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Патент USA US2097008

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Oct. 26, 1937.
w, c, WERTENBRUCH
'
2,097,008
RAILROAD ROUTING CHART
Filed June 22, 1936
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4 Sheets-Sheet 1
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0d, 26, 1937.
W. C. WERTENBRUCH
RAILROAD ROUTING CHART
Filed June 22, 1936
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4 Sheets-Sheet 2
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2/1
Oct. 26, 1937.
2,097,008
W. C. WERTENBRUCH
RAILROAD ROUT'ING CHART
4 ‘Sheets-Sheet 4_
Filed June 22, 1936
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2,097,008
Patented Oct. 26, 1937
UNETED STATE
'
PATENT OFFICE '
2,097,008
RAILROAD ROUTING CHART
William C. Wertenbruch, Washington, D. 0.
Application June 22, 1936, Serial No. 86,701
7 Claims.
This invention relates to transportation rout
ing systems and more particularly to a chart or
series of companion charts designed to control
the movements of railway traffic over a predeter
mined route.
Another object of the invention is the provision
together in book form, may be very conveniently
used for selecting routes over which it is possible
to transport goods from one point or city along
not only from a situation existing within a chart
‘
ous possible routes between certain cities all ex
tend substantially horizontally across a chart
without respect to the geographical location of
one city with respect to another.
While it has been stated that the charts are
to be used by railroads, it is to be understood
that they are not restricted to charting routes
along railroads from one city to another but may
also be used for charting transportation by roads,
water, or air.
The invention is illustrated in the accompany?
ing drawings, wherein
Figure 1 is a perspective view showing a set of
charts of the improved construction open for use.
Figures 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 are views of succes
sive pages or charts which are bound together
in book form.
Figure 8 is a view of a group of charts of a
.49 modi?ed form.
50
'
55
when routing is desired between certain points ‘ '
but where the same. routes cannot be used between
It is another object of the invention to permit
the charts to be used either individually or collec
tively and also to so arrange them that the pos
sible routes between various cities or gateways
of a railroad system will be connected by straight
lines which can be very easily followed from
one city to another.
It is another object of the invention to provide
20 a set of charts wherein the lines indicating vari
45
limitations.
A map will not suffice to present this informa
tion since a means must be provided whereby
certain routes shown thereon would be available
of a set of companion charts which, when bound
a railroad to another.
.30
(Cl. 283-1)
gateway to another within previously determined
By the term chart as used herein, I intend to
refer to a delineation in graphical form of certain
information required and necessary in determin
ing the available, permissible or feasible routes
between all points within the scope of a routing
guide. Such a chart must be a delineator capable
of serving the purposes described and forming a
necessary element in connection and together
with such other charts, devices or contrivances‘
which will present to the user, not only individ
ually but collectively in proper and logical corre
lation and sequence with other charts and also
any part thereof with any other part contained
__in the same or any other chart, routes from one
certain other points. This requirement arising
but in connection with situations not shown ’
therein but contained in other charts. For these ,
reasons this means is not made use of at the pres
ent time.
p
V
The invention is not the result of a collection
of tabulation setting forth certain existing infor
mation but is the discovery of a means, or appa
ratus, or an instrumentality by which speci?c
information concerning routes may be presented
in an economical and compact form.
The accompanying drawings illustrate an em- ,
bodiment of theinvention for use as a routing '
guide by railroads and, therefore, the connecting
lines between the various cities which are known
as gateways have been designated as railroad
lines, but, as previously stated, the invention is ,
not con?ned to use by railroads and the ‘lines
between the various cities may designate high
ways, waterways, or airways. Any number of
charts may be bound together, but in the pres
ent illustration, six sheets, each having a chart
thereon, have been illustrated in Figures 2, 3, 4,
5, 6 and 7. These'sheets have been individually
designated by the numerals 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 and
in the upper right hand corner portion of each
sheet there has been provided a page indicating .
number, as shown at '7, in order that the sheets
or pages may be correctly bound and easily lo
cated when use of the same is desired. A chart,
designated in general by the numeral 8, is printed
upon each page or sheet and attention is called
to the fact that only one face of each sheet has
a chart printed thereon- Therefore, a page or
sheet may be turned, as shown in Figure. 1, and
disposed in cooperating relation to a companion
chart.
