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USA Today - October 14 2017

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USA TODAY
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2017
1T
IN MONEY
IN LIFE
Social Security
checks to rise 2%
Jackie Chan destroyed
my power-ballad dreams
10.14.17
GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO
IN BRIEF
AUTHORITIES STAND BY
VEGAS SHOOTING TIMELINE
Las Vegas authorities say
they stand by their timeline of
the deadliest shooting in modern U.S. history, which has been
disputed by the hotel where the
gunman opened fire.
Sheriff Joseph Lombardo
told reporters Friday that Stephen Paddock rained down bullets on a concert crowd starting
at 10:05 p.m. Oct. 1. He has said
that six minutes earlier, Paddock sprayed 200 rounds from
his Mandalay Bay room into the
hallway, hitting a security guard
in the leg.
Lombardo pushed back
against criticism about the
timeline, saying he was “absolutely offended” by any suggestion that authorities bungled
the response.
GOP’S COLLINS TO STAY IN
SENATE, SKIP GOV. RACE
Republican U.S. Sen. Susan
Collins announced Friday that
she won’t run for governor because she believes she can do
more good by remaining in
Washington, where she serves
as an important swing vote. Her
announcement was welcomed
by supporters who view her as
an important check on President Trump, with whom she
has crossed on the GOP’s health
care proposal.
MIGRANT RESCUES RAISE
FEAR OF NEW LIBYA SURGE
About 600 migrants rescued
at sea arrived Friday in Sicily —
one of the biggest influxes since
Italy struck a deal with Libyan
authorities to limit migrant
smuggling — raising concerns
of a renewed surge on the Libyan human trafficking route.
The migrants, including
many unaccompanied minors
from sub-Saharan Africa, were
rescued in seven operations
over 36 hours and transported
to Palermo by the German nongovernmental organization SOS
Mediterranee.
They came as three weeks of
fighting around the Libyan city
of Sabratha have destabilized
militias that pledged to help reduce the flow of migrant smuggling across the Mediterranean
Sea.
Trump doubles down on
Obamacare, Iran deal
Ending insurance subsidies
could hurt middle class most
Jayne O’Donnell,
Herb Jackson
and Richard Wolf
USA TODAY
The federal government will
still be covering the cost of
higher premiums for millions
of lower-income people after
President Trump’s decision
late Thursday to stop paying
subsidies that cover consumers’ out-of-pocket health insurance costs.
It’s the higher-income people in some states — the very
ones Trump has claimed were
the victims of the Affordable
Care Act (ACA) — who will be
hit hardest, health policy experts say.
That’s because insurers in
most states priced their plans
higher to account for the loss
of the subsidies and only people earning less than four
times the federal poverty limit
will benefit.
“The two potentially vulnerable groups here are those who
are in counties where insurers
may pull out as a result of this
action and those not eligible for
subsidies to help them pay the
higher premiums,” says Larry
Levitt, senior vice president of
v STORY CONTINUES ON 2T
Getting Tehran to accept
changes is seen as unlikely
Owen Ullmann
and Jim Michaels
@oullmann, @jimmichaels
USA TODAY
President
Trump, who has
called the Iran nuclear agreement
the “worst deal
ever,” has found a way to distance himself from it symbolically without causing an
immediate rupture with Iran or
U.S. allies who want to keep the
accord in place.
Trump announced Friday his
refusal to re-certify Iran’s comANALYSIS
pliance with the 2015 agreement,
which prevents Iran from trying
to develop nuclear weapons for at
least a decade in exchange for relief from international economic
sanctions.
But Trump will not ask Congress to re-impose sanctions right
away, a move that could prompt
Iran to back out of the deal and
resume its nuclear development
program — much to the dismay of
other world powers who signed
onto the deal along with the U.S.
Congress requires the president to certify Iran’s compliance
with the agreement every three
months. Despite Trump’s refusal
v STORY CONTINUES ON 2T
Dumping DACA could cost
schools valuable teachers
And your kids
are likely to feel
the fallout, too
Greg Toppo
@gtoppo
USATODAY
Staff and wire reports
USA SNAPSHOTS©
Supersonic flight
ago
70 years
today
Yehimi Adriana Cambrón Álvarez, 25, an Atlanta high
school art teacher, works on a mural. Álvarez could be
deported if Congress doesn’t act to preserve the Deferred
Action for Childhood Arrivals program for immigrants.
KRISTIN FERRO
Students are “in shock
that I could be taken away
from the classroom.”
U.S. Air Force Captain
Chuck Yeager becomes
the first person to fly faster
than the speed of sound.
SOURCE history.com
MICHAEL B. SMITH AND JANET LOEHRKE, USA TODAY
DAN MACMEDAN, USA TODAY
DYANA BAGBY
Yehimi Adriana Cambrón Álvarez, Cross Keys High School art teacher
Growing up in metro Atlanta,
Yehimi Adriana Cambrón Álvarez
could see Cross Keys High School
from her bedroom window.
Born in Morelia, in Mexico’s
central Michoacán state, a place
hit hard by the drug war, she was
brought to De Kalb County, Ga.,
as a child. Cambrón grew up an
undocumented immigrant, one of
about 11.3 million in the USA. She
graduated from Cross Keys,
earned a studio art degree in 2014
and is deep into her third year
teaching art at her alma mater.
“This has kind of been my
dream, to come back and teach
here,” Cambrón said Tuesday as
she prepped for classes. “This is a
community that I grew up in —
this is where I call home.”
Her plans could soon collapse:
Last month, the Trump administration began winding down Deferred Action for Childhood
Arrivals (DACA), the 2012 Obama
administration program designed
to protect undocumented immigrants brought here as children.
v STORY CONTINUES ON 2T
La Niña watch in forecast as winter approaches
Doyle Rice
@usatodayweather
USA TODAY
La Niña, the cooler sibling of El
Niño, is likely to form over the
next few months, federal government forecasters said Thursday.
Specifically, there’s a 55% to
65% chance that a La Niña will
develop during the fall and winter
of 2017-18, the Climate Prediction
Center said.
The La Niña climate pattern —
a natural cycle marked by coolerthan-average ocean water in the
central Pacific Ocean — is one of
the main drivers of weather in
the U.S. and around the world, especially during the late fall, winter and early spring.
A typical La Niña winter in the
U.S. brings cold and snow to the
Northwest and unusually dry
conditions to most of the southern tier of the U.S., according to
the prediction center.
The Southeast and Mid-Atlantic also tend to see warmer-thanaverage temperatures during a
La Niña winter.
However, the Upper Midwest
into New York and New England
tend to see colder-than-average
temperatures, the Weather Channel said.
Globally, La Niña often brings
heavy rainfall to Indonesia, the
Philippines, northern Australia
and southern Africa.
The prediction center said we
are now under a “La Niña watch.”
The cycle is officially the El Niño
— Southern Oscillation, a see-saw
dance of warmer and cooler seawater in the Pacific Ocean.
Children
slide in the
snow in
Central Park
in January
2016. A La
Niña winter
would mean
colder than
average
temperatures
in New York.
FRANCOIS XAVIER MARIT,
AFP/GETTY IMAGES
USA TODAY
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2017
2T
‘Dems should call me to fix!’ Trump tweets
v CONTINUED FROM 1T
the Kaiser Family Foundation.
Rep. Tom MacArthur, a New
Jersey Republican who negotiated health insurance changes earlier this year that had the backing
of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, says he thinks the
cost sharing subsidies should be
funded through 2019, but “now
we also need to bring down costs
for the next group.”
In some states, including California, insurers only increased
premiums on the silver level
plans lower income people have
Corrections & Clarifications
USA TODAY is committed
to accuracy. To reach us,
contact Standards Editor
Brent Jones at 800-8727073 or e-mail accuracy@usatoday.com.
Please indicate whether
you’re responding to
content online or in the
newspaper.
PRESIDENT AND PUBLISHER
John Zidich
to buy to get the subsidies. That
lessens the impact of Trump’s decision on higher income consumers, Levitt says.
Trump’s move is widely seen as
his most significant one yet to undermine the ACA, which the Republican-led
Congress
and
Trump have so far failed to repeal
and replace.
It came just hours after he
signed an executive order that
would give these higher-income
people who buy their own insurance the option of buying cheaper
and less comprehensive insurance. But that action requires
federal rules, which would take
several months to enact and may
not take effect until the open enrollment period in November
2019.
It’s really just a different pool
of federal funds that covers the
higher rates. The tax credits people who earn less than $98,400
for a family of four receive to lower the cost of silver-level plans on
the exchanges are pegged to the
premium rates. That means as
the rates rise, so do the credits,
according to health policy analysts including Levitt and the Urban Institute.
The lost subsidies to insurers
means the federal government
would spend 18% more on premium tax credits for insurance cus-
tomers than it would have spent
on tax credits and cost-sharing
subsidies combined, according to
the Urban Institute. That would
be another $7.2 billion in 2018,
the Urban Institute said.
That means stopping the subsidies to insurers will actually
cost the federal government
money, not save it.
The White House said Thursday that its decision to stop paying the subsidies was based on a
Justice Department determination that the payments were not
appropriated by Congress. House
Republicans made the same argument in 2014 when they sued the
Obama administration.
Trump tweeted Friday that
“Dems should call me to fix!” the
imploding Obamacare. Rep. Josh
Gottheimer, a New Jersey Democrat and chairman of the 40member, bipartisan House Problem Solvers Caucus, said he
already had.
“We’re ready to sit down and
fix health care,” Gottheimer said.
“This move will singlehandedly
both increase the federal deficit
by $200 billion and spike premiums by more than 20% in New
Jersey next year.”
Insurers in most states assumed the subsidies would not be
continued when they submitted
their rates for 2018.
Compliance denied; Congress
may balk on adding sanctions
v CONTINUED FROM 1T
to do so this time, there are
many reasons why Congress
may be unwilling to take punitive action against Iran on its
own.
For one thing, U.N. inspectors say Iran is in compliance,
and there may be little appetite
for a new crisis involving nuclear weapons on top of the
mounting tensions with North
Korea over its nuclear program.
In addition, the deal has
strong support among businesses eager to sign deals with
oil-rich Iran. Boeing has a $3
billion contract to provide commercial aircraft.
Members of Trump’s own
administration, including Defense Secretary Jim Mattis,
have lobbied against undermining the agreement, which was
also signed by China, France,
Germany, Russia and the United Kingdom. “If we can confirm
that Iran is living by the agreement, if we can determine that
this is in our best interest, then
clearly we should stay with it,”
Mattis recently told Congress.
Trump, Israel and other
critics of the deal, signed by
President Obama, question
whether Iran can cheat and secretly develop nuclear weapons
without detection, an argument
disputed by U.N. inspectors.
These critics also complain
that the lifting of sanctions gives
Iran billions of dollars in new
funds to sponsor terrorist organizations around the world and develop ballistic missiles, which are
not covered under the accord.
While many in Congress share
that view, so long as they refrain
from imposing new sanctions, the
agreement would stay in place,
said Michael Rubin, an analyst at
the American Enterprise Institute. “Decertification isn’t synonymous with walking away from
the deal,” he said.
Rather than push to scuttle the
agreement, Trump plans to call
for new negotiations to modify it.
That approach is a long shot.
It’s possible that the White House
could work with Congress to
threaten severe sanctions as a
way to get Iran to agree to renegotiate, said Luke Coffey, an analyst at the Heritage Foundation.
But he also acknowledged that is
unlikely.
“I don’t see why Iran would
want to renegotiate anything
since the deal is so favorably on
their side,” he said.
EDITOR IN CHIEF
Joanne Lipman
CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER
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DACA’s uncertainty leaves 20,000 teachers in limbo
v CONTINUED FROM 1T
If lawmakers can’t fix DACA,
Cambrón and thousands of
teachers like her could face deportation when their work permits expire — in her case, that
happens in February 2018.
Her students, she said, are
“very aware of what’s happening”
with the program. “It’s very real
for them. They’re just in shock
that I could be taken away from
the classroom like that.”
Nationwide, about 20,000 DACA-eligible teachers — many who
possess Spanish-language skills
that are in high demand — could
be plucked from the classroom if
the program is phased out, the
Migration Policy Institute says.
Losing that many teachers
would have a huge effect on kids,
said Viridiana Carrizales of Teach
For America (TFA), a teacherpreparation program that advocates for DACA. “Every time a
student loses a teacher, that is a
disruption in the student’s learning,” she said.
Given rising student populations, public schools are short by
about 327,000 educators, according to a report Oct. 6 by the Economic Policy Institute, a
D.C.-based think tank.
President Trump sent Congress a list of demands Sunday
that he said “must be included” in
any legislation addressing the status of “DREAMers” such as Cambrón. The requirements include:
uBuilding a border wall.
uHiring thousands of border
guards.
uExpanding electronic employment verification systems.
Democrats rejected the demands. House Minority Leader
Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., called the
proposal “cruel and unacceptable
to the DREAMers, opposed by
the overwhelming majority of
Americans and anathema to the
values of our nation itself.”
DACA’s uncertainty pushed
teachers’ groups to play a more
active role in pressing Congress
to fix it. Last month, American
Federation of Teachers President
Randi Weingarten called Trump’s
move to wind down DACA “a
heartless assault on young immi-
CALIFORNIA WILDFIRES
Home of
‘Peanuts’
creator is
lost; widow
escapes
Trevor Hughes
and Doug Stanglin
@trevorhughes, @dstanglin
USA TODAY
CALISTOGA , CALIF. Firefighters faced another devastating
round of the low humidity, dry
foliage and strong weekend
wind gusts up to 60 mph Friday
as they battle more than 20
blazes in the deadliest week of
wildfires in state history.
The death toll from Northern California’s relentless wildfires increased to 31 with a
report from Sonoma County
Sheriff Robert Giordano Thursday night of two more fatalities.
More than 8,000 firefighters
are battling wildfires that have
burned 191,437 acres. At least
3,500 homes and businesses
have been destroyed and an estimated 25,000 people forced to
flee.
