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The Times Times 2 24 July 2017

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July 24 2017
The doctor who gives
women a Brazilian bottom
2
1GT
Monday July 24 2017 | the times
times2
An hourglass
Parents, if we want to
know how your kids
did at school, we?ll ask
Hilary Rose
I
GETTY IMAGES
n all the years I spent being
educated, a futile exercise if ever
there were one, I must have sat
hundreds of exams. After every
single one I came out, shrugged
and told my mother I?d waffled
and had probably failed.
Whenever the subject wasn?t
history or a language, I usually had.
I came bottom of the class in every
maths exam I sat, acquired O levels
of stunning mediocrity and only
came into my own in the sixth form,
possibly because the end was finally in
sight. However, my exam results and
term reports were largely between me
and my parents. So what on earth is
possessing these parents who are
posting them on social media?
What misconceived bragging is
this? There?s an epidemic of mental
ill-health among young people, and
the stresses and competitiveness of
social media are thought to play a
part. Schoolchildren are said to be
more heavily burdened by exams
than they were in my day, and more
worried about their performance.
I?m not entirely convinced by that ?
the testing regime has always been
tough, or at least it was at my school,
and sitting exams has always been
stressful. I suspect that the levels
of stress depend on the school, the
child and the parents, not the exams,
and a dodgy report is not the end of
the world. Either way, showing off
is only going to up the ante, and in
a bad way.
But then parenting for some people
seems to be about just that: showing
off. I?m thinking of the enormous
sense of entitlement radiating off
some parents as their children
terrorise pedestrians on their scooters.
I?m thinking of the woman I saw
on the Tube recently who told a
commuter to give up his seat for her
son, who was probably about seven or
eight. He declined, and quite right too.
Why on earth should he?
And I?m thinking mainly of those
nauseating round-robin Christmas
cards that some people send. What?s
that about? Do you honestly think
I care that little Thomas, whom I
have not met, has passed his grade 4
trumpet? Am I bothered that your
A good egg
even after
a month
The Brazilian butt lift is all the rage
among women looking for the ?golden
ratio?. Hannah Betts meets its leading
practitioner ? and one happy client
I can
out-tat
the Queen
pride in Lizzie is boundless after she
got a first in medicine at Oxford?
Surely the people who are interested
in Thomas and Lizzie already know
because you have a relationship with
them; you socialise, you talk, you ask
after their children. It seems safe to
assume that the people who don?t
already know aren?t interested, and
that applies to exam results too.
So, to all the parents posting about
George?s string of A stars and revelling
in the headmaster?s praise, stop. Think
again. Think of the poor kids who are
in tears because they have come
bottom of the class in maths, again,
or the ones who think that mediocre
GCSE results are going to blight their
lives. They won?t, but they don?t know
that yet. The judgment of the wider
world can wait.
Having been told
by Philip Kingsley,
the hair guru, that I
should be eating vast
quantities of protein
for the sake of my
straggly locks,
I account for about
half of all the eggs
eaten in this country,
starting with a raw
one in my breakfast
smoothie.
However, I?m
entirely unmoved by
the revelation that
the egg in my
lunchtime supermarket
sandwich might have
been cooked a month
ago. Boiled in bulk
in factories, then
pasteurised, they
apparently last for
weeks.
I imagine the people
who recoil in disgust
are the same people
whose slavish devotion
to use-by dates results
I always hoped that
getting older would
bring self-knowledge.
Alas, it seems mainly
to have brought
self-delusion, and never
more so than when
it comes to buying
souvenirs on holiday.
These are always,
without exception, a
bad idea, as the large
pink plaster pineapple
I inexplicably acquired
on a recent holiday will
attest. The pointless
mother-of-pearl box
was similarly unwise,
as was the inflatable
beach-ball-cum-globe,
the small wooden
tortoise and the big
lump of imitation coral,
which I thought would
look lovely in the
bathroom, but serves
only to remind me of
a magical holiday with
a man who turned out
to be vile.
So I?m intrigued by
a new exhibition at
Buckingham Palace
of the souvenirs that
HM has been given
on her travels. Bags
of salt from the British
Virgin Islands might
conceivably be useful
back home. A painted
ostrich egg from
Namibia and a
13th-century gold
breastplate from
Panama? Not so much.
Still, I bet she?s pretty
jealous of my plaster
pineapple.
Kevin Maher is away
in more than seven
million tonnes of edible
food being thrown away
every year.
Why do people trust
a label more than their
common sense? Of
course supermarkets
are going to err hugely
on the side of caution.
But if something smells
OK and is cooked
properly, it?s probably
fine. Even when it?s a
month-old egg.
I
am sitting in a Times conference
room, gently prodding the
posterior of 25-year-old Christina
Pereira, a woman who qualifies
for Constance Bennett?s remark
about Marilyn Monroe: ?Now
there?s a broad with a future
behind her.? Firm yet springy,
tightly packed yet bouncily yielding ?
never before have I understood the
allure of the female backside, but here
it is in all its plushly pert perfection.
?And if I walk you can actually
see the projection. It?s lovely,? cries
Pereira, a French translator, fluent in
four languages, yet whose arse tends
to do the talking for her. She?s right: it?s
thrilling. ?Like jello on springs,? I say
with a sigh, coming over all Some Like
It Hot. ?Are you sure it?s OK that I?m
touching it?? I ask. ?Of course,? trills
Pereira. ?I get so many girls asking.? I
give it one more ecstatic cupping, then
desist: a crowd is starting to gather on
the other side of the window.
The Pygmalion behind this Galatea
is the king of the rear, Dr Foued
Hamza, a French cosmetic surgeon
who has been practising in Britain
since 2009. Hamza, a dashing 53, is a
leading light in the Brazilian butt lift,
an innovative technique in which fat
cells are removed from the waist by
liposuction, then injected into the
bottom to achieve staggeringly
bootylicious results. He developed this
?sculpting? technique ten years ago
while operating on transsexuals
seeking hourglass proportions, but
now works largely with curve-seeking
women.
Each buttock can be injected
with between 500 and
1,500cc of fat, depending
on the patient?s size and
skin elasticity. Pereira
received the minimum,
but nipping in her waist,
plus naturally large hips,
created her va-va-voom
proportions. Sculpting
of this sort would not
be achievable with
diet and exercise.
?Impossible,? says
Hamza. ?You can?t tell
the brain to put the fat
here and lose it here.?
Moreover, because there
is no new fat production
after puberty (fat cells can
increase in size by 1,000
times, but do not increase
in number), once you
redistribute these cells, even
if you put on weight,
your figure will retain
its hourglass. Pereira
has piled on 6kg ?
or ?one big chicken
and a half? ? in the
three years since
her procedure, yet
her proportions
remain the same: a
73cm ?snatched? waist, her hips at
their natural 106cm and her buttocks
lofty with their coveted ?projection?, in
the manner of some minxish baboon.
Her �500 procedure may have
taken only an hour to perform, yet
recovery required two months of no
sitting for fear of ?decompression?.
Hamza recommends a mere three
weeks, but Pereira is ?an extremist.
I paid nearly �000 ? I?m going to
make sure this fat survives. I worried
it might go like Play-Doh. You cannot
diet because you need to feed the fat.?
The only side-effect is an occasional
?hot bottom?, which feels only right
because it undoubtedly is.
Once upon a time ? that time being
my girlhood ? we knew where we
stood in regard to backsides. Some
eras eschewed them altogether: the
1920s, the 1960s and the waif-crazed
1990s. Some, in the style of The Fast
Show?s Arabella Weir, fretted: ?Does
my bum look big in this?? The rest of
us merely ignored our rears, perching
on them from time to time, but
generally assuming that less was more.
However, over the past few years we
have been knocked sideways by the
rise of the super-arse. One minute
the rump was the great neglected area
of aesthetic angst, the next minute
women are dying from injecting more
junk into their trunk ? in less than
a year two women died at the same
Florida clinic while undergoing
Brazilian butt-lift surgery.
A colleague who once starved
herself into skeletal submission
complains about being a ?badoo?
(check Urban Dictionary), while
squatting up a storm and
sporting padded pants. This
summer?s hot beauty buy is the
mellifluous Brazilian Bum Bum
Cream, � a pop, the caffeine
content of which promises to
raise the Titanic (backside).
Kim ?that?s a novel way
to serve champagne?
Kardashian must certainly
take some responsibility, as
must the preponderance of
fellow Photoshop-inspired
figures. ?I?m not trying
to be like her because
she?s a bit ? you
know,? says Pereira.
We do. Yet patients
come to Hamza
wielding Instagram
images. ?It?s social
media,? he says.
?Everybody wants
to look like someone
else. My patients
bring photographs
and ask, ?Is this
possible?? ? Porn
too must surely
have played its part,
propelling us from
a starved, catwalk
ideal to wanting to
the times | Monday July 24 2017
3
1GT
times2
figure? That?ll be �500
The lowdown
Designer lattes
COVER AND BELOW: SARAH CRESSWELL FOR THE TIMES
be present; there must be a well-placed
inferior gluteal crease (that is, a
youthfully short rather than agedly
long arse); the inner gluteal fold must
have ?45-degree take-off? or a
downward left-to-right slope; and the
buttocks must be plumply contoured.
He ensures that his patients aren?t
dysmorphics by seeing them two or
three times before starting work. Yet
couldn?t our culture be said to be
suffering from a collective dysmorphia?
Certainly, Pereira?s steely determination
has taken other forms. ?I was starving
myself from 14 until 22,? she blithely
admits. ?I didn?t touch a burger in ten
years ? fries, rice, bread, nothing. I
became so sick, so skinny. My
boyfriend used to shout at me,
?You look too skinny because
you are bones.? I think I am
very strong-minded.?
She shows me a picture of
her pre-operative figure at
20. She looks lovely, with an
enviable shape. ?I already had
some people saying I had
a nice body. I was slim, but my
waist was not defined. I was never
fat, but I had big hips. I knew if my
waist were smaller I could look
proportioned. So for three years I was
researching and thinking, ?What body
do I want?? Because I knew surgery
was a good way to achieve your goals.?
Like many of Hamza?s patients,
she had never heard of the ?golden
The only
side-effect is
an occasional
?hot bottom?
be so many hyperbolically sexualised
Jessica Rabbits.
In 2014 inquiries about bottom
enhancing to the healthcare
comparison website Whatclinic.com
increased by 170 per cent; 88 per cent of
them were from women. This interest is
largely from girls aged 18-24, at 49 per
cent, with 36 per cent from those aged
25-35. Hamza-style augmentation via
fat transfer is increasingly more
popular than implants.
Not all of Hamza?s patients want an
extreme, Brazilian-style hoick, with
some merely aiming at being less
straight-up-and-down. However, the
young tend to be desirous of the
?golden ratio?, the 0.7 waist-to-hip
ratio (WHR), where the waist
circumference is 70 per cent of the
circumference of the hips and buttocks,
identified as being universally
appealing by the evolutionary
psychologist Dr Devendra Singh.
Singh argued that this Coca-Cola bottle
shape reflects fecundity, genetic
fitness, overall health and even
superior brain function. And what is
suggestive of good reproductive stock
we tend to find beautiful, meaning the
hourglass triggers an instant phwoar
factor in our caveman brains.
Monroe, Sophia Loren and the
Venus de Milo boasted WHRs of about
0.7. ?And I?ve got it too,? chirps Pereira.
Hamza cites evidence that our eyes
are increasingly drawn to ratios of
ever-greater extremes (0.6 to 0.67),
while the natural hourglass shows
signs of dying out; only 0.8 per cent
of women lay claim to it. Hamza
maintains that it was always a myth ?
corseting apart ? because women
require good fat reserves to spawn.
In a paper delivered last year to
the British Association of Aesthetic
Plastic Surgeons, Hamza discusses his
formula for the perfect posterior on
the basis of 120 case studies collected
over a couple of years. The WHR must
Christina Pereira, 25.
Left: Kim Kardashian,
who made the posterior
popular on social media
ratio?, but, boy is she a fan today,
despite finding it difficult to find
clothes. She fizzes with excitement
over the social-media attention she
receives for her ?orange in a bottle
figure?, with its pert ?projection? and
?snatched? waist. ?Instagram loves me.
I must be in so many Snapchats.?
And I assure you that all eyes turn.
I spot her in the Times lobby at a single
glance, where she has just escaped the
pursuit of a camera-phone-brandishing
school trip. ?Sometimes I don?t know
what to do. Everyone is stopping me
in the street. It?s crazy. Sometimes
I want to go outside and just be happy
and have no one look at me.? Pereira
is at pains to convey that she is not
?trashy?, ?tacky?, ?bad? or a ?hoe? (her
words), but a private individual with
an extremely public arse.
She is harassed ?between three
and eight times a day?: kerb-crawled,
propositioned, grabbed, even punched.
?I didn?t know it would be so hard.
Sometimes it?s flattering, but I get also
a lot of hate, especially from women.?
Still, she professes to have no regrets.
She does sometimes wonder if the
trend will vanish in a few years, but
reckons she can style it out. She ponders
what effect having a baby will have on
her hourglass, but plans to keep Hamza
on speed-dial. ?I just look the way I
should look. When I watch myself I am
thinking, ?I look better than I thought
I would.? I thank him all the time.?
Good weekend?
Not bad. Found a new hobby. What
about you?
Hit the shops! Check out the new
arm candy.
OMG, I love it. Is that the . . .
Gucci bag? Yep. Want to try it?
Yes! Well, no. Sort of. Actually, can I
borrow it to take an Instagram snap?
Of my bag?
Yes.
That seems weird. It being mine.
It?s not just going to be of the bag. It
will be the bag and my coffee.
That?s not less weird. Why would
you want to take a photo of my bag
with your coffee?
Because my coffee is also Gucci.
You can buy coffee at Gucci? I
suppose they are Italian . . .
No, no. It?s my regular Starbucks.
But I have the Gucci label embossed
on my foam with chocolate sprinkles.
That I did myself. With the stencil I
made at the weekend.
What possessed you?
Well I found this Instagram account.
Here we go.
Called @coffeenclothes. They take
pictures of designer handbags, with
matching lattes. Want to see?
Not really. So you?re not the only
loon who does this?
No ? and if it?s an Insta-trend, it?s
legitimate behaviour.
Fashion froth, more like.
Ha ha.
Go on then. What other designer
lattes can you get?
Oh, anything really. Burberry,
Givenchy, Louis Vuitton, Chanel . . .
And they have the matching bags?
They do.
Lucky them.
So . . . can I borrow your bag? So I can
do my own snap? Please?
I still really don?t see the point.
Especially now.
Why?
Your froth has evaporated.
Hannah Rogers
4
1GT
Monday July 24 2017 | the times
times2
Unhappy? Well, maybe that?s your
Gary John Bishop is a straight-talking
British life coach loved by America?s
alpha males. Harry Wallop meets him
I
t takes something remarkable to
break the golden rule adhered
to by all Londoners: do not catch
the eye of a fellow commuter on
the Tube. And never, under any
circumstance, engage a stranger
in conversation. So, Gary John
Bishop, take a bow. I was reading
his debut book on the Central Line
when a smartly dressed man across
the aisle smiled and said: ?Wow, that?s
an interesting title for a book.? It
certainly is. It?s called Unf*ck Yourself.
The tone of this forceful title is
replicated inside the book, which
promises to offer ?a slap from the
universe to wake you up to your true
potential and get spectacularly into
your life?. Most self-help books are the
literary equivalent of a yoga class, a
soothing stretch liberally sprinkled
with some ?because you?re worth it?
aphorisms. This one is the equivalent
of those British Military Fitness boot
camps where the instructor screams at
you to do squats in the pouring rain.
Here?s a typical passage: ?Act on the
moment and in line with what the
item in front of your face demands of
you. F*** how you feel, ACT! Not in a
minute. Not after this show is over.
Now.? It?s an approach that has won
a legion of fans, not least men of a
certain age.
Bishop is a life coach. These are to
Generation X what psychiatrists
were to baby boomers. You
can hire him for $300 to
$500 an hour ? although
he has a waiting list. And
he?ll listen to you over the
telephone then tell you
where you are going
wrong. He says that
among his clients are
celebrities, chief
executives, professional
sportsmen and even a few politicians.
?But I am more interested in who you
are, rather than who you have been up
to this point.?
Bishop is a plain, simple Gary ?
Gary John is his Sunday name, as he
calls it. ?I threw it in for a bit of
formality, but also part of it is if you
google ?Gary Bishop? one of the things
that comes up is a mass murderer.?
Glaswegian by birth, he has lived in
America for 23 years. ?That?s why my
accent is so messed up. I?ve got this
hybrid accent. I am like the bastard
love child of Tammy Wynette and
Sean Connery.?
It?s an accurate description. He speaks
to me via Skype from Florida, where
he lives, and sometimes it is a struggle
to untangle his vowels. ?Way? comes
out halfway between ?why? and ?weir?.
His book is noteworthy not only for its
title and tone, but for the reaction it has
received. He self-published it last year
as an ebook. He gladly admits that the
primary purpose was to add a bit of heft
to his coaching business. ?My
initial idea was if I could sell a
couple thousand copies I?d
be pretty happy.?
It has sold 40,000
self-published copies.
The reviews on Amazon
verge from enthusiastic to
evangelical. Here is one:
?DUDE Gary. Wow
man, this has me
on a whole new
level and love
how you were
straight
forward with
it :) Thank
you Homie,
Hope to
meet you one
day! :)?
Unf*ck Yourself: Get
Out of Your Head and
Into Your Life by
Gary John Bishop,
left, is published by
Yellow Kite on
Thursday, �.99
Bishop explains what happened
next. ?When I hit 30,000 copies sold
I was contacted by HarperCollins in
the States to ask me if I was interested
in publishing. I then googled the top
ten literary agents in the world. I
contacted six of them. I got a response
back from all of them within an hour.?
He picked Jenny Bent, who ?then
put the book up for auction and I had
18 publishers express an interest in
purchasing the rights to the book in
the United States alone. Everyone
wanted a piece of the book.? It is being
published in the UK by Yellow Kite,
part of Hodder & Stoughton. The
publisher hopes to replicate what
Random House did in 2011 when it
took up EL James?s Fifty Shades of Grey,
then an ebook with a loyal following.
It has since sold more than 100 million
copies. Did the publishers not want to
change the title? ?Nobody wanted to
mess with it. The title had already
proved itself, I guess,? he says. ?I am
still a Glaswegian at heart, and that
word is a particular favourite of mine.?
Bishop, who is 50, left school at 16.
the times | Monday July 24 2017
5
1GT
times2
own fault
?Grounding?, the new A-list buzzword
GETTY IMAGES
If you want to
be courageous,
you have to act
courageously
His father was a cooper, making whisky
barrels. ?Unfortunately he drank most
of what was in them.? His mother
brought up the children. ?We were a
very ordinary Glasgow family. I was
from the side of the tracks where they
stole the tracks ? the East End of the
city, Shettleston.? He went to work for
the Inland Revenue in Glasgow. ?I dealt
with people querying whether they
were on the right PAYE code. In 1994 I
just upped sticks and headed to the US.?
He was 27 and had decided to make
a go of his sideline, a band. They were
called Choke and enjoyed modest
success supporting the Black Crows
and Creed. ?I didn?t make money, but
it was a brilliant time. I met my wife
when I was a musician. She?s a proper
blond-haired beautiful American
woman. It?s pretty strange for her
being married to a gnarly Glaswegian.?
Yet despite the outward happy family
life, first in a band, then running his own
construction company, he wasn?t happy.
?I was driven, selfish, self-centred and
pretending to be kind and considerate,
but really just looking to see what I
could get out of it. My marriage was in
trouble. My version of demonstrating
my love to my wife was showing her
the number of hours I worked. There
are many men like that. They don?t
quite know how to express their love.?
It all changed when he went on a
life-coaching course. ?It was
mind-blowing to me, like the sky had
opened up.? So much so that he sold
his construction business and became
a life coach, first for a big personal
development company and then for
himself. He is still married to Maria,
and they have three boys. He
describes his marriage as ?awesome?.
His book is a distillation of all he has
learnt coaching clients, as well as from
what he has read. It is a strange mixture
of no-nonsense ?pull your finger out?
advice mixed with bite-sized nuggets of
classical philosophy. Heidegger, Socrates,
Marcus Aurelius, Seneca, Disraeli,
Aristotle, Jung, Napoleon, Theodore
Roosevelt and Epictetus appear. There?s
an awful lot of Epictetus, which is nice,
because he deserves a new audience.
?I tinker a bit with philosophy. I love
philosophy. I guess I rank myself a
C-grade philosophy student, but an
A-plus for applied philosophy.?
One thing that links these men
(women don?t get much of a look-in) is
that many are stoics. Positive thinking
is all well and good, but will only take
you so far. You need to get off that
sofa. ?If you want to be courageous,
act courageously. If you want to be
happy, one must pursue the act of
happiness by taking happy actions,?
Bishop tells me, paraphrasing
Epictetus. ?Your emotional state then
shifts with it. You can habitually build
up new actions, which by default
habitually builds up new emotional
states, and new ways of being.?
Don?t sit around feeling aggrieved
that you aren?t paid enough; go and
ask your boss for a pay rise. ?Do you
think Gandhi, or Rosa Parks, or
Abraham Lincoln weren?t gripped by
thoughts of doubt, fear or uncertainty?
HELL NO! They were racked by the
same kind of shit you are, but they
acted ANYWAY,? he writes.
It?s appealingly direct advice. And
in part it explains why the book has
struck a chord with a certain breed of
American men: Trump supporters. ?I
can see people on the right are really
drawn to the book, because they are
full of, ?Yeah, just do it!? But I am more
interested in what I can give
somebody to empower them, rather
than just telling them to do it.?
Maybe they like it because the
only living person discussed at length
is not the Dalai Lama, but Arnold
Schwarzenegger, who is cited as the
ultimate getting-off-your-arse-andachieving-your-goal kinda man.
?I?m not a gym guy. I don?t really do
the gym, I?m more of a pub guy,? says
Bishop. ?But Arnie appeals to me
because it struck me ? what must it
have been like for him aged 15 or 16,
living in Austria and having some of
the dreams he must have had? It must
have seemed impossible to him. But he
did it. And I find that fascinating.?
The lesson? Be relentless. Because
sometimes relentlessness is all you
have if you want to transform yourself
from a skinny Austrian teenager into a
world champion bodybuilder and the
governor of California.
Bishop is the first to acknowledge
that much of the self-help industry is
?bullshit, nonsense pop-psychology?,
but says he?s happy to be part of that
industry if he can genuinely help
people. ?I?ve had someone contact me
who said the book had made such a
difference that he?d checked himself
into rehab. It was moving; it moved me
to tears.? He gets a little choked up at
the memory. ?That?s why I did it. I
want people to realise they are great.?
He then rather ruins the moment,
by adding: ?Your access to realising
you are great is first realising you?re
an asshole.?
Paltrow?s
website
Goop
brought it
into the
spotlight
Naomie Harris and,
below, Gwyneth
Paltrow and her
Instagram photograph
N
ow that the word ?clean??
has been exiled from the
health world, celebrities are
inventing new ways to
prove they can do dirty.
Kelly Brook has declared gardening
her new ?full-time hobby?. Liz Hurley
has started modelling her swimwear
line while holding the unlikely prop of
a garden hosepipe.
On Thursday the actress Naomie
Harris went a step filthier: posing
barefoot on Instagram and declaring
herself a devotee of grounding ? ?whip
your shoes and socks off and connect
with the earth for a good 20-45
minutes!! Do that whenever you fly and
you won?t get #jetlag!!? she enthused.
Thanks to one well-pedicured
foot-selfie, going barefoot ? an act
once reserved for wedding dancefloors
or catching a verruca ? might
suddenly have more legs. The theory
(term used loosely) is that placing our
bare feet and/or hands on the earth
for 30 minutes a day
connects us to the energy of
the planet. Which,
apparently, is good.
The eye-rollers shouldn?t
be
b surprised that it was
Gwyneth Paltrow?s website,
Goop, home to other outthere trends such as putting
jade
eggs up your vagina,
j
that brought grounding (or
earthing)
into the spotlight.
e
It interviewed the leader
of the Earthing Therapy
o
Movement ? an American called
Clint Ober. After spending 30 years
working ? nope, not in a science lab
? in cable television, Ober wondered
if a similar benefit to grounding
electrical cables (reduced static
interference from the environment)
would also apply to grounded humans.
In the 18 years since, Ober has got
his ?science? to a place beyond TV
aerials. The gist is that our immune
systems release free radicals to destroy
pathogens. The problem is that free
radicals are electrically charged (still
with us?), so they have to steal an
electron from a healthy cell ? but
this damages it, triggering more free
radicals (and so on). The earth,
however, has infinite free electrons,
?so when a person is grounded, those
electrons naturally flow between the
earth and the body, reducing free
radicals?, he told Goop.
Given that free radical-generating
substances are ever-present ? in
pollutants, smoke, even booze ? will
drinking barefoot prevent a hangover?
So far, Ober and his fellow earth
therapists have linked it to pretty
much everything else: arthritis,
insomnia, depression, Harris?s jet lag.
Are there grounds for these claims?
?There are a handful of studies
suggesting that grounding has
beneficial effects, including reduced
pain, better sleep and normalised
day-night cortisol rhythm, but these
are from a small network of
researchers,? admits Dr Jenna
Macciochi, a doctor of immunology.
?There?s scant scientific basis for the
far-reaching claims that it can cure jet
lag, insomnia and depression.?
