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USA Today August 30 2017

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WEDNESDAY
THE NATION’S NEWS
E2
Harvey reaches
far and wide
uOne for the record books:
Almost 52 inches of rain 4A
uTrump tours Texas; ordinary
people, including ‘Mattress
Mack’ and his furniture stores,
come to the rescue 5A
08.30.17
uDelivery companies
suspend service 1B
DISASTER IN TEXAS
PHOTOS BY HENRIETTA WILDSMITH, USA TODAY NETWORK
Vivian Bell watches over her grandchildren Tuesday inside the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston. The shelter held 9,000 as of late Tuesday.
Agony builds as water rises
Survivor warns:
‘Grab only
what you need.
Grab your life’
Houston shelter filled twice over,
but ‘the doors will not close’
Rick Jervis and John Bacon
Kris Wartelle,
Kristin Askelson
and Claire Taylor
USA TODAY Network
USA TODAY Network
Rescue boats, highwater vehicles, kayaks and even
jet skis searched flood-swollen
streets Tuesday for trapped, desperate residents as relentless
Tropical Storm Harvey trudged
east toward Louisiana.
River levels marched higher,
swelled by days of relentless rain.
A reservoir splashed over its
banks, another threatened to
overflow, and authorities in Brazoria County, south of Houston,
announced a levee breach.
“GET OUT NOW!!” the county
urged residents near the Colum-
HOUSTON As stranded residents streamed in, the shelter
at the George R. Brown Convention Center grew more
packed by the hour — 9,000
evacuees and counting, nearly
double its intended capacity.
Conditions inside the center
in the heart of downtown were
crowded but organized with
the help of hundreds of Red
Cross volunteers and city
police, many of them working
24-hour shifts.
Still, as hundreds of evacu-
HOUSTON
HOME DELIVERY
1-800-872-0001
USATODAYSERVICE.COM
QIJFAF-03005x(N)k
SCOTT CLAUSE, USA TODAY NETWORK
Volunteers and first responders team up to rescue the
stranded from rising floodwaters Tuesday in Houston.
bia Lakes levee.
President Trump arrived in
Texas, meeting with Gov. Greg
Abbott in Corpus Christi but
staying out of Houston. Trump
lauded the agencies overseeing
rescue and recovery and said he
Change in security
is first since 9/11
Gaveled
in history
ago
50years
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today
Thurgoo
Thurgood
Marshall
Marsha
becomes the first
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SOURCE history.com; PHOTO AP
MICHAEL B. SMITH AND JANET LOEHRKE, USA TODAY
STATE-BY-STATE 6B
Ben Mutzabaugh
@todayinthesky
USA TODAY
Care to do some shopping at
the airport, even if you’re not
flying? Or walk a loved one to
the gate before his flight?
You’ll be able to do that starting next week at Pittsburgh International. The airport is
poised to become the first in
the USA to allow non-fliers regular access into its gateside terminal areas since security
measures changed after 9/11.
The airport has won approval
from the Transportation Security Administration to allow
non-ticketed customers to pass
AMERICA’S MARKETS 4B
v STORY CONTINUES ON 4A
v STORY CONTINUES ON 4A
Pittsburgh airport will allow
non-passengers through to gates
©COPYRIGHT 2017 USA TODAY,
A division of Gannett Co., Inc.
USA SNAPSHOTS©
expected the effort will be
viewed in the future as “the way
to do it.”
The devastation “was of epic
proportions. No one has ever
ees waited in relentless rain
outside the convention center,
Houston Mayor Sylvester
Turner acknowledged that the
city would need to move fast to
prevent cramped from becoming chaotic.
“The doors of the George R.
Brown will not close,” Turner
assured Houston residents
Tuesday. “However, I certainly
understand that if you have too
many people in a space too
long, it creates additional
problems.”
The city would open megashelters for displaced residents, possibly by the end of
the day, he said.
The scene bore an eerie sim-
Customers with no
tickets will still have
to go through the
same screening as
passengers.
through security, though they
would still have to go through the
same screening as those catching
flights. They’d also be required to
show ID so they can be vetted
against no-fly lists.
“Participants should be prepared to receive the same level of
security screening as travelers
and should ensure they’re not
carrying any prohibited items
such as weapons before coming
through the security checkpoint,”
the TSA’s Mike England said.
Access with the “myPITpass”
program starts Sept. 5, when
non-flying visitors can request a
day pass at a special counter in
MARKETPLACE TODAY 4D
PUZZLES 4D
the airport’s ticketing area.
Gateside access will initially be
allowed only on weekdays between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Officials
say that could be expanded if the
pass proves popular.
To ensure that visitors don’t
bog down screening lines, airport
and TSA officials say ticketed passengers will receive priority at
checkpoints. “We don’t expect
this will have any impact on wait
times,” England said.
The move is a major victory for
Pittsburgh International, which
helped pioneer modern airport
design when its terminals opened
in 1992. Anchoring the airport’s
concourses was its Airmall, a collection of stores that was unusual
for most U.S. airports at the time.
Security changes after 9/11 restricted terminal access to ticketed customers and abruptly
curtailed access to the popular
airport shops.
TONIGHT ON TV 5D
NEWSLINE
IN NEWS
Costco drops
trucking firm
Company accused of
labor violations
IN OPINION
Jamie Dimon
Bank CEO: America
needs tax reform now
IN SPORTS
Nobody immune
to mental illness
Athletes share their
mental health battles
IN LIFE
Fall books preview
New efforts from A-list
authors hit stores
WEATHER 6A
YOUR SAY 6A
USA TODAY
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
AT USATODAY.COM
8 A.M.
Tiny canine hero
A family would have burned
with their house if not for their
pet chihuahua.
ALL DAY
Burning Man
Trevor Hughes covers the desert
festival through Snapchat.
Saturn probe
Cassini is ready
for its last hurrah
Space workhorse
will send data right
up to its fiery end
All times Eastern
Traci Watson
Special to USA TODAY
Corrections & Clarifications
The name of the mayor of Tucson, Ariz., was incorrect in an
Aug. 23 story about President
Trump’s visit to Phoenix. He is
Jonathan Rothschild.
USA TODAY is committed
to accuracy. To reach us,
contact Standards Editor
Brent Jones at 800-8727073 or e-mail accuracy@usatoday.com.
Please indicate whether
you’re responding to
content online or in the
newspaper.
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NEWS 2A
E2
A long and illustrious career is
about to come to a violent end for
the Cassini spacecraft, which
opened scientists’ eyes to some of
the most life-friendly places in
the solar system.
On Sept. 15, Cassini will dive
into Saturn’s atmosphere, where
the craft will disintegrate and
melt in less than two minutes. A
true professional, it will send information to Earth until the end,
and researchers expect some of
the most valuable data of the entire mission to emerge from the
spaceship’s demise.
“The spacecraft has been used
to its fullest,” Cassini program
manager Earl Maize of NASA’s Jet
Propulsion Laboratory said at a
news conference Tuesday. “We will
have it broadcast data back down
to the very, very last minute.”
The $3.3 billion mission — paid
for by NASA and European partners — launched from Earth in
1997. After a long journey though
the solar system, Cassini spent a
remarkable 13 years circling Saturn. Only NASA’s Voyagers
probes have a longer track record
among the spacecraft exploring
the solar system beyond Mars,
the Cassini team says.
Now Cassini is running low on
fuel, so managers decided to have
it self-destruct on Saturn rather
than risk collision with its moons.
Since late April, Cassini has
been enjoying a strenuous farewell
tour of Saturn that saw the spacecraft dip repeatedly into the unexplored territory between the
planet and its nested halos. On this
“grand finale,” as NASA calls it, the
ship has zipped through the gap
between planet and rings 20 times,
taking the first samples of both the
rings and Saturn’s outer atmosphere. The craft also discovered
that the planet’s atmosphere and
rings are entangled in a complex
relationship beyond what researchers had expected.
“Scientists love mysteries, and
the grand finale is providing mysteries for everyone,” Cassini project scientist Linda Spilker, also
of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory,
said Tuesday.
The stream of scientific mysteries will begin drawing to a
close Sept. 14, when Cassini sends
its last images to Earth. At 4:37
a.m. ET on Sept. 15, the ship will
begin what NASA calls “the final
plunge.” It will swivel to give one
of its instruments the best possible view of the atmosphere on the
way down. A little more than
three hours later, it will enter Saturn’s atmosphere.
The spacecraft will hit more
than 400 degrees within seconds.
In short order it will lose control,
“Scientists love
mysteries, and
the grand finale
is providing
mysteries for
everyone.”
Project scientist Linda Spilker
lose contact with Earth, and begin to melt. First the outer shield,
then the aluminum components
and finally the parts made of iridium will burn away, vaporizing in
perhaps a minute.
Scientists would love to have
Cassini around for another decade. The hard-working ship has
yielded hints of the rings’ age –
preliminary data indicate they’re
young — and helped reveal that
Saturn’s tiny moon Enceladus has
a subsurface ocean that appears
hospitable to living organisms.
After such a bounty of results, scientists are loath to say goodbye.
“This is in many ways a tough
time,” said Spilker, who has
worked on Cassini since 1988. On
the other hand, “who knows what
new mysteries the next two
weeks will bring?”
MATT MARTON, AP
The move by the Illinois attorney general has the backing of
Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, above.
Chicago sued for
more police oversight
Illinois AG wants court
to monitor changes
Aamer Madhani
and Kevin Johnson
USA TODAY
CHICAGO Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan filed a federal
lawsuit Tuesday to force courtmonitored oversight for Chicago’s
effort to overhaul its police force.
The move by the state’s attorney general to sue the city of Chicago — with Mayor Rahm
Emanuel’s blessing — comes as
U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has expressed resistance to
pursuing such oversight — known
as consent decrees — of the Chicago Police Department and other law enforcement agencies.
Sessions argued that such efforts are detrimental to police
forces.
“As the state attorney general,
we are essentially stepping into
the shoes of the Department of
Justice — shoes that the DOJ has
abandoned at this point,” Madigan said in a news conference to
announce the lawsuit.
In the final days of the Obama
administration, the Justice Department issued a scathing report
that detailed deep troubles in the
Chicago department.
Along with the report, the Justice Department and the city issued “a statement of agreement”
to find remedies to improve policing and to repair the public’s
trust in the department.
Soon after being sworn into office this year, Sessions said the
Obama administration’s reliance
on the court-ordered overhauls
“undermined respect for police
and made — oftentimes — their
job more difficult.”
During the Obama administration, more than two dozen law
enforcement agencies — including ones in Ferguson, Mo., Baltimore and Chicago — were the
subjects of federal investigations
into misconduct.
Those inquiries often resulted
in the consent decrees, which required a federal judge to oversee
changes to policing operations.
The debate over a consent decree for the Chicago force comes
as the nation’s third-largest city
has seen its murder rate
skyrocket.
The city has recorded more
than 1,200 homicides since the
start of 2016 — more than New
York and Los Angeles combined.
President Trump has repeatedly pilloried Chicago over the
surge in homicides and questioned whether the city’s leaders
are tying the hands of street cops
charged with dealing with the
crime.
We combat
natural disasters with
acts of God.
In the wake of Hurricane Harvey, thousands of people have been impacted, their lives uprooted by disaster.
But they are not alone. Thanks to your generosity, The Salvation Army was already on the scene to provide
relief from the storm. Now, our troops are hard at work supplying food, water, shelter, and vital resources
for rebuilding. With your ongoing support, we will continue to help until the healing is complete.
To give, call 1-800-Sal-Army or visit HelpSalvationArmy.org today.
Disaster Response Emergency Housing Social Services Food Services Counseling
USA TODAY
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
NEWS 3A
RIGGED A USA TODAY NETWORK INVESTIGATION
Costco dumps trucking company
Transportation
business accused
of labor abuses
Brett Murphy
USA TODAY Network
Costco, one of the world’s largest retailers, stopped doing business with a California trucking
company accused of trapping
drivers in debt, then using it to
force them to work overtime.
Brands across the USA face increased scrutiny over labor abuses in their supply lines, a
problem revealed in a USA TODAY Network investigation in
June.
This month, four Democratic
senators, led by Sherrod Brown
of Ohio, sent letters to 16 retailers, calling on them to root out
“shameful” labor abuses.
Soon after, Costco Wholesale
dropped Pacific 9 Transportation, one of the biggest port
trucking companies in Southern
California.
Hewlett-Packard sent an auditor to investigate the company’s
labor practices.
Both retailers declined to
comment on their actions. Alan
Ta, chief operating officer for Pacific 9, said that even before
Costco withdrew, his company
stopped leasing trucks to drivers
and launched a series of changes
to improve their pay.
“We have made significant
change in our company and to
our industry,” Ta said in an
email.
A wave of pressure from retailers and manufacturers has hit
port trucking operations across
the industry, according to drivers
who said their employers have
been fielding calls from clients.
Those clients include Walmart, which pledged in a letter to
the senators that it would cancel
contracts with any trucking company that did not provide “assurances” of fair labor practices.
“The stories profiled in that
article are deeply concerning,”
Executive Vice President Jay
Jorgensen wrote of the USA TODAY Network investigation
“Rigged.”
“Any motor carrier that fails to
comply with law, such as those
alleged in the article, would be in
violation of our contract and
would therefore be subject to
cancellation,” he wrote.
The series revealed how port
trucking companies in Southern
California spent the past decade
forcing drivers to finance their
own trucks through companysponsored lease-to-own programs they could not afford.
RICK BOWMER, AP
Costco, one of
America’s
largest retailers, stopped
doing business with
Pacific 9
Transportation, a California trucking company
accused of
trapping
drivers in
debt to force
them to work
overtime.
ONLINE RIGGED.USATODAY.COM For full coverage of our
investigation, including photos and video interviews,visit us online.
The longer drivers worked, the
more trapped they felt. After a
few months, drivers typically had
paid thousands of dollars toward
a truck.
If drivers quit or got fired for
any reason, most of them lost the
truck and everything they had
paid. Many worked 20 hours a
day to keep up with their truck
payments and feed their families.
For years, Pacific 9 used the
same kind of lease-to-own
program.
Forty drivers won California
labor
commissioner
cases
against Pacific 9, accusing the
company of using the leases to
cheat them of fair pay. Half of
them testified that they had to
work up to 19 hours a day, violating federal fatigue laws for
truckers.
As the USA TODAY Network
began investigating and as labor
judgments piled up against Pacific 9, the company stopped using
leases. In April 2016, facing almost $7 million in court-ordered
back pay and penalties, the company filed for bankruptcy
protection.
It has since started rehiring
drivers as full-time employees
and stopped charging them truck
expenses.
Kim Jong Un’s belligerence stops
‘short of the red line,’ analysts say
‘All options are on the
table,’ Trump says
after missile launch
Jim Michaels and Mike James
USA TODAY
President Trump warned
Tuesday that “all options are on
the table” in response to North
Korea’s latest missile launch, but
a military one seems unlikely, security analysts said Tuesday.
“I think the administration
sees that an attack would be so
escalatory that we probably ought
to avoid that,” said Bruce Bennett, an analyst at RAND Corp.
Trump issued the warning after the launch of a midrange ballistic missile over Japanese
territory for the first time.
Trump’s response was more
measured than his earlier threat
to bring “fire and fury” to North
Korea.
He said Tuesday that North
Korea’s “threatening and destabilizing actions” increase the country’s isolation, and Pyongyang’s
actions show “contempt for its
neighbors.”
North Korean leader Kim Jong
Un, who has continuously defied
world opinion in pursuit of his
country’s nuclear weapons program, has managed to walk up to
a red line without crossing it,
analysts said.
He threatened to fire four missiles toward Guam, a U.S. territory. Instead, he sent a single
missile flying over Japan, a slight-
YONHAP NEWS AGENCY VIA EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY
Suh Hoon, director of South Korea’s National Intelligence Service, discusses North Korea’s latest missile launch Monday.
ly less provocative act.
“This is just short of the red
line,” said Patrick Cronin, an analyst at the Center for a New
American Security. It allows Kim
to defy the United States without
forcing Washington’s hand. “He’s
seeking better leverage in what is
essentially a negotiation.”
Trump did not reveal what options he is considering. “We’ll see,
we’ll see,” he said before boarding
a helicopter for a trip to tour
areas of Texas ravaged by Hurricane Harvey.
North Korea said Wednesday
that Kim was present for the missile launch and said his country
will continue to watch “U.S. demeanors” before it decides on future actions. Kim called the
launch a “meaningful prelude” to
containing Guam.
Cronin said Trump’s more
measured response Tuesday
seems to reflect the discipline his
new chief of staff, retired Marine
general John Kelly, brought to
the White House.
Washington does have some
options, including additional
sanctions or demonstrations of
force, such as flying bombers near
North Korean airspace. “We cannot let this stand,” Cronin said.
North Korea has twice fired
rockets that it said carried satellites over Japan — in 1998 and
2009 — but Tuesday’s launch was
the first time it fired a ballistic
missile over the island nation.
The Pentagon confirmed that
the missile’s northeastern path
“did not pose a threat to North
America.”
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe assailed the missile launch
and said he and Trump agreed in
a phone call to seek an emergency session of the United Nations
Security Council. He quoted
Trump as saying the United
States was “with Japan 100%.”
Abe said he and Trump saw the
launch as an unprecedented
threat, Japanese broadcaster
NHK reported.
Residents in several prefectures in northern regions of Japan were told to take cover when
the missile’s flight path was
detected.
South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of
Staff said the missile traveled
nearly 1,700 miles and reached a
maximum height of 341 miles as
it flew over the northern Japanese island of Hokkaido.
Japanese Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga described the
test as an “unprecedented, grave
threat.”
The South Korean government
said in a statement that it “condemns in the strongest terms this
provocation.” It said if the nuclear and missile provocations continue, it will respond strongly
based on a “stalwart” alliance
with the United States.
They agreed to “sternly” take
action at the U.N. Security Council, the South Korean Yonhap
News Agency reported.
Tuesday’s launch came days after North Korea fired three shortrange ballistic missiles into the
sea and a month after its second
flight test of an intercontinental
ballistic missile.
Protest restrictions gain traction in states
Group warns that
legislatures chip away
at right to speak out
Heidi M. Przybyla
USA TODAY
WASHINGTON Republican legislators in 20 U.S. statehouses proposed — and six legislatures
approved — restrictions on the
right to assemble and protest this
year, according to a new report by
the Democrat-aligned State Innovation Exchange.
“These bills would create a
new set of crimes, significantly
harsher penalties and costly fines
that could apply broadly to anyone — whether they are supporters of the president,
members of the Tea Party or just
concerned parents speaking out
at a school board meeting,” according to an advance copy of the
report. SiX works to advance liberal policies at the state level and
calls the wave of bills a “new and
disturbing trend.”
“Given this passage rate, there
is every reason to think we will
see more of these efforts in 2018,”
the report said.
Among the states approving
what SiX calls “anti-protester”
legislation were Arkansas, Oklahoma, North Dakota, Georgia and
South Dakota. Arkansas passed
an “anti-loitering” bill that makes
it an offense if a person “lingers,
remains or prowls in a public
place or the premises of another
without apparent reason and under circumstances that warrant
alarm or concern for the safety of
persons or property in the
vicinity.”
In Oklahoma, where there
have been protests against major
oil and gas pipelines, “trespassing
on property containing a critical
infrastructure facility without
permission” can be a misdemeanor punishable by up to six
months’ imprisonment. If the
damage is “willful,” punishment
increases to up to 10 years in jail.
Other efforts have stalled, particularly in states with Democrat-
ic governors. After protests in the
wake of the police killing of Philando Castile in 2016, Minnesota
conservatives proposed several
pieces of legislation. Castile, 32,
was shot and killed during a traffic stop when his girlfriend and 4year-old daughter were in the car.
One bill would have allowed
police departments to charge
protesters convicted of a crime
for the costs associated with demonstrations. The bills either failed
to advance or were vetoed by Gov.
Mark Dayton, a Democrat.
The wave of state legislation
comes amid rising tensions over
civil liberties across the USA
caused by police shootings of
black men, white supremacist rallies planned in several cities and
demonstrations against President
Trump’s policies, as well as clashes between police and “anti-fascist” or “antifa” protesters.
Rep. Nick Zerwas, a Republican sponsor of a Minnesota proposal that did not pass, said he
simply wants to stiffen penalties
for behavior that is already subject to fines, including blocking
access to freeways and airports.
“It was very narrow in scope
and aimed to increase criminal
penalties for a few specific violations,” Zerwas said. “What we’ve
seen is a pattern of behavior in
which individuals are closing
down airports or blocking freeways in violation of existing law.”
Other measures would have increased penalties for protesting
on an interstate highway from a
gross misdemeanor to a felony,
said Minnesota state Rep. Rena
Moran, a Democrat.
“The GOP continued to bury
anti-protester provisions in successive versions of larger omnibus public safety bills,” she said.
“There’s no indication that Republicans won’t continue to try to
pass these bills next year.”
Some failed proposals would
have reduced penalties for motorists who strike protesters with
their vehicles, according to the
report. This month in Charlottesville, Va., Heather Heyer was
killed when a man at a white nationalist rally plowed his car into
a crowd of counterprotesters.
Ta and many of his drivers
said the company is working to
become a model for the rest of
the industry.
Pacific 9’s sudden loss of business comes at a precarious time
for the company — the tail end of
drawn out bankruptcy negotiation with truckers.
Drivers and their attorneys
sent at least two letters to the
senators pleading with them to
ease pressure on retailers using
Pacific 9.
Rivera and Shackelford, a San
Diego firm representing some
Pacific 9 drivers, said Costco’s
decision might “lead to the closing of Pacific 9 altogether,” undoing months of negotiations and
possibly leaving drivers emptyhanded.
“We believe this would be a
tragedy,” the attorneys wrote.
Some drivers said the same —
even those who testified about
pervasive labor abuses inside the
company.
“Pacific 9 has followed
through on its commitments to
us drivers,” wrote trucker Santiago Aguilar, who filed a labor
claim against the company in
2013 and has since been rehired
as an employee with full protections. Aguilar’s letter was signed
by 13 others at the company.
“Now, I get a fair day’s pay for a
hard day’s work,” he said.
IN BRIEF
MATTIS: TRANSGENDER
TROOPS CAN STILL SERVE
Defense Secretary Jim Mattis
announced late Tuesday that
transgender troops will be allowed to serve in the military,
pending the results of a study by
experts.
The announcement follows
tweets and an order from President Trump that indicated transgender service members no
longer had a place in the military,
effectively reversing an Obama
administration policy. The order
affects the Department of Homeland Security, which houses the
Coast Guard.
Mattis’ move buys time for the
Pentagon to determine whether
and how it would allow thousands of transgender troops to
serve, whether they would receive medical treatment or how
they would be discharged.
ON FLA. TRIP, DEVOS WON’T
VISIT PUBLIC SCHOOLS
The Trump administration’s
secretary of education, who visited schools in Tallahassee on
Tuesday, decided to extend her
visit for a second day but still
won’t set foot in any public
schools, according to her
schedule.
Betsy DeVos, a staunch supporter of charter and private
schools, made stops Tuesday at
Holy Comforter Episcopal School
and Florida State University High
School.
Wednesday, she plans to visit
Bethel Christian Academy, a
voucher school.
NAACP CHIEF: THERE WILL BE
MORE CHARLOTTESVILLES
The NAACP’s leader said Tuesday that there would be more racial violence because the Trump
administration has “created an
atmosphere” that emboldens
white supremacists and other
hate groups.
“There will be many Charlottesvilles,” Derrick Johnson, the
NAACP’s interim president and
CEO, said in a speech at
the National Press Club in
Washington.
Johnson referred to a rally in
Virginia this month where white
nationalists and other groups
protested the possible removal of
a Confederate statue and clashed
with counterprotesters.
ALSO ...
uIranian government spokesman Mohammad Bagher Nobakht dismissed U.S. demands for
the inspection of Iranian military
sites by the U.N. nuclear watchdog, shrugging off a request by
Nikki Haley, America’s ambassador to the United Nations, as only
a “dream.” Nobakht said Haley’s
demand wasn’t worth any attention. Iran will not accept any inspection of its sites and
“especially our military sites.”
Staff and wire reports
4A NEWS
DISASTER IN TEXAS
E6
USA TODAY
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
Experts
51 inches and counting:
Harvey sets rainfall record postpone
Storm is eyeing
a final landfall near
Texas/La. border
Doyle Rice
TROPICAL STORM HARVEY
Expected path of Harvey
is within this area:
IND.
OHIO
W.VA.
KAN.
Tropical Storm Harvey has
broken the all-time contiguous
U.S. rainfall record from a tropical storm or hurricane, the National Weather Service said
Tuesday.
East of Highlands, the Cedar
Bayou gauge has picked up 51.88
inches of rain from Harvey, the
weather service said. This broke
the record of 48 inches set in Medina, Texas, from Amelia in 1978.
It’s just under the all-time U.S.
rainfall record from a tropical cyclone, which was 52 inches in Hawaii from Hurricane Hiki in 1950.
Harvey is now drifting over the
Gulf of Mexico about 95 miles
south-southwest of Cameron, La.,
the National Hurricane Center
said.
It will meander over the Gulf
on Tuesday before making a final
landfall somewhere near the Texas/Louisiana border, likely early
Wednesday.
PA.
ILL.
@usatodayweather
USA TODAY
MO.
VA.
Louisville
Sunday
7 a.m.
KY.
Nashville
OKLA.
ARK.
Memphis
TENN.
Saturday
7 a.m.
ALA.
Shreveport
TEXAS
MISS.
N.C.
S.C.
Friday
7 a.m.
GA.
LA.
Thursday, 7 a.m.
Houston
Atlantic
Ocean
Wednesday, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, 7 a.m.
Corpus
Christi
Tuesday, 1 p.m.
Harvey’s path
FLA.
Gulf of
Mexico
N
SOURCE NOAA (As of 1 p.m. CT, Aug. 29)
JANET LOEHRKE, USA TODAY
Harvey is then expected to
slowly move northeast across
Louisiana and Arkansas as a tropical depression from Thursday
into Saturday.
As it spins offshore, the storm
is expected to dump an additional
6 to 12 inches of rain through Fri-
day over the upper Texas coast
and into southwestern Louisiana,
exacerbating the life-threatening,
catastrophic flooding in the
Houston area, the hurricane center said.
As of Tuesday afternoon, up to
30% of Harris County is under
water, a flood official said. Harris
County is home to 4 million people, making it the third-largest
county in the U.S.
Amazingly, more than 6 million Texans have been impacted
by 30 inches or more of rain since
Friday, the weather service said.
Brief tornadoes may also form
anywhere from Galveston eastward to just south of New Orleans, the National Weather
Service warned.
As of 4 p.m. CDT, Harvey had
maximum sustained winds of 50
mph with a few higher gusts reported. It was moving to the
north-northeast at 6 mph.
Forecasters also were monitoring a system off the Carolina
coast, which brought rain to the
Mid-Atlantic on Tuesday. This
system is forecast to race out to
sea with minimal U.S. impact.
Still another system is being
watched in the eastern Atlantic
Ocean, which has a 90% chance
of becoming a tropical depression
or storm in the next five days.
Police chief fears
death toll will rise
v CONTINUED FROM 1A
Yuth Chhut, 98, sleeps at the convention center, which has
been packed well beyond its intended capacity.
Evacuees balance
relief, frustration
v CONTINUED FROM 1A
ilarity to Hurricane Katrina in
New Orleans in 2005 when the
city sent thousands of residents
to the Superdome. The stadium,
intended as a last-resort evacuation center, soon sank into chaos
with limited power, overtaxed
plumbing, insufficient food and a
shredded roof.
Houston is not the Superdome,
government officials stressed
Tuesday.
The Federal Emergency Management Agency was on the
ground and in the convention
center from Day One, spokesman
David Gervino said.
“So many people have stepped
up, from everyday citizens to first
responders to state and local officials and other government partners, both state and federal,”
Gervino said. “We’ve pre-positioned a wealth of assets. We had
other teams deployed here before
the first raindrops hit the ground.
This is a very different response.”
Tom McCasland, director of
Housing and Community Development for the city, said he hoped
to open another shelter close by
later in the day.
But, he declared, “our doors remain open. At no point, have we
closed the doors here. We are
sheltering people with pets and
urgent medical emergencies, and
we continue to shelter people as
they come in.”
Though officials stressed they
would not turn anyone away, they
could not guarantee everyone
would get a bed or a cot.
Evacuees entering the Houston convention center were
searched for firearms or alcohol.
Red Cross officials registered
evacuees before giving them
meals, blankets and dry clothing.
Doctors were on duty, and
there was a pharmaceutical area
and emergency room. Evacuees
with flood-damaged homes were
urged to register with FEMA.
Soon, the convention center
would have showers.
Volunteers were quick to assess needs.
“Right now, we have an urgent
need for wheelchairs,” said Tyler
Moyer, program marketing manager for the Red Cross.
Another small group of volunteers, the Texas Center for the
Missing and the Houston Police
Department’s missing-persons
division worked to reconnect
families who were separated as
they fled the floods.
For those inside, there was a
mix of relief and frustration.
Isaiah Arellano, 18, huddled
with a group of adults and children along the wall in a hallway of
the convention center. He has
been at the shelter since Monday,
when his house began flooding.
He walked through waist-high
water to reach a safe place, then
was taken to the shelter.
“Last night I slept on the hard
floor and used a towel as a pillow,” he said, pointing to cardboard that’s his bed.
“They said there are no cots.
Since last night we’ve been asking
for a crib for the baby, and we still
don’t have one.”
Marck Acosta of Houston reclined on cardboard and pillows,
his
6-month-old
daughter,
Aubrey, nursing a bottle of milk
next to him.
“Long, cold, crazy days,” he
said.
The family, he said, was picked
up by buses and taken to the convention center Monday.
“Within an hour, they gave us
dry clothes,” Acosta said. “They
gave us everything we need.”
He was grateful for everything.
Asked about sleeping on cardboard, Acosta said: “It’s not the
best, but it’s passable. It’s better
than being outside.”
seen it,” Trump said.
The storm remained over the
Gulf of Mexico on Tuesday; it already has dumped more than
50 inches of rain in parts of
Houston. A National Weather
Service gauge near Highlands,
Texas, recorded 51.88 inches of
rain — the highest total ever from
a tropical storm or hurricane in
the contiguous 48 states.
Harvey was expected to drop
an additional 6 to 12 inches of
rain through Friday over the upper Texas coast and into southwestern Louisiana.
Still, Mayor Sylvester Turner
was optimistic at a news conference Tuesday. “My hope is that
once we get past the next 24
hours that the situation in the
city of Houston will significantly
improve,” Turner said.
Emergency responders have
conducted more than 3,500 boat
and air rescues, and the number
was climbing. Outside help was
streaming in. Search-and-rescue
crews from Florida, California,
Utah and other areas were sent to
trouble spots. Wal-mart was shipping 2,000 kayaks to the area,
The giant shelter set up at the
George R. Brown Convention
Center in downtown Houston
was packed with more than 9,000
evacuees — nearly double its
planned capacity. Thousands
more slept in smaller shelters.
“Last night in Texas, 17,000+
people sought refuge in shelters,”
the American Red Cross tweeted
Tuesday. “We’re providing safety
& comfort to rescued families.”
Surrounded by people taking a
smoking break outside the con-
vention center, Danielle Brown
hugged her boyfriend, Lorenzo
Harps. They arrived Sunday night
after being rescued by boat from
a ground-level apartment.
“Everything was already flooded,” said Brown, huddled beneath
a relatively dry overhang as rain
poured down.
Before moving up, they tried
putting electronics, clothes and
keepsakes on counters and
shelves. The water climbed to
3 feet within hours before rescuers reached them the next day.
Harvey was Brown’s first brush
with a tropical storm or hurricane. Her message to the untold
numbers of residents experiencing a similar crisis: “Be prepared.
Be cautious,” she said. “Grab only
what you need. Grab your life.”
The mayor imposed a 10 p.m.to-5 a.m. curfew for the city after
warning residents about people
impersonating law enforcement
officers.
Police Chief Art Acevedo confirmed the death of a police officer who was trapped in his
flooded patrol car late Sunday or
early Monday while trying to get
to work. Acevedo called Sgt. Steve
Perez, a 34-year police veteran, a
“sweet, gentle public servant.”
The toll from Harvey was difficult to tabulate, and authorities
said it could be days before the
full extent of the storm is known.
“We know in these kind of
events that, sadly, the death toll
goes up,” Acevedo told the Associated Press earlier Tuesday. “I’m
really worried about how many
bodies we’re going to find.”
Contributing: Doyle Rice, USA TODAY;
The (Lafayette, La.) Daily Advertiser
WHERE HARVEY HAS DRENCHED TEXAS
Rain totals (in inches) through 10 a.m. Tuesday:
49.3 Continental
U.S. record
19.6
30.4
10.3
College
Station
Austin
TEXAS
10
San
Antonio
15.6
17.8
Houston
Marys Creek
Galveston
N
50 miles
SOURCE ESRI, NOAA
JIM SERGENT, USA TODAY
Victoria
arguing
climate
change
Meteorologists want
to have discussion —
once people are safe
Doyle Rice
@usatodayweather
USA TODAY
While unknown numbers of
people are dead, missing or displaced, writing about a potential
link between a national tragedy
such as Hurricane Harvey and
man-made climate change is an
understandably touchy subject.
“If you think appropriate time
to do so is while floodwaters are
continuing to rise, then that opportunism reflects your personal
values,” tweeted WeatherBell meteorologist Ryan Maue. “What we
need right now is an informed,
reasoned, intellectual debate on
climate change and extreme
events.”
Another meteorologist, Marshall Shepherd of the University
of Georgia, said he had concerns.
“I am uncomfortable discussing
as a human tragedy unfolds, but
when the dust settles, the conversation needs to happen — and a
recent National Academies report on attribution is a good place
to start. Attribution studies on
Harvey will happen.”
Climate change remains a polarizing issue in our divided
country.
Whenever a huge weather
event such as Harvey occurs, a
debate rages in the meteorological community about whether it
is appropriate to discuss potential
links between climate change and
that event.
The report that Shepherd referred to, which was released in
2016, said there is no evidence
that the number of tropical cyclones (tropical storms, hurricanes and typhoons) has
increased in recent decades as
the planet has warmed.
There has been “marginally
“Climate change is
making even heavier
rainfall possible.”
John W. Nielsen-Gammon,
meteorologist
significant increases in the frequency of Category 4 and 5
storms.”
Harvey was a Category 4 hurricane at landfall Friday night, the
strongest storm to hit the USA in
12 years.
The report warned that “tropical cyclones are projected to become more intense as the climate
warms.”
Precipitation in tropical cyclones is likely to increase because of the increased water
vapor content of the atmosphere,
similarly to other extreme precipitation events, the report said.
The theory goes that a warmer
atmosphere would make hurricanes more intense than they
would otherwise be. “Climate
change is making even heavier
rainfall possible,” noted John W.
Nielsen-Gammon, a Texas A&M
University meteorologist and the
Texas State Climatologist.
Another expert, Adam Sobel of
Columbia University, said that
“based on many previous studies
of extreme precipitation events,
as well as our overall scientific
understanding, it is plausible to
expect that they (tropical cyclones) will show some amplification due to increased water
vapor in a warmer atmosphere.”
Sobel said Harvey would have
been a huge disaster in Houston
with or without global warming.
This is because of the specific meteorological situation of Harvey
(the positions of the high-pressure systems and the jet stream),
and the location of a major city.
“There are ideas about how the
meteorological situation could
have been influenced by warming, but those are much less robust and well-understood, and at
this point, I view it as a natural
occurrence by default,” Sobel
said.
USA TODAY
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
NEWS 5A
DISASTER IN TEXAS
Trump tours storm-ravaged areas
This is a state that
‘can handle anything,’
he assures crowd
Gregory Korte
@gregorykorte
USA TODAY
President Trump mounted the
front bumper of a firetruck in
Corpus Christi, Texas, on Tuesday, waving a Texas flag and telling the gathered crowd, “We love
you. You are special. We are here
to take care of you.”
Trump came to Texas to survey the damage from Hurricane
Harvey and rally communities
trying to escape floodwaters. Harvey weakened to a tropical storm
on its way to Louisiana. Trump
said he might return to Texas and
Louisiana over the weekend.
The storm is the most severe
natural disaster of Trump’s presidency. More than 1.7 million people were under evacuation
orders, and search-and-rescue
operations continued.
“It’s historic, its epic, but I will
tell you, it happened in Texas, and
Texas can handle anything,”
Trump told hundreds of cheering
supporters outside the firehouse
after he received a briefing from
federal agencies responding to
the disaster.
On his way to meet with emergency officials, his motorcade
passed trees, signs and fences
knocked down by the hurricane’s
130-mph winds.
Later, he flew to Austin, where
he toured the state’s emergency
operations center and spoke of
the “monster known as Harvey.”
“It sounds like such an innocent name,” he said. “But it’s not
innocent.”
Spokeswoman Sarah Sanders
said aboard Air Force One that
Trump avoided the areas most
impacted by flooding.
“The president wants to be
very cautious about making sure
that any activity doesn’t disrupt
any of the recovery efforts. ... As
of right now, I don’t know that we
will be able to get to some of the
really damaged areas,” she said.
One of those areas is Houston,
where 9,000 people shared 5,000
cots at a makeshift emergency
shelter at the George R. Brown
Convention Center.
“We are very aware of the issues at the convention center,”
JIM WATSON, AFP/GETTY IMAGES
“We love you,” President Trump tells Texans. He avoided areas
most impacted by flooding to not disrupt recovery efforts.
Federal Emergency Management
Agency Director Brock Long told
Trump in Corpus Christi. “But let
me be clear, this is not the
Superdome.”
The New Orleans Superdome
was an enduring symbol of the
poor response to Hurricane Katrina in 2005.
Trump’s windbreaker-wearing
delegation included first lady
Melania Trump, Housing Secretary Ben Carson, Health Secretary Tom Price and Small
Business Administrator Linda
McMahon.
McMahon said the SBA approved its first disaster-related
loan, and Trump promised more
help would be on the way from
Congress. Rebuilding, Trump
said, is “going to be a costly
proposition.”
The budget Trump proposed
this year would cut some of the
programs that have traditionally
been used for disaster recovery —
notably the Community Development Block Grants.
His message in Texas on Tuesday contained no hints of that fiscal conservatism.
“We want to be looked at in
five years and 10 years from now
as ‘This is the way to do it,’ ” he
said at the Corpus Christi firehouse as dispatch calls came over
an address system.
He said it’s too early to declare
the relief efforts an unqualified
success.
“We won’t say congratulations.
We don’t want to do that,” Trump
told Texas Gov. Greg Abbott.
“We’ll congratulate each other
when it’s all finished.”
As Trump was in Texas, Vice
President Pence took to the airwaves, continuing a blitz of radio
and television interviews with
stations in the region.
“We know we’re not out of the
woods,” he told KKTX-AM in
Corpus Christi. “People within
the sound of my voice should
know that this is still a dangerous
storm.”
Humanitarians mobilize
to minimize Harvey’s misery
From the ‘Cajun
Navy’ to pet lovers in
Austin, help arrives
Greg Toppo
@gtoppo
USA TODAY
H. DARR BEISER, USA TODAY
After Hurricane Katrina hit Louisiana in 2005, the Federal
Emergency Management Agency set up housing in trailers.
Housing will be
‘frustrating’ and
‘a long process’
FEMA’s troubled Katrina mission took 7 years
Bart Jansen
@ganjansen
USA TODAY
Federal officials warned that
housing for thousands of Texans
displaced by Hurricane Harvey
could be a long-term problem.
“The state of Texas is about to
undergo one of the largest recovery-housing missions that the nation has ever seen,” Federal
Emergency Management Agency
Administrator Brock Long said
during a news conference Monday. “It’s a long process. Housing
is going to be very frustrating in
Texas. We have to set the
expectations.”
For
displaced
survivors,
FEMA’s goal is to move them out
of shelters and into temporary
housing near where they work,
then return them to a permanent
residence, Long said. Anyone in a
shelter or without financial
means to replace their housing in
18 counties qualifying for individual disaster assistance can receive
aid for a motel or to rent an
apartment.
“The goal of this is, if we can’t
put you back in your home because it’s destroyed or because
the floodwaters are there and are
going to be there a while, we want
to get you out of the long-term
sheltering,” Long said.
The process could take a while.
Hurricane Katrina struck Louisiana and wreaked havoc across the
Gulf Coast in August 2005.
FEMA did not end its temporary
housing mission for Katrina until
February 2012.
At its peak, FEMA provided
more than 45,000 temporary
housing units in Mississippi,
which the agency called the largest housing operation in the
country’s history.
FEMA announced before Harvey’s rain stopped falling that
30,000 people would need shelter
from the storm that dropped a
record 50 inches of rain by Tuesday morning. About 9,000 displaced people were at the George
R. Brown Convention Center in
Houston, which has a capacity for
5,000.
Storm victims in counties that
were declared disaster areas must
apply for services such as emergency housing at disasterassistance.gov. More than 22,000
families began the process by
Monday, Vice President Pence
told KKTX radio Tuesday.
“There may be as many as half
a million Texans who are eligible
for financial support,” Pence said.
FEMA has a priority under
federal law to buy trailers for
emergency housing. The Department of Housing and Urban Development will also offer options.
“The last resort is to bring in
manufactured homes and travel
trailers,” Long said. “But that is a
long process. We don’t start dragging in manufactured homes and
travel trailers right off the bat.
They’re not going to be on your
property tomorrow by any
means.”
Emergency housing after Katrina was criticized on several
fronts. Survivors welcomed temporary trailers until they could
find permanent housing, but
some reported burning eyes and
other problems from formaldehyde in the construction materials. Twenty-one trailer manufacturers settled a class-action
lawsuit by paying $14.8 million to
resolve the claims.
Government watchdogs blasted FEMA’s assistance program
for individuals. FEMA wasted
$30 million in improper or potentially fraudulent payments to
housing contractors during a sixmonth period after Katrina, according to the Government Accountability Office.
Katrina destroyed or damaged
134,000 homes and 10,000 rental
units in Mississippi.
From June 2006 to January
2007, the GAO found that FEMA
spent $16 million on contractors
without seeking the lowest bids
and $15 million on maintenance
inspections without any evidence
they occurred. An additional
$600,000 was spent on emergency repairs for housing that wasn’t
in FEMA’s inventory.
From good Samaritan Cajuns
to pet lovers in Austin with pickups and motorized canoes, humanitarian efforts are underway
in Houston and beyond to minimize the misery of flooding from
Tropical Storm Harvey.
Harris County Sheriff Ed Gonzalez called upon anyone with a
“high-water, safe boat or vehicle”
to pitch in — and like clockwork,
the boats arrived. Hundreds of
boatsmen from around the region, as well as others from the
“Cajun Navy,” have traversed the
flooded streets of Houston for
days.
Jon Bridgers, who founded the
Cajun Navy’s Facebook page, told
the Houston Chronicle that another squad of rescuers from
Louisiana was en route Tuesday.
Aid groups, accustomed to
widespread disaster declarations,
expected the Harvey relief effort
to be among their biggest ever.
The Salvation Army of Georgia
said its Harvey intervention
would be the “largest and longest
emergency response” in the history of the organization. The
SCOTT CLAUSE, USA TODAY NETWORK
Volunteers and first responders work together to rescue
residents and pets from rising
floodwaters.
group is deployed in nearby Victoria, Texas.
Southern Baptist Disaster Relief said it began sending teams to
Texas before Harvey made landfall Friday and will probably be in
Houston “for months to come.”
The group said it was assisting up
to 60,000 people displaced by the
flooding by providing hot meals,
laundry services, hot showers and
companionship. It will ease
Houstonians’ return to their
homes by helping to clear land,
remove fallen trees and restore
flooded homes.
Brad Kieserman of the American Red Cross said the group was
at the beginning of “a massive relief effort” in Houston.
The Red Cross said more than
80 tractor-trailer loads of cots,
blankets, ready-to-eat meals and
other supplies were on the
ground in Texas, and shelter supplies were in place for more than
34,000 people. Supplies for an additional 18,000 were en route.
Aid across the region flowed in
unlikely ways.
Do-it-yourself fundraising efforts, facilitated by sites such as
GoFundMe, sprouted. By late
Tuesday afternoon, a crowdfunding effort begun Sunday to help
replace the belongings of students at KIPP Houston High
School had not only raised more
than $12,000 of its $20,000 goal
— it was also trending on the
website.
Elsewhere, a YouCaring effort
to raise $3 million for victims of
Harvey had raised $2 million.
Austin Pets Alive, based in the
Texas capital, said Tuesday that it
saved about 430 animals from
Harvey’s floodwaters with the
help of other pet welfare organizations. The groups expect to rescue 1,000 pets by week’s end.
Mary Mattia, the Austin
group’s communication director,
said Tuesday she was leading a
caravan with pet supplies and
transport kennels headed back to
Houston. One of her team pulled
a motorized canoe, and another
member stopped at Walmart to
pick up a few rubber boats, she
said. “We’re going to figure it out
for the animals,” Mattia said.
Houston entrepreneur turns
furniture stores into shelters
‘Mattress Mack’
welcomes evacuees
Sharon Ko
KENS-TV, San Antonio
SAN ANTONIO One Houston furniture store owner who said his
community
supported
him
through tough times is paying it
forward by turning his two stores
into shelters to help evacuees.
After the remnants of Hurricane Harvey hit Houston, Jim
“Mattress Mack” McIngvale of
Gallery Furniture gathered volunteers and his delivery trucks
starting Sunday to rescue people.
“We had several Penske rental
trucks, 24-foot trucks that you
can get in any flooded street,” he
said Monday. “We sent volunteers out in Houston, picking up
people.”
In Houston, McIngvale, 66, is a
household name known for his
commercials with the slogan
“Gallery Furniture will save you
money!”
In 2009, someone lit his warehouse on fire, which resulted in
millions of dollars in damage.
Houston customers kept him in
JOHANNA VOSSLER, USA TODAY
Jim McIngvale’s two furniture
stores are save havens for 400
people and their pets.
business, so McIngvale said supporting residents during this
tragic time is one way to give
back.
Four hundred children and
adults are living at his two stores,
and he has allowed the families to
bring their pets.
“Last night, about 1:30 in the
morning, this little girl came in.
She’s 7 years old, had her parents
with her and I think probably her
uncle. She was the only one in the
group that spoke English. And
she was crying,” McIngvale told
National Public Radio on Monday. “And she said, ‘Will you allow
us to stay here?’ And it just broke
my heart because it was so personal to them. And unlike an
adult, she couldn’t hide her
feelings.”
McIngvale and his army of volunteers provide free breakfast,
lunch and dinner for the
evacuees.
Some of the volunteers, such as
Jasmine Broussard, are customers. Broussard knows the anguish
the evacuees are going through;
her family lost its home in Hurricane Katrina 12 years ago. “I
know what I went through, and I
couldn’t allow other people to go
through that,” she told NPR. “And
now, if I could be a help to somebody, that’s what I’m going to do.”
During Hurricane Katrina,
which struck the Gulf Coast on
Aug. 29, 2005, McIngvale helped
200 evacuees who fled New Orleans, providing shelter in his
store.
McIngvale, who has been in
business for more than 35 years,
is known for his philanthropy.
He’s given to numerous charities
and for more than 20 years, he’s
donated rooms full of furniture to
families in need at Christmas.
“I was raised as a Catholic. I
continued my Catholic faith
throughout my life, trying to do
the right thing,” he said.
USA TODAY
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
6A NEWS
YOUR SAY
Tracking the nation’s conversation
HURRICANE HARVEY
Prevent another disaster,
act on climate change
TWITTER
@USATOPINION
LETTERS
LETTERS@USATODAY.COM
Our followers shared their
thoughts on Hurricane
Harvey’s passage through
Texas and the rescue operations underway.
My heart goes out to
those in Texas who have
been displaced, lost their homes
or even their lives to Hurricane
Harvey. Unfortunately, storms
like this one will become much
more frequent unless our nation
takes significant action on climate change.
It’s true that Texas has always
had storms (as has the East
Coast, and Florida specifically).
But it’s the frequency and severity that the combination of rising
temperatures and sea levels is
pushing forward. A solution is
needed that bridges the partisan
divide.
One such solution is a fee on
carbon emissions, collected from
the source (such as coal plants)
then eventually returned to the
community. This is a marketand business-friendly plan quite
similar to one being proposed by
some in Capitol Hill.
Our children’s and grandchildren’s future depends on
what we do now, so we don’t
have many more large disasters
like Harvey in Texas. Contact
your representatives and ask
them to support a carbon fee
and dividend legislation.
Miriam Kirscht
Ypsilanti, Mich.
FACEBOOK
FACEBOOK.COM/
USATODAYOPINION
Just think, if we had a national
water grid, we could have
turned on the pumps at key
collection points and distributed
it to reservoirs around the country. Maybe after this, we can
think of ways to turn this hor-
The water is not forever.
Things can be replaced. Human compassion is unending. As long as there’s a tomorrow, there’s hope.
NATE BEELER, THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH, POLITICALCARTOONS.COM
N. Korea makes Trump
look like a paper tiger
@FMHilton
The United States Coast
Guard, thank you for your
unwavering support during
this crisis.
@ShaunaJones1
Matthew Farmer
It is not the aftermath yet.
Harvey is here for another
few days! We all need to be
there for victims in whatever
way we can. No politics.
SCOTT CLAUSE, USA TODAY NETWORK
Evacuating Houston
President Trump warned Tuesday that “all options are on the
table” in response to North
Korea’s launch of a ballistic
missile over Japanese territory
for the first time.
@PaintPaperPens
rible event into a call for action
that just might save billions in
future floods, drought and fires.
Thanks to all you heroes out
there. May you be blessed
many more times in life.
Edward W. Greenlee
I hate to see the elderly having to go through this. They
are so fragile.
@BreastsR4babies
Houston, you have a problem.
But don’t worry, we will do all we
can to help you.
This is so terrible, people
have lost their lives. Please,
to the neighboring counties,
help supply food and shelter
to those affected.
Luis F. Silva
@manavjoshi18
Right now, getting relief to our
friends in Texas is all that matters. Give generously, and show
the world what a great country
we are. We stand up for each
other, that is what makes us
great — always.
Things like these disasters
should tell us that the least of
our problems should be us
against each other.
Scott Bennett
FRONT & CENTER
It’s obvious that this is a contest of threats between Trump
and Kim designed to make
either us or them take action
first. Kim will keep indirectly
threatening through tests and
such until we commit to a move
against him. At that point, there
are countries (China has come
out and said this) that will back
North Korea simply because we
become the actual aggressor.
For more, follow @USATOpinion
or #tellusatoday.
Seattle
Olympia
73
75
81
On this date in 1982, parts of
Vermont picked up 3 inches of
snow.
Fargo
Billings
93
91
96
Reno
90
Carson City
Salt Lake City
Las Vegas
Flagstaff
116
90
64
Anchorage
61
90
Juneau
59
Tulsa
86
84
86
MidlandOdessa
Austin
89
87
San Antonio
90
81
Cincinnati
82
81
Louisville
85
Knoxville
74
79
83
Mobile
82
New
Orleans
Warmer
78/64
THU
T-storm
80/71
THU
Some
sun
84/58
FRI
T-storm
80/69
FRI
Cooler
72/56
AQI Good
THU
T-shower
92/80
THU
FRI
T-storms
86/79
FRI
c Cloudy
f Fog
i Ice
r Rain
10s
20s
30s
40s
50s
60s
86
91
87
Tampa
92
Miami
93
90
70s
THURSDAY
Savannah
98
BOSTON
CHARLOTTE
Shower,
t-storm
80/59
Not as
warm
71/54
Clouding up
72/62
Clearing
69/59
THU
Shower,
t-storm
81/54
THU
T-storms
79/67
THU
FRI
Cooler
67/52
FRI
T-storms
79/67
FRI
TODAY
THU
79/61pc
76/55pc
88/63t
78/59pc
84/55s
101/73s
61/49c
84/49t
76/65pc
81/70sh
87/68pc
105/78s
83/73r
94/66s
75/71r
84/60s
93/64pc
76/59pc
76/57pc
78/60pc
84/73pc
82/64pc
86/57pc
76/51c
73/47sh
90/65s
82/52pc
83/59s
101/74s
58/49r
78/47sh
82/61pc
91/72pc
90/67pc
106/80s
84/71t
91/62pc
79/71t
88/63pc
90/59s
66/48pc
69/48sh
77/48pc
87/76pc
80/61c
80/57c
WED
NEW YORK
ORLANDO
WED
Wind,
rain
85/76
WED
Warmer
75/66
WED
THU
T-storms
86/74
THU
Shower,
t-storm
83/56
THU
FRI
T-storm
87/73
FRI
Cooler
71/56
FRI
sn Snow
AQI Good
w Windy
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Colorado Springs
Columbia, S.C.
Columbus, Ohio
Corpus Christi, Texas
Dayton, Ohio
Daytona Beach, Fla.
Des Moines, Iowa
Duluth, Minn.
Durham, N.C.
El Paso, Texas
Fairbanks, Alaska
Flagstaff, Ariz.
Fargo, N.D.
Fort Myers, Fla.
Fort Smith, Ark.
Fort Wayne, Ind.
Fresno, Calif.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
Green Bay, Wis.
Greensboro, N.C.
Greenville, S.C.
Harrisburg, Pa.
dr Drizzle
Partly
sunny
80/65
Not as
warm
73/57
Partly
sunny
70/56
AQI Moderate
AQI Good
AQI Good
Akron, Ohio
Albany, N.Y.
Albuquerque
Allentown, Pa.
Amarillo, Texas
Anaheim, Calif.
Anchorage, Alaska
Aspen, Colo.
Atlantic City, N.J.
Augusta, Ga.
Austin, Texas
Bakersfield, Calif.
Baton Rouge, La.
Billings, Mont.
Birmingham, Ala.
Bismarck, N.D.
Boise, Idaho
Buffalo, N.Y.
Burlington, Vt.
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
Charleston, S.C.
Charleston, W.Va.
Cheyenne, Wyo.
WED
NEW ORLEANS
sf Snowflurries
U.S. CITIES
CHICAGO
Partly
sunny
82/68
WED
AQI Good
AQI Good
AQI Moderate
Charleston
Jacksonville
Tallahassee
85
Brownsville
MPLS-ST. PAUL
WED
81
80s
90s
100s
110+
Forecasts and
FRIDAY
graphics provided
by AccuWeather Inc.
©2017
Air quality index (AQI)
WED
T-storms
93/81
85
Columbia
San Juan
BALTIMORE
WED
78
77
79
84
Montgomery
83
78
TODAY
Washington Annapolis
82
Atlanta
Baton Rouge
Philadelphia
Raleigh
75
83
Harrisburg
79
Birmingham
Jackson
76
75
Richmond
81
77
69
New York
Charlotte
83
70
78
82
Little Rock
Houston
SOURCE National Weather Service,
AccuWeather
Below 10
Ice/mix
Hartford
76
82
Nashville
Shreveport
Albany
Charleston
Puerto Rico
DOYLE RICE AND ALEJANDRO GONZALEZ
@USATODAYWEATHER
Snow
Boston
Pittsburgh
Columbus
81
Dallas
Honolulu
80
Memphis
Lubbock
87
Lansing
Indianapolis
81 84
83
83
El Paso
Hawaii
81
Jefferson City St. Louis
Wichita
Oklahoma
City
88
Cleveland
80
82
70
76
Detroit
79
Chicago
Montpelier
Buffalo
79 82
Kansas City Springfield
89
109
Fairbanks
78
82
Albuquerque
Phoenix
86
Madison
Omaha
Topeka
83
81
San Diego
Alaska
Rain
Augusta
Burlington
Grand
Milwaukee Rapids
83
83
Santa Fe
Palm Springs
97
T-storms
73
76
79
Des Moines
Dodge City
Los Angeles
80
Sioux Falls
92
84
68
82
Denver
Aspen
103
107
105
70
89
86
St. George
Marquette
Pierre
North Platte
Cheyenne
93
91
Fresno
Casper
92
83
Elko
95
71
89
Idaho Falls Jackson
Hole
Duluth
Mpls-St. Paul
82
Rapid City
94
Burns
85
64
San Francisco
WHEN IS THE PEAK TIME FOR
ATLANTIC HURRICANES?
On average,
mid-September.
84
98
95
Boise
Sacramento
Note: For contiguous
48 states through
4 p.m. ET yesterday
Bangor
Bismarck
Miles City
Helena
78
Salem
87
MIAMI
Eric Montgomery
PRECIPITATION FORECAST
COLDEST: 32°
West Yellowstone,
Mont.
Spokane
92
Portland
Eureka
AQI Good
Nukes are bargaining chips.
In Kim’s mind, North Korea was
not allowed to sit at the adult
table because it didn’t have
nukes. The truth is, North Korea
is a terrible and sad country
with a grown child leading it. It
will always be at the kids table
with or without nukes.
YESTERDAY’S EXTREMES
HOTTEST: 112°
Imperial, Calif.
Bend
Heavy
rain
74/69
Robert Johnson
Upgrade your news. Install the free app.
WEATHER ONLINE
USATODAY.COM
TODAY’S HIGH TEMPERATURES
Over 6 million
Texans have
seen 30 inches
or more of rain
since Friday.
WED
Why does North Korea need
any weapons? It has China
protecting their back, like Beijing
has for decades. Kim is spending everything his country has
on something he can never use
(nukes). If he did, it would be the
end of his country.
Have Your Say at letters@usatoday.com, facebook.com/usatodayopinion and @USATOpinion on Twitter. All comments are edited for length and clarity. Content submitted to USA
TODAY may appear in print, digital or other forms. For letters, include name, address and phone number. Letters may be mailed to 7950 Jones Branch Drive, McLean, VA, 22108.
WEATHER
ATLANTA
Greg Hunder
Larry Best
@BettyWa95991780
Scott Hardy
To have peace, you must back
it up with war. North Korea
knows exactly what would happen if it really did attack any
part of the U.S. or our allies. But
they have been playing this
game for years hoping to get
suckers hooked into their antics.
Just a few weeks ago, Trump
supporters were here crowing
about how Trump’s blustering of
foolish red lines had worked. But
now, Kim Jong Un has just
stepped over one. I believe Kim’s
intent all along was to goad
Trump into destroying U.S. credibility so he could paint America
as a paper tiger. He succeeded.
@eugene_begay
Glad to see President Trump
is responding quickly. I’m not a
fan of the guy, but when he
does something presidential it is
nice to see. Just hope he doesn’t
try to make it all about himself.
TO COMMENT
TOP TRAVEL CITIES
As long as Trump only makes
threats, Kim won’t care. His
power is secure.
FACEBOOK
FACEBOOK.COM/
USATODAYOPINION
Partly
sunny
93/76
Partly
sunny
93/75
Stray
t-storm
90/75
AQI Good
h Haze
TODAY THU
81/65pc 80/60c
80/63pc 74/54pc
85/56t
82/58c
81/70pc 88/73c
81/64pc 79/57c
95/71pc 95/72pc
81/62f
78/56c
90/76t
91/77pc
83/62s
83/56s
70/51pc 63/48s
82/68pc 79/67t
90/65s
91/65s
64/43pc 65/45pc
81/54pc 78/53c
82/58s
78/60s
92/77pc 92/77t
87/71pc 85/68c
79/57f
76/50pc
105/73s 106/75s
79/59pc 73/46pc
79/53pc 68/47s
83/67pc 76/65t
78/67sh 78/68c
78/62pc 81/54c
pc Partly cloudy
Hartford, Conn.
Indianapolis
Islip, N.Y.
Jackson, Miss.
Jacksonville, Fla.
Jefferson City, Mo.
Kansas City
Key West, Fla.
Knoxville, Tenn.
Laredo, Texas
Lexington, Ky.
Lincoln, Neb.
Little Rock, Ark.
Long Beach, Calif.
Louisville, Ky.
Lubbock, Texas
Madison, Wis.
Manchester, N.H.
Memphis, Tenn.
Milwaukee
Mobile, Ala.
Modesto, Calif.
Montgomery, Ala.
Myrtle Beach, S.C.
DALLAS
WED
THU
FRI
DENVER
Partly
sunny
86/71
Partly
sunny
88/67
Partly
sunny
88/70
WED
THU
FRI
AQI Good
AQI Good
PHILADELPHIA
PHOENIX
WED
Warmer
78/65
WED
THU
Partly
sunny
85/57
THU
FRI
Cooler
73/56
FRI
AQI Good
s Sunny
sh Showers
TODAY
76/55pc
82/65pc
75/61pc
83/72r
87/73t
81/60s
81/60s
90/83s
82/67r
98/73s
82/65pc
83/57s
81/70r
92/73s
85/69pc
84/56s
78/57pc
72/55pc
81/71sh
79/62pc
82/75r
99/66s
83/74t
82/73pc
THU
80/49pc
81/59c
83/54pc
83/70t
93/75t
83/61pc
83/61pc
90/80t
75/67t
101/76pc
79/62c
84/60s
75/69r
92/73s
82/64c
84/59s
70/49pc
76/50c
80/69r
70/57pc
85/74t
103/75s
89/74t
85/76c
DETROIT
Clouding up
92/61
Shower,
t-storm
88/59
Some
sun
88/59
Sunny,
warm
109/85
Mostly
cloudy
108/84
Shower
106/85
AQI Moderate
WED
THU
FRI
HONOLULU
Fog
82/62
Not as
warm
72/50
Partly
sunny
68/55
AQI Moderate
SALT LAKE CITY
WED
THU
FRI
Stray
t-storm
93/68
Stray
t-shower
92/66
Sunny,
warm
91/65
WED
THU
FRI
Mostly
sunny
87/73
Partly
sunny
87/74
Mostly
sunny
86/73
AQI Good
SAN DIEGO
WED
THU
FRI
Mostly
sunny
86/72
Mostly
sunny
86/72
Mostly
sunny
83/72
HOUSTON
WED
THU
FRI
Rain,
wind
79/72
T-shower
87/71
Partly
sunny
90/71
AQI Good
SAN FRANCISCO
LAS VEGAS
WED
THU
FRI
Partly
sunny
107/85
Mostly
cloudy
103/83
Partly
sunny
106/85
AQI Moderate
LOS ANGELES
WED
Very hot
97/74
THU
Very hot
97/75
FRI
Very hot
99/75
AQI Moderate
WASHINGTON
SEATTLE
WED
Mostly
sunny
71/56
WED
Not as
warm
73/60
WED
Warmer
79/67
THU
Warmer
80/65
THU
Shower
76/56
THU
Some
sun
85/63
FRI
Sunny,
warm
90/67
FRI
Mostly
sunny
80/60
FRI
Cooler
72/60
AQI Moderate
AQI Good
AQI Moderate
AQI Good
AQI Good
TODAY THU
77/68c
80/72pc
83/69r
78/69r
77/62pc 83/55pc
74/59pc 80/52pc
79/69c
84/71pc
72/56s
80/63s
83/62s
85/61s
83/60s
85/62s
116/89s
114/86s
88/78r
88/77t
89/62s
88/65pc
78/62pc 76/52c
71/52pc 78/49sh
78/62pc 82/58s
73/57pc 83/53pc
85/69pc 80/67t
89/59pc 86/60pc
95/61pc 94/63s
79/65pc 82/64pc
76/58pc 66/48c
96/59s
103/69s
90/69pc 92/69s
82/60s
92/71s
83/54t
85/55pc
Sarasota, Fla.
Savannah, Ga.
Scottsdale, Ariz.
Shreveport, La.
Sioux Falls, S.D.
South Bend, Ind.
Spokane, Wash.
Springfield, Mo.
Springfield, Ill.
St. Louis
St. Petersburg, Fla.
Syracuse, N.Y.
Tallahassee, Fla.
Tampa, Fla.
Toledo, Ohio
Topeka, Kan.
Tucson, Ariz.
Tupelo, Miss.
Tulsa, Okla.
Virginia Beach, Va.
Wichita, Kan.
Wilmington, Del.
Winston-Salem, N.C.
Worcester, Mass.
TODAY THU
91/77pc 91/77t
86/73sh 91/75pc
107/82t
107/82c
77/71r
79/68r
82/58pc 82/61s
77/57pc 74/48pc
92/58s
83/56s
80/63s
82/62pc
82/59pc 84/60pc
84/66pc 84/65pc
93/79pc 93/79t
76/58pc 67/47sh
91/75t
91/76t
92/79pc 92/79t
80/59f
72/50pc
82/58s
84/60s
102/73t
102/75s
77/70r
82/69r
86/65s
87/63pc
77/67c
83/70pc
83/60s
86/61s
77/62pc 83/56pc
82/67pc 76/66t
68/56pc 75/48c
WORLD CITIES
t Thunderstorms
Nags Head, N.C.
Nashville, Tenn.
Newark, N.J.
New Haven, Conn.
Norfolk, Va.
Oakland, Calif.
Oklahoma City
Omaha, Neb.
Palm Springs, Calif.
Pensacola, Fla.
Pierre, S.D.
Pittsburgh
Portland, Maine
Portland, Ore.
Providence, R.I.
Raleigh, N.C.
Rapid City, S.D.
Reno, Nev.
Richmond, Va.
Rochester, N.Y.
Sacramento, Calif.
San Antonio
San Jose, Calif.
Santa Fe, N.M.
Beijing
Buenos Aires
Cancun, Mexico
Dubai, UAE
Frankfurt
Hong Kong
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
London
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai, India
Paris
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Toronto
Tokyo
TODAY THU
82/62s
80/64pc
61/44s
62/54s
88/78pc 89/78pc
106/87s 104/86s
88/66t
70/53c
92/82s
92/81t
78/67sh 77/66pc
83/64s
82/64s
76/43s
74/47s
60/50r
66/51pc
69/57t
70/59c
75/58s
66/45pc
63/47pc 68/49s
86/79sh 87/77sh
77/54t
69/53pc
85/69s
74/67c
86/66s
85/66s
74/60h
81/61s
88/79t
88/79t
65/47s
62/46s
75/54pc 66/45s
84/72r
77/69r
USA TODAY
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
NEWS 7A
OPINION
TODAY’S DEBATE SMOKING
Our view
Slash nicotine in cigarettes?
FDA offers an intriguing idea
Five decades of warnings about
the deadly consequences of
smoking have helped cut smoking
rates in half, but more than
36 million Americans are still
puffing away. And if history is any
guide, about half of them will die
premature deaths, plagued by everything from heart disease to
lung cancer.
Now Scott Gottlieb, a physician
and commissioner of the Food
and Drug Administration, has
proposed an intriguing plan to
help the remaining smokers kick
the habit and prevent more teenagers from getting hooked: Reduce the nicotine in cigarettes to
minimally addictive levels.
The proposal, unexpected from
an administration that is often
pro-industry and anti-science, is
far from a cure-all. But it has
some support in the research,
and the potential upside appears
greater than the downside.
Understand this: Nicotine is
not the deadly ingredient in cigarettes. The cancer-causing agents
are chemical compounds inhaled
through the smoke. But nicotine
hooks customers and keeps them
coming back for more.
In fact, nicotine in traditional
cigarettes is so addictive that it rivals heroin and cocaine, says Neal
Benowitz of the University of
California-San Francisco.
Reducing the level by at least
90% could wean some hardcore
smokers from cigarettes. Because
Jamie Dimon
A
merica is blessed with a
combination of advantages that few other
countries enjoy. We are
the longest surviving democracy,
with an entrepreneurial culture
that fosters and rewards hard
work and innovation. Our natural
resources are abundant. We have
the strongest military and a generally reliable rule of law and low
corruption. Our country has
some of the best universities and
hospitals and is home to many of
the best, most vibrant businesses
on the planet — from small and
midsize companies to large, global multinationals.
While we have been gifted with
some of these benefits and
earned others through hard work
and determination, we know that
U.S. exceptionalism requires vigilance. Specifically, it means transcending our differences and
seizing on opportunities to further the remarkable success story
of our country to provide greater
prosperity for all Americans.
Today, President Trump will
visit Missouri to speak about the
opportunity to do just that by finally passing comprehensive progrowth tax reform.
MARK LENNIHAN, AP
the vast majority of smokers start
by age 18, it could also prevent
teens from getting hooked. They
could experiment with smoking
but more easily give it up.
A large study released in 2015
— with nearly 800 participants
divided randomly into groups
that smoked cigarettes with different levels of nicotine for six
weeks — found that those using
cigarettes with the lowest levels
smoked fewer per day, were more
likely to attempt to quit than others in the study, and did not compensate by smoking more.
In the real world, the plan
would work only if all cigarettes
contained low levels of nicotine.
Reducing nicotine has potential risks. Critics of Gottlieb’s proposal argue that if only
low-nicotine cigarettes were
AMERICA
NEEDS TAX
REFORM NOW
Code is uncompetitive and loaded with
provisions that unfairly create winners and losers
GEOFF ROBINS, AFP/GETTY IMAGES
PRO-GROWTH POLICIES
After traveling to Europe, Asia,
the Middle East and Latin America this year, I saw governments
that understood the importance
of practical policies to promote
businesses and economic growth
because they benefit their people
through greater job creation and
wage growth. This month, I traveled to the Midwest and saw a different story, where businesses are
being held back by an uncompetitive tax code.
Foreign governments have figured out that sensible pro-growth
polices have the power to create
opportunity at all levels of the
economy. As a country, we seem
to have lost our way. As a businessman and a proud American,
this frustrates and upsets me.
Reforming the tax code is the
single most important thing that
Congress could do to jump-start
our economy, create jobs, and
raise wages for American workers. Our current code is uncompetitive, overly complex and
loaded with special interest provisions that unfairly create winners and losers. This drives down
capital investment, reduces productivity and causes wages to remain stagnant.
Individuals and businesses
waste billions of dollars and millions of hours each year trying to
figure out their tax bills — instead
of spending more time with their
available, smokers would compensate by smoking more or
turning to the black market. Yes,
some might. But cigarettes are
expensive, as much as $10.44 a
pack in New York, including taxes. Many smokers have low incomes and could not afford to
smoke more. Nor is everyone
willing to break the law.
Today, smokers can turn to less
harmful nicotine-delivery devices, such as electronic cigarettes and so-called heat sticks.
“What we’re trying to do is ensure these (cigarette) products
are minimally addictive,” Gottlieb
told the USA TODAY Editorial
Board. “And if there are addictive
products on the market, then
they’re far less risky. That’s the
policy in a nutshell.”
Some anti-smoking advocates,
while thrilled by Gottlieb’s nicotine reduction proposal, were appalled by his decision to push
back regulation of e-cigarettes to
2022, arguing that more needs to
be known about their safety.
More study is surely needed.
While a major British health organization last year urged smokers to switch to e-cigarettes,
American health advocates remain skeptical.
Tobacco companies will surely
resist efforts to slash nicotine levels. Yet any proposal with the potential to save millions of lives
deserves better than to be summarily snuffed out by critics.
families, or thinking about how to
innovate and expand.
Our corporate tax rate is the
highest in the developed world. It
has led to more American businesses being acquired by foreigners or struggling to keep pace
with their foreign competitors.
This means headquarter jobs are
going to overseas cities instead of
American cities. Our uncompetitive system has trapped more
than $2.5 trillion overseas because American companies are
penalized for bringing profits
back by our high U.S. corporate
tax rate.
PRO-WORKERS
This isn’t about helping companies like JPMorgan Chase. Yes,
tax reform will help American
companies become more competitive, but the real reason to do
it is to increase jobs and increase
wages. Under our corporate tax
system, workers bear up to 75%
of the corporate tax burden
through lower wages.
Tax reform should also be used
to do more for lower- and middleincome workers by expanding
programs such as the earned income tax credit, which already
lifts more than 7.3 million workers out of poverty.
A recent survey of Business
Roundtable CEOs found 90% believed that any delay in tax re-
form would harm the economy by
causing slower growth, hiring and
investment.
The other side of that coin is
that 76% of CEOs would increase
hiring if Congress was successful
in passing tax reform.
Tax reform isn’t easy, and
there’s a reason it has been more
than 30 years since it happened.
The time has come for companies
— and Congress — to set parochial and partisan interests aside to
find a way to enact reform. If a
proposal will result in greater
economic growth, more jobs,
higher wages and allow American
businesses to be competitive internationally, it should be supported.
I’m as optimistic as ever on the
future of America. It is encouraging that leaders in the White
House, Senate and House have
reached a common vision for
moving forward with reform. I
hope that vision becomes something that elected officials from
both parties can support, but it is
critical that we see progress now.
We have a limited window to
get reform done, and this is an
opportunity America can’t afford
to miss.
Jamie Dimon, CEO and chairman of JPMorgan Chase & Co., is
the chairman of the Business
Roundtable.
Opposing view
Didn’t we learn
from Prohibition?
Guy Bentley
Reducing deaths from smoking is a goal everyone shares,
and while lowering nicotine
levels in cigarettes sounds like
a reasonable idea, it carries
huge risks for potentially little
reward.
Smokers are drawn to cigarettes for the nicotine, but it’s
the smoke that kills them. Nicotine doesn’t cause lung cancer,
and no real-world evidence
suggests that reducing nicotine
will lower smoking-related
deaths.
Cutting nicotine in cigarettes is, however, a prohibition. Though some of the 36.5
million U.S. smokers might
switch to less harmful substitutes, such as e-cigarettes,
many would likely purchase
cigarettes on the black market.
Conventional
cigarettes
would still be available worldwide and easily smuggled into
the USA, creating an enormous
unregulated, untaxed market.
If the history of prohibitions is
any guide, this would be a boon
to organized crime, and law enforcement would have to divert
scarce resources to combat it.
Bhutan, which in 2004 became the first and only nation
to ban tobacco sales, suffered a
boom in tobacco smuggling and
has the highest share of
smokers in Southeast Asia.
Supporters argue that reducing nicotine will prevent teen
addiction to smoking. But this
relies on teens obeying the law
and not turning to the black
market. That’s naive, given that
more teens now use marijuana,
which is prohibited by federal
law, than cigarettes. The policy
is also unnecessary, given the
decline in teen smoking in 2016
to the lowest level in 25 years.
Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb has made clear that the
FDA must support a regulatory
framework to reduce smoking.
That’s laudable. It’s best
achieved by allowing products
such as e-cigarettes and heatnot-burn devices — which
greatly reduce the risks of
smoking but give consumers
the nicotine they seek — to enter and remain on the market.
A policy focused on tobacco
harm reduction through safer
nicotine alternatives would be
far more effective than a potentially disastrous prohibition.
Guy Bentley is a consumer
freedom research associate at
Reason Foundation, which receives some funding from companies that sell cigarettes or
other nicotine products.
Stop telling people they
will beat terminal illness
Kathryn B. Kirkland
Ever since Sen. John McCain
announced he had brain cancer, a
chorus of voices from around the
globe has urged him to “fight the
cancer.”
But McCain reminds us that in
the face of life-limiting illness, it’s
not that you’re a fighter that’s important. It’s what you are fighting
for. Families, friends and, yes,
doctors of patients with serious
or critical illnesses would do well
to get clear on the difference.
Metaphors invoking war, battle
and the fighting spirit are commonly used in response to diagnoses of cancer. They are often
heard in the language of families
whose loved ones face critical illnesses with poor outlooks in intensive care units. This is not
surprising. Adversity often elicits
the impulse to fight. This impulse
can help those facing difficult but
surmountable challenges, such as
some curable cancers, or survivable critical illnesses.
But should fighters always fight
the illness?
What happens when the illness
is not survivable — almost certainly the case for McCain?
Should we forgo the language of
battle, as some palliative care experts suggest? They point out
that it can create a sense of
shame or failure when the disease
progresses: “I must not have
fought hard enough. I’ve let my
family down.”
But here’s the most tragic unintended effect of assuming that
fighters should battle against the
disease: the missed opportunities
to fight for things that are most
important — and achievable.
Those would include time with
family, completion of estate plan-
ning, restoration of relationships
and even bucket lists.
When one of my palliative care
patients tells me, “I’m a fighter,” I
don’t tell her that the fight is futile. Instead I ask, “Tell me, what
should we be fighting for?”
To be sure, some cancers are
curable, and fighting with all
available weapons to overcome
them is a choice many would
make. But other people face cancers that will almost certainly
claim their lives and could result
in loss of critical abilities before
that. Up against a threat of that
nature, it is vital we help people
choose with great intention what
they will fight for.
McCain’s actions have shown
us that he understands this. In
the face of serious illness, he is
spending time with family and
speaking his mind on issues such
as President Trump’s transgender
military ban and pardon of former sheriff Joe Arpaio. Last
month, after his diagnosis, he returned to Washington to cast a
“no” vote on a flawed health bill.
He continues to urge his colleagues to work across party lines
on health care and his longstanding dream of immigration reform.
In his case, heroism has never
been about charging recklessly
against unbeatable opponents
but about fighting patiently and
steadily for what he believes.
Next time we learn of a public
figure or a family member or a
friend who is facing a life-limiting
illness, let’s use the war metaphor
if it feels right, but with a twist.
Instead of “You can beat this,” try
“What can I help you fight for?”
Kathryn B. Kirkland is director
of palliative medicine at Dartmouth’s Geisel School of Medicine
and a Public Voices fellow at the
OpEd Project.
"USA TODAY hopes to serve as a
forum for better understanding
and unity to help make the USA
truly one nation."
Allen H. Neuharth,
Founder, Sept. 15, 1982
GANNETT COMPANY PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
Robert Dickey
GANNETT CHIEF CONTENT OFFICER
& USA TODAY EDITOR IN CHIEF
USA TODAY PRESIDENT
& PUBLISHER
Joanne Lipman
John Zidich
EXECUTIVE EDITORS
CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER
Patty Michalski, Beryl Love
Kevin Gentzel
MANAGING EDITOR
PRESIDENT, SPORTS MEDIA GROUP
Donna Leinwand Leger
David Morgan
EDITOR, EDITORIAL PAGE
Bill Sternberg
8A NEWS
USA TODAY
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
SECTION B
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
State by
state:
News from
around the
nation 6B
Domino’s tests driverless
delivery with Ford 3B
ELAINE CROMIE, SPECIAL TO THE DETROIT FREE PRESS, VIA USA TODAY NETWORK
Deliveries halted in Harvey flood zones
UPS,
FedEx,
Postal
Service,
Amazon
suspend
services
in parts
of Texas,
Louisiana
Nathan Bomey
@NathanBomey
USA TODAY
Shipping giants UPS, FedEx
and the U.S. Postal Service have
indefinitely ceased delivery to
major swaths of Texas and Louisiana amid Hurricane Harvey
devastation, potentially disrupting supplies of critical medicines,
food and other packages.
The ferocious flooding that has
pummeled the region is preventing or severely limiting the major
delivery companies from reaching hundreds of cities and thousands of neighborhoods.
The Postal Service, famous for
its commitment to delivering in
bad weather, said it had suspended service at “several facilities”
and temporarily closed dozens of
post offices.
“When you think about all the
families and small businesses
that are impacted — just the
sheer number of ZIP codes that
were impacted — it’s pretty astonishing,” UPS spokesman Matt
O’Connor said.
Online giant Amazon.com said
it had temporarily shuttered its
Houston-area facilities and that
many local customers “should expect delays” in packages “until
the floods subside.” The storm
may also have damaged some delivery infrastructure.
Although it’s unclear how
many residents are awaiting
packages, the outages raise serious concerns about vulnerable
residents who rely on just-intime delivery of mail-order prescriptions and other goods.
Harvey, which is now considered a tropical storm, has
knocked out or significantly limited UPS delivery to more than
730 ZIP codes in Texas and Louisiana, the company said. O’Connor said UPS employees’ safety
was the company’s top objective.
FedEx temporarily suspended
air delivery to more than 350 cities and temporarily suspended or
dramatically cut back ground delivery to more than 490 cities.
Large cities without either option
included Houston, Corpus Christi
The
outages
raise
concerns
about
residents
who rely
on mailorder
prescriptions.
BREWERY SHIPS WATER
FOR HURRICANE RELIEF
An Anheuser-Busch brewery in
Georgia is shipping canned
drinking water to the American
Red Cross to help Hurricane
Harvey relief efforts in Texas
and Louisiana. The St. Louisbased beer giant says a truckload of water arrived in Baton
Rouge on Monday. More are
scheduled to arrive in Arlington,
Texas. More than 155,000 cans
are being sent.
Thanks to Harvey,
U.S. motorists could
pay 20 cents more
VOLKSWAGEN RECALLS
281,000 SEDANS, WAGONS
Volkswagen is recalling almost
281,000 CC and Passat sedans
and wagons in the U.S. because
the fuel pumps can fail and
cause the cars to suddenly stall.
The recall covers the CC from
the 2009 through 2016 model
years, as well as the Passat
sedan and wagon from 2006
through 2010. All have 4-cylinder
gasoline engines.
DOW JONES INDUSTRIAL AVG.
21,950
4:00 p.m.
21,865
21,900
9:30 a.m.
21,850
21,750
Nathan Bomey
@NathanBomey
USA TODAY
TIMOTHY A. CLARY, AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Whole Foods Market is hoping to shed its “Whole Paycheck” reputation.
WHOLE FOODS’ NEW
SHOPPER: IS IT YOU?
Customer 2.0 high on Amazon’s agenda
21,808
21,800
56.97
Zlati Meyer
21,700
@ZlatiMeyer
USA TODAY
TUESDAY MARKETS
INDEX
CLOSE
CHG
Nasdaq composite
6301.89 x 18.87
S&P 500
2446.30 x
2.06
T-note, 10-year yield
2.13% y
0.03
Oil, light sweet crude
$46.44 y
0.13
Gold, oz. Comex
$1313.10 x
3.40
Euro (dollars per euro) $1.1992 x 0.0013
Yen per dollar
109.71 x
0.62
SOURCES USA TODAY RESEARCH, MARKETWATCH.COM
uUSA MARKETS, 4B
©
Falling behind
If a business can’t keep up
with digital innovations,
executives say it will take
4 years,11 months
for their organization to go out
of business or to be absorbed
by a competitor, on average.
SOURCE Couchbase survey of 450 chief
information officers, chief technology
officers and chief digital officers
JAE YANG AND PAUL TRAP, USA TODAY
v STORY CONTINUES ON 2B
Gas prices
expected
to spike in
short term
MONEYLINE
U.S. HOME PRICES
SURGE IN JUNE
U.S. home prices climbed higher
in June with gains that are
eclipsing income growth —
creating affordability pressures
for would-be buyers. The Standard & Poor’s CoreLogic CaseShiller 20-city home price index
rose 5.7% in June, according to a
Tuesday report.
and Galveston.
“Our priority is always the
safety of our team members and
providing service to our customers,” FedEx spokesman Jonathan
Lyons said in a statement.
It was not immediately clear
how the delivery outage was affecting online delivery of certain
critical products such as
prescriptions.
For customers not able to receive mail-order prescriptions,
CVS spokesperson Stephanie Cunha said the company “is able to
provide one-time emergency refills” at stores with 10-day supplies “for plan members in
impacted areas.”
Amazon started its
first week as the new owner of
Whole Foods Market by cutting
prices on select items and
cross-promoting the tech gear
it sells on its website, but the
biggest challenge lies ahead:
luring new customers.
Sure, the online giant can leverage the power of its Amazon
Prime membership to promote
the upscale supermarket chain.
But that likely won’t be enough
as it seeks to keep Whole Foods’
devoted following while expanding it.
“Amazon will stay reverent of
the DNA of Whole Foods so the
core doesn’t abandon it and begin to educate those that are
likely to experience the brand
(for the first time) about the
wonderful elements that are
priced in a delicious way,” said
Eric Schiffer, CEO of California
private equity firm the Patriarch Group.
The venerable Austin-headquartered chain known for natural foods and high prices
NEW YORK
SAUL LOEB, AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Amazon began cutting prices
at Whole Foods on Monday,
its first day as new owner of
the grocery chain.
“The convenience
of Amazon is why
you’d do it. It’s
like your favorite
store just opened
one closer to you.”
Bob Phibbs, CEO of consultancy The
Retail Doctor, on having Whole Foods’
products delivered via Amazon
needs a jolt, experts say, if it’s going to deal with seven consecutive quarters of sales declines at
stores open at least a year. It will
need to pull customers from other chains in the $750 billion grocery industry, reaching beyond its
relatively narrow demographic
of affluent shoppers who see organic foods as healthier than
normal supermarket fare and
who embrace causes such as
animal welfare.
According to experts, the
new customers could include:
uThe far-flung: Given Amazon’s expertise in delivering
goods, people who don’t live
near a Whole Foods store will
be able to order online and have
it delivered. Whole Foods has
only about 460 stores in the
U.S., Canada and the United
Kingdom, a smidge compared
to the number of supermarkets
overall, so reach becomes
important.
“The convenience of Amazon
is why you’d do it. It’s like your
favorite store just opened one
closer to you,” said Bob Phibbs,
CEO of the New York-based
consultancy The Retail Doctor.
“They’re going to be curious.”
uAmazon Prime members: Whole Foods products
are now listed on Amazon, so
those already gung-ho enough
about Amazon to pay the
monthly or annual fee will want
to sample these new food
v STORY CONTINUES ON 2B
Gasoline shortages rippled
through the Houston area and
prices are rising for the entire
country as Hurricane Harvey
wreaks havoc on the energy
industry.
U.S. motorists are likely to
experience average increases of
10 cents to 20 cents per gallon,
GasBuddy.com petroleum analyst Patrick DeHaan said Tuesday. That’s up from a previous
forecast of 5 cents to 15 cents
per gallon.
Outages at Texas Gulf Coast
refineries and disruptions to
shipping corridors are fueling
the price increases, although
historically high gasoline inventories are likely to somewhat
mitigate the impact.
At least two dozen Houstonarea fuel stations reported to
GasBuddy’s tracker that they
did not have gasoline, DeHaan
said. Some are likely underwater or have sustained damage
from the ferocious flooding that
continues to crush the region.
Five refineries in the Houston area and six in the Corpus
Christi area were closed as of
Tuesday morning, representing
more than 12% of the nation’s
refining capacity, according to
the Department of Energy and
the American Petroleum Institute. Another seven refineries
in the region were operating at
reduced capacity, according to
the DOE. Outages included Exxon’s massive refinery in
Baytown.
Several ports through which
energy is often shipped, including Houston, Texas City, Galveston and Freeport, were still
closed as of Tuesday.
Other infrastructure has
been disrupted, including the
critical Colonial Pipeline, which
carries gasoline to several states
in the Southeast. Colonial Pipeline said its service was “interrupted” at its origin in Houston.
“Right now logistics are frozen,” DeHaan said.
Nationally, gas price increases are likely to last at least
two weeks and possibly more
than a month, DeHaan said.
Part of the uncertainty stems
from a lack of information
about the long-term damage to
refinery infrastructure.
USA TODAY
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
2B MONEY
Deliveries
come to a
standstill
v CONTINUED FROM 1B
DEBORAH BARFIELD BERRY, USA TODAY
The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s national coordination center in Washington, D.C., was in full swing Sunday.
INSURANCE PAYOUTS LIKELY WON’T
PUT VICTIMS’ LIVES BACK TOGETHER
Some policies have claim limits, and
government relief will only go so far
Roger Yu
@ByRogerYu
USA TODAY
When the rain finally stops, a
vast majority of homeowners in
Southeast Texas digging out from
Harvey’s aftermath will confront
another arduous obstacle — finding enough money to repair uninsured properties.
Estimates indicate that only
about one in five homes in the
greater Houston area are covered
by flood insurance, a scenario
that will likely drive hundreds of
thousands of people and business
owners to abandon their properties or take on heavy debts, not to
mention heightened pleas from
local governments for more federal subsidies.
The Consumer Federation of
America estimates only about
20% of homeowners with flood
damage in the region have insurance protection. Harvey could result in as many as 50,000 claims
for wind damage by homeowners,
and “as many as two or three
times” as many claims for federal
flood insurance, it says.
As of April, only about 15% of
homes in Harris County, Texas —
with 1.8 million homes and home
to Houston, the nation’s fourthlargest city — currently have active policies from the National
Flood
Insurance
Program
(NFIP), according to risk consulting firm Aon. Similarly, take-up
rates are lacking in neighboring
counties, Aon said.
In total, the storm will result in
$30 billion to $40 billion in property damage, Moody’s Analytics
estimates.
“It’s unprecedented on so
many different levels,” says Steve
Bowen, a director and meteorologist at Aon. “Unfortunately, we
are going to see that an abnormally high rate of economic damage is uninsured.”
With rain still falling, total insurance damage estimates are
hard to come by, and damage assessors won’t be able to get a
more accurate assessment until
it’s safe to do so. But the amount
paid by insurers likely will fall
somewhere between the payouts
of Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and
Hurricane Sandy in 2012, estimates Tom Santos, vice president
of federal affairs of the American
Insurance Association.
Katrina resulted in $14 billion
insured losses from floods while
Sandy incurred $8.4 billion, he
said.
The rush of flood claims will
take a heavy toll on the already
burdened NFIP, the insurance
program run by the Federal
Emergency Management Agency.
More than 90% of all flood insurance policies in the country
are issued by NFIP. And homeowners whose property is located
in designated flood zones are required to buy a policy, a requirement enforced by mortgageissuing banks.
Much of Southeast Texas was
not considered FEMA-mapped
zones in risk of flooding despite a
rapid increase in population in
Houston since 2000 that has
pressured its drainage systems.
“Most people in these lower
risk areas don’t buy flood insurance,” says Carolyn Kousky, director for policy research and
engagement at the Wharton Risk
Center of the University of Pennsylvania.
Those who’ve paid off their
mortgage or have a home bequeathed from parents — even if
they are in the flood zone — are
often reluctant to buy a flood
policy.
Renters can also buy flood insurance from NFIP, but many
aren’t aware of it, Santos says.
Typical homeowners or renters’
insurance policies generally don’t
cover flood-related damages.
Complicating the issue is that
NFIP caps payouts for residential
homes at $250,000 and $500,000
for commercial properties.
Many homeowners with a
NFIP policy don’t carry surplus
insurance even if they own more
expensive houses. And repair bills
exceeding the cap could be financially burdensome for some
homeowners. Those without any
kind of flood insurance can turn
to government assistance programs for relief. But it may not be
sufficient for many affected individuals. FEMA’s disaster relief
fund grants only about $5,000 on
average in payouts per individual,
Kousky said.
“It doesn’t make people
whole,” she said. Without flood
insurance, “you’re in trouble.”
The staggering amount of help
needed in Texas likely will mean
FEMA will have to come up with
more money to cover losses and
award relief funds.
REVIEWED.COM / MICHAEL DESJARDIN
The iPhone 7 is water-resistant, as are some other new
phones. But even water resistance has its limits.
If your phone got
wet, don’t do this
Elizabeth Weise
@eweise
USA TODAY
Smartphones
and water just don’t mix, as
thousands of people in Texas
are learning to their distress
during the flooding there.
Experts say even if a phone
is drenched, there are steps
you can take to recover it — but
it takes patience and the ability
to leave the phone alone.
What kills a wet phone is
electricity, said Gary Tan with
DE iPhone repair, a San Francisco-based company that offers
multiple
sites
for
smartphone repair and drying.
“Do not charge it. Do not
plug it in to see if it works. If
it’s on, electricity will flow, it
will touch the water that’s inside, and that’s when you fry
the (circuit) board,” he said.
This is also true even if your
phone is still working after it
was dropped in water.
“You didn’t get lucky. Turn it
off!” said Craig Beinecke, cofounder of TekDry, a Denverbased company that has more
than 600 sites nationwide
where consumers can quickly
get small electronics dried out.
What actually happened to
those “lucky” people is that it
took a while for the water to
reach connections inside the
phone. Once it did, the water
shorted them out.
And while some newer
SAN FRANCISCO
phones are water-resistant and
can withstand a quick drop in a
bucket or toilet, none are
waterproof.
Multiple websites suggest
sticking electronics that have
been submerged in liquid in a
bag of uncooked rice, to draw
the water out. But that actually
doesn’t work and can introduce dust and starch into the
phone as well, Beinecke said.
“We did a study, and rice was
slower to work than just leaving the phone out on the
counter. And neither worked
fast enough. After about 48
hours in rice, only 13% of the
water came out of the phone,”
he said.
The preferred method to
safely dry phones is to boil off
the water inside them at low
temperatures under vacuum.
Even so, salt water is another thing entirely, experts say.
The salts in ocean water are
strongly corrosive and can
quickly damage a phone.
If it’s impossible to get a
phone dried out under vacuum
within several days, there’s one
last-ditch trick, says David
Naumann, president of DryBox, which dries phones. “If,
and only if, it was in salt water,
then we recommend putting
the phone in a Ziploc bag with
some bottled, purified water
and just a pinch of baking soda.
... The baking soda counteracts
the corrosiveness of the salt
water until you can get it
cleaned out professionally,” he
said.
About 180 of the company’s
770 stores in the Hurricane Harvey-affected areas are currently
closed. “CVS is working diligently
to resume operations as soon as it
is safe for both our employees
and customers,” Cunha said in an
email. “In addition, we will have
our mobile pharmacy unit moved
into the area once it is safe.”
The storm has significantly
disrupted shipping corridors, including temporarily shuttering
the critical Houston Shipping
Channel. Several major ports
have also temporarily closed, including Houston, Texas City, Galveston and Freeport, according to
the Department of Energy.
“The current extraordinary
weather situation created by
Hurricane Harvey may cause
many ocean vessels to divert from
their intended port of unloading
to other port locations for discharge purposes,” the U.S. Customs and Border Protection said
in a statement.
Other areas affected:
uChemicals. Goods made
with plastics based on petrochemicals such as ethylene and
propolene could face sporadic
supply chain disruptions and retail price increases in the coming
weeks, PetroChem Wire executive editor Kathy Hall said.
“They’re like the crude oil and
natural gas of chemicals,” Hall
said. “You can’t make anything
without them.”
The storm has disrupted nearly half of the nation’s petrochemicals production capacity, she said.
uAutos. Dozens of auto dealerships in the Houston area temporarily closed, including all 18 of
the stores owned by the country’s
largest
dealership
chain,
AutoNation.
At Ford, “we know for certain
that many dealers have sustained
significant damage,” spokesman
Said Deep said.
Toyota spokesman Scott Vazin
said the automaker had not received any reports of damages to
vehicle inventories but acknowledged that it “could be too soon
to concretely say.”
Vehicle production appeared
to be largely unaffected in the
early going. General Motors, Ford
and Toyota said their manufacturing operations, which typically
rely upon just-in-time delivery of
parts, had not been affected.
But overall industry sales will
take a hit. Edmunds.com analyst
Jessica Caldwell estimated that
automakers would sell 2% fewer
vehicles than expected in August
because of Harvey, and the effects
will likely continue into September. But retail demand could pick
up in the coming months as consumers replace damaged vehicles
and make purchases they had intended to complete earlier.
uRetail. Nate Herman, senior vice president of supply chain
for the American Apparel & Footwear Association, said retailers
could be affected by increased
shipping costs or lower consumer
spending as a result of higher gasoline prices.
“However, it (is) too early to
say when and if that will happen,”
Herman said in an email.
And any impact would not immediately — if ever — lead to
empty shelves or clothing racks.
“But in theory it should be weeks
or months down the road when
anything would be felt,” says
Lloyd Wood, spokesman for the
National Council of Textile Organizations.
Still, some retailers are already
feeling the pinch. Zales, the chain
that sells diamond engagement
rings along with other jewelry,
said deliveries to areas affected by
the hurricane may be delayed.
Contributing: Charisse Jones
Amazon’s Whole Foods challenge: Finding new customers
v CONTINUED FROM 1B
options.
For Amazon Prime members
who aren’t physically close to a
Whole Foods store, the transition
will be even easier and the insider
benefits more enticing.
More than half of online grocery shoppers are Amazon Prime
members, according to the NPD
Group, a research outfit.
uThe frugal: Penny pinchers
long have steered clear of Whole
Foods, given its reputation for
prices so out of whack with mainstream markets it was known as
“Whole Paycheck.” That could
change.
“Cost is the most important,”
Deborah Finney, 53, a property
manager from Hackensack, N.J.,
said as she walked into a store.
“You want the most bang for your
buck.” If costs can be reduced,
“you’ll have (people from) different walks of life coming here to
shop.”
uMillennials: They could
become Whole Foods devotees.
But it’s all about price.
They are shoppers such as
Benjamin Kaneda, 20, a student
from Montclair, N.J., who stopped
“Cost is the most
important. You
want the most
bang for your
buck.”
Deborah Finney, 53, a property manager
from Hackensack, N.J.
at a Whole Foods in midtown
Manhattan and left carrying only
a cut-up melon and bag of carrots.
“It’s too expensive,” he said. “I
saw the price drop and wanted to
check it out.”
Whole Foods needs to find
more Millennials attracted not
only by lower prices, but the technology Amazon brings to the
market experience. That, combined with a consciousness about
nutrition and aversion to genetically modified foods, pesticides
and anything else they don’t
deem as natural, could make
them regulars.
“This is the ultimate dream
marrying those principles with
technology, which runs through
their veins,” Schiffer said.
uFair-weather shoppers:
Some consumers treat Whole
Foods as more of a specialty store
than a supermarket, buying only
select items there. Thanks to lower prices and better access, they
may increase their purchases —
even if it still doesn’t become
their primary market. Others will
just continue to stay away.
Even with select lower prices,
“what someone would pay $70 to
$80 at BJ’s Wholesale Club,
Winn-Dixie or ShopRite, they’re
paying $100 for” at Whole Foods,
said Burt Flickinger III, managing director of the Strategic Resource Group, a retail and
consumer goods consultancy.
USA TODAY
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
Regret over initially
not saving enough
adds fuel to the fire
for marketing exec
Tanisha A. Sykes
Special for USA TODAY
Vivian Gomez, a marketing executive, remembers the days
when she was making barely
enough to cover rent and the cost
of her commute.
She started in the public relations business at 20 and by the
time she was 21 was director of
her division at a celebrity marketing firm. From there, she took
what she learned and founded
her own company.
“When I launched The Maven
Firm in 2011, I had one client
who paid a $5,000-a-month retainer,” says Gomez, now 29 and
owner of the New York-based
boutique marketing, public relations and branding agency with
celebrity and small-business clients.
It sounds like a decent amount
of money, especially for a startup, but after paying expenses, she
had about $100 left in her bank
account for the first three months
in business.
“I was literally living paycheck
to paycheck,” she says. “But I
didn’t mind because feeling like I
owned something that was mine
made me work even harder.”
It was a tough lesson for the
young entrepreneur who kept
pondering: What if I had saved for
a couple of years before making
this decision? I wouldn’t have felt
the pressure to make it work no
matter what.
That pivotal thought motivated
her to get the company on track
fast by attracting a stream of clients, hiring freelancers and providing stellar service.
Initially, to do a really good job,
she had to spend more than half
of a given client’s retainer to hire
additional support staff, she says.
Today, her firm, which has revenues in the six-figure range, has
an average of 10 clients on retainer while employing five full-time
staff members and a gaggle of independent contractors.
Never one to rely on a single
stream of income, Gomez is in
the process of starting two addi-
MONEY 3B
AT 29, THIS ENTREPRENEUR KNOWS
THE STRUGGLE OF LIVING
PAYCHECK
TO PAYBACK
JAHN HALL
Vivian Gomez owns The Maven Firm, a marketing, PR and branding agency in New York City.
“I actually panic
now if I don’t put
a substantial
amount of money
into my savings
each month.”
Vivian Gomez
tional businesses: an e-commerce
site and a partnership with an AList Canadian entertainer and
beverage brand. She is investing
her resources and expertise into
the brand while owning a major
stake. “My company will be handling all of the celebrity endorsements, media coverage/outreach,
event partnerships, brand campaigns and publicity for the
brand,” Gomez says.
She’s also an avid saver, squirreling away $1,000 to $5,000 a
month for personal emergencies
in addition to saving in an IRA.
“I actually panic now if I don’t
put a substantial amount of money into my savings each month,”
she says.
With $15,000 left in student
loan debt, she makes automatic
payments to protect her credit
score. She needs to leverage that
A-1 score to invest in the next
venture. Her take on following a
dream is simple: “Yes, follow your
passion but also explore all as-
pects of your talent and work
smarter because one single
source of income will not make
you wealthy.”
Carlos Dias Jr., a wealth manager and financial adviser at MVP
Wealth Management Group and
Excel Tax & Wealth Group in Orlando, says on the face of it, Vivian’s financials look good. But he’s
concerned about her student
debt.
“With a 4% interest rate on her
student loan, Vivian would pay
$5,374 in interest on every
$25,000 borrowed over a 10-year
period,” Dias says. “Although
rates can range anywhere from
3.75% to 8.5%, it is to her advantage to pay off her student loan
debt as soon as possible.”
Dias offers tips to other
entrepreneurs:
uDiversify investments.
Although every person’s risk tolerance is different, diversifying
your assets is a way to mitigate
risk, Dias explains. Investing in
the stock market for the long
term can be cost-effective (depending on who is managing your
account), passive (you don’t have
to be hands-on like with real estate) and rewarding.
uSave more for emergencies. While Vivian is saving more
than enough in case she needs
some extra cash in a pinch, many
entrepreneurs
underestimate
how much is needed. Dias advises: “Entrepreneurs need to
have at least 12 to 15 months of
expenses set aside, then they can
focus on investing in the market.”
uSwitch to a higher-yielding bank account. “Vivian runs
the risk of receiving a negative return by keeping so much of her
cash in a low-yielding (or nonyielding) bank account because of
inflation,” Dias says. “We have experienced a lower inflation rate;
however, a good standard would
be around 3%, meaning that $1
today won’t have the same value
next year.” His advice? Place the
money in a money market account, Certificate of Deposit (CD)
or Treasury Inflation-Protected
Securities (TIPS), which require a
five-year time commitment.
uSecure your financial future. Look at the retirement accounts of today as your Social
Security because over the next 30
years, it’s going to look totally different. “Start saving as much as
possible in your retirement accounts,” he says.
Domino’s,
Ford team to
test driverless
pizza delivery
But will
customers
like the
idea of
what
amounts
to a
self-serve
pickup
process?
Engineers at
Ford and
Roush Performance
outfitted the
Fusion with
the hardware
and electronics necessary
to turn it into
a delivery
vehicle.
Brent Snavely
Detroit Free Press
ANN ARBOR , MICH . Someday, the
Domino’s pizza you order might
show up in a car that drives itself.
Domino’s and Ford Motor began testing Tuesday in Ann Arbor, where Domino’s is based, to
see whether customers like the
idea of driverless-car delivery or
stumble over what amounts to a
self-serve pickup process once
the pizza arrives.
The test involves using a
Ford Fusion sedan with markings and gear on
the roof to indicate
it
is
self-driving.
Ford said the
Fusion hybrid is
capable of driving itself but is
driven by an engineer for the purposes of the
testing. The windows will be tinted to prevent the customer from
seeing the driver. The main intent of the project is to test customer
reaction,
and
the
customers will think the vehicle
is driving itself.
The customer will receive a
text message when the vehicle arrives and then go out to the car.
The customer then will enter
the last four digits of his or her
phone number on a tablet computer mounted on the outside of
the vehicle. The correct number
causes the window to open, and
the customer can pull the pizza
out of a compartment designed to
keep the pizzas warm and prevent them from sliding around.
The nation’s second-largest
pizza chain isn’t sure whether its
customers will be eager to go out-
PHOTOS BY ELAINE CROMIE, SPECIAL TO THE DETROIT FREE PRESS, VIA USA TODAY NETWORK
“We are delivery
experts. This is
where the
industry is going.”
Russell Weiner,
president of Domino’s USA
side to pick up their pizza from a
driverless car in the rain and
snow, but it wants to begin testing the idea now so it can position
itself at the forefront of the
emerging technology.
“We are delivery experts. This
is where the industry is going,”
said Russell Weiner, president of
Domino’s USA. “We think we are
the right company, and we certainly are working with the right
partner to make this happen.”
While the idea will require the
customer to do a little extra work,
people have adapted in the past to
self-service gas and self-checkout
at grocery stores. Plus, the pizza
won’t cost more, and no tip will
be required.
Domino’s wants to make sure it
continues to explore innovative
ways to stay ahead of the competition for getting pizzas to the
right place as fast as possible. The
company began dispatching pizzas to homes in 1960 and delivers
more than 1 billion pizzas worldwide every year.
“So delivery is very important
to us,” Weiner said.
For Ford, partnering with
Domino’s provides a way to interact with a sophisticated company
in the food-delivery business as it
develops self-driving vehicles.
While much of the focus is on
self-driving vehicles used by ridehailing services such as Uber and
Lyft, the sale of vehicles capable
of delivering packages and goods
could be just as lucrative for
automakers.
“When you look at moving
goods, there are perishable goods,
which are difficult to do, like we
are experimenting with Domino’s, and then there are non-perishable goods,” said Sherif
Marakby, Ford’s vice president of
autonomous and electric vehicles.
For now, the partnership only
involves one vehicle at one Domino’s pizza location in Ann Arbor.
Over the next several weeks, randomly selected Domino’s customers will be asked whether they are
willing to participate in the research project and receive their
delivery from the self-driving
Ford Fusion hybrid.
Kevin Vasconi, Domino’s chief
innovation officer, said the com-
pany expects all kinds of things
will go wrong. In fact, he hopes
some customers have problems
because the purpose of the test is
to discover issues that engineers
haven’t anticipated.
But engineers at Ford and
Roush Performance, which outfitted the Fusion with the additional hardware and electronics
necessary to turn it into a delivery vehicle, seem to have thought
of almost everything.
If the wrong number is keyed
in three times, a prompt will direct the customer to call the store
for assistance. If a phone or another object is left in the compartment, as the customer picks
up, the pizza’s sensors will detect
the object and a voice will remind
customers to make sure they
have all of their belongings.
A touchscreen interface tablet,
which will guide the customer
through the experience, is attached on the passenger side of a
Ford Fusion hybrid autonomous
research vehicle. And if customers linger too long as they check
out the vehicle, they will be asked
to step away so the car can safely
drive away. Afterward, customers
will be asked to participate in a
survey that will ask how they
liked the service.
Domino’s
Chief Development Officer Kelly
Garcia stands
next to the
Ford Fusion
self-driving
hybrid that
will be used
as a test pizza
delivery vehicle in Ann
Arbor, Mich.
4B MONEY
AMERICA’S MARKETS
What to watch
@adamshell
USA TODAY
The blueprint for how Wall
Street reacts to threats of war,
military provocations and other
high-profile and unsettling geopolitical risks was on display
briefly Tuesday after North Korea lobbed a missile over Japan.
The knee-jerk reaction of traders was to take “risk” off the table
by selling investments such as
stocks that could potentially go
down a lot if the threat turns
from bluster to something worse.
The Dow took an early dive Tuesday, dipping almost 135 points,
before recouping its gains and
finishing the day up 57 points.
The market’s initial phase
Tuesday was classic “flight to
safety” trading. With questions
Price: $31.13
+56.97
Day’s high: $31.26
Low: $30.93
$35
The automaker said it will recall 281,000 vehicles in
the U.S. with a computer glitch that can cause cars
to stall. The recall covers the 2009 to 2016 CC and
the 2006 to 2010 Passat and Passat Wagon vehicles.
Change
-$0.33
% chg
-1.1%
DOW
JONES
$30
Aug. 1
Change
-$0.56
% chg
-0.3%
4-WEEK TREND
Domino’s Pizza
$200
% chg
0.9%
$178.38
$150
Aug. 1
Aug. 29
Price: $116.85 Day’s high: $116.98 Low: $116.33
4-WEEK TREND
Anheuser-Busch InBev
$150
The Budweiser parent company’s brewery in Georgia has halted beer production and switched to water to send to those affected by Hurricane Harvey.
More than 100,000 cans of water will be delivered to
Arlington, Texas.
Change
$1.04
Aug. 29
Price: $178.38 Day’s high: $178.72 Low: $176.10
Ford is teaming with the restaurant chain to test
driverless pizza delivery. There will still be an engineer at the wheel during testing, but customers will
get their pizza from a locked compartment.
S&P
500
SPX
+2.06
CHANGE: +.3%
CLOSE: 21,865.37
YTD: +2,102.77
PREV. CLOSE: 21,808.40
YTD % CHG: +10.6% RANGE: 21,673.58-21,879.22
$116.85
$90
Aug. 1
Aug. 29
22,000
21,865.37
STANDARD & POOR'S
CHANGE: +.1%
YTD: +207.47
YTD % CHG: +9.3%
CLOSE: 2,446.30
PREV. CLOSE: 2,444.24
RANGE: 2,428.20-2,449.19
COMP
NASDAQ
RUT
RUSSELL
+18.87
COMPOSITE
+1.45
RUSSELL 2000 INDEX
20,000
March
Aug.
STANDARD & POOR’S 500
NASDAQ COMPOSITE
CHANGE: +.3%
CLOSE: 6,301.89
YTD: +918.77
PREV. CLOSE: 6,283.02
YTD % CHG: +17.1% RANGE: 6,228.73-6,311.26
CHANGE: +.1%
YTD: +26.55
YTD % CHG: +2.0%
Company (ticker symbol)
6,400
CLOSE: 1,383.68
PREV. CLOSE: 1,382.23
RANGE: 1,371.80-1,385.19
S&P 500’S BIGGEST GAINERS/LOSERS
Price
$ Chg
2,500
6,301.89
YTD
% Chg % Chg
United Rentals (URI)
Harvey expected to fuel rebuilding demand.
114.94 +4.23
+3.8
+8.9
United Technologies (UTX)
Shares climb as Rockwell Collins deal nears.
118.70 +3.37
+2.9
+8.3
5,600
Aug.
16.51
Brown-Forman (BF/B)
Shares rise ahead of earnings call.
51.20
+.42
+1.16
Raytheon (RTN)
182.11 +3.87
Shares higher after North Korean missile launch.
130.74
+2.75
+2.6
+2.3
-9.8
+14.0
+2.2 +28.2
+1.11
+2.0
-.3
Ulta Beauty (ULTA)
Makes up loss on analyst outlook slash.
211.78 +4.03
+1.9
-16.9
+.94
+1.8
-6.7
200.95 +3.08
+1.6
+16.4
53.17
Price
$ Chg
YTD
% Chg % Chg
Best Buy (BBY)
55.02
Positive quarterly report yet fails to impress investors.
-7.45
-11.9 +28.9
Company (ticker symbol)
NAV
226.62
61.08
223.62
61.05
17.23
61.09
223.64
115.27
118.30
71.26
Chg.
+0.23
+0.05
+0.22
+0.05
-0.07
+0.05
+0.22
-0.45
+0.27
unch.
4wk 1
-0.8%
-1.1%
-0.8%
-1.1%
+0.1%
-1.1%
-0.8%
+0.1%
-0.4%
-0.3%
YTD 1
+10.7%
+9.9%
+10.7%
+9.8%
+18.6%
+9.9%
+10.7%
+18.7%
+20.9%
+7.0%
16.43
Under Armour C (UA)
Shares decline along with sibling stock.
15.34
-.44
-2.8
-39.1
Darden Restaurants (DRI)
Negative note, dips along with sector.
82.64
-2.20
-2.6
+13.6
16.11
-.36
-2.2
-41.5
Marathon Petroleum (MPC)
51.43
Prolonged Harvey shutdown pushes shares lower.
Freeport-McMoRan (FCX)
Indonesia deal seen to come at too big of a cost.
15.21
-.50
-3.0
-43.4
-1.09
-2.1
+2.1
-.32
-2.1
+15.3
Universal Health Services (UHS)
106.93
Harvey expected to hurt, dips along with peers.
-2.14
-2.0
+.5
HCA Holdings (HCA)
Flood exposure pushes shares lower.
77.59
-1.57
-2.0
+4.8
Nike (NKE)
Falls after Finish Line lowers forecasts.
52.73
-1.00
-1.9
+3.7
SOURCE: BLOOMBERG AND THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PERFORMANCE
DAILY YTD
SECTOR
Technology
0.4%
20.1%
Health care
0.2%
15.3%
-0.2%
13.5%
Industrials
0.7%
9.2%
Materials
-0.5%
9.2%
Consumer discret.
-0.1%
8.8%
Consumer staples
0.3%
5.8%
Financials
-0.3%
5.7%
Telecom
-0.3%
2.6%
Energy
-0.1%
-16.8%
Utilities
1 – CAPITAL GAINS AND DIVIDENDS REINVESTED
ETF, ranked by volume Ticker
VanE Vect Gld Miners
GDX
SPDR S&P500 ETF Tr
SPY
Barc iPath Vix ST
VXX
SPDR Financial
XLF
iShs Emerg Mkts
EEM
ProShs Ultra VIX ST
UVXY
iShares Gold Trust
IAU
CS VS 2x Vix ShTm
TVIX
PowerShs QQQ Trust
QQQ
US Oil Fund LP
USO
Close
24.42
244.85
47.87
24.57
44.69
31.19
12.58
17.01
142.97
9.46
Chg.
+0.16
+0.28
+0.57
-0.08
-0.08
+0.79
-0.02
+0.35
+0.56
-0.07
% Chg %YTD
+0.7% +16.7%
+0.1%
+9.5%
+1.2%
unch.
-0.3% +5.7%
-0.2% +27.6%
+2.6%
unch.
-0.2% +13.5%
+2.1% -82.1%
+0.4% +20.7%
-0.7% -19.3%
INTEREST RATES
MORTGAGE RATES
Type
Prime lending
Federal funds
3 mo. T-bill
5 yr. T-note
10 yr. T-note
Type
30 yr. fixed
15 yr. fixed
1 yr. ARM
5/1 ARM
Close 6 mo ago
4.25%
3.75%
1.16%
0.66%
1.02%
0.54%
1.71%
1.94%
2.13%
2.40%
Close 6 mo ago
3.69%
3.99%
2.96%
3.13%
3.16%
3.12%
3.09%
3.15%
SOURCE: BANKRATE.COM
COMMODITIES
Under Armour A (UAA)
Shares dip on Kevin Durant comments.
Mattel (MAT)
Reverses gain on Fullscreen partnership.
Aug.
MARKET PERFORMANCE BY SECTOR
TOP 10 EXCHANGE TRADED FUNDS
57.77
General Dynamics (GD)
North Korea concerns push shares up.
Fund, ranked by size
Vanguard 500IdxAdmrl
Vanguard TtlSMIdxAdmrl
Vanguard InsIdxIns
Vanguard TtlSMIdxInv
Vanguard TtInSIdxInv
Vanguard TtlSMIdxIns
Vanguard InsIdxInsPlus
Vanguard TtInSIdxInsPlus
Fidelity Contrafund
Vanguard WlngtnAdmrl
+2.1 +40.9
Dish Network (DISH)
Ruling opens path to $3.3 billion discount.
Jacobs Engineering (JEC)
Climbs on Southern Peru Copper deal.
March
AP
Coty (COTY)
Insider buys again, shares up.
Rockwell Collins (COL)
Climbs on United Technologies progress.
2,446.30
2,300
March
TOP 10 MUTUAL FUNDS
LOSERS
$31.13
DOW JONES INDUSTRIALS
INDUSTRIAL AVERAGE
GAINERS
4-WEEK TREND
Volkswagen Group
swirling over North Korea’s latest
missile test provocation — which
put both the U.S. and one of its allies on notice — investors initially
flocked to so-called haven investments, such as gold, U.S. government bonds and other assets
deemed safe places to park cash
when the world is experiencing
existential worries.
Gold jumped more than $22 to
climb as high as $1,331.90, nearing its 52-week high of $1,370.80
from September 2016. Gold settled at $1,313.10, continuing its
rise above $1,300 for the first
time since June 2016.
Money also flooded into U.S.
10-year Treasuries, briefly pushing the yield down to 2.088%, its
lowest level since the days after
the presidential election.
Calm returned and many of the
trades reversed by day’s end. But
not before the market showed
signs of being spooked.
MAJOR INDEXES
DJIA
ALL THE MARKET ACTION IN REAL TIME.
MARKETS.USATODAY.COM
STORY STOCKS
N. Korea sets ‘flight to safety’ trades in motion
Adam Shell
USA TODAY
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
K1
Commodities
Close
Prev.
Cattle (lb.)
1.05
1.06
Corn (bushel)
3.34
3.36
Gold (troy oz.)
1,313.10 1,309.70
Hogs, lean (lb.)
.60
.62
Natural Gas (Btu.)
2.96
2.93
Oil, heating (gal.)
1.67
1.64
Oil, lt. swt. crude (bar.)
46.44
46.57
Silver (troy oz.)
17.42
17.43
Soybeans (bushel)
9.31
9.35
Wheat (bushel)
4.03
4.00
Chg.
-0.01
-0.02
+3.40
-0.02
+0.03
+0.03
-0.13
-0.01
-0.04
+0.03
% Chg.
-0.9%
-0.7%
+0.3%
-2.3%
+1.2%
+1.9%
-0.3%
-0.1%
-0.5%
+0.7%
% YTD
-11.6%
-5.3%
+14.2%
-9.0%
-20.5%
-2.3%
-13.6%
+9.3%
-6.6%
-1.3%
Close
.7737
1.2529
6.5975
.8339
109.71
17.8496
Prev.
.7729
1.2494
6.6325
.8348
109.09
17.8152
20
11.66
Close
11,945.88
27,765.01
19,362.55
7,337.43
51,313.66
40
6 mo. ago
.8061
1.3291
6.8688
.9437
112.17
20.0776
Yr. ago
.7626
1.3017
6.6796
.8939
101.98
18.5992
+0.31 (+2.7%)
S&P 500 P/E RATIO
The price-to-earnings ratio, based on
trailing 12-month “operating” earnings:
15
FOREIGN MARKETS
Country
Frankfurt
Hong Kong
Japan (Nikkei)
London
Mexico City
30
10
0
FOREIGN CURRENCIES
Currency per dollar
British pound
Canadian dollar
Chinese yuan
Euro
Japanese yen
Mexican peso
CBOE VOLATILITY INDEX
Measures expected market volatility
based on S&P 500 index options pricing:
Prev. Change
12,123.47
-177.59
27,863.29
-98.28
19,449.90
-87.35
7,401.46
-64.03
51,266.72
+46.94
7.5
%Chg. YTD %
-1.5% +4.1%
-0.4% +26.2%
-0.5% +1.3%
-0.9% +2.7%
+0.1% +12.4%
20.33
22.5
SOURCES: MORNINGSTAR, DOW JONES INDEXES, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
IN-DEPTH MARKETS COVERAGE
USATODAY.COM/MONEY
30
0
SOURCE BLOOMBERG
+0.01 (+0.1%)
Best Buy’s resurgence continues despite hot competition
Nathan Bomey
and Charisse Jones
@NathanBomey, @charissejones
USA TODAY
The resurgence of electronics
retailer Best Buy accelerated as
the chain predicted a brighter future amid better-than-expected
sales of products such as wearable technology, smart-home devices and appliances.
Best Buy’s comeback continued despite intense online
competition from Amazon and
brick-and-mortar rivals, suggest-
ing the big-box chain is finding a
sustainable path.
Second-quarter sales at stores
open at least a year increased
5.4%, far outpacing S&P Global
Market Intelligence estimates of
2.1%.
Encouraging sales of computing devices, smartphones, appliances, wearable technology and
Internet-connected devices used
in the home helped offset a decline in sales of tablet computers.
“Against a backdrop of continued healthy consumer confidence, we believe broad-based
product innovation is resonating
with consumers and driving high-
BEST BUY
er (spending),” Best Buy CEO
Hubert Joly said in a statement.
“And, with our effective merchandising and marketing activities,
combined with our expert advice
and service available online, in-
store and in-home — we are garnering an increasing share of
those dollars.”
The company raised its forecast for fiscal-year revenue
growth from 2.5% to 4% and increased its projected operating
income by half a percentage point
to a range of 4% to 9%.
Best Buy plans to bear down
on the message that it’s a font of
tech expertise, expanding nationally a home adviser service it began piloting last year.
“What we’re seeing with home
advisers is they unlock demand,”
Joly said in an earnings call with
media, noting that the size of or-
ders generated by those house
calls — in which trained sales
people consult with homeowners
on products they might find useful — tends to be larger than
those in stores. “They help customers do things they would not
otherwise have done.”
The company’s second-quarter
revenue rose 4.8% to $8.94 billion, beating S&P Global Market
Intelligence estimates of $8.67
billion. That included growth of
more than 30% for online sales.
Net earnings totaled $209 million, up 5.6% from a year earlier,
beating projections of $195
million.
USA TODAY
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
R
3 DAY LIVE
PUBLIC
AUCTION
WITH OVER
2600 LOTS
MONEY 5B
PRESENTS A
PREMIERE
®
Firearms
TH
TH
AUCTION
D
FULL DAY
PREVIEW
SEPT. 7TH
OPEN TO
PUBLIC
SEPTEMBER 8 , 9 & 10
TH
This sale will feature the lifetime collection of acclaimed collector Vernon J. Berning – a half century treasure trove of fresh & important fine arms from around the world.Also featured will be a
host of other accomplished groupings such as the Collection of Judge Leon Ford III, the Dr. Sol Gourji Collection of Colts & Winchesters, authentic German World War II era militaria from
the Putnam Green/Sycamore Collection, the Jim Thomas Collection of military arms, the Chad Gripp Collection of exceptional pre and post-war Smith & Wesson double action revolvers,
the Doug Twiddy Collection of important 19th century American arms, and the Landmark Collection’s exciting selection of fully automatic and Class III firearms.
R
A selection of fine arms from the
OBERT M.
L
EE
Collection
LOT 1162
Rare and
Exceptional
Double Cased
Set of Factory Engraved Colt Model 1851
SSquareback
b k Percussion
P
i Revolvers
R l
Pre-Auction Estimate
$200,000-325,000
LOT 1016
Spectacular and FRESH Serial Number 17 New
Neew Haven
H
Arms
Company Factory Presentation Engraved First Mod
de Silver
S
Plated
Model
Henry Rifle wit
th Deluxe
D
Stock
with
Pre-Auction Estimate $240,000-375,000
$240,0
00 -375,000
-
Buffalo Bill &
Fred Kavanaugh
LOT 3036
Rare and Documented
Factory Inscribed Winchester
Model 1895 Lever Action Saddle Ring
Carbine Presented by Wild West Showman Buffalo
Bill (William F. Cody) to Fred Kavanaugh with Factory Letter
Pre-Auction Estimate $110,000-160,000
LOT 1304
Documented Highest Serial Number Parker Brothers Grade
7 AAHE Double Barrel 20 Gauge Shotgun with Case
Pre-Auction
e uct o Estimate
st ate $55,000-85,000
$55,000 85,000
LOT 152
28
S
Scarce
Auto-Ordnance Mod
del
11928 Fully Automatic Class III/
I
NFA Submachine Gun wiith
50-Round Drum Magazin
ne
Pre-Auction Estimatte
$16,000-25,000
$16,000-25,00
OVER 100 CLASS III ARMS
IN THIS AUCTION
LOT 3573
Raree and Highly Desirable
World W
War II U.S. Army Singer
Manufactu
uring Company Model
1911A1 SSemi-Automatic Pistol
LOT 1579
Historic and Well D
Documented World War II American Flag Flown on
LCI(L)-421 at the D-Day Landing on Gold Beach in the
the USS LCI(L
Morning Hours of June 6, 1944
Pre-A
Auction Estimate
$30,000-50,000
Pre-Auction
Estimate $250,000-375,000
Pre
LOT 1100
Incredibly Rare and Historic
Colonial Period Brass Barreled
Rappahannock Forge
Flintlock Officers Pistol with
Silver Furniture
Pre-Auction Estimate $50,000-75,000
D-Day
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USA TODAY
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
6B MONEY
STATE-BY-STATE
News from across the USA
ALABAMA Montgomery: The
Air Force joined with the private
sector in Alabama this week to
battle cyber-security threats. A
“hackathon” was held as part of
the Air Force Information Technology and CyberPower Conference in Montgomery.
ALASKA Juneau: Miners and
environmentalists are paying
close attention to the melting
Herbert Glacier north of Juneau.
Land that was completely covered 20 years ago is now exposed,
KTOO-FM reports.
ARIZONA Douglas: Fifteen
inmates and four corrections
officers were injured Monday
during an hour-long disturbance
at the 950-inmate medium-security Mohave prison unit in Douglas.
ARKANSAS Texarkana: This
southwest Arkansas county just
took in $408,000 of unclaimed
abandoned funds. The money
comes from companies that paid
royalties for mineral rights when
the owners couldn’t be found.
CALIFORNIA Dana Point: A
group of boaters spotted a sea
otter in what’s described as a rare
Southern California sighting, The
Orange County Register reports.
Marine experts say the sighting
could mean the sea otter
population is
rising.
COLORADO Denver: The num-
ber of drivers involved in fatal
Colorado crashes who tested
positive for marijuana has more
than doubled since 2013, the
Denver Post reports.
CONNECTICUT New Haven:
Charges were dismissed against
23 Yale University graduate students who blocked city streets
during a protest against alleged
sexual harassment at the school.
The New Haven Register reports
that the students must do community service.
DELAWARE Wilmington: The
last Dominican nuns in Delaware
are leaving the state, The News
Journal reports. The three nuns,
their two cats and 3,000 religious
books will move to Illinois at the
end of the month.
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: A suburban District of Columbia baseball field was renamed this week
in honor of Hall of Famer Ivan
“Pudge” Rodriguez, a former
Washington Nationals catcher
who spent most of his career with
the Texas Rangers.
FLORIDA Largo: The Pinellas
County sheriff fired a decorated
deputy who was caught on video
taunting an autistic boy who
threw a book at a teacher, The
Tampa Bay Times reports.
GEORGIA Atlanta: Georgia is
among states that have cut public
college and university funding
since the recession, prompting
many schools to raise tuition,
WABE Radio reports. A new
study by the Center for Budget
and Policy Priorities says fewer
students will be able to go to
college if the trend doesn’t stop.
HAWAII Honolulu: Three health
care companies and Honolulu
officials are teaming up to provide medical service and housing
to homeless people on Oahu, The
Star-Advertiser reports. Medical
plans include 24-hour urgent
care and a rapid detox and wound
care center.
IDAHO Boise: Idaho has auctioned another 59 residential
cabins for $29.1 million, The
Spokesman-Review reports. Most
of the buyers already owned
cabins. The state plans to reinvest
the money in higher-earning
timber and farm land.
ILLINOIS Chicago: Illinois now
has automatic voter registration.
Under the law, eligible residents
will be automatically registered
unless they opt out when they
visit Secretary of State’s offices
for drivers’ license services.
INDIANA Muncie: Officials of
HIGHLIGHT: TENNESSEE
Couple visit every Cracker Barrel in USA
SOUTH CAROLINA Charleston:
A parent sued Ashley Hall, an
all-girls school in Charleston,
after it sent an email that included private medical information on students. The lawsuit said
the email included a spreadsheet
that detailed allergies, psychiatric
diagnoses and other information.
Jessica Bliss
USA TODAY
For decades, Ray
and Wilma Yoder traveled
across the country on a unique
quest — to visit every Cracker
Barrel Old Country Store in the
country.
They ate their favorite meals
— meatloaf and pancakes and
grilled chicken sandwiches — in
the most obscure of places:
Duncan, S.C.; Layton, Utah; and
Baraboo, Wis.
Along the way, they stopped
at national landmarks such as
the Grand Canyon and the Statue of Liberty, and they visited
local wonders such as the Opryland Hotel.
They always kept a folded
map on which they circled every Cracker Barrel they visited
on the road. By 2015, they had
visited more than 600.
“A retiree is just that way,”
says Ray Yoder, 80.
The Yoders’ journey began
nearly 40 years ago in Nashville. Back then, it wasn’t their
goal to eat at every Cracker
Barrel.
Ray’s hometown of Goshen,
Ind., is a manufacturing center
for recreational vehicles and
accessories.
His job was to drive RVs
across the country, delivering
them to dealerships or buyers.
NASHVILLE
Muncie Community Schools say
the system won’t shut down
despite predictions that it’ll run
out of money by the end of the
year, The Star Press reports. The
district is facing an $8.5 million
general fund deficit but is pursuing a state loan.
IOWA Des Moines: This was a
Union state during the Civil War,
and the State Historical Museum
has an “Iowa and the Civil War”
exhibit. But not on display are 34
Confederate battle flags in its
underground vault. Authorities
say the flags aren’t central to the
history shown in the exhibit.
KANSAS Kansas: Gov. Sam
Brownback has signed an emergency disaster declaration in
response to storms that hit the
state this month. The declaration
covers eight counties.
KENTUCKY Louisville: An investigation into the University of
Louisville’s foundation includes
deleted documents from the
computer of ousted university
President James Ramsey, The
Courier-Journal reports. A forensic audit found a hard drive used
by Ramsey had been erased.
LOUISIANA Lake Charles: A
man accused of shooting a Louisiana pastor during a 2013 service
was released from jail after four
years behind bars and no trial,
The American Press reports.
MAINE Ashland: The Maine
Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry is holding
a meeting Wednesday on the St.
John-Allagash region and its
future. The area includes a
22,760-acre reserve adjacent to
Baxter State Park.
MARYLAND Cumberland: The
owner of a medical marijuana
dispensary in Cumberland says
he hopes to open for business in
November, The Cumberland
Times-News reports. The opening
has been delayed because of a
lack of approved marijuana growers with available product.
THE ELKHART TRUTH
Ray Yoder and his wife, Wilma, estimate they have traveled
about 5 million miles on their Cracker Barrel quest.
That’s how he found himself
in Nashville at the Opryland
Hotel setting up an RV show
and looking for a place to eat.
The most convenient spot
was a Cracker Barrel on Music
Valley Drive.
As the Yoders’ children grew
older and began to move away,
Wilma started joining her husband on the road.
It wasn’t long before Ray had
a plan: “I said to my wife, ‘We
have been to so many. Why
don’t we go to them all?’ ”
Wilma agreed.
Ray estimates they have
driven nearly 5 million miles.
Monday — as they walked
into their very last Cracker Bar-
come families in the Twin Cities,
with priority to families with
children under age 6.
MISSISSIPPI Greenville: Mis-
sissippi’s Washington County has
29 unsafe bridges but only
enough money to fix two of them,
The Delta Democrat-Times reports. Officials say the state will
pay to repair four, leaving 23
structurally deficient bridges.
MISSOURI Columbia: The Uni-
versity of Missouri is warning
students, staff and faculty that a
white supremacist group appears
to be recruiting on and near the
Columbia campus. The Columbia
Tribune reports that officials
spotted fliers addressing “Midwestern Patriots” and carrying a
neo-fascist symbol.
MONTANA Butte: Atlantic Richfield is picking up the estimated
$660,000 tab to repair flood damage at the Old Works Golf Course
in Anaconda, The Montana Standard reports. Heavy rain in July
caused significant damage.
NEBRASKA Lincoln: Dove hunt-
ing season begins next month in
Nebraska. Hunters have from
Sept. 1 to Oct. 31, with daily bag
and possession limits of 15 and
45, respectively.
rel in Tualatin, Ore., outside
Portland — they could say they
had officially called on all 645
Cracker Barrel locations in 44
states.
Their final trip came courtesy of Cracker Barrel, which is
based in Lebanon, Tenn.
The company flew the couple
out to Oregon from their home
in Indiana for the event. Cracker Barrel gave them the royal
treatment.
It was a great end to a 40year, millions-of-miles quest.
Well, at least until a new
store opens, that is.
Contributing: Tim Gordon, KGW-TV,
Portland, Ore.
proposed ordinance that would
prohibit building new billboards,
The Alamogordo Daily News
reports. Signs already in place
would have to be removed within
five years.
NORTH DAKOTA Bismarck:
New Song Church is starting a
ministry offering a safe place for
people recovering from addictions and other struggles, The
Bismarck Tribune reports. The
Celebrate Recovery community
ministry will
launch Sept. 8.
Thousands of people braved
massive traffic jams to get to the
annual Burning Man festival that
opened in the Nevada desert last
weekend, The Reno GazetteJournal reports. About 70,000
people are expected to attend the
art and music festival that runs
until Sept. 4.
NEW HAMPSHIRE New Hamp-
OKLAHOMA Oklahoma City:
ton: Grange Hall in New Hampton has been approved for
demolition. The 191-year-old
building has served as a chapel,
community center and classroom, The Laconia Sun reports.
Researchers are using a lowflying airplane to map deep faults
in Oklahoma, The Oklahoman
reports. Before, researchers used
oil and natural gas company data
for fault maps. But most industry
data is shallow, while most state
earthquakes have been much
deeper.
MASSACHUSETTS Boston: The
city’s official “Move-in Day” is
Friday as college students begin
moving back into their apartments and dorms — and clog up
Boston-area streets. Officials say
parking restrictions will be in
effect.
thorities say a runner participating in the Hood to Coast
relay stole a pickup and drove
through a field where runners
were resting, injuring a woman
and then fleeing, The Oregonian
reports. The man faces assault,
reckless driving, possession of a
stolen vehicle and DUI charges.
MICHIGAN Lansing: Wildlife
MINNESOTA Minneapolis:
Hennepin County has received a
$3.4 million HUD grant to help
residents remove lead paint in
their homes, Minnesota Public
Radio reports. The effort will
focus on low and moderate-in-
NEW JERSEY Somerdale: Police
are searching for a suspect who
slashed 52 tires on multiple police and fire vehicles. Tires on
nine police cruisers, one fire
vehicle and three personal cars of
police officers were slashed.
NEW MEXICO Alamogordo:
Billboard companies succeeded
in getting Alamogordo commissioners to put off a vote on a
TENNESSEE Knoxville: Ten-
nessee’s escaped monkey is back
home. Pretty Boy Floyd spent a
week on the loose but was caught
Sunday after walking up to the
owner’s daughter, The Knoxville
News Sentinel reports.
TEXAS Houston: A 150,000-
barrel fuel storage tank spilled an
unspecified amount of gasoline
near Houston after tilting over
because of rain from tropical
storm Harvey. Authorities say a
containment dike kept the fuel at
Kinder Morgan’s Pasadena Terminal.
UTAH St. George: Authorities
are launching restoration work
on a forest burned in a massive
wildfire near the Utah ski town of
Brian Head. The work includes
aerial seeding and mulching more
than 8.8 square miles of the forest, The Spectrum reports.
NORTH CAROLINA Tarboro:
Teams of planners, engineers and
architects conducted a design
workshop focusing on Princeville,
the first North Carolina town
established by blacks. The teams
created development scenarios
including housing, business and
other uses for a 52-acre tract.
OHIO Powell: The
Columbus Zoo says a
macaw that flew away
from an open-air exhibit area was safely recaptured after people spotted
the bright yellow and blue bird
near a golf club a few miles away.
Milo typically flies between zoo
handlers but took off on a gust of
wind last week, The Columbus
Dispatch reports.
NEVADA Black Rock City:
SOUTH DAKOTA Sioux Falls:
The finance industry has lost
hundreds of workers in the past
three years as health care and
retail companies grow their
South Dakota workforce, The
Argus Leader reports. A state cap
on payday loan interest rates
drove away about half of that
sector’s operators.
NEW YORK Syosset: Police on
Long Island are investigating
spray-painted anti-Semitic messages, including swastikas, on
walls, doors and windows of
Syosset High School. Detectives
believe the vandalism occurred
Sunday.
OREGON Birkenfeld: Au-
biologists are stepping up efforts
to monitor Michigan ospreys.
The birds all but disappeared
because of pesticides but are
coming back.
Foundation, The Call reports.
Woonsocket is seeking an artist
to design the oven and a mason to
build it.
PENNSYLVANIA Hazleton:
Authorities say an intoxicated
woman abandoned her 14month-old baby outside a bar.
Police charged 18-year-old Destiny Davila with child endangerment, public drunkenness and
underage drinking.
RHODE ISLAND Woonsocket:
This city is getting a wood-fired
community bread oven, thanks to
a grant from the Rhode Island
VERMONT Brattleboro: The
New England Center for Circus
Arts has opened at a new location
in Brattleboro with an event
featuring jugglers and a flying
trapeze, The Brattleboro Reformer
reports. The opening comes
after a month of internal
chaos resulting in the resignation of the center’s board.
VIRGINIA Richmond: A
10-story hotel is in the
planning stages to
brighten a dark section
along the downtown
Kanawha Canal, The
Richmond TimesDispatch reports.
The $34 million
Hyatt Place
Hotel is scheduled to open
in 2019.
WASHINGTON Coupe-
ville: Authorities in
Washington’s Island County say a
man beat a dog with a pickax and
finished it off with a .22 caliber
rifle for killing a chicken.
WEST VIRGINIA Charleston: A
Labor Day bell-ringing event in
West Virginia will celebrate U.S.
working women during World
War II. It’s being organized by a
Charleston-based nonprofit,
“Thanks! Plain and Simple.”
WISCONSIN Madison: Water
quality on Wisconsin lakes is
better this year after last summer’s blue-green algae hazards,
Wisconsin Public Radio reports.
Homeowners on Lake Petenwell
and smaller lakes described last
year as one of the worst in years.
WYOMING Laramie: The University of Wyoming is looking to
add a tourism bachelor’s degree
program, The Laramie Boomerang reports. School officials hope
the program will support economic diversification efforts.
Compiled from staff and wire reports.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
E4
SECTION C
Aging
well
Oregon
reborn
At 31, Rafael
Nadal has
returned to
the top of the
rankings and
is hungry to
win the U.S.
Open 5C
After a 4-8
season, new
Oregon coach
Willie Taggart
is determined
to restore
Ducks’ winning ways 2C
USA TODAY SPORTS
HELPLINE
MENTAL HEALTH
SCOTT CLAUSE, USA TODAY NETWORK
FIRST WORD
THIS IS TRULY A DAY
OF TEXANS HELPING TEXANS. IT HAS BEEN
GREAT FOR US TO HAVE JUST
A SMALL PART IN BEING
ABLE TO OPEN OUR DOORS
TO THE TEXANS GIVEN THE
CRISIS AND EVERYTHING
THAT SURROUNDS IT.”
Charlotte Jones Anderson,
Cowboys executive vice president and chairperson of the
NFL Foundation, which is matching the Texans’ $1 million donation to the United Way Relief
Fund to assist those affected by
Hurricane Harvey.
NUMBERS OF THE DAY
$10 million
Contribution from Les Alexander, owner of the Rockets, a
person with knowledge of the
pledge confirmed to USA TODAY Sports. He had originally
planned to donate $4 million.
$1 million
Amount Patriots owner Robert
Kraft and his family will contribute on a dollar-for-dollar basis
up to $1 million donated by the
public, according to the Associated Press. Titans owner Amy
Adams Strunk, who is from
Houston, is donating $1 million,
according to “The (Nashville)
Tennessean.”
$0
Cost of attending Baylor’s football opener Saturday against
Liberty for families affected by
Hurricane Harvey. The school
set up an online form for families — up to eight people — to
fill out to receive free tickets,
parking and a meal. Baylor
also offered its stadium for Sam
Houston State to host Richmond
on Friday night. Admission for
that game is free for everyone.
TWEET OF THE DAY
@JJWatt
$4 MILLION! New Goal:
$5 Million
Texans defensive lineman J.J.
Watt, who has spearheaded a
fund drive on Twitter with a
goal that has been increasing.
LAST WORD
“I HAVE HAD SO MANY OF
MY FRIENDS IN THE COACHING PROFESSION TEXT AND
CALL OFFERING PRAYERS
AND THOUGHTS FOR ALL
HOUSTONIANS. THEY ALL
ASK WHAT CAN WE DO TO
HELP.”
University of Houston basketball coach Kelvin Sampson,
who put out a message on
Twitter calling for the college
sports community to come
together after officials called
for donations of clothes.
Edited by Thomas O’Toole
USA SNAPSHOTS©
Joining the club
200
Goals scored
in the English
Premier League
by Wayne Rooney,
who recently
became the second player1
in league history to reach
the milestone
1 – Alan Shearer, who played from 1992-2006,
holds the record with 260
SOURCE Premierleague.com
ELLEN J. HORROW AND JANET LOEHRKE, USA TODAY
PHOTOS, FROM LEFT, JERRY WEST BY AP; BRANDON MARSHALL BY NOAH K. MURRAY, USA TODAY SPORTS; MICHAEL PHELPS BY ANDREW P. SCOTT, USA TODAY SPORTS; ROYCE WHITE BY LONDON LIGHTNING
Athletes are far from immune to mental health problems. In fact, recent research says they might be more prone to such issues.
ATHLETES FACE DEMONS
Size, strength, speed no match for power of illnesses that afflict mind
Scott Gleeson and Erik Brady
@ScottMGleeson and @ByErikBrady
USA TODAY Sports
Michael Phelps locked himself
in his bedroom for four days
three years ago. He had been arrested a second time for DUI. He
was despondent and adrift. He
thought about suicide.
“I didn’t want to be alive,” he
tells USA TODAY Sports. “I
didn’t want to see anyone else. I
didn’t want to see another day.”
Family and friends — “a lifesaving support group,” Phelps
calls them — urged him to seek
professional help. He got it. And
now he wants others who are
suffering from mental health issues to find the help they need.
Some will scoff at this. Phelps
is the golden boy of the Olympic
Games. Fame and fortune are his.
Really, what could be so bad in
his life?
That is never the right question. People from all walks of life
suffer from a range of mental illnesses. Roughly 44 million
American adults experienced
some form of mental illness in
2015 (the most recent year for
which numbers are available),
according to estimates by the National Institute of Mental Health.
That’s nearly one in five people
18 or older.
Athletes might be at increased
risk, according to research by Lynette Hughes and Gerard Leavey
of the Northern Ireland Association for Mental Health, who
found that factors such as inju-
ries, competitive failure and
overtraining can lead to psychological distress.
NBA legend Jerry West has
struggled for decades with dark
bouts of depression and low selfesteem. Sometimes people call
him brave for speaking openly
about it. He says that’s not courageous so much as honest.
“Some people hide their pain,”
West says. “I’m not proud of the
fact that I don’t feel good about
myself a lot of the time, but it’s
nothing I’m ashamed of.”
New York Giants wide receiver
Brandon Marshall calls mental
health awareness and acceptance
“the civil rights movement of our
era.” He was diagnosed with borderline personality disorder in
2011 and spoke about the importance of destigmatizing mental
illness in March at an NFL owners meeting. Giants owner John
Mara said you could have heard a
pin drop: “He raised our consciousness.”
Athletes face pressure to perform, often in the face of intense
public scrutiny, while competing
in a culture that inhibits them
from seeking the help they need.
“For the longest time, I
thought asking for help was a
sign of weakness, because that’s
kind of what society teaches us,”
Phelps says. “That’s especially
true from an athlete’s perspective. If we ask for help, then we’re
not this big macho athlete that
people can look up to. Well, you
know what? If someone wants to
call me weak for asking for help,
that’s their problem. Because I’m
saving my own life.”
A look at the struggles of five athletes impacted by mental illness, 4C
Colleges wary of
athlete protests
Backlash aimed at
Rangers misguided
Astros’ extra travel
isn’t a real tragedy
Backlash could be
great if it happens
Bob Nightengale
Dan Wolken
bnighten@usatoday.com
USA TODAY Sports
dwolken@usatoday.com
USA TODAY Sports
KIM KLEMENT, USA TODAY SPORTS
The Astros and Rangers will
play in St. Petersburg, Fla.
It’s a stroke of good luck for
the college athletics industrial
complex that there’s no need to
worry about a national anthem
controversy blossoming out of
its showcase college football
weekend beginning Thursday.
Even as the NFL sees more
and more players following the
lead of Colin Kaepernick to
protest racial inequality and
police violence, even as NBA
stars become bolder and louder
advocates for social justice,
there’s no point in asking what
would happen if players from
Alabama and Florida State
wanted to kneel during The
Star-Spangled Banner on Saturday at a stadium erected a couple miles from where Martin
Luther King Jr. was born.
Unlike the NFL, college football teams stay in their locker
KELLEY L. COX, USA TODAY SPORTS
Colin Kaepernick’s anthem
protest can’t happen in college; players are inside then.
rooms during the anthem, saving the likes of Nick Saban and
Dabo Swinney from a backlash
in deep red states where college
football means the most and
any form of player protest likely
won’t be well received.
But in the last year since
Kaepernick’s protest was first
noticed, momentum for highprofile black athletes to become
activists has grown. And it’s just
v STORY CONTINUES ON 2C
The rain won’t stop, people
are dying in Houston and thousands more are missing in one
of the largest natural disasters
America has ever faced.
And we’re supposed to be
worried about baseball?
We are actually engaging in a
petty feud on whether the Texas Rangers should have agreed
to flip-flop a three-game series
with the Houston Astros while
people are coping with a disaster around them.
Are you kidding me?
Please. Enough. Stop it.
It’s not a “tragedy” that the
Astros will have to travel an
extra week during their schedule, spending six games and
days in St. Petersburg, Fla., instead of playing at their home
ballpark of Minute Maid Park
in Houston.
That’s an absolute insult to
the millions of people of Houston.
This is no more than an inconvenience.
A tiny, minuscule nuisance
involving millionaire ballplayers in a $10 billion business.
Complain about your hardship staying in a five-star resort
this week while one of the most
destructive storms in the nation’s history has ravaged the
fourth-largest city in the country, with people still being rescued from rooftops, 30,000
taking refuge in emergency
shelters, hundreds of thousands still without power and
nearly a half-million people expected to apply for federal
assistance?
You kidding?
v STORY CONTINUES ON 6C
2C SPORTS
E2
USA TODAY
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
TAGGART, OREGON GO BACK TO BASICS
After fall, Ducks
begin climb back
George Schroeder
@GeorgeSchroeder
USA TODAY Sports
EUGENE ,
ORE .
Months now
since the paint dried, it is still jarring. All over the Oregon football
facility — and correspondingly,
within adjacent Autzen Stadium
— the formerly ubiquitous “Win
the Day” slogan has been erased.
In its place: “Do Something.”
If that feels somehow incomplete, it is. The full catchphrase,
scrolling on an electronic board
near the Ducks’ team meeting
room, makes more sense:
Blame No One
Make No Excuses
Do Something
For the first time in a long
time, the Ducks are doing something else. Come Saturday, when
they host Southern Utah, they
will be led out of the tunnel by
the Duck riding that motorcycle.
They will wear the latest new uniform and play fast. Just like
always.
But everyone around here
hopes the Ducks do something
different than last season’s 4-8,
which led to the ouster of Mark
Helfrich — and by extension, the
end of the culture created by
Chip Kelly.
Oregon’s rise to the upper echelon of college football was fast
and furiously fun. Its fall — less
than two years after playing for a
national championship — was
equally precipitous. Which is why
the old tagline is conspicuously
absent. It’s clear new coach Willie
Taggart has not done any marketing surveys or checked with the
creatives. What should Oregon’s
brand be?
“Get it back to a winning
brand,” Taggart says. “Tough. Fun
to watch. A disciplined football
team.”
It’s the kind of thing all coaches say, especially newcomers to a
difficult situation. What’s still
wild, Taggart says, is how that describes what he found at Oregon.
He was like most others; from
afar, he saw Oregon as a model of
how to rapidly build a winner.
“You heard ‘Oregon,’ ” he says,
“you knew new uniforms, you
SCOTT OLMOS, USA TODAY SPORTS
“We’re just gonna try to be better than we were last year,” Oregon coach Willie Taggart says.
knew the style of offense, you
knew they won a lot.”
And he knew they were suddenly losing a lot. In any failure,
there are multiple factors. Competitors adapt to — sometimes by
adopting — the innovations.
Sometimes recruits don’t pan
out, or coaching staffs go stale.
Sometimes guys get injured,
while other guys grow complacent. Sometimes the ball just
bounces funny. Sometimes it’s
some combination of all of the
above, and more.
“I found a fractured football
team,” Taggart says, and then explains. “I didn’t think our football
team liked each other. ... You talk
to some of the guys, they’d tell
you they weren’t close, there was
a lot of division from within,
which kind of tells in how the
season went. We had to get that
repaired.”
Players say a creeping sense of
entitlement had enveloped the
program. The Hatfield-Dowlin
Complex is perhaps the best facility in college football, but last season many Ducks spent very little
time there.
“Guys definitely took it a little
bit for granted,” sophomore linebacker Troy Dye says. “Guys
weren’t going to (medical) treatment. Guys weren’t using the
right nutrition. It was just guys
trying to do their own things.”
By contrast, Taggart describes
himself as “old school in this new
building.” A protégé of Jim Harbaugh, he says the program will
take on a “blue-collar mentality.”
The up-tempo offense will be “lethal simplicity.” And Taggart
won’t quite say it, but a big part of
his emphasis has been in getting
back to the basics, on and especially off the field.
“There were a lot of people
who worked their tails off to get
us where we’re at and to get these
things,” he says. “We owe it to
work our tails off to get it back.”
Even the approach to uniforms
will change, if only a bit. Taggart
says the Ducks won’t sport a new
look for every game.
“I don’t think that’s the reason
we got to where we got,” Taggart
says. “We won’t have 12 weeks
worth of uniforms. We could.
We’re just gonna get back to
what’s important. That’s playing
football and winning games.
Those uniforms don’t look well
when you don’t play well.”
After an uneven start last winter when three players were hospitalized after a conditioning
workout and an assistant coach
was fired after he was arrested for
driving under the influence, Taggart’s makeover has apparently
gone well.
“You wanted everything to just
go smooth,” Taggart says, “but
that’s not the world we live in. … I
always think you can take some
good out of a lot of things that
happen. I felt we did as a program. I thought it brought us
closer.”
He instituted team dinners
three times a week and mandatory breakfasts — all part of an effort to mend those fractures and
fissures, to build teamwork and
togetherness.
“I think everyone is really excited to play,” sophomore quarterback Justin Herbert says.
“Guys wake up, and they’re excited to practice and they’re excited
to go lift weights and there are
people around here watching
film. Everyone’s just real excited
to be here.”
Those are all good signs, if not
unexpected when a team buys in
to a new coach’s pitch. But what
ails Oregon is more than entitlement. As Taggart tries to rebuild
“quick, fast and in a hurry,” he’ll
do it with a depth chart for Game
1 that includes 33 freshmen or
sophomores.
“Every year our goal is to win
the Pac-12 championship,” Taggart says. “We’re not going to
waver from that. But we also
know there’s a lot of work to be
done to get there. We’re just gonna try to be better than we were
last year and move toward that
goal of winning that champion-
ship and knowing anything is
possible.”
Oregon might have a rising star
in Herbert, who emerged at midseason and became one of the few
bright spots in 2016. Taggart says
the return of senior running back
Royce Freeman and senior offensive lineman Tyrell Crosby was
important.
The biggest immediate issue is
defense. Even during their rise,
the Ducks were known for scoring touchdowns, not for stopping
them. But in the best seasons,
Oregon’s defense was better than
decent. Last season, though, Oregon allowed opponents an average of 41.4 points and 518.4 yards,
ranking 126th of 128 Football
Bowl Subdivision programs in
both stats.
Taggart’s hire of veteran defensive coach Jim Leavitt, along with
an overhaul of the scheme from
the 4-3 to a 3-4, promises improvement.
“He’s turned around a lot of
places,” Dye says, “brought the
defense from the bottom to the
top.”
But the ebb and flow of a football program doesn’t occur in a
vacuum. Taggart’s task is compounded because long-dormant
Washington has risen again under Chris Petersen; that 70-21
rout of Oregon last October at
Autzen Stadium seemed to signal
more than the end of a 12-game
losing streak in the rivalry.
Whatever happens with Oregon, Washington isn’t going anywhere. Stanford remains plenty
formidable. And in the Pac-12
South, USC seems headed back to
its traditional position as a national power.
Oregon was picked to finish
fourth in the Pac-12 North in a
preseason media poll. That’s
worth less than the pixels it was
published on, but it’s a reflection
of external expectations. Internally? No one is willing to admit
this, but it might be a gradual
rebuild.
“We’re doing the same thing
we did at Western Kentucky and
South Florida,” says Taggart, referring to his previous stops. “It’s
just now you’ve got the Oregon
brand and Nike with it. That’s one
hell of a team.”
What kind of team Oregon will
have this season remains uncertain. But the Ducks are definitely
doing something.
Colleges want players to talk it over with coaches
v CONTINUED FROM 1C
a matter of time before it filters
down to college sports, potentially bringing light to issues from racial inequality to campus policing
to college athlete compensation.
“As soon as Kaepernick did
what he did, I could see that was
the beginning of something and
guys were going to join him,” said
Bill Curry, the former Alabama
coach who was president of the
NFL Players Association during
the 1974 strike and helped lay the
groundwork for players to ultimately achieve free agency. “The
protest thing in the NFL is only
going to grow, and the college
guys, they’re figuring it out and
they’ll start saying, ‘This isn’t
right, this isn’t the American way,’
so I think they’ll follow along and
there will be more and more
organization.”
Make no mistake, the recent
events in Charlottesville, Va., the
current climate of political polarization and the current imperative for college athletes to “stay
woke” have spurred discussions
inside college athletics departments across the country about
how to deal with potential protests. The climate has changed
fairly significantly since even a
few years ago when the Missouri
football team boycotted in conjunction with a Black Lives Matter protest or when some Northwestern players attempted to
unionize.
“I was born in 1970, but it
seems to feel a lot like the ’60s,”
said Virginia Tech athletics director Whit Babcock, who acknowledged ongoing discussions within
his department and the administration about how to approach
possible athlete protests. “Even
though it is vastly different, the
Northwestern (situation) gave a
lot of us some time to talk about
how we would handle such
things. It is a new frontier.”
Several other athletics directors contacted by USA TODAY
Sports acknowledged raising the
issue with their football teams.
SCOTT EISEN, AP
Ex-football player Wade Davis says it might be harder for college athletes to speak out: “These kids have less power.”
While the industry consensus is
few would actively try to stop a
protest, much of the conversation
has been steered toward collaboration with coaches, administrators and teammates to bring
issues to light and helping them
understand the potential for
backlash rather than individuals
striking out on their own.
“More in terms of opening the
door for them to have dialogue
with coaches and administrators
about concerns they have,” Tulane athletics director Troy Dannen said. “But I think we will see
more and more ahead.”
That kind of language, though,
strikes former college and pro
football player Wade Davis as an
implicit deterrent for bold action.
Now a public speaker and advocate focusing on racial, gender
and LGBT issues, Davis pointed
toward the culture of a college
football team where the coach
has the biggest hammer and ath-
letes often don’t want to do anything that would jeopardize their
scholarship and chance to make
the NFL.
“It speaks to the desire to control what the protest looks like
and what the outcome is,” Davis
said. “They don’t want to lose
money. They don’t want fans not
going to games. I think it’s even
more complicated in college than
it is in the pro game because
these kids have less power and it’s
just a different dynamic in the
NFL. These guys aren’t even paid,
per se, in the same way pro athletes are, so there’s a different level of ownership the college level
feels over their athletes. Imagine
kids who play for Alabama kneeling. I mean, there would be a
riot.”
Dave Zirin, who has authored
several books on how protests,
social changes and sports have intersected at key moments in history, noted that college athletes
have been engaged in important
movements recently, including
former Wisconsin basketball star
Bronson Koenig going to the
Standing Rock Sioux reservation
to protest the Dakota Access
Pipeline and Georgetown rowers
covering up Nike swooshes to
protest sweatshop labor practices.
But nothing would have the
impact of star players on a majorcollege football team bringing
light to an issue during a primetime game. Which is why it ultimately will make its way to “the
big kahuna,” as Zirin called it,
even if the barriers are higher
than in some other sports.
“The ferment is there,” Zirin
said. “But I think when NCAA
football players protest about racism, which is really what we’re
talking about, the stakes are so
much higher for everybody involved than in the NFL, which
means it encompasses a lot more
risk and it also means that platform is going to be policed so
much harder because these guys
don’t have a union that can support them.
“You look at the NFL, and
yeah, you’ve got some fans who
are like, ‘I’m never going to come
to a game again,’ but it’s like,
‘Gimme a break, nobody believes
you.’ The NFL is locked into TV
money for years to the tune of
billions of dollars. They’ll be fine
for a little bit of bad publicity. But
at the NCAA level, look what happened at Missouri. That hangs
over this whole thing.”
Indeed, the potential power of
a college football team getting behind a cause was revealed in November 2015 when it threatened
to boycott a game against BYU.
Fewer than 48 hours later, the
president of the University of
Missouri system resigned and the
shock waves are still being felt as
the school’s subsequent drop in
enrollment has been directly tied
to that week’s events.
“In this day and age, the university system is at the heart of
the economic, political and psy-
chological life of an entire city, especially in these small cities in
the Southeastern Conference and
the Big 12,” Zirin said. “The success of the football team is make
or break for the economy, so if a
bunch of 18- and 19-year-olds
mess with that, the ripple effect is
crazy.”
Though it might still be polarizing, it’s no longer surprising to
see Cleveland Cavaliers star LeBron James fire off a Twitter missive at President Trump for his
response to Charlottesville or for
Seattle Seahawks defensive end
Michael Bennett to pick up where
Kaepernick left off.
But what would happen if a
star college football player, particularly at a high-profile school
in the Deep South, wore a Black
Lives Matter shirt during warmups or used a postgame media
session to talk about police brutality and racial profiling rather
than the game?
What would the consequences
be for the school? What kind of
pressure would conservative
white fans put on the coach to denounce it publicly? And what
would the recruiting consequences be for the coach if he
tried to stifle a player bringing
light to an issue?
“It’s an entirely different dynamic because the coach in college holds absolute sway,” Curry
said. “I would pray that nobody
would say, ‘I’m taking your scholarship away,’ and I don’t think I
know anybody that would do a
thing like that, but that’s what is
possible at the college level.”
Given the current climate, it’s a
matter of time before someone
tests that theory. And given how
scared athletics departments are
about this very scenario, even
without an anthem to kneel for,
college football players might find
out they have more power and a
louder voice than they knew.
FOLLOW REPORTER
DAN WOLKEN
@DanWolken for breaking news
and insight on college sports.
USA TODAY
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
SPORTS 3C
E2
Imagine a world without football
Nancy Armour
narmour@usatoday.com
USA TODAY Sports
Your lucky jersey is washed
and ready to go, your supply of
face paint is restocked and FritoLay is assured of meeting its
third-quarter numbers thanks to
you.
But as you keep one eye on the
clock, willing it to speed-forward
to Thursday night — this one, the
next or both — give a thought to
an idea making its way around
Twitter on Tuesday.
What, the Internet asked,
#IfFootballDidn’tExist.
Please, no screaming or hyperventilating. This was a social experiment by Hashtag Roundup,
not an actual drill.
“It just gets people talking. Our
tags exist more for the humor aspect of it,” said Robyn Dwoskin,
co-founder of Hashtag Roundup,
an app that poses questions each
morning. “This one probably hit a
nerve to some of those football
fans.”
But as college football gets underway in earnest Thursday night
and the NFL kicks off next week,
it’s an interesting thought to
ponder.
@Shea Browning: #IfFootballDidn’tExist Friday Night
Lights would just be me staring
upwards in the Walmart parking
lot.
KIRBY LEE, USA TODAY SPORTS
If football didn’t exist, Los Angeles Coliseum would have to find some other way to fill seats.
Now that’s just sad. And, long
term, probably not the best thing
for your eyes.
Fortunately, there were a few
other ideas.
@RetiredSimi: #IfFootballDidn’tExist: I guess there’s curling
Don’t laugh. Vernon Davis
loves curling and has already said
he plans to be at the Pyeongchang
Olympics to get his fill in person.
If it’s good enough for the Pro
Bowl tight end, it’s an idea worth
considering.
***
The next idea not only kills
time, it broadens your horizons.
All these years, we could have
been playing fantasy darts. Fantasy poker. Fantasy rock, paper,
scissors. Just about any activity
can be interesting if there’s money — or trash talking — involved.
@JDejuan2:
#IfFootballDidntExist I’d spend Sundays yelling about my fantasy bowling
team
(And before you ask, yes, fantasy bowling is very much a thing.
Ask any Wisconsinite. See if
they’ll share some cheese curds
while you’re at it.)
***
I like the spirit here, though
I’m not sure about the execution
of it. Also, I’m pretty sure firing
up a grill and cracking open a cold
one on the sidewalk outside Madison Square Garden or Staples
Center might get you arrested.
But, again, applaud the effort.
@thewatcher85:
#IfFootballDidntExist I’d have to tailgate
NBA games.
***
Now, there were some people
who were delighted by the idea of
no football. Many expressed con-
cerns about repetitive head trauma and the toll the game takes on
the long-term health of the
players.
@Solely_Toya: #IfFootballDidntExist I’d probably see a lot
less patients with concussions.
***
For most folks, though, the
thought of no football was a
source of great angst. Or what
daily life is like for a Buffalo Bills
fan.
@citizendolan: #IfFootballDidntExist
the
#Chargers
wouldn’t of been able to find new
and creative ways to disappoint me
season after season.
An opinion echoed by fans of
the Giants, Jets and about a halfdozen other teams, for what it’s
worth.
***
For some, the question actually
produced something of an existential crisis.
@Brockfest:
#IfFootballDidntExist I wouldn’t have a
name. I was named after a
@Giants player.
@AM_Page: I wouldn’t exist
That’s just a tad on the dramatic side. But the popularity of the
question was a reminder of the
very large role football plays in
American society.
And the many things we’d miss
if it really didn’t exist.
@Bobbo1123:
#IfFootballDidntExist We wouldn’t have Roger Goodell to kick around
FOLLOW COLUMNIST
NANCY ARMOUR
@nrarmour for commentary on
the latest sports news
Pulisic could cash in on staggering transfer fees
Martin Rogers
mjrogers@usatoday.com
USA TODAY Sports
NEW YORK Chances are that before too long American soccer
will have a player valued at
$100 million, and it is even more
likely that player will be Christian
Pulisic.
Thanks to the money madness
engulfing global soccer, nine figures, once enough to get the purchaser not one but two international superstars, is now the
kind of number being spent on
elite prospects with a tremendous upside.
Pulisic, 18, most certainly fits
into that category, given his meteoric rise with both German club
Borussia Dortmund and the U.S.
national team. Still young enough
that he can’t remember a time
when things were markedly different, the extraordinary fees
washing through the sport don’t
faze him.
“It’s all I know really. I have
just started my career,” Pulisic
told USA TODAY Sports on Tuesday, as he prepared for Friday’s
national team World Cup qualifi-
PETER STEFFEN, AP
Christian Pulisic’s strong play
in Germany could place his
value in the nine-figure range.
er against Costa Rica. “You see
these big money amounts going
around. It is just today’s game; it
is how it is.
“Of course, it still seems like a
lot to me; it seems like a lot to everybody I would think. (But the)
sums going around don’t really
affect a player too much. We are
all playing soccer, we all make
good money and it is kind of how
the world works.”
Only this week, Pulisic has
seen firsthand the extent of soccer’s new reality. His good friend
and Borussia Dortmund teammate Ousmane Dembele, 20, was
bought by Barcelona for a fee
of $125 million, with add-ons
that could take the amount to
$161 million.
Dembele is an outstanding talent but was still playing reserve
team soccer just two years ago.
Cristiano Ronaldo cost Real Madrid less eight years ago, when he
was already established as one of
the best two players in the world.
For those who have been
around soccer for a couple of decades and can reflect upon a time
when even a $1 million transfer
was significant, the escalation of
the fiscal side of the game has
been bewildering.
“It doesn’t make any sense to
me,” said U.S. head coach Bruce
Arena, shaking his head.
“The transfer fees are staggering, they are out of control,” national team goalkeeper Tim
Howard added. “We would all
agree on that.”
Players who have been bought
for huge sums, such as former
world transfer recordholder Paul
Pogba of Manchester United,
have admitted that the price tag
has brought additional pressure.
But, U.S. captain Michael Bradley
joked, such a burden could be
mitigated by other factors, such
as the reality that the figure will
also translate to enormous wages.
“There are some good problems
that come with that,” Bradley
said.
If Pulisic was to become a chief
target for a major European
team, the $100 million range
would be a possibility. That’s not
hype, it is just the state of the
market, which became red hot
at the end of last season and exploded this summer when Neymar joined Paris St. Germain
from Barcelona for $265 million,
smashing Pogba’s mark of
$116 million.
Young players are at a premium, and Pulisic’s skill set and vision are rare. Dortmund, flushed
with the Dembele money, would
not be in a position of needing to
sell, driving up the price further.
Also, Pulisic’s status as the great
hope for American soccer would
be a meaningful marketing opportunity for an enterprising European power.
If such a scenario arose, don’t
expect Pulisic to be swayed by it.
“I hear about all this stuff, this
kid and this hype and all that, but
it doesn’t matter too much to
me,” Pulisic added. “I just try to
put it out of my mind. I don’t
need all this outside attention
and all that. I just try to do the
best for myself and the people
around me. I have a lot of things
to improve on.”
Pulisic takes his responsibility
to the future of American soccer
seriously and on Tuesday announced his involvement in the
Prospects Cup, an upcoming
youth soccer tournament modeled on the Little League World
Series.
For Pulisic, a native Pennsylvanian who attended the Williamsport event at age 12, the soccer
tournament, which will be broadcast by Univision and distributed
internationally, offers great possibilities. If it enjoys even a fraction
of the success of its baseball
counterpart, the game in this
country will be the beneficiary,
and Pulisic hopes others like him
can filter up the pipeline.
“If we can get our kids playing
soccer from a young age, there is
no reason why we can’t compete
with any other country in the
world in the near future,” he said.
With the USA undefeated since
Arena took over for a second
time, Dortmund atop the German
Bundesliga and his own game improving, Pulisic has a lot to look
forward to, regardless of what figure soccer’s insane financial marketplace values him at.
fil-A restaurant in the school’s
city. If one was held, the school
had to provide cheerleaders and
mascots to appear.
uLouisville at Purdue, Lucas Oil Stadium. The 20-page
lease agreement that Purdue and
Louisville signed for the use of
the Indianapolis Colts home field
said the schools could get a title
sponsor for the game, but it was
subject to the stadium management’s approval and could not
promote any product or service
that competes with Lucas Oil
products. In addition, the Colts —
the stadium’s primary tenant —
had to give permission for any
agreement that might conflict
with a deal they have with anyone
on a three-page, single-spaced list
of sponsors. However, Learfield —
the schools’ marketing firm — did
find a sponsor, Ally Financial, and
so the game officially is the Ally
Classic.
FOLLOW REPORTER
MARTIN ROGERS
@mrogersUSAT for commentary
and analysis on soccer.
Bands, sponsors, mascots
all part of contract quirks
Steve Berkowitz
@ByBerkowitz
USA TODAY Sports
The early college football
schedule is almost exclusively
comprised of non-conference
games.
The games are being governed
by individually negotiated contracts.
Here are some of the more notable provisions from contracts
for this weekend’s games.
uFlorida A&M at Arkansas, War Memorial Stadium
in Little Rock. Arkansas agreed
to pay Florida A&M $750,000 if
its band — the famed “Marching
100” — attended the game or
$700,000 if the band did not attend. The band will not be on
hand for the game, director Shelby Chipman said Monday. Meanwhile, Florida A&M is saving
money on transportation by having its traveling party go to the
game by bus, about a 10-hour trip
from Tallahassee.
uNevada at Northwestern,
Ryan Field. The contract says
Nevada will be given 75 free game
programs to be delivered to its
dressing room at least one hour
before the game. Under the deal’s
original terms, set in January
2016, the game was to be played
Sept. 16 and Nevada was to be
paid $1.2 million. But when the
date was changed four months
later, the payment was increased
to $1.3 million.
uTulsa at Oklahoma State,
Boone Pickens Stadium. This
was 11 years — and three date
changes — in the making. It was
set up under a three-game contract made in May 2006 that included the terms of a four-game
men’s basketball series. Initially
set to have been played in 2012, it
was moved to 2016, then to this
year. Finally, in May, it was
moved from Sept. 2 to Aug. 31 for
TV.
uWest Virginia vs. Virginia Tech, FedExField. Under
their contract with the Washington Redskins’ stadium management company, Virginia Tech and
West Virginia had to use “reasonable efforts” not to play each other in a bowl game after the 2016
season.
uHoward at UNLV, Sam
Boyd Stadium. Howard is
scheduled to receive $600,000,
but university officials had to
agree to a specific series of activities in cooperation with UNLV
and the Las Vegas Convention
and Visitors Authority to promote the game and encourage
fans to travel to Las Vegas. In addition, at its own expense, Howard had to arrange for its band
and cheerleaders to arrive in Las
Vegas by noon the day before the
game to participate in various
events. Failure to fulfill any of the
obligations would allow UNLV to
reduce the guarantee by up to
$300,000. This is part of a threeyear arrangement between UNLV
and the convention and visitors
bureau to bring a historically
black college or university team
to Las Vegas, authority spokesman Jeremy Handel said.
uAlabama
vs.
Florida
State, Tennessee vs. Georgia
Tech. Both at Mercedes-Benz
Stadium. The contract for each
of the four teams participating in
a Chick-fil-A Kickoff Game in Atlanta — Alabama, Florida State,
Georgia Tech and Tennessee —
said that in the weeks leading up
the game the organizers could
stage a “Spirit Day” at a Chick-
4C SPORTS
E4
USA TODAY
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
ATHLETES BOLDLY DISCUSS MENTAL HEALTH
ROYCE
WHITE
Royce White left the NBA three
years ago amid demands for a
better mental health initiative
from the league. Today, playing
basketball in Canada, he
speaks bluntly about mental
illness and salts his conversation
with colorful metaphors and
off-color language.
“It’s not about the NBA,” he says.
“If (expletive) Walmart didn’t
have a (reasonable mental
health) policy, I would have done
the same thing there, too.”
He grew up in Minneapolis,
largely raised by a single mother and grandmother. Speaking
his mind always came naturally.
“I didn’t have men around me
growing up who saw having
anxiety as weak or not tough
enough,” White says. “I grew up
with a lot of diversity. Instead of
having that traditional one-male
role model, I was allowed to
have many. And maybe it’s just
where I’m from, but that whole
masculinity (stereotype) — men
can’t show weakness (crap) —
wasn’t around.”
One of White’s male role models was his fiery high school
coach, Dave Thorson, now an
assistant coach at Drake, who
led White to therapy. An inschool family practitioner ultimately diagnosed him with
generalized anxiety disorder
and obsessive compulsive disorder. Since, he has embraced
ROBERT HANASHIRO, USA TODAY SPORTS
“I need the same type of support as anyone who is struggling,”
says Royce White, who had a short stint in the NBA.
his illnesses rather than hide
them in silence.
“The million-dollar question is,
‘Does what you go through
make you better or worse?’ ”
White says. “I actually look at
my anxiety as a blessing.”
White, the Houston Rockets’
first-round draft choice (16th pick
overall) in 2012, made headlines
when he asked for accommodations to address panic attacks
when he flew on planes. He had
made 20 plane trips in a season
while at Iowa State; playing in
the NBA was going to require
something closer to 100 flights.
And the drugs he took to calm
his fears affected his energy in
games and practices.
“It’s been painted as me wanting special treatment because
of anxiety,” White says. “No, I’m
saying I need the same type of
support as anyone who is struggling. Call it whatever the hell
you want to call it. There are
specific injury doctors for players” with bum knees and
sprained ankles.
White says when he requested
an individual doctor, NBA officials told him if they made an
accommodation for him, they’d
have to do it for 450 players. He
played in three NBA games —
zero points for the Sacramento
Kings — as he bounced around
the NBA and its developmental
league for several seasons.
Kathy Behrens, NBA president of
social responsibility and player
programs, offers no comment
on White’s case specifically,
other than to say the league has
“great respect for Royce speaking about his struggles.” She
says the NBA is not new to the
issue but has “a growing understanding of the importance
of the subject.” She says players
currently have access to mental
health professionals through the
player assistance program.
Last season White played for
the London (Ontario) Lightning
of the National Basketball
League of Canada, where he is
the reigning league MVP and
the Lightning are the reigning
champion. His last affiliation
with the NBA was the Los Angeles Clippers’ Summer League
team in 2015.
“This isn’t just about me in the
NBA,” White says. “You hear all
the time about mental health
stigma and people being
ashamed. Well, there are people across the country who need
help, say they need help and
aren’t getting it. We should be
talking about them, too.”
ALLISON
SCHMITT
DIA DIPASUPIL, GETTY IMAGES
“We’re not gods,” Michael Phelps, with wife Nicole and son
Boomer, says of athletes. “I’m human like everybody else.”
MICHAEL PHELPS
For most of his solid-gold life,
Michael Phelps saw himself in
much the same way as the
outside world did.
“I saw myself as a swimmer
and nothing else,” he says. “I
didn’t know who I really was.
And neither did anybody else.
At the age of 30, I found myself.
And I decided I wanted to show
the world not Michael Phelps
the swimmer, but who I really
was.”
Phelps is 32, and he wants the
world to see him as husband,
father and, yes, history’s most
decorated Olympian — but
also as a depression sufferer.
“It’s good for athletes to be
open about who they are and
for people to see we’re far
from perfect,” Phelps says.
“We’re not gods. I’m human
like everybody else.”
After opening up about his
issues, he found he could help
others while helping himself.
“Once I started talking about
my struggles outside the pool,
the healthier I felt,” he says.
“Now I have kids and adults
come up to me and say they
were able to open up because
I was open about my life.”
Phelps retired after the 2012
Summer Games in London — or
so he said — but ended up
coming back for a last hurrah
in Rio in 2016, this time with his
infant son, Boomer, and his
newlywed wife, Nicole, to cheer
him on. Now he swears he’s
really retired. And he doesn’t
have to worry about what’s
next; his calling as an advocate
for mental health found him.
“My talent was in the swimming pool, but it’s led me to
something else in life,” Phelps
says. “It’s a duty. It’s an honor
to talk about mental health.
But I’m really just being my
authentic self, sharing my story.”
JERRY
WEST
West is Mr. Clutch. He’s The
Logo. A master architect, building teams behind the scenes.
He’s also, at 79, a life-long sufferer of depression. Or, as he
calls it, the dark place.
“This is something that doesn’t
go away, this depression,” West
says. “When I go through it,
it’s almost always based on
my (low) self-worth and selfesteem.”
West sees his suffering less as
an illness and more as a product of a tormented childhood of
abuse at the hands of his father. That’s part of why West
turned to basketball as a kid —
a “misfit with no confidence,” in
his words — in West Virginia. It
was a safe haven where he
JAYNE KAMIN-ONCEA, USA TODAY SPORTS
“I was looking for an escape.”
could build confidence.
“Everyone is driven by different
things in life,” West says. “To
some degree, based on some
of the things I saw growing up, I
was looking for an escape. I
was just looking for something
that I’d be appreciated for.”
Sometimes he played all by
himself in a fantasy world in
which he always splashed a
game-winning buzzer-beater.
“For anyone who saw me,” he
says, “they probably said, ‘My
God, this kid is crazy.’ ”
Schmitt executed a flip turn, as
the swimmer had done thousands of times before, as she
competed in an event in Austin
in 2015. And then, out of nowhere, midway through the
400-meter freestyle, she quit.
“That last 200 meters I was like,
(expletive) this,” she says. “I
knew I gave up, but I didn’t
know why.”
The answer, as it turned out,
was what she calls “the invisible illness” — depression.
Michael Phelps, her friend and
frequent training partner —
was at the meet. Months earlier, Phelps and Schmitt sat in a
burrito restaurant and discussed the suicide that week of
actor Robin Williams. Schmitt
had said she could understand
why he did it. At that point,
Schmitt says, “Michael knew
something was up.”
She had contemplated suicide.
She had considered driving off
the road on a snowy night to
make it appear as an accident.
Phelps approached her on the
pool deck after she quit on that
400 free. Bob Bowman, who
coached them both, also arrived. And Schmitt’s pain soon
came pouring out — the tears,
the sadness, the emptiness.
Schmitt says she began seeing
a psychologist soon after. Therapy, she says, “makes training
for the Olympics seem easy.”
She found it difficult to be vulnerable. She had been taught
to rush through, persevere and
come out stronger. She felt
embarrassed and ashamed.
“But now, therapy is the best
tool I’ve encountered in this
life,” Schmitt says. “It gives you
a safe place where you won’t
feel judged and can be your
true self.”
Not long after her tearful
epiphany, Schmitt found out
her 17-year-old cousin in Pennsylvania had committed suicide. Schmitt says this promising basketball player “was the
life of the party, always making
people laugh.” Schmitt pauses.
“But no one knew how dark of
a place she was in.”
This galvanized Schmitt. “In
sports, you get second
chances,” she says. “In life, you
don’t always get a second
chance.”
This, Schmitt says, is why she is
pursuing a master’s degree to
become a licensed clinical
social worker and counselor.
“Depression is something that’s
in you,” she says. “It’s not wanting to get out of bed, continuously feeling sad and down on
yourself. It’s not wanting to
exist, sometimes. There’s no
on-and-off light switch. When I
hear coaches, athletes telling
people to ‘snap out of it,’ it
makes me mad. Because you
could be pushing them down
that dark hole further.”
He emerged from childhood
sanctuary to be one of the
greatest players in history. The
darkness never left him, though.
“I feel that same sadness at
times now,” he says.
He took his West Virginia Mountaineers to the championship
game of the NCAA tournament,
where they lost. His Los Angeles
Lakers made the NBA Finals
nine times — and lost eight.
“I’ve learned way more in my
life through failure than I ever
did from success,” he says. He
didn’t feel the elation he
thought he would when the
Lakers won the NBA title at last
in 1972. “All I could do right
then,” he says, “was go back to
the other losses.”
Team camaraderie buoyed him
during his playing days. As a
team executive — with the Lakers, Memphis Grizzlies, Golden
State Warriors and, newly, the
Los Angeles Clippers — he often
is alone in his day-to-day oper-
ations. “You’re the judge, jury
and executioner,” he says.
The kid who wanted to be a
hero, sinking all those gamewinners in imaginary games,
says he never wanted credit for
his successes as an executive.
“You’ll never see me on a
(championship) podium or in a
picture,” West notes. “It was
never about me. Yet, on the
other hand, there are times
when I’d be down and out, and
you feel like you’d want someone to come up and say, ‘Hey,
you’re pretty good at what
you’re doing.’ That’s when the
(depression) kicks in.”
West says he thinks he’s able to
see talent and character
through a different lens than
other executives.
“Some of these kids, these players, they’re survivors,” he says.
“In many cases I thought I was a
survivor. That’s who I’m attracted to. Someone who’s been
through something.”
ROB SCHUMACHER, USA TODAY SPORTS
“Therapy is the best tool,”
Allison Schmitt says.
GARY DINEEN, NBAE/GETTY IMAGES
“I didn’t have anybody I
could talk to,” Imani
Boyette says.
IMANI
BOYETTE
The first time Boyette tried to
kill herself she was 10.
“The worst pain in the world is
waking up and knowing you
can’t even kill yourself, that it’s
not in your control,” she says.
“What people don’t realize
about suicide is that it’s like
you’re brainwashed. None of
my attempts made sense, but
it feels like the perfect answer
to make the pain stop in the
moment. You think it will all
be better if you can just disappear.”
Boyette, 22, is a center for the
WNBA’s Atlanta Dream. She
suffers from clinically diagnosed severe depression that
she attributes to a combination of circumstance (she was
raped as a child by a family
member) and happenstance
(her biological makeup).
“You feel like because you’re
not happy — when you should
be happy — that you’re hurting people around you and a
burden,” she says. “At a certain point, it just gets easier to
shut up because people get
sick of hearing you’re not OK
when you’re not sick on the
outside.”
Boyette says she tried to kill
herself three times. “I wasn’t
looking for help,” she says. “I
wasn’t looking for resources.
… I didn’t have anybody I
could talk to, I could touch,
who understands this hell I’m
in.”
That’s why Boyette is telling
her story. She wants to be the
role model she wishes she’d
had in her darkest hours, not
that it’s easy to do.
“Sometimes, I walk in a room
and regret being so naked
and vulnerable, but this is
bigger than me,” she says. “I
believe my purpose is to talk
about the things that people
are uncomfortable or afraid
to talk about. … I need to talk
about sexual abuse, because
we don’t talk about it enough
… The thing about childhood
sexual abuse is people look
at you like you’re this delicate
piece of china. Or, they look at
you disgusted, but don’t want
to be disgusted.”
Her brother, JaVale McGee,
plays for the NBA champion
Golden State Warriors and
her husband, Paul Boyette Jr.,
is a defensive tackle for the
Oakland Raiders. They met
when both were athletes at
the University of Texas. She
told him then about her childhood abuse, by way of explanation of her night terrors.
“After I got married, I went
into a deep depression, which
makes no sense whatsoever,”
she says. “It’s, like, the happiest time in your life. And it’s
hard to convince your husband this is not because I
don’t love you. I just can’t love
you out of this depression, out
of this fog.”
She describes the days when
she can’t even get out of bed
or brush her teeth. It’s as if she
were in a straightjacket, she
says, screaming in a soundproof room where no one can
hear her, even her husband.
Soon the screams are more
like echoes and she envisions
a glass wall where she presses her hand against his.
“I tell him just being there is
enough,” she says, eyes moist.
“You don’t have to understand or see my pain, but just
acknowledge it. And be
there.”
USA TODAY
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
SPORTS 5C
U.S. OPEN
No. 1 Nadal feeling strong at 31
After slow start,
Spaniard roars
to life for victory
WEDNESDAY’S
MATCHES
At USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, New York
Play begins on all courts at
11 a.m. ET
Arthur Ashe Stadium
Evgeniya Rodina, Russia, vs.
Eugenie Bouchard, Canada
Not before 1 p.m.
Henri Laaksonen, Switzerland,
vs. Juan Martin Del Potro (24),
Argentina
Timea Babos, Hungary, vs. Maria
Sharapova, Russia
Night session (7 p.m.)
Oceane Dodin, France, vs. Venus
Williams (9), USA
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (8), France,
vs. Denis Shapovalov, Canada
Louis Armstrong Stadium
John Millman, Australia, vs. Nick
Kyrgios (14), Australia
Alison Riske, USA, vs. Coco Vandeweghe (20), USA
Hyeon Chung, South Korea, vs.
John Isner (10), USA
Not before 4 p.m.
Steve Johnson, USA, vs. Kyle
Edmund, Britain
Sandra Harwitt
Special for USA TODAY Sports
NEW YORK In the tennis world,
the year 2017 is continuing to
bask in the renaissance of Rafael
Nadal as a major factor in the
game.
Most recently, the Spanish sensation returned to the No. 1 ranking for the fourth time in his
career.
During the spring clay-court
season, Nadal became the only
male player in the Open era to
win 10 titles at the same event,
something he achieved at Monte
Carlo and Barcelona, and secured
international headlines for doing
the same at the French Open.
The 31-year-old’s victory in this
year’s French Open — his first title at a major since winning the
2014 French Open — saw him
join Ken Rosewall and Pete Sampras as the only men in the history of tennis to win a major in
their teens, 20s and 30s.
The French Open trophy was
his 15th at a Grand Slam tournament — he ranks second behind
Roger Federer’s 19 Grand Slam
victories on the all-time champions list. Nadal is hoping that a
16th Grand Slam triumph could
be in the offing at the U.S. Open.
Nevertheless, Nadal understands that being 30-something
adds a different dimension to his
career.
“Everything is easier with 20,”
he said, smiling. “Everything. But,
yeah, it’s different part of life, different part of my tennis career.
And I enjoy it, all the parts. Even
when I had injuries, I enjoyed different things. I was able to enjoy
family and home and friends and
my beautiful island, Mallorca.
“And today, here I am at 31,” he
added. “If you tell me I will be
here with 31, being No. 1 of the
world, especially, seven, six, 10
years ago, I will not believe you,
so I try to enjoy every day with-
JERRY LAI, USA TODAY SPORTS
Rafael Nadal, above, nearly lost the first set Tuesday before rebounding to defeat Dusan Lajovic.
Kerber’s troubles persist
Defending champion Angelique Kerber’s year
took another hit when the
German was upset 6-3, 6-1 by
No. 45 Naomi Osaka of Japan in the U.S. Open on Tuesday.
Last year, Kerber won her
second career Grand Slam
tournament championship,
defeating current No. 1 Karolina Pliskova of the Czech Republic in the U.S. Open final,
NEW YORK
out thinking much about what
happened or what can happen. I
don’t know what gonna happen
tomorrow, and in terms of my
tennis career, I not thinking
much. I’m not worried about
when arrive the day that I have to
say goodbye.”
On a wet and dreary day in
following her first major victory in the 2016 Australian
Open, where she defeated
Serena Williams in the final.
This year, Kerber has yet to
add to the 10 overall career
titles she has won and has
lacked any gusto at the
Grand Slams.
Currently ranked No. 6, Kerber will drop out of the top 10
in the next rankings following
the U.S. Open.
New York on Tuesday, top-seeded
Nadal worked toward that goal in
securing a 7-6 (8-6), 6-2, 6-2 firstround victory vs. No. 85 Dusan
Lajovic of Serbia under the roof
at Arthur Ashe Stadium.
Nadal was slow in finding his
footing in the match and was
down 5-3 and staring at a first-set
loss. But once he came through
the first-set tiebreaker, his stature
as the top seed was evident, as he
picked apart the Serbian’s game.
“It was tough beginning of the
match,” Nadal said. “Some nerves,
obviously, after a week here practicing well, I think. I was practicing, I think, every day at very high
level, no?
“Today I didn’t play at that
high level, but just like this. Important thing is I won, and I have
one more day to keep practicing
and another chance to play better
the next day.”
Indeed, Nadal is no stranger to
success in New York.
The Spaniard has won the U.S.
Open trophy on two occasions, in
2010 and 2013, and holds a 47-10
winning record at the Billie Jean
King USTA National Tennis
Center.
It was here in 2010 that Nadal
completed his Grand Slam trophy
collection, having won at least
once at the other three majors al-
ready. That first U.S. Open victory
made the then-24-year-old the
youngest man in the Open era to
hold a title from all four majors.
Only Nadal and retired Andre
Agassi have won at all four of the
slams and also own an Olympic
gold medal in singles.
For the moment, the challenge
for Nadal doesn’t appear to be
anything on the health front,
which has to be a relief, considering his career has been injury
plagued. He missed much of the
second part of last season nursing
a wrist injury.
What could trip Nadal up is
that while he has had success on
hardcourts, he hasn’t won a title
on the surface since capturing the
2014 Doha tournament, which always is played the first week of
the new year.
The only one of the 12 titles he
has won since that Doha event
that wasn’t on clay was in 2015 in
Stuttgart, which was played on
grass.
NASCAR
Like father, like son:
Elliott switching to 9
Brant James
@brantjames
USA TODAY Sports
Days before the annual throwback weekend at Darlington
Raceway, Hendrick Motorsports
announced a throwback chapter
for one of its drivers beginning in
2018.
Chase Elliott will switch car
numbers from the 24 he has used
for the first two full seasons of his
Monster Energy NASCAR Cup
Series career — and by Jeff Gordon to win four championships —
to the 9 employed by his father,
Bill, who won 38 races and the
1988 series title with the number.
William Byron, who will replace Kasey Kahne for the fourcar team next season, will assume
the 24 decals as the current crews
are scheduled to remain with the
cars.
Chase Elliott, 21, won the 2014
Xfinity Series crown in a No. 9
Chevrolet fielded by Hendrick
partner JR Motorsports.
“I wasn’t sure I’d ever drive the
9 again,” he said in a release. “It’s
a huge deal to my family and everyone back home (in Georgia),
and I hope all of our fans will be
pumped to see it back on the
racetrack. There’s a legacy attached to that number, and I
want to carry it on. I think it’s
awesome that Hendrick Motorsports and NAPA wanted to do
this. It’s impossible not to be
excited.”
Elliott is seventh in the Cup
standings. Coincidentally, Kahne
succeeded Bill Elliott in the No. 9
Dodge at Evernham Motorsports
in 2004.
“I know what the 9 means to
Chase and his whole family,”
team owner Rick Hendrick said
in a release. “They’ve contributed
so much to our sport, and I’m
happy we can honor that history
by bringing the number back. I
JASEN VINLOVE, USA TODAY SPORTS
Chase Elliott, left, next year
will drive the No. 9 car made
famous by his father, Bill.
think fans will really love seeing it
out there.
“I told Chase we’d only do it if
he promised to win a bunch of
races, so I’m going to hold him to
that.”
Byron, 19, will make his Cup
debut next season as teammates
with Elliott, Alex Bowman, 24 —
who is replacing retiring Dale
Earnhardt Jr. in the No. 88 Chevrolet — and defending and seventime champion Jimmie Johnson,
41. Byron is in his first Xfinity
season with JRM.
“Jeff and Jimmie are the drivers I’ve always watched most
closely and tried to learn from,”
Byron said in a release. “I didn’t
think I could be more motivated,
but when Mr. (Rick) Hendrick
called to tell me (about driving
the No. 24), it took things to another level.
“I have so much respect for all
the people who have contributed
to the success of the 24. I know
it’s rare to have the chance to be
part of something like this. I’m
going to make the most of it.”
Hendrick has not made a number change for a full-time Cup car
since introducing the No. 88 —
which harkened to Earnhardt’s
family legacy — in 2008.
NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE UNITED STATES BANKRUPTCY COURT
FOR THE DISTRICT OF DELAWARE
) Chapter 11
In re:
TRUE RELIGION APPAREL,INC.,et al.,1 ) Case No.17-11460 (CSS)
) (Jointly Administered)
Debtors.