Among the structures destroyed was the Santa Rosa
home of “Peanuts” creator
Charles Schulz. His 78-year-old
widow Jean Schultz escaped
the house, which burned to the
ground, her stepson said
Thursday.
The Schulzes built the home
in the 1970s, and the cartoonist
lived there until his death in
2000. Most of his original artwork and memorabilia are at
the Charles M. Schulz Museum
and Research Center in Santa
Rosa, which escaped the flames.
The biggest blaze has destroyed 34,770 acres and is only
10% contained in Sonoma and
part of Napa counties, the
state’s wine country.
Contributing: The Associated Press
Monk wakes to red sky;
‘That could be my death’
grants and on our communities.”
“The young people covered by
DACA are woven into the fabric
of American society. They contribute to our economic growth
and our diversity,” she said.
Said Cambrón: “People do
think we’re these criminals who
are in hiding, but the reality is
that, especially because of DACA,
we are your teachers, we are your
lawyers. We’re in the professional
sphere now.”
Cambrón said she has been
open about her status. She holds
DACA staff training for her colleagues — and discussion groups
for students. “You build relationships with the students. They
open up to you,” she said. “I can’t
imagine having to leave.”
Drones soar
for research
in skies of
N. Dakota
Monastery residents, guests flee through valley overnight
Wide open spaces
offer an ideal lab for
capability testing
Amber Sandhu
and Jenny Espino
Trevor Hughes
@trevorhughes
USA TODAY
Redding (Calif.) Record Searchlight
UKIAH , CALIF.
Ajhan Jotipalo
Bhikkhu was asleep in his cabin
at the Abhayagiri Buddhist Monastery in Redwood Valley when
he first smelled smoke. It was
about 2 a.m. Monday, and he’d
left his cabin windows open, letting the cold breeze in. He didn’t
even open his eyes.
And then he heard the air
horn.
“As soon as I opened the door, I
could see the whole sky red. I said
to myself, ‘That could be my
death,’ ” he said.
Everyone in the neighborhood
was sounding off air horns. They
had a code: Once every 30 seconds meant someone was injured, and a continuous blast
meant an emergency.
They looked at the blaze trying
to determine which direction it
was coming from. They could see
the flames on the ridge, but they
did not know which direction the
wind would take it.
Jotipalo said a total of 14
monks plus 12 monastery guests
piled into six or seven vehicles
and headed north toward Willits.
They were told heading South
would be dangerous because
power lines were down in the
area.
Motorists evacuating the area
continued honking their horns to
alert neighbors, and some
stopped to assess whether the vehicles would make it down the
narrow road, which meant going
through seven creeks, some of
which still had water.
Jotipalo remembers hearing
something like a propane tank
going off in the distance.
“The trees were exploding,” he
said.
At one point a car pulled over
GRAND FORKS , N. D.
North Dakota’s windswept prairie and farmers’ fields are turning out an
unusual crop: Drones.
One of the nation’s most rural
states, North Dakota has quickly
become one of the leading spaces
for drone research, experimentation and testing.
Space, of course, is the key
word, since the sparsely populated state (pop. 760,000) has plenty
of room to fly. Farmers in particular see the drones as valuable
tools to monitor the state’s 39
million acres of agricultural land
spread across 30,000 farms.
Ajhan Jotipalo Bhikkhu says people were looking out for each
other in fleeing the advancing wildfire. JENNY ESPINO, USA TODAY NETWORK
“We have to
prepare ourselves
that the monastery won’t be
there when we
go back.”
Ajhan Jotipalo Bhikkhu
and helped exchange guests from
one of their vehicles so they could
make it through.
“People were looking after
each other,” he said, tears in his
eyes.
Jotipalo doesn’t know what
happened to the monastery. Fire
maps show a quarter on fire, but
conditions can change at any
moment.
Jotipalo and the 13 other
monks follow Shakyamuni Buddhism, a Thai forest tradition in
which they meditate in nature.
The Abhayagiri Buddhist Monastery just marked 20 years, and
Jotipalo has been there since the
beginning when the 250-acre lot
was nothing but two trailers and
a garage.
He has seen it grow to have a
meditation room, kitchen, and
cabins for each of the monks. He
was expecting next June would
be their grand opening, but now
Jotipalo feels it could be a “grand
closing.”
He talks about his favorite tree,
an oak that overlooks the monastery. “I had never known that was
my favorite,” he said.
It made him realize the beauty
of the property, a favorite trail,
the mountain lions and deer.
“I may never see that again,“
he said. “... We have to prepare
ourselves that the monastery
won’t be there when we go back.”
Pilots Jared Langley and Cory
Vinger fly an octocopter in
Grand Forks. TREVOR HUGHES, USA TODAY
The drones are often far more
sophisticated than the ones consumers can get from Best Buy.
They have sensors that “see” in
infrared and have greater flight
times and maneuverability.
The sensors are already so
good that farmers can count exactly how many cornstalks are
growing in a single acre, allowing
them to save on fertilizer and
fuel.
Grand Forks is home to the nation’s first commercial unmanned
aircraft systems business park,
Grand Sky.
USA TODAY
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2017
3T
The Power of Positive Thinking.
So it was almost a secular sort of
motivational gospel that he
preached publicly around the
world and in his books. I think
Trump drank more from that
motivational stream than he did
from the less readily available
traditional Christian part of Norman Vincent Peale.
Q
You wrote books on the
faith of George Bush and
Barack Obama. This time,
you focused instead on why
Christian conservatives
supported Donald Trump.
Why the different approach?
With Donald Trump, I think
the Christian commitment that
he has, that at least he talks about
today, is relatively newfound. Yes,
he was raised in church. Yes he
was influenced by Norman Vincent Peale. But I don’t think that
we see any evidence of what I
would call a defining Christian
faith, of a Christian faith where
he’s attempting to embrace the
core truths of traditional Christianity, and has people around
him who are perhaps confronting
him on his conduct to some extent. So I didn’t want to write a
book where the title suggested
that there was a long-term defining Christian commitment because I’m not sure that’s there.
Q
You do write that
Trump has a keen
spiritual hunger. What’s
the evidence for that?
His whole relationship with
(televangelist) Paula White, for
example, began because he was
watching television preachers
late at night. He asked her to
create these listening sessions
that he did around the country
with clergy. I talked to many,
many people who were there and
they said, “Look, whatever else
you can say about him, at least he
was interested. He was eager. He
wanted to learn.” He’s been
known to call some of his spiritual advisers relatively recently and
ask about matters of forgiveness.
... I think there is a hunger. Obviously, this is a man who is constantly battling his own demons,
as we know. So I’m not saying
that that hunger overrides or
defines. I am saying it’s there.
Q
Describe the faith
Trump learned from
Norman Vincent Peale,
the main minister in his life
until Peale’s death.
What’s important about Peale
is that Peale personally believed
in the born again brand of Christianity — a relationship with
Jesus, believing in his resurrection, and so on. But, publicly, he
was what we would now call a
motivational speaker. He wrote
Q
Is that what you meant
when you wrote that
Trump has faith, but the
problem for him and for the
nation is that it’s a faith he
learned from Peale?
Top left, Trump takes a seat next to Paula White of the New
Destiny Christian Center. Top right, he signs an executive
order with religious leaders. MICHAEL REYNOLDS, EPA; EVAN VUCCI, AP
Author says
Christian
conservatives
‘own’ Trump
Maureen Groppe l l USA TODAY
WASHINGTON
D
onald Trump, one
of the least religious men ever to
run for the presidency, won with what author Stephen Mansfield calls
the surprising help of religious conservatives. In his new
book, “Choosing Donald Trump:
God, Anger, Hope and Why Christian Conservatives Supported Him,”
Mansfield explains and critiques
that support. Mansfield writes
Christian conservatives were willing to overlook Trump’s behavior
and believe in him “largely because
he spoke of faith like a crusader.”
Mansfield talked with USA TODAY
about that appeal, and why he
thinks Christian conservatives
could end up paying a steep price.
Stephen
Mansfield is
author of
Choosing
Donald
Trump: God,
Anger, Hope
and Why
Christian
Conservatives
Supported
Him. BAKERBOOKS
If the primary minister in
Trump’s life had been Billy Graham, let’s say, or D. James Kennedy, or Jerry Falwell, you would
have had a far different man.
Peale really has two voices. One is
that traditional gospel in the
pulpit. But the other is motivational speak, which we all know
very well now. That’s what
Trump absorbed.
Q
How did Paula White
help deliver the Oval
Office into Trump’s hands?
He had contacted her because
he saw her on TV and he was
impressed. … After he got to know
her and she sort of became the
chaplain to his business, when he
made a head fake to running the
first time, he asked her to start
putting together meetings with
clergy around the country. ... He
began to be exposed to both clergymen from different streams
that he had known well before,
but also began to hear their
concerns. Many of the notes
that he sounded during his
campaign that resonated with
conservative religious Americans ... he acquired in these listening sessions. Skeptics, who
had prominent pulpits, became
believers, so to speak, and helped
deliver the White House.
Q
You use the word anger
in the title of your book,
and you write that while there
was a rise in political rage in
the country in general, that
was also a factor in Christian
conservatives’ support of
Trump. Why were they angry?
I think it’s essential to the
whole issue here. You have to put
your mind inside of the head of a
religious conservative in America,
and accept the fact that they felt
traumatized by the Obama administration and terrified by a
possible Hillary Clinton presidency. ... Remember that Donald
Trump did not get a majority of
evangelical or conservative religious support in the primaries.
But when it got down to where he
was the only viable alternative to
a Hillary Clinton presidency, the
average religious conservative
person in America was angry,
they were fearful and he channeled their rage. And he at least
made head fakes towards the hot
button issues they cared about.
And all of that contributed to his
astonishing numbers among
religious conservatives.
Q
Critics would say
religious conservatives
sold their soul by supporting
Trump, that they overlooked
Trump the man to get
policies they wanted.
I think there is truth to that
not so much regarding the average religious conservative on
Main Street. I think there is truth
in that for a lot of the prominent
religious leaders. The way that
some of the folks on the right,
some of these prominent religious conservative leaders supported Donald Trump, sold him,
helped rebrand him, I think
they’re going to regret. I think
there’s going to be some blowback for them long term. They
knew that they had a crass man.
Q
You write that Christian
conservatives took
responsibility for the
Trump presidency so they
“own him now.” Those are
pretty strong words.
I believe it’s absolutely true. If
they had maintained what I call a
prophetic distance, it would be
different. ... But they gave such
full-throated support, whatever
he does now, they’ve taken ownership of him.
Q
How important was
Trump's pick of Mike
Pence to be his running mate?
I think it was immensely important. People knew or sensed
that Trump was new to conservative Christianity, if not the occasional visitor. But Pence was long
term. He gave them confidence
that Trump would not only reflect their concerns, but wanted
someone like them at the table.
Duterte suspends drug war
to appease ‘bleeding hearts’
After Brexit, foreign
students are fleeing U.K.
schools for U.S., Canada
Move comes prior
to economic summit
set for Philippines
Immigration, visas
among concerns
Jane Onyanga-Omara
Thomas Maresca
USA TODAY
Special for USA TODAY
Britain’s decision to
leave the European Union is putting at risk billions of dollars the
country receives from foreign
students, who increasingly are
choosing to study in the U.S. and
other English-speaking nations.
The United Kingdom is the
second-most popular destination
after the U.S. for international
students, who contributed more
than $33 billion to the U.K.’s
economy in 2014-15.
Now, many of those students
are going to Canada and Australia, in addition to the U.S. as
Britain’s formal 2019 exit from
the EU nears.
A 2016 survey by student
recruitment consulting firm Hobsons found that 30% of international students said they were
unlikely to come to the U.K. to
study following the referendum
earlier that year to leave the EU.
Another 6% said they would definitely not choose Britain to study
as a result of the Brexit vote.
Government
figures
also
showed the number of Indian
students at British universities
fell 10% in the past year because
of concerns about immigration.
The loss is costly. According to
Oxford Economics, spending by
international students in 2014-15
supported 206,600 jobs in U.K.
university towns and cities. International students pay tuition
ranging from $12,000 to $43,000
a year, while British and EU students pay up to $11,380 a year.
Yinbo Yu, 25, an economics
student from China who represents international students in
the National Union of Students,
said some of his friends who did
their undergraduate study in the
U.K. were moving to Australia,
Canada and the United States for
their master’s or further study.
In Australia, nearly 50,000
LONDON
Philippine President Rodrigo
Duterte suspended his controversial war on drugs this week, ending a bloody campaign that
claimed thousands of lives and
brought international condemnation.
“This is better for the bleeding
hearts and the media,” Duterte
said in a speech Thursday. “I hope
I will satisfy you.”
Duterte ordered the country’s
police to disband anti-drug units
and cease Operation Double Barrel, a campaign that targeted
high-level dealers and street
pushers. The crackdown resulted
in almost 3,900 deaths, according
to official police figures.
However, rights groups and
critics claim that thousands more
have been killed in vigilante campaigns and extra-judicial killings.
The moves comes amid a public outcry over the brutal police
killings of three teenagers. This
was “definitely a response to perceived public anger,” said Richard
Javad Heydarian, author of The
Rise of Duterte: A Populist Revolt
Against Elite Democracy.
It comes also a few weeks before the Philippines will face international scrutiny as the
Southeast Asian country hosts
the regional ASEAN economic
summit Nov. 10-11. It will be attended by President Trump and
other world leaders.
In a phone call in April with
Duterte, Trump praised the Philippine leader for “doing an unbelievable job on the drug problem.”
In his address Thursday, Duterte threatened to expel European ambassadors who have been
critical of his drugs war tactics.
“You think we are a bunch of
morons here,” Duterte said. “Now
the ambassadors of those countries listening now, tell me, be-
Filipino relatives mourn for Ephraim Escudero, a victim of
extra judicial killing, during burial rites at a cemetery in San
Pedro, Philippines on Sept. 30. FRANCIS R. MALASIG, EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY
“Duterte’s
decision (to
suspend the
anti-drug
campaign)
appears to be a
response to
growing domestic
outrage.”
Phelim Kine, Asian division deputy
director or Human Rights Watch
cause we can have the diplomatic
channel cut tomorrow.”
A delegation of European lawmakers held a press conference in
Manila on Monday to condemn
the drug killings. Duterte appeared to interpret that as a
threat from the European Union
to have the Philippines removed
from the United Nations.
But the EU said the lawmakers
were not acting as part of an official EU mission. On Sept. 29, a
separate joint statement issued
by 39 United Nations countries
called for an end to the drug
killings.
Duterte took office in June
2016 on a law-and-order platform. He promised to kill 100,000
criminals within the first six
months of his administration.
The drug war has been generally popular in the Philippines,
but the killings of three teenage
boys brought thousands to the
streets in rarely seen protests.
This is the second time Duterte has suspended his drug
campaign. In January, he paused
operations following revelations
that a South Korean businessman
had been killed by anti-drug
police.
“What’s different this time is
that Duterte’s decision appears to
be a response to growing domestic outrage,” said Phelim Kine,
Asian division deputy director or
Human Rights Watch.
Polls about Duterte have been
contradictory. A survey by local
pollster Social Weather Stations
showed his public satisfaction
rating plunging to 48% in September from 66% in June. A separate poll released Friday by
Pulse Research Asia found his approval and trust ratings at 80%.
Chinese students began courses
in 2016, up 23% from 2015. Gary
Fan, a student at the University of
Sydney’s business school, told the
Financial Review website that
one of the draws for him was a
temporary graduate visa that allows students to work in Australia for up to four years after
they graduate.
By contrast, Yu said, the U.K.
government has scrapped a poststudy work visa program and is
now charging them to use the National Health Service. Moreover,
Prime Minister Theresa May’s
government has classified foreign
students as immigrants as part of
a drive to lower net migration to
less than 100,000 a year. Unlimited immigration from EU countries was a major reason the
Brexit referendum passed.
International students contributed more than $33 billion to the U.K economy in
2014-15. CAROLINE SPIEZIO, AP
“The government really has to
look into these issues and find
ways to protect our international
students,” Yu said.
The U.K. government says its
restrictions on foreign students
stem from the fact that many remained in the country illegally after completing their studies.
The government has commissioned a study to be completed by
next September on the impact of
international students.
“The Government strongly
wishes to continue to attract international students to study in
the U.K.,” Home Secretary Amber
Rudd said of the assessment.
USA TODAY
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2017
4T
CALIFORNIA WILDFIRES
Mike White
surveys wildfire damage
Wednesday in
Glen Ellen.
Strong winds
spread flames
fast, giving
people little
time to flee.
Evacuees,
some wearing
masks to
filter the
ever-present
smoke,
gather at
Napa Valley
College on
Wednesday.
JASON BEAN, RENO
GAZETTE-JOURNAL, VIA
USA TODAY NETWORK
JASON BEAN, RENO
GAZETTE-JOURNAL, VIA
USA TODAY NETWORK
Flames consume a home near Oakmont on Tuesday after firefighters were unable to save it. California’s wine country took the brunt of damage. TREVOR HUGHES, USA TODAY
‘I really should be dead
right now,’ survivor says
Wind-driven flames
have ‘nuclear blast’
feel as everything in
the way catches fire
A firefighter
works to
protect
homes along
Bennett
Valley Road
east of Santa
Rosa on
Wednesday.
JASON BEAN, RENO
GAZETTE-JOURNAL, VIA
USA TODAY NETWORK
Most of the Journey’s End mobile home community in Santa
Rosa was destroyed by the fast-moving wildfire that roared
through the community. JAY CALDERON AND RICHARD LUI, USA TODAY NETWORK
When flames swept over the mountain
like a “nuclear blast,” construction
worker and sculptor Paul Hanssen ran
from his burning home, a water-soaked
towel around his head and his dog by his
side and took shelter in a trailer. He
waited for two long hours as winds
howled and embers flew by. When the
fire passed, he emerged, parched with
thirst. He went to a nearby spring and
screamed to see if anyone else was
around. No one answered. Hanssen, 46,
had decided to stay to try to save his
home. But the fire spread too quickly,
pushed by fierce winds. Within a halfhour, the windows blew in and everything inside the house was on fire. “It
was like a nuclear blast wave that hit,”
he said. “The embers were insane. They
penetrated everything and set everything on fire.” So he retreated to the
trailer. When the winds died down, he
came out. Everything had burned. Water
tanks melted. The only things left were
the trailer and a backhoe. “I really
should be dead right now, and the only
reason I lived was an act of God, or
something,” he said.
— The Associated Press
USA TODAY
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2017
5T
MONEY
MONEYLINE
HUNGRY? FACEBOOK
LETS YOU ORDER FOOD
Social media giant Facebook is
expanding the ability to order
food for takeout or delivery
straight from the app or desktop. Facebook says users will be
able to choose from many services such as Delivery.com, DoorDash and ChowNow and
restaurants such as Papa John’s
and Panera. By
launching these
kinds of features,
Facebook is aiming
to be as useful as
possible so that its
2 billion-plus users
stay hooked and
stay longer. There
will be an “Order
Food” section in
Facebook’s Explore
menu. Facebook has
been testing the serFACEBOOK
vice for the past year.
BANK OF AMERICA
EARNINGS TOP FORECASTS
Bank of America’s earnings in
the third quarter came in
stronger than expected, boosted by strength in its consumer
banking business. Overall, the
bank posted a 13% jump in net
income to $5.6 billion. Revenue
in BofA’s consumer banking
division rose 10% to $8.8 billion,
with loans up 8% and deposits
up 9%. Net income in the consumer business was up 15% to
$2.1 billion, which chief financial
officer Paul Donofrio said was
“the highest profit in more than
a decade.” The bank also said
that credit quality “remained
strong.” Donofrio said the bank
was not seeing “consumer
weakness” in its credit card or
mortgage business.
Social Security benefits to
get biggest bump since ’12
SOCIAL SECURITY COLA
WILL BE 2% IN 2018
Social Security cost-of-living
adjustments over the past 10
years (percentage changes):
5.8%
Nathan Bomey
@NathanBomey
USA TODAY
Social Security recipients
will get a 2% increase in benefits in 2018, an amount slightly
lower than what was projected
this summer but up sharply
from the past two years.
The cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) covers more than
61 million Social Security beneficiaries and more than 8 million recipients of Supplemental
Security Income benefits. Some
people get both.
The boost is the highest since
a 3.6% bump in 2012. The aver-
age person will get about $25
more a month. The average
monthly Social Security payment
is $1,258, or about $15,000 a year.
The rate of the increase is tied
to the Consumer Price Index, an
inflation gauge. The Social Security Board of Trustees projected
in July that this year’s increase
would be 2.2%. Though it fell
short of that amount, it came after an increase of 0.3% for 2017
and no change in 2016.
Advocates for seniors claim the
inflation index doesn’t accurately
capture rising prices faced by
seniors, especially for health care.
“It’s squeezing them. It’s causing them to dip into savings more
quickly,” said Mary Johnson of
the Senior Citizens League. “The
lifetime income that they were
counting on just isn’t there.”
Some conservatives said the
inflation index is too generous
because when prices go up, people change their buying habits
and buy cheaper alternatives.
For upper-income retirees, the
gains will be partially offset by an
increase in the maximum
amount of earnings subject to Social Security tax, which will jump
1.2% to $128,700. The government will increase the earnings
limit for retirees younger than 66.
The limit for that category will
rise 0.7% to $17,040, so their
benefits will fall by $1 for every $2
above that amount that they earn.
5%
4%
3%
2%
2%
1%
’09
’18
SOURCE Social Security Administration
JIM SERGENT, USA TODAY
Contributing: The Associated Press
Feds crack
down on
student
loan scams
Debt ‘forgiveness’
fraud netted $95M
Nathan Bomey
WIS. BOARD TO DISCUSS
FOXCONN IN PRIVATE
Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker’s
job-creation agency is set to
meet behind closed doors next
week to continue discussions on
a contract with Foxconn Technology Group. The company wants
to build a flat-screen manufacturing campus in Mount
Pleasant. Walker signed a
$3 billion incentives package for
the company last month.
@NathanBomey
USA TODAY
Chairwoman Michelle Lujan Grisham, D-N.M., spearheaded the letter to 32 tech firms.
CHIP SOMODEVILLA, GETTY IMAGES
Congressional
Hispanic Caucus calls
out tech industry
U.K. FINANCE CHIEF WALKS
BACK BREXIT COMMENTS
Britain’s finance chief quickly
backed away from comments
that risked inflaming the Brexit
talks Friday, saying he regretted
describing the European Union
as “the enemy” during a TV
interview. Chancellor Philip
Hammond retreated from the
potentially volatile comments
moments after they aired on Sky
News, saying on Twitter that he
was “making the point that we
are united at home. I regret I
used a poor choice of words.”
Community is ‘wellpositioned’ but needs
‘a seat at the table’
DOW JONES INDUSTRIAL AVG.
Jessica Guynn
22,950
@jguynn
USA TODAY
30.71
22,900
4:00 p.m.
22,872
22,800 9:30 a.m.
22,750
22,841
22,700
FRIDAY MARKETS
INDEX
The Congressional
Hispanic
Caucus,
alarmed that technology and
gig-economy companies are not
hiring Hispanics as employees,
vendors and consultants, is
turning up the heat.
In a letter sent to 32 top
companies, Rep. Michelle Lujan
Grisham, D-N.M., chairwoman
of the Congressional Hispanic
Caucus, and Rep Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, first vice chair,
asked for detailed diversity statistics and an accounting of how
much partnership and philanthropic spending is allocated to
Hispanic-serving and Hispanicled institutions.
“The tech sector employs
7 million people in the U.S. and
accounts for more than $1.3
trillion in economic activity in
the nation’s economy. Unfortunately, in tech and ‘gig economy’ companies, Hispanics are
routinely
underrepresented
and underfunded,” they wrote.
Apple, Airbnb, Facebook,
Google, Microsoft and Uber
were among the companies to
receive a letter from the Congressional Hispanic Caucus.
By 2060, more than a quarter
of the U.S. population will be
Latino, representing more than
$1 trillion in economic power
and a major opportunity for the
tech industry to appeal to a
tech-savvy group with its prod-
SAN FRANCISCO
22,850
CLOSE
CHG
Nasdaq composite
6605.80 x 14.29
S&P 500
2553.17 x
2.24
T-note, 10-year yield
2.27% y
0.05
Oil, light sweet crude
$51.45 x
0.85
Gold, oz. Comex
$1301.50 x
8.20
Euro (dollars per euro) $1.1817 y 0.0019
Yen per dollar
111.89 y
0.33
SOURCES USA TODAY RESEARCH, MARKETWATCH.COM
USA SNAPSHOTS©
Background
checks?
28%
of small-business owners
have never performed
background checks when
hiring employees.
SOURCE 2017 Cox Small Business Security
Survey of 662 small-business owners
JAE YANG AND KARL GELLES, USA TODAY
Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-Texas.
ROBERT DEUTSCH, USA TODAY
“Unfortunately, in tech
and ‘gig economy’
companies, Hispanics
are routinely
underrepresented and
underfunded.”
Letter to 32 companies from the
Congressional Hispanic Caucus
ucts and services.
Yet in Silicon Valley tech companies, Latinos comprise a distinct minority, making up 6% of
employees, versus the 22% of employees in non-tech firms in the
area, according to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.
Hispanics
are
also
underrepresented nationwide in
the tech sector at 8% of employees and 3% of executives. At major Silicon Valley tech companies
such as Google and Facebook,
that percentage is far smaller.
Top universities turn out black
and Hispanic computer science
and computer engineering graduates at twice the rate that leading
technology companies hire them,
a USA TODAY analysis showed.
Minorities are also sharply underrepresented in non-technical
jobs such as sales and administra-
tion, with African Americans faring noticeably worse than
Hispanics, according to USA TODAY research.
The Congressional Hispanic
Caucus is following the example
of the Congressional Black Caucus, which has been pressing Silicon Valley on diversity. It
launched the Tech 2020 initiative, a campaign to boost recruitment of African Americans in the
industry over the next five years.
Next week, the Congressional
Black Caucus is sending a second
delegation to Silicon Valley for
meetings with top tech firms.
Some of the pointed questions
Hispanic lawmakers asked: How
many Hispanics are senior executives or on the board of directors?
Who are the three most senior
Hispanics? How many Hispanic
full-time employees are employed in public policy, federal
government relations, state and
local government relations, public
relations/communications,
marketing and legal? How many
Hispanics lead those departments? How many Hispanicowned firms do companies contract with?
Lawmakers say the information will provide a baseline on
staffing and corporate social responsibility priorities for the
companies.
“The Hispanic community in
the United States has played and
will continue to play a pivotal role
in the social, economic and political development of our country.
As we look to the future, the Hispanic community, as the nation’s
largest minority group, is wellpositioned to help lead the way as
our economy undergoes its most
recent transformation,” the letter
reads. “But we cannot do so if we
are not given a seat at the table.”
Federal and state authorities
are coordinating a crackdown
on scammers who falsely offer
people help with student loan
forgiveness.
The Federal Trade Commission, 11 states and the District
of Columbia said Friday they
collectively had taken 36 actions against scammers who allegedly racked up more than
$95 million in illicit fees
through student debt relief offers. Scammers targeting Americans with more than $1.4
trillion in student loan debt
have tricked countless people
into paying for bogus services,
including loan forgiveness or
payment reductions.
The new initiative, dubbed
“Operation Game of Loans,” has
involved coordinated action by
the U.S. Department of Education, the U.S. Postal Inspection
Service, attorneys general in
several states, local law enforcement agencies and other authorities and regulators.