The GP Dr Clare Morrison is also
sceptical that it?s anything more than
clever psychology ? and good old
fresh air ? at play. ?If you believe in it,
the placebo effect could take hold.?
Don?t have a garden? Don?t like
ants? Like . . . shoes? The Barefoot Sales
Corp (earthing.com) sells an earthing
kit ? with a throw and mat ? that
you plug in to recreate the grounding
effect inside. It costs $199. But what
price on better electrons, right?
Gemma Askham
6
1GT
Monday July 24 2017 | the times
life
Ask Professor Tanya Byron
Since their father died my
grandsons have been out of control
N
Eighteen months ago
our son-in-law took
his own life. He left
two children, aged five
and ten. We provided
support and childcare
for our daughter, who has struggled
with bringing up the boys alone.
We are particularly concerned
about the youngest. He is destructive,
throws and breaks things and swears
continuously. He has left a trail of
destruction throughout the house.
He has always been unruly and it is
difficult to decide how much to take.
Is his anger about his dad or a lack of
discipline when he was younger? He
is behind at school and teachers find
him difficult.
The eldest has suffered badly
because he was very close to his
father and understood that it was
suicide. He has been offered
counselling, but refuses to talk to
anyone except his mother about his
feelings. He has had a lot of time off
school because of his anxieties.
We often look after the children,
but find their behaviour difficult. We
don?t know who to consult because
our daughter refuses our suggestion
to speak to social services.
Angela
Q
The boys
need to
know
that they
weren?t to
blame ?
and that
grieving
is helpful
A
N
The tragic events that
have befallen your
family have clearly
left a legacy of despair
and trauma, which
your grandsons are
manifesting through their behaviour.
The boys and their mother have been
left grieving and traumatised.
The stress and despair must be
unbearable, and the boys must be in
a state of shock. The ten-year-old,
knowing that his father committed
suicide, is clearly overwhelmed and
showing separation anxiety that
compromises his ability to engage
with the world and leave his mother
(in case something happens to her).
r).
The five-year-old has limited capacity
pacity
to understand and is confused, grieving
ieving
and angry. As is normal for his agee he is
expressing this through his behaviour.
viour.
Your daughter must be struggling,
ng,
and it would be understandable iff she
were depressed and functioning with
less capacity. She is clearly havingg
difficulty containing her sons and
d
managing their grief. While your
suggestion to contact social services
ces
for help is an acknowledgment off
the challenges that your daughterr
faces, I imagine that this feels
threatening to a vulnerable woman
an
whose decision-making may be
compromised.
For the boys to be supported and
nd
their behaviour managed, your
daughter needs support too. Given
n
what the boys have been through,,
if their mother is depressed and
less able to cope, it will increase
their anxiety. Depressed mothers
generally show less attention to
their children?s needs and are
less likely to set boundaries.
Children of depressed mothers
are more likely to exhibit
challenging behaviour.
If you have a problem
and would like
Professor Tanya
Byron?s help, email
proftanyabyron
@thetimes.co.uk
This is a sad situation that requires
support and intervention at a number
of levels. The boys need therapy to
address the loss of their father. Given
their age differences, their needs will
be different, but as children they need
reassurance that they weren?t to
blame, to understand how talking and
grieving is helpful (which they may
not feel able to do with their mother if
they want to protect her), and to know
that daily routines, such as going to
school, are important. I suggest
that you contact Winston?s Wish
(winstonswish.org.uk, 08088 020021),
the charity that provides professional
therapeutic support for children who
have been bereaved. See also
griefencounter.org.uk.
It is important that the family are
linked into all the support available
through their GP, including a referral
to Child and Adolescent Mental
Health Services. Schools can also
support referrals for behavioural and
learning-related issues. Social services
can give your daughter additional
support ? not because she is a poor
mother, but because she is vulnerable.
Your youngest grandson exhibited
challenging behaviour before his
father?s suicide. This does not mean
that the suicide has not had an impact;
clearly it has amplified his behaviour.
There are two issues to address: what
underpins his behaviour, and how best
to address his grief, which is
exacerbating these difficulties.
There are many reasons for children
showing challenging behaviour,
ranging from inconsistent and poor
adult management to stress in the
child?s environment that causes them
to act out. If their father had been
unwell for some time, perhaps angry,
withdrawn and depressed, this may
explain one child who behaves in a
challenging way and another who has
become withdrawn. It is how they
have learnt to ?cope?.
To manage the unruly behaviour
alongside counselling and grief work,
alongsi
grandson requires containment
your gr
calm and consistent
via patient,
pati
boundaries. Given his emotional state,
bounda
suggest that he is incentivised with
I sugge
rewards for doing as asked and with
constant feedback. To punish a child
constan
behaving badly because of
who is b
distress
distr is effectively to ignore that
child?s emotional despair and not
chil
what they are expressing.
to ?hear?
?
When he has a tantrum try to
W
contain him somewhere he can
co
calm
down safely, rewarding
c
him for calming down. The key
h
is to be consistent and calm;
inconsistent responses will not
enable
him to learn to manage
e
himself differently.
It is clear that the whole
family
need immediate support.
f
Both
boys should be assessed
B
and
a have counselling offered to
them ? with their mother if they
won?t go alone. Your daughter may
also need
additional support for her
n
mental health and should contact the
charity Survivors of Bereavement by
Suicide, where she will find support
Suicide
who have been through
from those
th
same tragedy (uk-sobs.org.uk).
the sam
Madonna,
Warhol and
me: when the
Chelsea Hotel
is your home
Nicolaia Rips grew up in the legendary
New York residence, a misfit among
misfits. Now 18, she?s written a memoir
of the madness. By Damian Whitworth
N
icolaia Rips first
began to reassess
her upbringing in
New York?s famous
Chelsea Hotel when
she threw a princess
party for her
classmates and the
event was interrupted by an almost
naked neighbour who had just been
attacked by his axe-wielding partner.
Until then Rips, who is now 18 and
the precocious author of a first volume
of memoir, had adored her existence
in a hotel that has become a byword
for bohemian living. ?It felt wonderful,
magical,? she says. ?Never normal,
but beautiful.?
Rips was, by her account, a friendless
child, and the party was an attempt to
woo the other girls in her class. When
they gathered at the hotel she was
dressed as Belle from Beauty and the
Beast and ushered her guests past a
resident screenwriter she knew as Mr
Crafty, who told them: ?I hope you
princesses have a f***ing good time.?
An irascible artist in a wheelchair
called them midgets.
Safely inside her family?s
one-bedroom apartment, they were
settling in for the tea party when
there was a knock on the door from
El Capitan, a man in his fifties whose
gin intake had left him almost
mummified and who took Rips for
walks on the back of a giant
Newfoundland. On this occasion he
was wearing only underpants and
a monocle, which was cracked and
dangling round his neck. He explained
that he had been attacked by his
partner, who went by the name of
Lady Hammersmith. His arm was
swelling after she smashed up their
four-poster bed with an antique axe
and it collapsed on him.
A space was laid for the Capitan at
the table, but Rips could foresee how
the incident would be recounted by
the astonished princesses at school the
next day. For the first time she felt
ashamed of her home. The Chelsea
Hotel was no longer a shining castle
but a ?crumbling outpost of outcasts?.
The people she loved ?weren?t
captains, knights and ladies, they were
addicts, cripples and prostitutes?.
Legends are thickly woven around
the Chelsea Hotel, an establishment
that for decades attracted writers,
artists and musicians thanks to its
tolerance of eccentrics and their
excesses. They put up with the hotel?s
dilapidation (many celebrated its
seediness) and relished the long-term
rental deals and the management?s
flexible approach to bills.
Dylan Thomas was staying at the
hotel during a 1953 tour when he fell
ill and died in hospital. The story
that 18 straight whiskies hastened
his demise has been disputed, but he
was undoubtedly one of the hotel?s
thirstiest residents. The most
notorious incident in the hotel?s
history was the murder of Nancy
Spungen, seemingly stabbed by her Sex
Pistols boyfriend, Sid Vicious, in 1978.
Jackson Pollock was among the
artists who stayed and Andy Warhol
shot scenes of his film Chelsea Girls at
the hotel. Writers somehow managed
to get serious work done during their
sojourns. Arthur C Clarke wrote 2001:
A Space Odyssey while there, and
William Burroughs The Third Mind.
Arthur Miller stayed there after his
divorce from Marilyn Monroe.
Bob Dylan wrote a song for his
future wife, Sara, at the hotel, while
Leonard Cohen immortalised a tryst
with Janis Joplin in his song Chelsea
Hotel #2. Jack Kerouac and Gore Vidal
took a room for a one-night stand.
Madonna spent time there in the
1980s and later used a suite to shoot
photographs for her book Sex.
Rips?s parents came to the hotel
after they married 22 years ago. Her
mother, Sheila, is an artist and former
model, her father, Michael, a lawyer
and writer with a dislike of hard work,
according to his daughter. The family
travelled when she was an infant and
then returned to ?the Chelsea?.
the times | Monday July 24 2017
7
1GT
times2
EMILY MALAN; GETTY IMAGES
Andy Warhol shot
scenes for his
film Chelsea Girls
at the hotel
Michael?s idea of a children?s story
was to retell the works of Thomas
Carlyle for his daughter, so Nicolaia
was never read the stories of Eloise at
the Plaza Hotel. However, she became
aware of the children?s classics when
people saw her roaming the Chelsea?s
halls and compared her to Eloise. She
regards her childhood amid the gothic
denizens of the hotel as ?Tim Burton?s
Eloise?. Her book, Trying to Float, has
already been optioned for television
and it is easy to imagine Wes
Anderson bringing his Royal
Tenenbaums eye to her early life.
Sheila was both over-protective ?
she would cycle behind the school
bus to make sure her daughter got to
school safely ? and lax. She allowed
her daughter to mix with some
outlandish characters and was vague
about fundamental things, ranging
from breakfast to high schools
(12-year-old Nicolaia had to research
the application process herself).
The family apartment was a joyful,
but cramped place. Her parents walled
off an area the size of a walk-in
wardrobe in their living room as a
sleeping area for their only child. The
little room featured a carved wooden
window from Morocco, which gave her
Nicolaia Rips. Above
right, from top: the
Chelsea Hotel; Andy
Warhol at the Chelsea.
Below: Madonna
Trying to Float by
Nicolaia Rips is
published by Scribner,
�99
a view on to the kitchen where her
mother whipped up meals for the
stream of neighbours who flowed
through the small apartment.
The hotel was built in 1884, when its
12 storeys made it the tallest building
in New York. When Rips was a girl it
was presided over by the anarchic
Stanley Bard, whose family had owned
it for years. He could be formidable
when faced with unpaid rent. Rips
recalls seeing herds of residents
stampeding across the lobby whenever
he left for lunch.
Rips?s babysitter, Jade, was a
prostitute. ?A kind of courtesan,? she
corrects me. ?High end.? When Rips
was bullied at school she took comfort
from the support of Storm�, an
80-year-old sexually ambiguous
resident who kept a pink revolver
strapped to her ankle and promised that
if Rips had any more trouble she would
come to the school ?and take care of it?.
She never took her up on the invitation,
but the offer was a morale boost.
Rips did not have a happy time at
primary school and found it hard to
make friends. She was used to
spending time with adults and was
also marked out by her slowness at
learning to read and write. When she
and her parents were called into
school to discuss this, her father,
who is from a family of Nebraskan
optometrists, claimed that she had a
weakness of the eye that might have
caused damage to the brain. It was
nonsense, but she was subsequently
subjected to two years of visits to an
experimental eye clinic that she now
thinks may have harmed her eyesight.
A false sense of superiority inherited
from her father and an odd haircut
may have contributed to the suspicion
with which she was regarded by her
peers. Legends also grew around a
pool party during which she tried to
pass a baby to its mother in the water,
but somehow knocked the mother
unconscious and all three of them
nearly drowned. Later, on a school
snowshoe expedition, she slipped
behind the group and a mother who
came to help her fell off the mountain,
breaking several bones. Rumours
began that Rips had pushed her.
Her parents? eccentricities didn?t
help her to achieve acceptance from
her classmates. Her father, who had
picked up some martial-arts skills
from his Korean tailor, rendered
unconscious a boy in her class who
had rushed at him in a fit of anger.
Rips would sit alone in the school
caf�, then later, at middle school
(from the ages of 11 to 13), on the table
for oddballs, including Noah, ?the
Licker?, who tried to get close enough
to people to lick them, and Horatio,
?the Planker?, who would lie face
down on the floor whenever he got
agitated. Rips was able to offer them
some sort of protection from bullies
because of her reputation for being
homicidal, which had been embellished
by other pupils over the years.
She was bullied and one girl spread
a rumour that 11-year-old Rips was
pregnant. In the book she recounts all
this quite lightly. ?It was miserable, but
it was also doable because of the
support system I had from my parents
and the people in the hotel,? she says.
?I was surrounded by other people
who were miserable because they were
also outcasts.?
We are talking in the caf� of a
London hotel during a rail trip she is
taking around Europe with a friend.
She is bright and funny. Things have
turned out OK.
She worked on the book with her
father and says that some of the
stories have been ?imagined?, although
not the ones I?ve recounted here. One
tale (which she says is true) provides
an insight into the paranoia of New
York helicopter parents.
As the time of transition to middle
school approached, the parents of her
classmates received emails from the
class teacher offering them advice and
help for getting into good schools.
Many of them enthusiastically
took the advice, even though it meant
applying to schools in far-flung areas
they hadn?t heard of. It emerged,
after the process had ended, that they
were the victims of a hoax. The email
advice came not from the teacher, but
from a mischievous and enterprising
fellow pupil keen to lessen the
competition for good schools. ?There
was a rumour that maybe one of her
parents was involved, but we will
never know,? says Rips.
By the end of middle school Rips
had managed to acquire enough
popularity to be elected student
council president, using the slogan
?Nicolaia Rips, the best of a bad
bunch?. This came as a surprise to her
parents, especially her mother, who
on being told of her daughter?s plan
to run had immediately started
composing her loser?s speech.
Her mother, whom she clearly
adores, is not altogether happy. ?She
feels she isn?t in the book enough. She
is quite upset.? Her father, who has a
larger role, takes a different view. ?My
dad has told me I am not allowed to
write about him any more or I will be
snipped out of the will.?
Rips went on to LaGuardia High
School, renowned as the school on
which the film and TV series Fame
were based. She specialised in
singing, but realised she would not
make it as a professional. ?I am so
happy I did it. I learnt so much, I
met incredible people,? she says.
?It was also an insanely competitive
environment.? She is now studying
classics and creative writing at
Brown University.
The Chelsea Hotel is undergoing a
massive and lengthy renovation. Her
parents moved out three years ago,
but will move back into a bigger
apartment this autumn. Many of the
long-term residents have moved on or
died, and Rips fears that much of the
character of the place may be lost.
?There are a lot of ghosts, but I love it.?
8
1GT
arts
I want people to
say, ?Oh, that?s a
great record. He
hasn?t lost a thing?
Randy Newman, 73, the Oscar-winning singer-songwriter
who wrote You?ve Got a Friend in Me for Toy Story, tells
Dominic Maxwell why his new songs target Putin, not Trump
H
alfway through my
interview with
Randy Newman, the
fire alarm goes off in
his London hotel. We
carry on talking for
a few moments ?
about why it has
taken him nine years to come up with
his new album, about why, despite the
?meanness and buffoonery? at the
heart of American politics these days,
this great satirical singer-songwriter
would rather write about Putin than
he would about Trump ? before it
starts to look as if a false alarm might
for once be a real one. We rush to
the door.
Well, I say ?rush?. Newman?s knack
for a mordantly funny song and an
avuncular wisecrack may be
undimmed at the age of 73, but I hope
he?ll forgive me for mentioning that
he?s whiter of hair and heavier on his
feet than he was when Short People
gave him a rare hit single in 1977. We
walk slowly to the door, at which point
the alarm stops ringing. He tuts in
mock regret. ?Shame,? he says. ?I was
just about to go out to save some
people.?
To those of us who know him for his
increasingly rare pop albums ? after
a flurry in the 1970s, he settled into
making one a decade ? this is
Newman in a flash. Quick and
ironical, overblown yett
unassuming. To the
wider world Newman
has probably become
the man who does
the music for Toy
Story and other
Pixar films
(earning two
Academy awards and
18 additional
nominations); the man
n
ou?ve
who wrote and sang You?ve
Got a Friend in Me. He?s
e?s a
funny guy. He also hass enough
intellect, empathy and musicality to
keep from being nothing but a funny
guy.
Back in our seats, I repeat my
surprise that the new album, Dark
Matter, is political enough to contain a
song called Putin and a duet between
Jack and Bobby Kennedy called
Brothers, but has no room for a Trump
tune. This, after all, is the man whose
song A Few Words in Defence of Our
Country decried George W Bush for
being the worst president America has
had, while taking ironical cheer from
the idea that
he wa
wasn?t as bad as
Caligula,
the Spanish
Cali
Inquisition
or King
Inq
Leopold
of Belgium.
Le
In support of Barack
Obama?s
second tilt
O
at
a the White House,
Newman
sang a song
N
in the guise of
a blinkered
voter
bl
with tthe chorus:
?I?m
dreaming of a white
?I?m dre
president.? So why no song
about the Trump aadministration? He
shrugs. ?I wrote one, but it was so
vulgar that I didn?t see any reason to
add to the general vulgarity.?
Instead of dirty-mouthed disses of
the commander-in-chief, Newman
starts his latest record with possibly
the oddest, certainly the longest, song
Monday July 24 2017 | the times
the times | Monday July 24 2017
9
1GT
PIXAR; ALAMY; GETTY IMAGES
Woody and Buzz Lightyear in
Toy Story. Right: Randy Newman.
Far left: performing on Saturday
Night Live in 1983
arts
in his career. Dark Matter is an
eight-minute depiction of grand
debate between scientists and an
overbearing creationist who awards
himself victories against them on
subjects such as global warming and
evolution. Before another character
comes in to point out that the
creationist has been created by ?Mr
Newman? to be ?an object of ridicule?.
From You Can Leave Your Hat On to
Rednecks, from I Love LA to Mama
Told Me Not to Come, rare is the
Randy Newman song in which we?re
supposed to assume it?s the real Randy
Newman singing it. This, though, is
him aiming his shtick back at himself.
He chuckles, admits he thought twice
about pushing his luck this time, but
found that competing voices made
their way into several of his new
songs. ?It?s like I want my career to
end,? he says. ?You know, giving the
game away.?
It?s a big departure from the songs
he has written as part of the side
career as a film composer, which he
started in 1981 with Ragtime. ?Those
songs are vastly different from my
ordinary songs,? he says. ?I?m very
grateful to stuff like that that gets me
to the middle of the road. Sort of.
Briefly. I would never write You?ve
Got a Friend in Me of my own accord,
but I?m glad I did.? He hopes to work
on Toy Story 4, which is due to be
released in 2019, but says he hasn?t
yet heard from Pixar. He works just
as hard on his soundtracks as he does
on his albums, but finds them less
of a pressure.
?It?s assignment writing, so
it?s considerably easier. My
albums, though, are how I
judge myself, unfortunately.
When I look at myself and
I realise I haven?t done
one for a while, I think
I should try.? He
brightens. ?But I am
conscious that I am
doing fairly well for
my age. I think I?m as
good as I ever was at
it. Which is unusual in
this field. You know, with
Verdi, say, his last two
operas are his best two
operas. That?s not true in
pop music. Why, I don?t
exactly know.?
Unlike most singersongwriters who broke through
on the American west coast in
the late 1960s and early 1970s,
Newman never quite fitted into
what you might call ?youth
culture?. His mentality was
always more that of a New York
cartoonist than that of a Los
I have to
write a
lyric that
interests
me ? and
it takes
a bit to
interest
me
Angeles rocker, even if he was a native
Los Angeleno, the son of a doctor, but
nephew to three uncles (Alfred, Lionel
and Emil Newman) who were
successful Hollywood composers.
What?s nice about having joined the
family soundtrack business, he says, is
the chance to work with orchestras
full of musicians far better than him.
?It means a great deal to me.?
There is plenty of orchestra,
alongside the bluesy shuffles, on Dark
Matter. There?s a song from a father
reporting on his wife?s deathbed
speech to their children (Lost Without
You). There?s the couldn?t-be-sadder
song about a missing son (Wandering
Boy). There?s It?s a Jungle Out There, a
new version of his jaunty theme from
the television detective show Monk.
And there?s an orchestral stomp called
Putin, with female backing vocalists
cooing over the Russian president.
He was drawn to Putin as a comic
character after seeing the famous
picture of him with his shirt off. ?I
thought, ?What?s with the teenaged
stuff with all that power?? ?
All of which is highly engaging.
Much of which demands a few listens.
There are few four-to-the-floor rock
rhythms to help to make the lyrical
medicine go down. ?Yeah, I don?t
know if I?m in the best medium.
Comedy is not what people use
this medium for very much. This
is not music that you can eat
potato chips to.?
Yes, he knows that Dark Matter
doesn?t work as background music.
?And actually it worries me. You
know, I?m driving in the car
listening to something, I
don?t hear the words
necessarily. I would
notice my stuff in the
car because you
couldn?t tap your foot
to it. It would be an
irritant.? He chuckles.
?But there is nothing
I can do. I have to
write a lyric that
interests me, and it
actually takes a bit to
interest me.?
He?s not quite
sure why he is more
interested in being Tom
Lehrer than he is in being
Tom Petty. He doesn?t like
it if his songs serve only as
jokes, but he?s suspicious if
they don?t have jokes in
them either. In person
he dishes out avuncular
self-deprecation ?
?Jesus Christ now I?m
getting warmed up,? he
says halfway through an
answer, ?I gave you nothing but crap
for the first ten minutes? ? but knows
his worth. He likes his stuff. He knows
that others like his stuff. He also
knows that it?s not for everybody.
?I keep finding myself making lots
of noise and yelling, putting in big
jokes. I tend to think when you make
someone laugh you know you?re all
right. And maybe it proceeded from
some kind of insecurity. I think that?s
why I?ve written so much comedy, so
much more than anyone else who
has done this. If you can get people
to laugh then you can get them to
be quiet.?
These days he neither needs nor
expects a big payday from his albums.
?I just want to make a great record.
I want people to say, ?Oh, that?s a
great record. He hasn?t lost a thing? ?
all of that. I have [lost a thing], no
doubt, but I think it?s as good a record
as I?ve made.? He will tour to support
the album, probably just him and a
piano as usual, but he spends most
of his year at home in Los Angeles,
working on films, spending time
with his second wife, Gretchen, or
seeing his five children ? two by
Gretchen, three by his first wife,
Roswitha Schmale.
Bearing in mind that he?s such a
storyteller, I wonder if another Randy
Newman musical might be the logical
next step. When Newman made his
thus far only attempt at a stage
musical, Faust, in 1995, the American
rock critic Robert Christgau said:
?Musical comedy is the perfect
medium for his unique synthesis of
soundtrack grandeur, blues-savvy
studio rock and general Americana.?
Newman still likes Faust a lot, but
believes that its failure suggests that
the medium is not receptive to him.
He had recently been due to work
on a stage musical version of the
Dustin Hoffman film Tootsie, but
pulled out. ?I would have had to write
songs I wouldn?t have had pride in.
?A cross-dressing guy?, ha ha, you
know; what am I going to do with
that? The thing about musicals is,
I don?t like many of them. And
harmonically, it makes my butt pucker
just to think of them.?
So what about a Randy Newman
catalogue musical, a way of putting the
big hits (both of them) and the sort-of
hits into one smart, harmonically
un-butt-puckering evening? ?It will
be something I won?t have done.? Ah,
well. It can join the vulgar Trump song
and the heroic rescue of several hotel
guests on the list of great Randy
Newman projects that we will just
have to imagine for ourselves.
Dark Matter is out on Nonesuch on
August 4
10
1GT
Monday July 24 2017 | the times
television & radio
Vile George is top toad among the pond life
ROBERT VIGLASKY/BBC/MAMMOTH SCREEN
Andrew
Billen
TV review
Poldark
BBC One
{{{{(
Why It?s Kicking
Off Everywhere
BBC Two
{{{((
T
his series of Poldark, now
it has got past Ross?s dull
derring-do in France, has
resolved into a tale of toads
and toes. As far as the toads
go, George Warleggan has an aversion
traceable to an incident in his
schooldays in which Ross planted at
least one in his breaches. As if by
instinct, Ross?s brother-in-law, Drake,
spent some of the season introducing
them into the Warleggan pond. In,
by any standards, a disproportionate
Radio Choice
Catherine Nixey
Lunch
Radio 4, 10.45am
He can be a bit much,
Stephen Mangan. However,
he is excellent in this. The
premise of the programme
is really simple and sweet:
two old flatmates meet for
lunch and to talk about
anything and everything
apart from how much they
love each other. In today?s
episode Bella (Claire
Skinner, also excellent) has
just come back from her
honeymoon. ?Bella, don?t
take this the wrong way,?
Bill (Mangan) says. ?I?m not
sure I want to hear about
your perfect honeymoon.?
Decoding the News
Radio 4, noon
George Orwell said that
good prose should be
transparent, like a window
pane. All too often,
however, the language of
news taints and colours it.
In this programme Aditya
Chakrabortty picks on some
of the commonest offenders
on the Today programme
and asks what words such
as ?narrative? actually
mean. And why are they
plaguing our language? In
the course of this he will
speak to the former New
Labour spin doctor Alastair
Campbell and Clifford
Sofield from the Oxford
English Dictionary.
response, George first plotted to have
Drake hanged, then broke his heart by
forcing the love of the young man?s
life, Morwenna, to marry the vicar,
Ossie Whitworth. ?I thinkee still pine
for the girl that be lostee,? Drake?s
brother summarised last nightee.
This brings us to the biggest toad of
all, but also to toes. The Rev Ossie,
brilliantly played by Christian
Brassington as Toad of Toad Vicarage,
is a devoted man, but his devotion is
directed at women?s feet. While waiting
for Morwenna to become available
to him, he visited the local red-light
district to avail himself of some feet
for hire. The toe-sucking scene was
toe-curling. Now married, he has called
for extra variety in his life by importing
Morwenna?s sister, Rowella, into the
marital home. She only has to remove
her right shoe for him to have to excuse
himself. He is, Morwenna explained
unnecessarily to Demelza, ?a monster?.
Meanwhile, in the other unhappy
marriage of the series, George has
cruelly exiled his stepson to boarding
school and, in an act of spite
comparable to Alan Rickman?s
cancellation of Christmas as the
Sheriff of Nottingham, denied Aunt
Agatha a birthday party ? a blow so
grievous she died of it. George is the
JR of Poldark, or would be were he
ever able to accept that he has, in so
many ways, triumphed over the rival
Barnes family ? I mean Poldarks.
Radio 1
FM: 96.7-99.8 MHz
6.33am The Radio 1 Breakfast Show with
Nick Grimshaw 10.00 Clara Amfo 12.45pm
Newsbeat 1.00 Scott Mills 4.00 Greg James
5.45 Newsbeat 6.00 Greg James 7.00 Annie
Mac 9.00 Radio 1?s Specialist Chart with Phil
Taggart 10.02 Huw Stephens 1.00am
Friction 4.00 Adele Roberts
Radio 2
FM: 88-90.2 MHz
6.30am Chris Evans 9.30 Ken Bruce 12.00
Jeremy Vine 2.00pm Steve Wright 5.00
Simon Mayo 7.00 Paul Jones 8.00 Ana
Matronic 10.00 Bruno Tonioli at the Opera.
Opera?s broken-hearted clowns 11.00 The
Russell Davies Archive 12.00 Johnnie
Walker?s Sounds of the 70s (r) 2.00am
Radio 2?s Jazz Playlist 3.00 Radio 2 Playlist:
Great British Songbook 4.00 Radio 2 Playlist:
Hidden Treasures 5.00 Vanessa Feltz
Radio 3
FM: 90.2-92.4 MHz
6.30am Breakfast
Clemency Burton-Hill presents Radio 3?s
classical breakfast show, featuring requests
9.00 Essential Classics
Rob Cowan is joined by director Nicholas
Hytner and the Proms Artist of the Week is
the Scottish pianist Steven Osborne
12.00 Composer of the Week:
Mathias (1934-1992)
Donald Macleod explores Mathias?s
student days in Aberystwyth and London.
Mathias (Dance Overture, Op 16, Flute
Sonatina, Op 98, Piano Concerto No 1,
Op 2, and As truly as God is our Father)
1.00pm News
1.02 Live BBC Proms 2017:
Proms at Cadogan Hall
The Van Kuijk Quartet and Annelien Van
Wauwe perform Webern, Mozart, and a world
premiere by Laurent Durupt, from Cadogan
Hall, London. With Petroc Trelawny. Webern
(Langsamer Satz); Laurent Durupt (Grids for
Greed ? BBC commission: world premiere);
and Mozart (Clarinet Quintet in A major)
2.00 Afternoon on 3
With Verity Sharp. Another chance to hear
the BBC Symphony Orchestra and conductor
Joshua Weilerstein at the BBC Proms on
July 19. Presented by Sara Mohr-Pietsch.
Rebel (Le Chaos from Les 閘閙ens);
Pascal Dusapin (Outscape ? BBC
co-commission: UK premiere); and Hector
Berlioz (Symphonie Fantastique Op.14) (r)
Dirty dealer: George (Jack Farthing) with Elizabeth (Heida Reed)
4.30 In Tune
Suzy Klein is joined by the conductor Jules
Buckley, the pianist Joanna MacGregor, the
cellist Adrian Brendel and the violinist
Thomas Gould. Plus, the Villiers Quartet
6.30 Composer of the Week:
Mathias (1934-1992) (r)
7.30 Live BBC Proms 2017
The BBC Symphony Orchestra conducted by
Sir Andrew Davis, with the pianist Beatrice
Rana in Schumann?s Piano Concerto, recreate
Malcolm Sargent?s 1966 500th Prom, from
the Royal Albert Hall. Trad, arr. Wood (The
National Anthem); Berlioz (Overture ?Le
carnaval romain?); Schumann (Piano
Concerto in A minor). During the interval
presenter Sara Mohr-Pietsch and guest
Humphrey Burton discuss the career
of Malcolm Sargent. Elgar (Overture:
Cockaigne ? In London Town); Walton
(Fa鏰de, Suite No. 1; Fa鏰de Suite No. 2 ?
Popular Song); Holst (The Perfect Fool, Op
39); Delius (On Hearing the First Cuckoo in
Spring); and Britten (The Young Person?s
Guide to the Orchestra)
10.15 First Folio Road Trip
Emma Smith traces the story of seven of the
original 750 copies of Shakespeare?s First
Folio to learn how it helped make his
reputation as our national poet (r)
11.00 Jazz Now
Soweto Kinch presents a concert by the
Marty Ehrlich Sextet in concert from the
2016 Saalfelden Jazz Festival. The line-up is
a who?s who of great American players,
featuring Ehrlich on reeds, Jack Walrath on
trumpet, the trombonist Ray Anderson, the
pianist James Wiedman, the bassist Brad
Jones, and the drummer Ben Perowsky
12.30am Through the Night
Radio 4
FM: 92.4-94.6 MHz LW: 198kHz MW: 720 kHz
5.30 News Brie?ng
5.43 Prayer for the Day
5.45 Farming Today
5.58 Tweet of the Day
6.00 Today
9.00 Bringing Up Britain
The level of control parents have over their
children?s capacity for happiness (3/3)
9.45 (LW) Daily Service
9.45 Book of the Week: Shark Drunk
By Morten Stroksnes, translated by Tiina
Nunnally and abridged by Jill Walters (1/5)
10.00 Woman?s Hour
Presented by Jane Garvey. Including at
10.45 the 15 Minute Drama: Lunch By Marcy
Kahan. Comedy. See Radio Choice (1/5)
11.00 The Untold
Grace Dent introduces the story of a man too
ill to work who does not qualify for bene?ts
11.30 Sisters
Comedy written by Susan Calman (4/4)
12.01pm (LW) Shipping Forecast
12.04 Decoding the News
Aditya Chakrabortty investigates ?ve words
often used in media circles, beginning with
narrative and why it become so important.
See Radio Choice (1/5)
12.15 You and Yours
1.00 The World at One
Analysis of current affairs reports,
presented by Martha Kearney
1.45 Waco: Surviving the Apocalypse
The story of the 1993 siege and the lasting
impact on those who survived (1/5)
2.00 The Archers (r)
2.15 Drama: Fifteen Minutes
By Sarah Wooley. Drama about the
collaboration between Andy Warhol and
Truman Capote on Interview magazine (r)
3.00 Counterpoint
With competitors from Hertfordshire,
Suffolk and Somerset (4/13) (r)
3.30 The Food Programme
Sheila Dillon visits Greece to explore
the role of food in promoting economic
recovery and providing a future for the
country?s young people (r)
4.00 Public Indecency:
Queer Art in Britain
Simon Callow is joined by novelist Sarah
Waters and director Neil Bartlett (2/3)
4.30 The In?nite Monkey Cage
The wonders of insects (4/6)
5.00 PM
News headlines, analysis and reports
5.54 (LW) Shipping Forecast
6.00 Six O?Clock News
6.30 I?m Sorry I Haven?t a Clue
Jack Dee hosts from the New Alexandra
Theatre in Birmingham (5/6)
7.00 The Archers
Matt receives a warning, and Shula is
offered an alternative
7.15 Front Row
7.45 Lunch
Marcy Kahan?s comedy (1/5) (r)
8.00 The Inside Story of Election 17
It was one of the most surprising election
results of modern times. Anne McElvoy goes
behind the scenes to talk to key ?gures from
Labour, the Conservatives and the Liberal
Democrats, and ?nd out what really went on
8.30 Analysis
Minimum Wage: Too Much of a Good Thing?
Paul Johnson asks if the success of the
minimum wage is actually a problem (9/9)
Orthodoxy has it that unremitting
vileness is unwatchable. Each week
Jack Farthing proves us wrong.
A political revolution is at present
(ie in 1797) afoot in Poldark country.
If only Paul Mason had been around
to chronicle it for Channel 4 News.
Instead the former economics
reporter, also ex-Newsnight, this year
decided to put on a play at the Young
Vic Theatre in London, Why It?s
Kicking Off Everywhere, to explain
how the Arab Spring and the Occupy
movement led not to the overthrow
of global capitalism, but to Trump.
It starred Paul Mason.
Critics said that as theatre this
happening was a non-starter. If one
could put up with middle-class
theatregoers chanting revolution,
I would say in this filmed version it
worked well enough, although the
script was sentimental, sententious
and kept pouring virtue into the vessel
of presentable women. Mason?s
narrative, which seemed to admit his
naivety, was at least comprehensible.
What got me was the idea of a
reporter for public-service channels
arriving at these various revolutions
being minded to be so blatantly
partisan. Having sojourned too long at
a protest in Athens, Mason was told by
his editors to get out into the country.
I would have prescribed a quiet,
reflective afternoon in a darkened room.
andrew.billen@thetimes.co.uk
9.00 Natural Histories
It has given us our oldest stories, made
England a green and pleasant land and gives
suburban man a purpose. Brett Westwood
investigates the obsession with grass (7/25)
9.30 Bringing Up Britain
How to raise happy children (3/3) (r)
10.00 The World Tonight
With Ritula Shah
10.45 Book at Bedtime:
The Music Shop
By Rachel Joyce. The newly refurbished
Music Shop opens, but Frank?s latest music
lesson causes Ilse to reveal a painful
secret. Read by the author (6/10)
11.00 Blast
Daljit Nagra meet poets writing about
dif?cult fathers and absent mothers,
upbringings and lost parents, including
Wayne Holloway-Smith, Miriam
Nash and Raymond Antrobus (2/4)
11.30 With Great Pleasure
The actress Maureen Lipman shares her
favourite writings, poems and plays (2/4) (r)
12.00 News and Weather
12.30am Book of the Week:
Shark Drunk (r)
12.48 Shipping Forecast
1.00 As BBC World Service
10.30 The Consultants. Comedy, featuring a
glimpse into the mysterious world of an
exclusive gentlemen?s club 11.00 Dead
Ringers. Comedy impressions 11.30 A Look
Back at the Future. Speculative topical show
originally recorded in 1994
Radio 4 Extra
6 Music
Digital only
8.00am The Burkiss Way 8.30 Dad?s Army
9.00 The Write Stuff 9.30 North East of
Eden 10.00 Home Front Omnibus 11.00 A
Flash of Fire?ies 11.15 Queen Lucia 12.00
The Burkiss Way 12.30pm Dad?s Army
1.00 The Lives of Harry Lime 1.20 David
Attenborough?s Life Stories 1.30 Fragments
in Time 2.00 Sweet Tooth 2.15 Plants: From
Roots to Riches 2.30 Life in the Freezer 2.45
Thinking in Numbers 3.00 Home Front
Omnibus 4.00 The Write Stuff 4.30 North
East of Eden 5.00 Living with the Enemy
5.30 I?m Sorry I Haven?t a Clue 6.00 Undone
6.30 A Good Read 7.00 The Burkiss Way.
Comedy sketches with Jo Kendall 7.30 Dad?s
Army. Comedy with Arthur Lowe 8.00 The
Lives of Harry Lime. Drama starring Orson
Welles 8.20 David Attenborough?s Life
Stories. The duck-billed platypus. From 2009
8.30 Fragments in Time. The diary of a
British woman trapped in 1944 France. First
aired in 2000 9.00 A Flash of Fire?ies. Short
stories to mark writer Nadine Gordimer?s
90th birthday. From 2013 9.15 Queen Lucia.
By EF Benson 10.00 Comedy Club: I?m Sorry I
Haven?t a Clue. A second edition from the
Victoria Theatre in Halifax, West Yorkshire
Radio 5 Live
MW: 693, 909
6.00am 5 Live Breakfast 10.00 5 Live Daily
with Adrian Chiles 1.00pm Afternoon
Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00 5 Live Sport.
George Riley presents the day?s sports news
7.30 5 Live Sport: The Monday Night Club.
The latest football gossip and transfer news
9.30 5 Live Sport. George Riley presents a
?nal round-up of the day?s sports news
10.30 Phil Williams 1.00am Up All Night
5.00 Reports 5.15 Wake Up to Money
Talksport
MW: 1053, 1089 kHz
6.00am The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast
with Ray Parlour 10.00 Jim White 1.00pm
Hawksbee and Jacobs 4.00 Adrian Durham
and Darren Gough 7.00 Kick-off 10.00
Sports Bar 1.00am The Two Mikes 4.00 My
Sporting Life 5.00 Geoff Peters
Digital only
7.00am Nemone 10.00 Tom Ravenscroft
1.00pm Stuart Maconie 4.00 Steve Lamacq
7.00 Marc Riley 9.00 Gideon Coe 12.00 6
Music Recommends 1.00am The Enigmatic
Scott Walker 2.00 Holloway Dreams: The Joe
Meek Story 2.30 6 Music Live Hour 3.30 6
Music?s Jukebox 5.00 Jon Hillcock
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall 5.00
Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00
The Full Works Concert. Celebrating the
Tif?n Boys? Choir in a concert recorded at All
Saints Church in Kingston-upon-Thames.
Weelkes (Alleluia, I heard a voice); Howard
Goodall (The Lord is my Shepherd); Stanford
(Beati quorum via); Faure (Requiem Op 48);
Traditional (Danny Boy); Parry (Long Since
Egypt?s Plentiful Land); Franck (Panis
Angelicus); Richard Harvey Carol (Eventide);
Jonathan Dove (Seek Him that Maketh
the Seven Stars); Moses Hogan (Joshua
Fit the Battle); and John Rutter (The Lord
Bless You and Keep You) 10.00 Smooth
Classics 1.00am Sam Pittis
the times | Monday July 24 2017
11
1GT
artsfirst night
JOHAN PERSSON
Theatre
Taking Steps
Stephen Joseph, Scarborough
Pop
Jorja Smith
Electric Brixton, SW2
T
M
{{{((
his is an ingenious comedy
with a savage undertone.
Written by Alan Ayckbourn
in 1979, and regarded by the
author as his only true farce,
it was intended to be performed in the
round. It?s one of the prolific
playwright?s lesser-known works, yet,
with its astute balance of psychological
turmoil and situational hilarity, it?s a
neatly achieved pleasure. This revival,
which Ayckbourn directs, is neither as
cruel nor as wildly funny as it should
be, but it still makes a great piece of
intelligent entertainment.
Key to its success is its cunning
staging concept: the action takes place
in a three-storey Victorian house, but
plays out on just one level. So the
actors comically trot, scamper and
stumble up and down non-existent
staircases, and their paths cross even
when they?re in different rooms. The
crumbling and reputedly haunted pile
is the country home of Roland, a
booze-soaked hardware magnate, and
his discontented wife, Elizabeth, a
former dancer. Bored with her
marriage and longing to indulge her
artistic passions ? although her
talents are dubious ? Elizabeth is
planning to desert her husband.
Her reluctant accomplice is her
tactless brother Mark, a man so boring
that his conversation puts people to
sleep. Mark has his own romantic
issues with his highly strung fianc閑,
Kitty. And when Leslie, the spivvy,
motorbiking landlord, arrives to
negotiate the sale of the house, along
with Roland?s well-meaning, bumbling
young solicitor, Tristram, they all
become like scurrying mice in a maze,
searching for an escape route, chasing
each other or just their own tails.
Roland?s gibbering horror when he
discovers Elizabeth?s intentions is
genuinely distressing, as is Kitty?s
helpless misery with the ghastly Mark,
and Ayckbourn could usefully ratchet
up the intensity several notches. The
comedy also needs to be more frantic,
but Russell Dixon?s Roland slides
amusingly from whisky-slugging
bluster to blubbering, Louise
Shuttleworth revels in Elizabeth?s
cultural pretensions, and Antony Eden
as the good-hearted Tristram flaps
benignly about, the play?s burbling,
blundering moral centre. Even if it
never feels as if there?s enough at stake,
this is a highly enjoyable diversion.
Sam Marlowe
Box office: 01723 370541, to Oct 5
Proms at . . .
RNS/McGegan
Stage
@TheDock, Hull
{{{{(
Prom 9
Fidelio
{{(((
Prom 10
Aurora/Collon
{{{{{
Royal Albert Hall
H
{{{{(
A beleaguered duo: Daniel Ryan as the autistic Daniel and Samantha Spiro as his sister Peppy
Fixer-upper worth buying
Deborah Bruce
searches for
the meaning of
home in her
compassionate
new play, says
Sam Marlowe
Theatre
The House They
Grew Up In
Minerva,
Chichester
{{{{(
istory has been made . . . in
Hull. On Saturday the UK?s
City of Culture hosted the
first BBC Prom outside
London. In fact, three of
them ? the same programme
repeated to cater for the crowds
wanting to squeeze into Hull?s new
outdoor amphitheatre, bridging the
old dry dock beside the Humber.
Remarkably for Hull in July, nobody
got wet, except metaphorically. The
programme comprised 90 minutes of
water music, marking the 300th
anniversary of Handel?s famous
excursion on to the Thames, but also
including tempestuous Rameau,
humdrum Telemann (is there any
other?), two atmospheric Sea Sketches
Y
ou can calculate the market
value of a house, but how do
you put a price on a home,
with all its ghosts, its family
history, the decades of
memories that have seeped into its
walls? And, in a consumerist society
bedazzled by glossy property porn
and bedevilled by the housing crisis,
are we in danger of judging our
flesh-and-blood neighbours with no
more humanity than we eye up bricks
and mortar?
Deborah Bruce?s new play offers a
through-the-keyhole insight into the
domestic world of a pair of ageing,
reclusive siblings, misfits in a desirable
southeast London postcode, and we
witness the heart-rending fallout
when the hard-nosed, self-interested
21st century comes knocking.
As a piece of writing, it?s something
of a fixer-upper; it could do with a
stringent edit, and there are some plot
implausibilities. Yet it unmistakably
has good bones, as well as a big heart,
and Jeremy Herrin?s Headlong coproduction is beautifully acted by
Samantha Spiro and Daniel Ryan as
the beleaguered duo.
Peppy (Spiro, bright-eyed, witchyhaired) and her younger, autistic
brother, Daniel (a gentle, bear-like
Ryan), have lived in their Victorian
terrace since childhood. As well as an
intense, co-dependent intimacy, they
share a passion for art, and in her
youth Peppy was a Cambridge
undergraduate. Now the house, with
its overgrown garden and failing
plumbing, is crammed with a lifetime?s
obsessively accumulated junk.
That doesn?t deter Ben, the lonely
little boy from next door, who takes
refuge from his squabbling, divorced
parents in a sweet, tentative friendship
with Daniel. Ben?s visits arouse
suspicion; police are called, local
hostilities become overt, and intruders
? from forensics teams to newspaper
photographers and grasping would-be
homebuyers ? force their way over
the threshold.
Bruce?s dialogue delicately conveys a
sense of mingled intellect, anxiety and
social dysfunction, and Spiro?s frantic
energy is offset by Ryan?s lugubrious
solidity. There are some flourishes that
feel at once underdeveloped and
heavy-handed: Peppy reminds us that
her name is short for Penelope, loyal
wife of Odysseus, but it?s an analogy
that doesn?t quite resonate. And
references to the rivalry between the
painters Titian and Tintoretto,
presumably an echo of tensions in the
brother-sister relationship, feel rather
tacked on. However, the play is above
all an affecting plea for compassion
and generosity. Simple, sincere ? and
relevant, wherever you happen to live.
Box office: 01243 781312, to Aug 5
by Grace Williams, and a new piece,
RIVER, by the young Manchestertrained Grace Evangeline Mason. That
was short, but highly charged, pungent
harmonies rippling downwards, fierce
accents, and the odd detuned chord.
Under Nicholas McGegan, the
Royal Northern Sinfonia played with
irresistible spirit, and a boisterous
crowd cheered everything. Nothing
entertained more than the scintillating
encore: Iain Farrington?s A Shipshape
Shindig, an off-kilter take on The
Sailor?s Hornpipe that should go
straight into Last Night of the Proms.
Even a tenth of that flair would have
lifted the previous evening?s Prom. It
was a perversely undramatic concert
performance of Beethoven?s Fidelio,
not even with surtitles. The conductor,
Juanjo Mena, struggled to keep singers
and orchestra together, the BBC
Philharmonic?s strings lacked bite, the
imported Spanish choir never shivered
the spine, and the soloists impressed
only intermittently.
Stuart Skelton gave his usual utter
commitment as Florestan, but Ricarda
Merbeth (Leonore) had little lowerregister power and Detlef Roth was
a weak Pizarro. Thank heavens for
more spark from Louise Alder
(Marzelline), Benjamin Hulett
(Jaquino) and James Creswell, a fine
last-minute replacement as Rocco.
Much more gripping stuff on
Saturday night, when the Aurora
Orchestra improbably added
usically speaking, Jorja
Smith could be her
generation?s Amy
Winehouse. The
classically trained, newly
turned 20-year-old from Walsall in the
West Midlands may be f阾ed by Drake
? on whose latest album she
appeared, before supporting him here
on tour ? but rather than ride the
hip-hop/R&B hybrid into the charts,
the uncompromising singer is sticking
with the jazz and old soul she
obviously adores.
A singular vision can be challenging
for fans, however, and at a swelteringly
hot sold-out Electric, Smith wasn?t
about to bend. For the first 15 minutes
the languorous pace of her jazz-soaked
songs was spellbinding. By the
half-hour mark, chatter suggested she
could do with a change of tempo, or at
least some seats. Her four-man band
was proficient, but part of the problem.
Smith?s versatile and astonishing
vocals oozed depth and drama ? the
band simply, sometimes needlessly,
filled in the spaces.
Smith?s latest single, Teenage Fantasy,
lightened the mood with a singalong,
but more striking was the silence that
greeted the gorgeous Goodbyes,
written about the death of a friend and
performed only to electric guitar. As
she switched from her usual throaty,
smoky style to a pure high pitch you
could have heard a pin drop. Similarly,
when she brought on the soulster
Maverick Sabre to duet on Carry Me
Home, the stage sizzled with renewed
energy.
The gig?s final third proved that
progression is forthcoming. The
crowd, of course, went crazy for
Smith?s Drake collaboration, Get It
Together, albeit minus the rapper
even on screen, but it was one of
Smith?s new songs, On My Mind,
which strayed into disco and funk,
that finally got feet moving, before
her signature song, the Dizzee Rascalreferencing Blue Lights, served as a fun
reminder that the singer is only just
out of her teens.
Lisa Verrico
Beethoven?s Eroica to its repertoire of
symphonies played from memory.
That wasn?t just an astonishing feat of
concentration. With Nicholas Collon
favouring speeds ranging from zippy to
hair-raising, there was virtuosity all
round the band too.
Earlier, Collon and the incurably
enthusiastic Tom Service had given
a fun introduction to the symphony
illustrated with live extracts, and the
strings had delivered an impassioned
account of Strauss?s desolate but
gorgeous Metamorphosen. That was
apt too. Composed in 1945 Germany,
it is infused with quotations from the
Eroica?s funeral march that seem like
cries from the depths of despair.
Richard Morrison
12
1GT
Monday July 24 2017 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Chris Bennion
Diana, Our
Mother: Her
Life and Legacy
ITV, 9pm
Next month
is the 20th
anniversary
of the death
of Diana, Princess of
Wales, and we can
expect a slew of
best mum in the world.
She smothered us with
love, that?s for sure.? He
also describes her as
?one of the naughtiest
of parents?, while
William discusses how
important it was that
their mother understood
that there was ?a life
outside of the palace
walls?. There are plenty
of other contributions
too, including from
Earl Spencer, Elton
John, members of
the royal staff, and,
incongruously, the
pop star Rihanna.
?I understand that
change is frightening
for people,? Diana told
Martin Bashir in 1995.
?But I do think that
there are a few things
that could change that
would alleviate this
sometimes complicated
relationship between
monarchy and public.
I think they could
walk hand in hand,
as opposed to be so
distant.? Here, then,
is her true legacy: two
young royals who have
taken the public to
their hearts, as we
have them.
Horrible Histories
CBBC, 5.25pm
The awards-strewn
children?s show/surreal
comedy returns for
another series. Today?s
opener is about
Exceptional Explorers,
although, this being
Horrible Histories,
it mainly takes the
mickey out of all and
sundry for believing
that they ?discovered?
certain lands. The
highlights include a
Wurzels-inspired song
about 16th-century
seafaring and a skit
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Wild UK. New series. Exploring
the nation?s wildernesses and their wildlife 10.00 Homes
Under the Hammer. Featuring properties in North
Yorkshire, Stoke-on-Trent and Tunbridge Wells (r) (AD)
11.00 Food: Truth or Scare. Chris Bavin and Gloria
Hunniford investigate claims about oily ?sh (r) (AD)
11.45 Rip Off Britain: Holidays. A report on companies
that promise safe and secure airport parking, but leave
cars in ?elds or by the side of the road 12.15pm Bargain
Hunt. Eric Knowles is joined at an antiques fair at
Wetherby Racecourse by experts Nick Hall and Jonathan
Pratt, who help two teams buy three items to take to
auction in Darlington (AD) 1.00 BBC News at One;
Weather 1.30 BBC Regional News; Weather 1.45 Red
Rock. Angela suggests moving as a way to help Conor
(AD) 2.30 Escape to the Country. Sonali Shah is on the
Dorset coast with a couple hoping to ?nd inspiration (r)
(AD) 3.30 Money for Nothing. Sarah Moore transforms
items reclaimed from a tip in Surrey (r) 4.15 Flog It! From
Gloucester Cathedral (r) 5.15 Pointless. Quiz show
hosted by Alexander Armstrong (r) 6.00 BBC News at
Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am The TV That Made Me (r) 6.30 Right on the
Money (r) 7.15 Bargain Hunt (r) (AD) 8.00 Sign Zone:
Great British Menu (r) (SL) 9.00 Victoria Derbyshire
11.00 BBC Newsroom Live 1.00pm Athletics: Diamond
League Monaco Highlights. Gabby Logan introduces action
from the 11th meeting of the season, which took place at
Stade Louis II, and was expected to feature Usain Bolt in
the 100m (r) 2.00 Two Tribes. Quiz hosted by Richard
Osman (r) 2.30 The Best Dishes Ever. Dishes that are
good to make in advance (r) 3.00 This Wild Life. Saba
Douglas-Hamilton moves to Kenya to run a safari camp
(r) 3.30 Super Senses: The Secret Power of Animals. The
biologist Patrick Aryee and the physicist Helen Czerski
explore the world of animal senses. They begin with
sight, revealing how caribou use UV light to avoid
predators (r) (AD) 4.30 Live Swimming: World
Championships. Helen Skelton presents coverage of day
two from Danube Arena in Budapest, Hungary, which will
include the ?nal of the men?s 100m breaststroke
discipline. Coverage continues on the interactive service
6.00 Eggheads. Quiz show hosted by Jeremy Vine
6.30 Letterbox. Game show hosted by Mel Giedroyc
6.00am Good Morning Britain. A lively mix of news and
current affairs, plus health, entertainment and lifestyle
features 8.30 Lorraine. Entertainment and fashion
news, as well as showbiz stories, cooking and gossip.
Presented by Lorraine Kelly 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show.
Studio chat show (r) 10.30 This Morning. Chat and
lifestyle features, including a look at the stories making
the newspaper headlines and a recipe in the kitchen.
Presented by Eamonn Holmes and Ruth Langsford.
Including Local Weather 12.30pm Loose Women. The
former Emmerdale star Deena Payne joins the panel for
more topical studio discussion from a female perspective
1.30 ITV News; Weather 2.00 Judge Rinder. Cameras
follow criminal barrister Robert Rinder as he takes on
real-life cases (r) 3.00 Tenable. Five accounts managers
from Harrogate, North Yorkshire answer questions about
top 10 lists, then try to score a perfect 10 in the ?nal
round. Hosted by Warwick Davis (r) 4.00 Tipping Point.
Quiz show (r) 5.00 The Chase. Bradley Walsh presents as
four contestants work as a team to take on quiz expert
the Chaser and secure a cash prize (r) 6.00 Regional
News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.00am Countdown (r) 6.45 Will & Grace (r) 7.35
Everybody Loves Raymond (r) 8.35 Frasier (r) (AD) 10.05
Undercover Boss USA (r) 11.00 The Simpsons (r) 12.00
Channel 4 News Summary 12.05pm Couples Come Dine
with Me. Three couples from east London compete to win
the �000 prize (r) 1.05 Posh Pawn. Staff are amazed by
two diamond necklaces owned by different clients (r)
2.10 Countdown. With Chris Packham in Dictionary Corner
3.00 The Question Jury. The new jurors are determined to
stay positive 4.00 A Place in the Sun: Summer Sun. Ben
Hillman shows a number of properties to newly engaged
Glasgow couple Lyndsey and Paul, who want to buy a
holiday home in the area around Oliva in eastern Spain
5.00 Four in a Bed. The ?rst visit of the week is to the
Miners Arms in Nenthead, Cumbria, where two sisters
hope to impress guests with their eco credentials (r) 5.30
Come Dine with Me. The ?rst of a week of dinner parties
in Windsor, Berkshire 6.00 The Simpsons. Angry dolphins
attack Spring?eld, while Homer dies and has to perform
one good deed to get into Heaven (r) (AD) 6.30
Hollyoaks. Grace prepares to take down her and Warren?s
blackmailer and Al?e tries to help Lily and Prince (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff. Journalist
and broadcaster Matthew Wright and his guests debate
the issues of the day 11.15 The Yorkshire Vet. Julian
treats a much-loved cat with a swollen eye (r) 12.10pm
5 News Lunchtime 12.15 Big Brother. Daily round-up of
highlights (r) 1.10 Access. Showbiz news and gossip 1.15
Home and Away (AD) 1.45 Neighbours (AD) 2.15 NCIS:
Murder in the Family. The agents are investigated by the
FBI on suspicion of murdering arms dealer La Grenouille,
and Jenny Shepard is the prime suspect ? until an
eyewitness implicates Tony (r) (AD) 3.15 FILM: The
Killing Game (12, TVM, 2011) A forensic sculptor
whose daughter disappeared years previously receives a
series of menacing phone calls from a man claiming to
have killed her and announces his intention to strike
again. Mystery with Laura Prepon and Ty Olsson 5.00 5
News at 5 5.30 Neighbours. Piper is shocked when a
worrying online comment is brought to her attention (r)
(AD) 6.00 Home and Away. Ash and Kat rush Luc to
hospital, Jett tells John the facts about his father?s death
and VJ tries to lift Hunter?s spirits with a sur?ng lesson,
unaware Luc is critically ill (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
7.00 The Farmers? Country Showdown
(1/5) Following dairy farmers from
Kent competing at the Edenbridge &
Oxted Agricultural Show in Surrey (r)
7.30 Jodi?s Lovely Letters Aled Jones
meets Jodi Ann Bickley, who has ME
and has sent letters around the world,
supporting those who need it (AD)
7.00 Celebrity Antiques Road Trip The
actresses Jennifer Saunders and
Patricia Potter take to the road with
experts Philip Serrell and Mark Stacey,
travelling through Berkshire,
Hampshire and Oxfordshire (r)
7.00 Emmerdale Megan is on edge when
Charity sees her with Frank (AD)
8.00 EastEnders Recent events prompt
one resident to seek revenge (AD)
8.00 University Challenge Trinity College,
Cambridge, takes on Bristol
8.00 Call the Cleaners New series. Ben
Fogle and Liz Bonnin discover the
countryside?s hidden gems (1/6) (AD)
8.30 Men, Boys and Eating Disorders:
Panorama Nigel Owens investigates
the rising number of men and boys
who have eating disorders
8.30 Nadiya?s British Food Adventure
Nadiya Hussain explores the culinary
traditions of the Peak District.
See Viewing Guide (2/8) (AD)
8.30 Coronation Street Peter reveals that
he has offered Leanne, Simon and
Oliver a place to stay (AD)
9.00 DIY SOS: The Big Build Nick
Knowles and the team are joined by
local tradespeople in Dartford to
transform the home of a family whose
13-year-old son has cerebral palsy and
developmental delay (2/9) (r) (AD)
9.00 Ripper Street Reid has captured
Nathaniel Dove, ridding Whitechapel of
its most feared monster since Jack the
Ripper and also clearing the name of
the late Bennet Drake. But for the
detective and Jackson to be proven
innocent, they must bring down
Augustus Dove (6/6) (AD)
9.00 Diana, Our Mother: Her Life and
Legacy The Duke of Cambridge and
Prince Harry talk about their mother
Diana, Princess of Wales, and pay
tribute to the many ways her in?uence
has shaped their lives. Featuring
contributions from Diana?s brother,
Earl Spencer See Viewing Guide (AD)
10PM
9PM
8PM
BBC One
Early
through a photo album
created by Diana
(which has never
before been seen by the
public), talk about the
last time they saw her,
her death and the effect
it had on them as young
boys. Prepare for a
lump in your throat.
?She was our mum,?
Harry says. ?She still
is our mum. And, of
course, as a son I would
say this, she was the
7PM
Top
pick
programmes about her
to add to the steady
trickle we have had this
year. None, however,
is likely to be as
significant as this one
because it has been
made with weighty
contributions from
Prince William and
Prince Harry. The pair
speak openly about
their mother in Ashley
Gething?s film and, as
they make their way
10.00 BBC News at Ten
Late
11PM
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather
10.45 Peter Kay?s Comedy Shuf?e
The comedian receives a mysterious
phone call (5/6) (r) (AD)
10.00 Normal for Norfolk Desmond
MacCarthy ponders whether he will be
the last of the MacCarthys at Wiveton
Hall. See Viewing Guide (2/6) (AD)
10.30 Newsnight Presented by Evan Davis
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.00 Car Crash TV Events caught on ?lm
by dashboard-mounted cameras, from
freak accidents and amazing escapes to
racehorses on the loose (1/10) (r)
8.00 Bear about the House: Living with
My Supersized Pet Documentary
exploring the relationship between
people and their exotic pets, including
a Minnesota couple who keep a
one-ton buffalo that has to be
showered in the local car wash
8.00 King Tut?s Tomb: The Hidden
Chamber Documentary examining
recent discoveries made in the famous
burial chamber, which archaeologists
now believe may also be the resting
place of Queen Nefertiti (2/6) (r)
9.00 999: What?s Your Emergency? New
series. The return of the programme
following the emergency services, this
time focusing on the police, paramedics
and ?re service in Wiltshire. The
?rst edition examines the rise in
racially aggravated hate crimes
9.00 Traf?c Cops Special: Carjacked The
of?cers? hunt for a stolen car ends in a
dramatic foot chase, while car thieves
lead them on one of the longest
pursuits in the history of the force
7.30 Coronation Street Toyah and Peter
settle in at the Rovers (AD)
10.30 ITV News
11.15 Have I Got a Bit More Old News
for You Extended edition from October
2016. Jo Brand hosts the satirical
current affairs quiz, with Tim Farron
and Chris Kamara joining team captains
Ian Hislop and Paul Merton (3/11) (r)
11.15 The Mash Report Satirical news
presented by Nish Kumar (1/10) (r)
11.45 Cleverman New series. Sci-? drama
starring Hunter Page-Lochard (1/6)
11.00 Regional News
11.15 Killer Women with Piers Morgan
Piers travels to New York State to
meet Sheila Davalloo, serving a
total of 75 years after murdering
her lover?s wife and attempting to
kill her own husband (5/5) (r)
12.00 Who Do You Think You Are? Clare Balding is
particularly interested in her maternal great-grandfather.
Clare believes he could have been gay, but getting to the
truth of the matter proves a challenge when all the
evidence comes from a time when homosexuality was
illegal (r) (AD) 1.05am-6.00 BBC News
12.40am Sign Zone: Supermarket Shopping
Secrets Gregg Wallace and Babita Sharma look at the
retailers? attempts to outdo one another in terms of
convenience (r) (AD, SL) 1.40-2.40 Me and My Dog:
The Ultimate Contest. Dog owners and their pets
compete in a bid to make it to the grand ?nal (r) (SL)
12.10am Jackpot247 Viewers get the chance to
participate in live interactive gaming from the comfort of
their sofas 3.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show. The host invites
guests to air their differences over family and
relationship issues (r) (SL) 3.50 ITV Nightscreen
5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r) (SL)
10.00 Britain?s Bene?t Tenants
Documentary following the work of
specialist letting agencies. Leeds
letting agent Aimee investigates
complaints of a bad smell coming
from one of her properties (1/3) (r)
10.00 Big Brother Daily round-up of
highlights, featuring the latest tasks,
games, arguments, laughs, diary
room visits and bedroom chit-chat.
Narrated by Marcus Bentley
11.00 60 Days in Jail Criminal justice
student Dion is the last volunteer to
enter the jail and all eight of the
undercover inmates must now
face up to the harsh reality of life
behind bars (3/12) (AD)
11.05 Big Brother?s Bit on the Side
Rylan Clark-Neal presents the live
Big Brother companion show,
including a debate on the burning
issues and famous guests? thoughts
on the latest developments
12.00 A Very British Brothel Reports from a Shef?eld
massage parlour (r) (SL) 1.00am Ramsay?s Hotel Hell (r)
(AD) 1.45 The Supervet (r) (AD) 2.45 Escape to Costa
Rica (r) (AD) 3.40 Shipping Wars UK (r) 4.05 Selling
Houses with Amanda Lamb 5.00 Kirstie?s Vintage Gems
(r) 5.05-6.00 Location, Location, Location (r) (SL)
12.05am Countdown to Murder The story of Roderick
Newall, who was convicted of killing his parents (r) 1.00
SuperCasino 3.10 Nightmare Tenants, Slum Landlords.
A man happily living in his garden shed (r) 4.00 Tribal
Teens (r) (SL) 4.45 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10 Great
Artists (r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Wildlife SOS (r) (SL)
the times | Monday July 24 2017
13
1GT
television & radio
based on Educating
Yorkshire that casts
Christopher Columbus
as the worst geography
teacher ever. Kids,
however, will most
likely be delighted
by the story of the
Arctic explorer Peter
Freuchen, who dug
himself out of an icy
tomb using a frozen
poo. You won?t hear the
song Let It Go again
without wincing.
Nadiya?s British
Food Adventure
BBC Two, 8.30pm
The 2015 Bake Off
winner and all-round
good egg, Nadiya
Hussain, dons her
cagoule and heads
to the Peak District.
There is no doubt that
Hussain?s recipes are
on the simpler side, but
it makes a nice change
to watch a cookery
show that offers
realistic options for
your dinner. As well as
giving us her twist on
the classic Bakewell
tart, Hussain heads to
the village of Combs to
learn about traditional
Derbyshire oatcakes ?
she makes some
incredible-looking
samosas with them ?
and learns about
pickling in Hale.
?Best. Pickles. Ever.?
Game of Thrones
Sky Atlantic, 9pm
After a slow-burning,
ducks-in-a-row series
opener last week, things
should really get rolling
in Westeros tonight. In
this episode, entitled
Stormborn, in reference
to Daenerys Targaryen,
the Queen of Dragons
will receive an
?unexpected? visitor.
Could this be Jon Snow,
coming to seek an
alliance? Or Ser Jorah,
whose scale-covered
arm we saw lunging
out of a cell last week?
Snow will likely
appreciate a trip south,
seeing as in the north
he faces a challenge to
his authority. Meanwhile
diehard GoT fans are in
a spin after the trailer
revealed that Arya
Stark could be reunited
with her direwolf.
Normal for Norfolk
BBC Two, 10pm
Although he lives
resolutely in the past,
tonight Desmond
MacCarthy has his
mind on the future.
Namely, the future of
his ancestral home,
Wiveton Hall. He hopes
to hand the running of
it to his son, Edmund.
However, Edmund is
reluctant. Who can
blame him? The farm is
up to its tweedy armpits
in debt, the estate?s
private water supply is
struggling and rats are
stealing food from the
pheasants. ?Everything
is more complicated
than it used to be,?
Desmond says with a
sigh. ?Who knows?
We all might end up as
the servants to some
Japanese mogul.? Yes,
the future is a worry.
Sky1
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Road Wars 8.00 Flying Monsters with
David Attenborough (r) (AD) 10.00 Making
David Attenborough?s Flying Monsters (r) 11.00
Football?s Funniest Moments (r) (AD) 12.00
NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 2.00pm Hawaii Five-0 (r)
3.00 MacGyver (r) 4.00 The Flash (r)
6.00 Futurama. Fry and Leela gain powers (r)
6.30 The Simpsons. Back-to-back episodes (r)
9.00 A League of Their Own. Daniel Ricciardo,
Rob Beckett and Judy Murray join host James
Corden and regulars Jamie Redknapp and
Andrew Flintoff on the sports quiz (r) (AD)
10.00 Micky Flanagan Thinking Aloud. The
topics that keep him awake at night, beginning
with the world of men and women (r) (AD)
11.00 Modern Family. All three families deal
with problems on their holidays (r)
11.30 Modern Family. Jay tries to make a
good impression on his new neighbours (r)
12.00 A League of Their Own (r) (AD)
1.00am Hawaii Five-0 (r) 4.00 RSPCA Animal
Rescue (r) (AD) 5.00 Highway Cops (r)
6.00am Fish Town (r) 7.00 Urban Secrets (r)
8.00 Storm City (r) (AD) 9.00 The British (r)
(AD) 10.00 The West Wing (r) 12.00 Without a
Trace (r) 1.00pm CSI: Crime Scene Investigation
(r) 2.00 Blue Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00 Storm City
(r) (AD) 4.00 The West Wing (r)
6.00 Without a Trace. The team looks into the
case of a kidnapped motivational speaker (r)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. A property
tycoon?s wife is killed in her home (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. Danny investigates the
murder of a student on a college campus, Jamie
encounters a former law-school classmate and
Erin learns to give Nicky more freedom (r) (AD)
9.00 Game of Thrones. Daenerys receives a
visitor, Jon faces a revolt, and Tyrion plans the
conquest of Westeros. See Viewing Guide (r)
10.10 Thronecast. Sue Perkins and Jamie
East return with the companion show
11.10 Game of Thrones (r)
12.20am Ray Donovan (r) (AD) 2.50 Nurse
Jackie (r) 4.00 The West Wing (r)
6.00am Obese: A Year to Save My Life USA (r)
7.00 Nothing to Declare (r) 8.00 Bangkok
Embassy (r) 9.00 Cooks to Market (r) 9.15 My
Kitchen Rules: Australia (r) 10.30 Border
Security: Canada?s Front Line (r) 11.00 Stop,
Search, Seize (r) 12.00 Elementary (r) 1.00pm
Criminal Minds (r) 2.00 Bones (r) 3.00 Cold
Case (r) 4.00 UK Border Force (r) 5.00 Nothing
to Declare (r) 6.00 Nothing to Declare (r) (AD)
7.00 Sun, Sea and A&E (AD)
8.00 Elementary. Joan and Kitty look
into a string of murders (r) (AD)
9.00 Criminal Minds. The agents welcome a new
member as they hunt for an escaped killer (r)
10.00 Criminal Minds. The team ?nds a cryptic
connection between two murder victims (r)
11.00 Criminal Minds. The pro?lers race against
time to save an abducted family (r)
12.00 Cold Case. A murder case from 1929
(r) 1.00am Bones (r) (AD) 2.00 Criminal
Minds (r) 4.00 Border Security: Canada?s
Front Line (r) 5.00 Nothing to Declare (r)
6.00am The Glory of Russia: The Sights and
Sounds of St Petersburg 7.50 Classical
Destinations 8.00 Watercolour Challenge 9.00
Tales of the Unexpected 10.00 Treasure Houses
of Britain 11.00 Auction (AD) 12.00
Discovering: Simply Red 12.30pm Discovering:
The Smiths 1.00 Discovering: Shirley MacLaine
(AD) 2.00 Watercolour Challenge 3.00 Tales of
the Unexpected 4.00 Treasure Houses of Britain
5.00 Discovering: Guns N? Roses (AD) 5.30
Discovering: Foo Fighters (AD)
6.00 Discovering: Charles Bronson (AD)
7.00 The South Bank Show. Melvyn Bragg
meets writer and director Amma Asante
8.00 Breezin?: The George Benson Story
9.00 Rodrigo Y Gabriela at Baloise Session
10.15 2Cellos: Live at Arena Pula
12.00 The Gospel Music of Johnny Cash
1.00am Tales of the Unexpected 2.00
Watercolour Challenge 3.00 Frank Sinatra:
The Vintage Years 4.00 Dean Martin:
A Legend in Concert 5.00 Auction (AD)
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans 10.00 Live
ATP Tennis. The German Open. Coverage of the
opening day of the ATP World Tour 500 series
clay court tournament at the Am Rothenbaum
6.30pm Sky Sports News at 6. The latest news
7.00 Live World Matchplay Darts. Coverage of
day three from the Winter Gardens in Blackpool,
featuring the concluding four ?rst-round
matches in the event won by Michael van
Gerwen last year. The Dutchman met old rival
Phil Taylor in the 2016 ?nal, and while ?Mighty
Mike? eased through his ?rst-round match, ?The
Power? had a tougher time against the former
BDO player Robbie Green, winning 10-8
11.00 Through the Night. The day?s news
12.00 Through the Night 1.00am Live
WWE Late Night Raw. Wrestling action
from the States with the over-the-top stars,
featuring the likes of Seth Rollins and Finn
Balor. Presented by Michael Cole, Corey Graves
and David Otunga 4.15 WWE from the
Vault 5.00 Through the Night
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm Road Riders. An
adrenaline-fuelled documentary that captures
the lives and passions of the men, women and
families who are part of the world of Irish road
racing (r) 11.10 Peter Kay?s Comedy Shuf?e (r)
(AD) 11.40 Have I Got a Bit More Old News for
You (r) 12.25am Who Do You Think You Are?
(r) (AD) 1.25-6.00 BBC News
BBC One Wales
As BBC One except: 7.00pm-7.30 The Royal
Welsh Show 2017. New series. Kate Humble
presents highlights from the opening day of the
event that celebrates agricultural and rural life
in Wales, held at the showground in Powys
8.30-9.00 Nigel Owens: Bulimia and Me
BBC Two N Ireland
As BBC Two except: 7.00pm-8.00 Wayfaring
Stranger with Phil Cunningham. Musical
connections between Scotland, Ulster and
America (r) 10.00-10.30 Ar Bhealach na
Gaeltachta. Conall � M醝rt韓 visits the Rosguill
peninsula (r) 11.15-11.45 Normal for Norfolk.
Desmond MacCarthy ponders the future of
Wiveton Hall. See Viewing Guide (AD)
ITV Wales
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Drugs: The Next
Epidemic? A Wales This Week Investigation.
Rob Osborne reports on new type of drug that
is cheaper than heroin, with experts warning of
an emerging crisis on the streets of Wales
STV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 The People?s
History Show. Fergus Sutherland investigates
how Scotland got its name 12.10am After
Midnight 1.40 ITV Nightscreen 4.35 The
Jeremy Kyle Show (r) 5.30-6.00 Teleshopping
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm World News Today; Weather
7.30 The Royal Welsh Show 2017. New series.
Kate Humble presents highlights from the
opening day of the event that celebrates
agricultural and rural life in Wales, held at
the showground in Llanelwedd, Powys
8.00 Horizon: 10 Things You Need to Know
About the Future. The mathematician Hannah
Fry investigates the British public?s questions
about the future, including if people could live
for ever and if there will be a cure for cancer (r)
9.00 The Joy of Stats. Karolinska Institute
professor Hans Roslin presents a light-hearted
exploration of the world of statistics (r)
10.00 The Secret Science of Pop. The
evolutionary biologist Professor Armand Leroi
gathers scientists and researchers to analyse
more than 50 years of UK chart music (r) (AD)
11.00 Ocean Giants. The vocal ranges of marine
mammals, from humpback whales to the
Amazon boto dolphin. Last in the series (r) (AD)
12.00 Apples, Pears and Paint: How to Make a
Still Life Painting (r) 1.30am The Joy of
Stats (r) 2.30-3.30 Horizon: 10 Things You
Need to Know About the Future (r)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 6.30 Rude(ish) Tube
(r) 6.55 Made in Chelsea (r) 8.00 Melissa &
Joey (r) 9.00 Black-ish (r) 10.00 Baby Daddy (r)
11.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD)
12.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD) 1.00pm The Big
Bang Theory (r) (AD) 2.00 Melissa & Joey (r)
3.00 Baby Daddy (r) 4.00 Black-ish (r) (
AD) 5.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory. Double bill (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks. The trip to Ibiza begins (AD)
7.30 Coach Trip: Road to Zante. Fourteen
tourists head off on a trip around the
Mediterranean and southern Europe
8.00 FILM: The Day After Tomorrow (12,
2004) A climatologist races across America to
rescue his son as freak weather conditions cause
devastation around the world. Disaster thriller
starring Jake Gyllenhaal and Dennis Quaid
10.25 Vlogglebox. Young people review the
most popular viral content. Last in the series
11.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.30am Gogglebox (r) (AD) 1.35 Rude Tube
(r) 2.35 First Dates (r) (AD) 3.30 First Dates
Abroad (r) (AD) 3.55 New Girl (r) (AD) 4.45
How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD)
8.55am A Place in the Sun: Winter Sun (r)
11.00 Four in a Bed (r) 1.40pm A Place in the
Sun: Winter Sun (r) 3.50 Time Team (r) (AD)
5.55 Car SOS. The pair head on a trip around
Britain to revisit some of their favourite cars (r)
6.55 The Supervet. Noel Fitzpatrick faces a
challenge coming up with a solution for a
shih-tzu cross?s deformed front legs, and a
bulldog puppy with a fractured elbow (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. Kevin McCloud meets actor
Sean Simons, who has bought Cloontykilla
Castle in County Roscommon with a
view to creating a home (1/12) (r) (AD)
9.00 Secrets of China?s Forbidden City.
Documentary exploring the palace that housed
Chinese emperors for 600 years (r)
10.00 24 Hours in A&E. Patients include
84-year-old Neil who has fallen down stairs, and
his wife re?ects on the shock of realising that
their life may never be the same again (r) (AD)
11.05 24 Hours in A&E. A girl is treated after
being hit by a car and knocked under a bus (r)
12.05am Secrets of China?s Forbidden City (r)
1.10 24 Hours in A&E (r) (AD) 2.15 Grand
Designs (r) (AD) 3.15-4.00 8 Out of 10 Cats (r)
11.00am Master of the World (PG, 1961)
Sci-? adventure starring Vincent Price 1.05
War of the Planet of the Apes Interview
Special 1.15pm Gulliver?s Travels (PG,
2010) Fantasy comedy starring Jack Black (AD)
2.55 A Monster in Paris (U, 2011) Animated
comedy with the voice of Vanessa Paradis 4.40
Flight of the Navigator (U, 1986) Sci-?
adventure starring Joey Cramer
6.25 Snow White & the Huntsman
(12, 2012) Fantasy adventure starring
Kristen Stewart and Chris Hemsworth (AD)
9.00 Broken City (15, 2013) A New York
private eye hired to ?nd out if the mayor?s wife
is having an affair discovers a web of political
corruption. Crime thriller with Mark Wahlberg
11.10 The Connection (15, 2015) A French
magistrate orchestrates a campaign to bring
an international drug kingpin to justice.
Fact-based crime thriller starring Jean Dujardin
1.50am-3.45 Stand Up Guys (15, 2012)
Three ageing gangsters are reunited when one
gets out of prison, and try to recapture their
glory days. Crime comedy with Al Pacino,
Christopher Walken and Alan Arkin
6.00am Jonas Blue: The Hot Desk (r) 6.10
You?ve Been Framed! Gold (r) 6.35 Vanderpump
Rules (r) 7.20 The Ellen DeGeneres Show (r)
8.00 Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.30 Coronation
Street (r) (AD) 9.35 You?ve Been Framed! Gold
(r) 10.00 The Great Indoors (r) (AD) 10.30 Side
Effects (r) (AD) 11.00 LA Story (r) 11.25
Vanderpump Rules (r) 12.20pm Emmerdale (r)
(AD) 12.55 Coronation Street (r) (AD) 1.55 The
Ellen DeGeneres Show (r) 2.45 The Jeremy Kyle
Show (r) 4.55 Judge Rinder (r) 5.55 You?ve
Been Framed! Gold. Double bill (r)
6.50 FILM: Step Up (PG, 2006) Romantic
dance drama with Channing Tatum (AD)
9.00 Love Island: The Live Final. The reality
show reaches a conclusion as Caroline Flack
announces who the voting public have chosen
10.35 Family Guy. Brian enlists Stewie to help
him get his driving licence back (r) (AD)
11.00 Family Guy. A brush with death scares
Stewie into trying to be nice (r) (AD)
11.30 American Dad! (r) (AD)
12.00 American Dad! (r) (AD) 12.55am
CelebAbility (r) 1.40 Safeword (r) 2.20
Teleshopping 5.50 ITV2 Nightscreen
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Man About the House (r) 6.25
Heartbeat (r) (AD) 7.25 Where the Heart Is (r)
(AD) 8.25 Wild at Heart (r) (AD) 9.25 Judge
Judy (r) 10.50 Road to Avonlea (r) (AD)
11.50 Wycliffe (r) 1.00pm Heartbeat (r)
(AD) 2.05 The Royal (r) (AD) 3.10 Wild at
Heart (r) (AD) 4.15 Man About the House (r)
4.50 On the Buses (r) 5.20 George and
Mildred (r) 5.55 Heartbeat (r) (AD)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. A stuntman
dies in suspicious circumstances (r) (AD)
8.00 Midsomer Murders. When a family
glassware business collapses following the
death of one of its partners, Barnaby
investigates allegations of ?nancial
irregularities ? and a string of murders (r) (AD)
10.00 Law & Order: UK. Brooks and Devlin
investigate a homophobic religious group
within the police force (1/6) (r) (AD)
11.00 The Street. Mark Benton stars as Wayne,
who is desperate to make a new start even
if it means resorting to theft (5/6) (r)
12.20am Mrs Biggs (r) 1.45 On the Buses (r)
(SL) 2.10 ITV3 Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am The Chase (r) 6.50 Storage Wars: Texas
(r) 7.35 The Saint (r) 8.35 Cash Cowboys (r)
9.35 The Chase (r) 10.35 Tour de France
Highlights (r) 11.35 The Saint (r) 12.45pm
Gunsmoke (r) 1.50 Ironside (r) 2.50 Quincy ME
(r) 3.55 Minder (r) (AD) 5.00 The Professionals.
Bodie and Doyle stalk Cowley (r) (AD)
6.00 Storage Wars: Texas. The bidders
receive help from a famous cowboy (r)
6.30 Storage Wars: Texas. One of the buyers
?nds a historically important item (r)
7.00 The Chase. Quiz show (r)
8.00 The Chase: Celebrity Special. Nicholas
Owen, Laila Rouass, Vanessa Feltz and Tim Vine
try to win cash for charity by outwitting one of
the show?s resident trivia experts (r)
9.00 Car Crash Global. Featuring dash-cam video
footage of a host of astonishing accidents (r)
10.00 FILM: Gangs of New York (18, 2002)
An Irishman in 19th-century New York is taken
under the wing of the gang leader who killed his
father. Drama with Leonardo DiCaprio (AD)
1.15am Better Late Than Never (r) 2.10
Motorsport UK (r) 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Traf?c Cops 8.10
American Pickers 9.00 Storage Hunters 10.00
American Pickers 12.00 Deadly 60 1.00pm Top
Gear (AD) 3.00 Brojects 4.00 Steve Austin?s
Broken Skull Challenge (AD) 5.00 Top Gear (AD)
6.00 Top Gear. A trip to Ukraine (AD)
7.00 Sin City Motors. Steve Darnell and his Las
Vegas-based team spruce up a pickup truck for a
client working in the demolitions trade (AD)
8.00 Nev?s Indian Call Centre. Nev unleashes
his unique interview style on some interviewees,
as his attempt to recruit a Delhi-based
workforce enjoys mixed success (2/6)
9.00 Live at the Apollo. With Lenny Henry,
Mike Wilmot and Tommy Tiernan
10.00 QI XL. Bill Bailey, Jo Brand and Greg
Davies join Alan Davies and host Stephen Fry
11.00 David Beckham Into the Unknown.
Accompanied by three of his closest friends,
the former footballer continues his trek
12.00 Would I Lie to You? Rob Brydon presents
the panel show 1.20am Dave Gorman: Modern
Life Is Goodish 2.20 Would I Lie to You? 3.00
Game of Arms 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am Great Expectations 8.00 Danger?eld
9.00 Monarch of the Glen 10.00 All Creatures
Great and Small 11.00 The Bill 1.00pm Last of
the Summer Wine 1.40 Waiting for God 2.20
Birds of a Feather 3.00 Danger?eld 4.00
Monarch of the Glen 5.00 All Creatures Great
and Small. Tristan clashes with Siegfried
6.00 Waiting for God. Tom?s obnoxious
grandchildren create their own brand of havoc
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine. The trio lament
the lack of fresh vegetables available
7.20 Keeping Up Appearances. Richard?s
birthday gift brings trouble
8.00 Hetty Wainthropp Investigates.
The detectives are swamped with work
9.00 Death in Paradise. A tropical disease
strikes down Richard and, as Camille is in Paris,
Dwayne and Fidel are left to solve the murder of
a diver, found in shallow water (6/8)
10.20 The Inspector Lynley Mysteries. Havers is
sent to investigate the death of a radical
left-wing politician?s illegitimate daughter (2/4)
12.20am Taggart 3.00 Birds of a Feather 3.35
Garden Hopping 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Celebrity Antiques Road Trip 7.10
Hidden Killers of the Edwardian Home 8.00
Wonders of the Solar System (AD) 9.00 South
Paci?c (AD) 12.00 Planet Earth (AD) 3.00pm
Wonders of the Solar System (AD) 4.00 Secrets
of Britain. The history of Selfridges 5.00 Slow
Train Through Africa with Griff Rhys Jones
6.00 Forbidden History (AD)
7.00 The World at War. An account of Hitler?s
ascent to power in 1930s Germany
8.00 Monarchy by David Starkey. The historian
continues his examination of the British
monarchy, turning his attention to the Wars of
the Roses and the rise of Henry VII (1/5) (AD)
9.00 Monarchy by David Starkey. Examining
the reign of King Henry VIII (2/5) (AD)
10.00 Steptoe and Son. Harold tries ballroom
dancing, and enters a local competition
10.40 Steptoe and Son. Harold?s long-lost
brother turns up out of the blue
11.20 Steptoe and Son. Harold writes an article
12.00 Forbidden History (AD) 1.00am The
World at War 2.00 Slow Train Through Africa
with Griff Rhys Jones 3.00 Home Shopping
UTV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Lesser Spotted
Journeys. Joe Mahon visits the ?shing port of
Greencastle in County Donegal 12.10am
Teleshopping 1.10-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Sgriobag (Get Squiggling) (r) 5.15 Na
Braithrean Cuideachail (The Koala Brothers) (r)
5.25 Botannan Araid Uilleim (William?s Wish
Wellingtons) (r) 5.30 Na Luchagan Fhiacla
(Tales of the Tooth Fairies) (r) 5.35 Ceitidh
Morag (Katie Morag) (r) 5.50 Su Shiusaidh
(Little Suzy?s Zoo) (r) 6.00 Donnie Murdo
(Danger Mouse) (r) 6.10 Alvinnn agus na
Chipmunks (ALVINNN!!! and the Chipmunks) (r)
6.35 Ard-Sgoil a? Chnuic Annasaich (Strange
Hill High) (r) 7.00 Turas a? Bhradain (The
Salmon?s Journey) (r) 7.30 Beul Chainnt (r)
8.00 An L� (News) 8.30 O Mo Dh鵷haich (From
Uist with Love) (r) 9.00 Trusadh: Coltach ris an
t-saoghail (Autism: So Much to Give) (r)
10.00 Horo Gheallaidh (Celtic Music Sessions)
(r) 10.30 Gruth is Uachdar (Crowdie and
Cream) (r) 11.25-11.55 Cuide Ri Cathy
(Scottish Celebrities) (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Ben Dant (r) 6.15 Sam T鈔 (r)
6.30 Bobi Jac (r) 6.40 Octonots (r) 6.55 Peppa
(r) 7.00 Heini (r) 7.15 Blero yn Mynd i Ocido
(r) 7.25 Twm Tisian (r) 7.35 Antur Natur Cyw
(r) 7.50 Cymylaubychain (r) 8.00 Stiw (r) 8.10
Heulwen a Lleu (r) 8.20 Y Teulu Mawr (r) 8.30
Llan-ar-goll-en (r) 8.45 Dwylo?r Enfys (r) 9.00
Y Sioe 2017 1.55pm News S4C a?r Tywydd
2.00 Y Sioe 2017 5.00 Stwnsh: Anifeiliaid
Anhygoel 5.05 Stwnsh: Gogs (r) 5.10 Stwnsh:
Ben 10 (r) 5.35 Stwnsh: Pyramid (r) 6.00
News S4C a?r Tywydd 6.05 Cwpwrdd Dillad. Nia
Parry meets a musician and conductor whose
suits have been inspired by his ?lm-star
acquaintances, plus a feminist who loves pink,
and a woman who buys from second-hand
shops (r) 6.30 Gwlad Moc. The broadcaster
Moc Morgan is joined by Iolo Williams. Last in
the series (r) (AD) 7.00 Heno 8.00 Pobol y
Cwm. Ei?on warns Cadno she is playing with
?re by helping to Linda hide her tablets, while
Jim embarks on his latest hair-brained scheme
to increase the shop?s takings (AD) 8.25 Y Sioe
2017. Ifan Jones Evans presents highlights
from the ?rst day 9.00 News 9 a?r Tywydd 9.30
Y Sioe 2017 10.00 Dylan ar Daith (r) 11.00
Dos i Gwcio. The youngsters consider their
future (r) 11.30-12.35am Y Sioe 2017 (r)
14
Monday July 24 2017 | the times
1GT
What are your favourite puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7399
1
2
3
4
Codeword No 3083
5
6
7
14
24
8
18
1
Scrabble � Challenge No 1920
11
22
13
9
25
25
13
25
17
23
6
4
10
25
18
5
6
7
9
10
11 12
2L
2W
23
8
2W
r
3L
o
2L
2L
v
hoe
2L
o 2L r
3L
u 3L
2W
hoar
2W
9
3
23
7
13
13
4
6
13
5
4
4
22
25
23
25
G
11
1
11
23
21
23
22
24
4
23
4
13
2L
19
O
12
13
20
11
14
15
1
14
20
20
5
N
16
13
12
1
23
18
25
1
23
2
16
23
25
17
24
18
19
20
5
23
1
20
2W
18
24
13
4
4
13
8
16
13
24
14
21
18
1
26
18
20
5
13
11
What seven-letter word can you
play with this rack?
26
23
20
16
12
23
11
23
22
23
7
23
5
4
19
3
24
11
GEESITY
18
What eight-letter word can you
play with this rack?
Solution to Crossword 4398
7398
S
P
T
O L D
I
CC I
A
YNO
O
V ER
O
EN T
O
Y R
U
N
T
R
O
D
D
E
N
L L E
A
I ME
A
E
I
K
A I
Y
O
R
K
E
T ER
A
N S
GH T
I
U
E L P
R
I
S ED
18 Catholic priest's cassock (7)
20 Ban, refuse to allow (4)
23 Refusal to attack first (3-10)
24 Written or printed work (4)
25 Side parts of a chair (8)
13
22
23
1
1
18
15
11
26
H
I
J
K
2W
L
Use only the board area shown. Collins Official
Scrabble Words is the authority used, although the
solutions are not unusual words. Standard Scrabble
rules apply for making the word plays.
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
G
Down
15
16
17
18
N
O
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 88010. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge. For the full solution call
0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
6Winners will
receive a Collins
English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Lexica
No 3841
L
E
C
S
L
O
B
A
Z
E
I
S
E
A
R
H
T
I
S
D
E
T
E
E
R
E
Z
R
A
M
W
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
numbers in the
three shaded
boxes. Text
TIMES followed
by a space, then your three
numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your
name, address and postcode to
88010 (UK only), by midnight.
Or enter by phone. Call 09012
925274 (ROI 1516 415 029)
by midnight. Leave your three
answer numbers (in any order)
and your contact details.
No 3842
B
A
A
E
E
D
V
A
U
E
M
Calls cost �00 (ROI ?1.50) plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge.
Winners will be picked at random from all correct answers received.
One draw per week. Lines close at midnight tonight.
If you call or text after this time you will not be entered but will still be
charged. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
F
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Easy No 4075
Futoshiki No 2961
Kakuro No 1920
23
� 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
?
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line ?block?, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
<
1
?
<
?
7
30
10
10
12
23
23
22
24
3
3
16
24
24
17
4
39
33
18
32
6
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
17
4
17
17
18
6
6
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
25
11
3
>
24
16
39
< 4
<
6
4
22
?
?
Challenge compiled by Allan Simmons
SCRABBLE� is a registered trademark of J. W. Spear & Sons Ltd ㎝attel 2015
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
Saturday?s solution, right
C
Need help with today?s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s
network access charge.
SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
22
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
14
1 Impulsive, hasty (4)
2 Human image brought to
life (5)
3 Leather from deer (7)
4 Worked incessantly (6)
6 Depict in art (7)
7 Giving fresh life to (8)
8 Man-eating giant (4)
12 Brown horse (8)
14 When day and night have
the same length (7)
16 Counsellor (7)
17 Extreme fear (6)
19 Jason's ship (4)
21 Works for three players (5)
22 Finishes (4)
22
� PUZZLER MEDIA
1 Unbending nature (8)
5 Aircraft wing main beam
(4)
9 Tool for making electrical
joints (9,4)
10 City in Siberia (4)
11 Facial feature (7)
13 Using a garden tool (6)
15 Deep gorge (6)
P A P ER
U O
MA L L
I
T
CARP A
E O B
O S
P AN I C
L
O
A S N
I NC I D
C A E
EMBOD
23
25
Across
G
2L
Key
2L = double letter
3L = triple letter
2W = double word
3W = triple word
Letter values
AEIOULNRST=1
DG=2 BCMP=3
FHVWY=4 K=5
JX=8 QZ=10
MIDCORE
22
24
2L
F
21
23
7
24
14
4
6
39
7
16
12
� PUZZLER MEDIA
10
13
D
E
2W
the times | Monday July 24 2017
15
1GT
MindGames
White: Alexander Kotov
Black: Mikhail Botvinnik
USSR Championship,
Leningrad 1939
Nimzo-Indian Defence
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Bb4 4
Qc2 Nc6 5 Nf3 d5 6 e3 0-0 7 a3
Bxc3+ 8 Qxc3 Bd7 9 b3 a5 10
Bd3 a4 11 Nd2
This allows Black to take the
initiative. 11 b4 is preferable.
11 ... Re8 12 0-0 e5
Black plays the thematic break.
13 dxe5 Nxe5 14 Bb2 axb3 15
Nxb3 Ne4 16 Qc2
________
醨D 1rDkD]
郉p0bDp0p]
� D D D D]
轉 Dph D ]
� DPDnD D]
�)NDB) D ]
� GQD )P)]
�$ D DRI ]
谅媚牌侨
16 ... Nxc4
Botvinnik writes, ?In an end-
________
醨D D D i]
郉pD D 0p]
� GbD 0qD]
轉 D DnD ]
� DQD ) D]
�)ND 4 D ]
� D $ DP)]
�$ D D I ]
谅媚牌侨
28 ... Ree8
A normal ?human? move. However, computers prefer the active
28 ... Rh3 and after 29 Qc2 Re8 all
the black pieces join in the attack.
29 Qf1 h5 30 Nd4 Nxd4 31 Bxd4
Re4 32 Re1
32 Bb6 was more resilient.
32 ... Rxe1 33 Qxe1 Rxa3 34 Kh1
Ra8 35 Re2 Kh7 36 h3 Re8 37 Qf2
A blunder but, after 37 Qd2
Rxe2 38 Qxe2 Qf5, Black?s advantage is easily enough to win.
37 ... Qxg2+
A similar finish to SpielmannNimzowitsch published on July 17.
38 Qxg2 Rxe2 White resigns
________
醧D DrDkD] Winning Move
�DRD 0 ]
� 0ngpD 0] White to play. This position is from
Palma de Mallorca
轉 D DpD ] Botvinnik-Larsen,
1967.
� D D D D] Botvinnik recaptured on d6 here, a move
蹹PD ) ) ] that gave Black a little respite. What
跴G DQ)B)] should he have played instead?
贒 D D I ] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
谅媚牌侨 my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
2/3
EASY
25
MEDIUM
93
x 3 + 68 x 2 + 54
203
x 4 + 618
HARDER
?6
x3
+6
30%
OF IT
OF IT
2/3
?6
OF IT
3/4
OF IT
? 13 x 3 + 18
+ 38 x 2 ? 78
1
x 5 + 757 +OF/IT2 + 765
50%
OF IT
8
40%
OF IT
? 888
4
2 4
Polygon
Killer Gentle No 5542
8
11
5
27
15
3
17
15
15
5min
17
13
10
7
3
4
18
Montecatini, in Italy was the venue Dealer: South, Vulnerability: Neither
for the 8th biennial European
? 10 9 6 3 2
Open Championships. After a last- Teams
?7 6 3 2
minute change, we were all housed
?K 10 6 3
in a large specially-erected tented
?village a few miles out of town.
? KQ 4
?N
My partner Alexander Allfrey
?A 5 4 W E ?KQ J 10 8
made the mistake of renting bicy?AQ 4
?J 8 7 5 2
S
?J 6 4 3 ? A J 8 7 5 ?8 5 2
cles to get there ? which was fine
and dandy until I had some
?9
unwanted intimacy with concrete
?9
after my bike stopped but I didn?t.
?A KQ 10 9 7
More on that later.
S
W
N
E
Before I left Blighty, I saw some
1?
1NT
Pass
3?
fabulous bridge in the mixed
4?
Dbl
End
events ? such as on this board
from the Mixed Teams. At both
Contract: 4? Dbled, Opening Lead: ? A
tables, West led the ace of hearts v
4? doubled. Then the play convinced declarer he held ? KQx.
diverged.
Declarer ruffed the second heart
One West led a second heart. and cashed the ace-king of clubs,
Declarer ruffed and could afford to discarding a heart and a diamond.
cash the ace of spades, expecting He ruffed a third club, cashed the
his clubs to provide four discards king of diamonds and ruffed a diafor dummy?s diamonds. East dis- mond. He ruffed a fourth club and
carded on the ace of spades but ruffed a third heart.
declarer cashed the ace-kingHere is the three-card ending:
queen of clubs, discarding dia? 10 9 6
monds, and ruffed a fourth club.
?He ruffed a heart back to hand
??and led a winning fifth club. West
?
KQ
4
?ruffed but dummy?s king of diaN
??KQ
W E
monds was discarded. Doubled
??J
S
game made for the loss of two
?
?spades and the ace of hearts.
?A J
?At our second table, West found
?the stronger defence of cashing the
?Q
ace of diamonds at trick two,
before leading a second heart. It Having picked off all West?s nonappears declarer must lose two spades, declarer led his last club. All
spade tricks and go one down ? West could do was ruff with the
but appearances can be deceptive. queen but, at trick 12, he had to lead
West?s double and two-ace cash- from ? K4 round to declarer?s ? AJ.
ing defence (plus the smugness that Doubled game made ? Houdiniwas oozing from his every pore) style. andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
6
18
19
10
3
8
8
21
�
x
x
+
13
7 9
9 8 6
3
1 2
8 9 3
9 7 5
3 1
2
8 9 6
9 7
7
9
9 6
7 8
6
8
1 7
3 9
8
5
=
42
6
+
=
63
=
21
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
Suko 1984
1
4 > 2
5 > 3
5
2
1
4
3 < 4
?
2 > 1
3
5
3
1
4 > 2
2
5
5
?
3
1 < 4
x
x
12
Sudoku 9192
5
7
8 7
9 5
9
4
9 2
8 1
6
7
1 3
3 2 1
5
1 3
1 4 2
3 2 1
3 5
5
3 1 2
3 1
Set Square 1922
21
3
x
1
-
x
+
17
2
9
14
10
11
4
19
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
6
2 2
7
12
3
8
9
2
4
5
6
7
1
4
2
5
7
1
6
3
8
9
5
Z
-
O
8
�
9
3
4
+
1
7
6
9
8
3
5
4
2
9
3
2
1
6
7
8
5
4
8
6
7
5
9
4
2
1
3
KenKen 4074
5
4
1
3
2
8
9
6
7
7
5
4
8
3
9
1
2
6
2
9
8
6
7
1
4
3
5
6
1
3
4
5
2
7
9
8
Lexica 3839
+
2
13
22
17
x
9
12
11min
7
15
11
-
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
work out their
= 6 positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
works? We?ve
= 19 put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
14
13
17
-
Futoshiki 2960
A
F
A
O
R
F
O
N
G
O
R
A
E
L
6
Lexica 3840
B
N
R
+
+
Cell Blocks 2965
8
= 34 from 1-9 are
Chess 1 Rxg7+! Kf8 2 Rh7! leads to a winning attack,
eg, 2 ... Ne5 3 Qh5 Re7 4 Rh8+ is crushing
13
11
11
All the digits
+
+
27
3
7
7
3
Scrabble 1919
HYDRATE E11 down (56)
LIFER D10 down (38)
3
18
13
+
Tredoku 1483
7
20
3
9
5
6
Killer Tricky No 5543
18
2
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
Solutions
Kakuro 1919
Bridge Andrew Robson
x
15
22
14
2
3
12
15
2
Set Square No 1923
From these letters, make words of three
or more letters, always including the
central letter. Answers must be in the
Concise Oxford Dictionary, excluding
capitalised words, plurals, conjugated
verbs (past tense etc), adverbs ending in
LY, comparatives and superlatives.
How you rate 10 words, average;
14, good; 21, very good; 29, excellent
Saturday?s answers coopery, copy,
coyote, cr阷y, cryer, crypt, eyot,
gooey, goopy, gory, grey, grocery, gyre,
gyro, gyrocopter, oocyte, orgy, perry,
poetry, pogey, porgy, prey, pyre,
rectory, retry, rooty, ropey, ropy, rorty,
ryot, terry, toey, trey, troy, type, typo,
tyre, tyro, yore
6
5
2
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Mikhail Botvinnik, the Red Czar
of Soviet chess, was world champion on and off from 1948 to 1963.
Curiously, Botvinnik made a speciality of winning games with
bishops of opposite colour. Readers who have been following my
instructional series on opposite
bishops will recall that the Soviet
grandmaster Alexander Kotov
also suffered defeat against Botvinnik in a similar opposite bishop
game, published on July 15.
game this would increase the
drawing chances for the weaker
side but, when it is a question of
an attack, it is very important that
the active bishop should have no
opponent.?
17 Bxc4 dxc4 18 Qxc4 Qg5 19 f4
Qg6 20 Rfd1
White cannot accept the pawn
sacrifice. After 20 Qxc7 Bh3 21
Qc2 Rac8 22 Qe2 Nd6, the black
threats, such as 23 ... Rxe3 and 23
... Rc2, are too strong.