’
,
-
In ‘preparing a set of charts for use by rail
roads, the charts are plotted in the following
manner:
Having determined the various sections of the
country in which it is desired to depict the font
ings, I next select the important points at their
extremities, these points being referred to as gate
ways, and construct a chart which will showiall
available routes between any two points falling
4.5
/
2,097,00'8
2
within certain predetermined limitations. These
gateways are for the purpose of providing entries,
exits and connections with other sections. Thus
between San Francisco, California, and New York
city, New York, the logical routing would lie by
way of the gateways, Ogden, Utah; Denver, Colo
rado; Omaha, Nebraska; Chicago, Illinois, and
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
All the routes from
San Francisco to New York will be termed a
10 routing belt and important portions between the
gateways as sections thereof. The gateways have
been designated by abbreviations, the gateways
multiplied by seventy-?ve, which is the number
shown on page 6 of the chart in Figure '7, the re
sult is two hundred and one thousand, six hundred
routes which may be selected between San Fran
cisco and New York. It is customary and the
only means now provided consists in printing all
the information for each route in books or so
called tariffs which showthis information for each
route in a separate line of type matter. An ex
ample would be the route from San Francisco
to New York, as follows: Southern Paci?c R. R.
to Ogden, Utah; Union Paci?c R. R. to Denver,
Colorado; Union Paci?c R. R. to Omaha, Ne
braska; Chicago and North Western R. R. to Chi~
at ends of each section of a routing belt being
enclosed in a circle, as shown at 9, adjacent op
15 posite ends of a sheet, and intermediate primary cago, Illinois; Pennsylvania R. R. to Pittsburgh,
junctions being enclosed in squares, as shown at Pennsylvania, and Baltimore 8: Ohio R. R. to New
[0 in Figures 6 and '7. The gateway at the right _ York. These now average ?fty routes to a page.
By the use of my invention the six charts de
hand end or free end of each sheet or chart cor
responds to and is a duplicate of the gateway at scribed herein present to the user over 200,000
different routes between two points. Between
20 the left hand end or bound end of a companion
page or chart in the set, and referring to Figures the intermediate points many more are possible.
2 and 3, it will be seen that the gateway at the This results in a thick book even when printed in
left hand end of the chart shown in Figure 2 small type, and when printed in small type it is
bears the initials SF which is a contraction of San hard to read. It should also be noted that when—
ever routes are changed, new books must be
25 Francisco, while the gateway at the right hand
end of this chart bears the letters OG which is a printed, whereas by charting the routes in accord
ance with this invention, reprinting of an entire
contraction of Ogden. Routing lines H repre
senting railroads extend between the gateways in set of charts may be done at small cost or by
a horizontal direction longitudinally of the pages binding the set of charts in a loose leaf binder,
only those charts in which changes have been
30 upon which the charts are drawn. Between Chi
cago and Pittsburgh, there have been shown made need be reprinted and the new charts sub
twenty-eight routes, this number being made up stituted in place of those previously used. In view
by direct travel between Chicago and Pittsburgh of the fact that these charts take the place of the
routes printed in the o?icial tariff containing the
and also by selected travel through the inter
35 mediate important cities or junctions Hi. One of rates to be charged for shipping material from
these intermediate cities has been designated by
the letters TO to indicate Toledo, another CL to
indicate Cleveland, another IN to indicate
Indianapolis, and another CO to indicate Colum
40 buss Smaller towns and cities have also been
represented by large dots I2 and names of these
towns or cities are printed upon the charts over
the dots, as shown at [3. From Pittsburgh to
New York, transportation may be over seventy
45 five routes. Transportation may be either direct
between Pittsburgh and New York or by way of
the intermediate junctions, each of which bears
letters constituting a contraction of its name.
Smaller towns are indicated by the large dots l4
50 and the names of these towns are printed near
the top of the sheet or page, as shown at l5. It
20
25
30
35
one place to another, these books will be greatly
reduced in thickness which makes them easier to
handle and also cheaper to print.
