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Патент USA US2060491

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Nov. 10, 1936.
2,060,491
J. DIUNLOP
MOVING STAIRWAY
Filed- July 26, 1935
2 Sheets-Sheet l
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NVENTOR
vJames Dun/0,0
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ATT
NEY
Nov.‘ 10, 1936.
2,060,491
J. DUNLOP
MOVING STAIRWAY
Filed July 26, 1935
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
6U
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a.
INVENTOR
Patented Nov. 10, 1936
2,060,491
UNITED STATES2,060,491PATENT OFFICE
MOVING STAIRWAY
James Dunlop, Park Ridge, 111., assignor towest-r
~ inghouse Electric Elevator Company, Chicago,
11]., a corporation of Illinois
Application July 26, 1935, Serial No. 33,310
12 Claims. (Cl. 198-16)
My invention relates to moving stairways and and 3 and 4 and lower tracks 5 and 6 by a pair
more particularly to means for maintaining the of gear chains 1 and 8 between an upper landing
' step rollers and tracks of moving stairways free , (not shown) and a lower landing Ill. The gear
chains are supported at the lower landing by a
from dirt.
One object of my invention is to provide for
keeping the various moving parts of a moving
stairway in a clean condition at all times during
their operation.
Another object is to provide automatic ap
10 paratus for cleaning the moving parts of moving
stairways which may be easily and economically
constructed, installed and maintained in opera
tion. .
A further object is to provide apparatus for
cleaning stairways which shall be entirely auto
matic in operation and which shall require prac
tically no care on the part of the stairway at
tendants.
More speci?cally, it is the object of my inven
20 tion to provide apparatus which will automati
pair of sprocket wheels H and I2.
The chain 1 comprises a plurality of outer links
l4 and I5 (Figs/5 and 6), a plurality of inner
links 16 and‘ I‘! joined by a plurality of cross pins
l3. Referring more particularly to Fig. 6, the
pin’ “la is constructed with its ends provided
‘with grooved surfaces l9 upon which the ends
of the outer links [4 and I5 may be mounted.
The grooved surfaces l9 should be of such size
that they will make what is known as a “press ?t”
with cooperating holes in the outer links M and 10
I5 and thereby cause the pins and the links to
freeze and turn or act as one body after the chain
is assembled.
A bushing 2| is rotatably mounted upon the pin
I81: and the inner links l6 and I’! are mounted '
cally sweep from thejracks, from the step rollers _ upon the ends thereof by means of a “press ?t”
so that the bushing freezes to the inner links and -
which roll upon the tracks and from the step
treads any dirt which may fall thereon.
Other objects of the invention will be obvious
25 and appear hereinafter.
For a clearer under
standing of the invention reference may be had
to the accompanying drawings in which:
Figure l is a view, in side elevation, of the
} lower landing portion of a moving stairway em
30 bodying my invention.
'
Fig. 2 is a view taken on the lines II—II of
Fig. 1._
.
,
Fig. 3 is a view taken on the line III-III of
35
Fig. 1.
Fig. 4 is a top plan view of a portion of the
stairway atthe lower landing.
Fig. 5 is a detailed view of a portion of one of
the sprocket chains shown in Figs. 1 and 4.
Fig. 6 is a view taken on the line VI-VI of
40 Fig. 5.
Fig. '7 is a view, in side elevation, of one of the
inside track brushes shown in Fig. 1.
Fig. 8 is a view taken along the line VIII--VIII
of Fig. 7.
Fig. 9 is a view, in rear end elevation, of the
45
track brush shown in Fig. 7.
Fig. 10 is a view in side elevation of one of the
outside track brushes shown in Fig. 2, and
Fig. 11 is a view taken along the line XI-XI
50 of Fig. 10.
Referring more particularly to the drawings, I
have illustrated the lower landing portion of a
moving stairway (Figs. 1 and 4) as comprising
an endless series of movable steps S disposed to
55 be moved along two pair of upper tracks land 2,
rotates with them upon the pin [8a. A chain
roller 22 is rotatably mounted upon the bushing
2| for the purpose of engaging the sprocket wheel
teeth as the chain operates over the sprocket
wheel. The sprocket chain 8 is constructed in
the same manner.
Each of the steps S comprises a frame 24, a
step tread 25, a pair of leading rollers 26 and 21
(see Fig. 3) and a pair of trailing rollers 28 and
v 29.
The tread 25 may be made of any suitable
material, preferably of molded fibrous material
with a heat-hardened binder. The surface of
the tread 25 is constructed with a plurality of 35
grooves 30 which provide a plurality of cleats 3|
on its upper surface. The grooves extend from
the front to the rear of the step and may be of
any suitable width so long as they are su?iciently
narrow to prevent the shoe heels of the passengers 40
from entering therein.
The front rollers 26 and 21 are connected to
the steps S by an axle 33, the outer ends of which
extend through the chains 1 and 8, the rollers
being mounted on the outer ends of the axle be
yond the chain in any suitable manner. By this
construction, the front rollers are disposed to
travel along the track rails I and 4 and thereby
aid in supporting the chains 1 and 8 as well as
supporting the steps S. It will also be apparent
that this connection of the axle 33 with the
chains provides a means whereby the movement
of the. chains is imparted to the steps so that op
eration of the chains causes the steps to be car
ried along the stairway. The rear rollers 28 and 55
2,000,401
20 are mounted upon the step by an axle 34 in
position to roll along the track rails 2 and 3.
As the steps and chains approach the lower
landing while being operated in the direction
shown by the arrow 35, the front rollers leave the
lower track rails 6 and are then left suspended
in the air as the chains are carried around the
sprocket wheels H and I2. The rear rollers 28
and 29 continue along the lower track rails 5
which turn into a circular guard rail 31 running
concentric with the lower landing sprocket
wheels. As the rear rollers start upwardly they'
leave the guard rail 31 and move along a circular
track rail 38 mounted on the axle 39 of the
sprocket wheels. As the steps continue their
journey around the lower landing sprocket
wheels, the rear rollers leave the circular tracks
38 and move upon the upper tracks 2 and 3. As
the steps continue, the upper rollers complete
their trip around the sprocket wheels and ?nally
come into engagement with the upper track rails
I and 4. The steps now travel to the upper land
ing (not shown) with their front rollers 26 and
21 upon the upper track rails | and 4 and their
rear rollers upon the track rear rails 2 and 3.
A frame 4| (only a portion of which is shown)
is provided for supporting the stairway in its
operating position. A combplate 42 is secured to
the frame 4| at the lower landing ID to enable
30 the stairway passengers to enter and leave the
stairway.
In the operation of moving stairways, it is de
sirable to keep the stair treads and the_ various
parts of the stairway as free from dirt as possi
However, in connection with the stair
treads, it has been found desirable to clean out
the grooves 30 but to leave the upper surfaces of
the cleats 3| untouched except when they accu
35 ble.
mulate such an amount of dirt as makes it neces
40 sary to brush or otherwise clean them by hand.
In practice it has been found that the ordinary
accumulation of dust and grit on the top surfaces
of the cleats aids the passengers in maintaining
their footing and keeps them from slipping while
45 they are making use of the stairway.
In accordance with my invention I have pro
vided a brush for automatically cleaning the
grooves in the step treads while leaving the dust
on the cleats undisturbed. This means com
prises a tread brush 44 (Figs. 1, 3 and 4) located
at the lower landing and having its outer ends
bolted or otherwise fastened to the side mem
bers 45 of the frame 4|.
The tread brush is
provided with a plurality of rows of bristles 46 so
55 disposed on its under side that they sweep
through the grooves 30 of the step treads as the
steps are moved along the lower landing. The
tread brush may be located at any suitable point,
however, in the present instance it is shown as
60 positioned at the rear of the combplate 42 and
just ahead of the lower landing plate l0.
From the drawings, it will be apparent that as
the steps are operated along their tracks by their
gear chains, the bristles 46 of the tread brush
65 will sweep through the grooves 30 in the treads
and prevent the accumulating of dirt and dust
therein.
Inasmuch as the bristles 46 do not
touch the top surfaces of the cleats 3|, the cleats
will remain dusty and gritty, thus providing a
70
safe step surface. At the same time, if any large
pieces of dirt or ?bres, etc., get across the cleats,
the bristles will sweep them from the top of the
cleats. Hence it will be seen that the brush will
75 tend to keep the cleats clean to a certain: degree
but will not clean them to such an extent as to
cause them to become polished and smooth.
