close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US2060203

код для вставки
Nov. 10, 1936.
J. H. HAMMOND. JR
CALOR IFIG RADIATION DETONATOR
Filed Jan. 5, 1934
Ii
2,060,203
2,060,203
Patented Nov. 10, 1936
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
' 2,060,203
CALORIFIC RADIATION DETONATOB
John Hays Hammond, Jr., Gloucester, Mass.
Application January 5, 1934, Serial No. 705,359
9 Claims. (Cl. 114-21)
‘The invention relates to ordnance devices and The interior of the tube I1 is painted a flat
black so as not to re?ect any light. Positioned
more particularly to torpedoes.
pedo may be provided with radiation sensitive
at the focus of the lens I8 is a photoelectric cell
l9 which is connected to two brushes 20 and 2|
ship.
commutator is driven at any suitable speed by
According ‘to one form of the invention, a tor
which engage a commutator 22 which is made 5
5 devices which control the detonation‘ of the ex
‘plosive charge thereof when it passes beneath a‘ - up to two conducting segments 23 and 25. The
The torpedo mechanism may include a
heat sensitive device and a light sensitive device.
The heat sensitive device may be arranged to
10 control the detonation of the war head of the
torpedo. The light sensitive device may govern
thecontrol exercised by the heat sensitive device.
'
The invention also may provide a means where‘
by the detonation of the war head of the torpedo
15 is delayed a predetermined time after the light
. sensitive means had passed into the shadow of
the ship in order to allow the explosion to occur
near the central portion of the vessel, where it
would be most effective, rather than at the so
called “blister” where it would be comparatively
ineffective.
,
'
The invention also consists in certain new and
original features of construction and combina
tions of parts hereinafter set forth and claimed.
Although the novel features which are believed
25
to be characteristic of this invention will be par
ticularly pointed out in the claims appended
hereto, the invention itself, as to its objects and
advantages, the mode of its operation and the
30 manner of ‘its organization may be better under
stood by referring to the following description
taken in connection with the accompanying draw-.
ing forming a part thereof, in which:
The single ?gure of the drawing represents
diagrammatically the' forward portion of a tor
pedo provided with this invention.
In the following description and in the claims,
parts will be identi?ed by speci?c names for con
venience, but they are intended to be as generic
40 in their application to similar parts as the art
will permit.
Referring to the accompanying drawing there
is shown a waterborne body such as a carrier of
explosives having a water tight torpedo hull 9,
and arranged to be propelled in the usual man
ner by propellers located at the after end. The
hull 9. is provided with two transverse bulkheads
II and I2, thus providing two compartments l3
and M, the former being ?lled with an explosive
charge l5, such for example as TNT.
A hole is provided in the hull 9 t the top
V of the compartment M. This hole is covered
‘ by a sheet of glass or other transparent material
l6. Mounted in a time I‘! is a lens 13 which
means of a motor 26 which is energized bya
battery 21 and controlled by a switch 28. En
gaging the commutator 22 are two other brushes 10
29 and 30 which are connected through a trans
former 3| to the input circuit of an ampli?er
32 the output circuit of which is connected to
the winding of a relay 33. The photoelectric cell
l9 may be of the new type developed by the 15
Weston Instrument Company which does not
require the use of a battery for its operation.
Ampli?er 32 is so biased as to have detecting
characteristics.
A second hole is provided in a hull 9 at the 20
top of the compartment M. This hole is covered
by a sheet of glass 35 or other material trans
parent to heat rays. Mounted in a tube. 36 is a
lens 3'! which is also made of material trans
parent to heat rays and is positioned directly be- 25
low the hole in the hull. A ?lter 38 is positioned
in the tube 33 and is composed of material which
transmits only the desired heat rays, such for
example as hard rubber or a special type of glass.
Positioned at the focus of the lens 31 is a heat 30
sensitive element such as a thermopile or a
bolometer 39. This element is connected to two
brushes‘ 40 and III which- engage a commutator
42 which comprises two segments of conducting
material 43 and 44. This commutator may also 35
‘be driven from the shaft of the motor 26 or if
desired- may be driven by a separate motor at a
different speed.
