close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US2060836

код для вставки
Nov. 17, 1936.
F,ITAXNER
2,060,836
THERMAL CUT~OUT SWITCH
Filed April 28, 1953
n
\
'
9 ‘
I
56
$594111": 11 .
39 I312
_
I
Q
2% ?
73
'
73
71 75
.
59
77
4a
56
INVENTOR
Patented Nov. 11, 1936
' 2,060,836
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,060,836
THERMAL CUT-OUT SWITCH
- Frank Taxner, Turtle Creek, Pa.
I v
. Application April 28, 1933, Serial No. 668,355
'29 Claims.
5
(01. 200-138)
'
. My invention relates to cut-out switches but
material, the block 8 being attached by the rivets
more particularly to thermal cut-out switches for
general use where temperature control is neces
9 to said brackets.
sary.
the terminal block 8 and insulated therefrom, and
‘
My invention may also be-applied to non-ther
mal switches, the switch being thrown by a handle
or other mechanical means or connections.
.
~ In general the object which I have in view is the
provision of a device of this character which is
10 simple and inexpensive to manufacture, durable,
e?icient, and quick-acting in opening and clos
ing.
-
Other objects appear hereinafter;
In the accompanying drawing wherein I have
15 illustrated -a practical embodiment of the prin
ciples of my invention, Fig. 1 is a side elevation of
one form of the thermal switch,‘ the same being
partly broken away to show operating parts.
Fig. 2 is a plan view of the structure illustrated
20 in Fig. 1.
»
‘
Fig. 3 is a side elevation showing a modi?cation.
Fig. 4 is a detail of one of the bearing sockets
shown in Fig. 1.
Fig. 4a is a detail of a modified form of -a bear-‘
25 ing socket.
Fig. 5 is a disassembled detail of a pivotal con
. nection for use with the bearing socket shown in
Fig. 4a.
.
_
'
I0 and II represent binding posts mounted on
I2 are contact buttons mounted on the lower ends 5
of said posts which depend below said block. The
buttons may be composed of any good contact
material, such as a platinum and silver alloy. The
buttons I2 are arranged to contact with similar
contact buttons I3 carried by the free endof the 10
spring contact ?nger or arm I4.
The circuit of the apparatus that is to be pro
tected by my thermal control switch is placed in
series with the binding posts l0 and I I in the usual»
manner, and such circuit is made or broken ac- 15
cording to the heat dissipated by the apparatus
which controls the movement of the contact
?nger I4.
‘
Extending laterally of the base I and adjacent
to the brackets 4 and 5 are the ears I5 and I6 20
which serve as supports for mounting the switch
inplace.
.
'
,
I1 is a ?at bimetal ‘strip and I8 is a ?at leaf
spring or radius arm of heat-resisting metal
superimposed on the strip H. The strip and
springare fastened at one end to the inturned
?ange of the bracket 3 by means of the machine
screws I 9. The bimetal strip I1 extends longi
tudinally of the'base I and its free end, in its
Fig. -6 is a side elevation illustrating the use of
30 myinvention for the thermal control of a refrig
normal or cold position rests on the upper surface 30
erating system or the like.
.of theinturned ‘flange of the bracket 2._ The
Fig. 7 is a sectional view showing'the applica
spring I8, which may be termed “the actuating
tion of my invention to an electric iron.
spring”, also extends longitudinally of the base I Fig. 8 is a partial plan view of the same, parts and is secured by rivets to the bottom of the
‘ 35 being omitted or broken away.
Fig. 9 is a view in perspective of the contact
?nger employed in the structure shown in Figs. 7
and 8.
Fig. 10 is a perspective view of the elevator frame
40 employed in the structures shown in Figs. '7 and 8.
- Fig. 11 is a broken View similar to Fig. 7 but
angular lever 20. ‘ The lever 20 comprises two 35
legs ‘M and 22 which are disposed in angular rela
tion to each other. The leg 2| extends longitudi
'nally of the base I and is pressed to form a
rounded pivot 23 on its upper surface which is
disposed laterally of the leg and bears from below 40
on the lower surface of the base I. The leg 2|
showing a modification.
is extendedbeyond the pivot 23 to act as a stop .
Referring first to Figs. 1 and 2, I represents the I
base or frame of the device formed with a suitable to arrest the lever 20 in the normal position as
45 heat-resisting metal, such as stainless steel; Upon
- this frame are assembled the parts comprising the
’ thermal switch. The ends of the base I are bent
downwardly and then inwardly towards each other
to form the opposed brackets 2 and 3. 4 and 5
50 represent brackets extending upwardly from the
base I intermediate of its ends, and their upper
ends are provided with ?anges 6 and 1 extending
inwardly towards each other.
,
The brackets 4 and 5 support the terminal block
8 which may be made of suitable heat resisting
shown in Fig. 1.
.
_
The leg 22 of the lever 20 extends up through 45
an opening in the basev I and terminates in the
concaved V-shaped bearing socket 24 in which
is engaged the convex V-shaped pivot member 25.
The member 25 is held from lateral movement‘ 50
within the socket 24 by the oppositely disposed
ears 28 of the socket 24, as shown in Fig. 1. The
member 25 is a part of the bracket 2'! to which
is attached the contact ?nger I4 and the jack
spring 28.- The jack spring 28 is made of suit- 55
2
2,060,836
able ?at heat-resisting metal and is attached
at its opposite end to a pivot member 29.
The jack spring 29 may be said to be a chord
with respect to the radius arm [8 and as the
radius arm is rotated through a small arc the
chord spring must ?ex as distance between its
ends is shortened.
To secure the jack spring to the bracket 27 and
the pivot member 29 its ends are notched out as
10 at 39, so that when said ends are slid into en
gagement with the members 21 and 29 the tongues
3I struck from said brackets hold the spring
snugly against the side portions 32 of the bracket
while the ends 33 of the spring extend beyond
the bend in the necks of the tongues to hold the
spring against lateral displacement. This ar
rangement forms a secure assembly of the brack
ets in the jack spring.
The bracket 21 is off-set at 34 to form a suit
20 able surface for mounting the contact ?nger I4
thereon. The contact ?nger is secured as by
rivets 35 to said bracket but is insulated there—
from in the usual manner.
The end 36 of the
bracket is arranged to limit the upward bending
25 movement of the jack spring 29.
The jack spring pivot member 29 has formed
45
55
60
tion just previous to breaking contact. Thus a
low-resistance contact between the two pairs of
buttons is assured during normal operation of
apparatus with the switch closed.
As the bimetal strip cools after the circuit has
been broken, it straightens out into its normal
position, permitting the spring I8 to swing the
lever 20 counterclockwise on its pivot and there
by permitting the jack spring to move toward its 10
straightened position, following the relaxing
movement of the strip I'I' until the latter ap
proaches its straightened position, whereupon
the jack spring will snap into its straightened
position and thus cause the buttons I3 to spring
into contact with the buttons I2, thus restoring
the circuit.
Referring now to the modification shown in
Fig. 3, such parts as are similar to parts already
described in connection with Figs. 1 and 2 are
designated by like reference numerals while the
parts peculiar to Fig. 3 are as follows. 4I repre
sents a stud whose upper end portion 42 is
threaded and screwed into a threaded hole at
approximately the center of the base I. The 25
lower portion 43 of the stud is squared. 44 rep
thereon a convex or V-shaped portion 31 similar
resents a shoulder intermediate of the stud which
to the pivot member 25 of the bracket 21, and
the same is pivotally mounted within the con
caved bearing socket 38 of the bracket 39 also
shown in Fig. 4, the bracket 39 being ?xed to the
base I as shown in Fig. l. The cars 26 prevent
lateral movement of the pivot-member 29. An
extension 40 of the bracket 39 is arranged to
engage the upper surface of the base I to limit
the downward bending movement of the jack
may have ?attened perimetral surfaces for the
application of a wrench. 45 represents ‘a ?at
spring with depending ends and the intermediate 30
portion of which is provided with a hole through
which the stud extends, and 48 represents a
spacing collar mounted on the stud between the
base I and the spring, which latter is thus held
against the shoulder 44.
41 and 48 represent a pair of oppositely bowed
spring 28.
40
circuit is closed is not the same as is their posi
Referring now to Fig. 5, I show a reversal of
the pivotal connection of the jack spring shown
at 29--3B in Fig. 1, the member 29a attached
to the end of the jack spring being formed as
the socket while the portion 39a of the bracket
39 is the pivot member received in the socket.
The operation of the switch as illustrated in
Figs. 1 and 2 is as follows. The switch is mounted
in such manner that its bimetal strip I1 is adja
cent the portion of the associated apparatus
which is to be protected from overheating, or is
otherwise exposed to temperatures which are to
be controlled. As the heat is convected, its e?ect
on the strip I1 is to cause the free end of the
latter to swing upwardly or toward the base I,
the amount of its de?ection being proportional
to the temperature to which it is exposed. Such
de?ection of the strip I‘I ?exes the spring I8 and
thus causes the angular lever 20 to swing clock
wise on its pivot 23 which slides slightly on the
under surface of base I, the spring I8 acting as
a radius arm for the pivotal movement of the
lever. As a result of this movement of the lever
its leg' 22 swings clockwise in Fig. 1 thus bowing
the jack spring 28 downwardly, the stop 36 on the
bracket 21 preventing an upward bowing of the
jack spring. The initial ?exing of the jack spring
65 results in a sliding movement of the contact but
tons I3‘relative to the contact buttons I2 with
out breaking contact and as the bimetal strip I'I
approaches its maximum bending movement its
increased de?ection causes the jack spring-to
70 snap into'its position of maximum de?ection
wherein the extension 40 contacts with the base
I, thus snapping the buttons I3 out of contact
with the buttons I 2 and thus breaking the circuit.
It is evident that the normal position of the
75 buttons l3 relative to the buttons I2 while the
bimetal strips, the centers of which are provided
with registering square holes through which the
stud 4I extends, thus holding the strips in proper
assembled relation and guiding their move 40
ments. The ends of the strips rest on the in
turned ?anges of the brackets 2 and 3. Thus the
strips are free to flex while their movements are
guided by the stud.
The ends of the spring 45 have secured thereto 45
the brackets 49 and 59 which extend upwardly
through openings in the Base I. The upper end
of the bracket 49 is provided with a bearing
socket 24 similar to the corresponding socket on
the lever 20 in Figs. 1 and 2, and the correspond 50
ing ends of the spring ?nger I4 and of the Jack
spring 28 are pivotally connected thereto in like
manner as in Fig. 1. The opposite end of the,
jack spring 28 is attached to the inturned upper
portion of the bracket 50.
55
The apparatus operates as follows. As the bi
metal strips 41 and 4B expand they tend to
straighten out and then bow in reverse direc
tions, thus moving the ends of the spring 45 up
wardly toward the base I and, elevating the
brackets 49 and 50 and swinging their upper ends
toward each other with the result that the jack
spring 28 bends downwardly, thus releasing the
pressure of the spring ?nger I4 and breaking
the circuit. As the bimetal strips cool, they relax 65
and reverse, thus allowing the spring 45 to
straighten, and thereby permitting the jack
spring to return the spring ?nger I4 into its con
tact position.
It will be noted that the ends 01' the spring 45
when in its normal position are ?exed down
wardly while the jack spring 29 is substantially
straight. Thus when as the spring 45 tends to
straighten swinging the brackets 49 and 50 to
ward each other, the jack spring is bowed and
I
3
2,060,886
‘due to the movement of the brackets the bow
ing of the jack spring is necessarily downwardly.
Referring now to Fig. 6, I illustrate the type of
switch shown indetail in Figs. 1 and 2 employed
for temperature control in refrigerators and the
10
15
i
20
25
attached to the ends of the spring 45 as in Fig.
3. Instead of but two bimetal strips 41 and 48
oppositely arranged, as in Fig. 3, in Fig. 7 I have
shown a plurality of such pairs below the strips
41 and 48; as at 41d and 48a, and 41b and 48b,
like, 5| representing a frame which functions as all mounted in superimposed relation in the ele
the base of the switch, the spring strip l8 being vator frame 61 and held in proper assemblage
attached at one end thereto as shown at 52. between the vertical side members of said frame.
Bearing against the free end of the spring I8 is
It is obvious that by providing a plurality of
the stud 53 on the end of the multiple diaphragm - pairs of bimetal strips I increase the effective 10
54 which in turn is mounted on the end of the de?ection resulting from a given temperature
tube 55. The tube 55 extends through the back differential and thus obtain a more prompt re
plate of the frame 5| and the ?uid whose tem
sponse to a given change of temperature.
perature is to be controlled is admitted through
It is further obvious that a rotation of the '
the bore of the tube into the multiple diaphragm, handle 14 on a vertical axis would, by the screw
whereby the latter expands and contracts with . action of the bolt ‘I0, raise or lower the elevator
the expansion and contraction of the ?uid due frame 61 in accordance with the direction of ro
to temperature changes. Thus the diaphragm
tation. An elevation of the frame tends to com
takes the place of and functions as does the bi
press together the opposed bimetal strips, while
metal strip I‘! in Figs. 1 and 2.
lowering the frame allows said strips to expand 20
Referring now to Figs. '7, 8, 9, and 10, wherein into the position as shown in Fig. 7. The com
is illustrated an application of the type of switch pression of the strips will mechanically ?atten
shown in Fig. 3, 56 is the body of an electric iron them and do the work which would be otherwise
and 51 is the cap portion of the same secured required of a certain initial rise of temperature
thereto by the bolts 58 which may also attach and thus the total rise of temperature required
the handle 59. 60 is the heating element which to open the switch is lessened by this differential.
is held in place on, top of the body 56 by means
It is obvious that the rotation of the handle in
of the internal rib 6| of the cap 51. The usual
the proper direction to raise the elevatorframe ~
electrical connections for the heating element
reduces the temperature at which the switch will
are employed, the contacts I2 and I3 of the
switch being connected in series between the
open, while a reverse rotation of the handle raises 30
source of supply and the heating element 60 by'
a gauge and the handle with a suitable indicat
the conductors 62.
‘
The body 56 of the iron is provided with the
well 63 which is below the open center of the
heating element as shown in Figs. 7 and 8. The
switch structure is stepped in the well 63, the
base plate 64 being provided with the laterally
extending ears I 5 and I6 which ?t in shallow
seats in top of the body 56, so that when the
heating element 60 is fastened in position it
clamps the plate 64 ?xedly in place.
'The stud 4| depending from the‘ plate 64 ‘is
longer than that shown in Fig. 3 and has its lower
end stepped in a square hole 65 in the ?oor 66
of the rectangular elevator frame 61. as shown
in Fig. 10. The vertical side members of said
frame extend upwardly through openings in the
plate 64. The cross plate 68 which forms the
50 top of the frame 51 is provided with the threaded
hole 69 into which is screwed the lower end of
the. suspension bolt 10 which extends up through
a loosely ?tting hole in the terminal block 8
and also the loosely ?tting hole 6| in the cap 51.
55 The upper end of the bolt 10 is provided with
an eye through which extends a pin ‘I2 whereby
the bolt is pivotally attached in a recess 13 formed
in the handle member 14. The nose of the han
dle member is provided with eccentric bearing
60
85
70
75
said temperature. By providing the cap 51 with
' ing mark or pointer, the user may set the switch
to throw off at any predetermined desired tem
35
perature. -
By throwing the handle 14 from left to right
in 'a vertical plane in Fig.- 7, with the pin 12 as
an axis, and causing the cam surfaces 15 to ride
over the cap 51 the elevator frame 61 may be
raised sui?ciently to cause the ?ngers 66a to en 40
gage the ends of the spring 45, forcing the spring
to flex upwardly and thus open the switch. Thus
this motion of the handle 14 is used to mechani
cally throw the switch off and on.
Referring now toFig. 9 I show at Ma a modi?ed 45
form of contact ?nger which. instead of being
bifurcated as in Figs. 1, 2, and 3, comprises a
single stem carrying the spring yoke |4b upon
which the contact buttons l3 are mounted.
Referring now to Fig. 11 it will be noted that
between each of the pairs of opposed bimetal
strips 41 and 48, 41a. and 48a, and 41b and 4817,
I slidably mount on the stud 4| the ?at plates 18
with which the ends of the bimetal strips contact
when they reverse.
This provides a better en
55
gagement than directly between the ends of the
strips. The ends of the plates ‘I8 are rounded to
provide a point contact with the strips.
Again I mount above the spring 45 a bimetal
surfaces 15 whereby by swinging the handle 14 strip 19 whose center is ?xed on the stud 4| in 60
in a vertical plane and from left to right in Fig. spaced relation to the spring 45. The bimetal
‘7,, the bolt 10 and with it the elevator frame 61 strip 19 is shorter than the strips 41 and 48 and
may be raised.
.
is normally bowed upwardly or away from the
‘I6 represents a helical spring coiled about the spring 45. When it reverses under temperature
bolt ‘I6 between the cap 51 and a collar 11 pinned
65
or otherwise secured to the bolt. This spring changes it engages the spring 45 and tends to
bow
it
downwardly
while
the
strip
41
engages
the
tends to return the elevator frame 61 to and
maintain it in its lowermost position. The ends spring adjacent its ends and bows the latter up
wardly. The resultant compound ?exing of the
of the ?oor 66 of the elevator frame 61 are pro
vided with the upwardly extending ?ngers 66a. spring increases the shortening of spring 45 as a 70
which, when the frame 61 is raised, engage the result of a given temperature change and thus
reduces the temperature differential required to
ends of the spring 45.
As in Fig. 3, the spring 45 has its center ?xed ?ex the jack spring 28 and open the switch. The
relative to the stud 4| and normally its ends ends of strip ‘I9 are rounded to give a point con
curve downwardly. The brackets 49 and 50 are tact.
4
2,060,836
While I have described my improved thermal
switch in use as a cut-out, it is obvious that it
may be used as a reversing switch, contacts being
provided which will be closed when the contacts
illustrated are broken.
It is obvious that two rocking levers, similar to
the lever 20 in Fig. 1 could be employed in the
structure as set forth under the modi?cation as
shown in Fig. '7 to ?ex the jack spring, the levers
being disposed opposite to each other so their ends
with which the jack spring is connected will rock
toward each other and thus ?ex the jack spring,
these levers being rocked by the ?exing of the
actuating spring.
15
This structure is also applicable to the modi?
cation of my invention as shown in Fig. 11 where
by the bimetal strip 19 may be reversed so that it
will ?ex downwardly, the ends bearing against
the-under surfaceof the base 64 and the two op
20 positely disposed levers 20 arranged to engage the
under surface of the bimetal strip, thereby trans
mitting a double movement to the ’ brackets 49
25
and 50 in combination with the bimetal strips 45,
41, etc., thus making the switch more sensitive.
Again, my switch may be constructed without
bimetal or other temperature-operated elements,
the actuating spring being ?exed by mechanical
means such as a handle or other attachment or
connection.
I claim:
1. In a thermal cut-out switch, the combina
tion of a base, a leaf spring having one end has-
tened to the base, means actuated by temperature
changes arranged to ?ex said spring, a second leaf
35
spring having one end supported by the free end
of the first leaf spring and its other end supported
by the base and arranged to be ?exed by the ?ex
ing of the ?rst leaf spring, and a contact member
40 carried by the second leaf spring and arranged to
be held in circuit closing position when said sec
ond leaf spring is unfiexed and to be retracted
when the second leaf spring is ?exed.
2. In a thermal cut-out switch, the combination
45 of a base, a leaf spring having one end fastened to
the base, means actuated by temperature changes
arranged to ?ex said spring, a second leaf spring
having one end pivotally supported by the free
end of the ?rst leaf spring and its other end piv
otally supported by the base and arranged to be
flexed by the ?exing of the ?rst leaf spring, and
a contact member carried by the second leaf‘
bracket and having its other end pivotally mount
ed on a portion of the support, and.a contact
member normally held in circuit-closing position
by the second leaf spring and arranged to be re
tracted by the ?exing of the latter, whereby when
the first leaf spring is ?exed by the bimetal strip
the second leaf spring is ?exed and the contact
member is retracted from its closed position.
5. In a‘ thermal cut-out switch, the combina
tion of a support, a bimetal'strip attached at one
end to said support, a leaf spring attached at
one end to the support and arranged to be ?exed
by the ?exing of the bimetal strip, an angular le
ver arranged for rocking movement and attached
to the free end of said leaf spring, a second leaf 15
spring having one end pivotally connected to the
end of said lever, the other end of the second leaf
spring being pivotally attached to a portion of
the support, and a contact member normally held
in circuit-closing position by the second leaf 20
spring and arranged to be retracted by the flexing of the latter, whereby the ?exing of the bi
metal strip retracts the contact member from its
closed position.
6. In a thermal cut-out switch, the combina 25
tion of a support, a pair of opposed bimetal strips
mounted on said support, a leaf spring ?xed to
said support intermediate of its ends and arranged
to be flexed by the flexing of the bimetal strips,
a second leaf spring, the ends of which are car
30
ried by the ends of the first leaf spring, and
which is arranged to be ?exed by the ?exing of
the ?rst leaf spring, and 'a contact member nor
mally held in circuit-closing position by the sec
ond leaf spring and arranged to be retracted from~ 35
its closed position by the ?exing of the latter,
whereby the ?exing of the bimetal strips retracts
the contact member.
'7. In a thermal cut-out switch, the combina
tion of a support, a pair of opposed bimetal strips 40
mounted on said support, a leaf spring ?xed to
said support intermediate of its ends and ar
ranged to be ?exed by the ?exing of the bimetal
strips, brackets mounted on the ends of said leaf
spring, a second leaf spring having its ends pivot 45
ally attached to the brackets, and a contact mem
ber arranged to be normally held in circuit-clos
ing position by the second leaf spring and to be
retracted from its closed position by the ?exing
of the latter whereby the ?exing of the bimetal
strips retracts the contact member.
8. In a thermal cut-out switch, the‘combina
spring and arranged to be held in circuit closing tion of a base, a leaf spring having one end fas
position when said second leaf spring is un?exed tened to the base, means actuated by tempera
55 and to be retracted when the second leaf spring is ' ture changes arranged to ?ex said spring, a sec 65
?exed.
’
ond leaf spring having one end supported by the
3. In a thermal cut-out switch, the combination free end of the ?rst leaf spring and its other end
of a base, a leaf spring having one end fastened . supported by the base and arranged to be ?exed
to the base, a bimetal element mounted on the by the ?exing of the ?rst leaf spring, a contact
member carried by the second leaf spring and
60 base arranged to ?ex said spring, a second leaf
spring having one end supported by the free end
of the first leaf spring and its other end sup
, ported by the base ‘and arranged to be ?exed by
the ?exing of the ?rst leaf spring, and a contact
65 member carried by the second leaf spring and ar
ranged to be held in circuit closing position when
- said second leaf spring is un?exed and to be re
tracted when the second leaf spring is ?exed.
4. In a'thermal cut~out switch, the combina
70 tion of a support, a bimetal strip attached at one
end to the support, a leaf spring attached at one
end to the support and arranged to be flexedv by
the ?exing of the bimetal strip, a bracket moving
with the free end of said leaf spring, a second leaf
76 spring having one end pivotally mounted on said
arranged to be held in circuit closing position
when said second leaf spring is un?exed and to be
retracted when the second leaf spring is ?exed,
and manually operated means for holding the
contact member in open position.
.
9. In a thermal cut-out switch, the combination
of a base, a leaf spring having one end fastened
tothe base,‘ a bimetal element mounted on the
base arranged to ?ex said spring, a second leaf
spring having one end supported by the free end 70
of the ?rst leaf spring and its other end sup
ported by the base and arranged to be flexed by
the ?exing of the ?rst leaf spring, a contact mem
ber carried by the second leaf spring and arranged
to be held in circuit closing position when said 76
‘ 2,080,886
second leaf spring is un?exed and to be retracted . do not become impaired while the contact mem- .
when the second leaf spring is ?exed, and man
ually operated means for holding the contact
member in open position.
10. In a thermal cut-out switch, the combina
tion of a base, a leaf spring having one endyfas
tened to the base, a bimetal element mounted on
the base arranged to ?ex said spring, a second leaf
, spring having one end supported by the free end
10 of the ?rst leaf spring and its other end supported
by the base and arranged to be ?exed by the ?ex
ing of the ?rst leaf spring, a contact member car
ried by the second leaf spring and arranged to be
held in circuit closing position when said second
15 leaf spring is un?exed and to be retracted when
the second leaf spring is ?exed, and means for
.varying the degree of ?ex of the bimetal member
whereby to regulate the thermal temperature
effect to open the switch.
11. In a thermal cut-out switch, the combina
tion of a support, a leaf spring ?xed to said sup
port intermediate of its ends, means whereby the
?exing of the ends of said leaf spring throws out
the switch, and a plurality of pairs of oppositely
25 bowed metal strips arranged to reverse under
temperature changes and ?ex the ends of said
spring.
12. In a thermal cut-out switch, the combina
tion of a support, a leaf spring ?xed to said 'sup~
30 port intermediate of its ends, means whereby the
?exing of the ends of said leaf spring throws out
the switch, a plurality of pairs of oppositely
bowed bimetal strips arranged to reverse under
temperature changes and ?ex the ends of said
35 spring, and a bimetal strip arranged to ?ex and
engage the leaf spring inside its ends in oppo
sition to the ?rst mentioned bimetal strips.
13. In a cut-out switch, the combination of a
base, a leaf spring having one end fastened to
said base, a second leaf spring having one end
ber retains its normal circuit-closed position, and
means for ?exing said spring.
17. The combination of a contact member, a
spring, a resilient arm mechanically connected to
the spring and arranged when said spring is un
?exed to hold the contact member'in circuit-clos
ing position but when said spring is ?exed to hold
said contact member in its open circuit position,
whereby the ?exing characteristics of the spring 10
do not become impaired while the contact mem
ber retains its normal circuit-closed position,
and thermally activated means for ?exing said
spring.
18. In a cut-out switch, the combination of a 15
contact member, a jack spring arranged to nor
mally hold the contact member in circuit closing _
position and when ?exed, to retract the contact
member, a pair of brackets to which the ends of
the jack spring are pivotally connected, and ther 20
mally-actuated means for shortening the distance
between said brackets whereby to ?ex the jack
spring.
19. In a cut-out switch, the combination of a
contact member, a jack spring arranged to nor 25
mally hold the contact member in circuit closing
position ‘and when ?exed to retract the contact
member, a pair of brackets, socket and pivot
members on said brackets and on- the ends of the
jack spring whereby the jack spring is supported 30
between the brackets, and thermally-actuated
means to shorten the distance between the brack
ets whereby to ?ex the jack spring.
20. In a cut-out switch, the combination of a
contact member, a jack spring arranged to nor 35
mally hold the contact member in circuit clos
ing position and when ?exed to retract the con
tact member, a pair of brackets, angular socket
and pivot members on said brackets and on the
ends of, the jack spring whereby the jack spring 40
supported by the free end of the ?rst leaf spring . is supported between the brackets, and thermal
and the other end supported by said base, a con
, tact member normally held in circuit-closing posi
tion when the second leaf spring is un?exed but
45 arranged to be retracted by the ?exing of said
.ly actuated means to shorten the distance be
tween the brackets whereby to ?ex the jack
spring.
21. In a cut-out switch, the combination of a 45
springs, and means for ?exing the ?rstspring to ' contact member, a jack‘spring arranged to nor
retract said ‘contact member.
14. In a cut-out switch, the combination of a
support, a leaf spring mounted on said support, a
50 second leaf spring arranged to normally hold the
contact member in circuit closing position and
‘when ?exed to retract said member, operative
connection between said springs whereby the ?ex
ing of the ?rst spring retracts the contact mem
55 ber from its closed position, and means arranged
to engage the ?rst spring on opposite ends to ?ex
the same.
>
‘
15. In a cut-out switch, the combination of a
base, a leaf spring having one end fastened to
60 said base, a second leaf spring having one end
mally hold the contact member in circuit clos- -
ing position and when ?exed to retract the con
tact member, a pair of brackets to which the ends
of the jack spring are pivotally connected, and 50
manually operated means for shortening the dis—
tance between said brackets whereby to ?ex the
jack spring.
>
22. In a cut-out switch, the combination of a
contact member, a jack spring arranged to nor—
mally hold the contact member in circuit closing
position and when ?exed to retract the contact
member, a pair of brackets, socket and pivot
members on said brackets and on the ends of the
jack spring whereby‘the jack spring is supported
supported by the free end of the first leaf spring, between the brackets, and manually operated
and the other end supported by said base, a con . means to shorten the distance between the brack
tact member normally held in circuit-closing ets whereby to ?ex the jack spring.
23. In a cut-out switch, the combination of a
position when the second leaf spring is un?exed
65 but arranged to be retracted by the ?exing of contact member, a jack spring arranged to nor 65
said springs, means for ?exing the ?rst spring to mally hold the contact member in circuit c1057»
retract said contact member, and means for ing position and when ?exed to retract the con-'
tact member, a pair of brackets, angular socket
holding the ?rst spring in its'flexed position.
16. The combination of a-‘contact member, a and pivot members on said brackets and on the
70 spring, a resilient arm mechanically connected to ends of the jack spring whereby the jack spring
is supported between the brackets, and manually
the spring and arranged when said spring is un
operated means to shorten the distance between
?exed to hold the contact member in circuit-clos
ing position but when said spring is ?exed to hold the brackets whereby to ?ex the jack spring.
24. The combination .of a contact member, ‘a
said contact member in its open circuit position,
75 whereby the ?exing characteristics .of the spring spring, a resilientarm engaging the spring and 75
6
2,060,836
arranged when said spring is un?exed to hold
the contact member in one position but, when
said spring is ?exed to hold said contact member
in its opposite position whereby the ?exing char
acteristics of the spring do not become impaired
while the contact member retains its ?rst men
tioned position, and means for ?exing said spring.
25. The combination of a contact member, a
spring, a resilient arm supported from one end
10 on the spring and arranged when said spring is
un?exed to hold the contact member in one
position but when said spring is ?exed to hold
said contact member in its opposite position
whereby the ?exing characteristics of the spring
15 do not become impaired while the contact mem
ber retains its ?rst mentioned position, and means
for ?exing said spring.
20
26. The combination of a contact member, a
spring, a resilient arm supported from one end
on the spring, a contact carried on the other end
of the arm, said arm being arranged when said
spring is un?exed to hold the contact member in
circuit-closing position but when said spring is
25 ?exed to hold said contact member in its open
circuit position, whereby the ?exing character
istics oi.’ the spring do not become impaired while
the contact member retains its normal circuit
closed position, and means for ?exing said spring.
27. The combination of a contact member, a
radius arm, a spring mounted as a chord with re
spect to the radius arm and having one end ar
ranged to be operated by the free end of the radius
arm, said spring when ?exed being arranged to
operate said contact member, and means {or mov
ing the radius arm to ?ex said spring.
28. The combination of a contact member, a
radius arm, a lever member carried by the free
end of the radius arm, a spring pivotally sup 10
ported at one end on the lever member and by
which said contact member is carried, and means
for moving the radius arm, the lever thereby rock
ing the latter causing the spring to become ?exed
for operating the contact member.
ll
29. The combination of a contact member, a
radius arm, a lever carried by the free end of the
radius arm, said lever having two legs, one ap
proximately tangent to the radius arm and car
rying a pivotal socket and the other being dis
posed at an angle thereto and carrying a iulcrum
point, a spring pivotally supported at one end in
the pivotal socket of the lever and by which said
contact member is carried, and means for mov
ing the radius arm causing the lever to rock on
its fulcrum point thereby increasing the rocking
movement of the lever to ?ex the spring for oper
ating the contact member.
FRANK TAXNER.
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
1 059 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа