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USA Today November 06 2017

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$2.00 ❚ THE NATION'S NEWS
MONDAY
E4
U.S. woman wins
NYC marathon;
first since 1977
11.06.17
To cheers of U-S-A, Shalane Flanagan
crosses the finish line and helps soothe
city after a troubled week. In Sports
DERIK HAMILTON/USA TODAY SPORTS
NEWSLINE
MASS SHOOTING IN TEXAS
Gunman kills 26
at church service
Governor calls shooting the deadliest in state’s history
ROBERT DEUTSCH/USA TODAY
IN NEWS
Donna Brazile defends
depiction of campaign
Former DNC chair spars with critics of
new book; says Clinton was “Plan A”
I am an American
Reno’s Lisa Lee tirelessly works to
house the homeless
IN MONEY
Lack of diversity
creates blind spot
Facebook’s mostly white and male
vetters failed to stop fake Russian ads
Saudi prince’s U.S.
holdings in question
Billionaire investor arrested in Saudi
Arabian anti-corruption crackdown
Community members attend a vigil held across the street from the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas,
where 26 people where killed in a shooting on Sunday. COURTNEY SACCO/CORPUS CHRISTI CALLER-TIMES VIA USA TODAY NETWORK
IN SPORTS
Harvick, Truex clinch
NASCAR final four
Pair joins Kyle Busch among title
hopefuls, Keselowski sits in 4th
IN LIFE
War films take timely
look at patriotism
Thank You for Your Service, and Last
Flag Flying depict the war at home
Hammering away at
‘Thor: Ragnarok’
Director Taika Waititi talks cameos and
we take a look at Thor’s new hairdo
QIJFAF-01005z(e)k
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USA TODAY,
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USA SNAPSHOTS©
37,461
people were killed in
motor vehicle crashes
on U.S. roads in 2016,
up 5.6% from 2015.
SOURCE National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration
Mike Smith; Janet Loehrke/USA TODAY
STATE-BY-STATE 6B
John Bacon and Greg Toppo
USA TODAY
In what the governor called the
deadliest mass shooting in Texas’ history, a black-clad gunman opened fire
during a Sunday morning service at a
rural church outside San Antonio, leaving at least 26 dead, including children.
He was found fatally shot a short
time later in a neighboring Texas county after being pursued by a good Samaritan with a gun, officials said.
The gunman was identified as Devin
Kelley, 26, of nearby Comal County,
Texas, two law enforcement officials said
Sunday. The officials, who were not authorized to comment publicly, said it
wasn’t immediately clear whether the
gunman took his own life or was fatally
shot by law enforcement officials.
Kelley was previously in the Air Force
and served in logistics at Holloman Air
Force Base in New Mexico from 2010 until his discharge, according to Ann Stefanek, an Air Force spokeswoman.
“There are no words to describe the
pure evil that we witnessed in Suther-
In nearly 17 months,
3 mass shootings
Sunday’s devastation at the First
Baptist Church in Sutherland
Springs, Texas, comes a little over
a month after the country's worst
mass shooting, which took place
in Las Vegas on Oct. 1. On June
12, 2016, Omar Mateen killed 49
people at a gay nightclub in
Orlando.
See SHOOTING, Page 2A
Protesters’ battle in
court only beginning
PRESIDENT TRUMP
ONE YEAR LATER
Inauguration Day violence
brought serious charges,
and trials start this month
Trump voters
say tweets
are trouble
Sean Rossman
Susan Page and Josh Hafner
USA TODAY
USA TODAY
On Inauguration Day in Washington, anarchists and activists tore
through the streets for 16 blocks, tossing bricks at police officers, setting
trash cans and a limousine on fire and
smashing windows, all in opposition
to the new commander in chief.
Six officers had to be hospitalized
and more than $100,000 in damage
was done, resulting in 234 people arrested or charged with a crime —
among them an oncologist nurse, a
UPS driver and a full-time nanny.
But 10 months later, the arrests are
no longer side notes. A federal grand
jury indicted more than 200 people
with multiple felonies each. Nearly
200 still face six felony charges — inciting a riot plus five counts of destruction of property — together carrying
decades in prison. The protesters orig-
inally also faced felony charges of engaging in and conspiracy to riot, but
those charges were dropped to misdemeanors on Wednesday. The first
trials are scheduled to begin this
month.
The indictment alleges all the defendants played a part in encouraging
This isn’t quite what they expected.
Voters who helped put candidate
Donald Trump in the White House
did so because he promised to shake
up a political system they didn’t think
was working for them. Now, almost
exactly one year after his election,
they worry his disruptive persona
and provocative rhetoric may be undermining his ability to make the
government work for them.
They share no broad consensus
about what his biggest achievement
has been to date — he has yet to sign a
major piece of legislation — and in
what could create complications for
the administration, they don’t agree
what his top priority should be now.
See TRIALS, Page 4A
See TRUMP VOTERS, Page 2A
TRAVEL 4B
MARKETPLACE TODAY 5D
Parked cars burn on K Street, the
capital’s power corridor, after
President Trump’s inauguration on
Jan. 20. SEAN DOUGHERTY/USA TODAY
PUZZLES 5D
TONIGHT ON TV 6D
WEATHER 4A
YOUR SAY 5A
2A ❚ MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2017 ❚ USA TODAY
NEWS
E4
I am an American We are One Nation
TIRELESSLY WORKING TO
HOUSE THE HOMELESS
Lisa Lee has empathy
for society’s most
vulnerable individuals
Mike Higdon
Reno Gazette Journal
USA TODAY Network
Each week, this series will introduce
you to an exceptional American who
unites, rather than divides, our communities. To read more about the American
profiled here and more average Americans doing exceptional things, visit
onenation.usatoday.com.
What does it mean to you to be an
American?
To be an American means freedom
from persecution. It means to celebrate
diversity, to respect the liberties of our
fellow citizens and to fight for those liberties. For me, America is the “Mother of
Exiles” as exemplified by the Statue of
Liberty and the famous words of Emma
Lazarus, “Give me your tired, your poor,
your huddled masses yearning to
breathe free, the wretched refuse of
your teeming shore. Send these, the
homeless, tempest-tost to me, I lift my
lamp beside the golden door.” That, to
me, is what it means to be American.
What moment touched and motivated you to launch this effort?
As a child, I had several experiences
with houseless individuals that left an
impact. Years later, at the age of 18, I experienced homelessness for almost a
decade. After years of reinventing myself — housed and sober — I pursued
undergraduate and graduate degrees in
anthropology. All of these experiences
have driven my passion to draw attention to income inequality, the fallacy of
meritocracy, mental illness, substance
abuse, the trauma-informed approach
and the belief in empowering others to
use their own voices to become advocates for themselves and their communities.
MIKE HIGDON/USA TODAY NETWORK
Lisa Lee
Location: Reno
Age: 41
Profession: Psychiatric case manager
at Alta Vista Mental Health. Founder
of a writing group for people experiencing homelessness.
Mission: To end the stigma around
mental illness, substance abuse and
homelessness and fight for services
and justice for our most vulnerable.
What gives you hope or what concerns you?
The current political climate, globally, nationally and locally concern me.
It feels as if the pendulum has shifted
the world out of balance. Inequality is
blatant; racial, economic, gender and
ability inequality. We stand at the
crossroads. I do have hope for the future. The youth fuel my hope for a
chance at a sustainable and egalitarian world.
What do you hope to accomplish
through your efforts?
The eradication of stigma and
homelessness. I would love to put myself out of a job, make mead and live off
the land. For now, I’ll keep plugging
away at fighting for social justice,
equality, inclusion and the right of everyone in America to have their basic
needs met.
Nominate an American
Who are your American heroes? Share stories and nominees at onenation.usatoday.com or via email to onenation@usatoday.com or post a video submission to
Twitter, Facebook or Instagram (no longer than 2 minutes, please) with the hashtags #IAmAnAmerican #WeAreOneNation.
Trump voters
Continued from Page 1A
What most do agree on, however, is
what’s gone wrong: all those tweets.
“I do like the way he’s shaken things
up in numerous ways, but I definitely
would like him to be more presidential,”
says Margie Chandler, a business manager from Old Monroe, Mo. “He doesn’t
know when to stop talking.”
“Some of his tweets are, like, what
the hell does this have to do with running the country?” says Francis Smazal,
a registered nurse from Marshfield, Wis.
Chandler and Smazal are members of
the USA TODAY Trump Voter Panel, a
sort of free-floating focus group of 25
Trump voters from across the country
who have been weighing in every other
month or so. Drawn from respondents
to the final USA TODAY/Suffolk University Poll of 2016, their conversation in
2017 by email and phone takes the political temperature among core voters who
contributed to last year’s upset victory.
From our Trump voter panel
As the one-year anniversary of his
election
approaches
Wednesday,
Trump still scores a perfect approval
rating among these voters, but with
some caveats. Not one person in the
group says he or she would change their
vote in 2016. They tend to dismiss the
escalating investigation into Russian
meddling in last year’s election, and the
possibility that Trump associates colluded with Moscow, as just politics. But
they also express less confidence than
before about whether Trump can deliver
and more concern about his behavior.
In the first months of Trump’s presidency, as many as 13 of these voters predicted history would judge Trump to be
a “great” president. That number now
has dropped to seven.
“He isn’t drowning, but he isn’t on
land, either,” says Duane Gray, a truck
driver from Boise. “Presidentially, I kind
President Trump’s tweets worry USA
TODAY’s panel. MARK WILSON/GETTY IMAGES
of like where he’s going. Personally, he
needs to put that phone down and learn
to shut his mouth when he needs to. His
mouth is his own worst enemy.”
‘A dog-and-pony show’
Gray is one of a few on the panel who
believe that the Russia investigations
hold peril for the president.
“If these Russian contacts or whatever come through as collusion, then his
ass is grass,” he says. He predicts there
could be new and damaging revelations
in the wake of the first criminal indictments announced last week by special
counsel Robert Mueller, “when people
start facing prison time.”
The more common assessment
among this group, though, is that the
Russia investigations are nothing more
than what Monty Chandler, a disabled
veteran from Church Point, La., dismisses as “a dog-and-pony show.”
“It’s dirty politics,” says Patricia Shomion of Mount Gilead, Ohio. “I find it interesting that these things should be
Law enforcement officials work near the scene of a fatal shooting at the First
Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas. SOOBUM IM/ USA TODAY SPORTS
Shooting
Continued from Page 1A
land Springs today,” said Texas Gov.
Greg Abbott.
Speaking to reporters late Sunday,
Abbott said officials were cautiously
releasing information on the shooting,
including the names of victims, who
ranged in age from 5 to 72.
Officials said 23 of the victims were
shot inside the church.
Freeman Martin of the Texas Department of Public Safety said the
shooter, who wore a ballistic vest, was
spotted at about 11:20 a.m. at a gas station across from the church. Witnesses said he drove across the street, got
out of his vehicle “and began firing at
the church” with a Ruger assault-type
rifle.
He moved to the other side and continued firing, then entered the church,
Martin said, where he continued to
fire.
As the suspect left the church, Martin said, a bystander retrieved a rifle
and began firing at the shooter, who
dropped his Ruger and drove away.
“Our local citizen pursued the suspect at that time,” Martin said.
As law enforcement responded, the
suspect ran off a roadway at the Wilson County/Guadalupe County line,
Martin said. Officials found the suspect dead in his car, he said, but they
were not immediately certain if the fatal wound came from a self-inflicted
gunshot or from the person pursuing
him.
prosecutable, but all the stuff that Hillary (Clinton) has done was just, they’re
forgiven.”
A development they do appreciate:
Nearly all agree that the nation’s economy is doing better, although only half
say that upturn has been reflected in
their family’s finances.
But they are almost evenly split over
if the country’s security has improved or
stayed the same, and the terror attack in
New York City last week that killed eight
people rattled some.
“We’re more secure,” Shomion declares. “We have a new commander.”
But Jason Felts, a paramedic from
Galax, Va., is alarmed by Trump’s verbal
confrontations with North Korea’s unpredictable leader, Kim Jong Un. “He
should be a little more diplomatic.”
“Even if he takes the right actions,”
Anne-Marie Smith, a computer analyst
from Monsey, N.Y., says of Trump, “his
maturity level could put us in a confrontation with North Korea.”
A striking two-thirds of his supporters express at least some concern
about the president’s tendency to
punch and counterpunch, especially on
Twitter. In response to an open-ended
question to name the “worst thing”
Trump has done, more than half cite aspects of his personal behavior.
“He creates too many distractions,
which weakens any momentum in policy and legislation,” says Ken Cornacchione, a financial consultant from Venice, Fla.
In contrast, Michael Colombo, who
works in sales in Old Bridge, N.J., likes
Trump’s style. “Sometimes he shoots
from the hip; sometimes he talks before
he thinks it all the way out,” he says.
“But you know what? That’s the trait of
an honest man.”
Credit and blame
Answers were scattered in response
to an open-ended question about the
“best thing” the president has done.
Appointing Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court, says Colombo. “Calling
“We are pulling together as
a community. We are holding
up as best we can.”
Paul Buford, pastor of nearby River Oaks
Church
Frank Pomeroy, who is pastor of the
church, told ABC News he was out of
town when the rampage took place, but
that his 14-year-old daughter was killed.
Annabelle “was one very beautiful, special child,” Pomeroy said.
Paul Buford, pastor of nearby River
Oaks Church, said his service was underway when first responders in his
congregation were called to the scene.
He said some members of the community had “confirmed information” about
family members and friends. Buford declined to provide any details.
“We are pulling together as a community,” Buford said. “We are holding up as
best we can.”
President Trump, addressing the
shooting before speaking to U.S. and
Japanese business leaders at a meeting
in Tokyo, said the federal government
will give “full support” to Texas as it
deals with the aftermath of the “horrific
shooting” at the church. While these are
“dark times,” Trump said, Americans will
do “what we do best: We pull together.”
The government’s support will include survivors as well, he said. “We will
never, ever leave their side,” Trump said.
“Ever.”
Contributing: Kevin Johnson, David
Jackson and John Moritz
out” other countries in the United Nations, says Cheyne Henry, a business
manager from Red Lion, Pa. Supporting
the military, says Keely Vazquez, a
small-business owner from St. Paul.
Easing environmental regulations, says
John Karr, a retiree from Federal Way,
Wash.
As a group, these core supporters are
more likely to blame the administration’s legislative setbacks on forces other than the president, among them opposition Democrats, maverick Republicans, and a news media they call unfair.
That gridlock has caused Shomion’s
high hopes for action to fade.
“They haven’t done anything yet, and
now they’re infighting, so I don’t see it
going better,” she says.
Corrections & Clarifications
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To reach us, contact Standards Editor
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NEWS
BRIEFS
Pelosi backs training to prevent
sexual harassment in Congress
House Democratic leader Nancy
Pelosi says she hopes Congress will
pass legislation requiring lawmakers
and their staffs to complete training to
prevent sexual harassment.
Pelosi’s comments to CNN’s State of
the Union came Sunday after current
and former members of Congress
talked about experiencing sexual harassment from fellow lawmakers.
Pelosi said she believes Congress is
at a “tipping point” on the issues on
which Congress needs to do more.
USA TODAY ❚ MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2017 ❚ 3A
In Japan,
Trump
targets
N. Korea
President seeks pressure
from Putin, Asian leaders
David Jackson
Ryan: Repealing health insurance
mandate part of GOP tax talks
House Speaker Paul Ryan said Sunday that Republicans are discussing
whether their tax plan should include
a repeal of the Obama health law’s requirement that people have insurance
coverage or face a penalty.
Ryan told Fox News Sunday that “a
lot of members are suggesting” that
the tax plan repeal the mandate.
Reports: Queen Elizabeth has
investments in offshore havens
Newly leaked papers reveal that
Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II has invested some of her private money in offshore tax havens.
According to documents obtained
by the International Consortium of
Journalists, the queen’s investment
managers placed roughly $13 million
in offshore portfolios in the Cayman
Islands and Bermuda.
There is no suggestion the investments are illegal.
Militants storm Yemeni security
compound, kill at least 17
Masked militants set off a car bomb
outside a security headquarters in Yemen’s southern port city of Aden early
Sunday, killing at least 17 people before
storming the compound and sparking
combat that continued well into the
night, officials said.
Security officials said the militants
placed snipers on the roof and killed
most of the security forces inside.
Staff and wire reports
USA TODAY
President Trump spent his first day
in Asia Sunday by golfing with the Japanese prime minister, disclosing he
would soon meet with Russian President Vladimir Putin, and warning nuclear-armed North Korea against challenging the United States.
“No one — no dictator, no regime,
and no nation — should underestimate, ever, American resolve,” Trump
told military service members at Yokota Air Base in Japan, the first stop in a
week-long journey that will take him to
South Korea and China for talks on
what to do about North Korea.
The president is also scheduled to
attend Asian economic summits in
Vietnam and the Philippines, where
his criticism of U.S. trade agreements
will take center stage.
Trump will try to persuade China
and other nations to cut economic ties
to North Korea, thereby pressuring its
leader Kim Jong Un to give up nuclear
weapons. Those other nations include
Russia, as Trump announced he would
likely meet with Putin on the sidelines
of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Da Nang, Vietnam.
“We want Putin’s help on North Korea, and we’ll be meeting with a lot of
different leaders,” Trump told reporters aboard Air Force One en route to Japan.
A second Trump-Putin conference
— they also spoke at July’s G-20 summit in Germany —- will be scrutinized
beyond diplomatic policy.
Special counsel Robert Mueller and
congressional committees are investigating alleged ties between Trump’s
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has made a personal relationship with
President Trump a top priority. On Trump’s first day in Japan, the pair played a
round of golf. KIM KYUNG-HOON/AP
campaign team and Russians who
sought to influence the outcome of the
2016 presidential election. Trump left
for Asia less than a week after the indictment of former Trump campaign
chairman Paul Manafort.
During his first day in Japan, Trump
shared lunch, dinner, and a round of golf
with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo
Abe, and talked up the long-term U.S.Japan alliance.
The two leaders are scheduled to hold
a news conference Monday.
“We’re in the midst of having very
major discussions on many subjects, including North Korea and trade, and
we’re doing very well,” Trump said before dinner with Abe and their wives.
Abe, who has made a personal relationship with Trump a top priority, put
in special plans for the president’s visit.
The golf match featured a high-profile guest, professional star Hideki Matsuyama. Abe allowed journalists to see
him driving a golf cart with Trump in the
passenger seat.
They played at Kasumigaseki Country Club, site of the golf competition
when Japan hosts the 2020 Olympics.
While Abe wants to get close to
Trump, analysts said Japanese leaders
are wary of the unpredictable Trump,
especially on trade.
The Japanese “don’t like the
unpredictability that comes
with Trump’s approach.”
Author Richard McGregor
The president’s decision to kill the
proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership undercut Japan, which would have been a
key member of the Pacific Rim trading
bloc. The Japanese also are watching
Trump’s attempts to deal with their primary Asian rival, China.
“They don’t like the unpredictability
that comes with Trump’s approach,”
said Richard McGregor, author of Asia’s
Reckoning: China, Japan, and the Fate
of U.S. Power in the Pacific Century.
McGregor also said that, in the back
of their collective mind, Japanese leaders also fear that Trump “could do deals
with China behind their backs.
With the Russia investigation and
other domestic matters still unresolved,
Trump visits Asia with political problems back home.
According to a new Washington Post/
ABC News poll, only 37% of respondents approve of the job Trump is doing
as president.
Brazile defends depiction
of the Clinton campaign
Former DNC chair spars
with critics of new book
Heidi M. Przybyla
USA TODAY
WASHINGTON – Donna Brazile, the
former interim chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee, said critics
of her forthcoming book critical of Hillary Clinton’s 2016 campaign can “go to
hell,” while the current DNC chair, Tom
Perez, said one of the book’s most controversial claims is “without merit.”
In an interview on ABC’s This Week,
Brazile defended her contention that
she once considered using her powers to
remove Clinton from atop the 2016
presidential ticket. When Clinton fainted in New York City, Brazile said she
considered replacing her and her running mate, Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine with
Biden and New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker.
“I was under tremendous pressure
after Secretary Clinton fainted, to quote
unquote have a Plan B. I didn’t want a
Plan B. Plan A was great for me. I supported Hillary, and I wanted her to win.”
In a separate interview on NBC’s
Meet the Press, Perez called “the charge
that Hillary Clinton was somehow incapacitated ... quite frankly ludicrous.”
She was a “tireless candidate,” and besides, Brazile did not have the power to
remove Clinton, he said. The claim will
make people “perhaps start wondering
about other claims in the book,” he said.
Even as Brazile is critical of a special
fundraising agreement between the
campaign and the DNC, when asked if
the primaries were rigged for Clinton
and against Sanders, she said, “I found
no evidence, none whatsoever.”
The Democratic Party tensions displayed Sunday come two days before
the gubernatorial election in Virginia in
which the Republican, Ed Gillespie, is
narrowing the gap with the Democrat,
Ralph Northam, making some party officials anxious. Yet Brazile said she is
determined to speak out.
“For those who are telling me to shut
up ... you know what I tell them? Go to
hell,” said Brazile. “This was worse than
President Trump, flanked by Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach and Vice
President Pence, speaks to the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election
Integrity on July 19. The panel’s fate seems in limbo. MARK WILSON/GETTY IMAGES
2003 AP FILE PHOTO BY GERALD HERBERT
I didn’t want a Plan B. Plan A was
great for me. I supported Hillary, and
I wanted her to win.”
Trump voter fraud commission
appears to have gone dark
Deborah Barfield Berry
USA TODAY
Donna Brazile
Hurricane Katrina in terms of the emotional toll,” she said. “They don’t know
what it was like to be over at the DNC,”
she said.
Brazile was responding to a letter
from 94 former Clinton campaign
members that says she is misrepresenting the campaign and blasted her
for once considering removing Clinton
as the party’s presidential nominee.
In Hacks: The Inside Story of the
Break-ins and Breakdowns that Put
Donald Trump in the White House,
Brazile alleges that before Clinton became the Democratic nominee, her
campaign signed a joint agreement
with the DNC and Hillary Victory
Fund, in which her campaign would finance the DNC in exchange for oversight from the Clinton campaign. Usually, the nominee doesn’t take over
fundraising until after the nomination
has been accepted.
Perez said Clinton won by 4 million
more votes in primaries, which are
controlled by the states, whereas
Sanders did well in caucus votes, a
process which the party does control.
WASHINGTON – The election commission set up to investigate President
Trump’s charges of voter fraud seems
to have gone dark in recent weeks.
The commission last met on Sept. 12
in New Hampshire, and it’s unclear —
even to commission members — when
or where the next meeting will be.
Groups suing the commission for more
information about its activities also
have no clue.
“There’s not a lot of information out
there,” said Kristen Clarke, president
and executive director of the Lawyers’
Committee for Civil Rights Under Law.
“It’s been chaotic from Day 1 and remains chaotic. I think that they don’t
know what they’re doing. I think this
commission was poorly structured
and poorly conceived.”
The Lawyers’ Committee and several other civil rights and voting rights
groups, including the American Civil
Liberties Union, have sued the commission, arguing it hasn’t been transparent and hasn’t conducted enough
of its business in the open.
Indiana Secretary of State Connie
Lawson, a Republican commission
member and president of the National
Association of Secretaries of States,
said there hasn’t been much commission business in recent weeks.
“It’s my understanding that there are
so many lawsuits against the commission that ... right now there’s nothing
going on,” said Lawson, who testified
last month at a House Administration
Committee hearing on maintaining voter registration rolls. “It’s not the fact
that anybody’s being shut out. It’s just
that they wanted to get some of these
lawsuits settled.”
Trump set up the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity
to look into his allegations of voter fraud
in last year’s presidential election.
Trump claims the election included as
many as 3 million to 5 million fraudulent
voters, enough to erase Hillary Clinton’s
advantage in the popular vote. Election
experts dispute Trump’s claims.
The office of Vice President Pence,
who is commission co-chairman, said
the next meeting has not been scheduled yet.
The commission has held two meetings since it was created in May.
Lawson said she still expects the
commission will complete its report due
to Trump next year.
NEWS
4A ❚ MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2017 ❚ USA TODAY
Trials
of use of force were being investigated.
“There were thousands of individuals who exercised their constitutional
right to peacefully assemble and speak
out for their cause,” Sternbeck said in an
email. “Unfortunately, there was another group of individuals who chose to engage in criminal acts, destroying property and hurling projectiles, injuring at
least six officers.”
Continued from Page 1A
and conspiring to form a riot. Collectively, they’re accused of damaging two
Starbucks, a Bank of America, a D.C.
sandwich shop and a McDonald’s.
Among those facing charges is Kyle
Wright, who on the chilly inauguration
day stood toe-to-toe with a police officer
in downtown Washington as scores of
protesters were being arrested.
He was hurt, injured sometime during the fracas in the shadow of office
buildings, amid the flurry of pepper
spray and fire. The 22-year-old from
Chantilly, Va., despises capitalism and
views government as an oppressive hierarchy. So, when the officer warned
Wright not to step forward — he did.
He received a fine and community
service. Months later, he was indicted
and has since decided not to cooperate
with investigators.
“I’m the kind of person that doesn’t
back down from a fight, and this is the
state directly challenging me to a fight,”
said Wright, who wouldn’t discuss certain aspects of the day for fear of interfering in his case. “Obviously, I don’t
want to go to prison, but I’m where I
need to be.”
Of the 234 people arrested or charged
in the protests, 20 have had their cases
dismissed and another 20 have pleaded
to lesser charges, often misdemeanor rioting carrying a fine and community
service. That leaves 194 people, including Wright, who’ve decided to challenge
the charges by agreeing to a trial, the
first of which start with jury selection
Nov. 15.
The U.S. attorney’s office for D.C.,
which is prosecuting the protesters,
chose not to comment on the specifics
of the pending cases.
“The prosecutors don’t really want to
put all these people in jail because they
don’t have the time or the resources to
do so,” said Michael Heaney, a professor
at the University of Michigan who studies social movement and protests. “The
real penalty there is going through the
legal process.”
‘A huge risk for a day of protesting’
Lacy MacAuley, left, led outreach efforts for the protest group disruptj20, which
planned protests for Inauguration Day. COURTESY OF LACY MACAULEY
which protesters dress in black and cover their faces so they can’t be identified
by police.
Johns Hopkins University aside.
“All of this has just been incredibly
infuriating and disempowering and
frustrating,” said Lagesse, 30. “You get
scared for a second, but then the ridiculousness of why you’re scared is so overwhelming that you get angry.”
She went to protest the new president and arrived a half-hour late, beginning her march with a bandanna and
safety goggles to protect her from pepper spray. In her charging document, it
states she “willfully engaged, incited
and urged other people to engage in a
public disturbance.”
The ACLU of D.C. is suing 170 members of D.C.’s Metropolitan Police Department (MPD), its chief and the city
on Lagesse’s behalf and three others.
Among the many claims is that police
grouped protesters in a “kettle” as the
inauguration began, arresting them
without differentiating between those
committing crimes and those who
didn’t. The kettle, as the ACLU described it, involved the police blocking
off streets so they could cordon the protesters in one area.
The prosecution “has asserted theories of guilt so broad that they could effectively sweep in anyone on the street
that day who either was wearing certain
clothes or had certain views,” said Scott
Michelman, senior staff attorney at the
ACLU of D.C.
Prosecutors say the defendants
aligned in a “Black Bloc,” a tactic in
‘You get angry’
Weeks before her arrest, Elizabeth
Lagesse decided she’d put her pursuit of
a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from
WEATHER
FRONT & CENTER
Harsh, winterlike cold will
continue across the
north-central U.S. this week.
Sending a message
Except in a few instances, the indictment attributes violence broadly, often
blaming specific acts of destruction on
the group at large.
When Zachary Callahan, 38, the UPS
driver, and his wife, Sara, 30, pleaded to
lesser misdemeanor rioting charges
earlier this year, prosecutors didn’t
mention certain types of violence either
had individually committed. They did,
however, provide evidence each had
knowledge of the riots before they happened.
“I don’t think this is a very common
situation,” said Heaney, who was at the
protests doing research. He said the
charges are more severe than is typical,
but not as harsh as they could have
been. Protesters often are charged with
misdemeanors, things like failure to disperse or blocking traffic. But it’s possible the protesters could have faced federal or even terrorism charges.
