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The Washington Post July 14 2017

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Thunderstorms 93/75 • Tomorrow: Partly sunny 90/73 B8
SU V1 V2 V3 V4
FRIDAY, JULY 14 , 2017
. $2
Doubts linger in
GOP after release
of new health bill
For the Trumps, a day in the City of Light
MCCONNELL STILL SHORT OF VOTES
At least 3 senators unpersuaded by changes
S EAN S ULLIVAN,
J ULIET E ILPERIN
AND K ELSEY S NELL
BY
Senate Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell (R-Ky.) released a new
proposal to overhaul the Affordable Care Act on Thursday after
spending three weeks reworking
it to win over wavering lawmakers on the right and in the center.
But within hours, it was clear
that Senate leaders still didn’t
have the votes to fulfill their
long-standing quest to replace
former
president
Barack
Obama’s 2010 health-care law.
The new draft would lift many
of the ACA’s regulatory requirements, allowing insurers to offer
bare-bones policies without coverage for services such as preventive or mental-health care. It
would also direct billions of dol-
lars to help lower- and middleincome Americans buy plans on
the private market.
However, the draft leaves in
place deep proposed cuts to Medicaid — and at least three Republicans quickly signaled opposition to the bill, casting doubt on
McConnell’s plans to pass the bill
next week.
“The revised Senate healthcare bill released today does not
include the measures I have been
advocating for on behalf of the
people of Arizona,” said Sen. John
McCain (R-Ariz.) in a statement,
adding he planned to offer
amendments to change it.
The GOP’s continuing push —
HEALTH CONTINUED ON A8
Nod to the upper middle class
How a change in the GOP bill could
aid more-affluent households. A9
POOL PHOTO BY CAROLYN KASTER VIA REUTERS
President Trump and first lady Melania Trump visit the tomb of Napoleon Bonaparte at Les Invalides in Paris with
French President Emmanuel Macron and his wife, Brigitte. Later, the men held a joint news conference. Story, A13
Trump’s agenda threatened
by forecast of weak growth
Trump lawyers finding he prefers his own advice
CBO projection is at odds
with spending plan aimed
at eliminating U.S. deficit
P HILIP R UCKER,
A SHLEY P ARKER
AND D EVLIN B ARRETT
BY
The challenge for President
Trump’s attorneys has become, at
its core, managing the unmanageable — their client.
He won’t follow instructions.
After one meeting in which they
urged Trump to steer clear of a
certain topic, he sent a tweet
about that very theme before they
arrived back at their office.
He won’t compartmentalize.
With aides, advisers and friends
breezing in and out of the Oval
Office, it is not uncommon for the
president to suddenly turn the
conversation to Russia — a subject
Attorneys for president
struggling to enforce
traditional boundaries
that perpetually gnaws at him —
in a meeting about something else
entirely.
And he won’t discipline himself. Trump’s legal team, led by
Marc E. Kasowitz of New York, is
laboring to underscore the potential risk to the president if he
engages without a lawyer in discussions with other people under
scrutiny in widening Russia inquiries, including Jared Kushner,
LIU XIAOBO 1955-2017
An empty chair, and a life
filled with peaceful fury
BY
H ARRISON S MITH
In the days after the Chinese writer and dissident
Liu Xiaobo was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, on
Oct. 8, 2010, his country cut off trade talks with
Norway, home of the Nobel committee, and placed
his wife under house arrest. In apparent protest of
the award, a group of Chinese business and cultural
leaders established an alternative to the Nobel, the
Confucius Peace Prize, and later honored such
human rights renegades as Vladimir Putin, Fidel
Castro and Robert Mugabe.
Mr. Liu, who died July 13 at age 61, received the
Nobel for what the award committee called his “long
and nonviolent struggle for fundamental human
rights.” It was that very struggle, from his hunger
strike at Beijing’s Tiananmen Square to his insistent
calls to end one-party rule, that also made him a
marked man in China.
He was in the midst of an 11-year prison sentence
LIU CONTINUED ON A14
his son-in-law and senior adviser.
Nearly two months after Trump
retained outside counsel to represent him in the investigations of
alleged Russian meddling in last
year’s election, his and Kushner’s
attorneys are struggling to enforce traditional legal boundaries
to protect their clients, according
to half a dozen people with knowledge of the internal dynamics and
ongoing interactions, who spoke
on the condition of anonymity to
discuss the matter candidly.
Compounding the challenges
have been tensions between
Trump’s and Kushner’s legal
teams in a frenzied, siege-like environment. Senior White House
officials are increasingly reluctant
Opioids and Medicare A federal watchdog
said half a million beneficiaries took too much
of the powerful painkillers in 2016. A3
DeVos faults sex assault policy
Too many students treated unfairly
under Obama rules, she says. A4
President Trump’s budget
would not add to economic
growth or eliminate the deficit in
coming years, the nonpartisan
Congressional Budget Office said
Thursday, casting doubt on a plan
the White House has touted as
central to achieving the president’s domestic agenda.
The CBO projected that the
economy would grow at only
1.9 percent under the White
House’s plan — far below the
J OEL A CHENBACH,
M ARK B ERMAN
AND S AMANTHA S CHMIDT
BY
solebury township, pa. — Jimi
Liu Xiaobo
won the
Nobel Peace
Prize while in
prison.
Activist is
remembered
A fellow writer
says Liu Xiaobo
became “a
monument to
morality.” A14
ECONOMY CONTINUED ON A17
Trade rises for China, N. Korea
Numbers suggest Beijing is not
using its economic leverage. A6
Attorney for ‘person of interest’ in case says he confessed to role in slayings as search on farm continues
Patrick was the first to go missing.
The 19-year-old vanished last
week. Days later, three other
young men — all between the ages
of 19 and 22 — also disappeared,
setting off an intensive, grueling
search at a farm here in the rolling
country north of Philadelphia.
The search took a series of grim
turns Thursday, as authorities
said cadaver dogs had led them to
the body of one of the missing
men at the bottom of a 12-foot
grave. There, police found other
human remains that have not
been publicly identified. Hours
later, a 20-year-old man whom
police had considered a person of
THE NATION
Venus Williams into final Age is the greatest
strength for the 37-year-old, who will face
Garbine Muguruza for Wimbledon crown. D1
LAWYERS CONTINUED ON A4
D AMIAN P ALETTA,
A NA S WANSON
AND M AX E HRENFREUND
BY
In Pa., 4 missing men, a grisly discovery and, now, an arrest
IN THE NEWS
ADRIAN DENNIS/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE VIA GETTY IMAGES
to discuss the issue internally or
publicly and worry about overhearing sensitive conversations,
for fear of legal exposure.
“Stuff is moving fast and furious,” said one person familiar with
the work of the legal teams. “The
tensions are just the tensions that
would normally exist between two
groups of lawyers starting to work
together and struggling with facts
that we don’t all know yet.”
A third faction could complicate the dynamic further. Trump’s
eldest child, Donald Trump Jr.,
3 percent goal the administration
continued to outline as recently as
Thursday. It also warned that contrary to White House claims that
deep cuts to the safety net in the
budget would lead to a financial
surplus in a decade, the deficit
would actually be $720 billion.
The report was one of several
big questions that emerged
Thursday about whether Trump
would be able to deliver on the
central promises of his populist
agenda for governing.
He had pledged to replace
President Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act with a better
policy that guaranteed “insurance for everybody.” But Republican Senate leaders on Thursday
Customers got more
than cash at an ATM in
Texas when a repairman
trapped behind it dispensed notes asking for
help. A4
The overturned convictions of a former New
York lawmaker showed
that the bar is getting
higher to prosecute public corruption cases. A6
President Trump’s
budget would slash “critical counterterrorism
programs” from the Department of Homeland
Security, a congressional
report said. A9
After vast shipments of
questionable “organic”
products reached U.S.
ports, lawmakers said
they want to redefine the
USDA’s standards. A17
Five members of Congress who head antihuman-trafficking panels urged a federal criminal probe of sexual ads
on Backpage.com. A18
THE WORLD
With a nudge from
President Trump’s envoy, Israel and the Palestinians reached a watersharing pact. A12
THE ECONOMY
Two black pastors filed
a lawsuit against CocaCola and the American
Beverage Association,
MATT ROURKE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
People gather at the entrance to a driveway in Solebury Township,
Pa., as the search continued on Wednesday for four missing men.
claiming soda manufacturers deceive customers
with their products. A15
THE REGION
A Prince George’s
grand jury handed up a
murder charge in a fatal
stabbing at U-Md. that is
being probed as a possible hate crime. B1
Activists are trying to
open a bookstore — the
first in Washington to be
east of the Anacostia
River — in honor of a
slain journalist. B1
Corey Stewart, who
lost in Virginia’s GOP
gubernatorial primary,
announced he will try to
unseat Democratic Sen.
Tim Kaine in 2018. B1
Virginia’s high court
handed foes of the Atlan-
tic Coast Pipeline a minor victory but left the
huge project unscathed. B2
A Metro board committee voted to allow
new early-morning and
weekend parking fees at
its lots, one of several pilot programs to increase
revenue. B3
Three Maryland men
were indicted in the killing of two high school
students the night before
their graduation. B4
STYLE
“Saturday Night Live”
and “Westworld” received
22 Emmy nominations
each, and Alec Baldwin
earned a nod for his turn
as President Trump on
SNL. C1
interest confessed to playing a
role in the slaying of the four
missing men, according to his attorney.
Prosecutors had vowed to bring
answers to the families of those
who had disappeared, a mystery
that has gripped Bucks County.
“This painstaking process will
go on,” Matthew D. Weintraub, the
county’s district attorney, said at a
briefing Thursday. “We’re going to
bring each and every one of these
lost boys home to their families
one way or another. We will not
rest until we do that.”
Investigators had focused their
search on a property a few miles
from the Delaware River, a farm
owned by the parents of Cosmo
Dinardo, the man who has been
identified as a “person of interest”
MISSING CONTINUED ON A2
Inside
WEEKEND
Dive right in
Our guide to the area’s
best authentically scruffy
bars has some surprises.
ST YLE
Calamitous insight
Donald Sultan’s 1980s
“Disaster” paintings have
their echoes today. C1
BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A15
COMICS........................................C5
OPINION PAGES..........................A19
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B6
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS.............................A12
CONTENT © 2017
The Washington Post / Year 140, No. 221
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
6 1 0 2
A2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14 , 2017
D I G ES T
ENVIRONMENT
2 national monuments
taken off review list
Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke
said Thursday that two national
monuments in Washington and
Idaho are no longer being
considered for removal or
reduction by the Trump
administration.
In a statement, Zinke
announced that the 195,000-acre
Hanford Reach National
Monument in south-central
Washington and the 460,000acre Craters of the Moon
National Monument in southern
Idaho “are no longer under
review” as part of President
Trump’s order in April that more
than two dozen monument
designations be reconsidered.
Hanford Reach was
designated by President Bill
Clinton in 2000. Craters of the
Moon was established in the
mid-1920s but was greatly
expanded by Clinton in 2000.
Both are popular monuments
in their states, and their review
was not as controversial as the
one for Bears Ears National
Monument in Utah, designated
last year by President Barack
Obama, and the Grand
Staircase-Escalante National
Monument, designated by
Clinton in 1996.
— Darryl Fears
Carter treated for dehydration:
Former president Jimmy Carter
is being treated for dehydration
in Canada, where he is helping
build houses for Habitat for
Humanity. Carter, 92, was
“dehydrated working in the hot
sun” at a build site in Winnipeg
on Thursday, the organization
said. Carter and his wife,
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
President Trump attends Bastille Day celebrations before
departing France for Washington. Visit
washingtonpost.com/politics for developments.
8:30 a.m.
Consumer prices are expected to have risen 0.1 percent
in June, compared with a 0.1 percent decline the previous
month. Visit washingtonpost.com/business for analysis.
8:30 a.m.
Retail sales are expected to have risen 0.1 percent in
June, compared with a 0.3 percent decline the previous
month. For details, visit washingtonpost.com/business.
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An In the News item on Page
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Times Square rampage suspect
pleads not guilty: A U.S. Navy
veteran pleaded not guilty
Thursday to murder and
attempted murder after he was
accused of intentionally mowing
down pedestrians on a Times
Square sidewalk, killing a
woman and injuring 22 other
people. Prosecutors say Richard
Rojas, 26, who lived with his
mother in the Bronx, drove his
car from his home and through
Times Square on May 18. He told
police that he had been smoking
marijuana laced with the
hallucinogen PCP. Alyssa
Elsman, 18, from Portage, Mich.,
was killed, and her 13-year-old
sister, Ava, was injured.
— From news services
JAKE MAY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A car drives through a pool of water in Flint, Mich. The state has been pounded by thunderstorms and
high winds this week, and state utilities report that thousands of customers remain without power.
Connection of man said to admit role is still unclear
H A P P EN I N G TO D A Y
All day
Rosalynn, are in the middle of a
week-long project building
houses in various Canadian
cities.
MISSING FROM A1
in the case. Dinardo was arrested
Wednesday and accused of stealing and trying to sell a car belonging to one of the missing men, and
he was being held in jail on $5
million cash bail after being
deemed a flight risk.
On Thursday, Dinardo confessed to his role in the homicides,
one of his attorneys said.
“He confessed to his participation or commission in the murders of four young men,” Paul
Lang, one of Dinardo’s defense
lawyers, told reporters. “In exchange for that confession, Mr.
Dinardo was promised by the district attorney that he will spare his
life by not invoking the death
penalty.”
It is unclear whether others
participated in the slayings, and a
spokesman for the district attorney’s office declined to comment
on Lang’s statements. Early
Thursday evening, the extent and
conditions of the apparent plea
deal remained unknown, and Dinardo had not been charged in
connection with the slayings.
Dinardo apologized to relatives
of the victims on Thursday as he
left the county courthouse. Reporters asked Dinardo, who was
wearing an orange jumpsuit and
had his hands shackled, what he
would say to the relatives of the
victims.
“I’m sorry,” Dinardo said before
climbing into a police vehicle.
Dinardo has a history of unspecified mental illness, and he
was previously involuntarily committed to a mental health institution after firing a shotgun, authorities said. No one answered when
a Washington Post reporter visited an address listed for Dinardo in
court filings, a large house with a
swimming pool on a quiet cul-desac. A neighbor said Dinardo was
one of four children.
Many questions still remained
in the case, including precisely
how Dinardo is connected to the
four men — who, one by one,
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP
LEFT: Thomas Meo, Dean
Finocchiaro, Jimi Patrick and
Mark Sturgis.
began to disappear last week — or
why they might have been at the
farm.
Authorities were making good
progress among the farm’s dirt
roads and knee-high corn Thursday, Weintraub said, though he
declined to elaborate. Weintraub
said law enforcement officers
scouring the farm were enduring
“incredibly stifling heat” as they
searched, saying that the hole
where the remains were found
was 12 feet deep “and getting
deeper.”
Not far from the property —
owned by Dinardo’s parents, Antonio and Sandra, according to
prosecutors — shops line Route
202 in one of the most historic and
pastoral parts of America. “Fresh
Eggs: 1000 feet” says one sign.
“Organic Farm: Do not spray,” says
another.
Drone footage shows that the
search teams have been working
under a large tent, obscured by
trees from the main road and the
side roads. The farm is a few miles
west of New Hope, a historic town
that draws a heavy tourist crowd
looking for antiques and vintage
clothing. The two-lane road between New Hope and the county
seat of Doylestown has numerous
antique stories and a place called
Peddler’s Village.
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MATT ROURKE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cosmo Dinardo is escorted to a
vehicle while in police custody
on Thursday in Doylestown, Pa.
Traffic on the road is relatively
heavy — because this rural place
wants to be found by tourists.
Locals say they’re not alarmed,
even as they say things like this —
a sprawling murder mystery —
just don’t happen in that area.
James Jackman, a 19-year-old
who works at Antiques at the Old
Church, right next to the farm,
said that for this part of Pennsylvania to have a homicide investigation is “definitely out of character.”
The case so far is shot through
with questions of motive, method
and timing. The Philadelphia Inquirer reported that a man who
lives near the property said he had
heard gunshots on Friday night
and had given surveillance footage to police.
“It’s been crazy,” said a neighbor
who lives near the farm, declining
to be identified because of the
nature of the case. “It’s all a mystery.”
Patrick was last seen July 5. His
family released a statement
Thursday describing him as a
longtime baseball player — an
excellent pitcher and hitter, they
said — who recently finished his
freshman year at Loyola University in Baltimore. The school hosted a prayer service for him
Wednesday.
Early Thursday, Weintraub
said authorities had identified the
body of Dean Finocchiaro, 19, in
the common grave. Thomas Meo,
21, and Mark Sturgis, 22, also
remain missing. Weintraub said
officials had classified the case as
a homicide investigation, “we just
don’t know how many homicides.”
He did not say how Finocchiaro
was killed.
Authorities said they have
come up with more information
about relationships between the
men than they have made public,
but details have begun to emerge
in court filings, news reports and
social media postings.
Meo and Sturgis — who are
good friends and work together,
according to court records — first
met Dinardo when he was looking
to sell marijuana to them, one of
Meo’s friends told the Philadelphia Inquirer. Dinardo and Patrick both went to Holy Ghost Preparatory School in Bensalem, Pa.,
while Dinardo and Finocchiaro
had both posted on a Facebook
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Berman reported from Washington.
Alice Crites, Emma Ockerman and
Abigail Hauslohner in Washington
contributed to this report.
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page for buying and selling all-terrain vehicles, the newspaper reported.
Meo’s girlfriend last heard from
him in a text message on July 7,
according to court records, and he
did not show up for work on July
8. That same day, his mother reported him missing. Sturgis was
last seen July 7, court records
show. He also did not show up for
work July 8 and was reported
missing the next day.
On July 9, cars belonging to
Meo and Sturgis were found
about two miles apart. That same
day, Bucks County detectives interviewed a man from Bensalem,
Pa., who said that Dinardo had
offered to sell him an older model
Nissan Maxima for $500.
Detectives wrote that they believe Dinardo had illegally taken
Meo’s car, and they said Meo’s
insulin kit — needed to treat his
diabetes — was found inside. Meo
could not survive without the insulin kit, Weintraub’s office said.
Dinardo was arrested Wednesday and charged with trying to sell
Meo’s car, a 1996 Nissan Maxima
with Pennsylvania plates. As of
Thursday evening, he had not yet
been charged in the slayings.
Earlier Thursday, Weintraub
said Dinardo remained a person
of interest, but the prosecutor emphasized that the investigation is
“wide open.”
“We don’t pick a person and
then try to build a case around
that person,” Weintraub said at a
news briefing. “That’s not fair to
anyone. As of this moment, he
remains a person of interest. But if
others arise and we can name
them, we will.”
Neighbors on the cul-de-sac
where Dinardo lives described
him as a good kid who went out of
his way to help others — such as
volunteering to shovel them out
during snowstorms and refusing
payment — noting that the slayings were shocking.
“Beautiful family,” said a neighbor, who spoke on the condition of
anonymity. “I don’t know what
went wrong with the kid. Great
kid. Just saw him last week. Never
a sign of problems.”
The FBI is assisting the Bucks
County prosecutor’s office with
the investigation, sending out an
evidence response team and helping local detectives manage incoming tips, a bureau spokesman
said.
Though Dinardo’s attorney
said he confessed to avoid the
death penalty, the practice is rarely used in Pennsylvania, with just
three executions since 1976,
among the fewest of any state
with capital punishment during
that period. In 2015, Gov. Tom
Wolf (D) announced a death penalty moratorium that remains in
place.
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FRIDAY, JULY 14 , 2017
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
RE
Politics & the Nation
Federal o∞cials charge hundreds with health-care fraud
Operation nets doctors,
nurses who unlawfully
distributed opioids
BY S ARI H ORWITZ
AND R ENAE M ERLE
More than 400 people across
the country have been charged
with participating in health-care
fraud scams totaling about
$1.3 billion in false billings, including for the prescription and
distribution of opioids.
In what federal officials Thursday called the “largest ever health
care fraud enforcement action”
by the Medicare Fraud Strike
Force, 412 individuals, including
115 doctors, nurses and other
licensed medical professionals,
were arrested in a nationwide
operation that involved more
than 1,000 law enforcement
agents in at least 30 states.
“One American dies of a drug
overdose every 11 minutes and
ALEX WONG/GETTY IMAGES
Acting FBI director Andrew McCabe said some doctors wrote more
prescriptions for controlled substances in a month than hospitals.
more than 2 million Americans
are ensnared in addiction to prescription painkillers,” Attorney
General Jeff Sessions said at a
news conference Thursday. “We
will continue to find, arrest, prosecute, convict and incarcerate
fraudsters and drug dealers
wherever they are.”
Sessions said the operation began with tips from people in the
affected communities and from
“very sophisticated computer
programs that identify outliers.”
The investigation particularly
focused on medical professionals
who were involved in the unlawful distribution of opioids and
other prescription narcotics, officials said. The abuse of pharmaceutical opioids is widely blamed
for a medical crisis involving tens
of thousands of overdoses on
heroin and fentanyl.
“Last year, an estimated 59,000
people died from a drug overdose
. . . opioids play an enormous role
in that total number,” said Chuck
Rosenberg, acting administrator
of the Drug Enforcement Administration. “This is an epidemic.”
Approximately 91 Americans
die every day of an opioid-related
overdose, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Among the 412 defendants, 120
were charged with opioid-related
crimes. Six of the doctors were
charged with operating a scheme
in Michigan to prescribe unnecessary opioids, some of which
were then sold on the street. The
doctors allegedly billed Medicare
for $164 million in fraudulent
claims, according to federal officials.
A clinic in Houston allegedly
gave out prescriptions for cash.
Officials said one doctor at the
clinic provided 12,000 opioid prescriptions for more than 2 million
illegal painkiller doses. And a
rehab facility for drug addicts in
Palm Beach, Fla., that is alleged to
have recruited addicts with gift
cards, drugs and visits to strip
clubs, billed the government for
over $58 million in false treatments and tests.
“Narcotics officers have arrested schoolteachers, doctors, nurses and fellow law enforcement
personnel,” said acting FBI director Andrew McCabe. “Many who
succumb to the lure of the
opioid high are kids. . . . In some
cases, we had addicts packed
into standing-room-only waiting
rooms, waiting for those prescriptions.”
McCabe said that some doctors
wrote out more prescriptions for
controlled substances in one
month than entire hospitals were
writing.
Some of the health-care fraud
scams have been identified by
local reporters in the communities where they occurred. The
Palm Beach Post has covered the
issue extensively and highlighted
the Palm Beach County Sober
Home Task Force, which has targeted allegedly fraudulent drug
treatment centers.
And the national publication,
STAT, has chronicled “addict
brokers” who can earn tens of
thousands of dollars by recruiting and arranging transportation
and insurance coverage for addicts from the Northeast and
Midwest to go to drug rehab
centers in Florida. Some of the
centers are run by operators with
no training or expertise and they
often provide few services to the
addicts, according to the STAT
report.
“Health-care fraud is a reprehensible crime,” said Health and
Human Services Inspector General Daniel R. Levinson. “It not
only represents a theft from taxpayers who fund these vital programs, but impacts the millions
of Americans who rely on Medicare and Medicaid.”
sari.horwitz@washpost.com
renae.merle@washpost.com
Report: Dangerous levels of opioid use common among Medicare recipients
BY
L ENNY B ERNSTEIN
Nearly 70,000 people on Medicare’s drug plan received “extreme” amounts of narcotic painkillers in 2016 and more than
22,000 others appeared to be
“doctor shopping” for drugs, patterns that put both groups “at
serious risk of opioid misuse or
overdose,” a government watchdog reported Thursday.
In all, about half a million
people on the drug plan took
amounts of the powerful drugs
considered too large under standards set by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, according to the Department of
Health and Human Services inspector general’s office. That
number excludes people who had
cancer or were in hospice and
may require large doses of pain-
killers.
The report highlights another
aspect of the prescription opioid
epidemic that killed more than
15,000 people via overdoses in
2015 — potential abuse by older
and disabled people who qualify
for Medicare Part D, the program's optional prescription
drug benefit. In 2016, 43.6 million
people were covered. Medicare
primarily serves people who are
older than 65.
The opioid crisis has been most
closely linked to people between
the ages of 25 and 44, but the new
report shows that older people
are at risk.
As pressure to rein in the use of
addictive painkillers has grown
along with the epidemic, some
patients have pushed back, worrying that they will not be able to
obtain the medications they say
allow them to function.
In a Washington Post poll published in December, a majority of
long-term opioid users said the
drugs have dramatically improved their lives by relieving
intractable pain and two-thirds
said the relief is well worth the
risk of addiction.
The nearly 70,000 extreme users received the equivalent of 240
milligrams of morphine every
day for the entire year, Inspector
General Daniel R. Levinson’s office reported. The CDC recommends avoiding consumption of
more than 90 milligrams per day
and says use of the drugs for more
than three months substantially
raises the risk of dependence. The
most common drugs were Tramadol and pills containing hydrocodone or oxycodone.
In the extreme group, 678 peo-
ple received more than 1,000
milligrams a day for the entire
year — a level that might indicate
they were selling or otherwise
diverting their drugs to others.
The 22,308 “doctor shoppers”
received more than 120 milligrams of controlled substances
daily for at least three months
and used at least four prescribers
and four pharmacies in 2016.
“Although beneficiaries may
receive opioids from multiple
prescribers or pharmacies for legitimate reasons,” the report noted, “these patterns raise concern.”
The report found sharp differences among states in opioid
consumption.
In
Alabama,
46 percent of Part D beneficiaries
had received at least one opioid,
and in Mississippi the figure was
45 percent. At the low end of the
scale were Hawaii (21 percent)
and New York (22 percent). Overall, 1 in 3 Medicare drug beneficiaries received an opioid last year.
Those drugs were authorized
by more than 115,000 prescribers
who ordered opioids for at least
one person at serious risk of
misuse or overdose because of
their consumption patterns or
doctor shopping, the inspector
general concluded.
Every state but Missouri has
established databases that prescribers are required or encouraged to check for signs of doctor
shopping or abuse before authorizing the drugs. Some authorities say that these “prescription
drug monitoring programs” are
helping to curb doctor shopping
for painkillers.
Also Thursday, the National
Academies of Science, Engineer-
ing and Medicine predicted that
it would take years to undo the
harms of the prescription- and
illegal-opioid crises. In a new
report on pain management and
the opioid epidemic, a panel of
experts urged the Food and Drug
Administration to begin considering the public health implications of new opioid medications
and conduct a full review of the
safety and effectiveness of all
opioids currently on the market.
The report also called for the
expansion of treatment for substance abusers, improved insurance coverage for pain management and the explicit authorization of needle exchange programs.
leonard.bernstein@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
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THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14 , 2017
Trump’s attorneys facing tension, challenges in trying to rein in their client
LAWYERS FROM A1
hired his own criminal defense
attorney this week amid disclosures that he met with a Russian
lawyer with ties to the Kremlin
who he thought could provide incriminating information about
Democrat Hillary Clinton during
the campaign. Trump Jr. also is
considering hiring his own outside public relations team.
In remarks to reporters on Air
Force One before his arrival in
Paris on Thursday, Trump defended his son as “a good boy” who had
done nothing wrong and suggested he would support Trump Jr.
testifying about the case “if he
wants to.”
As in Trump’s West Wing, lawyers on the outside teams have
been deeply distrustful of one another and suspicious of motivations. They also are engaged in a
circular firing squad of private
speculation about who may have
disclosed information about
Trump Jr.’s meeting with the Russian lawyer to the New York Times,
said people familiar with the situation.
Michael J. Bowe, a partner at
Kasowitz’s firm and a member of
Trump’s legal team, said the lawyers are collaborating effectively.
“The legal teams have worked together smoothly and professionally from the start,” he said.
Another question is who will
pay the legal fees for the president
and administration officials involved in the Russia inquiries.
Some in Trump’s orbit are pushing
the Republican National Committee to bear the costs, said three
Stuck behind
an ATM, man
dispenses
notes for help
BY
RICKY CARIOTI/THE WASHINGTON POST
Marc E. Kasowitz, an attorney for President Trump, speaks at the National Press Club on June 8.
people with knowledge of the situation, including one who euphemistically described the debate as
a “robust discussion.”
Although the RNC does have a
legal defense fund, it well predates
the Russia investigations and is
intended to be used for legal challenges facing the Republican Party, such as a potential election
recount.
The RNC has not made a decision, in part because the committee is still researching whether the
money could legally be used to
help pay legal costs related to Russia. But many within the organization are resisting the effort, thinking it would be more appropriate
to create a separate legal defense
fund for the case.
RNC officials declined requests
for comment. The White House
has not said whether Trump,
Kushner and other officials are
paying their legal bills themselves
or whether they are being covered
by an outside entity.
Those retained by the parties
involved include Kasowitz, Bowe
and Jay Sekulow for Trump; Jamie
S. Gorelick and Abbe Lowell for
Kushner; and Alan Futerfas for
Trump Jr.
The president has been irritated
with Kasowitz, which the Times
first reported this week. The two
men have known each other for
decades, and both are hardcharging, prideful and brash.
But people briefed on the evolving relationship said Trump has
made Kasowitz absorb his fury
about the Russia inquiries — in
keeping with how the president
treats his White House staff, quick
to blame aides when things go
awry.
The lawyers are now faced with
the challenge of trying to force
change on Trump, 71, who
throughout his life has often
thrived amid freewheeling chaos.
He made his name as a flamboyant
Manhattan developer, trafficking
in hyperbole and mistruth — or
“puffery,” as one former aide put it
— while exhibiting little discretion
in his daily conversations. For
Trump, this was a formula for
success.
“There’s no question that Donald Trump has lied flagrantly and
almost pathologically his entire
life,” said Timothy L. O’Brien, author of the Trump biography
“TrumpNation” and a Bloomberg
View columnist. “For good parts of
his life, he’s been insulated from
the consequences of doing that.”
Trump is now the highest elected official in the nation, and with
that outsize perch comes potentially outsize consequences. His
legal team is trying to impress
upon him and those in his orbit
that there could be severe ramifications for lying to federal investigators or congressional committees.
O’Brien said, “He is now in a
completely different world, and
it’s a world unlike any he’s ever
existed in before — both in terms
of the sophistication and honesty
that’s required of him to do his job
well, and most especially the titanic legal and reputational conse-
quences of Donald Trump continuing to be the same old Donald
Trump.”
The president, however, believes he has done nothing wrong
and is the target of what he repeatedly has called “a witch hunt.” His
instinct, those close to him have
said, is to trust his gut and punch
back.
Barry Bennett, who was a
Trump campaign adviser, said
that Trump isn’t used to losing and
that “he never stops fighting.
That’s what life has taught him.”
During last year’s campaign,
Bennett recalled, “do you know
how many times people came to
him and said, ‘That was lethal,
you’re never going to survive it’?
Every time, he survived. When
somebody tells him he can’t do
something, he’s at a minimum circumspect.”
When it comes to Twitter, however, the president is hardly circumspect. His political advisers
have long urged him to restrain
his first impulses on social media
and to think twice before tweeting
— and now, his lawyers are asking
the same.
Still, the president persists.
“It’s my voice,’’ Trump said in a
recent interview with the New
York Times Magazine. ‘‘They want
to take away my voice. They’re not
going to take away my social media.’’
philip.rucker@washpost.com
ashley.parker@washpost.com
devlin.barrett@washpost.com
Robert Costa, Rosalind S. Helderman
and Carol D. Leonnig contributed to
this report.
DeVos: Obama-era sexual assault policy unfair
Survivor groups assail
her decision to hear from
advocates for the accused
ALEX HORTON
A police officer driving near
the waterfront in Corpus Christi,
Tex., on Wednesday afternoon
was waved down and given an
unusual tip: an ATM was dispensing handwritten notes scribbled with an existential appeal —
“please help.”
It had to be a joke, the responding officers believed. A
Bank of America ATM spitting
emergency notes with cash and
receipts sounded like an absurdly constructed plot of a “gotcha”
live television show. Then the
machine starting talking.
“Sure enough, we can hear a
little voice coming from the machine,” Corpus Christi police officer Richard Olden told the local
Fox News affiliate.
An officer kicked down the
door to reveal the author of the
notes. A man, hidden behind the
machine, was locked in the service room that housed the ATM.
He began scribbling notes to the
outside world in an analog version of The Wizard of Oz bellowing from behind a curtain.
The man was there to repair a
door lock, which got the better of
him, Corpus Christi police
spokesman Lt. Chris Hooper told
The Washington Post. The contractor, whose name and company were not released, had left his
phone and a device needed to
open the door from the inside.
“You can’t just turn the knob
and exit,” Hooper said.
The repairman wrote “several”
pleas for help to people using the
drive-through ATM, but it is
unknown how many notes were
passed on.
One note collected by a news
station read: “Please help. I’m
stuck in here, and I don’t have
my phone. Please call my boss,”
with the number written below.
Police freed the man, but since
there was no crime committed,
details and records are slim,
Hooper said. Officers on the
scene said they believed the man
was trapped for two hours.
The officers verified the man’s
employment with the man’s superior, Hooper said.
Thanks to the note, they knew
the number.
alex.horton@washpost.com
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the home
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SF
BY E MMA B ROWN
AND S USAN S VRLUGA
Education Secretary Betsy DeVos said Thursday that too many
students have been treated unfairly as colleges have sought to
comply with Obama-era policies
on handling sexual assault, but
she declined to offer specifics
about how she intends to move
forward on one of the more
controversial
and
closely
watched issues handled by her
agency.
“No student should feel like
there isn’t a way to seek justice,
and no student should feel that
the scales are tipped against him
or her,” she told reporters Thursday afternoon, after what she
called an “emotionally draining”
series of meetings with college
administrators, survivors of assault and students who said they
were falsely accused and wrongly
disciplined.
The day after her civil rights
chief suggested that 90 percent of
assault allegations are the result
of drunken and regretted sex
rather than rape, DeVos sought to
show sensitivity to victims, saying that assault allegations
should not be “swept under the
rug” and that women should not
be “dismissed.” But she also said
she is deeply concerned about
addressing the views of the accused. “Their stories are not often
shared,” she said.
Advocates for accused students have been pleased to have
the ear of the Trump administration, seeing an opening to roll
back Obama-era policies they argue have resulted in biased campus sexual assault investigations.
During Thursday’s session devoted to wrongful accusations,
about half a dozen students (including one woman) told their
stories, often tearfully, said Cynthia Garrett, co-president of Families Advocating for Campus
Equality.
“The secretary was extremely
attentive to these students,” said
Garrett, who was at the meeting.
“We had young men breaking
down telling their stories.”
But advocates for survivors of
sexual assault have been alarmed
by what they view as DeVos’s
outsize interest in hearing from
wrongfully accused students, given that only a small fraction of
rape reports are found to be false.
Dozens of survivors and their
allies gathered outside the Education Department on Thursday
to urge DeVos not to roll back
federal protections for victims of
sexual violence, and to decry
what they view as the Trump
administration’s lack of commitment to enforcing federal civil
rights law.
On the plaza outside the agency’s D.C. headquarters, activists
read stories of survivors from
across the country while DeVos
held her meetings inside.
PHOTOS BY EVELYN HOCKSTEIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Una Corbett, center, a Harvard University student and intern at the Feminist Majority Foundation, rallies for survivors of sexual assault.
“Survivors want to make it very
clear that we deserve to be listened to,” said Mahroh Jahangiri
of the advocacy group Know Your
IX, who helped organize the
event.
Education Department officials are weighing whether to
keep or reject Obama-era guidance that outlined how schools
must meet their obligations under Title IX, a federal law that
prohibits sex discrimination at
federally funded institutions.
Critics of that guidance, issued in
2011, said it was an executive
overreach that set too low a bar
for campus administrators to
find a student guilty of sexual
assault.
It “incentivized these campus
panels to err on the side of
punishing potentially innocent
students,” said Christopher Perry
of Stop Abusive and Violent Environments (SAVE), who met with
DeVos on Thursday.
Some accused students hope
the Trump administration will
take a different tack. Joseph Roberts said he was “cautiously optimistic” that federal officials will
care about his story: Roberts said
he was falsely accused of sexual
harassment and suspended for
three weeks before he was due to
graduate from Savannah State
University, an experience that left
him hopeless and suicidal. The
guidance, he said, “definitely
needs to be reexamined.”
Victims’ advocates and some
lawyers said the problem is not
with the guidance, but with the
way some colleges have interpreted it.
“They went overboard in terms
of changing their policies,” said
Naomi Shatz, a Boston lawyer
who represents accused students.
Shatz said too many schools don’t
hold hearings and don’t give accused students a chance to see the
Education Secretary Betsy DeVos said assault allegations should
not be “swept under the rug” but offered no specifics on her plans.
evidence against them — approaches that are unfair and not
dictated by the guidance.
Victims’ rights activists argue
that the guidance is firmly rooted
in existing law and fear DeVos
intends to jettison it. They said
remarks this week by Candice
Jackson, the acting head of the
Education Department’s Office
for Civil Rights, seemed to confirm that fear.
Speaking to the New York
Times, Jackson argued that college investigations have often
been unfair to accused students,
in part because of undue pressure
from the federal government. She
claimed that “90 percent” of accusations “fall into the category of
‘we were both drunk,’ ‘we broke
up, and six months later I found
myself under a Title IX investigation because she just decided that
our last sleeping together was not
quite right.’ ”
Jackson has since apologized
for the statement, saying her
words “poorly characterized the
conversations I’ve had” with advocates. “As a survivor of rape
myself, I would never seek to
diminish anyone’s experience,”
she said. “All sexual harassment
and sexual assault must be taken
seriously, which has always been
my position and will always be
the position of this department.”
Jackson apologized again to
survivors in the meeting Thursday, according to attendees. “It’s
impossible to take something like
that back,” said Fatima Goss
Graves of the National Women’s
Law Center, who was at the meeting. But she said the department
can show its commitment to protecting students by helping colleges understand how to fairly
adjudicate sexual assault allegations, and by conducting a listening tour to hear from survivors
nationwide.
“We can’t expect them to go to
Washington, D.C.,” Goss Graves
said. “The department has to go
to them and listen deeply.”
DeVos said at although she
intends to continue seeking input, she wants to move quickly to
make changes.
Thursday’s event was one part
of a broader effort to mobilize
support for maintaining the 2011
Title IX guidance, which victims’
rights advocates greeted as a step
toward ensuring disciplinary
consequences for students found
to have committed assault. In an
op-ed published in Teen Vogue
this week, 114 sexual assault survivors called on DeVos to keep the
guidance in place.
“We cannot imagine a more
cruel or misguided policy agenda
than one that withdraws protections from vulnerable students —
especially coming from the administration of a man who has
been repeatedly accused of committing sexual violence himself,”
they wrote.
In a letter to DeVos on Wednesday, Sen. Robert P. Casey Jr.
(D-Pa.) urged her to keep the 2011
guidance in place and decried her
decision to meet with advocates
for the accused, including the
National Coalition for Men and
SAVE, which the Southern Poverty Law Center has called misogynistic. “Instead of catering to
organizations that want to sweep
sexual assaults on college campuses under the rug, the Department of Education should confront this challenge directly by
coming to uphold the protections
currently in place,” Casey wrote.
Sen.
Kirsten
Gillibrand
(D-N.Y.), who spoke at Thursday’s
event outside the agency headquarters, said she doesn’t want to
see an innocent person punished
“any more than I want to see a
guilty person let off the hook.” But
she said there are still too many
victims who are met with blame
and retaliation rather than support and protection.
“There continues to be heinous
injustice across this country,” she
said.
emma.brown@washpost.com
susan.svrluga@washpost.com
FRIDAY, JULY 14 , 2017
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14 , 2017
Bar now higher for prosecuting public corruption cases
N.Y. state lawmaker’s
convictions overturned;
court cites McDonnell
BY
M ATT Z APOTOSKY
A federal appeals court’s decision to overturn the convictions
of former New York State Assembly speaker Sheldon Silver (D)
shows how public corruption cases have become much more difficult to substantiate in the wake of
a Supreme Court decision narrowing what qualifies as corruption, legal analysts said.
In a 54-page opinion released
Thursday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit wrote
that although prosecutors had
presented enough evidence to justify Silver’s convictions, jurors
had been wrongly instructed on
the action Silver would have to
take to make his conduct count as
criminal public corruption.
The appeals court cited the Supreme Court’s decision in the case
of former Virginia governor Robert F. McDonnell (R), who also
had his convictions vacated in
such a way that lawyers have long
warned could have wide implications for others suspected of public corruption.
“We recognize that many
would view the facts adduced at
Silver’s trial with distaste. The
question presented to us, however, is not how a jury would likely
view the evidence presented by
the Government. Rather, it is
whether it is clear, beyond a reasonable doubt, that a rational
jury, properly instructed, would
have found Silver guilty,” Circuit
Judge Jose A. Cabranes wrote.
“Given the teachings of the Supreme Court in McDonnell, and
the particular circumstances of
this case, we simply cannot reach
that conclusion.”
To substantiate corruption
charges, prosecutors must prove
that the person suspected of
wrongdoing performed an official
act in exchange for some benefit.
In the McDonnell case, the Supreme Court said that official act
YANA PASKOVA/GETTY IMAGES
Then-New York State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver leaves a federal courthouse after his arraignment on Jan. 22, 2015, in New York.
“must involve a formal exercise of
governmental power, and must
also be something specific” — effectively raising the bar on what
constitutes corruption.
“Setting up a meeting, talking
to another official, or organizing
an event — without more — does
not fit that definition of ‘official
act,’ ” Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. wrote in the opinion.
Silver, 73, was convicted in 2015
of taking millions of dollars in
bribes and kickbacks in exchange
for various favors and was sentenced to 12 years in prison —
although he was allowed to remain free with his appeal pending. According to prosecutors, Silver, a lawyer, persuaded a doctor
to pass on “valuable leads to unrepresented patients with mesothelioma,” and in return, routed
grants to the doctor for research
and gave other help. He also took
actions, such as casting favorable
votes, to benefit real estate developers that gave business to a law
firm that then sent Silver kickbacks, prosecutors said.
Silver’s trial happened before
the Supreme Court decided the
McDonnell case, and jurors were
given a broad definition of what
“official act” he would have to
perform to be guilty of corruption. They were told that such an
act could be “any action taken or
to be taken under color of official
authority.”
The appeals court said because
those jury instructions were
wrong based on the McDonnell
decision, the powerful New York
lawmaker may have been convicted in error.
“Here, the instructions did not
convey to the jury that an official
action must be a decision or action on a matter involving the
formal exercise of government
power akin to a lawsuit, hearing,
or
agency
determination,”
Cabranes wrote. “Nor did the instructions prevent the jury from
concluding that meetings or
events with a public official to
discuss a given matter were official acts by that public official.”
Legal analysts said the appeals
court’s decision reinforces how
prosecutors will face significant
challenges in bringing and winning public corruption cases. Activity that may be uncouth — such
as brokering meetings for wealthy
benefactors — is now legal.
“It’s the legacy of Bob McDonnell — making life easier for corrupt public officials everywhere,”
said Randall Eliason, a former
federal prosecutor who teaches
law at George Washington University.
Joon H. Kim, the acting U.S.
attorney in the Southern District
of New York, said in a statement
that prosecutors are “disappointed” by the decision, but “look
forward to retrying the case.”
“Although this decision puts on
hold the justice that New Yorkers
got upon Silver’s conviction, we
look forward to presenting to another jury the evidence of decades-long corruption by one of
the most powerful politicians in
New York State history,” Kim said.
“Although it will be delayed, we do
not expect justice to be denied.”
Former U.S. attorney Preet
Bharara, who was in charge when
Silver was convicted and sentenced, wrote on Twitter that the
evidence was “strong” and that
the Supreme Court had “changed
the law.”
Steven Molo and Joel Cohen,
Silver’s attorneys, said in a statement, “We are grateful the court
saw it our way and reversed the
conviction on all counts.”
Kelly Kramer, a white-collar
criminal defense lawyer at the
Mayer Brown law firm, said that
Silver’s conviction had long been
considered “one of the most vulnerable” after the Supreme
Court’s decision on McDonnell.
He said that although it is unlikely
that many other convictions will
be thrown out in a similar way,
prosecutors probably will now
bring fewer public corruption
cases, knowing the high bar they
must meet.
“What I think it means is
there’s a lot of cases where there’s
kind of inappropriate or unappealing behavior by politicians,
and that kind of stuff isn’t going to
get prosecuted unless the government can really point to a specific
vote or funding grant or official
action,” Kramer said.
Prosecutors will face one of
their first major tests in the case
against Sen. Robert Menendez
(D-N.J.), who is accused of helping a Florida ophthalmologist
with government business in exchange for campaign contributions and posh getaways. Menendez’s trial is scheduled to begin in
September.
Prosecutors say Menendez
tried to influence immigration-visa proceedings for the ophthalmologist’s girlfriends; assisted
the ophthalmologist in a dispute
with the Centers for Medicare and
Medicaid Services; and advocated
for action to help the ophthalmologist make money from a port
security contract in the Dominican Republic.
Eliason said Menendez probably will not have the same success as McDonnell, although his
attorneys have raised and will
again raise the argument that he
performed no official acts. And
Silver, analysts said, may have
similar trouble.
“He definitely sort of wins the
battle,” Eliason said of Silver. “It
remains to be seen whether he
wins the war.”
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
Despite sanctions, Chinese numbers N. Korean insider dismisses sanctions
show trade with N. Korea is thriving Former trade leader
BY
A NNA F IFIELD
tokyo — North Korea’s trade
deficit with China has risen to its
highest level, as trade between
the two countries continues to
rise, suggesting there is little distress in the North Korean economy despite rounds of international sanctions on Pyongyang designed to punish it for its weapons program.
The latest official trade numbers from Beijing suggest that
China, as President Trump tweeted last week, is not using its
economic leverage over its defiant neighbor.
“This growth shows that China
is not willing to turn the screws
on North Korea,” said Kent Boydston, an analyst at the Peterson
Institute for International Economics who closely follows the
trade data.
The Trump administration has
been calling on Beijing to use its
economic leverage over its errant
neighbor to make the Kim
Jong Un regime stop firing off
missiles and bellicose threats.
But, after North Korea launched
a missile last week technically
capable of reaching the United
States, Trump suggested he had
given up on China.
The latest release from China
presents a muddied picture.
The Chinese customs department released figures that
showed significant growth in
overall bilateral trade in the first
six months of the year.
The value of imports from
North Korea fell to $880 million
in the six months that ended in
June, down 13 percent from a
year earlier, according to the
figures. Notably, China’s coal imports from North Korea dropped
precipitously, with only 2.7 million tons being shipped in the
first half of 2017, down 75 percent
from 2016.
But a 29 percent spike in Chinese exports to North Korea —
North Korea bought $1.67 billion
worth of Chinese products in the
first six months of the year —
helped push total trade between
the two countries up 10 percent
between January and June, compared with the same period last
year.
But the customs office did not
release a full breakdown of the
trade data, and previous releases
have sent confusing signals.
“The numbers are not making
sense, and my instinct is to think
that the Chinese are underplay-
ing what they’re doing,” said
Boydston, who recommends taking the figures with a “large dose”
of salt.
But the overall picture suggests that North Korea is buying
increasing amounts of products
from China.
By Boydston’s calculations, the
trade deficit widened to a cumulative $600 million between January and May, the highest on
record. “North Korea is somehow
able to finance buying all these
Chinese products,” he said.
“The numbers are not
making sense, and my
instinct is to think that
the Chinese are
underplaying what
they’re doing.”
Kent Boydston, an analyst at the
Peterson Institute for International
Economics
This is puzzling to economists
because North Korea has no access to the international financial
system, which other countries tap
to fund their trade deficits. Furthermore, there have been no
major fluctuations in the North
Korean won, suggesting stability
in the economy.
Beijing was quick to pour cold
water on the suggestion that the
overall rise in trade suggested it
was not complying with U.N.
Security Council resolutions designed to punish Pyongyang for
its nuclear tests and missile
launches.
The growth in bilateral trade
“should not be used as basis for
questioning China’s solemn attitude towards the implementation of the Security Council’s
resolutions,” Huang Songping, a
spokesman for Chinese Customs,
told reporters in Beijing.
Monthly figures were more
representative of the trend, he
said, and China’s imports from
North Korea had been “falling
sharply for four consecutive
months since March,” including
by 36 percent in March and
42 percent in April.
China has been pledging to
curtail trade with North Korea as
part of international actions
against the Kim regime, but gov-
ernment officials and analysts
alike are skeptical about how far
China will go.
China said in February it
would suspend coal imports from
North Korea, potentially cutting
off a major financial lifeline for
Pyongyang, although analysts
caution that Chinese figures
should be viewed with some
skepticism as they are sometimes
manipulated for political purposes.
About 90 percent of North
Korea’s exports go to China, and
coal has been the single biggest
export item. But there has been
skepticism about China’s ban,
with coal ships and train cars
being seen going back and forth
between the two countries.
As the United States has
searched for ways to punish
North Korea for its repeated defiance of international bans on its
nuclear weapons testing and ballistic missile launches, it has repeatedly turned to China. Trump
has urged Chinese President Xi
Jinping to use China’s economic
dominance to sway North Korea
on nuclear testing. But after suggesting that Beijing was not acting to punish Pyongyang, Trump
last week suggested he had given
up on Xi.
“Trade between China and
North Korea grew almost 40% in
the first quarter,” Trump tweeted
the day after North Korea
launched its first intercontinental ballistic missile. “So much for
China working with us — but we
had to give it a try!”
Xi has made no secret of his
disdain for Kim and is clearly
frustrated at North Korea’s weapons testing and actions such as
the assassination of Kim Jong
Nam, the leader’s half brother
who had been protected by China.
But many North Korea analysts suggest China will not take
any action that could seriously
undermine the regime because
Beijing’s top priority is stability. It
does not want a flood of millions
of hungry refugees coming over
its northeast border if the Pyongyang regime collapses, and it
certainly does not want the
28,000 U.S. troops currently stationed in South Korea to be able
to move all the way up the
peninsula to the border with
China.
anna.fifield@washpost.com
Luna Lin in Beijing contributed to this
report.
in Kim’s regime says
evading rules is easy
BY
A NNA F IFIELD
Efforts to sanction North Korea into submission won’t work
because there are too many ways
around them, Ri Jong Ho says.
He should know.
For about three decades, Ri
was a top moneymaker for the
Kim regime, sending millions of
dollars a year back to Pyongyang
even as round after round of
sanctions was imposed to try to
punish North Korea for its nuclear defiance.
“We were never in pain or
hurting in our trade business
because of the sanctions,” Ri said
in an interview near Tysons Corner, Va.
The 59-year-old, whose job had
been to raise money for the North
Korean regime, and his family
live in Northern Virginia, having
defected to South Korea at the
end of 2014 and moved to the
United States last year.
“I used to be sanctioned, as a
North Korean who led trade at
the front line, but I never felt any
pain from the sanctions. The
sanctions were perfunctory,” Ri
said.
He described being able to
send millions of U.S. dollars to
North Korea simply by handing a
bag of cash to the captain of a
ship leaving from the Chinese
port city of Dalian, where he was
based, to the North Korean port
of Nampo, or by giving it to
someone to take on the train
across the border.
In first the nine months of 2014
— he defected in October that
year — Ri said he sent about
$10 million to Pyongyang this
way.
For more than two decades, the
United States has been trying to
convince North Korea to abandon its nuclear weapons program, alternating between inducements and punishments.
In both cases, American policy
has relied on China, North Korea’s erstwhile patron. But Beijing’s implementation of sanctions, even those it backed
through the United Nations, has
been patchy at best. China’s overwhelming priority is ensuring
stability in North Korea.
President Trump has repeatedly called on China to support his
policy of putting “maximum pres-
sure” on Pyongyang to stop its
nuclear and missile programs.
Efforts have not changed
North Korea’s behavior. This is
partly because multilateral sanctions imposed through the United Nations must be watered
down to avoid being vetoed by
China or Russia, traditional backers of North Korea, and partly
because other countries don’t implement the tougher but unilateral U.S. sanctions.
“Unless China, Russia and the
United States cooperate fully to
sanction North Korea, it will be
impossible to hurt them,” Ri said.
Russia’s role is often overlooked. Amid calls for China to
limit oil exports to North Korea,
Russia has dramatically increased the amount of oil it has
sent — some reports suggest exports have quadrupled — to
North Korea this year.
North Korea’s financial networks, moreover, are intentionally murky. The U.S. Treasury has
sanctioned more and more North
Koreans and North Korean companies by name to try to cut them
off from the American financial
system, but few if any have exposure to the United States.
For this reason, Ri’s insights
are widely sought after in Washington, where successive administrations have been trying to find
North Korea’s pressure points.
Ri worked for three decades in
Office 39, the Workers’ Party operation responsible for raising
money for the North Korean leader. The office has long been associated with legal trade and illicit
activity, including counterfeiting
dollars and drug smuggling.
Ri said he worked as president
of a shipping company and was
chairman of Korea Kumgang
Group, a company that formed a
venture with Sam Pa, a Chinese
businessman, to start a taxi company in Pyongyang.
He was awarded the title “hero
of labor” in 2002 for his efforts
and said he lived the good life in
Pyongyang, with a color TV and a
car. “I was very loyal to Kim Jong
Il, so I was rewarded by him,” he
said of leader Kim Jong Un’s
father and predecessor. “I was
rich.”
His last position was running
the Dalian branch of Daeheung, a
trading company involved in
shipping, coal and seafood exports, and oil imports.
But Ri grew disillusioned after Kim Jong Un suddenly denounced his uncle, Jang Song
Thaek, as a “traitor for all ages”
and had him executed at the end
of 2013.
Jang had been leading economic cooperation efforts with
China, and dozens of people who
worked for him were also purged
at the time, Ri said. He worried
that his family would be next.
They escaped to South Korea
before moving to the United
States, where his two children,
now in their 20s, plan to go
to college.
Experts said Ri’s arrival in the
United States could be a boon for
American efforts to crack down
on North Korea.
“It’s always useful when a defector, especially one that knows
the internal operations of Office
39 — and my assumption is that
he knows the external operations,
too — can help us,” said Anthony
Ruggiero, who worked on sanctions at Treasury and is with the
Foundation for the Defense of
Democracies.
Ri said North Korea has repeatedly found ways to circumvent whatever sanctions are
imposed.
“North Korea is a 100 percent
state enterprise, so these companies just change their names the
day after they’re sanctioned,” he
said. “That way the company
continues, but with a different
name than the one on the sanctions list.”
Ri’s Chinese counterparts
weren’t bothered, either, he said.
“My partners in China also
want to make a profit, so they
don’t care much about sanctions,”
he said. “When the Chinese government orders them to stop,
they stop for a few days and then
start up again.”
But without knowing how to
really hurt North Korea and
teaming up to do it, it will be
“impossible” to change Pyongyang’s calculus on the nuclear
program, Ri said.
For that reason, the former
money man advocates an idea
that the president has at least
flirted with: talks.
“I think there should be toplevel talks between the U.S. and
North Korea, so that they can
both work together to solve the
problem,” Ri said.
After last week’s intercontinental ballistic missile test and
last month’s death of Otto Warmbier, the Ohio college student
who returned from 17 months’
detention in North Korea in a
coma, talks seem a long way off.
But Trump, a businessman
who prides himself on being a
master negotiator, has said he
would be “honored” to meet Kim,
whom he called a “smart cookie.”
anna.fifield@washpost.com
FRIDAY, JULY 14 , 2017
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. FRIDAY,
JULY 14 , 2017
Anticipating GOP health-care bill vote, Cory Gardner finds himself in a bind
Sen. Cory Gardner
faces one of the
tougher political
PAUL KANE
predicaments of
any Republican
deciding how to vote on the GOP
health-care bill.
The Colorado Republican, a
rising star who defeated a
Democratic incumbent in 2014,
leads the campaign committee
responsible for protecting and
expanding the GOP majority.
That makes him a close ally of
Senate Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell (R-Ky.), who is
pressing every Republican to
support an unpopular proposal
barreling toward a vote by the
end of next week.
Gardner, 42, holds a
leadership post that normally
comes with an expectation of
loyalty. But he has remained
below the radar, both back home
and inside the Capitol, declining
to take a position on legislation
that would replace portions of
the Affordable Care Act.
For starters, he has homestate interests that make this one
of the more difficult roll calls of
his career. Colorado’s popular
Democratic governor, John
Hickenlooper, accepted the
Affordable Care Act’s expansion
of Medicaid funding —
extending medical coverage to
more than 400,000 state
residents. He has become a
leading spokesman against the
Republican plan to dramatically
cut back those federal funds for
the 31 states (plus the District)
@PKCapitol
that chose that option.
Gardner also has to concern
himself with his own reelection
in 2020, a presidential cycle with
a different political climate than
his first Senate race in one of the
nation’s marquee swing states,
when he campaigned heavily for
“repeal and replace.”
All of it makes Gardner’s a
classic case of the inside-outside
dilemma. He can vote for the bill
and earn points in Washington,
or he can cast a vote that would
probably be an easier sell to
voters back home.
Just don’t try to get an answer
now on which way Gardner will
go.
On Tuesday, he appeared with
McConnell’s leadership team at
the weekly news conference.
After listening to several others
discuss their derisive views of
Obamacare, Gardner avoided
talk of the most pressing issue of
the day. Instead, he bemoaned
Democratic delay tactics on
President Trump’s nominees and
applauded the decision to stay in
session a few extra weeks to
confirm more sub-Cabinet and
judiciary positions.
“It’s critically important that
we do the job the American
people sent us here to do today,”
Gardner said.
It was the first time Gardner,
chairman of the National
Republican Senatorial
Committee, had spoken at the
weekly Tuesday leadership press
event in more than a month. The
last time, on June 6, while some
ANDREW HARRER/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Sen. Cory Gardner (R-Colo.) has home-state interests that will
make the health-care bill vote one of his more difficult roll calls.
GOP leaders talked health care,
Gardner chose to speak about
developing a strategy to combat
Islamic State terrorists.
Aides to Gardner, who
declined to be interviewed for
this article, said he is still
reviewing the legislation and
holding his powder until
McConnell releases more
revisions.
“Senator Gardner is still
reviewing the legislation as there
will likely be some changes made
to the discussion draft that was
released a few weeks ago,” Casey
Contres, a spokesman, said in an
email. “In regards to his
leadership role in the Senate, it
never impacts how he votes for
Colorado, period.”
Some Democrats have accused
Gardner of ducking the issue.
AARP is airing an emotional
radio ad against him and four
other Republicans, urging them
to oppose the legislation.
One Democrat who has
declined to criticize Gardner is
Sen. Michael F. Bennet (Colo.),
his home-state colleague who
understands the competing
political pressures. In 2014,
Bennet served as chairman of
the Democratic Senatorial
Campaign Committee, the
counterpart to the post Gardner
now holds for Republicans.
Bennet said that the pressure
to remain loyal is real, but not
from colleagues. It comes from
the donors who fund these
multimillion-dollar campaigns
in the battleground states.
“You feel the pressure from
people that are donating to the
committee, who as a general
matter are expecting consistency,
understandably, with the
leadership, and so I think that
pressure builds,” he said.
Despite Bennet’s leading role
opposing Gardner in 2014, the
duo have worked out one of the
better relationships among
same-state senators. Bennet has
consistently declined to criticize
Gardner’s reluctance to take a
position on the health bill.
Those who know Gardner,
who was a two-term member of
the House before his Senate run,
believe he is adhering to an
approach that John A. Boehner
used to advise when he was the
House speaker: “Never say what
you’ll never do.”
This means that you keep your
head down, don’t negotiate
through the media and try to
work behind the scenes to shape
the legislation in your direction.
When the time comes, you cast
your vote.
In one of Gardner’s only
public moves, back in February,
he joined three other
Republicans from states that
accepted Medicaid expansion to
declare their opposition to how
the initial House draft would
quickly eliminate that funding.
The draft, they wrote, “does
not provide stability and
certainty for individuals and
families in Medicaid expansion
Senators
now await
CBO’s take
on new bill
HEALTH FROM A1
and continuing struggle — to
make good on a campaign promise it began invoking seven years
ago to “repeal and replace”
Obamacare reflected the peril
Republicans face whether they
pass a bill or not.
On the one hand, the ACA has
provided medical coverage for
millions of Americans — and has
grown more popular as a result.
Moderate Republicans remained
concerned Thursday that the
new proposal would make insurance unaffordable for some
middle-income Americans and
throw millions off the rolls of
Medicaid, the public insurance
for disabled and low-income
Americans.
Yet conservatives continued to
push for a more wholesale rollback of the ACA — highlighting
the danger for all Republicans of
failing to achieve a promise most
of them made on the campaign
trail.
“The new Senate health care
bill is substantially different
from the version released last
month, and it is unclear to me
whether it has improved,” Sen.
Mike Lee (R-Utah), a conservative who has pushed for a full
Obamacare repeal, said in a
statement. “I will need time to
study the new version and speak
with experts about whether it
does enough to lower health
insurance premiums for middle
class families.”
Looming even larger was the
reality that Republicans, despite
their control of both chambers of
Congress and with President
Trump in the White House, have
made little progress on an ambitious agenda that McConnell had
hoped to move on to next week
after a vote on the health-care
bill. Among their goals are major
tax legislation, raising the debt
ceiling and passing a defense
authorization bill.
Republican leaders seemed to
acknowledge Thursday the difficult path ahead, with several
speaking privately about internal
divisions on how to pass the bill
— and to prevent further defections.
“We will have the votes when
we start voting,” said Senate
Majority Whip John Cornyn (RTex.).
McConnell’s new draft was the
result of weeks of negotiations
with conservatives and moderates. For those on the right, the
plan incorporated a proposal
from Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) allowing insurers to offer minimalist policies as long as they offer
more-comprehensive ones as
well. Cruz said the provision
would give consumers greater
choice and lower-cost premiums.
For those in the center, the
new proposal would spend an
additional $70 billion offsetting
consumers’ costs and $45 billion
to treat opioid addiction.
Republicans financed these
PHOTOS BY OLIVER CONTRERAS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
ABOVE: Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) is surrounded by reporters Thursday on Capitol Hill. “The revised Senate health-care bill released
today does not include the measures I have been advocating for on behalf of the people of Arizona,” said McCain, who also said he would
offer amendments. BELOW: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) leaves a closed-door luncheon with fellow GOP senators.
changes by keeping a trio of
Obamacare
taxes
targeting
high earners — a 3.8 percent tax
on net investment income and a
0.9 percent Medicare payroll tax
on individuals making $200,000
a year or couples earning
$250,000, along with a tax on
insurers with high-paid executives. Lawmakers such as Sen.
Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) said repealing those taxes would give too
much relief to the wealthy at the
expense of the poor.
The new measure has won
Cruz’s backing, but Sen. Rand
Paul (R-Ky.), another conservative who said the measure still
does not do enough to unravel
Obamacare, remained opposed
to voting on the bill, as did
centrist Sen. Susan Collins (RMaine).
“My strong intention and current inclination is to vote no on
the motion to proceed,” Collins
told reporters, referring to the
procedural vote required before
the legislation can reach the
Senate floor. Collins added that
she hopes Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.)
will be willing to work with
Republicans to fix the legislation.
“I have had numerous Democrats
come to me and say they want to
work with us on the bill,” she
said. “I’m going to take them at
their word.”
Even as McConnell negotiated
with individual members, the
outlook for the bill was complicated when Sens. Bill Cassidy
(R-La.) and Lindsey O. Graham
(R-S.C.) debuted an alternative
proposal.
In a joint interview with CNN
on Thursday, Cassidy and
Graham said they would take the
billions of dollars the federal
government now receives in taxes under the ACA and direct that
revenue to the states.
The plan did not appear to be
gaining traction — Graham said
he would vote to start debate on
McConnell’s bill — but its introduction underscored the extent
to which a growing number of
GOP senators have started looking beyond the current effort,
with diminishing confidence that
it will prevail.
“I don’t see this as the end if
this bill were not to pass,” Collins
said. “I see it as the beginning of
the kind of process that I would
have liked to have seen in the first
place.”
The surprise announcement
from Graham and Cassidy came
just before Senate GOP leaders
released their revised health-care
proposal.
The McConnell plan would
allow Americans to pay for premiums with money from taxexempt health savings accounts,
an idea that many conservatives
have pushed for — a tax break
that primarily would benefit the
upper middle class.
The plan’s proposed rollback
of Medicaid expansion under the
ACA, as well as a proposal to slow
the overall growth of the program starting in 2025, gave a
number of Republican moderates pause Thursday.
Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio),
who came out against the original draft of the bill, said he was
not yet willing to vote yes to move
the bill to the floor. “I’m in the
same position I’ve been in, looking at the language and looking
forward to the analysis,” he said.
Cassidy and Sen. John Hoeven
(R-N.D.) said they need to see the
Congressional Budget Office
score, due next week, before
making a decision.
“We are going to look at it, read
it, understand it and see the CBO
score,” Hoeven told reporters. He
said that he was encouraged by
changes intended to help lowerincome Americans but that, “at
this point, I’m reserving judgment.”
In a sign of the challenge
McConnell still faces to round up
votes, he huddled Thursday afternoon in his office with Portman and Sens. Shelley Moore
Capito (R-W.Va.), Dean Heller
(R-Nev.) and Lisa Murkowski (RAlaska). Those lawmakers hail
from states that have extended
Medicaid under the current law
to cover able-bodied, childless
programs or the necessary
flexibility for states.”
The most recent Senate
Republican proposal offers a
longer wind-down, eventually
ending up with a near 50-50 split
between federal and state
funding for the working poor
who had become newly eligible
under the ACA for Medicaid
coverage. Under the ACA,
Washington picks up the entire
tab, with the figure phasing
down to 90 percent by 2020 — a
huge handout to the states
expected to approach $1 trillion
over the next decade.
Some Republicans have
embraced the cost-splitting
proposal as a suitable plan.
Others have recoiled at estimates
that it would still leave
22 million fewer people without
insurance than under the
current law.
“You have started to see
positive directions from the bill,”
Gardner said during a radio
interview back in Colorado over
the July Fourth recess.
This has left the impression in
some quarters that he will side
with McConnell, following
through on many pledges — and
previous votes — to repeal the
ACA.
It’s a balancing act that some
Democrats understand.
“I think the pressures are
higher in some ways,” said
Bennet, “but the answer is
always the same — that you’ve
got to put your state first.”
paul.kane@washpost.com
adults. Capito, who opposed the
earlier bill, said in a statement
she still has “serious concerns”
about the revised draft.
With Vice President Pence prepared to cast a tiebreaking vote
and no Democrats expected to
support the bill, Republicans
need the support of 50 of their 52
members to pass the legislation.
Senate leaders and Trump officials are aware that moderate
Republican holdouts may be the
bill’s biggest threat.
Seema Verma, administrator
of the Centers for Medicare and
Medicaid Services, made a presentation to a group of Republican senators from Medicaid-expansion states Thursday afternoon. She promised to do everything possible to minimize the
number of uninsured, by giving
states maximum flexibility in
how they could use some of the
money from the bill’s $182 billion
state stabilization fund.
Nearly 15 million Americans
would lose their Medicaid coverage by 2026 under the Senate bill,
according to the CBO. Verma
sought to minimize that outlook,
saying states could use the stabilization funding to heavily subsidize private coverage for these
Americans — even though the
size of the fund does not come
close to the bill’s $772 billion in
cuts to the program over the next
decade.
Cruz said the new bill was a
“substantial improvement” over
the first version and argued that
a focus on reducing premiums
was the best way to unite fractured Republicans. He touted his
proposal as a means of accomplishing both.
“It’s not what the federal government mandates you have to
buy — it’s your choice what
health insurance is the best for
you and your family,” Cruz said.
Critics, including insurers, say
that providing the option of
skimpier plans would draw
younger, healthier consumers
into a separate risk pool. That
development would drive up
rates for the Americans buying
more-comprehensive coverage
on the individual market, which
could in turn destabilize the
entire market.
The revised bill would establish a $70 billion fund to subsidize insurers providing both
kinds of plans “for the associated
costs of covering high-risk individuals,” according to a GOP
summary of the bill. It would also
allow individuals buying catastrophic plans to get a federal tax
credit if they would be otherwise
eligible, which is now barred
under current law.
The Senate bill also includes a
limited exemption for members
of Congress, which Republicans
said was due to procedural limitations in Senate budget rules.
Cruz introduced a measure to
strike the exemption Thursday
afternoon, saying in a statement,
“While this exemption was included in the Senate health care
bill out of procedural necessity,
we must still be diligent in ensuring that Members of Congress are
treated just like other Americans
under this law.”
sean.sullivan@washpost.com
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
kelsey.snell@washpost.com
Paige Winfield Cunningham and
David Weigel contributed to this
report.
FRIDAY, JULY 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
RE
Health-bill revision could
help the upper middle class
Change would affect
savings accounts used by
wealthier households
BY
M AX E HRENFREUND
A new tax break for the upper
middle class was offered up
Thursday in Senate Republicans’
revised version of their bill to
dismantle the Affordable Care
Act.
The legislation would make
health insurance premiums
more affordable for consumers
who buy the kinds of inexpensive
policies that are crucial to the
GOP health-care agenda. Yet independent analysts caution that
the benefits would mainly accrue
to affluent households, and the
provision might not substantially expand coverage among the
uninsured.
The language relates to health
savings accounts (HSAs), vehicles that allow consumers to set
aside a portion of their income
without it being taxed and then
use that money to pay for medical expenses.
Currently, the accounts can be
used only for out-of-pocket costs
such as insurance deductibles
and co-payments. The GOP bill
would allow owners of these
accounts to use the money to pay
for premiums, as well. Doing so
would make the accounts much
more attractive, allowing taxpayers to claim a break on a major
monthly expense rather than
only on their out-of-pocket costs
for doctor visits and other
health-care items.
The provision would primarily
benefit more-affluent households, in part because they are
the ones that can afford to divert
money into the accounts. And
because marginal rates on income are steeper for wealthier
taxpayers, they save more when
they are able to write off an
expense and reduce the income
on which they have to pay taxes.
About 44 percent of households — mostly those that are
less well off — do not pay any
federal income tax, according to
the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center. These households would not
benefit from being able to pay
premiums out of HSAs.
Additionally, the most important benefits would go to people
who are too affluent to qualify
for the federal subsidies that
would be available to help modest-income households buy private coverage on the individual
market. Since the subsidies cover
part of the cost of premiums,
those who receive them would be
OLIVER CONTRERAS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) on Thursday at the Capitol. A bill change he
pushed for could make health savings accounts more common.
able to deduct less from their
incomes.
Under the GOP bill, the subsidies would be available to households at up to 350 percent of the
federal poverty level, or about
$71,000 for a family of three.
For that reason, critics of the
GOP bill were skeptical that the
change with HSAs would help
uninsured Americans obtain
coverage, noting that many who
would be wealthy enough to
benefit meaningfully already
have insurance — coverage typically through an employer.
“It’s going to provide the
greatest benefits to higher-income people who already can
afford health insurance, so it’s
not going to do much in the way
of helping people afford coverage
who are going to lose it,” said
Edwin Park, a vice president for
health policy at the liberal Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.
The Joint Committee on Taxation (JCT) and the Congressional
Budget Office (CBO) — the two
nonpartisan agencies responsible for supplying lawmakers
with information about federal
taxes and spending — have forecast in a preliminary analysis
that the latest change to the rules
around HSAs would increase
coverage, according to a Senate
aide. A precise estimate was not
yet available Thursday, however.
Predicting exactly how the
provision would affect the number of uninsured Americans
would be extremely difficult, outside experts said, and the result
would depend on how the
change would interact with other revisions. For instance, another element of the bill — put
forward by Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.)
— could also make HSAs more
common.
Under current federal law, the
accounts are available only for
people who purchase plans with
higher deductibles. Cruz’s proposal would make it easier for
insurance companies to offer
such policies, and if HSAs were
more widely available because of
the GOP legislation, more people
might take advantage of the
opportunity to write off their
premiums.
Since policymakers have to
date not allowed taxpayers to pay
for insurance out of their HSAs,
any forecasts are part guesswork.
“I’m really reluctant to guess
how much it’s going to cost,” said
Linda Blumberg, an economist at
the nonpartisan Urban Institute.
“I don’t think it’s going to be
huge money necessarily, but I
think it’s going to have an impact.”
Tom Miller, an economist at
the right-leaning American Enterprise Institute, said: “It will be
a pretty imprecise guess.”
“The only number that will
matter will be supplied” by the
CBO and JCT next week, he
noted. The two agencies will
release a comprehensive analysis
of the revised bill.
That new bill would keep
several of the ACA taxes paid
mainly by the very rich. Initially,
GOP lawmakers had proposed
repealing those.
One is a levy on the salaries of
people earning more than
$200,000 a year as individuals,
or $250,000 for married couples.
The other taxes include a surcharge on certain investments
for households in that income
category and what is effectively a
special tax on the compensation
executives receive from their
firms in the insurance industry.
max.ehrenfreund@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
wonkblog
Celebrating 20 years
of changing lives
through innovation.
In 1997, a bipartisan group of 19 U.S. governors
collaborated to establish Western Governors University,
an online, competency-based university designed to
meet the needs of 21st century students. In just 20 years,
WGU has become one of the largest universities in the
country, providing accredited bachelor’s and master’s
degree programs in high-demand fields to more than
82,000 students and 85,000 graduates.
Congratulations
and best wishes
on your next
20 years!
Michael O. Leavitt*
Roy Romer*
Governor, State of Utah (1993–2003)
Secretary, U.S. Department of Health &
Human Services (2005–2009)
Governor, State of Colorado
(1987–1999)
Jim Geringer*
Governor, State of Wyoming
(1995–2003)
Greg Abbott
Governor, State of Texas
George W. Bush*
Governor, State of North Dakota
Governor, State of Texas
(1995–2000)
U.S. President (2001–2009)
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Governor, State of Indiana (2005–2013)
President, Purdue University
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Doug Burgum
Doug Ducey
Eric Greitens
Governor, State of Missouri
Governor, State of Arizona
Deep counterterrorism cuts planned
Trump’s budget would
slash ‘critical’ programs,
congressional report says
BY
M ARK B ERMAN
President Trump’s proposed
budget would cut more than half
a billion dollars from “critical
counterterrorism programs” administered by the Department of
Homeland Security, according to
a new congressional report.
The report, released Thursday,
says that Trump’s budget would
increase DHS funding by 7 percent while “numerous critical
programs that mitigate terror
threats are cut dramatically,” including programs designed to
target violent extremism, respond to terrorist attacks and
provide patrolling of U.S. airports.
The report, which breaks
down the cuts by program, was
written by Democratic staffers of
the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental
Affairs at the request of Sen.
Claire McCaskill (Mo.), the ranking Democrat on the committee.
A copy of the report was reviewed
by The Washington Post before
publication.
Trump’s budget describes the
cuts as necessary to scrap “underperforming programs” that do
nothing for core federal obligations. Although it was previously
known that the budget would
scale back some security programs at airports and transit
hubs and cut more than
$600 million from grants to state
and local agencies, the report
breaks down the extent of the
cuts to specific programs.
The proposed cuts, according
to the report, would include
stripping three-quarters of the
funding for Visible Intermodal
Prevention and Response (VIPR)
teams, which place officers at
airports as a public show of force
to deter terrorism — in effect, a
visible police presence. During
Trump’s inauguration, such
teams were placed at the three
Washington-area airports, as
well as in Union Station and the
Metro system.
Under Trump’s budget, VIPR
funding would drop to $15 million from $58 million, and the
number of VIPR teams would be
cut to eight from 31, with 277
full-time positions eliminated,
according to the report. The
Democratic staff members of the
Senate Homeland Security Committee say in the report that they
were told that even though federal officials say eight VIPR teams
can “maintain an acceptable security posture,” the three-quarters funding cut would “limit” the
presence of teams nationwide.
The report also says that a law
enforcement officer reimbursement program, which helps
strengthen security at airport terminals outside the gates, would
be eliminated, something that
would “disproportionately impact” smaller airports. In addition, an emergency management
grant program that helped train
local officials would be cut by
20 percent.
According to the White
House’s Office of Management
and Budget, some of the DHS
cuts are aimed at eliminating
redundant programs taking on
state and local responsibilities.
The law enforcement reimbursement programs at airports,
meanwhile, are described as “no
longer necessary” given that local
authorities have had time to shift
resources and priorities since the
Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.
In response to questions about
the report’s conclusions and
Trump’s budget, a DHS spokes-
woman pointed to a statement
from Homeland Security Secretary John F. Kelly praising a
House appropriations bill released this week. Kelly said the
bill “prioritizes the most pressing
issues facing our department,”
adding that it “supports critical
aviation security, disaster relief,
cybersecurity, and immigration
enforcement measures, which
are all essential to protecting our
nation and preserving our way of
life.”
A spokeswoman for Sen. Ron
Johnson (R-Wis.), the Homeland
Security Committee’s chairman,
did not immediately respond to a
request for comment on the report released by his committee.
According to the report, grant
programs aimed at helping local
efforts to fight terrorism also
would be cut back, a proposition
that has drawn ire from local law
enforcement leaders. When
Trump’s budget proposal was released, James P. O’Neill, the New
York City police commissioner,
said that the changes would target “the backbone of our entire
counterterrorism apparatus.”
In an article in the Atlantic,
former Homeland Security secretary Michael Chertoff and two
former Transportation Security
Administration administrators
argued against changes to airport
security staffing, saying that “an
administration that decreases its
investment in, and diminishes its
focus on, emergency management runs the risk of large-scale
calamity when disaster inevitably strikes.”
The White House budget blueprint released earlier this year
said that the document “prioritizes DHS law enforcement operations, proposes critical investments in front line border security, and funds continued development of strong cybersecurity
defenses.”
mark.berman@washpost.com
Bill Haslam
Gary Herbert
Governor, State of Utah
Governor, State of Tennessee
John Hickenlooper
Eric Holcomb
Governor, State of Indiana
Governor, State of Colorado
Jay Inslee
Gary E. Johnson*
Governor, State of Washington
Governor, State of New Mexico
(1995–2003)
Matt Mead
Bob Miller*
Governor, State of Wyoming
Governor, State of Nevada
(1989–1999)
E. Benjamin Nelson*
Governor, State of Nebraska
(1991–1999)
Butch Otter
Marc Racicot*
Brian Sandoval
Governor, State of Montana
(1993–2001)
Governor, State of Nevada
Edward T. Schafer*
Governor, State of North Dakota
(1992–2000)
Susan W. Brooks
Governor, State of Idaho
Rob Bishop
Congressman, State of Utah
Chris Cannon
Congressman, State of Utah
(1997–2009)
Congresswoman, State of Indiana
Tom Cole
James V. Hansen
Congressman, State of Oklahoma
Congressman, State of Utah
(1981–2003)
Mia Love
Luke Messer
Congresswoman, State of Utah
Congressman, State of Indiana
Todd Rokita
Mike Simpson
Congressman, State of Indiana
Congressman, State of Idaho
Chris Stewart
Bill Hansen
Congressman, State of Utah
Deputy Secretary, U.S. Department
of Education (2001–2003)
Rod Paige
Secretary, U.S. Department of
Education (2001–2005)
Jamie Merisotis
President & CEO, Lumina Foundation
Jim Ogsbury
Executive Director, Western
Governors’ Association
*Founding Governor,
Western Governors University
A10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
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275
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300
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250
08
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dislocation
150
14
15
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• Crompton Greaves Consumer Electricals
Indian manufacturer of consumer products
and household appliances
• Moncler
Luxury goods company specialising in high-end outerwear and apparel
Emerging Champions
Investing in companies that show growth potential
• VoloAgri Group
Vegetable seed technology and breeding company
headquartered in San Francisco
• Impossible Foods
US-based company developing next-generation
plant-based meat and dairy products
9
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17
TSR in S$ (%)
10
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Tapping the transforming economies of China, India,
South East Asia, Africa and Latin America
10
1
20
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Transforming Economies
14
13
30
14
100
+ve
15
40
16
945 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
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Financial Year
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0
16
18
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TSR in US$ (%)
Listing of Singtel
13
6
10
17
200
17
10
13
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+ve
T
.
FRIDAY, JULY 14, 2017
EZ
13
13
A11
RE
16
16
18
19
14
15
16
17
15
16
13
14
36
27
19
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21
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A12
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14 , 2017
The World
U.S. to certify Iran as compliant with nuclear agreement
Tillerson, Mattis backed
certification in heated
debate, officials say
BY
K AREN D E Y OUNG
The Trump administration, delaying an anticipated confrontation with Iran until the completion of a long-awaited policy review, plans to recertify Tehran’s
compliance with the Obama-era
nuclear deal, according to U.S. and
foreign officials.
The recertification, due Monday to Congress, follows a heated
internal debate between those
who want to crack down on Iran
now — including some White
House officials and lawmakers —
and Cabinet officials who are
“managing other constituencies”
such as European allies, and Russia and China, which signed and
support the agreement, one senior
U.S. official said.
As a candidate and president,
Trump has said he would reexamine and possibly kill what he called
the “disastrous” nuclear deal that
was negotiated under President
Barack Obama and took effect in
January last year. The agreement
shut down most of Iran’s nuclear
program, in some cases for decades, in exchange for an easing of
international sanctions.
Under an arrangement Obama
worked out with Congress, the
administration must certify Iranian compliance with the terms of
the accord every 90 days. If the
administration denies certification, it can then decide to reinsti-
tute sanctions that were suspended under the deal.
The Trump administration issued its first certification in April,
when it also said it was awaiting
completion of its review of the
agreement, called the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or
JCPOA. The senior official, one of
several who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss internal administration deliberations,
said the review should be completed before the next certification deadline in October.
The International Atomic Energy Agency, the United Nations
and other signatories have said
repeatedly that Iran is complying
with the agreement, under which
the country dismantled most of its
centrifuges and nuclear stockpile,
shut down a plutonium production program and agreed to extensive international monitoring of
all stages of the nuclear process.
Beyond disagreements over
what supporters of the deal consider minor and quickly rectified
infractions, and detractors assert
are dealbreaking violations, there
is broad consensus within the administration and Congress that
Iran continues to participate in
other prohibited activities not
covered in the nuclear accord.
The question is how the United
States should respond.
White House officials, including those charged with managing
Iran policy within the National
Security Council, believe Iran
should be punished not only for
nuclear violations, but also for its
support of international terrorism and its development of ballistic-missile technology.
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson,
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, left, and Secretary of State Rex
Tillerson faced opposition by the White House and lawmakers.
who has statutory responsibility
for certification, and Defense Secretary Jim Mattis have successfully argued that the nuclear deal
should not be tied to punishments
for those activities and that any
nuclear-related action should
await the review.
Officials cautioned that Trump,
who has made clear his disdain for
the accord, could decide not to
sign off on the recertification between now and the Monday deadline but said that was unlikely. The
decision to recertify was first reported Thursday by the Weekly
Standard.
Next Tuesday, the administration must also comply with a separate deadline, reporting to Congress on Iran’s overall nuclear behavior and deciding whether to
waive reinstituting sanctions lifted under the accord. That report,
due 180 days after Trump’s inau-
guration, was part of restrictions
lawmakers put on the agreement,
as was the 90-day certification
requirement.
As White House officials have
asserted their role in the process,
the administration has downgraded internal State Department
mechanisms for monitoring Iranian compliance. In recent weeks, a
separate State Department office
of Iran Nuclear Implementation
established by Obama was subsumed by the bureau in charge of
overall Middle East policy. Both
Stephen D. Mull, the lead coordinator for implementation, and
Stuart Jones, the acting head of
the Middle East bureau, are moving on from their jobs.
It is unclear who will replace
Jones or whether Mull will be
replaced at all.
Among those weighing in from
the outside during the debate,
which included a meeting of
Trump’s national security principals last week, were four GOP
lawmakers — Sens. Tom Cotton
(Ark.), Ted Cruz (Tex.), David Perdue (Ga.) and Marco Rubio (Fla.).
They urged noncertification in
a letter Tuesday to Tillerson, saying that in addition to “violations”
of the deal, “Iran continues to
wage a campaign of regional aggression, sponsor international
terrorism, develop ballistic missile technology and oppress the
Iranian people.”
Mark Dubowitz, head of the
Washington-based Foundation
for Defense of Democracies,
which has long criticized the accord and urged its reformulation,
said that recertification was “the
wrong decision.”
“I think the administration this
time around should have made
the decision not to recertify, explain why, and actually gone
ahead with the waiver and
slapped on some new nonnuclear
sanctions.”
Noncertification would not automatically trigger the end of the
deal. That would require the United States to allege a “material
breach” on Iran’s part and a referral to the joint commission of
signatories to the agreement for
assessment. But proponents of the
accord said that a failure to certify
would nonetheless trigger unwanted reactions.
Even if new sanctions were not
related to Iran’s nuclear program,
said Daryl G. Kimball, executive
director of the Arms Control Association, “the real question is
whether under those conditions
the political support inside Iran
for compliance with the deal will
continue.”
Allegations of Iranian violations, he said, are “trumped up”
and “not supported by any evidence. . . . They have exceeded
heavy-water limits by a tiny percentage, and gone back into compliance within days.”
Tillerson aide R.C. Hammond
made clear that his boss believes
that Iran is behaving badly in a
number of areas, regardless of the
assessment of the nuclear deal,
and that a new policy is being
formulated. “All the Obama Iran
deal did was pay for a pause” in
Iran’s nuclear program, he said. “It
didn’t fix any problems. What
we’re going to try to do is fix the
problems.”
The senior official added that
unlike the previous administration, “this administration sees the
JCPOA as a symptom, not the
disease.”
“The disease is broader Iranian
aggression. That’s what the strategy review is focused on, and until
it’s complete, it’s difficult to know
what is the best resolution,” the
official said.
Friday is the second anniversary of the signing of the deal, negotiated with Iran over a number of
years by the United States, Britain,
France, Germany, China, Russia
and the European Union. Other
signatories have openly rejected
Trump’s assessment, and they
have warned that they would continue to honor the agreement, and
increase their trade and relations
with Iran, no matter what the
United States does.
karen.deyoung@washpost.com
Carol Morello in Kuwait contributed to
this report.
With push from Trump’s envoy, Israel and Palestinians reach pact on water
BY
W ILLIAM B OOTH
jerusalem — President Trump’s
Middle East envoy, Jason Greenblatt, on Thursday announced a
water-sharing agreement between Israel and the Palestinians
that will provide additional supply to the parched populations in
the West Bank and the besieged
Gaza Strip.
The deal is part of a larger,
previously announced plan to
draw salty water from the Red Sea
to a huge desalination plant,
which will then move fresh water
via pipeline to Jordan, Israel and
the Palestinians. The undrinkable
brine will be used to help replenish and restore the Dead Sea,
which is slowly disappearing.
Greenblatt’s mediation on the
water deal was the first fruit of
the Trump team’s effort to see if it
can bring Israel and the Palestinians back to peace negotiations.
The agreement to provide more
water to the Palestinians, at a
reduced rate, is also designed to
build some trust between the
antagonists.
Israel will begin to provide the
extra water to the West Bank and
Gaza Strip now. The supplies will
eventually come from a desalination plant linked to a Red SeaDead Sea pipeline, to be completed in four or five years.
Greenblatt, who has been taking meetings with Israeli Prime
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu
and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, called the
water deal “an important step
forward.”
Trump’s envoy declined to answer any questions at the news
conference here about how his
effort to renew peace negotiations are going.
Mazin Ghunaim, head of the
Palestinian Water Authority, said
the increased supply of water
“will reduce the suffering of the
Palestinian people, which has
been worsened by the beginning
of summer and the crises that
they are living through.”
About one-third of the additional supply will go to Gaza,
“where more than 97 percent of
the water is not drinkable,” he
said.
Tzahi Hanegbi, Israel’s minister of regional cooperation, said
that after years of stalemates, the
Red Sea project will move forward. He thanked both Greenblatt and the Palestinians. He
called the desalination and pipeline venture the “biggest, most
ambitious project ever initiated
in our area.”
“It will supply a significant
amount of water to Jordan, to
Israel and to the Palestinians. It
will help us challenge the biggest
problem the Dead Sea is facing —
the evaporation of a meter a year
— and it will also harness green
energy,” Hanegbi said.
william.booth@washpost.com
SAID KHATIB/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE VIA GETTY IMAGES
Palestinian children fill jerrycans with drinking water from public taps during Ramadan at the Rafah refugee camp in the southern Gaza
Strip. On Thursday, Israel and the Palestinians struck a water-sharing deal to supply parched regions in the West Bank and Gaza Strip.
DIGEST
The man convicted of gunning
down Russian opposition leader
Boris Nemtsov on a bridge near
the Kremlin was sentenced
Thursday to 20 years in prison.
Prosecutors had asked for life
imprisonment for Zaur Dadayev
in the 2015 killing and did not say
whether they would appeal.
Four others convicted in the
killing were sentenced to terms
ranging from 11 to 19 years.
Nemtsov was an opponent of
Russian President Vladimir
Putin. He had been working on a
report about Russia’s military
involvement in the war in eastern
Ukraine and in the annexation of
Crimea.
Dadayev was an officer in the
security forces of Chechnya’s
Kremlin-backed leader, Ramzan
Kadyrov.
case of a British couple seeking
the right to take their critically ill
infant to the United States for
treatment said Thursday it was
worth trying a new experimental
therapy for the baby.
The doctor, whose name and
institution cannot be named
because of a court order, told
Britain’s High Court that new
clinical data has recently emerged
about the effectiveness of the
treatment proposed for
11-month-old Charlie Gard, who
suffers from a rare genetic
condition and is on life support.
The doctor estimated the
chance of “clinical meaningful
success” for an improvement in
Charlie’s muscle use to be at least
10 percent, but did not say
whether the infant’s brain
function would improve.
Judge Nicholas Francis said the
doctor should come to London to
see Charlie and meet other
experts, which the doctor said he
was willing to do.
— Associated Press
— Associated Press
RUSSIA
Man gets 20 years
in killing of Nemtsov
BRITAIN
EGYPT
U.S. doctor says new
therapy could aid baby
Fearing ISIS attacks,
churches cancel events
A U.S. doctor testifying in the
Egyptian churches suspended
and security commanders in the
southern city of Assiut.
President Abdel Fatah al-Sissi’s
government is trying to crush an
insurgency led by the Islamic
State terrorist group in northern
Sinai. Militants have targeted
Egypt’s Christians for their
support of Sissi.
— Associated Press
U.S., Somali forces reportedly
kill al-Shabab extremists: A
FAROOQ KHAN/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY
Indian police officers pay tribute at a ceremony marking Martyrs’
Day at Mazar-e-Shuhada, or Martyrs’ Graveyard, in Srinagar, the
summer capital of Indian-administered Kashmir. Martyrs’ Day is held
to remember 22 civilians who were killed in 1931 by troopers of the
then-Dogra ruler of Kashmir, Maharaja Hari Singh.
pilgrimages, conferences and
holidays through August on
Thursday after authorities
warned of possible attacks by
Islamic State militants.
Ishak Ibrahim, an activist and
researcher on the Egyptian
church, reported the suspension
by the majority Coptic Orthodox
and the smaller Anglican and
Catholic churches. Security
officials, pastors and others
confirmed the suspension.
They said the warning was
delivered to church officials at a
meeting this week with top army
senior Somali intelligence official
said that American and local
forces raided a rebel-held village
in southern Somalia early
Thursday and killed several alShabab extremists. The official
said Somali commandos aided by
U.S. forces in two helicopters
raided two locations, including a
detention center run by alShabab in Kunya-Barrow village
in the Lower Shabelle region. He
said the detainees were freed. The
official spoke on the condition of
anonymity because he was not
authorized to speak to the press.
There was no immediate
comment from the U.S. Africa
Command.
3 dead in Kenya kidnapping:
Suspected al-Qaeda-linked alShabab extremists briefly took a
Kenyan government official
hostage in the country’s volatile
southeast, leaving three people
dead, officials and police said.
A top public works official,
Maryam Elmaawy, was on her
way to visit families who had
fled recent al-Shabab attacks
when her convoy was attacked,
said Coast Regional Police
Commander Larry Kieng.
Elmaawy was rescued by Kenya’s
military but suffered injuries,
Kieng said. Police sources said
two police officers and a civilian
were killed.
German court convicts Turkish
man as terrorist: A German court
has convicted a former leading
member of the banned Kurdistan
Workers’ Party, or PKK, of
membership in a terrorist group
and sentenced him to three years
and three months in prison. The
Stuttgart state court said the 47year-old, a Turkish national
whose name it did not release,
was one of four PKK “sectoral
leaders” in Germany and a
leading official with the group in
the Dortmund and Düsseldorf
areas. The PKK wants greater
autonomy for Kurds living in
Turkey.
— From news services
FRIDAY, JULY 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
SU
Once cast as adversaries, Trump and Macron try to find common ground
Presidents emphasize
similarities while playing
down differences in Paris
BY J ENNA J OHNSON
AND J AMES M C A ULEY
paris — For dinner on Thursday,
French President Emmanuel Macron chose to dine with President
Trump at Le Jules Verne, an
opulent restaurant nestled in the
Eiffel Tower that has earned a
Michelin star yet still carries the
reputation of being an overpriced
tourist destination.
The extravagant meal capped
off a day filled with frequent
backslaps, handshakes, toothy
smiles, knee pats, photo ops and a
shared determination to find
common ground.
Up until now, the relationship
between these two world leaders
has been largely defined by their
stark differences — Trump vs. the
international anti-Trump — and a
defining moment occurred in
May when the boyish 39-year-old
French centrist fought for dominance in a white-knuckle handshake with the red-faced septuagenarian U.S. president in front
of reporters and cameras.
But as their presidencies slowly age, it is becoming clear the two
leaders have a lot in common.