20 ... Nd6 21 Qd3 Bf5 22 Qc3 Be4
23 Rd2 Bc6 24 Qd3 Nf5 25 Be5
f6 26 Bxc7 Rxe3 27 Qc4+ Kh8 28
Bb6
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Botvinnik?s speciality
Cell Blocks No 2966
Brain Trainer
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Chess Raymond Keene
E
C
E
A
T
O
M
Killer 5541
2
2
2
3
2
4
3
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7
5
2
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6
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A
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U
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Codeword 3082
9
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5
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2
7
9
1
Quiz 1 LL Cool J 2 Derek Jarman 3 Cerberus
4 Graves 5 Charles Darwin 6 Johann Bayer ?
it was the first atlas to cover the entire celestial
sphere 7 Gerald Durrell 8 Sigmar Polke
9 Brindisi ? then Brundisium 10 NouvelleAquitaine ? formed through a merger of
Aquitaine, Limousin and Poitou-Charentes
11 Claudio Monteverdi 12 Love in a Cold Climate
13 Bruges 14 The Blues 15 Indira Gandhi
CU
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A N
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E Y
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G
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E
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S
J
OP T
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F L Y
U
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L A T
T S Y
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L A S H
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QUAB
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OV E R
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A S
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P I
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C E ND
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P E Z E
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Word Watch
Cicisbeo (b) In Regency
England, the escort or
lover of a married woman
Dolnik (c) A poetic metre,
based on beats in a line
Dob (a) To snitch on or
report someone for
wrongdoing (slang)
Brain Trainer
Easy 51; Medium 448;
Harder 1,671
24.07.17
MindGames
Sudoku
Easy No 9193
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
Difficult No 9194
3 2
Fiendish No 9195
1 4
1
6 5 9
2
6
1 7
8
1 4
5
7 3
4
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
Cicisbeo
a A bone disease
b An escort
c A cowardly act
Dolnik
a Dubious
b A Russian pastry
c A poetic metre
Dob
a To snitch
b A stain
c An old horse
For interactive
Sudoku puzzles, visit
thetimes.co.uk/puzzles
Answers on page 15
3
2 4 1
3
8
4
2 9
2 9
1 8
4
7
PUZZLER MEDIA
1 4 5
7 5
6
2
9 7
1 8
2
4
5
9
3
6
9
2
5
7
3
3
3
9
8
1
3
9
to receive four clues for any of today?s puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
by Olav Bjortomt The Times Quiz Book
JOHN MANNING/TIMES NEWSPAPERS LTD
11 Vespro della Beata
Vergine, or Vespers of
1610, is a 90-minute
sacred work by which
Italian composer?
1 Which US rapper
won a Grammy for his
1991 song Mama Said
Knock You Out?
2 Tilda Swinton was
known as the muse
of which English
film director?
12 Lady Montdore, Polly
Hampton and Uncle
Matthew [Alconleigh]
feature in which 1949
Nancy Mitford novel?
15
3 Which three-headed
?hound of Hades?
was the offspring of
the monsters Echidna
and Typhon?
6 Which German
astronomer first
published his star atlas
Uranometria, Omnium
Asterismorum in 1603?
4 The sweet wine
Sauternes is made in
which subregion of the
Bordeaux wine region?
7 Ulysses the owl and
Quasimodo the pigeon
were pets of which
author while growing
up in Corfu?
5 The Voyage of the
Beagle was published in
1839 as which naturalist?s
Journal and Remarks?
8 Which German artist
(1941-2010) was known
for his Druckfehler
(printing errors) and
Lens Paintings series?
9 The Appian Way was
a Roman road that
connected Rome to
which city in Apulia?
10 Created through a
2016 merger of three
regions, what is the
largest administrative
region in France?
13 Which ?Venice of
the North? is the capital
of the Belgian province
of West Flanders?
The Times Quiz Book by
Olav Bjortomt is out now.
To order your copy visit
harpercollins.co.uk or call
0844 576 8120. Also available
from all good bookshops.
Friday?s
Quick
Cryptic
solution
No 879
14 What is the
colourful nickname of
the Australian rules
football club Carlton?
15 Which politician
(1917-84) is pictured?
Answers on page 15
The Times Quick Cryptic No 880
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Follow The Times Crossword
Editor @timescrosswords
by Joker
7
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R EG I S T
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S T A I R
T
I
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GA
S E E
M H
S T A R T
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CH A R I V
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N EWD E A
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D
P E R S I
6
Across
1 Make Ada rice when mixing
sponge (7,4)
8 Get angry if invaded by
northern poor (7)
9 Wagon broken by a weight of
stones (5)
10 Paid back low newspaper
interrupting Her Majesty?s
division (9)
12 Obviously, all rowers need this
to start (3)
13 Preserve tree invaded by many
blessed ants initially (6)
15 Bad result for part of Ireland
(6)
17 Organ the archbishop has
installed (3)
18 Swig ales wildly holding new
drinking vessel (4,5)
20 I had clerk starting late and
?nishing early ? layabout (5)
22 Leave a group playing (7)
23 Violently rebel toward
someone widely seen as leader
(5-6)
9
9 2 7
1
2
2
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1
2 8 9
4 7 3
1
3 5 2
4
Cluelines Stuck on Sudoku, Killer or KenKen? Call 0901 322 5005 before midnight
The Times Daily Quiz
7
1 5 8
7
5
Down
1 Organised criminals intend
rising about a ?ne (5)
2 Finish with a draught for a
decisive ending (9)
3 Rice with carp, never right for
a cold area (3,3)
4 Electrical discharge in large
vessel reported (3)
5 Look over alcohol where there
are duty-free shops (7)
6 Daring to come in with
pressure increasing (12)
7 A great sight ? robins, say,
compete in English tree (5-3,4)
11 Hostile West African country
gets biting insect around
November (9)
14 Thief left food all over car that
hasn?t started (7)
16 Inherited pub at end of lane
(6)
19 Tree?s more bare with top
removed (5)
21 Staff perhaps travelled on
bicycles mostly (3)
oe 12.00 6
Music Recommends 1.00am The Enigmatic
Scott Walker 2.00 Holloway Dreams: The Joe
Meek Story 2.30 6 Music Live Hour 3.30 6
Music?s Jukebox 5.00 Jon Hillcock
Classic FM
FM: 100-102 MHz
6.00am More Music Breakfast 9.00 John
Suchet 1.00pm Anne-Marie Minhall 5.00
Classic FM Drive 7.00 Smooth Classics 8.00
The Full Works Concert. Celebrating the
Tif?n Boys? Choir in a concert recorded at All
Saints Church in Kingston-upon-Thames.
Weelkes (Alleluia, I heard a voice); Howard
Goodall (The Lord is my Shepherd); Stanford
(Beati quorum via); Faure (Requiem Op 48);
Traditional (Danny Boy); Parry (Long Since
Egypt?s Plentiful Land); Franck (Panis
Angelicus); Richard Harvey Carol (Eventide);
Jonathan Dove (Seek Him that Maketh
the Seven Stars); Moses Hogan (Joshua
Fit the Battle); and John Rutter (The Lord
Bless You and Keep You) 10.00 Smooth
Classics 1.00am Sam Pittis
the times | Monday July 24 2017
11
1GT
artsfirst night
JOHAN PERSSON
Theatre
Taking Steps
Stephen Joseph, Scarborough
Pop
Jorja Smith
Electric Brixton, SW2
T
M
{{{((
his is an ingenious comedy
with a savage undertone.
Written by Alan Ayckbourn
in 1979, and regarded by the
author as his only true farce,
it was intended to be performed in the
round. It?s one of the prolific
playwright?s lesser-known works, yet,
with its astute balance of psychological
turmoil and situational hilarity, it?s a
neatly achieved pleasure. This revival,
which Ayckbourn directs, is neither as
cruel nor as wildly funny as it should
be, but it still makes a great piece of
intelligent entertainment.
Key to its success is its cunning
staging concept: the action takes place
in a three-storey Victorian house, but
plays out on just one level. So the
actors comically trot, scamper and
stumble up and down non-existent
staircases, and their paths cross even
when they?re in different rooms. The
crumbling and reputedly haunted pile
is the country home of Roland, a
booze-soaked hardware magnate, and
his discontented wife, Elizabeth, a
former dancer. Bored with her
marriage and longing to indulge her
artistic passions ? although her
talents are dubious ? Elizabeth is
planning to desert her husband.
Her reluctant accomplice is her
tactless brother Mark, a man so boring
that his conversation puts people to
sleep. Mark has his own romantic
issues with his highly strung fianc閑,
Kitty. And when Leslie, the spivvy,
motorbiking landlord, arrives to
negotiate the sale of the house, along
with Roland?s well-meaning, bumbling
young solicitor, Tristram, they all
become like scurrying mice in a maze,
searching for an escape route, chasing
each other or just their own tails.
Roland?s gibbering horror when he
discovers Elizabeth?s intentions is
genuinely distressing, as is Kitty?s
helpless misery with the ghastly Mark,
and Ayckbourn could usefully ratchet
up the intensity several notches. The
comedy also needs to be more frantic,
but Russell Dixon?s Roland slides
amusingly from whisky-slugging
bluster to blubbering, Louise
Shuttleworth revels in Elizabeth?s
cultural pretensions, and Antony Eden
as the good-hearted Tristram flaps
benignly about, the play?s burbling,
blundering moral centre. Even if it
never feels as if there?s enough at stake,
this is a highly enjoyable diversion.
Sam Marlowe
Box office: 01723 370541, to Oct 5
Proms at . . .
RNS/McGegan
Stage
@TheDock, Hull
{{{{(
Prom 9
Fidelio
{{(((
Prom 10
Aurora/Collon
{{{{{
Royal Albert Hall
H
{{{{(
A beleaguered duo: Daniel Ryan as the autistic Daniel and Samantha Spiro as his sister Peppy
Fixer-upper worth buying
Deborah Bruce
searches for
the meaning of
home in her
compassionate
new play, says
Sam Marlowe
Theatre
The House They
Grew Up In
Minerva,
Chichester
{{{{(
istory has been made . . . in
Hull. On Saturday the UK?s
City of Culture hosted the
first BBC Prom outside
London. In fact, three of
them ? the same programme
repeated to cater for the crowds
wanting to squeeze into Hull?s new
outdoor amphitheatre, bridging the
old dry dock beside the Humber.
Remarkably for Hull in July, nobody
got wet, except metaphorically. The
programme comprised 90 minutes of
water music, marking the 300th
anniversary of Handel?s famous
excursion on to the Thames, but also
including tempestuous Rameau,
humdrum Telemann (is there any
other?), two atmospheric Sea Sketches
Y
ou can calculate the market
value of a house, but how do
you put a price on a home,
with all its ghosts, its family
history, the decades of
memories that have seeped into its
walls? And, in a consumerist society
bedazzled by glossy property porn
and bedevilled by the housing crisis,
are we in danger of judging our
flesh-and-blood neighbours with no
more humanity than we eye up bricks
and mortar?
Deborah Bruce?s new play offers a
through-the-keyhole insight into the
domestic world of a pair of ageing,
reclusive siblings, misfits in a desirable
southeast London postcode, and we
witness the heart-rending fallout
when the hard-nosed, self-interested
21st century comes knocking.
As a piece of writing, it?s something
of a fixer-upper; it could do with a
stringent edit, and there are some plot
implausibilities. Yet it unmistakably
has good bones, as well as a big heart,
and Jeremy Herrin?s Headlong coproduction is beautifully acted by
Samantha Spiro and Daniel Ryan as
the beleaguered duo.
Peppy (Spiro, bright-eyed, witchyhaired) and her younger, autistic
brother, Daniel (a gentle, bear-like
Ryan), have lived in their Victorian
terrace since childhood. As well as an
intense, co-dependent intimacy, they
share a passion for art, and in her
youth Peppy was a Cambridge
undergraduate. Now the house, with
its overgrown garden and failing
plumbing, is crammed with a lifetime?s
obsessively accumulated junk.
That doesn?t deter Ben, the lonely
little boy from next door, who takes
refuge from his squabbling, divorced
parents in a sweet, tentative friendship
with Daniel. Ben?s visits arouse
suspicion; police are called, local
hostilities become overt, and intruders
? from forensics teams to newspaper
photographers and grasping would-be
homebuyers ? force their way over
the threshold.
Bruce?s dialogue delicately conveys a
sense of mingled intellect, anxiety and
social dysfunction, and Spiro?s frantic
energy is offset by Ryan?s lugubrious
solidity. There are some flourishes that
feel at once underdeveloped and
heavy-handed: Peppy reminds us that
her name is short for Penelope, loyal
wife of Odysseus, but it?s an analogy
that doesn?t quite resonate. And
references to the rivalry between the
painters Titian and Tintoretto,
presumably an echo of tensions in the
brother-sister relationship, feel rather
tacked on. However, the play is above
all an affecting plea for compassion
and generosity. Simple, sincere ? and
relevant, wherever you happen to live.
Box office: 01243 781312, to Aug 5
by Grace Williams, and a new piece,
RIVER, by the young Manchestertrained Grace Evangeline Mason. That
was short, but highly charged, pungent
harmonies rippling downwards, fierce
accents, and the odd detuned chord.
Under Nicholas McGegan, the
Royal Northern Sinfonia played with
irresistible spirit, and a boisterous
crowd cheered everything. Nothing
entertained more than the scintillating
encore: Iain Farrington?s A Shipshape
Shindig, an off-kilter take on The
Sailor?s Hornpipe that should go
straight into Last Night of the Proms.
Even a tenth of that flair would have
lifted the previous evening?s Prom. It
was a perversely undramatic concert
performance of Beethoven?s Fidelio,
not even with surtitles. The conductor,
Juanjo Mena, struggled to keep singers
and orchestra together, the BBC
Philharmonic?s strings lacked bite, the
imported Spanish choir never shivered
the spine, and the soloists impressed
only intermittently.
Stuart Skelton gave his usual utter
commitment as Florestan, but Ricarda
Merbeth (Leonore) had little lowerregister power and Detlef Roth was
a weak Pizarro. Thank heavens for
more spark from Louise Alder
(Marzelline), Benjamin Hulett
(Jaquino) and James Creswell, a fine
last-minute replacement as Rocco.
Much more gripping stuff on
Saturday night, when the Aurora
Orchestra improbably added
usically speaking, Jorja
Smith could be her
generation?s Amy
Winehouse. The
classically trained, newly
turned 20-year-old from Walsall in the
West Midlands may be f阾ed by Drake
? on whose latest album she
appeared, before supporting him here
on tour ? but rather than ride the
hip-hop/R&B hybrid into the charts,
the uncompromising singer is sticking
with the jazz and old soul she
obviously adores.
A singular vision can be challenging
for fans, however, and at a swelteringly
hot sold-out Electric, Smith wasn?t
about to bend. For the first 15 minutes
the languorous pace of her jazz-soaked
songs was spellbinding. By the
half-hour mark, chatter suggested she
could do with a change of tempo, or at
least some seats. Her four-man band
was proficient, but part of the problem.
Smith?s versatile and astonishing
vocals oozed depth and drama ? the
band simply, sometimes needlessly,
filled in the spaces.
Smith?s latest single, Teenage Fantasy,
lightened the mood with a singalong,
but more striking was the silence that
greeted the gorgeous Goodbyes,
written about the death of a friend and
performed only to electric guitar. As
she switched from her usual throaty,
smoky style to a pure high pitch you
could have heard a pin drop. Similarly,
when she brought on the soulster
Maverick Sabre to duet on Carry Me
Home, the stage sizzled with renewed
energy.
The gig?s final third proved that
progression is forthcoming. The
crowd, of course, went crazy for
Smith?s Drake collaboration, Get It
Together, albeit minus the rapper
even on screen, but it was one of
Smith?s new songs, On My Mind,
which strayed into disco and funk,
that finally got feet moving, before
her signature song, the Dizzee Rascalreferencing Blue Lights, served as a fun
reminder that the singer is only just
out of her teens.
Lisa Verrico
Beethoven?s Eroica to its repertoire of
symphonies played from memory.
That wasn?t just an astonishing feat of
concentration. With Nicholas Collon
favouring speeds ranging from zippy to
hair-raising, there was virtuosity all
round the band too.
Earlier, Collon and the incurably
enthusiastic Tom Service had given
a fun introduction to the symphony
illustrated with live extracts, and the
strings had delivered an impassioned
account of Strauss?s desolate but
gorgeous Metamorphosen. That was
apt too. Composed in 1945 Germany,
it is infused with quotations from the
Eroica?s funeral march that seem like
cries from the depths of despair.
Richard Morrison
12
1GT
Monday July 24 2017 | the times
television & radio
Viewing Guide
Chris Bennion
Diana, Our
Mother: Her
Life and Legacy
ITV, 9pm
Next month
is the 20th
anniversary
of the death
of Diana, Princess of
Wales, and we can
expect a slew of
best mum in the world.
She smothered us with
love, that?s for sure.? He
also describes her as
?one of the naughtiest
of parents?, while
William discusses how
important it was that
their mother understood
that there was ?a life
outside of the palace
walls?. There are plenty
of other contributions
too, including from
Earl Spencer, Elton
John, members of
the royal staff, and,
incongruously, the
pop star Rihanna.
?I understand that
change is frightening
for people,? Diana told
Martin Bashir in 1995.
?But I do think that
there are a few things
that could change that
would alleviate this
sometimes complicated
relationship between
monarchy and public.
I think they could
walk hand in hand,
as opposed to be so
distant.? Here, then,
is her true legacy: two
young royals who have
taken the public to
their hearts, as we
have them.
Horrible Histories
CBBC, 5.25pm
The awards-strewn
children?s show/surreal
comedy returns for
another series. Today?s
opener is about
Exceptional Explorers,
although, this being
Horrible Histories,
it mainly takes the
mickey out of all and
sundry for believing
that they ?discovered?
certain lands. The
highlights include a
Wurzels-inspired song
about 16th-century
seafaring and a skit
BBC Two
ITV
Channel 4
Channel 5
6.00am Breakfast 9.15 Wild UK. New series. Exploring
the nation?s wildernesses and their wildlife 10.00 Homes
Under the Hammer. Featuring properties in North
Yorkshire, Stoke-on-Trent and Tunbridge Wells (r) (AD)
11.00 Food: Truth or Scare. Chris Bavin and Gloria
Hunniford investigate claims about oily ?sh (r) (AD)
11.45 Rip Off Britain: Holidays. A report on companies
that promise safe and secure airport parking, but leave
cars in ?elds or by the side of the road 12.15pm Bargain
Hunt. Eric Knowles is joined at an antiques fair at
Wetherby Racecourse by experts Nick Hall and Jonathan
Pratt, who help two teams buy three items to take to
auction in Darlington (AD) 1.00 BBC News at One;
Weather 1.30 BBC Regional News; Weather 1.45 Red
Rock. Angela suggests moving as a way to help Conor
(AD) 2.30 Escape to the Country. Sonali Shah is on the
Dorset coast with a couple hoping to ?nd inspiration (r)
(AD) 3.30 Money for Nothing. Sarah Moore transforms
items reclaimed from a tip in Surrey (r) 4.15 Flog It! From
Gloucester Cathedral (r) 5.15 Pointless. Quiz show
hosted by Alexander Armstrong (r) 6.00 BBC News at
Six; Weather 6.30 BBC Regional News; Weather
6.00am The TV That Made Me (r) 6.30 Right on the
Money (r) 7.15 Bargain Hunt (r) (AD) 8.00 Sign Zone:
Great British Menu (r) (SL) 9.00 Victoria Derbyshire
11.00 BBC Newsroom Live 1.00pm Athletics: Diamond
League Monaco Highlights. Gabby Logan introduces action
from the 11th meeting of the season, which took place at
Stade Louis II, and was expected to feature Usain Bolt in
the 100m (r) 2.00 Two Tribes. Quiz hosted by Richard
Osman (r) 2.30 The Best Dishes Ever. Dishes that are
good to make in advance (r) 3.00 This Wild Life. Saba
Douglas-Hamilton moves to Kenya to run a safari camp
(r) 3.30 Super Senses: The Secret Power of Animals. The
biologist Patrick Aryee and the physicist Helen Czerski
explore the world of animal senses. They begin with
sight, revealing how caribou use UV light to avoid
predators (r) (AD) 4.30 Live Swimming: World
Championships. Helen Skelton presents coverage of day
two from Danube Arena in Budapest, Hungary, which will
include the ?nal of the men?s 100m breaststroke
discipline. Coverage continues on the interactive service
6.00 Eggheads. Quiz show hosted by Jeremy Vine
6.30 Letterbox. Game show hosted by Mel Giedroyc
6.00am Good Morning Britain. A lively mix of news and
current affairs, plus health, entertainment and lifestyle
features 8.30 Lorraine. Entertainment and fashion
news, as well as showbiz stories, cooking and gossip.
Presented by Lorraine Kelly 9.25 The Jeremy Kyle Show.
Studio chat show (r) 10.30 This Morning. Chat and
lifestyle features, including a look at the stories making
the newspaper headlines and a recipe in the kitchen.
Presented by Eamonn Holmes and Ruth Langsford.
Including Local Weather 12.30pm Loose Women. The
former Emmerdale star Deena Payne joins the panel for
more topical studio discussion from a female perspective
1.30 ITV News; Weather 2.00 Judge Rinder. Cameras
follow criminal barrister Robert Rinder as he takes on
real-life cases (r) 3.00 Tenable. Five accounts managers
from Harrogate, North Yorkshire answer questions about
top 10 lists, then try to score a perfect 10 in the ?nal
round. Hosted by Warwick Davis (r) 4.00 Tipping Point.
Quiz show (r) 5.00 The Chase. Bradley Walsh presents as
four contestants work as a team to take on quiz expert
the Chaser and secure a cash prize (r) 6.00 Regional
News; Weather 6.30 ITV News; Weather
6.00am Countdown (r) 6.45 Will & Grace (r) 7.35
Everybody Loves Raymond (r) 8.35 Frasier (r) (AD) 10.05
Undercover Boss USA (r) 11.00 The Simpsons (r) 12.00
Channel 4 News Summary 12.05pm Couples Come Dine
with Me. Three couples from east London compete to win
the �000 prize (r) 1.05 Posh Pawn. Staff are amazed by
two diamond necklaces owned by different clients (r)
2.10 Countdown. With Chris Packham in Dictionary Corner
3.00 The Question Jury. The new jurors are determined to
stay positive 4.00 A Place in the Sun: Summer Sun. Ben
Hillman shows a number of properties to newly engaged
Glasgow couple Lyndsey and Paul, who want to buy a
holiday home in the area around Oliva in eastern Spain
5.00 Four in a Bed. The ?rst visit of the week is to the
Miners Arms in Nenthead, Cumbria, where two sisters
hope to impress guests with their eco credentials (r) 5.30
Come Dine with Me. The ?rst of a week of dinner parties
in Windsor, Berkshire 6.00 The Simpsons. Angry dolphins
attack Spring?eld, while Homer dies and has to perform
one good deed to get into Heaven (r) (AD) 6.30
Hollyoaks. Grace prepares to take down her and Warren?s
blackmailer and Al?e tries to help Lily and Prince (AD)
6.00am Milkshake! 9.15 The Wright Stuff. Journalist
and broadcaster Matthew Wright and his guests debate
the issues of the day 11.15 The Yorkshire Vet. Julian
treats a much-loved cat with a swollen eye (r) 12.10pm
5 News Lunchtime 12.15 Big Brother. Daily round-up of
highlights (r) 1.10 Access. Showbiz news and gossip 1.15
Home and Away (AD) 1.45 Neighbours (AD) 2.15 NCIS:
Murder in the Family. The agents are investigated by the
FBI on suspicion of murdering arms dealer La Grenouille,
and Jenny Shepard is the prime suspect ? until an
eyewitness implicates Tony (r) (AD) 3.15 FILM: The
Killing Game (12, TVM, 2011) A forensic sculptor
whose daughter disappeared years previously receives a
series of menacing phone calls from a man claiming to
have killed her and announces his intention to strike
again. Mystery with Laura Prepon and Ty Olsson 5.00 5
News at 5 5.30 Neighbours. Piper is shocked when a
worrying online comment is brought to her attention (r)
(AD) 6.00 Home and Away. Ash and Kat rush Luc to
hospital, Jett tells John the facts about his father?s death
and VJ tries to lift Hunter?s spirits with a sur?ng lesson,
unaware Luc is critically ill (r) (AD) 6.30 5 News Tonight
7.00 The Farmers? Country Showdown
(1/5) Following dairy farmers from
Kent competing at the Edenbridge &
Oxted Agricultural Show in Surrey (r)
7.30 Jodi?s Lovely Letters Aled Jones
meets Jodi Ann Bickley, who has ME
and has sent letters around the world,
supporting those who need it (AD)
7.00 Celebrity Antiques Road Trip The
actresses Jennifer Saunders and
Patricia Potter take to the road with
experts Philip Serrell and Mark Stacey,
travelling through Berkshire,
Hampshire and Oxfordshire (r)
7.00 Emmerdale Megan is on edge when
Charity sees her with Frank (AD)
8.00 EastEnders Recent events prompt
one resident to seek revenge (AD)
8.00 University Challenge Trinity College,
Cambridge, takes on Bristol
8.00 Call the Cleaners New series. Ben
Fogle and Liz Bonnin discover the
countryside?s hidden gems (1/6) (AD)
8.30 Men, Boys and Eating Disorders:
Panorama Nigel Owens investigates
the rising number of men and boys
who have eating disorders
8.30 Nadiya?s British Food Adventure
Nadiya Hussain explores the culinary
traditions of the Peak District.
