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USA Today - 22 October 2017

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SUNDAY
AN EDITION OF USA TODAY
USA TODAY EXCLUSIVE
‘Era of economic
surrender is over’
In an op-ed for the USA Today
Network, President Trump lays
out the case for cutting taxes
and simplifying the tax code.
10.22.17
READ IT ONLINE AT
USATODAY.COM/OPINION
MANUEL BALCE CENETA AP
‘Bookstore
diplomacy’
helps link
D.C. with
Mexico
IN BRIEF
TRUMP CELEBRATES DEFEAT
OF ISLAMIC STATE IN RAQQA
President Trump said Saturday that the end of the Islamic
State “is in sight” after the militant group was driven out of
Raqqa, its self-declared capital
in Syria.
Trump said in a statement
that the recapture of Raqqa by
the Syrian Democratic Forces is
“a critical breakthrough” in the
campaign to defeat” ISIS.
Trump said the U.S. will back
diplomatic negotiations that
end the violence in Syria, allow
refugees to return safely home
and “yield a political transition
that honors the will of the Syrian people.”
Shops reaching out
so a border wall
cannot divide them
Julia Fair
USA TODAY
$417M AWARD IN TALCUM
POWDER CASE TOSSED OUT
A judge on Friday tossed out
a $417 million jury award to a
woman who claimed she developed ovarian cancer by using
Johnson & Johnson talc-based
baby powder for feminine
hygiene.
Los Angeles County Superior
Court Judge Maren Nelson
granted the company’s request
for a new trial, saying there
were errors and jury misconduct in the trial that ended with
the award two months ago.
Nelson also ruled that there
wasn’t convincing evidence that
Johnson & Johnson acted with
malice, and that the award for
damages was excessive.
FDA OKS NEW VACCINE
AGAINST SHINGLES VIRUS
U.S. regulators have approved
a new vaccine to prevent painful shingles, which is caused by
the chickenpox virus.
Drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline
said the Food and Drug Administration approved it late
Friday. It will be the second
shingles vaccine in the U.S.
Merck’s came out in 2006.
Studies funded by Glaxo
found it prevents shingles in
about 90% of people. Merck’s is
about 50% effective.
The U.S. Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention recommends vaccination for those 60
or older, partly because it loses
effectiveness over time.
Anyone who’s had chickenpox — nearly everyone over 40
— harbors the varicella-zoster
virus that causes the disease.
AT LEAST 54 OFFICERS DIE
IN AMBUSH NEAR CAIRO
At least 54 police officers
were killed when a raid on a
militant hideout southwest of
Cairo was ambushed, officials
said Saturday. The ensuing firefight was one of the deadliest
for Egyptian security forces in
recent years.
Police officials told the Associated Press that the firefight
began when security forces acting on intelligence moved
against a militants’ hideout.
Staff and wire reports
USA SNAPSHOTS©
Global experience
A cart is maneuvered over a broken bridge spanning the Vivi River on Friday in Utuado,
Puerto Rico. President Trump has boasted about his hurricane relief efforts. MARIO TAMA, GETTY IMAGES
Trump’s world
is not reality
Critics heap scorn on volatile president; others call him ‘candid’
David Jackson
NEWS
ANALYSIS
WASHINGTON
Sometimes
it
seems like President Trump is living in his own
world.
A world where Trump already has the votes to replace
the Affordable Care Act and
pass tax reform; where hurricane recovery efforts in Puerto
Rico are getting “A-plus ratings”; and where he has a “fantastic”
relationship
with
congressional Republicans.
To critics, the world is one in
which Republicans have been
unable to pass major legislation,
including health care and taxes;
in which lawmakers have harshly criticized the Puerto Rico response; in which a prominent
Republican has likened the
Trump White House to an adult
day care center — and one in
which Trump is seeking to create his own version of reality.
“Since he first emerged as a
presidential candidate, Trump
has regularly asserted things
that aren’t true in order to either avoid uncomfortable questions or paint a rosy (or
SOURCE Graebel Companies survey
of 500 U.S. college seniors
MICHAEL B. SMITH AND PAUL TRAP, USA TODAY
Trump’s world is volatile and
can shift suddenly:
uOn Tuesday, Trump indicated he supported a bipartisan
Senate plan to restore certain
health insurance subsidies; the
next day, he criticized the plan
as a gift to the insurance
companies.
u In early October, Trump
tweeted that Rex Tillerson was
“wasting his time” in seeking diplomacy with North Korea, yet
insisted he was not undercutting his secretary of State. After
Dan Cullen, media relations
manager for the American
Booksellers Association, said he
knows of no other agreements
like this between bookstores
across international borders.
“When small bookstores and
citizens like this engage in
small acts of citizen diplomacy,
it makes a big difference to
break (barriers) down,” said
Katie Levey, senior director of
communications for PYXERA
Global, the parent organization
for the Center for Citizen
Diplomacy.
Citizen diplomacy between
the bookstores can create momentum for other outreach,
Levey said, adding that bookstores are “mini meccas of
knowledge” that often hold
deeper understandings of a variety of cultures.
“It’s part of a bigger trend of
people reaching across boundaries and borders to understand
v STORY CONTINUES ON 2T
v STORY CONTINUES ON 2T
President Trump says he and Senate Leader Mitch
McConnell, R-Ky., have a great relationship. J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE, AP
“Trump has regularly
asserted things that
aren’t true in order to
avoid uncomfortable
questions or paint a
rosy (or dystopian)
picture.”
Nicole Hemmer, University of Virginia
dystopian) picture of whatever issue he’s talking about,” said Nicole Hemmer, an assistant
professor with the Miller Center
of Public Affairs at the University
of Virginia.
Sugar study is small win in cancer fight
@ashleymaytweets
USA TODAY
81%
Kyle Burk, who works at
Capitol Hill Books, and
Selva Hernandez, owner of
the Mexico City bookstore,
signed a mostly symbolic
agreement between their
businesses. CAPITOL HILL BOOKS
@djusatoday
USA TODAY
Ashley May
of college seniors are
interested in working
abroad after graduation.
As President
Trump fuels tension with Mexico with his plan to construct a
wall across the shared border, a
cluttered used bookstore on
Capitol Hill has taken diplomacy into its own hands.
Capitol Hill Books has signed
a Memorandum of Understanding creating a sister store
relationship with Librería a
Través del Espejo (Through the
Looking Glass) in Mexico City.
The agreement is mostly symbolic, store employees said, but
is part of a broader effort to create friendships with Mexicans
in the Trump era.
WASHINGTON
Belgian scientists say they’ve
made a research breakthrough
in the relationship between
sugar and cancer.
Researchers found that yeast
with high levels of the sugar
known as glucose overstimulated the same proteins often
found mutated inside human
tumors, making cells grow faster. The finding, published in
Nature Communications on Fri-
day, aims to shed light on how
cancer develops.
Johan Thevelein, Wim Versées
and Veerle Janssens started researching sugar’s link to cancer in
2008 to try and better understand what’s called the Warburg
effect, when tumor cells make energy through a rapid breakdown
of glucose not seen in normal
cells. That energy fuels tumor
growth.
The research “is able to explain
the correlation between the
strength of the Warburg effect
and tumor aggressiveness,” Thevelein, from KU Leuven in Belgium, said in a release.
Belgian scientists say they
have discovered a clearer
relationship between sugar
and cancer.
BEN HARDING, GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO
The finding is not a medical
breakthrough, and it doesn’t
prove that eating a low-sugar diet
could change a cancer diagnosis.
“The findings are not sufficient
to identify the primary cause of
the Warburg effect,” Thevelein
said in a release. “Further research is needed.”
Victoria Stevens, a cancer researcher with the American Cancer Society who was not involved
in the study, said this research is
great, but it comments only on
“about one product made during
the breakdown of glucose to produce energy.” In other words, it’s
a small step in a long process.
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
2T
Supporters say Trump looks to the positive
v CONTINUED FROM 1T
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Please indicate whether
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reports that Tillerson once called
Trump a “moron,” Trump told reporters that they have “a very
good relationship.”
u Trump continues to say that
the United States is the highesttaxed nation in the world, even
though that is not the case.
“Some people say it differently,
they say we’re the highest developed nation taxed in the world,”
Trump told Scripps last week. “A
lot of people know exactly what
I’m talking about, and in many
cases they think I’m right when I
say the highest. As far as I’m concerned, I think we’re really essentially the highest, but if you want
to add the ‘developed nation,’ you
can say that, too.”
To Trump supporters, it is the
critics and reporters who are distorting reality, taking Trump’s
statements out of context or putting them in a false light.
TRUMP IS ‘NOT SCRIPTED’
PRESIDENT AND PUBLISHER
“You can say that the president is
positive and the media is negative, always focusing on the negative side of things,” said White
House spokeswoman Sarah
Sanders.
She said Trump is “candid,”
and his style is one of the reasons
he defeated Hillary Clinton in last
year’s presidential election: “People want somebody who is real,
who is authentic, and who is not
scripted.”
Clinton received 2.9 million
more votes than Trump but lost
the Electoral College.
One result of Trump’s rhetoric:
Diametrically different accounts
of a single event, as happened in
stories about phone calls to families of soldiers killed in battle.
A member of Congress from
Florida who overheard one of
Trump’s calls said he patronized
the widow by saying her slain soldier “knew what he signed up
for”; Trump responded that he
“didn’t say what that congresswoman said; didn’t say it at all.”
Trump has said “I think I’ve
called every family of someone
who’s died,” but the families of
several slain soldiers said they
have not heard from the
president.
John Kelly, the White House
chief of staff, on Thursday confirmed Trump’s comments but
criticized Rep. Frederica Wilson,
a Democrat, for publicizing them.
LUNCH WITH MITCH
The different political universes
were on full display with last
week’s White House meeting between Trump and Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell.
Afterward, Trump brought
McConnell before reporters in
an impromptu Rose Garden
news conference, telling reporters they have a great relationship — never mind that they and
their aides have sniped at each
other for months over the lack
of a health care bill and other
setbacks.
Also never mind that former
White House strategist Steve
Bannon plans to back primary
challengers to Senate Republicans he believes have been insufficiently pro-Trump.
In the view of Trump, however, “maybe with the exception of
a few — and that is a very small
few — I have a fantastic relationship with the people in the Senate, and with the people in
Congress.”
A week before, Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., told The New York
Times that Trump’s recklessness
threatens “World War III” and
added that he isn’t the only Republican to feel this way.
“Look, except for a few people,
the vast majority of our caucus
understands what we’re dealing
with here,” Corker told the Times,
adding: “Of course they understand the volatility that we’re
dealing with and the tremendous
amount of work that it takes by
people around him to keep him in
the middle of the road.”
Also at the McConnell news
conference, Trump said he was
“very honored” that James Lee
Witt, the Federal Emergency
Management Agency head under
President Clinton, “gave us an Aplus” on hurricane recovery.
On Twitter, Witt said his grade
applied only to Texas and Florida.
To his supporters, Trump accentuates the positive.
Former Trump campaign
communications director Jason
Miller called the president a
master of media communications, and “many detractors
have been frustrated that President Trump is beating them at
their own game.”
Hemmer said Trump “has
shown ... that his statements are
not rooted in reality.
Instead, she said, Trump uses
rhetoric designed to make himself
look good: “I don’t think there is
an overarching strategy, other
than to avoid taking blame for
failures and to shore up his ‘I
alone can fix it’ argument.”
John Zidich
EDITOR IN CHIEF
Joanne Lipman
CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER
Kevin Gentzel
7950 Jones Branch Dr., McLean, Va. 22108,
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Book exchange will be shops’ first act of diplomacy
v CONTINUED FROM 1T
what other cultures look like,” she
said.
Countries have been exchanging historical pieces and art for
years, said Deirdre White, CEO of
PYXERA Global, the parent company of the Center for Citizen
Diplomacy.
When countries engage in exchanges and friendship agreements, benefits follow, White
explained.
“It’s getting people to think
about … the value of cross-border
cooperation and hopefully getting
a taste of that and thinking of other ways they might apply that,”
she said.
The stores plan to exchange
Spanish and English books as the
first act of diplomacy and hope the
friendship develops into the stores
becoming greeting points for travelers from the other country.
Jim Toole, 80, the owner of
Capitol Hill Books, said it’s fitting
the Mexico bookstore is named after an English story, promoting
the solidarity that comes with a
shared love of literacy.
“We’re going around, over and
through (the wall),” Toole said.
“We’re going through that wall
from an intellectual and not a
physical standpoint. The physical
standpoint is the books.”
“With all of the nonsensible
talk, and the kind of silly talk,
about building a wall between two
countries … it seemed like a really
good time to respond to that in a
small way,” said Kyle Burk, the so-
cial media manager for Capitol
Hill Books.
Burk also is a contract employee for Mexican Embassy in D.C.,
where he writes and translates for
the communications team.
Toole, a two-star rear admiral
during the Vietnam War, took
ownership of the bookstore about
seven blocks east of the U.S. Capitol in 1994 and filled every corner
of the building with a clutter of
used books and snarky book descriptions. Customers browse
mystery books upstairs in the
room where the former owner, an
ex-priest, died of a heart attack,
and on the lower level they find a
bathroom stuffed with foreign
language books.
“Since this country’s foreign
language (use) is in the toilet, I
took my toilet room and made it
my foreign language room,” Toole
said with a laugh.
More seriously, Toole explained
he hopes the memorandum will
stimulate an influx of foreign language books from Mexico to the
shop and bring in more Spanishspeaking residents from the Capitol Hill neighborhood.
On Monday, Trump reiterated
his concerns about Mexico, saying
drugs are pouring in over the border. “We need a wall in this country,” he said. “You know it, I know
it, everybody knows it.”
Toole said, “Our mission is to
try and overcome some of the bad
things that are being said with any
relationship with Mexico and instill an increased concern for literacy.”
Spain’s PM moves to Air Force recall of pilots
thwart separatists could hurt smaller airlines
and rule Catalonia Pilot shortage has
Cabinet invokes
constitution in face of
independence vote
Doug Stanglin
@dstanglin
USA TODAY
Spain’s prime minister said
Saturday that the government
would invoke unprecedented
constitutional authority to “restore order” in Catalonia, suspend the regional government
and call for fresh elections to
thwart its leaders’ attempt to declare independence.
After an emergency cabinet
meeting, Prime Minister Mariano
Rajoy said the government will
invoke Article 155 of the 39-yearold Spanish constitution to revoke Catalonia’s autonomous rule
and rule the region from Madrid.
Rajoy said his government had
no choice after Catalonia’s separatist government acted in a
manner that was “unilateral, contrary to the law and seeking confrontation” by holding a banned
independence referendum three
weeks ago.
Catalan leader Carles Puigdemont has threatened to call a vote
in the regional parliament for an
explicit declaration of independence from Spain.
Catalonia, whose regional capital is Barcelona, is a prosperous
industrialized region on the Mediterranean Sea bordering France.
The popular tourist area has long
been a hotbed of secessionist
movements.
Article 155, which has never
been invoked in the constitution’s
39-year history, allows central authorities to intervene when one
of Spain’s 17 autonomous regions
fails to comply with the law.
King Philip VI earlier expressed his support for the move
to rein in Catalonia’s autonomous
powers.
“Spain has to face an unacceptable attempt to secede a part of
its national territory and resolve
it through their legitimate democratic institutions while respecting our Constitution,” the king
said, Eldiario Digital reports.
The moves come only weeks
after the regional government
mounted a controversial referendum on Catalonian independence that featured police
disrupting some polling stations
and overturning ballot boxes.
Although the ruling Popular
Party has enough majority to get
the specific measures passed by
the country’s Senate, Rajoy has
rallied the support of the opposition to give his government’s actions more weight.
Contributing: Associated Press
Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy invoked direct rule at
an emergency Cabinet meeting Saturday. GABRIEL BOUYS, AFP/GETTY IMAGES
caused some regional
carriers to cut service
Bart Jansen
@ganjansen
USA TODAY
The Air Force plan announced
Friday to recall 1,000 pilots from
retirement could hurt smaller
airlines in the competition to hire
trained crews to fly their planes.
“We anticipate that the secretary of Defense will delegate the
authority to the secretary of the
Air Force to recall up to 1,000 retired pilots for up to 3 years,” the
Pentagon said in a statement.
Airlines have warned for years
about a looming pilot shortage,
with the threat that smaller communities could lose regular airline service. But the debate is
contentious because pilot unions
contend that if regional airlines
offered better pay, more candidates would embark on the costly
training to join the industry.
“I think that it makes sense
from the Air Force perspective to
look at retired pilots for the needs
of the military,” said John Cox, a
former airline pilot who is now a
consultant as president of Safety
Operating Systems.
“There is a pilot shortage, so
it’s going to have some effect,”
Cox added. “But the major airlines are still filling their classes.
It’s the regionals that are struggling a little bit, and some of the
business aviation slots are proving difficult to fill.”
Boeing projected in July that
airlines will need 637,000 new pilots over the next 20 years, including 117,000 in North America,
for the anticipated growth in
passengers.
Meanwhile, the number of
FAA pilot’s licenses held by people 20 to 59 years old has declined nearly 20% from 2009
through last year, according to an
analysis by the Regional Airline
Association, a trade group for
smaller carriers.
A shortage of pilots is likely to have a greater impact on
smaller carriers than major airlines. SAUL LOEB, AFP/GETTY IMAGES
The number of top-level Airline Transport Pilot licenses grew
slightly during that span, to
126,070 last year. But the number
of lower-level commercial licenses and private licenses,
whose pilots could feed into the
airlines, have declined from a
combined 283,339 in 2009 to
198,551 last year.
“This is a supply-demand mismatch,” Gen. David Goldfein, the
Air Force chief of staff, said in
April.
Horizon Air felt the brunt of
the competition, forced to cut
thousands of flights from its
schedule this year for lack of pilots, according to the Seattle
Times.
“I think you’re going to see
more impact in the regional airlines and the air taxi or in some
cases the business aviation than
you will at the major airlines,”
Cox said.
To bolster its hiring, the major
carrier JetBlue Airways began a
program to train its own pilots.
The first six members of the Gateway Select program finished
the first year of the four-year program in September. The airline
was recruiting 24 more candidates by the end of last month.
The shortage also is being debated in Congress. The Regional
Airline Association, representing
smaller carriers, has argued for
years that a 2013 rule from the
Federal Aviation Administration
made it harder to hire starting
pilots.
The rule required first officers
to match captains with at least
1,500 hours of flight experience,
up from 250 hours. Exceptions
were made for military pilots
with 750 hours of experience or
graduates of four-year colleges
with 1,000 hours.
The pilots’ union contends that
regional airlines would have plenty of starting pilots if they paid an
average of more than $30,000.
FAA legislation pending in the
Senate would allow classroom
lessons to count for some of the
hours. But pilots and relatives of
victims of the last fatal crash of a
U.S. passenger airline have fought
the change, arguing that safety
shouldn’t be compromised.
“The good news is that we currently have more fully qualified
pilots in the United States than
there are positions available, and
air travel is the safest mode of
transportation in the world due
to our commitment to schedule
with safety,” the union said.
“However, we do need to make
sure we have an adequate future
supply of qualified pilots — earning good salaries — and guard
against efforts to reduce safety.”
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
3T
Cocaine cut with opioid ‘changes game’
Fentanyl,
which
could
trigger an
overdose
even in
trace
amounts,
found in
new cities
Synthetic
opioids
are cheap
to make,
which
means
they are
cheaper
to buy on
the street
or on the
Dark
Web.
Adam Tamburin,
Holly Fletcher and
Natalie Neysa Alund
The (Nashville) Tennessean
For the first time,
Tennessee Bureau of Investigation scientists have detected fentanyl, a potentially deadly
narcotic, mixed in with samples of
cocaine.
Scientists in Nashville and
Knoxville, Tenn., recently found
fentanyl in three cocaine samples,
according to T.J. Jordan, assistant
director at the TBI. The discovery
points to the continuation of a disturbing trend.
For years, drug dealers have
used small amounts of fentanyl to
“cut” heroin and other opioids, a
process to add filler to a drug.
Finding fentanyl in cocaine, largely considered a party drug,
“changes the game,” Jordan said.
Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid
that is used clinically as a powerful pain reliever. In certain doses,
the drug can be 50 to 100 times as
potent as morphine.
Even trace amounts of fentanyl
— the equivalent of a grain of salt
— could be enough to trigger an
overdose. Although cocaine laced
with fentanyl has led to overdoses
in other parts of the country, Jordan said Friday that none had
been reported in Tennessee.
But, he said, the potential for
danger is incredibly high. It can be
absorbed through the skin, so
even touching the substance can
cause an overdose.
“To be blunt, what you might
buy and use, thinking it’s a good
time, could cost you your life,”
Jordan said.
Nashville police spokesman
Don Aaron said the department’s
crime lab has not come across any
cocaine laced with fentanyl. But
TBI officials said the handful of
those cases documented so far
could point to the impending expansion of a deadly trend.
In cases where a mixture of
fentanyl and cocaine isn’t fatal,
one expert said, it could increase
the likelihood that the user develops an addiction.
Patrick O’Shea, a former rec-
NASHVILLE
reational drug user who is now
call center manager at Addiction Campuses, a treatment hub
for drug and alcohol abuse, said
the trend threatened to change
the landscape for many of the
people who reach out to him for
help.
“Those that are using cocaine
recreationally, their usage is going
to increase because of the physical
addictive aspects of opiates (that)
are being injected into the cocaine,” O’Shea said. “It’s shaping
up to be a disaster.”
‘EXTRAORDINARILY
PROFITABLE’ FOR DEALERS
Experts say drug dealers use it as a
cheap way to amp up the power of
other drugs.
Synthetic opioids are “extraordinarily profitable for these illicit
drugmakers,” said Tom Doub,
chief clinical and compliance officer at American Addiction Centers, a national addiction
treatment company based in
Brentwood.
They are cheap to make, which
means they are cheaper to buy on
the street or through the Dark
Web, an untraceable part of the
Internet.
Illicit drugs could be attractive
for someone who cannot get the
usual supply of pills or is looking
for a cheaper alternative.
Heroin and fentanyl are a fraction of the cost of prescription
painkillers sold on the street.
The Tennessee results are worrying to the treatment industry,
although it’s not a surprise.
The fentanyl and carfentanil
epicenter has been the Northeast,
said Doub, but the drugs are beginning to show up in other parts
of the country.
“What worries me in hearing
this it’s sort of working its way
across the country, and again the
problem seems to be getting
worse not better,” Doub said.
though the debate over policy centers on controlling prescriptions.
AAC began seeing changes in
what people were abusing about a
year ago, Doub said.
And law enforcement has seen
a dramatic uptick of fentanyl laced
with other drugs in recent years.
In 2013, fentanyl was detected
in only 12 samples of illicit drugs
analyzed by TBI labs, according to
the agency.
So far this year, the drug and its
variations have been found in 320
samples, officials said.
“You can deal with prescription
opiate use but that’s not really
where most of these deaths are
coming from,” Doub said.
“I think some of the conversation is a little bit late. The usage
habits are already shifting away
from prescriptions for the people
we see.”
PIVOTAL BATTLEGROUND
IN OPIOID FIGHT
Follow Adam Tamburin on Twitter:
@tamburintweets
Follow Holly Fletcher on Twitter:
@hollyfletcher
Follow Natalie Neysa Alund on Twitter:
@nataliealund
In fact, Doub thinks drug mixing
has been a pivotal part of the
opioid crisis for some time, al-
T.J. Jordan,
assistant
director at
the
Tennessee
Bureau of
Investigation,
discusses the
findings of
synthetic
opioid
fentanyl in
cocaine.
Investigators
have seen an
uptick of
fentanyl
laced with
other opioids.
AYRIKA WHITNEY, USA
TODAY NETWORK
Sen. Sanders to skip
Women’s Convention
for Puerto Rico trip
Nicole Gaudiano
USA TODAY
NAACP picks Derrick
Johnson as president
He aims
to bring
new
vision
and
tackle
increased
racial
tensions
through
education
Eliza Collins
USA TODAY
The National Association for
the Advancement of Colored
People has named Derrick
Johnson the group’s president
and CEO. Johnson held the positions on an interim basis since
July.
“We have many things that
need to be updated, our goal was
to make sure that the individual
who sits in the seat was as familiar with our functions as possible as we continue to
transition,” Johnson said Saturday on a call with reporters.
Johnson’s
appointment
comes at a time of increased racial tensions in the United
States. In response, the NAACP
— which at 108 years old is the
nation’s oldest and largest nonpartisan civil rights organization — has been going through
leadership changes “as it re-envisions itself to take on a tumultuous and contentious social
and political climate.”
“With new threats to communities of color emerging daily
and attacks on our democracy,
“All issues are on
the table”
including the
group’s business
model “to make
sure that we have
the right mix.”
Derrick
Johnson,
speaking at a
National
Press Club in
Washington,
had been
interim
president
since July.
SUSAN WALSH, AP
Sen. Bernie Sanders announced he’s heading to Puerto
Rico instead of the Women’s Convention next weekend after Twitter erupted with criticism over a
man being chosen as a key speaker for the event.
The Vermont independent
apologized in a statement to the
organizers and wished them a
successful conference. It will be
held Friday through Sunday in
Detroit.
“Given the emergency situation in Puerto Rico, I will be traveling there to visit with San Juan
Mayor Carmen Yulín Cruz and
other officials to determine the
best way forward to deal with the
devastation the island is experiencing,” he stated. “The U.S. Congress cannot turn its back on the
millions of people in Puerto Rico
who, four weeks after the hurricane, are still without electricity,
food and running water.”
Among those last week who
decried Sanders’ planned appearance was Stephanie Schriock,
president of pro-choice PAC
EMILY’s List, who said the decision sent “the wrong message to
women everywhere.”
“Women are already leading in
the United States Senate, and this
is a moment where we have the
opportunity to lift them up,” she
said.
On Tuesday, the Women’s Convention issued a statement to correct the record, saying that
Sanders would not be opening or
headlining the convention, but
speaking in a panel discussion.
They announced Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., would open the
first night.
“We know that it has been a
painful week for women across
the nation,” the statement reads.
“We realize that we added to that
pain when we announced Senator Sanders as a speaker at the
Women’s Convention, and that
our announcement gave the impression that he is occupying a
central role at the convention.”
Derrick Johnson, NAACP president and
CEO
the NAACP must be more steadfast than ever before,” said Leon
Russell who is the board chairman of the NAACP. “Derrick has
the vision, mobility and courage
to help us meet that demand.”
Johnson told reporters Saturday that the NAACP would be
focused on increasing both voter
and education access. He also
said that “all issues are on the
table” and he would be looking
at the organization’s business
model and leadership process
“to make sure that we have the
right mix.”
Johnson’s election was unanimous. He previously was vice
chairman of the NAACP Board
of Directors and the state president of the Mississippi State
Conference of the NAACP.
Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., will not attend a conference next
weekend in Detroit. SPENCER PLATT, GETTY IMAGES
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
4T
Trump to allow release of thousands of files about JFK
Doug Stanglin
@dstanglin
USA TODAY
President Trump said Saturday
that he will allow more than
3,000 classified files on the JFK
assassination to be released this
week by the National Archives as
ordered by Congress.
The classified files were scheduled to be made public by Oct. 26,
barring intervention by the president, under the President John F.
Kennedy Assassination Records
Collection Act of 1992.
“Subject to the receipt of further information, I will be allow-
ing, as President, the long blocked
and classified JFK FILES to be
opened,” Trump tweeted.
Under the terms of the congressional act, Trump could have
blocked the release on the
grounds that making the material
public would harm intelligence,
law enforcement, military operations or foreign relations.
Most of the files are believed to
to be from the 1960s and 1970s,
stemming from the 1963 assassination and aftermath. But several
dozens were generated by government agencies in the 1990s in
apparent response to the conspiracy theories raised by the controversial Oliver Stone film JFK.
The National Archives has said
In this Nov.
22, 1963, file
photo,
President
John F.
Kennedy
rides in his
motorcade
about one
minute
before he was
shot in
Dallas. JIM
ALTGENS, AP
that, pending presidential approval, it would make all the released documents available on its
website by Thursday.
Trump’s tweet did allow some
wiggle room for last-minute exclusions by noting that his decision was “subject to receipt of
further information.”
The Washington Post reported
Saturday that an unidentified National Security Council official
said that some unnamed federal
agencies were asking Trump not
to release some files because they
involved sources and methods
used by the agencies.
Gerald Posner, author of the
book Case Closed, which argues
that Lee Harvey Oswald acted
alone in the assassination, tells
CNN the most revealing files to
be released involve circumstances around Oswald’s trip to
Mexico City seven weeks before
the shooting in Dallas.
While there, he tried to obtain
visas from the Cuban consulate
and Soviet embassy, according to
documents released in 1999.
Report: O’Reilly
stayed despite
$32M payout
Fox anchor signed four-year contract
for $25M a year after settlement
Doug Stanglin
@dstanglin
USA TODAY
In January, barely six months
after Fox News had ousted chairman Roger Ailes in a sexual harassment scandal, top-rated Fox
host Bill O’Reilly reached a
$32 million settlement with a
longtime network analyst who
had accused him of sexual harassment, The New York Times
reported Saturday, quoting two
people briefed on the matter.
After the settlement, 21st Century Fox — the Fox News parent
company — struck a new fouryear, $25 million per year contract with O’Reilly to continue as
host of The O’Reilly Factor.
At the time, Rupert Murdoch
and his sons, Lachlan and James,
the top executives at 21st Century
Fox, had made a business calculation to stand by O’Reilly despite
the harassment dispute, the
newspaper reported.
They were worried about the
company’s image in the wake of
the Ailes scandal and concerns
over the imminent departure of
high-profile anchor Megyn Kelly,
the Times said.
Although the $32 million deal
has not been previously made
public, 21st Century Fox acknowledges that it was aware of
the woman’s complaints about
O’Reilly, the Times reported.
These included allegations of repeated harassment, a nonconsensual sexual relationship and the
sending of gay pornography and
other sexually explicit material to
her, according to the people
briefed on the matter, the Times
reported.
The purported settlement is at
least the sixth such agreement
cut by O’Reilly. In April, after the
Times had reported on five similar deals, Fox severed ties with
O’Reilly.
The Times said the $32 million
settlement with Lis Wiehl was
more than three times the
amount of any of O’Reilly’s previously known deals. In 2004, he
had settled a lawsuit with a producer, Andrea Mackris, for about
$9 million. Harassment settlements involving O’Reilly that
have become publicly known to-
In an interview Wednesday, former Fox host Bill O’Reilly denied mistreating anyone and called
the allegations against him “politically and financially motivated.” RICHARD DREW, AP
Disclosed harassment
settlements involving O’Reilly
total about $45 million.
tal about $45 million.
Amid the turmoil, 21st Century
Fox had been facing legal and regulatory pressure, particularly its
need to improve its image while
seeking approval from British
regulators to buy the European
satellite company Sky.
In addition, federal prosecutors were looking into the network’s handling of sexual
harassment complaints against
Ailes and had asked for material
related to allegations involving
O’Reilly, the Times reported,
quoting an internal Fox email obtained by the newspaper.
Six days after Fox’s general
counsel, according to the email,
informed the Murdochs that details of the January settlement
were expected to become public,
O’Reilly was fired.
In a statement, 21st Century
Fox said it was not privy to the
amount of O’Reilly’s January set-
tlement with 15-year Fox News
analyst Wiehl, and regarded it as
a personal issue between the two.
Mark Fabiani, O’Reilly’s representative, issued a statement on
his behalf Saturday saying that
once again the Times has “maliciously smeared” the former Fox
news host and failed to print a
sworn affidavit from Wiehl, who
was described as O’Reilly’s former lawyer, “repudiating all allegations against” O’Reilly.
“The Times ignored that evidence, sworn under oath, and
chose to rely on unsubstantiated
allegations, anonymous sources
and incomplete, leaked or stolen
documents,” the statement said.
Egypt’s LGBT community Bannon takes on
fears crackdown on gays George W. Bush, calls
They’ve been targeted
by raids and religious
condemnation
Jacob Wirtschafter
Special for USA TODAY
Members of the lesbian,
gay, bisexual and transgender
community fear there is a concerted effort in Egypt to repress
LGBT people after a spike of arrests.
Armed officers swept into a
popular cafe in downtown Cairo
on Oct. 11 and detained at least a
dozen gay men.
The raid came as an Egyptian
lawmaker introduced a bill this
month that would lengthen prison sentences for gay people from
a maximum of three years to 25
years, alleging an increase in lesbian relationships.
The crackdown on homosexuality is driven in part by denunciations by Islamic groups that
consider gay relationships sinful.
“Homosexuality is a sickness
and disgrace that would be better
hidden from view and not promoted for dissemination until it
is treated and its disgrace removed,” said Mahram Mohammed Ahmed, chief of the
Supreme Council for Media Regulation, a government body. “We
call upon these homosexuals to
conceal their flaws and their sinful acts, not flaunt them, because
they are an evil that must be rooted out.”
Some supporters of gay rights
have refused to be deterred by
such rhetoric and have demonstrated solidarity for the LBGT
community. On Sept. 22, fans of
CAIRO
Hamed Sinno, singer of the
Lebanese group Mashrou’
Leila (“Leila’s Project”)
imitated Freddie Mercury at a
concert. HUSSEIN MALLA, AP
the Lebanese band Mashrou’ Leila held a rainbow flag at a rock
concert where lead singer Hamed
Sinno, who is gay, imitated the
late Queen icon Freddie Mercury.
“Hamed Sinno is a role model
for us,” said Ramiz Saadan, 24, a
dentistry student at Cairo’s Ain
Shams University. “It’s nice for a
change to see someone who’s actually openly gay singing on stage,
and 30,000 people not only singing along but also cheering like
crazy.”
The
flag-waving
incident
prompted Al-Azhar, the highest
Sunni religious authority in
Egypt, to call on Muslim preachers nationwide to denounce gays
in their Friday sermons in an effort “to stop those who seek to
spread
their
abnormalities
among Egyptian society.”
At least 71 people have been
detained by Egypt’s national security forces since the concert,
and two people were arrested.
“The magnitude of arrests
might be larger than what we
know, but these are the only cases
that we have managed to document or intervene legally,” said
Dalia Abdel Hamid, gender and
women’s rights officer at the
Egyptian Initiative for Personal
Rights.
Homosexuality is not illegal
under Egyptian law, but LGBT
people have been targeted
through anti-prostitution and debauchery laws.
“We are deeply concerned
about a wave of arrests in Azerbaijan, Egypt and Indonesia of
more than 180 people perceived
to be lesbian, gay, bisexual and
transgender,” said Rupert Colville, spokesperson for the United
Nations High Commissioner for
Human Rights in Geneva.
Some analysts said the crackdown is an effort by President
Abdel Fattah al-Sisi to distract attention from his country’s
mounting economic problems
and criticism that his government is too secular after the ouster in 2013 of President
Mohammed Morsi, a devout
practitioner of Islam who rose to
power through the radical Muslim Brotherhood.
“Since the military kicked the
Muslim Brotherhood out of power, there is an accusation the Sisi
government is not adhering to
the strictures of Islam,” said Nazeeha Saeed, an exiled Bahraini
journalist who monitors media
portrayals of gays and lesbians for
Out Right, an international LGBT
rights organization. “For the administration to prove the opposite, they are cracking down on
homosexuality to show how
much they are keeping morals.”
presidency ‘destructive’
Former adviser
reacts to rebuke of
President Trump
Eliza Collins
USA TODAY
Steve Bannon is no fan of former president George W. Bush’s.
“There has not been a more
destructive presidency than
George Bush’s,” Bannon said
Friday night during a speech to
the California Republican Party,
according to CNN.
Bannon, who was forced out
of his post as senior adviser to
President Trump this summer,
was reacting to a speech Bush
gave last week. Bush never mentioned Trump by name, but the
speech was a clear rebuke of the
current president. Former
president Barack Obama had a
similar message during two
speeches that same day.
“We’ve seen nationalism distorted into nativism,” Bush said
Thursday at a speech for the
Bush Institute’s Spirit of Liberty
event in New York. “Bigotry
seems emboldened. Our politics
seems more vulnerable to conspiracy theories and outright
fabrication.”
“It was clear he didn’t understand anything he was talking
about,” Bannon said Friday, according to CNN. Bush “has no
earthly idea of whether he’s
coming or going … just like it
was when he was president of
the United States.”
While members of the same
party, Bannon and Bush have lit-
Steve Bannon assailed former
president George W. Bush in a
speech to the California
Republican Convention in
Anaheim, Calf., on Friday.
RINGO H.W. CHIU, AP
tle in common policy-wise. Bannon helped elect Trump on a
nationalistic, anti-immigration
platform while Bush advocated
for a global foreign policy and
was pro-immigration.
Since leaving the White
House and returning to his position as executive chairman of
Breitbart, Bannon has been
leading a war against the establishment in both parties. Bannon and his allies have signaled
support for a slate of anti-establishment, pro-Trump candidates
running against incumbent lawmakers in both parties.
Bannon has vowed that anyone who has criticized Trump,
such as Arizona Republican Sen.
Jeff Flake, should be a target in
the 2018 primaries. But he also
has no patience for lawmakers
who
haven’t
denounced
Trump’s critics either.
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
5T
CALIFORNIA WILDFIRES
Mehdi Latrache tries on shoes at a donation
center. RICH PEDRONCELLI, AP
A wine bottle melted in the Nuns Fire is among the remains of
the Aston Vineyard in Glen Ellen, Calif. GREG BARNETTE, USA TODAY NETWORK
Gary Dower shows a photo of his 2010 Dodge
Challenger before it burned. AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Gordon Easter and fiancée Gail Hale embrace as they return to their home in Santa Rosa, Calif. KENT PORTER, PRESS DEMOCRAT, VIA AP
In the aftermath of blazes,
communities come together
THE MOST DESTRUCTIVE WILDFIRES IN CALIFORNIA HISTORY
were a great leveler, affecting workers who harvest wine grapes and
the entrepreneurs who employ them.
On the public beach campgrounds, the affluent slept alongside migrant workers and combed through donated supplies.
“We had people in Mercedes and Lexuses showing up” with soot on
their faces after losing everything, said Patty Ginochio, a volunteer.
Everybody thinks the winery owners are “rich guys and rich families, and they’re above everything,” said Adam Mariani, a fourth-generation farmer whose family runs the Scribe Winery in Sonoma. “But
the truth is people are completely bootstrapping here” and worried
about the effect of the fires on their livelihood.
In all, more than 100,000 acres burned in Napa, Sonoma and Solano
counties, and more than 100,000 people evacuated.
Even as the flames eased, employees and owners faced economic
fears. And months of rebuilding lie ahead.
The Associated Press
Lacey Tower returns to her Jenna Place home in Coffey Park, Santa Rosa, Calif. Residents who
fled a wildfire returned Friday for the first time in nearly two weeks KENT PORTER, PRESS DEMOCRAT, VIA AP
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
6T
MONEY
How (and
why) to take
a break
from social
media
Marc Saltzman
USA TODAY
While it was fun for a while,
you’ve had it with Facebook,
Twitter or Instagram.
Your feed has turned into a
constant flow of political diatribes, endless selfies from
friends who love themselves
way too much and colleagues
who wax groundless conspiracy
theories about current events.
Or maybe you’re simply sick
of the phoniness of it all, with
your friends faking the high life
when you know it’s all a façade.
As USA TODAY reported last
year, a study in 14 countries
found that comparing yourself
to others on Facebook is more
likely to leave you feeling depressed than when you do so
offline.
Regardless of the reason, you
might need a break. If it’s time
for a social media “timeout,”
consider the following suggestions on pulling it off.
GO COLD TURKEY
OR LIMIT YOUR ACCESS?
The first thing to decide is
whether you should completely
unplug from social media or
simply want it under control.
You’ll need to figure out if you
should rip the Band-Aid off and
fully abstain, or merely cut it
back to, say, 30 minutes a day.
Or maybe you uninstall social media on your smartphone
— to resist the temptation of
opening your favorite app on
the one device you always have
with you — but instead you
schedule a few minutes of
screen time on a personal computer, perhaps after dinner. It’s
not a one-size-fits-all scenario,
but ask yourself what kind of a
break you need. Maybe don’t
officially delete your account(s)
just yet, as you might regret
such a drastic move later.
POST A MESSAGE TO YOUR
FRIENDS OR FOLLOWERS
OK, so you’ve decided to cut social media out of your life instead of scaling it back. Even if
it’s temporary, there’s a right
way and wrong way to do it. To
avoid worrying friends and
family, publicly post something
to the effect of “Hey, I’m taking
a bit of a break from social
media” and remind your
friends they can reach you in
many other ways. If you simply
disappear unannounced, especially if you’ve posted quite a
bit, it might worry your online
friends and family.
As to your “goodbye” note,
try to avoid phrases such as
“You’ll never see me here
again!” You’ll look foolish if you
do rejoin.
SURROUND YOURSELF WITH
(OFFLINE) PEOPLE
If you’ve decided to take a break
from social media, the last thing
you want to see when out with
friends at a restaurant or club is
everyone on their devices. It’s
like trying to quit smoking in a
room full of smokers. In other
words, spend some time with
people who authentically enjoy
the physical company of others.
Enjoy the break. If you decided to take one, you needed it.
USA SNAPSHOTS©
Seen it before
Only
52%
of employees
say they
thoroughly
reviewed
their benefits
during last
year’s open
enrollment.
SOURCE MetLife’s 15th Annual Employee
Benefits Trends Study of 2,652 employees
JAE YANG AND PAUL TRAP, USA TODAY
BLACK MONDAY
Adam Shell
@adamshell
USA TODAY
O
n the 30th anniversary of the 1987
stock market crash
known as “Black
Monday,” the Dow enjoyed a
“Turnaround Thursday,” rebounding from an eerie 105point early dive to register its
52nd record close of the year.
The bullish end to the day
for the Dow Jones industrial
average was a reminder that
market crashes are rare
events, and that the regulators
that police Wall Street have
taken steps in recent years to
lower the odds of another market meltdown.
Today’s stock market has
some built-in shock absorbers
designed to slow down a meltdown that it didn’t have 30
years ago when Ronald Reagan
was president and the Dow fell
508 points, or 22.6% — in a single day.
Back in 2012, Wall Street’s
top regulator revised so-called
“circuit breakers,” to help slow
the descent of the stock mar-
ITS UNLIKELY
CRASH
ket on days it was in freefall.
Simply put, the circuit breakers
shut down the market temporarily after dramatic drops.
The Dow closed up 165.59
points Friday to finish at a record high of nearly 23,439.
Here a few reasons why a
1987-style crash might not occur
or play out the same way today:
CIRCUIT BREAKERS HELP
TO SLOW DECLINES
Under the circuit-breaker rules,
market-wide trading halts are
triggered if the Standard &
Poor’s 500 stock index falls 7%
(Level 1) or 13% (Level 2) or 20%
(Level 3) from the prior night’s
close.
If drops of 7% or 13% occur
before 3:25 p.m. a 15-minute
market-wide trading halt will
kick in. If similar declines come
at or after 3:25 p.m. no halt will
occur. If a market drop of 20%
triggers a Level 3 circuit breaker
at any time during the day, trading will be shut down for the rest
of the day.
“The idea of the circuit breakers is to bring short-term stability to the stock market and
prevent fear and panic from
snowballing,” explains Joe Quinlan, chief market strategist at
U.S. Trust.
2017 MARKET IS ON
MORE SOLID GROUND
Today’s market hasn’t raced
ahead quite as fast or exuberantly as stocks did leading up to the
1987 crash. What’s more, today’s
interest rates are far lower and
less threatening to stock valuations than back in October 1987
when the 10-year Treasury yield
was 10%, vs. today’s yield of
2.3%. Corporate earnings have
Traders on the New York
Stock Exchange are frenzied
Oct. 19, 1987, as the Dow
plunges. PETER MORGAN, AP
also been strong, which is another pillar of support for stocks.
The U.S. economy also is in
solid shape, as is the global
economy, where virtually every
country is seeing an uptick in
growth.
INVESTORS HAVE LEARNED
FROM PAST CRASHES
Investors haven’t forgotten the
1987 meltdown or the more recent “Flash Crash” in May 2010
that sent the Dow spiraling
down 600 points in minutes and
almost 1,000 points on the day
before recouping the bulk of its
losses.
“It makes me much more
aware of tail risks, which is a
good thing,” says Brad McMillan, chief investment officer at
Commonwealth
Financial
Network.
McMillan won’t rule out another crash one day, noting that
investor complacency is high at
the moment and “now as then,
investors really believe markets
are low risk and that returns are
more or less ensured.”
Roku looks to stay at head of streaming pack
There’s more to see
and it looks better
than ever before
Mike Snider
@mikesnider
USA TODAY
Roku is well-positioned to
maintain its spot atop the
streaming
video
device
competition.
Nine years ago, the Los Gatos, Calif.-based tech company
helped usher in the streaming
video market with its first settop box for watching Netflix.
Now, you can get more than
5,000 channels and watch
500,000 movies or TV shows on
the latest Roku devices.
The Roku basics: the device
connects to your TV and your
home broadband network via
Wi-Fi or Ethernet. With Roku’s
easy-to-use menu, you can
choose from a variety of channels including Amazon Video,
HBO Now, Netflix, and Showtime, as well as live subscription TV services such as
DirecTV Now, Hulu, Sling TV
and Sony’s PlayStation Vue.
Once you select them, they are
The Roku Ultra retails for $99.99. ROKU
downloaded and stick on your
Home menu like apps on your
smartphone.
Roku now offers five streaming
devices, including the entry-level
Roku Express ($29.99), which
connects via Wi-Fi to deliver HD
content to your TV.
With more consumers buying
4K TVs, Roku now has three devices that support 4K video, with
even more detailed images than
HD. The Ultra ($99.99) handles
HD video, standard 4K video and
4K video in high dynamic range
(HDR) with improved contrast
and a wider range of richer colors.
(The $69.99 Streaming Stick+
also supports 4K HDR, while the
$49.99 Streaming Stick handles
standard 4K.)
I used HDMI and Ethernet cables to connect the Roku Ultra to
a Samsung 4K Ultra HD TV and
my Verizon Fios router (you can
connect wirelessly, too.)
Roku makes it super simple to
find something to watch. From
the Home screen, you can see
icons for channels such as Amazon, HBO Now, Hulu and Netflix.
(Many have a free trial period.)
Some channels have free
videos. Click on News from the
Home menu and you will find
clips — some with ads — from
Bloomberg, CNN, E! News, NBC
and Newsy. A new Roku Channel
is stocked with free movies and
TV episodes with about half the
ads you would get watching adsupported broadcast TV.
Under Streaming Channels,
Roku has a 4K section that directs you to the growing number
of channels with content in the
higher resolution format (often
referred to as Ultra HD and 4K
Ultra HD). You can head to Netflix and quickly find its 4K shows,
including Stranger Things, Narcos and Orange Is the New Black.
In Amazon Video, the 4K offerings include TV series such as
Transparent and Tin Star.
Roku quickly launched each
service with crisp 4K video
streaming in seconds. (For 4K
video, Amazon and Netflix recommend broadband speeds of at
least 25 Megabits per second.)
Another 4K source on Roku is
Walmart-owned streaming service Vudu, which has free movies
and shows, as well as movies for
rent or purchase.
If you ever get lost you can hit
the back or home button on the
Roku remote. You also can use
hold the microphone button to
use your voice to search for comedies, movies with Clint Eastwood, or to launch a specific
channel. The remote has buttons
that take you straight to Hulu,
HBO Now, Netflix and Sling TV.
That ease of use is likely to
serve Roku well in keeping its
category-leading market share.
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
7T
PERSONAL FINANCE
Budget for the Y
holidays during
Halloween
Courtney Jespersen l NerdWallet
ou might have pumpkins on your porch,
but it’s already time to make room for the
year-end holidays in your budget. “I was
at Costco the other day, and I already saw
Christmas trees, (so) we need to be thinking about
it right now,” says Nick Givogri, a California-based
regional executive for investment service Merrill
Edge. Here’s how to get started:
WORK BACKWARD
Your past holiday spending is the
best indicator of what you’ll
spend this season, says Robert
Finley, a certified financial planner and the principal of Virtue
Asset Management in Illinois.
“Try to get your credit-card
statements,” Finley says. “Try to
look at your bank statements.
What did I spend on presents?
Did I have to do traveling? Did I
have to fly somewhere?”
Once you’ve estimated past
expenditures, create a baseline
for this year that includes
what you can reasonably
save over the next few
months.
For presents, Finley
recommends setting a
total and dividing it
by the number of
people on your list.
Then prioritize.
“If you’re going to
spend $1,500 and
you have 15 people on your list,
some of them you
might want to
spend more than
$100, and others
you might want
to spend less,
and then you
can work that
way,” he says.
But
presents aren’t all
you’ll buy. Account for decorations, travel,
donations
and
more. And don’t forget to build in
a miscellaneous category. It’ll
give you extra cushioning in case
a co-worker gives you an unexpected gift — and you feel compelled to reciprocate.
“It’s always better to have a little extra room or miscellaneous
— and then you don’t use it and it
goes back into savings — than
maxing out, and then something
comes along and you’re stuck
pulling out of savings,” Finley
says.
LOOK AHEAD
GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO
Ditch the cable box
for streaming apps
Rob Pegoraro
Special for USA TODAY
When you shop for pay TV —
whether it comes to your house
via cable, satellite or a fiber-optic
link — the price you see isn’t the
price you pay, thanks to a raft of
add-on fees traditionally led by a
rental fee for a cable box.
That receiver and its remote
not only add to your expenses but
compound the clutter around the
TV. And its onscreen interface is
often so clumsy that you can’t
count on it showing your channels in high definition.
But if you have a streamingmedia player plugged into a TV or
a “smart” TV with its own
streaming apps, you may have
new options for box-free viewing.
Here’s what the seven biggest
services now offer:
uAT&T’s mobile apps disable
Chromecast and AirPlay wireless
streaming to TVs, but the company now has a version of its Uverse app for Amazon’s Fire TV
and Fire Stick streaming players.
Its DirecTV app includes a Webbrowser version, so you could
theoretically plug a laptop into a
TV via HDMI or use the Chrome
browser’s Chromecast support.
uComcast has had an Xfinity
TV app for Roku devices in a public beta test since January that includes not just the channels you
pay for but also a cloud-hosted
digital video recorder. It now
plans to ship similar apps for recent Samsung and LG smart TVs
by the end of the year and early
next year, respectively.
The catch: Once the beta ends,
you’ll save only $2.50 per screen
by using this app instead of a box.
uSpectrum offers an app for
Roku players, Xbox One game
consoles and 2012 and newer
Samsung smart TVs that can
spare you its $5.99 equipment
fee. But you need at least one traditional box to use this.
uDish Network’s Dish Anywhere app now runs on Fire TV
and Fire Stick players, so you can
use that to replace the satellite
service’s $7-a-month boxes on
secondary TVs at home. Like
AT&T, Dish also offers an onlineonly service that runs only in
apps, Sling TV.
uVerizon has added AirPlay
output to its iOS app, so Fios TV
subscribers can use that with an
Apple TV instead of paying $12 a
month on a box for a second or
third TV. Note, however, that the
app confines watching DVR recordings to your iPhone or iPad,
disabling AirPlay for that content.
Its Android app doesn’t support
Chromecast output.
(Disclosure: I also write for Yahoo Finance, a subsidiary of Verizon’s media division Oath.)
uCox now offers apps for iOS
and Android that don’t require
you to have a cable box — but also
disable Chromecast and AirPlay
output. So watching TV on an actual TV will still cost $8.50 a
month for its hardware.
uAltice’s Optimum service
now has apps for iOS and Android and Kindle Fire, but they,
too, disable Chromecast and AirPlay. It also offers in-browser
viewing — so you can run an
HDMI cable to a TV in a pinch —
but that requires Microsoft’s ancient and abandoned Silverlight
plug-in. A box is $10 a month.
Email Rob at rob@robpegoraro.com.
Follow him at twitter.com/robpegoraro.
Setting a spending limit is just the
beginning. Budgeting requires
discipline and regular check-ins,
says Richard Colarossi, a certified
financial planner and partner at
Colarossi & Williams in New
York.
“If you don’t revisit it, what’s
the sense in having it?” Colarossi
says. “You have to match the actuals to your budget and see
where you’re over and under.”
Givogri agrees. He suggests setting a weekly reminder on your
phone to review how much
you’ve spent and how much you
have left to spend. If you discover
you overshot the budget on a particular gift, there’s hope.
Don’t forget to build
in a miscellaneous
category. It’ll give you
extra cushioning in
case a co-worker
gives you an
unexpected gift — and
you feel compelled
to reciprocate.
“Make an adjustment to the
other gifts or make an adjustment
to other expenses that you may
have for the particular month,”
Givogri says, citing strategies
such as eating meals at home to
save money in anticipation of potentially costly holiday outings.
And always keep your budget’s
ultimate goal in mind. It might be
focused on the months of November and December, but it will
affect your finances well into the
new year.
“When you do a budget and
start setting aside some money
now, you’re probably going to
help reduce credit-card debt,” Colarossi says. “Otherwise, if you
don’t budget and have the money
set aside, what’s going to happen?
It’s going to go on credit.”
You don’t have to pay for your
presents in cash, but you should
have the cash to pay them off so
you’re not left with hefty interest
fees, Colarossi adds.
Courtney Jespersen is a staff writer at
NerdWallet, a USA TODAY content
partner providing general news and
commentary. Email: courtney@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @courtneynerd.
TRICK OR TREAT?
Avoid treating scammers to your credit report data
Bev O’Shea l NerdWallet
Monitoring your credit reports should be like flossing: a routine that’s not
fascinating but that can help prevent something painful from developing.
So if an account that’s not yours pops up, be as alarmed as if you had hit a nerve.
It could suggest identity theft — that someone has the keys to your financial
life and can ruin your credit and commit fraud or worse in your name.
WATCH YOUR CREDIT
Regularly checking your credit
reports is good credit hygiene.
You are entitled to a free report
from each of the three major
credit bureaus once every 12
months through AnnualCredit
Report.com.
For the best protection, also
use a free credit report service to
monitor things more frequently.
The worst data breaches, such
as the Equifax hack that exposed
the personal information of
more than 145 million people,
can give scammers the raw materials they need. With information such as your name, Social
Security number and birth date,
someone can open a credit account in your name.
Before you call the police or
file a report, make sure the account isn’t yours. Maybe you got
instant credit at a retail checkout
and forgot, or perhaps a retailer
account is showing up under the
name of the bank that issues its
cards. Look at the date opened
and the amounts charged for
clues. You can also call the retailer and ask. Reasons may be innocent, like transposed numbers.
More ominously, you might
have a new account you didn’t
open.
WHAT TO DO IF YOU DO
First, place a fraud alert on your
credit file. This signals to poten-
GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO
With information
such as your name,
Social Security
number and birth
date, someone can
open a credit account
in your name.
tial creditors that any credit applications made in your name
should get additional scrutiny. It
also entitles you to an additional
copy of your credit reports. Use
them to check for any more po-
tentially fraudulent activity.
If the new account appears to
be fraudulent, you have a mess to
clean up.
You will need to:
uReport the identity theft to
the Federal Trade Commission
and/or your local police
department.
uClose
the
fraudulent
account.
u Call the fraud department
of any creditor involved, explain
what happened and which
charges are bogus.
uCorrect your credit reports
by filing a dispute with each
credit bureau. The FTC has a
sample letter that can help you
organize the information.
uConsider a credit freeze or
an extended fraud alert. You are
entitled to a seven-year fraud
alert, which is free, if you are an
identity theft victim. A freeze offers better protection but can be
cumbersome and expensive.
uThen, stay vigilant. Review
credit card and bank statements
for suspicious transactions, set
up alerts to notify you of charges
as they happen and watch your
credit score and reports for
changes.
Bev O’Shea is a writer at NerdWallet, a
USA TODAY content partner providing
general news and commentary. Its
content is produced independently of
USA TODAY. Email: boshea@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @BeverlyOShea.
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
8T
TECH
Deal will keep Viacom’s channels on Charter
Meanwhile, Verizon
remains in dispute
with Univision
Mike Snider
@mikesnider
USA TODAY
Charter and media company
Viacom has reached an agreement to keep channels such as
BET, Comedy Central, MTV and
Nickelodeon on the cable TV provider’s system.
But Verizon and Univision remain at odds on what the telecom
giant should pay to have the
Spanish language channel on its
Fios TV system.
Charter, which is the secondlargest U.S. cable company with
16.6 million pay-TV homes, and
Viacom extended talks after their
current deal over how much
Charter should pay Viacom for its
programming expired last Sunday. Viacom channels remained
on Charter’s systems during the
talks.
The two companies on
Wednesday released a joint statement they had reached an agreement in principle. “Spectrum
subscribers will continue to have
access to Viacom’s networks,
without disruption, while we finalize terms,” the statement said.
Among areas served by Charter
Spectrum: Austin, El Paso and
Corpus Christi, Texas; Cincinnati
and much of Ohio; Milwaukee
and much of Wisconsin and New
York state; Asheville, N.C., Louisville; and the Los Angeles area,
including Palm Springs.
Verizon and Univision’s dispute over the Fios TV system led
Trevor Noah’s Daily Show and other Comedy Central
programming will stay on Charter stations as part of an
agreement in principle reached last week. EVAN AGOSTINI, INVISION/AP
to Verizon removing Univision
from its network Monday afternoon. The TV and Internet provider said that Univision had
proposed “an increase of more
than double what they charge for
access to their channels today.”
“We’ve provided Univision a
reasonable offer to continue providing our customers access to
their channels. Unfortunately
they rejected that offer and as a
result we no longer have rights to
bring them those channels.”
In a letter to Federal Communications Commission chairman
Ajit Pai, Univision President and
CEO Randy Falco charged Verizon with not acting in good faith
and removing its channels from
Fios two minutes before the end
of an extension that had kept
Univision on since the companies’ deal expired Sept. 30.
“We have urged Verizon to immediately re-engage and negotiate a long-term renewal that is
fair to both Verizon and Univision,” he wrote.
Falco noted that the action
comes at a time when the U.S.
Hispanic community is seeking
coverage of “catastrophic natural
disasters both domestically and
abroad that have had a significant
impact on our viewers and their
families.”
MasterCard
customers
won’t have to
sign receipts
Credit-card giant says it uses newer,
more secure methods to prove identity
Jefferson
Graham
@jeffersongraham
USA TODAY
MasterCard customers won’t need to search for
a pen anymore when they make
purchases with the credit card.
The credit-card giant is making it official, eliminating the
need to sign for purchases made
on the card at retail, as of April.
Whether to sign or not will now
be an optional decision for merchants in the U.S. and Canada.
Already, many merchants don’t
require signatures for purchases.
LOS ANGELES
Sonos worked with Amazon on incorporating the AI assistant Alexa into the speaker, and its six microphones
constantly listen for your queries. SONOS
SONOS SOUNDS SMARTER
WITH ALEXA ON BOARD
Mike Snider
@mikesnider
USA TODAY
Sonos is upping the volume in
the smart speaker race.
Already well-known for its
great-sounding wireless home
speakers, Sonos is bringing to
market the first whole home
speaker system with built-in voice
control using Amazon’s digital
voice-commanded assistant Alexa.
The new speaker, the $199 Sonos One, due out Tuesday, raises
the bar for good-sounding smart
speakers.
But it has competition on the
way from Apple and Google, both
set to launch their own increasingly sophisticated speakers in December. Apple will have the $349
HomePod Siri-driven speaker, and
Google comes in with the $399
Home Max speaker.
Sonos has staked out some potentially profitable territory at its
price point. It comes in below
those future competitors, but a bit
more than the new Amazon Echo
speaker, out Oct. 31 for $99.99.
Amazon has given a nod to bettersounding music in that new model, touting its Dolby process for
improved music playback.
At home over the past several
months, I’ve enjoyed the Amazon
Echo that we’ve placed on the
counter bisecting our kitchen and
dining room. Echo’s smarts,
helped along by artificial intelligence, quickly won over my wife,
who might have nixed a traditional “dumb” speaker as simply
clutter.
Sonos One is like an Echo on
steroids. For starters, Sonos One is
The $199
Sonos
One,
due out
Tuesday,
raises the
bar for
goodsounding
smart
speakers
The Sonos
One is
going to
get even
smarter.
By year’s
end,
Sonos
plans to
let Alexa
have full
voice
control of
Spotify.
as smart as an Echo. Sonos
worked with Amazon on incorporating the AI assistant into the
speaker, and its six microphones
constantly listen for your queries
of Alexa.
Once you’ve finished setup, you
simply talk to Alexa through the
Sonos One: “Alexa, shuffle songs
by Tom Petty,” or “Alexa, play the
new song by Beck.”
When it comes to music, the
Sonos One hits a high note, outperforming the Echo. Added
depth comes in the tumbling
drums and guitar work at the start
of Bob Dylan’s Everything is Broken. And it delivers a richer rendition of the horn-infused and
percussion-driven rally at the
heart of Steely Dan’s Aja. There’s
also more oomph in the bass beats
of Wild Thoughts, DJ Khaled’s
track featuring Rihanna and Bryson Tiller.
Beyond just better sound, the
Sonos One will control music
throughout your home, wherever
you have Sonos speakers deployed. So I could ask the new Sonos One, which sat on a sideboard
in the dining room, to play my
Steve Winwood playlist on Amazon Music Unlimited in the living
room. And you can do this
throughout the home in other
rooms.
And, of course, you can ask the
Sonos One those everyday questions, such as “What’s the weather
forecast?” and “What was Babe
Ruth’s career batting average?”
Note: If you already have an
Amazon Echo or Dot speaker and
Sonos speakers, you can update
the Sonos app and wirelessly connect an Alexa-enabled device to
direct music to any of your current Sonos speakers (of course,
your older Sonos speakers won’t
talk to you).
Like other Sonos speakers, the
newcomer can be used as a solo
three-dimensional speaker or
paired for stereo sound or used
with other Sonos products such as
the larger Play:5 speaker ($499),
Playbar TV soundbar speaker
($699), and Sub subwoofer speaker ($699).
To get your speakers and Alexa
on the same page, you upgrade the
Sonos app on your smartphone or
tablet. The app walks you through
connecting your speakers to your
home wireless network.
You’ll also download the Alexa
app, if you haven’t already, and enable the Sonos skill within the app.
You will also want to add other
music apps within Alexa such as
Amazon Music, iHeart Radio, Pandora, Spotify and TuneIn.
Looking forward, the Sonos
One is going to get smarter. By
year’s end, Sonos plans to let Alexa
have full voice control of Spotify.
As of now, you cannot ask Alexa
to play specific Spotify tracks or
playlists, but you can pick Spotify
tracks, albums or playlists in the
Sonos app and then ask Alexa to
pause, skip or adjust the volume
using your voice. And you can similarly operate more than 80 other
music services, including Google
Play and Soundcloud, using the
Sonos app.
Next year, Sonos also plans to
update its software to allow the
new speakers to work with Google
Assistant and Apple’s Siri using
AirPlay 2, too.
So if you aren’t sure which AI
assistant you’ll ultimately make
nice with, the Sonos One is a
sound purchase that sounds good
now and in the future.
“Eliminating the need for signature is another step in the
digital evolution of payments
and payment security,” says Linda Kirkpatrick, executive vice
president of MasterCard’s U.S.
market development division.
In a blog post, she says research showed the company that
most folks believed it would be
easier to pay, and that checkout
lines would move faster, without
signatures slowing them down.
“This important step will improve the customer experience
and eliminate inefficient, ineffective and costly processes for
the retail merchant community
and their customers,” said Laura
Townsend, senior vice president
of operations for the Merchant
Advisory Group, a consortium of
retailers interested in new ways
to make payments.
“New and improved digital
authentication methods are
emerging, which bring better security to the payments ecosystem. Elimination of signature
will help pave the way for adoption of these methods.”
MasterCard says some 80% of
retail
transactions
made
through the card don’t require
signatures. The signature originally was designed as a security
precaution, to prove that you indeed made the purchase. But
MasterCard notes that chips,
biometrics and tokens use newer
and more secure methods to
prove identity.
MasterCard
says about
80% of retail
transactions
currently
don’t require
signatures.
MARK LENNIHAN, AP
“This
important
step will
improve
the
customer
experience
and
eliminate
inefficient,
ineffective
and costly
processes
for the
retail
merchant
community
and their
customers.”
Laura Townsend,
senior vice
president of
operations for the
Merchant
Advisory Group
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
9T
TRENDING
GREETING CARDS
COSTUMES
The art of writing correspondence is not dead. Consumers
are likely to spend about
$400 million on Halloween cards
this year. A great way to save is
by making your own. Dollar
stores, including Family Dollar
and Dollar Tree, are all over the
U.S. and have low-cost supplies.
Dollar stores sell cards, too.
Americans are expected to shell
out about $3.4 billion on Halloween attire. Men, on average,
spend more than women ($96 vs.
$77). But before you pull a
Wednesday Addams and dress
like everyone else, here are a few
tips for frugal shoppers.
Pop-up shops and Halloweenthemed stores are fun and convenient but also can be pricey.
Instead, consumers should try
discount retailers such as T.J.
Maxx, Nordstrom Rack or Party
City. Not only do these stores
offer huge savings, but shoppers
can find one-of-a-kind items.
Thrift stores, such as Goodwill
and The Salvation Army or your
local vintage shops, also have
reduced merchandise. Sometimes shoppers can even score
near-new costumes. “People
don’t usually re-wear costumes,”
says Andrea Woroch, a moneysaving expert. “Since they were
only worn one time, they’re usually in good condition.”
Online, browse Pinterest and
Instagram for ideas, then compare websites to find discounts.
“There are so many Halloween
retailers out there,” Woroch says.
“Google the retailer’s name and
‘coupon code’ to see who has the
best deal.” The point, she says, is
to avoid paying full price when
you don’t have to. Some sites to
check out are Buycostumes.com,
Halloweencostumes.com and
SpiritHalloween.com. Many have
free shipping. Jet.com offers
cash back on purchases, and
right now first-time customers
get an additional 15% off with a
promo code.
Apps like Poshmark and Mercari are free and let you buy and
sell clothes that no one else has.
Or, raid your bestie’s closet to see
what could fit into your costume.
“If you use what you have
around your house and then
you only spend $5 or $10 on
one item, then you really
save,” Woroch says.
And, if you’re flexible
about your costume, wait
until a few days before Halloween or even the morning of
to buy. Merchants often have
even bigger sales then
because they want to sell
everything in stock.
PHOTOS BY
GETTY IMAGES
Save money on
Halloween goods
Kellie Ell l USA TODAY
Americans are spending a frightening amount of money on Halloween.
The National Retail Federation estimates consumers will spend a record
$9.1 billion this year, up 8.3% from 2016 when the number was $8.4 billion.
That breaks down to an investment of $86.13 per person. But these hairraising statistics don’t have to be so scary. Here are the things Americans are
splurging on during Halloween — and ways you can celebrate on a budget.
CANDY
DECORATIONS
Halloween hits the sweet
spot: The NRF anticipates
Halloween candy sales will
hit $2.7 billion this year.
There are plenty of affordable ways to satisfy
your sweet tooth. Shoppers should buy in bulk.
Stores such as Costco,
Target, Sam’s Club
and Walmart have
supersize bags of
candy. Many of these
stores let you double
up on savings with
coupons. And, as
with costumes, wait
until Halloween
morning, when
candy goes
on sale at
many
stores.
Just like candy, Americans
are expected to purchase
$2.7 billion worth of
Halloween décor this
year. Thrift stores and yard
sales can offer major
savings on this front.
Lori Maloney, a stay-athome mom in
Kearneysville, W.Va.,
found Halloween
decorations at a yard
sale near her home.
“I probably paid 10%
of the retail value,” she
says of her July
shopping spree.
“At the time I thought
it was a bit silly to buy
them, but I’m glad
I did.”
Schools address shortage IRS clamping down on
of nurses in creative ways refund fraud, ID theft
Partnerships with
health systems help
ease financial burden
New safeguards help
cut numbers of fake
returns, victimized
tax filers, agency says
Ana B. Ibarra
California Healthline
Kevin McCoy
@kmccoynyc
USA TODAY
CONCORD, CALIF.
During a 15minute recess, the pupils trooped
from the playground toward
nurse Catherin Crofton’s office —
one with a bloody nose, a second
with a scraped knee and a third
with a headache.
“We’re here for first aid, emergency, counseling,” said Crofton,
of the Mount Diablo Unified
School District. “There is always
something to do.”
Mount Diablo and other districts nationwide can use all the
help they can get. Severe shortages of school nurses have been
reported in recent years in Colorado, Florida, Idaho, Illinois,
Michigan, Montana, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Utah
and Wisconsin — and money to
hire more is scarce.
Last year, Crofton saw 20 to 30
children a day at Cambridge Elementary, in eastern Contra Costa
County in the San Francisco Bay
area. Some were regulars, with
chronic conditions such as cystic
fibrosis who need daily medication. School nurses sometimes
are a child’s only regular link to
medical care and often spot
emerging disease outbreaks.
Desperate to fill the nursing
gap, the Mount Diablo district
partnered with John Muir
Health, a local health system of
doctors and hospitals, to pay for
Crofton’s position. Other districts
are addressing nursing shortages
creatively — and with mixed success — by opening school-based
community clinics, conducting
video sessions with faraway doctors and training office staff to
dress wounds or check glucose
levels of diabetic children.
Last year, the American Acad-
Nurse Catherin Crofton works at two elementary schools in
eastern Contra Costa County, Calif. HEIDI DE MARCO, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
emy of Pediatrics called for a
minimum of one full-time registered nurse in every school. Before that, the recommended ratio
had been 1 nurse to 750 students.
California is far from hitting either goal. Its ratio was 1-to-2,592
in the 2016-17 school year. In
many districts, one nurse must
cover two or more schools.
Last year, the Sacramento City
Unified School District experimented with telehealth, which
gives school staffers electronic access to a doctor to guide them.
Telehealth works well if there
is a school nurse, not a secretary,
consulting with the doctor, said
Nina Fekaris, the president of the
National Association of School
Nurses and a school nurse in Beaverton, Ore., outside Portland. “It
can’t be viewed as a replacement
of (nursing) services,” she said.
In some instances, clerks and
other school staff have been assigned medical duties, with disastrous results. In Washington
state, a girl reportedly died of an
asthma attack in 2008 under the
watch of a playground supervisor
when no nurse was around.
Partnerships between school
districts and health care organizations are among the most
promising because schools don’t
have to bear the full costs of hiring nurses. And they enable nonprofit health systems to count
their contributions of nurses and
free student services toward the
“community benefits” they must
provide to stay tax-exempt.
Such partnerships tend to be
more popular in the East. Schools
in Toledo, Ohio, for example,
hired 12 nurses through a deal
with a local health care system in
2015. “It has made an amazing
difference,” said Ann Cipriani,
health coordinator at Toledo
Public Schools.
But even where funding can be
found, finding qualified professionals to fill the positions can be
tough. The 10-month work
schedule is great, said Gail Williams, director of student health
services at Fresno Unified, but it’s
tough to compete with hospitals
open year-round.
This story was produced by Kaiser
Health News, which publishes California Healthline, an editorially independent service of the California
Health Care Foundation.
An Internal Revenue Service
tax industry crackdown is making
progress in the battle against
identity theft and tax refund
fraud, officials said Tuesday as
they announced plans for additional safeguards in 2018.
Fewer federal tax returns
linked to identity theft entered
the tax system in 2016, and the
number of taxpayers who said
they’d been victimized also
dropped, along with the number
of fraudulent refunds issued, the
officials said.
Among the highlights:
uThe IRS stopped 883,000 tax
returns with confirmed links to
identity theft in 2016, a 37% drop
from the year before. It stopped
443,000 potential tax refunds
linked to identity theft, a 30%
year-over-year decline.
uFinancial
institutions
stopped 124,000 suspect tax refunds in 2016, half the number
detected in 2015. The companies
have stopped 127,000 suspicious
refunds so far this year, reflecting
a handful of cases involving several thousand accounts.
uThe number of taxpayers
who told the IRS they had fallen
victim to identity theft dropped
to roughly 376,000 in 2016, a 46%
decline from the year before.
“We’ve seen the number of
identity theft-related tax returns
fall by about two-thirds since
2015,” IRS Commissioner John
Koskinen said in a statement.
“This dramatic decline helped
prevent hundreds of thousands of
taxpayers from facing the challenges of dealing with identity
theft issues.”
The declines stem in part from
a first-of-its-kind partnership,
launched in 2015, between the
IRS, state tax agencies, major taxpreparation companies and other
tax industry participants.
The agencies have been sharing information and implementing new electronic safeguards and
other measures aimed at thwarting identity thieves.
For instance, tax industry representatives have shared dozens
of key data points from electronically filed tax returns that have
helped the IRS to identify tax
scams and block fraudulent
refunds.
“We all need to
work diligently
and together to
combat this
common enemy.”
IRS Commissioner John Koskinen
As the crackdown continues in
2018, all official IRS W-2 forms
used to file federal tax returns for
the first time will include a verification code box. A 16-character
code will appear on approximately 66 million W-2 forms, more
than half of all forms issued, Koskinen estimated.
Taxpayers who prepare their
own tax returns and tax preparers will be urged to enter the code
in the verification box if their
form includes the 16-character
entry.
Additionally, the IRS will ask
tax professionals to gather more
information about clients who
file business tax returns.
Koskinen’s IRS term expires in
November.
“We know that cybercriminals
are planning for the 2018 tax season, just as we are,” Koskinen
said. “This coming filing season,
more than ever, we all need to
work diligently and together to
combat this common enemy.”
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
10T
Irresistibly entertaining.
Meet our new app, now with virtual reality.
Experience exclusive awards season access, the hottest
celeb trends, and the juiciest moments in pop culture.
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
11T
SUNDAY
WATCH: EMBRACE
YOUR ‘SCREAMING’
SERVICES.
There are plenty of options if
you want theatrical chills at
the movies, from new hit Happy Death Day to a pair of bigscreen projects featuring
familiar figures: The sequel
Boo 2! A Madea Halloween (in
theaters now) offers a crossdressing Tyler Perry dealing
with a haunted campground,
and Jigsaw (out Friday) brings
back the famed killer of seven
previous Saw movies.
If you’re feeling adventurous, take a chance on some
diamond-in-the-rough fare on
iTunes and other digital video
outlets. Wish Upon takes a
teenage girl (Joey King) on a
very bad path when she’s gifted a magical music box by her
dad (Ryan Phillippe), and
Halloween gets a Christmas
twist with the horror comedy
Better Watch Out, featuring a
babysitter (Olivia DeJonge)
and her young charge (Levi
Miller) trying to stay alive
during a home invasion.
Old-school horror cinephiles will want to check out
78/52, a documentary featuring Guillermo del Toro, Jamie
Lee Curtis and other notables
breaking down Alfred Hitchcock’s infamous Psycho shower scene frame by frame.
AMC’s zombie-tastic The
Walking Dead lumbers in for
an eighth season on Sunday,
but if you’re looking to binge
on creepiness, head to the
various streaming platforms.
The new anthology series
Lore, based on the popular
podcast, just premiered on
Amazon Prime and focuses on
the real origin stories of such
supernatural legends as werewolves, séances and possessed
dolls. And Hulu’s Freakish,
which pits high schoolers
against mutants spawned by a
chemical-plant meltdown, is
back for a second season.
Over on Netflix, for those
who’ve already gobbled up
Stranger Things (which releases its new season Friday)
and Black Mirror, give the
Buffy-esque British show
Crazyhead a go. While there,
check out the two new Stephen King movie adaptations,
Gerald’s Game and 1922, and
dive into The Babysitter, about
a boy (Judah Lewis) who finds
out the girl (Samara Weaving)
who tucks him in at bedtime is
part of a satanic cult.
For one-stop shopping,
Shudder is a must for even the
casual horror lover and a
dream for the hardcore fan,
offering an abundance of original content. There are shows
such as the outer-space mystery Missions, Neil Gaiman
anthology series Likely Stories
and Swedish supernatural
whodunit Jordskott, plus
movies such as Found Footage
3-D (which adds a dimension
to the cabin-in-the-woods
trope), Let Me Make You a
Martyr (with shock rocker
Marilyn Manson as a hitman)
and the black comedy Prevenge (about a pregnant woman who turns serial killer).
USA SNAPSHOTS©
Fashion fizzle
1 in 3
men admit to skipping an
event because they felt
they didn’t have the right
clothes to wear.
SOURCE Perry Ellis survey of 1,017 men
MICHAEL B. SMITH AND PAUL TRAP, USA TODAY
Cream of
the cropped
The captain is speaking —
and taking questions
WIREIMAGE/GETTY IMAGES
THERE’S NO TRICK
TO GETTING YOUR
FRIGHTS RIGHT
Brian Truitt l @briantruitt l USA TODAY
The scary season is upon us, and the ghoulish demonic clown of It
is just the tip of the ghastly fun. But where to start? Never fear, we’re here to
help. (Well, perhaps a little fear would be apropos.) Here’s a guide to what’s
new out there for getting your horror fix between now and Halloween.
Buffy has
nothing on
Crazyhead’s
Raquel (Susan
Wokoma, left)
and Amy (Cara
Theobold).
ERIC PIERMONT, AFP/GETTY IMAGES
LISTEN: LET THE
FRIGHT ONE INTO
YOUR EARS.
For those who think they need
to actually watch something to
be scared, let’s remember how
Orson Welles sent the nation
into a tizzy with his 1938 The
War of the Worlds broadcast.
Podcasts have taken the
reins from the spooky radio
shows of yesteryear, and there
are plenty. The NoSleep Podcast is a series of episodes with
all kinds of tales from the dark
side — and there are nine
seasons of it, too. Those who
want star power can download
Darkest Night, an anthology
series featuring Lee Pace and
RuPaul that focuses on twisty
stories and the weird goingson at a mysterious research
facility.
Speaking of weird, The
Black Tapes takes a “monster
of the week” spin, teaming up
a curious journalist and an
enigmatic paranormal investigator to look into strange
cases and how they tie into a
secret society. Tanis mashes
up sci-fi and the world of cults,
Rabbits is the story of a woman trying to find her missing
friend in the midst of a dangerous game involving alternate realities, and
Limetown centers on a scientific facility where everybody
just disappeared one day.
Podcasts Inside the
Exorcist and Inside Psycho
dig into the details of
Alfred Hitchcock’s famous
films. WARNER BROS.; IFC FILMS
STEFFAN HILL
Orson Welles
freaked out the
nation with his
1938 broadcast
of The War of
the Worlds. AP
Movie lovers will want to
download the newly-launched
podcast Inside the Exorcist,
which digs into the real-life
events that inspired the 1973
classic The Exorcist, as well as
all the insane things that went
on during filming. (To tide you
over waiting for upcoming
episodes, try out Inside Psycho, which focuses on the
production of Hitchcock’s
most infamous flick.)
v STORY CONTINUES ON 12T
CALENDAR
Plan your week in entertainment with these highlights
and pop-culture milestones:
STREAM
WATCH Stranger Things 2
drops on Netflix Friday. This
season is set in 1984, with the
citizens of Hawkins, Ind., “still
reeling from the horrors of
the Demogorgon and the
secrets of Hawkins Lab. Will
Byers has been rescued
from the Upside Down but a
bigger sinister entity still
threatens those who survived.”
HILARY BRONWYN GAY, PARAMOUNT PICTURES
TV
MUSIC
TUNE IN Drop the Mic, hosted
by Method Man and Hailey
Baldwin, premieres on TBS
Tuesday at 10:30 ET/PT. The
show is based on the segment
from The Late Late Show with
James Corden and pits stars in
head-to-head rap battle.
LISTEN Kelly Clarkson’s latest
FILM
GO TO Matt Damon, Julianne
Moore and Oscar Isaac star in
Suburbicon, out nationwide
Friday. The film follows a
suburban family, with ties to
organized crime, after a home
invasion.
KELSEY MCNEAL,
CBS
album, The
Meaning
of Life, is
out Friday.
The artist
released
the first
two songs
from the
album, Love So
Soft and Move You,
in September.
CHARLES
SYKES,
INVISION/AP
Compiled by Mary Cadden
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
12T
STREAMING
Take a swing
at these
home runs
IF YOU’RE
NOSTALGIC FOR
CHILDHOOD SPORTS:
THE SANDLOT
It’s time to play ball. Or, at least, press
play on a good baseball movie. The MLB
post-season is underway, and soon two
teams will be facing off in the 2017 World
Series. If you’re like us and you’re living
and breathing baseball this October, USA
TODAY’S Kelly Lawler helps you fill the
time between playoff games with these
five baseball movies that are available to
stream or rent. BYO Cracker Jacks.
Films such as It and
series such as Stranger
Things are capitalizing
on our current obsession
with nostalgia for a
childhood in the 1980s.
The Sandlot similarly
captured nostalgia for a
1960s childhood when it
premiered in 1993. The
film’s endurance as a
baseball and childhood
classic is because of its
strong themes of friendship and youthful
innocence.
SONY PICTURES HOME ENTERTAINMENT
THE NATURAL
Robert Redford grounds the film
as Roy Hobbs, the titular “natural” baseball player in the film,
which is based on the Bernard
Malamud novel. Hobbs’ long life
saga is examined in the film, from
the death of his father at a young
age to his against-the-odds resurgence as a professional baseball player on the fictional New
York Knights. The film has one of
the most exciting at-bat scenes in
any baseball film.
Stream it on Amazon.
Stream it on HBO Go/Now.
PATRICK RENNA BY 20TH CENTURY FOX
IF YOU LOVE SPORTS
DOCUMENTARIES:
FOUR DAYS IN
OCTOBER
KEVIN COSTNER AND SUSAN SARANDON BY ORION
BULL DURHAM
Kevin Costner is one of Hollywood’s baseball film
all-stars. Field of Dreams remains a classic in the
genre, but we’re also partial to Durham, which is a
frank and adult look at the world of minor league
ball.
ESPN’s 30 for 30 documentary series is an
absolute treasure for
sports fans who love
digging into the history
and cultural effects of
their favorite players,
coaches and games. (The
epic installment O.J.:
Made in America went
on to win an Oscar.) This
installment chronicles
how the Boston Red Sox
came back from a 3-0
deficit against the Yankees in the 2004 World
Series and went on to
break their “curse.”
BERNSEN, BERENGER, SHEEN BY PARAMOUNT
IF YOU LIKE ROOTING FOR THE
UNDERDOG: MAJOR LEAGUE
Baseball has seen its fair share of
underdogs and “lovable losers”
overcoming years-long championship droughts to win the World
Series. But no real story has come
close to the fun of Major League.
The 1989 film follows a team put
together by its owner specifically
to be the worst in the league, only
to start a winning streak just to
spite her.
Buy the 30 for 30 episode on
Amazon or iTunes.
Stream it on Starz.
Stream it on Amazon or Hulu.
BOSTON RED SOX JOHNNY DAMON AND DOUG MIENTKIEWICZ BY AP
Some
horrors
written
for all to
quake
v CONTINUED FROM 11T
READ: SCARY STORIES
SPOOK VARIOUS
MEDIUMS.
The master of horror, Stephen
King, has a couple of new books
out: Sleeping Beauties, his novel
with son Owen about women
around the globe going to sleep
and not waking up, plus his coming-of-age novella Gwendy’s Button Box with Richard Chizmar.
King isn’t the only one stirring
up the creepy cauldron. Victor
LaValle’s The Changeling is a brilliant and brutal take on an old
myth. Intrigued by the thought of
man-eating hippos? Sarah Gailey’s River of Teeth imagines a
Louisiana with carnivorous giants run amok. More into youngadult fiction? Stephanie Perkins’
There’s Someone Inside Your
House unleashes a slasher-movie
scenario where local teens are
murdered in an increasingly garish and stylish manner.
Comic books, too, are a literary
medium for those with a taste for
the terrifying. Archie, Betty, Veronica and the gang face a zombie
outbreak in Afterlife With Archie,
a must-read for all Riverdale TV
fans. Redneck chronicles a Texas
family of vampires that runs a
barbecue joint, Clean Room involves body-snatching monsters and a self-help cult, and
the Southern gothic comic
Harrow County follows an girl
who figures out her connection to the weird creatures of
her home on her 18th birthday. (There also are 172 issues
of The Walking Dead, so
whether or not you watch
the popular show, it’s best to
get busy there if you haven’t
yet.)
Redneck follows a family of
vampires who run a barbecue
joint in Texas. Yum? IMAGE COMICS
Just surfing the Web offers all
sorts of spooky tales, too. The
Dionaea House is a mystery that
unfurls over various emails, written by Oscar-nominated screenwriter Eric Heisserer (Arrival).
But Creepypasta.com and Reddit’s “nosleep” subpage are the
Internet’s seemingly never-ending troves of user-generated horror fiction — like a modern
version of ghost stories around
the old campfire, though you
might want to keep s’mores off
your laptop. There’s nothing scarier than sticky keys.
Master of horror Stephen
King is having a great 2017,
with movie adaptations and
new books. SCOTT EISEN, GETTY IMAGES FOR
WARNER BROS.
Corrections & Clarifications
PRESIDENT AND PUBLISHER
John Zidich
USA TODAY is committed
to accuracy. To reach us,
contact Standards Editor
Brent Jones at 800-8727073 or e-mail accuracy@usatoday.com.
Please indicate whether
you’re responding to
content online or in the
newspaper.
EDITOR IN CHIEF
Joanne Lipman
CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER
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PUZZLE ANSWERS
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
13T
FASHION
Cara Delevingne and Taraji P. Henson rocking short locks. WIREIMAGE/GETTY IMAGES WIREIMAGE/GETTY IMAGES
Sara M Moniuszko
and Brooke Metz
USA TODAY
Forget mermaid hair, the latest
“It” style is short and sweet (and
sometimes sassy).
Katy Perry and Cara Delevingne were spotted with matching peroxide pixies in Paris in
July. Taraji P. Henson showed off
her curly crop among other looks
while hosting the Black Girls
Rock! event in August. And Emma Roberts and Lucy Hale shared
their jaw-length bobs on social
media, which gave us Selena Gomez’s Met Gala bob vibes.
But stars aren’t the only ones
up on the trend.
As of July, Pinterest reports
domestic searches for “shag”
haircuts are up 220% year-overyear, and searches for pixie cuts
have increased, with asymmetrical pixies showing a 120% rise.
Naté Bova, a senior stylist at
Warren Tricomi Salon’s Plaza
Hotel location in New York, told
USA TODAY that she has noticed
the trend, with short hair styles
making up about 15% of her clients’ requests.
But why are our favorite stars
and friends making the chop? A
Cropped
locks are
2017’s big
hair trend.
But why?
“There’s this narrative that short hair
isn’t feminine ... but I’ve seen so many
women feel liberated, powerful and
even more feminine when they’ve made
that bold step.”
Mara Roszak, who has created hairstyles for Cara Delevingne, Brie Larson
and other stars.
feeling of empowerment may be
driving many women to the salon.
“There’s this narrative that
short hair isn’t feminine ... but
I’ve seen so many women feel liberated, powerful and even more
feminine when they’ve made that
bold step,” says Mara Roszak,
who has created hairstyles for
Delevingne, Brie Larson and other stars. “The things that hold us
back are the stories we tell ourselves.”
Those stories include the idea
that femininity is tied to long
locks, or that hair length is a key
to identity.
“More women hold onto that
more than they realize, but more
women who have cut their hair
off come into themselves and
channel a part they hadn’t accessed before,” Roszak says. “It’s
removing this sense of security
and also that fear we have of looking different.”
Which, Roszak adds, can cause
us to feel vulnerable. But even so,
embracing the cut can be a step
forward. “Women don’t want to
be told how to look or feel or be in
the world — it’s our own personal
choice,” she says.
Delevingne, who shaved her
head for her new movie Life in a
Year, echoed the statement in an
interview with USA TODAY.
“I definitely was more aware
that you could pretty much hide
behind your hair,” she says. “But
it was really liberating to realize
that you don’t need hair to be
beautiful and to feel like a
woman.”
The idea of taking control over
your appearance is an important
one in today’s Millennial generation, which Jane Buckingham,
founder and CEO of trend forecasting company Trendera, says
is another component.
Buckingham says short hair is
a solution for damaged hair.
“Practically, it’s just a good
thing to give it a rest and cut it off
and sort of start again,” she says.
Another bonus? Eliminating
unnecessary stressors, such as
the need to do one’s hair every
day, can be refreshing.
“(Short hair is) easier, right?
It’s a difficult time, the world is a
little bit crazy and people are like,
‘I just want to try something new.
I want something fresh. I want
something that feels exciting and
new,’ “ Buckingham explains. “
Delevingne agrees.
“It’s nice to not have to maintain your hair,” she says. “We all
get attachment to hair but it’s just
hair. It grows back.”
Contributing: Brian Truitt
HEALTH
Myths about breast cancer debunked
I DON’T HAVE A FAMILY
HISTORY OF BREAST
CANCER. SO, I WON’T GET IT.
This is one of the biggest myths
Litton hears. Only about 2 out
of 10 people diagnosed with
breast cancer have a family
history, according to the American Cancer Society. “Just because you don’t have a family
history, does not mean you are
safe,” Litton said.
BREAST CANCER IS A DEATH
SENTENCE.
Ashley May l @ashleymaytweets l USA TODAY
Breast cancer is easily the most well-known type of cancer, but do people
really know specifics? Jennifer Litton, associate professor of breast medical
oncology at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, said new
treatment options have changed what a diagnosis of breast cancer means
today. Here are a few myths:
EVERYONE WITH BREAST
CANCER NEEDS
CHEMOTHERAPY.
IF YOU HAVE BREAST
CANCER, YOU’LL HAVE TO
GET A MASTECTOMY.
While treatment can include
chemotherapy (which causes
hair loss), it might not. A lot
depends on the size of the cancer and the patient’s biology,
Litton said. Surgery and radiation are among other treatment
options available to patients.
Mastectomies are not as commonly recommended as they
were in the past. Even when a
patient opts for a mastectomy,
the surgery likely is not a radical
mastectomy, where the entire
breast is removed, but it’s usually partial, skin-sparing, simple
or modified, according to the
National Breast Cancer Foundation. Some researchers say
70% of mastectomies in women
with breast cancer are unnecessary, because healthy breast
tissue isn’t proven to significantly lower risk of recurrence.
Often, breast-conserving surgery such as radiation can be
done to spare the breast. “In the
vast majority of cases, having a
mastectomy does not change
the overall survival of cancer
they’ve been diagnosed with,”
Litton said. Having a mastectomy only lowers breast cancer
risk in the removed breast, but
doesn’t lower cancer risk in
other parts of the body, the
American Cancer Society says.
MEN CAN’T GET BREAST
CANCER.
While breast cancer in men is
rare (less than 1% of all breast
cancers), it happens. This is
because men have breast tissue.
Old age, high estrogen levels,
radiation exposure, alcohol
consumption, a strong family
history of breast cancer, or
genetic mutations can all increase a man’s risk of breast
cancer, according to the American Cancer Society.
THERE’S ONE TYPE OF
BREAST CANCER.
There are more than a dozen
types of breast cancer. Common kinds are carcinomas,
tumors that grow in organs and
tissues. Most breast cancers are
a type of carcinoma called adenocarcinoma that starts in the
milk ducts or milk-producing
glands. But, there are other
kinds of breast cancer that start
in the cells of muscle, fat or
connective tissue.
ONLY LUMPS THAT ARE
PAINFUL ARE CANCEROUS.
Cancerous lumps can be painful
or painless. Any lump that persists for two weeks should be
evaluated by a medical professional, Litton said.
A GOOD DIET CAN PREVENT
AND TREAT CANCER.
Litton said many diagnosed
with breast cancer look for a
“magic diet,” but the reality is
“the patient is not in control of
the cancer.” With that being
said, a low-sugar, plant-based
diet can help overall health.
The majority of those diagnosed with stage III, stage II
and stage I breast cancer survive at least 5 years after diagnosis, according to data from
the American Cancer Society.
Metastatic or stage IV breast
cancers have a 5-year survival
rate of about 22%.
ONLINE RESOURCES
Visit cancer.org for more information on types and treatments of breast cancer.
GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
14T
TRAVEL
DISPATCHES
Adventure of the Seas returns to
St. Thomas Nov. 10. JOE CAVARETTA, AP
Ships return
to St. Thomas
Commercial aircraft, including the Airbus A350 XWB, undergo detailed maintenance and its pilots are highly trained. SANG TAN, AP
PILOT’S PERSPECTIVE
OUR CAPTAIN ANSWERS YOUR QUESTIONS
Each week, former airline pilot and aviation safety
consultant John Cox answers questions from
USA TODAY readers about flying. Here are some
of the most commonly asked questions and answers.
More
Ask the
Captain
Send your
queries to
travel@
usatoday
.com, and see
USA TODAY’s
Money section
each Monday
for a new
batch of
reader
questions.
Even if the
flight is
smooth at
the time,
fliers are
advised to
heed the
fastenseat-belt
sign.
GETTY IMAGES/
ISTOCKPHOTO
Q
A
I’m going on my first
flight soon and I’m petrified. Do you have any tips?
I understand your trepidation and apprehension. It is
not uncommon for first-time
fliers. A few things to remember:
1. Aviation is the safest form of
public transportation in history.
You are safer flying than when
you are in your automobile, walking on a sidewalk, riding a train,
taking a bus or being on a
boat/ship.
2. The professionals that maintain and fly the airplane are some
of the most highly trained in the
world. Additionally, trained evaluators check their skills and
competencies regularly.
3. The maintenance of aircraft
is very detailed and frequent.
Airplanes have more redundancies than other forms of
transportation, which results in
increased reliability and safety.
4. Airplanes fly because of
physics, just as boats can float on
water. Some people look at an
airplane and ask, ‘How does
something that heavy fly?’ It can
because of the laws of physics and
the proper shape of the wing.
There is no mystery to it.
5. Aviation is one of the most
regulated industries in the world.
The close oversight of government regulatory
and safety organizations has
proven to be
effective.
Those are a few
of the many reasons to relax and
enjoy your upcoming flight. You
will experience a
totally new vantage point from
which to see the world.
Q
A
Does having only two
engines increase risk
when flying over oceans?
No, the reliability of modern
jet engines is so good that
flying over oceans or remote
locations is not risky. One consideration is that more engines
increase the possibility of one of
them having a problem. The
regulatory authorities have very
strict standards for twin-engine
overwater operations.
I fly over oceans in twin engine
airplanes many times each year
with no concern about the risk of
engine failure.
Q
If a twin-engine plane
has one engine that fails
midway over the Atlantic,
what options do the pilots
have?
A
Engine failures are very, very
rare, but should one occur,
the airplane can safely fly to an
alternate airport, the airport of
origin or the airport of destination. On overwater flights, the en
route diversion airports are
planned before departure. If
there is a need to divert — for an
engine problem or any other
issue — the pilots have the plan in
place.
Q
My friend, an airline
captain, tells me that the
bigger the plane, the more
backup systems on the aircraft. So are A380s, 747s and
777s safer to fly?
A
The A380, 747, 777 are certainly safe. So are other
airliners like the Airbus A320
family, the Boeing 737 family, 757,
767, A330/340, A350, 787, Embraer 135/145, EMB 170/190 and
Bombardier CRJs to list a few.
Airliners are safe.
The larger airplanes have a
larger number of redundant
systems due to their size but that,
by itself, does not mean one airplane is safer than another.
Q
A
Is there ever turbulence
that concerns the pilot?
Pilots do not like turbulence,
but because the designers of
modern airplanes have such a
safety factor built in, there is no
concern about damaging the
airplane. The concern pilots do
have is that passengers will not
have their seat belts fastened and
will be injured, or that a flight
attendant will not be secured in
the jumpseat.
Q
A
Why do fliers ignore the
fasten seat belt sign?
The captain illuminates the
sign when there is a possibility of turbulence. Turbulence is
unpredictable, and often will not
occur. This causes people to believe that there is no risk. This is a
false belief.
If the seat belt sign is illuminated, passengers should remain
in their seat. If physiological
reasons make a visit to the lavatory imperative, the passenger
must assume the risk.
Q
A
When lightning strikes
an airplane, are you safer
in the air or on the ground?
In the air, airplanes are designed to dissipate the lightning quickly. I have been flying
airplanes that were struck multiple times and there was little or
no damage sustained. All the
surfaces are bonded, giving the
lightning a pathway to pass back
into the atmosphere.
On the ground there is a risk to
people on the ramp if the airplane discharges the lightning.
For the passengers there is very
little or no risk in either situation.
Backup
systems are
built into all
aircraft,
including the
Boeing 747.
JEREMY
DWYER-LINDGREN
SPECIAL FOR USA TODAY
Relax and
enjoy your
upcoming
(first)
flight.
You will
experience
a totally
new
vantage
point from
which to
see the
world. ...
Most
people
never
forget
their first
flight.
Q
I’ve noticed that when
inbound to an airport,
the pilot begins decelerating
the aircraft sometimes a
half-hour prior to touchdown. Why don’t they go
faster longer?
Cruise ships will begin returning to St. Thomas on Nov.
10, less than two months after
the island was devastated by
hurricanes Irma and Maria, the
government of the U.S. Virgin
Islands announced Monday.
In a statement sent to media
outlets, the Virgin Islands government said Royal Caribbean’s
3,114-passenger Adventure of
the Seas would be the first
cruise vessel to return to the island on a regular sailing since
the back-to-back storms.
Irma and Maria caused widespread damage across St.
Thomas, knocking out power,
ripping roofs from homes and
stripping foliage from vegetation. The government of the
U.S. Virgin Islands has been
racing to restore the territory’s
top tourist areas so it can reopen to visitors. Tourism accounts for an outsized portion
of the Virgin Islands economy,
and the livelihoods of thousands of Virgin Islands residents are dependent on visitors,
officials have said.
“Welcoming cruise visitors
back to the U.S. Virgin Islands is
key to our economic recovery,”
tourism commissioner Beverly
Nicholson-Doty said.
Royal Caribbean on Monday
said it was working with the
government to restore St.
Thomas’s Magens Bay beach
area in time for Adventure of
the Seas’ arrival Nov. 10. Royal
Caribbean also said it was committed to resuming cruise calls
at the hurricane-ravaged islands of Puerto Rico and St.
Martin by the end of November.
Gene Sloan
A
Usually the speed reduction is due to air traffic
control instructions. As the
traffic near an airport backs up,
the speed is reduced. New navigation procedures show the
promise of maximizing maintaining cruise speed and altitude as long as possible.
Q
A
Have you ever gotten
lost while taxiing at an
airport?
Taxiing, particularly at a
large airport in limited
visibility at night, can be very
challenging. Many of the modern airliners have electronic
maps with the position of the
airplane displayed, which helps.
Those that do not have electronic displays require the crew
to have taxi charts.
I have never been lost, but
have taxied slowly and been
very careful to follow the taxi
clearance, using input from the
first officer.
Q
A
Are there any mandatory announcements
that a captain has to make?
Only if there is an emergency condition and the
captain must tell the flight
attendants and passengers to
“Brace!” All other announcements are up to the captain.
Q
A
Do you have a favorite
airport to land and take
off ?
There are special things
about several airports:
Landing on runway 13 in LaGuardia from the south provides a spectacular view of
Manhattan as you fly up the
Hudson River. Flying into Key
West with the beautiful clear
water and picturesque boats in
the harbor is always enjoyable.
One of my most vivid memories
was departing from Boston
Logan over the shipping channel as the tall ships were sailing.
For me, the most beautiful
airport is San Francisco: The
mountain and the bay combine
to make a spectacular sight.
Seating on Delta’s newest jet
includes privacy panels. USA TODAY
Delta unveils
suites, seats
Delta Air Lines showed off its
newest aircraft Tuesday, offering an up-close look at a jet that
the carrier says will become its
flagship aircraft for international service.
Delta’s first Airbus A350 widebody will debut on the route
between Detroit and Tokyo
Narita on Oct 30. Delta is the
first airline in North America to
take delivery of an A350. The
306-seat jet will be the first to
feature two of the carrier’s new
seating options: the Delta One
suite and the Delta Premium
Select premium economy seat.
The 32 Delta One suites feature seats that convert into lieflat beds. Though that’s become
a standard option for most big
global carriers, Delta’s newest
suites also come with a privacy
door, allowing suite customers
to close off their space.
The suites are scheduled to
be on all 25 of the A350s Delta
has on order. Delta also will retrofit its 18 Boeing 777s with
new suites beginning next year.
Also making its debut on
Delta’s A350 is the carrier’s first
premium
economy
seat.
Dubbed Delta Premium Select,
the seats are not simply coach
seats with extra legroom. They
come with extended recline and
footrests. The Premium Select
seats also come with such perks
as enhanced meal service and
amenity kits. Delta also will add
the seats to its Boeing 777s in
its overhaul of those aircraft.
Ben Mutzabaugh
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
15T
10BEST: Stops along the Great Lakes
Although the Great Lakes make up the
world’s largest body of fresh water, the inland
seas often are overlooked. “They’ve got unbelievable history and they’re not overly touristed,” says Thomas Shevory who recounts
his bicycle journey circling the five interconnected lakes — Superior, Michigan, Huron,
Erie and Ontario — in a new book The Great
Lakes at Ten Miles an Hour (University of
Minnesota Press, $16.95). “Once I started, I
didn’t want to stop. There’s nothing like them
anywhere in the world.” He shares some of
his favorite lakeside sites with Larry
Bleiberg for USA TODAY.
DULUTH, MINN.
HOLLAND, MICH.
The Great Lakes’ largest port has
reinvented itself as a touristfriendly Lake Superior haven,
featuring waterfront parks and
renovated warehouses with shops
and restaurants. The hillside city
also offers lakefront festivals, an
aquarium, harbor cruises and
ship and rail museums. “It’s a
bustling waterfront and a nice
little city,” Shevory says.
visitduluth.com
This prosperous community near
Lake Michigan is more than a
vacation town. The city of 33,000
is particularly popular during its
spring tulip festival. “There are
beaches and sand dunes, and a
really nice downtown,” Shevory
says. “It has that mixture of urban and rural that can be attractive.” holland.org
NIAGARA RIVER,
NEW YORK AND CANADA
Forget the Falls. Shevory suggests
visitors head upstream to explore
the Niagara River. An easy scenic
drive starts at Fort Niagara, N.Y.,
where the river meets Lake Ontario, then heads down along the
river gorge to Lewiston, before
crossing over to Canada. The
drive ends at Niagara-on-theLake, Ontario. “It’s a nice little
town with a lot of historic buildings. It was important on the
Underground Railroad.”
discoverniagara.org,
niagaraonthelake.com
DOOR COUNTY, WIS.
The ship-building town of Sturgeon Bay presides over Door
County, a popular Lake Michigan
getaway, known as the Cape Cod
of the Midwest. Visitors come for
parks, cuisine and maritime adventure. “It has a lot of variety,
both old villages and towns that
have now been turned over to
tourism, and a more wild side
with wide-open water,” Shevory
says. doorcounty.com
The Great Lakes’ largest port,
Duluth, Minn., has reinvented
itself as a tourist-friendly
haven. VISITDULUTH.COM
PORT AUSTIN, MICH.
Every Michigan native will tell
you that their state’s shaped like a
mitten, and Port Austin is found
on the tip of the thumb. Shevory
said he was charmed by the beauty of the historic town. “There
isn’t a major city on Lake Huron.
You’re really getting away from
everything.” portaustinarea.com
LONG POINT NATIONAL
WILDLIFE AREA, CANADA
CLEVELAND
Shevory says Ohio’s largest metropolitan area was a pleasant
surprise, with impressive museums, leafy universities and old
buildings repurposed as shopping
centers. As a music fan, he loved
the Lake Erie waterfront Rock
and Roll Hall of Fame, and sports
fans can catch some of the nation’s top teams as well. “Of all
the old industrial cities that I
went through, Cleveland had
been most successful in revitalizing its downtown,” he says.
“There’s a lot going on.”
thisiscleveland.com
MORE 10BEST:
TRAVEL.USATODAY.COM
See lists for travel ideas online.
EXPERIENCE
Kingston, Ontario, is Canada’s gateway to the Thousand
Islands. It also offers free ferry access to Wolfe Island, with
bicycling, golfing and beaches. CELIA SPENARD-KO
KINGSTON, CANADA
Canada’s gateway to the Thousand Islands is a gem, Shevory
says. The Lake Ontario waterfront city of Kingston has a prosperous downtown and a free ferry
to Wolfe Island, which offers
bicycling, golfing and beaches.
Wolfe is the largest of the Thousand Islands, a scenic region on
the U.S.-Canada border. “Some
are the size of a rock, and some
much larger. They’re kind of
amazing.” visitkingston.ca
TRAVEL
AMERICA
MANITOULIN ISLAND,
CANADA
This Lake Huron landmass is
generally recognized as the
world’s largest island in a freshwater body, and is connected to
the mainland by a one-lane
bridge. It’s a place to hike, fish and
meet Canada’s indigenous First
Nations people, who call the island home. “It’s about as isolated
as you can get and still be in that
part of North America,” Shevory
says. manitoulintourism.com
Shevory was surprised by the
northern side of Lake Erie.
“There’s so little there. It’s kind of
breathtaking, sort of unexpectedly undeveloped,” he says, citing
Canada’s Long Point National
Wildlife Area. The haven for
migrating birds stretches across a
sandy peninsula about 100 miles
west of Buffalo. “It kind of
changed my expectation of what
I’d see on Lake Erie.”
ec.gc.ca/ap-pa/
TAHQUAMENON FALLS STATE
PARK, MICH.
Located a few miles inland of
Lake Superior on Michigan’s
Upper Peninsula, this state park
boasts one of the largest waterfalls east of the Mississippi. “It’s
really spectacular, quite a sight,”
Shevory says. “You can get very
close to the falls and get a feel for
what it was like before development.” michigan.org/property/
tahquamenon-falls-state-park
FOR MORE INFORMATION
USATODAY.COM/EXPERIENCE/
When nature calls, lavatory is a real refuge
Laura Ruane
AT A GLANCE
USA TODAY Network
FORT MYERS , FLA .
With bathroom humor and a toilet-paper
ribbon-cutting, a wildlife refuge
in Florida rolled out its newest
exhibit: learning lavatories.
It’s no joke. These are working
public restrooms and a covered
walkway located at the J.N.
“Ding” Darling National Wildlife
Refuge on Sanibel Island.
They’ve morphed from institutional bland to bold — with animal sculptures and murals.
They’ve gotten more “green,” aka
environmentally friendly. It’s a
work in progress: Soon the
graphic displays will sport a few
factoids.
“We wanted to transform a
necessary nature call into an innovative
nature
enthrall,”
cracked refuge manager Paul Tritaik, speaking to a throng of about
30 friends and staffers at Friday’s
grand reveal of the restroom
redo.
The restroom project originated from identifying “a major
missed opportunity for educating
visitors,” said Birgie Miller, executive director of the “Ding” Darling Wildlife Society-Friends of
the Refuge.
Each year, the refuge welcomes
nearly 1 million visitors to Wildlife Drive, the four-mile, one-way
road that takes motorists, cyclists
and hikers through portions of
the preserve that are home to
more than 200 species of birds,
alligators, mangrove forests, and
more.
Only about a quarter of those
who travel Wildlife Drive step
into the refuge’s Visitor/Education Center to see “all of our wonderful educational exhibits,”
Miller said.
Admission to the education
center is free. It has interactive
exhibits about the animals living
in the refuge, knowledgeable
uWhat: J.N. “Ding” Darling
National Wildlife Refuge.
uWhere: One Wildlife
Drive, Sanibel Island, Fla.
uPhone: 239-472-1100.
uOnline: www.fws.gov.
uEducation Center
hours: Vary, call for
information.
uWildlife Drive: Open
from sunrise-sunset every
day except Friday.
uEducation Center: Free.
uWildlife Drive: $5/car,
$1/bike or pedestrian (under
16 free).
The walls outside the new Learning Lavatories set the educational tone at the J.N. “Ding”
Darling National Wildlife Refuge, whcvh opened Oct. 13. PHOTOS BY ANDREW WEST, NEWS-PRESS.COM
The refuge welcomes
nearly 1 million
visitors to Wildlife
Drive, which runs
through parts of the
preserve that are
home to more than
200 species of birds,
alligators, mangrove
forests, and more.
Project #LearningLav has created educational imagery inside
the center’s lavatories and on the outdoor wall leading to them.
folks who can field questions —
and a gift shop.
It also offers visitors tools to
better explore outdoors, including binoculars for loan while in
the refuge, a guide to duck calls,
and information about a free
smartphone app on which users
can view real-time wildlife sightings, post pictures, and play a
wildlife trivia game.
The entrance to the education
center is just a few steps away
from the public restrooms. It
seemed plausible the restrooms
could be changed to call more attention to the education center.
The refuge friends group enlisted creative people, hatched a
plan — and raised the money.
A $125,000 grant from the
West Coast Inland Navigation
District and contributions from
private donors paid for the restroom renovations.
Local artist Andrew Corke
fashioned a mother and baby
manatee out of recycled bike
tires.
North Carolina artist David
Williams sculpted other creatures out of foam and fiberglass,
and painted the murals.
In coming weeks, the restroom
stall doors will be wrapped with
wildlife imagery and some snippets of nature knowledge.
Visitors Paul Brown and Laurel
Brown of Long Island, N.Y.,
toured the restrooms. They have
a home on Sanibel, and over the
past 21 years “walked through
and driven through” the refuge
many times.
The learning lavatories? “Fantastic,” Paul Brown said, adding,
“It’s not something I’d have in my
house.”
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
16T
BOOKS
‘Booty’ gets to the bottom of pop
Exhaustive history
explores the power
and influence
of American music
Matt Damsker
Special for USA TODAY
Books about popular music typically
play into the cult of
personality, too easily losing sight of the
subtext and source of pop’s power. When a study comes along
that goes deep — for example,
Greil Marcus’ Mystery Train, or
Alex Ross’ The Rest Is Noise —
we’re awakened to cultural connections that can expand our appreciation of the sounds we often
take for granted.
Now, Ann Powers has delivered another such classic with
Good Booty (Dey St./William
Morrow, 448 pp, eeee out of
four). Subtitled “Love and Sex,
Black & White, Body and Soul in
American Music,” this richly researched, passionately argued
survey gets down, with persuasive rhetoric and narrative momentum. It makes the case
that American pop is one
long, nuanced continuum energized by a hardfought battle for sexual
and racial liberation.
Powers’ voice challenges pop mediocrity in
her role as NPR’s music
critic, and here she dePowers
clares that “American
music originates in the
by doing more than
bodies of its people, in
merely singing their
the pull of a moan from the Sunday hymns. “They were shakthroat and spine-loosening roll of ing it, baby, shaking it,” writes
the hips. From the beginning, it Powers of the moments when the
scandalized those who didn’t un- “ring shout” rocked rural Africanderstand it, or maybe felt its im- American churches.
A “fluid series of movements
pact too well.”
She refutes the lazy notion that blended with call-and-response
rock ’n’ roll began in 1956 — with singing,” the shout was a deeply
the fusions and appropriations of ingrained vestige of the horror
Chuck Berry, Elvis Presley and Africans experienced — and
others — and traces it as far back fought with their voices — on
as the early 1800s, when church their way to America, locked
worshipers worried their pastors down on the slaver ships sailing
REVIEW
Beyoncé has had a huge
impact on popular culture
as well as music. SHAREIF ZIYADAT,
FILMMAGIC
the Middle Passage. Powers then
guides us to the musical breeding
ground of New Orleans, where
American pop takes root in an
erotic loam of mixed-blood Creole culture.
There, slave life struggled for
freedom amid the sex trade of the
city’s Storyville and in Congo
Square, an open field on the outskirts of town where dancing
flourished and the mythos of an
American sound and style was
born, embodied by the flirtatious
“cocotte” and the dandyish “can-
dio,” a “template for male rock
and soul stardom.”
It’s no accident that Little
Richard’s signature sex-coded
smash, Tutti Frutti, was recorded
down the road from Congo
Square in 1955. (The phrase
“Good Booty” was part of the
original song, though it was
changed to “aw rooty” to protect
white sensibilities, and remains a
deathless descriptor in soul, funk,
and hip-hop.)
From there, Powers takes us on
a more familiar journey —
through jazz, blues, gospel, the
teen-driven era of the 1950s, the
sexual revolution of the ’60s,
groupie culture, the blues thefts
of Led Zeppelin and its “newly
pornographic musical eroticism,”
to “Britney, Beyoncé, and the Virtual Frontier” of today. Pop’s a
huge universe, of course, and
Powers can’t account for all of it,
but her insights and historiography are sharp, and her larger
point — that American music refracts and reflects a profound
struggle for freedom — resounds.
‘The Locals’ is a sad trip
into forgotten America
Lovely ‘Bookshop’ carries
too few novel plot points
Author
Dee
captures
a sense of
place and
and dread
in a small
town that
has been
left
behind
Even
with a
large cast
and lots
of stories,
‘Love’
still
comes up
a little
short
Mark
Firth
doesn’t know what to
make of Philip Hadi,
the New Yorker who
left
Manhattan
shortly after 9/11 to bring his family to Howland, a working-class
town in western Massachusetts’
Berkshire Mountains.
Firth, a contractor, is happy to
have Hadi’s business; he was
hired to beef up security at the
home Hadi usually left vacant for
all but the summer. But he understands little about how Hadi
made his money or his reasons
for moving to Howland.
Unlike most people in town,
Hadi has money, lots of it, and the
clash between the town’s residents who want to emulate him
and those who resent his influence drives the action of Jonathan Dee’s captivating new novel
The Locals (Random House, 400
pp.,eeegE ).
Dee deftly works in the same
territory as novelists Russell
Banks and Richard Russo to
show life in the parts of the
Northeast left behind by the
modern economy. Mills
have closed, jobs are gone,
and there are only so many
yoga retreats able to provide
jobs.
Somehow, the residents of
Howland elect the low-key
Jonathan Dee
and private Hadi as their
First Selectman, essentially
the mayor. Hadi uses his own
money to balance the town’s
books, which eases the tax burden but warps its democracy.
Which, Hadi says, may have outlived its usefulness.
He also starts to chip away at
the traditions that, however ragged, kept Howland alive.
The tension is between those
who want to emulate Hadi and
those who want him to go away.
Mark Firth is among the former. He starts to buy, rehabilitate
and then rent houses in and
around town, which fattens his
checking account but alienates
his family.
His younger brother, Gerry,
sells real estate, drinks too much
REVIEW
RAY
LOCKER
and sleeps around when he has
the chance. His sister Candace
first teaches school and then
finds a job at the local library.
Only a second sister, Renee, lives
outside of a 30-minute drive, in
Colorado
Howland, they eventually realize, is a Potemkin village.
It falls to Gerry Firth, often
drunk and fuming behind his laptop as he writes a little-read blog,
to set off the confrontation that
drives the town’s final crackup.
“The mood in the town was dark;
everyone felt under attack,” Dee
writes. “The response was not to
come together but rather to protect everything one had against
the depredations, real or imagined, of others.”
Dee, who lives in Syracuse,
N.Y., excels at capturing the feeling in these places whose best
days, if they ever really existed,
are decades gone by. His knowing
gaze and elegant writing work
well throughout The Locals,
which is infused with a sense of
desperation and dread.
The novel stumbles somewhat
near the end, however, seeming
to run out of steam.
Howland, as shown by Dee,
might be a good place to get gas
on the way to Stockbridge or
Great Barrington, but you
wouldn’t want to live there.
Meant to appeal to book lovers,
Veronica Henry’s How to Find
Love in a Bookshop (Pamela Dorman Books/Viking, 339 pp.,
ee1⁄2) is a love letter to books
and the shops that
sell them. UnfortuREVIEW
nately, while heartMARY
CADDEN
felt, the novel’s love
stories are spread a
little thin, almost as
though they were abridged.
Set in the idyllic English town
of Peasebrook, nestled in the
Cotswolds, the story opens with
Emilia Nightingale sitting at her
father’s deathbed. She has flown
back to Britain from Hong Kong,
where she has been living and
working. While there, she promises her father she will keep his
beloved book store open. The
bookshop, Nightingale Books, is tion to both Julius and his store,
more than a business to Julius. It though some are more intimately
also is his home — he’s lived in a entwined than others. Each charflat above the shop since
acter’s story sparks interest, but
shortly after Emilia’s
their promising tales feel
birth.
short-changed by an
When Emilia takes
abundance of added
over the shop, she
characters with even
learns that while her
more romantic trials
father may have
and
tribulations.
been skilled at findThere’s Dillon, a
ing just the right
groundskeeper; Jackbook for just the right
son, a single dad trying
customer, he was in no
to make his own way;
way an expert at busiJune, a bookshop emness. Emilia is left Veronica Henry ployee; Alice, the daughwith a shop running in
ter of Sarah Basildon;
the red, more customand Bea, a young mother
ers perusing her books than pur- and city transplant.
chasing and a land developer
The novel’s flow is steady and
waiting to pounce.
even, and its story lines, with ups
Along the way, Emilia’s life in- and downs, all fall easily into
tertwines with the lives and loves place. And while that makes for
of several characters. There is Sa- neat endings, it does not always
rah Basildon, the lady of the make for a gripping read. The
stately
Peasebrook
Manor; drama of possibly losing the
Thomasina Matthews, a world- bookstore is anticlimactic, buried
class chef and culinary instructor between myriad stories that
who is anything but worldly when spread many of the novel’s story
it comes to the opposite sex; Mar- lines a little thin.
But drama, or lack thereof,
lowe, a professional musician
who played alongside Julius in isn’t everything. For many readthe town’s string quartet and a ers, there really is something
potential love interest for Emilia; magical about bookstores — the
and Ian Mendip, a developer who smell, the atmosphere and of
has his own plans for Nightingale course, the books. And in the end,
Henry’s novel reminds us of just
Books.
All four have a strong connec- that.
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
17T
BOOKS
3
New and
noteworthy
Sisters First: Stories From Our
Wild and Wonderful Life
by Jenna Bush Hager
and Barbara Pierce
Bush (Grand Central,
non-fiction, on sale
Tuesday)
USA TODAY’s Jocelyn
McClurg scopes out the
hottest books on sale
each week.
WHAT IT’S ABOUT:
Joint memoir by
the Bush twins,
daughters of former president
George W. Bush.
THE BUZZ: Jenna
and Barbara will do
a #BookmarkThis
Facebook Live chat
with USA TODAY
on Oct. 25 at 1 p.m.
ET/10 a.m. PT.
President George W. Bush and first lady Laura Bush, with daughters Barbara, left, and Jenna before Jenna’s wedding in 2008. AP
1
The Rooster Bar
by John Grisham (Doubleday, fiction, on sale
Tuesday Oct. 24)
WHAT IT’S ABOUT:
Three law school
students, drowning in debt, decide
to expose the
hedge-fund operator behind a chain of
shady, third-tier law Grisham
schools —including their own.
THE BUZZ: Grisham is having a
busy year; he already had a No. 1
USA TODAY best seller this summer with Camino Island, the tale
of crooks who steal F. Scott
Fitzgerald’s manuscripts
from Princeton.
2
The Pioneer
Woman Cooks:
Come and Get It!
by Ree Drummond (William Morrow,
non-fiction, on sale Tuesday)
WHAT IT’S ABOUT: The popular
Food Network personality’s latest
cookbook offers “Simple,
Scrumptious Recipes
for Crazy Busy
Lives.”
THE BUZZ: Drummond’s Dinnertime hit No. 3 on
USA TODAY’s
Best-Selling Books
list in 2015.
Drummond
GRISHAM BY BILLY HUNT; DRUMMOND BY ROBERT DEUTSCH USA TODAY; BUSHES BY SHEALAH CRAIGHEAD, AP;
FAGER BY RICHARD DREW, AP; KHAN BY EDWIN TSE
Lesley Stahl has been a correspondent for 60 Minutes
since 1991. RICHARD DREW, AP
4
Fifty Years of 60 Minutes
by Jeff Fager (Simon & Schuster, nonfiction, on sale Tuesday)
WHAT IT’S ABOUT: It’s
subtitled The Inside
Story of Television’s
Most Influential
News Broadcast.
THE BUZZ: Fager,
executive producer of
60 Minutes, looks
back at the newsmagazine’s storied history on its
Fager
50th anniversary.
5
An American Family
by Khizr Khan (Random House, nonfiction, on sale Tuesday)
WHAT IT’S ABOUT: A mem-
oir by Gold Star parent
Khan, the Pakistani
immigrant who
spoke at the 2016
Democratic National Convention
and made headlines
for criticizing Donald Trump.
THE BUZZ: “A politiKhizr
cally pointed imKhan
migrant success
story mingled with equally pointed tragedy,” says Kirkus Reviews.
WHAT
AMERICA’S
READING®
THE TOP 10
BOOKLIST.USATODAY.COM
n Rank this week
n Rank last week (F) Fiction (NF) Non-fiction (P) Paperback (H)Hardcover (E) E-book
Publisher in italics
1
1
Origin
Dan Brown
Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon is on the
hunt (and run) again as he searches for a cryptic
password in Spain (F) (H) Doubleday
6
—
The Nightingale
Kristin Hannah
Historical World War II fiction about the choices
two sisters must make in Nazi-occupied France
(F) (E) St. Martin’s Press
2
—
Turtles All the Way Down
John Green
Aza pursues a mystery involving a fugitive
billionaire and potential reward money (F) (H)
Dutton Books for Young Readers
7
—
Grant
Ron Chernow
Biography of Ulysses S. Grant, Union general and
U.S. president (NF) (H) Penguin Press
3
—
Fairytale
Danielle Steel
Camille Lammenais battles her stepmother for
control of her family’s vineyards (F) (E) Delacorte
8
5
Killing England
Bill O’Reilly, Martin Dugard
Subtitle: “The Brutal Struggle for American
Independence” (NF) (H) Henry Holt and Co.
4
4
The Sun and Her Flowers
Rupi Kaur
A look at growth and healing through poetry;
follow-up to “Milk and Honey” (F) (P) Andrews
McMeel Publishing
9
6
It
Stephen King
Seven adults return to their small Maine town to
battle an evil creature that preys on children
(F) (P) Scribner
5
2
Magnus Chase and the Gods
of Asgard: The Ship of the Dead
Rick Riordan
Youth: Magnus Chase has to fight Loki, who is
preparing a ship of the dead for an attack; third
in series (F) (H) Disney-Hyperion
10 3
Harry Potter and the Prisoner
of Azkaban: The Illustrated Edition
J.K. Rowling; art by Jim Kay
Youth: Harry learns the spirits of loved ones linger
in us; third in series; illustrated version (F) (H)
Arthur A. Levine
The book list appears
every Sunday.
For each title, the format
and publisher listed are
for the best-selling
version of that title this
week. Reporting outlets
include Amazon.com,
Amazon Kindle, Barnes &
Noble.com, Barnes &
Noble Inc., Barnes &
Noble e-books,
BooksAMillion.com,
Books-A-Million, Costco,
Hudson Booksellers,
Joseph-Beth Booksellers
(Lexington, Ky.; Cincinnati,
Charlotte, Cleveland,
Pittsburgh), Kobo, Inc.,
Powell's Books (Portland,
Ore.), Powells.com, R.J.
Julia Booksellers
(Madison, Conn.), Schuler
Books & Music (Grand
Rapids, Okemos,
Eastwood, Alpine, Mich.),
Sony Reader Store,
Target, Tattered Cover
Book Store (Denver).
THE REST
11 8 The Cuban Affair/Nelson DeMille
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
15
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12
7
17
—
—
14
—
10
22
19
18
25 136
26 25
27 13
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
21
41
—
39
—
23
31
35
26
11
28
37
—
48
—
33
9
45
46
47
48
49
50
—
32
45
44
—
53
Charter boat captain and former Army officer Daniel “Mac” MacCormick is lured into a scheme to recover $60 million hidden away in Cuba (F) (E)
Simon & Schuster
Room on the Broom/Julia Donaldson, Axel Scheffler
Children: A witch in search of her hat welcomes myriad creatures onto her broom (F) (P) Puffin
Rhett and Link’s Book of Mythicality/Rhett McLaughlin, Link Neal Subtitle: “A Field Guide to Curiosity, Creativity, and Tomfoolery” (NF) (H) Crown Archetype
A Column of Fire/Ken Follett
In 16th-century England, two lovers remain separated by religious differences (F) (H) Viking
Sleeping Beauties/Stephen King, Owen King
A mysterious sleeping disorder disrupts an Appalachian town (F) (H) Scribner
Wonder/R.J. Palacio
Youth: August Pullman, who was born with a facial deformity, wants nothing more than to be normal (F) (H) Knopf Books for Young Readers
You Do Something To Me/Bella Andre
Cordelia’s surprise inheritance includes her father’s half of a company; seventh in series (F) (E) Oak Press
The Rules of Magic/Alice Hoffman
The Owens children discover a family curse when they visit their aunt (F) (E) Simon & Schuster
Don’t Let Go/Harlan Coben
Detective Napoleon “Nap” Dumas is drawn back to a dark period in his life when new clues turn up in the murder of his twin brother (F) (E) Dutton
Basketball (and Other Things)/Shea Serrano
Subtitle: “A Collection of Questions Asked, Answered, Illustrated” (NF) (H) Abrams Books
What Happened/Hillary Rodham Clinton
Memoir: The Democratic presidential candidate reflects on her loss to Donald Trump (NF) (H) Simon & Schuster
Milk and Honey/Rupi Kaur
Poetry collection divided into four chapters that explore four pains (F) (P) Andrews McMeel Publishing
Before We Were Yours/Lisa Wingate
Rill Foss fights to keep her siblings together after they’re forced into an orphanage (F) (E) Ballantine
The Girl Who Takes an Eye for an Eye/David Lagercrantz
Imprisoned punk hacker Lisbeth Salander returns to expose dark truths from her childhood with the help of journalist Mikael Blomkvist
(F) (E) Knopf
Stick With It/Sean D. Young
Subtitle: “A Scientifically Proven Process for Changing Your Life-for Good” (NF) (E) Harper
How to Catch a Monster/Adam Wallace; art by Andy Elkerton
Children: A child tries to scare away the monster in his closet (F) (H) Sourcebooks
Manhattan Beach/Jennifer Egan
During World War II, a woman goes to work at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, and her search for her missing father leads her into the world of
gangsters, showgirls and graft (F) (E) Scribner
Little Fires Everywhere/Celeste Ng
Mia Warren rents a house in suburban Cleveland and causes upheaval in the neighborhood (F) (E) Penguin Press
The Snowman/Jo Nesbø
Oslo police investigator Harry Hole investigates a series of disappearances (F) (E) Knopf
Everything is Mama/Jimmy Fallon
Children: Animals try to teach their babies other words besides “Mama” (F) (H) Feiwel & Friends
Pete the Cat: Trick or Pete/James Dean
Children: Pete the Cat goes trick-or-treating from house to house (F) (P) HarperFestival
Rescuing Bryn/Susan Stoker
Dane Munroe meets Bryn Hartwell when he moves to escape his troubles (F) (E) Stoker Aces Production LLC
Haunted/James Patterson, James O. Born
Detective Michael Bennett’s family vacation is disrupted when local cops uncover a crime scene (F) (E) Little, Brown
The Handmaid’s Tale/Margaret Atwood
The story of a handmaid named Offred who lives in the repressive Republic of Gilead (F) (P) Anchor
The Subtle Art of Not Giving a (Expletive)/Mark Manson
Subtitle: “A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life” (NF) (H) HarperOne
Dog Man: A Tale of Two Kitties/Dav Pilkey
Children: Dog Man tries to bust two cats who are in a bit of trouble with the law; third in series (F) (H) Scholastic
Merry and Bright/Debbie Macomber
Merry Knight’s holiday stress is compounded when her family adds her profile to a dating website (F) (H) Ballantine
The Keto Reset Diet/Mark Sisson, Brad Kearns
Subtitle: “Reboot Your Metabolism in 21 Days and Burn Fat Forever” (NF) (H) Harmony
The Woman in Cabin 10/Ruth Ware
Travel writer sees a woman thrown overboard on a luxury cruise (F) (P) Gallery/Scout Press
The Dark Tower I: The Gunslinger/Stephen King
Roland of Gilead pursues the Man in Black; first in Dark Tower series (F) (E) Scribner
StrengthsFinder 2.0/Tom Rath
Lifetime strategies for using your talents (NF) (H) Gallup
Billionaire at the Barricades/Laura Ingraham
Subtitle: “The Populist Revolution From Reagan to Trump” (NF) (H) St. Martin’s Press
Braving the Wilderness/Brené Brown
Subtitle: “The Quest for True Belonging and the Courage to Stand Alone” (NF) (H) Random House
We Were Eight Years in Power: An American Tragedy/
Collection of essays reflect on race, Barack Obama’s Presidency and it’s aftermath (NF) (H) One World
Ta-Nehisi Coates
Vanish/Tess Gerritsen
Pregnant homicide detective is held hostage (F) (E) Ballantine
Principles: Life and Work/Ray Dalio
The author shares the unconventional life and business principles that he’s developed (NF) (H) Simon & Schuster
There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Bat!/Lucille Colandro Children: The little old lady swallows a bat, owl, cat, ghost and goblin in this Halloween book (F) (H) Scholastic
Lilac Girls/Martha Hall Kelly
Debut novel about the intersecting lives of three women during World War II (F) (P) Ballantine
Building a StoryBrand/Donald Miller
Subtitle: “Clarify Your Message So Customers Will Listen” (NF) (H) Thomas Nelson
A Gentleman in Moscow/Amor Towles
In 1922, Count Alexander Rostov is sentenced by the Bolsheviks to house arrest in a grand hotel across from the Kremlin (F) (E) Viking
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
18T
SCREEN CHECK
TONIGHT ON TV
THE WALKING DEAD
AMC, 9 ET/PT
War is beginning in the postapocalyptic world of The
Walking Dead. The zombie
series begins its eighth season
tonight and promises to tackle
the popular “All Out War”
story line from the comic
books in the new episodes.
After holding their own
against tyrannical aggressor
Negan (Jeffrey Dean Morgan)
and the Saviors in the seventh
season finale, Rick (Andrew
Lincoln), Alexandria, the
Kingdom and the Hilltop are
bringing the fight to Negan.
Rick (Andrew Lincoln) and
Maggie (Lauren Cohan) get
ready for war on The
Walking Dead.
GENE PAGE, AMC
CRITIC’S
CORNER
Kelly Lawler
@klawls
USA TODAY
THE DEUCE
HBO, 9 ET/PT
OUTLANDER
STARZ, 8 ET/PT
Tonight’s the night Outlander
fans have been waiting for. After
keeping its romantic heroes
Claire (Caitriona Balfe) and Jamie (Sam Heughan) apart for the
first five episodes of Season 3, the
two are finally reuniting in a
special 75-minute episode. However, the decades they spent apart
present complications for rekindling their love affair, including Jamie’s new business dealings.
Claire (Caitriona Balfe) and Jamie (Sam Heughan) finally get
back together on Outlander. JASON BELL, STARZ
PUZZLES
CHAT WITH KELLY
USA TODAY’s Kelly
Lawler chats with
readers Mondays
at 2 p.m. ET at
facebook.com/
USATODAY. Read
edited excerpts below,
email questions to
klawler@usatoday.com
or tweet them to
@klawls and visit her
live online.
Answers placed on page 2
Play more puzzles at puzzles.usatoday.com
Puzzle problems? Contact us at feedback@usatoday.com
BY Fred Piscop
NO-HITTER
A
Q
A
Candy (Maggie Gyllenhaal)
settles in to porn movies on
The Deuce. PAUL SCHIRALDI, HBO
CROSSWORD
This bothers me: What
happens to all the food
Q
you see on The Big Bang Theory? Nobody really ever eats,
they just pick at it. I assume
it’s real and not prop food?
Incredible waste if it’s all
dumped into the garbage.
You are not the first person
to have noticed that sometimes on TV, realism falls to the
wayside when it comes to food
and drink.
A video and story from Slate
take a hilarious look at coffee
cups that are glaringly empty on
TV series. You can tell because
actors do not handle them like
they weigh anything or contain
dangerously hot liquids.
Once you notice it you’ll never
look at coffee on TV the same way
again. But for the sake of expediency and safety, sometimes food
isn’t real or coffee isn’t there.
What shows have surprised you the most this
fall, in good or bad ways?
In terms of new series, I was
most happily surprised by
Young Sheldon, which is so different from The Big Bang Theory in
so many ways. I’m not a fan of Big
Bang, so that was a happy surprise for me.
I’ve also been surprised, although I probably shouldn’t have
been, by how deftly and smartly
Brooklyn Nine-Nine handled
sending Jake (Andy Samberg)
and Rosa (Stephanie Beatriz) to
prison this season after they were
wrongly convicted. Not only did
The ’70s-set drama about
the rise of the porn industry continues to see
dramatic upheavals for
its characters as the
season progresses and
Times Square changes.
Change isn’t great for
C.C. (Gary Carr), Larry
(Gbenga Akinnagbe)
and Rodney (Method
Man), who are worried
about becoming obsolete
as the police continue to
push their business off the
streets, or Lori (Emily Meade)
who struggles to transition to
appearing on camera. But
Candy (Maggie Gyllenhaal),
thrives on it, and eyes a new job
on set.
the series maintain its humor and
tone with a new setting, it also
made subtle commentary and
didn’t leave Jake and Rosa unchanged by their experiences.
What do you think of the
new season of Riverdale?
I am thoroughly enjoying
the new season of Riverdale
as much as I enjoyed the first.
The series satisfies a particular
craving I have sometimes.
It’s one of the few high school
series on the air right now, and it
does a good job of balancing big
mystery arcs with plenty of soapy
teen drama.
The season premiere introduced a new mystery and shook
up the existing romances, and I
have high hopes.
I’m also excited to see that it
came back with a big ratings
increase. It’s a fun series to talk
about with your friends.
Q
A
K.J. Apa is
Archie on
Riverdale. CW
ACROSS
1 Topper on the Left
Bank
6 Places for facials
10 Heat source at a
fast-food restaurant
14 Resort island near
Curacao
15 Walt Kelly’s possum
16 Bad to the bone
17 Evidence of a B-52
attack, say
19 Marilyn Monroe
facial mark
20 “Much ___ About
Nothing”
21 Jobs for wreckers
22 Made an exact
copy of
24 Belgrade resident
26 Many a mall rat
27 German city of
Einstein’s birth
28 Without a saddle, to
an equestrian
32 Oater assembly
35 The Blue Devils of
college sports
36 River through
Kazakhstan
37 Postmortem bio
38 One passing bad
checks
39 Get tuckered out
40 Clothing brand with
a horseman logo
41 Red ___ (wieners)
42 Tillerson’s
department
43 Successful on one’s
own
45 Papa John’s delivery
46 Perfect, as a skill
47 Drillers at sea
51 Temple with a tiered
roof
54 Chutzpah
55 Concealed carry
org.
56 Proctored event
57 Thanksgiving Day fun
run, e.g.
© Andrews McMeel
60 Competitor of Allure
and Glamour
61 Blunted fencing
weapon
62 “Tara Road” novelist
Binchy
63 Seckel or Bosc
64 Leo or Aries
65 Wrapped up
DOWN
1 Rummy desserts
2 Gradually weaken
3 Grapevine tidbit
4 Gradually weaken
5 Like Braille
characters
6 Breed, as eels
7 Lobstering gear
8 Ten, to Bart Simpson
9 Caster of spells
10 Sauce served with
seafood
11 Bell-ringing
cosmetics company
10/22
12 Distance not run in
the Olympics
13 Said “no contest,” say
18 Exhibit wanderlust
23 Controversial statue
figure, these days
25 Contemplated item
in a Rembrandt work
26 Movie director’s shots
28 Flat-topped
formation
29 Bocelli delivery
30 Ox’s burden
31 Paul who painted
“Flower Myth”
32 Opens, as a car hood
33 Chamber music
woodwind
34 Place for a
houseplant
35 Two-terminal
semiconductor
38 Political entities of the
Mongols
42 “Boy, am I dumb!”
Answers: Call 1-900-988-8300, 99 cents a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-320-4280.
44 Rocker’s rival, in ’60s
England
45 Tidy sum
47 Like bourbon barrels
48 One way to mark
errors
49 Source of oranges
50 Filled to the gills
51 Hatchling’s cry
52 Shaft with a linchpin,
perhaps
53 Political fundraiser,
often
54 Maddux with four Cy
Youngs
58 Rival of Reuters
59 Process, as leather
CROSSWORDS
ON YOUR PHONE
mobilegames.usatoday.com
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
19T
QUOTE OF THE DAY
I HAVE NO
COMMENT. NOT
FRUSTRATION ...
THERE'S NO REASON TO
BE NASTY. I SHOULDN'T
HAVE SAID
SOMETHING,"
Florida State Jimbo Fisher after he got into it with
a fan after the Seminoles' 31-28 loss to Louisville.
MELINA VASTOLA / USA TODAY SPORTS
Dodgers’ Series drought, explained
Gabe Lacques
@gabelacques
USA TODAY Sports
As World Series droughts go,
the Los Angeles Dodgers’ 29-year
absence hasn’t inspired the lore
or engendered sympathy like other franchises’ misfortune.
There’s no clear line of demarcation featuring a billy goat or an
interfering fan. Then again, the
Chicago Cubs never traded Ernie
Banks, either.
Nonetheless, when Game 1 arrives Tuesday at Dodger Stadium,
that will end the longest World
Series drought in franchise history — yes, even surpassing the 26
years between the 1890 Brooklyn
Bridegrooms and 1916 Brooklyn
Robins.
A look at the low points, plot
twists and baseball wounds — often self-inflicted — that kept one
of baseball’s flagship franchises off
its biggest stage.
THE HANGOVER
Those 1988 Dodgers of Kirk Gibson, Orel Hershiser and little else
seemed like something of a baseball miracle, slaying the star-studded New York Mets and mighty
Oakland Athletics. Going back-toback? Heck, even Hershiser foresaw what was coming in accepting
his Cy Young Award over the winter. “It’s hard to repeat, just period, because of injuries,” Hershiser
said. “I wouldn’t predict us to
repeat.”
Hershiser’s physical downfall
wouldn’t come until years later,
but the club’s regression dogged
him: He nearly matched his epic
1988 season: 256 innings and a
2.31 ERA (compared to 2.26 and
267) but that got him a 15-15 record, instead of 23-8. Gibson’s leg
injuries were real: He played in 71
games and hit nine homers, one
year after hitting 25 in his MVP
season. At 82-78, the Dodgers
missed the playoffs, but surely it’d
be just a speed bump. Right?
1992
That which went sour in ’89 bot-
chise bankrupt amid a tabloid-caliber divorce.
A cliché even seasoned Angelenos couldn’t believe — the couple bought $74 million worth of
homes and spent $10,000 a
month on a hairstylist — left the
Dodger Stadium seats empty and
the major league product lagging
far behind the hated Giants to the
north. After a year spent in MLB
foster care after Selig seized the
club, the sale to hedge fund bro
Mark Walter seemed a relief.
tomed out in 1992. The Dodgers’
63-99 campaign remains their
worst by winning percentage
since 1912. Rookie Eric Karros’ 20
home runs led the club. Hometown star Darryl Strawberry’s
production dropped from 28
homers and 99 RBI in 1991 to five
and 25 in 43 games; he wouldn’t
play 100 games again until 1998,
with the New York Yankees.
The L.A. riots in April and May
provided a grim backdrop for the
city, diverting eyes from the terrible team rather than the team
providing a diversion from reality.
They finished 35 games behind
the Atlanta Braves, rendering almost invisible a meaningless September home run, the first hit by
a catching prospect named Mike
Piazza.
MATT STAIRS
OK, so there was some baseball
played in the McCourt era, and in
2008, the Dodgers nearly made
the World Series — until a 40year-old with a beer-league swing
interceded.
They were five outs from tying
the NLCS at 2-2 when the Philadelphia Phillies’ Shane Victorino
ripped a two-run, Game 4-tying
home run. Two batters later, it
was Matt Stairs driving the dagger, a two-run shot off closer Jonathan Broxton.
Not that they could see this
coming.
“I’m not going to lie. ... I try to
hit home runs and that’s it,” Stairs
said in an epic news conference
after his mammoth blast well up
the Dodger Stadium bleachers.
FOX AND PIAZZA
Ah, Piazza. His franchise-record
35 home runs in 1993 gave him
rock-star status in L.A., and as the
second in a chain of five consecutive NL Rookie of the Year honorees, he allowed Dodgers fans to
believe they’d returned to the halcyon days of the 1970s and early
’80s.
But in March 1998, Peter
O’Malley ended nearly a half-century of family ownership when he
sold the Dodgers to Fox for a
baseball-record $311 million.
Meanwhile, Piazza ventured into
his walk year with a prodigious
.334 career average, .974 OPS and,
at 28, 168 career home runs.
Surely Fox, which negotiated
billion-dollar deals with regularity, couldn’t mess up a simple
$100 million extension, right?
Um.
“I’m not going to lie and say I’m
not concerned about this, that I’m
not confused and disappointed by
the whole thing, because I am,”
Piazza told the Los Angeles Times
on opening day, some three weeks
after Fox gained control of the
club. “I’m mad that this has
dragged into the season. I’m not
going to use this as an excuse if
things aren’t going well. But how
can I not think about this?”
Two months later, a Hall of
Fame talent was gone in a block-
The Dodgers’ Kirk Gibson celebrates hitting a game-winning
home run in Game 1 of the 1988 World Series, the last time Los
Angeles made the Fall Classic. RUSTY KENNEDY, AP
buster deal brokered by TV execs,
not baseball people. Despite lavish spending, the Dodgers never
made the playoffs under Fox. And
Piazza walked right into Cooperstown — wearing a Mets hat.
BOSTON WRONG
The Piazza deal marked an abrupt
shift to corporate ownership, and
a group whose primary purpose
for buying the Dodgers was to
lock down long-term TV rights.
Come 2004, Fox wanted out, and
MLB Commissioner Bud Selig
jumped at the chance to mollify
one of baseball’s crucial corporate
partners.
Enter Frank McCourt — a Bos-
tonian deemed too cash-poor to
seriously bid on the Red Sox and
Angels but next man up when the
Dodgers came on the market.
MLB OK’d the heavily-leveraged
sale to McCourt, who claimed
he’d remake the Dodgers into a
modern juggernaut via newfangled analytics, and hired Moneyball protagonist Paul DePodesta
as his general manager a year
later.
The Dodgers would make the
playoffs four times under
McCourt, but he and wife Jamie
eventually became what L.A.
thought they were — grifting tourists who enriched themselves off
the club — and then left the fran-
THE MATTINGLY YEARS
This year’s club won its fifth consecutive division title, three of
those under manager Don Mattingly, who thanklessly shepherded the club through the end of the
McCourt era and into a brighter
future.
But his October work was not
stellar, as on more than one occasion he let ace Clayton Kershaw
to die on the vine as he tired, like
a manager trying to send a message to the front office that the
bullpen provided was insufficient.
That’s a move better left for April,
of course.
Gifted a 1-2 starting punch of
Kershaw and Zack Greinke, Mattingly’s Dodgers lost three of four
postseason series, leading to an
awkward exit in 2015 and the
dawn of the Dave Roberts era.
Cardinals look to ride Adrian Peterson
Jarrett Bell
jbell@usatoday.com
USA TODAY Sports
Footnote: With quick acceleration, Kamara is a big play waiting
to happen.
son’s season-ending knee injury.
So “All-Day” did more than rush
for 134 yards and 2 TDs on 26
carries against the Bucs. He injected some energy into a team
that sorely needed a jolt. Now do
it again.
STOMACH FOR AN UPSET
Jacksonville Jaguars at Indianapolis Colts. Sure, rookie
stud Leonard Fournette, officially
“questionable” with an ankle injury, insists he’ll play. But how effective will he be? Okay, Indy’s
31st-ranked defense can help any
runner get well soon. But the 3point home underdog will have a
shot because Jacoby Brissett will
be the best quarterback on the
field. Blake Bortles does not fit
the profile of picking up the slack
if Fournette is limited or inactive.
PRESSURE’S ON
USA TODAY Sports' Jarrett
Bell breaks down the keys for
Week 7 across the NFL:
WHO’S HOT
Adrian Peterson. After a statement of a comeback in his Cardinals debut, Peterson will try to
keep grooving in London against
a Rams defense — and a Wade
Phillips defense, at that — ranked
29th against the run. Yes, numbers can lie. Arizona ranks dead
last in rushing offense. But that
largely reflects life before Peterson, on the heels of David John-
USA SNAPSHOTS©
Homer happy
6,105
Total home runs
hit by all teams
in the regular
season, most in
a single year in
Major League
Baseball
history
SOURCE Baseball-reference.com
ELLEN J. HORROW AND JANET LOEHRKE, USA TODAY
Steve Sarkisian. After posting
an NFL-high 540 points last season under since-departed offensive coordinator Kyle Shanahan,
the Falcons head into the Super
Bowl LI rematch at New England
scoring nearly 10 fewer points per
game under Sarkisian. Julio
Jones — the star receiver that Bill
Belichick respectfully used two
scout team players to mimic during Super Bowl practices — is tied
for 33rd in the NFL with 25
catches. Bad optics. Per coach
Dan Quinn’s “suggestion,” Sarkisian moved from the sideline to
call plays from the coaches’ booth
... as Shanahan did. No matter.
Sarkisian’s pullback on the running game during the second half
last weekend drew heat as Atlanta blew a 17-point lead in losing to
Miami – just before seeing Tom
Brady and Co., amid reminders of
the Super Collapse. Hello, psychological checkup. Sure, Atlanta’s D has been suspect. But it
could sure use a hand from the
Matt Ryan-armed offense to relieve the pressure.
KEY MATCHUP
A.J. Green vs. Joe Haden. The
prolific Bengals receiver, second
in the NFL in receiving yards, recently ranked Haden as his second-toughest individual matchup
after Patrick Peterson. But it’s
doubtful the zone-heavy Steelers
will put Haden on Green exclu-
IF THE PLAYOFFS WERE TODAY
...
Adrian Peterson rushed for 134 yards and 2 TDs in a 38-33
Cardinals win over the Buccaneers. MICHAEL CHOW MICHAEL CHOW, THE ARIZONA
REPUBLIC-USA TODAY SPORTS
sively. Lured after cut by Cleveland, Haden was just what
Pittsburgh’s secondary needed: a
savvy veteran opposite Artie
Burns. Now, with Green scoring
TDs in three straight games,
comes a chance for the unit to
validate status as the NFL’s No. 1ranked pass defense.
coach Mike McCarthy, too.
Whereas Rodgers sizzled with
deft pre-snap reads, it’s incumbent on McCarthy to break in
Hundley with rollouts and halffield reads. Even better if they
support him with reliable power
running while the improved defense hums.
NEXT MAN UP
ROOKIE WATCH
Brett Hundley. No one expects
much from the unproven, thirdyear UCLA product who coughed
up three picks after relieving Aaron Rodgers (fractured clavicle) at
Minnesota. Which makes him
quite dangerous as the surging
Saints visit Green Bay. No, Rodgers’ shoes can’t be filled. But with
first-team practice reps, Hundley,
a rhythm passer with mobility,
may help keep hope alive. It’s on
Alvin Kamara. Sean Payton
couldn’t create a flow rotating
three backs. Exit Adrian Peterson. Enter more touches for
Kamara, New Orleans’ slippery
third-round pick, complementing
Mark Ingram. The 31 snaps vs.
Detroit in Week 6 matched his
highest activity (Ingram had 47),
nearly doubling his tally from
Week 2 and Week 3, when Peterson had his highest play-counts.
Five NFC teams that made the
playoffs last season — Dallas, Atlanta, Seattle, Detroit and
New York — would be sitting at
home. Only Green Bay, the team
with the QB situation, would be a
repeat qualifier. Translation:
NFC, wide open. In the AFC,
three of the four first-place teams
won their division last year.
DID YOU NOTICE?
DeMarcus Lawrence leads
the NFL with 8 1⁄2 sacks, quite
the out-of-character boost for the
much-maligned Dallas Cowboys
defense. Just one Cowboy has
ever led the league in sacks — and
it was another DeMarcus (Ware),
in 2008 and 2010. Good for Dallas: Lawrence is drawing more
double-teams. Good for Lawrence: This impact is coming in a
contract year.
Follow Jarrett Bell on Twitter
@JarrettBell.
USA TODAY
20T
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
NFL
Five critical Week 7 matchups to watch
Michael MiddlehurstSchwartz
@MikeMSchwartz
USA TODAY Sports
The Atlanta Falcons know the
cost of running out of gas against
Tom Brady.
For three quarters in Super
Bowl LI, the New England Patriots quarterback was stymied by a
relentless pass rush. But when
the pressure let up as the Falcons
tired, Brady threw for 246 yards
in the fourth quarter and overtime to power the largest comeback
ever
in
the
NFL
championship.
In Sunday's rematch at Foxborough, there's little question
Atlanta's defense will need to find
a finishing touch to secure a win.
Brady has been sacked 16 times
this year and on Monday said his
accuracy has not been up to his
usual standard. But the Patriots'
offense still tops the NFL with
412 yards per game, and Brady
trails only Alex Smith of the Kansas City Chiefs with a 106.9 passer rating.
Atlanta's pass rush could once
again prove troublesome for New
England, but the defense has just
12 sacks in five contests. Linebacker Vic Beasley is in his second game back from a hamstring
injury and could pose a problem
on the edge, along with defensive
ends Brooks Reed and Adrian
Clayborn. But the X-factor could
be defensive tackle Grady Jarrett,
who recorded three sacks in the
Super Bowl yet is still looking for
his first of 2017.
Running back James White
could be the Patriots' most effective answer for limiting Brady's
liability against the Falcons' pass
rush. Replicating his record-setting 14-catch Super Bowl performance seems unlikely now that
Atlanta will be keyed in on him,
but he should be an effective asset in keeping New England out
of obvious passing situations and
forcing linebackers to make plays
in coverage.
Here are four other matchups
that will define Week 7 in the
NFL:
Green Bay Packers QB
Brett Hundley vs. New Orleans Saints DE Cameron
Jordan
With Aaron Rodgers on injured reserve after undergoing
surgery on a broken collarbone,
the Packers' season now hinges
on the third-year backup keeping
the offense afloat. That's a tall order for a player with just 44 career
pass
attempts,
yet
teammates and coaches haven't
wavered in their support.
New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady is sacked by Atlanta Falcons defensive tackle Grady Jarrett during Super Bowl LI.
BOB DONNAN/USA TODAY SPORTS
Green Bay has counted on
Rodgers to deliver virtuoso performances, but the same won't be
expected of Hundley. The young
quarterback has struggled at
times to make quick decisions in
the face of the pass rush, as exhibited by the 125 sacks he took
at UCLA in three seasons. Limiting his reads and providing more
short passes may be Mike McCarthy's best bet to establish a
rhythm and keep the offense
flowing.
Jordan reinforced how disruptive he can be last week by recording two sacks and an
interception for a touchdown en
route to earning NFC defensive
player of the week honors. He
poses a significant obstacle for a
Packers offensive line still not at
full strength. With its defense on
the upswing, New Orleans could
dial up the blitz frequently and
challenge Hundley to handle the
pressure.
Arizona Cardinals RB Adrian Peterson vs. Los Angeles
Rams' front seven
Peterson will earn the odd distinction of becoming the first
NFL player to play in London
twice in one year after his trade
from the New Orleans Saints on
Oct. 10. Just three weeks after his
first international trip, the running back finds himself with a far
rosier outlook for the season.
Peterson's 134-yard, twotouchdown performance in his
Cardinals debut not only reinvigorated Arizona's lifeless run
game, but also illuminated what
the 32-year-old can bring to an
offense. He might not made a full
return to the all-pro form of his
earlier years, but he can be a dynamic and consistent threat for a
team willing to showcase him in
the ground game after he was relegated to a complementary role
in New Orleans. With the NFC
wide open, Peterson could be the
key to Arizona making a run for
the playoffs.
In order to make a similar push
for the postseason, the Rams will
have to shore up a run defense
that ranks 29th in the NFL with
139.5 yards allowed per game.
Aaron Donald has maintained an
output warranting defensive
player of the year consideration,
but the defensive tackle needs
more help up front. The defense
also may be without linebacker
Mark Barron, who is questionable with a thumb injury.
Philadelphia Eagles QB
Carson Wentz vs. Washington
Redskins' secondary
While most division races have
remained tight through the first
six weeks, Philadelphia has the
chance to gain some serious separation in the NFC East on Monday. A win would put the Eagles
two and a half games ahead of the
Redskins with the head-to-head
tiebreaker.
Wentz threw for 307 yards and
two touchdowns against Washington in a 30-17 win in the season opener, and the second-year
quarterback has continued to develop in the weeks since. He has
committed just two turnovers in
the last five games while throwing
11 touchdowns. With right tackle
Lane Johnson cleared from concussion protocol, Wentz should
be operating the league's thirdranked offense with nearly a full
arsenal.
The loss of rookie defensive
lineman Jonathan Allen puts an
even heavier burden on Washington's secondary. Cornerbacks
Josh Norman (ribs) and Bashaud
Breeland (knee) are both banged
up, and the ailments could prove
troublesome. The Redskins also
have to contain tight end Zach
Ertz, who had eight catches for 93
yards in the first meeting.
New York Giants RB Orleans Darkwa vs. Seattle Sea-
hawks' front seven
Perhaps one of the most surprising performances of the season came last week, when the
Giants' traditionally pass-happy
attack turned to the ground game
against the Denver Broncos. Big
Blue broke through, with Darkwa's 117 rushing yards powering a
23-10 win.
With Odell Beckham and
Brandon Marshall out for the
season, the Giants might continue to employ a more balanced
approach. Darkwa has to prove he
can replicate last week's performance, but he's a reliable, onecut runner who has averaged 5.7
yards per carry so far this season.
Even more promising for New
York is the progress made by its
offensive line, with the versatile
Justin
Pugh
leading
the
resurgence.
