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USA Today International - January 15, 2018

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MONDAY
INTERNATIONAL: AN EDITION OF USA TODAY
Long weekend?
Put together your
2018 reading list
01.15.18
IN BRIEF
Chelsea Manning files to run
for U.S. Senate seat in Maryland
Chelsea Manning will run for the
U.S. Senate in Maryland.
The transgender former Army officer who was convicted of leaking classified documents filed her statement
of candidacy with the Federal Election
Commission on Thursday.
The Washington Post reported Saturday that Manning, 30, will challenge
Democrat Ben Cardin in the primary.
He has served two terms and is an
overwhelming favorite to win.
New high-speed train on preview
run hits and kills woman in Fla.
A high-speed train that was offering
preview runs a day before its debut
struck and killed a woman, police in
Florida said Saturday.
The woman, Melissa Lavell, 32, was
crossing the tracks of the new Brightline train after the sun set Friday,
Boynton Beach police said.
Witnesses told police the woman
tried to make it across after the guard
rails were down.
Mormon officials to announce
new church leadership Tuesday
The Mormon church plans to announce its new leadership Tuesday,
acting in the wake of the death of
President Thomas S. Monson.
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints said the announcement
will be made by President Russell M.
Nelson, the faith’s senior apostle.
Monson died Jan. 2 at age 90 after
nearly a decade leading the church.
Among our top 10: Rose McGowan’s
‘Brave,’ which promises to expose hard
truths about the showbiz industry. In Life
African diplomats decry
Trump’s ‘racist’ remarks
Uproar dims odds of fix
for young immigrants
We’re concerned by “the continuing
and growing trend from the US administration towards Africa and people of African descent to denigrate
the continent and people of colour.”
Fredreka Schouten
USA TODAY
WASHINGTON
–
President
Trump’s remarks about African countries and Haiti drew condemnation
from a group of African ambassadors
to the United Nations who called them
“outrageous, racist and xenophobic”
and demanded a retraction and
apology.
Samantha Power, who served as
U.S. ambassador to the United Nations
under President Obama, shared the
ambassadors’ statement on Twitter.
“Whoa. I’ve never seen a statement
like this by African countries directed
at the United States,” she wrote.
The statement, issued late Friday
African group of U.N. ambassadors
President Trump says he has to be
“tough.” CAROLYN KASTER/AP
after the African ambassadors held an
emergency meeting, came amid an international outcry over Trump reportedly saying he’d rather have more immigrants from Norway and fewer from
Haiti and “shithole countries” in Africa.
Trump has seemed to deny using
those words but acknowledged on Twitter that he used “tough” language during
White House negotiations this week
with lawmakers on an immigration bill.
Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., the only
Democrat at the meeting with Trump,
confirmed the vulgar comments, telling
reporters the president said “things that
were hate-filled, vile and racist.”
See TRUMP, Page 2A
In mud-battered Montecito, back-to-back disasters have
Californians questioning how much more they can take
Iranians reject Trump’s demand
for changing nuclear deal
Iran said Saturday that it won’t accept any changes to its 2015 nuclear
deal with world powers after President
Trump vowed to pull out of the accord
in a few months if European allies did
not fix its “terrible flaws.”
In a statement carried by the staterun IRNA news agency, the Foreign
Ministry said Iran “will not accept any
change in the deal, neither now nor in
future,” and will “not take any action
beyond its commitments.”
It also said Iran would not allow the
deal to be linked to other issues, after
Trump suggested that sanctions relief
under the deal should be tied to Iran
limiting its long-range ballistic missile
program.
Staff and wire reports
Wade Haller and search dog Rex, a 9-year-old black Lab, climb over a gate at the
Four Seasons The Biltmore hotel in Santa Barbara County. TREVOR HUGHES/USA TODAY
‘Overwhelming’
¡¿H¢\ApB-740313¿+(K)N
INTERNATIONAL SPECIAL EDITION
This is a special edition of USA TODAY designed and
edited for readers around the world. Additional content
and late-breaking news and sports scores can always be
found at usatoday.com
©COPYRIGHT 2018 USA TODAY
a division of Gannett Co., Inc.
USA SNAPSHOTS©
Trevor Hughes
USA TODAY
The Thomas Fire burns Dec. 16 in
Montecito, Calif. MIKE ELIASON/AP
MONTECITO, Calif. – Residents of
this beleaguered town look up and wonder aloud: “Haven’t we suffered
enough?”
But they’re not looking at the sky for
answers.
Instead, they’re staring east at the
sharp peaks of the Los Padres National
Forest, which were scorched by December’s Thomas Fire and then denuded by
heavy rains that sent mudslides slamming through the town early Tuesday.
The fire destroyed more than 1,000
structures and is blamed for at least two
deaths.
See MONTECITO, Page 2A
False ballistic missile alert rattles Hawaii
Men
Sean Rossman and Carly Mallenbaum
69%
USA TODAY
Women
53%
Percentage of Americans
who have lost control of
their vehicles during winter
weather conditions.
SOURCE Michelin survey of 1,000 adult drivers
MIKE B. SMITH, ALEJANDRO GONZALEZ/USA TODAY
Hawaiians were sent scrambling
Saturday morning — for more than 30
minutes — after an emergency alert
notification warned of a ballistic missile threat, which turned out to be an
error.
A flurry of tweets with screenshots
of the message showed the alert
popped up on cellphones shortly after
8 a.m. local time. The message said:
“Ballistic Missile Threat Inbound To
Hawaii. Seek Immediate Shelter. This
Is Not A Drill.”
The message sent at least a few rushing for shelters as people pondered
whether a missile was heading toward
the island. Thirty-eight minutes later,
Hawaii Emergency Management Agency public information officer Richard
Rapoza said the alert was sent in error.
“What happened was ... during shift
changes (with) outgoing and incoming
staff, somebody selected the wrong item
on a computer,” he said.
Though administrator Vern Miyagi
said at a press conference that an unnamed employee made the error, Rapoza told USA TODAY: “We’re not pointing
fingers at an individual. What we need
to do now is address the problem.”
Hawaii Gov. David Ige vowed to “get
to the bottom of this” and said he’d be
meeting with the Defense Department
and the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency so that it doesn’t happen
again.
“We are sorry that this false alarm
has occurred. We are committed to ensure that it never happens again,” Ige
said. “We have already taken action to
minimize that possibility, by suspending tests, and already implemented a
process to ensure that at least two people are involved in (the alert-sending)
process.”
NEWS
2A ❚ MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2018 ❚ USA TODAY
Trump
Continued from Page 1A
Republican lawmakers who were in
the Thursday meeting generally sidestepped questions about precisely what
Trump said. Two Trump allies who were
in attendance, Sens. Tom Cotton of ArCorrections & Clarifications
USA TODAY is committed to
accuracy. To reach us,
contact Standards Editor
Brent Jones at
800-872-7073 or e-mail
accuracy@usatoday.com.
Please indicate whether
you’re responding to
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kansas and David Perdue of Georgia, issued a joint statement, saying they did
“not recall the president saying those
comments specifically.”
In their statement, the African ambassadors said they were concerned
about “the continuing and growing
trend from the US administration towards Africa and people of African descent to denigrate the continent and
people of colour.”
The controversy, stemming from discussions about whether to include immigrants from El Salvador, Haiti and African countries in an immigration bill,
appears to have dimmed chances of
reaching a deal on immigration in the
coming weeks.
Lawmakers are under a March 5
deadline to write legislation to replace
the Obama-era Deferred Action for
Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA.
The program extends legal protections to 800,000 immigrants who entered the United States illegally as children. Trump ended the program, and
finding a legislative solution is a key issue in negotiations between the White
House and congressional Democrats on
immigration policy.
On Saturday morning, Trump took to
Twitter to slam the Democrats over the
controversy: “I don’t believe the Democrats really want to see a deal on DACA.
They are all talk and no action. This is
the time but, day by day, they are blowing the one great opportunity they have.
Too bad!”
Trump’s allies have argued the controversy over his remarks is overblown.
Anthony Scaramucci, whose brief
tenure as White House communications director ended shortly after his expletive-filled comments about his administration colleagues appeared in The
New Yorker, said Trump “is not a racist.”
“Apparently he and I are the only two
people that use a few curse words here
and there,” he wrote on Twitter.
And other Trump backers said the
president’s remarks show he’s aligned
with a long-standing conservative push
to reshape immigration policy into a
merit-based system rather than one
based on family ties or admitting those
from countries beset by poverty.
“The point is, if you have a Ph.D., I
don’t care what country you’re from, we
want you,” Barry Bennett, a former
Trump adviser, told The Hill newspaper.
Montecito
The
powerful
Montecito
mudslides
tore off
part of this
house,
leaving
bookshelves
exposed
and
hurling
boulders
into the
yard.
Continued from Page 1A
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Then the mudslide destroyed at least
65 more homes, damaged 462 others
and killed at least 19 people. On Saturday, five people were still missing.
“It’s just so overwhelming,” said Bob
Santoro, who spent Friday digging out a
friend’s home. “People lost loved ones,
their homes, their cars, their friends,
entire neighborhoods in a matter of moments. That makes it all the more incomprehensible.”
The Thomas Fire, the worst wildfire
in recorded state history, was only officially brought under control Friday.
Crews are still trying to dig the 10,000person town out from the mudslides
that blocked roads, damaged bridges
and once again forced dozens of businesses to close in this bucolic seaside
community that counts Oprah Winfrey
and Ellen DeGeneres as homeowners.
Most residents have been ordered to
leave and told it might be weeks before
they can return as workers clear the
roads and search for buried bodies.
Those few remaining have been
walking their dogs and trying to hold
back tears of loss — the loss of kids,
neighborhoods, even favorite trees.
“It’s kind of like one of those movies
where everyone vanishes but you,” said
retired veterinarian and 30-year Montecito resident Gary Shaw, who refused to
evacuate. Many Montecito residents
TREVOR
HUGHES/USA
TODAY
evacuated for two weeks during the
height of the Thomas Fire, and authorities blame that for the decision by many
residents to ignore the subsequent
mudslide warnings.
The back-to-back disasters have exhausted rescue workers, drained overtime budgets and forced police detectives to set aside their caseloads to run
security checkpoints in the evacuation
zones. Vacations have been missed.
Family celebrations were put on hold.
Tempers are fraying.
You can’t drink the water; the natural
gas, power, Internet and cable are on the
fritz; and the beaches are closed because of contamination.
Even leaving is hard: The mudslide
has indefinitely blocked U.S. Highway
101, the main route south to Los Angeles.
“It’s breathtakingly horrible out
there,” said Das Williams, an elected
county supervisor who represents
Montecito.
Williams said it’s still unclear how
many people will be able to rebuild. Not
everyone who lives here is wealthy.
Many older residents are on fixed incomes and government-assisted health
care, he said, and few people had flood
insurance because they live on the side
of a mountain. It’s possible fire insurance will cover the mudslide damage, he
said, but that’s still an open question.
Irresistibly teed-up.
Road conditions in Nashville became hazardous due to a winter storm that hit
the state over the weekend. LARRY MCCORMACK/NASHVILLE TENNESSEAN
Shivering South braces for
another blast of snow and ice
Doug Stanglin
USA TODAY
A new blast of bitter arctic air is expected to sweep south next week, bringing the possibility of snow and ice from
Dallas to Birmingham.
Up to 2 inches of snow is possible
from Little Rock to Nashville, which is
only now emerging from an ice storm
that sent travelers spinning. Dallas,
Shreveport and Jackson, Miss., could all
see snow or a mix of snow and ice.
Forecasters say the cold arriving late
Monday and into Tuesday will send
temperatures below freezing into much
of the South.
How much moisture remains along
the eastward-moving front will determine whether the snow and icy mix fizzles before reaching Atlanta and Charlotte, N.C., or continues to march eastward across the Southeast on Tuesday
night into Wednesday, AccuWeather
forecasters say.
“In the latter scenario, snow and sleet
may again fall as far south as the Gulf
Coast of Alabama and northern Florida,” AccuWeather meteorologist Faith
Eherts said.
The South is already reeling from an
icy and snowy mix that sent cars and
trucks spinning off highways and closed
two interstates overnight Saturday.
At one point, the Tennessee National Guard was called out with Humvees
and a wrecker to help clear I-40, which
was was shut down over a 12-mile
stretch because of multi-vehicle
accidents.
Downtown bridges were closed at
one point in Nashville, and jack-knifed
tractor-trailers dotted interstates
throughout the city and surrounding
area. Much of the state felt the effect of
the winter storm.
Ice and snow were expected to remain a threat for much of the threeday weekend.
The greatest threat for freezing rain
and ice accumulations was expected
from southern New Hampshire into
eastern Maine: up to a tenth of an inch
as the arrival of a strong cold front
sends temperatures plummeting.
Forecasters said there could be up
to to 12 inches of snow around the
Great Lakes.
For the northern tier of the country,
there was little relief in sight from the
bitter cold. Bismarck, N.D., was
already in the deep freeze at minus 9
degrees.
Across the northern Plains into
Kansas and Missouri, high temperatures for Saturday were expected to
average 15 to 20 degrees below
average.
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NEWS
USA TODAY ❚ MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2018 ❚ 3A
NEWS
Years of persistence led to holiday
National recognition for King’s birthday a labor of love for many
Nicole Crawford-Tichawonna
Special to USA TODAY
When the late Rep. Katie Hall, D-Ind.,
went to Congress in 1982, it was to finish
the term of Adam Benjamin Jr., the
Northwest Indiana congressman who
had died suddenly of a heart attack.
But Hall, the first and so far only African American to represent Indiana in
Congress, also had another goal: She
wanted to add her name to the fight to
make Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday a
federal holiday.
On Nov. 2, 1983, President Reagan
signed into law HR3706, the King holiday bill written and introduced by Hall.
Beginning in 1986, Martin Luther King
Day — the first federal holiday honoring
an African American — would be observed on the third Monday in January.
King’s birthday is Jan. 15.
“My mother was grateful for being
the instrument God used to honor Dr.
King with a national holiday,” said attorney Junifer Hall, founder and CEO of the
Katie Hall Educational Foundation in
Gary, Ind.
Since that bill signing 35 years ago,
the King holiday has evolved. In 1994,
President Clinton signed a law designating it a National Day of Service.
“When King was assassinated in
April 1968, he had become a polarizing
figure to the political establishment —
and even within activist circles — due to
his criticism of U.S. imperialism and
specifically the Vietnam War,” said Karlos Hill, associate professor of African
and African-American Studies at the
University of Oklahoma. “King’s ‘fall
from grace’ is the primary context for
understanding why there was (more
than a decade of) resistance to naming a
federal holiday in his honor.”
Michigan Democratic Rep. John Conyers introduced the first bill for a King
holiday in 1968. The effort languished
for years.
President Reagan signs legislation establishing Martin Luther King Day, in the
White House Rose Garden on Nov. 2, 1983. At left are Coretta Scott King, King’s
widow, and bill author Rep. Katie Hall, D-Ind. THE RONALD REAGAN LIBRARY
“King’s ‘fall from grace’ is the primary context for
understanding why there was (more than a decade of)
resistance to naming a federal holiday in his honor.”
Karlos Hill
Associate professor of African and African-American Studies at the University of Oklahoma.
“Conyers would persist year after
year, Congress after Congress, in introducing the same bill again and again,
gathering cosponsors along the way,
until his persistence finally paid off ...
when (Reagan) signed the King Holiday
bill into law,” wrote congressional scholar Donald Wolfensberger in his essay
The Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday: The
Long Struggle in Congress.
Support for the holiday gained traction in 1979 when Coretta Scott King,
King’s widow and president of the King
Center in Atlanta, testified during several congressional hearings. She urged
Conyers to reintroduce his legislation.
President Carter urged Congress to support the measure, Wolfensberger said.
In 1980 Stevie Wonder got behind the
holiday effort, artistically and financially. That summer he released Happy
Birthday, which helped galvanize support for a holiday.
Wonder’s support “helped to create a
sustained dialogue about the merits of
honoring Dr. King’s legacy,” Hill said.
The Martin Luther King National Day
of Service was the brainchild of Rep.
John Lewis, D-Ga., and former Sen.
Harris Wofford, D-Pa., close friends of
Dr. King and civil rights leaders in their
own right, said Samantha Jo Warfield,
spokeswoman for the Corporation for
National & Community Service. Along
with AmeriCorps, Senior Corps and City
Year volunteer programs, CNCS oversees the King day of service.
Jeff Shafer joined City Year in 2009.
He found his niche and his passion in
admiration for King.
“I realized how radical he was in
pushing our country forward,” Shafer
said.
In 2013, Shafer wanted his family to
share the joy the King day of service
brought him. His older brother, Phil
Shafer, is a professional muralist known
as Sike Style. “I knew that my older
brother had this talent that we could
take to the next level,” Shafer said, adding that his father, Douglas Shafer, “has
fought for social justice his whole life.”
So Douglas and Phil braved the cold
Chicago weather that year to create a
King Day mural project. After that first
experience, Phil wrote on his website:
“This year I started a new tradition.”
MLK’s America remains a world of trouble
Mark Curnutte
Cincinnati Enquirer
USA TODAY NETWORK
The immediate response to the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. 50
years ago was one of fire and fury.
King’s murder April 4, 1968, on a motel balcony in Memphis silenced the civil rights movement’s most persuasive,
gifted and foresighted leader and lit tinderboxes across the country.
Riots exploded in 125 cities whose
ghettos were already seething with frustration and anger over poor housing
conditions, substandard public schools,
unchecked police brutality and unemployment rates that for young black
men were as much as seven times that
of mainstream America.
Nationally, 43 people died, 3,500
were injured and 27,000 arrested in violence during the 10 days following King’s
murder, according to Peter B. Levy’s
new book about race riots in the 1960s,
The Great Uprising.
Damage estimates reached upward
of $65 million — about $442 million
today.
The Holy Week Uprising, as the riots
are collectively known, appeared to give
the country the reason it needed to give
up on the ghettos. No longer would solutions for the hard problems of impoverished urban blacks, as outlined in the
Kerner Commission report on the 1967
riots released barely a month earlier, be
a national priority.
Instead, law and order became a dog
whistle of the campaign of Richard M.
Nixon, whose presidency would usher
in the militarization of local police instead of significant economic cures. The
long-term and large-scale effect of
King’s death was the intractable hardening of negative racial attitudes and
widening economic disparity he warned
of in the last three years of his life.
“His earlier life is remembered. The
last three years of his life and what he
was working on are forgotten, ” said
Clayborne Carson, 73, a Stanford University history professor and director of
the Martin Luther King Jr. Research and
Education Institute, which edits and
publishes King’s papers.
By 1968, King had run up against
backlash both from the civil rights
A segment of the Poor People’s March on Washington moves through
Philadelphia on May 14, 1968, en route to a rally at Independence Hall. The Poor
People’s Campaign was a vision of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. RUSTY KENNEDY/ASP
“King had a different vision, a vision
of where we should have been going
for the last 50 years. That’s the unfinished business of the 1960s.”
Clayborne Carson, Stanford University
history professor and director of the Martin Luther
King Jr. Research and Education Institute
movement and the larger society. As
younger leaders like Stokely Carmichael
adopted a more militant tone, King
pushed back against the Black Power
movement’s goals of self-sufficiency
and self-segregation, saying true racial
equality would not be achieved without
maintenance of a nonviolent philosophy and alliances with sympathetic
whites.
After the passage of the Civil Rights
and Voting Rights acts in 1964 and 1965,
King looked to build on his successes by
focusing on what he considered society’s three main evils: war, poverty and
racial injustice. In addition to denouncing the Vietnam War, he broadened his
civil rights agenda to include people of
all races who had been left behind economically, a move that drew controver-
Demonstrators protest for higher
wages and better working conditions
in Chicago on April 4, 2017, the 49th
anniversary of the murder of King.
SCOTT OLSON/GETTY IMAGES
sy and perhaps even ire.
“King was asking for a major redistribution of wealth,” Carson said. “Most
people looked upon that voting (rights)
was sufficient. Much of white America
looked at the civil rights gains and said,
‘We’re not going to give you any more.’
“But King had a different vision, a vision of where we should have been go-
ing for the last 50 years. That’s the unfinished business of the 1960s.”
King understood the dangers and farreaching consequences of racial segregation, said Beverly Daniel Tatum, 63,
President Emerita of Spelman College in
Atlanta.
“Racism in the U.S. is a problem that
can’t be solved without the active participation of white people,” said Tatum,
a clinical psychologist and author of
1997’s best-selling “Why Are All the
Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? and Other Conversations About
Race.” It’s been updated with a new prologue for a 20th-anniversary edition.
In it, Tatum lists the ground lost since
the ’60s in terms of increased mass incarceration of African-Americans, the
staggering loss of wealth among African-Americans caused by the mortgage
crisis of 2008, the re-segregation of
schools, and the misinformation that
shapes racial attitudes of whites who
have no significant personal contact
with people who are different.
“Racially in this country, for every
two steps forward it’s one step back,”
she said.
Black Lives Matter and other contemporary African-American groups
have begun a fuller examination of
King’s controversial last years. In January 2015, Black Lives Matter organizations in many states presented programs on the “militant King.” They
counter the “I Have a Dream” King of
1963, the King whose dream of a world of
equality existed somewhere in the future, as if in a distant mist.
King provided a blueprint for his final
crusade in 1967 in the pages of his last
book, Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos
or Community?
In it, he called for legal protections for
those living in public housing and receiving public assistance. He wrote that
“arbitrary lines of government should
not balkanize America into white and
black schools and communities.” He
promoted government subsidies for
businesses to employ people of limited
education and expansion of workplace
training paid for by the government.
“We are confronted with the fierce
urgency of now. … We still have a choice
today: nonviolent coexistence or violent
co-annihilation.”
NEWS
4A ❚ MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2018 ❚ USA TODAY
NEWS
ISIS militants fleeing Syria leave
Trump:
behind intel on computers, phones Dems hold
U.S. finds treasure trove
troops’
on group’s connections
paychecks
hostage
Syrian
Democratic
Forces
fighters
flash
victory
signs in
Raqqa on
Oct. 18.
Jim Michaels
USA TODAY
Islamic State militants fleeing
strongholds in Syria are leaving behind
a trove of records detailing everything
from the terror group’s finances to personnel documents on fighters.
“Their record-keeping is phenomenal,” U.S. Army Maj. Gen. James Jarrard
told USA TODAY.
The Islamic State, also called ISIS,
kept meticulous records, including directives and orders marked with official
stamps.
Over the past three years, the coalition and local forces have seized “hundreds of terabytes” of data from ISIS
computers and storage devices in
northern Syria, where U.S.-backed
forces are operating, according to the
coalition headquarters.
Each terabyte can hold more than
80 million pages of Microsoft Word
documents.
“We did learn a lot about their organizational structure, how they communicated, how they facilitated personnel
and finances,” Jarrard said.
“It is a very detail-oriented bookkeeping organization (with) tremendous amount of details on every individual,” he said. The records include a
YOUSSEF
RABIH
Gov’t funding runs out
again Friday if no deal
YOUSSEF/
EPA/EFE
Tom Vanden Brook
USA TODAY
“laundry list of individuals that have
moved into Syria and Iraq.”
The information has allowed the coalition to target the group’s top leaders.
“The most valuable stuff that we look
for immediately is the connections, the
understanding of the organization’s
construct so we can focus our targeting
efforts,” Jarrard said.
The Pentagon said it has killed many
of the group’s most senior officials,
though the top leader, Abu Bakr alBaghdadi, remains at large.
Analysts also use the intelligence to
paint a broader picture of how ISIS
functioned.
At its peak, the Islamic State earned
about $50 million a month from oil revenues and had another $500 million it
had looted from banks in areas it controlled. In 2014 it swept into Iraq from
Syria, capturing large swaths of territory, including Mosul, Iraq’s secondlargest city.
At the time it appeared invincible,
drawing fighters from around the
world to its self-proclaimed caliphate
in Syria and Iraq.
Today, the Islamic State has lost
98% of the territory it once controlled,
according to the coalition. Pockets of
militants have fled to remote areas.
Revenues have been depleted.
Jarrard, who commands the Special
Operations Joint Task Force in Iraq
and Syria, said it will take at least a few
more weeks to finish eliminating the
caliphate.
WASHINGTON – President Trump
accused Democrats on Friday of holding American troops’ paychecks hostage in their quest to strike a deal on immigration — but it all rests on lawmakers’ willingness to bust a Jan. 19 deadline to reach an agreement to fund the
government.
If lawmakers can’t agree on a deal,
the government will shut down. Pentagon officials say that means troops —
even those deployed to war zones in
Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan — would
not get paid on schedule. But that
doesn’t mean the military will collapse:
Ships would continue to steam, warplanes would fly, and troops would go
on patrol.
The issue will come to a head in the
coming days, and Trump is already
staking out his negotiating position.
“Sadly, Democrats want to stop paying our troops and government workers
in order to give a sweetheart deal, not a
fair deal, for DACA,” he tweeted. “Take
care of our Military, and our Country,
FIRST!”
Some Democrats have announced
that they will not support a spending
bill without an agreement on the issue
of “DREAMers.”
Trump killed the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals
program that had provided legal protection to as many as 800,000 immigrants who were brought to the country
illegally as children, and he challenged
lawmakers to come up with a solution
instead.
“It’s got to include the wall.
We need the wall for security.
Any solution has to include the
wall because without the wall,
it all doesn’t work.”
President Trump
Laying out his demands for a deal on DACA at a
news conference Wednesday
A woman walks in blowing snow in Boston on Jan. 4 during a cold spell that gripped much of the nation. MICHAEL DWYER/AP
Researchers: Intense cold
snap was extremely rare
Group says such events are growing far less common
Doyle Rice
USA TODAY
The recent brutal American cold
snap was a freak of nature, scientists
say, and such extreme cold is far less
likely to occur than it used to be.
Specifically, the frigid, record-breaking two-week cold spell that began in
late December is now 15 times rarer than
it was a century ago, according to a team
of international scientists who study
whether extreme weather events are
natural or more likely to happen because of climate change.
“Cold waves like this occurred more
frequently in the climate of a century
ago, and the temperature of two-week
cold waves has increased throughout
North America, which is consistent in a
climate of global warming,” said Geert
Jan van Oldenborgh, a senior researcher
at the Royal Netherlands Meteorological
Institute.
The study by the World Weather Attribution group analyzed weather rec-
“The temperature of
two-week cold waves
has increased throughout
North America, which is
consistent in a climate of
global warming.”
Geert Jan van Oldenborgh
Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute
ords dating back to 1880 and found the
cold weather that hit a swath of the U.S.
from Maine to Minnesota tends to happen once every 250 years. In the early
1900s, it happened about once every 17
years.
Climate change has made such cold
spells less common and less intense, the
group said. The scientists say cold
waves are now, on average, approximately 4 degrees warmer than they
used to be.
World Weather Attribution is an
international effort to analyze the possible influence of climate change on
extreme weather events, such as
storms, extreme rainfall, heat waves,
cold spells and droughts. It’s a partnership of Climate Central and several
universities.
Regarding a possible climate
change link through the effects of lower sea ice extent in the Arctic, the research team said the climate pattern
that led to this two-week cold period
did not occur more frequently in recent years.
“We do not find any evidence of intensification of this type of cold wave
due to climate change; in fact, the Arctic air moving south is now warmer,
which accounts for the trend of warmer cold waves,” said Claudia Tebaldi, a
science fellow at Climate Central.
They found that although this type
of extreme-cold event has decreased
in both intensity and frequency over
the past century, it will continue to
occur.
Contributing: Associated Press
This week, Trump demanded that a
fix for DACA must include money for a
wall along the border with Mexico, one
of his central campaign promises.
“It’s got to include the wall. We need
the wall for security,” he said at a news
conference Wednesday. “Any solution
has to include the wall because without
the wall, it all doesn’t work.”
If the government does shut down,
troops and Defense Department civilians in critical jobs are required to report for duty, Pentagon comptroller David Norquist said in December before
another short-term spending deal was
reached. But their paychecks will not be
issued until there’s an agreement on
funding the government.
“First item is military personnel report to work,” Norquist said. “But we
are not able to pay them until the shutdown ends. Civilians, it depends on
what we call ‘excepted activities.’ If
they’re performing an excepted activity
— safety of property, protection of life
— they report to work. If not, they will
either (be) given time to come in and
shut down their work. Or they will stay
at home; we’ll send them instructions
on that.
“I cannot emphasize too much how
destructive a shutdown is,” he said. “If
we have — we’ve talked before about
the importance of maintenance on
weapons systems and others, but if it’s
not an excepted activity, there’ll be
work stoppage on many of those maintenance functions.”
The effects of a shutdown would ripple throughout the military, Norquist
said. For instance, death benefits for
troops killed in action wouldn’t be paid
to families.
But critical national-security protection would continue, he said.
“Even under a shutdown, we continue to support and protect the security of the country,” he said.
MONEY
USA TODAY ❚ MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2018 ❚ 5A
Xu Li, right, goes upside down at the Samsung display showing
off the company’s VR technology Tuesday.
Intel’s Ivan Safrin, below, checks headsets to be used for a
demonstration of the company’s automated driving system.
Attendees stream into the Sands Convention Center for the 2018 Consumer Electronics Show on Wednesday in Las Vegas. PHOTOS BY ROBERT HANASHIRO/USA TODAY
What’s next for tech?
It won’t stay in Vegas
T
he 2018 Consumer Electronic
Show in Las Vegas wrapped up
Friday
after
a
week
of
industry showcases and events.
On display were all the latest and greatest
gadgets the tech industry has to offer, from
personal wearable devices and household appliances to drones, robots and next-generation automobiles. USA TODAY was on hand to
document the fanfare and take a look at the
future of augmented reality, the Internet of
Things and energy innovations.
Eric Chen, of Bellus 3D, holds up a lifelike 3-D rendering of his face that was
captured by the company’s new camera and app at a media event at CES
Unveiled on Jan. 7, two days before the start of the convention at large.
MONEY
6A ❚ MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2018 ❚ USA TODAY
Americans’ credit-card debt hits new record
Paul Davidson
USA TODAY
Americans’ outstanding credit-card
debt hit a record in November, highlighting a more confident U.S. consumer but also flashing a warning signal of
potential trouble down the road.
Revolving credit, mostly from credit
cards, increased by $11.2 billion to
$1.023 trillion, the Federal Reserve
said. That nudged the figure past the
$1.021 trillion high-water mark reached
in April 2008, just before the housing
and credit bubbles burst.
Over the past year, revolving credit
has surged by $55.1 billion, or 5.7%, according to the Fed and Contingent Macro Research.
GETTY IMAGES
Non-revolving credit, such as auto
and student loans, rose by $16.8 billion
to $2.8 trillion in November.
The all-time high for credit-card
debt doesn’t pose the risks to the economy that existed in 2008 because incomes are higher, UBS Credit Strategist
Stephen Caprio said. The ratio of credit-card debt to U.S. gross domestic
product is about 5%, compared with
6.5% in 2008, he said.
“It’s a potential early warning sign
but not a financial stability issue” for
the broader economy, Caprio said.
Still, Caprio noted that credit-card
delinquencies have increased to about
7.5% from 7% a year ago, underscoring
growing stresses for low-income
households in particular. While that’s
still below the 15% delinquency rate
reached during the financial crisis and
the 9% historical average, he said the
increase over the past year raises some
concerns. With jobs and income growing, the rise isn’t creating significant
problems now, but it could if the economy and labor market take a downward
turn.
“People should make 2018 the year
they focus on knocking down their
credit-card debt,” said Matt Schulz,
senior industry analyst for CreditCards.com. With the Federal Reserve continuing to raise interest rates, “that
credit-card debt is going to grow faster
and faster,” siphoning off money Americans should be putting aside for retirement,” Schulz said.
Tax preparers make refund pitches
Advance loans are appealing,
but know what you’re getting
Susan Tompor
Columnist
USA TODAY
Millennials and others who are looking for fast cash to pay holiday bills — as
well as unexpected car repairs and skyrocketing heating bills — are being bombarded with TV ads, window signs and
other pitches for tax refund advances.
