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The Times Times 2 17 July 2017

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July 17 | 2017
Mum asks us:
‘Why are you so normal?’
—
er
h
is
F
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ar
C
d
an
s
ip
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ad
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Mental illness, crazy
Ruby Wax’s daughters tell all
2
1GT
Monday July 17 2017 | the times
times2
Mental health?
Oversharers be
warned: your boss
is on Facebook too
Kevin Maher
P
GETTY IMAGES
icture the scene. You’re a
company boss and you’re
about to interview a
prospective employee.
The candidate is in the
lobby of your building
and they’re wanging on,
out loud, about how
much they love boozing, how much
they hate working and how they’re
only going for this idiotic job as a
handy stop-gap before an extended
holiday to Malaysia. You are walking
through the lobby. If you listen to the
candidate it’s probably illegal. If you
don’t put your fingers in your ears as
you pass them, it’s even worse. And if
you let the words that they have
spoken, in the lobby, out loud,
influence your decision about their
possible position within the company
in any way, well, you should probably
think about serious jail time.
This is an analogy for modern
employment law, as recently envisaged
by the heads of Europe’s data
watchdogs (including the UK
Information Commissioner’s Office),
who have decided that employers who
read the Facebook pages of job
applicants are likely to be breaking the
law. In the analogy, thus, the lobby
serves as the internet (public space
etc), while the boss is a victim of a
society that’s increasingly putting the
cart before the horse and treating
oversharing and mass exhibitionism
on social media as normative, and
perfectly acceptable, behaviour.
I don’t do Facebook. I can’t think of
anything worse than subjecting my
“social media friends” (random
punters you try to avoid at parties and
old schoolfriends you have tried to
forget for ever) to a blow-by-blow
account of what it’s like to type, watch
movies, eat food and pick up the kids.
Plus, well, as the Nigerian-Swedish
pop singer Dr Alban famously said, in
his 1992 dance classic that soon
became the intensely catchy
hum-along soundtrack for tampon
adverts: “It’s my life!” So back off.
Equally, I’m often horrified, when I
do find myself scanning through social
media by the unguarded intimacies
that are offered up, willingly, for public
consumption. “This is my wife, in bed.
She’s just woken up!” It’s as if the very
existence of social media is enough to
I’m more of
a girl than
you, Zayn
Quick! Hang on to
something! Stand in a
doorway! Apparently,
we’re in the middle of a
“genderquake”.
Ruby Wax’s daughters have formed a
comedy act. They tell Andrew Billen
about growing up amid laughter,
depression and visits from Carrie Fisher
Ditch
Blu-ray,
get E coli
justify its usage, when all they’re doing
is demonstrating lack of imagination
and an inability to place social media
within a “real world” context.
I am not alone, I know. There are
increasing tensions building up, clash
of civilisations style, between social
media dolts and the rest of us who find
ourselves caught in the gaze of their
perpetually raised cameraphones. I
was on the Tube recently and a
teenage tourist starting “vlogging”
(making a video diary) for his “friends
back home”. He kept filming me and
the people in my row. I eventually
moved. It’s the same reason that the
designer Stella McCartney was
allegedly “furious” with David
Beckham for posting on Instagram a
photograph of her daughter Reiley at
Harper Beckham’s birthday bash. The
photograph has received nearly
900,000 “likes”. Yep. “Hey, world!
These are my kids! You like?”
And what about Rhodri Philipps, the
4th Viscount St Davids, who was jailed
for 12 weeks for threatening the
anti-Brexit campaigner Gina Miller.
He offered £5,000 on Facebook for
“the first person to ‘accidentally’ run
over this bloody troublesome
first-generation immigrant”. He
probably thought that it was fine to be
a racist online (it was, he claimed, just
“satire”). Because what happens online
stays online, right? Alas, what happens
online has echoes in reality. It reveals
personal truths, foibles, inclinations
and character traits. But if you happen
to be a boss, well, it’s none of your
bloody business.
As reported by
Vogue, the pop star
Zayn Malik and his
model girlfriend, Gigi
Hadid, are breaking
gender-based societal
norms, flying in the
face of the stifling
patriarchy and creating
the aforementioned
genderquake.
And how are they
doing it? They are
wearing each other’s
clothes. Zayn admitted
that he once wore Gigi’s
T-shirt, even though it
was a girl’s T-shirt.
“Gender, whatever,” he
said. The rebel.
Well, in that case, I’ve
been genderquaking for
years. I wear a white
scarf that belonged to
my wife. And when I
was in Boston airport I
Remember when
DVDs came along?
And you had to change
all your VHS tapes?
And you’d just about
done that, you’d even
snagged a widescreen
special edition of The
Magnificent Seven,
when Blu-ray arrived?
And then you started
switching to Blu-ray,
but before you were
finished, digital video
files arrived. You’re
probably still midway
through that format
change, trying to
replace a Blu-ray of the
1950 version of No Way
Out (I certainly am),
but guess what? It’s
happening again. Only
this time, the big switch
is to DNA video files.
Yep, scientists at
Harvard University
have successfully stored
video images of a
galloping horse in the
DNA of E. coli bacteria
for a full week, after
which the E. coli
released the video in
near-perfect order
(with no late rental
charges). I’ve had it
with switching formats.
This time, I’m not
convinced. Bacteria
just seems a bit, well,
fragile. I don’t fancy
losing “westerns A-M”
by accidentally
overheating the Petri
dish. Or sneezing out
my entire sci-fi
collection. Although, in
truth, it’ll probably
depend on the pricing.
How much is a blob of
bacteria these days?
bought, and wore, an
extra-large pink
“Boston” hoodie — so
shoot me! I like pink!
— from the women’s
section of a sports shop.
So take that, Malik!
Or is that confusing,
because he was in One
Direction? Either way,
I can out-genderquake
that lightweight any
day of the week.
A
t the Brighton
Fringe one night last
month the comedy
duo Siblings were
sought out backstage
by a stranger. She
just had to tell the
two sisters that
Ruby Wax had been in the audience
— and, what was more, had been
laughing. Maddy and Marina Bye were
too polite, or possibly too mischievous,
to tell her that Wax is their mother.
Accompanied by their father, the TV
comedy director Ed Bye, the comedian
turns up pretty regularly. “Even if she
doesn’t know the lines, Mum will
mouth them with us,” Marina says,
with pride more than embarrassment.
Aged 23, Marina is the English rose
of the sisters, taller and blonde with a
BBC period drama face. At drama
school she was cast as Shakespeare
heroines and since then in rather
more dubious roles that her sister,
Maddy, will delight in telling me about.
Three years older, but looking rather
younger, Maddy is so much the spit of
her mother that I’m surprised the
backstage visitor did not cotton on.
We meet for the lightest of lunches
at the Picturehouse Central in
Shaftesbury Avenue, London, and
despite their physical dissimilarities
and differing tastes in clothes — big
jumper for Marina, dungarees for
Maddy — you would know they were
sisters, I think. They pick crumbs from
each other’s cheeks and finish each
other’s sentences.
“I remember absolutely hating you
when you were young. You kicked my
front tooth out,” Maddy says.
“By accident,” Marina says. “When I
was, like, two.”
“Aggressive little baby, she was,”
Maddy says. “But you always made me
laugh.”
They still make each other laugh,
even mid-performance. The first thing
I see them in is a wonderful fourminute YouTube sketch in which they
play two insufferably stupid products
of London day schools. They admit
their target is partly themselves, as
alumni of the £21,000-a-year
Harrodian school in Barnes, but it is
more likely that their aim is set at the
girls they made fun of back then. The
sketch builds brilliantly on manic
repetitions of the words “god” and
“sheep” and the phrase “don’t eat that”.
Next, and still before we meet, I see
them one stiflingly hot night in a
London pub as they try out their
Edinburgh Fringe show. I am sitting
next to one of their “unofficial
godmothers”, who says as children
their impressions of Wax were so good
that from another room it sounded as
if Ruby herself were there. There is
dancing, a bit of audience participation
and much fun at some very soft
targets, such as the ghost-hunter show
Most Haunted. They are very much the
unfinished article, but still funny
enough to earn a piece in The Times,
whoever their parents are.
“Someone said you’d see us and
think, ‘Semi-posh, nice English girls,’
but what we love the most is to shock
people and be raucous and disgusting
and dark,” Marina says.
Well, I don’t know about that. There
is a sketch about anti-bullying
instructors in which the dynamic
between the two is clearly bullying,
but, mildly edgy though this is, it still
harks back rather sweetly to their
schooldays. What really sets Maddy
corpsing is an obscure sketch in which
they both pop in false teeth and play
hillbillies living in something called
the Shackety-Shack. It played like an
in-joke and, it turns out, it was.
“When we were young we used to
go on crazy holidays where we’d drive
for 13 hours from one state to the next,
and we once drove past a tiny shack,”
Marina explains. “After being in a car
for ten hours you go kind of insane.
That’s where the material for
Shackety-Shack came from.”
“She was about eight and she went,
‘Shackety-Shack,’ ” Maddy recalls.
Mum and Carrie
could have lived
in a hippy
complex for sure
So, they are telling me this joke has
been going on for 15, 16 years? Yes.
If it sounds as if the Bye girls’
childhood was a riot, mother and
daughters outdoing one another with
the comedy turns (the girls’ older
brother, Max, seems to have acted
more as a reliable if critically astute
audience), one must remember that it
cannot all have been like that. Yes,
Wax was blessed with funny bones
and funny friends. A regular disruptor
to their childhood was the actress
Carrie Fisher, whose treat was to take
the family to Portobello Road market
and tell them to separate and come
back with the weirdest thing they
could find in 20 minutes. One time
she judged a puppy climbing out of a
plastic egg the winner. When Fisher
died at Christmas, I heard Wax on the
radio saying she and Fisher had
planned to run off and live in
retirement together.
“They could have gone lesbian and
lived in a hippy complex for the rest of
their lives for sure. That would have
happened,” Maddy acknowledges.
Sad for their dad, I say. “I think my
dad would have gone as well.”
Like Fisher, however, Wax has
spoken frankly about her mental
health problems and set up a network
of Frazzled Cafés, in which people
recovering from mental illness share
their experiences. She has talked
the times | Monday July 17 2017
3
1GT
times2
It’s never been taboo for us
The lowdown
Meryl’s bag
COVER & BELOW: CHRIS MCANDREW FOR THE TIMES; REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
about her struggles in more
detail recently, but when I
interviewed her in 2001 she
said that some years earlier
she had checked into the
Priory Hospital with postnatal depression after giving
birth to Marina.
“Wow,” Marina says.
“Didn’t know that,” Maddy
says.
Was much hidden from
them, I ask.
“I think definitely when we were
were
we
younger we didn’t really have much
h
idea, and I think that’s a testimony to
our parents,” Maddy says. “They made
our childhood so normal. Nothing was
obscure really. When we grew up we
understood it more. But mental health
has never, ever been a taboo in our
household. I mean, obviously it’s a
horrible, horrible thing to have and we
understand that, but it was all about
breaking the stigma and not being
afraid to talk about it.”
“That is thanks to Dad, though,”
Marina adds. “He was so amazing
about it when we were young and
would just explain it in a really
diplomatic way. You know, there was
nothing to hide and he’s a very caring,
amazing, solid man. None of us are
heroin addicts because my dad is great
— and my mum.”
“She’s, like, ‘Why are you so
normal?’ ” Maddy says. “In every one
off her
h shows that I’ve been to,
someone has put their hand up and
said, ‘Are your kids f***ed up?’ And
we’re, like, ‘Hiya! We’re here.’ ”
Surely the reason for that is,
growing up in postwar Chicago, Wax
was never convinced that her parents
loved her. Wax obviously loves her
children to the point of devotion.
“That’s why we have the confidence
we do: we have such a supportive
family,” Marina says.
After school Maddy went into PR,
later discovering that her bosses had
worked with the publicist Lynne
Franks, the model for Jennifer
Saunders’s Edina in Absolutely
Fabulous. Maddy had unintentionally
walked straight into her mother’s Ab
Fab territory (Wax was its script
editor). She was efficient, but felt a
performer lurking somewhere within
her. One day she mentioned to her
Top: Marina, left, and
Maddy Bye. Above:
with their mother,
Ruby Wax, in 2004
Siblings are at the
Gilded Balloon Teviot,
Edinburgh, August 2-28.
tickets.edfringe.com/
whats-on/siblings
godfather Alan Rickman that she had
heard about the École Philippe
Gaulier clown school in Paris, but
obviously it was not something she’d
join. He immediately told her to go.
“I just kissed the ground that he
walked on,” Maddy says. “He was a
genius, so funny, any advice he had to
give me I would just take it so quickly.
So, two days later I quit my job and
went to clown school.”
At the same time Marina was
training at the Guildhall School of
Music and Drama in London, where
she played Hermia in A Midsummer
Night’s Dream and Rosalind in As You
Like It. “As much as I’d love to do a
Lady Macbeth, there are so many
other actresses who could smash that,”
she says. “I’d much rather be the weird
servant that comes in and has some
sort of odd twitch.”
At the end of term they would
compare approaches. At Guildhall
teachers were polite and in
consequence even mild criticism
would send Marina sobbing to the loo.
Maddy, consistently told, like her
fellow students, that her performance
was “dog shit”, emerged more robust.
Marina graduated last year and now
has to face Maddy’s critique of her
performances in films including How
to Talk to Girls at Parties (“the biggest
dud I have seen at this year’s Cannes”
— Variety), in which she played an
alien required to do something
unprintable to humans to clone herself.
So I presume Maddy saw this and
felt Marina’s career needed rescuing
and they formed Siblings.
“Yeah, she saw me f***ing someone
and went, ‘OK, we’ve got to do
something.’ ”
In fact, Maddy says, they had always
planned to work together, but did
nothing about it until two years ago at
the Edinburgh Fringe, where Maddy
was directing a play. On a whim, they
signed up for an open-mike comedy
cabaret armed only with “two party
poppers, a sausage and a cagoule”.
“What we realised doing that was,
actually, this is really fun,” Marina says.
Siblings, on their few outings, have
garnered generous reviews, but it is
not the sort of success that persuades
n
a sibling to quit her day job. Maddy
sstill does some PR and Marina
ssupports her acting career with
children’s parties and drama coaching.
They live together in a flat in Notting
Hill, stealing each other’s clothes,
Marina, happily, finding Maddy’s
comedian boyfriend amusing.
Maddy plays their agent and looks
after whatever they earn, but there is
no parental subsidy and they will be
sharing overpopulated accommodation
next month in Edinburgh. Oh well, I
say, maybe they will be spotted by
some executive up for the television
festival. They look excited. Sadly, I say,
such execs spend the time drinking.
At least they can be assured of two
enthusiastic audience members — but
are they not inhibited playing before a
director of French & Saunders and the
doyenne of alternative comedy?
“Really, really not inhibited with our
parents,” Marina assures me.
“We want to make them laugh,”
Maddy says.
“I mean,” her sibling explains, “I feel
like it all came from them.”
I really like you, you know.
Thanks. I enjoy our professional
interactions too.
No, but I mean I really, really
admire you and I don’t care who
knows it. I’m thinking of getting
your face printed on my handbag.
What? Excuse me while I make a
quick call to HR.
There’s no need to be like that —
I’m just following in the footsteps
of the ever-inspiring Meryl Streep,
who stepped out this week carrying
a tote bag printed with a photo of
Michelle and Barack Obama
superimposed on a backdrop of the
White House.
How bizarre. Is it a fashion trend?
I wouldn’t go that far. Nobody
seems to know the provenance of
this particular item, but it has long
been known that Streep is a fan of
the former president. In 2009 she
told Channel 4 News; “I love him —
I think he’s fantastic.”
Do you think he and Michelle are
deeply uncomfortable with this
public fandom?
Far from it, the feeling seems to
be mutual. In 2014 Obama told a
White House reporter: “I love
Meryl Streep. Her husband knows I
love her. Michelle knows I love her.
There’s nothing they can do about
it.” Michelle subsequently described
the actress as “delightful”.
How very cosy. So why the bag? Is
Streep getting into design?
No explanation has emerged, but I
assume it’s a political statement —
not so much a kind gesture to the
Obamas as a rude one to President
Trump, whom Streep criticised at
the Golden Globes earlier this year.
He must be horribly hurt.
He does seem a bit sensitive about
it. After the Globes, he tweeted that
she was “one of the most over-rated
actresses in Hollywood”.
I wouldn’t mind a Donald Trump bag.
Michael Kors does a lovely satchel
in orange leather.
Hattie Crisell
4
1GT
Monday July 17 2017 | the times
times2
From Arya to zombies: the
The fantasy drama Game of Thrones
has captured (and then ripped out)
our hearts. As the new series starts,
Eli Baigel sorts the dwarfs from the
dragons in our bloodthirsty guide
A
is for Arya
Arya Stark, played by Maisie
Williams, is the down-to-earth
younger daughter of Ned Stark. She
has become a favourite of fans because
of her confidence, denouncement of
traditional gender roles and consistent
bad-assery. Her prime possession is
her sword, Needle, given to her by
her half-brother, Jon Snow (Kit
Harington), whose first lesson
included some sound advice: “Stick
them with the pointy end.”
B
is for Bran’s defenestration
Game of Thrones made clear that
it would be merciless in the first
episode of the first season. Young Bran
Stark (Isaac Hempstead Wright) had
just caught Cersei Lannister (Lena
Headey) having sex with her twin
brother, Jaime (Nikolaj CosterWaldau), who responded by pushing
him out of the window of a castle
tower (Jaime did get nicer once he
lost his arm).
C
is for the crown that melts
Fans went wild when the revolting
Viserys (Harry Lloyd, the great-greatgreat-grandson of Charles Dickens),
brother of Daenerys Targaryen
(Emilia Clarke), was killed by having
molten gold poured on his head by
the hulking Khal Drogo (Jason
Momoa). Lloyd played the whiny brat
like a natural.
D
is for dwarf
Peter Dinklage is charm
personified as the impish Tyrion
Lannister, whose pithy wisecracks
sound almost Shakespearean. It’s easy
to tell that Tyrion is George RR
Martin’s (see G) favourite character as
he’s handed all the best lines. There’s
even a book called The Wit & Wisdom
of Tyrion Lannister. He has become
Daenarys’s right-hand “halfman”
after killing his own father, Tywin,
while he was on the loo (Tywin,
not Tyrion).
E
is for Emilia Clarke
As Daenerys Targaryen, the
Berkshire-reared actress has
inspired a generation of young
girls to ride dragons and
conquer continents.
F
is for fire
Flames have accompanied
some of the biggest scenes,
from Daenerys stepping naked
from a fire with three dragons by
her side, to Stannis Baratheon’s
fleet ransacked by green wildfire
at the Battle of the Blackwater, to
the witch Melisandre, horrifically,
sacrificing Stannis’s daughter on a
burning pyre.
G
is for George RR Martin
The 68-year-old is the
bearded mastermind nerd who
wrote the books on which the TV
show is based, but is now two books
behind the series. He recently said
that he plans to create five spin-off
shows — why can’t he just finish
the first one?
H
is for The Hound
Rory McCann plays Sandor
the times | Monday July 17 2017
5
1GT
times2
A-Z of Game of Thrones
waiting for the moment when
Daenerys rides a scaly steed into a
burning King’s Landing.
N
is for Ned Stark
The Lord of Winterfell was played
by Sean Bean, arguably the most
high-profile actor in the series. Then
he was unceremoniously executed on
the orders of Joffrey in the first season.
See, told you no one is safe.
Left: Daenerys
Targaryen (Emilia
Clarke), Jon Snow
(Kit Harington) and
Cersei Lannister
(Lena Headey).
Above: Drogon.
Below: Peter Dinklage
as Tyrion Lannister
Clegane, the brute with a heart (kind
of), who recently returned after being
presumed dead. The Hound is the
essence of why we love Game of
Thrones: grisly, animalistic yet petrified
of fire, after his older brother, Gregor,
aka The Mountain, forced his face into
the flames as a child.
I
is for Iceland
When Jon Snow ventures beyond
the Wall, we get some sweeping shots
of glaciers filmed in Iceland. The
country, which has had a subsequent
surge in tourism, is also home to the
6ft 9in Hafthor Julius Bjornsson, who
once came second in the world’s
strongest man competition, and who
plays the terrifying Mountain (see
Hound, above).
J
is for Joffrey Baratheon
The torture-loving sadist was the
secret son of Jaime and Cersei, an
excellent warning against the perils
of inbreeding. There were cheers all
round when the young king,
deliciously played by Jack Gleeson,
turned purple and died after being
poisoned on his wedding day.
K
is for Kit Harington
The Londoner shot to fame
through his role as Jon Snow, the
bastard of Ned Stark who became
commander of the Nights Watch,
then died, was resurrected and
is now apparently not Ned’s bastard
after all. No wonder he’s so moody
all the time.
L
is for Lena Headey
As played by Headey, Cersei
Lannister is the ultimate paradox:
contemptible, scheming and
appallingly evil, yet undeniably loving
towards her children. With all of the
latter dead, the new queen of the
seven kingdoms can now devote
her energy to being contemptible,
scheming and appallingly evil.
M
is for Mother of Dragons
Daenerys gave birth to three
dragons at the end of the first
season and they are thrown in
every few episodes to sate the fantasy
diehards. It’s been like a coming-of-age
film, watching them grow from
cute lizards to death-dealing
flame-throwers. We’re all desperately
Qi
s for queens
These aren’t your average
fairytale queens. Some are calculating,
some are evil; most are sleeping with
their brothers.
R
is for the Red Wedding
Edmure Tully and Roslin
Frey’s nuptials had it all — singing,
dancing and several main characters
slain in a flurry of blades and
crossbow bolts: Robb Stark, his
mother Catelyn, his wife Talisa and
their unborn baby. It remains
one of the show’s most notorious
and beloved scenes; people just can’t
seem to get enough of watching
characters they love die. One of the
few episodes not to feature music
while the credits roll — to let the
massacre truly sink in.
S
is for sexposition
The term was coined to describe
the liberal way in which the show uses
naked people in dialogue scenes, often
in the background (especially
Littlefinger’s brothel).
is for thespians
Game of Thrones has featured an
impressive list of British acting royalty,
including Jonathan Pryce, who played
the Jeremy Corbyn-like High Sparrow;
Diana Rigg, who plays the
marvellously machiavellian Olenna
Tyrell; and Charles Dance as the
wincingly ruthless Tywin Lannister.
is for undressing
See S for sexposition. Among
the members of the main cast to have
bared all in the show are Clarke,
Alfie Allen (Theon Greyjoy) and
Carice van Houten (Melisandre).
is for the Old Gods and the New
Whether it’s the Seven, the
Lord of Light or the Old Gods of the
Forest, no one really understands
the religious beliefs of people in
Westeros. We know this much, though
— some gods are old, some are new
and none is compassionate.
is for power
Everyone wants it, few have it and
most people die for it. The political
climate that surrounds Game of
Thrones makes the UK seem strong
and stable. Leaders come and go, and
not because they’re calling foolhardy
general elections. It’s more likely a
result of committing suicide
(Tommen), poisoning (Joffrey) or, that
classic, assassination by a shadow
demon (Renly).
T
U
O
P
ASSOCIATED PRESS; HBO
V
The new season of
Game of Thrones
starts today on Sky
Atlantic, 9pm
is for violence
A lot of people die in Game of
Thrones, but rarely from natural
causes. The body count is more
than 700 and causes have included
decapitation, eyeball-gouging,
dragonfire barbecues and being eaten
by your own dogs (Ramsay Bolton).
W
is for women
The show has been criticised for
its portrayal of women, especially for
two graphic rape scenes involving
Jaime and Cersei, and Ramsay
Bolton (Iwan Rheon) and Sansa Stark
(Sophie Turner). The women struck
back in season six, with Cersei and
Daenerys continuing their march
towards world domination and Sansa
inflicting grisly canine revenge on
Ramsay (see V).
X
is for Xaro Xhoan Daxos
Phew, we found an X! Oh come
on, you must remember him. That
slippery merchant from Qarth?
Y
is for Ygritte
Played by Rose Leslie, she was
the wildling who stole Snow’s heart
(and virginity) and gave us the
immortal line, “You know nothing, Jon
Snow.” Leslie and Harington met on
set and have been an item ever since.
Z
is for zombies
The icy, blue-eyed undead
from beyond the Wall have been a
lurking presence since the first
episode and yet we still don’t really
know what they want and why they’re
there. That should soon become
apparent as we enter the endgame —
after all, Martin’s title for the entire
series is A Song of Ice and Fire.
6
1GT
Monday July 17 2017 | the times
life
Ask Professor Tanya Byron
I had an abortion when I was 22. Now I’m
self-harming because I can’t have children
N
A year ago, when I was
22, I became pregnant
while I was in a less
than ideal long-term
relationship. My
boyfriend was very
controlling and I panicked, knowing
that I could never have a child with
him, and had an abortion.
I told him that I had miscarried.
He was furious and left me. Although
I was very upset for a while, I was
also relieved as I didn’t know how
I would have ended the relationship.
I was devastated about the abortion,
though. I have always wanted a large
family since I was a little girl.
Three months ago I was told that
I had cervical cancer and a month
later had to have a hysterectomy.
I waited to see if I had any other
options, but in the end I had to go
through with it.
I can’t come to terms with the fact
that I will never have a biological
child, that I threw my chance away
through my own stupidity and the
situation I had allowed myself to get
trapped in. I am fixated on the
abortion and feel so guilty. I have
started cutting my stomach,
something I used to do on my legs
when I was a teenager, and I’m
finding it almost impossible to go to
work or university. I have missed a
lot of time at both already.
I keep having dreams about giving
birth and living a life with many
children, and every morning feel
fresh grief. I’m also going through
the menopause at 23, which makes
me feel disgusting. My life is now
completely different from the one I
had imagined. I have been estranged
from my parents since they asked
me to leave home at 17 and, although
I have close friends, this somehow
doesn’t feel enough.
Zoe
Q
N
Your trauma and
despair are palpable.
However, the fact that
you have
ave written to
me illustrates
ustrates that you
want to find support.
I respect you for taking
ng this first step
towards recovery.
It is totally understandable
andable that you
feel unable to engage with life and
have resorted to old, but unhelpful,
coping strategies, including
uding self-harm.
You need and deserve support to
enable you to make sense
ense of what you
have been through.
You have suffered multiple
losses. An abusive relationship
ationship
left you feeling helpless,
ss,
trapped and controlled
d—a
loss of your self-efficacy.
cy. An
abortion was the loss of your
pregnancy. Cervical cancer
ancer
has resulted in the losss of
your reproductive ability
ity
and of the dream of
becoming a mother to your
own biological children.
n.
You are clearly
traumatised and in need
ed
of support, so I shall take
ake
you through the issuess
you are dealing with to
o
offer some clarity amid
d
the chaos.
I recommend a good
d
therapist who can help
p
you with your trauma
and to find coping
strategies to replace the
he
self-harm. Ask your GP
for a referral to the
NHS Improving Access
ss
to Psychological
Therapies programmee
(nhs.uk and type in
IAPT in the search
field), and contact
student support services
ces
at your university. Many
ny
A
charities and voluntary services can
also offer support.
You are clearly still traumatised by
the abortion. This lloss is now even
more severe as you see your
one chance you had
pregnancy as the o
to have a child. To find a way through
support from those that
this you need supp
(mariestopes.org.uk/
understand (maries
women/counselling).
women/counselling
You are also facing
facin childlessness
and
after your cancer diagnosis
d
and now the
hysterectomy — an
menopause, which can be challenging
but can feel brutal
for many women, b
young as you. I hope
to someone as youn
you are talking to your GP
and gy
gynaecologist,
because they can help
becau
you to manage the
physical and mental
physi
health symptoms you
heal
may be experiencing.
ma
The Hysterectomy
Th
Association
A
(hysterectomy(hy
association.org.uk),
ass
which offers
wh
one-to-one
o
ttelephone
ccounselling, can
offer extra support.
Your self-harm is
a coping strategy
that may offer
th
short-term relief, but
sh
brings longer-term
br
despair. Harming
de
your stomach highlights
grief and trauma of
the gri
abortion and
your abo
hysterectomy, and the anger
hysterect
and rage you feel about what
you have eexperienced and
yourself. I urge you to
towards you
engage with selfharm.co.uk,
signpost you to local
which can sig
support as well
wel as online
and resources that
information an
offer shared experiences, ways others
have found help, alternatives to selfharm and much more. Also look at
themix.org.uk and mind.org.uk.
I understand your feelings that
friends aren’t enough, which is why I
have recommended that you engage
with as many support and counselling
services as meet your needs. However,
close friends can be a bedrock in so
many ways — I do wonder if your
unhappiness and self-loathing have
pushed them away. Please reach out,
do not be ashamed, and allow others
to support you in your pain. More than
anything you need a hug, a change of
scene, a chat about other aspects of
life. Ask your friends to support you to
get into work and back to university as
you are a hard-working young woman
who has a future, even though that
feels unthinkable right now.
I don’t know the circumstances of
your estrangement from your family,
but perhaps, with support from close
friends, you could consider also
reaching out to them.
Your life feels as if it has stopped
because it is full of regret and lacks
purpose and meaning. Your fixation
on having children is understandable,
but with counselling and support you
will learn to understand that you could
fulfil this dream — there are many
women who are loving and devoted
mothers to children who are not their
biological offspring. To be that mother
you will need to focus on your
recovery so that you can offer the love
and nurturing that child will need.
Find that from those around you —
close friends and professionals — and
recognise that to love a child you first
need to find that love for yourself. You
deserve this. Please let me know how
you get on.
If you have a problem and would like
Professor Tanya Byron’s help, email
proftanyabyron@thetimes.co.uk
the times | Monday July 17 2017
7
1GT
life
GETTY IMAGES
How to win
any argument
(it’s all in the
mind games)
Anyone can learn to boost their powers
of persuasion, says Damian Whitworth
J
ay Heinrichs knows a thing
or two about arguing. He is
the American author of
Thank You for Arguing, a
book first published in the
US ten years ago that
became a bestseller taught in
colleges. He now uses the
principles of the ancient art of rhetoric
to advise organisations ranging from
Nasa to Wal-Mart.
There is one man, though, who he
concedes may be tricky to outwit.
President Trump’s tendency to deny
reality, present his own “alternative
facts”, or baldly state the opposite of
what appears to be the truth, makes
him an extremely challenging
opponent in a verbal joust.
But if you thought Donald Trump
was just displaying astonishing
chutzpah when he claimed that his
inauguration crowd was huge when
photographic evidence suggested it
wasn’t, he should not be dismissed as a
one-trick arguer.
According to Heinrichs, Trump’s
confrontations with the media (or the
“fake news media”) are in a long
tradition of disagreement. “It’s a clash
between two kinds of rhetoric.”
When an American newspaper
writes an editorial full of carefully
researched arguments against a
Trump policy it is practising
deliberative argument, one of the
three types of rhetorical persuasion
(the other two are demonstrative and
forensic rhetoric). “What Trump
practises is demonstrative rhetoric —
a way of defining who is good and who
is bad. I call that tribal rhetoric.”
He’s not the only one who does
this. “Look at the mayor of London
[Sadiq Khan] after the recent attacks.
He said, ‘This is what we are; who we
are’ — defining ourselves as a people.
Trump talks about ‘we are good, the
people south of the border are bad’.
Tribal rhetoric.”
All too often we use the word
argument almost as a synonym for
“fight”. “An argument, done skilfully,
gets people to want to do what you
want,” Heinrichs writes. “You fight to
win; you argue to achieve agreement.”
Issues you may argue about boil
down to three core categories: blame,
values or choice. “Who moved my
cheese?” is a blame issue. “Should
abortion be legal?” is a values issue.
“Should we build a new car factory in
Britain?” is an issue of choice.
Blame focuses on the past, values
are discussed in the present tense and
choice questions are about the future.
If you want to succeed in arguments,
you do best to cast them in the future.
Heinrichs has two grown-up
children. When they were younger
he was always explaining rhetoric to
them. One day he found the toothpaste
tube empty and yelled at his son,
George: “Who used all the
toothpaste?” Back came the sarcastic
answer: “That’s not the point, is it? The
point is how we’re going to keep this
from happening again.” George had
been listening to his dad about looking
to the future to resolve arguments.
Aristotle’s most powerful tools for
persuasion are: logos, argument by
logic; pathos, argument by emotion;
and ethos, argument by character.
The most powerful tool in the logos
Skilful argument
gets people to do
what you want
box is concession, in which you
cannily use your opponent’s argument
to your own advantage. If a colleague
says your work is unoriginal, you
agree: “Sure, in the sense that it’s
already been used successfully.”
The key pathos tactic is sympathy,
registering your concern for your
audience’s emotions and then
changing the mood.
Three essential qualities of a
persuasive ethos are seeming to care
about your audience’s interests; an
appearance of knowing the right thing
to do; and virtue, which here means
sharing your audience’s values.
Heinrichs contends that Trump has
impeccable virtue. “I am not sure that
anybody likes Trump, but most of his
followers trust him. They feel like he’s
the leader for them.”
Jeremy Corbyn also is a man of
ethos. Just look at the young people
cheering him at Glastonbury.
“They are cheering Jeremy Corbyn
representing their values,” Heinrichs
says. “He is fighting the good fight for
them. Whatever that fight is they don’t
seem all that well-informed about.
But that doesn’t matter.”
When it comes to speeches,
President Obama performed as if
he had been to rhetoric school.
He followed Cicero in the way he
organised his speeches. While he may
lack Obama’s craft, however, Trump
does one thing very well. He fills his
speeches with impromptu bursts of
soundbites that are repetitive and
build to punchlines.
Heinrichs found these bursts were
about 12 seconds, the same as the
climax of speeches in films such as
Braveheart. Ancient rhetoricians
believed that an audience could easily
absorb a thought in such a stretch of
time. “There’s ancient method to this
seeming madness,” he writes of
Trump’s oratory of nonsequiturs.
Heinrichs, 61, a former journalist
who turned his fascination with
ancient rhetoric into a book and then
a consulting business, worked with
Nasa to reframe its arguments for a
budget increase — “really, space is a
rapidly developing economy” —
and with a healthcare company to
encourage parents to vaccinate their
children (the word “protection” was
substituted for “vaccination”).
He is full of crafty tricks. When his
wife didn’t like the name George for
their son, he proposed names he
knew she really wouldn’t like until she
decided George wasn’t so bad after all.
What advice might he have for
Theresa May to help her to win the
arguments with the EU over Brexit?
“One of the biggest mistakes that
people make in the beginning of any
argument is that they haven’t set real
Tricks to
get your
own way
Argument by
character (ethos)
6 Make the other
person feel that you
share their values.
6 Use the tactical flaw
technique of revealing
a weakness that wins
sympathy.
6 If the argument is
going against you,
switch to the other
side and support it.
Argument by logic
(logos)
6 Concede a point that
will not irreparably
damage your case.
6 Use the future tense,
for example: “You may
think me a jerk, but
let’s work out a way to
get along.”
Argument by
emotion (pathos)
6 Humour ranks
above other emotions
in persuasiveness
because it calms
people down.
6 Read the emotions
of the other person.
The most important
tactic is sympathy.
goals, so square one is setting a goal
that she and her party can agree on.
Is it hard or soft Brexit?
“How to then negotiate? The only
strategy she has is to ask: what is
advantageous to the audience? She
has to go to the EU and say, ‘I
understand what you want, here is
how we will deliver for you.’ If she
goes in saying, ‘I’m going to be a
bulldog,’ then the EU will say, ‘What
on earth do we want with a bulldog?’ ”
That sounds fairly unpromising, but
perhaps Heinrichs can help with my
concerns, namely how to persuade my
13-year-old son to detach himself from
his screens and head to bed. I explain
that I have already tried all logical
arguments about the need for sleep.
“Those arguments are never
effective,” Heinrichs says. “It has to
speak to his identity. So if there is
a choice it could be: what’s more
important, the screen or staying up?
Say he can stay up and read a book.”
If that doesn’t work, he suggests the
high-risk option. I can tell my son:
“Make your schedule, but it has to be a
schedule that ends up with you going
to a fine university after school.”
I can see the logic, but also the very
large pitfalls. So that evening I offer
him the choice. He takes the third way,
and goes straight to bed, telling me on
the way: “You’re ridiculous.”
Remembering my training in
rhetoric I immediately offer a
concession. “I know, I am ridiculous!”
He looks at me as if I am also mad.
Thank You for Arguing: What Cicero,
Shakespeare and the Simpsons Can
Teach Us about the Art of Persuasion
by Jay Heinrichs is published by
Penguin, £9.99
8
1GT
Monday July 17 2017 | the times
arts
One is rad. Why
Charles is down
with the Cornish
surfer scene
As Poundbury turns 30, Nansledan, the Prince of
Wales’s new village at Newquay, is making waves with
a younger generation. Clive Aslet takes a look round
T
his year the Prince of
Wales’s model
development of
Poundbury in Dorset
has been in the news
on account of its
30th birthday. What
few people outside
Cornwall know is that for the past few
years he has been quietly at work on
another scheme, beside the surfers’
paradise of Newquay.
Poundbury may irk some people
because of what they denigrate as the
Postman Pat style of the architecture,
which combines traditional streets
with formal spaces on which stand
classical buildings. However, there’s no
denying the influence that the prince’s
ideas have had on the planning
system when it comes to mixed-use
neighbourhoods, in which the car is
subservient to the pedestrian. They
were radical in the 1980s. Nansledan,
as the Cornish development is known,
takes them a step farther. They’re still
radical — and popular, especially
(would you believe it?) with the young.
Popularity in new housing is a rare
Right: Nansledan in
quality — with those who move into
Cornwall and, far right,
new developments and those who find
the Prince of Wales
them built on their doorsteps — yet
it’s essential, the prince believes, if
we’re to overcome the nimbyism that
obstructs new housing.
The Grenfell Tower tragedy has
thrown the spotlight on to affordable
accommodation. The obvious
difference between the haves and
have-nots in Kensington and Chelsea
has stirred fury. In Nansledan 30 per
cent of the housing is affordable.
Low-cost rented homes are scattered
Padstow
10 miles
among the more expensive
owner-occupied ones — a new
Newquay
three-bedroom terrace house is
on sale for £252,500 — with no
Nansledan
visible difference between them.
CORNWALL
It’s a far cry from the London
St Ives
developers who put affordable
housing in less desirable areas,
The
or manage to wriggle out of it
Penzance
Channel
altogether.
“How society chooses to house
people is every bit as important as
how it chooses to feed people,” says
Tim Gray, the Duchy of Cornwall’s
estate surveyor and chief of operations
at Nansledan, echoing the prince’s
views. “If you can get those two things
right, you will be happier, healthier
and better able to engage socially. At
Nansledan the ambition is to build
community and engender civic
pride, to live so that you can meet
your daily needs conveniently on
foot, not to differentiate between
homes of different tenures, and
to be connected socially with
the adjacent settlements — this
should provide good foundations
for deciding how the nation should
build homes in the future. There really
is an alternative.”
We know that the prince visited
Nansledan on July 16, 2014 because
there’s a plaque that says so. He
returns this month, as he does every
year. This has been causing the
architect Hugh Petter’s heart to beat
a little faster. A partner in Adam
Architecture, Petter is the master
planner of Nansledan and this year he
has the job of showing the prince an
art deco seahorse that has been fixed
to a building called Chi Morvargh
(Cornish for Seahorse Building) as one
of the project’s decorative flourishes.
In truth, though, Petter knows
that this detail, as with everything
at Nansledan, has been personally
approved by the boss (as they call
the times | Monday July 17 2017
9
1GT
arts
CHRIS SAVILLE PHOTOGRAPHY; REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
young families you see on the streets,
they seem to like Nansledan. “About
80 per cent of Tregunnel Hill [the trial
development that preceded the larger
Nansledan] are local. At Nansledan,
it’s two thirds,” Gray says. “Though we
want to attract some young people
from up country because they bring
new ideas.”
Like California, Cornwall is lifestylefocused, with a greater openness to the
green agenda than some metropolitan
areas. So they don’t find anything odd
about the prince’s much-lampooned
“holistic” approach; on the contrary,
they seem to love it. Let those who
Every detail has
been approved by
the boss, as the
Prince is known
him), who insists on seeing each
drawing, sample and idea at Clarence
House. No detail escapes his attention.
He takes a close interest in the paint
colours, for example, which are bright
and cheerful in a Cornish seaside-y
sort of way — which could be a bit
strong for some tastes. “Make them
bolder,” the prince says.
Art deco and jaunty colours can be
found in almost any holiday resort
hereabouts. They are local — and this
is a theme. Look at the street names:
Gwarak Agravayn, Bownder Marhaus
and Stret Morgan Le Fay . . . all of them
are Cornish. To get them right, the
Nansledan team have been working
with Maga, the Cornish Language
Partnership. They reflect local field
names, as well as tales of Arthurian
romance (Tintagel, where King Arthur
was supposedly conceived, is 30 miles
away). Nansledan is itself a Cornish
word meaning “broad valley”.
Roofs are made from Cornish slate
from a nearby quarry that has been
given a new lease of life. The quarry
provides jobs, and so do the
builders responsible for the
work — all firms from the
southwest and well known
to the Duchy, whose work
not only requires local
labour, but also helps to
establish local supply
chains. They form what
Gray calls a “consortium”
with the Duchy, a
method that ensures the
architecture is practical
and appropriate for
the local market,
while remaining
“HRH-friendly”.
Where Poundbury,
outside the affluent
county town of Dorchester,
attracts more than its share
of retirees, Newquay has a
quite different demographic. It’s
poor and homes are particularly
needed by young people — and to
judge from the number of people in
their twenties and thirties and
wish to mock the edible gardens (herbs
and fruit bushes are planted next to
houses), espaliered pear trees and bee
bricks (bricks with holes that are laid
into the eaves of houses to welcome
threatened bee populations) do so, but
they go down well in Nansledan. Plus,
they’re all part of the philosophy — as
well as local style, local materials and
local employment . . . local food.
This is symbolised by the
community orchard. Next to it, the
Duchy has given seven acres of
land that has been
energetically turned into
allotments. “Trespassers will
be composted” reads one of
the signs that personalise it.
Orchard and allotments are
only the visible signs of the
local food web that is being
encouraged. Something
approaching a quarter of
Britain’s greenhouse gas
emissions are produced by the
food industry, so anything
that can be done to reduce
food miles — and to educate
children about healthy eating
— must be good. At
Nansledan, however, the
community orchard and
allotments fulfil another
function: placed on the edge
of the development, they’re
somewhere that people from
Nansledan meet long-time
Newquay residents.
Nansledan is sometimes
called Poundbury-on-Sea, but
people who use the expression
(often pejoratively) haven’t
noticed the differences between the
two. Poundbury was the trailblazer.
With so much to prove about the
validity of traditional architecture,
it can seem a little self-conscious.
Nansledan and Tregunnel Hill are
calmer. Designed by Petter, with the
architect and interior designer Ben
Pentreath, the houses and small
apartment blocks are less fussy. A
particularly prominent building may
be given extra emphasis, by means of
a classical porch or slate-hung façade,
but the feel generally is much more
understated than the frenetic
Poundbury. Besides, whereas
Poundbury is flat, Nansledan has
more ups and downs; the topography
lends a natural variety.
On the 500 or so acres that
comprise Nansledan and Tregunnel
Hill, the Duchy will build more than
4,000 homes. (Or rather, its builder/
developers will: the Duchy sells them
the land before construction.) Buyers
are prepared to pay a premium over
equivalent new homes elsewhere —
experts calculate this at 18 per cent.
That’s hardly surprising, given that
Nansledan has so much more to offer
than a standard housing estate, whose
developer moves on as soon as it has
built and sold the properties.
The Duchy of Cornwall takes the
long view. It won’t hurry the pace; only
about 100 houses come on to the
market in any year. No faster rate is
possible because of the limited supply
of the building skills involved. As a
result, it will take decades for the
whole site to be built out — a
timescale that is inconceivable to
volume housebuilders such as
Persimmon. This, however, is central
to the Duchy model. While it invests
heavily in the early years, it knows —
because Poundbury has confirmed this
— that the value of its land will go up,
and it will more than recoup the initial
expenditure through later sales. The
key is that it already owns the land.
The whole problem of Britain’s
housing industry is land. So little
of it is available for building that
developers fight to get hold of
whatever they can, at whatever
price. There’s little money left for
place-making. The prince’s model isn’t
right everywhere, but it is already
appealing to other estates, such as
Burghley and Blenheim. It could work
for local authorities, pension funds
and other bodies that own land. If that
happened, future historians wouldn’t
look back on Nansledan as the Prince
of Wales’s seaside caprice (in the
spirit of an earlier Prince of Wales’s
Brighton Pavilion), but as the
beginning of a movement that made
Britain better to live in.
10
1GT
Monday July 17 2017 | the times
television & radio
This Spanish amnesia drama is one to remember
BBC/FILMAX INTERNATIONAL
Andrew
Billen
TV review
I Know Who You Are
BBC Four
{{{{(
Imagine: Chris Ofili —
The Caged Bird’s Song
BBC Two
{{{((
S
aturday’s new foreign serial,
I Know Who You Are,
started with television drama’s
worst premise: amnesia —
a condition, real or feigned,
that has been a lazy staple of
mass-produced TV drama from
Doctor Finlay’s Casebook to Mrs
Bauer’s forgetful interlude in the first
series of 24. This Spanish thriller —
psychological thriller would be fair —
opens with a man with a bloodied
head wandering down a road and
Radio Choice
Catherine Nixey
Fall Down Seven
Times, Get Up Eight
Radio 4, 9.45am
The author Naoki
Higashida has severe nonverbal autism. He is a man
who struggles so profoundly
with language that, as David
Mitchell, his translator,
explains, he has learnt to
communicate by typing out
responses on an alphabet
grid: a standard qwerty
keyboard layout drawn on a
piece of card. And yet this
“non-verbal” man writes
with the purity of a poet;
sentences so lovely, so
thoughtful, so vivid that
they take your breath away.
The Music Shop
Radio 4, 10.45pm
Rachel Joyce’s two previous
novels were titled The
Unlikely Pilgrimage of
Harold Fry and The Love
Song of Miss Queenie
Hennessy. This, then, is not
a woman afraid of whimsy.
And indeed, in this first
episode of the adaptation
of her new novel, we meet
a record shop that contains
a Father Anthony who is
making an origami flower,
and a man who insists on
listening only to Chopin
whose life is transformed
when he hears Aretha
Franklin. But if you don’t
mind whimsy, this has some
lovely moments.
entering a petrol station claiming not
to know who he is. He looks blankly at
his reflection in the chiller cabinet —
but, to be honest, which of us hasn’t?
Yet I Know Who You Are, while
fast-moving and glossy, imbues the
trope with thoughtfulness. It turns
“I know who you are” into a very
menacing sentence. If Juan Elias, the
“prominent” lawyer who may or may
not have killed his niece in the back
of his car, is telling the truth about
his amnesia, then he is embarking on
a terrifying journey that begins with
an introduction to his wife (bad news:
not just a scold, but the only plain
woman to have got through the sexist
casting process) and may end with
him discovering he is murderer. If
he is lying, on other hand, then it is
his wife, Alicia, who is oblivious to her
husband’s character.
One of Elias’s “discoveries”, in
Saturday’s second episode, is that the
couple had a disabled third child shut
away in a home. He expresses, or
affects, moral revulsion at this, but,
more interestingly, their parental
neglect suggests that forgetting can be
a conscious choice. The only person
Elias admits to recalling is young Eva,
now a lawyer, but once a law student
with whom he had an affair. If he is
telling the truth, this reminds us that,
conversely, remembering may be
unhelpfully involuntary. In an unlikely
courtroom scene, he interrogates Eva
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.33am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 Greg James
5.45 Newsbeat 6.00 Greg James 7.00 Annie
Mac 9.00 Radio 1’s Specialist Chart with Phil
Taggart 10.02 Huw Stephens 1.00am
Friction 4.00 Adele Roberts
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce. With
the country music star Keith Urban 12.00
Jeremy Vine 2.00pm Steve Wright 5.00
Simon Mayo 7.00 Paul Jones 8.00 Jo Whiley
10.00 Bruno Tonioli at the Opera.
Championing music by Puccini, Verdi and
Mascagni 11.00 The Russell Davies Archive.