NOTICE OF (A) HEARING TO CONSIDER CONFIRMATION OF
CHAPTER 11 PLAN; (B) DEADLINE FOR CASTING VOTES TO
ACCEPT OR REJECT PLAN; AND (C) RELATED MATTERS
True Religion Apparel, Inc. and certain of its above-captioned affiliates, as
debtors and debtors in possession (the “Debtors”) (a) filed on August 23, 2017
the Debtors’ First Amended Joint Chapter 11 Plan of Reorganization (as modified)
[Docket No. 376], amending the Debtors’ chapter 11 plan filed on July 5, 2017
(as amended and including all exhibits thereto and as further amended, modified or supplemented from time to time, the “Plan”) and (b) filed on August 24,
2017 the Disclosure Statement for Debtors’ First Amended Joint Chapter 11 Plan of
Reorganization (as modified) [Docket No. 383], amending the Debtors’ disclosure
statement filed on July 5,2017 (as amended and including all exhibits thereto and
as further amended,modified or supplemented from time to time,the“Disclosure
Statement”).
On August 24, 2017, this Court entered an order approving the Disclosure
Statement [Docket No.387] (the“Disclosure Statement Order”) and certain related
materials(collectively,the“SolicitationMaterials”).
Any party in interest wishing to obtain copies of the Disclosure Statement or the
Plan at the Debtors’ expense may do so by (i) contacting the Debtors’ Solicitation
Agent at 844.224.1136 (toll free) or 917.962.8386 (if international) or by email at
truereligionballots@primeclerk.com or by (ii) viewing such documents by accessing online at https://cases.primeclerk.com/truereligion. The documents are also
available on the Court’s website:www.deb.uscourts.gov. Please note that a PACER
passwordandloginareneededtoaccessdocumentsontheCourt’swebsite.
A hearing to consider confirmation of the Plan (the“Confirmation Hearing”) will
be held on October 5, 2017 commencing at 9:00 a.m. prevailing Eastern time
before the Honorable Christopher S.Sontchi,United States Bankruptcy Judge,at the
United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware, 824 Market Street, 5th
Floor,CourtroomNo.6,Wilmington,Delaware19801(“BankruptcyCourt”).
The record date for determining which holders of claims or interests in the
Debtors may vote on the Plan is August 23,2017 (the“Record Date”). If you are eligible to vote on the Plan,you will receive a ballot (a“Ballot”) in the mail.If you believe
you are entitled to vote on the Plan but do not receive a Ballot, please contact the
Debtors’ Solicitation Agent by phone or email as provided above. For your Ballot
to be counted, you must complete all required information on the Ballot, execute
the Ballot and return the completed Ballot to the address indicated on the
Ballot so that it is received by 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time on September 27,
2017 (the“Voting Deadline”). Any failure to follow the voting instructions included
with the Ballot or to return a properly completed Ballot so that it is received by the
VotingDeadlinemaydisqualifyyourBallotandyourvote.
If an objection is pending with respect to your Claim as of September 21,2017,
your vote will not be counted unless the Court temporarily allows your claim for
purposes of voting to accept or reject the Plan,and you are required to file a motion
for such relief (the “Rule 3018 Motion”) no later than September 28, 2017, which
may be heard on or prior to the Confirmation Hearing. Notwithstanding the foregoing,if the Debtors file an objection to a claim and request that such claim be allowed
inaspecificamount,yourBallotshallbecountedinsuchspecifiedamount.
The Bankruptcy Court has established September 27, 2017, at 4:00 p.m.,
prevailing Eastern time, as the last date and time for filing and serving objections
to the confirmation of the Plan (the “Plan Objection Deadline”). All objections to
confirmation of the Plan,including any supporting memoranda,must be in writing,
be filed with the Clerk of the Bankruptcy Court together with proof of service,and
shall (a) state the name and address of the objecting party and the amount of its
Claim or the nature of its interest in the Debtors’chapter 11 cases,(b) state with particularity the provision or provisions of the Plan objected to and, for any objection
asserted,the legal and factual basis for such objection,and (c) be served upon the
parties set forth in the Disclosure Statement Order and any party requesting special
noticepursuanttoBankruptcyRule2002onorbeforethePlanObjectionDeadline.
Objections not timely filed and served by the Plan Objection Deadline
in accordance with the provisions of this Notice will not be heard and will
beoverruled.
The Plan contains the proposed injunction and release provisions set
forthonAnnexAhereto.
The Confirmation Hearing may be continued from time to time without further
notice except for (i) an announcement made at the Confirmation Hearing or any
adjourned confirmation hearing or (ii) a written notice filed with the Bankruptcy
Court and served on all parties who have filed objections to confirmation of the
Plan,the United States Trustee,and all parties who have requested notice in these
chapter11casespursuanttoBankruptcyRule2002.
Dated: August 30,2017
PACHULSkI STANG ZIEHL & JONES LLP, /s/ Laura Davis Jones , Laura Davis Jones
(BarNo.2436),CounseltotheDebtorsandDebtorsinPossession
Annex A
Article X of the Plan contains, among other things, the releases and injunction set
forthbelow:
Article X.C. Releases by Holders of Claims and Interests.Except as otherwise provided in this Plan,on the Confirmation Date and effective as of the Effective
Date, for good and valuable consideration, to the fullest extent permissible under
applicable law, each of the Releasing Parties shall, and shall be deemed to, conclusively, absolutely, unconditionally, irrevocably, and forever release, waive, void,
extinguish, and discharge each Released Party (and each such Released Party so
discharged and released shall be deemed discharged and released by the Releasing
Parties) and their respective property from any and all Claims, Equity Interests,
obligations, debts, rights, suits, damages, Causes of Action, remedies, judgments,
defenses, counterclaims, and liabilities of any nature whatsoever, including any
derivative Claims asserted or which could be asserted on behalf of a Debtor and/
or a Reorganized Debtor, whether liquidated or unliquidated, fixed or contingent,
matured or unmatured, disputed or undisputed, known or unknown, foreseen or
unforeseen, then existing or thereafter arising, in law, equity or otherwise, that
such Releasing Party would have been legally entitled to assert in their own right
(whether individually or collectively) or on behalf of the holder of any Claim or
Equity Interest or other Entity,based on or relating to,or in any manner arising from,
in whole or in part,the Debtors,the Reorganized Debtors,any transactions contemplated by the Plan,the Chapter 11 Cases,the Prepetition First Lien Loan Documents,
the Prepetition Second Lien Loan Documents, the purchase, sale, or rescission
of the purchase or sale of any security of the Debtors or the Reorganized Debtors,
any payments,distributions,or dividends any Debtor or Affiliate paid to or received
from any Released Party, fraudulent or preferential transfer or conveyance, tort,
contract,breach of fiduciary duty,violation of state or federal laws,including securities laws,negligence,the subject matter of,or the transactions or events giving rise
to, any Claim or Equity Interest that is treated in the Plan, the business or contractual arrangements between any Debtor and any Released Party, the restructuring
of Claims and Equity Interests prior to or in the Chapter 11 Cases, the negotiation,
formulation,or preparation of the Restructuring Support Agreement,the Plan,the
Disclosure Statement, the Plan Supplement, or related agreements, instruments,
or other documents; provided, however, that the foregoing release shall not operate to waive or release any Claims, obligations, debts, rights, suits, damages, remedies,Causes of Action,and liabilities in respect of any Released Party,solely to the
extent: (1) arising out of or relating to any act or omission of such Released Party
that constitutes actual fraud, gross negligence, bad faith, or willful misconduct as
determined by Final Order of a court of competent jurisdiction or (2) arising under
thePlan,theConfirmationOrder,orthePlanDocuments.
Article X.E.2.b Injunction Against Holders of Released, Discharged
or Exculpated Claims. Except as otherwise provided herein or for obligations
issued pursuant hereto,all Entities that have held,hold,or may hold Claims or Equity
Interests that have been released pursuant to ARTICLE X.B or ARTICLE X.C, discharged pursuant to ARTICLE X.A,or are subject to exculpation pursuant to ARTICLE
X.D,are permanently enjoined,from and after the Effective Date,from taking any of
the following actions against,as applicable,the Debtors,the Reorganized Debtors,
the Released Parties, or the Exculpated Parties: (a) commencing or continuing
in any manner any action or other proceeding of any kind on account of or in connection with or with respect to any such Claims or Equity Interests; (b) enforcing,
attaching,collecting,or recovering by any manner or means any judgment,award,
decree, or order against such Entities on account of or in connection with or with
respect to any such Claims or Equity Interests;(c) creating,perfecting,or enforcing
any encumbrance of any kind against suchEntities or the propertyorEstates of such
Entities on account of or in connection with or with respect to any such Claims or
Equity Interests; (d) asserting any right of setoff (except for setoffs asserted prior
to the Petition Date), subrogation, or of any kind against any obligation due from
such Entities or against the property or Estates of such Entities on account of or in
connection with or with respect to any such Claims or Equity Interests;and (e) commencing or continuing in any manner any action or other proceeding of any kind
on account of or in connection with or with respect to any such Claims or Equity
Interestsreleased,exculpated,orsettledpursuanttothePlan.
ThefollowingaretworelevantPlandefinitions:
“Released Party” means, in its capacity as such: (a) each Debtor; (b) each
Reorganized Debtor; (c) the Prepetition First Lien Agent; (d) each of the other
Prepetition First Lien Creditors; (e) the Prepetition Second Lien Agent; (f) each of
the other Prepetition Second Lien Creditors; (g) Equity Parent; (h) TowerBrook, (i)
the Prepetition Revolver Agent;(j) each Prepetition Revolver Lender;(k) each other
party to the Restructuring Support Agreement in all capacities; (l) the DIP Agent;
(m) each DIP Lender;(n) the Class 5 Plan Consideration Cash Out Option Funder;and
(o) each Related Person of any of (a) through (n) of the foregoing; provided that,
notwithstanding the foregoing,a person is not a“Released Party”if such Person is
anExcludedParty.
“Releasing Party”means, in its capacity as such:(a) each Holder of a Claim that
votes to accept this Plan; (b) each Holder of a Claim that is Unimpaired under this
Plan;(c) each Holder of a Claim that is solicited to vote to accept or reject this Plan
but that does not vote either to accept or reject the Plan;(d) each Holder of a Claim
that votes to reject this Plan and does not elect on their ballot to opt out of granting the releases set forth in Article X.C ; (e) the Prepetition First Lien Creditors; (f)
the Prepetition Second Lien Creditors; (g) Equity Parent; (h) TowerBrook; (i) the
Prepetition Revolver Agent;(j) each Prepetition Revolver Lender;(k) the DIP Agent;
(l) each DIP Lender;(m) the Class 5 Plan Consideration Cash Out Option Funder;and
(n)eachRelatedPersonofeachof(a)through(m)oftheforegoing.
1
The Debtors,together with the last four digits of each Debtor’s tax identification
number, are: True Religion Apparel, Inc. (2633), TRLG Intermediate Holdings, LLC
(3150),GuruDenimInc.(1785),TrueReligionSales,LLC(3441),andTRLGGCServices,
LLC (8453). The location of the Debtors’headquarters and service address is: 1888
RosecransAvenue,ManhattanBeach,CA 90266.
Advertise Your Business Here!
To Advertise, Call: 1-800-397-0070
USA TODAY
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
6C SPORTS
MLB
A wild and wacky wild-card race
AL teams defy
logic in quest
for two spots
Bob Nightengale
bnighten@usatoday.com
USA TODAY Sports
This, undoubtedly, is the zaniest, most ridiculous, nuttiest
wild-card race the game of baseball has ever witnessed.
Where else would a team set a
franchise record with 43 consecutive scoreless innings, getting
pummeled 32-0 over the last four
games, and still be sitting three
games out of a wild-card spot?
Say hello to the Kansas City
Royals.
Where would you find a team
whose front office surrendered,
trading away its closer at the
deadline and veteran starter six
days after acquiring him, only to
be sitting in the No. 2 wild-card
chair?
Give it up for the Minnesota
Twins.
Where could you find a team
that traded one of its top pitchers
to the best team in baseball, calling it a season, only to infuriate
the Houston Astros by telling
them they can’t switch home
dates in light of Hurricane Harvey because they intend to be in
the wild-card race the final week
of the season?
Meet the Texas Rangers.
And, yes, name a team that can
make five errors in an inning —
the most by a team in 40 years —
get outscored by 24 runs this season and still be two games out of
a wild-card berth.
Take a bow, Seattle Mariners.
You might need to whip out
your solar eclipse sunglasses to
scoreboard watch these days,
with eight teams passing one another back and forth and six
teams within three games of the
second American League wildcard spot.
“It’s so hard to figure out,”
Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher
Jake Odorizzi said. “When you
win, it feels like four teams have
to lose to just gain a half-game.
And you lose, it feels like everyone else wins.”
You know the game can be cruel when the Twins can trade for
veteran starter Jaime Garcia
from the Atlanta Braves, have
him win his lone start, lose their
next three games in a row and
trade him to the New York Yankees. Oh, and just in case they had
any notions of still contending for
a playoff spot, they dumped AllStar closer Brandon Kintzler seconds before the trade deadline to
the Washington Nationals.
So, the Twins win 15 of 22
games since Aug. 6 and woke up
Tuesday trailing the Yankees by
three games for the top wild-card
spot and leading the Los Angeles
Angels, Baltimore Orioles, Mari-
PETER AIKEN, USA TODAY SPORTS
Third baseman Evan Longoria says the Rays’ trade deadline splurge “brought such a spark to the clubhouse.”
AL wild-card race
N.Y. Yankees
Minnesota
L.A. Angels
Baltimore
Seattle
Tampa Bay
Kansas City
Texas
ners, Rays, Royals and Rangers
for the No. 2 spot.
“You think you’re done and
over with,” Odorizzi says, “and
just the opposite happens. For
those teams that thought they
were out of it, maybe the pressure
was eased a little bit when they
traded away guys. It allowed
them to start playing more freely.
It doesn’t make a lot of sense, but
hey, baseball never does.”
The Rays were poised a month
ago to take over the AL East, sitting two games in back of the
Boston Red Sox. Rays management, believing this could be
their year, then went out and did
something completely crazy.
For the first time, they spent
money at the trade deadline.
They grabbed Adeiny Hechavarria in June, taking on the rest of
his $3.5 million salary. They traded for New York Mets first base-
W
70
67
67
66
66
66
64
64
L
60
63
65
65
66
67
66
66
Pct.
.538
.515
.508
.504
.500
.496
.492
.492
GB
+3
—
1
11⁄2
2
21⁄2
3
3
man Lucas Duda. Then refurbished their bullpen by acquiring
Steve Chisek from the Mariners,
Dan Jennings from the Chicago
White Sox and Sergio Romo from
the Los Angeles Dodgers.
When you add up the expenses, the Rays increased their
payroll by $7.5 million, a massive
hike for an impoverished team
whose season-opening $69.9 million payroll ranked third to last.
“This is the first year in my career where we made multiple significant additions to the team,”
says Rays third baseman Evan
Longoria, the team’s longest-tenured veteran, drafted in 2006. “In
the past, when we’ve had a really
good team during the year, we’ve
just added pieces from the farm
system to help us late in the year.
But this is the first year they really went out to help us, putting us
in position to win. It brought
such a spark to the clubhouse at
the deadline.”
So what happens? The Rays
promptly lose 12 of 15 games beginning Aug. 4, with the offense
averaging 1.7 runs per game.
“It sucked for us because we
were in great position,” Odorizzi
says, “then we have a tough weekand-a-half, and suddenly we’re
chasing five teams. We finally go
all-in, which is such a rare thing
here because of our financial
standpoint, and that’s what happens. But we still believe we can
do it.”
The beauty of the AL wild-card
race is that every team is flawed,
all enduring a downward spiral
from which it looked as if it
would never recover. The Mariners, who have the longest playoff
drought in baseball, were outscored 52-9 in an eight-game
span. The Yankees, who lost seven in a row in June, are 32-37
since June 9. The Orioles, whose
pitching staff has the third-worst
ERA in the majors, gave up 10 or
more runs six times in a twoweek span. The Angels played
two months without Mike Trout.
It’s so screwy that the Rays,
who pulled off the deals to establish one of the most vaunted bullpens in the game, also happened
to dump the guy who has put the
Orioles into contention. The Rays
decided former No. 1 pick Tim
Beckham no longer had a role
with the team, sent him to the
Orioles on July 31 and watched in
horror as Beckham has hit .395
with six homers and 18 RBI since
his departure.
“Hey, we’re just thankful the
front office gave us this opportunity,” Rays veteran starter Alex
Cobb said. “This is the first time
since I’ve been here that we’ve
made such an impactful acquisition of guys, where they saw a
weakness and fixed it.”
Certainly, it won’t be easy for
the Rays, who have a brutal
schedule. They have 19 games left
against the Red Sox, Yankees and
Orioles. Yet if they can survive
and just reach that wild-card
game with ace Chris Archer on
the mound, they’ll take their
chances against anyone.
“Being the underdog has always helped fuel us,” Archer says.
“People don’t really watch us, and
even when we had that crazy run
and had playoff teams, nobody
really rooted for us. We want to
do the same thing again, just
sneak up on everybody, and if we
get in, we can be dangerous.”
FOLLOW MLB COLUMNIST
BOB NIGHTENGALE
@BNightengale for commentary
and breaking news.
Debate over where to play is petty amid disaster
v CONTINUED FROM 1C
Sure, there will be plenty of
sympathy within Major League
Baseball that the Astros lost a
homestand and will spend a total
of 19 games and 21 consecutive
days on the road. They will be
away from their families, at least
until the Houston airports reopen, and when they finally return home, Houston won’t look
anything like it did when they
left.
Yet instead of focusing on financial relief funds, praising
MLB and the union for donating
$1 million and the Astros for
pledging another $4 million, we
are caught up in this petty-mindedness of the debate about
whether the Astros should be
playing these next three games in
Arlington, home of the Rangers.
The Rangers were originally
scheduled to play in Houston for
three games beginning Tuesday
night before Hurricane Harvey
forced the relocation of those
games. The Astros simply asked
the Rangers to switch the series,
saying they will play three games
in Arlington now but requested
that their three scheduled games
in Arlington on Sept. 25-27 be
switched to Houston.
The Rangers declined, saying it
wouldn’t be fair to their fans who
have already purchased tickets
for the game and not to their
players who are hanging on to the
fringe of the American League
wild-card race. The Rangers offered to instead permit the Astros
to be the home team this week in
Arlington, giving all of their proceeds to them. The Astros declined.
So MLB stepped in and moved
the series to St. Petersburg, after
also considering St. Louis, believing it would be the easiest resolution. It would also provide the
Astros the opportunity to stay put
for their series against the Mets,
which likely will be switched to
St. Petersburg, too.
This is when all the nastiness
began.
The Astros are fuming, believing the Rangers should have cooperated. The Rangers are
irritated because it makes them
look selfish. These two franchises
already were bitter rivals before
Hurricane Harvey came along,
and now it’s escalated.
Simply, the Rangers say, they
didn’t want their club to lose millions of dollars in revenue by
switching series, and if the Rangers are still in the wild-card race
in September, those three games
could loom large. They didn’t
want to embark on a 12-game,
four-city trip before ending their
season in Arlington.
The Astros, and anybody else,
to be honest, would have done the
same if the positions were reversed, but it still ignited a hate
storm.
“Classy as always, should be
absolutely ashamed,” Astros
pitcher Lance McCullers tweeted.
“Greed never takes off days, apparently. Stay strong #Htown!”
Rangers outfielder Delino
DeShields Jr., exasperated with
the sudden nastiness, took time
to respond on his Instagram account.
“I’m just going to put this out
there to get it off my chest because I can’t sleep and I’m really
frustrated how people have been
acting over the past 24 hours,”
DeShields wrote. “As a resident of
Texas I’m hurt by everything
that’s been happening in south
Texas. … I want people to understand that what is happening
down there is way bigger than
baseball. We love baseball yeah.
Baseball brings people together
yeah. I know the fans and families
and friends who live in Houston
are upset that baseball probably
won’t be played in Houston this
week along with the other cities
down there. I’m upset that we
aren’t playing in Houston because I love the city of Houston. ...
“What has happened in South
Texas is something beyond our
control and we all know that. We
can NOT do anything about it.
People, I don’t have any answers
on why we are playing in Tampa
or why we aren’t playing in Arlington and switching the series
in September. And that should be
everybody’s last concern right
now. But there’s a reason all of
this is happening and nobody on
the outside really knows what’s
been going on behind closed
doors. …
“Everyone wants to point fingers at each other calling each
other names, that we are classless
and nobody has respect for anybody. That’s BS. I have teammates
and coaches who either once
lived down there or have family
down there that are being affect-
ed by this. I’m sure there are people all throughout our organization and throughout our baseball
community who are being affected by this in ways you people on
the outside have no idea about.
But we want to call each other
names and disrespect each other
because of what? We are rivals?
That’s so irrelevant right now and
at this second I’m pretty disappointed at how people are reacting to this.
“This isn’t about where we are
playing a baseball game. This is
about people in Texas and from
all over the country coming together and helping the ones who
are and have been affected by this
natural disaster, not ripping each
other apart for something we
don’t have control over.”
Amen.
It’s only baseball, people.
You want real life and death?
Turn on your TV, watch the horror in Houston, clasp your hands,
and pray. Please, please, pray.
FOLLOW MLB COLUMNIST
BOB NIGHTENGALE
@BNightengale for commentary
and analysis from the diamond.
USA TODAY
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
SPORTS 7C
E6 K1
MLB SCORES
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East
Boston
New York
Baltimore
Tampa Bay
Toronto
W
75
70
67
66
61
L
57
60
65
67
71
Pct.
.568
.538
.508
.496
.462
GB
—
4
8
91/2
14
Strk.
W-2
L-1
W-6
W-2
L-3
Central
Cleveland
Minnesota
Kansas City
Detroit
Chicago
W
74
67
64
57
52
L
56
63
66
73
77
Pct.
.569
.515
.492
.438
.403
GB
—
7
10
17
211/2
Strk.
W-5
W-1
L-5
W-1
W-1
West
Houston
Los Angeles
Seattle
Texas
Oakland
W
79
67
66
65
58
L
52
65
67
66
73
Pct.
.603
.508
.496
.496
.443
GB
—
121/2
14
14
21
Strk.
L-1
W-1
L-4
W-1
L-1
Last
10
5-5
5-5
7-3
6-4
2-8
Last
10
7-3
6-4
3-7
4-6
6-4
Last
10
5-5
5-5
4-6
5-5
5-5
Home
40-25
37-24
40-26
34-33
35-33
Away
35-32
33-36
27-39
32-34
26-38
Home
36-29
31-35
35-31
31-32
30-34
Away
38-27
36-28
29-35
26-41
22-43
Home
37-30
36-31
34-32
35-29
37-31
Away
42-22
31-34
32-35
30-37
21-42
Home
39-27
35-29
29-36
28-39
28-35
Away
41-24
31-36
28-36
29-35
21-46
Home
35-28
35-30
37-31
35-31
32-35
Away
35-32
33-33
28-34
28-38
24-41
Home
52-16
42-23
38-26
33-31
31-35
Away
39-22
31-35
33-34
24-43
22-45
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East
Washington
Miami
Atlanta
New York
Philadelphia
W
80
66
57
57
49
L
51
65
72
74
81
Pct.
.611
.504
.442
.435
.377
GB
—
14
22
23
301/2
Strk.
W-3
L-2
L-3
L-2
W-2
Central
Chicago
Milwaukee
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
W
70
68
65
63
56
L
60
63
65
69
76
Pct.
.538
.519
.500
.477
.424
GB
—
21/2
5
8
15
Strk.
W-1
W-2
L-1
L-1
W-1
West
Los Angeles
Arizona
Colorado
San Diego
San Francisco
W
91
73
71
57
53
L
38
58
60
74
80
Pct.
.705
.557
.542
.435
.398
GB
—
19
21
35
40
Strk.
L-2
W-4
L-1
L-4
W-1
Last
10
7-3
7-3
3-7
3-7
6-4
Last
10
7-3
6-4
4-6
5-5
5-5
Last
10
6-4
6-4
4-6
3-7
4-6
IN BRIEF
CFL OWNER CITES
‘NEGATIVITY’ FOR BRILES
MARYLAND SCHOOL
BANS REDSKINS GEAR
COLLEGE PLAYER DIES
The CEO for the Hamilton
Tiger-Cats, Scott Mitchell, said in a radio interview
that his Canadian Football
League team “underestimated the tsunami of negativity” that would accompany the hiring of former
Baylor football coach Art
Briles and that once it became clear the sexual abuse
scandal was still a “fresh issue,” that led the team to
backtrack. The Tiger-Cats
ultimately reversed their
decision to hire the embattled coach as an assistant to
June Jones, the former
Hawaii and SMU coach.
“Most of the tsunami of
negativity started in the
(United) States,” Mitchell
said on SN590 The Fan in
Toronto. “I think most of
the social media activity
was generated out of the
States, where Art Briles and
Baylor is still a very, very
fresh issue. I think we
clearly
underestimated
that.” Mitchell said he felt
strongly that Briles deserved a second chance despite the team’s ultimate
decision and deflected
blame toward the media
and public perception as to
why Briles has remained
jobless since May 2016.
A
private
elementary
school in the Maryland
suburbs of Washington has
asked students and staff
not to wear clothing with
the team name or logo of
the Washington NFL club
when the new school year
begins next week. A letter
sent to families of Green
Acres School in Bethesda
says “the term ‘Redskin’ is a
racial slur. Its use, whether
intentional or not, can be
deeply insulting and offensive.” The letter, signed by
Neal M. Brown, head of
school, said the issue was
raised last fall by thirdgrade students during their
study of Native Americans.
He said a Native American
family with a student at the
school objected to such
clothing around the same
time. “We certainly don’t
want to vilify anyone who
comes to school in violation of this,” Brown told
USA TODAY Sports. “Ultimately, most kids won’t
wear that kind of clothing
because they understand
why it is upsetting to some
people.” Tony Wyllie, the
Washington team’s senior
vice president for communications, declined to comment.
A sophomore from Georgia
collapsed and died during
football practice at a Florida university. Stetson officials said in a statement
that Nicholas Adam
Blakely, 19, collapsed during a Monday evening practice. The accounting major
from Lawrenceville, Ga.,
was on the sideline when
he complained of not feeling well. He collapsed and
was taken to Florida Hospital DeLand, where he died.
Blakely was a defensive
back who was redshirted
last season and never
played in a college football
game. The team was preparing for its season opener
at Sacred Heart on Saturday in Connecticut.
OLYMPIC RUNNER DIES
An Olympic runner was
found dead in a swimming
pool at an apartment complex in Scottsdale, Ariz., on
Monday morning, police
said. David Torrence, 31,
was found at the bottom
of the pool at Center Court
Condominiums
about
7:30 a.m., Scottsdale police
said. He was pronounced
dead at the scene. Torrence
left his home in Malibu,
Calif., to train in Arizona a
few weeks ago.
ELLIOTT APPEAL GOES
TO SECOND DAY
An appeal hearing for Dallas Cowboys running back
Ezekiel Elliott will extend
to a second day. After meeting for several hours in
midtown New York on
Tuesday, Elliott’s appeal of
his six-game suspension for
a violation of the NFL’s
personal conduct policy
will continue into Wednesday, according to NFL Network. Elliott’s suspension,
levied Aug. 11, stems from
his alleged role in a domestic violence incident last
year. He was not arrested
or charged for the incident,
but the NFL felt there was
sufficient evidence to suspend him. Elliott’s penalty
can be upheld, reduced or
vacated following his appeal.
— Lorenzo Reyes
VALPARAISO SUED
The Horizon League has
filed a $500,000 lawsuit
against Valparaiso and the
Missouri Valley Conference
claiming
the
school
breached a one-year notification agreement before
leaving the league for the
MVC.
Valparaiso
announced it was leaving for
the MVC in May.
From staff and wire reports
FOR THE RECORD
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
New York at FC Dallas, 9 p.m.
Colorado at Los Angeles, 11 p.m.
NFL
American League
Cleveland at N.Y. Yankees, ppd.
Boston 3, Toronto 0
Texas 12, Houston 2
Baltimore 4, Seattle 0
National League
Atlanta at Philadelphia, ppd.
Cincinnati 14, N.Y. Mets 4
Washington 8, Miami 3
St. Louis at Milwaukee
Interleague
Detroit at Colorado
Chicago White Sox at Minnesota
Tampa Bay at Kansas City
Oakland at L.A. Angels
Preseason
All times ET
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs
L.A. Dodgers at Arizona
San Francisco at San Diego
N.Y. Jets
New England
Miami
Buffalo
South
Jacksonville
Indianapolis
Houston
Tennessee
North
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Pitchers
GS
2017 Statistics
Pct.
WHIP
ERA
W-L
IP
K
Cleveland at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m. ET
CLE: Bauer (R)
NYY: Garcia (L)
25
4
13-8
0-1
Seattle at Baltimore, 3:05 p.m. ET
SEA: Miranda (L)
BAL: Jimenez (R)
(Line: OFF)
.619
1.44
4.59
.000
1.78
5.95
26
21
Cleveland at N.Y. Yankees, 4:35 p.m. ET
CLE: Tomlin (R)
NYY: Montgomery (L)
20
23
7-9
7-6
.438
.538
25
19
7-13
11-6
Texas at Houston, 8:10 p.m. ET
TEX: Cashner (R)
HOU: Keuchel (L)
21
17
.350
.647
25
23
8-8
4-7
26
18
10-9
7-3
0
0
0-0
0-0
14
22
6-5
10-4
12
12
2-9
4-6
Pittsburgh at Chi. Cubs, 8:05 p.m. ET
W
3
1
1
0
L
0
2
2
3
T Pct
0 1.000
0 .333
0 .333
0 .000
PF
77
60
45
51
PA
48
65
80
68
Saturday’s games
Sunday’s games
99
104
3.44
2.58
New Orleans
Carolina
Tampa Bay
Atlanta
North
125.2
108.1
63
90
Green Bay
Chicago
Minnesota
Detroit
112.0
145.1
94
111
West
74.1
84.0
51
52
(Line: PHI -105)
.500
1.39
4.06
.364
1.49
4.36
153.0
126.0
111
117
(Line: STL -120)
.526
1.19
3.48
.700
1.13
2.87
168.1
100.1
175
95
26
8
11-11
4-3
.00
.00
(Line: WSH -210)
.545
1.39
5.17
.714
1.08
3.10
(Line: CIN -135)
.182
1.76
5.64
.400
1.97
7.99
(Line: CHC -182)
.500
1.25
3.97
.571
1.26
4.50
0.0
0.0
78.1
133.2
Seattle
L.A. Rams
Arizona
San Francisco
W
3
2
1
1
L
1
1
2
2
T Pct
0 .750
0 .667
0 .333
0 .333
PF
78
67
50
43
PA
70
71
61
61
W
2
2
1
0
L
1
1
2
3
T Pct
0 .667
0 .667
0 .333
0 .000
PF
40
78
33
47
PA
27
74
44
64
W
2
2
2
2
L
1
1
1
1
T Pct
0 .667
0 .667
0 .667
0 .667
PF
62
60
62
68
PA
46
54
61
46
W
3
2
2
1
L
0
1
2
2
T Pct
0 1.000
0 .667
0 .500
0 .333
PF
94
56
85
72
PA
43
52
68
82
59
156
22
6
83.0
56.1
165.2
46.0
8-10
2-1
84
43
109
53
69
27
100
160
INTERLEAGUE
Detroit at Colorado, 3:10 p.m. ET
(Line: COL -110)
9-8
.529
1.30
0-1
.000
1.21
27
3
3.90
3.79
166.0
19.0
167
11
Odds provided by Pregame.com.
RESULTS, UPCOMING GAMES
Thursday
American League
CWS at MIN, 1:10
TEX at HOU, 1:10
BOS at NYY, 7:05
TOR at BAL, 7:05
National League
NYM at CIN, 12:35
LAD at ARI, 3:40
PHI at MIA, 7:10
ATL at CHC, 8:05
WSH at MIL, 8:10
STL at SF, 10:15
AL LEADERS
Friday
American League
CLE at DET, 1:10
BOS at NYY, 7:05
TOR at BAL, 7:05
CLE at DET, 7:10
LAA at TEX, 8:05
KC at MIN, 8:10
TB at CWS, 8:10
OAK at SEA, 10:10
National League
ATL at CHC, 2:20
CIN at PIT, 7:05
PHI at MIA, 7:10
WSH at MIL, 8:10
ARI at COL, 8:40
LAD at SD, 10:10
STL at SF, 10:15
Interleague
NYM at HOU, 8:10
BATTING
Blackmon, Colorado
JTurner, Los Angeles
Harper, Washington
Murphy, Washington
Goldschmidt, Arizona
LeMahieu, Colorado
Ozuna, Miami
Seager, Los Angeles
Posey, San Francisco
Votto, Cincinnati
US Open
Men’s Singles: Yuichi Sugita, Japan, leads
Geoffrey Blancaneaux, France, 6-2, 6-2,
susp., rain; Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, vs.
Richard Gasquet, France, 3-6, 6-2, susp.,
rain; Maximilian Marterer, Germany, leads
Donald Young, United States, 3-6, 6-1, 0-2,
susp., rain; Bjorn Fratangelo, United States,
vs. Ivo Karlovic, Croatia, 7-6, 2-3, susp., rain;
Dominic Thiem, Austria, leads Alex De Minaur, Australia, 6-4, 6-1, susp., rain.
Women’s Singles’s — : Karolina Pliskova
(1), Czech Republic, def. Magda Linette, Poland, 6-2, 6-1; Barbora Strycova (23), Czech
Republic, def. Misaki Doi, Japan, 6-1, 6-3;
Jelena Ostapenko (12), Latvia, def. Lara Arruabarrena-Vecino, Spain, 6-2, 1-6, 6-1; Sorana Cirstea, Romania, def. Lesley Kerkhove, Netherlands, 6-1, 6-3; Yanina Wickmayer, Belgium, def. Lesia Tsurenko (28),
Ukraine, 6-3, 6-1; Naomi Osaka, Japan,
def. Angelique Kerber (6), Germany, 6-3,
6-1; Veranica Cepede Royg, Paraguay vs.
Nicole Gibbs, United States, 0-6, 6-1, susp.,
rain; Elina Svitolina, Ukraine leads Katerina
Siniakova, Czech Republic, 6-0, 6-6, susp.,
rain; Kaia Kanepi, Estonia vs. Francesca
Schiavone, Italy, 0-6, 4-2, susp., rain; Jennifer Brady, United States vs. Andrea Petkovic, Germany, 6-4, 3-4, susp., rain; Monica
Niculescu, Romania vs. Kristina Mladenovic, France, 6-3, 1-1, susp., rain.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
All times ET
EASTERN CONFERENCE
NL LEADERS
.355
.321
.318
.306
.303
.301
.300
.300
.299
.297
Cincinnati at Indianapolis, 7 p.m.
L.A. Rams at Green Bay, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Jacksonville at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Jets, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at New England, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Miami at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Baltimore at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Houston, 8 p.m.
Tennessee at Kansas City, 8:30 p.m.
Arizona at Denver, 9 p.m.
L.A. Chargers at San Francisco, 10 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 10 p.m.
TENNIS
(Line: SD -123)
.444
1.35
4.68 144.1
.667
1.39
4.91
33.0
L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. ET (Line: LAD -109)
LAD: Ryu (L)
19
5-6
.455
1.29
3.34
107.2
ARI: Ray (L)
21
10-5
.667
1.21
3.06 123.2
BATTING
Altuve, Houston
Garcia, Chicago
Hosmer, Kansas City
Reddick, Houston
Schoop, Baltimore
Gregorius, New York
Segura, Seattle
Ramirez, Cleveland
Gonzalez, Houston
Andrus, Texas
PA
19
29
44
65
(Line: MIN -207)
1.68
6.05
129.1
1.16
4.04 111.1
San Francisco at San Diego, 9:10 p.m. ET
Monday
American League
CLE 6, NYY 2
BAL 7, SEA 6
BOS 6, TOR 5
TB 12, KC 0
LAA 3, OAK 1
National League
WSH 11, MIA 2
CHC 6, PIT 1
SF 3, SD 0
Interleague
DET 4, COL 3
PF
67
43
52
52
153
108
(Line: OFF)
.000
.00
.000
.00
N.Y. Mets at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. ET
DET: Verlander (R)
COL: Bettis (R)
T Pct
0 1.000
0 1.000
0 .667
0 .333
Thursday
Miami at Washington, 4:05 p.m. ET
SF: Blach (L)
SD: Wood (L)
L
0
0
1
2
169.1
107.2
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 3:35 p.m. ET
PIT: Nova (R)
CHC: Quintana (L)
W
3
3
2
1
Dallas
Philadelphia
N.Y. Giants
Washington
(Line: HOU -185)
7-9
.438
1.34
11-2
.846
1.07
St. Louis at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m. ET
NYM: Montero (R)
CIN: Bailey (R)
PA
60
63
63
53
86
118
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 12:05 p.m. ET
MIA: Conley (L)
WSH: Strasburg (R)
PF
62
48
44
44
110.1
126.0
NATIONAL LEAGUE
ATL: ()
PHI: ()
T Pct
0 .333
0 .333
0 .333
0 .333
(Line: OFF)
1.30
5.38
1.22
4.00
(Line: KC -125)
TB: Odorizzi (R)
22
6-7
.462
1.36
4.82
KC: Vargas (L)
25
14-8
.636
1.31
3.72
Oakland at L.A. Angels, 10:07 p.m. ET (Line: LAA -149)
OAK: Graveman (R)
13
4-4
.500
1.40
4.24
LAA: Bridwell (R)
13
7-2
.778
1.15
2.89
STL: Martinez (R)
MIL: Anderson (R)
L
2
2
2
2
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
Tampa Bay at Kansas City, 8:15 p.m. ET
ATL: Dickey (R)
PHI: Eickhoff (R)
W
1
1
1
1
123
117
Chi. White Sox at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. ET
CWS: Holland (L)
MIN: Berrios (R)
PA
51
86
89
50
146.0
126.0
South
.339
.328
.325
.317
.316
.313
.313
.311
.311
.310
Toronto FC
NY City FC
Columbus
Chicago
New York
Atlanta FC
Montreal
Philadelphia
Orlando City
N. England
D.C. United
W
16
14
13
12
12
10
10
8
8
8
8
L
3
7
12
9
10
8
9
12
11
12
15
T Pts GF GA
8 56 55 26
5 47 48 35
3 42 42 42
5 41 47 36
3 39 38 33
6 36 44 32
6 36 42 41
7 31 36 38
7 31 27 39
5 29 39 41
4 28 22 44
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Seattle
Sporting KC
Portland
Houston
Vancouver
FC Dallas
San Jose
Salt Lake
Minnesota
Los Angeles
Colorado
D
0
1
1
1
1
0
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
PF
44
77
61
35
4.62
6.57
4.57
4.10
W
3
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
T Pct
0 .333
0 .333
0 .333
0 .000
Denver
Kansas City
L.A. Chargers
Oakland
(Line: TOR -109)
8-15
.348
1.39
6-10
.375
1.36
27
19
GP
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
L
2
2
2
3
157
15
Boston at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. ET
BOS: Porcello (R)
TOR: Happ (L)
West
Manc. United
Liverpool
Huddersfield
Man. City
West Bromwich
Chelsea
Watford
Southampton
Tottenham
Burnley
Stoke
Everton
Swansea
Newcastle
Leicester
Arsenal
Brighton
Bournemouth
Crystal Palace
West Ham
W
1
1
1
0
139.1
19.2
(Line: BAL -125)
.571
1.20
.357
1.58
8-6
5-9
Baltimore
Cleveland
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
English Premier League
All Times ET
W
11
10
11
10
11
9
10
10
7
6
6
L
7
5
9
8
9
7
11
13
14
14
15
T Pts GF GA
8 41 40 33
10 40 31 19
7 40 47 44
8 38 46 37
5 38 37 35
9 36 37 33
6 36 31 44
5 35 40 48
4 25 32 52
5 23 32 47
4 22 24 38
Saturday
Chicago at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Orlando City at New England, 7 p.m.
L GF GA
0 10 0
0 8 3
0 4 0
0 5 2
0 3 1
1 6 4
0 5 3
0 3 2
1 4 3
1 4 4
1 2 2
1 2 3
1 2 4
2 3 3
2 5 6
2 4 8
2 0 4
3 1 5
3 0 6
3 2 10
Pts
9
7
7
7
7
6
5
5
4
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
1
0
0
0
Liverpool at Manchester City, 7:30 a.m.
Bournemouth at Arsenal, 10 a.m.
Tottenham at Everton, 10 a.m.
Watford at Southampton, 10 a.m.
Chelsea at Leicester, 10 a.m.
West Bromwich Albion at Brighton, 10 a.m.
Manchester United at Stoke, 12:30 p.m.
Crystal Palace at Burnley, 8:30 a.m.
Newcastle at Swansea, 11 a.m.
Monday’s game
Huddersfield at West Ham, 3 p.m.
WNBA
W
21
20
17
12
12
9
L
11
12
15
19
20
23
Pct
.656
.625
.531
.387
.375
.281
GB
—
1
4
8½
9
12
WESTERN CONFERENCE
x-Minnesota
x-Los Angeles
x-Phoenix
Dallas
Seattle
San Antonio
W
24
24
16
15
14
7
L
7
8
16
17
18
25
Pct GB
.774
—
.750
½
.500 8½
.469 9½
.438 10½
.219 17½
Tuesday’s Game
Connecticut 86, Washington 76
Wednesday’s Games
Minnesota at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Chicago, 8 p.m.
AUTO RACING
NASCAR Monster Energy Cup
Schedule-Winners
Feb. 19 — x-Advance Auto Parts Clash (Joey
Logano)
Feb. 23 — x-Can-Am Duel at Daytona 1
(Chase Elliott)
Feb. 23 — x-Can-Am Duel at Daytona 2
(Denny Hamlin)
Feb. 26 — Daytona 500 (Kurt Busch)
March 5 — Folds of Honor QuikTrip 500
(Brad Keselowski)
March 12 — Kobalt 400 (Martin Truex Jr)
March 19 — Camping World 500 (Ryan
Newman)
March 26 — Auto Club 400 (Kyle Larson)
April 2 — STP 500 (Brad Keselowski)
April 9 — O’Reilly Auto Parts 500 (Jimmie
Johnson)
April 24 — Food City 500 (Jimmie Johnson)
April 30 — Toyota Owners 400 (Joey Logano)
May 7 — GEICO 500 (Ricky Stenhouse Jr)
May 13 — Go Bowling 400 (Martin Truex Jr)
May 20 — x-Monster Energy Open (Daniel
Suarez)
May 20 — x-Monster Energy NASCAR AllStar Race (Kyle Busch)
May 28 — Coca-Cola 600 (Austin Dillon)
June 4 — AAA 400 Drive for Autism (Jimmie
Johnson)
June 11 — Pocono 400 (Ryan Blaney)
June 18 — FireKeepers Casino 400 (Kyle Larson)
June 25 — Toyota/Save Mart 350 (Kevin
Harvick)
July 1 — Coke Zero 400, Daytona Beach, Fla.
(Ricky Stenhouse Jr.)
July 8 — Quaker State 400 (Martin Truex Jr.)
July 16 — New Hampshire 301 (Denny
Hamlin)
July 23 — Brickyard 400 (Kasey Kahne)
July 30 — Overton’s 400 (Kyle Busch)
Aug. 6 — I Love New York 355 at The Glen
(Martin Truex Jr.)
Aug. 13 — Pure Michigan 400 (Kyle Larson)
Aug. 19 — Bass Pro Shops NRA Night Race
(Kyle Busch)
Sept. 3 — Bojangles’ Southern 500, Darlington, S.C.
Sept. 9 — Federated Auto Parts 400, Richmond, Va.
Sept. 17 — Tales of the Turtles 400, Joliet, Ill.
Sept. 24 — New England 300, Loudon, N.H.
Oct. 1 — Delaware 400, Dover, Del.
Oct. 8 — Bank of America 500, Concord,
N.C.
Oct. 15 — Alabama 500, Talladega, Ala.
Oct. 22 — Hollywood Casino 400, Kansas
City, Kan.
Oct. 29 — Goody’s Fast Relief 500, Martinsville, Va.
Nov. 5 — AAA Texas 500, Fort Worth, Texas
Nov. 12 — Can-Am 500, Avondale, Ariz.
Nov. 19 — Ford Ecoboost 400, Homestead,
Fla.
x-non-points race
NASCAR Monster Energy Cup
Points Leaders
1. Martin Truex Jr., 951.
2. Kyle Busch, 850.
2. Kyle Larson, 845.
4. Kevin Harvick, 824.
5. Denny Hamlin, 753.
6. Brad Keselowski, 728.
7. Chase Elliott, 711.
8. Matt Kenseth, 703.
IndyCar Schedule-Winners
March 12 — Firestone Grand Prix of St. Petersburg (Sebastien Bourdais)
April 9 — Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach
(James Hinchcliffe)
April 23 — Grand Prix of Alabama (Josef
Newgarden)
April 29 — Phoenix Grand Prix (Simon Pagenaud)
May 13 — Grand Prix of Indianapolis (Will
Power)
May 28 — Indianapolis 500 (Takuma Sato)
June 3 — Chevrolet Detroit Grand Prix (Race
1) (Graham Rahal)
June 4 — Chevrolet Detroit Grand Prix (Race
2) (Graham Rahal)
June 10 — Rainguard Water Sealers 600
(Will Power)
June 25 — Kohler Grand Prix (Scott Dixon)
July 9 — Iowa Corn 300 (Helio Castroneves)
July 16 — Honda Indy Toronto (Josef Newgarden)
July 30 — Honda Indy 200 at Mid-Ohio (Josef Newgarden)
Aug. 20 — ABC Supply 500 (Will Power)
Aug. 26 — Bommarito Automotive Group
500 (Josef Newgarden)
Sept. 3 — Grand Prix at The Glen, Watkins
Glen, N.Y.
Sept. 17 — GoPro Grand Prix of Sonoma,
Calif.
Formula One Schedule-Winners
All times ET
EASTERN CONFERENCE
x-Connecticut
x-New York
x-Washington
Chicago
Atlanta
Indiana
9. Jamie McMurray, 700.
10. Clint Bowyer, 642.
11. Jimmie Johnson, 628.
12. Ryan Blaney, 623.
13. Kurt Busch, 586.
14. Joey Logano, 583.
15. Ryan Newman, 574.
16. Erik Jones, 574.
17. Daniel Suarez, 537.
18. Ricky Stenhouse Jr., 528.
19. Trevor Bayne, 470.
20. Kasey Kahne, 451.
March 26 — Australian Grand Prix (Sebastian Vettel)
April 9 — Chinese Grand Prix (Lewis Hamilton)
April 16 — Bahrain Grand Prix (Sebastian
Vettel)
April 30 — Russian Grand Prix (Valtterri Bottas)
May 14 — Spanish Grand Prix (Lewis Hamilton)
May 28— Monaco Grand Prix (Sebastian
Vettel)
June 11 — Canadian Grand Prix (Lewis
Hamilton)
June 25 — Azerbaijan Grand Prix (Daniel
Ricciardo)
July 9 — Austrian Grand Prix (Valtterri Bottas)
July 16 — British Grand Prix (Lewis Hamilton)
July 30 — Hungarian Grand Prix (Sebastian
Vettel)
Aug. 27 — Belgian Grand Prix (Lewis Hamilton)
Sept. 3 — Italian Grand Prix, Monza
Sept. 17 — Singapore Grand Prix
Oct. 1 — Malaysia Grand Prix, Sepang
Oct. 8 — Japanese Grand Prix, Suzuka
Oct. 22 — United States Grand Prix, Austin,
Texas
Oct. 29 — Mexican Grand Prix, Mexico City
Nov. 12 — Brazilian Grand Prix, Sao Paolo
Nov. 26 — Abu Dhabi Grand Prix, Yas Marina, United Arab Emirates
NHRA Leaders
Top Fuel
1, Antron Brown, 1,513. 2, Steve Torrence,
1,482. 3, Leah Pritchett, 1,453. 4, Tony Schumacher, 1,121. 5, Brittany Force, 1,052. 6,
Doug Kalitta, 1,038. 7, Clay Millican, 1,014.
8, Terry McMillen, 722. 9, Scott Palmer, 649.
10, Troy Coughlin Jr., 576.
ODDS
Pregame.com Line
College Football
Thursday
Favorite
L O/U
Underdog
Ohio State
201⁄2 58
INDIANA
MINNESOTA
24 50
Buffalo
MEMPHIS
26 67
La-Monroe
ARIZONA ST
221⁄2 711⁄2 New Mexico St
UCF
17 58
FIU
OKLAHOMA ST 18 69
Tulsa
Friday
Favorite
E. MICHIGAN
Washington
Navy
WISCONSIN
Boston Co
Colorado
L O/U
14 56
27 52
10 681⁄2
27 52
3 52
5 66
Underdog
Charlotte
RUTGERS
FAU
Utah St
N ILLINOIS
Colorado St
Saturday
Favorite
L O/U
Underdog
MICHIGAN ST 17 561⁄2 Bowling Green
IOWA
11 52
Wyoming
MARSHALL
21⁄2 51
Miami (Ohio)
CLEMSON
401⁄2 51
Kent St
UMASS
21⁄2 561⁄2
CO CRLINA
PENN ST
30 66
Akron
Louisville
24 67
Purdue
NEBRASKA
16 47
Arkansas St
N-WESTERN
24 60
Nevada
ILLINOIS
7
58
Ball St
OKLAHOMA
43 62
UNC
11 55
MISSISSIPPI
24 571⁄2
SO CAL
261⁄2 571⁄2
TEXAS
18 56
NOTRE DAME 17 54
AUBURN
34 59
GEORGIA
141⁄2 451⁄2
Kentucky
10 58
NC State
5 521⁄2
Michigan
3
45
Vanderbilt
31⁄2 58
Alabama
7
49
BOISE ST
11 62
UTEP
California
S. Alabama
W. Michigan
Maryland
Temple
Ga Southern
App St
SO MISS
S. Carolina
Florida
MTSU
Florida St
Troy
Sunday
Lsu
Virginia Tech
UCLA
16 (48)
4 52
31⁄2 57
Byu
West Virginia
Texas A&M
16 16 (48)
3 3 56
Byu
Georgia Tech
Monday
Lsu
Tennessee
NFL
Thursday
Favorite
GREEN BAY
BUFFALO
NY JETS
INDIANAPOLIS
ATLANTA
CAROLINA
TAMPA BAY
N. ENGLAND
HOUSTON
CHICAGO
NEW ORLEANS
MINNESOTA
KANSAS CITY
DENVER
S. FRANCISCO
Seattle
O T O/U Underdog
31⁄2 31⁄2 38
LA Rams
OFF OFF OFF
Detroit
1
1 36 Philadelphia
2
2 36
Cincinnati
3
3 38 Jacksonville
3
4 38
Pittsburgh
3
2 36 Washington
NY Giants
21⁄2 3 38
OFF OFF OFF
Dallas
3
3 36
Cleveland
4
3 37
Baltimore
3
3 38
Miami
3
3 38
Tennessee
3
2 37
Arizona
1
3 38 LA Chargers
+21⁄2 1 40
OAKLAND
DEALS
BASEBALL
American League
KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Optioned LHP Eric
Skoglund to Omaha (PCL). Recalled LHP Brian Flynn from Omaha.
NEW YORK YANKEES — Sent 1B Garrett
Cooper to Trenton (EL) for a rehab assignment.
TAMPA BAY RAYS — Optioned RHP Chih-Wei
Hu to Durham (IL). Designated 3B Taylor
Featherston for assignment. Reinstated
RHP Matt Andriese from the 60-day DL.
TEXAS RANGERS — Sent LHP Jake Diekman
to Frisco (TL) for a rehab assignment.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Designated LHP TJ
House and OF Norichika Aoki for assignment. Recalled RHPs Joe Biagini and Leonel
Campos from Buffalo (IL). Agreed to terms
with C Luis Liriano on a minor league contract.
National League
ATLANTA BRAVES — Sent RHP Luke Jackson
to Gwinnett (IL) for a rehab assignment.
CHICAGO CUBS — Sent RHP Justin Grimm
and SS Addison Russell to Iowa (PCL) for rehab assignments.
NEW YORK METS — Optioned RHP Kevin
McGowan to Las Vegas (PCL).
WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Optioned
RHP Erick Fedde to Syracuse (IL).
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BUFFALO BILLS — Released G Karim Barton,
DE Jake Metz, RB Cedric O’Neal, S Bacarri
Rambo, CB Jumal Rolle and WR Rashad
Ross.
CHICAGO BEARS — Waived DL Kapron Lewis-Moore and LB Alex Scearce.
CLEVELAND BROWNS — Terminated the
contract of DL Cam Johnson. Waived/injured DB Ed Reynolds II.
DETROIT LIONS — Waived OT Cyrus
Kouandjio.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Placed RB George
Winn on injured reserve. Signed RB Daryl
Richardson.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Traded LB
Marquis Flowers to Cincinnati for a 2018
seventh-round draft pick.
NEW YORK GIANTS — Waived DE Owa
Odighizuwa.
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS — Released L B
Sean Porter. Traded TE Vance McDonald to
Pittsburgh for an undisclosed draft pick.SOCCER
Major League Soccer
LA GALAXY — Named Dominic Kinnear assistant coach.
COLLEGE
BAYLOR — Suspended S Taion Sells three
games and OT Mo Porter one half.
BROWN — Named Bryson Johnson assistant men’s basketball coach.
CHARLESTON SOUTHERN — Named Rick
Duckett assistant head men’s basketball
coach.
KENNESAW STATE — Promoted assistant
women’s basketball coach Khadija Head
to associate head coach.
RHODE ISLAND COLLEGE — Named Brian
Sujecki assistant women’s soccer coach.
SAINT ROSE — Named Jim Thomas men’s
and women’s cross country coach.
SIENA — Named Tamara Perea water polo
coach.
SPORTS ON TV
Times Eastern. Programs live unless noted. Check local listings.
HORSE RACING: Saratoga Live, With Anticipation Stakes, in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. (Fox Sports 2, 4 p.m.)
MLB: Regional,, Cleveland at New York Yankees (1 p.m.) or St. Louis at Milwaukee (2 p.m.) (MLB Network); Detroit at Colorado
(4 p.m.) or Miami at Washington (5 p.m.) (games joined in progress) (MLB Network); Texas vs. Houston, in St. Petersburg, Fla.
(ESPN, 7 p.m.); regional, Los Angeles Dodgers at Arizona or San
Francisco at San Diego (games joined in progress) (MLB Network,
10 p.m.)
TENNIS: U.S. Open, second round, in New York (ESPN, 1 p.m., and
ESPN2, 6 p.m.)
USA TODAY
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
8C SPORTS
NFL
Lions get it right with Stafford deal
Yes, it’s a lot of money,
but perspective needed
Jeff Seidel
@seideljeff
USA TODAY Sports
Detroit Lions general manager
Bob Quinn has won the summer.
Quinn did what he
ANALYSIS had to do, when he
had to do it, signing
quarterback
Matthew Stafford to a
five-year contract extension that will keep him in Detroit through the 2022 season.
The terms might seem astronomical — and they are crazy numbers compared with real life —
but this deal is actually reasonable for both sides.
Stafford wins by becoming the
highest-paid player in NFL history, averaging $27 million a year,
and Stafford will keep that title
until, well, the next quarterback
comes along.
Meanwhile, the Lions win by
getting this done without having
to use the franchise tag, locking
up a top-10 quarterback for the
next five years.
Critics will say Stafford does
not deserve this much money because he has not guided this team
to, well, anything.
That this is eating up too much
of the salary cap.
That he is not one of the best
quarterbacks in the game.
That he has never won a playoff game.
And all those things are true.
But try winning in the NFL
without a quarterback. Or hoping
to find one in the draft. Or trying
to lure one in free agency.
The only question that matters
is this: What does the market dictate?
And this is a fair market value
when you consider Derek Carr
got a five-year, $125 million contract with the Oakland Raiders.
TIM FULLER, USA TODAY SPORTS
At $27 million a season, Matthew Stafford will be the NFL’s top-paid player, but another quarterback likely will pass him soon.
When it’s all said and done, this
contract will look reasonable in a
few years, when the rest of the
quarterbacks get paid.
The best part is, Stafford is 29
and in the prime of his career. He
is the face of this franchise, and
everything revolves around him.
He has averaged 278 passing
yards per game in his career, the
most over a player’s first eight
seasons in NFL history, according
to ESPN Stats.
Last season, before injuring his
middle finger, Stafford was out-
standing. There is reason to think
he could be even better, if running backs Ameer Abdullah and
Theo Riddick can stay healthy.
Still, that money. Yes, it’s jawdropping. And it makes sense
that Lions fans are frustrated.
The man who has thrown for
more than 30,000 yards has
earned $110,778,969 from the Lions, according to Spotrac.com.
If nothing else, Stafford has an
unbelievable sense of timing.
When he was taken with the top
overall pick in the 2009 draft, he
got a six-year, $72 million deal.
That was signed before the 2011
collective bargaining agreement
that created a rookie wage scale.
Then, he signed a three-year,
$53 million extension.
And now this.
In all likelihood, there will be
another contract after this one.
For now, give credit to Quinn
for getting this done. He continues to make solid decisions.
He has tried to rebuild the offensive line. Created some depth.
And now he has locked up his
quarterback.
And finally, give credit to Stafford. He could have held out for
more money, forcing the franchise tag. But he didn’t. Clearly,
he wants to be in Detroit.
It was a win for both sides.
The right deal, at the right
time.
Even if it is a ridiculous
amount of money.
Seidel is a columnist for the Detroit
Free Press, part of the USA TODAY
Network.
SECTION D
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
Remembering Diana
Her influence — from the royals
to fashion — is lasting 3D
PRINCESS DIANA 1961-1997
ON SALE
NOW
20TH ANNIVERSARY REMEMBRANCE EDITION
Special
edition
The
available
legacy
on newslives on
stands and
at onlinestore.usatoday.com
ON SALE THROUGH 9/11
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WHY WE STILL LOVE HER | HOW THE ROYALS CHANGED FOREVER | NEW BOOKS, TV SHOWS, EXHIBITS
JAYNE FINCHER,
GETTY IMAGES
LIFELINE
FALL BOOKS PREVIEW
CAUSE CELEB
Coldplay
dedicated a
special song to
Houston and
the victims of
Hurricane
Harvey at their
concert Monday. Chris
USA TODAY NETWORK
Martin paused
his band’s Miami show to explain that they were supposed
to play in Houston last week but
couldn’t because of the storm.
“A lot of people were supposed
to come to the concert and we
let them down,” he said. “We’re
so grateful for all the people
who come to our shows, and
canceling shows is not something we like to do, but in this
instance we kind of had to.”
So the band wanted to send
love to the city with an original
song called ‘Houston #1.’
THEY SAID WHAT?
THE STARS’ BEST QUOTES
“I just have to clean the barf
off of my tux. It used to be my
barf, but now it’s the twins’
barf. So it all works out.”
— George Clooney to the
Associated Press on his twin
babies, born in June
A-list authors to fill shelves
Dan Brown will deliver a new thriller, and even Robert Langdon himself — aka Tom Hanks
— is dipping his toe into fiction with a collection of short stories. More big names, including
Alice Waters, John le Carré, Amy Tan and Matthew Weiner, will soon hit bookstores.
USA TODAY’s Jocelyn McClurg looks at 10 cool books for fall.
1A Legacy
of Spies
Vote at
the library
Books from Clinton, the
Bush sisters, Baldwin
hit the shelves 2D
by John le Carré (Viking,
fiction, on sale Sept. 5)
WHAT IT’S ABOUT: Peter
Guillam, now retired from
the British Secret Service, is
summoned to London to
answer questions from a new
generation with little patience
for Cold War tactics.
COOL FACTOR: This is the first
le Carré thriller in more than
25 years to feature spymaster
George Smiley.
JEFF SPICER, GETTY IMAGES
USA SNAPSHOTS©
The nation’s
best sellers
Top five best sellers, shown in
proportion of sales. Example:
For every 10 copies of Y is for
Yesterday sold, The Glass
Castle sold 2.5 copies:
Y is for Yesterday
Sue Grafton
10
Coming to
My Senses:
The Making of a
Counterculture
Cook
2
by Alice Waters
(Clarkson Potter, non-fiction,
on sale Sept. 5)
NADAV KANDAR
A Legacy of Spies, out in September, is the 24th novel for John le Carré, 85.
The Girl Who
Takes an Eye for
an Eye
3
WHAT IT’S ABOUT: A memoir by
The Glass Castle
Jeannette Walls
2.5
Wonder
R.J. Palacio
2.4
Seeing Red
Sandra Brown
2.3
Beneath a Scarlet Sky
Mark Sullivan
2.1
THURSDAY Top 50 books list
(books.usatoday.com)
SOURCE USA TODAY Best-Selling Books
the chef (and cookbook author)
who opened Chez Panisse, the
influential Berkeley, Calif.,
restaurant, when she was 27 in
1971.
COOL FACTOR: Waters, at the
forefront of the local/organic
food movement, has seen her
influence extend all the way to
Michelle Obama’s White House
garden.
by David Lagercrantz
(Knopf, fiction, on sale Sept. 12)
WHAT IT’S ABOUT: The Girl With
the Dragon Tattoo mega-series
continues as imprisoned punk
hacker Lisbeth Salander teams
with Swedish journalist Mikael
Blomkvist to uncover the truth
1997 PHOTO BY FRED MERTZ
MARY CADDEN AND JANET LOEHRKE, USA TODAY
v STORY CONTINUES ON 2D
Alice Waters is all about organics.
A wave to ‘GoT’s Littlefinger, what’s next for Aidan Gillen
Rest in Peace, Petyr “Littlefinger” Baelish — if you can. That’s
quite the interesting life you
lived.
Littlefinger, the self-made lord
and schemer, came to his end in
Sunday’s Game of Thrones Season
7 finale, his death sentence for
treason and murder pronounced
by former ward Sansa Stark and
carried out by her sister, Arya,
who slit his throat.
Irish actor Aidan Gillen (The
Wire, The Dark Knight Rises), 49,
who imbued Littlefinger with
charm, wit and a hint of danger,
spoke with USA TODAY’s Bill
Keveney about his character, the
death scene, his favorite moments and how it feels to leave an
international phenomenon.
Q
How do you feel about
Littlefinger, a character
you’ve embodied for seven
years, being dead?
A
It was inevitable. … It’s been
a long ride and an exciting
one, so you feel a little empty afterward. In a way, it’s good to get
out when you’re ahead.
Arya Stark
(Maisie Williams) executes Petyr
“Littlefinger”
Baelish (Aidan Gillen) in
Thrones.
Q
A
Do you think Littlefinger deserved
to die?
As the actor playing
him, I’ve always been
able to justify his actions:
This is survival, this is revenge. If you’re talking to me
as Littlefinger, I’d probably say
no. From (the audience’s) point of
view, they want him to get his
comeuppance. He’s a classic villain. ... I’m fine with that.
Who’s
up,
who’s
down?
Q
Did Littlefinger really
love Sansa or was it political, an alliance that would
lead to greater power?
A
Tricky question. … You can
tell somebody you love them,
and it can mean 50 different
things. I’ve always tried to be a bit
non-specific about that. He definitely has feelings for her and
strong protective feelings, as well.
I think (feelings and politics
were) intermeshed.
Q
Arya (Maisie Williams)
had a smile on her face
HELEN SLOAN, HBO
when Sansa accused Littlefinger of murder and treason.
A
Well, she would, wouldn’t
she? … Here’s an interesting
piece of information: In the last
three years, I’ve had two Funko
(Thrones) dolls on the shelf in my
house, (Littlefinger) and Arya
standing just behind to the right
with, not a dagger, but a sword. …
There was a Q&A over a year ago
Everyone freeze
as we wait for
Season 8 4D
where I suggested Arya (would
kill Littlefinger). I hadn’t read
anything. (But) if I had known it
was going to be her, I wouldn’t
have said it. (He laughs.)
Q
A
Do you have any favorite
Littlefinger scenes?
There’s one in Season 2 in
the brothel with Ros (Esmé
Bianco), where he was talking to
her about how he wasn’t happy if
she wasn’t happy, but the language is very veiled. It was a
threat. I felt it was one of the first
times I had a proper shot at explaining who this guy was and
what he was capable of. … I like
the scenes with Sean Bean, (who
played Ned Stark). When Ned arrived in King’s Landing, there was
a classic line (from Littlefinger):
“Distrusting me was the wisest
thing you’ve done since you
stepped off your horse.” … So
much with Sansa (Sophie Turner). Much (of my story) was interlocked with hers. That scene at
The Eyrie where he plants a kiss
on her: It reveals a lot and was a
good character scene.
Q
You have upcoming roles
in the film Pickups and
the U.K. series Peaky Blinders. How has Thrones affected
your career?
A
It’s the biggest production
I’ve been involved with and
it’s run for a long time and the
character is quite eye-catching. I
hate talking about the mechanics
of career, but I’m sure it all helps.
USA TODAY
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
2D LIFE
Grant gets a tome; Hanks keys in; Kings team
reveals memories of her
traumatic childhood and shares
“heartbreaking” letters to and
from her mother.
COOL FACTOR: Tan sheds a
personal light on the creative
impulse behind best sellers such
as The Joy Luck Club and The
Valley of Amazement.
v CONTINUED FROM 1D
about her childhood and to exact
revenge.
COOL FACTOR: This is the second
Millennium sequel written by
Lagercrantz and sanctioned by
Stieg Larsson’s estate; the first,
2015’s The Girl in the Spider’s
Web, was a No. 1 USA TODAY
best seller.
JEFF VESPA
Matthew
Weiner
SHANE LEONARD
Stephen King
9
Sleeping
4Beauties
by Stephen King and
Owen King (Scribner,
fiction, on sale Sept. 26)
WHAT IT’S ABOUT: A
mysterious sleep disorder that can cause
women to become violent and feral disrupts an Appalachian town where the main
employer is a women’s prison.
COOL FACTOR: This is the first
time Stephen King has co-written
a book with his son (also an author), a project he calls a
“blessing” and a “thrill.”
by Matthew Weiner (Little, Brown,
fiction, on sale Nov. 7)
AUSTIN HARGRAVE
Typewriter aficionado Tom Hanks offers stories that feature his favorite
throw-back writing instrument. He has the keys to our heart.
Hamilton) and Washington
now focuses on Ulysses S. Grant
at a time when our nation is
relitigating the Civil War.
COOL FACTOR: Is Lin-Manuel
Miranda busy sharpening his
Grant vs. Lee rhymes? We can
only hope.
7
by Dan Brown
(Doubleday, fiction, on sale Oct. 3)
moves to Spain as Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon is
caught up in intrigue surrounding a former student’s high-tech
discovery.
Brown’s series
featuring Langdon unraveling
cryptic clues
and running for
his life includes
the blockbusters The Da
Vinci Code and
The Lost
Symbol.
by Andy Weir
(Crown, fiction, on sale Nov. 14)
by Tom Hanks
(Knopf, fiction,
on sale Oct. 17)
WHAT IT’S ABOUT: The action
WHAT IT’S
ABOUT: Sev-
6Grant
by Ron Chernow
(Penguin Press, non-fiction,
on sale Oct. 10)
WHAT IT’S ABOUT: The Pulitzer
Prize-winning author of biographies including Alexander
Hamilton (the inspiration for
the Broadway smash musical
enteen short
stories by the
Oscar-winning
actor, each involving a different typewriter
in some way. Hanks collects
vintage typewriters and has more
than 100.)
COOL FACTOR: This marks Hanks’
debut as an author. We think he’s
our type, judging by the retro
subject.
WHAT IT’S ABOUT: The teenage
daughter of a well-off Manhattan
couple is in the sights of a
sociopathic stalker.
COOL FACTOR: The creator of the
great AMC series Mad Men says
his debut novel was born the day
he saw a construction worker give
a “terrifying” look to a beautiful
schoolgirl on the Upper East Side;
Sally Draper, run!
10Artemis
Uncommon
Type: Some
Stories
5Origin
COOL FACTOR:
Heather,
the Totality
JULIAN JOHNSON
Amy Tan shares her memories.
Where the
8Past
Begins
by Amy Tan
(Ecco, non-fiction,
on sale Oct. 17)
WHAT IT’S ABOUT: In this sci-fi
adventure set on the moon, twentysomething
Jasmine
“Jazz” Bashara
is a small-time
smuggler
pulled into a
conspiracy for
control of the
city of
Artemis.
COOL FACTOR:
Weir’s best
seller The
Martian was the basis for the hit
Ridley Scott film starring Matt
Damon, and Artemis has been
snapped up for the movies by
20th Century Fox and New
Regency.
WHAT IT’S
ABOUT: In this
“writer’s memoir,” the popular
author of novels
about Chinese
immigrants
Election
sparks
political
analysis
The 2016 election —
and its aftermath — are
generating a flurry of political books this fall. Among
the most high-profile:
What Happened
by Hillary Rodham Clinton
(Simon & Schuster, on sale Sept. 12)
WILL HEATH, NBC
Alec Baldwin’s Donald J.
Trump opens up about his
own uuuuge year.
The Democratic presidential
candidate reflects on her loss to
Donald Trump in this highly
anticipated memoir.
Promise Me, Dad
Unbelievable: My
Front-Row Seat to the
Craziest Campaign in
American History
by Joe Biden
(Flatiron, on sale Nov. 14)
The former vice president
looks back on the year after he
learned his son, Beau, had a malignant brain tumor, as he also
wrestled with whether to run for
president.
by Katy Tur
(Dey Street, on sale Sept. 12)
The NBC News correspondent
reflects on the campaign and how
she became the story herself as
Trump singled her out
for criticism.
We Were Eight
Years in Power:
An American
Tragedy
by Ta-Nehisi Coates (One
World, on sale Oct. 3)
Essays by the author
of Between the World
and Me on how we got
from Barack Obama to
Donald Trump.
PATRICK SEMANSKY, AP
Former presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton opens up about the campaign.
Jocelyn McClurg
Billionaire at
the Barricades:
The Populist
Revolution
From Reagan
to Trump
by Laura Ingraham
(All Points Books,
on sale Oct. 10)
The conservative
commentator explains how Trump
connected with
voters.
Sisters First: Stories
From Our Wild and
Wonderful Life
by Jenna Bush Hager
and Barbara Pierce Bush
(Grand Central, on sale Oct. 24)
The twin daughters of George
W. Bush write a joint memoir
about living in the White House
under a previous Republican
administration.
You Can't Spell America
Without Me: The Really
& Clarifications
Tremendous Inside Story Corrections
USA TODAY is committed to accuracy. To reach us,
of My Fantastic First
contact Standards Editor Brent Jones at 800-8727073 or e-mail accuracy@usatoday.com. Please
Year as President
indicate whether you’re responding to content
Donald J. Trump
online or in the newspaper.
by Alec Baldwin and Kurt Andersen
(Penguin Press, on sale Nov. 7)
Baldwin brings his Saturday
Night Live impersonation of the
commander in chief to book
form.
A photo caption Tuesday on a
story about 10 successful summer
movies incorrectly described a
scene depicting British soldiers in
the movie Dunkirk. The soldiers
were preparing to evacuate the
harbor.
USA TODAY
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
LIFE 3D
DIANA, PRINCESS OF WALES
In those looks, layers of meaning
Iconic style was
no accident — and
not always subtle
Cara Kelly
USA TODAY
Did Princess Diana anticipate
becoming a #styleicon? By all accounts, she would have hated the
negative-feedback loops of Instagram and Twitter. But she certainly knew the power of clothing for
personal branding, long before the
Kardashians made a fortune from
it. And her meticulous use of fashion for messaging helps explain
the enduring fascination with her
style 20 years after her death.
“I suspect there are many aspects to Diana’s continuing iconic
status, but a central issue has to
be her ability to communicate in
personal terms across mass
media,” says Jude Davies, a professor of American literature and
culture at the University of Winchester in England and author of
Diana, A Cultural History.
The intensely personal messages coded in her clothing, particularly in tandem with her
charitable work, set her apart
from the Angelina Jolies and Madonnas of today, Davies says.
“Crucial to this was a sense of not
only her own feelings but her
own vulnerability,” he says.
“Hence, she didn’t come across as
patronizing — rather, as seeking a
genuine positive contact with
other human beings.”
While she was still Her Royal
Highness, she famously ditched
the customary gloves favored by
Queen Elizabeth II — a strategic
move that allowed skin-on-skin
contact with the masses she met
at hospitals and homeless shelters. That included people with
AIDS at a time when patients
were often treated like lepers.
“That a fascinating young royal
person would do this made much
more of a difference than a lot of
well-intentioned propagandists,”
says British author Peter York.
Her work for land mine removal
further let her ditch the princess
MARTIN CLEAVER, AP
Diana and the queen in 1987.
In the early days, the press
considered Diana frumpy.
persona and literally and symbolically roll up her sleeves.
“My favorite image of her,
apart from the Mario Testino
portraits, is her walking through a
minefield in jeans and a white Tshirt. That was so brave,” says
Meredith
Etherington-Smith,
former creative director of Christie’s International who worked
with Diana on a sale of her dresses at the auction house in
1997.
But Etherington-Smith
notes that Diana wasn’t
always so keenly dressed,
leading royal watchers to
characterize her as demure and somewhat
dowdy when she first
hit the spotlight. In
the early ’80s, she
became
the
poster-child
for “Sloane
Rangers” —
a
term
coined
by York
and Ann Barr. Referencing Sloane Square in
the posh Chelsea neighborhood of London, the
term described old-money preps who went to the
right exclusive schools, had
an affinity for country life
On the day Prince
Charles publicly admitted having an affair,
Diana showed up to an
event in the now-famous “Revenge Dress.”
JAYNE FINCHER, GETTY IMAGES
RONALD REAGAN PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY VIA AP
Princess Diana dances with John Travolta at a White House dinner in November 1985.
The dark blue Victor Edelstein dress she wore sold at auction for $222,500 in 1997.
and traditional values.
“We got her wrong.
Self-servingly, we got
her wrong,” says York,
noting that he and Barr
chose a photo of the
princess for the cover of their book
The
Official
Sloane Ranger
Handbook. “We
had taken it for
granted that she
would be a nice
upper-middle Sloane girl in
her behavior, and of course
what she was was a wacky
aristocrat with a very firm
idea of her own value.”
As Diana grew into her
public role, she was no wilting
British rose. She “began increasingly to find her own best friends
in fashion land and entertainment land,” York says. “And she
became this international type.”
The most famous display of her
international glamour came in
the form of a blue velvet gown by
Victor Edelstein that she wore
while dancing with John Travolta
at the White House in 1985. It
sold for $222,500 in the 1997
Christie’s auction, breaking a previous record of $145,000 for a
garment — coincidentally, the
white polyester suit that Travolta
wore in Saturday Night Fever.
But the personal messaging inherent in her clothing could be
calculated, with occasional digs at
her ex-husband or the press. On
the day Prince Charles was to
confess in an interview to having
an affair with Camilla Parker
Bowles, now the Duchess of
Cornwall, Diana showed up to the
annual Serpentine Gallery summer party in a short, figure-hugging Christina Stambolian dress
that became known as the “Revenge Dress.”
“It was quite deliberate,” says
Etherington-Smith. “She was
very good at obliterating the
press. Princess Diana, she was out
for the hero shot.”
And it played well to her audience, who loved the perceived
slap back against Charles and the
confines of the monarchy and her
inherent treatment of fashion as
important.
DI TAUGHT THE ROYALS HOW TO BE REAL
She mystified and
irked them, but made
them more involved
Maria Puente
USA TODAY
Exhibit A has to be the 2012
Summer Olympics in London.
Queen Elizabeth II, then 86 and
celebrating 60 years on her
throne, participated in an extraordinary video skit to open the
Games, featuring James Bond actor Daniel Craig and “the queen”
as a Bond girl skydiving from a
helicopter into the Stadium.
Mouths dropped, especially those
of her grandchildren, as tens of
thousands of Brits in the crowd
cheered and roared.
“Would she have done that
cameo had it not been for Diana,
all those years earlier, who emboldened them to do things in a
fresh way and be more relatable?”
asks American biographer Sally
Bedell Smith, who has written
best-sellers about both the queen
and Diana.
Diana’s feelings about the
Windsors were as mercurial as
she was, toggling between awe
and admiration and rage and despair in the years she was the desperately unhappy wife of Prince
Charles and the daughter-in-law
of the queen and Prince Philip.
The queen herself said after
Diana’s death, “There are lessons
to be drawn from her life,” and
those lessons are apparent, says
PR consultant and royal commentator Richard Fitzwilliams.
“Diana’s more approachable,
endearing and emotional style,
her conviction that the royal family had no heart, the way she
appealed to the public in (interviews), all this was unique but
had real impact,” Fitzwilliams
says. “It is a tribute to the resilience of the Windsors that they
have made certain changes yet
kept the monarchy’s mystique.”
Despite her troubles with her
in-laws, Diana always said she
wanted to bolster the ties between the monarchy and the people. She was, after all, the mother
of a future king.
ADRIAN DENNIS, AP
Queen Elizabeth II accepts flowers from a well-wisher after arriving at Buckingham Palace
Sept. 5, 1997. She gave a televised address that night, and Diana’s funeral was the following day.
British reporter Katie Nicholl,
author of several royal biographies, says Diana broke the mold:
She did and said things considered “very un-royal” that had a
positive effect, especially in the
way her sons, Prince William and
Prince Harry, were raised to be
aware of life beyond palace walls.
“As they have said in recent interviews, they are the princes and
the men they are today largely
because of the way Diana raised
them and the things that she exposed them to from an early age,”
Nicholl says.
“There is a rawness in these interviews, an openness that Diana
would have approved,” Fitzwilliams says. “The princes are following directly in her footsteps.”
Diana pressed “politically sensitive” causes not previously connected to the royals, including
AIDS treatment, help for the
homeless, the eradication of land
mines. These were issues that
touched real people and people
who had no voice, Nicholl says.
“Ultimately, this was all very
positive for the royal family even
though the queen and others
were concerned at points that
some of the issues Diana was
campaigning for weren’t synonymous with what royals should be
doing,” Nicholl says. “She was a
princess, but one who wasn’t
afraid to roll up her sleeves and
get stuck in, and that did the royal
family a huge amount of good.”
No doubt the 1,000-year-old
British monarchy already knew a
thing or two about keeping in
touch with the people. (To do
otherwise risked execution and
exile in centuries past.) But it was
Diana — equal parts beguiling
and bewildering — whose shocking death helped remind them of
this fundamental survival skill.
Her death was followed by
an almost-as-shocking tsunami of
grief that washed over Britain
and the world, and nearly
swamped the royals.
Tucked away at their usual
summer bastion at Balmoral,
LONDON ORGANISING COMMITTEE OF THE OLYMPIC
AND PARALYMPIC GAMES VIA AFP/GETTY IMAGES
The queen’s appearance with
“James Bond” in a video for
the 2012 Olympics in London
symbolized the new, more
relatable royal family.
their vast estate in Scotland, they
were unprepared for the reaction
back in London: the hysteria, the
headlines, the 24/7 media coverage, and the persistent importuning, from Prime Minister Tony
Blair and many others, that the
queen return to the capital, respond to the public grief, and put
on a semi-royal funeral for Diana.
“The queen has an unchanging
style, which has been perfection.
The death of Diana was the one
occasion where reliance on tradition and precedent were not
appropriate, and Blair was fortunately there to advise her,” Fitzwilliams says.
After first balking, the queen
met all the demands and more.
She rose to the occasion with a
stirring live speech to the nation
(the queen never does this) before the funeral, in which she
paid tribute to Diana.
In deed and metaphor, the
queen bowed her head to Diana’s
coffin, and it was sincere. Diana
was no longer a member of the
royal family, and she had behaved
in obstreperous ways in the years
before her 1996 divorce, but she
was still the mother of the
queen’s young grandsons; this
was a gesture no loving grandmother would withhold.
Immediately, public opinion
about the queen and her family
swung back to its previous high
levels. In the years since Diana’s
death, the royals have been more
popular than ever, culminating in
extravagant displays of affection
for the queen during her Diamond Jubilee in 2012 and for her
90th birthday in 2016.
Victoria Arbiter, daughter of
the queen’s former press secretary and a commentator for CNN,
says “little glimpses of Diana” are
apparent everywhere. But she
also gives credit to the queen.
“You can’t take anything away
from the queen and her ability to
adapt and evolve and meet the
needs of the people at any one
time,” Arbiter says. “Diana should
be credited with many changes,
one of which is the royal family is
very much more hands-on.”
Society’s expectations have
changed, Arbiter says. The deference and formality associated
with the royals are disappearing.
You might not see the queen in a
Starbucks, but she’s no longer
quite as remote as she once was.
“It’s been slow, gradual
change,” Arbiter says, “and Diana
was definitely the trigger.”
USA TODAY
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
4D LIFE
TELEVISION
Westeros frozen in place until the start of Season 8
queen. He needs to turn his luck
around in Season 8 to stay influential and alive.
2. JON SNOW,
AKA AEGON TARGARYEN
Kelly Lawler
@klawls
USA TODAY
The characters of Game of
Thrones laid it all on the table in
Season 7. When Season 8 comes
around, we’ll see if it was worth it.
The season finale of the series
didn’t do much to change the
power dynamics in Westeros. (Although it did take a master manipulator off the board.) Going into
Season 8, it still seems like anyone
can win and anyone can lose.
We ranked the top 10 characters from Sunday’s episode based
on how well they’re winning the
battle for Westeros, and their
own survival.
1. THE NIGHT KING
The leader of the White Walkers
remains on top after he and his
cool new pet zombie dragon took
down the Wall at the very end of
the season finale. The Wall was
pretty much the only reason our
friends in Westeros were able to
play their game of thrones for the
first seven seasons. Now that the
Army of the Dead is marching
south, we can only imagine what
havoc will follow.
He may be making some questionable romantic decisions and
accidentally punting the chance
for peace with his honesty, but
you can’t deny biology. With the
confirmation that Jon is the legitimate son of Rhaegar Targaryen, he’s the true heir to
the Iron Throne, and all
but confirmed to be
the
prophesied
“Prince Who Was
Promised.”
8. BRAN STARK
Bran, we’re so very glad you finally used your super-cool powers to
help! Now, perhaps, instead of
checking on everyone’s parental
statuses, you can figure out how
to defeat the Night King? Cool?
Cool.
9. JAIME LANNISTER
3. DAENERYS
TARGARYEN
We weren’t sure Jaime was going
to survive the season, but he
managed to escape the treachery
of his sister/lover Cersei and
make an honorable decision. His
standing in the seven kingdoms
will change depending on where
he goes next, but we hope he
heads north and reunites with
Brienne.
PHOTOS BY HBO
The Night King still rules the Game of Thrones.
Although Jon has
pledged fealty to her,
Dany is still in a weakthe Stark women get
ened position thanks
enormous credit for
to his true parentage Jon’s relationship
taking him off the
and her loss of a drag- with Dany will have board for good, and
on. Once the truth repercussions.
thus securing Stark
about Jon comes out,
control over Winterit will be interesting to see which fell at long last.
of them retains the most power.
Company to keep her on the Iron
Throne. She may be making a bad
call for the overall survival of the
human race, but she’s still alive
and she’s still on the throne. She’s
not going out without a fight.
The Stark sisters share a spot on
our rankings after their coordinated takedown of Littlefinger in
the finale. Although the ruse felt a
bit like it was more for the audience’s sake than Lord Baelish’s,
So, we guess this guy’s still
around, huh? In addition to
taunting Theon, Euron apparently is on a mission to get the Golden Company and a wedding night
with Cersei, which continues his
pattern of getting in the way of
our heroes in the most annoying
way possible. Hopefully, he will
be dispatched early in Season 8.
7. TYRION LANNISTER
Poor Tyrion. It hasn’t been a
great season for the youngest
Lannister sibling. He’s losing
ground with Dany on a political
level, because his schemes just
aren’t working. Adding to this is
the possibility that he is harboring unrequited feelings for his
6. CERSEI LANNISTER
4. ARYA AND SANSA STARK
10. EURON GREYJOY
Cersei added her own ruse to the
mix in the finale, first pledging to
help with the war against the
White Walkers and then informing Jaime that she has no intention of following through and
instead plans to hire the Golden
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Find and Circle:
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© Andrews McMeel
☑☐☐
☐☐☐
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QUICKCROSS
O
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UP & DOWN WORDS
By John Wilmes
8/30
By David L. Hoyt and Russell L. Hoyt
8/30
1. TALK
____ stick
2.
At any time
3.
4.
Carried a tune
5.
Bullring cheers
© Andrews McMeel
6.
Mexican monetary unit
Egg-shaped
Tuesday’s Answer
© Andrews McMeel
27 Sioux City’s state
51 First-string squad
28 Carnac the
54 A podiatrist may
Magnificent, e.g.
analyze it
29 Banshees’ cries
55 Grover’s red
30 Barnyard brooder
Muppet pal
33 Campfire stories
56 Surface at 68-Across
34 Seller of Kallax
58 Fax button
shelves
59 “You’re something
35 Pork fatback
___!”
product
60 Coaster on
36 Harp’s ancestor
56-Down
38 Like some phones
63 Play for a sucker
or cards
Tuesday’s Answer
39 Quick to
catch on
42 Writes like the
stereotypical
doctor
46 Place for hay
47 Limegrapefruit diet
drink
48 Worked
together
perfectly
49 Merit badge
recipient
8/29
50 Line in the
game of
CROSSWORDS
hangman
ON YOUR PHONE
TXTPERT
Across
1. 372737
4. 47238283
5. 3926
7. 736
8. 8378
9. 2433
6
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3. 7883368
4. 4583
6. 6284
7. 723
8/30
8
© USA TODAY and Rich Coulter
1
Use the
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keypad to
decode the
clues.
For example:
2 could be A,
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2
M O D
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5
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3
U
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8/30
Y
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7
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Yesterday’s solution
A
Tuesday’s Answer
GEORGE
HARRISON
FORD
HARRISON
MOTOR
FORD
CITY
MOTOR
DESK
CITY
JOB
DESK
DESCRIPTION
JOB
PLAY ONLINE
PUZZLES.USATODAY.COM
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9 8 7 3
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DIFFICULTY RATING
E
Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x2
box contains the numbers 1 through 6 (no repeats).
6 4
1
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6 3 1
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© Andrews McMeel
1
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DIFFICULTY RATING
$$
Tuesday’s Answers
3
7
6
1
2
5
9
8
4
2
4
1
9
7
8
3
6
5
5
8
9
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3
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1
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2
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1
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3
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1
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2
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6
3
2
5
3
1
2
4
6
6
2
4
3
5
1
8/29
© WIGGLES 3D GAMES
Rearrange the words to complete the quote.
ALL ANYTHING HEAR LIBERTY MEANS
PEOPLE RIGHT WANT
IF ___________ MEANS ______________ AT ________,
N D
T
QUICKCROSS
ON YOUR PHONE
English author George
Orwell talks about
freedom.
D
IT ___________ THE ___________ TO TELL ___________
A
10
Assns.
Clues:
1. Speak frankly
2. Type of sandwich
3. Cheese, perhaps
4. Reaching its highest level
5. Unconscious
6. A salesperson might
make one
7. Telephone option
DON’T QUOTE ME®
B
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L
9
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Heredity unit
SUDOKU FUSION
ON YOUR PHONE
mobilegames.usatoday.com
A
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Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3
box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (no repeats).
A
6
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8
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FORWARDING
7.
SUDOKU
mobilegames.usatoday.com
Today’s theme
Classroom
U
R
A
L
8/29
8/29
3
S
O
G
S
8/30
DOWN
1 Animals that stood
erect in “The Far
Side”
2 Like a campfire
story
3 Mythical meanie
4 ___ Bread
(bakery-cafe chain)
5 Whine like a
weakling
6 Shelter rescue,
perhaps
7 Weakens, as
support
8 Vegetable in the
onion family
9 Cruise itinerary
listing
10 Mixer that came in
siphon bottles
11 State bordering
British Columbia
12 Clan emblem
13 Loses a winter coat
18 McCoy of country
music
22 Jazz trio, say
24 Use a divining rod
26 Gunslinger’s dare
4
9
8/30
Tuesday’s answer: GALLON TALLER SELLER WALLET WILLOW COLLIE
ALLY / WORK PORK WORM CORE PORE / SAMMY DAVIS / PICKED /
ATTIC
Answers: Call 1-900-988-8300, 99 cents a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-320-4280.
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WORD ROUNDUP
2
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& EXPLOITED CHILDREN
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Visit us online at:
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CROSSWORD
1
Sex: Female
Race:
Biracial
Hair: Brown
Eyes: Brown
From: Hialeah, FL
PUZZLES
ACROSS
1 Roosters’ homes
6 Hero sellers
11 Part of FWIW
14 Opera phantom’s
instrument
15 Eligible for “The
Biggest Loser”
16 Word with a
Homer head-slap
17 Signal of imminent
danger
19 Raided the fridge
20 Place for a cheat’s
ace
21 Did caricatures
23 Word on a library
bookmark
25 Zips along
26 Rule against
30 Sewn border
31 Pricey topping for
crackers
32 A low-flow toilet
can lower it
37 Knocks out, in a
way
39 Word before
elephant or flu
40 “Sounds good!”
41 Start of a spring
thaw, perhaps
43 Drop a pop-up, say
44 Get into character
45 Successful on one’s
own
49 Bandmate of
Lennon
52 In need of Icy Hot
53 Many vacation
houses
57 Comes clean, with
“up”
61 Underground
resource
62 Pea concealer, in a
con game
64 Letters on Forever
stamps
65 Rides for celebs
66 Perfume ritually
67 ___ Swifty (bit of
wordplay)
68 Ski resort near
Montpelier
69 Threw in
DOB:
Feb 7, 2002
Missing:
Nov 8, 2016
Age Now: 15
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WHAT THEY DO NOT ________ TO ________.
8/30
Tuesday’s Answer: “My problem lies in reconciling my gross habits
with my net income.” - Errol Flynn
USA TODAY
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
LIFE 5D
PRIME-TIME NIELSEN RATINGS FOR THE WEEK ENDING AUG. 27
NETWORK TOP 20
CABLE TOP 10
BEYOND THE NUMBERS
The Browns and
the Giants do
some pushing
and shoving.
THE NEWS BEHIND THE RATINGS
BY BILL KEVENEY
DAVID RICHARD, AP
‘THRONES’ RULES
Show
Viewers (millions)
1 Game of Thrones (HBO)
12.1
2 President’s Address (Fox News)
5.1
3 Hannity (Fox News) Tue.
4.6
4 Address Analysis (Fox News)
4.4
5 WWE Raw (9pm) (USA)
3.6
* Giants/Browns (ESPN)
3.6
7 WWE Raw (8pm) (USA)
3.4
8 WWE Raw (10pm) (USA)
3.2
9 Rachel Maddow Show (MSNBC) Mon.
3.1
* Hannity (Fox News) Mon.
3.1
Game of Thrones super-size
Season 7 finale Sunday set another series record, 12.1 MILLION
viewers, 13% higher than the
previous record for the HBO hit
set just two weeks ago. With the
Thrones lead-in boost, Ballers
(2.9 MILLION viewers) and
Insecure (1.3 MILLION) also set
new viewer records.
NIELSEN SOCIAL CONTENT
RATINGS
ROSALIND O’CONNOR, NBC
VMUH-OHS
PLAYING TRUMP CARD
MTV’s annual Video Music
Awards spectacular on Sunday
continued to shrink, attracting
2.7 MILLION viewers, down for
the fourth season in a row, including an 18% drop from last
year.
Saturday Night Live’s summer presentation of
Weekend Update, which featured its first appearance
of Alec Baldwin’s President Trump, scored
5.1 MILLION viewers on NBC Thursday (up 6% from
the previous week), the biggest audience of the three
August broadcasts.
Show (Date)
1 Game of Thrones (HBO, Sun.)
2 Video Music Awards (MTV, Sun.)
3 President’s Address (Various, Mon.)
4 Black Girls Rock! (BET, Tue.)
5 WWE Raw (USA, Mon.)
6 WWE SmackDown (USA, Tue.)
7 Big Brother (CBS, Wed.)
8 Premios Tu Mundo (Telemundo, Thur.)
9 Big Brother (CBS, Sun.)
10 Big Brother (CBS, Thur.)
Facebook
Twitter
3,093,000 1,082,000
1,702,000 2,259,000
601,000
557,000
330,000
95,000
253,000
121,000
152,000
88,000
169,000
42,000
176,000
20,000
161,000
27,000
138,000
49,000
Data from week ending Aug. 27; Nielsen Social Content ratings
ranked by interactions on Facebook and Twitter of TV shows (except
sports) on their initial airdates, including posts or tweets as well as likes,
shares and retweets.
SOURCE Nielsen
ERIC MCCANDLESS, ABC
The competition’s hot on Celebrity Family Feud.
Viewers (millions)
1 America’s Got Talent (Tue.) (NBC)
12.6
2 America’s Got Talent (Wed.) (NBC)
10.8
3 49ers/Vikings (NBC)
7.3
4 60 Minutes (CBS)(R)
7.2
5 Big Brother (Sun.) (CBS)
6.3
6 Big Brother (Wed.) (CBS)
6.1
* The Big Bang Theory (CBS)(R)
6.1
8 Big Brother (Thur.) (CBS)
6.0
* Celebrity Family Feud (ABC)
6.0
10 American Ninja Warrior (NBC)
5.5
* NCIS (CBS)(R)
5.5
12 Chiefs/Seahawks (CBS)
5.2
13 SNL Weekend Update (NBC)
5.1
14 NCIS: New Orleans (CBS)(R)
5.0
15 Funniest Home Videos (ABC)(R)
4.9
16 Hollywood Game Night (NBC)
4.8
* Kevin Can Wait (CBS)(R)
4.8
18 Dateline Classic (NBC)(R)
4.6
* Marlon (NBC)
4.6
* The Wall (NBC)
4.6
TONIGHT ON TV
8:00
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
ABC
The Goldbergs
Feud settled.
Speechless
JJ’s romance.
Modern Family
Roaring ‘20s theme.
American
Housewife
Modern Family
The Goldbergs
Renovation re-think. Finding Bill a girl.
Kelly Lawler
CBS
@klawls
USA TODAY
Big Brother Houseguests try to earn
Power of Veto. (N)
Fox
MasterChef Cooks uses Nutella for breakfast dish; Top eight prepare fresh fish
dishes. (N)
Local Programs
NBC
America’s Got Talent A surprise guest
performs. (N)
Earth’s Natural Wonders
Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
A family suffers from a hate crime.
India: Nature’s Wonderland
CRITIC’S CORNER
10:30
11:00
11:30
Local Programs
Jimmy Kimmel Live
Matt LeBlanc.
NETWORK
PBS
CW
ION
Telemundo
Univision
Salvation Grace and Darius question the Criminal Minds Federal employees have Local Programs
president. (N)
heart attacks.
Marlon Being
Marlon Birthday
appreciative. (N)
treat. (N)
NOVA Combating Zeppelins.
Vixen: The Movie Orphan becomes superhero using totem. (2017)
Local Programs
Late Show
Stephen Colbert
Tonight Show
Jimmy Fallon
Charlie Rose (N)
Local Programs
Law & Order Facial scars.
Law & Order Desecration.
Law & Order Mob accountant.
Law & Order Dead journalist.
Jenni Rivera: Mariposa de Barrio (N)
Sin senos sí hay paraíso (N)
El Señor de los Cielos (N)
Al rojo vivo (N)
Titulares y más
Enamorándome de Ramón
Mi marido tiene familia Familia perdida. La tierra prometida Guerra.
Primer (N)
Noticiero Univ. (N)
Wahlburgers
Wahlburgers (N)
Wahlburgers
CABLE
IAN WATSON, USA NETWORK
Mike (Patrick J. Adams) looks
for a lifeline on Suits.
SUITS
USA, 9 ET/PT
The legal drama hits the
100-episode mark tonight in an
appropriately intense plot.
A hundred episodes in, a lot
of things are different for the
characters, but a lot of things are
still the same. Harvey (Gabriel
Macht) and Mike (Patrick J.
Adams) have to find external
help to get through a seemingly
impossible situation. Louis’
(Rick Hoffman) search for a
new associate is interrupted
when he runs into someone he
wasn’t expecting. Donna (Sarah
Rafferty) has her own shocking
proposition to handle.
RICHARD KNAPP, A&E
Rob Lowe and Co. find out
what fear is all about.
THE LOWE FILES
A&E, 10 ET/PT
Rob Lowe and sons John Owen
and Matthew continue their
quest to investigate the weird
and strange, this week exploring
fear. Matthew sits out this week’s
episode to study for law school
exams (happens to the best
paranormal investigators),
so John Owen and Rob visit
Old State Penitentiary in Boise,
where they meet an expert in
the psychology of fear.
A&E
AMC
Animal Planet
BBC America
BET
Bravo
Cartoon
CMT
CNBC
CNN
Comedy
Discovery
Disney
DisXD
DIY
E!
Food
Fox News
Freeform
FX
FXX
GSN
Hallmark
HGTV
History
HLN
ID
IFC
Lifetime
MSNBC
MTV
NatGeo
NatGeo Wild
Nick
OWN
Oxygen
Pop
Science
Spike
Sundance
Syfy
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
Travel
TruTV
TV Land
USA
Velocity
VH1
Viceland
WE
Weather
WGN America
Wahlburgers
Wahlburgers (N)
The Lowe Files An infamous prison. (N)
Armageddon An unruly crew of oil rig workers is trained to destroy a killer asteroid. Bruce Willis, Billy Bob Thornton (1998)
Treehouse Masters: Branched Out Pete is inspired by classic structures.
Wahlburgers
Clash (2010)
Treehouse Masters Adventurous family. Treehouse Masters: Branched Out
A Knight’s Tale A squire pretends to be a knight and contends for the heart of a noblewoman. Heath Ledger (2001)
Boyz n the Hood Three young black males come of age in the mean streets of Los Angeles. (1991)
A Knight’s Tale Heath Ledger (2001)
Martin
Martin
Real Housewives of New York City (N)
Jax & Brittany (N)
Odd Mom Out (N)
Real Housewives of New York City
What Happens
Jax & Brittany
King of the Hill
Cleveland Show
American Dad!
Bob’s Burgers
Family Guy “Star Wars.”
American Dad!
Martin
Bob’s Burgers
Along Came Polly A free-spirited woman tries to liberate a passive man obsessed with safety. Ben Stiller (2004)
Along Came Polly Ben Stiller (2004)
Shark Tank Recruitment clothes.
Shark Tank Stamping kit.
Madoff
Anderson Cooper 360° (N)
Cuomo Prime Time (N)
CNN Tonight with Don Lemon (N)
South Park
South Park
South Park
South Park
South Park
Misfit Garage: Fired Up (N)
Misfit Garage Ford Tudor restored. (N)
Andi Mack
Stuck in the Middle
Raven’s Home
Phineas and Ferb
Parker Plays
Parker Plays
Pool Kings
Pool Kings
Pool Kings
Life of Kylie
Life of Kylie
Broad City
CNN Tonight with Don Lemon (N)
Daily Show (N)
Daily Show
Garage Rehab Grapevine, Texas. (N)
Misfit Garage Ford Tudor restored.
Andi Mack
Liv and Maddie
K.C. Undercover
Bizaardvark
Polaris Player
Waypoint (N)
Waypoint Presents The Attack (N)
The IGN Show (N)
Pool Kings
Pool Kings
Pool Kings
Pool Kings
Pool Kings
Raven’s Home
WAGS Miami Future relative.
WAGS Miami Darnell’s behavior.
E! News (N)
Worst Cooks in America
Worst Cooks in America (N)
Cooks vs. Cons Using hazelnuts. (N)
Cooks vs. Cons Cooking competition.
Tucker Carlson Tonight (N)
The Five (N)
Hannity (N)
Tucker Carlson Tonight
Just Go With It Man with fake wedding ring meets lady, is ashamed of truth, and fakes divorce. Adam Sandler (2011) (8:20)
The 700 Club
Transformers: Age of Extinction Man and daughter make discovery. (2014) (6:30)
Snowfall Business pitfalls.
Snowfall Business pitfalls. (N)
Moneyball The general manager of the Oakland A’s changes how he assembles the team. Brad Pitt, Jonah Hill (2011)
The Maze Runner Dylan O’Brien (2014)
Family Feud
Family Feud
Emogenius
Emogenius
Idiotest (N)
Idiotest
Cash Cab
Cash Cab
Last Man Standing
Last Man Standing
The Middle
The Middle
The Middle
The Middle
The Golden Girls
The Golden Girls
Property Brothers at Home
Property Brothers: Buying & Selling (N) House Hunters (N) International (N)
American Pickers Hidden pickings.
American Pickers Tourist attraction.
American Pickers Frank’s old friend.
American Pickers Restoration picks.
Primetime Justice (N)
Forensic Files
Forensic Files
Forensic Files
Homicide Hunter: Lt. Joe Kenda
Homicide Hunter: Lt. Joe Kenda (N)
Cheech & Chong’s Next Movie (1980)
Billy Madison Millionaire’s lazy son repeats school. Adam Sandler (1995)
Baroness (N)
Little Women (N)
Little Women: LA Making amends. (N)
Growing Up Supermodel (N)
Little Women: LA Making amends.
All in with Chris Hayes (N)
The Rachel Maddow Show (N)
Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell (N) The 11th Hour with Brian Williams (N)
Catfish: The TV Show
Catfish: The TV Show
Catfish: The TV Show (N)
The ‘80s: The Decade That Made Us
Diana: In Her Own Words Never-before-seen recordings of Princess Diana are showcased.
Lion Kingdom Buffalo vs. lions.
Lion Kingdom Elephants vs. lions.
Lion Kingdom Rulebreaker.
Lion Kingdom Buffalo vs. lions.
The Thundermans
Full House
Full House
Friends
Little Women (N)
The Thundermans
Forensic Files
Full House
Forensic Files
Shattered Gruesome discovery. (N)
Full House
Greenleaf Grace is motivated.
Greenleaf Inclusivity sermon. (N)
CSI: Crime Scene Investigation
CSI: Crime Scene Investigation
CSI: Crime Scene Investigation
John Wick Kingpin’s son kills ex-hit man’s pup. Keanu Reeves (2014)
BattleBots 32 team robot fight.
BattleBots 32 team robot fight.
Cops
Cops
Cops
Swedish Dicks
John Wick Kingpin’s son kills ex-hit man’s pup. Keanu Reeves (2014)
Blood Drive (N)
Big Bang Theory
Big Bang Theory
My Baby’s Head Keeps Growing
Swedish Dicks
Cops
Cops
Conjoined Twins: Separation Anxiety
Friends
BattleBots 32 team robot fight.
Transparent Beach wedding.
Death of a Scoundrel A refugee cheats his way to wealth. George Sanders (1956)
Diana
Outrageous Acts of Science (N)
Cops
Big Bang Theory
Undressed (N)
CSI: Crime Scene Investigation
Swedish Dicks
Transparent
Big Bang Theory
Madison (1995)
Black Love Marriage discussion.
Fool’s Gold A beach bum searches for lost treasure. (2008) (7:30)
Big Bang Theory
Cops
Forensic Files
Homicide Hunter: Lt. Joe Kenda
Undressed (N)
Greenleaf Darius gets offer.
Swedish Dicks (N)
Property Brothers A home of their own.
Cops
Transparent
Face Off: Game Face
Full Frontal
Conan Snoop Dogg.
Journey to Italy A struggling couple visits Italy. Ingrid Bergman (1954) (10:15)
The Boy with No Brain
Conjoined Twins: Miracle Separation
The Bourne Supremacy Bourne is framed for murder. Matt Damon (2004)
The Bourne Ultimatum An amnesiac assassin seeks answers. Matt Damon (2007)
Expedition Unknown
Expedition Unknown Sheriff’s gold.
Expedition Unknown Lost treasure.
Inside Jokes
Inside Jokes
Inside Jokes
Inside Jokes (N)
I’m Sorry (N)
I’m Sorry
Inside Jokes
Inside Jokes
M*A*S*H
Loves Raymond
Loves Raymond
Loves Raymond
Younger (N)
Loves Raymond
King of Queens
King of Queens
Expedition Unknown Mythical kingdom.
Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
Suits Outside assistance. (N)
The Sinner Body discovered. (N)
The Auto Firm with Alex Vega
RMD Garage A 1962 bubble-top. (N)
Garage Squad (N) (Season premiere)
The Auto Firm with Alex Vega
Black Ink Crew: Chicago (N)
Signed King Dillon’s move. (N)
Black Ink Crew: Chicago
Love & Hip Hop Hollywood Clique war.
Bong Appétit
Huang’s World Gastronomic capital.
Huang’s World (N) (Season finale)
Desus & Mero (N)
Bong Appétit
How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days Executive and journalist fall in love. Kate Hudson (2003)
Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
Desus & Mero
How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days Kate Hudson (2003)
Why Planes Crash Dangers faced.
Why Planes Crash Automation fails.
John Q Dad tries to save his dying son.
John Q Dad tries to save his dying son. Denzel Washington, Robert Duvall (2002)
Highway Thru Hell Truck’s lumber.
Highway Thru Hell Stuck under semi.
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
MOVIE NETWORKS
BEN MARK HOLZBERG, CBS
Grace (Jennifer Finnigan) and
Darius (Santiago Cabrera) try
to head off catastrophe.
SALVATION
CBS, 9 ET/PT
The situation is only getting
more dire in the summer disaster
series, in which a small group of
people is trying to prevent an
asteroid from taking out the
planet. Grace (Jennifer Finnigan)
and Darius (Santiago Cabrera)
are seeking answers directly
from the president, while Harris
(Ian Anthony Dale) unearths
dangerous secrets.
Cinemax
Scott Pilgrim vs. the World In Toronto, a nerdy bass guitarist is forced to battle a
girl’s seven evil exes. Michael Cera, Mary Elizabeth Winstead (2010)
Rock Star A singer is recruited to replace the lead singer of the Keanu Jordan Peele
famous rock band. Mark Wahlberg (2001) (9:55)
(2016) (11:45)
Encore
Diamonds Are Forever Agent Bond discovers an arch-villain’s plot to destroy
Washington, D.C. Sean Connery, Jill St. John (1971) (7:57)
Outlander Black Jack’s visit brings panic. Outlander Saved Jamie struggles with
PTSD.
FXM
Under the Tuscan Sun A recently divorced woman buys a
Under the Tuscan Sun A recently divorced woman leaves her home in San Francisco and buys a dilapidated
dilapidated villa in Tuscany and finds love. Diane Lane (2003) villa in Tuscany where she finds new friends and romantic adventures. Diane Lane (2003) (9:50)
Hallmark Movies
Flower Shop Mystery: Mum’s the Word
Flower shop owner tracks down driver.
HBO
Minority Report A detective in the year 2054 attempts to countermand destiny after his department’s
crime-prediction technology indicates he will commit a murder. Tom Cruise, Colin Farrell (2002)
Lifetime Movie
The Wrong Student A couple battles with a young girl who becomes obsessed with The Wrong Girl A quiet teenage girl befriends the new girl in school, but her parent’s
her coach. Jessica Morris, Vivica A. Fox (2017)
happiness quickly fades when the new friend disrupts the family’s life. (2015)
Showtime
The Parent Trap Twins conspire to reunite
their parents. Lindsay Lohan (1998)
Starz
Inferno Tom Hanks
(2016) (6:44)
TMC
The Spirit A resurrected cop tries to keep Central City safe
from a diabolical villain. Gabriel Macht (2008)
Flower Shop Mystery: Dearly Depotted A lawyer-turned-flower shop owner
Murder, She Wrote Rhythm and blues
investigates the murder of a wedding crasher. Brooke Shields, Brennan Elliott (2016) legend dies.
Game of Thrones Jon leads party north
to capture wight.
Game of Thrones
Resist Night King.
Whitney: Can I Be Me Raw and uncensored portrait of singer Tiffany Haddish: She Ready! From the Hood to Hollywood!
Whitney Houston is featured. Cissy Houston (2017)
Growing up in foster care.
The Birdcage Dinner with his son’s prospective in-laws creates havoc for a gay father.
Robin Williams, Nathan Lane (1996) (8:47)
Julie & Julia A struggling writer follows the advice of renowned
chef Julia Child. Meryl Streep, Amy Adams (2009) (10:49)
Rampart A police officer named Dave Brown becomes wrapped up in a corruption The Gift Jason
scandal. Woody Harrelson, Ned Beatty (2012) (9:45)
Bateman (2015)
SPORTS NETWORKS
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2017 U.S. Open Tennis Second Round (Live)
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UFC Reloaded UFC 205: Alvarez vs. McGregor
Inside PGA Tour
Quest for Card
The Ultimate Fighter
Golf’s Greatest Rounds Presidents Cup - 1996
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Eastern Time may vary in some cities
(N) New episode.
USA TODAY
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2017
6D LIFE
FLOORING
FALL KICK-OFF SALE!
AUGUST 23 - SEPTEMBER 5
FALL 2017
This Fall Flooring Season,
SAVE UP TO 45%
on the inviting warmth, unique style,
and timeless beauty of
hardwood and wood-look flooring
and transform your
home today.
230+
varieties
Prefinished
Hardwood Flooring from
1.29
$
Save 25%
$ 49
sq ft
1
was
$1.99 sq ft
sq ft
Pioneer Oak
5/16” x 5” Engineered
10 yr wnty | 10040843
Prefinished
Hardwood & Bamboo
ALL ON SALE!
Bellawood Artisan Distressed
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$1.00 OFF
or more on 17 varieties of
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Prefinished
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55+
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1.59
$
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European Style Wide Plank Oak!
$ 99
sq ft
2
3
Save 30%
was
$5.29 sq ft
Amber Brazilian Oak
3/4” x 3-1/4” Solid
100 yr wnty | 10040191
LOWEST PRICE OF THE YEAR!
$ 09
sq ft
3
Save 24%
was
$4.09 sq ft
$3.59 sq ft 50 yr wnty | 10041169
Classic Gunstock Oak
3/4” x 2-1/4” Solid
50 yr wnty | 10024822
Save 35%
$ 39
sq ft
3
was
$5.19 sq ft
Distressed Palm Acacia
3/4” x 4-3/4” Solid
50 yr wnty | 10038036
varieties
1
was
$1.89 sq ft
PROOF
$ 89
sq ft
1
Save 24%
was
$2.49 sq ft
Distressed Shadow
3/8” x 3-7/8”
30 yr wnty | 10041010
$ 89
sq ft
2
Save 12% Distressed Antique Hazel
1/2” x 5”
was
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LOWEST PRICE OF THE YEAR!
$ 49
sq ft
3
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was
Mocha Oak
3/4” x 3-1/4” Solid
$4.59 sq ft 50 yr wnty | 10025929
water Wood-Look
60+
Horizontal Chocolate
3/8” x 3-15/16”
10 yr wnty | 10040759
Save 16%
$ 59
sq ft
OVER $1.00 OFF!
OVER $1.00 OFF!
$ 69
sq ft
Save 17% Vintage French Oak
3/8” x 6-3/8” Engineered
was
Waterproof Floors from
49¢
sq ft
$ 89
sq ft
1
Save 24% Distressed Coppermine
was
$2.49 sq ft
55+
varieties
3/8” x 3-7/8”
30 yr wnty | 10040996
$ 49
sq ft
2
Distressed Honey
Strand 1/2” x 5-1/8”
50 yr wnty | 10039148
Save 14%
was
$2.89 sq ft
North American
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49¢
sq ft
SPECIAL BUY
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¢
sq ft
49
$ 29
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1
$ 49
sq ft
1
Save 45%
was
89¢ sq ft
Save 24%
was
$1.69 sq ft
Save 17%
was
$1.79 sq ft
North Perry Pine
1.5mm Luxury Vinyl
10 yr wnty | 10039533
¢
49
Stormy Gray Oak
3mm Luxury Vinyl
30 yr wnty | 10040980
Save 40%
$ 09
was
sq ft
Summer Wheat Oak
36” x 6” Porcelain Tile
10 yr wnty | 10041378
Save 43%
$ 39
was
sq ft
2
2
$ 99
sq ft
2
Save 19%
was
Port Haven Oak
4mm Click Ceramic Plank
$3.69 sq ft 50 yr wnty | 10042365
$ 99
sq ft
2
36” x 6” Porcelain Tile
$3.49 sq ft 50 yr wnty | 10041540
$4.19 sq ft
Save 24%
$ 49
was
sq ft
2
Iron Gate Oak
Morning Sky Oak
36” x 6” Porcelain Tile
Lifetime wnty | 10041115
Heard County Hickory
12mm Laminate
Lifetime wnty | 10038157
Save 17%
$ 89
was
sq ft
Delaware Bay Driftwood
10mm Laminate
50 yr wnty | 10040492
1
1
$2.49 sq ft
$2.29 sq ft
$ 79
sq ft
1
$ 69
sq ft
2
Save 28% Smith Mountain Laurel
was
10mm Laminate
$2.49 sq ft 30 yr wnty | 10040359
Save 16% Misty Morning Oak
was
14mm Laminate
$3.19 sq ft Lifetime wnty | 10042317
Farmland Hickory
7mm EVP
$3.29 sq ft Lifetime wnty | 10040832
Save 19%
was
Cape Cod Oak
4mm Click Ceramic Plank
$3.69 sq ft 50 yr wnty | 10042357
While supplies last. Product prices & availability are subject to change. See store for details.
24
Save 24%
$ 89
was
sq ft
sq ft
Sandy Beach Oak
7mm Laminate
10043052
Months Promotional
Financing Available*
lumberliquidators.com • 1-800-HARDWOOD
On purchases made with your Lumber Liquidators credit card from August
23 - September 5, 2017 *Subject to credit approval. Minimum monthly
payments required. See store for details.
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