Actor Jon Hamm, wearing bib overalls, laments being stuck after his old
truck breaks down in a Dust Bowl setting in an H&R Block commercial.
“There’s got to be a way to get us
some money fast,” Hamm’s character
says. “If only there was some kind of advance we could get on our tax refund.”
The pitch is tempting — especially
when the commercial says up to $3,000
could be available in an advance.
Jackson Hewitt, which has its own
refund advance product, said 43% of
Millennial taxpayers polled indicated in
a recent survey that they plan to use
their tax refund to pay off holiday debt,
compared with 31% of the general population.
The refund loan products are relatively new. Consumers must dig into the
details to understand what kind of loan
they might expect and exactly what’s
being offered.
The advance loans are made by
banks — and secured by and repaid directly from a consumer’s tax refund. As
a result, the size of the loans will be limited.
So if you’re owed a $3,000 tax refund,
there’s no way you’re getting a $3,000
refund advance loan. Yet the big number is what consumers will see first.
Through Feb. 28, a 0% interest loan
for up to $3,000 will be offered to current and new customers at H&R Block. If
approved, H&R Block says, clients will
typically have access to money the same
day they apply.
Jackson Hewitt has a product that
promises up to $3,200 — up from a maximum of $1,300 last year — for a 0% interest loan.
Liberty Tax is promoting what it calls
“the largest tax refund advance offer in
the industry” with its Easy Advance
Loan of up to $3,250 now through
Feb. 28. No fees or interest is associated
with the loan.
USA SNAPSHOTS©
45%
of store-branded
credit card
holders don’t
know the current
interest rate.
SOURCE LendEDU 825 consumers who have
used a store-branded credit card within the
last year
JAE YANG, KARL GELLES/USA TODAY
H&R Block turned to actor Jon Hamm, left, to promote its tax refund loans. The Dust Bowl-era commercial says up to
$3,000 could be available in an advance. H&R BLOCK
Tax refund loan products are relatively
new. SUSAN TOMPOR/USA TODAY NETWORK
IRS cracking down on refund fraud
Tax refunds can be the single biggest
financial payout for many consumers
each year.
The demand for refund advance
loans is being driven up after a crackdown to combat tax refund fraud.
The Internal Revenue Service is now
required to hold back some refunds until at least mid-February for those
claiming the Earned Income Tax Credit
or the Additional Child Tax Credit. Last
year, about 15 million people who filed
early in the season faced those delays.
The IRS warns tax filers that refunds
that include such credits will not show
up in a taxpayer’s bank account or debit
card until at least Feb. 27 for those
choosing direct deposit. But more delays could take place if there are other
issues with the tax return.
Tips to avoid fast-loan problems
If you feel you cannot wait, well,
you’re going to be eager to listen when
someone starts talking about ways to
get fast cash. Here are some points to
consider:
❚ Everyone isn’t getting a 0% loan of
$3,000 or so. Liberty Tax, for example,
notes that to be eligible for the maximum $3,250 loan amount, you’d need
an expected federal income tax refund
— minus authorized fees for tax preparation services — that amounts to at
least $5,095.
The available loan amounts at Liberty Tax are $500, $800, $1,300 and
$3,250. The actual loan amount will
vary based on the expected refund
amount, ID verification, eligibility criteria and underwriting.
Liberty Tax is promoting a loan of up to
$3,250. SUSAN TOMPOR/USA TODAY NETWORK
The refund advance loans at H&R
Block are in four different amounts —
$500, $750, $1,250 or $3,000.
H&R Block said a client needs to be
due a federal income tax refund of at
least $1,000 to be eligible for a Refund
Advance.
The average federal income tax refund last year, according to the IRS, was
$2,782.
Jackson Hewitt customers can get
loans available in amounts of $100,
$200, $500, $750, $1,000 or $3,200.
The advance loan is offered to Jackson Hewitt clients by MetaBank in
Sioux Falls, S.D. MetaBank said it will
make up to $750 million in interest-free
refund advance loans in 2017, up from
the available $450 million last year.
A spokesperson for MetaBank said
the bank works to provide the highest
loan amount possible, and in many
cases the amount is more than 50% of
the refund due.
The refund advance loan is offered to
H&R Block clients by BofI Federal Bank
in San Diego.
The loan at Liberty Tax is offered by
Republic Bank & Trust Company, based
in Louisville.
❚ You cannot go online to get one of
these advances. You’re going to need to
visit a tax professional and have your
taxes prepared at a participating H&R
Block, Jackson Hewitt or Liberty office.
Jackson Hewitt also has tax preparation
offices in Walmart stores.
❚ No fee does not equal no cost.
Most of these promotions for refund advances highlight that there are no finance charges and no loan fees associated with the loans.
But this is key: Any tax preparation
fees would apply. So you want to try to
understand what you might pay to get
your taxes prepared at a given location.
H&R Block notes that you can file a
federal 1040 EZ for free through Feb. 28.
But many people cannot file the EZ
form. For example, you cannot file an EZ
if you claim dependents.
And you cannot file it if you claim any
credits other than the earned income
credit.
And H&R Block also notes that additional fees apply for the Earned Income
Tax Credit and certain other additional
forms, for state and local returns, and if
you select other products and services.
Don’t forget that there are now plenty
of ways for people to file a tax return
without paying a charge. Free File tax
software, for example, will be available
at www.irs.gov for many households
with incomes less than $66,000.
Some lower- and moderate-income
consumers could end up paying for tax
preparation services simply to get one
of these advance loans — even when
they might qualify for free tax services
via volunteer sites, such as the Accounting Aid Society in Detroit.
Chi Chi Wu, staff attorney at the National Consumer Law Center, said some
mystery shopping tests have shown
that tax preparation fees can be $400 to
$500 for some lower- or moderate-income taxpayers who qualify for the
Earned Income Tax Credit.
The tax preparation fees typically are
taken out of your refund when you take
out a refund advance loan.
❚ Is this really a way to get sameday cash? Jackson Hewitt says the refund advance money is available within
minutes to 24 hours of completing a tax
return with Jackson Hewitt if the money
is loaded on the American Express
Serve prepaid card. It’s often one hour.
But you do have to watch for any fees associated with using a prepaid card.
If you choose direct deposit into your
bank, the money could be available
within one to three days. The loan is
automatically repaid once the tax refund is received.
❚ Do you need to rush? If you’re looking at a smaller advance, say $500 or
$800, could you come up with that
money on your own to pay down some
bills? Remember that these 0% loans
only offer you money a few weeks before
your tax refund would be issued anyway.
NEWS
USA TODAY ❚ MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2018 ❚ 7A
OPINION
TODAY'S DEBATE: TECHNOLOGY AND HEALTH
Our view: Don’t single out
Apple for smartphone addiction
Anxiety and depression have spiked
recently among young people, and researchers believe that heavy usage of
wireless devices is a main reason why.
To help combat this trend, a couple
of large investors — Jana Partners and
the California State Teachers’ Retirement System — have turned to shareholder activism.
Specifically, they’ve targeted Apple,
demanding that the iPhone maker develop software giving parents more
power to limit the time their kids can be
active on their phones. The two investors also want Apple to commission a
study of the link between smartphone
usage and mental health issues.
The sentiment is right. The number
of major depressive episodes among
adolescents rose nearly 30% from 2005
to 2014, according to a study in the journal Pediatrics.
Other studies have specifically
linked the rise to use of social media.
One, published in Computers in Human Behavior, found that users of multiple social media platforms were three
times as likely to suffer from anxiety
and depression as those with more
modest usage.
Even so, the investors’ particular
tactic is suspect. For starters, if activists wanted to single out one company,
it would have to be Facebook rather
than Apple. The mental health problems did not spike in the era of television, video games and the first decade
of the World Wide Web. They spiked in
the era of social media, as kids have obsessively taken to interactive platforms
such as Facebook, Instagram and
Snapchat.
More broadly, the tactic of singling
out a company seems more like a publicity stunt than an actual way of addressing a problem. Tech companies
are in the midst of a full-fledged backlash these days as critics on both the
left and right find fault with them.
DREW ANGERER, GETTY IMAGES
A better way to address the issue of
smartphone addiction starts with parents. To some degree, this means individual parents setting limits individually on the screen time of their children, and using their financial leverage
as payers of smartphone bills to enforce
those limits.
Apple and other device makers already make software that can be used
to limit the times a child can be active.
Parents can and should be involved on
the social media platforms that their
kids are on, allowing them to monitor
the total time they are on and the types
of interactions they have.
But the problem goes beyond individual parents, who can sometimes
feel a sense of powerlessness in an era
of rapidly expanding technology. More
public service campaigns and programs in school, educating students as
well as parents about the link between
social media usage and mental health
issues, would be extraordinarily helpful. The rise in anxiety and depression
is serious, but many of those at risk
simply don’t know about it.
Tech companies, for their part, can
always be called on to be better corporate citizens. But focusing on Apple is
more about those doing the targeting
than finding real solutions.
Opposing view: It’s time for
Apple to update its controls
Barry Rosenstein
No one disputes that parents have
the ultimate responsibility to ensure
that their children use smartphones
safely. And we said that precisely in our
letter to Apple. That also applies to bike
safety, but preschoolers’ bikes still
come with training wheels.
The problem is that most experts
agree that Apple’s parental controls,
which were introduced in 2008 before
most kids had smartphones, have
failed to keep pace with the research on
negative outcomes.
For example, Apple’s controls are
largely binary, meaning parents can
only shut certain applications or tools
on or off, vs. moderating or modifying
their usage, which research suggests is
a better approach. Children who engage
in limited use of their smartphones
have better mental health outcomes
than those who do not use them at all,
and even the most concerning apps
such as Facebook can also have beneficial impacts in moderation.
Speaking of which, we did not focus
on Facebook first because Apple (unlike Facebook) can have an equally big
impact on this issue without modifying
Apple’s basic business model. In fact,
offering better options to parents
should enhance Apple’s business. In
order to improve tools for parents, Apple needs to partner with child development experts from the start to create
options that are grounded in the research, including tailoring them to different ages.
What seems especially odd about
this debate is that no one disputes that
there have been unintentional negative
consequences for some kids from excessive smartphone usage, and not
even Apple disputes that the company
can help parents who want to stop this.
Why anyone would not want Apple to
do so is mystifying.
The good news is that Apple is a
highly responsible and innovative
company, and in response to the concerns we and others have raised, Apple
committed this week to enhancing the
optional tools offered to help parents,
which should put this diversionary debate to rest.
Barry Rosenstein is managing partner at Jana Partners LLC.
GARY MCCOY, POLITICALCARTOONS.COM
Why today’s college
kids love socialism
Hint: Don’t blame
their professors
James Piereson
and Naomi Schaefer Riley
A third of Americans and as many as
44% of Millennials would prefer to live
under a socialist system than a capitalist one, according to a survey by the
Victims of Communism Memorial
Foundation. This is more than a little
puzzling at a time when socialism has
proved a catastrophic failure in its remaining strongholds in Venezuela,
North Korea and Cuba.
Some observers blame leftist professors for this development. It is true that
professors are overwhelmingly liberal
and have become more so in the past
three decades. But it is far from clear
that classroom indoctrination is driving students to the far left.
In a study published in 2009 of 7,000
students at 38 institutions across the
U.S., professors Matthew Woessner
and April Kelly-Woessner found that
students’ political beliefs did not
change much during their college
years. Even in cases where students’
opinions changed, there was little correlation between the direction of the
change and the political leanings of
their professors. When contacted
about these conclusions, Woessner
confirmed that although campuses today might seem more radical, his current research suggests that those earlier conclusions are still true.
If professors are not swaying student opinions in the classroom, what is
making them more sympathetic to socialism and less tolerant of conservative views about free markets and limited government?
Author Lenore Skenazy has suggested that students’ upbringings are a
large part of today’s problems on campus. In her book Free-Range Kids, she
argued that parents who try to protect
their children from every possible
threat or danger deprive them of the
freedom to grow up. Naturally, when
they arrive on campus as 18-year-olds,
they look to professors and administrators to take over the parental role of
protecting them from life’s challenges.
Thus, “helicopter parenting” yields
“snowflake” students unable to tolerate
uncomfortable opinions.
While this may be true, there are
nevertheless organizations and constituencies on the contemporary campus that are in position to gain from
protest and unrest. In response to perceived slights, however artificial or exaggerated they may be, activists demand and often receive compensation:
greater funding for their programs,
promises to hire more members of victimized groups, the creation of programs and courses to promote diversity
and multiculturalism on campus, and
other concessions of tangible kinds.
In these efforts, there seems to be an
alliance of students, diversity administrators and faculty members representing multicultural programs. These alliances are rarely formed in the classroom or in the traditional research disciplines. A 2014 study found that
students who spent a greater number
of hours on extracurricular activities on
campus (as opposed to classroom studies) were more likely to see their politics move toward one extreme or the
other, in most cases toward the far left.
This is an encouraging conclusion as
it suggests that students who are more
serious about their academic work are
more likely to think for themselves and
less likely to be drawn into disruptive
political activities.
There’s a catch: Students are spending less time in classrooms and academic study. According to data from
the Bureau of Labor Statistics analyzed
by the Heritage Foundation in 2014,
college students spend fewer than
three hours a day on class-related activities. It is thus not surprising to find
that professors have little influence on
student political beliefs compared with
the sway of peers, “student life” administrators and activists who are in
charge of extracurricular activities.
If moderate and liberal professors
want to take back the campus from illiberal activists who reject open debate
and a marketplace of ideas, then a good
place to start would be to reemphasize
academics as the raison d’etre of university life. “Student life” should be,
first and foremost, the life of the mind.
James Piereson is a senior fellow at
the Manhattan Institute. Naomi
Schaefer Riley is a senior fellow at the
Independent Women’s Forum.
YOUR SAY
Trump’s sanity is not for us to diagnose
LETTERS
LETTERS@USATODAY.COM
As President Trump’s behavior becomes more antic, some psychiatrists
find it appropriate to issue diagnoses of
Trump’s mental state, even though they
have not examined him. This approach,
most strikingly experienced when Barry
Goldwater ran for president in 1964, provoked a professional association of psychiatrists at that time to advise that
making complex diagnoses in the absence of personal examination was unprofessional, an advisory that became
known as the Goldwater rule.
Leaving aside the fact that the Freudian edifice has largely crumbled, psychiatrists remain a professionally cohesive
group convinced that they possess
knowledge and insight that is alien to
everyone else.
Well, sir, psychiatric pronouncements from afar by a closed guild of
know-it-alls warrant attention not to
exceed what each of us thinks on our
own. The Goldwater rule has as much
relevance now as it did when first suggested. Psychiatrists who disavow this
rule diminish the science they practice.
Paul Bloustein
Cincinnati
James S. Robbins’ column saying the
25th Amendment wasn’t meant to facilitate a coup misses the point. Robbins, like President Trump, confuses genius with sanity.
Racism isn’t genius, it’s the height of
stupidity. Trump’s history of racism has
played out over the decades through
breaking fair housing laws, refusing to
believe the truth about the Central Park
Five, birther lies about America’s first
African-American president, his defense of neo-Nazis, the awful conditions
in Puerto Rico months after a hurricane
and the threat of deportation of those
who came into the country decades ago
when their countries suffered disasters.
President Trump’s fitness for office
should be evaluated because of his belief in the insanity of white supremacy.
But, I guess, the 25th Amendment
wouldn’t be used to remove him.
Marvin Schwartzwalder
Walden, N.Y.
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Gannett Company President
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USA TODAY President
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JOHN ZIDICH
Associate Publisher
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NEWS
8A ❚ MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2018 ❚ USA TODAY
TRAVEL
POCKET GUIDE
lined with reconstructed halftimbered houses. Be sure to visit
the Zum Römer, where Holy Roman emperors were coronated.
Römerberg, Altstadt
10Best Local Experts
take you to the best
spots around Berlin,
Frankfurt, Munich
GO SEE ...
MUNICH
GERMANY
1. St. Peter’s Church
Munich’s oldest church, “Alter
Peter” (Old Peter) is recognizable
by its 91-meter tower, offering
some of the best views of the city.
Rindermarkt 1
+49 89 2102 3776
Andrea Schulte-Peevers
in BERLIN
Robyn Polzin
in FRANKFURT
Mike Richardson
in MUNICH
2. Hirschgarten
This used to be part of the royal hunting grounds. Today it’s the
site of a family-friendly beer garden (Bavaria’s largest), serving
top-notch local food.
Hirschgarten 1
+49 89 1799 9119
GO SEE ...
BERLIN
1. Berlin Wall Memorial
The Berlin Wall may be gone,
but it will never be forgotten.
This outdoor museum, which includes the last remaining stretch
of the wall in its original location,
explains how the barrier divided
a city and its people for 28 years.
Bernauer Strasse 119
+49 30 467 986 666
3. Odeonsplatz
For photo opportunities, it’s
hard to beat this square in central Munich. Odeonsplatz, named
for the Odeon concert hall, is bordered by some of the city’s most
significant buildings.
Odeonsplatz 1
+49 89 222 324
2. Stasi Prison
Former inmates lead tours of
the prison where the East German secret police held suspected
opponents of the regime — most
of them innocent of wrongdoing.
Genslerstrasse 66
+49 30 9860 8230
Marienplatz, above, has
been the main square of
Munich since 1158, although New Town Hall
dates only to 1874. West
of Frankfurt lie the ruins
of Rheinfels Castle, left.
3. Panoramapunkt
For the best bird’s-eye view of
central Berlin, let Europe’s fastest
elevator whisk you 24 floors to
this lofty perch above Potsdamer
Platz in a mere 20 seconds.
Potsdamer Platz 1
+49 30 2593 7080
3. Museumsufer
A walk along the Main River’s
Museum Embankment is a must.
Twelve museums sit on a single
tree-lined street, the most notable being the Städel art gallery.
Städel, Schaumainkai 63
+49 69 605098 232
SBORISOV, GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO
MARTINA BERG, GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO
4. Schloss Charlottenburg
See how the Prussian kings
who ruled much of Germany until 1918 lived at this mini-Versailles, framed by a lovely park
perfect for summer picnics.
Spandauer Damm 20-24
+49 30 320 911
10. Alte Oper
The Italian Renaissance-style
Alte Oper is Frankfurt’s original
opera house. Can’t make a show?
Linger at an outdoor cafe on
Opernplatz, the Opera Square.
Opernplatz 1
+49 69 1340 0
7. Neukölln neighborhood
Catapulted from gritty zone to
vibrant district, Neukölln is perfect for DIY exploration. Cafes
like Katie’s Blue Cat invite lingering between stops at vintage boutiques and hipster bars.
Katie’s Blue Cat
Friedelstrasse 31
+49 178 806 9701
5. Humboldt-Box
This multimedia exhibit accompanies the ongoing reconstruction of the city’s Prussian
imperial palace, which was demolished by the communists in
1950. Humboldt-Box introduces
the future tenants and explains
how the huge building will fit
within the city’s historic center.
Schlossplatz 5
+49 180 503 0707
8. Jüdische Mädchenschule
A former Jewish girls’ school in
a Bauhaus-era building has
evolved into a cultural hot spot,
featuring cutting-edge galleries, a
museum about the Kennedys and
even stellar restaurants.
Auguststrasse 11-13
+49 030 3300 6070
6. Pergamonmuseum
This crowd-pleaser wows with
monumental antiquities from
Greece, Rome and the Middle
East. Star exhibits include the radiant blue Ishtar Gate and the intricate facade of a caliph’s palace.
Bodestrasse 1-3
+49 30 266 424 242
9. Museum in der
Kulturbrauerei
This exhibit in a former brewery uses original documents, photographs and objects to peel back
the Iron Curtain on daily life in
communist East Germany.
Knaackstrasse 97
+49 030 4677 7790
10. Bikini Berlin
Browse fashion and design at
Germany’s first “concept mall,” in
a 1950s landmark building with
front-row views of the monkey
enclosure of the Berlin Zoo.
Budapester Strasse 38-50
GO SEE ...
FRANKFURT
1. Palmengarten
Established in 1868, this oasis
in the Westend is Germany’s largest botanical garden. Displays include more than 13,000 tropical
and subtropical plant species.
Siesmayerstrasse 61
+49 69 2123 3939
2. Hauptbahnhof Station
The busiest train station in
Frankfurt consists of a massive
main vestibule and two adjoining
neoclassical halls made of steel
and glass. Inside are a series of
platforms, shops and food stands.
Am Hauptbahnhof
Narrow slits
in barriers at
the Berlin
Wall Memorial provide
glimpses of
the “death
strip,” where
those fleeing
East Berlin
were often
gunned down.
4. Rheinfels Castle
West of the city, this castle’s
ancient stone ramparts rise over
the Rhine at Sankt Goar. The ruins recall the Middle Ages, while
the restaurant and its lovely terrace herald the modern day.
Schlossberg, Sankt Goar
+49 6741 7753
5. Goethehaus
Grand wood staircases take
visitors through the reconstructed timbered house where the
writer Johann Wolfgang von Goethe spent his childhood.
Grosser Hirschgraben 23
+49 69 138 800
6. Gerbermühle
After cycling along the Main
River, relax in the garden at this
16th-century flour mill renovated
as a hotel complex.
Gerbermühlestrasse 105
+49 69 689 7779 0
7. Hauptwache Station
This busy rapid-transit station
resembles an underground city
with its street performers, chalk
artists, international markets, dry
cleaners and even an entrance to
the Galeria department store.
An der Hauptwache 17
8. Kleinmarkthalle
This market hall hosts some 60
vendors selling fresh food, wine
and flowers every day except Sunday. Locals like a glass of wine in
the outdoor garten upstairs.
Hasengasse 5
+49 69 2123 3696
9. Römerberg
Heart of Frankfurt’s old town,
this charming central square is
GÜNTER STEFFEN,
VISITBERLIN
UNEXPECTED
GERMANY
4. Ramones Museum
Avid Ramones fan Flo Hayler
shares his collection of memorabilia in this cool east Berlin
shrine to the punk-rock pioneers.
Krausnickstrasse 23
+49 30 7552 8890
BERLIN
1. Story of Berlin
This museum’s engaging multimedia trip through the city’s history culminates with a tour of a
Cold War nuclear bomb shelter.
Kurfürstendamm 207-208
+49 30 8872 0100
Sunflowers, rather than jets,
aim skyward at Tempelhof.
2. Tempelhof Park
Tempelhof Airport, site of the
first Lufthansa flight and the Berlin Airlift, closed in 2008. It’s now
open as a beloved city park.
Entrances on Columbiadamm,
Oderstrasse, Tempelhofer Damm
3. Rembrandt Collection
The 16 Rembrandt works at
the Gemäldegalerie form one of
the world’s largest, most exquisite
collections by this Dutch master.
Matthäikirchplatz
+49 30 266 424 242
FRANKFURT
PHILIP KOSCHEL, VISITBERLIN
5. Long Island Summer
Lounge
Relaxing by day and edgy at
night, this beach bar atop an urban parking garage is a refreshing
antidote for what ails you.
Park House Exchange, Deck 7
+49 151 6150 9889
6. Festhalle
What do Miley Cyrus, Peter
Gabriel and OneRepublic have in
common? All have played this impressive neobaroque-style exhibition hall, which dates to 1909.
Ludwig-Erhard-Anlage 1
+49 69 1340 400
7. English Theatre
Delight in a memorable performance at this gem of a venue in
the city center. Seating 300, it’s
the largest English-language
theater in continental Europe.
Gallusanlage 7
+49 69 2423 1620
MUNICH
8. Bavaria Filmstadt
The famous film studio where
The Neverending Story, the original Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, Das Boot and many
4. Viktualienmarkt
From sausages and fish to exotic fruit, Munich’s open-air food
market boasts the highest-quality
gourmet groceries in town. At its
center lies a beer garden with a
lively atmosphere.
Viktualienmarkt 3
+49 89 8906 8205
5. Alte Pinakothek
The former royal collection of
Old Masters paintings resides
here. Dürer, Rembrandt, Peter
Paul Rubens and El Greco are
among those represented.
Barer Strasse 27
+49 89 2380 5216
6. Marienplatz
Munich’s main square since
1158, Marienplatz is abuzz with
activity and a great place for photos, with the Gothic Revival-style
New Town Hall in the spotlight.
+49 089 2330 0115
7. Residenz
Take a tour of the former main
royal palace of Bavaria, with its
130 rooms and 10 courtyards.
Residenzstrasse 1
+49 089 290 671
8. BMW Museum
From the earliest BMW engines to modern prototypes, the
permanent exhibit here appeals
to the car lover in all of us and
rolls out fun for all ages.
Am Olympiapark 2
+49 89 125 016 001
9. Nymphenburg Palace
This baroque beauty housed
Bavaria’s rulers beginning in
1675. Perhaps more spectacular
than the palace itself are the 490
acres of formal gardens.
Schloss Nymphenburg 1
+49 089 179 080
10. Asamkirche
A rococo gem, Asamkirche was
built as a private chapel for the
brothers who completed it in
1746. Now it’s open to the public.
Sendlinger Strasse 32
+49 089 2368 7989
Want even more great ideas?
Go to 1 Best.com for handy
travel lists, cool pics and hot
tips by Local Experts in popular
destinations around the world.
other movies were made offers
tours and a 4-D theater.
Bavariafilmplatz 7
+49 089 6499 2000
9. Eisbach River Surfing
On the Eisbach’s canal next to
the Haus der Kunst, look for the
spot just off the road where people surf year-round — in Munich.
Prinzregentenstrasse
+49 089 2339 6500
10. Kartoffelmuseum
The Potato Museum follows
the starchy vegetable and its various uses throughout history, with
special emphasis on its ties to
Munich. The museum is free and
worthy of an hour of your time.
Grafingerstrasse 2
+49 089 404050
SPORTS
USA TODAY ❚ MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2018 ❚ 1B
Bell could set the pace
for Steelers vs. Jaguars
Michael Middlehurst-Schwartz
USA TODAY
The Pittsburgh Steelers helped legitimize the Jacksonville Jaguars in 2017. But
after going 10-1 since falling to the eventual AFC South champions in a surprising 30-9 rout in Week 5, the Steelers’ potential return to the AFC Championship
Game depends on the team carrying the
lessons it implemented from that humbling defeat.
And while many expect the road to Super Bowl LII to feature a rematch of Pittsburgh and the New England Patriots,
Jacksonville is anything but a speed
bump.
Ben Roethlisberger threw five interceptions and the Steelers gave up 231
rushing yards in what served as the Jaguars’ emergence as a legitimate postseason threat. While Jacksonville rode the
same lockdown, turnover-generating defense and rugged run game back to the
divisional round, Pittsburgh was served
the reality check it needed. Roethlisberger in particular finished the season on an
upswing, posting a 102.7 passer rating in
the 11 games since that point.
But even with wide receiver Antonio
Brown expected to make a timely return,
it could be the running attack that swings
the second meeting.
Running back Le’Veon Bell managed
25 touches in the first meeting, but just 15
of those were runs. Although the Jaguars
steadily improved their rushing defense
over the season, the unit finished 21st
with 116.3 yards allowed per game. In its
six losses, Jacksonville gave up an average of 153.3 yards on the ground. Using
him frequently would help Pittsburgh negate a powerful pass rush led by defensive player of the year candidate Calais
Campbell, as well as limit its turnover liability against Jaguars Pro Bowl cornerbacks Jalen Ramsey and A.J. Bouye.
That could add up to a heavy workload
for Bell, who last season set the NFL record for rushing yardage in a player’s first
two playoff games with 337.
Much of Jacksonville’s burden for
stopping Bell could fall to linebackers Telvin Smith and Myles Jack. The two will
not only be critical in preventing him
from reaching the second level and
breaking long runs but also containing
Steelers running back Le’Veon Bell’s workload could negate the Jaguars’ pass rush. PHILIP G. PAVELY/USA TODAY SPORTS
him in the passing game. Bell had 10
catches in the first contest but managed
just 46 yards.
Here is the matchup that will define
the NFC divisional round game Sunday:
Saints WR Michael Thomas vs.
Vikings CB Xavier Rhodes
Whether this matchup truly manifests
remains unclear. While putting arguably
the league’s pre-eminent lockdown cornerback on the New Orleans Saints’ foremost threat in the passing game would
seem like a natural assignment, Rhodes
was tasked with covering Thomas on just
a handful of plays in the Minnesota Vik-
ings’ Week 1 win. But much has changed
for both teams since that point, and
Thomas has emerged as an even more
dangerous target in a Pro Bowl season.
Rhodes has an established pattern of
erasing opponents’ top receivers, having
held the likes of Antonio Brown, Julio
Jones and A.J. Green to modest outputs
in 2017. While Drew Brees completed
passes to eight receivers last weekend,
having Thomas taken largely out of the
equation would leave him with few reliable options against the second-ranked
pass defense (192.4 points per game).
New Orleans would also face a bleak outlook on third down, as it ranks a pedestrian 19th in conversion percentage (37.6)
and is up against the league’s best unit in
that facet (25.2% allowed).
With the running game integral to the
Saints’ success, Thomas has to establish
himself to prevent Minnesota from consistently loading up the box. Alvin Kamara and Mark Ingram were held to just 68
combined yards from scrimmage in a
wild-card win over the Carolina Panthers
thanks in part to an athletic linebacker
corps that prevented the Pro Bowl duo
from turning the corner and finding
open-field space. The Vikings could follow that formula with Anthony Barr and
Eric Kendricks while also disrupting
plays up front through nose tackle Linval
Joseph.
Football coaches
support changes
to redshirt rule
George Schroeder
USA TODAY
CHARLOTTE – College football
coaches attending the American Football Coaches Association’s annual convention were “unanimous,” according to
executive director Todd Berry, in support of a significant rule change regarding player eligibility.
For the second year in a row, the AFCA asked coaches at the convention
about altering the existing redshirt rule
USA SNAPSHOTS©
62
Points scored by the Jacksonville
Jaguars in the 1999 Divisional
Playoffs, most by any NFL team in
that round of the postseason.
SOURCE NFL
ELLEN J. HORROW, JANET LOEHRKE/USA TODAY
to allow players to participate in up to
four games in a season and still retain
status as a redshirt (thus preserving
four years of eligibility). Currently, if a
player participates in a single play in a
season, he uses a year of eligibility.
By unanimous, Berry clarified: “I
mean unanimous,” he said, insisting
that in surveys of coaches at each level
of college football during the convention, no one was against the proposed
changed.
“There were no dissenters on any level,” he said. “Very rarely will you find
coaches in agreement like this.”
That includes 59 FBS head coaches,
including 28 from schools in the power
five conferences, who attended an annual issues meeting last Wednesday.
The NCAA’s current eligibility model
allows athletes five years (after beginning full-time college enrollment) to
play four seasons, but in order to qualify
for a redshirt season, a player must not
participate in any games in a given season. Berry said the model worked when
college football programs had more than
100 scholarships and played 10-game
schedules.
At the FBS level, programs are limited
to 85 scholarships and play 12-game
regular seasons (and could play as many
as 15 games); at lower levels, they’re allowed fewer scholarships.
“I don’t see any valid arguments
AFCA executive director Todd Berry during the American Football Coaches
Awards in Charlotte. ANDREW P. SCOTT/USA TODAY
against it,” Berry said. “Nobody’s
against it. I’ve never heard a valid argument against it.”
The Atlantic Coast Conference has
sponsored a proposal to change the rule.
The proposal would resemble the current allowance in the NCAA’s medical
hardship rule, which allows players who
are injured and cannot return in a season to retain the year of eligibility if they
are injured before playing in more than
30 percent of the games in the first half
of the season.
The ACC’s proposal would be broader, allowing a player to participate in
four games at any point in the season.
Berry said the stresses of fewer
scholarships and more games, along
with an increased attention to player
safety, has led to more concerns about
asking players to play late in seasons,
thus burning their redshirts.
“It’s not fair to ask a student athlete
this question: ‘I’ve run out of people. I
know it’s the 11th game, but I need you
for 10 snaps to get out of this game,’”
Berry said. “Guys don’t get very long to
do this in the first place and we’re gonna
take away a whole year for 10 plays? But
that’s the rule now.”
Berry hopes the coaches’ endorsement would help push the ACC’s proposal to approval at the upcoming NCAA
Convention, perhaps even in time for
the 2018 season. He said the only pushback he’s heard was that other sports
might want a similar rule change.