Revisiting classic musical masterpieces from
the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s 12.00 Johnnie
Walker’s Sounds of the 70s (r) 2.00am
Radio 2’s Jazz Playlist 3.00 Radio 2 Playlist:
Great British Songbook 4.00 Radio 2 Playlist:
Hidden Treasures 5.00 Vanessa Feltz
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Music, news and the occasional surprise,
presented by Petroc Trelawny. Including
7.00, 8.00 News
9.00 Essential Classics
Sarah Walker’s guest this week is the
architect and broadcaster Maxwell
Hutchinson, who talks about his career and
shares some of his favourite classical music
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Haydn (1732-1809)
Donald Macleod presents the first a week
of programmes focusing on Haydn’s often
overlooked — yet beguiling — piano
sonatas, which spanned virtually his entire
composing life. He begins in the late-1760s,
with Haydn engaged at the court of Prince
Eszterhazy, deep in the Hungarian
countryside — a place the composer gloomily
dubbed “my desert”. Benchmark sonatas
recordings by John McCabe and Carole Cerasi
are joined by a thrilling — and rather unusual
— virtuoso reading by the Bulgarian-born
pianist Alexis Weissenberg. Haydn (Sonata
No 11 in B flat, Hob.XVI:2 — 1st mvt;
Sonata No 30 in D, Hob.XVI:19; “Caro
Volpino” — Lo Speziale — Act 1, Sc 7; “A’
fatti tuoi” — Lo Speziale — Act 2, Sc 6; and
Sonata No 33 in C minor, Hob.XVI:20)
1.00pm News
Francesc Garrido, left, as Juan Elias in I Know Who You Are
1.02 Live BBC Proms 2017:
Proms at Cadogan Hall
Petroc Trelawny presents a live recital in
which Robert Hollingworth directs vocal
ensemble I Fagiolini. Monteverdi (Cruda
Amarilli; Sfogava con le stelle; Longe da te,
cor mio; Possente spirto — from Orfeo;
Chiome d’oro; and Vorrei baciarti, o Filli);
Roderick Williams (Là ci darem la mano
— BBC commission: world premiere); and
Monteverdi (Laudate pueri Dominum a 5
— concertato; and Volgendo il ciel per
l’immortal sentiero)
2.00 Afternoon on 3
Clemency Burton-Hill and Petroc Trelawny
introduce another chance to hear Friday’s
opening concert of the Proms from the Royal
Albert Hall, London. The BBC Symphony
Orchestra, Igor Levit, Chorus and Proms
Youth Choir, under the conductor Edward
Gardner, perform Tom Coult (St John’s Dance
— BBC commission: world premiere);
Beethoven (Piano Concerto No 3 in C minor);
and John Adams (Harmonium) (r)
4.30 In Tune
Suzy Klein’s guests include Bojan Cicic with
the Illyria Consort before they perform at
Paxton House, and Joshua Weilerstein before
his debut conducting at the Proms
6.30 Composer of the Week:
Haydn (1732-1809) (r)
7.30 Live BBC Proms 2017
Sara Mohr-Pietsch presents live from
London’s Royal Albert Hall as Thomas
Sondergard conducts the BBC National
Orchestra of Wales, with the pianist Behzod
Abduraimov. Sibelius (Symphony No 7);
Rachmaninov (Piano Concerto No 2);
and Shostakovich (Symphony No 10)
10.15 Vladimir Ashkenazy on Ansel
Adams: the Print and the Performance
Vladimir Ashkenazy travels to the California
home of the acclaimed photographer Ansel
Adams to reveal how classical music inspired
and informed his friend’s art. Meeting the
photographer’s friends, family and former
colleagues, Ashkenazy hears how Adams
effectively ‘“composed” his images,
drawing on his musical background
when developing his prints (r)
11.00 Jazz Now
Soweto Kinch introduces a concert by the
Chicago-Based cellist Tomeka Reid’s quartet,
which features the guitarist Mary Halvorson,
the bassist Jason Roebke and Tomas Fujiwara
on drums. They play music from last year’s
eponymous album on the Thirsty Ear label,
including compositions by Reid, but also work
by the legendary reed player Eric Dolphy
12.30am Through the Night
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30am News Briefing
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day
6.00 Today
With John Humphrys and Justin Webb
9.00 Bringing Up Britain
Discussions on parenting (2/3)
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Book of the Week: Fall Down
Seven Times, Get Up Eight
By Naoki Higashida. The author offers an
insight into autism from his perspective as
a young adult. See Radio Choice (1/5)
10.00 Woman’s Hour
Discussion and interviews with Jane Garvey.
Including at 10.45 Drama: Assata Shakur
— The FBI’s Most Wanted Woman (1/5)
10.30-6.45pm (LW) Test Match Special
England v South Africa. Commentary
on the fourth day of the second Test,
which takes place at Trent Bridge
11.00 The Untold
Stories of 21st-century Britain (12/17)
11.30 Sisters
Fiona and Susan go on a road trip with their
mother, who is on day release from prison.
Comedy starring Susan Calman (3/4)
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 The Why Factor
The history of kissing (1/5)
12.15 You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
1.45 Cold War: Stories
from the Big Freeze
Stories of when nuclear weapons arrived at
US bases in English villages (11/15)
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: Human Resources
By Piers Black-Hawkins. Pharmaceutical
telemarketer Dylan’s world is turned on its
head when he receives a call from a girl
screaming for help. Mathew Baynton stars
3.00 Counterpoint
Contestants from Liverpool and Hull compete
for a place in the semi-finals (3/13)
3.30 The Food Programme
Sandor Katz and the Art of Fermentation (r)
4.00 Public Indecency:
Queer Art in Britain
Simon Callow explores LGBT life in Britain
through the lens of the arts (1/3)
4.30 The Infinite Monkey Cage
The life and death properties of oxygen (3/6)
5.00 PM
With Eddie Mair
5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast
about what kind of man she fell in
love with and, when she refuses to tell
him, tells a whopping great lie that
shakes our confidence in him.
How we love these BBC Four
serials, with their expensive interiors,
glamorous actors, tolerant attitude
to nudity and expansiveness (ten
episodes this one). Whether the
atmosphere is Scandinavia’s ice and
self-restraint or Spain’s heat and
intemperance, we Brits see ourselves
in them, but refracted by distance, just
as those old British movies on Talking
Pictures TV do by time. By comparison,
they help us to know who we are.
It took the artist Chris Ofili and his
Edinburgh master-weavers three years
to complete his new tapestry in the
National Gallery. Saturday’s Imagine:
Chris Ofili — The Caged Bird’s Song
was so leisurely it sometimes felt as
if we were watching the process in
real time. There were some thoughts
to catch — that tapestries were
northern Europe’s answer to the
south’s frescoes, such a boast of wealth
and taste that Henry VIII had three
miles of them — but much of the
programme lolled about in the
paradox of water being represented
by thread. This film was in closely
woven praise of Ofili. With the trend
against art criticism on the BBC now
rampant, I suppose it was for us to
decide whether to unpick it.
andrew.billen@thetimes.co.uk
6.00 Six O’Clock News
6.30 I’m Sorry I Haven’t a Clue
A second edition from the Victoria Theatre
in Halifax, West Yorkshire (4/6)
6.45 (LW) I’m Sorry I Haven’t a Clue
From the Victoria Theatre in Halifax (4/6)
7.00 The Archers
Matt is keen to impress
7.15 Front Row
Arts programme
7.45 Assata Shakur:
The FBI’s Most Wanted Woman
Dramatised by Debbie Tucker Green (1/5) (r)
8.00 Guns and Coders
Al Letson examines resistance in the
US to hi-tech childproof guns
8.30 Analysis
An extended interview with the political
theorist Yascha Mounk, who argues that
liberal democracy is in grave danger (8/9)
9.00 Natural Histories
Brett Westwood investigates the song and
folklore of the blackbird (6/25) (r)
9.30 Bringing Up Britain
Discussions on parenting (2/3) (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
With Chris Mason
10.45 Book at Bedtime:
The Music Shop
By Rachel Joyce. A mysterious woman faints
outside a record shop and changes the life of
the store’s owner. See Radio Choice (1/10)
11.00 Mark Watson’s Inner Child
The comedian examines why so many adults
are playing children’s games (r)
11.30 Today in Parliament
Political news presented by Sean Curran
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Book of the Week: Fall Down
Seven Times, Get Up Eight (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
Radio 4 Extra
Digital only
8.00am The Burkiss Way 8.30 Dad’s Army
9.00 The Write Stuff 9.30 North East of
Eden 10.00 Sense and Sensibility 11.00 Five
Stories by Rose Tremain 11.15 Philip and
Sydney 12.00 The Burkiss Way 12.30pm
Dad’s Army 1.00 The Manual of Detection
1.30 The Brixmis Story 2.00 Billy Liar 2.15
Plants: From Roots to Riches 2.30 What
Would Elizabeth Bennet Do? 2.45 Mrs
Robinson’s Disgrace 3.00 Sense and
Sensibility 4.00 The Write Stuff 4.30
North East of Eden 5.00 On the Rocks 5.30
I’m Sorry I Haven’t a Clue 6.00 Paradise
Lost in Cyberspace 6.30 A Good Read (r)
7.00 The Burkiss Way. Comedy sketches
7.30 Dad’s Army. Comedy with Arthur Lowe
8.00 The Manual of Detection. By Jedediah
Berry. Read by Toby Jones 8.30 The Brixmis
Story. The story of the British intelligence
officers 9.00 Five Stories by Rose Tremain.
Peerless. Read by Oliver Ford Davies 9.15
Philip and Sydney. By Alan Pollock 10.00
Comedy Club: I’m Sorry I Haven’t a Clue.
From the Victoria Theatre in Halifax, West
Yorkshire 10.30 The Consultants. Comedy
sketches 11.00 Dead Ringers. Comedy
impressions 11.30 A Look Back at the Future
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 5 Live Daily
with Adrian Chiles 1.00pm Afternoon
Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Track
and Field. The World Para Athletics
Championships 10.00 5 Live Sport: 5 Live
Cycling 10.30 Phil Williams 1.00am Up All
Night 5.00 Reports 5.15 Wake Up to Money
Talksport
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
with Ray Parlour 10.00 Jim White 1.00pm
Hawksbee and Jacobs 4.00 Adrian Durham
and Darren Gough 7.00 Kick-off 10.00
Sports Bar 1.00am The Two Mikes 4.00
My Sporting Life 5.00 Geoff Peters
6 Music
Digital only
7.00am Shaun Keaveny. With Phil Wang
10.00 Nemone 1.00pm Stuart Maconie
4.00 Steve Lamacq 7.00 Marc Riley 9.00
Gideon Coe 12.00 6 Music Recommends
1.00am The Davies Diaries 2.00 The Great
Bleep Forward 2.30 6 Music Live Hour 3.30
6 Music’s Jukebox 5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall 5.00
Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00
The Full Works Concert. Jane Jones presents
Verbier Festival highlights from across the
years. Beethoven (Symphony No.5 in C
minor); Bruch (Kol Nidrei — Arranged for
cello and string orchestra); Chopin (Piano
Concerto No.2 in F minor); Shostakovich
(Five Pieces for Two Violins and Piano);
Berlioz (Hungarian March); and JS Bach
(Cantata No.82 — “Ich Habe Genug”)
10.00 Smooth Classics 1.00am Sam Pittis
the times | Monday July 17 2017
11
1GT
MATTHEW WILLIAMS-ELLIS
Pop
Lovebox
Victoria Park, E3
artsfirst night
Proms 1 and 2
Berlin/Barenboim
{{{{{
N
{{{{(
BBCSO/Gardner
ow 15 years old, Lovebox is
showing no signs of fatigue.
In fact, the city festival
with a rural feel — only
the tops of tower blocks
poking above the trees give the game
away — has grown hipper in the face
of fierce competition.
This year’s two days boasted rather
different bills — Friday was aimed at
R&B and grime fans, Saturday at a
more commercial dance crowd.
Friday’s bill was the bolder, with all
eyes on Beyoncé’s leftfield little sister,
Solange, and hard-to-pin-down
headliner Frank Ocean, who has
cancelled a string of dates of late.
In fact, it was Solange who was
almost a no-show. Midway through a
seductive, vocals-led set that included
bare-chested men on brass and fun
choreography indebted to Prince
(formation moves and hair flung back
and forth), Solange confessed that she
had spent three days in hospital and
had been warned not to perform. If
she was under par, she didn’t show it,
switching from sultry, jazzy chanteuse
to hip-swivelling dancefloor diva with
ease, and praising her “black and
brown” fans for their support. The
only shame was the size of her tent —
half of the crowd had to stand outside,
where the sound was shocking.
Ocean infuriated some before he
had even appeared by insisting all
other stages were shut down during
his set, which began 25 minutes late.
Those who had hoped to party were
out of luck. Performing at the end of
a moodily lit walkway into the crowd,
initially to only minimal droning
organ, later alongside a pair of seated
guitarists, his supper club set was
heavy on atmosphere, but short on
opportunities to sing along.
In a seated venue it would have
been spectacular. In a field it fell flat.
A trio of tracks from last year’s Blonde
album were mesmerising, but so
low-key you had to concentrate to feel
their impact. After half an hour, many
had tired of mumbled lyrics and
fragile falsetto and headed for the exit.
Ocean must have noticed. “Sorry
if I’m not engaging perfectly,” he said.
“I haven’t done this in a while. I’m just
trying to figure it out.” His set picked
up with a singalong Thinkin Bout You
and a jubilant Nikes, but it was too
little too late.
Lisa Verrico
I
Theatre
A Tale of Two Cities
Regent’s Park Open Air
A
{((((
s Dickens would never
have written: “It was the
most mediocre of times.”
But then he didn’t see this
new play by Matthew
Dunster, whose desperation to make
this sweeping novel relevant to our
times has reduced it to something
that is hard to follow. You can hear
the thud all the way to Paris.
Dunster writes in the programme
about what motivated him to adapt
this novel written in 1859 to show the
unfairness of the French Revolution
{{{{(
Royal Albert Hall
and rational values, the “real” world
but a memory.
The imaginative staging makes the
most of simple means, letting the
marvellous score — filled with magic
flutes, silvery bells, resplendent
trumpets — do the work.
Puppeteers become moons, stars,
woodland creatures. Red and blue
torches depict the fire and flood that
Tamino and Pamina must overcome to
become part of the brotherhood.
Julian Hubbard is a noble, full-blooded
prince, although he doesn’t always
sound at ease. As Pamina, Beate
Mordal is beautifully poised, her Ach,
Ich fühl’s sung with muted melancholy.
Dialogue is in colloquial English, but
do we really need Papageno’s jarring
references to the EU, Tripadvisor and
cab sav? That said, Grant Doyle is an
appealing bird-catcher, his duet with
Sarah Gilford’s bubbly Papagena
deliciously flirtatious.
Hannah Dahlenburg’s Queen of
the Night has all the impressive
high notes, although lacks vengeful
rage, while Jihoon Kim is a suitably
wise Sarastro.
A polished Katherine Crompton
leads the Three Ladies, and Colin
Judson is a creepy Monostatos. The
happy-ever-after is hailed with golden
glitter and glorious voices united.
Box office: 01451 830292,
in rep to Saturday
s this going to be a Proms season
of political encores? At the first
night on Friday Igor Levit followed
a gorgeously gentle performance of
Beethoven’s Third Piano Concerto
with Beethoven’s Ode to Joy in Liszt’s
transcription. You didn’t need a degree
in cryptography to decipher that
gesture. Levit is well known for his
anti-Brexit rants and the Ode to Joy is
the European Union’s anthem.
More intriguing was the cheeky
encore that ended Saturday’s Prom
from Daniel Barenboim and his
magnificent Berlin Staatskapelle
orchestra. It was Land of Hope and
Glory. What on earth did they mean
by that? A sardonic salute to Britain as
we cast ourselves adrift? Or a genuine
gesture of affection?
One thing’s certain. In any Pomp
and Circumstance penalty shootout,
the Germans would win hands down.
I’ve never heard Elgar’s great march
played with such fierce virtuosity.
Yet it didn’t eclipse what came
earlier in the concert: a nuanced,
perfectly balanced and thrillingly
paced performance of Elgar’s First
Symphony. To hear a non-British
orchestra playing Elgar at all is still
rare. To experience this complex and
many-layered masterpiece delivered
with such beauty of tone, passion and
tenderness made the heart leap.
Earlier, the Berliners had provided
the most delicate of accompaniments
to Lisa Batiashvili in Sibelius’s Violin
Concerto. They needed to be delicate.
Batiashvili floated like a phantom
through the piece, dazzling with
precise articulation and subtle ideas,
but not projecting enough tone. It
probably sounded superb on radio.
In Friday’s opening Prom the
Beethoven concerto was sandwiched
between two contemporary pieces: a
five-minute sizzler called St John’s
Dance from the young London-born
composer Tom Coult, which was
frenetic and compelling, and the
choral epic Harmonium, written in 1981
by John Adams. The latter, American
minimalism on a maximal scale,
proved a thrilling curtain-raiser to the
new season, with excellent singing
from massed BBC choirs and the BBC
Symphony Orchestra in fine form
under Edward Gardner.
Richard Morrison
o
of times but none of that, or the
predictable violence, is the core
p
problem. It’s much more basic: the
p
first half is, mostly, incomprehensible.
Characters wear both modern and
18th-century dress. There are tiny
TVs flanking the stage with
black-and-white news montages
(including, of course, Trump). There
is slow-motion dancing. The brutal
set, by Fly Davis, consists of three
giant lorry containers, one stacked
on top of the other two. The
doors swing open to reveal
sometimes refugees in
tracksuits,
and other times
t
aristos sporting elaborate
Marie
Antoinette hairdos, with
M
extravagant
cakes.
e
Where is the flow? The
passion?
The engagement?
p
Dickens was a master of detail and
plot but that is lost here. Instead, it
feels like a lecture with break-out
acting scenes. The director, Timothy
Sheader, needed to force a narrative
on to this that worked and, at
2 hours and 45 minutes, it is too
long. Weirdly, truly dramatic scenes,
such as the storming of the Bastille,
are rather tame.
The acting, particularly Jude
Owusu as toff turned nice guy Charles
Darnay, is good and the second half
did engage more than the first. But
two halves don’t make a whole here.
It’s not so much let them eat cake as
let them eat Calais. I think I’ll pass.
Ann Treneman
Box office: 0844 8264242, until
August 5. This review ran in some
editions on Saturday
Sioned Gwen Davies, Carolyn Dobbin, Julian Hubbard and Katherine Crompton in The Magic Flute
A glorious, glittery flute
A production
of Mozart’s
singspiel
sparks the
imagination of
Rebecca Franks
Opera
The Magic Flute
Longborough
Festival Opera,
Gloucestershire
{{{{(
D
own the rabbit hole into
Wonderland. Through the
wardrobe to Narnia. Now
you can add to these fabled,
magical lands those of The
Magic Flute. For their charming new
production for Longborough Festival
Opera, Thomas Guthrie and Ruth
Paton take a leaf out of classic
children’s books to send us tumbling
into a fantastical world. “Where am I?”
asks Papageno, then Tamino. Dreams
and reality blur, puppets and people
intermingle. As the orchestra’s elfin
strings scurry in the overture, a
fairytale comes to life.
The production opens with a child
reading in bed. A pencil-sketch
backdrop depicts the elegant,
geometric patterns of a formal Age
of Enlightenment garden.
Are you sitting comfortably, we
seem to be asked, underscored
by the communicative, supple
orchestral sound superbly conjured
by Anthony Negus.
Let’s begin: “Chapter 1. Into the
Forest” (the first of several too
fleetingly displayed signs). Our
curiosity and wonder are immediately
aroused, an ideal approach to the
twists, trials and tricky tonal shifts —
from earthy humour to moral
didacticism — of Mozart’s singspiel.
We’re soon immersed in the story,
with its masonic symbolism
in 1789. “We recognise versions of
these injustices still played out in our
present, and that’s shocking,” he says.
His desire to make this leap, from the
French Revolution to the Syrian
refugee crisis, makes the whole thing
a bit of an ordeal.
There has been a mini hoo-ha
about this production because there
is some swearing and, during the
previews, there was a scene with
a prostitute involving the removal
of some knickers.
By press night, the knickers stayed
on. So no sex, and the swearing had
been minimalised, but what remains
jars. Here’s Defarge, the Paris wine
merchant, after a child is run over by
a golden chariot: “It’s better for the
poor little thing to die than to live this
f***ing life.” So it was also the cursed
Nicholas
Karimi as
Sydney
Carton
12
Monday July 17 2017 | the times
1GT
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Chris Bennion
Nadiya’s British
Food Adventure
BBC Two, 8.30pm
How quickly
can someone
become a
national
treasure? For Nadiya
Begum it happened
sometime between
episodes five and ten of
apart from the other
kitchen goddesses —
sitting, legs astride a
motorised asparagus
picker, she snorts:
“It takes me back to
childbirth!” You
wouldn’t get Nigella
on one of those.
Game of Thrones
Sky Atlantic, 9pm
George RR Martin’s
fantasy epic has always
been a vast, sprawling
thing — keeping tabs
on various characters
requires Sherlock-like
feats of memory —
but, as the seventh
and penultimate
season begins, events
are relatively
straightforward for
once. Jon Snow has
galvanised the North,
Cersei Lannister has
throttled the South
into submission, while
BBC One
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
Early
best of British grub, and
the Luton girl begins in
her own backyard, the
home counties. She
pops off to Oxfordshire
to inspect asparagus,
meets a fireman turned
food-smoker in Milton
Keynes and creates an
Eton Mess cheesecake
that could rot your
teeth just by looking at
it. It is Nadiya’s wry,
self-deprecating
humour that sets her
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Right on the Money. Helping
an 81-year-old woman struggling to juggle the family
finances while caring for her husband 10.00 Homes
Under the Hammer. A three-bedroom property in
Streatham, south London (r) 11.00 Neighbourhood Blues.
Rob McIvor investigates after art galleries in Bath are
inundated with Nazi-themed hate mail (r) 11.45 Rip Off
Britain: Holidays. A report on the cleanliness of British
hotel rooms, and money-saving tips for visiting America
(r) 12.15pm Bargain Hunt. Charlie Ross presents from
Newark (AD) 1.00 BBC News at One; Weather 1.30 BBC
Regional News; Weather 1.45 Red Rock. New series.
A killer is still at large, but the investigators lack leads,
the Kielys mark the anniversary of Darren’s death and
Claire is unaware of the danger an intruder poses 2.30
Escape to the Country. A couple seek a property able to
be adapted into a B&B (r) (AD) 3.30 Money for Nothing.
Sarah Moore transforms and then sells three things about
to be dumped at a tip in Stockport (r) 4.15 Flog It!
Making a profit at auction (r) 5.15 Pointless. Quiz show
hosted by Alexander Armstrong (r) 6.00 BBC News at
Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am The TV That Made Me (r) 6.30 Right on the
Money (r) 7.15 Bargain Hunt (r) (AD) 8.00 Sign Zone:
Alone with the In-Laws (r) (SL) 9.00 Victoria Derbyshire
11.00 BBC Newsroom Live 12.00 Daily Politics 1.00pm
Athletics: Diamond League Rabat Highlights. Gabby Logan
presents action from the 10th Diamond League event of
the season, held at Prince Moulay Abdellah Stadium in
Rabat, Morocco (r) 2.00 Triathlon: World Series
Highlights. Action from the men’s and women’s races in
the fifth round of the ITU World Triathlon Series, which
took place in Hamburg, Germany 4.15 Secrets of Our
Living Planet. Chris Packham reveals the connections
between species living in some of the world’s most
diverse ecosystems, beginning by exploring the web of
life in the Amazon (r) (AD) 5.15 Antiques Road Trip.
Charles Hanson and Christina Trevanion set off on a
journey seeking out bargain antiques, beginning in
Whaley Bridge, Derbyshire, before heading to Liverpool
(r) 6.00 Eggheads. Quiz show hosted by Jeremy Vine
6.30 Letterbox. New series. Game show hosted by Mel
Giedroyc, as pairs of contestants go head-to-head to crack
a series of passwords, in an attempt to take home £2,500
6.00am Good Morning Britain. A lively mix of news and
current affairs, plus health, entertainment and lifestyle
features 8.30 Lorraine. Entertainment and fashion news,
as well as showbiz stories, cooking and gossip. Presented
by Lorraine Kelly 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show. Studio chat
show 10.30 This Morning. Chat with famous faces and
lifestyle features, including a look at the stories making
the newspaper headlines and a recipe in the kitchen.
Including Local Weather 12.30pm Loose Women.
Interviews with famous faces and topical studio
discussion from a female perspective 1.30 ITV News;
Weather 2.00 Judge Rinder. Cameras follow the criminal
barrister Robert Rinder as he takes on real-life cases in a
studio courtroom (r) 3.00 David Dickinson’s Name Your
Price. Game show in which three pairs of contestants
compete against one another to correctly value antiques
or collectibles in order to win a cash prize (AD) 4.00
Tipping Point. Ben Shephard hosts the quiz show, in
which contestants drop tokens down a choice of four
chutes in the hope of winning a £10,000 jackpot (r)
5.00 The Chase. Quiz show hosted by Bradley Walsh (r)
6.00 Regional News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.20am 3rd Rock from the Sun (r) (AD) 6.45 Will &
Grace (r) 7.35 Everybody Loves Raymond (r) 8.35 Frasier
(r) (AD) 10.05 Undercover Boss USA. The co-founder of a
massage therapy chain goes undercover (r) 11.00 A Place
in the Sun: Winter Sun. Jonnie Irwin helps a woman from
the Lake District in Cumbria find a new home in Costa
Rica on her budget of £200,000 (r) 12.00 Channel 4 News
Summary 12.05pm Couples Come Dine with Me. Three
couples from the north Kent coast compete (r) 1.05 Posh
Pawnbrokers. A Pickwick customer is selling a rare
grandfather clock (r) 2.10 Countdown. With Suzannah
Lipscomb in Dictionary Corner 3.00 The Question Jury.
New series. Quiz show 4.00 A Place in the Sun: Summer
Sun. New series. Jasmine Harman tries to help Dave and
Debbie Gough from Swindon 5.00 Four in a Bed. The
competition begins at the White Lodge Hotel in Filey,
North Yorkshire (r) 5.30 Come Dine with Me. Charity
support worker Sebastian is the first host in Sheffield
6.00 The Simpsons. Principal Skinner uses his Counter
Truancy Unit to thwart a possible terror attack (r) (AD)
6.30 Hollyoaks. Armstrong convinces Cindy to do a talk
about powerful women in Liverpool (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff. The journalist
and broadcaster Matthew Wright and his guests debate
the issues of the day 11.15 House Doctor. A property
owner is ready to set up a new family home with his
fiancée, but is reluctant to sell his existing premises due
to the influence of his teenage children (r) (AD) 12.10pm
5 News Lunchtime 12.15 Big Brother. Daily round-up of
highlights, featuring the latest tasks, games, arguments,
laughs, diary room visits and bedroom chit-chat.
Narrated by Marcus Bentley (r) 1.15 Home and Away
(AD) 1.45 Neighbours (AD) 2.15 NCIS. Gibbs tries to
protect one of his dead daughter’s friends, who is being
stalked by an Iraq war veteran — but DiNozzo fears he is
allowing personal feelings to cloud his judgment (r)
3.15 FILM: Fatal Performance (PG, TVM, 2013)
An actress enters a nightmare scenario after agreeing
to impersonate the wife of a businessman during a
prestigious reception event. Thriller starring Nicholle Tom
5.00 5 News at 5 5.30 Neighbours. Gary thinks Terese
must be pregnant, but she tells him she is just off colour
(r) (AD) 6.00 Home and Away. Nate takes Leah kayaking
to cheer her up (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
7PM
it takes to ensure that
her first name one day
trips off the tongue
à la Delia and Nigella?
On this evidence, she
does — she is less
overtly sensuous than
Nigella Lawson, less
exacting than Delia
Smith, but she has her
own undeniably
Nadiya-esque charms.
In this series she will be
travelling around the
country celebrating the
7.00 Celebrity Mastermind With Lauren
Layfield, David Aaronovitch, Tim
Muffett and Kadeena Cox (3/10) (r)
7.00 Paul Hollywood’s Big Continental
Road Trip The Bake Off judge drives
across Europe. The first episode comes
from Italy, where Paul takes a six-day
journey with a different car for each
day, beginning in Rome where he is
joined by Strictly Come Dancing’s
Bruno Tonioli (1/3) (r) (AD)
7.00 Emmerdale Ross and Debbie wrestle
with their mutual attraction, while
Rhona receives news that makes
her fear the worst (AD)
7.30 Coronation Street Aidan is
blackmailed by a desperate Adam, and
David begs Shona to help him track
down another of Nathan’s victims (AD)
8PM
baked a cake for the
Queen’s 90th birthday
and fronted her own
show, The Chronicles of
Nadiya. For many she
epitomises the best of
multicultural Britain
and is saluted for being
Britain’s first bona fide
headscarf-wearing
heroine. This, however,
is her first big test — a
simple cookery show
that is all about her.
Does Nadiya have what
8.00 EastEnders Lauren questions Steven
following his shocking news, while
Ian celebrates accepting an offer
on the fish-and-chip shop (AD)
8.30 Trump’s Fortress America
— Panorama A report on the
implementation of deportations of
illegal immigrants in the US
8.00 University Challenge New series.
Jeremy Paxman hosts the return of the
student quiz, with Edinburgh taking on
Ulster in the opening first-round match
8.30 Nadiya’s British Food Adventure
New series. Nadiya Hussain embarks
on a culinary road trip around Britain.
See Viewing Guide (1/8) (AD)
8.00 Amazing Animal Births The
zoologist Lucy Cooke is on hand as
Carron the shire horse is set to give
birth for the ninth time (6/6) (AD)
8.30 Coronation Street Seb quizzes Eileen
about Phelan’s obsession with Nicola,
and Roy finds himself in Brian’s firing
line over a piece of litter (AD)
9PM
Top
pick
The Great British Bake
Off in 2015. Even before
she claimed the crown
in the final — and then
cracked stiff upper lips
everywhere with her
tearful “I can and I
will” speech — Nadiya
had become a firm
favourite thanks to her
wonderfully expressive
face and her general
exuberance. Since then
she has appeared on
Desert Island Discs,
9.00 DIY SOS: The Big Build Nick
Knowles and the team are joined by
local tradespeople in Swansea to
transform the three-bedroom home of
a family whose 15-year-old son has a
rare form of muscular dystrophy that
has led to a lifetime of painful
operations (1/9) (r) (AD)
9.00 Ripper Street With Reid locked in the
cells of Leman Street and Jedediah
Shine dead, Dove and Drummond try to
track down Long Susan and Jackson
and bring them to justice. However,
having retrieved their son Connor,
Long Susan and Jackson prepare to
leave London for good (5/6) (AD)
9.00 Fearless Emma tries to finally
uncover the truth, and Heather
reassures Matthew that nothing
connects the evidence to Linda’s death.
However, with pressure mounting,
Kretchmer isn’t so convinced and
urges Heather to stay in the UK
to fix the situation (6/6) (AD)
10PM
7.30 True North: World’s Oldest Family
Profile of a potentially record breaking
family from rural Co Armagh (AD)
10.00 BBC News at Ten
Late
11PM
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather
10.45 Peter Kay’s Comedy Shuffle The
comedian shines a light on dieting,
while Car Share’ss John and Kayleigh
are both in tears (4/6) (r) (AD)
11.15 Have I Got a Bit More Old News
for You Extended edition. Stephen
Mangan hosts the satirical current
affairs quiz, with Ruth Davidson and
Henning Wehn joining team captains
Ian Hislop and Paul Merton (r)
12.00 Who Do You Think You Are? Craig Revel
Horwood returns to his native Australia to find out more
about his grandparents’ families, curious to know if any
of his ancestors were also involved in showbusiness.
He discovers that one ancestor risked everything in the
Australian gold rush (r) (AD) 1.05am-6.00 BBC News
10.00 Normal for Norfolk New series.
Desmond MacCarthy attempts to keep
his 17th-century manor house afloat.