When the set of charts is in use and it is
desired to plot a route between San Francisco 40
and New York, or any one of the gateways be
tween San Francisco and New York, the route is
traced from San Francisco to Ogden over a se
lected one of the two routes shown upon the ?rst
chart illustrated in Figure 2. This page is then 45
turned until its free end is in slight overlapping
relation to the bound end of the second chart
and a route selected between Ogden and Denver,
after which the ?rst chart is flattened and the
second chart folded to dispose its free end slightly 50
over the bound end of the third chart, as shown
are shown upon page 3 of the chart in Figure 4
in Figure 1, and a route selected between Denver
and Omaha. In view of the fact that the gate
Way at the free end of the page containing the
second chart is designated to indicate Denver and
the gateway adjacent the bound end of the third
chart is also designated to indicate Denver, there
will be no danger of accidentally turning two
pages by mistake and thus failing to properly
plot the route between certain of the intermediate 60
junctions. The plotting of the route is contin
and by multiplying the four routes between San
Francisco and Denver by four, there will be pro
duced sixteen routes between San Francisco and
ued from one chart to the next chart and it can
be very easily determined what railroad a ship
ment of material will have to travel over in order
will thus be seen that various routes have been
shown in diagram between the gateways. Be
tween San Francisco and Ogden, there have been
55 shown two routes or railroads upon Figure 2 of
the drawings. Figure 3 of the drawings indicates
two routes between Ogden and Denver and by
multiplying the two routes between San Fran
cisco and Ogden by two, it produces four routes
between San Francisco and Denver. Four routes
65 Omaha.
By multiplying the sixteen routes be
tween San Franscisco and Omaha by six, which
is the number of routes between Omaha and
Chicago, there will be produced ninety-six routes
between San Francisco and Chicago. When this
is multipled by twenty-eight, which is the number
of possible routes between Chicago and Pitts
burgh, as shown on page 5 of the chart in Figure
6, the result is two thousand, six hundred and
eighty-eight routes between San Francisco and
75 Pittsburgh, and when this number of routes is
to effect movement over tariff routes from one 65
city to another. It will also be possible to deter—
mine whether stop offs may be effected at de
sired towns or cities.
In Figure 8 there has been shown a slightly
modi?ed arrangement of charts. In this embodi 70
ment of the invention, there have been shown
four‘charts designated by the numerals 16, 1'7, 18
and 19. One of the charts has been shown pro
vided adjacent the free end of the page or sheet
16 with a gateway 20 and upper and lower gate 75
2,097,008
a
ways 2| and 22. A routing line 23 leads to the chart will be readily understood by those skilled
gateway 20 and branch lines 24 and 25 lead from in the art and further detail description thereof
the routing line 23 to the gateways 2| and 22, re
is deemed unnecessary.
'
'
spectively.- The pages 17, 18, and 19 have charts
Having thus described the invention, what is
printed thereon in which the routing lines 26, claimed as new is:
2"! and 28 lead from gateways .20’, 2|’ and 22'
1. Means for controlling the movements of
adjacent the bound ends of the pages. These railway tra?ic comprising a plurality of leaves»
charts 1'7, 18 and 19 indicate routes which may be‘ each bearing indicia representing a portion of a
taken from a gateway, such as Pittsburgh, to
10 three different terminal cities. To illustrate the
use which this device would serve, reference is
had to chart 16 which could show all the routes
to the three gateways 20’, 2|’ and 22’ which are
Buffalo, New York, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,
15 and Kenova, West Virginia, respectively, from a
point such as Chicago, Illinois; chart 18 could
show the routes running from the gateway Buffalo
2!’ to such a terminal as Boston, Massachusetts;
chart 17 would show the routes from the Pitts
20 burgh gateway 20' to the New York terminal,
while chart 19 would show the routes from
Kenova gateway 22' to Norfolk, Virginia. If the
route to be followed from Chicago, is to New
York, the page 16 will be turned and the gateway
25 20 placed opposite the gateway 26'. If the route
from» Chicago is to be to Boston, the page 16
and any intervening pages between this page and
the page 18 will be turned together and the ter
minal 2i disposed opposite the gatewayv 2|’. If
30 the route from Chicago is to be to Norfolk, the
page 16 and any intervening pages between this
page and the page 19 will be turned as a unit
complete predetermined tariff route between cer
tain points, each leaf having symbols thereon
w
representing terminals of the adjacent tariff
route, said symbols being so arranged on the re
spective leaves that, when one leaf is disposed in
juxta-position to another leaf with the adjacent
terminals in registration, the continuity of the
portions of the tariff route depicted upon the
leaves will be complete.
2. Means for controlling the movements of rail
way traflic comprising a plurality of leaves each
having lines thereon representing portions of a
complete predetermined tariff route between cer
.29
tain points, each leaf having its opposite ends
provided with symbols representing terminals of
the adjacent tariff route, the symbols being so ar
ranged on the respective leaves that, when one
leaf is disposed in juXta-position to another leaf
with the adjacent terminals in registration, the
continuity of the portions of the tariff route
depicted upon the leaves will be complete.
3. Means for controlling the movements of '
railway traf?c comprising. a plurality of leaves
bound in book form and each leaf having spaced
and the page 16 disposed in overlapping relation lines thereon representing portions of a com
to the page 19 with the gateway 22 opposite the plete predetermined tariff route between certain
35 gateway 22'. In view of the fact that the gate
points, each leaf having symbols thereon rep- '
way 20’ is located midway the upper and lower resenting terminals of the adjacent tariff route,
edges of the page 17, this page can only have said symbols being so arranged on the respective
its gateway 20' alined with the gateway 20 of the leaves that, when the free end of one leaf is dis
page 16. In like manner, the gateway 2|’ can posed in juxta-position to the ?xed end of
40 only be alined with the gateway 2| of the page
another leaf with the adjacent terminals in reg 40
16 as it is near the upper edge of the page and istration, the continuity of the portions of the
the gateway 22' can only be alined with the gate
tariff route depicted upon the leaves will be com
way 22 of the page 16 as this gateway 22’ is near
plete.
the lower edge of the page 19. It will thus be
seen that when it is desired to plot a route from
Chicago to a predetermined one of three ter
minal gateways, a mistake cannot be made as
railway tra?ic comprising a plurality of leaves 45
bound in book form and adapted to be folded to‘
the gateways 20, 2| and 22 will only be properly
alined with the gateways 20', 2|’ and 22', respec
tively.