“Winter is coming for debt
relief scams that prey on hardworking Americans struggling
to pay back their student loans,”
FTC acting Chairman Maureen
Ohlhausen said in a statement.
To avoid falling prey to these
scams, watchdogs recommend:
uDon’t trust anyone offering fast loan forgiveness.
uDon’t pay upfront fees.
uRemember that criminals
can fake government seals.
uDon’t share your Federal
Student Aid website username
and password with anyone.
uIf you need help, you can
apply for deferments and forgiveness directly through the
Education Department or your
loan servicer.
In the largest alleged scam
targeted by the FTC and other
agencies, Student Aid Center
President Ramiro FernandezMoris and two other defendants are accused of bilking student loan borrowers of
$35 million in fees “by enticing
consumers to sign up for services using misleading and false
claims,” the FTC said. That case
was disclosed in May.
The FTC and the state of
Florida recently won a summary judgment against FernandezMoris in a federal court case,
the agency said Friday.
In another part of the operation, the FTC accused a company called Strategic Student
Solutions of receiving more
than $11 million for false promises to eliminate student loans
and pledging “nonexistent
credit repair services.”
USA TODAY
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2017
6T
AMERICA’S MARKETS
THE MOTLEY FOOL A FOOLISH TAKE
ALL THE MARKET ACTION IN REAL TIME.
MARKETS.USATODAY.COM
STORY STOCKS
10 biggest landowners in U.S.
Price: $11.94
rank
Kroenke
MALONE AT
fourth on the latest
John Maxfield
TOP OF LIST
Land Report. Other
The Motley Fool
notable ranch ownIn millions of acres
owned:
ers on the list inJohn Malone
2.2
Every year, The
clude Ted Turner,
Ted Turner
2.0
Land Report docuthe Singleton family
Emmerson family
1.95
ments the biggest
and the King Ranch
Stan Kroenke
1.38
landowners in Amerheirs.
Reed family
1.37
ica. To make it into
The rest of the 10
Irving family
1.25
the top 10 for the
biggest landowners
Singleton family
1.1
most recent year,
in the USA are ownBrad Kelley
1.0
King Ranch heirs
0.91
you’d have to own
ers of timberland.
Pingree heirs
0.83
nearly 1 million
The
Emmerson
SOURCE THE LAND REPORT
acres. The No. 1 perfamily is the nation’s
son on the list, John
second-largest lumMalone, who built a fortune in ber producer, controlling nearly 2
the media business, owns a re- million acres of timberland in
ported 2.2 million acres.
California and Washington.
Last year, Stan Kroenke —
The Reed and Irving families
owner of the Los Angeles Rams, are similarly major timber proDenver Nuggets and other sports ducers. Together, these landownfranchises — bought the 510,527- ers control about 14 million acres.
acre Waggoner Ranch, which That’s meaningfully larger than
spans six Texas counties. With his the state of Maryland (7.9 million
other holdings, that’s enough to acres).
Shares of the maker of Twinkies and other snacks
reached their low for the year after a leadership
change announcement. President and CEO Bill Toler said he would resign by March 1 and remain a
board member. The company’s COO left in August.
Change
-$1.49
% chg
-11.1%
$15
SPX
+2.24
INDUSTRIAL AVERAGE
CHANGE: +.1%
CLOSE: 22,871.72
YTD: +3,109.12
PREV. CLOSE: 22,841.01
YTD % CHG: +15.7% RANGE: 22,855.93-22,905.33
Change
-$0.18
% chg
-0.3%
Change
$1.19
% chg
0.7%
Oct. 13
4-WEEK TREND
Qualcomm
$60
The chipmaker is taking a shot at Apple in a patent
infringement fight, filing lawsuits in China seeking
to ban the sale and manufacture of iPhones in the
country. Most iPhones are made in China.
$52.82
$50
Sept. 15
Price: $173.74 Day’s high: $174.65 Low: $173.20
4-WEEK TREND
Facebook
$200
The social network announced new options, “Order
Food” and “Marketplace.” The “Order Food” app —
which has been tested over the past year — allows
users to order from local restaurants. “Marketplace”
lets users browse items for sale nearby.
Oct. 13
$173.74
$150
Sept. 15
Oct. 13
S&P
500
22,871.72
23,000
STANDARD & POOR'S
CHANGE: +.1%
CLOSE: 2,553.17
YTD: +314.34
PREV. CLOSE: 2,550.93
YTD % CHG: +14.0% RANGE: 2,552.09-2,557.65
NASDAQ
RUT
RUSSELL
+14.29
COMPOSITE
-2.50
RUSSELL 2000 INDEX
20,000
April
Oct.
6,605.80
NASDAQ COMPOSITE
CHANGE: +.2%
CLOSE: 6,605.80
YTD: +1,222.68
PREV. CLOSE: 6,591.51
YTD % CHG: +22.7% RANGE: 6,602.20-6,616.58
CHANGE: -.2%
CLOSE: 1,502.66
YTD: +145.53
PREV. CLOSE: 1,505.16
YTD % CHG: +10.7% RANGE: 1,502.22-1,508.21
S&P 500’S BIGGEST GAINERS/LOSERS
Company (ticker symbol)
Price
HP (HPQ)
21.71
Rating raised on market share, supplies business growth.
$ Chg
YTD
% Chg % Chg
+1.31
+6.4 +46.3
240.51 +13.70
+6.0
+11.1
Viacom (VIAB)
Average strong buy rating, shares jump early.
26.00
+5.8
-25.9
230.86 +10.72
+4.9
+1.0
Ulta Beauty (ULTA)
Makes up some of loss on stock rating cut.
198.58 +8.42
+4.4
-22.1
326.45 +12.28
+3.9
+2.7
+16.9
Mosaic (MOS)
Up another day since strong rating by analyst.
21.78
+.55
+2.6
-25.7
94.40
+2.32
+2.5
+21.9
Cerner (CERN)
73.57 +1.82
Reaches 2017 high as conference highlights opportunities.
+2.5 +55.3
Price
$ Chg
YTD
% Chg % Chg
57.68
-6.82
-10.6
-5.1
J.B. Hunt Transport (JBHT)
Third-quarter earnings miss estimates.
104.01
-4.34
-4.0
+7.1
Centene (CNC)
Dips on government plan to stop subsidies.
90.56
-3.12
-3.3 +60.3
Anthem (ANTM)
183.83
Declines with peers in negative political environment.
-5.91
-3.1
+27.9
Wells Fargo (WFC)
Third-quarter results came up short.
-1.52
-2.8
-2.6
PG&E (PCG)
Investors wonder about connection to wildfires.
Oct.
Fund, ranked by size
Vanguard 500IdxAdmrl
Vanguard TtlSMIdxAdmrl
Vanguard InsIdxIns
Vanguard TtlSMIdxInv
Vanguard TtInSIdxInv
Vanguard TtlSMIdxIns
Vanguard InsIdxInsPlus
Vanguard TtInSIdxInsPlus
Fidelity Contrafund
Vanguard WlngtnAdmrl
April
53.69
-1.58
-2.6
-36.3
Time Warner (TWX)
100.94
Doesn’t make up early dip as fund manager reduces.
-2.44
-2.4
+4.6
147.17
-3.50
-2.3
+4.8
Envision Healthcare (EVHC)
40.74
Negative political atmosphere, shares move lower.
-.91
-2.2
-35.6
Under Armour (UAA)
Dips as Amazon makes push into activewear.
-.36
-2.2
-44.3
16.19
SOURCE: BLOOMBERG AND THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Oct.
MARKET PERFORMANCE BY SECTOR
NAV
235.87
63.91
232.71
63.89
17.92
63.92
232.72
119.89
123.99
73.23
Chg.
+0.22
+0.04
+0.21
+0.04
+0.07
+0.04
+0.20
+0.48
+0.26
+0.07
4wk 1
+2.4%
+2.7%
+2.4%
+2.7%
+2.4%
+2.7%
+2.4%
+2.4%
+2.5%
+1.9%
YTD 1
+15.8%
+15.5%
+15.8%
+15.4%
+24.0%
+15.5%
+15.8%
+24.1%
+26.8%
+10.7%
PERFORMANCE
DAILY YTD
SECTOR
Technology
0.5%
25.1%
Health care
-0.3%
19.6%
Materials
0.5%
17.4%
Industrials
-0.2%
15.8%
Financials
unch.
12.4%
0.5%
12.1%
-0.7%
11.5%
Consumer staples
0.2%
5.5%
Telecom
0.1%
2.0%
-0.1%
-9.5%
1 – CAPITAL GAINS AND DIVIDENDS REINVESTED
ETF, ranked by volume
SPDR Financial
iShs Emerg Mkts
SPDR S&P500 ETF Tr
VanE Vect Gld Miners
iShares Brazil
ProShs Ultra VIX ST
Barc iPath Vix ST
US Oil Fund LP
PowerShs QQQ Trust
CS VelSh 3xLongNatGs
Ticker
XLF
EEM
SPY
GDX
EWZ
UVXY
VXX
USO
QQQ
UGAZ
Close
26.13
46.66
254.88
23.84
43.34
16.72
35.34
10.37
148.34
10.99
Chg.
+0.01
+0.42
+0.24
+0.12
+0.40
-0.64
-0.63
+0.14
+0.57
+0.16
% Chg
unch.
+0.9%
+0.1%
+0.5%
+0.9%
-3.7%
-1.8%
+1.4%
+0.4%
+1.5%
%YTD
+12.4%
+33.3%
+14.0%
+14.0%
+30.0%
unch.
unch.
-11.5%
+25.2%
-76.2%
INTEREST RATES
MORTGAGE RATES
Type
Prime lending
Federal funds
3 mo. T-bill
5 yr. T-note
10 yr. T-note
Type
30 yr. fixed
15 yr. fixed
1 yr. ARM
5/1 ARM
Close 6 mo ago
4.25%
4.00%
1.16%
0.91%
1.06%
0.80%
1.90%
1.76%
2.27%
2.24%
SOURCE: BANKRATE.COM
Commodities
Close
Prev.
Cattle (lb.)
1.13
1.12
Corn (bushel)
3.53
3.49
Gold (troy oz.)
1,301.50 1,293.30
Hogs, lean (lb.)
.60
.61
Natural Gas (Btu.)
3.00
2.99
Oil, heating (gal.)
1.80
1.77
Oil, lt. swt. crude (bar.)
51.45
50.60
Silver (troy oz.)
17.36
17.21
Soybeans (bushel)
10.00
9.92
Wheat (bushel)
4.39
4.31
Chg.
+0.01
+0.04
+8.20
-0.01
+0.01
+0.03
+0.85
+0.15
+0.08
+0.08
% Chg.
+0.4%
+1.1%
+0.6%
-0.5%
+0.4%
+1.8%
+1.7%
+0.8%
+0.8%
+2.1%
Close
.7523
1.2482
6.5874
.8462
111.89
18.9779
Utilities
Energy
CBOE VOLATILITY INDEX
Measures expected market volatility
based on S&P 500 index options pricing:
% YTD
-5.2%
+0.2%
+13.2%
-8.7%
-19.4%
+5.4%
-4.2%
+8.9%
+0.4%
+7.7%
20
9.61
Close
12,991.87
28,476.43
21,155.18
7,535.44
49,981.94
Prev.
.7533
1.2457
6.5891
.8448
112.22
18.7823
Prev.
12,982.89
28,459.03
20,954.72
7,556.24
49,962.79
40
6 mo. ago
.7996
1.3314
6.8830
.9423
109.16
18.5857
Yr. ago
.8161
1.3191
6.7257
.9047
103.60
18.9069
-0.30 (-3.0%)
S&P 500 P/E RATIO
The price-to-earnings ratio, based on
trailing 12-month “operating” earnings:
15
FOREIGN MARKETS
Country
Frankfurt
Hong Kong
Japan (Nikkei)
London
Mexico City
30
10
0
FOREIGN CURRENCIES
Currency per dollar
British pound
Canadian dollar
Chinese yuan
Euro
Japanese yen
Mexican peso
Consumer discret.
Close 6 mo ago
3.77%
3.87%
3.01%
3.05%
3.17%
3.12%
3.33%
3.16%
COMMODITIES
Signet Jewelers (SIG)
60.01
Extends losing streak as fund manager decreases.
McKesson (MCK)
Shares fall ahead of opioid crisis coverage.
2,300
April
TOP 10 EXCHANGE TRADED FUNDS
+.96
2,553.17
2,550
-13.5
CF Industries (CF)
36.80
Extends winning streak since dividend declaration.
Company (ticker symbol)
6,600
TOP 10 MUTUAL FUNDS
+1.43
Alliance Data Systems (ADS)
Strong monthly data push shares higher.
Tiffany (TIF)
Buy recommended, shares jump early.
STANDARD & POOR’S 500
5,600
Everest Re Group (RE)
Pricing might rise after hurricanes.
Chipotle Mexican Grill (CMG)
Shares rise as company teams with Facebook.
LOSERS
Sept. 15
Price: $52.82 Day’s high: $53.38 Low: $52.74
COMP
GAINERS
$11.94
$9
DOW JONES INDUSTRIALS
DOW
JONES
DJIA
4-WEEK TREND
Hostess Brands
MAJOR INDEXES
+30.71
Day’s high: $12.40 Low: $11.61
Change
+8.98
+17.40
+200.46
-20.80
+19.15
7.5
%Chg. YTD %
+0.1% +13.2%
+0.1% +29.4%
+1.0% +10.7%
-0.3% +5.5%
unch.
+9.5%
SOURCES: MORNINGSTAR, DOW JONES INDEXES, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
IN-DEPTH MARKETS COVERAGE
USATODAY.COM/MONEY
21.22
22.5
30
0
SOURCE BLOOMBERG
+0.02 (+0.1%)
Financial scandal continues to haunt Wells Fargo
Kevin McCoy
@kmccoynyc
USA TODAY
The ghosts of financial scandals past continue to weigh down
Wells Fargo’s present and future.
The U.S. banking giant said Friday that its quarterly profit from
July through September dropped
nearly 19%, an announcement
that sent Wells Fargo shares
down 2.7% to $53.69 on Friday.
The San Francisco-based company is coping with a scandal over
JUSTIN SULLIVAN, GETTY IMAGES
millions of unauthorized accounts and investigations of its
mortgage practices.
Wells Fargo reported net income of $4.57 billion, or 84 cents
per share, in the third quarter,
compared with $5.64 billion, or
$1.03 a share, a year earlier.
Results were hit by $1 billion in
upcoming legal costs tied to investigations of the bank’s mortgage-lending practices. The cost
reduced earnings per share by 20
cents and are not tax-deductible.
Wells Fargo CEO Tim Sloan acknowledged the financial impact
of the mortgage-related accrual
in a statement released with the
quarterly results. He said the
bank achieved growth in average
deposits, as well as in residential
mortgages, credit cards and sub-
scription finance.
Even the weather has been a
problem. Wells Fargo said it budgeted $450 million in reserve coverage for losses from the recent
hurricanes that battered Texas,
Florida and Puerto Rico.
Although Wells Fargo has reported
consistent
earnings
growth that typically outpaced its
major bank peers, the company’s
financial performance was badly
hobbled by the scandal over unauthorized accounts.
The scandal made national
news and startled consumers in
September 2016 as the bank was
hit with $185 million in penalties.
They were part of a settlement
with the Consumer Financial
Protection Bureau, the Office of
the Comptroller of the Currency
and Los Angeles legal officials. Investigators in those agencies said
Wells Fargo secretly opened millions of deposit and credit-card
accounts that harmed customers.
The investigators found that
the bank boosted its sales figures
by secretly opening the accounts
— then funding them by transferring money from customers’ authorized accounts without their
knowledge or permission.
USA TODAY
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2017
7T
LIFE
LIFELINE
STYLE STAR
Emma Stone sported a black Givenchy jumpsuit with
oversized florettes
during the gala
screening of ‘Killing
of a Sacred
Deer’ at the 2017
BFI London Film
Festival.
WIREIMAGE
THEY SAID WHAT?
THE STARS’ BEST QUOTES
“I set myself out to win one
game. I had no idea I’d be
this wildly successful. I had no
idea I’d find it, honestly, this
easy.” — Jeopardy! champ
Austin Rogers after his loss on
Thursday’s show, ending a
12-game winning streak that
netted him a total of $411,000.
MOVIES
Rebecca Hall’s
empowering
journey to
‘Professor
Marston’
ALEX TREBEK AND ROGERS BY CAROL KAELSON, AP
MAKING WAVES
Congratulations are in
order for Mindy
Kaling, who
revealed the
sex of her baby
on Friday’s
‘Ellen DeGeneres Show.’
WARNER BROS.
“I am not waiting,” Kaling told DeGeneres. “I
wanted to know way early. I’m
having a girl.”
CAUGHT IN THE ACT
Chris Hemsworth poses with a
fan at the Australian premiere
of ‘Thor: Ragnarok.’
LISA MAREE WILLIAMS, GETTY IMAGES
USA SNAPSHOTS©
Staying out of
the kitchen
51%
1%
of Americans admit
mit to
ordering takeout because
ause
they don’t want to cook.
k
SOURCE Sun Basket survey of 1,000 adults
MICHAEL B. SMITH AND VERONICA BRAVO, USA TODAY
ROBERT DEUTSCH, USA TODAY
She finds inspiration
in little-known history
of ‘Wonder Woman’
Patrick Ryan
USA TODAY
NEW YORK Like many women
seeing a female superhero lead a
movie for the first time in a decade, Rebecca Hall got emotional
watching Wonder Woman in
theaters this summer.
“The moment I saw her go
into battle, I was just profoundly moved,” Hall says. “I found Elizabeth Marston (Rebecca Hall), William Marston (Luke
myself saying, ‘Why am I moved Evans) and Olive Byrne (Bella Heathcote) enjoy a unique bond
(by this) more so than any other in Professor Marston and the Wonder Women.
action film ever?’ And I realized CLAIRE FOLGER, ANNAPURNA PICTURES
with Robinson’s script, which was
it was just a basic question of
erotic without being gratuitous
representation: I had not seen a
and treated their polyamory as a
woman save the world.”
serious relationship between
That she’s now at the center
three consenting adults rather
of her own superhero origin stothan a sexual kink.
ry made it all the more gratifyEspecially in their sex scenes
ing for the British actress, who
involving bondage and role play,
co-stars with Luke Evans and
“it was important to me that they
Bella Heathcote in Professor
don’t feel exploitative,” Robinson
Marston and the Wonder Womsays. “I was more concerned with
en (in theaters Friday). The senthe emotional leaps they were
suous period drama tells the
taking with each other, and that
little-known true story of Wonthe two women were leading and
der Woman creator William
not following.”
Marston (Evans), a psychologist
Eventually moving in together
who in the 1920s began a polyaand starting a family, the Marmorous relationship with his Bella Heathcote, left, stars as
stons and Byrne determine “how
brilliant academic wife, Eliza- Olive Byrne and Rebecca Hall
they are going to pay the bills and
beth (Hall), and research assis- as Elizabeth Marston.
CLAIRE FOLGER, ANNAPURNA PICTURES
raise children,” Hall says. “I
tant, Olive Byrne (Heathcote).
thought that was radical: to write
The women’s strong personalities and devotion to each oth- an and wanted to option the such a conventional love story
er went on to inspire the iconic book, until she learned director about such unconventional peocomic book character, whose Angela Robinson already had ple.”
Hall, too, had a somewhat unwritten a big-screen version,
core values are love and truth.
Hall, 35, first read about the which she had meticulously re- conventional upbringing. Her faMarstons in Jill Lepore’s The searched for nearly a decade. The ther, director Peter Hall, and
Secret History of Wonder Wom- actress immediately was taken mother, opera singer Maria Ew-
ing, fostered her love for the arts
from an early age. Growing up in
the rural English countryside, she
was not exposed to Wonder Woman or other comic books. Instead,
she found her female role models
in 1930s and ’40s films starring
Barbara Stanwyck, Bette Davis
and Katharine Hepburn.
“I wanted heroines when I was
young: strong women I knew, like
my mother,” Hall says. “I couldn’t
see them anywhere, so I was
drawn to that period.”
She discovered Wonder Woman while researching for Professor
Marston: first, reading the original comics, which were controversial in the 1940s for perceived
depictions of lesbianism and
bondage, before moving to modern iterations of the character.
The actress entertains the idea
of doing another superhero
movie, but only if it’s a better experience than Iron Man 3. Her
character, Maya Hansen, initially
was written as the blockbuster’s
big baddie but was greatly reduced when Marvel Studios decided “that toy won’t sell as well if
it’s female,” which director Shane
Black later revealed in an interview with Uproxx.
“The whole ‘you can’t possibly
have a female villain because it
wouldn’t sell dolls’ — I think
that’s past and they’re correctly
trying to right their wrongs,” Hall
says, noting Cate Blanchett’s upcoming evil role in Thor: Ragnarok. “But I wouldn’t want to fall
into that accident again of playing
a supporting role that was meant
to be more interesting and then
get sidelined, mostly because I’m
a lady.
“If I went into that again, I’d
want to be right front and center.
I’d love that.”
TELEVISION
‘The Good Doctor’ is still in; ‘The Gifted’ gets lifted
Gary Levin
TOP 10
MOST-TALKED-ABOUT
NEW TV SHOWS
@garymlevin
USA TODAY
1. The Good Doctor (ABC)
Two weeks into the fall TV season, viewers are making up their
minds about which new shows
are resonating.
ABC’s The Good Doctor, fall’s
most popular new drama, also
generated the most talk among
researcher Engagement Labs’
panel of 1,450 Americans ages 13
to 69, according to data provided
exclusively to USA TODAY.
NBC’s Will & Grace and CBS
comedy Young Sheldon — also the
top-rated newcomers, according
to Nielsen — were still generating
talk, though Will’s was turning
more mixed than positive.
And all three new Fox series,
though far from the most popular, won buzz, led by Marvel series The Gifted, which jumped
from the eighth-most-talked
about in premiere week to No. 5
last week after its premiere Oct.
2. Will & Grace (NBC)
3. Law & Order True Crime:
The Menendez Murders (NBC)
4. Young Sheldon (CBS)
5. The Gifted (Fox)
6. Marvel’s Inhumans (ABC)
7. SEAL Team (CBS)
8. Star Trek: Discovery (CBS1)
9. The Orville (Fox)
Aaron (Richard Schiff, left), Shaun (Freddie Highmore) and
The Good Doctor have been a card-carrying success. ABC
2. Ghosted moved up from 13th to
No. 10, and The Orville was steady
in ninth place.
Viewers were asked which of
20 new network shows they had
talked about with friends or family in the past 24 hours. The survey also asked whether those
conversations were positive, negative or mixed. Doctor was tops in
both overall talk and “net sentiment,” which weighs positive
buzz against negative.
In contrast, ABC’s Kevin (Probably) Saves the World scored lower in overall talk and ranked last
10. Ghosted (Fox)
1 — Star Trek: Discovery has moved to
CBS All Access streaming service.
Based on a survey of 1,450 viewers
ages 13 to 69 Oct. 2-8.
SOURCE Engagement Labs
in “net sentiment,” meaning
more of the discussion was negative or mixed than positive. (The
show ranked eighth the previous
week.) CW’s Dynasty, which
hadn’t yet premiered, also scored
low in sentiment, which may reflect viewers who “love to hate
the characters,” says Engagement
Labs’ Maggie Fosdick, who oversaw the survey.
Will dropped from fifth place
to ninth in its second week on the
air, as ratings cooled, too.
The results can predict the ultimate success of new shows; the
survey reveals shows viewers
may have sampled but didn’t like.
But Fosdick says the increase in
time-shifted viewing may delay
viewers’ judgments: “Word of
mouth is impacting time-shifted
viewing just as much as live”
airing.
During premiere week, ending
Oct. 1, the CBS comedy Me, Myself and I and ABC’s Inhumans
had the smallest pool of boosters.
The next survey will be in early
November after this week’s premieres of CW series and the
Nov. 2 rollout of CBS series including S.W.A.T. and Sheldon,
which returns in a new time slot.
USA TODAY
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2017
8T
TELEVISION
‘TRL’ needs to be better than a Twitter feed
MTV’s reboot is a
bust, and audience
isn’t likely to wait
Maeve McDermott
@maeve_mcdermott
USATODAY
TRL has no business existing
in 2017.
In the early 2000s, MTV’s Total Request Live was the ideal afternoon companion for culture
junkies. TRL was the place to
check in with the era’s biggest celebrities, to see what they were
wearing and to hear whatever offthe-cuff comments host Carson
Daly could charm out of them.
And, if you were lucky, to watch
whatever music videos you were
obsessed with, if they made the
show’s fan-voted countdown.
TRL was a powerful celebrity
gatekeeper, before the seismic
shift of social media put that power back in the talents’ hands. Now,
the rich and famous control what
and where they share information, speaking directly to fans on
Instagram and Twitter, and putting a major dent in TRL’s value
proposition. Then, there’s the fact
that MTV has all but eliminated
music videos, which fans don’t
need to watch on TV when they’re
freely available on YouTube.
With no exclusive celebrity access and no interest in the show’s
eponymous “request” countdown,
it’s hard to imagine the point of a
modern-day TRL reboot.
A week and a half in, it’s clear
MTV is struggling to create a
show worth watching. The issues
transcend the missed cues and
camera goofs — and there were
many — that are inherent to any
live show’s premiere. TRL desperately wants to speak the pluggedin language of memes and YouTube stars and trending topics of
its target audience of teenagers.
But it does so with all the nuance of a faulty online language
translator, bungling the final
product in the process.
MTV’s first mistake is abandoning the hosting expertise of
Carson Daly-style talking heads
in favor of greener social media
Romeo Santos performs on the premiere week of TRL, whose ‘R’ has been replaced by guests pushing their own songs. ZACH DILGARD
personalities. Led by Vine starturned comedian DC Young Fly
and Tamara Dhia, a former host
for the music/lifestyle site Complex, the voices of TRL are a revolving door of YouTubers and
Internet comedians who look the
part but struggle to create the viral moments that seem to be
their mandate, wasting their celebrity interviews on mindless
questions about what their guests
ate for breakfast.
In between, the show shoehorns social media into as many
segments as possible, with sometimes-cringeworthy results. Plenty of shows have tapped into
Twitter participation to bring
their comedy to life, but TRL isn’t
quite there yet, with segments
that recruited audience members
to build their own memes on a giant screen and forced a struggling
Rita Ora to match tweets with the
celebrity who sent them.
Most blasphemous of all is
TRL’s replacement for the music
video requests that made up the
“R” of the show. Instead, there’s
Internet-star hosts introduce guests, including Joan Smalls.
JON PAK
an MTV-sponsored playlist, to
which the hosts dutifully ask every guest to add a song. Instead of
crowd-funding the brilliantly hip
playlist that TRL was likely hoping to create, many of the celebrity guests simply added their
latest single, taking advantage of
the clueless concept.
And, as anyone who’s logged
onto social media over the past
year has noticed, it’s impossible
for a show that wants to appear
plugged-in to avoid talking politics. Yet TRL can’t decide whether it wants to be a woke voice of
the young #resistance or an escape from politics entirely.
Showrunner Albert Lewitinn
caught heat online in the days before the premiere for telling The
Fader he’d “love” to have President Trump on the show, and in
its first few days, TRL either fumbled its political moments or ignored social issues entirely.
Toward the end of the week,
the hosts grew bolder in expressing their political views, providing the quotable segments the
show desperately needed. That’s
especially true for DC Young Fly,
who channeled his sometimesmanic energy into sincere passion while speaking about Colin
Kaepernick and Puerto Rico.
Perhaps the show’s gradual embrace of wokeness is a glimmer of
hope for fans who still want to see
TRL adapt and succeed. But considering the notoriously short attention span of the teenage
audience the show is so thirstily
attempting to charm, it’s hard to
imagine they would watch a show
largely sourced from social media
that’s more boring than their actual Twitter timeline.
MOVIES
Jackie Chan drop-kicked my singing dreams
WATCH THE VIDEO
LIFE.USATODAY.COM
Bryan Alexander
@BryAlexand
USA TODAY
See the action icon exercise
his vocal cords, karaoke-style.
There are moments you know you’ll remember
forever. And not in a good way.
That happened last week when
I sang with martial arts icon Jackie Chan. The look of undisguised
disgust on Chan’s face was real:
He hated my voice.
It started happily enough as we
sat down to talk about his role in
The Foreigner (in theaters Friday).
Chan was game to discuss his
dramatic thriller, in which his
simple man Quan takes on a government minister (Pierce Brosnan) who might know the IRA
thugs who killed Quan’s daughter.
But when talk turned to Chan’s
love of singing, it took little
air-drumming, leg-stomping, getting all soulful before giving the
nod. “And should I forgive?” I
crooned.
That’s when he gave me that
look. My excuse: I don’t understand Chinese, so I didn’t know
what I was forgiving, or whom.
What’s my motivation?
On my next “forgive,” Chan got
even more dramatic with his disgust. The third “forgive” and he
threw his arms back wildly in
physical pain.
The guy who has broken nearly
every bone during his stunt-filled
film career is in agony because of
my voice.
There was no alternative but
to save face and go to full-on
LOS ANGELES
The martial arts icon shows he has vocal chops, too, in his song
Ordinary Man; the writer, not so much. DAN MACMEDAN, USA TODAY
prompting to get him to belt out
Ordinary Man, a song he recorded that’s inspired by the movie.
My gig was to sing in English
along with Chan’s Chinese,
duet-style.
When Chan dived into the first
verse, it felt so right. He started
Chan-appreciation mode. I pulled
out a lighter to give a competent
song sway.
Chan earned every second of
precious butane, soaring into a
dramatic climax before the music-stopping hand flourish. Big
applause from me.
You’d think Chan would let me
off the hook. Tell me he played up
the disgust for a laugh. That
didn’t happen.
“You know how music goes
‘Do, re, mi, fa, so, la, ti, do?’ ”
Chan asks, waiting a beat. “You
only have a ‘do.’ ”
His entourage busts out laughing. It’s a great moment for everyone else.
My singing career might be
dead, but they should replace
Simon Cowell on America’s Got
Talent with a vocal-star judge
who can throw zingers and real
punches.
LISTEN UP
THE PLAYLIST
Growin’ Up
Springteen opens with a rendition of his 1973 song
from Greetings From Asbury Park, interspersed
with his memories of his rock ’n’ roll awakening.
My Father’s
House
The melancholy track from 1982’s Nebraska
is an elegy to the artist’s father.
The Wish
Springsteen is one loving son, performing
this song in between glowing stories about his
beloved mother, Adele.
Thunder Road
The show gives Bruce’s 1975 classic track from
Born to Run a wistful acoustic makeover
The Promised
Land
Springsteen recalls leaving the confines of
New Jersey to chase his music dreams out West,
soundtracked by this song’s desert imagery.
Born in the USA
No song gets a transformation quite like this one,
reimagined as a stripped-down, snarling blues
track.
Tenth Avenue
Freeze-Out
Belting out the verses at his piano, Springsteen
dedicates the song to his dearly departed E Street
bandmate Clarence Clemons.
Tougher Than
the Rest
The show’s biggest surprise comes when
Springsteen’s wife, Patti Scialfa, walks onstage
and joins him to sing harmony.
Long Walk
Home
Springsteen invokes the words of Martin Luther
King Jr. while speaking about patriotism and
America, segueing into this politically resonant
song.
Dancing in the
Dark/Land
of Hope and
Dreams
Before closing the show with Born to Run,
Springsteen treats the audience to a seamless,
soaring medley.
SONG OF THE WEEK
Eminem’s
blistering
‘The Storm’
SEBASTIAN SILVA, EPA
Eminem isn’t shy about stepping into a
political storm.
He used his rapping skills to castigate
President Trump and his policies during
freestyle performance taped Oct. 6 in
Detroit and broadcast Tuesday as part
of the BET Hip Hop Awards.
The Grammy-winning rapper addressed
any fans who support Trump in the
41⁄2-minute video, titled The Storm.
Eminem, whose real name is Marshall
Mathers, rebuked Trump over numerous
topics, including the president’s reaction to
the deadly violence in Charlottesville, Va.,
tragedies in Puerto Rico and Las Vegas,
his criticism of protesting NFL players
and his frequent golf trips. He accuses the
president of racism and worries that he will
cause a nuclear holocaust.
“Any fan of mine who’s a supporter
of his/ I’m drawing in the sand a line/
You’re either for or against/ And if you
can’t decide who you like more/ And you’re
split on who you should stand beside/
I’ll do it for you with this (middle finger),”
he rapped.
Bill Keveney
GREG ALLEN, AP
Opening Thursday night,
Springsteen on Broadway
features its titular figure, alone
on the Walter Kerr Theatre’s
tiny stage, delivering two hours
of extended monologues and
reimagined classics from his
enduring songbook. Check out
some of the songs Springsteen
transforms during his one-man
Broadway show.
USA TODAY
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2017
9T
MOVIES
In theaters this weekend
eeEE
American Assassin
Plot: After losing his fiancée
in a terrorist attack, Mitch
Rapp (Dylan O’Brien) seeks
solo revenge before training
with a black ops unit led by
the mysterious Stan Hurley
(Michael Keaton).
Director: Michael Cuesta
Compiled from reviews by USA TODAY film critics
1 hour, 52 minutes
Kingsman: The Golden Circle
Rating: R
Upside: O’Brien brings
surprising edge to his young
assassin from Vince Flynn’s
book. And Keaton is so intense
he chews off an interrogator’s
ear and smiles maniacally.
Downside: Suspension of
disbelief collapses when the
fighting literally goes nuclear.
Plot: Street kid-turnedsuperspy Eggsy (Taron
Egerton) teams up with sidelined mentor Harry (Colin
Firth) and an elite group of
American secret agents to
fight crime syndicate The
Golden Circle.
Director: Matthew Vaughn
1 hour, 55 minutes
Leap!
Rating: R
Upside: Cruise is full of his
usual charisma but gives his
embattled pilot a needed and
hilarious sense of desperation.
Downside: The action is
well-paced, but the
momentum derails when
Barry’s family gets sucked into
his illegal dealings.
Plot: A French girl (voiced
by Elle Fanning) escapes
orphanage life to realize her
ballet dreams in Paris.
Directors: Eric Summer,
Éric Warin
2 hours, 1 minute
The Lego Ninjago Movie
Rating: PG-13
Upside: The two actors are a
winning match that does
justice to the real-life sports
figures.
Downside: You have to wait
a while to see Stone’s and
Carell’s chemistry in full.
Plot: A teen ninja hero (voiced
by Dave Franco) and his
estranged villain dad (Justin
Theroux) team up to save
Ninjago City.
Directors: Charlie Bean, Paul
Fisher and Bob Logan
LIONSGATE
Plot: TWA pilot Barry Seal
(Tom Cruise) gets involved in
gun running and drug
smuggling while working for
the CIA and the Medellín
Cartel.
Director: Doug Liman
Plot: Fighting for more
equality in tennis, Billie Jean
King (Emma Stone) takes on
aging men’s champ Bobby
Riggs (Steve Carell).
Directors: Jonathan Dayton
and Valerie Faris
eeee
Plot: A futuristic cop (Ryan
Gosling) unearths a discovery
that could throw the balance
between mankind and
bioengineered beings into
chaos.
Director: Denis Villeneuve
eeeE
1 hour, 40 minutes
Rating: PG
Upside: Theroux hijacks the
maniacally entertaining
movie as the clueless Lord
Garmadon.
Downside: It lacks the
cleverness of previous Lego
movies.
eeeE
2 hours, 44 minutes
mother!
Rating: R
Upside: A super-stylish and
deeply human sequel that
outclasses the original sci-fi
classic.
Downside: The runtime is a bit
staggering, but at least it’s
never boring.
Plot: A couple (Jennifer
Lawrence and Javier Bardem)
have their peaceful country
life upended by countless
strangers.
Director: Darren Aronofsky
1 hour, 34 minutes
The Mountain Between Us
Rating: PG-13
Upside: Eschewing gore, the
horror flick succeeds with its
fun, ‘Groundhog Day’-esque
comedic bent.
Downside: Its cleverness
becomes undone at times by
genre clichés and tired slashermovie antics.
Plot: Two strangers (Idris Elba
and Kate Winslet) charter a
jet in a snowstorm so they can
get home. When the plane
crashes, they’ve got only
each other.
Director: Hany Abu-Assad
WARNER BROS.
2 hours, 1 minute
Rating: R
Upside: It’s a bold, audacious
and quite insane look at
motherhood, mankind and
modern society.
Downside: The craziness of
its disturbing imagery and
bacchanalia gets a little
dizzying.
PARAMOUNT PICTURES/PROTOZOA PICTURES
eeeE
Plot: A college student
(Jessica Rothe) lives the day of
her murder again and again
until she figures out the killer.
Director: Christopher Landon
UNIVERSAL PICTURES
eeEE
1 hour, 44 minutes
Rating: PG-13
Upside: If you’re going to be
stranded, it helps to have
Winslet and Elba along for
the ride. Plus, there’s a dog!
Downside: The movie’s
not entirely sure what it is.
A harrowing survival tale?
A romance in the snow?
20TH CENTURY FOX
eeeE
It
Rating: PG
Upside: The main character’s
journey is a heartwarming
tale with cool dance
sequences.
Downside: The story is
predictable and extremely
recognizable for anybody
who’s seen ‘The Karate Kid.’
WARNER BROS. PICTURES
FOX SEARCHLIGHT
Happy Death Day
1 hour, 30 minutes
THE WEINSTEIN COMPANY
eeeg
Blade Runner 2049
Rating: R
Upside: Spine-tingling stunts,
lewd laughs and a deliciously
campy turn from Julianne
Moore as a drug lord.
Downside: Taxing run time
and excessive cameos, which
distract from the winsome
central duo of Egerton and
Firth.
eegE
UNIVERSAL PICTURES
Battle of the Sexes
2 hours, 21 minutes
20TH CENTURY FOX
eeeE
American Made
eegE
Plot: A band of small-town
teenagers have to stave off
the return of a dark force
manifesting itself as an evil
clown.
Director: Andy Muschietti
2 hours, 15 minutes
Spider-Man: Homecoming
Rating: R
Upside: The movie offers a
talented young cast and an
emphasis on heart rather than
all horror.
Downside: A long runtime
and unnecessary subplots
upend the grand ambitions.
Plot: Peter Parker (Tom
Holland) struggles to balance
his school life with being a
web-slinging superhero.
Director: Jon Watts
WARNER BROS.
eeeg
2 hours, 13 minutes
Rating: PG-13
Upside: Holland brings a
vulnerability and jocularity
missing from past movie
Spider-Men.
Downside: The beginning is
a little slow to set up the villain
and catch up with Spidey’s
previous mission.
COLUMBIA PICTURES
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USA TODAY
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2017
10T
QUOTE OF THE DAY
It is something I’m
seriously
considering. If I was
single, I’d definitely be
running. … Maybe I run as
an independent.”
Mark Cuban, Mavericks owner on whether he will
run for president in 2020.
JEROME MIRON, USA TODAY SPORTS
Teams seek Playoff statement
Title hopefuls
must avoid
untimely upset
NO. 23 UTAH AT NO. 13
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
Saturday, 8 p.m., ABC
Nobody plans to lose, of
course, but at least these two
once-beaten Pac-12 South hopefuls lost to teams from the opposite division. The winner of this
clash at the Coliseum will therefore be firmly in the driver’s seat
en route to the conference final.
After being pounded by Stanford RB Bryce Love a week ago,
the Utes defense must now contend with Trojans QB Sam Darnold’s aerial prowess. Darnold has
been a bit too pick-prone at
times, which Utah CB Julian
Blackmon might be able to exploit. But USC it tough to beat
when RB Ronald Jones is also
productive. The Utah offense remains a work in progress, which
is generally a suboptimal development at this juncture of the
season. WR Darren Carrington is
a great weapon, but QB Troy Williams must show better accuracy
to make full use of him. They
could have their hands full
against Trojans DE Christian
Rector and CB Iman Marshall.
Eddie Timanus
@eddietimanus
USA TODAY Sports
As the number of participants
in the College Football Playoff
must inexorably be trimmed to
four, each week is a battle to avoid
being one of the teams lost to attrition. With favorites now fairly
well established, the goal of Week
7 is to stay in the conversation for
at least another day.
Here are the games which, barring other surprises such as the
one that occurred a week ago in
Norman, Okla., will have the biggest impact on the Playoff
picture.
NO. 7 TCU AT KANSAS STATE
Saturday, noon ET, FS1
Thanks to that aforementioned
loss by Oklahoma, the Horned
Frogs currently are in the best
position to represent the Big 12 if
the conference does indeed earn
a spot. The key word there, of
course, is currently. There is
clearly no team that possesses
enough of a talent advantage over
the rest of the league to simply
coast to the finish. TCU’s last outing against West Virginia came
down to the wire, and the Wildcats were on the short end of an
overtime affair at Texas a week
ago.
TCU QB Kenny Hill has
emerged as a solid decision-maker to go along with his considerable
athletic
talent.
The
versatility of WR KaVontae Turpin provides another challenge
for S Kendall Adams and the KState secondary as they try to
limit the Horned Frogs’ big-play
potential. The Wildcats aren’t
quite as explosive, but QB Jesse
Ertz keeps mistakes to a minimum and can keep drives alive
with his feet. He’ll likely see a lot
of TCU LB Travin Howard.
NO. 12 OKLAHOMA VS. TEXAS
IN DALLAS
Saturday, 3:30 p.m., ESPN
A few plays here or there completely altered the dynamic of
this week’s Red River showdown.
The Sooners’ loss to Iowa State
NO. 11 AUBURN AT LSU
TCU quarterback Kenny Hill has emerged as a key decison-maker for the Horned Frogs.
KEVIN JAIRAJ, USA TODAY SPORTS
means they must now run the table to even think about inclusion
in the Playoff, despite owning the
league’s best non-conference victory. The Longhorns are in a similar situation to the Oklahoma
team of a year ago, with two nonconference losses all but eliminating them from consideration
but possibly in a position to compete for the Big 12 crown anyway.
The Oklahoma defense has not
been formidable since it shut
down Ohio State, a function of
encountering more multifaceted
attacks. It will be up to Longhorns QB Sam Ehlinger to stretch
the field and keep running lanes
open for himself and RB Chris
Warren. The Texas defense for its
part has shown improvement
since the Longhorns’ Week 1 loss
to Maryland. But Sooners QB
Baker Mayfield has a lot more
weapons at his disposal. Any
ground support provided by OU
RB Trey Sermon would help
Mayfield’s cause.
GEORGIA TECH AT NO. 10
MIAMI (FLA.)
Saturday, 3:30 p.m., ABC
For what its worth, the winner
of this game will for a time have
first place in the Atlantic Coast
Conference Coastal Division all
to itself. Yes, both teams still
must deal with Virginia Tech, and
the Coastal champ still figures to
be a heavy underdog in the conference finale against, in all likelihood, Clemson. But as we said,
the middle stretch of the season
is all about surviving another day.
The Hurricanes got the bad
news during the week that RB
Mark Walton (ankle) would require season-ending surgery, putting a damper on their thrilling
win at archrival Florida State.
The Miami ground game will be
in good hands with Travis Homer
taking on an increased workload,
but QB Malik Rosier will want to
get WR Braxton Berrios involved
as well. The Yellow Jackets have
their option game operating well,
as long as they avoid putting the
ball on the turf. QB TaQuon Marshall and RB KirVonte Benson
pick up the bulk of the yardage on
the inside, but the ’Canes must
also beware of WR Ricky Jeune,
who has taken three of his 10 receptions to the end zone.
Saturday, 3:30 p.m., CBS
Although nearly two months
out from the Southeastern Conference title game, the Alabama
and Georgia trains look to be on a
collision course. Auburn, with
both still on its schedule, is the
one league member that might
have something to say about that.
But if Auburn is indeed a viable
challenger, the Tigers of the
Plains must look the part by dispatching the Bayou Bengals.
The grumbles are a bit quieter
in Baton Rouge with a victory at
Florida in hand, but LSU has a
long way to go on both sides of
the ball. The LSU offense isn’t exactly explosive with QB Danny
Etling at the controls, though the
return of RB Derrius Guice
helped a bit last week in Gainesville. The going figures to be
tough against Auburn’s strong
front; LB Tre’ Williams has
missed a couple of games with a
shoulder problem but expects to
play. The Auburn offense, meanwhile, is rounding into form for
QB Jarrett Stidham. He is aided
by a deep and now fully healthy
backfield led by RB Kerryon
Johnson, who has found the end
zone 12 times despite playing in
just four of Auburn’s six games.
Young playoff drivers aren’t intimidated
Mike Hembree
@mikehembree
Special for USA TODAY Sports
CONCORD, N. C.
Does experience
or youth matter more in NASCAR’s current playoff format?
The age range of the drivers
competing for the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series championship is large.
Chase Elliott, the youngest, is
21. Matt Kenseth, the graybeard
of the group, is 45.
Four of the 12 remaining playoff drivers are in their 40s; three
USA SNAPSHOTS©
RBI machine
13
RBI
by Nelson
Cruz in the
2011 ALCS,
most by any
player in
a single league
championship
series
SOURCE Baseball-reference.com
ELLEN J. HORROW AND PAUL TRAP, USA TODAY
are younger than 30.
It’s worth noting that experience often trumps youth in the
race for NASCAR’s top prize.
Since the championship format
underwent drastic changes in
2004, only two drivers in their
20s (Kurt Busch, 26, in 2004 and
Brad Keselowski, 28, in 2012)
have won the crown.
Since the elimination piece
was added to the playoffs in 2014,
there have been two very experienced champions in Kevin Harvick (38) and Jimmie Johnson
(41) and a 30-year-old in Kyle
Busch with more laps on his résumé than most drivers with more
years in the sport.
With the second race of the
playoffs’ second round scheduled
Sunday at Talladega Superspeedway in Alabama, the three drivers
in their 20s are scattered across
the standings — Kyle Larson second, Chase Elliott fourth and
Ryan Blaney 11th.
“If you’re racing in the Cup series, I think you’ve been racing
long enough where you either
know how to get things done, you
know how to do things the right
way or you don’t,” said Elliott, a
second-generation driver in his
second playoff.
“I’m a pretty big believer in
that regardless of your age. I’m
not saying that because I’m early
on at it. I feel that way about oth-
Chase Elliott is 21 years old but second in the Monster Energy
NASCAR Cup Series playoff standings. JIM DEDMON, USA TODAY SPORTS
er sports. College football, NFL.
“If a guy comes in, knows how
to do his job, I think he can play
for whoever and do a good job at
it.”
Blaney, who put the Wood
Brothers team in the playoffs for
the first time, said youth can be a
positive despite the general con-
sensus that older drivers have an
advantage.
“I think having youth on your
side, you’re always just kind of on
‘kill’ all the time, and I think
that’s what these playoffs are
about,” he said. “I don’t think
that’s a bad thing to be. … They do
have experience on their side,
and that might benefit them, for
sure, but I think expectation is
just really not there for us.
“We just have curiosity and excitement to be here, and I think
that’s a really big asset, too.”
Blaney also said the presence
in the playoffs of drivers such as
seven-time champion Johnson
and other seasoned veterans who
know the playoff ropes isn’t
intimidating.
“These drivers are people just
like us,” he said. “I’ve watched
them when I was younger. I’ve
been big fans of a lot of them
when I was younger growing up
in this sport, and I just think it’s
really neat. I don’t really feel any
pressure or (that) I’m intimidated
by anybody.”
Playoff wins to date have been
scored by veterans: Truex (37)
and Kyle Busch (32) have two
each.
Austin Dillon, 27, was eliminated in the playoffs’ first round. He
said the age gap isn’t necessarily
important because “there are
young guys that drive like older
guys. Then there are older guys
that drive like younger guys.
“It’s hard for me to say if the
experience of the older guys plays
to their advantage. I think it’s
who is the smartest, and then
there are guys that drive a little
more aggressively that put themselves in good position.”
USA TODAY
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2017
11T
NFL
Cousins faces awkward start vs. 49ers
Quarterback leads
Redskins against
his former mentor
Mike Jones
@ByMikeJones
USA TODAY Sports
When Kirk Cousins takes the
field Sunday for the Washington
Redskins, the quarterback will
find himself at a curious intersection of his past, present and —
possibly — his future.
On the visiting sideline will be
San Francisco 49ers coach Kyle
Shanahan, who played a role in
Washington’s selection of Cousins in the fourth round of the
2012 draft (three rounds after the
team took Robert Griffin III second overall). Shanahan also
helped position Cousins for his
unexpected rise to starter three
years later.
On the home sideline, and on
the mic in Cousins’ helmet: Jay
Gruden, who picked up where
Shanahan left off when Washington fired the then-offensive coordinator and his father, head coach
Mike Shanahan, at the end of the
2013 season. Gruden eventually
hitched his Washington tenure to
Cousins, choosing him over the
former face of the franchise, Griffin, in 2015. Now Cousins and
Gruden aim to lead the Redskins
to a third consecutive winning
season and a return to the playoffs. They do so while blocking
out the fact that this could represent their final year together with
Cousins set to hit free agency after becoming the first NFL quarterback to play on the franchise
tag in consecutive seasons.
Meanwhile, Shanahan — five
games into his head coaching career — seeks his first victory
while working with a roster still
lacking a number of key building
blocks, most notably a franchise
quarterback. Because of Cousins’
and Shanahan’s mutual respect —
and the way Cousins’ skill set perfectly fits Shanahan’s offense —
San Francisco is expected to rank
among the quarterback’s suitors
in free agency.
Washington’s chances of retaining Cousins beyond this season hinge largely on the success
he and Gruden achieve. Even after Cousins set the franchise’s
single-season record for passing
yards in 2015 (4,166) then shattered it last year (4,917), team officials were reluctant to give him
a fair market contract. But they’d
be foolish not to do so if Cousins
leads Washington to the NFC
East title.
Even if Cousins receives a
Washington quarterback Kirk Cousins is coming off two solid performances. JAY BIGGERSTAFF, USA TODAY SPORTS
strong offer from the Redskins
next year, he could take his services elsewhere if he finds a more
ideal fit. He has a good relationship with Gruden. But concerns
about the stability of the franchise under team president Bruce
Allen, following general manager
Scot McCloughan’s firing, played
a role in Cousins’ decision to pass
on Washington’s final offer of the
summer, one light on guaranteed
money.
Cousins has said repeatedly
that he values fit and trust over
dollars and cents. Shanahan and
the 49ers, projected to have more
than $100 million in salary cap
space in 2018, could offer both.
Other suitors will arise as well,
so Cousins had no problem entering 2017 in a familiar prove-it
mode. He is coming off two of his
better performances while posting a combined 585 yards, five
touchdowns and no interceptions
in a blowout win over the Oakland Raiders and a last-minute
loss to the undefeated Kansas
City Chiefs.
Some critics will remain unconvinced until they see him win
a playoff game. But Cousins no
longer should have to answer
questions about whether he’s a
bona fide starter or if he should
be paid like other rising young
passers such as Derek Carr, Matthew Stafford and Andrew Luck.
As Cousins put his team on his
back down the stretch of that
Kansas City game, using his legs
and his arms to direct a comeback quest — he threw a potential
game-winning touchdown that
receiver Josh Doctson couldn’t
hang on to — one league insider
texted me unprompted to say
that Washington would be stupid
not to lock Cousins up to a longterm deal this offseason, believing Washington won’t find a better option in free agency and
would regress if forced to reset
the position in the draft. Two other insiders agreed when asked for
their opinions.
But contract talks must wait.
Franchise tag rules prohibit negotiations in season. The Redskins
might have to decide whether to
use a massive $34 million-plus
tag next year to merely keep
Cousins off the market as they try
to get a long-term deal done.
It’s funny how things work out
in the NFL. Cousins wasn’t Plan
A for Washington in 2012, and he
wasn’t even the original Plan B.
Shanahan revealed this week that
the Redskins had wanted Russell
Wilson in the fourth round because he had dual-threat abilities
mirroring RG3’s. But the Seattle
Seahawks took Wilson in Round
3, leaving Cousins as the fallback.
“We were excited from what
we saw in his college film, and
that’s what we liked the most
about him, and that’s why we
wanted him,” Shanahan told reporters. “The more you are
around the guy, you became even
more impressed of how special of
a person he is.”
Five years later, Cousins ranks
among the league leaders in completion percentage and passer
rating. And this year he has displayed an improved command of
the offense, greater confidence
and aggression — and doing so after the free agent departures of
two 1,000-yard receivers, Pierre
Garcon and DeSean Jackson.
Their young replacements, Terrelle Pryor and Doctson, have
made progress as Cousins has
found ways to elevate their play.
“His entire game is evolving,”
Gruden said of Cousins. “He’s just
going to continue to see things
and adjust to the different defenses and the fronts and the coverage that he sees.
“Playing quarterback is all
about experiences, learning from
your mistakes, moving forward
and continuing to compete at a
high level — on a consistent high
level. And that’s what he’s so far
doing.”
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Love’s stats put him atop deep RB class
4. MYLES GASKIN,
WASHINGTON
Paul Myerberg
Gaskin has been flying under the
radar since his freshman year.
Why should this season be any
different? He’s gained at least 91
yards in each of the Huskies’ first
three Pac-12 games, including
202 yards against Oregon State,
and has scored eight touchdowns
in his last five games.
@paulmyerberg
USA TODAY Sports
For all the well-deserved talk
about this season’s crop of college
quarterbacks, it’s not a stretch to
say another position deserves
equal praise: running back.
Penn State junior Saquon
Barkley sits at or near the top of
most Heisman Trophy lists as the
regular season reaches the midway point. But he’s not alone.
Across the Football Bowl Subdivision, talented running backs have
made themselves heard.
This week’s top 10 list takes a
look at the position. Entering the
second Saturday of October,
which running backs have been
the nation’s best?
5. NICK CHUBB, GEORGIA
What’s imposing about Georgia’s
running game is that Chubb isn’t
alone — there’s also Sony Michel,
who’s fantastic, along with
D’Andre Smith, Elijah Holyfield
and Brian Herrien. That’s some
major depth. But Chubb’s the top
dog and the team’s leading rusher, not to mention one of the
most productive backs in program history.
1. BRYCE LOVE, STANFORD
6. JOSH ADAMS, NOTRE DAME
Love is Stanford’s walking, talking
first down. How ridiculous is his
average of 10.5 yards per carry
through six games? Only one
Power Five running back in the
last decade has carried the ball
more than 150 times and averaged more than 8 yards per carry
— California’s Jahvid Best averaged 8.1 yards on 194 carries in
2008. Love already has 118 carries. That’s ridiculous.
Adams is one of two reasons, with
quarterback Brandon Wimbush
the other, why Notre Dame’s running game is already nearing last
year’s entire output as a team. He
has gained 776 yards, topping the
100-yard mark four times, and
done so on an impressive 9 yards
per carry.
Stanford Cardinal running back Bryce Love is averaging 10.5
yards a carry this season. STAN SZETO, USA TODAY SPORTS
2. SAQUON BARKLEY, PENN
STATE
equal success on the next level.
