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Патент USA US2083553

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June 15, 1937.:
M. P. ÀBLOMBERG
TOP
SILL
`
Filed July 16, 195.4
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2,083,553
2 Sheets-Sheet 1
June 15, 1937.
M, P_- BLOMBERG
.~
TOP SILL
Filed July 16, 1954
By
2,083,553
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
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Patented June 15, 1937
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2,083,553
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,083,553
TOP SILL
Martin P. Blomberg, Chicago, Ill., assignor to
Pullman-Standard Car Manufacturing Com
pany, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Delaware
Application July 16, 1934, Serial N0. 735,360
7 Claims. (Cl. 105-397)
This invention relates to railway cars, or sim
ing the belly, a part of the sheathing being indi
ilar vehicles, and has for its principal object to cated in Fig. 2.
provide a` relatively light but strong longitudinal
Each of the top sills I9 and 20 is preferably
stress member for use in the car or vehicle roof,
formed of aluminum alloy in one piece, this be
5 and preferably toI have this member in the form
ing readily accomplished by employing the ex
of a boxgirder so that the lower portion of the
trusion process. The sills, however, could be
girder may be used for an air duct, and the upper made of high tensile steel, or other suitable mate-A
portion for insulation.
rial, and certain of the objects of this invention
Further Vand other objects and advantages will
10 become apparent as the disclosure proceeds and
the description is read in conjunction with the
vmediate iiange 33 which also projects outwardly,
Fig. 2 is an enlarged, perspective view of a frag
provides a ledge upon which the ends of the ribs
ment of the longitudinal stress member in the
23 may rest, the ribs being of channel form and
having flanged feet, as indicated at 34. The ends
of the ribs are secured to the ledge 33 by rivets
35 passing through the flanged feet of the ribs.
Sheet metal stress plates 36 and 3l join, re
spectively, the top and bottom of the sills I9 and
20, thus forming a box girder which runs the
~
Fig. 3 is a perspective view showing the man
20 ner in which the top sills are secured to the door
end post;
Fig. 4 is a plan section taken4 on the line 4_4
of Fig. 2.
It will be understood that this specific disclo
25 sure and illustration of a preferred form of the
invention are for the purpose of disclosure only
and should not be construed as imposing limita
tions upon the appended claims except as may be
required by the prior art.
The body framework shown in Fig. 1 is particu
larly adapted to the new type streamline trains,
and comprises a center sill I0, end sills II and I2
secured to opposite ends of the center sill, door
end posts I3 and I4, and I5 and I6, respectively,
35 anti-telescoping plates I'I and I8 supported by the
door end posts, and top sills I9 and 20 connected
by stress plates 2I and 22 to form a box girder.
which rests upon and is secured to the anti
telescoping plates Il and I8 and the door end
40
vIn the embodiment of the invention shown,
each top sill has a relatively deep web portion
accompanying drawings, in which
Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic, perspective View of
body framework illustrating an application of
this invention;
car roof;
30
are achieved even when the top sills are made in
more than one piece.
10
posts I3, I4, I5 and I6. Preferably this portion
of the car framework is designed to carry a major
part of the car load.
The shell of the car is formed by a plurality of
ribs 23 which connect the top sills I9 and 20 with
'I'hese ribs
lie in vertical planes and are connected together
by various longitudinal framing members, such as
roof stringers 24, window header stringers 25, belt
rails 26, side sills 21 and various floor stringers
45 the upper part of the center sill I0.
50 (not shown).
The ribs when made in one piece
(as shown in Fig. 1) serve as combined carlines,
side posts and licor supports. The belly of the
car is formed by arcuate J-bars 28 which connect
the side sills to the bottom of the center sill.
55 Metal sheathing 29 covers the body shell includ
30 terminating in outwardly extending top and
bottom flanges 3| and 32, respectively. An inter
full length of the car.
The rivets 38 which se
cure the top stress plate to the sills I9 and 2U
also serve to hold the sheathing 29 in place and
provid-e further anchorage for the ribs 23, the
rivets passing through the wall 39 of the ribs.
The bottom stress plate 3l is secured to the
flanges 32 of the top sills by rivets 40.
30
An intermediate plate 4I secured to inwardly
extending ñanges 42 of the top sills, divides the
box girder into an air duct 43 and a space 44
above, which may be used for insulation, as indi
cated at 45.
Spacers 46 placed at intervals corresponding
35
to the ribs 23 and having the same cross sec
tional shape, rest upon and are secured by rivets
41 to the inwardly extending flanges 42 of the
top sills and reinforce the entire box girder struc
ture. Preferably, the top stress plate 36 is also
riveted to the spacers 46, the rivets being in
dicated at 48.
Along the lower margin of the top sills are
built-upy structures which house lighting fixtures
for providing the car interior with indirect
lighting. The structures include a cable support
49 secured to the web 30 of the top sills by ma
chine screws 50, and having cut-away portions
5I wherever the lamp sockets 52 are secured to
the support; a cover plate 53 of channel form
secured by screws 54 to an upwardly and out
wardly inclined flange 55 of each top sill, the
bottom ñange of the cover plate furnishing an
attaching surface for the ceiling sheet 56 and a 55
2
2,083,553
reflector back plate 5l; and a finish plate 58 fas
tened by screws 59 to the bottom stress plate 3l
and having a trough-like projection 60 which re
ceives a suitably curved reflector 6l for ldirecting
Ul the light furnished by the lamp 62 along the ceil
ing sheet. The ñnish plate 58 is preferably an
extruded member and has a channel 63 for ac
commodating the rivets Eil securing the bottom
stress plate 3l to the top sills.
The top sills are joined at their ends to the door
posts in a manner best shown in Fig. 3. The
flanges 55 are out off, as indicated at 64, so that
gusset brackets 65 may ñt into the channels
formed by the bottom flanges 32 and the inter
mediate iianges 33. The brackets are securely
riveted to the top sills and to the door end posts,
the rivets $6 which furnish the latter anchorage
passing through the anti-telescoping plates, and
through castings 6l which ñt within the tops of
the door end posts.
One very important advantage of the longi
tudinal stress member which has been described
is that the distribution of metal furnishes great
resistance to bending both in the vertical and
horizontal planes, and in addition, the member
provides convenient means for attachment to the
ribs; for housing the indirect lighting; and for
providing an air duct with space above for insu
lation.
What I claim is:
l. A longitudinal stress member for the roof of
railway cars, or similar vehicles, comprising a
pair oi top sills each having laterally extending
flanged reinforcements, one of said flanged rein~
iorcements being spaced from the top of the sill
and extending inwardly, stress plates joining the
top sills above and below to form a box girder,
and an intermediate plate secured to the in
wardly extending ilanges of the sill to divide
the interior of the box girder into an air duct
and a space for insulation.
2. A longitudinal stress member for the roof of
railway cars comprising a box girder having a
pair or" top sills for side walls, said sills having
intermediate laterally extending iianges and
metal stress plates for top and bottom walls, and
an intermediate plate secured to said flanges for
dividing the interior of the box girder into an air
duct extending longitudinally of said girder, and
a space above for insulation.
3. In combination, a one piece top sill having
a relatively deep web portion terminating in top
and bottom flanges, a plurality of intermediate
laterally extending flanges, and a U-shaped cover
plate rigidly secured to one of said intermediate
ñanges for forming a passage for electric wires
and the like.
4. A one piece top sill having a relatively deep
web portion terminating in top and bottom
flanges, and a plurality of intermediate laterally
extending iianges, one of said last mentioned
ilanges being spaced from the top of the sill and
extending outwardly and upwardly and means 15
including a cover plate for forming with said
bottom and last-named ñange a channel through
which electric wires may be extended.
5. A longitudinal stress member for the roof
of railway cars, or similar vehicles, comprising 20
a box girder having a pair of top sills for side
walls, and metal stress plates for top and bottom
walls, an intermediate plate dividing the interior
of the box girder into an air duct and a space
above for insulation, and spacers between the 25
top sills in said insulation space.
6. A longitudinal stress member for the roof of
railway cars, or similar vehicles, comprising a
box girder having a pair of top sills for side walls
and metal stress plates for top and bottom walls, 30
each of said top sills having a plurality of later
ally extending flanges, one of which is spaced
from the top of the sill and extends inwardly, and
an intermediate plate dividing the interior of the
box girder into an air duct and a space for insu 35
lation.
'7. A longitudinal stress member for the roof of
railway cars or similar vehicles comprising a pair
of top sills terminating in top and bottom. flanges,
stress plates connecting said top and bottom 40
flanges for forming a girder, intermediate lat
erally extending iianges on said sills, cover plates
secured to certain of said intermediate flanges
for forming passages for electric conductor ele
ments, and lamp supporting means carried by 45
said sills.
MARTIN P. BLOMBERG.
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