See Viewing Guide (2/8) (AD)
8.30 Coronation Street Peter reveals that
he has offered Leanne, Simon and
Oliver a place to stay (AD)
9.00 DIY SOS: The Big Build Nick
Knowles and the team are joined by
local tradespeople in Dartford to
transform the home of a family whose
13-year-old son has cerebral palsy and
developmental delay (2/9) (r) (AD)
9.00 Ripper Street Reid has captured
Nathaniel Dove, ridding Whitechapel of
its most feared monster since Jack the
Ripper and also clearing the name of
the late Bennet Drake. But for the
detective and Jackson to be proven
innocent, they must bring down
Augustus Dove (6/6) (AD)
9.00 Diana, Our Mother: Her Life and
Legacy The Duke of Cambridge and
Prince Harry talk about their mother
Diana, Princess of Wales, and pay
tribute to the many ways her in?uence
has shaped their lives. Featuring
contributions from Diana?s brother,
Earl Spencer See Viewing Guide (AD)
10PM
9PM
8PM
BBC One
Early
through a photo album
created by Diana
(which has never
before been seen by the
public), talk about the
last time they saw her,
her death and the effect
it had on them as young
boys. Prepare for a
lump in your throat.
?She was our mum,?
Harry says. ?She still
is our mum. And, of
course, as a son I would
say this, she was the
7PM
Top
pick
programmes about her
to add to the steady
trickle we have had this
year. None, however,
is likely to be as
significant as this one
because it has been
made with weighty
contributions from
Prince William and
Prince Harry. The pair
speak openly about
their mother in Ashley
Gething?s film and, as
they make their way
10.00 BBC News at Ten
Late
11PM
10.30 BBC Regional News and Weather
10.45 Peter Kay?s Comedy Shuf?e
The comedian receives a mysterious
phone call (5/6) (r) (AD)
10.00 Normal for Norfolk Desmond
MacCarthy ponders whether he will be
the last of the MacCarthys at Wiveton
Hall. See Viewing Guide (2/6) (AD)
10.30 Newsnight Presented by Evan Davis
7.00 Channel 4 News
7.00 Car Crash TV Events caught on ?lm
by dashboard-mounted cameras, from
freak accidents and amazing escapes to
racehorses on the loose (1/10) (r)
8.00 Bear about the House: Living with
My Supersized Pet Documentary
exploring the relationship between
people and their exotic pets, including
a Minnesota couple who keep a
one-ton buffalo that has to be
showered in the local car wash
8.00 King Tut?s Tomb: The Hidden
Chamber Documentary examining
recent discoveries made in the famous
burial chamber, which archaeologists
now believe may also be the resting
place of Queen Nefertiti (2/6) (r)
9.00 999: What?s Your Emergency? New
series. The return of the programme
following the emergency services, this
time focusing on the police, paramedics
and ?re service in Wiltshire. The
?rst edition examines the rise in
racially aggravated hate crimes
9.00 Traf?c Cops Special: Carjacked The
of?cers? hunt for a stolen car ends in a
dramatic foot chase, while car thieves
lead them on one of the longest
pursuits in the history of the force
7.30 Coronation Street Toyah and Peter
settle in at the Rovers (AD)
10.30 ITV News
11.15 Have I Got a Bit More Old News
for You Extended edition from October
2016. Jo Brand hosts the satirical
current affairs quiz, with Tim Farron
and Chris Kamara joining team captains
Ian Hislop and Paul Merton (3/11) (r)
11.15 The Mash Report Satirical news
presented by Nish Kumar (1/10) (r)
11.45 Cleverman New series. Sci-? drama
starring Hunter Page-Lochard (1/6)
11.00 Regional News
11.15 Killer Women with Piers Morgan
Piers travels to New York State to
meet Sheila Davalloo, serving a
total of 75 years after murdering
her lover?s wife and attempting to
kill her own husband (5/5) (r)
12.00 Who Do You Think You Are? Clare Balding is
particularly interested in her maternal great-grandfather.
Clare believes he could have been gay, but getting to the
truth of the matter proves a challenge when all the
evidence comes from a time when homosexuality was
illegal (r) (AD) 1.05am-6.00 BBC News
12.40am Sign Zone: Supermarket Shopping
Secrets Gregg Wallace and Babita Sharma look at the
retailers? attempts to outdo one another in terms of
convenience (r) (AD, SL) 1.40-2.40 Me and My Dog:
The Ultimate Contest. Dog owners and their pets
compete in a bid to make it to the grand ?nal (r) (SL)
12.10am Jackpot247 Viewers get the chance to
participate in live interactive gaming from the comfort of
their sofas 3.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show. The host invites
guests to air their differences over family and
relationship issues (r) (SL) 3.50 ITV Nightscreen
5.05-6.00 The Jeremy Kyle Show (r) (SL)
10.00 Britain?s Bene?t Tenants
Documentary following the work of
specialist letting agencies. Leeds
letting agent Aimee investigates
complaints of a bad smell coming
from one of her properties (1/3) (r)
10.00 Big Brother Daily round-up of
highlights, featuring the latest tasks,
games, arguments, laughs, diary
room visits and bedroom chit-chat.
Narrated by Marcus Bentley
11.00 60 Days in Jail Criminal justice
student Dion is the last volunteer to
enter the jail and all eight of the
undercover inmates must now
face up to the harsh reality of life
behind bars (3/12) (AD)
11.05 Big Brother?s Bit on the Side
Rylan Clark-Neal presents the live
Big Brother companion show,
including a debate on the burning
issues and famous guests? thoughts
on the latest developments
12.00 A Very British Brothel Reports from a Shef?eld
massage parlour (r) (SL) 1.00am Ramsay?s Hotel Hell (r)
(AD) 1.45 The Supervet (r) (AD) 2.45 Escape to Costa
Rica (r) (AD) 3.40 Shipping Wars UK (r) 4.05 Selling
Houses with Amanda Lamb 5.00 Kirstie?s Vintage Gems
(r) 5.05-6.00 Location, Location, Location (r) (SL)
12.05am Countdown to Murder The story of Roderick
Newall, who was convicted of killing his parents (r) 1.00
SuperCasino 3.10 Nightmare Tenants, Slum Landlords.
A man happily living in his garden shed (r) 4.00 Tribal
Teens (r) (SL) 4.45 House Doctor (r) (SL) 5.10 Great
Artists (r) (SL) 5.35-6.00 Wildlife SOS (r) (SL)
the times | Monday July 24 2017
13
1GT
television & radio
based on Educating
Yorkshire that casts
Christopher Columbus
as the worst geography
teacher ever. Kids,
however, will most
likely be delighted
by the story of the
Arctic explorer Peter
Freuchen, who dug
himself out of an icy
tomb using a frozen
poo. You won?t hear the
song Let It Go again
without wincing.
Nadiya?s British
Food Adventure
BBC Two, 8.30pm
The 2015 Bake Off
winner and all-round
good egg, Nadiya
Hussain, dons her
cagoule and heads
to the Peak District.
There is no doubt that
Hussain?s recipes are
on the simpler side, but
it makes a nice change
to watch a cookery
show that offers
realistic options for
your dinner. As well as
giving us her twist on
the classic Bakewell
tart, Hussain heads to
the village of Combs to
learn about traditional
Derbyshire oatcakes ?
she makes some
incredible-looking
samosas with them ?
and learns about
pickling in Hale.
?Best. Pickles. Ever.?
Game of Thrones
Sky Atlantic, 9pm
After a slow-burning,
ducks-in-a-row series
opener last week, things
should really get rolling
in Westeros tonight. In
this episode, entitled
Stormborn, in reference
to Daenerys Targaryen,
the Queen of Dragons
will receive an
?unexpected? visitor.
Could this be Jon Snow,
coming to seek an
alliance? Or Ser Jorah,
whose scale-covered
arm we saw lunging
out of a cell last week?
Snow will likely
appreciate a trip south,
seeing as in the north
he faces a challenge to
his authority. Meanwhile
diehard GoT fans are in
a spin after the trailer
revealed that Arya
Stark could be reunited
with her direwolf.
Normal for Norfolk
BBC Two, 10pm
Although he lives
resolutely in the past,
tonight Desmond
MacCarthy has his
mind on the future.
Namely, the future of
his ancestral home,
Wiveton Hall. He hopes
to hand the running of
it to his son, Edmund.
However, Edmund is
reluctant. Who can
blame him? The farm is
up to its tweedy armpits
in debt, the estate?s
private water supply is
struggling and rats are
stealing food from the
pheasants. ?Everything
is more complicated
than it used to be,?
Desmond says with a
sigh. ?Who knows?
We all might end up as
the servants to some
Japanese mogul.? Yes,
the future is a worry.
Sky1
Sky Atlantic
Sky Living
Sky Arts
Sky Main Event
Variations
6.00am Road Wars 8.00 Flying Monsters with
David Attenborough (r) (AD) 10.00 Making
David Attenborough?s Flying Monsters (r) 11.00
Football?s Funniest Moments (r) (AD) 12.00
NCIS: Los Angeles (r) 2.00pm Hawaii Five-0 (r)
3.00 MacGyver (r) 4.00 The Flash (r)
6.00 Futurama. Fry and Leela gain powers (r)
6.30 The Simpsons. Back-to-back episodes (r)
9.00 A League of Their Own. Daniel Ricciardo,
Rob Beckett and Judy Murray join host James
Corden and regulars Jamie Redknapp and
Andrew Flintoff on the sports quiz (r) (AD)
10.00 Micky Flanagan Thinking Aloud. The
topics that keep him awake at night, beginning
with the world of men and women (r) (AD)
11.00 Modern Family. All three families deal
with problems on their holidays (r)
11.30 Modern Family. Jay tries to make a
good impression on his new neighbours (r)
12.00 A League of Their Own (r) (AD)
1.00am Hawaii Five-0 (r) 4.00 RSPCA Animal
Rescue (r) (AD) 5.00 Highway Cops (r)
6.00am Fish Town (r) 7.00 Urban Secrets (r)
8.00 Storm City (r) (AD) 9.00 The British (r)
(AD) 10.00 The West Wing (r) 12.00 Without a
Trace (r) 1.00pm CSI: Crime Scene Investigation
(r) 2.00 Blue Bloods (r) (AD) 3.00 Storm City
(r) (AD) 4.00 The West Wing (r)
6.00 Without a Trace. The team looks into the
case of a kidnapped motivational speaker (r)
7.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. A property
tycoon?s wife is killed in her home (r)
8.00 Blue Bloods. Danny investigates the
murder of a student on a college campus, Jamie
encounters a former law-school classmate and
Erin learns to give Nicky more freedom (r) (AD)
9.00 Game of Thrones. Daenerys receives a
visitor, Jon faces a revolt, and Tyrion plans the
conquest of Westeros. See Viewing Guide (r)
10.10 Thronecast. Sue Perkins and Jamie
East return with the companion show
11.10 Game of Thrones (r)
12.20am Ray Donovan (r) (AD) 2.50 Nurse
Jackie (r) 4.00 The West Wing (r)
6.00am Obese: A Year to Save My Life USA (r)
7.00 Nothing to Declare (r) 8.00 Bangkok
Embassy (r) 9.00 Cooks to Market (r) 9.15 My
Kitchen Rules: Australia (r) 10.30 Border
Security: Canada?s Front Line (r) 11.00 Stop,
Search, Seize (r) 12.00 Elementary (r) 1.00pm
Criminal Minds (r) 2.00 Bones (r) 3.00 Cold
Case (r) 4.00 UK Border Force (r) 5.00 Nothing
to Declare (r) 6.00 Nothing to Declare (r) (AD)
7.00 Sun, Sea and A&E (AD)
8.00 Elementary. Joan and Kitty look
into a string of murders (r) (AD)
9.00 Criminal Minds. The agents welcome a new
member as they hunt for an escaped killer (r)
10.00 Criminal Minds. The team ?nds a cryptic
connection between two murder victims (r)
11.00 Criminal Minds. The pro?lers race against
time to save an abducted family (r)
12.00 Cold Case. A murder case from 1929
(r) 1.00am Bones (r) (AD) 2.00 Criminal
Minds (r) 4.00 Border Security: Canada?s
Front Line (r) 5.00 Nothing to Declare (r)
6.00am The Glory of Russia: The Sights and
Sounds of St Petersburg 7.50 Classical
Destinations 8.00 Watercolour Challenge 9.00
Tales of the Unexpected 10.00 Treasure Houses
of Britain 11.00 Auction (AD) 12.00
Discovering: Simply Red 12.30pm Discovering:
The Smiths 1.00 Discovering: Shirley MacLaine
(AD) 2.00 Watercolour Challenge 3.00 Tales of
the Unexpected 4.00 Treasure Houses of Britain
5.00 Discovering: Guns N? Roses (AD) 5.30
Discovering: Foo Fighters (AD)
6.00 Discovering: Charles Bronson (AD)
7.00 The South Bank Show. Melvyn Bragg
meets writer and director Amma Asante
8.00 Breezin?: The George Benson Story
9.00 Rodrigo Y Gabriela at Baloise Session
10.15 2Cellos: Live at Arena Pula
12.00 The Gospel Music of Johnny Cash
1.00am Tales of the Unexpected 2.00
Watercolour Challenge 3.00 Frank Sinatra:
The Vintage Years 4.00 Dean Martin:
A Legend in Concert 5.00 Auction (AD)
6.00am Good Morning Sports Fans 10.00 Live
ATP Tennis. The German Open. Coverage of the
opening day of the ATP World Tour 500 series
clay court tournament at the Am Rothenbaum
6.30pm Sky Sports News at 6. The latest news
7.00 Live World Matchplay Darts. Coverage of
day three from the Winter Gardens in Blackpool,
featuring the concluding four ?rst-round
matches in the event won by Michael van
Gerwen last year. The Dutchman met old rival
Phil Taylor in the 2016 ?nal, and while ?Mighty
Mike? eased through his ?rst-round match, ?The
Power? had a tougher time against the former
BDO player Robbie Green, winning 10-8
11.00 Through the Night. The day?s news
12.00 Through the Night 1.00am Live
WWE Late Night Raw. Wrestling action
from the States with the over-the-top stars,
featuring the likes of Seth Rollins and Finn
Balor. Presented by Michael Cole, Corey Graves
and David Otunga 4.15 WWE from the
Vault 5.00 Through the Night
BBC One N Ireland
As BBC One except: 10.40pm Road Riders. An
adrenaline-fuelled documentary that captures
the lives and passions of the men, women and
families who are part of the world of Irish road
racing (r) 11.10 Peter Kay?s Comedy Shuf?e (r)
(AD) 11.40 Have I Got a Bit More Old News for
You (r) 12.25am Who Do You Think You Are?
(r) (AD) 1.25-6.00 BBC News
BBC One Wales
As BBC One except: 7.00pm-7.30 The Royal
Welsh Show 2017. New series. Kate Humble
presents highlights from the opening day of the
event that celebrates agricultural and rural life
in Wales, held at the showground in Powys
8.30-9.00 Nigel Owens: Bulimia and Me
BBC Two N Ireland
As BBC Two except: 7.00pm-8.00 Wayfaring
Stranger with Phil Cunningham. Musical
connections between Scotland, Ulster and
America (r) 10.00-10.30 Ar Bhealach na
Gaeltachta. Conall � M醝rt韓 visits the Rosguill
peninsula (r) 11.15-11.45 Normal for Norfolk.
Desmond MacCarthy ponders the future of
Wiveton Hall. See Viewing Guide (AD)
ITV Wales
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Drugs: The Next
Epidemic? A Wales This Week Investigation.
Rob Osborne reports on new type of drug that
is cheaper than heroin, with experts warning of
an emerging crisis on the streets of Wales
STV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 The People?s
History Show. Fergus Sutherland investigates
how Scotland got its name 12.10am After
Midnight 1.40 ITV Nightscreen 4.35 The
Jeremy Kyle Show (r) 5.30-6.00 Teleshopping
BBC Four
E4
More4
Film4
ITV2
7.00pm World News Today; Weather
7.30 The Royal Welsh Show 2017. New series.
Kate Humble presents highlights from the
opening day of the event that celebrates
agricultural and rural life in Wales, held at
the showground in Llanelwedd, Powys
8.00 Horizon: 10 Things You Need to Know
About the Future. The mathematician Hannah
Fry investigates the British public?s questions
about the future, including if people could live
for ever and if there will be a cure for cancer (r)
9.00 The Joy of Stats. Karolinska Institute
professor Hans Roslin presents a light-hearted
exploration of the world of statistics (r)
10.00 The Secret Science of Pop. The
evolutionary biologist Professor Armand Leroi
gathers scientists and researchers to analyse
more than 50 years of UK chart music (r) (AD)
11.00 Ocean Giants. The vocal ranges of marine
mammals, from humpback whales to the
Amazon boto dolphin. Last in the series (r) (AD)
12.00 Apples, Pears and Paint: How to Make a
Still Life Painting (r) 1.30am The Joy of
Stats (r) 2.30-3.30 Horizon: 10 Things You
Need to Know About the Future (r)
6.00am Hollyoaks (r) (AD) 6.30 Rude(ish) Tube
(r) 6.55 Made in Chelsea (r) 8.00 Melissa &
Joey (r) 9.00 Black-ish (r) 10.00 Baby Daddy (r)
11.00 How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD)
12.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD) 1.00pm The Big
Bang Theory (r) (AD) 2.00 Melissa & Joey (r)
3.00 Baby Daddy (r) 4.00 Black-ish (r) (
AD) 5.00 The Goldbergs (r) (AD)
6.00 The Big Bang Theory. Double bill (r) (AD)
7.00 Hollyoaks. The trip to Ibiza begins (AD)
7.30 Coach Trip: Road to Zante. Fourteen
tourists head off on a trip around the
Mediterranean and southern Europe
8.00 FILM: The Day After Tomorrow (12,
2004) A climatologist races across America to
rescue his son as freak weather conditions cause
devastation around the world. Disaster thriller
starring Jake Gyllenhaal and Dennis Quaid
10.25 Vlogglebox. Young people review the
most popular viral content. Last in the series
11.30 The Big Bang Theory (r) (AD)
12.30am Gogglebox (r) (AD) 1.35 Rude Tube
(r) 2.35 First Dates (r) (AD) 3.30 First Dates
Abroad (r) (AD) 3.55 New Girl (r) (AD) 4.45
How I Met Your Mother (r) (AD)
8.55am A Place in the Sun: Winter Sun (r)
11.00 Four in a Bed (r) 1.40pm A Place in the
Sun: Winter Sun (r) 3.50 Time Team (r) (AD)
5.55 Car SOS. The pair head on a trip around
Britain to revisit some of their favourite cars (r)
6.55 The Supervet. Noel Fitzpatrick faces a
challenge coming up with a solution for a
shih-tzu cross?s deformed front legs, and a
bulldog puppy with a fractured elbow (r) (AD)
7.55 Grand Designs. Kevin McCloud meets actor
Sean Simons, who has bought Cloontykilla
Castle in County Roscommon with a
view to creating a home (1/12) (r) (AD)
9.00 Secrets of China?s Forbidden City.
Documentary exploring the palace that housed
Chinese emperors for 600 years (r)
10.00 24 Hours in A&E. Patients include
84-year-old Neil who has fallen down stairs, and
his wife re?ects on the shock of realising that
their life may never be the same again (r) (AD)
11.05 24 Hours in A&E. A girl is treated after
being hit by a car and knocked under a bus (r)
12.05am Secrets of China?s Forbidden City (r)
1.10 24 Hours in A&E (r) (AD) 2.15 Grand
Designs (r) (AD) 3.15-4.00 8 Out of 10 Cats (r)
11.00am Master of the World (PG, 1961)
Sci-? adventure starring Vincent Price 1.05
War of the Planet of the Apes Interview
Special 1.15pm Gulliver?s Travels (PG,
2010) Fantasy comedy starring Jack Black (AD)
2.55 A Monster in Paris (U, 2011) Animated
comedy with the voice of Vanessa Paradis 4.40
Flight of the Navigator (U, 1986) Sci-?
adventure starring Joey Cramer
6.25 Snow White & the Huntsman
(12, 2012) Fantasy adventure starring
Kristen Stewart and Chris Hemsworth (AD)
9.00 Broken City (15, 2013) A New York
private eye hired to ?nd out if the mayor?s wife
is having an affair discovers a web of political
corruption. Crime thriller with Mark Wahlberg
11.10 The Connection (15, 2015) A French
magistrate orchestrates a campaign to bring
an international drug kingpin to justice.
Fact-based crime thriller starring Jean Dujardin
1.50am-3.45 Stand Up Guys (15, 2012)
Three ageing gangsters are reunited when one
gets out of prison, and try to recapture their
glory days. Crime comedy with Al Pacino,
Christopher Walken and Alan Arkin
6.00am Jonas Blue: The Hot Desk (r) 6.10
You?ve Been Framed! Gold (r) 6.35 Vanderpump
Rules (r) 7.20 The Ellen DeGeneres Show (r)
8.00 Emmerdale (r) (AD) 8.30 Coronation
Street (r) (AD) 9.35 You?ve Been Framed! Gold
(r) 10.00 The Great Indoors (r) (AD) 10.30 Side
Effects (r) (AD) 11.00 LA Story (r) 11.25
Vanderpump Rules (r) 12.20pm Emmerdale (r)
(AD) 12.55 Coronation Street (r) (AD) 1.55 The
Ellen DeGeneres Show (r) 2.45 The Jeremy Kyle
Show (r) 4.55 Judge Rinder (r) 5.55 You?ve
Been Framed! Gold. Double bill (r)
6.50 FILM: Step Up (PG, 2006) Romantic
dance drama with Channing Tatum (AD)
9.00 Love Island: The Live Final. The reality
show reaches a conclusion as Caroline Flack
announces who the voting public have chosen
10.35 Family Guy. Brian enlists Stewie to help
him get his driving licence back (r) (AD)
11.00 Family Guy. A brush with death scares
Stewie into trying to be nice (r) (AD)
11.30 American Dad! (r) (AD)
12.00 American Dad! (r) (AD) 12.55am
CelebAbility (r) 1.40 Safeword (r) 2.20
Teleshopping 5.50 ITV2 Nightscreen
ITV3
ITV4
Dave
Drama
Yesterday
6.00am Man About the House (r) 6.25
Heartbeat (r) (AD) 7.25 Where the Heart Is (r)
(AD) 8.25 Wild at Heart (r) (AD) 9.25 Judge
Judy (r) 10.50 Road to Avonlea (r) (AD)
11.50 Wycliffe (r) 1.00pm Heartbeat (r)
(AD) 2.05 The Royal (r) (AD) 3.10 Wild at
Heart (r) (AD) 4.15 Man About the House (r)
4.50 On the Buses (r) 5.20 George and
Mildred (r) 5.55 Heartbeat (r) (AD)
7.00 Murder, She Wrote. A stuntman
dies in suspicious circumstances (r) (AD)
8.00 Midsomer Murders. When a family
glassware business collapses following the
death of one of its partners, Barnaby
investigates allegations of ?nancial
irregularities ? and a string of murders (r) (AD)
10.00 Law & Order: UK. Brooks and Devlin
investigate a homophobic religious group
within the police force (1/6) (r) (AD)
11.00 The Street. Mark Benton stars as Wayne,
who is desperate to make a new start even
if it means resorting to theft (5/6) (r)
12.20am Mrs Biggs (r) 1.45 On the Buses (r)
(SL) 2.10 ITV3 Nightscreen 2.30 Teleshopping
6.00am The Chase (r) 6.50 Storage Wars: Texas
(r) 7.35 The Saint (r) 8.35 Cash Cowboys (r)
9.35 The Chase (r) 10.35 Tour de France
Highlights (r) 11.35 The Saint (r) 12.45pm
Gunsmoke (r) 1.50 Ironside (r) 2.50 Quincy ME
(r) 3.55 Minder (r) (AD) 5.00 The Professionals.