Both are political outsiders
holding their first elective positions and relish having defied
their countries’ main political
parties, and they maintain contentious relationships with the
media. Both have pledged to dramatically shake up the establishment and rid their capitals of
power players and bureaucrats
who have long wielded influence.
Both have stressed businessfriendly policies and promised to
roll back regulations.
Both are seeking to confront
terrorism with actions critics say
could infringe on the freedoms of
their citizens.
And Trump and Macron also
appear to enjoy the opulence of
places such as Le Jules Verne and
the pomp that accompanies being a world leader. In the two
months that Macron has been
president, he has made two major
public declarations at Versailles,
while Trump likes to give television crews tours of the Oval Office
and has hosted several events in
the Rose Garden.
Macron’s allies are quick to
challenge comparisons to Trump,
arguing that former president
Barack Obama is a better match,
but his critics contend the emerging similarities are more than
superficial.
“They both want a monopoly
on public attention and are attracted by constant media coverage. And there is a similar kind of
narcissism in their attraction to
power,” said Patrick Weil, a
French constitutional scholar
and leading historian of immigration. “Both show a will to govern
against the Parliament and
against the press — without any
separation or balance of power.”
For his part, Macron has quickly and quietly amassed an authority that Trump could only dream
of possessing. In a country where
the executive is already stronger
than in many of its Western
counterparts, the new president
will govern largely with a coalition entirely of his own creation
— with deputies he himself handselected. The new party that Macron created — “En Marche!”
(Onward) — bears his initials,
which some see as Macron placing himself at the center of political life. The French media has
likened him to a “Jupiter” in the
Elysee Palace and called him the
“sun president,” a playful recasting of the “sun king,” another
name for Louis XIV, France’s
iconic monarch.
Last week, Macron gave a 90minute address to both houses of
Parliament at Versailles and announced his intent to get rid of
one-third of France’s 577 parliamentary deputies, in front of the
very deputies whose positions
would conceivably be eliminated.
“The French people have
shown their impatience with a
political world made up of sterile
quarrels and hollow ambitions in
which we have lived up until
now,” Macron said.
It was a more poetic version of
Trump’s popular rallying cry:
“Drain the swamp!”
When Trump and Macron
stand side-by-side — as they did
during a news conference on
Thursday afternoon in a gilded
ballroom at Paris’s Elysee Palace
— it can be difficult to spot any
similarities.
Trump towers over Macron but
often slumped or leaned heavily
on his lectern with his suit jacket
unbuttoned, his hair a bit unruly
and his face in a scowl. He agreed
to this trip at the last minute and
showed up with an entourage
that did not include anyone from
the State Department — and he
has yet to name an ambassador to
France. He spoke in vague proclamations instead of specifics. “We
will talk about that over the
coming period of time,” he said of
his decision to withdraw the
United States from the Paris climate accord and whether he
might revisit it. “And if it hap-
pens, that’ll be wonderful. And if
it doesn’t, that’ll be okay, too. But
we’ll see what happens.”
Meanwhile, Macron wore a
closely tailored dark suit that was
buttoned and he stood at perfect
attention, his hair neatly in place.
He prepares extensively for public appearances such as this one
and filled his remarks with purposeful talking points, speaking
with precision — and, at times, in
English. Macron went out of his
way to avoid conflict with Trump
or highlight their differences, despite the U.S. president’s deep
unpopularity in France.
Earlier in the afternoon,
Trump and first lady Melania
Trump met with Macron and his
wife at Les Invalides, a historic
complex in central Paris that is
home to Napoleon Bonaparte’s
tomb. As the two couples exchanged pleasantries, Trump
sized up Brigitte Macron and
commented: “You’re in such good
shape.” He then repeated the
comment to President Macron,
who has proudly filled half his
cabinet positions with women
and insisted on absolute gender
parity for his party’s ticket in
France’s recent parliamentary
elections.
From there, the two traveled to
Elysee Palace to meet one-on-one
and then discussed terrorism and
other pressing issues with their
top aides.
On the campaign trail, Trump
promised to “bomb the s---” out of
the Islamic State, seize oil from
land it controls, kill the relatives
of suspected terrorists and bring
back waterboarding. In December 2015, Trump proposed temporarily banning all foreign Muslims from entering the United
States, and as president, he
signed two executive orders that
tried to temporarily limit the
entrance of people from several
predominantly Muslim countries.
Macron was accused of being
too soft on terrorism during the
French campaign, a charge that
has vanished in his first few
months as president. He stunned
French liberals — many of whom
supported him in the election —
when he proposed making permanent some portions of French
law that grants the government a
host of temporary powers during
times of crisis to ensure national
security.
France has been under an official “state of emergency” since
Nov. 14, 2015, the day after Islamic State militants orchestrated a
series of deadly attacks on a Paris
concert hall and cafes, killing 130.
In the 18 months since then,
police have been able to conduct
warrantless home searches and
place individuals under house
arrest if they appear “suspicious”
in any way.
To the chagrin of civil liberties
advocates, Macron has proposed
making certain of these powers
permanent — albeit with a judicial review component. On Tuesday, more than 200 French aca-
BY
C AROL M ORELLO
State Rex Tillerson on Thursday
ended his first stab at mediating a
bitter spat in the Persian Gulf
region, an effort that took him to
three countries over four days but
yielded little discernible progress
in resolving the dispute.
Tillerson headed home after
meeting with Qatari officials to
brief them on his talks Wednesday with diplomats from four
Arab countries leading a trade
and diplomatic boycott against
Qatar: Bahrain, Egypt, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.
From the beginning, State Department officials tried to tamp
down expectations that much, if
anything, would be accomplished
on the trip. Last week, spokeswoman Heather Nauert warned
that the quarrel may not be settled for months.
Although U.S. officials noted
that Tillerson was just supporting the efforts of Kuwait, the
official mediator, his first foray
into shuttle diplomacy has thrust
him into the forefront of the
standoff.
His inability to resolve the
dispute was made more awkward
by a public gambit that Tillerson
made Tuesday, signing a memorandum of understanding that
says Qatar and the United States
will cooperate in blocking channels used to funnel money to
terrorists. The charge that Qatar
supports extremists is at the
heart of the Arab anger toward
the tiny Persian Gulf emirate. The
joint agreement, sent by telegraph to the boycotting countries, stated Tillerson’s position
that every state in the region
should do more to counter terrorism and not waste time on regional disagreements.
Tillerson’s midday meeting
Thursday in Qatar’s capital,
Doha, with the Kuwaiti and Qatari foreign ministers had buoyed
expectations that he was relaying
messages that could lead to nego-
tiations. But when the diplomats
emerged to pose for photographs,
they ignored questions from reporters asking if they were closer
to a resolution or if more meetings were planned.
One snippet of overheard conversation suggested that things
had not gone well.
“Hope to see you again under
better circumstances,” Mohammad bin Hamad al-Thani, the
brother of Qatari Emir Tamim
bin Hamad al-Thani, said as they
shook hands before Tillerson departed.
The Saudi-led bloc of countries
on June 5 cut diplomatic ties with
Qatar, suspended all their flights
into and out of Doha, and closed
the peninsular state’s only land
border — with Saudi Arabia.
Since then, Qatar has used ingenuity to meet some of its basic
needs. A wealthy Qatari businessman began flying in the first of
about 4,000 dairy cows to provide milk. Turkey and Iran are
helping to import food, and Iran
allows Qatar to use its air and sea
lanes.
On the surface, the boycott,
which Qatar calls a blockade, is
about Qatar’s alleged financial
support to Islamist groups. But
the boycotting Arab countries
issued 13 broad demands over
other matters such as closing the
Qatar-based television network
Al Jazeera and other news outlets. They also want Qatar to be
less friendly to archrival Iran, cut
ties with extremist groups and
expel Turkish troops based there.
Qatar has rejected the demands
as an infringement on its sovereignty.
The feuding countries are all
U.S. allies, and Tillerson worries
that the flare-up is a diversion
from priorities such as countering terrorism and isolating Iran.
Qatar hosts the region’s largest
U.S. military base, where 11,000
Americans work. The U.S. Navy’s
5th Fleet is based in Bahrain, and
U.S. surveillance planes fly from
the United Arab Emirates.
carol.morello@washpost.com
lawyer in hopes of learning damaging information about Democrat nominee Hillary Clinton during the 2016 campaign.
Macron, meanwhile, tried to
hand-select which journalists
would accompany him on a recent trip to visit French troops
stationed in West Africa and has
accused French reporters of leading a “manhunt” during the election. He also broke with the
tradition of holding a news conference on Bastille Day, which is
Friday. An Elysee official told Le
Monde newspaper that Macron’s
“complex thought process lends
itself badly to the game of
question-and-answer with journalists.”
When it came time for the last
question of Thursday’s news conference,
Macron
prompted
Trump with a reminder: “One last
question, for an American journalist.” Trump then called on a
correspondent for a Chinese television network who is based in
France, who asked about his relationship with Chinese President
Xi Jinping.
Hours later, Trump and Macron reconvened at the Eiffel
Tower for dinner, huddling with
their wives at a table next to a wall
of windows as the crimson sun
fell toward the horizon, illuminating the historic city’s skyline.
When asked about his first day
in Paris, Trump responded: “Very
good.”
jenna.johnson@washpost.com
james.mcauley@washpost.com
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Tillerson leaves Qatar with
no resolution on dispute
kuwait city — Secretary of
demics and researchers condemned the state of emergency in
a harshly worded public letter.
While Macron has condemned
Trump’s travel ban and comments about Muslims, he has
done little since taking office to
help migrants displaced by conflicts in the Middle East resettle
in his country.
Jacques Toubon, France’s public defender of civil liberties and a
former justice minister, likened
Macron’s recent proposal to a
French Patriot Act, and criticized
what he called the law’s “fluid,
cloudy” definitions of terrorists
and terrorism.
The gray areas, he said, were
“dangerous for our national cohesion.”
“There needs to be a debate,”
Toubon said of the proposal. “The
people, the Parliament, the intellectuals must debate this question — or the question will never
come to be debated.”
After giving brief remarks
Thursday, Trump and Macron
prepared to take four questions
from reporters — a rarity for the
two leaders, who have largely
avoided the media.
Trump has called the media the
“enemy of the people” and often
labels stories he does not like
“fake news.” Hours before boarding his flight to Paris, Trump
tweeted that the media has
launched “the greatest Witch
Hunt in political history” against
his eldest son, who admitted this
week to meeting with a Russian
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14 , 2017
Fellow writer says Liu Xiaobo became ‘a monument to morality and justice’
BY
E MILY R AUHALA
beijing — For friends and ad-
mirers of writer and activist Liu
Xiaobo, China’s only Nobel Peace
Prize laureate, his death Thursday is a dark crossroads.
To many, Liu represented hope
for a freer China with more room
for dissent. Now that he is gone,
they said, that dream looks more
distant.
“He fought for freedom and
democracy for more than 30
years, becoming a monument to
morality and justice and a source
of inspiration,” said Wen Kejian, a
fellow writer.
“His spiritual legacy will never
fade away,” he added. “The torch
he carried high will be passed on.”
Liu, who passed up opportunities to leave China for a life in
exile, had been in a Chinese
prison since his conviction for
“subversion” in 2009.
In 2010, he was awarded the
Nobel Peace Prize for his “long
and nonviolent struggle for fundamental human rights.” Since
he could not attend the ceremony, he was represented by an
empty chair.
The Nobel committee said in
a statement Thursday that the
Chinese
government
bears “heavy responsibility” for
his death.
“He was truly a prisoner of
conscience and he paid the highest possible price for his relentless struggle,” said Berit ReissAndersen, chair of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, in a state-
Given a prison
sentence,
then a Nobel
Peace Prize
LIU FROM A1
when he won the prize. It promoted a man whom much of the
world regarded as a distinguished activist and whose own
leaders considered a dangerous
subversive.
Foreign news reports about
the Nobel honor were blacked out
H
SAVE
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
ment.
“Liu Xiaobo was a representative of ideas that resonate with
millions of people all over the
world, even in China. These ideas
cannot be imprisoned and will
never die,” Reiss-Anderson added.
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson called Liu’s death a “tragic
passing” and noted his work
“promoting peaceful democratic
reform.” Tillerson’s statement
also urged Chinese authorities to
allow Liu’s widow, Liu Xia, to be
freed from house arrest and given
the option to leave China.
“In his fight for freedom,
equality, and constitutional rule
in China, Liu Xiaobo embodied
the human spirit that the Nobel
Prize rewards. In his death, he
has only reaffirmed the Nobel
Committee’s selection,” said Tillerson in a statement.
On June 25, officials announced that Liu had late-stage
liver cancer and was being moved
to a hospital, starting a macabre
battle about where and how he
should be treated — and where
and how he would die.
His friends said that Liu and
his wife wanted to travel to Germany or the United States for
treatment. Doctors from both
countries cleared it, but Chinese
officials insisted he was too sick
to leave.
As he lay dying, foreign governments, including the United
States, joined rights groups and
Chinese dissidents-in-exile in
calling for his release. The gov-
ernment rebuffed their pleas,
saying it was an internal matter.
“Even as Liu Xiaobo’s illness
worsened, the Chinese government continued to isolate him
and his family, and denied him
freely choosing his medical treatment,” said Sophie Richardson,
China director of Human Rights
Watch, in a statement.
“The Chinese government’s arrogance, cruelty, and callousness
are shocking — but Liu’s struggle
for a rights-respecting, democratic China will live on.”
Hu Jia, a fellow dissident who
counts Liu as a close friend, said
the scuffle over his final days
proved some of what Liu had
been saying all along: that the
ruling Communist Party could be
“coldblooded and cruel.”
What he most admired, Hu
said, was that Liu never stopped
resisting but that he always resisted peacefully. That would be
his legacy, Hu said.
Chinese authorities, who have
kept Liu out of the public eye for
years, said little about his death
in China, where authorities
called it a “desecration” of the
prize. Text messages that included his name went unreceived,
stymied by state-run cellular networks, and the news was
squelched online by the censorship apparatus known as the
“Great Firewall.”
At the Nobel ceremony in Oslo,
Mr. Liu was represented by an
empty chair. Not since the 1935
prize, when German pacifist Carl
von Ossietzky was being held at a
concentration camp by the Nazis,
had a laureate or a family member been unable to accept the
honor in person. Ossietzky died
at a Nazi hospital in 1938.
Mr. Liu spent much of the past
three decades in forced confine-
ment — at home, at labor camps
or in prison. And his final
months, after being diagnosed
with late-stage liver cancer in
May and granted medical parole,
drew international calls for his
release.
His death, at a hospital in the
northeastern city of Shenyang,
was confirmed by a statement
from the Chinese government,
and it made Mr. Liu the latest in a
string of Chinese dissidents
whose incarceration ended in serious illness or fatality. A photograph posted July 5 on Twitter by
the dissident writer Ye Du
showed an emaciated Mr. Liu at
the hospital with his wife, Liu
Xia, a photographer and poet
who had pleaded for better medi-
cal care for Mr. Liu.
A pair of American and German doctors who were granted
permission to treat Mr. Liu said
Sunday that he was strong
enough to seek medical treatment abroad. Chinese officials
resisted that claim and rebuffed
requests from Germany and the
State Department to allow him to
leave the country.
The hospital treating Mr. Liu
said that he was suffering from
respiratory and renal failure, as
well as septic shock, and that his
family had decided against inserting a breathing tube necessary to keep him alive.
Through it all, Mr. Liu’s plight
remained largely invisible at
home, where his writings were
censored and he was labeled a
mere criminal.
ground, preventing what he saw
as an excuse for the military to
“gun everybody down” — were
widely credited with saving thousands of lives. Still, at least several hundred civilians were killed
in the attacks, details of which
were suppressed by the Chinese
government.
“From the moment I walked
out of the square, my heart has
been heavy,” Mr. Liu said in “The
Gate of Heavenly Peace,” a 1995
documentary that took its name
from the English translation of
Tiananmen. “I’ve never gotten
over this.”
While biking on June 6, 1989,
amid a government crackdown
that led other prominent demonstrators to go into hiding, Mr. Liu
was captured by Chinese officers.
He later recalled the event in a
poem, “Experiencing Death”:
Deep in the night, empty road
I’m biking home
I stop at a cigarette stand
A car follows me, crashes over
my bicycle
some enormous brutes seize me
I’m handcuffed eyes covered
mouth gagged
thrown into a prison van heading nowhere
He was imprisoned for 21
months, branded a “black hand”
and an “evil mastermind,” and
forbidden from publishing in
China — a dictate that he subverted through pseudonyms and by
penning articles for overseas
publications.
Mr. Liu published more than
1,000 essays, by his count, and
called for reform, not revolution.
Yet he remained under state surveillance and in 1996 was sentenced to three years of forced
labor for drafting a declaration
that called for reconciliation with
Taiwan, freedom for Tibet and
the impeachment of President
Jiang Zemin.
Instead of leaving the country,
Mr. Liu chose to remain in China,
a decision that “was the path of
destruction for his life” but that
enabled him to remain an effective critic of the state, Schell said.
His work culminated in Charter
08, a sweeping, pro-democracy
manifesto that landed him in
prison for the last time.
Published online in 2008, the
document was modeled in part
on Charter 77, an anti-Communist tract that Czech dissidents
such as Vaclav Havel, a friend of
Mr. Liu’s, had drafted decades
earlier. Mr. Liu was among the
leading drafters and first signers
of Charter 08, which called for
“the democratization of Chinese
politics” through the establishment of a new constitution, greater freedom of expression, an independent judiciary and an end
to one-party rule.
The document drew unexpectedly wide-ranging support, receiving 10,000 signatures from
farmers, lawyers, philosophers
and street vendors until it was
pulled off the Internet by Chinese
censors. “Probably the most worrying thing to the authorities was
the broad coalition of people who
decided to put their name on it,”
Nicholas Bequelin, then an Asia
researcher at Human Rights
Watch, told Britain’s Guardian
newspaper in 2009. “It was the
organization [that concerned
them]; it was across different
social groups and across the
country. That’s really one of the
red lines for the party.”
Mr. Liu was captured by police
VINCENT YU/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A protester mourns Chinese Nobel Peace laureate Liu Xiaobo during a demonstration outside the
Chinese liaison office in Hong Kong on July 13. Liu had been in a Chinese prison since 2009.
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‘Looking for real life’
A bespectacled chain-smoker
with a stutter, Mr. Liu established
himself as a literary and political
bomb thrower in the mid-1980s,
when Chinese society experienced a “cultural fever” under
reform-minded Communist Party officials.
Mr. Liu (whose full name is
pronounced lee-oh SHEEOWbwoh) “was the enfant terrible of
the late-’80s intellectual scene in
Beijing,” said journalist Orville
Schell, an acquaintance of Mr.
Liu’s who is now a China scholar
at the Asia Society in New York.
“He was somebody who you invited to a party with some trepidation, because he was bound to
offend someone.”
Confucius was “a mediocre talent,” Mr. Liu said; contemporary
Chinese writers were even worse.
The country’s “Marxism-Leninism,” he wrote in one article, was
“not so much a belief system as a
tool used by rulers to impose
ideological dictatorship.”
Mr. Liu was a visiting scholar
at Columbia University when, in
April 1989, thousands of students
began demonstrating in Tiananmen Square to demand democratic reforms. The assembly
marked a turning point for Mr.
Liu, who arrived at Tiananmen in
May and began protesting alongside the movement’s young leaders.
When the chants began to die
down and soldiers started trying
to clear the square, Mr. Liu and
three friends — including Hou
Dejian, a popular rock singer
from Taiwan — erected a tent
beside the 10-story Monument to
the People’s Heroes and began a
72-hour hunger strike.
“We are not in search of death;
we are looking for real life,” the
strikers declared in a statement.
“We want to show that democracy practiced by the people by
peaceful means is strong and
tenacious. We want to break the
undemocratic order maintained
by bayonets and by lies.”
Two nights later, military units
launched a full-scale assault on
the square, firing their rifles and
driving armored vehicles into
crowds that lined the surrounding streets. Mr. Liu and his fellow
hunger-strikers, fearing a bloodbath in the square, acted as
negotiators between military
forces and the remaining demonstrators. At dawn on June 4, the
group successfully persuaded the
students to leave.
Mr. Liu’s actions — at one point
he grabbed a rifle from a demonstrator and smashed it on the
Thursday. At a news conference
at the hospital where he died,
doctors defended the care Liu
was given and the decision to
keep him there.
Strict censorship has stopped
many ordinary Chinese from following his case, though some still
tried to post about Liu online. In
an effort to stop people from
grieving
publicly,
censors
blocked the candle emoji.
Elsewhere in the region, his
death was greeted with open
sorrow and outrage.
In Hong Kong, people gathered outside the China Liaison
Office, the central government’s
outpost in the semiautonomous
city, to light candles and honor
Liu.
Nathan Law, a local pro-democracy activist, read from the
statement Liu prepared ahead of
his 2009 trial and which was read
in full the night he won the
Nobel. “I have no enemies and no
hatred,” it read.
Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen
tweeted a tribute to the man she
called a “tireless advocate for
human rights.”
“In 2010, Liu Xiaobo was
awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. In
the ceremony, the attention of the
whole world was on the empty
chair,” she said. “Sadly, he will
never have a chance to claim that
seat.”
emily.rauhala@washpost.com
Luna Lin in Beijing and Carol Morello
in Kuwait City contributed to this
report.
shortly before the document’s
release and confined to a windowless room north of Beijing.
His final public statement was in
court, days before he was found
guilty of “inciting subversion of
state power” on Christmas Day
2009.
“I firmly believe that China’s
political progress will never stop,
and I’m full of optimistic expectations of freedom coming to China
in the future, because no force
can block the human desire for
freedom,” he said in the statement. Titled “I Have No Enemies,” it was later read at his
Nobel ceremony.
The statement included extended remarks about his wife,
whose love he described as his
“most fortunate experience” in 20
years. “Even if I were crushed into
powder,” he said, “I would still
use my ashes to embrace you.”
Childhood under Mao
Mr. Liu was born in the northeastern city of Changchun on
Dec. 28, 1955, and came of age
during the worst years of the
Cultural Revolution. In Mao Zedong’s bid to reassert his authority and revive revolutionary zeal,
intellectuals and alleged dissidents were “reeducated” through
forced labor, and millions of urban children were sent out of
school and “down to the countryside” to work at farms and rural
communities. Thousands of professionals were attacked and
killed.
With his father, a professor of
Chinese literature, Mr. Liu
worked for a time in Inner Mongolia. He returned to Changchun
and graduated from Jilin University in 1982, part of the first
cohort to return to college after
Mao’s death in 1976. He received a
master’s degree in Chinese literature at Beijing Normal University
in 1984 and earned his doctorate
there four years later.
Mr. Liu was married at a labor
camp in 1996, although the marriage was not officially recognized for another two years. In
2012, Liu Xia told the Associated
Press that she was allowed to visit
Mr. Liu in prison once a month
but was otherwise permitted to
leave her apartment only to buy
groceries and see her parents.
A previous marriage, to Tao Li,
ended in divorce during Mr. Liu’s
first prison sentence. In addition
to his wife, survivors include a
son from his first marriage, Liu
Tao.
Mr. Liu focused increasingly
on his writing and poetry in later
years, and from 2003 to 2007
served as president of the Independent Chinese PEN Center.
Some of his work was translated
into English and published in the
2012 collections “No Enemies, No
Hatred” and “June Fourth Elegies.”
The latter featured poems that
Mr. Liu wrote each year in commemoration of the Tiananmen
Square attacks. The writing, he
said, was a means of bearing
witness to a tragedy that had
been excised from the country’s
official histories.
He wrote in one poem:
The day
seems more and more distant,
and yet for me it
remains a needle inside my
body
remains a crowd of Mothers
who’ve lost their children.
harrison.smith@washpost.com
FRIDAY, JULY 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
RE
Economy & Business
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Uber in Russia to
merge with rival
Yandex, an Internet giant
with a taxi business,
proved a formidable foe
BY
H AMZA S HABAN
Uber’s ride-hailing service in
Russia will merge with a much
larger competitor, Yandex, the
companies announced Thursday,
in a deal valued at $3.7 billion.
Yandex, an Internet search giant that also has a taxi business,
will claim majority ownership,
and Tigran Khudaverdyan, the
chief executive of Yandex’s taxi
operations, will lead the new
company.
The deal must first obtain regulatory approval, but the boards
of both companies have approved
the arrangement. Uber will own
just under 40 percent of the new
business.
Experts say the joint venture is
the latest sign of the challenges
that Uber has faced expanding
overseas, where it has engaged in
costly price wars against entrenched local competitors. The
Yandex deal ends one uphill battle for Uber in competing against
a dominant player abroad and
solidifies a strong position for the
company in Russia and Eastern
Europe.
“In many ways, it’s reminiscent
of Uber’s battle in China,” said
Arun Sundararajan, a professor
at New York University’s Stern
School of Business. “It’s a natural
conclusion in an effort to gain
market share where there is a
large domestic competitor. It allows Uber to strike a deal. Neither
company has to fight the price
war anymore.”
Last year, San Francisco-based
Uber sold its business in China to
Didi Chuxing, an archrival in the
country and the largest ride-hailing service there. The sale highlighted the immense challenge,
faced by many other Silicon Val-
ley giants, of going head-to-head
with dominant Chinese players.
In the cutthroat battle to lure
Chinese consumers in a population of more than 1.3 billion, Uber
and Didi were both losing money
as they tried to outdo one another
with lower prices, forgoing profitability. The deal allowed Uber to
keep its competitive foothold in
China with a roughly 20 percent
stake in Didi, which Uber said has
risen in value by $2 billion.
Sundararajan added that it is
also possible that Uber’s longterm plan never was to unseat the
major firm in Russia but eventually to squeeze itself into a
partnership. “In retrospect, it
may be that this was the strategy
all along,” he said. That kind of
dealmaking could allow the company to direct its resources
toward costly and ambitious
goals, such as building an autonomous fleet of on-demand cars
rather than subsidizing price cuts
against a stronger competitor, he
said.
When asked about that theory,
Uber declined to comment.
In Russia, Yandex offers more
than twice as many rides as Uber,
at about 24 million per month,
according to business data
shared with investors. Yandex
also counts nearly double the
gross revenue, at more than
$1 billion. And while each company will keep its brand, Yandex
customers will be to able to use
their app to summon Uber rides
in countries where Yandex does
not operate, and vice versa.
Uber’s food delivery service,
UberEATs, also will expand operations in the region.
“Combining Yandex’s local expertise in search, maps and navigation with our leading global
experience in ride sharing will
enable us to build the best local
services and provide a credible
alternative to car ownership
across the region,” Pierre-Dimitri
Gore-Coty, head of Uber’s business in Europe, the Middle East
and Africa, said in a statement.
ANDREY RUDAKOV/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Taxis connected through the Yandex.Taxi online app are seen in a Moscow parking lot, above. Yandex, which has more than 15,000 taxis linked
to its ride-hailing app in Moscow, will take a 59 percent share in a merger with Uber’s Russia unit. An Uber-linked car in Russia is below.
Uber’s deal in Russia comes
after a tumultuous period for the
company. In recent months, Uber
has been rocked by regulatory
scandals, legal battles, accusations of having a toxic workplace
culture, and a flurry of departures
among its top leadership, including the resignation of Travis Kalanick, the brash former chief
executive.
The company has adopted
sweeping reforms to reshape its
internal policies and repair its
public image, but it remains unclear whether the ride-hailing
service — once viewed as the
darling of Silicon Valley — can
fully recover from its troubles.
For Uber, the Yandex deal is
part of its plan to get into the
black, tempering its expand-atall-costs strategy with something
more financially pragmatic. In
the first quarter of this year, Uber
reported more than $700 million
in losses. But that figure is down
from the last three months of
2016, when Uber said it lost nearly $1 billion.
“This deal is a testament to our
exceptional growth in the region
and helps Uber continue to build
a sustainable global business,”
said Gore-Coty. Uber expects its
losses to shrink further in the
second quarter.
The combination with Yandex,
which the companies estimate
could provide more than
400 million rides this year, will
operate in 127 cities across six
countries, including Russia, Armenia and Azerbaijan. Uber,
which operates in more than 76
countries, will own roughly
37 percent of the new company
and will invest $225 million. Yandex will put in $100 million and
take about a 59 percent stake. The
VASILY MAXIMOV/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE VIA GETTY IMAGES
remaining 4 percent belongs to
employees.
The companies expect to close
the deal this year.
hamza.shaban@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/the-switch
Black pastors sue Coca-Cola, beverage group over health risks tied to soda
BY
C AITLIN D EWEY
William Lamar, the senior pastor at D.C.’s historic Metropolitan
African Methodist Episcopal
Church, is tired of presiding over
funerals for parishioners who
died of heart disease, diabetes and
stroke.
So on Thursday, Lamar and Delman Coates, the pastor at Maryland’s Mount Ennon Baptist
Church, filed suit against CocaCola and the American Beverage
Association, claiming that soda
manufacturers knowingly deceived customers about the health
risks of sugar-sweetened beverages — at enormous cost to their
communities.
The complaint, filed in D.C. Superior Court on Thursday on behalf of the pastors and the Praxis
Project, a public health group, alleges that Coca-Cola and the ABA
ran an intentional campaign to
confuse consumers about the
causes of obesity, making it more
difficult for them to protect the
health of their largely black,
D.C.-based parishioners.
Their case is similar to another
suit that was filed, and later withdrawn, in California in January.
The lawsuit marks a break with
tradition for African American
and Latino community groups
who have been reliable allies of
Big Soda in policy fights across the
country — despite evidence that
the harms of drinking soda affect
their communities disproportionately.
Obesity, hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and
lower-extremity amputations are
all far higher among people of
color than among whites. These
communities also drink more
soda — and are exposed to more
soda advertising.
“It’s become really clear to me
that we’re losing more people to
the sweets than to the streets,”
said Coates, who said he has seen
members of his congregation give
their infants bottles filled with
sugary drinks. “There’s a great
deal of misinformation in our
communities, and I think that’s
largely a function of these deceptive marketing campaigns.”
In a statement, Coca-Cola dismissed the pastors’ charges and
the merits of the earlier lawsuit in
California, which lawyers say they
withdrew to refile with the new
plaintiffs.
“The allegations here are likewise legally and factually merit-
less, and we will vigorously defend
against them,” the statement said.
“The Coca-Cola Company understands that we have a role to play
in helping people reduce their
sugar consumption.”
The pastors’ suit argues that the
beverage industry has deceived
consumers about the unique link
between soda consumption and
diseases such as obesity and Type
2 diabetes.
According to the complaint, Coca-Cola executives have invested
millions of dollars in research,
sponsored blog posts and advertising campaigns intended to disprove or confuse the link between
soda consumption and disease.
The company’s ads and its executives, as well as a number of compensated nutrition bloggers, have
also advanced the argument that
lack of exercise is primarily responsible for the obesity epidemic, and that the calories consumed
in soda can be easily offset by
increasing physical activity.
In 2013, Coca-Cola developed a
30-second prime-time TV ad,
called “Be OK,” that claimed that a
brief walk, a single “victory dance”
or a brief laughing spell were sufficient to burn the 140 calories in a
Coke can.
Coca-Cola Senior Vice President Katie Bayne also famously
told a USA Today reporter in 2012
that “there is no scientific evidence that connects sugary beverages to obesity.”
The suit argues that science
shows otherwise: There is, in fact,
a well-established link between
soda consumption and obesity,
though the exact mechanism of
that link is not well understood. A
20-year study of 120,000 adults,
published in the New England
Journal of Medicine in 2011, found
that people who drank an extra
soda per day gained more weight
over time than those who did not.
Obesity affects nearly half of all
African Americans and 42 percent
of Latinos, compared with just
over one-third of whites. A 2016
study in the Journal of Racial and
Ethnic Health Disparities found
that soda consumption was a particularly strong predictor of future weight gain for black children.
“There’s a health crisis in the
U.S., especially in our communities, and especially among children,” said Xavier Morales, the
executive director of the Praxis
Project. This is not coincidental,
he added: “They target our com-
munities with their marketing.
We’re going into those communities trying to save lives, and they’re
going out and erasing our message.”
The soda industry has argued
that it has done a lot to support
communities of color — and the
fight against obesity. In recent
years, these companies have added to their portfolios of low-calorie and no-calorie beverages.
“We support the recommendation of the World Health Organization (W.H.O.), that people
should limit their intake of added
sugar to no more than 10 percent
of their total daily calorie intake.
We have begun a journey toward
that goal,” Coca-Cola said in a
statement. “So we are taking action to offer people more drinks in
smaller, more convenient sizes, reducing sugar in many of our existing beverages, and making more
low and no-sugar beverage choices available and easier to find at
local stores. We’ll also continue
making calorie and nutrition information clear and accessible so
people can make more informed
choices for themselves and their
families without the guesswork.”
Soda companies have also,
through the American Beverage
Association, funded a number of
nutrition and healthy cooking
programs in low-income neighborhoods in New York, Los Angeles and other cities. ABA’s partners
on that project include the National Council of La Raza and the
National Urban League.
“America’s beverage companies
know we have an important role
to play in addressing our nation’s
health challenges. That’s why
we’re engaging with health groups
and community organizations to
drive a reduction in the sugar and
calories Americans get from beverages,” the ABA said in a statement. “Unfounded accusations
like these won’t do anything to
address health concerns, but the
actions we’re taking, particularly
in areas where obesity rates are
among the highest, can make a
difference.”
In the meantime, Lamar and
Coates say, they will continue visiting hospitals, and overseeing funerals, for members of their
churches suffering from obesityrelated illnesses.
“I am disgusted by the number
of hospital visits I make,” Lamar
said. “It just adds to the injustices
all around us.”
rate average shot up to 4.03
percent with an average 0.5 point
(Points are fees paid to a lender
equal to 1 percent of the loan
amount.) It was 3.96 percent a
week ago and 3.42 percent a year
ago.
new owners of the Chicago SunTimes, officials announced.
Former city council member
Edwin Eisendrath, who will serve
as chief executive of the SunTimes, submitted his bid last
month after Sun-Times owner
Wrapports announced it would
enter into discussions with Tronc,
which owns the rival Chicago
Tribune, to acquire the paper. He
said he was concerned that if
Tronc took over the newspaper,
the sale would lead to the demise
of the Sun-Times.
caitlin.dewey@washpost.com
DIGEST
TELECOMMUNICATIONS
Verizon confirms data
of 6 million was leaked
Verizon has confirmed that
data belonging to 6 million
customers was leaked online in
June. News of the incident was
first reported by ZDNet.
In a statement this week,
Verizon said the leak was caused
by an employee of one of the
company’s vendors who
accidentally allowed external
access to information put in a
cloud storage area. ZDNet
reported that the data was leaked
on an unprotected Amazon S3
storage server. This made the data
available to anyone who had the
public link to the cloud. (Amazon
chief executive Jeffrey P. Bezos
also owns The Washington Post.)
Amazon did not respond to a
request for comment.
A limited amount of personal
information, such as some phone
numbers and PINs, was included
in the data, but it did not include
Social Security numbers or voice
recordings, Verizon said. The PIN
numbers are used to authenticate
a caller phoning into the wireline
call center and cannot be used to
access customer accounts online,
the statement said.
No customer information was
lost or stolen, because the storage
area was accessible only to
Verizon, the vendor and the
researcher who flagged the leak,
according to the statement.
Hemu Nigam, a cybersecurity
analyst at SSP Blue, said he would
advise customers to change their
PINs because they could give
people access to other accounts
they use.
— Alex Schiffer
BUDGET
U.S. deficit rises to
$90.2 billion in June
The federal budget deficit rose
sharply in June compared with a
year ago, although much of the
increase showed calendar quirks.
The Treasury Department said
Thursday that the June deficit
totaled $90.2 billion, compared
with a surplus in June 2016 of
$6.3 billion. But outlays grew by
$39 billion this year because
benefit payments that normally
would have been distributed in
July were made in June since
July 1 fell on a Saturday.
Through the first nine months
of this budget year, the deficit
totals $523.1 billion, up from a
deficit of $399.2 billion during
the same period a year ago.
The Congressional Budget
Office released an updated
forecast last month that projected
the deficit for this year will total
$693 billion. That represented a
sharp increase of $134 billion
from the CBO’s January forecast.
The deficit in 2016 totaled
$585.6 billion.
The CBO blamed much of this
year’s increase on the fact that the
government is collecting less
money in tax revenue this year
than had been expected.
Congress is facing a deadline of
Oct. 1 to get a budget approved for
the next fiscal year, or face the
prospect that the government
would shut down.
— Associated Press
ALSO IN BUSINESS
Mortgage rates soared this week
to their highest levels since early
May. According to data from
Freddie Mac, the 30-year fixed-
Online shoppers looking to score
bargains during the Nordstrom
anniversary sale instead faced
glitches. In some cases, virtual
carts were emptied at checkout.
The Seattle-based department
store chain apologized, saying in
a tweet that it was working to
resolve the issue. The sale was set
to start July 21 and end Aug. 6, but
Nordstrom cardholders were
offered “early access” starting
Thursday.
An investment group led by a
former Chicago alderman and a
coalition of labor unions are the
— From news services
COMING TODAY
8:30 a.m.: Retail sales data.
8:30 a.m.: Consumer price index.
9:15 a.m.: Industrial production
data.
Earnings: Citigroup, JPMorgan
Chase
A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14 , 2017
Trump seems to be falling
into same trap as Obama
detailed projections of the
results they expected their plan
to deliver. In reality,
unemployment hit 10 percent a
few months later.
Republicans pounced on
Obama’s inability to deliver.
“The ‘stimulus’ has turned out
to be a classic case of big
promises and big spending with
little results,” said House Speaker
John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) in
2014. “Millions of families are
still asking ‘where are the jobs?’ ”
Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.) put
it this way in 2014: “Five years
. . . later, millions of Americans
are still waiting for the relief
Democrats and the president
promised.”
Now Trump is about to fall
into the same trap. The United
States hasn’t grown at 3 percent
a year since 2005. And the
country hasn’t achieved that
growth in a “sustained” way
since the late 1990s. A lot has
changed since then. The U.S.
population is getting older. As
baby boomers retire, there’s a
lower percentage of adults in the
workforce than in the 1990s.
On a basic level, the formula
for economic growth is more
workers plus higher productivity
from employees. It’s hard to see
how Trump will get more
workers with an aging
population and his plans to curb
immigration.
Mulvaney wants to get people
off welfare and back to work, but
the problem is that most of those
people don’t have the skills to get
jobs. The United States currently
has 5.7 million job openings.
That’s near the all-time high, and
it has been that way for about a
year now. The jobs aren’t getting
filled because employers can’t
find qualified people.
The bottom line is boosting
growth much above 2 percent
will be hard. That’s why the
White House is about the only
forecaster predicting a big boom.
Consider that the Congressional
Budget Office came out with a
new report Thursday predicting
Trump’s budget would cause
growth to go from 1.8 percent a
year to 1.9 percent a year.
At the end of his op-ed,
Mulvaney puts in a disclaimer:
The economic renaissance will
happen only “if we enact the
president’s broad agenda” and “if
MAGAnomics is allowed to
work.”
Just ask Obama how well the
excuse “they didn’t let us finish
our agenda” worked out.
Just in: The White
House wants
Americans to call
HEATHER
the president’s
LONG
economic agenda
“MAGAnomics,”
not “Trumponomics.”
“We are promoting
MAGAnomics — and that means
sustained 3 percent economic
growth,” wrote Mick Mulvaney,
President Trump’s budget
director, in a Wall Street Journal
op-ed Thursday.
Mulvaney gave a rehash of
what Trump has been saying
since he announced his run for
president, including cutting
taxes, slashing regulations and
rewriting trade deals to boost
growth. But here’s the key part:
Mulvaney promises 3 percent
annual growth. It’s in writing in
America’s top business
newspaper.
And with that promise, the
architects of MAGAnomics are
making the same error that the
masterminds of Obamanomics
made: They’re promising far
more than they are likely to
deliver. Even worse, they are
putting a concrete target out
there: 3 percent GDP growth or
bust.
Trump’s already off track.
Growth this year is shaping up to
be the same — or even worse —
than under Obama. Expectations
for the coming years aren’t much
better.
On the same day that
Mulvaney published his
MAGAnomics commentary, the
Wall Street Journal published an
article with the headline
“Forecasters lower economic
outlook amid congressional
gridlock.” Economists surveyed
by the Journal predict 2.4
percent growth in 2018 and 1.9
percent in 2019.
Of course, this is hardly the
first time the Trump team has
vowed “huge” and “spectacular”
economic growth. Trump himself
has said he can achieve 5 percent
growth (annual growth has not
exceeded 5 percent since 1984).
The White House website
promises expansion of 4 percent
a year and 25 million new jobs,
the most of any U.S. president.
Trump’s team should have
learned from Obama: Be careful
with concrete economic
promises.
Obama spent a lot of his early
days in the White House in 2009
trying to generate support for a
big stimulus proposal by
promising that it would create
millions of jobs. His team told
the nation that unemployment
was unlikely to exceed 8 percent
if the stimulus passed, part of a
Wonkblog
heather.long@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/wonkblog
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Budget director Mick Mulvaney predicts the economy will begin growing by 3 percent a year. Economists surveyed recently don’t agree.
One-third of Americans shop online once a week
BY
D ANIELLE P AQUETTE
46 percent of department store
jobs have vanished, according to
government data. The pace is
picking up.
At least 5,300 stores have announced closures this year, which
is three times the number over
the same period in 2016, according to data from Fung Global
Retail & Technology, a New York
think tank.
Between 2013 and 2017, America’s clothing stores lost about
64,000 jobs. From January to
June, general merchandise retailers, such as Sears and Macy’s, saw
31,000 jobs disappear.
These positions, which pay an
average hourly wage of $13, are
disproportionately held by women (60 percent). They are scattered nationwide but tend to concentrate in cities. Though more
store clerks have lost their jobs in
recent years than coal workers,
retail clusters don’t economically
bolster specific states the way
coal did for West Virginia.
The brick-and-mortar decline has coincided with an
e-commerce surge. The National
Retail Federation, a trade group
in Washington, expects that online retail this year will grow
between 8 and 12 percent, or up to
about three times the broader
industry’s rate.
More and more Americans are
embracing a trend that labor
groups have come to fear: We are
shopping online now about as
often as we take out the trash.
About one-third of adults buy
something on a computer or
phone at least once a week, up
from 21 percent in 2013, according to a new survey from Walker
Sands, a consulting firm that
watches e-commerce trends.
The poll of about 1,600 people
across the country also found that
nearly half prefer to purchase
goods on the Web. These days,
that includes just about everything: groceries, prescription refills, mattresses and party dresses. Just 4 percent of respondents
said they avoided online deliveries entirely.
“It’s gotten so easy and convenient,” said analyst Erin Jordan,
who led the report. “People are
getting used to that.”
The data builds on findings last
year from the Pew Research Center, which reported that 8 in 10
Americans shop online. When the
researchers first asked that question in 2000, only 22 percent of
respondents said they had ever
ordered something on a screen.
Since 2000, a whopping
as self-service checkout stands in
retail stores and increasing online sales, will continue to limit
the need for cashiers,” according
to the bureau’s website.
Meanwhile, people continue
remotely shopping.
Amazon reported recordbreaking sales from Prime Day, its
annual shopping event. (The
company didn’t release hard sales
numbers.)
The United Food and Commercial
Workers
International
Union, which represents retail
workers, released a statement
urging buyers to “examine the
high cost of Amazon’s business
model.” “Amazon’s brutal vision
for retail is one where automation
needlessly replaces good people
and good jobs,” said Marc Perrone, the group’s president.
A representative for Amazon
said the company has no plans to
automate existing jobs.
While Amazon does embrace
automation — the company
opened a grocery store in Seattle
last year that uses door sensors
instead of cashiers — it employs
more than 90,000 full-time workers across its fulfillment network
and aims to create roughly 25,000
more part-time warehouse jobs
by next spring.
This is not the first time a
cultural shift has rocked the retail world.
Back in the 1970s and ’80s, the
rise of malls in suburbia created
more work in outer-city communities but wiped out downtown
shopping centers. Heightened interest in online shopping is doing
the same thing to the country’s
storefronts — “only faster,” said
Mark Cohen, director of retail
studies at Columbia University’s
business school.
The trend, Cohen said, “is in a
state of acceleration. And the Internet is going to keep growing.”
Older shoppers are getting less
skeptical about typing their credit card number into a machine.
And younger generations, Cohen
added, are adopting voice assistants, such as Google Home and
Amazon’s Alexa, that can place
the orders for them. (Amazon.com chief executive Jeffrey P.
Bezos owns The Washington
Post.)
Automation is also taking a
toll. Over the next seven years,
according to the Bureau of Labor
Statistics, employment of cashiers in the United States is
projected to grow 2 percent, while
the average for all jobs is expected
to increase 7 percent.
“Advances in technology, such
danielle.paquette@washpost.com
THE MARKETS
6 Monitor your investments at washingtonpost.com/markets
Data and graphics by
Daily Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
21,800
Close
YTD
% Chg
21,553.09
+0.1
+9.1
20,800
19,800
18,800
17,800
Nasdaq Composite Index
6400
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
6274.44
+0.2
+16.6
Daily
% Chg
Industry Group
Multiline Retail
Power Prodct & Enrgy Trdr
Metals & Mining
Computers & Peripherals
Energy Equipment & Svcs
Diversified Telecomm
Airlines
Health Care Technology
Diversified Consumer Svcs
Leisure Equipment & Prod
0
–4.0%
+4.0%
3.14
2.12
1.24
1.23
1.21
–0.57
–0.69
–0.75
–0.82
–0.96
5400
4900
S&P 500 Index
2447.83
+0.2
+9.3
2475
2375
2275
2175
2075
J
A
S
O
N
D
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
Close
Daily
% Chg
65,178.35
15,135.00
50,975.44
0.5
–0.1
0.3
386.14
5235.40
12,641.33
7413.44
0.3
0.3
0.1
0.0
5736.77
3686.92
26,346.17
20,099.81
1.1
0.8
1.2
0.0
YTD % Chg
–20%
0%
+20%
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DuPont
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
211.09
85.37
147.77
206.23
108.47
104.13
31.27
44.43
83.80
80.97
26.79
230.40
153.29
153.63
34.24
–0.1
0.6
1.4
–0.1
–0.4
0.2
0.4
–0.2
–1.2
0.0
0.8
1.3
0.5
0.0
0.0
18.2
15.2
27.6
32.5
17.0
–11.5
3.5
7.2
14.2
–10.3
–15.2
–3.8
14.3
–7.4
–5.6
Company
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
Wal-Mart
Walt Disney
131.86
93.10
155.04
62.89
71.77
57.94
86.70
33.28
125.43
123.07
185.48
43.49
95.94
75.05
104.29
–0.3
0.6
–1.0
0.2
0.9
–0.5
–0.3
0.2
0.1
–0.5
–0.6
0.6
–0.2
1.5
–0.1
14.5
7.9
27.4
6.8
15.5
14.0
3.1
2.5
2.5
12.3
15.9
–18.5
23.0
8.6
0.1
Cross Currency Rates
US $
US $ per
EU € per
0.8772
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
1.1400
0.0088
1.2943
0.3117
0.7858
0.0564
0.0077
1.1353
0.2734
0.6894
0.0496
146.5850
35.3056
88.9990
6.3972
0.2409
0.6072
0.0436
Japan ¥ per
113.2500
129.1200
Britain £ per
0.7726
0.8808
0.0068
Brazil R$
Brazil R$ per
3.2077
3.6572
0.0283
4.1519
Canada $ per
1.2726
1.4507
0.0112
1.6470
0.3967
Mexico $ per
17.7013
20.1802
0.1560
22.9363
5.5180
Canada $
Mexico $
2.5208
0.1812
0.0719
13.9104
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 25,364.80
Russell 2000
1425.66
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 484.56
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
9.90
Consumer Rates
Daily % Chg
0.2
0.1
0.0
–3.9
YTD % Chg
9.0
5.0
8.3
–29.5
–0.8
–4.1
+1.3
–0.1
–0.8
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Exchange-Traded
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Daily
(Ticker) % Chg
Close
Daily
% Chg
$1.2895
$15.69
$9.8750
$0.1414
$5.1175
+0.1
–1.2
–4.5
+4.8
–4.7
day
$900
month
$1100
$1000
2.7
–0.5
–5.3
–1.1
1.7
0.9
–0.2
0.6
–1.0
Gainers
Dress Barn Inc
CARBO Ceramics
Tesco Corp
Tailored Brands Inc
JC Penney
Tetra Technologies
AppliedOptoelctrncs
AK Steel Holding
Pioneer Energy Svcs
Avis Budget Group
Dillard's Inc
Guess? Inc
Lumentum Holdings
Magellan
Gap
Express Inc
Buckle Inc
Ensco PLC
NRG Energy Inc
Century Aluminum
Daily
Close % Chg
$2.26
$7.07
$4.70
$11.04
$4.98
$2.80
$78.04
$6.64
$2.40
$31.55
$59.89
$12.46
$64.05
$77.65
$22.78
$6.47
$17.25
$5.18
$22.20
$16.45
9.7
8.3
8.0
8.0
7.8
7.7
7.4
7.1
6.7
6.7
6.3
6.3
6.1
6.0
5.6
5.5
5.5
5.5
5.3
5.2
Losers
Barnes & Noble Edu
Adv Micro Devices
Comty Health Sys
Calgon Carbon
Cogent Comm
TwentyFirst-A
Avon Products
Seagate Technology
MSC Indstr Direct
MiMedx Group Inc
Xperi Corp
Merit Medical
Twenty-FirstCen Fox
Papa John's
LivaNova PLC
TeleTech Holdings
Seneca Foods
Fiesta Restaurant
LeMaitre Vascular
Silgan Holdings
Daily
Close % Chg
$7.97
$13.53
$9.30
$15.70
$40.45
$27.56
$3.55
$38.32
$72.19
$14.46
$32.50
$36.68
$27.40
$74.99
$61.04
$40.90
$27.90
$18.25
$29.05
$31.28
–10.3
–5.3
–5.0
–4.0
–3.8
–3.8
–3.8
–3.5
–3.5
–3.3
–3.3
–3.2
–3.2
–3.2
–3.0
–3.0
–3.0
–2.9
–2.7
–2.7
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
Daily
% Chg
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Close
$2.6615
$3.6975
$46.08
$1,217.30
$2.96
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
5900
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.33
0.43
0.74
1.44
2.79
5.24
4.25%
Bank Prime
1.25%
Federal Funds
1.30%
LIBOR 3-Month
3.86%
30-Year fixed mortgage
3.06%
10-year note
Yield: 2.34
2-year note
Yield: 1.36
5-year note
Yield: 1.89
6-month bill
Yield: 1.13
15-Year fixed mortgage
3.10%
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
FRIDAY, JULY 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A17
RE
USDA program for organic foods ruled by ‘dysfunction,’ lawmaker says
BY
P ETER W HORISKEY
The far-reaching difficulties
that the U.S. Agriculture Department has in determining whether
imported “organic” food meets
standards or is fraudulent means
that it’s hard to know what products can be trusted, a grain industry executive told a Senate committee Thursday, as lawmakers
prepare the next farm bill.
The testimony comes after
news that millions of pounds of
shipments of questionable “organic” products have reached
U.S. ports.
Given the challenges of enforcement, “it is unreasonable to
accept that grain being imported
into the U.S. as organic has been
adequately validated,” Kenneth
Dallmier, president of Clarkson
Grain, said in his testimony.
The Senate Agriculture, Nutri-
tion and Forestry Committee is
collecting information as lawmakers prepare the next major
agriculture legislation, and it appears that one key lawmaker is
ready to shake up the way the
USDA regulates what can be sold
as “organic.”
“It seems that uncertainty and
dysfunction have overtaken the
National Organic Standards
Board and the regulations associated with the National Organic
Program,” the committee’s chairman, Sen. Pat Roberts (R-Kan.),
said in his opening remarks.
“These problems create an unreliable regulatory environment
and prevent farmers that choose
organic from utilizing advancements in technology and operating their business in an efficient
and effective manner. Simply put,
this hurts our producers and
economies in rural America.”
The remarks from the chairman portend a legislative fight
over USDA organic standards,
one that pits small farmers, many
of whom have embraced organic
products as a means of financial
survival, against larger agricul-
tion with fraudulent organic
imports.
After hearing a year ago from
constituents concerned about import fraud, Roberts said, he
pushed for USDA action. It appears he didn’t get what he was
“It seems that uncertainty and dysfunction have
overtaken the National Organic Standards Board.”
Sen. Pat Roberts (R-Kan.)
tural companies that have sought
to loosen organic rules.
It was not clear what new
technology Roberts was referring
to, but whether to classify “hydroponics” as organic has become a
contentious question among organic farmers.
Roberts also expressed frustra-
looking for.
“It is clear that if it takes this
long to get action, something
needed to change,” he said.
In recent years, an influx of
“organic” corn and soybeans
from overseas has cut profits for
U.S. organic farmers and raised
suspicions that some of the ship-
ments are “organic” in name only.
Last year, more than 50 percent of organic corn and more
than 70 percent of organic soybeans in the country were imports. That represents about a
million acres of crops, Dallmier
estimated.
Many U.S. organic grain farmers have complained that some
exporting countries are shipping
more than they can actually grow.
“The numbers weren’t adding
up,” Dallmier said in an interview.
Last month, The Washington
Post reported on three major
shipments of corn and soybeans
that were sold as “organic” despite evidence to the contrary.
The three shipments, each involving millions of pounds of “organic” corn or soybeans, were large
enough to constitute a meaningful proportion of the U.S. supply
of those commodities.
Since then, the USDA has “decertified” two of the companies
involved in the shipments. Three
Democratic senators — Dianne
Feinstein (Calif.), Patrick J. Leahy
(Vt.) and Debbie Stabenow
(Mich.) — have asked for the
USDA’s inspector general to increase enforcement of organic
import standards. And the Organic Trade Association, a major
industry group, has set up a task
force to propose remedies.
Among the proposals for detecting fraudulent organic imports that industry officials have
drafted: adding USDA staff at
overseas ports deemed to be highrisk, using electronic tracking
devices that would follow a product from farm to customer, and
raising the penalties for companies caught cheating.
peter.whoriskey@washpost.com
FanDuel and DraftKings
drop proposed merger
FTC, others had opposed
fantasy sports firms’
deal as anticompetitive
BY
JULIEN DE ROSA/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY
President Trump’s economic plan would reportedly cut government spending by $4.2 trillion over 10 years compared with existing law.
CBO projects 1.9% growth under White House plan
were advancing a proposal — its
fate uncertain — that would still
swell the nation’s ranks of the
uninsured by tens of millions.
Trump also faced questions
about whether he would follow
through on repeated promises to
stop foreign competitors from
“killing our companies and our
workers” by dumping steel at
ultra-cheap prices onto the global
market — and he repeated to reporters traveling on Air Force One
during his trip to France that “it’ll
stop.”
Yet he has been promising action for weeks, and Commerce
Secretary Wilbur Ross would tell a
meeting of senators on Thursday
only that he planned to provide
options to Trump soon.
Trump’s combination of setbacks and delays on key policy
initiatives highlight how the president is struggling to advance a
populist vision of governing in a
Republican Party that historically
has not been receptive to such an
approach.
With his budget and on health
care, Trump is falling in line with
some of his party’s most conservative voices, even if the policies
threaten to harm many of the
working-class voters who elected
him.
On trade — an issue where he
could act unilaterally — Trump is
facing opposition from companies, foreign allies and numerous
White House advisers who say
restricting imports could hurt
U.S. industry broadly far more
than it helps steel companies.
The delay on steel imports follows a decision not to label China
a currency manipulator as he advocated during the campaign, and
a last-minute decision not to
abandon the North American
Free Trade Agreement, which he
had often maligned.
“He certainly, as a president,
has not been able to articulate a
coherent agenda that responded
to the concerns of the country, or
the concerns of the people who
elected him. A lot of them were
low-income blue-collar whites,
and his agenda is not addressing
those concerns or those problems,” said Peter Wehner, a former
speechwriter
for
President
George W. Bush. “House and Senate Republicans weren’t in tune
with what he was running on,
either, so that was always going to
be a problem.”
As it emphasized progress on
health care and trade, the White
House dismissed the CBO report
as flawed because it had earlier
misjudged how many people
would sign up for the Affordable
Care Act.
“It’s not surprising that a bureaucracy which underestimated
by more than 100 percent Obamacare participation would also underestimate the economic benefits of MAGAnomics,” Office of
Management and Budget spokesman John Czwartacki said, using
a new buzzword for the administration’s economic policy that is
short for Make America Great
Again economics. “They are great
people, but are just wrong on
this.”
Building a coalition
The CBO report Thursday creates additional complications for
Republicans who need to build a
coalition of conservatives and
moderates to vote for a single
budget proposal, the first step in
what the GOP hopes will be an
ambitious fall of policymaking.
By rejecting the White House’s
declaration that large-scale
spending reductions and unspecified tax cuts will lead to economic
growth, the CBO could make it
harder for this coalition of GOP
lawmakers to band together.
Some key elements of the
White House’s agenda rely on
Congress’s ability to pass a budget. Only 50 Republicans are needed in the Senate to approve a tax
plan if it is part of an already
authorized budget plan, through
a process known as reconciliation.
If Congress does not pass a budget
plan, however, the Senate will
need 60 votes to authorize tax cuts
— and the GOP has only 52 seats.
The CBO’s projections came
with a caveat. It said the lack of
detail the White House has provided about its plans — primarily
its plan to overhaul the tax code —
made it difficult for the agency to
determine what the economic impact of these ideas would be. The
White House has put out only a
sparse, one-page blueprint for
overhauling the tax code.
“The President’s proposals
would affect the economy in a
variety of ways,” the CBO wrote in
its assessment. “However, because the details on many of the
proposed policies are not available at this time, CBO cannot
provide an analysis of all their
macroeconomic effects or of the
budgetary feedback that would
result from those effects.”
If the CBO, which is run by a
Republican appointee, raises
questions about the lack of details
in Trump’s tax plan now, it could
serve as a warning to the White
House and other Republicans as
they try to design a more comprehensive plan in the coming
months that is expected to rely in
large part on the assumption that
the economy will grow markedly
because of large tax cuts. Overall,
the CBO said the White House’s
plan would cut government
spending by $4.2 trillion over 10
years compared with existing law.
The White House seized on this
element of the CBO’s assessment.
“This administration is committed to making the necessary
investments to restore our military, secure our borders and modernize our infrastructure,” OMB
spokeswoman Meghan Burris
said.
The White House’s budget proposal was released in May, to set
government spending levels for
the year that begins Oct. 1. It
essentially makes recommendations to Congress, which is responsible for drawing up the
budget and appropriating funds
to use. Congress often uses the
budget proposal as a set of guidelines.
‘We’re like a dumping ground’
Meanwhile, Trump once again
suggested Wednesday that he is
planning to take action to restrain
imports of steel into the U.S. market, telling reporters aboard Air
Force One that China and other
countries were “dumping steel.”
“We’re like a dumping ground,
okay? They’re dumping steel and
destroying our steel industry.
They’ve been doing it for decades,
and I’m stopping it,” he said.
When asked if he was considering tariffs, the president replied:
“There are two ways — quotas and
tariffs. Maybe I’ll do both.”
Trump’s comments came as
company executives and foreign
leaders eagerly await a decision
on two separate investigations
that the Trump administration
launched in April, into the potential for imports of steel and aluminum to threaten U.S. national security.
If the administration finds that
imports are threatening security,
it could take broad action to limit
shipments through tariffs or quotas — an action that could spark
retaliation from trading partners
and cause prices to spike throughout the supply chain for the many
U.S. industries that use steel.
Ross had said that the report’s
findings would be available by the
end of June. But a decision has
been delayed because of resistance from steel-using industries
in the United States and members
of the administration who fear
igniting a trade war.
Meeting with senators on the
Senate Finance Committee on
Thursday, Ross said he would present Trump with a menu of options next week for how he could
act, the lawmakers said. Ross suggested different countries could
be treated differently under any
restrictions, and he singled out
Canada, which he said had not
dumped an oversupply of steel,
unlike other countries, a person in
the meeting said.
Sen. Pat Roberts (R-Kan.) gave
Ross a copy of a letter from agricultural groups at the meeting
that warned of the potential retaliatory blowback that could occur
if the White House cracks down
too harshly on steel.
In a letter sent Tuesday, 18 agricultural groups, including the National Pork Producers Council, argued that the restrictions on steel
and aluminum could result in other countries retaliating by restricting their products, an outcome that they said would be
“disastrous for the global trading
system and for U.S. agriculture in
particular.”
damian.paletta@washpost.com
ana.swanson@washpost.com
max.ehrenfreund@washpost.com
FanDuel and DraftKings, the
two giants in daily fantasy
sports, are dropping their proposed merger, weeks after a
federal regulator announced
that it would attempt to block
the deal.
In June, the Federal Trade
Commission along with the
attorneys general of California
and the District, said that they
would oppose the merger because they believed it would
lead to an unfair advantage in
the daily fantasy sports industry, giving the companies more
than 90 percent of the market.
When the merger was proposed,
many antitrust experts were
skeptical that the merger would
ever go through for just that
reason, unless the two companies could prove that they could
not survive without combining.
After the FTC announced
that it would seek to block the
merger, the companies were left
with two choices: go up against
the government in what would
have been an expensive legal
battle, or drop their proposal.
They went with the latter.
“FanDuel decided to merge
with DraftKings last November,
because we believed that this
deal would have increased investment in growth and product development, thereby benefiting consumers and the
greater sports entertainment
industry,” FanDuel chief executive Nigel Eccles said in a
statement Thursday. “While our
opinion has not changed, we
have determined that it is in the
best interest of our shareholders, customers, employees, and
partners to terminate the merger agreement and move forward
as an independent company.”
DraftKings CEO Jason Robins cited similar reasons in his
statement for the joint decision
and said his company has a
customer base of nearly 8 million people and has grown more
than 30 percent year-over-year.
Robbins added that the company is only beginning to expand
into overseas markets.
alex.schiffer@washpost.com
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“This will allow us to singularly focus on our mission of
providing the most innovative
and engaging interactive sports
experience imaginable, forever
changing the way fans connect
with teams and athletes worldwide,” he said.
When a judge imposed a
temporary restraining order on
the deal in June after the FTC’s
announcement, DraftKings and
FanDuel argued that they are
part of a much larger fantasy
sports world where large companies are capable of competing
with the two, an individual
close to the situation told
The Washington Post last
month.
The two companies were slated for an initial scheduling
conference with an administrative judge on Friday, according
to the New York Post.
When it was launched in
2009, FanDuel was considered
the first of its kind in the world
of daily fantasy sports, where
players form imaginary teams
based on real-life players, competing to earn cash and prizes.
DraftKings followed a few years
later in 2012.
The scoring is usually determined by how the players perform in the real-life games they
take part in that day. Most
fantasy leagues are scored as
weekly events in which winners
are determined by how their
roster performs for the entire
week.
Before their attempted merger, the companies were spending large amounts of money on
advertising to sway players into
joining their site or to recruit
them from the other.
In their short history, both
companies have had their fair
share of bouts with authorities
in several states that consider
daily fantasy sports a form of
gambling. The companies have
argued the contests are determined by skill.
In 2015, New York Attorney
General Eric Schneiderman
opened an inquiry to investigate how the companies prevent fraud after a New York
Times story revealed that a
DraftKings employee had accidentally released information
before the start of the week’s
National Football League games
and won $350,000 on rival
FanDuel the same week.
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Five in Congress press Sessions to investigate sexual ads on Backpage.com
BY
J ONATHAN O ' C ONNELL
AND T OM J ACKMAN
Five members of Congress who
head
anti-human-trafficking
groups called on Attorney General
Jeff Sessions to launch a criminal
investigation of Backpage.com after a trove of documents revealed
that the website hired a company
in the Philippines to lure advertisers and customers seeking sex.
Sens. Rob Portman (R-Ohio)
and Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.),
who lead a subcommittee that has
investigated Backpage since 2015,
along with Sen. Thomas R. Carper
(D-Del.) and Reps. Ann Wagner
(R-Mo.) and Carolyn B. Maloney
(D-N.Y.) demanded on Thursday
that the Justice Department examine the classifieds site after
information about the documents
was reported by The Washington
Post this week.
Wagner and Maloney, co-chairs
of a House task force on human
trafficking, accused Backpage of
“knowingly advertising and financially benefiting from participation in sex trafficking.”
“Backpage.com has long argued that it is a mere third-party
platform with no responsibility
for the sex trafficking ads that are
posted on its website,” the congresswomen wrote in a letter to
Sessions. “This is an utter lie.”
The Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations,
chaired by Portman, found in January that Backpage was removing
offensive terms from its sex ads
but allowing the ads, some with
possible child-trafficking content,
to remain posted. The committee
wrote to Sessions saying that it
had “determined that there is reasonable cause to believe that violations of law may have occurred.”
The newly revealed documents,
obtained through an unrelated
lawsuit, show workers at Avion
BPO in the Philippines focused on
adding and promoting sexual ads.
In some instances the workers
used language including “Let a
young babe show you the way”
and “Little angel seeks daddy” in
fake ads they posted on other sites
to attract customers to Backpage.
A Backpage attorney did not
respond to a request for comment
on the letter Thursday.
In various court cases, Dallasbased Backpage has contended
that it aggressively screens for
improper ads and is legally protected by the federal Communications Decency Act, which shields
website operators against liability
for content posted by their users.
Backpage has long claimed that it
was not involved in the creation of
content on its site.
The company also has stressed
that when police or federal agents
request help with cases, it complies quickly. Backpage and some
advocates say that having the ads
in one location is preferable to
having the ads dispersed to sites in
countries with less enforcement.
Wagner and Maloney have also
proposed an alteration to the
Communications Decency Act
clarifying that the 1996 law “was
never intended to provide legal
protection to websites that facilitate traffickers” and enabling “vigorous enforcement” under both
criminal and civil law for websites
with content “relating to sexual
exploitation of children or sex
trafficking.”
The bill was introduced in April
and has 30 co-sponsors. It would
also allow states to pursue criminal cases and victims to seek civil
remedies. The Senate, whose
Homeland Security Committee issued a scathing report on Backpage in January, is expected to
introduce its own legislation.
Both bills are certain to face
serious opposition from those
fearing abuse of the law and First
Amendment violations that
would inhibit the freedom of the
Internet.
In a speech on the Senate floor
Thursday, Portman said he supported the Communications Decency Act but that it was not intended to protect people engaged
in criminal activity. He cited the
Post report as evidence that
“Backpage workers were active
co-creators of many of these sex
advertisements including those
that seek to traffic women and
underage girls. I believe the legal
consequences should be that they
should lose their immunity under
the Communications Decency
Act. And that’s why we’ve asked
the Justice Department today to
review this matter.”
The Justice Department did not
respond to a request for comment
Thursday.
Backpage is an online classified-ad site similar to Craigslist. In
2010, after Craigslist closed its
“adult services” section under in-
tense pressure, many of the ads
migrated to Backpage. The ads
now in Backpage’s “dating” section are seen by many as thinly
veiled offers of prostitution, and
underage women who have been
trafficked on the site have come
forward in recent years to detail
their ordeals.
In their letter to the attorney
general, Wagner and Maloney
urged Sessions to go after Backpage under an existing criminal
law banning sex trafficking of children. “We see no reason,” the congresswomen wrote, “why a criminal case should not be brought
against Backpage.com for its
criminal role in sex trafficking in
America.”
Backpage has said that it uses
automated filters and human
moderators to remove ads potentially involving trafficking of minors and other illegal activity.
jonathan.oconnell@washpost.com
tom.jackman@washpost.com
Sessions claimed no contact with foreign o∞cials
But omission may not be
violation of security
clearance rules
BY
E LLEN N AKASHIMA
The Justice Department on
Thursday released a single redacted page from Attorney General Jeff Session’s security clearance form from November that
indicated he had not had any
contact with a foreign government official in the past seven
years.
That contradicts his later admission that he had met with
Sergey Kislyak, the Russian ambassador to the United States,
twice last year. At the time, Sessions was a U.S. senator and an
adviser to Donald Trump’s presidential campaign. The meetings
occurred in July and September.
Sessions’s omission may not be
a violation of security clearance
rules as long as the contacts occurred in his capacity as a lawmaker, U.S. officials say. But other
experts say he should have erred
on the side of transparency.
The watchdog group American
Oversight, whose lawsuit forced
the disclosure of the form, said
that FBI investigators should
have been told about the meetings. The group learned Thursday
in court that the bureau did not
turn up the information on its
own.
Sessions disclosed the meetings only after The Washington
Post inquired for an article published in March.
The question on the form,
known as an SF86, asks the applicant to say whether he has had
“any contact with a foreign government,” such as an embassy or
its representatives, inside or outside the United States in the past
seven years.
Sessions put an “X” in the box
marked “No.”
Ian Prior, a Justice Department
spokesman, said in a statement
that Sessions’s staff was told by
the FBI investigator handling the
background check that he need
not list meetings with foreign
dignitaries in connection with
Senate activities. Other U.S. gov-
ernment officials with clearances
who have dealt extensively with
foreign officials say they, too, have
been advised that they don’t need
to list contacts with such officials.
“It would be a different matter
if [Sessions] was acting in his
capacity as a campaign adviser,”
said an aide to Rep. Jackie Speier
(D-Calif.), whose office looked
into the matter.
Sessions met with Kislyak in
July during the Republican National Convention and in September in his Senate office.
Evan Lesser, an expert in security clearance investigations, said
it’s better to report the contacts.
“The lines can be blurry between
conversations that you might
have with a foreign national that
specifically relate to Senate work
and something that may be outside that,” he said. “That’s why it’s
important to list everything.”
Sessions, an early Trump supporter who advised the campaign
on foreign policy, was nominated
in November to be attorney general. The job he was being vetted
for — the highest law enforcement official in the country — is
very sensitive, and any contacts
with Russian officials would have
been good to disclose, Lesser said.
“It’s not just about foreign influence, but could someone hold
some sway over you?” he said. “It’s
precisely why you’re required to
list the entirety of your foreign
connections, including meetings
and financial ties. It’s really to
understand, is there a potential
conflict of interest, or could this
person be coerced in some kind of
way?”
Sessions did not disclose his
Kislyak meetings during his confirmation hearing in January. His
explanation was that he had met
with the ambassador as a member of the Armed Services Committee, not as a Trump adviser.
Nonetheless, watchdog groups
see Sessions’s answer as part of a
troubling pattern of Trump associates not disclosing contacts
with the Russian government.
Last year, Trump officials insisted that the campaign had not
had any communication with
Russian officials. This week, the
New York Times reported that
Trump’s son Donald Trump Jr.;
son-in-law, Jared Kushner; and
former campaign chairman Paul
Report pushes Medicare fund’s insolvency back
BY
C AROLYN Y . J OHNSON
The trust fund that pays Medicare’s hospital expenses will run
out of money in 2029, a year later
than the most recent projection,
according to a federal report. The
Social Security program will remain solvent until 2034, a projection unchanged from last year.
The annual report from the
Social Security and Medicare
board of trustees provides a snapshot of the long-term solvency of
the federal government’s two biggest entitlement programs. It
comes as Republican lawmakers
have introduced a new version of
a health-care bill that would
make deep, long-term cuts to a
different entitlement program,
Medicaid.
PHANTOM
Together, Medicare and Social
Security made up 42 percent of
federal program spending in
2016. Medicare covered 56.8 million beneficiaries in 2016, and
Social Security provided benefits
for 60.9 million people.
The trustees include representatives of the Treasury, Health
and Human Services, and Labor
departments and Social Security.
They noted that the growth in
national health spending in the
United States has slowed in recent years.
But they said it was unclear
how much of that reflected the
temporary effects of the economic downturn, as opposed to
systemic changes in how health
care is being used and paid for
that could result in savings in
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The slowdown in growth
helped keep the Medicare program solvent for one year longer
than the most recent projection
and helped avoid activating the
Independent Payment Advisory
Board, a 15-member board tasked
with proposing Medicare cuts if
spending grows faster than a target rate.
“The trajectory is still alarming. That is why the trustees issue
the warning that we do — the
same warning that has been issued for years now — that Congress must act to ensure the longterm fiscal viability, sustainability and survival of Medicare and
Social Security,” Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price
said. He said the report is based
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on assumptions that reflect current law and that it does not
factor in the possible repeal of the
Affordable Care Act.
“We haven’t calculated that
yet,” Treasury Secretary Steven
Mnuchin said. “But I hope that’s
in next year’s report.”
The trustees said that both
Medicare and Social Security face
long-term challenges. They exhorted lawmakers to act soon to
implement new policies to shore
up the programs, while there is
still time for the public — particularly vulnerable populations — to
prepare.
The disability insurance trust
fund, part of the Social Security
program, was projected to last
until 2028. That’s five years longer than last year’s projection,
BILL O'LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Attorney general nominee Jeff Sessions is sworn in June 13 for his
confirmation hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee.
Manafort met with a Russian
lawyer whom they thought had
information from the Russian
government that could help
Trump’s campaign.
“From Jeff Sessions to Jared
Kushner to Donald Trump Jr., the
president’s closest confidants appear to have collective amnesia
about their dealings with the Russian government,” said Austin
Evers, the executive director of
American Oversight.
because fewer than expected people joined the program. Applications for disability benefits have
been declining since 2010.
Mnuchin stressed that the key
to assuring the solvency of the
trusts — and the first priority for
President Trump — was growing
the economy.
“A combination of an aging
population and tepid economic
growth has produced the projected shortfalls for both Social Security and Medicare,” Mnuchin said,
citing the importance of tax and
regulatory reform in spurring
economic growth that will help
stabilize the programs’ finances.
Labor Secretary Alexander
Acosta pointed out that in 1960
there were five workers for every
Social Security recipient. By 2035,
there will be only two workers for
every beneficiary.
“By helping more Americans
enter the workforce, and then
also continue to work as long as
they choose, we can increase the
amount of growth and possibly
impact the long-term fiscal health
of the trust funds,” Acosta said.
The report comes as Senate
Republicans have put forth a
health-care bill that has been criticized for its cuts to a different
entitlement program, Medicaid,
the health-care plan for the poor.
Some health-policy experts have
argued that those cuts could increase Medicare spending if older
adults lose health-care coverage
and forgo care until they are 65.
“Reductions in coverage could
have unanticipated spillover effects for Medicare in the form of
higher premiums and cost sharing, if pre-65 adults need more
services when they age on to
Medicare as a result of being
uninsured beforehand,” a Kaiser
Family Foundation brief said.
ellen.nakashima@washpost.com
carolyn.johnson@washpost.com
FRIDAY, JULY 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A19
RE
washington forum
MICHAEL GERSON
The height of sleazy stupidity
G
MIKE COPPOLA/GETTY IMAGES FOR PEOPLE.COM
Jared Kushner and wife Ivanka Trump at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York last year.
EUGENE ROBINSON
The golden couple’s luster fades
J
ared Kushner and Ivanka
Trump have tried their best to
soar gracefully above the raging dumpster fire that is the
Trump administration. Unhappily for the handsome couple,
gravity makes no allowances for
charm.
Kushner, already reported to be a
“person of interest” in the Justice
Department probe of President
Trump’s campaign, is arguably the
individual with the most to lose from
the revelation that the campaign
did, after all, at least attempt to
collude with the Russian government to boost Trump’s chances of
winning the election.
The president’s hapless eldest son,
Donald Trump Jr. — who convened
the June 2016 meeting with a Russian lawyer for the purpose of obtaining dirt on Hillary Clinton — had
no operational role in the campaign.
Paul J. Manafort, who also attended,
was the campaign’s chairman, but
his many shady business dealings
with several Ukrainian and Russian
characters were already under scrutiny, so the encounter with attorney
Natalia Veselnitskaya could be seen
as just another item on the list.
Kushner was at the meeting, too,
however, and he had oversight of the
campaign’s digital operations. That
could be a problem, given the U.S.
intelligence community’s conclusion
that Russia interfered with the election and that the meddling took
place largely in cyberspace.
And unlike the other participants,
Kushner has an official position in
the Trump administration. He serves
in the White House as a senior
adviser to the president with responsibility for numerous high-profile
initiatives — and with a top-secret
security clearance, which should be
revoked immediately.
Trump Jr. says that Kushner didn’t
stay long at the session with Veselnitskaya and that no damaging information about Clinton was imparted. But because he kept the
meeting secret for more than a year,
scoffing indignantly at the very notion of collusion with the Russians,
and then twice lied about the nature
of the meeting before finally coming
clean, no one should believe another
word that Trump Jr. says on the
subject. At least, not until special
counsel Robert S. Mueller III puts
him under oath, which I believe is
likely to happen.
At one point in his changing story,
Trump Jr. said that Kushner and
Manafort didn’t even know what the
meeting was about. Yet he copied
both of them on an email chain that
begins with an intermediary’s offer
of campaign help from the “Russian
government.” The proper thing to do
would have been to call the FBI, but
this crowd knows nothing of propriety.
The Veselnitskaya encounter was
one of more than 100 meetings or
phone calls with foreigners that
somehow slipped Kushner’s mind
when he applied for his security
clearance. He revealed this one in
one of his subsequent efforts to
amend the form.
It is hard to imagine what connection Kushner might have had to the
Russian hacking of Democratic National Committee computers and
Clinton campaign chairman John
Podesta’s emails. But there was another component of the clandestine
effort to help Trump get elected:
Investigators believe that as Election
Day approached, Russian trolls and
“bots” flooded the social media accounts of key voters in swing states
with “fake news” and disinformation
about Clinton, according to a report
Wednesday by McClatchy.
How would the Russians know
which voters to target, down to the
precinct level, in states such as
Wisconsin and Michigan? This is a
question that surely will be posed to
Kushner, since at the time he happened to be overseeing a sophisticated digital campaign operation that
tracked voters at a granular level.
Ivanka Trump’s name has not
surfaced in the Russia affair. But she,
like her husband, is serving as a
presidential adviser, and she received unwanted attention when she
briefly took her father’s place at the
head table during the Group of 20
summit in Hamburg. We expect officials representing our country to
have been elected by the voters or
appointed because of merit, not installed by the caprices of heredity.
She also received unwanted scrutiny when three labor activists were
arrested in May for investigating
alleged sweatshop practices at a
factory in China where Ivanka
Trump-brand shoes have been manufactured.
Among Manhattan’s progressive
upper crust, Jared and Ivanka —
they really are first-name-only celebrities at this point — were expected
to at least temper the hard-right
policy positions being pushed by
other presidential advisers. If this
indeed is what they are trying to do,
they’ve had a negligible impact to
date.
Writing in Time magazine, Henry
Kissinger wished Kushner well “in
his daunting role flying close to the
sun.” Jared and Ivanka have firstclass educations. They know how the
Icarus story ends.
eugenerobinson@washpost.com
DAVID IGNATIUS
Political Islam in the modern world
T
he diplomatic machinations that
have enveloped Saudi Arabia, the
United Arab Emirates and Qatar
may seem like a membership feud
in a Persian Gulf club for the wealthy. But
their quarrel highlights battles that have
been roiling the Middle East since the Arab
Spring began nearly seven years ago.
The boycott against Qatar announced
last month by the Saudis, Emiratis, Bahrainis and Egyptians took the Trump administration by surprise — and triggered a
mediation effort this week by Secretary of
State Rex Tillerson. He is said to view the
conflict as counterproductive — damaging
all the feuding countries and helping their
common rival, Iran.
Tillerson is right to see this as a fratricidal dispute that should be resolved through
negotiation. The allegation that Qatar supports terrorism is weak, especially after it
signed a memo with Tillerson on Tuesday
committing to a joint counterterrorism
battle with the United States. The demand
that Qatar close Al Jazeera is outrageous;
the region needs freer media, not more
censorship.
The Saudis’ and Emiratis’ basic problem
is that they find Qatar a meddlesome and
untrustworthy neighbor. But by escalating
the family quarrel so radically, they have
hurt themselves. The longer this battle
goes, the more damage it will do to gulf
relations with Washington, stability in the
region and, perhaps most important, hopes
for modernization and reform in Saudi
Arabia.
If Tillerson wants to resolve this dispute,
he needs to reckon with the intensity of the
anger that triggered it. The fuse was lit in
2013, but its roots go back to 1996, when a
branch of the ruling family the Saudis
didn’t like took power against Saudi wishes.
For Saudi Arabia and the UAE, Qatar feels
like a thorn in the side, much as Cuba did
for the United States for more than
50 years.
This secret history emerges in documents published this week by CNN. The
network obtained a copy of a handwritten
accord signed Nov. 23, 2013, by the ruling
monarchs of Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Kuwait. It’s basically a mutual non-interference pact, with the additional stipulation
that no signatory will destabilize Yemen or
support the Muslim Brotherhood.
It’s the Muslim Brotherhood issue that
has caused the most bitterness. Qatar has
argued that the Brotherhood’s involvement
in politics will defuse extremism, rather
than augment it. The Obama administration took a similar view in its outreach to
the Brotherhood in Egypt after the fall of
President Hosni Mubarak in February 2011,
and in its support for President Recep
Tayyip Erdogan’s government in Turkey.
Both Obama policies are now widely judged
to have been failures.
President Barack Obama’s pro-Muslim
Brotherhood actions were poisonous to the
Saudis and Emiratis and help explain the
deep split that developed after Mubarak’s
departure in 2011. Rage at Obama deepened as he negotiated the nuclear deal with
Iran, another bitter enemy of the gulf Arabs.
The gulf Arabs responded by squeezing
Qatar to protect their flanks. The secret
November 2013 agreement came just five
months after a coup ousting the Brotherhood’s Mohamed Morsi in Egypt, and after
Iran had signed a framework nuclear agreement.
Hoping to compel Qatar to cease its
regional activism, the gulf states signed a
second pact on Nov. 16, 2014, which was
described as a “rescue of the first agreement,” Saudi sources said. It was broadened
to include the rulers of Bahrain and the
UAE. And it added a joint commitment to
protect Egypt’s stability (meaning, help
suppress the Brotherhood).
Qatari officials argue that they have
abided by the non-interference terms of the
agreement and that Al Jazeera and other
media outlets operate independently. They
protest that any complaints regarding the
2014 pact should have been referred to the
Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC). The Saudis privately concede that they acted unilaterally because they didn’t have GCC consensus.
What complicates this feud is that nearly
everyone has been playing both sides of the
street. The Qataris do maintain contact
with the Taliban and al-Qaeda’s affiliate in
Syria, but they coordinate some of their
activities with the CIA. The Qataris do
broadcast some extremist Islamist rhetoric,
but they also host the biggest U.S. air base in
the region. The Saudis and Emiratis want to
be America’s best friends, except when they
decide that their interests compel unilateral action.
The Qatar quarrel may seem like a tempest in an Arabian teapot. But at its heart is
the question that has vexed the world for a
decade: Is there a role for political Islam in
the modern world? Qatar says yes. The UAE
counters that Islamist agitators are the
enemy of tolerance and modernity. It falls
to Tillerson to see whether there’s a middle
ground.
davidignatius@washpost.com
iven what we know about the
collusion — and there is no
other word for it — between
then-candidate Donald Trump’s
most senior advisers and what they
thought was a Kremlin-tied lawyer offering dirt on Hillary Clinton, the most
shocking thing is that no one on the
Trump side was shocked. The most
offensive thing is that no one took
offense. Trump’s son, son-in-law and
campaign manager treated the offer of
aid by a hostile foreign power to tilt an
election as just another day at the office.
“I think many people would have held
that meeting,” the president affirmed. It
is the banality of this corruption that
makes it so appalling. The president and
his men are incapable of feeling shame
about shameful things.
Donald Jr. certainly doesn’t know
what all the fuss is about. Instead of
offering a hint of contrition, he offered
a complaint that the proffered information was not particularly useful. “I
applaud his transparency,” father said
of son. But disclosure is not really a
virtue if you are admitting highly
unethical actions without apology. It is
more like the public confession of
serious wrongdoing, and the attempted normalization of sliminess.
The ultimate explanation for this
toxic moral atmosphere is President
Trump himself. He did not attend the
meeting, but he is fully responsible for
creating and marketing an ethos in
which victory matters more than character and real men write their own
rules. Trumpism is an easygoing belief
system that indulges and excuses the
stiffing of contractors, the conning of
students, the bilking of investors, the
exploitation of women and the practices of nepotism and self-dealing. A faith
that makes losing a sin will make
cheating a sacrament.
Republicans have sometimes employed the excuse that members of the
Trump team are new to politics —
babes in the woods — who don’t yet
understand all the ins and outs. Their
innocence, the argument goes, is
proved by their guilt. This might apply
to minor infractions of campaign finance law. It does not cover egregious
acts of wrongdoing. Putting a future
president in the debt of a foreign power
— and subject, presumably, to blackmail by that power — is the height of
sleazy stupidity. It is not a mistake born
of greenness; it is evidence of a vacant
conscience.
The foundation for this approach to
campaigning and governing is a belief
that politics is an essentially dirty
business. Trump seems honestly convinced that the system is “rigged”
against him — to the point of defrauding him of millions of votes. If the
system is truly manipulated by political enemies, then only suckers are
bound by its norms and requirements.
Those who denigrate our system of
government are providing an excuse
for gaming it. And that is precisely
what Trump Jr. was doing — trying to
game American democracy.
Some believe that the political enterprise is noble but fallen. They have the
goal of restoring something lost and
loved. Others believe that politics is
essentially low and grubby, and must
be conducted by its own ruthless rules.
This attitude makes it difficult, apparently, to distinguish between political
hardball and subversion.
During the Trump campaign and his
young, paralyzed presidency, we have
heard some conservatives argue,
“We’re not electing a pastor in chief.” It
has been particularly strange to hear
religious conservatives claim that the
character of leaders doesn’t count. But
the character of a president leaves an
imprint on everyone around him. A
high ethical standard — think Gerald
Ford or George H.W. Bush — creates a
general expectation of probity. A low
ethical standard — think Richard Nixon or Donald Trump — has a pervasive
influence of its own, inevitably resulting in scandal.
C.S. Lewis posited three elements
that make up human beings. There is
the intellect, residing in the head.
There are the passions, residing in the
stomach (and slightly lower). And then
there are trained, habituated emotions
— the “stable sentiments” of character
— which Lewis associated with the
chest.
In the realm of political ethics, voters last year did not prioritize character
in sufficient numbers, during the party
primaries or the general election. Now
we are seeing the result. “In a sort of
ghastly simplicity,” Lewis said, “we
remove the organ and demand the
function. We make men without chests
and expect of them virtue and enterprise. We laugh at honor and are
shocked to find traitors in our midst.”
michaelgerson@washpost.com
FAREED ZAKARIA
Why the love for Russia?
T
he latest revelations about
Russia and President Trump’s
campaign are useful because
they might help unravel the
mystery that has always been at the
center of this story. Why has Trump
had such a rosy attitude toward Russia
and President Vladimir Putin? It is
such an unusual position for Trump
that it begs for some kind of explanation.
Unlike on domestic policy, where he
has wandered all over the political
map, on foreign policy, Trump has
held clear and consistent views for
three decades. In 1987, in his first
major statement on public policy, he
took out an ad in several newspapers
that began, “For decades, Japan and
other nations have been taking advantage of the United States.” In the ad, he
also excoriated “Saudi Arabia, a country whose very existence is in the
hands of the United States,” and other
“allies who won’t help.”
This is Trump’s worldview, and he
has never wavered from it. He has
added countries to the roster of
rogues, most recently China and Mexico. On the former, he wrote in his
presidential campaign book, “There
are people who wish I wouldn’t refer
to China as our enemy. But that’s
exactly what they are.” During the
campaign, he said: “We can’t continue
to allow China to rape our country.” A
few months before announcing his
candidacy, he tweeted, “I want nothing to do with Mexico other than to
build an impenetrable WALL and stop
them from ripping off U.S.”
Trump is what historian Walter
Russell Mead calls a “Jacksonian” on
foreign policy (after Andrew Jackson),
someone deeply skeptical and instinctively hostile toward other nations
and their leaders, who believes in a
fortress America that minds its own
business and, if disturbed, would
“bomb the s---” out of its adversaries
and then retreat back to its homeland.
This was Trump’s basic attitude
toward the world, except for Russia
and Putin. Ten years ago, when Russian money was pouring into the West,
Trump began praising the country and
its leader: “Look at Putin . . . he’s doing
a great job in rebuilding the image of
Russia and also rebuilding Russia
period.” In 2013, Putin wrote an op-ed
in the New York Times to try to
dissuade the Obama administration
from responding to the Syrian government’s use of chemical weapons. In it,
he argued that the poison gas was
actually used by the Syrian opposition
to trick Washington into attacking the
regime. Trump’s reaction was lyrical.
“I thought it was an amazingly wellwritten . . . letter. . . . I think he wants
to become the world’s leader, and right
now he’s doing that.”
Trump so admired Putin that he
imagined that the two of them had
met, making some variation of that
false claim at least five times in public,
and playing down any criticisms of
him. “In all fairness to Putin, you’re
saying he killed people. I haven’t seen
that,” he said in 2015. “Have you been
able to prove that?” When confronted
on this again earlier this year, he
dismissed it, saying, “We’ve got a lot of
killers. What, you think our country’s
so innocent?” Trump could not have
been making these excuses for any
political advantage. The Republican
Party was instinctively hostile toward
Russia, though in a sign of shifting
U.S. alignments, Republicans today
have a more favorable view of Putin
than Democrats by 20 points.
“There’s nothing I can think of that
I’d rather do than have Russia friendly,” Trump declared at a news conference last July. His campaign seemed to
follow this idea. He appointed as a top
foreign policy adviser Michael Flynn,
a man who had pronounced pro-Russian leanings and, we now know, had
been paid by the Russian government.
Paul Manafort, who was for a while the
head of Trump’s campaign, received
millions of dollars from Ukraine’s
pro-Russia party. During the Republican convention, there was a very
unusual watering down of hawkish
language on Russia’s invasion of
Ukraine. And once elected, Trump
chose as his secretary of state Rex
Tillerson, who had been awarded one
of Russia’s highest honors for foreigners and had a “very close relationship”
with Putin. Finally, there are the repeated contacts between members of
Trump’s campaign and family with key
Russian officials and nationals, which
again appear to be unique to Russia.
It is possible that there are benign
explanations for all of this. Perhaps
Trump just admires Putin as a leader.
Perhaps he has bought in to the
worldview of his senior adviser Stephen K. Bannon, in which Russia is
not an ideological foe but a cultural
friend, a white Christian country battling swarthy Muslims. But perhaps
there is some other explanation for
this decade-long fawning over Russia
and its leader. This is the puzzle now at
the heart of the Trump presidency that
special counsel Robert S. Mueller III
will undoubtedly try to solve.
comments@fareedzakaria.com
A20
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ABCDE
letters@washpost.com
Squabbling and silence
EDITORIALS
Liu Xiaobo
Honor lies not with China’s rulers but with the man they imprisoned until his death.
P
him a two-year prison sentence. Later he served
three years in a labor camp for other purported
political offenses. Mr. Liu’s causes were liberty and
democracy, which he considered universally applicable, not Western imports for which his native
country was somehow “not ready.” His specific
demand was that the Chinese Communist authorities accept the need for a constitutional overhaul
that would establish elections, rule of law and
freedom of speech, of the press, of assembly and of
religion.
In December 2008, Mr. Liu joined other intellectuals in publishing Charter 08, a pro-democracy
manifesto modeled on the Charter 77 issued by
Czech dissidents 31 years earlier. Notably, the
document not only called upon China’s rulers to
enable a better future for their people; it also told
the truth about the “gargantuan” price China’s
people had paid since the 1949 revolution: “Tens of
millions have lost their lives, and several generations have seen their freedom, their happiness, and
their human dignity cruelly trampled,” the charter
Changed, but not
for the better
observed.
Forthrightly addressing China’s past, present and
future earned Mr. Liu an 11-year sentence, for
“inciting subversion of state power,” which began in
late 2009 and which he was still serving, albeit on
medical parole at a hospital, when he drew his last
breath. His steadfast dissidence also earned Mr. Liu
the Nobel Peace Prize in 2010, though Beijing
refused to let him travel to Oslo for the award
ceremony, just as it also refused to let him receive
friends and well-wishers in his final days, or to go
abroad for medical treatment.
These final indignities were intended to degrade
and humiliate, but the attempt was futile and indeed
shames those who made it. Shortly before Mr. Liu
died, the man ultimately responsible for this and so
many other abuses in China, President Xi Jinping,
was basking in the glamour and glory of international politics at the Group of 20 summit in Hamburg.
Yet throughout Mr. Xi’s rule, the true locus of honor
in China has been any place of confinement occupied by Liu Xiaobo.
TOM TOLES
The Senate’s new health-care bill is
arguably worse than the old one.
S
ENATE REPUBLICANS released Thursday a
new version of their Obamacare repeal-andreplace bill. It is arguably worse than the
unpopular bill that preceded it.
The Congressional Budget Office projected that
the previous iteration would result in 22 million
more uninsured in a decade. “Looking at the revised
Senate health bill, it’s hard to see how it could
meaningfully alter CBO’s projection of how the
uninsured will grow,” the Kaiser Family Foundation’s
Larry Levitt noted. “The revised Senate bill reinstates
taxes on wealthy people, but it mostly does not spend
that money on health care for low-income people.”
In their revision, Senate leaders tried to blunt the
charge that the GOP wants to cut poor people’s health
care to fund tax cuts for the rich. Taxes on wealthy
people’s investment income were indeed maintained. But the bill would deeply slash Medicaid, the
state-federal program covering the poor and nearpoor, just as before. And it would still use the savings
to fund an array of tax cuts, including a break for
medical-device manufacturers. It would even add a
new tax break expanding tax-advantaged health
savings accounts, which would mostly benefit
wealthier people who have savings to put into them.