See Viewing Guide (1/6) (AD)
10.30 Newsnight Analysis of the day’s
events presented by Evan Davis
11.15 Horizon: Dippy and the Whale
Documentary following the Natural
History Museum’s replacement of its
famous dinosaur skeleton cast in the
entrance hall with the real skeleton of
a blue whale. Narrated by David
Attenborough (r) (AD)
12.15am Sign Zone: Eat Well for Less? Gregg
Wallace and Chris Bavin help a family from Nottingham
lower their food bills, and show them ways to follow a
healthier diet while saving money (r) (AD, SL) 1.15-2.15
Supermarket Shopping Secrets. How the retailers
compete in the market for healthier foods (r) (AD, SL)
10.00 ITV News at Ten
10.30 Regional News
10.40 Killer Women with Piers Morgan
Piers hears the story of Ashley
Humphrey, who in 2003 shot dead
barmaid Sandee Rozzo, trying to
understand how a seemingly innocent
20-year-old woman could end up
committing murder (4/5) (r)
11.40 The Kyle Files Jeremy Kyle tackles
the issue of dangerous dogs (4/6) (r)
12.10am Jackpot247 Viewers get the chance to
participate in live interactive gaming from the comfort of
their sofas, with a mix of roulette-wheel spins and lively
chat from the presenting team 3.00 The Jeremy Kyle
Show (r) 3.55 ITV Nightscreen. Text-based information
service 5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r) (SL)
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.30 Live World Para Athletics
Championships London 2017
Sophie Morgan, Ade Adepitan and Lee
McKenzie present coverage of the
evening session on day four of the
Championships, which takes place
at The London Stadium in Queen
Elizabeth Olympic Park. A number of
gold medals are set to be awarded
tonight, including the men’s T42 100m,
T36 200m, T54 800m and T44 long
jump, as well as the women’s T34
800m and T44 100m. With expert
analysis from Jonnie Peacock,
David Weir and Greg Rutherford
7.00 Cricket on 5 England v South Africa.
Highlights of the fourth day’s play in
the second Test of the four-match
series, which took place at Trent Bridge
in Nottingham. With commentary
provided by Graeme Smith, Geoffrey
Boycott, Simon Hughes, Michael
Vaughan and Mark Nicholas
8.00 All New Traffic Cops An insight into
the working life of officers patrolling
the nation’s roads, using modern
technology and old-fashioned methods
to bring criminals to justice
9.00 Eamonn & Ruth: Russian Roulette
Eamonn Holmes and Ruth Langsford
head to Moscow to infiltrate the
exclusive world of billionaire oligarchs.
They meet the son of one of Russia’s
wealthiest men, and learn about the
whims of the Russian elite (3/5)
10.00 Is Love Racist? The Dating Game
Emma Dabiri looks at racism in Britain
through the world of modern dating.
A volunteer group of British singletons
take part in a series of experiments to
discover if there’s more than meets the
eye going on in the world of modern
dating apps. See Viewing Guide
10.00 Big Brother Daily round-up of
highlights, revealing how the
housemates are getting on under the
all-seeing eye of Big Brother, featuring
the latest tasks, games, arguments,
laughs, diary room visits and bedroom
chit-chat. Narrated by Marcus Bentley
11.05 60 Days in Jail Three new
participants enter the programme,
while the others fight for acceptance
in their pods and one participant is
dragged into a confrontation that
quickly turns physical (2/12) (AD)
11.05 Big Brother’s Bit on the Side
Rylan Clark-Neal presents the
live Big Brother companion show,
including a debate on the burning
issues and guests’ thoughts on the
latest developments
12.05am Britain’s Benefit Tenants (r) 1.00 Who
Wants My Council House? (r) (AD) 1.55 Phil Spencer:
Find Me a Home (r) (AD) 2.50 The Supervet (r) (AD)
3.45 Supershoppers (r) 4.10 Tried and Tasted: The
Ultimate Shopping List (r) 4.35 Shipping Wars UK (r)
5.05-6.00 Location, Location, Location (r) (SL)
12.05am Countdown to Murder Examining the events
that led Dennis Nilsen to become a serial killer (r)
1.00 SuperCasino 3.10 The Nightmare Neighbour Next
Door (r) 4.00 Now That’s Funny! Internet-sourced
videos (r) (SL) 4.45 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10
Great Artists (r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Wildlife SOS (r) (SL)
the times | Monday July 17 2017
13
1GT
television & radio
Daenerys Targaryen
is heading to Westeros
to clobber them both
with her dragons and
her gargantuan army.
All of which is a trifle
compared with what’s
coming for them all
from the frozen wastes
beyond the Wall —
namely an undead
army of White Walkers,
who care not for plot
or characterisation. The
endgame has begun.
Normal for Norfolk
BBC Two, 10pm
Desmond MacCarthy
is back — as is his
crumbling manor
house, his centenarian
mother and his untamed
eyebrows. The cameras
have returned to
Wiveton Hall for
another series of wilful
eccentricity in the
company of the jolly
gentleman farmer and
his many financial woes.
Desmond’s latest
whizzo plans to keep
the old place afloat
include opening up a
derelict wing for hire
(“Oh my GOD,” he says,
a lot, while inspecting
it) and holding a yoga
retreat. “I don’t know
much about yoga,” he
admits. “I think they
like cosmic smells,
produced by ethnic
candles. Yes.”
Is Love Racist?
Channel 4, 10pm
“Love isn’t blind,”
claims Emma Dabiri’s
exploration of modern
dating, “it’s racist.” And
while that might sound
a little alarmist, her
documentary uncovers
some troubling truths.
Asking if dating apps
and websites are making
us more racist — most
of them allow us to
search for partners
based on everything
from salary to skin
colour — Dabiri uses
the UK’s first extensive
survey on race and
dating, as well as a
series of experiments
with some single
guinea pigs, to uncover
the “white bias” in our
society. And what
matters in the
bedroom, matters
in the boardroom . . .
The European
Cigarette Mystery
BBC Four, 10pm
What’s the EU ever
done for us? Well, it
provided this vastly
entertaining story for
one. In 2012 the Maltese
politician John Dalli left
his post as the EU
commissioner for health
after being embroiled in
a scandal involving Big
Tobacco — it was
alleged that one of
Dalli’s associates asked
a tobacco company for a
€60 million bribe. The
film-makers Mads
Brügger and Mikael
Bertelsen headed to
Malta to get to the
bottom of this mystery
and ended up stumbling
on an even bigger one.
And this one involved
secret sources, dodgy
documents and
assassination plots.
Sky1
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Sports 1
Variations
6.00am Hawaii Five-0 (r) 7.00 Road Wars (r)
8.00 Zoo Tales (r) (AD) 9.00 It’s Me or the Dog
(r) 10.00 Nothing to Declare (r) 11.00
Sanctuary (r) 12.00 NCIS: Los Angeles (r)
1.00pm Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00 NCIS: Los
Angeles (r) 4.00 Stargate Atlantis (r)
5.00 Modern Family. Comedy series (r)
6.00 Futurama. Rapidly rising temperatures
threaten all life on Earth (r) (AD)
6.30 The Simpsons. Back-to-back episodes (r)
9.00 A League of Their Own. With Ruud Gullit,
Alex Scott and Kevin Bridges (r) (AD)
10.00 A League of Their Own: US Road Trip 2.0.
Highlights from the gang’s second American
adventure. Last in the series
11.00 Freddie Fries Again. Andrew Flintoff and
Rob Penn head to Newmarket (2/6) (r) (AD)
12.00 The Force: Manchester (r) (AD) 1.00am
Brit Cops: Rapid Response. Police officers on
patrol (r) (AD) 2.00 Hawaii Five-0 (r) 3.00
Nothing to Declare (r) 4.00 RSPCA Animal
Rescue (r) (AD) 5.00 Highway Cops (r)
6.00am Storm City (r) (AD) 7.00 Fish Town (r)
8.00 Urban Secrets (r) 9.00 The Guest Wing (r)
(AD) 10.00 The West Wing (r) 12.00 Without a
Trace (r) 1.00pm CSI: Crime Scene Investigation
(r) 2.00 Blue Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00 Fish Town (r)
4.00 The West Wing. Double bill (r)
6.00 Without a Trace (r)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. Guest
starring The Who singer Roger Daltrey (r)
8.00 Thronecast: War Room. Discussion about
the seventh season of Game of Thrones
9.00 Game of Thrones. The return of the fantasy
drama with Kit Harington. See Viewing Guide (r)
10.10 Thronecast. New series. Sue Perkins and
Jamie East return with the companion show to
Game of Thrones, joined by famous superfans
11.10 Game of Thrones. The return of the
fantasy drama starring Kit Harington (r)
12.20am Seven Days in Hell (r) 1.20 FILM:
Pharmacy Road Spoof documentary about
doping in professional cycling (r) 2.05 Ray
Donovan (r) (AD) 4.15 The West Wing (r)
6.00am UK Border Force (r) 8.00 Customs UK
(r) 9.00 Cooks to Market (r) 9.15 My Kitchen
Rules: Australia (r) 10.30 Border Security:
Canada’s Front Line (r) (AD) 11.00 Stop, Search,
Seize (r) (AD) 12.00 Elementary (r) 1.00pm
Criminal Minds (r) 2.00 Bones (r) 3.00 Cold
Case (r) 4.00 UK Border Force (r) (AD) 5.00
Nothing to Declare. Documentary (r)
6.00 Nothing to Declare. Double bill (r)
7.00 Sun, Sea and A&E. A British tourist
starts having convulsions in Magaluf
8.00 Elementary. Holmes and Watson
race to find a kidnapped woman (r)
9.00 Criminal Minds. An urban vampire is
investigated. Reid makes a difficult decision (r)
10.00 Criminal Minds. Three victims are
found in the Arizona desert (r)
11.00 Criminal Minds. The team presents an
unsolved case to a group of students (r)
12.00 Bones (r) (AD) 3.00am Stop, Search,
Seize (r) (AD) 4.00 Border Security: Canada’s
Front Line (r) 5.00 Nothing to Declare (r) (AD)
6.00am Celtic Woman: Songs from the Heart
7.50 Classical Destinations 8.00 Watercolour
Challenge 9.00 Tales of the Unexpected 10.00
Design Dealers (AD) 11.00 Auction 12.00
Discovering: David Bowie 1.00pm Discovering:
William Holden (AD) 2.00 Watercolour
Challenge 3.00 Tales of the Unexpected 4.00
Design Dealers (AD) 5.00 Discovering: Queen
6.00 Discovering: Barbara Stanwyck (AD)
7.00 The South Bank Show. With the Game of
Thrones author George RR Martin
8.00 Andre Rieu: Live in Brazil. The violinist’s
first-ever concert in São Paulo
10.00 Master of Photography. The winner is
announced. Last in the series
11.00 Dolly Parton: Song by Song. The country
singer talks about Coat of Many Colours (AD)
11.30 Dolly Parton: Song by Song. Jolene (AD)
12.00 Hollywood Censored. Documentary (AD)
1.00am Tales of the Unexpected 2.00
Watercolour Challenge 3.00 The South
Bank Sky Arts Awards 2017 5.00 Auction
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans 9.00
Premier League 100 Club 10.00 Football’s
Greatest Teams (AD) 11.00 Transfer Centre
11.30 Great Sporting Moments 12.00 Football’s
Greatest Teams (AD) 1.00pm Great Sporting
Moments 2.00 Premier League Legends 3.00
Spanish Football Gold (AD) 3.30 Football Gold
4.00 Live at the Open. A look ahead to the event
5.30 Premier League 100 Club (AD)
6.00 Premier League Legends
6.30 Football’s Greatest Teams (AD)
7.00 Live Horse Racing. This evening’s meetings
from Windsor, Wolverhampton and Killarney
9.00 Fight Night. Kell Brook v Errol Spence Jr
11.00 Premier League Legends
11.30 Premier League Legends
12.00 Premier League 100 Club (AD) 1.00am
Football’s Greatest Teams (AD) 2.00 Premier
League Years. The 1994/95 season (AD)
4.00 Sporting Heroes: Peter Reid Interviews
Allan Lamb (AD) 5.00 Premier League
100 Club 5.30 Spanish Football Gold (AD)
BBC Two N Ireland
As BBC Two except: 10.00pm-10.30 Ar
Bhealach na Gaeltachta. Conall Ó Máirtín
explores the lesser-known places of the
Gaeltacht areas of Co Donegal (r) 11.15
Normal for Norfolk. New series. Desmond
MacCarthy attempts to keep his 17th-century
manor house afloat. See Viewing Guide (AD)
11.45-12.15am White Gold. Vincent concocts
a spectacular plot. Last in the series (r)
ITV Wales
As ITV except: 6.00pm-6.30 ITV News Wales
at Six 8.00-8.30 Wales This Week. Hints and
tips to save money over the holiday period,
from childcare advice to booking your holiday
getaway 10.45 Sharp End. Political discussion
with Adrian Masters and guests 11.10-11.40
Amazing Animal Births. A shire horse is set to
give birth for the ninth time. Last in the series
ITV Westcountry
As ITV except: 10.30pm-10.40
ITV News West Country
STV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 The People’s
History Show. Sarah Mack and Ashley Cowie
take a look into the history of East Kilbride,
Glasgow’s Britannia Panopticon and Footdee
fishing village in Aberdeen 12.10am After
Midnight 1.40 ITV Nightscreen 4.35 The
Jeremy Kyle Show (r) 5.30-6.00 Teleshopping
UTV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Lesser Spotted
Journeys. Joe Mahon travels the length and
breadth of Ireland meeting local and intriguing
characters along the way 12.10am
Teleshopping 1.10-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm World News Today; Weather
7.30 Handmade: By Royal Appointment.
Following the making of an engraved gold and
diamond pendant by Simon Benney (r) (AD)
8.00 Colour: The Spectrum of Science. Dr Helen
Czerski tells the story of scientific endeavour,
revealing the secrets of the universe as she
takes to the skies in a jumbo jet, equipped
with an infra-red telescope (3/3) (r) (AD)
9.00 Science and Islam. How astronomer
Nicolaus Copernicus’s theories about the Earth’s
orbit were influenced by the discoveries of
Islamic scientists (3/3) (r) (AD)
10.00 Storyville: The Great European Cigarette
Mystery. An investigation into John Dalli, the
former EU Commissioner of Health, who left his
post having been accused of being in the pocket
of the big tobacco companies. See Viewing Guide
11.00 Hidden Kingdoms. A rhinoceros beetle
avoiding predators on its way through Tokyo.
Stephen Fry narrates. Last in the series (r) (AD)
12.00 Ocean Giants. Whales and dolphins (r)
(AD) 1.00am Treasures of Chinese Porcelain (r)
(AD) 2.00 Science and Islam (r) (AD) 3.00-4.00
Colour: The Spectrum of Science (r) (AD, SL)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 6.30 Hollyoaks Does
Come Dine with Me (r) 7.00 Made in Chelsea (r)
8.00 Rules of Engagement (r) 9.00 Melissa &
Joey (r) 10.00 Baby Daddy (r) 11.00 How I Met
Your Mother (r) (AD) 12.00 New Girl (r) (AD)
1.00pm The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD) 2.00
Melissa & Joey (r) 3.00 Baby Daddy (r) 4.00
Black-ish (r) (AD) 5.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
6.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks. Simone gets emotional (AD)
7.30 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
8.00 FILM: Fantastic Four (PG, 2005) Five
astronauts develop superhuman powers during
an energy storm in space. Sci-fi comic-book
adventure starring Ioan Gruffudd (AD)
10.00 Vlogglebox. Young people review the
most popular viral content (AD)
11.05 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
11.30 The Big Bang Theory. Leonard is invited
to visit the Large Hadron Collider (r) (AD)
12.00 Gogglebox (r) (AD) 2.10am First Dates
(r) (AD) 3.00 First Dates Abroad (r) (AD) 3.25
New Girl (r) (AD) 4.15 How I Met Your Mother
(r) (AD) 4.40 Rules of Engagement (r)
8.55am A Place in the Sun: Summer Sun (r)
10.00 The Supervet (r) (AD) 11.05 Four in a
Bed (r) 1.40pm A Place in the Sun: Summer Sun
(r) 3.50 Time Team (r) (AD) 5.55 Car SOS (r)
6.55 The Supervet. A cat needs surgery on its
knee after falling from a balcony (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. Kevin McCloud revisits a
group of 10 families, including travellers and
single parents, who built their own councilsubsidised houses in Brighton (12/12) (r) (AD)
9.00 Dunkirk: The New Evidence. Examining the
famous Second World War evacuation of Allied
soldiers — codenamed Operation Dynamo —
from the beaches of Dunkirk, France,
between May 26 and June 4, 1940 (r)
10.00 24 Hours in A&E. A man is rushed to St
George’s after overturning his car onto metal
railings during a collision, and a woman who
has fallen over in a restaurant (r) (AD)
11.05 999: What’s Your Emergency?
An insight into the challenges faced by
emergency services on the roads (r)
12.05am Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares USA (r)
1.05 24 Hours in A&E (r) (AD) 2.10 Grand
Designs (r) (AD) 3.15-3.55 8 Out of 10 Cats (r)
11.00am First Men in the Moon (U, 1964)
Sci-fi adventure with Lionel Jeffries 1.05pm
Arabian Nights (PG, 1942) Adventure with
Jon Hall 2.45 Beau Geste (PG, 1939) Foreign
Legion adventure starring Gary Cooper (b/w)
5.00 Halls of Montezuma (U, 1950) Second
World War adventure starring Richard Widmark
7.20 Airplane II: The Sequel (15, 1982)
A computer malfunction sends a passenger
space shuttle hurtling toward the sun, while a
mad bomber is also on board. Disaster movie
spoof sequel with Robert Hays and Julie Hagerty
9.00 The Drop (15, 2014) A bartender who
secretly works for gangsters gets involved in
a robbery gone wrong that digs up long-buried
secrets. Crime drama starring Tom Hardy (AD)
11.10 Lawless (18, 2012) Three brothers
running a Depression-era bootlegging operation
come under threat from a corrupt sheriff. Crime
drama with Shia LaBeouf and Tom Hardy (AD)
1.25am-3.15 Northwest (15, 2013)
A teenage burglar and his younger brother get in
over their heads when they work for a gangster.
Crime drama starring real-life brothers
Gustav and Oscar Dyekjaer Giese
6.00am Busted: The Hot Desk (r) 6.10 You’ve
Been Framed! Gold (r) 6.35 Vanderpump Rules
(r) 7.20 The Ellen DeGeneres Show (r) 8.00
Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.30 Coronation Street (r)
(AD) 9.35 Scorpion (r) 10.25 Below Deck (r)
11.25 Vanderpump Rules (r) 12.20pm
Emmerdale (r) (AD) 12.55 Coronation Street (r)
(AD) 2.00 The Ellen DeGeneres Show (r) 2.50
The Jeremy Kyle Show (r) 5.00 Judge Rinder (r)
6.00 You’ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
6.30 You’ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
7.00 You’ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
7.30 You’ve Been Framed! Gold (r)
8.00 Two and a Half Men (r)
8.30 Two and a Half Men (r)
9.00 Love Island. Reality show
10.05 Family Guy (r) (AD)
10.30 Family Guy (r) (AD)
11.00 American Dad! (r) (AD)
11.30 CelebAbility (r)
12.10am FILM: Zack and Miri Make a
Porno (18, 2008) Kevin Smith’s comedy
starring Seth Rogen and Elizabeth Banks
2.15 The Vamps: The Hot Desk (r) 2.25
Teleshopping 5.55 ITV2 Nightscreen
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Man About the House (r) 6.25
Heartbeat (r) 7.25 Where the Heart Is (r) (AD)
8.25 Wild at Heart (r) (AD) 9.25 Judge Judy (r)
10.50 Road to Avonlea (r) (AD) 11.55 Wycliffe
(r) 1.05pm Heartbeat (r) 2.05 The Royal (r)
(AD) 3.10 Wild at Heart (r) (AD) 4.15 Man
About the House (r) 4.50 On the Buses (r)
5.20 George and Mildred (r) 5.55 Heartbeat (r)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. A small town is under
threat. Angela Lansbury stars (r) (AD)
8.00 FILM: Mamma Mia! (PG, 2008) A bride
asks three of her mother’s old flames to her
wedding to learn which of them is her father.
Musical comedy featuring Abba songs starring
Meryl Streep and Pierce Brosnan (AD)
10.10 Law & Order: UK. A former vice cop
is found beaten to death. With a guest
appearance by Sean Pertwee (3/7) (r) (AD)
11.10 The Street. A night out ends in tragedy
when Gary Parr attacks a taxi driver — but it
is his cousin, Ian, who is arrested, leading to
conflict between their mothers (4/6) (r)
12.30am Colditz. Lizzie’s flat is hit by a bomb
(r) 2.25 ITV3 Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am British Touring Cars: Crashes and
Smashes (r) 6.10 The Chase (r) 7.00 The
Professionals (r) 7.45 The Saint (r) 8.50
Storage Wars: New York (r) 9.45 The Chase (r)
10.50 The Professionals (r) (AD) 11.50 The
Saint (r) 12.55pm Tour de France Highlights (r)
1.55 Ironside (r) 3.00 Quincy ME (r) 4.00
Minder (r) (AD) 5.05 The Professionals (r) (AD)
6.05 Storage Wars: Texas (r)
6.35 Storage Wars: Texas (r)
7.00 Tour de France Highlights. A round-up
of the latest news from the Tour
8.00 The Chase: Celebrity Special (r)
9.00 Car Crash Britain: Caught on Camera.
A woman who got more than she bargained
more crossing the road (4/4) (r)
10.00 FILM: Crank: High Voltage (18,
2009) A hitman pursues a mobster who took
his heart and replaced it with a machine that
requires constant charging up. Action thriller
sequel starring Jason Statham and Amy Smart
12.05am Better Late Than Never (r) 1.00
Motorsport UK 2.00 Tour de France Highlights
(r) 2.50 ITV4 Nightscreen 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.00 Deadly 60 8.10
American Pickers 9.00 Storage Hunters 10.00
American Pickers 12.00 Deadly 60 1.00pm Top
Gear (AD) 3.00 Brojects 4.00 Steve Austin’s
Broken Skull Challenge (AD) 5.00 Top Gear (AD)
6.00 Top Gear. Hugh Bonneville guests (AD)
7.00 Top Gear. James May puts his foot firmly
on the accelerator while driving a Bugatti
Veyron, and the presenters invade a golf course.
Hugh Grant is in the Reasonably Priced Car (AD)
8.00 Nev’s Indian Call Centre. Update to the
series The Call Centre (1/6)
9.00 Live at the Apollo. With Kevin Bridges,
Shappi Khorsandi and Jack Whitehall
10.00 Dara O Briain’s Go 8 Bit. With guests
Kerry Howard and Ore Oduba. Last in the series
11.00 Go 8 Bit: DLC. Helen Thorn submits her
favourite video game for approval (10/10) (AD)
11.30 David Beckham Into the Unknown. (1/2)
The former footballer journeys through
the Amazon rainforest
12.30am QI XL 1.30 Dara O Briain’s Go 8 Bit
2.35 Parks and Recreation 3.25 The
Indestructibles 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am Great Expectations 8.00 Dangerfield
9.00 Monarch of the Glen 10.00 All Creatures
Great and Small 11.00 The Bill 1.00pm Last of
the Summer Wine 1.40 Waiting for God 2.20
Birds of a Feather 3.00 Dangerfield 4.00
Monarch of the Glen 5.00 All Creatures Great
and Small. An old friend visits James
6.00 Waiting for God. Diana enters
a “glamorous granny” competition
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine. Compo tracks
down his ferret to Nora’s washing basket
7.20 Keeping Up Appearances. Richard
demonstrates his electrical skills
8.00 Hetty Wainthropp Investigates. A woman’s
body is found at the bottom of a cliff
9.00 Death in Paradise. First episode of the
detective drama starring Ben Miller (1/8)
10.20 The Inspector Lynley Mysteries.
Feature-length episode. Lynley and Havers visit
a prestigious public school to investigate the
disappearance of a promising pupil. Nathaniel
Parker and Sharon Small star (1/4)
12.20am Taggart 3.00 Hetty Wainthropp
Investigates 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Celebrity Antiques Road Trip 7.10
Egypt’s Animal Mummies (AD) 8.00 Wonders of
the Universe (AD) 9.00 Deep Wreck Mysteries
11.00 Medieval Dead 12.00 WW2 Air Crash
Detectives 1.00pm Pompeii: The Mystery of the
People Frozen in Time 2.00 Wonders of the
Universe (AD) 3.00 Egypt’s Animal Mummies
(AD) 4.00 The True Story of Mary Celeste
5.00 Medieval Dead. Norse and Scottish clans
6.00 WW2 Air Crash Detectives. Investigating
the Baker’s Creek aviation disaster in Australia
7.00 Secrets of Britain. An exploration of the
Tower of London which has served as a
castle, a jail and a place of execution
8.00 Royal Murder Mysteries. The story of the
euthanasia of George V. Last in the series
9.00 The Two Ronnies. Vintage comedy
9.50 The Best of Tommy Cooper. Highlights
10.20 To the Manor Born. Audrey moves out
of Grantleigh Manor, and Richard moves in
11.00 Secrets of Britain. The Tower of London
12.00 WW2 Air Crash Detectives. The Baker’s
Creek aviation disaster 1.00am Medieval Dead
2.00 Secrets of War 3.00 Home Shopping
BBC Alba
5.00pm Sgriobag (Get Squiggling) (r) 5.15 Na
Braithrean Cuideachail (The Koala Brothers) (r)
5.25 Na Luchagan Fhiacla (Tales of the Tooth
Fairies) (r) 5.30 Ceitidh Morag (Katie Morag)
(r) 5.45 Leum is Danns (Jump and Dance) (r)
5.55 An Rud As Fhearr Leam 6.05 Donnie
Murdo (Danger Mouse) (r) 6.15 Alvinnn agus
na Chipmunks (ALVINNN!!! and the Chipmunks)
(r) 6.40 Ard-Sgoil a’ Chnuic Annasaich (Strange
Hill High) (r) 7.05 Binnein nam Beann
(Mountains of Scotland) (r) 7.30 Beul Chainnt
(r) 8.00 An Là (News) 8.30 O Mo Dhùthaich
(From Uist with Love) (r) 9.00 Trusadh: Na
Soisgeulaich (Reaching Out with Hope) (r)
10.00 Horo Gheallaidh (Celtic Music Sessions)
(r) 10.30 Gruth is Uachdar (Crowdie and
Cream) (r) 11.30-12.00 Cuide Ri Cathy
(Scottish Celebrities) (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Ben Dant (r) 6.15 Sam Tân (r)
6.30 Bobi Jac (r) 6.40 Octonots (r) 6.55 Peppa
(r) 7.00 Heini (r) 7.15 Blero yn Mynd i Ocido
(r) 7.25 Twm Tisian (r) 7.35 Antur Natur Cyw
(r) 7.50 Cymylaubychain (r) 8.00 Stiw (r) 8.10
Heulwen a Lleu (r) 8.20 Y Teulu Mawr (r) 8.30
Llan-ar-goll-en (r) 8.45 Dwylo’r Enfys (r) 9.00
Cled (r) 9.15 Y Diwrnod Mawr (r) 9.30
Chwedlau Tinga Tinga (r) 9.40 Falmai’r Fuwch
(r) 9.45 Bach a Mawr (r) 10.00 Ben Dant (r)
10.15 Sam Tân (r) 10.30 Bobi Jac (r) 10.40
Octonots (r) 10.55 Peppa (r) 11.00 Heini (r)
11.15 Blero yn Mynd i Ocido (r) 11.25 Twm
Tisian (r) 11.35 Antur Natur Cyw (r) 11.50
Cymylaubychain (r) 12.00 Heno (r) 1.00pm
News S4C a’r Tywydd 1.05 Cythrel Canu (r)
1.30 Genod y Carnifal (r) (AD) 2.00 News S4C
a’r Tywydd 2.05 Prynhawn Da 3.00 News S4C
a’r Tywydd 3.05 Terfysgwyr Tryweryn (r) 4.00
Awr Fawr 5.00 Stwnsh: Ffeil 5.05 Stwnsh:
Gogs (r) 5.10 Stwnsh: Ben 10 (r) 5.35 Stwnsh:
Pyramid (r) 6.00 News S4C a’r Tywydd 6.05
Cwpwrdd Dillad (r) 6.30 Gwlad Moc (r) (AD)
7.00 Heno 8.00 Pobol y Cwm. Cadno decides
whether to hide Linda’s tablets and Sioned’s
baby scan is taken, but she may not let Garry
see it (AD) 8.25 Garddio a Mwy. Sioned
Edwards looks back on a visit she made to
a Mold garden during April, where the brief
was to bring some much-needed colour to the
place in anticipation of a garden party 9.00
News 9 a’r Tywydd 9.30 Ffermio 10.00 Dylan
ar Daith. Dylan Iorwerth retraces the footsteps
of Ifor Rees (r) 11.00-11.35 Dos i Gwcio.
Part one of two. Catching up with the Cegin Cofi
gang and their healthy food van (r)
14
Monday July 17 2017 | the times
1GT
What are your favourite puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7393
1
2
3
4
Codeword No 3077
5
6
20
20
6
4
14
Scrabble ® Challenge No 1915
20
25
17
20
25
22
10
2
19
5
23
22
15
8
4
3
3
15
5
6
7
9
10
11 12
2L
2W
9
8
2W
E
l
2L
be
2L
neaten
2L
o 2L
d
3L
3L
m
2W
a
2L
2W
d
F
2W
8
9
9
9
10
15
8
20
16
14
8
14
15
25
7
25
3
8
22
6
3L
11
O W
7
12
13
3
D
11
2
15
25
15
22
11
19
22
3
2
25
12
16
11
3
16
16
17
18
17
10
24
11
22
25
26
2
8
18
2
19
13
20
15
20
20
21
13
20
7
8
20
2
20
23
17
18
15
11
11
11
1
17
22
2
What seven-letter word can you
play with this rack?
22
What eight-letter word can you
play with this rack?
22
17
3
10
11
8
8
21
8
8
15
22
8
yesthat
23
24
1
7
8
10
11
13
15
17
Large work building (6,5)
Rips; droplets (5)
Walt —, US poet (7)
Type of Italian bread (8)
Compass point (4)
Synagogue singer (6)
Middle Eastern market (6)
Wading bird (4)
Solution to Crossword 7392
WO
R
A L
P
PR
I
NE
G
R
E
G
I
O
N
A
L
D
A
P
R
A
R E
A P P E
T
I
E XCH
AN
Y
A L
B O
ERN
L
S
L Y
A R
DM I
O D
ND I
N N
ANG
Y T
H
I E
R
AM
O
E S
T
RA
T
X
E
H I N
M
NA T
M
E
P
COR
L
T I O
T
D I V
C
GO L
G
O
E
S
S
T
A
N
D
A
R
D
18
21
22
23
Eastern (8)
Stone Age artefact (7)
Game; moves quickly (5)
Out of place (11)
1
2
9
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
D
W
A
R
D
J
S
R
A
T
G
E
P
A
R
O
A
G
E
R
A
F
W
A
D
L
A
E
L
E
Y
U
L
R
D
E
Y
C
U
U
V
A
N
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Easy No 4069
Futoshiki No 2956
© 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
<
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line “block”, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
<
∧
<
1
7
14
4
Challenge compiled by Allan Simmons
SCRABBLE® is a registered trademark of J. W. Spear & Sons Ltd ©Mattel 2015
Calls cost £1.00 (ROI €1.50) plus your telephone company’s
network access charge. Texts cost £1 plus your standard network charge.
Winners will be picked at random from all correct answers received.
One draw per week. Lines close at midnight tonight.
If you call or text after this time you will not be entered but will still be
charged. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
17
18
35
14
24
30
14
38
34
15
30
12
35
>
3
17
35
10
17
14
19
14
4
30
13
22
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
24
16
7
39
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
22
6
33
∧
24
23
28
17
<
∨
L
Kakuro No 1915
>
∨
2W
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
numbers in the
three shaded
boxes. Text
TIMES followed
by a space, then your three
numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your
name, address and postcode to
88010 (UK only), by midnight.
Or enter by phone. Call 09012
925274 (ROI 1516 415 029)
by midnight. Leave your three
answer numbers (in any order)
and your contact details.
No 3832
A
K
6Winners will
receive a Collins
English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Lexica
G
J
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 88010. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s network access
charge. Texts cost £1 plus your standard network charge. For the full solution call
0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company’s network access
charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
A
I
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
Saturday’s solution, right
No 3831
H
Use only the board area shown. Collins Official
Scrabble Words is the authority used, although the
solutions are not unusual words. Standard Scrabble
rules apply for making the word plays.
O
14
Need help with today’s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
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SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
22
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Down
1 Not operational (3,2,6)
2 Swiss currency (5)
3 Profitable farm produce
(4,4)
4 Item of neckwear (3,3)
5 Roman poet (4)
6 Capital of Uganda (7)
9 Experts in the living world
(11)
12 Aromatic shrub (8)
14 Capital of Kenya (7)
16 Poorly-dressed child (6)
19 Body without limbs (5)
20 Flat round object (4)
8
© PUZZLER MEDIA
Across
G
2L
Key
2L = double letter
3L = triple letter
2W = double word
3W = triple word
Letter values
AEIOULNRST=1
DG=2 BCMP=3
FHVWY=4 K=5
JX=8 QZ=10
SEACUBE
20
17
16
23
39
12
23
4
© PUZZLER MEDIA
7
D
2W
the times | Monday July 17 2017
15
1GT
MindGames
White: Rudolf Spielmann
Black: Aron Nimzowitsch
San Sebastian 1911
Sicilian Defence
1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 Nf6 3 Nc3
The most challenging response
to Black’s opening is 3 e5. Critical
then is 3 ... Nd5 4 Nc3 e6 5 Nxd5
exd5 6 d4 Nc6 7 dxc5 Bxc5. Now
White can win a pawn with 8
Qxd5 although after 8 ... Qb6,
Black has reasonable counterplay.