The rollers upon which the steps operate and
by which they are guided along their tracks, have
a tendency to pick up dirt from various sources
and this dirt causes annoying effects when the
rollers roll along the tracks. In order to auto
matieally sweep the dirt from the rollers during
their operation, I have provided a novel pair of
brushes 5!! and 5|. The brush 50 is bolted or 10
otherwise secured to a portion 52 of the frame 4|
in such manner that the face of the brush will
engage each of the front rollers 26 on one side of
the step as it passes around the roller landing.
The brush 5| is disposed to cooperate with the
brush 5!] and is mounted upon a member 54 of
the frame 4| by means of a plurality of bolts
55. The face of the brush 5| is disposed opposite
the face of the brush 50 and at such a distance
therefrom that it will also engage the other side 20
of each of the front rollers 26 as the steps move
around the lower landing.
The brushes 50 and 5| must be so mounted
that they will bear with unequal pressure upon
the rollers 26. For instance, the brush 5!) may
be mounted so that it will exert quite a pressure
against the roller 26 and the brush 5| may be so
mounted that it will bear lightly against the
roller 26 as it passes. With this construction,
as the roller 26 passes between the brushes, the 30
friction between the brush 50 and the roller tends
to cause the roller to rotate against the lighter
brush 5| and this action causes the brush 5| to
sweep the dirt and dust from the roller.
In some cases it may be desired to make the 35
bristles of one brush thicker and heavier than
the bristles in the other brush and in that man
ner secure the desired rotation of the rollers.
In other brushes it may be desirable to combine
the two effects; that is, to make the bristles of 40
the brush 50 heavy and thick and set the brush
close to the roller and to provide the brush 5|
with bristles of lighter weight than the bristles
of the brush 50 and also set the brush 5| so that
it will bear more lightly against the rollers than 45
the brush 50. In the construction shown in Fig.
1, both the positioning of the brushes and the
weighting of the bristles are employed and the
combination operates effectively to keep the
rollers 26 free from dust and dirt as they pass 50
along their trip, thus leaving them clean to enter
the tracks and roll along the track rails with a
minimum amount of noise and effort.
Although I have provided means for keeping
the rollers clean, it is also desirable to provide 55
automatic means for keeping the roller tracks
clean and free from dirt. To accomplish this
purpose in practicing my invention, I provide a
left hand inner track brush 58, a right hand
inner track brush 59, a left hand outer track 60
brush 60 and a right hand outer track brush 6|.
Referring more particularly to Figs. 5 to 11,
the brush 6| is shown as provided with a body
member 62 having a central hub 63 and brush
faces 64 and 65. The brush face 64 is provided 65
with a plurality of bristles 66 and the brush
face 65 a plurality of bristles 61. The brush is
mounted on the chain 1 by a T-headed bolt 66
which passes through the bored out center 69
of the chain pin l8a. The T-head of the bolt 70
68 rests in a slot 10 in the outer face of the brush
body 62 so that the bolt and the brush remain
in ?xed relation to each other. The nut end of
the oolt 68 extends through the pin Hill to have
mounted upon it the track brush 59.
75
.' 2,060,491
The inner track brush comprises a body por
tion 12 provided with an upwardly projecting
member ‘I9 having a squared hole ‘I6 in its cen
ter disposed to ?t upon a squared portion 14 of
the bolt 98. A nut 15 is provided for holding
the bolt in position as it extends through the
outer brush 6|, the bored out pin I 8a, and the
hub 13 of the brush 59. As noted, the T-headed
end of the bolt 68 disposed in the slot 19 of the
10 outer brush SI and the- squared inner portion
of the bolt disposed in the squared aperture 16
in the hub 13 cause the outer brush, the bolt and
the inner brush to remain in a ?xed relation to
each other and prevent independent movement
15 of any one of them.
Thus it is seen that only
one bolt is necessary for securing both the outer
brush and the inner brush in their operative po
sition on the drive chain.
The brush 6| is so designed that its bristles
20 65 will engage the upper guard rail 68 and its
bristles 61 will engage the track rail 4 while the
steps are traveling along the upper portion of
the stairway. The brush 59 is so designed that
its bristles 19 will sweep the track rail, 3 as the
25 steps move along the upper portion of the stair
3 v
matted upon the track and slicked over by the
China bristle brush. In practice, it is usually
sumcient to connect to each chain only one
brush for each track rail except in cases where
dirt is very heavy. In such instances, one China
bristle brush and one steel wire brush for each
track will usually be found more effective.
By reason of the foregoing construction, it
will be seen that I have provided automatic means
responsive to operation of the gear chains for
simultaneously sweeping dirt from the stair
treads, from the step rollers and from the track
rails as long as the stairway is in operation, thus
keeping its various parts clean and causing the
stairway to operate with ease and without pro 15
ducing such noise as usually follows operation
of dirty steps over dirty tracks.
Although I have illustrated and described only
one speci?c embodiment of my invention, it is
to be understood that many changes therein and 20
many modi?cations thereof may be made with
out departing from the spirit and scope of the
invention.
I claim as my invention:
1. In a moving stairway, a frame, a plurality 25
of tracks mounted upon the frame, a plurality
way.
In order to maintain the brushes GI and 69 in of steps, a plurality of rollers mounted on the
their correct position during the operation of the steps for guiding them along the tracks, a brush
stairway, an extended arm or projecting member mounted on the frame with its brush surface dis
30 90 is mounted on the front portion of the body . posed to engage the tread surface of each step 30
‘I2 of the brush 59. The projecting member 80 as the step passes the brush, a plurality of
is provided upon its free end with a yoke or brushes mounted on the frame with their brush
U-shaped aperture 8| of- such size that it may be surfaces disposed to engage the rollers as the
fitted over a portion of the front axle 53 when steps pass, a pair of endless gear chains for
35 the brushes 59 and 6| are assembled and bolted moving the steps along the tracks and causing 35
together. The engagement of the arm 89 with the tread brush and the roller brushes to sweep
the axle 53 prevents the brush 59 and also the the treads and the rollers, and a plurality of
brush 6| from rotating relative to the chain so brushes connected to the chains with their brush
that they will follow the movements of the chain surfaces disposed to engage and sweep the tracks
40
40 as it operates the steps along the track and thus as the chains move along the tracks.
2. In a moving stairway, a frame, a track
cause the brush 59 to sweep the track rail 3 and
the brush 6i to sweep the guard rail 68 and also mounted on the frame, a plurality of steps, a
the upper track rail 4 as the steps move along plurality of rollers mounted on the steps for
guiding them along the track, a brush mounted
the upper side of the stairway.
'
15
As the steps reach the end of their upper trip on the frame with its brush surface disposed to 45
at the upper landing (not shown) they will round engage the tread of each step as the step passes
the upper landing and move down along the the brush, a pair of cooperating brushes mounted
on the frame with their brush surfaces disposed
under side of the stairway, during which move
ment the brush 6| will sweep the lower track opposite to each other and in position to engage
a roller on each step as the steps pass the brushes, 50
50 rail 6. However, by reason of the changed posi
tion of the steps while traveling on the under a chain for moving the steps along the track and
side of the stairway, the inner brush 59 will not causing the tread brush and the roller brushes
engage any track surface during that portion to sweep the treads and the rollers, and a brush
connected to the chain with its brush surface
of the trip.
~
55
The left~hand inner brush 58 and the left-hand disposed to engage and sweep the track in ac 55
outer brush 60 are constructed and operated in cordance with the movement of the chain in
‘
practically the same way as the inner brush 59 operating the steps.
3. In a moving stairway, a frame, a track
and the outer brush 6| except that they are
constructed for attachment to the opposite or mounted on the frame, a plurality of steps, each
of said steps having a tread provided with a plu 60
60 left-hand side of the stairway.
In practice, it is usually found advisable to rality of grooves, a brush mounted on the frame
employ what are known as China bristles in the with its brush surface disposed to engage only
various brushes, particularly in the inner and the the grooves in each tread of each step as it
outer track brushes. However, in some cases it passes the brush, and a chain for moving the
65 has been found that the use of China bristles steps over the track and causing the brush to 65
sweep only the grooves of the treads of the steps.
tends to let sticky dirt of a certain nature accu
4. In a moving stairway, a frame, a track
mulate in spots on the track rails, the brush tend
ing to slide over such small accumulations of dirt mounted on the frame, a plurality of steps pro
and polish them without removing them. To
70 avoid this, I place a second brush 59a ahead of
the brush 59 and likewise a second brush ahead
of the brush 8|. The brush 59a is the counter
part of brush 6i but is provided with steel wire
83 instead of China bristles. The use of the steel
75 wire breaks up any grit which may have become
vided with grooved treads, a brush having its
outer ends mounted on the side members of the 70
frame at the lower landing of the stairway, said
brush being provided with rows of bristles dis
posed to engage only the cooperating grooves in
the tread of each step as it passes the brush, and
a chain for moving the steps over the track and 75
4
2,000,491
causing the brush to sweep the-treads of the
one of the pins,\said bolt having a T-head on its
steps.
one end and a non-cylindrical portion on its
other end, a track brush disposed on the T-head
end of the bolt at one side of the chain, a second
brush, means for pivotally mounting the brush ‘track brush rigidly mounted on the non-cylin
drical portion of the bolt at the other side of the
on one portion of the chain, and means for con
necting one end of the brush to another portion chain, and a projecting member disposed on one
of the chain to maintain the brush surface of the end of one of the brushes for connection to an
5. In a moving stairway, a frame. a track
mounted on the frame, a plurality of steps, a track
brush in engagement with the track and sweep
10 it free from dirt as the chain operates the steps
along the track.
6. In a moving stairway, a frame, a track
mounted onthe frame, a plurality of steps, a plu
rality of rollers mounted on the steps for guiding
them along the track, a plurality of front axles,
one for each step, for mounting the front rollers
of the steps thereon, said axles extending through
said chain, a brush pivotally mounted on a portion
of the chain between the axles, and means for
connecting one end of said brush to the front axle
of the step adjacent to the position of the brush,
whereby the face of the brush will, engage the
track and sweep it as the chain operates the steps
along the track.
'7. In a moving stairway, a frame, a track
mounted on the frame, a plurality of steps, a plu
rality of rollers mounted on the steps for guiding
them along the track, a plurality of front axles,
one for each step, for mounting the front rollers
30 of the steps thereon, said axles extending through
said chain, abrush pivotally mounted on a por
other track pin to control rotation of both
brushes while in operation and cause their brush 10
faces to sweep the tracks as the chains move the
steps along the tracks.
10. In a moving stairway having a plurality of
steps operated along a plurality of tracks by a
chain, a T-headed bolt disposed through the
chain, said bolt having a shaft with a non-cylin
drical portion, an outer track brush mounted on
the T-headed end of the bolt with a cooperating
slot for the T-head to cause the brush to turn
with the pin, and an inner track brush mounted 20
on the non-cylindrical portion of the bolt at the
side of the chain opposite to the ‘outer track
brush, said inner track brush having its brush face
disposed to engage the inner track, a projecting
member disposed on the end of the inner brush, 25
and means for connecting the outer end of the
projecting member to an adjacent portion of the
chain to prevent rotation of the brushes and bolt
beyond the normal rotation due to the operation
30
of the chain.
11. In a moving stairway having a plurality of
tion of the chain between the axles, an arm on
steps operated over a track by a chain, a frame for
the brush having a recessed portion disposed to
embrace the front axle of the step adjacent to
the position of the brush, whereby the face of the
brush will engage the track and sweep it as the
chain operates the steps along the track.
8. A brush for the tracks of a moving stairway
comprising a body, a plurality of brush bristles
supporting the track, a plurality of brushes dis
40 disposed on one face thereof, a projecting mem
ber on the central portion of said body, said mem
ber being provided with an aperture for pivotally
connecting the brush to a portion of a moving
stairway chain, and an arm disposed on one end
45 of said body, said arm having a recessed surface
at its outer end for engaging another portion of
the moving stairway to control rotation of the
brush after it is pivotally mounted in position on
the chain.
9. In a moving stairway, a track, a plurality of
50
steps, a plurality of rollers mounted on the steps
for guiding them along the track, a chain com
prising a plurality of links and pins for moving
the steps along the tracks, a bolt disposed through
posed with their brush faces facing each other to
engage the rollers on the step as the steps are 35
moved along by the chain, and means for mount
ing the brushes with the pressure of the one brush
greater than the pressure of the other brush
against the rollers whereby the one brush causes
the roller to rotate against the other brush to be
swept free of dirt.
12. In a moving stairway having a plurality of
steps operated over a track by a chain, a frame
for supporting the track, a plurality of brushes
disposed with their brush faces facing each other 45
to engage the rollers on the step as the steps are
moved along by the chain, the bristles in the one
brush being heavier than those in the other brush
whereby the heavy bristles of the one brush fric
tionally engage the rollers and cause them to ro 50
tate against the lighter bristles of the other brush
as they are moved by the chain and are thereby
swept free of dirt.
JAMES DUNLOP.
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