Moderate senators who earlier claimed to have
concerns about cutting off poor people have no
reasonable justification for supporting this bill. If
they vote for it in anticipation that its Medicaid cuts
would phase in as planned, they would support a
massive blow to low-income people in their states. If
they vote for the bill with the calculation that future
Congresses would cancel its Medicaid cuts, then their
vote would likely equate to support for expanding the
national debt, because the Medicaid savings are the
major source of financing for the bill’s many tax cuts.
Medicaid is not the only way to cover people, of
course. But the new bill would chop up the private
market for individual insurance. A new provision
from Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) would divide healthy
people buying cheap and skimpy plans from less
healthy people who want comprehensive coverage.
The flimsy plans would cover little and come with
few consumer protections, a grave risk for anyone
who ended up needing care. The more comprehen-
Freedom from what, exactly?
sive plans would become increasingly unaffordable
as the least healthy — and therefore, to insurance
companies, most expensive — customers found
themselves increasingly isolated.
Even if the market avoided a death spiral, federal
assistance offsetting premiums for those seeking
comprehensive coverage would still be pegged to
much thinner plans than the current standard.
Despite GOP carping about high deductibles under
Obamacare, their alternative is destined to increase
these and other out-of-pocket costs.
States could lower costs with a pot of federal
money set aside for experimentation and market
Transit systems in other cities have generated
millions of dollars by selling the opportunity to
name stations, and Metro staff have said there are
potential opportunities with such high-traffic stations as Gallery Place, Metro Center, Navy YardBallpark and L’Enfant Plaza. Officials who support
the plan stress it would be tightly written and
stringently vetted so there would be no embarrassment.
It is hard to imagine, though, how the system
would avoid controversy if iconic names such as
L’Enfant Plaza or Metro Center were muddied with
corporate logos. Station names are tied to the
neighborhoods in which they are located, making it
easier — particularly for tourists and others unfamiliar with Metro — to navigate the system. That
stabilization. But these funds, even if fully appropriated, would be inadequate to the many tasks assigned them: addressing potentially skyrocketing
premiums in the sicker market, ensuring that skimpier coverage does not lead people to forgo needed
care and stabilizing the finances of insurers who may
find the individual insurance market difficult.
The CBO, slated to release its analysis of the
updated bill early next week, should have the final
say. But we cannot imagine it will contain good news
for the bill’s backers — nor, more important, for
Americans who want access to affordable health
care.
usefulness should not be sacrificed, and it’s a big
reason why selling naming rights was opposed by a
majority of Metro riders when the question was
raised in a 2012 survey. Issues encountered in other
cities should give pause. Los Angeles dropped its
plans because of concerns that refusing certain
sponsorships could open the system to lawsuits.
Boston couldn’t find companies willing to pay what
the system wanted. And didn’t Philadelphia lose a
certain charm when it replaced Pattison Station
with AT&T Station?
The solution to Metro’s money problems doesn’t
lie in peddling its assets or other nickel-and-dime
fixes such as increasing parking fees. Congress and
the system’s regional partners need to establish a
dedicated revenue stream for Metro.
ABCDE
L O CA L O P I N I O N S
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
Dealing with the crumbling FBI headquarters
Regarding the July 11 front-page article “Search for
new FBI building is canceled”:
The Trump administration’s decision to scrap the
plan to build a new FBI headquarters is reckless and
shortsighted. The FBI is responsible for keeping
America safe, yet its headquarters is dated, dysfunctional and dangerous. The Government Accountability Office found that the building doesn’t meet the
FBI’s long-term security needs, let alone help its
ability to fight crime and prevent terrorism. The
J. Edgar Hoover Building is sinking; there are leaks
and flooding.
A new headquarters was a good deal for taxpayers.
FBI employees are working in 20 rented spaces. We
would save more than $40 million a year by consolidating FBI employees in one facility. That is why
Congress provided initial funding to build a new
President Trump famously stated that he
could shoot someone on New York’s Fifth Avenue
and he wouldn’t lose supporters. It appears he was
right. Thanks to Donald Trump Jr., we have direct
evidence of intentional contact with a hostile
foreign power to gain domestic political advantage,
yet the president’s support among Republicans
remains steady.
GOP leaders’ silence is disturbing. I refuse to
believe that the GOP has sold its soul and our future
to a man who respects neither them nor our
institutions. Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) will always
be my hero. Sens. Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.), Tom
Cotton (R-Ark.), Susan Collins (R-Maine), Lisa
Murkowski (R-Alaska), Rob Portman (R-Ohio) and
others are patriots who love this country every bit
as much as I do. They have seen the information on
the suspicious and highly questionable activities of
Trump associates. Many of them have probably
seen even more. Yet most remain remarkably mum.
The ends do not justify the means. No tax reform
bill or health-care legislation is worth it.
In a few weeks, my son will take the oath and join
the military. He will be promising to risk his life to
support and defend the country from all enemies
foreign and domestic. My son! I am asking GOP
leaders to remember the oaths they took and set
limits on where politics ends and patriotism begins.
Kevin Brady, Olney
As a paid tax preparer, I read the July 9 Business
article “Side hustles are the new norm. Here’s how
much they really pay” with great interest and was
disappointed to find no mention of tax consequences. I’ve seen quite a few taxpayers who have
received a 1099-MISC reporting miscellaneous
income from these “gig economy” sources. They
often don’t know or realize that this income needs
to be reported on a Schedule C — Profit or Loss from
Business (or possibly Schedule E — Supplemental
Income and Loss) and may result in owing
additional taxes.
They may, of course, be able to deduct certain
expenses incurred in the performance of this
work. However, they often haven’t kept a record of
these expenses (e.g., mileage driven, additional
parking/toll expenses in the use of personal
vehicles). These additional sources of income are of
great importance to many; they just need to be
aware of tax reporting.
Mary Grafton, Alexandria
The first job of a station name has to be to provide useful information, not to solve a budget problem.
S
Regarding the July 11 front-page article “White
House defends Trump Jr.”:
Russian President Vladimir Putin must be
ebullient now with the state of the West in general
and the United States in particular. Russia has
managed to take advantage of a reasonably cohesive but slightly dysfunctional society, exploit
minor fissures and transform them into enormous
chasms with the latest brouhaha about Donald
Trump Jr.
We have devolved into a bunch of squabbling
nincompoops because we’ve been so artfully
played. Ideally, the media and politicians would
remind us that we’re on the same team. That is a tall
order because so much of our collective discourse
has become personal, and it’s extremely difficult to
admit fault. But it must be done.
Bill Marriott, Springfield
Hustle away, but don’t forget taxes
A Metro station by any other name
UCH IS the the dire state of Metro’s finances
that no idea about how to increase muchneeded revenue should be rejected out of
hand. But a plan that has been floated to sell
the naming rights to prominent stations raises some
alarms. Officials need to proceed carefully — with
thorough study and debate — to determine if the
benefits outweigh the downsides.
The proposal to seek corporate sponsorship for
some stations is one of a number of options that have
been presented to the board to help the cashstrapped system balance its operating budget for the
coming fiscal year. “We have a brutal budget year
coming up,” said Tom Bulger, vice chairman of the
D.C. Metro board’s finance committee, and “I don’t
think we can ask our riders to have increased fares.”
JULY 14 , 2017
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
OLITICAL DISSIDENCE is a great, and
beautiful, mystery. For those living under
repressive rule, the path of least resistance is,
well, not to resist — to accommodate and
survive, or, in less honorable but hardly rare cases, to
collaborate. And yet, some do choose the more
decent and difficult way. Out of idealism, necessity,
sheer refusal to submit or some unfathomable
combination of all three, they stand up, they speak
out, they assume risks.
China’s Liu Xiaobo embodied the dissident tradition, fighting back relentlessly but peacefully
against a regime in his country that epitomized
modern-day authoritarianism — until he died of
liver cancer on Thursday at age 61.
Mr. Liu was born in 1955, amid the horrific throes
of the early People’s Republic, and went on to study
literature and philosophy, earning his doctorate in
1988. Moved by the fall of communism in Europe
and the limited opening under Deng Xiaoping in
China, he joined the student protests in Tiananmen
Square in 1989. This conscientious activism earned
. FRIDAY,
headquarters. We can’t make America great unless
we first make it safe. The Trump administration
needs to give the FBI the facilities needed to do its job,
and that starts with a secure headquarters.
Barbara A. Mikulski, Baltimore
The writer, a Democrat, represented Maryland
in the Senate from 1987 to 2017.
Coming from a generation accustomed to buildings lasting longer than people, I count myself as one
of many who are short on sympathy for the oppressed
masses who have to suffer working in a “crumbling”
FBI headquarters. Many of us remember paying taxes
for the current building to get the poor G-men into a
state-of-the-art building. We expected it to be taken
care of. Maybe the FBI needs a human resources diet.
Michael J. Valentine, Fairfax Station
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In his July 9 Sunday Opinion essay, “Media
myopia on health care,” Gary Abernathy wrote that
an “anti-government political bent” is common
among Ohio residents, presumably including those
who use public highways, public schools, the public
court system, subsidized hospitals and public
utilities and who gain protection from multiple
public police forces and a huge public military.
These are communities, he wrote, “where people
don’t look to the government to solve all their
problems.” Good to know.
Mr. Abernathy further claimed that these Ohioans are “dedicated to the principle of freedom from
government mandates.” Putting aside the fact that
another word for “government mandates” is
“laws” (do they really value freedom from laws?),
let’s assume he was referring only to Obamacare’s
individual mandate to buy insurance. The hatred of
the mandate has been covered extensively in the
news media, contrary to Mr. Abernathy’s thesis.
And what it means is that these Ohioans have been
misinformed about or don’t understand a key
concept of insurance: that a large pool of healthy
applicants helps ensure coverage for the sick, which
we all will be before the end.
Brad Bonhall, Reno, Nev.
Instead of defending Trump supporters’ dedication to “the principle of freedom,” Gary Abernathy should be using his position in the media to
educate the voters. (I realize how crazy that sounds:
the media ignoring stories about the current
political circus to focus on issues and policy? Oh, if
only it were so.) Repealing Obamacare and reducing Medicaid will result in the uninsured flooding
emergency rooms for treatment for which they will
not be able to pay. Does “freedom” mean that you
let the taxpayers of your state pay for your health
care?
We have become such an entitled society that a
large swath of this country thinks that personal
responsibility is a great thing and the government
should stay out of their lives, as long as they
themselves do not have to be responsible and the
government programs from which they benefit are
left intact. I am convinced that had the rural,
blue-collar Trump voters been properly advised
before the election as to what they were actually
getting by voting for him, they would have
wholeheartedly rejected him. But this would have
taken real political leadership and a media that
takes its Fourth Estate responsibilities seriously.
Unfortunately, we have neither.
John F. Kelly Jr., Reston
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FRIDAY, JULY 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
The media’s
martyr
complex
BY
J
CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER
Bungled collusion
is still collusion
T
G ARY A BERNATHY
hillsboro, ohio
ust like our larger media counterparts, smaller news entities such
as our paper in southwestern Ohio
sometimes get criticized for being
unfair or biased.
As an example, years ago I was editor
at another small newspaper when the
local congressman became upset with
our columns and editorials. He called
for a meeting with our publisher and
me, bringing with him some important
local advertisers. The message was
clear.
Fortunately, our publisher held firm,
and we continued to exercise our right
to call it as we saw it. And we didn’t use
our news pages to portray ourselves as
martyrs for the First Amendment. Publicly, we ignored the incident.
I can already hear some saying, “But
that’s not the same as being attacked
almost daily by the president of the
United States.” In a way, it can be worse.
The fishbowl in which most small papers operate can make attacks by powerful local people pretty intimidating.
Unfortunately, when President
Trump accuses the mainstream media
of being “fake news,” too often the
journalists being targeted don’t ignore
it or merely address it internally. Instead, they react with public outrage,
their popping veins nearly bursting
through their thin skins.
Since the media, along with Congress, has approval numbers lower than
the president’s, it’s hard to persuade
most Americans to feel our pain. That
there is relatively little organic reaction
to the president’s criticisms outside of
offended newsrooms is the best proof of
the merits of Trump’s complaints.
Trump doesn’t deserve favorable coverage. All he deserves is fair and honest
coverage. But even liberals can’t argue
with a straight face that he’s wrong
about mainstream media bias.
Coverage of the president’s overseas
trip and participation in the Group of
20 summit offered numerous examples,
with major media outlets focused more
on minutiae — Ivanka sat in the president’s chair! — than on substance, giving comparatively short shrift to his
powerful remarks in Poland and the
important Syrian cease-fire agreement
brokered between Trump and Russian
President Vladimir Putin.
And later, the wall-to-wall coverage
regarding Donald Trump Jr.’s meeting
with a private Russian attorney was the
definition of overkill, considering no
one has brought forward any evidence
to contradict the accounts of the participants that no substantive information
was exchanged and there was no followup by anyone. But it was another opportunity to repeat “Russia, Russia, Russia,” the media’s magic words for conjuring, Beetlejuice-fashion, the genie
they hope will vanquish their bogeyman.
During his visit to Poland, Trump
dared to answer a question about the
media with the same reply he has always given, “fake news,” but his remarks
were reported with gloomy disapproval. “How dare he criticize the media
while overseas?” reporters cried.
When the mainstream media explodes with Shakespearean sound and
fury over Trump’s broadsides, conservatives scratch their heads. Their preferred information funnel, Fox News,
has been the target of derision for years,
including from presidents, with little
objection from other outlets. Fox News
usually answers the criticisms in a lighthearted way, when not ignoring them
outright.
Not CNN. Trump’s tweeting of an old
wrestling skit with the CNN logo superimposed on Vince McMahon’s head was
brash, but harmless. CNN reacted as
though Trump had set fire to its Atlanta
headquarters. Americans were subjected to solemn sermonizing from CNN
and other outlets over what were characterized as the president’s attacks on
the First Amendment itself and an incitement to violence. Nonsense.
The president’s very personal comments about MSNBC’s Mika Brzezinksi
were harsh, but “Morning Joe” has been
trashing Trump in personal terms for a
long time. Like it or not, Trump will be
Trump. Instead of brushing it off,
“Morning Joe” made Trump’s counterattack the focus of its program, another
win for a president who loves generating a response.
News outlets, whether in big cities or
small towns, are not synonymous with
the First Amendment. We are organizations that depend on the First Amendment to do our jobs, but that hardly
makes criticism of us — even aggressive
attacks from the president of the United
States — out of bounds.
On this point, Big Media could learn a
lesson from Small Media. When I have
responded to accusations of bias over
the years, my answer was not to whine
about the criticism, but to point to
examples of coverage that I believed
proved them wrong. I don’t see too
many media organizations doing that in
response to the president’s complaints.
If the day comes when members of
the mainstream media can prove
Trump wrong through the evidence of
their work, the president’s attacks will
lose their steam. That day is not here.
Gary Abernathy is publisher and editor
of the (Hillsboro, Ohio) Times-Gazette.
A21
RE
BOBBY YIP/REUTERS
A mourner in Hong Kong holds a photograph of Liu Xiaobo.
FRED HIATT
What are China’s
leaders so afraid of?
A
s you read about Nobel Peace
Prize winner Liu Xiaobo, who
died in Chinese captivity Thursday, ask yourself this: Why are
his jailers — President Xi Jinping and
the rest of China’s Communist regime —
so afraid?
I wonder about that question sometimes when I think of another of their
captives, someone you are less likely to
have heard of, a man named Wang
Bingzhang.
Wang is, at this point, one of China’s
longest-serving political prisoners. He
is 69 years old and in poor health. He has
been locked up since 2002, when Chinese agents kidnapped him from Vietnam, hauled him across the border, kept
him incommunicado for six months and
then sentenced him, in a one-day,
closed-door “trial” held without notice
to family or friends, to life in prison.
Wang’s crime? Like Liu, he had campaigned, peacefully, for democracy in
China. He had argued that freedom is
not a “Western” value but a desire and a
right of all human beings.
For that, he, like Liu, had to be locked
away and prevented from communicating with the world. As with Liu, whose
wife, Liu Xia, has been subjected to a
tormenting, bullying, isolating house
arrest though she has never been
charged with any crime, Wang’s family
must be made to suffer. His daughter
Ti-Anna Wang, who is Canadian and a
friend of mine, has not been permitted
to visit her father since she published an
op-ed in The Post urging his release
8½ years ago.
Why are they so afraid?
Why would they keep Liu Xiaobo in
his cell until his cancer was so advanced
that he was near death — and then keep
him from traveling abroad, where he
might yet have gotten care? Why would
they keep Wang from spending his last
years with his children and grandchildren?
What fear could motivate such cruelty?
The answer, I believe, has something
to do with the story China’s rulers tell
their people, and maybe themselves, to
cling to power.
The story, it’s important to note, is
partly true: The regime has, in the past
quarter-century, presided over steady
economic growth that has brought hundreds of millions of people out of poverty and into the middle class. On its scale,
it is a unique achievement in human
history.
But their story is also, in many respects, false. Far from being selfless
patriots, the ruling elite has grown fat
off the state. They do not want Chinese
people reading about their overseas
bank accounts or their children attending elite foreign prep schools and universities.
Far from being an alien Western
import, democracy has proved to be a
universal aspiration that has been embraced successfully in Japan, Indonesia,
South Korea and — most dangerously
for Beijing — Taiwan.
Far from delivering continuous progress for an ever-happier nation, the
regime since 1949 has intermittently
plunged China into disastrous famines
and spasms of internecine violence that
have cost tens of millions of lives. Today
it must employ tens of thousands of
censors and lock away hundreds of
lawyers, journalists and religious believers to maintain the facade of universal acclaim.
Perhaps most perilously, the Communist Party rules over a population that
no longer believes in communism. The
regime’s only remaining justification is
that it delivers economic growth. Yet, as
the economy becomes more complex,
growth becomes more and more dependent on people being free to think,
read, challenge and compete. The regime is caught in this paradox — and
afraid.
“Any government that jails its own
people for political dissent still has a
long way to go to become a respected
member of the international community,” Ti-Anna Wang wrote in that 2009
op-ed.
On some level, the regime must understand that. If it enjoyed international respect, it would not have to browbeat
and bully other governments not to
meet with the Dalai Lama and other
peaceful critics.
And China’s leaders must understand
that the same logic applies at home: If
they enjoyed the respect of their own
people, they would not have to shut
down every blogger, newspaper and
website that expressed an opinion contrary to the party line. They would not
have to keep Liu Xiaobo from traveling
to Norway to pick up his Nobel Prize.
They would not have to lock up 69year-old Wang Bingzhang to keep him
from extolling the virtues of democracy.
On some level, Xi and his colleagues
must know that Liu and Wang are right
and they are wrong. Clearly they fear
that their people will come to that
realization. Maybe they are also afraid
to admit it to themselves.
fredhiatt@washpost.com
POSTPARTISAN
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-partisan
Political dirt in the 2000
campaign led to jail time
One of the small footnotes to the Donald
Trump Jr. story on Russia deserves an elaboration. Many commentators have compared
the president’s son’s naive eagerness to use
damaging information about Hillary Clinton from a Russian lawyer with the 2000
Gore campaign’s wise decision to turn over a
dossier on George W. Bush to the FBI. The
real story is a little more interesting.
In 2000, I was helping to organize debate
prep for then-Vice President Al Gore. He
was a seasoned debater with an expert team,
and one of the most important members
was former congressman Tom Downey, an
old friend and Gore’s debate sparring partner in many previous elections. Downey not
only had a proven ability to mimic Gore’s
opponents’ debating styles but also was a
trusted adviser in his own right. Downey, to
get into character, had been studying Bush’s
previous debates as a primary candidate
and as governor.
So imagine Downey’s surprise when he
received an envelope containing a briefing
book and a videotape at his home address.
He said he looked only long enough to
determine that it was a book purporting to
help Bush prepare for his debates and a tape
supposedly of actual practice sessions. He
called me and Bill Daley, the campaign
chair, and while being careful not to divulge
any of the contents, said that he was turning
the materials over to the FBI.
The only discussion, as I recall it, was
whether the materials were real and stolen,
or whether this was an attempt to set up our
campaign for an eventual accusation of
dirty tricks. Either way, it was a hot potato
that we couldn’t get rid of fast enough. But
we decided to go further. To remove any
doubt that the Gore campaign had any
involvement in what, by today’s standards,
seems relatively innocent high jinks, and to
cut off any suspicion that we had in any way
benefited from the materials, we supported
Downey’s decision not to participate in
debate preps or even communicate with the
campaign on any debate-related matters.
All this is but a quaint footnote to recent
revelations of Trump Jr.’s decision to meet
with a Russian lawyer to collect political dirt
and then lie about it, aided and abetted in
his initial lie by the White House. But here’s
another footnote that Trump Jr. and others
in his orbit might want to know about: The
FBI’s investigation into the “Debate-gate”
matter in 2000 led to the indictment of the
woman who sent the tape. The potential
sentence of 10 years and a $500,000 fine was
plea-bargained down, but nonetheless, the
defendant received a year in prison on
charges of mail fraud and perjury.
Many things in today’s politics seem tolerated that would have been ruinous
17 years ago. Is the same true of our political
justice system, or has it maintained its
standards?
— Carter Eskew
he Russia scandal has entered a
new phase, and there’s no going
back.
For six months, the White
House claimed that this scandal was
nothing more than innuendo about
Trump campaign collusion with Russia
in meddling in the 2016 election. Innuendo for which no concrete evidence
had been produced.
Yes, there were several meetings
with Russian officials, some only belatedly disclosed. But that is circumstantial evidence at best. Meetings tell you
nothing unless you know what happened in them. We didn’t. Some of
these were casual encounters in large
groups, like the famous July 2016
Kislyak-Sessions exchange of pleasantries at the Republican National Convention. Big deal.
I was puzzled. Lots of coverup, but
where was the crime? Not even a
third-rate burglary. For six months,
smoke without fire. Yes, President
Trump himself was acting very defensively, as if he were hiding something.
But no one ever produced the something.
My view was: Collusion? I just don’t
see it. But I’m open to empirical evidence. Show me.
The evidence is now shown. This is
not hearsay, not fake news, not unsourced leaks. This is an email chain
released by Donald Trump Jr. himself.
A British go-between writes that there’s
a Russian government effort to help
Trump Sr. win the election, and as part
of that effort he proposes a meeting
with a “Russian government attorney”
possessing damaging information on
Hillary Clinton. Moreover, the Kremlin
is willing to share troves of incriminating documents from the Crown Prosecutor. (Error: Britain has a Crown
Prosecutor. Russia has a Prosecutor
General.)
Donald Jr. emails back. “I love it.”
Fatal words.
Once you’ve said “I’m in,” it makes no
difference that the meeting was a bust,
that the intermediary brought no such
goods. What matters is what Donald Jr.
thought going into the meeting, as well
as Jared Kushner and then-campaign
manager Paul Manafort, who were forwarded the correspondence, invited to
the meeting, and attended.
“It was literally just a wasted 20 minutes, which was a shame,” Donald Jr.
told Sean Hannity. A shame? On the
contrary, a stroke of luck. Had the
lawyer real stuff to deliver, Donald Jr.
and the others would be in far deeper
legal trouble. It turned out to be incompetent collusion, amateur collusion,
comically failed collusion. That does
not erase the fact that three top Trump
campaign officials were ready to play.
It may turn out that they did later
collaborate more fruitfully. We don’t
know. But even if nothing else is found,
the evidence is damning.
It’s rather pathetic to hear Trump
apologists protesting that it’s no big
deal because we Americans are always
intervening in other people’s elections,
and they in ours. You don’t have to go
back to the ’40s and ’50s when the CIA
intervened in France and Italy to keep
the communists from coming to power.
What about the Obama administration’s blatant interference to try to
defeat Benjamin Netanyahu in the latest Israeli election? One might even
add the work of groups supported by
the U.S. during Russian parliamentary
elections — the very origin of Vladimir
Putin’s deep animus toward Clinton,
then secretary of state, whom he accuses of having orchestrated the opposition.
This defense is pathetic for two
reasons. First, have the Trumpites not
been telling us for six months that no
collusion ever happened? And now
they say: Sure it happened. So what?
Everyone does it.
What’s left of your credibility when
you make such a casual about-face?
Second, no, not everyone does it. It’s
one thing to be open to opposition
research dug up in Indiana. But not dirt
from Russia, a hostile foreign power
that has repeatedly invaded its neighbors (Georgia, Crimea, eastern
Ukraine), that buzzes our planes and
ships in international waters, that opposes our every move and objective
around the globe. Just last week the
Kremlin killed additional U.N. sanctions we were looking to impose on
North Korea for its ICBM test.
There is no statute against helping a
foreign hostile power meddle in an
American election. What Donald Jr. —
and Kushner and Manafort — did may
not be criminal. But it is not merely
stupid. It is also deeply wrong, a fundamental violation of any code of civic
honor.
I leave it to the lawyers to adjudicate
the legalities of unconsummated collusion. But you don’t need a lawyer to see
that the Trump defense — collusion as a
desperate Democratic fiction designed
to explain away a lost election — is now
officially dead.
letters@charleskrauthammer.com
CATHERINE RAMPELL
An ouroboros of distractions
A
mericans, you need to start paying attention. Like, really paying attention — to the issues
that actually matter.
Stop getting distracted!
Take this Russian collusion nonsense. Lots of Americans are obsessed
with it, but it’s just a shiny distraction.
Yeah, sure, it looks as though members of the Trump campaign lied repeatedly, including on live TV and in Senate
testimony and on security clearance forms, about their contacts with
Russians. It looks as though they may
have been eager to get their hands on
possibly illegally obtained information
from a hostile nation. “I love it,” Donald
Trump Jr. wrote when offered dirt on
Hillary Clinton explicitly offered as
“part of Russia and its government’s
support for Mr. Trump.”
But that’s merely what the ninedimensional-chess players in the White
House want you to be obsessing over.
Focusing on the terrible things Team
Trump did during the campaign and
transition conveniently distracts you
from all the terrible things Team Trump
is doing during the presidency.
The administration is repealing consumer and environmental protections
left and right. The Education Department is making it easier for for-profit
colleges to defraud students. The Environmental Protection Agency has delayed an air pollution rule that the agency had determined would likely prevent
the poisoning of children.
The Trump deregulatory team is rife
with former lobbyists and others who
have conflicts of interest. President
Trump and his family members likewise
appear to be financially benefiting from
his role in the White House.
Yet fussing over regulatory decisions
and vaguely sleazy behavior is itself
a distraction from an even more important issue: the fact that Republicans are
trying to remake one-sixth of the U.S.
economy, largely in secret, while ripping
health insurance away from 22 million
Americans.
They’re laying out changes opposed
by insurers, providers and patient advocacy groups. They are doing so with no
hearings and no expert input, and reportedly with a scheme to sideline the
one neutral referee of the law’s potential
impact, the Congressional Budget Office. Attention must be paid!
However, all the noise over “healthcare reform” is itself a ruse intended to
distract voters from Republicans’ real
policy agenda: tax cuts for the rich.
The entire point of the Obamacare
repeal, at least for House Speaker Paul
D. Ryan (R-Wis.), is to pave the way for
tax cuts. Slashing Medicaid and tax subsidies for people on the individual insurance market would help offset the costs
of repealing taxes on rich people imposed by the Affordable Care Act.
The latest Senate health-care bill has
complicated that plan somewhat, but
plans for major tax cuts for rich people
and corporations are still advancing
behind the scenes and garnering precious little news coverage.
What scant awareness is being given
to tax cuts, however, is diverting the
public’s deficient attention from a far
more insidious scheme: efforts to systematically undermine democratic values and institutions.
There’s the Election Integrity Commission’s fishing expedition for state
voter data — which may have been deliberately bungled in an attempt to distract
voters from Republicans’ real, secret
goal of dismantling the National Voter
Registration Act, or “Motor Voter” law.
There are also the unending attacks
on freedom of the press and other First
Amendment rights. This includes a
fight picked with MSNBC hosts, which
White House aides lamented as a distraction from the far more important
fight with CNN.
But wait. All of this silliness is really a
form of misdirection so that Americans
will forget North Korea recently fired an
intercontinental ballistic missile capable of hitting Alaska. And that no one is
even nominated for critical diplomatic
and national security posts, such as
ambassador to South Korea and assistant secretary of state for international
security and nonproliferation.
But worry about such personnel vacancies is of course a distraction from
the fact that the man at the top of the
food chain is impulsively tweeting out
provocations to both enemies and allies.
And Trump’s tasteless Twitter feed is
also cleverly designed to distract you
from noticing that an iceberg nearly the
size of Delaware just broke off Antarctica.
Getting drawn into a debate about
whether climate change is to blame, and
whether American global leadership
could make a difference either way,
would surely sidetrack us from the vital
question of whether our president is in
hock to Russia.
And second verse, same as the first.
Welcome to 2017, the ouroboros of
distractions, where every terrible thing
is a head-fake for a ruse for a diversion
for a misdirection from something else
much, much worse.
crampell@washpost.com
A22
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THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14 , 2017
KLMNO
METRO
FRIDAY, JULY 14 , 2017
High today at
approx. 3 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
82 91 84 83°
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Precip: 75%
Wind: W
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WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
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B
SU
VIRGINIA
THE REGION
OBITUARIES
Dominion’s Atlantic Coast
Pipeline is still on course
despite a small victory in
court for opponents. B2
A Metro panel endorsed
new early-morning and
weekend parking fees in a
bid to increase revenue. B3
Chuck Blazer admitted to
his years of corruption and
helped expose the crooked
culture of world soccer. B6
Banned: Preferential school placement of D.C. o∞cials’ children Md. man
indicted
Policy follows scandal
over bypassing of lottery
in slaying
that applies to all others
of student
BY
P ETER J AMISON
Current and former government officials will be barred from
receiving special treatment for
their children in the District’s
notoriously competitive school-
enrollment process under a policy adopted by Schools Chancellor Antwan Wilson.
The change comes after an
uproar over a D.C. inspector general’s report that found that while
she was schools chancellor, Kaya
Henderson gave preferential
treatment to public officials’ children by helping enroll them directly in coveted schools, skirting
the city’s highly competitive
school lottery.
Extraordinary secrecy surrounded that report, which did
not name any of the parents who
received favors from Henderson
and was initially kept confidential by the inspector general’s
office. In May, The Washington
Post disclosed that two top officials in the Cabinet of Mayor
Muriel E. Bowser (D) were among
those who benefited. The Post
later obtained and published the
report.
Wilson’s new policy — announced in a letter Tuesday to
D.C. Council Education Committee Chairman David Grosso (I-At
Large) — goes beyond the steps
Bowser laid out in an executive
order she signed May 12, three
days after The Post reported that
Deputy
Mayor
Courtney
Snowden had her son placed directly at Capitol Hill Montessori
at Logan, a school with a waiting
list of more than 1,000 students
seeking places.
Bowser’s order required Cabinet officials to consult with the
D.C. Board of Ethics and Government Accountability before requesting a “discretionary trans-
fer” from the chancellor.
In contrast, Wilson’s policy
states that if current or former
public officials request special
school placements, school officials “will deny the request immediately without further consideration.”
In his letter to Grosso, Wilson
said the blanket ban is intended
“to limit any possibility of favoritism or improper use of public
office for private gain, or even the
appearance of favoritism.”
LOTTERY CONTINUED ON B4
VICTIM WAS STABBED
WHILE VISITING U-MD.
Officials still weighing
charge of hate crime
BY
L YNH B UI
A Prince George’s County grand
jury indicted a Maryland man on
one count of murder in the fatal
stabbing of a Bowie State University student that is being investigated as a possible hate crime.
The indictment, issued Thursday against Sean Urbanski, 22,
comes nearly two months after
Richard Collins III was killed
while visiting the University of
Maryland campus in College
Park.
Local and federal law enforcement officials said they are still
sifting through evidence to decide
whether Urbanski should also be
charged with a hate crime — a
determination expected in the
coming weeks.
“Developing a motive is always
challenging . . . and in this case
and every other case, we can’t get
it wrong,” county State’s Attorney
Angela Alsobrooks said in announcing the murder charge
Thursday.
Collins was visiting two friends
at U-Md. on May 20 when Urbanski approached them at a bus stop
about 3 a.m., police said. Urbanski
told Collins to move, police said,
and Collins refused. Urbanski,
who is white, then pulled a knife
and stabbed Collins, an African
URBANSKI CONTINUED ON B5
Bookstore planners fight stacked odds
Shop would be the only one east of the Anacostia River and would honor slain journalist
BY
PHOTOS BY MARVIN JOSEPH/THE WASHINGTON POST
TOP: Kymone Freeman, right, says goodbye to John Capozzi, who stopped by the
We Act Radio studios Tuesday. ABOVE: Freeman, co-owner of We Act Radio, is
spearheading an effort to open a bookstore in the basement of the radio station.
P ERRY S TEIN
The dark, dingy staircase leads to an even
dingier basement. A basement with a maze of
stacked boxes, dusty cleaning supplies, moldy
walls and abandoned furniture.
But Kymone Freeman has a vision for this
2,400-square-foot space in the heart of Southeast Washington’s Anacostia neighborhood.
He sees a colorful room with couches, a stage
and bookshelves — lots of wooden bookshelves stuffed with books of all genres.
Freeman is spearheading an effort to transform the drab space into the only D.C. bookstore east of the Anacostia River, an area that
includes many of the District’s poorest neighborhoods.
As details of the project evolve, organizers
have settled on this: It will be named the
Charnice Milton Community Bookstore in
memory of the 27-year-old journalist fatally
shot two years ago in Southeast. Police say
Milton was on her way home from covering a
community meeting and wasn’t the intended
BOOKSTORE CONTINUED ON B5
Sanders endorses Jealous’s bid in Maryland’s gubernatorial race
BY O VETTA W IGGINS
AND J OSH H ICKS
Sen. Bernie Sanders, whose
2016 presidential campaign
helped spark a national wave of
progressive populism, came to
the Washington suburbs on
Thursday to endorse civil rights
leader Benjamin Jealous for
Maryland governor.
With President Trump in the
White House, “we need more
than ever, at the statewide level, a
very different kind of leadership,”
Sanders (I-Vt.) told a cheering
crowd of several hundred. “And
what Ben Jealous is about, he has
a radical idea that maybe, just
maybe, government should represent all of the people and not
just the one percent.”
Jealous, the former head of the
NAACP and Maryland chair of
Sanders’s campaign, is one of
several Democrats vying for the
nomination to challenge popular
incumbent Gov. Larry Hogan (R).
State Sen. Richard S. Madaleno
Jr.
(Montgomery),
Prince
George’s County Executive Rushern L. Baker III, technology entrepreneur Alec Ross and attorney James Shea are running;
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, Rep. John Delaney
and former state attorney general Doug Gansler are weighing
bids.
The race is likely to reflect
many of the Democratic Party
fissures that were on display in
2016, with progressive voters
splitting from establishment
Democrats over the direction of
the party. And it will offer a
window into the strength of the
anti-Trump backlash among independent and Democratic voters, with Democrats hoping to
grab the governor’s mansion
back from a moderate Republican who for the most part has
kept his distance from the
45th president.
With just under a year until
the primary, Jealous has so far
drawn the most national attention. He was endorsed by Democracy for America even before he
announced he was running. On
Thursday, he won the backing of
Our Revolution — the progressive group Sanders formed after
his presidential run — and the
Maryland branch of the American Postal Workers Union.
Sanders told his audience that
Jealous’s campaign was essenSANDERS CONTINUED ON B5
Stewart
takes aim at
Va.’s Kaine
Trump supporter vows
a ‘ruthless’ campaign
opposing the senator
BY J ENNA P ORTNOY
AND A NTONIO O LIVO
Corey Stewart declared the
“kinder, gentler Republican” extinct Thursday as he announced
his plan to launch a “vicious” campaign to unseat Sen. Tim Kaine
(D-Va.) in 2018, with all the bombast that brought the Prince William supervisor
within a hair of
winning
his
party’s nomination for governor last month.
“I’m going to
run the most vicious, ruthless
campaign to
Corey Stewart dethrone Tim
Kaine from the
United States Senate,” said Stewart, not quite a month after losing
the gubernatorial nomination to
Ed Gillespie by 1.2 percentage
points. “It’s time that Republicans
take back that seat; it’s time that
we have a senator who supports
the president. Not trying to obstruct his way.”
The move pits Stewart, a President Trump supporter who celebrates the Confederacy and slams
illegal immigrants, against Hillary
Clinton’s former running mate in a
state that often embodies the nation’s political crosscurrents.
Stewart, who has boasted that
STEWART CONTINUED ON B4
Petula
Dvorak
She is away. Her
column will resume
when she returns.
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14 , 2017
VIRGINIA
Park worker testifies he fatally stabbed wedding caterer as she choked him
BY
E LLIE S ILVERMAN
The way Kempton Bonds described it, Tyonne Johns moved
toward him faster than he could
process what was happening.
His back was against a railing,
more than nine feet above the
ground, and soon her hands were
around his neck and his left hand
was trapped between their bodies, Bonds testified Thursday,
taking the witness stand in his
defense.
He told the jury what was
going through his mind: “She’s
right on top of me, and she’s
pushing me and I can’t breathe, I
can’t move, I can’t breathe, and I
just know I have to get her off of
me,” Bonds said. “I open the
knife, and I stab her to get her off
of me.”
Johns’s mother left the courtroom crying as Bonds, who is
charged with second-degree
murder, described stabbing her
daughter during an altercation
after a wedding reception at a
Chantilly park. Fairfax County
Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney Brandon Shapiro and witnesses, including the bride and a
wedding guest, had said Johns
never touched Bonds, a park
employee.
Bonds testified for hours on
the fourth day of his trial in
Fairfax County Circuit Court. The
jury will decide whether the stabbing in August last year at Ellanor C. Lawrence Park was a crime
or if Bonds acted in self-defense.
Shapiro and defense attorney
Peter Greenspun are expected to
give their closing arguments Friday before the jury begins deliberations.
The prosecution has portrayed
Bonds as a stickler to the venue
rules who had aggravated the
wedding party and guests and
then turned violent. But the defense countered that Bonds, now
20, felt threatened by Johns, 35,
who was the wedding caterer and
a friend of the bride and groom.
Earlier this week, Greenspun
told jurors a story of a young man
getting ready to head off to Virginia Commonwealth University
and who was trying to follow the
rules of his employer.
“He was so upbeat. We were
having a wonderful time going
linen shopping, buying accessories for the apartment, daily living things,” Bonds’s mother, Madelyn Smith, testified Thursday.
Her son was “optimistic and very
much looking forward to his life.”
The knife Bonds used to stab
Johns twice in her chest, tearing
through her chest cavity, lung
and puncturing her heart, was a
weapon made by his father who
had died two years before the
incident, said Smith, who was
married 23 years ago Sunday at
the location of the killing.
Bride Camellia Southerland,
37, testified this week that Bonds
was “very sarcastic and rude”
throughout the night.
Soon after they finished cutting the wedding cake, Bonds
shut off the music. This was
before Southerland had her first
dance with her husband, she
said.
Although Bonds was following
rules in the contract for the venue
— which required that the music
be ended at 9 p.m. — Southerland
said she didn’t realize this would
happen. Along with some guests,
she said, she pleaded with him to
turn the music back on. After
heated conversations with Bonds
and his manager, the music resumed.
But at this point, Southerland
testified, she felt like her wedding
was a “complete disaster.”
Southerland cried on the stand
as the prosecution played a video,
recorded by Bonds, of wedding
guests yelling curse words at
Bonds outside the venue before
he fatally stabbed Johns. Southerland said that she doesn’t usually curse and that her behavior
reflected her annoyance with
Bonds’s behavior throughout the
night.
“I was irate. I was completely
out of character,” she testified. “It
had been five hours of dealing
with the worst day of my life
possibly. I just wanted to load the
chairs and go home.”
She identified a voice in the
video that said “I’ll smack you
because I’ve got bail money . . .
leave her alone it’s her wedding
night” and “I’m going to knock
you out” as Johns.
But Southerland testified that
she never thought Johns would
actually assault Bonds and said
she never saw Johns touch him.
Others used similar phrases, but
she didn’t see anyone hurt him,
she testified.
“What was supposed to be a
special day for me was ultimately
ruined by him,” she said.
Bonds, who had called police
earlier in the night after tensions
grew between him and the wed-
ding guests, testified that he
shouted for police after the stabbing, believing an officer might
still be nearby. When no one
responded, he called 911.
On that call, played in court, he
yells for the wedding guests to
stay away from him and then tells
the official on the phone he’d
been “threatened” all night.
He tells the dispatcher: “I was
supervising them packing up
their stuff . . . at one point the
caterer just came straight at me
and started putting her hands
around my neck.”
The dispatcher then asks
Bonds whether he knows anything about a stabbing at his
location.
“Yes, they attacked me. I defended myself,” Bonds replies.
“You stabbed somebody?” the
dispatcher asks.
“She had her hands around my
throat,” Bonds says before asking
the dispatcher to send police.
ellie.silverman@washpost.com
THE DISTRICT
Police: Driver accused of striking
transgender woman was high on PCP
BY P ETER H ERMANN
AND C LARENCE W ILLIAMS
MICHAEL ROBINSON CHAVEZ/THE WASHINGTON POST
A break from the sun’s rays
People take cover in the shade at the base of the Capitol on Wednesday amid a sticky and sweltering week
for the region. Temperatures are expected to top 90 degrees again on Friday, but things should cool off
slightly when an afternoon front brings thunderstorms, which could be severe and potentially dangerous.
Forecast, B8
VIRGINIA
Opponents of Atlantic Coast Pipeline
get small victory, but project rolls on
BY
G REGORY S . S CHNEIDER
richmond — The Supreme
Court of Virginia ruled Thursday
on two cases related to the controversial Atlantic Coast Pipeline, handing opponents a minor
victory but otherwise leaving the
huge project unscathed.
The court found in favor of a
small group of landowners in
Buckingham County who said
pipeline surveyors had not provided adequate notice before entering their property. Survey
crews have since changed their
practice, though, to give more
specific information about timing.
The other case was potentially
far more sweeping, as a landowner challenged whether an out-ofstate utility has the right to enter
property for surveys or to seize
property under eminent domain.
Although the natural gas pipeline project is largely controlled
by Richmond-based Dominion
Energy, the partnership that is
building it is registered in Delaware. The court ruled that state
law permits the survey work but
said the plaintiffs had waited too
late in the legal process to raise
the issue of eminent domain, or
property seizure.
One expert said that could
leave the door open for someone
to pursue the eminent domain
question, because the state constitution contains language prohibiting any outside company
from exercising “the powers or
functions of a public service
enterprise.”
“In theory, at least, that would
prevent [a Delaware corporation] from taking the land to
build the pipeline on,” said Virginia Beach lawyer L. Steven
Emmert, publisher of Virginia
Appellate News and Analysis.
The problem in this case, he
said, is that the plaintiff did not
raise the eminent domain argument in the first stage of the case
but waited until later. The court
said Thursday that that was
outside the scope of its review —
but in a pointed way that Emmert took as a hint.
“If another landowner comes
along and grabs this idea and
presents it in a timely way,” the
court might take it up, Emmert
said.
The Atlantic Coast Pipeline is
intended to bring fracked natural gas on a 550-mile route from
West Virginia through Virginia
and into North Carolina, with an
extension into Hampton Roads.
Dominion Energy spokesman
Aaron Ruby applauded the
court’s rulings Thursday, saying
they had “upheld the constitutionality of Virginia’s survey law
and reaffirmed our right to perform these surveys.”
He noted that the company
had “proactively addressed the
issue of landowner notifications
by revising our notices to include
specific dates of entry before
surveying these properties. Going forward, we’ll continue our
company’s policy of providing
landowners with specific dates of
entry prior to surveying.”
Lawyers for the plaintiffs in
both of the cases decided on
Thursday could not immediately
be reached for comment.
The pipeline has stirred passionate protests in rural parts of
the state, mostly in the central
and southern regions, over environmental concerns and property rights issues.
Another similar project with
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washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Quizzes to enter the
correct response.
different owners — the Mountain
Valley Pipeline — is underway
simultaneously in the southwestern part of the state.
Together, the pipelines have
been a hot-button issue in the
Virginia governor’s race this
year. During the primaries, Democrat Tom Perriello drew considerable support in those parts of
the state by being the only candidate of either party clearly opposed to the pipelines.
But Perriello lost the nomination to Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam,
who has declined to take a clear
position on the projects and said
only that they should be subject
to strict environmental review.
Republican
nominee
Ed
Gillespie supports the pipelines
and has chided Northam for not
being more assertive.
The issue flared up again
Thursday when state Republicans claimed that Northam had
finally endorsed the pipelines on
a morning radio show. But
Northam’s campaign pointed out
that what he actually said to
conservative radio host John
Fredericks is the same thing he
has been saying all along.
When
Fredericks
asked
whether Northam would support
the project if federal authorities
give it final approval, he said:
“Yeah, sure, and you know again
the permitting process is . . . if it’s
done safely and responsibly, then
it’s going to move forward.”
Campaign spokesman David
Turner said later that Northam
“has always said he wants [the
environmental] evaluation to be
rigorous, based in science, transparent, and to make sure that
Virginia takes care of people’s
property rights.”
gregory.schneider@washpost.com
MEMBER EXCLUSIVES
A man charged with intentionally driving a stolen car into a
transgender woman and critically injuring her last week in
Northeast Washington was high
on PCP and told police he had
gone on an hours-long joyride,
according to the arrest affidavit
filed in court.
The 26-year-old victim, who
police said remains hospitalized
on a respirator with injuries including internal bleeding in the
brain, a punctured lung and a
lacerated spleen, had volunteered with transgender advocacy groups.
Police have charged Startwaune Anderson, 18, of Northeast with aggravated assault
while armed. He lives in the
Trinidad neighborhood, on the
same street in which police said
the vehicle — a black 2014 Ford
Focus hatchback — was stolen
and about half a mile from where
the victim was struck while crossing the street in the early-morning hours.
Transgender groups are calling
on D.C. police to record the July 5
hit-and-run at Fourth and K
streets Northeast as a hate crime,
based on accounts from three
witnesses that a man solicited the
victim for sex before the crash
and threatened to return with a
gun when he was rejected. Two
witnesses told police the man
was a passenger in the striking
vehicle; another said he was the
driver.
But the arrest affidavit says the
witnesses, friends of the victim,
may have confused two unrelated
incidents. Police wrote that they
found no evidence Anderson had
an encounter with the victim
before the 3:20 a.m. crash.
Acting captain Anthony Haythe of the D.C. police homicide
unit said Wednesday that “we
cannot definitively say at this
point that it was a hate crime.”
The captain did say that “we have
not ruled that out, and we are still
investigating.” He added, “We
believe the vehicle was used as a
weapon.”
“What we do know is someone
is getting justice today, and that
is the most important thing for
us, given we still have to walk and
live in this city,” said Ruby Corado, founder of Casa Ruby, an
LGBT organization that has
helped the victim over the past
several years.
A D.C. Superior Court judge
ordered Anderson detained until
a preliminary hearing on Friday.
His attorney did not respond to
interview requests.
According to the affidavit, Anderson found car keys on a sidewalk outside his home on Morse
Street and clicked them until he
found the matching vehicle. He
admitted to police on July 7 to
smoking PCP-laced marijuana
and other drugs, the court document says.
At first, the affidavit says, Anderson told police he went on a
joyride and may have struck a
trash bin. Police said surveillance
video recorded near the crash
scene shows the car speeding up
as it turns a corner, seconds
before the victim was struck. Just
before impact, which was not
captured on the video, police said
the sound picked up two engine
revs, “indicating that the driver is
rapidly accelerating.” The court
document also says the driver
changed lanes, lining up with the
victim.
Police said that after the crash,
the driver sped away but later
stopped to change a flat tire. The
affidavit says the driver slept in
the car for a bit and then resumed
his ride, stopping after hitting a
fence at Gallaudet University on
West Virginia Avenue shortly before 10 a.m.
Police said the car had blood
on it and a damaged passengerside windshield. Witness descriptions led police to Anderson.
Police said Anderson told them
he was alone in the car and may
have hit a fence. “I think I
crashed,” the affidavit quotes him
saying.
A detective then told Anderson, the affidavit says, that he hit
“something more important than
a fence.” The court document
says Anderson replied: “Did I hit
a person, did I hit a tree?”
Police said Anderson then
said, “It was either a car or a
dumpster. It was red or something. I wasn’t that f---ing high to
hit a f---ing person. I know how to
drive.”
Police said the victim was
wearing a red dress.
peter.hermann@washpost.com
clarence.williams@washpost.com
THE DISTRICT
White House fence-jumper pleads guilty
BY
S PENCER S . H SU
A California man who
breached the White House’s secure perimeter and roamed free
for nearly 17 minutes in March
pleaded guilty Thursday to one
count of knowingly entering and
remaining on restricted grounds.
Jonathan T. Tran, 27, of Milpitas, faces sentencing Sept. 25
before U.S. District Judge James
E. Boasberg in the March 10
incident that led to renewed
criticism of the U.S. Secret Service and further restrictions on
public access to areas around the
presidential residence.
In April, the Secret Service
imposed tighter security measures, including prohibiting access to sidewalks, roadways and
other areas along the White
House’s southern fence line between West Executive Avenue
and East Executive Avenue.
Tran was detected crossing a
five-foot outer fence near East
Executive Avenue and the Treasury Department complex at
11:21 p.m. but was not arrested
until 11:38 p.m. near the South
Portico entrance, the agency
said. He was carrying Mace.
To approach the mansion, Tran
scaled two additional barriers,
according to the Secret Service
account — an eight-foot vehicle
gate, then a 3½-foot fence near
the southeast corner of the
East Wing.
“Restricting public access to
the fence line will not only serve
to lessen the possibility of individuals illegally accessing the
White House grounds, but will
also create a clear visual break to
enable Secret Service officers to
identify and respond to potential
hazards including individuals attempting to scale the fence,” the
agency said in a statement at
the time.
In a plea agreement for the
misdemeanor, both sides agreed
to recommend that Tran be
barred from returning to the
District while under any period
of probation and that he be
required to participate in interviews with the Secret Service to
help determine potential risks.
Both sides agreed that federal
sentencing guidelines recommend zero to six months in
prison, although Boasberg could
go higher or lower.
During his time near the
White House, Tran triggered
multiple alarms and at various
points peered into a White House
window and hid behind a pillar,
according to surveillance video
and officer accounts. The Secret
Service declined to comment on
news reports that after the intrusion it fired two uniformed officers assigned to guard the Treasury building and the entrance to
East Executive Avenue.
Before Thursday’s appearance, Tran had been released to
his family’s home in Northern
California, subject to court and
electronic monitoring, mental
evaluation and treatment if
necessary.
According to a criminal complaint filed March 11, Tran also
had been carrying a book about
President Trump, a U.S. passport
and a laptop containing a letter
addressed to the president about
Russian hackers, saying Tran had
found “information of relevance.”
Tran stated that he had
jumped the fence and added, “I
am a friend of the president,”
Secret Service officer Wayne
Azevedo wrote in an affidavit at
the time of Tran’s arrest.
The breach was thought to be
the first fence-jumping since
Trump took office.
Trump, who was at the White
House that night, praised the
Secret Service for doing “a fantastic job” responding to a “troubled person.”
spencer.hsu@washpost.com
DID YOU KNOW?
Want to Know What Love Is? Free Tickets to Foreigner
on July 25 at Jiffy Lube Live
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on July 20 at 9:30 Club
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The godparents of the Afrobeat are preparing to release their new album, La
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blind, have combined their love story with a musical career to become famous
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FRIDAY, JULY 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
MARYLAND
Redistricting case could stall while Supreme Court hears Wisconsin dispute
Plaintiffs will argue to
move forward on Md.
issue in a hearing Friday
BY
J OSH H ICKS
Republican voters who claim
their constitutional rights were
violated when Maryland redrew
its congressional districts six
years ago return to federal court
Friday to argue that their case
should move forward, even as the
U.S. Supreme Court weighs a
similar dispute involving Wisconsin’s legislative map.
The plaintiffs in Benisek v.
Lamone allege that Democratic
leaders violated their First
Amendment rights by using
mapping software, voter-registration data and voting history to
draw a 6th Congressional District that would ensure a Democratic win. The seat, long held by
a Republican, has been filled
since 2012 by Rep. John Delaney
(D).
The plaintiffs want the court
to force the state to redraw the
congressional boundaries in advance of the 2018 election. On
Friday, theywill ask a three-judge
panel at the U.S. District Court in
Baltimore for an immediate injunction that bars the state from
using the voting map in 2018.
Late last month, Maryland Attorney General Brian E. Frosh
(D) filed a motion to dismiss the
case, claiming its arguments
“hinge on a single false premise:
Individuals who affiliate with a
party have a right to maintain
electoral successes gained by
their party under prior redistricting maps.”
Frosh said state officials involved in redrawing the boundaries intended to make the district more competitive for Democrats rather than unwinnable for
Republicans. He argued that the
plaintiffs — all registered Republican voters — have failed to show
that officials who changed the
boundaries specifically intended
to burden the representational
rights of GOP voters.
Plaintiffs’ attorneys compared
the argument to “saying a gambler playing with loaded dice
intends only to enrich himself,
and not to cheat the house.”
In defending Maryland’s
maps, Frosh — a Democrat in a
majority-Democratic state — is
breaking with others from his
party who are fighting to end
gerrymandering in states where
Republicans have an advantage,
including Wisconsin.
“If you look at the statements
of the Democratic attorney general in Maryland and the Republican attorney general of Wisconsin, their statements are the
same,” said former Wisconsin
state senator Tim Cullen (D),
who co-chairs the Fair Elections
Project. “Gerrymandering has to
go, regardless of which party
does it.”
The Maryland plaintiffs filed a
brief this week that argues
against putting their lawsuit on
hold, saying it is different from
the Wisconsin case, that the Supreme Court should have a
chance to hear both cases alongside each other, and that they
would suffer “irreparable harm”
in the next election if the 6th
District map is not struck down.
Frosh wrote that a Supreme
Court decision in the Wisconsin
case would help settle and simplify many of the questions involved in Maryland’s lawsuit,
which will probably be appealed
to the high court regardless of
how the three-judge panel rules.
In the Wisconsin case, a threejudge panel has ruled that the
state’s GOP leadership violated
voters’ First Amendment and
equal-rights protections through
partisan gerrymandering of the
state’s legislative assembly districts.
The Supreme Court has previously overturned voting maps on
the basis of racial gerrymandering, ruling that such efforts violate the Voting Rights Act. But
the justices have never agreed on
a method for determining
whether partisan manipulation
of voting boundaries can restrict
voters’ First Amendment rights.
Gerrymandering opponents
are hoping the Wisconsin plaintiffs have found an appropriate
standard, which they call the
“efficiency gap.”
The approach, developed by
two University of Chicago professors, tries to quantify each party’s
“wasted votes” — those that are
either above the threshold needed to elect a party’s candidate or
“lost” because voters from a particular party were placed in a
district where their numbers are
too small to make an impact.
Dividing the difference between the two parties’ wasted
votes by the total number of votes
cast determines the efficiency
gap. Proponents of the measure
say the gap should be close to
zero and not grow drastically
through redistricting.
The Maryland lawsuit does not
rely on the “efficiency gap” standard. It involves a single congressional district, rather than the
entire map for a state legislature.
THE REGION
intent” to reconfigure the 6th
District so voters there would “be
more likely to elect a Democrat
than a Republican.”
Bush and Miller denied seeking to switch the district to the
Democratic column. Busch said
he “voted for and supported what
I would believe was in the best
interest of the citizens”
Both leaders also said they
were largely unfamiliar with detailed data that their staffs received during the redistricting
process, including metrics showing the chances of Democrats
winning under various configurations of the districts.
Miller said he didn’t review
the information and that “it
wasn’t important to me.”
O’Malley recently began advocating for nonpartisan commissions to draw voting maps. It is
the same position espoused by
Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R),
who proposed legislation last
year and this year to that effect.
Miller and Busch, whose party
holds strong majorities in the
legislature, have called for national or regional redistricting
reform, saying they don’t want
Maryland to adopt an independent process while many Republican-dominated states continue
gerrymandering.
josh.hicks@washpost.com
LOC AL D I GE S T
Metro panel backs idea to charge
for weekend, early-morning parking
Expanded use of lots,
garages could earn
agency $825,000 a year
M ARTINE P OWERS,
F AIZ S IDDIQUI
AND R ACHEL S IEGEL
BY
A Metro board committee voted Thursday to allow the agency to
begin charging for weekend and
early-morning parking as part of
several six-month pilot programs
aimed at increasing revenue for
the cash-strapped agency.
Under the proposal, which is
expected to be approved by the
full board later this month, Metro
would begin charging people exiting parking lots at 7:30 a.m. each
weekday. That is two hours earlier
than when Metro’s parking staff
currently closes the exit gates and
begins collecting daily fees from
departing drivers.
Metro officials hope the expanded window will help the
agency profit from people who
park overnight at stations — a
routine practice despite being
prohibited at most stations.
Nina Albert, Metro’s director of
real estate and station planning,
estimated that on average, 2,000
people park overnight at stations.
Often, those people are able to
leave the station without paying
because they depart before
9:30 a.m. Metro has no entry fare
gates and no way to determine
whether cars that are exiting have
been inside the garage for a couple
of minutes or a couple of days.
Since the agency does not have
the staff or infrastructure to enforce the overnight ban, she said,
it might as well capitalize on the
practice. If Metro charged people
who park overnight and leave the
station in the early-morning
hours, it could make $825,000 a
year.
Metro also will pursue a pilot
program to charge people who
park at station garages and lots on
weekends, but those fees will be
small, Albert said, at least at the
beginning.
She said the weekend fees may
start out as low as 25 cents to $1 for
a day of parking. The purpose of
the pilot is not to make money, she
said, but to gather data on how
many people use the parking facilities on weekends and who those
people are. (Because SmarTrip
cards can be used to collect parking fees, Metro has a sense of how
many people parking are local vs.
out-of-towners.)
“We are not talking necessarily
. . . about charging the full fare.
We can charge a much lower fare,
just to start collecting the data,”
Albert said. “During the pilot,
we’re really trying to understand
who’s parking. . . . It’s not hardcore revenue generation.”
The real estate committee approved all six of the parking proposals laid out by staff, which also
include expanding the number of
stations that charge higher fees
for nonriders, decreasing weekday parking fees at under-subscribed stations, modifying evening parking hours and charging
higher parking rates for special
events.
Maryland shifted more than
360,000 residents out of the 6th
District in Western Maryland in
2011, and moved about the same
number of people into the district from heavily Democratic
Montgomery County.
Before the new lines took effect, Republicans made up nearly
47 percent of registered eligible
voters in the district, compared
with about 36 percent for Democrats. After the change, Republicans made up 33 percent of
registered eligible voters inside
the boundary, compared with
44 percent for Democrats.
Then-Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett,
a Republican who had won reelection by double-digit margins
over two decades, lost to Delaney
by 21 points, in what the plaintiffs’ attorneys called “the single
largest redistricting swing of any
congressional district anywhere
in the country.”
The plaintiffs’ legal team has
deposed some of the state’s leading Democrats, including former
governor Martin O’Malley, House
Speaker Michael E. Busch (DAnne Arundel) and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr.
(D-Calvert).
During his deposition, O’Malley, who led the 2011 redistricting
effort, said “it was certainly my
hope, and it was part of my
EVY MAGES FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Metro board members said all revenue-raising possibilities must be
studied to avoid more service cuts and fare increases.
They also voted to allow food
and beverages to be sold on Metro
parking properties on weekends
— and potentially holidays, pending a proposed amendment that
will go to the full Metro board — to
make it possible to rent out space
for farmers markets, auto shows,
marathons and other events.
Together, those proposals are
estimated to potentially raise
$8 million a year in new revenue,
Albert said.
Board member Malcolm Augustine said he was pleased with
the parking proposals and said
that Metro must be aggressive in
seeking new sources of cash. But
he warned that such measures
could affect ridership.
“I am a little concerned about
the impact on ridership on the
weekend, where we already have
really poor utilization of the rail
system itself,” he said.
Board members were also generally positive about continuing
discussions over the sale of naming rights to certain stations but
agreed they needed more information from Metro Assistant
General Manager Lynn Bowersox
before they allow any definitive
policy changes.
Still, multiple board members
argued that there is an urgent
need to explore all options to save
Metro from financial distress. The
agency is facing a potential significant cash shortfall for the fiscal
2019 operating budget — and as
Metro General Manager Paul J.
Wiedefeld presses regional leaders to establish a dedicated fund
for long-term capital needs, he
has also promised to look under
every rock for new revenue to help
plug short-term budget holes.
A similar deficit this year
forced Metro to resort to service
cuts and fare increases to balance
the budget. Metro board members
say they want to avoid a repeat of
that at all costs.
“We’re scraping the barrel,” said
board member Tom Bulger. “Critics can call us whatever they want,
but we need revenue for next
year’s budget.”
Board member Michael Goldman encouraged the Customer
Service Committee to broaden the
scope of the conversation to include the names of rail service
lines, perhaps with the potential
for bringing in revenue from a
Silver Line “Dulles Express.”
Others expressed concerns
about how far the proposal could
go. After the meeting, Jack Evans,
chairman of the board, imagined
a scenario in which the Trump
Organization offered Metro
$10 million to rename Federal Triangle as “The Trump hotel Metro
stop.”
“Now that would be an outcry!”
he said, laughing.
The board meeting turned contentious near its end, as some
members engaged in a heated exchange over a proposed restructuring of the board’s committees
— a debate that resulted in sharp
words and accusations of underhandedness and 11th-hour footdragging.
Goldman and fellow board
member Keturah D. Harley —
both voting members from Maryland — said they could not support the current proposal to overhaul the agency’s governing panel
and signified their intention to
veto the restructuring plan unless
substantial changes are made.
Goldman believes the proposed
changes give too much power to
nonvoting members of the Metro
board, in defiance of what he believes is the spirit of Metro’s governing compact. Harley, meanwhile, opposed the restructuring
on the grounds that the jurisdictions haven’t been given sufficient
input on the changes.
Metro’s board consists of eight
voting members and eight alternate members who represent the
District, Maryland, Virginia and
the federal government.
A veto would potentially thwart
a months-long effort to streamline the agency’s governance —
and could sink the proposal altogether.
D.C. leaders, however, sought to
quell debate over the restructuring at least until a full board vote
in two weeks.
The proposed changes would
shrink the number of board subcommittees from seven to four;
potentially lengthen the terms of
the current chair and vice chair by
realigning the election calendar;
and potentially allot increased responsibility to nonvoting members by allowing them to serve on
an executive committee. It would
also eliminate the position of second vice chair. Goldman stands to
lose his post as chairman of the
panel’s finance committee if accompanying officer assignments
are approved.
The issue will get a final hearing in two weeks, when the full
board of directors is scheduled to
meet for the last time before an
August recess.
martine.powers@washpost.com
faiz.siddiqui@washpost.com
rachel.siegel@washpost.com
THE DISTRICT
Teenager charged
in fatal shooting
Scalise undergoes
another operation
House Majority Whip Rep.
Steve Scalise was operated on
again Thursday as he continues
to try to recover from being shot
during an ambush of a
Republican baseball team
practicing on a Virginia field
last month, his family said.
Scalise, a Republican from
Louisiana, is at MedStar
Washington Hospital Center. He
“underwent surgery for the
management of deep tissue
infection related to his bullet
wounds,” said a statement from
his family released by
the hospital.
“He is in fair condition, and
will require careful monitoring
to see if and when further
interventions are necessary,” the
statement said.
Scalise, 51, was wounded
June 14 when 66-year-old James
T. Hodgkinson of Belleville, Ill.,
opened fire at a GOP team
practice in Alexandria.
Hodgkinson, a volunteer for
Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.)
during his 2016 presidential
campaign, was killed by police.
— Justin Wm. Moyer
A 16-year-old has been
arrested in a fatal shooting last
week in Northeast Washington,
D.C. police said.
Lamont McDonald of
Southeast has been charged as
an adult with second-degree
murder while armed, police said
in a statement. He was arrested
on a warrant Wednesday.
The youth is charged with
fatally shooting Malachi Yisrael,
43, the night of July 5 in the
Lincoln Heights neighborhood.
Police have not described a
possible motive, although
additional details could emerge
after the suspect makes his
initial appearance in D.C.
Superior Court.
— Peter Hermann
MARYLAND
Motorcyclist dies
after hitting a car
A District Heights man was
killed after his motorcycle hit a
parked car, according to Prince
George’s County police.
Dennis Davidson, 31, was
going south on Hilmar Drive in
District Heights when his
motorcycle crossed the
centerline and struck a parked
car on the other side of the
street about 1:15 p.m. Tuesday,
police said.
Authorities transported
Davidson from the 6600 block
of Hilmar Drive to a hospital,
where he was pronounced dead,
police said. No one else
was injured.
Authorities are asking anyone
with information about the
crash to call 301-731-4422 or
866-411-TIPS.
— Lynh Bui
VIRGINIA
Shooting injures two
people in Occoquan
Two people were shot in
Occoquan, suffering injuries
that were not thought to be lifethreatening.
The incident happened early
Thursday near Occoquan Road
and Colonial Drive. One person
had a gunshot wound to the
upper body and another to the
lower body, according to police
in Prince William County.
Both people were taken to the
hospital. Police said the incident
does not appear to be random.
— Dana Hedgpeth
LOTTE R I E S
Results from July 13
DISTRICT
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14 , 2017
VIRGINIA
Mississippi auditor demands payment from McAuliffe’s former company
BY
G REGORY S . S CHNEIDER
An electric car company
founded by Virginia Gov. Terry
McAuliffe (D) failed to deliver on
its economic promises and
should repay nearly $6.4 million
to the state of Mississippi, that
state’s auditor said in a report
issued Thursday.
The GreenTech manufacturing facility, announced with
great fanfare in 2009 after McAu-
liffe fell short in an earlier bid to
be Virginia’s governor, never
lived up to the promises it made
as a condition of receiving public
funding, said Mississippi State
Auditor Stacey Pickering.
Pickering, a Republican, said
last week that the company
should repay money to the state
and issued the report Thursday
to back that up. His demand was
first reported by the Richmond
Times-Dispatch.
In Thursday’s report, Pickering said the company missed a
number of targets. It defaulted
on its loan agreement, making
only one payment, and invested
$43 million after promising to
invest $60 million. The auditor
said he determined that the electric car plant, built in one of the
poorest counties in Mississippi,
at its peak created 94 new, active,
full-time jobs — but had promised to create 350.
And the report said that
GreenTech didn’t submit proper
data that would allow the state to
determine whether it lived up to
a promise of providing an average salary of $35,000.
Pickering said the company
was required to provide that and
other documentation under its
agreement with the state of Mississippi, but that GreenTech refused to do so. The state had to
obtain a subpoena to get its
documentation.
McAuliffe once touted the
company as evidence of his entrepreneurial skill. He courted
investors in China, using a special immigrant visa program. But
McAuliffe left the company late
in 2012 to make his successful
run for governor.
A spokesman said Thursday
that McAuliffe “has not had any
affiliation with GreenTech since
before he was elected. He’s been
MARYLAND
Indictments filed in killings of teens night before graduation
BY
D AN M ORSE
Three young Maryland men
accused of gunning down a pair
of high school students on the eve
of their graduation were indicted
on murder, robbery and weapons
charges Thursday, according to
records filed in Montgomery
County Circuit Court and a
spokesman for county prosecutors.
The grand jury indictments
against Jose Canales-Yanez, 25,
Edgar Garcia-Gaona, 24, and his
brother Roger Garcia, 19, were
not unexpected. On June 17, the
three were charged by Montgomery County Police with counts of
conspiring to commit murder
and committing murder, and they
were ordered held without bond.
The killings of the students,
Shadi Najjar, 17, and Artem Ziberov, 18, drew wide attention.
Both had been on the honor roll
at Northwest High School in Germantown and had plans to attend
college. The night of June 5, with
Najjar behind the wheel of a blue
Honda Civic, the friends pulled
up in a cul-de-sac in Montgomery
Village, about 20 miles north of
Washington, and were expecting
to meet someone who had expressed interest in buying a ticket
to the next day’s commencement.
But the interest in the ticket
was feigned and a ruse to set up
an attack, according to police
who contend the three accused
gunmen unloaded at least
30 rounds at the car and the
teens, killing them in their seats.
Detectives said in court filings
that they believe the attackers
were motivated by a drug deal
gone bad months earlier, when
Najjar allegedly stole drugs from
one of the gunmen’s girlfriend.
The indictments Thursday arrived after a panel of grand jurors
reviewed the police case. The
charges are similar to the police
charges, but with the addition of
handgun and robbery counts —
and are part of a regular process
of moving cases from Montgomery’s district court to circuit
court, where felony cases
are handled.
No trial dates were set. All
three suspects remain jailed, according to online court records.
Kathleen A. Dolan, an attorney
for Canales-Yanez, said she expected him to be exonerated.
“They got the wrong guy,” Dolan
said.
Ron Gottlieb, an attorney for
Edgar Garcia-Gaona, declined to
comment. Online court records
do not indicate whether Roger
Garcia has retained an attorney.
Few documents have been filed
in the public court record, other
than the original statements of
probable cause written by police.
In those documents, detectives
said that on the night the teens
were killed — at 10:13 p.m. —
Najjar sent a message to his
girlfriend saying he was going to
sell the commencement ticket to
“Roger Garcia.” Najjar and Ziberov were shot at approximately
10:46 p.m., police have said.
The detectives spoke to Garcia,
who said he did not know Najjar
or Ziberov and did not buy graduation tickets from them, according to court records. Garcia said
he had attended Northwest
High School.
Detectives were able to link
Roger Garcia to his brother —
Edgar Garcia-Gaona, who also
goes by Edgar Garcia — and
searched his brother’s home.
They found a “partial box of
‘Blazer’ .40-caliber ammunition,”
they wrote in court filings, adding: “It should be noted that, at
the crime scene, 11 of the 30 shell
casings recovered were ‘Blazer’
.40-caliber shell casings.”
Detectives said they connected
the brother to a friend, CanalesYanez. They learned that CanalesYanez’s girlfriend had reportedly
been robbed months earlier by
someone in the passenger seat of
a blue Honda Civic. Detectives
said that it had been Najjar who
committed the robbery, that he
had stolen drugs, and that the
June killings were an act of retaliation.
It is not clear whether Ziberov
knew about the earlier reported
robbery. The court records filed
Thursday show the conspiracy to
commit murder counts relate
only to the planning of Najjar’s
death — and indication that Ziberov may have gone to the fake
ticket sale and been in the wrong
place at the wrong time.
Ziberov was hit by 10 bullets,
police have said, and Najjar was
hit by four. The attackers also
took Najjar’s cellphone before
fleeing the scene, according to
court records.
Najjar’s father, Adi Najjar, has
said that any negative attention
given to what his son may have
done in the past misses the point.
“My boy is a beautiful boy,”
Najjar said last month. “We
raised him right. We loved him.
We still love him. He will be in our
hearts forever and ever.”
The Garcia brothers were both
born in Maryland, according to
court records. Canales-Yanez was
born in Honduras, according to
court records. Immigration
agents have lodged a detainer on
him at the jail, according to jail
officials, an indication that the
agents may try to have him deported at some point in connection with the case.
dan.morse@washpost.com
Some Republicans say Stewart’s candidacy could hurt GOP brand
STEWART FROM B1
he was “Trump before Trump was
Trump,” said Democrats partly
blame Kaine for losing the presidential race and called him a “nervous Nellie.”
Kaine dismissed the criticism,
but in a subtle barb announced
just ahead of Stewart’s news conference that he and Sen. Mark R.
Warner (D-Va.) had secured
$4.2 million in federal funding to
preserve Civil War-era battlefields.
“Right out of the gate, Corey
Stewart is more focused on namecalling than improving Virginians’ lives,” Kaine campaign
adviser Jenny Nadicksbernd said
in a statement. “Senator Kaine will
continue working with both Democrats and Republicans to build
economic opportunity through
better skills, jobs, and wages and
protect health care for all Virginians.”
Stewart’s announcement was
met with silence from state GOP
leaders and elected officials, who
said they are focused on making
sure Gillespie is the first Republican elected in November to statewide office since 2009.
But some Republicans said a
Stewart candidacy threatens to
damage the GOP brand and derail
Gillespie’s efforts to appeal to
moderate Republicans and independents, especially those in voterich Northern Virginia.
“Corey Stewart will be out there
saying and doing ridiculous
things that make the party look
bad and put Republican candidates in a terrible position,” said
Bill Bolling, a former two-term
Republican lieutenant governor.
“This is really a nightmare for the
Republican Party.”
From the front yard of his
Woodbridge home, Stewart announced his campaign with his
smiling wife, Maria, by his side,
but without any elected officials.
He said he was launching his
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campaign a year in advance to
start raising money for what could
be an expensive race. Stewart, who
struggled for funds in his gubernatorial bid and was outspent 3 to 1
by Gillespie, embraced controversial stances as part of a deliberate
strategy to garner media attention
and inflame voter passion. He
gave away an assault rifle at a
shooting range, unfurled Confederate flags at rallies and got into a
Twitter war with musician John
Legend, among other things.
Asked whether he would need
support and resources from state
and national party officials, Stewart was defiant. He said he had not
consulted with anyone before deciding to run on the heels of his
strong showing in the Republican
gubernatorial primary election.
“They’re less important than
they used to be, that’s for darn
sure,” he said. “The party is going
to have start waking up and realizing that constituents, conservative Republicans, are looking for a
more aggressive populist candidate. I’m talking about someone
who can actually appeal to people,
to average working-class people
and bring them in.”
Stewart acknowledged that
Kaine helped Clinton win Virginia
— the only Southern state she
carried. But he later said that
Democrats “aren’t that enthralled” with the senator.
Republicans have said running
nationwide with Clinton forced
Kaine to take positions — opposition to the Trans-Pacific Partnership as well as offshore drilling —
that are out of step with Virginia
voters.
Yet polls show Kaine — a former
governor and lieutenant governor
— is popular in the state with a
58 percent job-approval rating,
while Trump’s approval ratings
were at 36 percent in a Washington Post-Schar School poll in May.
Geoffrey Skelley, a political analyst at the University of Virginia
Center for Politics, said the statewide landscape favors Kaine.
“In an alternate universe where
Clinton won, people like Barbara
Comstock or Dave Brat would
probably be looking much harder
at running for Senate in 2018,” he
said, referring to Republican members of Congress from Virginia.
“But given that Trump won and is
very unpopular in the state of Virginia, my guess is Tim Kaine is very
happy to face Corey Stewart.”
“Stewart nearly won a primary
despite a serious resource shortage, so that might suggest that a
primary is better for him,” Skelley
said. “But the dynamics of the 2018
GOP candidate field will matter a
great deal.”
John Whitbeck, chairman of
the Virginia GOP, said he anticipates a crowded field.
“He’s not going to be the only
candidate, so we’re not even worried about that right now because
we have a tremendous challenge
ahead of us to win three statewide
races,” Whitbeck said, referring to
the November election when Virginia voters will choose a governor, lieutenant governor and attorney general.
Stewart is the first Republican
to announce his intention to challenge to Kaine. Carly Fiorina, the
former GOP presidential candidate, conservative radio host Laura Ingraham and retiring state
Del. Jimmie Massie III (Henrico)
have said they are considering
joining the race. The party will
decide its nominee in a primary
election next year.
In hypothetical matchups,
Kaine would defeat Fiorina by
24 points and Ingraham by
21 points, according to an April
Quinnipiac University poll.
In an interview with The Washington Post last month, Stewart
offered a glimpse of how he might
conduct himself with Kaine
through some blunt advice for
Gillespie in his contest against
Democratic
Lt.
Gov.
Ralph Northam.
“Ed, if you’re listening to this:
Nobody cares that your dad
Not quite a month after his
narrow loss in Virginia’s
Republican gubernatorial
primary, Corey Stewart says he
will run “the most vicious,
ruthless campaign” to unseat
Democratic Sen. Tim Kaine.
owned a grocery store,” Stewart
said, mocking Gillespie for a “boring” stump speech line geared
toward blue-collar voters and a
“Mr. Rogers sweater” Gillespie
wore in a campaign ad. “Sometimes, you just gotta be yourself.
Just do it.”
Stewart’s strong showing in last
month’s gubernatorial primary
shocked state party leaders and
political observers who had dismissed him as a fringe candidate.
The native Minnesotan’s embrace of “Southern heritage” issues and disdain for the Republican establishment drew support
from white nationalists and many
Trump voters in the western part
of the state as well as southwest
and Southside Virginia, and in
Prince William County.
Stewart served as Trump’s Virginia campaign chairman for
much of last year, until he became
too divisive for even the Trump
campaign and was fired.
Despite some of his inflammatory rhetoric about immigrants,
Stewart has navigated the changing demographics of his county
with some success.
He recently regained favor with
local Muslims upset about his support for Trump when he championed the building of a new
mosque in Gainesville — a project
that tapped into anti-Muslim sentiments before it was approved
after an all-night meeting last
month in a 5-to-4 vote.
But Stewart’s insurgent gubernatorial campaign did cost him
some support — four of the five
Republican supervisors who serve
with Stewart came out for
Gillespie, abandoning plans to
stay neutral.
jenna.portnoy@washpost.com
antonio.olivo@washpost.com
focused on running the Commonwealth and creating economic opportunity for the people
of Virginia. He doesn’t have any
knowledge or comment about
the company’s issues in Mississippi.”
GreenTech moved its headquarters last year to Sterling, Va.,
and did not immediately respond to email and phone messages.
gregory.schneider@washpost.com
New rule
for special
D.C. school
placements
LOTTERY FROM B1
Special school transfers will
still be available for students who
require them for special education or because of disabilities,
those who are physically endangered at their schools and the
children of military families, who
sometimes cannot go through the
normal lottery process because of
the timing of their parents’ postings.
LaToya Foster, a spokeswoman
for Bowser, said the new policy
reflected the mayor’s decision to
make permanent a moratorium
on discretionary transfers for
public officials’ children that she
put in place in May.
“As the policy was being formulated, the mayor decided that the
best way to ensure confidence in
the process was to extend the
prohibition permanently,” Foster
said.
D.C. Public Schools press secretary Michelle Lerner said Wilson
would not comment on the new
rules beyond the written policy.
She said the policy does not apply
retroactively to public officials’
children who are already in placements facilitated by Henderson.
The revelation of Henderson’s
special treatment for the children
of public officials and some other
associates outraged many District parents. In a city in which
the quality of public schools varies widely, the lottery — which
enables families to seek access to
schools outside their neighborhoods — is an annual source of
angst.
D.C. Inspector General Daniel
Lucas concluded that Henderson
did not commit any crimes but
had misused her authority by
giving preference to some parents who requested placements
that bypassed the lottery process.
Among those Henderson helped
were Snowden; City Administrator Rashad M. Young; former D.C.
mayor Adrian M. Fenty; and Roberto J. Rodríguez, a former staffer in the Obama White House.
Snowden and Young have
maintained that they did nothing
improper, an assertion echoed by
the mayor. Henderson, who re-
Officials’ requests for
preference for their
children will be denied
“immediately without
further consideration.”
New schools chancellor’s policy
signed last year after six years
heading DCPS, has dismissed the
findings of the inspector general’s
report as “an attempt to besmirch
my personal and professional
reputation.”
The city’s ethics board is also
conducting an investigation into
Henderson’s handling of school
placements.
Grosso, of the D.C. Council, had
requested information about all
special school placements dating
to 2014, the year in which the
citywide lottery was launched. In
his response, Wilson said the
school district had not kept “systematic records” of those placements but estimated that fewer
than five had been made, beyond
the seven described in the inspector general’s report.
None had been made since
Henderson left office, Wilson
said.
“Although I am disappointed
that it appears better records
were not kept of such requests
dating back to 2014, I applaud the
chancellor for establishing a policy to restore parents’ confidence
in the common lottery process
and utilize a more formal, transparent process for discretionary
placements going forward,” Grosso said in a statement.
peter.jamison@washpost.com
FRIDAY, JULY 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MARYLAND
EZ
B5
SU
THE DISTRICT
U.S. closes 2 former aides charged in cyberstalking of a congresswoman
Baltimore
light-rail
complaint
BY
BY
K ATHERINE S HAVER
The U.S. Transportation Department has closed a complaint alleging that Maryland
officials discriminated against
African Americans when they
canceled a long-planned lightrail line in Baltimore in 2015,
according to a letter sent to
state officials Thursday.
The federal agency will “administratively close the complaint without finding,” according to the letter sent to
Maryland Transportation Secretary Pete K. Rahn.
Federal officials have been
investigating two complaints,
which were consolidated into
one, alleging that African
Americans in Baltimore suffered “disparate impacts”
when Maryland Gov. Larry
Hogan (R) canceled the Red
Line project and diverted its
funding to road projects in
mostly white, rural areas of
the state. The 14-mile light-rail
line would have served lowerincome, African American
communities in the city.
The complaints were filed in
December 2015 by two African
American Baltimore residents
and civil rights groups, who
alleged that the Red Line’s
cancellation was part of a
history of racial discrimination in Maryland transportation funding decisions.
Hogan called the Red Line a
“wasteful boondoggle” that
would have cost far more than
its estimated $2.9 billion construction budget.
The letter signed by Charles
E. James Sr., director of the
Transportation Department’s
civil rights office, did not say
why the case was being closed
beyond saying it was “the
appropriate course of action.”
Ajmel Quereshi, an attorney
for one of the complainants,
called the letter “extremely
disappointing.”
“With the stroke of a pen,
this administration just killed
the complaint without any
finding or explanation at all,”
said Quereshi, senior counsel
for the NAACP Legal Defense
Fund. “This letter just says
we’re going to close the complaint because we can. It’s
brazen and disrespectful to the
people of Baltimore and insulting to African Americans
in Baltimore and throughout
the state of Maryland.”
James wrote that the agency
will continue a broader review
of the Maryland Transportation Department’s compliance
with Title VI of the Civil Rights
Act of 1964, which prohibits
racial discrimination in programs that receive federal aid.
Quereshi said such reviews
aren’t as thorough as the complaint investigative process
and often only require states
to show that they have a Title
VI plan. Moreover, he said, the
complainants will not have
any say in the review, as they
did in the complaint investigation.
Rahn called the letter “selfexplanatory.”
“If there are any issues in
the compliance review, USDOT
will discuss those with us,”
Rahn said in a written statement. “This review will complement our recent comprehensive MDOT-wide Title VI
plan we submitted to USDOT
this spring.”
katherine.shaver@washpost.com
S PENCER S . H SU
Two former staff members
have been charged in the circulation of nude images and video of a
representative to Congress and
her husband, federal prosecutors
and the U.S. Capitol Police announced Thursday in Washington.
Juan R. McCullum, 35, of Washington, was indicted by a grand
jury on two counts of cyberstalking, and a co-worker, Dorene
Browne-Louis, 45, of Upper Marlboro, Md., was indicted on two
counts of obstruction of justice,
said U.S. Attorney for the District
of Columbia Channing D. Phillips
and Capitol Police Chief Matthew
R. Verderosa in a statement.
The charging documents state
that both defendants worked for
the same official, who is identified
in the filings by the initials S.P.
Virgin Islands Del. Stacey Plaskett (D) confirmed Thursday in
statement that she is “S.P.,” saying
that “last year, my privacy was
invaded, which was followed by
an organized smear campaign
and defamatory press reports
concerning both me and my family.”
Plaskett said of her family that
“we continue to be saddened by
the damage we suffered as a result
of those egregious acts,” while
thanking investigators for their
work and people in the Virgin
Islands for their support.
Some of the personal photographs surfaced on the Internet
in July 2016 shortly before a primary election.
According to the indictment,
McCullum worked from April
2015 until June 2016 in the House
member’s legislative office in
Washington.
Browne-Louis
worked in the same office from
January 2015 until April 2016.
Public staff records show both
worked for Plaskett during those
times, McCullum as a legislative
counsel and Browne-Lewis as
a scheduler.
According to an indictment
handed up Tuesday and unsealed
Thursday, McCullum offered in
March 2016 to help take a House
member’s malfunctioning, password-protected iPhone to a local
Apple store to be repaired.
McCullum was not given permission to take, copy, or distribute any of the contents of the
iPhone, which contained the private nude images and videos, authorities alleged.
Browne-Louis pleaded not
guilty before a U.S. magistrate
2003 PHOTO BY JOE ELLIS/JACKSON (MISS.)
CLARION-LEDGER VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS
Juan R. McCullum was indicted
on two counts of cyberstalking.
Thursday to the obstruction of
justice charges and was released
on personal recognizance, authorities said. Her attorney declined to comment Thursday.
BOOKSTORE FROM B1
target. No arrests have been made
in the case.
Freeman estimates that he’ll
need to raise $180,000 for the
project.
“Books are the most transformative thing,” he said. “If you can
match the kid with the right book,
it can change them.”
Freeman, who co-owns We Act
Radio — a radio station on Martin
Luther King Boulevard in Anacostia, blocks from Frederick
Douglass’s historic house — said
the bookstore will have a focus on
African American authors and
will incorporate a social justice
mission.
He said he hopes that the bookstore can reduce the city’s illiteracy rate and subsequently reduce
violent crime, potentially preventing another death like that of
Milton’s. In the District, 19 percent of adults lack the reading
proficiency to read a newspaper,
according to the U.S. Education
Department’s National Center for
Education Statistics. The illiteracy rate in U.S. prisons is 60 percent, according to National Assessment of Adult Literacy data.
Milton’s parents said the bookstore’s social justice component
would make it an ideal tribute to
their daughter.
Milton’s mother, Francine Milton, recalled her daughter reading 99 books in a single summer
while in elementary school. She
was reading Shakespeare in middle school and, as an adult, en-
PHOTOS BY MARVIN JOSEPH/THE WASHINGTON POST
A bookstore that organizers are trying to open in the basement of
We Act Radio, above, would memorialize Charnice Milton, a 27year-old journalist who was killed two years ago. It would be in an
area that includes many of the District’s poorest neighborhoods.
joyed Japanese anime books. She
grew up in Southeast and sought
to tell stories that otherwise
wouldn’t be told as a contributing
reporter for Capital Community
News.
Her father, Ken McClenton,
said that Milton was often bullied
but found refuge in books and
libraries.
“I see this bookstore as mere
justice, not just social justice,”
McClenton said. “This is a tribute
to what a person can do when the
world comes against it. They can
overcome it. Even in death, Charnice was not a victim — she was a
conqueror.”
The bookstore, which Freeman
hopes to open before the end of
the year, would be housed in the
basement of the We Act Radio
studios. Freeman and other activists have collected thousands of
donated books to sell at the store,
although they eventually hope to
sell new and used books.
A nonprofit group affiliated
with We Act Radio, Social Art and
Culture, would operate the shop.
There are plans for professional
writing and reading workshops.
But Freeman said that he’s
raised only $1,200 so far, a frac-
tion of what’s needed to renovate
the basement space. At a ceremony announcing the bookstore
last month, representatives from
nonprofits, including Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in
America, and D.C. police attended
to show support.
Trayon White, who represents
Ward 8 on the D.C. Council, said
the bookstore is a needed addition to the neighborhood. A boom
in independent bookstores elsewhere in the city has yet to reach
neighborhoods each of the Anacostia River.
“It will show the value of education and literacy in our community,” he said. “It’s an excellent
idea that we should all support.
We can take something really sad
and make it positive for the community.”
For now, Freeman is planning
fundraisers while pitching developers on building in the neighborhood. He’s also hoping for a
financial boost from city leaders.
More than half a dozen teens
and college students are working
at We Act Radio as part of the
summer jobs program started by
former mayor Marion Barry,
helping Freeman pitch the store
to potential donors.
“This bookstore would mean a
lot. It would mean I wouldn’t
have had to go all the way uptown
to buy books,” said Emani Brown,
a 20-year-old senior at Virginia
State University who grew up in
Southeast. “Having access to a
place to purchase books here
would be amazing.”
Freeman said he envisions the
Charnice Milton Community
Bookstore being a mecca of black
intellectualism in the community. He can see philosopher and
black activist Cornel West hosting a reading, then walking upstairs for a radio interview at We
Act Radio.
A photo of Ida B. Wells, a
journalist and founding member
of the NAACP, greets visitors at
the entrance of We Act Radio.
Freeman wants to add a mural
depicting Milton to honor her
writing.
The shop would also enable
families to build book collections
of their own, he said.
“Not having a bookstore
wouldn’t be acceptable in any
other part of town,” he said. “The
library books need to be returned,
which means there are no books
left in the shelves at home.”
perry.stein@washpost.com
Many among crowd drawn to Sanders
SANDERS FROM B1
tially an extension of his own. He
said the candidate — who supports a $15 minimum wage, free
tuition at some public colleges
and a state-run, single-payer
health-care system — understands the pain felt by single
mothers who have trouble paying
child care, or minimum-wage
workers who spend 50 percent of
their income on housing.
“He knows that when we stand
together, we can do enormous
things,” Sanders said.
It remains unclear how much
weight Sanders carries among
Maryland
Democrats,
who
backed Hillary Clinton in the
2016 primary by a strong margin.
The candidate Our Revolution
endorsed in the recent Virginia
gubernatorial primary, former
congressman Tom Perriello, lost
that race by a wide margin. But
many in the crowd Thursday
morning were clearly drawn by
the senator’s presence.
“It was for Bernie,” Kensington
resident Irene Kelly, 67, said of
her presence at the rally. She said
she didn’t know anything about
Jealous, who is making his first
run for public office, and spent
part of the time before the event
reading his Wikipedia page.
Chris Bonilla, an 18-year-old
from Glenmont, said he is “intrigued” by the progressive
movement and came to the event
because of Sanders. Bonilla
walked away impressed by Jealous, however, and said he had
texted his cellphone number to
the campaign.
Danielle Greene, a retired librarian from Falls Church, Va.,
said she made the hour-long
drive to Silver Spring for a chance
to hear Sanders in person. She
left ready to contribute to Jealous’s campaign.
On Wednesday evening, Jealous, Madaleno, Baker and Kamenetz participated in a candidate
forum in Silver Spring organized
by Maryland Working Families
and SEIU. Ross, Shea and Gansler were not invited.
The Magazine
Delaney and Hogan were invited but did not attend.
The groups said they sought
the participation of candidates
they believe have statewide name
recognition and a strong base of
support, and have shown a clear
indication they are likely to run.
Ross and Shea, who like Jealous are first-time candidates,
took issue to being excluded from
the forum, which was closed to
reporters.
“The people should be allowed
to decide this election, which is
why it’s so disappointing that
great national organizations,
with proven progressive credentials, would deny their members
the right to hear from all of the
candidates a year before the primary,” Shea said.
Daniel Ensign, a spokesman
for the Ross campaign, said the
election “should be about putting
forward new ideas, meeting voters, and bringing new people into
the process.”
Welcome
to Utopia
In the 1960s, a
developer set
out to create
an ideal town in
rural Maryland.
It was a risk
then. Today,
Columbia is a
model.
Arts & Style
Golden era of standup: Never before has so much
original comedy material been so easily accessed and
consumed. Thank social media, Netflix and “Beatleslevel talent” for the explosion of laughter.
ovetta.wiggins@washpost.com
josh.hicks@washpost.com
Metro
Alias ‘The Limping Lady’: Enjoy the audacious World
War II exploits of Maryland native Virginia Hall, the spy
with the wooden leg.
that drugs
and alcohol
may
have
played a role
in the incident.
The possibility
of
drugs and
alcohol in
Urbanski’s
system are
“still aspects
Urbanski
of our investigation that we’re not prepared
to discuss,” Alsobrooks said.
When reached Thursday, a
spokesman for the Collins family
said they would not be commenting on the indictment.
If Urbanski is convicted, Alsobrooks said her office would seek
the maximum sentence of life in
prison without parole.
Collins’s killing drew national
attention and outcry.
Urbanski’s association with a
Facebook group that is called “AltReich: Nation” stoked concerns of
a possible hate crime amid heightened racial tensions at the University of Maryland and at other colleges across the country.
Authorities said the group
posted racist and inflammatory
material, but one of the site’s
creators told the media that the
page was intended to be satire.
In response to Collins’s slaying,
the University of Maryland announced a number of initiatives
intended to review how the college investigates, reports and prevents hate crimes.
Initially, authorities said it
didn’t appear that the stabbing
was racially motivated, but they
later enlisted the FBI’s help after
finding Urbanski’s link to the social media page.
Alsobrooks said law enforcement officials still have “quite a
bit of evidence to go through” as
they determine possible hatecrime charges. Urbanski had
“multiple digital devices” that
will take time to analyze, she
said.
If authorities determine that
Collins’s killing was racially motivated, prosecutors can request a
superseding indictment from the
grand jury to charge Urbanski
with a hate crime.
“Because we appreciate and respect that this family deserves to
know as best we can why this
happened to their son, it’s important for us to get it right,” Alsobrooks said. “The ‘why’ is something we all want to know.”
lynh.bui@washpost.com
Sports
America’s top 9-year-old: In youth basketball
culture, people are always searching for the next
superstar talent. Meet the young basketball player from
Prince George’s County who fits the bill at No. 1 in the
nation—and his conflicted mom.
Travel
A first time for everything: Flying with a baby. Flying
first class. Going by bus, and more. Six travelers share
the thrills and trepidations in doing something new.
17-0845 2x10.5
American, in a “totally unprovoked” attack, police said.
Urbanski fled but was later
found near the scene of the stabbing with a folding knife in his
pocket, police said.
