HOUR)
UCONN: THE MARCH TO MADNESS
2017 ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME
INDUCTION CEREMONY
OUTSTANDING NARRATOR - LIEV SCHREIBER
OUTSTANDING SOUND MIXING FOR A VARIETY SERIES OR SPECIAL
THANK YOU TELEVISION ACADEMY MEMBERS FOR OUR 111 NOMINATIONS
©2017 Home Box Office, Inc. All rights reserved. HBO® and related channels and service marks are the property of Home Box Office, Inc. Sesame Street ® and associated characters, trademarks and design elements are owned and licensed by Sesame Workshop. All rights reserved.
Issue No. 22, July 19, 2017
60
Moss was photographed
June 16 in New York’s
Central Park. Watch her
play “Fishing for Answers”
at THR.com/video.
On the cover: Sachin & Babi
dress, Dolce & Gabbana bra,
Roule & Co. earrings, ADMK
Jewelry ring. This page: Dolce
& Gabbana dress, Roule & Co.
earrings, Sydney Evan ring.
FEATURES
60 Elisabeth Moss Takes Sides
“Now is not really a time
to stand in the middle,” says
the women’s rights activist
and star of The Handmaid’s Tale
(nominated for 13 Emmys),
as she solidifies her status as
Peak TV’s reigning queen.
68 Comic-Con 2017:
‘Yes, I Am That Creature’
Spanish actor Javier Botet
has parlayed a rare genetic
disorder into a ghoulish
Hollywood career, landing
monster roles in such films as
Stephen King’s upcoming It.
74 Why Did Two Men Die
on a Tom Cruise Movie?
A survivor of a fatal plane
crash during production of
American Made breaks his
silence amid lawsuits, a pilot in
a “death pool” and filmmaker
finger-pointing.
Photographed here and for the cover by Olivia Bee
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
2
J U LY 19, 2017
SHOW TIME CONGRATULATES
®
OUR 2017 EMMY NOMINEES
®
LIEV SCHREIBER
WILLIAM H. MACY
RAY DONOVAN
SHAMELESS
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTOR
IN A DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTOR
IN A COMEDY SERIES
OUTSTANDING DIRECTING
FOR A DRAMA SERIES
HOMELAND
OUTSTANDING SOUND EDITING
FOR A SERIES
AMERICA FIRST
CRAIG A. DELLINGER , SOUND SUPERVISOR
RYNE GIERKE , DIALOGUE EDITOR
ERIC RABER , SOUND EFFECTS EDITOR
SHAWN KENNELLY , FOLEY EDITOR
JEFF CHARBONNEAU , MUSIC EDITOR
MELISSA KENNELLY , FOLEY ARTIST
VINCE NICASTRO , FOLEY ARTIST
MASTERS OF SEX
OUTSTANDING PRODUCTION DESIGN FOR
A NARRATIVE PERIOD PROGRAM
(ONE HOUR OR MORE)
FREEFALL • INVENTORY •
THE PLEASURE PROTOCOL
ELIZABETH H. GRAY , PRODUCTION DESIGNER
SAMANTHA ENGLENDER , ART DIRECTOR
HALINA SIWOLOP , SET DECORATOR
SHAMELESS
OUTSTANDING STUNT COORDINATION
FOR A COMEDY SERIES OR VARIETY
PROGRAM
EDDIE PEREZ , STUNT COORDINATOR
MANDY PATINKIN
HANK AZARIA
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR
IN A DRAMA SERIES
HOMELAND
HOMELAND
PENNY DREADFUL
OUTSTANDING PRODUCTION DESIGN
FOR A NARRATIVE CONTEMPORARY OR
FANTASY PROGRAM (ONE HOUR OR MORE)
PERPETUAL NIGHT • THE BLESSED DARK
JONATHAN MƜKINSTRY , PRODUCTION
DESIGNER
JO RIDDELL , ART DIRECTOR
PHILIP MURPHY , SET DECORATOR
OUTSTANDING HAIRSTYLING
FOR A SINGLE-CAMERA SERIES
EBB TIDE
LUCA VANELLA , HAIR DESIGNER
ALEXIS CONTINENTE , HAIRSTYLIST
SEVLENE RODDY , HAIRSTYLIST
JOSEPH WHELAN , HAIRSTYLIST
ORLA CARROL , PERSONAL HAIRSTYLIST
OUTSTANDING MAKEUP FOR A SINGLECAMERA SERIES (NON-PROSTHETIC)
PERPETUAL NIGHT
ENZO MASTRANTONIO , MAKEUP DESIGNER
CLARE LAMBE , KEY MAKEUP ARTIST
CATERINA SISTO , MAKEUP ARTIST
LORRAINE MƜCRANN , MAKEUP ARTIST
MORNA FERGUSON , PERSONAL MAKEUP
ARTIST
OUTSTANDING PROSTHETIC MAKEUP FOR
A SERIES, LIMITED SERIES, MOVIE OR
SPECIAL
NO BEAST SO FIERCE
STEPHEN COLBERT’S
LIVE ELECTION
NIGHT SPECIAL
OUTSTANDING GUEST ACTOR
IN A DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING VARIETY SPECIAL
RAY DONOVAN
AMERICA FIRST
LESLI LINKA GLATTER
STEPHEN COLBERT’S LIVE ELECTION NIGHT
DEMOCRACY’S SERIES FINALE:
WHO’S GOING TO CLEAN UP THIS SH*T?
OUTSTANDING VARIETY SPECIAL
STEPHEN COLBERT , EXECUTIVE PRODUCER
CHRIS LICHT , EXECUTIVE PRODUCER
TOM PURCELL , EXECUTIVE PRODUCER
JON STEWART , EXECUTIVE PRODUCER
BARRY JULIEN , CO-EXECUTIVE PRODUCER
DENISE REHRIG , SR. SUPERVISING PRODUCER
TANYA MICHNEVICH BRACCO ,
SUPERVISING PRODUCER
PAUL DINELLO , SUPERVISING PRODUCER
MATT LAPPIN , SUPERVISING PRODUCER
LIZ LEVIN , SUPERVISING PRODUCER
OPUS MORESCHI , SUPERVISING PRODUCER
PAIGE KENDIG , PRODUCER
JAKE PLUNKETT , PRODUCER
OUTSTANDING DIRECTING
FOR A VARIETY SPECIAL
JIM HOSKINSON , DIRECTED BY
OUTSTANDING WRITING
FOR A VARIETY SPECIAL
JAY KATSIR , HEAD WRITER
OPUS MORESCHI , HEAD WRITER
STEPHEN COLBERT , WRITER
MICHAEL BRUMM , WRITER
NATE CHARNY , WRITER
AARON COHEN , WRITER
CULLEN CRAWFORD , WRITER
PAUL DINELLO , WRITER
ROB DUBBIN , WRITER
ARIEL DUMAS , WRITER
GLENN EICHLER , WRITER
DJANGO GOLD , WRITER
GABE GRONLI , WRITER
BARRY JULIEN , WRITER
DANIEL KIBBLESMITH , WRITER
MATT LAPPIN , WRITER
MICHAEL PIELOCIK , WRITER
TOM PURCELL , WRITER
KATE SIDLEY , WRITER
JEN SPYRA , WRITER
BRIAN STACK , WRITER
JOHN THIBODEAUX , WRITER
NICK DUDMAN , PROSTHETIC
MAKEUP DESIGNER
SARITA ALLISON , KEY PROSTHETIC
MAKEUP ARTIST
BARNEY NIKOLIC , PROSTHETIC
MAKEUP ARTIST
DENNIS PENKOV , PROSTHETIC DESIGNER
©2017 Showtime Networks Inc. All rights reserved. SHOWTIME is a registered trademark of Showtime Networks Inc., a CBS Company. Emmy® is a registered trademark of the Television Academy and NATAS. “Penny Dreadful,” “Ray Donovan” & “Stephen Colbert’s Live Election Night Democracy’s
Series Finale”: ©Showtime Networks Inc. All rights reserved. “Homeland”: ©Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation. All rights reserved. “Shameless”: ©Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. All rights reserved. “Masters of Sex”: ©Sony Pictures Television and Showtime Networks Inc. All rights reserved.
91
E M M Y
OUTSTANDING DRAMA SERIES
®
N O
OUTSTANDING DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING DOCUMENTARY OR NONFICTION SPECIAL
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR A NONFICTION PROGRAM
CLAIRE FOY
OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR A NONFICTION PROGRAM
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING CINEMATOGRAPHY FOR A
NONFICTION PROGRAM
OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR A DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING PICTURE EDITING FOR A
NONFICTION PROGRAM
SHANNON PURSER
OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR A DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING ORIGINAL MUSIC AND LYRICS
OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR A DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING PRODUCTION DESIGN FOR A
NARRATIVE PERIOD PROGRAM (ONE HOUR OR MORE)
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
DAVID HARBOUR
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES
MILLIE BOBBY BROWN
OUTSTANDING GUEST ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR A DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING PRODUCTION DESIGN FOR A NARRATIVE
PERIOD PROGRAM (ONE HOUR OR MORE)
OUTSTANDING CASTING FOR A DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING CINEMATOGRAPHY FOR A
SINGLE-CAMERA SERIES (ONE HOUR)
JOHN LITHGOW
OUTSTANDING CASTING FOR A DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING PERIOD/FANTASY COSTUMES FOR A
SERIES, LIMITED SERIES, OR MOVIE
OUTSTANDING HAIRSTYLING FOR A SINGLE-CAMERA SERIES
OUTSTANDING MAIN TITLE DESIGN
OUTSTANDING SINGLE-CAMERA PICTURE EDITING FOR
A DRAMA SERIES - CHAPTER SEVEN
OUTSTANDING MUSIC COMPOSITION FOR A
SERIES (ORIGINAL DRAMATIC SCORE)
OUTSTANDING HAIRSTYLING FOR A SINGLE-CAMERA SERIES
OUTSTANDING SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS IN A
SUPPORTING ROLE
OUTSTANDING CREATIVE ACHIEVEMENT IN INTERACTIVE
MEDIA WITHIN A SCRIPTED PROGRAM - STRANGER THINGS
VR EXPERIENCE
OUTSTANDING MUSIC SUPERVISION
OUTSTANDING SOUND EDITING FOR A SERIES
OUTSTANDING SOUND MIXING FOR A COMEDY OR DRAMA
SERIES (ONE HOUR)
OUTSTANDING DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
KEVIN SPACEY
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES
ROBIN WRIGHT
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
MICHAEL KELLY
OUTSTANDING MUSIC COMPOSITION FOR A
SERIES (ORIGINAL DRAMATIC SCORE)
OUTSTANDING SOUND MIXING FOR A COMEDY OR
DRAMA SERIES (ONE HOUR)
OUTSTANDING MAIN TITLE DESIGN
OUTSTANDING ORIGINAL MAIN TITLE THEME MUSIC
OUTSTANDING SOUND MIXING FOR A
NONFICTION PROGRAM
OUTSTANDING CINEMATOGRAPHY FOR A
SINGLE-CAMERA SERIES (ONE HOUR)
OUTSTANDING SINGLE-CAMERA PICTURE EDITING FOR
A DRAMA SERIES - CHAPTER ONE
OUTSTANDING MAKEUP FOR A SINGLE-CAMERA SERIES
(NON-PROSTHETIC)
OUTSTANDING SOUND EDITING FOR A
NONFICTION PROGRAM
OUTSTANDING COMEDY SERIES
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES
AZIZ ANSARI
OUTSTANDING GUEST ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES
ANGELA BASSETT
OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR A COMEDY SERIES
OUTSTANDING CASTING FOR A COMEDY SERIES
OUTSTANDING SINGLE-CAMERA PICTURE EDITING FOR A
COMEDY SERIES
OUTSTANDING MUSIC SUPERVISION
OUTSTANDING SOUND MIXING FOR A COMEDY OR
DRAMA SERIES (HALF HOUR) AND ANIMATION
OUTSTANDING COMEDY SERIES
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES
ELLIE KEMPER
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES
TITUSS BURGESS
OUTSTANDING ORIGINAL MUSIC AND LYRICS
OUTSTANDING STUNT COORDINATION FOR A COMEDY
SERIES OR VARIETY PROGRAM
M I N A T I O N S!
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES
JANE FONDA
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES
LILY TOMLIN
OUTSTANDING PRODUCTION DESIGN FOR A NARRATIVE
SERIES (HALF HOUR OR LESS)
OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR A NONFICTION PROGRAM
OUTSTANDING PRODUCTION DESIGN FOR A VARIETY,
NON-FICTION, REALITY OR REALITY COMPETITION SERIES
OUTSTANDING CONTEMPORARY COSTUMES FOR A SERIES,
LIMITED SERIES, OR MOVIE
EXCEPTIONAL MERIT IN DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKING
OUTSTANDING TELEVISION MOVIE
OUTSTANDING DOCUMENTARY OR NONFICTION SERIES
OUTSTANDING CINEMATOGRAPHY FOR A
SINGLE-CAMERA SERIES (ONE HOUR)
OUTSTANDING MUSIC COMPOSITION FOR A LIMITED SERIES,
MOVIE, OR SPECIAL (ORIGINAL DRAMATIC SCORE)
SAN JUNIPERO
OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR A LIMITED SERIES, MOVIE
OR DRAMATIC SPECIAL
OUTSTANDING CINEMATOGRAPHY FOR A
MULTI-CAMERA SERIES
SAN JUNIPERO
OUTSTANDING CINEMATOGRAPHY FOR A LIMITED
SERIES OR MOVIE
NOSEDIVE
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING VARIETY SPECIAL
OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR A VARIETY SPECIAL
UZO ADUBA
OUTSTANDING VARIETY SPECIAL
OUTSTANDING GUEST ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR A VARIETY SPECIAL
OUTSTANDING STUNT COORDINATION FOR A
DRAMA SERIES, LIMITED SERIES, OR MOVIE
LAVERNE COX
OUTSTANDING DOCUMENTARY OR NONFICTION SERIES
OUTSTANDING CINEMATOGRAPHY FOR A
NONFICTION PROGRAM
OUTSTANDING DOCUMENTARY OR NONFICTION SPECIAL
OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR A NONFICTION PROGRAM
OUTSTANDING NARRATOR
MERYL STREEP
OUTSTANDING MUSIC COMPOSITION FOR A LIMITED SERIES,
MOVIE, OR SPECIAL (ORIGINAL DRAMATIC SCORE)
OUTSTANDING CHARACTER VOICE-OVER PERFORMANCE
KRISTEN SCHAAL
OUTSTANDING MULTI-CAMERA PICTURE EDITING FOR A
COMEDY SERIES
OUTSTANDING CHARACTER VOICE-OVER PERFORMANCE
MO COLLINS
OUTSTANDING GUEST ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
BEN MENDELSOHN
OUTSTANDING MUSIC COMPOSITION FOR A SERIES
(ORIGINAL DRAMATIC SCORE)
Issue No. 22, July 19, 2017
THE REPORT
15 An Embattled Path for
The Walking Dead
Amid a bitter lawsuit with
show creator Frank Darabont,
AMC now must deal with the
on-set death of a stuntman,
which has launched OSHA and
SAG-AFTRA investigations.
ABOUT TOWN
33 Sophie Turner’s Graduating
From Game of Thrones
The star hopes for a “seminormal” life after Westeros.
THE BUSINESS
46 Executive Suite: Gigi Pritzker
The indie producer bounces
back from the low point
of Mortdecai with 10 Emmy
noms for Genius.
48 How I Learned to Love
Netflix’s Big Spending
SUNGLASSES: WIL DELEON. BOTET: WESLEY MANN.
Analyst Ben Weiss on why
Netflix CEO Reed Hastings
is smart to roll the dice and
bet it all.
STYLE
53 The Art of Shade
Rainbow tints reign when it
comes to the hottest hues for
the latest designer sunglasses.
33
Turner was photographed July 6 at Eloi Studios
in Montreal. Hear her open up about the emotional
end of Game of Thrones at THR.com/video.
Celine blouse (available at Holt Renfrew).
54 When a 72-Year-Old
Woman Is on THR’s Cover
68
Industry icon Sherry
Lansing was terrified to be
photographed, but she
quickly became a role model
for aging with class.
Javier Botet was
photographed
July 9 in Concord,
Massachusetts.
BACKLOT
82 The Final Episodes
of Episodes
Showtime’s industry
satire gets the last laugh
as it comes to a close.
SEE YOU IN 2 WEEKS
This is a double issue. The next issue
publishes Aug. 2. Keep up with breaking
news, reviews and video at THR.com
and via Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.
53
Puma sunglasses with
colored mirrored lenses;
$89, puma.com.
Turner photographed by Shayne Laverdiere
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
6
J U LY 19, 2017
Matthew Belloni
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR
Alison Brower
Shanti Marlar
Tom Seeley
DEPUTY EDITORIAL DIRECTOR
CREATIVE DIRECTOR
DEPUTY EDITORIAL DIRECTOR,
DIGITAL MEDIA
Sudie Redmond
Stephen Galloway
Jennifer Laski
Jeanie Pyun
Peter Flax
EXECUTIVE MANAGING EDITOR
EXECUTIVE EDITOR, FEATURES
PHOTO & VIDEO DIRECTOR
DEPUTY EDITOR
FEATURES EDITOR
EDITOR-AT-LARGE Kim Masters
FILM
FILM EDITOR Gregg Kilday • SENIOR FILM WRITERS Borys Kit, Pamela McClintock, Tatiana Siegel • FILM REPORTER Rebecca Ford • TECH EDITOR Carolyn Giardina
STAFF WRITER, FILM Mia Galuppo • CHIEF FILM CRITIC Todd McCarthy • CHIEF THEATER CRITIC David Rooney • INTERNATIONAL FILM EDITOR Deborah Young
TELEVISION
TELEVISION EDITOR Lacey Rose • CHIEF TELEVISION CRITIC Tim Goodman • TELEVISION CRITIC Daniel J. Fienberg • TELEVISION EDITOR, EAST COAST Marisa Guthrie • TELEVISION NEWS EDITOR Lesley Goldberg
SENIOR WRITER, TELEVISION Michael O’Connell • TELEVISION WRITERS Bryn Elise Sandberg, Kate Stanhope • MEDIA & POLITICS WRITER Jeremy Barr • STAFF REPORTER Brian Porreca
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John Amato
PRESIDENT
Severin Andrieu-Delille
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The Re ort
↑ Film
Franchise Fatigue
Summer’s impact on sequels
and spinoffs p. 18
Television
Behind the Headlines
Upfronts Scorecard
How the networks’ ad sales
stack up p. 18
WALKING: GENE PAGE/AMC. TRANSFORMERS: PARAMOUNT PICTURES/BAY FILMS. STANKEY: JOHN LAMPARSKI/GETTY IMAGES FOR ADVERTISING WEEK NEW YORK. VINCIQUERRA: ANDY KROPA/GETTY IMAGES. WHITTAKER: BEN GABBE/GETTY IMAGES FOR TRIBECA FILM FESTIVAL. KELLY: NOEL VASQUEZ/GETTY IMAGES.
Heat Index
John Stankey
The AT&T veteran is expected
to lead Time Warner’s film
and TV business if and when
the $85.4 billion takeover
is done, giving him power
over Warner Bros., Turner
and more.
Tony Vinciquerra
The new Sony Pictures
CEO loses LStar Capital
as a major financing partner,
a blow to his efforts to
turn around the struggling
film division.
Tragedy Strikes The Walking Dead:
New Investigation Details Emerge
How did a seemingly simple 22-foot fall lead to the death of stuntman John Bernecker?
Authorities face hurdles and SAG-AFTRA demands answers: ‘It’s never a black and white thing’
Jodie Whittaker
The Broadchurch actress
is named the BBC’s 13th
Doctor Who star, the first
woman to play the iconic role.
R. Kelly
The R&B Grammy winner
is under fire after parents
of several young women
accuse him of holding them
in a sexual “cult.”
Showbiz Stocks
$53.96 (+7.1%)
DOLBY LABS (DLB)
Eric Wold of B. Riley ups
his ranking on the firm to
“buy” as its Dolby Cinema
opens its 100th theater
location.
$27.38 (-2.6%)
21ST CENTURY FOX
(FOXA)
The conglomerate’s
takeover of Sky could be
delayed until mid-2018
as a review from the U.K.’s
Competition & Markets
Authority is likely.
I
BY JONATHAN HANDEL
n the aftermath of the tragic
death of 33-year-old stuntman John Bernecker — who
died July 12 after plunging
headfirst from a balcony on the
Georgia set of The Walking Dead
— questions abound about how
a seemingly simple 22-foot fall
(“the ABC of stunts,” in the words
of one veteran stunt coordinator)
could go so horribly wrong.
The case has now been assigned
to Capt. John Kennedy, an officer within the Coweta (Georgia)
County Sheriff’s Office, which,
after initially being open about its
investigation, has since refused
to give materials to the media. A
staff member there told THR on
July 17 that the office had been
instructed to “freeze” all provision of additional materials — no
photographs, videos or new
reports — per a state law protecting pending investigations.
The Coweta probe will proceed in tandem with two others,
led by the federal Occupational
Safety and Health Administration
and SAG-AFTRA, though the
latter does not hire independent
investigators.
Right after the incident, local
law enforcement faced problems
that might complicate further
discovery. Deputy Sheriff J.P.
Traylor, the first officer on the
scene — he arrived at Raleigh
Studios in Senoia, Georgia, at
1:47 p.m., a half-hour after the
1:11 p.m. incident — filled out a
four-page report that day but was
unable to interview stunt coordinator Monty L. Simons as most
crewmembers had been sent away
within minutes of the accident,
according to Traylor’s report. It’s
unclear who asked them to leave
the set. (Simons did not respond
to an email and call requesting
comment, but he was described
by veteran stuntman Conrad
Palmisano, a former president of
the Stuntmen’s Association of
July 10-17
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
15
J U LY 19, 2017
↑ Stuntman Bernecker (left) died from
injuries sustained performing a fall on the
AMC show, now filming its eighth season.
Motion Pictures, as “very qualified, a good guy, focused and
competent.”)
Nor was Traylor able to interview Walking Dead’s first assistant
director on the episode (whose
name hasn’t been made public), the
person who generally is responsible for set safety, according to the
Directors Guild agreement with
studios and producers.
Instead, according to Traylor’s
report (whose second page
has been deliberately withheld
pursuant to law, according to a
sheriff’s clerk), the deputy was
able to contact only two of those
present: second assistant director Matthew Goodwin and actor
Austin Amelio (who plays Dwight
on the series), the other performer on the balcony.
Bernecker’s girlfriend, Jennifer
Cocker — herself a stuntwoman
The Report
Behind the Headlines
Left: Amelio on the set of The Walking Dead.
Above: Bernecker (left) on the set of Into the Badlands.
who has worked on such projects
as the AMC series Preacher — has
questioned Amelio’s presence
on the balcony on the grounds
that it was wrong to have an
experienced professional next to
a relatively inexperienced actor
“who doesn’t know what he’s
doing.” (Amelio did not respond
to a request for comment.)
Other issues surround the
case, including why photos of
the scene show a balcony but no
padding below, and why it took
17 minutes for an ambulance to
reach the stuntman, who subsequently was helicoptered to
Atlanta Medical Center. While a
fire engine arrived within seven
minutes, medevac helicopter Air
Life 4 did not evacuate Bernecker
until about 30 minutes after the
fall. He was declared dead at
6:30 p.m., but remained on life
support for several more days.
The tight-knit stunt community (who also are members of
SAG-AFTRA) has been devastated
by the death, and still remembers
other tragedies on the sets of productions including 2002’s XXX
and 2012’s The Expendables 2. AMC
and showrunner Scott Gimple
issued statements saying they
were “deeply saddened.”
According to the report by
Traylor (who spoke with THR on
July 17, after his superiors closed
off provision of documents),
Bernecker was supposed to fall from the
balcony railing onto
a pad made of a layer
of boxes, PortaPit
Palmisano
pads and another
large pad, but missed the padding
by inches. Traylor’s report quotes
Goodwin as saying that, after
signaling he was ready, Bernecker
got most of the way over “but did
not appear to get good separation
from the balcony.” He attempted to
abort the fall by grabbing the railing with both hands but failed.
Bernecker, who had accumulated 93 stunt credits in less than
a decade of work, was experienced
enough that eight of those credits
were as a stunt coordinator. In
that more senior role, he would
have been responsible for designing and prepping stunts and would
be a key player responsible for the
safety of other stuntmen.
Stunt performers also are
responsible for examining the
stunt design and demanding
changes if necessary, according
to multiple stuntmen sources.
Now it remains to be seen
whether the investigations will
lead to changes in the SAG-AFTRA
agreement between studios
and the union, whose wording
on such matters is vague. “All
reasonable requests and requirements for safety equipment in
connection with the performance
of stunts shall be complied with by
Producer,” the agreement states,
without defining “reasonable.”
Production on the eighth season
of Walking Dead, cable’s top-rated
show, was halted immediately
after Bernecker’s fall, but it
resumed July 17, leaving insurers
to wrangle over who pays for what.
The employer of record is customarily the payroll company, rather
than AMC, which produces the
series, says HUB Entertainment’s
Christie Mattull, an insurance broker. Other entities involved might
have general liability policies, but
AMC may have to cover the costs of
the production delay, as cast insurance usually only applies to stars.
No word was made public at
press time about funeral plans,
though the family had Bernecker’s
organs donated, according to
LifeLink Foundation.
“Something obviously went
wrong,” says Palmisano, who adds
that the cause might ultimately
never be known. “It’s never a black
and white thing. It’s always a pinch
of this, a dash of that, then something tragic happens.”
Scott Johnson contributed to
this report.
Should Hollywood Care About Those Nasty Walking Dead Emails?
ere the explosive emails that showrunner
W
Frank Darabont sent to associates on
AMC’s The Walking Dead just another example
of Hollywood excess from a brilliant talent? Or an
unacceptable breach of standards of conduct?
A brief and unscientific survey of showrunners
and executives suggests the industry’s reaction is
mixed. While no one defends Darabont’s profanitylaced emails, some condemn them more strongly
than others. Some are willing to cut Darabont slack
because AMC had slashed the show’s budget by
25 percent and imposed other difficult conditions
despite the fact that he had delivered the biggest
hit the network is ever likely to have.
Most of the emails, released as AMC fights a
$280 million lawsuit from Darabont and CAA,
were written in the weeks before his July 2011
dismissal. Given the sensitivities, several TV
veterans were unwilling to offer opinions on the
record, though Sons of Anarchy creator and
Darabont defender Kurt Sutter tweeted: “Abuse
← “People scream and shout and throw tantrums,” says one TV
executive, defending Darabont’s emails. “It happens all the time.”
“Fuck you all for giving me chest
pains because of the staggering
fucking incompetence.” DARABONT
is indefensible, but having penned my share of
deadly missives, @AMC_TV TMZing FD’s mail
with no context hurts all parties.”
Perhaps the most extreme reaction comes
from a showrunner with a major hit series in his
credits. “It literally pains me to take the side
of the great corporate overlord here,” he says
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
16
J U LY 19, 2017
in an email. “I am sure AMC did things wrong. …
This was their first time dealing with a massive,
MASSIVE hit. Undoubtedly, they were in over their
heads and mistakes were made. But nothing they
did on the managerial side could possibly warrant
Darabont’s behavior here. … Unconscionable.”
Another showrunner believes Darabont, 58,
was “desperately trying to protect his show,” but
“he comes off like a major dick, and though we
showrunners have all been frustrated at a camera
operator or director or writer, it is ultimately
unseemly and un-leader-like to talk that kind of
shit — or at least to commit it to writing.”
Darabont seems to get more understanding
from execs. “You can hear his heart bleeding for
the words on the page and his vision as a director,”
says a studio head. “When I read those emails, I
wished half the showrunners I know were that deep
into dailies and meanings of scenes.”
DEAD: GENE PAGE/AMC. BERNECKER: COURTESY OF JOHN BERNECKER/FACEBOOK. DARABONT: AMC/PHOTOFEST. PALMISANO: DAVID LIVINGSTON/GETTY IMAGES.
