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Патент USA US2073703

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March 16, 1937.
w. MICKS
72,073,703‘
METHOD OF MAKING KNITTED FABRIC '
Filed May 2, 1935
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4 Sheets-Sheet l
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2.9.9
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March 16, 1937.‘
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I w/MICKS
2,073,703
METHOD OF MAKING KNITTED FABRIC
Filed May 2, 1935
4 Sheets-Sheet 2
March 16, 1937;
I
‘
w. MICKS
v
METHOD OF MAKING KNITTED FABRIC
Filed May 2, 1935
2,073,703
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4 Sheets-Sheet 3
azqys.
March 16, 1937.
w, MICKS
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' 2,073,703
METHOD OF MAKING KNITTED FABRIC
‘Filed May 2, 1935
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Patented Mar. :16, 1937
' '
‘2,073,703
_
I YUNlTED; STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,073,703 '
ME'rnop' oFrmxmG ?m'rrr:n ranmc
-
Wilmot’ Micks, Nomi Hamilton, Ontario, Canada,
assignor to Scott a William, Incorporated,
' New York, N.’ Y., a corporation of Massachusetts
'
1
iiApplication my 2, 1935, Serial No. ‘1931':
11 Claims. (case-108)
toiknitted fabricsand the facing yarn is tensloned to obtain the'desired
This invention
to a method‘ of making; the same, and ‘relates
plating effect, its diameter and , loop > size, even
more particularly to multiple-yarn plated fabrics though‘ slightly reduced byreason of the high
of substantially uniform‘body or background color tension may still remain at least ‘as great as
5 ‘ at the front, ‘and a diiferentcolor or-colors at ‘those of the backing yarnsothatalsuperior‘cov- , a
the rear, and whereina backing yarn is mor
ering effect results. For extremefconditions of .
mallyiconcealed .by' a facing/yarn or yarns. In
a more specific‘ development; ornamental effects
are obtained-by selective reversal-of the facing
‘10 and backing yarns so that at ‘desired intervals
' the ban
yam, which is of' a different color,
kind or materlaLfrom thefacing yarn, appears
‘ - at the front of the'fabric to impart its particu
dissimilarity between the
and facing
yarns, it is desirable to employ a'facing‘yar'n
of such size or ‘count, relatively to ‘that of ' the
backing yarn, that when knit into the fabric its 10
diameter and loop size will definitely exceedithose
of the backing yarn.
-
I,
While improved effects have thus been obtained
lar, characteristics. thereto throughout ‘any tie-v by the employment of a single, relatively coarse
15 sired area, for example, a stripeor ?guring spot,
such stripe or spot appearing uppn ‘a background
having the characteristics of the normal facing
4
yarn
or yarns.
-
'
,
,
> In usual prior practice; the backing-and facing
20 yarns have been -of.substantia_lly the same diam
eter, and since, -_for reliably’ disposing the yarns
_ a in' plating relation, it'is usually considered requi
site to apply a greater tension to the facing yarn
than to the backing vyarn there results a tend-i
gauge facing yarn as above described, I ?nd that ' 15
a better and even shore reliable covering action
may be obtained by using two facing yarns of the
‘same color, instead of a'sln'gle facing yarn, the
combined cross-sectional. areaxof the two facing
yarnsdesirably being at least as great as that of 20
the bacldng yarn.
Preferably facing and backing
' '
yarns, each of a gauge coarser than that of- the
middle yarn, are used. For most effective results _
the two facing yarns should, ,be interknitinvplat
25 ency not only to ‘reduce the diameter of‘ the , ing relation to 'each'other as well as tothe baIck- 25
facing or-iplating yarn. relatively to that of the
backing-yarngbut also to reduce‘ the size of the
yarn loopumade, from‘the facing or plating yarn
' vas comparedwith that formed from the backing
30 yarn."
a consequence, the facing yarn does
ing yarn. By so disposing’the facing yarns, it is
possible, if desired, to make one of them, which
for, convenience may hereafter be referred toas '.
the “middle” yarn, of a cheaper or stronger‘ ma-
.
terlai than the facing yarn proper’, although it 30
. not‘ alway completely‘cover the body yarn, par- ' is to be observed that both the middle yarn and '
ticularly ‘whe'n:~_.the ‘yarns are of sharply con
' trasti-ng colors, ‘such as mayv be desirable for
_~the‘facing yarn-should be of substantially the
same ultimate color inthe ?nished fabric.
I
While the exact reasons for the improved ef
pattern eifects, and thus the fabric has a mot
35 tied, ‘speckled or cloudyfappearance and fails to fectsubservable by using‘twozfacing yarns of 35
. have theunifdnhity of color demandedrby the F ‘relatively small diameter, ratherthan a single
trade in thehmhmclassof goods,‘ On the other ‘ facing yarn of greater diameter, is not alto
“hand, byfreafton'i-of the?relativel'y small areas gether certain, it would appear that it may in
of the‘pattem ?gures, as compared with the part be due to the fact that lesser tension is 40
a 49
area; a failure of the ?guring yarn required 'to‘be placed upon the outer or‘ facing .
: completelyto'cover and conceal‘ the yarn behind - yarn proper, when a‘ middle yarn is-used, than
comparatively [small consequence, since when but a single platinglyarn is used, or, per
I it;
_
.
perceives the patterniigure as a whole
t
haps of more‘importance, the‘ fact that when-two "
sfac'ing yarns are introduced, ahy slippage of such 45
it'does wherepthey occur in broad facing ‘yarns from accurate plating relation to
tospick out errors - inl individ
otherwise uniform’color'. In devising ‘ the backing yarn ,wlll, dispose the two facing
fact ;is >Ai’aken advantage of yarns more or less side-by-side where their com
invention;
wairleremami- appear.
.
'
_
-
-
, bined diameters are effective to screen the back-
.ing'yarn, whereas .when vbut a single plating or 5.)
‘TE-Q-Ttioned," a?djafter considerable experiment. it"has ~ facing yarnof the same size as the backing yarn
beendlscovered that unexpectedly improved re- ~ is employed, transverse slippage of one yamwith I
:obtained-vby empIoyingQa; facing or ‘reference to the other places the facing and
_ platlngya‘rni-‘whichisof acoarser'count (larger backing yarns substantially side by side so that
, ; With‘ the ob'iect-?of avoiding the‘ 'dliliculty men
'55‘ diameterliithan the tacking‘ yarn. mus when , the backing yarn is exposed. Whatever the ex
'
2
_
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2,073,703
act cause of the improved result, it is a fact that
reverse plating is used for producing ?gured
the fabric resulting from the method as herein
fabric;
described is-more uniform in appearance than
ordinary plated fabric, whether in plain color or
,5 whether ornamented by reverse plating or’other
wise. When so ornamented, the uniform clear
colored body fabric provides the ideal back
ground for pattern effects. Since, as noted, cer
tain advantages of‘ the invention inhere from the
' 10 use of facing material, whether in a single thick
yarn, or a plurality of yarns, the expression
“strand material” has herein been employed for
Figs. 7, 8 and 9 are fragmentary diagram
matic elevations showing relations ~of the yarns,
needle hooks and sinkers for making normal
ground-work fabric in accordance with the
Ch
present invention;
Fig. 10 is a side elevation, with certain parts
omitted, illustrating a circular knitting machine
of a type useful in the practice of the present 10
invention;
Fig. 11 is a detail plan view, to larger scale,
conveniently designating either a single yarn or I of the web holder cam cap of the machine shown
a plurality of yarns functioning for the purpose
15 of concealing the backing yarn innormal loops.
_,
While reference is herein made to the.use of . a
in Fig.10;
_
_
.
-
, Fig. 12 is a diagram, in plan, to larger scale, 15
showing one relation of yarn feed, normal web
“backing? yarn, it is to be understood that this holder motions, and patterning web holder mo
term is intended in a broad sense and that when
ever desired, during the production of the fabric,
'20 one backing yarn may be substituted for a'n
other, for example, for variation in pattern color,
or that theabacking yarn may have associated
therewith a secondary yarn when desired, for
example for reinforcing.
25
When herein difference in f‘coior" is referred
to, it is to be understood that color is to be re
garded as merely one example of a distinguish- -
ing characteristic, and may be regarded as gen
erically de?ning any of such distinguishing fea
30 tures as, for example,_ ability to absorb color in -
dyeing; tensile strength; material; roughness or
smoothness; twist; elasticity; etc.
-
The improved method is conveniently pracr‘
ticed on a commercial scale by the. use of a
35 knitting machine, for example a circular, inde
pendent needle machine vprovided with devices
for causing the constituent yarns to be disposed
in plated relation in the fabric l'oops,—'-desirable
results in this respect being attainable ‘by the
40 association of properly shaped sinkers'with the
needles. Preferably the machine used is. of a
> type designed for reverse plating, and for ,the
convenientv attainment of the other desirable
features of thepresent invention, the employ
45 ment of pattern controlled reverse plating sink
ers is recommended, although it is contemplated
that other means for effectively and accurately
reversing the plating arrangement of the yarns
may be employed within the purview of the
50 present invention.
'
tions;
Fig. 13 is a typical detail radial section, at the
.verge of the needle cylinder, of the machine 20
shown in Fig. 10;
Fig. 14'is a side elevation, to large scale, of a
web holder or sinker useful in the practice of vthe
present invention;
Figs. 15 and 16 are diagrammatic fragmentary .25
elevations. to large scale, illustrating two yarns
such as are normally employed in making plated
fabric, before and after, respectively, they are
placed ‘under the usual tension for plating;
Fig. 17 is a front elevation of a duplex plated 30
*yam loop consisting of two like threads plated
one on the ‘other in accordance with the usual
practice;
'
Fig.v 18 is a section on the line |8-l8 of Fig. 1'7;
Fig. 19 is a fragmentary elevation showing a 35
relative diameter of two yarns which may be em
ployed in accordance with the present invention,
for producing plated fabric of uniform color;
Fig. 20 is a transverse section through a loop
of such fabric employing two yarns related as
those of Fig.‘ 19;
'
7
three
Fig. yarns
21 is useful
a fragmentary
in' accordance
elevation
withillustrating
the pres- , ‘
ent invention in making plated fabric;
-
,(1'4
Fig. 22 illustrates’, in'transverse section. two/[#45
arrangements of three yarns in a plated looplf
either of whichserves to conceal the backing or]
body yarn,—the several yarns being of the same
’ diameter;
Fig. 23 illustrates three yarns in plated rela- 50
’
one machine designed for making patterned, ,tionand in two different positions, whe'rein he
sinker-reversed plated fabric of usual type, is
described in the' patent to Page, No. 1,891,270,
and in the following description the-improved
55 method will be described with particular refer
ence to the employment of suchv a machine as
60
yarns are of substantially the same diameter, and
vlarger than the middle yarn;
the sinkers employed.
but illustrating the use of four yarns of substan
\
'
- an arrangement in which the backing and facing Cl Cl
that illustrated in the Page patentbut so'me-'
what modi?ed, particularly as to the shapes of
_
‘
r ,/
Fig. 725 is a vview generally similar to'i‘Flg. 20
In the accompanying drawings, 'in which de- " tially the same diameter in plating relatio'n;~
to
Figs. 26 and 27 are a transverse section
sirable embodiments of'the invention are illus-v
through three yarns'in normal plating relation '
’ trated by way of example,
' Fig. 1 is an elevation, to small scale, of a
$5.5
facing yarn is of .larger diameter than they 0/ (er
vtwo;v
,
%
-' Fig. 24 in view similar to rug. 2'3 but snéw’mg
circular knit stocking embodying the present
invention;
.
=
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Fig. 2 is a view, partly in perspective and part
ly in diagrammatic side elevation, illustrating
one preferred method oi’v feeding yarns to be
70 taken by the needles of a knitting machine in
and a fragmentary, elevation of a needle hook
having such yams disposed within the hook, re
1 spectively;
65
' Figs. 28 and 29 are views similar to Figs. 26 and
27 but showing the facing and backing yarns re‘
versed;
~
I
Figs. 30 and 31_ are diagrammatic cross sec
tions illustrating other combinations of facing, 70
backing and middle yarns, showing how, in each
‘accordance with the present invention;
Figs. ,3, 4, 5 and 6 are fragmentary views, to . case, if the facing and-middle yarns slip, they
large scale, showing a relation of the yarns, nee
dle hooks and sinkers desirably made use of in
75 the practice of the present invention, wherein
still cover ‘the backing yarn; and
_
Fig. 32 is a fragmentary perspective view show-.
ing a small section of the improved fabric com- 75
_
3
.' 3,073,708
prising
‘in plated relation
same size, but in/I'ig. 23 the facing yarn c1 is
with the .
facing and» ‘backing yarns reversed in .certain
shown as of greater ‘diameter, for. ~example, twice
the diameter of the;.-yarns d and 0. Thus the
A stocking S is ‘shown in‘ :Fig. _1 as‘ illustrative facing'yarn, ‘in normal plating relation, com
5'01.’ such a patterned fabric "as may readily be. pletely conceals» both the middle and backing '
made in accordance with-the present invention, yarns d. and e,~and- if it slips laterally from its
‘ the stocking shown having ‘the'rib top 'I','the-: properplatin'g position,_the greater bulk of the
‘
loops.