The incident was captured on
video, prosecutors said.
“He was simply standing with
friends when, completely unprovoked, he was repeatedly stabbed
at the bus stop,” Alsobrooks said.
Collins’s slaying came during
what should have been a time of
celebration for the young man,
who was to graduate from Bowie
State days later and had recently
been commissioned in the U.S.
Army as a second lieutenant.
Urbanski’s attorney, who did
not respond to a request for comment Thursday, said previously
spencer.hsu@washpost.com
Activists plan bookstore in neighborhood where none exist
State’s attorney: Stabbing at bus stop was unprovoked
URBANSKI FROM B1
McCullum has not yet appeared in court. Attorneys for
McCullum could not immediately
be identified.
In July 2016, after McCullum
left the congressional member’s
staff, he allegedly created a Hotmail account and a Facebook account under a fake name to post
the material and encouraged
sharing it, the indictment states.
The indictment also alleged that
McCullum texted Browne-Louis
as early as July 2, 2016, and
emailed her some of the material.
Federal investigators launched
an investigation within days, and
alleged that Browne-Louis deleted McCullum’s texts from her
phone and gave false and misleading statements to them and
the grand jury. Browne-Louis is
set to return to court Wednesday.
Sunday Savings
Save big with inserts in the Post Marketplace package
of this Sunday’s Post!
Some stories may not run due to breaking news.
B6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
obituaries
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14 , 2017
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
LITTLE
HALL
LEW
ARTHUR LITTLE
CONSTANCE V. HALL
SUA CHU LEW
In loving memory of ARTHUR LITTLE, who
departed this life 27 years ago, July 14, 1990.
I never realized how much one can be missed
until they are gone.
I love and miss you,
Your Daughter, Barbara Little
SMITH
DEATH NOTICE
Departed this life on June 26, 2017.
Devoted mother to Sharlene A. Gordon. Survived by sisters Gloria Beckford, Ethel Bernard, Una Melbourne,
Ivy Lawrence, and brother Spencer
Hall. Visitation Saturday, July 15,
2017 from 10 a.m. until hour of service 11 a.m.
at Temple Baptist Church, 3850 Nebraska Ave.
NW, Washington, DC 20016. Interment Gate
of Heaven Cemetery. Service by R.N. Horton's
Funeral Service.
On Friday, June 30, 2017, Sua Chu Lew, of
Washington DC. Beloved wife of the late Sun
Ock Lew; loving mother of William, Nancy
(Kenner), Colleen (Terry), Lucy and the late
David Lew; and cherished grandmother of
Nathan. Friends may call at the Hines Rinaldi
Funeral Home, LLC., on Saturday, July 15 from
11:30 a.m., until 1:30 p.m. Interment will follow
at George Washington Cemetery, Adelphi, MD.
Memorial contributions may be made to the
American Diabetes Association, (www.diabetes.org). Please view and sign the family
guestbook at:
www.hinesrinaldifuneralhome.com
LIVINGOOD
HOWTON
TAIT STUART LIVINGOOD
(Age 79)
Of Charlottesville, VA, formerly of Great Falls
and Reston, VA, died on July 12, 2017. Born in
Baltimore, MD, Tait was one of three daughters
of the late James Stuart and Frances Dornin.
She was preceded in death by her parents, her
sister, Sally Stuart, and by her former husband,
Dr. John Livingood. She is survived by her sister,
Betsy North; her sons, James, Jay and Joe; and
their wives and children. A memorial service
will be held Saturday, September 16, 2017, 2
p.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 500 Park
Street, Charlottesville, VA 22902. Additional
details at taitlivingood.com.
WILLIE MAE (POWER) SMITH
1928 - 2016
Beloved mother, grandmother, greatgrandmother, sister and aunt. And daughter of King Jesus. Always on our minds.
Forever in our hearts.
Love, Your Family
LOMAX
GEORGENIA E. LOMAX
HARRY MARSHALL HOWTON "Pete"
(Age 74)
BERND KAMMERER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Chuck Blazer elevated the status and wealth of soccer in North America over several decades, but any
achievements were polluted by a ravenous appetite to seek bribes and siphon cash from deals.
CHUCK BLAZER, 72
Soccer official’s corruption admission
led to toppling of global body’s leader
F ROM STAFF REPORTS
AND NEWS SERVICES
The charade only ended in the
final years of Chuck Blazer’s life.
Stripped of his extravagances, soccer’s gregarious and greedy dealmaker was forced to admit to his
years of corruption and confined
to a New Jersey hospital.
The eccentric bon vivant, who
once strode across the global stage
being flattered by sport and political
leaders, died in disgrace July 12 at 72.
However much Mr. Blazer elevated the status and wealth of
soccer in North America over several decades, any achievements
were polluted by the ravenous appetite of “Mr. 10 Percent” to seek
bribes and siphon cash from deals
into his personal account.
Mr. Blazer went on to play a
central role in exposing soccer’s
fraudulent culture, which led to
FIFA President Sepp Blatter, longtime leader of soccer’s governing
body, being toppled. But he turned
only when presented with little
option but to become a cooperating witness.
The impact of Mr. Blazer’s death
on the FIFA prosecution in the
United States — where three
South American soccer officials
are set to go on trial in November
— is unclear. Many of the more
prominent figures who might
have faced him as a star government witness have already pleaded guilty.
Mr. Blazer was driving his mobility scooter on a Manhattan
street in 2011 when he was
stopped by U.S. government
agents and threatened with arrest.
He had failed to fill in tax returns
for years, and he soon became a
government informant, using his
role on FIFA’s already-tainted executive committee to secretly record conversations with associates.
He swept up evidence that
formed the foundations of a Justice Department case against
world soccer executives who embezzled cash from commercial
contracts and sought payments in
return for backing countries as
World Cup hosts.
At a November 2013 court hearing where his treatment for rectal
cancer, diabetes and coronary artery disease was disclosed, Mr.
Blazer entered 10 guilty pleas. He
admitted to sharing in a $10 million bribe scheme with others to
support South Africa’s bid for the
2010 World Cup, and to facilitating a kickback linked to Morocco’s
failed bid for the 1998 World Cup.
His guilty pleas were only unsealed by a New York court in
July 2015 after the American investigation into FIFA exploded
into public view with a raid on a
Zurich hotel ahead of the annual
gathering of soccer nations.
Since then, U.S. prosecutors
have brought charges against
more than 40 soccer officials and
associates, while the Swiss attorney general has been conducting
parallel investigations.
Charles Gordon Blazer was
born
in
New
York
on
April 26, 1945. A graduate of New
York University, he worked as a
salesman and started in soccer
coaching his son’s club in New
Rochelle, N.Y.
He joined boards of local and
regional soccer organizations before becoming the U.S. Soccer Federation’s executive vice president
in 1984. He helped to form the
American Soccer League, a precursor to Major League Soccer,
before entering regional soccer
politics through CONCACAF, the
sport’s governing body for the
North and Central American and
Caribbean region.
Mr. Blazer urged Jack Warner to
run for president of the organization in 1990. When the Trinidadian won, he made Mr. Blazer the
general secretary — a position he
held until 2011.
In 1991, Mr. Blazer created the
CONCACAF Gold Cup, the organization’s national team championship that is played every two years
and is now underway. He rose
within FIFA to become chairman
of its marketing and television
advisory board, and then turned
on his boss, who also served with
him on FIFA’s executive committee.
Corruption had been rumored
for years within world soccer before Mr. Blazer provided evidence,
accusing Warner and Mohamed
bin Hammam of offering
$40,000 bribes to voters in the
2011 FIFA presidential election.
Bin Hammam, a Qatari who headed the Asian Football Confederation, had been the lone challenger
to Blatter, who was elected unopposed to a fourth term after Warner and bin Hammam were suspended.
Blatter was elected to a fifth
term in 2015 before resigning after
the raids in Zurich.
Mr. Blazer’s conduct was as corrupt as the actions of the people he
accused.
He pleaded guilty in November 2013 to one count each of
racketeering conspiracy, wire
fraud conspiracy, money laundering conspiracy and willful failure
to file a Report of Foreign Bank
and Financial Accounts, and to six
counts of tax evasion.
A separate CONCACAF investigation report released in 2013 said
Mr. Blazer “misappropriated
CONCACAF funds to finance his
personal lifestyle,” causing the organization to “subsidize rent on
his residence in the Trump Tower
in New York; purchase apartments at the Mondrian, a luxury
hotel and residence in Miami; sign
purchase agreements and pay
down payments on apartments at
the Atlantis resort in the Bahamas.”
While Mr. Blazer was banned
from soccer by FIFA in 2015, he
was awaiting sentencing when he
died. His lawyers announced his
death but did not provide additional details.
A marriage to Susan Aufox ended in divorce. Survivors include
two children and several grandchildren.
There were almost no public
tributes from FIFA or CONCACAF
immediately after his death. In
U.S. Soccer, the only acknowledgment of Mr. Blazer’s passing was a
comment in a news conference by
men’s national team coach Bruce
Arena.
“I’ve known Chuck for a lot of
years. He did a lot for the sport.
Sorry about all the issues regarding FIFA,” Arena said.
“But he was a good man.”
newsobits@washpost.com
DEATH NOTICE
BARRETT
Pete Howton, a Washington-area businessman
and former Navy officer, died of cancer on July
6, 2017. He passed away peacefully at home
in Falls Church, VA, with his family by his side.
He was born in Bristol, VA, in 1942, the son of
Harry G. Howton and Frances H. Howton. Mr.
Howton grew up all over the world as the son of
an Air Force officer, though his family had deep
roots in Alabama. He was a 1961 graduate
of Fishburne Military School in Waynesboro,
VA. In 1966, he graduated with an engineering
degree from the U.S. Naval Academy.
Mr. Howton’s years as a U.S. Navy officer
included service in Vietnam in command of a
Swift boat. He earned an M.S. in oceanography
from the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, CA. In 1975, he retired from the Navy
and went to work at Syscon Corp. in San Diego.
Mr. Howton was a true entrepreneur. He founded several companies after his military service,
including three successful government contracting firms: Kestrel Associates, Gray Hawk
Systems and finally Kingfisher Systems.
In 2005, he sold Gray Hawk to ManTech International Corp. Until his recent illness, he
remained actively involved in running Kingfisher. His companies have been on the Inc.
500 list of fastest-growing private companies
nine times.
Mr. Howton defined “family” broadly and valued it above all else. Another core value
was education, and he generously supported
many relatives and friends in their educational
pursuits.
His first marriage was to Louise Alpert, with
whom he had three children: Elizabeth Howton
(Nana) of Falls Church, VA, Martha Sottosanti
(Mark) of La Jolla, CA, and Chris Howton
(Donna) of San Diego, CA. He later married
Barbara Francis, with whom he had two children: Sylvana Howton and Annabeth Howton,
both of Falls Church. He also leaves two sisters,
eight grandchildren, and many other relatives.
A service will be held Wednesday, July 19
at 11 a.m. at St. Alban’s Episcopal Church,
6800 Columbia Pike, Annandale, VA. In lieu of
flowers, the family suggests donations to the
American Cancer Society.
Passed away on Thursday, July 6, 2017. The
family will receive friends at Oak Shade Baptist
Church, 3287 Old Catlett Rd., Catlett, VA on
Saturday, July 15, 2017 at 10 a.m. for funeral
service.
LOTARSKI
Dr. SUSANNE S. LOTARSKI
On July 9, 2017, at age 74, Dr. Susanne
S. Lotarski passed away in Rockville, MD.
Her father, Casimir Lotarski and mother,
Anna (Gerlach) Lotarski, predeceased her.
Susanne was a remarkable woman who
was very much loved and will be sorely
missed by her dear friends, Joseph and
Shirley Halizak, Maria Quas DePenno, Nerissa Cook, Christine Lucyk, many, many
others.
She was President of the Polish American
Congress (PAC) and very active in Polish
American community affairs. She was a
long-time employee at the Department of
Commerce and retired as Deputy Assistant
Secretary. Friends will be received at
Pumphrey’s Bethesda-Chevy Chase Funeral Home, 7557 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda
on Friday, July 14 from 3 to 5 and 7 to
9 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial in Shrine
of the Most Blessed Sacrament Western
Ave and Quesanda St., Washington, DC on
Saturday at 1 p.m. Entombment in Gate of
Heaven Cemetery on Tuesday, July 18 at
10:30 a.m. Please view and sign the family
online guestbook at
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
MEDAS
PAUL J. BARRETT, SR.
On Sunday, July 9, 2017, of Leisure World,
formerly of Rockville, MD. Beloved husband
of the late Marie A. Barrett, loving father
of Paul J., Jr. (and Susan) and John F., Sr.
(and Tracy) Barrett; grandfather of John
F. Jr. (and Jennifer) Barrett, Kelly M. (and
Tanner) Weeks and Patrick T Barrett; great
grandfather of Meghan C. and Connor J.
Barrett. Paul was eagerly awaiting the birth
of his third great grandchild. The family
will receive friends at St. Mary’s Catholic
Church, 520 Veirs Mill Rd., Rockville, MD
20852 on Monday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9
p.m., where a Mass of Christian Burial will
be offered on Tuesday, July 18, 2017 at 10
a.m. Interment Gate of Heaven Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers memorial contributions
may be made to St. Mary’s Catholic Church
at the above address. Please view and sign
the family’s online guestbook at:
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
COLEMAN
HUNTLEY
BESSIE MAE HUNTLEY
On Saturday, July 8, 2017 Bessie
Mae Huntley of Capital Heights,
Maryland entered peacefully into
eternal rest. Loving mother of Laverne, Bernard, William Huntley
and Linda (Walter) Huntley-Brewington. Also survived two sisters,
Thelma Daniels, Josephine Lewis; five grandchildren; nine great-grandchildren, many other
relatives and friends. Family will receive friends
on Saturday, July 15, from 10 a.m. until time of
service at 11 a.m. at Bethesda New Life Gospel
Church, 750 Kenilworth Ave. NE., Washington,
DC. Interment Harmony Memorial Park. Send
condolences:
www.wisemanfuneralhome.net
ENYD W. MEDAS
Entered into eternal rest on July 11, 2017.
Beloved sister of Beryl and the late Amy and
Hazeline; loving aunt of Terri, Walter, Derek,
John, Patty, Jackie and Trevor; cousin of Bertley
Elise, Joan, Eustace, John, Jimmy, Pat and and
the late Hank. Also survived by a host of
loving great-nieces, nephews, cousins, other
relatives and friends. Visitation on Tuesday,
July 18 at 10 a.m., followed by funeral service
at 11 a.m. at Church of the Redeemer, 1423
Girard St., NE. Interment Rock Creek Cemetery.
Arrangements by McGUIRE.
www.mcguire-services.com
SIMS
cans to progress in this society as a result
of racism. Dr. Sims was fluent in Spanish,
French, German, Italian, Portuguese, KiSwahili and Arabic. She retired from UDC
in 2007. Claude’s Tailor Shop (2011) her
latest book is a historical tribute to the
little known history of her father, the first
African American Tailor to build and own his
business in Joliet, Illinois.
WILLIAM THADDEUS COLEMAN, JR.
Former Secretary of Transportation, William Thaddeus Coleman, Jr. born July 7,
1920, died March 31, 2017 at his home
in Alexandria, VA at 96. He is survived
by his wife of 72 years, Lovida Hardin
Coleman; three children, William Thaddeus Coleman, III, Lovida Hardin Coleman,
Jr., and Hardin L. Kennedy Coleman, and
four grandchildren. A memorial service
will be held at 10 a.m. on October 28 at
the Washington National Cathedral in the
District of Columbia. In lieu of flowers,
donations should be made to the NAACP
Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.
of which Secretary Coleman was Chairman or President for 25 years. Additional
information is available for William Coleman at www.everlywheatley.com.
AMÉRICO AMORIM, 82
Dr. EDNA NIECIE SIMS
August 22, 1933 ~ May 17, 2017
The life of Dr. Edna Niecie Sims, an African
American university Spanish professor, is
celebrated as a historical and cultural legacy
that impacts higher education in the United
States and links America’s treasured Historically Black Education Institutions of Higher
Learning to the University of the District
of Columbia (UDC) and Howard University
where she taught. Dr. Sims was the First
African American to Chair the new Foreign
Language Department at the University of
the District of Columbia, the first Urban
Land Grant Institution of Higher Learning
in the United States. Dr. Sims taught Vocal
Pedagogy at UDC also. Dr. Sims spent a
lifetime building cultural bridges of friendship in this country and overseas and
encouraged her students to do the same.
Her many accomplishments come at a time
when it was uncommon for African Ameri-
A Celebration of Life Service for Dr. Edna
Niecie Sims: Wednesday, July 19, 2017 at
Shiloh Baptist Church, 1500 9th Street N.W.,
Washington, DC 20001. Visitation 10 to 11
a.m. Service 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. She is
survived by Shirley Sims Jackson (sister),
Rev. Arbuckle (Barbara); nieces Joy Catherine Jackson, Wendy Christina Jackson, Rogeria Westbrooks, Cynthia Brady (Thomas),
Shannon Brady, Gabrielle Marie Jackson;
nephews: Eric Vincent Jackson, Jr. MD, MBA
(Cheryl, MD), Eric Vincent Jackson, III, Julian
Alexander Jackson, Ronald Alton Marcus
Westbrooks, Marc Christopher Westbrooks;
Melvin Irving, John Boyden (Patricia), Yvonne
Mc Gee McLurklin, Reginald McLurken, John
Hawkins (Emily), Ira Glover, Jowell Staples
and a host of other relatives and friends.
An Endowed Study Abroad Scholarship Fund
has been established in memory of Dr. Edna
Niecie Sims at Howard University.
In lieu of flowers, please make donations
in memory of Dr. Edna Niecie Sims. Make
check/money orders payable to: Dr. Edna N
Sims Fund and Mail to:
Howard University
C/O Bank of America
P.O. Box 417853
Boston, MA 02241-7853
For online donations, questions contact:
Christina H. Esters, CFRE
(Phone] 202.238.2535 (Mobile) 336.266.8358
christina.esters@howard.edu
Known as Portugal’s king of cork
STAFF REPORTS
AND NEWS SERVICES
Américo Amorim, who was
known as the king of cork for
building his fortune on cork stoppers and was believed to be Portugal’s wealthiest man, died July 13.
He was 82.
His company, Corticeira Amorim, announced his death but did
not provide additional details.
Mr. Amorim had stepped down
from his executive duties in October because of health problems.
Portugal is the world’s largest
cork producer, accounting for
about half of global output, and
no cork company is larger than
Corticeira Amorim, which Mr.
Amorim’s grandfather founded in
1870. The company processes
about one quarter of all the cork
in the world, helping Mr. Amorim
build a fortune worth $4.4 billion,
according to Forbes magazine.
With plastic stoppers for wine
bottles encroaching on his market, Mr. Amorim diversified cork
uses into areas such as insulation
and furniture and created a conglomerate, the Amorim Group,
NACHO DOCE/REUTERS
Américo Amorim in 2009. His
Corticeira Amorim is the
world’s largest cork company.
that expanded his business into
wine production and tourism.
Mr. Amorim also held significant
stakes in Portuguese financial,
telecommunications and energy
companies.
He was born into a modest
family in Mozelos, in northern
Portugal, in 1934. The fifth of
eight children, he started work at
Corticeira Amorim — a small
company at the time — at 18. He
left that job to spend more than
four years traveling through
South America, Europe and Asia,
a trip he later described as “a
fantastic university.”
Mr. Amorim inherited a
2.5 percent share in the family
company, and from that he built
his business empire on the back
of an export drive.
After an army coup in 1974
toppled Portugal’s long dictatorship, business executives fled the
country. Mr. Amorim stayed and
bought their assets, sometimes
for knockdown prices, including
vast areas of cork forest in southern Portugal.
Survivors include his wife,
three daughters and several
grandchildren.
The cork oak is remarkable for
its spongy bark, which can be
peeled away every nine years or
so without killing the tree. Portugal’s cork industry employs
around 15,000 people, working
on harvest or in factories making
stoppers and other products.
Mr. Amorim’s companies do
business in dozens of countries. “I
don’t consider myself rich,” he
told a Portuguese newspaper in
2011. “I’m a worker.”
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Military emblems are available with death notices and in-memoriams
HAMLET H. DOUGLAS, JR.
"Hank"
On Tuesday, July 4, 2017 in Washington, DC.
died. Dear husband of 40 years of Betty "Bing"
Bradshaw. A native Washingtonian, Hamlet is
survived by brothers, Kevin Douglas and Brian
Douglas (Lesia); uncles, Herbert, Ralph and
Larry; aunts Doris and Yvonne. on Tuesday, July
18, 2017 a gathering of family and friends will
be held at Calvary Episcopal Church, 820 6th
St. NE. Washington, DC. for a 10 a.m. visitation
and a 11 a.m. memorial service. Services by
McGuire.
GABRIEL
STEPHEN D. GABRIEL (Age 47)
Passed on Saturday, July 1, 2017. Son of the
late Vernal and Eleanor Fennell Gabriel. He
was also preceded in death by his brother,
Keith Gabriel. He is survived by his devoted
companion, Jeannine Williams; siblings, Donald
Long, Andre (Gloria), Romone, Verna, and Pastor Vernell Gabriel and a host of other relatives
and many friends. Famiy will receive friends
on Saturday, July 15 at 2 p.m. until time
of Homegoing Service, 3 p.m. at Johnson &
Jenkins Funeral Home, 716 Kennedy St., NW.
www.johnsonandjenkinsfh.com
To place a notice call 202-334-4122 or 800-627-1150, ext. 44122
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FRIDAY, JULY 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
DEATH NOTICE
EZ
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MILLER
RICH
THOMPSON
CHEUNG
RAY
THURSTON
CORRINNE ESTELLE MILLER
(nee Milton) (Age 98)
MARSHALL MILLER RICH
Of Washington, DC, departed this life on Saturday, July 8, 2017. Services will be held on
Tuesday, July 18, 2017 at 9 a.m. at Pope Funeral
Home, 5538 Marlboro Pike, District Heights,
MD, followed by a funeral service at 10 a.m.
Interment at Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
LINDA F. RAY
MARGARET MARTT THURSTON
(Age 99)
On Thursday, July 6, 2017 in Silver Spring,
MD. She was a resident of Adelphi, MD,
formerly of Mt. Rainier, MD for 82 years.
Daughter of the late Robert Buchanan and
Corrinne Malinda (Parker) Milton. Granddaughter of Robert Lorimer and Ida
(Buchanan) Milton and Charles Clarence
and Mary "Molly" Elizabeth (Shaw) Parker.
She was the sister of the late Dorothy May
(Milton) Hysan (John). Estelle graduated
from McKinley Tech High School in 1937.
She was married to the late Earl Francis
Miller in 1941, with whom she shared over
55 years. Estelle worked as a secretary for
C & P Telephone Co. for over 30 years
before retiring. She was a member of St.
John's Episcopal/Anglican Church in Mt.
Rainier, MD for 94 years, where she served
in many capacities. She was also a member
of Bethel No. 10 of Job's Daughters and was
selected Queen in 1937. Estelle was a loving
and supportive mother and grandmother,
and an aunt, cousin, friend, and neighbor
to many. She had a quiet strength and was
a compassionate Christian. She especially
enjoyed traveling, reading, sewing, church
activities, and the Washington Redskins.
She had a long and interesting life and will
be greatly missed by family and friends.
She is survived by her daughter, Margaret
Corrinne Miller (companion Clarence Bee,
Jr.), and her son, Barry Earl Miller (Kathleen
Sharon Weaver Walker Miller); grandchildren Jeffrey Scott Miller (Chelsey), Danielle
Marie Miller, Gregory Martin Walker, Lara
Anne Granzow (Matthew), Lawren Shelynn
Andes-Miller (companion Joseph Austin);
great-grandchildren Shannon, Jeff, Jr.,
Jakob, and Nikolaas Miller, Jake, Jackson,
Jayden, and Jordan Walker, Lily, Macy, and
Mara Granzow, and Steven Austin. Friends
may call at Gasch's Funeral Home, P.A.,
4739 Baltimore Avenue, Hyattsville, on Friday, July 14 from 5 to 8 p.m., and also
on Saturday, July 15 from 10 a.m. until
service time at 11 a.m. at St. John's Episcopal/Anglican Church, 4112 34th Street, Mt.
Rainier, MD. Interment Fort Lincoln Cemetery, Brentwood, MD. Reception to follow
the burial at the church. Memorial contributions may be made in Estelle's name to
St. John's Episcopal/Anglican Church at the
above stated address.
www.gaschs.com
Passed away after a brief illness on July 6,
2017. He was born on August 3, 1925, the
son of Samuel Oscar and Helen Rich.
A native of North Carolina, he lived most of
his adult life overseas. He was predeceased
by his wife, Vesta Kellam Rich, and his first
wife, Mary Dowell Rich. In retirement he
settled in Potsdam, NY and following the
death of his wife he moved to Winchester,
VA where his volunteer work at the Museum of the Shenandoah Valley gave him
time to complete a critical assessment
of the works of a local Revolutionary era
portraitist. He lived his final years in Washington, DC. During World War II, he received
a commission in the U.S. Navy Civil Engineering Corps and served in the Pacific.
After the war he completed his civil engineering degree at North Carolina State
University and did postgraduate work at
Yale University. He entered the nascent and
rapidly growing field of traffic engineering
and spent his career with the international
engineering consulting firm, Wilbur Smith
& Associates of Columbia, SC. He served
as a managing director of Wilbur Smith's
Hong Kong office and worked for more
than 20 years in the direction of major
planning studies across Australasia, including metropolitan area studies in Bombay,
Melbourne, Singapore and Hong Kong. He
was a Fellow of the Hong Kong Institute
of Engineers, the Institute of Engineers Australia, the American Society of Civil Engineers, and the Institute of Transportation
Engineers, and was registered as a Professional Engineer in California.
He is survived by his daughter, Barbara
Cabot (Sharilyn Cohn); son, David Rich
(Mary Rich); and daughter by his first marriage, Nancy Kuhn (Roy Henwood); granddaughter Sena Rich; and several nieces and
nephews.
There will be a private graveside gathering
at a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to SacredFlight (www.sacredflight.org) and the NC State University
Library.
JANIE V. THOMPSON (Deaconess)
TOMCHIK
MICHAEL R. TOMCHIK (Age 69)
It is with regret that we notify
the members of Steamfitters
Local #602 of the death of Brother
Michael Tomchik. Private service
being held by family. Notice #1622
Daniel W. Loveless, FST
IN MEMORIAM
Actively involved in the District of Columbia's Chinatown community, George was
a founding member and officer of the Chinese American Citizens Alliance of Washington, DC and served as president of
several community organizations, including the Chi-Am Lions Club, Lee Federal
Credit Union, and Lee Family Association
of Washington, DC. He remained active in
these organizations for decades.
BEATTY
ANDRE QUINTAN BEATTY
7/14/1987 ~ 1/30/2006
Happy 30th Birthday, Dre
God blessed us with you on this special day
Always in our hearts, Forever missed and
loved!!
Mom, Dad, Candyce, Colin and Family
PLEDGER
RICHARD ALFRED PLEDGER "Dick"
(Age 84)
A resident of Greenspring Village in Springfield,
Virginia, died at his home on Sunday, July
2, 2017 with his wife by his side on their
62nd wedding anniversary. Born on July 3,
1932 in Mineola, New York, Dick was the
son of the late Walter A. Pledger and Mabel
S. Pledger. He was a 1950 graduate of the
New York Military Academy in Cornwall-onHudson, New York where he attained the
rank of First Captain, the highest military rank
for a cadet, and was awarded the Alumni
Distinction Award for Overall Contribution and
Accomplishments, the Physics Medal and the
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Award for
Excellence in Science and Mathematics. He
earned his B.S. degree from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York in 1954,
majoring in Biology with a minor in Chemistry.
In 1957, he earned his Ph.D. in Microbiology
with a minor in Biochemistry from Rutgers
University. He began his career with the U.S.
Department of Agriculture in Greenport, New
York at the Plum Island Animal Disease Laboratory and then spent a few years with
Hazleton Laboratories in Vienna, Virginia where
he studied processes leading to leukemia and
lymphoma. He spent the remainder of his
career with the National Institutes of Health
in Bethesda, Maryland working in the National
Cancer Institute and in the National Institute of
Diabetes, and Digestive and Kidney Diseases,
retiring in 1995. Dick was an accomplished
pianist and developed a very deep appreciation
for the classical works of Beethoven, Chopin
and Rachmaninov. Dick is survived by his wife,
Carolyn Hughes Brastow Pledger; his two sons,
Mark C. Pledger of Gaithersburg, Maryland
and his wife, Angela Y. Pledger, and Richard
T. Pledger of Manakin Sabot, Virginia and his
wife, Kelly C. Pledger; and five grandchildren
including Aaron C. Pledger, Joshua Pledger
and Andrew Pledger, and Ryan C. Pledger and
Hannah R. Pledger. In addition to his parents,
he was preceded in death by his brother, Walter
R. Pledger of Shippensburg, Pennsylvania. A
memorial service will be held on Saturday,
July 15, 2017 at 2 p.m. at the Chapel at
Greenspring Village in Springfield, Virginia, with
the Rev. James M. Bell officiating, immediately
followed by a reception at the Hunters Crossing
Conference Center on the Greenspring Village
Campus. Dick will be interred with his parents
in the Greenfield Cemetery in the Town of
Hempstead, New York on Long Island.
GEORGE CHEUNG
On Tuesday, July 4, 2017. Born in Taishan,
China and immigrated to the United States
in 1939. He was employed by the Federal
and District of Columbia governments for
a combined 28 years as an engineer. Following his "official" retirement in government service, he embarked on a second
career working as the general manager
of a Chinatown restaurant for 20 years,
retiring at the age of 84.
EDMONDS
ROSS
CYNTHIA E. ROSS "Cindy"
Peacefully on July 6, 2017; daughter of Rev.
Dr. Rose E. Bess; mother of Paul (Jocelyn) and
Leroy Avery, Tyrese Brown, Sedera and Ebony
Ross. Visitation July 15, 2017, 10 a.m. until
service 11 a.m. Independent Church Of God,
2302 Ainger Place S.E. Internment Cedar Hill
George was the patriarch of a large
extended family. He is survived by his
wife of 70 years, Helen Lee Cheung of
Kensington, Maryland; and daughters, Carolyn Hum, of Kensington, Maryland, and
Virginia Cheung (Jeff Neeley) of Washington, DC. Also surviving are his five
grandchildren, Matthew Hum of Singapore; Christina Hum Scarantino (Josef) of
Denver; Jonathan Hum of Changhua, Taiwan; Katherine Neeley of Bangkok; and
Alexander Neeley of Seattle; and greatgrandson, Oscar Scarantino.
In lieu of flowers, the family requests
memorial contributions in George's name
be made to the Angel Island Immigration
Station Foundation, 5 Third Street, Suite
700, San Francisco, California 94103; or
the Chinese Community Church of Washington, DC, 500 I Street, NW, Washington,
DC 20001.
CHARLES O. SECHLER (Age 70)
It is with regret that we notify
the members of Steamfitters
Local #602 of the death of Brother
Charles O. Sechler. Services held
by family. Notice #1623.
Daniel W. Loveless, FST
SPECTOR
JULES SPECTOR
(Age 86)
Surrounded by loving family, Jules Spector passed
away at his home in
Washington, DC, on July
7, 2017. Born in Philadelphia, PA. Beloved husband of Patricia (Regan)
Spector; and loving father of Michael (Kelly) and
Daniel (Lindsay) Spector. Also survived by his
four grandchildren, Jack, Will, Lilly and Amelia.
Son of the late Sarah and David Spector; and
brother of the late Paul Spector. He will be
remembered for his strength, loyalty, love of
family, and his fascination with the written
word. Family and friends are invited to call at
DeVol Funeral Home, 2222 Wisconsin Ave., NW,
Washington DC (Complimentary Valet Parking)
on Wednesday, July 19, between 5 and 7 p.m.,
with brief remarks at 6:30 p.m. Interment
private. In lieu of flowers, donations can be
made to the United States Holocaust Museum.
DEATH NOTICE
On Friday, July 7, 2017, of
Gaithersburg, MD, formerly of
Wheaton, MD. Beloved wife of
the late Paul A. Thurston; mother of Robert E. (Delabian), Jean
M. (Cynthia), George M. (Sally)
and the late William P. (Julian). Also survived
by 12 grandchildren, 10 great grandchildren and many other loving family and
friends. Service will be held on Saturday,
July 29, 10 a.m. at Guild Chapel, Asbury
Methodist Village, Gaithersburg, MD 20877
(enter through gatehouse, 301 Odendhal
Ave). Interment Gate of Heaven Cemetery,
private. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to United Church of
Christ of Seneca Valley, 13421 Clopper Rd,
Germantown, MD 20874.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
SCHNEIDER
On Friday, July 14, 2017, from 6 to 9
p.m., friends may visit with the family at
North Bethesda United Methodist Church,
10100 Old Georgetown Road, Bethesda,
Maryland 20814, visitation will also be
held Saturday, July 15 from 10 to 11 a.m.
where a funeral service will be held at the
same location on Saturday, July 15 at 11
a.m. Interment will follow at Washington
National Cemetery, 4104 Suitland Road,
Suitland, Maryland 20746.
Memories and Directions:
www.InterFaithFunerals.com
SECHLER
Linda F. Ray, born October 3, 1943, died
at home on Monday, July 10, 2017 after a
long fight with leukemia. She had retired
in 1997 from the Department of Army at
the Hoffman Building in Alexandria. She
was the youngest of eight daughters and
a lifelong resident of Virginia, living for
many years in Ashburn. She is survived
by her husband of 54 years, John Ray;
her only son, Ronald, her daughter-in-law,
Rebecca and her two grandchildren, Tyron
James, seven years old and Kayleigh, two
and one half years old, all of Ashburn, VA.
Linda loved to travel and attend outdoor
concerts. She was loved by everyone who
truly knew her and will be sorely missed.
A gathering of close family members was
held on Wednesday, July 12 and her body
was cremated shortly thereafter. Please
share online condolences with the family at
www.loudounfuneralchapel.com
FLEMING
ROSALIND OLIVIA EDMONDS
Happy Birthday, Mom!
Marco & Family
We have only your memory, dear Mom,
To remember our whole life through,
But the sweetness will linger forever,
As we treasure the image of you.
DEATH NOTICE
MARY WARNER MIDDLETON
SCHNEIDER
Fondly known as Middie to her grandchildren, passed peacefully at her home on July
6, 2017. The daughter of the late Alexander
Hanson Robertson Middleton, from Centreville, MD, whose parents founded Gunston
Day School and Frances Dubos Graman,
from Charleston SC. She is survived by
her three children, Maury Schneider, Peter
Schneider (Bernadette), deVismes Sharp
(Lawson); her four grandchildren, whom
she loved dearly – Joshua, Reed, Amy and
Alex. Her two sisters Dubos Armbrister
(nephew Robbie) and deVismes Lee (brother-in-law Ralph) and her two first cousins
Emilie Durham and Carter Bond. She was
preceded in death by her brother William
Hunter Surratt and her nephew Alec Armbrister.
PAID DEATH NOTICES
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
To place a notice, call:
202-334-4122
800-627-1150 ext 4-4122
FAX:
202-334-7188
EMAIL:
deathnotices@washpost.com
Email and faxes MUST include
name, home address & home phone #
of the responsible billing party.
Fax & email deadline - 3 p.m. daily
Phone-In deadline
4 p.m. M-F
3 p.m. Sa-Su
Born and Raised in Washington, DC, she
was known as one of the Middleton Triplets.
Mary attended Holton Arms High School,
where she wrote the Alumni news for her
class for years and kept up with her high
school girlfriends. In 1976 she moved to the
Eastern Shore of Maryland where she lived
until her death. She was previously married
to Peter P. Schneider. Mary and her sister
Dubos started a company, The Middleton
Services, that took care of the elderly. She
would always lend a hand and take care of
others. Mary will be remembered for her
kindness to others.
CURRENT 2017 RATES:
( PER DAY)
MONDAY-SATURDAY
Black & White
1" - $135 (text only)
2" - $306 (text only)
3" - $441
4" - $482
5" - $611
-----SUNDAY
Black & White
1"- $161 (text only)
2" - $339 (text only)
3" - $489
4" - $515
5" - $665
There will be a private service with her
family
BROWN
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6"+ for ALL Black & White notices
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SCHNIDER
January 1, 1981~ June 30, 2017
My beloved son, we miss you so much. I
know you are at peace now and I thank God
for allowing you to be my son. Love, Mom
Services will be held Saturday, July 15, 2017
at Meridian Hill Baptist Church, 5354 Sheriff
Road, Capitol Heights, MD, 20743
Viewing 10 a.m., Service 11 a.m.
DEATH NOTICE
6"+ for ALL color notices
$160 each additional inch wkday
$186 each additional inch Sunday
DAY
from Frederick Douglass Jr. High School and
J. Hayden Johnson Junior High School learned
to row. In 1992, they participated in their
first regatta. Today, the program has grown
into the Anacostia Community Boathouse
with special programs for youth, seniors, the
handicapped and survivors of breast cancer.
Hundreds enjoy the river sports daily in
dragon boats, outrigger canoes, single and
team sculls.
ROBERT EDWARD DAY, JR.
Robert Edward Day Jr. 83, of Silver Spring,
MD, husband of Diana M. Day, died peacefully
on June 24, 2017, at Friends House in Sandy
Spring, surrounded by his family.
Bob was a career diplomat for the U.S.
Department of State with Embassy postings
in East Germany, Poland, Yugoslavia and
Iran. Born in Evanston, IL on June 22,
1934, he was the son of Robert E. Day
and Ruth Silvernale Day. He graduated from
Washington-Lee High School in Arlington,
VA. Following his graduation from Cornell
University, he was a Fulbright Scholar at
Tubingen University in Germany.
Crew was his lifelong passion. After his
retirement, he recognized the Anacostia was
a rowable river and spearheaded a youth
rowing program. With five others, he created
the Organization for Anacostia Rowing and
Sculling. He was instrumental in acquiring
a coach and donations of boats, docks and
ramps. With his guidance inner-city youth
Bob is survived by his daughter Tatyana Joan
Day of Silver Spring; his step children Anne
Herbert and Jeff Herbert (Gina); and step
grandchildren Tanner Herbert and Elisbeth
Herbert of Wooster, OH; Lea White (Joe); step
great-granddaughter Rose White of College
Park, MD; his brother Loren Allen Day (Mary
Jo) of New York City; and his sister Catherine
Day Fern (Paul) of Las Cruces, NM. He was
predeceased by his son Mark Day.
Bob was an active member of the Cornell
Club of Washington, DACOR, Anacostia Community Boathouse Association, Friends of
Peirce Mill, Casey Trees, Sigma Phi Fraternity,
Capital Rowing Club and the Chevy Chase
Presbyterian Church.
A memorial service will be held on Friday,
July 14, 2017 at 11 a.m. at Chevy Chase
Presbyterian Church, One Chevy Chase Circle NW, Washington, DC. A reception at the
church will follow the service.
In lieu of flowers donations may be made to:
Anacostia Community Boathouse Association, P.O. Box 15349, Washington, D.C. 20003
Cornell Rowing, Teagle Hall, Attn. Chris Kerber, 512 Campus Road, Ithaca, NY 14853
Chevy Chase Presbyterian Church, One
Chevy Chase Circle, NW, Washington, DC
20015.
Rapp Funeral & Cremation Services is in
charge of arrangements.
ZOLKIWSKY
Notices with photos begin at 3"
(All photos add 2" to your notice.)
ALL NOTICES MUST BE PREPAID
Robert is survived by his devoted wife and two
sons; daughter-in-law, Robin Pena Brown and
Christopher Johnson; brothers, Willard Tanner
(Christine) and James Brown (Bessie); brotherin-law, Frederick Mushaw (Shirley); sister-inlaw, Josephine Tanner; cousins; nieces and
nephews.
Services will be held at 11 a.m. Sunday, July 16,
2017 at Miles Bethel Memorial CME Church,
242 Regional Airport Road, La Crosse, VA.
Viewing will be at the funeral home 2 to 6 p.m.,
Saturday, July 15, 2017 and one hour prior to
the service at the church. Services entrusted
to Oris P. Jones Funeral Est., South Hill, 434447-7158. In lieu of flowers, the family requests
donations in memory of Robert L. Brown, Jr. to
the VCU Community Memorial Hospital Cancer
Center, P.O. Box 90, South Hill, VA 23970, c/o
CMH Foundation.
DEATH NOTICE
On Monday July 10, 2017, Walter Richard
Zolkiwsky M.D. died from a recurrence of
cancer at the Reston Hospital Center, Reston,
Virginia from which he retired on April 15,
2017. He is survived by his wife of 45 years,
Laraine M. Zolkiwsky of Great Falls, VA.,
son, Mark Andrew Zolkiwsky; daughter-inlaw, Erin E. Zolkiwsky; granddaughter, Amelia
Jane Zolkiwsky all of Tampa, FL; son, Robert
Michael Zolkiwsky of Falling Waters, WV, son,
Geoffrey Douglas Zolkiwsky of Tampa, FL,
and beagle Jade Zolkiwsky of Great Falls,
VA. His brother, Donald J. Zolkiwsky of South
Plainfield, NJ; and many cousins; nieces and
nephews.
Dr. Zolkiwsky who was known as Dr. Z or
Z was born in Jersey City, NJ to Jon and
Mildred Zolkiwsky. He was raised in Bayonne,
NJ and was a graduate of Bayonne H.S., Seton
Hall University and Universidad Autonoma de
Guadalajara School of Medicine. He did
Family will be receiving friends at Money and
King Funeral Home in Vienna, VA on Sunday,
July 16, 2017 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and from
3 p.m. to 5 p.m. as well as on Monday, July 17,
from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. A Mass of Christian
Burial will be held on Tuesday, July 18 at
11 a.m. at St. Catherine of Sienna Catholic
Church in Great Falls, VA. Burial will follow
at Andrew Chapel Cemetery in Vienna, VA
and a luncheon will follow at Brix American
Bistro in Great Falls. In lieu of flowers, the
family is asking for donations to be made
in his name to St Jude’s Children’s Research
Hospital www.stjude.org Online condolences
and fond memories of Dr. Z may be offered to
the family at:
www.moneyandking.com
Additional plaques start at $26 each
and may be ordered.
STEVEN LIVINGSTON SCHNIDER
MARKETTA MARIE NELSON
On Thursday, July 6, 2017. Loving mother of
Charkeeta Mitchell, Charles Nelson III, LeKeeta
Young and Alecia Winters. Also survived by
her mother, Claudine Austin; four brothers,
Niles Jr., John, Dennis, Antoine; one sister,
Jan Austin, 12 grandchildren, four godchildren,
godmother, Linda and a host of other relatives
and friends. On Monday, July 17, 2017 friends
may visit with the family from 10 a.m. until time
of funeral service at 11 a.m. at From the Heart
Ministries, 5055 Allentown Rd., Suitland, MD.
Interment Lincoln Memorial Cemetery.
DEATH NOTICE
Club. Ada was especially proud to be a Dame
of Malta. She and George (a Knight of Malta),
often traveled with the Malta group to take
“maladies” to Lourdes, France.
There will be a Celebration of Steven's Life at
12 Noon on Saturday, July 15, 2017 at Unity
of Fairfax Church, 2854 Hunters Mill Road,
Oakton, Virginia 22124.
Contributions in Steven's honor may be made
to the Arlington Community Foundation for the
Steven Schnider Memorial Fund, 818 N. Quincy
St, Suite 103, Arlington, VA 22203 703-2434785 (www.arlcf.org).
DEATH NOTICE
Ada was very active in many local charities,
including the Christ Child Society, Merrick
Girls’ Camp, the Women’s Guild for Crippled
Children, Project Hope, the Ladies Committee for Catholic University’s “Theatre
Drive”, the Ki-Wives, and the Ladies Hunt
Committee. The DeFranceaux’ were lifetime
members of Congressional Country Club,and
founding members of the Potomac Polo
DEATH NOTICE
PICILLO
(Juan); one son, Angelo Phillip Picillo; and
five grandchildren, in addition to many other
dear relatives and friends. His memory will be
forever cherished.
Always the life of the party, Ada was wellknown for her wonderful Cajun stories and
quick wit. She was a wonderful party hostess
and they often had parties for “300 of their
closest friends.” Their Christmas Day Buffet
was well-known in the Potomac set. You
were “someone” if you were invited.
Ada is survived by her four children, George
Jefferson DeFranceaux of Lafayette, LA; Don,
DeFranceaux with wife, Peg, of Washington,
DC, Dianne Grod of Oceanside, CA and Kay
Leonard with husband, Jack, of Kapaa/Kauai,
HI; nine grandchildren and 15 great-grandchildren.
Friends may call at Delhomme Funeral
Home, 1011 Bertrand Dr., Lafayette, LA
70566 on Wednesday, July 26, 2017 from 5 to
7 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will be offered
at Saint John Cathedral, 515 Cathedral St.,
Lafayette, LA 70501 on Thursday, July 27,
2017 at 10 a.m. Arrangements by DeVOL
FUNERAL HOME.
Notices must be placed via phone, fax or
email. Photos must be emailed. You can
no longer place notices, drop off photos
and make payment in person.
Payment must be made via phone with
debit/credit card.
Steven is survived by his wife of 35 years,
Christine (née Peschock), their daughter, Gillian
Rodgers (Mike Mannebach) of Blacksburg, VA.,
and a granddaughter, Emily Rodgers. Steven
is also survived by his parents, Jean and
Martin L. Schnider, Sr. of McLean, VA. and
his siblings: Susan Schnider Duke (Thomas) of
Arlington, VA; Mary Anne Schnider of McLean,
VA; Frederick Martin Schnider (Rebecca Guarda) of Berkeley, CA; and Martin L. Schnider, Jr.
(Isabelle) of Potomac, MD. Steven's parents-inlaw, Roselyn (Peschock) and Jim Sharp of Dunn
Loring, VA. also survive him. He had 8 nieces,
8 nephews, a great-nephew, and countless
friends.
Many fund-raisers were held at San Souci
until they sold it in approximately 1968,
having already bought over 300 acres with
a home on Harris Creek in St. Michaels,
MD. They kept an apartment and then a
townhouse in Washington, DC, until retiring
full-time to San Souci Lagniappe, as the St.
Michaels home was called. In approximately
1990, they sold San Souci Lagniappe and
moved back to Ada’s hometown of Lafayette,
LA, where the main street in the new revitalized downtown of Lafayette is named for the
family: Moss Street. After George’s passing
in 1997, Ada moved back to Bethesda, MD to
be closer to her immediate family.
ADA MOSS DeFRANCEAUX
LEGACY.COM
Included in all death notices
Optional for In Memoriams
PLEASE NOTE:
Steven attended Ascension Academy and Virginia Tech. Steven was a partner at Fred
Schnider Investment Group. He served his
community as a volunteer firefighter and EMT
at Ballston's Station 2 in Arlington, VA, where
he achieved the rank of Captain. His interests
included a love of learning, cosmology, physics,
math, science, travel, and music. He was
intelligent, kind, and had a great sense of
humor.
DeFRANCEAUX
Ada Moss DeFranceaux, 104, passed away
peacefully in Bethesda, MD on Saturday, July
8, 2007. Born March 1, 1913 in Lafayette, LA,
Ada was the youngest of 12 children born
to Frank and Rose Aimee Moss. Ada moved
to Washington, DC at 19 and worked for
her brother, George Moss, who was a wellknown realtor and developer in Maryland.
She fell in love and married George Waldemar DeFranceaux on October 13, 1934. After
living in Bethesda from 1934 to 1948, they
moved to 9124 River Road, Potomac, MD, to
raise their family. Ada named it “Sans Souci”
(without cares or worries.)
All Paid Death Notices
appear on our website through
www.legacy.com
On Monday, January 23, 2017, Steven Livingston Schnider passed away at Inova Fairfax
Hospital. He was 63. Born at Garfield Hospital
in Washington, DC, he remained a lifelong
resident of the DC area, and lived in Vienna,
Virginia.
He received his early education in the public
school system of Brunswick County. In 1956,
he was drafted in the U.S. Army and served
in the Korean and Vietnam Wars. His tour of
duty took him to Korea, Panama and Vietnam.
On July 14, 1962, he married his best friend,
Yvonne Mushaw, whom he remained loyal
and dedicated to until his passing. They were
married for 54 years. He was the proud father
of their two sons, Darrell A. Brown and Derreck
R. Brown.
Dr. Z was in private practice for over 20 years
and during this period he became Chairman
of the Board of Trustees at Reston Hospital, a
position he held for over 10 years. In 2000,
Dr. Z ended his practice and joined the staff of
Reston Hospital Center and became the Chief
Medical Officer a position he held until his
retirement in 2017.
He and his family moved to Great Falls, VA
in 1985 and joined St. Catherine of Sienna
Catholic Church. Dr. Z enjoyed traveling,
cruising, cooking, home improvement
projects and taking yearly trips to Hilton Head,
SC. He also was an avid car washer and could
be found on most Saturdays out in front of his
home washing cars.
NELSON
Of Brodnax, VA passed away peacefully on
Tuesday, July 11, 2017. Robert’s life journey
began July 21, 1938, in Brodnax when he was
born to the late Robert and Minerva Brown. He
was the third of five children, Charles Tanner
(deceased), Willard Tanner, Virgie Simmons
(deceased) and James Brown.
his internship and residency in St. Johns,
Newfoundland, Canada. After completing his
residency, Dr. Z joined the Army Medical Corp
where he and his wife were assigned to Fort
A.P. Hill in Bowling Green, VA for four years
before being transferred to the Pentagon
Medical Clinic. In 1977 after 11 years in the
Medical Corp, Dr. Z was honorably discharged
with a rank of Major and he opened a private
family medical practice in Sterling, VA.
WALTER RICHARD ZOLKIWSKY, M.D.
December 2, 1944 - July 10, 2017
MEMORIAL PLAQUES:
All notices over 2" include
complimentary memorial plaque.
ROBERT LEE BROWN, JR.
(Age 78)
ANGELO PAUL PICILLO
(Age 83)
Died July 12, 2017 of complications from a
heart attack he suffered on July 9, just hours
after he had lost his beloved wife of nearly 60
years, Constance, to her own battle with lung
cancer.
Born December 6, 1933, in Newark, NJ., he
was one of 10 children. He is survived by one
sister, Delores. He is also survived by three
daughters, Saveria Donnelly (John), Theresa
Tangherlini (Daniel) and Rosanna Martinez
After graduating with a degree in civil engineering from New York University, he served
in the Army Corps of Engineers, attaining the
rank of major and working on continuity of
government operations at the height of the
Cold War. He voluntarily accepted a discharge
from the service to join the nascent National
Aeronautics and Space Administration,
where his work included launch facilities
development for the Apollo program. He
then joined the staff of the newly formed
Department of Transportation, where he rose
to oversee its facilities and real estate portfolio as a member of the Senior Executive
Service. He retired in 1997 as the department’s deputy assistant secretary of administration.
Family will receive friends to celebrate the
lives of Angelo and Constance Picillo at Beall
Funeral Home, 6512 NW Crain Highway (Rt 3
South), Bowie, MD on Friday, July 14, 2017,
from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. A Mass of
Christian Burial will be held for both of them
on Saturday, July 15, 2017, at 11 a.m., at
St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Church, 1800 Seton
Dr., Crofton, MD. Interment, private. Contributions in lieu of flowers may be made to the
Medstar Washington Hospital Center’s Zirkin
Heart and Vascular Center. Please view and
sign the family’s guestbook at:
www.beallfuneral.com
B8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14 , 2017
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Chance of severe thunderstorms
We start the day with at least broken
sunshine, and temperatures quickly
head upward. As a front approaches,
clouds will increase, and the odds of
storms follow. High temperatures
should reach the low 90s to mid-90s.
It will be rather sticky as well. By midafternoon,
storm chances grow quite a bit, and they could be
strong to severe, with possible damaging winds
and dangerous lightning. Tonight, scattered
storms may linger, but calmer weather should
move in. Lows will reach the upper 60s mid-70s.
Today
T-storms
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Saturday
Partly sunny
93° 75
Sunday
Mostly sunny
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Monday
T-storm
Tuesday
T-storm
Wednesday
T-storm
90° 73
91° 76
90° 75
89° 76
88° 74
FEELS: 93°
FEELS: 98°
FEELS: 97°
FEELS: 95°
FEELS: 94°
CHNCE PRECIP: 75%
P: 10%
P: 5%
P: 30%
P: 60%
P: 30%
WIND: W 6–12 mph
W: NW 8–16 mph
H: High
W: SSW 4–8 mph
H: High
W: SSW 6–12 mph
H: High
W: NW 6–12 mph
H: High
W: NW 6–12 mph
H: High
°
°
FEELS*: 106°
HUMIDITY: Very High
°
°
°
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Harrisburg
85/69
Hagerstown
86/70
Philadelphia
82/72
ACTUAL
FORECAST
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
97° 2:07 p.m.
79° 6:00 a.m.
89°/71°
100° 1954
56° 1888
94° 1:24 p.m.
71° 4:56 a.m.
88°/66°
97° 1966
52° 1978
95° 3:42 p.m.
74° 6:00 a.m.
88°/67°
99° 1966
55° 1978
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: +2.7° yr. to date: +3.8°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
Cape May
84/75
Annapolis
90/74
OCEAN: 61°
Charlottesville
93/73
Ocean City
87/76
OCEAN: 72°
Lexington
91/69
Richmond
97/75
Norfolk
98/79
Virginia Beach
93/78
Past 24 hours
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Normal
OCEAN: 70°
Kitty Hawk
90/77
OCEAN: 81°
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Moderate
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Ozone
Low
Low
Low
Moderate
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.00"
2.27"
1.60"
18.19"
21.34"
Trace
3.16"
1.54"
23.53"
22.34"
0.00"
2.47"
1.63"
21.00"
22.12"
Moon Phases
UV: High
Solar system
6 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, variably cloudy, showers,
thunderstorms, flash flooding and gusty winds possible.
High 74–78. Wind southwest 4–8 mph. Tonight, showers
and storms early. Low 60–66. Wind west–northwest 4–8
mph. Saturday, partly sunny. High 70–76.
Atlantic beaches: Today, variably cloudy, showers, a
heavy thunderstorm. High 84–98. Wind south–southwest
6–12. Tonight, showers, thunderstorm, some heavy, flash
flooding, damaging winds possible. Low 72–80. Wind
southwest 6–12 mph.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, humid, partly sunny,
shower, heavy p.m. thunderstorm. Wind southwest 5–10 knots.
Waves a foot or less. • Lower Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today,
partly sunny, hot, very humid, a heavy thunderstorm this afternoon.
Wind southwest 6012 knots. Waves 1–2 feet.• River Stages: Today,
the Little Falls stage will be around 3.2 feet, then near 3.4 feet on
Saturday. Flood stage at Little Falls is 10 feet.
Today’s tides
M
High
Low
Normal
Record high
Record low
Weather map features for noon today.
Baltimore
90/71
Dover
87/72
Washington
93/75
RECORD
°
Su
REGION
AVERAGE
(High tides in Bold)
Washington
6:54 a.m.
12:07 p.m.
7:17 p.m.
none
Annapolis
3:13 a.m.
9:20 a.m.
4:07 p.m.
10:16 p.m.
Ocean City
5:54 a.m.
11:57 a.m.
6:06 p.m.
none
Norfolk
1:25 a.m.
7:43 a.m.
1:51 p.m.
8:03 p.m.
Point Lookout
5:20 a.m.
12:06 p.m.
6:13 p.m.
none
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Bullhead City, AZ 113°
Low: Climax, CO 28°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
70/64/r
91/67/c
68/58/pc
92/73/pc
99/75/s
90/71/t
96/66/pc
89/75/t
100/66/s
102/72/pc
66/62/r
77/64/t
70/64/r
93/76/t
84/69/t
94/73/t
85/56/pc
75/62/pc
84/65/t
81/65/c
97/78/pc
85/61/pc
Tomorrow
81/62/pc
90/67/pc
66/55/pc
90/73/t
98/75/s
89/68/pc
97/69/s
88/74/t
91/58/s
100/68/t
74/66/pc
79/65/pc
78/63/pc
94/76/t
82/65/pc
92/72/t
84/57/t
85/66/s
80/63/s
79/64/s
94/77/t
82/57/t
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
83/62/pc
80/61/pc
88/72/t
83/60/c
88/66/s
68/62/r
88/76/pc
91/75/s
81/60/pc
90/73/t
91/73/t
82/64/t
110/88/s
93/72/t
85/67/pc
87/69/t
93/75/pc
91/81/pc
73/63/s
80/65/s
89/73/t
88/76/t
72/69/r
98/79/pc
92/71/s
82/66/s
91/73/pc
74/60/t
84/57/pc
81/62/pc
87/75/pc
91/76/t
79/63/s
90/74/t
94/75/pc
86/65/s
112/89/pc
89/71/t
89/69/pc
85/70/s
89/74/t
92/80/pc
84/66/s
93/67/t
88/69/t
89/76/t
82/69/pc
91/77/c
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
97/73/s
86/68/s
92/73/t
82/72/t
108/89/s
83/63/t
68/57/c
86/57/s
70/62/r
95/74/pc
98/67/s
97/75/t
95/60/s
87/69/pc
89/79/sh
97/73/pc
79/69/pc
70/55/s
88/79/sh
79/55/pc
92/65/s
78/64/t
93/78/t
90/70/t
World
High: Mitribah, Kuwait 120°
Low: Summit Station, Greenland –7°
July 16
Last
Quarter
July 23
New
July 30
First
Quarter
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Aug 7
Full
Rise
5:54 a.m.
11:55 p.m.
3:04 a.m.
6:12 a.m.
12:46 p.m.
6:20 p.m.
Set
8:33 p.m.
11:09 a.m.
5:26 p.m.
8:50 p.m.
12:21 a.m.
3:55 a.m.
excludes Antarctica
92/69/t
92/70/s
92/73/t
88/70/pc
108/87/pc
80/62/pc
70/59/pc
80/53/s
78/66/pc
93/72/t
98/67/s
90/73/c
100/64/s
88/70/s
90/80/sh
100/75/s
78/70/pc
73/56/pc
90/80/sh
75/53/s
93/58/t
79/62/pc
93/78/t
91/69/pc
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
71/54/sh
Amsterdam
66/56/sh
Athens
94/78/s
Auckland
53/46/sh
Baghdad
115/82/s
Bangkok
87/78/t
Beijing
92/76/t
Berlin
69/54/t
Bogota
67/49/pc
Brussels
70/53/sh
Buenos Aires
57/53/r
Cairo
101/80/s
Caracas
75/69/pc
Copenhagen
65/53/sh
Dakar
85/76/s
Dublin
69/57/pc
Edinburgh
66/54/pc
Frankfurt
74/52/sh
Geneva
78/56/t
Ham., Bermuda 84/77/s
Helsinki
67/47/pc
Ho Chi Minh City 85/77/t
Tomorrow
71/54/sh
68/60/c
91/75/s
56/46/s
117/85/s
87/77/t
92/75/t
70/55/pc
67/51/r
70/57/c
62/39/r
103/79/s
75/70/pc
67/56/pc
86/77/pc
75/58/sh
68/56/r
71/55/c
79/57/s
84/77/pc
68/52/pc
85/77/t
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
90/82/sh
94/79/s
83/71/pc
91/66/s
70/44/pc
92/68/pc
87/79/pc
88/80/t
82/75/c
71/60/pc
87/63/s
72/56/pc
104/70/s
87/78/t
75/51/pc
71/61/sh
72/61/r
88/83/r
75/51/pc
93/81/pc
70/51/sh
70/58/sh
75/55/pc
70/53/t
88/80/c
93/78/pc
82/70/s
91/67/s
67/46/s
92/68/t
88/79/pc
91/79/t
83/75/sh
70/59/s
87/62/s
76/64/c
100/70/s
86/77/t
74/52/pc
79/64/pc
73/60/c
86/81/r
77/52/c
93/82/pc
70/55/pc
80/59/s
79/60/pc
65/52/sh
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
79/65/s
113/88/c
87/70/s
87/67/pc
53/30/pc
78/50/s
90/75/pc
95/82/t
84/77/t
70/52/pc
69/51/pc
95/78/pc
88/74/s
87/77/pc
76/62/sh
73/57/pc
69/51/pc
81/66/s
112/82/pc
87/67/s
87/69/pc
43/21/r
75/50/pc
85/76/t
96/80/pc
86/77/t
72/54/pc
64/44/s
97/79/pc
93/76/s
89/79/s
82/63/s
68/54/t
69/52/sh
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
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KLMNO
Style
FRIDAY, JULY 14 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
RE
C
MOVIE REVIEWS IN WEEKEND
War for the Planet of the Apes Visually striking, emotionally gripping. (It’s the prehensile thumbs.) 24
A Ghost Story A bedsheet with eye holes manages to be a meditation on attachment, loss and art. 25
City of Ghosts A truly haunting glimpse into the lives upended by the Islamic State in Raqqa, Syria. 26
Lovebirds Joe and Mika
all atwitter about Trump
THEATER REVIEW
Mendes’s icy ‘Cabaret’
isn’t very welcoming
BY
N ELSON P RESSLEY
Maybe tomorrow belongs to a
different kind of “Cabaret.” The
defiantly strident production
that Sam Mendes first concocted
around Alan Cumming’s nasty
Emcee at London’s Donmar
Warehouse in 1993 is winding
down after a long, frigid reign.
The Roundabout Theatre Company’s version, co-directed by Mendes and choreographer Rob Marshall, is finishing its tour at the
Kennedy Center’s Eisenhower
Theatre, where it continues to be
imposing, dour and not much
fun.
The grubby cynicism is showbiz-averse, and it harshly overstates the obvious as Berlin’s
seedy Kit Kat Klub naturally segues into the thuggish Nazi rise.
This “Cabaret” is not just sour
and menacing but curdled and
festering with rot. As the audience gathers, the Kit Kat girls (in
ripped fishnets and lingerie) limber up onstage with leg lifts and
vivid splits, as if prepping for a
peep show. Their dead-eyed
dances of thigh-burning squats
and naughty hip rolls are zombie
THEATER CONTINUED ON C2
BY
CHIP SOMODEVILLA/GETTY IMAGES
“Morning Joe’s” Mika Brzezinski and Joe Scarborough talked at
the National Archives about their relationship with the president.
M ONICA H ESSE
Joe Scarborough and Mika
Brzezinski, high atop the foamed
crest of fame that traditionally
appears when one half of a couple
is accused by the President of the
United States on Twitter of having
a bloody facelift and the other half
of the couple responds by loudly
quitting the president’s political
party, continued riding their wave
on Tuesday night by appearing at
the National Archives in Washington.
The affianced co-hosts of
MSNBC’s “Morning Joe,” it turns
out, have also been named visiting
fellows to Harvard Kennedy
School’s Institute of Politics.
Wednesday’s talk — an interview
conducted by billionaire philanthropist David Rubenstein and attended by an auditorium full of
Harvard types — was their first
public event as part of this endeavor.
“Tomorrow I’m interviewing
George Bush and Bill Clinton together,” Rubenstein shared, “and
more people have asked me about
this interview than that!”
Scarborough preened. Brzezinski shook her head in apparent disbelief.
“Do you still call him Donald?”
Rubenstein wanted to know, about
MORNING JOE CONTINUED ON C3
22 Emmy
nods for
SNL and
‘Westworld’
BY E MILY Y AHR
AND B ETHONIE B UTLER
DONALD SULTAN/PRIVATE COLLECTION, NEW YORK
ART REVIEW
The master
of disaster
Donald Sultan’s paintings from the 1980s
captured horror without the sordid details
BY
P HILIP K ENNICOTT
I
n the 1970s, disaster was repackaged as mass entertainment. Movies dealt with towering infernos, cataclysmic earthquakes, chaos at the airport, hijackings,
crashes and the Hindenburg, and television settled
into its still ardent affair with the lives of cops, firefighters
and other first responders. Donald Sultan began making
his large, brooding, wall-commanding “Disaster” paintings
about a decade later, in the early Reagan years, which to
many seemed just as bleak and anxious, though with a thin
veneer of buoyant patriotism and nostalgia papering over
things like the AIDS crisis and the growing confrontation
with the Soviet east. Reagan is remembered, today, as a
genial figure who ended the Cold War; but visit Sultan’s
paintings, on view at the Smithsonian American Art
Museum, and you will reexperience all the gritty terror of
those years, when the leader of the Free World indulged a
flippant bellicosity that unnerved allies and enemies alike
(“We begin bombing in five minutes,” Reagan joked on an
open microphone in 1984).
A banner year for “Saturday
Night Live” paid off in a big way as
NBC’s 42-year-old sketch comedy
series walked away with 22 Emmy
nominations Thursday, tied with
HBO’s “Westworld” for the most
of any show.
Alec Baldwin’s SNL portrayal
of President Trump landed him a
nomination for best supporting
actor in a comedy, and Melissa
McCarthy’s
headline-making
turn as Sean Spicer no doubt
fueled her to a nod for guest
actress in a comedy, earned for an
episode she hosted in May.
Netflix’s “Stranger Things” and
FX’s “Feud: Bette and Joan” tied
for the second-most nominations
with 18, while HBO’s “Veep” was
close behind with 17.
As expected, HBO dominated
with 111 nominations, followed by
Netflix, continuing its climb as a
major player, with 91 nods.
In the drama series category,
the absence of last year’s winner,
“Game of Thrones,” which was
ineligible for this year’s prize because of the upcoming season’s
late start, helped make room for
freshmen series, five of which
made the cut: HBO’s “Westworld,”
Netflix’s
“Stranger
Things,” Hulu’s “The Handmaid’s
Tale,” Netflix’s “The Crown” and
NBC’s “This Is Us.” (Netflix veteran “House of Cards” and AMC’s
“Better Call Saul” landed the final
two spots.)
On the comedy series side,
Emmy voters went with some old
favorites, such as ABC’s “Modern
Family” and HBO’s “Veep,” both
previous winners that have been
nominated every year since they
were eligible. Rounding out the
category were HBO’s “Silicon Valley,” Netflix’s “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt,” Netflix’s “Master of
None,” ABC’s “Blackish” and the
sole newcomer, FX’s “Atlanta.”
The Emmy Awards air Sunday,
Sept. 17 on CBS and will be hosted
by Stephen Colbert, whose show
was nominated for variety talk seEMMYS CONTINUED ON C3
ART REVIEW CONTINUED ON C2
“Early Morning May 20 1986” by Donald Sultan uses a telltale silhouette of a firefighter’s helmet to convey disaster. Sultan’s
subjects were taken mainly from newspaper photographs of accidents, fires, chemical spills and other urban distress.
Clockwise from top left:
Nominees Alec Baldwin
(“Saturday Night Live”), Viola
Davis (“How to Get Away with
Murder”), Jonathan Banks
(“Better Call Saul”), and
Melissa McCarthy (SNL).
C2
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14 , 2017
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
CAUSE CELEB
Star of TLC’s ‘Little Couple’ against Medicaid cuts
Cause: Preventing proposed cuts to
Medicaid (you might have heard of a certain
GOP bill circulating around Congress these
days) that some advocates say will
disproportionately affect children,
particularly ones with complex medical
issues.
Celeb: Reality TV star Jennifer Arnold,
one half of the titular “Little Couple” on the
TLC series. Arnold knows about kids’ health
care: She, her husband and their two
children have skeletal dysplasia, commonly
known as dwarfism, and she’s a practicing
neonatologist.
Arnold says the chance to play prominent
lobbyist for a day is exactly why she got into
reality TV. “My goal of putting our lives out
there is to raise awareness, so whenever I
have opportunity to use this platform . . .
well, that’s why I put up with TV cameras in
our house.”
Scene: Various inner sanctums of power
around Capitol Hill, where Arnold and her
family on Thursday joined the Children’s
Hospital Association for a day of meetings
with members of Congress. Her agenda
included confabs with Republicans who have
You’re in such good shape. . . . Beautiful.”
— President Trump playing beauty pageant judge with Brigitte Macron, the wife of
Emmanuel Macron, France’s president, as caught on a video posted to the French
government’s Facebook page
CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION
Rep. Pete Olson (R-Tex.), right, meets with
Jennifer Arnold and husband Bill Klein.
supported the proposed cuts to Medicaid, the
prospect of which daunted her — but only for
a moment. “I guess I’m going to have to
change their minds,” Arnold said cheerily.
Sound bite: “The timing is critical,” she
said. “The BCRA [Better Care Reconciliation
Act] is scary — it would cut $43 billion in
Medicaid funding, which would more
negatively affect kids than adults. We have to
speak out. We have to talk to our
congresspeople.”
Michigan’s Kid Rock for Senate? Is he kidding?
matter how implausible (let us not
Is this a sincere political launch
forget that the potential “gentleman
or an elaborate marketing ploy (or
from Michigan” is featured in a sex
can we even tell the difference
tape, people).
anymore?): Kid Rock, born Robert
Ritchie, on Wednesday debuted the
“I have had a ton of emails and
website kidrockforsenate.com.
texts asking me if this website is
The site has a nifty, convincingreal,” he tweeted. “The answer is an
looking campaign logo that reads
absolute YES.”
“Kid Rock ’18 for U.S. Senate,”
The stringy-haired and oftalongside a photo of the singer
behatted Rock is a Republican and a
Kid Rock
looking . . . well, not exactly
supporter of President Trump, and
senatorial, but serious, at least, and sitting
Republicans have been eyeing the Senate
in what could pass for a Senate office. But
seat held by Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.),
it’s curiously devoid of any of the typical
who is up for reelection in 2018.
features of a campaign website, such as
So does it all add up to a mere ploy to sell
platforms, endorsements or a biography.
Brand Kid Rock? Susan Demas, the editor
And the singer does not appear to have
of Inside Michigan Politics, suspects so.
registered a candidacy with the Federal
“That’s the consensus opinion,” she says.
Election Commission.
“He’s looking for attention — and he’s
Still, he insisted that it’s genuine, no
getting it.”
DANIEL SWARTZ
George and Kellyanne Conway with French ambassador Gérard Araud and Andrea Mitchell.
Bastille Day fete at French Embassy
As the boss was wheels up for
Paris, where he was set to
celebrate Bastille Day with
French President Emmanuel
Macron, some White House aides
celebrated the bleu, blanc et
rouge a little closer to home,
joining the champagne-swilling
crowd at the French ambassador’s
residence Wednesday night.
Press secretary Sean Spicer,
accompanied by his wife,
Rebecca Miller Spicer, and
counselor Kellyanne Conway
and her husband, George
Conway, had a rare night out in
social Washington (did we
mention the boss was out of
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
town?) at the Bastille Day party
hosted by French Ambassador
Gérard Araud. Also spotted at
the swanky Kalorama soiree?
Commerce Secretary Wilbur
Ross and his wife, Hilary Geary
Ross, and MSNBC anchor
Andrea Mitchell.
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
Sultan’s paintings depict disaster, but you might not realize it at first glance
ART REVIEW FROM C1
Sultan’s paintings aren’t explicitly political, and he took his subjects mainly from newspaper photographs of accidents, fires, chemical spills and other urban distress. By the time he had built up
these paintings, using carved linoleum tiles, tar and smears of
lurid color over the surface, they
were doing something very different than what disaster as entertainment does. The source of the
original images was detectable
mainly through a few telltale silhouettes (a fireman’s helmet, a
row of streetlights, the metal architecture of an industrial plant
or railroad), while the larger image seemed to bubble and ooze
and bleed into abstraction. A particular shade of yellow in many
works recalls the ugly glare of
sodium vapor lights, as noxious a
mnemonic as is the smell of naphthalene or the cling of cheap polyester on a hot day.
Disaster entertainment promises proximity, a safe vantage
from which to scrutinize terror
and suffering. Sultan’s paintings
capture the horror, but little of the
animating detail. You feel that
you have glimpsed the disaster as
if waking quickly from sleep, or
passing by it at night on the highway. It is a snapshot that quickly
dissolves into a visually indistinct
but emotionally charged remembrance of having seen something
horrible. Even Andy Warhol’s silkscreened multiple images of car
crashes made in the 1960s — also
based on newspaper photographs
— allow the viewer more into the
scene, and play more on the
ghoulish appetites that make disaster imagery a rich source of
public entertainment.
Remove the word “disaster”
from this series, however, and you
might be hard-pressed to find any
distinct sense of danger or destruction in them. “Dead Plant
November 1 1988” looks like one
of Whistler’s smoky views of the
Thames; “Yellowstone Aug 15
1990,” which shows dark tree
trunks against Sultan’s familiar
industrial yellow, could be one of
van Gogh’s olive groves; several of
the industrial scenes have echoes
of Edward Hopper, Charles Sheeler and George Bellows. The ambiguity of Sultan’s titles, which often reference the date and sometime the place of a disaster without any specifics of what
happened (“Early Morning May
20 1986” and “South End Feb 24
1986”), recall a famous conceptual project, On Kawara’s date
paintings (begun in 1966), that
include only the date of the day
they were made rendered in white
against a solid background.
Kawara was painting his age, in
a literal sense, recording the passage of time, as if the painting is
merely the label one might find on
a box that contained the news and
events and personal dramas of
that particular day (they were, in
fact, packaged with newspaper
clippings). For Sultan, disasters
Icy rendition of ‘Cabaret’
brings its troubles inside
THEATER FROM C1
burlesques, all body and no soul.
Jon Peterson competently
steps into Cumming’s punk
shorts and shirtless, suspendersnapping
bravado,
nipples
rouged and sarcasm dripping.
This Emcee is rough trade all the
way — far rougher, of course, than
Joel Grey’s devilish, damned portrayal in the 1972 movie. Peterson, singing in steely tones, is
lean and leering, a terror daring
you to stomach his gross jokes as
he sashays through the impishly
coupling “Two Ladies” (one of
them a guy in drag) and the
rhythmically clipped “Money.”
If the Emcee is the show’s brute
force, Sally Bowles ought to be its
zest. The sturdy-voiced Leigh
Ann Larkin has wide eyes and a
big smile that she beams on
Benjamin Eakeley’s Clifford
Bradshaw, but to little effect. Cliff,
a bisexual would-be novelist, is
the Christopher Isherwood figure
— Isherwood’s “Berlin Stories”
are the show’s source material —
but Eakeley rushes through the
role, as if real feeling would be out
of place in this decadence machine. If Sally can’t charm him,
DONALD SULTAN/THE PARRISH ART MUSEUM
Donald Sultan’s “Polish Landscape II Jan 5 1990 (Auschwitz).” He
ended his “Disaster” series in 1990, citing the toll it took on him.
aren’t specific, they are rather a
mode of understanding the
world. If Kawara’s work says, “every day there is another day,”
Sultan’s says, “every day there is
another disaster.” Like reading
the horoscope and scanning the
obituaries, both of these extended
visual explorations belong to a
she can’t win us.
But Mendes never wanted us to
be won. His Sally sings “Cabaret”
in a state of shock, full of wrath as
she stares down her bleak future,
and all actresses, Larkin included, sound the same in this climactic moment. It’s not powerful; it’s
blunt, one-dimensional, stripped
of complication.
You still feel you’re in the
presence of one of the great musicals, thanks to the story’s steady
historical creep and the John
Kander-Fred Ebb tunes that have
been drilled into the American
culture’s bones since 1966. The
performance, with tour direction
credited to BT McNicholl, certainly marches with precision,
and the onstage orchestra whirs
merrily through the score, saxes
buzzing and a lively banjo suggesting a carefree attitude that
world that feels artificially constructed by media, by the fire hose
of newsiness that never turns off
and can only be escaped by detaching oneself from the source.
It’s gratifying, reading through
an interview with Sultan published in the exhibition catalogue,
that he avoids the cant and senti-
JOAN MARCUS
Leigh Ann Larkin sings Sally
Bowles with a sturdy voice in
Roundabout’s “Cabaret.”
mentality that would probably be
essential to this work if it were
being created today. He doesn’t
talk about memorializing the victims or the tragic fate of the innocent; when asked about first responders, he spoke in broad, systematic terms: “These figures, if
you are lucky, are always between
you and the catastrophe. They are
there to deal with it. So all human
systems have a system to deal
with that chaos, eventually.”
Sultan stopped his series in
1990. Asked why, he acknowledged the toll taken by the implicit subject of his series — that
everything is ephemeral — on
him: “Now every day there’s a new
catastrophe. So, they don’t need
me. I’ve got nothing to say about
that.”
Of course, the news medium
that inspired the disaster series
was also beginning to change.
Cable news was making disaster
more intimate, and seemingly
more frequent; in 1986, images of
the space shuttle Challenger exploding in flight became part of
the ever-expanding global archive
of horrifying tape loops. In 1991,
the bombing of Baghdad rendered images that feel as if they
were painted by Sultan, and animated in a computer. Social media hasn’t just glutted the market
with disaster imagery, it has made
us all painfully familiar with the
everyday disasters of each other,
the personal traumas and griefs
that make my pain your pain and
your pain my pain. Or, at least,
elevate our anxiety about pain to
an almost unbearable degree.
The other reason he stopped,
perhaps, is sought out in the
paintings themselves. By 1990, his
disaster paintings were becoming
too beautiful. The Yellowstone
painting, and another of Venice
(drained of its water) also made in
1990, begin to live independently
of the project as landscapes and
cityscapes. References to the history of painting take more prominence, and you realize the lodestar of this work was never disaster, it was always painting itself.
At the point that the artist runs
the risk of merely using disaster
for his own ends, of perhaps even
trivializing it in service to his art,
he pulls back.
Now the series is safely contained within the decade that inspired it. Taken together, these
works feel like a monumental series of history paintings, minus
the particulars of history. If they
are too dark and clotted to allow
us to figure out what it is that
menaces the world, that’s no matter. For taken together, they assert
an age-old idea that we forget
almost as soon as we fold up the
newspaper or turn off Facebook:
that the world is always menaced,
and nothing lasts forever.
you understand is fake. The musicians enjoy an extended turn in
the spotlight after intermission,
and it’s the only time the crowd
gets revved up.
If “Cabaret” feels omnipresent,
it’s because it is. Another version
of this production came to the
Warner Theatre with Teri Hatcher and Norbert Leo Butz in 1999,
and with a non-Equity cast in
2001. Arlington’s Signature Theatre staged the show in 1995.
Arena Stage gave it a whirl in
2006. Signature was at it again in
2015.
“Marred only by the overwrought contemporary conviction that ‘Cabaret’ has to club an
audience over the head with its
moral weight,” The Post’s Peter
Marks wrote of that last Signature model. The Mendes mold has
been dominant; the vehicle could
use a rest, and then a fresh vision.
For now, as the Kennedy Center’s
other current Nazi threat musical
tenant would put it, auf Wiedersehen. Good night.
philip.kennicott@washpost.com
Donald Sultan: The Disaster
Paintings is on view at the
Smithsonian American Art Museum
through Sept. 4. For more information
visit americanart.si.edu.
nelson.pressley@washpost.com
Cabaret. Book by Joe Masteroff,
music by John Kander, lyrics by Fred
Ebb. Originally directed by Sam
Mendes, co-directed and
choreographed by Rob Marshall; tour
directed by BT McNicholl. Costumes,
William Ivey Long; set, Robert Brill;
lights, Peggy Eisenhauer and Mike
Baldassari; music director, Robert
Cookman; sound design, Keith
Caggiano. With Alison Ewing, Mary
Gordon Murray, Scott Robertson and
Patrick Vaill. About 21/2 hours.
Through Aug. 6 at the Kennedy
Center Eisenhower Theater. Tickets
$59-$149. Call 202-467-4600 or visit
kennedy-center.org.
FRIDAY, JULY 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C3
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BOOK WORLD
Madeleine Blais’s vintage tales of Martha’s Vineyard
BY
H ELLER M C A LPIN
“To the New Owners,” Madeleine Blais’s evocative memoir
about her family’s deep connection with Martha’s Vineyard, was
triggered by the 2014 sale of the
beloved property that her in-laws
bought on Tisbury Great Pond in
the 1970s. It joins a flotilla of
elegies to bygone summer homes,
including George Howe Colt’s
memoir, “The Big House” (2003),
and Nick Fitzhugh’s documentary, “Starboard Light” (2014). In
each case, financial realities and
practicalities spurred a heartbreaking sale, which in turn unleashed a high tide of bittersweet
nostalgia.
Blais comes to her subject with
two major advantages: She’s a
deft and witty Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, and her husband’s parents were well-connected powerhouses. Nicholas
deBelleville Katzenbach served
as U.S. attorney general in the
mid-1960s. His wife, Lydia King
Phelps Stokes Katzenbach, was
an imposing psychoanalyst.
In her portrait of the Vineyard,
Blais dutifully trots out the
names of famous people who
have summered there, including
Jackie Onassis, Lillian Hellman,
John Belushi, and the Clintons
and Obamas, though few get
more than a passing mention.
Former Washington Post publisher Katharine Graham rates a
whole chapter. A high point of
each summer was their shared
meal, alternating houses. Blais
writes that Mohu, Graham’s 218acre estate in Lambert’s Cove,
“felt like the set of a Katharine
Hepburn movie, one in which the
heroine shows verbal spunk and
athletic grace in equal measure.”
Blais makes no bones about
how unhappy she is about her
expulsion from the family’s summer Eden, but she is well aware of
the dangers of writing what could
come across as a “Lament of the
One Percent.” To put her sadness
in perspective, she recalls her
strict Catholic upbringing by a
widowed mother of six, and cites
salient sources of global suffering
in the summer of 2014.
The book’s snappy tone is exemplified by Blais’s wry comparison of her husband’s old WASP
family with her own Irish American background. “They are before the Mayflower, mine is before the potato famine,” she
writes, also contrasting “private
viewings of the movie ‘PT 109’ at
the White House” with “all-youcan-eat spaghetti suppers in the
church basement. . . . John’s
father was mythic because he was
part of history; mine was mythic
because he was dead.”
At the heart of Blais’s book is
its eulogy to a culture of “purposeful modesty.” Her in-laws
built their single-story summer
house down a two-mile dirt
track “before the word ‘McMansion’ even existed, at a time
when people were still mindful
of what the neighbors might
think,” she writes. Like the
shack they replaced, it had a
“pickled-in-time quality,” with
no dishwasher, heat, AC, television or Internet. For years it
didn’t even have electricity or
telephone service. Maintained
with what she calls “a strategy
of benign neglect,” by the time
the family put it on the market,
“decay was general: Shingles
had detached from the exterior
like a self-peeling banana.”
Blais’s initial surprise at the
rustic shabbiness reminded me
of my own bafflement at the
threadbare rugs and miserable
ancient horsehair mattresses at
my husband’s grandparents’ Ad-
TO THE NEW
OWNERS
A Martha’s
Vineyard
Memoir
By Madeleine
Blais
Atlantic Monthly.
272 pp. $26
irondack cottage, where meals
were served formally on chipped
china. She comments, “The idea
of a certain kind of cheerful
self-abnegation in gorgeous settings was new to me, the notion
that patched elbows, fraying
hems, and chipped dishes throw
perfect vistas into relief and also
the notion that the less your
summer setting resembled the
heavy baggage of your winter
setting, the better.”
A self-declared archivist, Blais
relies heavily — sometimes too
heavily — on external documents
for her portrait of the Vineyard.
These include many articles from
the Vineyard Gazette quoted at
length, and even a family friend’s
college application essay about
what she learned about the less
privileged from her summer job
at the local Stop & Shop.
Excerpts cherry-picked from
the logbooks in which visitors
were required to write add more
color. These logs helped to fix
memories in “verbal aspic,” but
also to distinguish between, say,
“the Summer of All Fog” and the
summer of no water. The entries
include recipes, warnings, celebrity sightings, dog tales and what
she dubs “the artful complaint,”
often about the perennial paucity
of fish.
Some of the wittiest comments
are by her sister-in-law, Anne.
(“Electricians came. Electricity
didn’t.”) Favorite repeat guests
Philip Caputo and his wife, Leslie
Ware, a longtime Consumer Reports editor, cleverly rated each
year’s visit in CR style. Lydia
Katzenbach’s logpost in 1993 presciently flagged “delightful visits
and fun with the Clintons at Kay
Graham’s,” where she and her
husband “came away from dinner
especially impressed with HRC,
feeling with her intelligence, wit,
and warmth she could easily be
president herself. Maybe she will
be.”
Blais writes, “I am so grateful
we persisted in taking notes on
ourselves. In a culture that wor-
ships the delete button, there was
something comforting about the
indelibility of these words.”
“To the New Owners” sparkles
when Blais focuses on her family’s frequently funny experiences
instead of trying to capture Martha’s Vineyard with an island
tour and a rundown of its offseason activities. I won’t divulge
what eventually transpires with
the Katzenbach property, though
I can say that the book has an
edge. New owners — with your
central air-conditioning, lap
pools, saunas and screening
rooms — take note! Blais pointedly showcases the simpler, more
modest and, alas, rapidly disappearing old Vineyard she loves.
Unfortunately, the changes she
mourns are happening everywhere. Which makes records like
this all the more valuable.
bookworld@washpost.com
Heller McAlpin reviews books
regularly for The Washington Post,
NPR and the San Francisco
Chronicle.
On July 21 at 7 p.m., Madeleine Blais
will be at Politics and Prose
Bookstore, 5015 Connecticut Ave.
NW, Washington.
HBO collects 111 Emmy nominations, Netflix has 91 ‘Morning Joe’ hosts’ talk:
Trump, Trump, Trump
EMMYS FROM C1
ries after being snubbed last year.
Here’s our list of major nominations and analysis:
MORNING JOE FROM C1
Drama series
“The Crown” (Netflix)
“The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)
“Westworld” (HBO)
“Stranger Things” (Netflix)
“This Is Us” (NBC)
“Better Call Saul” (AMC)
“House of Cards” (Netflix)
We’re not surprised to see “This
Is Us” on the list, but NBC’s
beloved tearjerker is the first network drama to land a nod for this
category in six years. “The Handmaid’s Tale” is the one to watch on
Emmy night, though we won’t
count out “Westworld” or “The
Crown.” “The Leftovers,” despite
critical acclaim, failed to clinch a
nomination for its final season.
Comedy series
“Blackish” (ABC)
“Atlanta” (FX)
“Veep” (HBO)
“Master of None” (Netflix)
“Silicon Valley” (HBO)
“Unbreakable Kimmy
Schmidt” (Netflix)
“Modern Family” (ABC)
With a Golden Globe already
under its belt, Donald Glover’s
critically acclaimed FX comedy
“Atlanta” will be a strong contender against last year’s winner,
“Veep.” “Modern Family” clinches
its eighth nomination despite declining ratings (at one point it
won five years in a row).
Lead actress
in a drama
Claire Foy,
“The Crown” (Netflix)
Keri Russell,
“The Americans” (FX)
Elisabeth Moss,
“The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)
Viola Davis, “How to Get Away
With Murder” (ABC)
Robin Wright,
“House of Cards” (Netflix)
Evan Rachel Wood,
“Westworld” (HBO)
For the first time since “Homeland” debuted, Claire Danes is off
the list. The debuts of “The
Crown,” “The Handmaid’s Tale”
and “Westworld” mean nods for
Foy, Moss and Wood, respectively
— and the odds are good for Moss.
Lead actor in a drama
Sterling K. Brown,
“This Is Us” (NBC)
Matthew Rhys,
“The Americans” (FX)
Kevin Spacey,
“House of Cards” (Netflix)
Liev Schreiber,
“Ray Donovan” (Showtime)
Anthony Hopkins,
“Westworld” (HBO)
Milo Ventimiglia,
“This Is Us” (NBC)
Bob Odenkirk,
“Better Call Saul” (AMC)
While Brown’s “This Is Us”
nomination was expected, Ventimiglia was the wild card. Another new addition is Hopkins in
“Westworld,” which apparently is
the TV Academy’s new favorite
show. Otherwise it’s business as
usual, with Rhys’s second straight
nod for “The Americans” making
up for its absence in the best
drama category.
JOHN P. JOHNSON/HBO
James Marsden and Evan Rachel Wood in “Westworld.” Wood got one of the show’s 22 nominations.
Lead actress
in a comedy
Julia Louis-Dreyfus,
“Veep” (HBO)
Tracee Ellis Ross,
“Blackish” (ABC)
Lily Tomlin,
“Grace and Frankie” (Netflix)
Jane Fonda, “Grace and
Frankie” (Netflix)
Ellie Kemper, “Unbreakable
Kimmy Schmidt” (Netflix)
Allison Janney, “Mom” (CBS)
Pamela Adlon,
“Better Things” (FX)
Adlon, the co-creator and star
of “Better Things,” is the biggest
surprise here, though we’re not
sure she’ll be a match for LouisDreyfus, who has taken home the
trophy annually since 2012. Or
could Ross, clinching her second
nomination for “Blackish,” pull
off a surprise win, after earning
the Golden Globe in this category
last year? Fonda finally joins her
“Grace and Frankie” co-star Tomlin, a three-time nominee in this
category. Janney won best supporting actress for “Mom” in 2014
and 2015, but this is her first year
on the lead actress roster.
Lead actor in a comedy
Donald Glover, “Atlanta” (FX)
Anthony Anderson,
“Blackish” (ABC)
Jeffrey Tambor,
“Transparent” (Amazon)
Aziz Ansari,
“Master of None” (Netflix)
William H. Macy,
“Shameless” (Showtime)
Zach Galifianakis,
“Baskets” (FX)
We’re definitely not surprised
to see Glover here, but we weren’t
expecting the other newcomer,
Galifianakis, who co-created his
niche FX comedy — about a very
sad clown — with Louis C.K. (a
five-time nominee in this category). Tambor is the one to beat: The
“Transparent” actor has, somewhat controversially, taken home
the trophy for the past two years.
Other nominations:
Lead actress in a
limited series or movie
Nicole Kidman,
“Big Little Lies” (HBO)
Reese Witherspoon,
“Big Little Lies” (HBO)
Jessica Lange,
“Feud: Bette and Joan” (FX)
Susan Sarandon, “Feud: Bette
and Joan” (FX)
Carrie Coon, “Fargo” (FX)
Felicity Huffman, “American
Crime” (ABC)
Lead actor in a limited
series or movie
Ty Burrell,
“Modern Family” (ABC)
Alec Baldwin, “Saturday Night
Live” (NBC)
Tituss Burgess, “Unbreakable
Kimmy Schmidt” (Netflix)
Tony Hale, “Veep” (HBO)
Matt Walsh, “Veep” (HBO)
Riz Ahmed,
“The Night Of” (HBO)
John Turturro,
“The Night Of” (HBO)
Ewan McGregor, “Fargo” (FX)
Robert De Niro,
“The Wizard of Lies” (HBO)
Benedict Cumberbatch, “Sherlock: The Lying Detective” (PBS)
Geoffrey Rush, “Genius” (National Geographic)
“The Voice” (NBC)
“The Amazing Race” (CBS)
“Top Chef ” (Bravo)
“Project Runway” (Lifetime)
“RuPaul’s Drag Race” (Logo)
“American Ninja Warrior” (NBC)
Supporting actress
in a drama
Outstanding variety
talk series
Ann Dowd,
“The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)
Samira Wiley, “The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)
Uzo Aduba, “Orange Is
the New Black” (Netflix)
Millie Bobby Brown,
“Stranger Things” (Netflix)
Thandie Newton,
“Westworld” (HBO)
Chrissy Metz, “This Is Us” (NBC)
“Late Show With Stephen
Colbert” (CBS)
“Last Week Tonight With
John Oliver” (HBO)
“Jimmy Kimmel Live” (ABC)
“Full Frontal With
Samantha Bee” (TBS)
“Late Late Show With
James Corden” (CBS)
“Real Time With
Bill Maher” (HBO)
Supporting actor
in a drama
Outstanding
limited series
Jonathan Banks,
“Better Call Saul” (AMC)
John Lithgow,
“The Crown” (Netflix)
Mandy Patinkin,
“Homeland” (Showtime)
Michael Kelly,
“House Of Cards” (Netflix)
David Harbour, “Stranger
Things” (Netflix)
Ron Cephas Jones,
“This Is Us” (NBC)
Jeffrey Wright,
“Westworld” (HBO)
“The Night Of ” (HBO)
“Big Little Lies” (HBO)
“Fargo” (FX)
“Feud: Bette and Joan” (FX)
“Genius” (National Geographic)
Supporting actress
in a comedy
Vanessa Bayer, “Saturday
Night Live” (NBC)
Leslie Jones, “Saturday Night
Live” (NBC)
Kate McKinnon, “Saturday
Night Live” (NBC)
Kathryn Hahn, “Transparent”
(Amazon)
Judith Light, “Transparent”
(Amazon)
Anna Chlumsky, “Veep” (HBO)
Supporting actor
in a comedy
Louie Anderson,
“Baskets” (FX)
Outstanding realitycompetition program
Outstanding TV movie
“Black Mirror” (Netflix)
“Dolly Parton’s Christmas of
Many Colors: Circle of Love”
(NBC)
“Immortal Life of Henrietta
Lacks” (HBO)
“Sherlock: The Lying Detective” (PBS)
“The Wizard of Lies” (HBO)
Nominations by
network:
HBO: 111
Netflix: 91
NBC: 60
FX: 54
ABC: 34
CBS: 29
Fox: 21
Hulu: 18
Amazon: 16
emily.yahr@washpost.com
bethonie.butler@washpost.com
the president with whom the pair
used to be chummy.
“Well,” Brzezinski said slyly.
“Now I call him nothing. Because
we don’t talk. Things have kind of
devolved.”