‘You’ve turned [me] into a raging asshole,’ Frank Darabont ranted before he was fired in missives revealed in his AMC lawsuit,
but industry reaction is mixed: ‘You can hear his heart bleeding for his vision as a director’ BY KIM MASTERS AND LESLEY GOLDBERG
C O N G R AT U L AT E S T H E P H E N O M E N A L C A ST A N D C R E W O F
O N T H E I R 6 E M M Y ® N O M I N AT I O N S I N C L U D I N G
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DRAMA SERIES
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ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
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COMEDY OR DRAMA SERIES (ONE HOUR)
JEFF BEAL
MICHAEL KELLY
LORENZO MILLAN, NATHAN
NANCE & SCOTT R. LEWIS
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ROBIN WRIGHT
KEVIN SPACEY
Special thank you to Melissa James Gibson, Frank Pugliese, Daniel Minahan, Eric Roth, David Fincher, Josh Donen, Dana Brunetti,
Beau Willimon, Andrew Davies and Michael Dobbs
The Report
Transformers:
The Last Knight
$518M
Dark Universe, but slowly, to
allow for more script development. Convinced Tom Cruise saved
Mummy from being a bigger flop,
the studio is betting on names,
prepping an offer to Angelina Jolie
for Bride of Frankenstein and polishing the script for Van Helsing,
aimed for Channing Tatum.
Spider-Man:
Homecoming
$473M
Alien: Covenant
$232M
The Mummy
$390M
Franchise Films:
Rethink or Die
to give the fans a new experience,” says producer Lorenzo di
Bonaventura.
Wonder Woman (Warner Bros.)
By waving a feminist flag, director
Patty Jenkins breathed new life
into the DC universe. Warner Bros.
has started negotiations with
her for a sequel (star Gal Gadot
already has signed on for multiple
DC films), which it will officially
unveil July 22 at Comic-Con.
A humdrum summer leaves some brands in question, with
lower budgets and younger casts likely for those that return
T
BY REBECCA FORD AND BORYS KIT
he mixed box-office bag
for this summer’s tentpole
films is forcing studios to
revisit their strategies for keeping
individual franchises going.
Spider-Man (Sony)
Even before Homecoming hit
theaters, Sony ordered a sequel
for 2019, with Jon Watts now
in negotiations to return as
director. But the real test will
come as Sony expands its SpiderMan universe without Marvel’s
help. Venom shoots this fall
with director Ruben Fleischer
and star Tom Hardy; and the
female-superhero-led Silver &
Black will be directed by Gina
Prince-Bythewood. The studio
is convinced that emphasizing
Homecoming’s high school setting was key to the reboot. Says
Sony’s Tom Rothman, “Making
the audience care is a lot harder
than making things blow up.”
Alien (Fox)
Ridley Scott’s Alien: Covenant
Transformers (Paramount)
After the fifth installment, The
Last Knight, opened to a series
low, Paramount is cutting costs.
Its Bumblebee spinoff is pegged
at $70 million-plus, compared
to Last Knight’s $217 million. A
younger cast, headed by Hailee
Steinfeld, 20, will be directed
by Travis Knight when filming
starts in August. “We’re trying
Behind the Headlines
dropped 71 percent in its second
weekend, and sources say Fox
will have to reassess two intended
sequels Scott has pitched while
he is off helming All the Money in
the World and then The Cartel.
The Mummy (Universal)
Despite the film’s lackluster
performance, Universal is moving
forward with its monster-filled
Planet of the Apes (Fox)
The current trilogy has run its
course as War for the Planet of the
Apes opened lower domestically
($56 million) than its predecessor.
But while director Matt Reeves
has moved on to Warners’ Batman
movie, he is still interested in
returning for a spinoff based on
one of the other apes.
Cars (Pixar)
Cars 3’s $54 million domestic
opening was a franchise low,
and there are no official plans
for a sequel, though Disneytoon
Studios, planning an untitled
movie about fighter jets for 2019,
isn’t giving up on anthropomorphic transport.
Fast & Furious (Universal)
With The Fate of the Furious’
$1.2 billion worldwide gross, the
franchise appears impervious to
fatigue, so the studio is gearing
up for 2019 and 2021 installments
as well as a spinoff to star Dwayne
Johnson and Jason Statham.
Whew! TV Upfronts Defy Predictions of Doom and Gloom
Even as ratings sink, analysts estimate volume is up 3 percent to 4 percent over 2016 BY MARISA GUTHRIE
ood news for multiple networks from the TV upfronts
G
(the recently wrapped selling season). Despite ratings
dips, analysts predict the broadcast nets’ haul will be up
from 2016, when the upfronts brought in $18.5 billion across
cable and broadcast, according to Standard
Media Index. Jefferies & Co. estimates primetime
commitments will be 3 percent higher, and Pivotal
Research Group is looking at a 4 percent increase.
This comes as the promise of digital advertising
Yaccarino
has hit a wall, the result of major brands pulling ads
from Google platforms, afraid they might run next to offensive
content. Says NBCUniversal ad sales chairman Linda Yaccarino:
“The inability of companies of that magnitude to guarantee
brand safety was truly the straw that broke the camel’s back.”
NETWORK
HOW DID THEY DO?
BIGGEST LURES
ABC
CPM increases in high-single-digit range;
double-digit increases in late night and kids.
The Good Doctor,
The Mayor
CBS
Growth in morning, daytime and late night;
low-double-digit CPM increases in those dayparts.
CBS This Morning,
The Late Show
FOX
With flat volume, CPM increased 6 percent to 8 percent.
Empire, The Gifted,
The Mick, Star
NBC
Had its best upfront ever, with deals worth $6.5 billion
across NBCUni networks, up 8 percent over 2016.
This Is Us,
Will & Grace
WINNER!
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
18
J U LY 19, 2017
WONDER: CLAY ENOS/WARNER BROS. SPIDER: CHUCK ZLOTNICK/COLUMBIA PICTURES. TRANSFORMERS: PARAMOUNT PICTURES/BAY FILMS. ALIEN: MARK ROGERS PHOTOGRAPHER/TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX. MUMMY: CHIABELLA JAMES/UNIVERSAL. YACCARINO: SLAVEN VLASIC/GETTY IMAGES. DOCTOR: ABC/LIANE HENTSCHER.
Wonder Woman
$767M
WARNER BROS. TELEVISION GROUP
69TH PRIMETIME EMMY
®
OUTSTANDING DRAMA SERIES
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EVAN RACHEL WOOD as Dolores
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DISCOVERWESTWORLD.COM
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BEHIND THE VOICE
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PROUDLY CONGRATULATES OUR
AWARD NOMINEES
ALLISON JANNEY as Bonnie Plunkett
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The Report
Behind the Headlines
Domestic
International
Gross Cume % Chg Gross Cume
Cable TV
18-49
Live+3
Viewership
Live+3
Total
War for the Planet of the Apes FOX
56.3 56.3(1) 46*62 46 102.3
1.
Broadcast TV
The threequel easily roared past Spider-Man:
Homecoming — which fell more than expected
— but came in 22 percent behind the domestic
debut of the previous Apes film ($72.6 million).
1.
Big Brother (Thurs.) CBS
2.5
7.5M
1.
Fear the Walking Dead (1) AMC
3.8M
2.
Big Brother (Sun.) CBS
2.4
7.7M
2.
Fear the Walking Dead (2) AMC
3.7M
3.
Big Brother (Wed.) CBS
2.3
7.4M
3.
Power STARZ
2.3M
4.
Celebrity Family Feud ABC
1.5
7.5M
4.
Snowfall FX
2.2M
5.
Dateline NBC
1.2
6.
2.
Spider-Man: Homecoming SONY
44.2 207.3(2) -62 72.3*64 261.1 468.4
3.
Despicable Me 3 UNIVERSAL
19.4 188.4(3) -42 71*62 431.4 619.8
4.
Baby Driver SONY
8.7 73.1(3) -33 6.2*19
23.1
96.2
5.
The Big Sick LIONSGATE
7.5 16(4) +111 N/A
N/A
16
6.
The John Singleton drug drama
gives FX its fourth top-five cable
premiere of 2017, pulling 1.3 million
viewers in the adults 18-to-49
demo during its solid first entry.
6.2M
Candy Crush CBS
1.2
4.6M
Though it saw a solid live-plus-sameday premiere, time-shifting paints a
humbling picture for CBS’ game show
adaptation of the popular app. It
fetches a mere 9 percent lift from DVR.
Wonder Woman WARNER BROS.
6.8 380.6(7) -31 3.3*62 384.2 764.8
Wish Upon BROAD GREEN
5.5 5.5(1)
1.1*9
7.
Audience
Live+3
1.2
6.7
The horror pic is a ding for Broad Green
Pictures, which hasn’t found a genre breakout.
The company’s top-grossing release is
A Walk in the Woods (2015) with $30 million.
4.
Queen Sugar OWN
2.2M
6.
Preacher AMC
2.1M
6.
7.
The Wall NBC
1.1
5.1M
Claws TNT
2.1M
8.
8.
Little Big Shots: Forever … NBC
1.0
7.2M
Queen of the South USA
2.0M
9.
9.
Night Shift NBC
1.0
5.7M
Nashville CMT
1.5M
10. Turn AMC
1.1M
10. The
$100,000 Pyramid ABC
1.0
5.2M
11.
Hollywood Game Night NBC
1.0
4.5M
8.
Cars 3 DISNEY
3.1 140(5) -42 20.1*34 82.9 222.9
12.
Battle of Network Stars ABC
0.9
6.7M
9.
Transformers: Last Knight PARAMOUNT
2.8 124.9(4) -55 6.7*49 392.4 517.3
13.
Funderdome ABC
0.9
4.9M
14.
The Carmichael Show NBC
0.9
3.8M
15.
What Would You Do? ABC
0.8
4.1M
10. The
1.7
11.
House WARNER BROS.
23.1(3) -64 N/A
5.6
28.7
47 Meters Down ENTERTAINMENT STUDIOS
1.1 41.1(5) -58 90K*8 2.7 43.8
The Beguiled FOCUS/UNIVERSAL
922K 9.4(4) -55 1.3*11 2.4
The Kremlin
leader appeared
in source
material for
both projects.
One to Watch
For Better or Worse OWN
It’s the latter for Tyler Perry’s aging
comedy, which can’t crack 800,000
viewers as a big Viacom deal has
him set to leave OWN at 2018’s end.
12.
11.8
The drama will top out between $11 million and
$12 million domestically, behind director Sofia
Coppola’s Lost in Translation ($46.5 million)
and Marie Antoinette ($16 million).
Closer
Look
Thrones’ Growing Premieres
Live tune-in on July 16 sets an HBO record
SEASONS ONE THROUGH SEVEN
10.1
Guardians of the Galaxy 2 DISNEY
509K 386.6(11) -41 N/A 472.7 859.3
13.
Pirates of the Caribbean 5 DISNEY
496K 170(8) -58 7.5*35 581.5 751.5
10M
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
8.0
7.9
2015
2016
6.6
3.9
4.4
2.2
2011
2012
2013
2014
2017
14.
Jagga Jasoos UTV COMMUNICATIONS
490K 490K(1) N/A N/A 490K
Source: Nielsen Media, live-plus-same-day
Putin Axed
From Two
Thrillers
Russia’s president was denied
a presence in EuropaCorp’s
Kursk and Fox’s Red Sparrow
BY TATIANA SIEGEL
Hollywood isn’t ready to give screen
time to Russian president Vladimir
Putin, who’s been excised from two
upcoming studio features.
Fox’s Red Sparrow (March 2) tells
the story of a Russian spy (Jennifer
Lawrence) wooed by the CIA to be a
double agent. It’s based on former
CIA officer Jason Matthews’ novel,
which drew raves for
its insights into current spy craft. When
Fox exec Emma Watts
optioned the book in
Lawrence
2013, she shifted the
story from modern-day Russia to
1970s Budapest, nominally to give
it a more “timeless” feel — and
though Putin has a key role in the
book, he was dropped. Then, after
Frances Lawrence came aboard
as director, Watts shifted the story
back to the present day — and
yet despite the explosion of interest in the Kremlin following the
U.S. election, Putin’s character was
not restored. Insiders describe the
moves as “creative choices,” but by
avoiding Putin, Fox also is steering clear of any Russian hackers that
might protest.
Additionally, Putin is missing from
EuropaCorp’s upcoming Kursk,
the true story of a Russian submarine that sank to the bottom of the
Barents Sea in 2000, even though
he appears in the source material,
Robert Moore’s best-seller A Time
to Die, and was in early versions
of the screenplay. “For a studio to
release a movie about Putin that
makes him look like a fool would
be suicide,” says Ajay Arora, CEO
of security firm Vera, which works
with studios. “That’s a certain way
to be targeted [for retaliation].”
15.
Box-office source: comScore; estimates in $ millions; ( )Weekends in release; *Territories. Broadcast source: Nielsen, live-plus-3, week of July 3. Cable TV source: Nielsen, live-plus-3 scripted series, week of July 3.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
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CANDY: MONTY BRINTON/CBS. SNOWFALL: RAY MICKSHAW/FX. BETTER: COURTESY OF OWN. GAME: HELEN SLOAN/HBO. PUTIN: CLIVE MASON/GETTY IMAGES. LAWRENCE: ANTONIO DE
MORAES BARROS FILHOS/WIREIMAGE. WAR: COURTESY OF TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX. WISH: STEVE WILKIE/BROAD GREEN PICTURES. BEGUILED: BEN ROTHSTEIN/FOCUS FEATURES.
Box Office
AMC PROUDLY
CONGRATULATES OUR
2017 EMMY NOMINEES
®
OUTSTANDING DRAMA SERIES
Better Call Saul
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
Bob Odenkirk, Better Call Saul
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR
IN A DRAMA SERIES
Jonathan Banks, Better Call Saul
OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR A DRAMA SERIES
Vince Gilligan, Better Call Saul
OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR A DRAMA SERIES
Gordon Smith, Better Call Saul
OUTSTANDING ACTRESS IN A SHORT FORM
COMEDY OR DRAMA SERIES
Kelsey Scott, Fear the Walking Dead: Passage
OUTSTANDING SINGLE-CAMERA PICTURE EDITING
FOR A DRAMA SERIES
Skip Macdonald, Better Call Saul - Chicanery
Skip Macdonald & Kelley Dixon, Better Call Saul - Witness
OUTSTANDING PROSTHETIC MAKEUP
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Greg Nicotero, The Walking Dead
Jake Garber, The Walking Dead
Garrett Immel, The Walking Dead
Kevin Wasner, The Walking Dead
Gino Crognale, The Walking Dead
Kerrin Jackson, The Walking Dead
OUTSTANDING MUSIC SUPERVISION
7KRPDV*ROXELÉ%HWWHU&DOO6DXO
OUTSTANDING SHORT FORM COMEDY
OR DRAMA SERIES
Fear the Walking Dead: Passage
Better Call Saul: Los Pollos Hermanos Employee Training
OUTSTANDING SOUND MIXING
FOR A COMEDY OR DRAMA SERIES (ONE HOUR)
Larry Benjamin, Better Call Saul
Kevin Valentine, Better Call Saul
Philip W. Palmer, Better Call Saul
THANK YOU
TELEVISION ACADEMY
MEMBERS FOR OUR
13 NOMINATIONS
®
© 2017 AMC Network Entertainment LLC. All Rights Reserved.
SONY PICTURES TELEVISION
THE CROWN
OUTSTANDING CASTING FOR A
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IN A DRAMA SERIES
CLAIRE FOY
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ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
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DRAMA SERIES
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CORNER”
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PETER MORGAN, “ASSASSINS”
OUTSTANDING PRODUCTION
DESIGN FOR A NARRATIVE PERIOD
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OUTSTANDING PERIOD/FANTASY
COSTUMES FOR A SERIES, LIMITED
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29 EMMY AWARD NOMINATIONS
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“A SNOWMAN’S TALE”
The Report
Behind the Headlines
New Blood, Netflix Love and the
Emmys’ Most Evident Trends
The drama race is shaken up by five first-year series and late night gets political as TV Academy
voters appear to be informed by the aftermath of the 2016 election By Michael O’Connell
T
he culmination of an expensive and overwhelming campaign
season, the 2017 Primetime Emmy nominations offer something for most everyone — and, with few exceptions, as open
a race as the awards have seen in some time. A record five first-year
series — The Crown, The Handmaid’s Tale, Stranger Things, This Is Us and
Westworld — join familiar entries House of Cards and Better Call Saul in
the top drama race. That means there’s no category consensus leading
into the final round of voting, open Aug. 14, though HBO’s Westworld
More Series,
Fewer
Nominees
UP
leads with 22 noms. Newcomer Atlanta seems to pose the most serious
threat to Veep’s recent comedy reign, but the fervor for the whirlwind
election season of Saturday Night Live (which tied Westworld for the
most noms) may make the variety sketch show this year’s true comedic
breakout. TV Academy voters clearly took cues from the current political climate, also acknowledging the eerie alternate America of Hulu’s
Handmaid’s Tale with 13 mentions and laying on love for late night’s
biggest Donald Trump critics, Samantha Bee and Stephen Colbert.
The 2017 Nominees’ Greatest Reactions
By the Numbers
“I was just running a halfmarathon, as I do on Thursdays,
and look what happened?
Actually, I was in a meeting
with the field department.”
16%
349 scripted projects
were submitted for the
2017 Emmys ballot,
leaping past the
302 tally in 2016.
SNL’s
Leslie
Jones
Bee, on where she learned about Full Frontal’s
seven Emmy nominations
231
Saturday Night Live’s new record
for most nominations ever
Feud
DOWN
15%
Despite more series
than ever, the projects
with nominated actors
dropped from 46 in
2016 to 39. (See the six
acting noms for FX’s
Feud alone.)
“Thank you
to David Benioff
and D.B. Weiss
for not getting
your show
out in time for
Emmy season
this year. Next
year, we’re toast,
I guess.”
“Well, it turns out
‘Variety/Sketch
Series Nominee’
doesn’t do
much for your
Grindr profile.”
Stranger Things
co-creator Ross Duffer,
on Game of Thrones’
Emmy absence
Billy Eichner, after his
first 24 hours as a
nominee for TruTV’s
Billy on the Street
23
Nominations for non-white
performers, up 2 from 2016
13
Age of Stranger Things actress
Millie Bobby Brown, potentially the
youngest Emmy winner ever
4
The tally of female directors
nominated, down from 5 in 2016
Haves and Have-Nots: Emmy’s Widening Wealth Gap
There are more networks, platforms and programs than ever — so while some usual suspects (HBO and Netflix)
grow their already significant nom hauls, other perennial players (sorry, Showtime) are left sputtering
THE H AV ES
Casey Bloys
Ted Sarandos
HBO
Even without
Game of Thrones,
HBO tops all
other platforms
— growing its total
nominations to 111
(from 94 in 2016).
Netflix
As his streamer’s
nom numbers surge
nearly 70 percent
to 91 total mentions,
Sarandos also boasts
a rarity: three series
up for best drama.
Courteney
Monroe
National Geographic
Nine months after a
rebrand, the network
sees its prestige
scripted push pay
dividends with
10 noms for Genius.
THE H AV E-NOTS
Donald Glover
Roy Price
Chris Albrecht
Claire Danes
Jimmy Fallon
Atlanta
FX held steady
at 55, without 2016
favorite People v.
O.J., thanks in no
small part to Glover
and his four personal
noms for Atlanta.
Amazon
After a huge
FYC spend, Amazon
noms are flat
year-over-year, with
just 15 mentions
and a series snub for
Transparent.
Starz
Accolades continue
to elude the pay
cable network, which
saw its well-reviewed
American Gods limp
in with just two
below-the-line noms.
Homeland
The drama series’
continued slip is
more concerning for
Showtime, which
had total noms down
32 percent to just 15
and no new breakout.
The Tonight Show
With ratings down,
Tonight’s Trumphair-tousling host
falls out of the
variety race, scoring
a mention only
for online efforts.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
26
J U LY 19, 2017
FEUD: BYRON COHEN/FX. BEE: DANIEL ZUCHNIK/WIREIMAGE. EICHNER: DIA DIPASUPIL/GETTY IMAGES. JONES: WILL HEATH/NBC. BLOYS: TARA ZIEMBA/GETTY IMAGES. SARANDOS: FREDERICK M. BROWN/GETTY IMAGES. MONROE: DESIREE NAVARRO/
WIREIMAGE. GLOVER: VENTURELLI/GETTY IMAGES FOR GUCCI. PRICE: SLAVEN VLASIC/GETTY IMAGES FOR MUSEUM OF THE MOVING IMAGE. ALBRECHT: COURTESY OF STARZ. DANES: JASON LAVERIS/FILMMAGIC. FALLON: ANDREW LIPOVSKY/NBC.
EM M YS:
T H E R ACE
The Report
7 Days of DEALS
Who’s inking on the dotted line this week
Deal
of the
Week
Wang
Billionaire Wang Jianlin’s dreams of owning a major
“AMC does not rely upon financing from Dalian
U.S. film studio may have just gone poof. Now
Wanda,” the company said July 18. But Legendary is
China’s second-richest man is probably working
believed to be on less solid footing, with a pricey film
all of his government connections and industry
slate including Pacific Rim: Uprising with Universal.
acumen simply to retain the global entertainment
Yet insiders suggest Wanda shouldn’t have immeportfolio he already has amassed.
diate trouble co-financing a film slate, given the
Pressure mounted on the tycoon’s Dalian
capital, assets and international banking relationWanda Group when news emerged July 16 of a bankships it is known to have off China’s shores.
ing document circulating on Chinese social media
But nothing makes investors more skittish about
alleging that China’s biggest financial institutions
Chinese private firms than an aura of political dishad been instructed by state regulators not to
favor. And Wanda’s reputation and valuation already
supply financing to several of the conglomerate’s
have taken a considerable hit. In the wake of the docoverseas acquisitions.
ument’s emergence, shares and debt issued by several
The provenance of the memo (which THR has
of its subsidiaries plunged, while Standard & Poor’s
reviewed) has yet to be verified. Some have quesrated Wanda on negative credit watch, saying the
tioned its authenticity (it was erased from the
recent sale of its theme parks business — executed to
internet by Chinese censors, just as mysteriously
pay down debt — would cut into revenue.
as it appeared), but if legitimate,
“If they’re going after Wanda,
the directive appears to block
nobody is safe,” says USC politiWanda from raising funds to
cal science professor Stanley
Rosen, who specializes in the
bankroll its U.S.-based assets,
including theater chain AMC
Chinese film industry. “This
Entertainment and studio
sends a message to U.S. venture
Legendary Entertainment. The
capitalists and investors about
fate of Wanda’s $1.2 billion
the dangers of investing or partBeverly Hills development,
nering with even the biggest
which broke ground in April,
private enterprises in China.”
also is unclear.
Pacific Rim: Uprising hits theaters in 2018.
— PATRICK BRZESKI
James
FILM
Lily James (UTA, the
U.K.’s Tavistock Wood)
will play a young version
of Meryl Streep’s
character in Universal’s
Mamma Mia sequel.
It’s Andres Muschietti
(WME, Hirsch Wallerstein)
will helm Sony’s Robotech
adaptation and replace
Scott Derrickson as director of Hulu’s Locke and
Key pilot.
I Want My (Scripted) MTV: Cabler Unveils New Slate
MTV’s scripted overhaul includes some new
Big
takes on its current slate.
Deal
As Teen Wolf, the
cabler’s first scripted
drama, prepares to resume its sixth and
final season July 30, creator Jeff Davis
already is working on an anthological
reboot while continuing to develop MTV’s
War of the Worlds adaptation, which
will be a female-led take. Scream also is
getting the anthology treatment, starting with a third season featuring a new
premise, showrunner and Tyga- and
C.J. Wallace-led cast that will air its six
episodes over three nights in March. That
will be followed by a four-hour untitled
scripted drama about Wallace’s parents,
singer Faith Evans and late rapper The
Notorious B.I.G., which is expected to air
next summer. If those projects succeed,
the network hopes to team with more artists on scripted miniseries.
On the development side, MTV president
Chris McCarthy hopes scripted series
Calabasas will follow Beverly Hills, 90210
to become TV’s hottest town. The show,
like the new Scream, is executive produced
by Queen Latifah; it’s a dramedy that
explores the intersection of celebrity,
music, sports and young Hollywood.
Many industry observers believed MTV
was exiting the scripted
space after it canceled
three rookie shows —
including critical darling
Sweet/Vicious — and lost
The Shannara Chronicles
McCarthy
to Spike as part of Viacom’s
realignment. But the desire for scripted
plays (albeit limited) remains.
“MTV is in a great space on the
unscripted side, and we have the ability
to take our time picking stories,” says
McCarthy. “I’d like to have one scripted
event a quarter, but if we don’t get there,
I won’t beat ourselves up next year.”
Jorge Lendeborg Jr.
(Momentum, Mosaic,
Hansen Jacobson) will star
opposite Hailee Steinfeld
in Paramount’s Transformers
spinoff Bumblebee, along
with Abby Quinn, Jason
Drucker and Rachel Crow.
Alice Through the
Looking Glass’ James
Bobin (UTA, Sloane Offer)
will helm Lionsgate’s
adaptation of new novel
The Punch Escrow.
— LESLEY GOLDBERG
Rights Available! Hot new books with Hollywood appeal
BY REBECCA FORD AND ANDY LEWIS
Isadora (FARRAR, STRAUS AND GIROUX, MAY 23)
Stillhouse Lake (THOMAS & MERCER, JULY 1)
BY Amelia Gray AGENCY WME
BY Rachel Caine AGENCY CAA
With ballet movies in vogue (Red Sparrow, Swan Lake), this wellreviewed novel about tragic dance legend Isadora Duncan is
well-timed. Gray picks up her story in 1913, just after her two children drowned when their car plunged off a bridge into the Seine.
Perfect for an actress looking for a challenging role, this suspense
thriller follows a shy housewife who, after discovering her husband is a serial killer, morphs into a gun-toting warrior who tries
to build a new life for her kids — only to have trouble follow her.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
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J U LY 19, 2017
WANG: HAN HAIDAN/CNSPHOTO/VCG VIA GETTY IMAGES. PACIFIC: @JOHNBOYEGA/TWITTER. JAMES: MIKE MARSLAND/WIREIMAGE. WALLACE: FRAZER HARRISON/WIREIMAGE. BOOK: COURTESY OF MACMILLAN. PERRY: JEFFREY MAYER/WIREIMAGE. BELL: CINDY ORD/GETTY IMAGES. LENDEBORG
JR.: THOMAS CONCORDIA/GETTY IMAGES FOR KIA. BALDWIN: ROY ROCHLIN/FILMMAGIC. LA PEER: COURTESY OF PARADIGM TALENT AGENCY. JEEZY: THADDAEUS MCADAMS/FILMMAGIC. MASSOUD: GEORGE PIMENTEL/GETTY IMAGES FOR IMG. MCCARTHY: COURTESY OF MTV.
CHINA’S WANDA CR ACK DOW N DIMS
A BR IGHT HOLLY WOOD FU TU R E
$3.9M
Damages train operator CSX must
pay Midnight Rider crew member
Big
Number Sarah Jones’ family for her 2014
death, per a July 17 jury verdict.
Perry
Bell
Paradigm will consolidate its three L.A. offices in Beverly Hills.
Tyler Perry (WME,
Ziffren Brittenham) has
inked a multiyear content
partnership with Viacom,
including first-look rights
for Paramount and approximately 90 TV episodes
of original series per year.
Blake Lively (WME,
Management 360,
Jackoway Tyerman) will
star in EON Productions
and IM Global’s spy thriller
The Rhythm Section.
Leigh Janiak (Verve,
Morris Yorn) will write
and direct three movies
based on R.L. Stine’s Fear
Street books for Fox.
TELEVISION
Alec Baldwin (CAA) will
star as Col. Jessup in NBC’s
live A Few Good Men.
Tamron Hall (WME, Gang
Tyre) is partnering with
Weinstein Television for a
new daytime talk show.
Lendeborg Jr.
Baldwin
Jerry Bruckheimer
Television (CAA, Bloom
Hergott) has inked a
three-year overall deal with
CBS Television Studios.
DIGITAL
Ray Romano (ICM,
Conversation, Del Shaw)
will join Martin Scorsese’s
The Irishman for Netflix.
Atlanta producer Paul
Simms (CAA, Ziffren
Brittenham) has inked
an exclusive overall deal
with FX Productions.
Kristen Bell (CAA,
Schreck Rose) and Kelsey
Grammer (UTA, Surpin
Mayersohn) will star
in Netflix’s Like Father.
E! is developing docuseries Reunion Road Trip
starring the Jersey Shore
cast in the pilot. … FX is
developing crime drama
The Mastermind with EPs
Noah Hawley and Robert
Kirkman. … MTV has
greenlighted unscripted
series Catfish: Trolls,
Undressed and Win
Big. … TNT has renewed
rookie drama Claws. …
Showtime is developing
an L Word sequel.
Netflix has ordered an
adaptation of graphic novel
The Umbrella Academy
straight to series.
REAL ESTATE
Paradigm (Newmark
Grubb, CBRE) will move its
L.A. headquarters to the
Wilshire La Peer Building.
Ted Sarandos (Hilton
& Hyland) has sold
his Beverly Hills home
for $8.825 million.
ARTEMESIA
w w w. a r t e m e s i a . u s
l o s f e l i z • e s t. 1 9 1 3 • $ 1 1 , 7 5 0 , 0 0 0
Next
Big
Thing
Rep
Sheet
Rapper Jeezy has
signed with UTA, as has
R&B star Jeremih.
Director Robert
Schwentke (RED,
Insurgent, Allegiant)
has left CAA for WME.
Top Musical.ly duo
Lisa and Lena has signed
with WME.
Keala Settle (Broadway’s
Waitress) has signed
with 42West, as has rapper Meek Mill.
Pop star Cody Simpson
has signed with ICM
Partners.
Mena Massoud
REPS Canada’s
The Characters, Stokes
Management
WHY HE MATTERS
The Egypt-born actor,
25, beat more than
2,000 hopefuls to land
the coveted title role
in Disney’s live-action
Aladdin remake, opposite
Power Rangers’ Naomi
Scott as Jasmine and
Will Smith as the Genie.
Massoud, who was a regular on the 2015 TeenNick
drama Open Heart, will
recur as a CIA analyst
on Amazon’s upcoming
Jack Ryan series.
s a l ly f o r s t e r j o n e s
3 1 0. 6 9 1 . 78 8 8
john aaroe group
Art you can live in.
13,290 sf + guesthouse + gatehouse + two gated acres on private street
award-winning resto ration + ballroom + pipe organ + waterfalls + views to the ocean
FX NETWORKS PROUDLY CONGRATULATES
OUTSTANDING LIMITED SERIES
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTRESS
IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
JESSICA LANGE
SUSAN SARANDON
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR
IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
ALFRED MOLINA
STANLEY TUCCI
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTRESS
IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
JUDY DAVIS
JACKIE HOFFMAN
OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR A LIMITED
SERIES, MOVIE OR DRAMATIC SPECIAL
RYAN MURPHY
“AND THE WINNER IS… (THE OSCARS OF 1963)”
OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR A LIMITED
SERIES, MOVIE OR DRAMATIC SPECIAL
RYAN MURPHY
“AND THE WINNER IS… (THE OSCARS OF 1963)”
JAFFE COHEN, MICHAEL ZAM, RYAN MURPHY
“PILOT”
OUTSTANDING PRODUCTION DESIGN FOR A
NARRATIVE PERIOD PROGRAM (ONE HOUR OR MORE)
JUDY BECKER, JAMIE MCCALL, FLORENCIA MARTIN
OUTSTANDING CASTING
FOR A LIMITED SERIES, MOVIE OR SPECIAL
ROBERT J. ULRICH, CSA , ERIC DAWSON, CSA
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FOR A SERIES, LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
LOU EYRICH, HANNAH JACOBS, KATIE SAUNDERS
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FOR A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
CHRIS CLARK, RALPH MICHAEL ABALOS,
WENDY SOUTHARD, HELENA CEPEDA
OUTSTANDING MAKEUP
FOR A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE (NON-PROSTHETIC)
ERYN KRUEGER MEKASH, ROBIN BEAUCHESNE,
TYM BUACHARERN, KIM AYERS, BECKY COTTON,
DAVID WILLIAMS
OUTSTANDING MAIN TITLE DESIGN
RYAN MURPHY, ALEXIS MARTIN WOODALL,
KYLE COOPER, NADIA TZUO, MARGHERITA PREMUROSO
OUTSTANDING MUSIC COMPOSITION
FOR A LIMITED SERIES, MOVIE OR SPECIAL
(ORIGINAL DRAMATIC SCORE)
MAC QUAYLE
OUTSTANDING ORIGINAL MAIN TITLE THEME MUSIC
MAC QUAYLE
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NONFICTION OR REALITY SERIES
FEUD: BETTE AND JOAN: INSIDE LOOK
RYAN MURPHY, TANASE POPA, STEPHANIE GIBBONS,
KENNA MCCABE, SALLY DAWS, MAUREEN TIMPA
OUTSTANDING LIMITED SERIES
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IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
EWAN MCGREGOR
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IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
CARRIE COON
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR
IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
DAVID THEWLIS
OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR A LIMITED
SERIES, MOVIE OR DRAMATIC SPECIAL
NOAH HAWLEY
“THE LAW OF VACANT PLACES”
OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR A LIMITED
SERIES, MOVIE OR DRAMATIC SPECIAL
NOAH HAWLEY
“THE LAW OF VACANT PLACES”
OUTSTANDING CINEMATOGRAPHY
FOR A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
DANA GONZALES, ASC
OUTSTANDING CASTING
FOR A LIMITED SERIES, MOVIE OR SPECIAL
RACHEL TENNER, CSA , JACKIE LIND, CSA ,
STEPHANIE GORIN, CSA
OUTSTANDING SINGLE-CAMERA PICTURE EDITING
FOR A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
HENK VAN EEGHEN - “APORIA”
REGIS KIMBLE - “THE LAW OF VACANT PLACES”
CURTIS THURBER - “THE NARROW ESCAPE PROBLEM”
OUTSTANDING HAIRSTYLING
FOR A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
CHRIS GLIMSDALE, PENNY THOMPSON,
JUDY DURBACZ, EVA BLANCHARD
OUTSTANDING MAKEUP
FOR A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE (NON-PROSTHETIC)
GAIL KENNEDY, JOANNE PREECE,
AMANDA RYE, DANIELLE HANSON
OUTSTANDING MUSIC COMPOSITION
FOR A LIMITED SERIES, MOVIE OR SPECIAL
(ORIGINAL DRAMATIC SCORE)
JEFF RUSSO
OUTSTANDING SOUND EDITING
FOR A LIMITED SERIES, MOVIE OR SPECIAL
NICK FORSHAGER, JOE BRACCIALE,
MARTIN GWYNN JONES, BRENT PICKETT,
CLAIRE DOBSON, ROBERT BERTOLA, ALEX BULLICK,
TYLER WHITHAM, MATT DECKER, JOHN ELLIOT
OUTSTANDING SOUND MIXING
FOR A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
MARTIN LEE, KIRK LYNDS, CAS ,
MICHAEL PLAYFAIR, MICHAEL PERFTT
OUR
55 EMMY AWARD NOMINEES
®
OUTSTANDING COMEDY SERIES
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTRESS
IN A DRAMA SERIES
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IN A COMEDY SERIES
KERI RUSSELL
ALISON WRIGHT
ZACH GALIFIANAKIS
DONALD GLOVER
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTOR
IN A DRAMA SERIES
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FOR A DRAMA SERIES
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FOR A COMEDY SERIES
MATTHEW RHYS
JOEL FIELDS, JOE WEISBERG
“THE SOVIET DIVISION”
LOUIE ANDERSON
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FOR A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
MICHELLE CEGLIA, VALERIE JACKSON,
JOSE ZAMORA
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SERIES, LIMITED SERIES, MOVIE OR SPECIAL
ERYN KRUEGER MEKASH, MICHAEL MEKASH,
DAVID L EROY ANDERSON, JAMES M ACKINNON,
JASON HAMER, MELANIE EICHNER,
CRISTINA HIMIOB, MAIKO CHIBA
OUTSTANDING MUSIC COMPOSITION
FOR A SERIES (ORIGINAL DRAMATIC SCORE)
MAX RICHTER
DONALD GLOVER
“B.A.N.”
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FOR A COMEDY SERIES
DONALD GLOVER
“B.A.N.”
STEPHEN GLOVER
“STREETS ON LOCK”
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FOR A COMEDY SERIES
ALEXA L. FOGEL, CSA
TARA FELDSTEIN BENNETT, CSA
CHASE PARIS, CSA
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FOR A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
(NON-PROSTHETIC)
KIM AYERS, MIKE MEKASH,
ERYN KRUEGER MEKASH, SILVINA KNIGHT,
CARLEIGH HERBERT, LUIS GARCIA
OUTSTANDING SOUND EDITING
FOR A LIMITED SERIES, MOVIE OR SPECIAL
GARY MEGREGIAN, MPSE , STEVE M. STUHR,
JASON KRANE, MPSE , TIMOTHY A. CLEVELAND,
PAUL DILLER, MPSE , DAVID KLOTZ, NOEL VOUGHT
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTRESS
IN A COMEDY SERIES
PAMELA ADLON
OUTSTANDING ANIMATED PROGRAM
OUTSTANDING SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
HENRY BADGETT, TRACY M C CREARY, ANGELA BARSON,
LUCY AINSWORTH-TAYLOR, NIC BIRMINGHAM, SIMON ROWE,
ALEXANDER KIRICHENKO, FINLAY DUNCAN, COLIN GORRY
*$/$ 22 DE JULIO
&$-$0r*,&$0$'5,'
premiosplatino.com
About Town
People, Places, Preoccupations
PERSON OF INTER EST
Sophie Turner
on Graduating
From GoT
The X-Men star is hoping for a
‘semi-normal’ life after Westeros
By Bryn Elise Sandberg
Photographed by Shayne Laverdiere
ot unlike her Game of Thrones
character, who has gone from being
a pawn to a shrewd player in the
drama’s intrigues, Sophie Turner
has grown up on the HBO drama, which premiered its penultimate run on July 16. “I got
my sex education from this show, and a historical education,” says the U.K.-born actress,
21, who lives in London. After her character,
Sansa Stark, was brutally raped in season
five, “I definitely got educated on that as well,”
Turner offers, “and that spurred me to be
an activist [against sexual assault].” As the
job she’s held since age 13 winds down (she
can’t say when the final season starts filming
“because I don’t even know if I’m in it”), Turner
is looking forward to “getting back to grips
with a semi-normal existence.” She’ll appear
in a couple of upcoming indies (the Southern
drama Huntsville, the romantic comedy Time
Freak) and stars as Jean Grey in the X-Men films
(Thrones’ Maisie Williams joins her in the franchise with the upcoming spinoff New Mutants).
“It’s like summer camp,” says Turner of being
on set with Jennifer Lawrence and Michael
Fassbender. “It’s just a big group of us going
out and drinking and eating and having fun.”
The actress, who attended Thrones’ July 12
L.A. premiere with boyfriend Joe Jonas, isn’t
at liberty to reveal much about this season
except to say that she has scenes with actors
she’s never worked with before. “Sansa has a
lot of struggles with who she trusts and the
power she now has,” Turner says, noting that
she and her co-stars are terrified that each
time they’re handed a
“We didn’t know what kind of
new script, they’ll be
show it was. We didn’t know
what HBO was. We were kind
faced with their charof jumping into the deep end
acter’s demise. “We
in the dark,” says Turner of
being cast in GoT at age 13.
flip through frantiShe was photographed July 6
at Eloi Studios in Montreal.
cally and check in on
each other, like, ‘Are
Styling by Juliana Schiavinatto
Rosetta Getty dress
you still alive?’ ”
(available at ssense.com).
HAIR AND MAKEUP BY GENEVIEVE LENNEVILLE AT FOLIO MONTREAL
N
Hear Turner reveal the advice she gave to co-star Maisie Williams about joining the X-Men universe at THR.COM/VIDEO
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
33
J U LY 19, 2017
About Town
People, Places,
Preoccupations
lack Girl Magic is real,” says
Girls Trip director Malcolm
D. Lee. “People want to see
it, they want to be empowered by it.”
For Universal’s R-rated comedy, out
July 21, Lee aimed to capture that
magic — a notion popularized by a
2013 hashtag and disseminated
by figures from Solange Knowles
to Barack Obama — with an authentic rebuttal to reality
shows like Love & Hip
Hop. “I wanted a counterbalance to women
sniping or throwing
Lee
drinks. My wife’s book
club watched the movie as one of
my first audiences, and they laughed
and said, ‘I love how soft they are
with each other.’ If that’s part of the
takeaway of this bold, outrageous
comedy, that’s great.” Another takeaway he’d like: “To prove to the
industry that four black women can
open a movie and it does not have
to be about the space program, OK?”
Left: The dockside
space of Perelman’s
Le Bilboquet.
Above: Lauer with
(from left) Rosanna
Scotto, April Gornik
and Jill Martin at a
restaurant event to
save Sag Harbor
Cinema on June 16.
W O OD
HOLLYG O U T S
HAN
B
Two Mogul-Owned Hotspots
Put Sag Harbor ‘on Steroids’
Ron Perelman’s Le Bilboquet and Marc Rowan’s Lulu are drawing Matt Lauer
and Howard Stern, raising the Hamptons reservation bar and bringing on the
brunettes with clipboards: ‘Everybody is talking about it’ By Beth Landman
t the door of the hottest new Hamptons
restaurant, Le Bilboquet — a Sag Harbor
outpost of the NYC flagship owned by Ron
Perelman, Eric Clapton and restaurateur Philippe
Delgrange, among others — a brunette with a
clipboard studiously ignores a retreating couple,
while the maitre d’ dismisses a stunning British
duo by simply pointing to the gentleman’s flip-flops.
“They play hard to get at the door,” observes diner
Laurent Tourondel, the star chef who owns
LT Burger on Sag Harbor’s Main Street. Counters
Delgrange: “We don’t allow men to wear sandals.
It’s not so nice to be eating and see that.”
Xavier Merat, who owns Sag Harbor’s upscale
hair salon and caters to ladies not used to being
sized up at a door, including Uma Thurman, Julie
Andrews and the Olsen sisters, says: “Everyone
in town is talking about it.” Sag Harbor has been
the low-key Hamptons town despite the marina,
where yachts have edged out small vessels over
the years. But this season, two of the billionaires
who dock there opened restaurants in the former
fishing village: Perelman, who premiered Le
Bilboquet in June (and owned the East Hampton
A
— ASHLEY LEE
From left:
Regina
Hall, Jada
Pinkett
Smith, Queen
Latifah
and Tiffany
Haddish
in Girls Trip.
Mexican joint Blue Parrot with Renee Zellweger,
Jon Bon Jovi and Larry Gagosian), and Apollo
Group’s Marc Rowan, of Lulu on Main Street, who
also launched two hotspots in Montauk last year.
Millions were spent transforming Le Bilboquet’s
sprawling dockside into a chic space with teak
floors, champagne-hued booths and a deck with
Riviera-worthy umbrellas. A back patio has its
own entrance, with talk of giving a secret password
to VIP guests. Forget reservations:
Show up and hope for the best or
text the manager on his cell. “Money
is not the driving force for these
guys, so everything they have is at a
Perelman
higher level,” says Stephen Hanson,
who sold his BR Guest restaurants for $150 million in 2007 and is about to open a Manhattan
place in September called Life. Summer isn’t half
over, and Billy Joel and Rudy Giuliani already
have visited Lulu, while Joel, Matt Lauer, Howard
Stern, Michael Lynne and Michael Phelps have
stopped by Le Bilboquet. “This is the busiest I’ve
seen Sag Harbor,” says Tourondel. “Suddenly the
town is on steroids.”
L.A.’s Gilded, Gloomy Dinner for Two: $1,000, 21 Courses, Zero Cheer
Fire up those expense accounts: L.A.’s most anticipated restaurant of the year opened
July 6. Specializing in a rustic futurist cuisine, Vespertine is the brainchild of Jordan Kahn,
34, who first gained notice at Michael Mina’s late XIV in West Hollywood. Now, across from
his lunch spot Destroyer in Culver City, he has unveiled this earnest, doleful avant-garde
tasting menu: Expect out-there creations (crystalline ice plant, smoked lamb’s heart) served
in minimalist ceramic amid an end-of-the-world vibe. The sense of play that generally
comes with such calculated culinary experiences (and prices: A THR duo dined July 11 for
$995) is not in evidence here, as diners navigate from course to course on the restaurant’s four levels, tended to by servers in goth-tribal attire. “You’re in this very industrial
neighborhood, eating these strange natural things. It forces you to look at them in new
ways,” explains actress Monica Lacy (Amazon’s The Kicks), who with casting director husband Ross visited the first evening. “Vespertine is on to something unique.” It will be love
or hate for foodies in search of a new high — or a purposeful, mournful new low. – GARY BAUM
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
34
J U LY 19, 2017
Composers who provided music
for World War Z were tapped for
the doomy custom soundtrack at
Vespertine (housed in a four-level
building on Hayden Avenue, left).
Below: Mulberries and Vinegar,
one of 21 courses served July 11.
SAG: DOUG YOUNG. LAUER, PERELMAN: PATRICK MCMULLAN/GETTY IMAGES. LEE: GUSTAVO CABALLERO/GETTY IMAGES. GIRLS: MICHELE K. SHORT/UNIVERSAL STUDIOS. VESPERTINE: PETER CURY (2).
‘Black Girl Magic’
at the Box Office?
About Town
Yes, I Did Say That!
Quotes
A look at who’s saying what in entertainment
Compiled by Seth Abramovitch
“I was in Joshua Tree,
totally sober — completely
fucking sober — I look
up in the sky and there’s a
bunch of spaceships.”
KESHA
The singer, explaining to Billboard the inspiration for
her new album, Rainbow, which features several UFOs on
the cover and includes a song titled “Spaceship.”
STEVE WHITMIRE
The Kermit the Frog puppeteer,
in a blog post in which he relayed
how “devastated” he was to
be fired by Disney after 27 years
amid creative disputes.
“YOU NEED TO PAY
ATTENTION TO THE
MOTHERFUCKING
SCRIPT! I EVEN
CHOOSE MY
GODDAMN COMMAS
FOR A REASON!”
“It’s something
that would
enhance CBS.”
LESLIE MOONVES
The CBS CEO, while at the
annual Allen & Co. conference
in Sun Valley, Idaho, telling
CNBC of his interest in acquiring
“very worthy” CNN.
FRANK DARABONT
The Walking Dead creator,
ranting in a trove of abusive emails
— released amid his $280 million
lawsuit against AMC — sent to
network execs and crew during the
filming of the show’s first season.
“Beautiful women
crashing jazz
concerts is still more
[justice] than
a lot of victims get.”
“[I wanted to] make a
film that looked like
you — that looked
like the real world.”
DYLAN FARROW
AVA DUVERNAY
Woody Allen’s daughter,
responding on Salon.com to a
protest by topless activists
objecting to her father’s concert in
Germany. Their bodies were
painted with excerpts from Farrow’s
2014 letter detailing alleged
abuses by Allen when she was 7.
The director, introducing her
big-budget adaptation of
Madeleine L’Engle’s sci-fi classic
A Wrinkle in Time to the
racially diverse audience at D23.
ANN C.
LANDS
IN THE
HOT
SEAT
Ann Coulter’s over-the-top tweetstorm against
Delta — for failing to hold her “extra room” seat in
coach — earned the pundit zero star sympathy.
Chris Evans suggested that Coulter “shit bullshit”
while RuPaul dubbed her “the Rosa Parks of our
time.” The airline says it refunded Coulter’s $30.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
MAX LANDIS
The screenwriter, tweeting
his disapproval of singer
Ed Sheeran’s cameo on the July 16
Game of Thrones. Sheeran
later deleted his Twitter account.
36
J U LY 19, 2017
“Why is it lie after
lie after lie?
The deception,
Chris, is
mind-boggling.”
SHEPARD SMITH
The Fox News anchor, breaking ranks
with his pro-Trump network in
an exchange with colleague Chris
Wallace about Donald Trump Jr.’s
shifting stories regarding Russians.
KESHA: PAUL MORIGI/WIREIMAGE. DUVERNAY: DIMITRIOS KAMBOURIS/GETTY IMAGES FOR TIME. MOONVES: GARY GERSHOFF/WIREIMAGE. SMITH: ROBIN MARCHANT/GETTY IMAGES. COULTER: JEFFREY MAYER/WIREIMAGE.
“For me the Muppets
are not just a job.
They are a calling, an
urgent, undeniable,
impossible to
resist way of life.”
“No one wants you
here you absolute
boner killer.”
Going Out With
A Shred Of Decency
Last laughs begin August 20 10PM
Congratulations to the cast & crew of EPISODES
for five seasons of giving Hollywood the business.
©2017 Showtime Networks Inc. All rights reserved. SHOWTIME and related marks are registered trademarks of Showtime Networks Inc., a CBS
Company. “Episodes”: ©Hat Trick Productions Ltd. All rights reserved.
About Town
The Red Carpet
2
D.B. Weiss with wife
Andrea Troyer (far
left) and David Benioff
(far right) with
wife Amanda Peet.
Game of Thrones
Los Angeles, July 12
1
Sophie Turner
and Kit Harington
4
Gwendoline
Christie
Maisie Williams with
boyfriend Ollie Jackson
3
Nikolaj
Coster-Waldau
5
6
Jerome Flynn (left)
and Iain Glen
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
38
J U LY 19, 2017
Girls Trip
Party
Crawler
Los Angeles, July 13
Winter in Summer
The extravagant world
premiere of season seven
of Game of Thrones took
over Walt Disney Concert
Hall, with stars and showrunners D.B. Weiss (2) and
David Benioff (2) holding
court. “This season is
all about the alive human
beings coming together
and sensing that there’s a
greater threat here,”
Sophie Turner (1) told
THR before the screening
of the first episode with
a live orchestra. The lavish
afterparty was studded
with displays of costumes
and props from the
series, with performers
dressed in white garb on
stilts, while a DJ on an
ivory-colored Iron Throne
played a set in front of a
dance floor covered with
a map of Westeros.
An assortment of Night
King statuettes only
further reinforced the sentiment: “Winter is here.”
8
From left: Will Packer,
Donna Langley
and Larenz Tate
7
Malcolm D. Lee and
Jada Pinkett Smith
— JOSH WIGLER
TURNER, PEET, GLEN: JEFF KRAVITZ/FILMMAGIC. COSTER-WALDAU, CHRISTIE, WILLIAMS: FILMMAGIC. LEE, LANGLEY, SHELL, HALL: ALEX J. BERLINER/ABIMAGES. GLOVER, FORD: TIMOTHY NORRIS.
(Black) Girl Power
10
Regina Hall
9
From left: Jeff Shell, Queen
Latifah and Ron Meyer
Ford Theatre Grand Opening Gala
Los Angeles, July 15
“The best thing is
our friendship,” said Jada
Pinkett Smith (7) as she
walked the pink carpet with
co-stars Regina Hall (10),
Queen Latifah (9) and
Tiffany Haddish at the
Girls Trip Regal L.A. Live
premiere. “I love Moonlight,
I love Hidden Figures, but
I also want to see people
who are having fun and
just showing female friends
hanging out,” said writer
Tracy Oliver. Producer Will
Packer (8) and director
Malcolm D. Lee (7) agreed
audiences want that kind
of film, which led to their
idea of showing females
— not males — behaving
badly. “Women, particularly
black women, we made this
movie for you,” Lee told the
crowd before the screening.
— ARLENE WASHINGTON
Ford Revamp
The summer season
kicked off with a highenergy Savion Glover (11)
per formance, the first in
the fully restored amphitheater, which was feted on
the venue’s new terrace by
such guests as Debbie
Allen (12), Angela Bassett
and Kevin McHale, among
others. — RAMONA SAVISS
12
11
Savion Glover
From left:
Ford Theatres
Foundation board
chair David Ford
and Debbie Allen
with her husband,
former NBA star
Norm Nixon.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
39
J U LY 19, 2017
About Town
My mantra is
10 percent …
Heard Around Hollywood
Rambling Reporter
By Chris Gardner
Ari & Co. Find Inner Peace With Tony Robbins
WME-IMG co-CEO Ari Emanuel ’s passion for meditation (he called in
to a New York Times interview in April while on a retreat in India) has
spread to the agency’s Beverly Hills headquarters. Earlier this summer,
a Monday morning staff meeting was led by meditation guru Preetha
ji of One World Academy, described on its website as a “wisdom school
for enlightenment.” According to sources, her appearance came on
the heels of time spent at the company’s three-day retreat in January
at the JW Marriott Desert Springs Resort & Spa in Palm Desert, where
she and a colleague led morning and evening meditation sessions. The
summit’s opening remarks were from self-help giant Tony Robbins —
who signed with WME-IMG at the end of May. “People were so blown
away by him,” says one attendee. The life-coach entrepreneur could not
be reached for comment.
App Store to Mrs. Zemeckis:
Put Clothes on Your Emojis!
Leslie Zemeckis, wife of filmmaker Robert Zemeckis and a
longtime burlesque fan, recently
decided to launch an emojis app
devoted to the striptease art form.
Initially, though, she ran into
resistance from Apple’s App store,
which found some of her emojis
(samples of which are scattered
on this page) a tad too racy. “We
had to redo an emoji or two,” says
Zemeckis of the “difficult” process. But after giving her emojis
more clothes, she finally launched
BurlyQji this summer. “I’m all
about bringing burlesque into the
mainstream, [and an app] seemed
a natural way to promote its history,” says Zemeckis, who directed
the 2010 documentary Behind
the Burly Q: The Story of Burlesque
in America. “Hopefully, people
will ask, ‘What is burlesque?’ and
‘Who were these women from
the ’20s, ’30s and ’40s?’ ” Her next
project, vintage circus emojis and
personalized emojis, should have
an easier time with censors.
Jon Snow Plugs Leaks at
Game of Thrones premiere
To help prevent spoilers from
spilling after the July 12 premiere
Rose
Leslie
The subtle
emotions of
burlesque
dancer emojis.
Armie Hammer
lunched at Croft Alley.
On a different day,
Kristen Wiig and Sofia
Boutella were in. …
Brett Ratner checked
out The Rosy Oyster.
… Jamie Foxx popped
by Little Beach House
Malibu. … CAA’s Jim
Toth was at Georgie.
… Lana del Rey and
Robin Thicke had
dinner at TAO LA. …
Stevie Wonder and
Joni Mitchell were at
Crustacean, separately. … Gersh literary
agent Jeff Greenberg
stopped by Walter’s
Cafe. … Robert Wagner
sat with wife Jill St.
John at Mr Chow. …
Jimmy Iovine and Dr.
Dre shared a table at
Jean-Georges Beverly
Hills. ... Dolly Parton
held court at Cecconi’s.
Wiig
Foxx
Ward vs. Ward Mix-up at
New York’s Bowery Hotel
Power players Will Ward, a
partner at management production company ROAR, and Will
Ward, co-head of WME-IMG’s
endorsements group, have been
good-humoredly dealing with
each other’s misplaced phone
calls, emails and confidential
information for years. (Friends
and colleagues they have in common are sometimes given the
“Wrong Will Ward Award.”) But
the stakes were raised in midJuly when ROAR’s Ward checked
into a room at New York’s Bowery
Hotel and found it locked from
the inside. Yup, he’d been given the
key card to a room occupied by
WME’s Ward, who also happened
to be in town. Bowery staff scurried to secure him his own room.
“We both had a big laugh about
it,” says ROAR’s Ward, who found
a way to get even: He charged
his dinner with client Chris
Hemsworth at the hotel restaurant to WME’s Ward.
Got tips? Email rambling@thr.com
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
Power
Dining
40
J U LY 19, 2017
HO T
NEW
AU R
REST
ANT
Woodley Proper
The Quick Pitch The
San Fernando Valley’s
most ambitious chef,
Phillip Frankland Lee,
has added to his Encino
strip mall menagerie of
concepts that includes
Scratch Bar and the
former Top Chef contestant’s more recent
Crab & Co. Woodley
Proper, nominally a
gastropub, can’t help
turning standards on
their heads, like marrow
roasted in toasted
sourdough in the shape
of a bone.
The Inside Dish
Lee just opened an
unnamed experimental omakase sushi
counter in a back room.
There are no reservations. 16101 Ventura
Blvd. — GARY BAUM
EMANUEL: MICHAEL KOVAC/GETTY IMAGES. ROBBINS: ASTRID STAWIARZ/GETTY IMAGES. MEDITATING: ISTOCK (2). EMOJIS: COURTESY OF LESLIE ZEMECKIS
(5). LESLIE: JASON LAVERIS/FILMMAGIC. WOODLEY: JAKOB LAYMAN. FOXX: KEVIN WINTER/GETTY IMAGES. WIIG: TODD WILLIAMSON/GETTY IMAGES.
Emanuel leads his agency into enlightenment with an assist from Robbins.
of Game of Thrones’ seventh season at Walt Disney Concert
Hall, HBO enlisted its talent.
After intros by programming
president Casey Bloys and
creators David Benioff and D.B.
Weiss, Kit Harington’s voice
boomed from the speakers.
“Lords, ladies, wildlings, bastards and CAA agents,” he
intoned as Jon Snow. “Night gathers, and now my Watch begins.
I shall take no photos, hold
no phones, spread no rumors
on social media. I pledge my life
and honor to tonight’s Watch
for this night and all the nights
to come. Until Sunday [July 16,
when the premiere aired].”
Ygritte, aka actress Rose Leslie,
ended the announcement with
her famous line-turned-meme:
“You know nothing, Jon Snow.”
The voiceover script, THR is
told, was penned by CAA clients
Benioff and Weiss. And despite
the fact that Ygritte was killed off
in season four, Leslie attended
the world premiere with real-life
beau Harington.
Proudly Congratulates
-HIIUH\
DQG
'DYLG
for creating a great television show
(SLVRGHVPD\EHHQGLQJEXW
ZLWK\RXUWDOHQWDQGFUHDWLYH
DELOLWLHVZHNQRZPDQ\PRUH
HSLVRGHVZLOOEHFRPLQJ
<RXUIULHQGVDW
3KLOSRWW0HHNV
About Town
Mileposts
Designers Guild
Awards and president
of JumpLine Group
on June 26.
2
Lucia Chiao joined
Rothman Andres
Entertainment as a
manager July 12.
Deaths
1
3
1 Gilio and
Lewis
2 Tilly James
3 Freeman
and Bixby
Hitched, Hatched, Hired
Bob Wolff, who
spent eight decades
as a sportscaster
and provided the playby-play when the
New York Knicks
captured their two
NBA titles in the
1970s, died July 15
in South Nyack, New
York. He was 96.
Weddings
Jared Shulman,
Jim Gilio, a partner
director of content
marketing at
Anomaly Content
& Entertainment,
on July 4.
at Sloane Offer,
married Ashley Lewis,
senior director of
wellness at Goop.com,
on July 2 at a private
estate in Carpinteria,
California. The
couple will honeymoon in Italy.
Lauren Freeman,
director of acquisitions and
co-productions at
Lionsgate, married
Tom Bixby, ownermanager of Bodhi
Entertainment, on
June 17 at the Four
Seasons in Westlake
Village, California,
in front of more than
200 guests. The
couple will honeymoon in Italy and
Croatia this summer.
Engagements
Baker Machado, an
anchor and host
at the online news
network Cheddar,
became engaged to
Births
THR contributing
photographer Austin
Hargrave and wife
Jessica Hargrave,
executive producer
of Netflix series The
Keepers, welcomed
daughter Tilly James
Hargrave on July 8 at
Cedars-Sinai Medical
Center in Los Angeles.
Actress Kelly Briter
and husband
Brian Liebman,
owner of Liebman
Entertainment,
welcomed son
Harrison Russell
Liebman on
June 15 in New York.
Brad Turell was
named senior vp
corporate communications at ICM
Partners on July 17.
Joe Quenqua joined
Congrats
42West as a managing director based
in Los Angeles on
July 17.
Amazon Studios
tapped Nick Hall
as head of
drama and upped
Gina Kwon and
Ryan Andolina to
co-heads of
comedy July 12.
ICM Partners
hired Kristen Konvitz
for the agency’s
independent and
international
film department
and Ian Arougheti
Birthdays
JULY 21
Justin Bartha, 39
Charlotte
Gainsbourg, 46
JULY 22
Albert Brooks, 70
Willem Dafoe, 62
JULY 23
Woody Harrelson, 56
JULY 24
Rose Byrne, 38
Doug Liman, 52
Anna Paquin, 35
Gus Van Sant, 65
JULY 25
Matt LeBlanc, 50
JULY 26
Kate Beckinsale, 44
← Sandra Bullock, 53
Helen Mirren, 72
Kevin Spacey, 58
Jason Statham, 50
To submit, send email to hhh@thr.com
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
42
J U LY 19, 2017
as a talent agent
focusing on comedy
July 10.
Mary Gu was
appointed CEO of
the newly formed
CAA China on July 17.
Republic Records
named Dana Sano
executive vp film
& television July 17.
Stephen Mintz
was named vp
programming and
development at
Truly Original on
July 13.
Viacom International
Media Networks
promoted Jill Offman
to executive vp of
Paramount Channel
and gave Alex Okosi
oversight of BET in
all markets outside of
the U.S. on July 12.
Sarah Cowperthwaite
was promoted to
executive producer
of the Costume
Kapralik
David Kapralik, a key
executive at Columbia
and Epic Records
who was instrumental
in signing Barbra
Streisand and Sly and
the Family Stone to
their first label deals,
died July 12 in Maui,
Hawaii. He was 91.
Dick McInnes,
a Hollywood publicist and fixture in
the world of soap
operas for decades,
died July 10 at the
Veterans Affairs
hospital in West Los
Angeles. He was 81.
Evzen Kolar, a veteran
film executive and
producer behind such
movies as Surf Ninjas
and City of Industry,
died July 11 in Los
Angeles after a brief
illness. He was 67.
GILIO: KATE HOLSTEIN. BABY: AUSTIN HARGRAVE. BIXBY: MICHAEL SEGAL PHOTOGRAPHY. KAPRALIK: COURTESY OF STEPHEN PALEY. BULLOCK: JON KOPALOFF/FILMMAGIC. NICOTERO: AP PHOTO/ERIC JAMISON. LANDAU: MICHAEL
OCHS ARCHIVES/GETTY IMAGES. LOVELY: MOVIESTORE COLLECTION/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK. DAY: UNITED FILM/COURTESY EVERETT COLLECTION. DIARY: WEINSTEIN COMPANY/COURTESY EVERETT COLLECTION.
Inside the industry’s celebrations and news
1940-2017
George Romero: Zombie King
Before there was The Walking Dead, his 1968 film Night of the Living Dead
single-handledly created a modern-day mythology By Greg Nicotero
A
bear of a man whose love of impersonating Brando from The Godfather was
matched only by his fierce passion to
tell socially relevant tales in a way he alone
knew how, George was a true maverick. While
he is remembered largely for his singular
“invention” of what we know as the “mythology of the modern zombie,” his body of work
speaks to who he was: a visionary. His films
were timely, relevant and, at their heart, fun.
To imagine the backdrop of each of his tales
and impart what he wanted to say — and more
importantly, how he wanted to say it — made
his contribution to modern film staggering.
When someone told him, “You can’t do that,” he
responded with such a uniquely singular vision
that you couldn’t not stop and listen.
We met in the late 1970s, having been brought
together by my uncle, Sam, who had acted for
George in The Crazies, and I was immediately
a part of his family — and it’s a large and loyal
family. From there, as we became friends, he
recognized my growing fascination with
the industry and, without blinking, offered
me a job.
On Day of the Dead, I officially became a part
of his team as an assistant to Tom Savini, who
↑ Nicotero (left) and Romero at the 2005 Las Vegas premiere
of Land of the Dead. Romero died July 16 at age 77.
oversaw special makeup effects, joining those
who had been working by his side (and would
continue to do so for years), contributing
to his films for nearly two and a half decades.
It’s impossible to fully comprehend what
George has done for us as moviegoers and for
me personally, but his imprint is everlasting.
Above:
Landau circa
1966. Right:
With Burstyn
in 2008’s
Lovely, Still.
He died
July 15 at
age 89.
1928-2017
Martin Landau
An inspiration to his students,
‘he never seemed to be acting’
By Ellen Burstyn, as told to Scott Feinberg
Nicotero is an executive producer on
AMC’s The Walking Dead.
Above: Romero, surrounded by his cast of hungry
zombies during filming of Day of the Dead (1985), which
was part of his first trilogy of zombie movies that
began with the groundbreaking Night of the Living Dead
(1968) and continued with Dawn of the Dead (1978).
Right: The filmmaker with one of his flesh-eaters on the
set of Diary of the Dead (2007).
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
can’t even remember not knowing
Martin. I first saw him on Mission:
Impossible years ago, and then we met
at the Actors Studio. I became a member in
’67, and he was a member before that. Some
enormous number of people auditioned the
year that he did, like 1,500 or 2,000, and
only he and Steve McQueen were accepted.
As an actor, he had a real sense of reality
— he never seemed to be acting; he was
just always one with the character he was
playing — something that I got to know
better and more deeply when I eventually
worked with him [on the 2008 film Lovely,
Still]. When you look into the eyes of another
actor and you see that he’s totally there
— that he’s not running his lines in his head,
he’s just completely in the moment — it’s
a rare thing, and he had it. It felt like
we were jazz musicians, improvising and
riffing together.
He was a great actor — and I don’t say
that lightly or about many actors — and
his work will be admired forever, for as long
as there’s an acting profession. But I think
his legacy also will be carried on in all of
the people who were exposed to him and
learned so much from him at the Actors
Studio, where he was the artistic director
for the West Coast and gave his time and
his wisdom and his understanding of the
craft of the actor every week, year in and
year out. I don’t know what we’re going to
do without him, because he was the soul of
the Actors Studio.
I
Oscar-winning actress Burstyn is artistic
director of the Actors Studio in New York.
43
J U LY 19, 2017
over 200 productions supported
via Dutch cash rebate
such as Christopher Nolan’s DUNKIRK
• 19 shooting days in the Netherlands
• including aerial & water permit assistance
© 2017 Warner Bros. Ent. All Rights Reserved
The Business
Executive Suite
I
1
Gigi Pritzker
The indie producer bounces back
from the low point of Mortdecai
with a new company, Sundance hit
Landline and 10 Emmy noms for
Nat Geo’s Genius By Rebecca Ford
nominated for three Tonys in 2010.
And its Reality One division backs
immersive media projects such
as Jon Favreau’s Gnomes & Goblins
and creates original VR content
RÉSUMÉ
CURRENT TITLE
CEO, Madison Wells
Media
PREVIOUS JOBS
Co-founder of Dee Gee
Productions, co-founder
of Oddlot Entertainment
BIG HIT
Hell or High Water,
which earned
$27 million and four
Oscar nominations
through a partnership with Sony.
Pritzker, who lives in Chicago
with husband Michael Pucker, an
attorney, maintains offices there
and in Century City, where she
oversees a staff of 19. The mother
of three grown kids spoke to THR
at her L.A. base on June 27.
When things don’t work, like
Mortdecai and Ender’s Game, what
do you take away from it?
They sting a lot. They hurt,
they’re painful. The reality of this
business is it’s extremely mercurial and you don’t have control over
most pieces — release patterns,
a lot of those pieces. If you’re a
deeply controlling person, you’re
going to be incredibly frustrated. There’s a lot of reflection
Photographed by Gizelle Hernandez
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
46
J U LY 19, 2017
after each film. This isn’t a business for the faint of heart.
Has that made you more
cautious about how much money
you’ll invest in a project?
I’m always cautious. We take risks,
but we take smart risks. Frankly,
the finance structure of Ender’s
Game wasn’t as bad as you may
think. We lay off plenty of risk. I’m
not more cautious, but if you don’t
learn from [mistakes], you’re kind
of an idiot.
You’re an investor and on the board
of STX. How are they doing?
They’ve got an incredible, robust
future ahead of them, and I’m very
excited about the movies we’re
looking at. If anyone goes into
HAIR BY PATRICK CHAI FOR AMIKA HAIRCARE AT EXCLUSIVE ARTISTS. MAKEUP BY JENNIFER BUDNER FOR LAURA MERCIER AT EXCLUSIVE ARTISTS.
n her junior year at Stanford,
Gigi Pritzker went to study
in Nepal. “My mother said,
‘Why can’t you be frickin’ normal
and go to France like everyone
else?’ ” recalls the Chicago native,
whose family, one of America’s
wealthiest, built the Hyatt Hotel
empire. “Every aspect of who I am
somehow was molded and formed
[there],” she adds.
Pritzker, 54, an anthropology major who studied folktales
during her year abroad, has been
drawn to storytelling ever since.
She returned to Asia after attending a small film school in Santa Fe
to produce the 1998 doc Bhutan,
Kingdom of the Thunder Dragon,
launching her career in the movies. After creating sales/financing
company Oddlot Entertainment
in 2001, she merged it into
Madison Wells Media, which she
co-founded in 2015 with former
Legendary exec Clint Kisker.
It’s been a roller coaster ride
for one of Hollywood’s most
prominent indie financiers. While
Pritzker declines to go into detail
on how much money she’s invested
in her films — which range from
2010’s Rabbit Hole and 2011’s Drive,
to the bigger-budget 2013 and
2015 releases Ender’s Game and
Mortdecai — she’s open about the
pain of creative or financial misfires. “It’s not an easy business,”
she admits. “You get knocked down
a lot.” You also get lifted up, as she
discovered with 2016’s Hell or High
Water, a $12 million drama that
earned $27 million globally and
scored four Oscar nominations.
Pritzker’s new company, MWM,
aims to create content across a
variety of platforms, with three
branches: Through Oddlot, it
produces and co-finances film
and TV, including Nat Geo’s
Genius (with 10 Emmy noms); Jon
Stewart’s 2014 political drama
Rosewater; and the Sundance
breakout Landline (out July 21). The
company’s Relevant Theatricals
arm produces such stage shows as
Broadway’s Million Dollar Quartet,
1 Pritzker, photographed June 27
at her L.A. office, bought this art in
India. 2 When she was unable to
attend the Cubs’ 2016 victory parade,
she sent an assistant (also a
Chicagoan) to grab a souvenir hat.
releasing movies thinking in your
first two years [you’ll] have more
hits than misses, you’re in the
wrong business.
Is it harder to make a movie today
than a few years ago?
Much harder. Yet oddly, there’s
a ton of money in the industry.
The way television has evolved
has really changed the landscape
for film. Films have to be better,
frankly. Films used to think they
competed with each other; now
you compete with everything.
You produced Gillian Robespierre’s
Landline and Rebecca Miller’s
She Came to Me. Do you feel a need
to help female filmmakers?
This may be sacrilege, but no, I
don’t. It’s just really fun when you
find female filmmakers to work
with. We speak a language, just
like guys do, that is different. But
for me, it’s about talented people
doing good work. The goal is that
we should all have opportunity.
2
For indie films like Landline,
how important is box-office
success?
There is a measure of success
that we expect from all of our
films financially. But there are
also other measures that are
important, as far as being able to
give filmmakers opportunity
and the critical reception. But the
first is commerce because that’s
the business we’re in.
Has it been harder for you as a
woman producer-financier?
No question. It’s the little stuff:
the way people bond, “belonging
to the club,” “going to the game.”
Certainly, when I started in the
’80s, it was all guys. Guys mentor
each other more naturally than
women do. I never had a mentor.
It would have been really helpful. But because I grew up in a
male-dominated family, I never
thought about it. I just knew that,
like in my own family, I was going
to have to put my head down and
push hard to get what I wanted.
Amazon bought Landline
at Sundance. How do you feel
about these new digital
companies entering the market?
I am thrilled with how supportive Amazon has been about the
theatrical piece of it, because
for filmmakers that’s still really
important. I’d jump at the chance
to work with Netflix or Hulu.
4
5
3 “I make us do a shot of tequila
before every premiere,” she
says of the tequila-filled skull.
4 A gift from a former intern.
5 She helped organize a
fundraiser featuring the
Zac Brown Band. 6 Pritzker’s
brothers are Deadheads.
“The Grateful Dead are an
integral part of my childhood,”
she says. 7 The second
season of Genius will be about
Picasso. 8 The Electronic
Anachroscope, built in 1857,
was a gift from her husband.
3
We are about getting the stories
told by the people who want to
tell the stories.
What has it been like to step into
the VR space, which the industry is
still trying to figure out?
I’m not from a technology background, and as a company [we’re]
trying to learn, taking measured
steps. We have a determined focus
on emerging talent: We want to
bring in young directors who are
native to VR, as well as talent like
Favreau. Our deal with Sony gives
us the opportunity to work with
known IP and a studio that has
great relationships around the
world, so that we can see together:
Where does this stuff play? How
does it play in China versus the
Middle East? Because anyone who
says they know — nobody knows.
When you sign on to something,
how important is your credit —
producer vs. executive producer?
I am very particular about when
I will take a producer credit. For
example, on Draft Day [in 2014] my
deal was as a producer, but by the
time the process [was over], I didn’t
produce; I executive produced.
Some financier-producers complain
that the Producers Guild doesn’t
give them enough credit. Agree?
Yes, but it’s changing. Early on,
there was a bias against financierproducers, and I understand,
because it’s a tricky thing. There
are some people who don’t have
the self-policing gene; they just
want that credit.
Is there a project you wish you had
worked on?
Who on the planet doesn’t wish
they’d figured out to do Hamilton?
Do you have downtime?
In my car blasting tunes. But
if I really get downtime, it’s the
mountains. That’s therapy.
What frustrates you about the
business today?
6
I wish people were less afraid.
If we were more collaborative, it
would be better. There’s also a
lot of indecisiveness — I mean,
make a decision. It may not be
right; it may not be wrong; it’s not
always black and white, but just
make a decision.
8
7
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
47
J U LY 19, 2017
The Business
Digital
Sure, Netflix Spends
Big, but Critics Ignore
the Bigger Picture
As CEO Reed Hastings hits 104 million subscribers and
91 Emmy noms, a top analyst defends the $7 billion investment
in A-list content: ‘It will pay dividends for years’ By Ben Weiss
N
etflix’s recent cancellation of the big-budget series The Get
Down and Sense8, along with its growing investment in original
programming, have ignited new criticism about the streamer’s
spending habits and financial health. As CEO Reed Hastings invests
approximately $7 billion in content in 2017, some in the media are painting Netflix investors as credulous, sitting idly by while the company
spends like a drunken sailor.
At the recent ATX Television Festival in Austin, The New York Times
reported that Freeform programming and development executive vp
Karey Burke said she viewed Netflix’s spending “with disdain.” Another
exec suggested invoking a television industry rule that “everyone has to
be profitable,” a dig at Netflix’s negative free cash flow. Michael Pachter,
a Wedbush Securities analyst who remains an unrepentant Netflix hater
despite having been wrong on the direction of its stock for a decade,
continued his crusade against the company in a recent THR article by
calling the Netflix balance sheet “unfathomable.”
As a long-term Netflix shareholder, I will offer a few counterarguments for critics to consider:
→ Netflix is conservatively capitalized and financially strong. The
company’s $3.4 billion debt level
is moderate relative to its $70 billion market value, and it’s less
leveraged on a debt-capital ratio
than most of its media peers. As
evidence of its financial strength,
Netflix recently issued 1.3 billion euros ($1.49 billion) worth of
bonds at 3.625 percent, maturing
in 2027. The bond market is willing to finance Netflix at low rates
and long maturities because it has
established a durable subscription-based business model, with
Netflix’s Run of
Emmy Nominations
A digital pioneer sets
a streaming record,
trailing only rival HBO
54
80
60
40
91
31
34
14
20
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
predictable revenue and cash flow.
On July 17, Netflix reported adding
5.2 million subscribers during its
most recent quarter for a total of
104 million globally. On the other
hand, the financial performance of
Netflix’s media peers has become
more unpredictable due to cordcutting, advertising headwinds
and U.S. box-office volatility.
→ Netflix’s $7 billion investment in content yields more than
new programming, including a
company-best 91 Emmy noms this
year, second only to HBO: It drives
→ There is an intense focus on
Netflix’s content spending. But
what gets no attention, and
is perhaps more interesting, is
where Netflix does not spend
money. Unlike almost all of its
media peers, Netflix spends
nothing on a large sales team in
order to sell advertising against
its programming. Because TV
advertising is an increasingly
intolerable nuisance, this expense
creates little value for consumers. Netflix also spends virtually
zero to drive opening-weekend
box office for its original films, a
growing expense incurred by the
major studios that provides no
2012
48
Weiss is chief investment officer at
NYC-based 8th & Jackson Partners.
2013
2014
2015
2016
$267M
$300M
$123M
$112M
$187M
$17M
0
-$58M
-$16M
-$127M
-$300M
-$600M
Spending and Profits
-$900M
-$ 1.2B
The billions of dollars that Netflix
has spent since diving into
original content in 2013 coincide
with sinking free cash flow
-$ 1.5B
Net
Income
Source: Netflix annual reports
Illustration by Wesley Bedrosian
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
global adoption of internet television, serves to aggregate more
data on consumer entertainment
preferences and builds long-term
library value. Sense8 may be over
(except for a planned movie to
end the story), but its run likely
awakened a whole new group
of consumers to the benefits of
web-delivered TV. The return on
that awakening is not captured
on the balance sheet but will pay
dividends to Netflix for years.
value to the scores of people who
don’t live near a theater showing
the film. Netflix runs its business with about 4,700 employees;
CBS has 15,500, Time Warner
has 25,000. Netflix’s expenses are
not earmarked to support large
legacy cost structures. Instead, it
is spending on what matters most
to consumers: content.
J U LY 19, 2017
Free
Cash Flow
-$921M
-$1.7B
MOURNS
THE LOSS
OF A BELOVED
MEMBEROF
OURFAMILY.
Nelsan Ellis
1977–2017
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The Business
Moguls
Roger Ailes and Me:
Lessons Learned a
Year After a Fox Firing
On the anniversary of the ouster of the most influential
man in conservative politics, a legacy is revealed in Trump’s
anti-media venom, Murdoch’s unrest and a vision that has
jumped cable news to become the dominant historical current
By Michael Wolff
Just after the Fourth of July in
2016, Gretchen Carlson, a former
Fox anchor, accused Ailes in a
lawsuit of sexual harassment. Two
weeks later, months shy of the
20th anniversary of the network
he founded, Ailes, at 76, was out.
But what Ailes represented was
larger and, for liberals, more horrifying than ever.
Ailes’ defenestration on
July 21 — the day his friend
Trump accepted the Republican
nomination for president —
took place at Rupert Murdoch’s
triplex apartment on East 23rd
Street overlooking Madison
Square. In 2005, Ailes had been
a key player in forcing Murdoch
to choose between his executives
and his then-34-year-old son,
Lachlan, whom top managers
couldn’t abide. Murdoch sided
with his executives. As the biggest
single profit contributor to the
Murdoch holdings, Ailes, despite
years of animosity with the
sons — “I make the money; they
spend it” — continued to hold the
father’s support. But with 85-yearold Murdoch on a vacation with
Ailes’ Will
The Fox News founder left
the bulk of his fortune to wife
Elizabeth Tilson and son
Zachary, 17. Other bequests:
$250,000
Brother Robert, 79, a Florida doctor
$100,000
Bodyguard James Gildea
$30,000
Longtime assistant Judy Laterza
his new wife, former rock ’n’ roll
princess Jerry Hall, last July, the
sons, who now held penultimate
executive authority, took the
opportunity of Carlson’s lawsuit
to move against Ailes. In this
final meeting — where Lachlan,
who the day before had sported
shrub-like hair and a mountainman beard, now showed up for
this meeting with a WWE-like
shaven head — a plaintive father,
Illustration by Jesse Lenz
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
50
J U LY 19, 2017
back from his vacation, now had
to side with his sons.
The sons of the world’s greatest tabloid purveyor had taken
up arms, conveniently or otherwise, as a new moral force
(and, in the coming year, would,
as militant practitioners of
corporate righteousness, oust
a lineup of Fox managers and
talent). While Ailes and other Fox
cohorts were sent into exile, in
PORTRAIT: WESLEY MANN/FOX NEWS VIA GETTY IMAGES.
N
ot long after Roger Ailes
was forced out of Fox News
— a year ago — he and I
started to speak on a regular basis.
Sitting on his couch in his modest
suburban home in Cresskill, New
Jersey, or in his much grander
home overlooking the Hudson and
West Point in Garrison, New York,
he could seem like a genial retiree,
his wife, Beth, hovering nearby,
making jokes and supervising his
diet. When, in a sudden decision
this winter, the Aileses bought a
home in Palm Beach, Florida, we’d
chat on the phone — sometimes
a few times a week — about his
health, the weather, the news of
the day.
This was, of course, a window
into the fleetingness of power.
The single most influential person in conservative politics one
day, and the next, waiting for the
phone to ring. And not just the
fleetingness of power, but also its
current upside-down, ironical,
if not wackadoo, nature that was
hard to miss and that Ailes himself was a vigorous observer of.
After all, if Ailes’ enemies were
ecstatic about getting rid of him
— for a generation, he was the singular liberal bugbear — now they
had Donald Trump. Ailes might
be marooned on his couch, but
Trump was some ultimate culmination of the politics of the “silent
majority,” a concept Ailes had
helped pioneer as a young adviser
to Richard Nixon; and of the
“Reagan Democrats,” which Ailes
had identified for Ronald Reagan;
and of a permanently aggrieved
outsider political identity, which
Ailes had defined at Fox News.
1 Ailes (left) with personal lawyer Peter
Johnson Jr., leaving Fox News the day he was
fired. 2 Murdoch exiting Fox HQ that day.
this upside-down world, Trump,
accused of far more louche
behavior, was elected president.
It was Ailes’ tacit support
of Trump that, in part, made
his removal from Fox all the more
urgent for the Murdochs. And it
was not just the liberal sons who
were agitated by Ailes’ regard for
Trump, but also the father, whose
tabloid, the New York Post, helped
create Trump, but who found him
now, with great snobbery, not of
“our” conservative class. (“When
is Donald Trump going to stop
embarrassing his friends, let alone
the whole country?” Murdoch
senior tweeted the day after
Trump officially declared himself
a candidate.) Murdoch instructed
Ailes to tilt to anyone but Trump,
Ailes confided to me before he
was fired, even Hillary. (Ailes, for
his part, characterized Murdoch’s
periodic efforts at interference
as similar to Nixon’s instructions to bomb this or that country
— best ignored.)
After the election, a confounded
Murdoch had to call on his ex-wife
Wendi’s friends, Ivanka Trump
and Jared Kushner, to broker a rapprochement with the disreputable
Donald. Now, to Trump’s great
satisfaction, a humbled Murdoch
is a constant caller.
The Murdochs, with a strict
confidentiality provision in Ailes’
contract and administering a
slow-drip payout of the millions
owed him, were able to enforce his
silence as they pursued their plan
to erase his place in their corporate history. The 20th anniversary
of Fox News happened without
anyone uttering the name of the
dominant figure in cable news.
Ailes, the broadcaster and showman, was also one of the most
astute political operatives of the
modern era. Deprived of a public
outlet, Ailes offered me his private
tutoring on the age of Trump: 1)
His election proved the power of
a significantly smaller, but more
dedicated electoral base — as,
likewise in cable terms, a smaller
1
was ousted, and as Trump was
elected on an explicitly nationalist
platform, the Murdoch brothers
were pursuing their global dream
of taking full ownership of Sky,
the British satellite entertainment service, and creating a global
television and news company.
“Well, maybe they’re not wrong.
I mean, they’re not that bright,
hardcore base was more valuable
than a bigger, less-committed
one; 2) but this meant an inverse
dedication by an equally small circle of passionate enemies; 3) and,
hence, there will be blood. Here,
of course, he was also describing
what he saw as his own fate.
There were two different
Americas located in different
Murdoch instructed Ailes to
tilt to anyone but Trump, Ailes
confided to me, even Hillary.
worlds and different times, evermore unrecognizable to each
other — that was Ailes’ political and business insight, which
Trump has now carried to a
stunning conclusion. Ironically
for Ailes, Murdoch senior had
built his fortune cultivating one of
those worlds — presciently using
Ailes’ talents to cultivate it — but
his aspirational sons now saw
their future in the other. As Ailes
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
so they probably are wrong. But
maybe there’s a business there,”
said a bemused Ailes in the weeks
before his death. “It’s just never
going to be as good as the one they
are giving up.”
It seemed to fill Ailes with some
wonder that his vision — a vision
he described as his resistance to
the imposition of other people’s
visions (i.e. the liberals) — had, in
the past year, clearly jumped cable
51
J U LY 19, 2017
2
news and become the dominant
historical current. He was, to say
the least, impatient to get back
in the game. In May, the day after
he fell and hit his head in the
Palm Beach house — he would
be dead less than a week later —
he was supposed to go to New
York for a set of discussions that
could have put him back into the
news business.
“It’s strange to be at home with
nothing to do but just to see how
right you were. The liberals really
have had no idea what was going
on,” said Ailes, in buoyant humor,
during our last conversation, the
day before his fall. “But the lesson
is, you probably don’t want to be as
right as I’ve been. That’s not going
to make you a lot of friends.”
5 SEASONS
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4 GOLDEN GLOBE NOMINATIONS
1 GOLDEN GLOBE WIN
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DAV I D, JE F F R E Y & JI MMY,
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53
Style
Guest Column
When a
72-Year-Old
Woman Is on
the Cover
of a Magazine
Sherry Lansing was terrified to be
photographed, but, writes THR’s
former editor, she quickly became
a role model for aging with class
By Janice Min
’ve lived for exactly seven years
now in Los Angeles, a town
whose many well-heeled denizens consistently, comically panic
over two things: aging and rainy
days. The latter we can’t stop. But the
former? Doctors wielding injections, acid peels, scalpels and lasers
have turned tony enclaves in the City
of Angels into a living, breathing
canvas, a modern-day Renaissanceera Florence where the works (21st
century surrealism) are displayed
on faces alternately beautiful
and grotesque, strange simulacra
of youth.
Until recently I edited The Hollywood
Reporter, where I mandated that ages of the
female executives on our annual Women in
Entertainment Power 100 list be included.
Oh, my God! The begging, the tears, the cries
of sexism! I once wrote of the topic in the
magazine’s pages: “As a feminist, I don’t feel
age is something to hide … women buy into
the social prejudices we fight on one hand
but unconsciously support with the other.”
I added, “All I can think about when I see
women older than I am is how much more I
can accomplish in my career and life.”
Which brings me to Sherry Lansing. Ms.
Lansing is the most powerful woman in
I
Photographed by Miller Mobley
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
54
J U LY 19, 2017
↑ Lansing was photographed March 7 at her home in Bel Air.
She appeared on the cover of the March 29 issue of THR (inset),
which immediately sold out at L.A. newsstands.
and, through her foundation, trains retired
and midcareer tech executives to teach in
California’s public schools. More tellingly, she
mentors just about every big female executive
in Hollywood. WWSD — What Would Sherry
Do? Men and women ask themselves that several times a week here. I know I do.
Over our respective salads, the conversation
turns to her recent Hollywood Reporter cover
story, the last cover I booked before joining the
magazine’s parent company. The cover was
about Sherry on the occasion of the publication of a biography of her, Leading Lady (Crown
Archetype), by THR’s Stephen Galloway. Sure,
it is a juicy tome, filled with delicious stories
about celebrity feuds, bad behavior, Angelina
Jolie’s drug tests, and salary demands through
her movies, from Kramer vs. Kramer to Fatal
Attraction. But more importantly, it’s the story
of an insecure young woman’s discovery of
her inner steel: how to be comfortably single
until you are 47 (she met husband William
VINTAGE: MICHAEL OCHS ARCHIVES/GETTY IMAGES. ROGERS: RON GALELLA/WIREIMAGE.
Left: Lansing circa 1970, when
she was transitioning from
actress to script reader. Above:
With actor Wayne Rogers in 1983.
Hollywood history. Yesterday. Today. Ever. And
certainly when she was at Paramount Pictures
from 1992 to 2005, the first female to be a studio chairman. The chief. Not long ago, Sherry
and I met for one of our lunches, this one in the
garden of Beverly Hills’ Polo Lounge. Going out
in public with Sherry in L.A. is probably like
dining with Mark Zuckerberg in San Francisco.
She is a rock star. Billionaires (today, Nicolas
Berggruen) and current studio chiefs come to
kiss the ring, socialites fawn and even Michael
Ovitz still feels like he needs to make nice,
beckoning her over to his booth, decades after
they sparred over Forrest Gump.
What makes this remarkable is that Sherry
is 72. It’s an age when shame — particularly
for women — can creep in as many worry that
their power, relevance, health and physical
appeal are declining. Not Sherry. She loves
talking about her age and volunteers it casually, unself-consciously in conversation. She
is on the board of Regents of the University
of California, the board of the Carter Center,
co-founded Stand Up to Cancer, is active in
Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Los Angeles
Style
In NYC, Medispas for Moguls
Guest Column
espite the moniker “medispa,” few actual doctors head up these rapidly prolif-
D erating centers of noninvasive cosmetic procedures on both coasts. Now in New
York, Robert Silich, a plastic surgeon who has molded the faces of numerous film
industry moguls, is teaming with top orthopedic doctor Tom Scilaris to unveil Park
West Medical Spa in July at 75 Central Park West, while dermatologist Paul Jarrod
Frank, who will launch cosmetics line MDNA with Madonna in September, is premiering pfrankmdskinsalon at 1049 Fifth Ave. in August. “Despite the fact that procedures
can be performed noninvasively” — platelet-rich plasma injections for hair loss
(from $400) and noninvasive love-handle diminishment (from $1,200) are particularly
popular with men — “medispas still practice medicine,’’ says Frank. “It’s the well-known
physicians with good reputations that need to legitimize this niche.” — BETH LANDMAN
Friedkin, the director, at that age), survive
amid persistent sexism, quit your job while
on top and, most crucially, not slink away
as you grow older.
“I have to thank you,” she begins. “That
magazine cover was the most liberating thing
that ever happened to me.”
I am surprised and ask her to explain.
She reveals that at first she was mortified
by the idea of being photographed in her
house by Miller Mobley. She had been warned
by THR’s stellar photo director, Jennifer Laski,
that the team would not retouch the photos
of her any more or less than those of a young
star. “Because,” Jen told her, “all people will
talk about is how you were retouched and not
how good you look.” Part of Sherry’s anxiety,
she admits, was because she herself hasn’t had
work done to her face. But she acceded.
A former model and actress, Sherry laughs
when recalling the photo shoot: “I kept telling them I didn’t want any close-up pictures,
and all I could see was this giant lens getting
closer to my face.”
When the story went online March 29, she
— of the laissez-faire attitude about age — was
stricken. “All I could see were my lines.” She
says she spent the better part of the day beating
herself up: “Why did I let myself be photographed?” Her husband, “Billy,” as she calls
him, tried to calm her. Ever the Oscar-winning
producer, Sherry second-guessed why other
photos — taken further away, in softer light
— weren’t used. To make matters worse, the
image was used on The Drudge Report, reaching millions — millions — of people! The agony!
Then, she said, the most amazing thing
happened. Calls and emails poured in. The
persistent message was “thank you.” “Thank
A New Level of VIP
Health Care
In the Hamptons and Malibu, luxury services
are redefining concierge medicine
or Hollywood, the idea
F of concierge doctors —
primary care physicians who
offer around-the-clock
medical services to clients for
an annual fee that can run
upward of $50,000 — is nothing new. Taking this concept
to the next level is Manhattanbased pioneer oncologist and
internal medicine specialist
Bernard Kruger. After 30 years
of practice, the doctor (Ben
Stiller credits Kruger with saving his life with the discovery
of his prostate cancer in 2014)
noticed an absence of topnotch emergency services.
“There are too many instances
where patients have no other
alternative than being sent to
an ER,” says Kruger. His Priority
Private Care (170 E. 77th St.;
priorityprivatecare.com), a
referral-based, members-only
urgent care facility, provides
immediate and unlimited
access to such doctors as ER
physician Stephan Lynn —
who led the team at Roosevelt
Hospital on the night John
Lennon was fatally shot
— with no wait time for an
annual fee that starts at
$5,000. The service also has
extended to the Hamptons
this summer, with exclusive
house calls available every
weekend through Labor Day,
and a partnership with Liberty
Helicopters for medical transport on and off the island.
Meanwhile, in Malibu, Lisa
Benya, longtime internist for
local A-listers, has transformed
her headquarters, Cure by Dr.
Benya (22741 Pacific Coast
Highway; curemedspa.com),
into a full-blown wellness center in an oceanfront spot across
the street from Nobu Malibu.
Her new Cure Concierge
program (from $6,000 a year)
includes monthly spa and
beauty treatments (new
resident colorist Johnathan
Gale’s clients include Laura
Dern and Chloe Sevigny), in
addition to yearly physicals
and 24/7 primary medical
care. “There is so much more
to healing people than just
keeping them from getting
diseases,” says Benya. “Clients
get great medical benefits
from what used to be considered luxury work.” Benya
also will be launching a fulltime concierge doctor at her
second location at the Sunset
Tower Hotel in the next few
months. “We will be expanding
concierge club membership,”
she says. “Then we feel like
we can take this model nationwide.” — AMANDA EBERSTEIN
Illustrations by Lars Leetaru
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
56
J U LY 19, 2017
you for showing your wrinkles.” “Thank you
for showing what 72 looks like.” “Thank you
for not being retouched.” Not a friend — and
she has scores — failed to reach out. She says
she realizes now, especially in this town, that
“it’s both brave to have a face-lift but also
brave to not have one.”
The print issue sold out instantly on
newsstands in Los Angeles. The last time
that happened? When Bonnie Hammer,
then 64, chairman of NBCUniversal Cable
Entertainment, was on the Dec. 10, 2014, cover.
I have to believe women in town were ecstatic
to see one of them — smart, accomplished,
not a Hadid or Kardashian — on a cover. With
lines. And they were going to support it.
Sherry recalls that when she was 60, she sat
in a meeting for one of the organizations in
which she’s involved and suggested they bring
in some retirees to give them a second career.
One of the younger attendees scoffed and said,
“Why, so we can clean up after they pee on the
floor?” She said only when she told them that
Mick Jagger was then 61 that the group “got” it.
What older was in their fears versus what older
was in reality were two different things.
One of Sherry’s themes in her life is the
idea of “next.” That every person has another
chapter, that life is your own story told in
chapters. For her, Paramount was one, the
past 12 years were another. The acceptance of
looking her age was just prelude to another
one. After being the poster child in the battle
against sexism in Hollywood, she wants to
tackle ageism. Exactly how, she will figure out.
And she will.
A few weeks after my lunch with Sherry, I
ran into Judy Sheindlin, TV’s Judge Judy. She is
74 and the highest-paid woman in television.
She told me she, Sherry and power agent Toni
Howard, 72, were going with their husbands
on vacation. She laughed and likened it to the
movie Cocoon, about a group of senior citizens
who go on a trip. After rejuvenation by aliens.
It makes you wonder about the fare Hollywood
puts forth: Cocoon. The Curious Case of
Benjamin Button. 13 Going on 30. Big. Reverse
aging as fantasy.
And then Judy’s eyes lit up. “Oh, my gosh,
that photo you guys ran of Sherry. Thank you,
thank you, thank you!”
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Style
Costumes and Set Design
Von Brandenstein viewed the sets as character-driven and transformed
Beverly Hills’ historic Greystone into a mansion for Bomer’s Stahr: “I
thought of him as an English lord living in a Tudor house. We have our share
of art deco interiors; at the time, Tudor was their idea of great elegance.”
Glamour and
Illusions in
Hollywood’s
Golden Age
he closest template was always going to be a
Downton Abbey,” says writer-director Billy Ray
(whose screenplay credits include The Hunger
Games and Captain Phillips) of the look of Amazon’s adaptation of The Last Tycoon, out July 28. Based on F. Scott
Fitzgerald’s unfinished roman a clef of Hollywood’s golden
age during the Depression, the series deployed a dream
team of Oscar-winning production designer Patrizia von
Brandenstein (Amadeus) and Emmy-winning costume
designer Janie Bryant (Mad Men). Both drew inspiration
from MGM photographer George Hurrell, known for his
black-and-white images of 1930s stars, to dress and give
visual context to Matt Bomer ’s Irving Thalberg-inspired
studio head, Monroe Stahr, who goes head-to-head
against boss Pat Brady, played by Kelsey Grammer. Says
executive producer Chris Keyser: “I wanted to tell this
story about the cost of the American dream as applied to
Hollywood, the cost of lies that movies tell.” Adds Ray:
“The dynamic of Hollywood in l936 is the same dynamic
as the conversations we are having today.”
T
Bryant’s standout looks for Brady’s headstrong daughter, Celia (Lily
Collins), included a seductive halter dress. With Norma Shearer as a
muse, Bryant says of Celia: “I love how she is glam but smart, tailored
by day and sultry by night.” Referencing Clark Gable for Stahr, she
says: “His passion is filmmaking, and I felt like his suits should be
black and white, a play on the silver screen.” A sketch of a draped silk
gown for the show’s starlet (and Stahr’s deceased wife), Minna.
“We had fictional movies we re-created,” says von Brandenstein of the “sets within the sets,” including this
baroque film, and her sketch of a set from the biopic Stahr wants to make about Minna. No stranger to
period menswear, Mad Men alum Bryant “built a lot of 1930s three-piece double-breasted suits,” putting
Grammer’s powerful Brady in a formal brown and gray palette. L.A. locations included the Goldwyn
and Paramount lots, Musso & Frank and Point Dume, for Stahr’s Frank Lloyd Wright-inspired beach house.
INTERIOR, GRAMMER: MERIE WALLACE/AMAZON STUDIOS. BOMER: ADAM ROSE/AMAZON STUDIOS. SKETCHES: COURTESY OF SONY PICTURES TELEVISION (2).
An award-winning dream team (including
Mad Men’s Janie Bryant) delivers a visual feast
for Amazon’s The Last Tycoon By Cathy Whitlock
The morning of July 13 started like any other,
with Elisabeth Moss trying to eke out a little
more time in bed. She is not, by all accounts,
an early riser, and this sticky Thursday was
no different, save for the locale, South Florida,
where she was enjoying a rare few days off.
Then came the midday text from her publicist: a GIF of Chicago Cubs first baseman
Anthony Rizzo, shirtless and clapping. “I knew
it was good news,” says Moss, a fourth-generation Cubs fan, “because a shirtless Anthony
Rizzo is always good news.”
And it was: The Handmaid’s Tale had just
scooped up 13 Emmy nominations, including
a best actress nom for Moss, the dystopian
drama’s producer and star. In short order, she
began scrolling through the 49 congratulatory
texts that had already come in. Before long,
there would be a lengthy email chain among
the actors and a back and forth with showrunner Bruce Miller as well. By 3 p.m., Moss
was still working her way through the deluge.
This isn’t new territory for the 34-year-old
actress, whose pileup of critical hits — The
West Wing, Mad Men, Top of the Lake and now
The Handmaid’s Tale — has led to her media
moniker: the “Queen of Peak TV.” She earned
six nominations for what was once her careerdefining role as copywriter turned feminist
heroine Peggy Olson on AMC’s long-running
Mad Men and a seventh for her star turn as a
cop in Jane Campion’s 2013 Sundance Channel
miniseries Top of the Lake. But for reasons
that still confound a large contingent of TV
critics, Moss has never won an Emmy. “It’s
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
By
Lacey Rose
Photographed by
Olivia Bee
60
J U LY 19, 2017
HAIR BY TOMMY BUCKETT AT ARTISTS AND COMPANY, MAKEUP BY DANIEL MARTIN AT THE WALL GROUP. MANICURE BY GINA VIVIANO FOR CHANEL LE VERNIS AT ARTISTS BY TIMOTHY PRIANO.
With Hulu breakout Handmaid’s Tale
scoring 13 Emmy noms,
television’s reigning
(and surprisingly
foulmouthed) star
has become an
accidental activist
as her dystopian
drama refracts the
conflicts and fears
of Trump’s America
“I’m not an idiot. I see the pressure,
the expectations, the fact that,
‘OK, she was on Mad Men and now
she’s doing another show,’ and
there’s something scary about that,
of course, but what I chose to do
was to make damn fuckin’ sure it
was going to be what I wanted it to
be,” says Moss of The Handmaid’s
Tale. She was photographed June 16
at the Swedish Cottage Marionette
Theater in Central Park in New York.
Styling by Kemal Harris
Altuzarra dress, Catherine Weitzman
earrings, Sydney Evan ring.
lucky number eight,” she teases, turning more
serious as she continues: “But if you’ve been
nominated seven times and lost seven times,
you learn to be pretty excited about being
nominated. You feel this sense of, ‘Well, at least
I seem to be doing well consistently.’ ”
What makes this round of recognition different is not simply that her odds of taking
home a statuette are greater than they’ve ever
been but also that the universally lauded
Hulu series has redefined Moss’ career — as
an actress, a producer and, at first reluctantly,
an activist for women’s rights. “What I’ve
learned is, now is not really a time to stand
in the middle,” she says. “You’ve got to pick
a side.”
Jumping so quickly into another series
was not initially part of Moss’ plan. She liked
the idea of dabbling in the film world, throwing herself into a string of indies within days
of Mad Men wrapping, and then a second
installment of Top of the Lake, which she was
busy filming when her reps sent her a
copy of Miller’s Handmaid’s pilot. His take on
Margaret Atwood’s seminal novel — first
published in 1985 and now back on the bestseller list — centers on Offred, the titular
Handmaid, whose world has been overtaken
by a theocratic regime under which all fertile women are stripped of their rights and
forced into sexual slavery. Despite her initial
hesitation, Moss, who goes by Lizzie, recognized that the opportunity was one she
couldn’t pass up. Her one stipulation: She
insisted on being an active producer as well.
The demand didn’t faze Miller and
executive producer Warren Littlefield, who
both chuckle at the mere suggestion that
Moss’ could be a vanity title, as is often the
case when TV stars transition to producing.
“At the beginning, I’d send Lizzie five different films, and I’d say, ‘This one is just about
color palette; this one there’s a tone.’ And
she’s in Australia starring in Top of the Lake,
and a few days later, I’d get these detailed
analyses: ‘I completely see this, and I love this,
and what about this woman as a production
designer?’ ” recalls Littlefield. “I said to her,
‘Do you sleep at all?’ She said, ‘Well, I had a
weekend here.’ ‘Yeah,’ I said, ‘but you could go
to the gym, maybe out to dinner — I’ve been
on location before. I also eat.’ She was quiet,
and even though it was over the phone, I could
feel her smiling, and she said, ‘This is really
important to me.’ ”
Some 300 emails and nearly as many
conference calls followed before the trio first
met face-to-face on the Toronto set in the
summer of 2016. In that time, Moss also had
weighed in on directors — recommending
Reed Morano, with whom she’d worked
on the 2015 film Meadowland, to helm the
first three episodes — as well as on casting,
“I needed to prove to myself
not just that I could do something
else but that I wanted
to — that there were other
out there to play and Peggy
wasn’t the end.”
Dolce & Gabbana dress, Roule & Co. earrings, Sydney Evan ring.
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T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
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J U LY 19, 2017
Over a late lunch at a cafe on Manhattan’s
Upper West Side, where Moss shares an apartment with her two cats, Lucy and Ethel, I
wonder aloud how she handles the exceedingly
dark world of Handmaid’s, rife with rape and
physical abuse.
Moving a bed of lettuce leaves around her
plate, she recalls how famously blunt French
film star Isabelle Huppert responded (during
a roundtable discussion for THR) to a question about whether rape scenes in particular
can be more challenging to shake. “She was
like, ‘Noooo.’ Like, ‘It’s my job, and I go and
do my work and I go home.’ I was literally like,
‘Praise Jesus, she is my fuckin’ hero,’ ” says
Moss, whose propensity for profanity can be
jarring at times. “Some of the other actresses
[at the table, including Natalie Portman and
Amy Adams] probably wanted to answer like
that, but sometimes you feel like you shouldn’t
because you should take things seriously. But
I just love that she is so fuckin’ French that
she just was like, ‘Noooo,’ and that’s more of
the camp that I subscribe to.”
It’s an approach to acting that Morano, 40,
finds herself marveling at each time the pair
is together on set. “Lizzie has this uncanny
ability to transport herself, and it happens
very quickly,” she says. “We’d be joking around,
making fun of someone on the crew, and
then two seconds later I’d have a camera on
her and she’d be crying in a scene.”
Moss has felt comfortable pingponging
between real life and make-believe, however
grim it may be, for as long as she can remember. “Acting has always just been play for me,”
she says, harkening back to her debut as Sandra
Bullock’s 6-year-old daughter in a 1990 Jackie
Collins miniseries. “All I remember is doing
the scene where I find [Bullock’s] body in the
pool,” she says. By 10, Moss was being snatched
from her family in the Harvey Keitel movie
Imaginary Crimes; parts in other disturbing
flicks, including Girl, Interrupted, starring a
young Angelina Jolie, followed. “So yeah,” she
says, “I’ve never really done the lighter stuff,
even as a fuckin’ kid.”
Initially, all of it was just a sideshow to
her first love, ballet, which Moss studied at
the School of American Ballet in New York and
with Suzanne Farrell at the Kennedy Center
in D.C. But having picked up some early lessons
in discipline and hardship, she hung up her
pointe shoes at 15 and by 17 found herself back
in her native L.A., auditioning for a role on
The West Wing before a fast-talking man who
seemed particularly at ease with the material.
“Later I found out that that was Aaron Sorkin,”
she says of the series’ famed creator, adding
in her own defense, “I didn’t know who the fuck
anyone was.” Moss was cast as Zoey Bartlet, the
president’s daughter, and over seven seasons
on The West Wing earned a formative education
in the power of good writing.
Upon its wrap, Moss jumped immediately
to Mad Men as then-awkward secretary Peggy
Olson. It wasn’t the simplest decision. Back
then, AMC was known for airing crusty old
movies, and her agents, since replaced, were
trying to sell her on a forgettable indie casting
at the same time. But Moss, who was struck
by both the world and the script of Matthew
Weiner’s series, was insistent: “I just kept
saying, ‘Do not let Mad Men go.’ ” Over seven
seasons, the drama about 1960s ad men (and
women) helped usher in the golden age of
television, with Moss’ character ascending
the corporate ladder to become something
of a feminist icon. The status still tickles her,
she admits, as she searches her phone for her
favorite Peggy memes. She finds one in which
the Mad Men character, with shades on and
a cigarette dangling from her lips, shares the
screen with a bonneted Offred. “I fuckin’ love
this,” she says with a giant smile.
The Mad Men cast became a de facto family
for Moss, who’d been home-schooled during
her early teen years by her mother, a harmonica
player, and father, a music manager. Most of
Photographed by Sami Drasin
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
64
J U LY 19, 2017
The West
Wing
(1999-2006)
In her first major
role, she played
first daughter
Zoey Bartlet
in Sorkin’s
acclaimed
beltway drama.
her 20s were spent on that downtown L.A. set;
and given her dedication to ensuring everyone
there was having a good time, often by way of
competitive parlor games that Moss frequently
would win, her fellow castmembers anointed
her president of base camp. “I was like, ‘I’ll
pay for the flowers,’ and they were like, ‘Done!
You’re elected,’ ” she jokes. Her co-star Jon
Hamm, base camp’s self-appointed sergeantat-arms, recalls Moss being critical to the cast’s
morale. “For a girl who has made her bones
being a very heavy and very capable dramatic
actress,” he says, “she has a wicked sense
of humor, and she gives as good as she gets.”
During that time, Moss married — then
quickly divorced — Saturday Night Live alum
Fred Armisen. The tabloids attributed the
relationship’s demise to Moss’ devotion to
‘Oh, My God,
It’s Happening’
How the MGM/Hulu drama
saw elements of its own
dystopian vision unfold on
election night and beyond
GROOMING BY NICOLE WALMSLEY AT THE WALL GROUP. MORANO ON-SET HAIR AND MAKEUP BY
SAMANTHA FRYLING AT ART DEPARTMENT. ON-SET STYLING BY JARDINE HAMMOND
marketing and even wardrobe. At one point,
she had costume designer Ane Crabtree send
her swatches of the handmaids’ robes so that
she could chime in on the autumn-red hue. “I
may have taken it just a little bit too far,” she
laughs. (Her self-deprecating charm notwithstanding, it’s clear Moss has the instincts
and the eye of a producer, which she is bringing
to bear on a slew of other projects. More on
that later.)
What no one involved in The Handmaid’s
Tale could have predicted while filming last
fall was just how relevant the drama would
become in Trump’s America. Launched three
months into his presidency, the series hinges
on plot points — right down to the all-female
street protests — that mirror the real-world
news cycle with unsettling frequency. The
handmaids’ robes and bonnets have become
the de facto uniform for women’s rights activists, and references to the Hulu drama seem
to be fueling the feminist movement. “This
show has prompted important conversations
about women’s rights and autonomy,” Hillary
Clinton told a crowd gathered at Planned
Parenthood’s centennial celebration in May,
referencing a particularly poignant scene in
which one character says, “We didn’t look up
from our phones until it was too late.”
Along the way, the series has put Hulu on the
creative map in the same way Mad Men once
did AMC, and Moss, whose unflinching performance has lapped up praise as “chilling” and
“brilliant,” was catapulted into the unexpected
role of spokesperson — with which she’s only
now getting comfortable. “I guess I just didn’t
know anyone gave a shit about what I had to
say,” she says with the kind of wide smile you
rarely see from her onscreen.
Mad Men
Top of
the Lake
(2007-2015)
Over seven
seasons, Moss’
Peggy Olson
transitioned
from clueless
secretary to
feminist icon.
(2013, 2017)
To shed Peggy,
she flew halfway
around the
world twice to
play a cop
in Campion’s
celebrated mini.
Scientology, a theory later dispelled by
Armisen when he told Howard Stern that he
was a “terrible husband” and then, on Marc
Maron’s podcast, admitted that he struggled
with “cheating and infidelity.” At one point,
Moss chimed in, too, telling the New York
Post, “The greatest impersonation [Armisen]
does is that of a normal person.” While she
learned quickly that “if you don’t want people
talking about stuff, don’t talk about it yourself,” she can acknowledge it was a good line,
adding with a chuckle: “I was holding on to
that one for a while.”
Though the Armisen mentions figure
less prominently in her recent round of press
coverage, no profile of Moss is complete
without reference to Scientology, which she
was reportedly born into via her parents.
s many Americans were
still heading to the polls,
Elisabeth Moss set out
for the bar at Toronto’s
Drake Hotel with director Reed
Morano and a few others from
The Handmaid’s Tale. It was the
evening of Nov. 8, and Moss
wasn’t about to spend it studying
her lines for the following day’s
The
Handmaid’s
Tale
New York magazine once called her affiliation
with the church “the strange, odd fact of her
biography, the thing that does not belong in
her regular-chick story,” and sites like Jezebel
have argued that it’s relevant that “the star of
The Handmaid’s Tale belongs to a secretive,
allegedly oppressive religion.” Moss has come
to expect the line of questioning, even if she
consistently declines to respond. “It doesn’t
surprise me [that it’s always mentioned]
because I think if there was anything unusual,
it would be there [in a piece about me],” she
says with a shrug. “So when it was my marriage and I was going through that, it was that.