Bodie and Doyle stalk Cowley (r) (AD)
6.00 Storage Wars: Texas. The bidders
receive help from a famous cowboy (r)
6.30 Storage Wars: Texas. One of the buyers
?nds a historically important item (r)
7.00 The Chase. Quiz show (r)
8.00 The Chase: Celebrity Special. Nicholas
Owen, Laila Rouass, Vanessa Feltz and Tim Vine
try to win cash for charity by outwitting one of
the show?s resident trivia experts (r)
9.00 Car Crash Global. Featuring dash-cam video
footage of a host of astonishing accidents (r)
10.00 FILM: Gangs of New York (18, 2002)
An Irishman in 19th-century New York is taken
under the wing of the gang leader who killed his
father. Drama with Leonardo DiCaprio (AD)
1.15am Better Late Than Never (r) 2.10
Motorsport UK (r) 3.00 Teleshopping
6.00am Home Shopping 7.10 Traf?c Cops 8.10
American Pickers 9.00 Storage Hunters 10.00
American Pickers 12.00 Deadly 60 1.00pm Top
Gear (AD) 3.00 Brojects 4.00 Steve Austin?s
Broken Skull Challenge (AD) 5.00 Top Gear (AD)
6.00 Top Gear. A trip to Ukraine (AD)
7.00 Sin City Motors. Steve Darnell and his Las
Vegas-based team spruce up a pickup truck for a
client working in the demolitions trade (AD)
8.00 Nev?s Indian Call Centre. Nev unleashes
his unique interview style on some interviewees,
as his attempt to recruit a Delhi-based
workforce enjoys mixed success (2/6)
9.00 Live at the Apollo. With Lenny Henry,
Mike Wilmot and Tommy Tiernan
10.00 QI XL. Bill Bailey, Jo Brand and Greg
Davies join Alan Davies and host Stephen Fry
11.00 David Beckham Into the Unknown.
Accompanied by three of his closest friends,
the former footballer continues his trek
12.00 Would I Lie to You? Rob Brydon presents
the panel show 1.20am Dave Gorman: Modern
Life Is Goodish 2.20 Would I Lie to You? 3.00
Game of Arms 4.00 Home Shopping
7.10am Great Expectations 8.00 Danger?eld
9.00 Monarch of the Glen 10.00 All Creatures
Great and Small 11.00 The Bill 1.00pm Last of
the Summer Wine 1.40 Waiting for God 2.20
Birds of a Feather 3.00 Danger?eld 4.00
Monarch of the Glen 5.00 All Creatures Great
and Small. Tristan clashes with Siegfried
6.00 Waiting for God. Tom?s obnoxious
grandchildren create their own brand of havoc
6.40 Last of the Summer Wine. The trio lament
the lack of fresh vegetables available
7.20 Keeping Up Appearances. Richard?s
birthday gift brings trouble
8.00 Hetty Wainthropp Investigates.
The detectives are swamped with work
9.00 Death in Paradise. A tropical disease
strikes down Richard and, as Camille is in Paris,
Dwayne and Fidel are left to solve the murder of
a diver, found in shallow water (6/8)
10.20 The Inspector Lynley Mysteries. Havers is
sent to investigate the death of a radical
left-wing politician?s illegitimate daughter (2/4)
12.20am Taggart 3.00 Birds of a Feather 3.35
Garden Hopping 4.00 Home Shopping
6.00am Celebrity Antiques Road Trip 7.10
Hidden Killers of the Edwardian Home 8.00
Wonders of the Solar System (AD) 9.00 South
Paci?c (AD) 12.00 Planet Earth (AD) 3.00pm
Wonders of the Solar System (AD) 4.00 Secrets
of Britain. The history of Selfridges 5.00 Slow
Train Through Africa with Griff Rhys Jones
6.00 Forbidden History (AD)
7.00 The World at War. An account of Hitler?s
ascent to power in 1930s Germany
8.00 Monarchy by David Starkey. The historian
continues his examination of the British
monarchy, turning his attention to the Wars of
the Roses and the rise of Henry VII (1/5) (AD)
9.00 Monarchy by David Starkey. Examining
the reign of King Henry VIII (2/5) (AD)
10.00 Steptoe and Son. Harold tries ballroom
dancing, and enters a local competition
10.40 Steptoe and Son. Harold?s long-lost
brother turns up out of the blue
11.20 Steptoe and Son. Harold writes an article
12.00 Forbidden History (AD) 1.00am The
World at War 2.00 Slow Train Through Africa
with Griff Rhys Jones 3.00 Home Shopping
UTV
As ITV except: 8.00pm-8.30 Lesser Spotted
Journeys. Joe Mahon visits the ?shing port of
Greencastle in County Donegal 12.10am
Teleshopping 1.10-3.00 ITV Nightscreen
BBC Alba
5.00pm Sgriobag (Get Squiggling) (r) 5.15 Na
Braithrean Cuideachail (The Koala Brothers) (r)
5.25 Botannan Araid Uilleim (William?s Wish
Wellingtons) (r) 5.30 Na Luchagan Fhiacla
(Tales of the Tooth Fairies) (r) 5.35 Ceitidh
Morag (Katie Morag) (r) 5.50 Su Shiusaidh
(Little Suzy?s Zoo) (r) 6.00 Donnie Murdo
(Danger Mouse) (r) 6.10 Alvinnn agus na
Chipmunks (ALVINNN!!! and the Chipmunks) (r)
6.35 Ard-Sgoil a? Chnuic Annasaich (Strange
Hill High) (r) 7.00 Turas a? Bhradain (The
Salmon?s Journey) (r) 7.30 Beul Chainnt (r)
8.00 An L� (News) 8.30 O Mo Dh鵷haich (From
Uist with Love) (r) 9.00 Trusadh: Coltach ris an
t-saoghail (Autism: So Much to Give) (r)
10.00 Horo Gheallaidh (Celtic Music Sessions)
(r) 10.30 Gruth is Uachdar (Crowdie and
Cream) (r) 11.25-11.55 Cuide Ri Cathy
(Scottish Celebrities) (r)
S4C
6.00am Cyw: Ben Dant (r) 6.15 Sam T鈔 (r)
6.30 Bobi Jac (r) 6.40 Octonots (r) 6.55 Peppa
(r) 7.00 Heini (r) 7.15 Blero yn Mynd i Ocido
(r) 7.25 Twm Tisian (r) 7.35 Antur Natur Cyw
(r) 7.50 Cymylaubychain (r) 8.00 Stiw (r) 8.10
Heulwen a Lleu (r) 8.20 Y Teulu Mawr (r) 8.30
Llan-ar-goll-en (r) 8.45 Dwylo?r Enfys (r) 9.00
Y Sioe 2017 1.55pm News S4C a?r Tywydd
2.00 Y Sioe 2017 5.00 Stwnsh: Anifeiliaid
Anhygoel 5.05 Stwnsh: Gogs (r) 5.10 Stwnsh:
Ben 10 (r) 5.35 Stwnsh: Pyramid (r) 6.00
News S4C a?r Tywydd 6.05 Cwpwrdd Dillad. Nia
Parry meets a musician and conductor whose
suits have been inspired by his ?lm-star
acquaintances, plus a feminist who loves pink,
and a woman who buys from second-hand
shops (r) 6.30 Gwlad Moc. The broadcaster
Moc Morgan is joined by Iolo Williams. Last in
the series (r) (AD) 7.00 Heno 8.00 Pobol y
Cwm. Ei?on warns Cadno she is playing with
?re by helping to Linda hide her tablets, while
Jim embarks on his latest hair-brained scheme
to increase the shop?s takings (AD) 8.25 Y Sioe
2017. Ifan Jones Evans presents highlights
from the ?rst day 9.00 News 9 a?r Tywydd 9.30
Y Sioe 2017 10.00 Dylan ar Daith (r) 11.00
Dos i Gwcio. The youngsters consider their
future (r) 11.30-12.35am Y Sioe 2017 (r)
14
Monday July 24 2017 | the times
1GT
What are your favourite puzzles in MindGames?
Email: puzzles@thetimes.co.uk
MindGames
times2 Crossword No 7399
1
2
3
4
Codeword No 3083
5
6
7
14
24
8
18
1
Scrabble � Challenge No 1920
11
22
13
9
25
25
13
25
17
23
6
4
10
25
18
5
6
7
9
10
11 12
2L
2W
23
8
2W
r
3L
o
2L
2L
v
hoe
2L
o 2L r
3L
u 3L
2W
hoar
2W
9
3
23
7
13
13
4
6
13
5
4
4
22
25
23
25
G
11
1
11
23
21
23
22
24
4
23
4
13
2L
19
O
12
13
20
11
14
15
1
14
20
20
5
N
16
13
12
1
23
18
25
1
23
2
16
23
25
17
24
18
19
20
5
23
1
20
2W
18
24
13
4
4
13
8
16
13
24
14
21
18
1
26
18
20
5
13
11
What seven-letter word can you
play with this rack?
26
23
20
16
12
23
11
23
22
23
7
23
5
4
19
3
24
11
GEESITY
18
What eight-letter word can you
play with this rack?
Solution to Crossword 4398
7398
S
P
T
O L D
I
CC I
A
YNO
O
V ER
O
EN T
O
Y R
U
N
T
R
O
D
D
E
N
L L E
A
I ME
A
E
I
K
A I
Y
O
R
K
E
T ER
A
N S
GH T
I
U
E L P
R
I
S ED
18 Catholic priest's cassock (7)
20 Ban, refuse to allow (4)
23 Refusal to attack first (3-10)
24 Written or printed work (4)
25 Side parts of a chair (8)
13
22
23
1
1
18
15
11
26
H
I
J
K
2W
L
Use only the board area shown. Collins Official
Scrabble Words is the authority used, although the
solutions are not unusual words. Standard Scrabble
rules apply for making the word plays.
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
G
Down
15
16
17
18
N
O
Fill the grid so
that every
column, every
row and every
3x2 box contains
the digits 1 to 6
Cluelines Stuck on Codeword? To receive 4 random clues call 0901 322 5000 or text
TIMECODE to 88010. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge. For the full solution call
0907 181 1055. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s network access
charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
6Winners will
receive a Collins
English Dictionary
& Thesaurus
Lexica
No 3841
L
E
C
S
L
O
B
A
Z
E
I
S
E
A
R
H
T
I
S
D
E
T
E
E
R
E
Z
R
A
M
W
Solve the puzzle
and text in the
numbers in the
three shaded
boxes. Text
TIMES followed
by a space, then your three
numbers, eg, TIMES 123, plus your
name, address and postcode to
88010 (UK only), by midnight.
Or enter by phone. Call 09012
925274 (ROI 1516 415 029)
by midnight. Leave your three
answer numbers (in any order)
and your contact details.
No 3842
B
A
A
E
E
D
V
A
U
E
M
Calls cost �00 (ROI ?1.50) plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. Texts cost �plus your standard network charge.
Winners will be picked at random from all correct answers received.
One draw per week. Lines close at midnight tonight.
If you call or text after this time you will not be entered but will still be
charged. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri, 9am-5.30pm).
F
Slide the letters either horizontally or vertically back into the grid to produce a
completed crossword. Letters are allowed to slide over other letters
KenKen Easy No 4075
Futoshiki No 2961
Kakuro No 1920
23
� 2010 KENKEN PUZZLE & TM NEXTOY. DIST. BY UFS, INC. WWW.KENKEN.COM
?
All the digits 1 to 6 must appear in every row and column. In
each thick-line ?block?, the target number in the top lefthand corner is calculated from the digits in all the cells in the
block, using the operation indicated by the symbol.
<
1
?
<
?
7
30
10
10
12
23
23
22
24
3
3
16
24
24
17
4
39
33
18
32
6
Fill the grid so that
each block adds up
to the total of the
block above or to
the left. You can
only use digits 1-9
and you must not
use the digit twice
in one block. The
same digit may
occur more than
once in a row or
column, but must
be in a separate
block.
17
4
17
17
18
6
6
Fill the blank squares so that each row and column contains
all the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Use the given numbers and
the symbols that tell you if a number in the square is larger
(>) or smaller (<) than the number next to it.
25
11
3
>
24
16
39
< 4
<
6
4
22
?
?
Challenge compiled by Allan Simmons
SCRABBLE� is a registered trademark of J. W. Spear & Sons Ltd ㎝attel 2015
Win a Dictionary & Thesaurus
Numbers are substituted for letters in the crossword grid. Below the grid is the
key. Some letters are solved. When you have completed your first word or
phrase you will have the clues to more letters. Enter them in the key grid and
the main grid and check the letters on the alphabet list as you complete them.
Saturday?s solution, right
C
Need help with today?s puzzle? Call 0906 757 7188 to check the
answers. Calls cost 80p per minute plus your telephone company?s
network access charge.
SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
22
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
14
1 Impulsive, hasty (4)
2 Human image brought to
life (5)
3 Leather from deer (7)
4 Worked incessantly (6)
6 Depict in art (7)
7 Giving fresh life to (8)
8 Man-eating giant (4)
12 Brown horse (8)
14 When day and night have
the same length (7)
16 Counsellor (7)
17 Extreme fear (6)
19 Jason's ship (4)
21 Works for three players (5)
22 Finishes (4)
22
� PUZZLER MEDIA
1 Unbending nature (8)
5 Aircraft wing main beam
(4)
9 Tool for making electrical
joints (9,4)
10 City in Siberia (4)
11 Facial feature (7)
13 Using a garden tool (6)
15 Deep gorge (6)
P A P ER
U O
MA L L
I
T
CARP A
E O B
O S
P AN I C
L
O
A S N
I NC I D
C A E
EMBOD
23
25
Across
G
2L
Key
2L = double letter
3L = triple letter
2W = double word
3W = triple word
Letter values
AEIOULNRST=1
DG=2 BCMP=3
FHVWY=4 K=5
JX=8 QZ=10
MIDCORE
22
24
2L
F
21
23
7
24
14
4
6
39
7
16
12
� PUZZLER MEDIA
10
13
D
E
2W
the times | Monday July 24 2017
15
1GT
MindGames
White: Alexander Kotov
Black: Mikhail Botvinnik
USSR Championship,
Leningrad 1939
Nimzo-Indian Defence
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Bb4 4
Qc2 Nc6 5 Nf3 d5 6 e3 0-0 7 a3
Bxc3+ 8 Qxc3 Bd7 9 b3 a5 10
Bd3 a4 11 Nd2
This allows Black to take the
initiative. 11 b4 is preferable.
11 ... Re8 12 0-0 e5
Black plays the thematic break.
13 dxe5 Nxe5 14 Bb2 axb3 15
Nxb3 Ne4 16 Qc2
________
醨D 1rDkD]
郉p0bDp0p]
� D D D D]
轉 Dph D ]
� DPDnD D]
�)NDB) D ]
� GQD )P)]
�$ D DRI ]
谅媚牌侨
16 ... Nxc4
Botvinnik writes, ?In an end-
________
醨D D D i]
郉pD D 0p]
� GbD 0qD]
轉 D DnD ]
� DQD ) D]
�)ND 4 D ]
� D $ DP)]
�$ D D I ]
谅媚牌侨
28 ... Ree8
A normal ?human? move. However, computers prefer the active
28 ... Rh3 and after 29 Qc2 Re8 all
the black pieces join in the attack.
29 Qf1 h5 30 Nd4 Nxd4 31 Bxd4
Re4 32 Re1
32 Bb6 was more resilient.
32 ... Rxe1 33 Qxe1 Rxa3 34 Kh1
Ra8 35 Re2 Kh7 36 h3 Re8 37 Qf2
A blunder but, after 37 Qd2
Rxe2 38 Qxe2 Qf5, Black?s advantage is easily enough to win.
37 ... Qxg2+
A similar finish to SpielmannNimzowitsch published on July 17.
38 Qxg2 Rxe2 White resigns
________
醧D DrDkD] Winning Move
�DRD 0 ]
� 0ngpD 0] White to play. This position is from
Palma de Mallorca
轉 D DpD ] Botvinnik-Larsen,
1967.
� D D D D] Botvinnik recaptured on d6 here, a move
蹹PD ) ) ] that gave Black a little respite. What
跴G DQ)B)] should he have played instead?
贒 D D I ] For up-to-the-minute information, follow
谅媚牌侨 my tweets on twitter.com/times_chess.
2/3
EASY
25
MEDIUM
93
x 3 + 68 x 2 + 54
203
x 4 + 618
HARDER
?6
x3
+6
30%
OF IT
OF IT
2/3
?6
OF IT
3/4
OF IT
? 13 x 3 + 18
+ 38 x 2 ? 78
1
x 5 + 757 +OF/IT2 + 765
50%
OF IT
8
40%
OF IT
? 888
4
2 4
Polygon
Killer Gentle No 5542
8
11
5
27
15
3
17
15
15
5min
17
13
10
7
3
4
18
Montecatini, in Italy was the venue Dealer: South, Vulnerability: Neither
for the 8th biennial European
? 10 9 6 3 2
Open Championships. After a last- Teams
?7 6 3 2
minute change, we were all housed
?K 10 6 3
in a large specially-erected tented
?village a few miles out of town.
? KQ 4
?N
My partner Alexander Allfrey
?A 5 4 W E ?KQ J 10 8
made the mistake of renting bicy?AQ 4
?J 8 7 5 2
S
?J 6 4 3 ? A J 8 7 5 ?8 5 2
cles to get there ? which was fine
and dandy until I had some
?9
unwanted intimacy with concrete
?9
after my bike stopped but I didn?t.
?A KQ 10 9 7
More on that later.
S
W
N
E
Before I left Blighty, I saw some
1?
1NT
Pass
3?
fabulous bridge in the mixed
4?
Dbl
End
events ? such as on this board
from the Mixed Teams. At both
Contract: 4? Dbled, Opening Lead: ? A
tables, West led the ace of hearts v
4? doubled. Then the play convinced declarer he held ? KQx.
diverged.
Declarer ruffed the second heart
One West led a second heart. and cashed the ace-king of clubs,
Declarer ruffed and could afford to discarding a heart and a diamond.
cash the ace of spades, expecting He ruffed a third club, cashed the
his clubs to provide four discards king of diamonds and ruffed a diafor dummy?s diamonds. East dis- mond. He ruffed a fourth club and
carded on the ace of spades but ruffed a third heart.
declarer cashed the ace-kingHere is the three-card ending:
queen of clubs, discarding dia? 10 9 6
monds, and ruffed a fourth club.
?He ruffed a heart back to hand
??and led a winning fifth club. West
?
KQ
4
?ruffed but dummy?s king of diaN
??KQ
W E
monds was discarded. Doubled
??J
S
game made for the loss of two
?
?spades and the ace of hearts.
?A J
?At our second table, West found
?the stronger defence of cashing the
?Q
ace of diamonds at trick two,
before leading a second heart. It Having picked off all West?s nonappears declarer must lose two spades, declarer led his last club. All
spade tricks and go one down ? West could do was ruff with the
but appearances can be deceptive. queen but, at trick 12, he had to lead
West?s double and two-ace cash- from ? K4 round to declarer?s ? AJ.
ing defence (plus the smugness that Doubled game made ? Houdiniwas oozing from his every pore) style. andrew.robson@thetimes.co.uk
6
18
19
10
3
8
8
21
�
x
x
+
13
7 9
9 8 6
3
1 2
8 9 3
9 7 5
3 1
2
8 9 6
9 7
7
9
9 6
7 8
6
8
1 7
3 9
8
5
=
42
6
+
=
63
=
21
Please note, BODMAS does not apply
Suko 1984
1
4 > 2
5 > 3
5
2
1
4
3 < 4
?
2 > 1
3
5
3
1
4 > 2
2
5
5
?
3
1 < 4
x
x
12
Sudoku 9192
5
7
8 7
9 5
9
4
9 2
8 1
6
7
1 3
3 2 1
5
1 3
1 4 2
3 2 1
3 5
5
3 1 2
3 1
Set Square 1922
21
3
x
1
-
x
+
17
2
9
14
10
11
4
19
As with standard Sudoku, fill the grid so that every
column, every row and every 3x3 box contains the
digits 1 to 9. Each set of cells joined by dotted lines
must add up to the target number in its top-left corner.
Within each set of cells joined by dotted lines, a digit
cannot be repeated.
6
2 2
7
12
3
8
9
2
4
5
6
7
1
4
2
5
7
1
6
3
8
9
5
Z
-
O
8
�
9
3
4
+
1
7
6
9
8
3
5
4
2
9
3
2
1
6
7
8
5
4
8
6
7
5
9
4
2
1
3
KenKen 4074
5
4
1
3
2
8
9
6
7
7
5
4
8
3
9
1
2
6
2
9
8
6
7
1
4
3
5
6
1
3
4
5
2
7
9
8
Lexica 3839
+
2
13
22
17
x
9
12
11min
7
15
11
-
used in this
grid, but only
once. Can you
work out their
= 6 positions in the
grid so that
each of the six
different sums
works? We?ve
= 19 put 2 numbers
in to help you.
Do the sums
left to right and
top to bottom
14
13
17
-
Futoshiki 2960
A
F
A
O
R
F
O
N
G
O
R
A
E
L
6
Lexica 3840
B
N
R
+
+
Cell Blocks 2965
8
= 34 from 1-9 are
Chess 1 Rxg7+! Kf8 2 Rh7! leads to a winning attack,
eg, 2 ... Ne5 3 Qh5 Re7 4 Rh8+ is crushing
13
11
11
All the digits
+
+
27
3
7
7
3
Scrabble 1919
HYDRATE E11 down (56)
LIFER D10 down (38)
3
18
13
+
Tredoku 1483
7
20
3
9
5
6
Killer Tricky No 5543
18
2
Divide the grid
into blocks.
Each block
must be square
or rectangular
and must
contain the
number of
cells indicated
by the number
inside it.
Solutions
Kakuro 1919
Bridge Andrew Robson
x
15
22
14
2
3
12
15
2
Set Square No 1923
From these letters, make words of three
or more letters, always including the
central letter. Answers must be in the
Concise Oxford Dictionary, excluding
capitalised words, plurals, conjugated
verbs (past tense etc), adverbs ending in
LY, comparatives and superlatives.
How you rate 10 words, average;
14, good; 21, very good; 29, excellent
Saturday?s answers coopery, copy,
coyote, cr阷y, cryer, crypt, eyot,
gooey, goopy, gory, grey, grocery, gyre,
gyro, gyrocopter, oocyte, orgy, perry,
poetry, pogey, porgy, prey, pyre,
rectory, retry, rooty, ropey, ropy, rorty,
ryot, terry, toey, trey, troy, type, typo,
tyre, tyro, yore
6
5
2
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Mikhail Botvinnik, the Red Czar
of Soviet chess, was world champion on and off from 1948 to 1963.
Curiously, Botvinnik made a speciality of winning games with
bishops of opposite colour. Readers who have been following my
instructional series on opposite
bishops will recall that the Soviet
grandmaster Alexander Kotov
also suffered defeat against Botvinnik in a similar opposite bishop
game, published on July 15.
game this would increase the
drawing chances for the weaker
side but, when it is a question of
an attack, it is very important that
the active bishop should have no
opponent.?
17 Bxc4 dxc4 18 Qxc4 Qg5 19 f4
Qg6 20 Rfd1
White cannot accept the pawn
sacrifice. After 20 Qxc7 Bh3 21
Qc2 Rac8 22 Qe2 Nd6, the black
threats, such as 23 ... Rxe3 and 23
... Rc2, are too strong.
20 ... Nd6 21 Qd3 Bf5 22 Qc3 Be4
23 Rd2 Bc6 24 Qd3 Nf5 25 Be5
f6 26 Bxc7 Rxe3 27 Qc4+ Kh8 28
Bb6
� PUZZLER MEDIA
Botvinnik?s speciality
Cell Blocks No 2966
Brain Trainer
ANSWER ANSWER ANSWER
Chess Raymond Keene
E
C
E
A
T
O
M
Killer 5541
2
2
2
3
2
4
3
4
7
5
2
3
1
9
8
6
1
8
9
7
6
4
5
2
3
2
3
6
5
9
8
4
1
7
3
5
2
8
4
6
1
7
9
A
R
U
B
W
E
A
P
T
O
I
R
Y
O
L
L
D
K
Codeword 3082
9
6
4
1
5
7
2
3
8
8
1
7
9
2
3
6
5
4
6
9
1
3
7
5
8
4
2
7
2
8
4
1
9
3
6
5
5
4
3
6
8
2
7
9
1
Quiz 1 LL Cool J 2 Derek Jarman 3 Cerberus
4 Graves 5 Charles Darwin 6 Johann Bayer ?
it was the first atlas to cover the entire celestial
sphere 7 Gerald Durrell 8 Sigmar Polke
9 Brindisi ? then Brundisium 10 NouvelleAquitaine ? formed through a merger of
Aquitaine, Limousin and Poitou-Charentes
11 Claudio Monteverdi 12 Love in a Cold Climate
13 Bruges 14 The Blues 15 Indira Gandhi
CU
L
A N
W
E Y
D
R
E
G
R
E
S
S
J
OP T
Y
R
F L Y
U
S
L A T
T S Y
A
E L
E
S
X
L A S H
I
QUAB
N
I
I C
T
I
O
OV E R
I
E L Y
A S
K
P I
L
F
U
B L
RA
G
R
E
T E
C E ND
B
R
SOD E
N
A
OY E R
Y
E D
R
S
P E Z E
A
X
EM I T
E
O
N DON
Word Watch
Cicisbeo (b) In Regency
England, the escort or
lover of a married woman
Dolnik (c) A poetic metre,
based on beats in a line
Dob (a) To snitch on or
report someone for
wrongdoing (slang)
Brain Trainer
Easy 51; Medium 448;
Harder 1,671
24.07.17
MindGames
Sudoku
Easy No 9193
Fill the grid so that
every column, every
row and every 3x3
box contains the
digits 1 to 9.
Difficult No 9194
3 2
Fiendish No 9195
1 4
1
6 5 9
2
6
1 7
8
1 4
5
7 3
4
Word watch
by Josephine
Balmer
Cicisbeo
a A bone disease
b An escort
c A cowardly act
Dolnik
a Dubious
b A Russian pastry
c A poetic metre
Dob
a To snitch
b A stain
c An old horse
For interactive
Sudoku puzzles, visit
thetimes.co.uk/puzzles
Answers on page 15
3
2 4 1
3
8
4
2 9
2 9
1 8
4
7
PUZZLER MEDIA
1 4 5
7 5
6
2
9 7
1 8
2
4
5
9
3
6
9
2
5
7
3
3
3
9
8
1
3
9
to receive four clues for any of today?s puzzles. Calls cost 75p plus your telephone company?s
network access charge. SP: Spoke, 0333 202 3390 (Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm).
by Olav Bjortomt The Times Quiz Book
JOHN MANNING/TIMES NEWSPAPERS LTD
11 Vespro 
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