Devolved? Come now. Only in
the way things “devolved” for ousted acting Attorney General Sally
Yates or ousted FBI head James
Comey. Only in the sense that Donald Trump’s public vitriol can
make one into the toast of the
town. The night before, Scarborough and Brzezinski had appeared on “The Late Show With
Stephen Colbert” and given the
show its highest ratings in two
months. We should all devolve so
beautifully.
And — a boon to the salivating
public — Scarborough and Brzezinski appeared to have no interest
in re-evolving their relationship on
Tuesday, perfectly content to lob
casual insults and anecdotes that
made the president look like a
boundary-challenged
middle
school weirdo.
“He’s . . . he’s really into Joe,”
Brzezinski confided. “It’s really like
he watches our show and thinks it’s
important to be considered positively.”
“We didn’t talk through most of
the campaign,” Scarborough added. “They kept calling and saying,
you need to come over. He always
thinks that if he’s nice to you and
invites you to lunch or dinner that
somehow you’re going to give him
favorable coverage. And it always
ends the same, where somehow
he’s shocked that — ”
“That you’re not Sean Hannity?”
Brzezinski said.
[Uproarious audience laughter].
“It’s like when we went over to
the White House, Donald said,
‘Hey, is this your first time in the
Oval Office?’ ” Scarborough relayed. “Mika said no. He said, when
was your first time? Mika said,
when I was nine.” (Brzezinski’s father was a diplomat and President
Jimmy Carter’s national security
adviser). The president then said,
according to Scarborough, “But,
Joe, I guess this is your first time,”
at which point the former Republican congressman reminded the
president that he was a former
congressman and had been in the
Oval Office plenty.
[Uproarious audience laughter].
Brzezinski and Scarborough,
with the tele-friendly pitter-pat
perfected over a decade on the air,
offer a preview of what the lecture
circuit will look like in the frenzied
months after Trump’s administration ends: gaggles of politicos and
talking heads who used to be in
Trump’s circle, now racing for the
nearest podium to share just how
craaazy it all was.
Sure, Scarborough had offered
Trump advice, encouraging the
then-candidate to apologize for his
remarks on Mexicans, and to make
amends to John McCain (Trump
thanked him for his advice but told
him, “I just don’t apologize,” according to Scarborough). Sure, the
pair had accepted invitations to the
White House and Mar-a-Lago, and
sure, if Trump invited them again,
they would go.
“Now I call him
nothing. Because we
don’t talk. Things have
kind of devolved.”
Mika Brzezinski, when asked whether
she still calls the president Donald
“Wouldn’t you?” Brzezinski
asked Rubenstein, who demurred
that he had “never been invited.”
Sure to all of that — but let them
tell you, the Trump milieu was
craaazy.
“I actually had called — I think it
was Sean Spicer or Reince Priebus
— the day [Trump] had been inaugurated and put up those pictures
about crowd size,” Scarborough
said, pulling the audience back to
the time when the country was
forced to look at endless White
House pictures of ambiguously
sized crowds standing on the Mall.
The couple played coy about
their wedding plans in a way that
moderate celebrities must when
they suddenly have become maximum celebrities.
“Can we give the location?” Scarborough asked his fiancee.
“No, no!” she protested. (It is
Nantucket. They went ahead and
told everyone it is Nantucket).
But mostly it was all Trump, all
the time, in the way that so much of
America has become all Trump, all
the time.
“Joe, you have announced you
are an independent. Mika, have
you announced what party you are
in?” Rubenstein asked.
“I’m a Democrat.”
“But you’re not going to announce you’re an independent?”
She suppressed a snicker. “No.
I’m good.”
Uproarious audience laughter,
lots and lots of it.
monica.hesse@washpost.com
C4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14 , 2017
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
7/14/17
7:00
7:30
8:00
◆ News
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4.1 WRC (NBC)
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◆ ET
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14.1 WFDC (UNI) La Rosa de Guadalupe
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Friends From College (Netflix streaming) Cobie Smulders and KeeganMichael Key play a married couple in this comedy about a group of
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encounter a surprising connection
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Dark Matter (Syfy at 9) A familiar
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The Great British Baking Show
(MPT at 9) The remaining seven
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Noxon (“Buffy the Vampire Slayer,”
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LATE NIGHT
Chelsea (Netflix streaming) Aly
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Russell Wilson.
Fallon (NBC at 11:34) Repeat: Kate
McKinnon, John Cena, Mac
DeMarco.
20/20 (ABC at 10) As O.J.
Simpson’s parole hearing
approaches, his closest associates
reflect on the robbery that landed
the disgraced football legend in
prison.
Colbert (CBS at 11:35) “The Late
Show” looks back at the week’s
best moments.
Wynonna Earp (Syfy at 10)
Wynonna races to save Purgatory.
Corden (CBS at 12:37) Repeat:
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Russell Howard.
MOVIE
To the Bone (Netflix streaming) Lily
Collins plays a young woman
struggling with anorexia in this
drama from TV veteran Marti
ACROSS
1 Innocents
6 Afternoon tea
accompanier
10 Longtime
shipboard
scurvy
preventative
14 Piles (of)
15 “Yo”
16 Matched, in
Paris Match
17 Ring
heavyweights
20 Big cheese
21 NYC building
that was
Lennon’s last
home, with
“The”
22 Literary
intros
25 “Real Time”
host
26 Western
ambush site
27 ’80s voice
of Inspector
Gadget
30 “You said it!”
31 Protest
movement
32 Angus beef?
33 Makes next
to nothing
37 San Joseto-Sacramento
dir.
38 Uncultivated
land
39 Regarding
40 Navigation
tools
42 Grapefruit’s
bigger cousin
44 Common bugs
45 Baroness
Blixen’s pen
name
46 Women’s
clothing chain
founded on
Florida’s Sanibel
Island
48 Like Olympic
racetracks
49 Jack’s spot
54 Appear
55 Unnerve
56 Was
successful in
57 “Nothing
lived in him
but fear and
hatred”
Meyers (NBC at 12:37) Repeat: Will
Ferrell, Laverne Cox, Jeff Tweedy.
— Bethonie Butler
More at washingtonpost.com/tv
LEGEND: Bold indicates new or live programs
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High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
By Ed Sessa
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
Kimmel (ABC at 11:35) Repeat:
Chadwick Boseman, Tatiana
Maslany, Kyle, Lil Yachty.
(5:00) Live PD
Live PD: Rewind
Live PD (Live)
A&E
(5:00) Movie: The Departed ★★★ (2006)
Movie: GoodFellas ★★★★ (1990)
Fear Walking
AMC
Insane Pools: Deep End
Insane Pools: Deep End
Insane Pools
Insane Pools
Insane Pools
Animal Planet
Movie: Alex Cross ★ (2012)
(9:58) Tales
(11:02) Martin (11:38) Martin
BET
(6:22) Movie: Maid in Manhattan ★★
Movie: Friends With Benefits ★★★ (2011)
Friends With Benefits (2011)
Bravo
Gumball
King of Hill
Cleveland
Cleveland
Amer. Dad
Amer. Dad
Burgers
Family Guy
Family Guy
Cartoon Network Ben 10
Erin Burnett OutFront
Anderson Cooper 360
Anderson Cooper 360
The Axe Files
Anderson Cooper 360
CNN
Wizards Summer Series
Best of The Sports Junkies
SportsTalk SportsNet
Redskins
Count.
Comcast SportsNet Wizards Summer Series
South Park
South Park
South Park
South Park
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Chris Rock: Kill, Messenger
Comedy Central Futurama
Alaskan Bush People
Alaskan Bush People
Alaskan Bush
Alaskan Bush People
Alaskan Bush People
Discovery
K.C. Undercover
K.C.
K.C.
Bizaard
Andi Mack
Stuck/Middle K.C. Under.
K.C. Under.
Bizaardvark
Disney
E!
News
Movie:
Independence
Day
★★★
(1996)
E! News
E!
The
25th
ESPYS
X
Games
SportCtr
ESPN
2017 Body Issue
2017 World Series of Poker: Main Event (Live)
Kickboxing: Glory 43
ESPN2
Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners
Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive
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The Story With Martha
Tucker Carlson Tonight
The Five
Hannity
Tucker Carlson Tonight
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◆ The 700 Club
(6:50) Movie: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 ★★★ (2011)
The Bold Type
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(5:00) Movie: Oblivion ★★ Movie: White House Down ★★ (2013)
Snowfall
FX
(6:00) My Christmas Love
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The Middle
The Middle
Golden Girls Golden Girls
Hallmark
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Murder, She Wrote
Hallmark M&M Movie: The Christmas Card ★★ (2006)
Mission 2
VICE
(8:15) Movie: Watchmen ★★ (2009)
VICE
Independ
HBO
Tiny House
Tiny House
Beach
Beach
Beach
Beach
Hunters
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Ancient Aliens
Ancient Aliens
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(11:02) Little Women: LA
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The Real Bonnie and Clyde Nazi Megastructures
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Henry Danger Thundermans The Thundermans
Movie: Yogi Bear ★ (2010)
Full House
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(11:15) Cops Cops
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(5:30) Movie: Ghost Rider
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(6:15) Little Mister Jim ★★ Movie: Shadow of a Doubt ★★★★ (1943)
Movie: Lifeboat ★★★ (1944)
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(11:37) Will
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Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers (8:41) Impractical Jokers
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Playing
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Just teasing? Dig deeper to find out.
© 2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
58 Become
undone,
in a way
59 Gets down
to business?
DOWN
1 Senegal’s
pink-watered
__ Rose
2 Sushi
selection
3 Cannes view
4 Websiteto-website
connection
5 Embolden
6 Ones doing
the dishes
7 Sword handle
8 Maritime
agreement
9 Cagney does
it on stairs in
“Yankee Doodle
Dandy”
10 Came out
somehow
11 Dolts
12 Damon of the
Bourne films
13 Big cat of film
18 Wise one
19 “Very funny!”
7/14/17
22 Seafood
order
23 Punk rock
surname
24 Hyped-up
25 Transform
27 Pub entertainment
28 Mark with
blotches
29 “Already?”
31 Medieval
barriers
34 Hebrew greeting
35 Drives back
36 Make a personal connection?
41 On the way
42 Softwood tree
43 Knockout
couple?
45 Prominent
mayor at the
1968 Democratic Convention
46 What’s in your
wallet
47 News headliner
Lewis?
48 “__ With a ‘Z’”:
1972 TV special
50 Military band?
51 A, in Avignon
52 Photographer
Goldin
53 Board jumpers:
abbr.
THURSDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
Dear Carolyn: I
know teasing can
be a playful way to
get close or nudge
us not to take
ourselves too
Carolyn
seriously. But
Hax
sometimes I feel
my wife uses it to
express an
opinion or point about me
without saying it straight out.
These exchanges always seem
a bit off, like little sidelong digs,
but if I look at her inquisitively
she says she was “just teasing,”
implying that I missed the
harmless fun. I end up feeling offbalance, like the episode served
more to divide than join us.
If I’m misreading her, I want to
stop and lighten up. If my sense
of these situations is accurate, I
want to respond more
constructively. How do I know
which is which, and where do I
go from there?
— Too Sensitive?
Too Sensitive?: Think about a
time when your attempt to tease
someone fell flat.
Did you say, “I’m just teasing”
and imply your target “missed
the harmless fun”?
Or did you apologize?: “It was
supposed to be a joke. I’m sorry.”
There isn’t much of a verbal
difference here, but there’s a
huge emotional one. The latter is
what you say when you upset
someone you don’t mean to
upset.
The former is gaslighting.
A nickel definition: It’s a subtle
abuse tactic to make someone
question him- or herself instead
of the abuser. (See: “Snowflake,”
circa 2016.) It disempowers and
also isolates, since victims start
holding back to avoid making
these perceived mistakes.
So, your wife drops a sidelong
dig, and you don’t feel closer to
her, obviously — nor do you say,
“Wow. That was mean.” Instead
you retreat in fear that it’s your
fault for being sensitive.
Classic.
Read your letter, and note how
distant you sound from the
person you married.
It’s a surmountable problem,
though, once you learn to
identify and stand up to it, and —
this is huge — determine that
your partner is a decent person
who is acting unawares on
unhealthy reflexes, as opposed to
someone who knowingly seeks
(and justifies) the upper hand.
She’ll reveal which one she is
when you articulate your
discomfort with communication
by snark.
If she responds with more
blame, then you’ll know she’s not
willing to build trust through
openness. Counseling would
make sense in that case — just
you, though, not with a
domineering spouse.
If instead she drops her
defenses, enough to treat your
feelings as valid — a prerequisite
for breaking possibly lifelong
emotional habits — then there is
a clear and constructive path for
you to follow:
First, you find the courage to
communicate clearly — “That
sounds like a dig. If there’s
something you’d like to say to me,
then please say it directly.” Next,
she finds the courage to accept
that: “You’re right, I wasn’t being
direct: It bothers me when you
do X.” Then you accommodate as
you want to and can while
remaining true to yourself.
This leaves plenty of room for
harmless teasing — mutual,
joyful, ulterior-motive-free.
The power ruts you’re in, yours
and hers, deferring and
dominating, are about holding
on. That suggests — ironically —
that you’re both governed by fear
of losing someone.
The way to keep someone,
though, is to be open enough
about frustrations, fears and
affections to bring you close —
and to accept the risk of finding
out you’re better off apart.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
FRIDAY, JULY 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
EZ
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
RE
PICKLES
C5
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
BOTH SIDES VULNERABLE
NORTH
Q97
862
AJ752
K8
EAST
64
J 10 9
KQ96
AQ94
WEST
5
K743
843
10 7 6 5 2
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH (D)
A K J 10 8 3 2
AQ5
10
J3
The bidding:
SOUTH
WEST
NORTH
1
Pass
2
4
All Pass
Opening lead — 5
EAST
Pass
CLASSIC PEANUTS
rying to keep his weight
down, Cy the Cynic got a
membership in a fitness center. That lasted longer than I
expected: two weeks.
“It wasn’t working out, if
you’ll pardon the phrase,”
Cy said.
Cy has a similar problem
with partnerships: He is
less tolerant of his partner’s
errors than his own. In
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
today’s deal, Cy led a club
against four spades, and
East took the queen and ace
and led ... the jack of hearts.
South rose with his ace,
led a diamond to the ace
and ruffed a diamond. He
got to dummy with trumps
to ruff two more diamonds
and returned with a trump
to pitch a heart on the good
fifth diamond. He lost one
heart but made game, and
LIO
soon afterward, Cy’s partnership with East dissolved.
“I don’t need partners who
boot easy defenses,” the
Cynic said.
Cy will never find a perfect
partner; everybody makes
errors. At Trick Three, East
must lead a trump. He kills a
vital entry to dummy before
South can work on the diamonds, and South loses two HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
hearts.
T
CHARLES SCHULZ
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
Q97862
AJ752K8
The dealer, at your left,
opens one club. Your partner
doubles, and the next player
bids two clubs. What do you
say?
ANSWER: You might bid
2NT, a try for game. You
BLONDIE
would show 10 or 11 points
with a club stopper. But the
bidding suggests that partner
has a light, shapely double.
At notrump, the opponents
may set up and cash some
clubs. Bid two diamonds. If
they compete to three clubs,
try three diamonds.
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2017, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
C6
EZ
MUTTS
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
PATRICK McDONNELL
ZITS
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14 , 2017
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | JULY 14
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
This year you seem
more open to taking
action. You also are
able to identify with
others more easily. If you
are single, you are likely to
meet someone who seems
like a kindred spirit or soul
mate. You are more likely to
encounter this person in the
later part of the year. If you
are attached, the two of you
express more understanding
toward each other. Romance’s
flame will endure and often
become bigger. Aries knows
how to get you to express your
feelings.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
You might have stayed up late
or gone overboard last night,
so getting going might be
difficult. You could be tempted
to withdraw. However, if you
are an artist or are feeling
unusually creative, you’ll see
the benefits of all the recent
fun.
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
Use the morning, when you
feel empowered, for critical
matters. A friend seeks you
out, as he or she has some
gossip to share. Give this
person the space to express
his or her thoughts.
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
You seem to be on center
stage wherever you go. You
might wonder what would be
best to do as an issue drags
WEINGARTENS & CLARK you down. A discussion needs
to be private, yet that might be
hard to pull off right now.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
Opportunities stem from those
in your immediate circle.
You enjoy a hectic pace. You
also might need to deal with
a situation that suddenly
triggers some angry feelings.
Be aware of a tendency to sit
on your anger.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
Relate to a loved one directly.
A child seems withdrawn, and
you might be concerned. Use
your people skills to help draw
this person out; he or she will
be very grateful to get past this
present obstacle.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
You could be overwhelmed by
a partner who is being overly
demanding. You might not like
where a boss or someone you
need to answer to is coming
from. You are likely to witness
a volatile situation. Be careful,
and try not to get involved.
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
You seem ready for a swift
change and a free weekend.
You use this time for various
activities. You might be
joined by a friend who enjoys
spending time with you. News
from someone at a distance
could surprise you.
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
You see a problem developing,
and you might want to have a
heart-to-heart talk with a close
friend or loved one in order to
share some of your concerns.
You will find it necessary to
hear where this person is
coming from. Listen carefully.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
You might want to weigh the
pros and cons of a particular
situation. You could hear many
different pieces of information.
Look at the big picture. A new
friend seems to want your
undivided attention.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
You are coming from a place
of security. Communication
remains active, yet there
is an underlying theme of
frustration that could emerge
at any moment. Someone you
look up to might want you to
meet every one of his or her
expectations.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
Zero in on a money problem.
You will see that a response is
forthcoming. If you are willing
to open up, others are likely
to share their ideas. Don’t
automatically decide that an
idea is not good until you have
toyed with it for a while.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
You soar to a new level
of understanding. Others
become more willing to share
their feelings and thoughts.
Reach out to those closest to
you for better feedback and
understanding. Make plans to
visit with a dear loved one.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2017, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
KLMNO
SPORTS
FRIDAY, JULY 14 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
D
M2
PRO BASKETBALL
SOCCER
BASEBALL
GOLF
Jodie Meeks, motivated by joining a
playoff team, spends time getting to
know his new Wizards teammates at an
unofficial minicamp in Las Vegas. D3
D.C. United Coach Ben Olsen expects to
add ‘an attacking piece’ in the next
month to a team that has scored an
MLS-low 14 goals this season. D3
After a deal for a new stadium falls
through, the Potomac Nationals, one of
Washington’s Class A affiliates, might be
looking for a new owner and home. D5
Lydia Ko uses positivity and patience to
get off to a good start at the U.S.
Women’s Open, shooting a 4-under-par
68 to trail Shanshan Feng by two. D6
With MASN money, time
to pay price to fix flaw
The Washington
Nationals didn’t
play Thursday,
but they enjoyed
their most
significant
Barry
victory of the
Svrluga
season, granted
by a New York
court. Cut through the legalese,
and it’s this: At some point, they
likely will receive more money
— significantly more money —
from the Mid-Atlantic Sports
Network, on which their games
are broadcast. Celebrate, Nats
fans — but maybe save the Dom
Pérignon for when we find out
exactly how many millions and
when it will come in.
But with the second half of
the season opening Friday, the
decision also compels those
same Nats fans to turn to the
Lerner family, all but screaming,
“Spend the money!” Most World
Series contenders — and the
Nationals are indisputably one
— enter the final weeks before
the trade deadline with a wish
or a want. The Nationals have a
need dressed in blaze orange,
one so obvious it was in some
ways the talk of the sport at the
All-Star Game in Miami.
Washington has the highestscoring offense in the National
League. It has a rotation fronted
by a pair of all-stars. Not
addressing that need — the
bullpen — would amount to
malpractice. And now, with
their share of revenue likely to
be determined by an MLB panel
— exactly where the Nationals
SVRLUGA CONTINUED ON D4
Bullpen tops worry list
as Nats begin second half
BY J ORGE C ASTILLO
AND C HELSEA J ANES
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
One thing to follow as play resumes is whether veteran Ryan
Zimmerman (11) can continue his torrid offense down the stretch.
The Washington Nationals
open the second half of their
season Friday in Cincinnati,
owners of a 91/2-game lead in the
National League East, with
16 more wins than losses.
But for a team with the second-largest division cushion in
the majors, the Nationals might
have more questions than answers — questions posed by injuries or created by unprecedented
first-half performances that likely will prove crucial to the push
toward another October.
Here are five of the more
pressing ones, all of which will
be answered, one way or another, by the time the playoffs
roll around.
Turning back the clock
V. Williams returns
to Wimbledon final,
will face Muguruza
BY
It has been the zillion-dollar
question since about mid-April,
and with the nonwaiver trade
deadline 18 days away, the answer depends on some other
questions.
Which teams are going to
become sellers and when? Answer: That’s still not settled (remember when the Royals were
sellers?). But a few teams, such as
the Phillies, Reds and Padres,
definitely will sell.
How many relievers do the
Nationals seek to acquire? AnNATIONALS CONTINUED ON D4
Nationals at Reds
Today, 7:10 p.m., MASN2
Inside: Nationals win small victory
in MASN dispute with Orioles. D4
Bad ‘taste’:
Mystics
back home
after losses
Team seeks to improve
after defeats on road trip
BY
C HUCK C ULPEPPER
A VA W ALLACE
On June 29, the night of the
Washington Mystics’ most recent
home game, Ivory Latta sat at her
locker with ice packs taped
around her knees, a Cheshire cat
smile on her face and her fingers
held in front of her mouth like a
mouse nibbling cheese.
The Mystics had just won their
third straight game. Asked how
close Washington was to becoming the successful team its raw
talent suggested it could be, the
backup point guard flicked her
fingers before answering.
“It’s so close,” she said, “we can
almost taste it.”
Then the Mystics — at the time
the No. 1 team in the WNBA’s
Eastern Conference — embarked
on a three-game road trip. They
returned to Washington after
three losses for a brief respite
before facing Indiana on Friday.
wimbledon, england — For all the
days and fortnights and years of the
early 2010s, the horizon didn’t seem to
hold in store the kind of impressionist
painting of the Thursday that Venus
Williams just had. It did not hint she
might turn up at her Wimbledon sanctum and produce elegant forehands
and consummate know-how through a
charged semifinal against a homecountry sensation. There didn’t figure
to be any shot that would spawn as
much acclaim as did one pearl from her
6-4, 6-2 semifinal win over Johanna
Konta.
Yet here everybody was, at Centre
Court, in the midafternoon, in the year
2017. Here was Williams, 37, defying
entrenched logic about the process of
aging that allegedly besets all athletes.
Here were the usual 15,000 connoisseurs and stragglers, settling in to
groan and gasp for Konta but also, by
the sound of them, to appreciate Williams. And here came Williams’s ninth
berth in a Wimbledon final, after 73
minutes sprinkled with but nine unforced errors and one shot that epitomized the match.
It shouted from Williams’s path to
her meeting Saturday against ruthless
2015 Wimbledon finalist and 2016
French Open champion Garbine Muguruza, who already had torn through
Magdalena Rybarikova, 6-1, 6-1, in the
first semifinal. It came late in the first
set, after Williams and Konta had
tugged-of-war to 4-4 with a total forbiddance of service breaks. Williams,
serving, had just faced a 15-40 inconvenience that made the crowd stir in a
way that might daunt a neophyte. Williams, no neophyte, had just played a
smashing point in a pinch, backhanding a tricky winner into the corner
behind — and beyond — Konta.
Now she faced 30-40. The match
teetered as it figured to do. Williams’s
first serve curled decidedly long at 103
mph. Konta had the relief and privilege
of a second serve to field, so she bobbed
up and down in wait. Williams wound
up.
In a snippet of the depth of her
mastery at her 20th Wimbledon, she
slaughtered that thing 106 mph into
Konta. It tangled and baffled the 26year-old, whose awkward forehand attempt became a skittering groundball.
Deuce, two more points in a row and a
service break followed. A taut set had
unspooled in a whoosh.
“Her being able to do that is why she
is a five-time champion here, and why
MYSTICS CONTINUED ON D3
ACC’s profile
in football
got a big hike
last season
Clemson’s title, Jackson’s
Heisman provide boost
BY
WIMBLEDON CONTINUED ON D6
Wimbledon, men’s semifinals
Today, 8 a.m., ESPN
So . . . what are they going to
do about that bullpen?
ANDREW COULDRIDGE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Venus Williams, 37, enjoying her 6-4, 6-2 win over Johanna Konta, will play for her first Grand Slam title since 2008.
G ENE W ANG
charlotte — In his opening
remarks on the first of two ACC
football media days, Commissioner John Swofford detailed
several notable achievements
from member schools last year.
First was Clemson winning the
national championship. Next
came Louisville’s Lamar Jackson
claiming the Heisman Trophy.
“If that doesn’t tell you something about where ACC football is
today, I’ll give you my glasses
because we’ve made some progress,” Swofford said Thursday
morning.
Coaches and players were far
more emphatic about the ACC as
a football power and how it has
evolved from a conference whose
national profile had been tied
almost exclusively to basketball
for decades.
Over the past four years, the
ACC has produced two football
national champions and a pair of
Heisman Trophy winners. Last
ACC CONTINUED ON D5
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14 , 2017
washingtonpost.com/sports
EARLY LEAD
D.C. SPORTS BOG
Ajax player
su≠ers
permanent
brain injury
BY
Redskins
fans have
a lot on
their plate
FANCY STATS
M ARISSA P AYNE
BY
Abdelhak Nouri, known by his
nickname, “Appie,” to his fans,
appeared well Saturday when he
took the field for the Dutch side
Ajax in a friendly against Werder
Bremen in Zillertal, Austria.
But something changed with
about 20 minutes to play. Nouri’s
movement visibly slowed, and he
staggered a few steps, then collapsed. As his teammates gathered around him, the seriousness
of the situation became clear
when Nouri did not get up.
Five days later, the 20-year-old
midfielder remains in the hospital, where it has become apparent
he will never be the same.
On Thursday, Ajax said Nouri
suffered “serious and permanent
brain damage,” which likely
means Nouri’s professional soccer career is over.
The extent of Nouri’s brain
damage has not been disclosed. It
originally was thought that Nouri
collapsed because of a heart problem, which led to the match being
abandoned so he could be airlifted to the hospital. Follow-up tests
Tuesday,
however,
revealed
Nouri’s heart was functioning
normally. According to Ajax,
Nouri is in a coma.
As the latest news about
Nouri’s condition spread, soccer
players from around the world
reacted, including Barcelona star
Luis Suarez, who posted a photograph of himself with a young
Nouri along with a message of
encouragement.
Several of the world’s leading
soccer clubs also reacted to the
news, including Premier League
powerhouses Arsenal and Manchester United.
Meanwhile, some of Nouri’s
teammates and fans posted highlights from his career, which included 15 Eredivisie league appearances and cup games for Ajax
last season.
Nouri, who was born in Amsterdam to Moroccan parents,
also played for several Dutch national youth teams, including its
under-15, 16, 17, 18, 19 and
20 teams.
MATTHEW STOCKMAN/GETTY IMAGES
Colorado relief pitcher Adam Ottavino has 19 holds this season, second in baseball. But he also has a 5.74 ERA.
Plus-minus? Now it’s just a minus.
Some traditional statistics
appear to have outlived
their usefulness
BY
N EIL G REENBERG
Sports of all kinds have kept statistics
since forever, but that doesn’t mean we
should keep the most widely
recognizable ones.
Baseball, football and hockey are team
sports, yet individual players such as
pitchers, quarterbacks and goaltenders
are often measured by wins and losses.
Here are a handful of stats that seem
to have outlived their usefulness.
Plus-minus (hockey)
In 1967, the NHL decided to award a
player a “plus” each time he was on the
ice for an even-strength or shorthanded
goal and a “minus” for an even-strength
or shorthanded goal scored by the
opposing team, with the difference
between the two resulting in his plusminus.
A higher plus-minus is supposed to
indicate a better player, but it actually
indicates a player surrounded by better
teammates. Moreover, goaltenders
influence the statistic quite a bit.
Phil Kessel, forward for the Stanley
Cup-winning Pittsburgh Penguins, was
on the ice for 32 even-strength shots for
and 34 shots against per 60 minutes last
season.
Buffalo Sabres forward Evander Kane
was on the ice for 32 and 33 shots per 60
for and against, respectively.
Yet Kessel ended the season with a
plus-3 plus-minus thanks to superior
linemates and netminders whereas
Kane ended his campaign with a minus17. And that’s assuming the players on
the ice are all equally responsible for the
goals for and against, which they aren’t.
According to a five-year study (2008 to
2013) of every goal scored for and against
marissa.payne@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
QUOTABLE
“Thought I’d switch it
up.”
LONZO BALL,
Los Angeles Lakers rookie guard, who
had the best game of summer league
so far — 36 points, 11 assists and
eight rebounds — while wearing Nike
sneakers and not the Big Baller Brand
sneakers from the company owned by
his father.
(via Early Lead)
Cubs land Quintana
in deal with White Sox
The Chicago Cubs, struggling
since winning the World Series,
acquired 28-year-old left-hander
Jose Quintana from the White
Sox on Thursday in a major
trade between crosstown rivals.
The Cubs, trailing Milwaukee
by 51/2 games in the NL Central,
sent four prospects to the
rebuilding White Sox for
Quintana, a 2016 all-star:
outfielder Eloy Jimenez, righthander Dylan Cease, and
infielders Matt Rose and Bryant
Flete.
Quintana is 4-8 with a
4.49 ERA in 18 starts this season.
He won a career-high 13 games
last season and is 50-54 with a
3.51 since his debut in 2012. . . .
White Sox reliever Nate
Jones, out since April 28 with
inflammation in his pitching
elbow, underwent season-ending
arm surgery. He is expected to be
ready for the start of spring
training. . . .
The Tampa Bay Rays placed
injured outfielder Colby Rasmus
on the restricted list after the
player’s decision to “step away
from baseball.”
Holds and saves (baseball)
A hold occurs when a relief pitcher
enters the game in a save situation and
maintains his team’s lead for the next
relief pitcher, while recording at least
one out. There’s only one problem: It
does nothing to tell us how good a
reliever is.
Colorado Rockies reliever Adam
Ottavino has 19 holds this season, second
in baseball and one more than Andrew
Miller of the Cleveland Indians. But
Ottavino’s high ERA (5.74) and walk rate
(16 percent of batters faced) pale in
comparison with Miller’s (1.42 ERA and
6 percent walk rate).
That makes Ottavino’s value lower
than that of a replacement player
(minus-0.3 wins above replacement)
while Miller is one of the most valuable
relievers in baseball (plus-1.9 fWAR).
Saves are just as unreliable — it makes
little sense to reward a pitcher for three
outs with a lead of one, two or three runs.
Player efficiency fating, or PER
(basketball)
Former reporter and current
Memphis Grizzlies front-office member
John Hollinger created this catchall NBA
metric in an attempt to measure a
player’s per-minute performance — such
as field goals, free throws, three-point
attempts made, assists, rebounds, blocks
and steals, along with missed shots,
turnovers and personal fouls — while
adjusting for pace.
The challenge with PER is that it
largely measures offensive performance,
with the two defensive stats it
incorporates, blocks and steals,
unreliable in terms of evaluating a
player’s defensive acumen.
Using box plus-minus — a box score
estimate
of
the
points
per
100 possessions a player contributed
above
a
league-average
player,
translated to an average team —
incorporates a player’s defensive
acumen, giving us a more-rounded view
of his overall contributions.
Plus, it has the benefit of historical
data, allowing us to compare players on
different teams and eras.
To stick with this past season, centers
Rudy Gobert and Enes Kanter had
similar player efficiency ratings (23.3
against 23.7), but Gobert, by virtue of his
defensive abilities, was named to the allNBA and all-defensive teams, giving him
a much higher BPM (plus-5.8 vs. minus1.2).
Runs batted in, or RBI (baseball)
This one might surprise you, but RBI
is not the best way to evaluate hitting
ability. In fact, it is more of a team-centric
stat.
To produce a high number of RBI, a
batter needs players to be on base, and
that is dependent on a hitter’s spot in the
lineup and the hitters who bat in front of
him.
It’s better to look at which players are
good at driving in men on base when the
opportunity arises.
This validates Nolan Arenado (tied for
the major league lead with 70 RBI,
22.8 percent of others batted in) and
Nelson Cruz (70 RBI, 22.5 percent of
others batted in) at the top of the leader
board, but it also shows that Aaron Judge
(66 RBI, 16.1 percent) and Carlos Correa
(65 RBI, 16.7 percent) could do better at
the plate with men on base.
neil.greenberg@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
news/fancystats
At Wednesday’s “Taste of FedEx
Field,” the Redskins invited members of the media and several hundred season ticket holders to sample a number of new concession
items for this season. The updated
menu at Chez Snyder includes a
couple of fancy hot dogs, rice
bowls, fried shrimp, nachos with
pork rinds instead of chips and
Hog Wings (more on those later).
But the best addition might be
an ingenious vessel — “The Grub
Tub” — that lets customers carry
two stadium standbys at once.
Designed by California-based
RP & Associates, it features a large
bowl that fits on top of a cup, with
a straw through the center.
Beer drinkers will be happy to
know that the food cup also fits
over any bottle. The price for a
Grub Tub at FedEx Field has yet to
be announced, but when it debuted at Yankee Stadium in 2016,
a large soda, chicken tenders and
fries cost $18.50.
In food items, D.C. Stir Fry (Sections 120, 138, 402 and 426) will
feature a bulgogi rice bowl, a char
siu chicken rice bowl, Asian nachos with crispy wontons, and the
Hottodoggu, a beef hot dog
topped with pickled cabbage,
wasabi crema, nori, cilantro, scallions and sesame seeds.
The signature item at D.C. Que
(Sections 102, 120 and 405) is a
beef hot dog topped with barbecue pork, pickled cabbage and
crispy fried jalapeños.
The stand also will offer Hog
Wings — pork from the shank
tossed in a bourbon barbecue
glaze and served with fries.
The menu at Nacho Nation
(Sections 117, 138, 423 and 450)
includes Hog-Chos, which are
pork rinds topped with slowroasted pork, cheddar cheese, bacon, jalapeños, cilantro and scallions. The 128-ounce Ultimate Nachos are served in a footballshaped bowl (because they won’t
fit in a Grub Tub).
The Crab Shack (Sections 329,
336) will offer a crab sandwich
with Old Bay aioli and lettuce on a
potato roll, a grilled mahi-mahi
sandwich with lemon butter and
“Boom Boom” crispy shrimp with
fries.
Other new concession items
this season include pit beef and
turkey sandwiches, beef empanadas and an expanded selection of
healthier options, such as a vegetarian rice bowl with Asian vegetable salad, an albacore tuna salad and a chopped Caprese salad.
The Redskins also announced a
non-food-related addition: Walkthrough metal detectors have
been installed at all gates, an upgrade over the handheld wands
that security personnel previously used.
The team expects the metal detectors will make the screening
process up to three times faster.
scott.allen@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/dcsportsbog
D I G ES T
BASEBALL
the Edmonton Oilers, video analysis
showed that approximately “one third of
the plus and minus marks handed out
under the official plus-minus system are
assigned to players who don’t deserve
them,” according to David Staples, who
authored the study.
A better method for evaluating
players is to use shot percentage, the
ratio of shots in the team’s favor with that
player on the ice.
By this method, Kessel (48.6 percent)
and Kane (49.1 percent) are closer in
production.
S COTT A LLEN
The team did not provide
specifics, saying in a statement
that the club fully supports the
player deciding to leave.
Rasmus, 30, had been on the
10-day disabled list since June 23
with left hip tendinitis. He was
limited by injuries to appearing
in 37 games this season, batting
.281 with nine homers and
23 RBI in 121 at-bats. . . .
Tim Tebow hit the first gameending home run of his pro
baseball career, lifting the Class
A St. Lucie Mets over the
Daytona Tortugas, 5-4, in a
seven-inning game in Port St.
Lucie, Fla.
The former NFL quarterback
went deep with one out against
Cincinnati Reds minor leaguer
Austin Orewiler, hitting a firstpitch fastball over the fence in
left field. It’s his third home run
in 16 Florida State League games
following a promotion from
Class A Columbia, and his sixth
home run in 80 games in his first
season as a minor leaguer.
Tebow has hit safely in 11
straight games and is batting
.327 with St. Lucie. . . .
The Washington Nationals
optioned left-hander Sammy
Solis to Class AAA Syracuse. His
demotion comes following a
rough stint since coming off the
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disabled list on July 1.
The 28-year-old left-hander
allowed eight runs over three
innings in four appearances. He
allowed two home runs, walked
two batters and struck out
three. The damage hiked his
ERA to 14.73 in 71/3 innings this
season.
— Jorge Castillo
HOCKEY
Veteran defenseman Andrew
Ference, 38, who won a Stanley
Cup with the Boston Bruins in
2011, announced his retirement
from the NHL after 16 seasons.
Ference spent the past four
seasons with Edmonton, where
he served as captain from 2013
to 2015.
He had 43 goals, 182 assists
and 753 penalty minutes in 907
games with Pittsburgh, Calgary,
Boston and Edmonton. . . .
Carolina Hurricanes owner
Peter Karmanos Jr. is
considering selling the team.
Hurricanes spokesman Mike
Sundheim said in a statement
that Karmanos is deciding
whether to accept an offer for
the franchise or remain the
owner, but he declined to say
who made the offer.
Karmanos bought the
Hartford Whalers franchise in
1994 and moved it to North
Carolina three years later.
MISC.
Former T.C. Williams standout
Josephus Lyles held off Will
London II by 0.03 seconds in a
400-meter race Wednesday at a
meet in the Italian resort of
Lignano Sabbiadoro.
Lyles, who won with a
personal best of 45.42 seconds,
starred for T.C. Williams in 201516 before turning pro. He took
silver and bronze medals in the
400 and 200, respectively, at the
2015 World U18 Championships.
His brother, Noah Lyles, the
world U20 100-meter champion,
also ran for T.C. Williams. . . .
Gerson Mayen and Rodolfo
Zelaya scored within three
minutes of each other midway
through the opening half to give
El Salvador a 2-0 win over
Curacao in a CONCACAF Gold
Cup Group C game in Denver.
— From news services
and staff reports
FRIDAY, JULY 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
SU
Meeks is eager to win with Wizards
BY
On three-game road trip,
Mystics went wrong way
C ANDACE B UCKNER
Jodie Meeks has spent the past
few days in Las Vegas getting to
know his new Washington Wizards teammates.
He already has a connection
with the point guard — Meeks
was the University of Kentucky
upperclassman assigned to host a
young John Wall during his campus visit in 2009. Also, Meeks has
a working knowledge of Tim Frazier’s game, recognizing how Frazier had collected a triple-double
in a reserve role last year with the
New Orleans Pelicans. However,
the relationships formed in earnest this week as Meeks and
several Wizards — including Wall
and Frazier — participated in a
workout.
If it seems as if Meeks, 29, has
moved fast to acclimate with the
Wizards, then this explains his
willingness to join a winning
team.
Meeks, who signed a deal reportedly for two years and
$7 million, has not played significant playoff minutes since his
2011-12 season with the Philadelphia 76ers. Therefore, Washington’s 49-33 record and run to the
Eastern Conference semifinals
served as the motivation for him
as a free agent.
“They had a really good season
last year,” said Meeks, who then
mentioned his recent postseason
dry spell. “Losing gets pretty old
after a while. When you’re in this
league for a while, you look to
win. You always want to play well
and stuff like that and get a lot of
playing time early on, but after a
while you want to win. You want
to contribute still, but you want to
win. So I feel like I can still come
in and contribute and play some
significant minutes, but at the
same time, I want to be part of the
playoffs, too.”
In addition to playing on lottery-bound teams, Meeks has
grappled with various injuries.
Last July, he had foot surgery.
Then, after returning several
weeks later, Meeks dislocated the
thumb on his right, shooting
hand. Meeks appeared in just 36
games last season with the Orlando Magic and has not played 70 or
more games since the 2013-14
season with the Los Angeles Lakers.
During that year, Meeks filled
in for an injured Kobe Bryant and
appeared to be on the rise, averaging 15.7 points and shooting
40.1 percent from the three-point
arc.
“The past couple years have
been tough, just being injured,”
Meeks said. “Coming off my ca-
MYSTICS FROM D1
Each road loss — at Los Angeles, Phoenix and Connecticut —
looked like a regression for a
team that had tightened up both
mentally and defensively at the
end of June.
In L.A. and Phoenix, the Mystics (10-8) gave up double-digit
leads in the second half. The
Sparks trailed by 14 points with
six minutes left in the third
before their comeback win, and
the Sun pulled off the biggest
comeback in franchise history —
just two points shy of the WNBA
record for biggest second-half
comeback — when it rallied from
a 22-point deficit halfway
through the third quarter.
“We’ll be going, getting a lead
and then something happens and
it’s like . . . is that us out there?”
Latta said after practice at Verizon Center this week. “That’s
what it is: We get there, and it’s
like one little thing or two little
things we need to do and correct.
We can’t continue to take two
steps forward and a step back,
three steps forward and two steps
back. We can’t continue to do that
if we want to be the team that we
know we can be.”
Coach Mike Thibault attributes that poor second-half play
to the Mystics’ inexperience with
situations in which they’re the
ones being chased.
That could help explain why
the defense slipped and the Mystics grew less aggressive late in
the game against two desperate
teams. The Sparks’ Nneka Ogwumike played the entire second
half with four fouls; in Connecticut, no one could stop Jonquel
Jones as she muscled in 22
points.
“Part of it is our lack of maturity as a group — not as individuals
but as a group — to understand
the mentality a team brings when
they get desperate,” Thibault
said. “Both teams were desperate
against us. . . . I know some people said we let our foot off the
pedal. Maybe mentally a little bit,
but I think it’s a lack of understanding of when it gets tough
you have to set better screens,
you have to fight over screens
harder than you did when you got
your lead. The game gets harder
. . . and the more aggressive team
gets rewarded.”
Washington has more reason
than ever to play tenaciously. The
Mystics are at full strength now,
with forward Emma Meesseman
back in the starting lineup after
missing nine games while she
played overseas with the Belgian
national team. She eased back
into the rotation and, of the three
games she has played since returning stateside, had her best
game at Connecticut, where she
scored 16 points and grabbed five
rebounds in 31 minutes.
“My comfort level with the
team is good,” Meesseman said
Wednesday. “I mean, we were a
little bit frustrated after [the
losses], but if you aren’t, I think
that’s a bad thing.”
The Mystics spent their week
at home running drills and working on their defense before facing
Indiana and then a physical New
York team on Sunday.
Thibault is hoping the lessons
learned on the first part of their
road trip sink in before then.
“Part of it’s fixable with technique. Part of it’s fixable with
understanding. Part of it’s just
plain effort,” Thibault said. “I
think we thought we were playing hard, but there’s a difference
in mental toughness when you
have to fight the screen and fight
to block out and you have to go
through that a few times, and
unfortunately, this is one of those
hard lessons to learn. If we learn
from it, great. If we don’t, shame
on us.”
ava.wallace@washpost.com
ELSA/GETTY IMAGES
Jodie Meeks, limited by injuries to 99 games over the past three seasons, said he is now 100 percent.
reer year in L.A. three years ago, it
kind of looked like my career was
going up and a lot of great success
for me, and the injury bug kind of
hit me. So it’s been a little disappointing, but I try to make the
most of my opportunities.”
The injuries have passed;
Meeks said he’s 100 percent entering his ninth season. And through
the early part of summer, Meeks
has taken a measured approach
to getting ready for the next year.
The unofficial minicamp in Vegas was also attended by Markieff
“They had a really good
season last year. Losing
gets pretty old after a
while. When you’re in
this league for a while,
you look to win.”
Veteran guard Jodie Meeks, on why
he signed with the Wizards
Morris and newly signed Mike
Scott, according to Meeks. The
players got shots up and did
conditioning drills but mostly
spent the time getting familiar
with the new Wizards in a lowpressure setting.
“You don’t want to kill yourself
too much because then you might
tap out in September,” Meeks
said. “We’ll pick it up a little more
probably when the summer
evolves; right now it’s just maintaining skills.”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
Olsen on United’s plan: ‘Expect an attacking piece’
BY
S TEVEN G OFF
With forward Jose Guillermo
Ortiz’s departure this week, what
does D.C. United have planned for
its goal-challenged roster?
“You can expect an attacking
piece. Certainly an addition or
two,” Coach Ben Olsen said Thursday. “This stuff is very fluid. We
want to make a smart choice, not
only for now but the future. We
have some options. We have some
financial means to get this team
better.”
MLS’s international transfer
and trade window opened Monday and will last until Aug. 9.
United made its first summer
move three weeks ago by signing
Jamaican forward Deshorn
Brown, an acquisition unaffected
by the window rules because he
was already registered to play in
the United States (with the second-tier Tampa Bay Rowdies).
Beyond the promise of incoming help, from within MLS or
abroad, Olsen said he sees returning injured players as newcomers
of sorts. After long layoffs, midfielder Nick DeLeon (hernia surgery) and forward Patrick Mullins
(knee surgery) are close to rejoining the game-day group.
The prime concern for lastplace United (5-11-3) remains
scoring. It has posted a league-low
14 goals and gone scoreless 12
times.
Ortiz, on loan from Costa Rican
club Herediano, recorded one goal
in 16 league appearances and added one in the U.S. Open Cup. With
Brown settling into the squad and
Mullins returning soon, Olsen
said, Ortiz was “down in the depth
chart and wasn’t going to be part
of the 18 moving forward.
“I don’t think he would’ve been
that happy about it. Not every
situation is right for each player. It
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Midfielder Nick DeLeon, above, and forward Patrick Mullins are
close to rejoining United’s game-day group after long injury layoffs.
doesn’t mean he’s not good
enough for the league. The situation just wasn’t right.”
United released Ortiz this
week.
Upbeat about the front-line
corps at the start of the year, United has not received much production. Mullins, the first-choice
striker, hasn’t scored and has
missed much of the campaign
Home delivery starts your day off right.
with injuries. Ortiz sputtered. Sebastien Le Toux, a 33-year-old
wide player and forward with two
goals, is late in his career.
Lamar Neagle, a left wing and
forward, has squandered several
opportunities. Alhaji Kamara began the year at second-tier Richmond before being sold to a Saudi
club last month. Brown, who
scored against Dallas on July 4, is
1-800-753-POST
now atop the depth chart.
“Deshorn is jelling with the
group,” Olsen said. “We have a
whole week of training, which is
crucial. When you do get new guys
in, these training sessions are vital. It’s been a great week of training, great commitment, spirit.
Chip on shoulder, we’re positive.
And I think the belief is that we
have a fresh start.”
United is using the two-week
Gold Cup break to recalibrate, further integrate Brown and prepare
for Wednesday’s match at 2016
champion Seattle. Three days later, D.C. will host Houston.
Olsen said there are a number
of reasons for United’s offensive
shortcomings, which have come
less than a year after his club was
one of the most prolific in the
league late in the 2016 season. He
cited injuries, which have prevented the attacking group from
properly developing relationships.
“I can sit here and make excuses,” he said. “Nobody cares. Nobody cares. Most teams have gone
through it at one time or another.
The reality is we’re in last place.
The other reality is we’re a good
team that is capable of making the
playoffs. If we all raise it a little bit,
we get some guys back, we add
some fresh blood in the transfer
window, [and] we can make a run
at this thing.”
With 15 matches left on the
34-game schedule, including five
of six at RFK Stadium from Aug. 5
to Sept. 9, Olsen believes United
can reverse course.
“A lot of this stuff is fixable. The
chances have been there to win
games. But again, nobody cares.
This is the reality in the moment.
What are we going to do about it?
Where are we going to go? That’s
the question.”
steven.goff@washpost.com
SEAN D. ELLIOT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Washington’s Emma Meesseman, right, is back in the lineup after
missing nine games while playing with the Belgian national team.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14 , 2017
baseball
Nationals get small victory over Orioles in MASN dispute
BY
C HELSEA J ANES
The Washington Nationals
won a rare victory in the ongoing
legal battle over their share of
the Mid-Atlantic Sports Network’s television revenue when a
New York Appellate Court ruled
that their share of the rights fees
must be determined by the committee that was supposed to
determine them in the first place
— Major League Baseball’s Revenue Sharing Definitions Committee (known affectionately to
followers of this case as the
RSDC).
The decision does not award
the Nationals any money, nor
does it end the heated and convoluted legal saga in which they
and the Orioles have been deadlocked for years. They will not
get the $298 million the RSDC
originally awarded them in 2014
for their 2012-16 rights. That
decision was vacated in 2015, and
the appeals court upheld that
decision unanimously this week.
So the money originally awarded
the Nationals is no longer relevant.
But this week’s decision does
mean that, barring appeal, the
Nationals will be able to return
to the RSDC as they and the
Orioles determine their rights
fees for both the past five seasons
and the next five. The makeup of
that committee — composed of
three MLB owners and executives — constantly changes, and
the court therefore ruled, 3-2,
that while the last RSDC decision
must be thrown out, a new
committee might not present the
same problems.
The Orioles argued the 2014
RSDC ruling was unfair because
the same law firm that represented the Nationals also did work
for the league and the organizations of those on the panel. The
court agreed, which sent the
whole thing spiraling into a new
legal sinkhole: If not that RSDC,
then who would determine the
rights fees?
The most recent decision,
announced Wednesday, means
the Nationals can go back to
that RSDC for arbitration — the
committee both teams made a
contractual agreement to use
when the Nationals first moved
to D.C.
“We are gratified that the
appeals court recognized the importance of enforcing contractual arbitration agreements,” Nationals lawyer Stephen Neuwirth, of Quinn Emmanuel, said
in a statement. “We look forward
to finally having the rights fees
determined in the forum the
parties chose.”
Those rights fees, however,
might not be determined in the
forum the parties chose. The
court’s decision to send the arbitration back to the RSDC was not
unanimous. Those two votes of
dissent give MASN the right to
appeal the decision to the New
York Court of Appeals — the
highest appellate court. One of
those two votes came from the
chief justice of the First Department of Appeals, Judge Rolando
T. Acosta, whose dissenting opinion could pose problems for the
Nationals should the case move
to a higher court. Given the
history between these two teams,
the Orioles almost certainly will
appeal.
“We believe Presiding Judge
Acosta correctly recognized in
dissent that MLB’s pervasive bias
and unfair conduct has infected
the RSDC so as to frustrate the
parties’ intent to submit their
dispute to a fundamentally fair
arbitration,” Orioles lawyer Carter Phillips, of Sidley Austin, said
in a statement.
For now, the Nationals are
touting this decision as a victory. Indeed, they have not seen
many rulings in their favor
during the MASN dispute, making this one something to celebrate. Should the arbitration
go back to the new-look RSDC,
the Nationals seem likely to
benefit from that financially,
though presumably the kind of
independent arbiter the Orioles
favor would award them some
amount of money, too. In other
words, while the decision is a
victory for the Nationals, it
does not bring a conclusion to
the saga or money to their
coffers.
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
BARRY SVRLUGA
Windfall means there’s
no excuse not to fix flaw
SVRLUGA FROM D1
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Manager Dusty Baker, flanked by Jayson Werth and Trea Turner on Opening Day, will be smiling plenty if both return soon from injury.
Bullpen woes way out front on Nats’ list of concerns
NATIONALS FROM D1
swer: That could depend on how
much salary they are willing to
absorb, Koda Glover’s timetable
and whether they’re willing to
eat any contracts, among other
factors.
Which of Victor Robles, Juan
Soto, Carter Kieboom and Erick
Fedde is untouchable in a trade?
Are any of them?
Answer: The last we heard is
they are. But that could always
change as the deadline nears
and competition for the prized
relievers intensifies. Is Washington considering any in-house
options in the minors (i.e. Fedde
and/or Edwin Jackson)? Answer: It’s certainly a possibility.
Jackson has pitched well in
Syracuse and can opt out of his
contract Aug. 1, while Fedde has
both started and pitched out of
the bullpen to give Washington
a potential versatile piece.
The Nationals have had interest in a wide range of relievers,
including, according to people
with knowledge of the situation,
the Royals’ Kelvin Herrera, David Robertson of the White Sox,
the Padres’ Brad Hand and the
Phillies’ Pat Neshek. Washington is also reportedly targeting
Reds closer Raisel Iglesias. Obviously, they all won’t end up in
Washington. But maybe one or
two (or three?) of them — or
other bullpen pieces — are acquired. This much is certain:
The Nationals’ bullpen will look
different by the end of the
month.
Can Zimmerman keep it up?
Ryan Zimmerman’s resurgence transformed the Nationals’ offense from a deep and
powerful one into the most deep
and most powerful lineup in the
National League. With Zimmerman hitting like he has — .330
with 19 homers in the first half
— the Nationals built a leftright-left-right heart of the order four deep with hitters with
on-base-plus-slugging
above
.950.
NATIONALS ON DECK
at Cincinnati Reds
Today
7:10 MASN2
Tomorrow
7:10 MASN2
Sunday
1:10 MASN
Monday
12:35 MASN
at Los Angeles Angels
Tuesday
10:07 MASN2
Wednesday
10:07 MASN2
at Arizona Diamondbacks
July 21
9:40 MASN2
July 22
8:10 MASN2
July 23
4:10 MASN2
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
Zimmerman’s OPS is .969 at
the break, a few points ahead of
Daniel Murphy’s and ninth best
in baseball. But he has been in
steady offensive decline since
April (when he had an OPS of
1.345), through May (.905), into
June (.791) and in a small July
sample (.514), all while going
without a homer since the second week of June.
Some have argued that decline is a sign Zimmerman is
returning to his disappointing
2016 form, and indeed his
launch angle — which had improved to more than 12 degrees
in April — has declined back to 7,
a relative plummet. But Zimmerman always considers himself a second-half player and has
a .785 first-half OPS in his career
with an .859 OPS in the second.
When will Werth, Turner
and Taylor return?
Trea Turner and Jayson
Werth, the duo that makes up
the top of the order, are on the
disabled list. Meanwhile, Michael A. Taylor, who emerged as
a top-of-the-order fill-in, is out
with a mild oblique strain.
Turner has been out since
June 30 with a non-displaced
fracture in his right wrist. The
Nationals have not issued a
timetable for Turner, who was in
a soft brace on that wrist when
the team scattered for the allstar break. But if the injury
takes six weeks to heal, a conservative estimate for a break,
that would place Turner’s return
in mid-August — or, perhaps,
about four weeks after the allstar break.
Werth, meanwhile, has been
in West Palm Beach, Fla., for two
weeks, ramping up his baseball
activities after he suffered a
severe contusion to his foot in
early June. Manager Dusty Baker suggested that Werth might
be able to return to action in 10
days, when the Nationals are in
Arizona.
If he is able to return then, the
Nationals will have to piece
together only half of the top of
their order and could even use
Werth in the leadoff spot until
Turner returns. Werth is a .278
career hitter in the leadoff spot,
with a .363 on-base percentage.
Baker seemed optimistic that
Taylor, meanwhile, could return
shortly after his 10 days are up —
so sometime next week. But
oblique injuries normally take
nearly a month to heal completely. If Taylor’s is at all severe,
Baker’s prognosis could be overly optimistic.
What’s up with Ross?
Joe Ross left Sunday’s firsthalf finale after 31/3 innings with
what Baker later called “triceps
tenderness,” a problem that
manifested itself in high-80s
velocity that concerned Baker
and Mike Maddux enough to
send trainer Paul Lessard out to
check on him. Ross underwent
an MRI exam Sunday but was
not back from the test when
reporters were allowed in the
clubhouse. The Nationals have
not announced the results.
If the trouble is severe, the
Nationals could be hunting for a
fifth starter. They could look to
internal options, such as strug-
gling A.J. Cole or Fedde, both of
whom are in Syracuse. They
could consider Jackson, who
struggled in major league action
this year. Or, depending on the
severity of Ross’s injury, the
Nationals could look to the trade
market to bolster their rotation.
More answers about Ross’s condition likely will be available
when the team opens in Cincinnati on Friday.
There’s no way the Nationals
blow it. Right?
We don’t need any fancy projection models to know the
chances are low. Very low. The
Nationals are 52-36 coming out
of the break with a commanding
91/2-game lead on the secondplace Braves in the National
League East. A collapse would
be historic. A collapse would be
disastrous. Luckily for us, those
intricate projection models exist
to give us an idea of how
disastrous.
We will go with two websites’
models. FanGraphs projects the
Nationals will go 41-33 the rest
of the way to finish 93-69 with a
97.6 percent chance of winning
the division, a 1 percent chance
of settling for a wild card and a
1.3 percent chance of missing
the playoffs.
Baseball Prospectus predicts
Washington will go 40-34 after
the break to finish 92-70 with a
97.3 percent chance of claiming
the division, a 0.7 percent
chance of taking a wild-card
spot and a 2 percent chance of
missing the playoffs.
Beyond that? FanGraphs
gives the Nationals a 53.3 percent chance of finally breaking
through to the NLCS and an
11.1 percent chance of winning
the World Series. Baseball Prospectus is slightly more hopeful
of the Nationals winning Washington’s first World Series since
1924, giving them an 11.2 percent chance to take the title.
They will have plenty of questions to answer before then.
jorge.castillo@washpost.com
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
wanted it determined, a loss for
the MASN-controlling Baltimore
Orioles — there’s no more
hiding behind financial
constraints.
This team will be good
enough to win it all when — not
if — it addresses the bullpen.
The struggling Chicago Cubs
have a middling rotation. What
did they do Thursday? Why,
they added a front-line starting
pitcher in lefty Jose Quintana,
brashly sending four prospects
across town to the White Sox.
So we’re off and trading. And
don’t think each move made by
another contender doesn’t put
pressure on the Nats. It does.
There are a few ways to
approach this and a few groups
from which to choose. There is,
it seems, no way the Nationals
are going to give up stud
outfield prospect Victor Robles.
But it will be interesting to see
whether other previous
untouchables become,
essentially, touchable.
The place to start, of course,
is the ninth — and then work
backward. The most prominent
established closers who could be
available: Zach Britton of the
Orioles, Kelvin Herrera of the
Royals and David Robertson of
the White Sox. There are catches
with all of them.
We have pointed out in the
past one inescapable truth:
Since the Nationals moved to
Washington in 2005, Baltimore
is the only franchise with which
they haven’t completed a trade.
Given that the MASN feud still
engulfs both franchises, don’t
expect Peter Angelos to bless
any deal with Ted Lerner, even if
general managers Dan Duquette
and Mike Rizzo could work out
a palatable baseball trade.
Britton isn’t driving down the
BW Parkway. He’s just not.
Herrera’s problem isn’t the
way he has pitched or his
velocity; 10 of his past 11 outings
have been scoreless, and he’s
throwing his fastball 98 mph,
up over last season. It’s that
Kansas City, proud of its recent
run, is just three games out in
the AL Central and 11/2 games
out of the wild card. For Herrera
to become available, the Royals
would have to start the second
half horribly.
That brings us back to
Robertson, kind of where the
Nationals have been since they
lost out on free agents Mark
Melancon and Kenley Jansen in
the offseason. Washington
pursued a deal with the White
Sox for Robertson in the
offseason, and at least the Nats
feel like they had a trade in
place — only to have ownership
nix it. Now, as one person put it,
“The price of poker goes up.”
Robertson has 13 saves in 14
opportunities, a 2.87 ERA, just
1.02 walks and hits per inning
pitched (the collective WHIP of
Nats’ relievers is 1.45) and a
résumé that says he has closed
for the Yankees and set up
Mariano Rivera.
The haul from the Cubs,
which included both slugger
Eloy Jimenez and pitcher Dylan
Cease, shows how White Sox
General Manager Rick Hahn has
the power in negotiations for
his remaining major league
assets. In a conference call with
reporters, Cubs President Theo
Epstein said the deal “had zero
percent chance of happening
without both players.” Which
makes you wonder whether
Hahn would walk away from the
Nats without, say, outfielder
Juan Soto or pitcher Erick
Fedde.
Maybe Hahn will win such a
standoff and take a prime piece
— or more. Maybe Rizzo won’t
blink but won’t come away with
Robertson. That could leave the
Nats turning to one of a group
of lesser-known closers: Raisel
Iglesias of the Reds or A.J.
Ramos of the Marlins.
The Reds signed Iglesias out
of Cuba, and in his first year as
a closer he has impressed: 16
saves in 17 chances, a 1.69 ERA
and a 0.914 WHIP. He’s also
under control through 2020 and
is owed just more than $16.6
million over the next three
seasons. He could solve a
problem now and later —
which, of course, drives up the
price. Ramos, whose stats aren’t
as sexy as Iglesias’s, is a free
agent after next season.
Translation: You might get him
for less.
But here’s the problem with
closers who have closed for only
lousy teams: When your team
rarely has leads to protect,
you’re perpetually rested and
ready. What happens when
you’re trying to close out four
games in seven days? How will
you respond?
Which brings us to the other
part of this equation: The Nats
need two more relievers. They
already enter the second half
with two ex-closers on the
disabled list — veteran Shawn
Kelley and rookie Koda Glover
— and unless Sammy Solis’s
demotion to Class AAA
Syracuse on Thursday means
one of those two is ready to
return, they’re thin to start.
Say they just added
Robertson. Would that make
Blake Treinen the eighth-inning
guy again? Glover, if he’s back
healthy? Kelley? Or Matt Albers,
who, stunningly, has been
Washington’s most reliable
reliever thus far?
Preferably, another option
pushes those choices into the
seventh and sixth innings. Enny
Romero has shown flashes of
what he can be. But the Nats’
current construction asks him,
too frequently, to perform jobs
for which he’s only occasionally
ready. Add a closer and a
veteran setup guy, and suddenly
everyone else is in more
comfortable situations.
Two of those options, Pat
Neshek of the Phillies and Brad
Hand of the Padres, made the
NL all-star team. Justin Wilson
of Detroit has taken over
closer’s duties since the Tigers
booted veteran Francisco
Rodriguez, and he would be a
candidate for multiple roles.
Keep an eye, too, on Oakland’s
Ryan Madson — who turns 37 in
August and is owed $7.6 million
in 2018 as well — because Rizzo
has a history of pulling off deals
with Athletics baseball head
Billy Beane.
And how about this one, just
for fun? Hunter Strickland of
the Giants.
Put the helmet down, Bryce.
No, seriously. The Giants are
a disaster, Strickland has a 2.01
ERA and strikes out a guy per
inning, and Bryce Harper —
who was hit by Strickland
earlier in the season — would
have zero problem with any
player who gives the Nationals a
better chance to win.
The major news for the
Nationals on Thursday was the
MASN victory. But if that’s the
major development in July for
this franchise, then it will have
failed. Stay close to the phone.
Turn on your alerts. Play begins
again Friday, and relief help is
on the way — or else.
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
For more by Barry Svrluga, visit
washingtonpost.com/svrluga.
FRIDAY, JULY 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
Potomac
Nats’ deal
for stadium
falls apart
BY
R ICK M AESE
The Washington Nationals’
Class A affiliate in nearby Woodbridge soon may be looking for a
new home.
A proposed stadium deal that
would have kept the team in
Prince William County has apparently fallen through, and Art Silber, the team’s owner, said he will
start exploring other options. The
team’s stadium, 33-year-old
Pfitzner Stadium, is outdated, and
Silber has said that he faces a
deadline from Minor League
Baseball to find a new home for
the P-Nats by 2019. Otherwise he
likely would be forced to sell the
team, and it would relocate.
“While we are open to discussing other options with the County,
we are now required by Minor
League Baseball to also explore
other opportunities to obtain a
new home that will comply with
Major League Baseball Standards
for Minor League Teams,” Silber
said in a statement Thursday
morning. “Our current home at
Pfitzner Stadium for the last
33 years does not comply with
these standards.”
It was not immediately clear
why the deal fell apart. The team
agreed to a nonbinding letter of
intent in March with county supervisors that called for the county to use $35 million in bond
money to build a new 6,000-seat
stadium. The P-Nats would have
then paid back the full amount
over the course of a 30-year lease.
County
supervisors
had
planned to hold a public hearing
and to vote on a final deal at their
July 18 meeting. Silber had urged
the county to delay the vote because final terms were not yet set.
Silber told insidenova.com that
the most recent proposal would
be “suicidal business-wise and
would create tremendous risk” for
his team.
Silber told the website he could
explore stadium options in nearby Fairfax or Loudoun counties or
meet with potential buyers in
North Carolina.
Silber has tried for several
years to solve the team’s stadium
dilemma. The latest proposal
would have given the P-Nats a new
home at a site called Stonebridge
at Potomac Town Center, just off
Interstate 95, which is owned by
developer JBG Companies. Silber
said he needed to move forward
with the plans this summer; otherwise he feared he would have to
sell the team, a Nationals affiliate
since 2005, to an out-of-state buyer, and it would be forced to move
to a new community.
“I have no interest in owning a
ballclub in North Carolina or
something,” Silber told The Washington Post in June.
In his statement, the team owner said, “We are saddened to report that the parties have been
unable to come to an agreement
on terms to build a new ballpark.”
“It has always been our family
goal to find a way to continue to
serve Northern Virginia with the
finest in affordable, family entertainment — and great Nationals
Minor League Baseball — as we
have for more than two generations,” he said. “We will try to keep
everyone informed as the future
of the team unfolds.”
rick.maese@washpost.com
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D5
M2
Plenty of jabs on Mayweather-McGregor tour
BY
R ICK M AESE
new york — Conor McGregor,
the Dublin-born mixed martial
arts superstar, strutted to the
stage at Barclays Center, his chin
jutting out and leading the way,
his chest bare beneath a white fur
coat. He was followed by Floyd
Mayweather Jr., who had an Irish
flag draped over his shoulders despite no known Irish ancestry.
And in short order, they were
off, insulting each other’s looks,
talents and bank accounts.
McGregor, 28, bragged about
money, and Mayweather threw
piles of it in the air. In the third
round of the scheduled fourround battle — the combatants
relying on flapping lips rather
than flying fists — the two fighters
aimed to land clean shots, but
both stayed relatively dirty.
“I don’t just smell victory. You
know what I smell? I smell a [expletive]!” Mayweather, 40, barked
at McGregor at one point.
While many fight fans might
expect the Aug. 26 bout itself to be
dull — a novice boxer pitted
against one of the best tacticians
ever to lace up gloves — this week’s
media tour has been a championship-caliber spectacle — ridiculous, absurd, juvenile and at times
entertaining. Both men are
among the most outspoken, cocky
competitors their respective
sports have seen, a pair of bloodthirsty, camera-hungry peacocks.
“When we were talking about
this fight, the one thing everybody
said is ‘You can imagine how exciting the press conferences will
be,’ ” said Dana White, UFC’s president.
The talking tour is hitting four
cities in four days, from Los Angeles to London — with each stop
showcasing plenty of showmanship and very little sportsmanship. Both fighters played their
roles, trying to sell tickets and
inject excitement into a bout that
would be considered more of an
MIKE STOBE/GETTY IMAGES
Floyd Mayweather walks away after tossing money that rains down on Conor McGregor in Brooklyn.
exhibition or sideshow had the
participants been lesser names.
While the fight itself might settle only bar stool debates, the
week’s media tour is intended to
fan the flames. The fighters’ animosity, real or forced, is designed
to sell tickets — priced $500 to
$10,000 — and bait the public into
plopping down $90 or $100 for
the pay-per-view. The fight already had plenty of intrigue, and
the week’s festivities are doing
little to quell the buzz. Thousands
have showed up in each city to
watch the fighters strut and crow.
White said the UFC’s Facebook
page registered 12 million viewers
for the first news conference
alone.
“The numbers are astronomical,” he said.
The two men had never met
face to face before Tuesday’s event
in Los Angeles. Promoters say
their feelings were quick to develop and even quicker to spoil.
“It gets worse every city we go
to,” White said.
The show-before-the-show has
been akin to a raucous touring
circus with expletives and insults
flying, with both fighters eager to
engage in schoolyard heckling.
“Some points it became a little
bit uncomfortable,” said Stephen
Espinoza, the executive vice president for Showtime Sports. “. . . If
you know anything about the two
guys, this isn’t WWE. It’s not family-friendly. Do I condone all of the
language? No. But at the same
time, this is combat sports. Tempers are flaring.”
Again on Thursday night in
Brooklyn, neither fighter worried
about children’s ears among the
13,165 in attendance. Mayweather
called McGregor a con artist, a
circus clown and a quitter — with
ACC gets a hike in its football profile
ACC FROM D1
year the ACC went 17-9 against
the rest of the Power Five, the
best record of any conference.
It also compiled a 9-3 record
in bowl appearances last season,
has won five consecutive Orange
Bowls — the longest streak by a
conference in 72 years — and
since 2012 is 8-3 in Bowl Championship Series, New Year’s Six
and College Football Playoff
games.
“No question about it,” Clemson Coach Dabo Swinney, who
led the Tigers to their first national championship in 35 years,
said when asked whether football’s standing in the ACC has
reached that of basketball. “We
won the national championship
in football and in basketball. I
think that kind of speaks for
itself.”
Clemson is seeking to win
consecutive national championships for the first time since
Alabama did so in 2011 and 2012.
The road to a repeat will not
include a core group on offense
from last season, most notably
departed quarterback Deshaun
Watson. Also gone are wide receiver Mike Williams and running back Wayne Gallman, two of
the Tigers’ most dangerous playmakers outside of Watson.
“What I’m trying to convey to
the rest of the team and just
encourage guys what to think or
how to think is it was a great
accomplishment to reach one
national championship and win
that, but really just why not win
two?” Clemson defensive tackle
Christian Wilkins said. “We
shouldn’t get complacent because we won one. There’s still
more out there for us.”
The Tigers defeated Alabama
in the College Football Playoff
national championship game, 3531, behind Watson, whose touchdown pass to Hunter Renfrow
with one second to play sealed
the comeback.
Watson was named the most
outstanding offensive player after completing 36 of 56 passes for
420 yards and three touchdowns
and rushing for 43 yards and
another touchdown. The Heisman runner-up went No. 12 overall in the NFL draft to the
Houston Texans, leaving Kelly
Bryant, Hunter Johnson and Zerrick Cooper vying for the starting
job.
“It’s very important now in the
ACC,” Florida State Coach Jimbo
Fisher said, referring to winning
titles in football as well as basketball. “I think the programs have
developed that way. I think right
now what we’ve accomplished in
the last five years, you’re talking
about major wins, big wins, national championships, Heisman
Trophy winners.”
The Seminoles won the 2014
many expletives sprinkled in.
McGregor called Mayweather a
squirt who wears high heels —
with many expletives sprinkled
in.
Both fighters this week guaranteed a knockout, and in addition
to the R-rated taunting, Mayweather has brought out props,
hoisting a $100 million check in
Los Angeles and grabbing an Irish
flag from the crowd in Toronto.
McGregor has sported a suit with
small-print expletives serving as
pinstripes and swiped Mayweather’s pricey handbag on stage. He
said his white fur coat was made of
polar bear.
“I don’t give a [hoot] how hot it
is outside,” he said. “I’m still wearing this.”
Out of the gate, though, the two
fighters made clear that this bout
isn’t really about animosity or
grudges. The two had an awkward
Mountains are low point
for Froome in Stage 12
P ETREQUIN
L EICESTER
peyragudes, france — For his
CHUCK BURTON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
national championship behind
Heisman Trophy winner Jameis
Winston, then a redshirt freshman. The following year, Florida
State went 13-0 in the regular
season to secure a berth in the
College Football Playoff semifinals, where it fell to Oregon,
59-20, in the Rose Bowl for the
only loss of Winston’s two-year
college career.
Winston was the No. 1 overall
pick in the 2015 NFL draft.
Jackson, who also has aspirations of directing his team to a
national championship, paid
close attention to Winston during that time, unaware the two
would be linked as the youngest
Heisman Trophy winners.
Jackson was 19, just five days
younger than Winston, when he
became the first player in Louisville history to win the award.
“Well you know, I don’t really
worry about it,” Jackson said of
the possibility of becoming the
second player to win the Heisman Trophy twice. “It’s done. I
have it. I’m going to every game
trying to win it. I’m not worried
about the Heisman Trophy or
anything like that. I wasn’t trying
to win it last year.”
Still, Jackson accounted for 51
touchdowns along with 3,543
passing yards and 1,571 more
rushing. He averaged 410 yards
from scrimmage and won the
Heisman despite losing the final
two games of the regular season,
including, 41-38, to Kentucky,
which intercepted Jackson three
times.
Louisville then lost to LSU in
the Citrus Bowl, 29-9, with Jackson running for 33 yards on 26
carries and completing 10 of 27
passes for 153 yards and no
touchdowns.
He also was sacked eight
times. That result led to Coach
Bobby Petrino hiring a new offensive line coach during the offseason.
“The difference I see now in
our league, top to bottom, I’m not
talking about just the best one or
two teams, I’m talking about as a
league, we’ve got people in this
league now that absolutely want
to be the best, that absolutely
believe they can be the best,”
Swofford said. “I’ve been in this
chair 20 years, and I’m not sure in
all of those years if that sense was
there from a football standpoint.
“It was in there with basketball. Now football has joined that
in terms of having that mentality.”
gene.wang@washpost.com
rick.maese@washpost.com
TOUR DE FRANCE
BY S AMUEL
AND J OHN
“We’ve got people in this league now that absolutely want to be the
best,” Commissioner John Swofford said at the ACC’s media days.
back and forth in Los Angeles on
Tuesday, setting the stage for the
ensuing stops. As he was in Toronto and New York, McGregor was
clearly the Staples Center favorite.
“You want me to give it to him
right now?” Mayweather barked
to the crowd, which paid nothing
to get in and cheered wildly. The
boxer, a five-division champion
with a 49-0 record, smiled. “We
gonna save that for the payday,” he
said. “We’re gonna save that for
the money.”
While McGregor also seems to
thrive on the attention and the
pageantry, he’s aware that he has
little to lose. His legacy as an MMA
great is unlikely to be impacted
significantly by stepping in with
one of the best boxers ever. His
bank account, however, will be
life-changing; he will stand to
earn many times more than what
he would make on the biggest UFC
card. He alluded to this talking
about his newborn son. “My little
boy,” he said, “to provide for him
and to set him up for life, what
more motivation could you need?”
Indeed, both fighters figure to
bring in eight- and possibly ninefigure paychecks from a single
night of work that could support
generations of progeny, assuming
some degree of fiscal responsibility.
“That’s a $3 million fighter.
This is an $800 million fighter,”
Mayweather shouted at one point
Thursday night. “I ain’t running
nowhere but to the bank.”
Even if it’s a cash-grab and even
if fight experts have been critical
of the matchup — with most discounting McGregor’s chances in
his boxing debut — no one involved with the event is offering
any apologies.
“This is bigger than one person
having an opinion,” said Leonard
Ellerbe, the chief executive of
Mayweather
Promotions.
“. . . This is a big event that the fans
have demanded. The fans want it.”
three previous victories at the
Tour de France, Chris Froome
took advantage of the first big
mountain stage to deliver the
decisive blow.
On Thursday, that tried and
trusted strategy never got going,
and he surrendered the overall
race lead to Fabio Aru.
With its mountaintop finish,
the hugely demanding first stage
in the Pyrenees looked like the
perfect setting for his Sky Team to
stamp its authority on the race
and to help Froome increase his
lead in the general classification.
Until the final 400 yards of the
133-mile marathon through six
grueling ascents in the Pyrenees,
the well-oiled Sky machine had
everything under control.
Froome’s teammates had set a
fast tempo that prevented others
from attacking — a tactic that
prepared the ground for Froome’s
expected assault in the steep final
section leading to the finish in
the ski station of Peyragudes.
Froome’s move never came.
Not only was he unable to
attack during the climb, the British rider also cracked. Frenchman Romain Bardet won Stage 12
ahead of Rigoberto Uran and
Aru, who seized the overall lead
from Froome by six seconds.
Bardet is third overall, 25 seconds off the pace. Uran was
handed a 20-second penalty for
accepting a water bottle in the
last five kilometers, which is not
allowed, and is in fourth place
overall, 55 seconds back.
“My teammates did such an
amazing job,” Froome said. “I
didn’t have the legs at the end to
finish it off. Simple as that. No
excuses.”
When Aru launched his attack
in the final few hundred yards,
Froome was only able to follow
the Astana team leader for a few
bike lengths before he cracked.
He ended up crossing the line in
seventh place, 22 seconds behind
Bardet.
Bidding to become the first
Frenchman to win the Tour since
Bernard Hinault in 1985, Bardet
was the strongest in the brutal
incline and described his third
stage win on the Tour as “an
immense joy.”
He said he had visited the ski
station with his parents to scout
out the final climb.
“I knew it could suit me,” he
said. “I was patient. I made the
difference on the final hill. There
was not much to do before that
with the wind and the Sky train.”
Aru had trailed Froome by 18
seconds at the start of the stage.
“It’s one of the most beautiful
things that can happen to you in
life, wearing the yellow jersey,”
Aru said. “Clearly, it won’t be easy
to defend it. There are still nine
more stages; we’ll do our best.”
The final of the six ascents on
the menu between Pau and the
ski station was too difficult for
Froome, who had worn the yellow jersey over the previous seven stages.
He was grimacing with the
effort, his arms glistening with
sweat, as he wrestled his bike up
the super-steep climb that was
used as a location for the 1997
James Bond movie “Tomorrow
Never Dies.”
Froome zig-zagged his bike
across the tarmac as he tried to
cope with a gradient so steep that
it seemed to glue his wheels to
the road.
The only yellow item he wore
after the finish was the small ring
in his nose to help him breathe.
“I did my utmost at the end.
But I didn’t have the legs to
follow,” he said.
— Associated Press
BERNARD PAPON/REUTERS
Chris Froome, right, lost the overall lead of the Tour de France to
Fabio Aru, left. “I didn’t have the legs at the end,” Froome said.
D6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14 , 2017
GOLF ROUNDUP
Howell, Schniederjans
share John Deere lead
A SSOCIATED P RESS
MATT SULLIVAN/GETTY IMAGES
Lydia Ko, watching her tee shot on the fourth hole Thursday, took a few days off after her Women’s PGA Championship disappointment.
Piece by piece, Ko builds up her game
After collapsing in Women’s PGA, she has nice putting stroke and positive outlook at U.S. Women’s Open
BY
J ESSE D OUGHERTY
bedminster, n.j. — Lydia Ko
stood on the ninth green, head
cocked toward her right shoulder, glaring at a ball that didn’t
quite follow the path she intended.
A make would have tied her
with Shanshan Feng atop the
leader board in the opening
round of the U.S. Women’s Open
on Thursday. The miss brought
back a familiar feeling, one that
dotted a disappointing finish at
the LPGA Tour’s previous major,
the Women’s PGA Championship
in early July.
But Ko, who worked the past
three days on the practice putting
greens, mostly made putting a
strength throughout a 4-underpar round of 68 at Trump National Golf Club. Feng, who played
with Ko and two-time champion
Inbee Park, finished the round as
the clubhouse leader at 6 under,
one shot ahead of Amy Yang. It
was the first time that the three
medalists from the Rio Olympic
tournament — Park won gold for
South Korea, Ko won silver for
New Zealand and Feng won
bronze for China — were in the
same group.
Ko, 20, who entered the U.S.
Women’s Open ranked fourth in
the world, has seven top-10 finishes this season and has been
making subtle changes to her
game over the past six months.
In February, she named Gary
Gilchrist her new coach. She
tweaked her pre-swing routine,
moving her hand up the club on
her second practice stroke and
letting momentum carry her a
few steps forward. On Thursday,
she used a new putter that, outside of a few inches here and
there, produced the desired results.
“I think I just tried to trust my
stroke. That’s all you can do, just
commit to the line you have and
put a good stroke on it,” Ko said of
her strong putting Thursday.
“The greens are firm and fast like
they normally are at the U.S.
Women’s Open, so I was trying to
bogeys. A 4-over fourth round
included five more. She finished
tied for 59th place, 18 strokes
behind champion Danielle Kang.
Instead of overanalyzing and
making impulsive changes to her
swing, Ko took a few days off. She
had a few friends over to celebrate the Fourth of July. She and
Gilchrist combed through the
four rounds and pulled out positive takeaways. When things got
quiet and golf could have crept
into her mind, she found a clear
table and indulged a new pastime.
“The greens are firm and fast like they normally
are at the U.S. Women’s Open, so I was trying to
just be positive and just be patient. I think those
two words are really important for me.”
Lydia Ko
just be positive and just be patient.
“I think those two words are
really important for me. Just
don’t get too caught up in the
bogeys or the missed shot that I
had or the one putt I missed.”
After the Women’s PGA Championship at Olympia Fields (Ill.)
Country Club, it would have been
easy for Ko to pore over her
missteps. She went into the weekend at 4 under, three strokes off
the lead, and then stumbled
through the final two days. A
5-over third round included five
“I found a new hobby,” Ko said
Tuesday through a grin. “I build,
like, Lego houses. It says for 6- to
12-year-olds. It took my mind off
of golf.”
When she started training
again, Ko played a variety of
courses to prepare her for the
unpredictability in Bedminster.
In the lead-up to the tournament, players discussed massive
greens and tricky roughs as two
challenging variables. Ko mostly
avoided them Thursday with
strong approach shots, even
when her drives weren’t as accu-
rate as she would have liked.
Starting her round on the back
nine, she birdied every other hole
from Nos. 10 to 15, then sunk
back-to-back birdies on the 18th
and first holes. She needed just
one putt to finish the 18th, first
and second holes and soon lined
up a 12-foot birdie putt at the
par-3 fourth.
As she circled the green and
sized up the shot, a swelling
crowd settled into an anticipating quiet.
“Her putting has been amazing,” an older man whispered as
he hid from the beating sun
beneath a nearby tree.
“Shh,” a woman next to him
shot back. “Don’t jinx her now.”
With that, Ko stepped up to the
ball, slowly moved her right hand
onto her putter and tapped it to
the right of the hole. As it hooked
back, fans yelled “Go! Go!” and
“Get in!” and Ko started forming
her guide hand into a celebratory
first.
And then the ball disappeared
into the hole and out of sight, safe
from any frustration.
“I haven’t had much of a good
start at the U.S. Women’s Open,”
Ko said after her round. “But, you
know, this is my sixth Open, and
no matter how many times you’re
playing, I think you always get
excited and a little bit of the
butterflies on the first tee, and I
think this is the biggest major
championship. We all want to
peak at this time of the year, so
I’m happy with the way I started.”
jesse.dougherty@washpost.com
Charles Howell III and Ollie
Schniederjans each shot 8-underpar 63 on Thursday to share the
first-round lead in the John Deere
Classic in Silvis, Ill.
Playing alongside local favorite
Zach Johnson, Howell birdied
seven his first nine holes and
added a birdie on No. 7 in his
morning round at rain-softened
TPC Deere Run. The two-time
PGA Tour winner lost a playoff to
Kyle Stanley two weeks ago in the
Quicken Loans National in Maryland.
“This morning without traffic,
they were rolling like carpet,”
Howell said. “This morning was
absolutely the best scoring we’ll
see all week, which would also
lead me to believe that tomorrow
morning you’re going to see some
low scores as well. Here, it’s about
minimizing bogeys as much as
you can and take advantage of the
holes that you need to.”
Schniederjans birdied five of
his last eight holes in his lowest
round of the PGA Tour. The 24year-old former Georgia Tech star
earned a PGA Tour card last year
through the Web.com Tour.
“I haven’t had a great start
really all year on the first round,”
Schniederjans said. “I have had
some decent first rounds and
good Fridays, but this is the first
really good round I’ve had on
Thursday. It’s nice to get off to a
good start and hopefully keep it
going.”
Johnson was two strokes back
at 65 along with Rory Sabbatini,
Patrick Rodgers and Chad Campbell. Johnson, from Cedar Rapids,
Iowa, won the 2012 tournament.
CHAMPIONS TOUR: Larry
Mize had such a good day, even
his flubbed shots ended up being
effective.
Mize birdied half the holes and
shot an 8-under 64 for a onestroke lead over Bernhard
Langer, Corey Pavin and Steve
Flesch after the opening round of
the Senior Players Championship
in Owings Mills, Md.
Seeking his second win on the
50-and-over tour, the 58-year-old
Mize was 5 under after the front
nine. He made his only bogey on
the par-4 10th hole, but rebounded with birdies on 14, 15 and 16.
“On 15, I hit the 5-iron a little
thin but got away with it. Missed
it in the right spot and made the
putt,” Mize said. “That’s what
you’ve got to do when you have
these rounds — miss it in the right
spot at the right time. That’s what
I did today.”
That kind of good fortune,
along with a 50-foot putt for a
birdie on the ninth hole, provided
Mize with the second-best round
of his Champions Tour career.
Langer, the three-time defending champion, had a bogey-free
round on the 7,196-yard Caves
Valley Golf Course.
John Daly pleased the crowd
with loud orange, black and white
pants that featured the Baltimore
Orioles logo. He shot a 70.
EUROPEAN TOUR: Rickie
Fowler skipped the defense of his
Scottish Open title last year with
a heavy heart.
He began making up for lost
time Thursday.
The American picked up where
he left off in 2015 at the warmup
event for the British Open, avoiding trouble and rolling in five
birdies at Dundonald Links to
shoot a 5-under 67 in the first
round. He was in a six-way tie for
second place, two shots behind
Mikko Ilonen.
Fowler, who won the Scottish
Open when it was held at Gullane, missed the 2016 tournament because of scheduling conflicts arising from the Olympics
in Rio de Janeiro, which clogged
up the golfing calendar last summer.
“I would have loved to have
been here,” he said. “Coming off
winning the year before, I love
playing links golf and I love playing the week before a major. It
was tough to miss it.
“I’m just glad to be back.”
ANDY LYONS/GETTY IMAGES
“Here, it’s about minimizing bogeys as much as you can and take
advantage of the holes that you need to,” Charles Howell III said.
V. Williams and Muguruza reach showdown for women’s title at Wimbledon
WIMBLEDON FROM D1
she is the champion that she is,”
Konta said.
“I don’t know what to say about
that,” Williams said on the second
question about that, after answering the first: “There’s, like, no plan
or anything like that. I don’t plan.
I’m just trying to compete.”
Virginia Wade, the previous
British female Wimbledon semifinalist in 1978, said on the BBC of
Konta: “I don’t think she can
blame herself at all.”
What had figured to be a referendum on whether Konta had the
mustard to become the first British female champion since Wade
in 1977 turned instead into a chorus of swooning about the caliber
of Williams: the way she moved,
her forehand, her forehand down
the line and the forehand down
the line that passed Konta and
clinched the match. Unimaginably, all this came years — long
years — after her patch between
2011 and 2014.
When Williams narrowly lost a
U.S. Open semifinal to Kim Clijsters in 2010, 4-6, 7-6 (7-2), 6-4,
many people who crowd their
brains with tennis knowledge presumed a final chance might have
passed her by ever so achingly.
Things worsened from there. In
late summer of 2011, there came
the diagnosis of Sjogren’s syndrome, an autoimmune condition
with a litany of symptoms that
includes fatigue. From 2011 to
2014, Williams missed three of the
16 Grand Slams; in the other 13,
she reached one fourth round,
four third rounds, five second
rounds and three first rounds.
She became an afterthought, as
lingering champions can do. She
kept playing.
Today, somehow, she’s the only
player on the WTA Tour who has
reached two Grand Slam finals in
2017. On Saturday, she could become the oldest woman to win a
Grand Slam tournament since professionals were first allowed to
play them in 1968, breaking the
mark set by her younger sister Serena at the Australian Open in January.
“There were definitely some issues,” she said. “I had a lot of
issues. This year has been amazing in terms of my play, playing
deep into the big events actually.”
Yet she’s so seasoned and so
intent that it occurred to one reporter to notice a lack of outright
giddiness. “I feel very focused still;
there’s still a lot to be done,” she
said, soon adding: “But I like to
take courage in the fact that I’ve
been playing well this tournament
and this year, and all those moments have led to this.”
She has been playing commandingly. In some ways, it has
carried vestiges of 2007-09, when
she won 20 straight matches and
two titles here (2007-08). In the
past four rounds, against three
ambitious players born in 1997
and the seventh-ranked player in
KIRSTY WIGGLESWORTH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Playing her 20th Wimbledon, Venus Williams slugs a backhand during her win over Johanna Konta.
the world in Konta, she has lost
serve twice, including zero times
to Konta. With the factor of Williams’s serve hovering over the
match, her break of Konta for a 3-1
lead seemed to make the thing
secure, so airtight were her serve
and groundstrokes.
“She dictated the match from
the very first ball till the very last
one,” Konta said.
With her improbable level of experience, she demonstrated the difference between a seven-time
Grand Slam champion and an extremely good player. “This was my
second Grand Slam semifinal,”
Konta said. “It was her 202nd, I bet.”
It was her 22nd, technically, but
everybody got the point. Soon
enough, Williams’s last confident
forehand was traveling in behind
Konta’s momentum and obediently up the line and Williams was
raising her arms and smiling hugely toward her family et al., while
Konta was thinking to herself:
“Damn, I’m done,” she said. “Then
it was like, Oh, okay, well, I’m done.
And then it was, Oh, thank you,
everyone. It was truly magnificent,
the support that I had.”
That support had helped frame
the match as enticing beforehand.
It had helped push Konta through
three close matches here. Yet a
force more powerful and more
serene had surmounted the whole
lot of it, and a Thursday in 2017
had turned out to be luminous in
part because it was unforeseeable.
chuck.culpepper@washpost.com
FRIDAY, JULY 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
SU
W EEK EN D O N TH E A I R
S C O R E BOAR D
TOMORROW
MLB
TENNIS
4 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
New York Yankees at Boston » Fox Sports 1, WSPZ (570 AM)
Washington at Cincinnati » MASN2, WUSA (Ch. 9), WJFK (106.7 FM)
Chicago Cubs at Baltimore » WJZ (Ch. 13), MASN, WTEM (980 AM)
Texas at Kansas City » Fox Sports 1
Wimbledon
At All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club
In London
Purse: $41.1 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Grass-Outdoor
NBA SUMMER LEAGUE QUARTERFINALS
4 p.m.
6 p.m.
8 p.m.
10 p.m.
WOMEN’S SINGLES — SEMIFINALS
Garbine Muguruza (14), Spain, def. Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia, 6-1, 6-1; Venus Williams (10), United
States, def. Johanna Konta (6), Britain, 6-4, 6-2.
Teams TBD » ESPN2
Teams TBD » ESPN2
Teams TBD » ESPN2
Teams TBD » ESPNU
MEN’S DOUBLES — SEMIFINALS
Lukasz Kubot, Poland, and Marcelo Melo (4), Brazil, def.
Henri Kontinen, Finland, and John Peers (1), Australia,
6-3, 6-7 (7-4), 6-2, 4-6, 9-7; Oliver Marach, Austria, and
Mate Pavic (16), Croatia, def. Nikola Mektic and Franko
Skugor, Croatia, 4-6, 7-5, 7-6 (7-4), 3-6, 17-15.
SOCCER
11 a.m.
3:30 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
7 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
10 p.m.
International club friendly: BSC Young Boys at Benfica » beIN Sports
NASL: North Carolina at Portland » Lifetime
CONCACAF Gold Cup: Panama vs. Martinique » Fox Sports 2
CONCACAF Gold Cup: United States vs. Nicaragua » FX
NASL: Puerto Rico at North Carolina » beIN Sports
Men’s international friendly: Manchester United at Los Angeles » ESPN2
VENUS WILLIAMS (10) DEF. JOHANNA KONTA
(6), 6-4, 6-2.
TENNIS
9 a.m.
Wimbledon, women’s final » ESPN
GOLF
9:30 a.m.
12:30 p.m.
2 p.m.
3 p.m.
3 p.m.
6 p.m.
European Tour: Scottish Open, third round » Golf Channel
European Tour: Scottish Open, third round » WRC (Ch. 4), WBAL (Ch. 11)
USGA: U.S. Women’s Open, third round » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45)
Champions Tour: Senior Players Championship, third round » Golf Channel
PGA Tour: John Deere Classic, third round » WUSA (Ch. 9), WJZ (Ch. 13)
Web.com Tour: Utah Championship, third round » Golf Channel
CYCLING
Tour de France, Stage 14 » NBC Sports Network
EXTREME SPORTS
1 p.m.
3 p.m.
X Games » WJLA (Ch. 7), WMAR (Ch. 2)
X Games » ESPN
WOMEN’S BEACH VOLLEYBALL
1 p.m.