If something else happened to me, it would
be that. And I [understand the interest], I’m
happy to read about the thing that I don’t
know anything about, too.”
work. “My God,” she says, “I don’t
go out, especially when I’m working,
but I thought, ‘This is worth going
out for; we’re going to elect the first
female president.’ ”
As the night wore on, it became
clear Hillary Clinton would not be
the next U.S. president — and the
dystopian drama they’d been filming for months started to feel far
less fictional than it had mere hours
earlier. “It was like the twilight
zone,” says Morano. “Lizzie and
I were looking at each other like,
‘Oh, my God, it’s happening.’ ”
The following morning, many
were back on set, shooting another
politically charged scene in which
the Commander (Joseph Fiennes)
says to Moss’ Offred, “Better
never means better for everyone.
It always means worse for some.”
The line hit like a ton of bricks.
The Handmaid’s Tale would
premiere nearly six months later,
and the parallels in Trump’s
America became that much more
eerie. Before long, the drama
was regularly lighting up social
media (#feminism and #resist
quickly became trending topics
Director-producer Morano,
flanked by executive
producer Littlefield (left)
and showrunner Miller,
photographed June 21 in
Santa Monica.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
(2017-PRESENT)
As hands-on as
producer and
lauded star, she’s
led the Hulu
drama that has
the zeitgeist
in a chokehold.
She tucks her shoulder-length blond hair
behind her ears, and continues, now with that
smile reemerging: “There’s just not a lot else
to explore here. I mean, my cat has asthma.
It’s something that we’re dealing with: medicine twice a day and she gets a little inhaler.
You want to talk about that?”
You don’t need to spend much time with Moss
to see that she still has reservations about
her own soaring profile and the attention that
comes with it.
She talks about stars as though she isn’t
one and describes her life, though it includes
such things as stylists on her payroll, as
devoid of any glamour. One of the last times
she can remember going out at night, she
on Twitter), and the show’s robeand-bonnet costume had become
the go-to uniform for women’s
rights activists around the country.
In fact, 30 Planned Parenthood
volunteers donned it and descended
on the Capitol building two by two
to protest the Senate GOP’s
health care bill in June, and it wasn’t
the first time. “The fact that we
can provide a voice for these protesters and that we can be a part of
the conversation in that way feels
incredibly powerful,” says executive
producer Warren Littlefield, who
reveals he’s exploring the idea of
dual citizenship as a political
statement, a possibility given how
much time he spends shooting
in Canada.
Looking ahead to the future
of Handmaid’s, showrunner Bruce
Miller and the series’ majorityfemale writing staff already are
hard at work on season two. Moss
suggests there will be more
humor and lightness mixed in, while
Miller argues they can now lean
in to things that feel grounded in
this world in ways that gave him
pause last year. “Before, you may
not have been so eager,” he says,
“just because you weren’t sure that
people are going to get the connection or that it’s going to feel
resonant and not just depressing.”
As hard as it is to believe, given
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↑ Planned Parenthood volunteers
donned the Handmaid’s uniform to protest
the GOP health care bill.
how often art has imitated life on
the series, nearly all of the first
season had been written by early
November. (The one noteworthy
postelection cut: a line that was
too close to “Make America Great
Again.”) “I remember hearing how
Stephen Colbert told his staff
after the election, ‘If you ever were
worried that you weren’t doing
something important, stop worrying,’ and that was the same
feeling that we had on the set,” says
Miller. “I said, ‘Look around, if you
ever thought what you were doing
didn’t matter to the world and to
the conversation, stop thinking that
way because today it matters
a lot.’ ” — L.R.
1
1 Moss, flanked by
The Square cast at the
Cannes Film Festival.
2 Moss has kept the
note Campion slipped
under her door, asking her
to consider a second
installment of Top of the
Lake. Her response?
Only if her character could
be “more fucked up.”
3 Moss with her Top of the
Lake: China Girl co-stars
Gwendoline Christie (left)
and Nicole Kidman.
2
3
says, was Nov. 8, and that was only because
she expected the first female president to be
elected that evening. (See sidebar on page 64.)
Any free time she does have these days is
spent in front of the TV (Veep and This Is Us are
current staples) or out to eat with her mom,
Linda, who lives a couple of blocks away, and
her small circle of friends, all of whom she
has known for more than a decade and many
of whom she has worked with at some point
during her career.
“If Lizzie had her druthers, she’d probably
stay in bed all day,” says her best friend,
Susan “Goldie” Goldberg, a former AMC exec
who met Moss on the pilot of Mad Men. Though
the two text often and share a “borderline
obsession” with Disneyland, there are a handful of subjects on which they don’t see eye to
eye. “Lizzie’s a diehard Chicago Cubs fan, and
I’m a longtime Mets fan, so we agree not to
talk about that,” says Goldberg, now an exec
at Annapurna. “Or I love hiking in L.A., and
Lizzie dismisses the whole notion of hikes,
making fun of me and my ‘urban walks,’ as
she calls them.” Other Moss favorites: Central
Park, sushi and a decent Moscow Mule.
Moss is equally skilled at downplaying her
professional accomplishments. Ask about her
first visit to the Cannes Film Festival in May,
when her indie The Square, a satire of the art
world, won the Palme d’Or and her upcoming season of Top of the Lake earned rapturous
reviews, and she tries to refocus the conversation on the surrealness of the festival.
(“It’s like a French Fellini movie,” she says.
“Everyone’s walking around in tuxedos with
people taking pictures of them, and you’re
like, ‘Who the hell are these people?’ ”) After
a fair amount of prodding, she finally accepts
that her recent track record is noteworthy.
“Yeah,” she allows, “I recognize that I seem to
be on a streak of finding really good stuff and
people liking it.”
Looking ahead, that “stuff” will include
many projects that she’ll be intimately
involved in from the start — such as Fever,
the story of Typhoid Mary, which she acquired
the rights to and is starring in and producing with one of her mentors, Annapurna’s Sue
Naegle, for BBC America. She has been busy
meeting with other female producers, too,
including Girls’ Jenni Konner, who calls Moss
“our generation’s Meryl Streep,” about potential collaborations; and she’s in the process
of setting up a production company with two
other women, citing actress turned prolific
producer Reese Witherspoon as an inspiration.
Though female-led projects will almost
certainly be her bailiwick, she’ll continue partnering with liberal-minded men, too, including
filmmaker Alex Ross Perry, with whom she
already has done two films. The pair is quietly
prepping a third, for which Moss reveals she’ll
play the lead of a female rock group who’s also
an alcoholic, drug-addicted mother. “Come on,”
she jokes, “she couldn’t just be a rock star.”
Like Ross Perry, most who have teamed
with Moss try to do so again. Campion wasn’t
interested in returning to Top of the Lake for
a second installment unless she knew Moss
was on board. She proposed the idea on
a coaster that she slipped under Moss’ hotel
room door when they were both in L.A. for
the Emmys. “An actor like her is often relegated
to sidekicks, characters and best friends, but
beginning with Top of the Lake, Lizzie proved
she could be a lead — that she had the charisma
and gravitas to pull it off,” says Campion,
who adds that she’s accessible as an actress and
humble as a human in a way that so many
are not.
Weiner, her former Mad Men boss, has been
busy writing his Amazon anthology series,
about descendants of the Romanov family, and
while he hasn’t begun casting, he has said publicly that he’d like to have past castmembers
like Moss drop in. Though she has yet to have
that conversation with him, she says she’d
“love to do it.” Her current boss Miller says
he can’t fathom doing another project without Moss by his side. Sure, he has been blown
away by her talent onscreen (“She’s a miracle
to watch,” he says), but it’s her contributions
as a producer on Handmaid’s that he hadn’t
anticipated valuing so much. “Lizzie brings
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
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J U LY 19, 2017
“I’m such
a staunch
believer in
I don’t really
give a shit about
anybody who
isn’t. I don’t need
them to watch
the show.”
something that you don’t normally get from
producers, and once you get it, you never want
to not have it,” he explains. “Someone who’s
an expert on actors. A lot of the work that she
did the first season was just managing this
cast of players and getting a great performance
out of all of them.”
Of course, that doesn’t mean it has always
been smooth with Moss at the helm. She
famously put her foot in her mouth when promoting the series at the Tribeca Film Festival
in April. When asked whether the show’s
feminist themes drew her to the project, she
responded, “Honestly, for me, it’s not
PREVIOUS SPREAD, WEST: RON JAFFE/NBCU PHOTO BANK VIA GETTY IMAGES. MAD: COURTESY OF AMC.
LAKE: SEE-SAW FILMS (TOTL2) HOLDINGS PTY LTD/SUNDANCETV. HANDMAID’S: GEORGE KRAYCHYK/HULU.
PROTEST: SAUL LOEB/AFP/GETTY IMAGES. THIS SPREAD, WEST: STEPHANE CARDINALE/CORBIS VIA GETTY
IMAGES. NOTE: COURTESY OF ELISABETH MOSS. KIDMAN: PHILIP ROCK/ANADOLU AGENCY/GETTY IMAGES.
a feminist story. It’s a human story because
women’s rights are human rights. … I never
intended to play Offred as a feminist.” Within
minutes, the Twitter mob had pounced, and
the media began blasting her “striking and
somewhat baffling” reluctance to associate
with the feminist movement. The experience
proved a wake-up call for Moss. “I was asked
a question about my character, and I was
thinking about my character and about the
TV show,” she says, “not that I was speaking
for feminists.”
In the months since, she has warmed up to
her new platform, even if it can still leave her
with a pit in her stomach. “If you’re spending a year on something and you’re thinking
about it, you’re reading a book over and over
and you’re having to do these scenes, it sinks
in, this idea of like, what happens if we don’t
say anything or what happens if I don’t speak
up?” she says. She has started donating to
both the ACLU and Planned Parenthood and
has found ways to incorporate the organizations’ pins and ribbons into her red carpet
looks and her Instagram feed for her quartermillion followers to see.
After the lunch bill has been paid, I ask
whether she worries about alienating the part
of her audience that might not feel the same
way she does on these issues. Her response is
immediate and emphatic: “I’m such a staunch
believer in women’s rights, I don’t really give
a shit about anybody who isn’t. It’s like, I don’t
need them to watch the show. At a certain
point, things are more important than your
job.” Which is why when you see Moss back
on the red carpet at the Emmys in September,
you can expect some kind of political statement. “There will probably be a pin or a ribbon
involved,” she says, giggling as her mind
wanders. “Or maybe I’ll just wear a giant ACLU
ribbon and a really good spray tan.”
Hear Moss reveal what TV shows she’s obsessed with at THR.COM/VIDEO
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
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COMIC - CON
2017
‘YES,
I AM
THAT
CREATURE!’
Spanish actor Javier Botet
has turned a rare
genetic disorder into a
ghoulish (and lucrative)
Hollywood career, landing
monster roles in such
films as Alien: Covenant
and The Mummy
By REBECCA FORD
3
GROOMING BY LORI GREENE AT ENNIS INC. GORDO: QUIM VIVES. PEAK, ALIEN, CONJURING: COURTESY OF @JBOTET/INSTAGRAM. PANTHER: MARVEL/DISNEY.
I
n 2013, a strange
and creepy screen test
started making the
rounds in Hollywood. It
showed an extremely tall
and very lean figure in a
long black wig and white
face mask crawling on the
floor, contorting freakishly long limbs and fingers
in ways human skeletons
aren’t supposed to bend. A
lot of people thought it was
a puppet. Others figured
it was CGI. It turned out to
be Javier Botet, a Spanish
actor who has since become
the most in-demand
monster man since Boris
Karloff stomped around
the Universal lot with bolts
sticking out of his neck.
“My body is different, very
peculiar,” says Botet, 39,
who most recently played an
Egyptian god in The Mummy
and a space xenomorph
in Alien: Covenant and will
soon appear as a leper in
the upcoming adaptation of
Stephen King’s It, as well as
the title monster in Screen
Gems’ folklore-inspired
Slender Man. “When I was
a child, I would stand in
front of the mirror and fold
my arms and legs to make
unusual shapes. I’d move my
elbows or fingers and think
it was amazing. I was always
playing with that.”
When Botet was about 6
years old, he was diagnosed
with Marfan syndrome,
a rare genetic disorder that
results in extreme height
and slenderness — he grew
up to be 6-foot-6 and just
120 pounds — as well as
double-jointedness. The
condition, along with seeing his first Star Wars movie
that same year, gave him
an unusual appreciation
of aliens (“I was drawing
creatures nonstop”) and he
dreamed of one day portraying monsters onscreen.
So, after studying fine arts
in Granada, Botet moved to
Madrid (where he still
1
4
lives), got a job as a book
illustrator and in his
free time began making
short films of himself with
his own camera. Later, he
enrolled in a movie makeup
class, hoping the teacher
would introduce him to
directors. The plan worked:
At 27, he landed his first
monster role, in Brian
Yuzna’s 2005 horror film
Beneath Still Waters.
It was a tough gig: To
play the creature lurking
beneath a town’s lake, Botet
had to spend at least six
hours in makeup and shoot
his scenes in cold water
in December. “But it was
amazing,” he says. “I was so
happy to be working at
my dream. I told my mother
about it, and I was crying,
realizing that it happened.”
Botet, who has a Spainbased agent, now works
full-time — and nearly nonstop for the past few years
— on films. He shot several
other creature features
in Spain, and after playing
the titular character in the
2013 Guillermo del Toroproduced horror hit Mama,
word spread of his abilities, and that screen test of
him crawling on the floor
started getting noticed. He
was cast as three different
ghosts in Crimson Peak.
He was a spectral figure
in Leonardo DiCaprio’s
2
5
DON’T-MISS PANELS
AT COMIC-CON 2017
GAME OF THRONES Showrunners David Benioff and Dan Weiss
won’t be there and neither will top-tier stars Emilia Clarke and
Kit Harington, but the panel comes as the HBO show has never
been bigger (the seventh season premiere saw a series high
16.1 million viewers). Eyes will be on Sophie Turner, fresh from
the Montreal set of X-Men: Dark Phoenix. JULY 21, 1:30 P.M.
WARNER BROS. The big event this year. With Wonder Woman re-
energizing the DC universe, what kind of victory lap will the studio
take? Will a sequel be announced? Justice League, the next big
DC movie, will bring its lineup of heroes, including Jason Momoa
(does that portend a showing of Aquaman footage?). Also,
Ryan Gosling and Harrison Ford will be there with footage of
Blade Runner 2049. JULY 22, 11:30 A.M.
MARVEL Expect footage from Black Panther (with an appear-
ance by star Chadwick Boseman), as well as Thor: Ragnarok and
possibly Avengers: Infinity War. JULY 22, 12:30 P.M.
STAR TREK: DISCOVERY The CBS All Access series makes
its first official trip to San Diego, with the full cast and crew in
tow. Expect questions about production delays and creator
Bryan Fuller abandoning ship to focus on Starz’ American Gods.
JULY 22, 2:30 P.M.
STRANGER THINGS The Netflix drama
comes to Comic-Con for the first time,
with stars Winona Ryder and Millie Bobby
Brown offering details about season two.
JULY 22, 3 P.M.
← Botet, photographed July 9 in Concord, Massachusetts, is still waiting for one role: “I try to let everyone
know that my dream is to be part of Star Wars,” he says. “I can die very happy if I was in a Star Wars movie.”
Photographed by Wesley Mann
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
1 Botet played a trio of ghouls in
del Toro’s 2015 film Crimson Peak.
2 “People are constantly mistaking
his physical performance in
Conjuring 2 as stop-motion or
computer-generated,” says Wan of
Botet (dressed as the Crooked
Man with Spanish actress Karola
Sanchez). 3 The actor will take
on a more human role in the
upcoming comedy Algo Muy
Gordo. 4 Botet did motion capture
to create the xenomorph in
Ridley Scott’s Alien: Covenant.
69
J U LY 19, 2017
nightmare in The Revenant
(the scene was cut from the
final release). He was the
Crooked Man in Conjuring 2
(“Despite the creepy, scary
characters he portrays,
he’s the sweetest guy to
work with,” says director
James Wan). And he played
a dark creature terrorizing townspeople in Devil’s
Gate, a role that required
him to wear such uncomfortable prosthetics on his
head that he was all but
blind during his scenes.
“When you’re without your
senses for so many hours,
you start feeling like you’re
in a cocoon; you start losing control of everything,”
says the actor, who uses
mindfulness techniques
like breathing exercises to
calm himself during tough
situations.
“When I’ve been through
a few days with hard
makeup, sometimes I’m
tired and I think, ‘I’ve got to
stop,’ ” he says. “But then
I see in the monitor this
monster appearing — it’s
beautiful. And I think, ‘Yes!
I am that creature!’ ”
GROOMING BY LAURA COSTA AT ENNIS INC.
COMIC - CON
2017
THE MOST FAMOUS HOLLYWOOD
WRITER YOU’VE NEVER HEARD OF
Michael Green is on the hottest scriptwriting streak in town,
with credits on four major films this year (including
Blade Runner 2049, Logan and Murder on the Orient Express).
So how come nobody knows who he is?
By ANDY LEWIS
↑ Botet as the title character from Mama.
Photographed by Meredith Jenks
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
70
J U LY 19, 2017
← “I
W
hen Michael
Green first
started out as
a screenwriter, he read
every script he could get
his hands on. When he
finished a screenplay, he’d
toss it into one of two
piles. There was a pile for
scripts he thought were
better than what he himself
was writing and another
for scripts he believed were
worse. “I thought I could
start to tell where I ranked
as a writer,” he recalls.
“But back then, the ‘better
than me’ stack was a lot
higher than the ‘worse than
me’ stack.”
Twenty years later, there’s
a third stack — his own
produced screenplays — and
it’s getting taller all the
time. In fact, Green, 44, may
well be in the middle of
the best year any Hollywood
screenwriter has had in
decades, with credits on four
of 2017’s biggest features —
Logan, Alien: Covenant, Blade
Runner 2049 (with footage
don’t think I’ll ever be able to pull it off
again,” says Green of four movies in one year.
He was photographed July 11 in New York City.
premiering at Comic-Con)
and Murder on the Orient
Express — not to mention a
part in creating Starz’s new
hit show American Gods.
You have to go all the way
back to 1960 — when Billy
Wilder had The Apartment,
Ninotchka and the original
Ocean’s 11 come out — to
find a comparable streak.
And yet, unlike such showboaters as Joe Eszterhas
and Shane Black, Green has
managed to churn out all
these pages while keeping a
remarkably low profile.
Indeed, there is virtually no chance any of the
customers in this West
Village cafe on a rainy July
morning, even if they’ve
seen his movies, know
Green’s name. Dressed in
4
3
1
2
1 Murder on the Orient Express
(a solo credit). 2 American Gods,
co-created with Bryan Fuller.
3 Alien: Covenant, on which
Green and Jack Paglen have
story credit and John Logan
and Dante Harper have
screenplay credit. 4 Logan,
co-written with Scott Frank.
County’s Mamaroneck,
where he spent his childhood studying the Talmud
at a Jewish religious school
that his Israel-born
mother insisted he attend
(his father, a real estate
developer, was more
agnostic about his son’s
religious education). A lot of
his school friends weren’t
allowed to consume pop
culture, but Green’s parents
were more lenient. At 11,
he discovered the joys of
Spider-Man, kung fu movies
and Knight Rider. In high
school, he secretly installed
cable in his bedroom so he
could gorge on stand-up
comedy shows and such TV
jeans and an Oxford shirt,
the bald guy forking into
an egg white omelet looks
more like a run-of-the-mill
suburban dad than a red-hot
player in New York meeting with director Kenneth
Branagh (in fact, he is a
suburban dad; he lives in
L.A. with wife Amber, a
former copy editor at the Los
Angeles Times, and their two
young children).
Green grew up just north
of the city, in Westchester
series as Northern Exposure
and The Days and Nights of
Molly Dodd.
His life veered even
further toward the secular
when in 1991 he enrolled at
Stanford University, where
he wrote a column about his
dating life for the campus
paper. At that point, writing
screenplays wasn’t high
on his to-do list, but he did
script a romantic comedy
stage play and contributed
to the homecoming musical. “I didn’t go to college
thinking that I would be a
writer,” he says. “It took me
a while to figure out what
writing meant.” After graduating, Green came back
to New York and hustled his
way into a junior development job at HBO, where he
Hear Green reveal what it was really like brainstorming with Ridley Scott at THR.COM/VIDEO
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
71
J U LY 19, 2017
spent his workday reading
other writers’ scripts. That’s
when he started making
piles and realized he had a
flair for dialogue. He signed
with an agent, WME’s Ari
Greenburg, and a year later,
in 1998, Green was meeting
with the creator of a new
comedy being launched at
HBO: Sex and the City.
“I didn’t even know what
the show was about,” he
recalls. But when creator
Darren Star told him it was
a dating show, Green sent a
few of his Stanford columns
over to Star’s apartment.
And just like that, he had
his first TV credit. The Sex
by Steven Spielberg, who
hired Green to take over
Robopocalypse after Drew
Goddard left to make The
Martian. Green spent six
months meeting nearly
daily with the director in
what turned out to be the
master class of a lifetime.
To him, the fact that the
film never got made is all
but incidental. “I came
out of that with a new skill
set,” says Green. “I now
knew how to write a movie.”
And that’s when Green’s
career really took off,
particularly a fruitful relationship with 20th Century
Fox. Steve Asbell, the
executive vp for production,
connected him to James
Mangold, who sought out
Green (with Scott Frank) to
write Logan, Hugh Jackman’s
farewell to the X-Men series
(it grossed $616 million).
Asbell also introduced him
to Ridley Scott, who brought
him on to Blade Runner
and then Alien: Covenant.
And the studio hired him
for its all-star remake of
Agatha Christie’s Murder on
the Orient Express (opening Nov. 10). Green said yes
to them all — he even took
a temp gig writing patter
for the 2015 Oscars — juggling jobs like bowling pins.
“If anyone knew what I
was doing on the side while
doing what they believed
was the only thing I should
be doing, they would have
come after me with baseball
bats,” he jokes.
Of all the movies he has
coming out this year, Green
has the most personally riding on Murder on the Orient
Express. It’s the one screenplay he was most intimately
involved in — he’s the sole
writer — and it’s his first
foray into a genre outside
the action-superhero arena.
(Sources say Green got
about $1.25 million for
the script; his weekly rate
for rewrites is said to be
$200,000.) Branagh, who
not only directs but plays
time, though, Berlanti was
producing a big-screen feature and brought Green in
for an early draft, along with
Marc Guggenheim (now
the showrunner on Arrow).
Boom: Green had his first
film credit. Unfortunately,
the film was Green Lantern,
one of the biggest bombs
in superhero history, grossing just $116 million on a
$200 million budget.
Still, Green’s original
draft got noticed — before
it was completely rewritten by others — and his
timing was excellent. “It
was around the 2008 [economic] crash, and movie
studios were starting to
realize that there are these
things called television
writers who, unlike feature
writers, have discipline,”
↓ Blade Runner 2049, co-written with Hampton Fancher.
and the City gig led to more
jobs. He spent a season on
Smallville, three seasons on
Greg Berlanti’s Everwood
and had a brief stint on
Berlanti’s short-lived Jack
& Bobby. (Berlanti says he
was impressed with Green’s
versatility and his ability to
find “levity in the darkest
hours” of long writing days.)
By 2007, he was even developing his own show for NBC,
Kings, a David and Goliath
retelling that, despite good
reviews, fizzled after 13
episodes. Around that same
he says. “There used to be
a big divide [between TV
and film writers]. But the
studios realized that if you
gave TV writers a chance,
they would hit their deadlines, give you great work
and say, ‘Thank you.’ ”
Green began to think
more ambitiously, writing
a script for an action movie
based on the story of Moses
(those years of religious
training finally paying off).
The film never got made,
but his script did perform
one miracle: It got noticed
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
72
J U LY 19, 2017
Hercule Poirot, says the
pair forged a close relationship, riding on the real
Orient Express together
from Paris to Verona while
location scouting for the
film. “We were walking
down corridors, looking
at angles and how bullets
could have worked,” says
Branagh. “It was fantastic.”
Here at this cafe in the
West Village, though,
the writer is enjoying a rare
moment of leisure. “I was
looking through photos on
my phone the other day,” he
says. “I was looking at last
summer. And in the span of
just a few months, I went to
New York, Toronto, London,
Budapest, back to London,
to Budapest again, Toronto,
New York and back to L.A. I
just turned to my wife and I
said, ‘Was I an asshole?’ She
said sweetly, ‘We stayed out
of your way.’ ”
PREVIOUS SPREAD, MAMA: GEORGE KRAYCHYK/UNIVERSAL PICTURES. ALIEN: MARK ROGERS/20TH CENTURY FOX. GODS: JAN THIJS/STARZ. MURDER:
NICOLA DOVE/20TH CENTURY FOX. LOGAN: BEN ROTHSTEIN/20TH CENTURY FOX. THIS SPREAD, BLADE: COURTESY OF WARNER BROS.
COMIC - CON
2017
HOW TO BUILD
A BETTER BLACK SUPERHERO
There are three things every
African-American comic book protagonist
must have (not including superpowers),
writes the NBA great and THR columnist
By K AR E E M AB D U L-JAB BAR
W
hen I was a kid, Batman and Superman
didn’t just kick supervillains’ butts, they
also helped me battle the slings and
arrows of outrageous adolescence. I had already
read many exciting classic novels like The Three
Musketeers, Ivanhoe and Treasure Island, which
gave me hope that — unlike the mind-numbingly
boring daily routine of childhood — adulthood could
be an exciting adventure in which the battle to
defeat evil and corruption paid off in massive public
adoration and endless attractive women. Comic
books were a modern shorthand version of those
thick old books, made more exciting by the addition
of superpowers or cool gadgets.
Then along came Spider-Man in 1962, when I was
15, the same age as poor, pitiful Peter Parker. Not
only was he struggling to deal with his new Spidey
powers, but he was fighting an even more evil
nemesis: high school. Every high school kid understands the debilitating torment of being a teen, and
how it seems like you have a secret identity — the
polite, mild-mannered kid your parents want you
to be hiding the bursting hormonal desires, demonic
drives and unbridled energy that are the real you.
Spider-Man was the perfect expression of that adolescent angst of id versus superego. But when
you happened to be a teenage person of color, you
had an additional secret identity — especially if,
like me, you were one of only a few blacks in a white
high school. Everything you did was scrutinized
as a representation of how all African-Americans
behaved and thought. You were the default ambassador of blackness.
Today, kids of color have it easier, at least when
it comes to finding relatable comic book heroes,
because this is a golden age of black comic book
characters no longer relegated to servant or
sidekick status. There’s now a cornucopia of center-stage black heroes, who run the full spectrum,
from the traditional costumed male crime fighters
like Spawn, Blade, Falcon, War Machine, Green
Lantern, Luke Cage, Black Panther and half-black,
Illustration by Ulises Farinas
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
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J U LY 19, 2017
half-Puerto Rican Spider-Man Miles Morales, to
female warriors like Kamau Kogo (Bitch Planet),
Amanda Waller (Suicide Squad), Moon Girl (Moon
Girl and Devil Dinosaur) and Michonne (Walking
Dead). Marvel even has several Muslim female
superheroes, including Ms. Marvel, Monet St. Croix
and the second Black Widow. There’s a black
Watson and Holmes series; a black NBA player
turned inhuman, Mosaic; and a terrific black interpretation of the Frankenstein story called Victor
LaValle’s Destroyer. But not all black characters are
created equal. For me, there are certain characteristics a writer must consider when crafting a black
comic book protagonist. After all, with great storytelling power comes … you know the rest.
First, a black superhero must have a social
conscience that makes them aware that they are
a minority and what that means to them and all
others who are marginalized. Being black isn’t just
having the colorist shade the skin darker, it’s a
significant personal element that motivates the
character’s actions. The character doesn’t have to
start out full-throttle altruistic and self-aware. In
fact, it can be a much more exciting story for the
character to start selfish because they’ve been
marginalized (“I don’t owe this world anything!”)
and slowly come to the realization of their connection to society, even an imperfect society.
Second, the character should have a sense of
humor, especially about themselves. The degree
of humor depends on the overall tone. Michonne
in Walking Dead can’t be cutting off zombie heads
then using them as ventriloquist dummies. Having
dour, humorless heroes only works if other characters poke fun at their dourness, as happens in
Batman, with Robin, Alfred and Catwoman getting
laughs off Bruce Wayne’s brooding self-importance.
Humor is even more important for minority heroes
because otherwise their earnestness overwhelms
the story, making it seem like a political diatribe
rather than an adventure story. A great story can
be both, but humor makes it more subtle.
Finally, the character should be smart. It’s not
enough to defeat the enemy with superior power,
the hero must also be able to outwit them. One
enduring racial stereotype is the black man who is
more brawn than brain, the runaway field hand who
crushes anything in his path to freedom. I prefer
to see our black superheroes flexing their cunning
and dazzling us with intellect as much as with their
supernatural abilities. We have to promote the idea
that anyone can attain knowledge — even as we
entertain our fantasies of powers beyond science.
Invisibility is nice, but intelligence wins the day.
My own graphic novel, Mycroft Holmes and the
Apocalypse Handbook, features the very white
brother of Sherlock Holmes out to save the world.
My spin was to pair him with part-Native American
and part-black Lark Adler, the partner — definitely not a sidekick — who rivals him in every way
and surpasses him in some. My main goal was to
throw these two together for an exciting and sexy
adventure. But my subtext was to have a character
who represents the exploited Americans (Indians,
blacks, women) fighting alongside an enlightened white man to save the U.S. from a villain who
represents the corrupt ideals of racism, sexism,
xenophobia and class snobbery. Mycroft and Lark
are funny, smart, brave and have dark pasts they
want redemption from. After all, second chances
are what America is all about. And the rising tide of
black comic book characters lifts all of us closer. As
Lark tells Mycroft, “This country may not treat me
the way it should, but the Constitution says it wants
to. I just want to help it get to that point.”
Why Did Two Men Die
A survivor of a fatal plane crash during production
of American Made breaks his silence amid lawsuits,
questions about safety, a pilot in a ‘death pool’ and
filmmaker finger-pointing: ‘Hollywood cut corners’
BY SCOTT JOHNSON
T
The villagers saw lights flashing through thick
clouds. Then they heard a sound like an explosion. When they stumbled upon the wreckage
of a small plane close to a dairy finca near the
village of La Clarita, in the Colombian province
of Antioquia, there were three men inside,
trapped in the fuselage and badly injured but
alive. The plane’s tail had sheared off, and
the cockpit was a mangled lump of glass and
metal. The fuselage and wings were warped
and bruised, covered by fallen branches, just
a hundred yards below a ridgeline. The villagers ran to get help. When they returned with
rescue workers, only one of the occupants was
still breathing. He flashed them a thumbs-up
sign and even talked. The other two had died.
Plenty of planes go down each year in the
mountains and jungles of South America. This
one, a twin-engine Piper Smith Aerostar 600,
1
1 Berl (left) and Cruise during the production of
American Made. 2 Colombian officials inspected the site
where a Piper Smith Aerostar 600 went down on Sept. 11,
2015, leaving two dead. 3 Liman (left) and Cruise
during the production of American Made in July 2015.
had been ferrying three pilots who were
working on a film: Alan Purwin, 51, one
of Hollywood’s most sought-after helicopter
stunt operators; Carlos Berl, 58, a wellqualified airman who knew how to navigate
the red tape of the plane import-export business; and Georgia native Jimmy Lee Garland,
55, who could fly and repair just about anything. The flight took off after a long day of
filming for American Made, a Doug Liman
feature starring Tom Cruise, 55, as a drug
smuggler turned CIA pilot, which is set to be
released by Universal Pictures on Sept. 29.
Filming had been underway for weeks in the
hills in northeast Colombia, near the border
with Panama. But the filmmakers were based
in Medellin, 35 miles to the southeast. This
early-evening flight on Sept. 11, 2015, was supposed to be a short taxi ride home.
American Made depicts the intricacies of flying small airplanes in dangerous conditions,
and so in a strange life-imitates-art moment,
the crash highlighted one of the film’s central themes. The tragedy since has shifted to
a wider set of questions about what happened and who is responsible. More broadly,
the crash has raised new concerns about
the adequacy of industry standards governing
aerial work, including pilot safety. Berl and
Purwin are dead, while Garland has been left
without feeling across much of his lower body.
The families of Purwin and Berl are suing
producers Imagine Entertainment, Vendian
Entertainment and Cross Creek Pictures for
wrongful death and other damages, alleging
that, in a rush to wrap up filming and save
money, production and aviation companies
ignored basic safety considerations. The families of both dead men also are suing each
other, and Berl’s family is going after Garland,
the survivor, alleging negligence.
To complicate matters, Great American
Insurance, which initially indemnified the
production companies, recently filed suit in a
federal district court in California to disclaim
responsibility and look for relief from having
to pay under the $50 million general coverage policy, alleging that the flight in question,
as well as other flights conducted during the
course of production, may have been performed
2
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
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J U LY 19, 2017
CRASH: RAUL ARBOLEDA/AFP/GETTY IMAGES. LIMAN: DANA MIXER/SPLASH NEWS.
on a Tom Cruise Movie?
illegally. As each party scrambles to assign
blame about what happened in Colombia,
allegations suggest that the process to ensure
pilots were properly trained and licensed may
have been flawed. A judge has placed a gag
order on the ongoing legal proceedings, and
multiple attorneys representing different
parties declined to speak to THR. But in court
records, the litigants accuse the production
companies and other parties of behaving
“unlawfully and carelessly.”
Meanwhile, interviews with those involved
and an analysis of court and FAA documents
have revealed other troubling developments.
The Federal Aviation Administration frequently conducts “surveillance” of movie sets
and pilots, which often amounts to routine
pilot checks, equipment installations and protocol issues. But federal documents show that
Purwin and one of his companies, Helinet,
were on the FAA’s radar often. In 1996, Purwin
was the pilot in command of a helicopter when
it crashed, killing his fellow pilot and business
partner. And Purwin had a broad restriction
on his Airline Transport Pilot certificate that
would have prevented him from piloting any
fixed-wing aircraft in some of the weather and
regulatory conditions encountered during the
filming of American Made. Several pilots and
safety experts with entertainment industry
experience say Purwin was one of a handful of
maverick Hollywood pilots known for taking
unnecessary risks and being “dangerous.”
Three people in the Hollywood flying community say in interviews that Purwin had been
placed into what a group of pilots casually
referred to as a “death pool,” a group of risktaking pilots who were deemed to be the next
ones most likely to perish in a crash.
What this means for the rash of lawsuits
ramping up in court is unclear. Jeff Korek,
a New York-based attorney representing the
Berl family, argues his client’s suit is an
attempt to hold the industry responsible for
its poor safety standards. “The impact of the
loss of their father and only real parent simply
cannot be overstated,” says Korek. “We hope
to put a dent in the pocketbook of the motion
picture industry. We want the industry to
understand and practice one concept, which
the Berl family would expect to be put ahead
of all other considerations in the making of a
film, namely, safety before profits at all times.”
I
n many ways, working on American
Made was a pilot’s dream. Based on real
events, the film is set in the 1980s drugsmuggling era, when Colombian cocaine
kingpin Pablo Escobar and others were funneling tons of drugs north via mules, boats
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
3
and maneuverable twin-engine planes. The
movie follows the true story of Barry Seal
(Cruise), a drug runner recruited by the CIA
to go after Escobar. The production called for
plenty of flying in remote, dramatic landscapes over jungle canopies or a few feet off
the ocean. And the pilots would get a chance
to fly a plane that other pilots often view as
racy and daring, the airborne equivalent
of Formula One race cars. The Aerostar 600
was designed to be light, very fast and able
to carry large payloads. But the plane had a
poor safety record and, among many pilots, a
reputation as a “widow-maker.”
Carlos Berl grew up in a family of pilots
in Venezuela, where his parents had settled
after fleeing Austria and the Nazis after World
War II. The perils of piloting small planes
in South America during the 1980s became
evident when traffickers stole the Berls’
twin-engine Turbo Commander. The Berls
bought another one, but the cartel returned
and said they would take it if the family didn’t
sell. Carlos, the second of the four brothers,
eventually moved to Florida and later New
York. He kept flying, racking up an array of
licenses. The rules guiding airplane licenses
and certificates are complex; pilots need different licenses to pilot various types of planes,
and those certifications require maintenance, medical checks and frequent training.
By 2015, he had a G-IV, one of the most difficult licenses to obtain, usually reserved for
75
J U LY 19, 2017
Colombia
Santa Fe
de Antioquia
SOUTH
A M E R I CA
View of the wreckage
of the twin-engine
aircraft that crashed
Sept. 11, 2015, leaving
Berl and Purwin dead.
Medellin
corporate jet pilots. That year, Javier Diaz, a
family friend who lived not far from Berl’s
home in Dobbs Ferry, New York, approached
Berl with a proposition. A former investment
banker, Diaz had parlayed his passion for flying into a gig as a helicopter pilot and ran a
company in the area. Diaz told Berl he wanted
help with some routine flying on the set of a
movie starring Cruise about drug smuggling
in South America.
Berl’s family says he placed a premium on
safety, and FAA records appear to support
that claim. Between 2008 and 2015, Berl
voluntarily took 12 classes and seminars from
the FAA’s Safety Team programs, where he
received online training and attended inperson courses with certificated instructors.
His younger brother Andres, who learned to
fly at Carlos’ side, says his brother always used
instrumentation meticulously and participated in annual factory training sessions. On
paper at least, Berl seemed to be a pilot’s pilot.
Still, Diaz’s offer initially didn’t excite
him. He told his family he was worried about
getting dragged into a contractual relationship that might hinder his life. But Diaz
persisted. Berl had long experience bringing
airplanes in and out of South America; he
knew the regulations well; he spoke Spanish.
Eventually, Berl agreed to help with some
initial flight plans and with ferrying a plane
from Fort Lauderdale, Florida, to Colombia.
Eventually, he grew excited, says Jenny, Berl’s
24-year-old daughter. The first trip to South
America went well. Berl stayed in swanky
hotels, ate meals and snagged pictures with
Cruise and flew home without incident. (The
actor, through a spokesman, declined comment for this story.)
Then in September, Diaz called again. He
told Berl that producers wanted Berl to return
to Colombia for more work. Specifically, they
needed someone to fly the Aerostar 600 home
to Florida. Designed in the late 1960s, the
plane was known among pilots as “the world’s
fastest piston twin.” It was a sleek model
prized for its speed, even if it sometimes came
at the expense of safety. There have been more
than 260 deaths involving the plane in 191
accidents around the world since 1969, according to the Aviation Safety Network. A 1998
review published by the Aircraft Owners and
Pilots Association concluded Aerostars had
“a clear-cut distinction as fast and alluring
airplanes that will eat you alive at the maintenance shop or at the slightest hint of relaxed
vigilance on the controls.”
In other words, piloting an Aerostar wasn’t
for the uninitiated. “Pilots often call that
plane the Death Star,” says Chris Palmer, a
safety and risk assessment consultant who
has worked on hundreds of Hollywood
productions. “You had better be darn good
in that craft if you’re going to fly it.” But
Berl, an expert in so many planes, had never
stepped foot in one. Andres Berl says his
brother wasn’t interested in flying it without
advanced training. He says Berl asked Diaz
repeatedly whether he could get some training, but it never materialized. “It’s not like
a car,” says Andres. “Unless you’ve flown it
before, you need a certificate with a trained
pilot who signs your logbook.”
As Berl waited for word in New York, he
ordered the Aerostar manual with a map of
the instrument panel and began to study.
In the meantime, he asked Diaz to prepare
paperwork to legally import the plane back
from Colombia to the U.S. A few days later,
Andres says Carlos discovered that Diaz
hadn’t prepared that paperwork. Furious, Berl
told his brother he would cancel the trip to
Colombia. (Diaz declined repeated requests
for an interview.) That night, Sept. 9, 2015, the
two brothers parted ways at a train station
in Westchester County. They agreed to see
each other the next day. But a day later, Carlos
was gone. “I guess Diaz convinced him,” says
Andres, shrugging his shoulders during an
interview. Later that day, Berl called daughter
Anatomy of the Deadly Crash
3
The plane then collided with
trees on the mountain, at
which point one engine and part
of the tail were torn off.
4
The plane fell quickly to the
ground and came to rest
at a 140-degree angle. When
villagers first found the
wreckage, all three men on
board were alive.
Illustration by Todd Detwiler
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
76
J U LY 19, 2017
CRASH: RAUL ARBOLEDA/AFP/GETTY IMAGES. PURWIN: MICHAEL ROBINSON CHAVEZ/LOS ANGELES TIMES.
The crash occurred on a
35-mile flight from a film
location to Medellin
that was supposed to
last 20 minutes.
2
1
Jenny and told her he was going to be on set.
“I told him to give me a call when he was done,”
she says. It was the last time they spoke.
Like Berl, Jimmy Lee Garland didn’t have
any experience with Hollywood. But he knew
planes, and he knew how to fix them. Softspoken and polite, he had grown up in Georgia
and spent most of his adult life there flying planes. He was pleasantly surprised when
movie producers showed up one day at the
Cherokee County Airport, where he ran S&S
Aviation. Garland had licenses to fly many
types of planes. He also taught aviation, and
before he knew it, he and Cruise were soaring and floating in Garland’s Cessna 414,
a twin-engine transport aircraft that would
become one of two planes Cruise flies in
American Made. Garland worked as Cruise’s
double in the film. (FAA records show that
Cruise first got a private pilot’s license in 1994
and obtained his commercial license in 1998.)
During filming, Garland gave him lessons
2
After that initial contact,
authorities say, the pilot lost
control of the aircraft, which
started to rotate to the right.
1
Officials with the
Colombian equivalent
of the FAA say the Piper
aircraft was tilted at
a 68-degree angle when
it hit the hillside.
1 Purwin was one of the most sought-after
helicopter stunt operators in Hollywood, but his
safety record is now in question. 2 From left:
Garland, Purwin, an unidentified friend of one
of the pilots, Cruise and Berl in Colombia.
specific to the Cessna, sitting by his side while
Cruise manipulated the controls. He noticed
that Cruise “liked to participate in the stunts.”
Eventually Cruise was doing all the flying
himself, says Garland. “He’s a very good pilot.”
Toward the end of August, says Garland, the
producers asked him to return to Colombia
to fly the Cessna and help as a mechanic on
that plane and the Aerostar. For the next few
weeks, he flew all over the country, down to
the edge of the Amazon jungle and along the
borders of Peru and Brazil. He’d never done
anything like it before, and it struck him as a
“once-in-a-lifetime adventure.” By September,
after long days of shooting in Santa Fe de
Antioquia, Garland was commuting regularly
back to Medellin, where he and a business
partner stayed in a plush hotel. To kill time,
they ate steak dinners and played blackjack
at the local casino, where the dollar was worth
3,200 pesos. The flight back to Medellin on
Sept. 11 was a routine part of that week’s work.
Dawn in the farming region of Llano de
Ovejas had been clear, and villagers had
reported stars visible in the sky in the morning. After filming had wrapped for the day, the
Aerostar took off around 5:30 p.m. and headed
south. Without any radio contact or communication with air traffic controllers, it rose to
8,500 feet, following in the path of two helicopters that had left minutes earlier, one of which
was ferrying Cruise home for the night. As
the plane picked up speed, tracing lush mountainous ridges, a cloud bank was settling in
on the summits that circle the valley where
Medellin sits.
Garland blacked out when the plane crashed.
Colombian media reports indicate that he
spoke to his rescuers, but Garland claims not
to recall any of it. He says his first memory
is waking up in a hospital nine days later trying to rip a respirator out of his throat. The
crash left him with a shattered vertebra, collapsed lung, herniated diaphragm, 10 broken
teeth, broken ribs, a broken jawbone and a
cracked skull on both sides of a dislodged eye
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
77
J U LY 19, 2017
socket. His body veered close to sepsis in the
hospital, but he recovered. A small piece of
steel keeps his skull together. He’s undergoing
extensive physical therapy. “It took me about a
month to gather my wits,” he says. Liman, 51,
has stayed in touch, sending him articles about
spinal injuries, emails and a Christmas card.
(The director declined comment for this story.)
Berl’s lawsuit states unequivocally that
Garland was piloting the plane when it crashed,
with Berl as his co-pilot. But Garland, in two
interviews, categorically denied piloting the
craft that day. “I was there as a mechanic,” he
insists. The Purwin family suit claims Purwin
was along in a passenger seat to provide
additional instruction, but Garland says he
can’t recall, so it’s impossible to say with
any certainty. Of the three men, Purwin was
the only one with a Hollywood résumé. He had
worked on blockbusters and tentpole franchises, including Tropic Thunder, Pirates of the
Caribbean and Transformers, along with about
100 other movie and TV productions. Early in
his career, he had put together elaborate helicopter stunts for The A-Team and Airwolf.
With his wife, Kathryn, Purwin had founded
Helinet Aviation, and the company was a successful industry go-to for high-end aerial and
camera work. He had donated a helicopter
to Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, and he had
worked with rescuers after Hurricane Katrina,
providing medical transport to hospitals and
patients free of charge.
But Purwin’s death has led to a quiet reckoning among pilots and safety experts who
are closely examining his record. In 1996,
during filming for a commercial directed
by Michael Bay, Purwin was piloting a Bell/
Tsirah Cobra helicopter when a rotor blade
clipped a boulder, resulting in a crash that
killed his fellow pilot and business partner
Michael Tamburro. Tamburro’s wife, Tammy,
sued Purwin and received a $7 million settlement. One aviation expert with decades of
experience in Hollywood says that Purwin,
whom he knew personally and professionally,
was “frankly, a terrible pilot, and it was his
incompetence that killed his partner.” In a
recent interview, Tamburro’s widow declined
comment on the 1996 crash and said Purwin
was a “dear friend.” An FAA spokesman, Ian
Gregor, said that an examination of Purwin’s
records found mostly run-of-the-mill reviews
and complaints. There were a few “actual
problems,” says Gregor, but most of it was
“routine.” FAA records show that some of these
“actual problems” involved accidents and
complaints from the public. The regulatory
agency issued Purwin warnings after breaches
in standard protocol. In 2010, the camera ball
on Purwin’s helicopter broke when it struck
an electrical power wire. In 2012, Purwin was
cited for flying too close to the Malibu Pier. In
that case, the FAA reported that “enforcement”
Continued on page 86
Reviews
Dunkirk
Christopher Nolan’s absolute stunner of a
World War II film is riveting, emotionally rich
and bracingly unconventional By Todd McCarthy
OPENS
Friday, July 21
(Warner Bros.)
CAST
Fionn Whitehead,
Tom Glynn-Carney,
Jack Lowden,
Harry Styles,
Aneurin Barnard
DIRECTOR
Christopher Nolan
Rated PG-13, 106 minutes
Dunkirk is an impressionist
masterpiece. These are not the
words you’d expect to see applied
to a giant-budgeted summer
entertainment made by one of the
industry’s most dependably commercial big-name directors. But
it’s a war film like few others, one
that employs a large, expensive
canvas but draws its power from
brilliantly realized, often private
moments more than sheer spectacle. As resolute in its creative
confidence as the British are in
this historical narrative of having
one’s back to the wall, Dunkirk is
the film Christopher Nolan earned
the right to make thanks to his
contributions to Warner Bros.
with the Dark Knight trilogy.
For all its emotional potency,
this film doesn’t trade in cheap
sentiment, stiff-upper-lip cliches
or traditional battle film tropes.
It’s about resolve, determination and survival on the ground,
on the water and in the air. Using
a risky narrative structure that
splits the storytelling into three
intercut chronologies of different duration, Dunkirk dramatizes
the climax of the attempt by
the British Expeditionary
Force to help French, Belgian
and Canadian forces stem the
Germans’ sweep through France
in the spring of 1940. Some
400,000 mostly British soldiers
ended up on the beaches of
Dunkirk, in northern France, desperate for a way to make it across
the English Channel.
There are logistical matters
that need to be understood: The
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
78
J U LY 19, 2017
↑ Branagh is
a British
naval
commander
who helps
evacuate
soldiers from
northern
France as the
Germans
encroach.
shallow waters prevent the arrival
of large ships, and English owners
of “little ships” were encouraged
to make the crossing to help rescue as many soldiers as possible.
Nolan, who wrote the script, presents the situation with lashing,
pitiless directness. The first scene
has several English soldiers shot
at as they run through streets,
and all are cut down except one.
Tommy (Fionn Whitehead) makes
it to the beach, where he finds
thousands of other soldiers lined
up waiting for transport. The arbitrariness of who lives and dies is
established at once. One of Nolan’s
bold decisions is to never show a
Nazi or even a swastika; nothing is offered as a target for the
viewer’s antagonism.
Tommy teams up with soldiers
Gibson (Aneurin Barnard) and
Alex (Harry Styles), and the three
finesse a plan to get out on a pier
where boats can tie up under the
MELINDA SUE GORDON/WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT (2)
Film
supervision of Cmdr. Bolton
(Kenneth Branagh) and
Col. Winnant (James D’Arcy).
With naval vessels largely
useless, the only real effort the
English military can muster
is air power, represented here by
three Spitfire fighter planes sent
to bring down as many Luftwaffe
bombers as they can. The ace
flier is played by Tom Hardy, and
the aerial sequences are brilliantly and excitingly filmed.
The third narrative thread
involves the effort of civilian sailor
Dawson (Mark Rylance) and teen
son Peter (Tom Glynn-Carney) to
sail their yacht across the Channel
to bring home whomever they
can. They’re joined by a friend of
Peter’s, George (Barry Keoghan),
and later take on the shellshocked survivor of a sunken ship
(Cillian Murphy).
Nolan’s gambit is to intercut
these three related but distinct
narratives, each of which has its
own time frame; the effect is to
vividly contrast the different ways
soldiers experienced the same
event. Also distinguishing Dunkirk
is the conspicuous lack of inspirational speeches or digressions
about loved ones back home or
hopes for the future. It’s all about
the here and now. Quite properly,
no one stands out in the cast; as
required, everyone just does his
job well.
Although the film is deeply
moving, it’s not due to sentimentality or false heroics. There’s
never a sense of Nolan — unlike,
say, Spielberg — manipulating the
drama in order to play the viewer’s
heartstrings. Nor is there anything resembling a John Williams
score to stir the emotional pot.
On the contrary: In what has to
be one of the most adventurous
of his many scores, Hans Zimmer
strengthens the film with work
that incorporates both sound and
music to extraordinary effect.
Mostly it’s in the background,
reinforcing the action, though at
times it bursts forth on its own,
shatteringly.
Similar levels of top work
have been turned in across the
board, notably by cinematographer Hoyte Van Hoytema, whose
second consecutive feature with
Nolan was stunningly shot on a
combination of Imax and 65mm
film with a boxy aspect ratio; the
format plays a significant role
in one’s nearly immediate immersion in the world of the film.
Editor Lee Smith has helped the
director tell the tale in a brisk
106 minutes, making it Nolan’s
shortest film since his 1998 feature debut, Following.
A decimation of the British at
Dunkirk would almost certainly
have resulted in the U.K.’s capitulation to Hitler and no American
involvement in the European war.
So the film’s climax, as beautiful as it is thanks to the visually
astonishing presentation of
Hardy’s character’s fate, is more
like the beginning of the real war.
Even here, Nolan figured out how
to counter convention by having
an excerpt from Churchill’s famed
“We Shall Fight on the Beaches”
speech of June 4, 1940, heard —
not as intoned by the great orator
himself, but by an ordinary soldier in very ordinary tones.
In Dunkirk, Nolan has gotten
everything just right.
↓ Whitehead is a young British soldier trying to cross the English Channel to safety.
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Reviews
Television
THR’S SOCIAL CLIMBERS
Taylor
(left) plays
a motel
maid and
Hay a
guest’s
alluring
mistress.
A ranking of the week’s top actors, comedians
and personalities based on social media engagement
across Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and more
Last
Week
This
Week
Actors
Last
Week
Comedians
1
←
→ I
1
I
Dwayne Johnson
1
←
→ I
1
I
Kevin Hart
2
←
→ I
2
I
Zendaya
2
↑ I
3
I
D.L. Hughley
3
↑ I
11
I
Priyanka Chopra
3
↑ I
4
I
Ricky Gervais
4
↓ I
3
I
Shay Mitchell
4
↑ I
10
I
Amy Schumer
5
↑ I
6
I
Jennifer Lopez
5
↓ I
2
I
Joe Rogan
6
↑ I
9
I
Sabrina Carpenter
6
←
→ I
6
I
Mike Epps
7
↑ I
13
I
Gal Gadot
7
↓ I
5
I
Bill Maher
8
↑ I
-
I
Patton Oswalt
Gadot celebrated 8 million
followers on Instagram with
a post July 10, writing, “You
guys are the best fans and
I can’t tell you how grateful I
feel for having 8 [million] of
you supporting me.” Gadot
leaped 94 and 124 percent
in Instagram favorites and
comments, respectively.
↑ I
12
I
Kevin Hart
9
↑ I
16
I
Tom Holland
9
↓ I
8
I
Sarah Silverman
10
↑ I
17
I
Hugh Jackman
10
↑ I
-
I
George Lopez
11
↓ I
10
I
Robert Downey Jr.
12
↑ I
23
I
Vin Diesel
13
↑ I
-
I
Ryan Reynolds
14
↑ I
-
I
Deepika Padukone
15
↓ I
8
I
Lily Collins
16
↓ I
4
I
Lucy Hale
17
↓ I
7
I
Ansel Elgort
18
↑ I
-
I
Shemar Moore
19
↑ I
-
I
Reese Witherspoon
20
↓ I
18
I
Ricky Gervais
21
↓ I
5
I
Cara Delevingne
22
↓ I
19
I
Jared Leto
23
↓ I
20
I
Zac Efron
24
↑ I
-
I
Liam Hemsworth
25
↓ I
15
I
Ashley Benson
A motel room is the setting for a variety of
odd stories in the Duplass brothers’ impressive
new HBO anthology series By Daniel J. Fienberg
After announcing his
engagement to Meredith
Salenger on July 6,
Oswalt gained 178 percent
in Twitter mentions while
receiving support from
friends including Dwayne
Johnson and Mark Hamill.
The pair went public
with their romance in June.
8
Moore stars in CBS’
upcoming reboot of S.W.A.T.
as Sgt. Harrelson, and the
actor posted about the role
on Facebook, writing that
the show is “gonna have
y’all like ‘WHOA!!!’ ” Moore
gained 321 percent in
Facebook post likes, for a
total of 515,000.
Room 104
This
Week
Last
Week
TV Personalities
1
↑ I
2
I
Joanna Gaines
2
↑ I
4
I
Gordon Ramsay
The TV chef ate a slice
of pineapple pizza (his
least favorite food) on
Facebook Live after
receiving 500 donations
to his eponymous
charity. His Twitter posts
helped him move to
No. 2 with a 66 percent
boost in retweets.
3
↓ I
1
I
Tyra Banks
4
↑ I
6
I
Chris Hayes
5
↓ I
3
I
Bill Maher
6
↓ I
5
I
Steve Harvey
7
↑ I
10
I
Jonathan Scott
8
↑ I
-
I
Anthony Bourdain
9
←
→ I
9
I
Martha Stewart
10
↑ I
-
I
Anderson Cooper
Data Compiled By
Source: The week’s most active and talked-about entertainers on
leading social networking sites Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, YouTube
and Google Plus for the week ending July 11. Rankings are based on a
formula blending weekly additions of fans as well as cumulative
weekly reactions and conversations, as tracked by MVP Index.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
80
Today’s appetite for season-to-season anthologies hasn’t
translated into an appetite for the episode-to-episode
anthologies that used to be de rigueur (e.g., Twilight Zone,
The Outer Limits). Consequently, HBO’s Room 104 feels
almost experimental, even though its premise is sort of
old-school: Each episode tells a story within the confines
of one motel room.
The half-hour series was created by Jay and Mark Duplass
(Togetherness), who seem to have free rein from HBO within
a tiny budget. Their new endeavor has few restrictions
aside from the spatial limits of the setting and the 30minute run time, which guarantees that even an episode
with an iffy creative conceit is over before it can grate. The
six (of 12 total) installments sent to critics, directed by various lesser-known talents, are pretty good.
The titular room consists of two beds, a small table and
a vanity area. The premiere, “Ralphie,” directed by Sarah
Adina Smith, tells the nightmarish story of a babysitter
(Melonie Diaz) who arrives to watch a boy for the evening
and learns that his evil twin may be locked in the bathroom. Smith also directs the unsettling, if less satisfying,
“The Knockadoo,” featuring the compelling Sameerah
Luqmaan-Harris as a woman pursuing enlightenment
with an emissary from a strange cult (Orlando Jones).
Not all the episodes are horror-tinged, and there’s pleasing diversity among them. The dialogue-free “Voyeurs,”
from writer-director Dayna Hanson, centers on a cleaning
lady (Dendrie Taylor) and her fantasy about the mistress
(Sarah Hay) of the room’s occupant. In the densely chatty
“The Internet,” directed by Doug Emmett, an aspiring
novelist (Karan Soni) tries, via telephone, to walk his mom
through emailing him his manuscript. “The Fight,”
directed by Megan Griffiths, turns the room into a ring for
an impromptu battle between two MMA fighters. The following week’s episode is a meditation on the passing of time
anchored by a beautiful turn from Philip Baker Hall.
It’s a fertile format, with Room
AIRDATE 11:30 p.m. Friday,
104 also benefiting from scripts
July 28 (HBO)
that tackle issues of race and class
CAST Hugo Armstrong,
Davie-Blue, Melonie Diaz,
in interesting ways. The Duplass
Jay Duplass, Veronica
brothers and their creative team
Falcon, Adam Foster,
may just be starting to tap the conEllen Geer, Keir Gilchrist
cept’s potential, which makes the
CREATORS Mark and
show one to keep an eye on.
Jay Duplass
J U LY 19, 2017
ROOM: JORDIN ALTHAUS/HBO. GADOT: STEVE GRANITZ/WIREIMAGE. OSWALT: JASON LAVERIS/FILMMAGIC. RAMSAY: NOAM GALAI/WIREIMAGE. MOORE: TAYLOR HILL/FILMMAGIC.
This
Week
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CREATE AND PRODUCE THE FUTURE AT BU
Over the past ten years, the Boston University in Los Angeles program has
grown from a handful of participants to nearly 200 students in residence at
our LA site every year.
Boston University is searching for a new director of our BU in LA program,
who will help to nurture, and mentor, the next generation of entertainment
industry leaders, content creators, and performing artists across all platforms
in the ever-changing media landscape.
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The ideal candidate will possess not just a commitment to higher education,
but also an extensive background in the Los Angeles entertainment industry
and an administrative skill-set.
Most importantly, she or he will be the kind of leader who will expand our
program, raise its profile, and serve as an ambassador for Boston University
in articulating its vision to the entertainment industry.
For the full details on this position, please visit https://goo.gl/pZBUqF,
F where
you can begin the application process.
Boston University is an equal opportunity employer with a commitment
to diversity and inclusion, and all qualified applicants will receive
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sex, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any
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Backlot
Innovators, Events, Honors
The Final Episodes of Episodes Showtime’s industry
satire gets the last laugh as it comes to a close By Lesley Goldberg
F
or five seasons, Episodes co-creators
David Crane (of Friends) and Jeffrey
Klarik (of Mad About You) have bitten
the hand that’s fed them. With Friends veteran
Matt LeBlanc playing a fictional version of
himself in a sitcom about the inner workings
of the TV business, the pair have unspooled
a scathing portrait of network execs and the
flawed system in which they operate. But
rather than burn bridges, as one might expect,
the Showtime/BBC comedy has racked up
accolades, including 10 Emmy nominations.
Ahead of the show’s seven-episode final
season, debuting Aug. 20 on Showtime, the
longtime partners — personally and in business — open up about the series’ inspiration,
what’s next and the crazy Episodes plot point
about a talking dog that proved prescient.
How much of Episodes was based on
your experience behind the scenes on a show
like Friends?
JEFFREY KLARIK It’s not so much behind the
scenes of Friends but what happened to us
when we did The Class [in 2006-07] and how
CBS meddled in the process and pulled the
rug out from underneath us [after a single
season]. That led to the Episodes idea: what
American networks do to their television
shows. It becomes a show written by committee
versus something that’s personal. We did the
best version of The Class that we could do. Look
at that cast — Jason Ritter, Lizzy Caplan, Jesse
Tyler Ferguson, Jon Bernthal, Sean Maguire
and Lucy Punch. After The Class was canceled,
we were so disheartened, we decided that’s it
for network television.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
82
J U LY 19, 2017
↑ Klarik and Crane (center) with LeBlanc, John Pankow
and crewmembers on the set of the final season of Episodes.
DAVID CRANE The minute you start doing net-
work television — even with the best intentions
— there is enough anxiety about ratings and
numbers, and that completely takes over the
process. We loved the idea of writing what we
know and doing something for the BBC and
Showtime because they left us alone and we
were able to do the show that we wanted.
How much of your storylines have been rooted
in fact?
KLARIK Everything is rooted in something that
happened to us, [down to] the network deciding they’re moving [our show] to Saturday “for
our own good” — when nobody watches anything on Saturday. It’s this double-speak that
Left: LeBlanc and Pankow on season five of Episodes. Above, from left: Andrea Savage,
Mircea Monroe, Klarik, Crane, Kathleen Rose Perkins and LeBlanc at a 2015 Showtime party.
they have that you’re supposed to agree with
and act like you believe what they’re saying is
true even though you know it isn’t true.
CRANE We have lived through every permutation of what that network experience is.
But one of the things that we enjoyed with
the final season is that it wasn’t just about
network executives; we were having fun
exploring what the writers room from hell
was like. There’s an episode about managers
who are executive producers on shows and
don’t do anything. So, we’ve broadened our
satiric canvas this year.
So it’s that bad in network TV? You’re not
exaggerating?
KLARIK What’s so funny is one of the story-
EPISODES: SOPHIE MUTEVELIAN/SHOWTIME (2). SAVAGE: JASON MERRITT/GETTY IMAGES. LEBLANC: GARY GRSHOFF/WIREIMAGE.
lines that we had on Episodes was about this
talking-dog show that comes on opposite
Pucks [the fictional sitcom within Episodes]
and becomes this runaway hit. We made up
the idea as the most ridiculous show. And
ABC just canceled a show [Downward Dog] with
the same premise! People think we’re exaggerating what the business is like, and it’s not
an exaggeration at all. These characters exist,
and we’ve dealt with them.
CRANE There have been moments since we’ve
streaming folks, and we’ve met a few people
finished where something will happen, and
who are interested in working with us, and
we’ll say, “I wish we could put that in the show.”
we’re honing what the idea is.
But even with that feeling, leavKLARIK Just about everything
ing everyone wanting more
we watch is streamed, so
FEELING
is more important. And being
the idea of doing something
THE
LOVE
able to put a bow on it and
there would be great.
finish the way we wanted to
finish as opposed to finding
Do you think Friends could
EMMY NOMINATIONS
out that you’re done? It’s much
exist in today’s landscape?
including four for LeBlanc
and four writing noms for
more satisfying this way.
CRANE I think it would be hard
Crane and Klarik
to sell because it was such a
low-concept show.
Would you be open to reviving
it in the future?
KLARIK The irony is that it’s still
GOLDEN GLOBE
AWARD
out there and is still attracting
KLARIK We’ve been approached
for LeBlanc, along with
people. I think there is more
to do a film version of it,
three other nominations
attention on Friends than there
which is something we never
(for him and the series)
is on Episodes.
thought of doing and are now
thinking about ideas and
how we could go about rethinkGiven the number of reboots
BAFTA NOMINATIONS
including best situation
ing this as a film. We end it
being attempted today,
comedy and best female
with a sense of finality; but
would you ever consider
performance in a comedy
on the other hand, the idea of
a Friends revival?
(for Tamsin Greig)
reimagining it is appealing.
CRANE No! It shouldn’t happen.
We’ll see.
Talk about putting a bow on
it. We did 10 great years, and all you have to
do is turn on the TV and it’s there now in
What’s next for you two?
its best form.
CRANE Our agent set us up with a bunch of
10
1
2
Have you pissed off anyone you’ve taken
aim at during the series’ run?
CRANE People ask if we’re afraid of burning
bridges, and thank God we’re in a position
where if we burn some bridges it’s OK because
we’re not going back over that bridge again.
We’re very fortunate to be in a position where
we can get what we want on the air and not
have to be afraid, which is what you feel when
you’re on a network show.
WHY MATT LEBLANC ‘SLEPT WITH A FAN’
Or at least his character did — but on Episodes, the line between
fact and fiction often is blurry. The star explains …
e did a stalker
storyline that
was based in reality.
David, Jeffrey and
I were having dinner
in London, and this
woman was there
watching us. I went to
the bar, and she
started asking me a
bunch of questions.
She was clearly stalking me but harmless.
W
You sound like you’re still enjoying it, and you’ve
said Showtime wanted more. So why end it now?
KLARIK We had to move the show to London [for
financial reasons], and as much as we loved
being there, it wasn’t home. We were homesick
and felt like we’d said everything we set out to
say and were anxious to move on.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
83
J U LY 19, 2017
I told David and Jeffrey,
and they got really
nervous. I thought it
would be funny to
wind them up and tell
them that I got her
number and was going
to go out with her. I
kept it going for a few
days, and they thought
I was crazy: “She’s
going to kill you!” David
and Jeffrey turned
that into a woman
from the Make-a-Wish
Foundation who was
stalking me [in season two] whom I slept
with. But that was
how they would take a
seed of an idea and
elaborate on it. After
it was in the script, I
told them I never went
out with her. We had a
good laugh about it.
Backlot
Siggraph
2
Spidey Swings
Into Imageworks’
25th Anniversary
Siggraph to celebrate
Sony’s visual effects
division By Carolyn Giardina
3
1 Ironman and Spider-Man — or at least their digital doubles — in Spider-Man:
Homecoming. 2 A digital Ray Winstone as Beowulf in the 2007 movie of the
same name. 3 Helena Bonham Carter, the Red Queen in Alice in Wonderland.
Square ever done,” says Chen. “It took weeks to photograph
for reference and then eight months with 30 artists to
re-create the background. Then you had to craft the shots.
I suspect now that could take half the time. In two years, a
quarter of the time.”
That’s because technology is advancing at breakneck
speed — computers are more powerful and access to
cloud-rendering services offers the ability to ramp up for
big VFX sequences. Using drones, it’s possible to shoot 3D
laser scans of a location in a single day. And that, says Chen,
“will mean sequences will just get bigger and bigger.”
Imageworks also broke ground on Robert Zemeckis’
pider-Man will be jumping into Siggraph — the
annual international conference and exhibition
2007 film Beowulf, which, at the time, was arguably the
on computer graphics and interactive techniques
most ambitious effort ever attempted to feature human
produced by ACM Siggraph. The teen superhero’s latest
characters that had been fully created digitally — a chalincarnation in Spider-Man: Homecoming will be
lenge that’s still considered the most difficult
SIGGRAPH
the topic of one session, featuring the film’s visual
VFX experts face because, if even slightly off, the
effects team. And the film’s main VFX house,
results can be creepy, stranding the viewer in a
July 30-Aug. 3
Los Angeles
Sony Pictures Imageworks, will be spotlighted in
perceptual zone known as the “uncanny valley.”
Convention
another as it celebrates its 25th anniversary.
“That uncanny valley is still there — it’s so hard
Center
Imageworks — which has created VFX on
to overcome,” admits Chen. “But I look at what we
countless films, from Beowulf to Alice in Wonderland, and
did in Beowulf, and there are moments where you really
worked in conjunction with sister company
believe [actors such as Anthony Hopkins and Angelina Jolie]
Sony Pictures Animation on such projects as
are there.”
the Hotel Transylvania franchise and The Emoji
Siggraph will showcase the latest advancements, includMovie (out July 28) — also has handled the
ing digital doubles that were called upon to perform some of
visual effects on all the live-action Spiderthe aerial acrobatics in the newest Spider-Man movie. Theo
Chen
Man movies from 2002 on. Looking back on
Bialek, Imageworks’ VFX supervisor, says this time around
the company’s history, senior VFX supervisor the focus was on their evolving body language.
“The first few movies were about the iconic poses from
Jerome Chen, an Oscar nominee for 1999’s
the comics; this one they wanted to be more gritty and
Stuart Little and one of Imageworks’ first
keyed into Tom Holland’s performance. They started with
employees, recalls, “When I started, there were
Bialek
six people in one conference room, and all
extensive motion capture with Tom and with a stunt
the rendering power was in that room — maybe 24 procesdouble,” explains Bialek, adding that the motion-capture
sors with a giant air-conditioning unit. Now we have tens
data was used for less than half of the work — the rest
of thousands of processors and a thousand artists.”
was animated by the VFX artists. “A lot of what you can’t
Imageworks, as part of a studiowide cost-cutting effort,
really capture [with motion capture] is, for instance, the
moved its headquarters from Culver City to Vancouver in
weight distribution.”
2014, and during that time, what visual effects artists are
Imageworks president Randy Lake notes that in recent
capable of conjuring onscreen has changed dramatically.
years the use of digital doubles has become more prevaFor example, 2014’s The Amazing Spider-Man 2 featured a
lent — even close up. “Some good actors can’t tell if they are
battle in Times Square, but instead of filming in the iconic
looking at themselves,” he says. “We had that experience
Manhattan location, the team created all the backdrops
with Tom Holland. It’s not just background characters anydigitally. “It was the most extensive re-creation of Times
more; it’s full-frame digital doubles.”
S
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
84
J U LY 19, 2017
TOONS,
TECH AND
TEACHERS
CONVERGE
The conference’s
lineup reflects the
medium’s variety
FLOYD NORMAN
The first AfricanAmerican animator at
Walt Disney Animation
Studios delivers a
keynote speech on
July 31.
MANDY WALKER
The Hidden Figures
cinematographer
participates in an
AMPAS panel on the
movie on July 30.
TINY THE GIRAFFE
The newborn appears
at an animal sketching
course organized by
Otis College of Art
and Design on Aug. 1
and 2. — C.G.
SPIDER-MAN: COURTESY OF COLUMBIA PICTURES. BEOWULF: PARAMOUNT PICTURES/PHOTOFEST. ALICE: WALT DISNEY PICTURES/PHOTOFEST. WALKER: AMANDA EDWARDS/
WIREIMAGE. CHEN: ERIC CHARBONNEAU/BEI/SHUTTERSTOCK. GIRAFFE: COURTESY OF SIGGRAPH. NORMAN: MONICA MORGAN/GETTY IMAGES. BIALEK: COURTESY OF ARGULA PR.
1
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CRASH
Continued from page 77
began in January, and the next month Purwin
received a “warning notice.” All told, dozens
of incidents (which the FAA defines as potentially hazardous situations) go back several
years. FAA authorities say that incidents on a
pilot’s record are expunged after five years
or less, which could explain why the FAA had
no record of Purwin’s 1996 helicopter crash
in its files.
Meanwhile, since the crash in Colombia,
Purwin’s licensing has come under added
scrutiny. According to publicly available FAA
documents, he had what’s known as an
Airline Transport Pilot license. It’s one of the
highest ratings a pilot can get. However, FAA
records show that Purwin’s ATP was specific
to helicopters and did not apply to fixed-wing
aircraft. Mark Nathan Boss, a designated
pilot examiner who tested Purwin and issued
him a commercial license, says Purwin’s ATP
“doesn’t transfer to airplanes.” FAA records
show that Purwin’s ATP license came with an
officially noted limitation that read, “The carriage of passengers for hire on airplanes on
cross-country flights in excess of 50 nautical
miles or at night is prohibited.”
properly licensed, there still could be a legal
issue. FAA regulations state that any plane
used for carrying passengers for hire must
be listed on what’s called a 135 certificate,
and several aviation experts who work regularly in Hollywood say that flights conducted
during paid film projects often require that
designation. An FAA official confirms that the
company that owned the Aerostar did not possess that 135 certificate for fixed-wing planes.
Answers to questions regarding who piloted
the plane and whether it was properly certified
may emerge during the ongoing litigation.
Great American initially indemnified the
studios after the crash, to the tune of
$50 million. But in May, in a rare reversal, the
company filed a complaint in a federal district court against the producers, as well as Berl
and Purwin, alleging that multiple flights conducted during the filming of American Made
were “unlawful.” The policy stipulated that the
choice of pilots for flights made during filming
was to be “at the discretion” of Fred North, the
film’s aerial flight coordinator. Great American
argues that the plane may have been used
for an “unlawful purpose,” though it doesn’t
specify what that could be. It also points
to the ambiguity about who was piloting the
plane, or whether that person was “properly
“I fly there regularly, and I would have
stayed on the ground that day. You have to
have experience to fly in Colombia.”
That particular clause may not be relevant
to the crash in Colombia because flights and
crashes in foreign countries are adjudicated
by different agencies with different rules. But
Purwin’s ATP limitation would have applied
to any flight originating inside the U.S. On
Aug. 19, 2015, three weeks before the Aerostar
crashed in Colombia, a flight-tracking website
shows that the same plane filed another flight
plan. It originated in Clearwater, Florida —
where Cruise maintains a personal home and
the Church of Scientology has a major base of
operations — and ended in Kingston, Jamaica.
Berl was elsewhere on that date. Garland
denies that he ever piloted an Aerostar from
Florida to Jamaica. But that flight may be
relevant to the litigants in the case, including
Great American Insurance, because it originated on U.S. soil and appears to have been
conducted during the production window of
American Made. An FAA official says that the
flight would have been illegal if Purwin was
acting as the pilot-in-command because of the
limitation on his ATP. Of course, Cruise could
have been piloting the plane, but because
the FAA does not keep records of past flight
plans longer than 15 days, the full picture
remains incomplete. But even if Cruise was
certificated, qualified and rated under the
applicable law for the operation involved.” If,
as the Purwin suit suggests, Berl was piloting
the plane at the time of the crash, the insurance company claims the flight would have
been unlawful because a passenger was in
the aircraft without a properly certified flight
instructor giving lessons.
The Berl family is alleging that the movie’s
producers, Garland and Purwin hurried Berl
onto the Aerostar in Santa Fe de Antioquia
at the last minute before the flight took off
for Medellin and then told him that the short
flight south would be considered his training,
even though Berl had requested extra training on the aircraft before agreeing to take the
controls. The Berl suit says the terrain of the
flight path that night was “unsuitably difficult
for such an instructional flight, especially
one conducted in a rushed and unscheduled
manner in an aircraft with limited flight data
and weather instrumentation.” In interviews,
several people have alleged that the crew was
“rushing” to get back to Medellin that night in
order to keep ahead of delays that had plagued
production. One aviation expert who agreed to
be interviewed on the condition of anonymity
says that FAA officials with direct knowledge
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
86
J U LY 19, 2017
of the crash later told him that a dispute of
some sort took place just before the three
men boarded the plane. “Apparently there was
an argument about needing to leave immediately, even though they had some information
about the weather that they should have stayed
behind,” says this source. “But it was the
jungle, and they wanted to get out of there. I
was just told there was intense pressure to get
out as soon as possible. That causes shortcuts.”
And one lawyer familiar with the details of the
case claimed that Cruise had been on the plane
“just moments before” it took off. It was not
possible to verify that claim. (Garland declined
to comment.) The Berl lawsuit alleges that this
apparent rush to save time and money “compromised safety.” Andres Berl is more blunt:
“Hollywood cut corners.”
The Purwin suit echoes many of the same
charges but makes the parallel accusation
that as a passenger, he died because the men
in the cockpit, including Berl, shouldn’t have
been piloting the plane. All of which raises the
question of what role North, the aerial coordinator for the movie, may have played. Through
an attorney, North declined to comment, citing
ongoing litigation. The production companies also are keeping quiet for now, citing the
judge’s gag order. One experienced Colombian
pilot who is knowledgeable about the details
of the Aerostar crash agreed to share his
thoughts about the ill-fated trip on the condition of anonymity. “I fly there regularly, and
I would have stayed on the ground that day,”
he says. “You have to have experience to fly in
Colombia. You cannot fly here like you fly
in Miami, where there’s not a mountain anywhere. If you fly in South America, you have
to be very trained in the conditions.” The
Colombian authorities still are investigating
the crash, and their report is expected soon.
Whatever final thoughts the three men
shared in the cockpit that day likely never will
be clear, unless Garland recovers his memory
and decides to speak. From his years of flying
in Venezuela, Berl would have recognized the
sudden inclement weather patterns that could
abruptly emerge. For years, Escobar had used
these hills, the fog, the slipstream and the
presence of multiple, identical small planes
in the ether to great advantage in his rise as
the continent’s most prolific drug trafficker.
The moviemakers no doubt had wanted to
capture that sense of elusive beauty, the thrill
of flight, escape and maybe even freedom. It
wasn’t yet 6 p.m. when the plane arced high,
made an attempt to cross a ridgeline — and
failed. The small craft dropped, smashed into
a tree and began to splinter, carving a violent
path through the fields on a steep hill, coming
to rest, finally, in tatters on a terraced hillside,
under a grove of chestnut trees. Eventually,
Garland made it home alive. Purwin and Berl
never did. The question now is whether it was a
tragedy that could have been prevented.
THANK YOU TO OUR
SALUTE TO
HOLLYWOOD
KEEP THE MEMORIES ALIVE
FROM GENERATION TO GENERATION
HONOREES AND SUPPORTERS
Lenny Wilf, ASYV Chairman; Gene Simmons, recipient of Legacy Award; Rita Spiegel, recipient of
Lifetime Achievement Award; Gary Foster, recipient of Vanguard Award; Ron Meier, ASYV Executive Director
Meyer and Pattikay Gottlieb,
President of Samuel Goldwyn Films
Lenny Wilf; Gary Foster; Jonathan King, EVP of
Participant Media; Bill Bernstein, ASYV Western
Region Director of Institutional Advancement
Lifetime Achievement Award Honoree
Rita Spiegel and Donna Elyassian,
ASYV West Coast Development Staff
WITHOUT YOU THIS SUCCESSFUL, SOLD-OUT
BENEFIT GALA IN SUPPORT OF
YAD VASHEM
WOULD NOT HAVE BEEN POSSIBLE!
American Society for Yad Vashem
4BO7JDFOUF#PVMFWBSE4VJUFt-PT"OHFMFT$"t
XXX:BE7BTIFN64"PSH
88 Years of THR
Memorable moments from a storied history
1932
199 33
19
9 34
199 3 5
19
936
1 9377
1933 8
1933 9
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
4
1945
19466
19
9 47
199 48
194
49
199 5 0
1 9511
199 522
In 1942, Mrs. Miniver Mined Dunkirk for Six Oscars
Warner Bros. can only hope that
Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk, which
opens July 21, does as well as the first
Hollywood movie to touch on that
eight-day World War II battle/evacuation: Mrs. Miniver won six Oscars,
including best picture. While 1942’s
$1.34 million ($20 million today)
MGM production focused on an
upper-middle-class British family
trying to survive the war, one key
plot element is the father sailing with
the 800 boats that in 1940 rescued
about 340,000 British and French
troops surrounded by the German
army in the French port of Dunkirk.
The film is unabashedly pro-British.
“I was concerned about Americans
being isolationists,” said director
William Wyler, who died in 1981. He
said his attitude on making movies during the war was: “Let’s make
propaganda pictures but make them
good.” (He also made them profitable: Miniver earned seven times its
production cost just domestically.)
No less an authority on propaganda
than the Nazis’ Joseph Goebbels
was envious: He wrote that Miniver’s
“refined powerful propagandistic
tendency has up to now only been
dreamed of.” When the Oscars were
held in 1943 at the Cocoanut Grove,
THR said a high point came with a
message from President Franklin
D. Roosevelt. “We have succeeded in
turning the tremendous power of
the motion pictures into an effective
war instrument,” he wrote, “without
the slightest resort to the totalitarian
methods of our enemies.” — BILL HIGGINS
The Hollywood Reporter, Vol. CDXXIII, No. 22 (ISSN 0018-3660; USPS 247-580) is published weekly; 40 issues — three issues in January, March, April, May, July, August, October and November, and four issues in February, June, September and December — with 15 special issues: Jan. (1), Feb. (1), June (4), Aug. (3),
Nov. (3) and Dec. (3) by Prometheus Global Media LLC, 5700 Wilshire Blvd., 5th floor, Los Angeles CA 90036. Subscription rates: Weekly print only, $199; weekly print and online, including daily edition PDF only, $249; online only, $199; digital replica of weekly print, $199. Single copies, $7.99. Periodical Postage paid
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to MSI, PO BOX 2600, Mississauga, On L4T OA8. Direct all other correspondence to The Hollywood Reporter, 5700 Wilshire Blvd., 5th Floor, Los Angeles, CA 90036. Prometheus Global Media, LLC: Vice President, Human Resources: Angela Vitacco. Advertising/Editorial Reprints: Reprints of editorial or ads can be used
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toll-free (866) 525-2150. Outside the U.S., call (845) 267-4192, or e-mail subscriptions@hollywoodreporter.com. Copyright ©2015 Prometheus Global Media, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in any retrieval system or transmitted, in any form or by any means — electronic,
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T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
88
J U LY 19, 2017
MGM/PHOTOFEST
↑ Mrs. Miniver’s Greer Garson and Walter Pidgeon with young Christopher Severn and Clare Sandars. Inset: THR’s May 31, 1940, story on Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh in the midst of Dunkirk.
THANKS THE TELEVISION ACADEMY FOR OUR
®
36 EMMY NOMINATIONS
C O N G R AT U L AT I O N S TO A L L
AMERICAN CRIME
LAST MAN STANDING
Outstanding Lead Actress
in a Limited Series or Movie
FELICITY HUFFMAN
Outstanding Multi-Camera Picture Editing
for a Comedy Series
Outstanding Supporting Actress
in a Limited Series or Movie
REGINA KING
MARVEL’S AGENTS OF S.H.I.E.L.D.: SLINGSHOT
Outstanding Short Form Comedy or Drama Series
MATCH GAME
BLACK-ISH
Outstanding Comedy Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series
ANTHONY ANDERSON
Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
TRACEE ELLIS ROSS
Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series
WANDA SYKES
BOONDOGGLE
Outstanding Host
for a Reality or Reality-Competition Program
ALEC BALDWIN
MODERN FAMILY
Outstanding Comedy Series
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series
TY BURRELL
Outstanding Sound Mixing
for a Comedy or Drama Series (Half-Hour) and Animation
Outstanding Actor
in a Short Form Comedy or Drama Series
TY BURRELL
THE OSCARS®
DANCING WITH THE STARS
Outstanding Production Design
for Variety, Nonfiction, Event or Award Special
Outstanding Lighting Design/Lighting Direction
for a Variety Series
Outstanding Hairstyling
for a Multi-Camera Series or Special
Outstanding Makeup
for a Multi-Camera Series or Special (Non Prosthetic)
Outstanding Costumes
for a Variety, Nonfiction or Reality Program
Outstanding Choreography
DEREK HOUGH
Outstanding Choreography
MANDY MOORE
Outstanding Technical Direction, Camerawork, Video Control
for a Series
HOW TO GET AWAY WITH MURDER
Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
VIOLA DAVIS
Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series
CICELY TYSON
JIMMY KIMMEL LIVE
Outstanding Variety Talk Series
Outstanding Directing for a Variety Series
Outstanding Original Music and Lyrics
Outstanding Directing for a Variety Special
Outstanding Lighting Design/Lighting Direction
for a Variety Special
Outstanding Special Class Programs
Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Variety Series or Special
Outstanding Technical Direction, Camerawork, Video Control
for a Limited Series, Movie or Special
THE OSCARS®: ALL ACCESS
Outstanding Creative Achievement in Interactive Media
Within Unscripted Program
THE REAL O’NEALS
Outstanding Choreography
FRED TALLAKSEN
SHARK TANK
Outstanding Structured Reality Program
Outstanding Picture Editing
for a Structured or Competition Program
TAKING THE STAGE: AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSIC
AND STORIES THAT CHANGED AMERICA
Outstanding Music Direction
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The Hollywood Reporter, journal
1/--страниц
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