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USA Today - 15 October 2017

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SUNDAY
AN EDITION OF USA TODAY
IN MONEY
IN LIFE
Cash fades, but
kids can learn
Beck is finally back and
ready to get you dancing
10.15.17
GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO
IN BRIEF
TEXAS INMATES DONATE
$53,000 FOR HARVEY RELIEF
Officials say Texas prison inmates donated more than
$53,000 from their commissary
funds to the American Red
Cross to be used for Hurricane
Harvey relief.
Texas Department of Criminal Justice spokesman Jason
Clark says more than 6,600 inmates donated money between
Aug. 31 and Sept. 30. Harvey
made landfall in Texas as a Category 4 hurricane Aug. 25.
TRUMP’S TWEETS NOT STATE
ACTION, LAWYERS CLAIM
Lawyers
for
President
Trump say a judge should reject
a lawsuit challenging his ability
to block his critics from following him on Twitter.
The lawyers filed papers late
Friday to try to put an end to a
Manhattan federal court lawsuit that makes First Amendment claims. They say Trump’s
Twitter feed is not state action.
The lawsuit was filed in July
by the Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia
University and seven people rejected by Trump after criticizing the president.
SEBASTIEN BOZON, AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Weinstein expelled from
Academy over allegations
Producer embroiled in scandal after
actresses accuse him of sexual assault
Carly Mallenbaum
and Sean Rossman
USA TODAY
Harvey Weinstein, the embattled producer accused by
some of Hollywood’s leading
actresses of sexual assault, was
expelled Saturday by the
Academy of Motion Picture
Arts and Sciences board.
The board reviewed Wein-
stein’s membership at an emergency meeting and released a
statement Saturday afternoon
that it “voted well in excess of
the required two-thirds majority to immediately expel him
from the Academy.”
The statement from the Academy said: “We do so not simply
to separate ourselves from
someone who does not merit the
respect of his colleagues but also
to send a message that the era of
willful ignorance and shameful
Producer Harvey Weinstein
faces multiple allegations of
sexual abuse and harassment.
JOHN CARUCCI, AP
complicity in sexually predatory
behavior and workplace harassment in our industry is over.
What’s at issue here is a deeply
troubling problem that has no
place in our society. The Board
continues to work to establish
ethical standards of conduct
that all Academy members will
be expected to exemplify.”
Over his career, Weinstein
has cobbled together 341 Oscar
nominations and 81 wins. His
films include The King’s Speech,
The Artist and Shakespeare in
Love, all of which won best
v STORY CONTINUES ON 2T
CALIFORNIA WILDFIRES
20 REPORTED KILLED IN
HUGE BLAST IN SOMALIA
A huge explosion from a
truck bomb killed 20 people in
Somalia’s capital, police said
Saturday, as shaken residents
called it the most powerful blast
they’d heard in years.
The explosion appeared to
target a hotel on a busy road in
Hodan district. At least 15 people were injured, police Capt.
Mohamed Hussein said.
Police said people were
trapped in the rubble of the Safari Hotel, which was largely
destroyed in the explosion.
MILITANTS EVACUATE AS
RAQQA BATTLE NEARS END
The U.S.-led coalition and local officials said Saturday that
Islamic State fighters and civilians will be allowed to evacuate
Syria’s Raqqa, in a deal that signals the imminent capture of
the city but flouts earlier U.S.
protests of negotiating safe exits for the extremist group.
Foreign fighters will be excluded from the evacuation
deal, the coalition said.
IRELAND, UK BRACE FOR
IMPACT OF OPHELIA
Wind gusts of up to 80 mph
could lash the United Kingdom
and Ireland as the remnants of
Hurricane Ophelia hit the British Isles, the two countries’
weather
services
warned
Saturday.
The U.S. National Hurricane
Center said Ophelia strengthened Saturday from a Category
2 to a Category 3 hurricane,
with peak winds near 115 mph.
Staff and wire reports
USA SNAPSHOTS©
People look through the rubble of a home destroyed by the Tubbs fire in Santa Rosa, Calif., on Saturday. JAY CALDRERON AND RICHARD LUI/US
Crews seek traces of victims
as wind-whipped blazes rage
More Santa Rosa-area residents evacuated; 6 counties named for federal disaster assistance
Sam Gross
USA TODAY Network
SANTA ROSA , CALIF. As flames
leveled and charred dozens of
neighborhoods in Northern
California’s wine country, rescue crews sifted through the
remnants of homes Saturday
Doyle Rice
of instructors age 50-plus
say they tutor because they
want to share their
accumulated
knowledge.
SOURCE Wyzant survey of 1,000 tutors
age 50-plus
MICHAEL B. SMITH AND JANET LOEHRKE, USA TODAY
identified victims by searching
for medical devices such as artificial knees, said Sgt. Spencer Cran
of the Sonoma County Sheriff’s
Office.
Meanwhile, the fires raged on.
Gusting winds overnight drove
flames closer to communities
and neighborhoods in eastern
Santa Rosa, spurring early morning, mandatory evacuations.
Dean Vincent Bordigioni said
he woke at 3 a.m. to see flames
bursting on the ridge above his
winery 7 miles east of Santa Rosa, the Associated Press reported. He said things “went to hell
last night,” and firefighters have
“got a good fight going on.”
On Saturday afternoon, Caliv STORY CONTINUES ON 2T
‘Mysterious’ hole appears in sea ice near Antarctica
Sharing skills
73%
for victims unable to escape the
deadliest and most destructive
series of wildfires in the state’s
history.
The death toll from the fastmoving fires that began nearly a
week ago has reached 38 across
Sonoma, Mendocino, Yuba and
Napa counties — including 20
people killed in Sonoma County
alone. In some cases, officials
@usatodayweather
USA TODAY
A huge, mysterious hole has
been spotted in sea ice near
Antarctica, researchers reported this week.
The hole, which was detected
about a month ago, is roughly
30,000 square miles, or the size
of the state of Maine. It’s the
largest hole spotted in the Weddell Sea since the 1970s, scientists say.
“In the depths of winter, for
more than a month, we’ve had
this area of open water,” Kent
Moore, professor of physics at the
University of Toronto-Mississauga, told National Geographic.
The months of June, July and
August are winter in the Southern Hemisphere.
This is the second year in a row
that scientists have seen such a
massive hole in Antarctica’s sea
ice, though this one is bigger than
the one from last year.
The phenomenon is called a
“polynya,” which is an area of
persistent open water where one
would expect to find solid sea ice,
according to the National Snow
and Ice Data Center.
The hole was detected using a
The polynya is the dark region
of open water within the ice
pack. Scientists aren’t sure if
this one is related to climate
change, according to National
Geographic. NASA WORLDVIEW
robotic float that’s capable of operating underneath sea ice.
Satellite images further confirmed its appearance.
Moore worked with members
of the Southern Ocean Carbon
and Climate Observations and
Modeling project to investigate
polynyas and their climate
impacts.
“It’s just remarkable that this
polynya went away for 40 years
and then came back,” Moore said.
Without the insulating effect of
sea ice cover, a polynya allows the
atmosphere and ocean to exchange heat, momentum and
moisture, leading to significant
impacts on the climate.
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2017
2T
“What’s at issue here
is a deeply troubling
problem that has no
place in our society.”
The board of governors of the Academy
of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
Weinstein’s brother says he wants ‘justice’ served
v CONTINUED FROM 1T
Weinstein, and myriad politicians, actors and actresses have
condemned Weinstein in a series of statements.
The Academy’s board of governors includes Steven Spielberg, Tom Hanks, Whoopi
Goldberg and Laura Dern.
Fallout from the Weinstein
scandal continues more than a
week after an explosive New
York Times investigation de-
This is an edition of USA TODAY
provided for your local newspaper. An
expanded version of USA TODAY is
available at newsstands or by
subscription, and at usatoday.com.
picture.
An
Academy
statement
Wednesday called Weinstein’s
alleged actions “repugnant, abhorrent and antithetical” to the
group that organizes the Oscars.
Since then, even more bigname actresses have come forward to share their own harassment
stories
involving
For the latest national sports coverage,
go to sports.usatoday.com
CALIFORNIA WILDFIRES
Corrections & Clarifications
USA TODAY is committed
to accuracy. To reach us,
contact Standards Editor
Brent Jones at 800-8727073 or e-mail accuracy@usatoday.com.
Please indicate whether
you’re responding to
content online or in the
newspaper.
PRESIDENT AND PUBLISHER
John Zidich
EDITOR IN CHIEF
Joanne Lipman
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President
Trump
“throws
destructive
bones to his
base, then
tells
Congress
to fix it.”
Senate Minority
Leader Chuck
Schumer
Hollywood Reporter published
Saturday, Bob Weinstein said
he’s living in “a waking
nightmare.”
Bob, Harvey’s brother and cofounder of The Weinstein Co.,
said he knew his brother was a
philandering bully but had no
idea “the type of predator” his
brother is accused of being.
“I want him to get the justice
he deserves,” he said.
Crews try to track down missing
v CONTINUED FROM 1T
fornia Gov. Jerry Brown announced that the White House
had expanded federal disaster
assistance to individuals in four
more counties affected by the
raging fires: Butte, Mendocino,
Lake and Yuba. Similar disaster
aid had been announced Friday
for Napa and Sonoma.
New evacuation orders were
issued for parts of the Sonoma
Valley and in the Alexander Valley, north of the Tubbs fire.
Roughly 3,000 more residents
were evacuated from Santa Rosa
and 250 from the town of Sonoma, according to Cal Fire.
Evacuees and residents gathered at a Safeway grocery store
in Santa Rosa being used as a
transportation point to evacuation centers. They stood outside
watching flames creep down hillsides towards homes and vineyards on the valley floor. Small
armies of fire trucks and equipment drove past them toward
the flames as a half-dozen helicopters carrying water buckets
flew overhead.
Two days of calmer winds allowed firefighters to make headway on many of the Northern
California fires, including the
Tubbs, Nuns and Atlas fires that
are threatening communities in
Sonoma County. But winds
kicked up Friday night and remain a concern throughout the
weekend. The National Weather
Service issued a red flag warning
A firefighter mops up an area scorched by a wildfire Saturday in Santa Rosa, Calif. JAE C. HONG, AP
for the area until Saturday
evening.
The Tubbs Fire is 34% contained and has burned 35,270
acres, the Nuns Fire is 10% contained and has burned 46,104
acres, and the Atlas Fire is 45%
contained and has burned 50,383
acres.
Brown and Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Kamala Harris were
expected to attend a community
meeting Saturday afternoon in
Trump’s health care move
jolts many in Washington
Democrats
and some
GOP
lawmakers
fret about
its effect
on their
constituents
tailed decades of sexual harassment
accusations
against
Weinstein, and The New Yorker
released its own report, including allegations of rape and sexual assault.
The Weinstein Co., which he
helped to found, has fired him,
and Weinstein’s wife, fashion
designer Georgina Chapman,
announced she was leaving him.
In an interview with The
Fredreka Schouten
@fschouten
USA TODAY
WASHINGTON
President
Trump’s decision to abruptly cut
off federal payments to insurers
reverberated through the political world Saturday, putting
pressure on Congress to take action to address the high premiums that American consumers
could face and jolting the insurance industry.
Trump’s move late Thursday
to end federal subsidies that
help insurance companies reduce out-of-pocket costs for
low- and middle-income consumers also could deepen the
divide among Republicans on
how to tackle the 2010 Affordable Care Act as the market
opens in a little more than two
weeks for people to sign up for
health care.
Republican leaders have
pledged to dismantle the law,
but some in the GOP have
balked, unwilling to risk the political fallout in states where
large numbers of their constituents are insured through
Obamacare.
In a tweet Saturday, Senate
Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., called Trump’s decision an example of his “failure
to lead.”
The president, he said,
“throws destructive bones to his
base, then tells Congress to fix
it.”
Trump’s move to cut the payments came on the heels of his
Thursday executive order allowing consumers to buy insurance
through association health
plans across states lines. The
move could help millions of consumers find access to cheaper
insurance plans, but it could
drive them into alternative
plans that skirt the law’s consumer protections and coverage
requirements.
In tweets Saturday, Trump
celebrated his strikes against
President Obama’s signature
health care law and reveled in
the damage they had done to insurance stock prices, which fell
sharply Friday on news that he
was ending the subsidies.
“Health Insurance stocks,
which have gone through the
roof during the ObamaCare
years, plunged yesterday after I
ended their Dems windfall!” he
wrote in one tweet.
The Trump administration
and a group of House Republicans who went to court to challenge the subsidies say the
payments violate the Constitution because they were never
specifically authorized by Congress, which controls the federal
government’s purse strings.
The federal subsidies, which
total about $7 billion this year,
benefit more than 6 million people, many of whom live in states
that backed Trump in the 2016
presidential election.
Ending the payments will hit
consumers’ wallets because the
health care law still requires insurance companies to lower
costs for their poorest customers. Insurers are likely to make
up for those lost federal payments by boosting premiums for
consumers who buy their own
insurance.
The Congressional Budget
Office has estimated premiums
could surge by 20% with the loss
of subsidies.
A group of 19 Democratic
state attorneys general is suing
to block the move, which also
has been denounced by insurance companies and medical
groups, such as the American
Heart Association.
Nevada’s Republican Gov. Brian Sandoval also criticized
Trump’s actions, telling The Nevada Independent that ending the
payments will be “devastating”
to lower-income consumers.
“It’s going to hurt people. It’s
going to hurt kids. It’s going to
hurt families,” Sandoval said.
But conservative groups such
as Americans for Prosperity, affiliated with the Koch brothers,
hailed Trump’s actions to weaken the law.
Santa Rosa.
Search-and-rescue
efforts
mostly centered on neighborhoods that were badly burned
when high-speed winds pushed
flames through residential and
commercial areas on the north
side of Santa Rosa earlier in the
week. Crews were focusing Saturday on the decimated neighborhoods of Fountain Grove,
Larkfield and Coffey Park.
Cran said crews were also sift-
ing through the 235-name missing person’s list and tackling
specific-target searches by visiting the homes of people reported
missing. Investigators have been
able to locate 1,250 people so far.
“If someone has an elderly relative that’s missing, and they
have a specific address, or someone who had mobility or health
issues that were unlikely to escape a fire, that’s where we’re
heading to,” Cran said.
CALIFORNIA WILDFIRES
Rural and urban sites at risk
from ‘devil winds,’ tall grass
Corinne S. Kennedy, Elizabeth
Weise and Alena Maschke
The (Palm Springs, Calif.) Desert Sun
PALM SPRINGS , CALIF.
Iver Larson and his wife were halfway up
the road to their home near Kenwood, Calif., when a fire truck
coming down the hill stopped
them.
“The fire’s just over the ridge;
it’s close. You need to turn back.
Now,” Larson was told by the captain in the truck.
Commander Chris Childs of
the California Highway Patrol in
Napa County said at least 50 people had been rescued from hilltops by officers flying in
helicopters.
Fast-moving fires in Napa and
Sonoma counties fueled by “devil
winds” destroyed entire neighborhoods. The wind, with gusts
registering up to 79 mph, combined with the late-night timing
as two key elements of the fires’
deadly pace. Added to that is
growth in fire-prone areas, increasing the risk of wildfires
where people live and work.
California wine country is
famed not only for its vines but
also for the rolling hills and
graceful valleys in which many
vineyards sit. Vineyards can be
worth up to $400,000 an acre,
making growing wine grapes one
of the rare agricultural pursuits
worth more than selling out to
developers.
The multimillion-dollar views,
unobstructed by large-scale development, lend themselves not
just to tasting rooms but to highend homes on winding roads that
go deep into canyons and up hillsides most at risk in fires.
Experts advocate for defensible space. Cal Fire defines this as
“the required space between a
structure and the wildland area”
meant to stop the spread of wildfires. It’s more difficult to create
for homes on hillsides — those
with views — because fire moves
more quickly uphill.
Homeowners also don’t want
to chop down the ancient oaks
that give the area its character.
And the roads leading up to
homes tend to be narrow, with
trees on both sides. In a fire, the
trees burn and sometime fall
over, making it impossible for
residents to leave and for firefighters to get to.
California law demands any
structures adjacent to forest,
brush, or grass-covered land or
mountainous terrain maintain a
defensible space of 100 feet from
the structure in every direction.
However, the state regulations
lack teeth.
While Cal Fire inspectors enforce defensible space regulations
in some rural parts of the state, in
most parts of California the onus
falls on the property owner.
California’s drought ending
with a wet winter served as a double-edged sword.
“It seems like we can’t win
when we have four years of
drought, and then we get all this
rain, and that fuels the plant
growth that contributes to wildfires,” Cal Fire spokesperson
Lynne Tolmachoff said.
She said Cal Fire saw more
fires in lower elevations, where
the tall grasses grow and the subdivisions flourish.
In Napa and Sonoma counties,
strict development rules designed
to protect the agricultural character of the area have mostly kept
out subdivision building. However, cities like Santa Rosa have
seen tremendous growth — more
than 10% from 2000 to 2015, according to the city.
This has brought new challenges in combating wildfires.
Tolmachoff said fires in tightly
packed suburban neighborhoods
could become more frequent as
California’s urban areas expand.
“With houses so close together,
they can be susceptible because if
one home catches fire, other
homes around it can quickly
catch fire as well,” Tolmachoff
said.
She said people sometimes
think only areas at the edge of
wildlands are vulnerable, but
compact suburban developments
put many residents at risk.
State law
requires
100-foot
space
around
housing,
but it’s
often up
to owner
to comply
“With
houses so
close
together,
they can be
susceptible
because if
one home
catches fire,
other homes
around it
can quickly
catch fire as
well.”
Cal Fire
spokesperson
Lynne
Tolmachoff
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2017
3T
slams GOP’s
Ex-hostage: Extremists Bannon
establishment wing
killed my child, raped wife
Tells activists that
Republican senators
must fall in line
Canadian man
denounces ‘evil’
and ‘stupidity’ of
Haqqani network
Paul Singer
@singernews
USA TODAY
Fredreka Schouten
@fschouten
USA TODAY
A Canadian man freed after
years of captivity in Afghanistan
said the militants in the Haqqani
network raped his wife and killed
his young daughter while the
family was held hostage.
Joshua Boyle made the statement late Friday shortly after arriving in Canada with his
American wife, Caitlin Coleman,
who is from Stewartstown, Pa.,
and their three young children,
the Associated Press and other
news outlets reported.
The family was rescued this
week as part of an operation undertaken by Pakistani security
forces, acting with intelligence
provided by the United States.
Their release came five years after their abduction by the Taliban-linked extremists. They had
been on a backpacking trip in Afghanistan, and Coleman was
pregnant at the time. All four of
their children were born while
they were held hostage.
“The stupidity and evil of the
Haqqani network’s kidnapping of
a pilgrim and his heavily pregnant wife engaged in helping ordinary
villagers
in
Taliban-controlled regions of Afghanistan was eclipsed only by
the stupidity and evil of authorizing the murder of my infant
daughter, Martyr Boyle,” Joshua
Boyle told reporters Friday night
after landing in Toronto.
He said he now wants to create
a “secure sanctuary for our three
surviving children to call a
home.”
In an interview with the AP,
Dan Boyle, Joshua’s younger
brother, said he had spoken to his
Joshua Boyle, left, gets a police escort after arriving at the
airport in Toronto. NATHAN DENETTE, AP
brother a few times in the past
few days.
“He’s doing very well,” Dan
Boyle said. “He sounds a lot like
how he sounded five years ago.
He sounds like he had his head on
his shoulders and his wits about
him.”
In a statement, the Canadian
government said it will “continue
to support (Boyle) and his family
now that they have returned.”
Boyle has expressed disagreement with U.S. foreign policy, and
during his return flight to Canada, he nodded to one of the U.S.
State Department officials on
board the plane and said: “Their
interests are not my interests,”
according to an AP reporter who
was on the flight.
Boyle said he was in Afghanistan “helping the most neglected
minority group in the world,
those ordinary villagers that live
deep inside Taliban-controlled
Afghanistan, where no NGO, no
aid worker and no government
has ever successfully been able to
bring the necessary help.”
Pakistani authorities, long
criticized by U.S. officials of ignoring militant groups operating
within their borders, say the raid
to rescue the family was aided by
a tip from the U.S. and said it
demonstrated that Pakistan
would act against groups like the
Haqqani network when American officials shared information.
Boyle told his family that he,
his wife and their children were
intercepted by Pakistani forces
while being transported in the
back or trunk of their captors’ car.
His family said Boyle told them
some of his captors were killed,
and he sustained only a shrapnel
wound.
The AP and CNN reported U.S.
military officials say Boyle refused to board a U.S. military
transport plane early Thursday,
citing concerns that he could be
arrested.
Boyle told reporters that the
family’s departure was delayed by
a medical emergency involving
one of the children.
“I assure you, I have never refused to board any mode of transportation that would bring me
closer to home,” he said.
Boyle was once married to the
sister of Canadian-born Omar
Khadr, who was detained at
Guantanamo Bay after fighting
U.S. forces in Afghanistan. Officials have said there is no link between Boyle’s capture and Khadr.
Contributing: Associated Press
Former White House strategist
Steve Bannon told conservative
activists Saturday that the upset
victory of firebrand Roy Moore in
last month’s Alabama Senate Republican primary has refocused
the White House on its conservative agenda, which may include
moving the U.S. embassy in Tel
Aviv to Jerusalem.
Bannon said it is no coincidence that the White House has
rolled out a series of hard-line
policy announcements in recent
days, including a long list of new
immigration demands and the
decision to stop Obamacare subsidy payments to insurers to support coverage for low-income
customers.
“Those are not random events,
folks,” Bannon said at the Values
Voter Summit in Washington.
“That is ‘victory begets victory.’
We owe that to Judge Moore and
the good men and women of Alabama because that all came from
them.”
Bannon said he expects more
conservative policy announcements, including possibly one
next week that the U.S. is moving
its embassy in Israel and a declaration that the Muslim Brotherhood is a terrorist organization.
The Brotherhood is the Egyptian
political and religious movement
that elected Mohamed Morsi
president in 2012 after the nation’s populist revolution. He was
overthrown a year later.
The White House has made no
indication these announcements
are coming any time soon and did
not immediately respond to a request for comment.
President Trump “had some
bad information given to him and
some bad advice given to him”
and joined Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., in endorsing Sen. Luther Strange in
Former White House
strategist Steve Bannon says
U.S. Senate candidate Roy
Moore’s primary victory in
Alabama is a sign of things to
come. BRYNN ANDERSON, AP
the Alabama Republican primary,
Bannon said. But Moore, a former state Supreme Court justice,
beat Strange handily and is leading Democrat Doug Jones for the
December election to take the
Senate seat vacated by Jeff Sessions, now Trump’s attorney
general.
Since leaving the White House
in August, Bannon has pledged to
launch a crusade against establishment Republicans who support McConnell and are not
doing enough, in his eyes, to implement Trump’s agenda.
On Saturday, Bannon excoriated Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., who
responded to criticisms from
Trump on Twitter with his own
tweet saying the White House has
become an “adult day care” facility. Corker had already announced
he will not run for re-election
next year.
Bannon said that is not
enough: Activists now must demand that other Republican senators condemn his comments.
“All you folks that are so concerned that you might get primaried or defeated, there is time for
a mea culpa,” he said. “You can
come to the (microphones) and
condemn Sen. Corker.”
He called out Sens. John Barrasso of Wyoming, Deb Fischer of
Nebraska and Dean Heller of Nevada and said grass-roots conservatives “are coming for you.”
Fact check: Trump on ‘multiple violations’
He says Tehran broke
pact, but atomic
agency disagrees
Eugene Kiely
FactCheck.org
In refusing to certify the Iran
nuclear deal, President Trump
said Iran “has committed multiple violations of the agreement.”
But that’s not the finding of the
International Atomic Energy
Agency.
The IAEA has issued eight reports since the agreement was
implemented in January 2016,
and all eight — most recently
Aug. 31 — have found Iran is implementing the agreement.
Trump himself has certified to
Congress on two occasions that
Iran has complied with the nuclear deal known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action. The
president must issue a certification every 90 days.
On Friday, Trump announced
he would not once again certify
Iran’s compliance with the
JCPOA. His decision “gives Congress the option to introduce legislation reimposing U.S. sanctions
waived or suspended under the
JCPOA on an expedited schedule,” the Arms Control Association says.
Trump said Iran committed
“multiple violations” of the
JCPOA, which was negotiated by
the U.S., China, France, Germany,
Russia and the United Kingdom,
as well as representatives of the
European Union and Iran.
uTrump on Friday: Iranian
regime has committed multiple
violations of the agreement. For
example, on two separate occasions, they have exceeded the
limit of 130 metric tons of heavy
water. Until recently, the Iranian
regime has also failed to meet our
expectations in its operation of
advanced centrifuges.The Iranian
regime has also intimidated international inspectors into not
using the full inspection authorities that the agreement calls for.
Iranian officials and military
leaders have repeatedly claimed
they will not allow inspectors onto military sites, even though the
President Trump speaks about the Iran deal in the White House’s Diplomatic Reception room Friday. BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI, AFP/GETTY IMAGES
international community suspects some of those sites were
part of Iran’s clandestine nuclear
weapons program.
Let’s take a look at each of the
three issues Trump raised.
Under the agreement, Iran is
limited to 130 metric tons of
heavy water — which is a concern
to nuclear arms inspectors, as the
Associated Press reported, because it is “used to cool reactors
that can produce substantial
amounts of plutonium,” which
“can be applied to making the fissile core of nuclear warheads.”
On two occasions, Iran has
slightly exceeded the limits. The
first time was in February 2016, a
month after the agreement was
implemented, and again in November. So Trump is right, although he was aware of these
violations when he agreed twice
before
to
certify
Iran’s
compliance.
Iran also is now in compliance
with the heavy water limits, according to the eighth and most
recent IAEA report.
“Iran exceeded the heavy water
limits briefly but is now in compliance,” Daryl G. Kimball, executive director of the Arms Control
Association, said in an email. “It
is important to note that the
heavy water is now useless for
Iran given that its heavy water reactor at Arak has been reconfigured so that it cannot produce
plutonium.”
Iran filled the core of the
heavy-water reactor at Arak with
concrete in January 2016.
Kelsey Davenport, director for
nonproliferation policy at the
Arms Control Association, said
there was a misunderstanding
about the 130 metric tons.
Iran “interpreted language in
the deal setting the cap differently than” the other countries, believing that the “130-ton limit
was an estimate, not a hard cap.”
But that difference has been resolved, and there have been no violations since.
As for Trump’s concern about
advanced centrifuges, David Albright, an IAEA weapons inspector in Iraq during the 1990s and
founder of the Institute for Science and International Security,
said that issue has been resolved.
“The issue is the number of advanced centrifuges Iran had,” Albright said. “I would call it a
violation that has been corrected,
inadvertently I would add. The
extra ones broke.”
Trump’s reference to inspections at military sites refers to
Section T of JCPOA that covers
the development of dual-use
equipment that has civilian and
military applications, according
to Albright, an adviser to the
Trump administration. Albright
said the IAEA needs access to
military sites in order to verify
The issue is
whether Iran has
complied, and
even those within
Trump’s own
administration
have said Iran is
in compliance.
Iran’s compliance with Section T
of the agreement.
Under the JCPOA, the IAEA
has daily access to declared nuclear sites for 15 years and continuous electronic monitoring of
those sites for at least 15 years, as
explained in a guidebook published by the Belfer Center for
Science and International Affairs
at Harvard University. There is a
separate, confidential agreement
covering the Parchin military site,
which has been the site of past activity that the IAEA has suspected was connected to nuclear
weapons development. Critics
have claimed that agreement
amounts to self-inspections, a
claim the IAEA has denied.
“This is the most egregious of
Trump’s claims,” said Davenport,
of the Arms Control Association.
“The IAEA clearly stated that
Iran has granted inspectors all of
the access the agency has requested. If Iran had blocked ac-
cess, the P5+1, including the
United States, would not have
been able to say that Iran is complying with the accord.”
In a statement in response to
Trump’s speech, IAEA Director
General Yukiya Amano said that
“the IAEA has had access to all locations it needed to visit.”
Albright, who agrees with the
president that Iran is “not in full
compliance,” said the IAEA has
not asked for access to the military sites for fear it would “bring
down the entire deal.”
“The IAEA can ask to go, and if
Iran refuses, the JCPOA contains
a mechanism to allow one party
to snap back all sanctions,” Albright said. “But the IAEA is not
likely to want to bring down the
entire deal by asking to go to a
military site.”
We take no position on
Trump’s desire to renegotiate aspects of the Iran deal he does not
like. The issue, though, is whether
Iran has complied with the existing agreement, and even those
within his own administration
have said Iran is in compliance.
In September, Secretary of
State Rex Tillerson said Iran is in
“technical compliance” with the
deal, and Gen. Joseph Dunford,
chairman of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff, told Congress that “Iran is
adhering to its JCPOA obligations,” and the agreement is
working as intended.
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2017
4T
Austria voters likely to shift toward far-right
People’s Party head
Kurz, 31, expected to
take chancellorship
Special for USA TODAY
Sebastian Kurz
shot to prominence
by transforming his
People’s Party into
a decidedly
nationalistic party.
Austria, buffeted by the growing anti-immigration sentiment
that shook presidential elections last year, is poised to elect
a new lower chamber of parliament Sunday that is likely to
tilt to the far-right.
Polls indicated that the People’s Party (OVP), led by 31year-old foreign minister Sebastian Kurz, would win about a
third of the vote in the election
for the National Council and
become the new chancellor.
The far-right Freedom Party
(FPO), mostly founded by former Nazis in 1956, is likely to
pick up at least a quarter of the
es of Austrian politics, has become a playmaker with its even
harsher anti-refugee, anti-migrant and anti-establishment
message under leader HeinzChristian Strache, who has
called for a ban on “fascistic Islam.”
The party shocked the country — and Europe — last year
when its presidential candidate, Norbert Hofer, narrowly
lost a bid for the Austrian presidency.
Taking up his party’s anti-establishment message, party
leader Strache opened his final
campaign speech in Vienna
with a taunting message: “We
Maximilian Mayerhofer
A woman passes an election poster Saturday for Austria’s
Sebastian Kurz, leader of the People’s Party. VALDRIN XHEMAJ, EPA-EFE
vote.
Kurz shot to prominence by
transforming his party, which
has dominated post-war Austrian politics for more than 70
years, into a decidedly nationalistic and anti-immigrant party.
Now he is feeling pressure to
his right. The Freedom Party,
which had hovered on the fring-
don’t want morons in our government!”
With polls among the 6.4 million voters showing the only
other major party, the centerleft Social Democrats (SPO), in
third place, Kurz may well bring
the Freedom Party into a ruling
coalition in the 183-member
council, parliament’s dominant
lower chamber, and cement the
far-right policies. That would
relegate incumbent Chancellor
Christian Kern, chairman of the
Social Democrats, into opposition for five years.
The Social Democrats and
People’s Party, part of the current ruling coalition, agreed on
the early elections after months
of bickering. In 2015, Austria
took in about 90,000 asylumseekers, mainly Syrian Muslims. Growing political pressure
prompted Austria last year to
tell the European Union that it
did not want to accept any more
refugees.
Pence pursues
backing from
Koch allies for
tax-cut plans
Gathering of wealthy donors focuses
on political impact of passing reform
Fredreka Schouten
@fschouten
USA TODAY
Vice President Pence
on Friday sought to rally the
wealthy donors aligned with the
conservative Koch brothers to
use their political muscle to pressure Congress to pass sweeping
tax cuts, as the administration
steps up its lobbying for a tax
overhaul.
“To get this tax cut across the
line, to give the American people
the tax relief that they need, we
need every ounce of your energy
and enthusiasm,” Pence told billionaire industrialist David Koch
and about 100 donors who gathered at the St. Regis Hotel in midtown Manhattan for a strategy
session on policy fights in Congress and next year’s midterm
elections.
“This is the moment,” Pence
said. “Now is the time.”
The Koch network, one of the
most powerful forces in Republican politics, already has spent
more than $10 million this year
on its campaign to pass the tax
plan, running ads targeting vulnerable Democratic incumbents,
sending activists door-to-door in
key states and having donors dial
Republicans on Capitol Hill, pressuring them to speed a tax plan
through Congress this year.
“It’s the most significant federal effort that we have every undertaken,” said Tim Phillips,
NEW YORK
president of Americans for Prosperity, the largest group in the
sprawling network.
In all, the groups in the Koch
political empire plan to spend
close to $400 million in the 2018
election cycle on policy and political battles in Congress and statehouses around the country, far
exceeding the $250 million the
network spent in 2016.
Pence’s presence at the gathering, his first public appearance
before the network since assuming the vice presidency, underscores the growing urgency of the
White House and their allies to
chalk up a legislative victory, particularly after the GOP-controlled
Senate failed repeatedly in the
long-promised efforts to repeal
the 2010 Affordable Care Act.
Koch strategists and their contributors warned that the Republicans who control Congress face
a voter and donor backlash if they
fail to deliver tax cuts.
Chris Wright, a Denver-based
oil and gas executive who is active
in the network, said he was
“hugely nervous” that Congress
would falter on taxes.
“This is the crux issue of the
first two years of the Trump presidency,” Wright said. “If tax reform gets done, that animal spirit,
the growing incentive will lead to
a growing economy that will help
the Republicans massively in the
midterm elections,” he said.
The elected officials who huddled with donors Friday sounded
alarms, too.
If the tax overhaul “crashes
Vice President Pence tells wealthy conservative donors that
“this is the moment” for tax reform. ANDREW HARNIK, AP
David Koch presided over a
donor summit Friday in New
York. PHELAN M. EBENHACK, AP
and burns,” said Texas Republican Sen. Ted Cruz, the party
“could face a bloodbath” in the
2018 midterm elections for Congress. “We have the potential of
seeing a Watergate-level blowout,” he said, referring to the 1974
election that swept more than 90
new lawmakers into office.
“The left is energized. ... They
are showing up, and if conservatives stay home, that’s a recipe for
a Speaker Pelosi and Speaker
Schumer,” Cruz said, referring to
the Democratic leaders in the
House and Senate.
The tax plan aims to bring
about the biggest overhaul to the
U.S. tax code in decades and proposes broad cuts, including mea-
sures to abolish the federal estate
tax and lower the corporate tax
rate to 20% from 35%, which
backers say would make the United
States
more
globally
competitive.
But some of its provisions pose
political
difficulties
for
Republicans.
Among them: a plan to eliminate the federal deduction for
state and local taxes. Some GOP
lawmakers from districts in New
York and New Jersey with concentrations of high-income
households oppose the measure
because their constituents rely on
the tax deductions to ease the
high costs of living in those
communities.
Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., another
Republican who met with donors
Friday, acknowledged that Republican control of the White
House and the Senate is no guarantee that Republicans will reach
agreement.
“The House is like a football
team with a couple of coaches on
the sidelines and a great quarterback,” Scott told the donors. The
Senate, he said, is like “a track
team. Everybody is running their
individual race.”
The network counts more than
600 contributors who commit to
giving at least $100,000 a year to
support Koch priorities. But
many give millions annually to
back a broad range of issues, from
supporting free-market programs
at universities to anti-poverty
programs in cities such as Dallas.
Friday’s session was a smaller
gathering to delve into political
strategy ahead of the midterm
elections, when the president’s
party typically loses seats in
Congress.
Although the Kochs did not
back President Trump during the
2016 campaign, the network has
long ties to Pence and has collaborated closely with the White
House in recent months on several key issues, including the effort
to overhaul the tax code. A former top Koch aide, Marc Short, is
now the White House’s top liaison with Congress. And earlier
this month, Phillips of Americans
for Prosperity attended a small
gathering of conservative leaders
at the White House.
During the 2016 campaign,
Trump openly mocked his Republican rivals on Twitter for
courting Koch donors.
On Friday, Pence made it clear
that those tensions had faded.
“Whatever differences some in
the room may have had in the
campaign of 2016, the president
sent me here today to thank you
for your strong support of our
agenda this year, in 2017.”
Woman clinging to husband of 55 years dies in Calif. wildfire
Couple seeks refuge
from flames in a pool
Joe Szydlowski
The Salinas Californian
Armando Berriz remembers
the first time he saw his wife,
Carmen.
It was a lifetime ago in Cuba, as
his son-in-law Luis Ocon tells the
story: “He said, ‘When I was 13, I
saw her for the first time, and I
knew at that moment we were
going to be together.’ ”
He was right. Since then, they
never left each other’s side, even
as they escaped Fidel Castro’s
revolution. They married in Florida and spent the next 55 years
traveling the world, keeping their
family close. On their final night
together, they were with their
daughter Monica Ocon, Luis
Ocon and the couple’s daughter at
a Napa County mansion, laughing, talking and playing board
games.
Their last game had been Sorry! Carmen was the victor.
Then the fire drew closer. It
was time to go.
The five dashed out of the
home into three vehicles.
“Everything was engulfed in
flames,” Luis said. “The house
across the street was already like
a bonfire.”
But as the caravan made its escape, Armando and Carmen were
soon stranded. They had tried to
follow in their sedan, but debris
in the roadway trapped the car.
“The tires were spinning, but
they weren’t going anywhere,”
Luis said.
The car eventually broke down
amid the thick smoke and chaos,
leaving them separated from
their family.
Armando grabbed Carmen and
said they had to get to the pool.
She immediately followed him.
They spent the next six hours
there, him clutching the poolside
so hot that it burned his hands.
He gripped it so he could push
himself and Carmen underwater.
At times, the heat was so in-
Carmen Berriz died in her husband Armando’s arms Monday,
trapped in a swimming pool by a raging wildfire. PROVIDED/LUIS OCON
tense they kept only their lips and
noses above water to breathe.
When they went up for air, they
prayed together, Luis said.
Meanwhile, their family tried
to find them, traversing roads so
choked by smoke that only the
center divider was visible. Monica
and the couple’s daughter went to
“Everything was
engulfed in flames.
The house across the
street was already
like a bonfire.”
Son-in-law Luis Ocon
a friend’s house, while Luis drove
back. He said there was so much
fire and debris that he couldn’t
make it all the way there. He
flagged down a fire engine, which
also couldn’t make it.
At the pool, Carmen fainted.
Armando held her for two hours
before encountering a fire crew.
Carmen never recovered.
Luis and Monica had spent the
night searching area shelters and
hospitals for their in-laws. Eventually, Luis got a text message
from one of the firefighters who
had tried to save the Berrizes: Get
to the hospital “NOW.”
When they arrived, the firefighters helped Armando inside
and told Luis about his
mother-in-law.
“(He told me) when he was
with my mother-in-law, she is
what kept him alive,” Luis said.
“When she died, his three kids
were what kept him alive.”
Armando was “their rock,” Luis
said, but they can tell he is hurting as well as the family grieves.
“These were people all about
love.”
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2017
5T
Somalis look for survivors amid the rubble of buildings damaged by a truck bomb outside a hotel near the foreign ministry. FARAH ABDI WARSAMEH, AP
Smoke rises from the flames that continue to burn Saturday behind a man looking at the destruction caused by the Mogadishu bombing. MOHAMED ABDIWAHAB, AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Powerful truck bomb hits
hotel in capital of Somalia
Security had trailed
vehicle described as
suspicious; 20 dead,
at least 15 injured
A huge explosion from a truck bomb killed
20 people Saturday in Somalia’s capital,
shaking Mogadishu residents who described
the blast as the most powerful they’d heard
in years.
The explosion appeared to target the Safari Hotel, which was largely destroyed. Police
said people were trapped in the rubble of the
hotel, close to Somalia’s foreign ministry.
At least 15 people were injured, police
Capt. Mohamed Hussein said. He said security forces had been trailing the truck after it
raised suspicions.
The Somalia-based extremist group alShabab has recently stepped up attacks on
army bases. While there was no immediate
claim of responsibility for Saturday’s blast,
al-Shabab often targets high-profile areas of
Mogadishu with bombings.
Gunshots could be heard at the site, and
ambulance sirens wailed across the capital
that has been under tight security with military-manned checkpoints.
The explosion left a trail of destruction
across a busy intersection, with several bodies and bloodied clothing and shoes.
“There was a traffic jam, and the road was
packed,” said Abdinur Abdulle, a waiter at a
nearby restaurant.
The blast occurred two days after the head
of the U.S. Africa Command was in Mogadishu to meet with Somalia’s president and two
days after the nation’s defense minister and
army chief resigned for undisclosed reasons.
— Associated Press
Rescuers use a sheet to carry an injured man to an ambulance. Residents said the
bomb blast was the most powerful they had heard in years. FARAH ABDI WARSAMEH, AP
Vehicles burn at the explosion site in front of the
Safari Hotel. Mogadishu has been a target of past
al-Shabab extremist attacks. SAID YUSUF WARSAME, EPA-EFE
A Somali soldier and another
man help lead an injured
civilian away from the blast
area Saturday in the country’s
capital. FARAH ABDI WARSAMEH, AP
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2017
6T
MONEY
How do we teach
kids about money
as we ditch cash?
Piggy banks are slowly
becoming things of the past
as we shift toward digital
apps and services to hold
our money. GETTY
IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO
The loss
of feeling
cash in
hand
makes
the task
tougher,
but little
ones can
still learn
Brett Molina
@brettmolina23
USA TODAY
Doug Anderson discovered his
kids’ interest in money started
with the tooth fairy.
“They start learning a little bit
about money because they start
to accumulate some and learn a
little bit about its value,” said Anderson, who owns a business
media company based in Washington, D.C., and has four kids,
ages 6 months to 9 years, including a 5-year-old who just lost a
tooth.
The tooth fairy still largely operates in dimes, quarters or even
dollars. But soon, given the lack
of cash parents cart around, could
it start to pay by Venmo?
According to a 2016 Pew Research Center study, 24% of
Americans indicated they don’t
make purchases using cash during a typical week.
And that has made teaching
children about the value of money, from how to count and pay
with it to how to save it, a particularly 21st-century challenge.
“We’re vastly approaching that
real time where’s there no cash,”
said Neale Godfrey, of the Children’s Financial Network, a company she founded in 1989 to help
teach kids and parents about
money. “Our kids will look back
on bills and coins as relics.”
Fifty years ago, the ATM was a
novelty. Now, there are so many
different ways to pay for things.
We still have plastic — a 2016
study from credit card processor
Total System Services found that
75% of consumers surveyed said
credit or debit cards were their
most preferred form of payment,
with just 11% preferring cash.
But now there are also digital
options, from Apple Pay to apps
such as PayPal, Zelle and Venmo,
which let you send and receive
money with a few taps on a
smartphone.
For parents, this shift means
rethinking how to teach kids
about money.
Where earlier generations
earned cash allowances or received money as gifts from grandparents to buy a toy or candy,
today they might receive a digital
gift — such as an iTunes gift card.
At school, we don’t give kids
lunch money. We just add funds
to their school account digitally.
Robin Taub, a certfified public
accountant and author of A Parent’s Guide to Raising MoneySmart Kids, suggests getting kids
starting to think about money
around the age of 5, or whenever
they “start to express an interest
or a curiosity” about money.
“That tangibility of feeling and
handing over cash to somebody
feels very real, that sense of loss
which is hard to replicate when
you’re using plastic,” she said.
“You just don’t feel like you’re
losing it or spending it.”
A world without cash isn’t a
crazy notion. Look at countries
like Sweden, a model for a cashfree world, where even churches
have started taking donations via
mobile app.
“All they
see us do
with
money is
spend it.
They
don’t see
us save or
pay bills
or give to
charity.
Make
money
discussions a
normal
and
healthy
part of
your life
with your
kids.”
Neale Godfrey of
the Children’s
Financial Network
BRING OUT THE BILLS
Godfrey of the Children’s Financial Network said the most important thing parents can do is
not keep money a secret but talk
openly.
“All they see us do with money
is spend it. They don’t see us save
or pay bills or give to charity,” she
said. “Make money discussions a
normal and healthy part of your
life with your kids.”
Cash still carries value when it
comes to teaching, Godfrey said.
“We teach little kids to brush
their teeth. We teach them to
stop at a light. We teach them not
to talk to strangers,” she said. “We
try to make it as visual as
possible.”
For older kids, Godfrey suggests starting off with something
real, like taking their money to a
bank and opening an account.
Then you can flip to online elements like apps, but kids now
have a sense “that it started out to
be real.”
Even if you’re not as financially
literate as you would hope, teaching kids about money offers a
chance to learn together, Taub
said. “Parents don’t have to be financial experts themselves, but I
do encourage them to get their
own financial house in order so
that they can lead by example.”
4-BANK SYSTEM
Learning about the value of money isn’t just about how many
quarters are in a buck. It’s important to teach kids about planning
as both physical and digital temptations to spend pop up.
“Kids will probably tell you
that ‘you don’t understand,’ so
come prepared with a planning
story of your own — when you resisted buying something impulsively so you could save for
something important,” said Kurt
Rupprecht, a financial adviser
with K Street Financial Group in
Washington, D.C.
One way to encourage this is
the 4-Bank System, where money
kids receive is split among four
“bank” jars: spending, saving, giving and investing.
“It’s a great way to teach children to plan and set aside money
for different wants and needs,
now and in the future,” Rupprecht said.
There are other digital services
parents can consider for older
kids to help them manage money.
Greenlight is a debit card for kids
that looks like your typical credit
card. However, parents control
what stores can accept the card
and receive alerts when a purchase is made.
“(Parents) had this desire for
their kids to be smart with money
but didn’t have the knowledge or
the time,” said Tim Sheehan,
CEO of Greenlight. “These topics
weren’t really being taught in
school.”
Anderson, the father of four,
said around the time of the tooth
fairy’s visit to his kids, he started
a banking account with each child
to give them “an understanding
about keeping (money) there and
watching it grow.” His kids earn
“semi-regular contributions” by
completing chores or meeting
other goals.
He also makes sure to put
those accounts under their name
to capture their attention when
statements arrive in the mail. “It
gives the kid a sense of buy-in to
it, but it also discourages them
from spending it.”
Anderson saw this strategy pay
off recently when his two oldest
kids wrestled with whether to
purchase an Xbox video game
console, even independently going online to find the best deal.
“They can feel a sense of pride
and ownership; they have this
money in the bank, and they can
see it right there,” he said.
Here’s one way Google sees search changing for you
Lens makes your camera how you find info
Jessica Guynn
USA TODAY
SAN FRANCISCO Google thinks
smartphone technology should
be, well, smarter and do more of
the work for us.
The search engine giant is rolling out Google Lens as a preview
with its new Pixel phones. Pixel
USA SNAPSHOTS©
Looking good,
feeling bad
52%
of consumers
with good
credit scores
and in credit
card debt who
feel it’s a major
issue do not
feel in control
of their
finances.
SOURCE Marcus by Goldman Sachs Debt
Survey of 1,036 adults ages 22 and older
with a credit score of 660 or higher
JAE YANG AND PAUL TRAP, USA TODAY
users will be the first to try Google Lens in Google Photos and the
Google Assistant. It will come to
other devices “in time,” the company says.
Instead of searching the Internet with words, you will be able to
search the world with photos.
Google Lens turns your smartphone camera into a search engine. You point the camera at
something, and Google figures
out what it is, whether it’s a photo
from a family vacation five years
ago or a painting hanging on the
wall.
It’s a new frontier in search,
creating an Internet search box
that hovers over the real world.
Spot a flyer for piano lessons on a
telephone pole? Google Lens can
grab the email address and shoot
off a note. Can’t decide whether
to watch “Wonder Woman” on
Friday night? Point the camera at
the screen, and ask, “Is this movie
worth watching?” Ditto for that
new book from Zadie Smith.
The Lens feature is part of
Google’s big push into an “AIfirst” world being led by chief executive Sundar Pichai.
At the heart of Pichai’s vision is
the belief that we are increasingly
moving toward a world that runs
on artificial intelligence, meaning
no matter what screen we are in-
Aparna Chennapragada, senior director of product at Google
Inc., talks about Google Lens, an ambitious new AI-centered
app, at a product launch event Oct. 4. ELIJAH NOUVELAGE, AFP/GETTY IMAGES
teracting with — a smartphone or
a smart-home device — we will be
helped by the invisible hands of
smart machines that answer our
questions and help us complete
everyday tasks.
It’s a big leap forward from the
days of typing a string of words
into the Google search engine, al-
lowing the Internet giant to show
lucrative search ads. Now Google
is competing with other tech giants to assist consumers in their
everyday lives.
Visual search with Lens, like
voice search, is one way Google is
adapting to how people want to
retrieve information and com-
plete tasks.
“In an AI-first world, I believe
computers should adapt to how
people live their lives rather than
people having to adapt to computers,” Pichai said earlier this
month.
Google first showed off Lens at
its I/O conference for software
developers in May. At the time,
the use case that drew the most
applause was the one that showed
how Lens can help with a common and frustrating task: logging
into your Wi-Fi network. With
Lens, you can take a picture of the
sticker on your router that has
the name of the network and the
password, and your phone will
automatically connect to it.
Other tech companies have developed visual search features,
such as Samsung’s Bixby Vision,
Amazon’s Firefly and Pinterest’s
Lens.
How Google Lens works: It’s
built into Google Photos and
Google Assistant. Eventually you
will see a Lens button in the Google Photos and Google Assistant
apps. Tap on the Lens icon, and it
will summon information for you.
“The really cool thing about
Lens is that it represents a way to
interact with the real world that
we really haven’t had a chance to
do before from a search perspective,” said Gartner analyst Brian
Blau.
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2017
7T
PERSONAL FINANCE
Plan for possible tax-law changes
Questions unanswered, but that doesn’t mean you can’t prepare for what-ifs
Robert Powell
Special to USA TODAY
The Trump administration
and Republicans’ plan to reform
taxes in the U.S. is far from a done
deal. What’s more, it’s short on
details — and whatever details
there are seemingly change by
the day.
“In the tax world, a nine-page
tax framework is equivalent to a
tweet,” said Jean-Luc Bourdon, a
wealth adviser and principal at
BrightPath Wealth Planning. “It
leaves
many
questions
unanswered.”
Not surprisingly, financial experts say there’s not much you
should do until the proposals become the law.
But that doesn’t mean you
ought not do some what-if planning. Here’s what experts suggest:
MOVE TO A TAXFRIENDLY STATE?
The so-called framework for fixing the tax eliminates most itemized deductions (such as state
and local taxes), but it retains tax
incentives for home mortgage interest and charitable contributions.
At the same time, the framework increases the standard deduction to $24,000 for married
taxpayers filing jointly and
$12,000 for single filers.
That means those saving for or
living in retirement, and especially those who live in high- and local-tax states who now itemize
their deductions, will have to
crunch the numbers to see if they
will pay more or less in taxes after
factoring in their new marginal
individual income tax bracket —
12%, 25% and 35%, and possibly a
fourth higher rate on the highestincome household.
If you are paying more in taxes,
you might consider moving to a
more tax-friendly state.
“For retirees, still one of the
biggest areas of planning is determining which state they wish to
live in,” said Jonathan Gassman,
CEO and founder of The Gassman Financial Group.
Bourdon said it’s possible
many retirees might stand to
benefit from the higher standard
deduction and might not need to
consider moving.
“If you
don’t
have (an
investment
plan), it’s
time to
engage
a planner
and put
one
together.”
Jonathan
Gassman, CEO
and founder of
The Gassman
Financial Group
ONE FLEXIBLE STRATEGY
“I advise clients to be strategically flexible,” Bourdon said.
His advice: Taxpayers might
consider a donor-advised fund to
get a current-year tax deduction
but make charitable distributions
in future years when the taxpayer
expects to take the standard
deduction.
According to Fidelity Investments, a donor-advised fund, or
DAF, is a charitable giving vehicle
sponsored by a public charity that
allows you to make a contribution to that charity, be eligible for
an immediate tax deduction and
then recommend grants over
time to any IRS-qualified public
charity.
“Essentially, the taxpayer
would prefund future charitable
giving,” Bourdon said. “Donations
of appreciated investments to a
DAF aren’t subject to a capitalgain tax and get a tax deduction
at fair market value. The DAF
provides a current-year tax deduction and allows charitable distributions to be made in future
years.”
According to Bourdon, this
strategy is particularly relevant
when it’s beneficial regardless of
Set it and forget it
Turn a weakness into a strength — being
lazy can actually help you save money
Spencer Tierney
@SpencerNerd
NerdWallet
wealth without much effort.
Change up your banking with
these tricks.
SET UP AUTOMATIC
TRANSFERS
If saving money overwhelms
you, maybe it’s time to try a new
approach.
“Trick yourself to be lazy when
it comes to savings,” said Dan Andrews, a certified financial planner at Well-Rounded Success
in the Denver area.
In other words, make
saving more automatic.
Checking and savings accounts offer
tools that can aid
in building
The key to saving is consistency,
and that’s where technology can
help.
Using your bank’s website or
mobile app, create a recurring
the current tax proposal’s outcome.
DON’T PLAN ON PAYING
LESS ON ESTATE TAXES
The framework would repeal the
estate tax and the generationskipping transfer tax.
“If the estate and gift tax is
eliminated, this may actually help
retirees redeploy capital to help
younger generations save for
their own retirements,” Gassman
said.
“But let’s not be fooled by a lot
of this, as the estate tax has come
and gone several times,” he said.
TAX INCENTIVES
FOR RETIREMENT?
According to the Republicans’
framework, tax reform will aim to
maintain or raise retirement plan
participation of workers and the
resources available for retirement.
But the framework was short
on detail.
“There is nothing in the proposal that I see that would cause
someone to focus on saving more,
now,” Gassman said.
Should the proposed reforms
ever become law, those saving for
transfer from checking to savings
every month, or if you’re regularly paid twice or more monthly,
consider setting one after each
payday.
Automatic transfers free you
from regularly deciding when and
how much to save. And the setup
takes just a few minutes. You
need to know three things: which
two accounts to use, how often
transfers occur and the amount.
Experts recommend you save
about 20% of your after-tax income. So if you take home $5,000
a month, aim to put away $1,000.
If that’s initially out of reach,
start with a smaller amount, and
work your way toward that 20%.
SPLIT YOUR DIRECT DEPOSIT
If you’re tempted to skip saving
money right after payday, this
strategy might be useful. Instead
of a direct deposit into one account, you can have income go
straight to two or more accounts. This lets you separate
your spending money from
GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO
retirement will have to evaluate
their marginal and effective tax
rates to determine whether to
change the way they fund their
various retirement accounts.
The current rule of thumb
would have you fund your HSA
first and then, depending on
whether you’ll be in a higher or
lower tax bracket in retirement,
either a Roth 401(k) or a traditional 401(k) first.
If you anticipate being in a
lower tax bracket, you’d typically
fund your traditional 401(k) now
— and your Roth 401(k) now if
you anticipate being in a higher
tax bracket later.
“As for which would people be
better off with as far as Roth vs.
non-Roth, traditional vs. non-deductible IRA, one must run numbers and make some assumptions
and forecast what tax bracket
would they be in now vs. when
they intend on retiring,” Gassman
said.
And for those who are investing in taxable accounts, Gassman
recommends sticking to your
overall investment plan.
“If you don’t have one, it’s time
to engage a planner and put one
together,” he said.
your savings right away.
This strategy won’t work for
everyone. You need to receive
your pay as direct deposits, and
your company must be on board.
Some employers don’t let you
split direct deposits.
If split deposits are available,
there’s another perk. Some banks
offer sign-up bonuses when you
open a new checking account
with direct deposit. Just make
sure that a new account is a useful addition and that you don’t
get stuck with fees or high minimum-balance requirements.
OPEN MULTIPLE SAVINGS
ACCOUNTS
Having one savings account
might not be enough, especially if
you like focusing on specific financial goals. That’s where single-purpose accounts can shine.
Having multiple accounts is
easier than it sounds. Start with a
President
Trump talks
about his tax
reform plans
Sept. 27 in
Indianapolis,
but details
remain
sketchy.
JENNA WATSON, THE
INDIANAPOLIS STAR
Robert Powell
contributes
regularly to USA
TODAY, The Wall
Street Journal
and TheStreet.
Email rpowell
@allthings
retirement.com.
second savings account for one
purpose, such as stockpiling an
emergency fund. Then create a
recurring transfer, even if it’s a
small amount — say, $50 — to
gradually reach your goal. Tracking progress is easy; just check
the balance.
“I used to have just two accounts, checking and savings,”
said Muriel Vega, a tech writer in
Atlanta, “but they weren’t really
working for me.”
Eight years ago, she opened a
second savings account to use as
an emergency fund. When her
freelance assignments started
ramping up, she opened a business checking account and a savings account to set aside money
for business-related taxes. She
also has a separate checking account to pay home and utility
bills and a savings account for
vacations.
“I have seven accounts now.
That’s three checking and four
savings,” Vega said. Most of her
savings accounts are at two online banks that have attractive
features such as competitive savings rates and no monthly fees.
On the day she gets paid, she
has several automatic transfers
ready to send funds to her various accounts. The result: no micromanaging of money required.
LET IT RIDE
“I’ve seen clients save for two
months and then … give themselves a pat on the back and stop
doing it,” Andrews said. “This
prevents them from sticking to
their long-term savings goals.”
The savings process takes time,
but it doesn’t have to take effort.
You can avoid impulsive spending
and stick to your goals if you set
up an automatic system that does
the saving for you.
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2017
8T
TECH
THIS SMARTPHONE
TRICK LETS YOU DO
MORE IN LESS TIME
Marc Saltzman l USA TODAY
T
hanks to smartphones, you no longer have to run to a computer for things
like banking, shopping and posting to social media. But how you arrange your
smartphone apps can also help you speed up everyday tasks.
What’s that? You simply leave the apps the way your phone maker (or service provider) laid them out for you? And when you download new ones, you
leave them randomly placed on your screen?
You can quickly and efficiently access your apps with fewer taps and swipes by customizing where your apps are, how they’re presented and which apps you prioritize.
Whether you’re running Android or iOS, the following options might be able to shave
off some time or reduce frustration.
APPLE INC.
FROM THE SIDE
PAGE GROUPING, AND FOLDERS
Some smartphone owners prefer
to line the side of their smartphone with their favorite apps, as
they find it’s easier to tap with
one hand than reaching towards
the bottom of the screen.
You can manually place your
most-used apps on the side of
your main home screen in Android or iOS — along the right
side if you’re right-handed or the
left side if you’re left-handed.
Speaking of which, the latest
Samsung Galaxy devices offer an
“Apps Edge” feature, which lets
you instantly access the apps you
use the most by swiping your
thumb in front of the right side of
the screen (lefties can change
this, too). You will see 10 of your
most used apps here (which you
can modify, if desired). With the
Galaxy Note 8, you can also open
two apps at the same time using a
feature call “App Pair,” for a splitscreen view.
Swipe again from the right (or
left) side for a “People Edge”
panel, where you can add your
closest contacts for quick access.
But what about all the other
apps you have on your phone?
There isn’t a one-size-fits-all approach to organizing all the
apps on your smartphone.
Most people group them by frequency, such as your mostused apps on the first page of your home screen.
Others group by type of app, such as devoting one page each
for games, photography, social media, news and so on.
Few people adopt an aesthetic-based icon arrangement,
where the icons simply look good together, perhaps grouped
alphabetically or by color (seriously, it’s a thing).
Whatever you prefer, don’t forget both Android and iOS also
let you lump similar apps together into folders.
If you’re segregating by theme, then you might have folders
for work, social, kids, travel, games, sports, photography and so
on. That way, all related apps are in the same place, and you’ll
see miniaturized icons on the folder for a quick glimpse at
what’s inside.
You can always rename the folder if you don’t like what the
operating system comes up with for you.
SAMSUNG
QUICK SEARCH
If you’re a digital packrat and have way too many apps, sometimes
the fastest way to find what you’re looking for is to search by keyword or by using your voice.
With the former, you can swipe down on the screen in Android
and iOS, which reveals a search window, and you can type in the
name of the app. Easy peasy. In iOS, it will also show you apps you’ve
used recently.
Or use your voice to search for — and open — apps. For example,
on Android devices, you can say, “OK Google, open Uber,” or for
Apple phones, you can say, “Hey Siri, open Uber.”
And if you’re on Android, there’s also Google Gesture Search to
help you find something quickly. It’s a free app from the Google Play
store that lets you draw a single character and get a quick list of
matching items on your phone — such as “U” to see “Uber, or “US”
to see “USA TODAY.” It also works with contacts, settings, music and
browser bookmarks. When you see what you're looking for, tap it to
launch.
In short, there’s no right or wrong way to organize your apps, so
see what works best for you.
GOOGLE
BOTTOM ROW
For obvious reasons, the first thing you want to prioritize is
the apps you tap the most.
Smartphone makers often line the bottom of your home
screen with suggested apps for easy access. If you find tapping
these apps with one hand is intuitive — even as these phones
are getting bigger — then stick with this layout.
But you can change which app icons are at the bottom of the
screen. For example, Apple will give you Safari as a Web
browser, but why not replace it with Chrome, if that’s what
you prefer?
You can also swap around the order of the bottom-row apps,
and in some cases you can drag and drop an extra app or two
to extend it to five or six of your favorite apps (depending on
the phone). Or drop them down to three apps, if you like.
Columnist Marc Saltzman writes on tech devices and trends for USA TODAY.
Follow Marc on Twitter: @marc_saltzman.
SAMSUNG/USA TODAY
You can keep ads from following you online
Often annoying, they
can be turned off by
taking these steps
Kim Komando
@kimkomando
Is this just a coincidence? If
you recently looked at cameras
online, you’ll see ads for cameras
in the margins of your browser. If
you browsed new outfits, shirts
and trousers emerge.
Not long ago, “interest-based
advertising” creeped out a lot of
people. They couldn’t understand
why Facebook knew what they
had just shopped for on Amazon.
The truth is that personalized ads
are the result of a very impersonal process.
Your details are crunched bits
of data that make marketing
more efficient. Interest-based advertising uses information gathered through your browser.
Special algorithms analyze your
visits over time and across differ-
ent websites. This helps predict
your preferences and shows you
ads that are more likely to be of
interest to you.
Sometimes, all this tracking
can overwhelm the average customer. While the process is basically automatic and unmanned,
such ads can feel like an invasion
of privacy. This is why many people look for ways to throw them
off.
Here are three simple ways
you can do just that.
WIPE OUT HISTORY, AND
TURN OFF COOKIES
To start, you’ll want a clean slate.
Eliminate any trace of your past
searches. Clear all your browsing
data, history, cache and cookies
from your Web browsers.
Next, disable or limit tracking
on your gadget. This includes favorite services such as Facebook.
Next, make sure you delete
third-party advertising cookies,
too.
Afterward, take a moment to
test your browser with an online
security and privacy checker. I
like the Electronic Frontier
Foundation’s tool that shows you
information about the browser
you’re using and your risk level.
GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO
OPT OUT
You might only notice a handful
of culprits, but many companies
use algorithms to track your behavior and send you targeted ads.
Thankfully, there’s a way for
you to opt out of interest-based,
or “behavioral,” ads.
The Digital Advertising Alliance lets you review its participating partners. When you first
visit the DAA, the websites will
scan your computer. Once the
scan is complete, you’ll be shown
a list of partners advertising directly to you.
From there, you can learn
more about the practices these
companies use for interest-based
ads. You can opt out using “optout cookies” that are stored in
your browser with your preferences.
GO INCOGNITO
Every major Web browser —
Chrome, Edge, Firefox, Internet
Explorer, Safari and Opera — has
private, or incognito, browsing.
Turning this feature on means
your browser will ignore cookies,
including ad-tracking ones. Your
computer won’t record your
browsing history, almost like you
were never online.
When your browser is in private browsing mode, it will show
a special icon. In Firefox it’s a
mask, in Chrome it’s a little spy,
and in Edge it’s “InPrivate.”
Private browsing will keep
your computer safe from casual
snoopers. Someone who jumps
on your computer won’t see
where you’ve been.
Keep in mind that online ads
aren’t necessarily a bad thing.
Yes, they can annoy us, but
they’re also the reason most online content is free.
Without them, media outlets
and content creators would have
to find a different source of revenue. For most of us, seeing a few
presumptuous ads is a tiny price
to pay.
What questions do you have? Call my
national radio show or listen to the Kim
Komando Show on your phone, tablet
or computer.
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2017
9T
TRENDING
AMAZON
GIVES TEENS
PARENT-OK’D
ACCOUNTS
Mom and dad get
to have their say
throughout online
transaction
Charisse Jones
@charissejones
USA TODAY
Amazon says parents can hand
over the shopping keys to the kids,
though they’ll still have the power
to put up a red light.
For the first time, teenagers will
be able to independently log into
Amazon and shop as long as they
are linked to a parent’s account.
The new program, launching
Wednesday, allows up to four kids
in a family, between the ages of 13
and 17, to browse the Amazon app
on their mobile device, make purchases with a payment method
chosen by their parents, and have
packages delivered to an address
preselected by mom or dad.
Parents will have their say
throughout the transaction. Before the purchase is finalized, they
will get a text or email showing a
picture, description and price of
the item. If the parents approve of
the purchase, they can text “Y” for
yes. If they don’t respond, the order is automatically canceled in
48 hours.
If the teen suspects mom and
dad might hesitate to OK a purchase, they can include a note in
their order “explaining why all of
their friends have the video game
Parents who
link their
teenagers to
their Amazon
accounts will
get a text or
message
showing the
pending
purchase
before it’s
finalized. AMAZON
“This is the only way
where the teenager
has the independence
while the parents are
still in the know.”
Michael Carr, vice president
of Amazon Households
and they’re the only kid at school
who doesn’t have” it, said Michael
Carr, vice president of Amazon
Households.
Parents can also opt out of
green-lighting every purchase, instead setting a spending limit that
can vary from child to child. They
will still get messages about every
purchase and can cancel or send
the item back if they choose.
“This is something ... families of
teenagers need,” Carr said. “Today
you’re either giving the teenager
your credit card, or you’re giving
them the password to your account. ... This is the only way
where the teenager has the independence while the parents are
still in the know.”
Parents who are members of
Amazon Prime, the program that
enables shoppers to get free twoday shipping, Prime Video and
other perks for a monthly or annual fee, can also pass along those
benefits to their kids without paying extra.
It makes financial sense to loop
in the teens and tweens who make
up Generation Z. The group influences $600 billion of family
spending, outnumbers Millennials and will make up 40% of consumers by 2020, according to the
retail strategic firm HRC Retail
Advisory.
Many parents
simply hand
over the
credit card to
teens, but
Amazon’s
new option
eliminates
that need.
EVA-KATALIN, GETTY
IMAGES
Rising health costs ding
some in early retirement
Premiums keep going
up for many using
insurance exchanges
Steven Findlay
Kaiser Health News
Don and Debra Clark of GETTY IMAGES
Springfield, Mo., are glad they
have health insurance. Don is 56, Karen’s subsidized coverage,
and Debra is 58. The Clarks say which has a $4,500 deductible.
they know the risk of an unex- Without the government subsidy,
pected illness or medical event is the premium would be about
$700 a month.
rising as they age.
“What if we make more money
Don is retired, and Debra
works part time a couple of days a and get less of a subsidy or just if
week. As a result, along with the premiums increase a lot?”
20 million other Americans, they Karen Steininger asked. “That
buy health insurance on the indi- would be a burden.”
Her premium subsidy is sepavidual market — the one significantly altered by the Affordable rate from a program also offered
under the health law that helps
Care Act (ACA).
But the Clarks are not happy at very low-income people pay for
all with what they pay for their out-of-pocket expenses. Those
coverage — $1,400 a month for a cost-sharing subsidies are what
plan with a $4,500 deductible. President Trump announced late
Thursday that he is
Nor are they looking fordropping.
ward to open enrollment
The experiences of
this fall. They must
the Clarks and the Steichoose a new plan beningers illustrate how
cause their current insurthe ACA’s promise of
er is dropping theirs.
easier access to afford“This has become a
able health insurance for
nightmare,” said Don
people who retire early
Clark. “We are now
and the self-employed is
spending about 30% of
under threat. Also at
our income on health in- Karen
risk: a reduction in “job
surance and health care. Steininger
lock.”
We did not plan for that.” HANDOUT
In the run-up to the
Karen Steininger, 62,
of Altoona, Iowa, said her ACA law’s passage in 2010, then-Presicoverage not only gave her peace dent Obama spoke often of older
of mind but also helped her and workers hanging onto jobs they
her husband, who is now on no longer wanted just to keep
Medicare, stay in business the their health insurance.
Before the ACA, 1 in 4 55- to
past few years. But they, too, are
64-year-olds either couldn’t get
concerned about rising costs.
The Steiningers are self-em- coverage at all or could not afford
ployed owners of a pottery studio. it, according to AARP.
Insurers were allowed to deny
Their income varies year to year.
They now pay $245 a month for people coverage outright and
charge people over age 55 five to
10 times more than a younger
person. The ACA restricts that to
three times more and bars insurers from charging people with
pre-existing conditions more.
Trends in employer-sponsored
retiree coverage added to job
lock. Only 1 in 4 companies with
200 or more workers offered coverage to early (pre-65) retirees in
2017 compared with 66% of firms
in 1988, according to the Kaiser
Family Foundation. (Kaiser
Health News is an editorially independent program of the
foundation.)
“The aging but pre-Medicare
population was our major reason
to support the ACA then, and it
still is now,” said David Certner,
director of legislative policy at
AARP.
Data also show substantial
benefits of the law to the self-employed in this age group. For example, 18% of people ages 55 to
64 who were still working in 2015
got coverage through the ACA
marketplaces, up from 11.6% in
2013, according to an analysis of
Census Bureau data by the Employee
Benefit
Research
Institute.
But today’s retirees and selfemployed business owners find
themselves especially vulnerable
to rising premiums, high out-ofpocket costs and insurer turnover
associated with coverage in the
individual market.
“These are the people in their
late 50s or early 60s who don’t
qualify for government subsidies
because their incomes are too
high, they retire early or have
their own businesses,” said Kevin
Lucia, a health insurance specialist and research professor at
Georgetown University’s Health
Policy Institute in Washington,
D.C. “They are also more likely to
have pre-existing conditions and
thus high expenses.”
Joe Belfiore, Microsoft corporate VP of operating systems
group, demonstrates Continuum for phones at the Microsoft
Build conference in San Francisco in April 2015. JEFF CHIU, AP
RIP to Windows Phone:
Microsoft makes it official
Ed Baig
ebaig@usatoday.com
USA TODAY
Microsoft has finally pulled the plug
on Windows Phone.
Official confirmation
came from Microsoft executive Joe Belfiore on
Twitter.
“Of course we’ll continue to
support the platform: bug fixes,
security updates, etc. But building new features/hw aren’t the
focus,” Belfiore tweeted.
If there was any surprise, it
was that Windows Phone was
still breathing.
Windows Phone registered a
near-infinitesimal 0.1% market
share in the first quarter of this
year, reflecting the overwhelming dominance of Apple’s iPhone
and the many Android handsets.
That two-headed global monster not only took down Windows Phones but also delivered
the same blow to the once-dominant BlackBerry.
Even Bill Gates recently conceded that he now uses an Android phone.
Hard as it is to remember now,
early in the 2000s, Microsoft was
a factor with Windows Mobile
PERSONAL
TECH
handsets — and even before with
what were called Pocket PC devices, which were mostly targeted at business users. There
wasn’t much stickiness there,
however, and neither Microsoft
nor its partners could produce a
must-have Windows Mobile offering for consumers.
The Windows handsets were
typically too cumbersome for average folks. And the friendlier,
tile-based interface that eventually emerged — and which as a
reviewer I liked, though not
enough to beg off iOS or Android
— came too late to generate
meaningful turnaround.
Microsoft’s former CEO Steve
Ballmer famously dismissed the
iPhone in 2007 because of its
$500 subsidized price and the
fact that it lacked a keyboard.
Ballmer figured — wrongly! —
that the iPhone would in no way
appeal to businesses.
By the time Microsoft bought
Nokia’s smartphone business in
an ill-fated $7.9 billion acquisition that closed in 2014, it was already playing catch-up.
Belfiore’s apparent frustration
with the way things went down
with app developers came
through in one of his tweets: “We
have tried VERY HARD to incent
app devs. Paid money.. wrote
apps 4 them.. but volume of users is too low for most companies to invest.”
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2017
10T
Irresistibly athletic.
Meet our new app, now with virtual reality.
Feed your inner fan with in-depth player interviews,
up-to-the-minute scores, and the most thrilling moments in sports.
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2017
11T
SUNDAY
Don’t sleep on
pajama fashion
ZENDAYA BY JON KOPALOFF, FILMMAGIC
Arizona towns offer
views, brews and more
CHAPEL OF THE HOLY CROSS ABOVE SEDONA, ARIZ., ROGER NAYLOR
MUSIC
BECK DANCES BACK
Alt-rock
favorite shows
his Colors with
long-awaited
new album.
PETER HAPAK
Patrick Ryan l USA TODAY
YOU CAN’T RUSH GREATNESS.
Just take it from Beck, who surprised fans in June 2015 with amorous new song Dreams,
a euphoric blast of skittering drums and disco-funk guitars. Two years, three more singles and
countless delays later, the track has finally found a home on the alt-rock veteran’s 13th studio album,
Colors (out now), his long-gestating, dance floor-ready departure from Grammy-winning album of
the year Morning Phase.
So why the hold-up?
It was partly out of “wanting to have extra time to get all the details right: the artwork, the videos,”
says Beck Hansen, 47. “Also, I’d been on the road intensely for about five years. We were about to put
the record out and (tour) for another year, and I just felt I needed to be home for a little bit.”
v STORY CONTINUES ON 12T
USA SNAPSHOTS©
CALENDAR
‘Brewponing’ up
Plan your week in entertainment with these highlights
and pop-culture milestones:
Alcohol rebate
redemptions grew
25%
in the USA in 2016.
SOURCE Ibotta analysis of more than
31 million receipts
MICHAEL B. SMITH AND VERONICA BRAVO, USA TODAY
STREAM
WATCH In Acorn TV’s
Acceptable Risk, Elaine
Cassidy plays Sarah, a
widow who confronts a
conspiracy after she discovers her murdered husband
was not who she thought
he was. The six-episode
series drops the first two
episodes Monday.
MARY CYBULSKI, ROADSIDE ATTRACTIONS
FILM
GO TO Julianne Moore stars in
Wonderstruck, going nationwide Friday. The film, based on
the young adult story of the
same name by Brian Selznick,
tells the story of a boy and a girl
who share a mysterious connection 50 years apart.
MUSIC
TV
LISTEN Darius Rucker releases
his fifth country album, When
Was the Last Time, this Friday. The album’s lead single, If
I Told You, reached No. 1 on
Billboard’s Country Airplay
chart in June.
TUNE IN Martha Stewart
and Snoop
Dogg are
back for
another
season of
Martha &
Snoop’s Potluck
VH1
Dinner Party on VH1
Monday at 10 ET/PT. Dinner
guests this season include Sean
“Diddy” Combs, Jamie Foxx,
Queen Latifah, Kate Upton and
Terrence Howard.
LARRY MCCORMACK,
TENNESSEAN.COM
Compiled by Mary Cadden
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2017
12T
Try these ports in a stormy world
In times of stress and national tragedy, the arts can
offer a place to turn for
emotional healing. USA
TODAY editors and reporters frequently look to entertainment to self-soothe. As
we continue to follow the
news around the mass
shootings in Las Vegas, and
the effects of hurricanes in
Texas, Florida and Puerto
Rico, as well as numerous
wildfires, we’ve compiled
our recommendations of
TV shows, books, music and
movies that feel like comfort food in times of crisis.
COMFORT IN THE FAMILIAR
Many of us have a set of comfort
movies — no matter how good or
bad — that we can always turn to.
Coming-of-age stories instantly
cheer me. They’re predictable,
mindless and fun. Amelia Mignonette Thermopolis Renaldi,
Princess of Genovia (Anne Hathaway) in The Princess Diaries or
Lizzie McGuire (Hilary Duff ),
who remind me of youthful innocence. I’m not saying that I can
recite the Lindsay Lohan version
of The Parent Trap word-forword, but I’m not saying I can’t,
either. — Anika Reed
The Parent Trap (Lindsay Lohan), Harry Potter (Daniel Radcliffe) and The Office (Rainn Wilson) give us solace. DISNEY; WARNER BROS; NBC
isn’t Oscar-worthy. And the story
lines aren’t realistic. (I don’t believe soulmates are found after a
bout of amnesia while stumbling
upon a charming New England
town.) But the predictability of a
happy ending somehow makes
things better. — Erin Jensen
It’s nice to find comfort in
something nostalgic, but not so
nostalgic that it feels dated. That
sweet spot for me right now is TV
from the 2000s. NBC’s The Office
is that perfect comedy that’s remained relevant, with such typical workplace issues as bosses,
paper products and finicky coworkers. Who doesn’t like the
lovable but bumbling Michael
Scott (Steve Carell) or the relationship between Jim (John Krasinski) and Pam (Jenna Fischer)?
— Jennifer Cohen
When I need to quiet my mind
at the end of a long day, I reach
for a romance novel with one of
those covers featuring half-naked
men and women in period clothing. Focusing on those characters
keeps me from rehashing the
day’s anxieties. And there’s plenty
of quality writing coming from
smart women: I’m a fan of Monica McCarty and Sarah MacLean
(Stanford Law and Harvard graduates, respectively). — Cara Kelly
LOVE CONQUERS ALL
In theory, ABC’s Shark Tank
shouldn’t be soothing — a business-speak bonanza where millionaires romanticize a vision of
the American dream that I’m
pretty sure is a capitalist fallacy.
Shark Tank sells viewers the idea
When the world feels in disarray,
I scan my DVR for a Hallmark
Channel movie. The autumnthemed romances from the network’s Fall Harvest have been my
dose of happy lately. The writing
ESCAPISM VIA
ENTREPRENEURSHIP
that everyone can build their own
way, as long as they work hard.
And while that may not always
work out, I turn to the Tank as an
escapist fantasy, a magical room
where economic opportunities
are as equal and judicious as the
strength of the ideas behind
them. — Maeve McDermott
FICTIONAL RETREATS
When the magic of the world
seems to fade, I like to escape to
the fantastical lands of Hogwarts
and beyond in the Harry Potter
series. Whether popping in one of
the DVDs or cracking open a
book from the series (because if
you’re like me, you have a set of
each), you can forget about your
worries with the action, romance
and humor that fills these nostalgic tales. Plus, it’s nice to escape
to a world where good conquers
evil and love can be the answer to
everything. — Sara Moniuszko
When there’s too much noise
and too many headlines, I turn to
worlds that are far away. For a
real distraction, I watch British
series on PBS that prompt me to
think about history or try to solve
cases: Masterpiece Mystery series
Grantchester, Inspector Lewis and
Endeavour. When it comes to
music, I turn to the familiar on
other side of the world and the
soothing sounds of Iz, aka Israel
Kamakawiwo‘ole. The late singer
from Hawaii is known for his version of Somewhere Over the Rainbow/What a Wonderful World. Iz,
who died in 1997, left behind a
volume of work that reflects the
tropical sounds familiar throughout the Pacific Islands, including
my home, Guam. — Lorena Blas
things (Pride [In the Name of
Love]). George Michael (Faith),
gloriously alive. — Kim Willis
MUSICAL MEDITATION
The best cure for the blues?
Singing the blues in public.
There’s something about freely
flailing your limbs, cheering for a
musician and waving your cellphone light that creates a sense of
unity and joy. In particular, these
touring artists are worth your
time: Chance the Rapper puts on
an inspiring, spiritual show; Bruno Mars’ showmanship will have
you forgetting your worries; and
Lady Gaga’s awesome voice and
colorful staging will make you
smile. — Carly Mallenbaum
Anyone who came of age in the “I
Want My MTV” era can tell you
there’s a heck of a lot of happy
that can be wrung out of a daily
dose of ’80s music videos, and I
gravitate toward the ones with
the biggest hair and most blindingly neon clothes. Cyndi Lauper,
joyously hiccuping her way
through Girls Just Want to Have
Fun. Madonna, writhing poutily
on a gondola, wearing her infamous “Boy Toy” belt (Like a Virgin). Bono, with a mullet, of all
Soundtracks in period films —
whether lighter (Dazed and Confused, Almost Famous) or darker
(Goodfellas, Boogie Nights) —
transport me to seemingly simpler times. The backward-looking
movies are reassuringly nostalgic;
the hit songs provide immediate
recognition wrapped in the gauze
of hazy memory.Over time, songs
synced to visuals create a new
memory. — Bill Keveney
Delay helped the singer get back on his feet
v CONTINUED FROM 11T
Beck started writing Colors in
2013, the year before he released
his ruminative folk-rock masterstroke Morning Phase. The sparkling 10-song effort is a
collaboration between him and
pop songwriter/producer Greg
Kurstin (Kelly Clarkson, Pink),
who mined inspiration from the
feel-good catalogs of ’70s icons
including David Bowie and Talking Heads: “bands that embraced
rhythm in dance music and did
something artistic with it,” Beck
says.
The first song they wrote was
the piano-driven Dear Life, a
jaunty ode to dashed dreams and
rolling with life’s punches. While
that came together in just two
days, others went through multiple iterations as the two experimented with different sounds in
the studio: infusing the kaleidoscopic title track with vibrant
synths and pitch-altered vocals,
and second single Wow with woozy hip-hop beats reminiscent of
Beck’s rap playlist go-tos Lil
Yachty and Young Thug.
Every Colors song is punctuated by Beck’s immense gratitude
to still be making music, after he
suffered a spinal injury on a 2005
music video shoot that resurfaced
years later, sidelining him from
performing live until late 2011.
“I thought I would be able to
play music (again), but not the
way I was used to,” Beck says of
his three-year hiatus from touring. “When you’ve gone through
some periods when you’ve gone
adrift, or there’s struggle, or there
isn’t a lot of joy in things, and
then when you find it again, (you
realize) how appreciative you are.
I had that feeling, and music has
that power to be a small reminder
of the beauty in living. It’s good to
be amongst the world, be in the
moment.”
Beck says he already has a lot
of new music that’s “almost finished or in progress,” and hopes
his Colors follow-up won’t take
another four years to be released.
“I do like that the cycle of music is going much quicker these
days,” he says. When he broke out
with sophomore album Mellow
Gold and single Loser in 1994,
“people expected a new record
Beck says he held off releasing the new album because “I just felt I needed to be home for a little bit.” SEBASTIEN BOZON, AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Colors is out now.
“Music has that
power to be a
small reminder
of the beauty in
living. It’s good
to be amongst
the world, be in
the moment.”
every two to three years. Now, I
was looking at (rapper) Future,
and he put out 10 to 12 albums
since my last record came out.”
Early in his career, Beck was
dubbed the “King of Slackers,” a
label he was put off by and found
reductive.
“I was a little bit horrified,” he
says. “I was trying to bring together this wide, disparate array
of art and ideas, and then somebody says, ‘You’re just a slacker
who likes to sit on the couch and
play video games.’ I was like,
‘What? Wait!’ ”
But with age and experience,
he no longer sweats public opinion.
“It’s something that you can’t
control at all,” Beck says. “I gave
up on having any expectation of
what the perception is going to
be. You write a lyric and people
project their own things on it and
it becomes something else. That’s
the beauty of it.”
Corrections & Clarifications
PRESIDENT AND PUBLISHER
John Zidich
USA TODAY is committed
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contact Standards Editor
Brent Jones at 800-8727073 or e-mail accuracy@usatoday.com.
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Joanne Lipman
CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER
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PUZZLE ANSWERS
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2017
13T
FASHION
PAJAMA PARTY:
CELEBS DRESS
TO NINEZZZ’S
Anika Reed l USA TODAY
Celebrities are taking the Beyoncé line “I woke up like this” to the next level,
bringing the comfy chic look of pajama-inspired outfits to events and red carpets. These stars showed that they’re definitely not sleeping on the trend,
which popped up on the runways of New York and other fashion capitals earlier this year. Check out some of the best sleepwear-to-street looks.
DEMI LOVATO
Demi Lovato put a sleek and sexy spin
on her silky, deep navy two-piece set
during a visit to SiriusXM. Paired with
simple gold hoops, the star of the
show is the deep V-cut blazer top with
nothing visible underneath.
JON KOPALOFF, FILMMAGIC
TOMMASO BODDI, GETTY IMAGES FOR REPUBLIC RECORDS
ZENDAYA
JULIA MICHAELS
ELLE FANNING
Zendaya hit the Teen Choice Awards blue
carpet in August in this Ashish striped and
slightly slouchy two-piece set. She looked
cozy and comfortable in the sequined
striped men’s separates.
Robe or perfect party outfit? Julia Michaels
rolled into an MTV Video Music Awards after
party on trend in the low-cut dress, which
gave everyone a view of the “speak up”
tattoo by her collarbone. It also seems that
Michaels’ ensemble has pockets – fashionable AND functional.
Elle Fanning’s playful PJs
brought an air of whimsy
to the press tour for her
new movie ‘Leap!’ The
actress paired her Miu
Miu jumpsuit with a pair
of bold, color-block heels.
CINDY ORD, GETTY
IMAGES FOR SIRIUSXM
JAMIE MCCARTHY,
GETTY IMAGES
MOVIES
Emma Stone raised her game to play Billie Jean King
SHE WASN’T AFRAID OF PACKING
ON POUNDS.
Carly Mallenbaum
@thatgirlcarly
USA TODAY
It took more than Hollywood magic to turn Emma
Stone, the svelte actress
from La La Land, into Billie Jean King in her movie
Battle of the Sexes.
For starters, the physical
transformation required
three months, 15 pounds
and a meal and fitness
plan.
Trainer Jason Walsh,
founder of climbing gym
Rise Nation, who got Stone
in shape for La La Land,
knew the actress would
need to up her calorie intake and strength training
regimen to embody the
powerful tennis legend.
Here’s what Stone went
through to reshape her
body.
For Battle of the Sexes,
Emma Stone gained 15
pounds of muscle. MELINDA
SUE GORDON, 20TH CENTURY FOX
Stone is “very petite and has a dancer’s body,”
but she was willing to bulk up to look more like
King. “She took it seriously,” Walsh says. “She
wanted to do the story justice.”
Gaining a dozen-plus pounds of muscle made
Stone look more like a tennis pro, and also feel
more like her character. “We wanted to give
Emma the psychological backing” to be able to
compete in professional tennis matches, Walsh
says. “She needed to be resilient and to have the
psyche of being really strong.”
SHE DRANK TWO HIGH-CAL PROTEIN
SHAKES A DAY.
“It wasn’t like we were taking someone off the
Taco Bell diet,” Walsh says of his clean-eating
client, “but we added shakes into her diet.” The
shakes had “hundreds of calories” each, he says,
and usually contained a handful of spinach, a
supplement known as ashwagandha and a “good
tasting” protein powder. Fortunately, since
Stone was working out so much (twice a day),
she was hungry enough to down the filling
beverages.
SHE LIFTED AN IMPRESSIVE AMOUNT
OF WEIGHT.
Some of Walsh’s daily go-to strength training
exercises for Stone? Pushing and pulling sleds
twice her size, heavy farmer’s walks (aka walking
while holding dumbbells) and up to 300-pound
hip thrusts. At one point, Stone was deadlifting
185 pounds and doing push-ups with 50 pounds
of chains on her back.
“I was pretty proud,” Walsh says.
THEN SHE BACKED OFF.
Bobby Riggs and Billie Jean
King clown for the cameras.
ABC SPORTS
While Stone was gaining weight, she stayed away
from fat-burning cardio. But once she achieved
the right look for the film, “we started adding
conditioning aspects,” Walsh says. That meant
Stone was lifting fewer weights and doing cardio
at Rise Nation once or twice a week.
She’s two years beyond her most intensive
Battle of the Sexes training, yet Walsh encourages the actress, and anyone else trying to stay in
shape, to mix such activities as yoga and hiking
with strength training.
Yes, for women. And, yes, that means lifting
weights.
“I train (GLOW star) Alison Brie and (future
Captain Marvel) Brie Larson, and all of these
girls are strong as hell and not big,” he says. In
fact, after incorporating weight-lifting into their
workout routine, “They fit into their clothes
better (and) are three, four, five times stronger
than before.”
Want to see the results of Stone’s hard work?
Battle of the Sexes is in theaters now.
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2017
14T
TRAVEL
Flagstaff’s compact downtown makes it perfect for exploring by foot. FLAGSTAFF CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU
FIVE MUST-SEE
TOWNS IN ARIZONA
Visiting small towns is one of the great joys of travel. Combine scenic beauty, easy
access and welcoming main street businesses and you’ve got all the makings of a
memorable day trip. Scott Craven of USA TODAY Network-Arizona traveled the
state and found these gems you’re sure to enjoy.
The Smoki Museum in
Prescott, Ariz. SMOKI MUSEUM
PRESCOTT
On sunny, mild weekends — and
so many of them are — residents
and tourists flock to the grassy
square at the heart of downtown.
In view of the Yavapai County
Courthouse, a four-story granite
structure looming like a castle,
many stake claims to shady spots
under spreading elms, or peoplewatch from the courthouse steps.
Others browse the shops, restaurants and bars that box in the
4-acre plaza, a design that’s as perfect today as it was in 1864 when
the town was laid out. Founders
couldn’t have envisioned the role
the plaza now plays, hosting more
than 100 festivals and events annually. The square is not just Prescott’s heart, but its soul.
A great day: Arrive early, not
only to snag a nearby parking spot
but to enjoy breakfast on the
square at the Lone Spur Café, a
cowboy-themed restaurant that
gets you in an Arizona state of
mind. Burn off the steak and eggs
by browsing the antiques shops and
boutiques. At lunch, relax with a
craft beer at Prescott Brewing
Company. After more shopping, if
not a nap under the elms, take an
evening walking tour of Whiskey
Row, the drinking establishments
lining the plaza’s west side. The watering holes are as popular now as
they were when thirsty cowboys
rode in off the range.
Claim to fame: Step back in
time at the Palace Restaurant Saloon and Restaurant. Opened in
1877, the state’s oldest bar is one of
the most popular stops on Whiskey
Row and once hosted Doc Holliday
as well as Wyatt and Virgil Earp.
The Palace burned to the ground in
1900, but not before patrons carried the bar itself to safety. That
original Brunswick bar remains,
polished smooth over more than a
century of use.
Easy day trip from: Phoenix,
about 90 minutes away.
Details: www.visit-prescott.com
.
SEDONA
The first glimpse of Sedona is one of
awe. Towers and walls of red rock surround the hamlet like a fortress. But rather
than keep visitors out, the surreal landscape attracts tourists by the thousands.
The red- and orange-tinged sandstone
formations have been shaped over hundreds of millions of years. At sunrise and
sunset, they glow as if plugged into the
earth’s molten core.
A great day: Board a jeep operated by
one of the several companies specializing
in tours of the surrounding landscape. The
four-wheel-drive vehicles follow narrow,
rutted trails and power over boulders to
reveal stunning views. Once back in town,
head to Tlaquepaque Arts and Crafts Village, a collection of shops and restaurants
resembling a Spanish plaza.
Claim to fame: Many come to Sedona
to experience the spiritual energy said to
emanate from vortexes. Those open to the
possibilities may feel psychic forces energize and heal them, say adherents. Even if
Chapel of the Holy Cross sits high on
sandstone cliffs above Sedona, Ariz.
ROGER NAYLOR
you don’t believe, it’s worth visiting the
vortexes because they happen to be in
some of Sedona’s most scenic spots, such
as Bell Rock and Airport Mesa.
Easy day from: Phoenix, two hours
away.
Details: visitsedona.com.
Evidence of the area’s mining history dots the landscape around Jerome, Ariz.
MARK HENLE THE (ARIZONA) REPUBLIC
JEROME
The Asylum, a longtime favorite restaurant for tourists, is located in the Jerome
Grand Hotel, which was built in 1926 as a
hospital.
The way buildings cling precariously to
the side of Cleopatra Hill, it’s as if gravity
has been suspended in this former mining
town. Jerome is laid out vertically, with Arizona 89A switchbacking through it. The
Verde Valley spreads out below in one of
the most accessible vistas in Arizona.
With few signs of the mine shafts that
run through Cleopatra Hill like a honeycomb, Jerome now thrives on tourism, enhanced by a welcoming vibe exuded by
artists and small-business owners. Those
who visit during the holiday season will see
a plethora of peace signs outlined by
Christmas lights.
A great day: On the lower end of Cleopatra Hill, you’ll note a towering wedge assembled of formidable timber. Completed
nearly a century ago, the Audrey Headframe lowered miners more than 1,000
feet down a narrow shaft. Visitors may
stand on the thick sheet of transparent
plastic now covering the opening and peer
into the abyss. Continue to downtown Jerome for lunch at the Haunted Hamburger
and enjoy the view from the patio. Spend
the day browsing the dozens of shops and
galleries, and take a break at the tasting
room for Caduceus Cellars, owned by Tool
frontman Maynard James Keenan.
Claim to fame: The town may be Arizona’s most haunted. Many visitors hoping
for a spontaneous outbreak of spirits can
play it by eerie at the Jerome Grand Hotel.
The building opened in 1927 as the United
Verde Hospital and since then guests and
staff have reported all sorts of unearthly
activity, from apparitions and flickering
lights to disembodied voices. The hotel
looms over Jerome and even appears menacing at sunset. That’s a great time to duck
into its bar, The Asylum, where spirits of a
different kind are served.
Easy day trip from: Phoenix, two
hours away.
FLAGSTAFF
Settled at the base of the San
Francisco Peaks, Flagstaff is a popular getaway any time of year. It
sits at 7,000 feet, with welcome
heat relief in the summer and
snow-based recreation in the winter.
The town boasts a quaint, dogfriendly downtown with an atmosphere reflecting its laid-back residents. Shops and restaurants line
the narrow streets that form a pedestrian-friendly grid. Visitors mix
easily with college students from
Northern Arizona University, its
tranquil campus just south of the
central core.
A great day: A morning meal at
MartAnne’s Breakfast Palace is
mandatory for in-the-know tourists. Choose the breakfast burrito
or the chilaquiles, a house specialty
featuring tortilla chips scrambled
with eggs, green onions and your
choice of sauce. Cross Historic
Route 66 and the railroad tracks to
explore Flagstaff’s south side, a
once-ignored area that’s gaining
businesses and attention. After a
beer at Mother Road Brewery, head
back downtown and enjoy a bite at
Diablo Burger, where you can build
your own from dozens of add-ons.
As the sun sets, nurse a cocktail on
the balcony of the historic Hotel
Weatherford and watch the shadows engulf downtown.
Claim to fame: In 2001, Flagstaff was designated the first International Dark Sky Space by the
International Dark Sky Association. Civic leaders continue to keep
an eye on light pollution, restricting billboards, signs, streetlights
and more that could obscure the
night view. The city also is home to
the Lowell Observatory where, in
1930, Clyde Tombaugh discovered
the formerly-known-as-a-planet
Pluto.
Easy day trip from: Phoenix,
two hours away.
Details:
www.flagstaffarizona.org.
BISBEE
Two- and three-story buildings built
of brick and stone line Main Street as if
holding back the canyon walls rising
sharply along its length. Bisbee’s slopes
display a century’s worth of architecture, from historic inns to refurbished,
modern-looking former miners’ shacks.
Bisbee thrives on a laid-back foundation of artists, entrepreneurs and free
thinkers. Whether you’re exploring the
shops downtown, the drinking establishments of Brewery Gulch or the town’s
dizzying network of concrete stairs,
you’ll be welcomed with a smile.
A great day: After walking around
town, spend an evening along Brewery
Gulch, where the history flows like beer.
Start with dinner at the Stock Exchange,
where businessmen once gathered to
keep up with the latest prices via ticker
tape. Duck into St. Elmo’s, the town’s
oldest and diviest bar. If the barkeep has
stepped out, don’t worry, one of the regulars will be happy to pour you a brew.
Then cross the street to enter the Silver
King Hotel. Take a right at the top of the
stairs for the Room 4 Bar. With just four
stools and 100 square feet, it’s Arizona’s
smallest pub.
Claim to fame: Put on a yellow rain
slicker, climb aboard a rail car and rumble into the heart of a mountain. The
Copper Queen Mine Tour follows what
was once one of Bisbee’s richest veins,
mapped by men with no fear of dark, enclosed spaces.
Easy day trip from: Tucson, just
two hours away.
Details: discoverbisbee.com.
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2017
15T
EXPERIENCE
TRAVEL
AMERICA
FOR MORE INFORMATION
USATODAY.COM/EXPERIENCE/
UNIVERSAL’S
PARKS TAKE A
‘SHINING’ TO
HALLOWEEN
Arthur Levine l Special for USA TODAY
After Jack Torrance terrorized me, chopping his way
through doors in the creepy Overlook hotel and stalking
me as well as his poor son, Danny, in its hallways, I felt a
sense of relief and a tinge of joy when he got his comeuppance. There he was, ax in hand, frozen amid the snowy
hedges in the hotel’s maze. But when I passed a ghostly
bartender fixing drinks in the Gold Room, witnessed
blood oozing out of the elevators, and saw the soulless
eyes of the Grady twins fixate on me, I began to understand how the possessed inn could cause Torrance to go
stir crazy — or just plain crazy.
That’s the genius of Halloween
Horror Nights, which is running
on select evenings through Nov. 4
at Universal Studios Florida (sister park Universal Studios Hollywood has its own HHN event
through Oct. 31). Rather than
passively watch scary films such
as Stanley Kubrick‘s 1980 tour de
force, The Shining, visitors become characters in carefully reconstructed sets from the movies.
There’s no hiding behind a bucket
of popcorn. When Torrance
threatens to huff and puff and
blow the house in (Jack Nicholson’s distinctive dialogue from
the movie is piped in), guests
know they had best hightail it out
of the Overlook.
The Shining is the best of the
nine houses presented at this
year’s Halloween Horror Nights
in Orlando. With its lavishly detailed scenes and doting references to the source material, the
maze pays homage to the film in
grand style. And its menacing
characters set a foreboding tone
that sends tingles down the
spines of those who dare to enter.
“In the popular zeitgeist, The
Shining is one of the hallmarks of
horror,” says Patrick Braillard, a
creative development show director at Universal. “As fans, it’s a
treat for us to be able to play inside that world.”
Another world Braillard and
his team got to play in is the tele-
vision anthology series, American
Horror Story. A house dedicated
to the show is presented in three
acts and covers three seasons:
Asylum, Coven, and Roanoke.
With 14 scenes, it is the event’s
longest maze. Like The Shining,
AHS boasts impressive sets and
production values.
“If you’ve seen the show, you’re
going to constantly be in a state of
‘look at that,’ ” Braillard says.
“And if you’ve never seen the
show at all, you’re just going to
get scared.”
Put me in the latter category.
In one of the maze’s more disturbing scenes, a character tenderly combs the hair of a
life-sized doll and then lashes out
at guests in fits of rage. Set in a
nursery, the unmistakable scent
of baby powder lingers in the air.
That’s part of the multisensory
assault Universal takes in designing its Halloween attractions.
Among other odors represented
at the event, there is the pungent
smell of burning flesh. HHN is
decidedly not for the squeamish.
Jigsaw, the game-loving sadist
from the Saw films, invites visitors to become one of his victims
and try to make it through his
maze. There are characters attempting to escape traps by amputating their own limbs. The
Horrors of Blumhouse maze includes scenes from three horror
franchises: Sinister, The Purge,
A frozen Jack
Torrance
greets guests
on a set
inspired by
The Shining.
PHOTOS BY DAVID
SPRAGUE, UNIVERSAL
STUDIOS HOLLYWOOD
Fans can take
“terror
trams” to
Universal’s
backlot,
where they
might meet
Jason from
the Friday
the 13th
movies.
and Insidious. Comedy, albeit in a
sick and twisted form, mixes with
horror in the maze based on the
television series Ash vs Evil Dead.
Universal’s HHN event in Florida is the largest, most elaborate,
and arguably the best theme park
Halloween event in the country.
In addition attractions inspired
by movies and TV, , the four original houses really shine.
The best of the bunch is “Dead
Waters,” which takes guests to
the New Orleans bayou for a confrontation with the Voodoo
Queen and her minions. The set
design, which includes a half-
sunken riverboat, is stunning.
When brutish scarecrows weren’t
attacking me to defend their Depression-era farm, crows were
pooping on me (how’s that for
multisensory immersion?) in
“Scarecrow: The Reaping.” “Hive”
features Nosferatu-like vampires,
and “The Fallen” invokes a gothic
vibe with winged creatures looming in its crumbling cathedral.
The event’s scare zones, which
are set up throughout the park’s
streets, are especially good this
year. Retro aliens straight out of a
schlocky 1950s B movie cause hilarious havoc in Invasion. In the
Trick ‘R Treat zone, a sea of glowing pumpkins illuminate the
trees, while foreboding characters seek candy from panicky
guests. The Purge a staple at
HHN, returns for more anarchy.
The vehicles used for the park’s
famous Studio Tour are rebranded as Terror Tram for HHN. Visitors brave enough to wander the
studio’s backlot encounter the Titans of Terror: Leatherface from
The Texas Chainsaw Massacre,
Freddy Krueger of A Nightmare
on Elm Street, Chucky from
Child’s Play, and Jason Voorhees
of Friday the 13th infamy.
Beef on weck: Buffalo’s other culinary gift
The home of wings
also introduced this
iconic sandwich
Larry Olmsted
Special for USA TODAY
The scene: Buffalo’s most
famous local specialty undoubtedly is the hot wing, which spread
from here to almost every corner
of the globe. But locals have another heartfelt favorite that
hasn’t made it as far, though it is
certainly deserving of admiration:
the “beef on weck” sandwich.
While no one eatery can claim
to have created this specialty, and
it appears on menus all over
town, if you ask most locals, the
undisputed spiritual home of beef
on weck in the region is Charlie
the Butcher’s Kitchen, a meatcentric shop that specializes in
the sandwich and other sliced
meat concoctions. The eatery sits
conveniently outside the city’s
airport, just a mile from the terminal and perfect for a first or
last meal when visiting Buffalo.
Charlie’s has been an institution here since 1914, and now is in
the hands of the third generation
of owners, all named Charlie
Roesch, with different middle
names. The place is simple — you
look at overhead menu boards,
order at the counter, which offers
a close-up view of the process in
the open kitchen immediately behind it. The meat slicing is done
by hand on cutting boards right in
front of you. You move around
the corner to pay at the single
register, then sit in Formica
booths at simple tables topped
with floral tablecloths, or alternatively at bar stool counter seating.
It feels like a combination of a
fast-food eatery and food market,
and there are half a dozen smaller
Charlie’s Express locations, including one where the city’s NFL
team, the Bills, play in suburban
Orchard Park. There also is a sea-
After 18 hours, the slow-cooked beef at Charlie the Butcher’s is
hand-cut and piled on kimmelweck roll. LARRY OLMSTED, SPECIAL FOR USA TODAY
Buffalo’s Anchor Bar is famous for wings but its beef on weck
sandwich also is a standout. ANCHOR BAR
sonal stand dispensing just Beef
on Weck sandwiches at Coca-Cola Field, home of the city’s popular minor league baseball team,
the Bisons.
Charlie’s is not the only place
you can try beef on weck. Another local favorite is Bar Bill, a
neighborhood tavern in East Aurora, which routinely wins various local newspaper and
magazine Best of Buffalo awards
for its wings. While overlooked by
most out-of-town visitors, the
specialty also is featured on the
sandwich menu at the worldfamous Anchor Bar, where the
Buffalo wing was invented and a
pilgrimage spot for road-food
fans. It’s a longtime fixture at
Schwabl’s, a German restaurant
that has been here for more than
a century and a half. Beef on weck
is on just about every bar menu
around town. There are even
nouveau riffs on the classic: at
The Ward, a large brewpub/
sports bar on the river, the dish is
transformed into an appetizer.
Reason to visit: Beef on
Weck sandwich
The food: Long a beer brewing town, Buffalo had a sizable
German immigrant population,
and the story goes that sometime
bun is indispensable to the traditional version.
A classic example of America’s
melting pot and inventive nature
at work, apparently the sandwich
has no equivalent or roots in German cuisine. Charlie’s current
owner, Charlie W. Roesch, is the
semi-official ambassador of beef
on weck and has done demonstrations on TV and at food
shows around the world, spreading the gospel of the city’s second
most famous dish. “I went to
Dusseldorf and demonstrated it
and the Germans looked at me
like I was nuts,” he recalls.
At Charlie’s, the roast beef is
cooked slowly at 250°F until it
reaches an internal temperature
of 100°F, then the heat is lowered
and the beef cooks for another
10-12 hours. The process takes 18
hours and results in sliced meat
that is extremely tender. Here
they slice the roll, hand cut the
meat in front of you to order then
dip the top half of the roll in au
jus. You add horseradish to taste.
The salty roll is a good contrast
to the beef, and the horseradish
adds noticeable kick, though it is
not as hot as you might think.
Charlie’s has sourced the rolls
from a local bakery for many
Charlie the Butcher’s Kitchen
has been a local favorite since
1914. LARRY OLMSTED SPECIAL FOR USA TODAY
around 1880, a pretzel vendor
sought to expand his repertoire
beyond pretzels. He borrowed the
classic seasoning of pretzel salt
from his main product, incorporated the caraway seeds used in
another popular baked good, rye
bread, and put both these strongly flavored ingredients on top of a
Kaiser roll. This creation was
known as a kimmelweck roll, and
has since been shortened to just
weck. The creator sliced it in half,
filled it with sliced roast beef,
added a dollop of spicy horseradish, and voila, the beef on weck
was born. While some spots serve
the city’s most famous sandwich
on other breads or plain rolls, this
years. The salt makes the bread
dry out quickly, so the rolls last
just a couple of hours requiring
multiple
batch
deliveries
throughout the day. It’s a hearty
sandwich, and you can also get a
“mini” for a dollar less. Charlie’s
also specializes in roast turkey
sandwiches and grilled sausages
of all sorts.
The acclaimed version at Bar
Bill packs on even more sliced
beef but the roll — at Charlie’s, an
integral part of the sandwich — is
merely an accessory to the beef.
The city’s most interesting take
is the beef on weck dip at The
Ward, which chops up the roast
beef and mixes it with horseradish, then adds cheddar, Monterey
jack and cream cheeses, and
bakes it until bubbling in a ceramic dish.
Pilgrimage-worthy?:
Yes,
this is one of the most distinctive
and enduring of America’s regional sandwiches.
Rating: Yum! (Scale: Blah, OK,
Mmmm, Yum!, OMG!)
Price: $ ($ cheap, $$ moderate, $$$ expensive)
Details: Charlie the Butcher’s
Kitchen, 1065 Wehrle Drive, Buffalo;
716-633-8330;
charliethebutcher.com
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2017
16T
BOOKS
Alice Waters offers tangy memoir
Restaurateur’s
story will whet
your appetite
When a social activist who enjoys
throwing dinner parties becomes an influential
restaurateur without formal culinary training or business experience, there’s bound to be a good
back story, and this one goes way
back.
Alice Waters’ new memoir recounts the rebellious youth (not
unlike that of her male counterparts), college activism and exploration of the arts that evolved
into her “counterculture” restaurant, Chez Panisse, which would
so unexpectedly shape today’s
dining culture.
Of course, Coming to My
Senses: The Making of a Counterculture Cook (Clarkson Potter,
292 pp.,eeeg out of four stars)
also follows her parents’ inevitable influence and credits ex-boyfriends, their eventual spouses
and ultimately an entire Berkeley,
Calif., community that contributed to Waters’ success.
The chef and restaurateur begins her story in childhood, from
a middle-class life in the New Jersey suburbs, complete with casseroles and frozen peas, to her high
school years in the Midwest, and
her formative college experiences
in California.
Waters, inspired by the Free
Speech Movement of the 1960s,
has a way of portraying her misadventures — from a sorority
kicking her out to a Montessori
school firing her — in an endearing enough light to grab the reader’s support, even if she did wear
see-through
shirts
while
teaching.
The home cook finds herself
enamored with flowers, education, art and film before fully developing
her
passion
for
ingredients, sourcing and cooking
for dinner parties, all of which
make up the recipe for Chez
Panisse.
Yes, her love for food begins in
France, but not at Le Cordon
Bleu or a coveted apprenticeship.
Reckless collegiate travel abroad
broadens Waters’ dining discernment and, frankly, knowledge of
salad. And a simple, locally
sourced meal in Brittany serves
as her first “blueprint” for the
BOOK
REVIEW
ASHLEY
DAY
Author and chef Alice Waters. FRED MERTZ
restaurant a decade before its
realization.
The chef is not shy about sharing memories of the mistakes and
embarrassments that preceded
her fame. Without formal training, Waters eventually works her
way into the company of such
Alice Waters inspects the produce at a farmers market in
Washington, D.C. 2009 PHOTO BY SUSAN WALSH, AP
icons as Julia Child and James
Beard, who are amused when she
uses her hands to toss a salad and
mislabels a vegetable on the menu at Chez Panisse.
Many of her sentiments about
food demonstrate a similar approachability, such as insisting
upon simplicity when planning
her restaurant. Thus the idea of
one fixed-price menu; but even
on the first night, the experience
promised every attention to detail. Waters meticulously planned
the lighting, aromas, printing and
décor as much as the daily changing menu. The wine, on the other
hand,
was
selected
for
affordability.
In perhaps a brilliant book
sales strategy, Chez Panisse
doesn’t open until the final chapter, leaving the culinary icon’s
dozen other books to answer lingering questions.
After reading this mouthwatering tale of Waters’ intrepid youth,
you’ll be hungry for more anyway.
Langdon
goes on the
hunt again
in ‘Origin’
You may
come
away
feeling
smarter,
but
wonder
what in
God’s
name is
going on
Here’s a disappointing revelation:
Dan Brown’s latest
novel, Origin (Doubleday, 480 pages,
eegE), is only a fitfully entertaining religious rehash of his
greatest hits.
Loyal fans of his globetrotting
symbologist Robert Langdon will
no doubt be thrilled with the fifth
book in the series.
But despite exploring some seriously big concepts about creation and destiny in its
Spanish-set central mystery, Origin spawns a dizzying parade of
scientific jargon, non-stop travelogues and familiar tropes that all
lead to a fumbled ending.
After tussling with the Illuminati, hunting for the Holy Grail
and almost falling victim to a
deadly plague, you’d think Langdon (The Da Vinci Code, etc.)
would just stay home and not
tempt fate. Instead the heroic
Harvard professor doesn’t think
twice about jetting off to Bilbao
when his old student, Edmond
Kirsch, invites him to a potentially Internet-breaking presentation
at the Guggenheim Museum.
A 40-year-old iconoclastic futurist, Kirsch already has created
a dust-up with global spiritual
leaders after a sneak peek of a
new discovery that may answer
the questions, “Where did we
come from?” and “Where are we
going?” He has invited his old
teacher to the worldwide unveiling, which is not unlike an over-
Felicity Jones
and Tom
Hanks star
in Inferno,
another of
Dan Brown’s
best-selling
novels that
was turned
into a movie.
JONATHAN PRIME
BOOK
REVIEW
BRIAN
TRUITT
the-top iPhone announcement.
“The age of religion is drawing to
a close,” the enigmatic Kirsch
says, “and the age of science is
dawning.”
Huge if true, right?
Well, just before he’s about to
get to the good part, Kirsch is assassinated. His death kicks off
Langdon’s
new mission to find
out
who
killed him
and to crack
the late genius’
computer password (a 47-charAuthor Dan
acter line of
Brown
poetry) so the
world can hear this controversial
news.
Origin follows the Brown template to a fault. Shady murderer
with mysterious associations?
Check. Female partner playing an
integral part in saving the day?
Check. (Museum director Ambra
Vidal also happens to be the fiancée of Spain’s crown prince.) Exposition-filled plane rides and
plenty of chapter-ending cliffhangers? Check and check.
To his credit, Brown throws in
some contemporary touches. A
WikiLeaks-like conspiracy website is used as a plot device, and
one of the main characters is a
helpful artificial intelligence
named Winston. Designed by
Kirsch, he’s a combo of Siri and
Batman’s butler, Alfred, who robo-splains Darwin and other scientific know-how to Langdon and
Ambra on their journey, which
involves visits to cathedrals and
super-computing centers.
As with Brown’s other Langdon books, you do come away
feeling a little smarter as his cast
stops by such famed Barcelona
sites as the Sagrada Família and
the Casa Milà, digs into the art
style of Joan Miró and studies
the literary nuances of William
Blake and Friedrich Nietzsche.
But Origin eschews the usual
rousing ending for an overlong
denouement and a finale that’s
just puzzling — and not in a fun
Da Vinci Code way.
Tackling the scientific and
philosophical underpinnings of
God’s role (or lack thereof, depending on your beliefs) in our
existence within an actionadventure is an idea full of
fascinating potential.
Unfortunately with Origin,
Brown’s theory needs more evolution.
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2017
17T
BOOKS
1
New and
noteworthy
Endurance
by Scott Kelly (Knopf, nonfiction, on sale Tuesday)
WHAT IT’S ABOUT: In this
memoir, the astronaut
tells his life story, beginning with his childhood
as a “terrible student,”
through the year he
spent aboard the International Space Station.
THE BUZZ: “Fascinating
stuff…a worthy read for
space buffs,” says Kirkus
Reviews.
USA TODAY’s Jocelyn
McClurg scopes out the
hottest books on sale
each week.
Astronaut Scott Kelly
takes selfie inside the
Cupola, a module of the
International Space
Station.
2
The Last Mrs.
Parrish
by Liv Constantine (Harper, fiction, on
sale Tuesday)
WHAT IT’S ABOUT: A scheming
young woman determined to be
the “next Mrs. Parrish” insinuates herself into the lives of golden Connecticut couple Jackson
and Daphne Parrish; written
under a pen name by sisters
Lynne and Valerie Constantine.
THE BUZZ: A “devilishly ingenious
debut thriller,” says Publishers
Weekly in a starred review.
3
Uncommon Type:
Some Stories
4
by Tom Hanks (Knopf,
fiction, on sale Tuesday)
WHAT IT’S ABOUT:
Valerie, left, and Lynne
Constantine write under the
name Liv Constantine.
Leonardo da
Vinci
Reckless Daughter:
A Portrait of Joni
Mitchell
by David Yaffe (Sarah
Crichton Books/
Farrar, Straus &
Giroux, non-fiction,
on sale Tuesday)
by Walter Isaacson (Simon
& Schuster, non-fiction, on sale
Tuesday)
Seventeen short
stories, each featuring a typewriter in
some way.
THE BUZZ: The Academy Award-winning
Hanks
actor collects vintage
typewriters and apparently isn’t
afraid to use them.
SCOTT KELLY BY NASA VIA AP; CONSTANTINE BY ERIKA LIVINGSTON; HANKS BY AUSTIN HARGRAVE; ISAACSON
BY TOMÁŠ KRIST, THE ASPEN INSTITUTE; DA VINCI BY SCIENCE MUSEUM, OKLAHOMA; YAFFE BY ELLEN M.
BLALOCK
5
Isaacson
WHAT IT’S ABOUT: A biography of the
great Renaissance painter (The Last
Supper, Mona Lisa) who also had a
passion for science.
THE BUZZ: Continues Isaacson’s series of books about creative
geniuses, including Einstein and the No. 1 USA TODAY best
seller, Steve Jobs.
Walter Isaacson’s series tackles Leonardo da Vinci.
WHAT IT’S ABOUT:
Looks at the life
of the folk singer/
songwriter, now 73,
Yaffe who wrote such classics
as Both Sides Now, Woodstock and Free Man in Paris.
THE BUZZ: Yaffe wrote Bob Dylan:
Like a Complete Unknown.
WHAT
AMERICA’S
READING®
BOOKLIST.USATODAY.COM
n Rank this week
THE TOP 10
n Rank last week (F) Fiction (NF) Non-fiction (P) Paperback (H)Hardcover (E) E-book
Publisher in italics
1
—
Origin
Dan Brown
Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon is on the hunt (and
run) again as he searches for a cryptic password in Spain
(F) (E) Doubleday
6
4
It
Stephen King
Seven adults return to their small Maine town to battle
an evil creature that preys on children (F) (P) Scribner
2
—
The Ship of the Dead
Rick Riordan
Youth: Magnus Chase has to fight Loki, who is preparing
a ship of the dead for an attack; third in series (F) (H)
Disney-Hyperion
7
1
Sleeping Beauties
Stephen King, Owen King
A mysterious sleeping disorder that can cause women to
become violent and feral disrupts an Appalachian town
(F) (H) Scribner
3
—
Harry Potter and the Prisoner
of Azkaban: The Illustrated
Edition/J.K. Rowling; Jim Kay
Youth: Harry learns the spirits of loved ones linger in us;
third in series; illustrated version; art by Jim Kay (F) (H)
Arthur A. Levine
8
7
The Cuban Affair
Nelson DeMille
Charter boat captain and former Army officer Daniel
“Mac” MacCormick is lured into a scheme to recover
$60 million hidden away in Cuba (F) (E) Simon & Schuster
4
—
The Sun and Her Flowers
Rupi Kaur
A look at growth and healing through poetry; follow-up
to “Milk and Honey” (F) (P) Andrews McMeel Publishing
9
—
We Were Eight Years in Power Collection of essays reflect on race, Barack Obama’s
Ta-Nehisi Coates
presidency and its aftermath (NF) (H) One World
5
2
Killing England
Bill O’Reilly, Martin Dugard
Subtitle: “The Brutal Struggle for American Independence” (NF) (H) Henry Holt and Co.
10 5
What Happened
Hillary Rodham Clinton
Memoir: The Democratic presidential candidate reflects
on her loss to Donald Trump (NF) (H) Simon & Schuster
The book list appears
every Sunday.
For each title, the format
and publisher listed are
for the best-selling
version of that title this
week. Reporting outlets
include Amazon.com,
Amazon Kindle, Barnes &
Noble.com, Barnes &
Noble Inc., Barnes &
Noble e-books,
BooksAMillion.com,
Books-A-Million, Costco,
Hudson Booksellers,
Joseph-Beth Booksellers
(Lexington, Ky.; Cincinnati,
Charlotte, Cleveland,
Pittsburgh), Kobo, Inc.,
Powell's Books (Portland,
Ore.), Powells.com, R.J.
Julia Booksellers
(Madison, Conn.), Schuler
Books & Music (Grand
Rapids, Okemos,
Eastwood, Alpine, Mich.),
Sony Reader Store,
Target, Tattered Cover
Book Store (Denver).
THE REST
11 — Merry and Bright/Debbie Macomber
12 6 A Column of Fire/Ken Follett
13 — Manhattan Beach/Jennifer Egan
14
15
16
17
18
3
16
—
13
11
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
14
—
17
26
10
—
20
23
—
—
—
—
18
31
21
—
30
—
33
24
40
—
Don’t Let Go/Harlan Coben
Room on the Broom/Julia Donaldson, Axel Scheffler
Without Merit/Colleen Hoover
Wonder/R.J. Palacio
The Girl Who Takes an Eye for an Eye/David Lagercrantz
Before We Were Yours/Lisa Wingate
Winter Solstice/Elin Hilderbrand
Little Fires Everywhere/Celeste Ng
Milk and Honey/Rupi Kaur
Haunted/James Patterson, James O. Born
A Life Beyond Amazing/David Jeremiah
How to Catch a Monster/Adam Wallace; art by Andy Elkerton
Dog Man: A Tale of Two Kitties/Dav Pilkey
Mind Over Matter/Nora Roberts
The Keto Reset Diet/Mark Sisson, Brad Kearns
The Core: Book Five of the Demon Cycle/Peter V. Brett
The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump/Bandy X. Lee
The Handmaid’s Tale/Margaret Atwood
Principles: Life and Work/Ray Dalio
Braving the Wilderness/Brené Brown
A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms/George R.R. Martin
The Subtle Art of Not Giving a (Expletive)/Mark Manson
Until You Loved Me/Brenda Novak
The Woman in Cabin 10/Ruth Ware
Enemy of the State/Vince Flynn, Kyle Mills
Pete the Cat: Trick or Pete/James Dean
From a Certain Point of View: Star Wars/Renée Ahdieh, Meg
Cabot, John Jackson Miller, Nnedi Okorafor, Sabaa Tahir, et al.
41 77 The Snowman/Jo Nesbo
42 35 The Fix/David Baldacci
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
—
38
44
—
—
43
9
39
Merry Knight’s holiday stress is compounded when her family adds her profile to a dating website (F) (E) Ballantine
In 16th-century England, two lovers remain separated by religious differences (F) (H) Viking
During World War II, a woman goes to work at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, and her search for her missing father leads her into the world of
gangsters, showgirls and graft (F) (E) Scribner
Detective Napoleon “Nap” Dumas is drawn back to a dark period in his life when new clues turn up in the murder of his twin brother (F) (E) Dutton
Children: A witch in search of her hat welcomes myriad creatures onto her broom (F) (P) Puffin
Merit Voss deals with her unconventional family life and a broken heart (F) (E) Atria Books
Youth: August Pullman, who was born with a facial deformity, wants nothing more than to be normal (F) (H) Knopf Books for Young Readers
Imprisoned punk hacker Lisbeth Salander returns to expose dark truths from her childhood with the help of journalist Mikael Blomkvist
(F) (E) Knopf
Rill Foss fights to keep her siblings together after they’re forced into an orphanage (F) (E) Ballantine
The Quinn family is finally all together for the holidays; fourth in series (F) (E) Little, Brown
Mia Warren rents a house in suburban Cleveland and causes upheaval in the neighborhood (F) (E) Penguin Press
Poetry collection divided into four chapters that explore four pains (F) (P) Andrews McMeel Publishing
Detective Michael Bennett’s family vacation is disrupted when local cops uncover a crime scene (F) (E) Little, Brown
Subtitle: “9 Decisions That Will Transform Your Life Today” (NF) (H) Thomas Nelson
Children: A child tries to scare away the monster in his closet (F) (H) Sourcebooks
Children: Dog Man tries to bust two cats who are in a bit of trouble with the law; third in series (F) (H) Scholastic
David Brady needs a star for his documentary on paranormal psychology and wants agent A.J. Fields to help (F) (E) Silhouette Special Releases
Subtitle: “Reboot Your Metabolism in 21 Days and Burn Fat Forever” (NF) (H) Harmony
Arlen, Renna, and Jardir set out to find the Core, where the Mother of Demons lives; fifth and final in series (F) (E) Del Rey
Subtitle: “27 Psychiatrists and Mental Health Experts Assess a President” (NF) (E) Thomas Dunne
The story of a handmaid named Offred who lives in the repressive Republic of Gilead (F) (P) Anchor
The author shares the unconventional life and business principles that he’s developed over the past 40 years (NF) (H) Simon & Schuster
Subtitle: “The Quest for True Belonging and the Courage to Stand Alone” (NF) (H) Random House
Contains the first three prequel novellas to the author’s “A Song of Ice and Fire” series (F) (E) Bantam
Subtitle: “A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life” (NF) (H) HarperOne
Ellie Fisher tracks down Hudson King after they share a one-night stand (F) (E) Harlequin MIRA
Travel writer Lo Blacklock sees a woman thrown overboard on a luxury cruise, but no one believes her (F) (P) Gallery/Scout Press
Mitch Rapp assembles a covert team to go after Saudi officials who are working with ISIS (F) (E) Atria/Emily Bestler Books
Children: Pete the Cat goes trick-or-treating from house to house (F) (P) HarperFestival
Subtitle: “40 Stories Celebrating 40 Years of Star Wars” (F) (H) Del Rey
Oslo police investigator Harry Hole investigates a series of disappearances (F) (P) Vintage Crime/Black Lizard
Amos Decker investigates a murder-suicide outside FBI headquarters that could involve national security issues; third in series (F) (P)
Grand Central Publishing
The Four/Scott Galloway
Subtitle: “The Hidden DNA of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google” (NF) (H) Portfolio
Lilac Girls/Martha Hall Kelly
Debut novel about the intersecting lives of three women during World War II (F) (P) Ballantine
There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Bat!/Lucille Colandro Children: The little old lady now is swallowing a bat, owl, cat, ghost and goblin in this Halloween book (F) (H) Scholastic
Martin Luther/Eric Metaxas
Subtitle: “The Man Who Rediscovered God and Changed the World” (NF) (H) Viking
The Ugly Duckling/Iris Johansen
Ordinary woman turns into a beauty — and a moving target (F) (E) Bantam
StrengthsFinder 2.0/Tom Rath
Lifetime strategies for using your talents (NF) (H) Gallup
Sugar Pine Trail/RaeAnne Thayne
Julia Winston needs the help of Jamie Caine when she takes in two young boys before the holidays (F) (P) Harlequin HQN
To Be Where You Are/Jan Karon
In Mitford, newlyweds Dooley and Lace Kavanagh focus on their veterinary practice (F) (H) G.P. Putnam’s Sons
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2017
18T
SCREEN CHECK
TONIGHT ON TV
CRITIC’S
CORNER
Kelly Lawler
@klawls
USA TODAY
GOOD BEHAVIOR
TNT, 10 ET/PT
Downton Abbey alum Michelle Dockery is back as
Letty, a thief and con artist,
in the second season of the
drama. In the premiere,
Letty has finally regained
custody of her son Jacob
(Nyles Julian Steele) and
tries to settle down with
Javier (Juan Diego Botto), a
former assassin, to live a
normal life. The only problem: the couple are still
dabbling in criminal activity.
Letty (Michelle Dockery) is having a hard time settling in on Good Behavior. TNT
SURVIVOR’S REMORSE
STARZ, 10 ET/PT
FEAR THE
WALKING DEAD
9 ET/PT
The comedy wraps up its fourth
season, as Cam (Jessie T. Usher) and Reggie (RonReaco Lee)
butt heads over a potential deal
involving an abandoned school
property. Missy (Teyonah Parris) is looking for any opportunity that might help her get out
of the Calloway family’s orbit.
M-Chuck’s (Erica Ash) ambitions as a writer alienate her
from Cassie (Tichina Arnold),
and the rift may never be resolved.
Reggie (RonReaco Lee) is all
about the art of the deal in
Survivor’s Remorse. BOB
Madison (Kim
Dickens) searches
her soul on Fear.
MAHONEY, TNT
RICHARD FOREMAN, JR., AMC
‘Downton Abbey’ fans
can step back in time
Bill Keveney
@billkev
USA TODAY
For Americans who never received an invitation to Downton
Abbey — meaning everyone outside of Cora Crawley’s Yankee
family — there’s a second chance.
The beloved PBS Masterpiece
drama, which ended its six-season run last year, is coming to
America.
Downton Abbey: The Exhibition
opens Nov. 18 for a limited engagement in New York before
traveling throughout the country,
NBCUniversal International Studios announced.
The exhibition, described as a
“fully immersive experience,”
promises to connect fans to the
Downton characters, costumes,
locations and events of England’s
post-Edwardian era, from World
War I to the Roaring Twenties.
Visitors, who likely miss the
show as much as cast and producers do, will get an upstairs/
downstairs look at the Crawley
family estate, walking through recreations of sets that will take
them into the kitchen, servants’
hall, Carson’s pantry, Lady Mary’s
bedroom and the dining room.
More than 50 costumes worn
by Michelle Dockery, Hugh Bonneville, Maggie Smith and other
Downton stars will be on display.
They include Lady Mary’s and
Lady Edith’s wedding dresses,
Mary’s Season 2 proposal dress
and Rose’s royal presentation
dress.
Costumes were curated by Anna Robbins, who was the costume
designer for seasons 5 and 6.
Artifacts on display include the
bell board from the servants’ dining room and telegrams informing Lord Grantham of the sinking
of the Titanic and outbreak of
war with Germany.
The exhibit also will “showcase
never-before-seen footage.”
Costumes worn by Downton Abbey characters
will be featured in an exhibition coming to
New York. Later, it will travel to other U.S.
cities. PHOTOS BY CARNIVAL FILMS/PBS MASTERPIECE
In a statement, Michael Edelstein, president of NBCUniversal
International
Studios,
said
“Downton Abbey: The Exhibition
continues this extraordinary legacy and gives viewers an exclusive
invitation inside the series’ beloved characters, storylines and
sets.”
In New York, the exhibition
will take residence at 218 W. 57th
St. in Manhattan. Ticket prices,
which start at $30 for adults and
$15 for children, can be purchased at www.downtonexhibition.com.
More U.S. locations will be announced at a later date.
The zombie epic’s
third season concludes with a twohour finale, in which
Strand’s (Colman
Domingo) motives
finally are clarified,
Nick (Frank Dillane)
unearths a potential
new threat and
Madison (Kim Dickens) must deal with
a terrifying truth.
The kitchen
area where
Daisy (Sophie
McShera,
left) and Mrs.
Patmore
(Lesley Nicol)
work will be
featured in
the
exhibition.
PUZZLES
Answers placed on page 2
Play more puzzles at puzzles.usatoday.com
Puzzle problems? Contact us at feedback@usatoday.com
CROSSWORD
BY Fred Piscop
CLOSING BELLS
ACROSS
1 Roommate,
informally
6 Takes a breather
11 Place for a mani-pedi
14 Fred Astaire’s dancing
sister
15 Nip in the bud
16 Broody bird
17 Color associated with
a high-end jewelry
company
19 Color to paint a town?
20 Thunder Bay’s
province
21 Take away from,
with “of”
23 Wayside stopovers
25 Habitat for Humanity
constructions
26 Lie at rest
30 Sawing logs, so to
speak
33 Hebrew alphabet
starter
34 React to mold, as
cheese
35 Spray graffiti on
38 They’ve been dubbed
39 Italian city where
“Otello” premiered
40 Four-star review
41 72, at Augusta
National
42 Convicted arsonist,
e.g.
43 Strips on some
burgers
44 “Old ___” (Disney
classic)
46 “Scarface” of the
underworld
47 “Toodles!”
49 Cusser’s mouthwash
of old
51 Scouts’ finds
54 Singer or dancer, e.g.
59 Bus. card listing
60 CEO of NBC, 1981-86
62 “Agnus ___”
(mass hymn)
63 Like Poe’s work
64 Scorpion attack
© Andrews McMeel
65 Tee shot dist. units
66 Barking circus
performers
67 Words on a family
crest
DOWN
1 “Elder” or “Younger”
Roman statesman
2 Norse god who rode
Sleipnir
3 Test by lifting
4 Autostrada auto,
for short
5 Predicting a market
decline
6 Fabric made from
wood pulp
7 Tidal reflux
8 Auctioneer’s cry
9 Unlike “alternative
facts”
10 Colbert of talk TV
11 Seafood snack in a
shell
10/15
12 Thorn in one’s side
13 Range with a noted
statue of Christ
18 Muses count
22 Sturgeon delicacy
24 Popeye and Bluto
26 Talk like a
stereotypical
gangster
27 London Magazine
essayist
28 Big name in
sportswear design
29 Black ___ (covert
activities)
31 Distance between
wingtips
32 Lesser who played
Seinfeld’s Uncle Leo
34 Incite anger in
36 Publisher of romance
novels
37 Drummer Krupa
39 Gibson of “Lethal
Weapon” movies
Answers: Call 1-900-988-8300, 99 cents a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-320-4280.