CENTRE COURT
PLAY BEGINS AT 8 A.M. EDT
Sam Querrey (24), United States, vs. Marin Cilic (7),
Croatia
Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, vs. Tomas Berdych (11),
Czech Republic
SUNDAY
MLB
Washington at Cincinnati » MASN2, WUSA (Ch.9), WJFK (106.7 FM)
New York Yankees at Boston, first game » TBS
Chicago Cubs at Baltimore » WJZ (Ch. 13), MASN, WTEM (980 AM)
New York Yankees at Boston, second game » ESPN, WTEM (980 AM)
T PTS
5
38
5
38
3
33
3
30
5
29
1
28
2
26
5
23
6
21
5
20
3
18
GF
37
34
36
39
22
30
20
25
27
29
14
GA
19
19
24
27
29
32
25
21
29
31
31
WESTERN
W
Sporting KC ......................8
Dallas ...............................8
Houston ...........................8
Portland ...........................7
San Jose ...........................7
Seattle .............................6
Vancouver ........................7
Los Angeles .....................6
Real Salt Lake ..................6
Colorado ...........................6
Minnesota United ............5
L
4
3
7
7
7
7
7
8
12
11
11
T PTS
8
32
7
31
4
28
6
27
5
26
6
24
3
24
4
22
2
20
1
19
3
18
GF
24
30
34
34
22
25
24
28
23
19
25
GA
14
18
29
31
26
28
27
32
40
27
42
WEDNESDAY’S MATCHES
CONCACAF Gold Cup: Jamaica vs. El Salvador » Fox Sports 2
CONCACAF Gold Cup: Curacao vs. Mexico » Fox Sports 1
Wimbledon, men’s final » ESPN
L
2
5
6
11
10
16
PCT GB
.867
—
.706
2
.647
3
.450
61/2
.444
61/2
.111 121/2
x-Late game
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
San Antonio 79, at Indiana 72
at Chicago 90, Dallas 84
Connecticut 83, at Seattle 79
at Phoenix 89, Atlanta 84
THURSDAY’S RESULT
Atlanta at Seattle, 9
SATURDAY, JULY 22
Mercury 89, Dream 84
Houston at D.C. United, 7
Chicago at New York City FC, 2
New York at Minnesota United, 4
Colorado at Toronto FC, 7
Dallas at Montreal, 7:30
Los Angeles at New England, 7:30
Philadelphia at Columbus, 7:30
Sporting KC at Real Salt Lake, 10
Late Wednesday
ATLANTA ........................... 23
PHOENIX ............................ 26
SUNDAY, JULY 23
NWSL
W
North Carolina ...................9
Chicago ..............................7
Sky Blue FC........................7
Seattle ...............................5
Portland .............................5
Orlando ..............................4
Houston .............................4
Kansas City........................3
Boston ...............................3
Washington .......................3
L
4
3
6
3
4
5
7
6
6
6
T
0
3
1
5
4
4
2
4
4
3
Pts
27
24
22
20
19
16
14
13
13
12
GF
20
16
22
24
16
19
13
13
9
15
GA
12
11
21
17
12
20
22
18
14
20
9-9
Adleman (R)
5-6
4.71
6-9
Washington at Portland, 10
Orlando at Chicago, 3:30
North Carolina at Kansas City, 8
Boston at Houston, 8:30
Sky Blue FC at Seattle, 10
U.S. men’s national team
3.12
8-9
4.43
10-8
McCarthy (R)
6-3
3.12
10-4
European Tour: Scottish Open, final round » Golf Channel
European Tour: Scottish Open, final round » WRC (Ch. 4), WBAL (Ch. 11)
PGA Tour: John Deere Classic, final round » Golf Channel
USGA: U.S. Women’s Open, final round » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45)
Champions Tour: Senior Players Championship, final round » Golf Channel
PGA Tour: John Deere Classic, final round » WUSA (Ch. 9), WJZ (Ch. 13)
Web.com Tour: Utah Championship, final round » Golf Channel
Straily (R)
7-4
3.31
11-7
Gray (R)
2-0
3.75
5-0
deGrom (R)
9-3
3.65
11-6
ROCKIES AT METS, 7:10
DIAMONDBACKS AT BRAVES, 7:35
Walker (R)
6-4
3.65
10-4
Dickey (R)
6-5
4.23
10-7
7:30 a.m.
3 p.m.
3 p.m.
PHILLIES AT BREWERS, 8:10
Pivetta (R)
2-4
4.73
3-8
Davies (R)
10-4
4.90
12-6
Cueto (R)
6-7
4.51
9-9
Richard (L)
5-8
4.66
7-11
Formula One: British Grand Prix » CNBC
NASCAR Cup Series: Overton’s 301 » NBC Sports Network
IndyCar: Honda Indy Toronto » CNBC
(WON 5, LOST 0, TIED 5)
Sunday, Jan. 29: United States 0, Serbia 0
Friday, Feb. 3: United States 1, Jamaica 0
q-Friday, March 24: United States 6, Honduras 0
q-Tuesday, March 28: Panama 1, United States 1
Saturday, June 3: United States 1, Venezuela 1
q-Thursday, June 8: United States 2, Trinidad and
Tobago 0
q-Sunday, June 11: United States 1, Mexico 1
Saturday, July 1: United States 2, Ghana 1
a-Saturday’s result: United States 1, Panama 1
a-Wednesday’s result: United States 3, Martinique 2
a-Saturday, July 15: vs. Nicaragua at Cleveland, 7
q-Friday, Sept. 1: vs. Costa Rica at Harrison, N.J., 6:30
q-Tuesday, Sept. 5: vs. Honduras at San Pedro Sula,
Honduras
q-Friday, Oct. 6: vs. Panama at Orlando, Fla.
q-Tuesday, Oct. 10: vs. Trinidad and Tobago at Port-ofSpain, Trinidad
a-CONCACAF Gold Cup; q-World Cup qualifier
GIANTS AT PADRES, 10:10
MIXED MARTIAL ARTS
UFC Fight Night 113: Gunnar Nelson vs. Santiago Ponzinibbio
(welterweights) » Fox Sports 1
CYCLING
Interleague game
Tour de France, Stage 15 » NBC Sports Network
EXTREME SPORTS
CUBS AT ORIOLES, 7:05
1 p.m.
3 p.m.
Montgomery (L)
1-6
3.75
1-5
Gausman (R)
5-7
5.85
9-10
W-L
X Games » WJLA (Ch. 7), WMAR (Ch. 2)
X Games » ESPN
EasyPay
ERA
TEAM
AL games
getmoretime
inyourday
W-L
ERA
TEAM
TBD ( )
0-0
0.00
0-0
Pomeranz (L)
9-4
3.60
11-6
BLUE JAYS AT TIGERS, 7:10
Sanchez (R)
0-2
4.85
2-4
Verlander (R)
5-6
4.73
8-10
Easy Pay automatically charges your credit card
every time a payment is due and keeps your Post
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Berrios (R)
8-2
3.53
8-3
Morton (R)
6-3
3.82
7-4
Martinique: Kevin Olimpa; Karl Vitulin, Jordy Delem,
Sebastien Cretinoir; Nicolas Zaire (Jean-Manuel Nedra,
56th), Daniel Herelle (Johnny Marajom 78th), Stephane
Abaul, Antoine Jean-Baptiste; Yoann Arquin (Steeven
Langil, 64th), Johan Audel, Kevin Parsemain
United States: Brad Guzan; Eric Lichaj, Omar Gonzalez,
Matt Hedges, Justin Morrow; Kellyn Acosta (Alejandro
Bedoya, 62nd), Cristian Roldan, Gyasi Zardes, Paul
Arriola (Chris Pontius, 73rd); Juan Agudelo (Dax McCarty, 86th), Jordan Morris
ALSO
22. Nate Brown, United States, Cannondale Drapac, 5:41.
61. Andrew Talansky, United States, Cannondale
Drapac, 18:43.
153. Taylor Phinney, United States, Cannondale Drapac,
34:18.
OVERALL STANDINGS
(After 12 stages)
1. Fabio Aru, Italy, Astana, 52:51:49.
2. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky, :06.
3. Romain Bardet, France, AG2R La Mondiale, :25.
4. Rigoberto Uran, Colombia, Cannondale Drapac, :55.
5. Daniel Martin, Ireland, Quick-Step Floors, 1:41.
6. Simon Yates, Britain, Orica-Scott, 2:13.
7. Mikel Landa, Spain, Sky, 2:55.
8. Nairo Quintana, Colombia, Movistar, 4:01.
9. George Bennett, New Zealand, LottoNL-Jumbo, 4:24.
10. Louis Meintjes, South Africa, UAE Team Emirates,
4:51.
11. Alberto Contador, Spain, Trek-Segafredo, 7:14.
12. Mikel Nieve, Spain, Sky, 7:30.
13. Pierre-Roger Latour, France, AG2R La Mondiale, 8:13.
14. Damiano Caruso, Italy, BMC Racing, 8:53.
15. Alexis Vuillermoz, France, AG2R La Mondiale, 12:16.
16. Sergio Henao, Colombia, Sky, 13:46.
17. Emanuel Buchmann, Germany, Bora-Hansgrohe,
14:14.
18. Carlos Betancur, Colombia, Movistar, 15:40.
19. Warren Barguil, France, Sunweb, 16:03.
20. Brice Feillu, France, Fortuneo-Oscaro, 16:23.
ALSO
41. Andrew Talansky, United States, Cannondale
Drapac, 50:13.
44. Nate Brown, United States, Cannondale Drapac,
53:29.
167. Taylor Phinney, United States, Cannondale Drapac,
2:07:37.
AU TO R AC I NG
Paxton (L)
7-3
3.21
8-6
Shields (R)
2-1
4.95
3-4
RANGERS AT ROYALS, 8:15
S2834B 2x3
washingtonpost.com/subscriberservices
Or call 202-334-6100
Perez (L)
4-6
4.60
6-10
Hammel (R)
4-8
5.04
4-13
10-3
3.44
14-3
4-4
4.00
6-7
4-0
2.11
5-1
4-10
5.06
5-13
INDIANS AT ATHLETICS, 10:05
Carrasco (R)
Gray (R)
RAYS AT ANGELS, 10:07
Faria (R)
Nolasco (R)
Summer
Arena Football League
W
y-Philadelphia..................10
y-Tampa Bay......................8
Baltimore...........................4
Cleveland ...........................4
Washington .......................1
¢
79
L
1
3
6
8
9
T
0
0
0
0
0
Pct
.909
.727
.400
.333
.100
PF
638
556
481
607
427
PA
500
538
541
630
500
y-Clinched playoff spot
SATURDAY'S RESULTS
at Baltimore 49, Philadelphia 42
at Cleveland 41, Tampa Bay 39
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Washington at Philadelphia, 7
Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 7
SATURDAY, JULY 22
Baltimore at Washington, 7
Cleveland at Tampa Bay, 7
SATURDAY, JULY 29
Cleveland at Washington, 7
Philadelphia at Baltimore, 1
SUNDAYS
FRIDAY, AUGUST 4
Washington at Baltimore, 7
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1-800-357-7401, Ext. 3
Laurie Sullivan and Lisa Teehan won the 2017 Mary
Kauffman member-member tournament.
SPRINGFIELD
Thomas Lipowicz won the Boys 16-18 group in the 43rd
Annual Bobby Bowers Memorial Junior Golf
Tournament. Michael Brennan won the Boys 14-15
group, Ronnie Kim won the Boys 10-13 group and
Danielle Suh won the Girls 10-18 group.
LOCAL BASEBALL
sub.wpsubscribe.com/17summerx
CAL RIPKEN COLLEGIATE BASEBALL LEAGUE
S0526 2x5
CONCACAF Gold Cup
Group A
GP
Canada ............................. 2
Costa Rica........................ 2
Honduras ......................... 2
French Guiana.................. 2
Loudoun Riverdogs 7, Baltimore Redbirds 3
Rockville Express 4, D.C. Grays 2
Gaithersburg Giants 16, Baltimore Dodgers 4
Silver Spring-Takoma T-Bolts 6, Herndon Braves 2
W
1
1
0
0
D
1
1
1
1
L
0
0
1
1
GF GA Pts
5 3 4
2 1 4
0 1 1
2 4 1
FRIDAY, JULY 7
AT HARRISON, N.J.
Canada 4, French Guiana 2
Costa Rica 1, Honduras 0
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
AT HOUSTON
Costa Rica 1, Canada 1, tie
Honduras 0, French Guiana 0, tie
FRIDAY’S MATCHES
AT FRISCO, TEXAS
Costa Rica vs. French Guiana, 7:30
Canada vs. Honduras, 10
Group B
GP
United States .................. 2
Panama............................ 2
Martinique....................... 2
Nicaragua......................... 2
FOOTBALL
Savings
Offer expires 8/31/17. Available to new subscribers only.
Restrictions may apply. New subscriptions are subject to a $4.95 activation fee.
At Tampa, Fla.
Martinique............................. 0 2
—
2
United States ........................ 0 3
—
3
First half: None.
Second half: 1, United States, Gonzalez 1, 53rd minute.
2, United States, Morris 1 (Lichaj), 64th minute. 3,
Martinique, Parsemain 2 (Abauel), 66th minute. 4,
Martinique, Parsemain 3 (Audel), 74th minute. 5, United
States, Morris 2 (Zardes), 76th minute.
Yellow cards: Vitulin, Mar, 62nd; Morrow, US, 81st. Red
cards: None.
Referee: Henry Bejarano, Costa Rica. Linesmen: Carlos
Fernandez, Costa Rica; Geovany Garcia, El Salvador.
A: 23,368.
A 133.3-mile ride to the Pyrenees from Pau to Peyragudes, with six categorized climbs, including a "Hors
categorie" climb and a pair of Category 1's.
1. Romain Bardet, France, AG2R La Mondiale, 5:49:38.
2. Rigoberto Uran, Colombia, Cannondale Drapac, :02
behind.
3. Fabio Aru, Italy, Astana, same time.
4. Mikel Landa, Spain, Sky, :05.
5. Louis Meintjes, South Africa, UAE Team Emirates, :07.
6. Daniel Martin, Ireland, Quick-Step Floors, :13.
7. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky, :22.
8. George Bennett, New Zealand, LottoNL-Jumbo, :27.
9. Simon Yates, Britain, Orica-Scott, same time.
10. Mikel Nieve, Spain, Sky, 1:28.
11. Nairo Quintana, Colombia, Movistar, 2:04.
12. Warren Barguil, France, Sunweb, 2:08.
13. Damiano Caruso, Italy, BMC Racing, 2:11.
14. Alberto Contador, Spain, Trek-Segafredo, 2:15.
15. Pierre-Roger Latour, France, AG2R La Mondiale, 2:59.
16. Guillaume Martin, France, Wanty-Groupe Gobert,
4:20.
17. Tiesj Benoot, Belgium, Lotto Soudal, 4:33.
18. Serge Pauwels, Belgium, Dimension Data, 4:36.
19. Alexis Vuillermoz, France, AG2R La Mondiale, same
time.
20. Brice Feillu, France, Fortuneo-Oscaro, 4:56.
TWINS AT ASTROS, 8:10
MARINERS AT WHITE SOX, 8:10
Sign up for
Easy Pay today.
United States 3, Martinique 2
LINEUPS
YANKEES AT RED SOX, 7:10
C Y C LI NG
12TH STAGE
TEAM
6-7
Three-point Goals: Atlanta 8-22 (Holmes 2-3, Sykes 2-8,
Hooper 1-1, Clarendon 1-2, Hayes 1-3, Dantas 1-5),
Phoenix 8-24 (Taurasi 6-12, Currie 1-2, Mitchell 1-6,
Little 0-1, Talbot 0-1, Turner 0-2). Fouled Out: None.
Rebounds: Atlanta 29 (Williams 10), Phoenix 40 (Little
12). Assists: Atlanta 19 (Clarendon 10), Phoenix 17
(Little 6). Total Fouls: Atlanta 21, Phoenix 15. A: 9,342
(18,422).
At Peyragudes, France
2.86
7-7
17 — 84
28 — 89
Tour de France
ERA
Cole (R)
21
15
PHOENIX: D.Robinson 0-1 2-2 2, Griner 9-16 10-10 28,
Little 3-8 3-4 9, Talbot 1-5 0-0 2, Taurasi 7-15 0-0 20,
A.Robinson 0-0 0-0 0, Cannon 2-2 0-0 4, Currie 1-3 0-0 3,
George 0-0 0-0 0, Mitchell 3-9 6-6 13, Turner 3-7 2-2 8.
Totals 29-66 23-24 89.
Portland at Vancouver, 6:30
San Jose at Seattle, 10:30
7-4
Leake (R)
23
20
ATLANTA: Clarendon 9-12 2-2 21, Hayes 4-8 3-4 12,
Lyttle 3-10 0-0 6, Sykes 6-18 2-2 16, Williams 4-5 0-0 8,
Ajavon 1-2 0-0 2, Dantas 1-6 0-0 3, Holmes 5-9 1-3 13,
Hooper 1-2 0-0 3. Totals 34-72 8-11 84.
W-L
AUTO RACING
7:30 a.m.
WEST
W
Minnesota .................................. 13
x-Los Angeles............................. 12
Phoenix....................................... 11
Dallas............................................ 9
Seattle.......................................... 8
San Antonio.................................. 2
SATURDAY’S GAME
Gonzalez (L)
DODGERS AT MARLINS, 7:10
GOLF
3 p.m.
PCT GB
.611
—
.556
1
.500
2
.471
21/2
.412
31/2
.294
51/2
Washington at Indiana, 7
Chicago at New York, 7:30
Minnesota at Phoenix, 10
CARDINALS AT PIRATES, 7:05
TENNIS
10 a.m.
12:30 p.m.
1 p.m.
2 p.m.
3 p.m.
4 p.m.
6 p.m.
L
7
8
8
9
10
12
FRIDAY’S GAMES
SATURDAY, JULY 22
NATIONALS AT REDS, 7:10
SOCCER
9 a.m.
PGA Tour
EAST
W
x-Connecticut ............................. 11
Washington................................ 10
New York ...................................... 8
Atlanta ......................................... 8
Indiana.......................................... 7
Chicago ......................................... 5
Connecticut at Los Angeles, Late
D.C. United at Seattle, 10:30
Philadelphia at Montreal, 7:30
San Jose at New York, 7:30
Toronto FC at New York City FC, 7:30
Houston at Minnesota United, 8
Real Salt Lake at Portland, 10:30
Vancouver at Los Angeles, 10:30
Washington at Houston, 8:30
Nort Carolina at Portland, 3:30
Chicago at Sky Blue FC, 7
Kansas City at Orlando, 7:30
Boston at Seattle, 10
NL games
Teams TBD » ESPN2
Teams TBD » ESPN2
6 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
L
3
3
6
7
7
10
8
7
6
9
11
SATURDAY'S MATCHES
BASEBALL
NBA SUMMER LEAGUE SEMIFINALS
6 p.m.
8 p.m.
GOLF
WNBA
EASTERN
W
Chicago ..........................11
Toronto FC .....................11
New York City FC ...........10
Atlanta United FC ............9
Orlando City .....................8
Columbus .........................9
New York .........................8
Philadelphia .....................6
Montreal ..........................5
New England ....................5
D.C. United .......................5
FRIDAY, JULY 21
TODAY’S SHOW COURT SCHEDULES
World Series, semifinals » ESPN2
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1:30 p.m.
8 p.m.
Konta
7
4
68
64
33
111
104
92
2-7
0-2
26
20
13
48
833.9
7.2
Muguruza Rybarikova
Aces..............................................................3
3
Double Faults...............................................0
1
1st Serve Percentage ................................68
62
1st Serve Winning Pct. ..............................74
42
2nd Serve Winning Pct. .............................69
40
Fastest serve (mph) ................................108
111
Average 1st serve speed (mph) ..............100
101
Average 2nd serve speed (mph)................81
78
Net Points ............................................ 19-25 6-12
Break Points........................................... 5-12
0-1
Receiving pts. Winning Pct. ......................58
28
Winners (including service) ......................22
8
Unforced Errors..........................................11
11
Total Points Won .......................................60
33
Distance Covered-Yds-Match.............1360.2 1448.3
Distance Covered-Yds-Point ..................14.6
15.6
Time of Match.........................................1:04
Premier Boxing Champions: Omar Figueroa Jr. vs. Robert Guerrero
(welterweights) » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45)
8 a.m.
Williams
Aces ............................................................ 1
Double Faults.............................................. 2
1st Serve Percentage ............................... 66
1st Serve Winning Pct.............................. 79
2nd Serve Winning Pct. ............................ 65
Fastest serve (mph) ............................... 115
Average 1st serve speed (mph) ............. 104
Average 2nd serve speed (mph) .............. 91
Net Points ................................................ 5-8
Break Points ............................................ 3-8
Receiving pts. Winning Pct. ..................... 46
Winners (including service) ..................... 19
Unforced Errors........................................... 9
Total Points Won...................................... 67
Distance Covered-Yds-Match.............. 873.3
Distance Covered-Yds-Point ................... 7.6
Time of Match........................................ 1:13
GARBINE MUGURUZA (14) DEF. MAGDALENA
RYBARIKOVA, 6-1, 6-1.
Formula One: British Grand Prix, qualifying » CNBC
NASCAR Cup Series: Overton’s 301, final practice » NBC Sports Network
NASCAR Xfinity Series: Overton’s 200 » NBC Sports Network
BOXING
8 p.m.
BAS K E TBALL
Atlanta United FC at Orlando City, 7
AUTO RACING
8 a.m.
12:30 p.m.
4 p.m.
SOCCER
MLS
W
1
1
1
0
D
1
1
0
0
L
0
0
1
2
GF GA Pts
4 3 4
3 2 4
4 3 3
1 4 0
D
0
0
0
0
L
0
0
1
2
GF GA Pts
2 0 3
3 1 3
3 3 3
0 4 0
SATURDAY, JULY 8
AT NASHVILLE, TENN.
United States 1, Panama 1
Martinique 2, Nicaragua 0
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
AT TAMPA, FLA.
United States 3, Martinique 2
Panama 2, Nicaragua 1
SATURDAY’S MATCHES
AT CLEVELAND
Nicaragua vs. United States, 7
Panama vs. Martinique, 4:30
Group C
GP
x-Jamaica ........................ 1
x-Mexico .......................... 1
El Salvador....................... 2
Curacao ............................ 2
W
1
1
1
0
x-Late match
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
AT SAN DIEGO
Jamaica 2, Curacao 0
Mexico 3, El Salvador 1
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
AT DENVER
El Salvador 2, Curacao 0
Mexico vs. Jamaica, Late
SUNDAY’S MATCHES
AT SAN ANTONIO
Jamaica vs. El Salvador, 6
Curacao vs. Mexico, 8:30
QUARTERFINALS
WEDNESDAY’S MATCHES
AT PHILADELPHIA
QUARTERFINAL ONE
Group A winner vs. Group B second place, 6
QUARTERFINAL TWO
Group B winner vs. Group A or C third place, 9
THURSDAY’S MATCHES
AT GLENDALE, ARIZ.
QUARTERFINAL THREE
Group C winner vs. Group A or B third place, 7:30
QUARTERFINAL FOUR
Group C second place vs. Group A second place, 10:30
NASCAR Cup
JOHN DEERE CLASSIC
At TPC Deere Run; In Silvis, Ill.
Purse: $5.6 million
Yardage: 7,268; Par: 71 (35-36)
FIRST ROUND
Charles Howell III ..............................
Ollie Schniederjans ............................
Rory Sabbatini ...................................
Zach Johnson .....................................
Patrick Rodgers .................................
Chad Campbell ...................................
Daniel Summerhays ..........................
Wesley Bryan ....................................
Bryson DeChambeau .........................
Chez Reavie .......................................
Brandon Hagy ....................................
Trey Mullinax .....................................
Sam Horsfield ....................................
Dominic Bozzelli ................................
Kevin Streelman ................................
Kyle Reifers .......................................
Robert Garrigus .................................
Camilo Villegas ..................................
Andres Romero ..................................
Troy Matteson ...................................
Chris Stroud .......................................
Charley Hoffman ...............................
Ben Crane ...........................................
Patton Kizzire ....................................
Billy Hurley III ....................................
Sean O'Hair ........................................
Jamie Lovemark ................................
Brett Stegmaier ................................
Jonathan Randolph ............................
Miguel Angel Carballo .......................
J.T. Poston .........................................
K.J. Choi .............................................
Brian Stuard ......................................
Boo Weekley ......................................
Y.E. Yang ............................................
Nicholas Lindheim .............................
Gonzalo Fdez-Castano .......................
Greg Chalmers ...................................
J.J. Henry ...........................................
Robert Streb ......................................
Daniel Berger .....................................
Tag Ridings ........................................
Brian Campbell ..................................
Sam Saunders ....................................
a-Maverick McNealy ..........................
Dicky Pride .........................................
Chesson Hadley .................................
Troy Merritt .......................................
Vaughn Taylor ...................................
Kevin Kisner .......................................
Bubba Watson ...................................
Tim Wilkinson ....................................
Cameron Percy ...................................
Rick Lamb ..........................................
Kevin Tway ........................................
Ricky Barnes ......................................
Ben Martin .........................................
Brian Harman .....................................
Cody Gribble .......................................
Chris Kirk ...........................................
Cameron Tringale ..............................
Kelly Kraft ..........................................
Michael Kim .......................................
Max Homa ..........................................
a-Dylan Meyer ...................................
Richy Werenski ..................................
Mark Anderson ..................................
Jonathan Byrd ...................................
John Huh ............................................
Derek Fathauer ..................................
Tyrone Van Aswegen ........................
Shawn Stefani ...................................
Martin Flores .....................................
Seamus Power ...................................
Andrew Loupe ....................................
Ken Duke ............................................
John Rollins .......................................
Peter Malnati .....................................
Hunter Mahan ....................................
Geoff Ogilvy .......................................
Greg Owen .........................................
a-Nick Hardy ......................................
Bobby Gates .......................................
Brett Drewitt .....................................
Johnson Wagner ................................
Davis Love III .....................................
Kyle Stanley .......................................
Matt Every .........................................
Scott Stallings ...................................
Bob Estes ...........................................
Luke List ............................................
David Hearn .......................................
Lucas Glover ......................................
Curtis Luck .........................................
Kurt Slattery ......................................
Morgan Hoffmann .............................
Bill Lunde ...........................................
Spencer Levin ....................................
Harold Varner III ................................
Brendon de Jonge ..............................
Scott Brown .......................................
Zac Blair .............................................
Ryan Palmer ......................................
John Merrick ......................................
Alex Cejka ..........................................
Bud Cauley .........................................
Roberto Castro ..................................
Matt Jones .........................................
Wyndham Clark .................................
Brad Fritsch .......................................
Mark Hubbard ....................................
Stuart Appleby ..................................
Cliff Kresge ........................................
Ryan Armour ......................................
Chad Collins .......................................
Jason Bohn ........................................
Ryan Blaum ........................................
William McGirt ..................................
Steve Stricker ....................................
Nick Watney ......................................
Angel Cabrera ....................................
Shane Bertsch ...................................
Mark Wilson ......................................
Andres Gonzales ................................
Tom Hoge ...........................................
David Lawrence .................................
Julian Etulain .....................................
Sebastian Munoz ...............................
Kevin Na .............................................
Ryo Ishikawa .....................................
Grayson Murray .................................
Eric Axley ...........................................
Steven Alker ......................................
Bryce Molder ......................................
Charlie Wi ..........................................
Smylie Kaufman ................................
Ryan Moore ........................................
D.A. Points .........................................
Tyler Aldridge ....................................
Bobby Wyatt ......................................
Joel Dahmen ......................................
32 31
30 33
35 30
33 32
32 33
33 32
32 34
32 34
33 33
33 33
32 34
33 33
34 32
34 33
33 34
33 34
31 36
35 32
33 34
34 33
34 33
32 35
35 32
35 33
34 34
33 35
32 36
32 36
34 34
32 36
33 35
34 34
34 34
34 34
34 34
33 35
34 35
33 36
32 37
33 36
34 35
35 34
34 35
34 35
33 36
35 34
34 35
36 33
34 35
34 35
34 35
33 36
34 35
36 33
34 36
35 35
30 40
35 35
33 37
35 35
34 36
34 36
35 35
33 37
34 36
35 35
34 36
33 37
35 35
35 35
34 36
34 36
35 35
35 35
36 35
35 36
36 35
33 38
35 36
34 37
35 36
33 38
37 34
34 37
36 35
34 37
34 37
37 34
36 35
36 35
33 38
34 37
37 34
36 35
34 37
36 36
34 38
35 37
34 38
35 37
40 32
36 36
37 35
33 39
35 37
33 39
37 35
36 36
35 37
36 36
37 36
39 34
36 37
37 36
38 35
35 38
35 38
37 36
38 35
36 37
34 39
37 36
36 37
35 38
37 36
37 36
37 36
37 36
40 34
36 38
37 37
36 38
37 37
35 39
36 38
36 38
34 40
36 38
38 36
38 36
36 38
— 63 -8
— 63 -8
— 65 -6
— 65 -6
— 65 -6
— 65 -6
— 66 -5
— 66 -5
— 66 -5
— 66 -5
— 66 -5
— 66 -5
— 66 -5
— 67 -4
— 67 -4
— 67 -4
— 67 -4
— 67 -4
— 67 -4
— 67 -4
— 67 -4
— 67 -4
— 67 -4
— 68 -3
— 68 -3
— 68 -3
— 68 -3
— 68 -3
— 68 -3
— 68 -3
— 68 -3
— 68 -3
— 68 -3
— 68 -3
— 68 -3
— 68 -3
— 69 -2
— 69 -2
— 69 -2
— 69 -2
— 69 -2
— 69 -2
— 69 -2
— 69 -2
— 69 -2
— 69 -2
— 69 -2
— 69 -2
— 69 -2
— 69 -2
— 69 -2
— 69 -2
— 69 -2
— 69 -2
— 70 -1
— 70 -1
— 70 -1
— 70 -1
— 70 -1
— 70 -1
— 70 -1
— 70 -1
— 70 -1
— 70 -1
— 70 -1
— 70 -1
— 70 -1
— 70 -1
— 70 -1
— 70 -1
— 70 -1
— 70 -1
— 70 -1
— 70 -1
— 71 E
— 71 E
— 71 E
— 71 E
— 71 E
— 71 E
— 71 E
— 71 E
— 71 E
— 71 E
— 71 E
— 71 E
— 71 E
— 71 E
— 71 E
— 71 E
— 71 E
— 71 E
— 71 E
— 71 E
— 71 E
— 72 +1
— 72 +1
— 72 +1
— 72 +1
— 72 +1
— 72 +1
— 72 +1
— 72 +1
— 72 +1
— 72 +1
— 72 +1
— 72 +1
— 72 +1
— 72 +1
— 72 +1
— 73 +2
— 73 +2
— 73 +2
— 73 +2
— 73 +2
— 73 +2
— 73 +2
— 73 +2
— 73 +2
— 73 +2
— 73 +2
— 73 +2
— 73 +2
— 73 +2
— 73 +2
— 73 +2
— 73 +2
— 73 +2
— 74 +3
— 74 +3
— 74 +3
— 74 +3
— 74 +3
— 74 +3
— 74 +3
— 74 +3
— 74 +3
— 74 +3
— 74 +3
— 74 +3
— 74 +3
a-Amateur
SCHEDULE
Feb. 19: x-Advance Auto Parts Clash, Daytona Beach,
Fla. (Joey Logano)
Feb. 23: x-Can-Am Duel at Daytona 1, Daytona Beach,
Fla. (Chase Elliott)
Feb. 23: x-Can-Am Duel at Daytona 2, Daytona Beach,
Fla. (Denny Hamlin)
Feb. 26: Daytona 500, Daytona Beach, Fla. (Kurt Busch)
March 5: Folds of Honor QuikTrip 500, Hampton, Ga.
(Brad Keselowski)
March 12: Kobalt 400, Las Vegas (Martin Truex Jr.)
March 19: Camping World 500, Avondale, Ariz. (Ryan
Newman)
March 26: Auto Club 400, Fontana, Calif. (Kyle Larson)
April 2: STP 500, Martinsville, Va. (Brad Keselowski)
April 9: O’Reilly Auto Parts 500, Fort Worth, Texas
(Jimmie Johnson)
April 24: Food City 500, Bristol, Tenn. (Jimmie Johnson)
April 30: Toyota Owners 400, Richmond, Va. (Joey
Logano)
May 7: GEICO 500, Talladega, Ala. (Ricky Stenhouse Jr.)
May 13: Go Bowling 400, Kansas City, Kan. (Martin Truex
Jr.)
May 20: x-Monster Energy Open, Concord, N.C. (Daniel
Suarez)
May 20: x-Monster Energy NASCAR All-Star Race,
Concord, N.C. (Kyle Busch)
May 28: Coca-Cola 600, Concord, N.C. (Austin Dillon)
June 4: AAA 400 Drive for Autism, Dover, Del. (Jimmie
Johnson)
June 11: Pocono 400, Long Pond, Pa. (Ryan Blaney)
June 18: FireKeepers Casino 400, Brooklyn, Mich. (Kyle
Larson)
June 25: Toyota/Save Mart 350, Sonoma, Calif. (Kevin
Harvick)
July 1: Coke Zero 400, Daytona Beach, Fla. (Ricky
Stenhouse Jr.)
July 8: Quaker State 400, Sparta, Ky. (Martin Truex Jr.)
July 16: Overton’s 301, Loudon, N.H.
July 23: Brickyard 400, Speedway, Ind.
July 30: Pennsylvania 400, Long Pond, Pa.
Aug. 6: Watkins Glen 355, Watkins Glen, N.Y.
Aug. 13: Pure Michigan 400, Brooklyn, Mich.
Aug. 19: Bass Pro Shops NRA Night Race, Bristol, Tenn.
Sept. 3: Bojangles’ Southern 500, Darlington, S.C.
Sept. 9: Federated Auto Parts 400, Richmond, Va.
Sept. 17: Tales of the Turtles 400, Joliet, Ill.
Sept. 24: ISM Connect 300, Loudon, N.H.
Oct. 1: Dover Fall Race, Dover, Del.
Oct. 8: Bank of America 500, Concord, N.C.
Oct. 15: Alabama 500, Talladega, Ala.
Oct. 22: Hollywood Casino 400, Kansas City, Kan.
Oct. 29: Old Dominion 500, Martinsville, Va.
Nov. 5: AAA Texas 500, Fort Worth, Texas
Nov. 12: Can-Am 500, Avondale, Ariz.
Nov. 19: Ford Ecoboost 400, Homestead, Fla.
x-non-points race
STANDINGS
1. Martin Truex Jr., 709.
2. Kyle Larson, 675.
3. Kyle Busch, 609.
4. Kevin Harvick, 599.
5. Chase Elliott, 560.
6. Jamie McMurray, 545.
7. Denny Hamlin, 538.
8. Brad Keselowski, 536.
9. Jimmie Johnson, 519.
10. Clint Bowyer, 495.
11. Matt Kenseth, 478.
12. Joey Logano, 471.
13. Ryan Blaney, 462.
14. Erik Jones, 426.
15. Kurt Busch, 419.
16. Ricky Stenhouse Jr., 418.
17. Ryan Newman, 414.
18. Daniel Suarez, 373.
19. Trevor Bayne, 352.
20. Austin Dillon, 341.
LPGA Tour
U.S. WOMEN'S OPEN
At Trump National GC; In Bedminster, N.J.
Purse: $5 million
Yardage: 6,668; Par:72 (36-36)
PARTIAL FIRST ROUND
Shanshan Feng ................................... 35 31
Amy Yang ........................................... 36 31
Lydia Ko .............................................. 36 32
So Yeon Ryu ....................................... 33 35
Minjee Lee .......................................... 34 35
Cristie Kerr ......................................... 33 36
Sei Young Kim .................................... 33 36
a-Hye-Jin Choi .................................... 35 34
Megan Khang ..................................... 35 34
Jeongeun Lee ..................................... 33 36
Ashleigh Buhai ................................... 34 36
Brooke Henderson ............................. 35 35
Seon Woo Bae .................................... 36 34
In Gee Chun ........................................ 38 32
Mirim Lee ........................................... 33 37
Katherine Kirk .................................... 32 38
Supamas Sangchan ............................ 36 34
a-Bailey Tardy .................................... 35 35
Suzann Pettersen .............................. 36 34
Angela Stanford ................................. 34 36
Mi Hyang Lee ..................................... 35 35
Jenny Shin .......................................... 35 36
Lexi Thompson ................................... 35 36
Stacy Lewis ........................................ 37 34
Lizette Salas ...................................... 36 35
Mi Jung Hur ........................................ 36 35
Haru Nomura ...................................... 36 35
Moriya Jutanugarn ............................ 34 37
Ally McDonald .................................... 37 34
Jing Yan .............................................. 37 34
Jodi Ewart Shadoff ............................ 36 35
Min Sun Kim ....................................... 35 36
Morgan Pressel .................................. 35 36
Su Oh .................................................. 37 34
a-Lauren Stephenson ........................ 35 37
Charley Hull ........................................ 36 36
Brittany Lang ..................................... 38 34
Anna Nordqvist .................................. 37 35
Ai Miyazato ........................................ 36 36
a-Maddie Szeryk ................................ 37 35
Jane Park ............................................ 35 37
Sarah Jane Smith ............................... 35 37
Haneul Kim ......................................... 36 36
a-Brooke Seay .................................... 37 36
In Kyung Kim ...................................... 36 37
Austin Ernst ....................................... 35 38
Sung Hyun Park ................................. 38 35
August Kim ........................................ 37 36
Michelle Wie ...................................... 39 34
Danielle Kang ..................................... 37 36
Gerina Piller ....................................... 37 36
Eun Hee Ji .......................................... 37 36
Paula Creamer .................................... 38 35
Na Yeon Choi ...................................... 35 38
Jiyai Shin ............................................ 38 35
Azahara Munoz .................................. 36 37
Karine Icher ........................................ 35 38
— 66 -6
— 67 -5
— 68 -4
— 68 -4
— 69 -3
— 69 -3
— 69 -3
— 69 -3
— 69 -3
— 69 -3
— 70 -2
— 70 -2
— 70 -2
— 70 -2
— 70 -2
— 70 -2
— 70 -2
— 70 -2
— 70 -2
— 70 -2
— 70 -2
— 71 -1
— 71 -1
— 71 -1
— 71 -1
— 71 -1
— 71 -1
— 71 -1
— 71 -1
— 71 -1
— 71 -1
— 71 -1
— 71 -1
— 71 -1
— 72 E
— 72 E
— 72 E
— 72 E
— 72 E
— 72 E
— 72 E
— 72 E
— 72 E
— 73 +1
— 73 +1
— 73 +1
— 73 +1
— 73 +1
— 73 +1
— 73 +1
— 73 +1
— 73 +1
— 73 +1
— 73 +1
— 73 +1
— 73 +1
— 73 +1
a-Amateur
BOXI NG
FIGHT SCHEDULE
FRIDAY
At Buffalo Run Casino, Miami, Okla. (SHO), Antoine
Douglas vs. Juan De Angel, 10, for the vacant WBA-NABA middleweight title.
EFGHI
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Bids & Proposals
825
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Bids & Proposals
Brazilian Naval Commission Public Bid # 09/2017
Object: Acquisition of “Ammunition Supplies”.
Documentation: The Invitation to Bid with the detailed
object and Bid’s Requirements can be downloaded from
www.cnbw.mar.mil.br.
Proposals: Electronic Proposal containing “Qualification
Documents” and “Price Proposal” must be submitted via
email at bid@cnbw.mar.mil.br on August/04/2017. Opening
of Proposals will be on August/07/ 2017 at the following
address: Brazilian Naval Commission in Washington, 5130
MacArthur Blvd, NW, Washington DC 20016.
840
FRIDAY, JULY 14, 2017
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CLASSIFIED
D8
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Pardo & Drazin, LLC
Russell S. Drazin, Attorney
4400 Jenifer Street, NW, Suite 2
Washington, DC 20015
202-223-7900
TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY
4021 22nd Street, NE, Washington, DC 20018
(Lot 0049 in Square 4239)
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Purchase Money
Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of $390,000.00
dated July 22, 2016 and recorded July 27, 2016 as Instrument
No. 2016076086 with the Recorder of Deeds of the District
of Columbia ("Land Records") from 3G 1G 4021 22ND ST NE
LLC, as Grantor, to Daniel Huertas, as Trustee, for the benefit of
DP Capital LLC, as Beneficiary (“Deed of Trust”), default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and following the mailing
and recordation in the Land Records of an Affidavit of NonResidential Mortgage Foreclosure and a Notice of Foreclosure
Sale of Real Property or Condominium Unit, at the request of
the current noteholder, the Trustee will sell at public auction
at the office of Harvey West Auctioneers, Inc., 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015, on
JULY 25, 2017 AT 10:30 AM
ALL THAT LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in the City of Washington, District of
Columbia, known as 4021 22nd Street, NE, Washington, DC
20018 (Lot 0049 in Square 4239), and more fully described in
the Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an “AS IS” condition, with no
warranty of any kind, and subject to conditions, restrictions,
agreements, liens, and encumbrances of record affecting the
same â “ except those encumbrances of record that are
extinguished by operation of District of Columbia law by virtue of
the foreclosure of the Deed of Trust.
Purchaser will take title to the property subject to all taxes, water
and sewer charges, and other utility charges, if any. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the
date of sale forward. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $45,000.00 by cash or cashier’s
check will be required of the purchaser at the time and
place of sale. Purchaser shall settle within thirty (30) days of
sale. TIME SHALL BE OF THE ESSENCE WITH RESPECT TO
SETTLEMENT BY PURCHASER. Balance of the purchase price
to be paid in cash or certified funds at settlement. Interest to
be paid on the unpaid purchase money from the date of sale
to the date of settlement at the interest rate set forth in the
debt instrument secured by the Deed of Trust. Purchaser shall
be responsible for payment of all settlement costs.
The noteholder and its affiliates, if a bidder, shall not be required
to post a deposit or to pay interest.
In the event that purchaser does not settle as required for any
reason, purchaser shall be in default. Upon such default, the
deposit shall be forfeited to the Trustee and all of the expenses
of this sale (including attorneys’ fees and full commission on
the gross sale price) shall be charged against and paid out of
the forfeited deposit. The Trustee may resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulting
purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits
resulting from any resale of the property.
If the Trustee does not settle as set forth herein, the purchaser’s
sole remedy at law and in equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit and the sale shall be considered null and void and of
no effect whatsoever.
The Trustee reserves the right, in Trustee's sole discretion, to
reject any and all bids, to withdraw the property from sale at any
time before or at the auction, to extend the time to receive bids,
to waive or modify the deposit requirement, to waive or modify
the requirement that interest be paid on the unpaid purchase
money, and/or to extend the period of time for settlement.
Additional terms may be announced at the sale. The successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Trustee
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of
bidding.
Daniel Huertas, Trustee
Non-commercial advertisers can now place ads 24/7
by calling 202-334-6200
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Antiques
DC BIG FLEA &
ANTIQUE MARKET
JULY 22-23
Over 700 Booths
In 2 BUILDINGS!
An AMAZING Treasure Hunt!
SHOP FOR BARGAINS!
Dulles Expo, Chantilly,Va
4320 Chantilly Shop Ctr 20151
Sat 9-6…Sun 11-5
Park free…Adm $10
703-378-0910
www.thebigfleamarket.com
12114605
245
SPEAKER—200 Defin. Tech. ProSub
800 subwoofer. Black, perf. cond.
$200, Beth. MD, 301-530-5463
850
850
Montgomery County
min. whoodle—home raised
non-shed, hypoallergenic,ready
8/20, $2500, 410-443-5860
JULY 17, 24, 31, AUGUST 7, 2017
291
Sporting Goods
& Services
360
12115992
Estate Sales
Manassas, VA - 8110 Hillcrest Dr
Sat-Sun, 10-3. Full house sale.
www.caringtransitionsnova.com
Saris Bones 2 Bike Carrier - Trunk
for pics and details.
Mount—$99, HERNDON, VA, 703772-3172
408
Toys
Tickets, Sports
Redskins 2017 Season Tickets Sectioin 306, row 11, seats 13 & 14.
$5,000 firm.
304.237.7314
New Train Set—170.00 New Lionel 610
Safari Adventure electric train set.
Haymarket,Va, 703-754-9754
350
Dogs for Sale
Garage Sales, MD
CHEVY CHASE- Multi-Fam, 6216
Western Ave., Sat 7/15, 9am-2pm,
Toys, clothes HH items, & more!
Furniture
Garage Sales, VA
Home & Garden
MORKIE & Shorkie PUPS- Black/gold
& Red, 8 wks, M & F, hypo aller,
non-shed, shots/wormed, tiny &
gorgeous. $575. 703-577-9469
Shi Chon Puppy—Teddy Bear Puppy.
Local Va breeder. Lovely little puppy
5yr health warr 703-577-1069 9wks
www.DCDogFinders.com
Shih-Poo Shihtzu & more—304-9046289, CC, cash or Buy With NEW
EASY Financing on our web
www.wvpuppy.com
Teacup yorkie-pom pups.
very cute. $900,
717-847-5387
TIBETIAN MASTIFF- 13 months old,
male ,large boned import, pure bred,
$1500. Please text 301-586-7005 for
more information.
Tiny Yorkie, English Puggle-Bull &
more—304-904-6289,CC, cash or
Buy With NEW EASY Financing on
our web: www.wvpuppy.com
Fort Washington—808 Sero Pine
Lane,
Fort
Washington,
MD,
WINDOWS 10 LAPTOPS—$95 PLEASE 07/22/2017, 11:00am, 301-292-9784
CALL MR KAZEEM 202-855-6830
Lanham - Cipriano rd. & Brightleah.
7/15
8am.
2002
Nissan,
lawn
tractor,
260
mowers & too much too list for sale.
301.873.0663 Snooze U loose!
Curio/server cabinet—$250,
Potomac - 11209 Angus Pl. 7/15&16,
Dale City, VA, 703-590-4948
9-3. Furn, kid's items, desk, craft/art
wood 60 x 18 x 44" incld glass
supplies, clothes, tools/equip, rugs,
cabinet & wine rack excel cond.
household items, art & much more!!
Roll Top desk—$100.00, woodbridge,
355
VA, 703-492-6925
265
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!— I drive
to you, pay CASH, and haul them
away. Call 571-830-5871
Electronics
Samsung galaxy s7 edge 64gb—
$240, Alexandria, VA, 714-6319489
Trustees Sale - DC
Maltese, Yorkies, Mini Dachshund &
more—304-904-6289, CC, cash or
Buy With NEW EASY Financing on
our web www.wvpuppy.com
Chicco Trevi Stroller—Orig. cost
$179. Excellent Cond.$30, Arlington, VA, 571-581-5674
JULY 12, 14, 18, 20, 24, 2017
840
AIREDALE Terrier Puppy AKC
18 weeks, female. $800. Call Dan
410-770-9789
BERNESE MTN DOG PUPS - Ready
now, 2 Fs. Parents on premises. AKC,
S&W. 301-223-8702 or 301-366-5542
VIZSLA PUPPIES - Great house
pets/companions.
Very birdy. Ready 7/24.
301-222-7544.
Bloodhound Pups, AKC 8 wks, F & M,
Blk & tan,liver & tan. S/W, microchip, WHEATEN TERRIER &"Wheatini blendvet chkd + hlth guar Military/Police/ ing" Soft/No shed/aller. crt/ppr trnd
soc lap dg. see parents 8 wks /12 mo
Fire/Resc Disc. $850+ 540.219.9550
M/F. Fursonality.com 540-286-0633
Adopt Dogs
Medical Equipment
Medical Deluxe Walker—19.99 202- great prices! Furn, household items
233-0388
569-3296 Two Button Folding OBO
358
5" Wheels Retail $49.99
For Sale Maytag Washer & Dryer —
$199, woodbridge, VA, 703-508- 275
2636
Colesville—1620 Mithering Lane,
Silver Spring, MD, 07/15/- 16, 2017,
KIRBY Sentria Vacuum Cleaner & ELECTRONIC CLEANOUTS—WANTED
9am - 5pm, 484-486-4014
HUGE SPEAKERS TUBES HI-FI AMPS
Shampooer $—249 ExcCond, HEPA
MOST CASH 410-740-5222
360
rated, Cost $1300. 571-606-0319
Moving Sale
Merchandise Wanted
Upright Freezer - White, large, excellent conditio—$249, White Plains,
MD, 301-233-0388
GOVT SURPLUS TUBES WANTED—
JOINT ARMY NAVY JAN PREMIUM
PAID MOST CASH 410-740-5222
215
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!— I drive
to you, pay CASH, and haul them
away. Call 571-830-5871
Books, Music & Movies
Books—$245.00, 350+ quality used
books. All subjects. New Carrollton,
Md. 301-459 5072
OLD HI-FI ITEMS— COLLECTOR PAYS
MOST CASH PLEASE CALL THANK
YOU 410-740-5222
Estate Sales
1102 CHAIN BRIDGE RD, MCLEAN, VA
MCLEAN MANSION ESTATE SALE!
DIR: Park on Ballantrae Ln.
Cross carefully! Fri/Sat 9-3; Sun 9-1.
See Web 4 Details.
www.FOURSALES.com
Mom is Coton/Maltese. Dad pure- Puppies—Three beautiful female
bred Coton. Crate trained, vacc, AKC English Cream Retrievers. 5
social, non-shed $650, 301-748-2180 weeks old,ready 7/25. $2200 Call for
more info at 434-808-4594 or email
French Bulldog—AKC; Puppies ready us at timberlandpuppies@gmail.com
8/18; 202-841-5702;
www.blueridgefrenchbulldogs.com; 622
Adopt Cats
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPPIES- AKC
reg., Euro. world champ lines, Vrated conf., vacc., dewormed, 8 wks,
$1800 Call 571-643-1213
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS AKC.
$685. Vet checked and shots. Great
watch & family dogs. Ready July 27
Call 301-481-4943
2002 HALYARD LN, RESTON, VA
GOLDEN RET AKC & GOLDEN /
LAKESIDE ESTATE SALE!
LAB RET CROSS PUPS & ADULTS
DIR: Sunrise Valley Dr, Upper Lake Dr, 8 weeks - 5 yrs. Vet checked, parents
225
Halyard Ln. Fri/Sat 9-3.
Radio tubes—WANTED ham radios
on prem, health guar. 301-605-0543
huge speakers tube hif amps 202 Need a Quality Sale? 703-256-8300
W www.VictoriasPups.com W
AURORA SLOT CARS Wanted—$100
527 9501, vcvdc@msn.com
& up, cars/sets. + Atlas, AFX, Tyco,
3913 Chantilly Rd
Chantilly, VA
GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPPIES
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
Cox, AMT, Revell. 703-960-3594
TM SALES
Fri - Sun, 9-4
AKC, both parents on site, shots &
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Mid-cent furn, Oriental rugs,
vet checked. Will be ready July 15.
CASH FOR COMICS - Buying 1940Call Al, 301-807-3266.
costume jewelry & watches,
$750. Call 540-820-0967
1970s comics & toys. The older the
Will Come to you!
books, housewares. For more
better. Collectors welcome.
info see www.estatesales.net
Will travel. Call Ed 410-262-4103.
291
Collectibles
GREEK NUMISMATIC COLLECTION
Archaic,claissical,Hellinistic,seleukid
periods. 18 total. Call 703-931-7355
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!— I
drive to you, pay CASH, and haul
them away. Call 571-830-5871
Sporting Goods
& Services
Fizik Antares Black Saddle—49.99
202-569-3296 Free Seat Post OBO
Retail 199.99 Carbon Rails
5632 Bradley Blvd.
Bethesda, Md. 20814
Fri, Sat & Sun 10 - 3
www.emeraldestatesales.com
703 582 1135
GOLDEN RETREIVER—1200-1800, MF, PUPPIES AVAILABLE, 571-238-3497
Laborador retriever—AKC. Puppies:
Choc, ylw, blk females; 1 blk male
avbl. Born 6/1, UTD on vacc, exams.
Alex, VA - Sale by Gale. 1201 Glad- Ready to go 7/20. 540 209 3867
245
stone Pl. Fri & Sat 9-3. Sun 9-1. CB
& HAM radio gear, tools, dolls, antq Labradoodle & Goldendoodle— pups
rdy now! f1b noshed M's and F's
Apple Iphone 7 Plus 256GB—240 Novara Stinger12 Bike—Like new furn, radios, clocks, art supplies,
all colors! $1200 540-729-6365
Includes free case 3 months warw/trng wheels. $30, N. Arlington, costume jewelry, sewing supplies,
www.doodledogpups.com
ranty. Whatsapp 714-631-9489
VA, 571-581-5674
musical instruments, kitchen items.
Electronics
PUBLIC NOICE
DISADVANTAGED
BUSINESS ENTERPRISE
PROPOSED FEDERAL FY
2018-2020 GOAL
The
Northern
Virginia
Transportation Commission
(NVTC) hereby announces its
federal FY 2018-2020 goal of
7 percent for Disadvantaged
Business Enterprise (DBE)
participation. The goal and
its rationale are available for
inspection from 9 a.m.-4:30
p.m. (local time) at 2300
Wilson Blvd., Suite 620,
Arlington, VA 22201 or
online
at
www.novatransit.org/con
tact/DBE for 30 days
following the date of
publication of this notice.
Written comments on this
goal will be accepted for 45
days from the date of
publication of this notice.
Comments
should
be
addressed to: NVTC (Attn:
Scott Kalkwarf), 2300 Wilson
Blvd., Suite 620, Arlington,
VA 22201.
825
YORKSHIRE Terrier Males - 14 wks,
CHIHUAHUA - Adorable tiny
CKC papers, 1st shots/wormed;
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
apple head, 10 weeks,
Ready to go! $850 each. Serious
ALEXANDRIA - Beverly Hills
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
pure bred, not registered.
inquiries only. Call 301-523-6728
804 South Overlook Dr.
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
208
$350. Call 804-683-9409
Saturday 7/15, 8am- noon.
612
268
VIENNA - 2001 Annies Way. 22182.
Dishwasher, brand new, Stainless
Coton
de
Tulear/Maltese
mix—
2
M's.
Sat 7/15 7:30-1:30. Huge yard sale,
Steel—$249, White plains, MD, 302-
Appliances
850
Montgomery County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
KNOWN AS
242 33RD STREET, NORTHEAST
3003 Parker Avenue
WASHINGTON, DC 20019
Silver Spring, MD 20902
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
District of Columbia recorded on June 18, 2007, as Instrument Deed of Trust to ALLECK RESNICK, Trustee(s), dated July 28,
Number 2007080886, and in accordance Judgment filed on 2014, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
June 20, 2017 in case 2016 CA 003524 R(RP) and at the COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 49074, folio 084, the holder
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 WISCONSIN duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default
AVENUE, NW, SUITE 440, WASHINGTON, DC 20015-2034 on, having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of
the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee
AUGUST 22, 2017 at 3:30 PM
will offer for sale at public auction at THE MONTGOMERY
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
JULY 17, 2017 at 1:30 PM
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
242 33RD STREET, NORTHEAST, WASHINGTON, DC 20019, ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon
situated
in
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
LOT TWELVE (12) IN SQUARE WEST OF SQUARE 5001
as follows:
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representa- LOT NUMBERED FOURTEEN (14), IN BLOCK NUMBERED
tion, including but not limited to the description, fitness TWENTY (20), IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "WHEATON
for a particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical HILLS", AS PER PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 31 AT PLAT
condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, 192
materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or without either express or implied warranty or representation,
other laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merany assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
Section 42-1903.13.
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money at subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (6.44% record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be no certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment of of the purchase price with interest at 5.06% per annum from
current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
are to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation association dues and assessments that may become due after
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
from date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be Trustee's File No. (42269)
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
www.hwestauctions.com
Trustee’s File No. 22280
JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
12112690
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
610
820
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE
Dogs for Sale
Official Notices
295
205
Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
or call 202-334-6200
4Paws—Adopt fr 40+ cats &
kittens $v Sat 1-5 Fairfax
Petco www.fourpaws.org
703-352-3300 CFC#34517
How about some
home delivery?
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
Bids & Proposals
JAUNT is soliciting proposals
from qualified companies for
expansion and renovation of its
four-bay garage. Also, included in
this project is the renovation of
a conference room, a conversion
of an attic space to atraining
room, and a perimeter fence
repair. JAUNT's facility is located
at
104
Keystone
Place,
Charlottesville, VA 22902. Sealed
proposals for the project will be
received by JAUNT at 104
Keystone Place, Charlottesville,
VA 22902, up to 1:00 pm on
July 27, 2017, following which all
proposals will be publicly opened
and recorded. Proposals should
be directed to the attention of
Christopher Rowland, Assistant
Executive Director. All proposers
must familiarize themselves with
the requirements of the project
as is relates to the specifications
that are available at JAUNT's
office between the hours of
8:30am and 5:00pm, Monday
through Friday. JAUNT reserves
the right, in its discretion, to
reject any or all proposals and
to waive irregularities in any
proposal. A copy of the Request
for Proposals can be obtained
from JAUNT's office at 104
Keystone Place, Charlottesville,
VA 22902, JAUNT's website
www.ridejaunt.org/projects.a
sp or by contacting Christopher
Rowland
at
chrisr@ridejaunt.org<mailto:c
hrisr@ridejaunt.org> for an
electronic version. Only those
vendors who have requested in
writing or in person a copy of
the RFP will be notified of
addendums.
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
Nordic Track Exercise Skier—$195
Great cardio workout, easy to fold
up; Cost $800 new, 571-606-0319
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
mypublicnotices.com/
washingtonpost/PublicNotice.asp
FREE UNDER $250
If the merchandise you’re selling is priced under $250, your 3-line, 3-day ad is FREE!
Go to washingtonpostads.com for complete details and to order your free ad.
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
12016 Winesap Terrace
North Potomac, MD 20878
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to D. GENE MERRILL, Trustee(s), dated
February 26, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records
of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 33917, folio
628, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at
the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
JULY 17, 2017 at 1:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED FORTY-ONE (41), IN BLOCK LETTERED
"K", IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "QUINCE ORCHARD
KNOLLS", AS PER PLAT OF SAID SUBDIVISION RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 91, AT PLAT 9825, ONE OF THE LAND RECORDS
OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND, AND AS SHOWN
ON CORRECTION PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 97, AT
PLAT 10727, RECORDED AMONG SAID LAND RECORDS; SAID
RECORDED PLAT BEING NUMBERED SEVEN (7).
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 6.25% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (50733)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
509 ANDERSON AVENUE
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to ALLECK RESNICK, Trustee(s), dated
August 27, 2012, and recorded among the Land Records of
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 44926, folio
233, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at
the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
JULY 17, 2017 at 1:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED FIVE (5) IN BLOCK NUMBERED SEVEN (7)
IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "WEST END PARK", AS SET
FORTH IN PLAT BOOK LETTERED A ON PLAT NUMBERED 43
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 5.06% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (43426)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
851
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
www.hwestauctions.com
JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
830
Special Notices
Public Notice
DARWIN FERRERAS Amazing Care
HealthCare Services and Employment Agency, Insured and Bonded
Corp. is applying for a Certificate
of Need to establish a Home Healthcare Agency. A letter of Intent will
be filed with the District of Columbia State Health Planning and Development Agency (SHPDA). For additional information contact the
SHPDA at (202)442-5875.
835
Public Sale Notices
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
The contents of the below listed
unit(s) located at Storage Sense
Manassas - 7240 New Market Ct,
Manassas, VA, 20109; will be sold at
Public Auction online at www.lockerfox.com on Tuesday the 18th day
of July, 2017 at11:00 AM
#050 Gerson Barrera
#178 Kariel Caldwell
#124 Elsa Canales
#186 Randolph Carter
#084 Yillian Castellanos
#120 Jeffrey Fullerton
#151 Ludmilla Neagu
Storage Sense - Manassas reserves
the right to refuse any bid.
TERMS: CASH AT SALE
Notice of Public Sale
In accordance with the Maryland
self-service storage act 122.18.501
to 18-506, and to satisfy an Operator’s lien,
The contents of the following information will be sold at the public
auction to the highest bidder for
cash on:
Date: August 11th, 2017.
Time: 2:15pm.
Location: 12102 Conway Road,
Beltsville, MD 20705.
Crate:
Name:
1-8
Sharon Edwards.
12112568
850
Prince Georges County
Montgomery County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
DIANE S. ROSENBERG
MARK D. MEYER
JOHN A. ANSELL, III
KENNETH SAVITZ
JENNIFER ROCHINO
SYDNEY ROBERSON
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway
Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiff(s)
v.
Timothy Hancock
1130 Regal Oak Drive
Rockville, MD 20852
Defendant(s)
Case No. 426823V
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 28th
day of June, 2017, by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland, that the sale of 1130
Regal Oak Drive, Rockville, MD
20852, made and reported, will
be ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 28th day
of July, 2017, provided a copy of
this notice be inserted in a daily
newspaper printed in said County,
once in each of three successive
weeks before the 28th day of July,
2017. The Report of Sale states
the amount of the foreclosure
sale price to be $562,000.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Montgomery County, MD
July 7, 14, 21, 2017
12116212
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
COULD YOU
USE SOME
EXTRA CASH?
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054B 2x3
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
ARNESA L MOODY
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
Civil No. CAEF16-04224
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this
7th day of July, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N.
Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of
the Real Property designated as
1405 Windjammer Ct, Fort Washington, MD 20744, and reported
in the above entitled cause, will
be finally ratified and confirmed,
unless cause to the contrary
thereof be shown on or before
the 7th day of August, 2017 next;
provided a copy of this Order
be inserted in The Washington
Post, 1150 15th Street, Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S once a week
for three successive weeks
before the 7th day of August,
2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $360,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison (619)
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
July 14, 21, 28, 2017
12117681
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KEITH M. YACKO, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs,
V.
ARTHUR P. TINSLEY, et al.
Defendant(s).
CASE NO. CAEF15-08470
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this 10th
day of July, 2017, that the sale
of the property in this case, 4217
Quinn Street, Capitol Heights,
Maryland 20743, reported by Keith
M. Yacko, Substitute Trustees, be
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary be shown on
or before the 10th day of August,
2017 provided a copy of this Notice
be inserted in The Washington
Post, a newspaper published in
Prince George's County, Maryland,
once in each of three (3) successive weeks on or before the 10th
day of August, 2017.
The report states the amount of
sale to be $135,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison (#619)
Clerk of the Circuit Court
for Prince Georges County, MD
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 Viking Drive
Suite 203
Virginia Beach, VA 23452
(757) 213-2959
July 14, 21, 28, 2017
12117698
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
12112614
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
MIRNA HERNANDEZ
ANGEL DAVID HERNANDEZ
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF15-20381
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 7th
day of July 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 1822
Metzerott
Road,
Unit
#B2,
Hyattsville, MD 20783 will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to
the contrary thereof be shown on
or before the 7th day of August,
2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 7th day of
August, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$72,250.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
July 14, 21, 28, 2017
12117680
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
CARNELL GRANDY, JR. A/K/A
CARNELL GRANDY JR A/K/A
CARNELL GRANDY JR
LISA GRANDY
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
Civil No. CAEF15-00703
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 7th
day of July, 2017 by the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, Maryland and by the
authority thereof, that the sale
made by Kristine D. Brown, William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto,
Trustees, of the Real Property designated as 15605 Passaie Lane,
Bowie, MD 20716, and reported
in the above entitled cause, will
be finally ratified and confirmed,
unless cause to the contrary
thereof be shown on or before
the 7th day of August, 2017 next;
provided a copy of this Order
be inserted in The Washington
Post, 1150 15th Street, Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S once a week
for three successive weeks
before the 7th day of August,
2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $216,525.48.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison (619)
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
July 14, 21, 28, 2017
12117690
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
FRIDAY, JULY 14, 2017
850
Montgomery County
OPQRS
EZ
850
Montgomery County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
TRUSTEE'S SALE
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
10004 Le Fevre Drive, Cheltenham, MD 20623
SUITE 100
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
premises known as 10004 Le Fevre Drive, Cheltenham, MD
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
20623. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
of Trust, dated August 15, 2008, and recorded in Liber 30021
KNOWN AS
at Page 625 among the land records of the County of Prince
George's, in the original principal amount of $229,321.00.
9240 THREE OAKS DRIVE
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
Silver Spring, MD 20901
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
Deed of Trust to RECON TRUST COMPANY, Trustee(s), dated of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
October 19, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on August 1, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 35001, folio that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
594, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of limited to:
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, Tax ID# 11-1139765
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 affect same, if any.
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
JULY 17, 2017 at 1:30 PM
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
as follows:
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
LOT NUMBERED THIRTY-THREE (33) IN BLOCK LETTERED will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
"C" IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "SECTION SEVEN (7), by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
SLIGO PARK HILLS" AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN association dues and assessments that may become due after
PLAT BOOK 90 AT PLAT 9730
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
without either express or implied warranty or representation, taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condi- the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mate- property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record Trustee's File No. 16-260902.
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 5% per annum from the
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
www.hwestauctions.com
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
12116283
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
TRUSTEE'S SALE
association dues and assessments that may become due after
5900 Brooke Jane Dr, Clinton, MD 20735
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement premises known as 5900 Brooke Jane Dr, Clinton, MD 20735.
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the Trust, dated May 17, 2006, and recorded in Liber 25245 at
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting Page 051 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $415,624.00.
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on August 1, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
limited to:
Trustee's File No. (30944)
Tax ID# 09-3512811
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
www.hwestauctions.com
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
12112295 TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
851
851
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
Prince Georges County
Prince Georges County on
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
TRUSTEE'S SALE
association dues and assessments that may become due after
13216 PINE ROAD, Bowie, MD 20720
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
premises known as 13216 PINE ROAD, Bowie, MD 20720. taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
Trust, dated November 3, 2006, and recorded in Liber 29395 at the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
Page 472 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $360,000.00. purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at in front of the Duval Wing of Trustee's File No. 17-263659.
the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on August 1, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
limited to:
Tax ID# 14-1586924
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
www.hwestauctions.com
12116279
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 6.875% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TRUSTEE'S SALE
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
1705 Skipjack Drive, Fort Washington, MD 20744
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners premises known as 1705 Skipjack Drive, Fort Washington,
association dues and assessments that may become due after MD 20744. By virtue of the power and authority contained
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. in a Deed of Trust, dated October 26, 2007, and recorded
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer in Liber 30168 at Page 501 among the land records of
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for amount of $328,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on August 1,
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trustee's File No. 09-159194p.
Trust including but not limited to:
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
Tax ID# 05-0273086
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
www.hwestauctions.com
JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
12116810 TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
TRUSTEE'S SALE
association dues and assessments that may become due after
15416 KENNETT SQUARE WAY, Brandywine, MD 20613
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
premises known as 15416 KENNETT SQUARE WAY, Brandy- taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
wine, MD 20613. By virtue of the power and authority contained are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
in a Deed of Trust, dated April 27, 2005, and recorded in the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
Liber 22427 at Page 244 among the land records of the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
amount of $285,601.00. Upon default and request for sale, the are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front Trustee's File No. 16-261614.
of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on August 1,
2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 11-3242708
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
www.hwestauctions.com
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
12115951
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The 851
Prince Georges County 851 Prince Georges County
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
MARYLAND
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments JOHN
Substitute Trustees
Substitute Trustees
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed Plaintiffs
Plaintiffs
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners v.
v.
association dues and assessments that may become due after IFEANYI C. MADUAKOR
JOSEPH NWAOGBE
U. ONYENEHO
A/K/A JOSEPH O. NWAOGBE
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. ANNETTE
Defendant(s)
Defendant(s)
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
Civil Action No. CAEF16-38396
Civil Action No. CAEF16-07556
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
NOTICE
NOTICE
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for Notice is hereby given this 6th day Notice is hereby given this 3rd day
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the of July 2017, by the Circuit Court of July 2017, by the Circuit Court
Prince George's County, Maryfor Prince George's County, Maryproperty may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting for
land, that the sale of the propland, that the sale of the proppurchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees erty mentioned in these proceed- erty mentioned in these proceedand described as 607 Jarvis
ings and described as 3805 40th
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms ings
Crest Court, Bowie, MD 20721 will
Place, Brentwood, MD 20722 will
ratified and confirmed unless
be ratified and confirmed unless
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. be
cause to the contrary thereof be
cause to the contrary thereof be
Trustee's File No. 15-251175.
shown on or before the 7th day
shown on or before the 3rd day
of August, 2017, provided a copy
of August, 2017, provided a copy
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
of this NOTICE be published at
of this NOTICE be published at
least once a week in each of three
least once a week in each of three
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, successive weeks in some news- successive weeks in some newspaper of general circulation pubpaper of general circulation pubManassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
lished in said County before the
lished in said County before the
www.hwestauctions.com
JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
12116808
7th day of August, 2017.
3rd day of August, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$283,155.10.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$230,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
July 14, 21, 28, 2017
12117675
July 14, 21, 28, 2017
12117665
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
D9
Prince Georges County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
7013 Gateway Boulevard, District Heights, MD 20747
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 7013 Gateway Boulevard, District
Heights, MD 20747. By virtue of the power and authority
contained in a Deed of Trust, dated March 25, 2002, and
recorded in Liber 15700 at Page 650 among the land records
of the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $102,500.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on August 1,
2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 06-0651232
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-256217.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
12706 Holiday Ln, Bowie, MD 20716
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 12706 Holiday Lane, Bowie, MD 20716.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated March 17, 2009, and recorded in Liber 30554 at
Page 328 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $273,707.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on August 1, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 07-0689034
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-262875.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
11603 SILVERGATE LN, Bowie, MD 20720
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 11603 SILVERGATE LN, Bowie, MD 20720.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust,
dated December 13, 1999, and recorded in Liber 13539 at
Page 223 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $240,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on August 1, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 13-1564681
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 14-243904.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
12115430 JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
12115404 JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
12114658
TRUSTEE'S SALE
6301 Suitland Road, Suitland, MD 20746
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 6301 Suitland Road, Suitland, MD 20746.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated July 25, 2003, and recorded in Liber 18045 at
Page 281 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $188,461.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on August 1, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 06-0556084
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-258760.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
10302 SNOWDEN ROAD, Laurel, MD 20708
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 10302 SNOWDEN ROAD, Laurel, MD
20708. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated April 12, 2006, and recorded in Liber 24862 at
Page 191 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $371,200.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on August 1, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 10-1055656
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-259395.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
8506 14Th Place, Hyattsville, MD 20783
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 8506 14Th Place, Hyattsville, MD 20783.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated March 15, 2011, and recorded in Liber 32530 at
Page 344 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $163,741.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on August 1, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 17-1916709
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-261765.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
12115429 JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
TRUSTEE'S SALE
3405 Tinkers Branch Way, Fort Washington, MD 20744
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 3405 Tinkers Branch Way, Fort Washington, MD 20744. By virtue of the power and authority
contained in a Deed of Trust, dated May 27, 2011, and recorded
in Liber 32776 at Page 21 among the land records of the
County of Prince George's, in the original principal amount
of $492,198.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on August 1,
2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 05-3510872
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-258895.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
12802 Center Park Way, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 12802 Center Park Way, Upper Marlboro,
MD 20772. By virtue of the power and authority contained
in a Deed of Trust, dated April 11, 2006, and recorded in
Liber 25238 at Page 037 among the land records of the
County of Prince George's, in the original principal amount
of $280,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on August 1,
2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 15-3074663
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-261709.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
ERIN SHAFFER
Substitute Trustee
Plaintiff,
V.
ESTATE OF CAROL A. ANDERSON
303 Dias Drive
Fort Washington, Maryland 20744
Defendant(s)
CASE NO. CAEF16-44307
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby issued by the
Circuit Court of Prince George's
County this 5th day of July, 2017,
that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings, made
and reported by Erin M. Shaffer,
Substitute Trustee, be ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary be shown on or before
the 7th day of August, 2017 provided a copy of this Notice be
inserted in The Washington Post,
a newspaper published in Prince
George's County, Maryland, once
in each of three (3) successive
weeks on or before the 7th day of
August, 2017.
The report states the amount of
sale to be $290,000.00
Sydney J. Harrison(#619)
Clerk of the Circuit Court
for Prince Georges County, MD
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
www.hwestauctions.com
12114666 JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
851
Prince Georges County
851
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
DORIS J. HARRIS
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-02341
NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
GLORIA J. TURNER
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF16-24830
NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
JAMES PATRICK CARSON
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAE13-15809
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 7th
day of July 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 10700
Black Locust Court, Clinton, MD
20735 will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 7th day of August, 2017,
provided a copy of this NOTICE be
published at least once a week in
each of three successive weeks
in some newspaper of general circulation published in said County
before the 7th day of August, 2017.
Notice is hereby given this 6th
day of July 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 10719
Wembrough Place, Cheltenham,
MD 20623 will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 7th day of August, 2017,
provided a copy of this NOTICE be
published at least once a week in
each of three successive weeks
in some newspaper of general circulation published in said County
before the 7th day of August, 2017.
Notice is hereby given this 5th day
of July 2017, by the Circuit Court
for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 4725 Pard
Road, Capitol Heights, MD 20743
will be ratified and confirmed
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 7th
day of August, 2017, provided a
copy of this NOTICE be published
at least once a week in each of
three successive weeks in some
newspaper of general circulation
published in said County before
the 7th day of August, 2017.
Notice is hereby given this 5th
day of July 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 12412
Skylark Lane, Bowie, MD 20715 will
be ratified and confirmed unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 7th day
of August, 2017, provided a copy
of this NOTICE be published at
least once a week in each of three
successive weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said County before the
7th day of August, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$382,500.00.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$313,500.00.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$161,274.89.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$205,200.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
July 14, 21, 28, 2017
12117660
July 14, 21, 28, 2017
12117663
July 14, 21, 28, 2017
12117662
12114656
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
JAMIE L. BUNCHE
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-03792
NOTICE
12117678
12114662
TRUSTEE'S SALE
3308 Asher St, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 3308 Asher St, Upper Marlboro, MD
20772. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated February 3, 2006, and recorded in Liber 24322
at Page 268 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $405,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on August 1, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 03-0190892
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 15-249795.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
12115428 JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
851
July 14, 21, 28, 2017
June 14, 21, 28, 2017
12115427 JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
How about some
home delivery?
1-800-753-POST
12117659
SF
D10
851
Prince Georges County
OPQRS
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
FRIDAY, JULY 14, 2017
EZ
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
12512 Chelton Lane, Bowie, MD 20715
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 12512 Chelton Lane, Bowie, MD 20715.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated August 31, 2009, and recorded in Liber 31055 at
Page 133 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $270,019.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on August 1, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 14-1615251
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-260638.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
801 Sero Estates Drive, Fort Washington, MD 20744
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 801 Sero Estates Drive, Fort Washington,
MD 20744. By virtue of the power and authority contained
in a Deed of Trust, dated June 30, 2006, and recorded in
Liber 25650 at Page 435 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $330,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on August 1,
2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 05-0288647
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-256714.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
8519 Paragon Court, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 8519 Paragon Court, Upper Marlboro,
MD 20772. By virtue of the power and authority contained
in a Deed of Trust, dated December 30, 1991, and recorded
in Liber 8173 at Page 738 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $121,150.00. Upon default and request for sale,
the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at
the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the
front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at
14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on July
18, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed
of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 15-1745215
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 15-249332.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
5529 K St, Capital Heights, MD 20743
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 5529 K St, Capital Heights, MD 20743. By
virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust,
dated December 26, 2007, and recorded in Liber 29230 at
Page 155 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $220,001.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on July 18, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 18-2085348
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-263783.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
516 Mentor Avenue, Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 516 Mentor Avenue, Capitol Heights, MD
20743. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated June 30, 2006, and recorded in Liber 25630 at
Page 670 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $184,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on July 18, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 18-2008415
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or
certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 7.375% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-262240.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
12114655 JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
12114216 JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
12112927 JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
12112543 JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
12111239
TRUSTEE'S SALE
4803 Drexel Rd, College Park, MD 20740
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 4803 Drexel Rd, College Park, MD
20740. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated June 22, 2006, and recorded in Liber 25746 at
Page 363 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE, in the original principal amount of $330,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE, at the front of the Duval Wing of
the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on August 1, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 21-2393965
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 7% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-264623.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
9201 New Hampshire Ave #305, Silver Spring, MD 20903
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 9201 New Hampshire Ave #305, Silver
Spring, MD 20903. By virtue of the power and authority
contained in a Deed of Trust, dated January 12, 2007, and
recorded in Liber 27129 at Page 464 among the land records
of the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $147,175.00. Upon default and request for sale,
the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at
the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the
front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at
14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on July
18, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed
of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 17-1946029
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or
certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 6.125% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 15-249323.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
7220 Tamo Court, Hyattsville, MD 20785
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 7220 Tamo Court, Hyattsville, MD 20785.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated December 3, 2007, and recorded in Liber 30692 at
Page 031 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGES, in the original principal amount of $234,312.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGES, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on July 18, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 13-2821692
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-262185.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
9620 STUART LANE, Clinton, MD 20735
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 9620 STUART LANE, Clinton, MD 20735.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust,
dated December 17, 2001, and recorded in Liber 17976 at
Page 167 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $180,860.90.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on July 18, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 09-2823326
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 14-240187.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
8701 Community Square Lane, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 8701 Community Square Lane, Upper
Marlboro, MD 20772. By virtue of the power and authority
contained in a Deed of Trust, dated July 25, 2013, and
recorded in Liber 35111 at Page 327 among the land records
of the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $301,874.00. Upon default and request for sale,
the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at
the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the
front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at
14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on July
18, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed
of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 15-3075249
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-260665.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
12114815 JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
12114169 JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
TRUSTEE'S SALE
5617 Lanham Station Road, Lanham, MD 20706
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 5617 Lanham Station Road, Lanham, MD
20706. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated June 21, 2016, and recorded in Liber 25707 at
Page 514 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $304,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on August 1, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 20-3079498
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-261071.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
613 60th Place, Fairmount Heights, MD 20743
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 613 60th Place, Fairmount Heights, MD
20743. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated January 20, 2010, and recorded in Liber 31405
at Page 374 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $195,395.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on July 18, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 18-2084655
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-260120.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
12114218 JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
Membership is rewarding.
12114003
12112545 JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
12112924 JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
12111567
TRUSTEE'S SALE
1212 Pickering Circle, Upper Marlboro, MD 20774
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 1212 Pickering Circle, Upper Marlboro,
MD 20774. By virtue of the power and authority contained
in a Deed of Trust, dated August 18, 2005, and recorded
in Liber 23036 at Page 165 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $260,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on August 1,
2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 13-1528058
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 15-250025.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
12600 Nichols Promise Drive, Bowie, MD 20720
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 12600 Nichols Promise Drive, Bowie, MD
20720. By virtue of the power and authority contained in
a Deed of Trust, dated September 21, 2006, and recorded
in Liber 26553 at Page 79 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $620,000.00. Upon default and request for sale,
the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at
the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the
front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at
14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on July
18, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed
of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 07-3613965
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or
certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 8.375% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-255730.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
9412 Stream Valley Ln, Clinton, MD 20735
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 9412 Stream Valley Ln, Clinton, MD 20735.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated October 25, 2005, and recorded in Liber 25617
at Page 314 among the land records of the County of Prince
George's, in the original principal amount of $415,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on July 18, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 09-3373693
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-257296.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
12112547 JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
12111572 JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
12111569
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FRIDAY, JULY 14, 2017
851
Prince Georges County
OPQRS
EZ
851
Prince Georges County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
9223 St Andrews Pl, College Park, MD 20740
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 9223 St Andrews Pl, College Park, MD
20740. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated June 28, 2007, and recorded in Liber 28418 at
Page 312 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $332,250.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on July 18, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 21-2289072
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-262812.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
14223 Cold Harbour Drive, Accokeek, MD 20607
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 14223 Cold Harbour Drive, Accokeek, MD
20607. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated June 30, 2011, and recorded in Liber 32915 at
Page 344 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $272,902.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on July 18, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 05-3445616
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-259368.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
2103 Vermont Ave, Hyattsville, MD 20785
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 2103 Vermont Ave, Hyattsville, MD 20785.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated April 11, 2007, and recorded in Liber 27898 at
Page 303 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $210,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on July 18, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 13-1551738
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-263314.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
www.hwestauctions.com
12111235 JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
TRUSTEE'S SALE
12734 Gladys Retreat Circle #68, Bowie, MD 20720
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 12734 Gladys Retreat Circle #68, Bowie,
MD 20720. By virtue of the power and authority contained
in a Deed of Trust, dated May 13, 2009, and recorded in
Liber 31095 at Page 558 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $299,475.00. Upon default and request for sale,
the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at
the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the
front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at
14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on July
18, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed
of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 07-3799574
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-263808.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
12110405
TRUSTEE'S SALE
819 Clovis Ave, Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 819 Clovis Ave, Capitol Heights, MD
20743. By virtue of the power and authority contained in
a Deed of Trust, dated November 16, 2005, and recorded
in Liber 23969 at Page 001 among the land records of
the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $103,500.00. Upon default and request for sale,
the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at
the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the
front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at
14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on July
18, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed
of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 18-2010627
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 7.75% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 15-249742.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
12111230
TRUSTEE'S SALE
5504 YORKSHIRE DRIVE, Temple Hills, MD 20748
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 5504 YORKSHIRE DRIVE, Temple Hills,
MD 20748. By virtue of the power and authority contained
in a Deed of Trust, dated June 27, 2005, and recorded in
Liber 23414 at Page 125 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $284,000.00. Upon default and request for sale,
the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at
the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the
front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at
14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on July
18, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed
of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 09-0854869
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 12-227181.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
www.hwestauctions.com
JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
12110308
TRUSTEE'S SALE
5815 Kentucky Ave, District Heights, MD 20747
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 5815 Kentucky Ave, District Heights, MD
20747. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated March 31, 2014, and recorded in Liber 35859 at
Page 527 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $240,562.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on July 18, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 06-0546226
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-261257.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
12110313 JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
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Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
463 Mainview Court, Glen Burnie, MD 21061
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 463 Mainview Court, Glen Burnie, MD
21061. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated March 12, 2010, and recorded in Liber 22146
at Page 0093 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE
ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $127,645.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland,
on August 1, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in
said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 03-256-90008482
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-259362.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
852
Anne Arundel County
852
D11
Anne Arundel County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
507 Pride Of Baltimore Dr, Arnold, MD 21012
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 507 Pride Of Baltimore Dr, Arnold, MD
21012. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated February 22, 2007, and recorded in Liber 18887
at Page 178 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE
ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $650,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland,
on August 1, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in
said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 03-871-90057902
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 15-254987.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
12115985
TRUSTEE'S SALE
5603 Battee Drive, Churchton, MD 20733
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 5603 Battee Drive, Churchton, MD
20733. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated December 3, 2002, and recorded in Liber 12301
at Page 468 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE
ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $160,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland,
on August 1, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in
said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 07-268-90072516
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 15-251547.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
12115953
TRUSTEE'S SALE
1394 Stonecreek Road, Annapolis, MD 21403
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 1394 Stonecreek Road, Annapolis, MD
21403. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a
Deed of Trust, dated November 22, 2004, and recorded in
Liber 15663 at Page 0320 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount
of $270,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church
Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, on August 1, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 06-817-90035915
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-263958.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
12115975
www.hwestauctions.com
TRUSTEE'S SALE
JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
12110298
1729 Barnett Court #15, Severn, MD 21144
851
Prince Georges County 851 Prince Georges County Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
premises known as 1729 Barnett Court #15, Severn, MD
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
MARYLAND
21144. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
James E. Clarke
of Trust, dated April 28, 2008, and recorded in Liber 20135
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Renee Dyson
Trustee(s)
at Page 507 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE
Brian Thomas
Plaintiff(s)
Erin M. August
ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $246,137.00.
Hugh J. Green
vs.
Patrick M. A. Decker
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
GREGORIO ARIAS
Substitute Trustees
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
Plaintiffs
JOSE ARIAS
Defendant(s)
OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland,
V.
Mortgagor(s)
on August 1, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in
Doris B. Mitchell
Civil No. CAEF17-05351
Defendant(s)
said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
NOTICE
Civil No. CAEF16-25087
Tax ID# 04-001-90216588
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this
NOTICE PURSUANT
7th day of July, 2017 by the CirTO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
cuit Court for the COUNTY OF
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
for Prince George's County, Maryby the authority thereof, that the
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
land, this 6th day of July 2017,
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
that the foreclosure sale of the
William M. Savage, Gregory N.
affect same, if any.
property described in the deed of
Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of
trust docketed herein and located
the Real Property designated as
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
at 9101 New Ascot Court, Clinton,
3900 72nd Avenue, Hyattsville, MD
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
Maryland 20735 made and report20784, and reported in the above
ed by James E. Clarke, Renee
entitled cause, will be finally
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
Dyson, Brian Thomas, Erin M.
ratified and confirmed, unless
August, Hugh J. Green and Patrick
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
cause to the contrary thereof be
M. A. Decker, Substitute Trustees,
shown on or before the 7th day
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
Be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED,
of August, 2017 next; provided a
unless cause to the contrary be
copy of this Order be inserted in
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
shown on or before the 7th day
The Washington Post, 1150 15th
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
of August, 2017; provided a copy
Street, Washington, DC, MD in
of this Order be inserted in The
said
COUNTY
OF
PRINCE
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
Washington Post, once in each of
GEORGE'S once a week for three
association dues and assessments that may become due after
three (3) successive weeks before
successive weeks before the 7th
the 7th day of August, 2017.
day of August, 2017.
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
The Report of Sale states the
The report states the amount of
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
amount of the sale at $271,172.00.
the sale to be $211,270.52.
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
BY THE COURT:
BY THE COURT:
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
Sydney J. Harrison (619)
Sydney J. Harrison (619)
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Clerk of the Circuit Court
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
MATL567656
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
Shapiro
&
Brown,
LLP
Orlans PC
10021
Balls
Ford
Rd,
Suite
200
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
PO Box 2548
Manassas, Virginia 20109
Leesburg, Virginia 20177
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
703 449-5800
July 14, 21, 28, 2017 12117655
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
July 14, 21, 28, 2017
12117686
Trustee's File No. 17-263379.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
MARYLAND
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Plaintiff(s)
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
JACQUELINE HALL
ANDREA INGRAM
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
Civil No. CAEF16-24971
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this
7th day of July, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N.
Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of
the Real Property designated as
13101 Keverton Drive, Upper Marlboro, MD 20774, and reported in
the above entitled cause, will be
finally ratified and confirmed,
unless cause to the contrary
thereof be shown on or before
the 7th day of August, 2017 next;
provided a copy of this Order
be inserted in The Washington
Post, 1150 15th Street, Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S once a week
for three successive weeks
before the 7th day of August,
2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $231,800.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison (619)
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
July 14, 21, 28, 2017
12117689
Wake up to
home delivery.
202-334-7007
legalnotices@washpost.com
JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
12109416
TRUSTEE'S SALE
1613 POST OAK RD #23, Bowie, MD 20721
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 1613 POST OAK RD #23, Bowie, MD
20721. By virtue of the power and authority contained in
a Deed of Trust, dated September 14, 2009, and recorded
in Liber 31115 at Page 553 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $267,961.00. Upon default and request for sale,
the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at
the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the
front of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at
14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on July
18, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed
of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 13-3146040
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-263596.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
852
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
vs.
MOSES KOYI
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
Civil No. CAEF16-25500
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 7th
day of July, 2017 by the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, Maryland and by the
authority thereof, that the sale
made by Kristine D. Brown, William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto,
R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the Real
Property designated as 5906 L
St, Fairmount Heights, MD 20743,
and reported in the above entitled cause, will be finally ratified
and confirmed, unless cause to
the contrary thereof be shown on
or before the 7th day of August,
2017 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in The Washington Post, 1150 15th Street, Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S once a week
for three successive weeks
before the 7th day of August,
2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $125,676.38.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison (619)
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
July 14, 21, 28, 2017
12117684
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
SF
SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
www.hwestauctions.com
JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
12115947 A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
JULY
14,
21,
28,
2017
12115431
851
852
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
DENISE A. MCQUEEN
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
Civil No. CAEF13-21155
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this
7th day of July, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N.
Britto, Trustees, of the Real Property designated as 2820 CITRUS
LN, Springdale, MD 20774, and
reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on
or before the 7th day of August,
2017 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in The Washington Post, 1150 15th Street, Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S once a week
for three successive weeks
before the 7th day of August,
2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $317,636.00.
1-800-753-POST
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
12115297
TRUSTEE'S SALE
846 ORIOLE AVENUE, Glen Burnie, MD 21060
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 846 ORIOLE AVENUE, Glen Burnie, MD
21060. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated August 26, 2008, and recorded in Liber 20413
at Page 0006 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE
ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $354,319.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland,
on August 1, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in
said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 03-797-90228277
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 14-242206.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison (619)
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
July 14, 21, 28, 2017
12117693
Anne Arundel County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
John E. Driscoll, III, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Versus
Dynell Beckett
Defendant
No. C-02-CV-15-004137
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this Thursday, June 29, 2017 that the sale
of the property in the proceedings
mentioned, made and reported by
E. Edward Farnsworth, Jr., Substitute Trustee BE RATIFIED AND
CONFIRMED, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 31st day of July 2017
next; Provided, a copy of this
Notice be inserted in some newspaper published in Anne Arundel
County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 31st day
of July 2017 next. The report states
that the amount of sale of the
property at 327 GLOUCESTER
DRIVE, GLEN BURNIE, MD 21061 to
be $160,000.00.
Robert P Duckworth
Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, MD
7/7, 7/14, 7/21, 2017
12115974
Home delivery
is convenient.
852
Anne Arundel County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
John E. Driscoll, III, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Versus
Jason Gilbert Giordano
A/K/A Jason Gilbert
Nicole T. Giordano
Defendants
No. C-02-CV-17-000486
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this Thursday, July 6, 2017 that the sale of the
property in the proceedings mentioned, made and reported by E.
Edward Farnsworth, Jr., Substitute
Trustee BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 7th day of August 2017
next; Provided, a copy of this
Notice be inserted in some newspaper published in Anne Arundel
County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 7th day
of August 2017 next. The report
states that the amount of sale of
the property at 5 SOLITUDE COURT,
LOTHIAN, MD 20711 to be
$371,700.00.
SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
Robert P Duckworth
Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, MD
7/14, 7/21, 7/28/2017
1-800-753-POST
You, too, could have
home delivery.
SF
12116870
Wake up
to home delivery.
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
D12
852
Anne Arundel County
OPQRS
852
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
852
852
Anne Arundel County
Anne Arundel County
852
FRIDAY, JULY 14, 2017
EZ
Anne Arundel County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
1918 Mackiebeth Ct, Annapolis, MD 21401
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
premises known as 1918 Mackiebeth Ct, Annapolis, MD
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
21401. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated October 10, 2006, and recorded in Liber 18390
KNOWN AS
at Page 672 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE
1115 LEONARD DRIVE
ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $645,000.00.
Glen Burnie, MD 21060
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
certain Deed of Trust to RON MORRISON, Trustee(s), dated OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland,
September 29, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records on July 18, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in said
of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 17058, folio Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
0039, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by Tax ID# 02-852-90058971
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE ANNE affect same, if any.
ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 CHURCH TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401 ON,
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
JULY 25, 2017 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT LEASEHOLD LOT OF GROUND and improvements from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
described as follows:
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. 6, AS SHOWN by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
ON THE PLAT ENTITLED "SECTION 5, SUN VALLEY," WHICH association dues and assessments that may become due after
PLAT IS RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF ANNE the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
ARUNDEL COUNTY IN PLAT BOOK 31, FOLIO 15. A.P.N. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
#:375619382100
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
Said property is subject to an annual ground rent in the amount are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
of $150.00 due and payable on the 25th day of May and the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
November in each and every year.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
without either express or implied warranty or representation, are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condi- Trustee's File No. 16-258741.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 payable in certified A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
12111570
JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
12111574 at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of ANNE ARUNDEL
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 7.0% on
TRUSTEE'S SALE
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
TRUSTEE'S SALE
810 SOUTHERN HILLS DR # I-9K, Arnold, MD 21012
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
3383 WYE MILLS SOUTH, Laurel, MD 20724
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
premises known as 810 SOUTHERN HILLS DR # I-9K, Arnold, party) will be required to complete full settlement of the Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
MD 21012. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of premises known as 3383 WYE MILLS SOUTH, Laurel, MD
Deed of Trust, dated May 1, 2016, and recorded in Liber 29572 the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the 20724. By virtue of the power and authority contained in
at Page 369 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be a Deed of Trust, dated December 20, 2008, and recorded
ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $185,940.00. resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. in Liber 20642 at Page 070 among the land records of
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will All other public charges and private charges or assessments, the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, in the original principal
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be amount of $304,353.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
on August 1, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement Courthouse for the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, on July 18, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all
said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
Tax ID# 03-233-90050436
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for limited to:
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Tax ID# 04-472-05645830
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
affect same, if any.
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against affect same, if any.
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
association dues and assessments that may become due after is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (13-22901)
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laure D. Harris, Thomas
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
W. Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri, Keith M. Yacko, and Gene Jung
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
Substitute Trustees
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
Trustee's File No. 17-264015.
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
Trustee's File No. 13-237944.
www.hwestauctions.com
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
JULY 7, 14, 21, 2017
12114615
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
517 BROADWATER WAY, Gibson Island, MD 21056
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 517 BROADWATER WAY, Gibson Island, MD
21056. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated March 13, 2006, and recorded in Liber 17625
at Page 512 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE
ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $1,025,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland,
on July 18, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in said
Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 03-350-01886500
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 14-243426.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
7728 Gatewood Court, Pasadena, MD 21122
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
www.hwestauctions.com
JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
12114225 premises known as 7728 Gatewood Court, Pasadena, MD
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
21122. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
12110213
of Trust, dated April 30, 2003, and recorded in Liber 12995 855
855
Charles County
Charles County
at Page 079 among the land records of the County of Anne
Arundel, in the original principal amount of $178,489.00.
TRUSTEE'S SALE
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
TRUSTEE'S SALE
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
3512 Marble Arch Dr, Pasadena, MD 21122
3673 RUSTY LEAF COURT, Waldorf, MD 20602
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland,
premises known as 3512 Marble Arch Dr, Pasadena, MD on July 18, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in said Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
21122. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
premises known as 3673 RUSTY LEAF COURT, Waldorf, MD
Deed of Trust, dated September 20, 2004, and recorded in Tax ID# 03-676-06304411
20602. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a
Liber 15484 at Page 0531 among the land records of the Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and Deed of Trust, dated December 22, 2006, and recorded in Liber
COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, 6223 at Page 164 among the land records of the COUNTY OF
of $212,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may CHARLES, in the original principal amount of $275,200.00.
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the affect same, if any.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, on August 1, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The OF CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum Circuit & District Courts), LaPlata, MD, on August 1, 2017 at
limited to:
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within 12:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust
Tax ID# 03-190-90028409
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments including but not limited to:
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments Tax ID# 06-139256
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
association dues and assessments that may become due after conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer affect same, if any.
certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or
of the purchase price with interest at 6.625% per annum from are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the of the purchase price with interest at 6.625% per annum from
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
association dues and assessments that may become due after Trustee's File No. 16-258324.
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
association dues and assessments that may become due after
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
Trustee's File No. 17-264960.
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
www.hwestauctions.com
Trustee's File No. 13-238809.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
JUNE
30,
JULY
7,
14,
2017
12111573
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
855
855
Charles County
Charles County
855
Charles County
855
Charles County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
65 Meadow Ln, Waldorf, MD 20601
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 65 Meadow Ln, Waldorf, MD 20601. By
virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust,
dated June 24, 2011, and recorded in Liber 07532 at Page
0408 among the land records of the COUNTY OF CHARLES, in
the original principal amount of $261,905.00. Upon default
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for
sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF
CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between Circuit
& District Courts), LaPlata, MD, on August 1, 2017 at 12:00
PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including
but not limited to:
Tax ID# 06-102514
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-265415.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
3617 Dewey Ct, Indian Head, MD 20604
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 3617 Dewey Ct, Indian Head, MD 20604.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust,
dated January 9, 2006, and recorded in Liber 05653 at Page
0353 among the land records of the COUNTY OF CHARLES, in
the original principal amount of $157,000.00. Upon default
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for
sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF
CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between Circuit
& District Courts), LaPlata, MD, on July 18, 2017 at 12:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 07-074964
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-263737.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
12115293 JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
TRUSTEE'S SALE
2514 Archway Lane, Bryans Road, MD 20616
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 2514 Archway Lane, Bryans Road, MD
20616. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a
Deed of Trust, dated May 14, 2013, and recorded in Liber
08221 at Page 0184 among the land records of the COUNTY
OF CHARLES, in the original principal amount of $331,867.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
OF CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between
Circuit & District Courts), LaPlata, MD, on August 1, 2017 at
12:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust
including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 07-352668
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-262470.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
12109415
TRUSTEE'S SALE
146 Kalmia Court, La Plata, MD 20646
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 146 Kalmia Court, La Plata, MD 20646.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust,
dated October 22, 2009, and recorded in Liber 7012 at Page
52 among the land records of the COUNTY OF CHARLES, in
the original principal amount of $206,457.00. Upon default
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for
sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF
CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between Circuit
& District Courts), LaPlata, MD, on July 18, 2017 at 12:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 01-049143
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-264335.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
12114221
TRUSTEE'S SALE
12524 Mirkwood Ln, Waldorf, MD 20601
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 12524 Mirkwood Ln, Waldorf, MD 20601.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust,
dated April 19, 2007, and recorded in Liber 6302 at Page 646
among the land records of the COUNTY OF CHARLES, in the
original principal amount of $199,000.00. Upon default and
request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at
public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF CHARLES,
at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between Circuit & District
Courts), LaPlata, MD, on August 1, 2017 at 12:00 PM, all
that property described in said Deed of Trust including but not
limited to:
Tax ID# 06-215203
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-263745.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
856
Frederick County
12111563
856
Frederick County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
12138 Keymar Road
Keymar, MD 21757
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to MICHAEL LYON, Trustee(s), dated April 23,
2009, and recorded among the Land Records of FREDERICK
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 7483, folio 0340, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE FREDERICK COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 100 W. PATRICK ST, FREDERICK,
MD 21701 ON,
JULY 18, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED AUGUST 18, 2009 IN LIBER 7483, FOLIO 0340.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
www.hwestauctions.com
JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
12114231 TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
To place your legal notice in
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
856
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
Frederick County
Home delivery
the Classified section:
of the purchase price with interest at 5% per annum from the
ucs295176
is convenient.
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
CIRCUIT COURT FOR
Call: 202-334-7007
FREDERICK COUNTY
1-800-753-POST
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
SF
Sandra K. Dalton
www.hwestauctions.com
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
Clerk of the Circuit Court
JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
12115432
100 West Patrick Street
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
Courthouse
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
Frederick, MD 21701
Home delivery
(301) 600-1976
association dues and assessments that may become due after
Case Number: 10-C-17-000588 FC
is
convenient.
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Easy Pay automatically charges your
Lender License Number: 3687
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
James E Clarke
credit card every time a payment is due
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
VS.
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
Darlene M Bernier Thayer
and keeps your Post subscription coming
1-800-753-POST
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
NOTICE OF SALE
without service interruptions.
SF
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
Notice is hereby issued by the
Circuit Court for Frederick County
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
this 22nd day of July 2017, that the
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
sale made and recorded by James
E Clarke for the sale of the propersaid Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Home delivery
ty described in these proceedings
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
is convenient.
6725 Hemlock Point Road
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
New Market, MD 21774
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
be ratified and confirmed thiry (30)
days from the date of this Notice,
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
unless cause to the contrary be
1-800-753-POST
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
shown, provided a copy of this
Notice be inserted in some NewsSF
Trustee's File No. (32036)
paper published in this County,
once in each of three (3) successive weeks.
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
The report states the amount of
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
JULY 14, 21, 28, 2017
12115296
WP 2x1
LEGAL NOTICES
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subscriberservices
Or call 202-334-6100
Wake up
to home delivery.
S2843A 6x3
get more
time to
play
1-800-753-POST
SF
the sale to be $210,000.00.
Sandra K. Dalton
Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Frederick County
Khalid Walker
P.O. Box 2548
Leesburg, Virginia 20177 (703) 777-7101
7/7, 7/14/, 7/21, 2017 12115969
www.hwestauctions.com
JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
12113787
FRIDAY, JULY 14, 2017
856
Frederick County
OPQRS
EZ
856
857
Frederick County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
9721 Woodsboro Pike
Walkersville, MD 21793
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to JUDITH L. BARNETT, WILLIAM J. ZIEGLER
AND DAVID T. AX, Trustee(s), dated April 10, 2013, and
recorded among the Land Records of FREDERICK COUNTY,
MARYLAND in Liber 9507, folio 199, the holder of the
indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the
undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded
among the aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured
thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction at THE FREDERICK COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 100 W. PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, MD 21701 ON,
JULY 18, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED APRIL 24, 2013 IN LIBER 9507, FOLIO 199.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 4.99% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (46943)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
857
Howard County
Howard County
857
Howard County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
6309 Old Washington Boulevard
Elkridge, MD 21075
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from R.
MICHAEL WARD AND JENNIFER WARD, dated August 4, 2006
and recorded in Liber 10183, folio 708 among the Land Records
of HOWARD COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.13C17110852; Tax ID
No.01-164228 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
at THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD,
COLUMBIA, MD. 21045, on
JULY 18, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within
ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for
HOWARD COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 546122)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
ERIN M. AUGUST,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12114019
857
857
Howard County
857
D13
Howard County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
6630 Montgomery Road
Elkridge, MD 21075
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
MICHELLE HASTINGS, dated February 9, 2005 and recorded
in Liber 9087, folio 218 among the Land Records of HOWARD
COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure
Case docketed as Case No.13C17110562; Tax ID No.01162136 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at
THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD,
COLUMBIA, MD. 21045, on
JULY 18, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $16,600.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within
ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for
HOWARD COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 573895)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
KHALID D. WALKER,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Howard County
www.hwestauctions.com
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
10704 Cordage Walk
Columbia, MD 21044
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from NKEM
AMIN KHUMBAH, dated January 25, 2007 and recorded in
Liber 10518, folio 429 AND RE-RECORDED IN LIBER 10577,
FOLIO 465 among the Land Records of HOWARD COUNTY, MD,
default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed
as Case No.13C17110693; Tax ID No.15-057882 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the THOMAS DORSEY
BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD. 21045, on
JULY 25, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $33,800.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within
ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for
HOWARD COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 575516)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
KHALID D. WALKER,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
12114994
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
6964 Sunfleck Row
Columbia, MD 21045
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from EDITH
WIMBISH AND ALICE WIMBISH, dated April 3, 2007 and
recorded in Liber 10917, folio 214 AND LOAN MODIFICATION
RECORDED IN LIBER 14534, FOLIO 417 among the Land
Records of HOWARD COUNTY, MD, default having occurred
thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case
No.13C15105096; Tax ID No.16-091332 ) the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING,
9250 BENDIX ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD. 21045, on
JULY 25, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $48,700.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within
ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for
HOWARD COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 550782)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
ERIN M. COHEN,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
12114993
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1979 Daisy Road
Woodbine, MD 21797
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from ALONZO
A. POWELL AND CARROL L. POWELL, dated October 27, 2003
and recorded in Liber 07875, folio 346 among the Land Records
of HOWARD COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.13C17110626; Tax ID
No.04-325826 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
at THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD,
COLUMBIA, MD. 21045, on
JULY 18, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $6,600.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within
ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for
HOWARD COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 571095)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
ERIN M. AUGUST,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
872
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
12116171 JULY 7, 14, 21, 2017
www.hwestauctions.com
12116240 JUNE 30, JULY 7, 14, 2017
12114989
876
Fairfax County
Trustees’ Notice of Sale of valuable residential property commonly known
as 6706 James Lee St., Falls Church, VA 22042. By virtue of a certain Deed
of Trust dated May 31, 2005, and recorded June 6, 2005, in Deed Book
17364, Page 135 among the land records of Fairfax County, Virginia, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the appointed SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEES, Michael L. O’Reilly and Nancy J. O’Reilly will offer for sale, at
public auction, at the Fairfax County Circuit Court, 4110 Chain Bridge
Road, Fairfax, VA 22030, on Wednesday, August 2, 2017, at 2:00 p.m.,
the following-described premises, situated in Falls Church, County of
Fairfax, Virginia, and designated as and being now known for taxation and
assessment purposes as Apt. 249, 6706 James Lee St., Falls Church, VA
22042, Tax Map. No. 050-4-06-0249, and more particularly described as:
Apartment No. 249 at the address of 6706 James Lee Street, Falls
Church, Virginia in the JAMES LEE CONDOMINIUM, Phase 2, a condominium project, according to the Amendment to Master Deed creating
the same, dated February 19, 1974 and recorded February 19, 1974 in
Deed Book 2989 at page 47, among the land records of Fairfax County,
Virginia.
TOGETHER WITH the use and enjoyment of the Limited Common
Elements appurtenant thereto, as set forth in said Amendment to
Master Deed and the Master Deed incorporated by reference therein.
TOGETHER WITH THE undivided 1.851% interest in General and Limited
Common Elements declared in said Amendment to Master Deed to be
an appurtenance to the above described dwelling.
Terms of Sale: ALL CASH. A Deposit of $15,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is less, will be required at time of sale; such deposit
to be in cash, certified check, cashier’s check, or such other form as
the trustees may determine, in their sole discretion. The property is
sold in AS IS condition. All conveyancing, recording, recordation tax,
transfer tax, etc., at cost of purchaser. The balance of the purchase price,
due in cash, certified check, or cashier’s check shall accrue interest at
the rate of 6% per annum from date of sale to the date of receipt of
the balance of the purchase price. Terms of sale to be complied with
within fifteen (15) calendar days from date of sale, otherwise trustees
reserve the right to forfeit deposit, readvertise and sell the property at
the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser; or without forfeiting deposit,
trustees may avail themselves of any legal or equitable rights against the
defaulting purchaser. Time is of the essence. If trustees cannot convey
title, purchaser’s sole remedy is a return of deposit. Further terms and
particulars may be announced at the time of sale.
Michael L. O’Reilly, Substitute Trustee
Nancy J. O’Reilly, Substitute Trustee
For further information contact Nancy J. O’Reilly, The O’Reilly Law Firm,
761-C Monroe St., Suite 200, Herndon, VA 20170. 703-766-1991
July 7, July 14, July 21, and July 28, 2017
Prince William County
12116128
873
Prince William County
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
13104 Quann Lane,
Woodbridge, VA 22193
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
February 8, 2005, and recorded at Instrument Number 200502140023539
in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County,
VA, securing a loan which was originally $195,000.00. The appointed
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at
public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William
County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
July 28, 2017 at 1:00 PM
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of Lot 27,
Section T-18, Dale City, as the same appears duly dedicated, platted and
recorded in Deed Book 1550 at page 791, among the Land Records of
Prince William County, Virginia, and as more fully described in the aforesaid
Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
July 7, 14, 2017
12114245
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
5804 Brandon Hill Loop,
Haymarket, VA 20169
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
August 10, 2007, and recorded at Instrument Number 200708150093715
in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County,
VA, securing a loan which was originally $680,000.00. The appointed
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at
public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William
County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
August 4, 2017 at 1:00 PM
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of Lot 2,
Section 11, Piedmont, as the same appears duly dedicated, platted and
recorded, in Deed Book 2927 at Page 1188, among the Land Records of
Prince William County, Virginia, and as more fully described in the aforesaid
Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
July 14, 21, 2017
870
12116297
Arlington County
872
Fairfax County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
4061 SOUTH FOUR MILE RUN #203,
ARLINGTON, VA 22204
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
3314 DAUPHINE DR, FALLS
CHURCH, VA 22042
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $320,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 5.250000% dated
October 13, 2009, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
ARLINGTON as Deed Book 4317,
Page 2267, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF ARLINGTON, at the
front of the Circuit Court building
for the County of Arlington located at 1425 N. Courthouse Road,
Arlington, Virginia on August 9,
2017 at 12:30 PM, the property
with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 27007293
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $250,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.000000% dated
January 7, 2006, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 18167, Page 0944,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on August 9, 2017
at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0601-28-0003
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 16-260977.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
July 7, 14, 2017
July 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 2017
12116644
871
12116612
City of Alexandria
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 16-261201.
Home delivery is so easy.
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In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $286,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.879000% dated
June 28, 2005, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the CITY OF ALEXANDRIA as Deed Instrument Number
050022866, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction all
that property located in the CITY
OF ALEXANDRIA, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the City
of Alexandria located at 520 King
Street, Alexandria, Virginia on
August 9, 2017 at 11:30 AM, the
property with improvements to
wit:
Tax Map No. 50319980
Wake up to
home delivery.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 16-258584.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
12117858
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
Improved by the premises known as
20871 Sandstone Square, Sterling, Virginia
In execution of a Deed of Trust from Eric Richardson Copeland, dated
October 17, 2016, and recorded November 21, 2016, as Instrument
numbered 201611210078936 among the Land Records of Loudoun
County, Virginia, the undersigned substitute trustee will offer for sale
at public auction at the front entrance of the Court House for Loudoun
County, at 18 E. Market Street, Leesburg, Virginia, on
Tuesday, JULY 18, 2017 at 11:00 a.m.
the following property being the property contained in said Deed of Trust,
described as follows:
Lot 226, Section 4A, POTOMAC LAKES as the same appears duly
dedicated, platted and recorded in Deed Book 1057 at page 1260 and in
Plat Book 35 at page 31, among the Land Records of Loudoun County,
Virginia.
Commonly known as 20871 Sandstone Square, Sterling, Virginia
20165.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $7,000.00 or ten percent (10%) of the sale
price, whichever amount is less, in the form of cash or its equivalent will
be required of the purchaser at the time and place of sale; the balance
of the purchase money being due and payable within fifteen (15) days
after sale, time expressly being of the essence, with interest at the rate
of 3.99 percent per annum from date of sale to date of settlement.
Provided, however, that if the holder of the secured promissory note is the
successful bidder at the sale, no cash deposit shall be required, and part
of or the entire indebtedness, including interest and costs, secured by the
Deed of Trust, may be set off against the purchase price.
Any defaulting purchaser shall forfeit the deposit and stand the risk and
cost of resale.
Sale shall be made subject to all existing easements and restrictive
covenants as the same may lawfully affect the real estate. Sale is further
subject to mechanic's and/or materialman's liens of record and not of
record. The property will be sold subject to all conditions, covenants,
restrictions, rights of redemption of federal lienholders or encumbrances,
and agreements of record affecting the same, if any.
In the event the undersigned trustee is unable to convey to the purchaser
good title, then purchaser's sole and exclusive remedy shall be in the
refund of the deposit paid at the time of sale.
This sale is being made subject to a superior trust.
The subject property and all improvements thereon will be sold in "as is"
condition without warranty of any kind. Purchaser shall be responsible
for any and all building and/or zoning code violations whether of record
or not of record, as well as for all unpaid and enforceable homeowners'
or condominium owners' associa¬tion dues and assessments, if any.
Purchaser also shall be responsible for obtaining possession of the
property at his/her expense. Purchaser shall assume the risk of loss and
shall be responsible for any damage, vandalism, theft, destruction, or the
like, of or to the property occurring after the time of sale. Conveyance will
be by special warranty deed. Conveyancing, recording, transfer taxes,
notary fees, examination of title, state stamps, and all other costs of
conveyance are to be at the expense of purchaser. State and local
taxes, public charges, and special or regular assess¬ments, if any, shall
be adjusted to the date of sale and thereafter shall be assumed by the
purchaser.
Sale is subject to post-sale confirmation that the borrower did not file
for protection under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to the sale, as well
as to post-sale confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the
loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the
borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off
the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, the sale shall be null and
void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return
of his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced at
the time of sale. This is a communication from a debt collector and any
information obtained will be used for that purpose.
DAVID N. PRENSKY
Substitute Trustee
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
David N. Prensky, Esquire
5225 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W. #500
Washington, D.C. 20015
(202) 302-0539
July 7, 14, 2017
877
SF
877
Spotsylvania County
12115794
Spotsylvania County
TRUSTEE‘S SALE OF
10905 CARLTON DR
BUMPASS, VA 23024
Pursuant to the terms of a certain 1 Deed of Trust, in the original principal
amount of $358,000.00 , dated September 26, 2005, and recorded in the
Clerk's Office of the Circuit Court of Spotsylvania, Virginia (the "Clerk's
Office"), as Instrument Number 200500041234, default having been made
in the payment of the note thereby secured, the undersigned Sole
Acting Substitute Trustees, pursuant to the request of the holder of
the Note thereby secured, will offer for sale at public auction outside
of the Spotsylvania Circuit Court, located at 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, VA 22553 on July 18, 2017 at 01:00 PM, the property
briefly described as 10905 CARLTON DR, BUMPASS, VA 23024, and more
particularly described in said Deed of Trust as follows:
All that certain lot, piece, or parcel of land situate, lying and being
in Berkeley Magisterial District, of Spotsylvania County, Virginia, and
described as Lot 12, Carlton‘s Landing, on plat of subdivision of record
in Plat Book 6, Pages 33A - 36A, in the Clerk‘s Office of the Circuit of
Spotsylvania County, Virginia. , with improvements thereon.
TERMS OF SALE: Cash. A ten percent (10%) bidder's deposit in cash
or certified check payable to the Trustee(s) shall be required of the
successful bidder at the time of sale before the bidding will be closed;
settlement must be made within twenty (20) days from the date of sale
or property to be resold at cost of defaulting purchaser. All costs of
conveyancing, examination of title, recording charges, etc. will be at
cost of purchaser. Neither the Substitute Trustees, nor any other party
guarantees or covenants to deliver, or in any way, to obtain possession
of the premises for any third party purchaser. Additional terms may be
announced at the time of sale. Sale will also be subject to additional terms
contained in the Memorandum of Sale to be executed by the successful
bidder upon purchase.
Commonwealth Asset Services, LLC
Sole Acting Substitute Trustees
This communication is from a debt collector. This is an attempt to collect
a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Commonwealth Asset Services, LLC
281 Independence Boulevard, Pembroke One Building, 5th Floor,
Virginia Beach, VA 23462
www.sykesbourdon.com
(757) 965-5097 BETWEEN HOURS OF 9:00 A.M. and 11:00 A.M. ONLY
Our Case No: CA17-190185-1
July 7, 14, 2017
12116168
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PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
216 GRETNA GREEN CT,
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22304
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
Loudoun County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF VALUABLE
IMPROVED REAL ESTATE
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE
873
876
Loudoun County
6706 James Lee St., Apt. 249, Falls Church, VA 22042
AUGUST 2, 2017
July 14, 21, 2017
JULY 7, 14, 21, 2017
872
Fairfax County
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IS YOUR OLD CAR HOLDING UP?
YES
NO
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8"/5504&--*5
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CLASSIFIED
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GLS
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KIA 2014 FORTE EX
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LINCOLN 2001 CONTINENTAL Like
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THE WASHINGTON POST . GOINGOUTGUIDE.COM
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14, 2017
These dive bars are dingy, dark
and stuck in last century.
Thank goodness.
PAGE 18
MUSIC
$20 DINER
MOVIES
50 years on, Merriweather Post
Pavilion is still the venue that
makes memories of home. 6
Shawarma Guys in Alexandria
looks like a chain but cooks like
a street vendor. 10
A cool, dark theater and two
four-star films — your
weekend’s all set. 24
MICHAEL S. WILLIAMSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Watering holes
in the wall
2
EZ
TWO-STEP CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING
3 AREAS AND A FREE HALL!
$99!
Expires 7/29/17
4 AREAS AND A FREE HALL!
$129!
SAVE $76!
Expires 7/29/17
SAVE $91!
Offers may not be available outside the service territory. An area is defined as a room up to 250 square
feet. Combination areas and areas over 250 square feet are considered as separate areas.
Baths, staircases, landings, additional halls, walk-in closets, and area rugs are additional cost.
Valid for residential areas only. Not valid with other coupons or offers.
AIR DUCT CLEANING
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14, 2017
ARE YOUR AIR DUCTS CLEAN?
1.888.805.2372
SERVING VIRGINIA, MARYLAND, & DC
$99
SAVE $195
Additional vents $20 each. Includes FREE System Inspection.
Expires 7/29/17
IN SID E
Dining
A new opening
for fanciers of
fancy coffee. 9
Exhibits
23
Music
Dawkins; Steve
Earle; Royal
Headache;
Amadou &
Mariam. 5
Best Bets
3
Noteworthy events this week
EZ
Denizens Brewing
Carnivale
Silver Spring’s Denizens Brewing
celebrates its third anniversary
with an indoor-outdoor carnival
for adults. Beyond special beers,
you’ll find acrobats, stilt walkers,
grown-up carnival games, a
fortune teller, a dunk tank
(benefiting the Humane Society)
and DJs. Admission includes one
beer and a bag of popcorn.
When: Saturday from 2 to 10
p.m.
Where: Denizens Brewing, 1115
East-West Hwy., Silver Spring.
denizensbrewingco.com.
Tickets: $20, available in
advance from the website.
CAROLYN KASTER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Love this little bloom? Get your lotus flower fix at the Kenilworth gardens Saturday — it’s free.
Lotus and Water Lily Festival
Cherry blossoms are nice, but they’re not the only flowers worthy of a festival. The week-long
Lotus and Water Lily Festival at Kenilworth Park and Aquatic Gardens kicks off Saturday with
gardening workshops, lotus-tea tastings, dance performances, face painting and, of course,
blooming aquatic plants. Can’t get enough? The festival continues with garden tours
(Sunday), the annual Kids Day (Tuesday) and after-work paddling through the marshes
(Thursday).
Movies
Simians show
humans how
emotion’s done
in “War for the
Planet of the
Apes.” 24
TAYLOR BARNES/COURTESY OF DENIZENS
The brewpub Denizens,
above, is celebrating turning
3 by transforming into an
adults’ playground on
Saturday.
Stage
Colonial era-set
“The King and
I” is still
relevant. 14
The Van Pelt
Tickets: $12.
DC Zine Fest
Washington loves celebrating
France’s national holiday, and
July 14 falling on a Friday should
add extra joie de vivre to events
across town. Le Diplomate (1601
14th St. NW) opens early, at
10:30 a.m.; children can enjoy
face painting and a balloon
artist; adults get live accordion
music, mime performances,
special cocktails and a St.
Germaine slushy-making
machine on the sidewalk patio.
Chez Billy Sud (1035 31st St.
NW) is throwing an extended
happy hour with rosé on tap,
oysters on special and DJ Neville
C spinning French tunes from 5
to 9 p.m. The rooftop party at the
Bird (1337 11th St. NW) brings
$5 rosé and small plates, $8
cocktails and free birthday cake.
It sounds improbable that zines
(a.k.a. fanzines) could return to
popularity in this era of blogs,
Snapchat and tweetstorms, but
if vinyl and cassettes can return
to cultural relevance, let’s cross
our fingers and hope for the
best. More than 50 vendors will
sell their independently
produced zines of all stripes at
St. Stephen and the Incarnation
Episcopal Church in Columbia
Heights. Admission is free and
open to all, but if you want to
bring new reading material
home, keep things lo-fi and bring
cash.
When: Friday.
When: Thursday through
Saturday, July 22.
Where: Locations and times
vary.
Where: The John F. Kennedy
Center, 2700 F St. NW. kennedycenter.org.
Admission: Free.
Tickets: Prices vary, but many
shows are free.
When: Saturday from 10 a.m. to
4:30 p.m.
Where: St. Stephen and the
Incarnation Episcopal Church,
1525 Newton St. NW.
dczinefest.com.
Admission: Free.
— Fritz Hahn and Chris Richards
JULY 14, 2017
Where: DC9, 1940 Ninth St.
NW. dcnine.com.
The Kennedy Center crams an
absurd amount of laughs into the
three-day District of Comedy
festival. Highlights include Wyatt
Cenac bringing his New Yorkbased “Night Train” stand-up
showcase for a free performance;
Tituss Burgess and Jane
Krakowski stretching their
Broadway chops to front the
National Symphony Orchestra
Pops; and “Daily Show”
correspondents Roy Wood Jr.,
Ronny Chieng and Gina Yashere
performing stand-up. Throw in
podcast tapings with Michael Ian
Black and the editors of
Reductress, a performance by the
Improvised Shakespeare
Company, and free shows by local
comics, and you’ve got a very
funny, very busy weekend.
Bastille Day
. FRIDAY,
When: Thursday at 8:30 p.m.
District of Comedy
Festival
THE WASHINGTON POST
For indie-rock aficionados,
reliving one decade keeps
getting easier and easier. New
bands continue to emulate
obscure ’90s bands, while
obscure ’90s bands keep
reforming in hopes of reaching
new ears. The Van Pelt, a
jangling punk quartet that
disappeared in 1997 after two
poised albums, fall into the
latter category. You can hear
echoes of the Van Pelt in
Parquet Courts and Explosions
in the Sky, as well as a slew of
emo-revivalists — and now, after
a 20-year hiatus, you can hear
the real thing, too.
When: Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Where: Kenilworth Park and Aquatic Gardens, 1900 Anacostia Ave SE. go.nps.gov/lotus.
Admission: Free.
4
EZ
Plan Ahead
Noteworthy events over the next three weeks
July 21 Kendrick Lamar at
Verizon Center
July 24 WWE ‘Raw’ at Verizon
Center
Aug. 3 Trukfest at
the Phillips Collection
The days of getting lucky and snagging a
sneaky cheap ticket to see Kendrick Lamar
in the District are long gone. All that remain
for the hip-hop superstar’s show at Verizon
Center, with Travis Scott and D.R.A.M., are
“platinum” tickets, a variety of packages and
secondary-market seats. So if you want to
see the “Damn” tour, there’s no being
humble: You’re going to pay a pretty penny,
but there’s little chance you’ll leave the arena
feeling like you’ve been ripped off.
7:30 p.m. 601 F St. NW. verizoncenter.com.
Starting at $260.43.
Expect brooding banter, fistfuls of adrenaline
and plenty of pyrotechnics as professional
wrestling’s biggest stars start setting the
table for next month’s ‘Summerslam,” one of
the biggest events on the WWE calendar.
Former champions Roman Reigns and Seth
Rollins, as well as title contender Samoa Joe,
are scheduled to appear, so plan your signs
and chants accordingly.
7:30 p.m. 601 F St. NW. wwe.com. $20-$115.
For its monthly Phillips After
5 event in August, the
museum welcomes a
number of the District’s food
trucks, including CapMac,
Swizzler, Fava Pot and
Captain Cookie. Let that food
fuel your creativity, as visitors
can create collages inspired
by post-World War II German
artist Markus Lupertz, whose
exhibition runs through Sept.
3. Also on the menu: music
from eclectic funk group
Granny and the Boys.
5 to 8:30 p.m. 1600 21st St.
NW. phillipscollection.org. $10$12.
AMY HARRIS/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Aug. 3 ‘Narwhal: Revealing an
Arctic Legend’ opens at the
National Museum of Natural
History
We’re still a couple of years away from the
reopening of the museum’s centerpiece
dinosaur hall. Here to help tide us over: an
exhibition that dives deep into the icy waters
of the Arctic to reveal the worlds of the longtusked narwhal and the Inuit people whose
lives are connected to the marine mammal.
In addition to fossils, skulls and tusks, look
up to see the life-size model of the animal
swimming above the exhibition hall.
10th Street and Constitution Avenue NW.
naturalhistory.si.edu. Free.
— John Taylor
An untitled 2008 work by
Markus Lupertz. The
artist once said he aimed
to be “a painter without
responsibilities” —
beholden to art, not
history.
MARKUS LUPERTZ/GALERIE MICHAEL WERNER MARKISCH WILMERSDORF/
COPYRIGHT 2017 ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY/VG BILD-KUNST
Email: goingoutguide@washpost.com Telephone: 202-334-6808 Get listed: Our listings include events in the following categories: pop music, classical music, museums,
theater, dance, comedy and film. We accept events in the District; Montgomery, Prince George’s, Calvert, Charles and St. Mary’s counties in Maryland; and the area including
Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun and Prince William counties and the city of Alexandria in Virginia. If you’d like your event to be considered, please submit the event name, description, date, time, location
and price at events.washpost.com. Listings are subject to space restrictions. We cannot acknowledge every submission. Advertising: Ron Ulrich, ronald.ulrich@washpost.com, 202-334-5289
WEE K E ND
3701 Mount Vernon Ave.
Alexandria, VA • 703-549-7500
BROADWAY’S DEFINITIVE TONY®-WINNING MASTERPIECE
For entire schedule go to Birchmere.com
Find us on Facebook/Twitter!
Tix @ Ticketmaster.com 800-745-3000
Leigh Ann Larkin, Jon Peterson, Tommy McDowell and the 2017 company of
Roundabout Theatre Company’s CABARET. Photo © Joan Marcus
presents
“WILDLY IMAGINATIVE,
IMPECCABLY EXECUTED.”
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14, 2017
SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE
BEGINS NEXT WEEK!
July 18–August 20
Opera House
Jose Llana and Laura Michelle Kelly in Rodgers & Hammerstein’s The King and I. Photo by Matthew Murphy
TICKETS ON SALE NOW! KENNEDY-CENTER.ORG | (202) 467-4600
NOW THRU AUG. 6 | EISENHOWER THEATER
TICKETS ON SALE NOW! KENNEDY-CENTER.ORG | (202) 467-4600
Tickets also available at the Box Office. Groups call (202) 416-8400.
Theater at the Kennedy Center
is made possible by
Kennedy Center Theater
Season Sponsor
Major support for Musical Theater
at the Kennedy Center is provided by
KHAN
In Concert!
Fri. Nov. 24, 8 pm
Warner Theatre, Wash DC
Tix on sale Fri. 7/14 at 10am through Ticketmaster.com/800-745-3000
SOUTHSIDE JOHNNY & The Asbury Jukes
16 GARY PUCKETT & The Union Gap
July
15
THE ZOMBIES
17
19
For all other ticket-related customer service inquiries, call the Advance Sales Box Office at (202) 416-8540.
Theater at the Kennedy Center
is made possible by
Major support for Musical Theater
at the Kennedy Center is provided by
Kennedy Center Theater
Season Sponsor
Additional support is provided by The Blanche and Irving Laurie Foundation.
DON
DILEGO
FREDERICKS
SAWYER
w/Gabriel Wolfchild & The Northern Light, Haley Johnson
Jocelyn &
Arndt
ROGER CLYNE & THE PEACEMAKERS Chris
JEFFREY OSBORNE
21
23 PURE PRAIRIE LEAGUE
& ATLANTA RHYTHM SECTION
BILLY BRAGG
24
20
with
Tickets also available at the Box Office. Groups call (202) 416-8400.
For all other ticket-related customer service inquiries, call the Advance Sales Box Office at (202) 416-8540.
CHAKA
SONIA (from disappear fear)
Play
TOAD THE WET SPROCKET Beta
28,29
&30 THE BACON BROTHERS
31 NIKKI LANE Steelism
Aug 4 GORDON LIGHTFOOT
26&
27
The Birchmere presents…
The green pages.
FRIDAY
Aug 11,
8pm
Did you know? The Washington Post is printed using recycled fiber.
YOUSSOU
N’ DOUR
The Voice of Senegal
NF407 4x1
• Wash. DC
Tickets: gwutickets.com | 202.994.6800
Music
5
EZ
their summer
session
Dawkins
Show: Friday at Uptown Art House, 3412 Connecticut
Ave. NW. Show starts at 8 p.m.
facebook.com/otherfeels. $10 suggested donation.
F
CHAD BATKA
Steve Earle, whose new album,
“Outlaw,” resonates with
Waylon Jennings’s spirit.
Steve Earle
Show: With the Mastersons on
Tuesday at the Birchmere. Show
starts at 7:30 p.m.
703-549-7500. birchmere.com.
$59.50.
Kyp Malone appear on the funky
chill “Wily Kataso,” while Scissor
Sisters frontman Jake Shears
brings a glam pop explosion to
“Metemya.” Even with such a
diverse array of collaborators,
the album remains the singular
and persistent vision of Amadou
& Mariam.
The intimate atmosphere of
9:30 Club should be ideal for the
duo’s understated delivery and
subtle swaying.
— Christopher Kompanek
Simply calling Sydney’s Royal
Headache “garage punk” is an
affront to the band’s complexity.
Singer Shogun’s self-deprecating,
strained, soulful vocals over the
band’s melodious — and sometimes triumphant — riff-driven
rock makes them a tough group to
peg. Yes, punk would be applicable, but they certainly aren’t Poison Idea; and yes, garage might
also fit, but there is no retro pose
present. Royal Headache lives
very much in the present.
Their breakout 2011 self-titled
debut garnered them attention
that almost destroyed the group.
Shogun was “getting stressed out
by the shows and maybe the
attention,” he said in a 2015 Billboard interview. “I started to feel
a little bit pigeonholed.” The
band’s hiatus ended that same
year with the follow-up LP,
“High.” Although a more produced effort, “High” maintained
important facets of the group’s
spirit: a refusal to play by trite
genre rules, dedication to the DIY
ethos, and a lyrical focus on selfdenigration.
— Ambrose Nzams
HASSAN HAJJAJ
African-music trailblazers
Amadou & Mariam take their
appeal beyond borders.
JULY 14, 2017
Amadou and Mariam infuse
blues riffs and melodic pop
hooks into traditional Malian
music, creating rich sonic tapestries that are intensely joyful
while retaining the muted cool
of indie rock. The duo (a longmarried couple who are both
blind) are trailblazers charting a
new course for African music,
much like Fela Kuti did with
Afrobeat in the ’70s.
Their latest album, “Folila,”
features a number of guest performers that illustrates their
wide appeal. The eclectic singersongwriter Santigold is featured
on the opening track, “Dougou
Badia,” which matches highly
syncopated vocal phrasing with
a piercing guitar riff. TV on the
Radio’s Tunde Adebimpe and
Show: With the Rememberables
and Wildhoney on Friday at the
Black Cat. Doors open at 8 p.m.
202-667-4490. blackcatdc.com.
$15.
. FRIDAY,
— Mike Joyce
CINA M. NGUYEN
Show: With Redline Graffiti on
Thursday at 9:30 Club. Doors open
at 7 p.m.
202-265-0930. 930.com. $40.
Royal Headache
— Chris Richards
After crafting their songs long-distance, the Bethesda-born indie-pop band Dawkins will get to
play them together at an Uptown Art House concert.
Amadou & Mariam
ROYAL HEADACHE
Frontman Shogun lays soulful
vocals over his Aussie band’s
music, stretching the
boundaries of “garage punk.”
THE WASHINGTON POST
These days Steve Earle is feeling his age and then some. In the
liner notes accompanying his
new album, “So You Wannabe an
Outlaw,” the 62-year-old singersongwriter declares: “Hard times
out here in outlaw country,” before lamenting the recent deaths
of Merle Haggard, Leon Russell,
Guy Clark and Steve Young.
“I’ve been attending an awful
lot of funerals lately,” Earle adds,
“and maybe that, alone, explains
my sudden need to acknowledge
where I come from, to revisit the
solid foundation upon which I’ve
constructed this house of cards of
mine.” By that, he means mid-’70s
Nashville, “when the center of our
universe was Waylon Jennings.”
Dedicated to Jennings, who
died in 2002, “Outlaw” resonates
with his maverick spirit and Teletwang. But more important, Earle
and his longtime band, the
Dukes, prove that trying to go
home again isn’t necessarily a
fool’s errand or a retro diversion.
Beginning with the album’s footstomping title track, which features Willie Nelson, Earle conjures the fundamental thrust and
attitude of his renegade upbringing with fresh energy. Several
songs, in fact, wouldn’t sound out
of place on his 1986 breakthrough
album, the recently reissued
“Guitar Town.” Miranda Lambert
and other guests add some evocative touches.
Yet the combination of Earle
and the Dukes is enough to make
their upcoming show a sure bet,
laced with tunes that are boisterous (“Lookin’ For A Woman”),
soul-searching (“News From Colorado”) and poignantly heartfelt
(“Goodbye Michelangelo”).
or most teenage relationships, the hot
months between high school graduation
and the first day of college are lethal. The
friendships dim, the romances dissolve and
the garage bands almost always disintegrate. But
Dawkins — a group that took shape in the halls of
Bethesda’s Walt Whitman High School — found a
way to make it work on the digital plane. Guitaristkeyboardist Jack Jobst graduated from there in
2013, with vocalist-producer Will Guerry and guitarist Carson Lystad following in 2014. Since then,
the band has continued writing songs in ways that
weren’t imaginable in a previous era.
It works fast and slow. While attending farflung universities, the trio sketch out their musical ideas and send them to one another digitally,
sometimes in big Dropbox files, sometimes in
little voice memos recorded on their iPhones.
Then they tinker with the tunes and send them
around again. The way they describe it, it sounds a
lot like being in a band with your pen pals in the
cloud.
Guerry, Jobst and Lystad say that their longdistance song-crafting has made them more perceptive as collaborators — they encounter each
other’s proposals as listeners first, bandmates
second — and the complicated nature of the
process certainly might help to explain the softfocus intimacy of Dawkins’s new “Ep1,” a fivetrack proposition in which the architecture of the
songs feels slippery and psychedelic, but the
electronic timbres feel vivid and close.
Now, with everyone back home for the summer
— along with bassist Grayson Jobst, who is Jack’s
brother, and drummer Jordan Wolff stepping on
board for Dawkins’s live performances — they can
finally get these sounds out of the bandwidth and
into the air.
6
EZ
Music
PHOTOS FROM MERRIWEATHER POST PAVILION
HAVING NEIGHBORS OVER
Saturday’s a big party for Merriweather, where bands and fans feel at ease
BY
R UDI G REENBERG
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14, 2017
W
hen
Rockville-bred
band O.A.R. played
the main stage at
Merriweather Post Pavilion for the first time, in 2002,
they opened with “I Feel Home,”
which includes the lines, “I feel
home/ When I see the faces that
remember my own/ I feel home/
When I’m chillin’ outside with the
people I know.” Frontman Marc
Roberge can still see those faces
looking back at him.
“I’m looking out and there’s a
lot of people out there, but for
some reason, out of all these
people, I can see my mom and my
dad, my science teacher from
high school, my neighbor, the guy
I worked for at the golf course. It
was like looking out and every
character from ‘The Simpsons’ is
in there,” says Roberge, who often
went to the outdoor amphitheater with his bandmates as a
teenager to see Allman Brothers
Band and Phish shows. “It was
surreal to the point of comical,
like, we’re all in this one place.Can
you really believe this is happening? We’ve had multiple crazy
experiences there that continue
to make it a place of moments.”
For many music fans who grew
up (or currently live) in the greater Baltimore and Washington
If you go
Merriweather 50th
anniversary concert
With Jackson Browne, Willie
Nelson, Father John Misty
and Grace Potter. Saturday
at Merriweather Post
Pavilion. Show starts at
6 p.m.
410-715-5550.
merriweathermusic.com.
$55-$125.
A view of the Gehrydesigned amphitheater
Merriweather Post
Pavilion, in Columbia,
Md., which opened 50
years ago this week.
area, Merriweather continues to
be a place of memorable moments. The 18,000-capacity venue, nestled in the tree-lined
woods of Columbia, Md., and
designed by acclaimed architect
Frank Gehry, opened 50 years ago
Friday with a performance by the
National Symphony Orchestra.
Over time, Merriweather has
hosted huge names (a flier advertising the 1973 summer lineup
was so stacked — Pink Floyd!
Stevie Wonder! John Denver!
Miles Davis! — that it went, in
today’s terms, viral in February)
and has become one of the rare
noncorporate, non-cookie-cutter
venues renowned nationally by
fans and artists alike.
This weekend, Merriweather
celebrates its 50th birthday with
a concert headlined by Jackson
Browne and Willie Nelson, who
both have a history at the venue.
Rockville native Josh Tillman,
a.k.a. Father John Misty, will
open, and Grace Potter will host
and sing some songs.
“It’s a milestone, that place,”
says singer-guitarist Jason Isbell,
who headlined there last month.
“Most big sheds like that aren’t a
lot of fun to play, but this one
sounds fantastic and it looks really cool. It keeps getting better,
too.”
PAVILION CONTINUED ON 8
The Chrysalis, which will be the setting of concerts, movie
screenings and other events, officially opens next weekend.
Pavilion hatches a smaller stage
This season, Merriweather
Post Pavilion grew a second
stage. The Chrysalis, located in
the woods beyond the lawn, will
officially debut as a stand-alone
venue on July 22 with a show
from jammy bluegrass bands
Greensky Bluegrass and Leftover Salmon.
Part venue, part futuristiclooking neon-green sculpture
with a canopy built out of 7,700
aluminum tiles, the Chrysalis
sits within the site’s 36-acre
Symphony Woods and has a capacity of 7,000 people. It’s already hosted some festival sets,
community events and film
screenings. (The Chrysalis was
developed by nonprofit Inner
Arbor Trust.) But Greensky’s will
be the first ticketed show there, a
distinction not lost on the band’s
dobro player, Anders Beck.
“To play somewhere totally
new — not just new to us but
totally new, period, is exciting,”
says Beck, whose band made its
debut in the pavilion at the Merryland Music Festival last July.
“Who knows, maybe one day
we’ll be looking back and go, ‘Oh
man, that time when Greensky
opened the Chrysalis was the
coolest,’ because maybe 20 years
from now everyone will have
played that venue.”
— Rudi Greenberg
7
EZ
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8
EZ
Dining
Spike Mendelsohn’s tacos, at the judges’ table
BY
H OLLEY S IMMONS
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14, 2017
“Top Chef” alum Spike Mendelsohn has a stake in burgers
(Good Stuff Eatery), pizza (We,
the Pizza) and clandestine cocktails (the Sheppard, a speakeasy). Now he’s added tacos to
the list.
Santa Rosa Taqueria is the
chef’s latest concept, serving
casual Mexican food in the Capitol Hill space formerly occupied by Bearnaise, a defunct
steak frites joint.
Nachos, salads and Chipotleesque “casa bowls” — made with
beans, rice, pico de gallo and
your choice of meat — are available, although the menu is heaviest on tacos. Choose between
flour or corn tortillas and opt to
have yours the “Mexican way,” a
topping of radish, onion and cilantro.
The airy, two-story space can
easily cater to large groups, and
the $6 margaritas on tap encourage
lingering.
Bazooka-gumcolored
walls,
tacky plastic tablecloths and a
colorful mural screaming
“Hola!” create a festive, playful
vibe.
How did the tacos measure
up? We’re glad you asked, because we tried every single one.
Although the restaurant is
still ironing out its menu, the
generously portioned tacos deliver bold flavors and include
styles that will please vegetarians. Several tacos were overwhelmed by too much sauce,
and the fillings were often
eclipsed by the large shells; we
ripped off excess tortilla to
strike a better ratio. Still, they’re
worth trying, especially since
the hefty sizes make for a satisfying lunch at three for $10.
Here’s how all the tacos fared.
PAVILION FROM 6
Merriweather is in the third
year of a five-year, $55 million
renovation project that has added
a new box office, new concession
stands and bathrooms, a rotating
stage, a luxe backstage (complete
with two pools) and a new standalone venue (see sidebar). Before
next season, the pavilion’s roof
will be raised 20 feet to give fans
on the lawn a better view of the
stage.
The improvements come at a
time when Merriweather’s future
is bright. After years of concerns
that the venue would close or be
redesigned, ownership was transferred last winter from the How-
Carne asada
Kale con arroz
Barbacoa
Pulled pork carnitas
Mexican chorizo and cheese
Spicy fried shrimp
Al pastor
Baby bello
PHOTOS BY HOLLEY SIMMONSFOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Carne asada
The hunks of steak were tender, delicately seasoned and
topped with queso crumbles and
crema.
Kale con arroz
A bit on the bland side, this
leafy vegetable was almost undetectable. The taco was dominated
by its other fillings: rice, roasted
tomato salsa and queso.
five-chile mole, pickled red cabbage and a reasonable amount of
crema.
Pulled pork carnitas
This is among the favorites.
The taco with pulled pork carnitas — made with roasted tomatillo salsa and topped with sliced
jalapeños — is worth a try, though
ours was so oversaturated with
crema that it almost sprung a
tortilla leak.
ny fried egg with crispy edges.
Spicy fried shrimp
Despite the name, we didn’t
detect much heat on the breaded
shrimp. The mole verde did give
the dish a delicate, citrusy kick.
Pollo grillado
The juicy chicken breast was
drowned with crema, nearly undoing the meat’s proper preparation.
Barbacoa
Although it was dripping with
oil, the beef short rib was loaded
with fresh flavors, including a
Mexican chorizo and cheese
This was our favorite. The spicy
chorizo was tamed by a near-run-
Al pastor
The chunks of pork — topped
ard Hughes Corp. to the nonprofit
organization Downtown Columbia Arts and Culture Commission.
(In exchange, Hughes is developing part of what used to be the
venue’s main parking lots into a
new business, residential and retail core. (Merriweather attendees must now choose from a
series of free parking options
online before arriving.) I.M.P., the
production company that owns
the 9:30 Club and took over booking and operations at Merriweather in 2004, recently signed
a 40-year lease to continue running the venue.
Jean Parker has been a witness
to most of Merriweather’s changes. She saw her first concert ever
— the Beach Boys — at the venue
in 1972, started working there
part time in 1977 and took on a
full-time administrative job in
1983. By 1987, she’d become general manager, a role she’s held for
30 years.
“You could not build this venue
anywhere else and plop it down
among the natural environment
it sits in,” Parker says. “I think that
separates Merriweather from any
other venue in the country.”
Columbia resident Ian Kennedy helped launch the Save
Merriweather campaign in 2003,
when developers were threatening to shutter it. Now he’s executive director of the nonprofit that
owns the venue, and he attends
nearly every show, often riding
his bike from home after tucking
his kids into bed.
“Merriweather is the heart of
the community, and I think part
of that setting lends itself to this
feeling that you get in there,” he
says. “We have a sign that says,
‘Welcome to Merriweather Post,
make yourself at home.’ That is
the philosophy in a nutshell and
that is not going to change.”
For Roberge, whose band has
played the venue 16 times, Merriweather will always feel like
home. One of his most memorable performances was at 2015’s
“Dear Jerry” concert, the soldout, multi-artist tribute to the
Grateful Dead’s Jerry Garcia,
with a chili orange mole and
pineapple salsa — were so tough
that we gave up on this one
midway.
Roasted baby (porto)bello
mushrooms
This fungi-filled taco was the
best of the vegetarian options,
spiced with chile, cumin and paprika and loaded with rice,
Monterey Jack cheese, guacamole
and crema.
315 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. 202450-4800. santarosataqueria.
com.
goingoutguide@washpost.com
where O.A.R. covered “St. Stephen,” one of the Dead’s most
technically difficult songs.
“They’re gonna hate us if we
screw this up,” Roberge recalls
thinking. “Merriweather provided us with a pass — the fact that
we’d been through the ranks and
paid our dues. When we got up to
play that song, at that venue, we
felt like we belonged there, and
the crowd was so cool to us. It felt
like a huge accomplishment. And
I’ll always have that memory of
‘Dear Jerry.’ If we did ‘Dear Jerry’
at some other place it would have
felt like just another show. Instead, we felt like we were playing
in our house.”
rudi.greenberg@washpost.com
On the Town
9
EZ
Coffee snobs, rejoice: Blue Bottle is a steaming new option
BY
H OLLEY S IMMONS
In case a West Coaster you
know hasn’t already mentioned
it, Blue Bottle Coffee opened last
weekend in Georgetown.
The California-based cafe and
roaster, which also has locations
in Tokyo and New York, is beloved
for its fanatical commitment to
quality beans and precise brewing methods. Roasters at Blue
Bottle obsessively taste test coffee
daily to identify “peak flavor”; as
a pledge to freshness, all beans
are brewed and served within two
days of being roasted.
Though Georgetown has no
shortage of cool cafes (see: Baked
and Wired, Grace Street Coffee,
Crumbs & Whiskers), the opening
of Blue Bottle brings yet another
specialty coffee shop to Washing-
ton — joining the ranks of Vigilante Coffee, La Colombe, Qualia
Coffee, among others, and boosting the city’s overall coffee scene.
It also follows Blue Bottle’s
$20 million investment from venture capitalists in 2012, a move
that suggests the market is thirsty
for expertly brewed beans.
The new cafe — located at the
end of a cobblestone street with
an outdoor patio overlooking the
C&O Canal — is austerely decorated, wide open and massive
enough to do cartwheels in. A
huge window floods the space
with natural light and makes for
primo Instagrams of that cappuccino.
A few light bites and baked
goods such as English muffins
and oat bars round out a concise
drink menu, which includes the
It’s sweaty out, but that
probably won’t matter
to lovers of specialty
coffee. Blue Bottle, a
California coffee
brewer, has opened in
Georgetown.
HOLLEY SIMMONS/THE WASHINGTON POST
regular suspects: espresso, macchiato, cafe latte and a $4.75
cappuccino. Almond milk is available for a dollar surcharge.
A popular drink this summer is
likely to be the New Orleans-style
iced coffee ($4), cold brewed with
roasted chicory, cane sugar and
whole milk. It’s sweet without
being cloying and so creamy it
coats your tongue.
This is the company’s first location in Washington, with two
more planned for Union Market
and District Wharf.
1046 Potomac St. NW. Monday
to Friday and Sunday, 7 a.m. to
7 p.m., Saturday, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m.
bluebottlecoffee.com.
goingoutguide@washpost.com
An ice cream sandwich to cluck about
T IM C ARMAN
“PORTRAYED WITH TERRIFIC VERVE AND SNAPPY HUMOR.”
“A TIMELY, ALMOST REVOLUTIONARY WORK.”
- New York Times
- The Economist
TIM CARMAN/THE WASHINGTON POST
pens with cracklings: The fried (or
baked) skin is a concentrated blast
of flesh and fat, a flavor so porky it
borders on the obscene.
But is it good?
That’s a harder question to answer. Personally, I liked it. It’s like
the creamiest cream of chicken
soup, but in semisolid form. But I
suspect that, for many, this dessert
will be a game of chicken, and they
will be the first to swerve out of the
way.
$5. 501 G St. NW. 202-733-2612.
bantamking.com. The window is
open from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
tim.carman@washpost.com
“ROWDY FUN...DISPLAYS A STARTLING EROTIC EDGE”
- WASHINGTON POST
Just you wait, Henry Higgins...
JUST EXTENDED
THROUGH AUGUST 6!
BOOK AND LYRICS BY ALAN JAY LERNER
MUSIC BY FREDERICK LOEWE
DIRECTED BY ALAN SOUZA
Tickets/Info: olneytheatre.org
301.924.3400
WE’RE CLOSE BY! Just 10 min from the ICC, 30 min from DC, 15 min from Rockville and Columbia, and 40 min from Baltimore!
JULY 14, 2017
EXTENDED THRU AUG 6
BY JOHN STRAND
DIRECTED BY MOLLY SMITH
A CO-PRODUCTION WITH ASOLO REPERTORY THEATRE
AND PASADENA PLAYHOUSE
. FRIDAY,
Just. You. Wait.
THE WASHINGTON POST
Bantam King’s fried-chickenskin ice cream sandwich isn’t just
the latest dessert to incorporate a
savory ingredient. It’s a taunt to all
those treats that thought they
were so cool and adventurous for
adding crumbles of maple bacon.
“Ha! I laugh at your maple bacon, which is like adding candy to
dessert!” the sandwich seems to
mock. “Try mixing in crispy
lengths of chicken skin and actually promoting the ingredient to
diners who cringe at the thought
of snacking on animal skin.”
Yes, the ice cream sandwich is
something of an Andrew Zimmern dare, but not much. Not
really.
Bantam chef Katsuya Fukushima, who created the dessert based
on Moroccan bastilla, surrounds
the skin with so many other comforts that the fried bird epidermis
can get lost among the pileup of
ingredients. The ice cream sandwich is more literal than many of
its kind: A couple of scoops of
vanilla ice cream are sandwiched
in a toasted King’s Hawaiian bun,
a roll sweetened with a touch of
liquid sugar. The skin is scattered
atop the ice cream, and then the
whole sandwich is sprinkled with
powdered sugar, cinnamon and
kinako, a roasted soybean flour
often used as a garnish in Japanese desserts.
You’ll probably notice the skin’s
texture before its flavor: It adds a
brittle crackle to the sandwich, a
bite otherwise soft and creamy. But
should you hit a particularly rich
deposit of skin, the flavor will wallop you upside the head. It’s chicken
to the power of 10, which makes
sense, right? The same effect hap-
Will you bawk at
this dessert with
chicken skin in
it? It’s actually
pretty good.
Photo of Jade Wheeler and Edward Gero from Asolo Repertory by John Revisky.
BY
10
EZ
$20 Diner
Street shawarma in a strip mall
You may not find a
better $7 sandwich
than the one at this
surprisingly sleek shop
BY
T IM C ARMAN
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14, 2017
A
s I approach Shawarma
Guys from the parking
lot, I fear I’ve made a
mistake. The restaurant’s
logo looks too cutesy, too colorcoordinated, too corporate. My
concern only grows once I step
inside the Franconia shop: There
are electronic menus glowing
over the counters, and the interior has the clean, economical look
of a fast-casual restaurant designed for easy replication.
Needless to say, the $20 Diner
doesn’t do chains. Or at least not
many of them. Chains tend to be
above scrutiny. With their advertising budgets and sheer reach,
chains are immune to the praise
or needlings of a critic. Every
location has already been market-researched down to the last
household within a three-mile
radius. I prefer to save my calories and scribblings for the little
guys.
Well, turns out, the Shawarma
Guys are the little guys.
The shawarma/falafel shop
opened in the Festival at Manchester Lakes shopping center in
December 2015, the debut restaurant from Maseeh Es-Haq and
Mustapha Zeid. These brothersin-law make unlikely business
partners. Es-Haq, a native of Afghanistan, used to work in IT and
real estate, but food has long been
his passion. Zeid made his bones
in a different service industry
altogether: auto service, where he
still spends most of his work
hours.
Zeid, however, is the Lebanese
connection, the guy with the taste
buds conditioned to know when
the shawarma or hummus have
taken a horrible left turn. Still,
Es-Haq is the man in charge of
the kitchen, sort of Zeid’s emissary, even if the Afghan’s palate is
more attuned to the nuances of
rice, kebabs and mantu dumplings. Es-Haq clearly loves a challenge. Almost everything is made
in-house: the football-shaped
pita bread, the hummus, the
falafel, the kibbe, the fatayer meat
and cheese pies, even the carefully constructed towers of chicken
and beef/lamb used in the shawarma.
Not that you need more evidence, but Es-Haq is proof you
don’t have to be raised with a
cuisine to produce superb examples of it. If a diner makes smart
PHOTOS BY KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
TOP: Maseeh Es-Haq worked in IT and real estate before opening
Shawarma Guys with his business partner, Mustapha Zeid.
ABOVE: The beef and lamb shawarma in pita.
choices, Es-Haq’s shawarma
sandwiches are dense with interlocking flavors, almost impossible to separate without turning
your meal into a prospecting dig,
which is just daunting and distracting. This bite should be enjoyed fast and free of mind, as you
would on the sidewalks of Beirut
after a night of robust drinking.
With its counter service and
toppings bar, Shawarma Guys is a
reminder that Middle Eastern
street vendors may be the originators of fast-casual fare, these
quick-and-customizable snacks
that blow away the junk from
Western fast-food chains. This
strip mall shop allows you to
select your preferred shawarma
delivery system — pita, rice bowl
or salad — but the only logical
choice is the bread, fresh and
warm from the oven. Es-Haq has
developed a multigrain pita that
sounds precious but is actually
thin (so it won’t smother the
fillings), sturdy (so it can ferry the
fillings without bursting at the
seams) and flavorful (a filling’s
best friend).
My favorite construction is EsHaq’s pita spread with a thin
layer of hummus that’s infused
with tahini, garlic and lemon
juice. The hummus serves as your
de facto tarator sauce, the foundation of any respectable Lebanese shawarma. To this base, I’ll
add a secondary layer of toum, a
garlic sauce made with olive oil
and egg whites, which Es-Haq
whips into an airy, delicately pungent spread. From there, I’ll pile
in strips of the marinated-andgrilled meat, a halal mixture that
plays up the good, grassy flavors
of the lamb instead of the fatty
beef. After adding my preferred
toppings — pickles, sumac onions, a little lettuce and chopped
tomatoes — I’ll end up holding
what is, quite possibly, the finest
$6.95 sandwich in the DMV. In
fact, I wish I had one now.
The interesting thing is that
Es-Haq has smuggled a few Afghan flavors onto his Middle
Eastern menu. Instead of drizzling tahini on your shawarma,
you can opt for cilantro chutney
or spicy tomato chutney, both
built from recipes that Es-Haq
nicked from his mother. The cilantro sauce, in particular, adds a
fresh, almost bright note to the
shawarma, a cross-pollination
that doesn’t lead straight to basDINER CONTINUED ON 11
If you go
SHAWARMA GUYS
7011-C Manchester Blvd.,
Alexandria. 703-922-3665.
shawarmaguys.com.
Hours: 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. MondaySaturday; and 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Sunday.
Nearest Metro: FranconiaSpringfield, with a 1.3-mile trip to
the restaurant.
Prices: $2.95 to $4.49 for
appetizers and sides; $6.95 to
$8.95 for pita sandwiches, salads
and rice bowls.
More reviews from the $20 Diner:
The 10 best barbecue joints in the
D.C. area
These restaurants have the best
dim-sum dumplings in Washington
The $20 Diner’s 10 favorite
Chinese restaurants in the D.C.
area
Gus’s Fried Chicken is ‘world
famous’ for a reason
Ask Tom
Excerpts from Post Food Critic
Tom Sietsema’s online discussion
11
EZ
Q: We’re a group of six females
going out in the Maryland
suburbs (Bethesda, North
Bethesda, Rockville-ish areas) on
a Saturday night to celebrate one
of the ladies getting married.
We’re all over 30, so it’s not going
to be a raucous group, but we’d
like to have fun. I’m looking for
suggestions so that a vegan, a
vegetarian and a picky eater in
the bunch will all enjoy
themselves as well.
A: The freshly minted True Food
Kitchen in Bethesda should be at
the top of your list. It’s a chain
with a mindful, vegetableleaning menu, but also a
handsome setting, interesting
cocktails — pretty much
everything it sounds like your
group needs for a festive night
out.
Q: Relatives will be in town this
PHOTOS BY KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
DINER FROM 10
tardization. You can even wash
your sandwich down with the
chef’s Afghan-style tea, a combination of green and black teas
sweetened with sugar and honey. The drink was made for
shawarma (though obviously
not).
Should you prefer rice over
pita bread, the Himalayan basmati will be prepared Afghanstyle, a laborious process that
results in slender, aromatic
grains, each as separate as
blades of grass. Frankly, I preferred the rice over the falafel
that squatted atop the grains.
The fried chickpea-and-fava
balls were tasty enough, both
garlicky and herby, but their
shells could be hard nuts to
crack. Same with the underperforming kibbe, an economical
preparation that substitutes
walnuts for more expensive
pine nuts; these ground-beefand-bulgur croquettes were
fried to a toe-curling crunch.
The baba ghanouj is the highlight of the appetizers, a dip so
smoky and slammable you’ll
want to stock up on pita bread
to scoop it all up. The baklava is
one of the few items not made
in-house, but these flaky
squares are honeyed just
enough to take the salty edge off
the pistachio mixture. I’ll take
the baklava any day over the
house-made rice pudding, a jiggy mass flavored with vanilla
and sweetened to syrupy levels.
By the way, Es-Haq is not the
only creative one in his household. His wife, Saeda Siam, a
lawyer by profession, designed
the Shawarma Guys space, riffing off the existing coppercolored floor. Knowing the interior’s DIY roots, I now feel
sort of cruel for calling it corporate, but Es-Haq says the design
does hint at the shop’s ambitions. “We did kind of set it up
as a chain,” he says, “because
you never know what happens
in the future.”
tim.carman@washpost.com
weekend, and I’m looking for
recommendations for
restaurants. There will be two
kids (4-5 years old) in the group.
Both are very well behaved at
restaurants and fairly
adventurous eaters, except for
not liking spicy food. One adult
can’t eat seafood, but another
tends to eat pescatarian. We will
likely eat on the early side due to
the kids. Adult entrees $30 or
under are preferred. D.C. proper
or at least somewhere Metro- or
bus-accessible.
A: I’ve got the perfect spot for
you: Millie’s Spring Valley.
Although the restaurant serves
an abundance of fish, the menu
offers alternatives including a
fried chicken salad and steak
with fingerling potatoes, and the
nautical setting feels like a day at
the beach, replete with a fleet of
picnic tables and an ice cream
window outside.
Q: I moved back to the area after
Q: Ashby Inn or L’Auberge
Q: Do restaurant designers
Q: People often ask for
recommendations for good food
and family friendly restaurants
that are reasonably priced. Why
do you never recommend one of
the Great American
Restaurants? They have a range
of food choices and are all over
Northern Virginia (and one in
Gaithersburg). They are my
favorites, especially Coastal
Flats and Artie’s.
A: I was a huge fan of the locally
owned restaurants for years in
the early 2000s and plugged
them a lot, but I’ve been less
enamored of them recently, with
a few exceptions. Thanks for
reminding me to give them
another look-see.
realize how alienating high noise
levels in restaurants are to their
customers? There are a number
of places where the food and
service are fine, but you have to
shout to be heard and you
certainly can’t hear the specials
when they are recited. Would it
make any difference if we
pointed this out to the
management? We have crossed
those places off our list.
A: Yes! Yes! Restaurants need the
feedback. If enough customers
let them know they will be going
elsewhere for meals because they
can’t hear, at the very least the
establishments have a chance to
woo them back (by installing
soundproofing, turning down
the music, whatever).
Q: My wife and I have noticed
Q: Why did Ripple close?
A: In a few words, lack of
business, and despite good
the past few times we’ve dined at
upscale restaurants (in the
District but also abroad) that
Tom Sietsema hosts a weekly
Q&A on Wednesdays at 11 a.m. at
live.washingtonpost.com.
JULY 14, 2017
TOP: Falafel — fritters of chickpeas and fava beans — are
garlicky and herby, but are fried to an over-crisp shell. ABOVE:
Fatayer are bite-size pies that are available stuffed with meat,
cheese or spinach.
we’ve been seated at the back
corner of the restaurant. We’ve
wondered if there is a stigma for
being seated in the back, rather
then areas more in view of other
patrons. We’re in our early 30s
and are always smartly dressed
but are not the biggest spenders.
Are we reading too much into
this, or is there a reason we
would be seated at the back?
A: I think you’re reading too
much into the situation. How
could a restaurant predict your
spending habits, especially if
you’re “always smartly dressed,”
as you put it? Also, the backs of
some restaurants can be pretty
inviting. If you don’t like where
you’ve been led, you can always
ask for another table.
. FRIDAY,
Provencale: If you had to choose
one for a romantic dinner, which
would you pick?
A: Having been to the Ashby Inn
recently, and having enjoyed my
dinners there under the new
chef, I can vouch for the dining
destination in Paris, Va. My
favorite roost is the cozy
underground bar, by the way.
reviews.
On a more delicious note,
Ripple’s last chef, Ryan Ratino,
tells me he plans to open a place
of his own, Bresca, at 1906 14th
Street NW in September. He’ll be
weaving aspects of fine-dining
with a casual approach.
The Ohio native’s changing
menu will include dishes from
his youth (picture walleye pike)
as well as sea urchin linguine
with summer truffles. Bresca,
Ratino says, is Spanish for
honeycomb, its hexagon shape
evocative of strength, efficiency
and harmony. Bresca’s drinks
program will be created by the
esteemed Juan Coronado, late of
Barmini.
I, for one, can’t wait for the
place to open.
THE WASHINGTON POST
a 40-year absence. Now in search
of the best wings without driving
to Dinosaur BBQ in Baltimore
(my favorite place when I lived
up north).
A: My favorite chicken wings at
the moment are within easy
reach, at Johnny’s Half Shell in
Adams Morgan. The plump
grilled bites come with a cooling
Green Goddess dip that’s so
good, I could eat the spread by
itself.
DIXIE D. VEREEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Halibut with morels, peas, verjus, rhubarb and basil at the Ashby
Inn in Paris, Va. — a perfect destination for a romantic road trip.
12
On the Town
EZ
POP MUS IC
Prices listed where available
FRIDAY
MICHAEL MWENSO
& THE SHAKES
{Big band jazz
& swing}
Tonight!
FRI, JULY 14
NRBQ
{“Ridin’ in My Car,”
“Me and the Boys”}
Stand Up, Podcasts,
Sketch Comedy, Music & More!
SAT, JULY 15
GAELIC STORM
July 20–22
{Celtic folk rock}
with appearances by
THU, JULY 20
Jane Krakowski & Tituss Burgess with the National Symphony Orchestra Pops
The Daily Show Correspondents Tour with Roy Wood Jr.,
Ronny Chieng, and Gina Yashere  Louie Anderson  Puddles Pity Party
The Second City’s Almost Accurate to America: Divided We Stand
The Improvised Shakespeare Co.  Night Train with Wyatt Cenac
How to Be Amazing with Michael Ian Black  Judah Friedlander
Aparna Nancherla  Jo Firestone  Brandon Wardell
Boast Rattle with Kyle Ayers  Mortified  Reductress presents Mouth Time Live!
Leah Bonnema  Brittany Carney  Petey DeAbreu  Ryan Donahue
Chris Duffy  Sam Evans  Jared Freid  Violet Grey  Stavros Halkias
Benjy Himmelfarb  Jamel Johnson  Sean Joyce  Matty Litwack  Dylan Meyer
Joyelle Nicole  Molly Ruben-Long  Cerrome Russell  Paris Sashay
Chelsea Shorte  Justin Smith  Kasaun Wilson  Will Winner
Brightest Young Things presents The Bentzen Ball Podcast Studio
Underground Comedy
JOHN HAMMOND
{Songs from a blues icon}
THU, JULY 27
Hail! Hail! Rock ‘N’ Roll
A Live Tribute to
Chuck Berry
FRI, JULY 28
DAYMÉ AROCENA
{Cuban jazz & soul songstress}
BEN MILLER BAND Hill Country.
hillcountrywdc.com. 9:30 p.m. Free.
DARKEST HOUR, HAVOK AND GENOCIDE
PACT Rock & Roll Hotel.
rockandrollhoteldc.com. 9 p.m. $20. JAMES
TAYLOR, BONNIE RAITT Nationals Park.
atmlb.com/2v3I8Ik. 7 p.m. $55.50-$135.50.
LES NUBIANS, SAHEL The Hamilton.
thehamiltondc.com. 6:30 p.m. $20.75$25.75. MALI MUSIC The Howard Theatre.
thehowardtheatre.com. 8 p.m. $26.50-$65.
MARCUS JOHNSON Blues Alley.
bluesalley.com. 8 p.m. Through Sunday. $30$35. MICHAEL MWENSO & THE SHAKES
Amp by Strathmore. ampbystrathmore.com.
8 p.m. $20-$26. MY MORNING JACKET
Merriweather Post Pavilion.
merriweathermusic.com. 7 p.m. $46-$76.
RAEKWON, ALLAN KINGDOM The Fillmore.
fillmoresilverspring.com. 8 p.m. $25. ROYAL
HEADACHE, THE REMEMERABLES AND
WILDHONEY Black Cat. blackcatdc.com. 8
p.m. $15. RUSH PLUS & 1432 R U Street
Music Hall. ustreetmusichall.com. 10 p.m.
$5. THE MORRISON BROTHERS BAND,
THEM VIBES Gypsy Sally's. gypsysallys.com.
8:30 p.m. $15.
AMY BLACK Gypsy Sally's. gypsysallys.com.
8 p.m. $10-$12. BERES HAMMOND The
Howard Theatre. thehowardtheatre.com. 8
p.m. Through Wednesday. $39.50-$65.
COUNT VASELINE, TWO INCH ASTRONAUT
AND WESTERN STAR Black Cat.
blackcatdc.com. 7:30 p.m. $10.
DRAGONFORCE, ONCE HUMAN Rock &
Roll Hotel. rockandrollhoteldc.com. 8 p.m.
$25. EARTH, WIND & FIRE TRIBUTE BAND
Blues Alley. bluesalley.com. 8 p.m. $20. THE
CRANE WIVES Hill Country.
hillcountrywdc.com. 8:30 p.m. Free.
SATURDAY
WEDNESDAY
JACKSON BROWNE, WILLIE NELSON AND
FATHER JOHN MISTY Merriweather Post
Pavilion. merriweathermusic.com. 6 p.m.
$55-$125. MYLES PARRISH U Street Music
Hall. ustreetmusichall.com. 7 p.m. $15.
NERO, FEED ME AND NO MANA
Echostage. echostage.com. 9 p.m. $25-$35.
NIGHT BIRDS, THE LOVE SONGS AND
PSYCHIC SUBCREATURES DC9.
dcnine.com. 6:30 p.m. $10-$12. NIGHT
BIRDS, THE LOVE SONGS AND PSYCHIC
SUBCREATURES Blues Alley.
bluesalley.com. 6:30 p.m. $10-$12. NRBQ
Amp by Strathmore. ampbystrathmore.com.
8 p.m. $30-$40. RENT PARTY, THE
RADIOGRAPHERS AND COOL BABY Black
Cat. blackcatdc.com. 8 p.m. $12.
SOUTHSIDE JOHNNY & THE ASBURY
JUKES Birchmere. birchmere.com. 7:30 p.m.
$45. THE HIGHBALLERS Hill Country.
hillcountrywdc.com. 9:30 p.m. Free. TOWN
MOUNTAIN, I DRAW SLOW The Hamilton.
thehamiltondc.com. 8 p.m. $12-$17. ULTRA
NATÉ & LISA MOODY AND WAYNE DAVIS U
Street Music Hall. ustreetmusichall.com.
10:30 p.m. $10. WHITE FORD BRONCO
Rock & Roll Hotel. rockandrollhoteldc.com. 8
p.m. $25.
LOOK HOMEWARD Strathmore, Gudelsky
Gazebo. strathmore.org. 7 p.m. Free.
NESTOR TORRES Blues Alley.
bluesalley.com. 8 p.m. $25. ROD STEWART
WITH CYNDI LAUPER Jiffy Lube Live.
livenation.com. 7:30 p.m. $30-$399.
SAWYER FREDERICKS, GABRIEL
WOLFCHILD & THE NORTHERN LIGHT
AND HALEY JOHNSEN Birchmere.
birchmere.com. 7:30 p.m. $25. THE
NIGHTOWLS, THE XTET FEATURING ABBY
SCHAFFER Gypsy Sally's. gypsysallys.com. 8
p.m. $12-$14. ULTIMATE PAINTING, DOT
DASH DC9. dcnine.com. 9 p.m. $10-$12.
WHITEY MORGAN WITH COLTER WALL,
TONY MARTINEZ The Fillmore.
fillmoresilverspring.com. 8 p.m. $22-$77.
FRI, AUG 4
SUNDAY
AriHomeward
Shapiro
BLOODCLOT, NEGATIVE APPROACH DC9.
dcnine.com. 7:30 p.m. $18. GARY PUCKETT
& THE UNION GAP BAND Birchmere.
birchmere.com. 7:30 p.m. $35. KENNY
RITTENHOUSE Lubber Run Amphitheater.
{Of NPR & Pink Martini}
arlingtonarts.org. 6 p.m. Free. THE
KICKBACK Black Cat. blackcatdc.com. 7:30
p.m. $12-$15. VANS WARPED TOUR
Merriweather Post Pavilion.
merriweathermusic.com. 11 a.m. $29-$52.
ZAC BROWN BAND, DARRELL SCOTT Jiffy
Lube Live. livenation.com. 7 p.m. $175.
MONDAY
DAVE DETWILER & THE WHITE HOUSE
BAND Blues Alley. bluesalley.com. 8 p.m.
$20. GORILLAZ, VINCE STAPLES, DANNY
BROWN AND NO LAWN CHAIRS
Merriweather Post Pavilion.
merriweathermusic.com. 7:30 p.m. $49.25$199. THE ZOMBIES, DON DILEGO
Birchmere. birchmere.com. 7:30 p.m. $55.
TUESDAY
THURSDAY
AMADOU & MARIAM, REDLINE GRAFFITI
9:30 Club. 930.com. 7 p.m. $40. GAELIC
STORM Amp by Strathmore.
ampbystrathmore.com. 8 p.m. $40.
HILLSONG YOUNG AND FREE The Fillmore.
fillmoresilverspring.com. 7 p.m. $22.95$99.95. MOOGATU, LITZ Gypsy Sally's.
gypsysallys.com. 8:30 p.m. $10-$12.
PARTICLE The Hamilton.
thehamiltondc.com. 7:30 p.m. $12-$17.
PONCHO SANCHEZ Blues Alley.
bluesalley.com. 8 p.m. Through July 23. $50$55. ROGER CLYNE & THE
PEACEMAKERS AND JOCELYN & CHRIS
ARNDT Birchmere. birchmere.com. 7:30
p.m. $25. THE HIP ABDUCTION U Street
Sat, Aug 5
AMP & COMEDY ZONE PRESENT
Mike Storck
{HBO, The Bob and Tom Show}
Aparna Nancherla
Louie Anderson
THE WASHINGTON POST
Rob Maher
Thu, Aug 10
TICKETS ON SALE NOW!
KENNEDY-CENTER.ORG | (202) 467-4600
11810 Grand Park Ave, N. Bethesda, MD
Red Line–White Flint Metro
Tickets also available at the Box Office. Groups call (202) 416-8400.
For all other ticket-related customer service inquiries, call the Advance Sales Box Office at (202) 416-8540.
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14, 2017
Roy Wood Jr.
What! Still not getting home delivery?
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RICH POLK/GETTY IMAGES VIA BET
SF
Mali Music performs at Celebration of Gospel Live in Los Angeles.
The singer will put on a show at Howard Theatre on Friday.
13
On the Town
PG
Summer
Sale
# Sink
# Faucet
# Plumbing
# Hookup
INCLUDED!
Music Hall. ustreetmusichall.com. 6:30 p.m.
$15. THE MOODY BLUES Wolf Trap, Filene
Center. wolftrap.org. 8 p.m. $45-$115. THE
VAN PELT, POSITIVE NO AND WASHERS
DC9. dcnine.com. 9 p.m. $12. WYLDER,
SKOUT Black Cat. blackcatdc.com. 7:30 p.m.
$12.
TUESDAY
CHORALIS OFFERS SING-ALONG OF
MOZART, RUTTER The group performs
Mozart’s “Requiem” and Rutter’s “Gloria,”
with accompaniment by Grace Cho. The
audience is invited to participate. Score
rental is available for $5. Holy Trinity
Lutheran Church, 3022 Woodlawn Ave. Falls
Church. choralis.org. 7 p.m. $15.
C L A SSIC A L
Prices listed where available
COULD YOU
USE SOME
EXTRA CASH?
FRIDAY
NSO AND WOLF TRAP OPERA: PUCCINI'S
TOSCA The National Symphony Orchestra
and the Wolf Trap Opera perform Puccini’s
Tosca. Wolf Trap, 1635 Trap Rd., Vienna.
kennedy-center.org. 8:15 p.m. $25-$75.
SATURDAY
CANADIAN BRASS The brass
quintet performs classical, jazz and world
music including brass standards and
original arrangements. Dekelboum Theater,
Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center,
University of Maryland, 8270 Alumni Dr
College Park. theclarice.umd.edu. 8 p.m.
$25-$40.
NSO AT WOLF TRAP: THE TENORS The
three singers and the National Symphony
Orchestra perform. Wolf Trap, 1635 Trap Rd.,
Vienna. wolftrap.org. 8:15 p.m. $25-$100.
U.S. AIR FORCE BAND CONCERT An
outdoor performance featuring the Concert
Band and Singing Sergeants. 137 National
Plaza, National Harbor. usafband.af.mil. 7
p.m. Free.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
LISTEN LOCAL COMPOSERS CONCERT
Kensington Concerts presents a program
featuring the works of four local
composers: Sinae Kim’s “Five Variations on
Korean Hymn Tune” for flute, clarinet and
piano; Lawrence Ink’s “Le Reve” for flute
and “Sonata” for flute and clarinet; Rich
O’Meara’s “Island Spinning” for vibraphone
and marimba and Scott Pender’s “In the
Time Before” for flute, clarinet, violin, cello,
vibraphone and piano. A reception follows.
Kensington Baptist Church, 10100
Connecticut Ave., Kensington. 3 p.m. Free.
Suggested donation of $15.
ORGAN RECITAL Benjamin LaPrairie,
Associate Director of Music at the Basilica of
the National Shrine of the Immaculate
Conception presents an hour-long organ
recital. Basilica of the National Shrine of the
Immaculate Conception, 400 Michigan Ave
NE. nationalshrine.com. 6 p.m. Free.
ONLY
$
A0615 B 3x5
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Singers Bonnie Raitt and James Taylor are teaming up this summer
for concerts, including a performance Friday at Nationals Park.
14
EZ
On Stage
Getting to like
the original
‘King and I’
Content stricken from the 1951 show was restored
for modern relevance in Kennedy Center’s staging
BY
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14, 2017
I
G EOFFREY H IMES
n building a reputation over
the past 37 years as one of
America’s top stage directors, Bartlett Sher has directed plays by Shakespeare, Moliere, Ibsen, Tony Kushner, August Wilson and many more.
“But I believe Rodgers and Hammerstein are in the top five,” he
says. “They changed the art
form.”
Sher brings his 2015 Tony
Award-winning production of
Rodgers and Hammerstein’s
“The King and I” to the Kennedy
Center next week for a nearly
five-week run. About a third of
the final Lincoln Center Theatre
cast (including Jose Llana as
King Mongkut) are accompanying the show to Washington.
Sher, 58, is confident that the
show will resonate with today’s
audiences as much as it did when
it opened, in 1951.
“You have to admire Oscar
Hammerstein,” Sher says, “for
being attracted to a story about a
British single mother traveling to
a totally foreign culture when
that society was trapped between
its traditional history and its
growing export economy in a
time of colonialism. If you look at
the Mideast today, you see cultures trapped the same way and
wrestling with the same issues of
the status of women and a leader’s absolute power.”
Of course, Sher is quick to
point out, our attitudes about
other cultures have changed
quite a bit since 1951. In restaging the show, the director was
careful to avoid “Orientalism,”
the tendency to see foreign societies as strangely exotic and less
developed. The alterations he
had to make, however, had more
to do with casting and design
than with the script.
“Only two people in the 1951
cast were Asian,” he says. “We
would never do that now. In 1951,
the set design was a kind of
fantasia of what we thought the
Far East was like. Now we do
more research and try to be more
realistic. But the script itself was
solid.”
In fact, when Sher researched
Hammerstein’s manuscripts, he
discovered that the early versions were much franker about
politics and sexuality than the
versions used on Broadway and
in the 1956 movie. During the
1951 out-of-town tryouts, the
producers cut references to the
king’s relations with his dozens
of wives and to the way Siam’s
next-door neighbor Cambodia
was being colonized by France at
the time of the play’s action.
“I restored 50 to 60 lines,” Sher
reports. “Those lines give the
show more context. I restored a
line about the king wanting to
put a fence around Siam to
protect it from other countries,
and when he says it now, the
audience just erupts. There’s another line where the king complains that his newest wife Tuptim didn’t ‘honor’ him when they
were alone. Hammerstein knew
just what he was saying with that
line, and so do we today. Today’s
audiences are more comfortable
with that kind of sexual reference, and it enriches the play.”
The director had the full cooperation of the Richard Rodgers
Estate in making those restorations. Sher became good friends
with the late Mary Rodgers, the
composer’s daughter, after directing the original 2003 version
of her son Adam Guettel’s breakthrough musical “Light in the
Piazza.” In 2008, Sher strengthened those ties by winning a
MATTHEW MURPHY
Tony Award and a Drama Desk
Award for directing the hit revival of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s
“South Pacific.” He’s now working on Guettel’s new musical,
“Millions,” for Lincoln Center.
Any revival of “The King and
I,” of course, has to operate in the
shadow of the famous 1956 Hollywood film starring Yul Brynner
with his bald head and red
pajamas and Deborah Kerr with
her red curls and voluminous
skirts dancing through rooms
the size of airplane hangars.
Although the leads of the current
production, Llana and Laura Michelle Kelly, are better singers
and more nuanced actors, they
still have to compete with our
If you go
THE KING AND I
Kennedy Center Opera House,
2700 F St. NW. 202-467-4600.
kennedy-center.org.
Dates: Tuesday through Aug. 20.
Prices: $49-$159.
Laura Michelle Kelly and Jose
Llana in “The King and I.”
Director Bartlett Sher notes the
musical’s timelessness even in
2017: “If you look at the
Mideast today, you see cultures
trapped the same way and
wrestling with the same issues.”
movie memories of their charismatic predecessors.
“The ’56 film is actually quite
helpful in seeing the musical
now,” Sher insists. “They’re coming in already knowing something about the story itself. Because they’re not learning the
plot for the first time, they’re
more attentive to the smaller
details and the newer wrinkles.
They’ll see a story they already
know, but they’ll notice things
they never caught before. It’s the
same reason people go to see
‘Hamlet’ again and again.”
One thing that stands out
upon closer inspection is how
much the script raises expectaKING CONTINUED ON 15
15
EZ
RODGERS & HAMMERSTEIN'S A GRAND
NIGHT FOR SINGING A musical revue of
Broadway show tunes. NextStop Theatre
Company, 269 Sunset Park Dr., Herndon.
866-811-4111. NextStopTheatre.org. Opening
Thursday at 7:30 p.m. $40.
RODGERS & HAMMERSTEIN'S THE KING
AND I The Lincoln Center Theater’s
production, which won a Tony award for
best musical revival in 2015, is staged.
Kennedy Center, 2700 F St. NW. 202-4674600. kennedy-center.org . Opening Tuesday.
$49-$159.
TERESA D.C. theater group, Seventh Street
Playhouse, stages this play about Teresa of
Avila, a nun who must contend with a
church hierarchy, lusty friars and more as
she tries to open convents and get closer to
God. Greenbelt Arts Center, 123 Centerway,
Greenbelt. 301-441-8770.
greenbeltartscenter.org. Opening Friday at 8
p.m. $12-$22.
THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY
SPELLING BEE The McLean Community
Players present their summer musical
directed by Kevin and Pamela McCormack.
Vinson Hall Retirement Community,
Community Building Ballroom, 1735 Kirby
Road, McLean. McLeanPlayers.org. Opening
Friday at 8 p.m. $25.
THE DOVE A storytelling show featuring six
young Israeli and Palestinian storytellers
from Israel, Gaza and the West Bank.
Busboys and Poets, 1025 Fifth St. NW. 202387-7638. classy.org. Opening Thursday at
8:30 a.m. $5.
THE MARK OF CAIN Synetic Theater
presents the world premiere play centered
around Cain, civilization’s first criminal.
Synetic Theater, 1800 S. Bell St., Arlington.
866-811-4111. synetictheater.org. Opening
Wednesday. $35.
THINGS YOU SHOULDN'T SAY The
dragapella beautyshop quartet known as
the Kinsey Sicks take on politics, racism,
AIDS and more. Theater J, 1529 16th St.
NW. 202-777-3210. edcjcc.org/center-forarts/theater-j/. Opening Wednesday. $30$52. 202-518-9400.
THINK BEFORE YOU HOLLA Ally Theater
Company screens this compilation of true
stories that examine the roots of genderbased street harassment and how it affects
women’s psyches. Part of the Capital Fringe
Festival. Joe's Movement Emporium, 3309
Bunker Hill Rd. Mount Rainier. 301-6991819. joesmovement.org. Opening Saturday
at 8 p.m. $17.
THURGOOD A one-man play about the life
of Supreme Court Justice Thurgood
Marshall. Olney Theatre Center, 2001
Olney-Sandy Spring Rd., Olney. 301-9243400. olneytheatre.org/shows-a-events/
thurgood. Opening Wednesday. $45-$70.
KING FROM 14
STAN BAROUH
A reimagining of the musical “My Fair Lady” will be performed at the Olney Theatre Center through
July 23. Tickets to see Eliza Doolittle transform from a Cockney flower girl to a lady start at $38.
A L S O P L AY I NG
Prices are for the entire run of the
show; individual shows may vary.
OPENINGS
spends the summer in New York with her
grandmother, who’s running an illegal
speciality-undergarment boutique from her
apartment. Bowie Playhouse, 16500 White
Marsh Park Dr., Bowie. 301-464-4496.
bctheatre.com. Opening Friday at 8 p.m. $17$22.
NIGHT SEASONS Quotidian Theatre
Company presents Pulitzer Prize-winning
playwright Horton Foote’s play about a
matriarch who has outlived her husband
and daughter. The Writer's Center, 4508
Walsh St., Chevy Chase. 301-654-8664.
quotidiantheatre.org. Opening Friday. $15$30.
PASSING Set in the Harlem Renaissance,
the play explores themes of identity, race
and gender by Nileah Bell and Mary Nyingi
(Kukui Kikuyu Productions). Capital Fringe
Trinidad Theatre, 1358 Florida Ave., NE.
866-811-4111. capitalfringe.org. Opening
Saturday at 11 a.m. $17.
PINKALICIOUS THE MUSICAL Vital Theatre
Company performs the story of a girl who
turns bright pink after eating too many pink
cupcakes. Wolf Trap's Children's Theatre-inthe-Woods, 1551 Trap Road Vienna.
wolftrap.org. Opening Friday at 10:30 a.m.
$12.
STAGE CONTINUED ON 17
JULY 14, 2017
AN OCTOROON Playwright Branden JacobsJenkins’ riff on Dion Boucicault’s 19th
century melodrama. Woolly Mammoth
Theatre, 641 D St. NW. 202-393-3939.
woollymammoth.net. Opening Tuesday. $20$94.
AS YOU LIKE IT Shakespeare in the Park
presents an outdoor staging of the
Shakespeare comedy about lovers forced
into exile. Watkins Regional Park, 301
Watkins Park Dr., Upper Marlboro. 301-2186700. pgparks.com. Opening Thursday at
7:30 p.m. Free.
BON VOYAGE! A HAPPENSTANCE
ESCAPADE Two 19th century travelers
meet en route to Paris and take in the city’s
top sights, including the Moulin Rouge,
together. Round House Theatre, 4545 EastWest Hwy., Bethesda. 240-644-1100.
roundhousetheatre.org. Opening Friday. $26.
CARMEN Wordlessly reimagined, Synetic
co-founder Irina Tsikurishvili reprises the
title role in this newly adapted Synetic
classic. Recommended for ages 13 and
older for violence and adult themes. Synetic
Theater, 1800 S. Bell St., Arlington. 866811-4111. synetictheater.org. Opening
Wednesday at 7 p.m. $15-$35.
HORTON FOOTE'S NIGHT SEASONS The
elderly Josie celebrates her 93rd birthday,
and she begins to realize that her longevity
may be her life’s punishment. The Writer's
Center, 4508 Walsh St, Chevy Chase. 301654-8664. quotidiantheatre.org. Opening
Friday at 8 p.m. $15-$30.
MAGIC MEN LIVE! The stage production
inspired by films such as “Magic Mike” and
“Fifty Shades of Grey,” with dancing and
theatrical performances. Warner Theatre,
513 13th St. NW. 202-783-4000.
warnertheatredc.com. Opening Friday at 8
p.m. $20.
MAMMA MIA! Dance to ABBA’s greatest
hits during this feel-good musical. Wolf Trap,
Filene Center, 1551 Trap Rd. Vienna, Va.
22182. 703-255-1900. wolftrap.org.
Opening Tuesday at 8 p.m. $25-$75.
NANA’S NAUGHTY KNICKERS Katherine
DiSavino’s stage play about a girl who
BRAINY GIRL FOLLIES! The bar is turned
into a 1920s speakeasy with a burlesque
and comedy show with different
performances. Bier Baron Tavern, 1523
22nd St. NW. 202-293-1885.
inlovewithbier.com. Through Aug. 19.
BROKEN GLASS Arthur Miller’s
psychological drama, set in 1938 New York,
is about a woman who is inexplicably
paralyzed from the waist down after reading
about Kristallnacht (“The Night of Broken
Glass”) in the paper. Theater J, 1529 16th
St. NW. 202-777-3210. edcjcc.org. Through
Sunday. $13.50-$64.13.
BY THE SEASHORE A kid-friendly theatrical
journey to the beach through puppetry and
movement. The Lab at Convergence, 1819
N. Quaker Lane. Alexandria. 703-998-6260.
artsonthehorizon.org. Through July 29. $6.
CABARET A production of the Tony awardwinning musical by Roundabout Theatre
Company. Kennedy Center, 2700 F St. NW.
202-467-4600. kennedy-center.org. Through
Aug. 6. $59-$149.
CAPITAL FRINGE FESTIVAL 2017 The
festival celebrates its 12th year with drama,
dance, musical and physical performances
at the Logan Fringe Arts Space and other
venues. Logan Fringe Arts Space, 1358
Florida Ave. NE. capitalfringe.org. Through
July 30. Free-$25.
DIAL M FOR MURDER Sandy Spring
Theatre Group stages (and adds some new
scenes to) Frederick Knotts’ thriller, “Dial M
for Murder,” made famous by Alfred
Hitchcock. Arts Barn, 311 Kent Square Rd.,
Gaithersburg. 301-258-6394. wapo.st/
artsbarn. Through July 23. $12-$20.
FABULATION, OR THE RE-EDUCATION OF
UNDINE This summer production is
presented at the special performance
location of Gunston 2 and is produced in
partnership with Dominion Stage. Port City
Playhouse, Sleepy Hollow United Methodist
Church, 3435 Sleepy Hollow Road, Falls
. FRIDAY,
goingoutguide@washpost.com
ONGOING
THE WASHINGTON POST
tions and then dashes them.
In almost every stage musical, a flirtation in an early
scene must lead to marriage
or at least romance in the
final scene. But the flirtation
between the King and Anna
remains unresolved at the
end. Similarly, the illicit romance between Tuptim and
Lun Tha, the man who delivers her as a gift from the king
of Burma, is ultimately
thwarted — even if Anna
saves Tuptim from a flogging.
And yet no one is left unchanged by the encounter
between the British schoolteacher and the Siamese
court.
“The most important quality of a Rodgers and Hammerstein show,” Sher says, “is
how much the characters
learn and how much they
change. Anna has that problem of the West: We think we
always know better, but she
learns she can’t always apply
her values to this other culture, because they don’t always fit. She realizes that her
involvement with Tuptim is
an inappropriate intrusion
into the culture. Meanwhile,
the King doesn’t change as
much as Anna wants, but he
changes enough to do something no other ruler in the
region accomplishes: he resists colonialism, and Siam
remains independent.”
None of this would matter
as much as it does if the
dialogue didn’t occasionally
burst into song, lifted on the
wings of Richard Rodgers’s
indelible melodies. There’s a
reason that songs such as “I
Whistle a Happy Tune,” “Hello, Young Lovers,” “Getting to
Know You,” “Something Wonderful” and “Shall We
Dance?” are still sung outside
the confines of the show.
They boast choruses you can
hum the day after the show
and rhythms that fit the
words like gloves. You don’t
find such tunefulness in
many modern musicals, Sher
argues. The success of “Hamilton,” he adds, is due as much
to its tunefulness as to its
hip-hop innovations.
“Songs are an exaggerated
form of speech,” Sher says. “If
you’ve done as much Shakespeare as I have, you’re used
to the dialogue changing
when it moves from prose to
poetry; the language becomes more intense, more
emotional, more elevated.
The same thing happens in
Rodgers and Hammerstein
when the shows move from
dialogue to song.”
16
EZ
B FEATURED LISTING B
The Washington
Ballet’s
The Nutcracker
Tickets On Sale Today!
November 30December 24
Set in 1882 Georgetown, this gorgeous
production showcases the grandeur of
The Washington Ballet’s international
roster of dancers and the majestic
Tchaikovsky score. TWB’s The
Nutcracker has become a tradition for
generations of family and friends to
celebrate the holidays.
The Warner Theatre
513 13th St. NW
Washington, DC 20004
202.397.SEAT (7328)
Get more information at
washingtonballet.org and
ticketmaster.com
Tickets
priced for
everyone,
starting at
$33
“Simply
gorgeous!”
~The
Washington
Post
THEATRE
The 25th Annual
Putnam County
Spelling Bee
July 14-30
Fri. & Sat. at 8 pm
Matinees on July 16, 23,
and 30 at 2 pm
Presented by the McLean
Community Players
Ticket info:
McLeanPlayers.org
Directed by
Corey Latta Bales
L.E. Nichols adaptation of
A Little Princess
An Octoroon
By
Branden Jacobs-Jenkins
July 7, 8, 14, 21 @ 8 pm
July 9, 15, 16, 22, 23 @
2 pm
July 18-August 6, 2017
Joseph and the
Amazing Technicolor
June 15 - August 27
Dreamcoat
By: Horton Foote
July 14 – August 13
Fri/Sat at 8, Sun at 2
Added Sat Matinee at
2 on August 12
Famed playwright Horton Foote framed
his darkly humorous lyrical family drama
around Josie’s 93rd birthday. Having
outlived her husband and daughter, Josie
begins to realize her longevity may be her
punishment.
NVTA One-Act Plays
July 14, 15 @
7:00; 22 @ 1:00pm;
Awards 7/23 @ 6pm
Three nights of different one-act plays.
Open adjudication by local reviewers and
theatre professionals.
Night Seasons
Oblivion
Now through August 6
“The Second City's
Almost Accurate
Guide to America:
Divided We Stand”
Now Through
August 13!
Thurgood
Begins next week!
Starring HBO’s
The Wire’s
Brian Anthony Wilson
Wed. – Sat. @ 7:45pm
Wed., Sat., Sun., @
1:45pm
Tue-Fri at 8
Sat at 6 & 9
Sun at 3 & 7
Written by Carly Mensch (Orange is the
New Black), this comedy about family
was called "smart, sassy, and rewarding"
by The New York Times.
Who better to comment on the state of
our nation than the comedians who mock
it best? The Second City returns for
another summer of uproarious
irreverence. You may think you know
America, but if the last year has taught us
anything, it's that there are many different
Americas to get to know.
Not an originalist, Supreme Court Justice
Thurgood Marshall was an activist first
and then a jurist. Meet the late Justice in
this solo performance that recounts his
dramatic rise from humble roots to the
highest court in the land. From law school
at Howard to Brown v. Board of Edu., his
story is delivered with warmth and humor.
Vinson Hall Retirement
Community
Community Building
Ballroom
1735 Kirby Rd.
McLean, VA 22101
Aldersgate Church
Community Theater
1301 Collingwood Rd.
Alexandria, VA 22308
Woolly Mammoth Theatre Co.
641 D Street NW
202-393-3939,
woollymammoth.net
Toby’s Dinner Theatre
of Columbia
410.730.8311
Tobysdinnertheatre.com
The Writer’s Center
4508 Walsh Street
Bethesda, MD 20815
301-816-1023
www.quotidiantheatre.org
Online:
http//:www.brownpaper
tickets.com/event/2737669
James Lee Community Ctr
2855 Annandale Road
Falls Church, VA 22042
(703) 615-6626
RRUUC Fireside Room
6301 River Rd, Bethesda
www.unexpectedstage.org
301-337-8290
$23-$25
Opens
Tonight!
www.acct
online.org
for details
“MasochisticRegular ally brilliant.”
Tickets
start at $35 - Washington
City Paper
"sensational
Call for
tickets and ensemble...
talent"
information stunning
-TheatreBloom
$10 - $15
$30;$25
Senior;
$15
Fridays
30&under;
$15
Student
Featuring Jane
Squirer Bruns
and Carolyn
Kashner in a
cast of eleven.
Directed by
Jack Sbarbori
$15 Gen; ZemfiraStage
$10 Stu/Sr @gmail.com
$10-$27.50
Free student
& teacher
tickets!
301-337-8290
Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
kennedy-center.org
or call (202) 467-4600
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
Recommended
for age
16 and up.
Olney Theatre Center
2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Rd
301-924-3400
Olneytheatre.org
Discounts
available for
students,
Tickets
start at $45 groups,
seniors, and
military.
MUSIC - CONCERTS
Airmen of Note
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14, 2017
By Carly Mensch
THE WASHINGTON POST
Winner of the Tony and the Drama Desk
Awards for Best Book, The 25th Annual
Putnam County Spelling Bee has
charmed audiences across the country.
It features a fast-paced, wildly funny and
touching book by Rachel Sheinkin and a
truly fresh and vibrant score by William
Finn.
Based on the classic story by Frances
Hodgson Burnett of a young girl with
a fortune won, lost and reacquired in
London in the 1890’s. Family friendly!
An Obie-winning riff on a 19th century
melodrama that is part period satire, part
meta-theatrical middle finger, challenging
the racial pigeonholing of 1859—and today.
Bring the entire family to this Old Testament story of Joseph, his brothers and
his amazing coat as it comes to vibrant
life through uplifting song and dance.
24th Bach Festival
at Georgetown’s
Grace Church
Fri, July 21, 7:30 p.m.
Sat, July 22, 7 p.m.
Tues, July 25, 8 p.m.
Fri. July 14, 7:30 p.m.
Sun. July 16, 1:30 p.m.
Join us as we celebrate the 100th
birthdays of jazz luminaries Ella
Fitzgerald, Thelonious Monk, Tadd
Dameron, Dizzy Gillespie and Buddy
Rich!
July 21: AF Memorial
July 22: National Harbor
Plaza Stage
July 25: U.S. Capitol (west)
Outdoor concerts subject to
cancellation. View our
Facebook & Twitter for
concert cancellation status
All perf.
FREE, no
tickets
required
Friday, July 14 Yuri Liberzon, Guitar and
Piotr Pakhomkin, Guitar
Sunday, July 16 Lawrence Molinaro,
Organ and Joseph Regan, Tenor
Grace Church
1041 Wisconsin Avenue, NW
in Georgetown
202-333-7100
www.gracedc.org
$25 per
person per
concert,
students
$10 per
person per
concert
w/valid ID.
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
www.usaf
band.af.mil
“Grace Church
offers one of
Washington’s
supreme concert series, its
annual Bach
Festival.”-TWP
16-2898
On Stage
STAGE FROM 15
Church. info@portcityplayhouse.org. Through
July 22. $18-$20.
JUNIE B. JONES IS NOT A CROOK
Adventure Theatre presents a play based on
the children’s books by Barbara Park. Glen
Echo Park, 7300 MacArthur Blvd., Glen
Echo. 301-320-1400. adventuretheatremtc.org. Through Aug. 14. $19.50.
LADY DAY AT EMERSON’S BAR AND
GRILL Anacostia Playhouse presents Lanie
Robertson’s play about Billie Holiday’s life.
Anacostia Playhouse, 2020 Shannon Pl. SE.
202-290-2328. anacostiaplayhouse.org.
Through Aug. 6. $30-$40.
MY FAIR LADY Alan Souza directs an
intimate reimagining of the musical in
which Henry Higgins teaches flower-seller
Eliza Doolittle how to speak like a member
of the elite. Olney Theatre Center, 2001
Olney-Sandy Spring Rd., Olney. 301-9243400. olneytheatre.org. Through July 23.
$38-$80.
NIGHT SEASONS Quotidian Theatre
Company presents Pulitzer Prize-winning
playwright Horton Foote’s play about a
matriarch who has outlived her husband
and daughter. The Writer's Center, 4508
Walsh St, Chevy Chase. 301-654-8664.
quotidiantheatre.org. Through Aug. 13. $15$30. 301-816-1023.
ONCE UPON A MATTRESS The Newtowne
Players stage the Broadway musical about
a cursed king who’s queen has taken
control of his kingdom. Three Notch
Theatre, 21744 S. Coral Dr. Lexington Park.
301-737-5447. newtowneplayers.org.
Through July 30. $13-$18.
PERFORMING THE BORDER Washington
artists Clay Dunklin, Amy Lin, Susana Raab,
Jenny Wu and the Street Light Circus lead a
performance that explores the concept of
borders and boundaries. American
University Museum at the Katzen Arts
Center, 4400 Massachusetts Ave NW. 202885-1300. american.edu. Through Aug. 13.
¡RATÓN EN MOVIMIENTO! A bilingual
version of “Mouse on the Move,” a
production about two adventurous mice
and their worldly adventures. Imagination
Stage, 4908 Auburn Ave., Bethesda. 301280-1660. imaginationstage.org. Through
July 30. $14.
THE HAPPIEST PLACE ON EARTH A oneman show from Philip Dawkin about a
family’s quest to Disneyland after suffering
a tragedy. The Hub Theatre, 9431 Silver
King Court. Fairfax. thehubtheatre.org.
Through July 30. $22.
THE ORIGINALIST Helen Hayes Awardwinner Edward Gero returns as the late
Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.
Stage, 1101 Sixth St. SW. 202-488-3300.
arenastage.org. Through July 30. $41-$101.
THE REGULARS A young black woman
navigates the D.C. dating scene and
encounters a group of drinking buddies who
interfere with her first date. Capital Fringe
Trinidad Theatre, 1358 Florida Ave., NE.
866-811-4111. Through July 21.
THE WIZARD OF OZ The Puppet Co.
presents a puppet show closely based on L.
Frank Baum’s story. Glen Echo Park, 7300
MacArthur Blvd., Glen Echo. 301-320-1400.
thepuppetco.org. Through July 23. $12.
OBLIVION A comedy about a pair of secular
Brooklynite parents coming to terms with
their daughter’s decision to become a
Christian. River Road Unitarian Universalist
Congregation, 6301 River Rd., Bethesda.
301-229-0400. Through Aug. 6. $10.
WE FOUND THE WILD THINGS Who What
Where Theater presents Andrew Reid’s
coming-of-age play about seven friends and
seven New Year’s Eves in their hometown.
DC Arts Center, 2438 18th Street NW. 202462-7833. whowhatwheretheaterco.org.
Through Sunday. $10-$15.
WIG OUT! A play about African American
drag ball culture. Studio Theatre, 1501 14th
St. NW. 202-332-3300. studiotheatre.org.
Through Aug. 6. $20-$62.
WONDERLAND: ALICE'S ROCK & ROLL
ADVENTURE The Lewis Carroll classic gets
a modern musical update featuring a battle
of the bands competition with the
Jabberwocky. Imagination Stage, 4908
Auburn Ave., Bethesda. 301-280-1660.
imaginationstage.org. Through Aug. 13. $12$30.
COMEDY
BITCH SESH LIVE “The Real Housewives”
comedy podcast live. 9:30 Club, 815 V St.
NW. 202-265-0930. 930.com/event/
1465859-bitch-sesh-live-washington. Sunday
at 2 p.m. $39.50.
COMEDY CORNUCOPIA FOR FREAKS AND
WEIRDOS Experimental comedy group, The
Ex-Wives Club, blends comedy formats and
styles for a unique show. The Fridge D.C.,
516 Eighth St. SE. 202-664-4151.
thefridgedc.com. Thursday at 8 p.m. Free.
IMPROV POP-UP SHOW Improv groups
Sistine Robot and Reina perform their
summer show. Colony Club, 3118 Georgia
AVE NW. 202-722-7202. colonyclubdc.com.
Friday at 8 p.m. Free.
MATT KAZAM The performer brings his
one-man comedy show straight from the
Las Vegas strip to the local area. State
Theatre, 220 N. Washington St. Falls
Church. 703-237-0300.
thestatetheatre.com/events/
e1950.xml?_offset=8&_order=1. Friday at 7
p.m. $22-$27.
SUMMER SCHOOL Washington Improv
Theater’s five-week improv series of
ensembles and guest performers, centered
around “Yearbook,” a John Hughes-inspired
show with a soundtrack from the ’80s and
’90s. Source Theatre, 1835 14th St. NW.
202-204-7800. witdc.org. Friday. Through
Aug. 6. $12-$30.
THE DOLLOP History buff and podcast star
Dave Anthony reads unknown stories from
American history to fellow comedian Gareth
Reynolds. Merriweather Post Pavilion,
10475 Little Patuxent Pkwy., Columbia. 410715-5550. 930.com. Friday at 8 p.m. $20.
THE SECOND CITY'S ALMOST ACCURATE
GUIDE TO AMERICA: DIVIDED WE STAND
The Chicago-based sketch theater and
improv ensemble uses the latest election
as comedic fodder in its latest production.
Kennedy Center, 2700 F St. NW. 202-4674600. kennedy-center.org. Friday. Through
Aug. 13. $49-$69.
TIM AND ERIC The satire duo of Tim
Heidecker and Eric Wareheim celebrate 10
17
EZ
years of comedy with new material. Lincoln
Theatre, 1215 U St. NW. 202-888-0050.
930.com. Tuesday at 7 p.m. Through
Wednesday. $45. Both shows 7 p.m.
DANCE
CAPITOL TAP A tap-dance program from a
group of young and up-and-coming
Washington performers. Dance Place, 3225
Eighth St. NE. 202-269-1600.
danceplace.org. Saturday at 8 p.m. Through
Sunday. $15-$30.
COMPANY DANZANTE The contemporary
repertory dance company features the
work of its directors Katherine Horrigan
and Arturo Garcia. Lubber Run
Amphitheater, North 2nd and North
Columbus Streets, Arlington, Virginia
22203. 703-228-1850. arlingtonarts.org.
Friday at 8 p.m. Free.
DANCE EXCHANGE: STORIES FROM THE
FIELD Now in its 40th season, the Takoma
Park community studio presents “Stories
from the Field: Organizing Artists for
Change,” a program of interactive
performances that center on the junction
between art and social change. Dance
Exchange, 7117 Maple Ave. Takoma Park.
301-270-6700. danceexchange.org. Friday at
7:30 p.m.
AFLIGHT Jane Franklin Dance tackles
stories of relocation and migration in this
production for the Capital Fringe Festival.
Elstad Auditorium — Gallaudet University,
800 Florida Avenue NE. janefranklin.com.
Friday at 5:15 p.m. Through July 20. $20.
MUSIC - CONCERTS
Russian Festival
Concert
Sunsets with a
Soundtrack
Concert Band and
Army Voices
Sunsets with a
Soundtrack
Annual Alumni
Concert
Sat., July 22 at 7:30 pm
The Balalaika and Domra Association of
America presents a magical evening of
Russian and Eastern European music,
song, and dance—featuring a 100-piece
orchestra of Russian folk instruments
Tonight!
Friday, July 14
8:00 p.m.
The U.S. Army Concert Band and Army
Voices perform with special guest
conductor, Prof. Gary Hill of Arizona State
University! All concerts are free and open
to the public. BYO lawn chair. Series:
Most Fridays June 2-Aug 25 at 8:00 p.m.
(No show 8/18)
Next week!
Friday, July 21
8:00 p.m.
This annual tradition, The U.S. Army
Band "Pershing's Own" welcomes
alumni to join the band to play an evening
of crowd-loving musical gems. All
concerts are free and open to the public.
BYO lawn chair. Series: Most Fridays
June 2-Aug 25 at 8:00 p.m.
(No show 8/18)
Tonight at 8:15
Puccini's fiery diva is trapped between
her allegiance to her rebel lover and a
treacherous police chief who will stop at
nothing to possess her. The explosive
conflict between these three comes to a
hair-raising conclusion in one of opera's
most popular, suspenseful, and
unforgettable dramas.
Rachel M. Schlesinger
Concert Hall
3001 North Beauregard St.
Alexandria, VA
Tickets: www.bdaa.com
West Side of U.S. Capitol
Washington, DC
usarmyband.com
facebook.com/usarmyband
youtube.com/usarmyband
West Side of U.S. Capitol
Washington, DC
usarmyband.com
facebook.com/usarmyband
youtube.com/usarmyband
$30
adults
$25
seniors
$20
students
$5 children
Information
and
group sales:
404-374-2350
Free!
No tickets
required!
Weather call:
usarmy
band.com or
FB for info.
Free!
No tickets
required!
Weather call:
usarmy
band.com or
FB for info.
OPERA
NSO at Wolf Trap:
Grant Gershon,
conductor /
Wolf Trap Opera:
Puccini's “Tosca”
NSO at Wolf Trap
Wolf Trap National Park for
the Performing Arts
1551 Trap Road,
Vienna, Virginia
wolftrap.org
1 (877) WOLFTRAP.
Tickets
also
available
at the
Filene
Center
Box Office
Orange is the
New Barack
Fridays & Saturdays
at 7:30pm
A musical, political satire.
We put the MOCK in Democracy!
www.capsteps.com | Info: 202.312.1555
$36
West End Landmark
2301 M Street NW
(entrance on 23rd Street)
202-534-1907
www.landmarktheatres.com/
washington-d-c/west-endcinema
$9.50$12.50
Discounts available for groups
of 10+. Call:
202-312-1427
FILMS EVENTS
Marie Curie.
The Courage
of Knowledge
From 7/14
A fascinating tale of a real wonder
woman, the first to receive the Nobel
Prize and the only one to win it twice.
A legendary Polish scientist who was
ahead of her time.
www.
societyfilms.
org
AUDITIONS
Written by Alfred Uhry
Directed by Jim Howard
3 actors needed:
1 woman (southern accent, 60+)
1 man (southern accent, 40+)
1 man (African American, 60+)
Little Theatre of Alexandria
600 Wolfe Street,
Alexandria, VA 22314
www.thelittletheatre.com
See website for further
details.
NA
Please bring
current
headshot (if
you have one),
resume, and
accurate
conflict list.
JULY 14, 2017
Driving Miss Daisy
Sat, July 15 starting
@ 2pm;
Sun, July 16 starting
@ 7pm
. FRIDAY,
Ronald Reagan Building
1300 Pennsylvania Ave, NW
Tix available at 202.397.SEAT
ticketmaster.com
THE WASHINGTON POST
COMEDY
18
EZ
From the Cover
scraping the
bottom shelf
BY T IM C ARMAN
AND F RITZ H AHN
W
hen you’re knocking back cold bottles of
Miller High Life at a dive bar, the place
should feel as if time stood still somewhere
in the 20th century. It might be 1947 or it might be 1977.
It doesn’t matter. What matters is the temporal
disorientation of the space: You shouldn’t know what
decade it is until you walk outside and spot the first
late-model Japanese import.¶ Dive bars have some age
on them, and they don’t always carry their years
gracefully. The tabletop jukebox may be more booth
ornament than functioning sound system. The pool
table may have transitioned into a makeshift communal table. The bartender may be so old-school that if
you ask for a mezcal, he’ll hunt for a bottle with a worm
in it.¶ As we did this year with our list of America’s
most authentic dive bars, here, we sought out only the
Washington-area spots that fit our working definition:
Dives must have history. They must have regulars.
They cannot be expensive. They cannot have craft
cocktails.¶ Any place that opened after 2000, we
At the Raven, a dive bar in the Northwest neighborhood of Mount Pleasant, Gretchen Georgiadis serves the house s
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY, JULY 14, 2017
decided, did not qualify for dive status. A minimum age
requirement disqualified a few places from the start,
Raven Grill
including the Pug (opened in 2007), Red Derby (also
3125 Mount Pleasant St. NW.
202-387-8411.
2007) and Bravo Bar (2014). But even a once bona fide
dive, such as the Hawk & Dove on Capitol Hill, can lose
its credentials when a new owner decides to drag a bar,
kicking and screaming, into the 21st century. A dive bar
does not serve a chopped kale salad with shaved
pecorino.¶ The bars that made our list are so divey that
some didn’t even return our phone calls and emails for
background information. A true dive doesn’t care
about self-promotion.
tim.carman@washpost.com
fritz.hahn@washpost.com
Years ago, Gretchen Georgiadis
was putting in 80-hour workweeks as managing partner of a
local Bertucci’s. She was burned
out, or something close to it. Her
refuge was the Raven Grill, a
dimly lit watering hole with no
food (other than bagged chips)
but with plenty of spirits and
bar-stool therapy. She was a regular for a dozen years — until one
day when the owner approached
her.
“It just happens that the current
owner wanted me to come on” as
general manger, says Georgiadis.
She’s held the title now for nearly
eight years. She can also be found
mixing drinks behind the bar.
Over the course of its 80-plusyear history, the Raven Grill has
had something of a split personality. It once served a simple
menu — pickled eggs, 15-cent
cheeseburgers, basic pub grub —
but the kitchen was 86’d at least
a half century ago, Georgiadis
says. Some days, newcomers
still wander in, looking for a bite
to eat.
The bar has a martini glass
designed into its neon sign out
front, even though the Raven
doesn’t serve the Rat Pack staple.
Even the clientele has something
of a split personality: During the
week, the old-timers and Mount
Pleasant regulars will drop by for
a cold one. On Friday and Saturday nights, the millennials and
the curiosity seekers will stop by,
some looking to check off a box on
their dive-bar list.
Mount Pleasant has changed a
lot since Georgiadis started frequenting the Raven. Home prices
and rents have soared so high
that she moved to Glover Park.
“It’s cheaper to live north of
Georgetown,” she says. And yet:
The Raven has resisted all pressure to cater to the new wealth of
the neighborhood. The bar still
has no draft beer, no craft cocktails, not even a soda gun.
“A beer and a shot is probably
what we do most of,” Georgiadis
says.
Founded: 1935.
Decor: Nonoperative tabletop
jukeboxes. Framed portraits of
Jimi, Elvis, Dylan and other entertainment icons. Nicotinestained walls. Classic movies on
the TV. A boomer-era curio shop.
Signature drink: A shot of
Jameson with a can of Natty Boh.
19
EZ
Players Lounge
2737 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave. SE.
202-574-1331.
Michael Gregory sits at the bar,
still in his dress shirt and tie,
taking the edge off his day with a
glass of vodka and cranberry juice
cocktail. Game 5 of the NBA Finals is about to begin, and he has
a prime seat in front of a TV that
sits on an empty cooler behind
the bar. Before tip-off, a few more
patrons wander in, ready to
watch the Golden State Warriors
and Cleveland Cavaliers square
off one last time in the series.
Michael and his girlfriend, Janet Austin, are regulars, or at least
regular enough to know employees by name, even the private
nickname that some customers
have for a bartender who’s slow
with the drink refills. Michael
likes good food. He likes a good
stiff drink. He likes to debate with
fellow customers over the merits
of each player on the Cavs and
Warriors. The snark and informality make Players Lounge feel
more like a living room than a bar.
Players, near the neighborhood of Congress Heights in
Southeast, has assumed numerous identities since it was founded in 1972 by Stephen and
Georgene Thompson. The business launched as a strip club, says
manager Angela Thompson,
daughter of the owners. But Ward
8 politicos, including the late
Marion Barry, convinced the
Thompsons that adopting a
wholesome persona would make
the lounge more attractive for
campaign fundraisers.
“We found it more profitable
without doing the stripping,” Angela Thompson says.
At various times in its history,
Players has also served as a pool
hall (upstairs only), a TV repair
shop and a T-shirt store. More
than a decade ago, the Thompsons launched a catering business, which still serves up soulfood classics until 8:30 p.m. daily
at the bar. The owners have slowly
been renovating the interior and
exterior of their lounge, hoping to
attract concertgoers and basketball fans alike who will soon flock
to Ward 8 for the new sports and
entertainment complex, set to
open next year.
But for now, Michael, Janet and
all the other regulars are glued to
the TV, watching LeBron James
and the Cavaliers lose the NBA
title to the Warriors. Before the
game is over, the couple call it a
night. It’s nearing 10 p.m., and they
have to work in the morning. On
the sidewalk, they walk hand-inhand outside a bar that they may
not recognize in a couple of years.
Founded: 1972.
Decor: Mirrors, booths with
Michelob-branded Tiffany lamps
hanging overhead, party and holiday decorations. A party room
from the 1980s.
Signature drink: Patron margarita, Sex on the Beach.
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE
ANDRE CHUNG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
special: Jameson Irish Whiskey with Natty Boh. It’s the closest drink you’re getting to a craft cocktail.
THE WASHINGTON POST
TIM CARMAN/THE WASHINGTON POST
The Players Lounge, near Congress Heights, used to be a strip club.
. FRIDAY, JULY 14, 2017
ANDRE CHUNG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Regulars at the Raven, whose walls are graced with portraits of rock greats.
20
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From the Cover
FROM PREVIOUS PAGE
Dan’s Cafe
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14, 2017
2315 18th St. NW. 202-265-0299.
Dan’s used to be open seven
days a week in the 1980s, back
when Adams Morgan was a
neighborhood known for its ethnic diversity, not for chef-driven
restaurants and condo developments, recalls Tracy Dickens. He
should know: Dickens is not only
a native of the neighborhood, but
his father, Clinnie Dickens, has
owned Dan’s since 1965, when he
bought the bar from its founder, a
guy named (you guessed it) Dan.
Dan’s is now open Thursdays,
Fridays and Saturdays only, a
concession to the octogenarian
owner, who can still be found at
the end of the bar, eating chips
and directing traffic. Tracy, 53,
has worked, off and on, for his dad
since the early 1980s. From his
perch behind the bar, Tracy has
watched Adams Morgan assume
countless personas while Dan’s
has held down the same drab
storefront on 18th Street NW, a
spot so anonymous that many
still walk right by it. He’s witnessed the nightlife, the lowlifes,
the developers, the drunks, the
jumbo-slice wars.
The Dickens men, father and
son, form the nucleus of Dan’s.
Their experience and their struggles give the place its dive-bar
gravitas, a leathery mettle that
can withstand any assault on it,
even the impeccably dressed professionals who walk in and sing
along with Whitney Houston and
other jukebox divas. “That’s Celine,” says Tracy, as calm as a
Sunday morning. “I know her
voice.”
The regulars know what to
expect at Dan’s: cheap beer and
drinks served in plastic squeeze
bottles, an ingenious delivery system that triggers innocent memories of diner condiments and sippy cups. All squeeze-bottle drinks
require a $5 deposit, so you’re not
tempted to walk off with the
container. But what can you order
for your adult spill-proof bottle?
“Anything you want,” Tracy says.
Founded: Circa the 1940s.
Decor: A broken-tile bar, mismatched chairs, a covered pool
table, dusty hanging fake plants.
A fern bar gone to seed.
Signature drink: Squeeze-bottle cocktails.
Hideaway
6421 Old Alexandria Ferry Rd.,
Clinton. 301-856-1158.
hideawayclinton.com.
Few bar names are as apt as the
Hideaway: Tucked away in a
Prince George’s County industrial
park amid auto body shops and
taekwondo studios, across a dark
slip of road from the anonymous
fence surrounding Joint Base Andrews, the Hideaway is a place
where you probably won’t be
found if you don’t want to be.
On the other hand, if you’ve
made your way to a seat at the bar,
you’ve made an effort to be there.
Hideaway has that “everybody
knows everybody” vibe, from the
way longtime regulars greet Mr.
Ernie, an octogenarian who holds
court at the end of the bar, to how
they welcome the pool sharks
with cue stick cases slung over
their shoulders, who are waiting
to play on one of the four tables.
Monday is league night, when
50 to 60 members of the American Poolplayers Association gather, grabbing drinks and eating
popcorn shrimp or teriyaki wings
at the bar between games, and
alternately cheering for and razzing other players. “It’s a social
event,” says William Poindexter of
Brandywine, a real estate developer who helped found the league
in 2012. “It’s competitive, but everyone’s here to have fun.”
Rows of trophies, plaques and
photos commemorating trips to
national tournaments from Las
Vegas to Charlotte show just how
competitive it can be.
Many of the league’s players
come back during the week to
practice on the $1 coin-operated
tables. Poindexter understands
why: “The beer’s cheap, they’ve
got a good chef and it’s a good
location: Andrews is right outside.” He’s proud of the tables, too,
which are topped with blue felt: “I
redo them every six months. For a
dive bar, they’re good as s---.”
Founded: “Best I can tell, it was
1981,” says manager Renee Ketter,
whose father purchased the bar
in 2009.
Decor: American Legion hall
crossed with 1970s finished basement. The walls are covered with
knotty pine panels, and “at some
point, they covered part of the
walls with carpet,” Ketter says. “I
don’t know why.” The dance floor
is parquet; most of the banquetstyle chairs and tables sit on
industrial carpet.
Signature Drink: Domestic beer
poured into tall 22-ounce glasses.
Hank Dietle’s
PHOTOS BY MICHAEL S. WILLIAMSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
11010 Rockville Pike, Rockville.
301-881-8711.
Brittany Good, top, rings up a tab at the Hideaway, a dive in a strip
mall in Clinton, Md. Far from serving pain-inducing grease bombs,
this dive gets cheers for its food, such as the battered shrimp.
The temperature outside hovers in the mid-70s, but inside
Hank Dietle’s, it feels like a sauna.
It smells like a latrine, too. A
couple of fans move the hot air
around, providing not a single
cool breeze in the process. The
smart ones are drinking beer on
the front porch, which hasn’t
changed much since 1916, when
Dietle’s was known as Offutt’s, a
general store situated on the oldest road in Montgomery County.
James, a former Marine, sits at
the end of the bar, apparently
oblivious to the creature discomforts. James is leathery and muscular, still sporting a military-style
buzz cut. He’s wearing a Justin
Hayward Band concert T-shirt and
working his way through a pack of
L&M menthol cigarettes and a
pitcher of beer. He likes it when
Dietle’s is slow. The pool table is
always available, and he can play
whatever he wants on the jukebox.
Besides, when Dietle’s is dead,
James takes it upon himself to
serve as the bar’s guardian angel,
watching over Marcia, a bartender who’s pulling yet another double shift. She looks to be the only
employee in the place, although
she seems unfazed by the situation. She’s sitting in a wicker captain’s stool, her feet propped up on
the counter, reading her phone
and looking as tough as Hillary
Clinton on a military plane.
As the oldest bar in Montgomery County — its Class D beer-andwine license was the first issued
after Prohibition — Dietle’s has
outlasted some tumultuous times.
It survived the opening of White
Flint Mall (now all but a memory).
It survived the construction of the
Metro Red Line (whose workers
apparently drank at Dietle’s when
their shift ended). It survived a
coldblooded murder in the bar’s
parking lot in 1972. And it’s surviving the craft cocktail movement.
These days, on Saturdays, Dietle’s showcases rockabilly bands, a
throwback sound at a throwback
roadhouse. One of the ensembles
apparently purchased a microwave for the bar, which is strange,
because Dietle’s doesn’t offer food
(although the Corned Beef King
truck is often parked outside). The
microwave, says James, is not for
customers, but for the staff. The
musicians wanted to make sure the
employees could feed themselves,
so Dietle’s can continue feeding
regulars a slice of Rockville history.
Founded: 1916.
Decor: Tile floor, old wooden
booths with rigid backs, wooden
walls decorated with framed pho-
21
EZ
PHOTOS BY MICHAEL S. WILLIAMSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
TOP: Manager Ken Choudhary and bartender Michelle
Malashevich at Forest Inn in Arlington. ABOVE: Mac and Deborah
Fisher, regulars there for a combined 50 years.
Forest Inn
5849 Washington Blvd., Arlington.
703-536-7660.
Velvet Lounge
915 U St. NW. 202-462-3213.
velvetloungedc.com.
Downtown Saloon
7 N. King St., Leesburg. 703-6693090. facebook.com/Downtown
Saloon.
On a Thursday night, you can
spot the Downtown Saloon from
a block away: Look for a row of
Harleys and other bikes lined up
in the middle of historic Lees-
JULY 14, 2017
If you’re walking down U Street,
it’s hard to tell what’s going on at
the Velvet Lounge. You’ll probably
hear the thump of a DJ mix or the
roar of a punk band. But good luck
trying to peek through the enormous front windows, which are
plastered with stickers: bands
you’ve definitely never heard of
(or even heard), graffiti art on
shipping labels, promos for local
websites and events.
Velvet, which turned 20 in May,
. FRIDAY,
Arlingtonians know the pain of
losing a neighborhood bar: Jay’s
Saloon served its last frosty mug
in 2015, joining Whitey’s and the
Royal Lee in the pantheon of local
hangouts that now exist only as
memories.
The Forest Inn in Westover is
one of the survivors. Narinder
Sharma purchased the bar in 1982,
when it was called the Black Forest
Inn and located just up the block.
Construction of the “new” post
office displaced the Forest Inn in
1994, when it moved to a funky
little L-shaped storefront with a
long, empty hallway leading to the
bar and seating area. It’s simple,
with beige walls and the glow of
year-round Christmas lights.
Sharma’s business partner,
Ken Choudhary, who manages
the bar, remembers when it catered to construction and landscaping crews. “We used to open
at 7 in the morning to let people
get their crew together and drink
coffee,” he says. “Some of them
were drinking beer, but they’d
come back and have a beer at
lunch, then they’d come back for
happy hour. . . . Now you will see
this neighborhood is much more
federal-government people, or
young people with good tech
jobs.” A few years ago, the Forest
Inn changed its hours to reflect
burg, facing the 19th-century
courthouse. Inside, the pervasive
scent of cigarette smoke hangs in
the air — the Downtown Saloon
meets requirements for a smoking-ban exemption — and Led
Zeppelin, Queen and other classic
rock plays over loudspeakers.
Vintage Harley Davidson lampshades cast light down toward the
nicked-up wooden bar. Through a
set of doors is a game room with
pool tables and leather benches
along the walls.
Thursday is Bike Night, when
groups of riders — some wearing
vests emblazoned with motorcycle club patches, others with saltand-pepper hair pulled back into
ponytails — take over long tables
to down $3 domestic drafts and
plates of all-you-can-eat ribs, or
order burgers topped with chili
and cheese. Framed posters of
Eric Clapton and Janis Joplin
hang on the walls, along with
images of Marlon Brando from
“The Wild One,” a Donald Trump
sign, antique pistols and the Confederate battle flag of the Eighth
Virginia Infantry, which was
mustered in Leesburg in 1861.
A large banner on the back wall
announces that “Downtown Saloon Supports Our Troops!,” and
the bar backs it up with fundraisers and motorcycle rides in support of veterans’ charities. “All
veterans are welcome here,” says
owner Scott Warner, who served
in the Army. “Someone’s got to
keep them in mind.”
Warner took over the bar in
2000, after its previous occupant,
Payne’s Biker Bar, lost its liquor
license, and reopened it in early
2001. (He wasn’t a regular, he says,
but as a Harley rider, he did stop
in.) Some people still refer to the
Downtown Saloon as “Payne’s,”
but Warner, 58, isn’t bothered by
it: “It’s just a name. It’s was
Payne’s since ’64, so you ain’t
going to change that overnight.”
Downtown Saloon’s T-shirts still
reference the old slogan from
Payne’s, referring to the courthouse: “Better off here than across
the street.”
Karaoke takes over on Fridays,
and blues and rock bands perform Saturdays. The biggest
change over the years, Warner
says, is the composition of the
crowds who park their bikes outside: “Once upon a time, for Harley riders, it was more of a lifestyle. It was a workingman thing.
You fixed your own ride. It was
your transportation. Now, it’s
more of a hobby.”
Founded: In the 1960s, as
Payne’s Bike Bar. Reopened as
Downtown Saloon in 2001.
Decor: Southern roadhouse,
with plenty of neon beer signs
and band photos.
Signature drink: American
whiskey and domestic drafts. The
bar pours craft beer, including
locals Flying Dog and Lost Rhino,
but it’s not as popular with the
regulars.
THE WASHINGTON POST
to collages, arcade games and a
jukebox. A roadhouse with a
sense of history.
Signature drink: None.
the changing demographics,
opening at 9 a.m. and staying
open until 2 a.m., which brings “a
younger crowd,” as does Friday
night karaoke.
Despite the influx, the Forest
Inn maintains strong local ties:
“All of the staff — [bartender] Linda [Theodore] and the other ladies
— grew up in this area,” Choudhary
boasts. “All of the staff went to
Washington and Lee, Yorktown or
Wakefield” high schools. Sometimes, he says, newer residents
don’t get to know “the old Arlington people.” But the bartenders are
helping forge local connections.
Founded: In the 1970s. Moved
to its current building in 1994.
Decor: Beige. Two of the 11
tables are occupied by whirring
box fans. A fake Christmas tree
stands year-round and is decorated for different holidays, such as a
green plastic derby for St. Patrick’s Day and a sparkling Uncle
Sam top hat on July 4.
Signature drink: A cold Budweiser, which was, for years, the only
beer on tap. (There are now four.)
started as the District’s upstart
music venue, a place for indie and
punk bands who weren’t big
enough to get booked at the Black
Cat or 9:30 Club. It became known
for experimental noise acts and
raw garage rock, as well as door
policies that included selling tickets for cash on the day of the show
only. The downstairs bar, dimly lit
and lacking of furniture, was the
rowdy dive part of the business.
Although live music is Velvet’s
bread and butter — it continues to
host 18-and-over shows, mostly
Wednesday through Sunday —
Velvet hosted two of the city’s
most influential dance parties.
Bob Mould and Richard Morel’s
Blowoff,
an
unpretentious
monthly night of indie rock and
house, started in 2003 and eventually moved to the 9:30 Club.
Dava Nada’s Moombahton Mondays introduced the District to
that genre’s funky sound, which
remixes house music down to the
pace of reggaeton, at packed
weekly events in the summer of
2010. Both drew very different
crowds than, say, stoner rock
bands upstairs, but that was the
point, says Ashley May, who started hanging out at Velvet Lounge
in 2002 and bartended there from
2007 until last year.
“What’s special about the
crowd is that it has changed 10
times over through the years, but
it’s always amazing to me what all
those varying subcultures and
demographics had in common,”
she says. “They were all choosing
to be in a bar so dimly lit you
could barely see who was next to
you, and so crowded that that
person was likely spilling/
breathing/moshing/grinding on
you. People from all walks of
DMV life love that about the
place — they go there to get lost
and cut loose.”
Founded: 1997.
Decor: It’s like a blank canvas
for graffiti artists and music lovers: Almost every surface in the
first-floor bar — walls, tables,
ceilings, doors — has been tagged,
except the bar itself. (Maybe it has
been, but if so, it’s too dark to see.)
The patio out back — again, covered with stickers and graffiti —
consists of a tall fence around a
narrow strip of pavement and
looks more like a holding pen
than a beer garden.
Signature drink: While the bar’s
iconic neon sign depicts a martini
glass, the bar serves many more
cans of PBR and shots of whiskey.
22
EZ
From the Cover
Why it’s not a dive
Why it is a dive
It’s hard to hold misfortune
against a place, but that’s exactly
what I’m going to do.
Before a fire smoked out the
Tune Inn in 2011, the bar was a
classic D.C. dive, a watering hole
that felt seedy, claustrophobic
and, with all the taxidermied
critters staring down at you,
slightly threatening. On Capitol
Hill, where politicians keep a
constant eye on their enemies old
and new, the Tune Inn used to feel
like the after-hours version of
Congress: a place where it wasn’t
always easy to separate the hunters from the hunted.
But when the owners refurbished the place, removing the
drop ceiling, revealing a skylight,
and adding retro-hip booths, the
Tune Inn became the Georgetown
boutique version of its former
self. The edge was gone. The bar
added more draft lines, including
a craft beer or two. During a
recent visit, I spotted bottles of
Campari, Johnnie Walker Red
and Black labels, even Belvedere
vodka — which markets itself as
“luxury.” Patrons at the old Tune
Inn would have thrown that vodka at the nearest tourist in a fanny
pack.
Then there’s the Internet jukebox and the two dudes who were
controlling it one night with an
app on their phone. They
punched in Billy Joel’s “Uptown
Girl,” which is about as divey as a
Ladurée macaron. They ostensibly played the tune for the grayhaired men at the end of the bar,
but the longer Joel crooned about
his girl “living in her white bread
world,” the more I thought the
young guys were just mocking the
old-timers.
You know, maybe there’s hope
for the Tune Inn after all.
First, a caveat: I’m a regular at
the Tune Inn, to the point where
the bartenders grab me a beer
(Natty Boh) and a shot (Jim
Beam) before I have a chance to
sit down. (That’s a courtesy extended to all regulars, of which
there are many.)
Now let’s be honest, the only
reason we’re having this discussion is because of the June 2011
fire. When the Tune Inn reopened, five months later, it was
lighter and cleaner, and you could
get craft beers on tap.
What didn’t change is the Tune
Inn’s soul: people such as the late
Captain James, a former Marine
who held court and told stories at
the front of the bar, or the mix of
politicos and military veterans,
tourists and off-duty cops, all
watching the Nats game and
chowing down on jalapeño poppers and mozzarella sticks. Interns huddle in groups and crank
pop music on the jukebox.
Service is by turns efficient and
nonexistent, the chatter is loud,
and I’ve seen bartenders vault the
bar to separate customers who’ve
had a few drinks. It’s also probably
the only watering hole on the Hill
without a cocktail menu, and definitely the only one with chandeliers made of deer antlers.
Guy Fieri featured the deepfried burger and other bar food on
“Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives” in
2010, and I still wince at the “Guy’s
favorite!” logos next to particular
items on the menu. But I figure
that we’re three blocks from the
Capitol, and there are bound to be
tourists who heard about the
place from “Triple D.” If their
dinner visits subsidize my $3.50
beers and show them that Washington isn’t as stuffy or pretentious as they’ve heard, so be it.
FRITZ HAHN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Capitol Hill’s Tune Inn, shown in 2011, when it reopened after a polarizing refurbishment.
Tune Inn: Shiny sellout or steadfast?
T
he Tune Inn has dive bar cred in spades: Opened on Capitol Hill in 1947 and
currently owned by the third generation of the Nardelli family, the Tune
Inn starts serving breakfast and cold beers daily at 8 a.m. Old signs and
taxidermied animals — most shot or trapped by the Nardellis — cover the walls,
most notably a few mounted deer behinds. And yet there’s some debate in our office
about whether the Tune Inn counts as a dive bar these days. Here’s our
point-counterpoint. Tune Inn, 331 Pennsylvania Ave. SE.
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14, 2017
— Tim Carman
No
admittance
Tell someone that you don’t
consider their favorite watering
hole a “dive bar” and you might
have a fight on your hands. Why is
there so much power in the word
“dive”? Is it really that much
cooler to brag about hanging out
in a dive instead of enjoying a
solid neighborhood bar with
good food and affordable drinks?
Here are some local bars that
are frequently called dive bars,
along with our justifications for
why they’re not, in fact, dives. Yet.
The Big Hunt: More than 30
beers on tap, none of them Bud or
Miller. 1345 Connecticut Ave. NW.
— Fritz Hahn
Bravo Bar: It has the soul of a
dive, but not the age (it opened in
2014) or thin veneer of grease.
2917 Georgia Ave. NW.
Lyman’s Tavern: Pinball machines and a great jukebox are dive
staples, but having them doesn’t
make you a dive. 3720 14th St. NW.
The Post Pub: A dive bar does
not serve a New York strip steak.
1422 L St. NW.
The Pug: Probably the closest
thing to a classic dive, thanks to
cheap beers, year-round Christmas lights and deplorable bathrooms, but the H Street NE staple
loses points for its youth (opened
in 2007) and because you can buy
iPhone cables and high-end pork
rinds from its fancy vending machine. 1234 H St. NE.
The Red Derby: Two words:
roof deck. 3718 14th St. NW.
Showtime Lounge: A cash-only
policy, $5 beer-and-a-shot com-
DIXIE D. VEREEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Co-owner Jess Kleinmann plays pinball at (the non-dive) Lyman’s.
bos, a CD jukebox, Redskins wallpaper in the bathroom, a house
band fronted by an octogenarian
— Showtime’s getting there, but
the Bloomingdale bar is barely
four years old. Be patient. 113
Rhode Island Ave. NW.
Stained Glass Pub: All that pizza
attracts all those kids. Plus, points
docked for having two locations.
12510 Layhill Rd., Silver Spring;
6751 Dorsey Rd., Elkridge.
Stan’s Restaurant and Lounge:
The place takes its food offerings too
seriously, supplementing its fried
fare with black Angus prime rib and
grilled salmon stuffed with crab
imperial. 1029 Vermont Ave. NW.
Vienna Inn: Last time we visited Vienna Inn, there were enough
Little Leaguers in uniform to play
a round-robin tournament. If you
have to watch your language, it’s
not a dive. 120 E. Maple Ave.,
Vienna.
Wonderland Ballroom: This Columbia Heights spot, with its Ms.
Pac-Man machine and collection of
vintage signs, is just a little too
self-aware of its hipness — its house
beer is the Belgian Delirium Tremens and it hosts an annual Sundress Fest block party — to count as
a true dive. 1101 Kenyon St. NW.
— Tim Carman and Fritz Hahn
On Exhibit
23
EZ
M USE U M S
OPENINGS
“EQUILIBRIUM: FANNY SANÍN” An
exhibition that looks at the process of the
Colombian artist known for her works, which
feature clean-edged geometric forms. Four
to 18 preliminary drawings precede each
finished large-scale canvas. Opening Friday.
National Museum of Women in the Arts,
1250 New York Ave. NW. nmwa.org.
SPECTACTULAR GEMS AND JEWELRY
FROM THE MERRIWEATHER POST
COLLECTION More than 50 pieces of
jewelry that once belonged to Marjorie
Merriweather Post, one of the greatest
jewelry collectors of the 20th century.
Opening Friday. Hillwood Estate, Museum
and Gardens, 4155 Linnean Ave. NW.
hillwoodmuseum.org.
ONGOING
RUBELL FAMILY COLLECTION
Beverly Semmes’s “Blue Gowns” (1993) on display in the “Revival” exhibition, at National Museum of Women in the Arts through Sept. 10.
INDIAN “Nation to Nation: Treaties Between
the United States and American Indian
Nations,” through April 1. An exhibition
exploring the relationship between Native
American nations and the United States.
“Patriot Nations: Native Americans in Our
Nation’s Armed Forces,” through Jan. 1. An
exhibition of photographs of Native
Americans who served in the U.S. military.
Fourth Street and Independence Avenue SW.
nmai.si.edu.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WOMEN IN THE
ARTS “Revival,” through Sept. 10. An
exhibition of works by Louise Bourgeois,
Petah Coyne, Lalla Essaydi, Maria Marshall,
Alison Saar, Sam Taylor-Johnson and other
artists that explore ideas about strength,
fear and love. 1250 New York Ave. NW.
nmwa.org.
NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY “The Face
of Battle: Americans at War, 9/11 to Now,”
through Jan. 28. An exhibition of portraits by
six artists -- Ashley Gilbertson, Tim
Hetherington, Louie Palu, Stacy Pearsall,
Emily Prince and Vincent Valdez -- of activeduty soldiers and those who have served,
offering perspectives on war and its
consequences. “Marlene Dietrich: Dressed
for the Image,” through April 15. An
exhibition of images of Dietrich that
demonstrate her statement: “I dress for the
image. Not for myself, not for the public, not
for fashion, not for men.” The German-born
Dietrich has been seen as a symbol of antiNazism and an influential figure of the
LGBTQ community as well as a fashion icon.
“One Life: Sylvia Plath,” through May 20. An
exhibition of personal letters, family
photographs, objects and her own artwork
from the archives at Smith College and the
University of Indiana’s Lilly Library, that
shows the writer and poet’s struggle to
understand herself and to navigate the
social pressures of the time placed on young
women. Eighth and F streets NW. npg.si.edu.
NATIONAL POSTAL MUSEUM “Trailblazing:
100 Years of Our National Parks,” through
March 25. Featuring original stamp art from
the Postal Service and artifacts loaned by
the National Park Service, the exhibition
explores the ways in which mail moves to,
through and from our national parks. 2
Massachusetts Ave. NE.
postalmuseum.si.edu.
NEWSEUM “1967: Civil Rights at 50,”
through Jan. 2. An exhibition examining the
events of 1967 and the relationship between
the First Amendment and the civil rights
movement of the 1960s. “1776 -- Breaking
News: Independence,” through Dec. 31. This
exhibition is of the first newspaper printing
of the Declaration of Independence as it
appeared in the Pennsylvania Evening Post,
July 6, 1776. “Louder Than Words: Rock,
Power and Politics,” through July 31. The
Newseum and the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame
partnered for this exhibition of rock-and-rollrelated media that affected politics and
social movements. 555 Pennsylvania Ave.
NW. newseum.org.
PHILLIPS COLLECTION “Markus Lüpertz,”
through Sept. 2. An exhibition of 50 works by
the German pop artist and abstract
expressionist that traces his career from
recent works back to the 1960s. The
exhibition includes paintings of German
motifs, works from his dithyrambic pictures
and the Donald Duck series. An exhibition of
specific works by Lüpertz takes place at the
Hirshhorn simultaneously. 1600 21st St.
NW. phillipscollection.org.
RENWICK GALLERY “June Schwarcz:
Invention and Variation,” through Aug. 27.
An exhibition of works including vessels,
three-dimensional objects, wall-mounted
plaques and panels by the artist. “Parallax
Gap,” through Feb. 11. A site-specific
installation of drawings of ceilings of nine
different iconic American buildings that can
be viewed from various vantage points,
designed by the architectural design
practice FreelandBuck. The images are
layered so that the changes in perspective,
as viewers move underneath, create a
parallax (the effect of shifting depth or
distance). 17th Street and Pennsylvania
Avenue NW. renwick.americanart.si.edu.
SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM
“Down These Mean Streets: Community and
Place in Urban Photography,” through Aug.
6. An exhibition of the work of 10
photographers who documented U.S. cities
in the years after World War II, exposing the
effects of the urban crisis made apparent in
the neighborhoods that exist on the margins
of major cities such as New York and Los
Angeles. Donald Sultan “Disaster Paintings,”
through Sept. 4. An exhibition of paintings
capturing scenes of industrial destruction.
Eighth and F streets NW. americanart.si.edu.
U.S. NATIONAL ARBORETUM “The Bonsai
Saga: How 53 Japanese Bonsai Came to
America,” through Oct. 1. An exhibition that
features archival images and a film that tells
the story of how Japan gave 53 bonsai to the
United States in celebration of the nation’s
200th birthday. 3501 New York Ave. NE.
usna.usda.gov.
JULY 14, 2017
Fragonard. Sixth Street and Constitution
Avenue NW. nga.gov.
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC MUSEUM
“National Geographic Presents: Earth
Explorers,” through Sept. 10. A familyfriendly exhibition divided into five
environmental modules of multimedia
experiences with content from National
Geographic explorers around the world.
“Sharks,” through Oct. 15. An exhibition of
photos by National Geographic
photographer Brian Skerry, videos, artifacts,
models and interactive experiences on the
subject of sharks. 17th and M streets NW.
natgeomuseum.org.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN
AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE “More
Than a Picture: Selections From the
Photography Collection,” through Jan. 1. An
exhibition of more than 150 photographs
and related objects that demonstrates the
slavery era, Jim Crow, Black Lives Matter
and other key historical and cultural events
that illuminate African American life. 14th
Street and Constitution Avenue NW.
nmaahc.si.edu.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN ART
“Healing Arts,” through Jan. 1. An exhibition
of paintings and sculptures from the
permanent collection that attempt to
counter physical, social and spiritual
problems including global issues such as the
HIV/AIDS crisis. 950 Independence Ave. SW.
africa.si.edu.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AMERICAN
HISTORY “Righting a Wrong: Japanese
Americans and World War II,” through Feb.
19. An exhibition that commemorates the
75th anniversary of Executive Order 9066,
the document signed by Franklin D.
Roosevelt that denied constitutional rights
to Japanese Americans during World War II
and led to the imprisonment of thousands of
them. 14th Street and Constitution Avenue
NW. americanhistory.si.edu.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL
HISTORY “Objects of Wonder,” through
Jan. 1. The exhibition includes the “Blue
Flame,” one of the world’s largest and finest
pieces of gem-quality lapis lazuli; Martha,
the last known passenger pigeon; the
Pinniped fossil, from one of the earliest
members of the group of animals that
includes seals, sea lions and walruses; and
the 1875 Tsimshian House Front, one of the
best examples of Native Alaskan design
artwork. 10th Street and Constitution
Avenue NW. naturalhistory.si.edu.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN
. FRIDAY,
July 29. An anniversary exhibition of
photographs by Cynthia Connolly, Frank
Hallam Day, Avi Gupta, Max Hirshfeld, Franz
Jantzen and Colin Winterbottom interpreting
Philip Johnson’s architectural design of the
building. 2401 Foxhall Rd. NW.
kreegermuseum.org.
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS “World War I:
American Artists View the Great War,”
through Aug. 19. This exhibition showcases
posters, political cartoons, illustrations, fine
prints, popular prints, documentary
photographs and fine-art photographs. 101
Independence Ave. SE. loc.gov.
NATIONAL AIR AND SPACE MUSEUM
“Artist Soldiers,” through Nov. 11.
World War I is seen through the eyes of
professional artists who were recruited by
the U.S. Army and were considered the first
true combat artists, and through the artwork
of soldiers, including Jeff Gusky’s photos of
stone carvings made in underground
shelters. Sixth Street and Independence
Avenue SW. airandspace.si.edu.
NATIONAL ARCHIVES “Amending America,”
through Sept. 4. Marking the 225th
anniversary of the ratification of the Bill of
Rights, this exhibition of 50 original
documents chronicles attempts — some
successful, some not — to amend the
Constitution. 700 Pennsylvania Ave. NW.
archives.gov.
NATIONAL BUILDING MUSEUM “Wright on
the Walls,” through Sept. 4. The museum
celebrates the 150th birthday of architect
Frank Lloyd Wright with an interactive
installation by Scott Clowney and Vladimir
Zabavskiy in which visitors can color in
Wright designs on the walls using dry-erase
markers. “Hive,” through Sept. 4. An
installation of more than 2,700 paper tubes
varying in size from several inches to 10 feet
high, interlocked to create three
interconnected, domed chambers. 401 F St.
NW. nbm.org.
NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART, EAST
BUILDING “In the Tower: Theaster Gates,”
through Sept. 4. An exhibition of a new body
of work by Gates, “The Minor Arts,”
examines how ordinary and discarded
objects acquire value through the stories we
tell. 440 Constitution Ave. NW. nga.gov.
NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART, WEST
BUILDING “America Collects EighteenthCentury French Painting,” through Aug. 20.
An exhibition of 70 18th-century French
paintings, including masterpieces and
lesser-known works by artists including
Boucher, Ducreux and Jean-Honore
THE WASHINGTON POST
AMERICAN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM AT THE
KATZEN ARTS CENTER “Performing the
Border,” through Aug. 13. Washington artists
Clay Dunklin, Amy Lin, Susana Raab, Jenny
Wu and the Street Light Circus lead a
performance that explores the concept of
borders and boundaries. 4400
Massachusetts Ave NW. wapo.st/katzen.
AMERICAN VISIONARY ART MUSEUM
“Reverend Albert Lee Wagner: Miracle at
Midnight,” through Feb. 28. An exhibition
displays more than 50 recently acquired
works by Wagner to commemorate his
visionary transformation when he witnessed
house paint spilling on a floorboard. This
spiritual epiphany led him into a life of
religious service and artmaking for the
remaining 32 years of his life. 800 Key Hwy.,
Baltimore. avam.org.
ANACOSTIA COMMUNITY MUSEUM
“Gateways/Portales,” through Jan. 7.
Through the gateways of social justice,
community access and public festivals, this
exhibition explores the experiences of Latino
migrants and immigrants in Washington,
Baltimore, Charlotte and Raleigh-Durham,
N.C. 1901 Fort Pl. SE. anacostia.si.edu.
ARTHUR M. SACKLER GALLERY “Turquoise
Mountain: Artists Transforming
Afghanistan,” through Oct. 29. Artisans from
the Murad Khani district of Old Kabul
demonstrate their work and share their
experiences. 1050 Independence Ave. SW.
asia.si.edu.
ART MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAS “José
Gómez Sicre’s Eye,” through Aug. 6. The
museum celebrates the centennial of Sicre’s
birth. “Punctured Landscape (Canada),”
through July 30. An exhibition of ups and
downs in Canada’s history, including
indigenous issues, to celebrate Canada’s
sesquicentennial. “John D. Antone: Tree With
Human Heart,” through Sept. 1. A work of
bronze and direct-casted tree leaves and
branches, the tree with a human heart is
meant to signify the connection and
harmony between humans and the natural
world. 201 18th St. NW. museum.oas.org.
FOLGER SHAKESPEARE LIBRARY
“Painting Shakespeare,” through Feb. 11. An
exhibition of the Folger’s collection of
Shakespeare and Shakespeare-related art
and memorabilia, including oil sketches,
posters, scrapbooks, programs, prints,
figurines, photographs and paintings. 201
East Capitol St. SE. folger.edu.
GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY
MUSEUM AND THE TEXTILE MUSEUM
“Inspiring Beauty: 50 Years of Ebony Fashion
Fair,” through July 24. An exhibition of
ensembles from the Ebony Fashion Fair
created by Eunice W. Johnson, who helped
bring global fashion to the African American
community. 701 21st St. NW.
museum.gwu.edu/collectors-vision.
HIRSHHORN MUSEUM AND SCULPTURE
GARDEN “Markus Lüpertz: Threads of
History,” through Sept. 10. An exhibition of
more than 30 large-scale, early paintings by
the German neo-expressionist, including the
40-foot long work, “Westwall [Siegfried
Line]” (1968), making its U.S. debut.“My
Mommy Is Beautiful,” a new interactive work
by Yoko Ono, will span the length of the
museum’s lobby. Visitors are invited to
contribute photos or written thoughts or
memories of their mothers and attach them
to the 40-foot long canvas wall to serve as a
tribute to mothers everywhere. “Ai Weiwei:
Trace at Hirshhorn,” through Jan. 1. An
installation that portrays activists,
advocates of free speech and prisoners of
conscience in 176 portraits composed of
thousands of Lego blocks. Seventh Street
and Independence Avenue SW.
hirshhorn.si.edu.
KREEGER MUSEUM “Re-Vision: Looking
Anew at the Art of Philip Johnson and the
Design of the Kreeger Museum,” through
24
PG
Movies
War for the Planet of the Apes PHOTOS BY TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX FILM
Highly evolved and captivating to watch
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14, 2017
In the latest edition of the man-vs.-monkey saga,
CGI simians illustrate what it means to be human
BY
T
M ICHAEL O ’ S ULLIVAN
he best thing about the rebooted
“Planet of the Apes” film series
has always been the apes. Impressive on a technical level and
a dramatic one, these motion-capture
creatures — representing intelligent,
even soulful chimpanzees, gorillas,
orangutans and bonobos — outshine
their human counterparts in terms of
emotional connection with the audience.
They may not be people, but they are, in
every sense of the word, fully rounded
characters.
The title of the newest installment in
the durable franchise, “War for the Planet of the Apes,” is something of a misnomer. Although set 15 years after the
science experiment that gave rise to
smart, talking apes — and at the height of
hostilities between these intellectually
advanced animals and the more brutish
of the people who would subjugate them
— “War” includes fewer scenes of pitched
battle than moments of quiet contemplation and conversation. (Note: Not all of
the apes actually speak; many still communicate using graceful sign language.
In a parallel development, several humans have come to lose the ability to talk
— the result of a virus known as the
Simian Flu.)
All this is explained, for newcomers to
the saga, in a short preamble to the
action of the new film, which begins with
the apes ensconced in their fortified
encampment in the deep woods of
Northern California. Although the apes
just want to be left alone, and there is a
contingent of humans who are inclined
to leave them in peace, there is an
incursion by renegade human commanWAR CONTINUED ON 25
Maurice the orangutan, above, shown with an orphan girl, is one of the returning
characters to the sci-fi series in the stunning, complex “War for the Planet of the Apes.”
The newest movie in the franchise is anchored by ape leader Caesar, top center.
Movies
WAR FROM 24
Masterpiece
Very good
Okay
Poor
Also reviewed
City of Ghosts
Matthew
Heineman’s
documentary looks
at citizen journalists
in Syria. 26
The B-Side: Elsa
Dorfman’s Portrait
Photography
Documentarian
Errol Morris profiles
a pioneering portrait
artist. 27
BRET CURRY/A24
Rooney Mara stars as a woman identified only as “M” in “A Ghost Story.” Upending the tropes of
haunted-house movies, director and writer David Lowery has created something entirely fresh.
Plus
Common Sense
Media 31
Somebody’s watching me:
One heart who can’t let go
BY
M ICHAEL O ’ S ULLIVAN
B
y the standards of the
traditional ghost story, “A
Ghost Story” isn’t much
of one. By the standards
of the moody art-house meditation on love, loss, memory, forgetting, attachment, letting go and
the nature of eternity, it’s pretty
darn great.
Okay, perhaps not great. But
bold and strange, in that indie
way. Poetic without being pretentious, and at times deadpan funny, this ballad of a lonely poltergeist is certainly not for everyone,
but it is for some. Have I mentioned that it’s shot in a squarish
aspect ratio, with rounded corners, and bathed in the soft glow
of nostalgia, like a Hipstamatic
photo? Don’t let that put you off.
Casey Affleck, playing a music
composer identified only as C in
press materials, is supposed to be
dead for much of the film, hiding
under what amounts to a white
sheet — or something closer to a
banquet tablecloth in size, given
the way it trails him like a wedding gown — with two eye holes.
After a bit of Terrence Malickian
prologue, in which we’re shown a
collage of seemingly random,
fragmentary snippets from C’s
life with his significant other, M
(Rooney Mara), he dies, rather
suddenly, in a car accident that —
although it occurs entirely off
camera — manages to be mildly
shocking and entirely expected.
From that moment on, in this
fable written and directed by David Lowery of “Pete’s Dragon” and
“Ain’t Them Bodies Saints,” C
haunts M with the persistence of
a dog who is waiting for his
absent mistress. Or, rather, he
haunts the old house that they
lived in together. Standing
around rather morosely — if a guy
in a sheet can be said to be
morose, and not, more accurately,
motionless — C’s ghost watches M
devour an entire pie that has been
left for her, as condolence food, by
their real estate agent (Liz Cardenas Franke), and then he watches
her vomit it all up. He watches her
move on, bringing another man
(Barlow Jacobs) home, and then
he watches her move out.
He watches and watches and
watches, as other, newer residents of the house come and go,
even engaging in a little harmless
poltergeist activity to spice things
up. Part of the time is spent
silently communing with the fe-
male ghost next door, whom C
spots through the window. They
stare at each other — soul to soul
— speaking, in a way, through wry
subtitles. (According to the credits, she’s played by singer Kesha
Sebert, who formerly stylized her
stage name as Ke$ha. Because she
is always under a sheet, you must
take that on faith.)
There is very little spoken dialogue. Most of the words in the
film occur during a house party,
mutely witnessed by C’s spirit, as
a guest expounds, with the philosophical certitude of the man who
is about to have one beer too
many, on the impermanence of
art.
Is that the point of the film? It’s
never quite clear. More important: Can a ghost “die” and come
back to haunt itself ? Lowery
pushes the tropes of the haunted
house film past the breaking
point, creating something that is
entirely original — and oddly, if
not profoundly unsettling. Maybe
that guy at the party is right.
Maybe art doesn’t last forever.
But for a little while — long after
the closing credits anyway — “A
Ghost Story” manages to stick
with you.
michael.osullivan@washpost.com
R. At area theaters. Contains some disturbing images and brief coarse language. 93 minutes.
Opening next
week
Valerian and the
City of a Thousand
Planets is Luc
Besson’s live-action
adaptation of a
French graphic
novel.
Christopher Nolan’s
Dunkirk is a factbased World War II
drama.
Girls Trip is a
raunchy femalecentric comedy in
the vein of “Rough
Night.”
A teenager finds out
her father is having
an affair in the ’90sset comedy
Landline.
A man bonds with
an elephant in the
Thai drama Pop
Aye.
JULY 14, 2017
PG-13. At area theaters.
Contains sci-fi violence and
action, mature thematic
elements and some disturbing
images. 139 minutes.
Ratings guide
A Ghost Story . FRIDAY,
michael.osullivan@washpost.com
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
dos — led by a bloodthirsty
officer known only as the Colonel (Woody Harrelson) —
who kill some of the family
members of the apes’ broodingly charismatic leader Caesar, a chimpanzee played by
the great Andy Serkis, whose
expressive, guttural vocal performance and mimelike physicality anchors the film.
This, of course, triggers a
vendetta between Caesar and
the Colonel, whose troops
subsequently round up and
imprison many of the apes, for
slave labor, just as they are
moving camp to avoid further
attacks. Among those captured: Caesar and his only
surviving son, the infant Cornelius (Devyn Dalton).
With Caesar out of the action, though not out of commission — despite being tied,
seething, to a wooden structure that lends him the silhouette of a crucified, simian Jesus — the story shifts to the
small band of apes still at
large, plus a couple of newcomers. This group includes
the wonderfully wise elder
Maurice the orangutan (Karin
Konoval, a veteran of the previous two films), a mute little
human girl who has been orphaned (Amiah Miller) and a
talkative yet wryly doleful
zoo-escapee chimp who introduces himself only as Bad Ape.
In this last role, Steve Zahn
delivers a memorable turn,
transcending a part that
might otherwise have been
used for little more than comic relief, and leaving viewers
with a sense of genuine compassion.
Though much of this connection can be attributed to
the actors — and CGI wizards
— who give life to these nonhuman characters, kudos is
also due to the storytelling
skills of director and co-writer
Matt Reeves (“Let Me In”),
who did such a fine job with
the previous “Apes” film.
Along with returning writer
Mark Bomback, Reeves spins
a gripping, visually stunning
and emotionally complex tale
of otherness — one that examines, against its us-vs.-them
subtext, not just what it
means to be human, but also
humane.
“War for the Planet of the
Apes” may have the body of an
action film, but it has the soul
of an art-house drama and the
brains of a political thriller.
25
26
EZ
Movies
City of Ghosts This is what heroic journalism looks like
BY
A NN H ORNADAY
American audiences have enjoyed a recent spate of documentaries that take us beyond headlines and just-the-facts news stories about the Islamic State, Iraq
and Syria, and that give us, instead, a glimpse of the people
whose lives have been so viciously
upended by militancy’s rise in the
Middle East.
Last week, it was “Nowhere to
Hide,” offering a candid portrait
of the decimation of Jalawla, Iraq,
through the eyes of a gentlenatured medic and family man.
This week, it’s “City of Ghosts,”
providing an apt bookend chronicling the heroic efforts of citizen
journalists in Raqqa, Syria, as
they attempt to document the
carnage that the Islamic State has
wreaked on their once-cosmopolitan city. (Both films screened at
the AFI Docs festival in June.)
In 2014, when the Islamic State,
also known as ISIS, invaded Syria,
a group of enterprising teachers,
students and professionals began
filming the atrocities performed
by the group, which included public executions and torture. Because the international press was
largely ignoring what was happening in Raqqa, the anonymous
activists began to disseminate
AMAZON STUDIOS/IFC FILMS
A scene from the documentary “City of Ghosts,” which chronicles the undercover media group Raqqa is
Being Slaughtered Silently.
their images via social media,
eventually becoming known as
the undercover group Raqqa is
Being
Slaughtered
Silently
(RBSS).
As the Syria story heated up,
RBSS’s electronic missives became more widespread in the
mainstream media, while the Islamic State honed its own once-
primitive communications techniques into slick videos borrowing production values and story
beats from computer games and
Hollywood movies. “City of
Ghosts” chronicles that history,
and, when one of RBSS’s leaders is
suddenly killed, the subsequent
escape of several members to Turkey and Germany. In exile, they
desperately try to protect their
sources back home while making
sure the stories of Raqqa — and
Syria at large — reach a wider
audience, battling psychological
and emotional trauma while becoming the toasts of Western human rights and free-press advocates.
Directed by Matthew Heine-
Harold and Lillian: A Hollywood Love Story A charming tale whose stars weren’t stars
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14, 2017
BY
S TEPHANIE M ERRY
Movie directors get all the
credit. But what of the many
film-industry workers who toil
away behind the scenes, creating
memorable cinematic worlds?
Documentarian Daniel Raim certainly deserves accolades for rescuing two unsung Hollywood heroes from obscurity in “Harold
and Lillian: A Hollywood Love
Story.”
Chances are you’ve never
heard of its subjects — storyboard
artist and production designer
Harold Michelson and his filmresearcher wife Lillian — even
though they worked on some big
movies, including “The Birds,”
“The Apartment,” “Scarface,”
“Spaceballs” and “Who’s Afraid of
Virginia Woolf ?,” to name just a
few. Also listed among their impressive accomplishments is a
marriage that lasted 60 years.
Their contributions are every-
ZEITGEIST FILMS
A documentary about storyboard artist Harold Michelson and film
researcher Lillian Michelson, right, honors film-industry workers
who toil away off-camera. Much of the story, which is told by the
couple, is rendered as animated drawings including the one above.
where. As “Spaceballs” director
Mel Brooks explains, those ridiculous spherical helmets — among
other “little goodies” from the
film — were all Harold’s idea. Old
storyboard drawings also reveal
that it was Harold who came up
with the famous shot in “The
Graduate” that framed Dustin
HAROLD CONTINUED ON 27
man with breathtaking access
and urgency, “City of Ghosts” possesses the same taut, cinemavérité
energy as his previous film “Cartel
Land.” Like that movie, this is a
work of nerve and immediacy,
with the filmmaker gaining unprecedented proximity to the lifethreatening events he’s recording.
There are moments when the film
plays like a soberingly real-life
international thriller.
As heroic and important as
RBSS’s activism is, however, it’s
the quieter moments of personal
reflection that linger most, as
when one of the organization’s
founders succumbs to a fit of
uncontrollable shaking, his body
processing the grief and loss that
he has so assiduously tried to keep
at bay while literally trying to save
his country. As Americans continue to debate about a compulsively
tweeting president, strict immigration policies and efforts to manipulate an often easily distracted
media, “City of Ghosts” provides a
grim reminder of what journalism should look like, and why its
stakes are literally life and death.
ann.hornaday@washpost.com
R. At Landmark’s E Street Cinema.
Contains disturbing violent content
and some obscenity. In English and
Arabic with subtitles. 91 minutes.
Movies
27
EZ
B-Side: Elsa Dorfman’s Portrait Photography A Polaroid artist steps out from behind her enormous camera
BY
M ICHAEL O ’ S ULLIVAN
HAROLD FROM 26
Portrait photographer
Elsa Dorfman, left,
found her medium in
1980: Polaroid’s largerthan-life 20-by-24-inch
film. The specialized film
is no longer made, but
Dorfman has kept the
reject prints of her
interesting subjects.
other portrait artists say about
getting beneath a subject’s skin.
“I’m totally not interested in capturing their souls.”
Dorfman, who makes for a lively and loquacious subject, is equally contrarian about the putative
“truth” of photography, insisting
that it’s precisely the artifice — or
falsehood — of portraiture that
fascinates her.
As rare and highly specialized
as her instrument is, Dorfman likens the 20-by-24-inch camera to a
crude tool. It’s the “spoon” with
which one eats, she says, not the
delightful historical tidbits, such
as the story about Harold visiting
Dalton Trumbo, sketching beside
the bathtub where the screenwriter was known to soak and
type.
But the film’s subjects are just
as engaging. Lillian, an orphan,
was surprisingly progressive for
someone born in 1928. When Harold asked her to take a train from
Florida and move to Los Angeles
to marry him, she suggested that
they live together first, to make
sure they really liked each other.
Harold talked her out of that, too.
The movie works both as a
heartwarming celebration of two
extremely likable people and as
an illuminating glimpse behind
the curtain at the contribution of
storyboard artists. When Harold’s sketches for “The Ten Commandments,” for instance, are
compared to the film’s finished
scenes, the similarities are unmistakable.
In a sweetly appropriate flour-
ish, much of the story — told by
Harold (who died in 2007) and
Lillian themselves — is rendered
as animated drawings, some of
which are accompanied by actors
reading letters and poems the
couple exchanged: “I love you so
much I can’t even draw right,”
Harold wrote in one.
“Harold and Lillian” won’t
break any cinematic ground. The
story it tells is conventional,
chronological and straightforward. And that’s enough. With a
michael.osullivan@washpost.com
R. At Landmark’s E Street Cinema.
Contains graphic nudity and brief
strong language. 76 minutes.
story this charming, who needs
bells and whistles?
stephanie.merry@washpost.com
Unrated. At Avalon and Cinema
Arts Theatre. Contains nothing
objectionable. 100 minutes.
The Cinema Arts Theatre will host
Q&As with MaryAnne Anderson, a
friend and former colleague of
Lillian Michelson, following
Saturday’s 4 and 7 p.m. shows and
Sunday’s noon show.
JULY 14, 2017
ward to rescue her archive from
encroaching oblivion.
The most interesting parts of
this conversation come when
Dorfman talks about the art of
portraiture. “I’m really interested
in the surfaces of people,” she says,
in a departure from what many
“soup” (i.e., the art) itself.
In another metaphor, Dorfman
compares photography to a hammer attempting to “nail down the
now.” In a film that ultimately
becomes a provocative meditation
on impermanence, the artist
laughs at the futility of that effort.
“The now,” she says, “is constantly
racing beyond you.”
. FRIDAY,
Hoffman beneath a close-up of
Ann Bancroft’s bent knee.
Lillian, meanwhile, was insatiably curious, almost traveling to
South America with a drug kingpin to research “Scarface” — before Harold talked her out of it.
Her research library, which
moved locations a few times, was
a hot spot where Tom Waits and
other boldfaced names liked to
hang out. The film is filled with
PHOTOS FROM NEON
THE WASHINGTON POST
Photographer Elsa Dorfman is
known for her large-format Polaroid portraits, created on 20-by24-inch instant film, using one of
the five cameras originally built by
the company, which stopped making the specialized film after it
went bankrupt in 2008. Dorfman
stockpiled as much of it as she
could get her hands on, but as it
ran out, the artist, now 80, decided
to retire a couple of years ago.
Directed by the idiosyncratic
documentarian Errol Morris
(“The Unknown Known”), “The
B-Side: Elsa Dorfman’s Portrait
Photography” is a love letter to
Dorfman, who is also the filmmaker’s friend. Both are based in Cambridge, Mass., where Morris and
his family have sat for Dorfman’s
camera many times over the years.
Now it’s her turn in front of the
lens.
“B-Side” is structured, for the
most part, as a conversation between Morris and Dorfman, who is
shown pulling out one giant print
after another from storage cabinets
as she talks about the subjects (including the late writer Allen Ginsberg and other literary luminaries)
and her working methods. Typically, Dorfman offers clients a selection of two shots; one print goes to
the customer, and she keeps the
reject (or B-side) — which is often,
as it turns out, the more intriguing
of the two images.
Along the way, she stops to
muse on the ephemerality of life:
Ginsberg’s death, Dorfman’s advanced age, the demise of Polaroid
and the fact that her once-vibrant
prints are now starting to fade all
underscore a single theme — one
that’s echoed in the stillunresolved question of what will
become of Dorfman’s archive after
she’s gone. Though her work is
owned by several museums, including Harvard University’s Fogg
Museum, the National Portrait
Gallery and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, no institution or patron has yet come for-
28
EZ
Movies
Lost in Paris Husband and wife
star in a cinematic
circus act
BY
P AT P ADUA
Written and Directed by longtime collaborators
Fiona Gordon and her husband, Dominique Abel
(“The Fairy”), the lighthearted comedy “Lost in
Paris” is almost too cute for its own good, taking such
outlandish poetic license as a scene of an 87-year-old
woman climbing onto the Eiffel Tower — through a
tree. If you can forget logic, however, and just go
along for the ride, its absurdity can be endearing.
After receiving a letter from her concerned Aunt
Martha (Emmanuelle Riva of “Amour”) in Paris,
Fiona (Gordon), an unmarried librarian who lives in
a remote, snowbound part of Canada, travels to visit
her relative. Upon arriving, she immediately gets
lost, leading to a series of unlikely coincidences that
introduce her to Dom (Abel), a hobo who falls in love
with the awkward visitor.
With its visually stylish sight gags and broad
physical comedy, “Lost in Paris” blends the whimsy
of Wes Anderson with the inventive slapstick of
Jacques Tati, creating something that feels, at times,
like a circus act. As such, the film echoes the lives of
its creators: Abel, who is Belgian, and the Australianborn Canadian Gordon met in Paris in the 1980s and
together developed a series of burlesque shows
before going on to direct films.
The actors’ lean, lanky physiques suit the movie’s
cartoonish tone. Gordon, who has acknowledged her
resemblance to Olive Oyl, comes off like something
out of a “Popeye” short — one in which characters
whistle the theme to “Last Tango in Paris.”
“Lost in Paris” narrowly escapes preciousness,
thanks to actors who flesh out two-dimensional
characters with physical enthusiasm. (This goes for
the veteran Riva, who died in January, as well.)
Quirky to a fault, the film’s most absurd moments are
nevertheless grounded by the human need for
connection.
goingoutguide@washpost.com
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
JULY 14, 2017
Unrated. At Landmark’s Bethesda Row Cinema.
Contains strong language, nudity and sexual
situations. In English and French with subtitles. 83
minutes.
OSCILLOSCOPE LABORATORIES
Fiona Gordon, who stars with her husband and
co-writer in “Lost in Paris,” a slapstick comedy
that feels like an homage to Jacques Tati.
Hare Krishna! The Mantra, the Movement
and the Swami Who Started It All A misty-eyed look at a mystical leader
BY
M ARK J ENKINS
In 1965, a 70-year-old retired
pharmacist from Kolkata arrived
in New York with no contacts or
support and very little money.
What he did bring was, depending
on your point of view, either (a)
spiritual enlightenment or (b) a
mind-control cult that ripped susceptible middle-class teens away
from their families.
The documentary “Hare Krishna! The Mantra, the Movement and
the Swami Who Started It All” mentions both possibilities, but clearly
favors the first. Filmmaker John
Griesser and his co-director Lauren
Ross fill the film with footage of
Srila Prabhupada, the man who, in
1966, founded a religious organization called the International Society for Krishna Consciousness
(ISKCON), and his intelligent and
articulate disciples. Coverage of
controversies involving ISKCON after the guru’s 1977 death (including
an alleged murder conspiracy) is
relegated to a montage of unfavor-
ABRAMORAMA
Srila Prabhupada, the guru whose Hare Krishna movement is
examined, mostly uncritically, in a new documentary.
able TV news and a Hare Krishna
gag from “Airplane II.”
For viewers who aren’t hostile
to mysticism, vegetarianism and
endless chanting, it’s a stirring
story. Prabhupada arrived at a pivotal moment in American culture,
setting up shop in a Lower East
Side storefront behind a sign
promising “Matchless Gifts.” He
was soon communing with
George Harrison, members of the
Grateful Dead and Allen Ginsburg, who is shown singing “Hare
Krishna” to a smirking William F.
Buckley Jr. The swami’s goal was
simple, he explained: “To see everyone happy.” But how tricky a
goal that can be.
goingoutguide@washpost.com
Unrated. At the Angelika Pop-Up at Union Market. Contains drug references.
In sometimes heavily accented English with subtitles. 91 minutes.
Misfortune Suspenseful setup doesn’t pay off
BY
M ARK J ENKINS
Somewhere in the sands outside Tucson is a half-million-dollars’ worth of stolen diamonds.
That could be a big score for the
characters in “Misfortune,” a lowbudget showcase for director, cowriter and star Desmond Devenish. Viewers, though, will find
the setup more rewarding than
the payoff.
A stark prologue featuring two
AARP-eligible thugs reveals how
the jewels were nabbed, and how
the thieves then turned on each
other. Seven years later, one of
them, Mallick (Kevin Gage), has
been paroled and plans to grab
the gems from Boyd (Devenish),
the son of his late partner-incrime. Boyd never had the loot,
but with Mallick gunning for him,
he guesses where it is. So he heads
into the wilderness with his sexy
new girlfriend (Jenna Kanell) and
a buddy with gang connections
(co-writer Xander Bailey). Offering counsel is a veteran outlaw
played by musician-actor Steve
GUNNISON FILMS
Boyd (Desmond Devenish) in the noir “Misfortune,” about outlaws’
hunt for diamonds in the desert and the body pileup that ensues.
Earle, the cast’s most famous
member.
Boyd’s the quiet type, and this
desert-set film noir is similarly
taciturn. There’s little Tarantinostyle dialogue as the players
prowl through nicely composed,
neatly suspenseful set pieces. Perhaps more banter would have
helped sustain interest. As the
body count burgeons, the surprises become unsurprising, and the
climax proves anticlimactic.
goingoutguide@washpost.com
Unrated. At the Angelika Pop-Up at Union Market. Contains violence and obscenity.
In English and a bit of unsubtitled Spanish. 88 minutes.
Movies
29
EZ
Marie Curie: The Courage of Knowledge Biopic brings depth to its subject but loses focus
BY
A LAN Z ILBERMAN
Science biopics are a tough sell
to begin with. And the title “Marie
Curie: The Courage of Knowledge”
— which sounds like a paperback
in an abandoned library — does
the film no favors. Yet filmmaker
Marie Noelle fills the story with
passion, debate and human contradiction. If the material ultimately eludes the director’s grasp,
wandering off on unfocused tangents, it’s because of its ambition.
Co-written by Noelle and Andrea Stoll, “Curie” covers the
eight-year stretch between its
subject’s two Nobel Prizes (in
1903 and 1911). Karolina Gruszka
plays Marie as a determined, confident woman who finds herself
facing her biggest challenges after the untimely death of her
husband and fellow Nobelist,
Pierre (Charles Berling), in 1906.
Grieving — and without her
romantic and intellectual partner
— Marie continues their research,
proving that radium has the potential to cure cancer, all while
navigating Europe’s stodgy, patriarchal scientific community.
BIG WORLD PICTURES/SOCIETY FILMS
Karolina Gruszka plays the title role in “Marie Curie: The Courage of Knowledge.” The movie covers
the period between Curie’s two Nobel Prizes as she copes with the death of her husband.
Soon, she begins an affair with a
married
colleague
(Arieh
Worthalter), complicating her
legacy in the eyes of her sneering,
gossip-prone peers.
To her credit, Noelle tries to
move the story beyond the tropes
of the biopic: Marie lectures of-
ten, both on matters of science
and gender equality, and each
teachable moment has an organic
quality to it. Yet the film is, by
necessity, episodic, and the purpose of each section is not always
clear. In a subplot about the
friendship between Marie and
Albert Einstein (Piotr Glowacki),
for example, there is little substance beyond their relationship’s
novelty.
The cinematography is also
distracting at times, rendering
the action in a monochrome haze
that conjures the sterility of a
modern laboratory while also obscuring the actors — sometimes
quite literally. Their triumphs
and tragedies are, as a result, less
acutely felt.
Marie Curie’s life was rich with
incident, including a sex scandal
that led to a duel. “Curie” includes
all of it, as if to set off her professional accomplishments as all the
more remarkable. Ironically, the
film’s uneven, awkward handling
of these highlights adds up to little
more than a history lesson.
goingoutguide@washpost.com
Unrated. At Landmark’s West End
Cinema. Contains strong language,
nudity and adult situations. In
French with subtitles. 100 minutes.
Wish Upon A likable cast in an unentertaining tale
BY
S ANDIE A NGULO C HEN
STEVE WILKIE/BROAD GREEN PICTURES
From left: Sydney Park stars as Meredith, Joey King as Clare and
Shannon Purser (yes, it’s Barb!) as June a film that’s horror lite.
June yells “This is all your fault,”
viewers may be ready to demand
their own blood price.
goingoutguide@washpost.com
PG-13. At area theaters. Contains
violence, scary images, mature
thematic material and strong
language. 87 minutes.
JULY 14, 2017
particularly notable for her performance as a snarky gamer who
doesn’t put up with Clare’s nonsense. Purser, best known as Barb
in “Stranger Things,” once again
side-eyes a best friend too interested in the cool crowd to see
who’s genuinely loyal.
Unlikable Clare makes so many
awful decisions that by the time
. FRIDAY,
inscription. A demon inside the
music box, it seems, demands a
“blood price” for each wish and
has begun exacting it from those
around Clare. You’d think a girl
with so much death surrounding
her would immediately dump the
box. But she inexplicably doubles
down, figuring that if she already
feels guilty for the calamities the
box has caused, why should she
go back to being poor and miserable?
Working from a lackluster
script by Barbara Marshall (“Viral”), director John R. Leonetti
targets a younger audience than
with his R-rated “Annabelle,” in
what amounts to an unsatisfying
combination of “Final Destination” and “The Box.” Beyond
middle-schoolers, it’s unclear
who would enjoy this derivative,
cliche-filled exercise in horror
lite.
For all its flaws, “Wish Upon” at
least passes the Bechdel Test (a
valuable contribution in a movie
aimed at teen girls). Clare’s two
truth-telling best friends, June
and Meredith (Shannon Purser
and Sydney Park), are the best
things about the film. Park is
THE WASHINGTON POST
“Wish Upon” revives the Orientalist mysticism at the heart of the
teen-friendly “Gremlins” — an
enigmatic Asian artifact leads to
mayhem and murder — but it’s
nowhere as entertaining as the
1984 comedy-horror classic.
The movie opens, ominously,
with a melancholy suburban
mom (Elisabeth Röhm) placing a
canvas-wrapped item in the trash
as her young daughter tools
around the block on her bike.
Moments later, the girl returns
home to discover that her mother
has hanged herself in the attic.
Twelve years later, that girl,
Clare (Joey King), is a bullied
high-schooler embarrassed by
her widowed, pack-rat dad, Jonathan (Ryan Philippe, with little to
do except look concerned), who
scavenges dumpsters for junk to
sell.
Jonathan’s rummaging turns
up an intricately carved box covered with Chinese characters. He
gives it to Clare, who has learned
enough Chinese at school to read
part of the box’s inscription: It
grants seven wishes. Fresh from a
fight with the school’s queen bee,
Darcie (Josephine Langford),
Clare makes a childishly meanspirited wish: “I wish Darcie
would just go rot.” The box eventually opens, plays a creepy melody and closes. The next morning,
Darcie wakes up with necrotizing
fasciitis consuming her body.
News of Darcie’s blackened
flesh leads Clare to suspect that
her Chinese music box might
have real power, so she proceeds
to wish for what many teens
desire: love (granted, from the
cutest boy in school); wealth
(granted, from a recently deceased relative’s estate); and for
dad to stop being “so embarrassing.” Now dating a beautiful boyfriend, rich and entertained by a
father who plays smooth-jazz sax
— which somehow qualifies as
not embarrassing — Clare is finally the most popular girl in school.
(Yes, that’s another one of her
wishes).
What Clare fails to understand
is that her wishes aren’t free, even
after she is confronted by a classmate (the charming Ki Hong Lee,
from “The Maze Runner”) whose
cousin has translated more of the
30
EZ
Movies
COLUMBIA PICTURES/SONY PICTURES ENTERTAINMENT
“Spider-Man: Homecoming,” with a youthful, nerdy Spidey who juggles math homework and girl troubles with fighting evil, is a refreshing reboot.
ALSO PLAYING
Star ratings are from Post reviews;
go to goingoutguide.com/movies for
the full-length reviews. Movies not
reviewed by The Post are marked
“NR.” For showtimes, see the
Movie Directory.
[NR] 47 METERS DOWN
Claire Holt and Mandy Moore play
sisters who become trapped in a
shark cage at the bottom of the
ocean in this horror film. (PG-13,
89 minutes, contains sequences
of intense peril, bloody images and
brief strong language. At area
theaters.)
13 MINUTES
This German docudrama takes us
inside the head of would-be Hitler
assassin Georg Elser. (R, 110
minutes, contains violence,
torture, brief sensuality and coarse
language. At Landmark’s E Street
Cinema.)
BABY DRIVER
Ansel Elgort stars as a getaway
driver in Edgar Wright’s crime spree
recast as a jukebox musical. (R,
113 minutes, contains violence
and obscenity throughout. At area
theaters.)
BAYWATCH
Unlike other reboots before it, this
lazy, inane movie does little more
than desperately push the
envelope. (R, 119 minutes,
contains graphic nudity, strong
language and crude sexual
content. At University Mall
Theatre.)
BEATRIZ AT DINNER
When a massage therapist (a
mournfully radiant Salma Hayek) is
invited to an upscale dinner party,
comedy and clarity of privilege
ensue. (R, 83 minutes, contains
obscenity and a scene of violence.
In English and some Spanish with
subtitles. At area theatres.)
MOVIES CONTINUED ON 32
JULY 14, 2017
[NR] ALL EYEZ ON ME
Demetrius Shipp Jr. plays Tupac
Shakur in this biopic about the
rapper’s life and career. (R, 140
minutes, contains some nudity,
sexuality, violence and drug use;
crude language throughout. At area
theaters.)
What Washington is
watching on DVD
1. Logan
2. CHiPs, left
3. Power Rangers
4. Get Out
5. John Wick: Chapter 2
. FRIDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
NICOLE RIVELLI/LIONSGATE
From left: Kumail Nanjiani, Holly Hunter and Ray Romano play characters who misunderstand one
another while keeping watch over an ill young woman in the candid, exhilarating “The Big Sick.”
SOURCE: Redbox,
for the week ended July 9.
New on DVD
The Fate of the Furious
The Lost City of Z, right
A Quiet Passion
Smurfs: The Lost Village
Their Finest
PETER IOVINO/WARNER BROS. PICTURES
AIDAN MONAGHAN/AMAZON STUDIOS & BLEECKER STREET
Movies
Common Sense Media
War for the Planet of
the Apes (PG-13)
What parents need to know
–VARIETY
-Manohla Dargis,
THE NEW YORK TIMES
NS
SALLY HAWKIKE
ETHAN HAW
A FILM BY
Abel & Gordon
A FILM BY AISLING WALSH
LostInParis.Oscilloscope.net
WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM
Bethesda LANDMARK’S Fairfax CINEMA
BETHESDA ROW CINEMA ARTS THEATRE
(301) 652-7273
(703) 978-6991
STARTS
TODAY
WWW.MAUDIEMOVIE.COM
BASED ON THE TRUE STORY OF THE MAN MINUTES AWAY FROM ALMOST
KILLING ADOLF HITLER
“STUNNING. A MOVIE YOU MAY NEVER FORGET.”
- Jeffrey Lyons, WCBS RADIO
STEVE WILKIE/BROAD GREEN PICTURES
Joey King stars as Claire in “Wish Upon,” a teen horror flick in
which a mysterious music box grants King’s character seven wishes.
violence: Characters are killed
falling into spikes on walls, as
well as via swords, an ax to the
chest, sorcery, crossbows and the
supernatural strength of a young
man who can hurl his enemies
from hundreds of yards away.
But none of the violence is overly
graphic, bloody or gory.
Infrequent profanity includes
“a--” and “damn.” A joke is made
in which a character is taunted
as being an “a--boy” to a
superior. There’s some demonic
imagery that could be
nightmarish for younger or more
sensitive viewers. Characters
drink mead at a Viking
celebration. (98 minutes)
Via iTunes and Amazon video. Also
available on DVD.
Dragonheart: Battle for
the Heartfire (PG-13)
(PG-13)
STREAMING
Age 13+
Great performances in
emotional, intense biographical
drama.
“Lion” is an emotional
biographical drama about Saroo
Brierley, who was separated from
his family in India at age 5 after
ending up on a train bound more
than 1,000 kilometers away from
his hometown. Based on Brierley’s
memoir “A Long Way Home,” the
movie chronicles how Saroo (Dev
Patel) used Google Earth to track
down his birth family after a 25year separation. Children are
shown in danger — including a
disturbing scene in which
homeless children are abducted as
they sleep, one in which young
Saroo is physically inspected in a
creepy manner and others in
which he’s forced to live on the
streets with no shelter or food.
When the action switches to
Saroo’s adulthood, there are
scenes of implied sex (he and his
girlfriend are in bed, half dressed)
and passionate kissing. Adults (20somethings) drink at dinner
parties, restaurants and at home;
there’s also cigarette smoking and
infrequent strong language (“s---,”
“a--” etc.). And underlying
everything are powerful lessons
about perseverance, gratitude,
family bonds and the power of
technology. (118 minutes)
Via Netflix streaming, iTunes and
Amazon video.
Common Sense
Media helps
families make smart media choices.
Go to commonsensemedia.org for
age-based and educational ratings
and reviews for movies, games, apps,
TV shows, websites and books.
AN OLIVER HIRSCHBIEGEL FILM
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FROM JUDD APATOW
PRODUCER OF BRIDESMAIDS AND TRAINWRECK
“THE FUNNIEST DATE MOVIE OF 2017!”
PETER TRAVERS, ROLLING STONE
“A JOYOUS, GENEROUS-HEARTED
ROMANTIC COMEDY.”
MANOHLA DARGIS, THE NEW YORK TIMES
“ENCHANTING AND HILARIOUS!”
OWEN GLEIBERMAN, VARIETY
“AN EFFORTLESSLY FUNNY AND
CHARMING ROMANCE.”
JUSTIN CHANG, LOS ANGELES TIMES
NOW PLAYING AT THEATERS EVERYWHERE
JULY 14, 2017
TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX
In “War for the Planet of the
Apes,” Caesar (Andy Serkis)
wrestles with his darker
impulses amid war with humans.
Lion
13 MINUTES
. FRIDAY,
STREAMING
Age 13+
Medieval fantasy has some battle
violence, sorcery.
“Dragonheart: Battle for the
Heartfire” is a fantasy about a
dragon who must broker peace
between a brother and sister
fighting for the crown of a
kingdom. There’s medieval battle
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
Age 13+
Smart, emotional, violent sequel
has resonant ideas.
“War for the Planet of the
Apes,” which is part of the longrunning sci-fi/action movie
series, is the third movie
focusing on intelligent ape
leader Caesar (Andy Serkis). It’s
heavy on fantasy violence, with
guns and shooting, arrows,
missiles and explosions. Some
bloody wounds are shown,
although there’s not much gore
overall. Apes are imprisoned,
hung on crosses, whipped and
forced to work. Characters die,
and one character commits
suicide off screen. Language is
mild, with sparing use of
“goddamn” an