7
-
V
v
'
it will completely mask the body/
leg L, the foot I, the heel H and the toe t, all of
such parts being capable of being knitted in inte
‘Even if, as showti'n' Fig. 24, the backing yarn 10
10 gral continuation upona-circular knitting ma
chine, i'or example'of ‘the general type disclosed ;.j_&1 is of the same diameter and materialifor
in the patent -to Page No. 1,891,270 above re ‘1 example, wooli'as the. facing yarn c‘, the middle
. ferred to. - As shown, the leg, and if desired the ‘yarn d being smaller and of a different material 7
' ‘foot, comprises abackgroundh of, plain fabric in ' (-for‘example, cotton)“, the backing yarn e1 is ef
' lift/which only the color of the normal facing yarn . fectively- concealed by the yarns d and 01.
appears, and
'
areas of a diiferent color
15’
25the possibility of using more than’
.upon this
colored background fabric, three yarns is suggested,_jthe backing yarn i being
such pattern areas; if. desired, being ‘of different ' associated with three yarns o allof the same di
colors at different parts of thestoeking, as indi- , ameter 'lin plating relatiomthe yarns 9 being of
~ 20,
'20 cated at Pj and P1' respectively.- As suggested, - a different color from thebacking yarn f. I
. ‘such, different colored. pattern areas, produced byv ‘ ' v,The employment of a plurality of yarns of like
color, plated over a backing yarn of .adiiferent
reverse, plating, may result fromsubstitution of
color to produce a uniform'ground fabric lénds
v a backing or figuring'yarn of one color fora yarn
of another color, the result of such change of itself to the production of ?gured material by
25 yarn being ‘that the5 back of the fabric, at the reversal of the 'positionsof the facing and back- ‘ 25
un?gured portions, showshorizontal or vertical.v ing. yarn.‘ Thus the yarns m, p, s are shown in
stripes or' both, of ‘different colors, consisting of - normal relation in Figs. 26 and 27 for making a
ground fabric of uniform color, the yarns s being
the ‘facing yarn, p beinggtvhe middle yarn, and
m ‘being the backing yarn. In Figs. 28 and 29 30
.the exposed bights of the differently ‘colored
backing
30
yarns.
-
,
‘
v
_
‘
.
Figs. 15 to 18 illustrate the theoretical effect of,
knitting. a pair pit-yarns a and b, by usual meth the yarns m and s are shown as having been
"interchanged in position so that the yarn‘ m
ods, in plating relation, with the .yam use dis
posed as to appear at the face of the‘ fabric.
which normally appears at the back is exposed at
. Ordinarily, the facing yarn is tensioned more ' the face. While it is obvious that the pattern
' 35 than the backing or body- yarn in order to ensure ?gure as thus produced may-not be of asuniform '
' its'proper plating upon the latter. Thus if, for‘ a color as the background fabric, this" is of
example, as is usual, the two'yams a} and b are little consequence since the eye does not so readily
originally of the same material and diameter, the ' perceive slight variations in color in a small area
more highly tensioned yarn it tends to decrease as in an area of extended size, and it is much
40 in diameter, as shown in Fig. 16,. and in drawing more ‘important that the background fabric be 40
the stitch also tends to form a smaller loop than ' uniform than that the ?guring areas be of exact
'
.
'
‘the bac ng yarn, as shown in Fig; 17.‘ The net 1y uniform color.
In Fig. 30 the normal backing yarn m1_ is shown
result is at the yarn a. does not properly cover
_ and conceal the backing yarn b, and the plated as of a diameter greater than‘that of the middle
45 fabric has a cloudy or mottled eifect. ‘ On the ' yarn p1, and the facing yarn s1 in substantially the
other hand, if in accordance with the present in > ratio 4:3:3, so that the aggregate cross-sectional
vention the facing yarn :11 (Figs. 19 and 20) be . area of yarns p1 and s1, while greater than that
‘substantially larger or coarser than the backing J. of yarn m1, is not twice as great as the cross
'
yarn b1, then when ‘the yarns are assembled in sectional area of the latter.
In-Fig. 31 the backingryarn me and the ,middlej ‘
50 plated relation, the facing\ yarnwillstillibe of 1
While such
yarnp'z are of substantially equal diameter,‘ but
greater than that of the facing yarn s2. "
use of two yarns of different dib‘ametersfor plating
represents an improvement over prior plating
fabric embodying the present‘invention, drawn
sufficient bulk (Fig. 20) under ordinary circume
' stances to cover the backing yarn.
- In Fig. ,32there is illustrated a small piece‘ of
to large-scale and illustr'ating'the useof three
‘ 55 methods, a preferred embodiment of the inven
'
tion, as above suggested, involves ‘the use of two. yarns in the production of normal background
or more yarns of the same color plated over a ‘ fabric comprising loops in, in‘which the yarn s
backing or ‘?guring yarn of a di?erent' color. > constitutes the facing yarn, p the middle yarn,
Thus, as illustrated in Fig. 22, ‘the. yarns c and d and in which theyarn m constitute'sthe normal =
60 are plated relativelyto each other and to the. backing ~yarn, the yarns s and m being illustrated
backing yarn e, and normally conceal the latter. " as reversed in'thegloops k1 for the production of
.With this combination,- even though the facing
anguring stitch;
and middle yarns’ c and d respectively do not
_~
.
;
~As speci?c ex' ples of useful yarn combina
maintain an accurate plating relationto each - tions,it 'may be stated that apparently the cheap
65 other or to the <backing yarn, but slip laterally, ‘est' combination employs yarns inthe ratio of
’ they still completely mask the backing or ?gur .40% facing yarn and 30% each, backing and ,
ting yarn. Moreover, the introduction of the; middle yarns, respectively. Good results have
middle yarn between the facing and backing also been obtained using facing and'body yarns
yarns allows the use of less tension, so that the ' each of 30/1 wool andja middle yarn' of 80/2
70 facing yarn loops are not shortened so much as ' cotton;(yvhich isthe equivalent of- 60/1 wool).
inxtheusual plated fabrics and do not, tend to Another useful ‘combination~ comprises a 30/1 '
turn over‘ when the needle head is pulled through
them, as much as is commonly the case in plated
material.
75
v.
'
In Fig. 22 all threeyarns are shown as of the
wool i'acingya‘rn, an~ 80/2 cotton backing yarn,
' -
and a 50/1 wool middle yarn.
'
Equally good results may be'obtained bym'aki
log all of the yarns of equal weight, so far asap
75
4
2,073,703
pearance is concerned, but obviously a saving ‘of
cost is effected by making one of the yarns of a
smaller diameter than the others.
'
While ordinarily, the yarns as knitted, will be
5 of approximately the desired relative colors de
-_ sired in the ?nished article, it is to be understood
that the several yarns may be of such materials,
irrespective of- color, that by cross-dyeing, or
equivalent methods, the contrasting effects may
10 be obtained in the knitted fabric.
To assist in an understanding of the invention,
reference is herein made to a machine of the gen
eral type disclosed in the patent to Page No.
1,891,270, December 20, 1932, as an' example of
15 mechanism of a type suitable 'for use in the
practice of the present invention, and by means
of which the novel fabric herein claimed may be
, prepared, but it is to be understood‘that the pres
ent‘invention is not dependent for its successful
20 accomplishment upon the use of a machine of the
speci?c type herein illustrated, but that it may
well be carried into effect by other apparatus or
mechanical means, or even by the use of hand
the cam ?nger w1 on a radially placed bar 10’
(Fig. 11) mounted for vertical motion in respect
to astandard I0 (Fig. 10) having a pin II adapted
to take into a hole in the bar to’.
The bar to2
and cam ?nger wlare vertically moved to en
counter ‘one or the other of the series of butts 10
according to the pattern. to be knit. Referring
to Fig. 12,—when one of the butts w is en
counteredby cam ?nger 101, 'the corresponding
web holder is abnormally advanced, as indicated 10
at Y, whereas normally operated web holder‘
butts travel at line :c—:r: in relation to the needles
n. The ?nger-101 may operate anywhere between
the usual wave of withdrawal of the web holders
by cams in the cap 300 and the place of feeding
the yarns 111, 112, etc. As shown, it is placed be
tween the yarn feed throat F and the advancing
phase of the needle n at the stitch cam for cir
cular knitting (not shown)._
For rigidity, the bar to2 may be mounted upon a 20
block I2 (Fig. 10) fastened on the top of a verti
cal rod I3 passing through a bore in. a lug ll
of the standard I0. Bar I3 may also have a
bearing in a hole in a lug I'I projecting from
the standard I0 over the edge of the bed plate 25
D. Beneath the lug I1 is a compression spring
patent to Page, althoughsomewhat modi?ed as I8, reacting against a collar I9, to resist upward
hereinafter described to permit its most effective motion of the rod I3 and bar wz.
use in the ‘practice of the invention herein
Preferably pattern motions of the bar 102 and
?nger w1 are derived from the auxiliary pattern 30
Referring to the drawings, the machine illus
surface constituted of cams ‘N2 of different
trated comprises the usual needle cylinder 260 heights corresponding to the number of different
mounted for axial, rotary, and reciprocating ly placed butts 1.0, such cams being mountedv
movements (in respect to a stationary bed plate on the auxiliary pattern drum ‘H0. Asusual, the
35 D) on a bearing at the top of a column‘ 280. The
cam surface of drum ‘"0 transmits its indications 35
machine may have the usual means (not shown)
to a depending indicator lever 800, rocking on a
actuated implements.
'
25
Figs. 2, 10, 11, 12 and 13 illustrate in general a
machine such as‘ described in the above—named
30
claimed.
‘
.
'
.
for driving the cylinder in rotary_and reciprocat
?xed stud ‘H8.
Thev lever 800 may have an arm
ing movements, an ‘the cylinder carries the usual ’80-I carrying an adjustable follower 802 for a
web holder bed 295 l \ g. 13) for the reception of
40 the sinkers orv web = holders 290a (hereinafter
cam 8031formed on the end of the main pattern
surface or drum I20, this cam normally holding 40
more fully described), the sinkers or web holders . theparts 800, Ml, etc. upwardly out of opera
being normally actuated by’ cam elements in a tive relation to the indications on cam drum ‘H0.
web holder cam ca
300 (Fig. 13), held against
rotationwith the needle cylinder 260 and the
45 web holder bed 295 by usual means (not shown).
‘The machine is preferably provided with the
usual latch guard ring 550 (Fig. ,13) having a
thro'at‘opening F (Fig. 2) provided with a floor
or throat-plate 559, which constitutes a support
50 forthe active yarn guide or guides. These guides,
as here illustrated; are openings at the free ends
of the individually movable yarn'guide ?ngers
. F1, F”, F“, F‘, F5, etc., whiohare pivotally sup~
ported at 554 (Fig. 10) for actuation by thrust
I 55 bars 460 (for example‘such as are disclosed in
_ the patent to Scott No. 1,152,850) actuated in
predetermined timed relation bylcams onthe cam
drum
I20.
_
I
n
y
'
The cam ?nger 11)1 must be positioned in respect
to the lugs 11) on the web holders 29021 to react
with one or’ another thereof as desired, it being
noted that any one or more of these butts w
may be sheared off so that the web holder hav
ingthe removed butt will not be affected by the
position of the cam?nger w1 in its plane. How
ever, since the web holder bed partakes of the
up and down motion of the needle cylinder, and
as this motion is greater than the distance be
tween butts of the series w, it is requisite to com
pensate for this movement of the cylinder in the
pattern control of the position ‘of the ?nger 101. 55
One preferred way of doing this is by means of
the lever and linkage arrangement, including the
parts 26, 21, 28 and I30, more fully described in
the patent to Page No. 1,891,270 above re
The column 280' may as usual-be moved verti
60' cally with respect to the bed plate~D, for the pur-_ ferred to.
'
pose of varying'the elevation of the needle cyl
In accordance with one aspect of the present
inder 260 and its attachments with reference to invention, it is preferred simultaneously to feed
needle-actuating cams carried by a ring (not to the needles a backing, body, or ?guring yarn,
shown) secured to theibed plate D, thereby to and a relatively7 larger facing yarn in plating re
55 alter the stitch length. The column may thus lation and with provision for reverse plating, for
65
_ be moved by means of a lever 28I actuated by
cams on the drumv I20. The machine also com
prises an auxiliary pattern drum ‘IIO on a shaft
‘III driven by suitable pawl and ratchet mecha
70 nism (not shown) controlled by the primary
pattern surface 6| , all as set forth in the patent
to Page No. 1,920,427, dated August 1, 1933.
