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Патент USA US2073228

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YEN/‘Hamil 9, 319370
T. P, SHIELDS
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2,073,228
FINGER RING
Filed May 1, 1936 "
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March 9, 1937‘,
T. F. SHEELDS
FINGER RING
Filed May 1, 1936
2,073,228
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
WWW/45 P 5/7/1105
INVENTORQ
BY
M
ATTORNEY.
2,073,228‘
Patented Mar. 9, 1937
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,073,228
FINGER RING
Thomas P. Shields, North Arlington, N. J.
Application May 1, 1936, Serial No. 77,299
10 Claims.
(CI. 63-15)
This application is a continuation in part of
my copending application, for an “Improvement
in ?nger rings,” Serial No. 39,110, ?led Septem
ber 4, 1935.
5
This invention relates to an improvement in
?nger rings and has for its object the forming or
shaping of a shank of a ring in such a manner
that it will more particularly conform to the out
line of the base of the ?nger where it joins the
10 hand and be thus secured against rotation.
Another object is to provide a ring that will
comfortably lie in the crease that is formed by
the ?nger and the palm of the hand when the
hand is grasped about an object.
A further object is to permit the wearing of a
15
ring on the ?nger of the hand in such a position
and so adapted to the ?nger that the ornamental
top or setting of the ring will always remain in its
proper position with respect to the longitudinal
2° axis of the ?nger.
A still further object is to enable an ormamen
tal top setting to be positioned more toward the
base of the?nger. and, also since the entire dis
tance between the knuckle and the ?rst joint will
25 be thus made available for the placement of a
setting a much larger one may be effectively and
comfortably displayed.
‘
Another object accomplished is the position
ing of a top setting closer to the knuckle and
30 thus it willclear the seam of a glove, a present
difficulty with ornamental top rings.
Other objects will appear more fully in the
description which follows.
Heretofore ?nger rings have either followed a
35 true circular. outline with shanks lying entirely
in one plane, or, when they have varied from this
standard concept of an ornamental ?nger ring
they have assumed some regular geometric shank
offset design, symmetrical with respect to the
40 axis of the ?nger. For example, shanks having
two-equal offsets which join two circular seg
ments lying in parallel planes have been used.
However no ring can be. truly ?tted to a ?nger
at its base with a shank of symmetrical geometri~
45 cal proportions as a cursory examination of the
human hand will show.
Furthermore it. is apparent that unless a ring
at the base of the ?nger follows the natural
curvature of the ?nger it will be subject to dis
50 placement whenever the'?ngers are ?exed. Like
wise the~grasping of objects and the wearing of
gloves will ‘cause displacement.
My invention provides for a ring that is de
signed to encompass a ?nger more in harmony
55 with the natural con?guration of the particular
?nger upon which the ring is to be worn and I ‘
essentially consists in incorporating an offset
in one side of the shank. My improvement is
shown in the accompanying drawings which
illustrate some of the forms my invention may
take, although I do not limit myself to the par
ticular embodiments shown. The ?gures shown
are; Fig. 1, a front elevational view of a ring off
set-on one side.
Fig. 2, a side elevational view of the ring shown 10.
in Fig. 1.
Figs. 3, 4, 5 and 7 are side elevational vviews of
the ring of Fig. 1 showing various alternative de
signs.
Fig. 6 is a view of the back of the hand with a 15.
shank offset ring on the third ?nger.
Fig. 8 is a side elevational view of a ring whose
shank is notched to engage with the webbing it
abuts.
Fig. 9 is a side elevational view of one form 20
my offset segment may take.
Fig. 10 is a front elevational view of the seg
ment shown in Fig. 9.
To clarify the detailed description which fol
lows, I desire to point out that while circular ?n 25
ger rings whose shanks lie in a plane surface have
been in use since ancient times this design does
not conform to the outline of a human ?nger;
particularly at its base where such rings are gen
erally worn. The ?nger is not truly round at its
base, nor does it join the hand in a plane per
pendicular to the longitudinal axis of the ?nger.
When placed on the ?nger at its base, a conven
tional ring does not seat uniformly upon that por
tion of the hand which lies between the ?ngers 35
but bears only upon the edge of the webbing on
one side of the ?nger. This webbing recedes
from its edge toward the back of the hand in the
direction of the knuckles.
To bear on this ex
posed surface a ring shank must overlie the edge 40
of the webbing. Furthermore since the ?ngers
of the same hand differ in the extent and location
of the tissue connecting them, and since any one
?nger generally has the webbing on one side fur
ther removed from the tip of the ?nger than on 45
the other side, the problem of ?tting a ring to a
?nger is further complicated. Also to ?t a ring
in the crease that is formed between the palm
of the hand and the ?nger when it is ?exed re
quires a shank to lie in a .plane that for the third
and small ?ngers of the hand is not normal to
the longitudinal axis of the ?nger.
Thus it is appreciated that for a ring to truly
follow the contour of the ?nger at its base, and
to lie snugly in the crease formed with the palm 55
2
2,073,228
of the hand and to bear uniformly upon the ?esh
between the ?ngers on both sides thereof, requires
a design of complex curves and a different one
for each ?nger of the hand. I ?nd it is not prac
tical nor necessary to fully attain a form ?t, and
therefore I provide a means for substantially at
taining the required ?t by offsetting one side of
the shank or providing the equivalent of an offset
by notching out a portion of the shank on one side.
Having thus stated the problems my invention
recognizes, and referring to the numbered parts
in the ten views, the same or similar part carry
ing the same identifying number wherever shown,
a detailed description of certain embodiments of
15 my invention is as follows:—
A front elevational view of rings having but
one abrupt offset appears as in Figure 1, such de
parture as may occur from the truly circular out
line of a conventional ring being scarcely per
20 ceptible to the observer. Curved segment 3 is in
corporated in one side of the ring between shank
portions I and 2, in position to engage with the
?nger webbing it adjoins. Top setting 4 is dis‘
played symmetrical to the longitudinal axis of
25 the ?nger. Figure 2 is a side elevational view of
the same ring and shows the offset segment 3 fol
lowing the outlines of a reversed curve and adapt
ed to overlie the webbing it will abut. Shank
portion 2 is de?ected along line 6—-6 to accom
30 modate the offset and in the shape shown it will
follow the outline of the base of the ?nger where
it joins the palm of the hand and yet will display
the top setting in a plane normal to the longitu~
dinal axis of the ?nger. By de?ecting portions l
35 and 2 along horizontal line 5-—5 the entire top
half of the ring will lie in a plane normal to the
ring axis 1-1. To meet conditions the de?ec
tion can be made along any line or at any point
in the ring band.
40
Figure 3 is similar to Figure 2 except that off
set segment I4 is in a side elevational view a
straight section smoothly connected with shank
portions I and 2 which lie in diverging planes.
The ring of Figure 4 embodies my principle by
45 having its top portion I in a plane normal to
ring axis 'l-—'! and having portion 2 spiral shaped
relative to axis 7-1. Curved segment [5 joins l
and 2 on one side of the ring in juxtaposition to
the ?nger webbing on that side.
50
Fig. 5 shows a ring band l6 lying entirely in a
spiral relative to ring axis 1—'| except where the
extremities of the spiral are joined by curved
segment I1.
Instead of de?ecting ring band portion 2 to~
Ward the tip of the ?nger it may be de?ected
rearward as shown in Fig. 7, and by joining l
and 2 with a suitably curved segment l8 a ring
will be shaped that will be found more closely
?tting to some ?ngers than the rings with 0p
60 posite de?ected portions 2.
In the illustrations of Figures 3, 4, 5 and '7, the
ring in front elevational view presents the same
general appearance as in Figure l, curving
it joins the palm as the other illustrations I have
given, yet it aifords the additional advantage of
having all evidences of its adaptation to the ?n
ger webbing concealed from View when worn on
the ?nger.
Figure 6 is a view of the back of the hand
Wearing a ring of one offset upon the third ?n
ger. For clearness no setting is shown though
it would be positioned symmetrical to the longi
tudinal axis 8—-8 of the ?nger. Portion 9 of the 10
shank in dotted outline, lies beneath in the crease
at the base of the ?nger, while portion ID in
solid lines lies across the back of the ?nger.
Offset segment ll overlies the edge of the web
bing l3 between the second and the third ?ngers.
When worn thus upon the third ?nger of the
hand the shank straddles webbing on one side
only, on the other side of the ?nger the shank
abuts the webbing l3 as the conventional ring
does. As heretofore pointed out the offset takes 20
up some or all of the difference in the length of
the ?nger as measured on its sides and retains
that portion of the ring which supports the top
setting, in a plane normal to the longitudinal
axis of the ?nger. This ?gure also shows how
the setting is positioned closer to the knuckle
l2 than in an ordinary ring.
A ring of my invention when worn on the
small ?nger presents a smoothly contoured ex
posed outline, the offset portion adjacent to the
third ?nger being concealed from view. More
abrupt offsets or shoulders may be used than are
shown and in the case of a ring for the small
?nger it is possible to use a much greater offset.
It will be noted thruout that the direction of
the offset or cut out portion of the shank of the
ring depends upon whether the ring is intended
for the left hand or the right hand. The notched
or offset portion to accomplish its mission must
lie on that side of the ?nger which is of shorter
length, if it is the second or third ?nger and
for the ?rst and small ?nger on the Webbed side.
A number of methods well known to the jew
eler’s art may be used to shape rings that em
body my invention, however to more clearly de- l 45-
scribe my invention I point out one method that
I ?nd practical and e?icient. Any regular cir-i
cular shank may be taken and a segment re
moved at the location where the offset is de
sired. The shank is then placed in a vise so 50
that about one half of its length adjacent to
the cut is held between the jaws. The free por
tion is de?ected from its former plane to pro
duce the oifset desired. Into the gap so pro
duced by the removal of a section of the shank
and its de?ection is incorporated a previously
prepared o?set segment of any selected shape,
as for example a segment which is illustrated in
Figs. 9 and 10. Fig. 9 is a side elevational View,
(ii)
while Fig. 10 is a front elevational view.
I do not limit myself to any particular form
or shape of offset the foregoing description be
The outline of the cut away por~
ing intended to be illustrative only, and not lim
iting upon my invention. Nor do I limit myself
to the shape the major portion of the ring will
follow. The greater portion may be spiral
shaped with respect to the axis of the ring; or
a portion may lie in a plane surface and the bal
ance follow the outline of a modi?ed spiral
tion may be curved or angled, any notch or cut
curve; or a slight twist may separate the major
adapted to engage the ?nger webbing ful?lling
portion of the ring into two diverging planes.
smoothly about the finger irrespective of the type
65 of curved offset or band de?ection employed.
Since many rings have wide bands as in Fig, 8
it is possible to employ my invention in such rings
by having the shank l9 cut away on one side as
at IU su?ioient to engage the webbing between
70 the ?ngers.
my speci?cations. While this embodiment does
not employ a warped shank and therefore does
75 not as closely follow the base of the ?nger where
a
What I claim is:—
l. A ?nger ring comprising a single continuous
band having an upper circular portion lying in 75
3
2,073,228
a plane substantially at right angles to the axis
of the ring, a lower curved portion directly at
tached to and gradually divergent from the up
per portion on one side of the ring and joined
therewith on the other side by a band segment
adapted to overlie the webbing on that side of
the ?nger.
2. A ?nger ring comprising a single continuous
band having an upper circular portion lying in
10 a plane substantially at right angles to the axis
of the ring, a lower curved portion directly at
tached to and gradually divergent from the up
per portion on one side of the ring and joined
therewith on the other side by a reversed curve
15
shaped segment adapted to overlie the webbing
on that side of the ?nger.
3. A ?nger ring comprising a single continuous
band having an upper circular portion lying in
a plane substantially at right angles to the axis
20 of the ring, a lower curved portion directly at
tached to and gradually divergent from the up~
per portion on one side of the ring and joined
therewith on the other side by a curved seg
ment adapted to overlie the webbing on that side
25 of the ?nger.
4. A ?nger ring comprising a single continuous
band having an upper circular portion lying in
a plane substantially at right angles to the axis
of the ring, a lower curved portion in the form
30 of a helix relative to the axis of the ring har
moniously joining the upper portion on one side
of the ring and joined therewith on the other
side by a curved segment adapted to overlie the
35
webbing on that side of the ?nger.
5. A ?nger ring comprising a single continuous
band having an upper circular portion lying in
a plane substantially at right angles to the axis
of the ?nger, a lower circular portion lying in a
plane that diverges from the plane of the upper
40 portion on one side of the ring where the two
portions, join, and a. curved offset portion joining
the separated ends of the upper and lower por
tions and adapted to overlie the webbing on one
side of the ?nger.
6. In an ornamental ?nger ring a shank hav
ing a lower circular portion adapted to lie in
the crease formed at the base of the ?nger and
diverging away from a plane normal to the axis
of the ring at one end and abruptly restored
thereto at the other end by a web engaging por 1O
tion.
'
7. In an ornamental ?nger ring a shank com
prising a curved portion in the form of a helix
relative to the axis of the ring and a web en
gaging portion.
15
8. In an ornamental ?nger ring a shank com
prising a curved portion in the form of a helix
relative to the axis of the ring and a web en
gaging portion adapted to position the orna
mentation symmetrically with respect to the lon
gitudinal axis a distance of approximately one
20
fourth of an inch closer to the knuckle than the
position assumed by the ornamentation on a
standard conventional ring shank.
9. A ?nger ring comprising a single continuous
band having an upper circular portion lying in
a plane substantially at right angles to the axis
of ring, a lower circular portion lying in a plane‘
gradually offset from the upper plane at one end 30
and abruptly o?set by a curved web engaging
portion at the other end.
10. A ?nger ring comprising a single continu-‘
ous band having an upper circular portion lying
in a plane substantially at right angles to the IC). bl
axis of the ring, a lower circular portion lying
in a plane gradually offset from the upper plane
at one end and abruptly o?set by a straight web
overlying segment at the other end.
THOMAS P. SHIELDS.
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