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The Times Times 2 4 August 2017

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ARTS
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superhero —
I get £150 a gig
The British comedian and his film star teenager
August 4 | 2017
2
1GT
Friday August 4 2017 | the times
music
times2
Wagwan, fam?*
The middle-aged
guide to grime
Grime has never
The slang
been bigger, but
Before you go grime, best learn
the language. Yes, people will
do you know your
point at the school gates, but
heck, who cares? As Mick Jagger
Dizzee from your
might say in a mock cockney
“Man pensioner do dat
Bizzle? Lisa Verrico accent:
grime.”
Ends: the area you’re from. Don’t
is here to help
use hood.
I
t began as the sound of London’s
underground, of pirate radio
and grainy videos, of kids
in council estates making
beats in their bedrooms to vent
their frustration and impress
their friends. Now grime
has grown up, blown up
and gone global. Even Mick Jagger
has jumped aboard (turning left
on arrival, presumably), releasing
a Brexit-inspired single, England Lost,
with the grime star Skepta.
No longer confined to the streets —
or rather, roads (see slang) — grime
in 2017 is a headline-grabbing,
money-spinning cultural juggernaut
that’s topping the charts, winning
awards and changing the summer
festival landscape. Grime isn’t just
selling T-shirts in Topshop and
tracksuits on Asos, it’s flogging
upmarket cars, swanky suits and
expensive alcohol. In short, grime is
coming for you, so best be prepared.
Dust down your hoodie, say wagwan
and watch your kids cringe . . .
What is grime?
Grime is high-energy electronic music
over which MCs rap about their real
lives in their real accents. It began in
east London in the early Noughties
as an edgy antidote to the slick sound
of UK garage (remember Artful
Dodger?) and its fancy clubs, which
banned punters from wearing trackies
and trainers. Faster than hip-hop
and sparser and more aggressive
than garage, it took influences from
dancehall and rave, developed its
own language and adopted a casual
uniform centred on sportswear.
Long before Taylor Swift’s squad,
grime had crews — groups of mates,
mostly from estates in east and
south London, presenting shows on
pirate radio and releasing their vinyl
records on independent labels. In its
early years grime was a scene in
search of a name. The pioneering
Wiley even released a single titled Wot
Do U Call It?, which Channel 4
poached for a 2003 short film that
captured grime in its infancy.
Over the years grime has tiptoed
into the mainstream and retreated
Road/roadman: hip-hop is from
the street, grime is from the road.
Know your area well, sir? You’re a
roadman, who may or may not
smoke weed.
Wagwan: informal greeting,
borrowed from Jamaican patois,
meaning “what’s going on?”
P: money
Galdem: a group of girls. See also
mandem (a group of boys)
Fam: friend
Swag: bad; not bag
Creps: trainers
Bait: obvious
Peng: good-looking, attractive,
especially girls. Make like Stormzy
and tag dem peng tings.
Wasteman: useless person, waste
of space. I’m afraid that’s you,
trying to talk grime.
several times, but by 2015 it was too
big to put back in its box. The support
of Drake and Kanye West hasn’t hurt.
The godfather
Grime’s most important pioneer,
Bow-born Wiley, remained at the
centre of the scene for more than a
decade, inspiring and aiding younger
MCs, relentlessly releasing records
that pushed grime to grow up and
often at the heart of disputes with
big labels eager to make the music
more pop.
Wiley’s background in garage —
he had a minor hit in 2001 as part
of the garage crew Pay As U Go —
gave him a head start and it was his
infamous Eskimo Dance club nights,
begun in Watford in 2002, that gave
grime its breeding ground for the
next five years.
In 2002 Wiley’s minimalist
instrumentals became the blueprint
for early grime, notably his track
Eskimo — fans of his Roll Deep crew
briefly called the music Eskibeat
because of it. A famous falling-out
with Dizzee Rascal gave grime its first
big beef. Wiley reached No 2 in 2008
with Wearing My Rolex, but soon slunk
back underground, re-emerging in
2012 with the chart-topping Heatwave.
The stars
Dizzee Rascal
Grime’s poster boy was still in his
teens when he beat Coldplay and
Radiohead to become the youngest
winner of the Mercury music prize in
2003 for his debut album, Boy in da
Corner. The album’s lead single, I Luv
U, has been described as grime’s
equivalent of punk’s Anarchy in the
UK, although its successor, Fix Up,
Look Sharp, was the bigger hit.
Boy in da Corner was the first
indication that grime could go
mainstream, but Dizzee didn’t take
grime with him. After rapping on Band
Aid 20’s version of Do They Know It’s
Christmas?, he went bonkers for pop,
collaborating with commercial dance
DJs such as Calvin Harris, duetting
with Shakira and trying (and failing)
to give Robbie Williams some street
cred. He won best British male at the
Brits in 2010 and played at the
opening ceremony of the London
Olympics in 2012.
Lethal Bizzle
The Walthamstow rapper also known
as Lethal B was early to see the
commercial potential of grime. With
his More Fire Crew he broke the Top
Ten with Oi!, before signing a deal as a
solo artist and reaching No 11 the week
after Christmas 2004 with the Mobo
award-winning Pow! (Forward), a
controversial track about gun culture
that was banned from clubs and radio.
Skepta
A sharp mind, a cool mum and
a willingness to collaborate
beyond grime helped to turn
the 34-year-old Tottenham
artist into a team leader. It
was Skepta whom Kanye
West contacted when
he performed at the
Brits in 2015, asking
him to invite 30 of his
mates to appear on
stage in hoods.
Skepta and his
brother, Jme, founded
the influential collective
and label Boy Better
Know, to which the
Canadian star Drake is
signed. Their sister, Julie
Adenuga, is an influential
radio DJ.
In 2016 Skepta’s fourth
album, Konnichiwa, beat the
Above: Skepta.
Below: Stormzy and
Lady Leshurr
bookies’ favourite David Bowie to
take the Mercury prize, becoming
the first grime album to do so since
Dizzee’s Boy in da Corner. He was
overshadowed on the night by his
mum and her celebratory dance.
This year he found himself in
Debrett’s and did the double at
the Ivor Novellos.
The king
Stormzy has enjoyed a rapid
rise in recent years. Only
just 24, the Croydon
school dropout started
rapping in his teens
and had not long
independently released
his 2014 debut EP,
Dreamers Disease, when
he won best grime act at the
Mobos and became the first
unsigned rapper to appear
on Later with Jools Holland.
In 2016 he won the Times
breakthrough award at the
South Bank Awards.
Benefiting as much from his
huge personality, mile-wide smile
and striking style as from grime’s
the times | Friday August 4 2017
3
1GT
ANDREW COTTERILL/CAMERA PRESS
* Hello, mate
arts
times2
The songs
Shut Up – Stormzy
Did You See — J Hus
Wanna Know — Dave
Whippin Excursion – Giggs
Juice — Lady Leshurr
Freak of the Week —
Krept & Konan
Wot U Gonna Do? — Dizzee Rascal
Shutdown — Skepta
Can’t Go Wrong — Wiley
Big for Your Boots — Stormzy
Listen at spoti.fi/grime
his soft side and declaring his love
for his mum as he is with using his
killer rhymes and imposing frame to
start a party.
The hot list
What to do this weekend
Film
Land of Mine
Nominated for an Oscar,
this is a harrowing, moving,
high-tension drama, set in
1945, about young German
prisoners of war being forced
Theatre
North by Northwest
This retelling of the 1959 film is
a hoot: prepare for crop-dusting
chases and Mount Rushmore
moments. Hitchcock heaven.
Theatre Royal Bath (01225
448844), tonight and tomorrow
The politics
A scene that stands for #community
was always going to be perfect for
#politics. Before the general election
Jme spoke to a Snapchat-happy Jeremy
Corbyn at a surprisingly swish-looking
bistro and told the Labour leader why,
er, “bare of us don’t vote”.
Man Don’t Care, a Jme track, might
have been the perfect soundtrack for
Corbyn’s laments for the left behind,
were it not for some of its more
menacing lyrics: “You get a punch
in the face with my front door key/
Punch in the neck with my back door
key.” Still, it energised the scene to get
behind a leader who, six months ago,
thought grime was confined to the
House of Commons kitchen.
Dance
Romeo and Juliet
English National Ballet revives
Rudolf Nureyev’s dramatic and
testosterone-enriched staging of
Prokofiev’s great ballet. Several
casts to choose from in three
ascendance, at the turn of 2015 he was
named No 3 in the BBC’s Sound Of poll
and was one of the “hoods” who joined
Kanye on stage at the Brits. When
critics claimed that he had allowed
himself to be turned into a backing
dancer, Stormzy retorted with the diss
track Shut Up and had the last laugh
when it became a gold-selling Top Ten
hit. His appearance at Reading festival
last year was a glory moment for
grime. He pulled an enormous
crowd, overshadowing
the headliners, Red Hot
Chili Peppers.
This year is already
Stormzy’s year. Nominated
at the Brits, he joined Ed
Sheeran on stage for Shape Of
You and the pair’s performance,
released as a remix, hit No 1. His debut
album, Gang Signs & Prayer, released
through his own #Merky label, topped
the charts in February, becoming the
first grime album to do so.
Gang Signs & Prayer is one of two
grime albums shortlisted for this
year’s Mercury prize, alongside J Hus’s
Common Sense. Whether he wins or
not, there’s no stopping Stormzy, a
pin-up as comfortable with showing
Sara Pascoe
Philosopher-comic, light
entertainer, useful with a guitar;
when Pascoe gets all her
superpowers in just the right
balance, she’s about as exciting a
comedian as we have. Let’s hope
Visual art
Matisse in the Studio
A rare glimpse into the studio
of this 20th-century giant,
revealing his obsession with
objects — from Venetian chairs,
right, to African masks — which
Pop
Classical
BBC Proms
Thomas Adès, right, conducts
the National Youth Orchestra
in his own Polaris and
Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring.
Mussorgsky’s magnificent opera
Khovanshchina (Sun) should be
her show, LadsLadsLads, proves
to be the breakthrough Fringe
hit she deserves.
Pleasance Courtyard, Edinburgh
(0131 556 6550),
tonight and
tomorrow
in turn transformed his art.
Gorgeous paintings, weird
and wonderful things.
Royal Academy, London W1
(020 7300 8090), today, tomorrow
and Sunday
Regina Spektor
The Russian-born songwriter
and pianist, who has something
of Tori Amos’s quirky charm,
performs her new album,
The food
You can’t go wrong with Nando’s
when it comes to grime, except if
you’re in south London, where
Morley’s rules the roost. The
fried chicken chain is
adored by Stormzy, whose
lyric “Ask that Morley’s man
for more chips” is doubtless
dreaded by counter staff.
Drinks-wise it’s Red Bull all the
way, scarcely surprising, given how
much grime artists bounce around. Most
of the new wave of grime stars swear off
alcohol, although the sickly Alizé range
of liqueurs remains popular — and if a
high-end brand comes calling, it won’t
stop a lot of them endorsing it.
Do you know your grime? Take our
quiz at thetimes.co.uk/arts
Caitlin Moran’s Celebrity Watch
is away
performances, including lead
roles for Isaac Hernández and
Erina Takahashi, right.
Royal Festival Hall, London SE1
(020 7960 4200), tonight
and tomorrow
Comedy
The clothes
“I used to wear Gucci/ I put it all in
the bin ’cause that’s not me,” sang
Skepta on That’s Not Me, the £80 video
for which he won a Mobo. The MC
launched his own clothes range,
Mains, at Selfridges this summer.
Nike ruled the roost among grime
artists until recently — see Dizzee on
the cover of Boy in da Corner. But,
thanks largely to Stormzy, Adidas has
finally got its grime groove on. At 6ft
5in and strikingly handsome, Stormzy
has the best pose in grime, the best
merch in his label, #Merky, and the
best body to show it off.
More women are getting into grime,
on stage and off, but there’s a long way
to go. Leading the pack is the fabulous
Lady Leshurr, who rocks her grime girl
staples as well as she raps. For women,
the snapback hat has come into its own
— just don’t call it a baseball cap — and
huge hoop earrings are an essential.
to clear landmines from
the coast of Denmark.
See review, page 8.
On selected release
one of the season’s
ason’s
epic nights.
Royal Albert Hall,
London SW7
(020 7589 8212),
),
tomorrow and
Sunday
In Saturday Review tomorrow
Summer art: 10 great exhibitions
to see at Britain’s stately homes
Remember Us To Life.
Symphony Hall, Birmingham
(0121 780 3333), tomorrow
4
1GT
Friday August 4 2017 | the times
arts
interview
I used to be famous. Now
I’m only Spider-Man’s dad
The stand-up
comic Dominic
Holland tells
Dominic Maxwell
how it feels to have
a superhero son
S
ince we don’t get to meet
Spider-Man’s dad in the
films or in the comics, I
never thought I’d get to
meet the fellow in real life.
Here, though, sitting
opposite me in a Soho
members’ club — Lenny
Henry stops by to greet him at one
point — is the short, personable,
briskly articulate patriarch himself.
Which is to say, I’m here with Dominic
Holland, the stand-up comedian whose
eldest son, Tom Holland, is the latest
actor to play the world’s favourite
orphaned web-slinger.
Tom is riding high on great reviews
and box-office receipts of getting
on for £400 million worldwide
for Spider-Man: Homecoming. He
will appear in another couple of
Spider-Man films, and pop up in other
mega-budget Marvel superhero films
too. Soon, once he has done with being
limo-driven to Spider-Man premieres
and events around the world, he will
start filming opposite Daisy Ridley
(her from the new Star Wars films) in
another big-budget sci-fi film, Chaos
Walking, based on Patrick Ness’s books.
He is 21 years old. He is a star.
His father, meanwhile, is 50 years old,
and is driving himself up to Edinburgh
His ascent has
been glorious. It’s
been a thrill, a
wonderful fluke
for his first Fringe run in a decade.
He is playing at a 110-seat Free Fringe
venue at which he doesn’t charge for
tickets, but instead runs to the back of
the room at the end of the show to hold
out the bucket in which the audience
can put donations as they file out.
It is a mismatch in status, rest
assured, that has not gone unnoticed
in the Holland household in Kingston
upon Thames, where Tom still lived
until recently. In fact, Dad has given
his comeback show the same name he
gave his self-published memoir about
his and Tom’s parallel careers: Eclipsed.
Performers, even self-deprecating
ones, have egos. So how is it for the
award-winning star of Radio 4’s The
Small World of Dominic Holland when
he gets introduced as “the father of”?
He smiles. “It’s fine. I’m expecting it.
I’m very relaxed, that’s part of my
shtick. I say in the book, if Eddie
Izzard had a son who went on to
become Spider-Man, he could write a
book called Eclipsed too. Eddie Izzard
is a big arena comedian, but he ain’t a
film star. There is no shame in being
eclipsed by Tom Holland.”
No real angst lurking behind the
mock angst, then? “In terms of my son,”
he says, “no. I’d be worried if there were
any angst. But there is angst about how
hard it is to continue a career in
comedy. It is hard as a 50-year-old
these days to make a proper income on
the comedy circuit. But in terms of my
son and his ascent, it’s been glorious. It’s
been a thrill. It’s been a wonderful fluke.”
Holland never got paid good money
to dress up in spandex, but, that aside,
the times | Friday August 4 2017
5
1GT
BRADLEY PAGE/SOLO SYNDICATION; NIKKI HOLLAND
he’s had a fairly good run of it. He
was the funny boy in class when he
attended Cardinal Vaughan Memorial
School in west London, but never
imagined that he could turn that gift
into a career — hence going to
university in Leeds to study textiles
management, where he met his wife,
Nicola, on the same course. Then
came an eye-opening trip to the
Comedy Store in London, and textiles’
loss was stand-up’s gain. He won the
Perrier best newcomer award in
Edinburgh in 1993, and was nominated
for the main award in 1996, losing out
to Dylan Moran. Izzard managed him
for a while at that point, after Holland
answered his fellow stand-up’s key
question to him — “Could you be a
world-class comedian?” — with a
bashful “yes”.
However, as the decade came to
an end Holland started to lose his
self-belief. When Tom was still a
toddler and he and Nicola had just had
twin boys — Sam and Harry, now 18;
they also have another son, Paddy, 12
— Holland started to get scared of
doing stand-up. “I was knackered. I hit
a bit of a wall.” He kept working, but
his attempts to become more writer
than performer stalled — the novels
have never earned him more than
“beer money”, and although he sold
three screenplays they were not made.
While he was beavering away at
staying afloat, doing increasing work
on the more lucrative but less visible
corporate circuit, Tom’s career
happened almost by accident. A
teacher at the dance class that he went
to suggested that he should audition
for Billy Elliot. Holland thought that
this was pushing their luck, but they
decided to try. When Tom, then eight,
did the audition they didn’t think that
he was a good enough dancer, but the
musical’s director, Stephen Daldry,
happened to be in the room, and
thought he might have something,
says Holland. “He said, ‘We’ll teach
him the dancing.’ And after that
Tom worked very hard, he’s a very
determined little boy, he maxed out on
whatever natural talent he had, and
then lo and behold started playing
Billy. He was brilliant in the role too.”
Tom stayed in the show for 18
months, but Holland still thought this
was just a nice adventure, a one-off.
Dominic Holland and
his son Tom. Left: Tom
as Spider-Man
arts
interview
Then the producers of a film called
The Impossible — which starred Ewan
McGregor and Naomi Watts in the
true story of a family caught in the
2004 tsunami in Thailand — saw
footage of Tom on YouTube discussing
Billy Elliot. They gave him the part of
McGregor and Watts’s son. Nicola and
the boys decamped to Thailand for
three months (Holland flew in and out
when he could, sometimes at his own
expense) but he still doubted that this
would be more than a lovely
childhood memory.
That’s when, with Tom’s approval,
Holland wrote Eclipsed and released it
as an ebook. “People have loved it,” he
says, “but it’s not been the runaway
success I promised my wife
it would be.” He laughs. “She’s used
to that. ‘When, Dom, when?’ ‘Soon!’ ”
He has just republished it as a
physical book, with a few updates.
“The question I am asked constantly
is, ‘How did your son become
Spider-Man?’ I say, ‘Buy the bloody
book! Ten quid after the show!’ ”
The Impossible wasn’t a hit, but it
got Tom noticed in Hollywood. The
work kept coming, in films such as
The Lost City of Z and In the Heart of
the Sea. And now here he is, playing a
15-year-old high-school student cum
masked superhero spinning his web
and holding his own opposite co-stars
such as Michael Keaton and Robert
Downey Jr.
Does Holland give Tom advice?
More to the point, does Tom want that
advice? “Most kids don’t, do they?
‘What does Dad know?’ ” But yes, he
does give Tom advice, particularly on
how to deal with fame. “I tell him to be
apolitical. I say, ‘You’re not equipped,
Tom, you’re too young. Don’t get
drawn into this celebrity “what
do you think?” thing; what you
think is irrelevant, you’re just
a kid.’ But he’s very measured.
He’s a very grounded boy.
I’m not worried about
him becoming a
mad person.”
What’s more, the
Hollands have set
up The Brothers
Trust, a family
charity through
which Tom will do
all his charitable
work. It launched in
July, when they
auctioned tickets
to join Tom for
a screening of SpiderMan: Homecoming in
London.“Tom has an
extraordinary resource
now with his fame,” says
Holland. “He is going to be
well paid, well looked after. It
also gives him an opportunity
to do some really worthy
things. It’s a good thing to do
for others, but it’s also valuable
for him. It keeps you normal.
“Because Tom is an
inordinately lucky boy. He has no
right to look like he does, OK? Have
you seen his dad? OK, he’s got a
good-looking mum, but if he’s going
to look like me he ain’t going to be
Spider-Man. He’s very blessed and I
say to him, ‘Tom, all this is bollocks.
You can do it, Tom, but don’t believe
your talent.’
“He is talented, of course he is
talented, but he’s no more talented
than a lot of kids who just didn’t
get that chance. We are too quick
to tell ourselves that movie stars are
special people.”
Can Holland trace the altruism
behind the Brothers Trust to being a
practising Catholic? After all, there are
almost as few of those on the comedy
circuit as there are practising
superheroes. “Well, who’d admit to it?
It’s such career death now. But no, I’m
not an evangelist, I just say to my boys,
‘Going to Mass is just a nice way to
punctuate the week, just a nice way to
sit down and say how lucky we are.’
“I’m not like most comics,” says
Holland. “I met my wife at 19, I’m
not really from the comedy world.
I’m just a funny bloke. And I think
our family life has impacted on Tom
and his brothers more than anything
else. He has a very secure family
to come home to. I think he
appreciates that.”
Yes, Holland knows that he is
helping his marketability by talking
about his son, in interviews and on
There’s no way I
made Tom a star.
I can’t even get
myself arrested
stage (although he points out that
Tom is just one of the topics in his
show). “I’d be mad not to, because
nobody else can, it’s a unique hook.
I am 50 now, haven’t been on
television for years, the movie is out,
it ticks all the boxes.”
Last month Holland headlined a gig
in London on a Saturday night. He
earned £150. Nice work when you’re in
your mid-twenties, not enough to get
by on when you’ve got four boys to
support. Well, no, OK, one 12-year-old
schoolboy to support, one 18-year-old
(Sam) who plans to study drama
at university, another
18-year-old (Harry) who is
a would-be film-maker
going around the
world with his big
brother making the
videos for his
Instagram feed.
Holland knows
that this is his
chance to remind
the comedy world
he still exists. He also
knows that having
Spider-Man for a son is a
card that he can probably
play only once.
However, he has
rediscovered his love of
comedy, and talks bullishly
about his set. “I can make a
room full of people laugh. I
can make them laugh out loud.
I’m as good as I ever was.”
He would like to be a
“destination comic” again,
but knows that won’t happen
thanks to his son’s name any more
than his son got where he is because
of his father’s name.
He never saw any of this coming.
“And it quite suits me that I’m not
famous. I find it quite unattractive
famous people making their children
famous. I mean, there’s no way I made
Tom a star. I can’t get myself arrested,
let alone say, ‘Hey, Marvel? It’s
Dominic Holland on the phone. I’ve
got something for you.’ ”
Dominic Holland: Eclipsed is at the
Voodoo Rooms, Edinburgh (free,
non-ticketed), from tomorrow to
August 27. thebrotherstrust.org
6
1GT
Friday August 4 2017 | the times
arts
Richard Morrison the arts column
Being banged up with Bizet showed me why prisons need music
ALAMY; MUNTESR DE COSTA
Y
ou want Dartmoor to
be exactly as it was
last Friday afternoon.
Mists swirled round
the tors. Rain pelted
on treacherous bogs.
A fierce wind lashed
men and sheep alike.
Only the hound of the Baskervilles
was absent.
And in the heart of the moor, the
bleak bulk of Dartmoor Prison looked
as forbidding as it must have done to
the Napoleonic prisoners of war it
was built to incarcerate. The fanciful
phrase “if these walls had ears” is
frequently deployed, but never more
evocatively than within this grim jail.
It was where the 19th and 20th
centuries’ most notorious thugs were
held, including “Mad” Frankie Fraser,
Jack “the Hat” McVitie and Frank
“Mad Axeman” Mitchell — at least
until he made his sensational escape
50 years ago (abetted by the Kray
twins, who had him murdered a few
weeks later).
If these walls did have ears, however,
they would surely not have heard
anything more startling than the
sound coming from the prison chapel
last Friday. It was the sound of
sweltering Spain incongruously
imported into drenched Devon: a
performance of Carmen, no less,
fully staged, costumed and with the
prisoners themselves designing and
painting the handsome scenery and
singing the choruses.
I’ve seen some gripping
performances of Carmen, but not one
like this. Some terrific professional
singers — notably Kate Symonds-Joy,
taunting and tempestuous in the title
role, and Alex Edwards as the besotted
Don José — hurled out the main parts
as if auditioning for Covent Garden,
and a tiny orchestra of four (also
professionals) worked miracles to
summon up the hustle and bustle of
Bizet’s atmospheric score.
Yet it was the intensity of the
prisoners’ contributions that sent
shivers up the spine. Not only
their singing — although that was
astonishingly vibrant and tuneful —
but their total involvement in the
story. They were clearly living and
breathing every twist and turn. When
José stabbed Carmen (in mime only,
of course — no props of any kind,
let alone daggers, were allowed) the
tension was almost stifling. There was
plenty of broad humour too. “You’ll
get into trouble with the law,” one
character exclaimed during the
smuggling scene. “It’s a bit late for
that,” someone in the chorus shouted,
and brought the house down.
Such ventures are high-risk. HMP
Dartmoor may not house mad
axemen any more, but among its
600 inmates are many sex offenders.
Here was an opera driven by sex and
violence. During the three weeks of
rehearsal the music director, Adam
Green, and stage director, Tom
HMP Dartmoor.
Below: Kate SymondsJoy as Carmen
Guthrie, had to generate enthusiasm
without emotions getting out of hand.
Then there was the iron regime
of prison life to negotiate, and the
ever-present danger that a volatile
incident would end the project. On the
very morning of this show a prisoner
climbed on to the roof, mounting a
three-hour protest. Dartmoor’s
governor, Bridie Oakes-Richards — a
champion of rehabilitation — decided
the show must go on. Other governors
The prisoners
were living every
twist and turn
might have taken a different view.
Yet Britain’s prisons have never been
more in need of life-affirming projects
or positive publicity. This week the
president of the Prison Governors
Association launched a devastating
attack on the government after a
year in which there have been
26,643 assaults in prison
(including 7,159 attacks on staff),
unprecedented overcrowding
and understaffing, chronic drug
problems and an increasing
number of riots, such as
happened this week at HMP
The
T Mount in Hertfordshire.
In such circumstances any talk of
iinvolving prisoners in music or art
may seem ludicrous. It isn’t. Prison
must be about rehabilitation as well
as punishment. Society needs
offenders to emerge better
than they went in. We see
only too clearly what happens when
they don’t. Serial offending, casual
violence, riots — you may as well dig
out the old signs saying “Abandon
hope all ye who enter here”.
Art and music won’t turn criminals
into saints, but it can teach life skills
and divert festering resentments
and pent-up energies into positive
self-expression. There have always been
charities such as the Koestler Trust
willing to do this, and inspirational arts
leaders as well. For years Wasfi Kani’s
Pimlico Opera pioneered exactly
what I saw in Dartmoor last week —
professional musicians working
alongside prison staff and inmates
to produce wonderfully moving
productions — but the conditions get
harder and harder, and there is scant
help from government.
The Prison Choir Project, which
undertook the Dartmoor Carmen, had
to raise £21,000 from private sources
to do it, and faces similar fundraising
challenges for the two other prison
projects it will mount this year. And
as prison governors and staff face
more and more “unacceptable stress
and anxiety” (as the prison governors
put it this week) the chance of arts
projects being welcomed into prisons
may shrink to nothing.
The sadness is that, when I first
started reporting on such projects, in
the early 1990s, conditions in prisons
were nothing like as bad as they are
now. Indeed, it’s entirely possible that
the Victorian villains imprisoned in
Dartmoor 150 years ago were treated
more humanely than the 86,000
criminals crammed into Britain’s
prisons today. That can’t be right. It
suggests a society going backwards.
the times | Friday August 4 2017
7
1GT
arts
THE
CRITICS
Ed Potton
is enjoyably chilled by The Ghoul p9
Will Hodgkinson
is wrong-footed by Randy Newman p11
Rachel Campbell-Johnston
on how artists have captured the air p12
Hopelessly lost in space
workplace harassment. During a
crucial security briefing, at which the
fate of 30 million souls on a floating
space station is being discussed, he
leans in close to Laureline and
breathes the deeply creepy and
vaguely threatening: “Don’t worry.
We’ll be together on the beach soon.”
Delevingne engages her non-role
with gusto, even while struggling
badly with horrific clunkers such as:
“Just admit it. You’re scared of
commitment.” Yet the character of
Laureline pales when compared with
Besson’s previous “strong screen
women” (from Anne Parillaud’s Nikita
to Scarlett Johansson’s Lucy) and is
rarely more than a reactive cipher for
DeHaan’s one-note heroism.
It doesn’t help that the film around
them is close to a skittish, Technicolor
mess. Besson prides himself on being
a “world builder”: from his earliest
post-apocalyptic adventure, The Last
Battle, to his kids’ franchise Arthur and
the Invisibles he has displayed an
instinctive penchant for creating
immersive, fantasy environments filled
with awe-inspiring vistas and eccentric
alien inhabitants.
Expansive and densely populated
though the movie is (Oooh, a fish
pilot! A dragon duck! A hippo person!),
this is simply not enough. A plot
would have been nice. What we have
in its place is the enormous space
station Alpha, the City of a Thousand
Planets, which contains something
dangerous and radioactive at its
centre that must be investigated by
the (barf-bucket alert!) flirting Valerian
and Laureline. This may or may not
be connected to the genocide of a race
of elegant alien pearl farmers (think
Avatar’s Na’vi, but white) and the
bellicose ambitions of the crazed
space commander Arun Filitt (Clive
Owen, trying to keep a straight face in
bling-loaded Russian army uniform).
And yes, it’s all ironic and camp and
wacky (Laureline puts a psychedelic
jellyfish on her head to find the missing
Valerian), and defiantly un-Hollywood
(the movie stops for a three-minute
pole-dancing sequence from the
pop star Rihanna, playing an alien
shape-shifter who shifts, mostly, into
the shapes of raunchy housemaids and
dominatrix nurses).
It’s also lazy and slightly insulting to
the audience, who deserve more than
a lethargic, lurching narrative that
bounces between trailer-ready set
pieces (most of which could be
removed without affecting the film)
and then scrambles, in a desperate final
act, for something resembling meaning,
depth and emotional connection.
Rihanna gets a speech about
being “an illegal immigrant”, while
Delevingne, pushing at the edges of
her emotional register, is forced
to deliver a harrowingly trite yet
tear-stained monologue about love.
“Love is more powerful than anything
else,” she says, sniffling into DeHaan’s
typically blank face. In another film,
with another couple, it might have
been weak. In this one, with these two,
it’s the final nail.
Encased in a noirish mystery, the
film casts Wallace Shawn as John
Lahr, the theatric critic and Orton
biographer who is trying to piece
together the essence of Orton’s life —
as well as the seeds of his violent death
— at the hands of Halliwell. Flashbacks
and flash-forwards, and sidelong
glances at the theatrical high life in
1960s London (enter Vanessa Redgrave,
alarmingly good, as the literary agent
Peggy Ramsay) are mere background
for the central riveting showpiece —
the destructive relationship between
Orton and Halliwell.
Oldman tends to get the plaudits for
his cocksure hedonist, but Molina has
rarely been better. His rage at Orton’s
exploding fame and betrayals, which
eventually becomes homicidal, is even
more chilling because it’s oddly logical.
Unrequited love has rarely been more
bleak, or brilliantly described.
Kevin Maher
Prick Up Your Ears is screening at
the BFI Southbank, London SE1
the big film
Cara Delevingne
and Dane DeHaan
are badly miscast
in Luc Besson’s
mega-budget dud,
says Kevin Maher
R
alph Fiennes and
Jennifer Lopez in Maid
in Manhattan. Nicole
Kidman and Hugh
Jackman in Australia.
Angelina Jolie and
Johnny Depp in The
Tourist. There are
few things that can kill a movie faster
than bad screen chemistry (think dead
eyes, flat line-readings and cold-fish
kisses). To that list of egregiously
mismatched flop-buster paramours
we must now add, right up there at
the tippy top, Cara Delevingne and
Dane DeHaan in Valerian and the City
of a Thousand Planets.
It’s a mega-budget sci-fi franchisein-the-making from Luc Besson (The
Fifth Element, Nikita, Lucy). At a
rumoured cost of $200 million, it is
unquestionably the most expensive
European movie yet made. And yet
with Delevingne and DeHaan at the
core, professionally ill-equipped and
cruelly miscast as a pair of sparring,
bantering space agents in a state of
permanent romantic arousal, the film
was perhaps doomed to failure from
the start. It has already bombed at the
US box office.
They are Valerian (DeHaan) and
Laureline (Delevingne), cosmic
commandos from the 28th century
and the stars of a long-running
French comic-book series that is
actually hugely enjoyable, light and
full of intriguing time-travelling
shenanigans. It was this series,
classic
film
of the
week
Chemical imbalance: Dane DeHaan and Cara Delevingne play a pair of bantering, sparring space agents
Valerian and
the City of
a Thousand
Planets
12A, 137min
{((((
Prick Up Your
Ears (1987)
15, 105min
{{{{(
apparently, that inspired the pre-teen
Besson to follow a path towards
fiction, fantasy and film-making.
Our screen couple are presented
to us in the midst of a gross sexless
wrestle on an intergalactic space couch.
She is dressed in a tiny white bikini and
he is trying to pin her by the wrists
while forcing her to admit that she
loves him. DeHaan, to the uninitiated,
or those who haven’t seen him in last
year’s horror flop A Cure for Wellness, is
an acquired taste. His waifish, etiolated
appearance (he’s the discount DiCaprio)
and drawling Keanu-esque delivery
have made him a perfect player for
indie film curios such as The Place
Beyond the Pines and Devil’s Knot.
Here, at the head of a blockbuster with
global ambitions, he is the victim of
crackpot counter-casting.
Valerian’s version of cocksure
“romantic” banter, which he deploys
throughout the movie with sinister
intensity, is disconcertingly close to
A
perfect storm of talent
collides to create one of
cinema’s great doomed love
dramas. The director
Stephen Frears combines
with actor Gary Oldman and writer
Alan Bennett to deliver a witty,
engrossing and disturbing tale of the
professional jealousies and intimate
tensions between the playwright Joe
Orton (Oldman) and his increasingly
demented lover, Kenneth Halliwell
(Alfred Molina).
8
1GT
Friday August 4 2017 | the times
arts reviews
film
England is Mine
15, 94min
{{{((
Oskar Belton as Werner Lessner, one of the young German prisoners of war who were forced to clear landmines from the west coast of Denmark
Denmark’s darkest hours
D
The story of an awful war crime is devastating to watch, says Kevin Maher
enmark’s so-called
biggest war crime
forms the historical
backdrop of this
nerve-jangling
bomb-disposal drama,
a best foreign
language film Oscar
nominee that makes The Hurt Locker
look like a Merchant Ivory tea party.
The year is 1945 and, responding to
a British military decision, the Danish
government has forcibly deployed
2,000 German prisoners of war to
the western coast of Denmark to
begin the arduous and wildly
dangerous task of clearing 1.5 million
landmines from the beaches by hand.
Goodbye Geneva Convention, hello
sudden death.
Written and directed by Martin
Zandvliet, the film focuses on a
small troop of traumatised teenagers
— still in their tattered German
army uniforms — and the brutal
Icarus
15, 110min
{{{{(
Land of Mine
15, 99min
{{{{{
A trivial Super Size Me-style premise
(take performance-enhancing drugs on
camera and see if they work!) becomes
something far deeper in this thrilling
anti-doping documentary from Bryan
Fogel, released on Netflix today.
An amateur cyclist who wants to
investigate the nature of illegal drug use
in sport, Fogel finds his way into the life
of Grigory Rodchenkov, the charismatic
Russian doctor who was accused of the
orchestrated state-sanctioned doping
of the Russian national athletics team.
As the film progresses and the
pervasiveness of doping becomes
more apparent (everyone, the doctor
implies, is doping), Rodchenkov
becomes a whistleblower and flees
for his life (from former KGB agents),
with Fogel’s help, to America.
Even there Rodchenkov, now an
ostensible enemy of Vladimir Putin,
is not safe. The witness protection
programme beckons. It all gets
very Bourne, and it leaves you,
unfortunately, with a feeling of
profound and unassailable cynicism
about the fundamentals of
professional sport. KM
Danish sergeant, Carl Rasmussen
(Roland Moller), charged with clearing
a sizeable chunk of Jutland’s
Skallingen peninsula.
The opportunities for high-tension
drama are screamingly obvious. As we
get to know the soldiers — Helmut
(Joel Basman) the tough one, Ernst
(Emil Belton) the soft one, Louis
(Sebastian Schumann) the smart one,
and so on — the scenes of them
inching their way, terrified, across the
mine-laden beaches (they literally
poke the sand with sticks) become
increasingly difficult to stomach.
When the deaths do come, always
without notice (BOOM!), the effect
is never less than shocking and
always upsetting.
And yet what’s truly remarkable
about the movie, and lifts it above an
exploitation thrill ride, is that it also
works as a nuanced drama and a
delicate character portrait. Step
forward Rasmussen, who as the film
Maudie
12A, 116min
{{(((
Ethan Hawke and Sally Hawkins
progresses begins to feel for the
soldiers and bond with them. He starts
calling them “my boys”, he saves them
from a humiliating beating at the
hands of some angry locals and he
feels every loss in the minefield as a
profound personal grief.
By the final act it seems to have
shed the war-movie trappings almost
completely and has instead become
a touching meditation on fathers
and sons, and on the primal urge in
men to replicate that bond.
Moller’s performance is magnificent.
Huge and brooding, with swaggering
echoes of classic era John Wayne, he
commands attention in every scene,
but only because there are tantalising
hints of softness and sweetness
underneath. At one key point of
near-savage degradation, he takes
Louis aside, looks tenderly into his
eyes and whispers softly: “Repeat after
me, ‘It’s almost over. I’ll make it
home.’ ” Devastating.
A difficult and highly mannered
performance from Sally Hawkins
coupled with a repugnant and
profoundly unappealing character
played by Ethan Hawke sink this
curious, and curiously saccharine,
biopic.
The Nova Scotia artist Maud
Lewis (Hawkins) is the subject.
She paints simplistic naturescapes,
suffered from rheumatoid arthritis
as a child, and speaks, in Hawkins’s
bold characterisation, in a smiley,
whispery squeak that’s somewhere
between Björk and Tweety Pie’s
Granny.
Maud’s husband is a boorish tyrant
called Everett (Hawke), who is
relentlessly cruel, calls her a dog and
smacks her in the mouth when she
displeases him.
He stays cruel for most of the film.
But she keeps smiling, and painting
naturescapes in a bizarre and
self-contradictory movie from the
Irish director Aisling Walsh that
seems to celebrate creativity and
commitment even as it validates
domestic abuse. Just odd. KM
You don’t have to possess an obsessive
knowledge of the early life, musical
influences and chart hits of the
Mancunian pop icon Morrissey to
appreciate England is Mine. But it
helps. As it happens, I do (more
than 30 years of mostly unwavering
devotion in the tank), so perhaps
I can comprehend the ambitions of
the writer-director Mark Gill better
than many.
The film attempts to describe the
formative, entirely dull life of Steven
Patrick Morrissey before he became
the flower-flailing face of the Smiths
and subsequently a globetrotting solo
star (he is, bizarrely, very big in
Mexico).
Trapped, like Morrissey, in the
limited grimness of 1970s rain-sodden
suburbia, with little narrative
momentum (Morrissey moans a
lot and wants to be famous, and
that’s it), it envisages biographical
scenarios that might soon inform
his classic songs.
There’s the nightclub scene from
How Soon Is Now (“So you go and you
stand on your own/ And you leave on
Jack Lowden as Morrissey and
Laurie Kynaston as Johnny Marr
your own”), the maudlin walks from
Cemetry Gates (“A dreaded sunny day/
So I meet you at the cemetery gates”),
and the fairground altercations from
Rusholme Ruffians (“A boy is stabbed/
And his money is grabbed”).
Which is all lovely. And I know I
had a blast. But if you’re not a Smiths/
Morrissey devotee there can surely
be only ambivalence. Watching
someone incessantly scribble in
notepads while complaining, “I’m
sick of being an undiscovered genius,”
can get you only so far.
Tellingly, you are left with the
impression that the rising star Jack
Lowden has just done a pitch-perfect
Morrissey impression, if not quite a
characterisation. Morrissey has been
an elusive figure all his life, and he has
certainly eluded this film. KM
The Times
Film Show
Watch Kevin Maher
and Ed Potton discuss
the week’s new releases
at thetimes.co.uk/arts
the times | Friday August 4 2017
9
1GT
arts
film reviews
Who let the black dog out?
This murky,
sweaty thriller is a
perfect example of
the best unhinged
British horror,
says Ed Potton
L
ike our pop music,
British horror is at its
best when it’s stylish,
resolutely un-American
and teetering on the edge
of sanity. Films such as
The Wicker Man and
Don’t Look Now are the
equivalents of David Bowie and Kate
Bush albums, less concerned with
logic than a striking sense of disquiet.
This homegrown tradition has
enjoyed a revival in the past decade,
with Kill List, Sightseers, Prevenge and
now The Ghoul, a sweaty
combination of kitchen-sink horror
and hallucinatory thriller.
Bringing together much of the
talent in that new wave, The Ghoul
is the promising feature debut of
Gareth Tunley, an actor turned
writer-director who appeared in Kill
List and Sightseers. One of its executive
producers is Ben Wheatley, who
directed those two movies and is the
de facto godfather of the movement.
And among the cast is Alice Lowe, the
scene’s heavy-fringed poster girl.
The title suggests an orgy of the
undead loaded with jump scares, but
this is a more restrained and more
disturbing proposition. The monster
here is metaphorical: part depression,
part manic obsession. The black dog at
its most menacing.
Tom Meeten, a veteran of Sightseers
and Prevenge, stars as Chris, the
unreliable, possibly unhinged
protagonist. Is he an undercover cop,
pretending to be the patient of some
Troubled soul: Tom Meeten mooches through a stygian London as Chris, the unreliable protagonist of Gareth Tunley’s debut feature film
The Ghoul
15, 85min
{{{{(
dodgy psychotherapists while
investigating an incident involving
a gunman and victims who were
invulnerable to bullets? Or is he a
genuine patient of said therapists,
unemployed, grappling with reality
and struggling to get out of bed?
Perhaps he’s both . . .
Meeten has the perfect face for the
role, all saturnine brow, hollow eyes
and mute torment. He mooches,
hunched, through a stygian London;
the capital hasn’t looked this
oppressive since Mike Leigh’s Naked.
Tunley’s film is less substantial than
Leigh’s, but he creates a tangible
sense of dislocation in a brief running
time of 85 minutes. In this urban
underworld the M1 becomes mythical,
an escape route from a hell populated
by wackos and doppelgängers.
The Emoji Movie
Rufus Jones pops up as one of
Chris’s smooth-talking fellow
patients (or is he a suspect?), while
a glint-eyed Paul Kaye holds court
at a late-night gathering of
conspiracy-theory freaks. And
Geoffrey McGivern has great fun as
one of the therapists, a gregarious
occultist who immerses Chris in a
world of Möbius strips, John Dee and
William Blake, and almost certainly
Cardboard
Gangsters
U, 86min
(((((
Who’d have thought it: a film based
on the most shallow and crass of
communication methods that is itself
shallow and crass? Worse, it knows it’s
shallow and crass.
The Emoji Movie is the execrable
animated tale of Gene, voiced by
TJ Miller, an emoji for that most
21st-century of feelings: meh (aka
indifference). Yet the story revolves
around how Gene’s array of emotions
is so much richer than meh, thereby
highlighting the depressing limitations
of emojis. Patrick Stewart voices a poo
emoji — do you want a more telling
metaphor than that?
Not only does this film hate its
very subject matter, it’s also the
most hideous example of product
placement in cinematic history. Gene’s
journey of self-discovery — a brazen
rip-off of the Pixar hit Inside Out —
takes him from app to app on his
human owner’s smartphone, giving
It’s Mulholland
Drive with
grey skies and
bad teeth
airtime to a sickeningly large array
of corporate sponsors.
James Corden, who voices Gene’s
“loveable” sidekick, a high-five emoji,
must have thought he would never be
in a worse film than Lesbian Vampire
Killers. Amazingly, he has topped it. EP
Williams
15, 109min
18, 92min
{{{{(
Mark O’Connor’s film is a formulaic,
but confidently handled gangster flick
set in the rock-hard Darndale district
of north Dublin. John Connors is full
of bull-necked conviction as Jason
Connolly, a drug dealer working his
way up the food chain and doing a bit
of DJing on the side.
Lying in wait is Kierston Wareing,
set to full cougar mode as the wife
of a deadly underworld rival. “You
wanna be the king, you gotta ride
his missus!” yells Jason’s mate Dano
(Fionn Walton, great in the
loose-cannon Joe Pesci role).
Chainsaws, nightclubs, torture
scenes — we’ve seen it all before, but
not heard it like this: the dialogue,
thick with Dublin slang, is one of the
film’s trump cards. It’s slightly marred
by a denouement that breaks with
plausibility, but this is a punchy tale,
told with economy and power. EP
The title of this insightful film doesn’t
just refer to Frank Williams, the boss
of the Williams Formula One team.
Morgan Matthews’s film transcends
the remit of the sports documentary
by also focusing on his late wife,
Virginia, who wrote a book about her
experiences that is quoted throughout,
and on his daughter, Claire, deputy
principal of the team and the most
powerful woman in Formula One.
Frank’s story alone is compelling:
from selling spare parts to the head of
one of the sport’s top teams; the
accident that left him a quadriplegic;
the deaths of his drivers Piers Courage
and Ayrton Senna. Yet giving so much
time to his equally remarkable wife
and daughter elevates the film to a
family saga. It highlights his stoicism,
but also his selfishness — his daughter
refers to 32 family holidays, none of
which he had been on — and confirms
F1 as a hotbed of sexist pigs. EP
{{{((
Jailbreak (voiced
by Anna Faris) and
Gene (TJ Miller)
has The Wicker Man and Don’t Look
Now in his DVD collection. Not
that all the influences are parochial.
This is Mulholland Drive with grey
skies and bad teeth, and a similar
concern with duality and fantasy.
Like Chris, Lowe’s character,
Kathleen, is a slippery so-and-so.
One minute she’s a femme fatale,
the next she’s a concerned mate
from university.
Tunley, directing from his own
script, doesn’t try too hard to explain
himself — like a Möbius strip,
The Ghoul is not designed to be
unravelled. It’s not a perfect film;
some scenes have the slightly gauche
air of a student project. Yet there’s
enough queasy flair here to stand
comparison with many of its esoteric
British predecessors.
the times | Friday August 4 2017
11
1GT
arts
music
God, Darwin
and Putin —
but no Trump
Essential
tracks
Charli XCX
Boys
An atypically laid-back
electro-pop moment
from the bratty
songwriter/pop star.
Dornik
God Knows
An upbeat funk groove
holds down a superb
falsetto from the
Croydon R&B slinker.
America’s wittiest songwriter is on
topical form, says Will Hodgkinson
F
irst, a warning. Don’t
expect a Sail Away or
You’ve Got a Friend in Me
on Randy Newman’s
new album. Dark Matter
begins with an
eight-minute treatise
on science and religion
called The Great Debate, on which
Newman, below, utilises all manner of
unreliable narrators and viewpoints
to ensure we cannot know his own.
“Someone is watching me,” he sings
against a gospel choir and big piano
chords, which you could be forgiven
for taking as a heartfelt expression
of faith had he not spent the past few
minutes expanding on the theory
of evolution in matter-of-fact
act
fashion. “The giraffe, to
survive, must eat leaves high
gh
up on the yabba yabba
tree,” he explains, jauntily,
before dismissing Darwin
as an idiot who didn’t
understand devotion, and
then wrong-footing us again,
n,
telling us that one Randy
Newman is making up these
se
characters just to knock them
down,
em down
to laugh at “the Shakers, the Quakers
and the anti-inoculators” and the
scientists they rail against.
For much of his career Newman has
sung — with subtlety and empathy —
from one step removed. Plenty of
people thought the ironic I Love LA
was a heartfelt ode to the City of
Angels, although hopefully not too
many believed Newman when he
blamed the vertically challenged for
the world’s ills on Short People.
He has gone farther than usual
this time. The lesson from The Great
Debate is that Newman can’t be
Jessie Ware
Midnight
Nineties-style smooth
soul from Ware, back
from maternity leave
with her best vocal yet.
pop
Randy Newman
Dark Matter
Nonesuch
{{{{(
trusted, but then he offers the
heartrending Lost Without You, on
which a recently widowed old man
laments the loss of the woman
he spent his life with, and the
piano-led Wandering Boy, a She’s
Leaving Home-style tale of parents
missing their runaway child, and there
is no reason not to take him at his word.
Surprisingly, given that this is the
man whose A Few Words in Defense
of Our Country offered the solace that
George W Bush wasn’t as bad
Georg
as C
Caligula, Newman has
avoided
a song about
avo
Donald
Trump. He did
Do
write
wr one — about the
penis
pe of the president
of the reality television
age — but decided it was
too ob
obvious and vulgar.
Instead we have Putin, on which
Newman asks
ask why one of the world’s
most powerful men feels the need
to be photographed on a horse,
bare-chested. All of this is set to the
kind of music that Newman, whose
three uncles were Hollywood
composers, has absorbed into his very
being: musical theatre, Dixieland jazz,
lush orchestral arrangements. His
great skill is to align accessible,
borderline schmaltzy music to
eloquent words about loneliness,
hubris, companionship. Newman
is right. With songs as sophisticated
as this, a ditty about Trump’s little
friend is beneath him.
Glass Animals
Agnes
If the Flaming Lips were
from Oxford, they
might sound like this
rousing, quirky closer
from the album How to
Be a Human Being, just
nominated for the
Mercury prize.
Hear these and more at
spoti.fi/essentialtracks
Luke Doucet and
Melissa McClelland,
of Whitehorse
His great
skill is to
align
accessible,
schmaltzy
music to
eloquent
words
Whitehorse
Panther in the Dollhouse
Lal and Mike Waterson
Bright Phoebus
Six Shooter
{{(((
Full marks to Whitehorse, aka the
Canadian husband and wife Luke
Doucet and Melissa McClelland,
for not resting on their laurels. They
started out as an acoustic folk duo,
went through a door marked
Americana and popped out as an
Eighties-style power/electro-rock
outfit with songs about transgressive
types who come out only at night.
“It’s a quick buzz kill so you pop
another pill,” McClelland sings on
Nighthawks, while Manitoba Death
Star combines a hip-hop beat and
a yearning, David Lynch-friendly
guitar. There is some tasteful
referencing going on here but it
is all rather earnest, with the album’s
Bukowski-lite characters never really
transcending cliché and coming alive.
Domino
{{{{(
All but ignored on its release in 1972,
but since held up as a masterpiece
of British folk, Bright Phoebus is an
album that captures the romance
and mystery of everyday rural life.
For it, brother and sister Mike and Lal
wrote songs such as The Scarecrow,
imagining the titular bag of rags
as a sentient being, and Red Wine
and Promises, on which a drunken
woman collapses in the street, while
belligerently rejecting help.
Bright Phoebus ends with its
cheering, singalong title song about
the early morning sun, breaking the
spell of an album that elsewhere
possesses an eerie, ancient, flinty
mood. Evoking the strangeness lying
just below the surface of convention,
Bright Phoebus is an absolute one-off.
Best of Britten: piping up for an inspirational woodwind star
T
he Janet who receives
a glorious tribute on the
Britten Oboe Quartet’s
debut disc is Janet Craxton.
One of the finest British
oboists until her death in 1981 at
the age of 52, she was a founder
member of the London Sinfonietta,
the principal oboist in the BBC
Symphony Orchestra, the dedicatee
of many fine compositions (including
two on this disc) and an inspirational
teacher — not least to Nicholas
Daniel, who won the BBC Young
Musician of the Year under her
tutelage and is the oboist here.
Like the mercurial Daniel, the
three string players in the quartet are
principals in the Britten Sinfonia, and
right from the start of Mozart’s Oboe
classical
Britten
Oboe Quartet
A Tribute
to Janet
Harmonia Mundi
{{{{{
Quartet the hallmarks of that
ensemble — tremendous rhythmic
vitality, soloistic virtuosity,
interpretative boldness and seasoned
rapport — are evident here. The piece
is brilliantly articulated and
characterised, but even better is
Mozart’s unfinished Adagio, K580a,
which Daniel has completed, very
elegantly, for cor anglais and three
strings. It’s wonderfully elegiac and
haunting. No wonder that Mozart
reworked its theme for his last motet,
Ave verum corpus.
The two works written for Craxton
couldn’t be more different. Oliver
Knussen’s Cantata, composed when
he was 25, is like a mini-opera
without words: full of coiled energy,
convulsions, acrobatic demands,
and then a strange lullaby section
with the oboe floating plaintive
lines over a disembodied rocking
motif. Jean Françaix’s Quartet
for cor anglais and strings is
as witty and joyous as the Knussen
is tense and serious.
It’s also fiendishly hard to play,
although you wouldn’t guess it from
this sparkling romp. Sometimes it
sounds as if ten people, not four,
are involved in its intoxicating
contrapuntal passages. And although
I don’t much warm to the work,
there’s also excellent playing on
Britten’s Phantasy Quartet, an early
piece full of ambiguous moods and
clever thematic transformations.
The Danish composer Hans
Abrahamsen has been a force in
avant-garde circles for decades, but
came to wider attention four years
ago with his remarkable song cycle
let me tell you, setting Ophelia’s
words from Hamlet, although not in
the order Shakespeare wrote them.
Ensemble MidtVest’s 10 Preludes,
Six Pieces (DaCapo {{{(() offers
a chance to explore chamber music
from much earlier in his career.
Frankly they are a bit hard going,
but the disc also includes his
transcriptions of Satie (Gymnopédies)
and Nielsen (Fantasy Pieces).
They are a lot more beguiling —
especially the Nielsen arrangements,
where you have the feeling of intense
Danes sharing their pain and passion
across the decades.