But even as the highlight reel
overflows with jaw-dropping moments, don’t forget that he’s been
held to less than 100 yards in four
of Penn State’s six games. Call it
nitpicking — the numbers don’t
really do Barkley total justice —
but Love has the edge by a hair.
Barkley is a transcendent college
talent likely destined for near-
3. RASHAAD PENNY, SAN
DIEGO STATE
Through six games, Penny has
more rushing yards (993) than
San Diego State quarterback
Christian Chapman has passing
yards (968). That should highlight his importance for the best
team in the Group of Five. Not
bad for a senior who played backup to Donnel Pumphrey the last
three seasons.
7. JONATHAN TAYLOR,
WISCONSIN
Taylor’s national introduction
came Saturday night, when he
ran for 249 yards on 25 carries to
lead Wisconsin to a 38-17 win at
Nebraska. While productive Wis-
consin running backs come off
conveyor belts for the Badgers,
that Taylor is set for 1,000-plus
yards is rare, given the fact he’s
only a freshman.
8. JUSTIN CRAWFORD, WEST
VIRGINIA
Crawford’s been just as good as
expected, which says something
about his play through the first
five games of the season. He has
topped 100 yards in each game,
including 111 yards in the narrow
loss to TCU, and leads or is tied
atop the Big 12 in rushing, yards
per carry and touchdowns.
9. J.K. DOBBINS, OHIO STATE
Dobbins has been a key piece of
the puzzle as a true freshman for
Ohio State, giving Urban Meyer
and Kevin Wilson a game-breaking threat in the running game to
team with an improved passing
game. What’s even more impressive? That Dobbins missed all but
the first play of his senior year in
high school because of injury.
10. DIOCEMY SAINT JUSTE,
HAWAII
While Hawaii is at best a bowl
team, Saint Juste deserves some
recognition for being third nationally in rushing (892 yards)
and tied for third in touchdowns.
He has rushed for at least 78
yards in each of the Warriors’ six
games and topped the 200-yard
mark twice, most recently gaining
241 yards on 9.6 yards per carry
in Saturday’s loss to Nevada.
USA TODAY
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2017
12T
WEATHER
WEATHER ONLINE
USATODAY.COM
TODAY’S FORECAST
NATIONAL FORECAST
TODAY
SUN
TODAY SUN
73/58sh 80/45c
Providence
74/62c
76/55c
Raleigh, N.C.
78/62pc 84/60s
Allentown, Pa.
76/60c
80/51pc
Reno
59/31s
Atlantic City
76/69c
79/58pc
Richmond, Va.
77/64sh
85/57pc
Augusta, Ga.
88/61pc 90/66pc
Rochester, N.Y.
74/63sh
77/44t
Austin
90/68pc 75/53t
San Jose, Calif.
81/51s
88/55s
Bakersfield, Calif.
80/53s
88/58s
Sarasota, Fla.
88/74t
88/72c
Baton Rouge
91/69s
90/61pc
Savannah, Ga.
87/68pc 89/68pc
Boise
52/32s
61/37s
Shreveport, La.
92/68s
80/52t
Buffalo
72/65sh 73/43t
South Bend, Ind.
75/55r
56/42r
Cedar Rapids
69/43r
Spokane, Wash.
49/33pc 59/37s
Colorado Springs
64/27pc 57/35s
Springfield, Mo.
87/49pc
62/40pc
Columbia, S.C.
86/62pc 88/67pc
Syracuse, N.Y.
73/61sh
79/45t
Columbus, Ohio
80/65s
74/44t
Toledo, Ohio
79/66pc 68/41r
Dayton, Ohio
78/66s
71/43t
Tucson
93/60s
Daytona Beach
86/74sh
86/72sh
Des Moines
70/42r
57/41s
Duluth, Minn.
52/33sh 45/33c
Athens, Greece
77/59s
Fort Myers, Fla.
89/74t
89/74pc
Baghdad
93/66s
95/65s
Fresno
77/49s
83/52s
Beijing
54/46c
63/46c
Grand Rapids
68/55r
58/39r
Berlin
67/53pc 68/52s
Greensboro, N.C.
80/61pc 83/57pc
Buenos Aires
71/48s
74/55s
Greenville, S.C.
80/62pc 83/62pc
Cairo
82/65s
83/66s
Harrisburg, Pa.
77/63sh
84/52pc
Caracas, Ven.
90/78pc 90/78pc
Hartford, Conn.
72/60c
79/50c
Freeport, Bahamas
86/75pc 86/74pc
Huntsville, Ala.
86/66pc 84/50pc
Hong Kong
89/75sh 84/78t
Jackson, Miss.
91/66s
88/55s
Jerusalem
72/57pc 71/55s
Albany, N.Y.
Seattle
57/44c
Helena
49/31pc
Portland
61/41pc
Bismarck
48/28r
Portland
71/57c
Billings
51/36c
Boise
52/32s
Mpls-St. Paul
57/40r
Albany
73/58sh
Rapid City
47/31r
Milwaukee Detroit
68/51r
74/66pc Cleveland
79/67pc
Chicago
Pittsburgh
72/53r Indianapolis
78/62pc
Omaha
79/62pc
65/38r
St. Louis
Washington
87/53pc
Cincinnati 78/67c
Kansas City
79/68s
81/44t
Wichita
Charlotte
83/44t
82/60pc
Nashville
Memphis
Tulsa
85/67s
90/69s
89/51pc
Casper
41/27sn
Sacramento
79/46s
Salt Lake City
52/32pc
San Francisco
75/54s
Denver
55/29c
Las Vegas
79/52s
Los Angeles
88/63s
San Diego
77/63s
Albuquerque
79/42s
Phoenix
94/65s
PRECIPITATION
Little Rock
90/67s
Dallas-Fort Worth
94/61s
Houston
91/71pc
El Paso
90/56pc
Tampa
90/76pc
Alaska
Forecasts and
graphics provided by
AccuWeather Inc.
©2017
Precipitation
Thunderstorms
f Fog
h Haze
c Cloudy
dr Drizzle
10s
i Ice
r Rain
pc Partly cloudy s Sunny
20s
Rain
Hilo
82/69sh
Juneau
45/40r
30s
40s
Showers
sf Snow flurries
sh Showers
50s
60s
Snow
Miami
88/78t
Honolulu
86/75sh
Anchorage
44/32c
Below 10
Baltimore
76/63c
Orlando
85/73t
Hawaii
Temperatures (°F)
New York
73/63c
Philadelphia
78/67c
Charleston
84/67pc
Atlanta
Birmingham 81/66pc
86/67pc
New Orleans
89/74s
San Antonio
88/69pc
Boston
72/63pc
70s
Snow flurries
sn Snow
w Windy
t Thunderstorms
80s
90s
100s
110+
Ice / wintry mix
Note: The forecast highs are for the 24-hour
period of that day. Low-temperature forecasts
are for the upcoming night.
56/37pc
71/40s
95/67s
WORLD FORECAST
75/62s
Jacksonville
85/70c
87/70pc
Kingston, Jamaica
91/79pc 90/80pc
Knoxville, Tenn.
82/60c
82/50s
London
67/56pc 71/58s
Lexington, Ky.
81/67s
76/42t
Madrid
83/56s
83/54s
Louisville
82/70s
73/46t
Manila
85/78t
84/77t
72/55pc 74/55pc
Lubbock, Texas
88/49pc 67/39s
Mexico City
Madison, Wis.
68/46r
Montreal
67/57c
75/42r
McAllen, Texas
90/72pc 89/66t
Moscow
45/39r
42/38r
Mobile, Ala.
88/70s
Nassau, Bahamas
89/76pc 88/76pc
54/36c
87/67t
Myrtle Beach, S.C.
80/67pc 84/68s
New Delhi
98/71s
Nags Head, N.C.
78/70c
78/67pc
Paris
72/53pc 76/58s
99/71pc
Norfolk, Va.
79/69c
84/65pc
Rome
75/54s
Oklahoma City
87/50pc 64/41pc
Sydney
64/61c
71/60pc
Palm Springs
95/65s
95/68s
Tokyo
64/61r
64/55r
Pensacola, Fla.
89/74s
87/69t
Toronto
68/62sh 73/42r
77/54s
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PUZZLES
CROSSWORD
WORD ROUNDUP
BY Fred Piscop
By David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
BALLPARK
FIGURES
Three birds starting with C
Three chess pieces
Dickens novel: “____ ____”
Two trees starting with P
By John Wilmes
10
R A L
U P H
K I N
E J X
O O K
AW Z
WN D
S T E
B
R
G
G
Y
C
A
O
V
A
M
A
Z
O
N
L
O
T
P
N
P
N
U
I
L
E
A
G
I
G
B
V
G A
S C
L M
E S
N E
OW
E M
E R
By David L. Hoyt and Russell L. Hoyt
10/14
1. HENRY
2.
3.
4.
5.
Charges for services
6.
MAN
7.
Leg muscle
Clues:
1. Pioneering automaker
2. Vehicle introduced in 2000
3. Movie: “____ ____ Alcatraz”
4. “____ ____ to Eternity”
5. “____ ____ nothing!”
6. Enters a building
7. Confidential informant
Slender instrument
Primary color
© Andrews McMeel
10/14
58 DeGeneres
played one in
“Ellen”
62 Bit of wampum
63 Source of feathers
in pillows
64 Verdi opera with
elephants
65 Chlumsky of
“Veep”
66 He’s to the left of
Abe, at Rushmore
67 Gas in a 46-Down
sign
DOWN
1 Mining camp
currency
2 Big name in light
beers
3 Brass or bronze
4 English channel,
informally, with
“the”
5 ___ Avenue ($60
Monopoly buy)
6 Mobile’s state
(Abbr.)
7 Source of
nondairy “milk”
TXTPERT
3
Across
1. 342623
5. 776873
7. 6262
9. 766
10. 6263
6
8
© Andrews McMeel
Willing partner?
Brock and Gehrig of
baseball
9
10/14
7
10/14
Ty of baseball
4
5
U
E
L
R
R
V
A
I
UP & DOWN WORDS
QUICKCROSS
8 Word ignored in
alphabetization
9 Van Gogh’s lost
body part
10 Pliers, wrenches
et al.
11 Common
placemat shape
12 Dust-dwelling pest
13 Reason to hold
one’s nose
18 Hair product in
pompadours
21 Slow-pitch softball
path
24 Head the cast of
25 Homeowner’s
winter option
26 Improve, as wine
28 Annoying sort
29 “This won’t
hurt ___”
30 Rocky Road
holder
31 Whodunit suspect,
often
32 “Dragnet” radio
alerts, briefly
33 Supermarket
counter
Answers: Call 1-900-988-8300, 99 cents a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-320-4280.
2
☑☐☐☐☐☐☐☐
☐☐☐
☐☐☐
☐☐
☐☐
Eight major world rivers
© Andrews McMeel
Find and Circle:
ACROSS
1 Nature’s bandage
5 Moisten in the pan
10 Our genus
14 “Merry old” king
15 Luau greeting
16 Like diehard
rooters
17 Participant in
some video
games
19 Grp. joined by
Montenegro in
2017
20 1950 Asimov
classic
21 Alfred who
coined “inferiority
complex”
22 “Gangnam Style”
rapper
23 7-Down-based
Japanese fare
26 Trump’s “The ___
of the Deal”
27 Mentor to
some aspiring
performers
32 Included in
the mix
36 Lily family
member
37 Chamber group
woodwind
38 In itself
39 Letter
resembling a P
40 Pancakes served
with sour cream
41 Exploding cigar
sound
42 Parti-colored, like
a horse
43 Star-shaped
flower
44 Construction
company honcho
47 Bit of hope
48 Job for a tailor
49 Appliances in
windows, for short
52 “20 Mule Team”
cleaner
55 ___ del Fuego
(island group)
57 Wayward GI
1
N J
C I
A C
N C
A D
R T
Y P
T W
10/14
34 W.C. Fields
expletive
35 Quasimodo’s love
40 Bodega’s
neighborhood
42 Pick up the tab
45 Upper limit, for
short
46 Hash house, e.g.
49 Palmer with a links
“army”
50 Literally, “I believe”
51 See-through wrap
brand
52 Rummy cake
53 Wilson of “Cars”
54 “Strawberry” horse
56 McGregor of
“Beauty and the
Beast”
58 Band’s playlist
59 Tic-tac-toe
outcome, usually
60 Like a single sock
61 Word before alert
or carpet
CROSSWORDS
ON YOUR PHONE
mobilegames.usatoday.com
© USA TODAY and Rich Coulter
Down
2. 228352
3. 2437474
4. 7278637
6. 7272
7. 626
8. 666
Today’s theme
Friends and family
Use the phone keypad to
decode the clues.
For example: 2 could be
A, B or C ... and 5678 could
be LOST
Wife of Harry S.
QUICKCROSS
ON YOUR PHONE
mobilegames.usatoday.com
PLAY ONLINE
PUZZLES.USATODAY.COM
© Andrews McMeel
SUDOKU
Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x2
box contains the numbers 1 through 6 (no repeats).
Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3
box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (no repeats).
3 7
8
9
1
9
3
5 7 4
4
6
8 6
9
2
3
7
3
6
1
5
7 5
3
10/14
3
6
6
3
1
5
6
3
DIFFICULTY RATING
8
5
2
4 5
8
6 2 9
6
)))$$
SUDOKU FUSION
ON YOUR PHONE
DIFFICULTY RATING
)))$$ mobilegames.usatoday.com
© Universal Uclick
DON’T QUOTE ME®
English author Virginia
Woolf stresses the
importance of food.
Rearrange the words to complete the quote.
CANNOT DINED IF NOT ONE THINK
WELL
ONE ___________ ___________ WELL, LOVE ________, SLEEP
WELL, ________ ________ HAS ________ ___________ WELL.
10/14
© WIGGLES 3D GAMES
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