The purpose of such a device as is explained.
in Figure 8 arises from the necessity of showing
as illustrated on chart 16, in certain instances,
all the routes from Chicago to the three gate
ways, Buffalo, Pittsburgh and Kenova which can
be used interchangeably with routes running be
yond these three gateways. The routes, however,
running from the Buffalo gateway may not be
used interchangeably since the use of the routes
60 running therefrom are restricted only to Boston.
Similarly from the other two gateways shown in
charts 1'7 and 19, the routes are restricted re
spectively to New York and Norfolk. Such an ar
rangement is necessary since the routes shown,
for instance from Pittsburgh, would be the logi
cal routes to New York. They would, however,
not form logical routes to Norfolk and neither
Would New York be an intermediate point on the
routes to Norfolk.
By showing on chart 16
another gateway, the routes from Chicago shown
thereon can be brought into juxtaposition with
chart 19 upon which the logical routes to Norfolk
are found running from the Kenova vgateway.
From the foregoing description, it is thought
that the construction and mode of operating the
4. Means for controlling ‘the movements of '
dispose a free end portion of one leaf in over-v
lapping relation to the bound end portion of '
another leaf, each leaf having terminal~designat
ing means thereon and route-indicating means 50
connecting the same, the said terminal-designat- ‘
ing means being located in co-related positions
upon the said leaves whereby whenrone leaf is
folded to dispose its free end portion in over
lapping relation to the bound end portion of 55
another leaf, the terminal-designating means of
the two leaves will be substantially in registering
relation to each other and the routing means may
be accurately followed from one leaf to the other
leaf.
60
5. Means for controlling the movements of
railway traf?c comprising a plurality of leaves
stacked and bound together at one end, the said
leaves being formed of flexible material whereby
a leaf may be folded to dispose its free end in 65
overlapping relation to the bound end of another
leaf, each leaf bearing indicia representing a por
tion of a complete predetermined tariff route
between certain points and including terminal- '
indicating means adjacent ends of the ‘leaf and 70
route-indicating means extending longitudinally
of the leaf from one terminal-indicating means
to the other, the said terminal-indicating means
being located in co-related positions upon end
portions of the said leaves whereby when one leaf 75
2,097,008
is folded to dispose its free end portion 'in over
lapping relation to the bound end of another leaf,
terminal-indicating means of the two leaves will
be substantially in registering relation to each
other and the routing means may be followed
from one leaf to the other leaf.
7
'
6. Means for controlling the movements of rail
way tra?ic comprising a plurality of leaves bound
to each other at one end in book form, said
leaves consisting of ?exible sheets whereby a leaf
10
may be folded from its free end back upon itself
to dispose its free end in overlapping relation
to the bound end of another leaf, each leaf bear
ing indicia representing a complete predeter-’
mined tariff route between certain points and
including terminal-indicating‘ symbols adjacent
the bound and free ends of the leaf and route
indicating means extending along said leaf and
connecting said terminal-indicating symbols, one
of said leaves having a plurality of terminal
indicating symbols adjacent its free end spaced
from each other between upper and lower side
edges of the leaf and other leaves each having a
25
terminal-indicating symbol adjacent its bound
end disposed in a predetermined position be
tween upper and lower edges of the leaf corre
sponding to the location of a selected one of the
terminal-indicating symbols adjacent the free
end of the ?rst-mentioned leaf whereby when
the ?rst leaf is folded to dispose its free end por
tion in overlapping relation to the bound end
portion of a selected one of the second-men
tioned leaves, a selected terminal-indicating
symbol at the free end of the overlapping leaf
can only be disposed in registering relation to a
correspondingly located terminal-indicating sym 10
bol of one of the second-mentioned leaves.
7. Means for controlling the movements v0f
railway traffic comprising a plurality of leaves
having indicia thereon cooperating to depict a
complete route between terminals of the route
and each depicting a complete portion of the
said route, each leaf having terminal-indicating
symbols at its ends and route-indicating means
extending between its terminal-indicating sym
bols to ‘indicate available paths of travel in a 20
continuing direction between the terminal-in
dicating symbols, and each leaf having the ter
minal-indicating symbol at one of its ends du
plicated by a terminal-indicating symbol at an
end of a companion leaf.
WILLIAM C. WERTENBRUCIg-I.
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