The Seahawks' defense might
appear to be a mismatch for the
Giants, but the unit has had its
share of lapses this season. Seattle ranks an uncharacteristic 27th
in the NFL in rushing yards allowed per game (127.2). But the
unit bottled up Todd Gurley two
weeks ago and will try to force
New York to turn to its injuryriddled passing attack.
QB Wentz living
up to expectations
Mike Jones
@ByMikeJones
USA TODAY Sports
Your eyes don’t deceive you,
those are the Philadelphia Eagles
perched atop the NFC standings
with a 5-1 record.
In less than a year, the Birds
have gone from a last-place finish
(7-9) in the NFC East to a team
that’s playing like one of the
league’s best.
And here’s why.
Naturally, Philadelphia’s improvement starts at quarterback.
As a rookie, Carson Wentz took
his lumps, throwing 14 interceptions to go with 16 touchdown
passes. He struggled under pressure and couldn’t consistently deliver on the money downs.
But now? Wentz is living up to
expectations as the No. 2 overall
pick of the 2016 draft. He’s more
confident, poised and making
better decisions. He has displayed
a greater command of the offense, completing 60.9% of his
passes for 1,584 yards (fifth most
in the NFL) and 13 touchdowns
(tied for second). And with only
three interceptions, Wentz is
rocking a passer rating of 99.6,
which ranks seventh.
Wentz also has used his legs
with greater frequency, rushing
for 133 yards — second most on
the team — and averaging 4.2 per
carry. (Last season, he finished
with 150 yards on the ground.)
But the Eagles’ improvement
stems from more than just
Wentz.
Philadelphia’s front office
worked to give its young star an
improved supporting cast, adding
wide receivers Alshon Jeffery and
Torrey Smith. Running back LeGarrette Blount, a free agent addition, is averaging 5.6 yards per
carry (fifth best in the NFL), and
his 390 yards have eased pressure
on Wentz.
However, continuity could be a
bigger key to the league’s thirdranked offense. Right tackle Lane
Johnson — the Eagles were 5-1
when he was in the lineup last
year — has missed just one game.
Zach Ertz is leading all tight ends
with 34 receptions and 405 yards.
And after two disappointing seasons, former first-rounder Nelson
Agholor is finally making an impact out of the slot.
And perhaps most impressive
of all? The Eagles’ success rate on
third downs. Their 50.6% conversion rate is far and away the
league’s best figure.
Defensively, Philadelphia is the
NFL’s stingiest unit against the
run and holds foes to a 32.9%
success rate on third downs, third
best in the league. The Eagles are
giving up gobs of yards through
the air, but they rank fourth in
takeaways and keep opponents
out of the end zone, surrendering
just 20.3 points per game. That’s
the definition of bend-but-don’tbreak.
The Eagles’ lone loss was a seven-point defeat in Kansas City to
the Chiefs (5-2).
The big question for Philly involves sustainability. But given
the success in so many crucial
categories — third down efficiency on both sides of the ball, turnover ratio (+4) and point
differential (+43) — and the way
the schedule plays out, the Eagles’ prospects appear bright.
Philly hosts a battered Washington team Monday night. Completing a season sweep of the
Redskins would give the Eagles a
key tiebreaker and a 21⁄2-game
lead in the division. Washington
is currently one of just four teams
with a winning record remaining
on the schedule.
And the NFC seems even more
wide open now that Green Bay
Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers might be lost for the season
with a broken collarbone.
Staying healthy and overcoming inexperience, especially for a
player such as Wentz, are always
concerns, especially if the Eagles
reach postseason and have to face
more battle-tested teams.
Is QB Carson Wentz the man who will end the Eagles’ near
six-decade title drought? ERIC HARTLINE, USA TODAY SPORTS
Coach Doug Pederson acknowledged Thursday that a vital
component to playoff success involves attention to detail.
“It’s about doing the little
things now, meaning rest and hydration and extra study, or extra
conditioning, things that sometimes you lose sight of in all the
wins and the success that a team
has had,” Pederson said.
“This is that time of year, we’re
getting in that stretch of games,
seven, eight, nine, 10, 11, where
teams begin to separate themselves. We can’t have any letdowns (or) setbacks. Got to just
be full steam ahead.”
These Eagles have already built
a nice head of steam.
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
21T
NASCAR
Three Cup champs hope to
steer clear of elimination
Randy Covitz
Special for USA TODAY Sports
Toyota’s
NASCAR
success
translates
to car sales
Mike Hembree
CITY,
KAN.
NASCAR
should change the name of Sunday’s Hollywood Casino 400 to
the Champions on the Brink 400.
The Monster Energy NASCAR
Cup event at Kansas Speedway is
an elimination race that culminates the second round of the
playoffs, where the title-eligible
field will be reduced from 12 to
eight drivers.
And three drivers in precarious
positions, on or below the cut
line, are former Cup champions:
Jimmie Johnson, Kyle Busch and
Matt Kenseth. Johnson is clinging to the eighth and final spot,
seven points ahead of Busch and
eight in front of Kenseth.
Another former champion,
2014 title winner Kevin Harvick,
is in fourth place, 15 points above
the cut line.
Johnson, the seven-time and
reigning series champion, would
hate to see his bid for a record
eighth title end before the season
finale at Homestead-Miami
Speedway.
“The position I’m in, chasing
my eighth championship, and the
desire I have to be competitive
week in and week out and being
part of that final four is as high as
it’s ever been,” Johnson said. “It’s
been a tough year in some respects. The speed department has
been a little tough on us. We’ve
been frustrated in the summer
months, and that yielded poor results, and we’ve seemed to be on
the right track in the last few
weeks being competitive and collecting points.”
Johnson, a three-time winner
at Kansas, is wary of Joe Gibbs
Racing teammates Kenseth, a
two-time winner at Kansas, and
Busch, who has averaged a 3.8 finish in his last five races at the
track, including a win in 2016.
“When you think of this track
and the speed the Gibbs cars have
had, it’s been a great track for
Matt and Kyle both,” Johnson
said, “I can go out there and put
myself in a nice position in the
points and maintain this eighth
place on the bubble, and if Matt
or Kyle wins, it shifts that whole
thing down.
“We have to come to the track
with the mind-set of winning,
largely because … speaking of
Matt and Kyle, both are capable
of winning and shifting all the
points around.”
Busch, a four-time winner this
season, finds himself in peril because wrecks the last two weeks
at Charlotte and Talladega left
him with 29th- and 27th-place
finishes, respectively.
KANSAS
@MikeHembree
Special for USA TODAY
Seven-time NASCAR Cup Series champion Jimmie Johnson, right, enters Sunday’s elimination
race at Kansas in eighth place, seven points above the cutoff. ADAM HAGY, USA TODAY SPORTS
“It sucks that you work all year
long in order to build your point
cushion and your stage points
and your race wins and everything for Talladega,” Busch, the
2015 series champion, said of the
unpredictable
restrictor-plate
race. “Then I have Charlotte happen. Unfortunately, it’s my fault
that we had Charlotte happen. If
we would have finished eighth,
let’s say, at Charlotte, we wouldn’t
be talking about it. We would
have used up our point cushion
that we had at Talladega like we
built it for.
“What’s crazy is you can’t have
a mistake on your own. I made a
mistake at Charlotte. We can’t
have that mistake on your own.
You have mistakes brought to you
in part by others at Talladega that
wreck the entire field, and that’s
your championship. We still have
a chance, we’re still open, we’re
still viable. We can still come
through here and win or finish
second in every round and hopefully advance. We’ll see. We just
got to race it out.”
Kenseth, whose 774 led laps in
23 starts are the most of any driver at Kansas, has not won a race
since July 2016 at New Hampshire Motor Speedway, and he
seems fatalistic about his chances
of winning Sunday.
“I feel like I come to the racetrack every week with a chance to
win,” said Kenseth, the 2003
champion who is without a ride
next season. “But it’s been a yearand-a-half since we won. I’m almost sure I’ve never went two
years without winning a race.
“If we don’t run good Sunday,
then we don’t deserve to be in the
next round anyway. It’s a great
racetrack, one I really like. Hopefully we can hit it right this weekend and as a group we can all
execute, perform at a high level
like we’re capable of doing and
move on to next week.”
Two drivers, Martin Truex Jr.,
who’s won a season-high six
races, and Brad Keselowski, the
2012 series champion, already are
locked into the next round of
three races by virtue of their wins
at Charlotte and Talladega, respectively. But they can still have
an impact on the field by winning
at a track where Truex won in
May and Keselowski won in 2011.
Truex won the pole position for
Sunday’s race.
Toyota dominating in 2nd half of season
Mike Hembree
@MikeHembree
Special for USA TODAY Sports
Statistically speaking, the first
and second halves of the Monster
Energy NASCAR Cup Series season have been dramatically different for Toyota.
Toyota drivers won two of the
first 11 races (although they had
some promising runs at tracks
where they didn’t score). The
most recent 11 races? Toyotas
have won eight, including four of
the first five in the playoffs.
Ford ended a 13-race winless
streak with Brad Keselowski’s
last-lap victory Sunday at Talladega Superspeedway. That win
also ended a four-race victory
string by Toyota. Chevrolet is
looking for its first playoff win as
the series moves on to Kansas
Speedway this weekend.
Toyota’s Martin Truex Jr. has
been the season’s dominant driver with six victories — no one else
has more than four — and 19
stage wins. Toyota’s Kyle Busch is
second in stage wins with 13.
“They’re ahead of everybody,
no doubt,” Ford driver Joey Logano said. “They’re the best cars
out there on the racetrack, and a
lot of that is because they’ve done
their homework. They made
some great decisions and they’re
reaping the reward now.
Toyota driver Martin Truex Jr. has six NASCAR Cup Series
victories this season. ADAM HAGY, USA TODAY SPORTS
“Good for them. Not good for
us. We’ve got to go to work.”
It’s a particular plus for Toyota
that its teams seem to be riding a
high at the most critical point of
the season.
“I feel like they started the season not super-strong, kind of
worked their way up as the season went along, and I’d say
they’re peaking at the right time,”
Ford driver Ricky Stenhouse Jr.
said. “I felt like at the beginning
of the season our Fords were
really strong when the Toyotas
weren’t, but I think it’s kind of
flip-flopped now. I feel like Chevy
has kind of maintained that mid-
dle ground.”
Toyota strength sparked a minor debate at the start of the
playoffs when Keselowski, after
four Camrys had led the opening
practice for the first playoff race
at Chicagoland Speedway, tweeted, “We are all in for a rude awakening. Haven’t seen NASCAR let
a manufacturer get this far ahead
since the 70s.”
Toyota’s Denny Hamlin and
Busch were quick to lob responses in Keselowski’s direction,
Hamlin urging Keselowski to
“concentrate on your own program bro.”
Despite Toyota’s clear success
this year (and particularly of
late), Toyota Racing Development President David Wilson
said the playing field is level.
“Our competition in both the
Ford and Chevrolet camps is
right on top of us,” Wilson told
USA TODAY Sports. “To the earlier commentary (by Keselowski), I find it flattering overall. I
try to not let it become a
distraction.
“I think most people understand and appreciate that our
road through the sport has been
very rocky. This is our 11th year
in the Cup series. We have one
manufacturer championship and
one driver championship. To suggest we’ve been dominant is a
gross exaggeration.”
Toyota has won 12 races this
year. Chevrolet has won 10 and
Ford nine. Five races remain.
Toyota drivers have led 53% of
the laps run this year compared
with 25% for Ford and 22% for
Chevrolet.
Wilson said Toyota’s preseason
goal was to have two Camry
teams in the final four at Homestead. That remains quite possible, with Truex virtually a lock
for the final round of the playoffs
and Hamlin, Busch and Matt
Kenseth still in the mix.
Each of the three manufacturers has four drivers in the final
12, with four drivers scheduled to
be eliminated from the playoffs
at Kansas.
When Toyota steered into
NASCAR national series racing in
2004 by dipping its toes into the
Camping World Truck Series,
racing fans didn’t surge forward
to offer an enthusiastic welcome.
In fact, many were appalled
that a car manufacturer based
outside U.S. borders would be allowed to join what traditionally
was a motor sports form reserved
for American car builders. Although many Toyotas are built in
the U.S., the idea that a foreignbased brand would be racing
against full-fledged American
steel such as that found in Fords
and Chevrolets irritated some
fans.
Although some anti-Toyota
sentiment remains (there are anti-Toyota T-shirts with images
and language you probably won’t
encounter in church), the manufacturer has settled into a state of
normalcy in NASCAR circles.
Toyota entered the Cup series
in 2007, scored its first race win
in 2008 and won its first and only
driving title — by Kyle Busch — in
2015.
Although car manufacturers
typically go racing for a number
of reasons, including enhancing
understanding of car performance and testing of potential production-car pieces, the bottom
line is moving cars out of showrooms and into driveways. And
that goal, say Toyota officials, is
being reached.
“Obviously, we like motor
sports, but we entered NASCAR
because we felt that not all of its
tens of millions of loyal and passionate fans had us on their consideration
list,”
Toyota
Motorsports general manager
Keith Dahl told USA TODAY
Sports. “We thought this would
be a way to interact and engage
with fans and hopefully enhance
their experience in the sport and,
in doing so, end up with some
positive results.”
Dahl said Toyota success on
track has led to sales success.
“The trend has been upward
and that trend has increased even
more rapidly over the past 18
months or so as we won the driver championship and the manufacturer championship,” he said.
Dahl said Toyota has conducted telephone and Internet fan
surveys since its arrival in NASCAR. The topic of fan acceptance
of the manufacturer has been
among the issues addressed.
“Most fans recognize that we
make most of the cars we sell
here,” he said. “We’re deeply involved in America. And I think
the championship and the greater
awareness they have of us being
in the sport leads them to recall
and understand the attributes
that we’ve asked them about.
“When you have tens of millions of fans, there’s a bell curve,
but I think we have shifted the
bulk of that curve toward overall
acceptance in the sport.”
A circle of sorts was closed
within the Toyota community in
January when the car builder’s
2018 production Camry model
was unveiled at the Detroit Auto
Show alongside the 2018 Monster
Energy NASCAR Cup Series
Camry — an extremely public
demonstration of Toyota’s commitment to stock car racing.
It was a big moment for Toyota
Racing Development President
David Wilson.
Kyle Busch celebrates after
winning the 2015 NASCAR
Sprint Cup championship.JASEN
VINLOVE, USA TODAY SPORTS
USA TODAY
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017
22T
WEATHER
WEATHER ONLINE
USATODAY.COM
TODAY’S FORECAST
Seattle
60/48r
Helena
62/42r
Portland
63/48r
NATIONAL FORECAST
Bismarck
68/43pc
Portland
63/48s
Billings
68/46pc
Boise
60/44pc
Mpls-St. Paul
64/48s
Albany
74/51pc
Rapid City
73/42pc
Milwaukee Detroit
67/48r
76/59pc Cleveland
80/60pc
Chicago
Pittsburgh
69/50r Indianapolis
77/55pc
Omaha
74/59r
69/45s
St. Louis
Washington
67/52r
Cincinnati 75/59pc
Kansas City
77/58pc
68/43s
Wichita
Charlotte
71/44s
79/61pc
Nashville
Memphis
Tulsa
81/62pc
75/60t
71/45pc
Casper
64/43pc
Sacramento
77/49s
Salt Lake City
69/46s
San Francisco
74/54s
Denver
71/44s
Las Vegas
83/61s
Los Angeles
94/68s
San Diego
85/65s
Phoenix
92/65s
PRECIPITATION
Albuquerque
69/45s
Little Rock
69/53r
Dallas-Fort Worth
75/50pc
Houston
80/52r
El Paso
77/50s
San Antonio
80/49r
Tampa
89/76pc
Alaska
Precipitation
c Cloudy
dr Drizzle
10s
Thunderstorms
f Fog
h Haze
20s
Rain
i Ice
r Rain
pc Partly cloudy s Sunny
30s
Showers
sf Snow flurries
sh Showers
Hilo
85/72sh
Juneau
42/38r
40s
50s
Snow
Miami
89/80pc
Honolulu
88/73pc
Anchorage
33/25c
Below 10
Baltimore
73/53pc
Orlando
87/73pc
Hawaii
Temperatures (°F)
New York
73/60pc
Philadelphia
75/59pc
Charleston
83/68pc
Atlanta
Birmingham 76/66pc
81/69pc
New Orleans
83/66t
Forecasts and
graphics provided by
AccuWeather Inc.
©2017
Boston
71/56s
60s
70s
Snow flurries
sn Snow
w Windy
t Thunderstorms
80s
90s
100s
110+
Ice / wintry mix
Note: The forecast highs are for the 24-hour
period of that day. Low-temperature forecasts
are for the upcoming night.
YOUR SAY
SECOND LOOK
MON
72/59pc
TODAY
MON
Providence
76/55s
74/62pc
Raleigh, N.C.
79/56pc 78/64c
Albany, N.Y.
TODAY
74/51pc
Allentown, Pa.
76/52pc 76/60pc
Reno
73/41s
Atlantic City
71/64pc 74/66pc
Richmond, Va.
76/55pc 78/65c
Augusta, Ga.
82/66pc 79/60t
Rochester, N.Y.
78/57pc 76/60pc
Austin
77/48r
81/54s
San Jose, Calif.
81/52s
Bakersfield, Calif.
75/52s
83/58s
Sarasota, Fla.
88/75pc 86/71t
Baton Rouge
81/59t
74/54pc
Savannah, Ga.
83/71pc 82/63pc
Boise
60/44pc 63/39pc
Shreveport, La.
72/51r
73/55pc
Buffalo
76/59pc 74/59r
South Bend, Ind.
71/52r
63/45r
55/37pc
72/42s
85/57s
Cedar Rapids
64/40pc 66/42pc
Spokane, Wash.
58/39r
Colorado Springs
68/43s
Springfield, Mo.
62/45sh 69/44pc
68/36s
Columbia, S.C.
83/66pc 79/64t
Syracuse, N.Y.
76/54pc 73/61pc
Columbus, Ohio
78/56pc 75/50r
Toledo, Ohio
77/60pc 67/49r
Dayton, Ohio
76/58pc 69/49r
Tucson
91/59s
Daytona Beach
86/75sh 86/71pc
95/63s
Des Moines
66/45s
66/43pc
WORLD FORECAST
Duluth, Minn.
59/42s
58/34c
Athens, Greece
79/62s
Fort Myers, Fla.
89/74pc 89/74t
Baghdad
92/59s
92/62s
Fresno
75/51s
81/53s
Beijing
56/41c
59/37pc
56/44sh 53/44sh
77/62c
Grand Rapids
73/51r
64/45c
Berlin
Greensboro, N.C.
77/57pc
74/62c
Buenos Aires
64/46s
68/52s
Greenville, S.C.
76/63pc 71/59t
Cairo
82/66s
82/67s
Harrisburg, Pa.
75/55pc 76/64pc
Caracas, Ven.
90/78pc 89/78t
Hartford, Conn.
76/53s
Freeport, Bahamas
87/76pc 86/75pc
Huntsville, Ala.
81/65pc 72/52r
Hong Kong
80/70s
80/73s
Jackson, Miss.
78/59r
Jerusalem
73/55s
72/55s
74/59pc
71/52t
Jacksonville
86/73pc 86/66c
Kingston, Jamaica
90/79s
91/78t
Knoxville, Tenn.
79/59pc 71/53r
London
55/49sh
60/54c
Lexington, Ky.
79/59pc 71/49r
Madrid
68/42pc 71/43s
Louisville
80/63pc 70/52r
Manila
87/77pc 87/76c
Lubbock, Texas
73/45s
81/48s
Mexico City
78/55pc 69/48pc
Madison, Wis.
60/42r
64/40pc
Montreal
71/50pc 72/59pc
McAllen, Texas
92/60t
88/59s
Moscow
36/26pc 34/26pc
Mobile, Ala.
80/67t
75/53r
Nassau, Bahamas
90/77pc 90/76pc
Myrtle Beach, S.C.
80/66pc 79/67c
New Delhi
96/68pc 95/67s
Nags Head, N.C.
74/64pc 73/67pc
Paris
56/49c
59/55c
Norfolk, Va.
76/61pc
78/66pc
Rome
71/50t
67/47pc
Oklahoma City
70/44s
76/49s
Sydney
71/57pc
72/59s
Palm Springs
95/70s
102/77s
Tokyo
70/66r
72/55r
Pensacola, Fla.
85/71pc 81/59r
Toronto
73/56pc 70/57c
Tracking the nation’s conversation
TOON TALK
NEW VIEWS
ON TALKERS
AMERICAN LEGACY
The men of American football deserve our thanks and
support. By kneeling, they
are honoring the flag and
the men and women who
have sacrificed their lives for
our country. The players’
statement is clear. They
respect America, but our
country is falling short in
fulfilling the great values of
democracy it espouses. Their
kneeling is not a rejection of
America, it is a plea for our
nation to be all that we embrace. It is a measure of the
players’ courage to take a
unified stand against human
injustice in our country.
Unified dissent is one of
the cornerstones of a democracy. It is a principle that
has been practiced for 802
years, since the signing of
the Magna Carta in 1215. In
that year, a group of rebellious and dissenting barons
in England forced King John
to sign their brilliant document.
The Magna Carta has
become a foundation for
human liberty and justice
around the world, and in the
United States particularly.
We must acknowledge that
it was the positive product of
unified dissent by courageous men.
As this phenomenon for
social justice gains momentum, football will not only
continue to be America’s
foremost sport, it will also
become an acknowledged
leader for civil justice. Now
that will truly be an American legacy.
Robert C. Harris
Surprise, Ariz.
TO COMMENT
MARSHALL RAMSEY, THE (JACKSON, MISS.) CLARION-LEDGER
STEVE BENSON, THE ARIZONA REPUBLIC
GARY VARVEL, THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR
MIKE THOMPSON, DETROIT FREE PRESS
Have Your Say at letters@usatoday.com, facebook.com/usatodayopinion and @USATOpinion on Twitter. All comments are edited for length and clarity. Content submitted to USA
TODAY may appear in print, digital or other forms. For letters, include name, address and phone number. Letters may be mailed to 7950 Jones Branch Drive, McLean, VA, 22108.
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