40 Genre of Ice-T or Ice
Cube
42 Projecting rims, as on
wheels
43 First sacrament
45 REM part
46 Street vendor’s
vehicle
47 Hit the books
48 Dog-___
(bookmarked, in a
way)
50 Hall’s singing partner
in “Rich Girl”
52 Banyan or baobab
53 ___ Lee cakes
55 Sondheim’s “___ the
Woods”
56 Comedy sketch
57 Lawn party rental
58 “Therefore,” to
Descartes
61 Zilch
CROSSWORDS
ON YOUR PHONE
mobilegames.usatoday.com
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2017
19T
QUOTE OF THE DAY
It hurts, it
stinks, I
don’t know
what else to tell
you.”
Tennessee coach Butch Jones
after his team lost 15-9 to South
Carolina, dropping the Vols to
3-3 on the season, 0-3 in the SEC
Tennessee coach Butch Jones, center. WADE PAYNE, AP
Why Chargers won’t leave Los Angeles
cation so far. But if the Chargers
are 4-1 instead of 1-4, would reporters be asking the NFL about
the Chargers moving back?
Would StubHub Center have attracted a couple of thousand
more fans to fill out the picture of
success? When asked last week,
NFL vice president of communications Joe Lockhart dismissed
the notion of the Chargers possibly moving back to San Diego.
“The only place I’ve heard that, is
that I’ve seen it on the Internet,”
he said.
Brent Schrotenboer
@schrotenboer
USA TODAY Sports
Before they even
moved to their new home in Los
Angeles this year, the former San
Diego Chargers knew they were
destined to have the lowest home
attendance in the NFL in 30
years.
That’s what they signed up for
when they picked StubHub Center as their temporary new home
— a soccer stadium that seats
27,000.
They could have pushed instead to share a temporary home
with the Rams at Los Angeles
Coliseum, which seats more than
90,000. But they didn’t in part because they knew their first years
in L.A. wouldn’t be easy. And no
matter how bad it’s been so far for
the Chargers (1-4), they also
know there’s no going back to San
Diego, their abandoned home of
56 years.
“That ship has sailed,” said
Marc Ganis, a sports consultant
who has worked with NFL owners and has helped other teams
relocate to new cities. “You never
say never to anything, but boy,
this is as close to that as we could
get right now.”
Despite speculation about the
Chargers having relocation remorse, there are at least eight
reasons they aren’t going back, at
least for a long time, according to
those with direct knowledge of
the Chargers relocation and the
contracts involved.
SAN DIEGO
1. THE FLIP TAX
Chargers fans in San Diego have a
dream scenario. They’d like Chargers chairman Dean Spanos to
sell the team to a new owner — a
savior who would return the team
to San Diego and build a stadium
with his own money. But that’s
also a pipe dream, partly because
Spanos has shown no interest in
it and partly because of penalties
the NFL would levy on him —
penalties that are a condition of
getting a $200 million stadium
construction loan from the NFL.
Such transfer fees discourage
Spanos from “flipping” the franchise for profit soon after relocation — 20% of the gross sales
price of the franchise through
7. ATTENDANCE
FLUCTUATIONS DON’T
MATTER THAT MUCH
StubHub Center, home of the L.A. Galaxy of the MLS, seats 27,000 for Chargers games.
JAKE ROTH, USA TODAY SPORTS
2020 and 10% from 2021 through
2025, according to terms reviewed by USA TODAY Sports.
The penalty decreases by 1% per
year through 2035.
2. EXPECTATIONS
Television talk show host Jimmy
Kimmel showed a skit last week
that poked fun at the Chargers’
low attendance and said they
“miss San Diego” and “really
(messed) up” by moving to Los
Angeles uninvited.
It was funny, but in reality, the
Chargers knew it would be like
this at first.
Even with a sellout every game,
the Chargers would have had the
lowest average home attendance
in the NFL since at least 1997,
when the Houston Oilers temporarily moved to Memphis and averaged
28,028
before
permanently moving on to Nashville, according to STATS. Before
that, a few teams averaged about
27,000 at home during a 1987 season that included a players strike
and replacement players.
Thirty years later, the Chargers
are averaging about 25,000 a
game at StubHub and are getting
drowned out by fans from visiting
teams. That might not get better
at their next home game Oct. 22
against the Denver Broncos.
Yet if they expected significantly better ticket sales, they could
have pursued sharing the larger
Coliseum, whose commission
president told USA TODAY
Sports last year that it was open
to hosting both the Chargers and
the Rams. The Chargers opted for
a more intimate experience instead at StubHub, in part because
they knew they had to build their
brand in Los Angeles first.
3. 2020 VISION
This move always was about the
future beyond 2020, when the
Chargers are scheduled to share a
newly constructed $2.6 billion
stadium with the Rams in nearby
Inglewood. That stadium is being
built and sold based on two teams
playing there for 10 games a year
(two preseason, eight regular season). That includes deals involving stadium naming rights,
sponsorships and luxury boxes —
all based on 20 NFL games, not
10. A $200 million NFL loan to
the Chargers also is part of the
construction budget. Removing
the Chargers from this equation
would create a mess that’s hard to
untangle for the Rams, the NFL
and others.
4. THERE’S NOWHERE
ELSE TO GO
After several years of trying, Spanos left San Diego because he
couldn’t get a new stadium built
in San Diego. He said he needed
taxpayer support for it, but voters
rejected that in November. Without a new stadium, there’s
SDCCU Stadium (formerly Qualcomm Stadium), which is 50
years old and headed for closure
by the city of San Diego after
2018. Smaller new San Diego stadium proposals for pro soccer
and San Diego State football are
in the works, but none have been
approved.
5. THE RELOCATION FEE
After 2018, the Chargers are to
begin paying installments on a
$650 million relocation fee — for
the right to move to Los Angeles
from San Diego. That’s money
that goes into the pockets of other NFL owners. Those owners
would not want to see those
payments canceled so Spanos can
make another uncertain attempt
for a new stadium in San Diego.
6. THE CHANGEABLE
NARRATIVE
Kimmel and others might joke
about the bad optics of this relo-
The league knew there would be
attendance challenges in Los Angeles, where the Raiders and
Rams ranked 24th and 28th out
of 28 NFL teams in home attendance in 1994, the last time the
area had two NFL teams at once,
according to STATS. But the NFL
primarily makes its money from
media rights deals, including television, and shares it with its
teams. Locally, teams earn and
don’t share revenue from lucrative luxury boxes, sponsorships
and naming rights. That’s what
the Chargers’ and Rams’ new stadium is being built to attract in
Los Angeles and why they both
moved to the nation’s second-biggest media market.
8. LONG-TERM
FRANCHISE VALUE
Over time, the Chargers are projected to increase in franchise
value and make more money
in Los Angeles than they would in
San Diego, according to Vanderbilt sports economist John
Vrooman.
Ganis said it’s important not to
“use an example of a few games to
try to extrapolate out for 30
years.”
At the same time, he said, the
Chargers could do themselves a
favor if they want to avoid more
speculation and bad optics.
“It would really behoove the
Chargers to start winning,” he
said. “They know this. It’s an obvious statement, but there’s that
old saying: ‘You never get a second chance to make a first impression.’ ”
FOLLOW REPORTER
BRENT SCHROTENBOER
@schrotenboer for breaking news
and analysis from the NFL.
Saints, Steelers worth watching in Week 6
Jarrett Bell
jbell@usatoday.com
USA TODAY Sports
USA TODAY Sports' Jarrett
Bell breaks down the keys for
Week 6 across the NFL:
WHO’S HOT
Drew Brees. The Saints head into
USA SNAPSHOTS©
Youth movement
28
Wins by
golfers in their 20s
(split between
19 individuals)
in the 2016-17
PGA Tour season,
most in a single
season
since 1970
NOTE The prior record of 24 wins occurred
in 2014-15 & 1974.
SOURCE PGA Tour
ELLEN J. HORROW AND PAUL TRAP, USA TODAY
Sunday’s game against the Lions
looking to become the first team
in NFL history to open the season with five consecutive games
without committing a turnover.
That reflects how careful Brees
has been with the football in
helping New Orleans transition
out of another early-season funk
(0-2) to suddenly get back into
the potential playoff stratosphere. Just as striking as the
turnover stat is this factoid: Beat
the Lions, and the Sean Payton’s
team will get above .500 for the
first time since 2013. The Saints
have been doomed by ugly beginnings in recent years, but with
the defense suddenly playing better the past two games, they have
reason to hope that this is the
year they finally produce another
winning record. Then again, Detroit looms as a trap, even with
Matthew Stafford hobbling. The
Lions, whose defense has feasted
on turnovers this season, have
won the past three meetings
against the Saints.
“having it anymore,” the heat is
on the Steelers’ quarterback. No,
Big Ben hasn’t been as prolific as
we’ve often seen him (6 TDs, 7
INTs, 75.8 passer rating), but it’s
still too early – and there’s too
much healthy talent around him
-- to panic. Remember, the entire
Steelers’ offense has been slow to
find its rhythm. Le’Veon Bell, the
multi-tasking running back who
missed training camp and the
preseason amid a contract matter, could be the biggest key for
relieving pressure and helping
Roethlisberger get out of his
funk. Bell hasn’t been himself, either. All of which makes the
Steelers mighty dangerous heading into Sunday’s game against
Kansas City. Pittsburgh swept
both matchups against the Chiefs
last season, including the divisional playoff game at Arrowhead.
Now the Chiefs may loom as the
perfect matchup for Ben and Co.
to send the statement that they
remain the top contender that
many envisioned them to be.
PRESSURE’S ON
KEY MATCHUP
Ben Roethlisberger. After a disastrous, five-interception performance last weekend that was
arguably the worst of his career,
followed by the armchair psychoanalysis that persisted after
Roethlisberger cracked about not
Mike Evans vs. Patrick Peterson.
Chances are good that with the
Bucs coming to town, the Cardinals will assign Peterson, arguably the NFL’s best cornerback,
to shadow the prolific Evans,
maybe the most athletically-gift-
ed wideout in the game. Generally, Peterson doesn’t get many
balls thrown in his direction. But
Jameis Winston will have to occasionally try it, nonetheless,
with the 6-foot, 5-inch Evans providing such an inviting radius.
The Cardinals should be more
worried about whether Justin Bethel can handle the other Tampa
Bay receiver, speed merchant DeSean Jackson. Chances are that
he can’t. If Winston and Jackson
can establish the flow they’ve
been seeking, it could be the big
swing factor. Then there’s the
other Peterson in the mix for Arizona. Just-acquired Adrian Peterson makes his Cardinals debut
against a Bucs defense solidified
by two of the best young linebackers in the game, Lavonte David and Kwon Alexander.
Sunday night encounter into the
“No Fly Zone” of the Denver defense as the winless Giants looks
to pull off a shocker.
NEXT MAN UP
STAT’S THE FACT
Roger Lewis and Tavares King.
Who? With ankle injuries decimating the Giants receiving corps
last week – Odell Beckham, Jr.
and Brandon Marshall are done
for the season, while Sterling
Shepard is hobbling – Lewis finished the loss against the Chargers last weekend as the only
receiver on the field. King has
since been called up from the
practice squad. And now the
patched up receiver corps has a
With Mitchell Trubisky heading
to the Big ATM on the heels of his
NFL debut for the Bears last
Monday night, it’s time for a
warning: Under John Harbaugh,
the Ravens are 10-0 against rookie quarterbacks.
ROOKIE WATCH
Aaron Jones. Packers starting
running back Ty Montgomery is
expected to return for Sunday’s
NFC North showdown at Minnesota after missing a week to nurse
fractured ribs. The converted receiver causes so many issues with
his skill in the passing game. But
Jones, a fifth-round pick from
Texas El-Paso, showed during a
19-carry, 125-yard outing at Dallas that he has plenty to offer
with his quick burst and decisive
running. The 125 yards were
more than Green Bay had rushed
for in the past seven games combined.
FOLLOW NFL COLUMNIST
JARRETT BELL
@JarrettBell for commentary, insight and analysis.
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2017
20T
NBA
CHAMPION WARRIORS STILL TEAM TO BEAT
AJ Neuharth-Keusch
@tweetAJNK
USA TODAY Sports
With the chaotic summer in
the books and less than a week
remaining until opening night of
the 2017-18 season, we rank the
NBA’s 30 teams.
1. Golden State Warriors:
The Warriors come out of the offseason on top, again, after resigning (deep breath) Stephen
Curry, Kevin Durant, Andre Iguodala, Shaun Livingston, JaVale
McGee, Zaza Pachulia and David
West and acquiring Nick Young
and Omri Casspi (exhale). That
sound you hear? It’s the NBA’s 29
other teams scrambling to keep
up.
2. Houston Rockets: What
do you get when you combine a
guard-friendly head coach with a
backcourt made up of elite floor
generals in Chris Paul and James
Harden? An offense capable of
going toe-to-toe with any team
on any night. As for defense, the
additions of Paul, P.J. Tucker and
Luc Mbah a Moute will help.
3. Cleveland Cavaliers: Will
Isaiah Thomas be back to his old
self after returning from his hip
injury in January? Can Dwyane
Wade and Derrick Rose turn back
the clock? Is Tristan Thompson
best suited coming off the bench?
The Cavs roster, albeit much improved, is littered with questions.
4. Oklahoma City Thunder:
Russell Westbrook, Paul George,
Carmelo Anthony and the newand-improved Thunder will make
for must-see TV. But as far as title
contention goes, there’s still a gap
between them and the Warriors.
But how big?
5. San Antonio Spurs: Even
though they roster a top-three
talent in Kawhi Leonard and employ one of the greatest coaches
of all time in Gregg Popovich, the
Spurs have ground to make up in
the championship contention department. Aside from signing a
proven scorer in Rudy Gay, who’s
coming off a ruptured Achilles,
their summer was underwhelming.
6. Boston Celtics: The additions of Kyrie Irving and Gordon
Hayward helped narrow the gap
on the Cavs, but the Celtics —
made up of a dozen (no, seriously,
a dozen) new faces — will surely
miss the defensive presence of
Avery Bradley and Jae Crowder.
Don’t expect smooth sailing from
the get-go.
7. Washington Wizards:
Aside from re-signing John Wall
and Otto Porter to deals worth a
combined $276 million, the Wizards stayed relatively quiet. That’s
not necessarily a bad thing, as
they’re looking to build off what
was the franchise’s best season
since 1979. But what’s their
ceiling?
8.
Minnesota
Timberwolves: Not only are the Timberwolves poised to end their
league-worst 13-year playoff
drought, but — led by Jimmy But-
The Thunder added Paul George (13) and Carmelo Anthony (7)
to play alongside Russell Westbrook, but it remains to be seen
if they can beat the Warriors. MARK D. SMITH, USA TODAY SPORTS
ler, Andrew Wiggins and KarlAnthony Towns — they’re talented enough to fight for a top-four
seed in the Western Conference.
9. Toronto Raptors: The
Raptors re-signed Kyle Lowry
and Serge Ibaka and brought in
C.J. Miles from Indiana, but they
lost Patrick Patterson, P.J. Tucker, DeMarre Carroll and Cory Joseph. They’ll win 45-plus games
for the fifth consecutive season,
but then what?
10. Milwaukee Bucks: With
Giannis Antetokounmpo set to
continue
his
rise
to
superstardom, Khris Middleton
healthy and Thon Maker and
Malcolm Brogdon poised for second-season success, the Bucks
enter with a legitimate shot to
contend for a top-four seed in the
Eastern Conference.
11. Los Angeles Clippers:
You might not be able to recognize the Clippers after the face
lift, but don’t expect their six-season playoff streak to come to an
end. Led by $173 million man
Blake Griffin, along with DeAndre
Jordan, Danilo Gallinari and Pat
Beverley, the Clips are still going
to compete.
12. Denver Nuggets: With
the front line of Paul Millsap and
Nikola Jokic expected to be one
of the most dynamic in the
league, this Nuggets team is ready
to get back in the postseason for
the first time since 2013.
13. Miami Heat: The Heat
were big spenders, signing James
Johnson, Kelly Olynyk and Dion
Waiters each to $50 million-plus
deals. But for now, despite last
season’s 30-11 finish, there’s nothing that suggests Miami is anything more than a middle-of-theroad team.
14. Utah Jazz: Led by Rudy
Gobert, Ricky Rubio and Derrick
Favors, the Jazz are still capable
of sneaking into the playoffs. But
the days of 50-win seasons and
second-round playoff trips —
though short-lived — are over.
15. Portland Trail Blazers:
We know what Damian Lillard
and CJ McCollum are capable of,
but the real X factor is Jusuf Nurkic, who emerged as a legitimate
third option during the latter portion of last season after being
traded from Denver.
16. Memphis Grizzlies: With
the departures of Tony Allen and
Zach Randolph, these won’t be
the Grit ’n’ Grind Grizzlies of yesteryear. Memphis enters as nothing more than a fringe playoff
team trapped in a brutal Western
Conference.
17. Philadelphia 76ers:
There’s good reason for excitement in Philly, as the 76ers are
poised for a playoff push after
posting a 109-301 record over the
last five seasons. Health permitting, this team — headlined by
Joel Embiid, Markelle Fultz and
Ben Simmons — will turn some
heads.
18. Charlotte Hornets: Charlotte’s ceiling is the sixth seed in
the East while their floor is somewhere closer to the 10th. Can the
Hornets take advantage of good
coaching, a solid roster and a
weak conference, or will they fall
short for the second season in a
row?
19. New Orleans Pelicans:
The Big Three in The Big Easy —
Jrue Holiday, Anthony Davis and
DeMarcus Cousins — have what
it takes to make noise and work
their way into the postseason.
But will they? The future of coach
Alvin Gentry might depend on it.
20. Detroit Pistons: The Pistons, who have been mired in mediocrity for a good portion of the
last decade, don’t appear to be
ready to take a significant step
forward or back. The addition of
Avery Bradley is underrated, but
when you factor in the losses of
Marcus Morris and Kentavious
Caldwell-Pope, don’t expect Detroit to be all that inspiring.
21. Sacramento Kings: Look
at the bright side: With a roster
that features a nice mix of veteran leadership (Zach Randolph,
George Hill and Vince Carter)
and young talent (Buddy Hield,
De’Aaron Fox and Willie CauleyStein), the Kings might not be
unwatchable.
22. Dallas Mavericks: The
highlight of the Mavs’ summer
was drafting Dennis Smith Jr.,
which — as bright as his future
might be — doesn’t do much as
far as this season is concerned.
For just the fourth time since the
turn of the millennium, the Mavericks are bound for the lottery.
23. Los Angeles Lakers:
While we can already chalk this
season up as one that will end at
Game No. 82, the future is as
bright in Laker Land as it has
been in some time. Despite an
on-court product that will, at
times, be difficult to watch, the
spotlight will still shine bright on
the Purple and Gold this season.
24. New York Knicks: Even
though the NBA’s most dysfunctional franchise took some steps
in the right direction, namely
parting ways with Phil Jackson
and finding a new home for Carmelo Anthony, the waiting game
— and the frustration — will surely continue for Knicks fans.
25. Indiana Pacers: Fleeced
by Oklahoma City in the Paul
George deal, the Pacers enter
with little to be excited about.
And aside from Myles Turner and
Victor Oladipo, the future doesn’t
look all that bright either.
26. Phoenix Suns: Another
year, another lottery-bound season for the Suns, who will use this
season to focus on the development of franchise cornerstones
Devin Booker and Josh Jackson
as well as former lottery picks
Marquese Chriss, Dragan Bender
and Alex Len.
27. Orlando Magic: Will the
Magic be better than last season
after drafting Jonathan Isaac and
adding Jonathon Simmons, Arron Afflalo, Shelvin Mack and
Marreese Speights in free agency? Probably. But that’s not saying much. More than anything
else, all eyes will be on Aaron
Gordon and Elfrid Payton, who
both have a lot to prove during
their fourth NBA seasons.
28. Brooklyn Nets: After
bringing in 2015 No. 2 overall
pick D’Angelo Russell from the
Lakers, the Nets have a potential
franchise player to build around,
as well as some complementary
pieces in Allen Crabbe, Rondae
Hollis-Jefferson and Caris LeVert. It might not seem like
much, but it’s a start.
29. Atlanta Hawks: You’d be
hard-pressed to find a team that
has undergone the type of roster
turnover Atlanta has the last two
seasons, as this Hawks team features only three members of that
60-win team from three years
ago.
30. Chicago Bulls: The Bulls
didn’t just say so long to Jimmy
Butler this summer, they also said
so long to the inevitable success
that came with him on the roster.
Yes, Chicago finally has a direction, but for now that direction is
down.
The USA TODAY Network of voters:
USA TODAY Sports’ Sam Amick, Jeff
Zillgitt, Michael Singer and AJ Neuharth-Keusch; Detroit Free Press’
Vince Ellis; The Indianapolis Star’s
Clifton Brown; Milwaukee Journal
Sentinel’s Matt Velazquez
Simmons, Ball, Fultz headline race for ROY
AJ Neuharth-Keusch
@tweetAJNK
USA TODAY Sports
This wasn’t the much ballyhooed NBA draft class of 2003,
but this year’s class isn’t short on
talent, either. Our preseason favorite to win Rookie of the Year
wasn’t even drafted in June,
though Ben Simmons gets
lumped in with this year’s rookies
due to injury. Needless to say,
there’s competition and intrigue
all throughout the league when it
comes to the player most likely to
win Rookie of the Year.
1. Ben Simmons: Drafted
No. 1 by Philadelphia (2016)
Simmons, whose rookie season
was shut down after he broke his
foot during training camp last
year, is healthy, and that alone
should make him a Rookie of the
Year favorite. The 6-10 forward
will play different positions, including point guard, for a Sixers
team that’s poised to end the
franchise’s five-year postseason
drought. Simmons, not lacking
confidence, says he’s heading into
the season a much better player
than he was last year, and it’s “not
even close.”
2. Lonzo Ball: Drafted No.2
by Los Angeles Lakers
The hype surrounding Ball, for
better or worse, has ensured that
the spotlight will shine bright on
the 6-6 point guard during his
rookie campaign, as he heads into
the season holding the keys to
one of the NBA’s most storied
franchises. But after a strong
showing during Las Vegas Summer League, and some exciting
moments during his limited preseason action, early signs indicate
that Ball is well-suited for the
task.
3. Dennis Smith Jr.: Drafted No. 9 by Dallas
Smith, who could end up being
the steal of the draft, will have the
green light in Dallas, which in itself makes him a prime candidate
for Rookie of the Year honors.
But then you look at his talent —
he’s a freak athlete and has elite
playmaker potential — and Smith
taking home the hardware becomes all the more likely. Don’t
believe us? Take it from Smith’s
peers, who voted him most likely
to win the award in the annual
Rookie Survey.
4. Markelle Fultz: Drafted
No. 1 by Philadelphia
Fultz has superstar potential
and could easily end up being the
best player from this year’s draft
class. But as far as his Rookie of
the Year odds are concerned, the
fact that Fultz is going to spend a
lot of his time off the ball and will
be forced to share both the spotlight and the touches with Simmons and Joel Embiid might end
up hurting his stock a bit.
5. De’Aaron Fox: Drafted
No. 5 by Sacramento
The lightning-quick point
guard out of Kentucky has the
tools to contribute from Day One,
and though he’ll have to fight for
minutes behind veteran point
guard George Hill, he should see
plenty of time on the court for
the lottery-bound Kings. His
struggles on the perimeter (he
shot 24.6% from three-point
range at Kentucky) and thin
frame (he weighed in at 170
pounds at the combine) could
hinder his Rookie of the Year run,
though.
6. Josh Jackson: Drafted
No. 4 by Phoenix
Jackson, arguably the draft’s
best two-way player, is in line for
a heavy workload for a Suns team
that views him as a franchise cornerstone. He thrives in transition
and should be a nice fit in Phoenix’s fast-paced offense alongside
Eric Bledsoe and Devin Booker.
That said, his offensive game isn’t
all that polished and he struggles
with his jump shot.
7. Jayson Tatum: Drafted
No. 3 by Boston
Put him on a lottery team and
give him 30 minutes a night and
Tatum would be up there with
Simmons, Ball and Smith. He has
the talent, particularly as a scorer,
to see some meaningful minutes
with Boston’s second unit. But
odds are those minutes won’t be
enough to crown him as this
year’s top rookie. In fact, only two
of the past 20 Rookie of the Year
winners — Malcolm Brogdon
(26.4) and Mike Miller (29.1) —
averaged fewer than 30 minutes
per game.
8. Malik Monk: Drafted No.
11 by Charlotte
One of the draft’s top scorers,
Monk — who turned heads with
his 47-point outing against North
Carolina during his freshman
season with Kentucky — gives the
Hornets needed backcourt depth.
His defensive shortcomings
might limit his minutes, but expect to see Monk get playing time
at both guard positions, especially
with starting shooting guard
Nicolas Batum out for 6-8 weeks.
9. Donovan Mitchell: Drafted No. 13 by Denver, traded to
Utah
Another prime candidate for
the “steal of the draft” designation, the 6-3 combo guard out of
Louisville prides himself on his
defense, but he doesn’t exactly
struggle as a scorer. He sank 80
three-pointers at a 35.4% clip as a
sophomore after making 18 at
25% as a freshman, and he played
well during Utah’s undefeated
preseason run, scoring 26 points
on 10-20 shooting in the finale
against the Lakers.
10. John Collins: Drafted
No. 19 by Atlanta
Collins, a versatile forward
from Wake Forest, might be a
long shot to win the award, but
his role — and his highlight reel —
should be enough to get him
some consideration. Collins was
relatively unknown after his first
year with the Demon Deacons,
but emerged as one of the nation’s top bigs as a sophomore.
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2017
21T
NFL
Protesting can be a difficult decision
Many factors
make situation
tricky for players
Jarrett Bell
jbell@usatoday.com
USA TODAY Sports
ASHBURN, VA . As usual, Terrelle
Pryor was approachable and polite as a visitor stopped by his
locker for a quick chat. But the
Washington receiver, undoubtedly sensing the topic, was also
rather firm.
“I’ll talk about football,” Pryor
told USA TODAY Sports. “We can
talk about needing to beat the
49ers.”
Translation: Not going there.
After his last game, on Oct. 2,
Pryor got into a heated exchange
with a fan at Kansas City’s Arrowhead Stadium — moved to the
point of giving the man a finger,
he explained, after being repeatedly taunted with the N-word. In
an Instagram post, Pryor wrote
the tone of the incident was “the
exact reason why guys are kneeling during the anthem.”
Reminded of that Wednesday,
Pryor said, “I said what I had to
say.”
Kind of annoying, coming to
work, and pressed to make a social statement?
Pryor gave a half-smile.
“Nah,” he said. “I understand.
You’re doing your job.”
Elsewhere, one of Pryor’s usually affable teammates wouldn’t
touch the matter of the national
anthem protests.
“I work for The Man,” the player grumbled. “And I want to keep
working.”
Therein lies another layer to
Washington wide receiver Terrelle Pryor had an incident with a fan Oct. 2, but he wants to put
that behind him. His focus is on the 49ers this week. MARK TENALLY, AP
the cloud that has settled over the
NFL in relation to the anthem
demonstrations that are largely
protests against social injustice,
inequality and police brutality
against African Americans.
Although there’s the visceral
urge to protest in response to the
trash-talking
from
Donald
Trump, the decision to engage or
not for many players is not automatic. Some lesser-known ones
probably resist protesting because they lack job security and
are at the low end of the salary
scale. At the other end of the
spectrum, some are undoubtedly
eyeing post-playing careers while
considering political ramifications. Remember, Colin Kaepernick — the former San Francisco
49ers quarterback who earned
$43.5 million over six NFL seasons — still doesn’t have a job.
It’s a matter of dignity for
many in a league where more
than 70% of the players are African Americans. In determining
whether to express themselves,
there’s undoubtedly a sense that
they are also representing family
and friends. While high-profile
leaders including Philadelphia
Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins
and Seattle Seahawks players Michael Bennett and Doug Baldwin
have emerged in Kaepernick’s absence to define the purpose of the
protests, every player in the
league is affected to some degree.
Not every player is politically
and socially passionate, and
there’s a wide range of interests,
maturity and backgrounds. But
after Trump got involved, the entire league — owners included —
was put on full blast for a
self-check.
“You’ve got some guys who are
paying attention to it and some
guys who are not,” Washington
tight end Vernon Davis told USA
TODAY Sports. “Do you want to
focus on that or football?”
Davis, a 12th-year veteran, was
not among the six Washington
players who knelt before the
game at Kansas City.
“I’m just focusing on football,”
he said. “The cause is there. I
think it’s a good cause. They’re
trying to bring awareness to
something that needs to be addressed. Police brutality. Equality.
But at the end of the day — (with)
the president or higher-ups —
you’re either going to help or
you’re not. The ones who control
what’s going on in America, they
have the power to do something
about it.”
NFL players have been placed
in a difficult dilemma. It’s not like
African-American accountants,
lawyers or police officers were
suddenly cast with the decision to
kneel while their white co-workers and management figures contemplate their level of support.
In declaring that he won’t use
any player who doesn’t stand for
the anthem, Dallas Cowboys
owner Jerry Jones is selling the
notion that it’s good for his players because he’s taking the decision out of their hands.
How paternalistic. And condescending.
It’s one thing to defend the flag,
show concern for business ramifications and square off against the
players union about workplace
rules. But the notion that players
can’t make up their own minds is
crossing a line. That’s why activists, including Dr. Harry Edwards
and Rev. Al Sharpton, skewer
Jones as carrying a “plantation
mentality” as he essentially accedes to Trump’s wishes.
“Really, I don’t want my players making the call,” Jones told
USA TODAY Sports. “Everybody
understands it when your livelihood (is at stake). What nobody
gets is how damaging it can be
when we continue a debate about
the NFL when it comes to disrespecting the flag.”
It’s as if Jones thinks players in
a highly pressurized profession
can’t handle such a decision, a notion that drew a chuckle from
Davis.
“We’re grown men,” Davis said.
“You decide what you’re going to
do. If you want to stand or kneel,
you make your own decision.
Whatever.
“This is a job that’s full of pressure, but at the end of the day,
pressure is a good thing. In this
game ... you embrace it.”
FOLLOW NFL COLUMNIST
JARRETT BELL
@JarrettBell for commentary,
insight and analysis.
Twitter offers insights into Kaepernick
Quarterback’s tweets, followers prove
informative, show more than politics
Josh Peter
@joshlpeter11
USA TODAY Sports
Talib Kweli Greene, a rapper
who has used the racial epithet
“coon” to attack African Americans he thinks are harming the
black community, said he wants
to thank Colin Kaepernick for following his Twitter account.
“Following me is a brave
choice,” said Greene, who has
branded conservative politician
Ben Carson and Breitbart reporter Jerome Hudson as coons.
“Twitter every once in a while
will email me and be like, ‘You
have to erase that.’
“I say things football players
can’t say, you know what I’m
saying?”
Kaepernick, by contrast, is saying very little these days.
The controversial quarterback
hasn’t addressed the news media
in public since he parted ways
with the San Francisco 49ers after a 2016 season in which Kaepernick stirred emotions by
taking a knee during the national
anthem to protest social injustice.
But Twitter offers insight into
who he is, with whom he associates with and what he believes.
On Sunday, Vice President
Mike Pence walked out of the San
Francisco
49ers-Indianapolis
Colts game in protest of several
players taking a knee during The
Star-Spangled Banner, and Dallas
Cowboys owner Jerry Jones declared his players must stand for
the song.
In both cases, Kaepernick did
not comment.
But when CBS reported Kaepernick is not planning to kneel
during the anthem if he gets another shot to play in the NFL, he
responded on Twitter with a
Winston Churchill quote:
“A lie gets halfway around the
world before the truth has a
chance to get its pants on.”
It was Kaepernick’s first tweet
since Sept. 6 and characteristically cryptic. President Trump, who
has called for NFL owners to fire
or suspend players who refuse to
stand for the anthem, uses his
Twitter account as a bully pulpit.
Kaepernick engages in guerrillalike tactics — with his chosen
army.
Like Trump, Kaepernick generates heavy interest on the social
media site, with more than 4.6
million mentions since Sept. 1,
the most of any athlete, according
to Twitter. In addition, #ImwithKaep was used in 115,000 tweets
from Sept. 1 to Oct. 4.
Overall Kaepernick has 1.4 million followers but follows only 81
accounts — including Greene, the
rapper, and other controversial
figures.
For instance, there’s DeRay
Mckesson, a civil rights activist
who has been accused of inciting
violence, and Linda Sarsour, an
Palestinian American who has
called for boycott, divestment and
sanctions against Israel.
Last month, Mckesson joined
Kaepernick during a meeting
with Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey
and tweeted, “It was good to connect today & to discuss pathways
to change. There’s much yet to be
done.”
Sarsour attended the proKaepernick rally outside NFL
headquarters Aug. 23 and is a
member of The Gathering Justice, among the organizations to
which Kaepernick has donated
this year while giving away almost $1 million.
“Every conversation that I’ve
ever had with Colin is based on
what are we doing right now,”
Sarsour, who like Kaepernick
made Time magazine’s “100 Most
Influential People” list for 2017,
told USA TODAY Sports. “Where
is the work? What are you focusing on? Where is the need?
“I wish more people would understand who he is on a deep
level.”
Kaepernick offered a glimpse
when on July 4 he released a
video documenting his trip to
Africa.
“In a quest to find my personal
independence, I had to find out
where my ancestors came from,”
Kaepernick said during the narra-
Quarterback Colin Kaepernick raised awareness of social issues through protests.
ROBERT HANASHIRO, USA TODAY SPORTS
tion. “I set out tracing my African
ancestral roots, and it lead me to
Ghana.”
But his Twitter account suggests he is about more than politics. For example, he follows
Camp Taylor, a camp in Northern
California for children with heart
disease.
Kaepernick’s adoptive parents
lost two children to heart disease
and, as a rookie with the 49ers in
2011, Kaepernick donated his first
game check to Camp Taylor. He
sponsored the organization’s
charity golf tournament last year,
said Kavin Desai, a pediatric cardiologist and medical director of
Camp Taylor who said he has not
spoken to Kaepernick since the
protests began in August 2016.
“I’ve always been taken by how
thoughtful he is,” Desai said.
“He’s clearly a very caring person.
He’s got a huge heart. He’s very
deliberate. He’s smart. He knows
what he’s doing.
“I’m excited for what he’s doing
and the direction he’s going, because it’s what he wants to do.
We’re a little bit saddened that
he’s less involved with us at Camp
Taylor now, but that’s part of maturing, and I’m understanding of
that.”
Kaepernick also follows Jeremiah Jones, who said he contacted Kaepernick after reading
about the quarterback’s involvement with Camp Taylor. “He was
doing something positive, not being selfish,” Jones explained
about his decision to reach out to
the quarterback.
That was almost four years ago
when Jones, then 13, sent Kaepernick gear from his clothing
line, JYoungin, a non-profit that
promotes academics, sports and
leadership. Kaepernick wore a
red JYoungin vest on Jan. 12,
2014, after the 49ers beat the
Carolina Panthers 23-10 in a
playoff game, and JYoungin sales
spiked.
“They shot up like a rocket,”
said Jones, who added that Kaepernick also sent a boxful of his
own merchandise to Jones.
Jones said he feels a special
kinship with Kaepernick because
Jones, like Kaepernick, is biracial.
He keeps up with Kaepernick on
Twitter, and Jones remains on
the select list of Twitter accounts
Kaepernick follows.
“I’ve been rocking with Kaep
since he’s been rocking with me,”
Jones told USA TODAY Sports,
“and I’m still rocking with Kaep.”
More than a dozen of the Twitter accounts Kaepernick follows
belong to athletes, including Miami Dolphins receiver Kenny
Stills, who this year tweeted,
“Thinking NFL players are ‘protesting the flag’ is like thinking
Rosa Parks was protesting public
transportation.”
Another account belongs to his
girlfriend, Nessa Diab, whose
Muslim faith and pointed tweets
have drawn scrutiny from Kaepernick’s critics. On Sunday she
tweeted, “The reports that Colin
will stand for the anthem are
completely false! He has never
discussed this with anyone.”
Once again, Twitter offered the
only clues.
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2017
22T
WEATHER
WEATHER ONLINE
USATODAY.COM
TODAY’S FORECAST
Seattle
64/45pc
Helena
61/35s
Portland
68/43s
NATIONAL FORECAST
Bismarck
60/34s
Portland
70/53c
Billings
63/43s
Boise
61/35s
Mpls-St. Paul
54/38c
Rapid City
63/34s
San Francisco
82/58pc
Salt Lake City
60/37s
Denver
65/39s
Las Vegas
81/56s
Los Angeles
95/65s
San Diego
86/67s
Phoenix
97/71s
PRECIPITATION
Milwaukee
57/42c
Albuquerque
68/42s
Little Rock
68/48pc
Dallas-Fort Worth
74/51c
Houston
87/61pc
El Paso
75/51s
San Antonio
80/56t
Tampa
91/76pc
Alaska
Precipitation
c Cloudy
dr Drizzle
10s
Thunderstorms
f Fog
h Haze
20s
Rain
i Ice
r Rain
pc Partly cloudy s Sunny
30s
Showers
sf Snow flurries
sh Showers
Hilo
81/69sh
Juneau
47/40r
40s
50s
Snow
Miami
88/77sh
Honolulu
85/73sh
Anchorage
40/29pc
Below 10
Baltimore
84/54pc
Orlando
88/72sh
New Orleans
87/68pc
Forecasts and
graphics provided by
AccuWeather Inc.
©2017
New York
80/57pc
Philadelphia
82/57pc
Charleston
86/66pc
Atlanta
Birmingham 83/60pc
85/53pc
Hawaii
Temperatures (°F)
Boston
76/59c
Detroit
69/42r Cleveland
76/48t
Chicago
Pittsburgh
59/41pc Indianapolis
77/46t
Omaha
66/43r
60/38s
St. Louis
Washington
61/43t
Cincinnati 84/58s
Kansas City
73/44t
61/40s
Wichita
Charlotte
64/40s
84/63pc
Nashville
Memphis
Tulsa
78/46t
74/51t
67/43pc
Casper
57/36s
Sacramento
83/48pc
Albany
81/48c
60s
70s
Snow flurries
sn Snow
w Windy
t Thunderstorms
80s
90s
100s
110+
Ice / wintry mix
Note: The forecast highs are for the 24-hour
period of that day. Low-temperature forecasts
are for the upcoming night.
YOUR SAY
SECOND LOOK
MON
57/34s
TODAY
MON
76/58c
62/41pc
Albany, N.Y.
TODAY
81/48c
Raleigh, N.C.
85/62s
65/45pc
Allentown, Pa.
83/51pc 63/37pc
Reno
72/39s
78/44pc
Atlantic City
79/61pc
Richmond, Va.
85/57pc 67/44pc
Augusta, Ga.
90/65pc 79/51pc
Rochester, N.Y.
79/45t
Austin
79/53t
76/48s
San Jose, Calif.
89/55pc 89/57s
Bakersfield, Calif.
88/56s
91/61s
Sarasota, Fla.
88/73c
Baton Rouge
89/62pc 78/51pc
Savannah, Ga.
89/68pc 85/58t
Boise
61/35s
65/42s
Shreveport, La.
79/53pc 76/48s
Buffalo
74/44t
53/43pc
South Bend, Ind.
61/42r
60/44s
Cedar Rapids
57/36pc 64/44s
Spokane, Wash.
59/37s
63/44s
Colorado Springs
61/35s
Springfield, Mo.
62/39pc 67/42s
Columbia, S.C.
89/66pc 74/52pc
Syracuse, N.Y.
80/45t
Columbus, Ohio
75/45t
60/40s
Toledo, Ohio
69/42r
61/43s
Dayton, Ohio
71/43t
59/40s
Tucson
96/68s
94/68s
66/43pc
75/41pc
Providence
53/40sh
87/72t
53/37pc
Daytona Beach
86/73sh 86/72t
Des Moines
58/40s
67/48s
WORLD FORECAST
Duluth, Minn.
47/32c
55/39s
Athens, Greece
75/61s
Fort Myers, Fla.
89/73pc 90/73t
Baghdad
95/65s
92/62s
Fresno
83/53pc 87/55s
Beijing
62/44c
65/51pc
Grand Rapids
62/41r
Berlin
70/53s
70/54s
Greensboro, N.C.
83/56pc 68/44pc
Buenos Aires
74/55s
75/61s
Greenville, S.C.
82/59pc 70/47pc
Cairo
83/66s
83/66s
Harrisburg, Pa.
83/54pc 64/40s
Caracas, Ven.
90/78pc 92/78pc
Hartford, Conn.
79/52c
Freeport, Bahamas
86/75pc 84/75sh
Huntsville, Ala.
83/49pc 68/47s
Hong Kong
83/76sh 85/76sh
Jackson, Miss.
87/53t
Jerusalem
72/56s
Jacksonville
86/70pc 86/67sh
Kingston, Jamaica
90/80pc 90/80t
Knoxville, Tenn.
82/50s
66/42s
London
71/59s
Lexington, Ky.
75/45t
62/39s
Madrid
85/55s
80/53s
Louisville
75/47t
63/42s
Manila
84/77t
88/78t
60/45s
61/37pc
74/48s
79/63s
73/56s
74/53pc
Lubbock, Texas
69/39s
72/44s
Mexico City
74/55pc 68/55pc
Madison, Wis.
56/38c
61/45s
Montreal
71/43r
52/36pc
McAllen, Texas
89/66pc 80/61pc
Moscow
41/39r
45/41c
Mobile, Ala.
86/64pc 76/56t
Nassau, Bahamas
88/75pc 88/75sh
Myrtle Beach, S.C.
84/68s
New Delhi
98/70pc 98/69pc
Nags Head, N.C.
78/67pc 70/58c
Paris
76/57s
77/54s
Norfolk, Va.
84/67pc 69/54c
Rome
75/53s
76/53s
Oklahoma City
66/41pc
69/42s
Sydney
71/60pc 72/63s
Palm Springs
96/66s
99/70s
Tokyo
65/55r
59/56r
Pensacola, Fla.
87/69pc 79/62t
Toronto
73/40r
54/41sh
79/54t
Tracking the nation’s conversation
TOON TALK
NEW VIEWS
ON TALKERS
LATE NIGHT ON GUNS
Karol Markowicz’s column in
USA TODAY, “Jimmy Kimmel’s
tears aren’t helping Las Vegas
victims or decreasing gun
violence,” meets the strictest
definition of opinion in that it
is “a view or judgement about
something, not necessarily
based on fact or knowledge.”
The column does not promote
thoughtful dialogue on gun
violence.
I listened to late-night comic Jimmy Kimmel’s monologue
and there was no direct reference or inference that Republicans are all “monsters.” Kimmel merely expressed that,
for public safety reasons, no
one should own firearms
designed specifically to more
efficiently kill humans.
Kimmel didn’t call the half
of Americans who own guns
“monsters,” and he didn’t
blatantly repeat “Democratic
talking points,” as Markowicz
accuss in her column. In fact,
Kimmel’s points were, as he
described, commonsense
suggestions that most Americans subscribe to on some
level.
MARSHALL RAMSEY, THE (JACKSON, MISS.) CLARION-LEDGER
CHARLIE DANIEL, KNOXVILLE (TENN.) NEWS SENTINEL
Paul Colson
Birmingham, Ala.
Make no mistake, those
who have supported assault
weapon sales and wide distribution of firearms do bear
some responsibility for these
events. People might say
“guns don’t kill people, people kill people,” but I would
ask those who say that: If
Stephen Paddock had only a
knife on him, how many people would have died in Las
Vegas?
Charles McCormick
TO COMMENT
GARY VARVEL, THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR
MIKE THOMPSON, DETROIT FREE PRESS
Have Your Say at letters@usatoday.com, facebook.com/usatodayopinion and @USATOpinion on Twitter. All comments are edited for length and clarity. Content submitted to USA
TODAY may appear in print, digital or other forms. For letters, include name, address and phone number. Letters may be mailed to 7950 Jones Branch Drive, McLean, VA, 22108.
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