Richard Morrison
12
1GT
Friday August 4 2017 | the times
arts art
visual
And breathe . . . how artists have
A new exhibition
explores the tricky
subject of air. It’s a
gas, says Rachel
Campbell-Johnston
Y
ou may love it. You
may loathe it. But you
can’t help but look. In
his riveting painting
An Experiment on a
Bird in the Air Pump,
Joseph Wright of
Derby stages an
attention-seeking drama with the
power to stop all but the most
incurious in their tracks.
Wright depicts the most theatrical
moment of the experiment. A bird
trapped in a sealed glass vessel from
which all the air is being mechanically
extracted has fallen limply to the
bottom of its transparent prison. It will
die if it remains deprived of air any
longer. Will the magus-like scientist
lift the stopcock and offer it a
reprieve? Wright deliberately leaves
us, the spectators, in doubt.
This canvas, first exhibited in 1768
— six years before Joseph Priestley
discovered oxygen (initially named
by him “dephlogisticated air”) — is as
much about human reactions as
scientific demonstration. Its moment
of life-or-death drama, lit by a
single flickering candle flame and,
through the drawn curtains, by
the full moon that drifts loose of a
stormy veil of clouds, elicits a wide
range of responses. A child peeps
tearfully appalled; a young woman
turns away to hide starting tears;
a reflective philosopher observes
with undistracted fixity; a pair of
young lovers are interested only
in one another.
Regular visitors to the National
Gallery in London will no doubt be
familiar with this painting. It is one of
the most famous of Enlightenment
narratives. As a star loan to Air:
Visualising the Invisible in British Art
1768-2017, an exhibition at the Royal
West Academy, it has travelled to
Bristol for what curators believe is the
first time, where a new set of visitors
are invited to take their place at the
demonstration table. Wright leaves
a space open for them — and asks
them to consider with vivid immediacy
the very subject that this show sets out
to tackle.
Creating a visual image of
something that you cannot see might
sound like a perversely paradoxical
project. Yet air, as Wright’s painting
makes so strikingly manifest, is vital to
life. (Just in case you missed the point,
he sets a human skull in a glass bowl
at the front of the picture.)
How can an exhibition even begin
to tackle so vast a subject? The
curators realise that even to pretend to
cover something so all-encompassing
would be ludicrous — not least in a
show that spans about 250 years of
art history. Instead diverse ideas are
evoked in a wide array of genres,
styles, media and moods, dwelling
on one theme for a few paintings,
before flitting off to consider an
alternative approach.
This has been an opportunity to
bring a handful of fine or famous
paintings to regional audiences who
might otherwise not see them easily.
The Royal Academy lends a cloud
study by John Constable; an
atmospheric rendering of (as he
describes them on the back of the
canvas) “clouds silver grey, on warm
ground sultry”.
From the Lady Lever Art Gallery
in Liverpool comes Millais’ Bubbles,
an outmoded landmark of Victorian
sentimentality turned into an icon
by the fact that, almost a century
before Charles Saatchi began to
capitalise on the highly profitable
links between art and advertising, it
was bought by A&F Pears to advertise
the Pears soap brand. Millais was so
intent on capturing the iridescent
fragility of the floating bubble that he
had a crystal sphere made especially
to paint from.
By contrast, barely known, but in
terms of this show’s subject perhaps
more obviously relevant, are such
works as Robert Dighton’s satirical
watercolour image of a windy day in
the churchyard of St Paul’s Cathedral
(c 1785). Social proprieties are sent
flying as the wind snatches up
petticoats, indecorously exposes
ankles, sends hats and wigs flying,
and bares balding pates and big
bottoms. A catalogue entry also offers
a fascinating little aside. The artist —
The Balloon over
Calais, 1840, by EW
Cocks. Above left: An
Experiment on a Bird in
the Air Pump, 1768, by
Joseph Wright of Derby
who makes the window display of a
famous print shop the backdrop to this
scene — was an avid print collector
who stole a number of Rembrandt
etchings from the British Museum by
bribing the custodian to leave him
alone in the print room.
the times | Friday August 4 2017
13
1GT
visualarts
art
tried to capture the invisible
COURTESY OF UNILEVER PLC, ON LOAN TO NATIONAL MUSEUMS LIVERPOOL, BY KIND PERMISSION OF UNILEVER; IWM; THE ESTATE OF LS LOWRY. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, DACS 2017; SCIENCE MUSEUM/SCIENCE & SOCIETY PICTURE LIBRARY; THE NATIONAL GALLERY
Sometimes the show dwells briefly
on one theme. The curators have
considered air as the “substance”
that brings us music, and so there
are images of an accordian player
and a flautist. Smoky pollution can
make air not just visible, but also
beautiful, as paintings by artists such
as Turner and Lowry prove. A
contemplation of the bubble extends
to hot-air balloons with EW Cocks’s
commemoration of a record-breaking
1836 flight by Charles Green.
From there the exhibition considers
the barrage balloons of wartime
defence with a Frank Dobson
landscape incorporating a “balloon
apron” — a line of tiny aerial lozenges
stretched like a far-distant fence across
smoke-plumed industrial skies — and
a series of Eric Ravilious paintings,
among them an eerily surrealist
barrage, anchored by guy ropes like
some odd pneumatic sculpture amid
rain-swept hills. The catalogue makes
another fascinating link. It was
William James, the grandson of
Millais, who at the age of four posed
for Bubbles. He grew up to become a
Second World War admiral, met
Ravilious and recommended that he
make coastal defences a subject.
The exhibition is, broadly speaking,
chronologically hung. For many, the
most thrilling part will be the second.
With the invention of the aeroplane,
Above, far left:
Bubbles (1885-1886) by
John Everett Millais.
Above left: Runway
Perspective, 1942,
by Eric Ravilious.
Above right: A
Manufacturing Town,
1922, by LS Lowry
artists carry us soaring above the
clouds. Here is the skyscape of
Christopher Nevinson’s aerial
battlefield; Peter Lanyon’s abstract
rendition of a glider in flight. However,
for those with more contemporary
tastes, a gallery devoted to present-day
responses to the subject of “air” is
varied and thought-provoking.
The obvious and relatively
conventional — Bridget McCrum’s
semi-abstracted birds in brushy flights
of charcoal, Jessica Lloyd-Jones’s glass
lungs filled with green beech twigs —
will please some. However, there is
plenty to intrigue those who are
interested in the more technically
radical (Berndnaut Smilde’s Nimbus –
a cloud that hangs in the grand
stairway of the Royal West Academy)
or intriguingly conceptual (Neville
Gabie’s Collective Breath, in which the
breath of 1,111 people was collected and
released to play a single note over the
Atlantic for 49 minutes).
Air: Visualising the Invisible is a
wonderfully ambitious, delightfully
eloquent and ultimately successful
show. It doesn’t just capture the
invisible medium that surrounds us,
but also those secretive expanses that
lie inside our heads too. This is a show
to aerate the imagination.
Air: Visualising the Invisible in
British Art, 1768-2017 is at the Royal
West Academy, Bristol, to Sept 3
14
1GT
Friday August 4 2017 | the times
television & radio
It takes hard graft and tears to dig up your past
STEPHEN PERRY/BBC
Andrew
Billen
TV review
Who Do You
Think You Are?
BBC One
{{{((
Top of the Lake:
China Girl
BBC Two
{{{{(
E
mma Willis, of course familiar
to you as the host of Channel
5’s Big Brother (just my little
joke), broke tear-shedding
records in Who Do You
Think You Are? Not in volume, but
speed. Within five minutes she was
crying, and not for a death in infancy
or a transportation to a colony, but
over her late grandmother Edna. The
tears were indicative. Other subjects
have climbed their family trees in
Radio Choice
Joe Clay
Friday Night Is
Music Night
Radio 2, 8pm
The King’s Lynn Festival is
the setting for Friday Night
Is Music Night as Ken Bruce
presents a concert of
musical heroes and villains
from the worlds of film,
theatre and television. The
goodies are represented by
such characters as Robin
Hood and Ross Poldark.
The baddies can count in
their number Darth Vader
and Marlon Brando’s
Don Corleone. Richard
Balcombe conducts the BBC
Concert Orchestra with
guest artists, the soprano
Jeni Bern and the baritone
Adrian Der Gregorian.
CrowdScience
World Service, 8.30pm
Do animals commit
premeditated murder for
reasons other than survival?
This question sends the
CrowdScience team off
on a journey through the
deep forests of Budongo in
Uganda. They are seeking
our closest primate relative
— the chimpanzee — which
is known to kill not only
members from rival tribes,
but also its kin. What does
this morbid behaviour
say about the evolution of
lethal aggression, and are
murderous thoughts innate
to humans as well as chimps?
search of talent or status prefiguring
their own. Willis just wanted to find
people as good as her nan.
As part of that, she was keen to
discover evidence of hard physical work.
I last heard the term “grafter” used
this often when I interviewed Ricky
Tomlinson — and was subsequently
amused to watch a Royle Family in
which Caroline Aherne and Craig
Cash had placed his “I’m a grafter, me”
speech into the mouth of slacker Jim.
Willis did veer off track in Ireland.
She discovered her five-times
great-grandfather, Richard Fowler of
Boggy Meadows, was a “gentleman” —
that is a landowner who did not work
for a living. (“I expected working-class
grafters.”) Ever so slightly, her humble
head turned. Her jaw dropped
theatrically, however, when it was
revealed he was a Protestant bully
who had beaten up, stabbed and
tortured a couple of republican-minded
blacksmiths. In a field of sheep, Willis
lamented having found an ancestor
who “maybe” wasn’t so good.
Happily all was redeemed on the
other side of her father’s Irish ancestry
by an industrious artisan genius named
Michael Kirwan who had introduced
marble altars to Catholic churches
in the 1830s. More than that, he had
stood up to the most popular politician
of the day, Daniel O’Connor, when
“the liberator” dared to condemn trade
unionism. When she read his death
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo
12.45pm Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00
The Official Chart with Greg James 5.45
Newsbeat 6.00 Radio 1’s Dance Anthems
with Greg James 7.00 Radio 1 in Ibiza
8.00 Radio 1 in Ibiza 9.00 Radio 1 in Ibiza
10.00 Radio 1 in Ibiza 11.00 Radio 1 in Ibiza
12.00 Radio 1 in Ibiza 1.00am Radio 1 in
Ibiza 2.00 Radio 1 in Ibiza 3.00 Radio 1 in
Ibiza 4.00 Radio 1’s Essential Mix
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce
12.00 Vanessa Feltz 2.00pm Steve Wright
5.00 Amol Rajan 7.00 Tony Blackburn
8.00 Friday Night Is Music Night. A concert
about heroes and villains, from the Kings
Lynn Festival. With the BBC Concert
Orchestra are the singers Jeni Bern and
Adrian Der Gregorian, and the violinists
Vladimir & Anton. See Radio Choice
10.00 Sounds of the 80s. Sara Cox plays
some of the hits and rarities from the
1980s including a Megamix from 1987
12.00 Anneka Rice: The Happening
2.00am Radio 2’s Funky Soul Playlist
3.00 Radio 2 Playlist 5.00 Katie Puckrik
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Petroc Trelawny presents the classical
breakfast show, featuring listener requests.
Plus, works by composers featuring as part
of the BBC’s Gay Britannia season
9.00 Essential Classics
Rob Cowan is joined by the comedy promoter
and producer Karen Koren, who chooses more
of her favourite classical works
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Birth of Polyphony
Donald Macleod uncovers the growth of
polyphony in Italy. Rival composers competed
for prizes at Verona, and a blind organist
astounded Florence with his talent.
Anthonello de Caserta (Beaute parfait);
Giovanni da Cascia (Sedendo all’ombra
d’una bella mandorla; La Bella Stella; and
Quando la stella); Jacopo da Bologna
(Aquil’altera, ferma; and Elas mon cuer);
and Francesco Landini (Non ara may pieta;
Ochi dolente mie; Per seguir la speranca;
Nessun ponga speranca; Giunta vaga bilta;
and Adiu, adiu, dous dame yoli)
Emma Willis traced her ancestry on Who Do You Think You Are?
1.00pm News
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert
Chamber music by Stravinsky and
Rimsky-Korsakov performed by Ensemble
360 at Sheffield’s Crucible Studio as part of
the recent Russia in the Round season
2.00 Afternoon on 3
French Baroque ensemble Pygmalion, under
the director Raphaël Pichon, perform
Monteverdi’s Vespers of 1610 (r)
4.30 In Tune
Suzy Klein presents a lively mix of chat, arts
news and performances. Her guests include
the conductor Semyon Bychokov, before he
conducts two concerts at the BBC Proms
6.30 Composer of the Week:
Birth of Polyphony (r)
7.30 Live BBC Proms 2017
At London’s Royal Albert Hall, the BBC
Concert Orchestra, the Broadway musical
and Hollywood movie-score conductor John
Mauceri, the singer Dianne Reeves and the
trumpeter James Morrison pay tribute to
Ella Fitzgerald and Dizzy Gillespie in their
centenary year. The celebrations contrast the
Great American Songbook, which played a
key role in Fitzgerald’s live and recording
career, with the bebop and Afro-Latin sounds
in which Gillespie excelled. Gershwin
(Manhattan Rhapsody; and A Foggy Day);
Noble (Cherokee); Monk (Round Midnight);
Gershwin (Embraceable You); Ellington
(Harlem); Lecuona (Jungle Drums); Gershwin
(Fascinating Rhythm); Gillespie/Pozo/Fuller
(Manteca); Ellington/Tizol (Caravan); Reeves
(Tango du Jour); Gillespie (A Night in
Tunisia); and Shearing (Lullaby of Birdland)
10.15 Taking It All Back Home
The British singer and song-collector
Sam Lee explores how archives around the
world are looking to repatriate sound
recordings and asks in what sense a sound
can be “taken back”
11.00 Live World on 3
Lopa Kothari is at the BBC Blue Tent in
Edinburgh, part of Radio 3’s coverage at the
Festival and Fringe, with a concert of World
Music including Trip, an exciting new Scottish
band featuring keyboard, whistle and
bodhran — a BBC Introducing act; plus the
Turkish composer and performer Oguz
Kaplangi bringing traditional instruments
and electronic sounds from the play
Rhinoceros, shown at the EIF, playing
together with Scottish bagpiper Annie Grace;
also, South Korean Ensemble Su mixing
traditional instruments, among them a
zither, a one-string fiddle and Asian
percussion, with Western sounds
1.00am Through the Night (r)
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30am News Briefing
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day
6.00 Today
With Nick Robinson and Sarah Montague
9.00 Desert Island Discs
Kirsty Young talks to Facebook’s chief
operating officer Sheryl Sandberg (r)
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Book of the Week: The
Unwomanly Face of War
By Svetlana Alexievich. Translated by Richard
Pavear and Larissa Volokonsky (5/5)
10.00 Woman’s Hour
Lively discussion and interviews, presented
by Jenni Murray. Including at 10.45
Drama: Amanda Dalton’s adaptation of
Henry James’s Daisy Miller (5/5)
10.25-6.45 (LW) Test Match Special:
England v South Africa
Day one of the fourth and final Test in the
series, held at Emirates Old Trafford
11.00 Liberal Legalisers:
The Times Cannabis Letter at 50
Peter Hitchens asks the signatories of a
petition to decriminalise cannabis if they
have any regrets, in light of increasing
evidence of mental health dangers
from using the drug
11.30 To Hull and Back
Sophie is on a quest for love (3/5) (r)
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 Home Front
By Katie Hims
12.15 You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 Door Stepping
Jude Rogers finds herself drawn back
to a home in Wales (5/5)
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: Holding Back the Tide
By Nick Warburton. A couple inherit a house
in Yorkshire, where they are drawn into a
preservation group fighting against the
modernisation of the town (r)
3.00 Gardeners’ Question Time
Eric Robson and Peter Gibbs present the
show from the Westernmost and
Easternmost points of the UK in the first
of two special episodes to mark the series’
70th anniversary
3.45 Short Works
The Loop, by Linda Cracknell
4.00 Last Word
Obituaries, presented by Matthew Bannister
4.30 Feedback
notice Willis wept again even though,
as she conceded, she knew he was dead.
One day WDYTYA? will feature
someone related to an IRA thug. The
family story will be redeemed by the
discovery of another relative who is a
progressive member of the Anglo-Irish
ascendancy. Or perhaps not. If you
were uncertain who Willis was,
however, you knew by the end of this
programme: a girl with the right values.
Talking of “girls”, notice how even
the title of Jane Campion’s Top of the
Lake: China Girl is designed to make
us feel bad. The murdered prostitute
at the centre of the new case is Thai
not Chinese, and surely we should
not call her a “girl”. Saying the title
makes us racist and sexist.
Even I, Top of the Lake’s greatest
fan, felt last night’s initial flashback
was a little unlikely. Elisabeth Moss’s
detective, Robin, discovered on her
wedding day that her fiancé was a
pot-smoking cheat. She subsequently
burnt her wedding dress atop a funeral
pyre. Robin’s famed ability to read
others must have its dyslexic moments.
Still, the episode was full of great
comic moments, blissful acting and
real insights into men — Australian
men, anyhow. The good news is that,
in Ray, the cheeky pathologist, we
have finally met a decent guy. He is
in a gay relationship, but what the hell:
I identified with him gratefully.
andrew.billen@thetimes.co.uk
4.55 The Listening Project
Molly, who has a cochlear implant,
chats with her father Martin
5.00 PM
With Eddie Mair
5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast
6.00 Six O’Clock News
6.30 The Museum of Curiosity
With guests Phill Jupitus, Roger Graef
and Prue Leith (2/6)
6.45 (LW) The Museum of Curiosity
7.00 The Archers
Oliver decides it is time to move on
7.15 Front Row
7.45 Love Henry James: Daisy Miller
Dramatised by Amanda Dalton (5/5) (r)
8.00 Any Questions?
Political debate from the Radio Theatre at
Broadcasting House, London
8.50 A Point of View
Why people who work in musical theatre
are often miserable
9.00 Home Front Omnibus
Parts 1-5. By Katie Hims
10.00 The World Tonight
With Razia Iqbal
10.45 Book at Bedtime:
The Lie of the Land
By Amanda Craig. Despite the long hours and
low pay working in the pie factory, Xan is
finding new purpose as a wage-earner (5/10)
11.00 Great Lives
Maxine Peake reflects on the life and work of
the left-wing activist and politician Ellen
Wilkinson (r)
11.25 Short Cuts
Josie Long hears stories of people’s desire
for time to stop (5/6) (r)
11.55 The Listening Project
A conversation between friends who met on
a brick-laying course for women
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Book of the Week:
The Unwomanly Face of War (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
Radio 4 Extra
Digital only
8.00am I’m Sorry I’ll Read That Again 8.30
Doctor at Large 9.00 Who Goes There? 9.30
Gush 10.00 Pilgrim’s Progress 11.00 Gay
Britannia 11.15 The Babington Plot 12.00
I’m Sorry I’ll Read That Again 12.30pm
Doctor at Large 1.00 Outbreak of Fear 1.30
Sunflowers 2.00 Sweet Tooth 2.15 David
Attenborough’s Life Stories 2.30 Gay
Britannia: Tales of the City 2.45 The Real
Henry James 3.00 Pilgrim’s Progress
4.00 Who Goes There? 4.30 Gush 5.00
Safety Catch 5.30 It’s Funny and It’s True
6.00 The Children of Witchwood 6.30 Soul
Music 7.00 I’m Sorry I’ll Read That Again.
Comedy with John Cleese 7.30 Doctor at
Large. Comedy with Richard Briers 8.00
Outbreak of Fear. Murder mystery by RD
Wingfield 8.30 Sunflowers. Van Gogh’s
passion for the blooms 9.00 Gay Britannia.
Ian and Adam’s 2006 civil partnership in
Ambridge 9.15 The Babington Plot. By
Michael Butt 10.00 Comedy Club: It’s Funny
and It’s True. Felicity Ward and Fern Brady
discuss mental health (2/2) 10.30 BBC New
Comedy Award 2017. The fifth heat, from the
Glee Club in Cardiff 11.30 Revolting People.
Comedy with Andy Hamilton. From 2004
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 5 Live Daily
with Emma Barnett 1.00pm The Friday
Sports Panel 2.00 Kermode and Mayo’s Film
Review 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport:
2017 World Athletics Championships. Sonja
McLaughlan introduces coverage from
London 10.00 Stephen Nolan 1.00am Up All
Night 5.00 5 Live Boxing with Costello &
Bunce 5.30 5 Live Sport (r)
Talksport
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
10.00 Jim White 1.00pm Hawksbee and
Jacobs 4.00 Adrian Durham and Darren
Gough 7.00 Kick-off 10.00 Sports Bar
1.00am Extra Time with Tom Latchem
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny 10.00 Lauren
Laverne 1.00pm Mark Radcliffe 4.00
Steve Lamacq 7.00 Iggy Pop 9.00 Tom
Ravenscroft 12.00 Nemone’s Electric
Ladyland 2.00am 6 Music Classic Concert
3.00 6 Music Live Hour 4.00 You’ll Never
Be 16 Again 5.00 Jon Hillcock
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall 5.00
Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00
The Full Works Concert. Catherine Bott
highlights the triumphant key of E-flat, and
features works by Bach, Crusell, Schumann,
Bruch, and Mozart 10.00 Smooth Classics
1.00am Katie Breathwick 4.00 Jane Jones
the times | Friday August 4 2017
15
1GT
MARILYN KINGWILL
first night
arts
Pop
Bad Religion
O2 Academy, Bristol
Theatre
The Adventures
of Pinocchio
New Ambassadors, WC2
B
{{{((
ad Religion are living proof
of the old adage that punk
rockers never die, they just
turn into greying, balding,
bespectacled Vince Cable
lookalikes. Formed in southern
California in 1980, these influential
founding fathers of west coast
punk-pop have been fairly
consistently active for almost four
decades, although there have been
splits and sabbaticals along the way.
Now 52, their singer Greg Graffin
is a sometime college lecturer with
a master’s degree in geology and
a PhD in evolutionary biology. “Are
there any geologists in the house?” he
asked the Bristol crowd, tongue only
half in cheek. “Such an interesting
area, geologically speaking.”
Based around a nucleus of three
surviving founder members, the band’s
present five-piece incarnation roared
through 90 minutes of three-chord,
four-letter diatribes with impressive
focus and ferocity. Powered by
blended vocal harmonies, a Bad
Religion trademark, songs such as
American Jesus and Atomic Garden
sounded relatively sweet to the ear,
more folk-rock shanties than spiky
punk rants. This melodic accessibility
has undoubtedly been a factor
in the band’s healthy commercial
track record, selling more than
five million albums in a mostly
marginal subculture.
Yet the unvarying pace and
relentlessly conservative formula
of this bare-bones show soon grew
tiresome. Most bands of Bad Religion’s
vintage graduated long ago from
garage-rock juvenilia to embrace
more nuanced, challenging musical
forms. The dad’s army of punk-pop
remain rigidly confined by their
simplistic 1980s sound. Given his
background in evolutionary biology,
it is ironic just how little Graffin
has evolved musically.
This show finally achieved lift-off
in its closing stages, when the band
cranked out vintage crowd-pleasers
including the Iggy Pop-style slammer
21st Century (Digital Boy) and their
signature anthem, the tellingly titled
toe-tapper Punk Rock Song. Graffin
even struck a rare tender note with
Sorrow, a bittersweet dialogue with his
late father. These grey-haired veterans
have plenty of decent songs; what
a pity they sell them short with such
staid, uninspired presentation.
Stephen Dalton
Proms 24, 25
Philharmonia/
Salonen;
Monteverdi
Choir/Gardiner
Royal Albert Hall
{{{{(
S
E
{{{((
Emma
Hatton as
Eva Perón
Do cry for this revival
It may once
have been
important, but
this dull show
is mired in the
past, says
Sam Marlowe
Theatre
Evita
Phoenix, WC2
{{(((
ettling down to be lulled into
reverie by Ravel’s languid
Shéhérazade, I was instead
infused with a growing feeling
that I was watching a new star.
I’ve rarely heard a singer make a more
poised, polished or delectable Proms
debut than the young French mezzo
Marianne Crebassa did in this
sensuous song cycle.
She seems to have everything. She
can muster the power to carry over
this vast arena, but also has the
sensibility to caress ambiguously
erotic phrases. She has a glorious
timbre and a clean, 21st-century
technique, but also the confidence
to apply a fin-de-siècle glide between
the notes where appropriate.
T
here’s no question about
this show’s place in musical
theatre history — but must
it also be so resolutely stuck
in the past? In 1978 Andrew
Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice’s
blockbuster about Argentina’s first
lady, Eva Perón, was pioneering.
A “rock opera”, it was fluid, ambitious,
and its lilting, Latin-inflected score
introduced audiences to songs that
have become hummable classics —
notably Don’t Cry for Me, Argentina.
This touring revival, directed by Bob
Tomson and Bill Kenwright, makes no
effort to bring any fresh perspective to
the material.
It charts with workaday efficiency
the rags-to-riches story of the woman
who, as the wife of the military
dictator Juan Perón, captured the
hearts of the descamisados (the
dispossessed, or “shirtless ones”), and
by the time she died from cancer aged
33 was regarded as practically a saint.
Emma Hatton gives a committed
performance as the diva who made
a nation her stage. Yet there’s little real
sense of the personality behind the
myth, and the production is dated and
disappointingly pedestrian.
Matthew Wright’s bland design,
with its flown-in columns and arches,
emphasises the sparse staginess of the
action. Bill Deamer’s choreography is
similarly flavourless — even the tango
lacks spice. As Che, the revolutionary
narrator figure inspired by Che
Guevara, Gian Marco Schiaretti has
an attractive, virile presence and a fine
voice. Yet he fails to muster enough
political passion and sardonic wit, and
it doesn’t help that the epic scenes he
is describing look so feeble. “Why
all this howling, hysterical sorrow?”
he inquires in the opening funeral
sequence as a couple of mourners
amble past Eva’s coffin, an
underwhelming representation of
a country stricken by grief.
That shortage of dramatic heft
persists as we flash back over her
brief, glittering career. Hatton, chin
tilted, eyes flashing, gives a broad
impression of Eva’s charisma and
ruthless ambition, and her singing is
technically accomplished, even if its
strident tone sometimes grates. She is
ably supported by Oscar Balmaseda’s
foppish Magaldi, the tango singer who
is the young Eva’s ticket out of rural
obscurity, and by Kevin Stephen-Jones
as a solid Juan.
Sarah O’Connor as Perón’s rejected
Mistress sings the stand-out number
Another Suitcase in Another Hall
beautifully, but the tempo is so
achingly slow that you rather long for
her to stop. And, frankly, you feel the
same way about the production as it
plods towards its oddly unmoving
conclusion, Hatton screeching in
simulated deathbed agony. In an age
of celebrity culture, when politics
really do, to borrow from Rice’s lyrics,
seem like a circus, Evita still merits
revisiting. But it badly needs new life.
Box office: 0844 8717677, to Oct 14
It says much for the featherlight
and diaphanous playing of the
Philharmonia under Esa-Pekka
Salonen that they weren’t upstaged.
Indeed, they went on to give a
performance of John Adams’s Naive
and Sentimental Music so compelling
that it triggered a standing ovation in
the stalls. I joined in. Despite its overextended repetitions and its smugly
archaic title (taken from Schiller; you
have to understand what “naive” and
“sentimental” meant to an 18th-century
German philosopher — and even then
it seems to bear scant relevance to
what you hear), this three-movement
symphony is full of stunning orchestral
ideas. Along the way it evokes Sibelius,
Shostakovich and Stravinsky, before
ending in a rambunctious romp that is
pure Adams.
An hour to recover, and then into
a Prom that celebrated something even
more remote: not 18th-century
German philosophy, but 16th-century
German theology. This year marks the
500th anniversary of the day when
Martin Luther inaugurated the
Reformation by nailing his 95 theses to
a church door, and the Proms is going
wild about the boy. There’s a whole
Reformation Day to come (August 20),
but this fine concert of three Heinrich
Schütz psalm settings and two Bach
cantatas (all with Lutheran
connections) will take some topping.
It had stylish ensemble and solo
work from the Monteverdi Choir and
veryone knows Pinocchio —
the life-size wooden puppet
who dreamt of becoming
a real boy. This musical
version of the Carlo Collodi
classic is performed, in rotation, by
17 teams of young actors, many of
whom will be dreaming of cutting
their own strings and aiming for the
stars. A good number of them have
every chance of success. They are
students of the British Theatre
Academy, which trains performers
under 23.
This showcase production, directed
by Bronagh Lagan, is admirably
polished, and there’s certainly some
talent on display. The 75-minute piece
itself (by the New York-based duo,
composer-lyricist Neil Bartram and
writer Brian Hill) is a breathless,
sanitised take on Collodi’s dark,
picaresque tale, but it is bright and
buoyant, and Lagan delivers it with
a playful wink and plenty of sparkle.
The setting, designed by Nik Corrall,
has a tatty backstage glamour. It’s part
Big Top, part commedia dell’arte, with
grinning girl marionettes in tutus and
pierrot make-up, an illuminated aerial
hoop and racks of shiny costumes.
Pinocchio’s creation by Geppetto, the
wood carver — played by Martin
Neely, one of the two professional
leads, alongside Lizzie Rees as the Blue
Fairy — is conveyed in simple shadow
puppetry. Once brought to life, he is
a strapping chap in red rompers, with
a pointy prosthetic nose that, by clever
sleight of hand, grows alarmingly
whenever he tells a fib.
At the performance I saw, the role
was tackled by Nathaniel Purnell,
a nimble dancer and capable singer
with an engaging stage presence.
Pursued by Neely’s anxious father
figure, and guided by Rees, who is as
glittery and maternal as Cinderella’s
fairy godmother, Pinocchio ricochets
from one peril to the next, until he
discovers the importance of a good
heart. Tabitha Knowles is vigorously
villainous as a greedy puppet master,
James Sampson enjoyably obnoxious
as the naughty schoolboy Lampwick,
while Katie Foster shows off superb
vocals as a smilingly sinister child
catcher. And the chorus is crammed
with appeal, right down to the smallest
hoofer. A snappy miniature show, full
of sweet promise.
Sam Marlowe
Box office: 020 7395 5405, to Aug 30
English Baroque Soloists, deft and
dance-like interpretations from John
Eliot Gardiner and some surprises
(a rasping sackbut belting out the
chorale in one cantata sounded more
like Berlioz). The only quibble?
Schütz’s multichoral writing, imitating
Gabrieli, cried out for spatial
separation, rather than the tightly
crammed formation adopted here.
Richard Morrison
Four stars for Stockard
Channing in Apologia
First Night in the main paper
16
1GT
Friday August 4 2017 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Chris Bennion
World Athletics
Championships
BBC Two, 6pm/
BBC One, 7pm
The 2012
Olympic
Games
was an
extraordinary event
for Britain, one that
transformed — for
Gabby Logan presents
from the London
Stadium as the
World Athletics
Championships are
staged in Britain for the
first time. Ten days of
athletics begin tonight,
and while we have Mo
Farah, Caster Semenya
and Laura Muir to
look forward to, these
championships will
be dominated by one
man: Usain Bolt. The
eight-time Olympic
champion has
announced he is to
retire, but before he
does, the Jamaican
megastar will try to
turn his 11 World
Championship golds
into 13. He will run in
the 100m heats this
evening before — and
I’ll chance my arm with
this one — competing
in his last 100m final
tomorrow night. His
final act as an athlete
will be next Saturday,
in the 4x100m relay.
The highlight tonight
is Farah, who is
competing for gold in
the 10,000m (9.20pm).
Next Saturday Farah
will line up in the
5,000m as he tries
to win the 5,000m/
10,000m double for a
fifth time (twice at the
World Championships,
twice at the Olympics,
so far). Go, Mo. To
mark your card for
the weekend: the
men’s long jump final
takes place tomorrow
(8.05pm), Katarina
Johnson-Thompson
completes the
heptathlon on Sunday
(8.40pm), while
another Jamaican
superstar, Elaine
Thompson, goes for
gold in the 100m, also
on Sunday (9.50pm).
Secret Life of the
Holiday Resort
Channel 4, 8pm
The temptation when
watching this new
series, filmed in the
largest all-inclusive
resort on the Costa del
Sol, is to shout: “Not all
British holidaymakers!”
Most of the visitors
to Holidayworld are
British, and the picture
painted is of lager,
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast. News, entertainment and weather
reports 9.15 Animal Park Summer Special. The penguin
keepers embark on their most ambitious project to date
(AD) 10.00 Homes Under the Hammer. Featuring
properties in Devon, London and Kent (r) 11.00 Going
Back, Giving Back. Memories of the London riots of
August 2011. Last in the series 11.45 Rip Off Britain:
Food. The true cost of British fish and chips (r)
12.15pm Bargain Hunt. Charlie Ross presents from
Newark, Nottinghamshire (AD) 1.00 BBC News at One;
Weather 1.30 BBC Regional News; Weather 1.45 Red
Rock. Feelings run high on the day of Brian’s trial (AD)
2.30 The Code. Matt Allwright hosts a quiz in which
contestants must answer questions to help crack a
three-digit code that will open a safe full of money (r)
3.15 Escape to the Country. Jules Hudson assists a
retired couple in their bid to move to Cornwall (r) (AD)
4.15 Flog It! From Muncaster Castle in Cumbria (r) 5.15
Pointless. Quiz show in which contestants try to score
the fewest points possible by giving the least obvious
correct answers to questions (r) 6.00 BBC News at Six;
Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am The TV That Made Me (r) 6.30 Animal Park
Summer Special (r) (AD) 7.15 Bargain Hunt (r) (AD)
8.00 Sign Zone: Gardeners’ World (r) (SL) 9.00 Victoria
Derbyshire 11.00 BBC Newsroom Live 12.00 Britain’s
Great War (r) (AD) 1.00pm Two Tribes (r) 1.30 A Taste
of Britain. Janet Street-Porter and Brian Turner visit
Suffolk (r) 2.15 The Best Dishes Ever. A selection of
dishes using game (r) 2.45 Natural World. Scientist
Andrea Turkalo examines the social bonds formed by
elephants deep in the rainforests of central Africa, and
reveals how they communicate (r) (AD) 3.45 This Wild
Life. The family and camp team celebrate the end of the
tourist season (r) 4.15 The Life of Mammals. David
Attenborough examines the hunting tactics of the world’s
carnivores, from Arctic foxes in the frozen north to the
big cats of the southern hemisphere (r) (AD) 5.15
Antiques Roadshow. Objects valued at St Andrews
University in Scotland include a toy collection
that inspired the owner to become a pilot (r)
6.00 Live World Athletics Championships 2017. Coverage
of the opening ceremony at The London Stadium in Queen
Elizabeth Olympic Park. See Viewing Guide
6.00am Good Morning Britain. Chris Hoy talks about
moving from cycling into motor racing, while Dominic
Cooper chats about the second series of comic-book
adaptation Preacher 8.30 Lorraine. Joe Pasquale chats
about his upcoming UK tour 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show
(r) 10.30 This Morning. Interviews and lifestyle features,
including a look at the stories making the newspaper
headlines and a recipe in the kitchen. Includes Local
Weather 12.30pm Loose Women. With the Coronation
Street star Claire King 1.00 ITV News; Weather 1.30 Live
ITV Racing: Goodwood Festival. Ed Chamberlin and
Francesca Cumani present coverage of the fourth day of
the event, where the main race of the day is the 3.35
Qatar King George Stakes 4.00 Tipping Point. Ben
Shephard hosts the arcade-themed quiz show in
which contestants drop tokens down a choice of four
chutes in the hope of winning a £10,000 jackpot (r)
5.00 Cash Trapped. Quiz hosted by Bradley Walsh in
which six contestants answer questions and try
to trap one another out of the game, before one goes up
against the rest in the final round 6.00 Regional News;
Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.00am Countdown (r) 6.45 Will & Grace (r) 7.35
Everybody Loves Raymond (r) (AD) 8.30 Frasier (r) (AD)
10.05 Undercover Boss USA (r) 11.00 The Simpsons (r)
(AD) 12.00 Channel 4 News Summary 12.05pm Couples
Come Dine with Me. Three couples from Bristol compete
for the cash prize of £1,000 (r) 1.05 Posh Pawn. A couple
want to sell their unique house boat. Last in the series (r)
2.10 Countdown. Nick Hewer and Rachel Riley present
the long-running words-and-numbers game as naturalist
and broadcaster Kate Humble joins Susie Dent in
Dictionary Corner 3.00 The Question Jury. The current
jurors face their last chance to win £10,000 4.00 A Place
in the Sun: Summer Sun. Seeking a suitable property to
purchase on Spain’s Costa Almeria 5.00 Come Dine with
Me. Dinner-party challenge from central Scotland (r)
6.00 The Simpsons. Doctors discover Homer has had a
crayon lodged in his brain since childhood and decide to
remove it, instantly transforming him into a genius (r)
(AD) 6.30 Hollyoaks. Cindy is spooked when she wakes
up to see DS Armstrong standing over her, and Zack finds
looking after Daniel a bit overwhelming. Meanwhile,
James tries to explain himself to DS Armstrong (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff 11.15 The
Yorkshire Vet. Julian Norton heads to a local farm to
de-horn some young bullocks, and helps colleague Peter
Wright when a dog needs emergency surgery to remove a
bone wedged in its oesophagus (r) 12.10pm 5 News
Lunchtime 12.15 Celebrity Big Brother. Highlights of the
housemates’ first full day at the mercy of Big Brother,
revealing who is playing up for the benefit of the cameras
and who is taking a more laid-back approach (r) 1.10
Access 1.15 Home and Away (AD) 1.45 Neighbours (AD)
2.15 NCIS. Palmer comes under fire while investigating a
murder at a building site on a Navy base, and the
discovery of a second body reveals a case of stolen
identity (r) (AD) 3.15 FILM: Jesse Stone — Stone
Cold (12, TVM, 2005) A sleepy backwater town’s
hard-drinking chief of police pursues a serial killer and
investigates the rape of a teenager. Detective drama
starring Tom Selleck and Mimi Rogers 5.00 5 News at 5
5.30 Neighbours. Willow wrestles with whether to trial
living with Fergus and his family (r) (AD) 6.00 Home and
Away. Hunter breaks down after a confrontation with
Mason (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
7.00 Live World Athletics
Championships 2017 Gabby Logan
presents coverage of the opening night
of events at The London Stadium in
Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, which
will include the men’s 10,000m final, as
well as the opening round of heats in
the men’s 100m and women’s 1500m.
Great Britain’s Mo Farah is expected to
compete in the men’s 10,000m as he
tries to add to the tally of gold medals
he has claimed in this event at both
the 2012 and 2016 Olympic Games, and
the 2015 World Championships.
Meanwhile, his compatriot Laura Muir
will look to continue the incredible
form that saw her win double gold in
the 1500m and 3,000m at the European
Indoor Championships earlier this year,
while the biggest star in athletics,
Usain Bolt, will begin his quest for gold
in his final appearance at this
Championships. See Viewing Guide
10.00 BBC News at Ten
10.25 BBC Regional News and Weather;
followed by National Lottery Update
10.35 Not Going Out Lee worries that
Charlie is getting a reputation for
being the class clown (5/7) (r)
11.05 Old School (15, 2003)
An embittered lawyer decides to relive
the wild, crazy days of his youth after
his girlfriend is unfaithful, and enlists
the help of two equally disillusioned
friends in setting up a fraternity house
next to his former college campus.
Comedy starring Luke Wilson
Late
11PM
10PM
9PM
8PM
7PM
Early
Top
pick
three short weeks —
this sometimes
reserved nation into
a country of grinning
optimists. We promised
to bottle that energy
once the medals had
been swept up and the
javelins packed away.
We didn’t. Given the
events of the past 12
months, how we need
a little of that Olympic
togetherness now.
Here’s our chance.
12.40am-6.00 BBC News
7.00 Celebrity Antiques Road Trip
The musician Rick Wakeman and the
actor Ian Lavender embark on the
cross-country treasure-hunting
challenge around Norfolk (r)
7.00 Emmerdale Pollard tries to make a
good impression, and accusations fly
between Laurel and Emma (AD)
8.00 Mastermind Specialist subjects
include Margaret Atwood’s
MaddAddam trilogy
8.00 The Secret World of Posh Pets
A 21-year-old who exports pet
jellyfish. Last in the series
8.30 Only Connect A team of geocachers
takes on a trio from York with an
interest in Vikings
8.30 Coronation Street As Toyah and Eva
crack jokes about Steve’s proposal,
Leanne becomes defensive (AD)
9.00 Gardeners’ World
Monty Don plants a new bed of irises
and takes pelargonium cuttings, Carol
Klein pays the first of two visits to
West Yorkshire, and Nick Bailey
brightens up a dull and shady space.
Including Weather
9.00 Benidorm Geoff stages an
intervention when Pauline falls off the
wagon, a new ID card system causes
problems for the Solana’s staff, and
Joyce goes on a date with her estate
agent Monty (4/7) (r) (AD)
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.30 Newsnight Headline analysis
10.30 Regional News
10.40 Inside London Fire Brigade
The firefighters are mobilised
when a garden centre near Heathrow
goes up in flames, and to make
matters worse, there is a large
quantity of highly explosive gas
cylinders on site (2/3) (r) (AD)
12.05am FILM: Blackthorn (15, 2011) Western
starring Sam Shepard 1.40 Sign Zone: I Shot My
Parents The story of an American teenager who, at the
age of 14, tried to kill his mother and father while they
slept (r) (AD, SL) 2.40-3.40 Natural World: Sudan — The
Last of the Rhinos (r) (AD, SL)
7.00 Cricket on 5 England v South Africa.
Highlights of the opening day’s play
in the final Test of the four-match
series, which took place at Old Trafford
in Manchester
8.00 The Secret Life of the Holiday
Resort A look at life at an all-inclusive
Holiday World Resort in Malaga, Spain,
seeing what Britons get up to while on
holiday in the sun and what it takes to
keep them happy. See Viewing Guide
8.00 Funniest Ever Puppy Party
Iain Lee narrates a compilation of clips
featuring young hounds doing the
cutest and funniest things. Plus, a look
behind-the-scenes at the internet’s
best canine supervirals
9.00 The Last Leg Adam Hills, Josh
Widdicombe and Alex Brooker are
joined by famous guests for a comic
review of the significant moments
of the past seven days (12/13)
9.00 Celebrity Big Brother
The ups and downs of life in the Big
Brother house as friendships and
alliances are made, battle lines are
drawn and arguments erupt
10.00 Naked Attraction Anna Richardson
hosts as 22-year-old Sophie seeks a
conversational man, while 25-year-old
Dom hopes to find a confident, daring
and adventurous man (6/7) (AD)
10.05 Autopsy: Kurt Cobain Forensic
pathologist Dr Jason Payne-James
examines all the available medical
evidence of the rock star’s demise,
hoping to reveal the true cause of his
death. See Viewing Guide
11.05 Rude Tube A top 50 countdown of
internet clips in a celebration of the
unfortunate, including the worst
wedding intro ever and a girl with her
head stuck in a pumpkin
11.05 Celebrity Big Brother’s Bit on the
Side Rylan Clark-Neal presents the
CBB companion show, including guests’
thoughts on the latest developments
and behind-the-scenes insights
12.05am FILM: The Cold Light of Day (15, 2012)
Thriller starring Henry Cavill 1.40 The Windsors (r) (AD)
2.10 The Handmaid’s Tale (r) (AD, SL) 3.15 Food
Unwrapped (r) (AD) 3.40 Location, Location, Location (r)
4.35 Selling Houses with Amanda Lamb (r)
5.30-6.10 Shipping Wars UK (r)
12.05am SuperCasino Viewers get the chance to take
part in live interactive gaming 3.10 Celebrity Big Brother.
The ups and downs of life in the house (r) 4.05 Criminals:
Caught on Camera. The use of CCTV to fight crime (r) (AD)
4.35 Access (r) 4.45 House Doctor (r) 5.10 Divine
Designs (r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Wildlife SOS (r) (SL)
7.30 Coronation Street Steve asks Leanne
to marry him, and Michelle discovers
Robert has been lying to her (AD)
10.00 Live World Athletics
Championships 2017 Reaction to the
opening night of events
11.05 Golf: Women’s British Open
Highlights Eilidh Barbour presents
action from the second day of the
event, which this year is staged at
Kingsbarns Golf Links in Fife
7.00 Channel 4 News
11.40 Tipping Point Ben Shephard hosts
the arcade-themed quiz show (r)
12.35am Jackpot247 Viewers get the chance to
participate in live interactive gaming from the comfort
of their sofas, with a mix of roulette-wheel spins and
lively chat from the presenting team 3.00 Storage
Hoarders. A bodybuilder tries to conquer his storage
obsession (r) (SL) 3.50-6.00 ITV Nightscreen
the times | Friday August 4 2017
17
1GT
television
television &
& radio
radio
sunburn, fry-ups and
copies of the Daily Star.
It makes you realise
just how accurate the
ITV comedy Benidorm
is. However, these Brits
abroad are a pleasant
bunch and there are
some quirky insights —
it turns out that we
like pillows, but not
towels, although we
are still world leaders
at getting them on
the sunloungers.
BBC Proms 2017
BBC Four, 8pm
The Proms’ obsession
with anniversaries
continues; tonight it
marks the centenary
of the birth of two
titans of jazz, Ella
Fitzgerald and Dizzy
Gillespie. The Grammy
award-winning singer
Dianne Reeves and
the Australian trumpet
virtuoso James
Morrison will join the
BBC Concert Orchestra
to work their way
through the Great
American Songbook,
which underpinned
Fitzgerald’s career, and
a selection of Gillespie’s
Afro-Latin and bebop
numbers. The man
with the baton in his
hand is the Grammy,
Tony and Olivier
award-winning
conductor John Mauceri.
Down the Tracks
Sky Arts, 9pm
Fans of His Bobness
will have heard plenty
about his influences
from his excellent
Theme Time Radio
Hour (which went out
on 6 Music between
2007 and 2009). This
two-hour documentary
explores Bob Dylan’s
evolving interest in
music, from stating in
his school yearbook
that his ambition was
“to join Little Richard”,
to his love of Blind
Willie McTell and
country singers such as
Hank Williams. It also
looks at his interest in
Harry Smith and his
Anthology of American
Folk Music compilation
and the influence of the
Carter Family and
Dylan’s early mentor
Pete Seeger. Joe Clay
Autopsy
Channel 5, 10.05pm
While it is never the
most salubrious of
series, Autopsy can
often, ironically, shed
light on the lives of its
famous subjects. The
suicide of the Nirvana
frontman Kurt Cobain
in 1994 is one of the
rock’n’roll deaths that
has an enduring
fascination, not least
because Cobain was at
the height of his fame
when he died. Dr Jason
Payne-James, a British
expert in legal and
forensic medicine, asks
why a man who had
recently got married,
had a baby and become
a millionaire would
take his life. Some,
including Cobain’s
father-in-law, believe
that he was murdered.
Most, of course, don’t.
Sky1
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am The Flash (r) 8.00 NCIS: Los Angeles
(r) 10.00 Hawaii Five-0 (r) 11.00 MacGyver (r)
12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 2.00pm Hawaii
Five-0 (r) 3.00 MacGyver (r) 4.00 The Flash (r)
6.00 Futurama. Bender finds fame (r)
6.30 The Simpsons. Triple bill (r)
8.00 Modern Family. Phil and Claire get a
worrying glimpse of the future (r)
8.30 Modern Family. Gloria takes an instant
dislike to Javier’s new girlfriend (r)
9.00 Zoo. While under arrest, Jamie manages to
persuade Mitch and Logan to help her hunt for
members of a secret and dangerous organisation
10.00 The Force: North East. A burglar is
arrested twice within days, and a helicopter is
used to find a distressed woman in a park (r)
11.00 The Late Late Show with James Corden.
The first of three editions of the talk show (r)
12.00 A League of Their Own (r) (AD)
1.00am The Force: Essex. Double bill (r)
3.00 Brit Cops: War on Crime (r) 4.00 Animal
999 (r) 5.00 Monkey Life (r) (AD)
6.00am Storm City (r) (AD) 7.00 Fish Town (r)
8.00 Richard E Grant’s Hotel Secrets (r) 10.00
The West Wing (r) 12.00 Without a Trace (r)
1.00pm CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (r) 2.00
Blue Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00 Richard E Grant’s
Hotel Secrets (r) (AD) 4.00 The West Wing (r)
6.00 Without a Trace. A yacht turns up adrift in
a harbour with only its dead captain on board (r)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. Grissom is
reunited with Lady Heather (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. Danny must track down
Bonnie and Clyde-style thieves (r)
9.00 The Night Of. Detective Box leads the
investigation into the murder, and when Naz’s
parents arrive at the station, he finds a way to
use them to his advantage (2/8) (r) (AD)
10.10 FILM: Spy Game (15, 2001) A veteran
CIA agent puts off his retirement to rescue his
former protégé, who is facing the death penalty
in a Chinese prison. Thriller starring Brad Pitt
12.35am Game of Thrones (r) 1.45 Ray
Donovan (r) (AD) 4.05 The West Wing (r)
6.00am Obese: A Year to Save My Life USA (r)
7.00 Nothing to Declare (r) 8.00 Children’s
Hospital (r) 9.00 Cooks to Market (r) 9.15 My
Kitchen Rules: Australia (r) 10.30 Road Wars (r)
11.00 Customs UK (r) 12.00 Stop, Search, Seize
(r) (AD) 1.00pm Criminal Minds (r) (AD) 2.00
Bones (r) (AD) 3.00 Cold Case (r) 4.00 UK
Border Force (r) (AD) 5.00 Nothing to Declare.
Four back-to-back episodes (r)
6.00 Nothing to Declare (r)
6.30 Nothing to Declare (r) (AD)
7.00 Sun, Sea and A&E: South Africa. A man and
his dog are involved in a collision (2/3) (r)
8.00 Elementary. Sherlock tries to track
down a serial child-killer (r) (AD)
9.00 Nashville. A fallout results from the
video of Maddie and the police officer
10.00 Bones. Crime thriller (r) (AD)
12.00 Bones (r) (AD) 1.00am Sun, Sea and
A&E: South Africa (r) 2.00 Stop, Search, Seize
(r) 3.00 Elementary (r) (AD) 4.00 UK Border
Force (r) (AD) 5.00 Nothing to Declare (r) (AD)
6.00am Turandot on Sydney Harbour 8.00
Watercolour Challenge 9.00 Tales of the
Unexpected (AD) 10.00 National Trust: Garden
Treasures 11.20 Arts Scholarships: Sky
Academy 11.30 Auction 12.30pm Discovering:
Jethro Tull 1.00 Discovering: Rex Harrison 2.00
Watercolour Challenge 3.00 Tales of the
Unexpected (AD) 4.00 National Trust: Garden
Treasures 5.20 Arts Scholarships: Sky Academy
5.30 Discovering: Meat Loaf
6.00 Discovering: Yul Brynner
7.00 Carole King: A MusiCares Tribute. Tribute
to the Grammy-winning singer-songwriter
9.00 Down the Tracks: The Music That
Influenced Bob Dylan. See Viewing Guide
11.00 Eric Clapton Plays Baloise Session
12.30am An Evening with Mark Knopfler 1.45
Beat Beat Beat 2.00 Tales of the Unexpected.
Double bill (AD) 3.00 Watercolour Challenge
4.00 South Bank Show Originals: William
Golding 4.30 South Bank Show Originals:
Mama Lu Parks 5.00 Auction
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans 10.00 Live
Test Cricket: England v South Africa. Coverage of
the opening day of the final Test in the
four-match series, which is held at Old Trafford
7.00 Live EFL: Sunderland v Derby County
(Kick-off 7.45). Coverage of the opening
Championship fixture of the season, which takes
place at the Stadium of Light. Sunderland are
looking to bounce back from last season’s
disastrous campaign that saw them rooted to
the bottom of the Premier League table
10.15 Live World Golf Championship.
The Bridgestone Invitational. Coverage of the
second day of the competition held at the
Firestone Country Club in Akron, Ohio
11.30 World Rugby Show. Magazine show
rounding up the latest rugby union action
12.00 Live ATP Tennis. The Citi Open. Further
coverage of the fifth day’s play at the William
HG FitzGerald Tennis Centre in Washington, DC,
where Gael Monfils won the title in 2016
4.00am Through the Night
BBC Two Scotland
As BBC Two except: 7.00pm-8.00 Celebrity
Antiques Road Trip (r) 11.05 The Quay
Sessions. Excerpts from live musical sessions
11.35 Golf: Women’s British Open Highlights.
Eilidh Barbour presents action from the second
day of the event, which this year is staged at
Kingsbarns Golf Links in Fife 12.35am-2.10
FILM: Blackthorn (2011) Butch Cassidy lives in
secluded exile in a remote Bolivian village,
having survived his supposed last stand.
After years away from home, he decides the
time has come to return to his family in
America, but on the way, he runs into an
ambitious young outlaw and is drawn into one
last criminal adventure. Western starring Sam
Shepard and Eduardo Noriega
ITV Wales
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Coast & Country.
Andrew Price tries his hand at horseback
archery, while Ruth Wignall goes sheep
trekking in the Brecon Beacons
STV
As ITV except: 1.30pm-4.00 Live Racing on
STV: Goodwood Festival. Ed Chamberlin and
Francesca Cumani present coverage of the
fourth day of the event, where the main race
of the day is the 3.35 Qatar King George
Stakes. Plus, additional races at 1.50, 2.25 and
3.00. With reports from Oli Bell and Mark
Heyes, betting news with Matt Chapman,
and commentary by Mark Johnson
8.00-8.30 STV Children’s Appeal Summer
Special 12.35am Teleshopping 1.35 After
Midnight 3.05 ITV Nightscreen 5.05-6.00
The Jeremy Kyle Show (r)
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm World News Today; Weather
7.30 Top of the Pops: 1984. Featuring Sandie
Shaw and the Smiths, Duran Duran, Julio
Iglesias and Willie Nelson, Echo and the
Bunnymen, the Flying Pickets and Lionel Richie.
First shown April 26, 1984
8.00 BBC Proms 2017. A tribute to Ella
Fitzgerald and Dizzy Gillespie, in the centenary
year of their births, featuring singer Dianne
Reeves, trumpeter James Morrison and the BBC
Concert Orchestra. See Viewing Guide
10.05 Reginald D Hunter’s Songs of the South.
The comedian concludes his trip through the
American South by exploring the musical
heritage of Mississippi and Louisiana.
Last in the series (r) (AD)
11.05 Oh! You Pretty Things: The Story of Music
and Fashion. Documentary exploring the
influence of British musicians and designers on
the coolest looks, beginning with the golden
years of the 1960s (1/3) (r)
12.05am Oh! You Pretty Things: The Story of
Music and Fashion. Double bill (r) 2.05 Top of
the Pops: 1984 (r) 2.45-3.45 Reginald D
Hunter’s Songs of the South (r)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 6.30 Coach Trip:
Road to Zante (r) (AD) 7.00 Made in Chelsea:
South of France (r) (AD) 8.00 Melissa & Joey (r)
9.00 Black-ish (r) (AD) 10.00 Baby Daddy (r)
11.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD)
12.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD) 1.00pm The Big
Bang Theory (r) (AD) 2.00 Melissa & Joey (r)
3.00 Baby Daddy (r) 4.00 Black-ish (r) (AD)
5.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks. Cindy is alarmed over news of
Armstrong, and Dirk has a plan. Meanwhile,
Hunter and Neeta’s day out is ruined (AD)
7.30 Coach Trip: Road to Zante. The tour party
visits the beach resort of Rimini (AD)
8.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
8.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
9.00 FILM: This Is 40 (15, 2012) Comedy
starring Paul Rudd and Leslie Mann (AD)
11.40 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.10am The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD) 12.40
Gogglebox (r) (SL) 1.35 Tattoo Fixers on Holiday
(r) (AD) 2.35 Rude Tube (r) 3.25 First Dates (r)
(AD) 4.20 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD)
8.55am A Place in the Sun: Winter Sun (r)
11.05 Four in a Bed (r) 1.40pm A Place in
the Sun: Winter Sun (r) 3.45 Time Team.
Double bill (r) 5.55 Vet on the Hill (r)
6.55 George Clarke’s Amazing Spaces. A caravan
being transformed into an ice-cream parlour, the
country’s first-ever tree tent, and some unique
offices built from four old train carriages (r)
7.55 Grand Designs. Kevin McCloud follows a
couple knocking down an old Thames boathouse
and building a cutting-edge home in its place —
in the middle of a community dominated by
traditional houses (4/12) (r)
9.00 Dicte: Crime Reporter. Part one of two.
A football match ends with a huge fight in the
stands — and Jannik makes a shocking
discovery. In Danish (5/6)
11.00 24 Hours in A&E. A 50-year-old
mechanical engineer is rushed in with a
suspected heart attack, while two elderly
people are admitted with possible brain
haemorrhages (2/8) (r)
12.00 24 Hours in A&E (r) 1.00am Ramsay’s
Kitchen Nightmares USA (r) 2.00 Grand Designs
(r) 3.05-3.45 8 Out of 10 Cats Uncut (r)
11.00am Run Wild, Run Free (U, 1969)
Children’s drama starring John Mills and Mark
Lester 1.05pm Thunderbirds (PG, 2004)
Sci-fi adventure starring Bill Paxton 3.00
Millions (12, 2004) Comedy drama starring
Alex Etel 4.50 Home Alone (PG, 1990)
Family comedy starring Macaulay Culkin
6.55 I, Robot (12, 2004) A detective is
convinced a robot has killed its creator, even
though it has been programmed never to harm
humans. Sci-fi thriller with Will Smith
9.00 The Green Mile (18, 1999) A prison
guard amazed by the healing power and gentle
nature of a man on death row comes to doubt
his guilt. Supernatural drama starring Tom
Hanks and Michael Clarke Duncan
12.40am Red State (18, 2011) A murderous
preacher kidnaps three teenagers he judges to
be sinners, leading to his church being
surrounded by federal agents. Thriller starring
Michael Parks 2.20-4.00 Safety Not
Guaranteed (15, 2012) A magazine intern
responds to a personal ad from a supposed time
traveller seeking a companion for his next trip.
Sci-fi comedy starring Aubrey Plaza
6.00am The Vamps: The Hot Desk (r) 6.10
You’ve Been Framed! Gold (r) 6.35 Vanderpump
Rules (r) 7.20 The Ellen DeGeneres Show (r)
8.00 Emmerdale (r) (AD) 9.00 You’ve Been
Framed! Gold Top 100 Senior Moments (r) 10.00
The Great Indoors (AD) 10.30 Guidance (r) (AD)
11.00 LA Story (r) 11.25 Vanderpump Rules (r)
12.20pm Emmerdale (r) (AD) 1.30 You’ve Been
Framed! Gold (r) 2.00 The Ellen DeGeneres
Show (r) 2.50 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r)
5.00 Judge Rinder. Real-life cases (r)
6.00 You’ve Been Framed! Gold Strikes Back! (r)
7.00 You’ve Been Framed! Gold Presents.
Comedy inspired by viewers’ home videos,
featuring Harry Hill’s absurd thoughts (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men. Charlie is attracted to
an older self-help book author (r)
8.30 Two and a Half Men (r)
9.00 FILM: The Hangover Part II (15, 2011)
Comedy sequel starring Bradley Cooper (AD)
11.05 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.35 Family Guy (r) (AD)
12.05am American Dad! (r) 1.30 The Almost
Impossible Gameshow (r) 2.25 Teleshopping.
Buying goods 5.55 ITV2 Nightscreen
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am You’re Only Young Twice (r) 6.25
Heartbeat (r) (AD) 7.25 Wild at Heart (r) (AD)
9.20 Judge Judy (r) 10.45 Road to Avonlea (r)
(AD) 11.45 Wycliffe (r) 12.55pm Heartbeat (r)
(AD) 2.00 The Royal (r) (AD) 3.05 Wycliffe (r)
4.15 On the Buses (r) 5.55 Heartbeat (r) (AD)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. Disaster strikes on
the set of a television sitcom when the producer
is killed in cold blood (r) (AD)
8.00 Doc Martin. Louisa and Martin have their
first therapy session together (4/8) (r) (AD)
9.00 The Street. Bob Hoskins stars as pub
landlord Paddy, who finds himself on the wrong
side of a local gangster after barring the man’s
son from his pub (1/6) (r)
10.20 Law & Order: UK. A friend of Devlin is
murdered (4/7) (r) (AD)
11.20 Wire in the Blood. Part two of two.
A widow is abducted (6/8) (r) (AD)
12.20am Life of Crime (r) (AD) 1.20 Prime
Suspect VI. Crime drama (r) 3.05 Mr Selfridge
(r) (AD, SL) 3.55 Davina McCall: Life at the
Extreme (r) (AD, SL) 4.50 On the Buses (r) (SL)
5.40 ITV3 Nightscreen
6.00am World Cup Top Goalscorers (r) 6.15 The
Chase (r) 7.00 Storage Wars: Texas (r) 7.50
Hogan’s Heroes (r) (AD) 8.55 Ironside (r) 10.00
Quincy ME (r) 11.05 Minder (r) (AD) 12.05pm
The Professionals (r) (AD) 1.10 Hogan’s Heroes
(r) (AD) 1.45 Ironside (r) 2.50 Quincy ME (r)
3.55 Minder (r) 5.00 The Professionals (r) (AD)
6.05 Storage Wars: Texas (r)
6.30 Storage Wars: Texas (r)
7.00 The Chase. Quiz show (r)
8.00 FILM: Casino Royale (12, 2006)
James Bond pursues an international criminal
responsible for financing terrorist organisations
across the world. Spy thriller starring Daniel
Craig, Eva Green and Mads Mikkelsen (AD)
10.40 FILM: A Dangerous Man (18, 2010)
An ex-convict protects a kidnap victim from
gangsters, corrupt cops and Chinese special
agents. Action thriller with Steven Seagal (AD)
12.35am FILM: The Naked Gun — From the
Files of Police Squad! (15, 1988) Comedy
starring Leslie Nielsen and Priscilla Presley (AD)
2.20 Hogan’s Heroes (r) (AD, SL) 2.45 ITV4
Nightscreen 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.00 American Pickers
9.00 Storage Hunters 10.00 American Pickers
12.00 Top Gear (AD) 3.00pm Brojects in the
House 4.00 Steve Austin’s Broken Skull
Challenge (AD) 5.00 Top Gear (AD)
6.00 Top Gear. James May drives a Toyota Hilux
up an active Icelandic volcano (AD)
7.00 The Joy of Techs. Alexis Conran tries
to prove why technology could improve a road
trip around the Lake District
7.30 The Joy of Techs. Alexis Conran tries to
drag Marcus Brigstocke’s country cottage
into the 21st century
8.00 Motorway Cops. A trucker is caught using
his mobile phone at the wheel
9.00 FILM: South Park — Bigger, Longer &
Uncut (15, 1999) The foul-mouthed
youngsters of the Colorado town try to
prevent their parents waging war on Canada.
Animated musical comedy with the voices of
Trey Parker and Matt Stone
10.40 QI. Triple bill of the comedy panel show
12.40am Mock the Week 1.20 QI 2.40 Parks
and Recreation 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am The Bill 8.00 Dangerfield 9.00
Monarch of the Glen 10.00 All Creatures Great
and Small 11.00 The Bill 1.00pm Last of the
Summer Wine 1.40 Waiting for God 2.20 Birds
of a Feather 3.00 Dangerfield 4.00 Monarch of
the Glen 5.00 All Creatures Great and Small
6.00 Waiting for God. Classic comedy
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine
7.20 To the Manor Born. Audrey takes a holiday,
but frets about leaving Grantleigh Manor behind
8.00 Hetty Wainthropp Investigates. A road
rage case uncovers a family tragedy
9.00 Death in Paradise. The team is called to
investigate the death of a meteorologist, but
with a hurricane fast approaching, there is little
time to uncover the truth (7/8) (AD)
10.20 Death in Paradise. The host of a charity
fundraiser is shot dead (8/8) (AD)
11.40 The Inspector Lynley Mysteries.
Feature-length episode. Lynley and Havers
investigate the murder of a doorkeeper at the
House of Lords, which they initially connect to
the victim’s gambling debts (3/4)
1.35am Taggart 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Monsoon Railway 7.10 The World at
War 8.00 Forbidden History (AD) 9.00 Wild
China 12.00 Life in Cold Blood 3.00pm Some
Mothers Do ’Ave ’Em 5.00 Monsoon Railway
6.00 Forbidden History. Jamie Theakston
journeys to Greece and Italy to uncover the truth
about oracles — mythical figures who could
reputedly hear and speak to gods (AD)
7.00 The World at War. How German U-boats
were used to try to starve Britain
8.00 Impossible Engineering. The creation of
London’s Crossrail network, revealing how
taxidermy inspired a breakthrough (AD)
9.00 Impossible Engineering. The development
of the Shanghai Maglev (AD)
10.00 The Two Ronnies Sketchbook. Messrs
Corbett and Barker reminisce about sketches
11.00 Auf Wiedersehen, Pet. Ally’s dodgy
dealings take a turn for the worse, and Barry has
difficulty controlling Hazel who is suffering from
an overdose of sun, sea and sangria
12.10am Forbidden History. With Jamie
Theakston (AD) 1.10 The World at War 2.10
Monsoon Railway 3.00 Home Shopping
UTV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 UTV Life.
Pamela Ballantine introduces an entertaining
and eclectic mix of stories and studio guests
with which to usher in the weekend 12.35am
Teleshopping 1.35-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm A’ Bhriogais Chearr (Wallace & Gromit
in The Wrong Trousers) (r) 5.30 Am Balach
anns a’ Bhuilgean (Boy in the Bubble) 5.40
An Là (News) 5.50 Live Shinty 8.00 Ceann an
Righ (The King’s Head) (r) 8.30 O Mo
Dhùthaich (From Uist with Love) (r) 8.55
Fraochy Bay (r) 9.00 Belladrum 2017: Cridhe
Tartan 11.30 An Klondike (Dominion Creek)
12.25am-12.30 Binneas: Na Trads (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Ben Dant (r) 6.15 Sam Tân (r)
6.30 Bobi Jac (r) 6.40 Octonots (r) 6.55 Peppa
(r) 7.00 Cacamwnci (r) 7.15 Blero yn Mynd i
Ocido (r) 7.25 Twm Tisian (r) 7.35 Straeon Ty
Pen (r) 7.50 Cymylaubychain (r) 8.00 Stiw (r)
8.10 Heulwen a Lleu (r) 8.20 Y Teulu Mawr (r)
8.30 Yn yr Ardd (r) 8.45 Dwylo’r Enfys (r) 9.00
Cled (r) 9.15 Marcaroni (r) 9.30 Chwedlau
Tinga Tinga (r) 9.40 Falmai’r Fuwch (r) 9.45
Bach a Mawr (r) 10.00 Ben Dant (r) 10.15
Sam Tân (r) 10.30 Bobi Jac (r) 10.40 Octonots
(r) 10.55 Peppa (r) 11.00 Cacamwnci (r)
11.15 Blero yn Mynd i Ocido (r) 11.25 Twm
Tisian (r) 11.35 Straeon Ty Pen (r) 11.50
Cymylaubychain (r) 12.00 Heno (r) 1.00pm
News S4C a’r Tywydd 1.05 Byw yn y Byd (r)
(AD) 2.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd 2.05
Prynhawn Da 3.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd 3.05
O Fôn I Virginia (r) 4.00 Awr Fawr 5.00
Stwnsh: Anifeiliaid Anhygoel 5.05 Stwnsh:
Cog1nio (r) 5.30 Stwnsh: Mwy o Mwfs: MOM
(r) 5.45 Stwnsh: Gwboi a Twm Twm (r) 6.00
News S4C a’r Tywydd 6.05 100 Lle (r) 6.30
Garddio a Mwy (r) 7.00 Heno 8.00 Eisteddfod
Genedlaethol 2017. New series. Cyfle i edrych
ymlaen at Eisteddfod Genedlaethol Ynys Môn
2017 a’r Cyngerdd Agoriadol, A Oes Heddwch?
yng nghwmni Iwan Griffiths. A look ahead to
the Anglesey National Eisteddfod 2017 8.15
Cyngerdd Hedd Wyn: A Oes Heddwch? New
work by Aled and Dayfdd Hughes, Guto Dayfdd,
Paul Mealor and Grahame Davies, telling the
story of those who fought the First World War
and the Welsh communities left behind 10.00
Y Goeden Faled. Cerys Matthews follows the
journey of Deio from “Deio I Dywyn”, from
Llanrhaedr-ym-Mochnant to Tywyn, and learns
the history behind “Bugeilio’r Gwenith Gwyn”
(r) (AD) 10.30 Caryl (r) (AD) 11.00-11.35
999: Ambiwlans Awyr Cymru (r)
18
Friday August 4 2017 | the times
1GT
What are your favourite puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7409
2
3
4
5
6
23
7
8
22
3
9
14
11
12
11
12
2
23
15
16
2
15
9
6
10
14
9
6
26
17
17
2
25
12
2
2
14
2
7
17
12
13
8
14
22
10
6
26
14
Scrabble ® Challenge No 1929
7
7
7
14
2
7
15
6
9
1
26
14
17
19
7
4
18
10
26
4
19
12
17
21
15
9
2
17
2
22
19
5
7
17
19
5
7
2
3
14
14
17
7
7
9
18
14
What play covers two doubleword squares with this rack?
10
9
19
14
20
5
L O
A Z I MU
J
F
T
A Z T EC
R
L
ANA
A
L
S
GRA S S
E R
I MM E N
S
I
I
T A S K S
M
I
C A
L
T H T ROO
E O W
E M P OWE
R
A
E S T HE T I
A E
HOP P ER
R P
S E EMEN
G N R
ONEROU
N D S
P
I
R
A
C
Y
O
D
D
S
11 12
2W
D
E
F
G
2L
H
I
J
K
2W
L
2
13
6
21
19
19
3
19
11
9
Deteriorate (6)
Completely fresh (5,3)
Having moderate heat (4)
Trunk (5)
Co-operation (7)
Life in general (10)
Down
2 Extremely angry (5)
3 Make beer; drink of tea (4)
4 Make illegal, ban (6)
5 Greenery between fields (8)
6 Take-off strips (7)
7 Chief actor (7,3)
8 Hand or share out (10)
12 Clothes cupboard (8)
14 Area of open grassland (7)
16 English Methodist (6)
19 Crime involving fire (5)
20 Thin coat of paint (4)
22
SPAMFUG
17
What is the highest-scoring play
involving the M ?
17
6
25
Use only the board area shown. Collins Official
Scrabble Words is the authority used, although the
solutions are not unusual words. Standard Scrabble
rules apply for making the word plays.
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
W
14
15
16
17
18
11
12
13
24
25
26
N
19
20
21
22
23
© PUZZLER MEDIA
1
O
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
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A
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L
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E
D
H
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G
C
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L
H
B
I
A
B
N
Z
D
T
M
E
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T
O
A
W
E
M
P
E
Solve the puzzle
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A
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Difficult No 4085
Futoshiki No 2970
Kakuro No 1929
>
2
© 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
>
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line “block”, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
Challenge compiled by Allan Simmons
SCRABBLE® is a registered trademark of J. W. Spear & Sons Ltd ©Mattel 2017
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
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A
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7
24
30
16
7
24
23
>
5
6
23
3
24
38
26
16
20
10
∨
27
6
10
7
13
29
>
>
29
30
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
29
6
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
29
16
29
12
16
30
27
∨
<
16
4
12
∧
Key
2L = double letter
3L = triple letter
2W = double word
3W = triple word
Letter values
AEIOULNRST=1
DG=2 BCMP=3
FHVWY=4 K=5
JX=8 QZ=10
24
23
Solution to Crossword 7408
10
3
N
1 Exerciser of total control
over people's lives (3,7)
8 Local speech variant (7)
9 Closely compacted (5)
10 Slow cooked meat dish (4)
11 Range of frequencies for
radio transmission (8)
13 Coarse wood cutter (6)
9
NACKEDY
W
15
17
18
21
22
23
8
2
O
22
Across
7
19
20
21
19
6
z
2W
2W
o
3L
3L
n
2L i 2L
2L
n
brought
3L
a 3L
2W
i 2W
2L
2W
r
16
17
5
2W
3
9
22
9
4
14
7
19
16
16
16
24
4
23
23
3
24
© PUZZLER MEDIA
1
Codeword No 3093
the times | Friday August 4 2017
19
1GT
MindGames
White: David Howell
Black: Jack Rudd
British Championship,
Aberystwyth 2014
Dutch Defence
1 c4 e6 2 g3 Nf6 3 Bg2 d5 4 Nf3
c6 5 Qc2 Nbd7 6 d4 Bb4+ 7 Nbd2
Ne4 8 0-0 f5
The defining move of the Dutch.
________
árDb1kD 4]
à0pDnD 0p]
ß DpDpD D]
ÞD DpDpD ]
Ý gP)nD D]
ÜD D DN) ]
ÛP)QHP)B)]
Ú$ G DRI ]
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ
50
–4
MEDIUM
36
x 9 + 5/12
177
x 2 + 624 + 1/6
HARDER
x2
OF IT
1/2
+6
20%
OF IT
x8
x 2 – 189 ÷ 9
+5
x 3 + 122 + 3/10
OF IT
+6
OF IT
OF IT
x 3 + 629
Launching a decisive attack.
22 ... fxe3 23 Nxe6 Qe8 24 Nxf8
Qxf8 25 c5 Nb5 26 Qf5+ Nf6 27
Qe6+ Kg6
Black’s king lacks any shelter
while White’s queen and bishop
run riot on the light squares.
28 Bf5+ Kh5 29 Qxe3 g5 30 h4
Ng8 31 hxg5 Bxg5 32 Qe6 Re8
33 Bg4 checkmate
Bridge Andrew Robson
missing high cards. ♠ J952 facing
♠ 1083 would also work (for one
— eventual — extra trick): fourcard sequence, three higher cards.
♥ Q32 facing ♥ J65 would not
work. However, ♣Q32 facing
♣J105 would work.
QJ3 facing K2 is a great source of
two extra tricks. If you neglect this
suit (and the opponents do likewise), you will make no tricks. The
opponents will make their ace at Dealer: South, Vulnerability: Neither
some late stage and that will be
that. By the simple process of forc♠A K 2
ing out the ace, preferably leading
♥Q 7
♦10 8 4 3
the king (or to the king) as high
♣A 9 4 3
from the short hand, you will pro♠
J
10
5
4
3 N
♠9 7
mote two extra tricks. You don’t
♥9 8 6 4 W E ♥J 10 2
mind which opponent has the ace;
♦K 5
♦AQ 7 6
S
you don’t mind how many cards
♣J 4 ♠ Q 8 6 ♣Q 10 7 6
each opponent holds. You have
♥A K 5 3
two extra tricks.
♦J 9 2
What is so attractive about your
♣K 8 2
combined holdings is their sequenS
W
N
E
tial nature. Here’s another:
1NT
Pass
3NT
End
J952 facing Q103. Here, you
have a four-card sequence. You’ll
Contract: 3NT, Opening Lead: ♠ 4
use two of your cards in the
sequence to force out their ace and
As declarer in 3NT receiving the
king, and promote the other two ♠ 4 lead, you count eight top tricks:
cards. You don’t mind where the ♠ AKQ, ♥AKQ and ♣AK. The
ace and the king are, nor do you ninth will come from the diamond
mind how many cards the oppo- sequence, with more cards in the
nents have. The layout could be:
sequence (four) than the number of
Dummy
missing higher cards (three).
West ♦J952
East
Win (say) ♠ K and lead ♦3 (low
----♦AK8764
from longer length) to ♦6, ♦J and
Declarer
♦K. Win West’s (say) ♠ J with
♦Q103
(say) ♠ Q and lead ♦9 (high from
♦Q (high from short) will force the short hand). East wins ♦Q and
out ♦K; on regaining the lead, switches to (say) ♥J.
♦10 will force out ♦A, whereupon
Win dummy’s ♥Q (high from
♦J9 are promoted. That’s two short) and lead ♦10. East wins ♦A
extra tricks — even though East (West throwing ♠ 3) and leads
held all six missing cards (I am ♥10. Win ♥K, cross to ♠ A and
assuming notrumps, or that enjoy ♦8, just beating East’s ♦7.
trumps have been drawn).
♣AK and ♥A bring the trick tally
Note you have more cards in to nine — game made.
andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
the sequence than the number of
75%
OF IT
50%
OF IT
+7
÷ 3 + 786 x 4
2 3
6
Polygon
From these letters, make words of
four or more letters, always including
the central letter. Answers must be in
the Concise Oxford Dictionary,
excluding capitalised words, plurals,
conjugated verbs (past tense etc),
adverbs ending in LY, comparatives
and superlatives.
How you rate 17 words, average;
23, good; 28, very good; 33, excellent
Killer Moderate No 5561
7
7
22
11min
7
13
7
15
19
7
14
10
15
20
8
18
16
21
12
19
4
12
12
20
16
3
8
12
14
8
Killer Deadly No 5562
22
56min
26
14
6
15
20
7
12
23
30
7
1 2 4
6 4 8
6
8 9 7
6 8 9
9 7
7 5 1
6 3
3 1
1 2
+
+
=
13
=
72
7
9
7
9
3
1
1
3
5
4
6
9
2
8
7
4
2
8
3
1
7
9
6
5
9
4
6
1
2
5
7
3
8
8
1
7
5
2
3
6
4
9
4
2
3
9
6
8
7
1
5
9
5
6
4
7
1
2
8
3
7
9
8
3
5
6
1
2
4
9
7
7
9
8
5
3
2
1
R E J E C
E
E
I
CARA V
O K
I
ROY A L
D
L
V I N Y
C
N
L I QU E
I
U
X
QU E S T
U
S
R
E N T RA
9
8
3
1
4
2
1
3
9
5 8 7
8 6 9
2
7
3
9
8
4
6
5
1
3
1
4
2
9
8
5
7
6
5
8
9
6
7
3
1
4
2
7
6
2
5
4
1
8
9
3
5
4
2
8
1
9
3
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6
6
3
1
2
4
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3
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4
6
9
2
8
5
1
2
6
5
1
8
4
9
3
7
1
8
9
7
3
5
4
6
2
5
7
2
9
8
1
4
3
6
8
1
4
7
3
6
5
2
9
9
6
3
2
5
4
8
1
7
2
7
9
8
6
4
5
3
1
5
8
4
1
7
3
2
9
6
6
1
3
9
5
2
8
4
7
17
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
6
5 6
2
4
6
L
U
P
3
8
9
6
1
2
7
5
4
2
2
3
2
5
6
4
8
7
1
9
1
2
7
5
4
8
9
6
3
7
5
8
4
6
3
2
9
1
4
9
6
1
2
5
3
7
8
2
3
1
8
9
7
6
4
5
7
9
6
3
2
1
4
5
8
1
4
8
7
9
5
6
2
3
9
3
2
4
8
6
1
7
5
4
6
1
5
3
7
9
8
2
8
5
7
2
1
9
3
6
4
3
2 2
6
4
2
5 > 1
4
x
4
1 < 3
3
2
5
x
+
x
+
2
9
6
7
-
+
+
x
Suko 1994
5
2
4
3
8
7
9
1
6
8
3
6
1
9
5
4
2
7
9
7
1
6
2
4
5
3
8
7
4
3
9
6
2
1
8
5
1
9
5
8
4
3
7
6
2
2
6
8
7
5
1
3
9
4
4
5
9
2
3
8
6
7
1
3
8
7
4
1
6
2
5
9
6
1
2
5
7
9
8
4
3
S
W
O
O
O
N
U
E
U
R
Z
Y
E
C
T
U
A
S
P
N
Lexica 3858
3
∧
5
x
L
A
D
E
N
Scrabble 1928
SCAPEGOAT A7
across (48)
PIANOS F8
across (29)
RA
G
R E
N
E D
A
Y
S
I T
O
E D
G
Z Y
Lexica 3857
2
3 < 4
5
1
∨
1
4
2 < 3 < 5
Set Square 1931
3
E
X
H
I
B
I
T
Sudoku 9220
6
4
5
3
7
9
1
8
2
Futoshiki 2969
1
∧
4 > 2
22
18
A
CAM
G R
N OC
A M
SWA B
H
EMP
G A
R
S P
U
S
F I E L
F
U
F R E
Killer 5560
5
10
T
Sudoku 9219
8
5
1
7
3
6
4
2
9
Cell Blocks 2975
12
=
37
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
3
11
+
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
work out their
= 16 positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
works? We’ve
= 14 put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
Codeword 3092
2 1
9 5 3
8
2 4 1
7 9 3
1 3
6 8
7 8
1 6 9
2
18
7
4
x
Kakuro 1928
10
40
x
+
-
KenKen 4084
22
All the digits
= 12 from 1-9 are
+
5
24
2
-
x
Killer 5559
14
4
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
Solutions
6
9
7
8
5
2
3
1
4
8
11
7
6
6
2
x
Sudoku 9218
8
3 2
x
Yesterday’s answers aeon, aloe,
alone, ambo, anole, beano, bemoan,
bole, boma, bone, bonemeal, ebon,
lemon, leno, leone, loam, loan, loanee,
lobe, lone, melon, meno, moan, mobe,
mola, mole, noble, nome, omen
12
2 2
2
Set Square No 1932
________
á Dr1 4 D]
à0pD gk0p]
ß DphpD D]
Þ) HpD Dn]
Ý DP) 0 D]
ÜDPD GP)B]
Û DQDPD )]
Ú$ D DRI ]
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ
________
á 4 D DkD] Winning Move
àD D $pDp]
ßpD D $ D] White to play. This previous British
position is from
ÞD D D D ] Championship
Arkell-Summerscale, Coventry 2015.
Ý D D D I] It would seem that the white king, having
ÜD D DQ) ] been driven up the board, is in danger.
Û D D ) )] However, the black king is worse off. Why?
Ú4 D D Dq] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
Beginner Corner 15
Extra tricks by Force — Sequences
EASY
© PUZZLER MEDIA
Former British champion David
Howell distinguished himself by
winning the championship on his
own in 2009, 2013 and jointly in
2014. He is, of course, one of the
prime favourites to seize the title
this year in Llandudno. The first
prize of £10,000 for this year’s
event has been generously provided by Capital Developments
Waterloo Ltd. Today’s game is
one of Howell’s victories from the
championship where he tied first.
Round seven is played today in
Llandudno and games can be
followed via the 2seeitlive link on
the header of The Times Twitter
feed @times_chess. For regular
updates, direct to your twitter
account, just click on the “follow”
button.
9 Ne1
White plans to reposition the
knight on d3 while challenging
Black’s central knight with f3.
9 ... Ndf6 10 Ndf3 0-0 11 Nd3 Be7
12 b3 Bd7 13 Nfe5 Be8 14 Nf4
Qc8 15 a4
This allows White the option of
Ba3 to remove Black’s defender of
the dark squares, the bishop on e7.
15 ... Nh5 16 Nfd3
White does not allow Black to
ease his position with exchanges.
16 ... Qd8 17 a5 Rc8 18 f3 Nd6 19
Nc5 Bf7 20 Be3
Also very strong was 20 Nxf7
Kxf7 (otherwise 21 Nxe6) 21 e4
with a vicious attack.
20 ... f4
A desperate bid for freedom.
Here 21 Bxf4 would win a clear
pawn but White’s continuation is
even stronger.
21 Nxf7 Kxf7 22 Bh3
© PUZZLER MEDIA
Former champion
Cell Blocks No 2976
Brain Trainer
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Chess Raymond Keene
1
+
+
8
Quiz 1 Finland 2 Giant clam (Tridacna gigas)
3 Hindi 4 JMW Turner 5 Charles X, who was
king of France from 1824 to 1830 6 Slovenia
7 Richard Wagner 8 Mr [Charles] Bingley
9 Anthony Scaramucci 10 Solar sailing
11 Little Mix 12 Chile 13 Sahrawi Arab
Democratic Republic — in the Western Sahara
region 14 Javier Fernández 15 Rock of Gibraltar
F
A
U
N
C
E
F
A
I
P
O
P
E
E
R
X
I
P
L
A
I
T
Word watch
Downy (c) Sharp-witted,
knowing (slang)
Docken (b) Something of
no importance or value
Dubbo (c) A stupid
person (Australian slang,
after a town in New
south Wales)
Brain Trainer
Easy 51; Medium 494;
Harder 7,196
Chess 1 Rg6+! fxg6 2 Qf7+
Kh8 3 Qxh7 mate
04.08.17
MindGames
Mild No 9221
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
Difficult No 9222
3
6
5
1 6
5
9
4
1
3 5
6
6
7
3
5
1
2 8
9
1
6
7
5 9
3
7
2
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
Downy
a Much-read
b Lugubrious
c Sharp-witted
Docken
a Tawny
b Of no importance
c Healed
Dubbo
a Obstinate
b A lavatory
c A stupid person
For interactive
Sudoku puzzles, visit
thetimes.co.uk/puzzles
Answers on page 15
Fiendish No 9223
1
1 3
6
4
1
8 7
7
PUZZLER MEDIA
Sudoku
6 4
2 5
3
1
6
8
5
8 7
9
1
8
7
6 7 1
3
4
3
1 8
1
9
4
6
to receive four clues for any of today’s puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
by Olav Bjortomt The Times Quiz Book
GETTY IMAGES
1The Jussi Awards
is which EU
country’s premier
film industry event?
11 In 2016, which British
girl group reached No
4 in the singles chart
with Touch?
2 What is the largest
living bivalve mollusc?
12 The War of the
Pacific ended in
1883 with victory
for which South
American country?
3 In India, which
language is spoken as a
first language by nearly
425 million people?
15
6 The municipality
of Bloke and the
Bloke Plateau are
located in which
European country?
4 Ulysses Deriding
Polyphemus (1829) is a
work in the National
Gallery by which
English painter?
young gentleman rents
Netherfield Park?
7 The Bayreuth
Festspielhaus is
dedicated solely to the
performance of works
by which composer?
5 Louis Antoine of
France, Duke of
Angoulême, the last
Dauphin of France,
was the elder son of
which king?
8 In the novel Pride
and Prejudice, which
9 Nicknamed “The
Mooch”, who had ten
days as Donald Trump’s
communications
director?
10 Launched in 2010,
Japan’s Ikaros probe
was the first spacecraft
to use which method
as its main propulsion?
13 Which democratic
republic’s governmentin-exile resides in
Tindouf, Algeria?
The Times Quiz Book by
Olav Bjortomt is out now.
To order your copy visit
harpercollins.co.uk or call
0844 576 8120. Also available
from all good bookshops.
Yesterday’s
T
M P A S T I L L E
Quick
C
N
E
A RMA D A
Cryptic
O
L
CR E AMT E A
T
N
A
K
T UN A
solution
S
G
A P T
No 888
14 Which Spaniard
is the two-time
men’s world figure
skating champion
(2015 and 2016)?
15 Which limestone
promontory is pictured?
Answers on page 19
The Times Quick Cryptic No 889
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
21
23
18
19
20
22
P H
E
A
ND
L
S I
N
F E
OR
E S
I
POS T A
H
L
R A
A
T E
F A S T
H
S T
A
T
T
A
C
H
E
D
U
E
E
N
Follow The Times Crossword
Editor @timescrosswords
by Rongo
8
9
ME T A
R
I SMS
A
P
L
P A R A
P M
MA N I
Across
1 Church service prompt cued
badly, caused by large-scale
Creation? (4-8)
9 Went on horseback before old
cowboy show? (5)
10 Fools in underwater vessel
returning permit for cheap
travel (3,4)
11 Pray to some in centre —
atheists! (7)
12 Curse small effect of erosion
(5)
13 Room in jail is curtailed after
equality package (6)
14 Guard second way in (6)
17 Line in front of church recess
for sin (5)
19 Prison term unpopular for gap
year, perhaps (4,3)
21 1960s dance queen causing a
storm in America (7)
22 Six left keeping New York’s old
records (5)
23 Confused rower’s pedalo
driven by daylight (5-7)
4
6
6 4 5
2
8
9 2 5
3
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The Times Daily Quiz
9
6
Down
2 Business inspector, one who
listens (7)
3 Preserved Parisian and bully
taking the top off fire safety
device (5,8)
4 Discount to exist, coming up in
proportional price (6)
5 Video stream is showing
devastation in this? (8,5)
6 Caught, possesses ecstasy,
being run after (5)
7 Break up time, separating
Desmond and Orbison, say (7)
8 Cheese not lasting long when
cut (4)
13 System of exercises and dishes
containing iodine (7)
15 Beat edges of thinner part of a
pound (7)
16 Before entering stone circle,
sound heard from both sides
(6)
18 Friend accepting greeting
shows bottle (5)
20 Short story about powdered
mineral (4)
8
3
8
9
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