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USA Today August 31 2017

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THURSDAY
THE NATION’S NEWS
E2
Diana still
reigns in
our hearts
20 years after her death,
Princess of Wales keeps
a grip on America
08.31.17
IN LIFE
CHARLES TASNADI, AP
NEWSLINE
DISASTER IN TEXAS
IN NEWS
Flooding
chokes
off 25%
of oil
refining
Trump touts tax
plan in Missouri
President offers few
details on overhaul
Knocking out
missiles might
not be practical
N. Korea has aimed
high, into open seas
IN MONEY
New smartphones
are truly ‘grand’
Major rigs forced to
shut down, pushing
gas prices higher
Latest iPhone could
break $1,000 barrier
IN SPORTS
Nathan Bomey
@NathanBomey
USA TODAY
After NASCAR,
venerable tracks
going strong
Circuits endure despite
lack of Cup races
IN LIFE
NICK OZA, THE ARIZONA REPUBLIC, VIA USA TODAY NETWORK
‘Springsteen on
Broadway’ ticket
frenzy begins
Resellers asking for up
to $6,000 for seats
A patient waits for rescue from a health care facility in Port Arthur, Texas, that was flooded
after Hurricane Harvey. “Our whole city is underwater,” Mayor Derrick Freeman said.
Rain ceases,
misery remains
Waters recede in Houston; Port Arthur still submerged
DEBRA L ROTHENBERG, FILMMAGIC
HOME DELIVERY
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©COPYRIGHT 2017 USA TODAY,
A division of Gannett Co., Inc.
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Working people
159.8 million
Number of people 16 and
older in the nation’s labor
force as of May.
Claire Taylor
and John Bacon
HARVEY COULD BE THE COSTLIEST U.S. DISASTER
USA TODAY Network
Hurricane Harvey’s price tag could run as high as $160 billion,
according to an estimate from weather firm AccuWeather.
HOUSTON Nearly all waterways
in and around the city crested,
and floodwaters slowly receded,
but the region faced an enormous task to emerge from the
devastation of Harvey, which
was downgraded Wednesday
night by the National Hurricane
Center from a tropical storm to
a tropical depression.
The storm made a second
landfall, slamming coastal Louisiana not far from the Texas
border. Although the rain
stopped in Houston, the East
Texas city of Port Arthur was hit
so hard that a shelter was flooded and had to be evacuated.
“Our whole city is underwater right now,” Port Arthur Mayor Derrick Freeman, whose
home was swamped by 3 feet of
water, said in a Facebook post.
The city pleaded for more
boats to help rescue people.
SOURCE Bureau of Labor Statistics
MICHAEL B. SMITH AND PAUL TRAP, USA TODAY
Floodwaters closed oil refineries Wednesday along the Texas Gulf Coast, including the
nation’s largest, as Hurricane
Harvey showed its power to
ravage the energy infrastructure and drive up gasoline
prices.
Fifteen refineries were going
off line from Corpus Cristi to
Port Arthur, Texas, the Energy
Department reported. The list
included the largest refinery in
the USA, the Saudi-owned Motiva plant in Port Arthur, which
began what it called “a controlled shutdown.”
Taken together, the closures
represent about 25% of U.S. refining capacity, GasBuddy.com
petroleum analyst Patrick DeHaan said. “It’s a chilling effect
on the refining industry, which
is in a dire state right now,” DeHaan said.
Just before the Labor Day
holiday weekend, one of the top
travel weekends of the year, DeHaan estimated Wednesday
that gas prices would increase
15 to 25 cents per gallon nationwide as a result of Harvey. Earv STORY CONTINUES ON 4A
$160 BILLION
$49.8
Hurricane
Harvey
Rays of hope
in the darkness
Aug. 2017
Waters start a slow pullback
in Houston; paramedics
battle exhaustion 4-5A
uOur view: We’re seeing
America at its finest 7A
Hurricane
Katrina
Aug. 2005
$24.5
$19.9
$18.9
$14.0
Wall Street’s
response
Market barely blinks,
but the gas pump does 1B
Hurricane
Andrew
Superstorm
Sandy
Aug. 1992
Oct. 2012
Northridge
(Calif.)
earthquake
Hurricane
Ike
Sept. 2008
Jan. 1994
Radio host
does his part
KILT’s John Lopez and his boat
throw the stranded a lifeline
Christine Brennan, 1C
KARL GELLES AND JIM SERGENT, USA TODAY
v STORY CONTINUES ON 4A
1,850 U.S. leaders to Trump: Let them DREAM
Immigration program
is still in limbo
Alan Gomez
@alangomez
USA TODAY
More than 1,850 leaders nationwide from around the country pleaded with President
Trump on Wednesday to preserve an Obama administration
program that protects DREAM-
STATE-BY-STATE 6B
ers from deportation.
Trump is considering ending
the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA.,
created by President Obama. It
has granted deportation protections to nearly 800,000 undocumented immigrants brought to
the country as children.
Eight governors, five state attorneys general, more than 130
mayors, 230 state legislators, and
a slew of faith leaders, judges,
police chiefs and sheriffs signed
onto a statement asking the
president to reconsider.
AMERICA’S MARKETS 4B
JUSTIN LANE, EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY
People mark the fifth anniversary of the Deferred Action
for Childhood Arrivals program this month.
MARKETPLACE TODAY 4D
PUZZLES 4D
The vast majority of the signers are Democrats, including all
the governors and attorneys general. They represent states ranging from California and Oregon
to Minnesota, New York and Virginia. The list includes several
Republicans as well, such as Miami Mayor Tomas Regalado and
Aurora (Colo.) Mayor Steve
Hogan.
In the letter, the group highlights the economic contributions
DREAMers have made to their
communities since the program
was created in 2012. They said
TONIGHT ON TV 5D
the U.S. economy would lose
$460 billion over the next decade
if DACA were terminated. In addition, businesses would incur
$3.4 billion in turnover costs to
replace their DACA employees,
who are given work permits under the program, the letter said.
Most importantly, the signers
stressed the moral obligation of
the United States to protect those
undocumented immigrants, calling an end of the program “senselessly cruel.”
v STORY CONTINUES ON 2A
WEATHER 6A
YOUR SAY 6A
USA TODAY
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
NEWS 2A
E4
Shooting down every missile
might not be practical for U.S.
N. Korea
has been
aiming
high and
into open
seas, not
at USA or
allies
The lofty
trajectories of
recent
North
Korean
launches
may
complicate
efforts to
intercept
the
missiles.
Jim Michaels
@jimmichaels
USA TODAY
A successful U.S. test strike
against an intermediate-range
missile Wednesday raised questions about the feasibility of the
U.S. military intercepting a North
Korean missile test as a means of
deterring the country from provocative launches.
Experts said that may not be a
practical option since most North
Korean missile tests have been
aimed at the open seas, including
a missile launched to fly over Japan on Tuesday. The missile defense systems are designed to
defend U.S. territory or that of an
ally from incoming missiles.
“We don’t have the capability
to shoot down every missile every
time one is launched,” said David
Maxwell, associate director of
Georgetown University’s Center
for Security Studies. “We have no
need to defend the Pacific
Ocean.”
The missile that crossed Japan,
the first such launch, may have
been difficult to intercept. It flew
nearly 1,700 miles and reached an
altitude of 340 miles.
The lofty trajectories of recent
North Korean launches may
complicate efforts to intercept
the missiles, said Ian Williams, an
analyst at the Center for Strategic
and International Studies.
The trajectories are useful for
North Korea to test its missiles’
range without striking foreign
territory. A missile aimed at a real
target would fly on a flatter path.
U.S. and allied radar systems
can quickly determine where a
missile is headed and whether it
poses a threat to populated areas.
The systems can track test
AFP/GETTY IMAGES
launches, but there may not be
interceptors in a position to shoot
down projectiles if they are headed for the open seas.
“Ballistic missiles are easy (for
radar) to see,” Williams said. U.S.
radar systems are very effective at
determining where a missile will
land based on its speed, direction
and other information, he said.
Some analysts said intercepting a North Korean missile test, if
the circumstances allowed it,
could be an effective military response to North Korea, which
consistently has defied sanctions
designed to urge it to abandon its
nuclear weapons program.
“It may be that this is a natural
next step, to do something different,” said Thomas Karako, an
analyst at the Center for Strategic
and International Studies.
Tensions between the United
States and North Korea have
been building in recent weeks.
“The U.S. has been talking to
North Korea
continues to
provoke international
ire with its
incessant
missile
launches.
North Korea, and paying them
extortion money, for 25 years,”
Trump tweeted Wednesday.
“Talking is not the answer!”
North Korea showed no sign of
backing down.
The official Korean Central
News Agency reported Wednesday that the Hwasong-12, the first
missile the nation fired over Japan, was “guided” by leader Kim
Jong Un.
The agency said the launch was
“part of the muscle-flexing” in reaction to military drills by the
United States and South Korea,
“in disregard” for the North Korean regime’s “meaningful and
crucial warning.”
The U.S. Missile Defense Agency said Wednesday it had conducted a successful test in which
a medium-range ballistic missile
was intercepted off the coast of
Hawaii.
The USS John Paul Jones detected and tracked a missile
launched from the Pacific Missile
Range Facility on Kauai with its
onboard radar before intercepting it with SM-6 missiles, the
agency said.
The key components of America’s missile defense arsenal include ground based interceptors
designed to defend the United
States, ship-based Aegis interceptors and the THAAD or Terminal
High Altitude Air Defense
System.
The THAAD system intercepts
missiles as they re-enter the
atmosphere. The Aegis system is
designed to intercept missiles
that are “mid-course” or outside
the Earth’s atmosphere. The
United States has deployed the
THAAD system in South Korea
and has Aegis-equipped ships in
the region. Japan’s self-defense
forces also have ships equipped
with Aegis radar systems.
Revolutionary
gene therapy
approved for
leukemia — at
$475,000 fee
New
approach
harvests
cancer
patients’
immune
cells, but
price tag
is called
excessive
DREAM
program
at risk
v CONTINUED FROM 1A
“Five years ago, we made a
promise to them that they could
continue to stay here and work
towards achieving their American
dreams,” said Washington Gov.
Jay Inslee, a Democrat. “Now
there are national leaders cruelly
threatening to break that promise, a move that would fly in the
face of everything we stand for as
a nation that welcomes those
seeking opportunity for a better
life.
“As governor, I will do everything I can to keep our Dreamers
safe here, at home,” Inslee said.
The DACA program grants
two-year stays for undocumented
immigrants brought to the USA
before their 16th birthday who
have attended school or joined
the military and have not committed any serious crimes. It also
grants them work permits.
The program was created
through a memorandum by the
Department of Homeland Security, which means it can be rescinded without any input from
Congress. The president could
decide to eliminate the program
immediately, or simply stop approving new applications and allow the remaining DACA terms
to expire.
During the presidential campaign, Trump vowed to end the
program, calling it another example of Obama’s abuse of executive
power. After winning the presidential election, Trump changed his
position, expressing sympathy for
the young immigrants and saying
he would treat them with “great
heart.”
Republican leaders in 10 states
have threatened to sue the administration if it doesn’t end the
program by Tuesday.
John Kelly, the president’s
chief of staff and former secretary
of Homeland Security, said such a
lawsuit is likely to prevail, meaning DACA’s days are probably
numbered.
Trump has been vague about
what he will do. “It’s a decision
that I make, and it’s a decision
that’s very, very hard to make,”
Trump said in July.
AT USATODAY.COM
6 A.M.
Princess Diana
Trace her final hours, 20 years
after the day she was killed.
8 A.M.
Liz Szabo
Kaiser Health News
Allure of catfish
The nation’s first sanctioned
gene therapy — approved
Wednesday to fight leukemia that
resists standard therapies — will
cost $475,000 for a one-time
treatment, its manufacturer
announced.
The
Food
and
Drug
Administration approved the
therapy, called Kymriah, in children and young adults with acute
lymphoblastic leukemia whose
disease has come back in spite of
previous treatments. These patients typically have a poor prognosis, surviving three to nine
months, according to Novartis,
which makes the innovative
therapy.
The Switzerland-based company said the drug will cost nothing
if patients fail to benefit in the
first month.
Kymriah treats cancer in an
entirely new way. The individualized approach involves harvesting
cancer patients’ immune cells, genetically engineering them, then
returning them to patients’ bodies. The genetic engineering process aims to rev up patients’
immune systems to better fight
cancer.
“We’re entering a new frontier
in medical innovation with the
ability to reprogram a patient’s
own cells to attack a deadly cancer,” said Scott Gottlieb, the FDA
commissioner. “New technologies such as gene and cell therapies hold out the potential to
transform medicine and create
an inflection point in our ability
to treat and even cure many intractable illnesses.”
Novartis is working with 20
hospitals to provide Kymriah
within a month. Eventually, the
therapy will be offered at 32 sites,
the company said. The first patients could be treated within
days. The company is training
hospitals and staff to provide the
treatment, which can cause a lifethreatening immune reaction, as
well as long-term complications.
Novartis said it priced its drug
Find out why the mud-dwelling
fish is a favorite for anglers.
3 P.M.
NASCAR preview
NOVARTIS, VIA BRENT STIRTON, AP
Brant James breaks down what
to expect at the race.
All times Eastern
“The drug pricing
system in America is
completely broken.
Until policy in this
country changes, the
vicious cycle of
patients struggling
under high drug
prices will continue.”
David Mitchell,
president of Patients for Affordable Drugs
based on several considerations.
British health authorities have
said a price of $649,000 for a onetime treatment would be justified
given
Kymriah’s
significant
benefits.
Novartis also considered the
cost of bone-marrow transplants,
which are given to many leukemia patients whose cancer relapses.
Those transplants can cost up
to $800,000, Novartis said.
An advocacy group called Patients for Affordable Drugs recently met with officials at
Novartis to ask it to set a “fair”
price for the drug, whose early
development was supported by
$200 million in federal research
grants.
David Mitchell, a multiple myeloma patient and president of
the advocacy group, described the
drug’s price tag as “excessive.”
“Novartis should not get credit
for bringing a $475,000 drug to
market and claiming they could
have charged people a lot more,”
he said. “The drug pricing system
in America is completely broken.
Until policy in this country
changes, the vicious cycle of pa-
tients struggling under high drug
prices will continue.”
The FDA also is considering a
CAR T-cell therapy from California-based Kite Pharma. Gilead
Sciences — which has been criticized for the $84,000 price tag of
its hepatitis C drug — announced
Monday that it will buy Kite for
$11.9 billion.
Novartis officials said they will
offer a patient assistance program
to help people with out-of-pocket
costs.
Experts have noted that hidden costs could further add to patients’ financial burdens.
Beyond the cost of the procedure, patients would need to pay
for traditional chemotherapy,
which is given before CAR T-cell
therapy to improve its odds of
success. They would also have to
foot the bill for travel and lodging
to one of the hospitals equipped
to provide the high-tech
treatment.
Because patients can develop
life-threatening side effects
weeks after the procedure, doctors will ask patients to stay within two hours of the hospital for
up to a month.
In New York, even budget hotels cost more than $200 a night
— an expense not typically covered by insurance.
Patients who develop a dangerous complication, in which the
immune system overreacts and
attacks vital organs, might need
coverage for emergency room
care.
Kaiser Health News, a non-profit health
newsroom whose stories appear in
news outlets nationwide, is an editorially independent part of the Kaiser
Family Foundation.
Human
T cells
belonging
to cancer
patients arrive at Novartis Pharmaceuticals’
facility in
Morris
Plains, N.J.
Corrections & Clarifications
USA TODAY is committed
to accuracy. To reach us,
contact Standards Editor
Brent Jones at 800-8727073 or e-mail accuracy@usatoday.com.
Please indicate whether
you’re responding to
content online or in the
newspaper.
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USA TODAY
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
NEWS 3A
E2
Trump pitches tax plan to Mo. voters
President offers
few details on
‘pro-American’
system overhaul
historic route for commerce and
tourism across the American
West.
After a long preamble thanking dignitaries and addressing
the response to Hurricane
Harvey, Trump outlined broad
bullet points for his tax plan:
uMaking the tax code
“simple, fair and easy to understand.” Trump said the average taxpayer shouldn’t need
Gregory Korte
@gregorykorte
USA TODAY
WASHINGTON President Trump
tried to pump energy into his effort to revamp the tax code, enlisting Missouri voters Wednesday to put pressure on their
Democratic senator to pass
what he called “pro-American
tax reform.”
Trump was selling a tax plan
that largely doesn’t exist, and
the few details he gave are the
same that he outlined in a onepage document back in April.
The president flew to Springfield, Mo., to give a speech that
was part policy and part politics,
trying to get momentum on legislation that has been caught in
a congressional traffic jam behind health care, infrastructure
and the budget.
“This is our once-in-a-generation opportunity to deliver real
tax reform to hardworking
Americans,” Trump said. “I
don’t want to be disappointed by
Congress. Do you understand
me?”
“If (Sen. Claire
McCaskill)
doesn’t do it for
you, you have
to vote her out
of office.”
President Trump
JEFF ROBERSON, AP
“This is our once-in-a-generation opportunity to deliver real
tax reform to hardworking Americans,” President Trump tells
an audience Wednesday in Springfield, Mo.
Trump told factory workers
to call Democratic Sen. Claire
McCaskill to urge her to support
Trump’s tax plan.
“If she doesn’t do it for you,
you have to vote her out of office,” he said. The Missouri senator is running for re-election in
2018, and her office didn’t im-
mediately return a request for
comment.
The speech was aimed at middle-class taxpayers — those
whom Trump called “the forgotten people.” The White House
chose the venue for the speech,
a fan and blower company, for
its proximity to Route 66, the
professional help to file a tax return and should be able to file
their taxes on a single page.
uReducing the corporate
tax rate. Cutting the top corporate tax rate from 35% to 15% is
perhaps the toughest sell for
Democrats, but Trump said that
provision would amount to a
pay raise for American workers.
Reducing taxes will make American companies more competitive, leading them to hire more
workers and put pressure on
wages, Trump said.
uMiddle-class tax relief.
Construction
crew discovers
triceratops
skull in Colo.
IN BRIEF
PENTAGON: 11,000 U.S.
TROOPS IN AFGHANISTAN
The Pentagon revised the
number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan on Wednesday, acknowledging that there are 11,000 service
members there, not the 8,400
that had been reported under a
cap imposed by the Obama
administration.
Pentagon spokeswoman Dana
White said the new number was
not an increase but an effort to be
more transparent about troop
numbers.
Under previous rules, the Pentagon did not have to count temporary forces to meet the cap of
8,400 troops set by the Obama
administration. Those mandates
often meant the Pentagon underreported the personnel in
Afghanistan.
Allison Sylte
KUSA-TV, Denver
THORNTON, COLO. A construction crew unearthed a triceratops skeleton and skull Friday.
Paleontologists from the Denver Museum of Nature and Science came to the construction
site Monday to examine the
skeleton.
Joe Sertich, curator of dinosaurs at the Denver Museum of
Nature and Science, said the triceratops skull is one of only
three found in the Front Range
area.
SAUL LOEB, AFP/GETTY IMAGES
From left, Andrew McCabe, Rod Rosenstein, Dan Coats and Michael Rogers testify before the
Senate intelligence panel in June about Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.
Controversial spying
program under review
KUSA-TV
Construction workers dug up
bones from a triceratops dating back 66 million years, a
museum curator says.
Anti-terror law allows
warrantless snooping
on Americans
Erin Kelly
“A lot of times, these will be
plowed up, and they won’t be
recognized,” Sertich said. “We’re
really lucky in this case that it
was recognized as fossils and we
got the call.”
The bones are at least 66 million years old — something a little different from the 10,000- to
12,000-year-old fossils Sertich
said are usually found in the
Denver area.
Construction crews were digging deeper into the building
site than they usually do to build
parking lots and other structures — a depth that allowed
them to get closer to an era
when dinosaurs roamed the
Earth.
“My heart was racing!” Sertich said. “As soon as I uncovered it and realized this was a
horn of a triceratops and not
just another leg bone or part of a
hip, it made the site really
exciting.”
Crews have stopped work in
the area so scientists can expose
the fossil, look for other bones
and then extract them, the city
of Thornton said.
When the fossil is safely removed, the hope is that one day
it will be housed in an exhibit at
the Denver Museum of Nature
and Science.
“As soon as I got onsite, I realized it was a pretty important
dinosaur find, which are pretty
unusual in the Denver area,”
Sertich said.
Trump was less specific on this
provision than he was in April,
when he proposed cutting the
top tax rate from 39.6% to 35%
and reducing the number of
brackets from seven to three.
uBring back overseas corporate profits. This proposal,
known as tax repatriation,
would lower the rate on profits
made overseas in order to encourage companies to bring that
money back to the USA. Trump
said his proposal would recapture a portion of the more than
$3 trillion in such profits held by
U.S. companies offshore.
No sooner had Trump delivered the speech than Democrats
denounced it.
Senate
Minority
Leader
Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., said
Trump’s plan was a “boon for
the rich” cloaked in middleclass populism.
“If the president wants to use
populism to sell his tax plan, he
ought to consider actually putting his money where his mouth
is and putting forward a plan
that puts the middle class, not
the top 1%, first,” he said.
Trump said Wednesday that
his tax plan could actually hurt
wealthy Americans such as himself who can afford an army of
accountants.
“I’m speaking against myself
when I say this,” he said. “It’s
crazy. Maybe we shouldn’t be
doing this, you know? But we’re
doing the right thing. It’s true.”
USA TODAY
WASHINGTON Congress must decide by year’s end whether to
overhaul a controversial surveillance program that collects the
content of Americans’ emails,
phone calls, text messages and
other electronic communication
without a warrant.
“This law is supposed to be a
tool to fight terrorist threats overseas; instead it’s being used as an
end-run around the Constitution,” said Sen. Ron Wyden, DOre., a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee. Wyden
promised to put a hold on any bill
that allows the government to
continue spying on Americans
without a search warrant.
The program, known as Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, was
approved by Congress in 2008 to
increase the government’s ability
to track and foil foreign terrorists
in the wake of the 9/11 attacks.
Section 702 was designed to
spy on foreign citizens living outside the USA, and it specifically
bars the targeting of American
citizens or anyone residing in the
USA. Critics say the program
sweeps up the electronic data of
innocent Americans who may
communicate with foreign nationals, even when those foreigners aren’t suspected of terrorist
activity.
The government calls this “in-
cidental surveillance,” and intelligence officials have refused to tell
Congress how many unknowing
Americans have had their personal data collected.
The law is set to expire at the
end of December, leaving it to
Congress to either renew the program as it is or make changes to
strengthen privacy and constitutional protections. Lawmakers
are not likely to let the law lapse.
who wants to stop the warrantless surveillance of Americans.
“This is not just who you send it
to, but what’s in it.”
Intelligence officials appealed
to lawmakers to renew the program, which they said has helped
stop terrorist plots without violating Americans’ privacy rights.
In one case, the CIA used intelligence gathered under Section
702 to uncover a photograph and
“This law is supposed to be a tool to
fight terrorist threats overseas;
instead it’s being used as an end-run
around the Constitution.”
Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore.
The House Judiciary Committee is working to come up with a
bipartisan bill that would allow
legitimate surveillance of foreigners overseas to continue while
better protecting Americans’ civil
liberties.
Critics say Section 702 is more
dangerous to Americans’ civil liberties than the better-known Section 215 of the Patriot Act, which
Congress voted in 2015 to rein in
after its existence was disclosed
by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.
That program collected phone
record metadata that revealed
whom Americans called, when
the calls were made and how long
they lasted. It did not collect the
content of conversations, but the
Section 702 program does.
“The 702 program is about the
actual data — your conversations,
your photographs, your emails,”
said Rep. Thomas Massie, R-Ky., a
former tech company executive,
software developer and engineer
other details that enabled allies in
an African nation to arrest two
Islamic State militants connected
to planning “a specific and immediate threat against U.S. personnel and interests,” according to
joint testimony before the Senate
Intelligence Committee in June
by National Intelligence Director
Dan Coats, National Security
Agency Director Michael Rogers,
Deputy Attorney General Rod
Rosenstein and acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe.
“To protect privacy and civil
liberties, this program has operated under strict rules and been
carefully overseen by all three
branches of the government,”
Coats testified.
One of the biggest concerns
critics have is that information
collected “incidentally” on U.S.
citizens is stored by the NSA in
databases that the FBI and other
law enforcement agencies can
search to build criminal cases
against Americans.
AFL-CIO HEAD HAS HARSH
WORDS ON WHITE HOUSE
AFL-CIO President Richard
Trumka said Wednesday that it
has been difficult to work with
the White House because the faction that agrees with union leaders on trade “turned out to be
racist” while the other faction is
“Wall Streeters” who care little
about working people.
Trumka, speaking at a news
maker breakfast
hosted by The
Christian Science Monitor,
referred to the
faction led by
former
chief
strategist Steve
Bannon when
he talked about
“racist” advisers Trumka USA TODAY
who agree with
unions that trade deals are hurting workers.
Bannon and counterterrorism
adviser Sebastian Gorka left the
White House this month amid
criticism of what some said was
their support of white nationalist
groups. Both returned to Breitbart News.
TEXAS OPEN-CARRY SWORD
LAW TAKES EFFECT FRIDAY
Starting Friday, Texans will be
legally allowed to carry blades
longer than 51⁄2 inches in most —
but not all — public places.
That includes openly carrying
the famous Jim Bowie knife, as
well as daggers, dirks, throwing
knives, stilettos, poniards, swords,
machetes and spears.
An open-carry measure, HB
1935, was introduced this year by
Texas House Rep. John Frullo, a
Republican, but it met resistance
after a student was killed and
three wounded at the University
of Texas-Austin by an attacker
wielding a hunting knife.
As a compromise, HB 1935 was
passed by changing the definition
of “illegal knife” to “location-restricted” knife.
Staff and wire reports
4A NEWS
DISASTER IN TEXAS
E2
USA TODAY
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
MARK RALSTON, AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Traffic goes around flooding on the I-10 freeway Wednesday in Houston. The waters were receding, but Buffalo Bayou could stay at flood stage for weeks.
‘Houston is catching a break’
Dry spell forecast,
but city is sopping
Doyle Rice
@usatodayweather
USA TODAY
The news about Houston’s waterways is mostly good: The water
levels of many of the region’s
rain-swollen bayous, rivers and
creeks have crested and were
dropping as of Wednesday afternoon after catastrophic flooding
from Harvey.
Most of the area waterways
should drop below flood stage by
the weekend, said Gregory Wel-
lers, a hydrologist at the West
Gulf River Forecast Center in
Fort Worth.
“Houston is catching a break,”
Wellers said. The forecast was for
prolonged dry weather.
A quick review of the Houston
area’s flood gauges Wednesday afternoon found that most were
dropping.
However, the city’s main waterway, the Buffalo Bayou, which
stretches through the downtown
area, could stay at flood stage for
weeks, perhaps longer, Wellers
said. Two of the city’s reservoirs
— the Addicks and Barker Reservoirs — are full and will slowly
have to be drained into the Buffalo Bayou over the next several
weeks, he said.
“Higher-than-normal
controlled releases will continue
from the reservoirs into Buffalo
Bayou as the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers works to lower water
levels in both flood control facilities in west Harris County,” the
Harris County Flood Control District said in a statement. Reservoir releases are a common
post-storm step, the district said.
When it comes to flooding in
Houston, though, Hurricane Harvey was unique: “You can’t compare it to any other storm,”
Waller said of Harvey’s floods.
“The recovery process though,
once that starts, we’re talking
years,” he said.
Contributing: WFAA-TV, Dallas
WIN MCNAMEE, GETTY IMAGES
Residents return to their homes in Houston as floodwaters
begin to retreat. The city will get a chance to dry out a little.
People
use more
fuel than
rigs pump
Tiffaany
Duron, her
daughter
Emma
Sledge, 3, and
their dog
Daisy are
among the
thousands
of flooding
victims who
took shelter
at the George
R. Brown
Convention
Center in
Houston.
v CONTINUED FROM 1A
lier, he had predicted a boost of 5
to 15 cents.
The nationwide average as of
Wednesday morning was $2.40 a
gallon, up from $2.34 a week ago,
according to AAA.
Refinery outages include facilities run by Exxon Mobil, Citgo,
Petrobras, Flint Hills, Magellan,
Buckeye, Shell, Phillips 66 and
Valero Energy, according to the
U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s
Global Energy Institute.
Consequently, Americans are
using about 9.7 million barrels
per day of gasoline, while refineries are pumping out fewer than 8
million, DeHaan said.
“Gasoline inventories are going
to be chiseled away quickly if that
continues,” DeHaan said.
Sen. Ed Markey, D-Mass.,
urged President Trump to release
supplies from the nation’s Strategic Petroleum Reserve to ease the
impact on consumers.
But the nation had nearly 230
million barrels of gasoline inventory on hand as of Friday, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, so “we’re
not running out of gas anytime
soon by any means,” AAA’s Jeanette Casselano said.
Still, the refinery outages and
the closure of several ports have
disrupted the supply of fresh fuel
to stations in the Texas Gulf
Coast and other regions.
The Motiva operation alone
generates about 635,000 barrels
per day in normal times, according to the Oil Price Information
Service.
“Return to service is contingent upon recession of floodwaters in the area,” Motiva
spokesperson Angela Goodwin
said in a statement. “Our priority
remains the safety of our employees and the community.”
The plant was running at 60%
capacity as of Tuesday afternoon
and 40% on Tuesday evening.
LEE CELANO, USA TODAY NETWORK
Harvey’s a ‘1,000-year storm’
v CONTINUED FROM 1A
The hardships from Harvey are
far from over. The storm, which
hit the Texas coast Friday as a
strong hurricane, was forecast to
drop up to 10 inches of rain on
Louisiana before moving on to
Arkansas, Tennessee and parts of
Missouri. Forecasters warned of
possible tornadoes across a wide
swath of the Southeast as Harvey
rolled inland.
“We are working with the state
of Louisiana as the storm moves
through their state,” Elaine Duke,
acting secretary of Homeland Security, said in Washington.
She warned that despite receding waters in Houston, “catastrophic flooding is likely to
persist days after the rain stops.”
The confirmed death toll was
in double digits, including six
family members whose bodies
were found Wednesday in a van
that disappeared in high water
three days earlier.
“We are sad to confirm we have
retrieved six victims from a van
that was submerged in Greens
Bayou,” the Harris County Sheriff’s Office tweeted.
Authorities were concerned
that more bodies would be found
as the water recedes.
AccuWeather estimated Harvey’s cost at $160 billion, which
would make it the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history. AccuWeather President Joel Myers
called Harvey a “1,000-year
storm” and said parts of Houston
will be uninhabitable for weeks or
months.
Some areas near Houston received more than 50 inches of
rain, more than the level usually
seen in a year. The storm was not
likely to bring such devastating
flooding to Louisiana and other
states, but flash flooding could occur, AccuWeather reported.
Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator
Brock Long said more than
30,000 people took refuge in
more than 200 shelters, large and
small, in Texas. About 1,800 evacuees were moved to hotels and
other longer-term housing options, he said.
In
Houston,
authorities
opened two more mega-shelters
— the arena that houses the
NBA’s Rockets and the stadium
home of the NFL’s Texans — after
the convention center was packed
with almost 9,000 evacuees.
Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner imposed a midnight-to-5 a.m.
curfew aimed at ensuring that va-
cant homes and streets would be
safe. Turner and Police Chief Art
Acevedo warned that looters
would be prosecuted to the fullest
extent of the law.
“People were very cooperative
last night,” Turner said Wednesday. “The curfew will remain in
effect until we get past the situation we are in.”
Tiffany Duron wasn’t convinced. The East Houston resident packed her things and was
eager to leave the convention
center Wednesday, even though
floodwaters had reached her roof
line when she and her family fled
for the shelter two days earlier.
“They were already breaking
into my neighbors’ ” homes, she
said, adding that the looters “are
making it worse for everybody.”
More than 13,000 people have
been rescued from flooded homes.
Gov. Greg Abbott said an additional 10,000 National Guard
troops from across the nation
would join the 14,000 deployed in
the region to provide security and
aid in rescue efforts.
Taylor reports for The (Lafayette, La.)
Daily Advertiser; Bacon for USA
TODAY from McLean, Va. Contributing: Doyle Rice, Rick Jervis, Bart
Jansen and Jane Onyanga-Omara,
USA TODAY
Threat of
Irma comes
on heels
of Harvey
Doyle Rice
@usatodayweather
USA TODAY
For a nation reeling from
the devastation of Hurricane
Harvey, more unwelcome
news came Wednesday: Another possible threat was
brewing.
Tropical Storm Irma
formed in the central Atlantic Ocean, the National Hurricane Center said, but it’s
too early to know its track.
As of 5 p.m. ET, Irma had
60-mph winds. It was about
2,000 miles east of the Leeward Islands and about
3,000 miles southeast of Miami.
The storm was forecast to
strengthen into a hurricane
Thursday or Friday, driving
winds of about 75 mph. A
tropical storm becomes a
hurricane when its sustained winds reach 74 mph.
Irma will take about a
week to make its trek west
across the Atlantic Ocean,
AccuWeather said.
WeatherBell meteorologist Ryan Maue said Irma
will probably become an intense hurricane of Category
4 or 5 strength, near the
Leeward Islands of the Caribbean. A Category 4 storm
has winds of at least 130
mph.
“It is way too soon to say
with certainty where and if
this system will impact the
U.S.,” AccuWeather hurricane expert Dan Kottlowski
said. Possibilities range from
a landfall on the Leeward Islands to the Carolinas to
Bermuda, he said.
Another storm could spin
up in the Gulf of Mexico by
the weekend and could bring
more rain to the Texas and
Louisiana coasts.
USA TODAY
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
NEWS 5A
DISASTER IN TEXAS
Far from Houston, monsoons ‘If you
called,
cause havoc across nations
we are
More than 1,000
people die in India,
Bangladesh, Nepal
coming’
Deluged Port Arthur
struggles to cope
Siddhant Mohan
and Prashun Mazumdar
Special for USA TODAY
John Bacon and Jason Pohl
Heavy rains paralyzed India, Bangladesh and Nepal
for the second day Wednesday as
the worst monsoon in years has
caused more 1,000 deaths.
In the western Indian city of
Mumbai, many of its 20 million
residents waded through waisthigh water trying to get home
from work after being stuck overnight. Buses and trains were halted as roads became impassable.
India is used to regular flooding during monsoon season from
June to September, especially in
Mumbai, where millions live in
shantytowns that have poor
drainage. This year’s floods are
unusually severe. Rain was forecast to continue through the
week.
Shikha Joshi, 32, a banker in
Mumbai, had to spend the night
inside a train that was trapped
because the railway tracks were
underwater.
“No one could move anywhere,
so it was better to sit and let the
time pass,” said Joshi, who fretted
about her 12-year-old brother left
home alone — until neighbors
went to look after him.
Shivam Arora, 43, a trader in
Mumbai, was luckier.
“I have taken the local train to
work every day for the past 17
years and never have I seen the
network be so adversely affected.
It was a complete breakdown of
the system,” he said.
“Trains were canceled, stations
were closed, places (to take shelter) were jammed, and the situation on the roads was
catastrophic,” he said. “Thankfully, my Facebook feed was filled
with people offering their homes
as shelters. And I had to crash at
my friend’s place.”
Schools were shut, and offices
closed early or remained shuttered as the city experienced
power outages. People opened
their doors to stranded residents
and some took to the streets to
distribute water and food.
USA TODAY Network
NEW DELHI
RAJANISH KAKADE, AP
People walk through a flooded train station during heavy rains in Mumbai, India, on Tuesday.
“Trains were canceled, stations were
closed, places (to take shelter) were
jammed, and the situation on the
roads was catastrophic.”
Shivam Arora, a trader in Mumbai
The staggering number of
deaths in India and its neighbors
occurred when the rains triggered landslides and destroyed
thousands of houses, schools,
hospitals and farmland, the United Nations said this week.
Over the past two days, Indian
officials said at least five people,
including two children, died because of the flooding in and
around Mumbai. In the state of
Bihar in eastern India — one of
the worst areas affected — at least
400 have died.
Mahesh Yadav, 42, a farmer
from the Araria district of Bihar,
had to flee from his home as the
nearby Koshi River rose.
“I took my family and few canisters of grains and beans on a
boat before fleeing the house.
Now, one cannot see my house
anywhere. It has gone well under
the water,” he said after taking
refuge with his wife and two children in a makeshift shelter with
about 200 other families.
“It is difficult to feed children
even after successfully fleeing the
flood,” said his wife, Aarti Devi,
38. “Every other person is fighting for food.”
In other parts of India, especially remote villages, rescue
workers struggled to get to people
left homeless or injured, but the
rain delayed the work.
Sunder Kumar, 53, a construction worker from the village of
Valmiki Nagar in the state of Bihar, said in a phone call that he
was worried.
“We are living in a temporary
shelter, which is just a few feet
from the floodwater. The situation will get worse if the water
rises,” he said. “Relief and rescue
teams do not know this location,
as it is far from their reach.”
Flooding hit King Edward Memorial Hospital in Mumbai and
other medical centers. Wards
were closed and supplies delayed
as officials struggled to keep the
dirty water out of the facility.
Bilal Bhat, 37, who runs a small
shop in Srinagar, tried to get his
son to a doctor. “My son is sick
for the last seven days, and the
flood has crippled us to move
anywhere,” he said. “Now I have
to hire a boat to take my son to
the hospital.”
The forecast for more rain was
terrible news for Mohammad
Faizan, 33, a small-goods trader
who had to flee his house in Uttar
Pradesh’s Bahraich district after
the area started filling with
floodwater.
“I could not take anything with
me,” he said. “I left my family at
their grandfather’s home. I am
living on the roof of my house,
which is the only part left unsubmerged, waiting for the water to
pass.”
Poonam Kumari, 32, used to
run a small clothing boutique at
her house in Kishanganj in Bihar,
but she lost her sewing machine
in the flood. She’s not sure how
she will recover her business,
much less manage the next few
days.