3 ... d5 4 exd5 Nxd5 5 Bc4 e6 6
0-0 Be7 7 d4 Nxc3 8 bxc3 0-0
Black has a solid position with
potential play against White’s
weak queenside pawn structure.
9 Ne5 Qc7 10 Bd3 Nc6 11 Bf4
Bd6 12 Re1 cxd4 13 cxd4 Nb4
This is the main point of Black’s
manoeuvre starting with 9 ... Qc7.
14 Bg3
This is too passive. White
should activate his pawns with 14
c4, when the game is equal.
________
á DrD 4kD]
à0qD D 0p]
ß 0 DpD D]
ÞD Db) D ]
Ý D D D D]
Ü! D D GP]
ÛPD DR)PD]
ÚD $ D I ]
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ
25 f4
25 f3, blunting the power of the
d5-bishop, is much better. From
now on this bishop gives Black
tremendous play against White’s
kingside and the g2-square in
particular.
25 ... Qf7 26 Rec2 Rxc2 27 Rxc2
Qg6 28 Qc3 Bxa2 29 Bh4
29 Rxa2 Qb1+ wins the rook.
29 ... Bd5
This bishop has no opponent
and Black is effectively playing
the attack with an extra piece.
30 Be7 Re8 31 Bd6 Qe4 32 Qc7
h6 33 Rf2 Qe1+ 34 Rf1 Qe3+ 35
Rf2 a5 36 Be7 Qe1+ 37 Rf1 Qe3+
38 Rf2 Kh8 39 Bd8 Qe1+ 40 Rf1
Qe3+ 41 Rf2 Qe1+ 42 Rf1 Qg3 43
Rf2 Rf8 44 Qxb6 Rxf4 45 Be7 a4
White’s next is a blunder in a
hopeless position.
46 Kf1 Qxg2+ White resigns
________
árD D i D] Winning Move
àDqD D 0Q]
ßpD Db0r0] Black to play. This position is from
Medellin 2017.
ÞDp$ D D ] Valenzuela-Rios,
It looks as though the situation of the
Ý D D h )] white queen on h7 is causing Black some
Ü)PD H H ] discomfort. In fact, the exact opposite is
Û D D )PD] true. Can you see why?
ÚD D $ I ] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
ÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈ my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
7
EASY
MEDIUM
HARDER
SQUARE
IT
+9
÷2
+7
1/3
+9
OF IT
x 3 – 11
75%
OF IT
32
+ 1/2 x 5 – 47
+ 66 OF
IT
50%
OF IT
+ 1/2 + 83
+ 78 OF
IT
71
x 6 + 256 + 1/2 + 857
OF IT
70%
OF IT
+ 1/4 + 382 x 2
+ 996 OF
IT
3/4
OF IT
3
6
Polygon
From these letters, make words of three
or more letters, always including the
central letter. Answers must be in the
Concise Oxford Dictionary, excluding
capitalised words, plurals, conjugated
verbs (past tense etc), adverbs ending in
LY, comparatives and superlatives.
How you rate 14 words, average;
19, good; 24, very good; 30, excellent
Killer Gentle No 5531
10
22
6
17
6
9
4
4min
16
17
15
17
6
14
5
6
16
Bridge Andrew Robson
I’m a fan of the gambling 3NT,
whereby an opening bid of 3NT
shows a long (seven or more
cards), solid (ie no loser) minor
suit and no more than a queen
outside. By describing your hand
perfectly, partner can choose
whether to pass (with stoppers in
both majors and one minor) or
remove to 4♣/♦, 5♣/♦ or even
6♣/♦. Take this deal from a major
Pairs event.
At Table One, North was able to
bid his clubs only twice — not
enough to dissuade South from
declaring in one of his two fine
suits. West led a heart to East’s ace,
felling declarer’s king. Can you spot
the killing defence at trick two?
If East returns, say, his singleton
spade, declarer wins, draws trumps,
then leads over his club to dummy’s
winners. Slam made. Same if East
returns a diamond or the queen of
hearts. However, if East returns a
club, declarer’s line of communication with dummy’s clubs (after drawing trumps) is severed. Whether he
tries to cash a second club or set up
spades ruffing in dummy, he will
soon be congratulating East on a
fine switch (or, if mean-spirited, quietly fuming to himself).
Things were much easier for
South at Table Two. Knowing
partner held long, solid clubs, he
was able to leap to 6♣ at his first
turn, knowing the slam would be
almost laydown. He was not taxed
in the play, winning West’s spade
lead cheaply, drawing trumps and
running diamonds. With West failing to find his partner’s ace of
hearts at trick one, that was 6♣
plus one in double-quick time.
6
9
♠5
♥J 3
♦Q 2
♣A KQ J 9 5 3 2
♠4
♠ Q 10 7 6 3 2
N
♥AQ 9 8 6 5 2
♥10 7 4
W E
♦7 5
S
♦9 4 3
♣8 7 6
♣4
♠A K J 9 8
♥K
♦A K J 10 8 6
♣10
5
W
23
E
3♥ (1)
Pass
1♣
5♣
3♠ (2) 4♥ (3)
6♦(4) end
(1) Weakish hand with seven decent hearts.
(2) Understandable why South would bid
the major before the longer minor.
However, if he’d have bid 4♦, partner would
have bid 5♣ (over West’s 4♥ ), he’d have
bid 5♠ and partner would have bid 6♣.
With partner bidding clubs three times, he’d
have called a halt to proceedings.
(3) Raising to the level of the fit, taking
important space away from the opponents.
(4) Having not mentioned his lovely diamonds.
16
14min
7
22
7
14
5
12
14
23
16
7
10
3
12
8
12
11
Table Two
S
Contract: 6♣ (by S), Opening Lead: ♠ 6
andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
2 1
5 3 8
1
6
5
1 8
3 9 2
3
9
1
1
8 9
7 5 9
5 7 4
7
8 9 6
x
-
=
7
=2
=
18
=
13
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
Suko 1978
5
2
4
1
3
5 > 1 < 2
4
1
2
4 > 3
1
3 > 2 < 4
3
∧
4
3 > 2
∧
5
1
5
5
7
9
8
7
9
8
6
6
5
8
9
7
7
9
8
9
+
+
x
3
x
9
R
+
U
8
+
x
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
2
2 4
3
1
5
4
2
7
6
9
8
9
4
2
6
8
3
7
1
5
A
6
3
1
5
4
8
9
2
7
2
5
9
7
6
1
8
4
3
5
KenKen 4068
4
7
8
9
3
2
1
5
6
8
6
3
2
9
5
4
7
1
1
2
4
3
7
6
5
8
9
5
9
7
8
1
4
3
6
2
÷
M
A
P
4
4
T
P
Z
E
L
A
C
P
R
O
T
E
3 6
3
5
6
2
1
3
9
4
7
8
8
1
4
2
7
6
5
3
9
9
2
8
6
5
7
3
4
1
A
Y
E
L
U
M
A
O
W
O
H
K
Killer 5530
7
9
3
5
4
8
1
6
2
H
E
Z
F
1
4
2
F
Lexica 3830
I
x
4
8
7
8
6
1
5
9
2
3
4
Lexica 3829
6
2
2
20
4
7
+
Sudoku 9176
4
6
3
2
1
7
5
-
Contract: 6♦, Opening Lead: ♥ 4
W
N
E
3NT(1) Pass
6♣(2) end
(1) Gambling 3NT, showing a long, solid
minor and little outside.
(2) Knows partner has solid clubs, so there
is just one loser — the missing ace of
hearts.
5 1
2 3 1
4 2
9 8
7 9 6
8
1 6
8 9 7
6 8 9
9 7
x
9
22
+
Scrabble 1914
IGNITED K5 across (36)
WEBSITE J6 across (37)
Set Square 1917
18
20
12
x
=8
Futoshiki 2955
Cell Blocks 2959
11
1
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
work out their
positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
works? We’ve
put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
Chess 1 ... Bg8! 2 Qh8 Rxg3! 3 fxg3 Ng6 traps the
white queen
4
18
8
-
Solutions
2
17
All the digits
6
11
20
N
-
17
7
13
Table One
S
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
= 30 from 1-9 are
+
9
7
Killer Tricky No 5532
7
4
+
13
Pairs
21
3
2 2
+
21
3
Dealer: North, Vulnerability: Both
9
-
+
Kakuro 1914
15
5
3
5
16
8
3
3
Tredoku 1482
6
13
7
3
x
Saturday’s answers albinism, album,
albumin, allium, alum, animus, balm,
bulimia, busman, iamb, iambus, ilium,
labium, lamb, limb, limbus, liminal, limn,
luma, luminal, mail, main, mall, manus,
maul, miaul, mill, mini, minibus, minus,
mull, muslin, nimbus, numb, salmi,
simian, slam, slim, slum, small, subliminal
7
3
Set Square No 1918
© PUZZLER MEDIA
Aron Nimzowitsch, the author of
the celebrated strategic bible My
System, was a grandmaster whose
games are replete with opposite
bishop situations. In that respect,
Nimzowitsch was very much a
forerunner of the Soviet world
champion Mikhail Botvinnik,
several of whose games also feature in this instructional series. A
vital component in success with
opposite bishops is to identify a
target in the enemy structure that
cannot be protected by the opposing bishop. Notes to this game are
based on Nimzowitsch’s comments in My System published by
Hardinge Simpole.
14 ... Nxd3 15 Qxd3 b6 16 c4 Ba6
The recent exchange of a pair
of minor pieces has drawn much
of the energy from the white
position. Black now has excellent
play against the hanging pawns
and stands better.
17 Rac1 Rac8 18 Qb3 f6 19 Qa4
fxe5 20 dxe5 Ba3 21 Qxa3 Bxc4
22 Re4 Qd7 23 h3 Bd5 24 Re2
Qb7
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Opposite bishops
Cell Blocks No 2960
Brain Trainer
© PUZZLER MEDIA
Chess Raymond Keene
O
T
G
Y
A
B
U
G
Codeword 3076
1
3
5
4
8
2
7
9
6
4
7
6
9
1
3
2
8
5
3
5
1
8
6
4
9
2
7
6
4
9
7
2
1
8
5
3
2
8
7
3
9
5
6
1
4
Quiz 1 Katy Perry 2 Blackbird 3 USA Today
4 Chestnuts 5 Antoine Lavoisier 6 Chile and
Ecuador 7 Kazimir Malevich 8 JM Coetzee
9 Congo River aka Zaire River 10 Pyotr Ilyich
Tchaikovsky 11 Orca or killer whale 12 Yuriy
Norshteyn aka Yuri Norstein 13 Lluís Companys.
He was executed by firing squad in 1940 by the
Spanish dictatorship of Francisco Franco 14 New
Zealand 15 Altare della Patria or Monumento
Nazionale a Vittorio Emanuele II or Monument
of Victor Emmanuel II or Il Vittoriano
(nicknamed the Wedding Cake)
P R I GG I
L
N
A
U P S E T
M P
E
P R E Y
C
C
A
S U T UR E
P
C
YOU T H F
H
N
A
OU T L I V
L
I
C
E V E R
J
S H WA I F
O Q D
I
F L UMMO X
T
A
I
E
L OS E T E D
Y
H
L
P E B B L Y
B
D O
U L
S NOB
R
P
A O
E
AN N E X
A
R
Z
E
U N K Y AR D
Word Watch
Cadastral (a) Showing
or recording property
boundaries for
taxation purposes
Cacoepy (c) Bad or
wrong pronunciation
Kurgan (a) A prehistoric
burial mound in
central Asia
Brain Trainer
Easy 39; Medium 537;
Harder 6,544
17.07.17
MindGames
Easy No 9177
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
Difficult No 9178
5 4
4
2 1
1
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
8
6
4
Cadastral
a Showing boundaries
b Extremely amoral
c Affected by starlight
8
2
1
7
9
1
3
1 2 5
For interactive
Sudoku puzzles, visit
thetimes.co.uk/puzzles
6
7
6
9
1 5
Kurgan
a A burial mound
b A backpack
c Glacial deposits
Answers on page 15
4
5
3 9
7
3
Cacoepy
a Clumsiness
b An allergy to
chocolate
c Poor pronunciation
Fiendish No 9179
3 6
4 2
PUZZLER MEDIA
Sudoku
3
5 4
2
7
8 4
2
8
3 1 7
1
7
4
3
9
5
8 4
1
8 6
4
5 3
8
2 In the nursery rhyme
Sing a Song of Sixpence,
which creature pecked
off the maid’s nose?
by Olav Bjortomt The Times Quiz Book
12 Which Russian
animator directed the
shorts Hedgehog in the
Fog (1975) and Tale of
Tales (1979)?
15
3 The flagship
publication of the
Gannett Company,
which US newspaper
was founded by Al
Neuharth in 1982?
the Traité élémentaire de
chimie, the first modern
chemical textbook?
6 Which two South
American countries
have no land border
with Brazil?
4 Topped with whipped
cream, a Mont Blanc
is a dessert of puréed,
sweetened what?
7 Suprematist
Composition: White
on White (1918) is a
work by which Russian
painter?
5 In 1789, which
Frenchman published
8 Who won the 1983
Booker prize for his
novel Life & Times
of Michael K?
9 In the 1480s, Diogo
Cão found the mouth
of which river, Africa’s
second longest?
10 Richard Chamberlain
played which Russian
composer in the 1970
film The Music Lovers?
13 Which president
of Catalonia is the only
democratically elected
incumbent president
in European history to
have been executed?
The Times Quiz Book by
Olav Bjortomt is out now.
To order your copy visit
harpercollins.co.uk or call
0844 576 8120. Also available
from all good bookshops.
Friday’s
Quick
Cryptic
solution
No 874
14 The Ranfurly Shield
is a rugby union trophy
in which country?
15 Which Rome
landmark is pictured?
Answers on page 15
The Times Quick Cryptic No 875
1
2
3
4
5
6
12
13
7
10
11
14
15
16
17
18
21
24
19
22
20
23
A T Y P U S
E
O
P
N X
S H E E
A
T
A
N S UME R
A
E PON E S E
U
H
OM
F L AG
P
R
L
B A N K RO L L
I
I
W O
B R A N
N EWH
E
M
P
A
T
H
Y
DGE
O
DOG
S
E
P
I
A
P
Y P
R
E I
V
H I
L
L E
G
V E
O
N
A
N
Follow The Times Crossword
Editor @timescrosswords
by Mara
8
9
P L
A
L Y
T
CO
R
K E
S
A T
Across
1 Pay cut, story unrivalled (12)
9 First of criteria fit for message
(5)
10 Natural bend on cigar (7)
11 US city or territory, old (7)
12 Plunder weapon (5)
14 Reports claiming poor nag is
left to rot (9)
18 Part of Sicily, richly expressive
(5)
20 Title say removed from essay
and paper (7)
21 Rod contains desire for hot
stuff (7)
23 US state where I had a house
(5)
24 Devil started a bit differently,
it’s shown (12)
Down
2 Device that sprays blue rinse
all over the place (9)
3 Canoe I manoeuvred over a
Southern Hemisphere area (7)
4 He or she, perhaps, has to
consolidate declaration (13)
5 Jolly man? Got it! (5)
9
1
6 9
1
4
7
1
GETTY IMAGES
11 Featured in the 2013
documentary Blackfish,
Tilikum was a
notorious captive what?
2
5
2
3
8
to receive four clues for any of today’s puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company’s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
1 In June, which US
pop star became the
first person to reach 100
million Twitter
followers?
4
1
7 5
7
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight
The Times Daily Quiz
8
1
6 Grub’s ending in waste
receptacle (3)
7 Pass old germ orally? (6)
8 Exclusive southern home for
chickens! (5)
13 A face isn’t made to beguile (9)
15 Quite awful Los Angeles drink
(7)
16 Leader of clan in tartan, serene
(6)
17 Old king, brave man heading
for defeat (5)
19 Law works (5)
22 Root vegetable taking a month
to come up (3)
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