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Патент USA US2064513

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Dec. 15,v 1936.
y
-
` - E. F. ANDREWS
RADIO
CABLE
l
2,064,513
`
Filed March 9, 1931
m
'
2 Sheets-Sheet 1
Dec. 15, 1936.
E. F, ANDREWS v
2,064,513
RADIO CABLE
Filed March 9, 1951
2 Sheets-Sheet 2.
Patented Dec. 15, 1936
2,064,513
UNITED STATES
PATENT OFFICE
2,064,513
RADIO CABLE
Edward F. Andrews, Chicago, Ill.
Application March 9, 1931, Serial No. 521,157
16 Claims. (Cl. Z50-16)
This invention relates to multiple cables com
prising a plurality of electric conductors in
sulated from each other, and particularly to such
cables which are suitable for use with radio
5' receiving sets.
One of the objects of the invention is to pro
vide an improved multiple cable.
A further object of the invention is to provide
an improved multiple cable of generally flat form
which may readily be concealed by iioor cover
ings and the like.
A further object of the invention is to pro
vide an improved multiple cable which is of
generally iiat form and which can be readily
secured in desired position without endanger
ing the conductors or the insulation thereof.
A further object of the invention is to provide
a cable having an outer envelope and means as
sociated therewith for maintaining the conduc
tors and the like in desired position.
A further object of the invention is to pro
vide a cable in which one or more conductors
are located with respect to the others to mini
mize objectionable capacity effects therebetween.
25
A further object of the invention is to pro
vide a multiple cable in which a certain con
ductor is effectively shielded from another con
Figure l is an elevational view, partly in sec
tion, showing a radio receiving set and cable
embodying the invention:
Fig. 2 is a sectional plan view taken on the
line 2-2 of Fig. 1;
5
Fig. 3 is a plan detail view of a fragment of
the cable, the outer envelope being partly broken
away to disclose the insulated conductors and
other elements;
Fig. 4 is a sectional detail view taken on the 10
line 4-4 of Fig. 3;
Fig. 5 is a similar View of a modified form of
cable;
Fig. 6 is an enlarged sectional view of the irn
proved cable plug;
Fig. 7 is a perspective view showing a modified
form of cable which is readily detachable from
the radio set;
Fig. 8 is a perspective detail showing the male
plug element mounted on the set; and
Fig. 9 is a perspective view showing the modi
ñed form of cable connected to the set.
Referring to the drawings, the cable I0 corn
prises an outer envelope I I which encloses a plu~
rality of insulated conductors I2, I3, I4, and I5
and a suitable number of spacers or fillers I6.
The conductors I2, I3, I4 and I5 may suitably
tachable means at one end for connection to a
be rubber coated stranded copper Wires and the
spacers or ñllers I6 may suitably be cotton
cords of approximately the same size as the
insulated conductors so that said conductors
source of power, antenna and ground, and at
the other end detachable means for connection
Fig. 4 to provide a cable of generally iiat or
ductor.
A further object of the invention is to provide
30 an improved radio receiving set cable having de
to the radio set.
.
and spacers may be laid in a row as shown in
tape-like form.
The envelope II may suitably
A further object of the invention is to provide
be woven around the conductors and iillers and
a portable radio receiving set and a plurality of
radio cables whereby the set may be readily con
nected to and disconnected from a source of
power, antenna and ground in a plurality of
40 locations.
its opposite faces may be connected by threads
I‘I which pass between adjacent conductors and
A further object of the invention is to provide
a cable and radio receiving set cabinet provided
with means for stowing an excess length of
45
ñllers, preserving the desired arrangement of
manner so as to produce an envelope II having
a desired elongative design Woven into it.
connecting means.
vide a single filler of suitable width so as to pro
A further object of the invention is to provide
Other objects, advantages and capabilities of
the invention will appear from the following
description of preferred embodiments of the in~
vention, taken in conjunction with the accom
5 panying drawings, in which
5
the enclosed elements and the general fiat form
of the cable. The threads I'I may be posi
tioned during the weaving operation or during
a subsequent independent operation. The weav
ing operation may be conducted in any suitable
cable therein.
A further object of the invention is to provide
a radio receiving set cable having an improved
an improved connecting plug for a radio receiv
50 ing set cable.
0
Instead of the plurality of ñllers I6 I may pro
vide effective spacing between the conductor I5
and the other conductors I2, I3 and I4. The
conductor I5 is normally the antenna conductor,
the conductor I4 may, for example, be the ground
conductor, While the conductors I2 and I3 may be
the alternating current conductors which are
supplied with energy from the power lines.
It will readily be seen from the drawings that 55
"2,064,51á
2
it is preferred to space the antenna conductor I5
fashion. As illustrated, the chamber 29 is only
as far as possible from the other conductors. This
is done to reduce as far as possible the capacity
slightly wider than the cable and is suitably lo
cated in the base of the cabinet, the slot 3D being
vertical. It will be understood however that this
method of stowing cable is capable of other em
bodiments, since the flat cable lends itself to easy
stowage without risk of tangling.
It is to be noted that with this method of stow
ing the spacing between the antenna and the other
conductors is preserved. Adjacent the inner end 10
the cable I0 is secured to one of the side walls of
the chamber 29, which may readily be done since
between the antenna and the other conductors
and to reduce the signal power loss resulting
therefrom. Another advantage of this spacing is
the reduction of the possibility of the antenna
picking up a hum or other electrical disturbances
from the power lines.
The energy loss is a func
tion of the frequency and owing to the high fre
quency of the radio oscillations in the antenna
the signal strength loss is frequently considerable.
Another objectionable effect of the capacity be
tween the antenna and the other conductors is
that it tends to put the ñrst tuned circuit out of
step with the other circuits, which impairs the
efiiciency of the operation of set.
screws, tacks or the like may be passed through
the iillers I6 without danger to the conductors
or their insulation. The inner end of the cable IIJ 15
passes upwardly from the chamber 29 and its
various conductors are connected to the receiv
In order to obtain the full benefit of the in
vention, the material of which the ñllers I6 are
ing set.
In the modification shown in Figs. '7, 8, and 9
made should be of low speciñc inductive capacity.
the cable Ill is provided with a plug I9 which is 20
connected to the power outlet 2 I, ground lead 21,
and antenna lead 24, in the manner described
above. The other or free end is provided with a
plug element 32 which comprises sockets 33 which
I have found cotton string to be suitable since it
introduces a relatively small amount of solid mat
ter between the antenna and the other conduc
tors, 'the main dielectric being air.
ïn the modiñcation shown in Fig. 5 the ground
conductor it is omitted, or is replaced by a ñller
i@ and ground connection is made by means of a
shield ES of conductive material formed on the
exterior of the insulated conductors I2 and i3.
30 The shield i2 may suitably be constituted of
woven metal, although any other form of con
ducting coatine may be employed.
The free end of the cable i0 is connected to a
plug i9, which may suitably comprise the prongs
29 adapted to cooperate with a conventional
power outlet iii. The conductors I2 and I3 are
connected to the prongs 2D in the usual manner.
The plug Sti comprises a socket 22 which is con
nected to the antenna conductor I5, the socket
40 22 being adapted to receive a plug 23 of midget
type, whereby the antenna lead 24 may suitably
be connected to the receiving set.
The plug i!! also comprises a socket 25 to which
the ground conductor i4 of the cable is connected.
The socket 25 is adapted to receive a plug 26 of
are connected to the conductors I2, I3, I4 and I5. 25
The radio receiving set 28 has mounted thereon a
corresponding plug element 34 adapted to re
ceive the plug element 32. With a portable radio
receiving set 28 which is to be used in several
locations, a plurality of cables ID may be em
rug or the like until it is desired to use the in
strument in that location again. Such cables,
provided in the locations in which it is desired to
operate the instrument enables a modern receiv
ing set to be employed as a portable instrument 40
with much greater convenience than has hereto
fore been possible. This modiñcation of the in
vention is particularly adapted for situations
where, as is usually the case, the wall outlets are
obscured by pieces of furniture and the like. This 45
midget type, which is connected to a ground lead
modiñcation enables the cables to be more or less
27.
lt will thus be seen that I have provided an
extremely simple means whereby the radio set
50 may be connected to any suitable outlet. The
plug le is merely inserted in any suitable outlet
and the antenna and ground leads are plugged
into the plug I9.
The plug I5 may be formed integrally by a
molding operation or other suitable way, the
body being formed of suitable insulating ma
terial. This body is provided with a slot through
which the end of the cable IG is passed. This
end may be anchored to the plug by suitable
60 means, for example a bolt 3| which passes through
the plug body and through the cable I0 in the
central portion in which the ñllers I6 are located.
If desired, as shown in Fig. 6, the body of the plug
i9 may be made in two parts secured together by
permanently installed and concealed by floor cov
erings and the like. In such installation the
cable may be held in secured position by tacks or
the like which extend through the central por
tion of the cable and, passing through the fillers
I6, do not injure the conductors or their insula
tion. When the cable thus secured is uncovered,
the tacks employed are preferably provided with
ornamental heads.
Although the invention has been described in
connection with the specific details of preferred
embodiments thereof, it must be understood that
the bolt 3|.
The generally ilat form of the cable I0 enables
me to stow a certain amount of the cable very
conveniently in the radio cabinet so that no ex
cess lengths or convolutions of the cable need be
exposed. In Figs. l and 2, I have shown a receiv
ing set 28, in which I provide a chamber 29, into
which opens a slot 30 through which the cable
passes. 1t will readily be understood from Fig. 2
that when the cable is forced inwardly through
the slot 30 the cable will arrange itself in zig-zag
30
ployed which are readily connected and discon
nected at the set. Used in this way the ground
lead 21 and antenna lead 24 are left permanently
connected to the plug I9 and the cable I0, owing
to its generally flat form, may be concealed by a 35
such details are not intended to be limitative of
the invention except insofar as set forth in the 60
accompanying claims.
What I claim as new and desire to secure by
Letters Patent is:
l. A radio cable of generally flat form com
prising a group of conductors including current 65
conductors and a ground conductor in adjacent
relation, a separate antenna conductor, and a,
spacer maintaining the antenna conductor in
spaced relation to the said group of conductors,
all of said conductors and said spacer being ar 70
ranged in a plane.
2. A radio cable of generally flat form com
prising current conductors, a ground conductor,
an antenna conductor, and a spacer maintaining
the antenna conductor in spaced relation to the 75
3
2,064,513
other conductors, 'said conductors and spacer
10. In combination, a radio receiving set' cabi
being arranged in a plane, and the ground con
ductor being located between the current con
ductors and the spacer.
3. A radio conductor of generally flat form
comprising insulated current conductors, an in
sulated ground conductor, an insulated antenna
conductor, and a plurality of spacers of low spe
net comprising a chamber of horizontal plan,
one of the side walls being provided with a ver
>tical slot, a radio cable of generally flat form
secured within the cabinet at a point remote
from the slot and extending through the slot,
ciñc inductive capacity and having substantially
chamber it arranges itself in zigzag formation.
11. A radio cable of generally ñat form com 10
prising an outer envelope, current conductors, a
ground conductor and an antenna conductor lo
cated therewithin and arranged in a plane, the
current conductors and ground conductor being
10 the same dimensions as the conductors, said con
ductors and spacers being arranged along side
each other with the spacers between the antenna
and other conductors.
4. A radio cable comprising current conductors
15 located adjacent each »other provided with con
ductive shields a-dapted to be grounded, an an
tenna conductor, and means spacing said an
tenna conductor from the current conductors a
greater distance than that between adjacent cur
20 rent conductors.
5. A radio cable of generally flat form com
prising
current
conductors,
metallic
shields
thereon adapted to be grounded, an antenna con
ductor, and a spacer maintaining the antenna
25 conductor in spaced relation to the current conductors, said conductors and spacer being a1’
ranged in a plane.
6. A radio cable of generally ilat form com
prising insulated current conductors, metallic
30 shields thereon adapted to be grounded, an ín
sulated antenna, a plurality of spacers of low
speciñc inductive capacity of substantially the
same dimensions as the conductors, said con
said chamber being substantially rectangular in
shape so that when the cable ís forced into the:
arranged as adjacent members of a group and 15
the antenna conductor being located in substan
tially spaced and parallel relation thereto.
' 12. A radio cable of generally flat ribbon-like
form comprising current conductors and an an
tenna conductor, and means spacing said an
tenna conductor from the current conductors a
greater distance than that between adjacent cur~
rent conductors.
`
13. A flat radio cable comprising a conductor
and a shielded conductor in closely spaced re 25
lation and a third conductor on the side of said
shielded conductor remote from the first said
conductor and spaced from the shielded con
ductor a greater distance than the distance be
tween said shielded conductor and the ñrst said 30
conductor.
14. In combination, a radio receiver unit, a
flat cable connected to said unit and a plug se
spacers so as to maintain the cable in generally
cured to the end of said cable, said cable in
cluding a pair of adjacent alternating current 35
conductors and an antenna conductor spaced
from the alternating current conductors greater
than the spacing between said alternating cur
rent conductors, and said plug carrying ele
ments for connecting antenna and power leads 40
to said conductors.
15. A radio cable of generally flat form corn
prising an outer envelope, current conductors
flat form, the antenna conductor being separated
and an antenna conductor located therewithin
ductors and spacers being arranged along side
each other with the spacers between the antenna
and other conductors.
7. A radio cable comprising current conductors,
a groun-d conductor, an antenna conductor,
spacers of low specific inductive capacity, en
40 closed within a fabric envelope, and threads eX~
tending from one side of the envelope to the
other and between adjacent conductors and
45 from the other conductors by the spacers.
8. In combination, a radio cable of generally
flat form comprising current conductors, an an
tenna conductor and a ground conductor, an-d a
plug into which said cable is adapted to enter,
said plug being provided with prongs adapted
to enter a standard lighting outlet to which
prongs the current leads are connected, and be
ing provided with connection elements in its ex
posed portion to which the antenna and ground
conductors are connected.
and arranged in a plane, the current conductors 45
being arranged as adjacent members of a group
and the antenna conductor being located in sub
stantially spaced and parallel relation thereto.
16. In combination, a radio receiving unit, a
ñat cable connected to said unit and a plug se 50
cured to the end of said cable, said cable in
cluding a pair of adjacent alternating current
conductors and an antenna conductor spaced
from the alternating current conductors greater
than the spacing between said alternating cur 55
conductors of a radio cable, sockets in the eX
rent conductors, a pair of contacts on said plug
adapted to enter a standard outlet to connect
said alternating current conductors to power
supply, and a connecting element on a portion
posed portion of the plug for receiving antenna
and ground plugs, said sockets being adapted to
to said outlet for connecting an antenna to said
9. A radio cable plug comprising prongs for
cooperating with a standard lighting outlet,
means for connecting said prongs to the current
be connected to the antenna and ground con
ductors of a radio cable.
of said plug exposed when the plug is applied 60
antenna conductor.
EDWARD F. ANDREWS.
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