Engaging the commutator 42'
are two other brushes 43 and 41 which are con
nected through a transformer 48 to the input 40
circuit of an ampli?er 49 the output circuit of
which includes a relay 50 and a back contact of
the relay 33. Ampli?er 48 is so biased as to have
detecting characteristics.
A clock-work mechanism 5| is provided which 45
drives a commutator 52. This commutator is
provided with a conducting segment 53. To. the
shaft of the commutator is secured an arm 55
which normally engages a pin 56.
A second pin
.
51 is provided for limiting the motion of the arm 50
55 and the commutator, 52.
Engaging the. commutator 52 are four brushes
58, 59, 60 and GI. The brush 58 is connected
through a battery 52 to. one side of a solenoid
is positioned directly below the hole in the hull. ~63 the other side of which is connected to the P5 .
2
2,060,203
armature of the relay 50. The back contact of
this relay is connected to the brush 59.
l
The solenoid 63 isprovided with a core 66
which is adapted to be moved to the left when
this solenoid is energized.’ Secured to one end
of this core is a piston 61 which reciprocates in
a cylinder 68. This cylinder is provided with a
port 69 covered by a ?ap valve 10, which is adapte
ed to allow the air to escape rapidly‘ from this ’
the battery 8| to the detonator at which is det
onated, thereby exploding the charge of explosive '
l5 in the warhead of the torpedo. This explo
sion will take place directly under the center of
the ship as the mechanism has been so timed that
it will give the torpedo a su?icient ‘time to reach
a position under the center of the ship, thus‘ in
suring the destruction of the enemy vessel.
An important advantage of this system of
10 cylinder. The cylinder is also provided with a
‘ running torpedoes at considerably greater depths 10
port 1| the opening in which is controlled by a
than are now used is the fact that at these depths
needle valve 12, for restricting the ?ow of air.
through this port.
'
. To the other end of the core 66 is secured ‘an
15 insulating member 15 between which and the
solenoid 63 is mounted a compression spring ‘I6.
Mounted on the insulating member 15 is 'a con
tact 11 which is connected to the contact .6!
and at suitable times engages a conducting seg-,
20 ment 18 mounted on an insulating base ‘19. The
the wakes are much farther behind the torpedoes
when they come to the surface due to the longer
time it takes the bubbles of air to rise to the
surface and that the Wakes are much less con
15'
spicuous due to the fact that the air has had a
longer time to become diifused in the water. It
is, therefore, much more di?icult to observe and
locate these torpedoes than those run at present
day depths.
~
'
20
segment 18 is connected to one side of a detonator
Although only a few of the various forms in
80, the other side of which is connected to the which this invention may be embodied have been
contact 60 through a'battery 8|.
.
-'
herein, it is to be understood that the
For automatically starting the clock-work shown
25 mechanism 5| ‘a heavy weight 82_ is secured to_ invention is .not limited to any speci?c con
struction, but might be' embodied in various 25
the end of a ?at spring 83 the upper end of which forms without departing from the spirit of the in
is fastened to the casing of the clock-work mech
vention or the scope of the appended claims.
anism 5|. Theweight 82 is provided with a pro
What is claimed is: jection 84 which normally engages a ?nger 85
_ 1. In a moving body, an explosive charge,
30 which controls‘ the starting of the clock-work‘
means fordetonating said charge, a heat sensitive 30
mechanism. Engaging the end of the ?nger ‘85 is device for operating said detonating means and
a spring 86 which is supported on a bracket 81. a light sensitive device for controlling the opera
In the operation of this system when the tor
tion of said heat sensitive device so that when the
' pede is ?red the inertia of the weight 82 causes it light sensitive device is illuminated it will pre
35 to be moved backward relative to the torpedo thus
35
the operation of the heat sensitive ‘device.
disengaging the‘ projection 84 from the ?nger 85 vent
2. In a moving body, an explosive charge, means
which is moved upwardly 'under the action of for detonating said charge, a heat sensitive de
the spring 86, thus causing the clock-work mech
vice for operating said detonating means and a
anism to start turning the commutator 52 at a light sensitive device for controlling the operation
40 predetermined speed. ‘After a predetermined in
of said heat sensitive device so that when the
terval of time, the segment 53 of the commutator light sensitive device is illuminated it will prevent 40
52 will engage the brushes 58 and 59, thus en
the operation of the heat‘ sensitive device, and
erg‘izing the solenoid 63 which will cause the when the light sensitive device is not illuminated
core 66 to be moved rapidly to the left as. the‘air
45 in the‘ cylinder 68 is freely exhausted through it will permit the operation of the heat sensitive
device so that when it receives heat it will cause 45
the port 69. The contact ‘ll is-moved off the the detonation of the explosive charge.‘
segment 18 thus. keeping the circuit of the det
3. In a moving body, an explosive charge, means
onator 80 open. If'the torpedo ‘is running in' for‘ detonating said charge, a heat sensitive device
daylight by the time this occurs the relay 33' will for operating said detonating means so that when - '
50 be energized due to the light received by the
the heat on said device is changed it will cause
photoelectric cell I 9 the output of which has been ‘the detonation of said explosive charge, and light
converted to alternating current by means of the sensitive means for preventing the operation of
commutator 22, and ampli?ed by the ampli?er 32,
the output of which energized the relay 33. This
55 will open ‘the circuit through the relay 50, thus
making it ineifective.
'
-
>
This condition will continue as long as light
is received by the photoelectric cell I9. When
the torpedo passes beneath the hull of an enemy
60 vessel, however, this light will be out 01f, thus
deenergizing the relay ‘33, which will then put
the relay 50 in an operative condition. As the
torpedo passes beneath the hull of a ship heat
rays from this vessel will be received by the heat
65 sensitve element 39 the output from which will
be converted .into alternating current by the
’ commutator 42 and ampli?ed by the ampli?er 49,
thus energizing the relay 58.
This will cause the deenergization of the‘
said heat sensitive means as long as said light
sensitive means is illuminated.
4. In a moving body, an explosive charge, a 55
detonator for said charge, a photoelectric cell, a
thermopile, means operated by said thermopile
for causing the detonation of said explosive
charge, and means operated by said photoelectric
cell for preventing the explosion of said charge
while said cell is illuminated.
5.. In a moving body, an explosive charge, a
detonator for said charge, a photoelectric cell,
a bolometer, means operated by said b'olometer
for causing the detonation of said explosive 65
charge, and means operated by said photoelectric
cell for preventing the explosion of said charge
while said cell is illuminated.
.
470 solenoid 63 which allows its core 66 to be moved
to the‘ right under the action of the spring 16.
6. In a torpedo, an explosive charge, a heat
sensitive device, means responsive to a change in
The speed of this motion is determined by the
the intensity of heat received by vsaid device to
detonate said charge, a light sensitive devicev and
setting of the needle valve ‘I2. After a predeterJ
mined‘interval of time the contact 11 will en ; means to disable said heat sensitive device re
75 gage thesegment 18, thus closing the circuit from '
' sponsive to said light sensitive device.
70,
2,060,203
3
ship when the torpedo passes thereunder, where
torpedo which comprises running said torpedo by the charge is caused to explode when the tor
is underneath the ship.
at a substantial depth below the surface of the, pedo
9. In a torpedo, an explosive charge, means
7. The method of maneuvering a submarine
water and utilizing the heat waves transmitted‘
vertically through the water from the bottom of
the hull of the enemy ship when the torpedo
passes thereunder for detonating the explosive
charge of the torpedo.
8. In a torpedo, an explosive charge, means to
cause the, torpedo to pass underneath the hull of
an enemy ship, a thermocouple in said torpedo,
means to focus radiant heat waves from directly
above said torpedo onto said thermocouple, means
to detonate the explosive charge in response to
15 the heat thus received from the bottom of said
to cause the torpedo to pass underneath the hull
of an enemy ship, a thermocouple in said torpedo,
means to focus radiant heat waves from directly
above said torpedo onto said thermocouple, and
means responsive to variations in heat received
by said thermocouple caused by passage of the 10
torpedo beneath the hull of the enemy ship for
causing detonation of said charge, whereby the
charge is detonated when the torpedo is beneath
the ship.
15
JOHN‘ HAYS HAMMOND. JR.
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
438 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа