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Патент USA US2066257

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Dec- 29, 1936.
w. F. EPPENSTElNER
2,066,257
APPARATUS FOR SWEATING OUT FUSIBLE METALS
Filed Dec. 6, 1934
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2,066,257
W. F. EPPENSTEiNER
APPARATUS FOR SWEATING OUT FUSIBLE METALS
Filed Dec. 6, 1954
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Dec. 29, 1936.'
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APPARATUS FOR SWEATING OUT FUSIBLE METALS
Filed Dec. 6, 1934
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INVENTOR
Dec. 29, 1936.
2,066,257
w. F. EPPENSTEINER
APPARATUS FOR SWEATING OUT FUSIBLE METALS
Filed Dec. 6, 1934
6 Sheets-Sheet 5
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INVENTOR
BY
.3)‘ '
A'r‘TgziEYs’y'
Dec.‘29, 1936.
2,066,257
w. F. EPPENSTEINER
APPARATUS FOR SWEATING OUT FUSIBLE METALS
-
Fiuled Dec. 6, 1934
‘
GSheets-Sheet 6
INVENTOR
BY
' fZAT-rmvs.
2,066,257
Patented Dec. 29, 1936
UNITED STATES PAT
QFEIQE
2,066,257
APBARA'I‘US FOR SWEATING OUT
FUSIBLE METALS
William F. Eppensteiner, Rahway, N. .L, assignor
to The American Metal Company, Limited, New
York, N. Y; a corporation of New York
Application December 6, 1934, Serial No. 756,271
9 Claims.
My present invention relates to apparatus for
reclaiming more readily fusible metals from
those of lesser fusibility by the application of
5
heat. More speci?cally it relates to the recovery
of such fusible metals by the sweating out there
of from their union with metals of lesser fusibility
by the application of superheated steam. The
invention is applicable to the salvaging of various
metals from articles or defective structures con
10 taining them, such, for example: solder from
(Cl. 266-33)
articles to remove therefrom contaminating and
oxidizing in?uences and also raise their tempera
ture before they are subjected to the sweating
process. The invention Will be better understood
from the detailed description which follows, when
preheating and heating chambers of the ap
paratus.
Figures 1 and 1a are fractional front elevations
of an apparatus embodying my invention.
Fig. 2 is a transverse section taken substan
automobile radiators, lead from electric cable
tially along the plane of the line 2--2 of Fig. 1.
' coatings, Babbitt metal from bearings, tin from
tin-plate on cans and the like, and in numerous
other instances where a more‘ fusible metal or
section through the adjacent portions of the"
preheating and heating chambers of the ap
15 alloy is to be separated from a less fusible metal
or alloy.
'
20 the material to be treated in an oven or retort
and subject it to the heat of combustion applied
either externally or internally thereof, the more
fusible metal or alloy falling into a receiver or
tray beneath, while the less fusible metal or al
25 loy is pushed out or otherwise removed from the
Various means have already been pro
posed for agitating the metals being treated to
promote separation of the fused from the non
fused metal to increase the yield of the metal
30 to be recovered.
. Fig. 3 is an enlarged ‘fractional longitudinal
paratus.
~\
15
Fig. 4 is an enlarged fractional longitudinal
'
The method and means heretofore commonly
employed to bring about such separation of
metals of the class described has‘ been to place
container.
10
~
The objects of the present invention are to pro
vide an apparatus whereby the treatment of
metal articles or structures from which metals
are to be reclaimed can be carried out on a large
35 scale and in a continuous manner, wherein the
percentage yield of the recovered metals will be
substantially greater than has been heretofore
possible of accomplishment, and wherein the ob
jectionable effects of oxidation on the recovered
metals will be practically eliminated.
The foregoing and other objects of the inven
tion' not speci?cally enumerated are accom
plished by subjecting the metals or articles from
which the desired metals are to be salvaged to a
45 heat treatment in a non—oxidizing atmosphere at
elevated temperature, preferably by superheated
steam contained in a chamber while said articles
section through the remainder of the heating
chamber and showing the bosh pit into which the
articles, after being treated, are discharged.
Fig. 5 is a section taken substantially along the 20
plane of the line 5——5 of Fig. 4 and showing the
connection between the heating chamber and a
superheater.
Fig. 6 is a section taken substantially along the
plane of the line 6--6 of Fig. 4.
Fig. 7 is a transverse section taken substantial
1y along the plane of the line ‘l-—‘l of Fig. 4 and
showing in elevation the conveyor for carrying
away articles from the bosh pit, and a baling
press for acting upon such articles. ,
30
In the accompanying drawings which illustrate
‘a practicable embodiment of my invention, the
apparatus may be said to consist of a charging
conveyor A‘, feed conveyors _B and C, a trommel
D, a bosh pit E, a discharge conveyor F and a 35
baling press G. The conveyor C, the trommel
D and the bosh pit E, are preferably enclosed in
a steel casing or box H to provide a substantially
air-tight closure for the unit comprising said
parts. The steel box H may conveniently be
formed with double, spaced apart walls It and 2h,
suitably reinforced, the space between said walls
being ?lled with a heat insulating material 3h,
such as diatoma'ceous earth. The steel box H,
it will be understood, will have a con?guration 45
adapted to enclose the aforementioned parts of
the unit, suitable provision being made to take
care of expansion and contraction of the plates in
view of the considerable difference in tempera
tures between the interior of the casing and the 50
are being conveyed therethrcugh, agitating said
articles to free the more readily fusible metal
therefrom and collecting said fused metal in
reservoirs from which it may be intermittently outside atmosphere under operating conditions.
tapped. Preferably the articles being treated are The entire unit may be supported upon a suitable
subjected to a preliminary heating by the spent ‘foundation of concrete .or' the like J, while the
housings A’ and B’ enclosing the conveyors A and
steam after‘ leaving - the treatment chamber
55 proper, moving in a direction counter to said
B, respectively, may be suppormd upon a frame 55
2,066,267
work or foundation J’ constructed of steel, rein
ing, andvat their lower ends are ?tted with dis
forced concrete or the like material.
charge or tap-off tubes 2m which extend through
the wall of the casing, and said tap-off tubes, in
turn, are ?tted at their ends with rotatable elbow’
»
The charging conveyor A may be of any stand
ard link belt, apron type'construction, and may
5 ‘be driven by means (not shown) around the
sprocket wheels a and 2a, and b and 2b, respec
tively. The charging end of the conveyor A ex
tends beyond the housing A’, and to preclude the
free admission of air into the housing during the
10 charging operations there is provided within the
.housing A’ a pair of longitudinally spaced apart
?at doors 3a and 4a, so arranged that one of the
doors will be closed, as shown at 3a, when the
other will be open. The charging conveyor is in
clined upwardly and is adapted to discharge the
articles carried thereby to the feedconveyor B
' over a downwardly sloping apron 5a leading from
the discharge end of the conveyor A to the charg
ing end of the conveyor B.
20
Between the housings A’ and B’ and extending
upwardly, therefrom at the place of union‘is a
vent stack K of a height and diameter to provide
the necessary draft to draw the heating medium
(superheated steam) through the casing H from
25 the discharge end thereof ‘and through the hous
ing B’ from the discharge end thereof.
The feed conveyor B extends through the hous
ing 3' which constitutes a preheating chamber
for the articles to be acted upon. Said conveyor
30 . B, like the conveyor A, may be of any standard
link belt, apron type, and as ‘shown in Fig. 2,
_ consists of carrying plates or pans 2b supported
or L-tubes 3m which act as valves which are
adapted when turned downwardly to draw of! the
‘ molten metal from the troughs into suitable re
ceiving receptacles or molds 4m. At the opposite
or higher ends of each of the troughs M the ‘casing
is formed with an opening 5m for facilitating the 10
cleaning out of the troughs or the removal of
dross and dirt from the top of the molten metal.
Each of these openings is fitted with a door 6m
suitably hinged in any conventionalmanner to
open and close and provide atightly closed joint. 15
The ends of the troughs adjacent the doors 6m
are provided with inclined closures 1m, while at
the opposite ends the troughs are provided with
ba?le plates 8m which extend over the entrance
of the tap-off tubes 2m so that all metal to be 20
tapped off must ?ow underneath the ba?le, there
by precluding the passage of dross and dirt from
the troughs unless they be tapped practically dry.
The trommel D into which the articles being
treated are discharged from the conveyor C may 25
be of any desired or preferred construction, and
‘as herein shown, consists of a cylindrical screen
d suitably reinforced by longitudinally extend
ing T-beams 2d and by circumferentially disposed
encircling hoops 3d and by end hoops or rings
4c!v and 5d, respectively. The end rings each
carries‘a machined steel tire 6d or 1d, respec
tively, which ride upon trunnion rollers 8d mount
3.0
by rollers 3b adapted to ride over tracks 4b. T0
prevent the articles being carried by said conveyor , ed upon suitable pedestals or bearings. The tire
35 from jamming within the chamber and from con
id is formed around its periphery with equally 35
tacting the walls of the housing; there are mount
spaced recesses or sockets 9d, within which en
ed within the casing above the conveyor, skirt gage the teeth on a driving wheel llld driven by
boards 5b of any desired construction and ma
a suitableelectric motor (not shown). The axis
terial. The housing B’ through which the con
of they trommel is tilted slightly toward the dis
40 veyor 13 extends is formed with spaced openings charge end'in order to keep the articles being 40
6b in its side walls, the function for which will treated moving in that direction. Beneath the
trommel and extending throughout its length and
be presently made apparent.
,
The conveyor 0 upon which the articles to be
treated are sweated, extends through the heating
45 or sweating chamber of' the device and may be
of any preferred construction, and as herein
shown is of the chain, grate type and consists of
plvotally connected links 0 which support angle
iron crossbars 2c which may be conveniently
50 -welded to the links with the angles of the bars
across the width of the casing are a plurality of
V-shap'ed troughs M’, which, in construction, dis
position and function, are quitelsimilar to the 45
troughs M hereinbefore described.
'
For facilitating the transfer of the material
from the. discharge end of the conveyor C to the
trommel I provide a transfer apron N, and for
taking the thrust of the articles when falling 50
pointing upwardly, as best shown in Figs. 3, 4 . upon the entrance‘ end of the trommel I prefer
and 5. The links of the conveyor carry rollers to reinforce the same with a conical plate “6. 1
30 and the link chains are trained over sprocket I also prefer to provide a chamber below the dis-_
wheels 4c and 50, while the rollers 80 travel over charge end of the conveyor 0 and to provide in
v55 tracks 6c suitably supported by the inner wall of said chamber an inclined plate 0 extending from
the ?oor of said chamber to‘ the top of the apron
the casing H. Above the conveyor C and suit
ably supported by theinner wall of the casing are N. The function for said plate 0 will be pres
.
skirt boards 1c somewhat analogous to the skirt ently made apparent.
The bosh pit E located at the discharge end
boards 51: in the preheating chamber, for pre
60 venting the jamming between the chain and the of the trommel is adapted to receive the articles
casing of the articles while being ‘conveyed discharged therefrom. The bosh pit may be suit
through said chamber. It is intended that the ' ably constructed' of concrete or the like and ‘has
conveyor C in its travel through the heating or, suitable water connections e for ?lling the’ pit
sweating chamber beipractically non-agitating. and sewer connections 2e for draining the pit.
65 For transferring the articles from the conveyor Within said bosh pit there are mounted suitable
B to the conveyor C I provide an inclined chute L. bearing supports I provided with tracks 2! and
bearings (not shown) for rollers 3! and If for
Disposed between the upper and’ lower com
suitably guiding the lower end of the conveyor
ponents of the conveyor 0 are a plurality of V
shaped troughs M formed of steel or other suitable within the pit and providing a receiving station
70 material and connected together along their top - for the articles discharged from the trommel.
For guiding the discharge of the articles from
edges by angle irons m. These troughs M ex
tend completely across the width of the casing the trommel to the conveyor F an apron 8e sup
ported by the wall of the bosh pit may be pro
and cover the entire area beneath the upper com
ponent of the conveyor. The troughs are all vided. Where the apparatus is constructed in
twin units so that a single bosh pit may serve
75 mounted to tilt slightly transversely of the hous
55
65
70
76
2,066,257
/for both, a second apron 42 may be provided,
as shown» in Fig. 4. For excluding access of, the
air to the trommel through the bosh pit, the
connections between the casing enclosing the
trommel. and the‘ bosh pit are all water sealed,
for example, by the depending plate 571 (Fig. 4)
and the depending plates in (Fig. 7).
The discharge conveyor F at its upper end
leads to a chute P for transferring the articles
10 after having been passed through the sweating
3
above atmospheric pressure so as to exclude the
entrance of atmospheric air from said sweating
chambers. The draft created by the stack K
will usually be sufficient to cause a normal ?ow
of the steam from the sweating chambers through
the preheating chamber and also draw cooling
air through the openings 61) and cause it to pass
in the same general direction as the steam, which
is contrary to the direction of feed of the radi
ators. It will thus be appreciated that as the 10
process to the baling press G. This baling press steam is being progressively cooled, the radiators
may be of any desired or preferred construction, are being progressively heated and freed from
and as herein shown is of the screw spindle type, adhering moisture and other volatile matter.
From the conveyor B in the preheating cham
which may be motor operated and consists of
her the radiators will be discharged over the
a
plunger
9
operable
by
power
applying
means
15, 2g to compress a mass of material within the top apron-L onto the conveyor C into the heating or
of a casing or cylinder 3g to bale the same, after sweating zone. Here the action of the super
which said baled mass may be ejected from the ' heated steam upon theradiators as they travel
cylinder by an air operated plunger or the like along causes the solder to be sweated out and
fall between the angle bars, 0 down into the 20
20 4g into an open top freight car or the like Q.
superheated steam for heating the chamber V-shaped troughs M underneath. At the end
for sweating operations may be supplied by any of the conveyor C the radiators will be fed over
the apron N into the trommel D, where, by the
type of superheater R having the requisite ca
tumbling action thereof, practically all the re
pacity. The steam may be charged to the super
maining free or uncombined solder is removed 25
25 ~heater from an ordinary steam supply line S
and discharged from the superheater through the from the‘ radiators and caught in the V-shaped
pipe T, it being understood that the superheater troughs M’. The traveling conveyor C in the
will be equipped with the necessary indicating steam-heated chamber provides for the separa
tion of the molten metal under conditions of
pyrometers and other'appurtenances for main
practically no agitation, while the trommel D 30
30 taining a constant temperature. From the pipe
T the superheated steam may be conducted-to provides separation under conditions of violent
the casing H at two points, (1) \through the pipe
agitation. Separate pans being provided for the
collection of the fusible metal under each of
these conveyors, it will be appreciated that two
types of metal are produced and thus kept sepa 35
veyor C at or near the discharge end of said rate. The metal collected in the troughs M un
chamber. The pipes t and T" may be suitably _‘ der the non-agitating conveyor C is more pure
formed with holes through which the steam may than that collected in the troughs under the
trommel D. More speci?cally, in ‘treating auto—
enter the respective chambers.
It will be understood that the invention is mobile radiators, ithe solder collected in the 40
40
troughs M under the conveyor C is found to be
adapted for use for treating various types of de
somewhat richer in tin than that collected in
n ' vices for reclaiming more readily fusible metals
from the less fusible metals with which they are the troughs under the trommel.
From the trommel the radiators are dischargedv
associated. Speci?cally the present device has
into
the water ?lled bosh pit for cooling‘and are 45
been
designed
for
reclaiming
solder
from
auto
45
mobile radiators, and in describing the operation therein received upon the discharge conveyor F
and carried to the baling press G where they are
of the device such radiators will be considered as
baled and discharged into the ?at car Q. Where
the articles acted upon.
,.
Operation.—The radiators U are manually the radiators have been charged to the device
together with their frames, these frames will be 50
50 placed in position on the feed conveyor A, either
together with their frames or with their frames manually removed from the conveyor F as» they
removed. Depending upon the .capacity of the come up out of the bosh pit so as not to interfere
device. the radiators may be charged two wide with the baling of the substantially solder-free
and two or three high on the conveyor with their brass. The solder is tapped at intervals‘from
hose
connections, pointing downwardly. In the the V-shaped troughs through the L-tubes 3m 55
55
course of this feeding and charging operation it into the molds ‘4m. Just prior, however, to the
will be understood that one of the flat doors 3a tapping operation. the dross is preferably re
or 4a will always be closed so as to exclude an moved from the various troughs through the
inrush of air or a discharge of steam from the clean-out doors 6m. As the device is primarily
intended to be continuously operating, such tap 60
60 charging compartment of the casing H. From pings may be carried out, say once in every eight
the conveyor A the radiators are fed over the
apron 5a. onto the conveyor B within what is hour shift or oftener, if found necessary.
The entire apparatus may be shut down for a
termed the preheating chamber of the device.
In this preheater the superheated steam from the thorough clean out once every ten days or two
weeks, and in this connection it _may be stated 65
trommel chamber and the heating chamber en
closing the conveyor‘ C will slowly pass on its way that the only places whereat trouble has been
to the stack K out to the atmosphere, and in said experienced in the practical operation of the
device are at the discharge end of the conveyor
passage air will be admitted through the open
C
and at'the entrance to the trommel. To re
ings 5b ‘which will serve to lower the temperature
duce these troubles to a minimum I have pro
of
the
steam
as
it
approaches
the
charging
end
70
vided at the discharge end of the‘ conveyor C
T’ to the discharge pipes If within the chamber
around the trommel; and (2) through the pipe
35 T” into the heating chamber containing the con
of .the preheating chamber, and conversely, said
steam will serve to progressively heat the radi
ators as they approach the heating chamber
proper. The superheated steam is charged to
75 the heating and trommel chambers at slightly
the chutes or aprons N and O.
The trouble
aforementioned is primarily caused by the fact
that a large part of the radiators when arriving '
at the discharge end of the ‘conveyor C are in 75
4
2,086,257
ribbon form and very often these ribbons are car
ried beyond this discharge point between the
chamber having air inlets for the admission of
air to lower the temperature of the superheated
angle bars 0 forming the grate, thus dropping steam as _it is drawn through the preheating
underneath the-conveyor.
The apron 0 serves
to deflect this material down intothe chamber
at the ‘foot of said plate, which chamber. is pro
vided with the clean out door‘o. The plate 0
has also .been made removable so as to permit
access to the trommel proper through said door.
10 Experience has taught that at times the material
carried‘ beyond the discharge point, as explained
above, accumulates and builds up against the
underside of the conveyor, causing a jam which
necessitates shutting down the entire unit until
15 said material can be cleaned out.
It has also
been found- that these ribbons occasionally build
' up in the intake end of the trommel and gradu
ally build back to the grate conveyor, causing a
Jam at said point. To indicate to the operators
20 that either of these plug ups are taking place,
ammeters have been installed on the operating
platform to indicate the current consumption
of the two main drive motors. By thismeans the
operators can check the currentconsumption of
the motors, and when these show a constant rise
above the normal operating range, the operators
know that trouble is developing and can imme
diately shut dowri the unit for clean out, which
operation can usually be done in a short time
30 without cooling o?f the entire equipment.
chamber.“
'
,
. 2.~An apparatus for separating out more fusible 5
metals from less fusible metals with which they
are .united, comprising a chamber adapted to
contain a non-oxidizing high temperature at
mosphere, a traveling conveyor and a trommel at
the discharge and of the conveyor adapted to re 10
ceive metals treated by the conveyor, both the
conveyor and the trommel being movable within '
the chamber, and separate means below the con
veyor and below the trommel vfor collecting the
molten metal separated from the less fusible met 15
als by the high temperature atmosphere while
traveling through the chamber. -
3. An apparatus according to claim 2, wherein
the ends of the trommel are open and theaxis
of the trommel is tilted slightly'toward the dis 20
charge end thereof.
4. An apparatus for treating metals compris
ing a chamber adapted to contain a high-temper
ature,
non-oxidizing
atmosphere,
conveyor
means having openings therethrough movable 25
in the-chamber, substantially V-shape troughs
below the conveyor means and transversely dis
posed with respect thereto for'receiving ‘molten
metal, said troughs being connected together at
As previously pointed out, the clean out door 0 their tops to provide continuous receiving means 30
for the ‘molten metal, and means leading from
will serve for cleaning out any accumulations be
troughs to the outside of the chamber for
low the discharge end of the conveyor C. For ~ said
tapping off the molten metal from the troughs.
" freeing the front-end of the trommel, a door V
5. An apparatus for treating metals compris
has been provided in the roof'of .the casing H
over the discharge end of the conveyor C. A clean ing a chamber adapted to contain a high tem 35
out door X may also be provided in the casing perature, non-oxidizing atmosphere, conveyor
means having openings therethrough movable
H at the feed end of the conveyor C to remove
from beneath the apron L any accumulations in the chamber, substantially v-shape troughs
below the conveyor means and transversely dis
40 which may take place thereat.
,
For removing solder‘from radiators, experience
has taught that the best operating temperatures
are as follows; in the trommel sweating chamber,
from 800 ‘to 875° F., and at about six feet inside
the intake and of the sweater, from 750 to 775°
F. The temperature of the ‘heating or sweating
chamber within which the grate conveyor ‘C
moves, is‘ regulated by controlling a high'tem
perature steam valve Y in the line leading from
50
the superheater to the conveyor‘ chamber, while
ta Ll
lated primarily by the quantity of saturated steam
admitted to the superheater. Thiscan always be
controlled .by setting the automatic temperature
‘regulators at whatever degree of heat is required.
the temperature to the sweater over all is regu
While. I have shown and described an appa
ratus which was primarily designed for sweating
out solder from radiators, it will be appreciated
and understood that the invention is not to be
60 ‘construed as limitedv solely for this purpose, since
it will be apparent to those skilled in the art
that changes in construction, proportions and
mechanical details may be varied within the
scope of engineering skill without departing from L
65 the spirit of my invention.
What I claim is: ,
-
1. An apparatus for treating metalscomprising
a heating chamber, a preheating chamber in open
communication with the heating chamber, con
70 veyor‘ means movable through the chambers,
means for charging superheated steam to the
' . heating chamber, and means adjacent the arti
is
cle charging end of the preheating chamber for
a drawing the superheated steam through the heat
ing and preheating chambers, the preheating
posed with respect thereto and declined toward 40
one end for receiving molten metal, means on
the outside of the chamber leading from the lower
ends of the troughs for tapping‘ off the molten
metal from the troughs, and a ba?le in each
trough extending down therein below the draw 45
o?’ tube at the draw-oft end to prevent dross from
being drawn o?. .
' -
,
'
6. An apparatus for treating metals comprising
a. chamber, conveyor means having openings
therethrough movable in the chamber, substan 50
tially V-shape troughs disposed transversely of
and below the conveyor means, means at the out
side of the chamber leading from one end of the
troughs for tapping oif molten metal from the
. troughs and a ,door in the chamber at the oppo
55
site end of each trough for skimming o? the dross
from the molten metal and for cleaning out the
trough.
'
.-'1. An apparatus for treating metals'.compris
ing'a chamber, a conveyor grate and a trommel
at the discharge end ofthe conveyor grate mov
able within the chamber, an inclined slide for
transferringarttcles from the discharge end of
the conveyor grate to the trommel, and an oppo
sitely inclined de?ector slide extending from the
first slide rearwardly below the conveyor.
8. An apparatus for treating metals comprising
a chamber, a conveyor grate and a trommel-at
the discharge! end of the conveyor grate movable
within the chamber, an inclined slide for trans 70
ferring articles from the discharge and of the
conveyor grate to the trommel, an oppositely in
clined de?ector slide extending from the ?rst
slide rearwardly below the conveyor, and a clean 75
2,060,257
out door in the chamber near the bottom of the
-
’
5
tating conveyor being adapted to receive the
metals being treated from the practically non
agitating conveyor, and separate means below
9. An apparatusior separating out more fus
ible metals from ‘less fusible rh‘etals with which each conveyor. for collecting the molten metal
‘they are united, comprising a chamber adapted separated from-the less fusible metal by the high
temperature atmosphere while traveling through
to contain a non-oxidizing, high temperature at
mosphere, a practically non-agitating conveyor the chamber.
de?ector slide.
‘
WILLIAM F. EPPENS'I'EINER.
and a violently agitating conveyor arranged, in
tandem within the chamber, the violently agi
CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION.
Patent No. 2,066,257.
December ‘29, 1956.
WILLIAM F. EPPENSTEINER.
I It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification of
the above numbered patent requiring correction as follows: Page 1, second‘
‘column, lines 6; and '7, strike out "preheating and heating chambers of the
a apparatus" and insert instead the words and colon considered in conjunction
with the accompanying drawings, wherein: ; and that the said Letters Patent
should be read with this correction therein that the same may conform to the
record of the case
in the Patent Office. '
-
v
--
-:
'
Signed and sealed this 16th day of March, A. D. 1937.
' Henry ‘Van Arsdale
(Seal) _
'Activng Commissioner of Patents.
2,060,257
out door in the chamber near the bottom of the
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’
5
tating conveyor being adapted to receive the
metals being treated from the practically non
agitating conveyor, and separate means below
9. An apparatusior separating out more fus
ible metals from ‘less fusible rh‘etals with which each conveyor. for collecting the molten metal
‘they are united, comprising a chamber adapted separated from-the less fusible metal by the high
temperature atmosphere while traveling through
to contain a non-oxidizing, high temperature at
mosphere, a practically non-agitating conveyor the chamber.
de?ector slide.
‘
WILLIAM F. EPPENS'I'EINER.
and a violently agitating conveyor arranged, in
tandem within the chamber, the violently agi
CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION.
Patent No. 2,066,257.
December ‘29, 1956.
WILLIAM F. EPPENSTEINER.
I It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification of
the above numbered patent requiring correction as follows: Page 1, second‘
‘column, lines 6; and '7, strike out "preheating and heating chambers of the
a apparatus" and insert instead the words and colon considered in conjunction
with the accompanying drawings, wherein: ; and that the said Letters Patent
should be read with this correction therein that the same may conform to the
record of the case
in the Patent Office. '
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v
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-:
'
Signed and sealed this 16th day of March, A. D. 1937.
' Henry ‘Van Arsdale
(Seal) _
'Activng Commissioner of Patents.
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