Referring now to Figsl 13 and 14, the web hold
ers or sinkers 290Emay be provided with a
75 series of selector butts w adapted to react with
example for patterning, or preferably in ac
cordance with another embodiment of- the in
vention, simultaneously to feed a body or back
ing yarn. and twojor more plating yarns like
each other in ,color but different in color from 70
the backing yarn, and of an aggregate thickness
' preferably greater than that of the backing yarn,
--al1 of the yarns being delivered so as to plate
in de?nite order at the needles.
>
With this object in view, and with particular
5
._
aovavos
. reference to'the lastpsuggested arrangement,the ‘ “series, 'it seams-tomes m hr the’ sinkers
' active yarn guide ?ng‘er F1 (Fig. 12). may be con
or web holders 292*. like or functionally equivalent
sidered'vas delivering the bachngyarn 111 into. to the sinker 292‘ illustrated ‘in Fig. 14 (with the
the hook of the needle 1:1 while the yarn ?ngers exception of the diiference in length of the butts
5 l". and F‘ delivera middle-‘and‘facing yarn vi 20 and 290 as above referred to); »'But when the
and 10°, respectively; As shown in
2, the reverse plating effects are to be vconflnedto cer-~ .
'backing'or. body yarn 1/1 is delivered with a short 1 tain‘ predetermined needle wales only, then ordi- .
lead andrelatively steep slope jfrom?-a point ad- 1i nary'sinkers or webholderaffor‘example, such as
iacent to thecorner of the throat-plate 31559.3: those shown in the patent to BoottNo. 1,152,850
' loghile the yarns; i!‘ and 11‘ are ‘delivered-.1 to the " may be used, or if pattern controlled variation of 10'
needles with alonger lead and-at a loweri'rl'an'gle stitch length, for example._be desired at the un
than the yarn 1:1, and from points-‘on the ease __patterned areas, ‘then: sinkers of the kind dis
‘ of the throat ‘.platesubstantially spacedfrom the r"closed in the patent to Page No. 1,891,270, may be
point at which the yarn 111 is delivered. 'Pref-e ‘
15 erably the edge of the throat plate IE9 is cutaway
usedinstead of the sinkers It!‘ except atthe
aliatterning wales.
or recessed slightly at 559‘ to form a de?nite
'
.
_e.
r
__ _
,
" ‘ "i'rhe sinkers 292- which are especiallydem-ame,
location for thedellvery- of the yarns 1!‘ and 11.5,‘ ‘although not essential to the practice of the pres
the described relative arrangement of the sev- . ent invention, each comprises the lower leg ,2!" '
edge
eral‘ yarns being‘such as in‘normal knitting. to (Fig. 14) and the upper leg ill.
20 cause all.of the‘ yarns to be taken.and-knitted' of the operative portion of the latterv leg slopes
in a de?nite order inplatingrelatiom The fabric ' upwardly at 299 to the point 29!‘, and then slopes
‘ thus formed has a rear surface. characterized by ' downwardly and outwardly to form the bottom‘ or
the distinctive color or otherappearance. of the . ?oor ‘of a- narrow downwardly and outwardly di
'
' yarn uhwhich'isexposed- atthls side of the ‘rected throat 2”", above which isthe nib 29..
fabric, while the face or front of the fabrit shows The top edge Illh of the nib 280 also slopes down
wardly' and .rearwardly, substantially parallel to .
the characteristic color of the facing yarn 116,
the middle yarn y?which is of the same color as the slope of the throat Ill‘ and then, at the point’
25.
~
290', abruptlyv merges with the steeply Bloping'
outer edge "surface 2”“, which may be rectilinear.
yarn 115, being normally concealed between the
Iyarns 111 and 1!".
20
.
'
The present invention contemplates the.pro-- ' orif desired may be of downwardly concave'cbn
tour, terminating at its lower end at the substane '
duction ofv pattern effects, for example vertical‘
coioredstripes or_ de?nitely con?gured colored
spots upon a background of ‘a different color
ti'allyi horizontal
as‘.
.
_
-
When a web holder or sinker, such as 28!‘, is
which is more uniform in appearance than usual 3 employed in knitting plain, un?gured or. back
5 plated ground fabric. - The ?gures (stripes, spots, ground fabric, itsselector» butts to travel sub,
etc.) are preferably produced by a reverse plating stantially in the path indicated at H (Fig. 12)
operationyang» in accordance with a preferred in. relation to the needles 1:. When thus caused
method the sinkers 290! arerelied upon to pro; to operate, for example by displacementof the
duce the desired reverse plating effects, although patterning cam, ?nger w! from" the plane of any,
40 other known'methods of reverse plating capable of-_v the selector buttsl w, or when a buttw in a
of obtaining the desired results may be resorted plane of operation of the ?nger 101 has been
to. Further, as above noted, the invention con-x broken oil (so that the sinker moves-in response.
templates the production of pattern’ areas of to .the operation of the usual advancing and re
diiferent colors at different pointsinthe fabric, ' traeting cams operating on the butts 2.8 2hr 28)
45 and to this end ity is proposed, a's-hereinafter more K the yarns laid in the needle hooks by the opera
-fully described, to change the ?guring or backing 3 tion ofithe yarn delivery means above described ‘
' yarn at intervals. Since'in the present instance are caused;~-by the descending needle hook, ?rst
the backing yarn 111 is also the ?guringiyarn. it - to encounter the...surface 2|. otthe sinker, ‘as
. 'su?lces to substitute for the yarn 111 (when a {illustrated in Figs. 7, 8 and 9; The three'yarns
50 color change is desired) another 'yam 11' (carried ill,’ i!"8_nd .1!‘ are delivered with such relative.
for example by the yarn guide ?nger 1")‘ ,-the leads vand angles (as above described) as to enter
yarn 11' being of a color or character different from the needle hook in de?nite plating relation,-the
yarn‘ul. Such substitution of yarn may be made facing yarn 11° being nearest to the back or shank
in well known ways by pattern controlled manipu-'. portion of the hook, while the vbacking or ?guring '
_ lation of the yarn ?ngers 1".1 ‘and I", but prefer- ‘ yarn 1/1 is nearest to thetip ofthe book. The 55
ably, in order tomaintain accuracy of the feed-P inclinedsurface 29! ofthesinkeractsasacam
60
ing point for the body,‘ backing, ‘or ?guring yarn, so that as the needle reaches the position of Fig. 8,
the arrangement of yarn ?ngers disclosed in the ‘it presses the yarnp‘ ?rmly agalnstthe rear‘
interior surface of the needle hook, andby keeppatent to Swinglehurst No.,.1,938,673' maybe re
sorted to, such arrangement making itipossible . ing this yarn 'in-a'de?nite relation to the other
yarns as the needle descends to draw the stitch,.
ensuresthe continuation of normal plating up to
the vvery ‘needle wale where reverse plating is
To‘ obtain the desired sinker reverseplatlng . desired. The inclined throat ill‘, sloping down-,
65 effect, it-is preferable to‘ employ web holders or ,wardly' and outwardly, restores the stitch to sub
sinkers 290' of substantially‘ the shape illustrated stantially the same level at which it is initiated at
to deliver either of the yarns 1:1v or 11' fromthe
same point in the throat plate, and thus in
accurate plating relation to the yarns 1L‘ and a)‘.
in Fig. 14. ' Some of the sinkei's or web holders ‘ the inner or‘ lower end of the slope 298, so that
292“ may have short butts 29 and others long , the ultimate stitch length is not substantially
butts"! for the purposes ‘pointed out, for- ex“ varied by reason of the upwardly sloping cam
ample, in the'patent to Scott No. 1,152,850 and
for cooperation with the usual withdrawing cam
1
surface 299. - In normal plating the loop forming ' 70
sinker is not pushed in to its ‘operative position
306, vand with advancing cams such as the adjust-1
(at which the bottom of~ the throat 290* is oppo
able cami'lZ. '
site tothe back of the needle)‘ until‘ the approach- -
'
-
~
'
~'
For the production of reverse plated pattern
75 ing stitches at any selected needle of‘the entire
' ing yarns ‘are below the point of the
29!! .
(Fig. 8)., so that as. the needle continues to de
6
2,073,703
scend and the sinker moves inwardly to operative
position (Fig. 9) the yarnloops enter the throat
290a and are reliably positioned for accurate
determination of the stitch length.
, 5
‘For pattern knitting by reverse plating, select
ed sinkers 292a are advanced abnormally early in
the stitch forming operation beyond their nor
mal operative position by the action of the pat
tern actuated cam ?nger wlg which operates upon
' 10 the butts w.
Thus as the needle 11. receives the
yarns 1/1, g4 and 1/5 in its hook, the sinker 2923
is advanced from the position of 'Fig. 3 tothat
of Fig. 4 before the needle hook passes below the
level of the top of the sinker. In consequence,
15 the yarn bights withinthe needle hook ?rst‘ en
the background, which comprises. delivering to
the needles a backing yarn with a short lead
from a point adjacent to the corner of the throat
plate, simultaneously delivering a pair of yarns
substantially alike in color, but of a color differ
ent from that of the backing yarn, with a lead
and tension substantially greater than that of
the backing yarn and from a point in the throat
plate substantially removed from the point at
which the backing yarn is delivered, so relatively 10'
tensioning the several yarns ‘as to cause them
to plate normally in a de?nite relation with the
backing yarn at the rear of the fabric,—at prede
termined points causing the backing yarn to
appear at the front of the fabric by manipula 15
tion of the reverse plating sinkers, and at times
changing the backing yarn for another of a dif
ferent color while manipulating the yarns for
counter the sloping surface ‘Millb along which they
slide in response to the downward pull of the
needle until they pass the point 290°. The back
ing yarn 1/1 ?rst escapes over the edge at 290°,-—
reverse plating, thereby to produce differently
20 followed by the middle yarn y‘, and lastly by 1 colored ?gures upon the background fabric.
20
the facing yarn U45, so that evgntually the yarns
2. Method ‘of knitting multiple yarn plated
are disposed in the‘ relative arrangement shown
' in this ?gure.
Continued downward movement
of the needle tensions the yarns over the upper
25 edge 290° of the sinker, but since the facing yarn
115 is ?rst-down over the angle 299° it is pushed
outwardly toward the point of the needle hook,
followed by the middle yarn y‘ and the backing
yarn 311, so that ultimately they arrive in the
30 relative positions of Fig. 6, the net result being
to reverse the ‘order of the yarns. Thus the yarn
1/1 now lies against the inner rear surface of the
needle hook and plates on the outside of the
fabric upon a knitting machine provided with
pattern-controlled reverse plating means and a
throat plate provided with yarn-changing de
vices whereby to form a plain fabric having a 25
background of substantially uniform surface ap
pearance ornamented with ?gures of contrasting
surface appearance, said method comprising as
steps delivering‘ to the needles a backing yarn of
selected kind with a short lead from a predeter 30
mined point in the throat plate, simultaneously
delivering a plurality of other yarns, substan
tially alike but differing in kind from the back
other yarns, so that the yarn 111 is exposed at ' ing yarn, with a lead and tension substantially
35 the face of the fabric, while the normal facing
yarn 1/5 appears at the rear surface.
-
greater than that of the backing yarn and from
a portion of the throat plate substantially re
By proper selection of the sinkers to be actu
moved from the point at which the backing yarn
ated in the manner illustrated in Figs. 3 to 6 1 is delivered, so relatively tensioning the several
inclusive, any desired stitch may be reversely
40 plated so that pattern ?gures, such as stripes or
yarns as to cause them to plate normally in a
de?nite relation, with the backing yarn at the 40
‘ spots, may be formed'at any point in the fabric. ‘ rear of the fabric and completely concealed by
Since the body yarn also constitutes the ?gur
. the other yarns whether said other yarns remain
. ing yarn, it is readily possible to vary the color disposed in exact plated relation or slip so as to
of the ?gures from point to point on the fabric ' lie side by side,—-and, at a predetermined point
45 merely by exchanging one body yarn for anothér
of a di?'erent color. Thus by pattern control of
the yarn ?ngers F1 and F2, for example, the
yarns 1/1 and 1/2 may be exchanged in any usual
or desired order, for instance after the forma
in the operation, causing the backing yarn to
appear at the front of the fabric by manipulation
of the reverse plating means, thereby to produce
pattern ?gures of contrasting area upon the
50 tion of a selected number of courses, or at inter
vals during the formation of a single course, or
3. Method of knitting multiple yarn plated 50
fabric upon a knitting machinegtprovided with
pattern-controlled reverse plating sinkers, and
both.
‘
background fabric.
'
The method herein disclosed also lends itself a throat plate provided with yarn-changing de
to the production of ?oat patterns in plated fab
vices whereby to form a plain .fabric having a
55 rics, for example, narrow stripes, such as de
background of substantially uniform surface ap
scribed in the patent to Hirner, No. 1,062,910, pearance ornamented with ?gures of a contrast
May 27, 1913, .or the more elaborate ?oat pat
ing appearance, said method comprising as steps
terns made possible by the use of mechanism delivering to the needles a backing yarn of a
such as disclosed in the patent to Page, No. 1,969,
predetermined surface appearance from a point
60 853, August 14, 1934. Obviously, by following the adjacent to the corner of the throat plate, simul
method disclosed by Hirner or Page No. 1,969,853, taneously delivering to the needles a middle yarn
such a three-yarn plated fabric, as hereinabove ' and a facing yarn substantially alike but differ
‘ described, may also be ornamented with patterns
ing in surface appearance from th backing
of float stitches in which the facing and middle yarn,--the backing, middle: and facing yarns
65'ya.rns are ?oated at the rear,‘and the backing being delivered with successively greater leads
yam only is knitted into loops to form the de
and tensions, the backing yarn being separated
sired pattern area.
-I claim:
'
‘
‘
,
a substantial distance from 'the more closely
spaced middle and facing yarns where the yarns
1. Method of knitting multiple-yarn fabric~ leave the throat plate of the machine, so rela
upon a circular, independent needle knitting tively tensioning the several yarns as to cause
‘ machine provided with pattern controlled reverse
them to plate normally in a de?nite relation, with
plating sinkers, and a throat plate provided with the backing yarn at the rear of the fabric and
yarn-changing devices, whereby to form a plain completely concealed .by the middle and facing
fabric having a background of substantially uni-' yarns whether the latter yarns remain disposed
75 form color and ?gures in two or more colors upon in exact relative plated relation or slip so as to 75
.
i
. 2,073,703
'lie side'by side. and at predetermined points
causing the backing, yarn to appear at the front
of the fabric by manipulation of the reverse plat
ing sinkers thereby to produce patterningareas.
4. Method of knitting multiple yarn plated
fabric upon a circular, independent needle knit
ti'nglima’chine- provided with pattern-controlled
reverse’plating instrumentalities, and a throat
7
ures of a contrasting color, said method com
prising as steps delivering'to the needles a back
ing yarn of a predetermined color from a pre
determined point in the throat plate, simultane
ously delivering to the needles a middle yarn and
a.facing yarn substantially alike in‘ color but
differing in color from the backing yarn, the
backing yarn being of substantiallyone-ha-lf the
diameter of the facing yarn, the backing, middle
and facing yarns being delivered ‘with succes 10
plate provided with yarn-changing devices‘ where
by to form a plain'fabric having a background
sively larger leads and tensions, the backing
of substantially uniform color ornamented with
?gures of a contrasting color, said methodcom
prising as steps delivering to the needles a back
yarn being separated a substantial distance from
the more closely spaced middle and spacing yarns
where the yarns leave the throat plate of the
ing yarn, of a predetermined color and diameter
machine, so ,relatively tensioning the several 15
from a point adjacent to the corner of the throat
plate, simultaneously delivering to the needles
, yarns as to cause them to plate normally in a
a middle yarn and a facing yarn substantially
de?nite relation, with the backing yarn at the
rear of the fabric and completely concealed by
the middle and facing yarns whether or not the
alike in color; but differing in color from and
each of a diameter no greater than that'of the
backing yarn, the backing, middle and'facing
yarns being delivered with successively larger
leads and tensions, the backing yarn being sep
arated a substantial distance from the more
closely spaced middle and facing yarns where
the-yarns leave the throat plate of the machine,
so tensioning the several yarns as to cause them.
to plate normally in a de?nite relation, with the
backing yarn atthe rear of the fabric and com
‘pletely concealed by the middle and facing yarns
whether or not the several yarns remain disposed
' in exact plated relation,_and at predetermined
points causing the backing yarn to appear at
the front of the fabric by manipulation of the
several yarns remain disposed in exact plated 20
relation, and at predetermined points causing
the backing yarn to appear at the'front of the
fabric by manipulation of the reverse‘ plating
means thereby to produce patterning areas.
'7. Method of knitting multiple yarn plated 25
fabric upon a knitting machine provided with
pattern-controlled reverse plating sinkers, and a
throat ‘plate provided with yarn-changing de
vices whereby to form- a plain fabric having a
background of substantiallyuniform surface color 30
ornamented with ?gures of a contrasting color,
said method comprising as steps delivering to
thevneedles a backing yar'n of a predetermined
reverse plating instrumentalities thereby to pro- ' color from a predetermined point in the throat »
plate, simultaneously delivering to theneedles
duce patterning areas.
5. Method of knitting multiple yarn plated va middle and facing yarn, the facing and middle
yarns being substantially alike but of a color
fabric upon an independent needle knitting ma
chine provided with pattern-controlled reverse
plating sinkersuand a throat plate provided with
different from that of the backing yarn, the
middle yarn being of ‘substantially the same diam
eter as the- backing yarn and less in diameter
than the facing yarn, the backing, middle and
yarn-changing devices whereby to form a plain
fabric'having a background of substantially uni
form color ornamented with ?gures of a con ,facing yarns being delivered ‘with successively
trasting color, said method comprising as steps longer leads and tensions, the backing yarn be
stance from the
delivering to'the needles a. backing yarn of a ' ing separated a substantial
-
predetermined color from a point adjacent to the a more closely spaced middle nd spacing=yarns 45
corner of the throat plate, simultaneously de- ‘ where the yarns leave the throat plate of vthe mar ,
chinevso relatively tensioning the several‘yarns
livering to the needlesa" middle yarn and a fac
ing yarn substantially alikevin- color» but differing as to cause them to plate normally in a de?nite
in color from the backing yarn, the facing and relation, with the backing yarn at the reargof
backing yarns being of substantially equal diam‘ the fabric and completely concealed by the mid
dle‘ and facing'yarns whether or not the several
. eter and-themiddle yarn being of a diameter
substantially one-half that of the facing yarn, yarns remain disposed in exact plated relation,
the ‘backing, middle and facing yarns being de-v .and at predetermined points causing the backing
livered with successively greater leads and ten— yarn to appear at the front of the fabric‘ by
manipulation of the reverse plating sinkers there
sions, the backing yarn‘being separated‘a sub
.‘
stantial distance from .the more closely spaced by to produce, patterning areas.
8, Method of knitting multiple yarn plated
middle and spacing yarns where the yarns leave
the, throat plate of the ‘machine, so relatively
‘
tensioning the several yarns as to cause them
"to plate normally in a de?nite relation, with the
backing yarn at the rear of the v‘fabric and com
pletely concealed by the middle and facing yarns
whether or not the several yarns remain dis- .
posed in exact plated relation, and at predeter
mined points causing the backing yarn to appear
at the front of the fabric by manipulation of the
reverse plating sinkers thereby to produce pat
"terning
areas.‘
.
'
'
fabric upon a circular, independent needle knit
ting machine provided with pattern-controlled re
verse plating sinkersand a throat plate provided 60
with yam-changing devices whereby to form a- '
plain fabric having a background of substantially
uniform surface appearance ornamented with
?gures of a contrasting appearance, said method
comprising as steps delivering to' the needles -a 65
backing yarn of a selected kind with a short lead .
from a predetermined part ‘of the throat plate,
simultaneously delivering to the needles strand
material comprising a plurality of independent
6.~ Method of knitting multiple yarn plated
fabric ‘upon a circular, independent needle knit . yarns substantially alike in kind but distinctively 70
ting machine provided _,with pattern-controlled different in kind from the backing yarn, said
strand-material being ‘delivered with a lead and
reverse plating means, and a throat plate pro
vided with‘ yam-changing devices whereby to tension greater than that of the backing yarn and
form a plain fabric having a background of from a portion of the throat plate substantiallyre
75 substantially uniform color'ornamented with ?g-' moved from the point to which the backing yarn
8
2,073,708
is delivered, so relatively tensioning the backing
yarn and a facing yarn, the backing yarn being
yarn and strand-material as to‘ cause them to
delivered from a point adjacent to the corner of'
plate normally in a de?nite relation, with the
the throat plate, the backing, middle and facing
backing yarn at the rear of the fabric and com
UK
\yaizns being delivered with successively increas
pletely concealed by the strand-material whether _'iiig* leads and tensions respectively, the facing
the constituent yarns of the latter remain dis
and middle. yarns being of substantially the same
posed in exact plated relation or slip so as to surface appearance but differing in appearance
lie side by side,—at predetermined points causing from the backinéiyal‘n, the facing yarn being of
the backing yarn to appear at the front of the greater diameter thamthe backing yarn, the lat
fabric by manipulation of the reverse plating ter being separated a substantial distance from 10
sinkers, and at times changing the‘ backing yarn the more closely spaced middie‘and facing yarns '
for another of a different kind prior to the in
where the ‘several yarns leave the throat plate of
itiation of reverse plating thereby to produce the machine, so relatively tensioning the several
distinctively di?'erent ?gures upon the back
yarns as to cause them to‘ plate normally in a
ground fabric.
>
v
de?nite relation, with the backing yarnR at the
9. Method of knitting multiple yarn plated fab
ric upon a circular'knitting machine provided
with pattern-controlled reverse plating sinkers
and a throat plate provided with yarn-changing
20 devices whereby. to form a plain fabric having’ a
background of substantially uniform ‘color orna
mented with ?gures of a contrasting color, said
- method comprising as steps delivering to the nee
dies a backing yarn of a predetermined color and
. 2 UT
diameter with a short lead from a point adjacent
to the corner of the throat plate, simultaneously '
delivering a pair. of other yarns substantially
alike but differing in color from the backing yarn,
said pair ofyyarns being of an aggregate trans
30 verse thickness greater than that of the‘backing'
yarn, both yarns of said pair being delivered with
rear of the fabric and completely concealed by
the middle and facing yarns whether the latter
yarns remain disposed in exact plated relation or
slip so as to lie side by side,—and, at predeter
mined points in the operation, causing the back
ing yarn to appear at the front of the fabric by
manipulation of the reverse plating instrumen
talities thereby to produce patterning ?gures.
11. Method of knitting multiple yarn plated
fabric upon a circular independent needle knit 25
ting machine, provided with pattern-controlled
reverse plating sinkers and a throat plate pro
vided with yarn-changing devices whereby to
form a plain fabric having a background of sub
stantially uniform color with patterning ?gures 30
of contrasting color upon the background, said
a lead and tension substantially greater than that - method comprising as steps delivering to the nee
of the backing yarn and from a portion of the
throat plate substantially removed from the point
at which the backing'yarn is delivered, so rela
tively tensioning the severalyarns as to cause
them'to plate normally in a de?nite relation,‘
with the backing yarn at the rear’ of the fabric
dies a backing yarn of a predetermined diameter
and color with a short lead from, a predetermined
point of the throat plate, simultaneously deliv
ering a middle and a facing yarn to the needles '
with leads and tensions successively greater re-'v
spectively than that 'of the backing yarn-and
and completely concealed by the other pair vof from a ‘portion of the‘ throat plate substantially
yarns whether the latter remain disposed in removed from the point at which the backing 40
exactplated ‘relation or slip so‘as to lie side by - yarn is delivered, the middle and facing yarns
side,—-at predetermined points causing the back being of an aggregate transverse thickness great-7
ing yarn to appear at the front of the fabric by er than that of the backing yarn, so relatively
manipulation of the reverse plating sinkers, and at tensioning the several yarns as to cause them to
45 times changing the backing yarn for another of
a different color prior to the initiation of reverse
plating.
' '
.
a 10. Method of knitting multiple yarn ‘plated
fabric upon an independent needle knitting ma
50 chine provided with pattern-controlled reverse
‘plating instrumentalities and a' throat plate pro-
platenormally in a de?nitelrelation with the 45
backing yarn at the rear of the fabric and com?
pletely concealed by the middle and facing yarns
whether said latter yarns remain disposed in ex
act plated relation or slip so as to lie side by‘:
‘side,-at predetermined points causing the backs
ing yarn to appear at the front of the fabric by
vided with yarn-changing devices whereby to ~ manipulation of the reverse plating sinkers, and
form a plain fabric having a background of sub
55
stantially uniform surface appearance andorna-f
mented with ?gures of‘ a different surface'ap
pearance, said method comprising‘ as steps de
livering to the needles a backing yarn, a middle
at times changing the backing yarn for another
of a diiferent color prior to the initiation of re
verse plating thereby to produce differently col
ored ?gures upon the background fabric.
'
,WILMO'I' MICKS.
50
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