“If it’s right for student athletes,
what’s wrong with other sports doing
the same things?” he said, adding that it
shouldn’t be an issue to restrict the
change to football because of its unique
stresses.
“This needs to pass,” Berry said.
“This needs to pass right now. … We
know it’s right for football.”
SPORTS
2B ❚ MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2018 ❚ USA TODAY
TENNIS
Stephens hoping to up her game
Sandra Harwitt
Special for USA TODAY Sports
MELBOURNE – Sloane Stephens
hasn’t won a match in the seven she’s
played since winning her first Grand
Slam title at the U.S. Open last September. Nevertheless, the 24-year-old is dismissing that fact as inconsequential as
she approaches the start of the Australian Open.
“I think you have to kind of put everything in perspective, evaluate where you
are,” Stephens said. “I think personally I
had a lot of things going on. It’s a new
year, new season. I’m hoping not to get
injured. There’s tons of things to look forward to. I’m not going to dwell too much
on that (the losses).”
Following her triumphant U.S. Open,
Stephens spent the remainder of 2017
dealing with a knee injury, and lost all six
matches played during the remainder of
the season, including two at the Fed Cup
final. Despite Stephens’ lacking performance the Americans increased their
Fed Cup winning record to 18 titles with
their 3-2 win over Belarus in Minsk.
The highlight of the 13th-seeded Stephen’s autumn came off the court when
she graduated with a degree in communications from Indiana University East
through a discounted online program arranged with the school by the WTA.
“Everyone in my family has a degree.
My mom has her doctorate,” Stephens
said. “My brother is in college. I have to
graduate before him because I’m better
than him. I have to prove to him that I’m
smarter in everything.”
While Stephens speaks of hope heading into the new year, she didn’t start
2018 on a high note. She lost her first
match 5-7, 6-3, 6-1 to the seemingly rejuvenated Angelique Kerber of Germany,
the 2016 Australian Open champion, at
the Sydney tournament earlier this
week.
Stephens’ rise to Grand Slam champion status played out like a fairytale,
which earned her the 2017 WTA Comeback Player of the Year honors. Sidelined
with a foot injury for one month shy of a
year, Stephens returned to the tour at
Wimbledon, ranked as low as No. 957 the
last week of July, and then went 15-2 in
matches played through the U.S. Open.
“I think it’s always a tough transition
when you go from not playing tennis for
11 months to winning a Grand Slam,” Stephens said. “It’s never going to be anything you expected. In terms of that, it’s a
Sloane Stephens practices ahead of the Australian Open at Melbourne Park in Melbourne. SCOTT BARBOUR/GETTY IMAGES
little bit overwhelming.
“I thought winning the U.S. Open was,
like, the hardest two weeks of my life.”
she said. “To win seven matches in a row,
to say that’s luck? I wouldn’t say that. …
If it wasn’t hard, then everyone could do
it, right?”
Stephens made her first big impression in the game at the 2013 Australian
Open when she upset Serena Williams to
reach a first major semifinal.
In a position to become the 10th player
to win back-to-back titles at the U.S. and
Australian Opens, Stephens will play
35th-ranked Zhang Shuai of China on
Monday in the first round.
Stephens, who was also seeded 13th
the only other time she was seeded at the
Australian Open in 2014, is one of four
American women with seeding distinction this year. Venus Williams is the
highest-seeded player of the Americans
at No. 5, Coco Vandeweghe is No. 10 and
Madison Keys, who lost to Stephens in
the U.S. Open final, is No. 17.
The Australian Open will definitely
not have a repeat champion this year
with Serena Williams remaining on maternity leave after the birth of her first
child, daughter Alexis Olympia Ohanian
Jr., in September. The only past champion in the women’s draw is Kerber, so
there are good odds that the Australian
Open will welcome a new champion in
two week’s time.
The 37-year-old Venus Williams arrives here as the closest thing to a defending champion, as it was she who was
defeated by her already pregnant sister,
Serena, in last year’s final.
The oldest player in this year’s draw,
Williams reached the Australian Open
and Wimbledon finals, and the BNP Paribas WTA Finals, but never won a title last
season. This year’s Australian Open has
to be considered a wide-open Open, and
Williams’ experience, and suitable game
style for the hard courts here, could possibly deliver an eighth overall Grand
Slam title, and her first since Wimbledon
2008.
“She's 37 years old; at her age, winning a Grand Slam would be a ridiculous
achievement, especially as it would be
her first Australian Open title,” said Martina Navratilova, in a column she penned
on the WTA’s official website. “Last year,
Williams came so close in Melbourne,
when she was the runner-up to her
younger sister, and now she goes into the
tournament knowing she won't have to
deal with Serena, and that should put
some pep in her step.”
The women’s game is starting the
2018 season in similar fashion to the
open-door policy to the world No. 1 ranking that peppered all of last year.
In 2017, five players held the top spot
— Kerber, Serena Williams, Karolina
Pliskova of Czech Republic, Wimbledon
champion Garbine Muguruza of Spain
and Simona Halep of Hungary.
Halep, the current No. 1, can be challenged for the top position by five players
at this year’s Australian Open. Former
No. 1 Caroline Wozniacki of Denmark,
who won the 2017 year-end title, as well
as Elina Svitolina of Ukraine, Muguruza,
reigning French Open Jelena Ostapenko,
and Pliskova could all leave Melbourne
Park at the top of the rankings.
BASKETBALL
G-League event is
one-stop shop for
USA Basketball
Jeff Zillgitt
USA TODAY
MISSISSAUGA, Ontario – USA Basketball men’s national team director
Sean Ford has his laptop open, scouting
a G-League game between the Fort
Wayne Mad Ants and Oklahoma City
Blue at the Hershey Centre in this suburban Toronto city.
Ford is at the annual G-League Showcase, featuring 26 games in four days.
League executives, scouts and agents
are the primary spectators. There are
also fans who want to see pro basketball
– the NBA’s growing minor league – up
close at a reasonable price.
In previous years, Ford wouldn’t be at
a G-League game. There was no reason
for it.
But now with FIBA's new World Cup
qualifying system, which mirrors FIFA’s
months-long World Cup soccer qualifying process, competition segments fall
during the NBA season, preventing NBA
players from participating.
So, USA Basketball turned to the next
best American players available: G-Leaguers.
“There’s a sense of perceived failure
for players who don’t get to the NBA –
that people think they’re not good players, and it’s just not true,” Ford said.
“There are limited spots in the NBA.
They’re grinding for a chance to play in
the NBA. These guys are good players."
Ford is here to figure out who might
be on the roster for the next set of games
Feb. 23 against Cuba and Feb. 26 against
Puerto Rico in Santa Cruz.
“The Showcase is one-stop shopping," Ford said. "You get to see every
team play twice over a four-game period. You see the players in person, communicate directly with some who previously played with USA Basketball, see
the NBA front-office people and see
agents – typically all the people we deal
with.”
During the first qualifying segment in
November, 11 G-League players filled 12
of the roster spots, and that group defeated Mexico and Puerto Rico, giving
the Jeff Van Gundy-coached U.S. a 2-0
record in group play. (NBA players led by
San Antonio Spurs coach Gregg Popovich will compete in the 2019 World Cup if
the U.S. qualifies, which is expected.)
“Thank God for Jeff Van Gundy,” Ford
said. “That’s how we should start every
conversation. He’s done such a great job
and set such a great standard. These are
his words: We need toughness. We need
skill. We need athleticism. And we need
it in that order. Toughness and skill are
really important in the international
game.”
Ford is looking for players who fill
those needs. He has the G-League app
on his phone and said he watches more
G-League games than he does college
basketball.
“I watch a lot more G-League than I
previously have," he said.
Because of two-way contracts used
on G-League players, call-ups to the
Jeff Van Gundy will be utilizing plenty of G-League players on the Team USA
basketball roster as it tries to qualify for the World Cup. RAUL MARTINEZ/EPA
NBA, 10-day NBA contracts and overseas opportunities, the players used in
the first two qualifying games won’t be
the same in the February games. USA
Basketball has a pool of 60-70 players –
about 10-15 deep at each position.
“The thing we realize and we respect
is that these players are trying to make a
living playing basketball,” Ford said.
“They’re going to choose the path that
allows them to make the best living, and
no one is going to make a living playing
for USA Basketball. We hope that
through their playing with us we can
help them make a living and give them
exposure.”
Wisconsin Herd guard Xavier Munford, who played for the U.S. at the
AmeriCup tournament in the summer
and the two qualifying games just
signed a two-way contract with the Milwaukee Bucks.
“It was an honor to just be one of the
guys who made the team,” Munford
said. “Once we got rolling, it was great. I
learned a lot about the game from Coach
Van Gundy. I just soaked up all that
knowledge. This experience helped me
get a lot of exposure. Coach Van Gundy
is an honest coach. He let me know what
I needed to work on and what I needed
to do better at. He wanted to see the best
out of me and pushed me to be better
defensively.”
If the opportunity presented itself,
Munford would play for the U.S. again.
And that’s what makes Ford happy.
“I’ve enjoyed the players enjoying the
experience – watching them win games
and come together as a team in a short
period of time,” Ford said. “When it’s
time to say goodbye after a game and
they let me know they’d love to do it
again, that’s the key.”
SPORTS
USA TODAY ❚ MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2018 ❚ 3B
OLYMPICS
DEBATE OVER WHAT IS FAIR
Trans cyclists have
Olympian disagreement
on defining fairness
Scott Gleeson and Erik Brady
USA TODAY
Jillian Bearden and Rachel McKinnon
have much in common as cyclists, Olympic hopefuls and transgender women —
and much in conflict as opposite poles of
an intractable argument over how to balance what’s fair with what’s right.
Bearden agrees with the International
Olympic Committee that naturally occurring testosterone gives transgender
women an unfair advantage in competition against cisgender women, meaning
women who were born female, while
McKinnon believes subjecting trans
women to testosterone blocking violates
their human rights.
Bearden sees trans women who compete with unlimited levels of natural testosterone as dopers and cheaters while
McKinnon says looking at the issue that
way only furthers the oppression of
transgender people.
And never the twain shall meet.
USA TODAY spoke with the antagonists, both of who say they are fighting
for fairness. Bearden sees it as fairness
for all competitors while McKinnon
frames it as fairness for transgender athletes. All this comes in the wake of updated IOC guidelines in 2015 that require
women who transition from men to
block certain amounts of natural testosterone.
The issue is important now because
governing bodies such as USA Cycling,
USA Track and Field, USA Fencing and
US Lacrosse are crafting, or have recently
crafted, policies that more or less mirror
these IOC guidelines. And it all comes at
a time that Ashland Johnson, director of
education and research for the Human
Rights Campaign, calls the dawn of a
trans movement in sports.
The dispute between Bearden and
McKinnon is personal as well as intellectual. They’ve never competed against
each other — Bearden is at the highest
pro level — but Bearden says she asked
McKinnon to leave her cycling team last
spring because of their visceral disagreements. McKinnon then formed her own
team, and members of each cycling club
mostly share the orthodoxies of their respective leaders.
“I’ve proven how powerful testosterone is from when I competed” as a male,
Bearden says. “That doesn’t mean specifically that the more testosterone you
have the stronger you are, but the hormone provides a certain stamina that
continues to charge you. It gives you that
edge of pushing power.”
McKinnon says whether other competitors believe transgender women
have an unfair advantage is irrelevant
because she says there is no way to measure if such advantages even exist.
“This is bigger than sports, and it’s
about human rights,” McKinnon says.
“By catering to cisgender people’s views,
that furthers transgender people’s oppression. When it comes to extending
rights to a minority population, why
would we ask the majority? I bet a lot of
white people were pissed off when we
desegregated sports racially and allowed
black people. But they had to deal with
it.”
The IOC has long struggled with issues of gender. It instituted gender testing decades ago when men, in rare cases,
were suspected of competing as women.
At first the testing was of the crude, pulldown-your-pants variety. Later that
morphed into chromosomal testing with
a cheek swab. And in 1999, the IOC ended
compulsory gender testing.
But guidelines adopted in 2004 effectively said trans women had to undergo
sex reassignment surgery. New guidelines in 2015 threw out the surgery requirement but said trans women needed
to test below a specified level of testosterone for more than one year before they
could compete, down from two years.
Bearden thinks the new guidelines
make sense. McKinnon thinks they are
manifestly discriminatory.
All this comes at a time when President Trump wants to ban transgender
troops from serving in the military, a
move condemned by generals and many
in Congress. The Department of Defense
is tasked to develop an implementation
plan by March. That will come just weeks
after the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics.
No transgender athlete has competed
publicly in the Olympics, but advocates
Rachel McKinnon says, “We cannot have a woman legally recognized as a trans woman in society and not be recognized
that way in sports.” WELDON WEAVER
be worried about trans people taking
over the Olympics. We should be worried
about their fairness and human rights instead.”
Bearden makes a distinction between
discriminatory bathroom bills and what
she sees as rulemakers doing their best
to promote equality and inclusion.
“Having your rights violated is very
different than a sport you sign yourself
up for,” she says. “You have to comply
with certain rules. I don’t feel that’s discriminatory. I don’t think (guidelines) infringe on anyone’s rights. I feel like (testosterone blocking) is necessary to
achieve fairness. There are so many rules
in sports, and complying with these rules
allows us to ride with cisgender women
because it’s fairest to them.”
Limited research
Jillian Bearden is a pro-level cyclist and has a reasonable chance to make the
2020 Olympic team. SARAH BEARDEN
believe that will change in coming years.
Caitlyn Jenner — who won the decathlon
gold medal as Bruce Jenner at the 1976
Montreal Summer Games — told USA
TODAY last summer that she believes a
transgender Olympian will “undoubtedly” step into the worldwide spotlight by
the 2020 Tokyo Summer Games.
Bearden and McKinnon plan to try to
qualify for those Games. Bearden is a
pro-level cyclist and founder of the Trans
National Women’s Cycling Team; she has
a reasonable chance to make the U.S.
Olympic cycling team for 2020. McKinnon, an assistant professor of philosophy at the College of Charleston, is a category-1 elite-level road cyclist and founder of Foxy Moxy Racing. She is a lesslikely Olympic qualifier who hopes to
make the Canadian Olympic cycling
team for her native country.
Tia Thompson hopes to make the U.S.
Olympic volleyball team in 2020. She is a
transgender woman who waited three
years to get approval this year from USA
Volleyball to compete as a woman.
The Human Rights Campaign’s Johnson, who recently conducted awareness
training for U.S. Olympic Committee
coaches and administrators, says governing bodies are “moving away from old
stereotypes and moving toward gender
decisions based on science, inclusion
and fairness.”
There’s the rub: How to reconcile science (blocking testosterone) with human
rights (competing as you are).
The power of testosterone
Bearden transitioned in 2015 and has
been a scientific test subject for the IOC
by providing before-and-after performance data that she says proves the
power of testosterone. She understands
that pressing for human rights always
sounds like the right thing to do, but she
believes in this instance it would actually
hinder a transgender sports movement
that’s only just begun.
“Two years ago, no transgender woman (cyclist) was out (publicly) racing,”
Bearden says. “No one would dare come
out of the shadows. Now, because we’ve
laid the appropriate groundwork, we
have our foot in the door (with the IOC) to
where we can compete as our true selves.
“Quite frankly, it makes me feel good
racing with 50 other women who know
that I’ve passed a USA Cycling policy because I’ve submitted my (testosterone)
levels. It stops the questioning, the bullying. I can stand on the podium and feel
comfortable. Without a policy, for a lot of
women who don’t know me, they’d be,
like, what the (expletive)? And I get that.”
Under IOC and USOC guidelines,
Olympic-caliber transgender women are
required to keep their testosterone below
a certain level — 10 nanomoles per liter —
before competing, and must present a
doctor’s note showing testosterone levels are below that required threshold.
Natural testosterone in transgender
women is tested with the same methodology as unnatural testosterone created
by doping is measured in cisgender men
and women.
McKinnon, who teaches a class on
ethics and inclusion at Charleston, cites
the Olympic charter in saying that sport
is a human right.
“We cannot have a woman legally recognized as a trans woman in society,”
McKinnon says, “and not be recognized
that way in sports. … Focusing on performance advantage is largely irrelevant because this is a rights issue. We shouldn’t
Bearden lives in Colorado Springs,
home of the USOC. She believes compromise can lead to good solutions. McKinnon, originally from Victoria, British Columbia, believes she has an uncompromising call to justice.
Both women want transgender people
to thrive — in athletics and in society —
and both have received death threats for
their trouble. Last August, when Bearden
became the first trans woman to race
with a pro peloton in the USA, the Daily
Wire (a self-styled commentary site for
conservatives) ran a story under the
headline: “Man Who Thinks He’s a
Woman Crushing Women’s Cycling.”
McKinnon says testosterone testing is
insensitive to transgender athletes who
are uncomfortable outing themselves.
She points out some athletes are at an inbetween place in terms of their gender.
Scottie Pendleton, who rides for McKinnon’s Foxy Moxy team, identifies as gender non-conforming and goes by the pronouns of they and them.
“I race in the men’s field, but I identify
as more of a woman than a man,” Pendleton says. “There are a lot of misconceptions out there about gender, and it’s unknown how diverse the transgender
community is. We’ve culturally defined
gender as these two very specific things
and that you have to be one or the other.
Transgender breaks that barrier.”
Pendleton says there is limited research to show that natural testosterone
“can enhance sports performance metrics. It comes down to: What does fairness
in sports actually mean? I think any time
you exclude anybody because they are
different — regardless of how or why
they are different — you’re discriminating.”
Johnson, of the Human Rights Campaign, says, “The lawyer in me believes
all women should be subject to testing,
and a policy shouldn’t single out a trans
competitor. But at the same time, I don’t
necessarily see (the IOC’s guidelines) as
an anti-trans policy because there have
been unfair advantages linked to testosterone.”
LIFE
4B ❚ MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2018 ❚ USA TODAY
TRAVEL
Delta flight attendants Kirk Wise and Chesed Gomez have fun inside the turbine of Delta’s last 747, at the Pinal Airpark in Marana, Ariz. DAVID WALLACE/ARIZONA REPUBLIC
747 flies into retirement: Fond
farewell to an American icon
Ben Mutzabaugh
USA TODAY
ABOARD DELTA FLIGHT 9771 FROM
ATLANTA – Passengers wrote on the
cabin walls. There was free champagne
for all on board. And there was a wedding in economy class.
Delta Flight 9771 was anything but
ordinary, and that was by design.
The Jan. 3 flight from the world’s
busiest airport in Atlanta to a salvage
yard in Arizona marked the last time
that Boeing’s 747 jumbo jet would fly for
a U.S. passenger airline.
Delta operated its final regularly
scheduled flight on the jet in mid-December. This 747 then flew sports charters, the last of which carried the Clemson University football team home to
South Carolina following a bowl game in
New Orleans on Jan 2.
With that, there was only one mission left for Delta’s last remaining 747: a
flight to the “boneyard,” where retiring
planes are sent to be stored or scrapped.
On board were just 48 people, flight
crew, media and other Delta employees
and family members with ties to the 747.
The four-engine throttle of the
747. SPECIAL TO USA TODAY
Ask the Captain: Sad to see
the 747 go
Pilots of the Boeing 747 over the years, all of whom flew with Delta and/or
Northwest, pose in front of Delta’s last Boeing 747. SPECIAL TO USA TODAY
747 led to vows
Long run for historic plane
In November, United Airlines had a
similar retirement procession for its last
747, ending with a sold-out, retrothemed flight from San Francisco to Hawaii. United took its first version of the
jet in 1970, the year the 747 made its debut in airline fleets.
The trend extends beyond U.S.
shores as the passenger version of the
747 faces flagging fortunes elsewhere. A
number of other global airlines — including Air France and Hong Kong’s Cathay Pacific — have retired their 747s recently.
British Airways — the world’s largest
remaining operator of the 747 — will
phase out the 36 planes still in its fleet
by early 2024.
The move away from the four-engined 747 comes as newer fuel-efficient
two-engine models have gained favor
among the world’s airlines. Increasingly, carriers have looked to Boeing’s 777
and 787 or Airbus’ A350 and A330 when
buying new wide-body jets.
The outlook isn’t all doom and gloom
for the 747, however. The freighter version of the jet remains a staple for some
U.S. cargo carriers, such as UPS and Atlas Air. And a handful of foreign carriers
with recent orders for passenger 747s
are likely to maintain scheduled service
on the jumbo jet at least through the
next decade.
Chantel Watkins takes a selfie.
DAVID WALLACE/ARIZONA REPUBLIC
Delta’s final 747 by the
numbers
❚ Boeing 747-451
❚ Delta Ship 6314
❚ Boeing line number: 1232
❚ Manufacture completed:
10-17-99; delivered to Northwest
Airlines
❚ Seating configuration: 747s
can seat up to 400 passengers,
this model was configured with
48 Delta One; 42 Delta Comfort+; 286 Main Cabin
❚ Mileage: about 60 million
❚ Final charter/revenue segment: New Orleans-Greenville,
S.C.
❚ Notable airports frequently
served: DTW, MSP, JFK, LAX,
HNL, NRT, KIX, NGO, MNL,
PVG, PEK, AMS, CDG, TLV
❚ Was once named The City of
Shanghai
The in-flight ceremony joined Delta
747 flight attendant Holly Rick and Delta 747 pilot Gene Peterson, who fittingly
met nine years ago while working on 747
military charter flight in the Middle
East. The couple considered several
spots for their wedding, but ultimately
chose the so-called “Queen of the
Skies.”
Aisles in Delta’s economy section
were gussied up with white lace bunting
and rose petals. The bulkhead separating Delta’s Economy Comfort seating
from business class doubled as a backstop for the altar.
“This is my dream wedding,” Rick
said. “I’m on my favorite place to be in
the world.”
On the 747’s upper deck, another
Delta flight attendant stood, taking in
the moment with friends and co-workers.
Nancy Cobb said she’s been on the
747 before. Many times.
Somehow, she says, she ended up
working the 747 on her first-ever flight
for Northwest Orient back in 1985. The
carrier — later Northwest Airlines —
merged with Delta in 2008.
“I’ve spent my whole life flying this
plane,” said Cobb, now based in Detroit.
But on this flight, there was just one
more day to savor the iconic 747.
“She’s special to us,” Cobb said.
Question: Can the 747 be
saved? It’s sad to see the most
beautiful and iconic passenger
plane ever built being retired.
Cox: The 747 will remain in service in cargo operations for several
more years. In passenger service, it
has been overtaken economically.
The new fuel-efficient twins cost so
much less to operate that the 747
cannot compete.
The 747 entered service in 1969
as one of the technological marvels
of the day. In the 48 years since it
has remained iconic. Nearly 50
years in service is a remarkable feat
for any airplane.
Four-engine airplanes are becoming more rare due to economics
and the technical advances of the
twins. This trend will continue.
Q: If it’s too costly to operate a
four-engine aircraft, why can’t
the 747 be fitted with two new
modern engines?
Cox: The total thrust required is
the key, not the number of engines.
A 777 engine may be equal to two
747 engines, but the wing is not designed to take such a large engine
in one place.
In 1969, it took four engines to
power long-haul passenger planes.
Therefore, the 747’s design was
centered on four engines. Since
then, engine technology has improved, making more powerful engines common. However the design limitations remain for the 747.
The 777, a twin-engine airplane,
can fly almost as many people, almost as far as a 747, but it was designed 30 years later.
— John Cox
LIFE
USA TODAY ❚ MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2018 ❚ 5B
Bridges worth traveling the globe to see
Larry Bleiberg Special to USA TODAY
Bridges may be one of the oldest forms of construction, but the last few
decades have seen incredible innovations, says Judith Dupré, author of
the updated Bridges: A History of the World’s Most Spectacular Spans
(Black Dog & Leventhal, $29.99). Since the first edition of her book was
published 20 years ago, cable-stayed bridges, which use towers to directly support a roadway, have begun to rival suspension bridges for
crossing long spans, she says. In addition, bridges are getting spiffier,
with LED lighting and striking designs. “Engineers are coming up with
solutions,” she says. “They are unsung heroes.” She shares her favorites.
Mike O’Callaghan–Pat Tillman
Memorial Bridge, Nevada–Arizona
Penobscot Narrows Bridge +
Observatory, Prospect, Maine
This concrete-arch Colorado River
bridge opened in 2010, about 1,500 feet
downstream from the Hoover Dam. It
was meant to bypass the dam road, addressing traffic, security and safety concerns. “It takes its inspiration from the
dam and has a structure that’s really
monumental,” Dupré says. lvcva.com
Engineer Linda Figg spent hours talking to midcoast Maine residents and
learned about their pride in their granite, which was used for the Washington
Monument. That led her to model a 420foot bridge tower after the D.C. obelisk,
even including a viewing area at the top.
It opened in 2006 as the tallest public
observatory on a bridge. “It really recast
the long and important history of the
place,” Dupré says. Observatory open
seasonally. maine.gov/mdot/pnbo/
Laguna Garzón Bridge,
Maldonado, Uruguay
JULIEN LANOOM, NEXT ARCHITECTS
Architect Rafael Viñoly combines a
roundabout with a bridge to make a donut-shaped crossing in the middle of a
coastal lagoon. It slows traffic, increases
safety, and has fewer support columns,
a plus for marine life, Dupré says. “The
cars above are moving freely, and so are
the fish below.” turismo.gub.uy
Lucky Knot Bridge,
Changsha, China
Erasmus Bridge,
Rotterdam, Netherlands
This pedestrian crossing of the Dragon King Harbor River combines several
foot-bridges in a colorful red steel span
that seems to dance across the water.
Opened in 2016, it doesn’t appear to
have a beginning or end—a thrilling sequence of stairways and moon gates,
Dupré says. “It’s an example of creating
a crossing that was needed, and designing a landmark.” nextarchitects.com
Almost completely destroyed in
World War II, Rotterdam has been a laboratory of modern architecture and urban design. This light-blue steel span,
completed in 1996, is a combination cable-stayed bridge, viaduct and drawbridge. It has a single asymmetrical pylon, leading to its nickname: The Swan.
“It’s a landmark that ties the city together,” Dupré says. en.rotterdam.info
The Lucky Knot Bridge in Changsha,
China, combines several foot bridges
in a colorful red steel span.
EXPERIENCE
The Mike O’Callaghan–Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge crosses the Colorado River. It
opened in 2010, about 1,500 feet downstream from the Hoover Dam. SHUTTERSTOCK
Dragon Bridge, Da Nang, Vietnam
This six-lane span puts on a show,
changing colors and spitting fire and
water from a dragon head, making it an
instant landmark when it opened in
2013. “Until the advent of LED lighting it
would not have been economically feasible,” Dupré says. tourism.danang.vn/
en
Bay Bridge, San Francisco
The East Span, which opened in 2013,
replaced a crossing damaged by the
1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake, and is
now one of the world’s widest bridges.
The retrofitted West Span has a claim to
fame, too: It’s the world’s largest light
art installation, illuminated by 25,000
individually programmed LEDs. “The
bridge is an engineering feat, as well as
an aesthetic triumph,” Dupré says.
sftravel.com
Chenab Bridge,
Jammu and Kashmir, India
Although it won’t be completed until
2020, Dupré calls this span heroic,
showing the can-do spirit of workers
and engineers, who are laboring in a disputed region. “It’s going to be the
world’s tallest railway bridge, and one of
the longest.” Because of the remote location in northern India, supplies arrive
piecemeal by truck on windy mountain
roads. incredibleindia.org
Zhangjiajie Glass Bridge, China
Dupré says this pedestrian bridge in a
national park was built purely for fun.
The glass-bottom span crosses over a
gorge nearly 1,000 feet deep. When it
opened in 2016, it attracted such crowds
that it had to close briefly to add facilities for visitors. “People were so eager
to scare themselves to death,” she says.
travelchinaguide.com
Chameau Bridge, Moron, Haiti
This footbridge across Haiti’s floodprone Grand’Anse River has been a literal lifeline for villagers since opening in
2015, serving more than 40,000 people
per year. It’s one of hundreds of pedestrian crossings that the Denver-based
non-profit group Bridges to Prosperity
has helped fund around the world.
“These are being built in areas where access to a footbridge can be the difference between life and death, allowing
access to markets and hospitals,” Dupré
says. bridgestoprosperity.org
FOR MORE INFORMATION
TRAVEL
CRUISES
USATODAY.COM/EXPERIENCE/
The new year brings higher fees at sea
Gene Sloan
USA TODAY
Booked on a cruise for the coming
year? Brace yourself for higher daily
fees.
Two of the world’s biggest cruise
lines welcomed the new year by increasing the service charge they tack
onto passenger bills by a dollar a day,
and more lines are likely to follow in
their wake.
Both Royal Caribbean and sister line
Celebrity Cruises on Jan. 2 raised the
automatic gratuity charge they tack onto bills to $14.50 per person, per day for
passengers staying in most cabins.
That’s more than 7% higher than their
old levies of $13.50.
Passengers staying in suites on Royal
Caribbean and Celebrity ships now pay
$17.50 and $18 per person, per day, respectively — also up $1. Passengers
staying in Concierge Class and AquaClass rooms on Celebrity ships now pay
$15 per person, per day (up from $14).
With the increase, a family of four in
a standard cabin on a Royal Caribbean
or Celebrity ship will pay more than
$400 in automatic gratuities on a typical seven-night cruise — one of the
highest levies in the business. Among
other major lines, Carnival adds $12.95
per person, per day in service charges to
passenger bills. Princess Cruises and
Norwegian Cruise Line add $13.50 and
$13.99, respectively.
Increases at one line in the industry
often are followed within weeks or
months by increases at other lines.
Cruise lines have been pushing up
service charges at a rapid rate in recent
years. With its latest increase, Royal Caribbean’s gratuity fee for standard cabins is now nearly 21% higher than it was
as recently as early 2015. Over the same
period, the U.S. Department of Labor’s
main measure of inflation in the United
States, the Consumer Price Index for All
Urban Consumers (CPI-U), has barely
risen by 5%.
Royal Caribbean notes that passen-
Royal Caribbean has increased automatic gratuity charges
for 2018 cruises. ROYAL CARIBBEAN
Singer Carly Rae Jepsen makes her
cruise ship debut aboard Carnival
Splendor in February. JOSHUA PAUL/AP
gers who are unhappy with the service
they receive on ships can adjust the
amount of daily gratuity posted to their
accounts while on board by visiting the
Guest Services desk. A caveat: Only
passengers being charged gratuities
while on board can make adjustments.
Passengers who have pre-paid gratuities cannot make adjustments on
board.
Service charges, meanwhile, aren’t
the only on-board cruise costs jumping
this month. At least one line, cruise giant Carnival, is raising the amount it
charges for its drinks package.
As of Monday, the Miami-based
Cruisers about Vista and other Carnival ships will pay more
for optional drinks packages. ANDY NEWMAN/CARNIVAL CRUISE LINE
cruise giant is charging $56.95 per person, per day for its “Cheers!” beverage
package — a 3.6% rise. As in the past,
passengers can get a $5 per person per
day discount on the package by buying
it online in advance.
Passengers who purchase Carnival’s
Cheers! package also must pay an additional 15% gratuity fee. At the new base
rate for the package, the gratuity fee has
risen to $8.54 per person per day. Including the gratuity fee, the final cost of
the package will be $65.49.
On Carnival sailings in Europe, a value added tax of 10% also will be added to
the bill.
The Cheers! package lets passengers
order up to 15 alcoholic drinks in a 24hour period. Most cocktails, spirits,
beer and wine available by the glass on
Carnival ships are included. Passengers
also can order non-alcoholic drinks
such as juices, milkshakes, soda, mocktails, energy drinks, specialty coffees
and teas.
In other cruise news this month:
❚ Princess to bring back sailings
from Dublin
Princess Cruises in 2019 will offer
cruises from Dublin — something it
hasn’t done since 2009.
The California-based line’s 3,080passenger Crown Princess will operate
12-night British Isles sailings out of the
Irish capital from May to September
that feature stops in Belfast; Glasgow,
Invergordon and Edinburgh, Scotland;
Le Havre, France; Southampton and
Guernsey, England; and Cork, Ireland.
Princess in recent years has offered
the same British Isles itinerary during
summers out of Southampton and Le
Havre. Passengers in 2019 still will be
able to begin the itinerary in one of
those two ports but will have the option
of boarding in Dublin.
Crown Princess also will sail a single
one-way voyage from Fort Lauderdale
to Dublin in April 2019 as it re-positions
to the British Isles from the Caribbean.
The 18-night trip will feature stops in
Portugal, Belgium and the United Kingdom.
Fares for the new cruises out of Dublin start at $2,099 per person, based on
double occupancy and not including
taxes, fees and port expenses.
❚ Carly Rae Jepsen to perform on
Carnival ship
The multiplatinum singer/songwriter will play a free concert on Carnival’s
3,006-passenger Carnival Splendor.
The performance will take place Feb.
18 on Carnival Splendor’s outdoor Lido
Deck as the vessel sails from Long
Beach to the Mexican Riviera.
LIFE
6B ❚ MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2018 ❚ USA TODAY
BOOKS
REVIEWS
REVIEW
Women-in-peril thrillers
will chill you this winter
Jocelyn McClurg
USA TODAY
Author Andy Weir
Is the Girl trend finally Gone?
Maybe the “Girl” title trend is taking a
mini-break, but two new women-inperil/psychological thrillers prove that
as 2018 kicks off, publishers are still riding that, ahem, Girl on the Train.
Sure, The Woman in the Window by
A.J. Finn and The Wife Between Us by
Greer Hendricks and Sarah Pekkanen
easily could have been called The Girl in
the Window and The Girl Between Us,
but let’s give the authors props for substituting a couple of serviceable “W”
words.
Both books check off the now-familiar best-selling tropes established by
Gillian Flynn in 2012’s masterful Gone
Girl and polished by Paula Hawkins in
2015’s zippy The Girl on the Train. Unreliable narrators: check. Damaged, wineguzzling female protagonists: check.
Great big plot twists meant to cause
deep inhalations of breath: check. Film
rights snapped up: check.
The Woman in the Window (William
Morrow, 427 pp., eeeE ) does have a
nice ring to it, and Hitchcock’s Rear
Window is the obvious inspiration (Girl
on the Train’s alcoholic, voyeuristic Rachel can’t be overlooked, either).
Author A.J. Finn, a gender-neutral
pseudonym for former William Morrow
executive editor Daniel Mallory, knows
his classic movies (there’s even a character named Jane Russell!).
Like James Stewart in Rear Window,
Anna Fox is a shut-in who spies on her
neighbors with a telephoto lens.
Unlike Jimmy Stewart, Anna isn’t
wheelchair-bound with a broken leg;
she’s a child psychologist paralyzed by
panic attacks.
Her husband and young daughter
have moved out (why?), so Anna keeps
herself occupied by mixing pills and
booze, running an online chat for fellow
agoraphobics and spying on the new
neighbors across the park who paid
$3.45 million for a “landmark 19th century Harlem gem!” of a brownstone.
(Million Dollar Listing New York has
nothing on this novel.)
Then Anna sees what appears to be a
bloody murder through the window …
but nobody believes her.
I figured out two of the biggest “reveals” in Window well before they were
revealed, and Finn the cinephile’s taste
Weir goes
from
‘Martian’
to moon
David Holahan
Special to USA TODAY
Authors Sarah Pekkanen, left, and Greer Hendricks. BILL MILES
“The Woman in the Window” author
A.J. Finn, aka Daniel Mallory.
for melodrama can get silly (doorbells
ring, cellphones die, thunder crashes!)
but there’s something irresistible about
this made-for-the-movies tingler. Finn
knows how to pleasurably wind us up.
The Wife Between Us (St. Martin’s
Press, 343 pp., eeeE) bests The
Woman in the Window in the didn’tsee-it-coming plot twist category,
right on page 147.
The remaining pages, while intriguing, never quite top that early jawdropper.
Vanessa has suffered the ultimate
New York humiliation: She’s been
dumped by her hedge-fund husband,
Richard, and now she’s trying to make
ends meet working at Saks Fifth Avenue waiting on snooty former
“friends.” (She walked away without a
settlement in one of the novel's many
mysteries.)
Beautiful nursery-school teacher
Nellie seems ready to step into Vanessa’s place. Both women have secrets,
but so does “too-good-to-true” (re:
controlling) Richard.
Seemingly unstable stalker Vanessa is determined to stop Richard's remarriage to her “replacement.” Is it
sheer jealousy, or something else?
The Wife Between Us is built around
a deliciously clever premise, and it’s
psychologically astute, if a bit dreary.
Danger lurks in Wife, but it’s hard to
beat the kooky adrenaline rush of
Window’s pill-popping shut-in fighting for her life on a Harlem rooftop in
the pouring rain.
REVIEW
Erdrich’s ‘Living God’ creates
a deeper brand of dystopia
Mark Athitakis
Special to USA TODAY
In most dystopian fiction these days,
we humans are clearly to blame for our
ruin: We launch nukes, we pollute the
planet, we engineer viruses (digital and
organic) that get the better of us.
In Louise Erdrich’s philosophical yet
propulsive 16th novel, Future Home of
the Living God (Harper, 288 pp.,
eeeE), the source of the chaos is harder to pinpoint. Evolution has inexplicably ceased, turning the world regressive
and violent. Was it something we did?
Didn’t do? “Maybe God has decided that
we are an idea not worth thinking anymore,” muses Cedar, the narrator.
The glimpses of nature in this stalled
new world are discomfiting: Cedar hears
of “ladybugs the size of cats” and spies a
“sabertoothy cat thing” eating a dog and
a dragonfly with “a three-foot wingspan, golden green eyes the size of softballs.”
The real terror, though, is social. Cedar is 26 and pregnant, and in the panic
over a changed world, pregnant women
are being rounded up for uncertain purposes: protection, study or something
more nefarious. Women are disenfranchised, hunted down and forced into
“female gravid detention.”
That’s a phrase worthy of Margaret
Atwood, and Living God does bear a resemblance to the dystopias of The
Handmaid’s Tale and The Year of the
Flood. Women are menaced by evangelists: The Minneapolis street Cedar lives
Louise Erdrich
on has been renamed after a
Bible verse, and UPS trucks
have been repurposed by a
group called the Unborn Protection Society.
Trapped first in her home
and then in a prison-like maternity ward, Cedar fears
what awaits the child she’s scheduled to
deliver on Christmas Day.
“Hell is what’s happening right now,
here on earth,” Cedar’s mother tells her,
but that’s a notion that Cedar, like Erdrich, works to resist.
Cedar was born Native American and
adopted by Minneapolis Buddhists,
then became a serious Catholic — and
before the world became warped as if
by a funhouse mirror, she ran a religious magazine called Zeal.
Erdrich, winner of the 2012 National
Book Award for her novel The Round
House, interweaves the plot with
Ojibwe folklore and writings by Catholic thinkers such as Thomas Merton,
spiritual lifelines for Cedar as she plots
her survival. Though the world is upended, Cedar is concerned with the
morality of how she’s treated — and
treats others, especially when it comes
to violence.
None of this feels sanctimonious,
though, or like proselytizing. For all its contemplation, Future Home of the
Living God is as much a
thriller as it is a religiousthemed literary novel — it
thrives on narrow escapes,
surprise characters and a
perpetual sense of peril.
The novel is structured
as a diary Cedar is writing
for her unborn child: The
“you”
she
addresses
prompts us, the readers, to
consider how we might address such a broken world.
And there is something admirably
heroic in Cedar’s indomitability, her
non-dogmatic willingness to find hope
and even opportunity in a dire predicament.
“Evolution starts: a miracle,” she
writes. “Evolution stops: a miracle.”
It’s late in this century, up on the
moon, and Jasmine Bashara, nicknamed Jazz, is a struggling 26-yearold Saudi citizen who has lived in Artemis, a lunar city of 2,000 diverse
earthlings, since she was 6. Poor, irreligious and sassy,
she could make
Amy Schumer
blush.
Being an independent delivery person/
petty smuggler
isn’t
working
out. She lives in
a coffin-like cubical appointed
only with a bed
and a shelf, and
she mostly eats “gunk,” the dried algae
that is the standard fare of the moon’s
“little people.” Her main squeeze, Tyler, was stolen away by another man —
an Israeli, no less.
Jazz longs to be free of her hardscrabble existence. One of the many
things that apparently hasn’t changed
in more than half a century is income
inequality. She describes her lunar socio-economic status as working class,
her “hood” in scatological terms, and
her “residence” this way: “My coffin
isn’t going to be featured in Better
Homes and Moonscapes anytime soon,
but it’s all I can afford.”
Andy Weir is back. His second sci-fi
novel, Artemis (Crown, 305 pp.,
eeeE), is an action-packed technothriller of the first order. His first was
The Martian, a best seller that inspired
the film starring Matt Damon.
Being up to speed on high-school
science helps here, although the reader can skim all that high-tech jazz and
simply follow the topsy-turvy plot.
The book opens with Jazz failing her
test to join the EVA Guild (acronyms
like EVA often are not explained),
which would have allowed her to lead
lucrative tourist forays onto the moonscape. This setback sets the stage for a
dubious life decision that propels the
low-gravity plot into motion. For
$1 million slugs (the local currency),
she agrees to help a businessman sabotage a rival. Needless to say, things
don’t go as planned.
When Jazz isn’t entertaining the
reader with her snappy commentary
(“I threw off my clothes faster than a
drunk prom date”), she is involved in
enough derring-do to make James
Bond jealous. The pages fly by, taking
the reader into orbit some 238,900
miles above this vale of tears.
But Weir’s book fails to fully beam
his audience up. A little futuristic context would be welcome. How has the
world changed in 50-plus years, as in
climate change, for example? How
about geopolitics: There are Israelis
and Arabs coexisting on the moon, but
not a line about how they are getting
along on Earth.
And as for pop culture, virtually all
the references are 20th century,
whether Star Trek (century-old reruns?) or Eli Wallach (how about Vin
Diesel?) or Scooby-Doo.
The reader doesn’t learn if space
colonization is a one-off development
or if more cities are planned on the
moon or elsewhere. Like the domed
structures of Artemis, the novel is hermetically sealed from the world outside.
Still, by concocting cliff-hanging
action worthy of Indiana Jones, Weir
has provided the perfect vehicle for
humans who want to escape the severe gravity of planet Earth.
LIFE
USA TODAY ❚ MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2018 ❚ 7B
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NEWS
8B ❚ MONDAY, JANUARY 15, 2018 ❚ USA TODAY
WEATHER
WEATHER ONLINE
USATODAY.COM
Below 10
MONDAY’S FORECAST
10s
20s
30s
40s
50s
60s
NORWAY
Reykjavik
33/22sn
ICELAND
SWEDEN
KAZAKHSTAN
St. Petersburg
20/15c
Helsinki
24/19c
RUSSIA
ESTONIA
Oslo
30/26sn
Bergen
41/34r
Aberdeen
45/31sh
SCOTLAND
Gothenburg
32/31sn
Stockholm
31/29c
LATVIA
Riga
Edinburgh
23/17pc
45/32c
NORTHERN
Newcastle
IRELAND
Copenhagen
DENMARK
LITHUANIA
Belfast
47/33r
Galway
37/35c
Minsk
44/34sh
47/40sh
19/9s
Manchester
IRELAND
49/35r
Dublin
Hamburg
Shannon
41/35r
47/37sh 47/33sh Birmingham
Amsterdam
BELARUS
Warsaw
50/35r
GERMANY Berlin
46/39r
27/18s
WALES ENGLAND
36/33pc
NETH.
POLAND
Brussels Bonn
London
46/39r 45/39r
52/38r
Krakow
Prague
31/18s
BELGIUM
33/30pc
UKRAINE
LUX.
CZECH REP.
Le Havre
Frankfurt
50/45r
Bratislava
SLOVAKIA
43/39r Munich
Paris
33/27pc
48/44r
Zurich 41/33pc
Vienna
HUNGARY
42/38pc
EUROPE
Salzburg 33/26pc
Budapest
43/31pc AUSTRIA
SWITZERLAND
32/22pc
ROMANIA
Venice SLOVENIA
Bordeaux
42/34pc
53/49r
CROATIA
Lyon
Milan
SERBIA
49/44pc 43/35pc
FRANCE
Florence
Belgrade
Marseille
Santiago de Compostela
BOSNIA
49/42pc
35/27sf
Sofia
55/46pc
48/46r
32/26sn
ITALY
MONT.
Ajaccio
BULGARIA
KOSOVO
Dubrovnik
Rome
Skopje
Madrid
56/45pc
51/45sh
PORTUGAL
55/46pc
38/31sn
47/31pc
Tirana MACEDONIA
SPAIN
Barcelona
54/46sh
Lisbon
56/45pc
Naples
ALBANIA
54/47s
55/45sh
Cagliari
Valencia
GREECE
Palma
59/44pc
60/43pc
58/50pc
Seville
Faro
59/39s
59/42s
Athens
Palermo
53/48c
61/52sh
Algiers
Tunis
59/43pc
62/45h
Rabat
57/42pc
TUNISIA
ALGERIA
MOROCCO
f Fog
h Haze
80s
90s
100s
110+
RUSSIA
FINLAND
c Cloudy
dr Drizzle
70s
TUESDAY’S FORECAST
i Ice
r Rain
pc Partly cloudy s Sunny
sf Snow flurries sn Snow
w Windy
sh Showers
t Thunderstorms
Ulan Bator
0/-26s
Almaty
19/15c
UZBEK.
KYRGYZ.
TAJIK.
TURKMEN.
Kabul
51/25s
Vladivostok
20/9sn
N. KOREA
Pyongyang
37/22c
S. KOREA JAPAN
Seoul
42/27r
Tokyo
Osaka 55/45s
58/43s
Shanghai
MONGOLIA
Urumqi
18/5sn
Beijing
41/19s
ASIA
Xian
CHINA 47/25pc
AFGHANISTAN
IRAN
Islamabad
Lhasa
71/42h
Kathmandu 52/21s
66/40pc
PAKISTAN
New Delhi
NEPAL Dhaka
73/45h
78/58h
Karachi
Kolkata
81/61h
BURMA
73/52h
Mumbai
93/75h
Changsha
55/42c
60/43sh
Taipei
Guangzhou
77/62s
Hanoi 75/53s
TAIWAN
69/61c
Hong Kong
LAOS
71/61s
Rangoon
Da Nang
Manila
88/63s
THAILAND 76/67c
88/77c
VIETNAM
Bangkok
CAMBODIA
89/73pc
Phnom Penh Ho Chi Minh City
89/75c
88/75c
PHILIPPINES
INDIA
SRI LANKA
GUAM
Hagatna
88/78sh
MALAYSIA
MALDIVES
Singapore Balikpapan
85/75c
90/76t
PAPUA NEW
GUINEA
INDONESIA
Jakarta
85/77sh
Port Moresby
90/75c
Cairns
88/74t
Broome
86/78t
MAURITIUS
Alice Springs
95/67h
Brisbane
86/64pc
AUSTRALIA
Perth
87/73t
Sydney
74/65w
Canberra
79/48s
Melbourne
81/53s
Forecasts and
graphics provided by
AccuWeather Inc.
©2018
Note: The forecast highs are for the 24-hour period of that
day. Low-temperature forecasts are for the upcoming night.
CLOSE-UP FORECAST
AMSTERDAM
MON
TUE
WED
Rain,
breezy
46/39
A few
showers
43/37
Showers
around
43/37
JAKARTA
TUE
WED
THU
Heavy
rain
85/77
Stray
t-storm
89/77
AUCKLAND
Shower
76/68
TUE
WED
Rain,
windy
75/67
WED
THU
Showers
76/65
THU
JERUSALEM
BERLIN
Sunlit
41/19
MON
WED
Clearing
41/15
TUE
THU
Sunny
39/16
WED
LONDON
Stray
t-shower
91/60
MON
Morning
rain
52/38
MON
TUE
Clouds,
sun
55/45
TUE
Sunny
85/57
TUE
Shower
45/37
TUE
Sunny
89/59
WED
A stray
shower
46/39
WED
MON
Partly
sunny
55/46
TUE
A little
rain
42/27
TUE
TUE
Shower
59/53
WED
Clearing
43/28
WED
WED
Spotty
showers
62/41
THU
Some
sun
41/23
Rain at
times
48/44
MON
TUE
P.M. rain
49/39
TUE
Shower
51/45
RIO DE JANEIRO
WED
Partly
sunny
92/79
Sunny,
warm
95/78
Mostly
sunny
94/78
WED
ROME
BRUSSELS
Clouding
up
36/33
A little
rain
41/32
Mostly
cloudy
37/33
LOS ANGELES
MON
MON
Shower
45/41
JOHANNESBURG
BEIJING
TUE
Shower
53/45
WED
WED
Partly
sunny
89/73
Partly
sunny
91/73
Partly
sunny
92/74
MON
T-storms
88/76
PARIS
BANGKOK
TUE
SEOUL
Partly
sunny
73/55
Mostly
cloudy
70/54
Partly
sunny
72/54
SHANGHAI
THU
Showers
around
60/43
Some
sun, mild
57/41
Clearing
54/41
Rain
46/39
MON
TUE
Spotty
showers
44/36
A few
showers
42/37
TUE
Partly
sunny
47/31
Partly
sunny
53/34
Partly
sunny
53/31
TUE
WED
MADRID
MON
TUE
WED
MON
45/31sh
53/48c
56/45pc
44/34sh
35/27sf
41/34r
44/38pc
53/46r
50/35r
45/39r
53/49r
33/27pc
28/21pc
57/36s
51/45r
59/44pc
50/40r
36/33pc
51/45sh
46/40r
45/32c
59/42s
57/48pc
45/41pc
51/46pc
44/33sn
32/31sn
41/35r
24/19c
39/25pc
21/11s
31/18s
67/58sh
50/45r
54/47s
45/36pc
41/38r
49/44pc
59/42s
49/35r
55/46pc
43/35pc
19/9s
51/45pc
55/45sh
53/46pc
30/26sn
61/52sh
58/50pc
33/30pc
46/43r
33/22sn
23/17pc
43/31pc
48/46r
38/26sn
59/39s
40/32sn
32/26sn
20/15c
COPENHAGEN
WED
Mostly
sunny
68/50
Rather
cloudy
67/52
Partly
sunny
67/54
MON
A quick
shower
88/77
Shower,
t-storm
87/77
MON
MANILA
ST. PETERSBURG
WED
THU
Mainly
cloudy
20/15
MON
TUE
Sunny
22/17
TUE
WED
Partly
sunny
21/18
WED
TUE
WED
Clearing
88/76
Cloudy,
breezy
31/29
Snow,
1-3”
34/30
Snow,
1-3”
31/25
TUE
WED
MON
Cloudy
37/33
WED
WED
THU
TUE
FLORENCE
MON
Partly
sunny
74/64
Mostly
sunny
78/65
Mostly
sunny
84/68
TUE
TUE
WED
MON
Partly
sunny
43/35
Mostly
cloudy
44/31
Partly
sunny
53/30
MON
Flurries
26/19
MON
TUE
Clearing
22/12
TUE
WED
Inc.
clouds
21/16
WED
Mostly
sunny
77/62
Some
sun, nice
75/63
Mostly
cloudy
74/63
TUE
Sunny
55/45
MON
WED
Rain
56/44
TUE
THU
Mostly
sunny
58/40
THU
WED
TUE
WED
MOSCOW
TAIPEI
WED
FRANKFURT
Partly
sunny
49/42
Mostly
cloudy
53/49
Spotty
showers
56/34
Spotty
showers
47/33
Rain,
snow
40/33
Rain,
snow
43/36
MILAN
Partly
sunny
67/39
Partly
sunny
67/37
Some
sun
65/40
SYDNEY
TUE
DUBLIN
Cloudy,
breezy
37/35
Rain
ending
40/33
MEXICO CITY
STOCKHOLM
MON
WORLD FORECAST
HONG KONG
MON
P.M. rain
43/39
TUE
TUE
Rain,
breezy
46/36
Rain,
snow
41/36
WED
Partly
sunny
41/33
Rain,
breezy
44/34
Snow,
rain
36/33
MON
Partly
sunny
33/26
Snow,
1-2”
39/33
A few
showers
42/33
MON
WED
MUNICH
TOKYO
Sunny,
nice
71/61
Sunny,
nice
73/63
Mostly
sunny
73/63
THU
NEW YORK
VIENNA
Clouding
up
28/25
A bit of
snow
38/24
TUE
WED
Clearing
32/20
ZURICH
Partly
sunny
42/38
Rain,
breezy
46/36
A little
rain
40/35
TUE
WED
USA FORECAST
EUROPE
Aberdeen, Scotland
Athens
Barcelona
Belfast
Belgrade
Bergen, Norway
Bern
Bilbao
Birmingham, England
Bonn
Bordeaux
Bratislava
Bucharest
Cadiz, Spain
Caen
Cagliari
Cardiff
Dresden
Dubrovnik
Duesseldorf
Edinburgh
Faro, Portugal
Figari
Geneva
Genoa
Glasgow
Gothenburg, Sweden
Hamburg
Helsinki
Innsbruck
Kiev
Krakow
Las Palmas
Le Havre
Lisbon
Lucerne, Switzerland
Luxembourg
Lyon
Malaga
Manchester
Marseille
Milan
Minsk
Monte Carlo
Naples
Nice
Oslo
Palermo
Palma
Prague
Reims
Reykjavik
Riga
Salzburg
Santiago de Comp.
Sarajevo
Seville
Skopje
Sofia
St. Petersburg
CAIRO
MON
TUE
38/30sh
59/49sh
61/50s
37/33sn
46/40r
39/32sh
47/37r
58/49c
42/35sh
44/36sn
56/45r
38/34sn
32/28pc
61/40s
47/40r
59/52sh
44/37sh
43/33r
53/51r
43/35sh
38/32sn
63/48s
59/54sh
48/39r
56/48c
38/33sn
35/28r
40/33sh
24/19pc
43/32r
22/19s
36/29sn
67/60sh
47/41r
60/49sh
48/36r
43/34sn
51/42r
63/46s
41/34sn
58/51sh
44/31c
18/11pc
60/51c
56/52sh
61/53w
33/26sn
60/55sh
63/57s
41/31sn
46/37r
30/28pc
25/18pc
46/34r
55/45sh
44/38sh
61/45s
43/34c
41/32pc
22/17s
Strasbourg
Tallin
Tirana
Valencia
Venice
Vienna
Vilnius, Lithuania
Warsaw
MON
TUE
46/42r
21/16pc
54/46sh
60/43pc
42/34pc
33/26pc
19/13s
27/18s
49/39r
23/16pc
57/49r
69/48s
42/34c
39/33sn
21/16pc
33/29sn
ASIA / OCEANIA
Adelaide
Alice Springs Airport
Bali
Broome
Cairns Airport
Changde
Changsha City
Christchurch
Colombo
Da Nang
Darwin
Dhaka
Guangzhou
Hagatna, Guam
Hanoi
Ho Chi Minh City
Hobart
Karachi
Kathmandu
Kolkata
Kuala Lumpur
Kyoto
Lhasa City
Macau
Mumbai
Nanchang City
New Delhi
Noumea
Osaka
Pago Pago Int’l Airport
Perth
Phnom Penh
Pyongyang
Rangoon
Sapporo
Singapore
Tianjin
Vladivostok
Wellington
Wuhan City
Yokohama
TUE
86/63s
95/67h
84/76sh
86/78t
88/74t
52/39r
52/39c
77/62s
90/71c
76/67c
92/77sh
78/58h
75/53s
88/78sh
69/61c
88/75c
72/49pc
81/61h
66/40pc
73/52h
88/77sh
58/42s
52/21s
68/60s
93/75h
61/45pc
73/45h
88/74sh
58/43s
89/78sh
87/73t
89/75c
37/22c
88/63s
32/23c
85/75c
42/23pc
20/9sn
73/64pc
55/39r
56/49s
WED
92/68s
99/72t
85/76r
88/80t
85/75t
59/46pc
61/39pc
74/59pc
89/71s
76/68pc
90/77t
80/58h
79/55s
88/77s
73/60c
88/75r
78/52h
80/57s
69/40s
74/53h
90/76t
52/44r
50/21s
71/61s
90/75h
63/45c
73/47h
85/73t
55/43r
89/79t
89/70t
87/74c
39/20pc
90/65s
36/20c
85/75c
41/20pc
26/20s
73/64r
57/40pc
56/47r
MON
83/71pc
78/62pc
71/66sh
67/45r
79/64t
84/77pc
TUE
84/69pc
80/64pc
69/66pc
67/46r
81/63c
83/77pc
AMERICAS
Acapulco, Mexico
Belize
Bermuda
Bogota
Brasilia, Brazil
Bridgetown, Barbados
MON
Buenos Aires, Argentina 80/65pc
Calgary
24/8pc
Cancun, Mexico
74/65pc
Caracas, Venezuela
84/73pc
Cozumel, Mexico
75/68pc
Fort-de-France
84/75sh
Halifax, Nova Scotia
27/23c
Lima, Peru
78/69c
Montreal
4/0c
Nassau, Bahamas
79/67pc
Philipsburg, St. Maarten 83/76sh
Puerto Vallarta, Mexico 81/55s
Punta Arenas, Chile
59/46c
Quebec
7/0c
Quito, Ecuador
63/52sh
San Jose, Costa Rica
72/66pc
Santo Domingo
86/69pc
Sao Paulo
85/72t
Toronto
23/20sn
Vancouver
48/42c
Winnipeg
-9/-22c
TUE
84/68pc
41/25s
78/67pc
84/74pc
78/72pc
85/73sh
31/22pc
78/68pc
15/7sn
79/66pc
83/76pc
82/55s
58/45r
13/6c
65/51sh
78/66pc
86/70pc
84/70r
27/11c
48/40r
2/-4pc
Seattle
56/45c
Portland
53/43r
Chicago
24/6sn
San Francisco
58/53c
MON
89/77sh
74/58pc
88/75pc
74/41s
65/52pc
59/43pc
54/43pc
36/22s
67/43s
71/62s
62/57sh
73/60pc
58/42s
59/38s
88/77c
81/61pc
43/40pc
55/20s
89/73c
74/46pc
87/75pc
85/75pc
81/64pc
71/45s
92/63s
89/75pc
83/55pc
65/42s
57/42pc
58/46s
37/31pc
53/34s
65/55sh
88/55s
66/44h
62/45h
87/78pc
TUE
87/77sh
76/60s
87/75pc
76/42s
64/55c
63/43s
54/44pc
37/31sn
67/43s
70/59s
62/56pc
85/65s
61/44s
58/39pc
88/77pc
80/61pc
50/48sh
51/25s
86/73t
70/43s
87/75pc
87/74pc
80/63t
73/46s
94/59c
89/75pc
84/56pc
64/47c
63/44s
62/45s
36/29sf
45/33s
64/54c
91/62s
65/44s
62/47pc
87/78pc
St. Louis
28/3sn
Los Angeles
73/54pc
Phoenix
74/50s
Atlanta
47/30s
Dallas-Fort Worth
58/25s
New Orleans
58/40s
Houston
65/43s
Albany, N.Y.
Albuquerque
Allentown, Pa.
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Baton Rouge
Billing, Mont.
Birmingham, Ala.
Boise, Idaho
Boston
Buffalo
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
Charleston, S.C.
Charlotte
Cheyenne, Wyo.
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Colorado Springs
Columbia, S.C.
Columbus, Ohio
Concord, N.H.
Dallas-Ft. Worth
Daytona Beach, Fla.
Denver
Detroit
El Paso
MON
TUE
21/18pc
52/24s
28/21pc
34/27sn
47/30s
34/30c
64/30s
31/24pc
58/33pc
11/0pc
51/30s
46/33f
22/19sf
23/17sn
5/-9pc
48/29s
42/23s
22/7sn
24/6sn
33/4sn
27/15sn
29/8sn
48/26s
30/11sn
20/8pc
58/25s
59/46s
26/6sn
25/13sn
62/31s
31/17sn
41/28pc
36/20sn
34/31c
50/18c
43/28c
33/21i
39/22sn
46/21r
24/18s
39/13sn
43/34r
33/30pc
24/13sn
10/-6pc
58/36pc
52/31pc
33/19s
22/7sn
15/5pc
15/7pc
31/15s
58/37pc
14/5pc
28/21pc
31/16s
63/46pc
35/17s
21/10sf
43/28s
Fargo, N.D.
Fort Myers, Fla.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
Greensboro, N.C.
Hartford, Conn.
Honolulu
Houston
Huntsville, Ala.
Indianapolis
Jackson, Miss.
Jacksonville
Kansas City, Mo.
Knoxville, Tenn.
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile, Ala.
Myrtle Beach, S.C.
Nashville
New Orleans
Norfolk, Va.
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Palm Springs, Calif.
Pensacola, Fla.
Three new virtual reality adventures each week.
Immerse yourself
New York
28/25pc
Washington
32/26pc
Denver
26/6sn
AFRICA / MIDDLE EAST
Abidjan, Ivory Coast
Abu Dhabi
Accra, Ghana
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Alexandria, Egypt
Algiers, Algeria
Amman, Jordan
Ankara, Turkey
Baghdad
Bahrain
Beirut
Cape Town, S.A.
Casablanca, Morocco
Damascus, Syria
Dar es Salaam, Tanz.
Harare, Zimbabwe
Istanbul, Turkey
Kabul
Kinshasa, Congo
Kuwait
Lagos, Nigeria
Luanda, Angola
Lusaka, Zambia
Luxor, Egypt
Mecca, Saudi Arabia
Mombasa, Kenya
Nairobi, Kenya
Nicosia, Cyprus
Rabat, Morocco
Tangier, Morocco
Tbilisi, Georgia
Tehran, Iran
Tel Aviv, Israel
Tombouctou, Mail
Tripoli, Libya
Tunis, Tunisia
Zanzibar
Boston
22/19sf
Minneapolis-St. Paul
1/-6pc
vrtuallythere.com
MON
TUE
-7/-23pc
71/52pc
23/14sn
37/23s
24/17pc
82/71s
65/43s
49/28pc
28/0sn
56/31s
55/36s
17/-4c
43/26pc
65/48pc
48/19pc
36/8sn
44/18pc
73/63pc
25/11sn
1/-6pc
58/34s
45/29s
46/18pc
58/40s
34/26c
36/11pc
9/-5pc
65/45pc
78/54pc
57/39s
-2/-9s
76/54s
22/10sf
47/28h
32/25sn
82/70pc
46/25r
30/12sn
12/6pc
34/16sn
61/38pc
10/-2s
30/9sn
62/46pc
28/11s
17/4pc
24/11sn
76/62pc
24/8sn
6/-7s
56/22c
52/35c
22/9sn
53/26c
44/30c
24/7s
9/-3s
69/45s
76/54pc
60/26c
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, Maine
Portland, Ore.
Providence
Raleigh, N.C.
Rapid City, S.D.
Reno
Richmond
Rochester, N.Y.
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, P.R.
Sarasota, Fla.
Savannah, Ga.
Seattle
Shreveport, La.
Spokane, Wash.
Syracuse, N.Y.
Tampa
Topeka
Tucson
Tulsa
Washington, D.C.
Wichita
Miami
73/63pc
MON
TUE
30/27pc
74/50s
28/21sn
18/9pc
53/43r
26/19c
40/22s
8/-8pc
58/39c
36/21pc
23/21c
57/50c
28/3sn
44/27pc
63/34pc
70/53pc
58/53c
84/74pc
67/46pc
52/29s
56/45c
57/27pc
39/29f
23/17pc
67/47pc
19/-3c
76/46s
33/7sn
32/26pc
30/3sn
41/24sn
71/49c
23/2sf
27/23pc
52/41r
35/30c
51/30pc
23/10s
53/36r
47/27h
29/11c
62/44r
17/6s
43/33c
36/26i
68/53c
59/45r
83/74sh
71/47s
59/35pc
52/39r
32/15sn
36/28r
32/10sn
72/48s
12/-3s
70/45c
22/6s
42/24sn
17/-1s
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