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Патент USA US2094717

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1,094,117
- Patented Oct. v5, 1937
UNITED vs'rli'rss PATENT opt-1C5;
mors'ruanraoor MATERIAL
Arioe R. Olsen, Wilmington, Del, .assignor to I '
Hercules Powder Company, Wilmington, Del,
a corporation of Delaware
N0 Drawing. Application February 1, 1935,
_.
311 Claims. (Cl. 91-68)
This invention relates to a moistureproof ma
abietate, abietyl alcohol, hydrogenated abietyl’
terial, and more particularly to a moistureprooi ‘ a'lcohohabietyl stearate, etc. Where-the ?exi
materialcomprising a base of‘ cellulosic material, ~ bility of the moistureprooi' coating is not‘of great
preferably transparent sheet cellulosic material,
5 as, for example, glassine paper, regenerated cellu
lose, etc., or of other transparent sheet material,
as, for example, a cellulose ester or ether, gelatin,
agar-agar, etc., coated with a moisture-proo?ng
composition comprising chlorinated rubber and
10 an abietyl or hydrogenated abietyl. compound,
preferably one which will ‘act as a plasticizer
or ?exilizer for the chlorinated rubber. '
The term “moistureproof”, as understood by’
the art and as used in this speci?cation, describes
15 a coated base material which has a moisture per
meability of, at most, one-tenth of the moisture
importance, non-plasticizing abietyl or hydro
genated abietyl compounds, as, for example, 5
abietic acid, glyceryl abietate, etc., may be used. '
For producing the moistureproof material in
accordance with this invention the coating com-3
positions including chlorinated rubber and va
rious hydrogenated ‘ or unhydrogenated abietic 10,
acid esters‘ described in U. S. Patent No. 1,957;
786, to William Koch, dated May 8, 1934, may
be used, but it will be understood that the present
invention is not limited to moistureproof ma
terials produced by the use of ‘such compositions. 15
The chlorinated rubber for use'in the moisture
proofing composition in accordance with this in
permeability of the uncoated base material em
ployed in its production, and also describes a " vention may be produced by the chlorination of
coating composition capable of producing this re‘
raw or vulcanized rubber by any of the processes
20 duction in moisture permeability when applied to
generally used in its production.- Desirably, the 20'
a base material in a relatively thin coating, of, for chlorinated rubber employed will have a chlorine
example, in‘ a weight coating of from 2 to 5 content, of from about 60 to about ‘68%, altho
v'pounds per 3000 square feet of base material. any chlorinated rubber having a chlorine content
Heretofore it has been considered impossible tov of 50% or more may be used._ The viscosity
characteristics of the chlorinated rubber em- 25
2 produce a composition capable of moistureproof
ing these base materials without the inclusion ployed may vary widely and will be selected with 1
of a wax ‘or waxy material in the moistureproo?ng a view-to the desired viscosity and chlorinated
composition. In fact it has always been thought rubber content of the moistureproo?ng composi
that the moistureproo?ng qualities of these com- '
30 positions were
content.
due almost entirely to their wax _
-
.
The inclusion of wax in various types of coating
compositions in order to give them a moisture
proo?ng character has produced many dif?culties
3 in the application of such coatings to base ma
terials not encountered in the application of wax
free compositions. These vdifficulties have arisen ‘
particularly in the drying of the moistureproo?ng
tion.
'
Any abietyl or hydrogenated abietyl compound, 30
but preferably one that has a plasticizing action
on chlorinated rubber, may be used in formulating
the molstureprooflng composition in ‘ accordance
with this invention. The following compounds
are examples of such materials: methyl abietate, 35
ethyl abietate, amyl abietate, hydrogenated
methyl abietate, ‘hydrogenated ethyl abietate,
hydrogenated amyl abietate, abietyl alcohol, hy
compositions, but have been regarded as caused drogenated abietyl alcohol, abietyl stearate, etc.
40 by unavoidable characteristics inherent in mois
While‘there is no diilerence in their moisture- 40
tureproo?ng compositions.
'
-
Now in accordance with this invention it has
proo?ng action, it is preferable to use hydrogen-,
ated abietyl‘compounds rather-than the unhydro
been found that an improved moistureproof ma-' , genated, since the latter are less stable and dis
terial may be produced by coating a base. ma
color on prolonged exposure'to light. It will be
terial, as,'for example, sheet cellulosic material, , understood, however, that the use of both'types 45
“ preferably transparent, as glassine, regenerated of compounds is contemplated in the present in
cellulose, etc., cellulose esters and ethers, gela
tine, agar-agar, etc., in sheet form, etc., with a
moistureproof composition comprising chlorin
50 ated ‘rubber and an abietyl or hydrogenated
abietyl compound, preferably one capable of
plasticizing the chlorinated rubber, as, for ex
vention.
.
>
a. The exact formulation of the chlorinated rub
ber coating composition to be ‘used in any given
case will depend upon the ?exibility desired, the 50 '
degree of moistureproofness desired and the ‘spe
cine abietyl compound used as a plasticizer. For
ample, methyl abietate, ethyl abietate, amyl a given compound, the moistureproofness will in
abietate, hydrogenated methyl abietate, hydro crease in‘ proportion to the amount of'the com
65 genated ethyl abietate,- hydrogenated 'ainyl pound used. This likewise holds true for the 55
2,094,717
?exibility. when using‘ the same proportion of
different abietyl compounds, di?erent ?exibilities
in most cases, not such as to impair the trans
parency oi’ the ?nished product. A coating of 2
and moisture .permeabilities will be produced. In
rial is adequate-for inoistureprooiness and will
to 5 pounds per 3000 square'feet of base mate
other words, the e?ect of various of the abietyl
noti impair the transparency of the coated mate
Abietyl compounds, as the term is used in this‘
compounds on moisture permeability and ?exi
bility is not the same.
ria .
‘
I
Preferably the abietyl compound or hydro—
claims hereinafter set
genated abietyl compound will be included in the speci?cation and in the
are de?ned as compounds containing the‘
moistureproo?ng composition in amount consti _ _Iorth,
carbon skeleton of the hydrocarbon nucleus of 10
10 tuting from about 40% to about 80% by weight abietic acid, and include hydrogenated abietyl
of the amount of chlorinated rubber present. compounds, the latter compounds being speci?
’ The most desirable amount of such abietyl com
cally characterized as hydrogenated abietyl com
Pounds has been found to be from about 50%
pounds.
.
to about 60% by weight of the chlorinated rub
What I claim and desire to protect by Letters 15'
15
ber content.
'
_
'
The following table shows typical moisture
proo?ng compositions in accordance with this in
vention. The permeability values are for glasslne
Patent is:
taining a compound having the hydrocarbon
Moisture. perme
(non-v0 atile constituents)
_
comprising a sheet of transparent cellulosic ma
terial selected from the group consisting of
glassine paper and regenerated cellulose coated 20
with a transparent chlorinated rubber ?lm con
paper coated with a coating of 3 lbs.‘per 3000
20 square feet or the respective compositions:
Moisture roo?ng composition
_
l. A v?exible‘, transparent, moistureproof sheet
nucleus of abietic acid in amount su?lcient-‘to
ability value
(grams/sq. meter ' produce a moistureprooi ?lm but insu?lcient to
24hours)
. impair the transparency of the ?lm.
‘
25'
2. ‘A ?exible, transparent, moistureprooi ma
25
terial comprising a sheet of regenerated cellulose
coated with a-transparent ‘chlorinated rubber
?lm containing a compound having the hydro
carbon nucleus of abietic acid in amount sui?cient 30
abietylalcohol ..................... __
so 10genated
parts chlorinated rubber-0 parts hydro-g
to produce a moistureproo! ?lm but insufficient
genated methyl abietate. _' .................. _
to impair the transparency of the ?lm.
3. A ?exible, transparent, 'moistureproof ma
The above permeability values are directly terial comprising a sheet of glassine paper coated
comparable with a permeability of 300-400 for with a transparent chlorinated rubber ?lm con 35
fas uncoated glassine paper; 108 (ll-lb. coating) for taining a compound having the hydrocarbon
glassine coated with unplasticized chlorinated nucleus or abietic acid in amount su?lcient to
rubber; 127 (4 lb. coating) for glassine coated produce a moistureproof ?lm but insu?lcient to
with a composition comprising 10 parts chlorin
impair the transparencyoi the ?lm.
,
ated' rubber and 4 parts tricresyl phosphate;
4. A ?exible, transparent, moistureproot sheet 40
and 101 for glassine coated (4 lb. coating). with comprising a sheet of transparent cellulosic ma
a composition comprising 10 parts chlorinated terial selected from ‘the group consisting of
’ rubber and 3 parts dibutyl phthalate.
,glasslne paper and regenerated cellulose coated
The non-volatile constituents of the moisture
with’ a transparent chlorinated rubber ?lm con
proo?ng compositions in accordance with this taining a compound having the hydrocarbon
45 invention may be dissolved in a solvent, as, for
nucleus or ‘abietic acid and capable of plasticlzing
examplebenzene, toluene, xylan or ethyl acetate, chlorinated rubber in amount su?lclent to pro
coal tar naphtha, etc., for ready application'to duce a moistureprooi ?lm but insu?lcient to im
base material. These solutions can'then be ap
pair the transparency of. the ?lm.
’
plied very satlsfactorily by the ‘methods ‘ordi
5. A ?exible, transparent, moistureproo! sheet 50
50 narily used, such as spraying, dipping, coating comprising a sheet of transparent cellulodc ma
by the use of a doctor blade, etc. The viscosity terial selected from the groupconsisting of
.ot the solution used will depend upon thev time glassine paper and regenerated cellulose coated
of sheet to which coating is to be applied, the, with a transparent-chlorinated rubber ?lm con
method oi’ application and the coating thickness taining a com
d having the hydrocarbon 55
desired.‘
The
exact
viscosity
which
is
to
be
used
55
nucleus of hydroabietic acid in amount su?lcient
in any given case will be obvious to those skilled to produce a moistureprooif ?lm but insui?cient
in the art. The viscosity ofthe solution used to impair the transparency of the ?lm.
will depend on its total solids concentration and
6. A'?exible, transparent, ~moisturepl'oof sheet
on the viscosity type of chlorinated rubber used. ‘comprising a sheet of transparent cellulosic ma
5 It is, oi.’ course, obvious that for a solution of a‘ . terial ‘selected from the group vconsisting ct
10‘pats chlorinated rubber-c parts amyl able
n
10. parts chlorinated rubber-6 parts abietyl
a?mratn
10 parts chlorinated rubber-0 parts hydro‘
30H»
given viscosity the higher the solids content oi
the solution the thicker will be the ?lm applied,
glassine paper and regenerated cellulose coated
and hence the more moistureproot the ?nished
article. It will likewise be obvious that to obtain
taining a compound having the hydrocarbon
nucleus of hydroabietic acid and r ‘M of plas
an increased solids'content at a given solution
to use a chlorin
type.
hasbeen toundin many casestobedesirable ior
70 ease of application and production of a suitably
thick coating, but this may be varied widely and
is not, or course, in any way critical.‘
The thickness
applied to the base material mustbe sumcient to
75 produce a su?iciently low permeability value. but.‘
with a transparent chlorinated rubber ?lm con
ticizing chlorinated rubber in amount su?lcient
to produce a moistureproot ?lm but insu?icient
to impair. the transparency of the ?lm.
'1. A ?exible. transparent, moistureproot sheet
a sheet of
_
terial selected from the group consisting or
paper and regenerated cellulose coated
- with a transparent chlorinated rubber ?lm cm
taining' hydrogenated methyl abietatein amount
su?icientto produce a moistureproof ?lm but
2,094,717
insu?icient to impair the transparency of the
?lm.
.
'
-
I
-
3
glassine paper and regenerated cellulose coated
with a transparent chlorinated rubber ?lm con
'
8. A ?exible, transparent, moistureproof sheet
comprising a sheet of transparent celluloslc ma
5 terial selected from the group consisting of
taining a compound having the hydrocarbon
nucleus of abietic acid and capable of plasticizing
chlorinated rubber in amount of from about 40%‘ 5
glassine paper and regenerated cellulose coated to about 80% by weight of the chlorinated rub
with a transparent chlorinated rubber ?lm con
ber.
.
taining abietyl stearate in amount su?icient to _
11. A ?exible, transparent, moistureproof sheet
produce a moistureproof ?lm but insu?lcient to comprising a sheet of transparent cellulosic ma
10 impair the transparency of the ?lm.
terial selected from the group consisting of w_
'
9. A ?exible, transparent, moisturepro‘of sheet glassine paper, and regenerated cellulose coated
comprising a sheet of transparent cellulosic ma ‘with a transparent chlorinated rubber ?lm con
terial selected from the group consisting of
giassine paper and regenerated cellulose coated
15 with a transparent chlorinated rubber ?lm con
taining a compound selected from the group con-‘
sisting of abietic- acid esters, abietyl alcohol,
abietyl alcohol esters, hydrogenated abietic acid 15"
taining amyl abietate in amount sufficient to pro
esters; hydrogenated abietyl alcohol and hydro
duce a moistureproof ?lm but insu?lcien?'to 1m.
genated abietyl alcohol esters, in amount su?i
cient to produce a moistureproof ?lm but insuf?
pair the transparency of the ?lm.
,
10. A ?exible, transparent, moistureproof sheet
20 comprising a sheet of transparent cellulosic ma
terial, selected, from‘ the group consisting of
cient to impair the transparency of the ?lm.
.
,
ART-DE R. DISEN.
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