At the time of the arrests, MPD Chief
Peter Newsham attributed the protests
to a core group that numbered up to 500
people. The MPD chose not to answer
USA TODAY’s specific questions about
the protests, citing the pending litigation, but did offer a statement. Spokesman Dustin Sternbeck said all instances
Breaking News Ground
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TODAY’S HIGH TEMPERATURES
YESTERDAY’S EXTREMES
HOTTEST: 97°
Kingsville, Texas
PRECIPITATION FORECAST
COLDEST: -1°
Bannack, Mont.
Note: For contiguous
48 states through
4 p.m. ET yesterday
Seattle
43
Olympia
44
50
52
41
Burns
55
Sacramento
62
San Francisco
62
41
45
Carson City
35
Casper
North Platte
46
Denver
Aspen
52
49
Palm Springs
68
82
56
San Diego
71
Alaska
63
82
16
Anchorage
21
36
83
Juneau
85
90
84
86
87
83
84
Houston
87
Tallahassee
83
85
83
83
84
85
Miami
San Juan
91
Below 10
10s
20s
30s
40s
50s
60s
86
86
Brownsville
70s
TUESDAY
83
Savannah
Tampa
Puerto Rico
SOURCE AccuWeather, National
Hurricane Center
Doyle Rice; Alejandro Gonzalez/
USA TODAY
@USATODAYWeather
Charleston
Jacksonville
Mobile
New
Orleans
78
83
78
84
Jackson
Baton Rouge
San Antonio
Honolulu
36
Austin
Raleigh
Montgomery
Shreveport
MidlandOdessa
76
Columbia
Atlanta
77
68
Richmond
64
79
69
70
70
71
Charlotte
Nashville
TODAY
Philadelphia
Washington Annapolis
Charleston
72
Little Rock Birmingham
Dallas
83
Hawaii
71
60
61
59
67
67
65
Cincinnati
66
New York
56
Harrisburg
54
Memphis
Tulsa
Lubbock
81
52
51 51
49
Oklahoma
City
El Paso
Fairbanks
54
62
Boston
Hartford
62
Pittsburgh
Columbus
Jefferson City St. Louis Louisville
Knoxville
Wichita
48
68
Phoenix
48
49
44
44
50
49
Albuquerque
Chicago
60
Albany
Cleveland
Lansing
Kansas City Springfield
Indianapolis
Topeka
Santa Fe
Flagstaff
39
43
Dodge City
Los Angeles
Madison
Des Moines
47
Detroit
46 48
43
Montpelier
Buffalo
Grand
Milwaukee Rapids
Sioux Falls
36
46
45
67
34
Omaha
Cheyenne
52
St. George
72
Pierre
35
Salt Lake City
51
Las Vegas
Ice/mix
Augusta
Burlington
61
Mpls-St. Paul
29
33
33
Elko
54
64
How many tropical storms
and hurricanes have formed
in the Atlantic this year?
20
33
30
Fargo
Rapid City
Idaho Falls Jackson
Hole
Reno
Fresno
On this date in 1953, up to 30
inches of snow fell in the
Pennsylvania mountains.
Billings
37
Eureka
Snow
63
Marquette
Duluth
27
23
21
44
Bend
Rain
Bangor
Bismarck
Miles City
Helena
Boise
J E T S TRE A M
T-storms
Spokane
32
Portland
Salem
FRIGID
COLD
Some of the fierce government critics
who stormed the streets have found
themselves apologizing, begging for leniency and hesitant to demonstrate in
the future.
Among the more violent protesters
was Dane Powell, 32, an army veteran
and father of three from Largo, Fla. He’s
the first and only protester so far to receive prison time for his actions on Inauguration Day. He pleaded guilty to felony rioting and assault on a police officer. At his sentencing in July, where he
received a four-month prison term, he
appeared apologetic, far different than
his enthusiasm on Jan. 20.
Dressed head to toe in black, Powell
broke windows near the Starbucks and
Bank of America with a black flag, shattered the window of the McDonald’s
with a hammer and hurled bricks and
chunks of concrete at police officers.
In Florida, where he lives, convicted
felons lose their right to vote.
“I am standing before you today as
the first from this political case with a
felony conviction that will forever impact my life and the lives of my children,” Powell said at his sentencing
hearing. “I would also like to apologize
to anyone that was hurt, scared, felt
threatened by or affected by me in any
other way that day.”
Despite the charges and video evidence of the destruction, Lagesse and
Wright take offense to using the word
“violent” to describe the protests.
Wright insists it was the only way to be
heard.
“You won’t hear about something unless there’s some sort of destruction,” he
said. “You wouldn’t have heard about
Ferguson. … They didn’t cover the
peaceful protest until it turned violent.”
Lagesse said she has sat out protests
since, saying the arrest and prosecution
serves as a psychological barrier. The legal process, she said, is “a huge risk for a
day of protesting.”
80s
90s
100s
110+
Forecasts and
WEDNESDAY
graphics provided
by AccuWeather Inc.
©2017
TOP TRAVEL CITIES Air quality index (AQI)
BALTIMORE
ATLANTA
CHARLOTTE
BOSTON
CHICAGO
MON
Fog
78/64
MON
A little
rain
70/41
MON
A little
rain
66/42
MON
Fog
79/59
MON
TUE
Mostly
cloudy
79/60
TUE
Shower
52/41
TUE
Cooler
50/38
TUE
A little
rain
73/51
TUE
WED
An A.M.
shower
51/43
WED
Partly
sunny
50/40
WED
T-storms
60/47
WED
WED
T-storms
70/56
AQI Good
AQI Moderate
MON
TUE
WED
Partly
sunny
86/72
Mostly
sunny
85/72
Mostly
sunny
85/72
A bit of
snow
34/23
Mostly
sunny
33/20
Mostly
sunny
39/25
MON
TUE
WED
AQI Good
AQI Good
c Cloudy
AQI Good
MPLS-ST. PAUL
MIAMI
f Fog
i Ice
r Rain
AQI Moderate
NEW ORLEANS
MON
TUE
WED
Fog
83/65
Mostly
sunny
82/64
Partly
sunny
80/60
AQI Good
sf Snowflurries
U.S. CITIES
TODAY
TUE
Akron, Ohio
Albany, N.Y.
Albuquerque
Allentown, Pa.
Amarillo, Texas
Anaheim, Calif.
Anchorage, Alaska
Aspen, Colo.
Atlantic City, N.J.
Augusta, Ga.
Austin, Texas
Bakersfield, Calif.
Baton Rouge, La.
Billings, Mont.
Birmingham, Ala.
Bismarck, N.D.
Boise, Idaho
Buffalo, N.Y.
Burlington, Vt.
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
Charleston, S.C.
Charleston, W.Va.
Cheyenne, Wyo.
52/38c
62/32r
68/46pc
67/39r
77/42pc
71/56c
36/22s
49/29sn
70/50r
86/60f
85/64pc
63/42pc
84/65pc
20/6sn
77/66f
27/6sn
44/22c
47/32r
61/32r
40/29pc
83/61f
64/46r
45/18sh
49/35pc
46/27pc
67/44sh
54/39c
47/29pc
73/52pc
33/23s
47/21sn
59/48c
86/60pc
81/51pc
67/43s
84/64pc
31/18s
77/59c
33/10s
44/27s
44/29pc
43/28pc
43/21c
82/62pc
52/37sh
30/14sn
sn Snow
NEW YORK
MON
TUE
Cooler
53/41
TUE
WED
Partly
sunny
52/45
WED
AQI Moderate
w Windy
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Colorado Springs
Columbia, S.C.
Columbus, Ohio
Corpus Christi, Texas
Dayton, Ohio
Daytona Beach, Fla.
Des Moines, Iowa
Duluth, Minn.
Durham, N.C.
El Paso, Texas
Fairbanks, Alaska
Flagstaff, Ariz.
Fargo, N.D.
Fort Myers, Fla.
Fort Smith, Ark.
Fort Wayne, Ind.
Fresno, Calif.
Grand Rapids, Mich.
Green Bay, Wis.
Greensboro, N.C.
Greenville, S.C.
Harrisburg, Pa.
dr Drizzle
TODAY
54/42c
49/39c
60/28pc
83/61f
54/40c
89/70s
51/38c
82/65f
43/29pc
30/13pc
77/58f
81/55s
21/11s
56/37pc
29/6sn
84/68pc
66/54c
50/35c
64/41pc
46/30pc
39/27pc
75/56f
77/59f
65/40r
TUE
WED
h Haze
TUE
50/36c
50/37pc
34/23c
83/59c
52/37c
89/64s
49/33c
82/65s
43/24c
26/16s
64/46r
81/54pc
24/5pc
54/23pc
29/13s
84/67pc
63/46sh
49/28c
66/43s
45/27pc
40/21s
62/46r
74/56t
51/36c
MON
TUE
WED
AQI Good
ORLANDO
A little
rain
67/46
Partly
sunny
83/57
Not as
warm
70/44
A little
rain
55/40
MON
AQI Good
MON
DENVER
DALLAS
Partly
sunny
44/37
Partly
sunny
47/28
Sunny,
chilly
44/30
Partly
sunny
84/65
Partly
sunny
84/65
AQI Good
pc Partly cloudy
A little
rain
70/45
MON
TUE
Cooler
55/43
TUE
WED
Mostly
cloudy
54/44
WED
AQI Good
Hartford, Conn.
Indianapolis
Islip, N.Y.
Jackson, Miss.
Jacksonville, Fla.
Jefferson City, Mo.
Kansas City
Key West, Fla.
Knoxville, Tenn.
Laredo, Texas
Lexington, Ky.
Lincoln, Neb.
Little Rock, Ark.
Long Beach, Calif.
Louisville, Ky.
Lubbock, Texas
Madison, Wis.
Manchester, N.H.
Memphis, Tenn.
Milwaukee
Mobile, Ala.
Modesto, Calif.
Montgomery, Ala.
Myrtle Beach, S.C.
sh Showers
TODAY
67/35r
52/39c
68/43r
83/66pc
84/61f
51/39c
48/29pc
82/73pc
72/59t
91/67s
60/47r
47/29pc
68/55c
69/55r
59/48c
83/46s
39/28pc
65/36r
71/57c
43/34pc
83/64f
65/39pc
84/64f
79/62f
MON
Cooler
48/35
Partly
sunny
48/29
Sunny,
chilly
46/29
TUE
WED
AQI Good
PHOENIX
MON
s Sunny
Warmer
50/29
AQI Good
PHILADELPHIA
Fog
84/66
DETROIT
Mostly
cloudy
52/24
A little
snow
34/25
Partly
sunny
82/63
Partly
sunny
82/59
Mostly
sunny
82/59
AQI Moderate
Shower
52/33
Partly
sunny
46/27
Partly
sunny
52/35
TUE
WED
TUE
WED
Partly
sunny
87/75
Mostly
cloudy
86/74
Showers
around
86/74
AQI Good
SALT LAKE CITY
MON
HONOLULU
MON
TUE
WED
Mostly
cloudy
71/61
Sun,
clouds
71/56
Mostly
sunny
71/56
LAS VEGAS
Fog
87/69
MON
TUE
Partly
sunny
85/64
TUE
WED
Showers
76/54
WED
AQI Moderate
SAN DIEGO
MON
HOUSTON
MON
SAN FRANCISCO
MON
TUE
WED
Partly
sunny
62/47
Mostly
sunny
64/50
A little
rain
66/56
Partly
sunny
72/52
Partly
sunny
72/48
Sunny,
nice
69/50
AQI Good
TUE
WED
A little
rain
68/56
Mostly
sunny
71/54
Mostly
sunny
72/56
TUE
WED
AQI Good
SEATTLE
MON
LOS ANGELES
MON
Partly
sunny
43/31
Mostly
cloudy
47/38
A little
rain
49/40
WASHINGTON
MON
A little
rain
71/47
TUE
Shower
53/45
WED
An A.M.
shower
51/47
AQI Good
AQI Good
AQI Moderate
AQI Moderate
AQI Moderate
TODAY
74/63c
69/58c
68/43r
67/41r
79/57r
62/42pc
61/41pc
46/29pc
82/62c
82/66f
35/16sn
56/36r
64/36r
50/34c
68/41r
78/56f
33/12c
54/25pc
76/49r
50/32r
62/38pc
86/66s
65/42pc
63/37c
Sarasota, Fla.
Savannah, Ga.
Scottsdale, Ariz.
Shreveport, La.
Sioux Falls, S.D.
South Bend, Ind.
Spokane, Wash.
Springfield, Mo.
Springfield, Ill.
St. Louis
St. Petersburg, Fla.
Syracuse, N.Y.
Tallahassee, Fla.
Tampa, Fla.
Toledo, Ohio
Topeka, Kan.
Tucson, Ariz.
Tupelo, Miss.
Tulsa, Okla.
Virginia Beach, Va.
Wichita, Kan.
Wilmington, Del.
Winston-Salem, N.C.
Worcester, Mass.
TODAY
82/66pc
83/60f
80/60pc
84/65pc
36/23c
46/32c
32/15pc
57/42c
50/38c
51/41c
83/67pc
55/31r
85/59f
85/68pc
49/36c
49/30pc
82/58pc
78/63c
60/43pc
77/59r
49/36pc
69/43r
74/55f
63/37r
WORLD CITIES
t Thunderstorms
TUE
52/32pc
48/34c
54/39c
81/60c
87/64s
49/32c
45/26c
82/73s
71/51r
90/64s
54/40c
41/22pc
65/45t
71/53s
54/41c
64/33pc
42/22pc
51/32pc
65/48r
44/26pc
82/64pc
65/42s
83/64pc
78/59c
Nags Head, N.C.
Nashville, Tenn.
Newark, N.J.
New Haven, Conn.
Norfolk, Va.
Oakland, Calif.
Oklahoma City
Omaha, Neb.
Palm Springs, Calif.
Pensacola, Fla.
Pierre, S.D.
Pittsburgh
Portland, Maine
Portland, Ore.
Providence, R.I.
Raleigh, N.C.
Rapid City, S.D.
Reno, Nev.
Richmond, Va.
Rochester, N.Y.
Sacramento, Calif.
San Antonio
San Jose, Calif.
Santa Fe, N.M.
TUE
66/59r
64/47r
54/41c
53/38c
65/54r
63/46s
53/34c
42/23c
83/57pc
82/66s
34/17pc
50/34c
48/31pc
49/38c
54/35pc
65/47r
36/16pc
56/32s
57/43r
45/29pc
63/43s
86/56pc
67/45s
59/35c
TUE
83/65s
85/63pc
80/56pc
78/57c
34/21pc
45/29c
34/23pc
48/36c
51/30c
51/35c
84/68s
45/26pc
85/62pc
85/67s
49/28c
46/26pc
79/55pc
73/51t
53/36c
64/55r
46/31c
55/40c
62/46r
47/33pc
Beijing
Buenos Aires
Cancun, Mexico
Dubai, UAE
Frankfurt
Hong Kong
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
London
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai, India
Paris
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Toronto
Tokyo
TODAY
62/43s
78/60pc
84/70pc
93/76s
47/33pc
77/72c
61/50pc
66/52pc
88/60s
51/41s
80/49pc
56/27r
40/33pc
95/77h
51/30s
76/68t
62/46t
59/48c
86/75c
78/57r
47/32pc
68/56s
TUE
67/35s
74/63c
84/70pc
93/76s
49/40r
79/72c
62/51s
68/54s
89/56s
53/37r
80/48s
42/31pc
42/26c
95/77h
49/37pc
76/67r
59/46t
64/50pc
86/76c
68/59s
45/30pc
68/58pc
NEWS
USA TODAY ❚ MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2017 ❚ 5A
OPINION
TODAY'S DEBATE: ABUSIVE LABOR PRACTICES
Our view: Protect West Coast
port truckers from exploitation
The business of harbor trucking,
where cargo is hauled short distances
from docks to nearby warehouses and
rail depots, is unfamiliar to most Americans.
But a series of investigative reports
by the USA TODAY Network could go a
long way in opening eyes. At the Southern California ports of Los Angeles and
Long Beach, which account for an astounding 37% of container traffic into
the United States, all is not well.
Earlier installments in the series
showed that truck drivers at these
ports are routinely trapped into abusive contracts and lease-to-own agreements. Forced into debt, they are
worked past exhaustion and left with
little or nothing to show for their labor.
They have scant recourse and virtually
no leverage to improve their plight.
Even when drivers win judgments
before state labor agencies, they rarely
collect back wages, according to the latest installment, published last month.
Of $37 million in back wages awarded
by state labor authorities in California
from 2012 to last year, as little as $3 million was actually paid.
To avoid paying these back wages,
the trucking companies employed a variety of schemes that typically involved
shutting down, then reopening under a
different name.
One company, Fargo Trucking, was
ordered to pay drivers a record $8.7 million in back pay but never did. It simply
morphed into a new company called
Express FTC. CEO Philip Ting, meanwhile, has taken to documenting his
jet-setting lifestyle, involving pricey
watches and champagne, on social
media.
Apologists for the trucking companies point to a decline in business as
shippers increasingly favor East Coast
ports, and to a California air pollution
law that mandates cleaner — meaning
newer and more expensive — trucks.
Near the Port of Long Beach. OMAR
ORNELAS, THE DESERT SUN
It’s also the case that some aspects
of the shipping business suffer from the
opposite problem: powerful longshoremen unions that jack up workers’
wages, and consumers’ costs, with
their ability to slow traffic at the docks.
While this could provide some context for the ruthless behavior of trucking companies toward their drivers, it
in no way provides justification.
A couple of useful legislative remedies have been proposed in Congress.
One would end the abusive contractual
practices and put harbor truck drivers
under fair labor laws. A second, involving a lighter touch from Washington,
would end federal pre-emptions that
prevent cities from taking their own actions to protect workers. Some advocates for short-haul truckers say that
making retailers liable for the abuses
would quickly improve the situation.
Laws alone, however, won’t fix this
problem, as some of the trucking companies have shown themselves to be
masters of evasion. To get their attention, consumers and the customers of
these trucking companies need to continue registering their outrage about
these intolerable labor practices. Only
that kind of sustained pressure will get
these companies to clean up their act.
Opposing view: Tools already
exist to deal with bad actors
Tyler Rushforth
It is impossible to overstate the important role that America’s truck drivers play in our economy — doubly so at
our ports where thousands of drivers
work to ensure the smooth flow of
goods into and out of our country.
Many of those drivers are entrepreneurs in an industry providing upward
mobility and a middle-class lifestyle to
millions of hardworking Americans.
The trucking industry is made up of
roughly 525,000 motor carriers, with
some 3.5 million drivers. The vast majority of both follow the many rules in
place to keep the public safe and protect drivers — rules that should be enforced against carriers that flout them.
For example, if drivers and carriers
are found to be operating in excess of
the hours-of-service rules, then they
should be found in violation and be taken out of service by law enforcement as
per current rules, a task that will get
easier this December once truck drivers are required to record their hours
electronically. We at American Trucking Associations not only welcome
such enforcement activities, we enthusiastically support them.
Trucking is a large and diverse industry which, to be sure, has some bad
actors. But the tools to deal with them
already exist, making these proposals
redundant and burdensome, without
addressing the problems they purport
to solve.
Many thousands of drivers make the
choice to be independent contractors,
to try and grasp the American Dream
by starting a company. Some of trucking’s biggest names began as one-truck
operations. However, it is not the right
choice for everyone.
Right now, the trucking industry is
short many thousands of drivers. Competition for good drivers with clean
safety records is fierce. If drivers feel
they are being exploited by a bad actor,
there are thousands of fleets looking to
fill openings.
If Congress wants to address issues
at our ports, it should focus on congestion, efficiency and safety — making it
easier for these drivers to do their jobs
rather than layering further regulations
on the industry.
Tyler Rushforth is executive director
of the American Trucking Associations’
Intermodal Motor Carrier Conference.
STEVE SACK, STAR TRIBUNE, POLITICALCARTOONS.COM
A president is
winning. China’s.
Brian Klaas
BANGKOK – “We’re going to win so
much,” Donald Trump said last year,
“you’re going to be so sick and tired of
winning.” And “you’ll say, ‘Please, Mr.
President, we beg you sir, we don’t want
to win anymore.’ ” He was right. We just
didn’t know that “Mr. President” would
be President Xi Jinping of China.
As Trump makes his diplomatic tour
of Asia, the West faces a simple and unfortunate reality. Four powers in the
world are strong enough to meaningfully shape global affairs: the United
States, the United Kingdom/European
Union, Russia and China.
Europe and Britain are turning inward, battling the self-inflicted wound
of Brexit and trying to minimize the
damage from illiberal populism in Hungary and Poland. America under Trump
has taken a transactional, short-term
view of diplomacy that willfully cedes
U.S. influence and leverage — except on
a narrow band of issues dear to Trump.
These trends mean the West is
smashing its geopolitical might on the
anvil of its own foolishness. The authoritarian regimes in China and Russia are gleefully picking up the pieces.
Here in Bangkok, it’s striking how
everyone I talk to — from generals in
the country’s ruling military junta to
liberal-minded political party leaders
— says the same thing off the record:
China is the new power. Trump’s America is waning. And we can extract what
we need from him using flattery, without giving up anything meaningful.
China moves in
A former Thai foreign minister told
me Trump sees Thailand exclusively
through the lens of helping to pressure
North Korea. So Trump’s message to
the military junta was simple: Help us
isolate North Korea. The problem?
Thailand already was happy to do so.
Even though Thailand’s military regime has recently arrested journalists
and forced an elected head of state into
exile, Trump gave the regime international legitimacy and a full visit to the
White House last month. That is worth
a huge amount to Thailand’s generals.
It was a major bargaining chip. Trump
threw it away in exchange for Thailand
agreeing to buy an infinitesimal
155,000 tons of U.S. coal — 0.02% of
production. Quite the Art of the Deal.
Thailand is drastically ramping up
military purchasing and infrastructure
deals with China. Bangkok is eyeing
more long-term trade engagement with
Beijing, particularly since Trump decided to scrap the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement. In the past,
Bangkok might have worried more that
these moves would alienate Washington. After all, Thailand is America’s oldest ally in the region. But under Trump,
Beijing is accelerating a long-term shift
as it peels Bangkok away from the orbit
of Washington.
Unthinkable ignorance
Thailand is only a mid-level player,
but it’s a microcosm of a broader longterm trend across Southeast Asia. And
with Trump, can we really be surprised? Xi is seasoned, capable, calculating. Trump is inexperienced, incompetent, impulsive. Xi thinks 10 years
into the future; Trump thinks 10 seconds ahead.
This part of the world is being exposed this week to Trump’s unthinkable ignorance of its politics. According
to a Japan Times report on the North
Korea threat, Trump “could not understand why a country of samurai warriors did not shoot down the missiles.”
Aside from being ignorant of Japan’s
overtly pacifist political culture, the
samurai warrior line is cringe-worthy.
Perhaps Trump could also inquire
about geishas using their fans to blow
away the missiles, or whether Prime
Minister Shinzo Abe could find the
right Pokéball to contain Kim Jong Un?
Xi doesn’t make such idiotic comments. And there are clear signs that
Xi, like Thailand’s government, has figured out that China can keep chipping
away at U.S. diplomatic power so long
as he indulges Trump’s ego.
I fear that historians are going to use
this week’s Asia trip to explain how
America lost Asian allies on the geopolitical chess board, and how China
turned them into pawns.
Brian Klaas, a fellow at the London
School of Economics and Political Science, is author of The Despot’s Apprentice: Donald Trump’s Attack on Democracy, coming Nov. 14.
YOUR SAY
Elected officials should follow Flake’s lead Republicans are selling out constituents
LETTERS
LETTERS@USATODAY.COM
Honesty is the most important aspect of an effective government. With
everything that’s happening right now
within the government, everyone in
power should look to the speech of Sen.
Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., to bring morality
back to politics. Everything that’s happening in relation to the Russian allegations make us all wonder if we can truly
trust what the people in charge are saying to us. There will probably never be a
time where politics is grounded on morality, but I do not think that it is too
much to ask to be transparent. Agreeing
with what the officials are saying is not
important; what is important is that we
can trust them. We should be represented with honesty and the ability to know
that our representatives are trustworthy and will do everything in their power
to make this country a better place.
Elected officials need to follow Flake’s
lead, standing up for what is right.
Laura Kralicky
North Kingstown, R.I.
LETTERS
LETTERS@USATODAY.COM
The tax plan my congressman, Rep.
Peter Roskam, R-Ill., sold in his recent
column is a bad deal for the nation and
his constituents. Roskam claims the
plan will help parents save for their kids’
college tuition. He neglects to mention
students will be even more in debt, because they’ll no longer be able to deduct
interest on their loans. Adding to our
national debt will also mean higher taxes for them eventually. Reducing state
and local deductions, along with the
mortgage interest deduction, will hit
Roskam’s district. I feel that I’m being
sold out by a congressman who wants to
carve up the middle class.
Reid McCollum
Hinsdale, Ill.
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6A ❚ MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2017 ❚ USA TODAY
NEWS
USA TODAY ❚ MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2017 ❚ SECTION B
IN MONEY
Why inflation is so misunderstood
Ken Fisher column. 2B
IN TRAVEL
How to snag the best holiday airfare
Sometimes it pays to wait until the last minute. 4B
STATES
Around the nation
GETTY IMAGES
Preschoolers help out with marriage proposal. 6B
Facebook’s lack of diversity
blamed for fake accounts
Social network has major
blind spot, lawmaker says
Jessica Guynn
USA TODAY
SAN FRANCISCO — In a heated moment during last week’s Capitol Hill
hearings, Rep. Terri Sewell questioned
whether the paucity of African Americans in Facebook’s workforce — and
more specifically on the teams of reviewers who vet content and advertising — contributed to the company’s failure to catch Russian operatives using
fake accounts to stoke racial tensions
ahead of last year’s presidential election.
Displayed behind Sewell, a Democrat
from Alabama and a member of the
Congressional Black Caucus, was one of
the Russian-backed ads showing a famous black-and-white photograph of the
Black Panthers from 1968 with the caption: “Never forget that the Black Panthers, group formed to protect black
people from the KKK, was dismantled
by us govt but the KKK exists today.”
The Facebook ad was intended to exploit racial divisions and get AfricanAmerican users to follow a fake Russian
account called Blacktivist. It was shared
on Facebook at least 29,000 times.
“Who are your vetters, and are they a
diverse group of people?” Sewell confronted Facebook’s general counsel Colin Stretch.
“Like every aspect of our workforce,
we are committed to building a workforce that is as diverse as the community we serve,” Stretch replied.
“You’re saying I should trust that
your vetters, who will be vetting this
kind of information, are going to be a diverse workforce?” Sewell asked.
“What you should be confident of is
that we understand the importance of
diversity,” Stretch said.
From Washington to Silicon Valley,
that confidence is sorely lacking. Despite repeated pledges to close the racial
gap in its U.S. workforce, a tiny fraction
— 3% — of Facebook is African-American. In all, Facebook employs 259 black
people, according to the company’s
most recent government filing. That’s
out of 11,241 people.
The Russian infiltration of Facebook
is just the most recent example of how
that lack of diversity creates major blind
spots for the giant social network that’s
staffed mostly by white and Asian men,
says University of Southern California
FRIDAY MARKETS
INDEX
CLOSE
Dow Jones industrials
Dow for the week
Nasdaq composite
S&P 500
T-bond, 30-year yield
T-note, 10-year yield
Gold, oz. Comex
Oil, light sweet crude
Euro (dollars per euro)
Yen per dollar
23,539.19
0.4%
6764.44
2587.84
2.81%
2.33%
$1266.50
$55.64
$1.1608
114.16
CHG
x
x
x
x
y
y
y
x
y
x
22.93
105.00
49.49
7.99
0.02
0.02
11.60
1.10
0.0051
0.16
Rep. Terri Sewell, D-Ala., left, questions Facebook's General Counsel Colin Stretch on the role that the company's lack of
diversity played in the spread of racist messages by fake Russian accounts. MANUEL BALCE CENETA/AP
Facebook employs 259
black people, according to
the company’s most recent
government filing. That’s
out of 11,241 people.
professor Safiya Umoja Noble, author of
the upcoming book Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce
Racism.
The reality: With people screening
content on Facebook spread around the
globe, many of them working as lowly
paid contractors, it’s possible that few, if
any, are African American and therefore
are far less familiar with and invested in
racially coded messages about the Black
Lives Matter movement and civil rights
issues in the U.S., Noble says.
“We have to ask how it is that con-
Stretch told Sewell: "Like every aspect
of our workforce, we are committed to
building a workforce that is as diverse
as the community we serve."
JACQUELYN MARTIN/AP
gressional members have enough
knowledge to recognize the problematic
nature of the kind of hateful and divisive advertising that is allowed to proliferate on these platforms, but that some
of the best engineers in Silicon Valley,
4 states try to halt
$3.9 billion Sinclair
TV mega-merger
and their CEOs, can’t acknowledge the
significance of it,” she said.
Sewell’s face-off with Facebook during Wednesday’s House Intelligence
Committee hearing on Capitol Hill follows weeks of criticism from the Congressional Black Caucus over Facebook’s handling of fake Russian pages
and ads.
The pages and the ads they placed,
rigged to look like the work of American
activists, spread incendiary messages
during and after the presidential campaign. Facebook repeatedly denied the
Russians exploited its platform until
September. Last week, the company admitted that 146 million Americans may
have been reached on Facebook and Instagram.
The black community had raised
suspicions about those posing as activists on Facebook and Twitter.
When the Russian-backed “BlacktiSee DIVERSITY, Page 2B
Alluring Kashmir
Mike Snider
USA TODAY
SOURCES USA TODAY RESEARCH, MARKETWATCH.COM
USA SNAPSHOTS©
55%
of working mothers
come back to the
same or similar jobs
with the same
demands and time
commitments as
before their children
were born.
SOURCE Accenture survey of 2,285 working
mothers
Jae Yang; Alex Gonzalez/USA TODAY
A nearly $4 billion deal to create a nationwide TV
powerhouse is attracting a growing group of critics.
Hunt Valley, Md.-based Sinclair Broadcast Group,
the largest U.S. broadcaster with 191 stations, is seeking regulatory approval for the $3.9 billion acquisition of Tribune Media Co. and its 42 stations.
But state attorneys general in four states — Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts and Rhode Island —
have come out in opposition to the merger, saying
that the bolstered Sinclair, with 230-plus TV stations, would have too much national power and could
stifle points of view in local markets.
They’re also concerned that Sinclair, which some
critics say forced local stations to provide favorable
coverage to Republican candidate Donald Trump’s
campaign at the expense of rival Hillary Clinton, has
too cozy a relationship with the administration.
“The proposed consolidation fails to further the
public interest by allowing for increased consolidation that will decrease consumer choices and voices
in the marketplace,” the state attorneys general wrote
See SINCLAIR, Page 2B
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MONEY
2B ❚ MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2017 ❚ USA TODAY
Yellen & Co. are all wrong about inflation
Lower rates won’t cause
it, more bank lending will
Ken Fisher
Columnist
Special to USA TODAY
Federal Reserve head Janet Yellen
has misplaced inflation. And she just
can’t find it. Oops! Her cabal thinks
yearly Consumer Price Index increases
of 2% are somehow “right.” They can’t
fathom why what they do doesn’t create
“enough” inflation.
Once you understand why this is stupid, you can plan, budget and invest
better.
Inflation isn’t precise. Indexes like
the CPI — a wonky lineup of antiquated
goods and services — are misleading.
Indexes are guesstimates, broad averages. There is no “right” average. Some
prices rise much more, some less and
some fall. Health care and education
costs are rising. Electronics are falling.
Energy costs have fallen fiercely since
2011.
Your experiences vary from others.
Grandma feels health care costs more
than young singles. Renters dread rising
rents. Homeowners don’t. Undergrads
munching McDonald’s fear food costs
less than mothers of three.
Yellen, Powell & Co. misunderstand.
Markets don’t. They value realities, not
arbitrary indexes. Take stocks. They’ve
done super despite inflation indexes being “too low.”
When I was young, the economist
Milton Friedman was in his prime.
Among the 20th century’s great thinkers, Friedman’s fame flowed from showing how money and inflation really
worked. His 1963 opus, “A Monetary
History of the United States” (co-author, Anna Jacobson Schwartz), detailed how changes in money supply affected growth and inflation, for good or
ill. Few now recall his teachings. You
should.
Here they are: Inflation follows from
excess money supply growth. Deflation? From money supply shrinking.
Put another way, inflation is too
much money chasing too few goods and
services. Long term, money supply
growth totals to real economic growth
plus inflation. Contrary to common perception, we just grew the broad quantity
of money, as formally defined, at the
lowest rate of any economic expansion,
ever.
Who grew it at this low rate? Banks
did. Money, what we trade when buying
and selling things, comes from banks. In
Sinclair
Diversity
Continued from Page 1B
Continued from Page 1B
in their letter Thursday to Federal
Communications Commission. That
agency and the Justice Department
are reviewing the merger, which was
announced in May.
The deal would bring together Sinclair’s current roster of 191 stations,
which reaches more than 38% of the
U.S., with Tribune’s portfolio of WGN
and stations in Los Angeles, New York,
Chicago and Philadelphia.
The state AGs’ concerns are echoed
by consumer advocates and some in
the TV industry, as well as a coalition
of 49 Democrats in the U.S. House of
Representatives.
The group sent questions about the
merger to Sinclair CEO Christopher
Ripley last week.
Sinclair’s post-merger reach of 72%
reach of U.S. homes “is well above the
cap that Congress imposed in order to
protect viewpoint diversity and localism,” they wrote. A federal mandate
prohibits the reach of a single local
broadcaster of beyond 39% of U.S. TV
homes.
The company entered the television
business in 1971, when Julian Sinclair
Smith opened its first TV station in
Baltimore. His son David Smith became CEO in 1988 and by 2014, Sinclair
had 109 TV stations.
In January, Ripley became CEO and
Smith is now executive chairman. Another son, Duncan, is vice president
and secretary. With a third son, Robert, who remains a director, the three
brothers own about 21% of the public
company.
The company got some attention in
April for hiring Boris Epshteyn, a special assistant to President Trump, as a
chief political analyst. His “Bottom
Line with Boris” commentary segments appear across Sinclair’s network of stations.
Its stations stretch across the U.S,
from Albany, N.Y., and Gainesville,
Fla., to Seattle and El Paso. The combined broadcast company would have
stations in 39 of the top 50 markets.
Sinclair has said the merger would
allow the new company to better serve
local viewers with expanded local coverage, better facilities and more programming, delivered in part by operational efficiencies, allowing Sinclair to
upgrade the stations’ facilities, expand
the stations’ local coverage (including
local news), offer even greater value to
multi-channel video distributors, and
increase syndicated and original programming offerings.
vist” Facebook page and Twitter account called for a march in Baltimore
after the police custody death of Freddie Gray, Rev. Heber Brown III, pastor
of a Baltimore church, confronted
Blacktivist, asking if those behind the
account organizing the police brutality
march were local. The account responded that it was not based in Baltimore
but was “looking for friendship, because we are fighting for the same reasons.”
Brown retorted that Blacktivist
should “come learn and listen before
you lead.” When he later learned that
the account was fake and based in
Russia, Brown said he was stunned
that he had disrupted a “Russian op.”
Another fake Facebook page operated by the Internet Research Agency
in St. Petersburg, Russia, Black Matters, promoted a protest in New York
City the Saturday after the election
with a Facebook ad. More than 16,700
people signed up to attend on the
event page and 33,000 said they were
interested in the event. Tens of thousands showed up.
That such an extensive covert effort
by an adversarial foreign power mimicked U.S. political discourse and
gained big followings by targeting specific groups of American Facebook users and spreading racially divisive
messages is deeply worrying to Allison
Jones, director of communications of
Code2040, a San Francisco organization that works to increase the diversity of the tech industry’s workforce.
Jones says igniting racial animosity
is a common technique used for centuries to exploit divisions to amass and
maintain power. Now, with the enormous reach and influence of social
media in today’s society, it’s more effective than ever, making it even more
crucial that Facebook and other technology companies employ diverse
workforces, she says.
“These technologies are increasingly the filter through which we interpret
the world around us. There is huge potential for them to increase empathy,
understanding and connectivity, but
there are also great risks that they will
only amplify biases already held,
deepening inequity as well as polarizing people across the country,” Jones
says.
The Congressional Black Caucus is
moving with greater urgency to pressure Silicon Valley to hire more people
of color.
Last month, representatives met
with Facebook’s Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg in Washington,
then with executives in Facebook’s
Menlo Park, Calif., headquarters. They
are speaking up about the lack of diversity at all levels of the company,
from the board of directors to the engineers who build the company’s products. Sandberg has committed to
recruiting an African American to the
all-white board. Even fewer African
Americans — just 1% — hold technical
roles at Facebook.
“Having a diverse workforce in all
aspects of tech companies, especially
as relates to reviewing content and ensuring user safety, is critical to the success of the tech industry,” Rep. G.K.
Sinclair Broadcast headquarters in
Baltimore. EILEEN BLASS/USA TODAY
Friedman’s day, it was cash and bank
accounts, and it was called “M2.” Now
money also includes credit cards, bank
transfers, e-payment systems and some
complex banking instruments. It’s
called “M4.” Most of M4 is actually
loans (like credit cards).
The money supply increases only
when our banking system increases net
outstanding loans. That’s how it works.
More bank lending, more money. It’s
that simple.
In our eight-year-long economic expansion, based on Federal Reserve data,
M4 grew by 2% a year. As did our economy. Hence, low inflation. In prior expansions, M4 always rose at least twice as
fast.
So inflation stayed low, despite gargantuan quantitative easing by the Fed.
As I’ve always said, and Friedman
would know, QE isn’t expansionary or
inflationary, despite common belief.
Why? Because QE decreases bank
lending and hence money supply
growth. Why? Banks pay for short-term
deposits to recycle into longer-term
loans. That’s banking’s core business.
Always was. Banks live off that spread
between short- and long-term interest
rates. When long-term rates rise relative
to short-term ones, banks become more
eager lenders because lending becomes
more profitable. They gain a wider gross
profit margin on future loans. So they
lend more.
With QE, the Fed bought long-term
debt securities. That pushed up their
price, dropping their interest rates. Ms.
Yellen, Powell & Co. stupidly think lower
rates will cause inflation. Wrong. They
never learned their Milton Friedman.
Inflation needs more lending.
And lending decelerated this year,
meaning overall inflation won’t rise
much anytime soon. So don’t invest in
things whose prices depend on big inflation. Skip natural resources, most
commodities, gold and raw land. Home
prices recovered from the housing crash
and probably won’t see big gains from
here. As inflation remains low, don’t envision interest rates returning to yesteryears’ higher levels that so many expect.
Won’t happen!
From here, only a rapid unwinding of
QE would goose inflation. What has
been and will keep working for investors
in this low inflation environment?
Rather obviously, the stock bull market. Enjoy it.
Ken Fisher is the founder and executive chairman of Fisher Investments,
author of 11 books, four of which were
New York Times bestsellers, and is No.
200 on the Forbes 400 list of richest
Americans. Follow him on Twitter
@KennethLFisher
This Facebook post was placed by a Russian group hoping to sow discord after
last year’s election. Tens of thousands showed up for the protest. FACEBOOK
Butterfield, a North Carolina Democrat
and former chairman of the caucus, told
USA TODAY in an email.
Having more black people in the
room is a crucial step but isn’t enough,
says Sara Wachter-Boettcher, author of
Technically Wrong: Sexist Apps, Biased
Algorithms, and Other Threats of Toxic
Tech.
African Americans are far more attuned than white Americans to the ways
racially divisive messages are coded
and communicated, but companies
should not place an unfair burden on
“the most marginalized staff to speak up
and push back against company decisions,” she says.
“This is a topic where actual experts
exist — people with backgrounds in
critical race theory, in history, in cultural
studies,” she says. “Why aren’t policies
and review procedures also informed by
people who’ve studied the way racism
has historically functioned in America,
and how racist groups communicate
and gain power?”
Facebook’s chief executive Mark
Zuckerberg said he plans to double the
number of employees and contractors
who handle safety and security issues
to 20,000 by the end of 2018. He said
Facebook would pour more resources
into engineering efforts and would focus on new artificial intelligence systems to detect what Zuckerberg described as “bad content and bad actors.”
Noble says Facebook is placing too
much faith in yet-to-be-proved artificial
intelligence to monitor content on its
platforms. These technologies are not
yet sophisticated enough to detect the
political and social nuances of the carefully crafted manipulation deployed by
the Russians.
And, too often, she says, they harbor
the biases of the people who build them
and the biases they learn from the Internet.
When artificial intelligence expert
Rob Speer, chief science officer of Luminoso, built a restaurant review algorithm, it rated Mexican dining spots
lower because it learned to associate
“Mexican” with negative words like “illegal.” The reason, he says, is that the
system learned the word “Mexican”
from scouring the Web, where Mexican
is frequently used with the word “illegal,” as in “illegal immigrants.”
A Stanford study found that Internettrained artificial intelligence associated
stereotypically white names with positive words such as love and laughter and
stereotypically black names with negative words such as failure and cancer.
Having too few people of color building and testing new products has created public relations nightmares for Silicon Valley companies.
In 2015, Google apologized for its
photos application mistakenly labeling
photos of black people as “gorillas.” The
Google workforce is 56% white and 2%
black.
In 2016, Google image searches were
criticized for delivering very different
results for “three black teenagers” than
for “three white teenagers,” raising troubling questions about how racial bias in
society and the media is reflected online.
“For some time, we have heard claims
by Silicon Valley executives who are in
denial about the ways their projects impact democracy and vulnerable people
— from racist and sexist trolling to
fraudulent disinformation that poses as
credible evidence we can trust,” Noble
says. “In reality, these companies generate all kinds of ideas and unleash them
on society, and we have to deal with the
repercussions and harm after the fact.”
MONEY
USA TODAY ❚ MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2017 ❚ 3B
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MONEY
4B ❚ MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2017 ❚ USA TODAY
TRAVEL
ASK THE CAPTAIN
Older planes
fun to fly, but
so are new ones
John Cox
Special to USA TODAY
HOLIDAY AIRFARE STRATEGIES:
DOES WAITING
LONGER EVER WORK?
On Travel
Christopher Elliott
USA TODAY
When it comes to planning your holiday travel, sooner is better. Or is it?
For example, if you’re flying home for
Christmas, you’ll need to book tickets
anywhere from 14 to 20 days in advance,
in order to find the lowest airfare, according to advance booking data from
Expedia. On the other hand, if you’re
looking for a low fare for Thanksgiving,
you missed your window — it ended
Sept. 23. Sorry, flights are now up to 15%
more expensive.
This holiday season, timing will be
more important than ever. Wait too long
and you could be stuck with a higher
price. Book too early, and you’ll miss the
best rates.
Take Lori Grube, who started planning her Thanksgiving trip to Hawaii a
year ago. No kidding.
Grube, a law enforcement dispatcher
in Gaines, N.Y., began tracking airfares
and researching alternate airports in order to get the best fare to Honolulu. She
determined that a 21⁄2-hour drive to Toronto could save her a bundle on airfare
and that the best airline would be United. She downloaded the airline’s app
and checked it obsessively.
“The prices fluctuated quite a bit, and
when there was a price I felt was good,
my husband didn’t think it was good
How to call the travel
industry’s bluff during
the holidays
❚ Look for the “secret” cheap days. The
day of Thanksgiving, Christmas and
New Year’s tend to be quieter and
cheaper for airline tickets. A little flexibility can save you a lot of money.
❚ Want a whole week? Try “dead week”
— the first week of the year. It’s typically the quietest week of the year and you
can find great prices on tickets and
accommodations.
❚ Be opportunistic. Many Caribbean
destinations, struggling to recover from
a wave of hurricanes, are expected to
start discounting. Even places that
aren’t affected but are in the same
region might lower prices. And don’t
feel guilty, these economies depend on
tourism.
enough,” she recalls. “So I forged ahead.”
Finally, she booked her tickets nine
months before her vacation. Her price
for two first-class seats to the Aloha
State: $2,258. Not bad.
Here’s why booking early is usually a
sound strategy: Airfares are generally
headed higher, thanks to rising fuel
prices, says Mahmood Khan, who directs Virginia Tech’s hospitality and
tourism management program. “Air
travel will be costlier, and early reservations are needed,” he says.
Hotels will also offer early discounts, but watch out for “gotchas.”
Hotels will offer more pre-payment
options, which means that in exchange for a modest discount, your
room is totally nonrefundable.
But zigging when everyone else
zags can sometimes also pay. An airfare analysis by Yapta.com for USA
TODAY found that, on average, air
ticket prices sometimes drop closer to
the departure date. Its data show that
29% of airlines’ price drops occur 21
days or more in advance, dropping to
16% in the 15- to 21-day advance purchase time frame, followed by an increase to 27% eight to 14 days prior to
departure. Then prices drop again
within one week of departure, as 29%
of airline price decreases happen
within this window.
“Most price drops occur between
seven days prior to arrival and checkin,” says Yapta spokesman Jeff Pecor.
If you’re reading this story now,
you’ve probably missed all the good
deals for Thanksgiving, and maybe
the rest of the year. Maybe it’s time to
call the travel industry’s bluff: Stay
flexible and wait until almost the last
minute. What have you got to lose?
Christopher Elliott is a consumer
advocate and editor at large for National Geographic Traveler. Contact
him at chris@elliott.org.
Question: I have heard several airline pilots say that they preferred the
feel of flying older analog-gauged
equipment to newer “glass cockpit”
aircraft. Did you have a preference
during your airline career?
— submitted by reader Shawn,
Phoenix
Answer: I certainly understand the
comment about preferring the feel of
older airplanes. They were very enjoyable to fly. The newer fly-by-wire airplanes are different in how they feel,
but I enjoyed them too. The best answer I can provide you is an analogy. I
have a restored early-1960s British
sports car that is a lot of fun to drive.
However, my day-to-day transportation is a 2017 Acura. I like the additional safety features, reliability and automation for everyday use. My preference in airplanes is similar.
Q: I work for UPS and have noticed
when I am giving the flight plan to
the captain the vast differences between our older A300 cockpit and
our newer 767 cockpit. Do the newer
electronic gauges make it easier to
fly, and which do you prefer to fly?
— Kasey, Louisville
A: I enjoyed my transition from the
older flight deck to the modern “glass”
flight decks. The benefit of better situational awareness and ease of understanding was a safety benefit.
If you have a chance to see the flight
deck of an A350 or Boeing 787, you will
see even more modern design. They
are beautiful and very functional.
Q: What is your favorite airplane
to fly and why? Do you favor Boeing
traditional yoke and wheel or Airbus
side-stick configuration?
— Andrew Levenson
A: I have several favorites, due to
the vast differences in types of airplanes. The Grumman Gulfstream I
was my favorite propeller airplane.
Of the jets I flew it would be hard to
pick one, so call it a tie between the
B737 and the A320. For corporate jets,
the newer Gulfstreams. My favorites
all are extremely well designed, enjoyable to fly, very capable and comfortable.
The side stick was very easy to adjust to and intuitive. I have much more
experience flying airplanes with conventional yokes, but I don’t really favor
one over the other.
John Cox is a retired airline captain
with US Airways and runs his own aviation safety consulting company.
Have a question about flying? Send
it to travel@usatoday.com.
Airport shoeshine stands are still on their feet
Harriet Baskas
Special to USA TODAY
In the days when people dressed up
to fly, shoeshine stands were an airport
staple.
“People used to spend time getting
ready to travel,” said Hector Diaz, who
has managed the five locations of the
Shoe Hospital at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport for 10 years. “Now
they just get up and put on gym shoes,
sandals or whatever. Some mornings
customers are still wearing pajama bottoms when they come in to have their
shoes shined.”
With travel attire so informal, shoeshine services at airports may seem, like
payphones, to be on the way out. But in
the most recent passenger amenities
survey conducted by Airports Council
International-North America, the number of airports with shoeshine stands
(about 50) exceeds those with business
centers and TSA PreCheck enrollment
stations.
Time-crunched business travelers
are helping to keep most airport shoeshine stands in business, but in many
airports it’s a long-held tradition of fast,
friendly, inexpensive and, in some
cases, complimentary services, that
keeps customers coming back.
At Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport, the two Like New
Shoe Shine stands have been run by
Wayne Kendrick’s family for about 40
years. Kendrick, who began helping his
At Chicago O’Hare, the Shoe Hospital
not only shines shoes ($6) and boots
($8), it also offers repair services for
shoes, luggage, purses, bags and other
items. CHICAGO DEPARTMENT OF AVIATION
dad at the airport 33 years ago, now operates the stands at Louis Aarmstrong
with his brother. He charges $7 for a
shine, up just $2 from the $5 his dad
charged years ago.
“He’s been called ‘the mayor of the
airport’ on more than one occasion,”
said airport spokeswoman Michelle
Wilcut. “Some people drop off their
shoes before traveling and pick them up
on their return. Wayne has also been
known to walk out to the curb to pick up
a bag of shoes from customers that are
not traveling but need a shine.”
Javier Anchondo has been operating
the Los Amigos Shoe Shine at El Paso
International Airport for a dozen years
and has been charging $4 for a full shine
for shoes or boots since 2005.
At Chicago O’Hare International Airport, the Shoe Hospital not only shines
shoes ($6) and boots ($8), it also offers
repair services for shoes, luggage,
purses, bags, jackets and other leather
items and sells accessories such as shoe
laces, arch supports and shoe cushions,
often to pilots and flight attendants.
Passengers can drop off items in need of
repair and pick up them up on their return trip or have repaired items mailed
home.
“Shining shoes is a dying art,” says
Denise Pullen, owner of the Classic
Shine Company. “But I’m trying to keep
that art in the forefront and bring it to
venues — like airports — where it’s a
convenience.”
Classic Shine operates at five airports, including Dallas/Fort Worth International, Kentucky’s Louisville International; McGhee Tyson, near Knoxville, Tenn.; Northwest Arkansas Region Airport; Greenville-Spartanburg
International Airport in South Carolina;
and, soon, San Diego International Airport.
The company charges $8 across the
board for its service.
“We perform the same steps whether
we do shoes or boots, so we’re not going
to charge more for one,” said Pullen.
“Plus, boot customers are some of our
best customers — and our best tippers.”
In keeping with the “Keep Austin
Weird” mantra, passengers at Austin
Bergstrom International Airport have
asked the staff at the Love Shines stand
to shine everything from fancy boots to
casual Keens.
“I’ve heard a band give them a shoutout from the airport music stage,” said
AUS airport spokesman Jim Halbrook.
“The singer had gotten his shoes shined
there and was very happy with the quality.”
Another singer happy with the way
his shoes and boots look after visiting
an airport shoeshine stand is Lyle Lovett, who penned an essay for the Houston Chronicle about his deep appreciation for the shoeshine stand in Terminal
C at Houston’s George Bush Intercontinental Airport.
Although he says he’s capable of caring for his own footwear, “even on days I
wish I didn’t have to fly, I look forward to
getting to the airport early enough to get
a shine. There’s just something extragood about a professional shine, something important,” Lovett writes.
And it’s not just the excellent shoeshine that Lovett likes. As the shine men
and women are improving his boots, Lovett says he enjoys their stories and always benefits “from the pride they take
in their work.”
Harriet Baskas is a Seattle-based airports and aviation writer.
MONEY
USA TODAY ❚ MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2017 ❚ 5B
Why your brain can’t resist
a celebrity endorsement
Jeff Stibel
Columnist
Special to USA TODAY
I have a problem. Every time
I see a celebrity, my first
thought is that I know them
personally. I have notoriously
embarrassed friends, colleagues and family by walking
up, talking up and even hugging Tom Brady, Denise Richards, Gary Busey, Matthew
McConaughey (I call him Matt)
and many others as they awkwardly try to run from me.
Just last week I saw my
“good friend” Cuba Gooding Jr.
at a restaurant, as he graciously
played along and almost stole a
slice of my pizza.
It turns out that I am not
alone. Our brains were not built
for the new-age notion of celebrity. We evolved without TV,
movies, gossip magazines and
other mental junk food. Our
brains are highly tuned to recognize people, mainly because
it was once a life-or-death decision to determine friend from
foe.
When we met in the wild, it
was critical to remember
friendly faces and deadly to
forget our enemies. But that
same mechanism for remembering faces is ill-equipped to
distinguish between our makebelieve friends on TV and our
real ones. So it’s not uncommon to think of celebrities as
part of the family.
Advertisers have been exploiting our celebrity neurons
for years. The concept of using
celebrity endorsements to
market products is almost as
old as marketing itself. In the
1930s, baseball legend Babe
Ruth was one of the first people
paid to endorse a brand, Red
Rock Cola. The trend has been
going strong ever since, with
athletes, musicians and actors
raking in millions to promote
consumer goods. It’s big business: LeBron James has a lifetime Nike contract worth an estimated $500 million; Kevin
Durant signed a 10-year, $300
million Nike contract. 50 Cent
endorsed Vitamin Water for a
share of the company, earning
$100 million when it sold;
Beyoncé signed a $50 million
contract with Pepsi.
A celebrity endorsement increases a company’s sales an
average of 4% relative to its
competition, and also in-
I almost shared a pizza with
Cuba Gooding Jr. WIREIMAGE
Gwen Stefani owns L.A.M.B.
KEVIN MAZUR VIA GETTY IMAGES
creases a company’s stock value by 0.25%, according to research by Harvard Business
School professor Anita Elberse
and Barclays Capital analyst
Jeroen Verleun. For large companies — which are more likely
to use celebrity endorsements
— 4% can be billions, justifying
the exorbitant costs.
Why do celebrity endorsements work? The answer lies in
the brain. First, our minds do
not do a good job of differentiating between real and makebelieve, so celebrities become
familiar to us. When a familiar
face promotes a product, it
makes it seem as if the product
itself is familiar, which makes
people more likely to buy it.
Even though we’ve never met
them, the brain regards familiar celebrities the same way it
does people who are actually
familiar and trustworthy to us
in real life. And the brain loves
familiar faces and lights up
when we see one. The more familiar, such as your mom, the
more the brain becomes active.
Similarly, through simple
transitive properties, an endorsement by a high-quality
person makes the product ap-
pear high quality. Endorsements give a product some credentials. We assume a beautiful celebrity knows more about
beauty products than we do, an
athlete knows more about
thirst-quenching
beverages,
and we may even assume that
an actor who plays a doctor on
TV is knowledgeable about
drugs. I’m willing to bet that
more people would line up to
buy a prescription drug from
George Clooney than from the
surgeon general because the
brain has associated Clooney
with medical knowledge after
seeing him as a doctor on the
television series ER for more
than a decade.
But there are important caveats and limits. Advertising
campaigns must be developed
skillfully, or there’s a risk that
the viewer remembers the celebrity, not the product. Worse
still, there’s a risk of a celebrity’s negative attributes or misalignment tearing down the
brand. An inauthentic endorsement is worse than no endorsement at all. Samsung
spokespersons Manny Pacquaio and David Beckham have
been caught using other brands
of phones.
Companies have evolved as
a result to engaging celebrities
as founders, owners and shareholders. In doing so, they better
align their brand to the individuals promoting them and allow
for
greater
authenticity.
Whether Jessica Alba’s The
Honest Company, or Gwyneth
Paltrow’s GOOP or Gwen Stefani’s L.A.M.B., the message and
the messenger are one.
As a consumer, understanding how celebrity influences
the brain is a powerful anecdote to their overall impact on
your decisions. Ask yourself if
you would drink that tequila if
Clooney wasn’t the owner or if
you would buy that necklace if
Angelina Jolie wasn’t wearing
it. Ask yourself if you would
wear that lipstick if Kylie Jenner’s name wasn’t on it, or if
you would take that advice if it
wasn’t coming from Oprah.
And for goodness sake, they
are people, too — go hug a celebrity.
Jeff Stibel is vice chairman
of Dun & Bradstreet and an entrepreneur who also happens to
be a brain scientist. He is the
USA TODAY bestselling author
of “Breakpoint” and “Wired for
Thought.” Follow him on Twitter at @stibel.
Saudi prince’s U.S. holdings
in question after his arrest
Billionaire, 62,
called the ‘Arabian
Warren Buffett’
Adam Shell
USA TODAY
The arrest of one of the
world’s wealthiest men, Saudi
Arabia’s Prince Alwaleed bin
Talal — dubbed the “Arabian
Warren Buffett” by Time magazine — has cast a spotlight on
his vast investment holdings,
which include American companies Citigroup, Apple, Twitter and ride-hailing service
Lyft.
His arrest in Saudi Arabia on
Saturday night was part of a
sweeping
anti-corruption
crackdown that included detaining 10 other Saudi princes,
four country ministers and
dozens of other ministers, seen
as a move by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman to tighten
his grip on power.
Prince Mohammed, 32, a
son of King Salman, was
named next in line for the
throne in June.
Prince Alwaleed, 62, ranked
45th in Forbes magazine’s 2017
list of the world’s richest billionaires and has a current esti-
Prince Alwaleed’s investments
include Apple, Twitter, Lyft,
the Plaza Hotel and more.
mated net worth of $17.2 billion.
His global holdings include
stakes in companies stretching
from the Middle East to Europe
to the U.S. through his investment firm Kingdom Holding
Co. His investments also include the Plaza Hotel, a New
York landmark, as well as a sizable stake in the Four Seasons
hotel chain.
The
high-profile
arrest
raised concerns about the future of his business empire, as
well as the political stability of
Saudi Arabia, a key player in
the world’s energy markets. It
also sparked speculation on the
future of the wealthy prince’s
investment holdings. Shares of
Kingdom Holding fell nearly
8% Sunday in Saudi Arabia.
Wall Street analysts, however, downplayed a major negative impact when stock trading
resumes Monday. The U.S.
market, they argue, has survived more severe shocks than
this since the bull run in stocks
began in early 2009.
“I don’t see why this should
be any different,” said Brad McMillan, chief investment officer
at Commonwealth Financial
Network.
Prince Alwaleed, one of the
most well-known members of
the Saudi royal family, is probably best known to Americans
for his appearances on cable
business news channels like
CNBC, where he often weighs
in on financial matters and is
viewed as the “face” of Saudi
Arabia’s investment community.
In late October, he told CNBC
that the cryptocurrency bitcoin
would “implode” one day and
weighed in on the future of
electric cars. The prince, who
bought a yacht from President
Trump back in 1991, also said in
a tweet during the presidential
election that Trump should
drop out of the race, saying,
“You will never win.” The prince
later congratulated Trump on
his surprise win.
Patriots QB Tom Brady and I once shared an awkward hug. AP
LEGAL NOTICE
IF YOU OWN CERTAIN
INSINKERATOR BRAND F-201
INSTANT HOT WATER FILTERS,
You Could Claim Benefits from
a Class Action Settlement.
A federal court authorized this notice in a case
called Desio v. Emerson Electric Co., No. 2:15-cv346 (E.D. Wash.).
What’s This All About?
There is a proposed settlement regarding certain
InSinkErator F-201 filters used in water filtration
systems, which were designed to be used in
instant hot water dispenser systems. The lawsuit
alleges that the filters can crack and cause water
damage. InSinkErator denies it did anything
wrong.
Are You Affected?
Your rights are affected if you own or lease a
residence or other structure in the United States
containing (1) an installed InSinkErator F-201
Instant Hot Water Dispenser Filtration System
(“F-201 System”) and (2) an F-201R filter cartridge
manufactured from 2001 through January 31,
2011 (“Old Filter”). InSinkErator no longer sells
Old Filters. You can see pictures of an Old Filter at
www.F201WaterFilterSettlement.com.
What Can You Get?
The proposed settlement would allow affected
people and businesses to ask for (1) a free new
filter to replace the Old Filter (up to three per
person), (2) a cash award of $15 per Old Filter (up
to three per person), or (3) a cash award to pay
for up to 40% of any property damage expenses
paid out-of-pocket related to Old Filter failures
occuring after January 22, 2018. The settlement
agreement calls for the payment of $3.8
million into a settlement fund to provide these
settlement benefits and to pay attorneys’ fees,
cover costs and expenses of providing notice and
administering the settlement, and pay a service
award to the two Representative Plaintiffs who
filed the lawsuit.
How Do You Get Your Settlement Benefits?
You have to file a claim by December 31, 2020
to receive settlement benefits. Go to
www.F201WaterFilterSettlement.com to file a
claim online now. The website also provides
instructions for how to file a claim in hard copy
through the mail.
What Are Your Other Options?
1. Do Nothing – You will remain in the settlement
but you will not receive settlement benefits and
you give up your rights to sue InSinkErator for the
legal claims in this case.
2. Exclude Yourself – If you do not want to be
included in the settlement, you must exclude
yourself by January 22, 2018. If you exclude
yourself, you will not get settlement benefits from
the Settlement, but you will keep your right to sue
InSinkErator. The website explains how to exclude
yourself.
3. Object – If you remain in the settlement but
don’t like it, you can object to it by January 22,
2018. The website explains how to object. The
Court will hold a hearing on February 6, 2018 to
consider objections. If you object, you can appear
at the hearing on your own behalf or through an
attorney, but you don’t have to.
This is only a summary. For detailed information,
visit the website or call the number below.
Para una notificación en Español, vistar
www.F201WaterFilterSettlement.com
www.F201WaterFilterSettlement.com
1-833-FILTER5
(1-833-345-8375)
MONEY
6B ❚ MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2017 ❚ USA TODAY
STATE-BY-STATE
ALABAMA Athens: Authorities say
News from across the USA
HIGHLIGHT: NEVADA
NORTH CAROLINA Winston-Salem:
two juveniles are charged with phoning in a bogus terrorist threat that
caused Johnson Elementary School
to be evacuated, Al.com reports.
Employees at the Omega House Family Restaurant are responding to NFL
players who kneel during the national
anthem. The workers wear T-shirts
that read “I Proudly Stand For The
Flag – And Kneel for the Cross.”
ALASKA Juneau: Officials recom-
mend raising the quota for wolf hunting and trapping on Prince of Wales
Island’s federal lands, KTOO-FM
reports.
NORTH DAKOTA Mandan: Students
at Mandan High School raised $1,400
in a bake sale to help people affected
by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico,
The Bismarck Tribune reports.
ARIZONA Phoenix: Gov. Doug Ducey
wants the federal government to let
Arizona partner with private businesses to build new facilities at highway rest areas.
ARKANSAS Little Rock: Utility officials say winter rates are rising because of higher costs to acquire natural gas, The Arkansas DemocratGazette reports. Customers will see
hikes from almost 2% to nearly 9%.
CALIFORNIA San Francisco: Pacific
Gas & Electric expects costs up to
$200 million to restore power after
last month’s devastating wildfires,
The San Francisco Chronicle reports.
Sara Trigero’s preschoolers and co-workers help her boyfriend Dallin
Knecht make his suprise marriage proposal on the University of
Nevada-Reno campus Friday. PHOTOS BY JASON BEAN/RENO GAZETTE-JOURNAL
Preschoolers help man
make surprise proposal
Siobhan McAndrew
COLORADO Denver: A suspect in a
1978 killing is being sought after he
was released because prosecutors
missed a deadline to file charges.
CONNECTICUT Waterbury: The former office manager at a Connecticut
law firm is charged with embezzling
more than $125,000, The RepublicanAmerican reports.
DELAWARE Dover: The former chief
of security at a state prison where
inmates staged a deadly riot and
hostage-taking is no longer with the
Department of Correction.
Reno Gazette-Journal
It’s hard to say no to a bunch of
adorable preschoolers.
Being in love and on one knee
with a diamond doesn’t hurt either.
That was exactly what University of Nevada-Reno (UNR) student Dallin Knecht was betting on
when he proposed to his girlfriend
Sara Trigero on Friday.
Trigero, a teacher at the Child
and Family Research Center at
UNR, was surprised when her class
of 2- and 3-year-olds were in on the
proposal.
Trigero walked out of a meeting
to her class and co-workers standing on the Quad at UNR holding a
sign that read, “Sara, say yes.”
“She loves the kids so much that
any other way I thought to propose
didn’t seem like enough,” Knecht
said. “This seemed original.”
Trigero said yes. The couple met
working at Brew Brothers, a restaurant at the Eldorado Hotel Casino in Reno and have been dating
for two years.
Sara
Trigero
shows the
engagement ring
given her
by Dallin
Knecht,
right.
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: A ground-
breaking ceremony last week marked
the start of work on a memorial to
President Dwight Eisenhower. Organizers hope to have the memorial
ready by June 2019.
FLORIDA Lakeland: A woman riding
a horse down a busy Florida highway
was arrested and charged with DUI.
Authorities say Donna Byrne registered blood alcohol level of .161.
OREGON Seaside: A cougar sighting
prompted Seaside Heights Elementary officials to move student activity
inside, The Daily Astorian reports.
PENNSYLVANIA Harrisburg: Health
officials say more than 1,000 people
signed up for the new medical marijuana program on its first day, the
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review reports.
RHODE ISLAND Providence: The
state Division of Motor Vehicles
wants to levy a $250 late fee to restore vehicle registrations if their
safety inspection has lapsed.
SOUTH DAKOTA Pine Ridge: The
ally don’t feel safe on campus.
who voluntarily seek treatment,
Minnesota Public Radio reports.
KENTUCKY Louisville: The Ken-
tucky Farm Bureau opened enrollment for 2018 Roadside Farm Market sellers.
IDAHO Weiser: Chris and Sharolyn
Schofield have carved a unique niche
in art — making colossal sculptures
of Idaho Russet Burbank potatoes,
the Capital Press reports. Thousands
of onlookers watch the dropping of
their giant, glowing potato in downtown Boise each New Year’s Eve.
Treasurer Ken Miller says revenue
collections went up 10.6% in October
compared to a year ago.
Some 90 560th REDHORSE engineer
reservists are home after a six-month
deployment to southwest Asia.
international conservation group has
recognized Georgia’s barrier islands
as important habitat for shorebirds.
spray painting the Prince Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole statue in the Waikiki neighborhood pleaded no contest
and was sentenced to two days in jail.
OKLAHOMA Oklahoma City: State
SOUTH CAROLINA North Charleston:
GEORGIA St. Simons Island: An
HAWAII Honolulu: A man accused of
OHIO Columbus: State lawmakers
are considering a plan to require photos on food stamp cards to combat
selling them for cash.
LOUISIANA Rayville: Authorities
say 10 cows died when an
18-wheeler carrying them overturned on Interstate 20, The NewsStar of Monroe reports.
MAINE Augusta: State officials say
food stamp recipients are eligible to
get replacements for losses resulting from last week’s power outages,
WCSH-TV reports.
MARYLAND Baltimore: Mayor
Catherine Pugh has launched a
program to eliminate rats from public housing, The Baltimore Sun reports. The city’s 16 public housing
developments will get quarterly
rodent and cockroach treatments.
MISSISSIPPI Tupelo: This Mississip-
pi city has dedicated a small-scale
replica of the Vietnam Veterans
Memorial, The Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal reports.
MISSOURI Jefferson City: The Mis-
souri Department of Public Safety is
investigating the St. Louis Veterans
Home amid allegations of poor care,
The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports.
MONTANA Billings: A Canadian
mining company raised $2.5 million
to help fund a gold mine north of
Yellowstone National Park, the
Bozeman Daily Chronicle reports.
Indian Health Service says the Pine
Ridge reservation hospital faces new
federal sanctions after it previously
was found in violation of quality-ofcare standards.
TENNESSEE Charleston: Wacker
Chemical will keep its staff of almost
700 workers even though a September explosion will likely keep the
plant idle until next year, The Chattanooga Times Free-Press reports.
TEXAS San Antonio: An Army ser-
geant and military recruiter was sentenced to nearly 17 years in prison in
a scheme to funnel dozens of assault
weapons to a Mexican drug cartel.
UTAH Salt Lake City: Hundreds of
LGBTQ students will hold a summit
Dec. 2 at Utah Valley University.
NEBRASKA Omaha: A judge dis-
missed a theft case against a former
Winnebago Tribal Council member,
The Sioux City Journal reports.
VERMONT Brattleboro: Local stu-
dents who do good work have a new
incentive: cards for free cheeseburgers, the Brattleboro Reformer reports.
NEVADA Ely: Official say a fight at
Nevada’s maximum-security prison
in Ely left four inmates injured.
About 40 inmates were involved.
VIRGINIA Richmond: Liquor sales in
Virginia set a new record for the last
fiscal year — $940 million. The top
seller was Hennessy cognac.
NEW HAMPSHIRE Salem: Police are
ILLINOIS Brookfield: A giraffe that
officials of Brookfield Zoo describe as
the matriarch of the herd was euthanized when her health declined.
INDIANA Flora: A fundraising group
is selling cookbooks to raise the reward money in the fire deaths of four
young sisters a year ago. Authorities
blame arson for the blaze.
IOWA Davenport: Compassion
Church has agreed to accept $15,000
to settle a lawsuit against the city and
three officials accused of using zoning regulations against its program
feeding the homeless.
MASSACHUSETTS Boston: Boston
College is planning a $150 million
science center to enroll new engineering and science majors. Construction on the center begins in
2019.
MICHIGAN Portage: A shipping port
along Lake Michigan has landed a
nearly $10 million federal grant for
an expansion project, The (Northwest Indiana) Times reports.
KANSAS Wichita: Kansas State Uni-
versity is stepping up police patrols
following a spate of racial incidents.
The president of the Black Student
Union says minority students gener-
MINNESOTA Brainerd: St. Joseph’s
Medical Center says it will no longer
take patients committed for psychiatric illness but still accepts those
warning of a particularly deadly
batch of heroin/fentanyl after responding to three overdoses in 24
hours, one of them fatal.
WASHINGTON Olympia: The state’s
NEW JERSEY Newark: Mayor Ras
Baraka is accused of violating campaign finance rules in the closely
contested 2014 race.
WEST VIRGINIA Charleston: State
prepaid college tuition plan has reopened to investors after being frozen
for more than two years.
corrections officials suspended five
guards without pay following an Oct.
25 escape that wasn’t noticed for
about 36 hours.
NEW MEXICO Santa Fe: State offi-
cials credit reliance on paper ballots, in part, for making New Mexico
less vulnerable to hackers, The Santa Fe New Mexican reports.
WISCONSIN Madison: A nonprofit
that supports the dairy industry objects to replacing the “America’s
Dairyland” slogan on state license
plates, as a state lawmaker proposes.
NEW YORK Albany: The cemetery
where human rights pioneers Frederick Douglass and Susan B. Anthony are buried is among 21 state
properties recommended for the
State and National Registers of Historic Places.
WYOMING Cheyenne: Police and
animal control officers tranquilized
and captured a mountain lion roaming the city, The Wyoming Tribune
Eagle reports.
Compiled from staff, wire reports.
E6
USA TODAY ❚ MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2017 ❚ SECTION C
IN SPORTS
It’s up to Oklahoma’s defense
Sooners’ elite offense can’t do it all 2C
Irish crack Amway Top 5
Notre Dame jumps three spots in rankings 2C
Paul eager to start playing again
TONY JONES JR. BY MATT
Rockets guard may be a week or two away 2C
CASHORE/USA TODAY SPORTS
Harvick, Truex clinch spots in final four
Keselowski sits comfortably in 4th in NASCAR transfer slot
A.J. Perez
USA TODAY
FORT WORTH – Brad Keselowski exited Sunday’s AAA Texas 500 with a decent grasp on the fourth and final playoff spot ahead of the final race before the
championship field is set.
Given what occurred on the first lap,
the Team Penske driver hardly lamented his fifth-place finish.
“We’ll take it,” Keselowski said. “I still
want more. I hate to give up those stage
points. Nineteen points isn’t terrible for
a cushion. We’ll need to go and have a
solid race at Phoenix next week and
hope none of the other guys win.”
Two more title-eligible slots in the
Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series
playoffs were taken at Texas Motor
Speedway on Sunday. Kevin Harvick’s
victory, his first in Texas, locked him in,
and Martin Truex Jr.’s runner-up finish
gave him enough points to secure a spot.
With last week’s win, Kyle Busch became the first driver to attain a slot in
the season finale at Homestead-Miami
Speedway in two weeks.
“I’m happy to get to victory lane here.
It’s been a long time coming,” Harvick
said. “I knew I had a really good car. ... I
waited until the end and was able to get
on the outside of Martin. I’m real proud
of everyone at Stewart-Haas Racing.”
Keselowski had to pit on the first lap
of the 500-mile race after Busch drifted
up the track and made contact. That put
him a lap down in 39th place.
“Something happened on lap one,
and basically we started the race last
and a lap-and-a-half down,” Keselowski
said. “That cost us a bunch of stage
points, but we rallied with a solid effort
See NASCAR, Page 6C
Kevin Harvick celebrates after his AAA
Texas 500 win made him title eligible.
JEROME MIRON/USA TODAY SPORTS
Martin Rogers
Columnist
USA TODAY
New York
Marathon
inspires show
of defiance
ers in his midst. He went into full puntreturn mode, darting and dashing to a
stunning, 56-yard touchdown.
Crawford’s next thought: “Are you
kidding me?”
It was that kind of day at JerryWorld. Strange things happened.
The much-maligned Dallas defense
essentially kept one of the NFL’s highest-scoring offenses in check, regaining its groove after the midgame lapse
— Dallas gave up a 62-yard TD drive to
NEW YORK – A light and persistent
drizzle dampened most of the New
York Marathon course on Sunday
morning, but there was something else
in the air, too. It was something magical and meaningful, and it was felt
with the enduring tread of each runner, each cheer from the thronged
masses in all five boroughs.
It was hope and optimism and defiance, a three-tiered shield to soothe
this city, as New York put a troubled
week behind it and put its best foot (or
feet) forward, time and time again.
It was the kind of thing that can’t
help but lift you, a tonic created from
nothing more than human energy and
feeling, and it inspired Shalane Flanagan, so much so that the Portlandbased veteran became the first American women’s winner of the race since
1977.
“This last week has been really hard
as a nation and in New York,” said
Flanagan, who was close enough to the
Boston bombing in 2013 that she heard
the blast. “It hits home with me significantly. We always need a reason to
smile in tough times, and hopefully
(this) can bring a few smiles to people’s faces.”
Marathons are always more about
the struggle of the human spirit than a
simple race, and this year’s event had
its own character. The terrorist attack
allegedly perpetrated by ISIS sympathizer Sayfullo Saipov on Tuesday was
met with a resolute response here and
an unmissable message that terrorism’s kryptonite is perseverance.
It inspired Koen Naert, 28, from Bel-
See COWBOYS, Page 4C
See MARATHON, Page 6C
David Irving (95) tackles Kareem Hunt as the Cowboys held the NFL rushing leader to 37 yards. TIM HEITMAN/USA TODAY SPORTS
‘D’ stars in Dallas
Cowboys surprise Chiefs with all-around effort
Jarrett Bell
Columnist
USA TODAY
ARLINGTON, Texas – Just two seconds were on the clock before halftime
when the Kansas City Chiefs dialed up
the perfect play to foil Rod Marinelli’s
prevent defense.
With eight Dallas Cowboys defenders stationed inside their own 10-yard
line — looking for a Hail Mary — Alex
USA SNAPSHOTS©
Smith took the snap from Kansas City’s
44-yard line and flipped a pass over the
middle for Tyreek Hill.
Tyrone Crawford, the Dallas defensive end, was assured as he turned back
to watch the play develop.
“Oh, man, we’ve got this,” Crawford
remembered thinking, flashing back in
the boisterous locker room after the 2817 win. “All those guys are down there.”
No matter.
Hill, the lightning-fast receiver who
doubles as one of the NFL’s most dangerous returners, had a convoy of block-
SPORTSLINE
FIRST WORD
I’m going to swing big and play my game,
like I always do. Just enjoy the moment.”
Men:
Women:
3.41 3.48
American tennis player Jack Sock, after winning the
Paris Masters final 5-7, 6-4, 6-1 against Filip Krajinovic and qualifying for the season-ending ATP
Finals in London.
Cumulative GPAs for Division I
skiers, best for both men and
women among all NCAA Div. 1
sports in 2015-16
NOTABLE NUMBERS
LAST WORD
311, 4
I can’t imagine a
better ending to
this season, two titles
in two weeks and this
is the biggest one.”
Yards and touchdown passes by
Jared Goff, both game career highs
for the second-year quarterback, as
the Rams trounced the Giants 51-17.
50
SOURCE NCAA Research
Ellen J. Horrow; Janet Loehrke/USA TODAY
Jack Sock reacts after his win. MICHEL EULER/AP
Bowl-eligible teams for the 78 slots
available after Florida Atlantic, Florida International and Virginia were
among several teams that notched
their sixth victory this week.
German tennis player
Julia Goerges, who
defeated American
CoCo Vandeweghe 7-5,
6-1 in the WTA Elite
Trophy final Sunday.
Compiled by USA
TODAY Staff
2C ❚ MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2017 ❚ USA TODAY
SPORTS
E6
Sooners will go as far as defense allows
Stoops: Big 12 teams
not easy to contain
George Schroeder
Columnist
USA TODAY
STILLWATER, Okla. – The quarterback was sitting on the floor in a narrow
corridor, eating a plate of postgame barbecue, when the defensive coordinator
happened by. Mike Stoops stopped and
fist-bumped Baker Mayfield.
“I told you,” he said, “we’d get a couple of stops.”
But only a couple.
In a 62-52 victory over rival Oklahoma State that lived up to its Bedlam
nickname, Mayfield and Oklahoma’s offense was very near unstoppable and
looked every bit like a unit capable of
putting up points — a whole lot of points
— on anyone. But they had to be, because Oklahoma’s defense played every
bit like a unit capable of giving up points
— a whole lot of points — to anyone.
The Sooners will remain no worse
than No. 5 in this week’s updated College Football Playoff Top 25, and they
might well move into the top four. But
the offensive-defensive dichotomy
poses a bit of a dilemma for the selection committee.
The Sooners piled up 785 yards in another road win against a ranked opponent. But they gave up 661 yards and 52
points. In the second quarter, when the
teams combined for 52 points, it was
like watching a tennis match, only it
wasn’t so much a sustained rally but as
if the teams were trading smashed aces.
What to make of it all? Last Tuesday
night, Kirby Hocutt, the selection committee’s chair, noted: “We talked about
the offensive strength that Oklahoma
has … but the selection committee has
that same question about Oklahoma’s
play on the defensive side of the ball.”
After the shootout, there’s good reason
1. Alabama (9-0)
Points: 1,624 (64 first-place votes).
Previous ranking (PR): 1. Next: Saturday
at No. 18 Mississippi State (ESPN, 7).
2. Georgia (9-0)
Points: 1,560 (1). PR: 2. Next: Saturday at No. 10 Auburn (CBS, 3:30).
3. Wisconsin (9-0)
Points: 1,392. PR: 4. Next: Saturday
vs. Iowa (ABC, 3:30).
4. Clemson (8-1)
Points: 1,379. PR: 5. Next: Saturday
vs. Florida State (ESPN, 3:30).
5. Notre Dame (8-1)
Points: 1,367. PR: 8. Next: Saturday at
No. 6 Miami (Fla.) (ABC, 8).
for both impressions to be magnified.
“I really don’t care,” said Lincoln Riley, the Sooners’ first-year coach. “We
won. … We’re not perfect. I’m not saying
we are. We’ve got a lot of things to get
better at. But we’re good at winning.”
There’s no arguing that. But are they
good enough defensively to keep winning? How would it translate in the
Playoff? Mayfield insisted Bedlam was
not just a Big 12 shootout but “two of the
best teams in college football,” and he
might be right. For certain, it was two of
the best offenses. Maybe the two best.
Let’s be clear: Oklahoma’s defense is
not good. The Sooners rank 75th and
87th nationally in scoring and total defense, allowing averages of 28.2 points
and 413.1 yards, respectively.
But Stoops has an alternate theory: It
might not be nearly as bad as the Big 12
can make it look.
“Trying to take away everything from
these offenses is almost impossible,”
Stoops said. “They’re so good.”
When it comes to the Big 12, what
makes it different is the offenses, yes.
There are defensive deficiencies, no
doubt. But how much of that is magnified by the threat level, week in and
week out, of those offenses? Stoops’
contention, at least partly, is that the
stats are skewed because Big 12 defenses are stretched until they break in
ways that their counterparts in many
other conferences don’t face.
There is no other conference where
as many dangerous offenses lurk. That’s
not the case in the Southeastern Conference, where the muddy middle doesn’t
feature an offense that scares anyone.
“It’s ridiculous,” Stoops said, speaking specifically of the idea that the Big 12
doesn’t play defense. “That’s an unfair
bias. And I’m not — shoot, we’ve got to
play better than that. … I laugh at people. I say, ‘You don’t face what we face.’
Look what happens when they do?”
He has a point. But we’ve seen the receivers running free behind the secondary, the running backs blowing through
holes created by the defensive schemes
built to cover up the coverage problems.
Will Johnson makes one of Oklahoma’s two interceptions Saturday, this one in
front of Oklahoma State’s Marcell Ateman. KEVIN JAIRAJ/USA TODAY SPORTS
Which in part is what makes the idea
of Oklahoma in the Playoff pretty fun.
Consider, for a moment, Oklahoma’s offense vs. Alabama’s defense, or Georgia’s. How much fun would that be?
Football four
After two huge upsets, the Big Ten is
in danger of missing the Playoff.
After Iowa’s stunning blowout of
Ohio State and Michigan State’s slightly
less surprising win against Penn State,
the league’s best hope appears to be
Wisconsin wins out.
Potentially even worse for the Big
Ten: Michigan beats Wisconsin. Or a
two-loss Big Ten East team (take your
pick from among Michigan State, Ohio
State or Penn State) beats Wisconsin in
the Big Ten championship game.
At that point, the Big Ten has to hope
for all kinds of chaos everywhere else.
1. Georgia — The Bulldogs controlled
things against South Carolina and
clinched the SEC East along the way.
The threat level increases dramatically
this week at Auburn.
2. Alabama — LSU was never in position to win, but the Tigers matched up
physically with ’Bama, which suffered
apparently serious injuries at linebacker. The Crimson Tide looked less than
immortal.
3. Notre Dame — The Irish put away
Wake Forest early despite missing running back Josh Adams for most of the
game. Up next, a showdown with Miami
(Fla.).
4. Clemson — The Tigers won a tussle at North Carolina State. Three unranked opponents before a probable Atlantic Coast Conference title game
matchup with Miami.
6. Miami (Fla.) (8-0)
13. Penn State (7-2)
20. Washington State (8-2)
Points: 1,326. PR: 6. Next: Saturday
vs. No. 5 Notre Dame (ABC, 8).
Points: 817. PR: 7. Next: Saturday vs.
Rutgers (BTN, noon).
Points: 376. PR: not ranked. Next:
Saturday at Utah (Pac-12, 5:30).
7. Oklahoma (8-1)
14. Southern California (8-2)
21. South Florida (8-1)
Points: 1,314. PR: 9. Next: Saturday
vs. No. 9 TCU (Fox, 8).
Points: 778. PR: 17. Next: Saturday at
Colorado (Fox, 4).
Points: 306. PR: 23. Next game:
Nov. 16 vs. Tulsa.
8. Washington (8-1)
15. Oklahoma State (7-2)
22. Michigan (7-2)
Points: 1,154. PR: 11. Next: Friday at
Stanford (FS1, 10:30).
Points: 764. PR: 10. Next: Saturday at
No. 23 Iowa State (ABC/ESPN2, noon).
Points: 261. PR: 24. Next: Saturday at
Maryland (BTN, 3:30).
9. TCU (8-1)
16. Michigan State (7-2)
23. Iowa State (6-3)
Points: 1,143. PR: 12. Next: Saturday
at No. 7 Oklahoma (Fox, 8).
Points: 609. PR: not ranked. Next:
Saturday at No. 11 Ohio State (Fox, noon).
Points: 150. PR: 16. Next: Saturday vs.
No. 15 Oklahoma State (ABC/ESPN2,
noon).
10. Auburn (7-2)
17. Virginia Tech (7-2)
Points: 900. PR: 15. Next: Saturday vs.
No. 2 Georgia (CBS, 3:30).
Points: 555. PR: 13. Next: Saturday at
Georgia Tech.
11. Ohio State (7-2)
18. Mississippi State (7-2)
Points: 881. PR: 3. Next: Saturday vs.
No. 16 Michigan State (Fox, noon).
Points: 462. PR: 22. Next: Saturday vs.
No. 1 Alabama (ESPN, 7).
12. Central Florida (8-0)
19. Memphis (8-1)
Points: 854. PR: 14. Next: Saturday vs.
Connecticut (ESPNU, noon).
Points: 457. PR: 21. Next game:
Nov. 18 vs. Southern Methodist.
Big Ten in big trouble
24. North Carolina State (6-3)
Points: 149. PR: 19. Next: Saturday at
Boston College (ABC/ESPN2, noon).
25. LSU (6-3)
Points: 136. PR: 20. Next: Saturday vs.
Arkansas (ESPN, noon).
Dropped out: No. 18 Stanford (6-3), No. 25 Arizona (6-3).
Others receiving votes: West Virginia (6-3) 120; Iowa (6-3) 112;
Stanford (6-3) 58; Toledo (8-1) 31; Boise State (7-2) 29; Arizona
(6-3) 25; San Diego State (8-2) 18; South Carolina (6-3) 6; Northwestern (6-3) 5; Troy (7-2) 4; Army (7-2) 3.
The Amway board of coaches is made up of 65 head coaches at
Football Bowl Subdivision schools. All are members of the American Football Coaches Association.
Paul eager to navigate Rockets’ guard experiment
Sam Amick
USA TODAY
Chris Paul had plenty of distractions
from his mental misery on Saturday.
There was practice with his Houston
Rockets in the morning, with Paul getting
another step closer to returning from the
left knee injury that has sidelined him
since Oct. 17. There was a charity event
that followed, a feel-good affair in which
the focus was rebuilding two middle
schools that were damaged in Hurricane
Harvey. And there were Paul family soccer games to keep track of remotely, with
his 8-year-old son, “Lil Chris,” in one and
5-year-old daughter, Camryn, in the other.
If only for a day, the 32-year-old had a
mental break from what has been a brutal start to his Rockets tenure after six
years with the Los Angeles Clippers.
“Basketball is a huge part of my life,
and I don’t get to do that,” Paul, who was
promoting a new State Farm commercial
that premieres on Wednesday, told USA
TODAY by phone. “We’ve actually been
on the road a lot, so it’s actually good to
be home for a while. Just try to stay busy,
and my wife tries to keep me sane.”
For competitors such as Paul, the only
thing more maddening than losing is not
being able to play.
This was supposed to be the early
days of Paul playing alongside James
Harden, with reigning Coach of the Year
Mike D’Antoni trying to work his magic
while they all learned how to co-exist. Instead, Paul banged his knee in a preseason game Oct. 11, struggled in the season
opener and hasn’t played since.
“It’s going to set us back — no doubt
about it,” D’Antoni, whose team improved to 8-3 with a 137-110 rout of the
Utah Jazz on Sunday, told USA TODAY by
phone. “There’s going to be a learning
curve.”
As Paul and D’Antoni see it, the ninetime All-Star likely will return at some
point in the next two weeks. He has made
key progress in the last
week, having gone from
the boxing and water
treadmill routine that
helps maintain his wind
to on-court activities.
Said D’Antoni: “Now
Chris Paul
he’s getting back on the
USA TODAY
floor, where he’s now
shooting foul shots, shooting a little bit.
He’s been working his butt off. … He’s going to be in shape, and he’s trying to take
his anxiety and frustration out on working out. But it’s normal stuff. ... It’s (only)
unique because he just got here, and we
have all this going on.”
By this, he means the process of unseating the Golden State Warriors as NBA
champs while integrating two of the best
point guards in the NBA.
Paul routinely pulls 23-year-old big
man Clint Capela aside, painting a picture of how they will make opponents
pay when he returns.
He also pounds the point about their
need to improve defensively.
“We won’t know really what we look
like until I get back out there,” Paul said.
“(But) man, I’m learning so much, so
much. … I think the biggest thing that we
talk about as a team is communication,
so we’re trying to make sure we continue
to get better and better at that — especially on the defensive end.
“Coming from a different team, you
talk about what was the perception of
this team when you were at another
team. … We want to play up-tempo and
all that different type of stuff, but it’s no
secret that the NBA champions (for) the
past six, seven years have all been top 10
in defense.”
D’Antoni has entrusted that end of the
floor to assistant coach Jeff Bzdelik since
last season. But Paul’s view, on that topic
and many more, is being heard.
“He’s seeing things where we can get
better, what we need to do,” D’Antoni
said. “A lot of (his feedback) is personnel
driven. He knows the league really well.”
SPORTS
E4
USA TODAY ❚ MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2017 ❚ 3C
NFL
Rams, Eagles have offenses in high gear
Lindsay H. Jones
USA TODAY
The 40 things we learned from Week
9 of the NFL season.
1. In a sign of things to come, the Los
Angeles Rams scored Sunday’s first
touchdown on an 8-yard pass from
quarterback Jared Goff to tight end Tyler Higbee against the New York Giants.
But that was hardly the Rams’ most entertaining play of the first half. That
would be the 52-yard screen-pass TD
from Goff to wide receiver Robert
Woods — which came on third-and-33.
According to Pro Football Reference, no
team had converted a third down of
more than 30 yards in the 21st century.
2. The Rams rolled 51-17 and have
now scored 40 or more points three
times this season. In eight games, they
have posted 263 points, already surpassing their total of 224 from all of
2016.
3. The Denver Broncos made a notable move last week by switching quarterbacks from turnover-prone Trevor
Siemian to Brock Osweiler. Didn’t make
much of a difference Sunday against the
Philadelphia Eagles, as Osweiler was intercepted twice.
4. The Broncos did manage a field
goal on their opening drive, the first
time they’d scored on their initial possession since Week 2.
5. Eagles quarterback Carson Wentz
deserves to be the MVP front-runner,
especially after becoming the first player since Andrew Luck in 2013 to throw
three first-half touchdown passes
against the vaunted Broncos defense.
6. Wentz leads the NFL with 23
touchdown passes, and he was pulled
from Sunday’s game with more than
eight minutes remaining.
7. Trade analysis I: RB Jay Ajayi averaged a season-best 9.6 yards per carry
(eight rushes, 77 yards) and scored on a
46-yard touchdown run in his Eagles
debut. Philadelphia gained 419 yards
against the top-ranked Denver defense,
which hadn’t allowed more than 276 in a
game this season before Sunday.
8. Trade analysis II: Entering Sunday, the Miami Dolphins had averaged
the fewest yards and points this season
with Ajayi’s services. They shouldn’t
miss him that much.
9. Denver had allowed 21 points per
game over its first seven contests. The
fact the Eagles torched the Broncos for
51 should be as concerning — if not more
so — than their quarterback woes.
10. As if we needed more reminders
of the Tom Coughlin influence in Jacksonville, the Jaguars benched star rookie running back Leonard Fournette for a
violation of team rules, including missing the team photo. That’s sending a
message that even the best players will
not be coddled.
11. By the way, Chris Ivory and T.J.
Yeldon combined for 110 rushing yards
in Fournette’s absence, helping the Jaguars to a 23-7 win against the Cincinnati
Bengals.
12. Trade analysis III: New Jaguars
DT Marcell Dareus didn’t fill up the stat
sheet — his three tackles tied for third
on the team in Sunday’s win — but he
did help limit Cincinnati to just 148
yards and those seven points.
13. Trade analysis IV: The Bengals
still have backup quarterback AJ
McCarron. Maybe they should have
played him. Andy Dalton is now 9-14-1
since the beginning of last season.
14. Both the Bengals and the Jaguars
had to play more than half the game
without one of their best players after
Cincinnati wide receiver A.J. Green and
Jacksonville cornerback Jalen Ramsey
were ejected for fighting. Replays clearly
showed Green throwing punches, so he
can expect a fine this week.
15. Tampa Bay Buccaneers wide receiver Mike Evans should also expect a
fine — maybe even a suspension — for
his role in a sideline altercation with
New Orleans Saints cornerback Marshon Lattimore. Evans leveled Lattimore with a blindside hit from behind
and then appeared to throw punches.
Evans was not tossed, even after a long
discussion among the officials, in a situation that clearly warranted an ejection.
16. Life without Deshaun Watson,
who suffered a torn anterior cruciate ligament in Thursday’s practice, looks
pretty grim for the Houston Texans.
They lost 20-14 at home to the Indianapolis Colts with Texans quarterback
Tom Savage completing just 19 of 44
passes for 219 yards.
17. Savage did connect on the first
touchdown pass of his career Sunday, a
Pair of NFC division leaders score 51 points in Week 9 blowouts
Redskins cornerback Josh Norman and Seahawks holder Jon Ryan (9) react after Seattle kicker Blair Walsh, center, missed
a field goal attempt. STEPHEN BRASHEAR/AP
Bengals wide receiver A.J. Green throws a punch at the helmet of Jaguars
cornerback Jalen Ramsey. SAM GREENE/THE CINCINNATI ENQUIRER
34-yarder to wide receiver DeAndre
Hopkins. He had several chances to win
the game in the final seconds, but his final two passes fell incomplete in the end
zone, and he was strip-sacked on the final play. (Which makes us ask again:
Why did coach Bill O’Brien want Savage,
and not Watson, to be Houston’s starter
on opening day?)
18. Savage now has one touchdown
pass in 149 career attempts. Watson
threw for 19 touchdowns in his first 204
throws.
19. Colts kicker Adam Vinatieri, 44,
managed eight points Sunday, giving
him sole possession of second place on
the league’s all-time scoring list with
2,442. He needs 103 more to displace
Hall of Famer Morten Andersen for first
place.
20. A snapshot of everything that’s
wrong with the Atlanta Falcons offense:
All-pro wide receiver Julio Jones, wide
open in the end zone, dropping a deep
TD pass from QB Matt Ryan on fourth
down in the fourth quarter of the 20-17
loss to the Carolina Panthers. “I didn’t
take advantage of the opportunity,”
Jones said. “I just missed it. No excuses
or anything like that. I just missed it.”
21. Are the Panthers finally figuring
out how to best use rookie RB Christian
McCaffrey? He had a career-high 66
rushing yards against the Falcons after
totaling 117 in his first eight games.
22. Trade analysis V: How much do
the Buffalo Bills need WR Kelvin Benjamin? Welp, he was inactive during
Thursday night’s loss to the New York
Jets, though QB Tyrod Taylor still
passed for two TDs and a season-high
285 yards with the receivers who were
already in Buffalo.
23. Trade analysis VI: How much
did the Panthers — many seemed
shocked when Benjamin was traded
Tuesday — miss their former No. 1 re-
ceiver? Welp, they had a season-low 129
net passing yards Sunday.
24. Trade analysis VII: FWIW, the
Benjamin deal seems like one that
should work out for all parties. The 6-5,
245-pounder should provide a needed
red-zone threat for the Bills, who’ve gotten only seven TDs from their wideouts.
Carolina, meanwhile, now has more opportunities to integrate McCaffrey and
fellow rookie Curtis Samuel while it
awaits the seemingly imminent return
of TE Greg Olsen to its arsenal.
25. Still, the Saints continue to look
like the best team in the NFC South.
With the defense dominant over the last
month — the Bucs managed just 10
points and 200 yards Sunday — and
New Orleans RBs Mark Ingram and Alvin Kamara combining for 231 total
yards and two TDs, QB Drew Brees isn’t
under nearly as much pressure.
26. Trade analysis VIII: And in one
of those moves that worked out for everyone, while Ingram and Kamara were
piling up the yards in New Orleans, former Saints RB Adrian Peterson had his
second 100-yard effort in three appearances with the Arizona Cardinals. Peterson amassed 159 yards on career-high
37 carries in a 20-10 defeat of the San
Francisco 49ers.
27. What a disaster of a season for the
Buccaneers, who fall to 2-6 and have no
bye week after having to take Week 1 off
because of Hurricane Irma. And QB Jameis Winston’s shoulder continues to
be an issue — he spent the second half
on the sideline Sunday after taking another hit.
28. Any lingering questions about the
health of Tennessee Titans QB Marcus
Mariota, who suffered a hamstring injury a month ago, should be answered after watching him hurdle a Baltimore
Ravens defender on a scramble Sunday.
29. The Ravens lost 23-20 in Nash-
ville, but QB Joe Flacco passed for a pair
of scores and a season-high 261 yards
after being knocked out by that ugly hit
from Miami LB Kiko Alonso in Baltimore’s previous game.
30. Count the New England Patriots
among the biggest winners of Week 9.
Not only did Tom Brady get to spend his
Halloween bye week dressed up as avocado toast, the Pats emerged as suddenly alone in first place in the AFC East
thanks to the Jets’ upset of Buffalo.
31. The Giants’ 34-point loss to the
Rams was their worst since they were
beaten 38-0 at Carolina in 2013.
32. Before Tony Romo called his first
Dallas Cowboys game for CBS on Sunday, the team honored its former quarterback’s return to AT&T Stadium with a
pregame tribute video and a banner behind the end zone that read “Welcome
home 9.” Romo remarked to broadcast
partner Jim Nantz: “I wasn’t prepared
for that. That was pretty emotional.”
33. Romo brought interesting insight
to the telecast, including discussing the
unique way the sun shines through the
windows during late-afternoon games
at the stadium. Several times, he referred to his former teammates by their
first names.
34. Preventing the bomb is usually
the right way to defend against a Hail
Mary. But teams playing the Kansas City
Chiefs will need to rethink that strategy
after Tyreek Hill’s 57-yard touchdown at
the end of the first half against Dallas.
Hill caught a short pass from QB Alex
Smith as the final second ticked off the
clock and weaved his way past Cowboys
defenders for one of the most exciting
plays of the year.
35. Travis Kelce, with an assistant
from several Chiefs teammates, won the
award for Sunday’s best touchdown celebration with a simulated potato sack
race.
36. However, the Chiefs couldn’t
overcome the Cowboys. Smith threw his
first interception of the season, tying
Hill for the team lead, in a 28-17 defeat.
37. Dallas RB Ezekiel Elliott practiced
just once last week as his suspension
was reinstated and then once again put
on hold Friday. But who needs practice?
Elliott rushed for 93 yards and a touchdown and now has six scores in the last
three weeks.
38. Trade analysis IX: If the 49ers
don’t allow new QB Jimmy Garoppolo
onto the field, they’re in serious danger
of the second 0-16 season in league history.
39. Trade analysis X: What happened to that high-powered offense the
Seattle Seahawks showed last week in
scoring 41 points against the Houston
Texans? Seattle’s offense — with newly
acquired LT Duane Brown — was shut
out for more than 48 minutes against
the Redskins on Sunday before Russell
Wilson’s touchdown pass to TE Luke
Willson.
40. Rough day for Seahawks K Blair
Walsh, who missed all three field goal
attempts wide left against Washington.
Seattle lost 17-14.
Contributing: Nate Davis
4C ❚ MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2017 ❚ USA TODAY
SPORTS
E6
NFL
Wentz, Eagles carve up reeling Broncos in rout
Philadelphia scores
51 in moving to 8-1
Mike Jones
USA TODAY
PHILADELPHIA – It shouldn’t have
looked that easy. Not against the topranked defense in the NFL.
But there they were, Carson Wentz
and the Philadelphia Eagles offense:
passing at will, running at will and lighting up the scoreboard in a 51-23 rout Sunday at Lincoln Financial Field to improve
their league-best record to 8-1 as they enter their bye.
The matchup should have presented
Wentz & Co. with one of their toughest
tests of the season, but instead, the Eagles — tired of repeated reminders of the
Broncos’ greatness — attacked the visitors with a vengeance, and Denver offered little resistance.
The Broncos (3-5) entered the game
having never allowed more than 29
points in a contest this season. But the
Eagles found the end zone seven times.
Denver hadn’t allowed more than 278
yards to an opponent, but Philly racked
up 419.
Wentz recorded another four-touchdown outing (his second in three weeks),
and the Eagles running backs combined
for a 197-yard, three-touchdown rushing
day.
“That’s a good defense and that’s a
good rushing defense, and they are that
way for a reason,” Eagles coach Doug Pederson said after his team’s seventh consecutive victory. “I just think that when
you hear that all week — everybody’s got
Eagles quarterback Carson Wentz hit Alshon Jeffery with one of his four TD
passes Sunday. BILL STREICHER/USA TODAY SPORTS
a lot of pride. They want to do their jobs
and do them right. It’s a good test for our
offensive line, and they really stepped up
to the occasion, and, gosh, they rose up
and did a nice job today.”
Indeed, the Eagles players heard from
the outside that they would likely struggle against the Broncos. But in their
meetings and on the practice fields, they
heard repeatedly about how they could
use Denver’s aggressive style of play to
their advantage.
So when the Eagles gave them the look
they wanted and Wentz & Co. lined up
and ran an option play where the quarterback first faked the handoff, scrambled to his right as if to run, sucking defenders toward him, and then floated a
32-yard touchdown pass to Alshon Jef-
fery for their first score of the game, the
success came as no surprise.
“I think we felt really confident in our
plan and the looks that they were showing,” said Wentz, who further strengthened his case for MVP and extended his
league-leading touchdown total to 23.
Said Jeffery, “It’s just something the
coaches seen and something we’ve practiced all week. (Eagles cornerback Ronald) Darby can tell you, all week we practiced it and it worked on him, so that’s
something that we did a good job of
scheming the game plan of. Carson did a
great job. We practiced it: If he pulls it you
take off running, and that’s what we
done.”
The Eagles also let the overaggressive
Broncos pass rush to work to their favor
in the run game. With defenders out of
place and off-balance, the backs gashed
Denver for runs of 46, 28 and 26 yards.
New addition Jay Ajayi gained 77 yards
and a touchdown on eight carries, and
Corey Clement ran for two touchdowns
to lead the way.
Broncos players lamented after the
game that it felt as if the Eagles knew exactly what was coming on defense and
how to attack. Wentz, Jeffery and their
teammates said that basically was the
case and praised their coaches’ gameplanning.
Meanwhile, the Eagles defense had
equally as impressive a day. All game
long they harassed newly installed Broncos starter Brock Osweiler, sacking him
three times, hitting him seven more
times and intercepting him twice.
Denver found the end zone once offensively — a fourth-quarter connection between Osweiler and Demaryius Thomas.
And the Broncos defense tacked on a garbage-time touchdown after Eagles backup Nick Foles fumbled on a Von Miller
sack that Brandon Marshall returned 19
yards.
But the Eagles didn’t even care after
the game. Considering their record entering their bye week, they had reason to
smile.
“It’s hard to win in this league. It really
is,” safety Malcolm Jenkins said. “Every
single one of them, you get excited about
and cherish. With everyone you stack up,
you know the opponent is going to come
at you that much harder. We embrace
that. … Obviously, we’re happy going into
the bye at 8-1. That doesn’t happen many
times. … Having a start like this sets us up
for where we want to go.”
‘Superman’ Newton leads Panthers past Falcons
Lorenzo Reyes
USA TODAY
CHARLOTTE – Cam Newton strolled
to the middle of the huddle, the right side
of his silver pants stained with streaks of
grass.
He was about to bleed the clock dry in
the final series of the game. Once again,
the quarterback nicknamed “Superman”
had to do it all for the Carolina Panthers
to secure a win.
The Panthers withstood a late charge
from the Atlanta Falcons on Sunday 2017 to keep pace in the NFC South. Elsewhere, the division-leading New Orleans
Saints (6-2) demolished the Tampa Bay
Buccaneers to retain their slim grip of
first place. The Panthers, though, are
close behind at 6-3.
Although the Panthers tried to alter
their offense over the offseason to limit
Newton’s carries and his exposure to big
hits, the franchise quarterback continues
to be Carolina’s most dangerous rushing
option. Newton ran the ball nine times for
a team-high 86 yards and scored the goahead touchdown in the final seconds of
the first half.
It marked the fourth consecutive
game Newton has led Carolina in rushing
yards.
Cowboys
Continued from Page 1C
start the second half to fall behind for the only time in the
entire game 17-14 — to pass a
major test.
If you saw this coming, you
should hang out with Tony Romo, Nostradamus in a broadcast booth.
But there they were. This
rebuilt defense, applying heat
from the front with the likes of
Crawford, NFL sack leader DeMarcus Lawrence, David Irving and rookie Taco Charlton.
Kareem Hunt, the NFL’s rushing leader, ran for just 37
yards. Kansas City was 4for-11 on third-down conversions. Smith, the NFL’s highest-ranked passer, threw his
first interception of the season.
If Dallas (5-3) is going to
stay in the thick of the race,
this is the type of defense it
will need.
“I think we’re starting to get
close to the type of defense we
“Cam running the ball — that’s our offense,” Panthers guard Trai Turner told
USA TODAY Sports. “When I came in, we
were doing it. Years later, and we’re still
doing it. It starts with No. 1.”
Said rookie running back Christian
McCaffrey: “He can pretty much do it all.
It opens everything for everybody.”
Newton also completed 13 of 24 passes
for 137 yards. Only three players caught
passes.
But in a season that has seen injuries
snatch away star quarterbacks including
Aaron Rodgers of the Green Bay Packers
and Deshaun Watson of the Houston
Texans, the pounding Newton takes on a
weekly basis will remain a concern.
“I’ve been playing like this for a long
time,” Newton said when asked about the
hits he takes.
Although Carolina might like to limit
the blows to its star player, Newton’s
prowess on designed runs gives Panthers
offensive coordinator Mike Shula flexibility and creativity to dial up effective play
calls, often with misdirection.
On what was designed to be a handoff
in the first quarter, Newton saw a Falcons
defender over left tackle Matt Kalil indicating a blitz. Newton changed the play
on his own, faking the handoff and keeping the ball on a bootleg for 34 yards for
want to be,” linebacker Sean
Lee said.
More tests await: Next up,
Atlanta. Sure, the Falcons are
sputtering, but they’ll be at
home. Maybe reigning NFL
MVP Matt Ryan, Julio Jones
and Co. are poised for a flashback.
Then
Philadelphia
comes to North Texas. The Eagles, the hottest operation in
the NFL, put up 51 points
against the Denver Broncos’
top-ranked defense Sunday.
No, this road will not get
any easier for the Cowboys —
especially if they’re without
Ezekiel Elliott. Dallas had its
star running back in the mix
Sunday, after his six-game
suspension was put back on
hold by an administrative stay
ruling Friday — another entry
into the saga that is Elliott legally fighting the NFL’s contention that he violated the
league’s domestic violence
policy. But despite limited
practice time, he rushed for 93
yards on 27 carries, with a
touchdown, to provide his
typical foundation for the Dallas offense.
Carolina’s longest rush of the season.
“The biggest thing more so than anything is he does his job,” Panthers coach
Ron Rivera said. “He sees opportunities
and he takes them.”
An already rough season for Jonathan
Stewart continued, as the veteran running back lost two fumbles in a threetouch stretch in the first quarter. After
that, McCaffrey took the lead in the backfield, flashing speed and lateral quickness. McCaffrey posted a career-high 66
rushing yards on 15 carries and added a
4-yard TD on a triple-option pitch. Stewart had 21 yards on 11 carries.
McCaffrey likely won’t average 20 carries in a game given his frame and early
role within the offense. But with Stewart
struggling, Carolina might increase the
rookie’s role.
“You have to account for him,” Turner
said of McCaffrey. “You can’t just say,
‘OK, he’s out there, we’re not worried
about him.’ He’s a threat. He’s a great
back. He’s explosive. He’s fast. What
people don’t understand is that he’s able
to take a hit and give hits, too.”
This was the Panthers’ first game
without Kelvin Benjamin after the No. 1
receiver was traded to the Buffalo Bills on
Tuesday. As Newton’s production in the
passing game showed, replacing Benja-
The Cowboys need to prove
they can win games like they
did Sunday, when the defense
dominated and Dak Prescott
played splendidly. Prescott
passed for an efficient 249
yards (2 TDs, 0 INTs, 106.8 rating) and had three timely runs
(27 yards) that included a 10yard TD scramble and two
scampers for first downs.
Also, while Dez Bryant
caught six passes for 73 yards,
it was Terrance Williams with
the 100-yard game (9 catches,
141 yards) and Cole Beasley
with a pair of TD catches.
All that balance on offense,
all-around defensive effort, a
special-teams lockdown. A
complete game, to run the
winning streak to four games.
After the crazy touchdown
before the half — some serious
in-game adversity — the Cowboys demonstrated a certain
resilience.
“Let it go, we can’t change
it,” Crawford said of the mindset. “We just have to keep
playing.”
They’d better keep that
mantra in mind.
Panthers quarterback Cam Newton
scores a touchdown in Sunday’s
victory. BOB DONNAN/USA TODAY SPORTS
min is going to take some time.
Receiver Devin Funchess led the Panthers in receiving yards (86) and tied for
the most catches (five). McCaffrey was
the next-closest player with 28 yards,
while Curtis Samuel caught three passes
for 23.
The Panthers next face the Miami Dolphins and New York Jets, with the bye
week sandwiched in on Week 11.
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SPORTS
E6
USA TODAY ❚ MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2017 ❚ 5C
IN BRIEF
Report: Miller to be discharged
ond playoff hole at TPC Summerlin to
knock off Alex Cejka and Whee Kim.
Chicago Bears tight end Zach Miller
is scheduled to leave a New Orleans hospital Monday, a little more than a week
after suffering a horrific injury against
the Saints, ESPN reported Sunday afternoon. Miller had emergency surgery last
week to repair a torn popliteal artery in
his left leg, an injury that has resulted in
amputation in some previous instances
involving other football players. The 33year-old dislocated his left knee while
trying to catch a touchdown pass, which
subsequently damaged the artery. According to ESPN’s report, Miller will require more surgeries to repair damaged
ligaments in his knee but “the primary
concern was saving the leg.”
Duchene part of three-team trade
The Matt Duchene saga is over, as
the Colorado Avalanche have traded
him to the Ottawa Senators in a pair of
deals that included Kyle Turris going to
the Nashville Predators. Duchene joins
the Senators as their new No. 1 center,
Turris gives the Predators more depth
down the middle and the Avalanche
push forward with their rebuilding
youth movement. Colorado gets top
prospects Samuel Girardi and Vladislav Kamenev and a 2018 second-round
pick from Nashville and prospect Shane
Bowers, goaltender Andrew Hammond and a 2018 first- and 2019 thirdround picks from Ottawa. Avalanche
general manager Joe Sakic said the
Senators first-round pick was top-10
protected.
Cantlay gets first win in playoff
Patrick Cantlay bogeyed 17 and 18,
blew a lead and then rallied to win a
three-player playoff and win the Shriners Hospitals for Children Open in Las
Vegas — first first career PGA Tour victory. “It was a grind, just the last few
holes,” he said. “It’s hard to describe the
feeling.” Cantlay made a par on the sec-
Gun Runner rules at Breeders’ Cup
There’s a new king in horse racing,
and it’s Gun Runner. The 4-year-old
colt won the $6 million Breeders’ Cup
Classic by 21⁄4 lengths Saturday, sending
rival Arrogate to a third consecutive career-ending defeat at Del Mar. Gun Runner ran 11⁄4 miles in 2:01.29 and paid
$6.80, $4.40 and $3.20. Arrogate hasn’t
been the same horse since his dominant
wins in the $12 million Pegasus World
Cup and the $10 million Dubai World
Cup this year that made him the sport’s
richest Thoroughbred with over $17 million in earnings. The Dubai race was the
last time Gun Runner lost. Since then,
he has four consecutive victories.
Bledsoe showed up the following morning for Phoenix’s shootaround but was
sent home by the Suns, and Phoenix has
been trying to work out a trade for the
unhappy point guard.
Miami fan charged
Police are investigating a videotaped
altercation where a University of Miami
football fan slaps an officer, who then
punches her in the head. Miami-Dade
Police Detective Alvaro Zabaleta said
in an email Sunday that Bridget Freitas, a 30-year-old nurse, has been
charged with felony battery on a police
officer and misdemeanor disorderly
conduct. He said the department is reviewing the video to make sure proper
procedures were followed in the altercation at Hard Rock Stadium during Miami’s win Saturday over Virginia Tech.
According to the arrest report, Freitas
had been arguing with other fans and
was “using profanity in a loud, boisterous manner” when officers arrived.
They say they tried to calm her down
and asked her to move to the concourse,
but she refused and sat on the steps.
From staff and wire reports
Suns’ Bledsoe fined for tweet
Suns point guard Eric Bledsoe was
fined $10,000 by the NBA for his Oct. 22
tweet in which he said, “I Dont wanna
be here,” general manager Ryan McDonough confirmed to AZcentral sports
Sunday. McDonough declined to comment further. In addition, Yahoo Sports
reported that Bledsoe will this week
start working out with Suns staff members. There are no plans, however, for
Bledsoe to rejoin the team. Bledsoe’s
tweet came just hours before the Suns
fired coach Earl Watson and replaced
him with interim coach Jay Triano.
FOR THE RECORD
NFL
Philadelphia
Toronto
Brooklyn
All Times ET
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
New England
Buffalo
Miami
N.Y. Jets
South
Tennessee
Jacksonville
Houston
Indianapolis
North
Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cincinnati
Cleveland
West
Kansas City
Denver
L.A. Chargers
Oakland
Philadelphia
Dallas
Washington
N.Y. Giants
South
New Orleans
Carolina
Atlanta
Tampa Bay
North
Minnesota
Green Bay
Detroit
Chicago
West
L.A. Rams
Seattle
Arizona
San Francisco
L
2
3
3
5
T Pct
0 .750
0 .625
0 .571
0 .444
PF
216
174
92
191
PA
179
149
152
207
W
5
5
3
3
L
3
3
5
6
T Pct
0 .625
0 .625
0 .375
0 .333
PF
181
206
229
162
PA
193
117
208
260
W
6
4
3
0
L
2
5
5
8
T Pct
0 .750
0 .444
0 .375
0 .000
PF
167
190
129
119
PA
131
171
158
202
W
6
3
3
3
L
3
5
5
5
T Pct
0 .667
0 .375
0 .375
0 .375
PF
253
150
150
169
PA
208
198
152
190
W
8
5
4
1
L
1
3
4
7
T Pct
0 .889
0 .625
0 .500
0 .125
PF
283
226
177
129
PA
179
178
194
207
W
6
6
4
2
L
2
3
4
6
T Pct
0 .750
0 .667
0 .500
0 .250
PF
221
168
170
158
PA
155
159
172
198
W
6
4
3
3
L
2
3
4
5
T Pct
0 .750
0 .571
0 .429
0 .375
PF
179
164
176
134
PA
135
161
169
171
W
6
5
4
0
L
2
3
4
9
T Pct
0 .750
0 .625
0 .500
0 .000
PF
263
189
139
143
PA
155
149
201
239
Sunday’s Games
Jacksonville 23, Cincinnati 7
L.A. Rams 51, N.Y. Giants 17
New Orleans 30, Tampa Bay 10
Carolina 20, Atlanta 17
Tennessee 23, Baltimore 20
Indianapolis 20, Houston 14
Philadelphia 51, Denver 23
Arizona 20, San Francisco 10
Washington 17, Seattle 14
Dallas 28, Kansas City 17
Oakland at Miami
Open: Chicago, Minnesota, New England,
L.A. Chargers, Cleveland, Pittsburgh
Detroit at Green Bay, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday’s Game
Seattle at Arizona, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 12
Pittsburgh at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Washington, 1 p.m.
L.A. Chargers at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Green Bay at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Houston at L.A. Rams, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
Dallas at Atlanta, 4:25 p.m.
New England at Denver, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Kansas City, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Oakland
Monday, Nov. 13
NBA
All times ET
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
L
2
4
.556 21⁄2
.556 21⁄2
.333 41⁄2
L
4
4
5
5
8
Pct GB
.600
—
.556 1⁄2
.500
1
.444 11⁄2
.200
4
L
3
5
5
6
6
Pct GB
.700
—
.500
2
.444 21⁄2
.400
3
.250
4
Central Division
W
7
5
4
4
2
Detroit
Indiana
Milwaukee
Cleveland
Chicago
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W
8
6
6
5
1
Houston
Memphis
San Antonio
New Orleans
Dallas
L
3
3
4
5
10
Pct
.727
.667
.600
.500
.091
GB
—
1
1½
2½
7
Northwest Division
Minnesota
Portland
Denver
Utah
Oklahoma City
W
7
5
5
5
4
L
3
4
5
5
4
Pct
.700
.556
.500
.500
.500
GB
—
1½
2
2
2
W
7
5
4
4
1
L
3
4
5
6
8
Pct
.700
.556
.444
.400
.111
GB
—
1½
2½
3
5½
Pacific Division
Golden State
L.A. Clippers
L.A. Lakers
Phoenix
Sacramento
Pct GB
.800
—
.556 21⁄2
Pacific Division
GP
Los Angeles 14
Vegas
13
San Jose
13
Vancouver 13
Calgary
13
Anaheim
14
Edmonton 13
Arizona
15
W L OT Pts GF GA
10 2 2 22 48 31
9 4 0 18 47 37
8 5 0 16 36 30
7 4 2 16 35 31
7 6 0 14 30 34
6 6 2 14 40 43
4 8 1 9 30 43
2 12 1 5 39 62
Memphis 113, L.A. Clippers 104
Detroit 108, Sacramento 99
Minnesota 112, Dallas 99
New Orleans 96, Chicago 90, OT
Golden State 127, Denver 108
Sunday’s Games
Atlanta 117, Cleveland 115
Miami 104, L.A. Clippers 101
Boston 104, Orlando 88
Washington 107, Toronto 96
San Antonio 112, Phoenix 95
Houston 137, Utah 110
New York 108, Indiana 101
Minnesota 112, Charlotte 94
Oklahoma City at Portland
Memphis at L.A. Lakers
Monday’s Games
Boston at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Brooklyn at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Miami at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
All times ET
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
Tampa Bay
Ottawa
Toronto
Detroit
Boston
Montreal
Florida
Buffalo
GP
15
14
15
15
12
15
13
14
W
11
6
8
7
5
6
4
4
L OT Pts GF GA
2 2 24 59 42
3 5 17 51 47
7 0 16 57 55
7 1 15 42 41
4 3 13 34 37
8 1 13 41 55
7 2 10 47 56
8 2 10 35 53
Metropolitan Division
Columbus
New Jersey
Pittsburgh
N.Y. Islnders
Phildelphia
Washington
N.Y. Rangrs
Carolina
GP
14
12
16
14
15
14
15
12
W
9
9
8
8
7
7
6
4
L OT Pts GF GA
4 1 19 48 38
3 0 18 45 37
6 2 18 42 58
5 1 17 54 46
6 2 16 47 43
6 1 15 43 46
7 2 14 47 52
5 3 11 32 37
St. Louis
Winnipeg
Colorado
Dallas
Nashville
Chicago
Minnesota
GP
15
13
14
14
14
15
12
W
11
7
8
8
7
7
5
L OT Pts GF GA
3 1 23 50 36
3 3 17 42 39
6 0 16 48 47
6 0 16 41 39
5 2 16 37 41
6 2 16 43 36
5 2 12 37 35
2
1
7
9
7 13 8
4 22 4
Saturday’s results
STOKE 2, Leicester 2
HUDDERSFIELD 1, West Brom 0
SWANSEA 0, Brighton 1
SOUTHAMPTON 0, Burnley 1
NEWCASTLE 0, Bournemouth 1
WEST HAM 1, Liverpool 4
TOTTENHAM 1, Crystal Palace 0
MAN CITY 3, Arsenal 1
EVERTON 3, Watford 2
CHELSEA 1, Man United 0
Vegas 5, Ottawa 4
N.Y. Rangers 5, Florida 4, OT
Montreal 5, Winnipeg 4, OT
Washington 3, Boston 2
St. Louis 6, Toronto 4
Tampa Bay 5, Columbus 4, SO
Colorado 5, Philadelphia 4, SO
Chicago 2, Minnesota 0
Dallas 5, Buffalo 1
Arizona 2, Carolina 1, SO
Vancouver 4, Pittsburgh 2
Nashville 4, Los Angeles 3, OT
San Jose 2, Anaheim 1, SO
Saturday’s games
Arsenal vs. Tottenham, 7:30 a.m.
Burnley vs. Swansea, 10 a.m.
Leicester vs. Man City, 10 a.m.
Liverpool vs. Southampton, 10 a.m.
Crystal Palace vs. Everton, 10 a.m.
West Brom vs. Chelsea, 10 a.m.
Bournemouth vs. Huddersfield, 10 a.m.
Man United vs. Newcastle, 12:30 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Detroit 4, Edmonton 0
N.Y. Islanders 6, Colorado 4
Montreal 2, Chicago 0
New Jersey at Calgary
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
AP Top 25
Monday’s Games
Arizona at Washington, 7 p.m.
Columbus at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Boston, 7 p.m.
Vegas at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Detroit at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer Playoffs
All Times ET
Conference Semifinals
Home-and-home
First leg
Eastern Conference
Oct. 30: Toronto 2, New York 1
Oct. 31: Columbus 4, New York City FC 1
Western Conference
Oct. 29: Vancouver 0, Seattle 0, tie
Oct. 30: Portland 0, Houston 0, tie
Second leg
Eastern Conference
Sunday: New York 1, Toronto 0, Toronto advances on away goals
Sunday: New York City FC 2, Columbus 0,
Columbus advances on aggregate 4-3
Western Conference
Thursday: Seattle 2, Vancouver 0, Seattle
advances 2-0
Sunday: Houston 2, Portland 1, Houston
advances on aggregate, 2-1
NHL
Swansea
11 2
Crystal Palace 11 1
Home teams in CAPS
Sunday’s results
Saturday’s Games
Saturday’s Games
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
Miami at Carolina, 8:30 p.m.
W
8
5
W
6
5
5
4
2
Orlando
Washington
Charlotte
Miami
Atlanta
Monday’s Game
Boston
New York
4
4
6
Southeast Division
W
6
5
4
4
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
5
5
3
Conference Championships
Eastern Conference
First leg
Tuesday, Nov. 21: Toronto at Columbus, 8
p.m.
Second leg
Tuesday, Nov. 28 or Wednesday, Nov. 29:
Columbus at Toronto, TBD
Western Conference
First leg
Tuesday, Nov. 21: Houston at Seattle, 10
p.m.
Second leg
Thursday, Nov. 30: Seattle at Houston, 10
p.m.
English Premier League
All Times ET
Man City
Man United
Tottenham
Chelsea
Liverpool
Arsenal
Burnley
Brighton
Watford
Huddersfield
Newcastle
Leicester
Southampton
Stoke
Everton
West Brom
Bournemouth
West Ham
GP
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
W
10
7
7
7
5
6
5
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
2
3
2
D
1
2
2
1
4
1
4
3
3
3
2
4
4
3
2
4
1
3
L
0
2
2
3
2
4
2
4
4
4
5
4
4
5
6
5
7
6
GF
38
23
20
19
21
20
10
11
17
8
10
16
9
13
10
9
7
11
GA
7
5
7
10
17
16
9
11
21
13
10
16
11
22
22
14
14
23
Pts
31
23
23
22
19
19
19
15
15
15
14
13
13
12
11
10
10
9
The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press
college football poll, with first-place votes
in parentheses, records through Nov. 4, total points based on 25 points for a firstplace vote through one point for a 25thplace vote, and previous ranking:
W-L
Pts
Pv
1. Alabama (56)
9-0
1520
1
2. Georgia (5)
9-0
1468
2
3. Notre Dame
8-1
1357
5
4. Clemson
8-1
1289
6
5. Oklahoma
8-1
1258
8
6. Wisconsin
9-0
1256
4
7. Miami
8-0
1220
9
8. TCU
8-1
1087
10
9. Washington
8-1
1061
12
10. Auburn
7-2
875
16
11. Ohio State
7-2
781
3
12. Okla. State
7-2
766
11
13. Mich. State
7-2
760
24
14. UCF
8-0
736
15
15. Southern Cal
8-2
718
17
16. Penn St.
7-2
717
7
17. Va. Tech
7-2
537
13
18. Miss. State
7-2
464
21
19. Wash. State
8-2
420
25
20. Memphis
8-1
376
22
21. Michigan
7-2
184
NR
22. S. Florida
8-1
177
NR
23. W. Virginia
6-3
163
NR
24. Iowa St.
6-3
155
14
25. Iowa
6-3
147
NR
Others receiving votes: LSU 142, NC State
101, Toledo 31, Stanford 22, Boise State
14, Arizona 14, Northwestern 6, Army 2,
San Diego State 1.
AUTO RACING
NASCAR Monster Energy
Cup-AAA Texas 500
At Texas Motor Speedway
Fort Worth, Texas
Lap length: 1.50 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (3) Kevin Harvick, Ford, 334 laps, 0 rating,
59 points.
2. (7) Martin Truex Jr, Toyota, 334, 0, 51.
3. (2) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 334, 0, 47.
4. (35) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 334, 0, 40.
5. (10) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 334, 0, 32.
6. (8) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 334, 0, 42.
7. (36) Joey Logano, Ford, 334, 0, 30.
8. (34) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 334, 0, 35.
9. (1) Kurt Busch, Ford, 334, 0, 38.
10. (4) Erik Jones, Toyota, 334, 0, 34.
11. (19) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 334, 0, 26.
12. (12) Ricky Stenhouse Jr, Ford, 334, 0, 25.
13. (15) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 334, 0, 27.
14. (6) Daniel Suarez, Toyota, 334, 0, 24.
15. (18) Aric Almirola, Ford, 334, 0, 22.
16. (16) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 334, 0,
21.
17. (14) Danica Patrick, Ford, 333, 0, 20.
18. (13) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 333, 0,
19.
19. (5) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 333, 0, 18.
20. (25) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 333, 0,
17.
21. (23) Michael McDowell, Chevrolet, 333,
0, 16.
22. (26) Chris Buescher, Chevrolet, 333, 0,
15.
23. (21) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 332, 0, 14.
24. (27) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 332, 0, 13.
25. (28) Matt DiBenedetto, Ford, 332, 0, 12.
26. (22) Landon Cassill, Ford, 331, 0, 11.
27. (9) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 331, 0,
10.
28. (37) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 330, 0, 9.
29. (29) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 330, 0, 8.
30. (24) David Ragan, Ford, 329, 0, 7.
31. (38) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 325, 0,
6.
32. (30) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, 322, 0, 0.
33. (32) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Chevrolet, 322,
0, 4.
34. (31) Ray Black Jr, Chevrolet, 305, 0, 0.
35. (17) Dale Earnhardt Jr, Chevrolet, 304,
0, 2.
36. (20) Clint Bowyer, Ford, 303, 0, 1.
37. (11) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, accident,
282, 0, 18.
38. (33) David Starr, Chevrolet, accident,
237, 0, 0.
39. (39) Corey Lajoie, Toyota, engine, 227, 0,
1.
40. (40) Gray Gaulding, Toyota, engine,
159, 0, 1.
ODDS
Pregame.com Line
NBA
Monday
Favorite
ATLANTA
PHOENIX
GOLDEN STATE
Line
OFF
OFF
OFF
O/U
OFF
OFF
OFF
Underdog
Boston
Brooklyn
Miami
National Hockey League
Monday
Favorite
WASHINGTON
BOSTON
NY RANGERS
TORONTO
DALLAS
VANCOUVER
Line
-225
-130
-110
-230
-145
-138
Underdog
Arizona
Minnesota
Columbus
Las Vegas
Winnipeg
Detroit
Favorite
Line O/U
Underdog
MIAMI OHIO OFF (OFF)
Akron
BUFFALO
101⁄2 OFF Bowling Green
Wednesday
Favorite
Line O/U
Underdog
W MICHIGAN 201⁄2 OFF
Kent St
Toledo
6 OFF
OHIO U
E. Michigan
1 OFF CENT. MICHIGAN
Thursday
Favorite
Line O/U
Underdog
N ILLINOIS 291⁄2 OFF
Ball St
APP ST
161⁄2 OFF Georgia Southern
PITTSBURGH 9 OFF
North Carolina
Friday
Line
11⁄2
9
5
O/U
OFF
OFF
OFF
Underdog
CINCINNATI
STANFORD
BYU
Saturday
Favorite
MARYLAND
S CAROLINA
Virginia Tech
Tulane
NC State
UCF
SYRACUSE
PENN ST
Duke
Line O/U
OFF OFF
9 OFF
21⁄2 OFF
6 OFF
3 OFF
OFF OFF
31⁄2 OFF
28 OFF
2 OFF
NFL
Monday
Favorite
Detroit
Line O/U
2
431⁄2
Underdog
GREEN BAY
Thursday
Line
+205
+120
+100
+210
+135
+128
College Football
Tuesday
Favorite
Temple
Washington
UNLV
OHIO STATE
141⁄2 OFF
Michigan St
Indiana
8 OFF
ILLINOIS
Troy
16 OFF CSTL CAROLINA
MID TENN
14 OFF
CHARLOTTE
AIR FORCE
3 OFF
Wyoming
NEVADA
17 OFF
San Jose St
Texas Tech
7 OFF
Baylor
West Virginia
KANSAS ST
21⁄2 OFF
OKLAHOMA
6 OFF
TCU
IOWA ST
111⁄2 OFF
Oklahoma St
LOUISVILLE
9 OFF
Virginia
Notre Dame
4 OFF
MIAMI
NAVY
OFF OFF
SMU
Washington St 11⁄2 OFF
UTAH
NRTHWETRN
5 OFF
Purdue
MISSISSIPPI
18 OFF
La-Lafayette
MINNESOTA
2 OFF
Nebraska
Alabama
141⁄2 OFF MISSISSIPPI ST
FAU
51⁄2 OFF LOUISIANA TECH
Southern Miss 10 OFF
RICE
SOUTHERN CAL 14 OFF
COLORADO
WISCONSIN
13 OFF
Iowa
Georgia
2 OFF
AUBURN
MISSOURI
10 OFF
Tennessee
TEXAS A&M
18 OFF
New Mexico
UCLA
OFF OFF
Arizona St
VANDERBILT
3 OFF
Kentucky
Arkansas St
12 OFF
S ALABAMA
Georgia St
4 OFF
TEXAS STATE
NORTH TEXAS 21 OFF
UTEP
TEXAS
31 OFF
Kansas
MARSHALL
OFF OFF
W Kentucky
FIU
71⁄2 OFF Old Dominion
UTSA
6 OFF
UAB
CLEMSON
18 OFF
Florida St
LSU
17 OFF
Arkansas
ARIZONA
20 OFF
Oregon St
Boise St
5 OFF
COLO ST
Fresno St
9 OFF
HAWAII
Underdog
Michigan
Florida
GA TECH
E CAROLINA
BOSTON COLL
UCONN
Wake Forest
Rutgers
ARMY
Favorite
Seattle
Line
6
O/U
OFF
Underdog
ARIZONA
Sunday
Favorite
Minnesota
CHICAGO
Pittsburgh
JACKSONVILLE
TAMPA BAY
TENNESSEE
New Orleans
DETROIT
LA RAMS
ATLANTA
SAN FRANCISCO
New England
Line O/U
Underdog
1 OFF WASHINGTON
3 OFF
Green Bay
71⁄2 OFF INDIANAPOLIS
41⁄2 OFF
LA Chargers
3 OFF
NY Jets
6 OFF
Cincinnati
3 OFF
BUFFALO
10 OFF
Cleveland
10 OFF
Houston
2 OFF
Dallas
21⁄2 OFF
NY Giants
6 OFF
DENVER
Monday (11/13)
Favorite
CAROLINA
Line O/U
8
OFF
Underdog
Miami
DEALS
BASKETBALL
NBA
ATLANTA HAWKS — Signed F Tyler Cavanaugh to a two-way contract.
LOS ANGELES LAKERS — Recalled C Thomas
Bryant from South Bay (NBAGL).
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
ARIZONA COYOTES — Recalled D Joel Hanley from Tucson (AHL).
CALGARY FLAMES — Placed D Travis Hamonic on injured reserve, retroactive to
Thursday. Recalled D Rasmus Andersson
from Stockton (AHL).
WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Recalled D Kristofers Bindulis from South Carolina (ECHL)
to Hershey (AHL).
SPORTS ON TV
Times Eastern. Programs live unless noted. Check local listings.
HORSE RACING: Melbourne Cup, in Melbourne, Australia (Fox Sports 1, 9:30 p.m.)
NFL: Detroit at Green Bay (ESPN, 8:15 p.m.)
GOLF
PGA Tour - Shriners Hospitals for Children Open
At TPC Summerlin
Las Vegas
Purse: $6.8 million
Yardage: 7,255; Par: 71
Final
(x-won on second hole of playoff)
x-Patrick Cantlay (500), $1,224,000.................67-71-70-67—275 (-9)
Alex Cejka (245), $598,400 ...............................66-74-72-63—275 (-9)
Whee Kim (245), $598,400 ...............................65-72-72-66—275 (-9)
Patton Kizzire (115), $281,067..........................70-66-76-64—276 (-8)
J.T. Poston (115), $281,067 ................................69-71-70-66—276 (-8)
Chesson Hadley (115), $281,067.....................74-65-69-68—276 (-8)
Bryson DeChambeau (85), $211,933 ..............67-72-71-67—277 (-7)
Tom Hoge (85), $211,933 ..................................68-73-67-69—277 (-7)
Beau Hossler (85), $211,933.............................69-69-66-73—277 (-7)
Alex Kang, $150,733 ..........................................70-73-71-64—278 (-6)
Graeme McDowell (64), $150,733...................70-70-72-66—278 (-6)
Aaron Baddeley (64), $150,733 .......................70-66-74-68—278 (-6)
William McGirt (64), $150,733.........................68-73-69-68—278 (-6)
A.J. McInerney, $150,733 ...................................71-70-70-67—278 (-6)
J.J. Spaun (64), $150,733 ...................................66-65-73-74—278 (-6)
Tony Finau (52), $112,200 .................................69-69-69-72—279 (-5)
Talor Gooch (52), $112,200 ..............................71-67-77-64—279 (-5)
Charley Hoffman (48), $98,600........................68-71-71-70—280 (-4)
Gary Woodland (48), $98,600.........................73-67-68-72—280 (-4)
Kevin Chappell (35), $61,483............................67-71-75-68—281 (-3)
Jason Kokrak (35), $61,483...............................67-75-71-68—281 (-3)
Adam Schenk (35), $61,483 ..............................68-74-70-69—281 (-3)
Webb Simpson (35), $61,483...........................70-73-69-69—281 (-3)
Ryan Armour (35), $61,483................................68-74-72-67—281 (-3)
Ryan Blaum (35), $61,483..................................66-74-72-69—281 (-3)
Sam Burns, $61,483 ............................................68-74-72-67—281 (-3)
Austin Cook (35), $61,483 .................................73-70-70-68—281 (-3)
Brandon Harkins (35), $61,483.........................68-70-73-70—281 (-3)
Stephan Jaeger (35), $61,483..........................69-68-76-68—281 (-3)
Luke List (35), $61,483.........................................71-70-70-70—281 (-3)
Trey Mullinax (35), $61,483...............................73-69-69-70—281 (-3)
Robert Garrigus (20), $35,284..........................70-65-77-70—282 (-2)
Peter Malnati (20), $35,284...............................67-72-74-69—282 (-2)
Nick Taylor (20), $35,284 ...................................69-71-74-68—282 (-2)
Aaron Wise (20), $35,284..................................73-69-70-70—282 (-2)
Byeong Hun An (20), $35,284...........................72-70-69-71—282 (-2)
Luke Donald (20), $35,284 ................................72-70-73-67—282 (-2)
Scott Piercy (20), $35,284...................................69-74-68-71—282 (-2)
Ethan Tracy (20), $35,284..................................71-72-73-66—282 (-2)
Kevin Tway (20), $35,284...................................68-71-71-72—282 (-2)
Martin Flores (13), $24,480 ...............................71-71-70-71—283 (-1)
Brandon Hagy (13), $24,480.............................69-72-71-71—283 (-1)
Jim Knous, $24,480.............................................71-71-73-68—283 (-1)
Seamus Power (13), $24,480 ............................69-71-71-72—283 (-1)
Scott Stallings (13), $24,480..............................73-70-68-72—283 (-1)
Jimmy Stanger, $24,480 .....................................67-75-74-67—283 (-1)
Kelly Kraft (9), $18,292.........................................67-65-79-73—284 (E)
Rod Pampling (9), $18,292 .................................70-73-72-69—284 (E)
Ben Silverman (9), $18,292 .................................69-73-76-66—284 (E)
Brett Stegmaier (9), $18,292 ...............................67-76-71-70—284 (E)
Ernie Els (7), $16,003..........................................69-71-71-74—285 (+1)
Anirban Lahiri (7), $16,003...............................69-72-71-73—285 (+1)
Bubba Watson (7), $16,003.............................72-71-71-71—285 (+1)
Richy Werenski (7), $16,003 .............................74-68-73-70—285 (+1)
Troy Merritt (7), $16,003....................................70-69-70-76—285 (+1)
Ryan Moore (7), $16,003...................................69-71-71-74—285 (+1)
John Huh (5), $15,028 .......................................66-73-71-76—286 (+2)
David Lingmerth (5), $15,028..........................71-69-75-71—286 (+2)
Jesse Mueller, $15,028 ......................................70-73-70-73—286 (+2)
Sam Saunders (5), $15,028 ..............................68-70-75-73—286 (+2)
Brian Stuard (5), $15,028..................................70-71-69-76—286 (+2)
Daniel Summerhays (5), $15,028....................67-75-75-69—286 (+2)
Scott Brown (4), $14,348 ...................................73-70-73-71—287 (+3)
Derek Fathauer (4), $14,348 ............................68-75-73-71—287 (+3)
Ryan Hogue, $14,348........................................68-73-75-71—287 (+3)
Harold Varner III (4), $14,348 ..........................70-72-72-73—287 (+3)
Kevin Streelman (4), $14,008...........................72-70-75-71—288 (+4)
Corey Conners (3), $13,668 ..............................70-71-74-74—289 (+5)
Brian Davis (3), $13,668 ....................................70-71-75-73—289 (+5)
Roberto D?az (3), $13,668 ...............................69-72-71-77—289 (+5)
Shawn Stefani (3), $13,668 ..............................69-73-74-73—289 (+5)
Chad Campbell (3), $13,192 ...........................75-68-75-72—290 (+6)
Russell Knox (3), $13,192 ..................................69-73-75-73—290 (+6)
Michael Thompson (3), $13,192 ......................69-70-77-74—290 (+6)
Geoff Ogilvy (2), $12,852 .................................71-72-77-71—291 (+7)
Camilo Villegas (2), $12,852............................72-71-72-76—291 (+7)
Retief Goosen (2), $12,580 ..............................71-71-78-72—292 (+8)
James Hahn (2), $12,580..................................72-71-73-76—292 (+8)
LPGA Tour - Toto Japan Open
At Taiheiyo Club (Minori Course)
Ibaraki, Japan
Purse:, $1.5 million
Yardage: 6,608; Par: 72
Final
Shanshan Feng, $225,000 ...................................66-63-68—197 (-19)
Ai Suzuki, $137,536................................................66-65-68—199 (-17)
Anna Nordqvist, $99,772 .....................................67-68-66—201 (-15)
Lizette Salas, $77,182............................................66-69-68—203 (-13)
Sarah Jane Smith, $40,716 ..................................71-67-66—204 (-12)
Moriya Jutanugarn, $40,716 ...............................71-67-66—204 (-12)
Mi Hyang Lee, $40,716 .........................................68-70-66—204 (-12)
Minjee Lee, $40,716...............................................70-67-67—204 (-12)
Mamiko Higa, $40,716 .........................................69-68-67—204 (-12)
Lydia Ko, $40,716...................................................68-68-68—204 (-12)
Ayaka Watanabe, $40,716..................................68-67-69—204 (-12)
Serena Aoki, $24,748.............................................71-67-67—205 (-11)
Sei Young Kim, $24,748 .........................................67-70-68—205 (-11)
Charley Hull, $24,748 ............................................70-64-71—205 (-11)
In Gee Chun, $18,256 ............................................69-70-67—206 (-10)
Angel Yin, $18,256.................................................69-69-68—206 (-10)
Jiyai Shin, $18,256 .................................................73-64-69—206 (-10)
Saki Takeo, $18,256 ..............................................69-68-69—206 (-10)
Jane Park, $18,256 ................................................66-71-69—206 (-10)
Teresa Lu, $18,256..................................................69-67-70—206 (-10)
Pei-Ying Tsai, $18,256............................................68-68-70—206 (-10)
Stacy Lewis, $18,256..............................................68-67-71—206 (-10)
Min-Young Lee, $18,256 .......................................66-68-72—206 (-10)
Sun-Ju Ahn, $14,119.................................................69-69-69—207 (-9)
Chae-Young Yoon, $14,119 ....................................67-71-69—207 (-9)
Yukari Nishiyama, $14,119.....................................68-69-70—207 (-9)
Momoko Ueda, $14,119 .........................................69-66-72—207 (-9)
Haruka Morita-WanyaoLu, $11,837 .....................74-67-67—208 (-8)
Megan Khang, $11,837..........................................72-68-68—208 (-8)
Jeong Eun Lee, $11,837 ..........................................70-69-69—208 (-8)
Caroline Masson, $11,837 ......................................68-70-70—208 (-8)
Saiki Fujita, $11,837 .................................................66-72-70—208 (-8)
Marina Alex, $8,919.................................................75-68-66—209 (-7)
Shoko Sasaki, $8,919 ...............................................73-67-69—209 (-7)
Lexi Thompson, $8,919............................................68-72-69—209 (-7)
Jodi Ewart Shadoff, $8,919 .....................................71-68-70—209 (-7)
Ritsuko Ryu, $8,919 ...................................................70-69-70—209 (-7)
Eri Okayama, $8,919 ...............................................70-68-71—209 (-7)
Nasa Hataoka, $8,919 ............................................66-71-72—209 (-7)
Brittany Altomare, $8,919.......................................68-68-73—209 (-7)
So Yeon Ryu, $8,919 .................................................68-68-73—209 (-7)
Austin Ernst, $6,796..................................................73-69-68—210 (-6)
Brooke M. Henderson, $6,796................................71-69-70—210 (-6)
Chella Choi, $6,796 ..................................................69-71-70—210 (-6)
Karine Icher, $6,796..................................................69-69-72—210 (-6)
Kana Mikashima, $5,622 ........................................73-70-68—211 (-5)
Misuzu Narita, $5,622 .............................................69-74-68—211 (-5)
Hee-Kyung Bae, $5,622...........................................74-68-69—211 (-5)
Michelle Wie, $5,622................................................76-65-70—211 (-5)
Rie Tsuji, $5,622.........................................................73-68-70—211 (-5)
Eun-Hee Ji, $5,622 ....................................................68-71-72—211 (-5)
European Tour - Turkish Airlines Open
At Regnum Carya Golf & Spa Resort
Antalya, Turkey
Purse: $7 million
Yardage: 7,159; Par: 71
Final
Justin Rose, England.................................................69-68-64-65—266
Nicolas Colsaerts, Belgium......................................64-64-73-66—267
Dylan Frittelli, South Africa.......................................70-67-66-64—267
Padraig Harrington, Ireland....................................65-72-64-67—268
Thorbjorn Olesen, Denmark ...................................69-68-66-66—269
Kiradech Aphibarnrat, Thailand.............................66-67-66-71—270
Eddie Pepperell, England.........................................66-66-71-67—270
Shane Lowry, Ireland ................................................68-66-65-72—271
Julian Suri, United States..........................................68-70-66-67—271
Fabrizio Zanotti, Paraguay .....................................72-66-67-66—271
Matthew Fitzpatrick, England .................................69-65-70-68—272
Thomas Pieters, Belgium ..........................................69-67-66-70—272
Matthew Southgate, England ................................69-65-69-69—272
Peter Uihlein, United States.....................................69-67-68-69—273
Paul Waring, England...............................................70-69-67-67—273
Stephen Gallacher, Scotland...................................69-65-69-71—274
Tyrrell Hatton, England .............................................67-70-71-66—274
Joost Luiten, Netherlands .........................................64-73-67-70—274
Callum Shinkwin, England .......................................71-67-67-69—274
6C ❚ MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2017 ❚ USA TODAY
SPORTS
E2
Victory
tradition
muted out
of respect
FORT WORTH — Kevin Harvick’s
victory lane celebration Sunday lacked
something that has been tradition at
Texas Motor Speedway: the celebratory
firing of a pair of pistols into the air.
Track President Eddie Gossage told
USA TODAY Sports the decision was
made out of respect for the 26 people
killed at a church outside San Antonio.
“In light of what happened, it was the
respectful thing to do,” Gossage said.
The six-shooter celebration has been
a part of most race celebrations since
the track opened in 1997.
The celebration has come under
scrutiny before, including when some
questioned the National Rifle Association’s sponsorship relationship with the
track after the mass shooting at an elementary school in Newtown, Conn., in
2012.
A.J. Perez
With Sunday’s victory, Kevin Harvick will seek his second NASCAR Cup title on Nov. 19 at Homestead-Miami Speedway. He
won it in 2014. JEROME MIRON/USA TODAY SPORTS
NASCAR
Continued from Page 1C
The pit crew for Brad Keselowski works on his car after it made contact with another car at the start of Sunday’s race.
JEROME MIRON/USA TODAY SPORTS
to get back to fifth. I’m happy for that.”
Keselowski has a 19-point lead on
Denny Hamlin, who is fifth in the standings entering next Sunday’s race at
Phoenix Raceway.
Hamlin, who finished third Sunday,
and Ryan Blaney (22 points behind Keselowski) are certainly within striking
distance. The two Hendrick Motorsports drivers (Chase Elliott and seventime champ Jimmie Johnson), however,
will likely need to win at Phoenix to secure a spot in the finals.
Elliott started 34th after his car failed
to clear technical inspection and didn’t
make a qualifying run Friday. He rallied
to finish eighth but is 49 points behind
Keselowski. “We just never really hit on
it,” Elliott said. “It was a very frustrating
afternoon. We’ll just go on to Phoenix.
We are going to try to get a victory and
go on to Homestead.”
Johnson, who had won for the seventh time on this 1.5-mile oval in April,
started ninth and slowly drifted back in
the pack as the race wore on. He finished in 27th place, three laps down.
Johnson has won four times at Phoenix, but not since 2009. “In places where
we expect to run well and traditionally
do, we haven’t,” Johnson said.
“(But) one thing this team will never
do is give up.”
Marathon
Continued from Page 1C
gium. Naert briefly led the men’s race
before cramping dropped him to eighth,
fighting his way over the finish line with
gritted teeth and tortured calf muscles.
“What happened at the beginning of
this week affected my country very seriously,” Naert said. Ann-Laure Decadt, a
Belgian mother of two, was one of the
victims, while another Belgian woman,
Marion Van Reeth, lost both of her legs
in the incident.
“Everyone is hurting because of
that,” Naert added. “I ran with those
thoughts in my heart. Every single runner here runs for those people who died.
It was such a special race for that reason.”
The crowds turned out in vast numbers, but it wasn’t one of those displays
of overt patriotism, full of waving flags
and “U-S-A.” It was more a celebration
of the New York way of life, and it felt
just right. The encouragement from the
roadside was heartfelt and genuine and
mixed with that inimitable brand of Big
Apple humor. The signs were humorous, the energy was upbeat, the banter
bitingly sarcastic.
It was the best response possible.
New York showed up, was not muted or
subdued, while remaining aware of the
struggles yet determined not to be quieted by them.
It inspired Shirley Smith, a motherof-two from Newark who was in Lower
Manhattan on Tuesday but did not hear
of the attack until she returned home
that evening. She had been to the marathon in the past but didn’t plan to this
time.
“Then I changed my mind,” Smith
said. “If the purpose of terrorism is to
provoke fear, then you have it within you
Fans cheer and support the competitors Sunday during the TCS New York City Marathon. VINCENT CARCHIETTA/USA TODAY SPORTS
power to defy that. That’s what every
runner is doing, and if you can give them
a tiny lift with your encouragement,
why wouldn’t you?”
Perhaps the biggest indicator of what
emotion this marathon generated is
that it inspired even those who inspire
others.
Meb Keflezghi is 42, is the USA’s best
known marathon runner and placed 11th
in the final race of his career. After
crossing the finishing line and allowing
himself a satisfied smile, Keflezighi’s
thoughts turned to the past week, rather
than the last 15 years of running.
“I feel like New York is my city,” said
Keflezighi, who lives in San Diego. “Everybody (running) did, and we wanted
to protect it. We’ll go on with our life.
“Life and marathons are a journey,
but sports is a celebration. This made us
appreciate life. We have to move on,
somehow, someway.”
New York will, you can be sure of
that. Based on the evidence of Sunday
morning, it already has.
“We always need a reason to smile in
tough times, and hopefully (this) can
bring a few smiles to people’s faces.”
Shalane Flanagan
Women’s champion
K1
USA TODAY ❚ MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2017 ❚ SECTION D
IN LIFE
17 blockbusters and counting
The definitive ranking of all the Marvel movies. 2D
‘Mean Girls: The Musical’
“I give you: Sexy Corn!” and other one-liners. 3D
‘Thor’ is roaring like thunder
PARAMOUNT PICTURES
LIFELINE
Director Q&A, hair stylin’, boffo box office. 4-5D
MOVIES
HOW WAS YOUR DAY?
PATTON OSWALT
Congratulations! The
comedian married
actress/writer
Meredith Salenger
on Saturday in
Los Angeles. “True GREGG DEGUIRE/
love. True happiWIREIMAGE
ness. Forever and
Always. The Oswalts,” the bride wrote
on Instagram with a couple of photos
of her new family: husband Patton
and his daughter with his late wife,
Michelle McNamara.
Adam (Miles Teller) returns home to his wife (Haley Bennett), but he has brought the war with him. FRANCOIS DUHAMEL, AP
FILMMAGIC; GETTY IMAGES
IT’S YOUR BIRTHDAY
WHO’S CELEBRATING TODAY
Sally Field is 71. Ethan Hawke is 47.
Emma Stone is 29.
War dramas take a stark,
timely look at patriotism
STYLE STAR
ROWAN BLANCHARD
Patrick Ryan
The ‘Girl Meets
World’ star looked
glamorous in Gucci at the
LACMA Art + Film Gala
Saturday in Los Angeles.
She wore the militarymeets-floral ensemble
at the event honoring
artist Mark Bradford
and filmmaker
George Lucas.
What is the cost of patriotism?
That’s the weighty question posed
by two timely new dramas depicting
the war at home: Thank You for Your
Service (now showing) follows two
young soldiers (Miles Teller and
Beulah Koale) suffering from PTSD
upon returning from Iraq. And Last
Flag Flying (now in New York and Los
Angeles, expands nationwide Nov. 17)
is a road-trip movie about three Vietnam War veterans (Bryan Cranston,
Steve Carell and Laurence Fishburne)
who reunite to bury one of their
Marine sons.
The latter is adapted from Darryl
Ponicsan’s 2005 novel and directed by
Richard Linklater. Much like the filmmaker’s signature movie Dazed and
Confused, most of Last Flag is spent
with Larry (Carell), Sal (Cranston) and
Mueller (Fishburne) shooting the
JASON LAVERIS/
FILMMAGIC
USA TODAY
breeze and swapping stories, airing
their grievances about the Iraq War and
their time in the service, and mulling
whether to forgo a military burial for
Larry’s son as an act of protest.
“I didn’t want it to be false heroism,”
Linklater says. When you’re a soldier,
“you’re at the bottom of the heap, so
there’s a lot of (complaining) and moaning,” and many feel underappreciated
when they come home.
But Last Flag’s central trio ultimately
agrees to move forward with a military
funeral, because “when it comes down to
that moment of tragedy and the ultimate
sacrifice Larry Jr. has made, they’re
going to respect him,” Linklater says.
“They put their own politics aside.”
Thank You explores a similarly complicated relationship with patriotism,
telling the true story of Adam Schumann
(Teller) and “Solo” Aeiti (Koale) as they
struggle to readjust to civilian life.
Stretches of the film are spent in therapy
sessions and veterans hospitals, where
the characters are met by inattentive
staff and long waits for treatment.
“It’s such a big part of what these
guys return to,” says writer/director
Jason Hall (American Sniper).
The movie’s title is also meant to rebuff that colloquialism people trot out
when they greet veterans.
“ ‘Thank you for your service’ is a
downright cop-out,” Hall says. For
soldiers, the act of “coming home is
equally heroic, and we need to find a
way to help them do that.”
Darker facets of heroism in recent
war movies such American Sniper and
Zero Dark Thirty could resonate more
deeply this fall, given the hundreds of
athletes who have protested racial inequality by kneeling during the national
anthem, and recent claims that President Trump told a soldier’s widow her
husband “knew what he signed up for.”
Says Hall, “We don’t have a grasp of
what these guys go through, and that
rings clear.”
BOOK REVIEW
‘Water’: Worry, worry everywhere
STUART C. WILSON/GETTY IMAGES
Zlati Meyer
CAUGHT IN THE ACT
PADDINGTON & PALS
‘Paddington 2’ actors Hugh Bonneville and Hugh Grant join their film’s
title star at the sequel’s London
premiere Sunday at BFI Southbank.
The movie opens in U.S. theaters
in January.
USA SNAPSHOTS©
78%
of Americans frequently
have a snack or mini meal
before dinner.
SOURCE Sabra Unofficial Meal Survey of
1,000 adults.
Mike B. Smith; Veronica Bravo/USA TODAY
USA TODAY
Miami’s Art Deco buildings have retained their beauty. Fancy cars owned
by multimillionaires who made it big
in real estate are parked beside palatial
homes and exclusive shopping districts. The Magic City, so dubbed for its
stratospheric growth, is
still a popular tourist
attraction.
And the visiting outof-towners are bringing
scuba gear to go diving
in the streets.
That’s how Jeff Goo- Jeff
dell envisions Miami’s Goodell
demise in The Water Will
Come: Rising Seas, Sinking Cities, and
the Remaking of the Civilized World
(Little, Brown, 352 pp., eeeE out of
four), a journalistic take on what will
happen to the world’s coastal regions
as climate change elevates sea levels.
After a prologue titled “Atlantis”
that creates a new literary genre of
speculative non-fiction, Goodell dives
into a wonky but vivid mix of science,
history and sociology. A comically sad
lesson on how hucksters transformed
the Sunshine State into the Boomville
we know today bleeds into the author’s
trip to Greenland for ice testing, then
to the woes of Alaskan coastal com-
munities, back to South Florida (one
chapter is titled “Miami Is Drowning”)
and out again to the wider world.
Goodell dips his toe into the lessons
to be learned from Venice, Italy, and the
Netherlands — and into the spreading
concern in post-Hurricane Sandy New
York City and Norfolk, Va., home to a
huge chunk of the United States’ naval
power. Readers even get a glimpse of
Nigeria’s rising-water coping strategies,
which include a floating school (which
later collapsed) and an entire community built on stilts.
Billions of dollars will be spent — to
either slow down the seas’ approach or
to relocate people and assets in their
way. The coming economic apocalypse
is worse than anything Noah warned
about, according to the author.
“As our planet changes, so will we,”
Goodell warns.
A contributing editor at Rolling Stone
and a fellow at the Washington, D.C.,
think tank New America, Goodell talks
about climate change and what it means
to every person on the planet in a way
that will engage even the non-Nova
crowd.
Yet at times the book is repetitive.
Amid swirls of statistics come the same
points over and over: Fossil fuels get
much of the blame. Millions of people
will be displaced. Policymakers move at
a glacial pace. Real estate developers refuse to heed warnings. (“My biggest fear
is mayhem — the Mad Max response,”
one of them is quoted as saying.)
People who believe in climate change
will find themselves nodding and tsktsking as they zip through this easy-toread volume.
Global warming skeptics might want
to invest in some diving gear.
LIFE
2D ❚ MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2017 ❚ USA TODAY
MOVIES
Marvel’s marvels, definitively ranked
moral code that created an intriguing
thread for his next two movies.
Brian Truitt
USA TODAY
With 17 blockbuster movies and
counting since 2008, the Marvel Cinematic Universe has created a cosmos of
big stars. So where does Thor: Ragnarok
(now showing) fit into this superhero
saga? Here’s the definitive ranking of all
the Marvel movies so far:
5. Guardians of the Galaxy
Vol. 2 2017
They had us at “Kurt Russell plays a
living planet.” The gravy is everything
else: adorable Baby Groot dancing in the
middle of a space battle, Dave Bautista’s
Drax being the buff, oddball voice of reason, and Michael Rooker’s space outlaw
Yondu stealing the show.
17. Iron Man 2 2010
Let’s accentuate the positive: The sequel gave us Scarlett Johansson’s sleek
secret agent Black Widow and put Don
Cheadle in the War Machine armor. Everything else was a scattershot mess
with Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.)
taking on the wholly underwhelming
villain Whiplash (Mickey Rourke).
16. The Incredible Hulk
2008
Before ultimately being replaced in
other movies by Mark Ruffalo, Edward
Norton starred as scientist Bruce Banner in this odd duck from the nascent
MCU. This mostly forgettable affair exists to serve as a reminder that we still
deserve a good solo Hulk film one day.
15. Iron Man 3 2013
The results are only so-so as Stark
tussles with PTSD, criminally underused antagonist Mandarin (Ben Kingsley) and yawn-worthy villain Aldrich
Killian (Guy Pearce). The threequel also
proved that, yes, too many armored
suits are a bad thing — heck, even Gwyneth Paltrow gets one.
14. Thor: The Dark World
2013
Chris Hemsworth’s thunder god has
a sequel that’s a blender of familiar fantasy tropes as Thor and love interest
Jane Foster (Natalie Portman) have to
deal with a dark elf with an Infinity
Stone. Tom Hiddleston’s iconic trickster
Loki is in fine form and the film’s highlight in every way.
13. Thor 2011
Not Marvel’s greatest solo movie, but
certainly one that takes some admirable
swings. A quasi-family drama that boots
4. The Avengers 2012
Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) supports his fellow soldiers in “Captain America:
The First Avenger.” JAY MAIDMENT
Thor from the realm of Asgard to Earth in
fish-out-of-water fashion so he can be
worthy of his mystical hammer Mjolnir.
12. Avengers: Age
of Ultron 2015
Bursting with a packed ensemble, it’s
lacking the superteam mojo of the first
Avengers. Only when we see Hawkeye
(Jeremy Renner) and his secret home life
do we get that great Joss Whedon touch.
Also: Bless James Spader’s heart for being the world’s snarkiest killer robot.
11. Thor: Ragnarok 2017
Thor and Hulk make a dynamic duo
in the best Thor solo film (and funniest
Marvel project), and anything with the
two of them is magic. It’s just too bad
the larger narrative featuring a hostile
takeover by goddess of death Hela (Cate
Blanchett) takes a backseat to the various shenanigans.
10. Doctor Strange 2016
Benedict Cumberbatch gets a fantastically weird and trippy introduction to
the MCU as a sorcerer supreme who
goes from rich jerk to humbled hero. It’s
a magical version of Iron Man’s origin
and some gags are overly goofy, yet the
filmmaking wizardry and effects are
second to none.
9. Ant-Man 2015
The heist comedy with a supershrinking dude was a bigger risk than
Guardians of the Galaxy. Paul Rudd,
Michael Douglas and Evangeline Lilly
are great together, though, and Marvel
gave us something we hadn’t seen yet: a
hero who’s also an ex-con dad.
8. Iron Man 2008
The beginning, the kickoff, the OG. A
crew of Avengers was probably still a
pipe dream for fans and most of Hollywood when Downey first put on the Iron
Man suit, but from the start, the signature swagger, attitude and swig of humility he gave Stark set the tone for everything that was to come.
7. Spider-Man:
Homecoming 2017
Spider-Man,
Spider-Man,
does
whatever a spider can — and when
you’re the new version of the teen webslinger played by Tom Holland, you also
deal with balancing extracurriculars,
getting a date for the big homecoming
dance, trying to impress Tony Stark and
fighting the Vulture in an epic youngadult adventure.
6. Captain America:
The First Avenger 2011
Marvel nailed the origin story of
Steve Rogers (Chris Evans), the little guy
whose heart was bigger than his biceps
until a super-soldier serum pumped
him up. It offered a great World War II
aesthetic, two-fisted adventure and a
Whedon’s jam-packed ensemble
lived up to its giant-size expectations.
While the heroes-batting-each-other
trope is starting to get played out, the
excitement is palpable, and fanboy
hearts melt when hammers and shield
fly as Iron Man, Cap and Thor meet.
3. Captain America:
Civil War 2016
Personal and political stakes are at play
as Cap chooses his best friend (and brainwashed assassin) over Iron Man, blowing
up the Avengers dynamic. Plus, the best
superhero battle of them all and memorable intros for Black Panther (Chadwick
Boseman) and Spider-Man (Holland).
2. Guardians of the Galaxy
2014
Fantastic tunes, a strange cast of
characters that works, and a story
where you’re hooked on a bunch of feelings, from the emotions of young Peter
Quill crying over his dying mother to the
hilarity of grown-up Peter (Chris Pratt)
explaining Footloose to new pal Gamora
(Zoe Saldana). We are Groot, indeed.
1. Captain America:
The Winter Soldier 2014
More political thriller than superhero
blockbuster, Captain America’s second
solo film — and the best Marvel jam of
them all — taps into timely themes of
privacy concerns, an enemy growing
from within, and military might used in
ethically questionable ways. Come for
the timeliness, stay for Cap wrecking a
bunch of guys in an elevator.
TELEVISION
One war story, told on many fronts
‘Long Road Home’ looks
at a single day in Iraq
Jacqueline Cutler
Special for USA TODAY
It was a long road home — for everyone.
National Geographic’s The Long Road
Home (Tuesday, 9 ET/PT) tells the story
of one battle in the Iraq War from multiple perspectives — of the American
soldiers who fought, of their families
back home and of Iraqis who were involved. Each of the eight episodes focuses on an individual and that person’s
point of view on April 4, 2004, the day of
the battle in Iraq’s Sadr City.
“It captures the soldiers and the families as everyday people and as everyday
Americans,” says ABC News chief global
affairs correspondent Martha Raddatz,
who wrote the best seller on which the
serie is based. “They are human beings
who have to make split-second decisions about themselves and their brothers and sisters.
“Everything they do is a risk, and
they rise to it,” she says. “ This is the
history of war captured in these eight
hours. I hope people around the world
understand ... what it means so they can
have a voice in their own country and
understand that sometimes there is absolutely no choice.”
In early 2004, the U.S. Army was in
the Sadr City section of Baghdad to help,
or so the soldiers thought. Sadr City,
population 2.5 million, was considered
“the safest place in Iraq,” and being deployed there meant the sort of duty
many soldiers found boring.
These men from the 2nd Battalion,
5th Cavalry Regiment had arrived in Iraq
on March 31; by April 4, they were in the
cross hairs of insurgents’ AK-47s.
A 19-man platoon had been dispatched on its usual sanitation security
duty, accompanying workers hosing off
the sewage steaming in the streets.
Suddenly, the streets emptied. The
silence was shocking.
Then the real shock came. Insur-
Eric Bourquin (Jon Beavers, left) and Ben Hayhurst (Patrick Schwarzenegger) take cover. VAN REDIN/NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
Executive producer Mike Medavoy
and journalist/author Martha Raddatz.
STEWART VOLLAND, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
gents, in houses and on rooftops, started firing at the Americans. The platoon
sought shelter in a house and called for
rescue, but the convoys trying to reach
them became ensnared in their own
firefights. Eight American soldiers and
hundreds of Iraqis were killed on “Black
Sunday”; 65 Americans and an unknown number of Iraqis were wounded.
This battle made it clear that the U.S.
military was no longer simply trying to
stabilize and promote peace in Iraq a
year after the invasion that toppled
Saddam Hussein; it was fighting an
insurgency. Over the yearlong deployment, an additional 160 soldiers of the
Army’s 1st Cavalry Division died.
On April 4, however, the mission was
to extract the trapped platoon, recover
the dead and rescue the injured.
“From my perspective, the story is
both specific and universal at the same
time, and I think those are stories I
always respond to,” says Carolyn Bernstein, National Geographic’s executive
vice president for global scripted development and production. “And from a
Nat Geo perspective, it fits the bill as
well: a very specific story about a specific incident during the Iraq War that took
place in eight hours.”
The Long Road Home also showcases
the women left behind on a grassy patch
at Fort Hood, Texas, the country’s largest active-duty Army base, where National Geographic was allowed to build a
rambling set.
Just as the men formed a deep brotherhood, the women of Fort Hood forged
a sisterhood.
The actors playing the soldiers and
those portraying their wives all reached
out to their real-life counterparts, as
showrunner and writer Mikko Alanne
suggested.
“It’s the importance of the truth, the
everyday reality of the people,” says
Kate Bosworth, who plays Gina Denomy. “The truth is where you meet someone and bare your soul.”
Jason Ritter, who plays her husband,
Capt. Troy Denomy, says: “I think we all
had this sense that whatever we were
doing was infinitesimal compared to
what the real guys were doing. That level of humility. It’s not coming in and saying, ‘I have seen a lot of war movies.’ ”
LIFE
USA TODAY ❚ MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2017 ❚ 3D
THEATER
‘Mean Girls: The Musical’: OMG, it’s so fetch
Cara Kelly
USA TODAY
Get in, losers: We’re going to Broadway.
But first, a pit stop at The National
Theatre, which is, like, a really pretty stage
in the heart of our nation’s capital that
may or may not have ever hosted Ladysmith Black Mambazo (but is definitely
Prairie Home Companion-friendly).
That’s right: Mean Girls: The Musical
is here, and there are new hilarious oneliners to be learned.
For those Gretchen Weiners-types
who may have worried that the adaptation, announced in March, could never
match the perfection of the film, put
your fears aside. It doesn’t disappoint.
The long-awaited musical version of
the 2004 movie that spawned a million
memes began its trial run Tuesday night
in Washington, D.C., where it’ll spend a
few weeks polishing its nail beds and
otherwise perfecting the show before
heading to the big time in New York for
previews starting in March.
Though there will undoubtedly be
tweaks, it’s shaping up to be, in the
common Plastics parlance, so fetch.
(That’s slang, from London ...)
If you didn’t get that — or any of the
above — then the musical adaptation
may not translate for you. Nor will the
sexy Santa costumes and shirts with
boob holes, which were plentiful in the
audience at the first preview, coincidentally held on Halloween night, which
gave the whole thing a Rocky Horror Picture Show vibe. That same type of cult
fandom, which inspires people to dress
up as their favorite characters and recite
lines along with the cast, probably will
be the key to the Tina Fey/Lorne Michaels-backed musical’s success.
Fey struck comedy and zeitgeist gold
with the film, for which she wrote the
screenplay and starred as Ms. Norbury.
For the musical iteration, she wrote the
book and partnered with an all-star
team including her husband, Jeff Richmond, a composer for 30 Rock and Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt; Michaels,
who serves as executive producer; Nell
Benjamin, lyricist for Legally Blonde:
The Musical and director/choreographer Casey Nicholaw (The Book of Mor-
Cady (Lindsay Lohan), Karen (Amanda Seyfried), Regina (Rachel McAdams) and Gretchen (Lacey Chabert) struck a mean
chord in the 2004 movie. Now the cult favorite is headed to Broadway. MICHAEL GIBSON, AP
There are new one-liners
to be learned in the musical
version of the movie that
spawned a million memes.
COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL THEATRE
mon, Something Rotten!).
The cast is equally well-suited: Erika
Henningsen, who plays Cady Heron
(Lindsay Lohan in the film), was the
youngest actor to play Fantine in Les
Misérables on Broadway. Taylor Louderman, aka Regina George (Rachel McAdams), made her Broadway debut in
Bring It On: The Musical. And Kate
Rockwell as Karen Smith (Amanda Seyfried), is another Legally Blonde alum.
While Rockwell may be able to elicit
roaring laughter for simply repeating
the line “I’m a mouse, duh,” Mean Girls
does more than that. Karen gets a solo
dedicated to the memorable utterance,
another Rocky Horror parallel with
freight-night-style dancing, in which
she laments the burden of being the
Irresistibly entertaining.
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dumb hot one. It’s the reason she loves
Halloween, the one day people can pretend to be anything.
“It’s like the Internet, but in person
and with candy,” she says before parading out a dozen potential sexy costume
options. “I give you: Sexy Corn!”
Gretchen (Ashley Park) also gets a
solo and expanded story line, singing
“What’s wrong with me?” when rejected
by bestie Regina. As does Janis, who
gets a power ballad about raising her
middle finger high.
Cady and Regina remain the stars, as
they are in the film, and share a fun
power dynamic that lets Regina emerge
in the beginning like a Bond villain.
Though there are fresh content jokes
and story lines and mentions of Instagram and technology that didn’t exist in
the early 2000s, the lines that have become so ubiquitous that they’re part of
Millennials’ vocabulary are almost all
accounted for. So we’ll let you in on a
little secret, because we’re such good
friends: Get your tickets now.
LIFE
4D ❚ MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2017 ❚ USA TODAY
MOVIES
Q&A: Let’s hammer away at ‘Thor’
Andrea Mandell
USA TODAY
Spoiler alert: The following discusses plot points for Thor: Ragnarok, so
beware if you haven’t seen it yet.
Did Thor: Ragnarok leave you wondering where those crazy cameos come
from? We’ve got the answers straight
from director Taika Waititi on the latest
Thor adventure (in theaters now), starring Chris Hemsworth, Cate Blanchett
and Tom Hiddleston.
Q: Let’s talk about that post-credits
scene.
A: I don’t know anything about Infinity War (the new Avengers movie out
May 4).
Q: That’s not even what I was going
to start with! OK, we’ll start elsewhere: How much convincing did it
take to get Matt Damon to cameo for
the theater scene on Asgard?
A: None at all! About 30 seconds on
the phone. Chris (Hemsworth) called
him and he goes, “We want to do this
thing, come and do it!” They’re good
friends. I’d met him a couple of times,
and then we sort of jumped on the
phone with him. It was like three hours;
it was really quick. That was so much
fun. It made me so much more satisfied
with that scene as well.
Q: What about Luke Hemsworth’s
cameo as Thor in the same scene? I
did a double-take.
A: We were talking and I was like,
“Hey, man, you’ve got to get Luke in
there somewhere.” Because Liam (Chris
Hemsworth’s other brother) wasn’t
available. That scene hadn’t been written yet. It made perfect sense.
Q: OK, so the post-credits scene:
Is that officially Thanos’ ship?
A: Yep.
Bruce Banner/Hulk (Mark Ruffalo) and Thor (Chris Hemsworth) cross paths in “Ragnarok.” JASIN BOLAND/MARVEL STUDIOS
Q: Anything else you can tell me
about it?
A: Nope. (Marvel is) so secretive!
None of the directors are allowed to tell
each other anything. No one reads each
other’s scripts. I have no idea what
Black Panther’s (in theaters Feb. 16)
about. I’m serious. I’ve never seen it.
Q: Did Marvel give you free rein on
Ragnarok?
A: When I first met them, one of the
things they said to me was, “If you come
in here trying to reinvent everything or
assuming that a Hollywood studio is the
enemy before you’ve even started, then
you’re in the wrong place. It is a collabo-
ration. We want to make Marvel films,
but we’d also like to make a Taika film.”
So I had to keep reminding myself of that.
Whenever I felt challenged, which was
not often at all, I had to remind myself,
“I’m helping these guys make a movie
about source material that isn’t mine.”
It was a good lesson for me coming
from the indie world, where being an auteur is supposed to be this cool thing.
Your vision. Your voice. If I hear the word
“visionary” attached to a director’s name
again, I swear, it drives me crazy. Because
it’s all BS. Any film is a team effort.
Q: So you feel like the final film is
as “you” as films like Boy or Hunt for
the Wilderpeople?
A: This film is as Taika as any of my
films. It just happens to be a giant
superhero movie. I look at the film and
I’m like, “I’m so surprised they let me do
this stuff.” Every week I had a new triumph which was also a shock to me.
Like, “Are they even watching the film?
They let me put that joke in there?”
Q: What’s an example of one of
your biggest triumphs?
A: All of Korg (played by Waititi). All
of that character. He has no business being in there. He’s so irreverent. There’s a
huge amount of irreverence in this film;
if you know my stuff, it’s all I do.
A shorn Thor (Chris Hemsworth) — the ’do wasn’t exactly his idea — and the Hulk (Mark Ruffalo) have a heart-to-heart in “Ragnarok.” MARVEL
Stylist answers the buzz on that short hair
Carly Mallenbaum
USA TODAY
Thor must face one of his greatest
fears in his third solo film: The Asgardian superhero sees a barber.
In Thor: Ragnarok (in theaters now),
the godly golden locks of Chris Hemsworth’s hammer-wielding hero are
shorn in favor of an edgier new ’do.
So what’s the deal with the fresh cut?
Hair designer Luca Vannella explains.
It fits the tone of the new film.
In the first two Thor films, the god of
thunder took himself and his signature
hammer, the Mjolnir, very seriously. In
the third outing, however, directed by
Taika Waititi (Hunt for the Wilderpeople), fans will see a “more human and
funny” side of the hero, Vannella says.
This time around, Thor has a different weapon, different armor, different
sense of humor and yes, different hair.
It’s not inspired by the comics.
Though a short-haired Thor appears
in comics including The Unworthy Thor,
Vannella says, Hemsworth’s hair “is just
a whole new look for the movie.”
Thor isn’t Samson losing all of his
strength with his mane, but the haircut
does illustrate a turning point for the
hero. In Ragnarok, Thor protests the
severing of his tresses before he’s forced
into a gladiatorial fight. The hairstyle —
extra-short on the sides with several
lines in the scalp — was informed by the
ultra-stylish planet of Sakaar, where
Thor unwillingly gets the new cut.
YouTube there are demos” of how to
shave lines like Thor’s.
The new ’do is darker.
A too-blond buzz on Thor could look
“very fake or it could look like blond tips
on a ’90s guy,” Vannella says. A darker
shade made more sense, because “his
long hair has a dark root” and his hair
would have to be dark to account for heroically earned sweat, dirt and grease.
There was plenty of discussion
about Valkyrie’s hair, too.
Those lines were made to look
hand-clipped.
Vannella, whose grandfather was a
barber, wanted Thor to look as though
his hair was cut with old-school clippers. “I wanted a broken haircut (that)
wasn’t very accurate,” he says.
Though Hemsworth didn’t actually
have lines shaved into his scalp for the
movie —Vannella used hair gel to strategically part his strands — “already on
In 2013’s “Thor: The Dark World,”
our hammer-wielding hero cut quite
a different figure. JAY MAIDMENT/MARVEL
Warrior Valkyrie — a new character in
the Marvel Cinematic Universe — has
light hair in the comic books, but Vannella decided against giving Tessa
Thompson a blond wig for the role.
“We had a lot of drawings with blond
hair on Tessa, and she looked really
good,” he says. “But some people could
be disappointed that Marvel hired a girl
like Tessa and then wanted to change
her to blond.”
LIFE
USA TODAY ❚ MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2017 ❚ 5D
MOVIES
‘Thor: Ragnarok’ rings up a muscular $121 million
‘Bad Moms’ is a distant
second with $17 million
From staff reports
USA TODAY
NEW YORK – Thor: Ragnarok thundered to one of the year’s best box office
debuts with an estimated $121 million
domestically, again proving the Disney
might.
The robust debut for the third Thor
movie, starring Chris Hemsworth, was a
welcome shot in the arm for Hollywood
and theater owners who have just
suffered through a terrible October. Ragnarok also bucked the trend of diminishing returns for sequels.
The 2011 Thor had a $65.7 million debut; 2013’s Thor: The Dark World opened
with $85.7 million.
“It’s not often you see the second and
third installments in the franchise outpacing the previous issue,” says David
Hollis, Disney’s distribution chief. “You
don’t expect neverending returns when
it comes to sequels, but it definitely
speaks to the quality of the talent at
Marvel and the way they’re thinking
about each film out of the gate.”
Kristen Bell, Mila Kunis, Kathryn Hahn and “A Bad Moms Christmas” have high
hopes for the holidays. HILARY BRONWYN GAYLE/STX ENTERTAINMENT
dio estimates Sunday. The holidaythemed sequel, which returns stars Mila
Kunis, Kristen Bell and Kathryn Hahn,
came in shy of the 2016 original’s $23.8
million opening.
But the big story was Thor, which
also grossed $151.4 million in its second
week of international release. The film
has made $427 million worldwide in
10 days.
Disney isn’t alone in being able to roll
out such blockbusters, but three of the
year’s five $100 million-plus opening
weekends are theirs (the other two are
Beauty and the Beast and Guardians of
the Galaxy Vol. 2).
The other new nationwide release, A
Bad Moms Christmas, opened with $17
million for the weekend and $21.6 million since Wednesday, according to stu-
It has been feast or famine this year
at the box office. August was historically
dismal, September swung to recordbreaking highs, and October again badly
slumped with the lowest overall gross in
a decade. The year is running down
4.8% from last year’s record pace, according to comScore.
Rounding out the rest of the top five:
Jigsaw, the latest installment in the
Saw horror franchise, finished third
with $6.7 million; Tyler Perry’s Boo 2!
Madea Halloween was fourth with $4.7
million; and Gerard Butler disaster epic
Geostorm finished fifth with $3 million.
Several films opened in limited release, including Greta Gerwig’s comingof-age tale Lady Bird, with Saoirse Ronan and Laurie Metcalf. On four
screens, it drew some of the most
packed theaters of the year with a
$93,900 per-screen average.
Rob Reiner’s LBJ, with Woody Harrelson, debuted with $1.1 million in 659
theaters. Richard Linklater’s Last Flag
Flying, with Bryan Cranston, Steve
Carell and Laurence Fishburne, brought
in a per-screen average of $10,500 in
four theaters.
Final numbers are expected Monday.
Contributing: Kim Willis
To view more Classified listings,
visit: www.classifieds.usatoday.com
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QUICKCROSS
© Andrews McMeel
11/6
Friday’s answer: ARTIST HOIST WAIST EXIST MIST BUST LIST RUST /
AUDITION ABSOLUTE FLEXIBLE INSOMNIA / CRUMB THUMB /
ANIMALS / INSIDE
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UP & DOWN WORDS
By John Wilmes
11/6
By David L. Hoyt and Russell L. Hoyt
11/6
1. ACE
Surprisingly-->
2.
Military no-show
3.
4.
-->easy task
5.
“Auld Lang ____”
© Andrews McMeel
6.
Crow cries
Not home
Friday’s Answer
© Andrews McMeel
28 Snake dance tribe
29 Town hall event,
perhaps
30 Greek letter in
geometric angles
34 Chi-town exchange,
with “the”
35 Fancy-schmancy
38 Yellow-furred dog
of comics
39 Capital before
German
reunification
40 Warning of
imminent
attack
43 Fast-food order
carrier
46 Orbiter from
1986 to 2001
48 Military
helicopter
named for a
tribe
49 Moneygrubbing
50 Serpentine
swimmers
51 Approach the
peak of
TXTPERT
Across
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5. 22769273
7. 2683
10. 2253
11. 693
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11/6
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1. 5262
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3. 76828466
4. 9333
6. 738
7. 282
8. 393
9. 793
© USA TODAY and Rich Coulter
52 Personnel director’s
find
55 Huffy state
56 Sport similar to
aikido
57 Peck or pound
58 Bout stoppers,
briefly
61 Play a kazoo
62 Troublemaking tyke
63 Nutella holder
4
Use the
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For example:
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B or C ... and
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A
11/6
A
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Clues:
1. ____ ____ spades
2. Out ____ ____
3. Yearlong ticket
4. Monopoly move
5. Be on deck
6. Upcoming Saturday and
Sunday
7. “SNL” feature
Friday’s Answer
HOT
POTATO
SALAD
POTATO
SALAD
DRESSING
ROOM
DRESSING
NUMBER
ROOM
ONE
NUMBER
DAY
ONE
PLAY ONLINE
PUZZLES.USATODAY.COM
mobilegames.usatoday.com
2
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1
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2 6
6 1
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4 1
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2
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8
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)$$$$
© Andrews McMeel
)
DIFFICULTY RATING
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Friday’s Answers
6
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3
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1
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1
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11/3
Rearrange the words to complete the quote.
ANNOYANCE EXAMPLE FEW GOOD
HARDER
PUT
UP
________ THINGS ARE ___________ TO ________ ________ WITH
M
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3
5
4
6
1
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© WIGGLES 3D GAMES
THAN THE ______________ OF A ________ ___________.
11/6
S
Friday’s solution
© Andrews McMeel
Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x2
box contains the numbers 1 through 6 (no repeats).
7
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Author Mark Twain
jokes about good
behavior.
I
C
UPDATE
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6
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5 9 4
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11/3
C
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Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3
box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (no repeats).
CROSSWORDS
ON YOUR PHONE
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Friday’s Answer
Today’s theme
Agriculture
I
P
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O
11/3
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DOWN
1 20-Across females
2 Ended a flight
3 Without purpose
4 Robb’s father on
“Game of Thrones”
5 Caterpillar
products
6 Volcanic peak in
California
7 Beverage with a
nose
8 Neighbor of a
tackle
9 In a bygone time
10 Not hard to chew
11 Marcher to the beat
of his own drum
12 Business expenses
13 Info-gathering
mission
18 Bondsman’s
offering
23 Fan club’s focus
24 Card that can have
two values
25 Cause of a rapid
heartbeat, perhaps
26 Head start, e.g.
27 Study all night, say
4
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ACROSS
1 Figure depicted in
stained glass
6 Fret about, slangily
11 In place of
14 Further along in life
15 Door jamb
attachment
16 Look back on
regretfully
17 Rash enthusiasm
19 List-abbreviating
abbr.
20 Place to wallow
21 Beverage store buy
22 UCSD part
24 Arguing or laboring
25 Makes a meal of
27 Tablespoon-size
cookie
31 Lariat tosser
32 Wizened caster of
spells
33 Like old lettuce
36 Dr. Zaius of
moviedom, e.g.
37 Not as tipsy
41 Vintage car
whose name is a
monogram
42 In top condition, to
a collector
44 Umlaut half
45 Some Persian Gulf
rulers
47 Carrier of excess
water
51 Lessen the
quality of
53 Service entrance
location, maybe
54 Benghazi’s land
55 Unload on eBay
56 Protrude, like Jay
Leno’s chin
59 Keogh plan
alternative
60 Taiwan Strait vessel
64 Hooked up with
65 Summer forecast
word
66 Call-in show
medium
67 Comb dweller
68 Like bottles for
recycling
69 Easy gaits
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Friday’s Answer: “I have never smuggled anything in my life. Why, then, do I feel
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LIFE
6D ❚ MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2017 ❚ USA TODAY
BOOKS
Alec Baldwin’s ‘Fantastic’ White House ride
Channeling the president ...
Jocelyn McClurg
USA TODAY
You Can’t Spell America Without Me
(Penguin Press, on sale Tuesday) is cowritten with political commentator and
author Kurt Andersen (Fantasyland:
How America Went Haywire). It’s a
first-person parody “memoir” by the
president that goes behind the scenes at
the White House (son Barron is a stealth
adviser) and gives constant updates on
Trump’s golf game. (There are many,
many holes-in-one.) Since he started
donning an orange wig, squinting and
waving his hands around a lot on SNL,
Baldwin seems to have become Trump.
You’ll want to #BookmarkThis.
On Nov. 8, join USA TODAY for a
Facebook Live chat with actor Alec
Baldwin about his new
book, You Can’t Spell
America Without Me: A
So-Called Parody: The
Really Tremendous Inside
Story of My Fantastic
First Year as President
Donald J. Trump.
Baldwin
#BookmarkThis is a (as himself)
series of live video chats
with best-selling authors, and fans can
submit questions. It’s a great opportunity to touch base with Baldwin, who
brings his Emmy Award-winning Saturday Night Live Trump impersonation to
book form (complete with hilarious
original photographs).
tweeted last year before the election.
Will the president find the parody
book funny? Twitter thinks not.
Before SNL’s new season began,
Baldwin, 59, told USA TODAY he hopes
his impersonation spurs voters to turn
out for the 2018 midterm elections and
“start to change the direction we’re
going. Because I’ve never been more
fearful about the future of the country.”
When he’s not impersonating the
president, Baldwin has a busy movie career. Recent credits include The Baby
Boss and Blind. He’s also the author of
the 2017 memoir Nevertheless, and for
many years played Tina Fey’s boss, Jack
Donaghy, on the NBC sitcom 30 Rock.
... while Trump hits back
How to join the chat
Baldwin is no fan of the president;
the disdain is mutual. “Watched Saturday Night Live hit job on me. Time to retire the boring and unfunny show. Alec
Baldwin portrayal stinks,” Trump
Join the Facebook Live chat Wednesday at 2:30 p.m. ET/11:30 a.m. PT on the
USA TODAY Life Facebook page. To
learn more or to submit questions, visit
BaldwinChat.usatoday.com
TONIGHT ON TV
8:00
Critic’s Corner
Kelly Lawler
USA TODAY
Rolling Stone: Stories
From The Edge
HBO, 9 ET/PT
This documentary, directed
by Alex Gibney (Going Clear)
and Blair Foster (George Harrison: Living in the Material
World), chronicles the past 50
years of American pop culture,
politics and (of course) music
through the lens of the magazine. It recounts Rolling Stone’s
history, examines how it became a cultural force and features performances from the
Rolling Stones, Bruce Springsteen, Tina Turner, Janis Joplin, the Sex Pistols, The Clash
and Ice-T. It’s being presented
over two nights; the conclusion
airs Tuesday (9 ET/PT).
Co-founder Jann Wenner in the
early days. BARON WOLMAN/HBO
Supergirl
CW, 8 ET/PT
National City is in crisis when
multiple children get lead poisoning, and Morgan Edge (Adrian Pasdar) blames Lena Luthor
(Katie McGrath), who used a
lead bomb to save the city from
the invading Daxamite army in
last spring’s finale. Lena is unsure whether a flaw in her
bomb’s design may be responsible, but Kara (Melissa Benoist)
and Samantha (Odette Annable)
work to clear her name.
8:30
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Young Guns II Emilio Estevez (1990)
Ride with Norman Reedus (N)
Young Guns Six young gunslingers seek justice. Emilio Estevez (1988)
The Last Alaskans Fur count decreases.
The Last Alaskans The sun reappears.
The Last Alaskans Korths surprised.
Star Trek: Voyager Aliens in disguise.
Star Trek: Voyager Neelix helps Naomi. Star Trek: Voyager Help from the future. Star Trek: Voyager Borg schizophrenia.
The Players Club College student works at strip club. (1998) (7:25)
The Last Alaskans Winter preparations.
Life Two men convicted of murder are sentenced to life in a prison camp. (1999)
The Real Housewives of Atlanta
Real Housewives of Orange County (N) The Real Housewives of Dallas (N)
What Happens (N) Real Housewives
King of the Hill
Cleveland Show
Family Guy
American Dad!
American Dad!
Bob’s Burgers
Bob’s Burgers
Family Guy
The Holiday Two women suffering from romance woes decide to swap homes over Christmas. Cameron Diaz (2006)
The Holiday Cameron Diaz (2006)
Shark Tank Made-in-America goods.
Shark Tank Paintbrush storage.
Shark Tank Healthier cookies.
American Greed: Scams
Anderson Cooper 360° (N)
Anderson Cooper 360° (N)
CNN Tonight with Don Lemon (N)
CNN Tonight with Don Lemon (N)
South Park
South Park
South Park
South Park
Fast N’ Loud: Revved Up (N)
South Park
Fast N’ Loud A 1934 Ford Coupe. (N)
South Park
Daily Show (N)
Opposition (N)
Max Grundy A 1954 COE truck. (N)
Fast N’ Loud A 1934 Ford Coupe.
Andi Mack
K.C. Undercover
Bizaardvark
Raven’s Home
Stuck in the Middle
Liv and Maddie
Bizaardvark
Raven’s Home
Star vs. (N)
Pickle (N)
Rebels (N)
Rebels (N)
Gravity Falls
DuckTales
Star vs. (N)
Pickle (N)
Texas Flip N Move Craftsman style.
Texas Flip N Move Saving money.
Texas Flip N Move Bed & breakfast.
Texas Flip N Move Functional house.
10 Things I Hate About You Girl seeks date for older sister. Julia Stiles (1999)
Keeping Up with the Kardashians
E! News (N)
Holiday Baking Championship
Holiday Baking Championship (N)
Christmas Cookie Challenge (N)
Vegas Cakes
Tucker Carlson Tonight (N)
Hannity (N)
The Ingraham Angle (N)
Fox News @ Night (N)
Matilda (1996)
Just Go With It Man with fake wedding ring meets lady, is ashamed of truth, and fakes divorce. (2011)
Pitch Perfect 2 The exploits of the girls who comprise an a cappella group are followed. (2015)
Vegas Cakes
The 700 Club
Pitch Perfect 2 An a cappella group goes international. (2015)
The Simpsons
The Simpsons
The Simpsons
The Simpsons
The Simpsons
The Simpsons
The Simpsons
The Simpsons
Family Feud
Family Feud
Family Feud
Family Feud
Idiotest
Idiotest
Cash Cab
Cash Cab
Royal Christmas Prince abandons royal customs for love. Lacey Chabert (2014)
On the Twelfth Day of Christmas Woman lifts man’s holiday spirit. (2015)
Love It or List It Retired couple.
Love It or List It Work load dispute.
House Hunters (N) International (N)
American Pickers Salvage yard.
American Pickers Untouched goods. (N) Pawn Stars (N)
Pawn Stars (N)
Primetime Justice (N)
How It Really Happened
Forensic Files
Forensic Files
20/20 on ID (N)
The 1980s: The Deadliest Decade (N)
People Magazine Investigates (N)
That ‘70s Show
That ‘70s Show
That ‘70s Show
That ‘70s Show
That ‘70s Show
That ‘70s Show
G.I. Jane Female soldier is chosen to train as a Navy SEAL by a US senator. Demi Moore, Viggo Mortensen (1997)
House Hunters
International
Pawn Stars
Pawn Stars
Forensic Files
Forensic Files
20/20 on ID
That ‘70s Show
That ‘70s Show
Project Runway Winter theme.
All in with Chris Hayes (N)
The Rachel Maddow Show (N)
Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell (N) The 11th Hour with Brian Williams (N)
Teen Mom 2
Teen Mom 2 (N)
Teen Mum Second baby. (N)
Teen Mom 2
Zero Dark Thirty Chronicle of the covert operation to take down al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden. (2013) (4:30)
Long Road Home
Animals Gone Wild
Full House
Animals Gone Wild
Full House
Full House
Full House
Animals (N)
Animals (N)
Animals Gone Wild
Fresh Prince
Fresh Prince
Friends
Locked Up
Friends
Dateline on OWN Missing sister.
Dateline on OWN Couple killed.
Dateline on OWN Dead wife.
Dateline on OWN Missing sister.
Snapped Woman disappears.
Snapped Cowboy homicide.
Snapped Self-defense.
It Takes a Killer (N) Snapped
ER Mark and Kerry clash.
ER Mark struggles with new physician.
ER Cleo feels guilty after misdiagnosis.
How It’s Made
How It’s Made
Space’s Deepest Secrets Riddles of the sun. (N)
Cops (N)
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Girls (2007)
How It’s Made
How It’s Made
Cops
Cops
Meet Joe Black Anthony Hopkins (1998)
The Shining A man driven mad by evil forces at an abandoned resort stalks his own family. Jack Nicholson (1980)
Journey 2: Mysterious Island (2012)
Jeepers Creepers 3 Authorities hunt for the Creeper. (2017)
Family Guy
Family Guy
Family Guy
Family Guy
American Dad!
Gladiator Russell Crowe (2000)
American Dad!
Conan (N)
Hollywood on Trial Investigation of communist influence in Hollywood. (1976)
Our Vines Have Tender Grapes Norwegian immigrants share rural life. (1945)
Long Lost Family Abandoning mom. (N) Long Island Medium (N)
The Healer (N) (Series premiere)
American Sniper Deadliest sniper questions every kill shot as targets are men, women and children. Bradley Cooper (2015)
Bizarre Foods
Bizarre Foods
Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern
Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern
Long Lost Family Abandoning mom.
The Kingdom Jamie Foxx (2007) (11:01)
Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern
Impractical Jokers Impractical Jokers Impractical Jokers Impractical Jokers Carbonaro Effect
Carbonaro Effect
Carbonaro Effect
Carbonaro Effect
Loves Raymond
Mom
King of Queens
King of Queens
Modern Family
Modern Family
Loves Raymond
Loves Raymond
Loves Raymond
Mom
WWE Monday Night Raw from Manchester Arena in Manchester, England
West Coast Customs
Inside West Coast Customs (N)
Inside West Coast Customs (N)
West Coast Customs
Love & Hip Hop (N)
Scared Famous Forming alliances. (N)
Love & Hip Hop
Scared Famous Forming alliances.
It’s Always Sunny
It’s Always Sunny
It’s Always Sunny
It’s Always Sunny
It’s Always Sunny
It’s Always Sunny
Desus & Mero (N)
Bronson (N)
CSI: Miami Horatio extradited.
CSI: Miami Calleigh kidnapped.
CSI: Miami Vigilante murderer.
CSI: Miami Body in sinkhole.
Secrets of the Earth
Secrets of the Earth
Highway Thru Hell Truck’s lumber.
Highway Thru Hell Stuck under truck.
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
MOVIE NETWORKS
Lucifer (Tom Ellis) is Sin Citybound. MICHAEL COURTNEY/FOX
Lucifer
Fox, 8 ET/PT
Lucifer (Tom Ellis) and Ella
(Aimee Garcia) go to Vegas to
search for Candy (Lindsay Gort).
Chloe (Lauren German), however, is upset that Lucifer left
town on her birthday.
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to klawler@usatoday.com or
tweet them to @klawls.
Cinemax
The Nice Guys In 1970s Los Angeles, a private eye and a hired enforcer form a
mismatched pair as they investigate the case of a missing girl. (2016)
Encore
Swing Vote One vote decides presidential
election. Kevin Costner (2008) (6:57)
FXM
The Bourne Legacy Following the separation of Jason Bourne, another field agent escapes the termination
of more agents and sets out to expose the CIA’s crimes. Jeremy Renner, Rachel Weisz (2012)
Hallmark Movies
Magic Stocking Holiday stocking has
magical abilities. Bridget Regan (2015)
Christmas Secret Single mother overcomes hard times to uncover family secret
during the holidays. Bethany Joy Lenz, John Reardon (2014)
Once Upon a Christmas Santa’s daughter
saves Christmas. John Dye (2000)
HBO
High Maintenance
Culture shock.
Rolling Stone: Stories from the Edge A look is taken at the popular magazine,
and the blend of journalism and music. (N)
HBO Boxing After Dark 11/4/17
Lifetime Movie
The Perfect Stalker Woman kills husband and fakes a stalker to make neighbor
fall in love with her. Danielle Savre, Jefferson Brown (2016)
Killer Assistant Magazine editor’s assistant becomes obsessed with her after
one-night stand. Arianne Zucker, Brando Eaton (2016)
Showtime
SMILF Comparison White Famous
test.
Principal’s office.
SMILF Comparison White Famous
test.
Principal’s office.
Starz
The Girlfriend Experience Escort hired to All Governments Lie: Truth, Deception and the Spirit of
discover secret.
I.F. Stone Government and corporate deception. (2016)
TMC
Notting Hill A movie star finds love is difficult when one is always in the public eye.
Julia Roberts, Hugh Grant (1999)
High Maintenance
Ask for interview.
Totem A teenage girl uses a totem to control a supernatural
threat. Lia McHugh, Lawrence Pressman (2017)
Tales from the
Tour Bus
The River Wild While traveling down a treacherous river, a professional whitewater Supercop Martial arts cop fights drug
rafter struggles to survive in a deadly game with two armed fugitives. (1994)
smugglers. Jackie Chan (1992) (10:54)
Shameless Carl sells the family’s
inheritance.
The Bourne Legacy A new agent escapes termination and
seeks to expose CIA crimes. Jeremy Renner (2012) (10:45)
Shameless Carl sells the family’s
inheritance.
Outlander Claire makes a return to
Lallybroch.
The Girlfriend
Experience
Love the Coopers The Cooper family’s annual Christmas Eve celebration turns
chaotic thanks to a series of unexpected visitors and unforeseen events. (2015)
SPORTS NETWORKS
ESPN
ESPN2
FS1
Golf
MLB
NBA
NBCSports
NFLN
Monday Night Football Detroit Lions at Green Bay Packers from Lambeau Field (Live)
SportsCenter with Scott Van Pelt
Monday Night Football Detroit Lions at Green Bay Packers from Lambeau Field (Live)
SportsCenter
UFC Main Event
UFC Main Event
PGA of America Highlights
Horse Racing Melbourne Cup (Live)
MLB Tonight
NBA Game Time
Quick Pitch
Pregame (Live)
Super High Roller Cash Game
NFL Total Access
Speak for Yourself
PGA Tour Golf Shriners Hospitals for Children Open: Final Round from TPC Summerlin in Las Vegas
NBA Basketball Brooklyn Nets at Phoenix Suns from Talking Stick Resort Arena (Live)
Super High Roller Cash Game
A Football Life Jim Kelly
30 for 30 Four Falls of Buffalo
MOVIES
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