“My 8-year-old son is suffering
from a stomach infection. ... All I
can wish for is the floodwater to
go down very soon,” she said.
Mohan reported from Varanasi, India.
Residents of Port Arthur posted urgent pleas for rescue on
social media Wednesday as the
Texas city struggled to function
after days of hammering rains
from Tropical Storm Harvey that
forced the nation’s largest oil
refinery to close.
The city was slammed by more
than 2 feet of rain over 24 hour,
which flooded the civic center
that had been serving as a shelter
for more than 100 evacuees. A
community center then was set
up to house people.
“Our whole city is underwater
right now but we are coming!”
Mayor Derrick Freeman, whose
own home was swamped in 3 feet
of water, said in a Facebook post.
“If you called, we are coming.
Please get to higher ground.”
Freeman sounded a common
theme across the region, imploring volunteers with boats to help.
“We need it,” he said.
Water flowed like rivers in
streets. At the Gulf Health nursing home, about a dozen boats
were lined up outside in chestdeep water. Emergency crews,
along with fisherman and volunteers, worked to remove residents, many of whom were
bedridden and in wheelchairs.
Video showed some residents in
their beds, the water up to their
mattresses.
Rescue efforts at one point
were slowed by an apartment fire
that forced first-responders to
evacuate residents of the complex. Lightning also delayed the
operation, Freeman said.
Freeman said the Coast Guard
has helicopters and boats deployed around the city and the
National Guard is operating out
of the local Walmart parking lot.
“Continue to call 911 if you are
unsafe,” Freeman said in a Facebook post Wednesday afternoon.
“We’re coming y’all.”
For paramedics,
Even state’s sturdy bridges
erode in rushing floodwaters 92 non-stop hours
on the front lines
Despite excellent
maintenance record,
spans crumble
They’re a lifeline for
the most vulnerable
Bart Jansen
@ganjansen
USA TODAY
Kris Wartelle
USA TODAY Network
Texas is one of the best states
in the country for maintaining its
outsize share of bridges, but rain
and flooding in the wake of Hurricane Harvey have begun toppling them and undermining
roads around Houston.
The Woodforest Boulevard
bridge across Greens Bayou collapsed, according to the Harris
County Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Management.
Two portions of Garrett Street
collapsed, Sheriff Ed Gonzalez
said. A chunk of State Highway
316 washed away south of Houston, according to the state Department of Transportation.
The problem: Moving floodwaters gnaw away at the foundation of bridges and roadways in a
process engineers call scouring.
As the foundation erodes, columns supporting bridges collapse
or roads simply wash away.
“If a bridge isn’t on piles, if it’s
just sitting on soil or rock, the
fast-moving water can eat away at
the supporting foundation and
actually cause it to tip over,” said
Andy Herrmann, a past president
of the American Society of Civil
Engineers and a 40-year consulting engineer in New York City.
In the same way, scrubbing
away the gravel foundation of a
road undermines the concrete or
asphalt pavement. “Once you
wash away that foundation, you
can get scour holes, sinking of the
roadway itself,” Herrmann said.
BAYTOWN,
RICK JERVIS, USA TODAY
FM 762 near Rosenberg, Texas, washed out Saturday as rain
from Hurricane Harvey flooded the state.
More destruction is likely as
flooding will probably continue
for days.
Harvey is projected to be the
most damaging hurricane in history, dropping more than 50
inches of rain on Houston. Early
estimates tally $160 billion in
damage.
Even as the storm moves
northeast from Texas to Louisiana, emergency officials warned
that flooding is expected to linger
in Houston.
Texas has a larger-than-average share of bridges: 53,488 out of
the country’s 614,387. The state
takes above-average care of them,
according to a review by the
American Society of Civil Engineers: Only 900, or 1.7%, are rated structurally deficient by
federal inspectors. For comparison, 9% of bridges nationwide are
rated deficient.
“Texas has been taking care of
their bridges,” Herrmann said.
A catastrophic example of
what rain can do to a bridge came
April 5, 1987, when an Interstate
90 bridge that was part of the
New York State Thruway col-
lapsed into Schoharie Creek during flooding from spring storms.
Ten people died as four cars
and a tractor-trailer plunged 80
feet into the swollen creek. The
National Transportation Safety
Board ruled that the thruway authority failed to maintain adequate support around the bridge
piers, which allowed severe erosion around the column footings.
The same threat follows in the
wake of Harvey.
Bridges are often supported by
concrete footings, which typically
sit on soil or rock beneath the river. The footings serve as the foundation for columns, which
shoulder the beams that hold the
roadway above.
“But that fast-moving water
can start eating down to the footing,” Herrmann said. “Once it
gets underneath the footing,
that’s when you have problems.”
Another threat to bridges is
getting forced off their foundations. If water rises taller than the
bridge, the deluge and debris
such as trees could dam the flow
and weigh against the concrete
deck, Herrmann said.
TEXAS
Paramedics
Will Roberts and Isolde Cabanas
have been on duty for 92 hours
straight, living through the nightmare left by Hurricane Harvey.
Both work for Acadian Ambulance, a private company that operates in 34 Louisiana parishes
and in 37 counties in Texas. Acadian responders such as Roberts
and Cabanas are on the front
lines, saving the most vulnerable
of disaster victims.
The job has taken a toll. “I have
blisters all over my feet from not
changing my boots for two days,”
Cabanas said. “My feet were always wet, and as soon as they’d
dry, we had to get back into high
water again.”
Rogers said the two have been
answering non-stop emergency
calls, responding to patients in
renal failure unable to get dialysis, to head injuries and cardiac
arrests.
“There have been a lot of slip
and falls also,” Roberts said. “Especially the elderly. They are
trapped in doors and have to fend
for themselves, no one to care for
them, and that’s what happens. “
Cabanas, 28, who lives in Pasadena, has been a paramedic for
seven years. Since Harvey hit, she
has gotten plenty of experience
with high-water response. On
one call, she evacuated a patient
from a flooded neighborhood on
Pasadena’s north side by ambulance. When water got too high
for the ambulance, the patient
was transferred to a dump truck,
and, finally, to a boat before
reaching a hospital.
“All you’re concerned about is
the patient and getting them
what they need,” she said. “Afterward, adrenaline goes down, and
it gets emotional. I really didn’t
get tired until yesterday. … I went
in one of the rooms and crashed
for four hours.”
Finn Brouillet and Jaime Larrea are fresh off a 36-hour shift.
The two-man crew has been
fielding emergency calls the entire time, responding to everything from patients having
seizures to traumatic injuries.
But Brouillet and Larrea considered themselves lucky. “The
“All you’re concerned
about is the patient
and getting them
what they need.
Afterward,
adrenaline goes
down, and it gets
emotional. ”
Paramedic Isolde Cabanas
crew we relieved had been out for
four or five days, “ Brouillet said.
In Pasadena, more than 30
calls were lined up, he said. Emergency operators had to triage
calls. Patients in dialysis had nowhere to go. Hospitals in Pasadena were closed.
Acadian Operations Supervisor
Jordan Wells said a typical shift
in Pasadena involves an average
of 14 emergency calls.
These days are not typical, he
said: “Shifts like that mean no
downtime or sleep or rest.”
USA TODAY
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
6A NEWS
YOUR SAY
Tracking the nation’s conversation
HISTORY
Making the case for
Confederate statues
LETTERS
LETTERS@USATODAY.COM
FACEBOOK
FACEBOOK.COM/
USATODAYOPINION
TAKING DOWN HISTORY
Do you support removing
Confederate statues from
public spaces around the
country?
As a longtime
advocate and supporter
of equal rights for all, I find
myself in what may seem to be
an ironic position. There has
been a rise recently in demands to take down the statues that appear to praise the
Confederacy. I am opposed to
that for three main reasons:
uFirst, I agree with philosopher George Santayana:
“Those who cannot remember
the past are condemned to
repeat it.”
uSecond, it does a disservice to those who suffered
under the harsh life of slavery
in the Confederacy to wipe out
that part of our history.
uThird, it sets a destructive
precedent.
Instead, it seems it would be
good to erect a noticeable,
prominent piece in the same
area as the existing statues.
This new piece could be abstract in nature or a statue of
specific civil rights advocates.
Also, adding an informative
plaque regarding the period of
history depicted could bring to
light some of the injustices
suffered and some of the opposition campaigns that occurred. This approach has
evidently succeeded in Richmond, Va., along their Monument Avenue.
Such an alternative would
recognize the past, both flaws
and challenges, educate viewers and pay tribute to deserving historic figures of our
nation.
The Jim Crow era is a stain on
our history. It was a means of pushing the slavery agenda. Take every
Confederate statue down that
was erected during and after the
Jim Crow era. Leave the rest standing. If you really care about these
statues, you can support putting
them in museums.
Support
39%
Oppose
50%
DAVID FITZSIMMONS, THE ARIZONA STAR, POLITICALCARTOONS.COM
Osteen, that wasn’t
very Christian of you
Mike Gleason
Don’t know
Sad day in America when historical statues that have been here
for years are being destroyed
because of the politically correct
left.
10%
ing. Why would he want his
church members to be caught in
the flood?
FACEBOOK
FACEBOOK.COM/
USATODAYOPINION
Charity Smith
Gene Washer
This line I saw said it all: There is
nothing great about two men who
committed treason against the
United States to fight to keep the
institution of slavery intact.
Racists can complain about
tearing Confederate statues
down as much as they want. As
soon as they do it, they expose
themselves.
SOURCE Quinnipiac University Poll conducted
Aug. 17-22 of 1,514 registered voters. Margin of
error is ±3.1 percentage points.
JANET LOEHRKE, USA TODAY
TWITTER
@USATOPINION
Our readers shared their
thoughts on Charlottesville,
Va., covering Confederate
statues in black fabric.
The left needs to grow a spine
and learn coping skills. How
they function in the real world
with adversity is a scary thought.
This stain removal is the best
response to white supremacists all
over the country. They achieved
the exact opposite of what they
wanted with their demonstrations.
Good job, America!
@UncleSam2k17
Daniel Hernandez
@mrpatrickrhodes
For more, follow @USATOpinion
or #tellusatoday.
Just admit you handled the
situation poorly, apologize for
that and move on, fella.
Tracy Nickerson
As a Christian, I feel those
church doors should have been
the first to open, whether prepared or not. To turn away helpless people in a desperate time
does not represent the God I
serve. I will pray for you, Pastor
Osteen, as well as all of those
you turned away.
Osteen does not represent all
Christians, just those in his flock.
I didn’t know Osteen had the
only church in Houston. Ask the
people who were affected by
Hurricane Katrina how comfortable those Superdome seats
were while they slept sitting up.
Osteen’s church did experience
flooding, but when his message
on Twitter sending prayers for
those affected by the hurricane
went out on Sunday, it was
mainly telling the thousands of
people who usually show up for
Sunday morning service not to
show up because of the flood-
What has your experience
with law enforcement been?
Submit videos or photos at
policing.usatoday.com. Send
your comments on Twitter
using #policingtheusa or
email letters@usatoday.com.
Let’s make America love again.
Steve Patterson
Glenn J. Heller
POLICING THE USA
POLICING.USATODAY.COM
@GFAqua
Just keep your feet off the fine
furniture, keep your kids quiet,
no eating on the sofas, stay out
of the offices, and no washing
your clothes in the bathrooms.
Can you just sit there and stare
out into the air?
It was not safe! I mean, can
you imagine how much it would
have cost to replace the carpeting from all those dirty, wet
people?! That cuts into the budget! And big homes don’t buy
themselves!
Massimo Marino
These icons cause deep grieving pain for many of our brothers and sisters, emphatetically
consider that.
Katherine Conover
Tucson
Pastor Joel Osteen opened his
Houston megachurch to flood
victims Tuesday after social
media critics slammed the
televangelist for not offering to
house people in need.
Billie J. Segars
Careful not to trip while you’re
backpedaling so furiously, sir.
Matthew Farmer
Have Your Say at letters@usatoday.com, facebook.com/usatodayopinion and @USATOpinion on Twitter. All comments are edited for length and clarity. Content submitted to USA
TODAY may appear in print, digital or other forms. For letters, include name, address and phone number. Letters may be mailed to 7950 Jones Branch Drive, McLean, VA, 22108.
TO COMMENT
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USATODAY.COM
TODAY’S HIGH TEMPERATURES
FRONT & CENTER
YESTERDAY’S EXTREMES
HOTTEST: 113°
Needles, Calif.
Record heat
is possible
over the next
few days in
the West.
PRECIPITATION FORECAST
COLDEST: 34°
Leadville, Colo.
Note: For contiguous
48 states through
4 p.m. ET yesterday
Seattle
Olympia
79
77
82
85
85
Burns
On this date in 1954, Hurricane
Carol smashed into Long Island
and New England.
67
Sacramento
103
San Francisco
85
94
91
Carson City
Salt Lake City
90
St. George
Las Vegas
Palm Springs
98
112
78
San Diego
86
81
85
66
57
Juneau
56
87
85
89
Austin
89
91
San Antonio
92
Jackson
81
79
90
84
84
Richmond
83
Raleigh
78
Columbia
88
88
Charleston
90
86
89
92
Tampa
87
93
Miami
San Juan
SOURCE AccuWeather
DOYLE RICE AND KARL GELLES
@USATODAYWEATHER
Below 10
10s
20s
30s
40s
50s
60s
93
89
96
70s
FRIDAY
88
Savannah
Jacksonville
Tallahassee
Puerto Rico
Brownsville
TODAY
82
81
Atlanta
Mobile
New
Orleans
81
81
81
Baton Rouge
Houston
Philadelphia
Charleston
Montgomery
Shreveport
Harrisburg
Washington Annapolis
79
79
83
78
83
Charlotte
Nashville
80
New York
75
77
Little Rock Birmingham
Dallas
MidlandOdessa
82
77
Tulsa
84
Honolulu
Cincinnati
81
Memphis
Lubbock
88
81
81 82
86
Oklahoma
City
90
79
Hartford
73
Pittsburgh
Columbus
Jefferson City St. Louis Louisville
Knoxville
Wichita
87
89
Chicago
72
82
73
70
73
Boston
80
Albany
Cleveland
Lansing
82
84
85
Hawaii
71
64
66
Detroit
73 72
68
Montpelier
Buffalo
Kansas City Springfield
Indianapolis
Topeka
El Paso
Anchorage
Ice/mix
Augusta
Burlington
Grand
Milwaukee Rapids
81
Omaha
109
Fairbanks
Snow
75
69
Madison
Des Moines
Cheyenne
Albuquerque
Phoenix
86
Alaska
74
Sioux Falls
North Platte
Santa Fe
Flagstaff
59
81
Dodge City
Los Angeles
65
89
89
78
Marquette
Pierre
Denver
Aspen
96
102
105
Casper
82
Duluth
Mpls-St. Paul
79
89
77
91
Fresno
39 mph.
87
Elko
Fargo
Rapid City
Idaho Falls Jackson
Hole
Reno
80
AT WHAT WIND SPEED IS A
TROPICAL STORM NAMED?
Billings
87
Eureka
87
91
90
91
Bismarck
Miles City
Helena
Boise
Bend
Rain
Bangor
Spokane
82
Portland
Salem
T-storms
80s
90s
100s
110+
Forecasts and
SATURDAY
graphics provided
by AccuWeather Inc.
©2017
TOP TRAVEL CITIES Air quality index (AQI)
BALTIMORE
ATLANTA
THU
T-storm
81/72
Partly
sunny
84/59
THU
BOSTON
THU
CHARLOTTE
Warmer
80/54
T-storms
79/70
THU
CHICAGO
THU
FRI
T-storm
82/64
FRI
Cooler
68/56
FRI
Cooler
68/52
FRI
T-storms
81/68
FRI
SAT
Partly
sunny
82/64
SAT
Rain
67/62
SAT
Partly
sunny
70/57
SAT
Shower,
t-storm
83/64
SAT
AQI Good
AQI Good
THU
T-shower
93/80
THU
FRI
T-storm
90/79
FRI
SAT
Showers
90/79
SAT
Partly
sunny
74/53
Partly
sunny
74/61
T-storm
81/62
AQI Good
AQI Good
c Cloudy
AQI Good
MPLS-ST. PAUL
MIAMI
f Fog
i Ice
r Rain
AQI Good
NEW ORLEANS
THU
Partly
sunny
83/56
THU
FRI
T-storm
87/73
FRI
Cooler
69/58
FRI
SAT
Stray
t-storm
88/74
SAT
A little
rain
70/62
SAT
U.S. CITIES
TODAY
FRI
Akron, Ohio
Albany, N.Y.
Albuquerque
Allentown, Pa.
Amarillo, Texas
Anaheim, Calif.
Anchorage, Alaska
Aspen, Colo.
Atlantic City, N.J.
Augusta, Ga.
Austin, Texas
Bakersfield, Calif.
Baton Rouge, La.
Billings, Mont.
Birmingham, Ala.
Bismarck, N.D.
Boise, Idaho
Buffalo, N.Y.
Burlington, Vt.
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
Charleston, S.C.
Charleston, W.Va.
Cheyenne, Wyo.
76/51c
73/45sh
89/64s
82/50pc
83/57s
101/74s
57/48r
78/47t
82/59pc
90/73pc
91/67s
106/80s
81/70t
87/60pc
83/71t
87/66pc
91/59s
66/47pc
69/46sh
72/49pc
88/75t
81/63c
81/57t
70/55c
65/44s
89/62pc
69/52pc
87/64pc
99/74s
56/47sh
77/44pc
71/58pc
90/72t
92/68pc
109/82pc
87/69t
88/60s
80/64t
87/55s
93/63s
64/47s
63/45c
72/45pc
88/75t
73/61r
82/54s
sn Snow
AQI Good
w Windy
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Colorado Springs
Columbia, S.C.
Columbus, Ohio
Corpus Christi, Texas
Dayton, Ohio
Daytona Beach, Fla.
Des Moines, Iowa
Duluth, Minn.
Durham, N.C.
El Paso, Texas
Fairbanks, Alaska
Flagstaff, Ariz.
Fargo, N.D.
Fort Myers, Fla.
Fort Smith, Ark.
Fort Wayne, Ind.
Fresno, Calif.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
Green Bay, Wis.
Greensboro, N.C.
Greenville, S.C.
Harrisburg, Pa.
dr Drizzle
TODAY
81/60c
73/54pc
83/57pc
88/73c
79/57c
95/72s
79/55c
91/77pc
81/58pc
65/47s
77/69t
90/65s
66/43pc
78/53pc
79/61s
92/77t
86/65c
73/52pc
105/75s
73/45pc
67/47s
75/66r
78/69c
81/55c
FRI
63/59r
69/57pc
81/57pc
89/73t
65/59r
94/70pc
63/56r
92/76sh
78/54s
67/56pc
75/67t
91/66s
60/40sh
78/52pc
77/56t
90/76t
87/64pc
70/54pc
108/77s
70/45s
68/45s
72/64t
81/66t
70/55pc
SAT
Partly
sunny
93/76
Stray
t-storm
92/75
T-storms
89/74
pc Partly cloudy
FRI
Some
sun
86/58
FRI
SAT
Sunny
90/61
SAT
Partly
sunny
84/57
THU
FRI
Cooler
71/58
FRI
SAT
Rain
68/62
SAT
sh Showers
TODAY
80/48pc
81/58c
82/54pc
79/69t
92/75t
81/62pc
82/61pc
90/82t
77/68r
100/77s
79/62c
84/61s
78/66r
92/73s
82/63c
85/59s
71/49pc
76/49pc
77/67r
68/57pc
86/73t
103/73s
88/74t
85/75c
Partly
sunny
72/51
Partly
sunny
67/54
Partly
sunny
73/59
THU
AQI Good
PHOENIX
AQI Good
Hartford, Conn.
Indianapolis
Islip, N.Y.
Jackson, Miss.
Jacksonville, Fla.
Jefferson City, Mo.
Kansas City
Key West, Fla.
Knoxville, Tenn.
Laredo, Texas
Lexington, Ky.
Lincoln, Neb.
Little Rock, Ark.
Long Beach, Calif.
Louisville, Ky.
Lubbock, Texas
Madison, Wis.
Manchester, N.H.
Memphis, Tenn.
Milwaukee
Mobile, Ala.
Modesto, Calif.
Montgomery, Ala.
Myrtle Beach, S.C.
T-storm
89/60
THU
s Sunny
DETROIT
THU
AQI Good
PHILADELPHIA
AQI Good
h Haze
FRI
AQI Good
ORLANDO
T-storm
87/73
AQI Good
Mostly
sunny
70/53
Plenty of
sun
77/59
DENVER
Partly
sunny
89/68
Partly
sunny
90/69
Partly
sunny
90/71
THU
AQI Good
NEW YORK
THU
sf Snowflurries
DALLAS
Cooler
72/57
Partly
sunny
109/85
Partly
sunny
109/84
Partly
sunny
106/85
AQI Unhealthy s/g
FRI
SAT
Partly
sunny
88/75
T-storms
90/66
Sunny,
warm
91/65
Sunny,
warm
95/68
HOUSTON
THU
FRI
Shower
86/72
FRI
SAT
Shower
85/73
SAT
AQI Good
SALT LAKE CITY
THU
HONOLULU
THU
FRI
SAT
Partly
sunny
92/70
Partly
sunny
89/71
AQI Unhealthy s/g
SAN DIEGO
THU
Warmer
90/71
Mostly
sunny
86/71
Mostly
sunny
83/72
Partly
sunny
84/73
SAN FRANCISCO
THU
FRI
SAT
Warmer
80/63
Sunny,
warm
88/68
Sunny,
warm
87/66
LAS VEGAS
THU
FRI
SAT
Partly
sunny
102/81
Partly
sunny
104/84
Mostly
sunny
105/84
AQI Moderate
SEATTLE
THU
FRI
SAT
Partly
cloudy
77/56
Mostly
sunny
80/60
Sunny,
warm
86/63
LOS ANGELES
THU
Very hot
98/76
FRI
Very hot
100/76
SAT
Partly
sunny
98/75
AQI Unhealthy s/g
WASHINGTON
THU
Some
sun
84/63
FRI
Cooler
68/59
SAT
Rain
70/68
AQI Moderate
AQI Good
AQI Moderate
AQI Good
AQI Moderate
TODAY
80/72sh
79/70r
84/55pc
81/52pc
84/69pc
81/60s
84/60s
85/63s
112/87s
86/77t
89/65pc
75/52c
77/48c
82/58pc
83/52pc
78/69t
89/60t
94/62s
83/63pc
66/47c
103/67s
92/70s
92/69s
85/55pc
Sarasota, Fla.
Savannah, Ga.
Scottsdale, Ariz.
Shreveport, La.
Sioux Falls, S.D.
South Bend, Ind.
Spokane, Wash.
Springfield, Mo.
Springfield, Ill.
St. Louis
St. Petersburg, Fla.
Syracuse, N.Y.
Tallahassee, Fla.
Tampa, Fla.
Toledo, Ohio
Topeka, Kan.
Tucson, Ariz.
Tupelo, Miss.
Tulsa, Okla.
Virginia Beach, Va.
Wichita, Kan.
Wilmington, Del.
Winston-Salem, N.C.
Worcester, Mass.
TODAY FRI
92/77t
89/75t
90/75pc 89/75t
107/82pc 107/83pc
81/68r
86/68pc
81/61s
75/60pc
73/49pc 70/49pc
82/57s
88/58s
81/60pc 78/55pc
82/59pc 76/47pc
82/64pc 75/54pc
94/79t
91/77t
65/46sh 62/44s
89/75t
89/73t
93/79t
91/78t
70/52pc 66/55pc
84/60s
82/60pc
103/72s 103/73pc
81/67t
80/62c
87/62pc 87/63pc
82/70pc 74/68c
86/61s
86/66pc
83/55pc 71/56pc
75/66r
72/63t
74/47pc 63/46s
WORLD CITIES
t Thunderstorms
FRI
68/45s
67/57c
69/53pc
83/66pc
91/74t
78/50pc
79/56s
89/82t
82/65r
99/76s
69/58r
81/63pc
84/62pc
91/74s
67/62r
87/64s
71/45s
66/47pc
77/63c
67/54s
86/69t
109/75s
87/68t
87/77t
Nags Head, N.C.
Nashville, Tenn.
Newark, N.J.
New Haven, Conn.
Norfolk, Va.
Oakland, Calif.
Oklahoma City
Omaha, Neb.
Palm Springs, Calif.
Pensacola, Fla.
Pierre, S.D.
Pittsburgh
Portland, Maine
Portland, Ore.
Providence, R.I.
Raleigh, N.C.
Rapid City, S.D.
Reno, Nev.
Richmond, Va.
Rochester, N.Y.
Sacramento, Calif.
San Antonio
San Jose, Calif.
Santa Fe, N.M.
FRI
76/73sh
71/58r
71/56pc
69/50pc
74/69c
87/66s
86/65pc
80/62s
115/86pc
88/74c
89/62s
66/55c
68/45pc
92/62s
69/49s
77/69t
89/57s
96/65s
68/60c
62/45s
109/70s
92/70s
101/74s
84/56pc
Beijing
Buenos Aires
Cancun, Mexico
Dubai, UAE
Frankfurt
Hong Kong
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
London
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai, India
Paris
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Toronto
Tokyo
TODAY FRI
83/65pc 85/67pc
62/53s
70/61c
89/78pc 87/78pc
106/87pc 103/87pc
68/52c
69/51pc
91/78t
90/81t
79/66pc 81/65s
82/63s
82/65s
75/52s
72/40s
65/49pc 67/51pc
69/56c
70/59pc
65/44pc 63/43pc
65/45s
69/50s
86/77sh 86/77sh
69/51pc 67/52t
75/67c
72/63c
85/70s
82/66t
80/60f
82/62s
87/78t
86/79pc
60/47pc 63/45s
64/44s
64/49h
75/65r
71/69r
USA TODAY
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
NEWS 7A
OPINION
Our view
Storm images show
America at its best
For those outside its path, the
most enduring memories of Hurricane Harvey could be the images of America as most
Americans like to think of it: A
black deputy sheriff wading
through floodwaters with a white
child in each arm; a white SWAT
officer, also wading through
floodwaters, carrying a Vietnamese American cradling her sleeping baby; three Asian and
Hispanic constables, knee-deep
in water, carrying an elderly
woman in a wheelchair.
Our national narrative, the origin story that is our permanent
legacy, is our diversity.
This is a gift we too often either take for granted or lose sight
of in heated arguments over what
to do about immigration or Confederate statues. Yet it is alive and
well in Houston and, one hopes,
across America.
One Harvey photo after another shows rescue teams made up
of black, white, Hispanic and
Asian responders, helping people
of all races. Pets and livestock,
too. The rescuers are doing what
is urgent in the moment and no
doubt think nothing of it. Yet
these images very much belie the
harsh, divisive politics that Donald Trump rode to the White
House and now practices from
the Oval Office. Seeing them is a
much needed reminder: This is
who we are.
Adversity has a way of bringing
people together. In 2005, 15 days
after Hurricane Katrina slammed
Tom Nichols
O
nce again, the North
Koreans have engaged
in a missile test. Once
again, President Trump
has warned that “all options are
on the table.” And once again, especially after he tweeted Wednesday that “talking is not the
answer,” Americans are nervously
wondering what he means.
Should the president of the
United States have sole authority
to use nuclear weapons? Even before North Korea’s recent provocations, we were long overdue for
a debate on a question that carries existential risk for human
civilization.
Some Republicans are loath to
support any limits on the president’s ability to use nuclear weapons, such as a bill to first require a
congressional declaration of war,
in part because they view such
moves — understandably — as a
direct attack on Trump’s
presidency.
Many Democrats, meanwhile,
have long opposed nuclear weapons in principle and could well be
using public anxieties about
Trump as a stalking horse for an
agenda that includes the eventual
abolition of nuclear arms.
The question of control over
the strategic deterrent is not,
however, a discussion required
solely because Trump is president. Nor is it time — yet, anyway
— to eliminate the crucial role of
nuclear deterrence in our national security. Rather, we need to
think seriously about our system
because it is predicated on assumptions that have been out of
date for more than 20 years.
A MODEST PROPOSAL
Every possible change, including
leaving things as they are, seems
fraught with risk. But let us begin
with a modest proposal: There is
no obvious reason, absent a crisis
or military threat, to invest sole
authority to use nuclear weapons
with only one person.
Nuclear hawks will object and
note that during the Cold War, we
entrusted a single leader with the
key to the nuclear arsenal for
many reasons — among them the
need to maintain tight control
over nuclear release and to respond rapidly in case of a nuclear
attack out of the blue. We are no
longer in constant danger of a
surprise attack, however, nor are
we facing a massive enemy coalition. Today, we have room to reform civilian control of nuclear
weapons.
The essential change would be
to restrict the president’s first use
of nuclear arms in peacetime,
while defining the circumstances
the Gulf Coast, a photographer
following a search and rescue
team from Orange County, Calif.,
took a shot of three team members — two white people and, in
the center of the iconic tableau, a
burly Hispanic former Navy medic — gently carrying an emaciated
black man from a home that two
earlier teams had marked empty.
Some who helped that day saw
the scene as a metaphor for government failures. But Richard
Ventura, logistics manager of the
rescue team, looked at it and saw
racial harmony.
The imperatives of disaster response are not dissimilar to the
imperatives of battle, and they
bring to mind what Defense Secretary James Mattis told a group
of U.S. troops in a video posted on
Facebook last week, after the
white supremacist protest in
Charlottesville, Va., and President
Trump’s disturbing responses.
“You’re a great example for our
country right now. It’s got some
problems. You know it, and I
know it,” Mattis said. “You just
hold the line until our country
gets back to understanding and
respecting each other, and showing it and being friendly to one
another.” He added that America
has two powers: intimidation,
“that’s you,” and inspiration, “and
we’ll get the power of inspiration
back.”
He also reminded them that
“we’re so doggone lucky to be
Americans.”
Yes. We are.
Did climate change
intensify Harvey?
HARRIS COUNTY SHERRIF’S OFFICE
Deputy sheriff Rick Johnson
DAVID J. PHILLIP, AP
Houston SWAT officer Daryl Hudeck
JON SHAPLEY, HOUSTON CHRONICLE, VIA AP
From left, constables Paul Fernandez, Michael Tran and Radha Patel
A DECISION
SOLELY FOR
A PRESIDENT?
Absent a crisis, there’s no reason to empower
a single person to launch nuclear weapons
AHN YOUNG-JOON, AP
Television news in Seoul, South Korea, showing President
Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.
that would return full and unitary
control to the White House in order to deal with a crisis or other
imminent danger.
I suggest we reorganize our
day-to-day system of control to
leave authority for first use of nuclear weapons with the president
— but subject to the veto of one
senior member of the legislative
branch. I would nominate the
Senate majority leader: He or she
is a national figure who cannot be
dismissed by the president and,
being outside the line of presidential succession, does not stand
to gain directly from counteracting the president.
This two-leader rule, however,
would govern only the first use of
nuclear weapons absent any other threat. For example, if the U.S.
Strategic Command determined
that the United States was under
attack of any kind, the act of communicating this warning could
return unilateral nuclear control
to the president. Congress could
also allow other triggers, such as
if NATO invoked Article 5 to provide a common defense.
alone would impose a new seriousness on AUMF debates.) Such
changes would involve Congress
in the question of nuclear use, but
without inviting chaos in a situation where deterrence demands
calm and resolve.
Such arrangements would not
only calm public concerns, they
might also force more bipartisanship and communication between the legislative and
executive branches. And they
might make the Senate — and by
extension, the American people
— think a bit harder about whom
to elect as majority leader.
These suggestions all have
their drawbacks. But if we are to
have a serious national discussion
about the stewardship of our nuclear arsenal in the 21st century,
we have to stop relying on default
positions we inherited from the
Cold War.
Creating a more stable deterrent will require some long overdue soul-searching on the part of
an American public that has been
loath to think about such things.
The issue of presidential control
is a good place to start.
CALM AND RESOLVE
If we face a long period of hostilities, a president could propose an
Authorization for the Use of Military Force, which would include
granting the president sole authority to use nuclear arms. (This
Tom Nichols, a Russia specialist and professor of national security affairs at the Naval War
College, is the author of The
Death of Expertise. The views expressed here are solely his own.
Even as floodwaters raged this
week in Texas and Louisiana, so
did the debate over the possible
link between Hurricane Harvey
and man-made climate change.
Climate activists pointed to the
historic rainfall and epic flooding
as exactly the type of extreme
event forecast to occur as the
globe warms. Skeptics cited a long
list of tropical storms that
slammed Texas even before the
buildup of greenhouse gases in
the atmosphere.
So who’s right?
In some ways, the question is
premature, even unseemly, while
search and rescue efforts continue. And a definitive answer
won’t come until scientists conduct post-storm “attribution”
studies. In all likelihood, though,
the conclusion will be that climate change didn’t cause Harvey,
but it almost surely made the
storm worse.
Harvey produced 40- to 50inch rainfall totals that left parts
of Houston looking like Venice
and rivaled snowfall accumulations from blizzards in the Northeast. It was, in fact, the most
extreme rainfall event on the
continental United States in recorded history.
Such events are consistent
with the basic science of climate
change: Warmer than normal water temperatures, in places such
as the Gulf of Mexico, provide
heat energy that fuels the formation and rapid strengthening of
tropical storms. Warmer air holds
more water vapor, which in turn
produces more rainfall. And rising sea levels exacerbate storm
surge and inland flooding.
According to the National Climate Assessment, “Heavy downpours are increasing nationally
(in recent decades), with the largest increases in the Midwest and
Northeast. Increases in extreme
precipitation are projected for all
U.S. regions.”
This isn’t just happening in
North America.
Even as Harvey riveted the nation’s attention this week, the
death toll topped 1,000 from unusually severe monsoonal rains
half a world away in Bangladesh,
India and Nepal.
In the coming days and weeks,
expect to hear politicians describe Harvey as an “act of God”
that had little or nothing to do
with human-induced climate
change. Even if climate change is
real, they’ll add, a serious effort to
curb greenhouse gas emissions,
through a carbon tax or other
means, would be too expensive.
On Wednesday, the private
company AccuWeather estimated
that Harvey could end up costing
$190 billion, making it the priciest natural disaster in U.S. history,
equal to the combined cost of
Hurricanes Katrina and Sandy.
With that kind of price tag atop
a torrent of human misery, the
question isn’t whether the nation
can afford to get serious about
global warming. We can’t afford
not to.
Tax cuts for the rich
won’t help our economy
Felicia Wong
Modern conservatism was
built on cutting taxes, supposedly
because cutting taxes for successful people will spur them to create even more wealth, which will
trickle down to the rest of us in
the form of jobs. So it’s no surprise to see cutting corporate taxes, from a nominal 35% rate to as
low as 15%, at the top of the wish
list for the Republican tax “reform” drive that President
Trump kicked off Wednesday.
What is surprising, and dismaying, is how many people outside the GOP repeat the idea that
corporate taxes are holding back
our economy despite the pile of
evidence that says the opposite.
First of all, the effective tax
rate that corporations pay —
meaning the actual rate after
credits and deductions are taken
into account — is roughly 20%.
And the theory — cut taxes on
cash-strapped companies so they
have money to invest and spur
growth — doesn’t match reality.
U.S. corporations are massively
profitable and sitting on close to
$2 trillion in cash. But instead of
investing in capital improvements or worker pay to benefit
the broader economy, executives
raise their own salaries and juice
the price of their stock options.
Finally, we’ve tried this before
and we know how it ends. In
2004, Congress reduced corporate tax rates to encourage firms
to “repatriate” funds held overseas and to drive more corporate
investment. The result was bad
all around: The top beneficiaries
of the law cut more than 20,000
net jobs, slowed their research
spending, and spent more on executive compensation and stock
buybacks even though the law explicitly said not to.
More recently, Kansas Gov.
Sam
Brownback
massively
slashed state tax rates on corporations and high individual incomes. Instead of unleashing
growth, this led Kansas to grow
more slowly than its neighbors
and caused a budget deficit so severe, the rating agency S&P described it as structurally
imbalanced.
If Congress wants to boost the
economy and drive job growth,
there are many tax changes that
could help. For example, my colleagues at the Roosevelt Institute
suggest that trillions of dollars
can be found by taxing unproductive financial and corporate activities that do not yield real growth,
starting with a financial transaction tax. Those dollars could be
invested in real projects, from
roads and bridges to universal
broadband and even free college,
that would strengthen a modern,
competitive economy.
Democratic leaders have argued that reform cannot simply
be a cover for giving more to the
wealthiest. But not every Democrat signed on, and the Trump
White House continues to court
the holdouts.
Republicans will do everything
in their power to achieve their tax
cutting dreams. And to Trump,
tax “reform” is simply a way for
the rich to scam money from everyone else. So shame on anyone
— especially wavering Democrats
— who ignores the pain out there
and succumbs to the siren song.
It’s not high corporate taxes
that are holding our economy
back; it’s the dying, stubborn
myth of trickle-down.
Felicia Wong is president and
CEO of the Roosevelt Institute.
"USA TODAY hopes to serve as a
forum for better understanding
and unity to help make the USA
truly one nation."
Allen H. Neuharth,
Founder, Sept. 15, 1982
GANNETT COMPANY PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
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& USA TODAY EDITOR IN CHIEF
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EXECUTIVE EDITORS
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8A NEWS
USA TODAY
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
Customer Satisfaction:
The Only Thing That Matters.
“LG has received more J.D. Power awards for
Kitchen & Laundry Appliances than any other manufacturer”
LG is honored to receive J.D. Power top rankings
in 7 out of 11 home appliance categories:
French Door Refrigerators | Top-Mount Freezer Refrigerators
Front-Load Washers I Top-Load Washers
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LG received the highest numerical score in the respective segments of the J.D. Power 2017 Laundry and Kitchen Appliance
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SECTION B
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
Alexa, Cortana
get chummy
Amazon,
Microsoft
announce
partnership
between the
digital rivals
5B
AMAZON ECHO BY
ETHAN MILLER, GETTY
IMAGES; CORTANA BY
REVIEWED.COM
MONEYLINE
State by
state: News
from around
the nation 6B
Hurricane
pushes gas
prices near
2-year high
DISASTER IN TEXAS
U.S. ECONOMIC GROWTH
UPGRADED TO 3% IN Q2
The U.S. economy rebounded
sharply in the spring, growing at
the fastest pace in more than
two years amid brisk consumer
spending on autos and other
goods. The gross domestic
product, the broadest measure
of economic health, grew at an
annual rate of 3% in the AprilJune quarter, the Commerce
Department reported Wednesday. It was the best showing
since a 3.2% gain in the first
quarter of 2015.
But they are still far
below all-time mark
of $4.11 in July 2008
Nathan Bomey
SIMON SUES STARBUCKS
OVER TEAVANA CLOSURES
Simon Property Group, one of
the nation’s largest mall operators, has sued Starbucks over its
plans to shutter all of the Teavana stores operating in its centers
nationwide. In the lawsuit filed
Aug. 21, Simon officials argued
that their shopping centers rely
on each of their tenants fulfilling
their lease obligations, including
continuously operating in the
space for the entire lease term.
Among the 379 stores being
closed, 78 are in Simon centers.
HOME DEPOT SETTLES
CLAIMS OVER RECALLS
Home Depot has agreed to pay
the U.S. government $5.7 million
to settle charges that it sold
recalled washing machines, fire
extinguishers and other faulty
products. The U.S. Consumer
Product Safety Commission says
the recalled products were sold
by the home-improvement
retailer between 2012 and 2016.
In agreeing to the settlement,
Home Depot did not admit guilt.
@NathanBomey
USA TODAY
ERICH SCHLEGEL, GETTY IMAGES
Rescuers from Odessa, Texas, make their way through floodwaters along Eldridge Parkway
in the Energy Corridor of west Houston on Wednesday.
WALL ST. SHRUGS
OFF HARVEY
Stock market has a way of overcoming natural
disasters, no matter how big or how destructive
Shoppers
stock up on
supplies at
a Food
Town grocery store
Friday in
Houston.
Adam Shell
@adamshell
USA TODAY
REDESIGNED CAYENNE BY PORSCHE
PORSCHE CAYENNE SUV
GETS A MAKEOVER
Porsche has revealed a redesign
of its Cayenne SUV. The VW
Group luxury brand showed off
the third-generation Cayenne
late Tuesday, with U.S. sales
expected to begin in 2018.
DOW JONES INDUSTRIAL AVG.
21,950
21,900
4:00 p.m.
9:30 a.m.
21,892
21,865
21,850
21,800
27.06
It’s as if stock investors
haven’t turned on the TV or
tuned into the Weather Channel over the past week.
Unsettling images of Houston, the nation’s fourth-largest
city, underwater from Hurricane Harvey’s torrential rains
and estimated damage of $160
billion have not been enough to
cause stock prices to sink.
Both the Dow Jones industrial average and benchmark Standard & Poor’s 500 stock index
have risen in value at the same
time the storm ravaged southeast Texas, and more recently
southwest Louisiana. The Dow
has climbed nearly 110 points
since Harvey barreled into Texas, and the S&P 500 has finished higher four consecutive
days, nudging 0.8% higher.
AccuWeather
estimates
damage at $160 billion, which
would make it the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history.
While a rising stock market
during a hurricane of this epic
size might seem counterintuitive,
“Beyond two weeks
the increases should
wind down, but
you’ll still see gas
prices affected by
Harvey for at least a
month.”
GasBuddy petroleum analyst
Patrick DeHaan
stocks have a long history of
weathering storms, no matter
how big or how destructive.
The S&P 500, for example,
was down only 0.2% a month
after Hurricane Katrina, currently the most-expensive U.S.
hurricane, struck New Orleans
in August 2005. It was 4% higher three months later and up
6% six months later. Similarly,
after falling 3% in the month after Sandy struck New Jersey in
price at $2.40 on Wednesday
morning. Prices could soon top
the two-year high of $2.50 from
August 2015, AAA’s Jeanette
Casselano said.
“I think the biggest increases
will be now over the next five
days,” GasBuddy petroleum
analyst Patrick DeHaan said.
“Beyond two weeks the increases should wind down, but
you’ll still see gas prices affected by Harvey for at least a
month.”
Overall, the nationwide average is expected to peak with an
increase of 15 cents to 25 cents,
up from an initial outlook of 5
cents to 15 cents, DeHaan projected. It’s an unusual trend for
gas, which typically kicks into
reverse gear following the conclusion of the Labor Day driv-
v STORY CONTINUES ON 2B
v STORY CONTINUES ON 2B
BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI, AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Wall Street also
knows that
economic growth
will rebound during
the “rebuilding,
restocking and
replacing” phase.
Gasoline prices are spiraling
toward a two-year high with the
Labor Day rush approaching after Hurricane Harvey ravaged
the Texas Gulf Coast.
The storm brings what had
been a summer of low gas
prices to what could become a
surprising end, far costlier than
anyone expected earlier this
month.
With 15 refineries closed as
of Wednesday due to flooding,
gasoline prices are rising. The
national average hit $2.43 per
gallon as of 2:15 p.m. Wednesday, up 7 cents from a week ago,
according to consumer information site GasBuddy.com.
AAA pegged the average
21,750
21,700
WEDNESDAY MARKETS
INDEX
CLOSE
CHG
Nasdaq composite
6368.31 x 66.42
S&P 500
2457.59 x 11.29
T-note, 10-year yield
2.14% x
0.01
Oil, light sweet crude
$45.96 y
0.48
Gold, oz. Comex
$1306.40 y
6.70
Euro (dollars per euro) $1.1890 y 0.0102
Yen per dollar
110.36 x
0.65
SOURCES USA TODAY RESEARCH, MARKETWATCH.COM
uUSA MARKETS, 4B
Are you ready for
$1,000 smartphones?
Premium features on
high-end devices add
to production costs
USA SNAPSHOTS©
Edward C. Baig
and Eli Blumenthal
Average
CD yields
@edbaig, @eliblumenthal
USA TODAY
As of Wednesday:
Will you need to take out a
mortgage to purchase your next
smartphone?
OK, that’s an exaggeration.
But with a new iPhone 8 expected to crack the $1,000 price
barrier when it goes on sale (most
likely) next month, it is worth
asking what kind of deep pockets
buyers need to have.
Indeed, the price for Apple’s
10th-anniversary iPhone could
conceivably go much higher than
a grand, especially if supplies are
constrained.
“A $1,000 iPhone would be
testing the limits of what consumers are willing to pay,” says
6-month
This week Last week Year ago
0.23%
0.23%
0.18%
1-year
This week Last week Year ago
0.40%
0.39%
0.30%
21⁄2-year
This week Last week Year ago
0.58%
0.58%
0.48%
5-year
This week Last week Year ago
0.96%
0.93%
0.80%
Find more interest rates at
rates.usatoday.com.
SOURCE Bankrate.com
JAE YANG AND KARL GELLES, USA TODAY
Allure with Attitude
APPLE
The iPhone 7 Plus already
cost more than $1,000 if you
purchased generous storage.
Neil Mawston, executive director for the global wireless practice at Strategy Analytics in
London. “$1,000 is more than
what many people pay for a new
television.”
Of course, you already came
close to spending that much last
year if you purchased the
iPhone 7 Plus and maxed out on
storage.
It’s not just Apple. The upv STORY CONTINUES ON 2B
Black and White Diamond and Spinel Skull Ring
Carats: Diamonds: 3.09 • Spinels: 2.92 • Palladium and 18K Gold
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Antiques • Fine Art • Jewelry
Since 1912
rauantiques.com
USA TODAY
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
2B MONEY
Buffett says it doesn’t feel like a 3% economy
Billionaire investor
weighs in on Apple,
Harvey and Trump
Adam Shell
@adamshell
USA TODAY
Billionaire investor Warren
Buffett says it still feels more like
a 2% economy to him despite the
government today boosting its
second-quarter GDP growth estimate to 3%.
In an interview with CNBC,
Buffett, who turned 87 Wednesday, weighed in on many topics
Wall Street is watching, ranging
from Hurricane Harvey and
North Korea to his major holdings in Apple and major banks
such as Bank of America and
Wells Fargo.
When asked if it felt like a 3%
economy, Buffett, chairman and
CEO of Berkshire Hathaway,
which has investments in virtually every part of the U.S. economy,
said, “I would guess we are in a
2% growth economy now. Every
now and then we think we are accelerating, and every now and
then that maybe there’s a double
dip. It just seems to be a couple of
percent.”
Here’s what the “Oracle of
Omaha” said about other key
topics:
uApple stock. Buffett said he
has not sold a single share of Apple stock since he began accumulating them, but he said one of his
fund managers — either Ted Weschler or Todd Combs — did last
quarter as a way to fund new investment ideas. At the end of the
second quarter, Buffett’s Berkshire owned 130.2 million shares
of the iPhone maker, according to
regulatory filings, which amounts
to a 2.5% stake in the tech company, Buffett said.
Buffett did not say whether he
was adding to his Apple position
in the current quarter.
CLIFF OWEN, AP
“I would guess we are in a 2%
growth economy now,” Berkshire Hathaway Chairman
and CEO Warren Buffett said.
uKraft Heinz acquisition
mind-set. Buffett said consumer
products giant Kraft Heinz, best
known for brands such as Heinz
ketchup, Oscar Mayer hot dogs
and Jell-O, would not buy rival
Mondelez International, home to
brands such as Oreo cookies,
Dentyne gum and Wheat Thins
crackers. Kraft shares were unchanged, while Mondelez shares
fell 1.9%. Buffett’s Berkshire is a
major owner of Kraft Heinz along
with private equity firm 3G. At
the end of the second quarter,
Berkshire owned 325.6 million
shares.
uBerkshire’s sizable bank
holdings. Buffett, who on Tuesday night exercised his right to
buy 700 million shares of Bank of
America stock at a discounted
price of $7.14 under terms of a
2011 deal with the bank after he
invested $5 billion, says he’s happy with his new investment. “I
like the business, and I like the
valuation very much,” Buffett
said.
Buffett, also a major holder of
Wells Fargo, says he still thinks it
is a “terrific bank” despite its fake
accounts scandal. “The problems
are being corrected,” Buffett said.
uHurricane
Harvey.
Through its ownership of Geico
auto insurance, Buffett said Berkshire Hathaway underwrites
roughly 10% of the auto policies
in Texas and insures about
Newseum CEO
steps down as
it considers
selling, closing
$1,000
may be
new norm
v CONTINUED FROM 1B
coming Galaxy Note 8 that Samsung recently announced will
cost between $930 and $960
when it comes out next month
(depending on carrier). And
there’s no word yet on how much
the soon-to-launch LG V30
smartphone will cost.
Some of the higher cost has to
do with premium features. The
V30 will sport the kind of pricey
edge-to-edge OLED display we
may see on the iPhone 8, and, in
fact, LG could be a supplier of just
such a screen on the iPhone.
As the battle among high-end
devices intensifies, manufacturers are having to invest in flashier
features to make their products
stand out. Edge-to-edge displays,
water resistance, iris scanning
and dual cameras are becoming
more common, but they also add
to the cost of manufacturing.
“Smartphones have not become commodities, and, in a maturing market, it is healthy to see
segments willing to pay more for
higher end features, materials
and design,” says Avi Greengart,
the research director for consumer platforms and devices at
GlobalData.
For instance, consumers who
need to have a phone hyped as
the world’s first “holographic
media machine” must be ready to
pay at least $1,200 for the Hydro-
Roger Yu
@ByRogerYu
USA TODAY
ELI BLUMENTHAL, USA TODAY
From left, Samsung’s Galaxy Note 8 — which will cost between $930 and $960
when it comes out next month — Galaxy S8+ and Galaxy S8.
gen phone, a yet-to-be released
device promised from high-endcamera maker Red.
Greengart points out that
there are bargains to be had. Chinese smartphone manufacturer
OnePlus, for example, sells
phones with robust specs, including the same Qualcomm processor as the Note 8, at prices
starting at $479.
For all the publicity surrounding $1,000 smartphones, the average selling price for premium
smartphones lately actually has
fallen slightly or remained relatively flat worldwide, according to
researcher Gartner. In the first
quarter of 2017, average prices in
the premium segment (the highest-end smartphones) were $460,
compared to $482 during the
same period a year earlier.
How we pay for phones has
“$1,000
is more
than what
many
people
pay for
a new
television.”
Neil Mawston,
executive director
for the global
wireless practice
at Strategy
Analytics in
London
certainly changed over the past
couple of years — and so the
sticker shock is more apparent.
The norm used to be to pay up
front for a phone that was subsidized at a somewhat reduced
price by your wireless carrier,
typically tied to a two-year contractual obligation. That is how a
$649 iPhone could be listed at
$199.
While an iPhone 8 almost certainly is going to command top
dollar, some analysts expect the
phone to fly off of shelves. There’s
pent-up demand for the phone,
which may boast such missing
iPhone features as wireless
charging and facial unlocking.
That said, there’s equal speculation Apple will also unveil less
expensive iPhone 7S models to
appeal to buyers who don’t have
an unlimited budget.
Motorists Storm fails to sink stocks
unlikely to
stop driving
v CONTINUED FROM 1B
v CONTINUED FROM 1B
ing season.
Americans are paying about 19
cents more per gallon than a year
ago, which equates to nearly $3
more per 15-gallon fill-up, according to AAA. But with prices still
far below their all-time high mark
of $4.11 per gallon set in July
2008, motorists probably won’t
cancel late-summer road trips.
“I think they’ll stick to their
plans,” Casselano said.
The latest catalyst driving
prices higher was Wednesday’s
announced closure of the Saudiowned Motiva oil refinery in Port
Arthur, Texas, the largest refinery
in the U.S. at 635,000 barrels per
day, according to the Oil Price Information Service.
Other major refineries in the
region, including Exxon Mobil’s
plant in Baytown, have been crippled by similar conditions.
With Motiva down and other
recent closures, about 25% of the
nation’s gasoline refining capacity
is offline, DeHaan said.
Several refineries in the Corpus Christi area are already making plans to reopen this week,
according to IHS Markit analysts.
Also, IHS reported that no refineries have reported long-term
damage, likely limiting the lasting
effect on gas prices. But with all
four Houston ports closed, the
flow of energy products in the region is at a near standstill until
flood waters subside.
500,000 cars. “We don’t know at
this point” the size of the losses,
he said. He added that Berkshire
reduced its exposure to catastrophic lines of insurance in recent years due to premiums
coming down, so he didn’t foresee
a hit from that line of coverage.
uPresident Trump’s tenure. Buffett, who raised money
for and voted for Hillary Clinton
in the 2016 presidential election,
says he prefers not to criticize sitting presidents, even ones he
didn’t vote for. “I am not in the
business of attacking any president,” he said. Buffett says he has
invested during 14 of 15 president’s terms during his lifetime,
and stocks rose each time.
uNorth Korea threat. Saying, “Who knows what could happen?” Buffett stressed that the
more nations such as North Korea that have nuclear capabilities
the “more likely that ... something
with a remote probability finally
happens. It’s a more dangerous
world.”
October 2012, the S&P 500 was
9% higher six months later.
Despite the human suffering,
“natural disasters often have substantive local impact but less of a
national effect,” Tobias Levkovich, chief U.S. equity strategist at
Citigroup in New York, wrote in a
report. What’s more, he adds,
these catastrophes are viewed by
investors
as
“nonrecurring
events,” or one-time hits that
won’t cause a long-lasting drag on
the overall U.S. economy or earnings of U.S. companies.
Another reason the market can
shrug off risks associated with violent weather has a lot to do with
the size of the economy and stock
market. The estimated size of the
economy is between $18 trillion
and $19 trillion, which means
damage totaling $160 billion can
be absorbed, says Karyn Cavanaugh, senior market strategist at
Voya Investment Management.
Similarly, the current market
value of all 500 companies in the
S&P 500 is now $22.7 trillion,
adds Howard Silverblatt, senior
index analyst at S&P Dow Jones
Indices. Large companies can
survive disruptions in regional
sales and profits.
Wall Street also knows economic growth will rebound during the “rebuilding, restocking
and replacing” phase. Cars totaled by water damage will need
to be replaced. Homes will have
to be rebuilt and repaired. That
means sales of roofing materials,
lumber, windows, sheet rock,
pumps, portable generators and
paints will spike. And thousands
will be put back to work.
DAVID J. PHILLIP, AP
Jose Martinez works to
remove drywall from a
home damaged by floodwaters in
Houston.
Harvey also hit at a time of
strength for both the broader U.S.
economy and foreign economies.
The U.S. government upped its
estimate for second-quarter GDP
Wednesday to 3%. Plus, jobs remain plentiful and consumer
confidence is near its highest level since the 2008 financial crisis.
That strength provides a buffer to
the fallout caused by Harvey.
Storm-stocks include:
uHome improvement retailers. Stocks such as Home Depot and Lowe’s attract investors.
Lowe’s has climbed nearly 2%
and Home Depot is up 1.1% since
Harvey hit Texas last Friday.
uGenerator makers. When
the power goes out, stocks such
as Generac, a maker of generators
that can power an entire home
using natural gas, and Briggs &
Stratton, the engine and portable
generator manufacturer, see pops
in their stocks.
uInsurance stocks. Normally, shares of property and casualty insurers such as Allstate,
Travelers and Chubb take a big
hit following hurricanes. But
losses associated with Harvey are
seen as being smaller as most of
the damage is due to flooding,
which is not covered under normal homeowners’ policies.
The
facility,
which
drew
800,000
visitors
last year,
can’t
compete
with free
Smithsonian
museums
Newseum may close.
The financially struggling news
museum in Washington, D.C.,
said Wednesday its CEO stepped
down, and it’s considering selling
the building or moving to a new
location because of insufficient
visitor traffic.
Other options being considered by the Freedom Forum, the
foundation that owns the building, are selling and leasing the
building back, forming partnerships or developing condominiums for shared use.
The foundation’s “strategic review” doesn’t immediately affect
Newseum’s programs for visitors,
it said.
Located on Pennsylvania Avenue between the White House
and the Capitol, Newseum sits on
a prime downtown location steps
away
from
Smithsonian
museums and
other tourist attractions, such
as Chinatown.
Newseum
drew more than
800,000 visitors
in 2016. But
competing with
SAUL LOEB, AFP/GETTY IMAGES
free Smithsonian museums for visitors’ time The Newand attention, it hasn’t been able seum is on
to independently fund its opera- Pennsylvania
tions through visitors’ fees and Avenue behas had to rely on the foundation tween the
to narrow the deficit.
White House
The museum’s revenue, which and the
is reported separately, was $59.3 Capitol.
million in 2015, the last year it
filed the figure with the Internal
Revenue Service. Expenses totaled $61.9 million.
“It has been difficult to raise
through admission fees what it
costs to operate a world-class
museum in a city of free museums,” Newseum said in a statement. “Because of its highly
technical, interactive experiences, the Newseum’s annual operating costs have always exceeded
revenues.”
The Freedom Forum said it has
spent more than $500 million to
build and fund the Newseum.
The foundation reported $13.3
million in revenue in 2015. It had
$42.3 million in total expenses.
The Freedom Forum was
formed in 1991 by the late Al Neuharth as successor to a foundation started in 1935 by newspaper
publisher Frank Gannett, who
started a media company under
his name. Neuharth was also
CEO of Gannett when the company started publishing USA TODAY. Gannett has since spun off
its newspaper and online news
business and renamed itself Tegna. The newspaper and online
news business, which has taken
the name of Gannett, owns USA
TODAY and 109 local news properties.
Jeffrey Herbst, who was Newseum’s CEO for the past two
years, stepped down Monday.
USA TODAY
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
MONEY 3B
Plan seeks
to allow IRA,
401(k) for
home repair
Similar provisions
granted after Katrina,
Sandy and Rita
Roger Yu
@ByRogerYu
USA TODAY
HENRIETTA WILDSMITH, USA TODAY NETWORK
Evacuees rest Tuesday at the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston. The facility’s website has links to donation sites.
TECH FIRMS STEPPING UP
TO HELP HARVEY VICTIMS
Apple
donates
$2M to
the Red
Cross;
Google,
Amazon,
AT&T,
Facebook
also dig
deep into
pockets
Elizabeth Weise
@eweise
USA TODAY
SAN FRANCISCO Tech companies
are tapping their deep pockets to
raise money to help victims of
Hurricane Harvey.
Google staff donated $250,000
to the American Red Cross,
which the company matched dollar for dollar, and Google also
made a corporate contribution of
$250,000. On Tuesday, it
launched an additional $1 million
matching campaign to gather donations from staff and Google users for Red Cross efforts in Texas
and other affected areas.
Apple donated $2 million to
the American Red Cross for Hurricane Harvey relief efforts. The
company has also pledged to
match employee donations two
to one.
In addition, Apple is making it
GOOGLE
easy for users to donate to the
Red Cross via its iTunes page,
which now features buttons for
donating between $5 and $200.
The money is transferred directly
to the American Red Cross from
iTunes, so those donating won’t
get a tax writeoff. But they also
won’t have to do anything more
than click a button on a site they
probably visit frequently.
Through
contributions
and matching
funds, Google
is aiming to
donate upwards of
$1.75 million
to the relief
effort.
Amazon, and its newest acquisition Whole Foods Markets, will
be matching donations made in
stores or on its website for up to
$1 million.
The Amazon wish list from the
Red Cross gives a sense of the immediate needs of those in floodravaged areas: phone chargers
and children’s bedding.
Facebook has announced it will
match every dollar raised on its
site, up to $1 million, for the Center for Disaster Philanthropy’s
Hurricane Harvey Recovery
Fund.
AT&T has pledged $350,000 to
help communities affected by
Hurricane Harvey. The AT&T
Foundation will also match employee donations up to $100,000.
In addition, customers can text
‘HARVEY’ to 90999 to donate
$10 to the American Red Cross.
Microsoft made an initial donation of $100,000 to the Red
Cross, with the company and its
employees pledging to do more.
Best Buy apologizes for $43 bottled water in Houston
Retailer calls incident
‘big mistake,’ faces
social media backlash
Charisse Jones
@charissejones
USA TODAY
A case of bottled water priced
at nearly $43 at a Best Buy store
outside storm-ravaged Houston
was a “big mistake,” according to
the retailer, with the incident
sparking a social media backlash
and shining a spotlight on price
gouging in the wake of Hurricane
Harvey.
A photo of two cases of bottled
water, one selling for $42.96 and
the other for $29.98, at a Best Buy
in the Houston suburb of Cy-
press, was posted Tuesday on
Twitter by a journalist, unleashing a series of angry Twitter responses. The photo shows the
higher-priced package appears to
be for 24 bottles while the less expensive pack has 12 bottles.
Best Buy spokesman Jeffrey
Shelman apologized in a statement for what he said was an error made by a local employee who
added up the cost of each individual bottle of water to come up
with the price for the entire case.
“This was a big mistake on the
part of a few employees at one
store on Friday,” Shelman said.
“We’re sorry and it won’t happen
again.”
He added, “not as an excuse
but as an explanation,” the bigbox electronics seller doesn’t usually sell packages of bottled water.
By contrast, Walmart, on its web-
DAVID PAUL MORRIS, BLOOMBERG
“It won’t happen again,” Best
Buy officials said about selling
overpriced bottled water.
site, lists 24 packs of Poland
Spring bottled water for $20.63.
Even if it was done in error,
Best Buy’s exorbitantly priced
bottled water was, at least for a
few hours, touted as one of the
more glaring examples of the
price gouging in the wake of Hurricane Harvey, which has displaced thousands of Texans and
left many in search of shelter, dry
clothing and fuel.
The office of the Texas State
Attorney General said that as of
Wednesday morning, it had received 684 complaints about excessive pricing. They included a
convenience store in Houston
selling gasoline for $20 a gallon.
Such acts can lead to a $20,000
fine or penalty of up to $250,000
if the victim is at least 65 years
old. The state attorney general
has so far notified nine alleged offenders that they have violated
the law and fines they could face
if they don’t stop the gouging.
“Price gouging is not only reprehensible, it’s illegal,” Texas Gov.
Greg Abbott said Wednesday.
Harvey victims may soon get
an unusual funding source as
they dig out — their retirement
plans.
Retirement plan lobbyists are
asking the federal government to
waive financial penalties for affected Southeast Texans if they
withdraw funds from their individual retirement accounts (IRA)
or work-sponsored 401(k) or
403(b) retirement saving accounts.
People who withdraw funds
from retirement accounts before
they turn 591⁄2 years old typically
have to pay a 10% penalty and
other state and federal taxes.
“This may be the only savings
individuals may have set aside,”
says Nevin Adams, chief of marketing and communications for
the American Retirement Association, which is supporting the
“Think very carefully
before making an
early withdrawal
from a retirement
account. ... This deals
a permanent
setback to your
retirement
planning.”
Greg McBride, chief financial analyst,
Bankrate.com
penalty-waiver proposal. Similar
retirement account-related relief
provisions were granted by the
Internal Revenue Service and
other federal agencies to victims
of Hurricanes Katrina, Sandy and
Rita, Adams says.
Only about 20% of the region’s
residents who have had their
homes damaged by Tropical
Storm Harvey are estimated to
have flood insurance, and the
proposal could open up additional funding sources for those who
want to self-fund home repair.
The Federal Emergency Management Agency will offer some
federal financial help. But the
agency has averaged only about
$5,000 in individual payouts in
past disasters, says Carolyn Kousky, director for policy research
and engagement at the Wharton
Risk Center of the University of
Pennsylvania.
Withdrawing from retirement
accounts early is always a dicey
gamble as money in them is
“locked in” and grows over time
with compounding interest. “You
can never put that money back
later,” says Greg McBride, chief financial analyst at personal finance site Bankrate.com.
“Think very carefully before
making an early withdrawal from
a retirement account,” he said.
“Even for permissible reasons,
this deals a permanent setback to
your retirement planning.”
McBride advises scouring for
other funding sources first before
tapping into retirement accounts.
Emergency savings and low cost
borrowing — such as a zero-percent introductory rate on credit
cards or low-rate personal loans
— should be considered, he says.
How to keep your kids out of trouble while using Reddit
It’s easy to fall down
rabbit holes on this
popular online site
Brett Molina
@brettmolina23
USA TODAY
There is perhaps no other site
on the Internet more informative, entertaining and confusing
to use than Reddit.
It’s called “the front page of the
Internet” for good reason. Nearly
everything you have seen catching viral buzz online likely started
on Reddit.
Users can find just about anything they want, on any topic. For
most of Reddit’s users, it’s awe-
some. For parents, it’s both good
and bad.
There are countless parenting
communities in Reddit, so that’s a
plus. But what if your child wants
to check out Reddit? Because its
owners take a more hands-off approach, it’s very easy for kids to
stumble into a link or image inappropriate for children.
For parents, here’s what you
should know about Reddit:
WHAT IS REDDIT?
Launched in 2005, Reddit is essentially a massive forum categorized by a variety of topics called
subreddits, usually preceded by
an “r/.” For example, some of the
straightforward subreddits include r/news or r/books. Others
can get pretty specific, such as r/
cordcutters for users who have
Reddit is the fourthmost-popular site
in the U.S., with more
than 300M users a
month. It’s behind
Google, YouTube
and Facebook.
HOW POPULAR IS REDDIT?
dropped cable or want to cut the
cord and seek tips, advice or other
information. Some are just plain
strange. Want a subreddit with
just pictures of birds with human
arms? It really exists.
Subreddits are run by moderators, Reddit users who earn the
title by creating a subreddit or being promoted by a current moderator. In some cases, moderators
will have their own set of rules for
participating in a subreddit.
WHY IS REDDIT A BIG DEAL?
According to traffic analytics firm
Alexa, Reddit is the fourth-mostpopular site in the U.S., with more
than 300 million users each
month. For perspective, it’s behind only Google, YouTube and
Facebook. Reddit boasts more
than 138,000 communities.
innocent stuff then fall down this
rabbit hole into stuff that’s a lot
more questionable for their ages.
Reddit also features a lot of
anonymous comments and messaging, and it’s possible for anyone to message your child if
they’re on Reddit.
HOW CAN I PROTECT THEM?
You can find literally anything on
the Internet via Reddit. It’s an incredibly powerful, crowdsourced
outlet. It uses a voting system
where users decide which content is most relevant by giving
them “up” or “down” votes.
SHOULD I WORRY ABOUT
MY KIDS USING IT?
Reddit is kinda like YouTube in
that kids can start with seemingly
On the messaging front, users can
control who sends them messages. They can add “trusted users” by their username, so only
they can send messages. For
questionable comments, users
can report them for review.
As for content, users can control what subreddits or items appear on Reddit. Another trick is
subscribing to subreddits, which
help shape what the front page of
Reddit will look like.
USA TODAY
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
4B MONEY
AMERICA’S MARKETS
THE MOTLEY FOOL ASK A FOOL
ALL THE MARKET ACTION IN REAL TIME.
MARKETS.USATODAY.COM
STORY STOCKS
Some companies will win big
Price: $157.79 Day’s high: $157.98 Low: $154.48
4-WEEK TREND
Cummins
$200
Q: Who would benefit most from tax reform?
The engine maker unveiled its zero-emissions fully
electric engine for large trucks. Teaming with
Roush, the truck will have a maximum payload of
44,000 pounds and a range of about 100 miles with
a full battery.
Matthew Frankel
The Motley Fool
A: There are three main ways
companies could potentially benefit from tax reform.
If the corporate tax rate is reduced, it could benefit companies
that currently pay high effective
tax rates. For example, Southwest
Airlines generates most of its
sales inside the U.S. and pays a
38% effective tax rate. CVS
Health pays an effective tax rate
of 39%. If the federal tax rate
were to be reduced from 35% to
20% as is being proposed, these
companies could be big winners.
Another possible benefit is
from the proposed repatriation
tax break. It currently costs businesses 35% to bring foreign prof-
Change
$2.95
its back home, and a temporarily
low repatriation rate of 10% or so
could be part of a tax reform
package. This would help companies such as Apple and Microsoft,
which have nearly $400 billion in
overseas cash between the two.
Finally, companies that rely on
consumer spending could benefit
from lower personal income tax
rates. Amazon.com, for example,
could reap the rewards of higher
consumer spending, as could payment processors such as American Express. However, predicting
the big winners of individual income tax reform is a bit trickier.
% chg
1.9%
Change
-$0.88
% chg
-1.1%
Change
$13.53
% chg
1.4%
Price: $82.74 Day’s high: $83.01 Low: $82.61
4-WEEK TREND
Novartis AG
$100
The pharmaceutical company’s blood cancer treatment, CAR-T therapy, has been approved by U.S.
regulators. The treatment modifies one’s own immune cells, which are then reinjected into the body.
The price tag for a course of treatment is $475,000.
$82.74
$80
Aug. 2
Aug. 30
4-WEEK TREND
$1000
After the e-commerce giant revealed price reductions on select items at Whole Foods on Monday, a
survey of 18 items reportedly found the grocer was
50% more expensive on average than its biggest
grocery competitor, Walmart Stores.
$967.59
$800
Aug. 2
Aug. 30
STANDARD & POOR'S
CHANGE: +.5%
YTD: +218.76
YTD % CHG: +9.8%
CLOSE: 2,457.59
PREV. CLOSE: 2,446.30
RANGE: 2,443.77-2,460.31
COMP
NASDAQ
RUT
RUSSELL
+66.42
COMPOSITE
+7.64
RUSSELL 2000 INDEX
CHANGE: +1.1%
CLOSE: 6,368.31
YTD: +985.19
PREV. CLOSE: 6,301.89
YTD % CHG: +18.3% RANGE: 6,303.57-6,374.48
21,892.43
22,000
S&P
500
SPX
+11.29
INDUSTRIAL AVERAGE
CHANGE: +.6%
YTD: +34.19
YTD % CHG: +2.5%
Company (ticker symbol)
Martin Marietta Materials (MLM)
Shares rise ahead of post-Harvey rebuild.
Analog Devices (ADI)
Earnings and earnings view beat estimates.
March
CLOSE: 1,391.32
PREV. CLOSE: 1,383.68
RANGE: 1,381.20-1,392.77
Price
$ Chg
Incyte (INCY)
138.27 +13.30
Gains as NDA resubmit expected to be accepted by FDA.
Gilead Sciences (GILD)
Positive Kite Pharma deal pushes shares up.
20,000
81.23 +5.49
6,400
2,500
5,600
+7.2
+13.4
213.80 +10.98
83.72
+5.4
-3.5
Vulcan Materials (VMC)
121.86 +5.36
Polaris Materials acquisition, positive industry give boost.
+4.6
-2.6
+.52
2,457.59
2,300
March
Aug.
Advanced Micro Devices (AMD)
Favorable company notes, teams with Baidu.
12.67
Qorvo (QRVO)
Positive company note, reaches month’s high.
73.12 +2.66
+3.8 +38.7
CarMax (KMX)
Harvey could provide rush of demand.
65.99 +2.43
+3.8
+2.5
Brown-Forman (BF/B)
Posts strong quarterly results, boosts forecast.
53.14
+3.8
+18.3
+4.3
March
AP
Fund, ranked by size
Vanguard 500IdxAdmrl
Vanguard TtlSMIdxAdmrl
Vanguard InsIdxIns
Vanguard TtlSMIdxInv
Vanguard TtInSIdxInv
Vanguard TtlSMIdxIns
Vanguard InsIdxInsPlus
Vanguard TtInSIdxInsPlus
Fidelity Contrafund
Vanguard WlngtnAdmrl
NAV
227.72
61.40
224.71
61.37
17.23
61.41
224.73
115.27
119.30
71.39
Chg.
+1.10
+0.32
+1.09
+0.32
unch.
+0.32
+1.09
unch.
+1.00
+0.13
4wk 1
-0.3%
-0.6%
-0.3%
-0.6%
+0.1%
-0.6%
-0.3%
+0.1%
+0.4%
-0.1%
YTD 1
+11.3%
+10.5%
+11.3%
+10.4%
+18.6%
+10.5%
+11.3%
+18.7%
+22.0%
+7.2%
United Rentals (URI)
119.19 +4.25
Climbs in positive industry on post-Harvey rebuild.
+3.7
YTD
% Chg % Chg
Price
$ Chg
26.81
-2.42
-8.3
+16.6
Freeport-McMoRan (FCX)
14.56
Dips on Indonesian government deal on Grasberg mine.
-.65
-4.3
+10.4
Progressive (PGR)
46.57
Harvey damage expected to cut quarterly estimates.
-1.06
-2.2
+31.2
ETF, ranked by volume Ticker
SPDR S&P500 ETF Tr
SPY
iShs Emerg Mkts
EEM
SPDR Financial
XLF
VanE Vect Gld Miners
GDX
PowerShs QQQ Trust
QQQ
Barc iPath Vix ST
VXX
US Oil Fund LP
USO
ProShs Ultra VIX ST
UVXY
iShares Rus 2000
IWM
iShs iBoxx HY CpBd
HYG
Close
246.01
44.76
24.67
24.16
144.65
47.65
9.38
30.81
138.37
88.36
Chg.
+1.16
+0.07
+0.10
-0.26
+1.68
-0.22
-0.08
-0.38
+0.88
+0.24
20.85
-.33
-1.6
-22.1
Best Buy (BBY)
Sales concerns push shares lower.
54.19
-.83
-1.5
+27.0
United Continental Holdings (UAL)
Shares dip on Harvey financial hit.
62.02
-.87
-1.4
-14.9
Apache (APA)
38.37
Shares lower again as sector is affected by Harvey.
-.50
-1.3
-39.5
L Brands (LB)
Reverses early gain ahead of sales report.
36.06
Anthem (ANTM)
Shares fall early and hover near month’s low.
191.50
41.20
-.46
-1.3
-45.2
-2.33
-1.2
+33.2
-.51
-1.2
+17.6
SOURCE: BLOOMBERG AND THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
0.7%
20.9%
Health care
0.5%
15.9%
-0.3%
13.2%
Materials
0.7%
10.0%
Industrials
0.4%
9.7%
Consumer discret.
0.7%
9.6%
Financials
0.4%
6.1%
Consumer staples
unch.
5.8%
Telecom
-0.2%
2.4%
Energy
unch. -16.8%
Utilities
% Chg %YTD
+0.5% +10.1%
+0.2% +27.8%
+0.4% +6.1%
-1.1% +15.5%
+1.2% +22.1%
-0.5%
unch.
-0.8% -20.0%
-1.2%
unch.
+0.6% +2.6%
+0.3%
+2.1%
INTEREST RATES
MORTGAGE RATES
Type
Prime lending
Federal funds
3 mo. T-bill
5 yr. T-note
10 yr. T-note
Type
30 yr. fixed
15 yr. fixed
1 yr. ARM
5/1 ARM
Close 6 mo ago
4.25%
3.75%
1.16%
0.66%
1.01%
0.54%
1.73%
1.94%
2.14%
2.40%
Close 6 mo ago
3.76%
4.04%
2.96%
3.20%
3.10%
3.14%
3.11%
3.22%
SOURCE: BANKRATE.COM
COMMODITIES
Discovery Communications (DISCK)
Negative note, high short interest.
Technology
1 – CAPITAL GAINS AND DIVIDENDS REINVESTED
+11.7
+12.9
PERFORMANCE
DAILY YTD
SECTOR
TOP 10 EXCHANGE TRADED FUNDS
+1.94
Aug.
MARKET PERFORMANCE BY SECTOR
TOP 10 MUTUAL FUNDS
+15.3
Coach (COH)
Doesn’t make up early dip, nears August’s low.
STANDARD & POOR’S 500
+10.6 +37.9
+5.2
H&R Block (HRB)
Shares tumble after first-quarter report.
6,368.31
YTD
% Chg % Chg
+4.17
Company (ticker symbol)
Aug.
NASDAQ COMPOSITE
S&P 500’S BIGGEST GAINERS/LOSERS
LOSERS
Aug. 30
DOW JONES INDUSTRIALS
CHANGE: +.1%
CLOSE: 21,892.43
YTD: +2,129.83
PREV. CLOSE: 21,865.37
YTD % CHG: +10.8% RANGE: 21,839.47-21,914.26
GAINERS
Aug. 2
Amazon.com
Teresa Kersten is an employee of LinkedIn and is a member of The Motley
Fool’s board of directors. LinkedIn is
owned by Microsoft. Matthew Frankel
owns shares of AXP and AAPL. The
Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Amazon and AAPL. The Motley
Fool recommends AXP and CVS Health.
DOW
JONES
DJIA
$150
Price: $967.59 Day’s high: $969.41 Low: $956.91
MAJOR INDEXES
+27.06
$157.79
Commodities
Close
Prev.
Cattle (lb.)
1.06
1.05
Corn (bushel)
3.30
3.34
Gold (troy oz.)
1,306.40 1,313.10
Hogs, lean (lb.)
.61
.60
Natural Gas (Btu.)
2.94
2.96
Oil, heating (gal.)
1.67
1.67
Oil, lt. swt. crude (bar.)
45.96
46.44
Silver (troy oz.)
17.40
17.42
Soybeans (bushel)
9.23
9.31
Wheat (bushel)
4.04
4.03
Chg.
+0.01
-0.04
-6.70
+0.01
-0.02
unch.
-0.48
-0.02
-0.08
+0.01
% Chg.
+0.3%
-1.2%
-0.1%
+1.9%
-1.5%
+0.5%
-1.0%
-0.1%
-0.8%
+0.2%
% YTD
-11.3%
-6.4%
+13.6%
-7.3%
-21.1%
-1.8%
-14.5%
+9.2%
-7.4%
-1.1%
Close
.7737
1.2621
6.5926
.8411
110.36
17.7416
Prev.
.7737
1.2529
6.5975
.8339
109.71
17.8496
20
11.24
Close
12,002.47
28,094.61
19,506.54
7,365.26
51,193.52
40
6 mo. ago
.8061
1.3291
6.8688
.9437
112.17
20.0776
Yr. ago
.7643
1.3085
6.6764
.8977
102.97
18.8427
-0.42 (-3.6%)
S&P 500 P/E RATIO
The price-to-earnings ratio, based on
trailing 12-month “operating” earnings:
15
FOREIGN MARKETS
Country
Frankfurt
Hong Kong
Japan (Nikkei)
London
Mexico City
30
10
0
FOREIGN CURRENCIES
Currency per dollar
British pound
Canadian dollar
Chinese yuan
Euro
Japanese yen
Mexican peso
CBOE VOLATILITY INDEX
Measures expected market volatility
based on S&P 500 index options pricing:
Prev. Change
11,945.88
+56.59
27,765.01 +329.60
19,362.55 +143.99
7,337.43
+27.83
51,313.66
-120.14
7.5
%Chg. YTD %
+0.5% +4.5%
+1.2% +27.7%
+0.7%
+2.1%
+0.4% +3.1%
-0.2% +12.2%
SOURCES: MORNINGSTAR, DOW JONES INDEXES, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
IN-DEPTH MARKETS COVERAGE
USATODAY.COM/MONEY
20.43
22.5
30
0
SOURCE BLOOMBERG
+0.10 (+0.5%)
Businesses added robust 237,000 jobs in August
Payroll processor ADP
signals strong hiring
for third month in row
Paul Davidson
@Pdavidsonusat
USA TODAY
Some economists say this
week’s August jobs report may
disappoint, despite an encouraging survey released Wednesday,
because of a pattern of weak initial estimates in late summer.
Payroll processor ADP said the
private sector added a robust
237,000 jobs in August. That
would appear to signal a third
consecutive month of strong hiring in the Labor Department’s
employment report Friday, which
will be closely watched.
ADP was expected to count
185,000 new jobs, according to a
Bloomberg survey of economists.
The government report Friday is
projected to report 180,000 payroll gains by businesses and federal, state and local governments.
ADP attempts to forecast Labor’s private-sector total and gen-
The Labor Department
on Friday is projected
to report 180,000
payroll gains by
businesses and
federal, state and
local governments.
erally reflects similar broad
trends. However, it often varies
from it significantly. For July,
ADP’s estimate was 27,000 below
the government’s report of
205,000 private-sector gains.
ADP’s August tally, however,
may substantially overshoot La-
bor’s report. In August over the
past five years, the government
has reported a sluggish average of
146,000 job gains, according to an
analysis by High Frequency Economics. Over the next two revised
estimates, those increases were
upgraded to an average 192,000.
As a result, Jim O’Sullivan, High
Frequency’s chief U.S. economist,
is forecasting just 160,000 payroll
gains Friday.
But economist Andrew Hunter
of Capital Economics says the Labor Department’s recent tendency to initially undercount August
job gains “is probably just noise.”
He’s forecasting a healthy
200,000 employment gains.
A poor showing is unlikely to
prompt the Federal Reserve to
put off an anticipated announcement in mid-September that it
will begin reducing its $4.5 trillion portfolio of assets. That initiative is expected to gradually
push up long-term interest rates.
The Fed likely will be more focused on an unemployment rate
that could have fallen to a 16-year
low of 4.2%, putting more pressure on it to nudge rates higher to
head off an eventual sharp rise in
wages and price inflation.
USA TODAY
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
MONEY 5B
TECH
FCC gets record number of Net Neutrality comments
Nearly 22 million
are logged, but will it
matter in long run?
Jefferson
Graham
@jeffersongraham
USA TODAY
LOS ANGELES Nearly 22 million comments were logged
by the Federal Communications Commission weighing in on the issue
of Net Neutrality — but it probably won’t make a difference.
TALKING
TECH
Wednesday was the final day
consumers could voice their opinion to the agency on the changes
to Net Neutrality rules, which the
current chairman has said he
wanted to nix.
The rules were put into effect
during the Obama administration
in 2015 to prevent Internet providers from adjusting the speeds
of big-time users — of throttling
sites such as Netflix and Hulu.
But under the Trump presidency,
the current FCC chairman seeks
to abolish the rules, in an era of
deregulation.
For the past months, consumers have been urged to speak out
to the agency — egged on by folks
such as HBO’s John Oliver, who
made it a personal crusade.
Researcher Emprata studied
“We will continue to
not block, throttle or
discriminate against
lawful content, no
matter what the FCC
does.”
Internet giant Comcast, in a statement
the comments on behalf of the industry and said 60% were against
repeal and that most of the letters
were form-generated — as in
computer generated bots. It added that more than 7 million of the
comments came from temporary
(fake) email addresses.
In response, Evan Greer, the
campaign director for Fight for
the Future, which has been campaigning to keep the current
rules, said the Emprata study
proved her point. “They are getting trounced when it comes to
public opinion, and people from
across the political spectrum
overwhelmingly agree that they
don’t want their ISPs to have control over what they can see and
do on the Internet.”
The net result of all those comments, Greer suggests, shows that
people care deeply about the Internet, “and don’t want companies like Comcast, Verizon and
AT&T to control what we can see
and do online. The public record
matters, regardless of what the
FCC decides to do, as the agency
will have to defend its decisions
in court.”
That’s where the issue is expected to go next, as well as Con-
gress, which has a hearing set for
next week on the issue.
Meanwhile, despite the heated
rhetoric, Internet providers say
they don’t want to be regulated —
and insist they won’t throttle
your Internet.
“We will continue to not block,
throttle or discriminate against
lawful content, no matter what
the FCC does,” Internet giant
Comcast said in a statement.
Current FCC chairman Ajit Pai
is a Republican who voted against
the rules as a commissioner and
was named chairman by Trump
earlier this year. He has said the
regulations are heavy-handed,
have reduced investment in network expansion and slowed consumer access to faster broadband
connections.
These
selfies
can help
save lives
REVIEWED.COM
The arrangement makes strategic sense for both Amazon and
Microsoft, tech analyst Patrick
Moorhead says.
Researchers uncover
app that can detect
pancreatic cancer
Brett Molina
@brettmolina23
USA TODAY
DAVID BECKER, GETTY IMAGES
NEW BFFS: ALEXA, CORTANA
WILL TALK TO EACH OTHER
Ed Baig
ebaig@usatoday.com
USA TODAY
Alexa and Cortana
will be going to the
dance together.
On
Wednesday,
Amazon and Microsoft announced a first-of-its kind
collaboration between the onetime rival digital assistants that
will begin in earnest later this
year.
Owners of Amazon’s popular
Alexa-driven Echo speakers will
be able to say, “Alexa, open Cortana.” Folks with Windows 10 devices will be able to similarly ask
Cortana to open Alexa.
The tech companies are trying
to leverage each of the digital assistants’ respective strengths,
which will let you use the convenience of voice in more ways,
PERSONAL
TECH
both at home and in the workplace.
For example, as an Alexa customer you might ask Cortana out
loud to update your calendar inside Microsoft Office or to read
aloud an email. Cortana users can
summon Alexa to shop inside
Amazon, control smart home devices and otherwise tap into an
Alexa “skills” set that numbers
more than 20,000.
In a press release issued by
Amazon, Microsoft CEO Satya
Nadella said that “ensuring Cortana is available for our customers everywhere and across any
device is a key priority for us.
Bringing Cortana’s knowledge,
Office 365 integration, commitments and reminders to Alexa is a
great step toward that goal.”
His counterpart at Amazon,
Jeff Bezos, said that “the world is
big and so multifaceted. There
are going to be multiple successful intelligent agents, each with
access to different sets of data
and with different specialized
Echo owners will be
able to say, “Alexa,
open Cortana.” Folks
with Windows 10
devices will be able
to ask Cortana to
open Alexa.
skill areas. Together, their
strengths will complement each
other and provide customers with
a richer and even more helpful
experience. It’s great for Echo
owners to get easy access to
Cortana.”
The arrangement makes strategic sense for both Amazon and
Microsoft, tech analyst Patrick
Moorhead of Moor Insights &
Strategy says. Alexa gains access
to more than 500 million Windows 10 installations and access
to high productivity skills, while
Cortana taps into home automation and a diverse consumer base.
Moorhead doesn’t think the
agreement raises privacy con-
cerns. “It appears that Cortana on
Alexa and Alexa on Cortana operate as ‘apps,’ and therefore there
is no data sharing.”
Just how deep and smooth the
integration turns out to be remains to be seen. For now, the
other major digital assistants, Apple’s Siri and the Google Assistant, will remain independent of
Alexa, Cortana and each other.
But in June, Amazon’s Dave
Limp expressed interest in having Alexa work with both Siri and
Google Assistant. “If Apple or
Google want to come calling, my
phone number is out there,” he
said at the time. “I don’t know if I
can envision it, but I hope it will
happen on behalf of customers.”
Moorhead says the arrangement “certainly shakes up the
digital assistant market and will
likely put the most pressure on
Google Assistant.”
And fresh competition will
soon arrive from Apple’s HomePad and from Microsoft via the
Harman Kardon Invoke speaker.
Khosrowshahi takes the reins at Uber
‘This company has to
change,’ new CEO
says at first meeting
Marco della Cava
@marcodellacava
USA TODAY
Uber started a
new ride Wednesday, as incoming
CEO Dara Khosrowshahi took
over from co-founder Travis Kalanick at an all-hands headquarters meeting.
In audio leaked to Yahoo, a
subdued Kalanick can be heard
haltingly reciting Khosrowshahi’s
résumé — born in Tehran, emigrated to New York’s Westchester
County at age 9, educated at
Brown University, star at
Expedia.
“So Uber’s next chapter begins
today,” Kalanick says. “And we
have an inspiring leader to take
us there. His name is Dara. Let’s
clap.”
While Expedia’s outgoing CEO
pledged to maintain the corporate drive for which Uber, often
SAN FRANCISCO
controversially, became known,
the 48-year-old also vowed to address the toxic cultural issues
that rocked the company this
year.
“This company has to change,”
Khosrowshahi said, according to
a tweet posted by Uber’s communications team. “What got us
here is not what’s going to get us
to the next level.”
Khosrowshahi, who addressed
staffers in conversation with Uber board member and Kalanick
supporter Arianna Huffington,
added that the company’s legacy
of sexism and aggressiveness as
outlined in Susan Fowler’s explosive February blog post had to be
changed at a grass-roots level.
“If culture is pushed top down,
then people don’t believe in it,”
he said, according to an Uber
tweet. “Culture is written bottoms up.”
Another tweet indicated that
Khosrowshahi wants to bring in a
chairman who can serve as his
“partner at the board level.” Uber’s myriad issues include recent
board infighting that affected the
CEO search.
Uber investor Benchmark Cap-
2012 PHOTO BY PAUL SAKUMA, AP
Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi is now likely to focus on
filling multiple C-suite openings, including the CFO spot.
ital, which has a seat on the
board, is suing Kalanick for mismanagement. On Wednesday, a
judge ruled in Kalanick’s favor
that the dispute needs to be resolved through arbitration and
not a trial.
Khosrowshahi also is likely to
take advantage of multiple Csuite openings to create an inner
circle capable of executing his
marching orders for the ridesharing company.
The vacancies include chief operating officer, chief marketing
officer and chief financial officer.
The last of these is likely to be a
priority for Khosrowshahi, who
before taking the reins at Expedia
in 2005 served as CFO of Barry
Diller’s IAC Travel, which bought
Expedia in 2003.
Khosrowshahi’s close collaborator at Expedia, CFO Mark
Okerstrom,
was
promoted
Wednesday to chief executive of
the online travel company.
The all-hands meeting at Uber
was a private event. But reports
from those attending sketched
out a few salient details.
Khosrowshahi believes privately-held Uber, whose $70 billion valuation has taken a hit of
late, should go public in “18 to 36
months,” reported The Information’s Amir Efrati, citing a source
at the meeting. Khosrowshahi
also said Uber needs to “stabilize”
and then decide “if we narrow the
focus or continue with big bets,
and which ones,” according to the
source. The new CEO will start
work Tuesday.
Efrati also tweeted out a group
photo from the event, showing a
smiling Khosrowshahi — decked
out in a black Uber T-shirt —
standing next to Huffington and
Kalanick.
Could a selfie help save your
life?
Researchers at the University
of Washington are working on an
app that could analyze selfies
from your smartphone to detect
early signs of pancreatic cancer.
The app, called BiliScreen, uses
the smartphone’s camera along
with a series of algorithms to
check for levels of bilirubin in the
whites of a person’s eyes. This
buildup of bilirubin is one of the
earliest signs of pancreatic cancer, as well as other diseases such
as jaundice or hepatitis.
An early clinical study of 70
people found correctly identified
“cases for concern” nearly 90% of
the time.
“The hope is that if people can
do this simple test once a month
— in the privacy of their own
homes — some might catch the
disease early enough to undergo
treatment that could save their
lives,” said Alex Mariakakis, lead
author of the paper on the app.
“The hope is that if
people can do this
simple test once a
month — in the
privacy of their own
homes — some might
catch the disease
early.”
Alex Mariakakis, lead author of the
paper detailing the app
The app works with a 3-D
printed viewer resembling the
Google Cardboard VR headset,
and a pair of paper glasses to calibrate colors. The goal is for the
app to work on its own without
accessories.
The findings will be presented
during Ubicomp 2017, a conference hosted by the Association
for Computer Machinery, that
looks at computing that can occur
using any device, in any location,
and in any format.
Early screening for pancreatic
cancer is critical, since it has one
of the lowest survival rates
among all cancers. According to
the American Cancer Society,
pancreatic cancer has the lowest
survival rate at 8%.
DENNIS WISE, UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON
BiliScreen box helps detect
signs of jaundice in the eye.
USA TODAY
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
6B MONEY
STATE-BY-STATE
News from across the USA
ALABAMA Montgomery: The
state is nearing a deadline to
explain how it plans to overhaul
mental health care in Alabama
prisons. A federal judge has set
Sept. 7 for a status conference
after ruling in June that current
psychiatric care of inmates is
“horrendously inadequate.”
ALASKA Anchorage: A magnitude 4.0 earthquake hit part of
Alaska’s Aleutian Islands chain
this week, according to the U.S.
Geological Survey. There were no
reports of injuries or damage.
ARIZONA Phoenix: A Tempe
woman was sentenced to 30 days
in jail and three years of probation for cruelty to animals. Maricopa County prosecutors say two
of the six pets that Tiffany Fajardo was paid to care for died while
the owners were out of town and
the other four needed medical
care.
ARKANSAS Hot Springs: Face-
book will donate virtual reality
kits to every public high school in
Arkansas. Gov. Asa Hutchinson
says the state and the social
media giant are expanding their
TechStart Partnership that seeks
to generate interest in computer
science careers.
CALIFORNIA Action: Authori-
ties say members of the Golden
Valley High School volleyball
team had to evacuate their school
bus when it erupted in flames on
the trip back home from a game,
KABC-TV reports. Four patients
were examined by paramedics.
HIGHLIGHT: INDIANA
Eye doctors treat few eclipse cases
Shari Rudavsky
Indianapolis Star
The dire and
widespread warnings about
looking into the sun during the
solar eclipse Aug. 21 warded off
all but a few passing problems
for people’s eyesight, doctors
said.
In the days after the eclipse
— 91% of the sun was obscured
at its peak here — Raj Maturi,
an ophthalmologist with the
Midwest Eye Institute in the
Indianapolis area, and his colleagues saw two patients with
eclipse-related problems.
The most common effect?
Ghost images, in which patients
see a bright spot in the middle
of their visual field.
Maturi belongs to two national doctor groups that have
tracked eye problems from the
eclipse. One California man
suffered significant vision loss
because the glasses he bought
were fake.
“The damage to his retina
was in the shape of an eclipse,”
said Maturi, who didn’t offer
details about where the man
viewed the phenomenon or
how long he looked at the sun.
In Indianapolis, ophthalmologists saw patients who looked
at the sun with their naked eyes
for a few seconds as they put on
or took off eclipse glasses. Their
INDIANAPOLIS
to black victims who were coerced into confessing to crimes
they didn’t commit.
INDIANA Whiting: The city’s
park director resigned after
pleading guilty to a federal misdemeanor of helping an out-of-state
man involved in dogfighting. The
(Northwest Indiana) Times reports that Martin Jakubowski
admitted providing two pit bulltype dogs and housing for dogs at
city animal shelters.
COLORADO Vail: Vail Valley is
on pace to set another lodging
revenue record this summer, The
Vail Daily reports. A study finds
overall occupancy flat or slightly
down compared to last year, but
revenue increased as a result of
higher rates driven by demand.
CONNECTICUT New Haven: The
foundation that runs the Connecticut Tennis Center has begun
marketing the 13,500-seat stadium as an ideal site for small conventions and business meetings.
IOWA Des Moines: A former
prison nurse says Iowa’s corrections agency discriminated
against him because he’s transgender. His lawsuit filed in Polk
County is the first transgender
rights case since the Iowa Civil
Rights Act was amended in 2007
to include gender identity and
sexual orientation.
bitten by a shark last weekend in
Florida, The Palm Beach Post
reports. The incident occurred off
Bathtub Reef Beach, about 45
miles north of West Palm Beach.
GEORGIA Atlanta: The stadium
that served for years as Turner
Field for Major League Baseball’s
Atlanta Braves after a stint as
Centennial Olympic Stadium
now has a new name as a college
football home: Georgia State
Stadium.
HAWAII Honolulu: Hawaii’s
largest health care companies are
joining forces to help the state’s
growing homeless population
with medical care, the Honolulu
Star-Advertiser reports.
IDAHO Sandpoint: A response
plan is in place in the event of an
oil spill on Lake Pend Oreille and
the Clark Fork River, The Bonner
County Daily Bee reports. The
plan identifies at-risk resources
such as water intakes and wetlands.
ILLINOIS Chicago: School officials say Chicago’s police torture
scandal from the 1970s to the
early 1990s will be part of the
curriculum for 8th and 10th graders. Two years ago, millions of
dollars in reparations were paid
exposure did not last long
enough to do permanent damage. Anti-inflammatory drugs
and time helped those patients
return to normal in a few days,
Maturi said.
Had they looked longer, their
problems probably would have
been more extensive. “The cells
are in the middle of a shock
from so much energy coming to
the eye,” Maturi said. “Unfortunately, there’s no treatment
that works. If you’re literally
burning something, it’s impossible to bring it back to life.”
Some patients called the
ending its partnership with Greyhound. The Springfield-based
company says the change, effective Sept. 27, will enable more
express service.
MICHIGAN Mackinac Island:
Some tourism businesses on
Mackinac Island say they’re facing a severe worker shortage
because of a drop in federal visas.
The island has depended on
foreign workers to fill summer
jobs for decades.
MINNESOTA Mankato: A heart
transplant recipient gave a teddy
bear with a recording of her
heartbeat to the family of her
organ donor. Alyssa Sandeen
received Kate Leekley’s heart in a
transplant after Leekley died in a
2013 car crash, the Mankato Free
Press reports.
people are accused of tattooing
without a license in Mississippi’s
George County, WLOX-TV reports. Authorities say investigators responding to complaints of
illegal tattoos also found stolen
property and illegal drugs.
lice are looking for an armed man
who robbed a truck driver at the
Delaware House Service Area on
Aug. 5. The suspect fled on foot.
FLORIDA Stuart: A child was
President Trump glances
at the solar eclipse Aug. 21
without protective glasses.
MISSISSIPPI Lucedale: Two
DELAWARE Newark: State Po-
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: Security video shows two District of
Columbia police officers dancing
and questioning the sexuality of a
burglary victim. WRC-TV reports
that an internal investigation is
ongoing into the officers’ conduct.
MARK WILSON, GETTY IMAGES
MISSOURI St. Louis: At least
KANSAS Lawrence: A Kansas
farmer hopes to attract visitors to
his sunflower plot over the Labor
Day weekend, The Lawrence
Journal-World reports. George
Hunsinger’s six-acre plot has gray
mammoth sunflowers growing up
to 12 feet tall, and Peredovik
sunflowers growing up to 6 feet
tall.
KENTUCKY Frankfort: An in-
dependent consulting group says
Kentucky lawmakers should take
away some cost-of-living raises
awarded to state retirees over the
past 20 years.
LOUISIANA Baton Rouge: A
man who confronted burglars
attempting to break into his
wife’s vehicle in East Baton
Rouge Parish was shot, The Advocate reports. Authorities say
two suspects ran from the scene.
MAINE Camden: Police are
searching for a man who tried to
break into an armored truck
while wearing a yellow hazmat
suit and a tight black mask, WABI-TV reports. Authorities say
the man fled into nearby woods.
MARYLAND Hyattsville: U.S.
Transportation Secretary Elaine
Chao and Maryland Gov. Larry
Hogan have signed an agreement
to build a 16-mile light rail project in the traffic-congested
Maryland suburbs of Washington.
580 Missouri state government
employees have taken advantage
of paid parental leave since Gov.
Eric Greitens signed an order
that provides the benefit, St.
Louis Public Radio reports.
MONTANA Billings: The Montana Supreme Court has overturned a lower court ruling that
Billings owes 27 current
and former police officers $2.7 million in
back pay and penalties.
NEBRASKA Louisville: Former University of Nebraska
Medical Center
Chancellor Harold
Maurer retired three
years ago. Now, at age
80, he’s back at work
part-time as a pediatrician, The Omaha
World-Herald
reports.
NEVADA Elko:
Opening week
classes were canceled at the
Grammar No. 2 school in Elko
after officials determined that a
bat stuck in the building had
rabies, The Elko Daily Free Press
reports.
NEW HAMPSHIRE Henniker:
Three months after New England
College celebrated its largest
graduating class in its 70-year
history, the school welcomed its
largest incoming class ever. More
than 490 new students started
classes Monday at the Henniker
campus.
NEW JERSEY Passaic: State
MASSACHUSETTS Springfield:
Peter Pan Bus Lines says it’s
officials revoked the medical
license of Alex Blanco, a former
Eugene and Marilyn Glick Eye
Institute at the Indiana University School of Medicine concerned because they had
glanced up when the sun was
covered with a cloud, said Louis
Cantor, chairman of the department of ophthalmology. Others
were worried about pets outside during the time.
“There were a lot of misconceptions about it,” he said. “Just
being outside is not an issue.
It’s staring at the sun. ... Looking at an eclipse is no different
than looking at the sun on a
non-eclipse day.”
On a normal sunny day, people have little reason to go
through the discomfort of staring at a ball of hot gas. The only
safe way to look at the sun —
during an eclipse or any other
time — is through special glasses that render the rest of the
world invisible.
President Trump stared for a
moment at the sun during the
eclipse in Washington.
The White House has not
said whether he suffered any
vision changes.
The age of his eyes may have
offered a modicum of protection, Maturi said.
“The eyes of younger people
tend to have clearer lenses,
while their grandparents’ eyes
may have cloudier lenses,” he
said. “That may block the glare
a tad but doesn’t offer anywhere near full protection.”
Passaic mayor now serving a
prison term for taking $110,000
in bribes. The state Board of
Medical Examiners determined
that the podiatrist’s actions constituted a “crime involving moral
turpitude.”
NEW MEXICO Farmington: The
ousted superintendent for Navajo
Head Start says she was illegally
dismissed last month, The Daily
Times reports. Sharon Singer
filed a grievance alleging that her
removal violated tribal law. Head
of schools Tommy Lewis Jr. says
an audit shows financial abuse by
Singer.
NEW YORK New York: The
head of Metro-North’s biggest
union says he’ll ask members to
authorize a strike to protest contract disputes with the New York
commuter railroad, the Journal
News reports. The union represents conductors and engineers
on a line used by about 280,000
commuters a day.
NORTH CAROLINA Charlotte:
A lawsuit accuses the Charlotte
School of Law of defrauding taxpayers out of $285 million by
admitting unqualified students,
then manipulating records to
keep them enrolled, The Charlotte Observer reports.
NORTH DAKOTA Minot: Scandinavian folk art classes will be
offered during the annual Norsk
Hostfest at the State Fairgrounds
in Minot in late September, The
Minot Daily News reports.
OHIO West Chester: A
fundraising gala is set for
Sept. 23 for the National
Voice of America Museum of Broadcasting in
Ohio. The VOA’s Bethany
Station transmitted news
into Europe starting in
1944, and later into South
America before it was decommissioned in 1994.
OKLAHOMA Wynnewood:
PETA officials say they
have safety concerns
about 19 tigers that the
Greater Wynnewood
Animal Park recently
acquired from a Florida
zoo, The Oklahoman reports.
PETA wants them moved to a
wildlife refuge in Colorado.
OREGON Eugene: The widow of
a man who died a day after a
non-cardiac chest pain diagnosis
is seeking $10 million in a lawsuit
against McKenzie-Willamette
Medical Center in Springfield and
other care providers. The suit
says Aaron Martineau died from
a tear in the wall of a main heart
artery.
PENNSYLVANIA Philadelphia:
A man is suing health insurer
Aetna, saying his sister learned he
was taking HIV medicine after
the company mailed him an enve-
lope that allowed her to see information on where to purchase
the drugs.
RHODE ISLAND Providence:
Mayor Jorge Elorza wants to
borrow at least $200 million over
the next 10 years to fund repairs
at city schools, WPRI-TV reports.
City Councilwoman Jo-Ann Ryan
says the mayor’s plan would need
to be vetted by the City Council,
but appears to be responsible.
SOUTH CAROLINA Columbia:
The state’s Mothers Against
Drunk Driving chapter says
South Carolina’s DUI laws are
tilted in favor of people who drive
under the influence. MADD says
the law’s detailed requirements
on videotaping traffic stops often
leads to pleading DUI cases down
to reckless driving.
SOUTH DAKOTA Pierre: A
South Dakota game survey determined that the summer drought
intensified the state’s declining
pheasant population. The survey
shows a 45% decline statewide in
pheasants per mile, compared to
2016.
TENNESSEE Memphis: The
Orpheum Theatre in Memphis
has canceled a long-running
screening of Gone With the Wind
because of racially insensitive
content in the classic 1939 film.
TEXAS Houston: Authorities
moved nearly 6,000 Texas inmates from six prisons to other
institutions this week because of
tropical storm Harvey. The rising
Brazos River forced many of the
transfers.
UTAH Salt Lake City: A state
strategy to curb violence and
drug trafficking in a Salt Lake
City neighborhood near an overcrowded downtown homeless
shelter will cost $67 million over
two years. The effort includes a
stepped-up police presence, drug
treatment and job training and
placement.
VERMONT Rutland: Officials are
reviewing options to protect a
water main after discovering that
Vermont Railway built a siding
over the line. The Rutland Herald
reports that new railroad tracks
were discovered about two
months ago running over a manhole cover.
VIRGINIA Richmond: A federal
judge says Virginia prisons must
recognize the Nation of Gods and
Earths, also known as the Five
Percenters, as a religion and allow
its followers to congregate. The
Nation of Islam offshoot has been
considered a black supremacist
gang by state prison officials.
WASHINGTON Port Angeles:
Authorities hoisted a man by
helicopter from the side of a cliff
after he fell near Port Angeles on
the Olympic Peninsula. The
Coast Guard says the man was
taken to Seattle’s Harborview
Medical Center, where he was in
stable condition.
WEST VIRGINIA Charleston:
State officials say 13 counties are
more than 90 days past due on
payments to house inmates at
West Virginia’s regional jails. The
Charleston Gazette-Mail reports
that the late bills total around
$5.5 million.
WISCONSIN Madison: Secre-
tary Cathy Stepp of the Wisconsin Department of Natural
Resources is resigning to work for
the EPA. Gov. Scott Walker praises Stepp as a strong reformer. But
environmentalists say her attempt to scuttle Wisconsin Natural Resources magazine was a
move to silence a voice promoting science.
WYOMING Cheyenne: The
owner of a Cheyenne building
filed a lawsuit against the state
over rent payment. Wyoming
rented temporary offices while
the state Capitol complex is renovated. The building’s owners say
they’re owed $930,000.
Compiled from staff and wire reports.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
E2
High
hopes
SECTION C
Kyrgios
falters
Ohio State
kicks off
vs. Indiana,
hoping to
erase bad
memories of
last season’s
finish 4C
Mercurial Aussie, hampered
by injuries,
questions his
future after
first-round loss
in U.S. Open 5C
J.T. BARRETT BY GREG BARTRAM,
USA TODAY SPORTS
SPORTSLINE
FIRST WORD
THERE’S MORE
IMPORTANT
THINGS THAN FOOTBALL
RIGHT NOW. I’M EXCITED
FOR (TEXANS) THAT THEY
CAN GET HOME.”
Cowboys linebacker Sean Lee,
on the Dallas-Houston preseason game being canceled.
MAGIC NUMBER
17
Aces by No. 14 seed Nick Kyrgios in a 6-3, 1-6, 6-4, 6-1 firstround loss to fellow Australian
John Millman in the U.S. Open.
In the third set, Kyrgios received
on-court medical treatment
and at one point asked a ball
boy to grab and stretch his
arm. “My arm felt numb,” he
said. “My arm is not broken, but
it was sore.”
JEREMY BREVARD, USA TODAY SPORTS
Bowman Gray Stadium, one of 13 tracks cut from NASCAR’s schedule 45 years ago, still draws fans in Winston-Salem, N.C.
VENERABLE TRACKS ENDURE
MASSIMINO BY KEVIN JAIRAJ, USA TODAY SPORTS
LAST WORD
“THE ’NOVA NATION HAS
LOST A LEGEND AND GREAT
LEADER. COACH’S LOVE OF
FAMILY, COMMUNITY AND
TEAMWORK WERE EVIDENT
IN EVERY GAME HIS TEAMS
EVER PLAYED. ALL OF US, AS
COACHES AND PLAYERS,
IDOLIZED COACH MASS. ...
HE NEVER STOPPED BEING A
CHERISHED MENTOR AND
FRIEND.”
Villanova men’s basketball
coach Jay Wright, on the death
of Rollie Massimino, 82. The
coaching icon led Villanova for
19 seasons and guided the
Wildcats to the 1985 NCAA
national championship, stunning No. 1 Georgetown 66-64.
Massimino, who was inducted
into the Collegiate Basketball
Hall of Fame in 2013, also
coached at UNLV, Cleveland
State and, for the last 11 seasons, Keiser University in West
Palm Beach, Fla.
FANTASY FOOTBALL EXTRA
Our annual issue of USA TODAY
Sports Weekly contains more
than 20 pages of fantasy football content, including the latest
player rankings and stat projections, player capsules and a
cheat sheet to take to your
draft. Plus, a 32-page pullout
that includes MLB, NFL and
college football coverage.
Available on newsstands. To
subscribe, go to mysports
weekly.com or call 800-872-1415.
The digital edition is available
in the Apple, Google Play and
Amazon Kindle stores.
Edited by USA TODAY Sports
Mike Hembree
@mikehembree
Special for USA TODAY Sports
One of the most dramatic changes
in NASCAR occurred before Dale
Earnhardt Jr., the sport’s current
most popular driver, was born.
In 1972, stock car racing’s sanctioning body decided it had to get
smaller to get bigger. So NASCAR
trimmed the schedule of its top series from 48 races to 31.
The change stemmed from NASCAR’s new sponsorship agreement
with R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. and
its Winston cigarette brand. After
putting millions of dollars into stock
Eight of 13 venues
NASCAR dropped
in 1972 still active
“We’ve stood the
test of time —
almost 70 years. ...
We try to fine-tune
what’s here and
try to keep it up to
modern times.”
Gray Garrison, Bowman Gray
stadium promoter
car racing (and ultimately becoming
a keystone in NASCAR’s growth),
RJR played a major role in cutting
what became the Winston Cup
schedule and putting more emphasis
on faster tracks and longer races.
“It was the way to go, definitely,”
seven-time champion Richard Petty
told USA TODAY Sports. “What they
were doing was cutting out the 100mile races at the short tracks and going bigger. Winston started advertising NASCAR all over the country, and
that brought in bigger sponsors for
the teams. That’s how we got STP (a
longtime Petty sponsor).”
Lost in the downsizing, however,
were 13 short tracks, all booted from
v STORY CONTINUES ON 8C
Sports radio host comes to rescue
‘Houston is in distress, so you stop everything and help,’ Lopez says
Christine Brennan
cbrennan@usatoday.com
USA TODAY Sports
John Lopez pulled into a
middle-aged couple’s front yard
on a 16-foot fishing boat Tuesday afternoon. Although they
had never met, the Houstonarea couple was thrilled to see
him. He tossed them two life
vests and helped them onto the
boat. He never said his name, nor
did they say theirs. There was no
need for introductions. The couple was safe, and Lopez was again
on his way to find more survivors
in the wake of the overwhelming
devastation left by Hurricane
Harvey.
Moments later, though, when
Lopez let out what those of us
who know him recognize as his
hearty and distinctive laugh, the
couple quickly glanced at each
other, then did a double take, giving Lopez a good, long look. Although they never said it, Lopez
knew. He knew that they now
realized the man who had bor-
rowed a boat to come to their rescue was not simply an unknown
good Samaritan, but the popular
sports radio personality they listen to daily on Houston’s KILT
SportsRadio 610.
Not that that mattered to Lopez, then or ever. “These were
regular people,” he told USA TODAY Sports in a phone interview
Wednesday. “They never thought
the water would get that high, so
you get them out and they just
hug your neck and you never see
them again, but you feel good you
did it.”
v STORY CONTINUES ON 2C
JOHN LOPEZ
John Lopez spent Tuesday in
a boat rescuing people stranded in the Houston area.
THE MOST HIGHLY ACCLAIMED THRILLER OF THE YEAR
RICHARD ROEPER
“ONE OF THE VERY BEST MOVIES I’VE SEEN THIS DECADE.”
JEREMY RENNER ELIZABETH OLSEN
FROM THE WRITER OF ‘SICARIO’ & ‘HELL OR HIGH WATER’
NOW PLAYING EVERYWHERE
USA TODAY
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
2C SPORTS
HURRICANE HARVEY
Watt targets $10M with fundraiser
Texans standout’s
efforts pay off in
online donations
Josh Peter
@Joshlpeter11
USA TODAY Sports
The fundraising effort by
Houston Texans star defensive
end J.J. Watt is expected to raise
$10 million for Hurricane Harvey
victims after surpassing $6 million Wednesday and dwarfing the
original goal of $200,000, according to YouCaring, the online company taking donations and
managing the effort.
Watt, a four-time all-pro end
and three-time NFL defensive
player of the year, started the
campaign on YouCaring.com on
Sunday with a donation of
$100,000. Since then, Tennessee
Titans owner Amy Adams Strunk
donated $1 million and NBA star
Chris Paul donated $50,000, but
the most of the money raised has
come from 65,000 donors contributing between $20 and $100
apiece.
“This thing is gaining only
more and more steam and momentum,” Dan Saper, CEO of
YouCaring, told USA TODAY
Sports. “Who knows? But we’re
confident we can get to $10 million. J.J.’s confident he can get
there.”
Saper said Watt’s fundraising
campaign is on pace to raise more
money than any other crowdfunding effort, with the record
being about $8 million raised
through GoFundMe in 2016 for
victims of the mass shooting at
Pulse nightclub in Orlando.
When Watt posted his first
BUTCH DILL, AP
The Texans’ J.J. Watt signs autographs for fans holding signs referencing Hurricane Harvey on Saturday in New Orleans.
tweet about his Hurricane Harvey relief campaign, Saper said,
YouCaring’s website crashed.
“Our poor head of engineering
the other day, he was up until
2 a.m. shoring up the servers and
back at it at 7 a.m.,” Saper said.
“We had never experienced a
surge of traffic of that magnitude
before.
“Our engineering team has
been working to ensure that it
(the website) has been up, and it’s
been largely up 99.9% of the time
since then. So we’ve got through
the woods on that initial surge.”
Saper, noting that his staff of
about 50 based in San Francisco
operates solely on optional tips,
said the money raised by Watt’s
effort will be handled by the JJ
Watt Foundation, a 501c3
non-profit.
“He’s now posting photos and
his team is posting photos showing massive cafeterias filled with
supplies that they’re purchasing,
that this is real, they’re not just
sitting on a pile of cash,” Saper
said. “They’re taking action immediately and they’re going to be
delivering supplies in trucks as
soon as they get in. So he’s been
amazing at this.”
Watt’s mother, Connie, and
members of the Texans staff have
been
communicating
with
YouCare.com on Watt’s behalf,
according to Saper. But Watt has
been active on Twitter, posting
updates when the campaign
reached new milestones and
Wednesday setting the $10 million goal.
The campaign raised $500,000
within 24 hours, and the surge
continued with the following
milestones: $1 million by Monday
night, $3 million by midday Tuesday (bolstered by the Titans’
$1 million donation) and $6 million by Wednesday afternoon.
With boat and expertise, radio host lends hand
v CONTINUED FROM 1C
John and I go back to the late
1980s, when he wrote for the
Houston Chronicle and we sometimes shared a row in the media
tribune at venues across seven
Olympic Games.
In 1991, we even shared a wild
cab ride through the dark streets
of Havana during the Pan American Games, with John translating
for the two of us. We haven’t seen
each other in several years, but
when I looked at his Twitter feed
Tuesday, I knew I had to get in
touch.
“(My boat) in dry dock 100
(miles) away. But I have truck,
life vests, etc. (Message) me if
you have a boat. I’ll pick up.”
Over the next half-hour, Lopez, an avid fisherman whose
home was not flooded, sent out a
few similar tweets. He received a
dozen responses and ended up
with two small fishing boats, using one for the first part of the afternoon, then switching to the
second for the rest of the day.
“Have acquired a Jon boat,
about to start rescue efforts in
Walden on Lake Houston. DM
me address if you need out.”
Forty minutes later, Lopez
sent out another tweet, this one
accompanied by a video of his
view of the flooded streets he was
traversing. His message was simple: “@ me if you need help”
Over the next 10 hours, Lopez
rescued 18 to 20 people.
“Some of them got on the boat
with only a trash bag full of
clothes,” he said. “They’ve just
lost everything, yet they’re saying, ‘God is good.’ Their appreciation was amazing. By the time I
was done, I realized I might have
helped them, but they helped me
more. They made me feel better.”
There were some “spooky”
moments, he said. He turned into
one neighborhood and spotted a
white truck, totally submerged,
with its engine running, its lights
on and its windshield wipers
going.
“Oh crap,” Lopez said. “I had to
work my way over to look and see
what was in there. But I’m thinking to myself, ‘I don’t want to do
this. What if there’s a body in
there?’ ”
Thankfully, the truck was
empty. “I guess the water was rising so fast, that person got out
that fast. I hope they are OK.”
Lopez talked to one man in an
upscale neighborhood who wanted to stay put on the second floor
of his flooded home but was concerned about the neighbor across
the street. So Lopez drove the
boat to the front of that house,
tied up to a brick banister,
jumped into nearly chest-deep
water, slowly pushed open the
front door and called out, “Anybody there?”
No answer. He waded into the
foyer, then the living room. A garbage bag and picture frame floated by. Soon, he noticed
something else: an empty wheelchair, floating sideways in the
game room.
It was time for another “Oh
crap.” He trudged up to the landing of a staircase and yelled upstairs. “I didn’t hear a thing. That
house was vacant, thankfully.”
Lopez often found himself mo-
toring through water that he figured was about 6 feet deep. The
roads were familiar, of course.
This is where he lives. On one
boulevard he drives often, the
tops of the mailboxes were his
only navigation system.
As experienced as he is at
boating, it wasn’t always easy. “I
actually bumped into what I
thought was a log and realized it
was the top of a car.”
The devastation was all around
him. At some distance, he spotted
a sign listing the clearance for a
road: 16 feet 8 inches. “Water was
touching the bottom of the sign.”
Lopez didn’t just save people.
He rescued a couple of dogs and
even came upon a barn, helping
lead a woman’s two horses to
safety by poking a stick into the
floodwater to find the shallowest
points for the horses to navigate.
Throughout the day, Lopez
was never alone in his efforts.
“The best part about it was all the
people who were out there on
boats, probably 30-40 different
boats, firefighters, the Coast
Guard, just people out there try-
ing to help.”
I asked him if he had seen the
recently released movie Dunkirk,
the World War II story of the rescue of thousands of British soldiers by hundreds of British
citizens in pleasure boats.
“Oh my gosh, it really was like
that,” Lopez said. “I was by the
Costco and I turned around and I
saw like six boats coming at me. I
don’t mean to sound overly dramatic, but it was like a military
landing.”
And he, of course, was an integral part of it.
“I was just really trying to help.
I just wanted to do what needed
to be done. The fisherman’s code
says when you see a boat in distress, you stop everything and
help that boat. Now Houston is in
distress, so you stop everything
and help.
“I knew I had the expertise. I
just needed a boat.”
with your pattern of egregious
safety-related violations including your hit on a defenseless player during the 2015 Wild Card
game and your hit against a Baltimore tight end away from the
play on January 3, 2016 … When
players violate the rules intended
to protect player safety on a repeated basis, and particularly
when the violations carry with
them a significant risk of injury to
an opposing player … you must be
held accountable for this continuing unacceptable conduct.”
The Bengals linebacker was initially disciplined for breaking two
rules for a hit on Kansas City
Chiefs fullback Anthony Sherman on Aug. 19 — hitting a player
in a defenseless posture and unnecessary roughness. The defenseless posture rule specifically
protects the head and neck area,
and Burfict and the Bengals
staunchly maintained that the
linebacker hit Sherman in the
chest, though Sherman’s head did
snap back upon contact. After
hearing Burfict’s appeal via conference call Tuesday, Thrash
ruled that the five-game penalty
was too severe. He won’t be able
to play now until Oct. 1 at the
Cleveland Browns. It is the third
consecutive season in which the
Bengals will be without the 2013
Pro Bowler to start the year.
— Jim Owczarski,
The Cincinnati Enquirer
HOURS AFTER BEING CUT,
HADEN JOINS STEELERS
MASSIMINO LOSES BATTLE
WITH CANCER AT 82
Joe Haden’s former AFC North
rivals are his new teammates.
The cornerback agreed to a threeyear deal worth $27 million with
the Pittsburgh Steelers on
Wednesday, according to ESPN,
just hours after he was released
by the Cleveland Browns. A twotime Pro Bowl selection, Haden
has struggled with injuries and
missed 16 games in the last two
seasons. Haden, 28, joins a Steelers defense that ranked 12th in
the NFL last season but was
shredded by Tom Brady (384
passing yards, three touchdowns)
and the New England Patriots in
the AFC Championship Game.
Rollie Massimino, who was the
coach for one of the greatest upsets in college basketball history,
died Wednesday, according to a
release from Keiser University.
He had been battling cancer. He
was 82. For the last 11 years, Massimino has been the coach for
Keiser, an NAIA school in West
Palm Beach, Fla. But he was most
famous for coaching Villanova,
which entered the 1985 tournament seeded eighth, to the NCAA
championship against Georgetown, the top-ranked team in the
country. Until recent years, Massimino was in relatively good
health. He had surgery to remove
a tumor in his lung in 2011, suffered a collapsed lung and had
brain surgery in 2016. But he was
still coaching. At Keiser, he led
the program — one he started in
2006 — to eight NAIA tournaments with a national runner-up
and a semifinal as his two best
finishes. “As our campus community deeply mourns the loss of
Coach Massimino, we extend our
warmest thoughts and condolences to his wife Mary Jane and
the entire Massimino family,”
Keiser University Chancellor Arthur Keiser said in a statement.
“We are so truly honored to have
shared this time with him and
take some degree of comfort in
knowing the positive impact he
has had on college students for
the last four decades remains immeasurable.” The 1985 Villanova
championship, though, might be
his greatest accomplishment.
Coming into the tournament, the
Wildcats had lost seven of their
previous 13 games and lost to
St. John’s by 15 points in the second round of the Big East tournament. They squeaked by the first
two rounds, beating Dayton by
two and Michigan by four. They
then beat Maryland, North Carolina and Memphis State, all seeded higher, before defeating
All-American center Patrick
Ewing and tournament favorite
Georgetown in the final. Massimino left Villanova in 1992, spent
two years at UNLV and seven
more at Cleveland State before
retiring to play golf in South Florida. It was there that an old
friend, Rick Smoliak, asked for
advice from Massimino on starting a basketball program at
Northwood College (which became Keiser). Instead, when the
program started in 2006, Massimino became the coach. Before
going to Villanova in 1973, he
spent two seasons at Stony Brook
and one season as an assistant
coach to Chuck Daly at Penn.
He had an overall coaching record of 816-462 in 41 seasons.
— Kevin Spain
FOLLOW COLUMNIST
CHRISTINE BRENNAN
@cbrennansports to keep up with
the latest sports issues.
IN BRIEF
KAREEM ELGAZZAR, USA TODAY NETWORK
Bengals linebacker Vontaze Burfict
will be eligible to return Oct. 1.
BURFICT WINS APPEAL; BAN
REDUCED TO THREE GAMES
Vontaze Burfict, Marvin Lewis and the Cincinnati Bengals
were vindicated. Sort of. James
Thrash, the NFL and NFL Players Association’s appeals officer
for on-field discipline, ruled to reduce Burfict’s five-game suspension to three games Wednesday,
the league announced. In the letter notifying Burfict of his suspension, NFL vice president of
football operations Jon Runyan
wrote: “This is not your first offense with respect to illegal hits
to defenseless players; to the contrary, this incident is consistent
KEN BLAZE, USA TODAY SPORTS
The Steelers hope cornerback Joe
Haden can be a difference-maker.
From staff and wire reports
USA TODAY
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
SPORTS 3C
NFL
Texans may be wise to open on road
Jarrett Bell
jbell@usatoday.com
USA TODAY Sports
Heading home to their hurricane-ravaged city Wednesday was
a good thing for the Houston
Texans.
Staying home for their regularseason opener against the Jacksonville Jaguars on Sept. 10, while
Houston deals with the effects of
Hurricane Harvey, is another
matter.
“I think that would be the most
important thing for the people,
knowing how much people care
about football in Houston,” Texans linebacker Brian Cushing told
the Houston Chronicle.
“For us to play that first game
at home, it would smooth a lot of
things over. I’m not saying completely, but I believe it would
help.”
The most important thing?
That’s football mentality for
you. Sure, the opener has been
circled on the calendar for
months, and staging it as scheduled at NRG Stadium would provide a boost of civic pride.
But it’s too early to declare that
having this game in Houston is
the right thing.
The Texans’ preseason finale
against the Dallas Cowboys was
scrapped Wednesday once it finally became possible for Houston’s players to return home. The
exhibition, scheduled for Thurs-
day, had been relocated to Arlington, and 40,000 tickets were sold
to fans who thought they would
be supporting relief efforts.
Here’s hoping common sense
prevails as the NFL determines
what to do with the Texans’ next
game. Given Houston’s stretched
resources and the condition of
the region’s infrastructure, the
easiest solution would be to flip
home dates between the AFC
South rivals, which would put the
Dec. 17 game slated for Jacksonville in Houston. That would
mean the Texans would open the
season with three consecutive
road games and the Jags would
do likewise to close the season.
So be it.
Cushing, like his coach, Bill
O’Brien, can’t be knocked for having can-do spirit. Yet given the
devastation left by the storm,
which broke the U.S. rainfall record and dumped more than 50
inches on Houston, the priority
there has to do with search, rescue and recovery. There are evacuation centers all across the
region. Thousands have lost
homes. Transportation has been
short-circuited.
The Texans, diverted to Dallas
this week after a Saturday night
preseason game in New Orleans,
are feeling all of this. And we
know that star defensive end J.J.
Watt gets it. Banking on his platform and popularity, he began a
fundraising campaign Sunday
with a goal of $200,000. By
Wednesday, he’d raised more
than $6 million and was hoping
to reach $10 million. Good thing
he’s not just sticking to sports.
TONY GUTIERREZ, AP
Coach Bill O’Brien would like the Texans to keep their Sept. 10
opener against the Jaguars at home in Houston.
Still, seeing the comments
from Cushing and O’Brien —
while Houston is still in life-saving mode — made me wonder
about perspective. Should the city
even think about hosting a football game in less than two weeks?
“If our stadium’s ready to go,
it’s important to have that game
at home,” O’Brien said. “Maybe it
gives our fans a chance, for three
hours at least, to cheer and kind
of forget about the trials and
tribulations of what would be the
last two weeks.
“I think we have the best fans,
anyway, so imagine what NRG
Stadium will be like for that first
home game. Football’s big in Tex-
as, anyway, but when you put it in
Houston and take into consideration such a catastrophic event,
football becomes even bigger. It
gives our fans a chance to cheer
and let off some steam.”
Memo to O’Brien: It’s not just
about the condition of the stadium.
He means well, offering hope.
Maybe in a week, O’Brien’s sentiments would be spot on.
But now? His comments sound
too much like they’re coming
from a football coach with a limited view of a bigger picture.
Should resources needed to deal
in a post-Harvey world be diverted for a game?
The NFL, pondering alternatives, is in no rush to make a
decision.
After Katrina, the New Orleans
Saints spent an entire season on
the road. At the moment, the Texans and the league, which has
moved games in recent years on
short notice amid weather-related issues, need to wait and see
how the recovery unfolds in the
coming days.
The NFL usually gets it right in
these situations. Its decision ultimately might be swung by the importance of civic pride that could
be boosted by a game and whether that dovetails with critical assets needed for recovery efforts.
Cushing and O’Brien, meanwhile, are hardly alone in their
sentiments.
“I’m cautiously optimistic they
they’ll play the opener here,” Max
Edison, sports editor of the Houston Defender, told USA TODAY
Sports. “Hopefully, in 12 days, it
will be the kind of diversion
where people will say, ‘Let’s get
back to normal.’ By then, people
will be looking for that alternative. And nothing says that like
football in Texas.
“From the high school games
to colleges to the Texans, football
will help the motivation and
bring the area back. That’s going
to be the reward for all the hard
work that will be needed with the
recovery.”
Or so it is suggested.
FOLLOW NFL COLUMNIST
JARRETT BELL
@JarrettBell for commentary,
analysis and breaking news.
Fox
Sports
president
stands
by
Vick
Network adds
CHARLIE
RIEDEL, AP
Former
quarterback
Michael
Vick
will be a
studio
analyst
for “Fox
NFL
Kickoff” and
will
make
appearances on
Fox
Sports 1
shows.
former QB to NFL
pregame show
A.J. Perez
@byajperez
USA TODAY Sports
NEW YORK Fox Sports President
Eric Shanks said he absolutely
and completely understands the
backlash over the network’s hiring of former quarterback Michael Vick, though Shanks added
it was “the right thing to do.”
Vick will be a studio analyst for
Fox NFL Kickoff and will make
appearances on Fox Sports 1
shows, as first reported by USA
TODAY Sports on Friday. A
Change.org
petition
asking
Shanks to reconsider the hire because organizers “do not believe
that Michael Vick is repentant”
for his part in a dogfighting ring
more than a decade ago had gathered more than 60,000 signatures
as of Wednesday afternoon.
“We absolutely and completely
understand,” Shanks told USA
TODAY Sports. “It’s not a different reaction than what we had
prepared ourselves for internally
at Fox Sports. ... We talk about
what happened then. What type
of person is Mike now? What
debt has he paid to society? We
still believe it’s the right thing to
do.”
Vick served 18 months in pris-
on after his 2007 conviction related to a dogfighting operation
on his property in Virginia that
led to his release from the Atlanta
Falcons. Vick returned to the
NFL in 2009 with the Philadelphia Eagles and finished his 13season career with the Pittsburgh
Steelers in 2015.
As evidenced by the petition
and through social media reaction, many thought that Vick’s
ties to dogfighting should pre-
clude him from having a broadcast career.
“Clearly, we knew that there
was potential to be a reaction,”
Shanks said. “We spent a lot of
time with Mike. We looked at his
experience playing in the league
after he paid his debt to society.
“We looked at his interaction
and support he’s gotten from people like Andy Reid at the Chiefs
and (former NFL coach) Tony
Dungy. Over the last 10 or 11
years, not only has he paid his
debt to society but he’s done everything a person who has made
a terrible mistake like that can do.
We felt it was the right person at
the right time for us.”
Former NFL receiver Nate
Burleson, who is among the new
faces on CBS’ The NFL Today
pregame show, said Vick has paid
his debt.
“If you don’t like Michael Vick,
fine,” Burleson said. “If you don’t
want to watch Michael Vick, fine.
But if you’re asking him to pay after he spent time in prison for a
crime, then how much more
work does he have to do? Does he
have to pay for it the rest of his
life?
“Society says when somebody
commits a crime, they go to jail,
and once they get out, they have
served their time. I have a problem with people who have a problem with Vick having a job.”
BASKETBALL
LaVar, rest of Ball family to star in reality show
Docuseries will air
on Facebook Watch
Scott Gleeson
@scottmgleeson
USA TODAY Sports
Move over, Kardashians. The
Ball family is stepping into the reality spotlight — and doing it on
Facebook, not the E! cable
channel.
Los Angeles Lakers rookie
point guard Lonzo Ball and his
outspoken father, LaVar Ball, star
alongside the rest of the family in
a reality docuseries, Ball in the
Family.
In a preview for the show, set
to premiere with the first two
episodes on Facebook Watch on
Thursday, the first question
posed in a behind-the-set interview with Lonzo is one most of
the country also would like to
know:
“What’s the deal with your
dad?”
LaVar Ball has catapulted himself into the public spotlight in a
way no sports dads ever have
thanks to outlandish comments
that include him saying he could
beat Michael Jordan one-on-one.
He also has used his Big Baller
Brand to give Lonzo his own $495
shoe, the ZO2.
LaVar is heard in the preview
saying, “My three boys (Lonzo,
LaMelo and LiAngelo) are the
best ballplayers I’ve ever seen in
my entire life.”
“Family is everything to me,”
LaVar adds in the preview. “I’ve
always told my boys, ‘You can
make all the money in the world.
But it’s not fun if you’re just by
yourself.’ ”
LaVar and his wife, Tina Ball,
serve as producers on the show.
Tina’s recovery from a stroke, in
which she struggled to speak for a
period of time, is emotionally
chronicled in the series.
“We wanted to give our fans an
unfiltered look into our lives and
show them a side of us that isn’t
typically seen,” LaVar said in a
statement. “We have a big community of fans on Facebook, so
we’re excited our series is going
to be on Watch. And who better
to help us tell our story than
Bunim/Murray Productions.”
Bunim/Murray Productions is
best known for its part in Keeping
Up with the Kardashians.
The reality show falls in line
with LaVar’s branding tactics, but
it’s unclear how it will affect his
three sons. There’s massive pressure already on Lonzo to restore
greatness to the Lakers franchise.
Team president of basketball operations Magic Johnson previously compared LaVar to Kris
Jenner, saying: “The Kardashians,
we didn’t say that the mom (Jenner) was bad, and she made them
a lot of money, right? She’s
bragged on her daughters, and I
think it’s the same here.”
New episodes will be available
on Sundays beginning Sept. 10.
BUNIM/MURRAY PRODUCTIONS
Lonzo Ball, bottom, and his younger brother LaMelo will be
featured in their new family reality show “Ball in the Family.”
4C SPORTS
E2
USA TODAY
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
FSU-’Bama: Who can afford loss?
Each week during the season, the USA TODAY Sports
college staff (Paul Myerberg, George Schroeder, Erick
Smith, Eddie Timanus and Dan Wolken) will provide
their answers to on an intriguing question from college
football. This week:
The Florida State-Alabama
showdown is one of the biggest openers in recent memory. One of them has to lose, of
course. So which team will
have a better shot at the Playoff after a loss?
MARK KONEZNY, USA TODAY
SPORTS
Jimbo
Fisher
and
Florida
State
will
have
plenty
more
chances
to prove
their
worth.
their place in the title conversation. Not to mention, isn’t the Atlantic Coast Conference a better
league than the SEC? Agree to
disagree, I guess. What we can all
agree on is that the loser of this
game still controls its road to a
national semifinal — just win out.
PAUL MYERBERG
You’d think Alabama at first blush
and not be wrong in one key respect: The Crimson Tide almost
certainly would get the benefit of
the doubt if push came to shove
in early December.
There are more than a few
benefits from being college football’s gold standard; one is that
Alabama’s name value is off the
charts. Another plus for the Tide
is the lack of secondary title contenders in the Southeastern Conference, which has essentially
smoothed out the team’s path to
yet another Playoff berth.
But I’m going with Florida
State here, since the Seminoles
would have greater opportunities
from Week 2 forward to regain
GEORGE SCHROEDER
Alabama’s path to the Playoff after a loss in the opener is easier
than Florida State’s. The ACC is
deeper than the SEC. With a loss,
either team’s margin for error becomes narrow. It’s possible either
could get into the Playoff as a
two-loss conference champion,
but so far we haven’t seen one.
More likely, the loser needs to
run the table. This is hard to fathom, but the SEC currently provides Alabama an easier road.
It’s also worth noting the equity Alabama has built up over the
last few years as Nick Saban built
a dynasty. Win four national
championships in eight years,
you’ve got street cred with every-
one, including the selection committee. If necessary, the ’Bama
Bump is real, y’all.
ERICK SMITH
A loss by either team will not do
too much damage, as long as neither gets blown out. Even then,
it’s hard to imagine a one-loss
ACC or SEC champion being left
at home. Alabama is in better position to run the table should it
stumble. The Crimson Tide have
won their conference the last
three seasons, and the schedule
also sets up nicely this season.
Their four conference road
games are Vanderbilt, Texas
A&M, Mississippi State and Au-
burn. The path is much more difficult for Florida State with
games against Louisville and Miami (Fla.) at home and trips to
Clemson and Florida. The Seminoles could get there with two
losses, but that would require
some stumbles from other teams.
EDDIE TIMANUS
Here’s the problem with a potential Alabama recovery from an
opening-day loss to Florida State:
If the rest of the SEC proved to be
as mediocre as, well, as it was last
year and is projected to be in preseason polls, the Crimson Tide
won’t have another opportunity
for a signature win to put on their
résumé for the committee. Their
remaining non-conference games
are pedestrian, with all due respect to Colorado State, so under
those circumstances a second
loss sustained in SEC play could
prove fatal.
FSU, on the other hand, still
would have a shot at a marquee
win. It’s at Clemson, of course, so
coming out of Death Valley with
that W is always easier said than
done. But if the Seminoles can
pull it off and then go on to win
the ACC, they should be Playoff
bound even with a stumble in
conference or possibly in the regular-season finale in Gainesville.
DAN WOLKEN
It’s Alabama. We’ve seen them
lose early before and make the
Playoff, so if the Crimson Tide
happen to be 0-1 on Saturday
night, it would be pretty easy to
see the season falling into the
same pattern as 2014 and 2015.
You could even envision a scenario in which Alabama ends up
with two losses this season but
makes the Playoff on the strength
of winning the SEC title. Florida
State probably doesn’t have that
luxury. If the Seminoles lose Saturday, they almost certainly have
to run the table.
Trophy makes rounds,
beginning in Minnesota
KIM KLEMENT,
USA TODAY
SPORTS
Erick Smith
@erick_smith
USA TODAY Sports
One of the most famous trophies in college football could be
making a stop near you during
the 2017 season.
The Amway Coaches Poll Trophy will crisscross the country
during the season. The trophy
with its famous crystal football is
awarded in conjunction with the
American Football Coaches Association every year to the winner
of the College Football Playoff.
The kickoff of the tour starts
Thursday in Minnesota. The trophy is being accompanied by USA
TODAY Sports assistant managing editor Thomas O’Toole, who,
as a side gig, also serves as a
Dancing with the Stars analyst.
The Golden Gophers are hosting Buffalo in the home opener
for new coach P.J. Fleck.
One day before the game, the
trophy appeared at the Minneso-
The
Amway
Coaches
Poll
Trophy
is always a
welcome
sight.
ta State Fair. Darrell Thompson,
Minnesota’s all-time leading
rusher and current radio analyst
for the team’s broadcasts, will be
on hand for an event at TCF Bank
Stadium before the game.
“It’s a tremendous honor for
myself and the state of Minnesota
and the University of Minnesota
football program,” Thompson
said of hosting the trophy.
“There’s kind of been a new, infused energy around the coach.
It’s great to be recognized to have
the trophy here for the opener.”
There will also be a stop Satur-
day in Los Angeles for Southern
California’s game against Western
Michigan.
Former Trojans coach John
Robinson, who won a national title at the school in 1978, will
make two appearances with the
trophy — Friday at an Amway
Business Center event and Saturday before the game at the USC
fan fest.
There are six other scheduled
stops through October. More will
be added in the weeks leading up
to the announcement of the playoff pairings on Dec. 3.
Title-hungry Ohio State opens vs. Indiana
With plethora of talent, new offensive leader, team fired up for season
THE OFFENSE
Paul Myerberg
@PaulMyerberg
USA TODAY Sports
BLOOMINGTON, IND.
Ohio State’s
push for the College Football
Playoff begins Thursday night in
Bloomington, Ind., with a matchup against Indiana that has no
shortage of story lines.
Right off the bat: The Buckeyes’ new offensive coordinator,
Kevin Wilson, resigned as the
head coach at Indiana in December amid allegations of player
mistreatment, adding a layer of
intrigue to this season-opening
pairing.
But there’s far more to keep in
mind as No. 2 Ohio State takes
aim at a return trip to the Playoff,
after last season’s humbling loss
to Clemson in the Fiesta Bowl.
That was a last-straw moment
for coach Urban Meyer, who
quickly jettisoned former coordinator Tim Beck in favor of Wilson, the former Oklahoma
assistant with a reputation as one
of college football’s top offensive
minds.
The offense will be under the
spotlight, potentially overshadowing the factors — known and
unknown — that could either lift
this program to its second national championship under Meyer or lead OSU to cede the
Big Ten Conference East Division
to Penn State or rival Michigan.
As the Buckeyes prepare for
the opener, here are four aspects
to consider: the offense, the quarterback, the defensive line and
the secondary.
The biggest change to Ohio
State’s attack is in pace and tempo, two factors — along with elite
quarterback play and a varied list
of skill talent — that defined Wilson’s scheme during an impressive stint with Oklahoma.
What might be slightly overlooked is how Wilson’s philosophy of attacking defenses entails
sharing the wealth, which might
represent an equally profound
change from the Buckeyes’ 2016
system. A year ago, OSU was simply too reliant on all-purpose
standout Curtis Samuel; that
wasn’t evident against most
teams but painfully clear when
facing off against the elite opponents on its schedule.
Thursday night’s kickoff will
begin to answer three important
questions facing the offense:
uHow fast can Ohio State
move — or how many plays can
this offense cram into 60 minutes?
uWill the running game find
success along the interior, from
one guard to the other?
uCan Wilson find a way to get
the ball out of quarterback J.T.
Barrett’s hands and into the arms
of the Buckeyes’ talented crop of
skill players?
THE QUARTERBACK
Speaking of Barrett, there’s no
doubting the drive, leadership
skills and grasp of what Meyer
demands from the position. What
might be up for debate is whether
Barrett can reclaim his freshman
year form, when he piloted Ohio
State to the doorstep of the Playoff, and make a charge at the
Heisman Trophy.
That we’re even discussing that
possibility speaks to Barrett’s potential in this offense. Based on
Wilson’s history, it’s obvious that
the senior will be put into can’tfail situations, or at least into
spots that take advantage of his
positives while shying away from
his potential negatives.
But here’s one thing about Barrett: As much as anyone, if not
more so, he was frustrated by the
way the Buckeyes system sputtered in 2016. For a student-athlete never lacking for motivation,
the chance to take center stage in
one of college football’s most
quarterback-friendly
schemes
gives Barrett an opportunity to
turn the page in time for one last
push for a title.
THE DEFENSIVE LINE
The argument over which team
brings the hardiest defensive line
into 2017 really focuses on two
teams: Ohio State and Clemson.
While the Tigers’ front is downright filthy — having Dexter Lawrence alongside Christian Wilkins
at tackle is just mean — no team
can sniff the Buckeyes’ depth.
How deep? Loaded enough at
end, for example, that the Buckeyes have tinkered with an alignment that puts five on the field
simultaneously. In part, the ability to trot out exotic formations is
a testament not only to the unit’s
depth but individual players’ ability to flex between multiple positions; senior Jalyn Holmes can
play end, tackle or stand up as a
rush linebacker, for instance.
That’s scary. But it doesn’t stop
there. Tyquan Lewis. Nick Bosa.
MIKE CARTER, USA TODAY SPORTS
Quarterback J.T. Barrett helped Ohio State win the 2014 national title and would love to deliver a second trophy.
Sam Hubbard. Holmes. Freshmen Chase Young and Jonathon
Cooper.
And that’s just on the outside.
Tracy Sprinkle and Dre’Mont
Jones hold down the fort along
the interior, giving the Buckeyes
enough quality bodies to roll out
wave after wave of top-tier talent
at opposing offenses.
THE SECONDARY
One more question to consider:
How capably can Ohio State rebuild a defensive backfield that
lost three starters to the first
round of the NFL draft? (Yes,
three.) Malik Hooker, Marshon
Lattimore and Gareon Conley
leave big shoes to fill. But recent
history is on the Buckeyes’ side.
Like, very recent history. Don’t
forget that the secondary was a
potential question mark heading
into last season, when the defense had to replace three starters. The pass defense was even
better. There’s no doubt that
OSU’s defensive staff feels confident in what the new cast brings
to the table.
The leadership role falls to
senior safety Damon Webb, the
lone returning starter. But the
breakout star might be junior
cornerback Denzel Ward, who
has next-level speed and has
shown flashes of big-play potential. Opposite Ward, the Buckeyes
will lean on sophomores Damon
Arnette and Kendall Sheffield, the
latter a five-star junior college
transfer. Expectations are high
for Sheffield.
USA TODAY
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
SPORTS 5C
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Wilder, Old Dominion always aim high
Coach known for catchphrases builds
program with nod to blue-collar roots
Paul Myerberg
@PaulMyerberg
USA TODAY Sports
NORFOLK , VA .
Growing up in
Madison, Maine, where his father
ran an Exxon station and his
mother a local restaurant, Bobby
Wilder knew by his 13th birthday
that he wanted to be a football
coach.
When his schedule allowed,
Wilder would pump gas and
check oil at the gas station. The
restaurant, Mad Dog Pizza, which
he described as “a Happy Days
kind of place,” served breakfast,
lunch and dinner, and it was an
all-hands-on-deck family establishment — his four older sisters
and mother logged long hours,
while his grandmother cooked
the molasses cookies and donuts.
More often than not, however,
Wilder was playing sports.
“I’m the one that’s different.
The only one involved in athletics,” he said. Baseball in the
spring and summer. Football in
the fall. Basketball and hockey in
the winter. An epiphany came as
a young teenager, when Wilder
spent a summer working a local
sports camp: I want to coach, he
thought.
For the rest, it was seven days a
week at the station and the restaurant. Asked if or when his
family took any vacation, Wilder
can recall just one: On a winter
day, they loaded into a car and
drove to neighboring New Hampshire to visit the local Santa’s
village.
“The epitome of a blue-collar
family, that’s what we were.
That’s just what my family did,”
Wilder said. “It was ingrained in
me. So now when I work seven
days a week here, I don’t think
I’m doing anything out of the
norm of what I’ve seen my entire
life.”
You can take the coach out of
Maine — eventually, and not until
a decade ago — but you can’t take
Maine out of the coach. Wilder’s
approach to building the Old Dominion football program from
scratch is itself a byproduct of his
home state — its people, its mentality and, last but not least, its
state university, where he played
and coached for more than two
decades before being hired as the
Monarchs’ first head coach in
2007.
“The values that he instills into
the staff and the players here at
ODU are very similar to the
things I was taught as a player at
Maine,” said quarterbacks coach
Ron Whitcomb, a four-year starter under center for the Black
Bears from 2003 to 2006. “We
used to call it the Maine Way. It’s
a workman’s mentality. You’re not
expecting anybody to give you
anything, and you’re going to
work your way to the success you
have. That’s definitely been the
way we do things around here.”
The program Wilder has built
is taking flight: Old Dominion,
which rechristened its program
in 2009 after debt and a rule prohibiting freshman eligibility led
the university to shutter football
in 1940, went 10-3 and won the
Bahamas Bowl last fall, cementing the Monarchs’ place as the
most successful startup in Football Bowl Subdivision history.
How it was built and how it has
been maintained bears the fingerprints of Wilder’s long tenure at
Maine, where he once starred at
quarterback before being hired by
current Iowa coach Kirk Ferentz
as a restricted-earnings assistant
in 1990.
In hindsight, it was perfect
training for the task of building
an FBS program from scratch.
Under Ferentz and his successor,
longtime Maine coach Jack Cosgrove, Wilder learned to maximize the Black Bears’ assets and
paper over the program’s weak
links, such as a clear recruiting
disadvantage; the university was
“the last stop before the bus stop”
for potential college prospects,
Wilder said.
That mind-set fit into the dominant theme of his childhood:
JASON COOPER, AP
Coach Bobby Wilder hoists the Bahamas Bowl trophy last year
after Old Dominion beat Eastern Michigan to finish 10-3.
Wilder seeing his parents work
seven days a week, one at the gas
station and the other at the restaurant, to make ends meet in
Madison. Once he arrived at
ODU, it felt normal to change the
Gatorade in the Monarchs’ drink
dispenser, for example, or to
empty the garbage from the
coaches’ offices. It’s a lesson he
learned from Cosgrove: No job is
too small, Wilder was told, so
don’t wait for someone else to do
what you can handle yourself.
“There’s no job that he
wouldn’t do,” said ODU offensive
coordinator Brian Scott, who
coached alongside Wilder with
the Black Bears from 2004 to
2006, “but that’s just Maine.”
But there is undeniably something unique about Wilder, particularly in one key respect: In an
era of constant movement among
coaches — particularly among assistants, though traffic among
head coaches draws far more attention — Wilder enters his 28th
season as a full-time coach having
worked at just two programs,
Maine and ODU.
“You’re talking about an endangered species. You don’t see
that in this time and age,” senior
associate athletics director Bruce
Stewart said. “But that’s who he
is. It’s also indicative of how he
coaches.”
Ferentz’s impact lingers, and
Cosgrove’s is even more profound. Yet Wilder’s approach is,
in a word, organic — not birthed
from any individual coach but developed and honed during his entire career, dating even to his days
as a record-setting quarterback,
when he began to collect the
thoughts and ideas that have
come to define his tenure as a
head coach.
“I prepared for this, took a lot
of notes, studied,” Wilder said. “I
did everything my whole life to
get myself ready to be comfortable being a head coach.”
Take his collected sayings,
which his assistants and players
term “Wilderisms.” P.M.A., he’ll
tell the team, an acronym for Positive Mental Attitude. And others:
Aim high. Stay in your lane. I’m
just happy my key still works. Every day is your birthday. Make today your masterpiece.
Or view the ease with which
ODU has pivoted from one offen-
sive style to the next. Once a passfirst team led by Taylor Heinicke,
who left in 2014 as one of the
most prolific quarterbacks in Division I history, the Monarchs’
2016 scheme was predicated
more on the running game, even
as the offense had enough balance to finish fifth in Conference USA in total passing yards.
“It is very organic. I don’t have
an ego when it comes to our offense, defense or special teams,”
Wilder said of his program’s approach. “I think that’s why we’re
67-30. I’m not trying to minimize
our ability to coach X’s and O’s,
but we do aim high. Everything is
those two words: aim high.”
ODU’s rise, meanwhile, has led
to a possibility: Should the Monarchs again contend for a conference title, it’s inevitable that
Wilder’s name will be tied to
Power Five openings in November and December — a prospect
he shrugged aside, calling the
ODU program “like my child.”
“I don’t want to sound selfish,
but I started this program. And
this is considered the best startup
program in the history of college
football. It’s just such an unbelievable source of pride,” he said.
“My child right now is 8 years
old. My child is in the third grade.
And my child is still growing. I
look at it as an unlimited potential to continue to grow and be
successful. It would have to be
something monumental to make
me consider wanting to stop raising my child, if that doesn’t sound
too corny. My heart and soul is in
this.”
His heart and soul, and more
than a little bit of Maine. But
that’s always been the case. Even
during the hiring process, which
began with a cold call to thenathletics director Jim Jarrett,
Wilder never deviated from his
script: I know I’m not from the
area, he said, but here’s my blueprint for building this program —
a pitch that quickly moved him to
the top of the Monarchs’ list.
“I didn’t have a name. I wasn’t
a name guy,” he said. “I wasn’t at
Virginia, Virginia Tech, Alabama,
Clemson. I was an assistant coach
at the University of Maine. But I
knew exactly who I was.”
U.S. OPEN
Kyrgios: ‘I’m not dedicated to game at all’
After first-round loss, “There are
Aussie introspective, players out there
questions future
... that want to
get better, that
Sandra Harwitt
strive to get
Special for USA TODAY Sports
better every day.
I’m not that guy.”
NEW YORK There is absolutely
no denying that Nick Kyrgios is a
wildly talented tennis player, but
he’s also a flawed individual who
doesn’t understand where he belongs in the grand scheme of the
sport.
Unfortunately, at this moment
in time, the person most confounded by the conundrum that
is Nick Kyrgios is actually Kyrgios
himself.
After No. 14 seed Kyrgios suffered a disheartening 6-3, 1-6, 6-4,
6-1 first-round defeat to fellow
Australian John Millman in the
U.S. Open on Wednesday, he
again revealed his multifaceted
perplexing personality.
“Obviously, I’m disappointed I
lost today,” Kyrgios said, then
changed gears. “It’s not the end of
the world. I will get over it in
probably a half-hour.”
It’s difficult to ever know how
Kyrgios, 22, will present; what he
will say, how he’ll react. And often, as he showed in his postmatch news conference, he offers
a smorgasbord of emotions.
Within a 10-minute or so span,
Kyrgios was insolent, immature,
compassionate and confused.
The floodgates really opened
when Kyrgios was asked whether
his coaching relationship with
Frenchman Sebastien Grosjean, a
four-time Grand Slam tournament semifinalist based in South
Florida, will continue after their
original agreement to work
through this U.S. Open.
“I don’t know, honestly,” Kyrgios said. “I’m not good enough
for him. He’s very dedicated. He’s
an unbelievable coach. He probably deserves a player that is probably more dedicated to the game
than I am. He deserves a better
athlete than me.
“I’m not dedicated to the game
at all. He’s helped me a lot, especially with the training. ... There
are players out there that are
Nick Kyrgios
more dedicated, that want to get
better, that strive to get better every day, the one-percenters.
“I’m not that guy,” he added,
bowing his head.
The match against Millman
was another mixed bag for Kyrgios, which is about the way his
year can be described.
He served 17 aces despite a
shoulder problem that surfaced
early in the third set for which he
received medical treatment on
court and at one point asked a
ball boy to grab and stretch his
arm.
“My arm felt numb,” he said.
“What else do you want me to
say? My arm is not broken, but it
was sore.”
On the downside, there were
the 60 unforced errors, the four
breaks of serve on the 14 break
points he presented Millman and
the general frustration.
Kyrgios received a warning for
an audible obscenity, which was
reported to umpire Carlos Ramos
from a linesperson. Ramos admitted not to hearing what Kyrgios said — a later look on TV
showed him uttering the curse —
and the Australian argued he
hadn’t said anything wrong.
Then, after losing the third set,
Kyrgios smashed his racket,
which resulted in a point penalty
and enabled Millman to start
serving the fourth set at 15-0. Interestingly, after the match was
over, Kyrgios was intent on taking
the mangled racket with him and
had to ask a ball boy what happened to it as it had disappeared
from his courtside chair. Once retrieved, he attempted to zip it
into his gear bag but it no longer
would fit, so he just carried it off
in his hand.
As for his season, the highlight
was reaching the recent Cincin-
GEOFF BURKE, USA TODAY SPORTS
Nick Kyrgios, above, lost to John Millman on Wednesday 6-3, 1-6, 6-4, 6-1.
nati final, which he lost to Grigor
Dimitrov. He also was a semifinalist at tournaments in Miami,
Marseille and Acapulco but has
dealt with elbow, hip and shoulder injuries that have forced him
to withdraw or retire from too
many matches.
At the Grand Slams this season, Kyrgios fell in the second
round in the Australian and
French Open, and now the first
round in Wimbledon and the U.S.
Open.
“Obviously, I’m not having a
shocking year,” he said. “Obviously, in the scheme of things, I’m
not having the greatest year for
what, maybe, people think I
should have done. But the last
three months have been a nightmare, really.”
If there’s an endearing quality
to Kyrgios it’s that he seems to
get along well with other players,
in particular the fellow Australians he shares the Davis Cup
stage with, and has a love of country. Australia will play in the Da-
THURSDAY’S KEY MATCHES
At USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, New York
Play begins on all courts at 11 a.m. ET
Elina Svitolina, Ukraine, vs. Evgeniya Rodina, Russia
Not before 1 p.m.
Karolina Pliskova, Czech Republic, vs. Nicole Gibbs, USA
Roger Federer, Switzerland, vs. Mikhail Youzhny, Russia
Night session (7 p.m.)
Ons Jabeur, Tunisia, vs. CoCo Vandeweghe, USA
Rafael Nadal, Spain, vs. Taro Daniel, Japan
Louis Armstrong Stadium
Jelena Ostapenko, Latvia, vs. Sorana Cirstea, Romania
Andrey Rublev, Russia, vs. Grigor Dimitrov, Bulgaria
Taylor Fritz, USA, vs. Dominic Thiem, Austria
Not before 5:30 p.m.
Tatjana Maria, Germany, vs. Madison Keys, USA
vis Cup semifinal against
Belgium, in Brussels, the weekend after the U.S. Open conclusion and he hopes to be there.
“Davis Cup is one of my priorities this year,” Kyrgios said. “I put
it right at the top of my list. I have
put a lot of effort into Davis Cup
this year. I made myself available
for every tie. It is my goal to win
the Davis Cup.”
The Kyrgios conclusion for
now is that despite possessing the
kind of brilliance that could easily
lead him to the No. 1 ranking, getting there seems well beyond his
current capabilities.
The tennis world, however, will
continue to hope he can find an
inner peace, because his talent
could produce incredible tennis
memories.
6C SPORTS
E2
USA TODAY
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
NFL
Preseason standouts: What’s next?
Michael MiddlehurstSchwartz
@MikeMSchwartz
USA TODAY Sports
With no stakes and limited implementation of teams’ schemes,
the NFL preseason often can feel
like a throwaway. But it also can
serve as a stage for several of the
league’s promising young stars to
show what they’re capable of.
Thursday marks the end of the
preseason schedule, with many
teams holding their starters out
of action.
Ahead of the finales, we look at
10 players who stood out in the
preseason and assess what could
be ahead for them once the regular season begins.
DESHONE KIZER, QB,
CLEVELAND BROWNS
Two weeks after his quarterbacks
coach said he wasn’t ready for the
top job, the second-round pick
from Notre Dame impressed
head coach Hue Jackson so much
that he was named the Week 1
starter. Kizer’s raw numbers (including a 6-for-18 passing performance in his third outing)
weren’t impressive, but he established himself as the best playmaker for the offense.
What’s next: Kizer will become the 27th starting quarterback for the Browns since they
returned to the NFL in 1999, and
he should have considerable license to play through mistakes
after Jackson said the rookie’s
designation was permanent. He
should jolt an offense that only
had 15 passing touchdowns in
2016 but needs to be more consistent and make better decisions to
make progress.
CHRISTIAN MCCAFFREY, RB,
CAROLINA PANTHERS
Considered a front-runner for offensive rookie of the year, the
No. 8 overall pick has met the immense expectations facing him
this summer. He racked up 72 total yards and a touchdown in his
second preseason outing and has
comfortably split first-team reps
with Jonathan Stewart.
What’s next: McCaffrey’s full
mer Chicago Bears teammate.
Parker has been Cutler’s favorite
target, and he should thrive with
more jump balls and downfield
opportunities that suit his playing style.
role within the offense is likely
yet to be revealed. In addition to
operating in a backfield timeshare with Stewart, he should
take on a more vital function in
the passing game as a checkdown
option for Cam Newton, who was
limited earlier in training camp
while recovering from offseason
shoulder surgery. McCaffrey will
have to establish a rapport with
Newton, but he could be integral
to Carolina’s plan to take some of
the burden off the former MVP.
KENNY GOLLADAY, WR,
DETROIT LIONS
After building a considerable
buzz in training camp, the thirdround pick from Northern Illinois roared into the preseason by
making two touchdown catches
in his debut.
What’s next: Despite showing
plenty of promise and working
with the first-team offense, Golladay might find chances difficult to
come by as a rookie given the
presence of Marvin Jones, Golden Tate and other established options in the passing game. Still, he
should thrive as a red-zone threat
and stands as a promising prospect for the near future.
DALVIN COOK, RB,
MINNESOTA VIKINGS
The former Florida State standout made a smooth transition to
his new surroundings, making
the most of his first-team reps
while Latavius Murray was out
with an ankle injury. Cook also
proved to be an all-purpose
threat with solid work as a receiver and a pass blocker.
What’s next: Murray is back,
but every indication shows that
Cook has a runway to the starting
job. After scoring 48 touchdowns
over three years in college, Cook
brings a big-play facet to a team
dedicated to improving the
league’s worst rushing attack in
2016.
KAREEM HUNT, RB,
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS
A third-round pick from Toledo,
he quickly made his mark in Kansas City. He had 63 yards on 11
carries in the second preseason
game.
What’s next: With Spencer
Ware expected to miss the season
with a knee injury, Chiefs coach
Andy Reid said Hunt will take on
the featured back role. Working
in a solid offense, he should be in
for a substantial workload and
could be one of the year’s breakout players.
CHRIS CARSON, RB,
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS
The seventh-round pick from
Oklahoma State quickly displayed
a skill set that belied his draft status. Carson has steadily earned
more reps in the running back rotation, and he notched 90 total
yards on 10 touches in the third
preseason game.
What’s next: It’s important to
DEREK BARNETT, DE,
PHILADELPHIA EAGLES
keep the hype pumping out of Seattle in perspective after Christine Michael’s “awakening” last
preseason resulted in the running
back being waived in November.
Carson finds himself behind Eddie Lacy, Thomas Rawls and C.J.
Prosise, but all three have had
trouble staying healthy.
chart. Early opportunities probably will be limited as he operates
behind the other receivers and
tight end Delanie Walker in a
run-heavy offense. But Taylor
presents a needed big-play threat
from the slot and could become a
more integral piece as the season
progresses.
As the first player in Southeastern Conference history to record
10 or more sacks in three consecutive seasons, Barnett displayed
his pass-rushing prowess early by
recording three sacks in his first
two preseason games.
What’s next: Philadelphia’s
defensive line is loaded, but coordinator Jim Schwartz intends to
work plenty of players into his rotation. Barnett should have ample
pass-rushing opportunities despite his likely role of working behind projected starters Brandon
Graham and Vinny Curry.
TAYWAN TAYLOR, WR,
TENNESSEE TITANS
DEVANTE PARKER, WR,
MIAMI DOLPHINS
REUBEN FOSTER, LB,
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS
No. 5 overall pick Corey Davis
was sidelined for most of August
with a hamstring injury. Taylor, a
third-round selection from Western Kentucky, took the opportunity to step up and give
Tennessee an explosive new dimension in the passing game. He
has averaged 18.1 yards per catch,
and teammate Brice McCain
compared him to Indianapolis
Colts standout T.Y. Hilton.
What’s next: With Davis and
free agent acquisition Eric Decker back at practice, Taylor likely
will be pushed down the depth
It was easy to see why the Dolphins coaching staff talked up
the former first-round pick all
offseason. Parker showed the
ability to capitalize on big-play
strikes, including a 72-yard catchand-run in his third preseason
game.
What’s next: He could become the biggest beneficiary of
Jay Cutler stepping in as the
starting quarterback after Ryan
Tannehill suffered a season-ending knee injury. Cutler called the
third-year wide receiver a faster
version of Alshon Jeffery, his for-
After missing time in the offseason with a shoulder injury, Foster
showed little rust in the preseason, which included eight tackles
and several big hits in his third
outing.
What’s next: The first-round
pick has locked down a starting
role at weakside linebacker and
could be a leading contender for
defensive rookie of the year.
Coach Kyle Shanahan said the
former Alabama star is “ahead of
schedule,” though he wants to see
improvement on some fundamentals.
KIM KLEMENT, USA TODAY SPORTS
In somewhat of a surprise, rookie DeShone Kizer is set to begin
the season as the Browns’ starting quarterback.
MLB
Indians prove they’re team to beat in AL
Francona, Kluber
again have Cleveland
poised for pennant
Bob Klapisch
@BobKlap
USA TODAY Sports
NEW
YORK
New
York Yankees fans
have
historically
been obsessed with
the Boston Red Sox,
and for good reason — this is a
gripping blood feud that has lasted for almost a century. But the
ticket buyers in the Bronx got a
wake-up call during this week’s
showdown with the Cleveland Indians, specifically when Corey
Kluber outpitched Luis Severino.
The message couldn’t have been
clearer.
For all the mental energy devoted to the Red Sox, it’s the Indians who pose the biggest threat to
American League opponents.
And, yes, that sentiment also applies to the Houston Astros, who
were crowned in early summer as
the AL team most likely to end up
in the World Series against the
Los Angeles Dodgers.
But thanks to their pitching,
the Indians have been the better
club since Aug. 1 and show no
signs of regression.
That’s specifically bad news for
the Yankees, who saw their best
pitcher, Severino, get outpitched
by Kluber on Monday. Wednesday, the Indians swept a doubleheader at Yankee Stadium, as
Trevor Bauer and rookie Ryan
Merritt each held the Yankees to
one run. And it’s also bad news
for the Red Sox, whose own
Terminator, Chris Sale, has given
up 13 earned runs in his last eight
innings against Cleveland.
There are plenty of reasons the
Indians are on a roll, picking up
where they left off from last season. But outsiders focus on two
key assets: Kluber, who’s in the
running for the Cy Young Award,
and Terry Francona, who just
might win manager of the year.
ANALYSIS
NOAH K. MURRAY, USA TODAY SPORTS
Francisco Lindor, left, and Jay Bruce enjoy the Indians’ victory
Wednesday vs. the Yankees in the opener of a doubleheader.
As one major league executive
puts it, Francona’s low-key manner of getting the most out of
players without pushing too hard
makes him everything a club
would want in a manager.
Francona hardly needs an introduction in New York, as his
Red Sox in 2004 became the only
team to engineer a postseason
comeback from 3-0 playoff defi-
cit, defeating the Yankees in the
American League Championship
Series. Francona’s .618 winning
percentage is by far the best in
the wild-card era.
And last season he almost became the only the fifth manager
in the game’s history to win a
World Series with multiple
teams, falling just short of joining
Bucky Harris (1924 Washington
Senators, 1947 Yankees), Bill
McKechnie (1925 Pittsburgh Pirates, 1940 Cincinnati Reds),
Sparky Anderson (1975-76 Reds,
1984 Detroit Tigers) and Tony
La Russa (1989 Oakland Athletics, 2006 and 2011 St. Louis
Cardinals).
Francona and the Indians
made it all the way to Game 7 of
the Fall Classic against the Chicago Cubs, and even then a champion wasn’t decided until the 10th
inning. The Tribe fell short, but
president of baseball operations
Chris Antonetti nevertheless
praised Francona for doing “a
masterful job” in turning the Indians into a powerhouse.
This season, he has kept them
at that level, despite missing two
weeks — including his All-Star
Game managerial gig — to have a
cardiac ablation.
“He was always focused on,
‘How do we take what we have
and figure out a way to make the
team and individual players successful?’ ” Antonetti said. “He
never worries about who’s not
here and what adversity we face,
but finding a way to overcome it. I
think we’ve seen it over the
course of the season and certainly
throughout the postseason.”
What does that mean for 2017?
The truth is, the Indians could be
even better, now that the industry
is more clearly defined than ever
between the haves (the Dodgers,
Washington Nationals, Cubs, Astros, Red Sox, Yankees and Indians) and have-nots (everyone
else). The Indians will spend September doing calisthenics for the
playoffs, with only six games
against teams over. 500.
Not that they have struggled
against elite teams. They are 2814 against the Astros, Yankees,
Red Sox, Twins, Angels and Seattle Mariners — all of whom are either October-bound or have
realistic chances of getting there.
More than ever, what separates
the good from the very good
clubs, and what distills into a
world champion after that, is the
Game 1, 4 and 7 ace. Right now,
that would have to be Kluber,
who again validated his larger-
than-life status this week.
Kluber allowed the Yankees
three hits and two runs in a 6-2
victory, taking down Severino in
the process. It was a psychological setback for the Yankees, who
consider Severino their best hope
in a wild-card playoff and in any
Game 7 showdown against an
opposing team’s ace.
No doubt Severino, 23, is a future star if he isn’t already. No
one in baseball maintains his 98mph fastball deeper into a game.
But Kluber is a rung higher on
the pyramid, leading the AL with
a 2.63 ERA and 0.89 WHIP
(walks plus hits allowed per inning pitched).
No wonder Kluber is nicknamed Klubot: He’s a machine
when it comes to disassembling
opponents, even more so this season. His 215 strikeouts to 33
walks works out to a career-best
6.52 ratio.
“It’s starting to get a little bit
(boring), because you’re getting
no action out there,” Cleveland
center fielder Bradley Zimmer
told MLB.com this week. “It’s like
you’re standing and watching him
throw sliders and guys swinging
over them. I’ve said this, I feel
like, every time he pitches: ‘The
guy is unbelievable. I’m just happy he’s on our side.’ ”
Perhaps even more remarkable
is that Kluber is leading the
charge for a pitching staff that’s
missing Andrew Miller (knee),
Danny Salazar (elbow) and Josh
Tomlin (hamstring). Throw in infielder Jason Kipnis (hamstring)
and outfielder Michael Brantley
(ankle), and you have a roster sufficiently banged up that posting a
19-9 August record into should
have been a long shot.
But the Indians are gaining
momentum again, even if it’s under the radar. This is how they
prefer it, deferring the headlines
to the Yankees and Red Sox. But
that doesn’t make the Tribe any
less dangerous. It would be a mistake to underestimate them.
Klapisch writes for The (Bergen County, N.J.) Record, part of the USA TODAY
Network.
USA TODAY
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
SPORTS 7C
E6
MLB SCORES
FOR THE RECORD
FOOTBALL
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East
Boston
New York
Baltimore
Tampa Bay
Toronto
W
76
70
68
66
61
L
57
62
65
68
72
Pct.
.571
.530
.511
.493
.459
GB
—
51/2
8
101/2
15
Strk.
W-3
L-3
W-7
L-1
L-4
Central
Cleveland
Minnesota
Kansas City
Detroit
Chicago
W
76
68
65
58
52
L
56
63
66
74
78
Pct.
.576
.519
.496
.439
.400
GB
—
71/2
101/2
18
23
Strk.
W-7
W-2
W-1
W-1
L-1
West
Houston
Los Angeles
Texas
Seattle
Oakland
W
79
68
66
66
58
L
53
65
66
68
74
Pct.
.598
.511
.500
.493
.439
GB
—
111/2
13
14
21
Strk.
L-2
W-2
W-2
L-5
L-2
Last
10
5-5
4-6
8-2
6-4
2-8
Last
10
8-2
6-4
4-6
5-5
6-4
Last
10
4-6
5-5
5-5
3-7
5-5
Home
40-25
37-26
41-26
34-33
35-34
Away
36-32
33-36
27-39
32-35
26-38
Home
36-29
32-35
36-31
31-32
30-34
Away
40-27
36-28
29-35
27-42
22-44
Home
37-31
37-31
35-29
34-32
37-31
Away
42-22
31-34
31-37
32-36
21-43
NFL Preseason
All times ET
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
N.Y. Jets
New England
Miami
Buffalo
South
Jacksonville
Indianapolis
Houston
Tennessee
North
Baltimore
Cleveland
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
West
Denver
Kansas City
L.A. Chargers
Oakland
East
Washington
Miami
Atlanta
New York
Philadelphia
W
81
66
59
58
49
L
51
66
72
74
83
Pct.
.614
.500
.450
.439
.371
GB
—
15
211/2
23
32
Strk.
W-4
L-3
W-2
W-1
L-2
Central
Chicago
Milwaukee
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
W
71
69
66
63
56
L
60
64
66
70
77
Pct.
.542
.519
.500
.474
.421
GB
—
3
51/2
9
16
Strk.
W-2
W-1
L-1
L-2
L-1
West
Los Angeles
Arizona
Colorado
San Diego
San Francisco
W
91
74
72
58
53
L
39
58
61
74
81
Pct.
.700
.561
.541
.439
.396
GB
—
18
201/2
34
40
Strk.
L-3
W-5
L-1
W-1
L-1
South
Last
10
7-3
6-4
5-5
4-6
4-6
Last
10
7-3
6-4
3-7
4-6
4-6
Last
10
5-5
7-3
4-6
4-6
3-7
Home
40-27
35-29
29-36
28-39
28-37
Away
41-24
31-37
30-36
30-35
21-46
New Orleans
Carolina
Tampa Bay
Atlanta
Home
36-28
36-31
37-31
35-31
32-36
Away
35-32
33-33
29-35
28-39
24-41
West
Home
52-16
43-23
39-27
34-31
31-35
Away
39-23
31-35
33-34
24-43
22-46
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
L
2
2
2
3
T Pct
0 .333
0 .333
0 .333
0 .000
PF
44
77
61
35
PA
51
86
89
50
W
1
1
1
1
L
2
2
2
2
T Pct
0 .333
0 .333
0 .333
0 .333
PF
62
48
44
44
PA
60
63
63
53
W
3
3
2
1
L
0
0
1
2
T Pct
0 1.000
0 1.000
0 .667
0 .333
PF
67
43
52
52
PA
19
29
44
65
W
3
1
1
0
L
0
2
2
3
T Pct
0 1.000
0 .333
0 .333
0 .000
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
Dallas
Philadelphia
N.Y. Giants
Washington
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W
1
1
1
0
North
Green Bay
Chicago
Minnesota
Detroit
Seattle
L.A. Rams
Arizona
San Francisco
PF
77
60
45
51
PA
48
65
80
68
W
3
2
1
1
L
1
1
2
2
T Pct
0 .750
0 .667
0 .333
0 .333
PF
78
67
50
43
PA
70
71
61
61
W
2
2
1
0
L
1
1
2
3
T Pct
0 .667
0 .667
0 .333
0 .000
PF
40
78
33
47
PA
27
74
44
64
W
2
2
2
2
L
1
1
1
1
T Pct
0 .667
0 .667
0 .667
0 .667
PF
62
60
62
68
PA
46
54
61
46
W
3
2
2
1
L
0
1
2
2
T Pct
0 1.000
0 .667
0 .500
0 .333
PF
94
56
85
72
PA
43
52
68
82
Thursday, Aug. 31
Cincinnati at Indianapolis, 7 p.m.
L.A. Rams at Green Bay, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Jacksonville at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Jets, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at New England, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Miami at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Baltimore at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Houston, 8 p.m.
Tennessee at Kansas City, 8:30 p.m.
Arizona at Denver, 9 p.m.
L.A. Chargers at San Francisco, 10 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 10 p.m.
Canadian Football League
All Times ET
EAST DIVISION
American League
Cleveland 2, N.Y. Yankees 1, 1st game
Baltimore 8, Seattle 7
Boston 7, Toronto 1
Texas 8, Houston 1
National League
Atlanta 9, Philadelphia 1, 1st game
Atlanta 5, Philadelphia 2, 2nd game
Milwaukee 6, St. Louis 5
Washington 4, Miami 0
Interleague
Detroit 6, Colorado 2
Cleveland 9, N.Y. Yankees 4, 2nd game
Chicago White Sox at Minnesota
Tampa Bay at Kansas City
Oakland at L.A. Angels
Toronto
Ottawa
Montreal
Hamilton
W
4
3
3
0
L
6
6
6
8
WEST DIVISION
N.Y. Mets 2, Cincinnati 0
Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs
San Francisco at San Diego
L.A. Dodgers at Arizona
Calgary
Winnipeg
Edmonton
B.C.
Saskatchewan
W
7
7
7
5
4
L
1
2
2
5
4
T
0
1
0
0
Pts
8
7
6
0
PF
230
282
199
148
PA
254
271
231
310
T
1
0
0
0
0
Pts
15
14
14
10
8
PF
298
308
253
269
251
PA
169
278
256
274
195
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
GS
W-L
TEX: Hamels (L)
HOU: McHugh (R)
17
7
Chi. White Sox at Minnesota, 1:10 p.m. ET
CWS: Gonzalez (R)
MIN: Colon (R)
21
8
7-10
4-2
.412
.667
Boston at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. ET
BOS: Rodriguez (L)
NYY: Sabathia (L)
18
21
K
109.2
39.2
67
39
(Line: MIN -152)
1.43
4.30
127.2
1.45
4.04
49.0
80
25
27
5
6-8
2-2
3.78
3.63
(Line: NYY -117)
.500
1.24
4.19
.667
1.26
3.82
105.1
115.1
114
90
(Line: BAL -129)
.429
1.42
5.04
.500
1.08
5.46
151.2
29.2
152
20
4-4
10-5
Toronto at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. ET
TOR: Estrada (R)
BAL: Hellickson (R)
IP
(Line: HOU -135)
9-2
.818
1.15
2-2
.500
1.24
NATIONAL LEAGUE
N.Y. Mets at Cincinnati, 12:35 p.m. ET
NYM: deGrom (R)
CIN: Stephenson (R)
26
5
(Line: NYM -127)
.667
1.16
3.39
.333
1.75
5.81
14-7
2-4
172.2
52.2
201
55
(Line: ARI -115)
.706
1.08
3.76
.714
1.08
3.14
117.1
166.1
118
182
(Line: MIA -159)
.167
1.38
4.36
.000
1.36
3.70
53.2
24.1
29
13
74.1
101.2
76
89
(Line: WSH -120)
1.11
2.40 168.2
1.35
3.91 156.2
152
105
L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 3:40 p.m. ET
LAD: Maeda (R)
ARI: Greinke (R)
21
26
12-5
15-6
Philadelphia at Miami, 7:10 p.m. ET
PHI: Lively (R)
MIA: Despaigne (R)
9
2
1-5
0-1
Atlanta at Chi. Cubs, 8:05 p.m. ET
ATL: Newcomb (L)
CHC: Hendricks (R)
14
18
(Line: CHC -220)
.222
1.55
.556
1.24
2-7
5-4
Washington at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. ET
WSH: Gonzalez (L)
MIL: Davies (R)
26
27
13-5
15-7
.722
.682
St. Louis at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. ET
STL: Wacha (R)
SF: Bumgarner (L)
24
13
9-7
3-6
.563
.333
4.36
3.45
(Line: SF -129)
1.40
4.33
1.04
2.85
129.0
85.1
124
81
Amway Coaches Top 25 Poll
The preseason Amway Top 25 football poll,
with first-place votes in parentheses, final
2016 records, total points based on 25
points for first place through one point for
25th, and last season’s final ranking:
Record
Pts Pvs
1. Alabama (49)
14-1 1603
2
2. Ohio State (5)
11-2 1512
6
3. Fla. State (4)
10-3 1434
8
4. Southern Cal
10-3 1415
5
5. Clemson (7)
14-1 1367
1
6. Penn State
11-3 1257
7
7. Washington
12-2 1245
4
8. Oklahoma
11-2 1237
3
9. Michigan
10-3
959
10
10. Wisconsin
11-3
936
9
11. Okla. State
10-3
912
11
12. LSU
8-4
834
14
13. Auburn
8-5
819
22
14. Stanford
10-3
732
12
15. Georgia
8-5
701
NR
16. Florida
9-4
681
13
17. Louisville
9-4
676
20
18. Miami
9-4
472
23
19. Kansas State
9-4
339
NR
20. West Virginia
10-3
319
17
21. South Florida
11-2
247
19
22. Virginia Tech
10-4
235
16
23. Texas
5-7
193
NR
24. Tennessee
9-4
155
24
25. Utah
9-4
109
21
Others receiving votes: Washington State
99, Colorado 72, TCU 58, Boise State 49,
Notre Dame 49, Texas A&M 46, Pittsburgh
45, N.C. State 39, Oregon 37, Northwestern
25, Nebraska 23, Memphis 22, Arkansas
22, Mississippi State 19, San Diego State
18, Appalachian State 11, BYU 10, Georgia
Tech 10, Tulsa 10, Wyoming 9, Western
Michigan 8, Temple 8, North Carolina 8,
Houston 7, Troy 6, Minnesota 6, Iowa 5, Louisiana Tech 4, Syracuse 3, Arizona 2, Army
1, Colorado State 1, Michigan State 1,
Maryland 1, Toledo 1, UCLA 1.
Odds provided by Pregame.com.
SOCCER
RESULTS, UPCOMING GAMES
Tuesday
American League
BAL 4, SEA 0
BOS 3, TOR 0
TEX 12, HOU 2
MIN 6, CWS 4
KC 6, TB 2
LAA 8, OAK 2
CLE at NYY, ppd.
National League
ATL at PHI, ppd.
WSH 8, MIA 3
CIN 14, NYM 4
STL 10, MIL 2
CHC 4, PIT 1
ARI 7, LAD 6
SD 6, SF 3
Interleague
COL 7, DET 3
Friday
American League
CLE at DET, 1:10
BOS at NYY, 7:05
TOR at BAL, 7:05
CLE at DET, 7:10
LAA at TEX, 8:05
KC at MIN, 8:10
TB at CWS, 8:10
OAK at SEA, 10:10
National League
ATL at CHC, 2:20
CIN at PIT, 7:05
PHI at MIA, 7:10
WSH at MIL, 8:10
ARI at COL, 8:40
LAD at SD, 10:10
STL at SF, 10:15
Interleague
NYM at HOU, 8:10
AL LEADERS
BATTING
Altuve, Houston
Garcia, Chicago
Hosmer, Kansas City
Reddick, Houston
Ramirez, Cleveland
Schoop, Baltimore
Abreu, Chicago
Andrus, Texas
Gregorius, New York
Segura, Seattle
RUNS
Judge, New York
Springer, Houston
Altuve, Houston
Ramirez, Cleveland
Andrus, Texas
Betts, Boston
Gardner, New York
Schoop, Baltimore
Upton, Detroit
2 tied at 80
RBI
Cruz, Seattle
Schoop, Baltimore
Upton, Detroit
KDavis, Oakland
Machado, Baltimore
Mazara, Texas
Smoak, Toronto
Judge, New York
Abreu, Chicago
Pujols, Los Angeles
Saturday
American League
BOS at NYY, 1:05
CLE at DET, 6:10
TOR at BAL, 7:05
KC at MIN, 7:10
TB at CWS, 7:10
LAA at TEX, 7:15
OAK at SD, 9:10
National League
ATL at CHC, 2:20
LAD at SD, 3:40
STL at SF, 4:05
CIN at PIT, 7:05
PHI at MIA, 7:10
WSH at MIL, 7:10
ARI at COL, 8:10
LAD at SD, 10:10
Interleague
NYM at HOU, 2:10
NYM at HOU, 8:10
Major League Soccer
All times ET
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Toronto FC
NY City FC
Columbus
Chicago
New York
Atlanta
Montreal
Philadelphia
Orlando City
N. England
D.C. United
97
92
87
85
84
82
81
81
81
103
99
94
91
88
84
84
82
80
79
BATTING
Blackmon, Colorado
JTurner, Los Angeles
Harper, Washington
Murphy, Washington
Goldschmidt, Arizona
LeMahieu, Colorado
Posey, San Francisco
Seager, Los Angeles
Votto, Cincinnati
Ozuna, Miami
RUNS
Blackmon, Colorado
Stanton, Miami
Goldschmidt, Arizona
Gordon, Miami
Harper, Washington
Votto, Cincinnati
Bryant, Chicago
Arenado, Colorado
Inciarte, Atlanta
Yelich, Miami
RBI
Arenado, Colorado
Stanton, Miami
Goldschmidt, Arizona
Ozuna, Miami
Lamb, Arizona
Rizzo, Chicago
Votto, Cincinnati
Duvall, Cincinnati
Zimmerman, Washington
2 tied at 87
L
3
7
12
9
10
8
9
12
11
12
15
T Pts GF GA
8 56 55 26
5 47 48 35
3 42 42 42
5 41 47 36
3 39 38 33
6 36 44 32
6 36 42 41
7 31 36 38
7 31 27 39
5 29 39 41
4 28 22 44
WESTERN CONFERENCE
NL LEADERS
.354
.320
.319
.306
.305
.305
.302
.302
.301
.299
W
16
14
13
12
12
10
10
8
8
8
8
.339
.327
.325
.320
.317
.314
.311
.310
.310
.310
119
103
98
92
92
90
89
82
82
82
111
110
105
103
96
94
90
89
88
Seattle
Portland
Sporting KC
Houston
Vancouver
FC Dallas
San Jose
Salt Lake
Minnesota
Los Angeles
Colorado
W
11
11
10
10
11
9
10
10
7
6
6
L
7
9
5
8
9
7
11
13
14
14
15
T Pts GF GA
9 42 41 34
8 41 48 45
10 40 31 19
8 38 46 37
5 38 37 35
9 36 37 33
6 36 31 44
5 35 40 48
4 25 32 52
5 23 32 47
4 22 24 38
Saturday
Chicago at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Orlando City at New England, 7 p.m.
New York at FC Dallas, 9 p.m.
Colorado at Los Angeles, 11 p.m.
Wednesday
Sporting KC at NY City FC, 7:30 p.m.
English Premier League
All Times ET
Manc. United
Liverpool
Huddersfield
Man. City
GP
3
3
3
3
W
3
2
2
2
D
0
1
1
1
L GF GA
0 10 0
0 8 3
0 4 0
0 5 2
0
1
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3 1
6 4
5 3
3 2
4 3
4 4
2 2
2 3
2 4
3 3
5 6
4 8
0 4
1 5
0 6
2 10
7
6
5
5
4
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
1
0
0
0
Liverpool at Manchester City, 7:30 a.m.
Bournemouth at Arsenal, 10 a.m.
Tottenham at Everton, 10 a.m.
Watford at Southampton, 10 a.m.
Chelsea at Leicester, 10 a.m.
West Bromwich Albion at Brighton, 10 a.m.
Manchester United at Stoke, 12:30 p.m.
Sunday’s games
Crystal Palace at Burnley, 8:30 a.m.
Newcastle at Swansea, 11 a.m.
Monday’s game
Huddersfield at West Ham, 3 p.m.
National Women’s Soccer
League
All Times ET
North Carolina
Portland
Chicago
Orlando
Sky Blue FC
Seattle
Kansas City
Houston
Boston
Washington
W L
14 5
11 5
9 6
9 6
9 9
7 7
6 9
7 10
3 10
4 12
T
0
4
5
5
2
6
5
2
7
4
Pts
42
37
32
32
29
27
23
23
16
16
GF
29
29
27
37
35
38
23
20
16
26
GA
16
19
24
26
41
33
29
29
26
37
Wednesday’s Game
North Carolina 3, Washington 2
Saturday’s Games
Washington at Portland, 3:30 p.m.
Boston at Orlando, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Sky Blue FC at FC Kansas City, 6 p.m.
North Carolina at Chicago, 6 p.m.
Seattle at Houston, 8 p.m.
WNBA
W
21
20
17
12
12
9
L
11
12
15
20
20
24
Pct GB
.656
—
.625
1
.531
4
.375
9
.375
9
.273 12½
W
x-Minnesota
25
x-Los Angeles
24
x-Phoenix
16
x-Dallas
16
Seattle
14
San Antonio
7
x-clinched playoff berth
L
7
8
16
17
18
25
Pct
.781
.750
.500
.485
.438
.219
GB
—
1
9
9½
11
18
Tuesday’s Game
Connecticut 86, Washington 76
Wednesday’s Games
Minnesota 80, Indiana 69
Dallas 99, Chicago 96
Thursday’s Games
Pts
9
7
7
7
Tomljanovic, Australia, 6-3, 6-2; Julia
Goerges (30), Germany, def. Saisai Zheng,
China, 6-2, 6-1; Ashleigh Barty, Australia,
def. Aliaksandra Sasnovich, Belarus, 6-1,
7-6 (7); Sloane Stephens, United States, def.
Dominika Cibulkova (11), Slovakia, 6-2, 5-7,
6-3; Anastasija Sevastova (16), Latvia, def.
Kateryna Kozlova, Ukraine, 6-4, 6-4; Donna
Vekic, Croatia, def. Shuai Peng (22), China,
6-0, 6-2; Sofia Kenin, United States, def. Sachia Vickery, United States, 6-3, 4-6, 7-6 (0).
Second Round
Maria Sharapova, Russia, def. Timea Babos, Hungary, 6-7 (4), 6-4, 6-1.
AUTO RACING
NASCAR Monster Energy Cup
Schedule-Winners
Feb. 19 — x-Advance Auto Parts Clash (Joey
Logano)
Feb. 23 — x-Can-Am Duel at Daytona 1
(Chase Elliott)
Feb. 23 — x-Can-Am Duel at Daytona 2
(Denny Hamlin)
Feb. 26 — Daytona 500 (Kurt Busch)
March 5 — Folds of Honor QuikTrip 500
(Brad Keselowski)
March 12 — Kobalt 400 (Martin Truex Jr)
March 19 — Camping World 500 (Ryan
Newman)
March 26 — Auto Club 400 (Kyle Larson)
April 2 — STP 500 (Brad Keselowski)
April 9 — O’Reilly Auto Parts 500 (Jimmie
Johnson)
April 24 — Food City 500 (Jimmie Johnson)
April 30 — Toyota Owners 400 (Joey Logano)
May 7 — GEICO 500 (Ricky Stenhouse Jr)
May 13 — Go Bowling 400 (Martin Truex Jr)
May 20 — x-Monster Energy Open (Daniel
Suarez)
May 20 — x-Monster Energy NASCAR AllStar Race (Kyle Busch)
May 28 — Coca-Cola 600 (Austin Dillon)
June 4 — AAA 400 Drive for Autism (Jimmie
Johnson)
June 11 — Pocono 400 (Ryan Blaney)
June 18 — FireKeepers Casino 400 (Kyle Larson)
June 25 — Toyota/Save Mart 350 (Kevin
Harvick)
July 1 — Coke Zero 400, Daytona Beach, Fla.
(Ricky Stenhouse Jr.)
July 8 — Quaker State 400 (Martin Truex Jr.)
July 16 — New Hampshire 301 (Denny
Hamlin)
July 23 — Brickyard 400 (Kasey Kahne)
July 30 — Overton’s 400 (Kyle Busch)
Aug. 6 — I Love New York 355 at The Glen
(Martin Truex Jr.)
Aug. 13 — Pure Michigan 400 (Kyle Larson)
Aug. 19 — Bass Pro Shops NRA Night Race
(Kyle Busch)
Sept. 3 — Bojangles’ Southern 500, Darlington, S.C.
Sept. 9 — Federated Auto Parts 400, Richmond, Va.
Sept. 17 — Tales of the Turtles 400, Joliet, Ill.
Sept. 24 — New England 300, Loudon, N.H.
Oct. 1 — Delaware 400, Dover, Del.
Oct. 8 — Bank of America 500, Concord,
N.C.
Oct. 15 — Alabama 500, Talladega, Ala.
Oct. 22 — Hollywood Casino 400, Kansas
City, Kan.
Oct. 29 — Goody’s Fast Relief 500, Martinsville, Va.
Nov. 5 — AAA Texas 500, Fort Worth, Texas
Nov. 12 — Can-Am 500, Avondale, Ariz.
Nov. 19 — Ford Ecoboost 400, Homestead,
Fla.
x-non-points race
NASCAR Monster Energy Cup
Points Leaders
No games scheduled
TENNIS
US Open
Winnipeg at Saskatchewan, 4 p.m.
Monday, Sept. 4
Edmonton at Calgary, 3 p.m.
Toronto at Hamilton, 6:30 p.m.
Texas at Houston, 1:10 p.m. ET
1
0
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Sunday’s Games
Pitchers
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
Saturday’s games
x-Connecticut
x-New York
x-Washington
Chicago
Atlanta
Indiana
Ottawa at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
2017 Statistics
Pct.
WHIP
ERA
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
All times ET
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Thursday’s Game
THURSDAY’S GAMES
AMERICAN LEAGUE
West Bromwich
Chelsea
Watford
Southampton
Tottenham
Burnley
Stoke
Everton
Swansea
Newcastle
Leicester
Arsenal
Brighton
Bournemouth
Crystal Palace
West Ham
USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center (seedings in parentheses):
Men’s Singles: Stefano Travaglia, Italy, def.
Fabio Fognini (22), Italy, 6-4, 7-6 (8), 3-6, 6-0;
Viktor Troicki, Serbia, def. Norbert Gombos, Slovakia, 3-6, 6-3, 3-6, 6-4, 6-3; Aleksandr Dolgopolov, Ukraine, def. Jan-Lennard Struff, Germany, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2, 1-6, 6-3;
Tomas Berdych (15), Czech Republic, def.
Ryan Harrison, United States, 6-4, 6-2, 7-6
(4); David Goffin (9), Belgium, def. Julien
Benneteau, France, 6-4, 2-6, 6-4, 6-2; Guido
Pella, Argentina, def. Steve Darcis, Belgium,
6-1, 6-2, 6-0; Gael Monfils (18), France, def.
Jeremy Chardy, France, 7-6 (6), 6-3, 6-4; Damir Dzumhur, Bosnia-Herzegovina, def.
Pablo Cuevas (27), Uruguay, 7-5, 7-6 (3),
6-1; Cedrik-Marcel Stebe, Germany, def.
Nicolas Kicker, Argentina, 5-7, 6-3, 6-1, 6-1;
Andrey Rublev, Russia, def. Aljaz Bedene,
Britain, 6-1, 6-4, 6-4; Grigor Dimitrov (7),
Bulgaria, def. Vaclav Safranek, Czech Republic, 6-1, 6-4, 6-2; Mikhail Youzhny, Russia, def. Blaz Kavcic, Slovenia, 6-3, 5-7, 6-4,
6-3; Fernando Verdasco, Spain, def. Vasek
Pospisil, Canada, 6-2, 0-0; Feliciano Lopez
(31), Spain, def. Andrey Kuznetsov, Russia,
6-4, 7-6 (4), 6-7 (5), 6-2; Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany, def. Tim Smyczek, United
States, 6-1, 6-4, 6-4; Santiago Giraldo, Colombia, def. Vincent Millot, France, 6-1, 6-0,
4-6, 4-6, 6-4; Malek Jaziri, Tunisia, def. Thiago Moura Monteiro, Brazil, 7-6 (5), 4-6, 6-3,
5-7, 6-4; John Millman, Australia, def. Nick
Kyrgios (14), Australia, 6-3, 1-6, 6-4, 6-1; Roberto Bautista-Agut (11), Spain, def. Andreas Seppi, Italy, 6-2, 4-6, 6-2, 7-6 (1); Dustin Brown, Germany, def. Thomaz Bellucci,
Brazil, 6-4, 6-3, 6-2; Juan Martin Del Potro
(24), Argentina, def. Henri Laaksonen, Switzerland, 6-4, 7-6 (3), 7-6 (5); Adrian Mannarino (30), France, def. Richard Berankis, Lithuania, 6-2, 6-4, 6-2; Taylor Fritz, United
States, def. Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus, 6-4,
6-4, 6-3; Mischa Zverev (23), Germany, def.
Benoit Paire, France, 6-3, 6-2, 3-6, 6-7 (3),
7-5; John Isner (10), United States, def. Hyeon Chung, South Korea, 6-3, 6-4, 7-5; Paolo
Lorenzi, Italy, def. Gilles Muller (19), Luxembourg, 6-7 (4), 6-3, 7-6 (4), 6-3; Kevin Anderson (28), South Africa, def. Ernests Gulbis,
Latvia, 6-3, 7-5, 6-4; Borna Coric, Croatia,
def. Alexander Zverev (4), Germany, 3-6,
7-5, 7-6 (1), 7-6 (4); Kyle Edmund, Britain,
def. Steve Johnson, United States, 7-5, 6-2,
7-6 (4); Nicolas Mahut, France, def. Albert
Ramos-Vinolas (20), Spain, 4-6, 6-4, 4-6,
6-3, 6-0; Pablo Carreno-Busta (12), Spain,
def. Cameron Norrie, Britain, 6-2, 6-4, 6-3;
Lucas Pouille (16), France, def. Jared Donaldson, United States, 7-5, 6-4, 4-6, 3-6, 6-4;
Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, def. Evgeny Donskoy, Russia, 6-4, 6-4, 7-5; Diego Sebastian Schwartzman (29), Argentina, def.
Janko Tipsarevic, Serbia, 6-2, 6-4, 7-5; Marin Cilic (5), Croatia, def. Florian Mayer, Germany, 6-3, 6-3, 6-3.
Women’s Singles: Shuai Zhang (27), China, def. Sabine Lisicki, Germany, 6-7 (4), 6-3,
6-0; Ana Bogdan, Romania, def. Taylor
Townsend, United States, 6-4, 4-6, 6-3; Agnieszka Radwanska (10), Poland, def. Petra
Martic, Croatia, 6-4, 7-6 (3); Yulia Putintseva, Kazakhstan, def. Sofya Zhuk, Russia, 7-6
(3), 6-3; Ons Jabeur, Tunisia, def. Brienne
Minor, United States, 6-1, 7-5; Coco Vandeweghe (20), United States, def. Alison Riske,
United States, 2-6, 6-3, 6-4; Lucie Safarova,
Czech Republic, def. Anett Kontaveit (26),
Estonia, 6-7 (5), 6-1, 6-4; Nao Hibino, Japan,
def. Catherine Cartan Bellis, United States,
6-3, 4-6, 7-5; Kurumi Nara, Japan, def. Sara
Sorribes Tormo, Spain, 6-1, 6-2; Svetlana
Kuznetsova (8), Russia, def. Marketa Vondrousova, Czech Republic, 4-6, 6-4, 7-6 (2);
Evgeniya Rodina, Russia, def. Eugenie Bouchard, Canada, 7-6 (2), 6-1; Shelby Rogers,
United States, def. Kayla Day, United
States, 6-2, 4-6, 6-4; Daria Gavrilova (25),
Australia, def. Allie Kiick, United States, 6-2,
6-1; Elena Vesnina (17), Russia, def. Anna
Blinkova, Russia, 6-1, 6-3; Kirsten Flipkens,
Belgium, def. Madison Brengle, United
States, 6-2, 6-3; Tatjana Maria, Germany,
def. Ashley Kratzer, United States, 6-1, 6-1;
Daria Kasatkina, Russia, def. Qiang Wang,
China, 6-7 (7), 6-2, 6-3; Christina McHale,
United States, def. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (19), Russia, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2; Denisa Allertova, Czech Republic, def. Rebecca Peterson, Sweden, 6-2, 7-6 (5); Venus Williams
(9), United States, def. Oceane Dodin,
France, 7-5, 6-4; Petra Kvitova (13), Czech
Republic, def. Alize Cornet, France, 6-1, 6-2;
Magdalena Rybarikova (31), Slovakia, def.
Kristyna Pliskova, Czech Republic, 7-6 (4),
7-6 (3); Aleksandra Krunic, Serbia, def. Ajla
1. Martin Truex Jr., 951.
2. Kyle Busch, 850.
2. Kyle Larson, 845.
4. Kevin Harvick, 824.
5. Denny Hamlin, 753.
6. Brad Keselowski, 728.
7. Chase Elliott, 711.
8. Matt Kenseth, 703.
9. Jamie McMurray, 700.
10. Clint Bowyer, 642.
11. Jimmie Johnson, 628.
12. Ryan Blaney, 623.
13. Kurt Busch, 586.
14. Joey Logano, 583.
15. Ryan Newman, 574.
16. Erik Jones, 574.
17. Daniel Suarez, 537.
18. Ricky Stenhouse Jr., 528.
19. Trevor Bayne, 470.
20. Kasey Kahne, 451.
O/U
59
53
681⁄2
52
511⁄2
66
L O/U
Underdog
31⁄2 38
LA Rams
31⁄2 351⁄2
BUFFALO
1 36 Philadelphia
2 36
Cincinnati
3 37
Jacksonville
4 37
Pittsburgh
2 36 Washington
3 38
NY Giants
3 36
Cleveland
2 37
Baltimore
3 38
Miami
3 38
Tennessee
2 36
Arizona
3 38 LA Chargers
11⁄2 40
OAKLAND
OFF OFF
Houston
DEALS
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Optioned LHP Donnie Hart to Norfolk (IL). Reinstated RHP Dylan Bundy from the bereavement list.
BOSTON RED SOX — Assigned 3B Steve Selsky outright to Pawtucket (IL). Reinstated
RHP Ben Taylor from the 10-day DL and optioned him to Pawtucket. Sent RHP Matt
Barnes to Portland (EL) for a rehab assignment.
CLEVELAND INDIANS — Assigned RHP Diego Moreno outright to Columbus (IL).
Placed RHP Dan Otero on paternity leave.
Recalled RHP Shawn Armstrong and LHP
Ryan Merritt from Columbus.
HOUSTON ASTROS — Sent RHP Lance McCullers Jr. and C Max Stassi to Corpus Christi (TL) for rehab assignments.
KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Placed LHP Brian
Flynn on the 10-day DL. Recalled LHP Eric
Skoglund from Omaha (PCL).
LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Sent 3B Yunel Escobar to Inland Empire (Cal) and RHP Garrett Richards to Salt Lake (PCL) for rehab assignments.
MINNESOTA TWINS — Sent LHP Hector Santiago to Rochester (IL) for a rehab assignment.
NEW YORK YANKEES — Recalled LHP Jordan Montgomery from Scranton/WilkesBarre (IL) as 26th man for Wednesday’s
doubleheader. Sent DH Matt Holliday to
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.
SEATTLE MARINERS — Sent RHP Evan Scribner to Tacoma (PCL) for a rehab assignment.
TEXAS RANGERS — Assigned RHP Tanner
Scheppers outright to Round Rock (PCL).
TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Assigned LHP TJ
House outright to Buffalo (IL). Released OF
Norichika Aoki. Optioned RHP Leonel Campos to Buffalo. Selected the contract of LHP
Brett Anderson from Buffalo.
National League
ATLANTA BRAVES — Placed C Tyler Flowers
on the 10-day DL. Recalled RHP Jason
Hursh and C David Freitas from Gwinnett
(IL). Sent LHP Ian Krol to Gwinnett for a rehab assignment.
LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Reinstated INF/
OF Cody Bellinger from the 10-day DL. Optioned C/INF Kyle Farmer to Oklahoma
City. Sent LHP Adam Liberatore to Oklahoma City (PCL) for rehab assignments.
MIAMI MARLINS — Sent LHP Wei-Yin Chen
to Jupiter (FSL) for a rehab assignment.
MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Sent C Andrew Susac and LHP Brent Suter to Wisconsin
(MWL) for rehab assignments.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Recalled RHP Ricardo Pinto from Lehigh Valley (IL).
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Traded RHP Mike
Leake and international cap space to Seattle for SS Rayder Ascanio.
PHILADELPHIA 76ERS — Signed F James Michael McAdoo to a two-way contract.
Agreed to terms with G James Blackmon Jr.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
ATLANTA FALCONS — Waived WR Reginald
Davis III, OT Will Freeman and Ss Jordan
Moore and Deron Washington. Waived/injured OT Kevin Graf.
CINCINNATI BENGALS — Announced LB
Vontaze Burfict had his NFL suspension reduced from five to three games for his
egregious hit on a Chiefs running back.
CLEVELAND BROWNS — Terminated the
contract of DB Joe Haden. Traded OL Cam
Erving to Kansas City for a 2018 fifth-round
draft pick.
OAKLAND RAIDERS — Signed WR Seth Roberts to a two-year contract extension.
TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Signed QB
Ryan Griffin to a one-year contract extension.
TENNESSEE TITANS — Waived/injured CB
Jeremy Boykins and WR Mekale McKay.
Pregame.com Line
College Football
Friday
L
14
27
91⁄2
27
31⁄2
41⁄2
Favorite
GREEN BAY
Detroit
NY JETS
INDIANAPOLIS
ATLANTA
CAROLINA
TAMPA BAY
NEW ENGLAND
CHICAGO
NEW ORLEANS
MINNESOTA
KANSAS CITY
DENVER
SAN FRANCISCO
Seattle
DALLAS
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
ODDS
Favorite
E. MICHIGAN
Washington
Navy
WISCONSIN
Boston College
Colorado
Thursday
Underdog
Charlotte
RUTGERS
FAU
Utah St
N ILLINOIS
Colorado St
Saturday
Favorite
L O/U
Underdog
MICHIGAN ST
17 531⁄2 Bowling Green
IOWA
11 49
Wyoming
MARSHALL
21⁄2 45
Miami (Ohio)
CLEMSON
391⁄2 511⁄2
Kent St
UMASS
21⁄2 561⁄2 CSTL CAROLINA
PENN ST
30 66
Akron
Louisville
24 67
Purdue
NEBRASKA
141⁄2 47
Arkansas St
NRTHWESTRN 24 60
Nevada
ILLINOIS
7 551⁄2
Ball St
OKLAHOMA
43 63
UTEP
N CAROLINA
13 55
California
MISSISSIPPI
231⁄2 571⁄2 South Alabama
SOUTHERN CAL 26 571⁄2
W. Michigan
TEXAS
19 56
Maryland
NOTRE DAME
18 54
Temple
AUBURN
34 59
Ga Southern
GEORGIA
14 451⁄2
App St
Kentucky
101⁄2 57
S. MISS
NC State
5 521⁄2 South Carolina
Michigan
4 43
Florida
Vanderbilt
31⁄2 59
MID TENN
Alabama
7 481⁄2
Florida St
BOISE ST
10 62
Troy
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
ARIZONA COYOTES — Announced the retirement of RW Shane Doan.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
COLUMBUS CREW — Transferred D Nico
Naess to Heerenveen (Eredivisie-Netherlands).
LA GALAXY — Named Pierre Barrieu director of sports performance.
COLLEGE
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BASKETBALL
COACHES — Executive director Jim Haney
accepted a multi-year contract extension.
BARUCH — Named Gregory Wyzykowski
men’s and women’s tennis coach.
EAST CAROLINA — Named Eric Tyler volunteer assistant baseball coach.
ETSU — Named Paige Neely assistant softball coach.
FLORIDA — Suspended RB Jordan Scarlett
and WR Rick Wells indefinitely.
IUPUI — Agreed to terms with men’s basketball coach Jason Gardner on a contract extension through 2019-20.
SAINT JOSEPH’S — Named Jamie O’Hare
women’s basketball video coordinator.
SOUTH CAROLINA — Announced freshman
women’s basketball G Haley Troup has left
the program.
TULANE — Named Shane Spellman assistant beach volleyball coach.
Sunday
Favorite
Virginia Tech
UCLA
L O/U
4 52
3 57
Underdog
West Virginia
Texas A&M
Monday
Favorite
Tennessee
L O/U
3 56
Underdog
Georgia Tech
NFL
BOXING
Fight Schedule
Sept. 3
At Kyoto, Japan, Shun Kubo vs. Daniel Roman, 12, for Kubo’s WBA World junior
featherweight title.
SPORTS ON TV
Times Eastern. Programs live unless noted. Check local listings.
CYCLING: Vuelta a Espana, Stage 12, Montril to Antequera, Spain
(same-day tape) (NBC Sports Network, 1 p.m.)
GOLF: European PGA Tour, D&D Real Czech Masters, first round,
in Prague, Czech Republic (Golf Channel, 5 and 9 a.m.); Web.com
Tour, Nationwide Children’s Hospital Championship, first round,
Columbus, Ohio (Golf Channel, 3 p.m.); LPGA tour, Cambia Portland Classic, first round, in Portland, Ore. (Golf Channel, 7 p.m.)
HORSE RACING: Saratoga Live, P.G. Johnson Stakes, in Saratoga
Springs, N.Y. (Fox Sports 2, 5 p.m.)
MLB: Regional coverage, Chicago White Sox at Minnesota or Texas vs. Houston in St. Petersburg, Fla. (MLB Network, 1 p.m.); Boston
at New York Yankees or Toronto at Baltimore (MLB Network,
7 p.m.)
NFL: Preseason, Philadelphia at New York Jets (NFL Network,
7 p.m.), Seattle at Oakland (NFL Network, 10 p.m.)
SOCCER: FIFA World Cup 2018 qualifying, France vs. Netherlands,
in Saint-Denis, France (ESPNews, 2:30 p.m.), Portugal vs. Faroe Islands, in Oporto, Portugal (Fox Sports 1, 2:30 p.m.), Bulgaria vs.
Sweden, in Sofia, Bulgaria (Fox Sports 2, 2:30 p.m.)
TENNIS: U.S. Open, second round, in New York (ESPN2, 1 and
7 p.m.)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL ON TV
Thursday (times p.m. Eastern)
Matchup
Florida International (0-0) at Central Florida (0-0)
Buffalo (0-0) at Minnesota (0-0)
Tulsa (0-0) at No. 11 Oklahoma State (0-0)
North Dakota (0-0) at No. 25 Utah (0-0)
No. 2 Ohio State (0-0) at Indiana (0-0)
Florida A&M (1-0) at Arkansas (0-0)
UL-Monroe (0-0) at Memphis (0-0)
New Mexico State (0-0) at Arizona State (0-0)
Time/TV
6/CBSSN
7/BTN
7:30/FS1
7:30/Pac-12
8/ESPN
8/SEC
9/CBSSN
10:30/Pac-12
Surface
Grass
Artificial
Artificial
Artificial
Artificial
Artificial
Artificial
Grass
Pregame.com line
UCF by 17
Minnesota by 24
Okla. State by 171⁄2
N/A
OSU by 21
NA
Memphis by 26
ASU by 221⁄2
Sagarin difference
UCF by 22.27
Minnesota by 22.19
Okla. State by 22.48
Utah by 26.22
OSU by 23.95
Arkansas by 56.78
Memphis by 29.53
ASU by 26.86
Jeff Sagarin’s power ratings show the relative strength of teams. 2.41 points are added to the home team’s rating to
calculate the difference.
8C SPORTS
E6
USA TODAY
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
NASCAR
Some venues succumbed
Mike Hembree
@mikehembree
USA TODAY Sports
NASCAR reduced the schedule
of its top national series dramatically in 1972 — from 48 races to
31.
Thirteen short tracks were
booted from the schedule at the
end of the 1971 season:
Hickory Speedway, Hickory, N.C.
On Cup schedule 1953 to 1971
(35 races). Xfinity schedule 1982
to 1998. Now runs weekly schedule highlighted by Late Models.
When the track held Sunday afternoon races, it suspended competition to eliminate engine noise
while funeral services were held
at an adjacent cemetery.
Columbia Speedway, Cayce,
S.C.
Cup schedule 1951 to 1971 (43
races). A legendary stock car racing short track, Columbia Speedway is remembered for providing
solid experience for future champions such as Richard Petty and
Cale Yarborough. After closing
and becoming overgrown with
weeds and sitting dormant for
more than 30 years, the facility
reopened in 2009 as a venue for
concerts, corporate outings, car
shows and similar events.
Greenville-Pickens Speedway, Easley, S.C.
Cup schedule 1955 to 1971 (28
races). Continues to operate a
weekly program. David Pearson
and Ralph Earnhardt (Dale Earnhardt Sr.’s father) won track
championships at the half-mile,
which hosted the first flag-to-flag
network television coverage of a
Cup race (April 10, 1971). NASCAR founder Bill France Sr. promoted the first race at the track
in 1946.
Smoky Mountain Raceway,
Maryville, Tenn.
Cup schedule 1965 to 1971 (12
races). The track continues to operate with Late Model racing on
an irregular schedule. Petty won
five of the last seven Cup races
there.
South Boston Speedway,
South Boston, Va.
Cup schedule 1960 to 1971 (10
races). SoBo also hosted Xfinity
and Camping World Truck Series
races but dropped off the national
series schedule in 2003 with its
last truck race. The track hosts
Late Models every other week.
Attend enough races here, and
you’ll eventually eat one of the
track’s famous bologna burgers.
New Asheville Speedway,
Asheville, N.C.
Cup schedule 1962 to 1971
(eight races). Adjacent to the
French Broad River, New Asheville was a hotbed for regional
racing after the Cup series left
town, but the track was closed in
1999 when the area was converted to a city park. The racing surface, now part of the park, is used
for bicycling and walking.
Kingsport
Speedway,
Kingsport, Tenn.
Cup schedule 1969 to 1971
(three races). Track now runs a
Late Model schedule weekly.
Albany-Saratoga Speedway,
Malta, N.Y.
Cup schedule 1970 to 1971 (two
races). Once part of the so-called
Northern Tour, Albany now runs
weekly Sportsman races.
Islip Speedway, Islip, N.Y.
Cup schedule 1964 to 1971 (six
races). One of the shortest (0.2mile) tracks to host the Cup series, Islip closed in 1984.
Bowman Gray Stadium,
Winston-Salem, N.C.
Cup schedule 1958 to 1971 (29
races). Despite being in the head-
quarters city of then-new NASCAR sponsor R.J. Reynolds,
Bowman Gray was one of the casualties of the top series’ downsizing. The track remains strong,
however, and has built a regional
reputation for fierce racing and
occasional over-the-top driver
confrontations.
Middle Georgia Raceway,
Byron, Ga.
Cup schedule 1966 to 1971
(nine races). No longer an active
track, Middle Georgia is perhaps
best remembered for hosting a giant music festival in July 1970 —
the Atlanta International Pop
Festival — as a reported total of
more than 200,000 fans came to
the venue to listen to Jimi Hendrix, the Allman Brothers Band
and many others.
Meyer Speedway, Houston
Cup schedule 1971 (one race).
Bobby Allison won the only Cup
race on the half-mile track, outrunning the rest of a 13-car field.
The track no longer is in operation.
Ona Speedway, Ona, W.Va.
Cup schedule 1963 to 1971
(four races). Once operated by
entertainment kingpin Dick
Clark, the speedway now hosts
Late Models every other week.
Breaking
down the
divisions
Short tracks across the nation name their divisions differently, so there is no
consistent nomenclature. But
at Bowman Gray Stadium, the
categories break down like
this.
Modifieds:
Featured
cars, lightweight, powerful,
designed specifically for racing. They must weigh at least
2,650 pounds and are low to
the ground, open-wheeled
and race with offset chassis.
Sportsman: Allows Late
Model stock cars that are
stock in appearance. Both sixand eight-cylinder engines
are allowed.
Street Stock: Cars are
similar to Sportsman cars but
weigh more and generally
have fewer engine modifications.
Stadium Stock: Fourcylinder cars with stock bodies, usually the “starter” division.
Mike Hembree
45 years later, tracks going strong without NASCAR
v CONTINUED FROM 1C
the Cup schedule. The list included
five tracks that could be considered
series bedrock: Hickory (N.C.)
Speedway,
Greenville-Pickens
Speedway and Columbia Speedway
in South Carolina; South Boston
Speedway in Virginia; and Bowman
Gray Stadium in Winston-Salem,
N.C.
Losing a NASCAR race might
have been a death warrant to some
sites — unable to continue without
the sport’s top series — but only five
of the tracks eliminated from the top
circuit faded away. Eight survive today and several are thriving, doing
business and making money in a
crowded entertainment market.
Two of the success stories are
Bowman Gray and South Boston,
tracks that hosted a total of 39 Cup
races. Each has good crowds for regularly scheduled weekend racing,
and each, in some ways, is a reminder of what NASCAR Cup racing once
was — down-home weekend fun
with the family watching drivers as
familiar as the guy next door.
MEMORIES AND MADHOUSE
In many ways, Bowman Gray was the
most surprising name on the hit list.
It had been a part of NASCAR’s
top-tier series since 1958, and NASCAR founder Bill France Sr. once
promoted races at the track. More
than two dozen members of the
NASCAR Hall of Fame trace their
racing roots to the flat, quarter-mile
track about 80 miles north of Charlotte. The track is located in the same
city as R.J. Reynolds Tobacco, whose
arrival in the sport opened the exit
door for Bowman Gray.
Weekly racing became the speedway’s selling point, and its Modified
division quickly gained steam. Today,
Bowman Gray’s Saturday night program has Modified, Street Stock,
Sportsman and Stadium Stock
events. The Modifieds are easily the
crowd favorite, but Bowman Gray
has an impressive car count in all divisions; a typical race night includes
more than 130 cars, a number that
would overwhelm some small tracks.
MIKE HEMBREE FOR USA TODAY SPORTS
A lack of star drivers doesn’t mean fans can’t make memories,
South Boston Speedway general manager Cathy Rice says.
Bowman Gray’s biggest draw,
however, is the near-certainty that
almost any race at the tight track will
lead to confrontation — driver vs.
driver, car vs. car, sometimes both.
The compact nature of the facility
leaves little room for passing when
competing cars are almost equal, so
bumping and banging are generally
required when moving through the
field.
This helped earn the track its
“Madhouse” nickname, one that was
underlined when the History Channel broadcast a fight-heavy series —
MadHouse — from the track in
2010.
“We’re racing, but we’re also entertainment,” track promoter Gray
Garrison, one of several third-generation members of his family to operate Bowman Gray, told USA TODAY
Sports. “The fans can get close. They
can see the drivers inside the cars.
They can see them fighting the
wheel. There is a lot of banging and
beating and pushing and shoving.
And fans like excitement.”
They also like the atmosphere,
one that can generate hostilities that
can spread across a season. Highlights — or lowlights, depending on
perspective — have included fights in
the infield and garage area and drivers using their cars to ram into each
other, hood to hood, on the track.
Security personnel limit the drama, but they usually let things go, to
a point.
On many nights, there is a professional wrestling flavor to it all. A recent Saturday’s grandstand activity
included a grandmother instructing
her grandson on the best way to display the middle finger to a passing
driver.
“We come here and sit in the
same seats every night,” Tommy Carson, a Winston-Salem resident, told
USA TODAY Sports. “You can’t beat
the prices and the entertainment
value. This place has some of the
best Modifieds and best short-track
drivers around, and you never know
what’s going to happen.”
The track is unique. The asphalt
racing surface circles the stadium’s
football field. The horseshoe-shaped
grandstand seats 17,000, with the
opening on one end allowing entrances and exits from the garage.
There is no pit road inside the track.
The city of Winston-Salem owns
the facility and leases it to the speedway operators and also to WinstonSalem State University, which uses it
during football season. There can be
no overlap of the two sports, so Bowman Gray’s racing schedule ends in
August.
France and Alvin Hawkins of
Spartanburg, S.C., began promoting
races at the track in 1949, and members of Hawkins’ family still operate
the facility.
In NASCAR’s early days, France
and Hawkins rented adjacent houses
in Winston-Salem and used the city
as a sort of hub for the fledgling racing business.
Hawkins and his wife, Eloise, had
six children. Johnnie Pinilis, the
youngest, still works at the track.
Garrison, the track promoter for the
last 15 years, is a grandchild of Alvin
and Eloise Hawkins, as are track
manager Jonathan Hawkins and
track publicist Loren Pinilis.
“We’ve stood the test of time — almost 70 years,” Garrison said. “We
keep the tickets cheap ($10 for
adults), haven’t raised the prices in
15 years. We try to fine-tune what’s
here and try to keep it up to modern
times. But it’s a unique place with a
lot of history. We don’t want to mess
it up.”
RACING THEN, RACING NOW
Cathy Rice, South Boston Speedway’s general manager since 1989,
says it’s her goal to build on the
memories people have of the stars of
the Cup series — drivers such as Petty, Bobby Allison and Benny Parsons
— racing at the track decades ago.
“We still have people come here
every race night like they did then
and set up their lawn chairs in Turns
3 and 4 and watch the races,” Rice
told USA TODAY Sports. “They talk
about the days when Richard and
Bobby and all those guys raced here.
And they’re good memories. That’s
what I want to make happen today. I
want our fans to go home with memories like that.”
It’s not the same, of course, since
the Cup series left town in 1971. But,
for many, a race is a race is a race.
“A Late Model driver can win every race and not make any money,”
said Guy Haskins, who has worked at
South Boston since the 1960s and
befriended many of the Cup drivers.
“He’s in it for the hobby and loves to
do it. People who go to Cup races today and have never watched a good
Late Model race — they’ve missed it
all.”
Located in south central Virginia
near the North Carolina line, South
Boston, celebrating its 60th year, is a
major financial engine for the area,
say longtime fans.
“On Saturday night, this is where
people go,” said Jesse Spencer Jr., a
former Limited Sportsman track
champion. “We’re fortunate to have
a track like this in Halifax County. It
was big to have the Grand Nationals
(now Cup) here, but everybody
moved on. The crowds have fallen off
some, but I think that’s mainly because so much more is going on.”
The racing — now in Late Model
and Limited Sportsman divisions,
along with occasional NASCAR touring series — still entertains, Spencer
said.
“Some people have in their minds
that they want to see that big name
all the time,” he said. “I want to see a
good race. And these guys can put on
a heck of a show.”
Joe Chandler, sports editor of
South Boston newspaper the Gazette-Virginian, said he was shooting photographs for the paper when
Parsons won the final Cup race at the
track on May 9, 1971.
“Does this community miss having the Cup races? Yes,” Chandler
told USA TODAY Sports. “But South
Boston has always brought in good
touring series with K&N and Modifieds. The fans enjoy that. I think a
lot of interest has to do with the
competition. If there’s good competition, fans are going to come.”
Bill Mangum said he has been a
track regular since South Boston’s
dirt-track days in the late 1950s,
when his father, Gordon, raced.
“When the Grand Nationals
raced, it was hard to get a seat, because everybody was a superstar,” he
said. “You better get your ticket
early.”
He said the Cup series’ departure
wasn’t a major deal for area fans “because Martinsville Speedway is right
up the road and Richmond is not
that far. There wasn’t much talk
about it then. And the track has done
really well.”
OLYMPICS
White focused on halfpipe for 2018 Games
Rachel Axon
@RachelAxon
USA TODAY Sports
MALIBU, CALIF.
Shaun White
planned a low-key birthday celebration for this week, just dinner with
friends and family.
By Sunday, when he turns 31, the
two-time Olympic gold medalist will
be in New Zealand chasing snow and
a World Cup win to start a season
that he hopes will get him back atop
the podium in Pyeongchang.
“If I show up, I’m going to try and
win,” White told USA TODAY Sports,
speaking of the Olympics specifically
while acknowledging an ethos that
has made him one of the most-accomplished competition riders in the
sport.
“That’s all I care about and want
to do. I won’t lie to you. I think you
can tell by my life’s record that’s kind
of what I like to do and I don’t really
aim any lower, so I’d be lying to say
I’m not there to win.”
The journey back to another
Olympic medal begins this season
with a FIS World Cup in Cardrona,
New Zealand, on Sept. 8-9.
Long snowboarding’s most famous rider, White comes into this year
with a new approach coming off a
disappointing fourth-place finish in
Sochi. He changed coaches, switching from longtime coach Bud Keene
to Olympic bronze medalist JJ
Thomas. He spends more time working out and in physical therapy.
He spent part of the offseason
training in Oregon and in Mammoth,
seeking to stay closer to home to stay
connected with friends and family.
White is enjoying the sport again,
relishing in learning new tricks.
“I have a couple things in my
pocket that I’m waiting to see what
happens just so I know and maybe I
need that motivation to clear this
hurdle,” he said. “Just going up
thinking, ‘Oh, I might need it’ is
harder to get the job than going, ‘OK,
I need this trick. It’s not a maybe
anymore. I need this to succeed.’ ”
Those tricks — one new to him
and one new to snowboarding entirely — are likely to come out during
the four remaining qualifying events
that will determine the U.S. team.
White wouldn’t say what they
were, but footage from this offseason
shows the veteran rider has dialed in
one of snowboarding’s toughest
tricks.
White learned a frontside version
of the YOLO flip, a double cork 1440
created by Iouri Podlatchikov that
helped the Swiss rider claim gold in
Sochi.
“It’s just such a strange trick. It’s
been a battle,” White said. “It’s like
I’ve done it before, but then again the
technique wasn’t as good so I would
start over doing it to the airbag, trying to do these little tweaks and
changes and then bring it back and
take it back to the airbag. It’s just
been this kind of like ongoing battle,
so I think that was finally some footage you saw when it all clicked.”
This time, White will only spend
time learning tricks in one event.
In 2014, he made the U.S. team in
halfpipe and slopestyle with the latter event making its Olympic debut
in Russia. But splitting time between
training for both events took its toll,
and White withdrew from the slopestyle competition once he got to
Russia.
By doing both, he felt like he was
constantly relearning tricks in each.
“I was just thinking about being
kind to myself and just doing halfpipe this time. Honestly, it was such
a struggle to do both,” he said
“I never felt like I was gaining the
proper momentum and feeling rewarded for it because every time I
would learn something somewhere, I
would feel like I was neglecting the
other. It wasn’t like I felt satisfied in
the end.”
With a new approach and singular
focus, White hopes this Olympic year
will end differently. After this first
event, White will return to New Zealand to train in October, possibly
with a stop in Switzerland on the
way.
Next week, it will be warm and
crowded, with riders from around
the world taking advantage of the
end of New Zealand’s winter. But
White is looking for a little more to
celebrate as he continues his path
back to the Olympics.
SECTION D
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
Keeping
Dylan
forever
young
Joan Osborne
is knockin’ on
Bob’s door for
new album 5D
JEFF FASANO
LIFELINE
REMEMBERING DIANA
ROYALS REPORT
REMEMBERING MUMMY
There’s nothing more English
than a beautiful garden, and
no one more English than
Princess Diana. So that’s where
Prince William and Prince Harry
chose to pay tribute to their
mother on Wednesday, the eve
of the 20th anniversary of her
death. Clutching umbrellas,
the princes and Duchess Kate
of Cambridge, William’s wife,
visited the Sunken Garden
on the grounds of Kensington
Palace — their current central
London residence and Diana’s
former home. The engagement
was to be the young royals’ sole
public appearance before the
anniversary, aimed at highlighting their mother’s life and her
charitable legacy. They were
expected to spend the anniversary day in private.
KIRSTY WIGGLESWORTH, AP
HOW WAS YOUR DAY?
GOOD DAY
DREW SCOTT
We finally have our first official
couple for Season
25 of ‘Dancing
With the Stars.’
‘Good Morning America’
announced
Wednesday
that ‘Property
Brothers’ star Drew
GETTY IMAGES
Scott will join pro
Emma Slater on
the dance floor this fall. Slater
earned the coveted Mirrorball
trophy with football star Rashad
Jennings last season, and Scott
hopes to win first place with his
reigning partner. “What I’m
really looking forward to is
finale night, where I hope Emma and I will be holding up the
Mirrorball,” Scott told ‘People.’
“I want to make her proud
and really want her to be a
back-to-back champion.”
USA SNAPSHOTS©
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MAEVE MCDERMOTT AND JANET LOEHRKE, USA TODAY
Britain’s Princess still has
a special hold on America
Maria Puente
Diana, Princess of Wales, arrives at the American
Red Cross in Washington in June 1997. She was
there to discuss the effort to ban land mines
worldwide, one of the princess’ signature causes.
USA TODAY
T
wenty years later, it’s as
if she didn’t really die.
America’s attention is
again haunted by Diana,
Princess of Wales — queen,
then and now, of many a Yankee heart.
Pick up any device, peruse
any newsstand or bookstore,
switch on your TV, and there
she is, glowing in the strobe
lights, beaming that megawatt
smile, batting those intensely
blue eyes — permanently young
and beautiful at 36 years old.
“People who die young are
forever trapped in amber,” says
best-selling American author
Sally Bedell Smith, who has
written biographies of DiThe
ana, Prince
world
Charles and
Queen Elizastood
beth II. “No
still
one can imagWhere were
ine what Diyou when you ana
would
heard the
have looked
news? 3D
like
as
56-year-old.”
A “unique
It was hard
funeral for
to grasp when
a unique
she died in a
person” 6D
car crash in
Paris, 20 years ago on Aug. 31,
1997: How could such a charismatic presence suddenly vanish, and under such banal
circumstances?
It’s the question Britain and
the world are still asking. Americans, too. The country that
threw off the royal yoke 241
years ago clasped the aristocrat-turned-royal Diana to its
breast when she was alive, and
embraces her still all these
years later.
“The fact that 20 years on we
still talk about Diana, that she
still captures and enthralls in
equal measure and remains to a
degree a mystery and a dichotomy, are testimony to her legacy
and the deep impression she
left,” says Katie Nicholl, a British journalist, royal biographer
and commentator whose next
book, Harry: Life, Loss and
Love, comes out in 2018.
American fans of Diana treasure their memories of her in
their country — especially her
first visit in 1985, when she
wore blue velvet to dance with
John Travolta at the Reagan
White House.
She especially liked New
York and visited often, going to
a homeless shelter and an AIDS
clinic in 1989, attending a charity gala in 1995, and auctioning
her dresses for charity in June
1997, just weeks before she
died.
v STORY CONTINUES ON 2D
DOUG MILLS, AP
Reporter’s diary
Not calm, not carrying on
Maria Puente
USA TODAY
PETER DEJONG, AP
Welsh Guards carry Diana’s
casket, topped with the royal
standard, out of Westminster
Abbey after her funeral.
Elton John warbling a hastily
rewritten Candle in the Wind in
Westminster Abbey? No way it
could happen in the hallowed
space where a mighty choir is
meant to sing Handel’s Coronation Anthems.
The ninth Earl Spencer, Diana’s
brother Charles, in his eulogy
hurling imprecations at the media
and some seething smacks at the
royal family — even as his god-
mother the queen listened from a
few feet away? Unthinkable.
Then the roar erupted the instant he was through. Multitudes,
weeping, applauding, cheering.
The roar thundered on the public
speakers, whipped down The
Mall and around Horse Guards
Parade, along Whitehall and into
the abbey. Then, incredibly, I
could hear the rumble of applause in the abbey from what
sounded like most of the 1,900
guests.
Diana’s death undid the Britv STORY CONTINUES ON 2D
EVERYONE IS FEELING THE HEAT OF THE YEAR’S SEXIEST THRILLER
PHILIPPA GREGORY
BESTSELLING AUTHOR OF THE OTHER BOLEYN GIRL AND THE WHITE QUEEN
“BEAUTIFULLY FILMED WITH A STELLAR CAST.”
ACADEMY AWARD® WINNER
ALICIA VIKANDER
SCRE NPLAY
BY
DANE DEHAAN
ACADEMY AWARD® WINNER
ACADEMY AWARD® WINNER
AND
JUDI DENCH
AND
CHRISTOPH WALTZ
AND TOM STOPPARD TBASHENOVEDUPELOBYN DEBORAH MOGGACH DIRECTBYED JUSTIN CHADWICK
STARTS TOMORROW
ARTWORK ©2017 THE WEINSTEIN COMPANY LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
USA TODAY
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
2D LIFE
Warmth, beauty made her ideal princess
“People could relate
to her, wanted to be
her, wanted to be her
best friend.”
v CONTINUED FROM 1D
In the 2014 hit play Charles III,
in which the Prince of Wales becomes king and improbable chaos
ensues, Diana puts in spectral appearances as a blond Banquo’s
ghost haunting her ex and her
sons. But she haunts everybody —
and Americans more than most.
American author Christopher
Andersen, whose 1998 best-seller
The Day Diana Died has been reissued as an e-book, says Diana
has always been “more popular in
America” than even in Britain.
“The revisionism about her,
depicting her as neurotic, grasping, a villain — Americans never
bought into it. It didn’t appeal to
their idea of the fairy-tale
princess,” Andersen says.
Observers such as Andersen,
Smith and Nicholl, who watched
Diana for years, think Americans
projected their fantasies on Diana
but also picked up on her vulnerabilities: her bulimia, her unhappiness and divorce, her many
childhood traumas.
Americans connected with Diana’s obvious warmth, which was
so much a contrast with the icy,
standoffish royals, Andersen says.
“She was human, that was the key
to her,” he says. “We recognized
something of ourselves in her.”
She reached out to people in a
way no other royal had done, as
the first royal to embrace people
with AIDS, for instance. “That
resonated with Americans,”
whom she reminded of former
first lady Jackie Kennedy, Andersen says. “The level of their celebrity has not been matched by
Victoria Arbiter,
CNN contributor
LEFTERIS PITARAKIS, AP
A photo and plastic flower are left in memory of Princess Diana
on the grounds of Kensington Palace in 2007. The palace is
where Diana lived even after her divorce from Prince Charles.
anyone else since then.”
Plus, don’t underestimate the
power of Diana’s stunning looks,
says Smith, author of Diana in
Search of Herself: Portrait of a
Troubled Princess (1999), and
Prince Charles, The Passions and
Paradoxes of an Improbable Life
(published in April). She says Diana was at the height of her allure
when she died.
“She had just been photographed by Mario Testino, she
looked beautiful, but most people
didn’t realize she was spinning
like a top,” Smith says. “Diana
projected an image of strength,
recovery and vulnerability. She
projected innocence and wonderment. She was an object of great
sympathy. And everybody was
just completely captivated by her
beauty.”
She was rich, beautiful, the
mother of a future king and a
woman beloved by millions — but
not by her husband, the Prince of
Wales, who was in love with
someone else and had been since
even before their gloriously romantic royal wedding in 1981.
He knew it, she knew it, but we
didn’t know it, not until much later when it all came to tears.
Many, many tears.
“When you think ‘princess,’
that was Diana, the emblem of
the term,” says Victoria Arbiter, a
British-born CNN contributor in
New York who lived in Kensington Palace in her teens as the
daughter of Dickie Arbiter, a former press secretary to the queen.
“She was a beautiful woman
who felt injured and hurt by her
husband, so there was a massive
sense of public sympathy for her,”
Victoria Arbiter says. “People
could relate to her, wanted to be
her, wanted to be her best friend.”
This was especially true of
Americans, whose attitudes about
celebrities are different from
those of the British, she says.
“(The British media) often
show celebrities falling out of
nightclubs, looking rough and
flaunting their underwear,” she
says. “What (the American
media) do is show them on red
carpets looking great. They’re celebrated, they’re seen as bettering
their life. In England, it’s seen as
jumping your class.”
So, as the 20th anniversary of
her death approaches, Britain
naturally is deep-diving into Diana memories. Even Prince William and Prince Harry decided
they would mark the anniversary
not with a charity pop concert, as
they did for the 10th, but by
agreeing for the first time to be
interviewed in a documentary.
The American media are filling
the summer with Diana, with
multiple documentaries and specials scheduled or already aired.
Why else would they do that
except that they know audiences
will devour them?
America is ready for a long
look back at Diana, and for a good
cry about what might have been.
PETER DE JONG, AP
Horse guards pass mourners outside Buckingham Palace on Sept. 1, 1997, a day after the Paris car crash that killed Diana.
PAUL HACKETT, AP
Elton John plays a special version of Candle in the Wind,
re-written as Goodbye English Rose, during the funeral service.
The people
demanded
public grief
v CONTINUED FROM 1D
ish. At least temporarily, they let
loose all their sorrow and shock,
their guilt and rage and regret.
They mourned, loudly and unashamedly.
Their
beautiful
princess, just 36, was gone. The
most famous woman in the world
— a superstar whose tribulations
dominated daily headlines for 16
years — was snuffed out in a commonplace tragedy: a car crash.
The whole world mourned: An
estimated 2.5 billion people
watched her semi-royal funeral —
a “unique funeral for a unique person,” the palace called it, proving
that the royals, at least, remained
the undisputed masters of the
transcendent ceremonial flourish.
When the British woke up on
Sunday, Aug. 31, to the horrifying
news that Diana had died in a
hospital about 4 a.m. Paris time,
the national nervous breakdown
began. By Sunday evening, her
body was flown back to Britain,
accompanied by her stunned exhusband, Prince Charles, and her
two sisters, who traveled to Paris
on the royal jet to collect her.
There was rising hysteria in the
streets and in the press. Never-before-seen public fury at the royal
family and the queen about what
was initially interpreted as royal
indifference. Demands that the
standard over Buckingham Palace
be lowered in respect, despite the
rules of protocol. Demands that
there be a public and royal funeral, even though since her 1996 divorce, Diana was no longer royal
and both the Spencers and the
royal family sought privacy. Demands that the family, especially
her sons, William, 15, and Harry,
JEFF J. MITCHELL, AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Walking behind the coffin: Prince Philip, the queen’s husband; Prince William; Charles, Earl
Spencer, the princess’ brother; Prince Harry; and Diana’s ex-husband, Prince Charles.
12, grieve with their people.
“Show us you care!” screamed
one tabloid headline. “Where is
our queen? Where is her flag?”
shouted another.
Carpets of flowers grew outside Diana’s home at Kensington
Palace — so many that Britain
had to import more from the
Continent. People queued for up
to eight hours to sign the condolence books at St. James’s Palace
where her body lay.
It was a daily whirlwind of developments, most notably the
queen capitulating to advice from
Prince Charles and others to return to London, delivering an unprecedented live tribute speech
to the nation, and bowing her
head when the coffin passed her.
London shut down on the day of
the funeral, Sept. 6. All flights
over the city were rerouted.
An estimated 1 million people
lined the 3.5-mile funeral route in
an eerie silence broken occasionally by keening sobs and the clipclop of the horses drawing the
gun carriage with her coffin
draped with a royal flag. The envelope on top marked “Mummy”
was heartbreaking, as was the
march of her sons, her ex-husband, her former father-in-law,
Prince Philip, and her brother behind the gun carriage.
Prince Harry and Prince William now say the march was traumatic for them, that no child
should be forced or encouraged
to participate in such a ritual. But
at the time, many saw it as a royal
tradition and a dignified gesture,
providing visual reassurance for a
worried nation that Diana’s sons
were coping with the tragedy.
For her final journey home to
her family’s 500-year-old Althorp
House for burial, crowds of
mourners lined the route and
threw flowers on her hearse — so
many that the driver had to stop
to remove them. She was buried
in private (only eight close family
were there) on a small island in
the middle of an ornamental lake.
She remains there to this day, the
Lady of the Lake, safe at last from
prying eyes and cameras.
USA TODAY
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
LIFE 3D
Elizabeth
Emanuel
designed
Diana’s
wedding
gown.
“She was
in people’s
hearts,” she
says. “It was
like losing
family. The
time has gone
so quickly.”
REMEMBERING DIANA
Where were you
when you heard?
Jane Onyanga-Omara and Kim Hjelmgaard | USA TODAY
LONDON
A
s with the moment in November 1963 when news
broke of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, many people can recall exactly where they were or
what they were doing 20 years ago when they heard
Princess Diana had died.
“It was very, very strange after
her death, you know, the sort of
outpouring of love and emotion
from so many people that had
never even met her,” Prince Harry, who was just 12 when his
mother died, says in the documentary Diana, Our Mother: Her
Life and Legacy. “I was thinking
to myself, ‘How is it that so many
people that never met this woman, my mother, can be crying and
showing more emotion that I actually am feeling?’ ”
Here are people’s stories of
that moment:
ELIZABETH EMANUEL
“I was in bed. It was 5 in the
morning, and my dad called me
and said, ‘You’d better turn on the
TV,’ ” says Emanuel, 64. She and
her former husband, David, designed Diana’s wedding dress and
many other outfits for the young
princess in the 1980s.
“They didn’t announce she was
dead (at first). They just said she
was in a car crash.
“It was unbelievable. It was
really terrible. You don’t think
anybody like that would just die.
She was such an iconic and wonderful person.
“She was in people’s hearts. It
was like losing family. The time
has gone so quickly. She is (still)
such a big part of our lives.”
PHIL DAMPIER
“I got a call about 2 a.m. from a
photographer to say there was
something I needed to know:
There had been a car crash and
that Dodi (Fayed, her companion)
was dead and Diana was injured,”
says Dampier, a former journalist
who covered Princess Diana for
Britain’s Sun newspaper and
whose new book, Diana: I’m Going to be Me — The People’s
Princess Revealed in Her Own
Words, came out in June.
“So I got up and started watching the television. By that time I
had left the Sun and was working
as the royal editor for an Australian magazine. For me, the
strange thing was that while most
people did not know what was going on in the United Kingdom,
because of the late hour and the
time difference in Australia and
other parts of the world, they did.
“I remember calling one hardened photographer to tell him she
had died, and I heard his wife
shriek in the background and
then burst into tears. It was quite
eerie. It was about 5 a.m. Then, of
course, in the morning, the enormity of it all sank in.
“There’s a whole generation of
kids, anyone under 30, who don’t
remember her or even know who
she is. A lot of people are discovering Diana for the first time.”
CHRIS ANDERSON
Anderson, 39, an accountant from
London, was in college when Diana died.
“I remember seeing it on TV,”
he says. “We were all really
shocked. It was one of those moments you never forget. It was
disbelief. We started phoning
people we knew. It wasn’t until
she died that it became so apparent what a big presence she was.”
BOOK BUZZ
NEW ON THE LIST
AND IN PUBLISHING
2011 PHOTO BY SANG TAN, AP
TEMI ADAMOLEKUN
“I was 18 and I was at home and
my then-boyfriend called me to
tell me,” says Adamolekun, 37,
who was living in London when
Diana died. She now lives in San
Francisco and is co-founder of
Radiant Workspace, a co-working
space for women.
“I came to Kensington Palace
to lay flowers later that evening.
It was such a somber atmosphere, to see so many people so
sad. I don’t think I’ve ever seen
that many flowers in my life.”
JOHN LOUGHREY
Loughrey, 62, a huge fan who for
two decades followed all things
Diana, had just opened a bottle
of champagne to celebrate his
wife’s birthday.
multitude of fans know the end is
near. And they’ve shot the penultimate book in the author’s popular Alphabet Mystery series, Y Is
for Yesterday, to No. 1 on USA
TODAY’s Best-Selling Books list.
This is the third P.I. Kinsey
Millhone book in a row to make
its debut in the top spot. W Is for
Wasted landed at No. 1 on Sept.
19, 2013, while X did the same on
Sept. 3, 2015.
The series kicked off in 1982
with A Is for Alibi. The first Grafton mystery to
hit No. 1 was L Is
for Lawless in
1995. (USA
TODAY’s bestseller list began
in fall 1993.)
The only other
Alphabet title to
top the list was
Q Is for Quarry
in 2002.
In Y Is for Yesterday, Millhone
is called into a case involving the
murder of a girl at an elite private
school.
Grafton has made a game teasing out which word she’ll choose
to go with the letter in each new
title. With X, she changed things
up and went with plain old X.
But the 77-year-old writer long
ago revealed the title for the very
last Alphabet mystery, which will
be called Z Is for Zero and will hit
stores in fall 2019.
Then what?
Here’s Grafton’s answer, posted on her web site: “Many of you
are asking (some quite plaintively) what I intend to do when I get
to ‘the end’ of the alphabet. I’ve
been consistent in my response,
which is ‘no clue.’ I want to see
what kind of shape I’m in mentally and physically. I don’t want to
keep on writing if the juice is
gone. These novels about Ms.
Millhone take incredible focus,
ingenuity, energy, and imagination. If I have the wherewithal, I
may write a Kinsey Millhone
stand-alone or two. If I feel I’ve
lost my touch, I’ll retire with
grace.”
Jocelyn McClurg
Then the couple happened to
turn on the news and heard there
had been a terrible automobile
accident in the French capital.
“We didn’t drink any of that
champagne. It went back in the
fridge with the cork off,” Loughrey says. “Then, when it was confirmed that Diana was dead, we
just cried.
“I didn’t cry alone. The whole
world cried. She was special.”
WHAT
AMERICA’S
READING®
BOOKLIST.USATODAY.COM
n Rank this week
THE TOP 10
‘Y’ ask why? Sue Grafton’s
CARL COURT, AFP/GETTY IMAGES
“The whole world cried,” says John Loughrey, photographed
camping out for the wedding of Will and Kate in 2011.
n Rank last week (F) Fiction (NF) Non-fiction (P) Paperback (H)Hardcover (E) E-book
Publisher in italics
1
—
Y is for Yesterday
Sue Grafton
P.I. Kinsey Millhone investigates the
murder of a girl at an elite private school
(F) (E) Marion Wood Books/Putnam
6
2
3
The Glass Castle
Jeannette Walls
Memoir: Author reflects on her
unconventional childhood (NF) (P) Scribner
7 12 Before We
Were Yours
Lisa Wingate
Rill Foss fights to keep her siblings together
after they’re forced into an orphanage
(F) (E) Ballantine
3
5
Wonder
R.J. Palacio
August, who was born with a deformity,
wants nothing more than to be normal
(F) (H) Knopf Books for Young Readers
8
Jacob and Megan Brandeis get jobs at the
Store in order to expose the organization’s
secrets (F) (H) Little, Brown
4
1
Seeing Red
Sandra Brown
TV journalist Kerra Bailey revisits the
bombing of a Dallas hotel 25 years earlier
(F) (E) Grand Central Publishing
9 11 The Woman
in Cabin 10
Ruth Ware
A travel writer sees a woman thrown
overboard on a luxury cruise, but no one
believes her (F) (P) Gallery/Scout Press
5
—
Beneath a Scarlet Sky The story of an Italian youth during
Mark Sullivan
WWII who finds himself spying for the
Allies (F) (E) Lake Union
10 —
Nick Mitchell takes a job as a carpenter
at a wedding venue owned by Pallas
Saunders (F) (E) Harlequin HQN
—
2
The Duchess Deal
Tessa Dare
The Store
James Patterson,
Richard DiLallo
You Say It First
Susan Mallery
The Duke of Ashbury attaches specific
terms to his marriage to Emma Gladstone
(F) (E) Avon
The book list appears
every Thursday.
For each title, the format
and publisher listed are
for the best-selling
version of that title this
week. Reporting outlets
include Amazon.com,
Amazon Kindle, Barnes &
Noble.com, Barnes &
Noble Inc., Barnes &
Noble e-books,
BooksAMillion.com,
Books-A-Million, Costco,
Hudson Booksellers,
iBooks (Apple, Inc.)
Joseph-Beth Booksellers
(Lexington, Ky.; Cincinnati,
Charlotte, Cleveland,
Pittsburgh), Kobo, Inc.,
Powell's Books (Portland,
Ore.), Powells.com, R.J.
Julia Booksellers, Schuler
Books & Music (Grand
Rapids, Okemos,
Eastwood, Alpine, Mich.),
Sony Reader Store,
Target, Tattered Cover
Book Store (Denver).
THE REST
11 7 The Whistler/John Grisham
12 6 The Late Show/Michael Connelly
13 10 Milk and Honey/Rupi Kaur
14 9 Camino Island/John Grisham
15 18 A Game of Thrones/George R.R. Martin
16 14 The Subtle Art of Not Giving a (Expletive)/
Mark Manson
17 15 What Do You Do With a Problem?/Kobi Yamada
18 16 It/Stephen King
19 — Drunk Dial/Penelope Ward
20 13 Two by Two/Nicholas Sparks
21 20 Make Your Bed/William H. McRaven
22 23 Lilac Girls/Martha Hall Kelly
23 25 The Handmaid’s Tale/Margaret Atwood
24 28 To Kill a Mockingbird/Harper Lee
25 — The Beauty of Us/Kristen Proby
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
31
35
22
24
—
—
—
The Couple Next Door/Shari Lapena
StrengthsFinder 2.0/Tom Rath
Hillbilly Elegy/J. D. Vance
Ready Player One/Ernest Cline
Love Another Day/Lexi Blake
Myths & Magic/K. Adrienne, et al
If Not for You/Debbie Macomber
33 — Sulfur Springs/William Ken Krueger
34 17 The Big Lie/Dinesh D’Souza
35 29 The Lying Game/Ruth Ware
36 39 Astrophysics for People in a Hurry/
Neil deGrasse Tyson
37 26 1984/George Orwell
38 — The 9th Girl/Tami Hoag
39
40
41
42
—
—
42
32
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
—
46
—
41
—
38
33
The Hideaway/Lauren K. Denton
The Nazi Officer’s Wife/Edith H. Beer
A Gentleman in Moscow/Amor Towles
The Good Daughter/Karin Slaughter
The Secret Life of Bees/Sue Monk Kidd
The Outsiders/S.E. Hinton
Map of the Heart/Susan Wiggs
The Great Gatsby/F. Scott Fitzgerald
Royally Mine/ S. Stoker, et al.
Any Dream Will Do/Debbie Macomber
The Medical Examiner/
James Patterson, Maxine Paetro
50 — The Beginning/Catherine Coulter
In Florida, lawyer Lacy Stoltz investigates a claim that a corrupt judge has gotten rich through a casino built on Native
American land (F) (P) Dell
Detective Renée Ballard is banished to the night shift after filing a sexual harassment complaint (F) (E) Little, Brown
Poetry collection divided into four chapters that explore four pains (F) (P) Andrews McMeel Publishing
A charismatic Florida bookseller becomes a suspect after daring thieves steal the original manuscripts of F. Scott
Fitzgerald’s novels from Princeton (F) (H) Doubleday
Trouble and coldness descend on a kingdom where the seasons are out of balance; first in series (F) (E) Bantam
Subtitle: “A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life” (NF) (H) HarperOne
Children: A child learns how to face a persistent problem (NF) (H) Compendium
Seven adults return to small Maine town to battle an evil creature that preys on children (F) (P) Scribner
Rana Saloomi calls her childhood crush, Landon Roderick, during a moment of weakness (F) (E) Penelope Ward
Ad man Russell Green finds himself jobless and a single father to a 6-year-old (F) (P) Grand Central Publishing
Subtitle: “Little Things That Can Change Your Life ... And Maybe the World” (NF) (H) Grand Central Publishing
Debut novel about the intersecting lives of three women during World War II (F) (P) Ballantine
The story of a handmaid named Offred who lives in the repressive Republic of Gilead (F) (P) Anchor
1960 coming-of-age classic about racism; Pulitzer winner; 1962 movie (F) (P) Grand Central Publishing
Television executive Trevor Cooper wants to do a show about Riley Gibson’s restaurant; fourth in series (F) (E)
William Morrow Paperbacks
Anne and Marco Conti are suspects in a crime, which reveals secrets that each are keeping (F) (P) Penguin
Lifetime strategies for using your talents (NF) (H) Gallup
Subtitle: “A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis” (NF) (H) Harper
Wade Watts escapes his grim life by searching for a lottery ticket in a virtual world (F) (P) Broadway Books
Brody Carter is hired to protect Dr. Stephanie Gibson; 14th in series (F) (E) DLZ Entertainment
Science fiction and fantasy collection of 21 novels and novellas (F) (E) Carter & Bradley Publishing
Music teacher Beth Prudhomme moves 2,000 miles away from her controlling parents, whose views may blind her to
the appeal of mechanic Sam (F) (P) Ballantine
Cork O’Connor and Rainy Bisonette try to find Rainy’s son, Peter, who has disappeared in Arizona (F) (E) Atria Books
Subtitle: “Exposing the Nazi Roots of the American Left” (NF) (H) Regenry Publishing
Four estranged friends are pulled back together years after they are thrown out of their boarding school for lying
(F) (E) Gallery/Scout Press
Succinct takes on the science of the universe by renowned astrophysicist (NF) (H) W.W. Norton
Classic: A future world where Big Brother is watching (F) (P) Signet Classic
Minneapolis investigators Sam Kovac and Nikki Liska investigate the murder of a Jane Doe who may be the victim of
a serial killer (F) (E) Dutton Adult
Sara Jenkins learns her late grandmother has left her a bed and breakfast (F) (E) Thomas Nelson
Subtitle: “How One Jewish Woman Survived the Holocaust” (NF) (E) William Morrow Paperbacks
In 1922, Count Alexander Rostov is sentenced by the Bolsheviks to house arrest in a grand hotel (F) (E) Viking
Lawyer Charlotte Quinn takes on a case that brings up memories of an attack on her years earlier (F) (E)
William Morrow
Lily, 14, runs away from home; story set in 1964 South (F) (E) Penguin
Youth: Coming-of-age story between different teenage social classes; movie (F) (P) Viking Children’s
Camille Palmer’s future changes when she returns to her father’s French hometown (F) (E) William Morrow
Classic: Ambition, love and betrayal in the 1920s (F) (P) Scribner
Collection of 22 novellas about bad-boy royalty (F) (E) Sweet Savage Press
Pastor Drew Douglas meets Shay Benson when both are at crossroads in their lives (F) (H) Ballantine
The Women’s Murder Club investigates the attempted murder of a woman who was having an affair (F) (E) Bookshots
Agents Dillon Savich and Lacey Sherlock investigate a case that is connected to the murder of Lacey’s sister;
first in series (F) (E) Berkley
USA TODAY
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
4D LIFE
The ‘Springsteen on Broadway’ ticket frenzy is on: $6,000 a pop
show’s limited run and intimate
setting at the 960-seat Walter
Kerr Theatre, tickets were hard
to come by. Some fans flooded the
hashtag #SpringsteenBroadway
with complaints.
“I just received a “StandBy”
message for #SpringsteenBroadway tickets. What does that
mean?” wrote one of the buyers
waiting to hear from Ticketmaster about additional tickets.
Tickets also appeared for resale on Stubhub around the official 10 a.m. sale time. Prices
skyrocketed from $2,000 to more
than $6,000.
“Springsteen on Broadway
(wants) to give Springsteen fans a
unique experience,” Ticketmaster
said in a statement. “They care
deeply about the fans and due
to the intimate venue setting,
there may simply be more fans
who want to see Springsteen on
Broadway than there will be
available tickets.”
Maeve McDermott
@maeve_mcdermott
USA TODAY
Tickets for Bruce Springsteen’s
Broadway debut, Springsteen on
Broadway, went on sale at 10 a.m.
Wednesday. Despite Ticketmaster’s efforts to thwart bots and
resellers, tickets immediately appeared on Stubhub, with some
listed for more than $6,000.
The show sold tickets via
Ticketmaster’s Verified Fan platform, which required fans to register weeks in advance; a randomly
selected group received a code via
text message to buy tickets hours
before they went on sale. Prices
were $75 to $850.
Springsteen on Broadway begins previews Oct. 3 and is
scheduled to open Oct. 12, with
Springsteen performing five
shows a week. Because of the
GREG ALLEN, AP
Bruce Springsteen will do five shows a week for a limited run at Walter Kerr Theatre in New York.
To view more Classified listings,
visit: www.classifieds.usatoday.com
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and non-competitive counties pursuant to its
Business Data Services Report and Order,
32 FCC Rcd 3459 (rel. April 28, 2017).
For additional information,
see verizon.com/tariffs.
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8/31
Find and Circle:
Six units of length
Five four-letter words ending with VE
Four three-syllable countries
Band of tissue
Hottest planet in our solar system
PLAYGROUNDS
☑☐☐☐☐☐
☐☐☐☐☐
☐☐☐☐
☐
☐
Wednesday’s answer: OREGANO OVERDO ORZO / TEENAGER
PRODUCER AIRSTRIP / URUGUAY CHILE PERU / HORSE CAMEL
SKUNK / PINK TEAL GRAY
QUICKCROSS
© Andrews McMeel
By David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
1-800-THE-LOST
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UP & DOWN WORDS
By John Wilmes
8/31
By David L. Hoyt and Russell L. Hoyt
8/31
1. ROYAL
Stuff
2.
Netflix rival
3.
4.
Pub orders
5.
Queue cue?
© Andrews McMeel
6.
Jackie or Charlie
Govern
Wednesday’s Answer
© Andrews McMeel
P
E
S
O
8/31
51 Wine and dine
19 Ready for a nap
21 Cop’s ID
52 Broadway backers
25 Dorothy’s transport 54 Lay into
to Oz
58 Unit in the game of
26 ___ out (barely
Risk
managed)
60 Isle of Scotland’s
28 Forty nickels or 50
Inner Hebrides
pennies
61 Relative of a 1-Across
29 Colon, in an
62 Letter before theta
emoticon
DOWN
63 Discs on turntables
31 Propelled, as a
1 Airliner
64 Orange seed
dinghy
maintenance site
32 Kate Middleton,
2 “Relax, soldier!”
Wednesday’s Answer
for one
3 Like yoked oxen
37 Antioxidant-rich
4 Manhattan
berry
or London
38 Practically
neighborhood
cloudless
5 “Green” science
39 Prepackaged,
6 Stops, as rain
single-serving
7 Paw’s spouse
meal
8 “Fifty Shades of
Grey” heroine, briefly 40 Asia’s ___ Sea
9 Proofreader’s “leave 42 Divvy up
45 Football ref,
it in”
slangily
10 Place for a rocking
46 Supplied a
chair
spread for
11 Stark naked
8/30
49 Daiquiri flavor
12 Tetley offering
13 Psychic’s purported 50 Chef who says
CROSSWORDS
“Bam!”
gift, briefly
ON YOUR PHONE
67 Like the scent of
many air fresheners
68 Having a bug
69 Fraternity kegger,
e.g.
70 Trench maker’s tool
71 Gibson ___ Paul
guitars
3
TXTPERT
Across
1. 26237
4. 65483
6. 7829
8. 4739
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5
7
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Down
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1
Use the
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2 could be A,
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A
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4
G
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A
7
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8
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4
5
Yesterday’s solution
8
6
5
Wednesday’s Answer
TALK
TURKEY
BURGER
TURKEY
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BURGER
OUT
TOPPING
COLD
OUT
CALL
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5
8
4
2
5 3
1
6
6
3
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3
2
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1
3 7
2
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1
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3 4
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9
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Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x2
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2
7
9
2
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1
9
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Canadian novelist
Margaret Atwood
thinks about human
behavior.
E
6
3
6
1
4
2
5
5
4
2
6
1
3
© WIGGLES 3D GAMES
Rearrange the words to complete the quote.
CONSIDER FORGOTTEN FREEDOM NEVER
OWN PROBABLY WHY YOUTH
I’VE ___________ UNDERSTOOD ________ PEOPLE ______________
___________ A TIME OF ___________ AND JOY. IT’S ______________
A
T
H
1
2
3
5
4
6
8/30
DON’T QUOTE ME®
A
S
Clues:
1. Will and Kate’s nuptials,
e.g.
2. White gown, often
3. ____ ____ the nines
4. “For here” alternative
5. Proceed
6. ____ ____ schedule
7. Naturally; obviously
mobilegames.usatoday.com
8/31
R
E
QUICKCROSS
ON YOUR PHONE
1
5
9 2
7
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N
8
A
A
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Requirement
9
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Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3
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T
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COURSE
7.
SUDOKU
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Colors
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V
A
L
8/30
8/30
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9
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BY David J. Kahn
6
Sex: Female
Race:
Hispanic
Hair: Brown
Eyes: Brown
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ACROSS
1 Fez or fedora
4 Movie about Dr.
King’s march
9 Vengeful feeling
14 Had a nosh
15 Beachfront view
16 Softens, with “down”
17 Grant-awarding
org.
18 Kitchen sink
accessory
20 Runs about playfully
22 Something to
scratch
23 On the 15-Across
24 Word before space
or limits
27 Dog-summoner’s
word
30 Card game played
at many online
casinos
33 Orbison who
sang “Oh, Pretty
Woman”
34 Like “Paree,” in song
35 Update the decor of
36 Pub order
37 In pursuit of
40 Now-then
connection
41 Two-masted
sailboats
43 Cleveland hoopster,
for short
44 Poet Pound
46 Ripken Jr. in
Cooperstown
47 Lend a hand
48 Period when few
home runs were hit
53 Showy spring
bloom
55 Become swollen
56 Dark clouds, to
some
57 At hand
59 IRA, e.g.
61 New York City
tourist attraction,
and a hint to this
puzzle’s theme
65 “Norma ___” (Sally
Field movie)
66 Starting lineup
ACTIVE LIFESTYLE
COMMUNITY
BECAUSE THEY HAVE ______________ THEIR ________.
8/31
Wednesday’s Answer: “If liberty means anything at all, it means the right
to tell people what they do not want to hear.” - George Orwell
USA TODAY
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
LIFE 5D
MUSIC
Joan Osborne boldly embraces ‘Songs of Bob Dylan’
Bob Doerschuk
Special for USA TODAY
Unlike almost everything in today’s popular music and in the
great standards of years past, the
songs of Bob Dylan can be savored in multiple ways. The finest
among them are elusive and accessible, puzzling and informative, all at the same time.
None of this intimidates Joan Osborne. In
fact, that’s why she dedicates her new album entirely to his work. More
than a tribute to his legacy,
Songs of Bob Dylan, out
Friday, also captures Osborne at her best as a vocal
interpreter. Much of this
stems from the insight she
has gained into his intentions as a writer.
“One of the great lessons of
Dylan’s writing is that his songs
are obviously about something or
someone very specific to him,”
says Osborne, 55. “And yet he
uses this poetic language that
allows it to be about many other
things. This makes them all the
more powerful because you want
the listener, even more than the
singer, to take in that story in a
way that means something to
them.”
This repertoire has fascinated
Osborne since her earliest years.
She drew from it onstage in
Greenwich Village nightclubs
and bars after
moving
east
from her home
state of Kentucky. As her
reputation
spread nationally after her
hit single One
of Us, Dylan
himself took
note. And in 1998, he sent her an
unexpected invitation to join
him on a duet version of his
elegiac Chimes of Freedom, to be
featured on the 1999 NBC miniseries The ’60s.
JEFF FASANO
Osborne, 55, has drawn from
Dylan since her early years.
“We recorded on the same microphone,” she recalls. “My face
was literally inches from his face.
We did Chimes of Freedom three
times. Each one was very different from the others. Because
Dylan has this very restless intelligence, he can change his approach very quickly from one
moment to the next. So I had to
really lock onto his phrasing and
basically stare at his lips so that I
could match what he was doing
with my harmony.
“It was actually a positive thing
for me because I had to concentrate fully, so I didn’t have any
mental energy left over to be like,
‘Oh, my God, I’m on the microphone with Bob Dylan!’ ”
The decision to tackle this
project stems from Osborne’s
two-week residencies in 2016 and
2017 at New York’s Cafe Carlyle,
each one featuring Dylan’s songs
exclusively. For those engagements, she fashioned many of
them into personal statements
that honored his spontaneity as
well as his writing. Many of these
turn up on Songs of Bob Dylan,
including Rainy Day Women
#12 & #35 transformed into
dreamy shuffle and Ring Them
Bells as a cascade of piano chords,
tumbling like a carillon sounding
the hour.
Just one track, Masters of War,
pushed Osborne to focus on the
literal rather than figurative qualities of the lyric. There’s nothing
obscure about its scorn for war
profiteers, a message that was
well understood in the 1960s and
is relevant to today as well.
“The thing that connected with
me is the line in the first verse: ‘I
want you to know I can see
through your mask,’ ” she says.
“That’s very direct, this concept
of speaking truth to power, not
just saying it in a general way but
addressing it directly to a person.
“As a mother, the verse about
fearing to bring children in the
world also resonates with me.
This is a frightening time to be
alive. And it’s this kind of moment when our great artists and
poets are most needed.
“We need songs like this more
than ever to crystallize our passion and to express what we’re
feeling.”
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USA TODAY
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017
6D LIFE
REMEMBERING DIANA
The grief
of a nation
spills over at
the funeral
Mary Cadden l USA TODAY
E
arly on the morning of Sept. 6, 1997,
Princess Diana’s funeral cortege
started from her home of Kensington
Palace. Thousands of mourners
surrounded the palace, where countless
flowers had been left. More than 1 million
mourners lined the route of the
procession to pay their respects to the
people’s princess.
That route was supposed to
start at St. James’s Palace but was
extended in anticipation of the
crowds. From Kensington Palace,
the procession wound past Kensington Gardens and Hyde Park,
past Royal Albert Hall and later
down the tree-lined Constitution
Hill past Buckingham Palace to
St. James’s Palace. At that point,
her sons, her ex-husband and her
former father-in-law joined to
walk behind the casket until the
cortege arrived at Westminster
Abbey.
On top of the casket was a card
addressed to “Mummy” from her
sons, Prince William, then 15, and
Prince Harry, 12.
The boys were shattered. In an
interview this year with the Express, William described that
walk as “one of the hardest things
I have ever done.” Harry, in an interview recently with Newsweek,
said: “My mother had just died,
and I had to walk a long way behind her coffin, surrounded by
thousands of people watching me
while millions more did on television. I don’t think any child
should be asked to do that, under
any circumstances. I don’t think
it would happen today.”
The public funeral was attend-
JOHN GAPS III, AP
Prince William, left, and Prince Harry stayed
close to their father. Harry recently said, “I
don’t think any child should be asked to do
that, under any circumstances.
Mohammed
Fayed, whose
son Dodi was
killed along
with Diana
and their
driver, leaves
Westminster
Abbey with
his wife,
Heini.
Diana’s casket
was topped
with the royal
flag and an
envelope simply addressed
‘Mummy.’
SANTIAGO LYON, AP
POOL PHOTO BY PAUL HACKETT VIA AP
EVERY SEAT COMES WITH
A MOUNTAIN VIEW.
Come explore the Canadian Rockies with an unforgettable
rail adventure. Aboard our luxurious coach, you’ll make
friends from around the world and enjoy regionally inspired
cuisine while being surrounded by world-class scenery.
POOL PHOTO BY JEROME DELAY VIA AP
More than 1 million mourners
lined the funeral route from
Kensington Palace to Westminster Abbey Sept. 6, 1997.
ed by the royal family, world leaders and celebrities, including
British Prime Minister Tony
Blair, first lady Hillary Clinton,
Henry Kissinger, Tom Hanks,
Steven Spielberg, George Michael, Mariah Carey, Luciano Pavarotti, Tom Cruise and Nicole
Kidman.
Both of Diana’s sisters read
tributes at the funeral service.
Blair gave a reading and was followed by Elton John, who performed Goodbye England’s Rose, a
reworked version of his and Bernie Taupin’s 1973 classic Candle
in the Wind. Only a month earlier,
Diana had comforted the singer
at the funeral of slain fashion designer Gianni Versace.
Immediately after John’s performance,
Diana’s
brother,
Charles Spencer, delivered his eulogy. “Diana was the very essence
of compassion, of duty, of style, of
beauty,” he said. He promised
that “on behalf of your mother
and sisters, I pledge that we, your
blood family, will do all we can to
continue the imaginative way in
which you were steering these
two exceptional young men.” He
also would famously blame the
media for her death, calling her
the “most hunted person of the
modern age.”
After prayers, a blessing and
hymn and the commendation for
Diana were given, the public funeral service was over. The cortege left Westminster Abbey.
Later that day, Diana was laid
to rest after a private service at
Althorp, the Spencer family estate. She was buried on an island
in a lake within the 500-year-old
estate’s gardens.
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